header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under proc...

  1. 2015-12-08: 2015-12-08 PROC 1
  2. 2015-12-10: 2015-12-10 PROC 2
  3. 2016-01-26: 2016-01-26 PROC 3
  4. 2016-01-28: 2016-01-28 PROC 4
  5. 2016-02-02: 2016-02-02 PROC 5
  6. 2016-02-04: 2016-02-04 PROC 6
  7. 2016-02-16: 2016-02-16 PROC 7
  8. 2016-02-18: 2016-02-18 PROC 8
  9. 2016-02-23: 2016-02-23 PROC 9
  10. 2016-02-25: 2016-02-25 PROC 10
  11. 2016-03-08: 2016-03-08 PROC 11
  12. 2016-03-10: 2016-03-10 PROC 12
  13. 2016-03-22: 2016-03-22 PROC 13
  14. 2016-04-14: 2016-04-14 PROC 15
  15. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 PROC 16
  16. 2016-04-21: 2016-04-21 PROC 17
  17. 2016-05-03: 2016-05-03 PROC 18
  18. 2016-05-05: 2016-05-05 PROC 19
  19. 2016-05-10: 2016-05-10 PROC 20
  20. 2016-05-17: 2016-05-17 PROC 21
  21. 2016-05-17: 2016-05-17 PROC 22
  22. 2016-05-31: 2016-05-31 PROC 24
  23. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 PROC 25
  24. 2016-06-07: 2016-06-07 PROC 26
  25. 2016-06-09: 2016-06-09 PROC 27
  26. 2016-06-16: 2016-06-16 PROC 29
  27. 2016-10-04: 2016-10-04 PROC 32
  28. 2016-11-15: 2016-11-15 PROC 39
  29. 2016-11-17: 2016-11-17 PROC 40
  30. 2016-12-08: 2016-12-08 PROC 45
  31. 2016-12-13: 2016-12-13 PROC 46
  32. 2017-02-07: 2017-02-07 PROC 47
  33. 2017-03-07: 2017-03-07 PROC 53
  34. 2017-03-09: 2017-03-09 PROC 54
  35. 2017-03-21: 2017-03-21 PROC 55
  36. 2017-05-04: 2017-05-04 PROC 56
  37. 2017-05-09: 2017-05-09 PROC 57
  38. 2017-05-16: 2017-05-16 PROC 59
  39. 2017-06-08: 2017-06-08 PROC 64
  40. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 PROC 67
  41. 2017-09-21: 2017-09-21 PROC 68
  42. 2017-09-28: 2017-09-28 PROC 70
  43. 2017-10-03: 2017-10-03 PROC 71
  44. 2017-10-05: 2017-10-05 PROC 72
  45. 2017-10-17: 2017-10-17 PROC 73
  46. 2017-10-19: 2017-10-19 PROC 74
  47. 2017-11-07: 2017-11-07 PROC 77
  48. 2017-11-09: 2017-11-09 PROC 78
  49. 2017-11-23: 2017-11-23 PROC 80
  50. 2017-11-28: 2017-11-28 PROC 81
  51. 2017-11-30: 2017-11-30 PROC 82
  52. 2017-12-05: 2017-12-05 PROC 83
  53. 2017-12-07: 2017-12-07 PROC 84
  54. 2017-12-12: 2017-12-12 PROC 85
  55. 2018-01-30: 2018-01-30 PROC 86
  56. 2018-02-27: 2018-02-27 PROC 91
  57. 2018-03-20: 2018-03-20 PROC 93
  58. 2018-03-22: 2018-03-22 PROC 94
  59. 2018-03-27: 2018-03-27 PROC 95
  60. 2018-04-17: 2018-04-17 PROC 96
  61. 2018-04-19: 2018-04-19 PROC 97
  62. 2018-04-24: 2018-04-24 PROC 98
  63. 2018-04-26: 2018-04-26 PROC 99
  64. 2018-05-01: 2018-05-01 PROC 100
  65. 2018-05-03: 2018-05-03 PROC 101
  66. 2018-05-08: 2018-05-08 PROC 102
  67. 2018-05-23: 2018-05-23 PROC 104
  68. 2018-05-28: 2018-05-28 PROC 106
  69. 2018-05-29: 2018-05-29 PROC 107
  70. 2018-06-05: 2018-06-05 PROC 110
  71. 2018-06-05: 2018-06-05 PROC 111
  72. 2018-06-06: 2018-06-06 PROC 112
  73. 2018-06-07: 2018-06-07 PROC 113
  74. 2018-06-07: 2018-06-07 PROC 114
  75. 2018-09-20: 2018-09-20 PROC 117
  76. 2018-09-25: 2018-09-25 PROC 118
  77. 2018-09-27: 2018-09-27 PROC 119
  78. 2018-09-27: 2018-09-27 PROC 120
  79. 2018-10-02: 2018-10-02 PROC 121
  80. 2018-10-04: 2018-10-04 PROC 122
  81. 2018-10-15: 2018-10-15 PROC 123
  82. 2018-10-16: 2018-10-16 PROC 124
  83. 2018-10-16: 2018-10-16 PROC 125
  84. 2018-10-17: 2018-10-17 PROC 126
  85. 2018-10-18: 2018-10-18 PROC 127
  86. 2018-10-30: 2018-10-30 PROC 128
  87. 2018-11-01: 2018-11-01 PROC 129
  88. 2018-11-20: 2018-11-20 PROC 132
  89. 2018-11-29: 2018-11-29 PROC 135
  90. 2018-12-04: 2018-12-04 PROC 136
  91. 2018-12-11: 2018-12-11 PROC 138
  92. 2018-12-13: 2018-12-13 PROC 139
  93. 2019-02-19: 2019-02-19 PROC 142
  94. 2019-02-28: 2019-02-28 PROC 144
  95. 2019-03-19: 2019-03-19 PROC 145
  96. 2019-04-02: 2019-04-02 PROC 146
  97. 2019-04-04: 2019-04-04 PROC 147
  98. 2019-04-09: 2019-04-09 PROC 148
  99. 2019-04-11: 2019-04-11 PROC 149
  100. 2019-04-30: 2019-04-30 PROC 150
  101. 2019-04-30: 2019-04-30 PROC 151
  102. 2019-05-02: 2019-05-02 PROC 152
  103. 2019-05-07: 2019-05-07 PROC 153
  104. 2019-05-14: 2019-05-14 PROC 155
  105. 2019-05-16: 2019-05-16 PROC 156
  106. 2019-05-30: 2019-05-30 PROC 158
  107. 2019-06-06: 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  108. 2019-06-13: 2019-06-13 PROC 162

Displaying the most recent stories under proc...

2019-06-13 PROC 162

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 162nd meeting of the standing committee. Although it says we're in camera, we won't be for a few minutes because we have to do just one thing first.

I'll read the notes from the clerk. They say, “The committee would like to thank the best clerk in the history of the House of Commons”—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:—“and the best researchers.”

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: Those are good notes. Thank you.

Actually, what I'd like to do is this. We have a cake here to present which says on it, “Happy Retirement from Filibustering to the Great Parliamentarian from Hamilton Centre.”

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: Yes, you can take pictures.

I'll take requests to speak.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Chair, I move that we put the recipe in the Hansard.

The Chair:

There are pictures.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

That is amazing. Who arranged for that? Thank you so much.

An hon. member: You're famous.

An hon. member: Is it bilingual?

The Chair: Oh, yes, we can't present this: It's not bilingual.

An hon. member: It should be in braille too.

An hon. member: Hey, David, if you want to share that cake, it has to be in two languages.

Mr. David Christopherson: I wonder how much sugar is in it.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

You deserve it. You impress me, you know that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're very kind.

Listen, thank you to whoever did this. I'm blown away.

The Chair:

So it goes without saying—and I'll get a speaking list here—that obviously you're a very passionate member. I think you've been very principled. Each of us, in theory, should have one-tenth of the influence on this committee, but I think that's not true. I think you have more than your one-tenth of influence on this committee. There's making a point and there's making a point, and you can certainly make a point very passionately, and although members might often disagree, we think the points you're making are principled—I do, anyway. You believe in them and you're a great asset to this Parliament, and I know there are some people who will add to my comments.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much.

When I was appointed deputy House leader, they told me I was on PROC and the only thing I knew about PROC was the filibuster that had happened, and I wasn't looking forward to it.

I came to my first meeting and I had an idea about something, and immediately Mr. Christopherson said, “Oh, the parliamentary secretary came and he's imposing his will on committee,” and I thought, “Oh, my God, what have I gotten myself into accepting this position and coming down here, and how are we going to do this going forward?”

But over the past couple of years, I have been just amazed and have incredible respect for what you do for your constituents and our country. The residents of Hamilton are incredibly fortunate to have someone as passionate and with such great integrity as you. We can disagree with you, but no one can question the integrity with which you raise and bring forward your points, and that you fervently believe in what you bring forward. Without any level of bullshit, you get straight to the point. I had to use swearing in this, and Hamilton can appreciate that.

I'll speak for myself and say that I'm fortunate enough to have a mentor in Jim Bradley. He may not be as loud, but I think he brings that same level of commitment to the point that you'd better not stand between me and my constituents, because you're going to have to go through me. It's something I strive to do, and I appreciate seeing it in this place. You will be incredibly missed in this chamber by all sides of the House.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

(1105)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

First of all, I was given seven or eight minutes' notice that I'd be doing this, which puts me in mind of Gladstone's famous comment that if he were given a month to prepare a speech, he could deliver a five-minute speech; if he were given a week, he could deliver a 20-minute speech; if he is told immediately beforehand, it could take hours for him to get to his point.

Nonetheless, I do want to say this. First of all, David is a colleague who, as we all know, gets directly to the point, but then can persist in making that point for a very long time.

It's been a pleasure, David, a real pleasure working with you. Other members won't know this, but I have been pestering him about where he is going to live in retirement, because I am hoping to have a chance to hang out, have a beer on his dock, just chat and enjoy the company of a really remarkable colleague.

I did have enough time to ask a few other colleagues about you. I mentioned to them, of course, the fact that you started in municipal politics, and after a successful elected career there, went on to provincial politics, and then from there to federal politics. I asked what people thought of that, and some of my Conservative colleagues thought that it shows you are persistent and determined. I also heard the suggestion that it shows that you are multi-talented. The one I thought was most fitting was the observation that you're just a slow learner.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: You are retiring now, which shows that you've finally learned that it's worth spending as much time as possible with family—something we'll all learn sooner or later. I do hope you get to share some of that retirement time with us, and with me in particular.

Thank you.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

I'll echo what Mr. Reid has said, but I want to say as well that it's been a privilege sitting next to you and that I've had the honour—usually Scott sits here—of sitting between two distinguished parliamentarians who actually know what they're talking about, what this committee is about and what's being done.

Being the new guy on the committee and a rookie, it's been great to hear your observations, comments and experience, as well.

I say this truthfully: You will be missed, and I hope you'll be sitting at that table from time to time, perhaps in the next Parliament, when we need some expertise from the wisdom of the past.

I wish you very well, David. We appreciate all you've done.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, John. I know that.

The Chair:

Mr. Sweet.

Mr. David Sweet (Flamborough—Glanbrook, CPC):

It's good that I am here today, being someone who has shadowed this fine gentleman in Hamilton for some 14 years now. Of course, he predates me by many years.

Let me say this. There are some things that are consistent about David Christopherson. One of them is that he usually does not need a microphone to make his point. Secondly, no one in Hamilton ever wants to follow him on the platform after he has spoken.

I'll tell you, for 14 years, there has never been a partisan word from him, publicly, about me. I hope that I have kept that end of it as well. In fact, on many occasions, Mr. Christopherson has actually stood in front of audiences and commended me, so he is a parliamentarian who understands that, yes, we have to fight vociferously over policies that we sometimes profoundly disagree about, but we're all still human. We all still go home, have issues and wish to try to be dignified and decent human beings together.

That's what is most impressive to me about David Christopherson, and I see in him at home and in his actions in that regard.

His public service has always been like that. I have talked to those who have worked with him on council and who also, apparently, profoundly disagreed with him on many issues, but are still his friends, because of the way he dealt with them personally.

Knowing that, there is one thing that David has repeated to me. He said, “When we're on the ground here, it's about supporting our community—supporting Hamilton.” He's lived by that for all the time I've known him.

(1110)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The first time I encountered David was when I was working for a guy you might have heard of, Scott Simms, on the public accounts committee, where we served very briefly. My observation, because David Christopherson was the chair at the time, was that he was the first chair I had ever encountered who could filibuster his own committee.

I have learned a lot from you, David, and it's been quite fun, because on our first day here—as I have said in the past—we had a fairly tense exchange in our very first interaction, so I thought, “Okay, that's a good start.”

I do want to express some concern that when you leave, whoever replaces you from the NDP on this committee—or if it's multiple people; we'll see—will have your values in making sure that this committee can work in a non-partisan way. There are people in this place, in all parties, who are ruthlessly partisan, in a completely inappropriate way, and you're not.

We've been able to function because I think, on all sides, we have that here. I just want to say how much I appreciate that and how much I learned from you over the last four years of working with you.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

He doesn't predate me, I can tell you that. In 2004, my friend, it was the Paul Martin minority government, and I went from government to opposition to third party and back to government. That's one thing I've got on you—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:—that I've been all around the circle.

There's an old joke in Newfoundland where a Newfoundlander and, I'll say, a Hamiltonian were in the woods one day and a big grizzly bear walked out and growled and showed his teeth. The Newfoundlander bent over and started tying up his shoe and the Hamiltonian asked, “You don't think you're going to outrun that bear, do you?” The Newfoundlander says, “No, I just just have to outrun you.”

The reason I bring up that story is that this is the type of business where we mark our own personal performance by the marching of others. On many occasions I find myself giving my interventions that, one, are at least understood by all and, two, using a cadence that will keep everyone's attention—at least for a short period, until I get my main point out.

David did that with such absolutely astonishing ease. He made it seem so easy. The best professional athletes make their profession look easy, and David does that. He makes this profession look easy, but it's not easy. I've seen him on television and in the House and certainly at committee, and it's the passion that he brings from the grassroots to here. I say “grassroots” in the strictly political sense, from the municipal level to the provincial and now federal level.

I think the past few weeks are a good way to summarize his opinion about how this place should work, because I have noticed with a great deal of angst that what has really driven him to a point of anger, which I didn't see before, was the idea of a dissenting report. Dissension was starting to get under David's skin, and it's still there perhaps. Whether or not we have a dissenting report, I think is a testament to how he wants us all to get along or, as he likes to say, “come along”.

Anyway, David, you will be missed. I had a card for you here.

A Voice: No. We're working on it.

Mr. Scott Simms: Oh, you're working on it. All right.

A Voice: A family card.

Mr. Scott Simms: We're working on a card. All the best, my friend.

I suspect you will not be with title, but certainly with opinion, and one that I hope you never extinguish. David, all the best.

The Chair:

Thank you, Scott.

Before I go to Ruby, I also appreciate the passion with which you continue to make the point that the security of Parliament shouldn't be in the hands of the government. It's a very substantial point. Thank you for that.

Now we'll go to Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I wish I could say I've had as many terms and as much history with you, Mr. Christopherson. My time with you has been short, but it has been very sweet. It has just been this one term. I really wish you would stay longer, so I could have many more terms of experience with you, because my term on this committee has definitely been very enjoyable.

I've learned a lot. You definitely scared me on the first day. I thought what am I doing here? What is happening? After that initial shock wore off, I could see that the words that you speak always come from a place of truth and with a lot of integrity. I have a lot of respect for you. I don't think you'll ever understand the impact that experienced members have on newer members. We walk in your footsteps, and it's nice to see that we can have mentors on different sides of the aisle. Thank you for helping all the junior members along the way this first term.

You'll always be remembered in this place. I hope we're able to live up to always speaking our mind no matter what the circumstances, and feeling good about ourselves at the end of the day. I'm sure you have no problem sleeping at night because you have always made your position clear. I think that's really important and people respect a politician who comes to this place and does not forget the people who brought them here and what they believe.

(1115)

[Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I'll now add a bit of French to this discussion. [English]

That's good for you. You will miss that in Hamilton, the French.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh![Translation]

You may recall that I first met you at a meeting of the Standing Committee on National Defence, when I was replacing a colleague. At that time, I was impressed by how you promoted your ideas, but above all by your understanding of the issues. Obviously, you knew how to advocate for your interests and argue.

When I joined the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs in September—I was the last member appointed—you impressed me once again. We were studying Bill C-76, and I had the impression that I was taking a course on filibustering. You certainly promote and debate your ideas with conviction, and you deserve full credit for it.

As Ms. Sahota said, we learn a great deal from observing our more experienced colleagues and from never losing sight of our objectives and the interests of our constituents.

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wanted to ask Mr. Christopherson, and perhaps Mr. Simms if I could ask him.... We talked about your progression from the municipal level to the provincial and federal levels, which begs the question: What's next? Is it the UN or the CSA?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's not the Senate.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: When I speak, I'll discuss that.

The Chair:

Can I have permission from the committee to go a few minutes into the bells?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

David, you've been to Centre Block as much as anybody. Is there not a delay?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a delay of about one and a half to two seconds.

Mr. Scott Reid:

So it's nothing essential, okay. It's very handy having this. Now we can gauge with greater accuracy for getting up there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's always there, but it's not on.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Wasn't it in our old digs over at 112 north? There was an old TV there, wasn't there?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

There are two TVs on the top of the cabinet.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible--Editor] said that we should look at what we should do the next time.

Mr. John Nater:

We won't be there, I think. That's my understanding.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We won't, or they won't?

Mr. John Nater:

In theory the room itself won't be there.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The room itself will be disassembled and replaced with something.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It could be a supply closet.

Mr. John Nater:

Only the heritage rooms will be 100% preserved.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That somewhat, to some degree, was developing into a heritage room. In the woodwork, it had those carved insignia of the various services. It was on it's way to becoming a—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's why it had the hop leaves and grapes. It was the bar.

(1120)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that right? That was the bar? Is that for real?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's why there were grapes and hop leaves as a border around the top of the room.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We have good conversations in this committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I remember grapes, for sure. I don't remember the grape leaves, but okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You had to look up a little higher.

Mr. David Sweet:

In the previous Parliament, I chaired the veterans affairs committee, and we dedicated 112 north to the Canadian veterans. That's why we had the parliamentary carver do all the symbols on the walls for all of the branches of the armed forces to honour them. There was quite the fanfare with the Speaker, etc., to dedicate that room, and our hope was that it would be retained as a memorial to our veterans.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's the kind of thing that you wouldn't be aware, David, but we passed a resolution in this committee. It was reported in the House, but it hasn't been adopted yet though, has it?

The Chair:

Which one?

Mr. Scott Reid:

On Centre Block.

The Chair:

No, and in fact maybe you should speak to your House leader, if we can get consent to do that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You should ask again, then. I think you would find you'd have consent.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Before I do I would like to expose the.... I hope you take it in a lighthearted way, but we asked our spokesperson to be the front of our presentation to you and this card. If a spokesperson would like to—

The Chair:

Kevin Lamoureux.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We thought we'd come full circle. That was the first day.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Kevin does present a challenge to the photographers of Canada.

The Chair:

Every committee member, obviously, has given commendations, which, in itself, is a testimony because everyone had great commendations.

I would give you the opportunity to respond, Mr. Christopherson. Do you have any last words for Parliament? But it's not a filibuster.

Mr. David Christopherson:

“Goodbye” would be the end of the sentence.

You almost have me speechless, which is quite the accomplishment. I'm blown away. I just confess that, for all the passion I bring to the issues, I don't handle emotional issues real good. This just overwhelms me. Nothing means more to me than words like you've given today, words from colleagues who walk in the same shoes. No matter how close you are, it's not until you've walked in those shoes and know what it's like to be a parliamentarian that you fully understand, when fellow parliamentarians compliment you, what it means, especially when they're people you respect.

I've been blessed, especially this last Parliament, with being on two committees whose mandates I thoroughly enjoy: public accounts and PROC. It's also given me an opportunity to spend time with some of the finest parliamentarians that I've met. The hardest thing for us to do is to climb past partisanship, yet it's the critical part where we actually make a difference, where we find a way to move forward for the country—that ability to set that aside. I'm guilty of not doing it all the time, too, because our passions do drive us, but at the end of the day, that ability means everything.

With the people I've been able to serve with, the two chairs that I've served under—you, Mr. Larry Bagnell, and Mr. Kevin Sorenson.... I've been blessed with fantastic chairs who were only interested in the best for Parliament and Canada.

I thank all of you.

I thank my fellow Hamiltonian, David Sweet. We know that nobody gets up every day and says, “What can I do for Hamilton”, unless they're Hamiltonians themselves. I've always believed that when we're on home turf, it's important for those of us from different parties to make their city the priority and that we, as much as possible, come here and have a united front on the issues that matter. When we disagree, we do it respectfully. If we're going to have a knock-down, drag-'em-out fight, we do it here in the context of Parliament. However, when we go home, we're home, and we treat each other with respect. That means a lot.

I can't address everyone individually, as I know that I don't have enough time, but, Mr. Reid, definitely you'll be the first invitation to that dock, and I'll have a cold one ready for you, sir.

There are a number of people who I'm looking forward to continuing to work with.

I'll just also mention that on the issue of parliament's security that matters to us, Mr. Blaney today, who was the minister at the time, just stopped by me after our public accounts committee—I don't think I'm telling tales out of school; I hope not—and said to me, “Look, you need to understand that, at the time, we were under a lot of pressure. There were a lot of crises. I think we made the wrong decision. I think we made a mistake. I want you to know that if I'm here in the next Parliament, I'm committed to changing that and putting it back to the way it should be.”

I know that people like Mr. Graham and others care about that, and that's a good sign. It means a lot because it's the way Parliament should run.

Just to end, I was asked if I'm going to still be around. Yes. It turns out that sitting around on the public accounts committee for 15 years suddenly qualifies you as an expert. There are people around the world who would like me to come and do some work with their public accounts committees and their auditor general systems, and I'm now on the board of directors of the Canadian Audit and Accountability Foundation. It's the main non-profit NGO that we use at the public accounts committee for their expertise and assistance. I'll be joining their team and travelling. So, I'll be continuing to do that. Hopefully it's not more than half time. I still want to put my feet up for the other half. I'm tired: I've been working for 50 years, and that's sufficient.

Those are my plans going forward. However, I'm also aware that plans, like war plans, change. The first thing that goes out the window when the war starts is the plan, so we'll see what actually happens.

What I would like to do, if you'll allow me, is.... This is very difficult. You guys have really, really thrown me for a loop. What's interesting is.... You mentioned the filibuster, and a lot of you have commented on the non-partisanship. I have a present that speaks to both those issues. It speaks to the filibuster, but it also speaks to non-partisanship and extends beyond us as parliamentarians.

You all know Tyler Crosby, who is without question, in my view, the most amazing staff person on the Hill, bar none. You often see me talking to him. He's my right hand. I couldn't do this job without him, at least not the way I'd like to. However, he's not always there. Sometimes he nips out to get something, and then I have nobody else. It's just me here, right?

(1125)



Yet, when we were in a filibuster, when it was time to unite and fight the good fight, those lines didn't matter, and the partisanship didn't matter.

The Hill Times actually had a picture. I'll just read the cutline that goes with it. It says, “NDP MP David Christopherson consults with an opposition staffer ahead of resuming the filibuster at the House Affairs Committee on April 5. He alone spoke eight hours in all that day, and for another four hours on April 6.” The other person in that picture is Kelly Williams.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: I want to present to Kelly a frame of that picture as an indication of the way that we can be non-partisan not only as politicians but as staffers.

I thank you for the unpaid work that you did for me. You assisted me to do what I did.

With that, colleagues, there aren't enough words to properly say what this has meant to me. This will stay with me forever. You really touched me in a way that I can't express, and I thank you very much. It means everything to me.

The Chair:

Does the committee want to do any work on the reason we're here, or do you want to go to the vote?

Scott Reid: Do we have to go to the vote if we adjourn, or can we have some cake?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: We should suspend.

The Chair: You want to suspend?

Mr. Scott Reid: Suspending is a better idea. You're right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: We can suspend for awhile.

The Chair: Okay, we'll suspend, and then we'll come back in camera and hold our discussion. We'll have cake now.

Is that okay? Anything else? Good.

The meeting is suspended.

(1125)

(1135)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 162nd meeting. For the first time, Kevin's been allowed in the room by David Christopherson without David blasting him.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Lamoureux, every member of the committee has said nice things about David, so we invite you to add to the record before we go to vote.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.):

Yes, thank you very much, Mr. Chairperson. I understand you said this was the 162th meeting. I can honestly say that I think I was there for the first three, and then I had this wonderful experience. David and I have gotten to know each other over the years, and I've always seen him to be a very strong, powerful advocate for democracy in many different ways. And, can he ever filibuster. I learned that a number of years ago, and I trust that my colleagues who are on the PROC committee were able to witness how David has that art, and he exercises it exceptionally well.

David, I think, partisanship aside, that you will indeed be missed, as you are a great parliamentarian. I always like to consider myself first and foremost a parliamentarian, and I see you as a peer, as someone who has contributed immensely not only to this committee but also on the floor of the House of Commons. I just want to wish you and your wife the very best in the years ahead. For some reason I don't think we've heard or seen the last of you, but now that David is leaving the House, who knows? Maybe if am the PS next go-round, I might actually return. I haven't missed my absence, I must say that. I rather enjoyed the proceedings of the House. But I do wish you, on a personal note, the very best in the years to come.

Thank you very much, and thank you for allowing me to be here.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Before we go back in there, I have a motion.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With respect to Mr. Christopherson, be it resolved that he's a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

All in favour?

A voice: I don't know if David heard the motion.

The Chair: Did you hear the motion, David?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, I didn't. No.

The Chair:

Oh, you didn't vote for it yet.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's just resolved, with regard to Mr. Christopherson, that he's a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, wow. I've now achieved it. There's the phone call.

The Chair:

Passed unanimously.

We are suspended again.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 162e séance du comité permanent. L'ordre du jour indique que nous sommes à huis clos, mais nous ne le serons pas avant quelques minutes, car nous avons d'abord quelque chose à faire.

Je vais lire les notes du greffier. Elles se lisent comme suit: « Le Comité aimerait remercier le meilleur greffier de l'histoire de la Chambre des communes »...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:...« et les meilleurs analystes. »

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Ce sont de bonnes notes. Merci.

En fait, voici ce que j'aimerais faire. Nous avons ici un gâteau à offrir, sur lequel il est écrit: « Happy Retirement from Filibustering to the Great Parliamentarian from Hamilton Centre ».

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Oui, vous pouvez prendre des photos.

Je vais prendre les demandes d'intervention.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, je propose que la recette soit publiée dans le hansard.

Le président:

Il y a des photos.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

C'est extraordinaire. Qui a organisé cela? Merci beaucoup.

Un député: Vous êtes célèbre.

Un député: L'inscription est-elle bilingue?

Le président: Ah c'est vrai, nous ne pouvons pas en offrir: l'inscription n'est pas bilingue.

Un député : Elle devrait aussi être en braille.

Un député : David, si vous voulez partager ce gâteau, l'inscription doit être dans les deux langues.

M. David Christopherson : Je me demande quelle est sa teneur en sucre.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Vous le méritez. Vous m'impressionnez, est-ce que vous le saviez?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très gentil.

Écoutez, merci à la personne qui a organisé cela. Je suis époustouflé.

Le président:

Il va donc sans dire — et j'aurai une liste d'intervenants — que vous êtes de toute évidence un député très passionné. Je pense que vous êtes un homme de principes. En théorie, chacun d'entre nous devrait avoir un dixième de l'influence sur ce comité, mais je crois que ce n'est pas le cas. Je crois que vous comptez pour plus d'un dixième de l'influence au sein de ce comité. Il y a différentes façons de faire valoir un point de vue. Vous pouvez certainement le faire avec beaucoup de passion. Même si les membres du Comité sont souvent en désaccord, nous pensons que les points que vous soulevez sont fondés sur des principes — du moins, c'est ce que je crois. Vous croyez en vos principes et vous êtes un grand atout pour le Parlement, et je sais que d'autres voudront renchérir.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Lorsque j'ai été nommé leader parlementaire adjoint, on m'a dit que je siégerais au comité de la procédure. La seule chose que je savais au sujet de ce comité avait trait à l'obstruction qui s'y était produite, et je n'avais pas hâte d'y siéger.

Je suis venu à ma première séance et j'avais une idée à proposer. Immédiatement, M. Christopherson a dit: « Oh, le secrétaire parlementaire est venu et il impose sa volonté au Comité ». Je me suis dit: « Mon Dieu, pourquoi ai-je accepté ce poste et comment allons-nous faire pour aller de l'avant? »

Toutefois, au cours des dernières années, j'ai été tout simplement épaté et j'ai un respect incroyable pour ce que vous faites pour vos électeurs et pour notre pays. Les résidants de Hamilton ont une chance incroyable d'avoir quelqu'un de si passionné et d'aussi intègre que vous. Nous pouvons ne pas être d'accord avec vous, mais personne ne peut remettre en question l'intégrité avec laquelle vous soulevez vos arguments, et le fait que vous croyez fermement en ce que vous avancez. Sans aucune « bullshit », vous allez droit au but. J'ai dû dire un gros mot ici, et je crois que Hamilton peut le comprendre.

Je vais parler en mon nom et dire que j'ai la chance d'avoir Jim Bradley comme mentor. Il n'est peut-être pas aussi bruyant, mais je pense qu'il apporte le même niveau d'engagement au point qu'il vaut mieux ne pas vous mettre entre moi et mes électeurs, parce que vous allez devoir me passer sur le corps. C'est quelque chose que je m'efforce de faire, et je suis heureux de le voir au Parlement. Vous nous manquerez énormément en Chambre, peu importe le parti.

Des députés: Bravo!

(1105)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Tout d'abord, on m'a donné un préavis de sept ou huit minutes, ce qui me rappelle le fameux commentaire de Gladstone selon lequel s'il avait un mois pour préparer un discours, il pouvait en faire un de cinq minutes; s'il avait une semaine pour le préparer, il pouvait en faire un de 20 minutes; mais si on l'informait à la dernière minute qu'il devait faire un discours, il pouvait mettre des heures pour en arriver au fait.

Néanmoins, je tiens à dire ceci. Tout d'abord, David est un collègue qui, nous le savons tous, va droit au but, mais qui peut ensuite s'obstiner à le dire pendant très longtemps.

David, cela a été un plaisir, un vrai plaisir, de travailler avec vous. Les autres membres ne le savent pas, mais je l'ai talonné à propos de l'endroit où il va passer sa retraite, parce que j'espère avoir l'occasion de passer du temps avec lui, de prendre une bière sur son quai, de bavarder et de profiter de la compagnie d'un collègue vraiment remarquable.

J'ai eu le temps d'interroger quelques collègues à votre sujet. Je leur ai mentionné, bien sûr, le fait que vous avez commencé en politique municipale, et qu'après une carrière d'élu réussie, vous êtes passé à la politique provinciale, puis à la politique fédérale. J'ai demandé aux gens ce qu'ils en pensaient, et certains de mes collègues conservateurs pensent que cela montre que vous êtes persévérant et déterminé. J'ai également entendu dire que cela démontre que vous avez de multiples talents. L'observation la plus juste est à mon avis celle suggérant que vous apprenez lentement.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Vous prenez maintenant votre retraite, ce qui indique que vous avez enfin compris qu'il vaut la peine de passer le plus de temps possible en famille, ce que nous comprendrons tous tôt ou tard. J'espère que vous aurez l'occasion de passer une partie de votre temps à la retraite avec nous, et avec moi en particulier.

Merci.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je me ferai l'écho des propos tenus par M. Reid, mais je tiens aussi à dire que cela a été un privilège de siéger à vos côtés et que j'ai eu l'honneur — habituellement, Scott siège ici — de siéger entre deux éminents parlementaires qui savent de quoi ils parlent, qui comprennent le mandat de ce comité et ce qu'on y accomplit.

En tant que nouveau membre du Comité et recrue, j'ai été ravi d'entendre vos observations et vos commentaires et de vous entendre parler de votre expérience.

Je le dis en toute sincérité: vous nous manquerez, et j'espère que vous siégerez à cette table de temps en temps, peut-être au cours de la prochaine législature, lorsque nous aurons besoin de l'expertise et de la sagesse du passé.

David, je vous souhaite bonne chance. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants pour tout ce que vous avez fait.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, John. Je le sais.

Le président:

Monsieur Sweet.

M. David Sweet (Flamborough—Glanbrook, PCC):

Je suis ravi d'être ici aujourd'hui. J'ai moi-même suivi cet homme à Hamilton pendant environ 14 ans. Bien entendu, il me précède de beaucoup d'années.

Bon, voici ce que je voulais vous dire. Certaines choses ne changent pas chez David Christopherson. D'abord, il n'a pas souvent besoin de microphone pour faire valoir son point de vue. De plus, personne à Hamilton ne veut prendre la parole après qu'il a eu son tour au micro.

Je peux vous assurer qu'au cours des 14 dernières années, il n'a jamais fait un seul commentaire partisan à mon sujet en public. Je crois que cela a été réciproque de ma part. En fait, à plusieurs reprises, M. Christopherson m'a félicité devant des auditoires. C'est un parlementaire qui comprend que bien que nous ayons des prises de bec au sujet de politiques qui nous divisent profondément, nous sommes tous humains. Nous rentrons tous à la maison à la fin de la journée, nous avons chacun nos problèmes et nous tentons tous de faire preuve de bonté et de dignité.

C'est ce que j'admire le plus chez David Christopherson. Ce sont des qualités qui le caractérisent ici et dans sa circonscription.

Son service public est étayé par ces mêmes qualités. J'ai parlé à des gens qui ont siégé avec lui au conseil et qui, apparemment, étaient parfois en profond désaccord avec lui sur de nombreuses questions, mais qui sont tout de même demeurés bons amis en raison des bonnes relations interpersonnelles qu'il entretenait.

Cela étant dit, David Christopherson m'a souvent répété une chose. Il me disait: « Lorsque nous nous trouvons sur le terrain, nous devons appuyer notre collectivité, nous devons appuyer Hamilton. » Depuis que je le connais, il a toujours appliqué ce principe.

(1110)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La première fois que j'ai rencontré David Christopherson, je travaillais pour le comité des comptes publics avec un certain Scott Simms, vous le connaissez peut-être. Nous y avons travaillé très brièvement. David Christopherson était le président du comité à l'époque, et il est le seul président que j'ai rencontré qui pouvait faire de l'obstruction à son propre comité.

Vous m'avez beaucoup appris, monsieur Christopherson. Cela a été vraiment agréable. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, lors de votre première journée ici, nous avons eu un débat assez houleux et je me suis dit: « Bon, c'est un bon début. »

J'aimerais toutefois vous faire part de l'une de mes inquiétudes. J'espère que la personne qui vous remplacera à ce comité pour représenter le NPD, ou les personnes, on verra bien, partagera vos valeurs et veillera à ce que le comité soit non partisan. Certains députés, tous partis confondus, sont des partisans implacables, de façon tout à fait inappropriée, mais vous n'êtes pas l'un d'entre eux.

Je crois que ce comité fonctionne bien parce que tous les partis arrivent à faire fi de toute partisanerie. Je tenais à souligner que j'en suis très heureux et que j'ai beaucoup appris de vous au cours des quatre dernières années.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Il ne me précède pas, je peux vous l'assurer. En 2004, alors qu'il y avait un gouvernement minoritaire sous la tutelle de Paul Martin, je suis passé du gouvernement, à l'opposition, au troisième parti, pour enfin revenir au gouvernement. Sur ce, je vous ai damé le pion...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:... et j'ai bouclé la boucle.

Il y a une blague terre-neuvienne qui va comme suit. Un Terre-Neuvien et, disons, un Hamiltonien se promènent dans les bois un beau matin lorsqu'un grizzly sort de la brousse et se met à grogner et à montrer les dents. Le Terre-Neuvien se penche et se met à attacher ses chaussures. Le Hamiltonien lui demande: « Tu ne penses pas pouvoir courir plus vite que l'ours quand même? » Le Terre-Neuvien lui répond: « Non, je dois seulement courir plus vite que toi. »

Je vous raconte cette blague parce que l'environnement dans lequel nous travaillons nous oblige à comparer notre rendement à celui des autres. À maintes reprises, je me suis surpris à faire des discours qui sont, premièrement, compris par tous et qui, deuxièmement, sont assez bien rendus pour retenir l'attention de tout le monde, du moins, pendant un certain temps, soit jusqu'à ce que je fasse valoir mon argument.

David Christopherson le fait avec une aise absolue. Cela semble être si facile. Les meilleurs athlètes professionnels nous donnent l'impression que leur travail est facile, et c'est exactement ce qu'il fait. Il nous donne l'impression que cette profession est facile à faire, bien qu'on sache que ce n'est pas le cas. Je l'ai vu à la télévision, à la Chambre et, bien sûr, au Comité. Partout, il fait preuve d'une passion qui se transpose de la base jusqu'ici. Je peux bien dire « base » au sens strictement politique, soit du municipal au provincial et maintenant au fédéral.

Je crois que les dernières semaines résument bien son point de vue au sujet de la façon dont cet endroit devrait fonctionner. J'ai remarqué chez lui beaucoup d'angoisse qui a entraîné une véritable colère, chose que je n'avais jamais vue, et ce en raison du rapport dissident. La dissension lui puait au nez, et c'est peut-être toujours le cas d'ailleurs. Que nous ayons un rapport dissident ou non, cela témoigne de la collaboration qu'il souhaite voir, ou comme il le dit « faire front commun ».

Bref, monsieur Christopherson, vous allez nous manquer. J'avais une carte pour vous.

Une voix: Non. On y travaille.

M. Scott Simms: Ah, on y travaille. Très bien.

Une voix: Une carte de famille.

M. Scott Simms: On prépare une carte. Je vous souhaite tout le bonheur possible, mon ami.

Vous n'aurez probablement plus de titre, mais vous aurez certainement encore des opinions, qui, je l'espère, seront toujours tout aussi enflammées. Je vous souhaite tout le bonheur du monde, monsieur Christopherson.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Simms.

Avant de céder la parole à Mme Sahota, je comprends la passion avec laquelle vous défendez la sécurité du Parlement, à savoir qu'elle ne devrait pas se retrouver entre les mains du gouvernement. C'est une question importante. Merci de la souligner.

Passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aurais aimé pouvoir dire que j'ai eu beaucoup de mandats et une longue histoire avec vous, monsieur Christopherson. Le temps que j'ai passé avec vous a été court, mais cela a été un véritable plaisir. Il n'y a eu qu'un seul mandat. J'aimerais vraiment que vous restiez plus longtemps, afin que je puisse travailler à vos côtés longtemps encore, car mon mandat au sein de ce comité a été très agréable.

J'ai beaucoup appris. Vous m'avez vraiment fait peur le premier jour. Je me suis dit, mais qu'est-ce que je fais ici? Que se passe-t-il? Après que ce choc initial se soit dissipé, j'ai compris que vous parlez toujours avec beaucoup de sincérité et d'intégrité. J'ai beaucoup de respect pour vous. Vous ne comprendrez sûrement jamais l'impression que des députés chevronnés peuvent avoir sur les nouveaux venus. Nous marchons sur vos traces, et c'est agréable de voir que nous pouvons avoir des mentors de tous les partis. Merci d'avoir aidé tous les nouveaux membres au long de ce premier mandat.

On se souviendra toujours de vous ici. J'espère que nous serons à la hauteur de vos attentes: que nous serons toujours capables d'exprimer notre pensée, quelles que soient les circonstances, et que nous pourrons nous sentir bien dans notre peau à la fin de la journée. Je suis certaine que vous dormez toujours sur vos deux oreilles parce que vous dites toujours ce que vous avez sur le coeur. C'est très important selon moi, et les Canadiens respectent un politicien qui vient ici sans toutefois oublier les gens qui l'ont élu et ce en quoi ils croient.

(1115)

[Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je vais maintenant rajouter un petit peu de français à cette discussion. [Traduction]

C'est bien pour vous. Cela vous manquera à Hamilton, le français.

Des députés: Oh, oh![Français]

La première fois que je vous ai rencontré, si vous vous rappelez, c'était lors d'une réunion du Comité permanent de la défense nationale, alors que je remplaçais un collègue. À cette occasion, vous m'aviez impressionnée par la façon dont vous défendiez vos idées, mais surtout par la maîtrise de vos dossiers. De toute évidence, vous saviez défendre vos intérêts et argumenter.

À mon arrivée en septembre dernier au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre — la dernière à y être nommée —, vous m'avez de nouveau impressionnée. Nous étions en train d'étudier le projet de loi C-76 et j'ai eu l'impression de suivre un cours sur comment faire de l'obstruction systématique. Il ne fait aucun doute que vous défendez et débattez vos idées avec conviction, ce qui est tout à votre honneur.

Comme le dirait Mme Sahota, nous en apprenons effectivement beaucoup à observer nos collègues plus expérimentés et à ne jamais perdre de vue nos objectifs et les intérêts de nos citoyens.

Je vous remercie.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais une question pour M. Christopherson, et peut-être M. Simms, si je peux... Nous avons parlé de votre progression du municipal au provincial et ensuite au fédéral, ce qui soulève la question suivante: quelle est la suite? Est-ce l'ONU ou les services secrets?

M. David Christopherson:

Ce n'est pas le Sénat.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Je vais en parler lorsque j'aurai la parole. 

Le président:

Est-ce que le Comité me donne la permission de poursuivre la séance quelques minutes pendant que la sonnerie retentit?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président : Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur de Burgh Graham, vous vous êtes rendu à l'édifice du Centre autant que quiconque. N'y a-t-il pas un décalage?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a un décalage d'environ une seconde et demie, ou de deux secondes.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce n'est rien d'essentiel alors. C'est très pratique. On peut mieux juger du temps qu'il nous faut pour monter à la Chambre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est toujours là, mais ce n'est pas allumé.

M. Scott Reid:

On avait cela dans notre vieille salle de réunion 112 nord, non? Il y avait une vieille télévision, n'est-ce pas?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Il y a deux télévisions au-dessus du classeur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible] que nous devrions nous pencher sur la procédure pour la prochaine fois.

M. John Nater:

Nous ne serons plus ici, je crois. C'est ce que j'ai compris.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous, ou eux?

M. John Nater:

En théorie, la salle même ne sera plus là.

M. Scott Reid:

La salle sera complètement démantelée et remplacée par quelque chose d'autre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela pourrait être un placard à fournitures.

M. John Nater:

Seules les salles patrimoniales seront préservées à 100 %.

M. Scott Reid:

Cette salle devenait en quelque sorte une salle patrimoniale, on y trouvait des emblèmes gravés de divers services. Elle allait devenir une...

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est pourquoi il y avait des feuilles de houblon et des raisins. C'était le bar.

(1120)

M. Scott Reid:

Ah oui? C'était le bar? Est-ce la vérité?

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est pourquoi il y avait des raisins et des feuilles de houblon qui ceinturaient le plafond.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous avons de bonnes discussions à ce comité.

M. Scott Reid:

Je me souviens des raisins. Je ne me souviens pas des feuilles de vigne, mais bon.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il fallait lever les yeux un peu plus haut.

M. David Sweet:

Lors de la dernière législature, j'étais le président du comité des anciens combattants et nous avons dédié la salle 112 nord aux anciens combattants canadiens. C'est pourquoi nous avons demandé au sculpteur du Parlement de graver ces symboles sur les murs qui représentaient les branches des Forces armées canadiennes, nous voulions leur rendre hommage. Il y a eu toute une célébration avec le Président de la Chambre, etc. Nous voulions leur dédier cette salle et nous espérions pouvoir en faire un espace commémoratif pour nos anciens combattants.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous n'êtes certainement pas au courant, monsieur Christopherson, mais nous avons adopté une résolution à ce comité. La résolution a été déposée en Chambre, mais elle n'a pas encore été adoptée, pas vrai?

Le président:

Laquelle?

M. Scott Reid:

Sur l'édifice du Centre.

Le président:

Non. En fait, vous devriez peut-être en parler à votre leader à la Chambre, à savoir si nous pouvons obtenir le consentement pour le faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous devriez alors poser la question à nouveau. Je crois que vous obtiendrez le consentement.

M. Scott Simms:

Avant de le faire, j'aimerais parler d'autre chose. J'espère que vous ne le prendrez pas mal, mais nous avons demandé à notre porte-parole de livrer notre discours et cette carte. Si un porte-parole veut bien...

Le président:

Kevin Lamoureux.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous pensions avoir bouclé la boucle. C'était le premier jour.

M. Scott Reid:

M. Kevin Lamoureux représente un défi pour les photographes au Canada.

Le président:

De toute évidence, tous les membres du Comité ont fait des éloges, ce qui, en soi, est un témoignage. Tout le monde avait de grands éloges à faire.

J'aimerais vous donner l'occasion de répondre à vos collègues, monsieur Christopherson. Avez-vous un dernier mot à dire au Parlement? Sachez que ce n'est pas de l'obstruction.

M. David Christopherson:

Au revoir sera la fin de ma phrase.

Je suis presque sans mot, ce qui est tout un exploit. Je suis estomaqué. Je dois vous avouer que, même si je suis passionné sur bien des enjeux, je ne gère pas très bien mes émotions. Je suis dépassé par les événements. Rien ne m'importe plus que ce que vous m'avez dit aujourd'hui, à titre de collègues qui vivent les mêmes choses que moi. Peu importe à quel point vous êtes près d'une autre personne, tant que vous ne vous êtes pas mis dans les souliers d'un parlementaire et que vous ne savez pas ce que c'est que d'être un parlementaire, vous ne pouvez pas comprendre entièrement la portée des compliments de vos collègues parlementaires, et ce que cela signifie, surtout lorsque les compliments viennent de collègues que vous respectez.

Au cours de la dernière législature en particulier, j'ai eu la chance de siéger à deux comités dont les mandats me plaisent énormément: celui des comptes publics et celui de la procédure. Siéger à ces comités m'a également donné l'occasion de passer du temps avec certains des meilleurs parlementaires que j'aie rencontrés. La chose la plus difficile à faire pour nous, c'est de passer outre la partisanerie. Or, cela est essentiel pour changer les choses et pour envisager l'avenir de notre pays. Moi-même je n'ai pas toujours réussi à le faire, parce que nos passions nous mènent, mais, au bout du compte, cette capacité à passer outre la partisanerie fait toute la différence.

J'ai servi avec des collègues et sous l'égide de deux présidents, à savoir vous, monsieur Bagnell, et M. Kevin Sorenson. J'ai eu la chance d'avoir des présidents de comités fantastiques qui ne désirent que ce qu'il y a de mieux pour le Parlement et le Canada.

Je vous remercie tous.

Je remercie David Sweet, mon collègue d'Hamilton. Nous savons que personne ne se lève tous les jours en se disant: « Que puis-je faire pour Hamilton? », à moins de vivre à Hamilton. J'ai toujours cru que lorsque nous sommes à la maison, tous les députés, peu importe leur parti, devraient faire de leur ville leur priorité, afin que, si possible, nous revenions ensuite ici au Parlement, unis, pour parler des enjeux qui importent. Lorsque nous ne sommes pas d'accord, nous nous traitons quand même avec respect. Si nous devons mener une lutte acharnée, nous le ferons ici, au Parlement. Cependant, lorsque nous rentrons à la maison, nous sommes chez nous et nous nous traitons avec respect. Cela signifie beaucoup pour moi.

Je ne peux m'adresser à tout le monde individuellement, car le temps me manque. Par contre, monsieur Reid, vous serez certainement le premier que j'inviterai à venir me rejoindre sur mon quai, et j'aurai une bière fraîche qui n'attendra que vous.

Il y a un certain nombre de personnes avec qui j'ai hâte de continuer à travailler.

J'aimerais également parler d'un enjeu qui me préoccupe, à savoir la sécurité au Parlement. Aujourd'hui, M. Blaney, qui était ministre à l'époque, est passé me voir après notre séance du comité des comptes publics — je ne crois pas trahir de grands secrets, du moins je l'espère — il m'a dit: « Écoutez, vous devez comprendre qu'à l'époque, nous avions beaucoup de pression sur les épaules. Nous faisions face à beaucoup de crises. Je crois que nous avons pris la mauvaise décision. Je crois que nous avons fait une erreur. Je veux que vous sachiez que si je siège à la prochaine législature, je désire changer cela et remanier le système, afin de faire les choses comme il se doit. »

Je sais que des collègues tels que M. Graham et d'autres s'en préoccupent. C'est un bon signe. C'est très important, car c'est ainsi que le Parlement devrait fonctionner.

Pour conclure, on m'a demandé si j'allais rester dans les parages. Oui. Il s'avère que siéger au comité des comptes publics pendant 15 ans vous qualifie tout d'un coup d'expert. Il y a des gens partout dans le monde qui aimeraient que je vienne travailler avec leur comité des comptes publics et leur bureau de vérification générale. D'ailleurs, je siège désormais au conseil d'administration de la Fondation canadienne pour l'audit et la responsabilisation. Il s'agit de la principale ONG sans but lucratif à laquelle le comité des comptes publics fait appel pour son expertise et son aide. Je vais me joindre à leur équipe et voyager avec elle. Je continuerai donc à m'impliquer dans le domaine. J'espère que ce ne sera pas plus qu'un travail à temps partiel, car j'aimerais bien me reposer le reste du temps. Je suis fatigué. Je travaille depuis 50 ans, et cela est suffisant.

Voilà mes plans pour l'avenir. Cependant, je sais aussi que les plans changent, tels les plans de guerre. Lorsque la guerre commence, le plan est la première chose qui est jetée aux oubliettes. Nous verrons donc ce qui se passera réellement.

Si vous me le permettez, ce que j'aimerais faire, c'est... C'est très difficile. Vous m'avez réellement décontenancé. Ce qui est intéressant, c'est que... Vous avez parlé de l'obstruction et nombre d'entre vous ont parlé de la non-partisanerie. J'ai un cadeau qui traite de ces deux enjeux. Ils nous ramènent à l'obstruction, mais aussi à la non-partisanerie et va au-delà des parlementaires.

Vous connaissez tous Tyler Crosby. Il est selon moi sans contredit, le membre du personnel le plus extraordinaire de la Colline, sans exception. Vous me voyez souvent lui parler. C'est mon bras droit. Je ne pourrais pas faire ce travail sans lui, du moins pas comme j'aimerais le faire. Toutefois, il n'est pas toujours à mes côtés. Parfois, il sort pour aller chercher quelque chose, et je me retrouve alors seul. Il n'y a que moi ici, n'est-ce pas?

(1125)



Malgré cela, lorsque nous étions dans une période d'obstruction, qu'il était temps de s'unir et de se battre, les lignes de parti et la partisanerie n'avaient plus d'importance.

Le Hill Times avait une photo. Je vais vous lire la légende qui accompagnait cette photo. On peut y lire: « Le député néo-démocrate David Christopherson consulte un employé de l'opposition avant de reprendre l'obstruction au comité des affaires de la Chambre, le 5 avril. Lui seul a parlé huit heures ce jour-là, et encore quatre heures le 6 avril. » L'autre personne sur cette photo est Kelly Williams.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Je tiens à offrir un exemplaire encadré de cette photo à Mme Williams, afin de prouver que nous pouvons parfois passer outre la partisanerie, pas seulement comme politicien, mais aussi comme membre du personnel.

Je tiens à vous remercier pour le travail non rémunéré que vous avez accompli pour moi. Vous m'avez aidé à faire mon travail.

Cela dit, chers collègues, les mots me manquent pour exprimer correctement ce que vos paroles représentent pour moi. Elles resteront gravées dans ma mémoire pour toujours. Vous m'avez réellement touché d'une façon que je ne peux pas expliquer. Merci beaucoup. Cela signifie tout pour moi.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité désirent-ils se pencher sur la raison de notre présence ici aujourd'hui, ou souhaitez-vous aller voter?

M. Scott Reid: Devons-nous aller voter si nous ajournons la séance ou pouvons-nous manger du gâteau?

M. David de Burgh Graham: Nous devrions suspendre la séance.

Le président: Vous désirez suspendre la séance?

M. Scott Reid: Il est préférable de suspendre la séance. Vous avez raison.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Nous pouvons suspendre la séance un court instant.

Le président: D'accord, nous allons suspendre la séance, avant de revenir à huis clos pour poursuivre notre discussion. Nous pouvons manger du gâteau maintenant.

Cela vous sied-il? Quelqu'un désire-t-il prendre la parole? Bien.

La séance est suspendue.

(1125)

(1135)

Le président:

Soyez à nouveau les bienvenus à la 162e séance. Pour la première fois, M. Christopherson a permis à M. Lamoureux d'être dans la pièce sans l'attaquer.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Lamoureux, tous les membres du Comité ont eu des éloges à propos de M. Christopherson. Nous vous invitons à ajouter votre grain de sel avant d'aller voter.

M. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg-Nord, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je vous ai entendu dire que cette séance est la 162e. Pour être franc, je crois avoir siégé aux trois premières, et c'était une expérience formidable. Au fil des ans, M. Christopherson et moi avons appris à nous connaître. J'ai toujours vu en lui un ardent et un fervent défenseur de la démocratie, et ce, à maints égards. C'est sans parler de cette capacité à faire de l'obstruction. Je l'ai appris il y a quelques années. Je suis certain que mes collègues du Comité ont été témoins de sa maîtrise de l'art de l'obstruction. Il y excelle.

Cela dit, je pense, sans égard à la partisanerie, que vous nous manquerez en effet, car vous êtes un excellent parlementaire. Je me considère toujours comme un parlementaire avant tout, et je vous vois comme un pair, comme quelqu'un qui a grandement contribué non seulement aux travaux de ce comité, mais aussi aux débats de la Chambre des communes. Je vous offre à vous et à votre femme mes meilleurs vœux pour les années à venir. J'ai l'impression toutefois que ce n'est pas la dernière fois qu'on vous verra ou qu'on vous entendra, mais maintenant que M. Christopherson quitte le Parlement, qui sait? Si je suis nommé à nouveau secrétaire parlementaire lors de la prochaine législature, je reviendrai peut-être. Je dois dire que cela ne m'a pas manqué. J'ai beaucoup aimé participer aux procédures de la Chambre. Cela dit, sur une note personnelle, je vous souhaite le meilleur pour les années à venir.

Merci beaucoup, et merci de me permettre d'être ici parmi vous.

M. Scott Reid:

Avant de retourner à la Chambre, j'aimerais déposer une motion.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

À propos de M. Christopherson, qu'il soit résolu qu'il est un bon camarade, ce que personne ne peut nier.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Tout le monde est en faveur de la motion?

Une voix: Je ne sais pas si M. Christopherson a entendu la motion?

Le président: Avez-vous entendu la motion, monsieur Christopherson?

M. David Christopherson:

Non.

Le président:

Oh, la motion n'a pas encore été mise aux voix.

M. Scott Reid:

À propos de M. Christopherson, qu'il soit résolu qu'il est un bon camarade, ce que personne ne peut nier.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, j'ai tout accompli. J'entends l'appel.

Le président:

La motion est adoptée à l'unanimité.

La séance est suspendue à nouveau.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard proc 10013 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on June 13, 2019

2019-06-06 PROC 160

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

Welcome to the 160th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being held in public at the moment. The first order of business today is consideration of regulations respecting the non-attendance of members by reason of maternity or care for a newborn or newly adopted child.

We're pleased to be joined by Philippe Dufresne, the House law clerk and parliamentary counsel, and Robyn Daigle, director, members' HR services. Thank you both for being here.

Members will recall that our 48th report recommended that the Parliament of Canada Act be amended to provide members of Parliament with access to some form of pregnancy and parental leave. The legislation was subsequently amended to empower the House of Commons to make regulations. As you're aware, the Board of Internal Economy considered the matter last week and recommended that PROC consider a set of draft regulations that it unanimously endorsed.

I would note for the members that the draft regulations distributed in the morning have some slight differences from what we received from the board last week, and it's my understanding that the law clerk will explain the reasons for the changes.

With that I'll turn it over to you, Mr. Dufresne, for your opening remarks.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne (Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel, House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

Mr. Chair and members of the committee, following last week's letter from the Board of Internal Economy, I am pleased to appear before you today with my colleague Robyn Daigle, director of Members' Human Resources Services, to discuss the potential regulations on non-attendance related to maternity and paternity.

You will likely be familiar with this issue because, as the chair mentioned, it comes from a recommendation the committee itself issued in one of its reports presented to the House earlier in this session.[English]

Under the Parliament of Canada Act, a deduction of $120 is to be made to the sessional allowance of a member for each day the member does not attend a sitting of the House of Commons beyond 21 sitting days per session. Days in which a member is absent by reason of public or official business, illness or service in the armed forces are not computed as days of non-attendance and no deductions are made in such circumstances.

There is, however, no similar exemption if a member does not attend a sitting due to pregnancy or providing care for a newborn or a newly adopted child. Your committee considered this issue earlier in this session. In its 48th report entitled "Support for Members of Parliament with Young Children", this committee, after reviewing the relevant provisions respecting deductions for non-attendance, concluded and recommended as follows: It is the Committee’s view that a member should not be penalized monetarily for his or her absence from Parliament due to pregnancy and/or parental leave. Therefore, the Committee recommends That the minister responsible for the Parliament of Canada Act consider introducing legislation to amend section 57(3) of the Parliament of Canada Act to add that pregnancy and parental leave be reckoned as a day of attendance of the member during a parliamentary session for the purposes of tabulating deductions for non-attendance from the sessional allowance of a member. [Translation]

Following that committee recommendation, Bill C-74 was introduced in Parliament and passed. It amended the Parliament of Canada Act to authorize the two Houses of Parliament to make regulations regarding the attendance of their respective members and regarding amounts to be deducted from the sessional allowance for the parliamentarian missing meetings owing to their pregnancy or any parliamentarians missing meetings to take care of their new-born or newly adopted child.

Earlier this year, the Board of Internal Economy asked the House Administration to prepare a bill for its review. While preparing the proposal, the administration took into account the fact that members are not employees. Members hold public office and are not replaced when they are absent as would be, for example, an employee on parental leave. National emergencies or other important matters can always occur and force the member to return to the House or to take care of an issue in their riding.

So the issue before you is not a matter of leave in the strict sense. It is rather about whether absences related to maternity or paternity should be considered as less justified than those related to other motives such as illness, public or official business, or service in the armed forces.

The administration examined the rules in provincial and territorial legislative assemblies in Canada. We have also reviewed Great Britain's practice. That review helped us see that the majority of legislative assemblies allow members to miss sittings, without a financial deduction, by reason of maternity or paternity, over a definite or indefinite period of time.

(1105)

[English]

The members of the Board of Internal Economy unanimously endorsed the following proposal in terms of potential regulation: first, that no deduction be made to the sessional allowance of a pregnant member who does not attend a sitting during the period of four weeks before the due date; second, that there be no deduction to the sessional allowance of a member providing care for his or her newborn child during the period of 12 months from the child's date of birth; and, third, that there be no deduction to the sessional allowance of a member providing care for a newly adopted child during the period of 12 months from the date the child is placed with the member for the purpose of adoption.

This proposal is in line, in my view, with this committee's 48th report, presented in 2017, and with new section 59.1 of the Parliament of Canada Act.

I note that the proposal is not about a period where members will not attend at all to their parliamentary functions, but rather, as mentioned, members of Parliament are not replaced when absent. They are not in the same situation as employees and there will always be issues of either national or local importance that will warrant members and require members to attend either to Parliament or to their constituency. As such, the aim of the proposal is to make sure that no deduction is made to the sessional allowance of a member who misses a sitting of the House because the member is pregnant or providing care for his or her newborn or newly adopted child.

The document entitled “Draft Regulations”, which has been circulated to the members of the committee, contains the legal text that, if adopted by the House, would implement what is proposed. I note that we've made small editorial changes since it was first sent to the members by the board. They do not affect the substance of the proposal. We also removed the coming into force provision, presuming that the committee and the House would want the regulations to come into force immediately upon their adoption, but if the will is otherwise, a different date could be inserted.

I also note that the letter from the Board Of Internal Economy to this committee indicated that the board was also supportive of having no deductions made for the period of four weeks before the due date for a member whose partner is pregnant. In so doing, the board recognized the important role that the non-pregnant partner plays in the weeks leading up to the due date.[Translation]

That idea is certainly worth exploring. We have analyzed the provisions of the Parliament of Canada act to determine whether, in its current form, the act would make it possible to include those circumstances in the proposed regulations.

Following that analysis, I'm of the opinion that extending the application of the four-week non-deduction period to members whose spouse is pregnant would go beyond the wording of the new section 59.1 of the Parliament of Canada Act, which sets out situations where the House of Commons can make regulations. It states that non-attendance could apply to its members who are unable to attend a sitting of the House by reason of: (a) being pregnant; or (b) caring for a new-born or newly-adopted child ... or for a child placed with the member for the purpose of adoption. [English]

The English version is similarly drafted and does not include the situation of a member whose partner is pregnant, and so I note that under the existing regime a member whose partner is pregnant could still be absent prior to the due date for some or all of the 21 sitting days without any deductions.[Translation]

Under the circumstances, I am not suggesting that the committee recommend extending the application of the non-deduction period prior to the child's birth to members whose spouse is pregnant. The implementation of that suggestion would require an amendment to section 59.1 of the Parliament of Canada Act.

However, this is an important issue that is worthy of consideration. The committee could decide to explore this issue in the next session to find potential options. Those options could include legislative amendments or data analysis to clarify trends and measure the repercussions of the current rules on pregnant individuals' spouses.

(1110)

[English]

Last, the board raised the issue of vote pairing for members who are absent from the chamber for family reasons. The committee may also wish to consider this as a topic for a subsequent report.

This will conclude my presentation, but we will of course be happy to answer any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That adds some great clarity.

I have two things for the committee. One, I want to deal with just the recommendation first and come to a conclusion as to whatever we're going to do with this. Two, I'm going to do open rounds so anyone can ask questions, because there may be different interests here.

Madam Moore. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore (Abitibi—Témiscamingue, NDP):

I would like to clarify certain aspects, to ensure that we understand the situation properly.

Let's use the example of a pregnant member whose riding is very far. If ever, as of the 28th week of pregnancy, it became very complicated for her, medically speaking, to get to Parliament, she would have to provide a medical certificate justifying her absence from the House, as far as I understand. Basically, the days in the period between the 28th week and the 36th week of pregnancy would be considered sick days. As of the 36th week, they would be considered pregnancy days.

In short, before the 36th week of pregnancy, a member's non-attendance must be justified through medical reasons that prevent her from coming to Parliament. In that case, the individual must provide a medical certificate.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Yes, that's right.

In its current form, the Parliament of Canada Act already accepts absences due to illness. In any circumstances where medical or illness reasons can be established, be it related to pregnancy or not, members can miss sittings.

The idea behind the committee's recommendation is that the period leading up to the birth be included even without a medical certificate.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Great.

I want to clarify something else.

During those days of non-attendance, the member remains responsible for all the administrative aspects—so anything that cannot be delegated to employees. The member continues to fulfil their duties, such as by approving their employees' various absences and their office's spending. The whole administrative component related to the management of the member's office remains the member's responsibility, correct?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's correct.

In fact, the member also maintains their responsibilities toward their constituents. That is why, in the context of the rules defined here, we think that the situation of members cannot really be compared with that of employees on parental leave. Even the expression “parental leave”, in my opinion, is not the best expression to be used in this case. Members are in a different situation; they are not truly on leave in every respect.

What is proposed is to specify that, in some cases, it will not be possible to attend sittings of the House. At that point, the absence should not be treated more harshly than non-attendance for other reasons.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Ultimately, a member with a critic role can be called by their party to provide advice on positions to take, for example, while a nurse on maternity leave would not be called at home to be asked whether a patient should be given a particular medication.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Exactly.

In theory, an employee on parental leave is replaced by someone else, or it is expected that the individual will not be available to do the work. In the case of a member, the situation would be different.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Concerning the 12-month period, that is left to the member's discretion. There is no obligation to take 12 months of leave. A member can make a judgment call and decide to be present for two months because an important issue for them is under consideration, and then decide to take a month to be with their child.

The parliamentary calendar is often made up of three-week blocks of sitting, after which members can return to their riding for a week. The member could elect not to return to the House during the week in the middle of that block, to avoid having to make a round trip over the weekend. In general, members make a round trip in less than 48 hours, to make the trip less difficult. So a member could choose to spend the middle week in their riding, to avoid round trips over a weekend. That would be possible to do over a 12-month period.

(1115)

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's right. During the 12-month period following the birth of a child, the adoption of a child or the placement of a child for the purpose of adoption, the member's absences will not be counted. If there are no absences, it does not apply, of course. That does not mean the member cannot or must not be in the House. When they decide not to attend for those reasons, those reasons are good ones in the House's view.

Ms. Christine Moore:

I have one last question. It's about financial penalties. Basically, that amendment shelters members from financial penalties.

Often, all the $120 deductions for every day of sitting that will be missed are added up. We tell ourselves that it may not be a very large amount, but Parliament could decide at any time to increase that amount. For example, it could decide that, from now on, there will be a $500 deduction per day of non-attendance. In that case, the estimated cost of absences for maternity reasons would no longer be the same at all.

Do you know when the $120 amount was last indexed or changed?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The $120 amount has always remained at $120. That amount has not been modified. However, the House can modify it. The act states that the House can, through regulations similar to the ones proposed here, decide to increase it. That is a possibility.

Ms. Christine Moore:

So, to your knowledge, the $120 amount has never been increased.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

No.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Okay.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Allow me to now answer your underlying question.

Indeed, the deduction may not be a very high amount, at the end of the day. Even if all the days of non-attendance over a period of time were not justified, the percentage of the session allowance received by the member would remain high. It is important to understand that this is not leave. A member's situation would be different from an employee's situation in those circumstances.

As it has been mentioned at the Board of Internal Economy, beyond the simple issue of the financial amount, there is also this willingness to recognize that the reason invoked is legitimate and that the deduction should not apply.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Thank you very much. That answers my questions. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses. I appreciate the clarity with which you've presented this, particularly the reasoning around the four weeks for the partner of a person who's giving birth.

I want to follow up a little bit on the thinking that went into preparing this specific proposal. I know that some provincial legislatures have a maternity and parental leave provision. Others leave it to the discretion of the speaker of the legislature. I'd be curious to know why the recommendation came for this versus leaving it to the discretion of a speaker or presiding officer.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The way the legislation is drafted, it really talks about covering those circumstances, the pregnancy situation and the caring for a child. The question became what period do you use. As you say, some legislatures will make no deductions at all, probably in line with the thinking that there are differences for members, who never cease to be members during the session and who continue to have pressures and obligations. Others have said that it's with leave of the speaker, with leave of the assembly. Others use such categories as extraordinary family or personal circumstances or situations. Some have no deductions but they have an ethics code where there's an expectation that you attend assiduously and if you do not, you need to justify that.

It was really an attempt to see, in looking at all of this, what makes sense in terms of the practice out there. The 12 months and the four weeks prior were proposed. It could have been something different, but that was something that we felt was reasonable in the circumstances.

(1120)

Mr. John Nater:

I think you're right. I think that is reasonable. It leaves the discretion and the responsibility and accountability to members themselves. I think that makes sense. It would be interesting to hear from some of the provinces to see their reasoning, but perhaps that's a discussion for another day.

I just want to clarify something about section 59.1, because I was listening through translation. The reasoning for not including the four weeks for the member whose partner is having the baby is that it would be ultra vires of that section of the act. It wouldn't be possible to implement that provision based on the amendment to the Parliament of Canada Act that was passed through last year's budget implementation legislation.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The act states: members who are unable to attend a sitting of that House by reason of

(a) being pregnant;

With that language, in both English and French versions, in my mind it's specific to those circumstances. PROC's recommendation was also similarly in that vein. Again, that's something that may warrant consideration as a policy matter. That would certainly be open to the committee to do.

Mr. John Nater:

That's something that would have to be done basically through an amendment to the Parliament of Canada Act, to permit that.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

To include that as part of the reasons, it would, in my view, require such a change.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that clarity as well.

You mentioned briefly the coming into force date. Is it your recommendation that we would proceed with that in the first sitting of the next Parliament?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

It could be the first sitting of the next Parliament. In the current form, it would enter into force immediately once adopted by the House. Assuming that the House would continue to sit in this session, after that, it would apply immediately.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm curious more generally about some of the statistics of members' absences.

Are there anonymized records kept of dates missed for medical reasons and public functions, and also for the “other” category that we see when we check off the boxes? Are those records kept? Are there statistics you'd be able to share with us based on that?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I don't believe there are statistics that we would be able to share.

I don't know if my colleague would want to add to that in terms of the—

Ms. Robyn Daigle (Director, Members’ HR Services, House of Commons):

I am not aware of any statistics either, except that they're kept and they're sent to HRS. If it were to be above 21 days, then deductions would be made.

Mr. John Nater:

Are you aware of any members having exceeded the 21 days during this Parliament?

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

Not recently, that I am aware of.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that.

I think we generally know when members have missed days for reasons of pregnancy and having given birth. It's less clear when the member's partner has given birth. I am assuming we also don't have statistics on the partners of....

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

The only stats we would have is what's included and provided to us in the monthly attendance form, and that's absolutely it.

Mr. John Nater:

I know that, for example, I missed five days when our third child was born, and four days when our first child was born, but they both had the good common sense to be born on break weeks, which helped lessen those days.

I appreciate that.

I think that's all I have at this point, Chair, in terms of questions.

The Chair:

Madam Moore. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore:

I would just like to clarify something about retroactivity of sorts.

Let's take the example of a new member with a six-month-old child at the time of election. Could they choose to have a lighter schedule over the first six months of their term?

If these regulations were implemented now, since there are not many sitting days left, I would be surprised if people decided to opt for that kind of a schedule. However, once the regulations have been implemented, any members with a child under the age of 12 months could decide to miss sittings on certain days for reason of parenthood.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Even if the regulations came into force as soon as the House made them, they define the period in question as the period that starts on the day of the child's birth or the day when the child is placed with the member for the purpose of adoption, depending on the case, and ends 12 months later. If, at the time of the regulations coming into force, the child has already been born, that 12-month period would have already begun and would continue. The 12-month period would not begin on the date the regulations are made.

(1125)

Ms. Christine Moore:

That's right. Essentially, that means that, if I had an 11-month-old child when the regulations went into force, I would have another month to benefit from that measure.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Yes.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

My first question is, how did this issue land in the lap of the House administration and then the Board of Internal Economy? What prompted this issue to be explored?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

In the initial PROC report—this was prior to the amendment of the act—there was a recommendation that if this happened, the House administration could be consulted on that. Then more recently there was an express request made in PROC for the House administration to look into this. I believe this was raised by the government House leader, and as a result of that request made at the board, we came forward with those proposals.

It was always understood that ultimately it's the House that makes those decisions in terms of regulations. The idea was that this would be presented to the board to seek the board members' views, but ultimately it would come here, which would be the body to then ultimately refer it to the House.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Have any members in the past faced challenges and approached the House administration about this issue?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I wouldn't have that information.

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

Yes, I am aware of cases where difficulties have been expressed, similar to where we have sometimes been engaged with helping accommodate members who are trying to be in the workplace and who might have some difficulty. We might put measures in place for them to assist them.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can you elaborate a little more without revealing who the members are? From your experience or from documented records—you can go back decades, if you like—what have some of the challenges been for them?

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

I think it's similar to a lot of the stuff that's already been studied in PROC over the last couple of years in making it a more family-friendly environment for the members. We know—it's very public—that some MPs are new mothers and fathers.

Some concerns have been expressed that there are no maternity provisions for some of these individuals. Sometimes measures are put in place to assist them if they need to travel. Sometimes regulations are in place when they need to travel on airplanes or if they have more than one child.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You stated that parental leave perhaps was not the best terminology for this but it was in line with what had been used in the past. Can you explain why you think leave wouldn't be the best terminology and if there's a way perhaps that we can rephrase it?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Certainly in the proposed regulation we are talking about maternity and parental arrangements and we're talking about justified absences from a House sitting. My point was that it's not the same type of leave that you would see an employee take, where the employee is not performing the functions of the job during that leave. That really is to answer questions about comparing this to the leave an employee takes, the length of leave and the benefits for employees who are on maternity leave, parental leave and so on. Does the member's so-called parental leave from this type of regime compare favourably or not?

My point is it's difficult and perhaps not the best way to compare those two things, because the member, unlike the employee, always continues to be a member. What we're talking about here is not the member being on leave from his or her role as a member, but it's the member having a justifiable reason for being absent from the chamber for a certain period of time. The member continues to be the member and continues to have all the functions.

(1130)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. The draft regulation referred to “paternity and parental arrangements” in the title.

Where does the term “leave” come from anyway?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I'm mentioning the fact that sometimes we talk about this in the sense of parental leave.

I believe in some of the previous reports the word “leave” might have been used as well as the justification. When we looked at this and the board looked at this it's not seen as a leave situation but more as the justifiable circumstances where a member would be absent from the chamber.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I believe you mentioned that exceptions are also made to this 21-day requirement for armed forces sick leave and public or official arrangements. Have any other exceptions ever been made on a per case basis, and if so, what were those exceptions?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

We have the listed exceptions in the act. They are the three that I've highlighted. The other one I did not mention is if the House has been adjourned that day. There's no concern about not having been there. That, to me, is one that is perhaps implicit. The three that are considered justifiable reasons are illness, public or official business, service in the armed forces. The question became while illness might cover some absences, certainly for the pregnant member during the pregnancy and perhaps after the birth as well, but there's a gap. If you only justify it when you consider it to be illness, that does not provide the full recognition and the full protection for parents and pregnant members.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kind of circumstances are the public and official engagements, for example?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's not defined. It would be raised by the member looking at their circumstances. There's certainly an understanding that members do many things outside the chamber that are part of their public or official business, such as attending events, following up on matters outside the chamber. It's a largely defined category.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

A member could be working in their riding and this exception would apply to them. They would not have to appear for 21 days if they can justify there's something relevant that they're doing there.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

It would be for the member to say that they were absent and this was public or official business, that they were following up on matters in their constituency.

There is, obviously, an expectation that members will try to organize their affairs so as to be able to be in the House. That's really part of the role of members, to balance those two things: the obligations in the constituency and the obligations in the House.

The act recognizes there will be times when the members cannot be in the House and it's going to be because they're engaged in other public or official business.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

As a comment at the end, I see this perhaps—I mean, we haven't seen it come into effect yet, but maybe Christine can speak from her experience—being used for flexibility and not in its entirety, from day one until the end of the 12th month. It might be that issues and circumstances arise from time to time in that first year of having a baby. Perhaps one month it would be difficult, or perhaps something happens in the fourth month and you were fine and able to come prior to that.

I'm sure we can learn a lot from Christine Moore, and there are other members who have had children as they've been serving.

Thank you for answering those questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go to Madam Moore and then Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore:

I can answer some of Ms. Sahota's questions.

You were wondering under what circumstances we may be talking about public or official business. I could tell you about a fairly plausible case. If a member becomes president of an international parliamentary association—for example, the Canadian NATO Parliamentary Association or the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly—we can assume they will often miss sittings because they will have to travel. Having known some presidents of international parliamentary associations, I know that the position leads to many absences. I also know that some members have been approached to seek candidacy with an international association, but they decided not to do it. In any case, if a member holds an internationally recognized position that takes up a lot of their time, that could be one of the plausible reasons for which they will not often be present in Parliament. That is an example of public or official business that would explain why a member is not present.

I can now explain to you how we came to these regulations.

While I was a member, I had three children, so three pregnancies. When I started working on this issue, I knew that, until the Parliament of Canada Act was amended, we could not move on to the next step, that of regulations.

The Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs first met on this issue and then produced a report containing that recommendation. The measure was then included in the budget. Once the Budget Implementation Act received royal assent and, consequently, the Parliament of Canada Act was amended, I provided draft regulations to the NDP House leader, who was then Ms. Brosseau. She was in charge of getting the regulations adopted. In fact, it was up to House leaders Ms. Bergen, Ms. Chagger and Ms. Brosseau to begin the discussion on the regulations.

Once I returned after giving birth, I came back to the issue to figure out why the regulations had not yet been adopted. I also tried to get this file on the agenda. So I know that other discussions were held among the House leaders of various parties to put it back on the agenda before the parliamentary session ends, so that a new Parliament would not have to finish the work on this.

That is what has happened concerning the regulations.

(1135)

[English]

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

To build on Ruby's first question, BOIE makes changes all the time to all kinds of things, and in my four years on this committee, they've never come to procedure and House affairs.

Why this one? Do we have to take an action for this to happen?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Yes, you do. The act talks about the House making a regulation by rule or order, and so the power really lies with the House.

What is being asked of this committee is to report to the House with a recommendation that the House could consider. It's not something that BOIE would have the authority to do, given the way it is set out in the Parliament of Canada Act.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, but BOIE changes things all the time, and there's nothing else they've done that would ever have had to come through PROC. I'm just surprised by that.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I'm guessing that the regulations they've done are not regulations under the Parliament of Canada Act. They must have been regulations under some other governing authority.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Under the book.... Whatever the book's called. Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If I understand correctly, the way it works is that normally a regulation is made by the Governor in Council on the recommendation of a minister, but in this case it's made by the Governor in Council on the recommendation of the House.

Is that how it works?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

This is a bit of a unique situation. This is really regulation made by the House on the authority in the Parliament of Canada Act, but in the exercise of its privileges in order to govern the presence of its members in the House.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The Governor in Council has no role in this at all.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

In my view, the Governor in Council does not have a role in this, because it would be looking at the manner in which the House is organizing and accepting the presence of its members in its proceedings. It's really at the heart of the proceedings of the House and the conduct of the proceedings in the House.

It's an unusual type of situation, but it is not something that the board would do by adopting one of its bylaws. It is something that the House would do. It could have been raised by the House, by a member, but in this circumstance, given PROC's role in studying this in the past, the board felt it was appropriate that PROC would be given the opportunity to look at this and report back.

(1140)

The Chair:

That's enough—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have just one tiny little thing.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We have to send a report to the House with the expectation that nothing will happen unless the House concurs in that report.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Thank you.

Sorry about that, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

It's okay.

You still have the floor, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Scott, I want to let you know that last week I briefly chaired the natural resources committee, and the Simms method is now in the wild.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's gone viral.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I've made it a precedent in other committees.

Thank you for that information. It's quite helpful.

On process, because I'm a processor, as you know, do we have a report ready to do something with?

The Chair:

The report will be this: We report that we approve this; we recommend this to the House.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, then, I guess I will suggest that we do that.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have one more question.

You had spoken about a comparison to other parliaments around the world.

Can you explain some of the research you've done?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Sure. We've considered the provincial legislatures.

Some of them will make no deductions to the allowance of members. In those cases, any absence does not result in a deduction. Others will have categories that are open-ended, like leave of the speaker, notice to the speaker, or extraordinary family circumstances or personal situations. Those could be covered. Some are explicit—maternity, parental—and some aren't.

In the U.K., there are no deductions, but they've put in place, on a pilot project, a system of proxy voting. They've also considered the impact on the House itself.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Proxy voting is given to members who are on some kind of leave, and only under that circumstance.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

It's a system in a temporary standing order that the U.K. House has put in place.

As indicated in the letter from PROC, this is something that this committee may wish to consider in a subsequent report.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In your opinion, is this the simplest way of dealing with it, rather than providing for numerous other exceptions, family circumstances, and then...?

My gut would say that most people, if they're in a certain situation, could figure out a way to justify it within a certain category anyway, if we were to provide other categories.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Well, that's the proposal that was put to the board in an attempt to meet the intent of section 59.1 of the Parliament of Canada Act and also the recommendation from this committee. In my view, it's something that would achieve that objective.

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

I might just add, too, that with the 21 days, presumably some of these other types of cases could be met with those 21 days that are already there.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid, did you want to be on the list even though you don't have a bow tie on bow tie day?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would be a dangerous precedent.

I think the answer is that I was trying to respond to David.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think it's all being resolved and getting straightened out by our staff.

The Chair:

I'm not sure why we don't have them sit at the table.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would make things much more efficient.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments before we decide?

Okay. We'll vote on the report that members have been given.

Are you voting or commenting, Ms. Moore?

Ms. Christine Moore:

I will talk afterwards. I'm in favour, but I will propose something else afterwards.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll vote.

That's carried. This is a report to the House.

Christine.

Ms. Christine Moore:

I don't know if we can have in our report that we should later consider modifying the Parliament of Canada Act to include a member whose partner is pregnant. We are not able to right now, but maybe we could consider it later, or maybe the minister responsible should consider that.

(1145)

The Chair:

For the four weeks before? You're talking about that clause.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Yes.

The Chair:

PROC could discuss that now or at another time. It's up to the members. They only have to be there 21 days, so you're talking about only nine days or something in a month that, in the rare circumstances where that would....

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The 21 days is available to everyone for any reason, so it could be used for that.

The Chair:

It wouldn't very often be a problem.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Okay. That's good.

The Chair:

Okay.

While you're here, on another thing which is related, in the message from BOIE, they also said that we might discuss at sometime in the future the proxy pairing or the pairing. I've asked the researcher to do a report, because since we turned that down, England has passed a provision on that. I asked the clerk to give us some information later on what England has done and what other people have done, for the committee's information.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

I don't think we actually voted, the three Conservatives here. I think we were sort of.... In addition to the questions Ms. Moore had on the extension for those with partners having children, I think we wanted to look at more information relative to that, so that perhaps we could consider this.

It is a consideration, as my colleague Mr. Nater said. It's generally somewhat apparent when we have an expectant mother, for most cases here, in the House, but for someone who has a partner who will be having a child, we can't always see that, and we can't anticipate that. These people certainly deserve to be recognized and accommodated as well. We think that deserves some consideration. Perhaps we could look further into that. I think we wanted to do that.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll add it to a future agenda to discuss that, or do you want to discuss it—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We were thinking that maybe we could even look at it further now. That might be a positive thing to do.

Ms. Christine Moore:

It's possible to just add a line on the report that the minister should consider the question and maybe think about modifying the Parliament of Canada Act. Maybe we could refer that and ask the minister to consider it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think it's a good consideration. Even further to the consideration, we could find out more information about those who have faced such a challenge before. There was an indication that some provincial legislatures have adopted different formats, one of the two models, and perhaps it might be worthwhile to take some time to evaluate those provincial legislatures as well.

Ms. Christine Moore:

In the report, maybe we could add the different issues we want to go back to later. It will have to go back to proxy voting and to the question of the partner. In the report, maybe we could include what we refer to for a subsequent study.

The Chair:

I don't think we're going to change the report. We've done the report, but we're going to take Stephanie's advice and look into this further. We'll get some research on it and have a discussion on it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I think we should.

The Chair:

You don't want to necessarily discuss any—

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

I guess to tease it out a little bit, in terms of extending this and having.... My wife has given birth twice during this Parliament and to extend it beyond the 21 days, I'm looking for examples of it being necessary and whether there is a situation that exists where members need this time. I don't know if we're searching for a solution without a problem.

(1150)

The Chair:

Does Parliament ever sit more than 21 days in a row?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Twenty-one sitting days is already more than a month.

Mr. John Nater:

I think Mr. Bittle said it may be a solution in search of a problem. I want to see, perhaps, if there is in fact a problem because it is something that BOIE recommended. I'd be curious to look into those reasons.

The example I use for myself is that I wouldn't have needed those provisions. I only missed four or five days both times. In both examples, neither was prior to birth. I can see where there would be a situation in which—especially for those members who are significant distances from Ottawa—the due date is close, and they want to be there for the birth. They may take a week or so off prior to the birth to ensure they are at home in the riding. I know that in the lead-up to the births of my two children who were born during this Parliament, I was well aware of the flight schedules for all hours of the day to ensure I could quickly get home if I needed to.

I think it's worthwhile to have a discussion at least as to whether this is an issue because BOIE did make that recommendation. I'd be curious to know where they're going with that and what the impetus was for that decision. I haven't read the blues or the notes from the BOIE meeting, so I can't see what their reasoning was for that, but I think it's worthwhile having a discussion at least.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, are you on the list? Madam Moore?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes I am, but I forget why.

The Chair:

Madam Moore. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore:

Basically, here is the problem I am seeing regarding the 21 days.

Let's take the example of a member who lives very far from Ottawa and would have to travel for 24 hours to be present when his spouse gave birth. He could completely miss the birth. So it can be expected for them to want to remain with their spouse as of the 36th week of pregnancy.

If, by misfortune, the 36th week of pregnancy happened to fall within a House sitting period, the 21 days could be used to cover the period when the member is staying at home, but he will be left with no days for any other leave reasons. Let's take the case of a member who has already had to miss two weeks of sittings for other reasons that are not covered, such as to attend his father's or mother's funeral. If he wanted to take another leave to stay with his wife who is close to giving birth, the 21 days may not be enough.

It is more in that kind of a situation that this could happen. It may not have happened in the past, but it could happen. [English]

The Chair:

What if we left it up to the subcommittee on agenda to determine when and if this came back?

Ms. Christine Moore:

Just on the proxy voting, maybe you should consider a meeting with technology services to figure out what could be used and what technology or which way we can do it. In terms of technical challenges, I think it could be interesting to have a meeting with technology services.[Translation]

This could help the committee decide whether that option is reasonable and reliable from a security point of view. That could also be added to the agenda of a subsequent meeting. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, I just suggested a possibility that we leave it up to the subcommittee on agenda—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

The Chair:

—to bring those two items back, the proxy and the four weeks in advance.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We might defer it to PROC 43.

The Chair:

Well, the subcommittee can decide that.

Okay, we're going to suspend for a few minutes to go in camera for the next items on the agenda.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour.

Bienvenue à la 160e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. La première partie de la séance est publique. Le premier point à l'ordre du jour est l'examen des règlements concernant les absences de députés dues à une grossesse ou à la nécessité de prendre soin d'un nouveau-né ou d'un enfant nouvellement adopté.

Nous sommes ravis d'accueillir M. Philippe Dufresne, légiste et conseiller parlementaire de la Chambre des communes, et Mme Robyn Daigle, directrice, Services en RH aux députés. Merci à vous deux de votre présence.

Comme les membres du Comité s'en souviennent sans doute, notre 48e rapport recommandait que la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada soit modifiée de façon à accorder aux députés une forme quelconque de congé de maternité et de congé parental. La loi a ensuite été modifiée de manière à conférer à la Chambre des communes le pouvoir de prendre des règlements. Comme vous le savez, le Bureau de régie interne s'est penché sur la question la semaine dernière et il a recommandé que notre comité examine un projet de règlement qu'il a approuvé à l'unanimité.

Je souligne, pour les membres, qu'il y a de légères différences entre le projet de règlement qui a été distribué ce matin et le document que le Bureau nous a envoyé la semaine dernière. Je crois que le légiste nous expliquera les raisons pour lesquelles les modifications ont été apportées.

Sur ce, je cède la parole à M. Dufresne, qui nous présentera sa déclaration préliminaire.

M. Philippe Dufresne (légiste et conseiller parlementaire, Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, à la suite de la lettre du Bureau de régie interne de la semaine dernière, cela me fait plaisir de comparaître aujourd'hui devant vous avec ma collègue Robyn Daigle, la directrice des Services en ressources humaines aux députés, afin de discuter du règlement potentiel sur les absences liées à la maternité et à la parentalité.

Ce sujet vous sera sans doute familier puisque, comme l'a mentionné le président, il résulte d'une recommandation formulée par le Comité lui-même dans un de ses rapports présentés à la Chambre plus tôt au cours de cette session.[Traduction]

En vertu de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, une somme de 120 $ est déduite de l'indemnité de session pour chaque jour où le parlementaire n'assiste pas à une séance de la Chambre des communes au-delà de 21 jours par session. Les jours où l'absence du parlementaire est attribuable à un engagement officiel ou public, à une maladie ou au service dans les forces armées ne font pas partie des absences comptabilisées, et dans ces circonstances, aucune somme n'est déduite de l'indemnité.

Or, il n'existe pas d'exemption pareille pour les cas dans lesquelles un député ou une députée n'assiste pas à une séance en raison d'une grossesse ou de la nécessité de prendre soin d'un nouveau-né ou d'un enfant nouvellement adopté. Votre comité a étudié la question plus tôt dans la session. Il a examiné les dispositions pertinentes portant sur les déductions en cas d'absence et il a présenté sa conclusion et sa recommandation dans son 48e rapport, intitulé Services destinés aux députés ayant de jeunes enfants: Le Comité est d'avis que les députés ne devraient pas être pénalisés financièrement s'ils s'absentent du Parlement en raison d'une grossesse ou d'un congé parental. Par conséquent, le Comité recommande: Que le ministre responsable de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada envisage de présenter un projet de loi afin de modifier le paragraphe 57(3) de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada pour qu'il y soit mentionné que les journées d'absence attribuables à une grossesse ou à un congé parental doivent être considérées comme un jour de présence du député ou de la députée pendant la session parlementaire aux fins du calcul des sommes à déduire de l'indemnité de session en cas d'absence. [Français]

À la suite de cette recommandation du Comité, le projet de loi C-74 a été déposé au Parlement et adopté. Cela a modifié la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada afin d'autoriser les deux Chambres du Parlement à prendre des règlements en ce qui a trait à la présence de leurs membres respectifs et aux montants à déduire de l'indemnité de session pour la parlementaire absente à des séances en raison de sa grossesse ou pour tout parlementaire absent pour prendre soin de son nouveau-né ou d'un enfant nouvellement adopté.

Plus tôt cette année, le Bureau de régie interne a demandé à l'Administration de la Chambre des communes de préparer un projet pour son examen. En préparant la proposition, l'Administration a notamment pris en considération le fait que les députés ne sont pas des employés. Les députés occupent une charge publique et ne sont pas remplacés lors de leur absence comme le serait, par exemple, un employé en congé parental. Des urgences nationales ou d'autres questions importantes peuvent toujours survenir et obliger le député ou la députée à revenir à la Chambre ou à s'occuper d'un dossier dans sa circonscription.

L'enjeu devant vous n'est donc pas une question de congé au sens strict. Il s'agit plutôt de savoir si les absences liées à la maternité ou à la parentalité devraient être considérées comme étant moins justifiées que celles liées aux autres motifs tels que la maladie, les engagements publics ou officiels, ou le service dans les forces armées.

L'Administration a examiné les règles dans les assemblées législatives des provinces et des territoires au Canada. Nous avons également revu la pratique en Grande-Bretagne. Cet examen a permis de constater que la majorité des assemblées législatives permettent aux députés de s'absenter, sans déduction financière, pour des raisons de maternité ou de parentalité, pour une période déterminée ou indéterminée.

(1105)

[Traduction]

Les membres du Bureau de régie interne ont adopté à l'unanimité la proposition de règlement suivante: premièrement, qu'aucune somme ne soit déduite de l'indemnité de session d'une députée enceinte qui n'assiste pas à une séance au cours de la période de 4 semaines précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement; deuxièmement, qu'aucune somme ne soit déduite de l'indemnité de session d'un député qui s'absente pour prendre soin de son nouveau-né au cours de la période de 12 mois suivant le jour de la naissance de l'enfant; et troisièmement, qu'aucune somme ne soit déduite de l'indemnité de session d'un député qui s'absente pour prendre soin d'un enfant nouvellement adopté au cours de la période de 12 mois suivant le jour où l'enfant est placé chez lui en vue de son adoption.

À mon avis, cette proposition est en phase avec le 48e rapport du Comité, présenté en 2017, et le nouvel article 59.1 de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

Je souligne qu'il n'est pas question, dans la proposition, d'accorder aux députés un congé au cours duquel ils n'exerceront pas du tout leurs fonctions parlementaires. Je le répète, les députés ne sont pas remplacés durant leur absence. Ils ne se trouvent pas dans la même situation que les employés, et il surviendra toujours des questions d'intérêt national ou local qui obligeront les parlementaires à se présenter au Parlement ou à s'occuper de dossiers dans leur circonscription. Par conséquent, l'objectif de la proposition est de veiller à ce qu'aucune déduction ne soit effectuée sur l'indemnité de session de la parlementaire qui n'assiste pas à une séance de la Chambre en raison de sa grossesse, ou de tout parlementaire qui s'absente pour prendre soin de son nouveau-né ou d'un enfant nouvellement adopté.

Le document intitulé Projet de règlement que vous avez reçu contient le texte juridique qui mettra en œuvre la proposition si celle-ci est adoptée par la Chambre. Je vous prie de noter que nous avons apporté quelques légères modifications au document depuis que le Bureau vous l'a envoyé. Ces modifications n'ont aucune incidence sur le fond de la proposition. Nous avons aussi retiré la disposition d'entrée en vigueur, en présumant que le Comité et la Chambre souhaiteraient que le règlement entre en vigueur dès son adoption. Si ce n'est pas le cas, une date peut être ajoutée.

Je souligne également que dans la lettre qu'il a envoyée au Comité, le Bureau de régie interne a écrit qu'il appuyait aussi la proposition de ne pas effectuer de déduction sur l'indemnité d'un député qui s'absente durant la période de quatre semaines précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement de sa conjointe. Ce faisant, le Bureau reconnaît le rôle important joué par le conjoint durant les semaines qui précèdent la date prévue de l'accouchement.[Français]

C'est certainement une idée qui mérite d'être explorée. Nous avons effectué une analyse des dispositions de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada afin de déterminer si, dans sa forme actuelle, celle-ci permettrait d'inclure ces circonstances dans le règlement proposé.

À la suite de cette analyse, je suis d'avis que le fait d'étendre l'application de la période de quatre semaines de non-déduction aux députés dont la conjointe est enceinte irait au-delà du libellé du nouvel article 59.1 de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, qui prévoit les situations où la Chambre des communes peut prendre des règlements. On indique que l'absence pourrait s'appliquer aux cas suivants: a) la parlementaire qui n’assiste pas à une séance de la chambre dont elle fait partie en raison de sa grossesse; b) le parlementaire qui [...] doit prendre soin de son nouveau-né [ou] d’un enfant nouvellement adopté [...] [Traduction]

Le libellé de la version anglaise est semblable; il n'inclut pas la situation d'un député dont la conjointe est enceinte. Cependant, je précise qu'en vertu du régime actuel, un député dont la conjointe est enceinte peut tout de même s'absenter durant la période précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement sans subir de déduction si le nombre total d'absences est inférieur à 21 jours de séance.[Français]

Dans les circonstances, je ne suggère pas que le Comité recommande d'étendre l'application de la période de non-déduction avant la naissance de l'enfant aux députés dont la conjointe est enceinte. La mise en œuvre de cette suggestion nécessiterait une modification à l'article 59.1 de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

C'est toutefois un enjeu important qui mérite d'être étudié. Le Comité pourrait décider d'explorer cette question lors de la prochaine session afin de trouver des options potentielles. Ces options pourraient inclure des modifications législatives ou encore une analyse des données afin de préciser des tendances et de mesurer les répercussions des règles actuelles sur les conjoints des personnes enceintes.

