header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-04-19 PROC 97

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 97th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This morning, we pursue our study of the use of indigenous languages in the proceedings of the House of Commons. We are pleased to be joined by officials from two government departments. These aren't the ones that provide translation; these are other ones that have an interest in this.

Our witnesses are, from the Department of Canadian Heritage, Hubert Lussier, Assistant Deputy Minister, Citizenship, Heritage and Regions; and William Fizet, Director General, Citizen Participation. We also have, from Statistics Canada, Jean-Pierre Corbeil, Assistant Director, Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division; Pamela Best, Assistant Director, Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division; and Vivian O'Donnell, Analyst, Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division.

Thank you for being here.

I'll now turn the floor over to Mr. Fizet for his open statement, to be followed by Mr. Corbeil. [Translation]

Mr. William Fizet (Director General, Citizen Participation, Department of Canadian Heritage):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.[English]

Thank you for allowing us to be here to provide information on indigenous languages in Canada as part of your study of the interpretation of indigenous languages in the House of Commons.

I would like first to acknowledge that we are on traditional Algonquin territory and that the language traditionally spoken in this territory is referred to as Algonquin or Maniwaki Algonquin.

My name is William Fizet. I'm the Director General of the Citizenship Participation Branch, and within that branch we have the aboriginal peoples' program.[Translation]

Budget 2017 allocated $19.5 million to the aboriginal languages initiative annually until 2019-20, which is three times more than previous allocations. In 2017-18, it supported 203 projects, which implemented participatory activities and developed resources in indigenous languages. Seventy-three languages or dialects received support from ALI in that year.

The Government of Canada recognizes that languages are an essential element of culture. Thus, indigenous languages are an essential element of indigenous culture. Indigenous people have used and continue to use their languages to describe the world they live in, to make sense of it, and to teach their cultures and values to their children.[English]

Indigenous people were prevented from using and transmitting their languages through policies like that of the residential schools. Indigenous languages need support to be revitalized. To use them in the public domain, in the House of Commons, would have a great symbolic value.

The discussion about the usage of indigenous languages in our institutions needs to be held alongside a discussion on vitality of languages and the important revitalization efforts made by the indigenous communities themselves. The vitality of indigenous languages is assessed through a series of factors, including the proportion of speakers to the total population and average age of mother tongue speakers. Right now, not all indigenous people are able to speak their language. Moreover, the way languages and dialects are counted is complicated.

Let me share some overarching general information from Statistics Canada on this matter. Census 2016 revealed that approximately 1.6 million people reported an indigenous identity. A little more than one in six, which is approximately 260,000, reported being able to conduct a conversation in an indigenous language. A little more than 210,000 people reported having an indigenous language as their mother tongue. In 2016, the average age of mother tongue speakers had increased to 36.7 years. In 2011, the average age was 35 years old. When compared to the 1981 data, it shows an increase of more than nine years. However, there are exceptions, and those can be found with mother tongues of lnuktitut, which is an Inuit language, Atikamekw, and Naskapi, where the average approximate age is 26 years.

(1105)

[Translation]

We see overall declining trends in percentages reporting an aboriginal mother tongue or language knowledge, and increasing average ages of mother-tongue speakers and the data indicate similar patterns and trends for males and females. The various indigenous languages spoken in Canada are reflective of the richness of indigenous cultures in Canada.

We know that linguists generally identify 11 indigenous language families that cross international borders, however, there is no definitive list of indigenous languages and dialects spoken in Canada, and we learn more about the languages every year.

Census 2016 revealed that the indigenous languages with more than 10,000 mother tongue speakers are Cree languages, lnuktitut, Ojibway, Oji-Cree, Dene and lnnu.[English]

One other main source of information about indigenous languages is UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. UNESCO maintains a list of 90 indigenous languages for Canada. This list was first established in 2008 by Canadian researcher Mary Jane Norris, who used data from previous censuses and a review of literature to establish the nomenclature. The list is updated regularly and now contains 2011 census data; it will continue to be updated as additional information becomes available.