(1110)

[Traduction]

Enfin, le Bureau a soulevé la question du pairage pour les députés qui s'absentent de la Chambre et qui manquent un vote pour des raisons familiales. Le Comité pourrait également décider d'explorer ce sujet en vue d'un futur rapport.

Voilà qui met fin à ma déclaration préliminaire, mais bien sûr, nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup pour tous ces éclaircissements.

J'ai deux choses à dire au Comité. Premièrement, je veux que nous nous penchions d'abord strictement sur la recommandation et que nous décidions ce que nous allons en faire. Deuxièmement, la discussion sera libre; autrement dit, tous peuvent poser des questions, car il pourrait y avoir des champs d'intérêt différents.

La parole est à vous, madame Moore. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore (Abitibi—Témiscamingue, NPD):

J'aimerais clarifier certains aspects, pour m'assurer que nous comprenons bien ce qu'il en est.

Prenons le cas d'une députée enceinte dont la circonscription serait très éloignée. Si jamais, à partir de la 28e semaine de grossesse, il lui devenait très compliqué, sur le plan médical, de se rendre au Parlement, elle devrait présenter un certificat médical qui justifierait son absence de la Chambre, selon ce que je comprends. Au fond, les journées comprises entre la 28e et la 36e semaine de grossesse seraient considérées comme des journées de maladie. À partir de la 36e semaine, elles seraient considérées comme des journées de grossesse.

Bref, avant la 36e semaine de grossesse, l'absence d'une députée doit être justifiée par des raisons médicales qui l'empêchent de se rendre au Parlement. Cette personne doit alors présenter un certificat médical.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Oui, tout à fait.

Dans sa forme actuelle, la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada accepte déjà une absence pour des raisons de maladie. Dans n'importe quelles circonstances où l'on peut établir des raisons médicales ou de maladie, que ce soit lié à la grossesse ou non, il est possible de s'absenter.

L'idée derrière la recommandation du Comité, c'est que la période à l'approche de la naissance soit incluse même s'il n'y a pas de certificat médical.

Mme Christine Moore:

C'est parfait.

Je veux clarifier autre chose.

Pendant ses journées d'absence, le député ou la députée demeure responsable de tout le côté administratif, donc de tout ce qui ne peut pas être délégué à des employés. Le député continue de remplir ces fonctions, par exemple approuver les différentes absences de ses employés et les dépenses de son bureau. Tout le volet administratif en lien avec la gestion du bureau du député demeure la responsabilité du député, n'est-ce pas?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est exact.

En fait, le député conserve aussi ses responsabilités à l'égard des citoyens de sa circonscription. C'est pour cela que, dans le contexte des règles définies ici, selon nous, on ne peut pas vraiment comparer la situation de députés avec celle d'employés qui sont en congé parental. Même l'expression « congé parental », selon moi, n'est pas la meilleure expression qui convienne à ce dont on parle ici. Les députés sont dans une situation différente; ils ne sont pas véritablement en congé à tous les égards.

Ce qui est proposé, c'est de préciser que, dans certains cas, il ne sera pas possible d'assister aux séances de la Chambre. À ce moment-là, cela ne devrait pas être traité plus sévèrement que les autres motifs d'absence.

Mme Christine Moore:

Dans le fond, un député ayant une fonction de porte-parole peut se faire appeler par son parti afin qu'il fournisse des conseils sur les positions à prendre, par exemple, tandis qu'on n'appellerait pas à la maison une infirmière en congé de maternité pour lui demander si on devrait administrer tel ou tel médicament à un patient.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Exactement.

En théorie, un employé qui est en congé parental se fait remplacer par quelqu'un d'autre, ou encore on s'attend à ce que la personne ne soit pas disponible pour faire le travail. Dans le cas d'un député ou d'une députée, la situation sera différente.

Mme Christine Moore:

En ce qui concerne la durée de 12 mois, c'est laissé à la discrétion du député. Il n'y a pas d'obligation de prendre 12 mois de congé. Un député peut en juger et choisir d'être présent pendant deux mois parce qu'il y a un enjeu d'importance pour lui, et ensuite décider de prendre un mois pour être avec son enfant.

Le calendrier parlementaire est souvent constitué de blocs de trois semaines de séance, après quoi les députés peuvent retourner dans leur circonscription pendant une semaine. Le député pourrait choisir de ne pas revenir à la Chambre pendant la semaine située au milieu de ce bloc, pour éviter d'avoir à faire l'aller-retour pendant la fin de semaine. En général, les députés font l'aller-retour en moins de 48 heures, pour que le déplacement soit moins difficile. Donc, un député pourrait choisir de passer la semaine du milieu dans sa circonscription, pour éviter les allers-retours d'une fin de semaine. Ce serait possible de faire cela pendant une période de 12 mois.

(1115)

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est cela. Pendant cette période de 12 mois suivant la naissance d'un enfant, l'adoption d'un enfant ou l'accueil d'un enfant en vue de son adoption, les absences du député ou de la députée ne seront pas comptées. S'il n'y a pas d'absences, c'est sûr que cela ne s'applique pas. Cela ne veut pas dire que le député ou la députée ne peut pas ou ne doit pas être à la Chambre. Quand le choix est fait de ne pas y être pour ces raisons, ce sont de bonnes raisons aux yeux de la Chambre.

Mme Christine Moore:

J'ai une dernière question. C'est au sujet des pénalités financières. Dans le fond, cette modification met les députés à l'abri de pénalités financières.

Souvent, on fait la somme de toutes les déductions de 120 $ pour chacun des jours de séance où l'on devra s'absenter. On se dit que cela ne représente peut-être pas un si gros montant, mais le Parlement pourrait décider à tout moment d'augmenter ce montant. Par exemple, il pourrait décider que, dorénavant, il y aura une déduction de 500 $ par journée d'absence. Dans ce cas, le coût estimé des absences pour des raisons de maternité ne serait plus du tout le même.

Savez-vous à quand remonte la dernière fois que le montant de 120 $ a été indexé ou modifié?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Le montant de 120 $ est toujours resté à 120 $. Ce montant n'a pas été modifié. Cependant, la Chambre peut le modifier. La Loi prévoit que la Chambre peut, par l'entremise d'un règlement semblable à celui proposé ici, décider de l'augmenter. C'est une possibilité.

Mme Christine Moore:

Donc, à votre connaissance, le montant de 120 $ n'a jamais été augmenté.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Non.

Mme Christine Moore:

D'accord.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Permettez-moi maintenant de répondre à votre question sous-jacente.

Effectivement, la déduction ne représenterait peut-être pas un montant très élevé, au bout du compte. Même si toutes les journées d'absence pendant la période n'étaient pas justifiées, le pourcentage de l'indemnité de session touchée par le député demeurerait élevé. Il est important de comprendre qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un congé. La situation d'un député serait différente de celle d'un employé dans ces circonstances.

Comme cela a été mentionné au Bureau de régie interne, au-delà de la simple question du montant financier, il y a aussi cette volonté qu'on reconnaisse que la raison invoquée est légitime et que la déduction ne devrait pas s'appliquer.

Mme Christine Moore:

Merci beaucoup. Cela répond à mes questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins. Votre présentation de la proposition était très claire, surtout l'explication de la question des quatre semaines pour le conjoint de la personne enceinte.

J'aimerais en savoir plus sur la réflexion qui a mené à la proposition que nous avons devant nous. Je sais que certaines assemblées législatives provinciales ont des dispositions au sujet des congés de maternité et des congés parentaux. D'autres s'en remettent au président de l'assemblée législative. J'aimerais savoir pourquoi on a opté pour ces recommandations au lieu de s'en remettre au Président.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

La mesure législative est formulée de façon à tenir compte de situations précises, soit la grossesse et la nécessité de prendre soin d'un enfant. Il restait à fixer la période visée. Comme vous venez de le dire, certaines assemblées législatives n'effectuent aucune déduction, probablement parce que la situation des députés est unique: ils demeurent des députés tout au long de la session et ils continuent à subir des pressions et à avoir des obligations. D'autres assemblées législatives demandent la permission du président ou de l'assemblée. D'autres encore se servent de catégories comme des situations ou des circonstances familiales ou personnelles exceptionnelles. Certaines ne font pas de déduction, mais leur code d'éthique exige que les députés soient assidus et qu'ils justifient leurs absences.

Le but était de comparer les différentes pratiques et de déterminer ce qui conviendrait ici. Nous avons proposé 12 mois et 4 semaines précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement. Notre proposition aurait pu être différente, mais nous trouvions ces périodes raisonnables et bien adaptées aux circonstances.

(1120)

M. John Nater:

Je suis d'accord avec vous. Je trouve la proposition raisonnable. Elle responsabilise les députés en leur permettant de prendre leurs propres décisions. Je trouve cela logique. Ce serait intéressant de discuter avec des représentants des provinces pour comprendre leurs points de vue, mais ce sera une discussion pour une autre séance.

J'aimerais demander une clarification au sujet de l'article 59.1, car j'écoutais l'interprétation. La raison pour laquelle les quatre semaines précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement de la conjointe d'un député ne sont pas incluses, c'est qu'une telle mesure serait ultra vires. Il ne serait pas possible de l'appliquer en vertu de la modification qui a été apportée à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada au moyen de la loi d'exécution du budget de l'année dernière.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

La loi stipule: pour:

a) la parlementaire qui n'assiste pas à une séance de la chambre dont elle fait partie en raison de sa grossesse;

À mes yeux, le libellé des versions française et anglaise vise très précisément cette situation. La recommandation de votre comité allait aussi dans le même sens. Je le répète, c'est une question qui pourrait faire l'objet d'un examen. Le Comité pourrait certainement se pencher là-dessus.

M. John Nater:

Pour ce faire, il faudrait modifier la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Pour inclure cette situation dans les raisons, oui, d'après moi, il faudrait modifier la loi.

M. John Nater:

Merci pour cette précision.

Vous avez mentionné brièvement la date d'entrée en vigueur. Recommandez-vous que la mesure entre en vigueur à la première séance de la prochaine législature?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est une possibilité. Sous sa forme actuelle, elle entrerait en vigueur dès qu'elle serait adoptée par la Chambre. Si la Chambre continuait à siéger durant la session en cours, elle serait applicable immédiatement.

M. John Nater:

J'ai des questions générales concernant les données relatives aux absences des députés.

Conserve-t-on des dossiers anonymes sur les absences attribuables à des raisons médicales et à des engagements publics, ainsi qu'à la catégorie « autre » que nous pouvons cocher? Conserve-t-on de tels dossiers? Avez-vous des données à ce sujet que vous pourriez nous transmettre?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait de données que nous puissions vous transmettre.

Ma collègue voudrait peut-être ajouter quelque chose par rapport...

Mme Robyn Daigle (directrice, Services en RH aux députés, Chambre des communes):

Moi non plus, je ne crois pas qu'il y ait de données, mises à part celles qui sont envoyées aux Services en RH. Si un député était absent plus de 21 jours, il y aurait des déductions.

M. John Nater:

À votre connaissance, des députés ont-ils excédé la période de 21 jours durant la législature actuelle?

Mme Robyn Daigle:

Pas récemment, à ce que je sache.

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie.

Je pense que de façon générale, nous le savons quand une députée s'absente en raison de sa grossesse et de son accouchement. C'est moins évident lorsque c'est la conjointe d'un député qui a accouché. Je présume que nous n'avons pas non plus de données sur les conjoints...

Mme Robyn Daigle:

Les seules données que nous avons sont celles qui sont incluses dans les rapports mensuels des présences qui nous sont envoyés. C'est vraiment tout.

M. John Nater:

Je sais, par exemple, que j'ai été absent pendant cinq jours à la naissance de mon troisième enfant et pendant quatre jours à la naissance de mon aînée, mais les deux ont eu le bon sens de venir au monde durant des semaines de relâche, ce qui m'a aidé à réduire mon nombre d'absences.

Je vous remercie.

Ce sont toutes les questions que j'ai pour l'instant, monsieur le président.

Le président:

La parole est à vous, madame Moore. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore:

Je voudrais seulement clarifier quelque chose au sujet d'une certaine rétroactivité, si l'on peut dire.

Prenons l'exemple d'un nouveau député qui a un enfant âgé de 6 mois au moment où il est élu. Pourrait-il choisir d'avoir un horaire allégé pour les six premiers mois de son mandat?

Si l'on mettait ce règlement en vigueur maintenant, étant donné qu'il ne reste plus beaucoup de jours de séance, je serais étonnée que des gens décident d'opter pour un tel horaire. Par contre, dès qu'il sera mis en vigueur, tous les députés ayant un enfant âgé de moins de 12 mois pourraient choisir de s'absenter pendant certaines journées pour des raisons de parentalité.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Même si le règlement entrait en vigueur dès son adoption par la Chambre, la période visée y est définie comme étant la période qui commence le jour de la naissance de l'enfant ou le jour où l'enfant est placé chez le député en vue de son adoption, selon le cas, et qui se termine 12 mois après ce jour. Si, au moment de l'entrée en vigueur du règlement, la naissance de l'enfant avait déjà eu lieu, cette période de 12 mois aurait déjà commencé et se poursuivrait. La période de 12 mois ne commencerait pas le jour où le règlement est adopté.

(1125)

Mme Christine Moore:

Non, effectivement. En gros, cela veut dire que, si j'avais un enfant âgé de 11 mois au moment de l'entrée en vigueur du règlement, j'aurais encore un mois pour bénéficier de cette mesure.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Oui.

Mme Christine Moore:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

La parole est à vous, madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

D'abord, j'aimerais savoir comment le dossier s'est retrouvé sur le bureau de l'Administration de la Chambre, puis du Bureau de régie interne? Qu'est-ce qui a donné lieu à l'examen de cette question?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Le rapport initial du Comité, qui a précédé la modification de la loi, recommandait de demander l'avis de l'Administration de la Chambre si la loi était modifiée. Puis, plus récemment, le Comité a demandé expressément que l'Administration de la Chambre se penche sur la question. Je crois que c'est le leader parlementaire du gouvernement qui en a fait la demande. La proposition est le résultat de la demande présentée au Bureau.

Il a toujours été entendu que les décisions relatives à la réglementation relèvent de la Chambre. L'idée était de présenter le dossier au Bureau pour obtenir l'avis de ses membres, puis de renvoyer la proposition au Comité, qui la présenterait ensuite à la Chambre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-il déjà arrivé que des parlementaires connaissent des difficultés et s'adressent à l'Administration de la Chambre à ce sujet?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je n'ai pas d'information là-dessus.

Mme Robyn Daigle:

Oui, je sais qu'il est arrivé que des parlementaires fassent part de difficultés. Comme dans le cas de députés qui veulent être présents malgré certains défis, nous pouvons mettre des mesures d'adaptation en place pour les aider.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de détails sans révéler qui sont les parlementaires en question? D'après votre expérience ou d'après d'anciens dossiers — vous pouvez remonter à il y a plus de 10 ans, si vous voulez —, quelles sont les difficultés que ces parlementaires connaissent?

Mme Robyn Daigle:

Je pense qu'elles sont semblables à de nombreux dossiers que le Comité a étudiés au cours des dernières années en vue d'offrir aux députés un milieu plus favorable à la conciliation travail-famille. Nous savons — c'est très public — que certaines députées sont de nouvelles mères et que certains députés sont de nouveaux pères.

Des préoccupations ont été soulevées relativement à l'absence de dispositions sur la maternité. Parfois, des mesures sont mises en place pour venir en aide aux parlementaires qui doivent voyager. Parfois, des règles sont adoptées pour les déplacements par avion ou pour les députés ayant plus d'un enfant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez dit que l'expression « congé parental » n'est peut-être pas la meilleure expression qui convienne à ce dont on parle ici, mais que c'est conforme à ce qui a été utilisé dans le passé. Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi vous pensez que « congé parental » ne serait pas la meilleure terminologie? Est-il possible de reformuler?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Dans le règlement proposé, il est question de mesures liées à la maternité et à la parentalité et des absences justifiées à une séance de la Chambre. Ce que je voulais dire, c'est que ce n'est pas le même genre de congé qu'un employé prendrait s'il n'exerçait pas les fonctions de l'emploi pendant ce congé. Il s'agit de répondre aux questions qui se posent lorsque l'on compare ce régime au congé que prend un employé, à la durée du congé et aux avantages sociaux des employés qui sont en congé de maternité, en congé parental, etc. Ce qu'on appelle le congé parental du député dans ce type de régime se compare-t-il avantageusement, ou non?

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que la comparaison des deux est difficile, et peut-être pas la meilleure façon de procéder, car contrairement à l'employé, le député exerce toujours ses fonctions. Ce dont il est question, ce n'est pas de gens qui n'exercent plus leur fonction de député, ce rôle, mais de gens qui ont une raison valable de s'absenter de la Chambre pendant un certain temps. Le député est toujours député et continue d'en exercer les fonctions.

(1130)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Dans le titre du projet de règlement, on faisait référence aux « mesures liées à la paternité et à la parentalité ».

D'où vient le terme « congé »?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je note qu'on en parle parfois dans le sens de « congé parental ».

Je crois que dans certains des rapports précédents, le mot « congé » a aussi pu être utilisé à titre de justification. Lorsque nous avons étudié la question, tout comme le Bureau de régie interne, nous avons conclu qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un congé, mais plutôt de circonstances qui justifient l'absence d'un député à la Chambre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que vous avez mentionné qu'il y a aussi des exceptions à la règle des 21 jours, soit pour les congés de maladie, le service dans les forces armées et les engagements publics ou officiels. D'autres exceptions ont-elles déjà été accordées? Si oui, quelles étaient-elles?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Il y a les exceptions énoncées dans la loi. Ce sont les trois que j'ai mentionnées, et une autre dont je n'avais pas parlé, soit en cas d'ajournement de la Chambre. À ce moment-là, l'absence ne pose pas problème, ce qui va de soi, à mon avis. Les trois raisons considérées comme justifiables sont la maladie, les fonctions publiques ou officielles et le service dans les forces armées. On s'est demandé si certaines absences pourraient être considérées comme des congés de maladie, notamment pendant la grossesse d'une députée enceinte et peut-être aussi après l'accouchement, mais il y a un vide. Si l'absence n'est justifiée qu'en cas de maladie, on n'assure pas une pleine reconnaissance et une pleine protection des parents et des députées enceintes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous des exemples d'un engagement public et officiel?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Ce n'est pas défini. Il reviendrait au député de le déterminer en fonction des circonstances. Il est entendu que beaucoup d'activités des députés à l'extérieur de la Chambre sont des fonctions publiques ou officielles, notamment la présence à certains événements ou le suivi de dossiers. C'est une catégorie largement définie.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

L'exception s'appliquerait à un député qui travaillerait dans sa circonscription, et il pourrait s'absenter pendant 21 jours s'il peut justifier le travail qu'il y fait.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Il reviendrait au député de dire qu'il s'est absenté pour des fonctions publiques ou officielles, qu'il faisait un suivi dans sa circonscription.

On s'attend évidemment à ce que les députés essaient d'organiser leur horaire pour être présents à la Chambre. Il incombe aux députés de concilier leurs obligations dans leur circonscription et leurs obligations à la Chambre.

La loi reconnaît que les députés ne pourront pas être présents à la Chambre, dans certaines circonstances, pour exercer d'autres fonctions publiques ou officielles.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pour terminer, je dirais qu'il est possible — ce n'est pas encore en vigueur, mais Mme Moore pourrait parler de son expérience — qu'on y ait recours avec une certaine latitude et non de façon intégrale, du premier jour à la fin du 12e mois. Toutes sortes de choses peuvent survenir, de temps à autre, au cours de la première année avec un bébé. Il pourrait être difficile de venir avant un mois, ou la personne pourrait être obligée de s'absenter pour une raison quelconque au quatrième mois, alors qu'elle était déjà revenue.

Je suis certaine que Mme Christine Moore pourra nous en apprendre beaucoup. D'autres députées ont eu des enfants pendant qu'elles exerçaient ces fonctions.

Merci d'avoir répondu à ces questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Moore, suivie de M. Graham. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore:

Je vais pouvoir répondre à certaines questions de Mme Sahota.

Vous vous demandiez dans quelles circonstances il peut s'agir d'engagements publics ou officiels. Je pourrais vous décrire un cas qui est quand même raisonnablement plausible. Si un député devient président d'une association parlementaire internationale, par exemple l'Association parlementaire canadienne de l'OTAN ou l'Assemblée parlementaire de l'OSCE, on peut supposer qu'il s'absentera souvent en raison des voyages qu'il aura à faire. Ayant connu certains présidents ou certaines présidentes d'associations parlementaires internationales, je sais que cela cause beaucoup d'absences. Je sais aussi que certains députés ont été pressentis pour présenter leur candidature à une association internationale, mais ont choisi de ne pas le faire. Quoi qu'il en soit, si un député occupe un poste reconnu à l'international qui prend beaucoup de son temps, cela pourrait être une des raisons plausibles pour lesquelles il ne serait pas souvent présent au Parlement canadien. C'est un exemple d'engagement public ou officiel qui expliquerait pourquoi un député n'est pas présent.

Je peux maintenant vous expliquer de quelle façon nous en sommes venus à ce règlement.

J'ai eu trois enfants, donc trois grossesses, alors que j'étais députée. Quand j'ai entrepris le travail sur cette question, je savais que, tant que la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada n'était pas modifiée, on ne pourrait pas procéder à l'étape suivante, soit celle du règlement.

Il y a eu une première rencontre au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Par la suite, le Comité a produit un rapport qui contenait cette recommandation. La mesure a ensuite été incluse dans le budget. Une fois que la loi d'exécution du budget a reçu la sanction royale et que, par conséquent, la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada a été modifiée, j'ai fourni une ébauche de règlement à la leader à la Chambre du NPD, qui était Mme Brosseau à ce moment-là. C'est elle qui était responsable de faire adopter le règlement. En effet, il revenait aux leaders à la Chambre, Mmes Bergen, Chagger et Brosseau, de commencer à discuter du règlement.

À mon retour après avoir accouché, je suis revenue sur la question afin de savoir pourquoi le règlement n'était toujours pas adopté. J'ai aussi tenté qu'on remette ce dossier à l'ordre du jour. Je sais donc qu'il y a eu d'autres discussions entre les leaders à la Chambre des différents partis pour le remettre à l'ordre du jour avant la fin de la session parlementaire, pour ne pas qu'un nouveau Parlement ait à finaliser le travail là-dessus.

Voilà donc ce qui s'est passé concernant le règlement.

(1135)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Dans la même veine que la première question de Mme Sahota, le Bureau de régie interne apporte fréquemment des modifications à toutes sortes de choses, et au cours de mes quatre années au Comité, aucun de ses représentants n'est venu au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Pourquoi dans ce cas-ci? Devons-nous prendre des mesures pour que cela se concrétise?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Oui. Aux termes de la loi, la Chambre peut, au moyen de règles ou d'ordres, prendre un règlement. Donc, cela relève essentiellement de la Chambre.

Nous demandons au comité de faire rapport à la Chambre en lui présentant une recommandation, aux fins d'examen. Le Bureau de régie interne n'en a pas le pouvoir, étant donné le libellé de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, mais le Bureau de régie interne change tout le temps les choses, et c'est la première fois qu'il saisit le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cela me surprend, c'est tout.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je suppose que les règlements qui ont été pris n'avaient pas été pris en vertu de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Ce sont probablement des règlements pris en vertu d'une autre autorité de gouvernance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sous le livre... Quel qu'en soit le titre. Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Habituellement, si j'ai bien compris, le règlement est pris par le gouverneur en conseil sur recommandation d'un ministre, mais dans ce cas-ci, c'est le gouverneur en conseil qui le prend sur recommandation de la Chambre.

Est-ce ainsi que cela fonctionne?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est une situation un peu particulière. Il s'agit en fait d'un règlement pris par la Chambre en vertu de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, mais dans l'exercice de ses privilèges, afin de régir la présence des députés à la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

Le gouverneur en conseil n'a aucun rôle à jouer à cet égard.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

À mon avis, le gouverneur en conseil n'a aucun rôle à jouer à cet égard, car cela reviendrait à examiner la façon dont la Chambre gère la présence des députés lors de ses travaux. C'est intimement lié aux délibérations de la Chambre et à leur déroulement.

La situation est inhabituelle, mais ce n'est pas quelque chose que le Bureau de régie interne peut faire par l'intermédiaire de règlements administratifs. Cela relèverait de la Chambre. La question aurait pu être soulevée par la Chambre, par un député, mais dans ces circonstances, étant donné le rôle du Comité dans l'étude de cette question par le passé, le Bureau de régie interne a jugé bon que le Comité ait l'occasion d'étudier la question et d'en faire rapport.

(1140)

Le président:

C'est assez...

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai seulement un petit commentaire.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous devons envoyer un rapport à la Chambre en espérant que rien ne se passera à moins que la Chambre n'entérine le rapport.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Merci.

Toutes mes excuses, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Il n'y a pas de souci.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Reid, je tiens à vous faire savoir que la semaine dernière, j'ai brièvement présidé le Comité des ressources naturelles et que la méthode Simms est maintenant répandue dans la nature.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est devenu viral.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'en ai fait un précédent dans d'autres comités.

Merci de cette information. C'est très utile.

En ce qui concerne le processus, parce que je suis spécialiste du processus, comme vous le savez, avons-nous un rapport qui pourrait être utile?

Le président:

Le rapport sera le suivant: nous indiquons que le Comité approuve le projet de loi et qu'il en recommande l'adoption à la Chambre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce cas, je suppose que je vais proposer d'aller de l'avant.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, la parole est à vous.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai une autre question.

Vous avez parlé d'une comparaison avec d'autres parlements dans le monde.

Pouvez-vous parler de certaines de vos recherches?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Bien sûr. Nous avons étudié les assemblées législatives des provinces.

Certaines d'entre elles ne font aucune déduction à l'allocation des députés. Donc, il n'y a pas de déduction en cas d'absence. D'autres ont des catégories ouvertes, comme le congé du Président, l'avis au Président, les circonstances familiales extraordinaires ou les situations personnelles. Ces situations pourraient être couvertes. Certaines sont explicites — congé de maternité, congé parental —, et d'autres non.

Au Royaume-Uni, il n'y a pas de déductions, mais on a mis en place un système de vote par procuration dans le cadre d'un projet pilote. L'incidence sur la Chambre elle-même a aussi été prise en compte.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le vote par procuration est accordé aux députés qui sont en congé, et seulement dans ces circonstances.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est un système prévu dans un règlement temporaire adopté par la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni.

Comme indiqué dans la lettre du Comité, il s'agit d'une question que le Comité voudra peut-être examiner dans un rapport ultérieur.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

À votre avis, est-ce la façon la plus simple de régler la question, plutôt que de prévoir de nombreuses autres exceptions, des circonstances familiales, puis...?

Mon instinct me dit que si nous adoptions d'autres catégories, la plupart des gens qui se trouveraient dans une situation particulière trouveraient tout de même un moyen de la justifier pour une certaine catégorie.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Eh bien, c'est ce qui a été proposé au Bureau de régie interne pour que ce soit conforme à l'esprit de l'article 59.1 de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada ainsi qu'à la recommandation du Comité. Je pense que c'est quelque chose qui permettrait d'atteindre cet objectif.

Mme Robyn Daigle:

J'ajouterais simplement qu'avec les 21 jours, on peut supposer que ce serait suffisant pour que certains des autres types de cas se règlent d'eux-mêmes.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid, vouliez-vous être sur la liste même si vous ne portez pas le nœud papillon, en ce jour du nœud papillon?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait un dangereux précédent.

Je pense que la réponse, c'est que je tentais de répondre à M. de Burgh Graham.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense que notre personnel s'affaire à régler tout cela.

Le président:

Je ne sais pas pourquoi on ne leur demande pas de se présenter à la table.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait beaucoup plus efficace.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires avant que nous décidions?

D'accord. Nous allons voter sur le rapport qui vous a été remis.

Allez-vous voter ou faire des commentaires, madame Moore?

Mme Christine Moore:

Je parlerai après. Je suis pour, mais je proposerai autre chose après.

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons voter.

C'est adopté. Il s'agit d'un rapport à la Chambre.

Madame Moore, la parole est à vous.

Mme Christine Moore:

Je ne sais pas s'il est possible d'inclure dans notre rapport que nous devrions envisager plus tard une modification à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada pour inclure un député dont la partenaire est enceinte. Nous ne pouvons pas le faire pour l'instant, mais nous pourrions peut-être examiner la question plus tard. Cela pourrait aussi être le ministre responsable.

(1145)

Le président:

Pour la période de quatre semaines précédant la date de l'accouchement? Vous parlez de cette disposition-là?

Mme Christine Moore:

Oui.

Le président:

Le Comité pourrait en discuter maintenant ou à un autre moment. C'est aux membres de décider. Seulement 21 jours de présence sont requis. Donc, vous ne parlez que d'environ neuf jours en un mois, ce qui, dans les rares cas où...

M. Philippe Dufresne:

La règle des 21 jours s'applique à tous, quelle qu'en soit la raison. Ils peuvent donc être utilisés à cette fin.

Le président:

Cela ne poserait pas problème souvent.

Mme Christine Moore:

D'accord; très bien.

Le président:

Très bien.

Pendant que vous êtes ici, sur une question connexe, dans le message du Bureau de régie interne, on indique aussi que nous pourrions discuter, un moment donné, de procuration ou de jumelage. J'ai demandé à notre analyste de préparer un rapport, parce que depuis que nous avons rejeté l'idée, l'Angleterre a adopté une disposition à cet égard. J'ai demandé au greffier de nous donner, plus tard, des renseignements sur les mesures prises par l'Angleterre et d'autres, à titre d'information.

Madame Kusie, la parole est à vous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Je ne pense pas que nous ayons voté, nous, les trois conservateurs présents. Je pense que nous étions en quelque sorte... Je pense que nous voulions avoir plus de renseignements à ce sujet, outre les questions de Mme Moore sur la prolongation pour ceux dont la partenaire attend un enfant, afin de pouvoir étudier la question.

C'est une considération, comme l'a dit mon collègue, M. Nater. C'est généralement assez évident dans la plupart des cas ici, à la Chambre, lorsqu'une députée est enceinte, mais pour la personne dont la partenaire attend un enfant, nous ne le voyons pas toujours, et nous ne pouvons le prévoir. Ces personnes méritent certainement qu'on reconnaisse leur situation et qu'on les accommode. Nous pensons que cela mérite d'être étudié. Nous pourrions approfondir la question. C'est ce que nous voulions faire, à mon avis.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous l'ajouterons à l'ordre du jour d'une prochaine réunion pour en discuter. Voulez-vous plutôt en discuter...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous pensions qu'on pourrait peut-être approfondir la question maintenant. Cela pourrait être une bonne chose à faire.

Mme Christine Moore:

C'est possible de simplement ajouter une phrase au rapport pour dire que la ministre devrait étudier la question et peut-être envisager de modifier la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Peut-être que nous pourrions renvoyer le document et demander à la ministre d'étudier la question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que c'est un bon point. Nous pourrions même aller plus loin et trouver plus de renseignements concernant les personnes qui se sont déjà retrouvées en pareille situation. On a indiqué que certaines assemblées législatives provinciales avaient adopté différents formats, un des deux modèles, et peut-être qu'il vaudrait la peine de prendre le temps de les évaluer aussi.

Mme Christine Moore:

Dans le rapport, peut-être que nous pourrions ajouter les différentes questions auxquelles nous voulons revenir plus tard. Il faudra reparler du vote par procuration et de la question de la conjointe qui est enceinte. Nous pourrions peut-être ajouter au rapport les éléments que nous renvoyons à une étude ultérieure.

Le président:

Je ne pense pas que nous changions le rapport. Nous l'avons rédigé, mais nous allons suivre le conseil de Mme Kusie et étudier la question plus à fond. Nous ferons des recherches à ce sujet et en discuterons.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, je pense que nous devrions le faire.

Le président:

Vous ne voulez pas nécessairement discuter de...

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je suppose que pour faire un peu la lumière sur la question de prolonger les absences et d'avoir... Ma conjointe a accouché deux fois au cours de la présente législature, et je cherche à trouver des exemples où il serait nécessaire de prolonger l'absence au-delà des 21 jours actuellement prévus et à déterminer s'il existe une situation dans laquelle les députés ont besoin de le faire. Je ne sais pas si nous cherchons une solution pour laquelle il n'y a pas de problème.

(1150)

Le président:

Le Parlement siège-t-il parfois plus de 21 jours d'affilée?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vingt et un jours de séance représentent déjà plus d'un mois.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que M. Bittle a dit qu'il pourrait s'agir d'une solution en quête d'un problème. Je veux voir s'il y a vraiment un problème, car c'est quelque chose que le Bureau de régie interne a recommandé. Je serais curieux de me pencher sur ces raisons.

L'exemple que j'utilise pour moi-même est que je n'aurais pas eu besoin de ces dispositions. Je n'ai manqué que quatre ou cinq jours à chaque accouchement. Dans les deux cas, ce n'était jamais avant la naissance. Je peux voir une situation où — surtout pour les députés qui habitent très loin d'Ottawa — à l'approche de la date d'accouchement, on souhaite être présents au moment de l'accouchement. Ils pourraient prendre une semaine environ avant le fait pour s'assurer d'être chez eux dans leur circonscription. Je sais qu'à l'approche de la naissance de mes deux enfants au cours de la présente législature, je connaissais bien l'horaire des vols à toutes les heures de la journée pour m'assurer de pouvoir rentrer rapidement chez moi au besoin.

Je pense qu'il vaut la peine de discuter au moins de la question de savoir si c'est problématique vu qu'il s'agit d'une recommandation du Bureau de régie interne. Je serais curieux de savoir où ils veulent en venir et ce qui a motivé cette décision. Je n'ai pas lu la transcription ou les notes de la réunion du Bureau de régie interne, alors je n'arrive pas à comprendre leur raisonnement, mais je pense qu'il vaut la peine d'en discuter, à tout le moins.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, êtes-vous sur la liste? Madame Moore?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je le suis, mais j'ai oublié pourquoi.

Le président:

Madame Moore, la parole est à vous. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore:

Dans le fond, voici le problème que je vois en ce qui concerne les 21 jours.

Prenons l'exemple d'un député qui habite très loin d'Ottawa et qui aurait à voyager pendant 24 heures pour assister à l'accouchement de sa conjointe. Il pourrait rater complètement l'accouchement. On peut donc s'attendre à ce qu'il veuille rester près de sa conjointe à partir de la 36e semaine de grossesse.

Si, par malheur, la 36e semaine de grossesse tombe pendant une période de séance de la Chambre, les 21 jours peuvent servir à couvrir le temps où le député reste à la maison, sauf qu'il ne lui en restera plus aucun pour tous les autres motifs de congé. Prenons le cas d'un député qui a déjà dû s'absenter pendant deux semaines pour d'autres raisons qui ne sont pas couvertes, par exemple pour assister aux funérailles de son père ou de sa mère. S'il veut prendre un autre congé pour rester auprès de sa femme qui est près d'accoucher, les 21 jours risquent de ne pas être suffisants.

C'est davantage dans une telle situation que cela pourrait arriver. Ce n'est peut-être pas arrivé dans le passé, mais cela pourrait arriver. [Traduction]

Le président:

Que diriez-vous qu'on laisse au Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure le soin de trancher cette question quand elle sera à nouveau soulevée, le cas échéant?

Mme Christine Moore:

En ce qui concerne le vote par procuration, peut-être que vous devriez envisager de tenir une réunion avec les services technologiques pour déterminer ce qu'on pourrait utiliser — le type de technologie — ou comment on pourrait procéder. D'un point de vue technique, je pense qu'il pourrait être intéressant de tenir une réunion avec les services technologiques.[Français]

Cela pourrait permettre au Comité de juger si cette option est raisonnable et fiable du point de vue de la sécurité. Cela pourrait aussi être inscrit à l'ordre du jour d'une réunion subséquente. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, j'ai simplement suggéré la possibilité de nous en remettre au Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure...

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

Le président:

... pour soulever à nouveau ces deux points, la procuration et les quatre semaines anticipées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions remettre l'étude de ces questions à la réunion PROC 43.

Le président:

Le sous-comité pourra en décider.

D'accord, nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes pour passer à huis clos afin de couvrir les prochains points à l'ordre du jour.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard proc 16180 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on June 06, 2019

2019-05-30 PROC 158

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 158th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(a)(iii) and the motion adopted on May 16, we are studying several proposed changes to the Standing Orders.

Today we are pleased to be joined by Frank Baylis, member of Parliament for Pierrefonds—Dollard, as well as Elizabeth May, member of Parliament for Saanich—Gulf Islands and leader of the Green Party of Canada. Thank you both for being here.

I would just remind members that we've set some precedents on this committee, new ideas. One is the Simms protocol, and another one for today's meeting is that, probably for the first time ever, we're giving the witnesses unlimited time as opposed to a 10-minute limit.

We're going to start with Mr. Baylis and then go to Ms. May.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

First of all, I'd like to express my gratitude to PROC for agreeing to look at this motion, to Mr. Christopherson for presenting it and to everybody on PROC who had an open mind. I understand that agreement isn't to say we accept it or we agree with everything in the motion, but that you would have a serious look at it. I'm very grateful for this opportunity. Thank you.

Two things brought me to bring this motion forward. Since I arrived here, I was shocked, and I think anybody I spoke to was shocked, at the lack of civility and decorum in the House and lack of productive debate. I don't believe any one party or one person is to blame. I think we all share a little of the responsibility.

I spent the first year or two asking people, talking to people, trying to cajole people to be a little politer or have better debates. And I realized at some point that it was no longer paying. It was better to have confrontation than collaboration. That had happened over time. There had been changes and things had progressed away from how we used to run the place to a point where now it was better to have confrontation.

We probably need to look at our Standing Orders. This phenomenon of consolidation of power into the centre is not new. It's not unique to Canada. Professors will tell you what they call the third wave of autocratization, as we heard at one of our committees with Ms. Kusie.

In any system, democracy is always in a constant battle with autocracy. As we see right now in the world, many great nations are moving toward autocracy. We can see this in one place where a leader has named himself dictator for life. We see another great nation where a leader is a dictator in all but name because they have the pretenses of elections, and we see another nation where another leader is constantly attacking the very foundations of their democracy. And we see that in so many countries.

Here in Canada we don't have a leader who's done this, but over time power has been centralized, seeped inward towards what we call the PMO or the OLO. With this pulling together of power, many things have happened. The role of the MP has been slightly modified. The role of the Speaker has been drastically changed. Citizens have been disenfranchised.

People often say to me that when we brought the cameras in, that's when it all got bad. I don't believe that for a second. I looked at many ideas. One of the ideas was if we had cameras on everybody all the time, I bet you it would change overnight. It was explained that can't be done because we have certain rules that the camera can only be on a person speaking.

I looked at how they run the audiovisuals. That rule is such that bad behaviour can go unpunished because it's never seen.

For example, the Senate moved and they now have the right to show all camera angles. They said it makes for much better, much more interesting TV, but it's also going to have an impact. One of my ideas was let's put cameras everywhere and if someone is behaving badly all the time, everybody will know that. I didn't use that idea here. Why? Because we're in politics and we look at the art of the possible.

I read all the ideas that had been presented over the last dozen years or so. Then I chewed on it; I thought about it and then I tried to say what is doable. I considered low-hanging fruit. I thought this motion was very simple.

Many people have said to me this is way too big, it's way too much. I don't think it is, and I'm going to challenge all of you in PROC to look at it from that perspective.

Serendipitously, you have just done a study on second chambers, and the majority of this motion turns around the implementation of a second chamber, so I don't think we need to do another study on a second chamber. I believe you have done a good study. If you've done a study on a second chamber, you can now ask yourselves whether you should try or not bother trying it. Or you could say, “Let's do another study again next Parliament”, but if you're going to do another study again next Parliament, I would challenge you to ask what questions you didn't ask during this Parliament, in your study right now. I believe we're ready to try something.

What is it that I'm proposing and how did I come to these packages? There are three areas where I want to take power that's been centralized over time and just decentralize it. At this point, I want to say none of these ideas are new, except for one part of one idea, and that's the one I'm getting the most push-back on. That was my idea, so I'm pretty sure it won't make the cut. Having said that, none of these ideas are mine, number one.

Number two, I didn't write most of this motion.

Here I'd like to stop to say thank you to the people who did do it. First of all, I'd like to thank Scott Reid, and especially his assistant, Dennis Laurie. They did the brunt of the work writing the whole section on a second chamber.

I'd like to thank Michael Chong, because he collaborated a lot and he's very knowledgeable on issues of decorum, powers of the Speaker, and how things changed over time.

I'd like to thank Daniel Blaikie and Murray Rankin, because they took the ideas that had been proposed by Kennedy Stewart, who had taken these ideas from the United Kingdom about how to give citizens the right to bring matters of debate into Parliament.

I'd like to thank David Graham, because he looked at ideas for how to make it fairer for people who are doing private members' business to have their chance, because sometimes you may have people who have been elected three times and they never get up, but someone who was elected once gets up. There's a core unfairness in how we do private members' business, and he had ideas about that, which I incorporated.

I'd like to thank Scott Simms, because he studied how the United Kingdom has strengthened its committees and brought those ideas into the package.

Obviously, I'd like to thank Elizabeth May, because as everybody knows, she has been a strong voice for strengthening Parliament overall, for changing—or even, I would say, honouring—our rules. She'll speak a bit about that idea in a moment.

I thank all those people. I also recognize that none of those ideas are new; none of them have not been debated; none of them have not been studied. To hear the argument that it's too much, I tell you now, if you're going to make a second chamber today, tomorrow, in a year or 10 years from now, it'll be a big motion. You can't get around that. You have to write it.

What's inside the actual motion now? The first thing is the Speaker, powers to the Speaker. The Speaker has the name “Speaker” for a simple reason: in every Westminster system, including ours, up until the 1980s and early 1990s, the Speaker has decided who speaks. It seems pretty reasonable. He's not called “the reader of the list”; he's called the Speaker, because his job is to decide who speaks. It's that simple. I'd like him to do his job. I think we all want him to do his job. If he does his job, two things will happen: decorum will shoot up, because he'll have a carrot and a stick to let people who are behaving speak and let people who are not behaving not speak. The second thing is that debate will improve. This is how it's done in every other Westminster system. We are unique: We are wrong.

I spoke at length with other Speakers—I spoke at length with our longest-serving Speaker, Mr. Peter Milliken—and they all agree that this is a perversion of the system and it should be put back to the way it was.

How did it happen? There was a lady, Madam Jeanne Sauvé, who couldn't see very far, and she asked for help with people at a distance who might be getting up to speak, so they were giving her a few names.

(1110)



There was another speaker—I won't give his name—who was not that interested in doing his job, and said, “Can you just make it easier for me? Just put them in alphabetical order, or whatever, and just....”

Then, over time, the whips decided we had more power, and the whips got stricter with the lists, until something happened in the previous government where a ruling had to be made about what the powers of the whips, the House leadership and the Speaker really were.

We need to put it back the way it was, and the way it should be. That's number one.

The second thing is powers to the citizens—a simple idea. Bruce Stanton mentioned this when he came and spoke about the second chamber. In the United Kingdom, if they reach the threshold of 100,000 signatures on a petition, it gets debated in their second chamber. Of note is that these are the debates that everybody watches. This is what people care about. This is what their citizens watch.

We took that number of 100,000 and made it 25% higher by population so that we don't have any spurious debates, and we ensured that anything that meets that threshold would still come to PROC to be looked at, to make sure it's not some silly thing, or something that's already been debated. As long as it hasn't, it would get a take-note debate in the second chamber.

That would re-engage our citizens to say, “Hey, I have a say in what goes on. It's not just once every four years that you ask me my opinion. If I really care about, say, the salmon run in B.C., and it's really important to me, and I have 70,000 other Canadians who say it's really important, then I want to hear Parliament express themselves.” They'll get a chance to do it. They'll engage themselves. Just like what happened in the United Kingdom, they'll be more engaged in their democracy.

The third thing is powers to the members of Parliament.

Again, over time there has been a degradation of power and a degradation of the role of the member of Parliament, who is a representative of her constituents. When she is elected and has to come to Ottawa, she is elected under a banner. We have to always answer the balance. I'm elected as an NDP/Liberal/Conservative/Green Party, but I'm also elected because I'm Frank Baylis, or Elizabeth May or Linda Lapointe. I have to balance what my citizens want with what I think, sometimes, is morally right, and with what the party wants.

But I am not elected as a trained seal, to simply do each and every time exactly what the party demands. If so, then they don't need any of us. We have no role to play, if that is our role. If I say that all I do in my job is to vote 100% the way the party votes, every single time, well, great, they don't actually need me. They'll just take the percentages, do the math and get out of the way.

We have a role to play. We have a role to play sometimes if enough of our constituents.... And this has happened to me. A lot of them wrote to me on a certain subject, and I said, “Okay, I have to listen to them. I'm not going to vote with my party on something here, because I'm going to represent them.”

This is our role. We need to give our members of Parliament their power back. How do we do that?

We looked, first of all, at our ability to bring private members' bills forward. Right now, it's fundamentally unfair. If you're lucky, you may get one. If you're unlucky, you won't get one. If you're half lucky, like me, you might get your first hour, which you might blow; but that's another question.

There might a lesson there. I haven't found it yet.

Voices: Oh, oh!

(1115)

The Chair:

Are you proposing a change to the Standing Orders?

Mr. Frank Baylis:

My point here is that every person elected within reason, for whom we can see how to do it, should get the chance to get heard. That's just being fair.

Then, if we have a shortened schedule, like let's say, for example, not everybody gets up because there is a minority government and we don't have a four-year cycle, the people who were last and didn't get up should be brought over. It's a very simple thing, a simple idea, but it makes total sense. Someone I talked to who was elected three times and not once had a private member's bill would get one. That just seems fair.

The second thing is the way our system is supposed to work is if it sounds like a good idea we vote to say let it go to committee and let's listen to what the committee has to say. We bring in experts and experts are supposed to tell us you should change this, you should fix that, this is why you brought us in here. Then we report back to Parliament to vote yes or no for these changes.

Committees should be reporting to Parliament, not to the whips, not to the ministers. The idea here is, as was done in the United Kingdom, to say let the committee chairs be elected by Parliament. It's a simple idea.

This set of changes gives the Speaker back his powers, gives the citizens some powers, and gives the MPs some powers, all within reason. How do we do this? This is where the second chamber comes in. I want to point out here do not think for an instance that we are charging or leading the way if we put a second chamber in place. For 25 years they've had it in Australia, and for 20 years they've had it in the United Kingdom. We are not ahead of the curve here. We're not taking a risk here. The whole idea is to implement a second chamber.

Then I took an idea...as Bruce Stanton said, and he said even here in the committee, when they brought these in there was skepticism. People said, you know, I'm not sure. So what they did is they said, let's give it a two-year trial period. That's written right into the motion, try it for two years. If you don't like it take it away, undo everything, nothing ventured nothing gained.

Lastly, if we bring in a second chamber we have to look at the schedule. I looked at the schedule and said, okay, when will it sit? What happens if there are votes going on? What happens if there's something that has to be decided? It doesn't get decided in the second chamber.

The second chamber is there to ensure that private members' business gets done, that members of Parliament get more chances to speak, and with the changes to the Speaker and the Speaker's powers to ensure that the whips don't take that over as well, so that the private members' business gets heard. That's why the package is 19 pages. That's it. It's a simple package. It's nothing in there other than one little thing, which I put in and I'm going to take out, because what I've been doing as well is I've been asking a great many people and I've gotten a lot of great suggestions, little things I didn't think of. For example, when I changed the schedule I said we're going to do away with overnight voting. We don't need it. We should start treating ourselves like human beings, not like animals. If you did what we do to ourselves to an animal, someone would be knocking on your door for animal cruelty. It's true.

Then I spoke to one member of Parliament and he said to me, Frank, the most important thing I think I do as an MP is vote. To vote is my most important thing. You've changed the rules so that there would be no voting overnight, but still from 9:00 to 10:30 straight I've got to go to the bathroom. They said to me that in the labour codes of our country you can't make someone work for four hours without giving them a break. I thought, you know, I didn't think of that. That's an example of a change that I'm going to suggest here, and I brought other ones like that. People have said to me, “Have you thought of this, have you thought of that?” It's a small change, but it's a totally reasonable change and it matches just our labour codes. On this entire package, I've heard from many people who say, too much, too big, too late in the game.

Prior to coming to Ottawa I ran a business and people worked from 9:00 to 5:00. They didn't stop at 4:15 and say the day's over. There's time for you to look at this. You've already done most of the looking at it. You've already done the big part of it, which is the second chamber.

(1120)



I think there's time. I'm asking you—and this is my ask—to go through it. Do your job. Rip it apart in whatever way you can, but give the members of Parliament and the House of Commons the right and the opportunity to vote on it.

PROC's here to look at these procedures, to study them. I don't think it's hard to say we trust our own members of Parliament enough to express themselves on this package. If they don't like it, that's their right. If they do like it, that's their right. It's how we run ourselves, how we choose to run ourselves.

I say to this too. If you have a family, if you have young kids, if you have a health problem and you don't look at this seriously, don't complain. Don't go home and say to your wife or your husband or your kids, “Well, you know what? I didn't vote for it because my leadership didn't want me to”, or, “You know, that's just the way it is. You don't understand Parliament, but let me tell you, we're going to be voting all night, but don't worry about my illness.” I've talked to a lot of people who had serious illnesses who were aggravated by that overnight voting. It's unacceptable.

It's unacceptable. We are elected here as members of Parliament. We have a say. We are not trained seals. I'm asking for this: any change that's reasonable, anything you see in error in here.... I am not perfect, but I did not write most of it. I do not want to take credit where it's not due. I'm truly asking you, please, before the Parliament's done, to send it up and let our members, our fellow colleagues, express themselves.

With that, I'm going to say thank you very much for hearing me out. I'm very appreciative of that.

I'll pass it over to Elizabeth.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

This is such a really wonderful opportunity to have a chance to talk to PROC about some of these fundamental issues. I'm deeply grateful for the chance, and I thank Frank, and there are a lot of you around the table who also helped in working on these proposals.

Frank asked me to speak to this one specific piece, which is around the Speaker and questions and identifying who speaks, and the roles of the whips. I'm just going to back up by saying that I find, now that I'm on the brink of turning 65, that I'm sometimes cursed with a really good memory. I also have the benefit of oral history from MPs who have passed on, so forgive me for being somewhat of a storyteller. Thinking about the continuity of our Parliament and actually knowing how it used to be is something that vanishes very quickly. A newly elected MP has no idea that it wasn't always like this.

I have the great good fortune to have worked in the Mulroney administration—I wasn't a member of the party that was in power at the time—as a senior policy adviser to the minister of the environment. I was frequently in the House and working with the Speaker of the House at the time, John Fraser, to try to see if there was a way to get all-party support for something that we were doing. On a marvellous day, we got unanimous consent through to save the lower third of what was then called the Queen Charlotte Islands but is now Gwaii Haanas National Park in Haida Gwaii.

I have a bit of institutional memory, and I find myself often feeling that I wish I didn't have such a good memory; it would make it easier to tolerate what's going on.

In any case, I also want to share with you a reminiscence about Flora MacDonald, because I adored Flora MacDonald. She was my role model and hero. For those of you who don't know, she was the Progressive Conservative member for the Kingston area and served in the government of Joe Clark briefly. She would never have tolerated heckling around her, that's for sure. I said to her, Flora, do you think so-and-so is doing a good job as Speaker? She said, “Ha. We haven't had a good Speaker since Lucien Lamoureux.” I went back to figure out who Lucien Lamoureux was and when he was Speaker. It was from 1966 to 1974.

So someone who had an even better memory than mine, but who has now passed on, had that view. When you go back and look, you realize that the history of our Parliament and our democracy in terms of the role of MPs and what we do when we come here to serve is one of a continual progression...I wouldn't say that it's democracy versus autocracy, but there is an element of that, of diminishing the role of the member of Parliament at the cost of the rise in the power of organized political parties. Organized political parties, and particularly back rooms, decide that what we actually do in Parliament is just a precursor to when we go back to fighting with each other in election campaigns, so the business of Parliament gets overtaken by the party whips or backroom party people in a way that didn't happen in the 1980s, for example.

Now, focusing on the issue of the Speaker's authority and how we can enhance decorum, improve the quality of debate and restore more power to the individual MP, we can serve a lot of goals all at once by observing a rule that we already have. I want to cover this off very quickly because I know that we all want to talk about these things.

When Lucien Lamoureux was Speaker, the Speaker's control over who was recognized in the House was the Speaker's alone. He also had powers—as the Speakers continue to have, but they have fallen into disuse—and members who ignored the Speaker in the way that happens on a daily basis now would have been named, expelled from the chamber and not allowed to return for a period of time, at the Speaker's discretion—a week, a couple of months, six months.

The Speaker was also massively impartial. One of the things for which Lucien Lamoureux is known is that he tried to follow the British practice. He had been elected as a Conservative. Once he became Speaker of the House, which wasn't then a position that we voted for, he ran for re-election as an Independent. The Liberals and the Progressive Conservatives stood down and did not run against him as an Independent. The NDP did run against him. He was re-elected as an Independent. The next time he ran as an Independent, all the parties ran against him. Over time, he gave up on his effort to replicate what happens in the U.K.: the Speaker should be 100% impartial.

As for what happened under Jeanne Sauvé, who was Speaker from 1980 to 1984, she did have eyesight issues. It was legitimate.

(1125)



She couldn't quite see. You're supposed to catch the Speaker's eye. That's our rule confirmed by former speaker Andrew Scheer in his ruling on Mark Warawa's question of personal privilege when he was denied his S.O. 31. We know that the rule is that you catch the Speaker's eye. According to former speaker Scheer, there is no party list that must be observed by the Speaker. You just catch the Speaker's eye. You couldn't catch Jeanne Sauvé's eye. She said she couldn't see everybody well enough to know who was standing at the far ends of the chamber. She asked for the list from a party whip just to make it easier for her. That has now become so entrenched that the Speakers don't want to go back to just saying that they don't have to follow the party list.

What happens in the U.K.? John Bercow is Speaker in the U.K. I'm sure we've all watched him for great entertainment. He receives a request to ask a question in writing from a member of Parliament earlier in the day. He decides what questions will be asked. You're not quite catching the Speaker's eye—of course the Parliament of Westminster has over 600 MPs; they can't fit in the space—but you know ahead of time you're going to be able to ask your question. It's the Speaker's call.

Where does power reside, then? With the Speaker. Are you going to thwart the Speaker, break protocol, break the rules or act contemptuously towards the Speaker or the decorum of the House? No. The power in that House resides with the Speaker.

I think we all want to talk about these issues and how you feel about the proposals that we've put together as a group. In closing, I just want to thank some other people who have informed this process. I was very much educated by and enjoyed working with Brent Rathgeber when he was the Conservative from Edmonton—St. Albert. He really stood on these principles of defending the rights of an individual member of Parliament in this place. There's also Kennedy Stewart, who took the lead working with a number of us. I won't list everybody in the book; proceeds go to Samara. Of course, Scott and Michael Chong were involved. We all played some role in turning Parliament inside out.

Out of that book effort—just to share this because this is on the record and Canadians may be interested to know—we actually have an all-party democracy caucus. The thing that brings us together is how we make progress, despite our party affiliations, to reduce the power that political parties have over individual MPs. I think it's a fascinating project. Anita Vandenbeld is the current chair of the democracy caucus, but we are all-party, so anybody who wants to join who hasn't already.... We're already thinking about what we do after the next election, depending on who's re-elected and who isn't. How do we keep this going?

Anyway, PROC is the official committee of democracy, our rules and how we conduct ourselves in this place. I want to thank you for this opportunity to make a public plea in this committee for you to encourage the Speaker to not be afraid of the wrath of the party whip. The Speaker could just decide to say, “I don't need your lists; I can see everyone just fine from where I'm sitting; I know everybody by name and I will decide as Speaker”, or we could go to the U.K. practice of submitting the questions to the Speaker in advance and seeing which ones the Speaker chooses.

It would certainly serve multiple goals of improving the independence and the power of individual members of Parliament. It would certainly improve decorum in the House and it would serve the very salutary purpose of rebalancing through no change in the rules because these are our rules. Respecting our rules, I'd love to add “don't read speeches”, but that's not part of our current package.

I'd love to dig into this and see what we can do in the remaining days of this session of Parliament to advance the noble effort of respecting the fact that no one gets elected to be a member of Parliament in this country if they haven't already done considerable work of service in their community. I think all of us are people who care about our communities and have a head on our shoulders. We really don't need to check our brains at the door the minute we become a member of Parliament because of the power of the back room.

Thank you.

(1130)

The Chair:

Thank you very much to both of you.

We will go on to questions now.

When you're talking about frustration, you'd be even more frustrated.... In one of our previous studies, we had a witness from another Parliament. I think it might have been New Zealand or some place where there's proportional rep. At times, people don't even stand up to vote; the party whip just stands up and votes for the entire party.

We'll go on to Linda.

(1135)

[Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Baylis and Ms. May. I am pleased to have you with us.

Mr. Baylis, I listened to you carefully. You mentioned the reasons that prompted you to introduce this motion. In your opinion, members of Parliament are being discourteous and misbehaving by focusing on confrontation rather than co-operation. It is still a substantial motion. You pointed out that it was not perfect, but that it should still be voted on. You said a number of interesting things.

In your opinion, what would be the benefits of eliminating lists of members submitted to the Speaker by parties? How would this encourage members of Parliament to behave in a co-operative rather than confrontational manner in the House? This is the first point of the motion; the motion deals with five main topics. Ms. May talked about the lists of members, Jeanne Sauvé's arrival and all that. What makes you think that eliminating lists will promote co-operation and prevent confrontation?

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you, Ms. Lapointe. That's an excellent question.

I would add this: not only will this promote courteous behaviour, but it will also increase productivity. Those will be two positive effects.

I would like to point out one more thing about bad behaviour or lack of respect during the oral question period. According to all the surveys, this is the main reason why women do not run for office. They do not understand all the work of members of Parliament and do not see what we do in committee. They look at the oral question period with horror and say to themselves that they will never be MPs.

I brought my two daughters to a session of the House, and I was ashamed. One of them has no qualms about telling me when she doesn't like something. She was shocked to see what was happening. I personally never get into this game. You know me well enough to know that, Ms. Lapointe. Never in my life would I behave like that, because I always keep in mind that one of my daughters or my father might be watching me from the gallery.

How will this encourage members of Parliament to be courteous? There is a whole series of things.

We talked about co-operation, as opposed to confrontation.

First, inappropriate behaviour will not help members to obtain the consideration of the Speaker of the House, as the Speaker will prevent them from speaking. If I am a new member of Parliament and I start yelling in the House, the Speaker will ask me to calm down and I will not have the right to speak. That is one thing.

Second, if I'm always yelling at members, they will not support any private member's motion or bill I may have introduced; they will not even talk to me. I will not be able to co-operate with them. If I want their help, it's best if I stop yelling.

Third, we will be freer to support measures by following our conscience, without fear of being punished.

A whole series of things can encourage members of Parliament to act with courtesy.

Members are not stupid; when they come to the House, they see that it's more advantageous to yell than to co-operate, and that is why they do it.

We must consider the whole package that will allow us to change that.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

I understood what Ms. May said about the lists of members.

Ms. May or Mr. Baylis, have you spoken to the former Speakers of the House about this issue? Ms. May, you said that one of them was more or less interested in doing this work. Did you talk about the lists with people who were there at the time?

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Yes. I have taken note of all the witnesses who have made presentations on this issue to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs over the past 10 years. I went to see them or tried to contact them. I spoke to former Speakers of the House, including Peter Milliken. I don't remember the exact number of years, but I think he held the position for 13 years. All the people I spoke to unanimously said that these powers must be given back to the Speaker of the House.

(1140)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I would like to add that, across the Commonwealth, Canada is the only country in the world where the Speaker of the House has lost his or her own power to political parties. We are the only country in this situation.

I also spoke to John Fraser, who was Speaker of the House. He also used lists of members. Jeanne Sauvé—

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I'm sorry to interrupt, but I have another question.

In terms of the election of the Speaker and the election of committee chairs, what makes you think that an amendment to the Standing Orders will reduce confrontation and encourage co-operation? What will it really bring? Forgive me for having some doubts about that.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Am I allowed to ask Scott Simms to answer that question?

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I know we'll certainly be asking him to appear, but you're the one here today.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Very well.

It started in the United Kingdom, with a few committees, and things worked very well. They thought it was fantastic and decided to apply it to all committees.

There is always the issue of checks and balances. Previously, all decisions were centralized and made by one person. You were following exactly what that person was doing, otherwise it was over for you. Now members can follow the committee chair. I wouldn't say that this offers protection, but there are some checks and balances, even in the case of a minister. If a minister introduces a bill, the committee studies it, but is not forced to support the minister. It is freer to propose and discuss changes. There will be a discussion between the minister and the committee chair. Once again, this promotes dialogue and co-operation. We're no longer in a take-it-or-leave-it situation.

With each item I'm proposing, I keep trying to bring people together. We will have to co-operate and discuss, not only among ourselves, but with all members of Parliament. [English]

The Chair:

Peter Milliken was in for 10 years and 124 days.

Mr. Nater.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

[Inaudible-Editor] was the longest serving.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Longest serving, not longest talking.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Baylis and Ms. May, for joining us.

You made the comments about oral history. Being a first-time MP, I've benefited from different people around the precinct who have been able to share stories of the past. I do want to point out one person. He would hate me for having his name recorded here in Hansard, but it's John Holtby. Mr. Holtby has served half a century in parliamentary democracy. He was chief of staff in the McGrath committee, co-editor of Beauchesne's, first clerk assistant of the Ontario legislature. He's a fascinating gentleman with massive experience.

The comment about catching the Speaker's eye and Ms. Sauvé is one story he frequently shared with me and his concerns with that. I wanted to acknowledge Mr. Holtby. He recently retired from this place and I wanted to put that on the record. He is also fond of sharing his story of his beloved dog, Oliver, who met Governor General Sauvé at Rideau Hall, jumped into the fountain at Rideau Hall, and then jumped into the hands of Governor General Sauvé soaking wet. He's fond of that story. I wanted to acknowledge him in that way, and it seemed like a logical point to do that.

I did want to start questions with Mr. Baylis.

This is a slightly touchy subject. You were scheduled to speak on Monday. I say this with some delicacy. We all make mistakes. I make mistakes on a daily basis, I'm sure. Private members' business is debated on Mondays at 11:00 a.m. This has been the process since we were first elected in this place.

I'm giving you the opportunity to address that. This is a large motion, 19 pages. It causes me concern about how the entire process has been thought out, how carefully weighted and considered these ideas were, when you did miss the time of private members' business on the day that you were scheduled.

(1145)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

What happened—and this is 100% my fault, not my staff's or anybody else's—was that I made a mistake in my Google calendar. I had been trading my positions to try to move up so I would get a second hour, which I didn't have, but I was trying to get a second hour. At one point I was in the evening schedule, and that had gotten locked in my head somehow.

I'm normally here anyway, and it wouldn't have mattered, but on this particular day, because I had worked so long on this motion, I got up, and I practised my speech a couple of times, and I said to myself, “You know what I'm going to do?”, which I've never done before, “I'm going to go to the gym first and work off a bit of my nervous energy, have a sauna and really come out relaxed and ready to deliver my speech this evening.”

Lo and behold, when I came out, my phone.... My relaxed period lasted about 30 seconds, and I found that, yes, as you point out, on Mondays we do it at 11 a.m., and so that error is 100% mine. Then I tried to be philosophical about it, and I thought that maybe wasn't right for me to push forward with it on my own anyway. Maybe God was talking to me or something like that, I don't know. Maybe it should come properly through PROC. That was my hope, anyway, but I was really running two horses, and one was hoping that PROC would study it and bring it up, because I do believe that is the proper way to do it and give people the vote.

I also was really committed to getting on the record and hoping to find a second hour to have people at least vote on it, much as I've asked here. The fault is 100% mine that I did not do that. I apologized to everybody. It's unacceptable; there's no excuse for it. It wouldn't have mattered any other day because I'd be here anyway, and if I had forgotten, they would have just called me to say, “Get your butt over here.” I don't know why these things coalesce, but that's how it happened.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you. I appreciate that explanation.

You touched on running two horses, both in the House and here at committee. Is it your intention now to pursue it solely in this committee, or are you planning to bring it back to the House?

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I had been trading up to get my first hour and then hoping that someone would literally give me the second hour so that I would be able to bring it to a vote, but this was a work in motion, and through these processes and changes, that's how my mix-up in the timing came about. I did not have any commitment to a second hour yet. I was in discussions with some people, but it's a big ask. I'm basically asking that they not speak and let me speak a second time.

It would truly be my preferred route anyway to have this committee say to our fellow colleagues, “This is something you can vote on”. I always was hoping for this anyway.

Mr. John Nater:

It kind of begs the question. Would it have been preferable in the first place that your motion in the House be a motion for PROC to study? I don't want anyone to go on a fool's errand by working on one thing and being pre-empted by something else. You discussed, I think in iPolitics, that you were considering amendments within the House.

It's always challenging when we're going down two separate routes. We're studying one thing, and the House is studying something different but on a similar topic. I'm just wondering if it was preferable in the first place to have done it through PROC rather than trying to do these two separate—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If there was time, absolutely. The issue we've always had.... Even now I've not actually lost my hour; I'm just going to have it some time at the end of June or the beginning of July, when it won't happen.

My problem was always that I wouldn't have enough time. Why won't I have enough time? Because the luck of the draw when I got my PMB was such that it came at the end of the schedule. At least I got an hour. This is why, if these changes were in place, I wouldn't have had to do that.

How I came to the number of hours necessary was by calculating the last 20 years of, on average, how many PMBs got closure, which is either voted for, abandoned or defeated, and I made the calculation backwards.

Absolutely, about having time, you're right. That's the right way to do it, but I was racing against time.

(1150)

Mr. John Nater:

We did have a private conversation in the House of Commons. I'm not going to reveal that, but we did talk about the idea of consensus, so I would offer you this opportunity. What's your viewpoint on the consensus of changes to the Standing Orders? It's something that I think we should be—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I think Ms. Kusie proposed at the beginning, after Mr. Christopherson brought this forward, that it should be unanimous. I mentioned to her that I was very grateful. I would point out, by the way, that I had discussions with people like David de Burgh Graham. He was of the mindset that the way we should do it is as a group. We should try—I know it's very hard—to take the politics out of this. We should try to say that we're doing the right things for the right reasons, and we should respect the issues such as how we treat ourselves.

We ask a lot, when we come up here, of our families, for example, but some things we're doing for no reason. We should respect them and say, “Can we make ourselves better so that we are better for our citizens?” We would get to see our citizens and our families more, and we would be working properly.

All those things led me to this process, but why I had to have two horses.... As you well know, I came in, and I spoke to every single one of you individually, and I asked the same thing: Please look at it. I was very grateful, and I think that's the first thing I stated here. I'm very, very grateful that you agreed to do so, and I agree with your approach.

Mr. John Nater:

Great.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you both for being here. I appreciate it.

I want to pick up on the last item about the private member's bill, just to close that circle.

I was one of those who was kind of taken aback when I heard. I'll be straight up that my first thought was that they got to him. They got to him. The election's coming and they said to him if he wants to even see anything from the central campaign, he'd better be dropping this PDQ. We were having a little discussion in the backbenches, where I reside, and we weren't sure how to read it.

I have to say that I was very pleased when my motion, M-170, was up last night. It speaks to the issue of the executive—the cabinet—still controlling the hiring process for Parliament's agents and recognizes that Parliament is supreme. Government is not Parliament; government is secondary to Parliament. I'm sure it didn't escape anybody's notice that I didn't even lose it by a close one. I lost it by a country mile.

That speaks to a couple of things. The first thing it speaks to is the fact that both our presenters stood up and voted for it. In particular, Frank, I turned to my colleagues the second you did that and said that this puts paid to the issue of whether this was a mistake or whether they got to him because nobody's that stupid to cave on the one hand and then stand up and get himself in trouble on the other.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Can I say thank you?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

I have absolutely no doubt that that's the case. Again, I had the benefit of speaking to you before, a number of months ago. I was impressed by the fact that you were using your private member's spot to improve Parliament.

It was one thing for me to do it, but I'm not running for re-election. If I were running for re-election, make no mistake, I would have been looking at how I could use it to make sure that I was messaging to my constituents that I have their backs, that I'd be a good choice to stay here for them. However, you are going to run again, and you gave that up because you believed in the importance of this.

Mr. Chair, it also speaks to the challenge.

I have to tell you, colleagues, that I thought—and it's not the fact that it was mine—the notion of our taking back control was pretty straightforward and was motherhood. Do you know what stopped it? The very power structure that I was trying to break through.

I wasn't surprised. It just indicated that I failed. To me, that also means that there will likely, and I would hope—hope springs eternal—be another colleague who runs and comes into Parliament, or a veteran who has been around and has a vested interest in this, who would grab it and run with it. I have to tell you that, in terms of the low-lying fruit for democratic reform, taking back control of what is already ours is as easy as it gets. We don't need to pass a new law. We don't need to amend the Constitution. All we have to do is say, “Yes, we will take control of this process.” That's it.

I lost. I got maybe five—I'm being generous to myself—non-New Democrats on the main motion, which really wasn't even as effective as the amendment because it spoke to the vacancy that's now created by the untimely death of Michael Ferguson. I'll be honest: I thought I could play on the idea that if I couldn't play to the respect that members should have for themselves as parliamentarians, maybe I could play to their heartstrings—that we could do this in Michael's memory. There are documents that aren't that old—from over the last few years—that have been signed by every agent of Parliament saying, “Take back control, Parliament, please.”

And yet, the power structure that.... The reason that I'm tying this in, Mr. Chair—I know that you know why—is that the challenge of what's in front of my colleagues is enormous. If anybody has any doubt, just look at the vote result last night. I don't believe that there's a single parliamentarian in the House who gets up every day and says, “How can I give away my relevancy today just a bit more?” In fact, I think most parliamentarians get up thinking, “I'm going to try to make the world a better place. I'll start by making sure that Parliament is a better place.”

However, the power of the current whip-House leader structure is such that I couldn't break through except for a very small handful of courageous members who felt strongly enough that they were going to take their stand.

I was very pleased to move the motion. Like you, I appreciate the gratitude of my colleagues for allowing this to be aired and talked about. Oftentimes what happens with these kinds of things is that they don't even see the light of day. You snuff it out early so that you don't have to deal with it. It's now getting an airing. Again, I'm an optimist. I do believe that, over time, we'll get there.

This is a major challenge. If the motherhood issue of hiring our own agents isn't enough to do it, I'm not sure about the good arguments that are here. It's going to take a political shift of enough parliamentarians who don't just want to talk the talk of reform, but are actually prepared to put their asses on the line to defend that principle. That's easier said then done—just go look at the recorded vote last night.

I see Madam May squirming in her seat, anxious to join in this discussion. I would just invite her thoughts. I've done a good job of saying how difficult it is, so it's not so much to do that, but to maybe affirm that it exists.

Give us your thoughts, Elizabeth, on why you remain optimistic. You're running again, and I think there's a really good chance that you're going to come back.

(1155)

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, hey, I don't have to be as partisan as I used to be. That's the beauty of having those things unleashed. You get the chains off. You can state what you actually think. I think you have a very good chance of getting re-elected. How radical.

Given that, what are your thoughts on all this, at the tail end of this Parliament as we head into the next one?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Number one, I just want to say that even though we may not get this motion.... I mean, with getting those first-hour and second-hour debates, I'm fighting to try to find a second hour for getting Bill S-203 through, for example—which is widely supported—on ending the keeping of whales in captivity.

The goal of what we all worked on here, as far as I was concerned, was to get a good chance at procedure and House affairs committee to talk about it and work on it and to try to do it together. I'm happy about that. That's one reason for optimism: We're talking about it here.

The other is that Canadians want it, but I don't think.... When I'm knocking on doors, people don't say, how is it that the Speaker doesn't have control over who gets recognized in question period? It doesn't come up. They do say, how can you stand it when people all around you are yelling all the time and banging on their desks? That doesn't look right. I know we've all had this experience of school groups coming in, and they took the kids out because they they didn't want them to see that. They were horrified.

We want high voter turnout. We want a healthy democracy. We want respect for the institution. We would also rather that people didn't think the fact that we are politicians means we were a subclass of human beings, somewhere below—I don't know—the paparazzi. I mean, I was a lawyer and now I'm a politician. It just doesn't get worse. Where do I go from here?

It would be nice to feel we have done something that our voters wanted us to do to elevate the discourse and make them proud of what they see, as Canadians, happening in Parliament.

We know the mechanics that can make that happen, so I think if we work for our constituents in the way that they would like to have the House be more respectful, have our work be more productive.... And for me, the single biggest issue—and there are a number of places that aren't even in this motion where I'd love to see the change—is to reduce the power of the back room over the conduct of what happens on the floor.

(1200)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair. Thanks everybody.

Thank you to our guests.

I will go on a bit of a rant.

Obviously I'll put my bias on the table. I'm co-author or partial author of this particular motion. I hope to get a chance to talk about my aspect of it. I know it was brought up earlier.

I'll answer your question when I get to there I guess, Madame Lapointe.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I will ask the question again.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I don't doubt it.

I want to talk about catching the Speaker's eye. This goes to Ms. May's thing, but before I get to a question, there comes a point when it becomes so obvious that something is wrong here that it behooves us to actually look at this and say, “Come on; this is a bit much.”

I spoke about this when we had a press conference about what Frank is doing here.

Frank, thank you for being here.

I'll give you one example in the day, which is called S.O. 31s. We all call them S.O. 31s. People come me and they say, “Oh, you mean members' statements.” No, I mean party statements, because that's what they are, right?

Now, I have no problem with any recognized party or non-recognized party stating it's where we're all in the House. Obviously the party mechanism is really what controls the functions of government and it's how we relate to each other. It's even a part of my proposal on committee chairs. But for 15 minutes of a day, can we not have the freedom by which I get to say, “I represent my constituents, and here's what I have to say”? The retort to that from the office is this, “But we balance it: we do this, we do that”, and I can say congratulations, but that's not the point.

The point is this. If Ms. Kusie wants to do a one-minute statement about carbon pricing and anti-government, then that should be her choice. If somebody comes to Ms. Kusie and says, “I want you to do this nasty little bit of work toward the government”, and she says no, that slot goes to Mr. Nater or Mr. Reid or Mr. Chong or whoever's next. That's not a member's statement, is it? Not at all. Ms. Kusie has every right to stand up and hammer the government in a one-minute statement. She also has the right to talk about a local charity in her riding, and so on and so forth.

That's 15 minutes of the day. This goes to what Ms. May said about the proliferation of control from a centre that exists within this Parliament more so than any other parliament around. We can't even get 15 minutes.

In saying that, let me go back to catching the Speaker's eye. There's also another side to that as well. Let's say you catch the Speaker's eye for members' statements, question period, government debates. There comes a point where there's going to be a little bit of chaos in there because you do have this dilatory motion that a member be now heard. You've heard that before. We've had motions where, when someone gets up to speak, someone gets up, moves a motion that someone else be heard, the whole thing shuts down, we vote. It's a delay tactic, but it happens.

If we had the entire day, do you think that would happen?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

“Let the member now be heard”, “that this House do now adjourn”—dilatory motions of that type are not the individual member's choice. Again, it's the party whips deciding, “This is warfare. This is not Parliament. We want to get the other guy. We want to catch them off guard. We want to waste time, mess up the government's agenda.”

I would say another piece that isn't in this package but I would like to mention is not in our rules—actually, it's against our rules—is to read a speech in the House. People read speeches in the House.

By the way, we're the only country in the Commonwealth that has this notion of “recognized party”. In other parliaments in other democracies, you don't have to have a minimum number of seats, but never mind. Because of that rule that was created in 1963, which was about giving larger parties money that they voted for themselves and smaller parties wouldn't get the money, over time these other rights accrued to those who were in parties with more than 12 seats.

It means I'm not in the House leaders' meetings, so this is massive speculation. What I assume is going on in the House leaders' meetings, when the House doesn't function very well and we are able to spend five or six hours debating Canada-Latin friendship week or month—what was it we were debating for five hours one night, not long ago? It was Canada-Latin friendship month. People were down to reflecting on how much they like sombreros and tacos. They had nothing to say. But there was no time for bills that really matter. The House leaders in the back rooms are able to say, “Well, we can put up any number of speakers, but we won't tell you.” If we didn't have that, if we updated our rules that you had to actually speak without notes, only people super-knowledgeable on that issue would take the chance to rise to speak and try to fill 10 minutes.

To your question if it would happen, as long as the party whips, in the back rooms of political parties, are able to dictate what happens on the floor of the House, it would still happen, but it's a modest step toward recreating our real system. Sir John A. Macdonald used to refer to the members of his own caucus as loose fish. He never knew where they were going to go. Our fish are really nailed down—sorry about that, Scott.

(1205)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, it's an endangered species sort of thing.

I agree with many aspects of it. I'm just trying to find.... I don't want drastic changes as part of this; I want modest changes. My goodness, the example I gave at the top of my question is just a modest one.

I also agree with you on the speech part. I believe that in other chambers, the members take it upon themselves to heckle people if they start reading from notes exclusively. I've always said, if you can't stand in the House of Commons and talk without notes for 10 minutes, you shouldn't be there, but that's a whole other issue.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

None.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh, I thought you said “some”.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Catch his eye.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Can I propose a motion by unanimous consent to give Scott some more time? I'm sure what he's going to do next will be really good.

The Chair:

Okay, go ahead, Scott.

Mr. Scott Simms:

There's no pressure now, whatsoever.

Mr. Baylis, where does the next Parliament start, with what you've presented here? What do you want to see the next Parliament do, in changing the Standing Orders?

That's a question for both of you.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I have a quick aside. I did read up on, “You're not allowed to read.” You can have notes. I decided not to put it in here. I do think we should go there, but we need to bring all of our colleagues along. They're not going to be trained to do that.

I want to challenge one other thing, before I answer your question, Scott. Our constituents care. Don't doubt that for a second. I challenge you, please: If any of you knock on doors over the next couple of weekends, ask, “Do you care about civility and the carrying on in the House of Commons? Does it matter to you?”

I had constituents talk to me about it, and I mentioned to them that I'm working on something. I name-dropped Michael Chong, because he's very well known and respected. I said to a guy, “Mr. Chong is collaborating with me,” and he was two thumbs up on that.

What do I hope comes out of it? I started, I have not deviated and as Mr. Nater asked me, I'm really hoping that you choose to bring this up to Parliament now, so that we start the next Parliament with these changes in place.

Written into the motion is a two-year trial period for the second chamber. If, after two years, you don't like it, and you want to change or get rid of it, you can unwind everything. It's very simple. I don't think we're asking for a lot. I know you say it's a big motion, but this turns around a second chamber. If you pull the second chamber out, the private member...has to go away and the citizens' rights for take-note debates have to be taken away, because there's no time in the main hall. All these things get unwound.

I will still go around and talk to any colleague who will talk to me about it. I'm asking you, as PROC, to let your colleagues pronounce themselves on it. If they say, “No, it's not good enough,” or, “We don't like it,” that's their right.

I don't think PROC should say, “We're denying the right of colleagues to speak.” I think your job is to say, “This is no good, and we're going to radically change it, or just update or tweak it.” Whatever you choose to do, that's your right, but I don't think it's your right to say, “Ah, you know what, we're just going to stop it from going up, because we don't want it.”

That's my hope, and I'm not entertaining other thoughts, honestly, Scott.

(1210)

Ms. Elizabeth May:

My hope, and this is a big hope, is that we can actually discuss this in an election campaign, so that after the election, when people are back, we are able to say to whoever is running for Speaker—and I assume our current Speaker will run again—that we have public support for you to, for instance, tell the whips that you don't need their lists. You heard it in the election campaign.

I know it's a very obscure topic, but I think the notion of, “Would you like to see us work to create greater decorum, when we get back to Parliament?”.... Political parties after an election, should go away. Let the people who are elected do their work. It will never happen completely, but it used to be a lot more like that. Even in the eighties, it was a lot more like that. In the nineties, it was a lot more like that. It's the hyper-partisanship of day-to-day life in Parliament that is an obstacle to progress, on a wide range of issues.

For me, it's about a lot more than decorum, but the decorum is a part of how we have a Parliament that functions in all of our interests, instead of in the interests of inventing a fake wedge issue for use later.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I've been urging flexibility on these things, but did you want me to try to be seven or five minutes? What are we aiming for here?

The Chair:

You are on a five. I've been a little flexible, and all the speakers have gone over a bit.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. I will try to honour tradition as opposed to making up for everybody else.

Some things being suggested I think are utopian. I want to spend a minute on reading speeches. I know that's not part of the proposal.

Tonight is the night of my private member's motion. I've been waiting for almost four years. It's very exciting. And I have 15 minutes to talk about why January 29 should be a national day of solidarity with victims of anti-religious violence.

I happen to have my speaking notes here, which I will be reading word for word. You will notice there's a little 9 and a little 10. That indicates it takes me a minute to get from there to there. I have it timed so it's exactly long enough. If I don't use a script, I won't get all the information I packed in there. I can't do it extemporaneously, even though I am a big fan of extemporaneous talk when available. I even have little notes here because it turns out that when I redid it I forgot to edit some material and my numbers were off and I've got to go back and... I'm not going to keep on adjusting, partly because I read more slowly in French than in English.

A mechanistic application of the no-reading rule would have some consequences that I don't think those who advocate it had in mind. That's a concern to me.

I know S.O. 31s didn't originate here; they originated with Scott, but I think we've identified a real problem.

Right now as I understand it, the theory, which has been abused, is that whoever catches the Speaker's eye will give an S.O. 31, but it has come to be divided up fairly among the parties, and the parties have used it to assign to us. I only know my own party, but I think every party has adopted a process of saying the last couple are reserved for party business, and the rest are on some kind of rotation. I just checked with my staff. I am up on our rotation for an S.O. 31 on the Tuesday after next.

I think the only way we could make sure the S.O.31s are 100% about private members' business would be to make it a formal rotation; private members' bills are a lottery. You get put in there, and then after that you go through it. It's systematized that way in the Standing Orders.

Now that I've thought it through, your instigation to try putting that in I think is not a bad idea. It would resolve the problem. I think the reason my side puts in partisan attacks, and your side puts in partisan attacks and the NDP does too in all fairness is we're in an arms race with each other. If you create a situation where we're all disarmed, I think the problem would go away and return to its original purpose.

I wanted to get that one on the record.

(1215)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I want to reflect on two of your points.

I read the rules on reading, and they are quite flexible. They would allow for the first person speaking to...it does take into account situations like yours or the ministers'. They understand if the minister is giving a budget, he's not going to say he's doing this.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's a good example. A Speech from the Throne would be even better.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

But those things are written in the rules. It's not as if you're not reading at all. The rules are quite clear. Let's say you have to quote someone, wondering what that quote was, or if you're presenting a bill or a motion you would have the right to read it. They understand that.

I want to make the reading part clear even though it's misunderstood. That's why I wanted to clarify.

The second thing on the S.O. 31 is the last two reserved.... As I said, there has been degradation. It was understood the Speaker does whatever. The last couple were reserved because things come up, and the parties need to have it. Over time, that got taken over. Then this concept of rotation did happen for a while, at least in the Liberal Party, where you had four.... You knew months ahead that this was the day, get ready. It's the nature of the beast that over time things get centralized, and at some point we have to hit the reset button and say we're pushing it back out.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I know that, with S.O. 31s, people do actually trade, to the extent that they are still on a rotation—the trend for some of them has been to go toward being on a rotation. They're also tradeable, at least in my caucus. I traded my last one with Larry Miller, who wanted to honour someone who was in the gallery on the day. I had an S.O. 31 and he didn't, and that's why I'm going in his former slot.

The question I had is this. It's for both of you, and I think you may have different answers. On the issue of consensus, how much consensus ought there be before the Standing Order change arises—not just the package we have here but any significant standing order? I'd be interested in knowing how much consensus you think is appropriate—whether it's unanimous consent being required or whether it is something equivalent to, let's say, the consent of all of the recognized parties, which are not quite the same thing, or whether we should just go on a straight majority vote.

Just tell me where you are in there. There may be other options I haven't mentioned.

The Chair:

Do you mean in committee?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No. I mean in the House.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Let me, first of all, say that your contributions to democracy in this place, Scott, are much appreciated by me personally. I love working with you. You are one of the people who have their eye on the ball and have a historical framework for understanding what we need to do to protect parliamentary democracy, and I appreciate that.

I love the fact that Scott's idea around S.O. 31s is that, as you mulled it over, there is a solution—we make it a lottery, they all come in order and then everyone gets their own S.O. 31. I just wanted to say that was great.

I did propose changes to the Standing Orders in response to those put forward by the government House leader back at the beginning of this session of Parliament. It was frustrating for me that, having put a ton of work into something....

I happened to be travelling to the U.K. for another reason. I spent some time in their Parliament, met with my colleague, the only member of the Green Party in the Parliament of Westminster, and found out how they did things there. It was fascinating, really fascinating, not just reading the book but asking what it's like.

I would have loved to have had some response from anyone to the work I put into my 26 pages of suggestions for how we could improve our Standing Orders.

How do we actually do it? I think it would be best to have real consensus, which is very hard to get to. To stop the parties from having the control to stop us from reducing the power of the parties is the problem. So where is the consensus? Where does it really lie? Is the consent with the individual member? Or is the consent with the party brass that really does not want to relinquish control over how much they're able to dictate the way bills go through the House? It's more than just when we get to speak. The ultimate thing is the control, a lack of productivity in the effort to create kabuki theatre—and that's a credit to Michael Chong for this particular phrase about what we do in Parliament.

I would love to see, maybe, an anonymous ballot, some really good workshops at the beginning of Parliament. As I said, we have newly elected people. They have no idea what these issues mean day to day. The reason we're all here is that Frank came in and said, “This isn't good. I don't like this. I'd like to see it changed.” So maybe workshopping it through with individual MPs, and then testing for consensus, which is.... The Green Party makes decisions by consensus. We wouldn't usually put it to a secret ballot, but given the role of political parties overseeing everything the other—

(1220)

Mr. Scott Reid:

How do you determine—

The Chair:

You're four minutes over time already.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Sorry.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I just want to ask.... This is actually really important.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You say you determine things by consensus, but there is some point at which you say, “Aha, we've got consensus.” And just a tad before, you didn't have it yet. What is that point?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

The secret ballot is what I was suggesting as a way to test for consensus in this situation. What we do in the Green Party is say, “Okay, we've fought this thing out. People were in vicious and violent disagreement. Are we now at a point where we've heard each other enough that we have to compromise here?” Then we test for consensus. Do we have consensus, which is basically unanimous?

If we don't have consensus, then we ask people, “Would you stand aside to allow the consensus to be accepted?” Then generally speaking, when people realize that the hill they want to die on is occupied by only themselves, they'll generally say, “I will stand aside”, and this is accepted by consensus.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you. That helps a lot to understand how that works.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'd like to retain the right to read, and I'll tell you why: I think a lot better in writing than I do extemporaneously. It's a quirk of my character, which I have quite a few of. The issue for me is not so much if you have notes or speeches; it's who writes them. Do you know in advance that you're going to give a speech? Do you know what you're going to say? Are you really giving your own speech? I've given some speeches that I've written myself and that people have had a good chuckle at. I've put a lot of effort into them. I've also been provided speeches where it was, “Here, can you speak in three minutes?”, and I've had to ask what I'd be talking about.

That's what's wrong with the system. That's where the breakage is. Do you agree with that?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Yes, but the easiest way to make sure that people are delivering their own words is if they're not reading a speech. I would go to Scott's point about the timing. For instance, in the British Parliament, the Speaker is more flexible about the time, but we have these hard and fast rules around timing. It's 30 seconds to ask your question in question period. That's not what happens in the Parliament of the U.K. So a bit more flexibility on the part of the Speaker would allow for someone to actually speak extemporaneously.

The only time I ever read anything in the House was when I did a very detailed point of order, with loads of quotes, in the 41st Parliament to try to stop Bill C-38, that it wasn't truly an omnibus bill. The only time I read something is when I have a detailed legalistic point. I have a little clock in front of me. When I start speaking for my 30 seconds and then it gets to 20 seconds, I know I have to wrap. When I start speaking for 10 minutes and it gets to nine minutes, I know I have to wrap. So I don't ever read; I'm lucky that way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Nine minutes down and not nine minutes left, correct?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Nine minutes gone and one minute left.

Your question is a good one, David, about there being a way to verify that you wrote the speech yourself and didn't just get it handed to you. I mean, when I hear members reading speeches and mispronouncing words, I know they're not familiar with the concept and that's why it's coming out all funny like that.

(1225)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're right.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Could I add a little bit there, David?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

This touches on two points here. We talked about how this thing should be done when we get a new Parliament. I would not have been in a position, newly elected, to espouse these things. I had to read the rules, but I also had to experience the rules. People say it should be redone in a new Parliament. I actually think it should be done now. I would again make the argument that because we're seasoned now, we can make that change.

When it comes to reading, I did it once. I'm a team player, and I was new and didn't understand. Someone asked me, “Will you do this?” I said, “Yes, I'm part of the team.” I read it—once, and once only. When I realized what I had done, I said I would never do it again, because it's not right. I am speaking as a member of Parliament, and if I'm going on record, I should at least be putting my words down and I should at least know what I'm talking about. I had to experience that to realize that it's not right.

Michael Chong once related to me a very funny anecdote about how one time in their party, by error, the exact same speech was read twice—verbatim.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Well, I put it in my point of order to the Speaker at the time—this was with regard to why Bill C-38 wasn't in proper form—that I'm there all the time, and I heard whole paragraphs read verbatim the same. This is embarrassing for MPs, but these weren't just any old MPs; these were ministers. It wasn't deliberate plagiarism, but someone in the back room was just trying to spit out the speeches. I was hearing the same text over and over and over again from people who obviously had not written it themselves and didn't really know what they were talking about but were prepared to read a speech.

I think Parliament is about talking.[Translation]

We are here to say what we mean in our own words.[English]

You're not supposed to read somebody else's work.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right.

I'm running out of time already—

Ms. Elizabeth May: Sorry, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: That's okay. It's always fascinating. I wish we had many more hours.

I would propose that what we need is a 15-minute slot where you speak as long as you feel like up to 10 minutes, and all the remaining time goes to Qs and As. If you want to have a conversation, and have a two-minute speech and 13 minutes of Qs and As, go for it. That's what I would prefer. I'd much rather have a conversation than a speech.

But I don't want to belabour that point. I'm already probably past my time, and I just started my list.

The first time I met you, Elizabeth, was in 2008 at the Guelph Mercury community editorial board. One of the first questions I asked you was about whether our politics work because of or in spite of the parties. Your answer was very clear and very direct: It's very much in spite of the parties. So how do we fix anything when at the core, no candidate exists in any election if the party leader doesn't approve them and then has complete control over the membership at committee and all sorts of things? At the end of the day, there's always that power at the end. We can change everything we want, but we still have to do what they want if we want to come back at the next election.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Michael Chong's original version of the Reform Act that he brought forward was to take that away. We have to remember that the rule that the party leader must sign the nomination papers was an unintended consequence of saying that the parties' names would be on the ballot along with the candidates' names. Between 1867 and the seventies, we didn't have the parties' names on the ballots, just the candidates' names.

My party, if you want to know how do it, has passed a bylaw that I'm not allowed—no leader of the Green Party is allowed, it's not particular to just me—to refuse or decline to sign a nomination paper without the support of two-thirds of the elected federal council. With regard to the misuse of the leader's power to pull nominations from really good candidates and to stick in somebody they like better, I would just say that reducing that power is something that we could do legislatively. Michael Chong did try.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'd be remiss if I didn’t say that the only person who has actually followed the time here has been Madame Lapointe.

The Chair:

She didn’t actually follow the time either.

We have time for one more question and I’ll give it to Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. In my opinion, I have complied with the seven minutes allotted to me. Everything always starts with following the rules. I must say that I personally like it when everyone follows the rules we set up. [English]

The Chair:

Sorry, you had seven minutes and 56 seconds. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Mr. Baylis, earlier, you talked about the reasons why women do not get involved in politics. Everyone has given their opinion on a number of things. However, I am a woman and I have spoken to many women who were considering becoming involved in politics. You said that women do not want to get involved because of the behaviour in the House, but that is not the main reason. Women think more about the quality of life they will lose on a personal level. However, if you ask a man whether he would like to get involved in politics, he will not think twice about it. If you tell him he'll do a good job, he'll go for it without hesitation. Women think much more about the consequences. Most of the time, they are the backbone of the family. That's more the sort of thing the women I have talked to told me.

In terms of decorum, the purpose of the motion is to establish co-operation rather than confrontation. That's what you said at the outset. Frankly, it's a very good objective. Yes, we need to work together, and yes, we have things to do.

That being said, it is a very substantial motion, which is divided into a number of separate items. If you ask me to vote for or against the motion at the end of the session, I would point out to you that we will not have had time to debate it and check whether it will accomplish exactly what it is supposed to accomplish. I'm not convinced of that yet. I will have some questions for my colleagues about that when they are here. For the time being, the motion is too substantial for us to make a decision.

I would like to know how you think we could proceed with such a lengthy motion.

I do not agree with the motion in its entirety. However, I am very much in favour of certain aspects. No, it is not normal to have voting marathons. No, it's not appropriate. It's not healthy. No one can impose that on anyone. However, our rules allow opposition parties to do so.

Everyone here at present was elected on the basis of an election platform. In principle, you, Frank Baylis, represent the riding of Pierrefonds—Dollard, but you were elected under the Liberal banner. The folks opposite are members of the opposition and have promised to do certain things. When you are in the House, you represent the people of Pierrefonds—Dollard, and I represent the people of Rivière—des—Mille—Îles, but under the Liberal banner. We cannot ignore that aspect when we are in the House. We promised to do things.

Could you comment on that?

(1230)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You make some very good points, Ms. Lapointe.

First, I want to clarify one thing in terms of women's involvement in politics. It goes without saying that we have women in our ranks. My comments were based on an article about a survey of all female provincial premiers across the country. That's where I got that statement from. They were asked about their experience and why so few women held those positions. Those women are the ones who said that the main obstacle to encouraging more women to get involved in politics was what they saw during the oral question period. I just wanted to share that with you.

Let me reiterate that this will also help productivity. I sincerely believe in courtesy and productivity.

Furthermore, you are saying that the motion is too substantial. However, if we are talking about making changes to create a parallel chamber, we will not be able to get around it being substantial. It's written down, and it's up to you to decide whether or not you want to proceed.

Finally, I completely agree with maintaining a balance with the electoral platform. We are elected as Liberal members of Parliament. As a Liberal member of Parliament, when the work was done, I asked for an appointment with our Prime Minister, who is also from the Liberal Party. I explained the process to him and asked him whether it could be a free vote. He did not answer 100% yes, considering that he had just been briefed on my entire proposal, but in his opinion, it met the criteria he had previously established to determine when it could be a free vote. It is not against our platform or the charter, and it is not a vote of confidence. That is what our Prime Minister told me.

So in terms of the balance that needs to be maintained, it is maintained in this case. I would ask you to check with our Prime Minister. [English]

The Chair:

Can we have your closing comment, Elizabeth?

(1235)

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you.

I want to say that the work Frank initiated here is already proving its worth in that we're having this conversation. I would love to encourage all of my colleagues to think more about it.

I hear what you're saying, Linda, but it's very important that we remember that the only job description that we have in law is in the Constitution of Canada. The Constitution of this country doesn't mention the existence of political parties. We are here to represent our constituents, and Westminster parliamentary democracy says that all members of Parliament are equal, and that the Prime Minister is basically first among equals, primus inter pares. We are not here as cogs in the machines of our respective political parties. To remedy this, to say the pendulum has gone too far in the direction of MPs being mere cogs in a larger machine that exists to attain power for no other purpose, I think we are in a good position as members of Parliament in 2019 to start making the change that says let's push the pendulum back even a bit, because it's gone too far.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you both for coming. You've obviously opened up a lot of topics that people have very interesting and passionate views on, as David Graham said—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've opened Pandora's box.

The Chair:

I was thinking that.

As David Graham said, we could discuss this for hours and hours, and I'm sure we'll discuss it more.

We're going to suspend for a few minutes while we change to the next section of the meeting.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 158e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Conformément au sous-alinéa 108(3)a)(iii) du Règlement et à la motion adoptée le 16 mai, nous étudions plusieurs modifications proposées au Règlement.

Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir aujourd’hui Frank Baylis, député de Pierrefonds—Dollard, ainsi qu’Elizabeth May, députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands et chef du Parti vert du Canada. Merci à vous deux d’être ici.

J’aimerais simplement rappeler aux députés que nous avons établi des précédents, adopté de nouvelles idées, dans ce comité. Le protocole Simms en est un exemple. De plus, pour la réunion d’aujourd’hui et probablement pour la première fois, nous supprimons la limite de 10 minutes pour donner aux témoins un temps de parole illimité.

Nous allons commencer par M. Baylis, puis nous passerons à Mme May.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Tout d’abord, j’aimerais exprimer ma gratitude au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour avoir accepté d’examiner cette motion, mais aussi à M. Christopherson pour l’avoir présentée et à tous les membres du Comité qui ont fait preuve d'ouverture d'esprit. Je comprends que cela ne signifie pas que vous acceptez la motion ou que vous êtes d’accord avec tout ce qui s'y trouve, mais cela montre que vous allez l'examiner sérieusement. Je suis très reconnaissant de cette occasion. Merci.

Deux choses m’ont amené à présenter cette motion. Depuis mon arrivée ici, j’ai été choqué et je crois que tous ceux à qui j’ai parlé l’ont été aussi, par le manque de courtoisie et de décorum à la Chambre et par l’absence de débat productif. Je ne crois pas qu’il faille blâmer un parti ou une personne en particulier. Je pense que nous avons tous notre part de responsabilité.

J’ai passé les deux premières années à poser des questions, à parler aux gens et à essayer de les cajoler pour qu’ils soient un peu plus polis ou pour que les débats soient meilleurs. Et je me suis rendu compte à un moment donné que cela ne payait plus. La confrontation était préférable à la collaboration. Cela s’est produit au fil du temps. Des changements s'étaient opérés et les choses avaient évolué. La façon dont nous gérions autrefois les choses a changé et nous sommes arrivés à un point où la confrontation est devenue préférable.

Notre Règlement est sans doute à revoir. Ce phénomène de concentration du pouvoir au centre n’est pas nouveau. Ce n’est pas propre au Canada. Les professeurs vous parleront de ce qu’ils appellent la troisième vague d’autocratisation, comme nous l’avons entendu lors de l’une de nos réunions avec Mme Kusie.

Dans tout système, la démocratie est toujours en lutte contre l’autocratie. Nous le voyons aujourd'hui partout dans le monde, de nombreux grands pays basculent vers l’autocratie. Nous le voyons dans un pays où un dirigeant s’est nommé dictateur à vie. Il y a un grand pays dans lequel le dirigeant a tout d'un dictateur sauf le nom parce qu’il prétend tenir des élections et nous voyons un autre pays dont le dirigeant s’attaque constamment aux fondements mêmes de sa démocratie. Nous le constatons dans de nombreux pays.

Ici, au Canada, aucun dirigeant n'a agi de cette manière, mais au fil du temps, le pouvoir a été centralisé, il a migré vers ce que nous appelons le Cabinet du premier ministre, le CPM ou vers le Bureau du chef de l'opposition, le BCO. Cette concentration des pouvoirs a eu un certain nombre de conséquences. Le rôle du député a été légèrement modifié. Le rôle du Président a été radicalement modifié. Les citoyens ont été privés de leurs droits.

Les gens me disent souvent que c’est lorsque nous avons fait entrer les caméras que les choses ont mal tourné. Je ne le crois pas un instant. J’ai réfléchi à de nombreuses idées. Je pense, par exemple, que si des caméras étaient braquées sur tout le monde en permanence, les choses changeraient du jour au lendemain. On m'a expliqué que cela ne pouvait pas se faire parce que nous avons certaines règles selon lesquelles la caméra ne peut filmer que la personne qui parle.

J’ai examiné la façon dont est géré l'audiovisuel. Cette règle est telle que les mauvais comportements peuvent rester impunis parce qu’on ne les voit jamais.

Par exemple, le Sénat a changé cette règle et il est désormais possible d'en montrer tous les angles de prise de vue. Il a été dit que cela avait beaucoup amélioré la télévision, qu’elle est beaucoup plus intéressante, mais cela aura aussi des effets. L’une de mes idées était d’installer des caméras partout, ainsi, si quelqu’un se comporte mal en permanence, tout le monde le saura. Je n’ai pas conservé cette idée ici. Pourquoi? Parce que la politique est l’art du possible.

J’ai lu toutes les idées qui ont été présentées au cours des 12 dernières années. Puis j’ai travaillé dessus, j’y ai réfléchi et j’ai essayé de voir ce qui était faisable. J'ai regardé ce qui était facile à mettre en œuvre. Je croyais que cette motion était très simple.

Un grand nombre de gens m’ont dit que c’était beaucoup trop important, que c’était beaucoup trop ambitieux. Je ne crois pas que ce soit le cas et je vais mettre ce comité au défi d’examiner la question sous cet angle.

Par un heureux hasard, vous venez de faire une étude sur les secondes chambres et l'essentiel de cette motion tourne autour de la mise en œuvre d’une seconde chambre. Je ne pense donc pas que nous ayons besoin de refaire une étude là-dessus. Je crois que vous avez fait du bon travail. Puisque vous avez fait une étude sur une seconde chambre, vous pouvez maintenant vous demander s'il conviendrait d'essayer ou non. Vous pourriez aussi dire: « Procédons à une autre étude au cours de la prochaine législature », mais si vous estimez devoir refaire une étude au cours de la prochaine législature, je vous mets au défi, dans le cadre de l'étude qui nous occupe aujourd'hui, de poser les questions restées en suspens. Je crois que nous sommes prêts à essayer quelque chose.

Quelles sont mes propositions et comment en suis-je arrivé à cet ensemble de mesures? Il y a trois domaines dans lesquels je veux m'attaquer au pouvoir qui a été centralisé au fil du temps et le décentraliser. Pour l’instant, je tiens à dire qu’aucune de ces idées n’est nouvelle, à l’exception d’un point, à l'encontre duquel se manifeste d'ailleurs le plus de résistance. C’était mon idée, alors je suis à peu près certain qu'elle ne sera pas retenue. À part cela, aucune de ces idées ne vient de moi.

Deuxièmement, la majeure partie de cette motion n'a pas été rédigée par mes soins.

J’aimerais m’arrêter ici pour remercier ceux qui l’ont fait. Tout d’abord, je voudrais remercier Scott Reid et surtout son adjoint, Dennis Laurie. Ils ont fait le gros du travail de rédaction de toute la section concernant une seconde chambre.

J’aimerais remercier Michael Chong, parce qu’il a beaucoup participé et qu’il connaît très bien les questions de décorum, de pouvoirs du Président et la façon dont les choses ont changé au fil du temps.

J’aimerais remercier Daniel Blaikie et Murray Rankin, parce qu’ils ont repris les idées qui avaient été proposées par Kennedy Stewart, qui s'est inspiré d'idées venant du Royaume-Uni sur la façon de donner aux citoyens le droit de porter des sujets au Parlement pour qu'ils y soient débattus.

J’aimerais remercier David Graham, parce qu’il a travaillé sur des idées visant à rendre les choses plus équitables pour ceux qui mènent des initiatives parlementaires. Il arrive parfois que des députés qui ont été élus trois fois ne se lèvent jamais, mais que quelqu’un qui a été élu une fois se lève. Il y a une injustice fondamentale dans la façon dont nous traitons les affaires émanant des députés et M. Graham avait des idées à ce sujet, que j’ai intégrées.

J’aimerais remercier Scott Simms, parce qu’il a étudié la façon dont le Royaume-Uni a renforcé ses comités et intégré ces idées à l’ensemble.

Évidemment, j’aimerais remercier Elizabeth May, parce que, comme chacun le sait, elle a été une voix forte pour renforcer le Parlement dans son ensemble et pour changer — ou même, je dirais, faire respecter — nos règles. Elle parlera un peu de cette idée dans un instant.

Je remercie tous ces gens. Je reconnais également qu’aucune de ces idées n’est nouvelle; elles ont toutes déjà été étudiées et débattues. À propos de l’argument selon lequel c’est trop ambitieux, j'affirme que si vous voulez créer une seconde chambre aujourd’hui, demain, dans un an ou dans 10 ans, ce sera une motion très ambitieuse. C'est inévitable. Il faut la rédiger.

Qu’y a-t-il dans la motion actuelle? Il s'agit tout d'abord du Président, des pouvoirs du Président. Il porte le titre de « Président » pour une raison bien simple: dans tous les systèmes de Westminster, y compris le nôtre, jusqu’aux années 1980 et au début des années 1990, c’est le Président qui décidait qui prenait la parole. Cela semble assez raisonnable. Il ne s’appelle pas « le lecteur de la liste »; il s’appelle le Président, parce que son travail consiste à décider qui a la parole. C’est aussi simple que cela. J’aimerais qu’il fasse son travail. Je pense que nous voulons tous qu’il fasse son travail. S’il fait son travail, deux choses vont se produire. D'abord le décorum va s’améliorer, parce qu’il aura une carotte et un bâton pour faire en sorte que seuls les gens qui se comportent correctement puissent avoir la parole. Ensuite, le débat s’améliorera. C’est ainsi que cela se passe dans tous les autres systèmes de Westminster. Nous sommes uniques: nous avons tort.

J’ai eu de longues conversations avec d’autres Présidents — j’ai parlé longuement avec M. Peter Milliken, qui a le plus d’ancienneté en qualité de Président — et ils s’entendent tous pour dire qu’il s’agit d’une perversion du système et que celui-ci devrait être rétabli dans son fonctionnement antérieur.

Comment cela s’est-il passé? Il y avait une dame, Mme Jeanne Sauvé, qui ne voyait pas très bien et elle a demandé de l’aide pour identifier les gens qui se levaient pour parler et qui se trouvaient loin d'elle, alors on lui a donné quelques noms.

(1110)



Il y a eu un autre Président — je ne donnerai pas son nom — qui n’était pas très intéressé à faire son travail et qui a dit: « Pouvez-vous simplement me faciliter les choses? Mettez-les simplement en ordre alphabétique, ou peu importe, et... »

Puis, avec le temps, les whips ont décidé qu'ils avaient plus de pouvoir et ils ont été plus stricts au sujet des listes, jusqu’à ce qu’il se passe quelque chose sous le gouvernement précédent et qu'il ait fallu rendre une décision sur les pouvoirs des whips, des leaders à la Chambre et du Président.

Nous devons rétablir les choses telles qu’elles étaient et telles qu’elles devraient être. C’est le premier point.

La seconde chose, ce sont les pouvoirs des citoyens — une idée simple. Bruce Stanton l’a mentionné lorsqu’il est venu parler de la seconde chambre. Au Royaume-Uni, si une pétition atteint le seuil des 100 000 signatures, elle fait l’objet d’un débat à la seconde chambre. Il est à noter que ce sont les débats que tout le monde regarde. C’est ce qui importe aux gens. C’est ce que les citoyens regardent là-bas.

Nous avons pris ce chiffre de 100 000 et l’avons augmenté de 25 % en fonction de la population, de sorte que nous n’ayons pas de débats fallacieux et nous avons veillé à ce que tout sujet qui atteindrait ce seuil soit soumis au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, pour nous assurer que ce n’est pas quelque chose de stupide, ou quelque chose qui a déjà été débattu. Si les conditions sont réunies, il y aura un débat exploratoire à la seconde chambre.

Cela permettrait de relancer la participation des citoyens s'ils se disaient: « J’ai mon mot à dire sur ce qui se passe. Ce n’est pas seulement tous les quatre ans que l'on me demande mon opinion. Si je me soucie vraiment de la migration du saumon en Colombie-Britannique, par exemple et que c’est vraiment important pour moi et que 70 000 autres Canadiens disent que c’est vraiment important, alors je veux que le Parlement s’exprime à ce sujet. » Les gens auront l’occasion de le faire. Ils vont participer. Tout comme ce qui s’est passé au Royaume-Uni, les citoyens seront plus engagés dans leur démocratie.

Troisièmement, il y a les pouvoirs des députés.

Encore une fois, au fil du temps, le pouvoir s’est dégradé et le rôle du député, qui représente ses électeurs, s’est dégradé. Lorsqu’il est élu et qu’il doit venir à Ottawa, il est élu sous une bannière. Nous devons toujours trouver le juste équilibre. Je suis élu comme député du NPD, du Parti libéral, du Parti conservateur ou du Parti vert, mais je suis aussi élu parce que je suis Frank Baylis, ou Elizabeth May ou Linda Lapointe. Je dois trouver un équilibre entre ce que veulent les citoyens que je représente, ce que je pense, parfois, être moralement juste, et ce que veut le parti.

Mais je ne suis pas élu pour faire le singe savant, pour à chaque fois faire exactement ce que le parti exige. Si c’est le cas, ils n’ont pas besoin de nous. Nous n’avons alors aucun rôle à jouer. Si tout ce que je fais dans mon travail, c’est voter à 100 % comme le parti, systématiquement, eh bien, c’est parfait, ils n’ont pas vraiment besoin de moi. Qu'ils se contentent de prendre les pourcentages, de faire les calculs et de débarrasser le plancher.

Nous avons un rôle à jouer. Nous avons parfois un rôle à jouer si un nombre suffisant de nos électeurs... Et cela m’est arrivé. Beaucoup d’entre eux m’ont écrit sur un certain sujet et je me suis dit: « D’accord, je dois les écouter. Je ne vais pas voter avec mon parti sur ce sujet, parce que je vais les représenter. »

C’est notre rôle. Nous devons redonner à nos députés leur pouvoir. Comment faire?

Nous avons tout d’abord examiné notre capacité de présenter des projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire. À l’heure actuelle, c’est fondamentalement injuste. Si vous avez de la chance, vous aurez peut-être la possibilité d'en proposer un. Si vous êtes malchanceux, vous ne pourrez pas. Si vous êtes à moitié chanceux, comme moi, vous aurez peut-être droit à votre première heure, que vous ficherez peut-être en l'air; mais c’est une autre question.

Il y a peut-être là une leçon à tirer. Je ne l’ai pas encore trouvée.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

(1115)

Le président:

Proposez-vous une modification au Règlement?

M. Frank Baylis:

Voilà où je veux en venir: chaque personne élue, dans les limites du raisonnable, lorsque c'est possible, devrait avoir la possibilité de se faire entendre. Il s’agit simplement d’être juste.

Alors, si nous avons un calendrier raccourci, disons, par exemple, que tout le monde n'a pas la possibilité de s'exprimer parce qu’il y a un gouvernement minoritaire et que nous n’avons pas un cycle de quatre ans, les gens qui étaient les derniers et qui ne se sont pas levés devraient être appelés. C’est une chose très simple, une idée simple, mais tout à fait logique. J’ai parlé à quelqu’un qui a été élu trois fois et qui n’a jamais présenté de projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire, dans ce cas il pourrait le faire. Cela me semble juste.

Ensuite, notre système est censé fonctionner de telle sorte que si cela semble être une bonne idée, nous votons pour renvoyer le projet de loi devant le Comité et écouter ce qu’il a à dire. Nous faisons appel à des experts qui sont censés nous dire qu’il faut changer ceci, qu’il faut régler cela et c’est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici. Nous présentons ensuite notre rapport au Parlement pour qu'il vote pour ou contre ces changements.

Les comités devraient produire des rapports pour le Parlement et non pour les whips ou les ministres. L’idée ici, comme cela a été fait au Royaume-Uni, est de permettre au Parlement d'élire les présidents de comité. C’est une idée simple.

Cet ensemble de changements redonne ses pouvoirs au Président, donne certains pouvoirs aux citoyens et donne des pouvoirs aux députés, tout cela dans les limites du raisonnable. Comment faire? C’est ici que la seconde chambre entre en scène. J'insiste: ne pensez pas que nous allons innover si nous mettons en place une seconde chambre. Cela fait 25 ans qu’il y en a une en Australie et au Royaume-Uni, elle existe depuis 20 ans. On ne peut pas dire que nous ayons une longueur d’avance. Nous ne prenons pas de risques. L’idée est de mettre en œuvre une seconde chambre.

Ensuite, j’ai pris une idée — comme l’a dit Bruce Stanton, et il l’a dit ici même devant le Comité, lorsque ces mesures ont été présentées, il y avait un certain scepticisme. Les gens ont dit, vous savez, je ne suis pas sûr. Ils ont donc décidé d’accorder une période d’essai de deux ans. C’est écrit dans la motion, essayons pendant deux ans. Si le résultat ne vous plaît pas, alors qu’on la supprime, qu’on défasse tout. Qui ne tente rien n'a rien.

Enfin, si nous créons une seconde chambre, nous devons examiner le calendrier. J’ai regardé le calendrier et je me suis demandé quand elle allait siéger? Que se passe-t-il s’il y a des votes? Que se passe-t-il si une décision doit être prise? Ce n’est pas la seconde chambre qui décide.

La seconde chambre est là pour veiller à ce que les affaires émanant des députés soient traitées, à ce que les députés aient davantage d’occasions de s’exprimer et, compte tenu des changements apportés au rôle et aux pouvoirs du Président, à s’assurer que les whips ne s'emparent pas aussi de ces prérogatives, afin que les affaires émanant des députés soient entendues. C’est pourquoi le paquet de mesures ne compte que 19 pages. C’est tout. C’est un paquet simple. Ce n'est rien, hormis une toute petite chose, que j’ai incluse et que je vais retirer, car j’ai posé des questions à beaucoup de gens et j’ai reçu beaucoup d’excellentes suggestions, de petites choses auxquelles je n’avais pas pensé. Par exemple, lorsque j’ai modifié l’horaire, j’ai dit que nous allions éliminer le vote de nuit. Nous n’en avons pas besoin. Nous devrions commencer à nous traiter comme des êtres humains et non comme des animaux. Si on infligeait à un animal ce que nous nous infligeons à nous-mêmes, quelqu’un viendrait s'émouvoir en disant que c'est de la cruauté envers les animaux. C’est vrai.

Ensuite, j’ai parlé à un député et il m’a dit, Frank, la chose la plus importante que je pense faire en tant que député, c’est voter. Voter est pour moi la chose la plus importante. Vous avez changé les règles pour qu’il n’y ait pas de vote de nuit, mais malgré tout, entre 9 heures et 10 h 30 sans interruption, je dois aller aux toilettes. Ils m’ont dit que dans les codes du travail de notre pays, on ne peut pas faire travailler quelqu’un pendant quatre heures sans lui donner un répit. J'ai réalisé que je n’y avais pas pensé. C’est un exemple des changements que je vais proposer et j’en ai apporté d’autres du même acabit. Les gens m’ont dit: « Avez-vous pensé à ceci, avez-vous pensé à cela? » C’est un petit changement, mais il est tout à fait raisonnable et il ne fait que respecter nos codes du travail. Pour ce qui est de l’ensemble de la question, j’ai entendu beaucoup de gens dire que c’était trop, trop gros, trop tard.

Avant de venir à Ottawa, j’ai dirigé une entreprise et les gens travaillaient de 9 heures à 17 heures. Ils ne s'arrêtaient pas à 16 h 15 en disant que la journée était terminée. Vous avez le temps d’examiner cette question. Vous avez déjà fait la majeure partie de l’examen. Vous avez déjà fait le gros du travail, c’est-à-dire l'étude de la seconde chambre.

(1120)



Du temps, il y en a, je pense. Je vous demande — et c’est ce que je vous demande — de passer la motion en revue. Faites votre travail. Décortiquez-la comme bon vous semble, mais il faut donner aux députés et à la Chambre des communes le droit et la possibilité de voter sur ce point.

Le PROC est ici pour examiner ces procédures, pour les étudier. Il n'est pas difficile, à mon avis, de dire que nous faisons suffisamment confiance à nos propres députés pour qu’ils s’expriment sur cette proposition. S’ils ne l’aiment pas, c’est leur droit. Si cela leur plaît, c’est aussi leur droit. C’est notre façon de fonctionner, c'est ainsi que nous choisissons de nous diriger nous-mêmes.

Je le dis aussi. Si vous avez une famille, si vous avez de jeunes enfants, si vous avez un problème de santé et que vous ne prenez pas sérieusement la situation en main, ne vous plaignez pas. Ne rentrez pas chez vous en disant à votre femme, à votre mari ou à vos enfants: « Eh bien, vous savez quoi? Je n’ai pas voté en faveur parce que mes dirigeants ne voulaient pas que je le fasse » ou encore: « Vous savez, c’est ainsi. Vous ne comprenez pas le Parlement, mais laissez-moi vous dire que nous allons voter toute la nuit, mais ne craignez rien pour ma santé. » J’ai parlé à beaucoup de gens qui souffraient de maladies graves et dont l'état s'est aggravé après avoir passé des nuits entières à voter. C’est inacceptable.

C’est inacceptable. Nous sommes élus ici à titre de députés. Nous avons notre mot à dire. Nous ne sommes pas des chiens savants. Je demande ceci: tout changement raisonnable, toute erreur que vous y relevez... Je ne suis pas parfait, mais je n’en ai pas rédigé la majeure partie. Je ne veux pas m’attribuer le mérite de ce qui ne m’est pas dû. Je vous demande vraiment, s’il vous plaît, avant que le Parlement termine ses travaux, de procéder et de laisser nos membres, nos collègues, s’exprimer.

Sur ce, je vous remercie beaucoup de m’avoir écouté. Je vous en suis très reconnaissant.

Je cède la parole à Mme May.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

Merci, monsieur le président.

C’est vraiment une belle occasion de discuter avec le Comité de la procédure de certaines de ces questions fondamentales. Je vous suis très reconnaissante de me donner la chance de participer au débat et je remercie M. Baylis; vous êtes nombreux à cette table à avoir, vous aussi, contribué à la préparation de ces propositions.

M. Baylis m’a demandé de parler précisément des points concernant le Président, les questions et l’identification des intervenants, ainsi que le rôle des whips. Je vais juste prendre du recul et dire que je constate, maintenant que je suis sur le point d’avoir 65 ans, que je suis parfois affligée d'une très bonne mémoire. J'ai également l'avantage d'avoir écouté des députés qui sont maintenant décédés me raconter leur histoire, alors pardonnez-moi d’enfiler en quelque sorte l'habit du conteur. On réfléchit à la continuité au sein de notre Parlement et on sait, en fait, à quoi cela a déjà ressemblé, mais on passe rapidement à autre chose. Un député nouvellement élu n’a aucune idée que les choses n'ont pas toujours été ainsi.

J’ai la grande chance d’avoir travaillé dans l’administration Mulroney — je n’étais pas membre du parti qui était au pouvoir à l’époque — à titre de conseillère principale en matière de politique auprès du ministre de l’Environnement. J’étais souvent à la Chambre et je travaillais avec le Président de la Chambre de l’époque, M. John Fraser, pour essayer de voir s’il y avait moyen d’obtenir l’appui de tous les partis à l'égard de l'un de nos projets. Un jour de gloire, nous avons obtenu le consentement unanime pour sauver le tiers inférieur de ce qui s’appelait alors les îles de la Reine-Charlotte, mais qui porte maintenant le nom de parc national Gwaii Haanas, à Haida Gwaii.

J’ai un peu de mémoire institutionnelle et je me retrouve souvent à espérer ne pas avoir une aussi bonne mémoire; il serait plus facile de tolérer ce qui se passe.

De toute façon, je veux aussi vous parler de Flora MacDonald, parce que j’adorais cette femme. Elle était mon modèle et mon héroïne. Pour ceux d’entre vous qui ne le savent pas, elle a été députée progressiste-conservatrice de la région de Kingston et a brièvement fait partie du gouvernement de Joe Clark. Elle n’aurait jamais toléré le chahut autour d’elle, c’est certain. Je lui ai demandé si elle pensait qu’un tel faisait du bon travail comme Président. Elle a répondu: « qu'il n'y avait pas eu un bon Président depuis Lucien Lamoureux. » J'ai fait mes recherches pour savoir qui était Lucien Lamoureux et quand il avait été Président. C’était de 1966 à 1974.

Donc, une personne dotée d'une mémoire encore meilleure que la mienne, mais qui est maintenant décédée, pensait ainsi. Quand on remonte un peu le temps, on se rend compte que l’histoire de notre Parlement et de notre démocratie en ce qui concerne le rôle des députés et le nôtre lorsque nous venons ici pour servir est une histoire de progression continue... Je ne dirais pas que c’est la démocratie par opposition à l’autocratie, mais il y a un peu de cela; le rôle du député est amoindri au détriment du renforcement du pouvoir des partis politiques organisés. Les partis politiques organisés, surtout les acteurs en coulisses, décident que ce que nous faisons vraiment au Parlement n’est qu’un signe avant-coureur de la reprise des combats en campagne électorale, de sorte que les activités du Parlement sont maintenant supplantées par les whips des partis ou les acteurs des partis de l'antichambre contrairement à ce qui se faisait dans les années 1980, par exemple.

Maintenant, en nous concentrant sur la question de l’autorité du Président et sur la façon dont nous pouvons améliorer le décorum, rehausser la qualité du débat et redonner plus de pouvoirs au député, nous pouvons atteindre beaucoup d’objectifs en même temps en observant une règle que nous avons déjà. Je veux aborder cette question très rapidement parce que je sais que nous voulons tous parler de ces choses.

Lorsque Lucien Lamoureux était Président, le Président était le seul à décider qui avait la parole à la Chambre. Il avait aussi des pouvoirs — comme les Présidents en ont toujours, mais ils sont tombés en désuétude — et les députés qui faisaient fi du Président de la Chambre, comme cela se fait tous les jours maintenant, auraient été pointés du doigt et expulsés de la Chambre et ils n’auraient pas été autorisés à revenir pendant un certain temps, à la discrétion du Président — une semaine, deux mois, six mois.

Le Président était aussi ultra-impartial. Une des choses pour lesquelles Lucien Lamoureux est connu, c’est qu’il a essayé d'appliquer la pratique britannique. Il avait été élu comme conservateur. Lorsqu’il est devenu Président de la Chambre, ce qui n’était pas un poste pour lequel nous votions à l'époque, il s’est présenté de nouveau comme indépendant. Les libéraux et les progressistes-conservateurs se sont retirés et ne se sont pas présentés contre lui en tant qu'indépendant. Le NPD s’est présenté contre lui. Il a été réélu comme indépendant. La fois suivante, tous les partis se sont présentés contre lui. Avec le temps, il a baissé les bras et ne s'est plus efforcé de reproduire ce qui se passe au Royaume-Uni: le Président devrait être entièrement impartial.

Quant à ce qui s’est passé avec Jeanne Sauvé, qui a été Présidente de 1980 à 1984, elle avait des problèmes de vue. C’était légitime.

(1125)



Sa vue n'était pas vraiment bonne. Il faut attirer l'attention du Président pour demander la parole. C’est notre règle qui a été confirmée par l’ancien Président Andrew Scheer dans sa décision sur la question de privilège personnel de Mark Warawa à qui on avait refusé la possibilité de faire une déclaration conformément à l'article 31 du Règlement. Nous savons que, selon la règle, il faut capter l'attention du Président. D'après l’ancien Président Scheer, il n’existe pas de liste de parti que le Président soit tenu de respecter. Il suffit d'attirer l’attention de l'occupant du fauteuil, ce qui était impossible dans le cas de Jeanne Sauvé. Elle disait qu’elle ne pouvait pas voir tout le monde suffisamment bien au fond de la Chambre pour savoir qui demandait la parole. Elle a donc demandé la liste à un des whips pour que sa tâche soit plus facile. Cette pratique est tellement devenue une habitude que les Présidents n'ont pas envie de revenir en arrière pour affirmer qu'ils ne sont pas tenus de suivre la liste des partis.

Que se passe-t-il au Royaume-Uni? John Bercow est Président au Royaume-Uni. Je suis certaine que nous nous sommes tous amusés à le regarder. Un député lui demande par écrit de poser une question tôt dans la journée. Il décide des questions qui seront posées. Il ne s'agit pas vraiment d'attirer l'attention du Président — bien sûr, le Parlement de Westminster compte plus de 600 députés; il n'y a pas assez de place pour tout le monde —, mais vous savez à l’avance que vous allez pouvoir poser votre question. C’est au Président de décider.

Alors, qui a le pouvoir? C'est le Président. Allez-vous déjouer le Président, enfreindre le protocole, enfreindre le Règlement ou agir avec mépris à l’égard du Président ou du décorum de la Chambre? Non. Le pouvoir dans cette chambre appartient au Président.

Je pense que nous voulons tous parler de ces questions et de ce que vous pensez des propositions que nous avons élaborées en groupe. En terminant, je tiens à remercier d’autres personnes qui ont éclairé cette démarche. J’ai beaucoup appris de Brent Rathgeber lorsqu’il était conservateur d’Edmonton—St. Albert et j’ai beaucoup aimé travailler avec lui. Il a vraiment défendu les droits du député dans cette enceinte. Il y a aussi Kennedy Stewart, qui a pris l’initiative de travailler avec un certain nombre d’entre nous. Je ne vais pas énumérer tout le monde; le produit de la vente sera remis au Samara Centre. Bien sûr, Scott Reid et Michael Chong y ont participé. Nous avons tous joué un rôle dans la réorganisation du Parlement.

Simplement pour que ce soit consigné au compte rendu et que les Canadiens sont peut-être intéressés de le savoir, cet effort a généré un caucus multipartite pour la démocratie. Ce qui nous rassemble, c’est notre manière de progresser, malgré nos affiliations politiques, pour réduire le pouvoir que les partis politiques ont sur les députés. Je pense que c’est un projet fascinant. Anita Vandenbeld est l’actuelle présidente du caucus pour la démocratie, mais nous représentons tous les partis, donc, toute personne qui veut se joindre à nous qui n'a pas déjà... Nous réfléchissons déjà à ce que nous allons faire après les prochaines élections, selon qui est réélu et qui ne l’est pas. Comment continuer sur cette lancée?

Quoi qu’il en soit, le PROC est le comité officiel de la démocratie, de nos règles et de la façon dont nous nous conduisons ici. Je tiens à vous remercier de m’avoir donné l’occasion de lancer un appel public au Comité pour que vous encouragiez le Président à ne pas craindre la colère du whip du parti. Le Président pourrait simplement décider de dire qu'il n'a pas besoin de ces listes, qu’il peut voir tout le monde d’où il est assis, qu’il connaît chacun par son nom et qu’il prendra une décision en sa qualité de Président, ou nous pourrions adopter la pratique qui a cours au Royaume-Uni et qui consiste à soumettre les questions au Président à l’avance et à voir lesquelles il choisit.

Nous pourrions ainsi certainement atteindre bien des objectifs, à savoir renforcer l’indépendance et le pouvoir des députés. Nul doute que cela permettrait d'améliorer le décorum à la Chambre et servirait l’objectif très salutaire de rééquilibrer les choses en ne modifiant pas le Règlement, car ce sont nos règles. En ce qui concerne nos règles, j’aimerais bien ajouter l’interdiction de livrer des discours, mais cela ne fait pas partie des propositions dont nous sommes actuellement saisis.

J’aimerais bien approfondir la question et voir ce que nous pouvons faire au cours des derniers jours de la présente session parlementaire pour faire avancer l'effort louable de respecter le fait que, dans ce pays, personne n’est élu député s'il n’a pas déjà fait un travail considérable au service de sa communauté. Je pense que nous nous soucions tous de nos communautés et que nous avons tous une tête sur les épaules. Nous n’avons pas vraiment besoin de laisser notre cerveau à la porte dès que nous devenons membres du Parlement à cause du pouvoir de l’antichambre.

Merci.

(1130)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à vous deux.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions.

Vous parlez de frustration, mais vous seriez encore plus frustrée… Dans l’une de nos études précédentes, nous avons entendu un témoin d’une autre législature. Je pense que c’est peut-être celle de la Nouvelle-Zélande ou d'un autre pays où il y a une représentation proportionnelle. Parfois, les gens ne se lèvent même pas pour voter; le whip du parti se lève et vote pour tout le parti.

Nous allons passer à Linda Lapointe.

(1135)

[Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Baylis et madame May. Cela me fait plaisir que vous soyez parmi nous.

Monsieur Baylis, je vous ai écouté avec attention. Vous avez parlé des raisons qui vous ont mené à présenter cette motion. Selon vous, les députés manquent de courtoisie et adoptent de mauvais comportements en privilégiant la confrontation plutôt que la collaboration. Il s'agit quand même d'une motion volumineuse. Vous avez souligné qu'elle n'était pas parfaite, mais qu'il faudrait tout de même qu'elle fasse l'objet d'un vote. Vous avez dit plusieurs choses intéressantes.

Selon vous, quels seraient les avantages d'éliminer les listes de députés soumises au Président par les partis? De quelle façon cela inciterait-il les députés à adopter à la Chambre un comportement de collaboration plutôt que de confrontation? Il s'agit du premier point de la motion; la motion traite de cinq principaux sujets. Mme May a parlé des listes de députés, de l'arrivée de Jeanne Sauvé et de tout cela. Qu'est-ce qui vous laisse croire que l'élimination des listes favorisera la collaboration et empêchera la confrontation?

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci, madame Lapointe. C'est une excellente question.

J'ajouterais ceci: non seulement cela favorisera un comportement courtois, mais cela augmentera la productivité. Ce seront deux effets positifs.

J'aimerais souligner une autre chose, au sujet du mauvais comportement ou du manque de respect lors de la période des questions orales. Selon tous les sondages, c'est la principale raison pour laquelle les femmes ne se présentent pas en politique. Elles ne comprennent pas l'ensemble du travail des députés et ne voient pas ce que nous faisons aux comités. Elles regardent la période des questions orales avec effroi et se disent que jamais elles ne seront députées.

J'ai amené mes deux filles à une séance de la Chambre, et j'ai eu honte. L'une d'elles ne se gêne pas pour me le dire quand elle n'aime pas quelque chose. Elle était choquée de voir ce qui se passait. Pour ma part, je n'entre jamais dans ce jeu. Vous me connaissez assez bien pour le savoir, madame Lapointe. Jamais de la vie je n'aurais un tel comportement, car je garde toujours à l'esprit qu'une de mes filles ou bien mon père pourrait me regarder depuis les tribunes.

Comment cela encouragera-t-il les députés à être courtois? Il y a toute une série de choses.

On a parlé de collaboration, par opposition à la confrontation.

Tout d'abord, un comportement inapproprié n'aidera pas un député à obtenir la considération du Président de la Chambre, car ce dernier l'empêchera de prendre la parole. Si je suis un nouveau député et que je commence à crier à la Chambre, le Président me demandera de me calmer et je n'aurai pas le droit de parole. C'est une première chose.

De plus, si je crie toujours après les députés, ceux-ci ne vont pas appuyer toute motion ou tout projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire que j'aurais pu présenter; ils ne vont même pas me parler. Je ne pourrai pas collaborer avec eux. Si je veux leur aide, il est préférable que j'arrête de crier.

Troisièmement, on sera plus libre d'appuyer des mesures en suivant sa conscience, sans craindre qu'on soit puni.

C'est un ensemble de choses qui pourront encourager les députés à agir avec courtoisie.

On n'est pas stupide; quand on arrive à la Chambre, on voit qu'il est plus payant de crier que de collaborer, et c'est pour cela qu'on le fait.

Il faut considérer l'ensemble des choses qui nous permettront de changer cela.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

J'ai compris ce que Mme May a dit au sujet des listes de députés.

Madame May ou monsieur Baylis, avez-vous parlé aux anciens Présidents de la Chambre à ce sujet? Madame May, vous avez dit que l'un d'eux avait plus ou moins le goût de faire ce travail. Avez-vous parlé de ces listes à des gens qui étaient là à l'époque?

M. Frank Baylis:

Oui. J'ai pris en note tous les témoins qui avaient fait une présentation à ce sujet devant le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre au cours des 10 dernières années. Je suis allé les voir ou j'ai essayé de les contacter. J'ai parlé à d'anciens Présidents de la Chambre, notamment à M. Peter Milliken. Je ne me souviens pas du nombre exact, mais je pense qu'il a occupé cette fonction pendant 13 ans. Tous les gens à qui j'ai parlé ont dit, de façon unanime, qu'il fallait redonner ces pouvoirs au Président de la Chambre.

(1140)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je veux ajouter que, dans tout le Commonwealth, le Canada est le seul pays où le Président de la Chambre a perdu ce pouvoir qui lui est propre, au profit des partis politiques. Nous sommes le seul pays à connaître cette situation.

J'ai aussi parlé à M. John Fraser, qui a été Président de la Chambre. Il utilisait, lui aussi, des listes de députés. Mme Jeanne Sauvé...

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Excusez-moi de vous interrompre, mais j'ai une autre question à poser.

Concernant l'élection du Président et celle des présidents de comité, qu'est-ce qui vous permet de croire qu'une modification du Règlement va réduire la confrontation et favoriser la collaboration? Qu'est-ce que cela va véritablement apporter? Permettez-moi d'avoir quelques doutes à ce sujet.

M. Frank Baylis:

Est-ce que j'ai le droit de demander à Scott Simms de répondre à cette question?

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je sais que nous allons sûrement lui demander de comparaître, mais c'est vous qui êtes ici aujourd'hui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Très bien.

Cela a commencé au Royaume-Uni, avec quelques comités, et les choses ont très bien fonctionné. On a trouvé cela fantastique et on a décidé de l'appliquer à tous les comités.

Il y a toujours cette question de contrepoids. Auparavant, toutes les décisions étaient centralisées et émanaient d'une seule personne. Vous suiviez exactement ce que cette personne faisait, sinon c'en était fini pour vous. Maintenant, les députés peuvent suivre le président du comité. Je ne dirais pas que cela offre une protection, mais il y a un certain contrepoids, même face à un ministre. Si un ministre présente un projet de loi, le comité l'étudie, mais n'est pas forcé de se ranger derrière le ministre. Il est plus libre de proposer des changements et d'en discuter. Il y aura une discussion entre le ministre et le président du comité. Encore une fois, cela fait en sorte de promouvoir le dialogue et la collaboration. On n'est plus dans une situation où c'est à prendre ou à laisser.

Dans chacun des éléments que je propose, je cherche toujours à rassembler les gens. Il va falloir collaborer et discuter, non seulement entre nous, mais avec tous les députés. [Traduction]

Le président:

Peter Milliken a travaillé pendant 10 ans et 124 jours.

Monsieur Nater.

Mme Elizabeth May:

[Inaudible] a servi le plus longtemps.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Les plus longs états de service, pas le plus long discours.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, Monsieur Baylis et Madame May, de vous être joints à nous.

Vous avez parlé de l’histoire orale. Comme je suis député pour la première fois, j’ai profité de l’expérience de différentes personnes dans la Cité parlementaire qui m'ont parlé du passé. Je tiens à signaler une personne en particulier. Il détesterait que son nom soit consigné dans le hansard, mais c’est John Holtby. M. Holtby a servi pendant un demi-siècle dans un régime démocratique parlementaire. Il a été chef de cabinet à l'époque du comité McGrath, corédacteur en chef des ouvrages de Beauchesne et premier greffier adjoint de l’Assemblée législative de l’Ontario. C’est un homme fascinant avec une expérience incroyable.

Il m’a souvent parlé de la pratique d'attirer l’attention du Président et de Mme Sauvé et de ses préoccupations à ce sujet. Je tiens à remercier M. Holtby. Il a récemment pris sa retraite et je tenais à le dire. Il aime aussi raconter l’histoire de son chien bien-aimé, Oliver, qui a rencontré la gouverneure générale, Mme Sauvé, à Rideau Hall; il a sauté dans la fontaine qui s'y trouvait puis, tout mouillé qu'il était, dans les bras de Mme Sauvé. Il aime cette histoire. Je voulais reconnaître ainsi cet homme, et il me semblait logique de le faire.

Je voulais commencer la période de questions avec M. Baylis.

C’est un sujet un peu délicat. Vous deviez prendre la parole lundi. Je le dis avec délicatesse. Nous faisons tous des erreurs. J'en fais tous les jours, j’en suis sûr. Les affaires émanant des députés font l'objet d'un débat les lundis à 11 heures. C’est ainsi que les choses se passent depuis que nous avons été élus pour la première fois à la Chambre.

Je vous donne l’occasion d’en parler. Il s’agit d’une motion volumineuse de 19 pages. Je sais que tout le processus a été bien pensé et que les idées ont été soigneusement pondérées et prises en considération et cela m’inquiète que vous n'ayez pas profité du temps réservé aux affaires émanant des députés qui avait été prévu pour vous.

(1145)

M. Frank Baylis:

Ce qui s’est passé — et c’est entièrement de ma faute, pas celle de mon personnel ou de qui que ce soit —, c’est que j’ai fait une erreur dans mon calendrier Google. J’avais échangé mes positions pour essayer d’avancer afin d’avoir une deuxième heure, ce que je n’ai pas eu, mais j’essayais d’avoir une deuxième heure. À un moment donné, j’étais dans l’horaire du soir et d'une façon ou d'une autre, je suis resté sur cette idée.

D'habitude, je suis ici de toute façon et cela n’aurait pas eu d’importance, mais ce jour-là, parce que j’avais travaillé très longtemps sur cette motion, je me suis levé et j’ai pratiqué mon discours à quelques reprises, puis je me suis demandé ce que j'allais faire, ce que je n’ai jamais fait auparavant; j'ai décidé de me rendre au gymnase libérer un peu de cette énergie nerveuse, d'aller dans le sauna et d'en sortir vraiment détendu et prêt à livrer mon discours le soir.

Eh bien, voilà, quand je suis sorti, mon téléphone... Ma période de détente a duré environ 30 secondes, et j’ai constaté que oui, comme vous l’avez souligné, le débat se fait le lundi à 11 heures; je suis donc tout à fait responsable de ce malentendu. Ensuite, j’ai essayé de philosopher et je me suis dit que ce n’était peut-être pas correct pour moi d’aller de l’avant tout seul. Il se peut que ce fût Dieu qui me parlait ou quelque chose du genre, je ne sais pas, et qu'il fallût passer par le Comité de la procédure. C’est ce que j’espérais, en tout cas, mais j’étais vraiment en train de courir deux chevaux à la fois, et j'espérais que le Comité de la procédure étudierait la question et la soulèverait, parce que je crois que c’est la bonne façon de procéder et de donner le droit de vote aux gens.

Je me suis aussi vraiment engagé à la faire inscrire au compte rendu et j’espérais trouver une deuxième heure pour que les gens puissent au moins voter, comme je l’ai demandé ici. C’est entièrement de ma faute si je ne l'ai pas fait. J’ai présenté mes excuses à tout le monde. C’est inacceptable; il n’y a aucune excuse. Cela n’aurait pas eu d’importance un autre jour, parce que j'aurais été sur place de toute façon, et si j’avais oublié, on m'aurait simplement rappelé de me présenter. Je ne sais pas pourquoi ces choses s'alignent, mais c’est ainsi que cela s'est passé.

M. John Nater:

Merci. Je vous remercie de cette explication.

Vous avez parlé de courir deux chevaux à la fois, à la Chambre et ici, au Comité. Avez-vous l’intention de poursuivre vos efforts uniquement au sein de ce comité ou de nouveau à la Chambre?

M. Frank Baylis:

J’avais fait des compromis pour obtenir ma première heure, puis j’espérais que quelqu’un me donne littéralement la deuxième heure pour que je puisse soumettre la question au vote, mais il s’agissait d’un travail en cours et avec ces processus et ces changements, je me suis mélangé dans mon horaire. Il n'y a pas encore eu un engagement pour la deuxième heure. J’ai discuté avec certaines personnes, mais c’est une lourde tâche. Je leur demande essentiellement de ne pas parler et de me laisser parler une deuxième fois.

Je préférerais de toute façon que le Comité dise à nos collègues que c'est une question sur laquelle ils peuvent voter. C'est ce que j'ai toujours espéré, de toute manière.

M. John Nater:

Cela m’amène à poser la question. Aurait-il été préférable au départ que votre motion à la Chambre fasse l'objet d'une étude au comité de la procédure? Je ne voudrais pas que l'on perde du temps à travailler sur un sujet qui aurait déjà fait l'objet d'une étude ailleurs. Vous avez dit, dans iPolitics si je me souviens bien, que vous étiez en train d'étudier la possibilité de présenter ces amendements à la Chambre.

C’est toujours compliqué lorsque deux processus distincts sont lancés. Par exemple, nous étudions un thème et la Chambre étudie quelque chose de différent, mais sur un sujet similaire. Je me demande simplement s’il n'aurait pas été préférable que le comité de la procédure s'en charge dès le départ, plutôt que d’essayer de mener deux...

M. Frank Baylis:

Si on avait le temps, tout à fait. Le problème que nous avons toujours eu... Et même maintenant, je n’ai pas vraiment perdu mon heure. Elle me reviendra à la fin de juin ou au début de juillet, quand ce sera trop tard.

J'ai toujours su que je n'aurais pas assez de temps, il est là, le problème. Pourquoi n’aurais-je pas assez de temps? Parce que le hasard a fait que lorsque j’ai présenté mon projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, c'était à la fin de la journée. Au moins, j'ai réussi à avoir une heure. C’est pourquoi, si ces changements avaient été faits à temps, je n’aurais pas eu à faire cela.

J’en suis arrivé au nombre d’heures nécessaires en calculant, sur les 20 dernières années, le nombre de projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire qui ont soit fait l’objet d’un vote, ont été abandonnés ou ont été rejetés, puis j’ai fait une moyenne.

Vous avez tout à fait raison au sujet du temps. C’est la bonne façon de procéder, mais je manquais de temps.

(1150)

M. John Nater:

Nous avons eu une conversation privée à la Chambre des communes. Je ne la répéterai pas, mais nous avons parlé de l’idée du consensus, alors je vous offre cette occasion. Quel est votre point de vue sur le consensus quant aux modifications du Règlement? Je pense que c’est quelque chose que nous devrions...

M. Frank Baylis:

Je pense que Mme Kusie a proposé au début, après que M. Christopherson ait présenté la motion, que nous devrions être unanimes. Je lui ai dit que j’étais très reconnaissant. Soit dit en passant, j’ai eu des discussions avec certaines personnes, David de Burgh Graham, notamment. Il était d’avis que notre groupe devrait parler d'une seule voix. Nous devrions essayer — je sais que c’est très difficile — de faire abstraction de la partisanerie. Nous devrions pouvoir dire que nous faisons les bonnes choses pour les bonnes raisons, et nous devrions respecter ces questions de la même façon que nous nous respectons nous-mêmes.

Nous exigeons beaucoup, quand nous venons ici, de nos familles, par exemple, mais il y a des choses que nous faisons sans raison. Par respect pour eux, nous devrions poser la question: « Pouvons-nous nous améliorer nous-mêmes de sorte que nous servions mieux nos citoyens? » Nous verrions davantage nos citoyens et nos familles, et nous ferions les choses comme il se doit.

Ce sont toutes ces choses qui m’ont amené vers ce processus, mais la raison pour laquelle il fallait deux voies différentes... Comme vous le savez bien, je suis arrivé et j’ai parlé à chacun d’entre vous individuellement, puis j'ai demandé la même chose à chacun d'entre vous: jetez-y un coup d’œil. J’étais très reconnaissant, et je pense que c’est la première chose que j’ai dite ici. Je suis très, très reconnaissant que vous ayez accepté et je suis d’accord avec votre approche.

M. John Nater:

Excellent.

Merci.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous deux d’être ici. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

J’aimerais revenir sur le dernier point concernant le projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire, ne serait-ce que pour boucler la boucle.

J’ai été parmi ceux qui ont été surpris d’entendre cela. Je vais vous avouer franchement que j'ai d'abord pensé qu'ils l'avaient influencé. C'est ça, ils l'ont atteint. Les élections s’en viennent et on lui a dit que s’il voulait obtenir quoi que ce soit de la campagne centrale, il ferait mieux de laisser tomber ce projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Nous avons eu une petite discussion entre députés d'arrière-ban et nous ne savions pas trop comment interpréter cela.

Je dois dire que j’ai été très heureux lorsque ma motion, la motion M-170, a été présentée hier soir. Elle porte sur le fait que l’exécutif — le Cabinet — a encore le dernier mot sur le processus d’embauche des agents parlementaires et reconnaît le fait que le Parlement constitue encore l'instance suprême. Le gouvernement n’est pas le Parlement: le gouvernement dépend du Parlement. Je suis sûr que tout le monde a remarqué que je n’ai pas été défait de justesse. J’ai perdu par une marge très importante.

Il y a deux ou trois choses à en déduire. La première, c’est le fait que les deux personnes qui l'ont présentée ont voté en faveur. Frank, en particulier, je me suis tourné vers mes collègues dès que vous vous êtes levé et j'ai affirmé que cela closait le débat à savoir s'il s'agissait d'une erreur ou s’ils l'avaient influencé parce que personne n'est assez stupide pour céder dans un premier temps, pour se lever ensuite et se mettre dans l'embarras.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je peux vous remercier?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Je n’ai absolument aucun doute que c’est ce qui s'est passé. Encore une fois, j’ai eu l’occasion de vous parler il y a quelques mois. J’ai été impressionné par le fait que vous utilisiez votre temps de parole pour améliorer le Parlement.

C’était une chose pour moi de le faire, mais je ne me représente pas aux élections. Si je me présentais aux prochaines élections, ne vous y trompez pas, j’aurais cherché des façons de m’en servir pour faire comprendre à mes électeurs que je les appuie et que ma candidature représenterait un excellent choix pour eux. Cependant, vous allez vous présenter de nouveau, et vous en avez fait fi parce que vous croyiez en l’importance de cette question.

Monsieur le président, cela en dit long sur la difficulté de la chose.

Je dois vous dire, chers collègues, que je pensais — et ce n’est pas parce que c’était la mienne — que l’idée de reprendre un certain contrôle était assez simple et qu’elle allait de soi. Savez-vous ce qui a fait obstacle? La structure même du pouvoir que je tentais de mettre en échec.

Ça ne m'a pas étonné. J’ai simplement noté que j’avais échoué. Pour moi, cela signifie également qu’il y aura probablement, et je l’espère — l’espoir est éternel —, un autre collègue qui se présentera et qui viendra au Parlement, ou un vétéran qui a de l'expérience et qui a un intérêt direct dans ce dossier, qui reprendra le flambeau. Je dois vous dire qu’en fait de réforme démocratique facile à réaliser, il est difficile de faire mieux que de simplement reprendre le contrôle de ce qui est déjà à nous. Nul besoin d’adopter une nouvelle loi. Nul besoin de modifier la Constitution. Il suffit de dire: « Oui, nous allons prendre le contrôle de ce processus. » C’est tout.

J’ai perdu. J’ai reçu peut-être cinq — et je suis généreux — votes non néo-démocrates sur la motion principale, qui n’était même pas aussi puissante que l’amendement, car elle portait sur la vacance créée par le décès prématuré de Michael Ferguson. Je vais être honnête, j’ai pensé que, si je n'y arrivais pas simplement en évoquant le respect que les députés devraient avoir pour eux-mêmes en tant que parlementaires, que je pourrais peut-être utiliser une corde sensible — celle de la mémoire de Michael. Il y a des documents qui ne sont pas si vieux — qui datent de quelques années — qui ont été signés par tous les agents parlementaires et qui disaient qu'il fallait, à tout prix, reprendre le contrôle du Parlement.

Pourtant, la structure du pouvoir qui... La raison pour laquelle j'en parle, monsieur le président — je sais que vous savez pourquoi —, c’est que le défi qui attend mes collègues est énorme. Si qui que ce soit en doute, il n’a qu’à regarder le résultat du vote d’hier soir. Je ne crois pas qu’il y ait un seul parlementaire à la Chambre qui se lève le matin en se disant: « Comment pourrais-je perdre un peu plus de ma pertinence aujourd’hui? » En fait, je pense que la plupart des parlementaires se lèvent en se disant: « Je vais essayer de rendre le monde meilleur. Je vais commencer par m’assurer que le Parlement est un meilleur endroit. »

Toutefois, le pouvoir de la structure actuelle, où le whip et le leader parlementaire sont au premier plan, est tel que ma motion n'a pas réussi à faire une percée, mis à part une poignée de députés courageux assez solidement convaincus pour prendre position.

J’ai été très heureux de présenter la motion. Comme vous, je suis reconnaissant que mes collègues m'aient permis de faire en sorte que ces idées soient diffusées et discutées. Souvent, ce qui arrive avec ce genre de motions, c’est qu’elles ne voient même pas la lumière du jour. On les tue dans l'œuf pour ne pas avoir à se prononcer. Nous avons réussi à en parler. Encore une fois, je suis optimiste et je crois qu’avec le temps, nous y arriverons.

C’est un énorme défi. Si la question fondamentale de l’embauche de nos propres agents n’est pas suffisante, je ne suis pas certain de la valeur des arguments qui sont présentés ici. Il faudra un changement politique de la part d’un nombre suffisant de parlementaires, qui ne se contenteront pas de parler de réforme, mais qui seront prêts à mettre leurs culottes pour défendre ce principe. C’est plus facile à dire qu'à faire, à en croire le vote par appel nominal d’hier soir.

Je vois que Mme May grouille d'impatience de participer à cette discussion. Je l’invite à nous faire part de ses réflexions. J’ai réussi à décrire la difficulté de la tâche, alors il ne s'agit pas de répéter, mais simplement d' affirmer qu'elle est toujours là.

Dites-nous, Elizabeth, les raisons de votre optimisme. Vous vous présentez de nouveau, et je pense qu’il y a de bonnes chances que vous reveniez.

(1155)

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Et puis, ce qui est bien, c'est que je ne suis pas guidé par un esprit partisan autant qu’avant. C’est la beauté de lancer ce genre de discussion. On peut laisser tomber ses chaînes. On peut dire ce qu'on pense vraiment. Et je pense que vous avez de très bonnes chances d’être réélue. Comme c’est radical!

Sur ce, que pensez-vous de tout cela, à la fin de la présente législature, alors que nous nous dirigeons vers la prochaine?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Premièrement, je veux simplement dire que même si nous ne réussissons pas à faire adopter cette motion... Ce que je veux dire, c’est qu’avec ces débats sur la première heure et la deuxième heure, je fais des efforts pour trouver une deuxième heure pour faire adopter le projet de loi S-203, par exemple — qui est largement appuyé — sur la fin du maintien des baleines en captivité.

En ce qui me concerne, le but de toutes nos discussions était d’avoir une bonne occasion, au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, d’en parler et d’y travailler ensemble. J’en suis heureuse. Voilà une raison d’être optimiste: nous en parlons ici.

L’autre, c’est que les Canadiens sont d'accord, mais je ne pense pas... Lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte, les gens ne me demandent pas comment il se fait que le Président n’a aucun contrôle sur qui a la parole pendant la période des questions. Personne ne parle de ça. Ce qu'on me demande, par contre, c'est comment j'arrive à supporter que les gens autour de moi crient tout le temps et frappent sur leur bureau. Ils perçoivent qu'il y a quelque chose qui cloche. Je sais que nous avons tous été témoins de groupes scolaires qu'on a dû faire sortir parce qu’on ne voulait pas que les élèves assistent à ce spectacle. Les enfants étaient horrifiés.

Nous voulons un taux de participation électorale élevé. Nous voulons une démocratie saine. Nous voulons favoriser le respect des institutions. Nous préférerions aussi que les gens ne voient pas les politiciens comme une sous-catégorie d’êtres humains, quelque part en dessous, disons, des paparazzi. Je veux dire, j’étais avocate et maintenant je suis politicienne. Je suis déjà au bas de l'échelle. Jusqu'où cela peut-il aller?

Ce serait bien de sentir que nous avons fait quelque chose que nos électeurs souhaitaient nous voir faire, pour élever le discours et faire en sorte qu'ils soient fiers de ce qu’ils voient, comme Canadiens, à leur Parlement.

Nous savons quels mécanismes mettre en branle pour y arriver, alors si nous travaillons pour nos électeurs afin que la Chambre soit plus respectueuse, que notre travail soit plus productif... Le plus gros problème — et il y a un certain nombre de choses que j'aimerais changer qui ne se trouvent même pas dans cette motion, comme réduire le pouvoir des acteurs en coulisse sur la conduite des activités sur le parquet.

(1200)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Merci à tous.

Merci à nos invités.

Je vais me lancer dans une sorte de diatribe.

Je vais devoir afficher mon parti pris. Je suis le coauteur de cette motion et j’espère que j'aurai l’occasion de parler de l'aspect qui émane de moi. Je sais que la question a été soulevée plus tôt.

Je répondrai à votre question le moment venu, je suppose, madame Lapointe.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je vais reposer la question.

M. Scott Simms:

Je n’en doute pas.

Je veux parler du fait d'attirer l'attention du Président. Cela revient à ce qu’a dit Mme May, mais avant d'en arriver à une question, il arrive un moment où il est si évident que quelque chose cloche, qu' il nous incombe de nous déciller les yeux et de dénoncer l'exagération.

J’en ai parlé lors d’une conférence de presse sur le travail que Frank réalise ici.

Frank, merci d’être ici.

Je vais vous donner un exemple, celui des déclarations des députés. Nous les appelons généralement les déclarations en vertu de l’article 31 du Règlement. Les gens viennent me voir et me disent: « Oh, vous parlez des déclarations de députés. » Non, je parle des déclarations de parti, parce que c’est ce qu’elles sont, pas vrai?

Je n’ai aucune objection à ce qu’un parti, reconnu ou non, déclare que c’est là où nous en sommes tous, en ce qui a trait à la Chambre. De toute évidence, les stratagèmes de parti contrôlent les fonctions du gouvernement et la façon dont nous interagissons les uns avec les autres. Ma proposition sur les présidents de comités porte même en partie là-dessus. Mais pendant 15 minutes d'une journée, nous n'aurions même pas la liberté de dire: « Je représente mes électeurs et voici ce que j'ai à dire »? La réponse typique du bureau est: « On rétablit l'équilibre par la suite, on fait ceci, ou cela ». Félicitations, mais là n'est pas la question.

La question est plutôt celle-ci: si Mme Kusie veut faire une déclaration d’une minute sur la tarification du carbone ou sur les positions antigouvernementales, ce devrait être son choix. Si quelqu’un s’adresse à Mme Kusie et lui dit: « J'aimerais que vous fassiez ce petit boulot désagréable pour le gouvernement », et qu’elle refuse, cela revient à M. Nater, à M. Reid, à M. Chong ou à quiconque dont c'est le tour. On ne parle pas là d'une déclaration de député, n’est-ce pas? Pas du tout. Mme Kusie a tout à fait le droit de se lever et de taper sur le gouvernement dans une déclaration d’une minute. Elle a aussi le droit de parler d’un organisme de bienfaisance local dans sa circonscription, et ainsi de suite.

C'est 15 minutes par jour. Cela revient à ce que Mme May a dit au sujet de la mainmise d'un petit groupe au sein du Parlement, qui a plus de pouvoir que dans tout autre Parlement autour de nous. Il est impossible d'avoir ne serait-ce que 15 minutes.

Cela dit, permettez-moi de revenir à la question d'attirer le regard du Président. Il y a un autre aspect à cela. Disons que vous réussissez à attirer l’attention du Président concernant les déclarations de députés, la période des questions et les débats du gouvernement. Il viendra un moment où il y aura du chaos, car on introduira une motion dilatoire pour faire entendre tel député. Vous savez de quoi je parle. Nous avons tous été témoins d'une situation où une personne se lève pour parler, puis qu'une autre se lève, présente une motion donnant la parole à un autre député, et tout s'arrête là, on passe au vote et voilà. C’est une tactique dilatoire, mais cela arrive.

Si nous avions toute la journée, pensez-vous que cela se produirait?

Mme Elizabeth May:

« Qu'on donne la parole à ce député » ou « que la Chambre ajourne ses travaux maintenant » — les motions dilatoires de ce genre ne relèvent pas du libre arbitre de chaque député. Encore une fois, ce sont les whips des partis qui décident que « c'est la guerre, ce n'est pas le Parlement, il nous faut la peau du député d'en face, il faut le prendre au dépourvu, il faut faire passer le temps et perturber l'ordre du jour du gouvernement. »

J'ajouterais quelque chose qui ne fait pas partie de ce débat, mais j'aimerais le mentionner, car cela n'est pas dans le Règlement — en fait, c'est contraire à notre Règlement — et c'est la lecture de discours à la Chambre. Les gens lisent des discours à la Chambre.

Soit dit en passant, nous sommes le seul pays du Commonwealth à avoir cette notion de « parti reconnu ». Dans d’autres parlements, dans d’autres démocraties, il n’est pas nécessaire d’avoir un nombre minimal de sièges, mais peu importe. À cause de cette règle qui a été créée en 1963 et qui consiste à remettre de l’argent aux grands partis — ce pour quoi ils ont eux-mêmes voté, pour que les plus petits partis ne touchent pas d'argent. Au fil du temps, ces droits se sont appliqués à ceux qui étaient membres de partis ayant obtenu plus de 12 sièges.

Ce que cela signifie, c'est que je ne peux pas participer aux réunions des leaders à la Chambre, alors je dois avancer des hypothèses. Je dois tenter de deviner ce qui se passe lors des réunions des leaders à la Chambre, alors que la Chambre est dysfonctionnelle et qu'on peut y passer cinq ou six heures à débattre de la semaine ou du mois de l’amitié Canada-Amérique latine — c'était sur quoi le débat qui a duré cinq heures un soir, il n’y a pas si longtemps? C’était le mois de l’amitié Canada-Amérique latine. Les députés ont débattu de leur amour pour les sombreros et les tacos. Ils n’avaient rien à dire. Mais on n'avait pas de temps pour les projets de loi vraiment importants. Depuis les coulisses, les leaders à la Chambre peuvent dire: « Nous allons faire intervenir tel nombre de personnes, mais nous ne vous le dirons pas. » Si ce n'était pas de cela, si nous mettions à jour le Règlement de sorte qu'il faille parler sans consulter de notes, seules les personnes très renseignées sur un sujet prendraient la parole et réussiraient à en parler pendant 10 minutes.

Pour répondre à votre question, à savoir si c'est possible, tant que les whips des partis, depuis les coulisses, pourront dicter l'ordre du jour à la Chambre, cela pourrait quand même se faire, mais ce serait un tout petit pas vers le retour à notre véritable système. Sir John A. Macdonald avait l’habitude de qualifier les membres de son propre caucus d'oiseaux relâchés dans la nature. Il ne savait jamais quelle direction ils allaient prendre. Nos députés ont le bec cloué — désolé, Scott.

(1205)

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, c'est en quelque sorte une espèce en voie de disparition.

Je suis d'accord avec de nombreux aspects. J'essaie simplement de trouver... Je ne veux pas de changements radicaux; je veux des changements modérés. Bon sang, l'exemple que je donnais au début de ma question est plutôt modéré.

Je suis aussi d'accord avec vous à propos des discours. Je crois que dans d'autres parlements, les députés ne se gênent pas pour chahuter les gens qui ne font rien d'autre que lire des notes. J'ai toujours dit que si vous n'êtes pas capable de vous lever à la Chambre des communes et de parler sans notes pendant 10 minutes, vous n'êtes pas à votre place, mais c'est une tout autre histoire.

Est-ce qu'il me reste du temps?

Le président:

Eh bien, non.

M. Scott Simms:

Oh, j'avais compris: « Oui, c'est bon. »

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Il faut attirer son attention.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Est-ce que je peux proposer une motion, par consentement unanime, pour donner plus de temps à M. Simms? Je suis certain que ce qu'il va faire ensuite sera vraiment bon.

Le président:

D'accord, allez-y, monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Il n'y a aucune pression à l'heure actuelle.

Monsieur Baylis, par où commence la prochaine législature, avec ce que vous avez présenté ici? Que voulez-vous que la prochaine législature fasse, en modifiant le Règlement?

Ma question s'adresse à vous deux.

M. Frank Baylis:

J'ai une petite parenthèse. Je me suis renseigné à propos de l'interdiction de lire. On peut avoir des notes. J'ai décidé de ne pas le mettre ici. Je pense que nous devrions aller dans ce sens, mais nous devons emmener tous nos collègues avec nous. Ils ne seront pas formés pour cela.

J'aimerais contester un autre point, avant de répondre à votre question, monsieur Simms. Nos électeurs ne s'en fichent pas. N'en doutez pas un instant. Je vous mets au défi. Si l'un de vous fait du porte-à-porte au cours des prochains week-ends, qu'il demande aux gens: « Est-ce que vous vous souciez de la courtoisie et du bon déroulement des travaux à la Chambre des communes? Est-ce que cela vous importe? »

Des électeurs m'en ont parlé et je leur ai dit que je travaillais sur quelque chose. J'ai lâché le nom de Michael Chong, parce qu'il est très connu et très respecté. J'ai dit à quelqu'un: « M. Chong collabore avec moi », et il a levé les deux pouces.

Qu'est-ce que j'espère en tirer? J'ai commencé, je n'ai pas dévié de ma route et, comme M. Nater me l'a demandé, j'espère sincèrement que vous choisirez de soumettre ceci au Parlement dès maintenant, pour que nous puissions entreprendre la prochaine législature avec ces changements en vigueur.

La motion prévoit une période d'essai de deux ans pour la seconde chambre. Si, au bout de deux ans, vous ne l'aimez pas et que vous voulez la changer ou vous en débarrasser, vous n'aurez qu'à tout défaire. C'est très simple. Je ne pense pas que nous demandions grand-chose. Vous dites que c'est une motion volumineuse, mais il s'agit tout de même de créer une seconde chambre. Si on enlève la seconde chambre, le simple député... doit disparaître, et les droits des citoyens de voir des débats exploratoires se trouvent bafoués, parce qu'il n'y a pas de temps pour cela dans l'enceinte principale. Toutes ces choses-là peuvent se défaire.

Je vais quand même continuer d'en discuter avec tout collègue qui le voudra bien. Je vous demande, à vous du Comité de la procédure, de laisser vos collègues se prononcer là-dessus. S'ils disent: « Non, ce n'est pas suffisant » ou « Nous n'aimons pas cela », c'est leur droit.

Je ne pense pas que le Comité de la procédure puisse dire: « Nous refusons le droit de parole aux collègues. » Je pense que votre travail est plutôt de dire: « Ce n'est pas bon, nous allons le changer radicalement, ou simplement le mettre à jour ou l'ajuster. » Peu importe ce que vous déciderez de faire, c'est votre droit, mais je ne pense pas que vous ayez le droit de dire: « Ah, vous savez quoi, nous allons tout simplement empêcher cette motion-là de se rendre à la Chambre, parce que nous n'en voulons pas. »

Voilà ce que j'espère, et je n'ai pas d'autre idée derrière la tête, sincèrement, monsieur Simms.

(1210)

Mme Elizabeth May:

J'espère, sans me faire trop d'illusions, que nous pourrons en discuter lors d'une campagne électorale, de sorte qu'après les élections, nous pourrons dire à quiconque se présente à la présidence — et je suppose que le titulaire actuel se présentera de nouveau — qu'il a l'appui du public pour pouvoir, par exemple, dire aux whips qu'il n'a pas besoin de leurs listes. Cela aura été dit pendant la campagne électorale.

Je sais que c'est un sujet très occulte, mais je pense que l'idée de demander: « Aimeriez-vous que nous travaillions à créer un meilleur décorum, une fois de retour au Parlement? »... Après une élection, les partis politiques devraient s'effacer. Laissons les élus faire leur travail. Cela n'arrivera jamais complètement, mais c'était bien plus comme cela auparavant. Même dans les années 1980, c'était bien plus comme cela. Dans les années 1990, c'était bien plus comme cela. C'est l'hyperpartisanerie de la vie quotidienne au Parlement qui fait obstacle au progrès, sur un large éventail de questions.

Pour moi, c'est beaucoup plus qu'une question de décorum, mais le décorum est essentiel pour avoir un Parlement capable de servir les intérêts de tous, au lieu d'une enceinte où on invente de faux enjeux pour s'en servir plus tard.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

J'ai demandé qu'on fasse preuve de souplesse à ce sujet, mais vouliez-vous que je prenne sept ou cinq minutes? Qu'est-ce que nous visons ici?

Le président:

Vous avez cinq minutes. J'ai fait preuve d'un peu de souplesse, et tous les intervenants ont un peu dépassé leur temps de parole.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Je vais essayer de suivre la tradition au lieu de compenser pour tous les autres.

Il y a des choses qui me paraissent utopiques. Je veux consacrer une minute au fait de lire des discours. Je sais que cela ne fait pas partie de la proposition.

Ce soir, c'est le soir de ma motion d'initiative parlementaire. J'attends depuis près de quatre ans. C'est très excitant. Et je dispose de 15 minutes pour expliquer pourquoi le 29 janvier devrait être une journée nationale de solidarité avec les victimes de violence antireligieuse.

Il se trouve que j'ai ici mes notes d'allocution, que je lirai mot pour mot. Vous remarquerez qu'il y a un petit « 9 » et un petit « 10 ». Cela veut dire qu'il me faut une minute pour aller de l'un à l'autre. J'ai chronométré, alors j'ai exactement la longueur voulue. Si je ne me sers pas d'un texte, je ne pourrai pas livrer toute la matière que j'y ai mise. Je ne peux pas l'improviser, même si je suis un grand amateur de discours improvisés, qui saute sur chaque occasion d'en prononcer un. J'ai même quelques notes ici parce que lorsque je l'ai refait, j'ai oublié de réviser des passages, alors mes chiffres ne fonctionnent plus et je dois revenir en arrière et... Je vais arrêter de m'ajuster, ne serait-ce que parce que je lis plus lentement en français qu'en anglais.

Une application automatique de l'interdiction de lire aurait des conséquences imprévues pour ceux-là mêmes qui la préconisent. Cela me préoccupe.

Je sais que la question des déclarations de députés relevant de l'article 31 n'est pas venue d'ici; elle est venue de M. Simms, mais je pense que nous avons mis le doigt sur un véritable problème.

À l'heure actuelle, d'après ce que je comprends, la théorie, dont on a abusé, est que tout député qui attire l'attention du Président pourra invoquer l'article 31, mais on en est venu à une répartition équitable entre les partis qui, à leur tour, font une répartition parmi leurs députés. Je connais seulement mon propre parti, mais je pense que chacun a adopté une formule selon laquelle les deux dernières déclarations sont réservées aux affaires du parti, et le reste est attribué selon une sorte de rotation. Je viens de vérifier auprès de mon personnel. Je suis inscrit sur la rotation pour une déclaration de député mardi en huit.

Je pense que la seule façon de nous assurer que les déclarations en vertu de l'article 31 portent intégralement sur des affaires émanant des députés serait d'établir une rotation officielle; les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire sont une loterie. Vous avez votre place dans la rotation, après quoi elle suit son cours. C'est systématisé de cette façon dans le Règlement.

Maintenant que j'y ai bien réfléchi, je pense que ce n'est pas une mauvaise idée. Cela réglerait le problème. La raison pour laquelle mon camp lance des attaques partisanes, puis que votre camp en fait autant, puis le NPD aussi, honnêtement, c'est que nous sommes engagés dans une course aux armements entre nous. Si on s'arrange pour désarmer tout le monde, je pense que le problème disparaîtra et qu'on reviendra à notre but premier.

Je voulais que cela figure au compte rendu.

(1215)

M. Frank Baylis:

J'aimerais revenir sur deux points que vous avez soulevés.

J'ai lu les règles sur la lecture, et elles sont assez souples. Elles permettent à la première personne qui parle de... cela tient compte de situations comme la vôtre ou celle des ministres. Si le ministre présente un budget, il ne dira pas qu'il va se mettre à lire.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est un bon exemple. Un discours du Trône serait encore mieux.

M. Frank Baylis:

Mais ces choses-là figurent dans les règles. Ce n'est pas comme si on ne devait pas lire du tout. Les règles sont très claires. Disons que vous devez citer quelqu'un, vous vous demandez ce qu'il a dit exactement, ou si vous présentez un projet de loi ou une motion, vous auriez le droit de lire. Les règles admettent cela.

Je veux clarifier la question de la lecture même si elle est mal comprise. C'est pourquoi je tenais à apporter cette précision.

Le deuxième point, c'est à propos des deux dernières déclarations de députés qui sont réservées... Comme je disais, les choses se sont détériorées. Il était entendu que le Président faisait comme bon lui semblait. Les deux dernières ont été réservées parce qu'il se passe des choses et que les partis en ont besoin. Avec le temps, cela a pris le dessus. Ensuite, la formule de rotation s'est appliquée un certain temps, du moins au Parti libéral, où il y avait quatre... On savait des mois à l'avance que ce serait telle journée et qu'il fallait être prêt. C'est dans la nature des choses qu'avec le temps, tout tend à se centraliser; à un moment donné, il faut remettre les compteurs à zéro et se dire qu'on revient à l'état initial.

M. Scott Reid:

Je sais qu'avec les déclarations de députés, il se fait des échanges, dans la mesure où elles sont toujours inscrites dans une rotation, comme le veut la tendance pour certaines d'entre elles. Elles sont échangeables, du moins dans mon caucus. J'ai échangé ma dernière avec Larry Miller, qui voulait rendre hommage à quelqu'un qui était dans la tribune ce jour-là. J'avais droit à une déclaration et pas lui, et c'est pourquoi j'occupe maintenant le créneau qui était le sien.

Ma question est la suivante. Elle s'adresse à vous deux, et je pense que vous aurez peut-être des réponses différentes. Quel devrait être le degré de consensus nécessaire pour modifier un article du Règlement — pas seulement ceux qui sont visés ici, mais n'importe quel article important du Règlement? J'aimerais savoir jusqu'où il faudrait aller, à votre avis: est-ce qu'il faut avoir l'unanimité ou bien quelque chose équivalant, disons, au consentement de tous les partis reconnus — ce qui n'est pas tout à fait la même chose — ou encore devrions-nous tenir un vote classique à la majorité simple?

Dites-moi où vous vous situez là-dedans. Il y a peut-être d'autres options que je n'ai pas mentionnées.

Le président:

Voulez-vous dire en comité?

M. Scott Reid:

Non. Je veux dire à la Chambre.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Permettez-moi, tout d'abord, de dire que je trouve très louable votre contribution à la démocratie dans cette enceinte, Scott. J'adore travailler avec vous. Vous êtes un de ceux qui gardent l'œil ouvert et qui ont des références historiques pour savoir ce qu'il faut faire afin de protéger la démocratie parlementaire, et j'apprécie cela.

J'aime le fait qu'après réflexion, vous vous ralliez à l'idée de M. Simms au sujet des déclarations relevant de l'article 31, à savoir qu'il y a une solution: nous en faisons une loterie, un ordre est établi et tout le monde obtient son créneau. Je voulais juste dire que c'était formidable.

J'ai moi-même proposé des modifications au Règlement en réponse à celles proposées par le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre au début de la présente session. C'était frustrant pour moi, après avoir tant travaillé à quelque chose...

Il se trouve que je me suis rendue au Royaume-Uni pour une autre raison. J'ai passé du temps dans le Parlement, j'ai rencontré ma collègue, la seule députée du Parti vert au Parlement de Westminster, et j'ai appris comment on faisait les choses là-bas. C'était fascinant, vraiment fascinant, pas seulement de lire le livre, mais de demander ce qu'il en est.

J'aurais bien aimé que quelqu'un réagisse à tout le travail que j'ai mis dans mes 26 pages de suggestions pour améliorer le Règlement.

Comment nous y prendre au juste? Je pense qu'il vaudrait mieux avoir un vrai consensus, ce qui est très difficile à obtenir. Le problème, c'est d'enlever aux partis l'emprise qu'ils exercent sur nous pour nous empêcher de réduire leur pouvoir. Alors où se trouve le consensus? Où est-ce qu'il se situe vraiment? Est-ce que le consentement appartient à chaque député? Ou est-ce qu'il appartient aux bonzes du parti, qui ne veulent absolument pas renoncer à leur pouvoir de dicter comment les projets de loi doivent cheminer à la Chambre? Il ne s'agit pas seulement de nos occasions de parler. Le problème ultime, c'est l'emprise des partis, c'est la productivité sacrifiée au rituel du théâtre kabuki, comme le disait si bien Michael Chong pour décrire ce qui se passe au Parlement.

J'aimerais bien voir, peut-être, un scrutin anonyme, quelques très bons ateliers au début de la législature. Comme je disais, nous avons de nouveaux élus. Ils n'ont aucune idée de ce que ces enjeux représentent au jour le jour. La raison pour laquelle nous sommes tous ici, c'est que M. Baylis est venu nous dire: « Ce n'est pas bon. Je n'aime pas cela. J'aimerais que cela change. » Alors, peut-être qu'on pourrait travailler en atelier avec les députés, puis essayer d'obtenir un consensus, c'est-à-dire... Le Parti vert prend des décisions par consensus. Nous ne les soumettons pas normalement à un scrutin secret, mais étant donné le rôle des partis politiques qui surveillent tout ce que les autres...

(1220)

M. Scott Reid:

Comment faites-vous pour savoir...

Le président:

Vous débordez déjà de quatre minutes.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Désolée.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux juste demander... C'est vraiment important.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous dites que vous prenez des décisions par consensus, mais il arrive un moment où vous vous dites: « Ah! ah! Nous avons un consensus. » Juste un peu avant, vous ne l'aviez pas encore. Quel est ce moment?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Le scrutin secret est ce que je proposais comme moyen de vérifier s'il y a consensus dans ce cas. Au Parti vert, nous disons: « Bon, nous avons débattu de cette question. Il y a eu de violentes prises de bec. Sommes-nous rendus à un point où la discussion ne donne plus rien et qu'il faut maintenant faire des compromis? » Ensuite, nous vérifions s'il y a consensus. Avons-nous un consensus, qui est essentiellement unanime?

Si nous n'avons pas de consensus, alors nous demandons à des gens: « Accepteriez-vous de vous retirer pour qu'il y ait consensus? » En général, lorsqu'ils se rendent compte qu'ils sont seuls à défendre farouchement leur position, ils acceptent de se retirer et le consensus passe.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci. Cela aide beaucoup à comprendre comment cela fonctionne.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais garder le droit de lire, et je vais vous dire pourquoi: je pense beaucoup mieux par écrit que par improvisation. C'est une bizarrerie de mon caractère, et c'est loin d'être la seule. Pour moi, la question n'est pas tant de savoir si vous avez des notes ou des discours; c'est de savoir qui les écrit. Savez-vous à l'avance que vous allez prononcer un discours? Savez-vous ce que vous allez dire? Est-ce que vous prononcez votre propre discours? J'ai prononcé des discours que j'ai rédigés moi-même et qui ont bien fait rigoler. J'y ai mis beaucoup d'efforts. On m'a aussi remis des discours en me disant: « Voici, pouvez-vous prendre la parole dans trois minutes? », et j'ai dû demander de quoi j'allais parler.

Voilà ce qui ne va pas dans le système. C'est là que le bât blesse. Êtes-vous d'accord avec cela?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Oui, mais le meilleur moyen de s'assurer que les gens prononcent leurs propres mots, c'est qu'ils ne lisent pas un discours. Je vous renvoie à l'argument de M. Simms à propos du temps de parole. Au Parlement britannique, par exemple, le Président est plus souple à cet égard, tandis que nous avons des règles strictes de minutage. Vous avez 30 secondes pour poser votre question à la période des questions. Ce n'est pas ainsi que cela se passe au Parlement du Royaume-Uni. Donc, un peu plus de souplesse de la part du Président aiderait à s'exprimer de façon improvisée.

La seule fois que j'ai lu quelque chose à la Chambre, c'est lorsque j'ai fait un rappel au Règlement très détaillé, avec des tas de citations, au cours de la 41e législature pour essayer de bloquer le projet de loi C-38, alléguant que ce n'était pas un vrai projet de loi omnibus. Le seul moment où je lis quelque chose, c'est lorsque j'ai un argument juridique détaillé. J'ai une petite horloge devant moi. Lorsque j'arrive à 20 secondes sur les 30 qui me sont allouées, je sais que je dois conclure. Lorsque je dispose de 10 minutes et que je suis rendue à 9, je sais que je dois conclure. Je ne lis donc jamais; j'ai cette chance-là.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Neuf minutes écoulées et non pas neuf minutes restantes, c'est bien cela?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Neuf minutes écoulées et une minute restante.

Votre question est bonne, monsieur Graham, à savoir s'il y a moyen de vérifier qu'on a écrit le discours soi-même et qu'on ne l'a pas simplement reçu. Lorsque j'entends des députés lire des discours et prononcer de travers, je sais qu'ils ne sont pas familiers avec le sujet et c'est pour cette raison que les mots sortent drôlement de leur bouche.

(1225)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez raison.

M. Frank Baylis:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose, monsieur Graham?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cela touche deux points. Nous nous sommes demandé comment procéder lorsque nous aurons une nouvelle législature. Je n'aurais pas été en mesure, nouvellement élu, de me faire à ces choses-là. J'ai dû lire les règles, mais j'ai dû aussi en faire l'expérience. Il y en a qui disent qu'il faudrait revoir cela dans une nouvelle législature. Je dis qu'il faut le faire maintenant. Je le répète, maintenant que nous sommes aguerris, nous pouvons apporter ce changement.

Pour ce qui est de la lecture, je l'ai fait une fois. Je suis un joueur d'équipe, j'étais nouveau et je ne comprenais pas. Quelqu'un m'a demandé: « Pourriez-vous faire cela? » J'ai répondu: « Oui, je fais partie de l'équipe. » Alors j'ai lu — une fois et une fois seulement. Lorsque j'ai compris ce que j'avais fait, je me suis dit que je ne le ferais plus jamais, parce que ce n'est pas bien. Je parle à titre de député, et si mes propos doivent être consignés, autant que ce soit les miens et que je sache de quoi je parle. Il a fallu que je vive cela pour me rendre compte que ce n'était pas bien.

Michael Chong m'a déjà raconté une anecdote très amusante sur la fois où, dans son parti, le même discours a été lu deux fois par mégarde — mot pour mot.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Bien, je disais dans mon rappel au Règlement à l'époque — à propos des vices de forme du projet de loi C-38 — que j'étais présente tout le temps, et que j'avais entendu des paragraphes entiers répétés mot pour mot. C'est gênant pour les députés, mais cela ne venait pas de la bouche d'anciens députés; c'étaient des ministres. Ce n'était pas du plagiat délibéré, c'était juste quelqu'un dans les coulisses qui essayait de cracher les discours. J'entendais débiter le même texte encore et encore dans la bouche de gens qui, de toute évidence, ne l'avaient pas écrit eux-mêmes et ne savaient pas vraiment de quoi ils parlaient, mais qui étaient prêts à lire un discours.

Je pense que le Parlement est fait pour parler.[Français]

Nous sommes ici pour parler dans nos propres mots.[Traduction]

Vous n'êtes pas censé lire le travail de quelqu'un d'autre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Je suis déjà à court de temps...

Mme Elizabeth May: Désolée, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Très bien. C'est toujours fascinant. Je souhaiterais que nous ayons beaucoup plus d'heures à notre disposition.

Ce qu'il nous faudrait, c'est un créneau de 15 minutes où on peut parler aussi longtemps qu'on veut pendant les 10 premières, après quoi tout le temps qui reste est consacré aux questions. Si vous voulez avoir une conversation, il n'en tient qu'à vous de discourir pendant deux minutes et de répondre aux questions pendant 13 minutes. C'est ce que je préférerais. J'aimerais bien mieux une conversation qu'un discours.

Mais je ne veux pas m'éterniser là-dessus. J'ai probablement déjà dépassé le temps que j'avais, et ma liste est à peine entamée.

La première fois que je vous ai rencontrée, madame May, c'était en 2008 au comité de rédaction du Guelph Mercury Tribune. Une des premières questions que je vous ai posées, c'était si notre politique fonctionnait grâce aux partis ou malgré eux. Votre réponse a été aussi claire que directe: elle fonctionne malgré les partis. Alors, comment régler quoi que ce soit si, à la base, aucun candidat n'existe dans une élection à moins d'être approuvé par le chef du parti, qui a ensuite la haute main sur la composition des comités et toutes sortes de choses? Au bout du compte, il y a toujours ce pouvoir qui joue à la fin. Nous avons beau changer tout ce que nous voulons, nous devons quand même nous y plier si nous voulons revenir aux prochaines élections.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Dans sa version originale, la Loi instituant des réformes que Michael Chong a présentée allait supprimer cela. Rappelons-nous que la règle selon laquelle le chef du parti doit signer les actes de candidature est une conséquence imprévue de la décision de mettre le nom des partis sur le bulletin de vote, à côté du nom des candidats. De 1867 jusqu'aux années 1970, le nom des partis ne figurait pas sur les bulletins de vote, seulement le nom des candidats.

Mon parti, si vous voulez savoir comment il s'y prend, a adopté un règlement administratif qui dit que je n'ai pas le droit — pas moi en particulier, mais tout chef du Parti vert — de refuser de signer un acte de candidature sans l'appui des deux tiers du conseil fédéral élu. Quant au pouvoir abusif du chef de refuser une excellente candidature pour placer quelqu'un qu'il aime mieux, c'est un pouvoir que nous pourrions réduire par voie législative. Michael Chong a bien essayé.

M. Scott Simms:

Je m'en voudrais de ne pas dire que la seule personne qui a vraiment respecté son temps de parole est Mme Lapointe.

Le président:

Non. Elle non plus n'a pas respecté l'horaire.

Il nous reste du temps pour une autre question, et je vais le donner à Mme Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Selon moi, j'ai respecté les sept minutes qui m'avaient été accordées. Tout commence toujours par le respect des règles. Je dois dire, pour ma part, que j'aime bien que tout le monde respecte les règles qu'on met en place. [Traduction]

Le président:

Désolé, mais vous avez fait sept minutes et 56 secondes. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Monsieur Baylis, tantôt vous avez parlé des raisons pour lesquelles les femmes ne s'engageaient pas en politique. Tout le monde a donné son opinion sur plusieurs choses. Or je suis une femme et j'ai parlé à beaucoup de femmes qui envisageaient de s'engager en politique. Vous disiez que les femmes ne voulaient pas s'y engager à cause des comportements qui ont cours à la Chambre, mais ce n'est pas la principale raison. Les femmes pensent davantage à la qualité de vie qu'elles vont perdre, sur le plan personnel. Par contre, si vous demandez à un homme s'il aimerait s'engager en politique, il ne se posera pas trois fois la question. Si vous lui dites qu'il ferait du bon travail, il va se lancer sans hésiter. Les femmes pensent beaucoup plus aux conséquences. La plupart du temps, elles sont le pivot de la famille. C'est plutôt ce genre de choses que m'ont dites les femmes à qui j'ai parlé.

Pour ce qui est du décorum, le but de la motion est d'instaurer la collaboration plutôt que la confrontation. C'est ce que vous avez dit d'entrée de jeu. C'est franchement un très bon objectif. Oui, il faut collaborer, et oui, nous avons des choses à accomplir.

Cela dit, c'est une motion très volumineuse, qui est découpée en plusieurs éléments distincts. Si vous me demandez de me prononcer pour ou contre la motion à la fin de la session, je vous ferai remarquer que nous n'aurons pas eu le temps d'en débattre et de vérifier si cela va accomplir précisément ce que c'est censé accomplir. Je n'en suis pas encore convaincue. À ce sujet, j'aurai des questions à poser à mes collègues quand ils seront présents. Pour le moment, c'est trop volumineux pour que nous puissions nous prononcer.

J'aimerais savoir comment, selon vous, nous pourrions procéder dans le cas d'une motion aussi volumineuse.

Je ne suis pas d'accord sur la motion dans son entièreté. Il y a toutefois des aspects auxquels je suis très favorable. Non, il n'est pas normal de faire des marathons de vote. Non, ce n'est pas convenable. Ce n'est pas sain. Personne ne peut imposer cela à quelqu'un. Cependant, nous avons des règles qui permettent aux partis de l'opposition de le faire.

Tous les gens qui sont ici présentement ont été élus sur la base d'une plateforme électorale. En principe, vous, Frank Baylis, représentez la circonscription de Pierrefonds—Dollard, mais vous avez été élu sous la bannière libérale. Les gens en face de nous font partie de l'opposition et ont promis d'accomplir certaines choses. Quand vous êtes à la Chambre, vous représentez les gens de Pierrefonds—Dollard, et je représente ceux de Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, mais sous la bannière libérale. Nous ne pouvons pas faire fi de cet aspect quand nous sommes à la Chambre. Nous avons promis d'accomplir des choses.

J'aimerais entendre vos commentaires à ce sujet.

(1230)

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous soulevez de très bons points, madame Lapointe.

Je veux d'abord préciser une chose, en ce qui concerne l'engagement des femmes en politique. Il va sans dire que nous avons des femmes dans nos rangs. Mes propos étaient basés sur un article faisant état d'un sondage effectué auprès de toutes les premières ministres provinciales du pays. C'est de là que j'ai tiré cet énoncé. On les avait questionnées sur leur expérience et on leur avait demandé pourquoi si peu de femmes occupaient ces fonctions. Ce sont ces femmes qui ont dit que le principal obstacle, lorsqu'il s'agissait d'encourager plus de femmes à s'engager en politique, était ce qu'elles voyaient pendant la période des questions orales. Je voulais simplement vous faire part de ce fait.

Je répète que cela va aussi aider la productivité. Je crois sincèrement à la courtoisie et à la productivité.

Par ailleurs, vous dites que la motion est trop volumineuse. Or s'il est question d'apporter des changements afin d'instaurer une Chambre parallèle, on ne pourra pas éviter que ce soit volumineux. C'est écrit, et c'est à vous de déterminer si vous voulez ou non aller de l'avant.

Enfin, je suis complètement d'accord pour ce qui est de maintenir un équilibre avec la plateforme électorale. Nous sommes élus à titre de députés libéraux. En tant que député libéral, lorsque le travail a été terminé, j'ai demandé un rendez-vous avec notre premier ministre, qui est aussi du Parti libéral. Je lui ai expliqué le processus et je lui ai demandé, entre autres choses, s'il pourrait s'agir d'un vote libre. Il ne m'a pas répondu oui à 100 %, compte tenu du fait qu'il venait tout juste d'être mis au fait de l'ensemble de ma proposition, mais, selon lui, cela respectait les critères qu'il avait déjà établis pour déterminer dans quels cas il peut s'agir d'un vote libre. En effet, cela ne va à l'encontre ni de notre plateforme ni de la Charte, et ce n'est pas un vote de confiance. C'est ce que notre premier ministre m'a dit.

Donc, pour ce qui est de l'équilibre à maintenir, dans ce cas-ci, c'est respecté. Je vous demanderais de vérifier cela auprès de notre premier ministre. [Traduction]

Le président:

Pouvez-vous conclure, madame May?

(1235)

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci.

Je tiens à dire que le travail que M. Baylis a mis en marche ici prouve déjà sa valeur puisque nous avons cette discussion. J'encourage fortement tous mes collègues à y réfléchir davantage.

Je comprends ce que vous dites, madame Lapointe, mais il est très important de se rappeler que la seule description de poste que nous ayons en droit se trouve dans la Constitution du Canada. La Constitution ne mentionne pas l'existence de partis politiques. Nous sommes ici pour représenter nos électeurs, et la démocratie parlementaire de Westminster dit que tous les députés sont égaux et que le premier ministre est essentiellement premier parmi ses pairs, primus inter pares. Nous ne sommes pas de simples rouages dans les machines de nos partis respectifs. Pour remédier à cela, pour dire que le pendule est allé trop loin du côté où les députés ne sont que des rouages dans une grosse machine dont le seul but est d'atteindre le pouvoir, je pense que nous sommes bien placés, nous les députés en 2019, pour amorcer le changement et ramener le pendule un peu de l'autre côté, parce qu'il est allé trop loin.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à vous deux d'être venus. Vous avez manifestement lancé le débat sur un grand nombre de sujets qui suscitent des opinions aussi intéressantes que passionnées. Comme l'a dit David Graham...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons ouvert la boîte de Pandore.

Le président:

C'est ce que je pensais.

Comme l'a dit David Graham, nous pourrions en discuter pendant des heures et des heures, et je suis sûr que nous en discuterons davantage.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes pour passer à la prochaine partie de la réunion.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard proc 31093 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 30, 2019

2019-05-16 PROC 156

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. I call the meeting to order.

Welcome to the 156th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being televised.

Our first order of business today is consideration of the main estimates under the Leaders' Debates Commission.

We are pleased to have with us the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions.

She is joined by officials from the Privy Council Office. They are Allen Sutherland, Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government and Democratic Institutions; and Matthew Shea, Assistant Deputy Minister of Corporate Services.

Thank you for being here. I'll now turn the floor over to the minister for her opening statement.