Languages on the list are linked to the community with the largest number of speakers. Thus the list does not illustrate the actual dispersion of speakers in any given province or territory.

UNESCO's list includes the classification of languages based on their level of endangerment. The scale is based on the level of use of a language across generations. In the UNESCO scale, there are levels of endangerment for languages. For example, a language is deemed “vulnerable” if it is used by some children and in all domains such as school, home, work, and ceremonies. A language is “critically endangered” if it is used only by some of the great-grandparental generation. Other levels are “definitely endangered” and “severely endangered”. All indigenous languages in Canada are deemed “endangered”. Some languages are secondarily surviving such as Huron-Wendat, meaning that they have been brought back, while some are dormant and could potentially be revived. Others, we have to be frank, have become extinct.

For the 2016 census, StatsCan reported on 70 indigenous languages. The analysis shows that indigenous people who shared their information have reported more than 70 indigenous languages. StatsCan includes only the languages meeting the threshold of 45 speakers in the information released. The new list of 70 languages represents an increase from the 60 reported in the 2011 National Household Survey.

An important difference between the StatsCan data and the UNESCO list is found in the classifications of languages of the north. Census 2016 identifies four Inuit languages or dialects, while the UNESCO list identifies eight languages or dialects. Also, StatsCan refers to Algonquin as the language spoke in this traditional territory, while UNESCO uses the name Maniwaki Algonquin.

Canadian Heritage is currently supporting research with Mary Jane Norris to further our knowledge and classification of indigenous languages in Canada. I should note, however, that the complexity of the matter is such that there is not a definitive number of indigenous languages or any consensus in their classification. The update that we're embarking on will ensure that the 2016 data is used to understand the health and trends of indigenous languages. This work will also increase the information available on the various names used to identify indigenous languages.

These languages are currently identified by names that can have various linguistic origins such as the actual indigenous language, different indigenous languages, French, or English. Ultimately, however, communities have the knowledge and the final say to validate that information.

Lastly, we have to consider the writing systems used for various indigenous languages. Among others, the Roman alphabet and the syllabic system are used to write indigenous languages. Graphic symbols are taken from the International Phonetic Alphabet and blocks have been created in 1999 and 2009 to add characters. They're referred to as the Unicode Block “Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics” and the Unicode Block “Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics Extended”.

Standardization of systems is ongoing and this may lead to considering how IT elements might need to be adjusted to complement the work you're doing.

I'll now turn to the levels of endangerment for the 90 languages that UNESCO speaks to. There are 23 vulnerable and unsafe languages. There are five languages that are “definitely endangered”. There are 27 “severely endangered” languages, and there are 35 languages that UNESCO considers to be “critically endangered”. This last category means the language is used mostly by the great-grandparental generation and up. On average, the age of indigenous speakers has been increasing.

(1110)

[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Just to clarify, or further refine, your opening, the land we're on, is that on the Anishinaabe branch of the Algonquins?

Mr. William Fizet:

Here?

Yes.

The Chair:

Monsieur Corbeil.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil (Assistant Director, Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division, Statistics Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.[Translation]

I would like first to thank the members of the committee for inviting Statistics Canada to appear before the committee to contribute to its study on the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons.

My presentation will cover three main topics. I will begin by presenting some general statistics on the very wide diversity of indigenous languages spoken in Canada, their number and distribution across the country, as well as the language variables available in the census that can be used to inform us of the status of the indigenous languages in this country. I will subsequently present general historical trends on spoken indigenous languages and their relative vitality. I will conclude with key factors and indicators of the vitality and long-term viability of indigenous languages in Canada.

Indigenous languages spoken in Canada are of great importance to first nations people, Métis and Inuit. More than 70 indigenous languages were reported in the 2016 Census. The vast majority of these languages are unique to Canada and, as with most indigenous languages globally, they are not spoken anywhere else in the world. This is just one of the many reasons that the preservation and revitalization of their languages is of great importance.