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the committee for inviting me back here today. I am pleased to be here to discuss the main estimates of 2019-20 for the independent Leaders' Debates Commission.

I am grateful to be joined by Mr. Al Sutherland, Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government and Democratic Institutions, as well as Mr. Matthew Shea, Assistant Deputy Minister for Corporate Services.[Translation]

During my February 19 appearance before this committee, I reiterated the essential role that leaders' debates play in Canada's democracy, and I emphasized that such debates should be organized in a manner that puts the public interest first.[English]

The commission is exercising its independence and impartiality in executing its primary mandate, which is to organize two leaders debates, one in each official language, in advance of the 2019 general election, and in related spending. Through these estimates, the commission is requesting $4.6 million to organize these debates. [Translation]

The commission, led by the Right Honourable David Johnston, has established a small secretariat made up of Michel Cormier, Executive Director, Stephen Wallace, Senior Advisor, and four other staff members. [English]

On March 22, 2019, the members of its advisory board were announced, and on March 25 it held its first in-person meeting with the commissioner and the executive director. The board will provide advice to the commissioner on how to carry out its mandate. It is composed of seven individuals who reflect gender balance, Canada's diversity, and a broad swath of political affiliations and expertise.

The commission has established a web presence, and on April 4 it launched a request for interest related to debates production, which informed a full request for proposals that was issued earlier this week.[Translation]

Additional costs are expected for the contracting of a production entity to produce and broadcast the debates, the ongoing operation of the advisory board, awareness raising and engagement of Canadians, and administrative costs.

As the members around the table will know, the commission has the independence to determine how best to spend the operating funds it has been allocated while remaining within the funding envelope.[English]

In his recent appearance before this committee on May 2, 2019, the debates commissioner, the Right Honourable David Johnston, reiterated his intention and duty to use funding in a responsible manner. Furthermore, he emphasized that the funding being sought is an “up to” amount and that the commission will ensure it operates cost-effectively in all of its work.[Translation]

Finally, the Order in Council setting the mandate of the commission is clear: the Leaders’ Debates Commission is to be guided by the pursuit of the public interest and by the principles of independence, impartiality and cost-effectiveness.

The commission provides a unique opportunity for Canadians to hear from those looking to lead the country, from reliable, impartial sources.[English]

As we know, online disinformation is something we will all contend with leading up to the next election.[Translation]

The leaders' debates become even more important this year as they provide a venue to communicate clear and reliable information that is accessible to everyone at the same time.

I am pleased to answer any questions members may have on this topic.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister. Thanks for coming. You come here a lot.

I'd like to welcome Bob Bratina to the committee.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll open the questioning with Madam Lapointe.[Translation]

Thank you.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I'm trying to start up my computer. Yesterday, I visited the commission's website. We have been told that the commission is on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. I was looking at the financial aspect in particular. I don't know if you have checked out the commission's site, but there is no link to Instagram. The site only indicates which platforms the commission is using.

Are you aware of this?

(1110)

Hon. Karina Gould:

No.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You didn't check it out? Yesterday, I checked it out.

That was my first question. I am trying to start up my computer but it is not co-operating.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I know that my staff looked everywhere today and found the link to Instagram. It may be easier to access from the app than from the computer.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

No. I tried it.

Hon. Karina Gould:

We could show you how to do it.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Both you and Debates Commissioner David L. Johnston have already appeared before the committee on this matter. How is he making out with his preparations? There is a process to be followed. The website gives the timeline. For example, it shows what is to be accomplished by March and by May. Has he completed what he had to do within the timeframe? [English]

Mr. Matthew Shea (Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services, Privy Council Office):

Similar to the last time we appeared, I'd underscore the fact that they're arm's length. We provide support to the debates commissioner as needed, from a corporate perspective.

As far as them getting along, we're helping them to get contracts in place. They have an RFP out right now, and we're working with them on that. They have space set up. If they have IT requirements, we help them.

As far as tracking their progress, that's not our role. In fact, for most questions you'll have that are really detailed about the work they're doing, we're not involved. That's a very purposeful decision we've taken to ensure that we are at arm's length here. It's no different from what we do with the commission of inquiry for MMIWG or for the new special adviser to the Prime Minister. We absolutely make sure that there's an arm's-length relationship and independence. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

It is an entity unto itself. These people report to the commissioner. Ultimately, the minister is supervising this. Is that correct?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It is not a supervisory relationship. We—

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You are accountable to the government.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, as the independent commissioner, Mr. Johnston is required to report to Parliament. During the process, we ensured that the commission would have the independence required to make its own decisions and that there would be no political or government influence. As stated in the Order in Council, after the election the commission is to table a report in Parliament providing its advice on this matter.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You spoke about cost-effectiveness. There will be a leaders' debate in French and one in English. As we know, the leaders will be asked to participate. Do you know if all television networks purchase the rights? I am thinking in particular of Radio-Canada, TVA and CPAC.

Hon. Karina Gould:

No. The Order in Council states the following.[English]

The feed has to be free. It has to be made available to any organization free of charge. That was done specifically and purposefully. One of the things we heard through the consultations is that these debates should be accessible to any Canadian who is interested in them, and they should be made easily available. Making the feed free of charge will accomplish that goal. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The commission's main mandate is to make the debate accessible to everyone, including members of minority language communities and members of the linguistic majority, whether English or French. Not all people will necessarily have access to electronic tools. I imagine they will ensure that the debate will be on the radio.

Hon. Karina Gould:

That is the objective.[English]

The dissemination of the debates themselves will be available. The only requirement, as listed in the order in council, is to ensure the integrity of the debates. Otherwise, the feed will be made available.

That's really up to Canadian entities, organizations and broadcasters as to how they choose to use that. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

All right.

You said that there will be a report at the end. Have you at least specified what kind of report you want and what you want it to cover? For example, will the commission determine if it managed to reach young people as expected? We know that it is more difficult to reach young voters. Is that one of the issues that you want to see in the report that will be tabled after the election?

(1115)

Hon. Karina Gould:

We have yet to work out all those details, but you can see in section 10 of the order what we hope to get from this report.

Of course, next time you see the commissioner I think it would be a good idea to ask him those very questions if you want to know what happened after the election. I encourage parliamentarians to do that.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I started by talking about social media because I tried to connect to each platform last night.

We need to raise awareness. I know that it's part of the commissioner's mandate to raise awareness and to reach as many electors as possible to inform them of upcoming debates and encourage them to get out and vote. Is that something you would like the commissioner to do?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The mandate includes a component on public awareness of the debates. The goal is not necessarily to encourage people to go out and vote. At the very least we have to ensure that all Canadians are aware of the leaders' debates and know how to view them.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay, thank you very much.

My computer is still not working.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mrs. Kusie has the floor.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Hello, Minister. It's lovely to see you, and you did a great job again last night at Politics and the Pen. You did just a lovely job.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Minister Gould, you referred to the independence of the debates commission. I would say that it is not truly independent, because if it were, you wouldn't be here today for the estimates. Our committee has already heard from the Chief Electoral Officer and from the administration of the House of Commons on the main estimates. Both of them, I will point out, did not have a minister appearing on their behalf, so evidently you're here today.

Why did you not create a debates commission that was entirely independent, instead of one within your own department, where the government in power could have both political and financial control over the commission?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Just for clarification with regard to the Chief Electoral Officer, the Chief Electoral Officer is, of course, an independent officer of Parliament, but they do report their main estimates through me as a minister as well. I would strongly argue that they are very independent in their actions and activities. I think that's an important clarification to make.

With regard to the debates commission, the way it has been set up is really to ensure that they have the resources necessary to fulfill their mandate, but without any direction or conversation between the commissioner and the government once they've been established.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

From your appearance here today for the main estimates, it seems evident to me that your department does in fact have the ultimate authority over the budget of the debates commissioner. Is that true?

Hon. Karina Gould:

In fact, one of the things that I did as minister was sign authority so that the commission can make all of those decisions—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, but you did provide that signed authority.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—because anything that is going through government spending has to have ministerial accountability, but all of those decisions are taken by themselves.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure, but even if you claim that you're not interfering in the budgetary decisions of the commission, ultimately you as the minister and the government of the day do have that authority. Is that not true?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Can I just jump in?

You talk about Minister Gould's department, but we are here as PCO. It's important to note that unlike a commission of inquiry, for example, which is supported by PCO, although at arm's length, this is actually a separate entity, with its own estimates and with its own deputy head, and it has the ability to make all of those decisions.

With regard to finances, I am the arm's-length service provider for them. They chose that, although they had every opportunity to go to other options and they looked at other options.

In my role, my team supports them in HR, IT, finance and all those areas. They don't brief me on that. I don't brief the minister and I don't brief Mr. Sutherland, so there is no interference whatsoever in the process. There is no interference in any of their spending whatsoever.

Our only goal as a service provider will be to make sure that they do things that follow policy and that are legal, which I think is in everyone's best interest.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I am kind of concerned about the term “arm's length”. It's still very clear to me that the minister and the government do control the budget, so I'm wondering why you would place something so critical to our democratic institutions as a leaders debate under your department, thus compromising the commission's independent integrity by controlling the budget, rather than making it an entirely independent organization like Elections Canada.

(1120)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I am so delighted to hear from the Conservatives how important you think leaders debates are. That is really a wonderful change of tone, and I'm glad, because I hope it means that there will be full participation in this election within them.

One of the reasons we created the leaders debates and the independence of this process was to ensure that all Canadians would be able to access these debates and know that this is done in the public interest, not in backroom deals whereby previous prime ministers try to dictate the terms and conditions of how these debates take place.

I am just absolutely thrilled to hear the Conservative position on this.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's kind of disappointing commentary to me. It's starting to sound a little more marginal than an actual response. I feel that if you genuinely thought that something like this was so important for Canadians and was so democratic, Minister, then at least you would have provided the opportunity to have the creation of the debates commission discussed in the House of Commons. You didn't even extend that courtesy, not to mention turning down many of the recommendations that this committee gave to you in regard to the debates commission. The House of Commons didn't have an opportunity to feed into this conversation about the debates commission.

I would certainly say that we support democratic processes, but to me this serves as an example of one case in which your ministry did not.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think all the members of Parliament here would agree with me that this committee, as a committee of the House of Commons, in fact did a very robust study on leaders debates and fed into this process, along with the public consultations and the round tables that we held with stakeholders.

One of the outcomes of this process is that following this upcoming election, the current commissioner will report back to Parliament, and specifically to this committee, within six months of the election to talk about the process, to talk about what can be improved, and to talk about whether this should be established in statute or not.

I am really quite grateful for the input and the involvement of the House of Commons, and notably the members of this committee.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

You're making that statement even though the debates commission wasn't even debated in the House of Commons.

These reflect the recommendations that you did not take that were made by the house procedure committee. The office of the debates commissioner is under the ministry of democratic institutions and not under Elections Canada; the government chose the participation criteria, rather than the debates commissioner in consultation with the advisory panel; and the Liberal government unilaterally chose the debates commissioner, as I've gone over several times with you and with the debates commissioner himself, without any consultation with the other political parties or a fair process as set out in the recommendations.

It just sounds to me that for someone who purports to hold this as a key component and institution of the democratic process, so far it has not been installed and implemented very democratically, Minister.

Thank you.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Do I have a chance to respond?

The Chair:

You have 15 seconds.

Hon. Karina Gould:

As I've said many times—and I believe this is the fourth time I've appeared, in fact, on this very topic—we've had lots of engagement on this issue, and I've very much appreciated all the feedback, all the advice given, and all the challenges from this committee. I think that that has led to the appointment of a very illustrious, trusted Canadian to take on this mandate, someone who I think will be able to deliver for Canadians a debate that's in the public interest and that all Canadians will have access to.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister. It's good to see you again.

You're right that we've been around this a few times. I have to tell you that I even leaned over to Tyler and said, “I'm running out of questions,” because we have gone around a lot of times.

I will reiterate, because it needs to be said, that the only thing on which I agree with my colleagues from the Conservative caucus is that the process was ham-fisted. There wasn't as much respect paid to this committee and the work we did as was promised in the election, and the name was chosen unilaterally. Those are all legitimate criticisms that the government has to wear.

However, I am in full alignment with the desire to make this so credible that the price to be paid by any political leader for not attending the leaders debate would be greater than any benefit from hiding and not having to be accountable and not facing scrutiny. I'm going to draw a very distinct line at criticizing the government on some of the missteps on the way to getting here. Those criticisms are not, in my opinion, enough to delegitimize the existence of the commission, particularly in the choice of Mr. Johnston. You had to go a long way to find a Canadian that no one could lay a glove on politically in any way, but you found him, and it matters.

I have to tell you that the inquisition-style questioning that was put upon Mr. Johnston from the official opposition was almost becoming a little embarrassing. He finally turned and said, in my paraphrased words, “You want assurances that this position is going to be filled with integrity? My name is on the line and my reputation is on the line. That's where the credibility is going to come from.”

You know what? For me, and I think for the overwhelming majority of Canadians, given Mr. Johnston's track record as a servant of Canada and as a servant of the public interest, that's good enough for me, as long as it's linked with public accountability at the end.

I did ask him about that, drilling down to make sure that the review was going to be as vigorous as it needs to be, and again I was satisfied. If I were returning to the next Parliament, which I am not, I would feel satisfied that I was going to have in front of me the analysis that I need to go back and determine whether we achieved the objectives in the way that we wanted, particularly in terms of accountability.

I could take more time asking questions, but I don't want to take away from joining with you in being surprised and pleased that we now have on record that the Conservatives believe that this is important and that it matters. Now what we need to do is make sure that there's so much credibility around this process that never again does a leader from any party dodge national debates when he or she wants to be the prime minister of this country.

If I have any time left, Minister, you're welcome to it to reinforce something, or we can just move on, but that was the most important thing. I don't have any questions now. I think the really important questions are going to come after the fact, when we review how well it worked and where we can make improvements.

Quite frankly, as a last thought, the proof of the pudding is going to be on the night of the debates. Are all the seats full? If they are, then we collectively, in the majority, were successful. If there's even one empty seat, then we failed. We've failed to create the political climate where you couldn't afford to pay that price. History is going to tell us the tale.

Thanks very much, Chair.

Thank you again, Minister.

(1125)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I will just say thank you, Mr. Christopherson, for those comments. I take the whole of them, both the critique and the support.

I think that's where going through this process will be important. Having that review at the end and having that accountability for what worked, what didn't, what we can do better, and how we can make this a long-term proposal are vitally and critically important.

I know that we both share a deep passion for public service and accountability, as well as for the importance of leaders debates as Canadians make up their minds as to who they want to be led by in the future.

Thank you for your comments.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Just to reiterate, the minister is here because the committee asked her to be here. She didn't necessarily have to be here.

We'll go to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Again, picking up on that point, I don't think we've ever put up a fight in terms of asking a minister to come. I think we work well as a committee, and when these requests have been made, I know Minister Gould has been here four times on this issue and many other times on many other issues. I don't understand the criticism at the beginning of Ms. Kusie's statement, but that said, I would like to build a little on what Mr. Christopherson said.

This is about what has happened over the last couple of months on this committee. Again, we work very well together, and there tends to be a very respectful tone in this committee, but when we had a series of witnesses, starting with the Clerk of the House, we saw the whip from the official opposition come down and question his integrity.

Then when we had the Chief Electoral Officer, who has been before this committee many times and has worked very well with this committee, Mr. Poilievre questioned his integrity, going so far as to suggest, in the absence of any evidence, that Elections Canada is a Liberal lapdog. He had no qualms about doing it and took delight in doing it, even correcting me when I got the quote wrong on his statement.

Then it went one step further.

Mr. Christopherson's comments described the integrity of David Johnston very well. Within Canada there are few individuals who have such unassailable credibility, and you would think they would be able to come before this committee. I agree with Mr. Christopherson that we can disagree on the process by which individuals were selected and how this commission came to be, and those are fair comments. The opposition is well within its rights in questioning the government on its role and its decisions and the difference between the recommendations of this committee and what actually happened, and it should be asking those questions. That's the type of debate I'm used to in this committee.

However, to then hear the opposition question the personal credibility of David Johnston to the extent that he had to stand up and defend himself by pointing to his own body of work is shocking.

Can you comment on that and your impression of...I would call him “Your Excellency”, but there's a rule that you have to put five dollars in the pot towards his charity. Can you comment on the credibility of David Johnston and your conversations that you have had so far?

(1130)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Certainly.

First of all, I think it's a challenge when the credibility of very credible people is challenged, particularly when they are making it very clear that they are acting independently and that there has been no opportunity for interference or pressure. I believe we should take them at their word, particularly in the case of someone like Mr. Johnston, who has served Canadians for decades. He has made a career and a life of serving Canadians and has not been partisan in any way whatsoever.

This was someone who was appointed by Prime Minister Harper to be Governor General, and then we appointed him as the debates commissioner. He has been tremendous in being above partisanship and always thinking about the Canadian spirit.

That's a characteristic we were looking for when we were looking for the person who could manage what is a very political and very partisan issue. Really, since leaders debates have begun, they have been decided in back rooms. There has been political manoeuvring. Whoever was the leader of the day often had more say and authority in terms of when and where these debates would be held. We saw that in clear abundance in 2015, when the former prime minister basically dictated where, when, how and who would be participating in the debates.

That's why we were specifically looking for someone who could rise above all of that, someone Canadians could trust because they would know there would not be any inkling of partisanship, that this would not be political and would be purely about public service and serving the Canadian interest.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

Maybe I will ask more directly about the attack on the credibility of Elections Canada and the Chief Electoral Officer.

I guess I look perhaps to our friends to the south and at attempts by politicians to score political points against institutions, especially independent institutions, that are involved in the democratic process. For me, it's troubling to see that happen here, to see it happen with delight from the opposition, and it worries me going into an election that in the absence of any evidence there is a gleeful willingness to attack the Chief Electoral Officer and Elections Canada, which is one of the most respected electoral bodies in the world.

Can you comment on that as well?

(1135)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Elections are based on two things in my opinion: trust in the process and trust in the outcome. In order to have those, you need to have trust in the impartial independent administrator of those elections. I believe that Elections Canada since its inception has been a shining example around the world of that impartiality and that independence.

It has administered the elections legislation created by this Parliament, and numerous parliaments before it, effectively and in a way that Canadians can have confidence and trust in. I think it is a particularly dangerous path to go down to flirt with questioning the independence, the integrity and the impartiality of our independent officers of Parliament.

Although on many sides we may not always agree with its findings or directions, the fact is that we have granted it that authority as Parliament and we need to respect it. We can disagree with it, but we should not question the motives behind it.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I want to congratulate you on last night and your amazing ability to play the cowbell. That's a wonderful talent. Congratulations on that.

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's one of my few talents, playing the cowbell.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Bittle.

Now to Ms. Kusie. [Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

The irony of this is that you've mentioned over and over again the character and integrity of the individual who was chosen, Mr. David Johnston. The sadness and the irony of this is that, if you had submitted to a fair and transparent process in an effort to choose him, you wouldn't have had the opportunity to question, not him, but the procedure of how he was chosen. I think that's truly a disservice to him. I find what we're discussing incredibly ironic. There's no doubt as to the integrity and the experience and the resumé of Mr. Johnston. It's the process, and that was your process. Really, it's your process that has created this unfortunate conversation.

I want to turn to the producer. It will be a producer organizing the debates rather than the commission, and it's likely to be a media consortium. Your government essentially created the debates commission and funded it with $5.5 million in a year where we have a fourth consecutive deficit, a year when the budget was supposed to be balanced, according to the Prime Minister. Yet how can we be sure that it will not be significantly different from previous debates that have been held, if there is in fact this consortium?

I see media in the room here today. I'm going to ask if you think it should be the role of the commission and thus the government, your government, to participate in your organization and broadcasting.

Hon. Karina Gould:

On your first question with regard to the $5.5 million, it's important to note that this is a ceiling amount. That is an up-to amount. One of the important things we wanted to ensure was that the commission had sufficient resources to produce a debate that was of high quality, that reached journalistic standards, and that was available and accessible to Canadians.

Something we heard throughout the consultation process was that it was necessary to ensure that sufficient resources were made available. Additionally, it's also to ensure that the feed can also be public and free to anyone who wants to use it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Was this because you didn't trust the media? Was it because you didn't think they were capable of doing something they've done for years?

Hon. Karina Gould:

No, that is absolutely not the case. In fact, I have reiterated on numerous occasions the very important role that media play in our democracy, particularly our traditional mainstream medium. We would not have this wonderful democracy we have without the incredible journalists across the country who hold governments to account.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yet it would seem that you're trying to control them through the use of this commission.

Hon. Karina Gould:

That is not the case at all. That may be your take on things, but this commission is created to ensure that these debates are widely available. The primary purpose of this, Ms. Kusie, as I have reiterated on countless occasions, is to ensure that the public interest is the primary driver behind all of this. It's to ensure that it is as widely disseminated as possible.

We saw in 2015 how one political leader was able to change, for political advantage, the nature of the debates, where they were disseminated, and where they were broadcast.

The fact of the matter is that Canadians have come to rely on leaders debates as an important political moment where they make decisions, where they look at their political leaders in spontaneous moments, where they get to see how they interact. They get to make decisions as to who they want to lead them.

(1140)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

But if it's a producer and ultimately a consortium, aren't you concerned that smaller media organizations are likely to be left out?

There are so many smaller media organizations, platforms, and there is very much the possibility of them not being a part of this democratic process as a result of this motion.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would point you to the RFP that was released, and I would note that this was created by the commission.

The point, and what's in the order in council, is specifically to bring as many diverse participants in as possible. They're going to make that decision. The commissioner will make that decision, based on advice from the advisory council that he has put in place. It is specifically to ensure that this as accessible and inclusive a process as possible.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

By controlling the process? That's ridiculous. That's completely unreasonable that you would allow for freedom of the media in developing a commission under the ministry—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Ms. Kusie, one thing that I would point to—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

—which decides the producer, which decides the members of the consortium to implement the debates commission. It's completely contrary to—

Hon. Karina Gould:

If you'll allow me, in the order in council, it specifically encourages the debates commission and commissioner to work with partners across the country if they wish to hold other debates as well.

The commissioner is mandated to ensure that there is one debate in English and one debate in French. It is not by any means to limit the number of debates that are going on, but to support others who wish to engage in this process and to create some innovations in this process.

Going to the heart of your question, it is about accessibility, about inclusivity and it is about reaching those markets that have been underserved in the past.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

And thanks for welcoming the media, Althia Raj, etc.

Now we'll go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My first question is around the amount of funding that has been allocated.

What led you to decide that this amount—the ceiling amount or the actual amount that is now identified—would be appropriate, considering there are so many unknown variables to how these debates are going to occur?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We wanted to ensure that we had sufficient resources to produce two high-quality debates in both official languages. It was also to ensure that there was sufficient remuneration for both the commissioner and also the technical secretariat that would be put in place. This would be an 18-month process, and it was to ensure that it was going to have sufficient resources. It's not only about producing the debates, but it's also about informing Canadians that these debates will be taking place as well. So it's to ensure that they have the resources to actually fulfill their mandate.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What makes you think that this is enough?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

We did our best analysis at the time that we did the funding proposal. We did err on the side of putting in more money. We put money in for professional services, knowing that they would want to have some type of contract in place to run the debates. They would need communication services. They would need personnel. They'd need back-office support.

We've done this before, as far as setting up independent organizations is concerned. We have recent experience with things like commissions of inquiry, so it gave us some sense of the types of costs. When you start a new organization, there are always start-up costs. That's one of the challenges with having a short-term organization.

I can't go into the spending from last year because the books aren't officially closed and public accounts are not released, but I feel comfortable saying that they will spend, and we will spend, less in the last fiscal year than was anticipated. In particular, the support from PCO in setting them up was much less than what we anticipated.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh, really.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

The main reason is that the debates commissioner, from day one, made clear to me that he wanted to spend as little money as possible, to be as efficient as possible. We looked at existing space, existing material. He asked for very few changes to the office to try to make it as cost effective as possible. I know that for our spending, it's been much less than anticipated.

I have no reason to believe that they won't be able to live within the amount they have here.

I can't get into certain things for privacy reasons, but some of the members of the advisory committee, even though they're entitled to collect per diems, have chosen not to do that. The debates commissioner himself has already indicated that he will donate the money he receives to charity.

Ultimately, there are many ways they are trying to reduce costs, so we have no reason to believe that this will not be enough. In fact, it's likely overstated.

(1145)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's good to hear.

The commissioner, the secretariat and the advisers were offered salaries comparable to what other commissioners would have.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Absolutely. There is a cost for personnel; please don't misunderstand. I'll make it clear that the debates commissioner himself is being paid but is donating that money to charity. There was no way for him to just not be paid, because of the type of position he's in. There are other staff. They have about five FTEs this fiscal year. We do anticipate that they will be spending on salary. These people are entitled to salary for the hard work they're doing. I'm more saying that the debates commissioner has gone out of his way to try to minimize those costs.

One of the reasons they outsourced their administrative support to us was that they didn't want to create their own corporate services shop when we do this for independent organizations all the time. We gave him a menu of the type of stuff we can do. We're doing almost all of that back-office support for him. My anticipation is that we will spend much less than we anticipated at PCO as well.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I just want to switch gears a little bit. We've gone through the debates commissioner quite a bit, we had him before us recently, and there's not so much that you can say because of the arm's-length relationship.

Madame Lapointe pointed out a question about Facebook. Earlier this week, Facebook put up a new edition to their user agreement about making sure that those who boost posts or have job posts don't discriminate by gender or by any other ways as to who their advertising targets are. Do you have any similar thoughts as to what can be done through Facebook and other social media platforms when it comes to political advertising or the micro-targeting that has been occurring in campaigns, local or national, so that the electorate isn't excluded from what parties are putting out in their platforms and other communications?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think the ad registry that this committee brought forward in Bill C-76 will play a very important role in that. Facebook has stated that it will have an ad registry for the pre-writ and writ period. I think that's a really important measure, because Canadians will be able to see all of the advertisements that political actors are putting forward during that period. I think that is very important.

I also think you raise an interesting point with regard to micro-targeting. It's an ongoing conversation we're having. It's one that I imagine will also come up during the grand committee event that will happen in a couple of weeks about what that means in terms of different political actors using that and not having a full picture. One of the interesting things I always think about is that if you're advertising through more traditional means, whether it's on the radio, on TV or in newspapers, you are going to see all of the different political ads, because that's the one venue you have to look at it. On social media, you may see only one party's ads, for example, because maybe you're not part of the target demographic. That's certainly something that I think we need to reflect on further in terms of whether or not that fits within the spirit of our elections legislation.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister and guests, for joining us this afternoon.

I want to follow up very briefly on a response that was given to Ms. Sahota. It was mentioned that five FTEs are part of the commission. Are these indeterminate employees of the Government of Canada or are they on contract?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Just to clarify, it's a separate organization within the government, so they're all technically government employees from that perspective. The majority of them are there on short-term contracts or term employment arrangements. I believe that one they've hired is on secondment from a government department. It's a mix. There are some part-time employees who are part of that as well.

Mr. John Nater:

Generally when will that employment cease?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

I don't have the exact date, but it will be post-election, obviously.

A voice: March 20, 2020.

Mr. Matthew Shea: Okay: March 20.

(1150)

Mr. John Nater:

Great. Thank you for that clarification.

I was reviewing the request for proposal that was submitted earlier this week. Paragraph 4.1(c) states: “An evaluation team composed of representatives of Canada will evaluate the bids.” Who will be those representatives?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

That is the debates commission entirely. I'll maybe comment really quickly on the RFP. Beyond that would be inappropriate, given that there's an active RFP.

The debates commission did an information request to potential applicants for this procurement before actually posting it. Part of the reason...and I wanted it to round back when there was some talk that it would be a media consortium that wins it. Part of the goal was actually to give an opportunity for potential bidders to ask questions to try to clarify the contract to make it so that it was as accessible as possible.

The request for proposal is currently out. It doesn't close until May 30, and that's why I think it's inappropriate for me to comment further, other than to say that I know the goal is to have multiple bidders. That's always the goal when we do these types of things, because it gives us the most choices and it is the most efficient way of doing it. The actual choice, to go back to the question that's come up a few times, is entirely delegated to the debates commissioner and his team. If they ask us for advice on process, we're happy to do that, but even in the case of this contract, they have worked directly with Public Works, and not through us, for some of these steps.

Mr. John Nater:

So, PCO had no input on the RFP that went out early this week.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Absolutely not.

Mr. John Nater:

This was entirely through Public Works.

Section M.2, which lists some of the requirements for the media consortium or whatever we want to call it—

Hon. Karina Gould:

The bidder.

Mr. John Nater:

—for the proposed bidder, is rather extensive and does tend to appear, at least, to skew towards the three large media companies: CTV, CBC and Global.

I'm looking for an opinion, Minister. Would you be concerned if the only successful bidder was the consortium of CBC, CTV and Global?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I don't think that it would be appropriate for me to comment on the bidding process at this time.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay.

Would you have concerns if newer media or smaller media entities like APTN, print journalists, HuffPost Canada, CPAC and Maclean's were not part of the process?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, I don't think it would be appropriate to comment, as there is an ongoing and existing RFP, but the intent, as I have stated before, is to make this as inclusive and successful as possible.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm going to rephrase this. Would you be disappointed if this actually just became a media consortium debate as we've seen in previous elections?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Because there's an ongoing RFP at the moment and because this is an independent process, I wouldn't want to make a comment that would prejudice either decision.

Mr. John Nater:

I see that I have about a minute left. I'm just going to make a brief comment and then provide Ms. Kusie with a chance to ask a final question.

I would be concerned if we were in a situation where we spent a significant amount of money creating this commission and then saw a diversity of media opinions being left out of the actual debate process. Right or wrong, there were five debates last time—a variety of groups. There was some controversy—I'm not going to deny that—but there was a variety of debates, and I'd be exceptionally disappointed if newer media and diversity of media were not part of this process.

I have 34 seconds left, so I'll throw it to Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

With regard to litigation for the debates commission, if the debates commission is involved in litigation, will it be you instructing the lawyers or the debates commissioner himself?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

We'd want to confirm the exact legalities. Normally it's the department, which would be the debates commissioner, but I think we can confirm that. I think that what we could say with confidence would be the fact that we would respect the independence of the organization and that every step would be done at arm's length as much as possible.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Would they have the opportunity to seek outside counsel if they wished, or would they need to use lawyers who answer to the Attorney General?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

I would need to get back to you on the ins and outs of that. I apologize.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Matthew Shea: Do you know, Allen?

Mr. Allen Sutherland (Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government and Democratic Institutions, Privy Council Office):

Presumably, it would depend on the nature of the litigation.

The Chair:

We have several minutes left, so I'll give Mr. Graham and Mr. Christopherson, if they want, some very short time.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

That's fine. I don't need a lot. I just want to build on one of John Nater's points.

Would you be disappointed if a party leader declined to send a leader to a debate organized by the commission?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, at this point in time, I think it's very clear why we put the debates commission in place, and it is specifically to address some of the unfortunate circumstances that arose in 2015. However, while 2015 was a moment where it became very clear why the process wasn't working, it's still clear that there were issues with how leaders debates came about previously. This is trying to address some of those challenges and to really state, as I've said on numerous occasions, that this is about the public interest.

I would hope that no leaders would feel like they didn't have to present themselves to Canadians if they were truly seeking to become the prime minister. I think it's a really important piece of how our democracy works and how Canadians engage with political leaders.

(1155)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there anything preventing a future government that says that this whole debates thing is just entirely too democratic from coming along and killing it?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We did put in place a first step here so that we could evaluate how this process works. The idea is that the commissioner will report back on how it works, how it can be improved and how to make it a more permanent process.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

I'm going to take a moment to again be absolutely as crystal clear as I can possibly be on my behalf and on behalf of my caucus and party. The process left a bit to be desired. I have held the government to account as best I can—repeatedly, forcefully and legitimately, I believe. As concurred by Mr. Bittle, it's at least a point of legitimate debate.

We are where we are. The commissioner is acceptable to us and the rules of engagement are acceptable to us. We had no more input as the NDP than the Conservatives did, but we believe this is an important element of our democracy. We were not, as a country, well-served by the processes and antics, and I'm not suggesting that my party is without blame, either.

It behooves all of us to do everything we can to respect and support the debates commission, because it's an important part of our democracy. We've got the example from the U.S. where for the longest time now, it has had an independent commission that conducts its debates. The Americans fight about everything, but I haven't heard anybody suggest that there's unfairness or partisan advantage in their system and process.

My hope is that the commission be successful, that all the party leaders turn out, that Canadians get what they need from the process. I have every confidence that the next Parliament will do its due diligence in terms of holding the government and the commissioner to account for the money they spend, the decisions they make and the procedures they follow.

It would be very disheartening for me—and I'll end on this statement while watching the election unfold that I won't be involved in, at least as a candidate—as one of the debates is whether there's legitimacy around the commission as it provides an exit strategy for one of the party leaders or any of them who don't want to be held to account and be held to the kind of scrutiny that those debates will offer.

We wish the commission well. We look forward to its success. Notwithstanding and subject to some details that could arise, we have every intention of being supportive and participating. This committee's done a good job.

I have one last point. I hope there's a good analysis between what this committee proposed.... We spent a lot of time, we worked hard on our report, and it was disappointing to see the way a lot of that work was set aside by the government after it promised to do things differently.

Being where we are now, it behooves all of us to see this be successful, in my view, and I say that as a small “d” democrat, not just a large “D” democrat. There's nothing more precious than our democracy, and this is an important part of strengthening that democracy.

(1200)

The Chair:

Thank you, David. That was very eloquent, as usual.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I felt the problem with previous debates was not that leaders did not want to participate, but on the contrary, leaders who did want to participate were excluded. That seems not to have come up today. Will it be the case that the leader of the Green Party will be included in the debates that are under the purview of the debates commission in the 2019 election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Ultimately, all the decisions will be made by the debates commissioner himself. However, given the criteria that was established, a party leader would have to meet two of the three. First, being elected to the House under the party that he or she is leading, or having a member there; second, running candidates in 90% of all electoral districts; and third, having a sufficient chance to have a member elected to the House, given ongoing polling and public context.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The third one is obviously the most difficult to determine, so it does raise the question, have any criteria been provided to us that will cause us to know in advance of the writ period as opposed to discovering partway through what is going to determine who gets in or who gets out?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That will be a decision for the commissioner.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, I would request that the committee write to the debates commissioner to ask him the answer to this question. I did raise it with him when he was here in person and he seemed conscientiously seized with the thought that he ought to provide us with the response. It might be time to write to him and make that request, so we can know how he's going to interpret that criterion.

The Chair:

You want to write to the debates commissioner.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Write to him to ask a question.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to ask about what he takes that third criterion to mean.

The Chair:

Sure. I'll do that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Shall vote 1, under “Leaders' Debates Commission”, carry? LEADERS' DEBATES COMMISSION

ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$4,520,775

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Now that we've done the debates commission, the House of Commons, PPS and the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, shall I report the votes in the main estimates to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you very much and thank you for coming. It's great to have you again.

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's always a pleasure.

The Chair:

We will suspend for a few minutes while we get ready for committee business.

(1200)

(1215)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 156th meeting of the committee. I would like to remind members we're still being televised.

There are just a couple of things on the agenda. We have Mr. Christopherson's proposed motion for a study on the Standing Orders, and also, potentially, Mr. Reid's motion. Now that we've done a study, hopefully we can finalize his motion sometime soon.

There is another committee coming in here, so we will end exactly at 1:00. I'd like to go in camera for a very minor thing right at the end, at five minutes to 1:00.

Mr. Christopherson, your motion is on the floor. You've already introduced it. I see you've submitted two documents to the committee, though, that help clarify and simplify it. It's a very large package, so this is a good summary. The floor is yours.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. Thank you, Chair. I appreciate that.

Just to pick up on where Ms. Sahota left off, we could be done in 10 minutes. My sense of this is it could go either of two ways. One is we're going to be done in 10 minutes, and everybody will say yes, we'll study it and give some respect to the people who did all this work. We could decide how much of a study that is and so on, once we make that decision.

If we're not going to say that, then there's a distinct possibility this discussion will go on for a period of time. It seems unreasonable for us not to give this group of colleagues the opportunity to at least be heard.

This is running parallel to another motion in the House that has similar effects. We just have to let those two paths unfold as they will. The issue for us is whether we want to study it right now. Whether we'll be done or not and how extensive our study will be are details we can deal with after the fact.

Chair, I think I ended my brief remarks last time almost on the same note, in that I'm looking to get a sense of where colleagues are. Either this is going to be real quick, and we'll decide we're going to do it and just need to talk details, or we're into a different world where.... Well, I'll be optimistic and hope we don't enter that world. There's no need to describe a world that I'm optimistic we won't enter.

Again, I would just plead—literally plead—with colleagues. There's frustration on the part of a lot of backbenchers about the continued sense of backbench involvement in decision-making being watered down. More and more power over the decades has accrued in the PMO. There have been presidents in the United States who have said publicly they would give anything to have the amount of direct power that a majority prime minister has in our system. It's understandable. I'm speaking to the leadership of all the caucuses in the House when I say that at the very least, if this safety valve is not triggered, these frustrations aren't going away. They're only going to get stronger.

I've described publicly a couple of times what I think is going to happen going forward. As the public demands democratic reform because they don't see it responding to their current needs, they're going to elect people who have a mandate to go and fix things. This is not going anywhere. It has to be dealt with. Either it's going to be dealt with by the majority of members opening their arms to change and being fair-minded, or we're going to be facing blockages and thwarted attempts to be heard. That's just going to lead to greater and more extreme actions on the part of future MPs. I don't see how it could not result in that.

Again, I want to remain optimistic. I haven't had any indication from colleagues on where we're going on this motion, either privately or publicly.

I would ask that my name be put back on the list as I relinquish the floor. I would be very interested to hear from colleagues. Again, in my view we could be out of here in a few minutes, or we're going to be wrestling with this for far more time than we ever thought.

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Kusie, then Mr. Graham, then Madame Lapointe.

Did you have your hand up, too, Ms. Sahota?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I did, but don't put it down yet. We'll see what everyone says. It might not be needed.

The Chair:

Madam Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I have to be very sincere and say that certainly some of my colleagues even here contributed to this study. As well, some of my Conservative caucus members who have been members of the Conservative caucus for many years and even ran for the leadership are in support of the consideration of changes such as these.

I think it would be inaccurate for me to say that there is not an interest for some of these ideas within my caucus. That would not be true. There is an interest because certainly our membership, as is clearly indicated for the membership of the NDP and the Liberals, also have an appetite for the reconsideration of—for lack of a better term—powers.

I do feel there is an interest and an appetite in the consideration of the proposed ideas within this motion, but perhaps I'll just move a friendly amendment that the motion be amended by adding the following: provided that the Committee shall not report any recommendation to the House without the unanimous agreement of this Committee.

I know that there has been the indication previously of the importance of some of the members, if not all the members—well, some of the members, better I leave it at that—of this committee to have unanimous agreement of items such as this, so I think that this amendment is in keeping with the spirit and the genre of that desire of other members of this committee. As I mentioned, it would be inaccurate for me to say that there's not an interest within our caucus in the discussion and the exploration of these ideas.

I will move this friendly amendment.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

I'm going to go to Mr. Graham, but just before I do, could I get a one-word answer from Mr. Christopherson as to whether he accepts that as a friendly amendment?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Could I hear that again, please?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We'll distribute them, Chair, and pardon me for not doing that previously. My apologies; that was my fault.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's okay. It's not a requirement.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll go to Mr. Graham, and then we'll get back to you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is just a quick comment. Ms. Kusie, I don't oppose your amendment at all. My one concern, my one request—and I say this very sincerely—is that no member obstruct any recommendation for the purpose of obstructing a recommendation, so that they're considered honestly and in good faith, so we don't have a situation where we say, yes, we're going to go on the consensus model, and then one person sits there and says, “No, no, no”, because that would be really unfortunate.

I want to make sure that we have an assurance from you on the record saying that will not be the case, that the consensus model will be sincere, and that everything will be considered. If that's the case, I'm very happy to support that amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Would you like me to respond?

Perhaps I don't understand exactly what you.... I would say that, if you are making reference to the.... I guess the only word I can think of is the “spite” of an individual member to withhold something. Obviously this would require assurance from all members of the committee, not just from me.

I see no reason to spite any of these proposed changes specifically. I don't think it's a secret or unknown that I will have to stay in communication with my caucus in regard to the items discussed and the direction of the study, but as I said, there is a sincere interest that I have seen in the exploration of these ideas. If my caucus is committed to the consideration of this, as their shadow minister for democratic institutions, so am I.

(1225)

The Chair:

Okay.

On the amendment, Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Do I have to talk about the amendment or can I make the comments I wanted to make?

The Chair:

We are talking about the amendment.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Very good.

I would be okay with unanimous recommendations. [English]

The Chair:

Okay.

On the amendment, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I was in favour of it until I heard Ms. Kusie's explanation, which could have been an easy “yes, we will genuinely consider all of these proposals”, but we then got a pretzel answer.

I guess I'd like to hear from Mr. Christopherson before I make my decision on the amendment.

The Chair:

Before that, though, we have Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I'll be very brief.

I think we could genuinely work on a consensus model.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I agree.

Mr. John Nater:

I've spoken with Mr. Baylis on this. His suggestion in our conversation—I'm not telling tales out of school—was that we work on a consensus basis on this.

From our official opposition standpoint as a party, there's a lot of information in here that we would genuinely like to study. There are going to be elements that we may not agree with on the overall direction. Mr. Christopherson may not agree with it, the Liberals may not agree. There may be hills that we may be willing to die on and we may not be.

However, regarding the approach, I'm genuinely interested in this.

I would go one step further. I hope we can also, in parallel, finalize our second chamber study as well. I would like to see that hopefully reported to the House. There is some overlap here, but I don't want to see that study not go forward, because I think we've done some good work and research on that one as well.

The Chair:

Right now, reviewing the second chamber draft report that the researcher has done is on the first Tuesday that we get back.

Ruby Sahota, did you want to speak on the amendment? You were originally on the list.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: No.

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

I have two things.

One, it's always been our preference that any changes to the Standing Orders, just like election laws, would have agreement of all the parties. That's the first point. That is sort of our default position.

Two, this is new, and it potentially changes the power structure. It's not going to go easy, and it's not going to be straightforward. At this point, I would take just about anything that is not wildly unacceptable as an amendment, if we can get a unanimous consent to have this heard. To me, that's the key thing.

Those are the two points: one, the preference that any changes like this, or election laws, where we're talking about the referee's rules, should have, in an ideal situation, the support of all the parties involved, including the independents for that matter, given that they're affected by these things too.

Two, it's really important that this be heard, that it be given the light of day. As much as possible, I think we should be bending over backwards to accommodate that. Quite frankly, if that's the only amendment that it takes for us to get unanimity in sending the message that we want this to be heard and we want to provide a venue for our colleagues to express their concerns and recommendations, then by all means, I accept the friendly amendment and appreciate the sincerity with which I believe it was put forward.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Christopherson, to your point, I'd like to apologize to Mr. Bittle. With regard to the spirit that my response to Mr. Graham was in, I would have felt it to be more insincere for me just to say yes. My intention was greater sincerity, if you will, in qualifying that.

Mr. Christopherson, you're right. I believe in completing the study. I believe this is how information is largely disseminated to the media and to social media. These ideas are heard, and this study will allow them to be heard. There is the possibility for these ideas to go into the public and into Canadian society, just in being heard here.

Thank you for your recognition of that.

(1230)

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on the amendment?

(Amendment agreed to)

The Chair: Now we'll go back to the main motion.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I obviously support this motion very strongly. I think it's very important that we go through this.

Nobody is asking us to take the entire text of the changes and approve it in bulk. It's very important for all of us to look at each item one at a time and ask whether it make sense. It's having those proper discussions without wasting time, but really considering each one properly and trying to get this thing back on time to have it adopted by the House, so that when we come back next year—hoping that most of us do—we are able to have those rules in place.

The Chair:

Ms. Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

There is a very wide range of things being proposed. As far as establishing a parallel debating chamber is concerned, we conducted a study on that. I believe we are reporting on it and that will address that aspect.

People need to come talk to us about it. For example, we are talking about the power of the Speaker and I would like to hear from witnesses on that topic. We are talking about committees. I would like to hear from people who have experienced this and might be able to relay the advantages and disadvantages.

It is one thing to do a clause-by-clause study of the motion. Personally, I need to hear people talk about different topics. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think we're all singing from the same page. I'm not going to say anything that might derail that. I think we're in a good place, and I hope it carries.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This is a meaty motion, to put it mildly, at 19 pages. I think we have to assume that we are committing ourselves to saying that most of the remainder of the time we have before this Parliament comes to an end will be devoted to this subject. In order to make sure we don't waste any of that time, I wonder if it's possible for representatives of the various parties to chat with each other and with you, Mr. Chair, about how we're going to structure that time to make sure we use it effectively.

The Chair:

I would never commit our future time. So many things come up in this committee—questions of privilege, etc. Obviously, right now it's in the forefront. Any discussions that happen would be great.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It would be nice to be off and running as soon as we get back from the break week.

The Chair:

Any further discussion on the motion to study this?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David Christopherson:

Was that unanimous?

The Chair:

Yes.

We'll put that on the agenda as soon as we can.

Now we go to Mr. Reid's motion. We had a study. There are three ways we can proceed. First of all, we approved his motion, so we could just send it to the House. Second, we had some great witnesses and a lot of information. We could ask our researcher to do a report, to which we would attach the motion as a recommendation. Third, we could modify the motion. I'll just mention one small concern I had with it, and there may be more. It's a very technical motion. I think we all agree with the concept that PROC should study this and continue to study it. That's the idea of the motion.

It seemed to me that the way it was written we would have to get consent every year to have that part of PROC's mandate. It's hard enough to get consent from the House in procedures and get things done on our committee, because we're so busy. If we're going to agree it's in the committee, I would suggest that we just put it in the committee if the House agrees to that.

I'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, if you want to remove that particular provision...the purpose of that is just to make sure that part of the standing order comes to an end when the Centre Block renovations are complete. That's the logic. In all fairness, maybe that's far in the future, and we shouldn't worry about it.

It would be a simple matter to have that removed from the Standing Orders. I think that particular provision could be excised with these. I know as chair you're not supposed to propose amendments, but if someone else wanted to suggest that amendment, I would certainly be completely open to it. We could then go and see—

(1235)

The Chair:

We've already passed your motion so we can't amend it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Why not?

The Chair:

We can do another one.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We can move another motion.

The Chair:

To follow up, I'm not sure it's good to end that mandate, because the West Block is finished but we're still commenting on things that could be changed here. They're then going to do the Confederation Building and all these other buildings. Centre Block is only the beginning. I think we should leave it to later PROCs to decide whether to get it out of their mandate. I think it's good that we're looking at the parliamentary precinct.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're correct in that the LTVP is a very long-term plan, and it started many years ago. West Block wasn't the first, and Centre Block won't be the last. When we finally finish going through all the buildings, it will probably be time to do the first one again.

This is an ongoing and permanent mandate to oversee the structure and function of the Hill.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I take your point. I think I've already relayed the story of how, when I was a teenager, I was involved in working at an engineering firm—Clemann Large Patterson consulting engineers—when they were involved in the final stages of the renovations to the East Block, which is now due for renovations, so there you are.

The Chair:

The clerk said that, if the committee is willing, he could come back next meeting with some wording.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would make sense to me.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll do that.

We'll come back with an improved motion. Do you want that to be part of a report, so we get on the record everything we heard from those witnesses for future discussions, or do you just want to approve a motion and send that to the House?

Mr. Scott Reid:

My inclination would be to just send the.... You know what, I'm not sure of the answer to that, because there are two things to think about here. One is that we're making a motion that would be a change to the Standing Orders. Presumably that should be kind of a stand-alone. It'd be odd to have anything else in there.

On the other hand.... Thank you for passing out the latest Hill Times. I think Rob Wright summed up really well the thing I had been struggling to say. I think it would be helpful for our committee to say this—I don't know if it would be in the same report or in a separate report—in a way in which the House can concur in it prior to September, when they block off half the front lawn for an indefinite period of time.

What I have here is the headline “'Appetite suppressant' needed for Centre Block wish lists, says PSPC”. Truer words have never been spoken. I kept asking in earlier meetings who the parliamentary partners were. Well, now I know what they meant. The Senate as a whole, the House of Commons as a whole and the Library of Parliament as a whole have submitted the following items on their wish lists. Everybody says, “We would like to have these things”, and everybody says, “It would be really nice if our thing could be right there in Centre Block.” As a former Centre Block office resident, I fully understand why people would like that. However, we now know that accommodating all those things involves digging a hole in the front lawn big enough that you can literally take Centre Block and drop it in. Have a look at the map—it's actually true.

We've given them.... Even a snake that can unhinge its jaws can only eat so much. We've given them too much, and we need to get back the message, “Hey, we all need to start paring down our asks of PSPC, because they are impracticable.”

(1240)

The Chair:

What about this? We do your motion separately, hopefully very shortly in an upcoming meeting, so that your motion doesn't get derailed, and then we ask the researcher to do a report based on the witnesses we may or may not get to. That way we'd get your motion done, and it's up to the committee whether we get to the report.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. Because you were looking at me, you weren't in a position to see the expression on our analyst's face as we assign him that task, but—

The Chair:

Could you do it again?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

Maybe I could just ask our analyst.

Andre, what challenges would be involved in doing that?

Mr. Andre Barnes (Committee Researcher):

The Library is here to serve the committee. There's no doubt about that.

We are in the midst of trying to fry several fish for the committee. We could find someone to write a witness summary, if that's what the committee would like. I would like to be involved in it, but I probably wouldn't have the time.

I would have some concerns, but we could get it done. If that's the will of the committee, we certainly would get it done.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't know how to respond to that.

The Chair:

That's up to you, Mr. Reid.

An hon. member: What's the downside of not including it?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Everybody now knows what the problem is. That is now out in the public domain. I'm hoping our friends, the media, will take some of that material, which some of them are collecting, and say, “Here's the practical problem we face.”

Mr. David Christopherson:

I hear your quandary. I just looked at it and thought, “Well, what's the downside of not having the report?”

The efficient thing is to let the motion go alone. Is there anything lost? I'm not sure there is. As long as we maintain that information within our considerations, that's where it needs to be right now. It seems to me that speed is of the essence. In terms of anything anybody wants from the House, you had better get your dibs in early.

Those are just some thoughts, Scott.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If the committee is agreeable, maybe the pared-down approach is the better one.

The Chair:

Okay. Can you come back next meeting with some wording we can discuss?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That sounds good to me.

The Chair:

We'll try to get that done. As David said, anything.... This is a doable thing in the time remaining.

At our next meeting, we're looking at the parallel chambers report, and then at Mr. Christopherson's motion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, if I may, do we want to start the study before we even begin the process, or anything else, and invite the delegation in to give us their presentation, so that we can understand exactly how big the project is? From there, we can make a plan of attack. Normally, we do it the other way around, but in this case, given that it's being driven by MPs, it seems to me to make sense to give them a chance to come in, be heard and make their case. Then we can decide what the process is. We are going to break it down. I can imagine some of the long discussions we're going to have. It'll be interesting, but we'll break that down piece by piece, and go through it.

We could do it ahead of time, but, again, anything that delays it.... Time is our enemy right now, so I'm constantly thinking that if we have options that allow us to get things done and moving, that is really the prime consideration.

I'm not married to that, colleagues. I just throw that out as a thought, in terms of how we might begin.

The Chair:

What names were you thinking of? Mr. Baylis, obviously....

Mr. David Christopherson:

I would maybe ask Mr. Baylis if he wants to bring a representative delegation of the people involved, and let him decide who that is, how many, their presentation.... Give them their day in court. Let them take as long as they want, because it's a complex report, and then outline what they hope to get from us. Then we are equipped to make some decisions: What's our time frame? How are we going to bite this off? What information do we need? Is there any research we're going to do? Can we get that under way early, so that it's ready for us?

I'm open to better ideas, Chair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was going to suggest that perhaps the idea would be to advise Mr. Baylis, and everyone involved with writing that motion, of the fact that we're getting the study under way, and say that they are always welcome to come to our committee and be part of the discussion. They're all part of writing it. That becomes an ongoing involvement, instead of a one-off involvement.

I think that would ensure that anybody involved in the creation of this has their opportunity all the way throughout to do it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think that is an excellent idea, but I, for one, would probably.... As I've said, I'm one of those who contributed, but I'm not a major contributor. There are others—

(1245)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I did one paragraph.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. It was more because I'm on this committee, and I was willing to provide the vehicle.

I hear what you're saying. That could flow from what we hear. Then we can decide not only what we're going to do, but who's going to be involved in doing it.

It's such a disparate subject, and so vast. You've got multiple parties, and we have unanimity—we're actually there. If we can just hold that together, and give them a chance to come in and make their pitch as to what they hope to see, and what they realistically hope we can do in the remainder of this Parliament, we can be seized of that. If one of the things we want to talk about is who is part of this, the way we did with some other files we've had, I'd be open to that, at that time.

I still think that, right now, it makes sense to bring them in as early as possible. There is some media interest. This is what they want more than anything—a chance to get these ideas out there. If they did have hope that we were going to conclude it in this Parliament, let's hear that. Some of them are veterans who understand what's entailed in the process of trying to get it done. They may offer us some ideas that we otherwise wouldn't think of, as we set about our work plan.

Again, with the greatest of respect—and I'm not married to the idea—it still seems to make sense to me that our first step, right now, would be to invite them to come in, and give them as much time as they need to make their pitch. From there, we're well equipped to set out our work plan, and the objectives we think we can achieve, in the time available.

The Chair:

To make this a little more concrete, I'll say that on the 30th we could ask Mr. Baylis and whoever he'd like to bring with him to come to committee. Do you have thoughts on that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

The only thing different from our usual rules, Chair, is that I would suggest we give them the courtesy of as much time as they want to make a fulsome and complete presentation, respecting the amount of work that they've put into it.

The Chair:

Yes, it's a bit longer than 10 minutes would cover. As Mr. Reid said, this is very complex. There are all sorts of issues, and I'm sure not everyone is going to agree on everything, so we'll do that.

The meeting is suspended.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bienvenue à la 156e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette réunion est télévisée.

Le premier point à l'ordre du jour est l'examen du Budget principal des dépenses sous la rubrique Commission aux débats des chefs.

Nous avons le plaisir de recevoir l'honorable Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques.

Elle est accompagnée de représentants du Bureau du Conseil privé. Il s'agit d'Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint au Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental et Institutions démocratiques; et de Matthew Shea, sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels.

Je vous remercie de votre présence. Je laisserai maintenant la parole à la ministre pour sa déclaration préliminaire.

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je remercie le Comité de m'avoir invitée à revenir aujourd'hui. C'est un plaisir de venir discuter du budget des dépenses de 2019-2020 de la Commission des débats des chefs, qui est indépendante.

Je remercie M. Al Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint au Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental et Institutions démocratiques; et de Matthew Shea, sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels, de bien avoir voulu m'accompagner.[Français]

Lors de ma comparution du 19 février dernier devant ce comité, j'ai rappelé le rôle fondamental que jouent les débats des chefs dans la démocratie canadienne et j'ai souligné qu'il fallait accorder la priorité à l'intérêt public dans l'organisation de ces débats.[Traduction]

La Commission est indépendante et impartiale dans l’exécution de son mandat principal, qui est d'organiser deux débats des chefs, un dans chaque langue officielle, pour les élections générales de 2019, ainsi que dans la gestion des dépenses connexes. Dans le budget des dépenses, la Commission demande 4,6 millions de dollars pour organiser ces débats.[Français]

La Commission, dirigée par le très honorable David Johnston, a établi un petit secrétariat composé de Michel Cormier, directeur général, de Stephen Wallace, conseiller principal, et de quatre autres personnes.[Traduction]

Le 22 mars 2019, les membres du comité consultatif (le comité) ont été annoncés, et le 25 mars, le commissaire et le directeur général ont eu leur première réunion en personne. Le comité va guider la Commission dans l’exercice de son mandat. Il est composé de sept membres et sa composition tient compte de la parité entre les sexes et de la diversité de la population canadienne, ainsi que d'un large éventail d’allégeances politiques et de compétences.

La Commission a établi sa présence sur le Web et, le 4 avril, elle a lancé un appel à manifestation d’intérêt concernant la production des débats qui a servi à orienter la demande de propositions lancée cette semaine.[Français]

Des dépenses supplémentaires sont prévues pour couvrir l'octroi d'un contrat à une entreprise de production qui produira et diffusera les débats, les activités courantes du Conseil consultatif, la sensibilisation et la mobilisation des Canadiens, et les coûts administratifs.

Comme les députés ici présents le savent, la Commission jouit de l'indépendance nécessaire pour décider de la meilleure façon de dépenser les fonds de fonctionnement qui lui ont été accordés dans les limites de l'enveloppe budgétaire approuvée.[Traduction]

Lors de sa récente comparution devant le Comité, le 2 mai 2019, le commissaire aux débats, le très honorable David Johnston, a réaffirmé qu’il avait l’intention et le devoir d’utiliser les fonds de façon responsable. De plus, il a souligné que les fonds demandés représentent un montant « maximal » et que la Commission veillera à fonctionner de manière économique dans toutes ses activités.[Français]

Finalement, le décret définissant le mandat de la Commission est clair: la Commission aux débats des chefs est guidée par la poursuite de l'intérêt public et par les principes d'indépendance, d'impartialité et d'efficacité financière.

La Commission offre une occasion unique aux Canadiens d'entendre de sources fiables et impartiales ce qu'ont à dire ceux qui cherchent à diriger le pays.[Traduction]

Comme nous le savons, nous devrons tous composer avec la désinformation en ligne d'ici les prochaines élections. [Français]

Les débats des chefs seront encore plus importants cette année, car ils fourniront un lieu pour communiquer l'information de manière claire, fiable et accessible à tous en même temps.

Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions à ce sujet.

Merci, monsieur le président. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre. Merci de votre présence. Vous êtes souvent des nôtres.

Je souhaite la bienvenue au Comité à Bob Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Nous commencerons les questions par Mme Lapointe.[Français]

Merci.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'essaie d'ouvrir mon ordinateur. Hier, je suis allée sur le site Internet de la Commission. On nous explique que la Commission est déjà présente sur Facebook, Instagram et Twitter. Je regardais l'aspect financier, notamment. Je ne sais pas si vous êtes allée vérifier sur le site de la Commission, mais il n'y a pas de lien vers Instagram. On nous dit sur quelles plateformes se trouve ou non la Commission.

Êtes-vous au courant de cela?

(1110)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous n'êtes pas allée vérifier cela? Hier, je l'ai fait.

C'était ma première question. J'essaie d'ouvrir mon ordinateur, mais il ne collabore pas.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je sais qu'aujourd'hui mes employés ont cherché à tous les endroits et ont trouvé le lien vers Instagram. Il est peut-être plus facile d'y accéder par l'entremise de l'application que de l'ordinateur.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Non. J'ai essayé de le faire.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous pourrions vous montrer comment le faire.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Vous avez déjà comparu devant notre comité à ce sujet, de même que le commissaire aux débats, M. Johnston. Où en est-il dans ses préparatifs? Des choses devaient être faites pour suivre le processus. Sur le site Internet, on indique des délais, par exemple on dit où il doit en être rendu en mars ou encore en mai. Est-ce qu'il a accompli le travail qu'il devait faire dans les délais? [Traduction]

M. Matthew Shea (sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Comme lors de notre dernière comparution, je soulignerai que la Commission est indépendante. Nous fournissons, au besoin, au commissaire aux débats un soutien, du point de vue des services ministériels.

Pour ce qui est de savoir où en est la Commission, nous l'aidons à mettre en place des contrats. Elle a lancé une demande de propositions, une DP, et nous travaillons dessus avec elle. Ses bureaux sont installés. Si elle a des besoins en TI, nous l'aidons.

Quant à surveiller ses progrès, ce n'est pas notre rôle. En fait, pour la plupart des questions que vous aurez sur les détails du travail qu'elle effectue, nous ne sommes pas concernés. Nous avons très délibérément décidé qu'il en soit ainsi pour garantir son indépendance. C'est la même chose qu'avec la Commission d'enquête sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées ou le nouveau conseiller spécial auprès du premier ministre. Nous veillons scrupuleusement à avoir des relations d'indépendance. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est une entité en soi. Ces gens relèvent du commissaire. Ultimement, c'est la ministre qui supervise cela. Est-ce exact?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce n'est même pas une relation qui implique une supervision. Nous avons...

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous avez des comptes à rendre au gouvernement.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, à titre de commissaire indépendant, M. Johnston a l'obligation de rendre des comptes devant le Parlement. Lors du processus, nous nous sommes assurés que la Commission aurait l'indépendance nécessaire pour prendre ses propres décisions et qu'il n'y aurait pas d'influence politique ou gouvernementale. Comme le précise le décret, après les élections, la Commission aura pour mandat de soumettre un rapport au Parlement faisant état de ses conseils à ce sujet.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous avez parlé d'efficacité financière. Il y aura un débat des chefs en français et un en anglais. Comme nous le savons, les chefs seront invités à y participer. Est-ce que toutes les chaînes de télévision achètent des droits? Êtes-vous au courant de cela? Je pense notamment à Radio-Canada, à TVA et à CPAC.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non. Voici ce qui est précisé dans le décret.[Traduction]

La retransmission doit être gratuite. Elle doit être accordée à toute organisation sans frais. Il s'agit d'une décision expresse et délibérée. Ce que nous avons notamment entendu pendant les consultations, c'est que ces débats devraient être accessibles à tout Canadien qui s'y intéresse et qu'il devrait être facile de les suivre. La gratuité de la retransmission servira cet objectif. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

La mission du commissaire est notamment de rendre le débat accessible à tous, qu'il s'agisse de communautés linguistiques en situation minoritaire ou de gens de la majorité linguistique, que ce soit en anglais ou en français. Or les gens n'auront pas nécessairement tous accès à des outils électroniques. J'imagine qu'il va même faire en sorte que ce soit diffusé à la radio.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est l'objectif.[Traduction]

La diffusion des débats eux-mêmes sera possible. La seule exigence, comme le précise le décret, est de garantir l'intégrité des débats. Autrement, la retransmission sera possible.

Il appartient aux entités, aux organisations et aux radiodiffuseurs de décider d'utiliser cette possibilité. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Vous dites qu'il y aura un rapport à la fin. Avez-vous à tout le moins précisé quel genre de rapport vous souhaitez et les sujets que vous désirez qu'il couvre? Par exemple, va-t-on vérifier si l'on a réussi à atteindre les jeunes autant qu'on le souhaitait? On sait qu'il est plus difficile de joindre les jeunes électeurs. Est-ce un des enjeux que vous voulez voir figurer dans le rapport qui suivra les élections?

(1115)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous n'avons pas encore précisé tous ces détails, mais vous pouvez voir, à l'article 10 du décret, ce que nous espérons de ce rapport.

Bien sûr, je crois qu'il serait bon, la prochaine fois que vous verrez le commissaire, de lui poser ces questions précises, étant donné que vous voulez savoir, après les élections, comment les choses se sont passées. Ce serait une excellente idée que les parlementaires le fassent.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Tantôt, j'ai commencé par parler des médias sociaux parce que j'ai essayé de me connecter à chacun d'eux, hier soir.

Il faudra sensibiliser les gens. Je sais qu'il fait partie du mandat du commissaire de sensibiliser et de toucher le plus d'électeurs possible, afin qu'ils soient au courant de la tenue des débats et de les encourager à aller voter. Est-ce quelque chose que vous souhaitez que le commissaire accomplisse?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le mandat comporte un volet d'information du public au sujet des débats. Le but n'est pas nécessairement d'encourager les gens à aller voter. Il faut au moins s'assurer que tous les Canadiens sont au courant de la tenue des débats des chefs et qu'ils sauront comment y avoir accès.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord, merci beaucoup.

Mon ordinateur ne fonctionne toujours pas.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Bonjour, madame la ministre. C'est un plaisir de vous voir, et une fois de plus, vous étiez très bien hier soir à Politics et The Pen. Vraiment, bravo.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Madame la ministre, vous avez parlé de l'indépendance de la Commission des débats. Je dirais qu'elle n'est pas vraiment indépendante, car si elle l'était, vous ne seriez pas ici aujourd'hui au sujet du budget des dépenses. Le Comité a déjà entendu le directeur général des élections et l'administration de la Chambre des communes au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses. Ni l'un ni l'autre, je tiens à le souligner, ne se sont fait représenter par un ministre, alors que vous êtes présente aujourd'hui.

Pourquoi n'avez-vous pas créé une Commission des débats entièrement indépendante, au lieu d'une commission au sein de votre propre ministère, ce qui permet au gouvernement en place d'exercer dessus un contrôle à la fois politique et financier?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'aimerais préciser que le directeur général des élections est, évidemment, un mandataire indépendant du Parlement, mais qu'il présente son Budget principal des dépenses par mon intermédiaire en qualité de ministre aussi. Je suis intimement convaincue qu'il est très indépendant dans ses actions et ses activités. Je pense qu'il est important de le préciser.

En ce qui concerne la Commission des débats, elle a été créée de manière à disposer des ressources nécessaires pour remplir son mandat, mais sans directive ou conversation entre le commissaire et le gouvernement une fois qu'elle a été établie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Votre présence devant le Comité aujourd'hui au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses me donne à penser que votre ministère a, en fait, le pouvoir ultime sur le budget de la Commission des débats. N'est-ce pas vrai?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En fait, une des choses que j'ai faites en tant que ministre a été de signer une autorisation qui permet à la Commission de prendre toutes les décisions...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord, mais avez-vous fourni cette autorisation signée?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... parce que les ministères doivent rendre compte de toute dépense publique, mais c'est la Commission qui prend toutes les décisions.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certes, mais même si vous affirmez ne pas vous ingérer dans les décisions budgétaires de la Commission, en fin de compte, c'est vous, en qualité de ministre, et le gouvernement en place qui avez ce pouvoir. Est-ce que ce n'est pas vrai?

M. Matthew Shea:

Puis-je intervenir?

Vous parlez du ministère de la ministre Gould, mais nous sommes ici en tant que BCP. Il est important de souligner que, contrairement à une commission d'enquête, par exemple, qui a le soutien du BCP, tout en étant indépendante, il s'agit d'une entité qui est, en fait, séparée, avec son propre budget des dépenses et son propre administrateur général, et elle est habilitée à prendre toutes ces décisions.

En ce qui concerne les finances, je suis son fournisseur de services indépendant. Elle en a fait le choix, alors qu'elle avait toute possibilité de choisir d'autres options et qu'elle a examiné d'autres options.

Pour ma part, mon équipe la soutient du point de vue des ressources humaines, des TI, des finances et dans les domaines connexes. Elle ne m'informe pas à ce sujet. Je n'informe pas la ministre et je n'informe pas M. Sutherland. Il n'y a donc aucune ingérence dans le processus. Il n'y a aucune ingérence dans aucune de ses dépenses.

Notre seul but, en tant que fournisseur de services, sera de veiller à ce qu'elle fasse les choses dans le respect de la politique et de la loi, ce qui est, me semble-t-il, dans l'intérêt de tous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Le terme « indépendant » me soucie. Il reste très clair pour moi que la ministre et le gouvernement contrôlent bien le budget. Je me demande donc pourquoi vous feriez relever de votre ministère quelque chose d'aussi essentiel pour les institutions démocratiques qu'un débat des chefs et compromettriez l'indépendance et l'intégrité de la Commission en contrôlant son budget, au lieu d'en faire une organisation entièrement indépendante, comme Élections Canada.

(1120)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis ravie d'entendre les conservateurs souligner combien les débats des chefs sont importants à leurs yeux. C'est un changement de ton merveilleux et j'en suis heureuse, car j'espère que cela signifie qu'ils participeront pleinement à ces élections.

Si nous avons créé les débats des chefs et opté pour l'indépendance de ce processus, c'est en partie pour faire en sorte que tous les Canadiens puissent suivre ces débats et savoir qu'ils sont organisés dans l'intérêt public, pas avec des ententes en coulisse par lesquelles d'anciens premiers ministres essayaient de dicter les conditions dans lesquelles ces débats se dérouleraient.

Je suis enchantée d'entendre la position des conservateurs à cet égard.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je trouve votre commentaire décevant. On est loin d'une vraie réponse. Il me semble que si vous pensiez réellement que ce genre de chose est tellement important pour les Canadiens et tellement démocratique, madame la ministre, vous auriez au moins donné l'occasion de discuter de la création de la Commission des débats des chefs à la Chambre des communes. Vous n'avez même pas eu cette courtoisie, sans parler des nombreuses recommandations du Comité à propos de la Commission des débats que vous avez rejetées.La Chambre des communes n'a pas eu l'occasion de participer à cette conversation sur la Commission des débats.

Je dirais certainement que nous soutenons les processus démocratiques, mais, selon moi, nous avons ici un exemple de cas où votre ministère n'en a pas fait autant.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que tous les députés présents conviendront avec moi que le Comité, en tant que comité de la Chambre des communes, a fait une étude très solide sur les débats des chefs et participé à ce processus, parallèlement aux consultations publiques et aux tables rondes que nous avons organisées avec les parties intéressées.

Ce processus a notamment pour résultat qu'après les prochaines élections, le commissaire actuel rendra compte au Parlement et, plus particulièrement, au Comité, dans les six mois qui suivront les élections afin de parler du processus, de ce qui peut être amélioré, et de voir si la Commission devrait faire l'objet d'une loi.

Je suis reconnaissante à la Chambre des communes et, notamment, aux membres du Comité de leurs commentaires et de leur participation.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Vous déclarez cela, alors que la Commission des débats n'a même pas été débattue à la Chambre des communes.

Ceci reflète les recommandations du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre dont vous n'avez pas voulu. La fonction de commissaire aux débats relève du ministère des Institutions démocratiques et pas d'Élections Canada. Autrement dit, le gouvernement a choisi les critères de participation, au lieu que ce soit le commissaire en consultation avec le comité consultatif, et le gouvernement libéral a choisi unilatéralement le commissaire aux débats, sans consultation avec les autres partis politiques ni processus équitable, comme nous le recommandions.

J'ai l'impression que pour quelqu'un qui prétend qu'il s'agit d'un élément et d'une institution clés du processus démocratique, pour l'instant, vous n'avez pas créé et mis en place la Commission de manière très démocratique, madame la ministre.

Je vous remercie.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Puis-je répondre?

Le président:

Vous avez 15 secondes.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme je l'ai dit à de nombreuses reprises — et je crois qu'il s'agit de ma quatrième comparution sur ce même sujet —, nous avons donné plein d'occasions de participer sur ce sujet même et je suis très reconnaissante de tous les commentaires, de tous les conseils donnés, de même que de toutes les questions posées par le Comité. Je pense que cela a conduit à la nomination d'un très illustre Canadien de confiance, de quelqu'un qui, à mon sens, sera capable de remplir ce mandat et de proposer aux Canadiens un débat qui sera dans l'intérêt public et auquel tous les Canadiens auront accès.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci,

La parole est maintenant à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre. C'est un plaisir de vous revoir.

Vous avez raison de dire que nous sommes revenus sur le sujet plusieurs fois. Je dois vous dire que j'ai même glissé à Tyler que je n'avais plus de questions tellement nous avons passé de temps dessus.

Je rappellerai, parce qu'il le faut, que la seule chose sur laquelle je suis d'accord avec mes collègues du caucus conservateur est que le processus a été maladroit. On n'a pas montré au Comité et au travail qu'il a fait autant de respect qu'il avait été promis lors des élections, et le nom a été choisi unilatéralement. Ce sont autant de reproches légitimes que le gouvernement doit entendre.

Cependant, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec la volonté de rendre la Commission tellement crédible que le prix à payer pour tout dirigeant politique qui ne participerait pas au débat des chefs serait plus grand que tout avantage à ne pas se montrer pour ne pas rendre de comptes et ne pas s'exposer à un examen. Je serai, toutefois, très clair dans mes critiques au gouvernement à propos de certaines maladresses qu'il a commises dans sa démarche et préciserai que ces critiques ne suffisent pas, à mon sens, à délégitimer l'existence de la Commission ni le choix de M. Johnston, en particulier. Il était difficile de trouver un Canadien qui soit inattaquable politiquement, mais vous l'avez trouvé et c'est important.

Je dois dire que l'interrogatoire serré auquel l'opposition officielle a soumis M. Johnston devenait presque embarrassant. Il a fini par déclarer, et je paraphrase, « Vous voulez avoir l'assurance que je m'acquitterai de cette fonction avec intégrité? Il y va de mon nom et de ma réputation. C'est de là que je tire ma crédibilité. »

Vous savez quoi? Pour moi, et je pense pour l'immense majorité des Canadiens, étant donné la carrière de M. Johnston au service du Canada et de l'intérêt public, c'est suffisant, du moment que le tout est lié à une reddition de comptes à la fin.

Je l'ai interrogé à ce sujet, j'ai insisté pour être certain que l'examen serait aussi vigoureux qu'il le doit, et là encore, j'ai été convaincu. Si je revenais à la prochaine législature, ce qui n'est pas le cas, je serais convaincu d'avoir devant moi l'analyse dont j'ai besoin pour déterminer si nous avons atteint les objectifs comme nous le voulions, notamment en matière de reddition de comptes.

Je pourrais prendre plus de temps et poser des questions, mais je préfère rester sur la surprise et le plaisir, que je partage avec vous, d'avoir entendu les conservateurs déclarer publiquement qu'ils pensent que c'est important et que cela compte. À présent, nous devons faire en sorte que ce processus soit tellement crédible que plus jamais un chef de parti ne se soustraira aux débats nationaux quand il ou elle aspire à devenir premier ministre de ce pays.

S'il me reste du temps, madame la ministre, sentez-vous libre de l'utiliser pour revenir sur quelque chose, sinon, nous pouvons passer à la suite, mais c'était le plus important. Je n'ai pas de question pour l'instant. Je crois que les questions vraiment importantes viendront après les faits, quand nous examinerons comment tout s'est déroulé et chercherons à déterminer ce qui peut être amélioré.

Très franchement, pour conclure, c'est le soir des débats qu'on aura la preuve. Toutes les places sont-elles occupées? Si elles le sont, nous saurons collectivement, dans la majorité, que nous avons réussi. S'il n'y a ne serait-ce qu'une place inoccupée, nous aurons échoué. Nous aurons échoué à créer le climat politique où on ne peut pas se permettre de payer ce prix. L'histoire nous dira ce qu'il en est.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Encore merci, madame la ministre.

(1125)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je tiens à vous remercier, monsieur Christopherson, de vos observations. Je prends note de toutes, des critiques comme du soutien.

Je crois que c'est en cela qu'il est important de passer par ce processus. Il est tout à fait essentiel d'avoir cet examen à la fin et cette reddition de comptes sur ce qui a fonctionné, ce qui n'a pas fonctionné, ce qui peut être amélioré, et de déterminer ce que nous pouvons faire pour faire de la Commission une solution à long terme.

Je sais que nous sommes tous deux très attachés au service public et à la responsabilisation, et que nous sommes convaincus de l'importance des débats des chefs au moment où les Canadiens choisissent la personne qu'ils veulent voir diriger le pays à l'avenir.

Je vous remercie de vos observations.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Le président:

Je tiens à rappeler que la ministre se trouve ici parce que le Comité lui a demandé de venir. Elle n'était pas nécessairement obligée de venir.

Monsieur Bittle, vous avez la parole.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Pour revenir, encore, sur ce point, je ne crois pas que nous nous soyons jamais battus au sujet de la comparution d'un ministre devant le Comité. Il me semble que nous travaillons en bonne entente et, lorsque ces demandes sont faites, je sais que la ministre Gould a comparu quatre fois devant nous sur ce sujet et de nombreuses autres fois sur de nombreux autres sujets. Je ne comprends pas la critique formulée par Mme Kusie au début de son intervention, mais cela dit, j'aimerais ajouter quelque chose aux propos de M. Christopherson.

Il s'agit de ce qui s'est passé ces deux derniers mois au Comité. Je me répète, nous travaillons très bien ensemble et le ton est généralement respectueux au Comité. Cependant, quand nous avons reçu une série de témoins, à commencer par le greffier de la Chambre, nous avons vu le whip de l'opposition officielle contester son intégrité.

Ensuite, nous avons reçu le directeur général des élections, qui a comparu de nombreuses fois devant le Comité et qui collabore très bien avec lui. M. Poilievre a remis en question son intégrité et est allé jusqu'à laisser entendre, sans avancer aucune preuve, qu'Élections Canada est aux ordres des libéraux. Il n'a eu aucun scrupule à le faire et y a pris plaisir. Il est même allé jusqu'à me corriger quand j'ai fait une erreur en citant ses propos.

Puis on a franchi une autre étape.

M. Christopherson a très bien parlé de l'intégrité de M. Johnston. Peu de personnes au Canada ont une crédibilité aussi inattaquable, et on penserait qu'elles pourraient se présenter devant le Comité. Comme M. Christopherson, je pense qu'on peut ne pas s'entendre sur le processus de sélection des personnes et sur la façon dont la Commission a été créée, et ce sont des commentaires honnêtes. L'opposition a tout à fait le droit d'interroger le gouvernement sur son rôle et ses décisions, de même que sur la différence entre les recommandations du Comité et ce qui est, en fait, arrivé, et elle devrait poser ces questions. C'est le type de débat auquel je suis habitué au Comité.

Il est, cependant, choquant d'entendre ensuite l'opposition remettre en question la crédibilité personnelle de David Johnston à tel point qu'il a dû se défendre en soulignant l'ensemble de son travail.

Qu'en pensez-vous et quelle est votre impression au sujet de... je l'appellerais « Son Excellence », mais la règle est qu'on mette cinq dollars dans le pot pour un organisme de bienfaisance. Pouvez-vous parler de la crédibilité de David Johnston et des conversations que vous avez eues jusqu'ici?

(1130)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Certainement.

Tout d'abord, il est problématique, à mon sens, de voir la crédibilité de personnes très crédibles attaquée, en particulier lorsqu'elles font savoir très clairement qu'elles agissent en toute indépendance et qu'il n'existe aucune possibilité d'ingérence ou de pression. Selon moi, nous devrions les croire sur parole, surtout dans le cas de quelqu'un comme M. Johnston qui sert les Canadiens depuis des décennies. Toute sa carrière et sa vie ont été au service des Canadiens et il n'a jamais manifesté aucun esprit partisan.

Voilà quelqu'un qui a été nommé gouverneur général sur la recommandation du premier ministre Harper et qui a ensuite été nommé commissaire aux débats. Il est incroyablement impartial et toujours animé de l'esprit canadien.

C'est une caractéristique que nous recherchions chez la personne qui serait capable de gérer une question très politique et très partisane. En réalité, depuis que les débats des chefs existent, ils sont décidés en coulisse. Il y avait des manoeuvres politiques. Qui que ce soit qui dirigeait le pays à ce moment-là avait davantage voix au chapitre et plus de pouvoir pour ce qui est de décider où et quand les débats auraient lieu. Nous l'avons vu très clairement en 2015 quand le premier ministre d'alors a, au fond, dicté où et quand auraient lieu les débats et qui y participerait.

C'est pourquoi nous cherchions précisément quelqu'un qui pouvait se hisser au-dessus de la mêlée, quelqu'un en qui les Canadiens pourraient avoir confiance parce qu'ils sauraient qu'il n'y aurait pas l'ombre d'un esprit partisan, que ce ne serait pas politique et qu'il s'agirait purement de service public et de servir l'intérêt du Canada.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vous remercie.

Peut-être vais-je vous poser des questions plus directement sur l'attaque contre la crédibilité d'Élections Canada et du directeur général des élections.

Je pense à ce qui se passe aux États-Unis et aux politiciens qui cherchent à marquer des points contre les institutions, en particulier les institutions indépendantes, qui font partie du processus démocratique. Je suis inquiet de voir que cela arrive ici, de voir que l'opposition se livre avec un malin plaisir à ce petit jeu, et je suis inquiet de voir qu'à la veille d'élections et en l'absence de toute preuve, on s'attaque avec jubilation au directeur général des élections et à Élections Canada, qui est un des organismes électoraux les plus respectés du monde.

Que pouvez-vous nous dire à ce sujet également?

(1135)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les élections reposent sur deux choses, selon moi, la confiance dans le processus et la confiance dans les résultats. Pour avoir les deux, il faut avoir confiance dans l'administrateur indépendant et impartial des élections. Il me semble que depuis sa création, Élections Canada est un parfait exemple dans le monde entier de cette impartialité et de cette indépendance.

Il veille à l'application de la loi électorale adoptée par le Parlement actuel, et de nombreux autres avant lui, de manière efficace et digne de confiance, pour les Canadiens. Il est, à mon sens, particulièrement dangereux de s'aventurer à contester l'indépendance, l'intégrité et l'impartialité de nos agents du Parlement indépendants.

Bien qu'à de nombreux égards, nous ne nous entendions pas toujours sur ses constatations ou ses directives, le fait est que nous lui avons, en tant que Parlement, accordé ce pouvoir et que nous devons le respecter. Nous pouvons ne pas être d'accord avec lui, mais nous ne devrions pas remettre en question ses motivations.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je tiens à vous féliciter de votre prestation hier soir et de votre étonnante capacité à jouer le jeu. C'est un merveilleux talent et je vous en félicite.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est un de mes rares talents, jouer le jeu.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Bittle.

La parole est à présent à Mme Kusie. [Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Il est paradoxal que vous ne cessiez de mentionner la réputation et l'intégrité de la personne que vous avez choisie, M. David Johnston. La triste ironie de tout cela, c'est que, si vous vous étiez soumis à un processus équitable et transparent afin de le choisir, vous n'auriez pas eu l'occasion de remettre en question, non pas lui, mais la procédure employée pour le choisir. Je suis d'avis que c'est vraiment dommage pour lui. Je trouve notre discussion tout à fait paradoxale. Il n'y a aucun doute sur l'intégrité, l'expérience et le curriculum de M. Johnston, mais sur le processus, sur votre processus. En réalité, c'est votre processus qui est à l'origine de cette regrettable conversation.

J'aimerais passer au producteur. Il y aura un producteur qui organisera les débats pour la Commission et il s'agira probablement d'un consortium de médias. Au fond, le gouvernement a créé la Commission des débats et lui a donné un budget de 5,5 millions de dollars au cours d'une année où nous enregistrons un quatrième déficit consécutif, d'une année où le budget était censé être équilibré, d'après le premier ministre. Toutefois, comment pouvons-nous savoir que ces débats seront très différents des débats précédents, si c'est, en fait, ce consortium qui les organise?

Je vois les médias dans la salle aujourd'hui. Je vais vous demander si vous pensez que c'est le rôle de la Commission, et donc du gouvernement, de participer à votre organisation et à votre radiodiffusion.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En réponse à votre première question sur les 5,5 millions de dollars, il est important de souligner qu'il s'agit d'un montant maximal. D'un plafond. Nous voulions nous assurer, entre autres, que la Commission dispose d'assez de ressources pour produire un débat de qualité, à la hauteur des normes journalistiques et accessible à tous les Canadiens qui souhaitent le suivre.

Nous avons notamment entendu tout au long des consultations qu'il fallait veiller à ce que la Commission dispose de suffisamment de ressources. De plus, cela permet aussi de garantir une retransmission publique et gratuite pour quiconque veut la suivre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce que c'est parce que vous ne faisiez pas confiance aux médias? Parce que vous ne les pensiez pas capables de faire quelque chose qu'ils font depuis des années?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non, ce n'est pas du tout le cas. En fait, j'ai rappelé à maintes occasions le rôle important des médias dans notre démocratie, en particulier de notre média traditionnel. Nous n'aurions pas cette belle démocratie sans les journalistes extraordinaires qui, dans tout le pays, obligent les gouvernements à rendre des comptes.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pourtant, vous donnez l'impression d'essayer de les contrôler en recourant à cette commission.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce n'est pas du tout le cas. C'est peut-être comme cela que vous voyez les choses, mais la Commission est créée pour que les débats soient largement accessibles. Le principal objectif, comme je ne cesse de la rappeler, madame Kusie, est de faire en sorte que l'intérêt public prime en ce qui concerne les débats. Il s'agit de faire en sorte qu'ils soient diffusés le plus largement possible.

Nous avons vu en 2015 comment un dirigeant politique a pu à lui seul changer, par intérêt politique, la nature des débats et l'ampleur de leur diffusion.

Le fait est que les Canadiens en sont arrivés à considérer les débats des chefs comme un moment politique important où ils prennent des décisions, observent les réactions spontanées de leurs dirigeants politiques et voient comment ils interagissent. Ils peuvent décider de qui ils veulent voir à la tête du pays.

(1140)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Mais si c'est un producteur et, pour finir, un consortium, ne craignez-vous pas que des petites organisations médiatiques soient laissées de côté?

Il existe tellement de petites organisations médiatiques, de plateformes, et il est fort possible qu'elles ne fassent pas partie de ce processus démocratique à cause de cette motion.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'attirerai l'attention sur la demande de propositions, la DP, qui a été publiée et je soulignerai qu'elle a été créée par la Commission.

L'idée, et la teneur du décret, est justement de réunir le plus de participants possible. La décision lui revient. Le commissaire prendra cette décision en se fondant sur l'avis du comité consultatif qui a été mis en place. Le but est expressément de rendre le processus aussi accessible et inclusif que possible.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En contrôlant le processus? C'est ridicule. Il est complètement insensé de dire que vous favorisez la liberté des médias en créant une commission qui relève du ministère...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Madame Kusie, j'aimerais souligner que...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

... qui choisit le producteur et les membres du consortium pour mettre en oeuvre la Commission des débats. C'est totalement contraire à...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Si vous le permettez, le décret encourage expressément la Commission des débats et le commissaire à travailler en collaboration avec des partenaires dans tout le pays s'ils souhaitent également organiser d'autres débats.

Le commissaire doit veiller à ce qu'il y ait un débat en anglais et un débat en français. Il n'est en rien habilité à limiter le nombre de débats organisés. Au contraire, il doit soutenir les personnes qui souhaitent participer au processus et innover dans ce processus.

Pour aller à l'essentiel de votre question, il s'agit d'accessibilité, d'inclusion et de toucher les marchés mal desservis dans le passé.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Et merci d'avoir salué les médias, Althia Raje, etc.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Ma première question concerne le montant alloué à la Commission.

Comment avez-vous décidé que ce montant — le montant maximal ou le montant réel maintenant mentionné — serait approprié, étant donné les nombreuses variables inconnues dans l'organisation de ces débats?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous voulions nous assurer d'avoir des ressources suffisantes pour produire deux débats de qualité dans les deux langues officielles. Nous voulions aussi être certains d'avoir suffisamment pour rémunérer le commissaire et le secrétariat technique qui sera créé. Il s'agit d'un processus de 18 mois et il fallait veiller à ce qu'il ait des ressources suffisantes. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de produire les débats, mais aussi d'informer les Canadiens de ce qu'ils ont lieu. Il faut donc veiller à ce que la Commission dispose des ressources nécessaires pour remplir son mandat.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Qu'est-ce qui vous donne à penser que c'est suffisant?

M. Matthew Shea:

Nous avons fait la meilleure analyse possible quand nous avons fait la proposition de financement. Nous avons préféré prévoir plus d'argent. Nous avons prévu des fonds pour les services professionnels, étant donné qu'il faudrait conclure un contrat pour le déroulement des débats. Des services de communication seront nécessaires. Il faudra du personnel et un soutien administratif.

Nous avons déjà mis sur pied des organismes indépendants. Nous avons une expérience récente des commissions d'enquête, par exemple, ce qui nous a donné une idée des coûts. Quand on crée un organisme, il y a toujours des coûts de démarrage. C'est une des difficultés des organismes provisoires.

Je ne peux pas parler des dépenses de l'an dernier parce que les comptes ne sont pas officiellement clos et que les comptes publics ne sont pas publiés, mais je peux m'avancer à dire qu'elle aura, et que nous aurons, moins dépensé que prévu au cours du dernier exercice. En particulier, le soutien apporté par le BCP pour la création de la Commission a coûté nettement moins que prévu.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oh, vraiment.

M. Matthew Shea:

La principale raison en est que le commissaire aux débats m'a clairement fait comprendre, dès le premier jour, qu'il voulait dépenser le moins possible et être le plus efficace possible. Nous avons examiné des locaux existants, du matériel existant. Par souci d'économie, il a demandé très peu de changements au bureau. Je sais que, du point de vue de nos dépenses, c'est beaucoup moins que prévu.

Je n'ai aucune raison de croire que la Commission ne s'en tiendra pas au budget qui lui a été alloué.

Je ne peux pas parler de certains détails pour des raisons de confidentialité, mais certains membres du comité consultatif, quand bien même ils ont droit à une indemnité journalière, ont choisi de ne pas en percevoir. Le commissaire aux débats lui-même a déjà fait savoir qu'il ferait don de sa rémunération à des organismes de bienfaisance.

Enfin, la Commission essaie de réduire les coûts de nombreuses façons, ce qui fait que nous n'avons aucune raison de croire que ce montant ne suffira pas. En fait, il restera probablement de l'argent.

(1145)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela fait plaisir à entendre.

Le commissaire, le secrétariat et les conseillers se sont vus offrir des salaires comparables à ceux d'autres commissaires.

M. Matthew Shea:

Tout à fait. Il y a un coût en personnel, comprenez-moi bien. Soyons clairs, le commissaire aux débats lui-même est payé, mais il fait don de cet argent à des organismes de bienfaisance. Il était impossible de ne pas le rémunérer, étant donné sa fonction. Il y a d'autres employés, soit environ cinq ETP pour cet exercice. Nous prévoyons qu'il y aura des dépenses salariales. Ces personnes ont droit à un salaire pour le travail assidu qu'elles accomplissent. Ce que je dis surtout, c'est que le commissaire aux débats ne ménage pas sa peine pour réduire les coûts au minimum.

Si la Commission nous confie ses tâches administratives, c'est en partie parce qu'elle ne voulait pas créer sa propre unité de services ministériels, alors que nous offrons couramment ce type de soutien à des organismes indépendants. Nous avons remis au commissaire une liste de ce que nous pouvions faire. Nous nous occupons de pratiquement tout son soutien administratif. Je pense que nous dépenserons aussi nettement moins que prévu au BCP aussi.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais passer à autre chose. Nous avons parlé assez longuement du commissaire aux débats, nous l'avons reçu au Comité récemment et vous ne pouvez guère en dire plus à cause de l'indépendance de la Commission.

Mme Lapointe a posé une question au sujet de Facebook. En début de semaine, Facebook a mis en place une nouvelle version de son contrat d'utilisation afin de s'assurer que les personnes qui encouragent des messages ou publient des annonces d'emploi ne fassent pas de discrimination fondée sur le sexe ou de quelque autre manière que ce soit à l'égard des cibles de leur publicité. Avez-vous des idées similaires quant à ce qui peut être fait sur Facebook et sur d'autres plateformes de médias sociaux par rapport aux publicités politiques ou au micro-ciblage qu'on voit dans les campagnes, locales ou nationales, afin que l'électorat ne soit pas exclu de ce que les partis mettent sur leurs plateformes et dans leurs autres communications?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que le registre des publicités proposé par le Comité dans le projet de loi C-76 jouera un rôle très important en l'espèce. Facebook a déclaré qu'il allait créer un registre des publicités pour la période pré-électorale et électorale. Je pense que c'est une mesure vraiment importante parce que les Canadiens pourront voir toutes les publicités que les acteurs politiques diffusent au cours de cette période. C'est, selon moi, très important.

Je pense aussi que vous soulevez un point intéressant au sujet du micro-ciblage. C'est une conversation continue que nous avons. Je crois qu'il en sera aussi question pendant la réunion du Grand Comité qui aura lieu dans quelques semaines, par rapport à ce que signifie ce micro-ciblage auquel différents acteurs politiques recourent et au fait qu'on n'ait pas de vue d'ensemble. Ce qui est intéressant, entre autres, à mes yeux, c'est que si on fait de la publicité par des moyens plus traditionnels, comme la radio, la télévision ou les journaux, on voit toutes les différentes publicités politiques parce que ce sont des supports qu'on regarde. Dans les médias sociaux, on ne verra peut-être que les publicités d'un seul parti, par exemple, parce qu'on ne fait peut-être pas partie de la population ciblée. Il me semble que c'est une chose à laquelle nous devons réfléchir davantage afin de déterminer si cela correspond ou pas à l'esprit de notre loi électorale.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre, et mesdames et messieurs, de vous être joints à nous cet après-midi.

J'aimerais revenir très brièvement sur une réponse qui a été faite à Mme Sahota. On a indiqué que cinq équivalents temps plein font partie de la Commission. S'agit-il d'employés pour une période indéterminée du gouvernement du Canada ou de contractuels?

M. Matthew Shea:

Permettez-moi d'apporter quelques précisions; il s'agit d'un organisme distinct à l'intérieur du gouvernement, donc, de ce point de vue, et techniquement, ce sont tous des employés du gouvernement. La majorité d'entre eux sont engagés dans le cadre de contrats de courte durée ou pour une période déterminée. Je pense que l'un d'entre eux est en détachement d'un autre ministère. La composition de l'effectif est mixte. Il y a également quelques employés à temps partiel.

M. John Nater:

De manière générale, quand ces emplois prendront-ils fin?

M. Matthew Shea:

Je ne connais pas la date exacte, mais ce sera après les élections, évidemment.

Une voix: Le 20 mars 2020.

M. Matthew Shea: Très bien, le 20 mars.

(1150)

M. John Nater:

Super. Merci pour ces précisions.

Je regardais Ia demande de propositions qui a été soumise plus tôt cette semaine. L'alinéa 4.1c) se lit comme suit: « Une équipe d’évaluation composée de représentants du Canada évaluera les soumissions. » Qui seront ces représentants?

M. Matthew Shea:

Cette question est laissée à l'entière discrétion de la Commission. Je pourrais peut-être vous parler brièvement de la DDP. Mais il serait inapproprié de ma part d'aller plus loin, étant donné que la DDP est en cours.

La Commission des débats a transmis une demande d'information à des soumissionnaires potentiels pour cette acquisition avant de publier la DDP. Cela s'explique en partie... et je souhaitais attendre son retour, lorsque l'on a commencé à dire que ce serait un consortium des médias qui l'emporterait. L'objectif consistait, en partie, à offrir à des soumissionnaires potentiels la possibilité de poser des questions et d'obtenir des précisions sur le contrat afin de le rendre aussi accessible que possible.

La demande de propositions est en cours. La date de clôture est le 30 mai, et c'est pourquoi je pense que je ne devrais pas formuler d'autres commentaires à ce sujet, sauf pour dire que je sais que l'objectif visé est d'inciter de nombreux soumissionnaires à soumettre une proposition. C'est toujours l'objectif lorsque nous faisons ce genre d'exercice, parce que cela nous donne un plus grand choix et que c'est la façon la plus efficace de procéder. Pour ce qui est du choix proprement dit, pour revenir à la question qui a été posée à quelques reprises, il repose entièrement entre les mains du commissaire aux débats et de son équipe. Si on nous demande notre avis concernant le processus, nous serons ravis de les aider, mais même dans le cas de ce contrat, ils ont fait appel directement à Services publics, et non à nous, pour certaines étapes.

M. John Nater:

Donc, le Bureau du Conseil privé n'a eu aucun mot à dire sur la DDP qui a été publiée cette semaine.

M. Matthew Shea:

Absolument aucun.

M. John Nater:

L'exercice a relevé entièrement de Services publics.

La section M.2, qui indique certaines des exigences que le consortium des médias ou peu importe le nom que nous allons lui donner...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le soumissionnaire.

M. John Nater:

... que le soumissionnaire proposé, devra respecter est assez détaillée et ne semble pas, du moins, pencher en faveur des trois grandes sociétés de télédiffuseurs: CTV, CBC ou la Société Radio-Canada et Global.

J'aimerais avoir votre opinion, madame la ministre. Est-ce que cela vous inquiéterait si le seul soumissionnaire retenu était le consortium de CBC ou la Société Radio-Canada, CTV et Global?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne pense pas qu'il soit approprié pour moi de formuler des commentaires sur le processus de demande de propositions en ce moment.

M. John Nater:

D'accord.

Est-ce que cela vous inquiéterait si les nouveaux médias ou les plus petits médias comme APTN, la presse écrite, HuffPost Canada, CPAC et Maclean's ne participaient pas au processus?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, je ne pense pas qu'il soit opportun que je fasse des commentaires, étant donné que la DDP est en cours, mais le but visé, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, est que le processus soit aussi inclusif et fructueux que possible.

M. John Nater:

Je vais reformuler ma question. Seriez-vous déçue si, au final, le débat ne concernait que le consortium des médias, comme ce fut le cas lors des élections précédentes?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Compte tenu du fait que la DDP est actuellement active, et qu'il s'agit d'un processus indépendant, je ne voudrais pas faire de commentaire susceptible d'être préjudiciable à la décision, quelle qu'elle soit.

M. John Nater:

Je vois qu'il me reste environ une minute. Je vais faire un bref commentaire, et donner la chance ensuite à Mme Kusie de poser une dernière question.

Je serais préoccupé si nous nous retrouvions dans la situation d'investir une somme considérable dans la création de cette commission pour constater par la suite qu'une gamme d'opinions médiatiques sont mises à l'écart du processus de débat proprement dit. Que ce soit bon ou mauvais, il y a eu cinq débats la dernière fois — organisés par divers groupes. Ils ont suscité la controverse — je n'ai pas l'intention de le nier — mais il y a eu une variété de débats, et je serais exceptionnellement déçu si les nouveaux médias et la diversité des médias ne participaient pas à ce processus.

II me reste 34 secondes, je vais laisser Mme Kusie en profiter.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certainement.

En ce qui a trait aux litiges qui toucheraient la Commission des débats, autrement dit, si la Commission était visée par un litige, est-ce que ce sera vous qui donnerez des instructions aux avocats ou le commissaire aux débats lui-même?

M. Matthew Shea:

Il faudrait confirmer le cadre juridique exact. Normalement, ce serait le ministère, en l'occurrence, le Commissaire aux débats, mais je pense que ça reste à confirmer. Je pense que ce que l'on peut dire avec certitude, c'est que nous allons respecter l'indépendance de l'organisme, et que toutes les mesures seront prises sans lien de dépendance, autant que possible.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

La Commission aura-t-elle la possibilité de faire appel à des conseillers juridiques externes, si elle le souhaite, ou devra-t-elle se tourner vers les avocats qui relèvent du procureur général?

M. Matthew Shea:

Je vous fais toutes mes excuses, mais je vais devoir vous revenir pour les tenants et aboutissants de cette question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Très bien.

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Matthew Sea: Connaissez-vous la réponse, Allen?

M. Allen Sutherland (secrétaire adjoint au Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental et Institutions démocratiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Je suppose que cela dépendrait de la nature du différend.

Le président:

Il nous reste encore sept minutes. Je vais donc accorder à M. Graham et à M. Christopherson, un tout petit peu de temps, s'ils le souhaitent.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

C'est très bien. Je n'ai pas besoin de beaucoup de temps. Je voulais simplement revenir sur l'un des points qu'a mentionnés John Nater.

Seriez-vous déçue si un chef de parti refusait de participer à un débat organisé par la Commission?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, pour le moment, je pense que les raisons pour lesquelles nous mettons la Commission des débats en place sont très claires. Elles visent particulièrement à éviter les circonstances malheureuses qui se sont produites en 2015. Cependant, bien que 2015 ait marqué un moment où l'on a été à même de constater clairement les raisons pour lesquelles le processus ne fonctionnait pas, il est encore clair aujourd'hui que la manière dont les débats étaient organisés posait des problèmes. Notre initiative vise donc à corriger ces problèmes et à affirmer, comme je l'ai dit à maintes reprises, que nous travaillons à promouvoir l'intérêt public.

Il est à espérer qu'aucun chef de parti n'en vienne à penser qu'il peut se dispenser de se présenter devant les Canadiens s'il cherche vraiment à devenir premier ministre. Je pense que c'est un élément vraiment important des rouages de notre démocratie et de la manière dont les Canadiens nouent le dialogue avec les chefs des partis politiques.

(1155)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Existe-t-il des mesures visant à empêcher un futur gouvernement de déclarer que toute cette histoire de débats est vraiment trop démocratique pour qu'on y donne suite, et d'y mettre fin?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous avons effectivement mis en place une première étape nous permettant d'évaluer le déroulement du processus. L'idée est que le commissaire présentera un rapport faisant état de ses conclusions sur le déroulement du processus, sur les améliorations éventuelles et ses recommandations en vue d'en faire un processus conçu pour durer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais prendre un moment, encore une fois, pour réaffirmer notre position le plus clairement possible, en mon nom personnel, en celui de mon caucus et en celui de mon parti. Le processus a laissé un peu à désirer. J'ai fait mon possible pour que le gouvernement rende des comptes à ce sujet — de façon répétée, avec force et légitimité, selon moi. Comme l'a indiqué M. Bittle, il s'agit au moins d'un point dont il est légitime de débattre.

Voilà où nous en sommes. La nomination d'un commissaire est acceptable pour nous, et les règles de fonctionnement le sont également. Au NPD, nous n'avons pas eu notre mot à dire plus que les conservateurs, mais nous croyons qu'il s'agit d'un élément important de notre démocratie. Nous n'étions pas, en tant que pays, bien servis par les processus et les tactiques antérieures, et je ne suis pas en train de dire que mon parti est blanc comme neige à cet égard.

Il nous incombe à tous de faire le nécessaire pour respecter et appuyer la Commission des débats, parce qu'il s'agit d'un volet important de notre démocratie. Nous avons l'exemple des États-Unis où depuis très longtemps maintenant, il existe une commission indépendante qui mène ces débats. Les Américains se disputent à tout propos, mais je n'ai entendu personne suggérer que leur système et leur processus étaient inéquitables ou servaient à des fins partisanes.

J'espère que la Commission obtiendra du succès, que tous les chefs de parti se présenteront aux débats, et que les Canadiens obtiendront ce dont ils ont besoin dans le cadre de ce processus. Je suis persuadé que le prochain Parlement fera preuve de toute la diligence requise pour ce qui est d'exiger que le gouvernement et le commissaire rendent des comptes concernant l'argent dépensé, les décisions prises et les procédures suivies.

Je trouverais très démoralisant — et je vais conclure sur cet énoncé, en regardant les élections se dérouler sans moi, du moins en tant que candidat — que l'on remette en question la légitimité de la Commission, et que l'on se serve de ce prétexte pour offrir une stratégie de sortie à l'un des chefs de parti ou à quiconque voudrait se dispenser de rendre des comptes ou de se prêter à l'examen dont ces débats fournissent l'occasion.

Nous souhaitons bonne chance à la Commission. Nous espérons qu'elle aura du succès. Malgré tout, et sous réserve d'incidents qui pourraient survenir, nous sommes déterminés à participer et à la soutenir. Ce Comité a fait du bon travail.

J'aimerais faire valoir un dernier point. J'espère qu'il y a eu une bonne analyse des propositions qu'a faites ce Comité... Nous avons passé beaucoup de temps, nous avons travaillé fort à l'élaboration de notre rapport, et nous avons été déçus de voir qu'une bonne partie de notre travail avait été mise de côté par le gouvernement, alors même qu'il avait promis de faire les choses différemment.

À ce point-ci, il nous incombe à tous de faire en sorte que cette Commission remporte du succès, selon moi, et je le dis en tant que démocrate avec un « d » minuscule, et pas seulement en tant que démocrate avec un « D » majuscule. Rien n'est plus précieux que notre démocratie, et voici un moyen important de renforcer cette démocratie.

(1200)

Le président:

Merci, David. C'était très éloquent, comme d'habitude.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Selon moi, le problème avec les anciens débats ne tenait pas au fait que les chefs ne voulaient pas participer, mais au contraire, au fait que certains chefs souhaitaient participer, mais étaient exclus. Cette question ne semble pas avoir fait surface aujourd'hui. Sera-ce le cas, et est-ce que la chef du Parti vert sera incluse dans les débats qui relèveront de la Commission des débats lors des élections de 2019?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En bout de ligne, toutes les décisions seront prises par le commissaire aux débats lui-même. Cependant, compte tenu des critères ayant été établis, les chefs de partis politiques doivent répondre à deux des trois critères. Premièrement, avoir été élu à titre de député à la Chambre pour le parti qu'il ou elle dirige, ou compter un député élu; deuxièmement, soutenir des candidats dans 90 % de toutes les circonscriptions; et troisièmement, avoir une véritable possibilité d'être élu à la Chambre, compte tenu des sondages d'opinion et du contexte politique.

M. Scott Reid:

Le troisième critère est, évidemment, le plus difficile à déterminer, alors il soulève la question suivante, est-ce que l'on nous a soumis des critères qui nous permettront de savoir avant la période électorale plutôt qu'à mi-chemin quel chef sera admissible ou non?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Cette décision appartient au commissaire.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais demander que le Comité écrive au commissaire aux débats pour lui demander la réponse à cette question. Je la lui ai déjà posée lorsqu'il s'est présenté ici, et il semblait convaincu de devoir fournir une réponse à cette question. Le moment est peut-être venu de lui écrire et de lui présenter cette demande, afin que nous sachions comment il va interpréter ce critère.

Le président:

Vous voulez écrire au commissaire aux débats.

M. David Christopherson:

Lui écrire pour lui poser une question.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux lui demander de nous fournir des précisions sur la signification du troisième critère.

Le président:

Certainement. Je vais le faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Le crédit 1, sous la rubrique « Commission aux Débats des Chefs » est-il adopté? COMMISSION AUX DÉBATS DES CHEFS

ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme.....4 520 775 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence)

Le président: Maintenant que nous avons réglé le cas de la Commission aux débats, de la Chambre des communes, du Service de protection parlementaire et du Bureau du directeur des élections, devrais-je faire rapport du Budget principal des dépenses à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président:Merci beaucoup et merci d'être venue. C'est toujours un plaisir de vous voir.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Pour moi aussi.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la réunion pendant quelques minutes pendant que nous nous préparons à nous occuper des affaires du Comité.

(1200)

(1215)

Le président:

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue à la 156e réunion du Comité. Je rappelle aux députés que la réunion est télédiffusée.

Il n'y a que deux ou trois points à l'ordre du jour. D'abord, la motion proposée par M. Christopherson pour que l'on modifie le Règlement, et également, potentiellement, la motion de M. Reid. Maintenant que nous avons achevé une étude, avec un peu de chance, nous parviendrons à finaliser sa motion avant peu.

Un autre comité vient tenir une réunion dans cette salle, donc nous allons terminer à 13 heures pile. J'aimerais poursuivre à huis clos pour une question vraiment mineure à la fin, soit cinq minutes avant 13 heures.

Monsieur Christopherson, votre motion est maintenant à l'étude. Vous l'avez déjà présentée. Je vois que vous avez soumis deux documents au Comité, cependant, qui contribuent à la préciser et à la simplifier. Il s'agit d'une documentation assez imposante, dont vous avez fait un bon résumé. Vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci, monsieur le président. J'apprécie vos observations.

Pour reprendre à partir du moment où Mme Sahota a fini, nous pourrions avoir achevé le tout en l'espace de 10 minutes. À mon avis, les choses peuvent se passer de deux manières. Selon la première, nous aurons fini en l'espace de 10 minutes, et tout le monde dira oui, nous allons nous pencher sur cette question et témoigner un peu de respect aux personnes qui ont accompli tout ce travail. Nous pourrions déterminer l'ampleur que nous souhaitons donner à cette étude, une fois que nous aurons pris cette décision.

En revanche, si nous n'acceptons pas, il existe une autre possibilité que cette discussion se poursuive pendant un assez long laps de temps. Il me semble déraisonnable de notre part de ne pas offrir à ce groupe de collègues la possibilité d'être au moins entendus.

Cette motion se présente en parallèle avec une autre motion déposée à la Chambre qui entraîne des effets comparables. Nous n'aurons qu'à laisser ces deux motions suivre leur cours comme il se doit. La question, en ce qui nous concerne, consiste à décider si nous sommes prêts à en faire l'étude dès maintenant. Quand nous en aurons terminé ou pas, et l'ampleur que nous voulons donner à notre étude sont des détails qui peuvent être réglés après le fait.

Monsieur le président, je pense que j'ai terminé mes brèves observations la dernière fois pratiquement sur la même note, en ce sens que j'essaie d'établir quel est le sentiment de mes collègues à ce sujet. Soit tout ira très vite, et nous décidons d'aller de l'avant avec l'étude et il ne restera qu'à régler les détails, soit nous nous engageons dans un tout autre monde où... Je vais me montrer optimiste, et espérer que nous n'entrerons pas dans ce monde. Il est inutile d'expliquer ce que je veux dire par ce monde dans lequel j'ai bon espoir de ne pas aller.

Encore une fois, j'implore — littéralement, je les implore — mes collègues. Les députés d'arrière-ban éprouvent passablement de frustration en raison du sentiment permanent de ne pas participer pleinement au processus décisionnel. Depuis des décennies, le Cabinet du premier ministre accroît ses pouvoirs. Certains présidents des États-Unis ont déclaré publiquement être prêts à donner n'importe quoi pour posséder la somme de pouvoir direct dont un premier ministre majoritaire dispose dans notre système. C'est compréhensible. Je m'adresse au leadership de tous les caucus de la Chambre lorsque je dis cela à tout le moins; si cette soupape de sûreté n'est pas déclenchée, ces frustrations ne vont pas disparaître. Elles ne feront que s'accumuler.

J'ai décrit publiquement à quelques reprises ce qui, selon moi, va se produire dans le futur. Comme le grand public exige une réforme du système démocratique parce qu'il constate qu'il ne répond pas à ses besoins actuels, il va élire des personnes qui auront pour mandat d'aller corriger des problèmes. Cela ne mène nulle part. Il faut s'occuper de la situation. Soit c'est la majorité des députés qui accueilleront à bras ouverts le changement et se montreront équitables, ou alors nous devrons faire face à des blocages et à des tentatives contrariées de se faire entendre. Cette situation ne fera qu'entraîner des actions de plus en plus extrêmes et vastes de la part des futurs députés. Je ne vois pas comment il pourrait en être autrement.

Encore une fois, je veux demeurer optimiste. Je n'ai obtenu de mes collègues aucune indication, que ce soit en privé ou en public, de la direction que nous allons prendre concernant cette motion.

Je demanderais à ce que mon nom soit remis sur la liste lorsque je céderai la parole. J'ai très envie d'entendre ce que mes collègues ont à dire à ce sujet. Encore une fois, selon moi, nous pourrions sortir d'ici dans quelques minutes, ou alors nous lancer dans un débat sur cette question qui pourrait s'éterniser beaucoup plus longtemps que nous l'aurions jamais cru.

(1220)

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Kusie, puis M. Graham, et ensuite Mme Lapointe.

Aviez-vous levé la main, vous aussi, madame Sahota?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, mais n'inscrivez pas mon nom tout de suite. Je vais écouter ce que les autres ont à dire. Peut-être que ce ne sera pas nécessaire.

Le président:

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je dois me montrer très sincère et reconnaître que certains de mes collègues, même ici, ont participé à cette étude. Par ailleurs, certains membres du caucus conservateur qui en font partie depuis de nombreuses années et qui se sont même portés candidats à la direction sont favorables à ce que l'on étudie la possibilité d'apporter de tels changements.

Je mentirais si je vous disais que certaines de ces idées ne suscitent aucun intérêt au sein de mon caucus. Ce serait faux. L'intérêt existe parce que nos membres, au même titre que ceux du NPD et du Parti libéral, souhaitent eux aussi que l'on reconsidère — faute d'un meilleur terme — les pouvoirs.

Je sens effectivement un intérêt et une envie de se pencher sur les idées proposées dans cette motion, mais peut-être que je me contenterai de présenter un amendement favorable demandant que la motion soit modifiée par l'ajout du texte suivant: pourvu que le Comité ne fasse aucun rapport des recommandations à la Chambre sans avoir obtenu le consentement unanime de ce Comité.

Je sais que certains membres du Comité, sinon tous les membres — disons, certains membres, il est préférable de le formuler ainsi — de ce Comité ont fait savoir qu'ils trouvaient important d'obtenir le consentement unanime sur des points comme celui-ci, c'est pourquoi je pense que cet amendement préserve l'esprit et la lettre de ce souhait des autres membres du Comité. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, je mentirais si je disais que personne au sein de notre caucus ne s'intéresse à la discussion et à l'exploration de ces idées.

Je propose cet amendement favorable.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Graham, mais juste avant, pourrais-je obtenir une réponse d'un seul mot de la part de M. Christopherson pour savoir s'il accepte cette proposition à titre d'amendement favorable?

M. David Christopherson:

Pourriez-vous le répéter, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous allons en faire la distribution, monsieur le président, pardonnez-moi de ne pas l'avoir fait auparavant. Je vous fais toutes mes excuses; c'est de ma faute.

M. David Christopherson:

Ne vous en faites pas. Ce n'est pas obligatoire.

Le président:

Très bien, la parole est à M. Graham, et puis nous reviendrons à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai qu'un bref commentaire. Madame Kusie, je ne m'oppose pas du tout à votre amendement. Ma seule préoccupation, ma seule demande — et je le dis en toute sincérité — c'est qu'aucun député ne s'oppose à une recommandation simplement pour s'y opposer, afin que les recommandations soient prises en considération honnêtement et de bonne foi; ainsi, nous pouvons éviter ce genre de situation où l'on dit, oui, nous allons adopter le modèle consensuel, jusqu'à ce quelqu'un s'insurge et proteste en disant, « Non, non, non », parce que ce serait vraiment dommage.

Je veux que vous nous donniez l'assurance, pour le compte rendu, que ce ne sera pas le cas, et que le modèle consensuel sera sincère, et que tous les points seront pris en considération. Si c'est le cas, c'est avec grand plaisir que j'appuie cet amendement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Voulez-vous que je réponde?

Peut-être que je ne comprends pas exactement ce à quoi vous... Je dirais seulement que, si vous faites référence à... Le seul mot qui me vient à l'esprit est la « malveillance » d'un député qui voudrait cacher quelque chose. Évidemment, il faudrait que vous obteniez la même assurance de la part de tous les autres membres du Comité, et pas seulement de ma part.

Je ne vois aucune raison de contrarier ces changements proposés spécifiquement. Ce n'est un secret pour personne que je reste en contact avec mon caucus au sujet de tous les points qui seront abordés et de l'orientation de l'étude, mais comme je viens de le dire, j'ai senti un intérêt sincère pour l'étude de ces idées. Si mon caucus est favorable à ce que l'on étudie ces questions, en tant que porte-parole de l'opposition en matière d'institutions démocratiques, je le suis aussi.

(1225)

Le président:

Très bien.

Sur l'amendement, madame Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Dois-je parler de l'amendement ou puis-je faire les commentaires que je voulais faire?

Le président:

Il est question de l'amendement.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Très bien.

Je serais plutôt d'accord pour que ce soit des recommandations unanimes. [Traduction]

Le président:

Très bien.

Sur l'amendement, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'étais favorable à l'amendement jusqu'à ce que j'entende l'explication de Mme Kusie, qui aurait pu se résumer facilement à « oui, nous allons étudier véritablement chacune de ces propositions », au lieu de quoi, nous avons obtenu une réponse emberlificotée.

Je pense que j'aimerais bien entendre ce qu'a à dire M. Christopherson avant de prendre ma décision concernant l'amendement.

Le président:

Mais avant, il faut entendre M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je serai très bref.

Je pense que nous pourrions véritablement travailler selon un mode consensuel.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, je suis d'accord.

M. John Nater:

J'en ai parlé avec M. Baylis. Lors de notre conversation, il m'avait suggéré — et je ne suis pas en train de raconter ce que l'on devrait taire — de travailler selon un mode consensuel.

De notre point de vue, en tant que parti de l'opposition officielle, il y a une quantité d'information que nous souhaiterions vraiment étudier. Il y aura des éléments dont nous n'approuverons peut-être pas l'orientation générale. D'autres avec lesquels M. Christopherson, ou les libéraux, pourraient ne pas être d'accord. Il y aura peut-être des arguments auxquels nous tiendrons à tout prix, ou peut-être pas.

Cependant, en ce qui concerne l'approche, elle m'intéresse vraiment.

J'irais même un peu plus loin. J'espère que nous pourrons également, en parallèle, mettre également un point final à notre étude de la deuxième chambre. J'aimerais que l'on fasse rapport des résultats de cette étude aussi à la Chambre des communes. Il y a un peu de chevauchement, mais je ne voudrais surtout pas que cette étude n'aille pas de l'avant, parce qu'à mon avis, nous avons fait du bon travail et de solides recherches dans ce cas aussi.

Le président:

Pour le moment, l'examen du rapport préliminaire sur la deuxième Chambre que l'attaché de recherche a rédigé est fixé au premier mardi après notre retour.

Ruby Sahota, vouliez-vous vous exprimer sur l'amendement? Vous étiez inscrite sur la liste au départ.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Non.

Le président: Très bien.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais aborder deux points.

Premièrement, nous avons toujours préféré que tout changement apporté au Règlement, tout comme aux lois électorales, obtienne l'approbation de tous les partis. C'est mon premier point. C'est en quelque sorte, notre position implicite.

Deuxièmement, c'est nouveau, et cela pourrait potentiellement modifier la structure du pouvoir. Ce ne sera pas facile, et ce ne sera pas simple. À ce moment-ci, j'accepterais pratiquement n'importe quel amendement, pourvu qu'il ne soit pas carrément inacceptable, si nous pouvons obtenir le consentement unanime d'étudier ce que je propose dans la motion. En ce qui me concerne, c'est le principal.

Voici ces deux points: premièrement, la préférence que tout changement de ce genre, ou à des lois électorales, alors qu'il est question de modifier les règles imposées par l'arbitre, doive bénéficier, dans une situation idéale, de l'appui de tous les partis en cause, y compris les indépendants, d'ailleurs, étant donné que ces questions les touchent eux aussi.

Deuxièmement, il est vraiment important que cela soit entendu, que cela soit exposé au grand jour. Dans la mesure du possible, je pense que nous devrions faire des pieds et des mains pour que cela se produise. Bien franchement, si c'est le seul amendement qu'il nous faut pour obtenir le consensus, et envoyer le message que nous voulons que ce soit entendu et que nous voulons fournir à nos collègues un endroit pour venir exprimer leurs préoccupations et formuler leurs recommandations, dans ce cas, j'accepte bien sûr l'amendement favorable et j'apprécie la sincérité avec laquelle il a été présenté.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Christopherson, pour revenir à point, j'aimerais présenter mes excuses à M. Bittle. En ce qui concerne l'esprit dans lequel j'ai formulé ma réponse à M. Graham, j'aurais trouvé moins sincère de ma part de répondre simplement par oui. Mon intention était d'apporter plus de sincérité, si vous voulez, à ma réponse.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez raison. Je suis convaincue qu'il faut réaliser cette étude. Je crois que c'est ainsi que l'information est diffusée largement dans les médias et les médias sociaux. Ces idées sont entendues, et cette étude fera en sorte qu'elles se répandent. La possibilité existe que ces idées fassent leur chemin jusqu'au grand public et dans la société canadienne, simplement après avoir été entendues ici.

Merci de le reconnaître.

(1230)

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un a quelque chose à ajouter au sujet de l'amendement?

(L'amendement est adopté.)

Le président: Maintenant, revenons à la motion principale.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Évidemment, j'appuie très fortement cette motion. Je pense qu'il est très important de passer en revue ces modifications.

Personne ne nous demande d'approuver en bloc la totalité des changements proposés. Mais il est très important d'examiner chacun des points, un par un, et de se demander s'ils ont du sens. Il s'agit d'en discuter comme il se doit, sans perte de temps, mais en étudiant chaque point convenablement et en essayant de terminer cette étude dans les délais pour qu'elle soit adoptée à la Chambre, de sorte que lorsque nous reviendrons, l'an prochain — en espérant que la majorité d'entre nous reviendront — nous pourrons faire en sorte de mettre ces règles en vigueur.

Le président:

Madame Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Dans ce qui est proposé, il y a des sections très différentes les unes des autres. Pour ce qui est d'établir une seconde chambre de débat, nous avons fait une étude là-dessus. Je crois que nous allons faire le rapport, alors cela viendrait en quelque sorte combler cet aspect.

Il faudrait que des gens viennent nous en parler. Par exemple, on parle du pouvoir du Président, et j'aimerais entendre des témoins à ce sujet. On parle des comités; j'aimerais entendre des gens qui ont déjà vécu cela et qui pourraient nous dire quels avantages et désavantages ils ont pu voir par la suite.

Étudier la motion article par article, c'est une chose. Personnellement, il faudra que j'entende des gens parler des différents sujets. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je pense que nous sommes tous sur la même longueur d'ondes. Je ne dirai rien qui pourrait faire dérailler ce processus. À mon avis, nous sommes en bonne position, et j'espère que la motion sera adoptée.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Il s'agit d'une motion pour le moins volumineuse, avec ses 19 pages. Je suppose que nous nous engageons à dire que la majorité du temps qui nous reste avant la fin de cette législature sera consacrée à ce sujet. Afin de nous assurer de tirer le meilleur parti de ce temps, je me demande s'il serait possible pour les représentants des divers partis de se parler et de discuter avec vous, monsieur le président, de la manière dont nous allons structurer ce temps pour qu'il soit utilisé le plus efficacement possible.

Le président:

Jamais je ne m'engagerai sur l'utilisation future de notre temps. Il se produit tellement de choses dans ce Comité — questions de privilège, etc. De toute évidence, actuellement, cette question se situe au premier plan. Cependant, toute discussion est la bienvenue.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait bien de pouvoir commencer dès que nous rentrerons de la semaine de relâche.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter concernant la motion visant à ce que l'on étudie ce document?

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. David Christopherson:

Était-ce à l'unanimité?

Le président:

Oui.

Nous mettrons cette étude à l'ordre du jour dès que possible.

Maintenant, passons à la motion de M. Reid. Nous en avons fait l'étude. Nous pouvons procéder de trois manières différentes. Premièrement, nous avons approuvé cette motion, aussi nous pourrions tout simplement la transmettre à la Chambre. Deuxièmement, nous avons entendu des témoins fort intéressants et avons recueilli beaucoup d'information. Nous pourrions demander à notre attaché de recherche de rédiger un rapport, auquel nous pourrions joindre la motion à titre de recommandation. Troisièmement, nous pourrions modifier la motion. Je vais vous faire part d'un sujet de préoccupation qui m'est venu à son sujet, et il pourrait y en avoir d'autres. Il s'agit d'une motion très technique. Je pense que nous sommes tous d'accord sur le principe que le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre devrait étudier ceci, et continuer de le faire. C'est le sens de cette motion.

Il m'a semblé que dans sa formulation actuelle, il faudrait obtenir le consentement de la Chambre chaque année pour que cette étude fasse partie du mandat du Comité. C'est déjà suffisamment difficile d'obtenir le consentement de la Chambre pour les procédures et les affaires qui concernent notre Comité, parce que nous sommes très occupés. Si nous nous mettons d'accord pour que cela relève du Comité, je suggérerais d'attendre que la Chambre l'approuve avant de l'indiquer dans la formulation.

Je cède la parole à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, si vous voulez supprimer cette condition particulière... elle visait uniquement à faire en sorte que cette partie du Règlement prenne fin une fois que les rénovations de l'édifice du Centre seront achevées. C'est la logique que j'ai suivie. En toute justice, peut-être que c'est loin dans le futur, et que nous ne devrions pas nous en préoccuper.

Ce serait assez simple de supprimer cette condition dans le Règlement. Je pense que cette condition particulière pourrait être supprimée. Je sais qu'en tant que président, vous n'êtes pas censé proposer des amendements, mais si quelqu'un d'autre souhaite suggérer cet amendement, je suis tout à fait disposé à l'accepter. Nous pourrions ensuite aller voir...

(1235)

Le président:

Nous avons déjà adopté votre motion, aussi nous ne pouvons pas lui apporter d'amendement.

M. David Christopherson:

Pourquoi pas?

Le président:

Mais nous pouvons présenter une autre motion.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, nous pouvons adopter une autre motion.

Le président:

Pour poursuivre, je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit une bonne idée de mettre fin à ce mandat, parce que l'édifice de l'Ouest, mais on entend encore des commentaires sur les choses qui pourraient être modifiées ici. Ensuite, ils vont se tourner vers l'édifice de la Confédération et tous ces autres édifices. L'édifice du Centre n'est que le début. Je pense que nous devrions laisser aux futurs Comités de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre la décision de retirer cette surveillance de leur mandat. Je pense que c'est une bonne chose que nous nous intéressions à la cité parlementaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez raison de dire que la Vision et plan à long terme est un plan à très long terme, et cela a commencé il y a de nombreuses années. L'édifice de l'Ouest n'a pas été le premier, et l'édifice du Centre ne sera pas le dernier. Lorsque nous aurons terminé la réfection de tous les édifices, il sera probablement temps de recommencer avec le premier.

Il s'agit d'un mandat continu et permanent de surveiller la structure et le fonctionnement de la Colline du Parlement.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends votre point. Je pense avoir déjà raconté que lorsque j'étais adolescent, j'avais travaillé pour une firme d'ingénierie — Clemann Large Patterson consulting engineers — alors qu'ils en étaient arrivés aux dernières étapes de la rénovation de l'édifice de l'Est. Aujourd'hui, cet édifice a besoin de rénovations, alors vous voyez ce que je veux dire.

Le président:

Le greffier me dit que si le Comité est d'accord, il pourrait revenir à la prochaine réunion avec une nouvelle formulation.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d'accord.

Le président:

Très bien, alors, c'est ce que nous ferons.

Nous reviendrons avec une motion améliorée. Souhaitez-vous que cela fasse partie d'un rapport, afin que nous puissions inscrire au compte rendu tout ce que nous avons entendu de nos témoins aux fins de futures discussions, ou voulez-vous simplement faire approuver la motion et la transmettre à la Chambre?

M. Scott Reid:

J'aurais tendance à dire de seulement transmettre la.... Finalement, je ne suis pas certain de savoir quoi répondre, parce qu'il faut tenir compte de deux éléments. Premièrement, nous présentons une motion qui vise à modifier le Règlement. Je suppose que cela devrait être présenté de façon indépendante. Cela pourrait paraître étrange d'inclure quoi que ce soit d'autre dans cette motion.

Par contre... Merci d'avoir fait circuler le dernier numéro du Hill Times. Je pense que Rob Wright a vraiment bien résumé ce que je m'efforçais de dire. Je pense qu'il serait utile que notre Comité en parle — je ne sais si ce devrait être dans le même rapport ou dans un rapport séparé — de manière à ce que la Chambre puisse l'approuver avant septembre, lorsqu'ils vont commencer à bloquer la moitié de la pelouse en avant pendant une période indéterminée.

J'ai ici un article intitulé « 'Appetite suppressant' needed for Centre Block wish lists, says PSPC ». On n'a jamais dit aussi vrai. Lors de précédentes réunions, j'ai demandé à plusieurs reprises qui étaient les partenaires parlementaires. Eh bien, maintenant, je sais ce qu'ils voulaient dire. Le Sénat dans son ensemble, la Chambre des communes dans son ensemble, et la Bibliothèque du Parlement dans son ensemble ont transmis les éléments suivants sur leurs listes de souhaits. Tout le monde dit, « Nous aimerions avoir telle et telle chose », et tout le monde dit, « Ce serait vraiment bien si notre truc pouvait se trouver juste ici, dans l'édifice du Centre ». En tant qu'ancien locataire d'un bureau dans l'édifice du Centre, je comprends parfaitement pourquoi les gens voudraient obtenir telle et telle chose. Cependant, nous savons désormais que pour permettre d'installer toutes ces choses, il faut creuser un trou dans la pelouse du Parlement. Un trou tellement énorme que l'on pourrait littéralement y jeter l'édifice du Centre. Jetez un coup d’oeil à la carte — vous verrez que c'est vrai.

Nous leur avons donné... Même un serpent capable de se décrocher la mâchoire ne peut manger plus qu'à sa faim. Nous leur avons ouvert la porte trop large, et il faut revenir au message, « Écoutez, il faut commencer à restreindre nos demandes auprès de SPAC, parce que cela devient irréalisable. »

(1240)

Le président:

Que pensez-vous de ceci? Nous nous occupons de votre motion séparément, avec un peu de chance, lors d'une prochaine réunion, afin d'éviter qu'elle n'échoue, et ensuite nous demandons à l'attaché de recherche de préparer un rapport en fonction des témoins que nous parviendrons à rencontrer. Ainsi, nous aurons réussi à faire adopter la motion, et il appartiendra au Comité de déterminer si nous préparons un rapport.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Parce que, étant donné que vous me regardiez, vous ne pouviez pas voir l'expression du visage de notre analyste lorsqu'il a été question de lui attribuer cette tâche, mais...

Le président:

Pourriez-vous le refaire?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Peut-être que je pourrais demander à notre analyste.

Andre, quelles seraient les difficultés liées à ce travail?

M. Andre Barnes (attaché de recherche auprès du comité):

Le rôle de la Bibliothèque est de répondre aux besoins du Comité. Cela ne fait aucun doute.

Nous sommes en train de réaliser plusieurs tâches différentes pour le Comité. Nous pourrions trouver quelqu'un pour rédiger une synthèse des témoignages, si c'est ce que le Comité souhaite. J'aimerais y participer, mais je n'aurai probablement pas le temps de le faire.

J'ai certaines réserves, mais nous pourrions y arriver. Si c'est ce que le Comité veut, nous ferons en sorte d'y parvenir.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne sais pas comment répondre à ça.

Le président:

À vous de décider, monsieur Reid.

Une voix: Quelle serait l'incidence négative de ne pas l'inclure?

M. Scott Reid:

Tout le monde sait quel est le problème. C'est public maintenant. J'espère que nos amis les médias s'inspireront de ces renseignements, que certains d'entre eux recueillent, et disent: « Voici le problème pratique qui se présente ».

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends votre dilemme. J'ai simplement jeté un coup d'oeil et pensé: « Eh bien, quelles seraient les conséquences de ne pas avoir le rapport? »

Pour être efficace, il faudrait traiter la motion seule. Perd-on quelque chose? Je n'en suis pas sûr. Dans la mesure où nous gardons cette information à l'esprit, c'est là où elle doit être présentement. Il me semble qu'il n'y a pas de temps à perdre. Si l'on veut quoi que ce soit de la Chambre, il faut faire vite.

Ce ne sont là que quelques idées, Scott.

M. Scott Reid:

Si le Comité est d'accord, l'approche plus restreinte me semble la meilleure.

Le président:

Bon. Pouvez-vous revenir à la prochaine réunion avec une formulation dont nous pourrons discuter?

M. Scott Reid:

Ça me semble possible.

Le président:

Nous essaierons d'accomplir cela. Comme David l'a dit, quoi que ce soit... C'est faisable dans le temps qui reste.

À notre prochaine réunion, nous étudierons le rapport sur les chambres parallèles, puis la motion de M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, si nous entreprenions l'étude avant même de commencer le processus, ou quoi que ce soit d'autre, et invitions la délégation à nous présenter leurs idées, pour que nous puissions comprendre exactement l'ampleur du projet? À partir de là, nous pourrons formuler un plan d'attaque. Normalement, nous faisons les choses inversement, mais dans le cas présent, comme c'est conduit par les députés, il me semble logique de leur offrir la possibilité de venir présenter leur cas. Ensuite, nous pourrons décider comment procéder. Nous allons le décortiquer. Je peux imaginer les longues discussions que nous aurons. Ce sera intéressant, mais il faudra le décortiquer petit bout par petit bout et le passer au peigne fin.

Nous pourrions le faire avant, mais là encore, n'importe quoi qui retarde... Nous sommes dans une course contre la montre présentement, et je ne cesse de penser que si nous avons des options qui nous permettent de faire les choses et d'avancer, c'est vraiment la considération première.

Je n'y tiens pas mordicus, chers collègues. Ce sont juste des idées que je lance sur la façon dont nous pourrions commencer.

Le président:

À qui pensez-vous? M. Baylis, bien sûr,...

M. David Christopherson:

Je demanderais peut-être à M. Baylis d'amener une délégation représentative des personnes ayant participé et le laissant choisir qui, combien et quoi présenter... Donnons-leur l'occasion de faire valoir leur point de vue. Qu'ils prennent tout le temps dont ils ont besoin, parce que c'est un rapport complexe, puis nous disent ce qu'ils attendent de nous. Nous serons ensuite équipés pour prendre des décisions: Quel est notre échéancier? Comment allons-nous attaquer cela? Quels sont les renseignements dont nous avons besoin? Va-t-on faire des recherches? Pouvons-nous lancer cela suffisamment tôt pour que ce soit prêt pour nous?

Je suis ouvert à d'autres idées, monsieur le président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'allais proposer que nous disions à M. Baylis et à tous ceux ayant participé à la rédaction de cette motion que nous entreprenons l'étude et leur disions qu'ils sont les bienvenus au Comité pour participer à la discussion. Ils ont tous contribué à la rédaction. Ainsi, cela devient une participation continue plutôt qu'une participation ponctuelle.

Et ainsi, je crois que quiconque a participé à la création de cette motion aura l'occasion de la suivre jusqu'au bout.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est une excellente idée, mais, pour ma part, il est probable que je... Comme je l'ai dit, je suis un de ceux qui ont contribué, mais pas un contributeur important. Il y a d'autres...

(1245)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai produit un paragraphe.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. C'était plus parce que je fais partie de ce comité et que j'étais disposé à offrir les moyens.

Je comprends ce que vous dites. Ce que nous entendons pourra nous donner un élan. Ensuite, nous pourrons décider de ce que nous allons faire, et qui y participera.

C'est un sujet si disparate et si vaste. Il a plusieurs partis, et nous sommes unanimes — nous y sommes presque. Si nous pouvons maintenir la vapeur et leur donner l'occasion de nous présenter leur point de vue quant à ce qu'ils espèrent voir, et ce qu'ils peuvent s'attendre réalistiquement à ce que nous fassions dans le temps qui reste de cette législature, nous pourrons nous pencher sur la question. Si une des choses dont nous voulons parler porte sur la question de savoir qui fait partie de cela, comme nous l'avons fait dans d'autres dossiers, je serais ouvert à cette possibilité à ce moment-là.

Je maintiens que, à l'heure actuelle, la chose la plus logique à faire est de les entendre le plus vite possible. Les médias manifestent un certain intérêt. C'est ce qu'ils veulent le plus — la possibilité de diffuser ces idées. S'ils espéraient vraiment que nous pouvons mener à bien cela au cours de cette législature, qu'ils nous le disent. Certains d'entre eux sont des vétérans qui savent ce que cela représente de tenter de le faire. Ils pourraient nous donner des idées auxquelles nous n'aurions pas pensé pour notre plan de travail.

Une fois de plus, je répète avec le plus grand respect — quoique je ne sois pas attaché outre mesure à l'idée — que la première étape la plus logique présentement, à mon sens, serait de les inviter à venir et de leur donner tout le temps dont ils ont besoin pour présenter leurs arguments. À partir de là, nous serons bien équipés pour établir notre plan de travail et les objectifs que nous pensons pouvoir atteindre dans le temps qui reste.

Le président:

Pour que cela soit un peu plus concret, je dirais que nous inviterons, le 30, M. Baylis et quiconque qu'il aimerait amener avec lui au Comité. Que dites-vous de cela?

M. David Christopherson:

La seule chose différente par rapport à nos règles habituelles, monsieur le président, serait, à mon avis, de leur accorder la courtoisie de prendre tout le temps dont ils ont besoin pour faire un exposé complet, par souci de considération envers le travail que cela a représenté pour eux.

Le président:

Oui, cela prendrait un peu plus que 10 minutes. Comme l'a dit M. Reid, c'est très complexe. Il y a toutes sortes d'enjeux, et je suis sûr que nous ne serons pas toujours d'accord sur tous les points. Faisons donc ça.

La séance est suspendue.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard proc 28631 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 16, 2019

2019-05-14 PROC 155

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[Translation]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone.[English]

Good morning and welcome to the 155th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

This morning we are hearing witnesses for our study on the mandate of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs and oversight of the Centre Block rehabilitation project and the long-term vision and plan, as discussed at the meeting of Tuesday, May 7.

From the House of Commons, we have Michel Patrice, deputy clerk, administration; and Stéphan Aubé, chief information officer.

From the Department of Public Services and Procurement Canada, we have Rob Wright, assistant deputy minister, parliamentary precinct branch; and Jennifer Garrett, director general, Centre Block rehabilitation program.

We also have Larry Malcic, architect from Centrus Architects.

Thank you all for being here. I've been told that you're all available to stay for the two hours of the meeting. From what I understand, there will be an opening statement to be followed by a presentation on the long-term vision and plan. After that we'll move to questions by committee members for the remainder of the meeting.

As you know, we all have a great interest in increasing communications on this topic, so this is very good. Everyone's very pleased this meeting is occurring.

Mr. Wright, please begin your presentation. [Translation]

Mr. Rob Wright (Assistant Deputy Minister, Parliamentary Precinct Branch, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Good morning, Mr. Chair and committee members.

I am pleased to be here today to update you on the Centre Block rehabilitation program.

I am accompanied by Jennifer Garrett, director general for the Centre Block rehabilitation program, and Larry Malcic from Centrus, who is the program's design consultant.

We are pleased to be working on this exciting program with our parliamentary partners and to have the opportunity to discuss the restoration of the Centre Block with you this morning.[English]

Since the historic move of parliamentarians out of Centre Block last Christmas, PSPC has been working in collaboration with the administration of the House of Commons on preparing the Centre Block for its major rehabilitation. This involves working hand in hand with Parliament on decommissioning the building so that it is fully separated from the rest of the Hill. This includes such things as rerouting underground IT networks and removing the building from the central heating and cooling plant.

Another key part of the decommissioning process is ensuring that the remaining art and artifacts in the building are safely moved and stored. During this work, the Centre Block remains under the control of Parliament, and we expect that it will be officially transferred to Public Services and Procurement Canada by the end of the summer.

While we continue to collaborate on the important decommissioning process, we are also advancing the assessment program, which had begun while you were still using the Centre Block. We have now progressed to opening up the floors, walls and ceilings to deepen our understanding of the building's condition, which is an important component of de-risking the project.

In addition to working to better understand the building's condition, we have also been working closely with parliamentary officials to define the functionality desired for the Centre Block of the future. In modernizing the Centre Block so that it supports a modern parliamentary democracy, we are also taking care to restore the beautiful building. We have heard loud and clear from you and other parliamentarians the desire to immediately recognize the Centre Block when it reopens and to feel immediately at home again.

An important element of the conversation on the Centre Block's future is phase two of the visitor welcome centre. Much like phase one is done for the West Block, the expanded visitor welcome centre will provide security screening for visitors to Parliament Hill outside of the footprint of the Centre Block and East Block. As well, it will provide additional services to Canadians and international tourists visiting the Parliament Buildings. It is also envisioned that this underground facility will provide functions that directly support the operations of Parliament, such as committee rooms.

You will see in the upcoming presentation that the design and construction of the visitor welcome centre will join the West, East and Centre Blocks in one parliamentary complex. As we move forward, thinking of the Centre Block as a central part of this unified parliamentary complex should provide some interesting opportunities. Approaching the Centre, West and East Blocks as a parliamentary complex is part of a larger initiative to transform the precinct into a more integrated campus. This campus will tie together the facilities on the Hill, as well as important buildings in the three city blocks facing Parliament Hill, such as the Wellington, Sir John A. Macdonald and Valour buildings.

This shift involves moving from a building-by-building approach to a more holistic strategy on such important and interconnected elements as security, the visitor experience, urban design and the landscape, material handling and parking, the movement of people and vehicles, environmental sustainability and accessibility.

Gaining your feedback on the functions you feel should be contained in the Centre Block and the visitor welcome centre and how the space should work for parliamentarians, media and the public is invaluable for our work going forward. We are happy to be back at this committee to hear your thoughts, and we are very eager to continue engaging with parliamentarians on this important work.

I will now ask Ms. Garrett and Mr. Malcic to walk you through the presentation. Along with my colleagues from the House of Commons, I'll be happy to answer any questions you may have. Thank you.

(1105)

Ms. Jennifer Garrett (Director General, Centre Block Program, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Thank you. Good morning, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee.

With regard to how are going to roll out this presentation, I'm going to take you through what I call the programmatic aspects of the presentation. Then I'm going to hand the floor to Mr. Malcic to take you through some of the initial ideas that the architect has to respond to the 50% functional program that we've received to-date from our parliamentary partners. Then we'll close with you on the next steps.

This next slide depicts the project scope for the program. Launching off the successes of both this building and the Senate of Canada buildings, we're now launching the biggest heritage rehabilitation program that PSPC has ever done. That program contains essentially two key components, the first being the modernization of Centre Block program proper, which is effectively a complete base building upgrade from masonry to structural to seismic to modern and mechanical and electrical systems, just to give you a sense. Essentially, the entire base building needs to be upgraded to meet modern standards. Along with that, there needs to be design to address a functional program to ensure that we're supporting modern parliamentary operations well into the 21st century.

The second component of the program scope is to construct phase two of the visitor welcome centre. Essentially, if you look out in front of Centre Block—and yes it is an underground facility—we're going to dig a very large hole and build that visitor welcome centre phase two. That facility will have capabilities to support parliamentary operations and services in support of visitors who are coming to Parliament Hill, and we'll connect the triad—the East, West and Centre Blocks—effectively forming what Mr. Wright referred to earlier as a “parliamentary complex”. That triad will obviously be part of a broader parliamentary campus.

The next slide shows this joint effort between the House of Commons administration and us to map out for you the construction and the design process as we go through the program.

I would say that at this point we're still working with our construction manager to formalize the final project schedule, but we have key milestones that we can share with you this morning, and we basically have a three-year outlook for the program at this point.

In terms of design, we've essentially launched the functional program phase, as well as the schematic design process. By the end of this fiscal year in March, if you're following along the two top rows of arrows—the functional program and the design arrows—our target is to effectively have a preferred design option at the schematic design level for the Centre Block and visitor welcome centre. But if we start to move down a row and start to follow the construction activities, this is a layered integrated program approach. We're not waiting for the design process to be complete, but are starting construction activities. Two key construction activities that we are going to be launching through the fall and winter time frame are targeted demolition and abatement in a November time frame within Centre Block, as well as the start of excavation in a winter 2020 time frame. To do that, our construction manager has already started the tendering process.

That is the key outlook for the big programs standing up.

The other thing that we're going to be doing, which we've already launched and are actively working on, is completing that comprehensive assessment program that Mr. Wright referred to in his opening remarks and completing the projects that we call the “enabling projects”, things like the temporary loading dock. The books of remembrance relocation was part of that, and there are temporary construction roads, and there's effectively standing up the construction site.

Regarding the next slide, perhaps some or all of you may have seen an early drawing of what we expected to be the construction delineation site early on in the program. This slide in front of you represents our latest thinking and our interactions on planning with the construction manager. It represents our understanding of what we think that site construction delineation is going to be for the program. Effectively, what you'll see, if you look to the left of the slide, is that we've outlined where visitor welcome centre phase one is, and the grey hatched in area is essentially the footprint for the proposed visitor welcome centre phase two, based on the functional program requirements we've received from parliamentary partners to date.

(1110)



That effectively drives it in combination. The three considerations that drive the delineation of that line are support of existing parliamentary operations, the construction needs of what is going to become a very large construction site, and also managing the visitor experience.

We want to make sure that we're balancing all of those, so there has been a significant amount of activity and coordination to ensure that we're setting that line with the administrations of the House, Senate and the Library in consultation with our construction manager. The line we think will allow us to continue to support parliamentary operations and enable a program of visitor experience on the front lawn but allow the construction manager to execute the program.

I'll go to the next slide. Before I hand the floor over to Larry, there are some things or key design challenges that I wanted to flag that we know about right now and that we will start to work through in the coming months over the course of the program. As I referred to when we were talking about the scope slide, base building modernization is going to be significant in terms of Centre Block, and it will take up space. In studying that, what we know to date right now in terms of our assessments and our understanding of modernization and code requirements is that it's going to take up space from the functional program in Centre Block proper to the tune of about 2,500 square metres.

To give you a sense of what that means in terms of physical space, that would be the equivalent of all the offices on the fourth floor of Centre Block. That's to put in things such as conduits for modern HVAC and to increase the structural: put the seismic solution in place, washrooms, IT closets, etc., all the sort of space-building functional requirements. That's the first one.

The second one is the technical challenges of actually modernizing and undertaking a very significant modernized program in what is one of our highest heritage buildings in the country. Rest assured that we have conservators and all sorts of experience with us to do that, but it is not an insignificant challenge. In support of that, we've mapped completely the heritage hierarchy of the building, and we are doing our very best to put design into the building or to design the building so that we're having the least amount of impact on heritage in heritage areas where there would be a lower hierarchy in the building. We're working through that.

Finally, the functional program demand that we have received to date from parliamentary partners does exceed the availability or the supply. We have a demand-and-supply issue, so part of the work that we're going to be going through in the coming months is working through that. There's a series of key decisions that we'll bring you back to, once the architect has taken you through the program, to have a bit of a sense of how we're going to go through that.

We'll go to the next slide, and without further ado I'm going to pass the floor to Mr. Malcic.

(1115)

Mr. Larry Malcic (Architect, Centrus Architects):

Thank you.

I'm pleased to return to this committee to share information and ideas regarding the rehabilitation of Centre Block.

It is, as Mrs. Garrett has said, a high heritage building, and we wish to preserve that key important heritage. But it's also the working heart of the Canadian parliamentary democracy, and that has evolved over the last century since the building was designed and built. What has remained constant is the importance of the fundamental planning principles that created the building and, indeed, the triad of buildings in the first place. Those are the beaux arts design planning principles that have emphasized the hierarchy of spaces and the importance of both ceremonial circulation and processional routes, as well as providing a very strong infrastructure for the functional aspects of the building. You have the symmetrical displacement of the two chambers, the House and Senate, the placement of the library on axis, along with Confederation Hall, and in more recent years the Centennial Flame. We want to ensure that as we move forward with the project, we extend that beaux arts plan to create a campus or a complex of buildings that are appropriate in every way to the historical intentions of the original creators of Parliament Hill.

We see, as we look at this in a conceptual way, the way in which we plan to maintain the axiality of the design. In fact, we'll draw it together more closely, so that we can integrate the collection of buildings in a better way that relies on the fundamental principles, by adding the visitor welcome centre complex, phase two. This will knit together East Block and West Block and provide additional spaces that have long been lacking in Centre Block, particularly new committee rooms, a new entry to the overall complex, especially for visitors, and the connections, as I said, to the other buildings.

I want to specifically begin today perhaps with the House chamber and the modernization considerations that are important there. The House chamber, as a focal point in the overall building, encapsulates the issues faced throughout the building. We want to ensure that the design is “future-proofed” so that it can accommodate, as the nation grows, the growing number of members of Parliament. We have to find a way to accommodate that.

Now, one of the fundamental questions is: Will we accommodate that within the footprint of the existing chamber, or should we develop an expansion of that?

There's the question of furniture, and whether the existing furniture that has been part of the original design can be reused, or whether we shall be looking for something newer for that.

As the number of members of Parliament grows, so the lobbies themselves need to grow as well. The question is, how do we accommodate this important growth, which really reflects the growth of the nation, in the actual physical building itself?

Finally, there's the provision of universal accessibility, which is important throughout the building and is something that the original architects never considered.

If I begin with those considerations of the Commons chamber, the fundamental issues include life safety and code requirements, especially the code requirement for universal accessibility and, as I said before, the seating capacity in line with the growing population and the number of parliamentarians. These will be measured against the heritage assets that are in the building; future broadcast and communications technology; modernization of all heating, cooling and plumbing; and the design for seismic activity, which was of course never considered in the original building.

As we do our discovery and investigate all of these aspects of the building, we're developing a fundamental set of drawings. You see one of them here, a section through the Commons chamber that shows the degree to which we're using modern technology as well, including photo autometry to integrate actual photographic imagery of the building with the drawings themselves.

(1120)



Let's look at the organization of seating in the House of Commons chamber. The chamber as it is does not currently meet building codes for life safety or accessibility. We need to correct those deficiencies and we also need to provide additional seating, ideally to achieve 400 seats plus the Speaker's chair, to provide for growth over the next decades. We can make significant improvements and get to some of that capacity. Obviously, though, it will require changes, and some of those changes may require compromises. We expect that we can achieve code compliance and accessibility from the floor of the chamber to the ambulatory, as shown in one of the options I developed to have the 400 seats.

This potential solution is based on maintaining the House's tradition of parallel seating—and, although other chambers in other places do other forms of seating, the actual configuration of the existing room itself lends itself to the parallel seating.

In looking at the chamber, we need to look not only at the actual floor of the chamber but also at the galleries surrounding the chamber, because they too are equally challenged in terms of contemporary life safety and accessibility requirements and must be updated. We've designed options to make these improvements, but they will come at a cost of capacity. Currently there are a total of 553 seats in all of the galleries combined. Meeting current code standards and providing accessibility may reduce that number to about 305 seats. This would require reorganizing the seating and reducing the steep rake of the north and south galleries that no longer meets code.

The functional program, I should point out, includes the request for a remote chamber to be located in the visitor welcome centre to allow people to view proceedings in a more appropriate setting with multimedia displays, which could be a contemporary and appropriate way to expand the viewing of the House in its meetings.

Just to look in more detail at the north gallery, here is an option for it: reduce the steepness of the pitch of the seats, provide fully accessible viewing positions and achieve building code compliance. You begin to see the way in which modern building codes will impact the existing space.

Similarly, in the south gallery, a plan for it includes, in this case, the console operator booth. These are ways that we can, without altering the historic fabric or indeed the look and feel of the room that are so important to the dignity of Parliament, make the accommodations necessary.

With regard to committee rooms, the importance and use of committee rooms has changed dramatically over the last 100 years. They are now an integral part of the legislative process and much in demand. Both the Senate and the House need new committee rooms, and I would ask Mr. Wright to elaborate on that.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Thanks, Larry.

As has just been positioned, there will be a number of choices, and the options that are shown there are just illustrative. There will be many more options that will be considered over time, so this is really the start of a conversation—which is the important point. It's not the end of a conversation, but a critical piece.

Committee rooms are along that line. We have clarity on the requirements. It's a question of where committee rooms should be situated. It's important to consider the location of those committee rooms in the fullest context of the parliamentary precinct. There's a tendency, as we are focusing on the Centre Block project right now, to want to try to fit everything into the Centre Block, but we may be well served, and Parliament may be well served, by thinking of the broader context as we try to move forward into an integrated campus, with the facilities increasingly being integrated with tunnel infrastructure, for example. So this decision of where to locate committee rooms will be very important.

The last point I'll make on this slide is with regard to the heritage committee rooms within the Centre Block. There are challenges with bringing those up to a high level of security that, for example, a caucus room would require. We have made investments in the West Block, and as we move to a parliamentary complex it may be useful to think of how the West Block and the Centre Block could be used in tandem as an integrated facility.

I'll move to next slide.

This gives you an illustration of where committee rooms are right now, as the Centre Block is now offline. Many of those committee rooms now are not on the Hill proper. You can see that for both the House of Commons and the Senate, there have been a number of major investments off the Hill.

How can we leverage those investments over the long term and ensure that the parliamentary operations remain the primary driver of where the functions that serve Parliament should be located?

The next slide attempts to articulate a diversity of locations where committee rooms could be located. You can see, in the Centre Block, the return of committee room functions that were in the Centre Block, both for the House and the Senate. You can see the potential for committee room locations within the visitor welcome centre phase two. You can see the idea of what are called pavilions on the north end of the Centre Block, and the idea of putting committee rooms where the chamber is in the West Block.

The East Block will go under major restoration for the Senate. Committee rooms could be added there. Of course, the existing committee rooms in the Wellington Building and the Valour Building are there. They remain as important investments. Also important to consider is the fact that we will be working to develop new facilities for both the House and the Senate of Canada adjacent to the former U.S. embassy at 100 Wellington, initially to provide swing space so that we can empty the Confederation Building, which requires restoration as well as the East Block, and then over the long term those would become permanent accommodations for Parliament. That again is a potential location space for committee rooms.

We have to sequence all of this over time to make sure it meets the needs of parliamentarians, but it's an important conversation about how to move that along over time to make sure we're making the best investments on behalf of Parliament to serve the needs of a modern parliamentary democracy.

Again, it's an important dialogue that will take place over the coming months.

I'll pass it back to Larry to continue.

(1125)

Mr. Larry Malcic:

Thank you.

Circulation and connections are fundamental to any building's functioning. Centre Block itself, because of the nature of its beaux arts plan, had a very clear plan of circulation. Once again, however, what we are planning and now designing are ways that we can extend the clarity and power of that circulation system.

It's one in which we need to bring together many different things. Here you begin to see the way in which we want to create the new front door for Parliament in the visitor welcome centre, and to use that then to provide a clear public entrance and public circulation.

We want to ensure that the circulation for parliamentarians and their staff is equally efficient and effective and, ideally, that it would be a circulation system that runs independently of the public circulation. We also have to consider, as part of circulation, the building's servicing. How do we bring goods in and distribute them throughout the building? How do we bring rubbish and garbage out of the building in a way that doesn't have an impact on any of the building users?

All of these things intertwine. We also have the additional layers, in terms of circulation, of bringing the building services into the plan, because those, too, have to be considered as part of the circulation system. The goal is for all of the buildings to become interconnected so they will work as one campus and a complex of buildings. In this way, you will have the benefit of all of them working together rather than simply independently.

At the moment, this is still very much in development, but you begin to see, here in the green, the way in which public circulation could be brought in through the visitor welcome centre. It could come in horizontally across the visitor welcome centre, and then vertically into what are currently the light wells or the courtyards of the building and be given direct access. The public then would have direct access into the galleries. The paths of visitors and members of the public would not necessarily cross those of parliamentarians and those doing parliamentary business. However, it does show that we're considering the courtyards as a fundamental part of the solution for a much better, more operational Centre Block. By glazing them and enclosing them, we are actually able to reduce the overall external footprint of the building and improve its sustainability by reducing its energy consumption. We could then provide a series of spaces where the new functions, including the circulation, could be introduced.

Finally, we've already touched on the visitor welcome centre and its relationship with this, but this shows diagrammatically the way we view it, which is as a great opportunity. It's the opportunity, I guess, of this century, to take Centre Block and expand it—in the green you see the expansion of the House of Commons—to provide committee rooms and other support facilities, which are very necessary to the operations of Parliament.

In red, you see on the east side the expansion for the Senate.

In orange, you see the requirements of the Library of Parliament to provide a better, more appropriate visitor experience.

In yellow, you see the entry sequence, which will actually provide a fitting entrance, one that reflects the dignity of Parliament as it's traditionally defined. We would therefore integrate into a single campus the group of buildings that exist there now, create the connections to the East Block and the West Block and provide the new space for both the Senate and the House. Centre Block itself, freed up and opened up once again, will be able to function as it was conceived and designed, maintaining its dignity, history and prominence while ensuring it has an effective and efficient role as the centre of Canadian parliamentary democracy.

(1130)

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Earlier, in terms of the presentation, we talked about making some key programming decisions. In delivering this program, the intent is to make decisions in layered approaches, going from the highest level down to the more detailed, so that they can be made in the appropriate time frame. We're looking for enduring decisions, because change is obviously the enemy of projects like these. Once you've designed something and you're going back to reverse decisions that you've made, it costs time and ultimately money.

With regard to the programmatic decisions in support of the program, you'll see that there are some related to the base building modernization effort, and there are those related more to the functional or the parliamentary program. We are working very closely with the administrations of the House of Commons, the Senate and the Library of Parliament to make sure that we are landing those decisions and releasing work for the architect in a way that will benefit the program.

Things like asbestos abatement, the seismic approach, as well as key programmatic decisions around the functional program—what the hoarding is going to physically look like, what the chamber size inlaid is going to be—are all key decisions that we need to make in a transparent fashion. This is in terms not only of their design but also of their impact in support of parliamentary operations, as well as cost.

We're having similar discussions with the other partners and engagements with parliamentarians accordingly. Obviously, some of these will benefit from much-needed feedback from parliamentarians. We look forward to working with the House of Commons to receive that feedback.

I'll close the presentation and give you a sense of what the next year looks like for the Centre Block rehabilitation program. As I referenced earlier, we are going to both refine the functional program and schematic design with a view to landing on the preferred design option in a March time frame. We have a whole bunch of enabling projects at work. The work in the east pleasure grounds and the relocation of monuments to get ready for the substantial construction program are ongoing as we speak.

This is your last year for Canada Day celebrations as traditionally planned on the Hill, because sometime after Labour Day you will see fast fence go up along that site delineation line you saw earlier in the presentation, and the actual construction site for the Centre Block rehabilitation program will take place. For example, you'll see things like the dismantling of the Vaux wall and construction trailers will start to show up on site, as well as the construction hoarding.

We continue to work on the site implementation plan and the hoarding design. We'll soon have some good information on that. We will complete both the comprehensive assessment program, which will feed into the design process; what we know about the building; as well as formed substantive cost, scope and schedule early in 2020.

That's it for the presentation.

We'd be happy to take any questions the committee may have for us.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you for that very detailed and helpful presentation.

We'll start with questions, Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

My thanks to the witnesses for your presentations.

Frankly, I would have liked to see it in December or March. By showing us far more specific documents, the direction you are taking seems much clearer. You seem much better prepared than the last time you were here, thanks to those supporting documents.

Earlier, you said that you would connect the different buildings together. Right now, we can go from the Centre Block to the East Block through a corridor. Does that mean that we'll have the same thing between the building...

Will you connect the Valour Building and the Victoria Building, so that parliamentarians can walk between the two through inside corridors?

Mr. Rob Wright:

Yes, exactly. In the future, the goal is precisely to have a parliamentary precinct integrated into the infrastructure and to create buildings connected by tunnels in particular.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You mentioned the Valour and Victoria buildings, but you haven't said anything about the Wellington, Confederation and Justice buildings, where most of the MPs' offices are currently located.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Yes, it's exactly the same thing.

The same idea applies to the Wellington and Sir John A. Macdonald buildings, as well as the Confederation and Justice buildings.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

It may take a number of years to get to that point. If I understand correctly, are all those little buses going to disappear?

Mr. Rob Wright:

That's a question for Parliament to figure out what the best solution is.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Mr. Rob Wright:

In Washington, there is a shuttle service in a tunnel to allow staff to move around.

It might be a good idea to borrow, it might not. That's a different discussion.

(1140)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The little buses that go everywhere are not making the task any easier during construction, that's for sure.

It's interesting anyway.

In your documents, earlier, you mentioned that 2,500 square metres will be used for the operations of the buildings, which is equivalent to the area of the fourth floor of the Centre Block. Right now, the Centre Block works fine. How much space is needed? I don't understand why more space is needed.

Since the heating and plumbing are a number of years old, even 100 years old, and today's techniques have improved, am I wrong in saying that less space should be needed? [English]

Mr. Rob Wright:

There are a couple of really critical things. One is that there are insufficient stairs and elevators in the Centre Block. They will take up significant space.

If you look at an example of the West Block, the amount of space required for mechanical space increased fourteenfold as we moved from the previous building to this modern building. It takes a lot more space to operate the systems. We anticipate that there will be more bathrooms to service parliamentarians, so that takes more space, including the plumbing. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That's for sure. [English]

Mr. Rob Wright:

There's no central air conditioning in the Centre Block. It doesn't meet code in most respects. Bringing it up to code takes space, and modernizing it as well.

Making it a modern building so that it will meet modern codes will require space. One of the potential opportunities—and this is the beginning of a conversation—is to leverage the courtyards so that some of that space.... Elevators, as you saw in the presentation, are one potential opportunity to leverage, so that you lose less space in the heritage interiors of the building. Those decisions will be fundamentally critical over time. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

When you came to meet with us the last few times, we talked about consulting parliamentarians who worked in the former Centre Block. The Board of Internal Economy had to be consulted, and so did the members of Parliament. Was there a consultation with MPs to find out their views? I can give you mine.

In your document, for which I thank you, you show that there are currently 338 seats and that there will be 400. People are sitting in rows. I can tell you that folding chairs in rows of five doesn't work. I myself sat on a bench made up of folding chairs. Several colleagues are often not on time and you always have to get up to let them pass.

I'm not sure whether that's what you have in mind, but I'm telling you it's really inconvenient.

Are you consulting the parliamentarians who are currently working here?

With 400 seats, I'm not sure we'll be able to move around.

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration, House of Commons):

Thank you for your question, Ms. Lapointe.

In response to your first question about the suggested plan, that's only one option to demonstrate that the potential increase in the number of members of Parliament in the House of Commons must be taken into account.

The intent is indeed to present those options to the working group formed by the Board of Internal Economy. Then, it will also be a matter of consulting this committee, of course. So it's an option. You have seen throughout the presentation that no final decision has been made; these are just options. In addition, I think it is our common duty, at Public Services and Procurement Canada and the House administration, to present you with options to start the discussion and receive instructions to meet your needs as parliamentarians.

As for the consultations on your experience in the West Block, administration employees will meet with members of Parliament, for example, officers or staff from those offices to ask for their feedback, as well as their suggestions, advice and comments.

(1145)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Will it be in the next five weeks? Then the House will adjourn and it may be quite a while until we come back.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

That's right.

We are quite aware of this particular period. What I am telling you is that meetings with parliamentarians or their staff have already begun. They will continue over the next five weeks and will likely continue in the post-election period.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Is that it? I still have some questions.

The Chair:

Yes, it is. You can continue in the next round.[English]

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I was also enjoying Madame Lapointe's intelligent questions, and the answers were very enlightening as well, so I thank those witnesses who responded.

I want to thank all the witnesses who are here today, and in particular for the very helpful additional information you have given us. This deck you've presented to us is far and away the most informative thing we've seen so far, which we are all grateful for.

As one would expect, it raises many questions.

There was one question I wanted to start with before returning to the documents. This is for Mr. Patrice. When you appeared before us on March 19, you stated that the Board of Internal Economy had approved a governance model, which presumably would be highly relevant going forward. Could you table a copy of that governance model with our clerk?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes, I will provide you the decision taken by the Board of Internal Economy. The governance model will be defined, frankly, by the members of that working group, but obviously, that working group, as per the discussion at the Board, will report to the Board, and it will also consult and meet with this committee and other stakeholders going forward toward a successful program.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would it be unreasonable to ask you to table the relevant documentation in time for us to look at it at our Thursday meeting, which will also be on the same subject?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I will do my best.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd really appreciate it if you could.

Thank you for the very helpful Gantt chart. I look down it and see that you divided things up timewise. The first one is April to September—we're in that period now—when certain things commence.

The one thing that ends in September 2019 is the Centre Block decommissioning. That is done sometime in September. A number of things start in the period we're in now, and continue on post-September. The one that strikes me most significantly is the schematic design issue. It seems to me that starting that process before the next election is highly problematic in terms of getting input from the House of Commons and us.

Additionally, I should note that construction management—the tendering—starts in September, so there may actually be tenders that are put up before Parliament or the House of Commons has a chance to do any oversight. We are going to be in the middle of an election; no one will be in a position to do oversight. I think that is problematic.

In the interest of the House of Commons—which, after all, is the body that oversees expenditures—having its appropriate share of control over this, both on the costs side and what the costs are being incurred for, I encourage you to put that off until the post-election period. I recognize that this would not speed up the project, but this is one of those times when I think it might be appropriate. My colleagues may contradict me on this point, but that's my initial observation. That is a problematic timeline. I just throw that thought out for your consideration.

Mr. Malcic, thank you for being here. I found your comments with regard to the architectural issues very informative. I did have an administrative question for you. From whom do you formally take your marching orders or instructions? Or, if you wish, who are you contracting with?

Mr. Larry Malcic:

We are contracted to Public Works.

(1150)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I see Ms. Garrett raising her hand. Does that mean they take their instructions from you?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

They do. PSPC is both the project implementer—the RC or financial authority for the project and the monies that we get for Treasury Board and the project authorities associated with it—and the contracting authority, through our department. We tendered Centrus' contract, and they take instructions from us as the technical authority for that contract.

In terms of that, we get requirements from parliamentary partners, which we translate into scope and a mission for the designer to execute, but they do get their instructions from PSPC.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it just one contract that you folks have, Mr. Malcic, or is it more than one?

Mr. Larry Malcic:

It's one contract.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I assume that contract is a matter of public record. I shouldn't ask you, Mr. Malcic; I should ask you, Ms. Garrett. Would you be able to submit that to this committee?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Absolutely, we can submit that. In fact, we provided that information to the administration of the House of Commons, and it's on buyandsell.gc.ca publicly. It was publicly tendered and is publicly available. We will absolutely get that information to you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With regard to the construction management design packages, I assume there's some tendering that may be going on. While the tenders won't be put out, is it possible to submit what their content will be—what the tenders are for—to this committee? Is that done at this point, and if so, could it be given to us?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Absolutely. We'd be happy to do that. Maybe I could premise that with just a bit of context for you, because it might help put you at ease a little bit.

We're cognizant that we're working in the time frame of an election. We are trying to do engagements and get some feedback to make sure that we can continue to work on the program. Fortunately, some of the early decisions are really around the base building aspects, particularly in support of the two key milestones that I was talking about earlier in the presentation, starting with targeted demolition and abatement, which needs to be done one way or the other within Centre Block itself, as well as the commencement of excavation. We're not talking about tendering our entire program to execute through the construction manager. We're talking about tendering associated with those early works.

We'd be happy to provide those details when they're ready. We're working on that documentation right now.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

If there is anything you can submit to us, we would like to have it. I'll leave it at that and perhaps we can follow up with our clerk at the next meeting as to what you were able to submit.

Do I have any time left, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have eight seconds.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case, thank you all for being here and for your very informative responses.

The Chair:

I forgot to welcome Dominic Lessard, deputy director, real property, with the House of Commons.

Thank you for joining us.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

That's great. Thank you, Chair.

Thank you all for being here.

It's interesting, quite fascinating, to watch this evolve.

To me it looks like one of the tricky things going forward is the possibility of a parallel chamber. The good news is that this would enhance our democracy; we've already had an initial study. We haven't made it yet, but my hunch is that there'll be a positive recommendation going to the House that we continue to look at this.

The downside is that it's not a decision that's going to be made right away, yet it may be an important ingredient because of the space. It has to be dedicated; it'll just be for that purpose if it's the way we're currently looking at it.

I'd appreciate your thoughts on how we would move forward with that, given the various timings here.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We're going to adapt to the requirements of the House of Commons. Obviously, we've been listening with interest to the committee's discussions on the parallel chamber and are looking forward to the report of the committee and the decision of the House on this matter. It's our role to respond to and adapt to the needs of the House and its members.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I get that. I'm looking for a little more.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It depends on the size of the parallel chamber that you're talking about. I've read and learned that in some jurisdictions the size is not necessarily as significant as the existing chamber.

(1155)

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, not at all.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We've got quite a few options, if that's the case.

Mr. David Christopherson:

My curiosity is around trying to make the timing work so we can make an informed decision. Parliament is not known for rushing, to start with. You, of course, are on a deadline to make these decisions. Give me your thinking on how that's going to unfold.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I'm thinking of an existing committee room, for example. Depending on the size of this chamber and how frequently it would meet, it would probably depend on rearranging some existing space.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It could be daily.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Then maybe it's a question of blocking out the time for that facility and that space and preparing it in a way that would work for what you decide.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, that's fine.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We've got a good team and we're able to respond. They're always up to the challenge.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have no doubt.

It sounds as if you've taken the election period into account. I want to be very clear: We leave here near the end of June.

This Parliament's not coming back. It'll be the next Parliament. That could be any time in November or later, and then, once Parliament sits, it sometimes takes weeks on end to get committees running—although this one gets set up first. It wouldn't be unreasonable for that to tip us into the new year before committees are on the ground and functioning.

Have you taken that into account, that you're not going to have access to MPs for a period of months, starting Canada Day, recognizing that you've got decisions that have to be made?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes, we have taken that into account and have received two names for that working group, and are waiting for the third one, which I believe I'm going to receive this week. The hope is that we're going to have our first meeting following the coming constituency week, and then we'll be in a position to engage with those members and start making early decisions. Here I'm thinking of hoarding design and things like that. They'll have to look at options and see what they prefer and make recommendations. Then there's also the benefit that the Board of Internal Economy will continue to exist.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Here would be my concern if I were returning, which I am not. When we come back and start to ask questions, we might hear, “Oh, sorry, we had to make that decision on a deadline and you weren't around.”

We don't want to hear that. I need an assurance from you so that the 43rd Parliament doesn't get the answer: “Well, we had to make that decision because you weren't here.”

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I understand that. For some of the decisions, the beauty of communication right now is that we're going to be able to reach them. We'll have to assess whether there are key decisions that affect members that would need to be made between, let's say, June and the post-election period.

From what I've seen and what I've glanced over in my discussion with our partners, with Public Works, they understand the context and that things will occur. Certain key decisions will have to wait until the post-election period. There are some decisions that I think can be made before the House rises in June, but that is going to be for the members to decide.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Obviously, there are going to be some decisions made regarding the demolition of the building, and so on. I could be wrong, but I'm not sure that you're interested in making decisions on that piece.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, and that's a perfect segue to my last question. Would this committee be able to get both a list of key decisions that have to be made, and also the timing of those decisions and the process? Could we get those from you?

We're getting closer to understanding this, but it's still a little bit nebulous about who's making the final call. BOIE represents us...almost. Remember, they're under the string of command that starts with the leaders. We are not. When we sit in these committees, we are each sovereign.

Therefore, I, as a member of this committee, would like to see what that critical path is, with all the decisions listed that have to be made, what the timing is for those decisions and what the current process is, if it's different from a general process of decision-making and specific to any of the particulars. Can we get that?

(1200)

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We can certainly provide you a list of what I would say are key elements, or eye-level elements, of the decisions that need to be made.

The timing depends also on the members, so I won't commit to timing. If a decision needs to wait until the members are ready to make that decision, we can give a general ballpark estimate of the season, and all of that. As I see it, we won't impose our schedule on members. It's not our role to impose that on members.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that. You did hear us, and you're responding as though you have it posted above all of your desks.

That's excellent. We appreciate that.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes, we will provide you with a list of decisions that we believe members are interested in.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can I just leave a thought, and then I'm done?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

You might tell us, “On this, we don't want to have any say in it”.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I don't think for one minute that you're going to try to run out in front of us. In fact, in this current system, that's the last thing you want. If anything, you're probably going to be hounding us to make sure. There's lots of CYA here; I get it. That's good. That's what we want.

Here's the point, though: There are some decisions that are mechanical, with one following another, but again, I just want to be clear that there aren't going to be any such decisions that, because they have to be made, negate the ability of Parliament to make a further decision. This might throw things off a bit, but I just want it to be crystal-clear in the committee evidence that there won't be any decisions that preclude this committee's ability to have input and their opinion, both by virtue of optional things and things that have to be done from a construction point of view.

I just want that reassurance.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

That is noted.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Good.

The Chair:

Before I go to Mr. Graham, I have a question.

Ms. Garrett, you mentioned some consultation with MPs.

Mr. Patrice, you mentioned two names related to the consultation process of the Board of Internal Economy.

Could you tell us who those MPs are and how they were chosen?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Those names are chosen by their respective House leaders at the Board of Internal Economy, I would suspect in consultation with their parties. I won't provide you the names until I have the three names.

The Chair:

Ms. Garrett, are those the same people you were referring to?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

I was only referring to an intention of the House administration to do an engagement with parliamentarians. It has been clear to PSPC that the engagement process will be executed through the House of Commons administration, so I defer to Mr. Patrice's comments on that matter.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I would also encourage you to have a panel of former parliamentarians involved, because as we get further and further from 2019, there will be fewer and fewer people who remember what Centre Block is supposed to be like.

I'd say, “Call David”—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:—because he would be a good asset for you because he will soon be a former MP, sadly.

On the topic of the secondary debating chamber—this is more of a comment than a question—I would encourage you to look at a permanent space as an idea, not at a committee room that we can reassign, because the structure of the room would be physically different. It would have to be. With the galleries and the television, it would be a different structure. If you leave it as a committee room that gets reassigned, then one week it will have three days. The next week it will have two days. The next week it will just be forgotten. So, it has to have its own structure in place. I want to put that on record.

With regard to Linda's comments on the rang d'Oignon—which is a phrase I love—looking at the 400-seat arrangement you have.... I had the distinct pleasure of having the middle of the five-seat section in the last chamber, and while the chairs were way more physically comfortable than the chairs we have now, the actual egress and entry to those is an absolute royal pain in the ass. If we cannot do that, I would be much obliged.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Nicely put.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Is there any physical possibility of physically enlarging the chamber?

Mr. Rob Wright:

That option illustrates the challenge, I think. It's not an option that we're saying or advocating should be implemented. We're working on a broad range of options. What that indicates is that if the House wants to maintain its existing set up, that's essentially how to make it work. There are a lot of downsides to that, and that's recognized.

Then it's a conversation about what other ways would work for the House of Commons, whether that would be—and I'm just kind of speaking out loud here—kind of progressing towards benches similar to the U.K. model over time; whether that is taking a very different, more radical approach to putting in the seating; or whether that is enlarging the chamber. These are very important considerations that would, as Ms. Garrett indicated, make it critically important to take decisions as early as we can and have those decisions last until the end of the project.

Enlarging the chamber is very challenging in its own right. There are some significant challenges from a structural and architectural perspective in that part of the building. It's possible, as most things are, but there would be significant costs involved. To make that decision, we would have to, I think, make sure that we've touched bottom on a broad range of options and really be sure that we settle with consensus on what we feel is the right option.

(1205)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is the railway station, now the Senate of Canada building, going to remain as part of the parliamentary precinct after the renovations of Centre Block are finished?

Mr. Rob Wright:

The reading and railway rooms?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, the railway building, the station.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Oh, sorry.

At this point, those are considered temporary buildings. For the Rideau Committee Rooms, I think we have a lease in place until something like 2034 with the National Capital Commission, so they were planned as temporary accommodations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You showed a map of the front lawn that shows that we will lose about half of the lawn with the new building. Is that correct? The road would also be quite a bit farther south than it currently is. Is that also correct?

Mr. Rob Wright:

That's just during the construction phase.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's not a permanent thing.

Mr. Rob Wright:

It's not permanent at all, no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The road will go up above into Centre Block again.

Mr. Rob Wright:

That would be all underground. The entrance would be as close.... So, you'd walk up South Drive, for example, and you would enter in almost at grade. There would be a slight downslope to enter into the facility, and essentially the Vaux wall would be on top of that facility, so the look and feel of the Hill would return to what it is today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How long are we going to lose the lawn for, and where are Canada Day celebrations going to go?

Mr. Rob Wright:

Those are two important questions. One thing we could consider, if it were something that Parliament wanted, is a phasing of the visitor welcome centre in the Centre Block. It would be possible to open the visitor welcome centre perhaps significantly ahead of the Centre Block. We haven't really looked at that in a detailed way yet, but if it were a desire of Parliament to phase that, then the visitor welcome centre could open in advance. I would be careful about how much time in advance that would be, but let's call it a significant period in advance of the Centre Block. It would potentially do a couple of important things: It would return the look and feel of the Hill more quickly and it would provide additional amenities for visitors as well as important services to support the operations of Parliament. So that's a conversation.

For Canada Day, we have been working very closely with Canadian Heritage, who's the lead on that, as well as the parliamentary partners to try to ensure that all of those core activities that occur on the Hill, especially during the summer months, remain in a modified form. This year there will be zero impact. Then, as we move forward, there will be modified.... We're looking at having a modified sound and light show, trying to ensure that it remains, and an element of Canada Day; it would have to be modified. There's the changing of the guard and all of those elements, from making sure that the flag continues to be changed on the Peace Tower to making sure that the carillon continues to be played as long as possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When I started on the Hill almost a decade ago, I heard rumours that there was consideration given to using the front lawn of Parliament as an underground parking lot. Has that ever been considered in a serious way?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I don't think it's ever been considered in a serious way. I think there have been some exploratory elements. We have looked at removing surface parking, which is a principle of the long-term vision and plan. For the most part, most of the feasibility, I'll call it, has looked more at the western area of the campus rather than the front lawn.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Linda touched on the tunnel access between buildings. Confederation and Justice had a tunnel built a few years ago. I think I mentioned this in the previous meeting. In 2011 they ripped out the lawn between those two buildings. It still hasn't reopened. It was supposed to be closed for a year or two.

That tunnel was built recently, within the timeline of the LTVP, but it was not done in a way that staffers and parliamentarians could use it. Why not? Will there be some remediation of that? What is the long-term plan to have all the buildings interconnected by tunnel?

(1210)

Mr. Rob Wright:

I'll have to get back to you on the specifics of that, but the long-term plan, working with Parliament on what services you need, is to have an interconnected campus where, for example, Wellington Street is less of a barrier within the campus, and the Wellington Building, the Sir John A. Macdonald and Valour buildings and the West Block are interconnected, as are Confederation and Justice, and then the visitor welcome centre in a much more meaningful way. It almost becomes one integrated facility.

That is the planning on a go-forward basis. We have conceptual but not detailed plans on those tunnels. We have worked that out on a conceptual level, but that is an important conversation as we move forward together.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I'll come back to you later.

The Chair:

We now move to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

I appreciate our witnesses joining us today.

I want to start with a comment, which I mentioned at a previous meeting that Mr. Wright and Ms. Garrett were not at. It's about this building itself. I find it very disappointing that Public Works, the department that's responsible for accessibility, which I personally find very important, would allow a room to be built in this building on the fourth floor that's not accessible. I'm someone who has a close family member who uses a wheelchair for mobility. My family uses strollers to get our three young kids around. So I find it very disappointing that the room is not accessible. I want to put that on the record once again for the benefit of a department whose responsibility includes accessibility. I am very disappointed by that. It's an exceptional building, but the fact that we have a room that's not accessible to people with mobility issues is disappointing. Frankly, I think it's unacceptable for the Parliament of Canada, and I want to put that on the record.

I would like to follow up on the slide that's here right now, which you touched on earlier, Mr. Graham. Am I right to assume that the visitor welcome centre, phase two, is going ahead? It's been approved and it's happening. Is that a correct assumption?

Mr. Rob Wright:

Well, I would say that maybe the best answer to that, in a way, is yes and no, in the sense that the concept of a visitor welcome centre I think dates back to 1976 with the Abbott commission. There's a long-standing discussion around a visitor centre. As the security and threat environment has continued to evolve, the importance of it being a security element outside of the footprint of the core Parliament Buildings has increasingly become important.

With its becoming a priority as a project for Parliament, we did a review of the long-term vision and plan in 2005 and 2006, and this project was identified as a key priority of Parliament. There have been approvals that have been sought to proceed with this project. At the same time, what I would say is that on this slide you see here a footprint that exists because of the functionality that Parliament wants to be in there, which is an ongoing conversation. We haven't come to the end of that conversation. The shape of that facility I think is still very fluid in working with you.

It could become smaller, but I would say that my understanding at this point is that the requirement of having security screening outside of the footprint of the buildings is a fundamental objective of the long-term vision and plan. The visitor welcome centre exists first and foremost to meet that need, and then it provides multiple other benefits to Parliament in terms of providing interpretive services for visitors as well as core functions for Parliament that are difficult to fit within the heritage buildings themselves.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay. I want to maybe step back a bit, then. You mentioned that approvals had been sought, and I assume approvals have been given for certain elements. Can you share with the committee what those approvals have been, when they happened and what specifically was approved?

I don't think anyone is going to disagree about the security requirement and having it off-site. I assume that's the visitor welcome centre. One is that it's separate and apart, but I think very much knowing what has been approved, what exactly has been approved thus far going forward.... The front lawn of Parliament is Canada's front lawn. Having a massive hole into bedrock for potentially a decade I think would be a concern to the general public, which leads me to my question.

Where has the public been on this? Has there been any consultation whatsoever with the public at large in terms of having a massive hole on Parliament Hill shrinking the size of the front lawn for potentially a decade? Has there been any engagement?

(1215)

Mr. Rob Wright:

As far as public engagement goes, we work very closely with Parliament and want to ensure that parliamentarians are engaged. I think the public consultation—and perhaps Mr. Patrice can add to this—would be done in coordination with parliamentarians, which would be very important. We work hand in glove with the administration of Parliament. Essentially, one of our core objectives is to meet the needs of Parliament.

Our understanding is that the visitor welcome centre is a core priority of Parliament, for both the security requirements and the visitor services as well. Yes, there is the challenging path to getting to a better Hill, I guess, in the sense that there will be disruption, but one of the key objectives of the visitor welcome centre is to enhance the Hill for visitors—for Canadian visitors and for international tourists.

To get to that point requires disruption. There's no way around that. That's a choice for Parliament to make.

Mr. John Nater:

I am out of time, but the chair did give me a brief leeway.

Based on the current approval process, approvals that had been given to the Department of Public Works under the current timeline, when will a shovel go into the ground to start digging phase two of the visitor welcome centre?

Mr. Rob Wright:

As I think Ms. Garrett indicated, this would be early 2020.

Mr. John Nater:

At this point, if we're looking at early 2020, this committee will disappear in five weeks' time and potentially may not come back until January of 2020, depending on when.... There will be no further opportunity for this committee to have input on the visitor welcome centre's phase two.

Mr. Rob Wright:

But absolutely on what is in the visitor welcome centre, phase two—

Mr. John Nater:

But shovels will be in the ground. It's going to happen in that general....

Mr. Rob Wright:

Unless we are given some direction to stop, then yes.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Frankly, the committee would also have a chance to provide input on the actual size in terms of the requirement and all of that, but the concept, as Mr. Wright pointed out, of the visitor welcome centre goes back a decade or so in terms of its approval.

The Chair:

Okay. Before I go to Ms. Sahota I assume that the visitor welcome centre phase two that Mr. Nater is talking about was approved by the Board of Internal Economy, because we just learned about it recently. We don't know anything about it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Chair, if I might, it was suggested that one of the things that's left flexible and yet to be decided is the size.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How can they start digging if they don't know what size it will be?

I'm sorry, but you said that one of the areas where there was still some room for input and flexibility was the size of the welcome centre. How can you start digging it if you don't know how big you're going to make it?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I'll make two points and then I'll pass it on to Ms. Garrett for some additional detail. The visitor welcome centre has been an important part of the long-term vision and plan for some time and has been in public documents for probably longer than a decade, I would say. We've made efforts to communicate that to parliamentarians and the broader public. Maybe we can make better efforts at that. We have an annual report that is posted on our website. It's outlined as a priority within that as well.

As far as the excavation goes, the visitor welcome centre phase two is going to have a significant footprint regardless of what goes in it. There's some fluidity, though, on making sure that it's sized appropriately given the engagement with Parliament.

I'll pass it over to Ms. Garrett.

(1220)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sorry, I still didn't hear an answer. If there's still some flexibility about the size of it, how can you start digging the hole? That's all. How can you know how big a hole to dig until you know the size? You're telling me the size is flexible, yet we're going ahead and starting digging. I just need some help understanding this.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Perhaps I can provide a little bit more clarity.

In terms of digging the hole, you're correct, that it is important when you go out to tender that you give that contractor whom you're tendering the work to a sense of how big that hole is going to be. I think that in the context of the comments that were made earlier and back to my earlier comments about layered decisions—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

—how big that hole is going to be is of critical importance.

Then to the other comments that were made, what goes into it will become equally important, but that decision can be made at a later date when there's a little bit more information known and some more consultation completed.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're getting....

Go ahead.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

To answer the question more specifically, to manage that risk because of where we are, there are options in front of us. We can start digging the hole by making some assumptions about the minimum size of that hole.

And just going back to when we met about the elm tree, one of the things the committee actually asked us to look at doing was advancing excavation so that we could replant in the east pleasure grounds sooner than later, and we are looking at that.

But what is the minimum footprint that we know we're going to need to make it safe to start digging that hole, so that when Parliament comes back we can talk a little bit more? Having said that, some of the early decisions and engagements that we're trying to get at are discussions that we presented here today around things like committee rooms, which would ultimately influence decisions around how big that hole is going to be, as an example.

I can continue to try to clarify this. I'm trying to answer your question directly.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Let me just try to repeat that in my words and see if I've got it.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Sure.

The Chair:

Briefly, David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I'll be as quick as I can, but I need to be clear.

There's a minimum size and you're going to dig that anyway, and once you're in there you have the options of making it bigger or not, depending on what decisions are made about committee rooms and where they're placed. It sounds like you can start digging without knowing the final size, because you do know a minimum size and it requires the same kind of start. Am I starting to get it?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

The answer to that question is yes, recognizing that it makes the contracting aspect a little more complex, but it's manageable. This is a very large and complex program, and that's what we're here for, to manage those types of risks.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks.

The Chair:

I assume any parking spaces will have electric charging stations.

Ms. Sahota, you're on.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

My legislative assistant, Caroline, is amazing. She lived in Europe for a while. She just informed me that with a lot of the excavation projects there, archeologists are often involved if there is anything to be found underneath. Especially with the amount of excavation that's needed for this project, there may be historical artifacts.

Are there archeologists involved in this project?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Absolutely, there are. In fact, we've found some interesting things.

Right now, if you stroll by the east pleasure grounds and look through the fencing, you'll see quite a significant archeological dig under way. They've uncovered the old barracks and guard houses. Because there is potential for artifacts on the Hill, we've mapped the potential impact and where we might find those as high, medium and low, and before we do any work—for example, build an east interconnect, or a construction road on top—part of our assessment program is to assess whether or not there are archeological resources, and when we find them, to fully excavate and document them accordingly.

If there's further information this committee would like to have on what we've found and the approach we're taking on that, we'd be happy to provide it. We have very good expertise and capability at Centrus in archeology.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I would love to hear more about whatever you find. I think that's fascinating. It should definitely be showcased and highlighted—maybe in the visitor centre. People could come to learn about it and understand our history.

Has there been any consultation with the Algonquin peoples, since it is unceded territory of the Algonquin?

(1225)

Mr. Rob Wright:

Right now, as you may know, we're working in a very close partnership with the national indigenous organizations and the Algonquin on the former American embassy to turn that into a national indigenous space.

We're working almost daily at this point with those groups, including the Algonquin Nation, on a wide variety of elements in addition to the 100 Wellington project. We're looking at opportunities to do some capacity-building as well as contracting opportunities to increase their participation in the work that's happening within the precinct.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have a question on the West Block, and then on how that relates to the entrances for Centre Block.

Why are the larger, grander main entrances of West Block usually locked off and not used as everyday entrances for MPs? For example, the double-door entrances on the side and the Mackenzie Tower are all shut down.

Is that something we can expect at Centre Block? Are we not going to be able to go under the bell tower anymore? Will there be just side routes for everybody, or through the visitor centre at the bottom? How's that going to work?

Mr. Stéphan Aubé (Chief Information Officer, House of Commons):

Certainly in the future, the goal is to have these facilities accessible to members as well as visitors so they can have access. In the context of the West Block, the Mackenzie Tower entrance and the Speaker's entrance—these are the main entrances at the sides—have been reserved for specific access for members and visitors right now from other countries, for example the Croatian president, who was here this week. We're reserving these entrances for that. The other entrances are for staff, members and administration.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are there similar plans for Centre Block? Before, the Centre Block doors were open for all members to use, and if staff were accompanying them, they could use them as well.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I must admit we did not look that far ahead, but I would suspect it's the intent that these doors will still be accessible for members and staff.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'd like to say that—

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The concern is more about the visitors going through, for security purposes obviously, but—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'd like to—

Mr. Michel Patrice:

—I suspect we'll have to look at that, but in my mind those doors would be still accessible above ground by members and parliamentary staff.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I hope so because I definitely think there was a special feeling of entering through those doors, and some of that feeling has been lost since we've been here in the West Block. It's a beautiful building, but I hope we're still able to use some of those entrances.

I'd like to share the remainder of my time with Linda.

Is there anything left?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The visitor welcome centre is the area where almost all of my concerns are focused.

When it comes to issues like putting elevator shafts into the current courtyard areas in the Centre Block, on its face, I think that makes sense, and so on.

My concerns are entirely around the visitor welcome centre and its colossal size. It really is big. It's going to be very expensive. It's bedrock down there. I don't know if it's granite, sandstone or limestone.

Does anybody else know?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

It's a lot of bedrock.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There's a lot of rock, yes. When it comes to archeology, I thought, well, you don't go down very far before there are no more archeological possibilities. There may be paleontological possibilities. I don't know.

Anyway, here's the thing about it. Once the shovel goes in the ground, once the contracts are given out for the shovel to go in the ground, all of which is scheduled to happen before the election—or at least part of it is scheduled to happen before then—inevitably, many dollars will have been spent that are unrecoverable. The bigger the footprint, the bigger the space we're committing to, even though we do not have a consensus on what should go in there.

I can tell you that, among the things you're showing, I am vigorously opposed to a number of them. Let me tell you, I do not agree with putting the Library of Parliament, which I assume is a museum, there. It's not that we shouldn't have a museum of parliamentary history. As a historian, I love the idea. It's just that there are a lot of other buildings that could go into it. It doesn't have to be attached to the Centre Block.

Viewing rooms to watch parliamentary procedures when there's overflow do not have to be underground there. In the event we think something like that is going to happen, we can set up seating in other places. To go back to the Westminster model, parliament traditionally involved multi-purpose rooms, Westminster Hall being the most obvious and most glorious of them, and that's almost a thousand years old.

On the issue of security, we already have the place people will come in for security reasons. We could put a second spot in, but we have a place that is designed to maximize security. It's well-designed. It serves its purpose well. It's outside of the buildings.

In terms of access from that area to the House of Commons and Senate chambers, well, the Senate is a little more difficult, but for the House of Commons, the tunnel shown there in grey to the west of Centre Block could be a way of accessing viewing areas in the House of Commons, so there's no need to run that in front, underground, which means that you could get that access underground without disrupting Canada's front lawn.

There's room on the side and back, in your plans themselves, for potential pavilions. That might be controversial. I assume those are above ground, but we don't have a chance to speak as to whether that is less intrusive, or to get public feedback. I literally didn't know of this possibility until today.

I know you have a little strip along the belvedere that you've opened up, and I have a personal sentimental reason for wanting that to be open for the next few years. That is the spot where I first kissed my wife, actually, but for the many other people who don't have that particular sentimental attachment, the front lawn is more important.

The pleasure of viewing the side, which is where the Senate extra buildings...that could be done.

On House of Commons committee rooms, none of them should be underground, under what is now the front lawn, because we have a large number of other rooms available to us. Throughout my entire lifetime—and I'm more than half a century old and have lived in Ottawa my whole life—the conference centre, now the Senate, has been sitting there as a great big empty black hole. It's finally being used. Now that it has been reconditioned, we could use that for some committee rooms.

For number 1 Wellington, the old railway tunnel that's being reconditioned, I know we have a lease that expires—in 2034, I think you said—but it's a lease between ourselves and the NCC. We can use those permanently, and they're lovely rooms, so I think we can increase the number of committee rooms easily. In the Macdonald Building, those rooms could be multi-purpose and turned into committee rooms, or at least some of them could be—those in the upstairs part.

You see what I'm getting at. There's lots of room for all these things without doing what is the most intrusive thing of all the different things we're doing here, the most expensive and the one with the least certain timelines.

I know I've used up all of my time, Mr. Chair, but I will say, speaking for myself only, that in my opinion, the absolute.... I would like to see nothing happen with regard to the visitor welcome centre phase two, even if it means missing a building season, until you have the consent of the House of Commons. I feel very strongly about that. If this stuff goes ahead before the next election and we've spent a bunch of money before the House comes back, regardless of which party is in government—it happens—I know that I for one will be distressed.

(1230)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Personally, I don't agree with you, but I won't bring that up now.

We've got lots on the list still.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What's the story with the elm tree?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I'll pass this to Ms. Garrett in a moment. As you know, we were here some time ago—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We know very well.

Mr. Rob Wright:

We had a good discussion on the elm tree. As we discussed, the elm tree was to be cut. The wood is being stored, so that it will be cured and could be used for a future parliamentary use in consultation with Parliament by the dominion sculptor. We are working with the University of Guelph as well to grow some small saplings. I think the survival rate of those saplings was quite low, which was indicative of the health of the tree itself.

I'll pass it off to Ms. Garrett to give more detail.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Thank you, Mr. Wright.

Mr. Wright pretty much covered it. The only thing I would add is that based on the tree's health, we did take a hundred cuttings from the tree—the best cuttings the arborist could find. We sent them off to the University of Guelph and they picked the best 50 to try to propagate them. Of those 50 saplings, only 10 have survived that propagation process. We have 10 saplings that are growing in a greenhouse at the University of Guelph and when they're strong enough, they'll be grown outside and then returned to the precinct when it's appropriate.

(1235)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you.

When I left my last round, I was asking about tunnels. If you go back to slide 17, on proposed circulation for parliamentarians, I'm wondering if you could provide access between East Block and West Block, so we don't have to go up and around. I just thought that the purple should cross, unless you want us all to go through the freight tunnels.

I don't have a lot left and I'll leave it to Ms. Lapointe in a second.

As we've been taking Centre Block apart, have we had any real surprises?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

I would say we haven't had surprises, but there was a disappointment. We were hopeful that the shafts within the building would be sufficient to carry, for example, our mechanical and electrical.... They're much smaller than we were anticipating, which is causing us to drive to new solutions. We're still in the process of articulating designated substances in the building.

The most interesting discussion will be in terms of the structural work and assessments that we're doing right now. It's related to one of the upcoming decisions, namely, on how we will seismically reinforce the building. There are some opportunities around base isolation that would allow us to save a lot of the heritage hierarchy in the building and the structure that's above the basement in the building.

There have been no surprises from the perspective that we've got a very old building that requires a very significant modernization. Having said that, all of that allows you to do much more detailed planning for the design and costing of the program, which we're working on at present.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are no listening devices in the walls or bags of cash in behind things, or something like that?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

There haven't been, so far.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one last question before I pass this on. When am I going to get kicked out of my office in the Confederation Building?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

That's a good question.

Mr. Rob Wright:

This is another point of engagement with Parliament on the broader campus strategy. Doing the major restoration of the Confederation Building will require swing space. We are planning to put facilities for the House and the Senate adjacent to the former U.S. Embassy to support the restoration of the Confederation Building, as well as the East Block. Those facilities are not designed yet, nor are they close to construction. You'd be looking towards or past mid-2025 to get to that point.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If I have any time left, I'd like to give it to Ms. Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Do I have any time left?

The Chair:

You have one minute left.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Will I have more later?

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay. I'll wait for the next round in that case.

The Chair:

You'll go after Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If Ms. Lapointe prefers to wait, I'll continue for another minute.[English]

Is the Supreme Court involved in the LTVP? I know there's been talk about renovating that one as well.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Full restoration of the Supreme Court is in the plans. The West Memorial Building is the swing space for that facility. It's part of the long-term vision and plan from a planning principle perspective, but not from an implementation perspective.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned the old U.S. embassy briefly. Is that also to be a swing space, or is it only for the...?

Mr. Rob Wright:

That will be a permanent space with some adjacent space that will run through to Sparks Street for a permanent national indigenous peoples space.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, you have three minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have a quick question that I promised my daughter I would ask. I was going to do it quietly, but I'll do it publicly. I think I know the answer, but I'm going to ask anyway.

Are there any plans to reintroduce the cat world that existed prior to West Block's being closed?

I confess that walking over to see the cats was her favourite part of coming to Parliament Hill. It's a cool tradition.

Mr. Rob Wright:

It was my grandmother's favourite part as well.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There you go. See?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I think at this point there are no plans to reintroduce it that I am aware of.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I didn't think so, but it would be really cool if there were. I leave that out there. Maybe there are some creative folks.

I have two things, one point and then a question.

The point is that I really appreciated knowing for the first time how you're looking at the parliamentary precinct differently. Right now, truly, we have a frankenparl. In the decade and a half that I've been on the Hill, we added a committee space here and grabbed offices there. It's been pulled together with duct tape and bale wire. It doesn't make any sense when you talk about flow. So I'm pleased to hear that we're going to get away from that nonsense, take a step back and look at all the facilities as they all start to blend, and the idea that we may still have to be off the Hill, whereas we weren't in the past. When I first got here, everything was nice and neat on the Hill. So I'm pleased about that.

I share some of the concerns that Mr. Reid has raised about the visitor welcome centre. When you're providing the committee with the list of decisions and the time frames, I assume this will be a part of that; that a detailed subset will speak to exactly where we are with the visitor welcome centre in the decisions that are made and are not being revisited versus those that, going forward, have not been made, and what your thinking is on when and how those decisions are going to made. I would ask that you include that in the report you provide to us.

(1240)

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It's been noted.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You keep saying “noted”. I assume that “noted” is your word for yes.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's very good. Thank you.

The Chair:

Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I want to come back to some of the things that several parliamentarians and I have discussed, but I still feel that I've had no clear answer.

When you first came here on December 11, you said that the rehabilitation of the Centre Block was intended “to safeguard and honour its heritage... to support the work of parliamentarians; to accommodate the institution's evolving needs; to enhance the visitor experience; and to modernize the building's infrastructure.”

I am very concerned about the part about parliamentarians.

On March 19, you said that the Board of Internal Economy would set up a working group. We raised the issue a number of times to find out who would be involved in the working group, but I have heard nothing yet about parliamentarians. However, recently, we were consulted about cutting down an elm tree. Since Parliament will probably not sit until January, who will be consulted if decisions on next steps have to be made by then?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

As I said, we will have a working group of three people. So far, I have received two names and I prefer to wait until I have the third before—

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

There are only five weeks left.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I should receive the third name by the end of this week.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

We were consulted about the felling of a tree. However, I think we have more major decisions to make than cutting down a tree.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That being said, I apologize to those who care a lot about trees.

I am thinking of questions such as when to decide on the number of members, whether or not to set up a parallel debating chamber or whether or not to excavate—my colleague said earlier that there is rock here, under the building.

By the way, I don't feel reassured, because I didn't get the answer I wanted.

When you renovated the West Block, you had to excavate rock because that's all there is under the building. You are now saying that you will have to excavate in front of the Centre Block. What did you learn from the excavation work you did here? What are the best practices you have learned that you will be able to apply to your work on the Centre Block?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I hope that the members of the working group will be able to meet after the next break. For the time being, the leaders of each of the parties in the House have appointed members to sit on this working group, as decided by the Board of Internal Economy.

The general and specific concerns of committee members were heard. The Visitor Welcome Centre will be one of the priority topics before the adjournment in June. Discussions will begin and a list of questions or concerns that parliamentarians have raised with the working group will be compiled. The group will then report to the Board of Internal Economy, which will present it to this committee as soon as possible.

As for the lessons learned from the construction work at the West Block, I'll let Mr. Wright tell you about that.

(1245)

[English]

Mr. Rob Wright:

There have been many lessons learned and I think we could have a deep conversation about that. There would be two that would be relevant to today's conversation that would be very important.

One is, as Ms. Garrett mentioned, the layered decision-making approach and to focus on those elements that we can get consensus on and to move forward on them. That lends itself to phased implementation. In the middle of the West Block we started to shift gears, in working between Public Services Procurement Canada and the House of Commons. We're going to apply that lesson learned fully for Centre Block.

It's the phased approach, really focusing on those structural elements, first and foremost, where we can get the greatest clarity early, and then, once we have the clarity of the functionality that we have, focusing the effort, from a construction perspective, on areas that need to be perfect for the operations of Parliament, the chamber being perhaps the most obvious of those, and committee rooms. They should be completed earlier and handed over to the House of Commons, which is the technical authority on the IT and broadcasting elements. The construction elements of the building and all of the critical IT elements should be finished at the same time, rather than being sequential, which is what we used to do previously in projects. The Wellington Building and the Valour Building and elements of that would have been more sequential. We think we can save time and enhance the quality by approaching it with a more phased approach. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I still have some questions. [English]

The Chair:

One quick question. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

On March 19, when you appeared before the committee, you said that 20% of the decommissioning process had already been completed. Today, May 14, what is the percentage? [English]

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

I believe that 20% was in reference to the decommissioning process. We are approximately 40% decommissioned. We're on track to finish those decommissioning activities in an August 2019 time frame, with a view of being able to transition the building back from parliamentary partners to PSPC, and then a very rapid turnover to our construction manager, who will take over custody of the site and stand up the construction site.

There are key elements that need to come out of the building. We've moved quite a bit of the moveable assets, things like artifacts and furniture, especially those to support parliamentary operations, but there are residual assets in the building and some pretty important artifacts. A good example are the war paintings in the Senate chamber. Two of the six are down, and the remaining six will be moved by a mid-June time frame.

Most importantly, on the House of Commons side, is the decommissioning of the IT infrastructure in the building. That is ongoing as we speak and is well in progress, but has to be completed, as well as some of the activities to isolate the building, so it can be taken essentially off the grid. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Before I go to Mr. Reid, I have one question. It came up during our study on a family-friendly House of Commons and I think it was mentioned one of the times you were here before. It was the suggestion that one of the things you might look at is play space or a playground, either outside as Mr. Reid suggested, as part of the courtyard, or indoors. Has any thought been given to that?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Nater, respect, please!

I'm hearing a long silence.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

I can jump in and try to answer.

Part of what we are looking at is making Parliament more family friendly. We have been given requirements from our parliamentary partners to make sure that when parliamentarians and their families are busy, they can effectively support that.

With regard to exterior play, honestly I'd have to go back and check the functional program requirements, but with regard to the interior of the building, I know we've been given requirements for improved family-friendly space in a universally accessible environment and we will endeavour to make sure that those spaces are in the appropriate locations within the building.

(1250)

Mr. Stéphan Aubé:

There have already been discussions on possible play areas on the outside. Consideration was given to the visitor welcome area beside the West Block, but that hasn't yet been finalized. As you can see, we're just in discussions right now, first, on how circulation would happen both inside and outside the building.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Very briefly, there are a few of us around the table who do have young families now. I joked that my daughter will be the MP by the time we get back into Centre Block, so it won't be relevant, but it would be nice if, when these discussions are happening, those who currently have young families have some type of consultation or input.

My family was up last week and they had a great time on the front lawn of Parliament blowing bubbles and running around. It was a lot of fun. That doesn't happen in the winter, so it would be nice to have some consultation with those of us around the table and in Parliament who currently have young families on the Hill.

The Chair:

I have a six-year-old and a 10-year-old.

Mr. Reid, you're next on the list. Also Ms. Kusie hasn't spoken yet, which you might want to defer to. However, where do you want to go with your motion? Did you want to finalize that today or at another meeting?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I think it would be preferable if we let that wait until a different meeting. There are still more questions. I know I'm not the only person who has more questions and we have all these witnesses here, so it's our chance to ask them.

The Chair:

Okay. Do you want to allow Ms. Kusie to go, or do you want to go?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you okay with my taking it?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to say a couple of things. First of all, I want to stress one area where I really admire the work you've done: your seismic work on this building to make it earthquake-proof. It was most emphatically not earthquake-proof before you started your work on it, so I congratulate you for that. I'm well aware of the challenges that Centre Block faces in that regard, and while I like to economize on many things, I'm not asking you to economize on that.

I think the fundamental problem that all of you face is that your parliamentary partners, as you describe the various groups that are submitting to you, have not told you what their needs are. They've given you a wish list, which is not quite the same thing. It's the difference between what I would like to have and what the economists talk about as supply and demand.

Demand is ultimately what I want to have and am prepared to pay for. None of us has made the hard choices. I'm not talking about you making hard choices; we haven't made the hard choices. We're imposing the arbitration job to a large degree on you, and that is profoundly unfair. I can see you attempting to deal with it and respond to everybody's needs.

We have to give you clearer guidelines, so I hope that what I've said so far is not understood as criticism of Public Works, the architects or the House administration. Au contraire, it is a critique of the process that we are part of, and we need to get our act together.

On another note, I gather that the idea of swing space beside the former U.S. embassy has not been approved by anybody. I think it is a good idea. Right now, that is an unutilized space. It's a parking lot that doesn't even have cars parked there anymore. It makes eminent sense to put something in there that could be used as space, and then in the long run, the obvious flaw with the current building is that it is too small for an indigenous heritage history museum. There's no way there is enough space. The swing space might serve that purpose.

I do have to ask this question: How long do you anticipate the big hole, as you've called it, in the ground for the visitor welcome centre being there? We know it starts in September 2019. When will it be filled in and the ground covered over and be back to being usable?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I think that would come back to one of the questions. If Parliament wanted to accelerate the opening of the visitor welcome centre, in essence, to prioritize the visitor welcome centre and return the front lawn and the operations that the functionality that would be provided there, that would be a different scenario than if you wanted the visitor welcome centre and the Centre Block to reopen on the same day. We could look at both of those scenarios. If there were a desire to prioritize the visitor welcome centre, it would be there for a shorter period.

(1255)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I assume the rationale for phase two of the visitor welcome centre being the first thing on your agenda is that the work that's going on in Centre Block initially for the first couple of years is not the heavy structural work that will be needed later on. It's a matter of figuring out what's there, removing items that are there. You're trying to do multiple things at the same time. I assume that's the logic of it.

If the visitor welcome centre or parts thereof were started later, thereby allowing us to figure out what should and shouldn't go out there, is it possible that either the amount of time the visitor welcome centre hole is in the ground or the amount of ground that's being dug up at any given time could be reduced, or some combination? I mean some part of the footprint being not dug up for all or part of the period and perhaps the period during which all or part of this being dug up being shrunk.

I worded that in a way that's difficult to answer, but I'll leave that with you.

Mr. Rob Wright:

To be clear on the Centre Block, there will be significant interior demolition work beginning this fall. That's not the construction of particular spaces, but the demolition of large floor plates. Regardless of what you decide you want, that is the way to go. We're comfortable with that. Then the excavation of the visitor welcome centre is to happen in tandem. I understand what's coming from at least certain members of the committee, that waiting could perhaps reduce the footprint and save money, which is admirable. At the same time, waiting spends a lot of money. It's really important for the committee to be aware of that as well. The longer we wait, the more money is being spent. Both sides of the balance sheet have to be looked at.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much to all of you. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

I want to thank you all too.

There are lots more questions and meetings. There is another committee coming in here.

Make it really short, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have just a very quick question to validate.

Is the media being consulted to ensure that there isn't an area like the Hot Room again?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

That is part of the plan.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I'll go to Mr. Christopherson in a moment.

Just so the committee knows, on Thursday, the first hour is the minister on the main estimates on the debates commission. The second hour is free, perhaps for what Mr. Christopherson is going to do. Then the first meeting after we're back, we had tentatively scheduled to have the review of the draft report on the parallel debating chambers. Sometime we have to get back to Mr. Reid's motion. And we have to get out of here at 1:00 because there is another committee.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How much time does that give me, Chair? I can't see the face of the clock.

The Chair:

There's about one minute on the clock.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's what I thought. I'll take this opportunity. I appreciate that. I only asked for the floor so that I can formally move my motion: “That the Committee study the following proposed changes to the Standing Orders and report back to the House”. The attached documents with the details of those changes have been circulated in both languages.

I don't know how much discussion we require here. I'm sort of going on the assumption that there's enough support in the back benches to at least explore, and give some air and time to, a lot of work that's been done by a lot of colleagues. I'm a little bit part of it, mostly just contributing thoughts as opposed to being a key player. My role is just that I'm on this committee, so I'm the one moving the motion.

I'd be looking for, either now or quietly afterwards, or at the beginning of the next meeting, but in some way, whether the study is going to become an issue or whether we can quickly deal with this motion and get on with having the delegation come in and start rolling up our sleeves and going through some of the proposals.

That's what I would be seeking going forward. The answer to that will dictate how quickly we can dispose of this motion and get on with the work, or if we're going to have to make a bit of a cause célèbre out of it, which I'm hoping is not the case.

(1300)

The Chair:

We'll certainly discuss that shortly, but probably not today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm ready to vote.

The Chair:

You're ready to vote.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I can win, I'll take a vote now.

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think we need some time to discuss it further before we go to a vote.

The Chair:

Okay.

We'll bring it up soon, David.

Well, thank you again. Hopefully, these good discussions will continue, because you brought lots of great information today that was very helpful to us. Thank you very much for doing that and keeping us in touch as things proceed.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Français]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour, tout le monde.[Traduction]

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 155e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Ce matin, nous entendrons des témoins dans le cadre de notre étude sur le mandat du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, et sur la surveillance du projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et la vision et le plan à long terme, comme nous en avons discuté lors de la séance du mardi 7 mai.

Nous recevons Michel Patrice, sous-greffier de l'Administration, et Stéphan Aubé, dirigeant principal de l'information, de la Chambre des communes.

Nous entendrons également Rob Wright, sous-ministre adjoint de la Direction générale de la Cité parlementaire, et Jennifer Garrett, directrice générale du Programme de l'édifice du Centre, de Services gouvernementaux et Approvisionnement Canada.

Nous accueillons en outre Larry Malcic, architecte chez Centrus Architects.

Merci à tous de comparaître. On m'a indiqué que vous pouviez tous rester pour les deux heures que durera la séance. Je crois comprendre que vous ferez un exposé, suivi d'un diaporama sur la vision et le plan à long terme. Les membres du Comité vous poseront ensuite des questions pour le reste de la séance.

Comme vous le savez, nous tenons beaucoup à améliorer les communications à ce sujet; c'est donc une excellente chose que nous nous rencontrions. Tout le monde est enchanté que la présente séance ait lieu.

Monsieur Wright, vous pouvez commencer votre exposé. [Français]

M. Rob Wright (sous-ministre adjoint, Direction générale de la Cité parlementaire, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Bonjour, monsieur le président et membres du Comité.

Je suis heureux d'être ici, aujourd'hui, pour vous donner une mise à jour du programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre.

Je suis accompagné de Mme Jennifer Garrett, directrice générale du Programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre, et de M. Larry Malcic, de Centrus, qui est le consultant en design du programme.

Nous sommes heureux de travailler sur ce programme excitant en collaboration avec les partenaires parlementaires et d'avoir l'occasion de discuter de la restauration de l'édifice du Centre avec vous, ce matin.[Traduction]

Depuis le déménagement historique des parlementaires, qui ont quitté l'automne dernier l'édifice du Centre, SPAC et l'Administration de la Chambre des communes se chargent conjointement des préparatifs pour les travaux de réhabilitation majeurs qui seront effectués. Cela exige de travailler en étroite association avec le Parlement pour procéder à la fermeture de l'édifice. Il s'agit de l'isoler complètement du reste de la Colline, par exemple, en réaménageant les réseaux de TI souterrains et en débranchant l'édifice de la centrale de chauffage et de refroidissement.

Une autre partie cruciale du processus de fermeture consiste à s'assurer que les objets d'art et les artefacts encore présents dans l'édifice sont entreposés dans un endroit sûr. Pendant ces travaux, l'édifice du Centre reste sous le contrôle du Parlement. On prévoit qu'il sera officiellement confié à Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada d'ici la fin de l'été.

Pendant que nous continuons de travailler à cet important processus de fermeture, nous mettons également en œuvre le programme d'évaluation, qui a commencé alors que vous occupiez toujours l'édifice du Centre. Nous avons maintenant commencé à ouvrir les planchers, les murs et les plafonds pour mieux évaluer l'état de l'édifice; il s'agit d'une étape importante pour atténuer les risques liés au projet

En plus de nous efforcer de bien saisir l'état de l'édifice, nous collaborons étroitement avec les agents parlementaires à définir les caractéristiques souhaitées pour l'édifice du Centre de l'avenir. Tout en travaillant à moderniser l'édifice du Centre pour qu'il appuie le fonctionnement d'une démocratie parlementaire moderne, nous nous consacrons à remettre ce magnifique bâtiment en état. Nous avons bien compris le désir exprimé par vous et d'autres parlementaires de retrouver l'édifice du Centre que vous connaissez et de vous y sentir chez vous dès sa réouverture.

Par ailleurs, la phase II du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est un autre élément important dans la discussion entourant l'avenir de l'édifice du Centre. L'agrandissement du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs permettra d'effectuer le filtrage de sécurité des visiteurs hors des murs des édifices du Centre et de l'Est, comme cela a été le cas avec la phase I de l'édifice de l'Ouest. Le centre réaménagé offrira aussi de nouveaux services aux Canadiens et aux touristes étrangers venant visiter les édifices du Parlement. On prévoit également intégrer aux nouvelles installations souterraines des fonctions utiles au fonctionnement du Parlement, comme des salles de comités.

Comme vous le constaterez dans le diaporama à venir, en vertu de la nouvelle conception, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs rassemblera les édifices de l'Ouest, de l'Est et du Centre de façon à former un complexe parlementaire unifié. À mesure que les travaux progressent, le nouveau rôle de l'édifice du Centre comme cœur d'un complexe parlementaire devrait donner naissance à toutes sortes de possibilités intéressantes. Cette vision d'unification des édifices du Centre, de l'Ouest et de l'Est s'inscrit dans un projet plus large consistant à faire de la Cité parlementaire un complexe intégré rassemblant les installations situées sur la Colline, mais aussi des édifices importants situés dans les trois pâtés de maisons lui faisant face, comme les édifices Wellington, Sir-John-A.-Macdonald et de la Bravoure.

Cette transition exige d'abandonner une vision axée sur des immeubles distincts pour adopter une stratégie d'ensemble à l'égard d'éléments cruciaux et interreliés, comme la sécurité, l'expérience des visiteurs, l'urbanisme et l'aménagement paysager, la manutention et le stationnement, la circulation des personnes et des véhicules, la durabilité environnementale et l'accessibilité.

Vos avis sur les fonctions qui devraient être hébergées dans l'édifice du Centre et le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, et sur la façon dont devrait être organisé l'espace pour servir les parlementaires, les médias et le public, nous seront extrêmement précieux. Nous sommes heureux de comparaître de nouveau devant vous pour entendre vos commentaires, et nous nous faisons fort de poursuivre nos consultations auprès des parlementaires dans le cadre de ces travaux de grande importance.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Mme Garrett et à M. Malcic, qui présenteront le diaporama. Je serai ensuite heureux de répondre à toutes vos questions avec l'aide de mes collègues de la Chambre des communes. Merci.

(1105)

Mme Jennifer Garrett (directrice générale, Programme de l'édifice du Centre, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Merci. Bonjour, monsieur le président et distingués membres du Comité.

Notre diaporama se déroulera comme suit. Je vous expliquerai ce que j'appelle les aspects problématiques du dossier, après quoi je céderai la parole à M. Malcic, qui vous exposera certaines des idées initiales qu'a l'architecte en réaction au programme à moitié fonctionnel que nous avons reçu de nos partenaires parlementaires. Nous terminerons en vous présentant les prochaines étapes.

La diapositive suivante explique la portée du programme. Forts de la réussite des projets de l'édifice où nous nous trouvons et des édifices du Sénat du Canada, nous lançons maintenant le plus important programme de réhabilitation patrimoniale que SPAC ait jamais entrepris. Ce programme comprend essentiellement deux composantes clés, la première étant la modernisation de l'édifice du Centre proprement dit afin de mettre entièrement à niveau l'édifice de base, qu'il s'agisse de la maçonnerie, de la structure, de la résistance aux séismes ou des systèmes mécaniques et électriques. Voilà qui vous donne une idée de l'ampleur de la tâche. Essentiellement, l'édifice de base doit être entièrement porté aux normes modernes. Il faut en outre procéder à la conception dans le cadre d'un programme fonctionnel pour s'assurer d'appuyer les activités parlementaires modernes tout au long du XXIe siècle.

La deuxième composante du programme consiste à construire la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Essentiellement, devant l'édifice du Centre, nous creuserons un immense trou afin d'y construire la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, car oui, il s'agira d'une installation souterraine. Cette dernière aura la capacité d'appuyer les activités et les services parlementaires afin d'accueillir les visiteurs qui viennent sur la Colline du Parlement, et nous relierons les édifices de l'Est, de l'Ouest et du Centre afin de former ce que M. Wright a qualifié plus tôt de « complexe parlementaire ».

La diapositive suivante montre l'effort conjoint déployé par l'Administration de la Chambre des communes et nous afin de vous expliquer le processus de conception et de construction que nous suivrons au cours du programme.

Je dirais que pour le moment, nous travaillons encore avec notre gestionnaire de construction afin d'officialiser l'échéancier final du projet, mais nous connaissons les principaux jalons que nous pouvons vous présenter ce matin. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons essentiellement un horizon de trois ans pour le projet.

Sur le plan de la conception, nous avons essentiellement lancé la phase du programme fonctionnel ainsi que le processus de conception schématique. Si vous suivez les deux premières lignes de flèches, soit celles du programme fonctionnel et de la conception, vous verrez que d'ici la fin de l'exercice, en mars, notre objectif consiste à choisir une option préférée en matière de conception à l'étape de la conception schématique pour l'édifice du Centre et le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Cependant, si on descend pour commencer à suivre les activités de construction, on voit qu'il y a une approche intégrée par couches sur le plan du programme. Nous n'attendons pas la fin du processus de conception pour entamer les activités de construction. Deux activités de construction clés que nous lancerons à l'automne et à l'hiver visent à procéder à la démolition et à l'abattage ciblés à l'intérieur de l'édifice du Centre en novembre et à commencer l'excavation au cours de l'hiver 2020. À cette fin, notre gestionnaire de construction a déjà amorcé le processus d'appel d'offres.

Voilà les principales étapes prévues pour les grands programmes.

En outre, nous avons déjà lancé le programme d'évaluation exhaustive auquel M. Wright a fait référence dans son exposé. Nous travaillons activement à ce programme, tout en achevant ce que nous appelons les « projets habilitants , comme celui du quai de chargement temporaire. Parmi ces projets figuraient le déplacement des Livres du Souvenir, les routes de construction temporaires et l'aménagement du chantier de construction.

La diapositive suivante comprend un schéma, dont certains ou la totalité d'entre vous ont peut-être déjà vu une version préalable montrant ce dont le site devrait avoir l'air au début du programme. La diapositive devant vous vous présente le fruit de nos dernières réflexions et interactions en matière de planification avec le gestionnaire de construction. Elle montre ce que nous pensons être la disposition prévue du chantier de construction dans le cadre du programme. De fait, si vous examinez la partie gauche de la diapositive, vous verrez l'endroit où se trouve la phase un du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, alors que la zone grise hachurée montre essentiellement l'empreinte du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs proposé à la phase deux, le tout se fondant sur les besoins exprimés par les partenaires parlementaires jusqu'à présent dans le cadre du programme fonctionnel.

(1110)



Le tout s'appuie essentiellement sur une combinaison de trois facteurs, qui déterminent l'emplacement de cette ligne: le soutien aux activités parlementaires, les besoins en matière de construction pour ce qui deviendra un immense chantier de construction, et la gestion de l'expérience des visiteurs.

Nous voulons nous assurer de concilier tous ces facteurs; nous avons donc fait beaucoup d'activités et de coordination afin de tracer cette ligne en tenant compte de l'Administration de la Chambre des communes, du Sénat et de la Bibliothèque, en consultation avec notre gestionnaire de construction. Cette ligne nous permettra, selon nous, de continuer d'appuyer les activités parlementaires et d'offrir un programme d'accueil des visiteurs sur le terrain avant, tout en permettant au gestionnaire de construction d'exécuter le programme.

Je passerai à la diapositive suivante. Avant de céder la parole à Larry, je voulais traiter de points ou de défis que nous connaissons déjà au chapitre de la conception et auxquels nous commencerons à nous attaquer dans les prochains mois dans le cadre du programme. Comme je l'ai indiqué lorsque je présentais la diapositive sur la portée, la modernisation de l'édifice de base aura des répercussions considérables dans l'édifice du Centre en réduisant l'espace disponible. Pour avoir étudié la question, nous savons actuellement, grâce à notre évaluation et à notre compréhension des exigences de la modernisation et du code, que le projet réduira de quelque 2 500 mètres carrés l'espace disponible pour le programme fonctionnel dans l'édifice du Centre.

Pour vous donner un aperçu de l'espace physique que cette superficie représente, cela équivaudrait à tous les bureaux du quatrième étage de l'édifice du Centre. Ces travaux visent à installer les conduites pour des systèmes de chauffage, de ventilation et de climatisation modernes, et à améliorer la structure afin de mettre en place la solution de résistance aux séismes, des toilettes, des salles de TI et d'autres installations afin de satisfaire l'éventail de besoins fonctionnels de l'édifice. C'est la première étape.

La deuxième concerne les défis techniques qui vont de pair avec la mise en œuvre d'un important programme de modernisation dans un des plus importants édifices patrimoniaux du pays. Je peux vous garantir que nous faisons appel à des restaurateurs et à des personnes aux expériences variées pour intervenir, mais le défi est de taille. À l'appui de ces activités, nous avons entièrement établi la hiérarchie patrimoniale de l'édifice, faisant de notre mieux pour intervenir de manière à avoir le moins de répercussions possible sur le patrimoine dans les aires patrimoniales où la hiérarchie est moins élevée dans l'édifice. Nous déployons donc des efforts à ce sujet.

Enfin, les demandes reçues à ce jour de la part des partenaires parlementaires dans le cadre du programme fonctionnel dépassent actuellement l'offre d'espace disponible. Nous avons donc un problème d'offre et de demande. Nous tenterons de trouver une solution dans les prochains mois. Nous vous présenterons une série de décisions clés après que l'architecte vous aura expliqué le programme afin de vous donner une petite idée de ce que nous ferons à cet égard.

Nous passerons maintenant à la diapositive suivante, et sans plus attendre, je céderai la parole à M. Malcic.

(1115)

M. Larry Malcic (architecte, Centrus Architects):

Merci.

Je suis enchanté de témoigner de nouveau devant le Comité pour lui présenter de l'information et des idées sur la réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre.

Ce dernier est, comme Mme Garrett l'a souligné, un important édifice patrimonial que nous souhaitons préserver. Cet édifice constitue toutefois également le cœur de la démocratie parlementaire canadienne, laquelle a évolué au cours du dernier siècle depuis la conception et la construction de l'édifice. Ce qui est demeuré constant, cependant, c'est l'importance des principes de planification fondamentaux à l'origine de ce trio d'édifices. Ce sont des principes du plan de style beaux-arts qui mettent en lumière la hiérarchie des espaces et l'importance de la circulation cérémoniale et des parcours de procession, tout en offrant de très solides infrastructures pour les aspects fonctionnels de l'édifice. Les deux chambres, soit la Chambre des communes et le Sénat, sont disposées de manière symétrique autour de l'axe formé par la Bibliothèque et la rotonde de la Confédération. Ces dernières années s'est ajoutée la flamme du centenaire. Nous voulons, alors que nous allons de l'avant avec le projet, élargir le plan de style beaux-arts afin de créer un campus ou un complexe d'édifices convenant à tous les égards aux intentions historiques des créateurs initiaux de la Colline du Parlement.

Alors que nous examinons le projet du point de vue conceptuel, nous voyons de quelle manière nous comptons maintenir l'axe dans la conception. En fait, nous rapprocherons le tout de manière à mieux intégrer les édifices en nous appuyant sur les principes fondamentaux grâce à l'ajout de la phase deux du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Ce faisant, nous relierons les édifices de l'Est et de l'Ouest et fournirons des espaces supplémentaires qui font défaut depuis longtemps dans l'édifice du Centre, particulièrement de nouvelles salles de comité, une nouvelle entrée au complexe, notamment pour les visiteurs, et des liens menant aux autres édifices, comme je l'ai indiqué.

Je veux commencer aujourd'hui en parlant peut-être des points à considérer pour la modernisation de la Chambre des communes. Cette dernière, à titre de point de mire de l'édifice, illustre les problèmes qui se posent dans l'édifice. Nous voulons que la conception soit à l'épreuve du temps afin de pouvoir accueillir les députés, dont le nombre augmentera à mesure que la population croîtra. Nous devons trouver un moyen d'y parvenir.

Il faut toutefois se poser la question fondamentale suivante: le ferons-nous dans l'empreinte actuelle de la Chambre ou devrions-nous procéder à un agrandissement?

Nous devons nous demander si nous pouvons réutiliser le mobilier actuel, qui faisait partie de la conception initiale, ou si nous devons en acheter du nouveau.

À mesure que le nombre de députés augmentera, celui des groupes de pression fera de même. Comment ferons-nous pour que l'édifice puisse suivre cette croissance importante, qui témoigne en fait de la croissance de la population?

Enfin, il y a la question de l'accessibilité universelle, qui est importante dans l'ensemble de l'édifice et à laquelle les concepteurs initiaux n'ont jamais pensé.

Si je commence par les considérations relatives à la Chambre des communes, les problèmes fondamentaux incluent les exigences ayant trait à la sécurité et au code, en ce qui concerne notamment l'accessibilité universelle et, comme je l'ai indiqué plus tôt, le nombre de places assises pour tenir compte de l'augmentation de la population et du nombre de parlementaires. À cet égard, il faudra tenir compte des biens patrimoniaux que contient l'édifice, de la future technologie de diffusion et de communication, de la modernisation de tous les systèmes de chauffage, de climatisation et de plomberie, et de la résistance à l'activité sismique, tous des facteurs qui n'ont évidemment jamais été pris en compte lors la conception initiale de l'édifice.

À mesure que nous faisons des découvertes et que nous examinons tous ces aspects de l'édifice, nous réalisons un ensemble fondamental de dessins. Vous en voyez un ici; il s'agit d'une section de la Chambre des communes qui montre à quel point nous utilisons également la technologie moderne, dont l'autométrie photographique, pour intégrer de véritables images photo aux dessins proprement dits.

(1120)



Examinons l'aménagement des sièges dans l'enceinte de la Chambre des communes. Actuellement, l'aménagement ne satisfait pas aux exigences du code du bâtiment en matière de sécurité des personnes ou d'accessibilité. Nous devons corriger ces lacunes. Nous devons aussi fournir des sièges supplémentaires, idéalement pour passer à 400 sièges, plus le fauteuil du Président, ce qui nous donnerait la latitude nécessaire pour la croissance des prochaines décennies. Nous pouvons apporter des améliorations importantes pour atteindre cette capacité, en partie. Cependant, des changements seront nécessaires, évidemment, ce qui exigera des compromis. Nous estimons être en mesure de respecter le code et d'assurer l'accessibilité du parquet de la Chambre jusqu'à la zone ambulatoire, comme on le voit dans l'une des options que j'ai préparées pour atteindre les 400 sièges.

Cette solution potentielle est fondée sur le maintien de l'aménagement traditionnel des sièges à la Chambre, les sièges parallèles. Bien que d'autres configurations soient utilisées ailleurs, la configuration de la salle actuelle se prête à un aménagement en parallèle.

Lorsqu'on étudie la Chambre, il convient de ne pas se limiter au parquet. Il faut aussi considérer les tribunes qui l'entourent, qui doivent être modernisées, car les mêmes enjeux liés à la sécurité des personnes et à l'accessibilité s'y posent. Nous avons conçu des options pour améliorer ces aspects, mais cela a une incidence sur la capacité. Actuellement, les tribunes comptent 553 sièges au total, ce qui pourrait être réduit à environ 305 sièges afin de respecter les normes actuelles du code du bâtiment et assurer l'accessibilité. Pour ce faire, il faudrait réaménager les sièges et réduire l'inclinaison abrupte des tribunes nord et sud, qui ne sont plus conformes au code.

Je souligne que le programme fonctionnel comprend l'aménagement d'une salle dans le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs afin de permettre aux gens de suivre les délibérations de la Chambre à distance, dans un cadre plus approprié avec des écrans multimédias. Cela pourrait être une façon moderne et appropriée d'accroître le nombre de spectateurs pour les séances de la Chambre.

Examinons la tribune nord plus attentivement. Une des options consisterait à réduire l'inclinaison de la tribune afin d'offrir des points de vue entièrement accessibles et de respecter le code du bâtiment. Cela vous donne un aperçu de l'incidence des codes du bâtiment modernes sur l'espace existant.

Pour la tribune sud, le plan d'aménagement comprend, dans ce cas-ci, la cabine de l'opérateur de console. Voilà ce que nous pouvons faire pour prendre les mesures d'adaptation qui s'imposent, mais sans altérer le tissu historique ou l'apparence de la salle, qui sont si importants pour maintenir la dignité du Parlement.

En ce qui concerne les salles de comité, leur importance et leur utilisation ont considérablement changé au cours des 100 dernières années. Ils font maintenant partie intégrante du processus législatif; la demande est grande. Tant le Sénat que la Chambre des communes ont besoin de nouvelles salles de comité. Je vais laisser M. Wright donner des détails à ce sujet.

M. Rob Wright:

Merci, Larry.

Comme on vient de l'indiquer, diverses options seront offertes, et celles qui sont présentées ici ne sont qu'à titre indicatif. Beaucoup plus d'options seront examinées au fil du temps. Donc, nous en sommes essentiellement au début de la discussion. Il importe de le souligner. Ce n'est pas l'aboutissement de la discussion, mais un élément essentiel.

Les salles de comité en font partie. Les exigences à cet égard sont claires. La question est de savoir où elles devraient être situées. Il est important de considérer l'emplacement des salles de comité dans le contexte général de la Cité parlementaire. Alors que nous nous concentrons sur le projet de l'édifice du Centre, nous avons tendance à vouloir tout intégrer à l'édifice du Centre, mais il pourrait être avisé, pour nous et le Parlement, d'examiner cela en fonction d'un contexte plus large axé sur la création d'un campus intégré, par exemple avec une plus grande intégration des installations aux infrastructures des tunnels. Le choix de l'emplacement des salles de comité sera donc très important.

Mon dernier point au sujet de cette diapositive porte sur les salles de comité patrimoniales de l'édifice du Centre. Assurer un niveau de sécurité adéquat pour une salle de caucus, par exemple, n'est pas facile. Nous avons investi dans l'édifice de l'Ouest et, tandis que nous progressons vers la création d'un complexe parlementaire, réfléchir aux façons d'utiliser l'édifice de l'Ouest et l'édifice du Centre en tandem, comme une installation intégrée, pourrait être utile.

Passons maintenant à la diapositive suivante.

Vous voyez ici l'emplacement actuel des salles de comité, étant donné que l'édifice du Centre est maintenant hors service. Beaucoup de salles de comité ne sont pas sur la Colline. Vous constaterez qu'un certain nombre d'investissements importants ont été faits à l'extérieur de la Colline du Parlement, tant pour la Chambre des communes que pour le Sénat.

Comment pouvons-nous tirer parti de ces investissements à long terme et veiller à ce que l'emplacement des salles réservées aux travaux parlementaires soit toujours fonction de leur incidence sur le fonctionnement du Parlement?

Sur la diapositive suivante, nous présentons les divers emplacements possibles des salles de comité. Vous pouvez voir qu'il y aura toujours, dans l'édifice du Centre, des salles de comité, tant pour la Chambre que pour le Sénat. Vous pouvez voir les emplacements potentiels des salles de comité dans le cadre de la phase 2 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Vous pouvez voir les propositions pour les pavillons, comme on les appelle, à l'extrémité nord de l'édifice du Centre et une proposition sur l'établissement des salles de comité dans l'édifice de l'Ouest.

L'édifice de l'Est fera l'objet d'une restauration majeure pour le Sénat. Des salles de comité pourraient y être ajoutées. Évidemment, les salles de comité actuelles de l'édifice Wellington et de l'édifice de la Bravoure sont là. Ce sont toujours d'importants investissements. Il est aussi important de garder à l'esprit que nous travaillerons à l'aménagement de nouvelles installations pour la Chambre et le Sénat du Canada au 100, rue Wellington, près de l'ancienne ambassade des États-Unis. Ces installations serviront de locaux transitoires. Cela nous permettra de vider l'édifice de la Confédération, qui doit être restauré, ainsi que l'édifice de l'Est. À long terme, ces locaux pourraient être intégrés en permanence au complexe parlementaire. C'est un autre emplacement éventuel pour les salles de comité.

Nous devons échelonner tout cela dans le temps pour veiller à répondre aux besoins des parlementaires. Il s'agit d'une discussion importante sur la marche à suivre. Notre but est de faire les meilleurs investissements au nom du Parlement pour satisfaire aux exigences d'une démocratie parlementaire moderne.

Encore une fois, c'est une discussion importante qui aura lieu au cours des prochains mois.

Je cède la parole à Larry pour la suite.

(1125)

M. Larry Malcic:

Merci.

La circulation et les connexions sont essentielles au fonctionnement de tout bâtiment. Le plan de circulation de l'édifice du Centre lui-même était très clair, en raison de son style beaux-arts typique. Encore une fois, cependant, nous en sommes aux étapes de planification et de conception des moyens d'accroître la clarté et l'efficacité de ce système de circulation.

Cela nécessite la prise en compte de nombreux facteurs distincts. Ici, vous pouvez voir ce que nous voulons faire pour aménager la nouvelle porte d'entrée du Parlement, dans le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Notre objectif est qu'elle serve d'entrée publique et qu'elle facilite la circulation du public.

Nous voulons nous assurer que les parlementaires et leur personnel peuvent circuler tout aussi efficacement. Idéalement, les voies d'accès seraient indépendantes des voies réservées au public. Dans ce contexte, il faut aussi prendre en compte l'entretien de l'édifice. Comment peut-on faire entrer les marchandises et les distribuer partout à l'intérieur? Comment peut-on éliminer les déchets sans nuire aux activités des occupants de l'édifice?

Toutes ces choses sont entremêlées. À cela s'ajoute la circulation des travailleurs de la construction. Il faut en tenir compte dans le plan de circulation. L'objectif est de relier tous les bâtiments pour qu'ils fonctionnent comme un campus, comme un complexe de bâtiments. Ce sera avantageux, car ils fonctionneront de manière intégrée et non de façon indépendante.

Nous en sommes encore à l'étape de la conception, pour le moment, mais vous commencez à voir — ici, en vert — le chemin que pourront emprunter les membres du public, en passant par le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, qui serait l'entrée horizontale, disons, puis ils pourraient monter, verticalement, dans les puits de lumière actuels ou les cours de l'édifice. Le public aurait alors un accès direct aux tribunes. Les parcours des visiteurs et des membres du public ne croiseraient pas nécessairement les voies d'accès réservées aux parlementaires et au personnel. Toutefois, cela démontre que nous considérons que les cours intérieures font partie intégrante d'une solution visant à améliorer l'édifice du Centre et son fonctionnement. L'installation de vitrage et de cloisons nous permet de réduire l'empreinte extérieure globale du bâtiment et d'améliorer sa durabilité en réduisant sa consommation d'énergie. Ainsi, nous aurions la possibilité d'aménager divers espaces propices à l'introduction de nouvelles fonctions, y compris la circulation.

Enfin, nous avons déjà parlé du centre d'accueil et de son rôle dans l'ensemble. Vous voyez ici une représentation schématique de notre vision. C'est une occasion formidable. Je pourrais dire que c'est une occasion unique d'agrandir l'édifice du Centre — en vert, vous voyez l'agrandissement de la Chambre des communes — pour aménager des salles de comité et d'autres installations auxiliaires qui jouent un rôle essentiel dans les activités du Parlement.

En rouge, à l'est, vous voyez l'agrandissement du Sénat.

En orange, vous voyez les exigences de la Bibliothèque du Parlement qui visent à améliorer l'expérience des visiteurs.

En jaune, vous voyez la séquence d'entrée. Ce sera une entrée convenable, une entrée qui reflétera la dignité du Parlement, selon la définition traditionnelle du terme. Le résultat serait l'intégration, en un seul campus, de l'ensemble des édifices actuels, l'établissement de liens avec l'édifice de l'Est et l'édifice de l'Ouest, et la création de nouveaux locaux au Sénat et à la Chambre. Après sa réouverture, l'édifice du Centre, qui aura été dégagé, pourra fonctionner comme il a été imaginé et conçu, en conservant sa dignité, son histoire et son importance. En outre, nous veillerons à ce qu'il puisse jouer efficacement son rôle au cœur de la démocratie parlementaire canadienne.

(1130)

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Plus tôt dans notre exposé, nous avons parlé de la prise de décisions clés en matière de programmation. Dans la prestation de ce programme, nous visons à prendre des décisions selon des approches multidimensionnelles, du niveau plus général au plus détaillé, afin que les décisions soient prises dans les délais appropriés. Nous recherchons des décisions durables, car dans des projets comme celui-ci, le changement est notre ennemi, évidemment. Une fois franchie l'étape de la conception, tout retour en arrière pour annuler les décisions que vous avez prises a un coût, en temps et, ultimement, en argent.

Pour ce qui est des décisions essentielles visant à appuyer le programme, vous verrez que certaines d'entre elles sont liées aux travaux de base de modernisation de l'édifice, et d'autres qui sont davantage liées au programme fonctionnel ou au programme parlementaire. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les administrations de la Chambre des communes, du Sénat et de la Bibliothèque du Parlement pour veiller à ce que ces décisions soient prises puis transmises à l'architecte, pour la réussite du programme.

L'élimination de l'amiante, les mesures parasismiques et les principales décisions essentielles liées au programme fonctionnel — l'apparence physique de la palissade, la taille de la Chambre — sont toutes des décisions clés que nous devons prendre en toute transparence. Ici, on ne parle pas seulement de la conception, mais aussi de leur incidence sur les activités parlementaires et de leur coût.

Nous avons des discussions semblables avec nos autres partenaires, puis nous consultons les parlementaires en conséquence. De toute évidence, certains partenaires bénéficieront de la rétroaction tant attendue des parlementaires. Nous avons hâte de travailler avec la Chambre des communes pour obtenir cette rétroaction.

Pour terminer cet exposé, je vais vous donner un aperçu des étapes du programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre au cours de la prochaine année. Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, nous allons mettre au point le programme fonctionnel et la conception schématique pour qu'une décision soit prise quant à l'option préférée d'ici le mois de mars. Une série de projets de base ont été mis en œuvre. Des travaux préparatoires en vue de l'importante étape de la construction sont en cours, notamment les travaux sur les aires de détente du côté est et le déplacement des monuments.

Cette année sera votre dernière occasion de célébrer la fête du Canada sur la Colline du Parlement, comme le veut la tradition. En effet, quelque temps après la fête du Travail, une clôture sera rapidement érigée le long de la ligne de délimitation du site que vous avez vue plus tôt dans la présentation, et la construction commencera sur le site même du programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Par exemple, vous assisterez notamment au démantèlement du mur de Vaux, à l'installation de remorques de construction et à la mise en place de la palissade en vue de la construction.

Nous poursuivons notre travail sur le plan de mise en œuvre et la conception de la palissade. Nous aurons bientôt des renseignements utiles à ce sujet. Au début de 2020, nous terminerons le programme d'évaluation globale, qui servira au processus de conception, ainsi que le regroupement des informations sur l'immeuble, l'établissement des coûts, de la portée et du calendrier.

C'est tout pour la présentation.

C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons à vos questions.

(1135)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de cette présentation très détaillée et utile.

Nous commençons les questions avec Mme Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présentation.

Franchement, j'aurais aimé y assister au mois de décembre ou au mois de mars. En nous montrant des documents beaucoup plus précis, le chemin que vous empruntez semble bien plus clair. Vous semblez beaucoup mieux préparés que lorsque vous êtes venus les dernières fois, grâce à ces documents à l'appui.

Tantôt, vous avez dit que vous alliez intégrer les différents édifices ensemble. Présentement, on peut aller de l'édifice du Centre à l'édifice de l'Est par un couloir. Cela veut dire qu'il va y avoir la même chose entre l'édifice...

Est-ce que vous connecterez l'édifice de la Bravoure ainsi que l'édifice Victoria, pour que les parlementaires puissent se promener entre les deux par des couloirs intérieurs?

M. Rob Wright:

Oui, exactement. Dans l'avenir, le but est exactement d'avoir une cité parlementaire intégrée à l'infrastructure et de créer des édifices reliés par des tunnels, notamment.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous parlez des édifices de la Bravoure et Victoria, mais vous ne parlez pas des édifices Wellington, de la Confédération, ainsi que de la Justice, là où se trouve actuellement la majorité des bureaux des députés.

M. Rob Wright:

Oui, c'est exactement la même chose.

C'est le même but en ce qui concerne les édifices Wellington et Sir-John-A.-Macdonald, ainsi que les édifices de la Confédération et de la Justice.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il faudra éventuellement plusieurs années avant d'en arriver là. Si je comprends bien, tous ces petits autobus qui circulent vont disparaître?

M. Rob Wright:

C'est une question à poser au Parlement pour savoir quelle serait la meilleure solution.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

M. Rob Wright:

À Washington, il y a un service de navette dans un tunnel pour permettre au personnel de circuler.

Ce serait peut-être une bonne idée à emprunter, ou peut-être pas. Cela fait partie d'une autre discussion.

(1140)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il est sûr et certain que, durant la construction, les petits autobus qui circulent un peu partout ne facilitent pas la tâche.

C'est en tout cas intéressant.

Dans vos documents, vous avez parlé plus tôt de 2 500 mètres carrés qui serviront au fonctionnement des édifices, ce qui équivaut à la superficie du 4e étage de l'édifice du Centre. Présentement, on fait fonctionner l'édifice du Centre. De combien d'espace a-t-on besoin? Je ne comprends pas qu'il faille plus d'espace.

Comme les techniques de chauffage et de plomberie qui sont utilisées datent de plusieurs années, voire de 100 ans, et que les techniques d'aujourd'hui se sont améliorées, est-ce que je me trompe en disant que cela devrait prendre moins d'espace? [Traduction]

M. Rob Wright:

Il y a deux ou trois aspects très importants. Le premier est le manque d'escaliers et d'ascenseurs dans l'édifice du Centre. Ils prendront beaucoup d'espace.

Je vous donne un exemple pour l'édifice de l'Ouest. L'espace requis pour les systèmes mécaniques était 14 fois plus important lorsque nous sommes déménagés de l'ancien bâtiment à ce bâtiment moderne. Il faut donc beaucoup plus d'espace pour ces systèmes. Nous prévoyons qu'il y aura plus de salles de toilettes pour les parlementaires; il faudra plus d'espace, notamment pour la plomberie. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est sûr. [Traduction]

M. Rob Wright:

L'édifice du Centre n'est pas doté d'un système de climatisation centrale et, à bien des égards, il n'est pas conforme au Code du bâtiment. Il faudra de l'espace pour le moderniser conformément au Code.

Donc, il faudra de l'espace pour en faire un bâtiment moderne conforme aux codes du bâtiment actuels. L'une des possibilités — et ce n'est que le début d'une discussion — est d'exploiter les cours intérieures pour qu'une partie de cet espace... Comme vous l'avez vu dans la présentation, c'est une possibilité pour les ascenseurs. Ainsi, vous perdriez moins d'espace dans l'intérieur patrimonial de l'édifice. Ces décisions seront fondamentalement essentielles au fil du temps. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Quand vous êtes venus nous rencontrer les dernières fois, nous avons parlé de consulter les parlementaires ayant travaillé dans l'ancien édifice du Centre. Le Bureau de régie interne devait être consulté, ainsi que les députés. Y a-t-il eu une consultation des députés pour recueillir leur avis? Je peux vous donner le mien.

Dans votre document, pour lequel je vous remercie, vous montrez qu'il y a actuellement 338 places et qu'il y en aura 400. Les gens sont assis en rang d'oignons. Je peux vous dire que les chaises rabattables par rangées de cinq, ça ne fonctionne pas. J'étais moi-même assise sur une banquette composée de chaises rabattables. Souvent, plusieurs collègues ne sont pas à l'heure et il faut toujours se lever pour les laisser passer.

Je ne sais pas si c'est à cela que vous pensez, mais je vous dis que ce n'est vraiment pas commode.

Consultez-vous les parlementaires qui travaillent ici actuellement?

Avec 400 places, je ne sais pas si nous serons en mesure de circuler.

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration, Chambre des communes):

Je vous remercie, madame Lapointe, de votre question.

En réponse à votre première question, en ce qui concerne le plan suggéré, il ne s'agit que d'une option pour démontrer qu'il faut tenir compte de la croissance éventuelle du nombre de députés à la Chambre des communes.

L'intention est effectivement de présenter ces options au groupe de travail qui a été formé par le Bureau de la régie interne. Plus tard, il s'agira aussi de consulter évidemment ce comité-ci. Donc, c'est une option. Vous avez vu, dans toute la présentation, qu'aucune décision définitive n'a été prise, il ne s'agit que d'options. De plus, je considère qu'il est de notre devoir commun, à Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada et à l'Administration de la Chambre, de vous présenter des options pour démarrer la discussion et recevoir des directives en vue de répondre à vos besoins à titre de parlementaires.

Pour ce qui est des consultations sur l'expérience que vous êtes tous et toutes en train de vivre en occupant l'édifice de l'Ouest, il y a effectivement des employés de l'Administration qui vont rencontrer des députés, par exemple, des agents ou des membres du personnel de ces bureaux pour leur demander leur rétroaction, ainsi que leurs suggestions, conseils et commentaires.

(1145)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Est-ce que ce sera dans les cinq prochaines semaines? Ensuite, la session sera ajournée et, avant qu'on revienne, il pourrait s'écouler beaucoup de temps.

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est exact.

Nous sommes tout à fait conscients en fait de cette période particulière. Ce que je vous dis, c'est que les rencontres avec les parlementaires ou les membres de leur personnel ont déjà débuté. Elles vont continuer au cours des cinq prochaines semaines et elles se poursuivront vraisemblablement durant la période postélectorale.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est fini? J'ai encore des questions à poser.

Le président:

Oui. Vous pourrez continuer au prochain tour.[Traduction]

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

J'ai bien aimé également les questions intelligentes de Mme Lapointe, et les réponses ont également été très éclairantes, alors je remercie les témoins qui ont répondu aux questions.

Je tiens à remercier tous les témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui, et en particulier des nouveaux renseignements très utiles que vous nous avez fournis. La présentation que vous nous avez faite est, de loin, l'information la plus utile que nous ayons reçue jusqu'à maintenant, et nous vous en sommes tous reconnaissants.

Comme il fallait s'y attendre, cela soulève beaucoup de questions.

J'ai une question que je veux vous poser tout d'abord avant de revenir aux documents. Elle s'adresse à M. Patrice. Lorsque vous êtes venu témoigner le 19 mars dernier, vous avez mentionné que le Bureau de régie interne avait approuvé un modèle de gouvernance, qui sera probablement très pertinent à partir de maintenant. Pourriez-vous en faire parvenir une copie à notre greffier?

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui, je vais vous faire parvenir la décision qui a été prise par le Bureau de régie interne. Le modèle de gouvernance sera établi, à vrai dire, par les membres du groupe de travail, mais bien sûr, le groupe de travail, comme il en a été discuté au Bureau, fera rapport au Bureau, et il consultera et rencontrera le Comité et d'autres intervenants pour assurer la réussite du programme.

M. Scott Reid:

Si ce n'est pas trop demander, pourriez-vous faire parvenir les documents pertinents à temps pour que nous puissions les examiner à notre séance de jeudi, qui portera également sur le même sujet?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je vais faire de mon mieux.

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous pouviez le faire, je vous en serais très reconnaissant.

Merci beaucoup du diagramme de Gantt qui est très utile. En le regardant, je vois que vous avez divisé le projet en fonction des périodes. La première est avril à septembre — soit la période dans laquelle nous nous trouvons — lorsque certains éléments se mettent en branle.

L'événement qui se produit en septembre 2019 est la fermeture de l'édifice du Centre. Cela aura lieu quelque part en septembre. Certains éléments débutent pendant la période dans laquelle nous nous trouvons et se poursuivent après septembre. L'un d'eux qui retiennent plus précisément mon attention est l'avant-projet de conception. Il me semble qu'il sera très difficile d'obtenir nos commentaires et ceux de la Chambre des communes en entamant ce processus avant les prochaines élections.

De plus, je dois souligner que la gestion de construction — le processus d'appels d'offres — commence en septembre, ce qui veut dire qu'il se pourrait que certains appels d'offres soient mis en place avant que le Parlement ou la Chambre des communes n'ait eu la chance d'effectuer aucune surveillance. Nous serons au beau milieu des élections; personne ne sera en mesure d'effectuer la surveillance. Je pense que c'est un problème.

Afin de s'assurer que la Chambre des communes — qui, après tout, est l'organe de surveillance des dépenses — peut assumer la part de contrôle qui lui revient, tant pour ce qui est des coûts engagés que ce à quoi ils sont associés, je vous encourage à reporter le tout après les élections. Je suis conscient que cela n'aurait pas pour effet d'accélérer le projet, mais je pense que c'est le genre de situation où il serait opportun de le faire. Mes collègues pourraient avoir une opinion contraire, mais c'est ma première observation. C'est un échéancier qui pose problème. Je lance tout simplement l'idée pour que vous puissiez en discuter.

Monsieur Malcic, merci d'être avec nous. Vos remarques au sujet des enjeux architecturaux ont été très utiles. J'ai une question de nature administrative à vous poser. De qui prenez-vous officiellement vos ordres ou vos instructions? Ou, si vous préférez, qui vous a accordé le contrat?

M. Larry Malcic:

Nous avons été embauchés par Travaux publics.

(1150)

M. Scott Reid:

Je vois que Mme Garrett lève la main. Est-ce que cela veut dire que c'est vous qui leur donnez les instructions?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Oui, en effet. Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada est à la fois le réalisateur du projet — l'autorité financière responsable du projet et des fonds que nous recevons du Conseil du Tésor et les pouvoirs d'approbation connexes — et l'autorité contractante. C'est notre ministère qui a attribué le contrat à Centrus, et comme nous sommes le responsable technique chargé du contrat, ils suivent nos instructions.

À ce sujet, nos partenaires parlementaires nous font part de leurs exigences, que nous convertissons en tâches définies que le concepteur doit exécuter, mais c'est bel et bien Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada qui leur donne les instructions.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur Malcic, est-ce que vous avez un ou plusieurs contrats?

M. Larry Malcic:

Il s'agit d'un seul contrat.

M. Scott Reid:

Je présume que le contrat est du domaine public. C'est une question que je ne devrais pas vous poser à vous, monsieur Malcic, mais plutôt à Mme Garrett. Seriez-vous en mesure de fournir l'information au Comité?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Bien sûr, nous pouvons vous la faire parvenir. En fait, nous avons fourni l'information à l'Administration de la Chambre des communes, et c'est sur le site achatsetventes.gc.ca. Il s'agissait d'un appel d'offres public et l'information est publique. Nous allons vous fournir l'information sans problème.

M. Scott Reid:

Au sujet de la gestion de construction et de l'ensemble des détails de design, je présume qu'il y a des appels d'offres en préparation. Même s'ils ne sont pas rendus publics, serait-il possible de faire parvenir au Comité quel sera leur contenu, soit ce sur quoi ils porteront? Est-ce déjà prêt, et si c'est le cas, est-ce de l'information que vous pourriez nous fournir?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Tout à fait. Nous serons heureux de le faire. Je peux vous donner un peu de contexte tout de suite, ce qui aiderait sans doute à vous rassurer un peu.

Nous sommes très conscients de travailler pendant une période électorale. Nous essayons de consulter les gens et de recueillir leurs points de vue pour nous assurer de pouvoir continuer de travailler sur le programme. Heureusement, quelques-unes des premières décisions qui doivent être prises portent sur des aspects du bâtiment de base, tout particulièrement pour ce qui est des deux jalons importants dont je vous parlais au début de mon exposé, soit entreprendre les travaux ciblés de démolition et d'assainissement qui doivent avoir lieu, de toute façon, dans l'édifice du Centre même, de même que les travaux d'excavation. On ne parle pas de lancer des appels d'offres pour tout le programme par l'entremise du gestionnaire de construction. On parle de lancer des appels d'offres pour ces aspects préliminaires des travaux.

Nous serons heureux de vous fournir les détails dès qu'ils seront prêts. Nous travaillons sur ces documents en ce moment.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

S'il y a d'autres renseignements que vous pouvez nous faire parvenir, nous aimerions les recevoir. Je vais m'en tenir à cela, et nous pourrons sans doute faire du suivi auprès du greffier à la prochaine réunion pour savoir ce que vous avez été en mesure de nous soumettre.

Monsieur le président, me reste-t-il du temps ?

Le président:

Il vous reste huit secondes.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, merci de votre présence et de vos réponses très éclairantes.

Le président:

J'ai oublié de souhaiter la bienvenue à M. Dominic Lessard, directeur adjoint, Biens immobiliers, qui travaille pour la Chambre des communes.

Merci d'être avec nous.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

C'est bien. Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous d'être avec nous.

C'est intéressant, très fascinant, de voir les choses évoluer.

Je pense qu'une des difficultés à venir est la possibilité d'une chambre parallèle. La bonne nouvelle, c'est que cela renforcerait notre démocratie; nous avons déjà effectué une première étude. Le rapport n'est pas encore prêt, mais j'ai le pressentiment qu'on recommandera notamment à la Chambre de continuer d'examiner la question.

L'inconvénient, c'est que la décision ne sera pas prise tout de suite, mais que ce serait un élément important pour prévoir l'espace. Il faut que l'espace soit réservé uniquement à cet usage, si cela va dans le sens de ce que nous envisageons actuellement.

J'aimerais avoir vos idées sur la façon de procéder, étant donné les divers échéanciers ici.

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous allons nous adapter aux exigences de la Chambre des communes. Nous avons suivi avec intérêt les discussions du Comité à propos de la chambre parallèle et attendons avec impatience le rapport du Comité et la décision de la Chambre à ce sujet. Notre rôle consiste à nous adapter aux besoins de la Chambre et de ses députés.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, je comprends bien cela, mais j'aimerais avoir un peu plus d'information.

M. Michel Patrice:

Tout dépend de la taille de la chambre parallèle dont vous parlez. J'ai lu quelque part que dans certains pays, sa taille n'est pas nécessairement aussi importante que celle de la chambre existante.

(1155)

M. David Christopherson:

Non, pas du tout.

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous avons quelques options, le cas échéant.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis curieux de savoir comment l'échéancier peut fonctionner pour que nous puissions prendre une décision éclairée. On sait, en partant, que le Parlement n'est pas reconnu pour agir à la hâte. Vous, naturellement, avez des décisions à prendre et des délais à respecter. Dites-moi comment vous envisagez les choses.

M. Michel Patrice:

Je pense à une salle de comité existante, par exemple. Selon la taille de la chambre et la fréquence à laquelle elle se réunit, on pourrait sans doute réorganiser un espace existant.

M. David Christopherson:

Elle pourrait siéger quotidiennement.

M. Michel Patrice:

On pourrait alors réserver du temps pour cette salle et l'organiser en fonction de ce qui fonctionnerait pour vous.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, très bien.

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous avons une bonne équipe et nous sommes en mesure de nous adapter. Nous sommes toujours en mesure de relever le défi.

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'en doute pas.

Il semble que vous ayez tenu compte de la période électorale. Je veux être très clair: nous quittons vers la fin juin.

C'est la fin de la présente législature. On passera à la suivante. Il se pourrait que ce soit en novembre ou plus tard et, une fois que la Chambre a recommencé à siéger, il faut parfois quelques semaines pour que les comités reprennent leurs travaux — bien que notre comité soit le premier à être formé. Il ne serait pas déraisonnable de penser que les comités pourraient ne pas être fonctionnels avant la nouvelle année.

Avez-vous pris cela en considération, soit que les députés ne seront pas ici pendant des mois, à partir de la fête du Canada, et que vous avez des décisions qui doivent être prises?

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui, nous avons pris cela en considération et nous avons reçu le nom de deux députés qui feront partie du groupe de travail, et nous attendons le nom d'un troisième que je devrais recevoir, je crois, cette semaine. Nous espérons pouvoir tenir la première réunion au cours de la semaine qui suivra la prochaine relâche, puis nous serons en position d'entamer les discussions avec ces députés et de commencer à prendre les premières décisions. Je pense ici au design et à d'autres éléments du genre. Ils devront examiner les options et décider ce qu'ils préfèrent et formuler des recommandations. Comme le Bureau de régie interne poursuivra ses activités, c'est aussi un avantage.

M. David Christopherson:

Voici ce qui m'inquiéterait, si je revenais, ce qui n'est pas le cas. Au retour, il se pourrait qu'on pose des questions et qu'on entende la réponse suivante: « Oh, désolé, nous avions un échéancier pour prendre cette décision et vous n'étiez pas là. »

C'est une réponse qu'on ne veut pas entendre. J'ai besoin que vous me garantissiez que les députés de la 43e législature ne vous entendront pas dire: « Eh bien, nous avons dû prendre la décision parce que vous n'étiez pas ici. »

M. Michel Patrice:

Je comprends cela. Dans le cas de certaines décisions, la beauté des communications à l'heure actuelle est que nous allons pouvoir les joindre. Nous allons devoir évaluer si des décisions clés qui touchent les députés devront être prises, disons, entre juin et la période postélectorale.

D'après ce que j'ai vu et entendu lors de mes discussions avec nos partenaires, avec Travaux publics, ils sont conscients du contexte et des situations qui pourront se présenter. Certaines décisions clés devront attendre après la période électorale. Je pense que certaines pourront être prises avant que la Chambre cesse de siéger en juin, mais ce sera aux députés d'en décider.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

M. Michel Patrice:

De toute évidence, il faudra prendre des décisions au sujet de la démolition de l'édifice, etc. Il se pourrait que je me trompe, mais je ne suis pas certain que vous souhaitiez prendre les décisions à ce sujet.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, et c'est le lien parfait avec ma prochaine question. Est-ce que le Comité pourrait obtenir la liste des décisions clés qui doivent être prises, de même que quand elles doivent l'être et le processus? Pouvez-vous nous fournir cette information?

Nous commençons à mieux comprendre le tout, mais ce n'est pas encore tout à fait clair qui prend l'ultime décision. Le Bureau de régie interne nous représente… presque. N'oubliez pas que ses membres relèvent de la chaîne de commandement qui remonte jusqu'aux chefs. Ce n'est pas notre cas. Quand nous siégeons au sein des comités, nous sommes maîtres à bord.

Ainsi, en tant que membre de ce comité, j'aimerais voir en quoi consiste le chemin critique, avec le moment où les décisions doivent être prises et quel est le processus actuel, s'il s'avère différent du processus général de prise de décisions et particulier dans chaque cas. Pouvons-nous obtenir cette information?

(1200)

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous pouvons très certainement vous fournir la liste de ce que j'appellerais les principaux éléments, les éléments de haut niveau, concernant les décisions qui doivent être prises.

Le moment choisi dépend aussi des députés, alors je ne vais pas m'engager à cet égard. Si une décision doit attendre jusqu'à ce que les députés soient prêts à la prendre, nous pouvons donner une idée approximative du temps, comme la saison, etc. À mon sens, nous n'imposerons pas notre échéancier aux députés. Notre rôle n'est pas d'imposer cela aux députés.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous en remercie. Vous nous avez entendus, et vous répondez comme si c'était affiché dans chacun de vos bureaux.

C'est excellent. Nous vous en remercions.

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui, nous allons vous fournir une liste des décisions qui, selon nous, intéressent les députés.

M. David Christopherson:

Puis-je simplement ajouter quelque chose, avant de terminer?

M. Michel Patrice:

Vous pourriez nous dire: « Sur ce point, nous ne voulons pas avoir notre mot à dire. »

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne pense pas un instant que vous allez essayer d'aller plus vite que nous. En fait, dans le système actuel, c'est la dernière chose que vous souhaitez. Vous allez sans doute nous harceler pour avoir la confirmation. Il y a beaucoup de « protégez vos arrières » ici; je comprends. C'est une bonne chose. C'est ce que nous souhaitons.

Voici ce qu'il faut retenir toutefois: certaines décisions sont mécaniques, une suivant l'autre, mais encore une fois, je veux juste m'assurer d'être clair, à savoir qu'aucune décision, parce qu'elle doit être prise, n'empêchera le Parlement d'en décider autrement par la suite. Cela pourrait avoir pour effet de bousculer un peu les choses, mais je veux simplement être très clair dans les témoignages du Comité qu'aucune décision n'empêchera le Comité d'avoir son mot à dire au sujet tant des éléments optionnels que de ce qui doit être fait du point de vue de la construction.

Je veux simplement en avoir l'assurance.

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est noté.

M. David Christopherson:

Excellent.

Le président:

Avant de passer à M. Graham, j'ai une question.

Madame Garrett, vous avez parlé de la consultation des députés.

Monsieur Patrice, vous avez mentionné deux noms au sujet du processus de consultation du Bureau de régie interne.

Pouvez-vous nous dire qui sont ces députés et comment ils ont été choisis?

M. Michel Patrice:

Les personnes ont été choisies par leurs leaders à la Chambre respectifs au Bureau de régie interne. Je présume qu'elles l'ont été en collaboration avec leurs partis. Je m'abstiendrai de vous donner les noms jusqu'à ce que j'aie celui de la troisième personne.

Le président:

Madame Garrett, est-ce les mêmes personnes à qui vous faisiez allusion?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je faisais simplement allusion à l'intention de l'Administration de la Chambre de consulter les parlementaires. Il est clair pour Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada que c'est l'Administration de la Chambre des communes qui s'occupera du processus de consultation, alors je m'en remets à ce qu'a dit M. Patrice à ce sujet.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous encouragerais aussi à faire participer un groupe d'anciens parlementaires, parce que plus nous nous éloignerons de l'année 2019, moins de gens se souviendront de ce à quoi l'édifice du Centre est censé ressembler.

Je dirais: « Appelez M. Christopherson »...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:...car il serait un excellent atout pour vous, étant donné que, malheureusement, il ne sera bientôt plus député.

En ce qui concerne le sujet de la chambre de débat parallèle — il s'agit davantage d'une observation que d'une question —, je vous encouragerais à chercher un espace permanent, au lieu d'une salle de comité que nous pourrions réattribuer, car la structure de la salle serait différente. Il faudrait qu'elle le soit, compte tenu des tribunes et des services de télévision. Si vous permettez que ce soit une salle de comité qui est réattribuée, une semaine, elle aura trois jours de disponibilité. La semaine suivante, elle aura deux jours de disponibilité. Et la semaine suivante, elle sera simplement oubliée. La structure de cette chambre doit être mise en place, et je tiens à ce que cela figure dans le compte rendu.

En ce qui concerne les commentaires de Mme Lapointe à propos des sièges en rang d'oignons — c'est une expression que j'aime beaucoup —, en examinant la disposition des 400 sièges que vous avez prévus... dans l'ancienne chambre, j'ai eu le grand plaisir d'occuper le siège du milieu d'une section de cinq sièges et, même si les sièges étaient beaucoup plus confortables que ceux dont nous disposons en ce moment, la manœuvre requise pour occuper un siège ou le quitter était vraiment pénible. Si nous pouvions éviter cela, je vous en serais grandement reconnaissant.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très bien dit.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Est-il possible d'agrandir la chambre?

M. Rob Wright:

Cette option illustre les difficultés que nous rencontrons, je crois. Ce n'est pas une option que nous suggérerions fortement ou dont nous recommanderions la mise en oeuvre. Nous nous employons à élaborer un vaste éventail d'options. Cela indique que, si la chambre souhaite maintenir son aménagement actuel, c'est essentiellement la seule façon d'accommoder cela. Cette option a de nombreux désavantages, que nous reconnaissons.

Sinon, il faudrait avoir une discussion à propos des autres aménagements qui fonctionneraient pour la Chambre des communes, que ce soit — et je réfléchis un peu à voix haute maintenant — un genre d'évolution avec le temps vers des bancs semblables au modèle adopté au Royaume-Uni, que ce soit l'adoption d'une approche très différente et plus radicale en matière d'aménagement des sièges, que ce soit un agrandissement de la chambre. Ce sont là des considérations très importantes qui, comme Mme Garrett l'a indiqué, rendent cruciale l'importance de prendre des décisions aussitôt que possible et de maintenir ces décisions jusqu'à la fin du projet.

L'agrandissement de la chambre est à lui seul une tâche très difficile. D'un point de vue structurel et architectural, cette partie de l'édifice présente certaines difficultés de taille. Il est possible d'agrandir la chambre, comme il est possible de mettre en oeuvre la plupart des idées, mais cela entraînerait des coûts importants. Avant de prendre cette décision, il faudrait, selon moi, que nous ayons épuisé un vaste éventail d'options et que nous soyons certains qu'il y a consensus quant à l'option qui nous semble correcte.

(1205)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'après la fin des rénovations de l'édifice du Centre, la gare ferroviaire, qui constitue en ce moment l'édifice du Sénat du Canada, continuera de faire partie de la Cité parlementaire?

M. Rob Wright:

La salle de lecture et la salle ferroviaire?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, l'édifice ferroviaire, la gare ferroviaire.

M. Rob Wright:

Oh, pardon.

Pour le moment, ces édifices sont considérés comme temporaires. En ce qui concerne les salles de comité Rideau, je pense que nous avons signé avec la Commission de la capitale nationale un bail qui expirera à une date comme 2034. Elles ont donc été prévues à titre temporaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous nous avez montré une carte de la pelouse avant qui montre qu'elle perdra la moitié de sa superficie en raison de la construction du nouvel édifice. Est-ce exact? Le chemin se situerait aussi beaucoup plus au sud qu'il l'est en ce moment. Est-ce aussi exact?

M. Rob Wright:

Les choses seront ainsi seulement pendant la période de construction.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cet aménagement n'est pas permanent.

M. Rob Wright:

Non, il n'est pas du tout permanent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le chemin remontra de nouveau jusqu'à l'édifice du Centre.

M. Rob Wright:

Tout cela sera sous terre. L'entrée sera aussi près... Par conséquent, si vous empruntez la promenade Sud, par exemple, vous entrerez presque au niveau du sol. Une légère pente vous mènera vers l'entrée de l'installation. Le mur de Vaux se trouvera au-dessus de l'installation. La colline du Parlement retrouvera donc son apparence actuelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pendant combien de temps perdrons-nous la pelouse, et où les célébrations de la fête du Canada se dérouleront-elles?

M. Rob Wright:

Voilà deux importantes questions. Si le Parlement le souhaitait, nous pourrions envisager d'ouvrir à l'avance le centre d'accueil des visiteurs de l'édifice du Centre. Il serait possible d'ouvrir le centre d'accueil des visiteurs peut-être assez longtemps avant l'ouverture de l'édifice du Centre. Nous n'avons pas encore examiné vraiment cette possibilité en détail, mais, si le Parlement le désirait, le centre d'accueil des visiteurs pourrait ouvrir à l'avance. Je serais prudent avant de préciser combien de temps à l'avance cette ouverture pourrait avoir lieu, mais disons que cette période serait importante. Cela pourrait avoir deux ou trois effets importants: la colline du Parlement retrouverait son apparence plus rapidement, et le centre permettrait d'offrir des commodités supplémentaires aux visiteurs ainsi que d'importants services pour appuyer les activités du Parlement. C'est donc une conversation que nous devrions avoir.

En ce qui concerne la fête du Canada, nous travaillons très étroitement avec Patrimoine canadien, qui est le ministère responsable de cet événement, ainsi qu'avec les partenaires parlementaires afin d'essayer de faire en sorte que toutes les activités de base qui se déroulent sur la colline du Parlement, en particulier pendant les mois d'été, se poursuivent sous une forme modifiée. Cette année, il n'y aura aucun impact. Puis, à mesure que les travaux avanceront, il y aura des modifications... nous envisageons de présenter une version modifiée du spectacle son et lumière afin de nous efforcer de maintenir sa présence et sa contribution à la fête du Canada. Il sera nécessaire de le modifier. Il y a aussi la relève de la garde et tous ces éléments, qui vont de la nécessité de s'assurer que le drapeau au sommet de la Tour de la Paix continue d'être remplacé à la nécessité de s'assurer que le carillon continue de jouer aussi longtemps que possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque je suis arrivé sur la colline du Parlement il y a 10 ans de cela, j'ai entendu des rumeurs, selon lesquelles on envisageait d'utiliser la pelouse avant pour construire un stationnement souterrain. Cela a-t-il déjà été envisagé sérieusement?

M. Rob Wright:

Je ne crois pas que cela ait déjà été envisagé sérieusement. Je pense qu'il y a eu quelques activités exploratoires. Nous avons cherché à supprimer les aires de stationnement de surface, un principe qui figure dans la vision et le plan à long terme. Dans la plupart des cas, ce que j'appellerai les études de faisabilité ont mis davantage l'accent sur la partie ouest du campus plutôt que sur la pelouse avant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mme Lapointe a abordé la question de l'accès par tunnel entre les édifices. Il y a quelques années, un tunnel a été construit entre l'édifice de la Confédération et l'édifice de la Justice. Je pense que j'ai mentionné cela au cours de la séance précédente. En 2011, ils ont arraché la pelouse entre ces deux édifices. Depuis, ils n'ont toujours pas rouvert le tunnel. Il était censé être fermé pendant une année ou deux.

Ce tunnel a été construit récemment, dans le contexte de la VPLT, mais il n'a pas été construit de manière à ce que les parlementaires et les membres du personnel puissent s'en servir. Pourquoi pas? Des mesures correctrices seront-elles prises à cet égard? Quel est le plan à long terme en ce qui concerne l'accès par tunnel à tous les édifices?

(1210)

M. Rob Wright:

Je vais devoir vérifier et vous communiquer les détails plus tard, mais le plan à long terme, qui a été élaboré en travaillant avec le Parlement afin de déterminer les services dont vous avez besoin, vise à créer un campus interrelié où, par exemple, la rue Wellington représente moins un obstacle au sein du campus, et l'édifice Wellington, l'édifice Sir-John-A.-Macdonald, l'édifice de la Bravoure et l'édifice de l'Ouest sont interreliés, tout comme l'édifice de la Confédération et l'édifice de la Justice, pour ensuite être reliés au centre d'accueil des visiteurs d'une façon beaucoup plus constructive. Ces édifices deviendront presque une installation intégrée.

C'est là la planification à venir. Nous disposons de plans conceptuels de ces tunnels, mais pas encore de plans détaillés. Nous avons trouvé des solutions au niveau conceptuel, mais c'est une conversation qu'il est important que nous ayons à mesure que nous avançons ensemble.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je vous interrogerai de nouveau plus tard.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Je suis reconnaissant à nos témoins de s'être joints à nous aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais commencer par formuler une observation, que j'ai mentionnée au cours d'une séance précédente à laquelle M. Wright et Mme Garrett n'assistaient pas. Elle concerne l'édifice où nous nous trouvons. Je trouve très décevant que Travaux publics, le ministère responsable de l'accessibilité — une dimension que, personnellement, je juge très importante —, permette la construction d'une salle non accessible au quatrième étage d'un édifice. Un membre proche de ma famille utilise un fauteuil roulant pour se déplacer, et ma famille utilise des poussettes pour déplacer mes trois jeunes enfants. Je trouve donc très décevant que la salle que nous occupons ne soit pas accessible. Je tiens à ce que cela figure dans le compte rendu une fois de plus, au profit du ministère dont les responsabilités comprennent l'accessibilité. Je suis très désappointé à ce sujet. Cet édifice est exceptionnel, mais le fait que cette salle ne soit pas accessible aux personnes ayant des problèmes de mobilité est très décevant. Pour être franc, je trouve cela inacceptable de la part du Parlement du Canada, et je tiens à ce que le compte rendu en fasse état.

J'aimerais maintenant donner suite à la diapositive qui est projetée en ce moment et que vous avez abordée plus tôt, monsieur Graham. Ai-je raison de supposer que la phase 2 du centre d'accueil des visiteurs ira de l'avant? Elle a été approuvée, et elle sera mise en œuvre. Ma supposition est-elle correcte?

M. Rob Wright:

Eh bien, je dirais que, d'une certaine façon, la meilleure réponse à votre question est peut-être oui et non, en ce sens que le concept d'un centre d'accueil des visiteurs remonte à 1976, je crois, à l'époque de la Commission Abbott. Les gens discutent depuis longtemps d'un centre d'accueil des visiteurs. À mesure que le contexte de la sécurité et des menaces a continué d'évoluer, il est devenu de plus en plus important que le centre d'accueil des visiteurs devienne un élément de sécurité situé à l'extérieur des principaux édifices du Parlement.

Comme ce projet pour le Parlement est devenu prioritaire, nous avons examiné la vision et le plan à long terme en 2005 et en 2006, et ce projet a été distingué comme l'une des priorités du Parlement. Nous avons cherché à obtenir des approbations pour pouvoir amorcer le projet. En même temps, je dirais que vous voyez sur la diapositive une empreinte qui existe en raison de la fonctionnalité que le Parlement souhaite intégrer dans ce centre, ce qui engendre une conversation permanente. Nous n'avons pas encore terminé cette conversation. Je crois que la forme que prendra cette installation est encore très fluide et assujettie au travail que nous réaliserons avec vous.

Le centre pourrait devenir plus petit, mais je dirais qu'à ma connaissance actuelle, la nécessité d'avoir une vérification de sécurité à l'extérieur des édifices du Parlement est un objectif fondamental de la vision et du plan à long terme. Le centre d'accueil des visiteurs existe d'abord et avant tout pour répondre à ce besoin, puis pour fournir plusieurs autres avantages au Parlement qui sont liés à la prestation de services d'interprétation pour les visiteurs et à l'exercice de fonctions de base pour le Parlement, des fonctions qu'il serait difficile d'abriter dans les édifices patrimoniaux mêmes.

M. John Nater:

D'accord. Alors, j'aimerais peut-être retourner un peu en arrière. Vous avez mentionné que vous cherchiez à obtenir des approbations, et je présume que certains éléments ont été approuvés. Pourriez-vous indiquer au comité quelles approbations ont été reçues, quand elles ont été reçues, et qu'est-ce qui a été approuvé précisément?

Je crois que personne ne contestera les exigences en matière de sécurité et le besoin d'assurer ces services de sécurité à l'extérieur des édifices du Parlement. Je présume que c'est le centre d'accueil des visiteurs qui jouera ce rôle. Premièrement, il est distinct et éloigné, mais je pense que le fait de savoir ce qui a été approuvé exactement jusqu'à maintenant... La pelouse avant du Parlement est la pelouse avant du Canada. Je pense que le grand public sera préoccupé par le fait d'avoir un énorme trou dans le sous-sol rocheux de cette pelouse pendant peut-être une dizaine d'années, ce qui m'amène à poser la question suivante.

Quel rôle le public a-t-il joué à cet égard? Des consultations ont-elles été menées auprès de la population en général, en ce qui concerne le fait d'avoir un énorme trou sur la colline du Parlement et de réduire la taille de la pelouse avant pendant peut-être une dizaine d'années? Des dialogues ont-ils été noués avec le public?

(1215)

M. Rob Wright:

En ce qui concerne la participation du public, nous travaillons très étroitement avec le Parlement, et nous souhaitons nous assurer que les parlementaires sont consultés. Je pense que la consultation du public — et peut-être que M. Patrice pourra ajouter quelque chose à cet égard — sera entreprise en collaboration avec les parlementaires, ce qui serait très important. Nous travaillons main dans la main avec l'administration du Parlement. Essentiellement, l'un de nos objectifs fondamentaux consiste à répondre aux besoins du Parlement.

Nous croyons comprendre que le centre d'accueil des visiteurs est l'une des priorités fondamentales du Parlement, à la fois pour satisfaire à des exigences en matière de sécurité et pour offrir des services aux visiteurs. Oui, je suppose que le parcours pour améliorer la colline du Parlement sera difficile, en ce sens qu'il provoquera des perturbations, mais l'un des principaux objectifs du centre d'accueil des visiteurs est d'améliorer la colline du Parlement pour les visiteurs canadiens ou les touristes internationaux.

Des perturbations seront nécessaires pour en arriver là, et il n'y a aucun moyen d'éviter cela. C'est un choix que le Parlement fait.

M. John Nater:

Mon temps de parole est écoulé, mais le président m'a accordé une légère marge de manœuvre.

Compte tenu du processus d'approbation actuel et des approbations que le ministère des Travaux publics a reçues dans les limites de l'échéancier actuel, quand commencerez-vous à creuser pour entreprendre la phase 2 du centre d'accueil des visiteurs?

M. Rob Wright:

Comme Mme Garrett l'a dit, je crois, ce serait au début de 2020.

M. John Nater:

En prenant le début de 2020 comme cible et sachant que ce comité disparaîtra dans cinq semaines pour ne revenir, peut-être, qu'en janvier 2020, selon le moment où... Le Comité n'aura plus l'occasion de se prononcer sur la deuxième phase du projet de centre d'accueil des visiteurs.

M. Rob Wright:

Mais il pourra absolument se prononcer sur ce qu'il y aura dans le centre d'accueil, phase deux...

M. John Nater:

Mais les pelles auront commencé à creuser. Cela va se produire dans ce contexte général...

M. Rob Wright:

À moins qu'on ne nous donne des directives pour arrêter, alors oui.

M. Michel Patrice:

Franchement, le Comité aurait aussi l'occasion de se prononcer sur la taille réelle du centre d'accueil par rapport aux exigences et tout cela, mais, comme l'a souligné M. Wright, l'approbation du concept remonte à environ une décennie.

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à Mme Sahota, je présume que la deuxième phase du centre d'accueil dont parle M. Nater a été approuvée par le Bureau de régie interne, car nous venons tout juste d'en entendre parler. On ne sait rien à ce sujet.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, si vous me le permettez, on a laissé entendre que l'une des choses qu'il est encore possible de déterminer et pour laquelle il y a une certaine souplesse, c'est la taille.

Le président:

C'est vrai.

M. David Christopherson:

Comment peuvent-ils commencer à creuser s'ils ne savent pas quelle taille il aura?

Je suis désolé, mais vous avez dit que l'un des aspects où il y avait encore une certaine marge de manoeuvre et de flexibilité était la taille du centre d'accueil. Comment pouvez-vous commencer à creuser si vous ne savez pas quelle taille aura l'immeuble?

M. Rob Wright:

Je vais faire deux remarques, puis je céderai la parole à Mme Garrett pour plus de détails. Le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est un élément important de la vision et du plan à long terme depuis un certain temps et il fait partie des documents publics depuis probablement plus d'une décennie, je dirais. Nous avons fait des efforts pour communiquer cela aux parlementaires et au grand public. Nous pourrions peut-être faire de meilleurs efforts à cet égard. Nous avons un rapport annuel qui est affiché sur notre site Web, et ce centre y est décrit comme étant une priorité.

En ce qui concerne l'excavation, la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs aura une empreinte importante, peu importe ce qu'il contient. Il y a toutefois une certaine marge de manoeuvre qui nous permettra de nous assurer que sa taille sera appropriée, compte tenu de l'engagement pris auprès du Parlement.

Je cède la parole à Mme Garrett.

(1220)

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis désolé, je n'ai toujours pas entendu de réponse. S'il y a encore une certaine flexibilité quant à la taille du trou, comment pouvez-vous commencer à le creuser? C'est tout. Comment savoir jusqu'où creuser si l'on ignore la taille du trou qui doit être creusé? Vous me dites que la taille exacte reste encore à déterminer, mais nous allons quand même de l'avant et nous commençons à creuser. J'ai juste besoin que l'on m'aide à comprendre cela.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je pourrais peut-être apporter quelques précisions.

Pour ce qui est de creuser le trou, vous avez raison de dire qu'il est important, dans le cadre d'un appel d'offres, de donner à l'entrepreneur retenu une idée de la taille que devra avoir ce trou. Je pense que dans le contexte des observations qui ont été faites plus tôt et de celles que j'ai formulées tout à l'heure au sujet des décisions à plusieurs niveaux...

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

... la taille de ce trou est d'une importance capitale.

Ensuite, en ce qui concerne les autres observations qui ont été faites, ce qui sera mis dans ce centre deviendra tout aussi important que le reste, mais cette décision pourra être prise à une date ultérieure lorsqu'on en saura un peu plus et que les consultations seront plus avancées.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous obtenons...

Allez-y.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Pour répondre à la question plus précisément, c'est-à-dire pour gérer ce risque en fonction de la situation où nous sommes, nous avons des options. Nous pouvons commencer à creuser le trou en faisant des hypothèses sur la taille minimale qu'il devrait avoir.

Pour revenir au moment où nous nous sommes rencontrés au sujet de l'orme, l'une des choses que le Comité nous a demandé d'envisager, c'est de faire avancer les travaux d'excavation pour que nous puissions replanter les terrains d'agrément de l'édifice de l'Est le plus tôt possible, et c'est quelque chose que nous sommes en train d'examiner.

Mais quelle est la taille de l'empreinte minimale dont nous savons que nous avons besoin pour commencer à creuser ce trou en toute quiétude et qui nous permettra de faire avancer la conversation lorsque le Parlement reprendra? Cela dit, certaines des premières décisions et certains des premiers engagements que nous essayons d'obtenir portent sur des choses que nous avons présentées ici aujourd'hui, comme les salles de comité, ce qui, en fin de compte, pourrait avoir une incidence sur les décisions relatives à l'ampleur du trou, par exemple.

Je peux continuer d'essayer de clarifier cela. J'essaie de répondre directement à votre question.

M. David Christopherson:

Permettez-moi de le répéter dans mes propres mots et de voir si j'ai bien compris.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Bien sûr.

Le président:

Rapidement, David.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, je serai aussi rapide que possible, mais je dois être clair.

Il y a une taille minimale, mais vous allez creuser de toute manière, et une fois que vous aurez commencé, vous aurez la possibilité de l'agrandir ou non, selon les décisions qui seront prises au sujet des salles de comité et de l'emplacement de ces salles. On dirait que vous pouvez commencer à creuser sans connaître la taille définitive, parce que vous connaissez une taille minimale et que cela ne change rien au début des travaux. Est-ce que je commence à comprendre?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

La réponse à cette question est oui, reconnaissant que cela rend l'aspect contractuel un peu plus complexe, mais c'est gérable. Il s'agit d'un programme très vaste et très complexe, et c'est pour cela que nous sommes là, c'est-à-dire pour gérer ce genre de risques.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Le président:

Je suppose que toutes les places de stationnement seront équipées de bornes de recharge électriques.

Madame Sahota, c'est à vous.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Mon assistante législative, Caroline, est incroyable. Elle a vécu en Europe pendant un certain temps. Elle vient de m'informer que dans bon nombre de projets d'excavation, les archéologues sont sur place au cas où il y aurait des découvertes intéressantes à faire. Étant donné l'ampleur du trou qu'il faudra creuser pour ce projet, il se peut que l'on tombe sur des artefacts historiques.

Y a-t-il des archéologues impliqués dans ce projet?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Absolument, il y en a. En fait, nous avons trouvé des choses intéressantes.

À l'heure actuelle, si vous vous promenez sur les terrains d'agrément de l'édifice de l'Est et que vous regardez à travers la clôture, vous allez voir qu'une fouille archéologique assez importante est en cours. Ils ont découvert de vieux baraquements et des postes de garde. Parce qu'il y a un potentiel d'artefacts sur la Colline, nous avons cartographié l'impact potentiel des travaux et nous avons répertorié les endroits où les probabilités de trouver des artefacts sont élevées, moyennes ou faibles. Avant de faire quoi que ce soit — par exemple, construire une connexion avec l'édifice de l'Est ou aménager un chemin de construction en surface —, nous devons nous plier à notre programme d'évaluation afin de déterminer s'il existe des ressources archéologiques. Le cas échéant, nous devons les excaver complètement et les documenter en bonne et due forme.

S'il y a d'autres renseignements que le Comité aimerait avoir sur ce que nous avons trouvé et sur notre approche à cet égard, nous serons heureux de les lui transmettre. Chez Centrus, nous disposons d'un grand savoir-faire et d'excellentes ressources en matière d'archéologie.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais en savoir plus sur ce que vous allez trouver. Je trouve cela fascinant. Ces découvertes devraient assurément être mises en valeur — peut-être dans le centre d'accueil. Les gens pourraient venir pour en apprendre davantage au sujet de ces artéfacts et pour mieux comprendre notre histoire.

Puisqu'il s'agit d'un territoire algonquin non cédé, y a-t-il eu des consultations avec les Algonquins?

(1225)

M. Rob Wright:

À l'heure actuelle, comme vous le savez peut-être, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec des organismes autochtones nationaux et avec les Algonquins afin de voir comment il serait possible de transformer l'ancienne ambassade américaine en un espace autochtone national.

À l'heure actuelle, nous travaillons presque quotidiennement avec ces groupes — y compris avec la nation algonquine — sur toute une variété de choses en plus du projet du 100, rue Wellington. Nous cherchons des occasions de renforcer nos capacités et de passer des marchés afin d'accroître la participation de ces peuples aux travaux qui se déroulent dans la Cité parlementaire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai une question sur l'édifice de l'Ouest, puis sur la façon dont cela est lié aux entrées de l'édifice du Centre.

Pourquoi les grandes entrées principales de l'édifice de l'Ouest sont-elles fermées à clé la plupart du temps? Pourquoi ne sont-elles pas utilisées comme entrées de tous les jours pour les députés? Par exemple, les entrées à double porte sur les côtés et l'entrée de la tour Mackenzie sont toutes fermées.

Est-ce quelque chose à laquelle on peut s'attendre à l'édifice du Centre? Nous sera-t-il désormais impossible de passer sous le clocher? Y aura-t-il des trajets secondaires pour tout le monde? Ou devrons-nous passer par le centre d'accueil au bas de l'escalier? Comment envisage-t-on cela?

M. Stéphan Aubé (dirigeant principal de l'information, Chambre des communes):

Il est certain qu'à l'avenir, l'objectif est de rendre ces installations accessibles aux députés et aux visiteurs, de leur en donner l'accès. Dans le contexte de l'édifice de l'Ouest, l'entrée de la tour Mackenzie et l'entrée du Président — ce sont les entrées principales sur les côtés — sont, pour l'instant, réservées aux députés et aux visiteurs d'autres pays. Par exemple, c'est ce qu'on a pu voir avec le président croate, qui était ici cette semaine. Nous réservons ces entrées pour ces personnes. Les autres entrées sont pour le personnel, les députés et l'administration.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Existe-t-il des plans semblables pour l'édifice du Centre? Auparavant, les portes de l'édifice du Centre étaient ouvertes à tous les députés, et si le personnel les accompagnait, il pouvait les utiliser également.

M. Michel Patrice:

Je dois admettre que nous n'avons pas regardé aussi loin en avant, mais je présume que l'intention est de permettre aux députés et au personnel de continuer d'utiliser ces portes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais dire que...

M. Michel Patrice:

Ce qui nous préoccupe, ce sont plutôt les visiteurs, sécurité oblige, mais...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais...

M. Michel Patrice:

... je crois bien que nous allons devoir nous pencher là-dessus, mais à mon avis, les députés et le personnel parlementaire pourront continuer d'utiliser ces portes du rez-de-chaussée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je l'espère parce que je crois qu'il y avait un sentiment spécial au fait d'entrer par ces portes, et qu'une partie de ce sentiment a disparu depuis que nous sommes ici, dans l'édifice de l'Ouest. C'est un bel immeuble, mais j'espère que nous pourrons continuer d'utiliser certaines de ces entrées.

J'aimerais donner le reste de mon temps de parole à Linda.

M'en reste-t-il?

Le président:

Non, votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Reid, nous vous écoutons.

M. Scott Reid:

Le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est l'objet de presque toutes mes préoccupations.

Quand il s'agit de questions comme l'installation de cages d'ascenseur dans les cours intérieures actuelles de l'édifice du Centre, à première vue, je pense que cela a du bon sens.

Mes préoccupations concernent entièrement le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs et sa taille colossale. C'est vraiment énorme. Cela va coûter très cher. À cet endroit, le sous-sol, c'est de la roche. Je ne sais pas si c'est du granit, du grès ou du calcaire.

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre le saurait?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

C'est une bonne couche de roche.

M. Scott Reid:

Il y en a beaucoup, oui. Pour ce qui est de l'archéologie, je me suis dit, eh bien, il ne faut pas creuser très profondément pour qu'il n'y ait plus de possibilités de ce côté-là. Il peut y avoir des possibilités sur le plan paléontologique. Je ne sais pas.

Quoi qu'il en soit, voilà ce qu'il faut retenir. Une fois que les travaux seront commencés, une fois que les contrats auront été attribués pour commencer à creuser — ce qui est prévu avant les élections ou du moins, en partie avant les élections —, on aura par la force des choses dépensé beaucoup d'argent qu'il nous sera impossible de récupérer. Plus l'empreinte est grande, plus l'espace auquel nous souscrivons est grand, même si nous n'avons pas de consensus sur ce que cet espace devrait contenir.

Je peux vous dire que je m'oppose vigoureusement à certaines des choses que vous proposez. Par exemple, je ne suis pas d'accord pour que la Bibliothèque du Parlement, qui est, je suppose, un musée, y soit aménagée. Je ne dis pas que nous ne devrions pas avoir un musée d'histoire parlementaire. En tant qu'historien, j'adore l'idée. C'est juste qu'il y a beaucoup d'autres bâtiments qui pourraient faire l'affaire. Il n'est pas nécessaire de l'attacher à l'édifice du Centre.

Il n'est pas nécessaire que les salles où il sera possible d'observer les procédures parlementaires quand il y aura débordement soient souterraines. Si nous pensons qu'une telle chose va se produire, nous pouvons installer d'autres sièges ailleurs. Pour en revenir au modèle de Westminster, le Parlement avait traditionnellement des salles polyvalentes. Westminster Hall étant la plus en vue et la plus impressionnante d'entre elles, et cela remonte à presque 1 000 ans.

Pour ce qui est de la sécurité, nous avons déjà un endroit par où les gens devront entrer. Nous pourrions aménager un deuxième endroit, mais celui que nous avons est conçu pour maximiser la sécurité. Il est bien conçu et il remplit bien sa fonction. C'est à l'extérieur des bâtiments.

Maintenant, en ce qui concerne l'accès à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat, disons d'entrée de jeu que les choses sont un peu plus compliquées pour le Sénat. En revanche, pour la Chambre des communes, le tunnel illustré en gris à l'ouest de l'édifice du Centre pourrait être un moyen d'accéder aux aires d'observation. Il n'est donc pas nécessaire de faire passer cela devant, sous terre. Ce qui signifie qu'il serait possible de rejoindre cet accès souterrain sans toucher à la pelouse avant.

Dans vos propres plans, il y a de la place sur le côté et à l'arrière pour d'autres pavillons. C'est quelque chose qui pourrait être controversé. Je suppose que ceux-là sont en surface, mais nous n'avons pas eu la chance d'établir si c'était moins intrusif ou de savoir ce que le public en pense. Je n'avais littéralement jamais entendu parler de cette possibilité avant aujourd'hui.

Je sais que vous avez ouvert une petite allée le long du belvédère, et j'ai une raison sentimentale personnelle de vouloir que ce passage reste ouvert pendant les prochaines années. Pour tout dire, c'est l'endroit où j'ai embrassé ma femme pour la première fois, mais pour les nombreuses autres personnes qui n'ont pas cet attachement sentimental particulier, la pelouse avant est évidemment plus importante.

Le plaisir de voir le côté, c'est-à-dire là où se trouvent les édifices supplémentaires du Sénat... Cela pourrait se faire.

En ce qui concerne les salles des comités de la Chambre des communes, aucune d'entre elles ne devrait être souterraine — c'est-à-dire sous ce qui est maintenant la pelouse avant — parce que nous avons un grand nombre d'autres salles à notre disposition. Tout au long de ma vie — et j'ai plus d'un demi-siècle et j'ai toujours vécu à Ottawa —, le centre des congrès, ce qui est maintenant le Sénat, a été là comme un grand trou noir vide. Il est enfin utilisé. Maintenant qu'il a été remis en état, nous pourrions utiliser certains de ses locaux pour les audiences des comités.

En ce qui concerne le 1, rue Wellington, l'ancien tunnel ferroviaire qui fait l'objet d'une remise en état, je sais que nous avons un bail à durée limitée — je crois que vous avez dit qu'il prenait fin en 2034 —, mais il s'agit d'un bail entre nous et la CCN. Nous pouvons utiliser ces locaux en permanence, et ce sont de belles salles. Je pense donc que nous pouvons facilement augmenter le nombre de salles pour les comités. Dans l'édifice Macdonald, ces pièces pourraient être polyvalentes et devenir des salles pour les comités — ou du moins certaines d'entre elles, celles qui sont à l'étage.

Voyez-vous où je veux en venir? Il y a beaucoup d'espaces que nous pouvons utiliser pour toutes ces choses sans avoir à recourir aux scénarios les plus intrusifs, les plus coûteux et à ceux dont les délais sont les moins précis.

Je sais que j'ai épuisé tout mon temps de parole, monsieur le président, mais je dirai, pour ma part seulement, qu'à mon avis, l'absolu... J'aimerais que la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs soit mise en veilleuse jusqu'à ce que vous ayez le consentement de la Chambre des communes, même si cela veut dire qu'on perdra une saison de construction. C'est quelque chose qui me tient à coeur. Si ce projet de loi est adopté avant les prochaines élections et que nous avons dépensé beaucoup d'argent avant le retour de la Chambre, je sais que je vais me sentir mal à l'aise, et ce, quel que soit le parti au pouvoir.

(1230)

Le président:

Merci.

Personnellement, je ne suis pas d'accord avec vous, mais j'en resterai là.

Il y a encore beaucoup d'intervenants sur la liste.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle est la situation en ce qui concerne l'orme?

M. Rob Wright:

Je vais céder la parole à Mme Garrett dans un instant. Comme vous le savez, nous étions ici il y a quelque temps...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous le savons très bien.

M. Rob Wright:

Nous avons eu une bonne discussion à ce sujet. Comme nous l'avons expliqué, l'orme devait être abattu. Le bois est entreposé en ce moment et, une fois qu'il sera durci, il pourra servir à un usage parlementaire futur; c'est le sculpteur du Dominion qui en décidera, en consultation avec le Parlement. Nous collaborons également avec l'Université de Guelph pour faire pousser quelques petits arbrisseaux. Je crois que le taux de survie de ces arbrisseaux était assez faible, ce qui en dit long sur la santé de l'arbre lui-même.

Je cède la parole à Mme Garrett, qui vous donnera plus de détails.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Merci, monsieur Wright.

M. Wright a fait le tour de la question. J'ajouterais seulement que, compte tenu de la santé de l'arbre, nous avons prélevé une centaine de brindilles — les meilleures que l'arboriculteur a pu trouver. Nous les avons envoyées à l'Université de Guelph, et les chercheurs ont choisi les 50 meilleures pour essayer de les propager. Parmi ces 50 arbrisseaux, seulement 10 ont survécu au processus de propagation. Il y a donc 10 arbrisseaux qui poussent dans une serre de l'université et lorsqu'ils seront assez solides, ils seront transférés à l'extérieur, puis retournés sur les lieux, le moment venu.

(1235)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci.

Avant la fin de ma dernière intervention, je vous ai posé des questions sur les tunnels. Si vous retournez à la diapositive 17, qui montre la circulation proposée pour les parlementaires, je me demande s'il y a lieu de fournir un accès entre l'édifice de l'Est et celui de l'Ouest afin que nous n'ayons pas à faire un détour. Il me semble que les lignes mauves devraient se croiser, à moins que vous vouliez que nous passions par les tunnels de marchandises.

Comme il ne me reste pas beaucoup de temps, je vais céder la parole à Mme Lapointe dans un instant.

À mesure que nous démantelons l'édifice du Centre, avons-nous eu droit à de vraies surprises?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je dirais que nous n'avons pas eu de surprises, mais il y a une chose qui nous a déçus. Nous espérions que les puits à l'intérieur de l'édifice suffiraient pour supporter, par exemple, les systèmes mécaniques et électriques... Ils sont plus petits que nous l'avions prévu, ce qui nous oblige à trouver de nouvelles solutions. Nous en sommes encore à déterminer les substances désignées dans l'édifice.

La discussion la plus intéressante portera sur les travaux structurels et les évaluations que nous effectuons à l'heure actuelle. C'est lié à l'une des décisions qu'il faudra prendre prochainement, c'est-à-dire comment nous envisageons de renforcer la résistance de l'édifice aux séismes. Il y a certaines possibilités concernant l'isolation de la fondation, ce qui nous permettrait de sauver une bonne partie de la hiérarchie patrimoniale de l'édifice et la structure située au-dessus du sous-sol.

Il n'y a pas eu de surprises, étant donné qu'il s'agit d'un très ancien édifice qui nécessite une modernisation de très grande envergure. Cela dit, le tout vous permet de faire une planification beaucoup plus détaillée de la conception et de l'établissement des coûts du programme, et c'est sur quoi nous travaillons en ce moment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous n'avez pas découvert des dispositifs d'écoute dans les murs ou des sacs remplis d'argent derrière les structures ou quelque chose de ce genre?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Il n'y a rien eu de tel, du moins jusqu'à maintenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question avant de céder la parole. Quand serai-je expulsé de mon bureau à l'édifice de la Confédération?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

C'est une bonne question.

M. Rob Wright:

Voilà un autre point dont il faudra discuter avec le Parlement dans le cadre de la stratégie générale du complexe. La restauration majeure de l'édifice de la Confédération exigera des locaux transitoires. Nous planifions l'aménagement d'installations pour la Chambre et le Sénat, à côté de l'ancienne ambassade des États-Unis pour appuyer la restauration de l'édifice de la Confédération, ainsi que de l'édifice de l'Est. Ces installations ne sont pas encore conçues, et elles sont loin d'être construites. Il faudrait attendre jusqu'au milieu de l'année 2025 ou au-delà.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'il me reste du temps, j'aimerais le céder à Mme Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Me reste-t-il du temps de parole?

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

En aurai-je d'autre plus tard?

Le président:

Oui.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord. Je vais attendre à plus tard dans ce cas.

Le président:

Vous passerez après M. Christopherson.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si Mme Lapointe préfère attendre, je vais continuer une minute.[Traduction]

La Cour suprême participe-t-elle à la vision et au plan à long terme? Je sais qu'il y a eu des pourparlers sur la rénovation de cet édifice également.

M. Rob Wright:

La restauration complète de l'édifice de la Cour suprême fait partie des plans. Les locaux transitoires pour cette installation se trouvent dans l'édifice commémoratif de l'Ouest. Cela s'inscrit dans la vision et le plan à long terme, du point de vue des principes de planification, mais pas du point de vue de la mise en oeuvre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez mentionné brièvement l'ancienne ambassade des États-Unis. Est-ce que ce sera également un endroit pour les locaux transitoires, ou s'agit-il seulement de...?

M. Rob Wright:

Ce sera un espace permanent, composé d'une partie adjacente, le long de la rue Sparks, l'objectif étant de créer un espace national permanent pour les peuples autochtones.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez trois minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai promis à ma fille de vous poser une petite question. J'allais le faire en privé, mais j'ai changé d'avis. Je crois connaître la réponse, mais je vais vous poser la question quand même.

Prévoit-on rétablir le sanctuaire des chats qui était là avant la fermeture de l'édifice de l'Ouest?

Je dois avouer que le fait d'aller voir les chats était ce que ma fille préférait lorsqu'elle venait sur la Colline du Parlement. C'est cool comme tradition.

M. Rob Wright:

C'était ce que préférait ma grand-mère aussi.

M. David Christopherson:

Voilà. Vous voyez?

M. Rob Wright:

Je crois qu'à ce stade-ci, rien n'est prévu pour le rétablir, pour autant que je sache.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bien ce que je pensais, mais cela aurait été merveilleux si on le rétablissait. Je vous laisse y réfléchir. Il y a peut-être des gens créatifs.

J'aimerais faire une observation, puis poser une question.

Je suis vraiment heureux de savoir, pour la première fois, comment vous examinez la Cité parlementaire différemment. À l'heure actuelle, en toute honnêteté, nous avons affaire à un parlement à la Frankenstein. Depuis les 15 ans que je suis sur la Colline, nous avons ajouté une salle de comité et des bureaux ici et là. Le tout se tient au moyen d'un ruban adhésif et de fils métalliques. Cela n'a aucun sens quand on tient compte du déroulement des travaux. Je suis donc ravi d'apprendre que nous allons nous éloigner de cette situation absurde, prendre du recul et examiner toutes les installations à mesure qu'elles commencent à devenir un complexe intégré, sans oublier l'idée que nous devrons peut-être rester à l'extérieur de la Colline, alors que ce n'était pas le cas avant. À mes débuts au Parlement, tout était beau et propre sur la Colline. J'en suis donc content.

Je partage certaines des préoccupations que M. Reid a soulevées au sujet du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Lorsque vous fournirez au Comité la liste des décisions et des échéances, je suppose que cet aspect en fera partie; il y aura sans doute une sous-section détaillée qui décrira la situation actuelle des travaux liés au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs en ce qui concerne les décisions qui sont déjà prises et qui n'ont pas besoin d'être revues, par rapport à celles qui n'ont pas encore été prises, et vous pourriez également prévoir quand et comment ces décisions seront prises. Je vous invite donc à inclure cette information dans le rapport que vous nous remettrez.

(1240)

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est noté.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous n'arrêtez pas de dire « c'est noté ». Je suppose que c'est votre façon de dire oui.

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très bien. Merci.

Le président:

Madame Lapointe, la parole est à vous. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je veux revenir sur certaines choses que plusieurs parlementaires et moi avons abordées et au sujet desquelles je n'ai toujours pas l'impression d'avoir eu une réponse claire.

Quand vous êtes venus la première fois, le 11 décembre dernier, vous avez dit que la réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre visait « à protéger et honorer le patrimoine de l'édifice [...] à appuyer le travail des parlementaires, à répondre à l'évolution des besoins de l'institution, à améliorer l'expérience des visiteurs et à moderniser l'infrastructure de l'édifice. »

Je suis très préoccupée par le volet des parlementaires.

Le 19 mars, vous nous avez dit que le Bureau de régie interne mettrait sur pied un groupe de travail. Nous sommes revenus plusieurs fois à la charge pour savoir qui serait impliqué dans ce groupe de travail, mais je n'ai encore entendu parler d'aucun parlementaire. Par contre, dernièrement, nous avons été consultés au sujet de l'abattage d'un orme. Puisque le Parlement ne siégera probablement pas avant le mois de janvier, qui sera consulté si des décisions doivent être prises d'ici là sur les prochaines étapes?

M. Michel Patrice:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous aurons un groupe de travail composé de trois personnes. Jusqu'à présent, j'ai reçu deux noms et je préfère attendre d'avoir le troisième avant...

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il ne reste que cinq semaines.

M. Michel Patrice:

Je devrais recevoir le troisième nom d'ici la fin de cette semaine.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Nous avons été consultés pour l'abattage d'un arbre. Or, il y a selon moi des décisions à prendre qui sont beaucoup plus importantes que l'abattage d'un arbre.

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Cela dit, je demande pardon à ceux qui tiennent beaucoup aux arbres.

Je pense à des questions comme à quel moment décider du nombre de députés, l'établissement ou non d'une chambre de débat parallèle ou encore la nécessité d'une excavation — mon collègue a dit tantôt que c'était du roc, ici, sous l'édifice.

En passant, vous ne me réconfortez pas, car je n'ai pas obtenu la réponse que je voulais.

Quand vous avez rénové l'édifice de l'Ouest, vous avez dû excaver du roc puisqu'il n'y a que cela sous le bâtiment. Vous dites maintenant que vous allez devoir excaver devant l'édifice du Centre. Qu'avez appris des travaux d'excavation que vous avez menés ici? Quelles sont les meilleures pratiques que vous avez apprises ici et que vous allez pouvoir appliquer à vos travaux sur l'édifice du Centre?

M. Michel Patrice:

J'ai espoir que les membres du groupe de travail pourront se rencontrer au retour de la prochaine pause. Pour l'instant, les leaders de chacun des partis de la Chambre ont désigné des députés pour siéger à ce groupe de travail, tel que décidé le Bureau de régie interne.

On a entendu leurs préoccupations générales et particulières des membres du Comité. Le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera l'un des sujets abordés de façon prioritaire, avant l'ajournement en juin. Les discussions vont commencer et on dressera une liste des questions ou préoccupations dont les parlementaires auront fait part au groupe de travail, qui fera ensuite rapport au Bureau de régie interne, qui le présentera dès que possible à ce comité.

Pour ce qui est des leçons apprises à la suite des travaux de construction à l'édifice de l'Ouest, je vais laisser M. Wright vous en parler.

(1245)

[Traduction]

M. Rob Wright:

De nombreuses leçons ont été tirées, et je crois que nous pourrions avoir une conversation approfondie à ce sujet. Il y en aurait deux qui seraient utiles et très importantes dans le contexte de la discussion d'aujourd'hui.

La première leçon concerne, comme Mme Garrett l'a mentionné, l'approche décisionnelle à plusieurs niveaux et la nécessité de mettre l'accent sur les éléments sur lesquels nous pouvons nous entendre et d'y donner suite. Cela se prête à une mise en œuvre progressive. En plein milieu des travaux liés à l'édifice de l'Ouest, nous avons commencé à changer de vitesse grâce à notre collaboration avec Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada et la Chambre des communes. Nous allons appliquer pleinement cette leçon aux travaux de l'édifice du Centre.

Voilà donc l'approche progressive, qui consiste vraiment à mettre l'accent, d'abord et avant tout, sur les éléments structurels que nous pouvons déterminer avec la plus grande clarté, tôt dans le processus, et ensuite, une fois que nous avons tiré au clair la fonctionnalité, il s'agit de concentrer nos efforts, du point de vue de la construction, sur les zones qui doivent être parfaites pour le fonctionnement du Parlement. L'enceinte est peut-être l'endroit le plus évident, de même que les salles de comités. Ainsi, ces endroits devraient être remis en état en premier, puis cédés à la Chambre des communes, qui assume la responsabilité technique en matière de TI et de télédiffusion. Les éléments liés à la construction de l'édifice et tous les éléments essentiels en matière de TI devraient être terminés en même temps, au lieu d'être échelonnés, comme nous le faisions auparavant dans le cadre des projets. Quant aux édifices Wellington et de la Bravoure, les travaux seraient réalisés par étapes. Nous pensons pouvoir gagner du temps et améliorer la qualité grâce à une approche plus progressive. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

J'ai encore des questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Permettez-moi de poser une brève question. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Le 19 mars dernier, lorsque vous êtes venu au Comité, vous avez dit que 20 % du processus de déclassement était déjà fait. Aujourd'hui, le 14 mai, à quel pourcentage en est-on? [Traduction]

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je crois que le pourcentage de 20 % se rapportait au processus de déclassement. Nous en sommes maintenant à environ 40 %. Nous sommes en bonne voie de terminer les activités de déclassement d'ici août 2019 afin de pouvoir assurer la transition de retour, de sorte que l'édifice soit transféré des partenaires parlementaires à SPAC. Ensuite, après un roulement très rapide, notre gestionnaire des travaux de construction assumera la garde du site et surveillera le chantier de construction.

Par ailleurs, il faut enlever certains objets clés de l'édifice. Nous avons déplacé une bonne partie des biens mobiliers — des choses comme des artefacts et des meubles —, surtout ceux destinés à appuyer les activités parlementaires, mais il reste quelques biens dans l'édifice, notamment certains artefacts d'une grande importance. Voici un bon exemple: les tableaux de guerre dans la salle du Sénat. Deux des six tableaux ont été décrochés, et les autres le seront à la mi-juin.

Par-dessus tout, du côté de la Chambre des communes, nous procédons au déclassement de l'infrastructure de TI dont est doté l'édifice. Ce travail se poursuit en ce moment même, et le tout progresse bien, mais nous devons terminer le déclassement, ainsi que les activités destinées à isoler l'édifice, pour pouvoir essentiellement le débrancher du réseau électrique. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord, je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à M. Reid, j'aimerais poser une question. Ce point a été soulevé dans le cadre de notre étude sur une Chambre des communes propice à la vie familiale, et je crois que nous en avons également parlé lors d'une de vos comparutions devant notre comité. Il s'agit de la proposition d'envisager, entre autres, de créer une aire de jeux ou un terrain de jeux, soit à l'extérieur — quelque part dans la cour, comme M. Reid l'a proposé —, soit à l'intérieur. A-t-on réfléchi à cette possibilité?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Nater, un peu de respect, je vous prie.

Voilà un long silence.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je peux essayer de répondre.

Un de nos objectifs est de rendre le Parlement plus propice à la vie familiale. Nous avons pris connaissance des exigences de nos partenaires parlementaires pour veiller à ce que les parlementaires puissent compter sur ce soutien lorsqu'ils sont occupés avec leur famille.

En ce qui concerne le terrain de jeux extérieur, honnêtement, il faudrait que je vérifie les exigences du programme fonctionnel, mais pour ce qui est de l'intérieur de l'édifice, je sais que nous avons reçu des directives pour un espace amélioré et favorable à la vie familiale dans un environnement accessible à tous, et nous nous efforcerons de faire en sorte que ces espaces soient situés aux endroits appropriés dans l'édifice.

(1250)

M. Stéphan Aubé:

Il y a déjà eu des discussions sur les aires de jeux possibles à l'extérieur. Nous avons pris en compte la zone d'accueil des visiteurs à côté de l'édifice de l'Ouest, mais ce n'est pas encore confirmé. Comme vous pouvez le constater, nous sommes en train de discuter, en premier lieu, de la circulation à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de l'édifice.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vous avez la parole.

M. John Nater:

Très brièvement, certains d'entre nous ont de jeunes enfants. Je dis à la blague que ma fille sera élue députée d'ici notre retour à l'édifice du Centre, alors ce ne sera plus pertinent. En tout cas, ce serait bien si, dans le cadre des discussions, ceux qui ont actuellement de jeunes enfants pouvaient être consultés ou avoir leur mot à dire.

Ma famille était sur la Colline la semaine dernière, et les enfants ont passé un bon moment sur la pelouse, devant le Parlement, à faire des bulles et à courir. C'était très amusant. Nous n'avons pas une telle occasion en hiver, alors il serait intéressant de consulter ceux d'entre nous, au Comité et au Parlement, qui ont de jeunes enfants en ce moment.

Le président:

J'ai moi-même deux enfants âgés de 6 et 10 ans.

Monsieur Reid, vous êtes le suivant sur la liste. Comme Mme Kusie n'a pas encore pris la parole, vous pourriez peut-être partager votre temps avec elle. Cela dit, qu'aimeriez-vous faire avec votre motion? Vouliez-vous que nous nous en occupions aujourd'hui ou à une autre réunion?

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je crois qu'il serait préférable de reporter la motion à une autre réunion. Il y a encore des questions en suspens. Je sais que je ne suis pas le seul à avoir d'autres questions à poser, et nous avons tous ces témoins parmi nous, alors c'est l'occasion pour nous de les interroger.

Le président:

D'accord. Voulez-vous céder la parole à Mme Kusie, ou préférez-vous intervenir en premier?

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que cela vous dérange si j'y vais en premier?

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais soulever deux points. Je tiens d'abord à insister sur un secteur dans lequel j'admire vraiment le travail que vous avez réalisé: votre mise à niveau séismique du présent édifice pour qu'il soit résistant aux tremblements de terre. Il ne l'était clairement pas avant que vous entamiez vos travaux, alors je vous félicite. Je suis bien conscient des défis qui touchent l'édifice du Centre à cet égard, et même si j'aime qu'on économise sur bien des choses, je ne vous demande pas de le faire sur ce point.

Je pense que le problème fondamental auquel vous êtes tous confrontés est que vos partenaires parlementaires, comme vous décrivez les divers groupes qui vous font des soumissions, ne vous ont pas fait part de leurs besoins. Ils vous ont donné une liste de souhaits, ce qui n'est pas tout à fait la même chose. C'est la différence entre ce qu'on aimerait avoir et ce que les économistes qualifient d'offre et de demande.

Au bout du compte, la demande est ce que je veux avoir et ce pour quoi je suis prêt à payer. Aucun d'entre nous n'a arrêté les choix difficiles. Je ne dis pas que vous faites des choix difficiles; nous n'avons pas arrêté de choix difficiles. Nous vous imposons le travail d'arbitrage, dans une large mesure, et c'est profondément injuste. Je peux voir que vous essayez de vous acquitter de cette tâche et de répondre aux besoins de tous.

Nous devons vous donner des lignes directrices plus claires, alors j'espère que ce que j'ai dit jusqu'à présent n'est pas perçu comme une critique de Travaux publics, des architectes ou de l'Administration de la Chambre. Au contraire, c'est plutôt une critique du processus auquel nous participons, et nous devons nous reprendre en main.

Changement de sujet, je conclus que l'idée d'un espace pour mettre des locaux temporaires à côté de l'ancienne ambassade des États-Unis n'a été approuvée par personne. Je pense que c'est une bonne idée. À l'heure actuelle, c'est un espace inutilisé, un stationnement où on ne se gare même plus. Il y a vraiment lieu d'y créer un espace qu'on pourrait utiliser et, à long terme, le défaut évident du bâtiment actuel est qu'il est trop petit pour un musée de l'histoire et du patrimoine autochtones. C'est impossible qu'il soit suffisamment grand. Les locaux temporaires pourraient être utiles à cet égard.

Je dois vous poser une question: selon vous, combien de temps faudra-t-il pour que soit rempli le gros trou — comme vous l'avez appelé — à l'endroit où l'on construira le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs? Nous savons que les travaux commenceront en septembre 2019. Quand sera-t-il remblayé et à quel moment le sol serait-il recouvert et prêt à être utilisé?

M. Rob Wright:

Je pense que cela nous ramène à une des questions que nous nous posions. Si le Parlement voulait hâter l'ouverture du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, grosso modo, pour lui accorder la priorité et libérer la pelouse en vue de reprendre les opérations et fonctions normales à cet endroit, ce serait différent d'un scénario dans lequel on voudrait que le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs et l'édifice du Centre rouvrent leurs portes la même journée. Nous pourrions nous pencher sur ces deux scénarios. Si on souhaitait accorder la priorité au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, ce serait sur une période plus courte.

(1255)

M. Scott Reid:

Je présume que si la construction de la phase 2 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est votre priorité, c'est que les travaux en cours à l'édifice du Centre pendant les deux premières années ne sont pas les travaux structurels importants qu'il faudra effectuer plus tard. Il faut déterminer les objets qui s'y trouvent et les enlever. Vous essayez de faire plusieurs choses à la fois. Je présume que c'est votre logique.

Si on entamait des travaux sur le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs ou des parties de celui-ci à une date ultérieure, ce qui nous permettrait de déterminer ce qui devrait ou non s'y trouver, pourrait-on réduire la durée de la période pendant laquelle il y aura un trou dans le sol à l'emplacement du Centre ou la superficie sur laquelle se fera l'excavation à n'importe quel moment, ou une combinaison des deux? C'est-à-dire, pourra-t-on faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait pas de travaux d'excavation dans une section de l'empreinte pendant toute la période ou une partie de celle-ci et potentiellement réduire la période d'excavation pour l'ensemble ou une partie du projet.

J'ai formulé ma question de telle façon qu'il est difficile d'y répondre, mais je vous laisse y penser.

M. Rob Wright:

Pour être bien clair en ce qui concerne l'édifice du Centre, d'importants travaux de démolition intérieure débuteront cet automne. Il ne s'agit pas de la construction d'espaces particuliers, mais bien de la démolition de plaques de plancher spacieuses. Quoi que vous décidiez, c'est la façon de procéder. Cela nous convient. Ensuite, l'excavation du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs doit se faire simultanément. Je crois comprendre ce qui s'en vient pour avoir entendu au moins certains membres du Comité en parler: le fait d'attendre pourrait réduire l'empreinte et permettre de réaliser des économies, ce qui est admirable. Parallèlement, l'attente coûte cher. Il est très important que les membres du Comité en soient aussi conscients. Plus nous attendons, plus nous dépensons de l'argent. Il faut tenir compte des deux côtés du bilan.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup à vous tous. Je vous en sais gré.

Le président:

Je tiens moi aussi à vous remercier tous.

Il nous reste bien des questions et des réunions. Un autre comité s'en vient dans cette pièce.

Soyez très bref, monsieur de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai juste une question brève à poser.

Consulte-t-on les médias pour s'assurer qu'il n'y a pas d'endroit comme la Salle des dépêches encore une fois?

M. Michel Patrice:

Cela fait partie du plan.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Christopherson dans un moment.

Pour votre information, jeudi, pendant la première heure de notre réunion, le ministre nous parlera du Budget principal des dépenses en ce qui concerne la Commission des débats des chefs. La seconde heure sera libre, peut-être pour ce que M. Christopherson fera. Ensuite, au cours de la première réunion après notre retour, nous avons pour l'instant prévu d'examiner l'ébauche du rapport sur les chambres de débat parallèle. À un moment donné, il nous faudra revenir à la motion de M. Reid. Et nous devons quitter cette pièce à 13 heures parce qu'il y a un autre comité.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Combien de temps cela me laisse-t-il, monsieur le président? Je n'arrive pas à voir l'horloge.

Le président:

Il reste environ une minute.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est ce que je pensais. Je vais en profiter. Je vous en sais gré. Je n'ai demandé la parole que pour pouvoir officiellement proposer ma motion: « Que le comité soit chargé d'étudier les modifications proposées suivantes au Règlement et en fasse rapport à la Chambre. » Les documents contenant les détails de ces modifications ont été distribués dans les deux langues.

J'ignore dans quelle mesure nous devons en discuter. Je pars, en quelque sorte, du principe que nous avons suffisamment d'appui chez les députés d'arrière-banc pour au moins explorer quantité de travaux qui ont été effectués par de nombreux collègues et y accorder un peu d'attention. J'en fais un peu partie; j'ai surtout proposé des idées au lieu d'avoir été un des principaux acteurs. Mon rôle est simplement d'être membre du Comité. Voilà pourquoi je présente la motion.

J'aimerais qu'on détermine, soit maintenant ou simplement après, ou au début de la prochaine réunion, mais d'une façon ou d'une autre, si l'étude posera problème ou si on peut rapidement traiter cette motion pour faire venir la délégation afin de nous mettre au travail et d'examiner certaines des propositions.

C'est ce que je chercherais à faire par la suite. C'est la réponse qui déterminera à quelle vitesse on peut traiter cette motion et se mettre au travail, ou si nous aurons besoin d'en faire un type de cause célèbre — j'espère qu'il n'en sera rien.

(1300)

Le président:

Nous allons en discuter bientôt, c'est clair, mais pas aujourd'hui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis prêt à voter.

Le président:

Vous êtes prêt à voter.

M. David Christopherson:

Si je peux obtenir gain de cause, j'aimerais qu'on passe au vote maintenant.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, la parole est à vous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que nous avons besoin de temps pour discuter davantage de la motion avant de la mettre aux voix.

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous allons le faire bientôt, monsieur Christopherson.

Merci encore. Espérons que ces bonnes discussions continueront parce que vous nous avez donné aujourd'hui énormément d'excellents renseignements qui nous seront très utiles. Merci beaucoup de l'avoir fait et de nous tenir au courant au fur et à mesure que les choses progressent.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard proc 37283 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 14, 2019

2019-05-07 PROC 153

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 153rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

For members' information, we're sitting in public.

Before we start, related to what we just saw, do you remember when we were discussing parallel chambers and also the elm tree and there was a question about who has the authority? You'll get this notice soon, but I had the researchers look into it and in 1867 when the Constitution was created, there was a transfer to a government department and then at the same time it was placed under the control of the Department of Public Works and Government Services.

You'll get this. It's being translated but I thought it would be interesting for people to know where the authority rested.

The minister can come on Thursday, May 16, related to the main estimates for the Leaders' Debates Commission.

The order of the day is committee business. I've asked the clerk for a short list of potential items of business that the committee discussed, which has been handed out.

These matters have been raised in committee or put on notice in recent weeks. Although there is no obligation for members to put their items forward for today's discussion, I thought it could help guide us in our deliberations.

I open the floor to the committee.

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

I'm not sure if I have to raise a point of order further to the situation with the bells and unfortunately where we had the time allocation vote on the last visit of the minister, but I wanted to bring forward again the motion I had.

I'm not sure. Was it tabled or did we just dismiss it because we were concerned we didn't have enough time to debate it?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

The suggestion was that the committee would come back to it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, I do have another copy of it today here again.

The motion asks that we “continue the study of Security and Intelligence Threats to Elections; that the study consist of five meetings”—since the group didn't like the original 12 meetings I suggested, although I feel there is enough material for that when we cover all aspects of the spectrum from privacy to disinformation, which is the term that Jennifer Ditchburn prefers as indicated at the Policy Options breakfast this morning. I was happy to see our chair Larry Bagnell there.

Although there is not a lot of new information unfortunately but it would consist of five meetings so I think that seems reasonable. I recognize, in the context of the time that's left, it might be hard to fit this in, but five meetings seems enough.

Especially from my meeting with parliamentary secretary Virani it seems as though this would be a service to the government to help them get information. I'm seeing more and more that it's unfortunate the government wasn't able to consider this earlier because I see the solutions being very high level and complex, but perhaps even if we could provide any recommendations or insight, I think the minister would genuinely benefit from it and appreciate it as would, therefore, the government and Canadians, of course, which is the reason we're here.

As I said, it would consist of five meetings and the findings would be reported to the House.

Mr. Chair, thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Just before I open the discussion I want to welcome Mr. Guy Caron to the committee. Just to let committee members know, I spoke in glowing terms of his role as a member of Parliament yesterday in the House. He comports himself very professionally so we like to have him at this committee because the members here are very forward thinking as well. It's great to have you here.

Mr. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NDP):

Thank you.

The Chair:

To open discussion, we have Mr. Nader.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

I don't want to say too much. The motion is self-explanatory. I do think it's important that we, as the PROC committee, undertake the study. Five meetings are reasonable, but I don't think it's a hill that we're going to die on. If there's some flexibility, it would be important.

The one point I want to get on record is that it would be important to hear from at least the chair, if not all five members of the panel that's been created to oversee interference in the upcoming election. Even in the short period of time between when it was announced to today, we've seen a change in membership on that committee based on changes in the people who hold those positions.

There's a new Clerk of the Privy Council, who was the DM for foreign affairs, so it's a new position there as well. It would be important to hear from at least the chair, the Clerk of the Privy Council, if not all five members of the committee. Whether we do that in camera, if that's necessary, I don't think anyone would be opposed to that. At least hearing from the chair and members of the committee would be important, given the context of our being five months away from an election.

(1110)

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I'd like to thank Ms. Kusie for bringing this motion forward. However, we're in the last bit, the final stretch, and we had already gone through these matters. We had extended discussions and debates related to our elections on many occasions, but especially in our consideration of Bill C-76.

I know a lot of that time was filled up with debate unrelated to the matter itself and protecting Canadians, and there was an extended filibuster on that. That would have been an excellent opportunity to extend our study on that, but it's late in the game.

I know there's work already being done by the ethics committee on topics related to this. We've already discussed it and I don't see us getting into this at this particular stage.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I want to confirm, for the discussion of this and any other items that come forward, and I think I'm right in looking at the schedule. We have 11 meetings left, not including today's meeting. One of those is taken up with having the minister, so I believe that's 10 additional meetings.

The Chair:

Half of one would be with the minister.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Fair enough, we have 10 and a half left.

It's probably unlikely that we're going to spend an entire meeting again on the committee schedule, our agenda. Am I right on that? Okay, so we have 10 and a half meetings. For anything we discuss, we should bear that in mind, because the issue now essentially is that one item will crowd another off the list. That is true regardless of which motion we're speaking to, or which subject matter we're speaking to.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I certainly appreciate Mr. Bittle's comments with regard to the discussion and evaluation of topics during Bill C-76. Unfortunately, I was not here for the bulk of it, but I feel as though that was really with regard to the legislation at hand. It was an opportunity to reflect upon, truly, the experts with regard to what I believe is the greatest challenge and the greatest threat facing our democratic institutions in the coming year. I don't think that is outrageous, outlandish or an exaggeration.

I want to be sure that the government is very clear on what it's doing and the message it is sending to Canadians in rejecting such a study. It's very grave. It's very serious. In our committee, this is potentially the greatest responsibility we have to the Canadian public, coming up within the short time frame. To reject a study on this is truly to do a rejection of our due diligence to the integrity of the election.

As a member of Parliament and as a shadow minister for democratic institutions, I don't want to accept that responsibility, that lack of due diligence and evaluation, so I would really ask that the government consider the message that it is sending to Canadians about its seriousness with regard to the integrity of the election in rejecting this motion.

(1115)

The Chair:

Do you have any comment on Mr. Nater's possible proposal that the meetings be in camera?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I would absolutely be open to anything that we can find that will provide us some insight or shed some light. I genuinely believe the government, as in many nations across the world stage, is struggling to find, in this case, concrete legislative solutions, but also solutions in general to a challenge that has a significant effect on society.

Here, specifically, I'm speaking in terms of the integrity of the election, but beyond. I think it could do a great service to not only the integrity of the election but also to the piggybacking of the work, as my colleague Mr. Bittle mentioned at ethics as well. It would only enhance and maybe even confirm some of the work that they have done before us. I believe that's a piece of what they have done over there in regard to the privacy, largely.

Here we deal with matters that are more concrete, more specific, more real life, more immediate, for certain. Again, they have done this work, which I think is good, valuable work, and I have had conversations with the chair, my colleague—my apologies, the name of his riding escapes me right now—as well as other members of the ethics committee, the member for Thornhill, the member for Beaches—East York—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

You can use their names here.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sorry. I appreciate that. I am formal by nature too, David, coming from the diplomatic world.

I feel as though this would—

Mr. Scott Reid:

In all fairness, your name is longer than your riding name, I think.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: You have a middle name, too.

Mr. Scott Reid: I do have a middle name but out of courtesy to my colleagues, I don't share it.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, well, now I'm curious. I'll have to sneak a peek at your driver's licence or passport sometime.

The Chair:

The chair is Mr. Zimmer.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Of course, yes, Mr. Zimmer, since I can refer to him by name.... Thank you.

I generally feel that there would be so much to gain from this in so many dimensions of the public sphere and perhaps the private sphere as well, which, of course, we are not obligated to...but can certainly move towards that.

Again, I would really urge the government to consider this. I think even three or four meetings would provide great benefit if we received good briefing notes from ethics on where they left off. As I said, that's only one dimension of privacy. It doesn't get into the disinformation. Disinformation, I guess, would be the greatest other area for study. I really believe this would be of significant benefit to the government, and it would be a disservice to Canadians, since we have this time, to not look into it.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Do we know exactly what the ethics committee did on this?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I would have to check, but their study was largely related to privacy, as I understand it. I would ask our analysts to expand further if they have any more information specifically regarding the Cambridge Analytica scenario. I think they're doing a lot as well, as I understand it, with the grand committee, which is scheduled to meet, I believe, at the end of May in terms of privacy solutions.

But again, privacy is just one.... I see this as a component of election integrity. When I say “component”, maybe if I had to assign a percentile, it's 20% or 30%. Once you get into disinformation and databases, I would say 20% or 25%. I see it as a component, but I don't see it as the full picture or the full evaluation of what is required to attempt.

Again, I take great responsibility for this even within my own party, within the opposition, doing my own research and making recommendations from our point, but here certainly for Canadians it's a piece of it but it's not the entire picture. I think we owe it, as I said, to Canadians to attempt to get a piece of the bigger picture and attempt to provide the executive of our government with some concrete recommendations and potential solutions insofar as the time frame goes, because unfortunately, we are down to a very small time frame. As well, this touches on our time frame, our role as a single-nation state because I think that many of the solutions that are required become multilateral considerations.

Thank you, Chair.

(1120)

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a quick question.

What is the objective? What are we actually hoping to achieve?

If we do this study and we table it in the House, all we are really achieving is putting on the record all of the vulnerabilities in our election just before the election happens.

Here are the weaknesses. Good luck, everybody. Thank you.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

As I said, the objective would be to provide recommendations to the minister in an attempt to maintain the integrity of the election insofar as possible. That to me is the objective.

I think that our analysts are capable enough and we as a committee are prudent enough to be able to manage the content of the final report to have some control over that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Can I ask you a question?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, sure.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You can continue having the floor. I'm just trying to....

The Chair:

We're missing protocol.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm just curious about how our recommendations are actually going to be....

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Implemented?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No, not implemented. Sorry.

I wonder how they're going to be better than what they would be able to recommend themselves, those who are responsible for making sure our elections are secure, when we don't really have the clearance to really get the information and what the threats that we're facing actually are. I feel like we're going to get a very surface-level understanding of what the issues are. Those recommendations are really not going to hold a lot of weight because I think there are better people who have the necessary clearance to really know and understand what the threats are that we're facing. They have so much more information and tools at their disposal than our committee would really have to tackle that issue properly.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

First of all, let me say I'm very fortunate to have top secret clearance. It's a process that's very uncomfortable. I'm not sure everyone in this committee would want to undertake it.

Beyond that, I definitely hear what you're saying. I do consider this when I am personally evaluating solutions. Having said that, I think those with the knowledge are only a piece of the puzzle. It falls upon us for two reasons. One is for us to take in coordination the testimony of those with specifically.... It generally seems to fall to those with the technical knowledge. I would expect that, and that's why I proposed five meetings. Considerations from members of the media, academia, policy perspectives, which could be either of those two or other non-government organizations.... It falls upon us to collect the information and evaluate it. That's the one way that I see it.

I do see what you're saying, it's definitely been, not an obstruction but a consideration, and again something that was brought up in the Policy Options breakfast. It's something I also mentioned when I was at ethics as a witness, which is that certainly while as a former member of the public service of Canada I have great faith in our public service, I'm always very concerned about how we retain those candidates with the knowledge necessary. I might have even mentioned it here: Do you have to go to San Jose for a weekend, or go to the headquarters of Fortnite in an effort to obtain them? But I see that only as small piece, because I think there are many facets of society and many players to implicate and listen to.

The second one would be, in consideration of all that information amassed, if you will, the recommendations that we would make.

I just thought of this now as well. I look at the responsibility we agreed to take at the G20, G7 Charlevoix to be a global leader in this area. In fact, I would say that our doing this study helps fulfill our commitment to be this leader. Was it the G20 or the G7? It was G7 Charlevoix.

I think it was G7, anyway, where we committed to be leaders in this space. As parliamentarians, let's follow through on that. Thank you very much.

(1125)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

I just want to make a couple of points, in response to some of the discussion.

Mr. Graham made a point that we're going to have to put a report in and show all our weaknesses. That is a concern, but is it any less concerning than the alternative, which is that we bury our heads in the sand and say there are no threats to our democracy, no cyber-threats or threats from foreign influence? I think that would be an even more concerning direction to take, that we assume there are no threats or we bury our heads in the sand and say that we as parliamentarians don't see that threat.

That would be my first point, that there are threats and we recognize there are threats. There is no sense in denying it. We might as well address the concerns head on.

The second point is more general. Ms. Sahota touched on it a little as well, in terms of who the experts are in this field. Certainly the experts are there, and they are a part of the apparatus of government.

At the end of the day, Mr. Christopherson mentioned not too long ago that the Elections Act and elections are part of the bread and butter of this committee. This is what the committee is mandated to do within our Standing Orders. Our responsibility is the Canada Elections Act, and certainly the protection of our elections from foreign threats, from cyber-threats, is part of what we are mandated as a committee to study and to undertake.

As for shying away from this study because we aren't the experts, well, most parliamentarians aren't the experts on any number of the subject matters that may come before committee. It is our responsibility as democratically elected parliamentarians to undertake these studies, to undertake the recommendations. We do that by going to experts within the field, whether it is CSE, CSIS or other departments responsible for these things.

I sense where the room is at, in terms of where this motion is going. I just think it would be a shame if we, as the procedure and House affairs committee, did not at least undertake a study on this matter. I will leave it there, Chair.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, were you saying that the security committee of the House of Commons has more clearance, or whatever it is called, so it could have more information?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

They do. Yes, the intelligence committee...public safety. All of us don't have the clearance that's needed. I do agree with what Mr. Nater is saying. We undertake a lot of studies. We're not the experts. Our job is to listen to the experts, but I still don't think that those experts.... I feel it's still going to be such a very high-level type of study that we're not going to be able to get down to real solutions in order for our agencies to take appropriate measures and actions.

It'll inform us a little, but I don't know what it will really achieve at the end of the day. If we had lots of time, I would like the idea. We would need lots of time to really get deep into that issue.

(1130)

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Can we have a recorded vote, please?

(Motion negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair:

I just want to put my bias into committee business. Hopefully, sometime before the summer, we will do instructions to the researcher on the parallel chamber, because we've done so much work on it. I know Mr. Reid has a motion on it, too.

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This actually is not on the parallel chamber. On March 1 I circulated a notice of motion. I will not move the motion at the moment. I'd like to invite a little bit of discussion about it first.

The motion is about changing Standing Order 108(3)(a) to amend our own mandate. People can read the motion itself, but essentially it creates a situation where we would have a couple of new responsibilities. We would be reviewing and reporting on all matters related to the Centre Block rehabilitation project and the long-term vision and plan for the precinct—without intruding upon the responsibilities of others in this regard—and providing a report back on an annual basis to the House of Commons regarding any discussions or hearings we've had. Specifically, we would be undertaking a study and reporting back to the House by the end of this Parliament.

People seemed generally receptive to the general idea. I'm not sure if they were as receptive to this specific motion. In particular, I'd asked Mr. Bittle to get a sense of whether or not his own House leadership was generally favourable to the idea—possibly even favourable to the motion itself—and he said he'd get back to me. So I wonder if we could just have a brief discussion about whether or not there is an openness to moving forward with the motion or perhaps, in a less specific way, to moving toward taking some responsibility, and maybe a lot of responsibility, for providing oversight on this very significant and expensive project.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Yes, I think there was not only general support from all the parties. There were also some passionate interventions by members of Parliament that they definitely wanted input into future renovations of both this building and Centre Block—that it's our workplace and we should have some input. I think it was agreed to by the administration that we didn't have sufficient input into the renovations to this building in particular.

I'll open the discussion. I don't want to prejudge the committee, but I think there was certainly positive reception for something in this line. People might have suggestions on the wording, but let's hear from the parties.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

I did undertake Mr. Reid's request. I did speak to individuals. It didn't come up again and I forgot to update him, but we have no concerns with this. We're happy to discuss this as an item in positive terms and move forward on it.

I don't know how you wish to structure it. Mr. Simms and I were discussing beforehand how this might look. I don't know if we need more than a meeting to really go through it. I think both of us said that we'd like to hear from you about how you thought a “study” would look, but that might just be a matter for discussion between us.

In terms of a witness, I don't even know who that would be. We were thinking a meeting or two related to this would be reasonable, but we're happy to hear from you on how you see this coming forward. We're more than happy to discuss this and we think it's a good initiative.

Mr. Guy Caron: Mr. Chair—

(1135)

The Chair:

If I may, Mr. Caron, Mr. Christopherson is very passionate about this committee having input into the Centre Block renovations.

Mr. Guy Caron:

I understand, but I have one question for Mr. Reid about this.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Guy Caron:

When I was at the public accounts committee, I remember studying the rehabilitation of some of the buildings. Is there such a project with the public accounts committee or with the AG?

Mr. Scott Reid:

The Board of Internal Economy does. I haven't heard of public accounts being involved at all, but that doesn't mean they aren't. It may just be that I'm ill-informed. Definitely, the Board of Internal Economy is involved.

The trouble, in a nutshell, is that the Board of Internal Economy can't report back to the House. Ultimately, it's the House itself that would want to assert—I hesitate to use the word “control”, because we're talking about a building that's shared with the Senate—the kind of oversight that lets us say definitively that we want this feature to be present, or we are profoundly unhappy with the timeline that's been proposed, or that cost structure needs to get signed off by somebody. It has to be the House of Commons as a whole.

The trouble is that the board can't report to the House. We can report to the House. It could be any committee, but it needs to be a committee of Parliament—an actual committee, as opposed to the board—doing the detail work of hearing the witnesses, keeping track of the changes from one year to the next through multiple Parliaments, because the Centre Block won't be finished until multiple Parliaments have gone through, and potentially multiple changes of ministers and even possibly governments.

All we can do is report to the House. Then the report can be debated and potentially enacted, and it becomes a House order to the people who are actually doing this work on our behalf. That's the logic of it.

Does that answer your question?

Mr. Guy Caron:

It does.

I just wanted to see if what was taking place through public accounts or through the AG office was a punctual thing or a recurrent thing, but it seems to be punctual.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

The Chair:

David Christopherson is on public accounts. If they were doing anything on those topics, we would have heard loud and clear.

Mr. Guy Caron:

He would have reported it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I respond to Mr. Bittle?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

First of all, I want to ask if it would be appropriate, in your opinion, for me to move the motion.

If it would be, why don't I do that? Then I'll speak very briefly to the question of how many meetings and that kind of thing.

The Chair:

Does everyone have this?

A voice: Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let me move the motion.

In speaking to it, I would just say that I don't have strong opinions on how many meetings we ought to have. Because the report date is the very last day we're sitting, I suggest that we don't have to tie ourselves in. We can fill in empty spots that arise with the other matters we're discussing here.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, for people listening on the radio, could you read at least the first paragraph of your motion, so they know what we're discussing?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me. I listen to this, too. Yes, I will read the motion: That the Committee undertake a study of Standing Order 108(3)(a) to consider amending the Committee’s mandate to include the review, study, and report to the House on all matters pertaining to the Centre Block Rehabilitation Project and the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) for the Parliamentary Precinct, notwithstanding other review or oversight authorities, by adding the following new subsections to Standing Order 108(3)(a):

Then it goes to (x) because there's an enumerated list. This is the end of a very long list in that particular standing order: (x) the review of and report on all matters relating to the Centre Block Rehabilitation Project and the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) for the Parliamentary Precinct, notwithstanding other review or oversight authorities that exist or that may be established;

I'll do the rest in French.

(1140)

[Translation] (xi) the review of an annual report on the Centre Block Rehabilitation Project and the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) for the Parliamentary Precinct, including current and projected timelines, the current state of incurred and projected expenditures, and any changes therein since the last report on these matters, provided that the committee may report on these matters at any time, and that the committee annually includes a recommendation respecting the continued retention of Standing Orders 108(3)(a)(x) and 108(3)(a)(xi).”; and, that it report its recommendations to the House no later than its last meeting in June 2019. [English]

The Chair:

Good.

Maybe the minute-taker could use the motion we handed out, because it has the letters behind that you didn't read out.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that's right.

The Chair:

Due to timing and everything, I would suggest that we try to do it in May, because you never know what's going to come before this committee. There could be points of privilege or something.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's true.

The Chair:

We wouldn't want it to fall between the cracks.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I agree with that. I do want to say one other thing here, that we submit the recommendations to the House, essentially for the change to the standing order, and then we simply see. If the House is willing to support it by unanimous consent, we could go forward, or if not, we could just let the matter die in the House, but we would report back in time to give the House that choice.

I only think it makes sense to pursue something such as this if it has widespread support.

The Chair:

What if it did die in the House for maybe one vote or something? Is there an option to recommend it to the PROC of the next Parliament? The PROC of the next Parliament can either agree or disagree with our recommendation, but at least it would be on their agenda.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Part of the reason I said that was that the only way to get a vote in the House is to have a concurrence debate. As a practical matter, it's very hard to arrange a concurrence debate that late in the Parliament. My natural inclination on something such as this, to look towards unanimous consent, is doubled when you face that type of practical consideration.

As someone who has been on the committee a long time, I would just say, there's no formal mechanism, but the next PROC is likely to take very seriously that which was said by the current PROC on something such as this.

The Chair:

It is or isn't likely to do so?

Mr. Scott Reid:

It is, pretty much so.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What's stopping us from sending a recommendation letter to the next version of ourselves? Have you thought of that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's true.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

PROC could write a letter to say to our future self that it should look at these issues that we raised.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's like the movie Groundhog Day, where he breaks the pencil so that his future self, when he wakes up, will know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right.

As a practical matter, that's what we can do with this, and say, “Dear PROC of the 43rd Parliament, follow this.”

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

The Chair:

I think I had Mr. Nater on the list.

Mr. John Nater:

Maybe just following up on that, there's also the option for the next PROC, as part of the routine motions at the beginning of the 43rd Parliament, to do a routine motion that PROC undertake an ongoing study every six months or every calendar year on this. That's an option, too.

Just very briefly, in terms of our limited time going forward, personally I think it would be nice to hear from Mr. Wright from the public works department on this matter. He seems to be the designated departmental official on this. It would be nice to hear from him one last time before we adjourn for dissolution.

Perhaps a potential second witness would be the architects we had previously before the committee: Centrus, or something such as that.

The Chair:

Do you mean the ones we had at the December meeting?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes. It would be just to hear whether there have been any updates in terms of what they've found since we vacated the premises, whether there's anything new that they can share on that matter.

The third and final point would be an actual briefing from someone, whether that's Mr. Wright or someone else, on the long-term vision and plan, what is actually currently on record as having been approved going forward. There were different suggestions at the last meeting of what was approved, when it was approved.

Mr. Reid has talked before about the second phase of the visitor welcome centre. I think we're all in the dark as to exactly what is currently approved in terms of this blasting on the front lawn to dig a new visitor welcome centre. It would be nice to know what has been approved and what's currently the plan.

Those are the three points we could do, whether that's in one single meeting or two half meetings. They would generally be the witnesses I'd want to hear. That's somewhat independent of the actual motion itself, because the motion is recommending a change, but it ties in, hand in hand.

(1145)

The Chair:

Would you want them before we finalize the motion?

Mr. John Nater:

I don't think we necessarily need that. They're somewhat independent, because the motion is a structure to report.

I'd personally like to hear from those witnesses before we adjourn this Parliament. I'm flexible on that.

The Chair:

It makes sense to me.

Mr. Bittle, I think you asked the question of Mr. Reid.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's fine. If it's a meeting or two, that works for us.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, you have Mr. Nater's suggestion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think we should deal with that as a committee, rather than amending the motion to contain it. I would suggest scheduling it.

The Chair:

Yes.

Did you want to have a meeting on the motion, or do you want to have a meeting with those witnesses and then have the motion at the end of that meeting? What are your thoughts?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Why don't we try to see if we can adopt the motion now and then move towards that?

We aren't actually tying ourselves to a specific number of meetings. That allows maximum flexibility for the committee to have as few as one and as many as the committee decides.

The Chair:

The proposal is to finish discussion on the motion right now, and then I'll go to discussion on the other people. Is there any further discussion on the motion?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: It's unanimous.

Now let's discuss a meeting for the witnesses Mr. Nater just suggested. Is anyone opposed to our trying to get those witnesses in as soon as possible for a meeting?

The Clerk:

Committee members will recall that we've had witnesses already on an ongoing study having to do with the Centre Block rehabilitation project. I just asked the chair whether the witnesses suggested by Mr. Nater would be a continuation of that study, or whether the witnesses would be specifically tied to the study on the potential recommended standing order change.

Mr. John Nater:

I think Mr. Reid's motion is almost a stand-alone. I suspect the witnesses won't be speaking directly to the change in the committee's mandate. Certainly, they're connected, but I think it would be a stand-alone motion.

My only question is whether we would need to hear witnesses from the clerk, perhaps on this motion itself, but I don't know if that would be necessary.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid's motion, as the clerk says, does refer to undertaking a study. Do we need the study now that we've approved the motion? We've approved a motion that says we're going to undertake a study.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The study is of Standing Order 108(3)(a).

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The real question is whether this is the right way, whether we want to recommend these changes to the Standing Orders themselves. That's what we would be reporting back to the House on.

If we invite witnesses, it will be not so much to say, “Hey, tell us more about this.” Rather, it's to say we're trying to figure out whether or not this particular change will work, and if so, what sort of reporting over the next decade or more they would be making to us, or who else we should be contacting.

For example, I think in Mr. Wright's most recent appearance, he referred to our parliamentary partners. It was unclear to me who the parliamentary partners were. We would be trying to figure out the practicalities of who they're communicating with now, how authority is flowing through, who is authorizing the contracts that have been, I gather, given out for the changes to the visitor welcome centre—the visitor welcome centre phase two—and who they've consulted with in terms of the impact this is going to have on the other uses for the front lawn.

I'm just looking at that one part of the project, but I assume it's going to have an impact on our Canada Day celebrations for the next decade or so, and that this is being cleared by somebody.

Do you see what I'm saying? It's all about how the reporting works and how they would interact with us, how their other parliamentary partners would interact with us. At the end of hearing some of that witness testimony, we'd be better equipped to say whether or not these suggested changes to the Standing Orders make sense or are a bad idea. Then, our report back could—

(1150)

The Chair:

Those witnesses would be related to this study of the standing order.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's what I would suggest, yes, as a way of figuring out whether.... Even if in the end, the committee decides that these suggested changes to the Standing Orders are not a good idea, we would as a group have a clearer idea about where the lines of communication are and are not. All we know for sure right now is that whatever loop there is, we're outside of it, and so apparently are most of the other people in the House of Commons.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll have a meeting with the witnesses that Mr. Nater suggested, and then we'll have a meeting on your report, basically, reporting back as to whether or not we make a recommendation on those standing order changes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's right.

The Chair:

Is that okay?

Just review the witnesses for the clerk again, the ones you suggested, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

My suggestions would be Mr. Wright from public works, or whomever else is deemed necessary from public works; the architects we had at the December meeting to see if there's anything new; and then an appropriate authority to go over the long-term vision and plan for what's currently been approved. Whether that would be from House administration or....

The Chair:

Okay, so we have one hour where we would have the first two witnesses, and you said in the second hour there would be a presentation of the long-term vision and plan. They know that there is a presentation of that plan—

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, so whether it's within the same two-hour meeting or one hour and one hour, we'd do whatever works for the witnesses.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll try to do it in the same meeting. If not, is that okay?

We'll set another meeting to make the report and discussion as soon thereafter as we can on the schedule.

Is everyone in agreement with that? Good.

We'll go to further committee business.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have another two actually.

The next thing I had on the list that was circulated here was that a motion was put on notice about having the commissioner of Canada elections appear in relation to SNC-Lavalin. Should I read that motion, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. The motion is simply: That the Commissioner of Canada Elections appear before the Procedure and House Affairs Committee to discuss the illegal contributions made by SNC-Lavalin to the Liberal Party of Canada and his decision to issue a compliance agreement.

The Chair:

Don't forget, when you're doing your list about committee members, my bias of giving direction to the researcher on the parallel chamber study that we did.

Is there discussion on the motion that was just read?

Go ahead, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Côté provided a brief statement on the subject as well. I will read this into the record. Unfortunately, I only have it in English or else I'd distribute it. I apologize for that. He says, and this was on May 2: In light of renewed media interest in a 2016 decision by the Commissioner of Canada Elections to enter into a compliance agreement with SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. and certain allegations made concerning the circumstances surrounding the conclusion of this agreement, the Commissioner wishes to provide clarifications in the interest of maintaining public confidence in the integrity of the Canada Elections Act's compliance and enforcement regime. The Commissioner carries out his compliance and enforcement mandate with complete independence from the government of the day, including from the Prime Minister's Office or any Minister's office, from any elected official or their staff, and from any public servant. At no time, since the current Commissioner was appointed in 2012, has an attempt been made by any elected official or political staffer to influence or to interfere with any compliance or enforcement decision that did not directly involve them as the subject of the investigation.

I guess this next part was intended as a statement by the commissioner. This must be intended as the part that's for media quotation, because it's indented and in italics. The independence of the Commissioner is a key component of our electoral compliance and enforcement regime. In my time as Commissioner, there has never been any attempt by elected officials, political staffers or public servants to influence the course of an investigation or to interfere with our work. And I want to make it clear that if this ever happened, I would promptly and publicly denounce it.

He obviously was very concerned about that. He then provides a little bit of background information. Compliance and enforcement decisions are taken in a manner consistent with the Compliance and Enforcement Policy of the Commissioner of Canada Elections. Paragraph 32 outlines the various factors that go into determining which compliance or enforcement tool is most appropriate in a given case. With respect to SNC-Lavalin, some of the factors that were taken into consideration are outlined in the compliance agreement. As noted at paragraph 32(b) of the Policy, the evidence gathered during an investigation is an important consideration in determining how to deal with a particular case. This calls for an objective review of the evidence that has been assembled to assess its strength. In this regard, it should be noted that a compliance agreement may be entered into on the basis of evidence meeting the civil standard of balance of probabilities, while the laying of criminal charges requires evidence that meets the criminal standard of proof beyond a reasonable doubt. It should be noted that through amendments to the Act made with Bill C-23 in 2014, the longstanding practice of the Commissioner to not provide details of investigations was confirmed, with the adoption of clear confidentiality rules. This is consistent with the manner police and investigative agencies treat information related to their investigations

That's the statement. I think that indicates some limits that we would have to place on ourselves with regard to confidentiality. I think we would, as a committee, as long as we're cognizant of that, be able to get some useful additional information as to how this policy functions and how it functioned in this particular case.

I will just say that I accept at face value the commissioner's statement that there was no attempt made by any elected officials or political staffers to interfere or influence. We're simply trying to figure out how this all works and to see to what extent this is consistent with other practices. The obvious parallel here is with the Dean Del Mastro prosecution that resulted in the laying of charges.

I don't know what the commissioner would say. I can kind of guess based on his statement, but only if he comes here can we get a full explanation, so that is the basis and the rationale for the motion.

(1155)

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

There has been a troubling pattern over the last little while at this committee. First, we had the Clerk of the House of Commons here, and the Conservatives brought down their whip to question his integrity without any evidence. They did this even though the Clerk had reached out to the House leader's office directly to ask if he could proceed, but there was no response and his integrity was questioned.

Then the Chief Electoral Officer came. I know we may disagree on certain points of policy, and I know we have disagreed with the Conservatives about recommendations that have been made. I haven't been on this committee since the start, but we have had an incredible working relationship with the Chief Electoral Officer. I didn't think it would be possible for any member to stand up and question his integrity. Well, that happened last week as well when the honourable member from Carleton gleefully called him a “Liberal lapdog”. I think I got it wrong last time, and he corrected me, and he was gleeful in that correction. Then they brought someone else in to do this, and I hope the members who are typically here wouldn't engage in this, but they questioned his integrity even though he had no involvement. The law says he has no involvement and there's no evidence that he did, but there was a gleeful willingness to question his integrity

Then in the next hour there were valid concerns about the way in which David Johnston was appointed. We heard it from Mr. Christopherson, and we heard it from the Conservative Party last time, and there was disagreement as to that. I would have thought that David Johnston would have been one of the individuals in this country whose integrity could not be questioned, based on his work, yet we had the Conservative Party question his integrity. He had to defend his own integrity, inviting his detractors to look at his lifetime of work. All of this was done without any evidence, without any provocation. Now, once again, Conservative Party wishes to call in another public official to question their integrity without any evidence.

I don't know if they appreciate the irony of doing this, of calling in an independent prosecutor to question their decision. I've used this term before, “the Nobel Prize for irony”. I don't know if that's a thing but it seems you're in the running. You criticize the government for contemplating asking a question about the direction of a prosecution and a deferred prosecution agreement, and you had that out there for a couple of months. “How dare you?” they said. We heard this for two months and no laws were broken, as stated by the witnesses. “How dare you even think about asking such a question?”

Now we wish to call an investigator, an independent investigator-prosecutor from the office of the director of public prosecutions, and question this person about their decision. It boggles the mind and it is unbelievable how desperate the Conservative Party is to have SNC discussed that they are willing to go back on everything they have said over the last couple of months in order to achieve that goal.

At the end of the day, my understanding is that the justice committee is still going through its estimates process, that the commissioner of Canada elections is still under their jurisdiction in terms of the estimates process, and that there will be an opportunity....

(1200)



I don't think I'll be supporting the motion at the end of the day anyway, but I'd like to clear it up just so we have a really truthful motion. I'd like to propose an amendment so that the motion reads: That the Commissioner of Elections Canada appear before the Committee to discuss the illegal contributions made by SNC-Lavalin to the Liberal Party of Canada and the Conservative Party of Canada and his decision to issue a compliance agreement to SNC-Lavalin and Pierre Poilievre.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Chris, do you have the wording to give to us?

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, he was just asking if you have the wording.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me, I was up with David discussing what we'll be doing this summer—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: —and I suddenly realized we were through the rhetoric and onto the substance. I didn't get back in time to start making notes, so that's my bad.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The amendment would be at the end of the second line, which would read, “to the Liberal Party of Canada and the Conservative Party of Canada”.

(1205)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me. Can I just stop and ask a factual question in the middle of that? Was the illegal contribution you're referring to made to the Conservative Party of Canada or was it to a riding association of the Conservative Party of Canada? Do you know?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'm not 100% familiar, but if you're supportive of that, that's a question that can be asked.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Does anybody know the answer to that question? The compliance agreement with Pierre or with his campaign suggests it was to his riding association as opposed to the Conservative Party itself—unless this was in the context of his being the minister at the time. I'm just trying figure out what.... You can understand my concern for precision. I don't want put down a factually incorrect statement in a motion. If you can figure that out—I just don't have the information in front of me—then we could.... I see what you want to do. I want to make sure it's correct, and then we could probably vote in favour of it.

Chris, Stephanie looked this up on the CBC's website. It says here—and I'm quoting from the relevant news story—“The Conservative Party of Canada netted far less as a result of the scheme. The party received $3,137, while various Conservative Party riding associations and candidates were given $5,050.” Are we sure this is in the context of the...? Yes, it is. Sorry, I'm just seeing this now, $83,534 to the Liberal Party, various Liberal associations....

Would you be open to a bit of an amendment to your amendment, Chris? No. Do you mind if I...?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Let's hear it. I'll hear it, fair enough.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Yes, that's true. Anyway, let me tell you what it is and you can decide about it.

I think what we're getting at is that if we're going to do this, it would make sense to make it to the Liberal and Conservative parties of Canada and various riding associations of the Liberal and Conservative parties of Canada. That would be the suggestion. What you're really doing is that you're pointing out that, in addition to SNC-Lavalin having given money to the Liberal Party of Canada, it gave it to the Conservative Party of Canada, which is obviously factually correct. Additionally it was to various riding associations of both parties.

If we want to bring in Pierre Poilievre, I assume it's because we're making reference to his riding association. I assume it must have one of them. Nepean—Carleton, I'm guessing. Therefore, we would have to make reference to the riding association donations or we're getting someone who literally can't talk to the subject matter. I would want, as well, to extend it to include the relevant members of Parliament, both Conservatives and Liberals, for both parties. That might take a bit of research to find out who they are, but would that seem reasonable to you? We're basically trying to extend the net to include everybody who has been included on both sides.

The Chair:

Mr. Caron.

Mr. Guy Caron:

To which we should add, actually, that in the same article, they're talking about four candidates for the leadership of the Liberal Party who received funds as well.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that right?

Mr. Guy Caron:

Yes, according to the article. I have it in French, too.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Unfortunately, this is not my phone. It just locked, so I can't.....

Maybe, if we're doing that, we should say, “and leadership candidates” and then “consult with any or all of the individuals who were...”.

Guy, I'm looking at you for this. If we're mentioning Pierre by name, we should probably mention any of the people involved who signed compliance agreements.

(1210)

Mr. Guy Caron:

In the article, there are no names involved, so I cannot tell you which ones.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

I'll stop there because I've managed to not actually come up with a single wording, but that would be my suggestion as to how to deal with this amendment.

The Chair:

Where exactly are we, Mr. Reid?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm waiting for a response from Chris.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I don't agree to this as a friendly amendment. We believe that the hypocrisy of this should be pointed out. That's why the motion should include.... I believe that if we say “Liberal Party of Canada” and “Conservative Party of Canada,” we've included riding associations and whatnot. I think that's—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Including their riding associations...?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

To me it doesn't matter, but I think the important thing is to have.... I guess the most shocking thing was to have Mr. Poilievre come down here and question the integrity of the Chief Electoral Officer and the commissioner of Elections Canada.

He himself received and negotiated a compliance agreement, which is a valid legal settlement, so if the Conservative Party is going to criticize what the commissioner did on one thing, they should also attack Mr. Poilievre's also receiving one, and maybe demand that he see his day in court as well. Let's keep it all in there. I'd like to keep my amendment as it is.

A voice: If he could be asked to provide a wording—

Mr. Scott Reid:

He's not accepting the wording, so there's no need for a revised wording.

I'm going to suggest another revision then. I'm very glad this is not an in camera meeting.

I'm working from what I have written down as Chris's proposed amendment, which is itself an adjustment to my motion. It would read, “That the Commissioner of Canada Elections and Pierre Poilievre appear before the Committee to discuss the illegal contributions made by SNC-Lavalin to the Liberal Party of Canada and the Conservative Party of Canada and their riding associations, and his decision to issue compliance agreements”.

The Chair:

Is that a subamendment to the amendment?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I guess so. I don't actually know at this point what it would be procedurally.

Could it be considered a subamendment? Is that permissible?

The Clerk:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let's do it that way. That way we can have an up and down vote on that one if we wish, or further debate.

May I assume, Mr. Chair, that we're in the debate on the subamendment now?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

I think this accomplishes covering most things. It does not cover the four contributions that Mr. Caron mentioned with regard to party leadership contestants, simply because I think we were spiralling into a lot of confusion, but it does deal with the key subject matter at hand, which is SNC-Lavalin's unlawful contributions. Nobody disputes that because there are compliance agreements out there. Everybody's in agreement, including the recipients, that these were not lawful contributions. This provides a really good opportunity to look at the underlying question.

I went to some lengths, in reading that statement, to make the point that this is not about trying to cast aspersions on any elected official or staffer up here. This is about trying to find out how justice is administered in this particular case, and there is no better way to do it than via a study that encompasses all those who were recipients of these illegal contributions at the level of electoral riding associations.

That's my sales pitch.

(1215)

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I feel as though, Chair, this has the same theme as my previous suggested motion.

Mr. Bittle, are you sure? This really will be the WWF of PROC. We're getting into the creamed corn here. This is bad. I'd like to offer the government one more opportunity. Let's put the motion as it is. We'll do a recorded vote. If it reveals nothing else, there's no harm, no foul, and we move on. I suggest that to the government, just make sure.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion before we vote?

The committee will suspend for a couple of minutes.

(1215)

(1220)

The Chair:

Are we ready to vote on the subamendment?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. We would like a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We will have a recorded vote.

(Subamendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair: We're now on the amendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was jotting down my own notes for the subamendment. I didn't get the amendment.

Could either Chris or the clerk read it?

The Chair:

Chris, do you want to?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

At the end of line two, it's “and the Conservative Party of Canada”. Then it ends, “and his decision to issue a compliance agreement to SNC-Lavalin and Pierre Poilievre.”

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would you be able to say "compliance agreements", plural?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me, but I have one other question to ask. You're aware that the Pierre Poilievre compliance agreement is not with relation to SNC-Lavalin. That's on a separate matter.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'm aware.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Good. I have no further comments.

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote on the amendment.

(Amendment agreed to: yeas 9; nays 0)

The Chair: Now we'll have the vote on the motion as amended.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd like a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote.

Just for the wording, Mr. Reid, would it be a friendly amendment that the committee “invite” the Commissioner of Canada Elections to appear?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. If everybody else is agreeable to it, I certainly am.

The Chair:

We have a recorded vote on the motion as amended.

(Motion as amended negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair: Carrying on committee business, I'll go to Mr. Caron, but I'm wondering if I could get the permission of the committee to use Thursday's meeting to give instructions to the researcher on our parallel chamber report.

Mr. Reid.

(1225)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd be fine with that.

The Chair:

Is anyone opposed?

That's great. We'll do that on Thursday.

Mr. Caron. [Translation]

Mr. Guy Caron:

I'd like to say that I am quite pleased to set aside the motion Mr. Christopherson wanted to present and to let him introduce it at some subsequent date. I will not introduce it this morning. [English]

The Chair:

Okay. We're not discussing that motion today.

On that list I handed out, is there anything we haven't dealt with yet?

Mr. Scott Reid:

There's my point of order, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

We tried to do things while you were away, but it didn't work.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The point of order I wanted to.... You remember when this came up. We had a committee meeting on April 11. The bells were ringing and we had a witness, I believe, so you opened the meeting and sought unanimous consent so that we could hear some testimony from the witness. You obtained unanimous consent as soon as the meeting was in session. We heard from the witness and then people went off to votes in the House.

My own interpretation of the Standing Orders is that the chair of a committee cannot have unanimous consent to begin the meeting. Therefore, it is out of order to begin a meeting when the bells are already ringing. By way of contrast, if the meeting is already taking place, it's an easy matter to get that note.

The practical significance of this—it's not a vast significance—was that a number of people, me included, did not come to the meeting on the assumption that it wasn't happening. This really was a good faith misunderstanding or a different interpretation of where the rule lies.

I think my understanding is correct. I'm prepared to accept that my understanding might be incorrect, but one way or the other, I'd like to see it resolved.

The problem we face is simply this: In this committee, in any committee, you can't make a decision that locks the House in place. We always say we are the masters of our own affairs in committees. Of course the same is true in spades in either direction, but I think it would be helpful to try to figure this out. I'm not exactly sure of the right mechanism for doing that, for getting a yes or no answer to my own interpretation of the Standing Orders. I simply throw that out to other members to think about.

The Chair:

I'll give you two options, Mr. Reid. I'll give you the short answer or the long answer. The short answer is that there's nothing in the Standing Orders that precluded me from doing that. There is a thing in the Standing Orders precluding me from doing it if the bells start during a meeting, which would leave us two choices.

We cannot do anything, but there are two choices. We could make a suggestion for a change in the procedures of our committee so that it's clarified or we could actually do a report to the House and try to get it changed for all committees.

The long answer is that I could read out what I just said in great lengthy terms as prepared by the clerk, if you would like.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it an option? You sound somewhat reluctant.

The Chair:

No, I'm fine.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The other option, as I said, is that you could circulate it. It would be helpful to have that in writing.

Ultimately, as I've said, I'd like an instruction from the House to have the standing order explicitly say it means this or it means that; either is satisfactory. Having it explicit is what I'm really after.

(1230)

The Chair:

We could solve it for our committee quite easily by making it something here. If you want it to go to to the House for all committees, then that's more problematic, but we can do that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I only want to suggest that if committee members are willing to do that. I may be the only one who's fixated on this, and if that's the case, then I would be wasting people's time pursuing it. Could we actually start with getting a sense of what other people think, and whether this is just my own fixation as opposed to a real issue? If they think it's a real issue, then we should, I think, look at taking it to the House, and if they think it's just me, then I should just let the matter drop.

The Chair:

Okay, that's a good point. Just so people know what we're talking about. This is Standing Order 115(5): Notwithstanding Standing Orders 108(1)(a) and 113(5), the Chair of a standing, special, legislative or joint committee shall suspend the meeting when the bells are sounded to call in the Members to a recorded division, unless there is unanimous consent of the members of the committee to continue to sit.

That's what happens if the bells ring while we're here. However, it's silent on what happens if they ring before. That's what we could clarify either for our committee procedures or propose to the House for all committee procedures, because it's not clarified. But as Mr. Reid's asking what the thoughts of the committee are generally, we'll open it up for that.

Mr. Caron. [Translation]

Mr. Guy Caron:

I am reluctant.

What I am trying to avoid in this committee are unforeseen adverse effects. I think that if the bells start to ring and the meeting has not yet begun, it is the responsibility of the chair to reconvene the meeting sometime after the vote the bells signal has taken place.

The possibility of beginning the meeting while the bells are ringing may raise various problems, and different strategic tactics could be used by certain parties, subsequently. I would have trouble accepting an interpretation according to which the chair would be authorized to begin a meeting while the bells are still ringing.

Consequently, I do not agree, not necessarily for reasons I can explain right now, but because of the potential use of that provision as a probable loophole later. [English]

The Chair:

Yes, I think that's a good point.

Just to let you know the context of this particular one, it was a minister who was here on the estimates and ministers are really hard to come by, so we wanted to at least get their opening statement because we might not get it. All the representatives who were here from each party agreed, as well as the two vice-chairs, so that all the parties had agreed at the time, but we did not make the effort to contact Mr. Reid or others who weren't here, which was probably a mistake. That's just to let you know the context.

But you've made a very good point that you wouldn't want that type of interpretation to be misused.

Are there any other thoughts?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I would say that we hopefully can get some Liberal feedback of some sort. They're not normally shy about contradicting me.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham is never shy.

Go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My own instinct is that if the chair has the consent of members of all parties, then I don't see a problem. That's my own personal opinion. If any of the parties objected, I totally get it. It shouldn't happen, but when people from all parties present say, yes, we can do it, I can't find a reason not to allow that.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I wasn't there for that meeting. Who was in attendance when the meeting started?

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie, do you remember? You were here and Mr. Christopherson was here, I think.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I was here. At the very beginning, no one was here except the minister and me. Then it was Mr. Christopherson and I think Linda trickled in at some point. I don't....

The Chair:

There was a quorum.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

There was a quorum and there was consent. I guess that's the question I have. There was quorum and there was consent to hear the witnesses. Even if there were a rule in place, would that have been acceptable?

I appreciate it and I'm happy to just proceed going forward that, in the absence of consent, we wouldn't start a meeting if the bells were ringing. I appreciate Scott's concern. I don't think it was malicious. It was to get a minister's statement in. I guess I don't have strong opinions either way on the subject, but I understand the concern. There seemed to have been, from my understanding, consent to proceed. Even if there were a rule in place, the seven minutes or eight minutes allotted to the minister still would have gone forward. I guess I leave it to the committee. Again, I don't have strong feelings either way.

(1235)

The Chair:

Part of the point in that particular case was that we'd come back after the bells, for sure, but there may not have been time to ask questions of the minister. By getting her statement out of the way, it certainly made sure that when she came back there would be time for questions. It was more of a functional thing—we were just checking out if everyone was okay—rather than a procedural thing.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Again, I emphasize that I think everything was done with the best intention of conforming with the Standing Orders as they were sincerely believed to be in the minds of those who were present. It was unanimous consent. You asked for it and they gave it. Clearly, everybody who was here thought so, and that was the majority of the committee, which means, ipso facto, that the impression I've had of the Standing Orders is a minority impression.

One thing that's clear is that there's not an enormous appetite to discuss this at this time. We've now had a chance to discuss this, and it's a public meeting, so it's on the record. I don't think we're going to be in a position to make recommendations to the House as a whole. Maybe we could just conclude the subject by getting an indication from you as to how you would act in a parallel circumstance, should it arise between now and the end of this Parliament, and we'll know whether to head for the House in such a situation or to head here.

Before I ask you for that, I'll just say that it's not as problematic for this committee. We are meeting directly below the House of Commons, which is one floor up. It would obviously be a more serious practical matter if it was a meeting that was taking place in the Wellington Building, say, or the Valour Building, which will never arise for us but does arise for others.

That's not to push you in either direction, because nothing you do here will have a precedent for anybody else. It is simply to point out that you can validly go one way or the other, as long as you are clear as to which practice you'll be following, we'll know.

The Chair:

My sense, from the comment we just had, is that there didn't seem to be a problem if all parties that have a seat on the committee were in agreement. I think that on the next occasion I would also endeavour to do not only that, but also, if possible, send a quick email to every member of the committee so that one of the few people, like you, who didn't come to the room would know that we were going to proceed that way.

I don't think this would happen very often, but that's how I would proceed.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Is that okay with everyone? Is there any further business before the end of this meeting?

For Thursday, can you can come back with your ideas for the researcher on our report on parallel chambers, including recommendations to make sure that it doesn't fall off where it goes from here.

Then, on Thursday, May 16, the minister will be here on main estimates on the debates commission.

Mr. Caron, is Mr. Christopherson coming back?

Mr. Guy Caron:

I'm sure Mr. Christopherson would actually know that. You said the one hour for the minister. Do you usually have officials also presenting if there are any further questions?

The Chair:

The ministers usually bring officials with them. I think this minister has always had officials from the Privy Council Office with her to answer questions.

She doesn't make a lot of decisions related to the expenditures of the debates commissioner, so we had the debates commissioner already. He came before committee and answered a lot of the questions that people might have had on the specifics. The committee also asked for her to come. Any time she's come before us, she's always had officials with her.

(1240)

Mr. Guy Caron:

If there were a desire from, say, David to have the officials stay afterwards, if there were more questions but the minister was no longer available, would that be something the committee would consider? At this point I would ask the committee to keep it open until David comes to see if that's his wish.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Typically I wouldn't have an issue with that, but this is very narrow with respect to the debates commission. The official came to answer questions on that, David Johnston. We've already gone through that. I imagine there will be some questions related to the debates commission but it will go beyond that. We had all of the officials who are making the decisions on the debates commission. Otherwise, if there is a grand appetite.... I don't know, but that's already happened.

Mr. Guy Caron:

I just want to leave it open until David comes back.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Fair enough.

The Chair:

That's it. I thank the committee. I think it was a very professional discussion and we dealt with a lot of business.

Thank you. The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 153e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Pour la gouverne des membres, je signale que c'est une séance publique.

Avant de commencer, en ce qui concerne ce que nous venons de voir, vous rappelez-vous lorsque nous discutions des chambres parallèles, de l'orme et de la question de savoir qui a le pouvoir? Vous recevrez cet avis sous peu, mais j'ai demandé aux analystes de se pencher sur ces questions. En 1867, lorsque la Constitution a été créée, il y a eu un transfert de pouvoirs à un ministère gouvernemental et, à l'époque, c'était le ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux.

Vous recevrez cet avis. Il est en train d'être traduit, mais je croyais qu'il serait intéressant que les gens sachent qui détenait ce pouvoir.

La ministre peut venir comparaître le jeudi 16 mai pour discuter du Budget principal des dépenses de la Commission aux débats des chefs.

Les travaux du Comité figurent à l'ordre du jour. J'ai demandé au greffier de fournir une courte liste des affaires dont le Comité a discuté, ce qu'il a fait circuler.

Ces questions ont été soulevées au Comité ou ont fait l'objet d'un avis au cours des dernières semaines. Même si les membres ne sont pas obligés de soulever leurs points dans le cadre de la discussion d'aujourd'hui, je croyais que ce pourrait être utile dans le cadre de nos délibérations.

Je vais céder la parole aux membres du Comité.

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Je ne suis pas certaine si je dois invoquer le Règlement pour faire suite à la situation avec la sonnerie et, malheureusement, nous avons eu le vote sur l'attribution de temps lors de la dernière visite du ministre, mais je voulais présenter à nouveau ma motion.

Je ne suis pas certaine de ce qu'il en est. A-t-elle été déposée, ou l'avons-nous simplement mise de côté car nous craignions ne pas avoir suffisamment de temps pour en débattre?

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

On avait suggéré que le Comité l'examine subséquemment.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord, j'en ai une autre copie aujourd'hui.

La motion propose que « soit poursuivie l'étude sur les menaces en matière de sécurité et de renseignements visant les élections ». On propose que l'étude s'échelonne sur cinq réunions, puisque le groupe n'a pas aimé ma proposition initiale de 12 réunions. J'estime néanmoins que ce nombre de réunions aurait été approprié pour couvrir tous les aspects, allant de la protection des renseignements personnels à la désinformation, qui est le terme que Jennifer Ditchburn préfère utiliser, comme nous avons pu le voir au petit-déjeuner sur les options stratégiques ce matin. J'ai été ravie de voir notre président, Larry Bagnell, à cette activité.

Bien qu'il y ait malheureusement peu de nouveaux renseignements, l'étude s'échelonnerait sur cinq réunions, ce que j'estime raisonnable. Je reconnais, étant donné le temps qu'il nous reste, qu'il serait difficile de prévoir une étude d'envergure, mais cinq réunions semblent suffire.

À la lumière de ma rencontre avec le secrétaire parlementaire Virani, il semble que l'on rendrait service au gouvernement en l'aidant à obtenir ces renseignements. C'est de plus en plus fréquent, et il est regrettable que le gouvernement n'ait pas été en mesure d'examiner ces questions plus tôt car les solutions sont très complexes et de très haut niveau. Cependant, même si nous pouvions formuler des recommandations ou des avis, je pense que la ministre en bénéficierait vraiment et en serait reconnaissante, tout comme le gouvernement et les Canadiens, et c'est évidemment la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici.

Comme je l'ai dit, on tiendrait cinq réunions et les conclusions seraient présentées à la Chambre.

Monsieur le président, merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Juste avant de céder la parole aux membres, je tiens à souhaiter la bienvenue au Comité à M. Guy Caron. Pour la gouverne des membres du Comité, j'ai parlé en termes élogieux du rôle du député hier à la Chambre. Il fait preuve d'un grand professionnalisme, et nous aimons le recevoir à ce comité car les membres sont très tournés vers l'avenir également. Nous sommes ravis de vous recevoir ici.

M. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NPD):

Merci.

Le président:

Pour lancer la discussion, nous allons entendre M. Nader.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Je ne veux pas trop parler. La motion est explicite. Je pense qu'il est important que nous, au Comité de la procédure, entreprenions cette étude. Cinq réunions, c'est raisonnable, mais je ne pense pas que cela deviendra notre Golgotha. Il serait important qu'il y ait une certaine flexibilité.

Le point que je veux faire valoir, c'est qu'il serait important d'entendre l'avis du président, à tout le moins, voire l'avis des cinq membres du groupe qui a été créé pour surveiller l'ingérence lors des prochaines élections. Même durant la courte période depuis qu'on en a fait l'annonce aujourd'hui, on a constaté un changement dans la composition de ce comité en fonction des changements des gens qui occupent ces postes.

Il y a un nouveau greffier du Conseil privé, qui était auparavant le sous-ministre délégué des Affaires étrangères, si bien que c'est un nouveau poste aussi. Il serait important d'entendre à tout le moins l'avis du président, du greffier du Conseil privé, voire des cinq membres du Comité. Nous pouvons le faire à huis clos, si c'est nécessaire, mais je ne crois pas que quiconque s'y opposerait. Il serait au moins important d'entendre l'avis du président et des membres du Comité, puisque nous sommes à cinq mois des élections.

(1110)

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier Mme Kusie d'avoir présenté cette motion. Nous sommes toutefois rendus à la fin, à l'étape finale, de l'étude, et nous avons déjà examiné ces questions. Nous avons discuté et débattu longuement de nos élections à maintes reprises, mais surtout dans le cadre de notre étude du projet de loi C-76.

Je sais que bien souvent, nous avons débattu de sujets non liés à la question à l'étude et de la protection des Canadiens, et il y a eu beaucoup d'obstruction. Ce serait une excellente occasion de prolonger notre étude, mais il est un peu tard.

Je sais que le Comité de l'éthique a déjà mené des travaux sur des sujets connexes. Nous en avons déjà discuté, et je ne nous vois pas nous pencher là-dessus à ce stade-ci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je veux confirmer, aux fins de la discussion sur cette question et d'autres enjeux dont nous serons saisis, et je pense que j'ai raison d'examiner le calendrier. Il nous reste 11 réunions, sans compter la réunion d'aujourd'hui. L'une de ces réunions sera avec la ministre, si bien qu'il nous reste 10 réunions, si je ne m'abuse.

Le président:

La moitié d'une de ces réunions sera avec la ministre.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien, il nous reste 10 réunions et demie.

Il est sans doute peu probable que nous allons consacrer encore une fois une réunion complète à examiner le calendrier des travaux du Comité, notre ordre du jour. Ai-je raison? D'accord, il nous reste donc 10 réunions et demie. Dans le cadre de nos discussions, nous devrions garder cela à l'esprit, car le problème qui se pose maintenant, c'est que l'ajout d'un sujet d'étude fera disparaître un autre point sur la liste. C'est vrai, peu importe la motion ou le sujet dont nous discutons.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, la parole est à vous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je comprends les commentaires de M. Bittle sur la discussion et l'évaluation des sujets lors de l'examen du projet de loi C-76. J'ai malheureusement manqué la majeure partie des discussions, mais j'ai l'impression que cela portait vraiment sur le projet de loi. C'était l'occasion de faire une véritable réflexion sur les experts à consulter pour ce qui est, à mon avis, le plus grand défi et la plus grande menace pour nos institutions démocratiques au cours de la prochaine année. Je ne pense pas que ce soit scandaleux, absurde ou exagéré.

Je veux m'assurer que le gouvernement est très conscient de ce qu'il fait et du message qu'il envoie aux Canadiens en rejetant une telle étude. C'est très grave. C'est très sérieux. C'est peut-être la plus grande responsabilité de notre comité à l'égard de la population canadienne, et ce, à très court terme. Rejeter une étude à ce sujet revient à abandonner toute diligence raisonnable concernant l'intégrité des élections.

En tant que députée et ministre du cabinet fantôme chargée des institutions démocratiques, je ne veux pas accepter cette responsabilité, ce manque de diligence raisonnable et d'évaluation. Je demande donc au gouvernement de tenir compte du message qu'il envoie aux Canadiens quant à l'importance qu'il accorde à l'intégrité des élections en rejetant cette motion.

(1115)

Le président:

Avez-vous un commentaire sur la possibilité de tenir la réunion à huis clos, comme le propose M. Nater?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, je serais tout à fait ouverte à tout processus qui pourrait nous éclairer. Je crois sincèrement qu'à l'instar de bien d'autres pays du monde, le gouvernement s'efforce de trouver, dans ce cas-ci, des solutions législatives concrètes, mais aussi des solutions d'ordre général à un enjeu d'une grande incidence pour la société.

Je parle plus précisément de l'intégrité de l'élection, mais cela va aussi plus loin. Je pense que cela pourrait être extrêmement utile, non seulement pour l'intégrité de l'élection, mais aussi sur le plan de la continuité du travail entrepris au Comité de l'éthique, comme mon collègue M. Bittle l'a mentionné. Cela ne ferait qu'améliorer et peut-être même consolider une partie du travail qu'il a effectué avant nous. Je crois que c'est en grande partie lié à la protection de la vie privée.

De toute évidence, nous traitons ici de sujets plus concrets, plus précis, plus réels et plus immédiats. Je rappelle que ce comité-là a fait un travail que je qualifierais d'utile et de précieux, et j'ai eu l'occasion de discuter avec le président du comité, mon collègue... Je suis désolée, le nom de sa circonscription m'échappe en ce moment. J'ai aussi discuté avec d'autres membres du Comité de l'éthique, soit le député de Thornhill et le député de Beaches—East York...

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Vous pouvez utiliser leurs noms, ici.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Désolée. Je comprends. J'ai aussi tendance à suivre le protocole, David, puisque je viens du monde de la diplomatie.

J'ai l'impression que cela pourrait...

M. Scott Reid:

Pour être juste, je pense que votre nom est plus long que le nom de votre circonscription.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Vous avez aussi un deuxième prénom.

M. Scott Reid: En effet, mais je le tais, par courtoisie envers mes collègues.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oh! Là, je suis curieuse. Un jour, j'essaierai de jeter un œil sur votre permis de conduire ou votre passeport.

Le président:

Pour le président, c'est M. Zimmer.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Évidemment. Oui, c'est M. Zimmer, puisque je peux l'appeler par son nom... Merci.

J'ai généralement l'impression qu'il y aurait tant à gagner dans tant de dimensions de la sphère publique et peut-être aussi de la sphère privée... Évidemment, nous n'y sommes pas obligés... Mais nous pouvons certainement aller dans ce sens.

Encore une fois, j'exhorte le gouvernement à étudier la question. Je pense que seulement trois ou quatre réunions seraient très utiles, si le Comité de l'éthique nous fournissait de bonnes notes d'information sur ses travaux. Comme je l'ai dit, ce n'est qu'une dimension de la vie privée. Il ne s'agit pas de désinformation, même si c’était un sujet d'étude des plus intéressants. Je suis convaincue que ce serait très avantageux pour le gouvernement, et refuser d'étudier cet enjeu serait préjudiciable aux Canadiens, puisque nous avons le temps.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Connaissons-nous la nature exacte des travaux du Comité de l'éthique à ce sujet?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il faudrait que je vérifie, mais l'étude portait en grande partie sur la protection de la vie privée, d'après ce que j'ai compris. Je demanderais aux analystes de nous en dire davantage, s'ils ont d'autres renseignements sur le scénario de Cambridge Analytica. Je crois savoir que ce comité a de nombreux travaux avec le Grand Comité qui doit se réunir à la fin mai, je crois, pour discuter de solutions en matière de protection de la vie privée.

Mais encore une fois, la protection de la vie privée n'est qu'un... Je considère que c'est un élément de l'intégrité électorale. Je parle d'un élément, mais en pourcentage, je dirais que cela représente 20 ou 30 %. Toutefois, lorsqu'il est question de désinformation et de bases de données, je dirais 20 ou 25 %. Je considère cela comme un élément, mais ce n'est pas un portrait complet ou une évaluation complète des mesures à prendre.

Encore une fois, j'assume une grande responsabilité à cet égard, même au sein de mon propre parti, dans l'opposition. Je fais mes propres recherches et je formule des recommandations de notre point de vue, mais ici, pour les Canadiens, cela représente une partie du tableau, et non l'ensemble. Comme je l'ai indiqué, je pense que nous avons le devoir, pour les Canadiens, de chercher à avoir une vue d'ensemble et à formuler, pour le pouvoir exécutif, des recommandations concrètes et des solutions possibles concernant l'échéancier, puisqu'il nous reste peu de temps, malheureusement. De plus, cela touche à notre échéancier, à notre rôle en tant qu'État-nation, car je dirais que bon nombre des solutions qui s'imposent deviennent des considérations multilatérales.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1120)

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une petite question.

Quel est l'objectif? Quel résultat espérons-nous?

Essentiellement, si nous faisons cette étude et que nous la déposons à la Chambre, nous ne ferons que mettre au jour toutes les vulnérabilités de notre système électoral juste avant les élections.

Voilà les faiblesses. Bonne chance à tous. Merci.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Comme je l'ai dit, l'objectif serait de faire des recommandations au ministre afin de tenter de maintenir l'intégrité de l'élection dans la mesure du possible. Pour moi, c'est cela l'objectif.

Je pense que nos analystes sont assez compétents et qu'en tant que comité nous aurons la prudence nécessaire pour gérer le contenu du rapport final afin d'exercer un certain contrôle là-dessus.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Puis-je vous poser une question?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous pouvez continuer. Je voulais juste...

Le président:

Nous ne suivons pas le protocole.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais simplement savoir comment vos recommandations seront...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Mises en oeuvre?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, pas mises en oeuvre. Désolée.

Je me demande comment elles pourraient être meilleures que les recommandations de ceux qui sont chargés d'assurer la sécurité de nos élections, alors que nous n'avons pas vraiment l'habilitation nécessaire pour obtenir des renseignements concrets et connaître les menaces réelles qui pèsent sur nous. J'ai l'impression que nous aurions une compréhension très superficielle des enjeux et que nos recommandations n'auront pas beaucoup de poids, en réalité, parce que je pense qu'il y a des personnes mieux qualifiées qui ont l'habilitation nécessaire pour connaître et comprendre les menaces auxquelles nous sommes confrontés. Ils sont tellement mieux renseignés et outillés que notre comité pour régler adéquatement ce problème.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Permettez-moi d'abord de dire que j'ai beaucoup de chance d'avoir une cote de sécurité de niveau « très secret ». C'est un processus très désagréable. Je ne suis pas certaine que tous les membres du Comité voudraient s'y soumettre.

Quoi qu'il en soit, j'ai bien entendu ce que vous dites. J'en tiens compte lorsque j'évalue personnellement les solutions. Cela dit, je pense que ceux qui ont les connaissances ne sont qu'une pièce du casse-tête. Il nous incombe de le faire, pour deux raisons. L'une d'entre elles est de prendre en compte les témoignages de ceux qui ont spécifiquement... En général, la tâche incombe à ceux qui ont les connaissances techniques nécessaires. Je m'y attendais, et c'est pourquoi j'ai proposé cinq réunions. Il s'agirait d'avoir l'avis de membres des médias et du milieu universitaire — ou d'autres organisations non gouvernementales — sur les orientations politiques. Il nous incombe de recueillir l'information et de l'évaluer. C'est la seule façon dont je vois les choses.

Je comprends ce que vous voulez dire. Ce n'est pas un obstacle, mais une considération qui, encore une fois, a été évoquée lors du petit déjeuner sur les options stratégiques. En outre, lorsque j'ai témoigné au Comité de l'éthique, j'ai mentionné qu'à titre d'ancienne membre de la fonction publique du Canada, j'ai une grande confiance à l'égard de la fonction publique canadienne, mais je suis toujours très préoccupée par la rétention des candidats qui ont les connaissances requises. J'en ai peut-être même parlé ici. Pour les trouver, faut-il aller à San Jose pour une fin de semaine, ou aller au siège social de Fortnite? Toutefois, ce n'est pour moi qu'une petite partie, car je pense que la société comporte de nombreuses facettes et de nombreux intervenants qui ont un rôle à jouer et qu'il faut écouter.

La deuxième raison, ce sont les recommandations que nous ferions en fonction des renseignements que nous aurions recueillis, pour ainsi dire.

Je viens juste de penser à un autre aspect. Je pense à la responsabilité que nous avons acceptée au G20, au G7 de Charlevoix, celle d'être un chef de file mondial dans ce domaine. En fait, je dirais que mener cette étude nous aiderait à respecter cet engagement. Je me demande si c'était au G20 ou au G7. C'était au G7 de Charlevoix.

Je pense que c'est au G7 que nous nous sommes engagés à être des chefs de file à cet égard. En tant que parlementaires, respectons cet engagement. Merci beaucoup.

(1125)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, la parole est à vous.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais simplement soulever quelques points en réponse à certains propos.

M. Graham a fait valoir que nous devrons présenter un rapport et montrer toutes nos faiblesses. C'est préoccupant, mais est-ce moins préoccupant que l'autre solution, à savoir nous mettre la tête dans le sable et dire qu'aucune menace ne pèse notre démocratie, qu'il n'existe aucune cybermenace ou menace due à l'ingérence étrangère? Je pense qu'il serait encore plus inquiétant de prétendre qu'il n'y a pas de menaces ou de nous cacher la tête dans le sable en disant que nous, les parlementaires, ne voyons pas cette menace.

C'est le premier point que je voulais soulever: les menaces sont réelles et nous le reconnaissons. Le nier n'a aucun sens. Vaut mieux s'attaquer aux problèmes de front.

Le deuxième point est plus général. Mme Sahota en a également parlé un peu; il s'agit de déterminer qui sont les experts dans ce domaine. Il y a des experts, évidemment, et ils font partie de l'appareil gouvernemental.

En fin de compte, comme M. Christopherson l'a mentionné il n'y a pas très longtemps, la Loi électorale et les élections sont au centre des activités du Comité. C'est là le mandat du Comité, conformément au Règlement. La Loi électorale du Canada est de notre responsabilité. La protection de notre processus électoral contre les menaces étrangères et les cybermenaces fait certainement partie du mandat d'examen et d'entreprendre du Comité.

Quant à refuser de faire cette étude sous prétexte que nous ne sommes pas des experts, eh bien, je dirais que la plupart des parlementaires ne sont pas des spécialistes pour bon nombre des enjeux dont le Comité pourrait être saisi. En tant que parlementaires démocratiquement élus, nous avons le devoir d'entreprendre ces études et de formuler des recommandations. C'est pourquoi nous faisons appel à des experts du domaine, notamment des gens du CST, du SCRS ou d'autres ministères chargés de ces questions.

Je vois où nous en sommes quant au sort réservé à cette motion. Je pense simplement qu'il serait dommage que le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre n'entreprenne pas au moins une étude sur cette question. Je vais en rester là, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, disiez-vous que le Comité de la sécurité de la Chambre des communes a plus d'habilitation — peu importe comment cela s'appelle —, ce qui lui permet d'avoir plus de renseignements?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui. Le comité du renseignement, de la sécurité publique, pardon... Nous n'avons pas tous la cote de sécurité nécessaire. Je suis d'accord avec les propos de M. Nater. Nous entreprenons beaucoup d'études. Nous ne sommes pas des experts. Notre travail consiste à écouter les experts, mais je ne pense toujours pas que ces experts... J'estime qu'il s'agira encore d'une étude si poussée que nous n'arriverons pas à trouver de vraies solutions pour que nos organismes puissent prendre les mesures et les actions requises.

Nous nous informerons un peu, mais je ne sais pas à quel point cela nous sera utile, en fin de compte. J'y serais favorable si nous avions beaucoup de temps, car il nous faudrait en effet beaucoup de temps pour véritablement aller au fond des choses.

(1130)

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pouvons-nous avoir un vote par appel nominal, s'il vous plaît?

(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

Je veux simplement donner mon avis sur les travaux du Comité. J'espère que nous pourrons donner des instructions à l'analyste pour notre étude sur la chambre parallèle avant l'été, parce que nous y avons consacré beaucoup de travail. Je sais que M. Reid a aussi une motion à ce sujet.

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, il n'est pas question des chambres parallèles. Le 1er mars, j'ai fait circuler un avis de motion. Je ne vais pas proposer la motion en ce moment. J'aimerais d'abord vous inviter à en discuter un peu.

La motion vise la modification de l'article 108(3)a) du Règlement en vue de modifier notre propre mandat. Les gens peuvent lire la motion eux-mêmes, mais elle crée essentiellement une situation où nous aurions deux responsabilités nouvelles. Nous ferions la revue de toutes les questions liées au Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et à la vision et au plan à long terme de la Cité parlementaire et nous présenterions des rapports à ce sujet — sans nous ingérer dans les responsabilités des autres organismes sur ce plan —, et nous produirions un rapport annuel à l'intention de la Chambre des communes concernant toutes nos discussions ou nos audiences. Plus précisément, nous mènerions une étude et nous présenterions un rapport à la Chambre d'ici la fin de la présente législature.

Les gens semblaient généralement réceptifs à l'idée générale. Je ne sais pas s'ils seraient aussi réceptifs à cette motion particulière. J'ai entre autres demandé à M. Bittle d'essayer de savoir si les dirigeants de son propre parti étaient généralement favorables à cette idée — et peut-être même favorables à l'idée de la motion elle-même —, et il m'a dit qu'il me reviendrait là-dessus. Je me demande donc si nous pouvons simplement discuter brièvement afin de savoir si les gens sont ouverts ou pas à cette motion ou peut-être, de manière moins spécifique, à l'idée d'assumer une part de responsabilité, et peut-être une grande part de la responsabilité de surveillance de ce projet très important et très coûteux.

Le président:

Merci.

En effet, je pense qu'il n'y avait pas qu'un appui général de la part de tous les partis. Il y a eu quelques interventions passionnées de la part de députés qui voulaient absolument intervenir dans les travaux de rénovation futurs de cet édifice et de l'édifice du Centre — c'est notre lieu de travail et nous devrions pouvoir intervenir. Je pense que l'administration a admis que nous n'intervenions pas assez dans les rénovations de cet édifice en particulier.

Je vous invite à en discuter. Je ne veux pas préjuger de l'issue des discussions du comité, mais je pense qu'il y avait certainement un accueil favorable à quelque chose de ce genre. Les gens pourraient avoir des suggestions quant au libellé, mais écoutons les partis.

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai donné suite à la demande de M. Reid et j'ai parlé aux gens. Nous n'en avons plus parlé et j'ai oublié de lui revenir là-dessus, mais nous n'avons aucun problème avec cela. Nous serons ravis de discuter de ce point de façon positive et d'aller de l'avant.

Je ne sais pas comment vous souhaitez structurer cela. M. Simms et moi avons discuté de l'allure que cela pourrait prendre. Je ne sais pas s'il nous faudrait plus d'une réunion pour vraiment parcourir cela. Je crois que nous avons tous les deux dit que nous aimerions entendre ce que vous avez à dire sur les allures que prendrait une « étude » d'après vous, mais cela pourrait n'être que le sujet d'une discussion entre nous.

En ce qui concerne un témoin, je n'en ai aucune idée. Nous avons pensé qu'une réunion ou deux à ce sujet serait raisonnable, mais nous serons ravis de vous entendre nous dire comment vous voyez cela. Nous serons plus qu'heureux de discuter de cela, et nous trouvons que c'est une bonne initiative.

M. Guy Caron: Monsieur le président…

(1135)

Le président:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur Caron, M. Christopherson est très passionné à l'idée d'une contribution du Comité aux rénovations de l'édifice du Centre.

M. Guy Caron:

Je comprends, mais j'ai une question pour M. Reid à ce sujet.

Le président:

Nous vous écoutons.

M. Guy Caron:

Quand j'étais au Comité des comptes publics, je me rappelle avoir étudié la remise en état de certains édifices. Est-ce qu'il y a un tel projet au Comité des comptes publics ou au BVG?

M. Scott Reid:

Le Bureau de régie interne le fait. Je n'ai rien entendu du tout à propos de la participation du Comité des comptes publics, mais cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils ne le font pas. C'est peut-être que je suis mal informé. Le Bureau de régie interne intervient, c'est sûr.

En bref, le problème, c'est que le Bureau de régie interne ne peut pas faire rapport à la Chambre. Au bout du compte, c'est la Chambre elle-même qui voudrait exercer — j'hésite à utiliser le mot « contrôle », parce que nous parlons d'un édifice que nous partageons avec le Sénat — un type de surveillance qui nous permettrait de dire ce que nous voulons absolument avoir comme caractéristique, ou de dire que nous sommes vraiment mécontents de l'échéancier qui est proposé, ou encore, que la structure de coûts doit être approuvée par quelqu'un. Il faut que ce soit la Chambre des communes dans son ensemble.

Le problème, c'est que le Bureau de régie interne ne peut pas faire rapport à la Chambre. Nous ne pouvons pas faire rapport à la Chambre. Ce pourrait être n'importe quel comité, mais il faut que ce soit un comité du Parlement — un vrai comité, par opposition au Bureau de régie interne — qui fait le travail détaillé d'entendre des témoins, de suivre les changements d'une année à l'autre malgré de multiples législatures, parce que l'édifice du Centre ne sera pas terminé avant le passage de multiples législatures. Il y aura vraisemblablement eu de multiples changements de ministres et même de gouvernements.

Tout ce que nous pouvons faire, c'est faire rapport à la Chambre. Le rapport peut ensuite faire l'objet d'un débat et être adopté. Il devient alors un ordre de la Chambre pour les gens qui exécutent les travaux en notre nom.

Est-ce que cela répond à votre question?

M. Guy Caron:

Oui.

Je voulais juste voir si cela se faisait par l'intermédiaire du comité des comptes publics ou du BVG, de façon ponctuelle ou récurrente, mais il semble que ce soit ponctuel.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Le président:

David Christopherson fait partie du Comité des comptes publics. S'ils faisaient quelque chose à cet égard, nous en aurions entendu parler haut et fort.

M. Guy Caron:

Il en aurait parlé.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que je peux répondre à M. Bittle?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Premièrement, j'aimerais vous demander s'il serait approprié, d'après vous, que je propose la motion.

Dans l'affirmative, pourquoi ne le ferais-je pas? Je parlerais ensuite très brièvement de la question du nombre de réunions et de ce genre de choses.

Le président:

Tout le monde a cela?

Une voix: Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais proposer la motion.

Je dirai seulement que je n'ai pas d'opinion arrêtée sur le nombre de réunions que nous devrions tenir. Parce que la date du rapport est la date de notre dernière réunion, je pense qu'il n'est pas nécessaire d'être très rigide. Nous pouvons remplir les espaces libres que nous aurons, compte tenu des autres questions dont nous discutons ici.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, pour les personnes qui écoutent à la radio, pourriez-vous au moins lire le premier paragraphe de votre motion afin qu'ils sachent de quoi nous discutons?

M. Scott Reid:

Pardonnez-moi. Moi aussi j'écoute cela. Oui, je vais vous la lire: Que le Comité entreprenne une étude sur l'article 108(3)a) du Règlement et envisage la possibilité de modifier le mandat du Comité pour y inclure la revue de toute question liée au Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et à la Vision et du plan à long terme (VPLT) pour la Cité parlementaire en vue d'en faire rapport à la Chambre des communes, nonobstant les autres organismes de contrôle et de surveillance, en ajoutant les deux sous-alinéas suivants à l'article 108(3)a) du Règlement :

Puis nous nous rendons à l'alinéa x), car il y a une énumération. C'est la fin d'une très longue liste dans cet article précis du Règlement. (x) La revue de toutes les questions liées au Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et à la Vision et du plan à long terme (VPLT) de la Cité parlementaire et la présentation de rapport à ce sujet, nonobstant les autres organismes de contrôle et de surveillance existants ou établis ultérieurement;

Je poursuis.

(1140)

[Français] (xi) l'examen et la production d'un rapport annuel sur le Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et la Vision et le Plan à long terme (VPLT) pour la Cité parlementaire, y compris les échéanciers actuels et prévus, l'état actuel des dépenses engagées et prévues, tout changement concernant ces aspects depuis le dernier rapport, pour autant que le Comité puisse faire rapport sur ces questions à tout moment, et que le Comité propose chaque année une recommandation tant que les articles 108(3)a)(x) et 108(3)a)(xi) du Règlement seront en vigueur."; et qu'il fasse rapport de ses recommandations à la Chambre d'ici sa dernière réunion en juin 2019. [Traduction]

Le président:

Très bien.

La personne qui prend les notes pourrait utiliser la motion que nous avons distribuée, étant donné qu'il y a les lettres que vous n'avez pas lues.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, en effet.

Le président:

À cause des contraintes de temps et de tout le reste, je suggère que nous essayions de faire cela en mai, parce que vous ne savez jamais ce qui va se présenter à ce comité. Il pourrait y avoir des questions de privilèges, par exemple.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est vrai.

Le président:

Nous ne voudrions pas que cela tombe dans l'oubli.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d'accord. J'aimerais dire une chose, cependant. J'aimerais que nous soumettions les recommandations à la Chambre, concernant les changements au Règlement, puis que nous attendions de voir ce qui se passe. Si la Chambre est prête à donner son consentement unanime à cela, nous pourrions aller de l'avant. Sinon, nous pourrions tout simplement laisser la question s'éteindre à la Chambre, mais nous ferions rapport à temps pour donner ce choix à la Chambre.

Je crois qu'il ne vaut la peine de chercher à réaliser quelque chose de ce genre que si le soutien est généralisé.

Le président:

Et si cela se termine à la Chambre à cause d'un seul vote, par exemple? Est-ce qu'il serait possible de recommander cela au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de la prochaine législature? Le PROC de la prochaine législature pourrait être d'accord ou n'être pas d'accord avec notre recommandation, mais au moins, ce serait au programme du Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai dit cela en partie parce que la seule façon d'obtenir un vote à la Chambre est de tenir un débat sur une motion d'adoption. Sur le plan pratique, il est très difficile d'organiser un débat sur une motion d'adoption alors que la législature tire à sa fin. Pour quelque chose de ce genre, j'aurais encore plus tendance à rechercher le consentement unanime, compte tenu de ce facteur d'ordre pratique.

Je suis au Comité depuis très longtemps, et je dirais qu'il n'y a pas de mécanisme officiel, mais le prochain PROC va vraisemblablement prendre très au sérieux ce qui s'est dit dans le PROC actuel sur une question de ce genre.

Le président:

Vraisemblablement ou pas vraisemblablement?

M. Scott Reid:

Très vraisemblablement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qu'est-ce qui nous empêche d'envoyer une lettre de recommandation à la prochaine version de nous-mêmes? Avez-vous pensé à cela?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est sensé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le PROC pourrait écrire une lettre disant au futur PROC qu'il devrait se pencher sur les questions que nous avons soulevées.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est comme le film Le jour de la marmotte, quand il casse le crayon pour passer un message à la personne qu'il sera quand il va s'éveiller.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Sur le plan pratique, nous pouvons faire cela et dire: « Chers membres du PROC de la 43e législature, faites ceci. »

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Le président:

Je crois que j'avais M. Nater sur la liste.

M. John Nater:

À ce sujet, au moment d'adopter les motions de régie interne au début de la 43e législature, le prochain PROC peut toujours adopter une motion de régie interne voulant que le PROC mène une étude périodique, tous les six mois ou chaque année civile, à ce sujet. C'est une autre option.

Très brièvement, en ce qui concerne les contraintes de temps, je crois personnellement qu'il serait bien d'entendre M. Wright, du ministère des Travaux publics, sur cette question. Il semble être le fonctionnaire désigné du ministère à ce sujet. Il serait bon de l'entendre une dernière fois avant la dissolution du Parlement.

Nous pourrions aussi entendre les architectes qui ont comparu précédemment devant le Comité. C'était Centrus, ou quelque chose de ce genre.

Le président:

Vous parlez de ceux que nous avons reçus à la réunion de décembre?

M. John Nater:

Oui. Ce serait simplement pour qu'ils fassent le point sur ce qu'ils ont constaté depuis que nous avons vidé les lieux, à savoir s'ils auraient quelque chose de nouveau à nous dire.

Le troisième et dernier point serait une séance d'information qui nous serait présentée par quelqu'un, M. Wright ou quelqu'un d'autre, sur la vision et le plan à long terme, sur ce qu'il y a en ce moment dans les dossiers comme ayant été approuvé. À la dernière réunion, diverses suggestions ont été faites concernant ce qui a été approuvé et le moment où cela a été approuvé.

M. Reid a parlé précédemment de la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Je crois que nous sommes tous dans le noir en ce qui concerne ce qui est approuvé — le dynamitage pour faire un trou dans la pelouse avant en vue de la construction du nouveau Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Il serait bien de savoir ce qui a été approuvé et ce qui est prévu en ce moment.

Ce sont les trois choses que nous pourrions faire, que ce soit lors d'une seule réunion ou de deux demies réunions. Ce sont généralement les témoins que j'aimerais entendre. C'est en quelque sorte indépendant de la motion dont il est question, car la motion recommande un changement. Cependant, c'est très lié à la motion.

(1145)

Le président:

Voulez-vous cela avant que nous finalisions la motion?

M. John Nater:

Je ne crois pas que ce soit nécessaire. Ce sont deux choses indépendantes, parce que la motion vise la structure relative à la reddition de comptes.

J'aimerais personnellement entendre les témoins que j'ai mentionnés avant la dissolution du Parlement. Je suis flexible.

Le président:

Je trouve que c'est sensé.

Monsieur Bittle, je crois que vous avez posé la question à M. Reid.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est bon. Si c'est une réunion ou deux, cela fonctionne pour nous.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la suggestion de M. Nater.

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois que nous devrions traiter de cela en tant que comité, plutôt que de modifier la motion pour contenir cela. Je suggère que nous mettions cela à l'ordre du jour.

Le président:

Oui.

Vouliez-vous que nous consacrions une réunion à la motion ou que nous tenions une réunion pour entendre les témoins, puis traiter de la motion à la fin de cette réunion? Quelles sont vos idées à ce sujet?

M. Scott Reid:

Pourquoi n'essayons-nous pas de voir si nous pouvons adopter la motion maintenant, puis passer au reste?

Nous ne sommes pas en train de nous contraindre à un nombre précis de réunions. Ainsi, le Comité peut décider de ne se réunir qu'une seule fois ou autant de fois qu'il le veut.

Le président:

Ce qui est proposé, c'est de mettre un terme à la discussion sur la motion dès maintenant, puis j'ouvrirai la discussion au sujet des autres personnes. Quelqu'un d'autre veut parler de la motion?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La motion est adoptée à l'unanimité.

Discutons maintenant d'une réunion pour entendre les témoins suggérés par M. Nater. Est-ce que quelqu'un s'oppose à ce que nous essayions de convoquer dès que possible ces témoins à une réunion?

Le greffier:

Je rappelle aux membres du Comité que nous avons déjà entendu des témoins dans le cadre de l'étude en cours liée au Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Je viens de demander au président si les témoins que M. Nater a suggérés viendraient témoigner dans ce qui serait la poursuite de cette étude, ou si ces témoins seraient liés directement à l'étude sur la modification du Règlement qui est recommandée.

M. John Nater:

Je crois que la motion de M. Reid est presque une motion à part entière. J'ai l'impression que les témoins ne parleront pas directement du changement au mandat du Comité. Bien sûr que c'est lié, mais je pense que ce serait une motion à part entière.

Ma seule question est de savoir si nous avons besoin d'entendre des témoins proposés par le greffier, peut-être pour cette motion particulière, mais je ne sais pas si c'est nécessaire.

Le président:

Comme le greffier le dit, la motion de M. Reid fait référence à une étude. Avons-nous besoin d'une étude, maintenant que nous avons adopté la motion? Nous avons adopté une motion qui dit que nous allons entreprendre une étude.

M. Scott Reid:

Il s'agit de l'étude de l'article 108(3)a) du Règlement.

Le président:

C'est juste.

M. Scott Reid:

La vraie question à se poser est celle de savoir si c'est la bonne façon, si nous voulons recommander ces changements au Règlement comme tel. C'est à ce sujet que nous ferions rapport à la Chambre.

Si nous invitons des témoins, ce ne sera pas tant pour leur dire: « Dites-nous en plus à ce sujet. » Ce serait plutôt pour dire que nous essayons de voir si ce changement va fonctionner ou non, et dans l'affirmative, de nous enquérir du type de rapports qu'ils nous présenteraient au cours de la prochaine décennie au moins, et de savoir qui d'autres nous devrions contacter.

Par exemple, je pense qu'au cours de sa plus récente comparution, M. Wright a parlé de nos partenaires parlementaires. Je ne savais pas exactement qui les partenaires parlementaires étaient. Nous essayerions de comprendre les aspects pratiques: les personnes avec lesquelles ils communiquent maintenant, la structure des pouvoirs, les personnes qui autorisent les contrats attribués, je suppose, pour les changements au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs — la phase deux — et les personnes qu'ils ont consultées au sujet des répercussions que cela aura sur les autres utilisations de la pelouse avant.

Je regarde cette partie du projet seulement, mais je présume que cela aura un effet sur les célébrations de la fête du Canada au cours de la prochaine décennie environ et que quelqu'un a approuvé cela.

Voyez-vous ce que je veux dire? C'est toute la question de la façon dont la reddition de comptes fonctionne et de la façon dont ils interagiraient avec nous et dont leurs autres partenaires parlementaires interagiraient avec nous. Après avoir entendu certains de ces témoignages, nous serions mieux outillés pour dire si les changements suggérés au Règlement sont sensés ou sont une mauvaise idée. Alors, notre rapport pourrait…

(1150)

Le président:

Ces témoins seraient liés à cette étude du Règlement.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est ce que je proposerais, oui, comme moyen de déterminer si... Même si à la fin, le Comité décide que ces changements proposés à ces dispositions du Règlement ne sont pas une bonne idée, nous aurions en tant que groupe une meilleure idée de l'endroit où se trouvent les voies de communication. À l'heure actuelle, notre seule certitude, c'est que peu importe quel est le cercle, nous sommes à l'extérieur, et il semble que ce soit la même chose pour la majorité des autres personnes à la Chambre des communes.

Le président:

Bien. Nous tiendrons une séance avec les témoins proposés par M. Nater, et nous en tiendrons ensuite une autre sur votre rapport, essentiellement, pour présenter ou non une recommandation concernant ces modifications au Règlement.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est bien cela.

Le président:

Est-ce que cela vous convient?

Veuillez repasser en revue les témoins pour le greffier, ceux que vous avez proposés, M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je propose M. Wright de Travaux publics, ou quiconque d'autre est jugé nécessaire au ministère; les architectes que nous avons entendus à la réunion du mois de décembre pour voir s'il y a du nouveau; et ensuite une autorité compétente pour passer en revue la vision et le plan à long terme, ce qui est actuellement approuvé. Qu'il s'agisse de quelqu'un des services administratifs de la Chambre ou...

Le président:

Bien. Nous prendrons donc une heure pour entendre les deux premiers témoins, et vous dites que la deuxième heure servirait à présenter la vision et le plan à long terme. On sait que ce plan est présenté...

M. John Nater:

Oui. Donc, c'est soit pendant la même séance de deux heures, soit deux séances de deux heures, peu importe ce qui fonctionne pour les témoins.

Le président:

Je vois. Nous allons essayer de nous en tenir à la même séance. Sinon, est-ce que cela vous convient?

Nous allons prévoir une autre réunion pour faire le rapport et discuter le plus tôt possible en fonction du calendrier.

Est-ce que cela convient à tout le monde? Bien.

Nous allons passer à d'autres travaux du Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai deux autres points.

Le prochain que j'avais sur la liste que j'ai fait circuler porte sur une motion inscrite au Feuilleton des avis pour faire comparaître le commissaire aux élections fédérales au sujet de SNC-Lavalin. Devrais-je la lire, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

La motion dit simplement: Que le commissaire aux élections fédérales comparaisse devant le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour parler des contributions illégales que SNC-Lavalin a faites au Parti libéral du Canada et de sa décision de conclure une transaction.

Le président:

N'oubliez pas, lorsque vous faites une liste concernant des membres du Comité, mon penchant qui consiste à donner des directives au chercheur sur l'étude parallèle de la Chambre que nous avons faite.

Quelqu'un veut-il discuter de la motion qui vient tout juste d'être lue?

Allez-y, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

M. Côté a aussi fait une brève déclaration sur le sujet. Je vais la lire pour le compte rendu. Malheureusement, je ne l'ai par écrit qu'en anglais, et je ne l'ai donc pas distribuée. Je m'en excuse. Le 2 mai, il a dit: À la lumière d'un regain d'intérêt médiatique quant à la décision du commissaire aux élections fédérales prise en 2016 de conclure une transaction avec le Groupe SNC-Lavalin inc. ainsi que de certaines allégations faites concernant les circonstances entourant la conclusion de cette transaction, le commissaire désire émettre certaines clarifications dans l'intérêt de maintenir la confiance du public dans l'intégrité du régime d'observation et de contrôle d'application de la Loi électorale du Canada. Le commissaire exerce son mandat d'observation et de contrôle d'application de la Loi d'une manière totalement indépendante du gouvernement de l'heure, y compris du Bureau du premier ministre et de tout ministre, de tout représentant élu et de leur personnel, ainsi que des fonctionnaires. En aucun cas, depuis la nomination du commissaire en 2012, des représentants élus ou des membres de leur personnel politique n'ont tenté d'influencer ou d'interférer relativement à toute décision quant à l'observation ou le contrôle d'application de la Loi qui ne les impliquait pas de façon directe à titre de sujet d'une enquête.

Je suppose que le passage suivant se veut une déclaration du commissaire. C'est probablement la partie qu'on voulait que les médias citent, car c'est en retrait et en italique. L'indépendance du commissaire est un élément primordial de notre système de contrôle d'application en matière électorale. Depuis ma nomination à titre de commissaire, il n'y a jamais eu de tentative d'influencer le déroulement d'une enquête ou d'interférer avec notre travail par des représentants élus, leur personnel politique ou des fonctionnaires. Et je tiens à être clair: si cela devait jamais se produire, je le dénoncerais promptement et publiquement.

Il était manifestement très préoccupé par la question. Il donne ensuite un peu d'informations connexes. Les décisions relatives à l'observation et au contrôle d'application de la Loi sont prises conformément à la Politique du commissaire aux élections fédérales sur l'observation et le contrôle d'application de la Loi électorale du Canada. Le paragraphe 32 énonce les divers facteurs considérés pour déterminer le moyen d'observation ou de contrôle d'application le plus approprié pour faire respecter la Loi dans un cas en particulier. En ce qui concerne SNC-Lavalin, certains des facteurs pris en compte par le commissaire sont énoncés dans la transaction. Tel que noté au paragraphe 32b) de la Politique, la preuve recueillie au cours d'une enquête est un élément important à considérer dans la prise de décision quant à l'approche à prendre dans chaque dossier. Ceci requiert une évaluation objective de la preuve qu'on a recueillie pour en évaluer la force. À cet égard, il importe de souligner qu'une transaction peut être conclue sur la base d'une preuve rencontrant le fardeau de preuve en matière civile, soit la prépondérance des probabilités, alors que le dépôt d'accusations pénales exige une preuve qui rencontre le fardeau pénal de la preuve, soit hors de tout doute raisonnable. Il importe de souligner que, suite à des amendements découlant du projet de loi C-23 en 2014, on a confirmé, par l'adoption de règles claires en matière de confidentialité, la pratique bien établie du commissaire de ne pas fournir de détails relativement à ses enquêtes. Ceci reflète d'ailleurs la manière dont les forces policières et les organismes d'enquête traitent des renseignements qu'ils ont recueillis suite à leurs enquêtes.

C'est la déclaration. Je pense que cela fixe des limites que nous devrions nous imposer en matière de confidentialité. J'estime que, en tant que comité, dans la mesure où nous en sommes conscients, nous serions en mesure d'obtenir d'autres renseignements utiles sur le fonctionnement de cette politique et sur la façon dont elle a fonctionné dans ce cas-ci.

Je me contenterai de dire que j'accepte sur parole la déclaration du commissaire, à savoir qu'aucun élu ni attaché politique a tenté de s'ingérer dans le processus ou de l'influencer. Nous essayons tout simplement de comprendre comment tout cela fonctionne et de voir dans quelle mesure c'est conforme à d'autres pratiques. Il y a un parallèle évident à faire avec les poursuites contre Dean Del Mastro, qui ont mené à des accusations.

Je ne sais pas ce que dirait le commissaire. Je peux deviner un peu en m'appuyant sur sa déclaration, mais nous n'obtiendrons une explication complète que s'il vient ici. C'est donc le fondement et la logique de la motion.

(1155)

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

On observe au Comité une tendance inquiétante depuis quelque temps. Tout d'abord, le greffier de la Chambre des communes a comparu ici, et les conservateurs se sont acharnés à remettre en question son intégrité sans preuve à l'appui. C'est ce qu'ils ont fait même si le greffier s'était adressé directement au bureau de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre pour lui demander s'il pouvait aller de l'avant, mais il n'a pas reçu de réponse et son intégrité a été remise en question.

Nous avons ensuite reçu le directeur général des élections. Je sais que nous ne nous entendons peut-être pas sur des questions politiques, et je sais que nous étions en désaccord avec les conservateurs pour ce qui est de leurs recommandations. Je ne siège pas au Comité depuis le début, mais nous avons avec le directeur général des élections une relation de travail exceptionnelle. Je ne pensais pas qu'un député pouvait intervenir et remettre en question son intégrité. Eh bien, c'est également ce qui s'est produit la semaine dernière lorsque l'honorable député de Carleton l'a traité avec un air réjoui de « chien de poche des libéraux ». Je pense m'être trompé la dernière fois, et il m'a corrigé, avec un air réjoui. On a ensuite fait venir quelqu'un d'autre à cette fin — j'espère que les députés qui sont normalement ici ne se livreront pas à ce jeu —, et son intégrité a été remise en question même s'il n'y était pour rien. La loi dit qu'il n'y est pour rien et rien ne prouve qu'il a agi ainsi, mais on s'est empressé d'un air réjoui à remettre en question son intégrité.

Ensuite, pendant l'heure qui a suivi, on a soulevé des préoccupations valables à propos de la façon dont David Johnston a été nommé. C'est M. Christopherson qui les a exprimées, et nous les avons entendues de la part du Parti conservateur la dernière fois, ce qui a donné lieu à un désaccord. Je pensais que David Johnston était une des personnes au pays dont l'intégrité ne pouvait pas être remise en question, compte tenu du travail qu'il a accompli. C'est pourtant ce qu'a fait le Parti conservateur. M. Johnston a dû défendre sa propre intégrité, en invitant ses détracteurs à regarder le travail de toute une vie. Tout cela s'est fait sans preuve, sans provocation. Maintenant, le Parti conservateur souhaite encore une fois faire venir un fonctionnaire pour remettre en question son intégrité sans preuve à l'appui.

Je ne sais pas s'ils comprennent le paradoxe de la situation, lorsqu'ils font venir un procureur indépendant pour remettre en question sa décision. J'ai déjà parlé du prix Nobel du paradoxe. Je ne sais pas si cela existe, mais vous seriez apparemment dans la course. Vous critiquez le gouvernement parce qu'il a envisagé de poser une question à propos de la direction prise dans une affaire juridique et d'un accord de suspension des poursuites, et c'est ce qui se produit depuis deux mois. Ils ont dit: « Comment osez-vous? » C'est ce que nous entendons depuis deux mois, mais aucune loi n'a été violée, comme l'ont déclaré les témoins. « Comment osez-vous même songer à poser une telle question? »

Nous voulons maintenant demander la comparution d'un procureur-enquêteur indépendant du Bureau du directeur des poursuites pénales, et interroger cette personne sur sa décision. C'est ahurissant et incroyable de voir à quel point le Parti conservateur cherche désespérément à alimenter la discussion sur SNC, jusqu'à être disposé à revenir sur tout ce qu'il a dit au cours des deux derniers.

Au bout du compte, je crois comprendre que le comité de la justice examine encore les prévisions budgétaires, que cela relève toujours de la compétence du commissaire aux élections fédérales dans le processus budgétaire et que l'occasion se présentera...

(1200)



Quoi qu'il en soit, au bout du compte, je ne pense pas que je vais appuyer la motion, mais j'aimerais mettre les choses au clair pour que nous ayons vraiment une motion sincère. Je propose donc de la modifier ainsi: Que le commissaire aux élections fédérales comparaisse devant le Comité pour parler des contributions illégales que SNC-Lavalin a faites au Parti libéral du Canada et au Parti conservateur du Canada et de sa décision de conclure une transaction avec SNC-Lavalin et Pierre Poilievre.

M. Scott Reid:

Chris, pouvez-vous nous donner le libellé?

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, il a demandé si vous avez le libellé.

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez-moi. Je parlais avec David de ce que nous allons faire cet été...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: ... et je me rends soudainement compte que nous avons fini les beaux discours pour passer au vif du sujet. Je ne suis pas revenu à temps pour prendre des notes; c'est ma faute.

M. Chris Bittle:

La modification serait à la fin de la deuxième ligne: « au Parti libéral du Canada et au Parti conservateur du Canada ».

(1205)

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez-moi. Puis-je interrompre et poser une question factuelle au milieu de tout cela? La contribution illégale dont vous parlez était-elle pour le Parti conservateur du Canada ou pour une association conservatrice de circonscription? Le savez-vous?

M. Chris Bittle:

Je ne suis pas tout à fait certain, mais si le libellé vous convient, c'est une question qui pourra être posée.

M. Scott Reid:

Quelqu'un connaît-il la réponse à cette question? La transaction conclue avec Pierre ou les responsables de sa campagne laisse entendre que la contribution était pour l'association de circonscription, pas pour le Parti conservateur proprement dit — à moins qu'elle ait été faite en estimant à l'époque qu'il allait être le ministre. J'essaie juste de comprendre ce qui... Vous pouvez comprendre pourquoi je veux des précisions. Je ne veux pas insérer une déclaration inexacte dans une motion. Si vous pouviez vérifier — je n'ai pas l'information sous les yeux —, nous pourrions alors... Je vois ce que vous voulez faire. Je veux que la motion soit exacte, et nous pourrions ensuite probablement l'appuyer.

Chris, Stephanie a vérifié sur le site Web de CBC. Il est écrit — et je lis le bon article — que le Parti conservateur du Canada a beaucoup moins profité du stratagème. Le Parti a reçu 3 137 $, alors que différentes associations de circonscription du Parti conservateur et différents candidats ont obtenu 5 050 $. Sommes-nous certains que c'est dans le contexte de... Oui, c'est le cas. Désolé. Je viens tout juste de voir le montant de 83 534 $ pour le Parti libéral, les différentes associations libérales...

Seriez-vous disposé à modifier un peu votre modification? Non. Cela vous gêne si...

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vous écoute. C'est de bonne guerre.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien. Oui, c'est vrai. Quoi qu'il en soit, laissez-moi vous dire ce que je propose, et vous pourrez décider ensuite.

Je pense que ce qui ressort, c'est que si nous faisons cela, il serait logique de parler du Parti libéral du Canada, du Parti conservateur du Canada et de leurs différentes associations de circonscription. En réalité, ce que vous faites, c'est souligner que SNC-Lavalin a donné de l'argent au Parti libéral du Canada ainsi qu'au Parti conservateur du Canada, ce qui est évidemment exact. L'entreprise en a aussi donné à différentes associations de circonscription des deux partis.

Si nous voulons faire comparaître Pierre Poilievre, je suppose que c'est parce que nous parlons de son association de circonscription. Je suppose que c'est l'une des associations concernées, Nepean—Carleton. Par conséquent, il nous faudrait mentionner les dons aux associations de circonscription, ou nous allons convoquer quelqu'un qui ne peut carrément pas parler de la question. J'aimerais également inclure les députés concernés, tant du côté conservateur que du côté libéral, dans les deux partis. Il faudra peut-être chercher un peu pour savoir de qui il s'agit. Cette façon de procéder ne vous paraît-elle pas raisonnable? Nous tentons essentiellement d'englober toutes les personnes concernées des deux côtés.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Caron.

M. Guy Caron:

À vrai dire, nous devrions ajouter que, dans le même article, on dit que les quatre candidats à la direction du Parti libéral ont également reçu des fonds.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce exact?

M. Guy Caron:

Oui, selon l'article. Je l'ai aussi en français.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Ce n'est malheureusement pas mon téléphone. Il vient de se verrouiller; je ne peux donc pas...

Si nous faisons cela, nous devrions peut-être ajouter « et les candidats à la direction » et aussi « consulter toutes les personnes qui ont ».

Monsieur Caron, je vous pose la question. Si nous nommons M. Poilievre, nous devrions probablement aussi mentionner les personnes impliquées qui ont conclu des transactions.

(1210)

M. Guy Caron:

Dans l'article, il n'y a aucun nom. Je ne peux donc pas vous dire les personnes dont il s'agit.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Je vais m'arrêter là parce que je n'ai en fait pas réussi à proposer un libellé précis, mais ce serait ma suggestion pour ce qui est de cet amendement.

Le président:

Où sommes-nous exactement, monsieur Reid?

M. Scott Reid:

J'attends la réponse de M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je ne suis pas d'accord pour dire que c'est un amendement favorable. Nous estimons qu'il faut souligner l'hypocrisie de tout cela. C'est la raison pour laquelle la motion devrait mentionner... Je suis d'avis que, si nous disons « Parti libéral du Canada » et « Parti conservateur du Canada », cela comprend les associations de circonscription et tout le reste. Je crois que c'est...

M. Scott Reid:

Y compris leurs associations de circonscription?

M. Chris Bittle:

J'estime que cela n'a pas d'importance, mais je crois que c'est important d'inclure... J'imagine que le plus troublant a été de voir M. Poilievre se présenter ici et mettre en doute l'intégrité du directeur général des élections et du commissaire aux élections fédérales.

Il a lui-même reçu et négocié une transaction, ce qui est un règlement juridique valide. Bref, si le Parti conservateur compte critiquer ce qu'a fait le commissaire dans un cas, il devrait aussi se montrer critique à l'endroit de M. Poilievre qui en a aussi conclu une et il devrait peut-être demander que leur collègue subisse aussi un procès. Gardons tout ce qui s'y trouve. J'aimerais que mon amendement demeure tel quel.

Une voix: Pourrions-nous lui demander de formuler...?

M. Scott Reid:

Il n'accepte pas le nouveau libellé. Il n'est donc pas nécessaire de le reformuler.

J'aimerais dans ce cas proposer une autre modification. Je suis très heureux que ce ne soit pas une réunion à huis clos.

Je me fonde sur les notes que j'ai prises concernant la proposition d'amendement de M. Bittle, qui vient modifier ma motion. La motion serait: « Que le commissaire aux élections fédérales et Pierre Poilievre comparaissent devant le Comité pour parler des contributions illégales que SNC-Lavalin a faites au Parti libéral du Canada et au Parti conservateur du Canada et à leurs associations de circonscription et de sa décision de conclure des transactions. »

Le président:

Est-ce un sous-amendement à l'amendement?

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois bien. Je ne sais pas vraiment la forme que cela devrait prendre à ce stade-ci sur le plan de la procédure.

Pouvons-nous le considérer comme un sous-amendement? Est-ce recevable?

Le greffier:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Faisons-le ainsi. Nous pourrons ainsi approuver ou rejeter cette proposition si nous le voulons ou en débattre.

Monsieur le président, ai-je raison de croire que nous sommes maintenant saisis du sous-amendement?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Je crois que cette proposition réussit à inclure la majorité des éléments. Cela n'inclut pas les quatre contributions qu'a mentionnées M. Caron concernant les candidats à la direction du parti, tout simplement parce que je crois cela sème beaucoup de confusion, mais cette proposition traite du sujet qui nous préoccupe, c'est-à-dire les contributions illégales de SNC-Lavalin. Personne ne conteste cela, parce que des transactions ont été conclues. Tout le monde est d'accord, y compris les personnes qui les ont reçues, qu'il ne s'agissait pas de contributions légales. C'est une excellente occasion de nous pencher sur la question sous-jacente.

Je me suis efforcé dans mon intervention d'expliquer que l'objectif n'est pas d'essayer de jeter le discrédit sur des élus ou des employés ici. Cela vise à essayer de comprendre la manière dont la justice est administrée dans ce cas précis, et la meilleure manière de le faire est de réaliser une étude qui se penche sur toutes les personnes qui ont reçu ces contributions illégales dans les associations de circonscription.

C'est mon boniment.

(1215)

Le président:

Madame Kusie, allez-y.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, j'ai l'impression que cette proposition a le même thème que la motion que j'ai proposée précédemment.

Monsieur Bittle, en êtes-vous certain? Le Comité PROC se transformera vraiment en ring de la WWF. C'est grave. C'est du sérieux. J'aimerais offrir une dernière chance au gouvernement. Proposons la motion telle quelle. Nous aurons un vote par appel nominal. Si cela ne permet pas de révéler autre chose, il n'y aura aucun problème, et nous passerons à autre chose. C'est tout simplement ce que je propose au gouvernement.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires avant de passer au vote?

Le Comité suspendra ses travaux quelque minutes.

(1215)

(1220)

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à mettre aux voix le sous-amendement?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Nous aimerions avoir un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous aurons donc un vote par appel nominal.

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président: Nous sommes de retour à l'amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

Je notais rapidement le sous-amendement. Je n'ai pas noté l'amendement.

M. Bittle ou le greffier pourrait-il le lire?

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, pouvez-vous le lire?

M. Chris Bittle:

Au début de la troisième ligne, nous ajoutons « au Parti conservateur du Canada », puis la fin de la motion serait « et de sa décision de conclure une transaction avec SNC-Lavalin et Pierre Poilievre ».

M. Scott Reid:

Seriez-vous prêt à parler plutôt de « transactions » au pluriel?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Je m'excuse, mais j'ai une autre question à poser. Vous êtes au courant que la transaction conclue avec Pierre Poilievre ne concerne pas SNC-Lavalin. C'est une question distincte.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je le suis.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Parfait. Je n'ai pas d'autres commentaires.

Le président:

Nous aurons un vote par appel nominal concernant l'amendement.

(L'amendement est adopté par 9 voix contre 0.)

Le président: Nous devons maintenant mettre aux voix la motion modifiée.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais avoir un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous aurons un vote par appel nominal.

En ce qui concerne le libellé, monsieur Reid, considéreriez-vous cela comme un amendement favorable si nous disions que le Comité « invite » le commissaire aux élections fédérales à comparaître?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Si cela convient à tout le monde, cela me va.

Le président:

Passons au vote par appel nominal sur la motion modifiée.

(La motion modifiée est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président: Poursuivons les travaux du Comité. La parole sera à M. Caron, mais je me demande si le Comité me permettrait d'utiliser la réunion de jeudi pour donner des directives au recherchiste concernant notre rapport sur les chambres parallèles.

Monsieur Reid, allez-y.

(1225)

M. Scott Reid:

Cela me convient.

Le président:

Quelqu'un s'y oppose-t-il?

C'est parfait. Nous le ferons jeudi.

Monsieur Caron, allez-y. [Français]

M. Guy Caron:

Je voudrais dire que je suis très heureux de mettre de côté la motion que M. Christopherson voulait présenter et de lui laisser le soin de la présenter à une date ultérieure. Je ne la présenterai donc pas ce matin. [Traduction]

Le président:

D'accord. Nous ne débattons pas de cette motion aujourd'hui.

Concernant la liste que j'ai distribuée, reste-t-il quelque chose dont nous n'avons pas encore parlé?

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a mon rappel au Règlement, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous avons essayé de le faire pendant que vous n'étiez pas là, mais cela n'a pas fonctionné.

M. Scott Reid:

Le rappel au Règlement que je voulais... Vous vous souvenez de ce qui s'est passé. Nous avions une réunion le 11 avril. La sonnerie d'appel retentissait, et nous avions un témoin, si je ne m'abuse. Vous avez donc déclaré la séance ouverte et vous avez demandé le consentement unanime du Comité pour entendre le témoin. Vous avez obtenu le consentement unanime du Comité dès le début de la réunion. Nous avons entendu le témoin, puis les membres du Comité se sont rendus à la Chambre pour voter.

D'après mon interprétation du Règlement, le président d'un comité ne peut pas demander le consentement unanime pour commencer une réunion. Par conséquent, c'est contraire au Règlement de commencer une réunion lorsque la sonnerie retentit déjà. En revanche, si la réunion est déjà commencée, la situation est simple à cet égard.

L'importance concrète de cela — ce n'est pas d'une grande importance — était qu'un certain nombre de personnes, dont moi, ne se sont pas présentées à la réunion en présumant qu'elle n'aurait pas lieu. C'était vraiment une méprise de bonne foi ou une interprétation différente des règles.

Je crois que mon interprétation est la bonne. Je suis prêt à concéder qu'elle est peut-être incorrecte, mais j'aimerais que ce rappel au Règlement soit réglé d'une manière ou d'une autre.

Voici tout simplement notre problème. Au Comité et à tout autre comité, un président ne peut pas prendre une décision qui nuit à la Chambre. Nous disons toujours que nous sommes maîtres de nos travaux dans les comités. Cela va évidemment dans les deux sens, mais je crois qu'il serait utile d'essayer de régler cette question. Je ne suis pas certain du bon mécanisme pour ce faire et confirmer que ma propre interprétation du Règlement est exacte ou inexacte. Je le mentionne simplement à mes collègues pour qu'ils réfléchissent à la question.

Le président:

Je vais vous donner deux options, monsieur Reid. Je vais vous donner la réponse courte et la réponse longue. La réponse courte est qu'il n'y a rien dans le Règlement qui m'empêche de le faire. Il y a quelque chose dans le Règlement qui m'empêche de le faire si la sonnerie d'appel retentit pendant une réunion, ce qui nous laisse alors deux choix.

Nous ne pouvons rien faire, mais il y a deux choix. Nous pouvons proposer de modifier les règles de procédure de notre comité pour préciser cet aspect ou nous pouvons en fait présenter un rapport à la Chambre pour essayer d'appliquer ce changement à l'ensemble des comités.

La réponse longue est que je pourrais lire, si c'est ce que vous souhaitez, ce qu'a préparé le greffier en utilisant de belles grandes tournures de phrase, mais je viens de le résumer.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce une option? Vous semblez quelque peu réticent.

Le président:

Non. C'est correct.

M. Scott Reid:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, l'autre option est que vous pourriez faire circuler ce document. Ce serait utile de l'avoir par écrit.

En fin de compte, comme je l'ai mentionné, j'aimerais que la Chambre fasse en sorte que le Règlement mentionne explicitement que cela signifie ceci ou cela. L'un ou l'autre, c'est correct. Je cherche vraiment à ce que ce soit dit de manière explicite.

(1230)

Le président:

Nous pourrions régler la question très facilement pour notre comité en faisant la modification ici. Si vous voulez saisir la Chambre de la question pour que cela s'applique à tous les comités, c'est plus problématique, mais nous pouvons aussi le faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux seulement voir si les membres du Comité souhaitent le faire. Je suis peut-être le seul que cela obsède. Si c'est le cas, je risque de faire perdre du temps aux gens. Pourrions-nous tout d'abord commencer par avoir une idée de ce que les autres pensent et vérifier si je suis le seul que cela obsède et si c'est un véritable enjeu? Si les autres pensent que c'est un véritable enjeu, j'estime que nous devrions donc en saisir la Chambre. Si les autres pensent que c'est seulement moi, je vais laisser tomber.

Le président:

D'accord. C'est un bon point. Pour que les gens sachent ce dont nous parlons, il s'agit du paragraphe 115(5) du Règlement: Nonobstant l’alinéa 108(1)a) et le paragraphe 113(5), le président d’un comité permanent, spécial, législatif ou mixte suspend la réunion lorsque retentit la sonnerie d’appel pour un vote par appel nominal, à moins qu’il y ait consentement unanime de la part des membres du comité pour continuer à siéger.

Voilà ce qui se passe si la sonnerie d'appel retentit pendant une réunion. Cependant, le Règlement ne prévoit rien si la sonnerie d'appel retentit avant le début de la réunion. Nous pourrions préciser cet aspect dans nos procédures ou proposer à la Chambre de modifier les procédures pour l'ensemble des comités, parce que ce n'est pas précisé. Cependant, comme M. Reid veut prendre le pouls du Comité à ce sujet, nous en discuterons.

Monsieur Caron, allez-y. [Français]

M. Guy Caron:

Je suis réticent.

Ce que j'essaie d'éviter à ce comité, ce sont des effets pervers non prévus. Je pense que, si la sonnerie commence à retentir et que la réunion n'a pas encore commencé, c'est la responsabilité du président ou de la présidente de convoquer la réunion à une heure qui va suivre la fin du vote pour laquelle il y a eu une sonnerie.

Avoir la possibilité de commencer la réunion alors que la sonnerie retentit peut soulever différents problèmes, et différentes questions stratégiques pourraient être utilisées par certains partis par la suite. J'aurais du mal à accepter une interprétation voulant que le président soit autorisé à commencer une réunion alors que la sonnerie retentit déjà.

Je suis donc en désaccord, pas nécessairement pour des raisons que je peux expliquer maintenant, mais à cause de l'utilisation possible de cette disposition comme une échappatoire probable par la suite. [Traduction]

Le président:

Oui. Je crois que c'est un bon point.

J'aimerais vous donner un peu de contexte concernant la situation dont il est question. C'était une ministre qui comparaissait devant le Comité pour discuter du budget, et il est difficile de prévoir des ministres à l'horaire. Nous voulions donc au moins entendre l'exposé, parce qu'autrement nous ne l'aurions peut-être pas entendu. Tous les représentants des partis qui étaient là étaient d'accord, de même que les deux vice-présidents. Bref, tous les partis étaient d'accord à l'époque, mais nous n'avons pas essayé de communiquer avec M. Reid ou les autres qui n'étaient pas là, ce qui était probablement une erreur. Vous avez maintenant le contexte.

Toutefois, vous avez fait valoir un très bon point; vous ne voudriez pas qu'une telle interprétation soit utilisée à mauvais escient.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais bien entendre ce qu'en pensent les députés libéraux. Ils ne se font pas normalement prier pour me contredire.

Le président:

M. Graham ne se fait jamais prier.

Allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Instinctivement, si le président a le consentement des députés de tous les partis, cela ne me pose pas de problème. C'est mon opinion. Si l'un ou l'autre des partis s'y oppose, je le comprends tout à fait. Cela ne devrait pas se produire, mais nous pouvons le faire, si les députés de tous les partis y consentent. Je ne vois aucune raison pour ne pas le permettre.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je n'étais pas là à cette réunion. Qui était là quand la réunion a débuté?

Le président:

Madame Kusie, vous en souvenez-vous? Vous étiez là, de même que M. Christopherson, je crois.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. J'étais là. Au tout début, il n'y avait personne d'autre que moi et la ministre, puis M. Christopherson et Mme Lapointe, je crois, se sont joints à nous par la suite. Je ne...

Le président:

Nous avions le quorum.

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous avions le quorum et nous avions le consentement du Comité. J'imagine que c'est la question que je me pose. Nous avions le quorum et nous avions le consentement du Comité pour entendre les témoins. Même si nous avions une règle à cet égard, cela aurait-il été acceptable?

Je le comprends et je suis heureux de tout simplement dire qu'à l'avenir, si nous n'avons pas le consentement du Comité, nous ne commencerons pas une réunion si la sonnerie d'alarme retentit. Je comprends la préoccupation de M. Simms. Je ne crois pas que c'était malintentionné. L'objectif était d'entendre l'exposé de la ministre aux fins du compte rendu. Je ne penche ni d'un côté ni de l'autre, mais je comprends la préoccupation. Selon ce que j'en comprends, le Comité a consenti à aller de l'avant. Même s'il y avait une règle en place, nous aurions tout de même accordé sept ou huit minutes à la ministre. Je crois que je vais me plier à la volonté du Comité. Je répète que je n'ai pas d'opinions bien arrêtées sur la question.

(1235)

Le président:

Un aspect important dans cette situation précise, c'était que nous devions évidemment revenir après les votes, mais nous n'aurions peut-être pas eu de temps pour poser des questions à la ministre. En entendant son exposé, cela nous a évidemment permis de nous assurer d'avoir du temps pour poser des questions lorsqu'elle est revenue. C'était davantage lié au fonctionnement — nous vérifiions simplement que tout le monde était d'accord — qu'à la procédure.

Monsieur Reid, allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

Je répète que je crois que les gens présents cherchaient vraiment à respecter le Règlement et que cela se fondait sur leur interprétation sincère du Règlement. Nous avions le consentement unanime. Vous l'avez demandé et vous l'avez obtenu. Il ne fait donc aucun doute que c'était ce que pensaient les gens qui étaient là. Vous aviez la majorité du Comité, ce qui signifie automatiquement que mon interprétation du Règlement représente ce que pense la minorité.

Il y a un élément qui est clair, et c'est que les gens ne souhaitent pas vraiment en discuter à ce moment-ci. Nous avons maintenant eu l'occasion d'en discuter, et c'est une séance publique. Cela figurera donc au compte rendu. Je ne crois pas que nous serons en mesure de formuler des recommandations à la Chambre. Nous pourrions simplement clore le sujet en vous demandant de nous dire comment vous agiriez dans une circonstance semblable si une telle circonstance se produisait d'ici la fin de la législature, et nous saurons à l'avenir si nous devons nous rendre à la Chambre dans une telle situation ou venir ici.

Avant de vous laisser répondre, j'aimerais seulement dire que ce n'est pas vraiment un problème pour notre comité. Nos réunions ont lieu directement en dessous de la Chambre des communes, qui se trouve à l'étage supérieur. Ce serait évidemment un problème plus grave sur le plan pratique si la réunion avait lieu dans l'édifice Wellington ou l'édifice de la Bravoure. Ce ne sera jamais le cas pour nous, mais c'est possible pour d'autres.

Je ne cherche pas à vous influencer dans un sens ou l'autre, parce que vos décisions au Comité n'établiront pas de précédent pour les autres. Cela vise simplement à souligner que vous pouvez faire l'un ou l'autre. Tant que vous précisez la pratique que vous appliquerez, nous saurons à quoi nous en tenir.

Le président:

En me fondant sur le commentaire que nous venons d'entendre, j'ai l'impression que cela ne semblait pas poser de problème si tous les partis qui sont représentés au Comité étaient d'accord. La prochaine fois, je crois que je m'engagerais à procéder ainsi et à, si c'est possible, envoyer un petit courriel à chaque membre du Comité pour que les quelques membres, comme vous, qui ne se sont pas présentés ici soient au courant que nous procéderons ainsi.

Je ne crois pas que cela se produira très souvent, mais c'est ainsi que je procéderais.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Cela vous convient-il? Y a-t-il d'autres points avant de clore la réunion?

Pour la réunion de jeudi, j'aimerais vous demander de réfléchir à des idées pour le recherchiste qui s'occupera de notre rapport sur les chambres parallèles, y compris vos recommandations pour nous assurer de maintenir le cap pour la suite des choses.

Ensuite, le jeudi 16 mai, la ministre comparaîtra devant le Comité pour discuter du Budget principal des dépenses concernant la Commission aux débats.

Monsieur Caron, M. Christopherson sera-t-il de retour?

M. Guy Caron:

Je suis certain que M. Christopherson pourrait vous répondre. Vous avez mentionné une heure pour la ministre. Y aura-t-il aussi des fonctionnaires, s'il y a d'autres questions?

Le président:

Les ministres sont normalement accompagnés de fonctionnaires. Je crois que cette ministre a toujours été accompagnée de fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé pour répondre aux questions.

Elle ne prend pas beaucoup de décisions concernant les dépenses du commissaire aux débats. Le commissaire aux débats a déjà témoigné devant le Comité. Nous l'avons entendu, et il a répondu à beaucoup de questions que les gens avaient sur des aspects précis. Le Comité a aussi demandé à la ministre de comparaître devant le Comité. Lorsqu'elle comparaît devant le Comité, elle est toujours accompagnée de fonctionnaires.

(1240)

M. Guy Caron:

Par exemple, si M. Christopherson souhaitait que les fonctionnaires restent plus longtemps s'il y a d'autres questions et que la ministre ne peut pas rester plus longtemps, est-ce quelque chose que le Comité serait prêt à envisager? J'aimerais demander au Comité de garder cette possibilité en tête jusqu'au retour de M. Christopherson pour voir si c'est ce qu'il souhaite.

M. Chris Bittle:

Cela ne m'aurait normalement pas dérangé, mais les discussions seront vraiment limitées en ce qui concerne la Commission aux débats. Le commissaire David Johnston a témoigné devant le Comité pour répondre aux questions. Nous l'avons déjà fait. Je présume qu'il y aura quelques questions concernant la Commission aux débats, mais les questions déborderont de ce cadre. Nous avons déjà entendu les fonctionnaires qui prennent les décisions concernant la Commission aux débats. Néanmoins, si les gens le souhaitent vraiment... Je ne sais pas, mais nous l'avons déjà fait.

M. Guy Caron:

Je souhaite simplement que le Comité attende le retour de M. Christopherson pour prendre la décision.

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord.

Le président:

Ce sera tout. Je remercie le Comité. Je crois que nous avons eu des discussions très professionnelles et nous avons réussi à abattre beaucoup de travail.

Merci. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard proc 25201 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 07, 2019

2019-05-02 PROC 152

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1125)

[Translation]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

Welcome to the 152nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.[English]

We had discussions with all parties, and if it's okay with everyone, we will proceed with 45 minutes for each set of witnesses because we have two sets and a half hour less.

Is that okay with everyone?[Translation]

Very well.

This morning, we are continuing our study on the main estimates for 2019-20, vote 1 under Office of the Chief Electoral Officer.

The witnesses are from Elections Canada. We have Stéphane Perrault, Chief Electoral Officer; Michel Roussel, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Electoral Events and Innovation; and Hughes St-Pierre, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Internal Services.

Thank you for being here today.

I will now hand the floor over to you, Mr. Perrault. You may go ahead with your presentation.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault (Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It is a pleasure to be before the committee today to present Elections Canada's main estimates and plans for 2019-20. This appearance also provides the opportunity to update committee members on the implementation of Bill C-76 and, above all, our final preparations for the general election.

Today, the committee is voting on Election Canada's annual appropriation, which is $39.2 million and represents the salaries of some 440 indeterminate positions. This is an increase of $8.4 million over last year's appropriation. As I indicated when I last appeared before this committee, the increase is essentially a rebalancing of the agency's budgets, moving expenses for terms and contract resources out of the statutory authority and into the annual appropriation in order to fund indeterminate resources. It does not represent any spending increase overall. In fact, it results in a slight spending reduction.

Combined with our statutory authority, which funds all other expenditures under the Canada Elections Act, our 2019-20 main estimates total $493.2 million. This includes $398 million for the October 21 election, which represents the direct election delivery costs that will be incurred in this fiscal year.

Our most recent estimates indicate that total expenditures for the 43rd general election will be some $500 million. The expenditures may vary due to various factors such as the duration of the campaign.

I note that, while preparing our budgets last fall, we had estimated the cost of the election at some $470 million. The difference is mainly due to Bill C-76—$21 million—which had not been passed at the time of preparing our estimates and therefore had not been taken into account.

Elections Canada continues to implement Bill C-76 and bring into force its provisions as preparations are completed.

Following my last appearance, the new privacy policy requirements for political parties, the administrative reintegration of the Commissioner of Canada Elections within the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, as well as the establishment of the new register of future electors, came into force on April 1.

On May 11, the changes brought by Bill C-76 for electors residing outside Canada will also come into force. The balance of other provisions will come into force in June. From an electoral operation perspective, Elections Canada will then be ready to conduct the election with the required Bill C-76 changes. Our applications, training and instructions will have been updated, tested and ready for use.

In terms of regulatory activities, all guidance on political financing will be finalized and published prior to the beginning of the pre-writ period on June 30. Leading up to that date, we will continue consulting parties on various products through the opinions, guidelines and interpretation notes process.

The agency is also gearing up to complete the audits of political entity returns following the election. We are expecting increases in the audit work stemming from the new requirements introduced by Bill C-76, notably for third parties, as well as the removal of the $1,000 deposit for candidates.

Despite this increase, we aim to reduce the time required to complete the audit of candidate returns by 30% in order to improve transparency and ensure more timely reimbursements. To achieve this, we are implementing a streamlined risk-based audit plan.

(1130)

[English]

A key priority as part of our final preparations is to further improve the quality of the list of electors. Every year some three million Canadians move, 300,000 pass away, more than 100,000 become citizens, and 400,000 turn 18. This translates roughly into 70,000 changes in any given week.

To ensure the accuracy of the register, Elections Canada regularly draws on multiple data sources from more than 40 provincial and federal bodies as well as from information provided directly by Canadians, mostly online. This will be facilitated by recent improvements made to our online registration systems to capture non-standard addresses and upload identification documents.

With the enactment of Bill C-76, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada is now able to share information about permanent residents and foreign nationals. This provides Elections Canada with a much-needed tool to address the long-recognized issue of non-citizens appearing on the register of electors. This spring, we expect to remove approximately 100,000 records as a result.

We have also recently written to 250,000 households for which we believe we have records that need correction. Efforts to improve the accuracy of the list of electors will continue and will be supported by a new pre-writ campaign to encourage Canadians to verify and update their information over the spring and the summer.

On April 18 the agency concluded an extensive three-week election simulation exercise in five electoral districts. The simulation allowed us to test our business processes, handbooks and IT systems in a setting that closely resembles that of an actual election. Election workers were hired and trained, and they participated in simulated voting exercises that factored in changes introduced by Bill C-76. This exercise also gave some of our new returning officers the opportunity to observe local office operations and exchange with more experienced colleagues.

Overall, the simulation exercise confirmed our readiness level while identifying a few areas in which we need to refine some of our procedures, instructions and applications. The final adjustments will be made this spring.

With the assurance provided by our simulation and most recent by-elections, I have a high level of confidence in our state of readiness and our tools to deliver this election.

From an electoral security perspective, the agency is engaged this spring in a number of scenario exercises with the Commissioner of Canada Elections and Canada's lead security agencies to ensure that roles and responsibilities are clear and that proper governance is established to coordinate our actions. As indicated in the Communications Security Establishment's most recent report, Canada is not immune to cyber-threats and disinformation.

Since the last general election, a wide range of organizations, including Elections Canada, have worked to adapt to the new context and strengthen Canada's democratic resilience in the face of these evolving threats. Elections Canada and its security partners approach the next general election with a new level of vigilance and awareness and unprecedented level of co-operation.

General elections are one of Canada's largest civic events. Our role is to provide a trusted and accessible voting service to 27 million electors in some 338 electoral districts. lt involves hiring and training more than 300,000 poll workers deployed in more than 70,000 polls across the country. Our returning officers have been continually engaged in improvements planned for the next election. I had the opportunity to meet with our field personnel across Canada. I can assure you that they are engaged, ready and resolved in their commitment to provide electors and candidates with outstanding service.

(1135)

[Translation]

Mr. Chair, I would be pleased to answer any questions the committee members may have. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much. It's great to have you back again. We have a great working relationship.

We'll go to Mr. Simms for seven minutes.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I'm going to be sharing my time with Mr. Graham.

First of all, welcome back, as always. I want to talk about some of the good things you've done over the past little while: the new policy requirements for political parties, the register of future electors and of course the administrative reintegration of the Commissioner of Canada Elections, which I think was something very important for them to do their jobs.

In the meantime, one new element of Bill C-76 that many people had questions about was the ramifications, both financial and administrative, for what we now know as the pre-writ period.

Can you comment on that, please?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We have new rules that will be in place for June 30. They're not in force right now; that period starts at that point in time. At that point there are now extensive rules for third parties on the one hand to cover all of their partisan expenditures and rules for parties to limit their partisan advertising expenses, which covers only the direct advertising. This is a new feature that we did not have in previous elections.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

Let me return to the future electors list, which is also a new process. Can you describe how it's going? I know, as of April 1, it's now in force. However, what do you have left to do to make sure this is ready for the coming fall election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The register is in place. Right now, we are not very actively pursuing registration of future electors. We are mostly going to focus on that after the election.

We are receiving. It is up and running, but our energy is not focused on the registration of future voters; it is focused on the register of electors for this election.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, understood. I think Mr. Graham is going to touch on that issue in just a moment—not to presuppose what he is going to ask, but I just did.

I want to get back to another issue. That is, during the last iteration of what was called the Fair Elections Act, Elections Canada found itself constrained in what it could communicate with the public. It's very important that Elections Canada be more outgoing. Certainly it would be great for Elections Canada to be communicating more broadly with the people about the importance of their constitutional right.

Can you tell us some of the things you are doing to reach out to people? I understand about the list itself and cleaning up the list, but what are some of the things you are doing to communicate to people about the vote itself that is coming up in the fall?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

During the writ period itself, we are not changing our approach. During the election period we're focusing strictly on providing information about where and when to register and to vote. That is our focus.

What has changed somewhat is that before the writ period we can now speak more broadly about the electoral process, including to voters, not just non-voters. One of the things we are doing, which I mentioned in my speech, is a pre-writ campaign to promote registration. We want to have Canadians register and update their information, so prior to the writ period we will have an influencer campaign to promote registration and voting. That will run starting this spring and this summer but will stop in the writ period.

We are also going to have a campaign on social media literacy to talk about disinformation, the risk of disinformation and making sure that Canadians check their sources when they go online on social media.

Those are the basic new things we're doing.

(1140)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

My remaining time can go to Mr. Graham.

The Chair:

You have three minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

As I recall, we've changed the rules a bit on foreign electors. Can you tell me the level of interest you're getting, if there is much, from potential foreign electors?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In terms of the new rules, it's a bit of a complicated process, because there was a ruling by the Supreme Court in February that allows Canadians abroad, who have resided in Canada, to vote notwithstanding the fact that they've been abroad for any number of years. Since that time, based on that ruling, we've received up to 2,000 new Canadians-abroad registrations. Half of them are from people who have been away for more than five years.

On May 11, the new rules will kick in, so that will change and restrict the ability of voters to choose where they can vote. Under the old regime, they could choose a number of places where they could vote; under the new rules, they have to vote at their place of last ordinary residence in Canada. That will kick in on May 11.

In terms of numbers, we've seen some increase but nothing very dramatic.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

In your comments, you talked about the 70,000 changes per week to the voters list, which is obviously significant. If I were to look at a voters list on any given day, what would you say is the percentage of accuracy of that list?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

You have roughly 10,000 changes that happen in any given day. The accuracy of the list evolves as we get closer to the election. At the time we began the last election, the accuracy was around 91.5%, and it ended up around 94.5%.

Based on the number of activities we're doing right now, I'm quite optimistic that we will be at a higher level when we start this election than in the last one, but it's something we'll have to measure then.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. I have a minute.

You talked about cyber-threats. I'm not sure that's a public discussion. It should probably have been an in camera discussion. Is there material that we would find useful to have in camera during this meeting?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Not really. We had to make a lot of changes to our IT infrastructure just because it had become obsolete. We had the opportunity this cycle to take advantage of that, to renew our IT infrastructure in a way that meets security standards. We have been working quite closely with the CSE to provide us advice on how to do that and make sure that our suppliers are trustworthy, and so forth.

We have, then, been working with them, and that really is the main thing.

The other thing I would add is that we have been doing training for all of our personnel at headquarters and in the field. You can invest enormous amounts of money in IT security, but if somebody clicks on a link, that compromises everything, so many of our efforts have been on awareness. We have many workers during an election at headquarters, and there are people in the field using computers. We want to make sure that everybody who has a computer is trained to recognize phishing attempts, for example.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And foreign influence is not your bailiwick.

My time is up. Thank you.

The Chair:

Welcome, Pierre Poilievre, to the committee, for seven minutes.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC):

SNC-Lavalin falsified documents to funnel more than $100,000 in illegal money through 18 company officials to the Liberal Party. Do you support the commissioner's decision to let the company off without charges?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I am not aware of the details of the investigation or of all the circumstances that informed this decision. What I can say on this is what is on the public record, which is that the seriousness of the offence is one factor but is not the only factor in making the decision to prosecute or take other steps, such as a compliance agreement. The commissioner has been explicit on that.

One factor, for example, is the availability of evidence. Is there evidence that could support a criminal prosecution? If there is not such evidence, then that's the end of the avenue for prosecution.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

On that point, the CBC did a documentary, and it discovered a list of employees through whom the money was funnelled. I am going to quote: All of the former SNC-Lavalin employees and spouses named in the list who spoke to The Fifth Estate...said they were not contacted by the Commissioner of Canada Elections to let them know their names were on the document.

These are the people through whom the illegal donations were funnelled. You say there's no evidence. How could you possibly conclude that, when none of the people who were used to funnel the illegal donations were even contacted?

(1145)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I did not speak to the existence of evidence in that particular file. I said that this is one factor in general that the commissioner takes into account. I'm not aware of the evidence that was available in that file or the evidence in particular that relates to any of these individuals.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Well there's plenty of evidence, in fact, the company has now conceded that it had generated fictitious bonuses and other benefits which, according to information obtained in the context of the commissioner's investigation, were of a total value of $117,803. That is evidence; that is known.

Knowing this, do you still support your commissioner's decision not to pursue the matter in court?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

As I said, I cannot pronounce on that. I do not, by institutional design, have access to the information.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Who would?

The Chair:

I'm sorry, I have a point of order.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is a matter for the elections commissioner, who, because of the Canada Elections Act, was not part of Elections Canada at the time of this investigation.

That's just a quick point. Carry on.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Who would?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The Commissioner of Canada Elections has this information.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Do you support his appearance to answer these questions before this committee?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's neither for me to support or to oppose his appearance.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

You might want to claim that, but you asked to have control over the commissioner, you now hire the commissioner, you fire the commissioner and you decide how much the commissioner gets paid—that was something you asked for in the legislation. Now you seem no longer to want to have the responsibility that comes with that power. Which is it?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

For the record, the reunification of the commissioner with Elections Canada was not something that was recommended by Elections Canada.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

The original separation was vigorously fought by Elections Canada when you were at the highest level. You also endorsed the bill that reunified them. You asked, then, for the power, but you don't seem to want to have the responsibility.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The unification is an administrative one. The Chief Electoral Officer, under the regime as it is designed under Bill C-76, is at arm's length from any investigation conducted by the commissioner.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

The office is now reunified, and you are now responsible for it; section 509 of the current statute makes it so. That is the hard reality.

Can you understand why Canadians would become cynical about the fair and even-handed enforcement of election law in this country, when well-connected Liberal insiders can engage in a four-year-long conspiracy involving 18 company officials to funnel illegal money using false and fictitious documentation and not face a single day in court? Can you understand why someone might get a little bit suspicious about whether the law is being evenly enforced on elections?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Mr. Chair, as I've said, I do not have the information that allows me to have a sense of that particular file and the reasons that supported the decision of the commissioner. I'm not aware of the discussions that took place with the commissioner or with the DPP, if there were any discussions with the DPP. This is outside of the scope of my activities.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

You said in your opening remarks that it was within your scope, because you pointed out that the reunification affected the budgetary matters of your agency. You have acknowledged the reunification; my friend across the way has celebrated it. All of a sudden it has become very inconvenient for you to have the two offices reunified in one, because while you want the power, you don't want the responsibility.

It sounds to me as though what we need here is the commissioner to come to explain his actions, if you won't explain them for him.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's something for the committee to decide. It's certainly not for me to decide.

Under the new arrangements, the only thing I would add is that we are responsible—I am responsible—for the administrative support of the commissioner, but not for the specific investigations he may choose to pursue or not pursue, and if he pursues them, the measures that he undertakes pursuant to the—

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

So, are you committing that no one in your office or under your employment will ever speak to the commissioner about investigations?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We certainly will not be involved in any decision regarding the conduct of an investigation—

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

But you discuss them with him?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The commissioner is empowered to ask my view or the views of others—

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Would you offer them without being asked, ever?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that's an abstract question. I don't have the answer—

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Well, it's not abstract. There are investigations that could happen, and you would be able to advise on them. Do you, ever?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If the commissioner has a question regarding, for example, the importance to the regime of a particular provision, I think that's a fair question.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

So you do discuss investigations with him.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That is not what I said.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Well, it seems to be what you said.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

What I have said, Mr. Chair, is that if the commissioner wants to engage in a conversation regarding the importance, for example, of a provision of the act, the integrity of the regime, that is a sound thing. I think the Commissioner of Canada Elections, who enforces the act, and the Chief Electoral Officer need to have a common view on how the regime operates and what the more important aspects of the regime are.

(1150)

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Well, I think, given that you've acknowledged that you can have conversations with the commissioner, you should have a conversation about how it is even possible for an enterprise like SNC-Lavalin to carry out this kind of patent, four-year running fraud involving 18 employees to funnel money, 93% of which went to one political party—the party whose government appointed you to your position—and not face one single day in court for it.

You offered your opinion on a lot of different things over the years. Can you at least offer your opinion on whether you think that state of affairs is correct?

The Chair:

Do so briefly, because the seven minutes are up.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Mr. Chair, I would simply point to the compliance agreement as drafted by the commissioner, in which he was at pains to explain the evidence obtained by SNC-Lavalin and the fact that this was a critical aspect of pursuing the matter. As I said before, the existence or absence of evidence supporting a prosecution is of course critical to the ability to do a prosecution. Anything beyond that relates to the investigation itself, and I cannot speak to it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we go to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair. With your permission I'd like to move from inquisition back to the matter at hand.

My question to you, first of all, would be, what was the biggest challenge of implementing Bill C-76? What was the toughest part of it?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly, there was quite a large effort required in changing the IT systems that are affected. It's not something that is easy to appreciate from the outside, but many of the business processes in running a launch involve IT systems, and doing comprehensive changes to IT systems in the months leading up to an election is a challenge.

We were able to do it; I can say with confidence that these changes were made. They were tested in January; they were then stress-tested to the volume, and exceeding the volumes, that you can expect in a general election; and they were deployed in a simulated election. We've handled that challenge and we're confident. I am certainly confident going into this election.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have some security questions, and I know Mr. Graham has too. I can do them now, but I have a funny feeling that they still might be better done in camera, because I want to drill down a bit. I'll leave that to the end, however, and we can make a determination.

As much as the government gets credit for Bill C-76 and unravelling some of the ugliness that was in the “unfair elections act” that the previous government enacted, the way they did it was ham-fisted and borderline incompetent.

However, am I correct in stating that the government, like the previous party in power, did not change the law regarding parties submitting receipts? It's my understanding that for years and years we've been trying to get to the point that parties should have to provide receipts in the same way candidates do when you are evaluating whether they are entitled to their subsidies.

I can't think of the number right now off the top of my head, but $76 million comes to mind, though that could just be a number I'm pulling out of thin air. It's a huge amount of money that the parties get subsidies for, and they don't have to provide receipts.

Is that still the case?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, that's the case. The number you're looking for is $76 million.

We are the only electoral jurisdiction, I believe, in Canada that does not have access to any supporting documentation for parties, so I was disappointed that this was not a part of Bill C-76.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, it is just unbelievable that we've gone through two regimes that changed the law and both have said no to parties having to provide receipts. How the heck do you get subsidy dollar one from the Canadian government without a receipt if they ask for it? This has to be the only example, and it's such an abomination in our democracy; it truly is.

This is my last kick at this thing, which is why I'm going at it. This is just unacceptable.

How many millions of that $76 million should not go to the political parties—my own included—when they're not even providing receipts? We do not know. I put the blame for this squarely with this government and the previous government, who refuse to hold themselves to the same account that they demand from everybody else who deals with government. If there's anything to write about in terms of big things that still need to be done to fix our democracy.... People think security, and that's legitimate, but accountability, folks: $76 million of subsidies goes to political parties with no receipts. Unbelievable.

Now I want to turn to security, so I'll just ask the questions, Chair, and I'll leave it to you and the witnesses to determine whether we should stay in public or not.

Right now, what do you see as the single biggest macro threat to our election?

(1155)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I can only refer to the recent report of the Communications Security Establishment, which is a public report. It says basically that the biggest threat is disinformation and the biggest target is the ordinary voter. That's the biggest target, and that's why we think it's important in the lead-up to the election to have an awareness campaign to make sure that Canadians check their sources.

We have no indication that there are any foreign actors who intend to favour one party versus another. We have no sense that this is the concern. I think the general sense is that there's an interest in undermining the electoral process itself and the willingness of Canadians to participate and trust in the electoral process. That's where our focus is going to be.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Where are we expecting these threats?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's not for me to speak to that. It's for a national security agency.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Don't you need to know that, though?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It really doesn't change what we do. Our role is to protect our infrastructure. Our role is to correct misinformation about the voting process. Our role is to educate Canadians. Whether the disinformation comes from one country or another or whether it's internal to Canada really does not affect our response to this. It affects Global Affairs; it certainly affects CSIS, for example, or CSE, but not Elections Canada.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I see.

I assume that there is a plan in place to be evaluating this question throughout the election. Then, I would also be interested in what your plans are for everybody to regroup after the election, in terms of security, to see what worked, what didn't work and how well we defended our system.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

These are two good points.

In terms of regrouping, we're not there yet, but it is certainly something that is high on my mind. After the election we'll have to touch base to see what happened. What we are doing now, as indicated, is working using scenarios—tabletop exercises with security partners—to make sure that we each understand what the other can do, what the boundaries are, what the contact points are, so that the governance is clear and that nothing falls between the cracks and that we operate efficiently, if we need to intervene during the election.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

Are you in consultation if not outright coordination with other allies that are facing the same problem?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. First of all, we take part in various forums that exist around the world and have discussed this issue. We've been in Estonia—I believe last March. There was a forum at the OAS as well this year. We have what we call the four countries, which are the U.K., Australia, New Zealand and Canada.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—the Five Eyes?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

—well, without the Americans.

We are a group that are in fairly constant communication. I will be in London this summer engaging them, looking at what will have occurred in the Australian election, which is just happening. We are, then, keeping abreast of the issues around the world.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you all for being here today.

Can you remind me when the commissioner was appointed?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I believe it was in 2012, but I'd have to confirm.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I also believe that it was in 2012. I believe that was a few years before this government was elected, as a first point.

The next point is that the honourable member from Carleton has mentioned and has criticized Elections Canada as really “a Liberal black dog”. Would you care to comment on that?

(1200)

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

I'm sorry, that is false.

As a point of order, I said “lap dog”, not “black dog”.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Oh, I'm sorry, Mister. I have a transcript in front of me. It says “black dog”, but we'll go with “lap dog”.

Would you care to comment on that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I will not comment on that.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Looking around the world, do you have any concerns with elected officials calling into question the integrity of impartial elected officials?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Again, I will not comment on that.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The job of Elections Canada is to remain independent and be a beacon to Canadians, but also a beacon to other countries, because we've heard from other individuals at this committee that Elections Canada has a strong profile around the world because of the regulations in place and because of the reputation of Elections Canada—not just this current administration's, but going back many decades.

Is that the role you seek to maintain as Chief Electoral Officer?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We have a strong tradition in Canada. We will be celebrating next year our 100th anniversary, “we” being Elections Canada. One hundred years ago, Canada chose to create an independent chief electoral officer. It was the first country in the world to do that, and it's been considered ever since a model around the world in terms of the independence of the office. It's something we're very proud of.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Before the commissioner was moved back to Elections Canada under Bill C-76, can you remind us where the commissioner was previously housed?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Until recently, he was within the office of the DPP, the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's interesting, that he was with the Director of Public Prosecutions. It's also interesting that the opposition is calling, seemingly, for interference in a prosecution, which is ironic, given the debate in this city over other issues the past few months ago.

I appreciate that you don't want to comment and shouldn't comment—and I respect that—on this prosecution. Would you care to comment on the compliance—?

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr, Chris Bittle: I don't know, Mr. Poilievre. I think in this committee we wait for each other to finish, but I know you're new and that this is your first time being here.

Would you care to comment on the compliance agreement between the Commissioner of Canada Elections and Mr. Poilievre that was signed in 2017?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

For the very same reason that I will not comment on the SNC-Lavalin compliance agreement, I will not comment on that compliance agreement or any compliance agreement.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I appreciate that. It's interesting that Mr. Poilievre, in his glass house over there, is throwing stones. I guess he didn't question whether he should have his day in court to hear this out. I appreciate that he may be up for the Nobel Prize in irony, in coming here today to make this criticism.

I have a few minutes left. I'd like to turn it over to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I found it very ironic. I hope I got this correct, but Mr. Poilievre mentioned the independence. Listen, I'm all for that. As a former critic.... About the commissioner returning to Elections Canada, it was never suggested by them. It was a decision that we wanted to make as a party, and on becoming government, we wanted to return to that for the independence. I agree with him, but I found it ironic that his very last comment there was about telling this man to tell the commissioner about SNC-Lavalin.

You should have that conversation with him.

They're either independent or they're not, which is what Mr. Poilievre suggested. That's unfortunate. As Mr. Christopherson likes to say, I mean, come along.

Anyway, thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll move on to another point.

Getting back to the topic at hand, I'd like to ask questions about the simulations and how those ran. I was wondering if you could expand on that a bit, please.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly. It's something that we've done once in the past on a much smaller scale. This time around, we essentially opened five returning offices. We deployed the technology. A lot of our systems are new. We trained the personnel to work on that technology, to use it. We simulated complaints and public inquiries. We tested the governance, not just the systems and the response. They interacted with headquarters, for instance, on those issues. As I said, they hired personnel. They trained them.

Just like in a real election context, they go home for a few days after the training. When they come back, it's not just right after the training. They will have forgotten a few things. Then we run simulations of different kinds of voter ID issues and of people registering in order to make sure they understand the procedures and they run them well. Then we make adjustments to our training as necessary. We also ran scenarios of the wrong things happening. People were not aware of what those scenarios would be, so they had to respond appropriately.

It's a comprehensive test of the systems, the governance, the procedures and the training that go into an election.

(1205)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I only have a few seconds left. In which regions of the country did you operate these?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There were five: New Brunswick, Montreal—in Outremont, Toronto, Winnipeg and Ottawa.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Ms. Kusie for five minutes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you very much, Chair.

I certainly would like to thank the honourable member for Carleton for being here today to bring these occurrences to light, and I have to say that I have a lot of respect for the Chief Electoral Officer. As a former diplomat, I can see that he's being very gracious in his responses and is certainly doing his best to answer the questions without any overreach for his counterpart, the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

However, it seems to be, following upon the questioning of my colleague, the honourable member for Carleton, that it's necessary to go beyond the responses of the Chief Electoral Officer here. He has indeed indicated that if it is the will of the committee we certainly can ask these questions of the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

As such, Chair, I would like to move the following motion, which is now being table-dropped in both official languages.

I would like to move a motion that the Commissioner of Canada Elections appear before the procedure and House affairs committee on our study of the estimates.

I am moving this motion at this time, Chair, and would like to open it up to debate. Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We should be playing the Jeopardy! song in the background.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Mr. Chair, if I could just correct the number I gave, the reimbursement of $76 million is the overall number, including candidates, and $39 million is for parties.

The Chair:

Okay.

The clerk and the researcher have pointed out to me that the commissioner's estimates are actually not before this committee. They're before the justice committee, so this motion would be out of order.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

One moment, Chair, please. I'd like to take a pause.

The Chair:

Sure.

(1210)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Mr. Chair, it sounds like you've made a ruling that this is out of order. Is that correct?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case, I would like to introduce the following motion: that the Commissioner of Canada Elections appear before the procedure and House affairs committee to discuss the illegal contributions made by SNC-Lavalin to the Liberal Party of Canada and his decision to issue a deferred prosecution agreement or whatever it's called.

A voice: A compliance agreement.

Mr. Scott Reid: Yes, a compliance agreement.

The Chair:

You're giving notice?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm introducing that motion right now.

The Chair:

For 48 hours' notice?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, right now.

The Chair:

You have to give notice because it's not on the topic we're discussing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Ah. So tell me, what's happening next Tuesday?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: No, no, this is relevant, because this will be back next Tuesday.

The Chair:

We haven't determined anything yet. It was basically committee business.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Well, this will be our first item of committee business, then, Mr. Chair.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

One moment, Chair.

The Chair:

You have about three minutes left.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: Yes.

The Chair: Okay, Stephanie. I think you have about two minutes left. Then we'll switch our panel of witnesses.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. Thank you, Chair.

Monsieur Perrault, you mentioned on Tuesday at the Senate finance committee that you estimate the number of Canadians voting will go from 11,000 electors to 30,000...due to the new provisions set out in Bill C-76. How did you come up with these estimates, please?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There were two methods. The main method was looking at the increase in demand after the first Frank ruling, if I'm not mistaken, at the trial that struck down the five-year rule. We then saw an increase for several months, during a number of months, when the five-year rule was removed, so some projections were made based on that.

We also know that in the United States, Americans abroad can vote without restrictions as to the years they've been away, so we looked at the proportion of Americans abroad who vote as compared to the proportions of Americans in the States who vote. You have to take into account that many Americans abroad are in the military, and that's a bit of a skewing of the numbers, so it's not an exact science.

Our projections of 30,000 remain. I would call that a class D estimate, in the sense that it's not an exact science, but we maintain our position on those numbers at this point in time.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

If there end up being significantly more Canadian electors voting abroad than the estimated—let's just say 100,000—will Elections Canada have the necessary resources to deal with such a significant increase? Perhaps while you're addressing that you could also address the numbers at home as well, to avoid massive delays in voting. Perhaps you can start with the voting abroad.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We're not at all worried about the numbers of those voting abroad. We have excess capacity to triage large mail numbers. We are acquiring new machines to triage the mail. We will be prepared. I'm not worried about that.

In terms of the voting in Canada, what we are seeing is a trend in the last election, a trend that we've seen provincially and internationally: there is a tremendous increase in voting at advance polls. In New Zealand, they're at 50%. In Australia, they're at close to 50%, and I would suspect that they're going to get to 50% in this election. Federally, we could be well into 30% or 35% in the next election.

There are a few things that we've done. We've streamlined the paper process at the advance polls. We've increased by 20% the number of advance polls. That will also serve to reduce the travel distance in rural areas. It's not just the volume. It will get the polls closer to the people. There's an increase in the voting hours. They used to be only from noon until 8 p.m., and now it's from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. There's a range of tools that we've done.

The other thing that we've seen in Ontario and Quebec provincial elections is a dramatic increase in voting at the returning office. It was 400% in Quebec and 200% in Ontario, so we have streamlined the special ballot process that is used for voting at the RO's office to make it more efficient. We're increasing the capacity as well.

(1215)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Kusie. Now we'll do the standard question for votes on estimates.[Translation]

Shall vote 1 under Office of the Chief Electoral Officer carry?[English] OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ELECTORAL OFFICER ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$39,217,905

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Thank you very much for coming. We appreciate having you back. I'm sure we'll see you many times in the future.

We'll suspend while we change witness panels.

(1215)

(1215)

The Chair:

Good afternoon. Welcome back to the 152nd meeting of the committee as we continue our study of the main estimates for 2019-20. We now turn our attention to vote 1 under the Leaders' Debate Commission.

We are pleased to be joined today by the Right Honourable David Johnston, the Debates Commissioner. He is accompanied by Bradley Eddison, Director of Policy and Management Services at the Commission.

Thanks to both of you for making yourselves available today. I'll now turn the floor over to you, Mr. Johnston, for your opening remarks. It's great to have you back.

Right Hon. David Johnston (Debates Commissioner, Leaders' Debates Commission):



Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. It's wonderful to be back.[Translation]

Thank you for the opportunity to appear before the committee today.[English]

Thank you inviting the Leaders' Debates Commission to review our main estimates. You've kindly introduced us, so let me jump right in.

As you know, the mandate of the commission is to put on two debates, one in each official language. Within that directive is also a commitment to important elements such as transparency, accessibility and reaching as many Canadians as possible. Since my appointment as debates commissioner in late 2018, the commission has been working to achieve these goals and help give Canadians the best debates possible.

Let me begin with a brief overview of the 2019-20 main estimates. The commission is seeking a total of $4.63 million overall for its core responsibility, which is to organize two leaders debates for the 2019 federal general election, one in each official language.[Translation]

Before I tell you how we plan to use the funding to carry out our mandate, I'd like to talk a bit about what we've accomplished thus far.[English]

Since work began in December 2018, the commission has completed the first phase of our mandate, consulting with over 40 groups and individuals with a wide range of expertise and views. This includes accessibility, youth, indigenous, academic and journalistic groups. We've been pleased with the positive responses from these groups on the existence of a debates commission and our mandate. Our consultation