The Census of Population provides several measures of the use and knowledge of indigenous languages. The number of individuals with an indigenous language as their mother tongue is counted, as is the language spoken most often or on a regular basis at home, the language used at work, and the language in which they can conduct a conversation.[English]

In 2016 the overall national response rate for the census was 97.4%. Statistics Canada works with indigenous organizations and communities on an ongoing basis to improve participation in surveys and the census. As in previous years, census staff conducted door-to-door enumeration of households in reserve communities as well as in remote and northern communities. The census questionnaires were made available in 11 indigenous languages: Atikamekw, Denesuline, Dogrib, Inuktitut, Montagnais, northern Quebec Cree, Oji-Cree, Ojibwa, Plains Cree, and Swampy Cree.

Overall, the coverage and participation in the 2016 census was excellent. Although 14 out of the 984 census subdivisions classified as reserves were incompletely enumerated in 2016, which could affect counts for some specific languages, the proportion of such incompletely enumerated census subdivisions has systematically decreased over time.

The census, with its expansive reach across the country, remains one of the most comprehensive sources of information about indigenous languages in Canada. As stated, more than 70 languages were reported. In 2016, as shown in the tables provided to the committee, about 213,000 reported an indigenous language as their mother tongue—that is, the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood. Nearly 264,000 people reported that they were able to conduct a conversation in one of the 70 aboriginal languages. This is to say that there are 24% more speakers of an indigenous language than people who have an indigenous language as their mother tongue. This is an indication of the importance of the acquisition of these languages as a second language.

(1115)

[Translation]

Of the 70 indigenous languages spoken, 36 languages had at least 500 speakers. The Cree languages, which are spoken primarily in Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba, and Quebec, accounted for just under 100,000 speakers, or 37% of all speakers of an indigenous language in Canada.

Inuktitut, the second most common indigenous language, is mainly spoken in Nunavut and Nunavik and had slightly less than 41,000 speakers.

Ojibway and Oji-Cree, spoken primarily in Ontario and Manitoba, accounted for 28,000 and 15,600 speakers, respectively, while the approximately 13,000 Dene speakers were mainly in Saskatchewan and Alberta.

Four other Algonquian languages—Montagnais, Mi'kmaq, Atikamekw, and Blackfoot—grouped together had nearly 33,000 speakers.

Considering that almost 9 in 10 of all speakers of an indigenous language in the country spoke one of these nine languages or groups of languages, this means that many other indigenous languages have very few speakers

As a result, these are generally considered by several specialists as threatened or destined to an uncertain future. The average age of these indigenous language populations varies considerably from one group to the other. For example, the average age of the population with Inuktitut as a mother tongue was 27 in 2016 compared with 61 for the population with Michif as a mother tongue.

The language profiles of first nations people, Métis and Inuit vary considerably. In 2016, two out of three Inuit stated they could speak an Inuit language well enough to conduct a conversation, predominantly Inuktitut. Among first nations people, more than 21% said they spoke an indigenous language, whereas among the Metis, less than 2% stated they were able to do the same.

Among the 73% of Inuit living in the Inuit Nunangat, 84% could speak an Inuit language, while this was true for 11% of those residents outside the Inuit Nunangat. Similarly, 45% of first nations with registered Indian status, who lived on a reserve, could speak an indigenous language, compared with just over 13% of those living off-reserve.

The place of residence, concentration, and proportion of members of a community on its territory are among the factors influencing the propensity to know and use an indigenous language.[English]

The census allows us to look at change over time. Between 1996 and 2016, the population reporting the ability to conduct a conversation in an indigenous language increased from 234,000 people to nearly 264,000, an increase of 12.8%. However, it is important to note that the indigenous population increased at a much faster pace. The pace of growth of the indigenous-language-speaking population is not keeping pace with the growth of the indigenous population overall.

The story of long-term viability is different for every language. For example, in 2016 the number of people who could speak either Cree, Ojibwe, or Oji-Cree was roughly the same as it was 20 years earlier, that is, over 125,000. On the other hand, the number of Dene speakers grew by almost 15% over the 20-year period.

The census shows that the number of people who can speak an Inuit language has increased. In 1996 there were just over 30,000 people in Canada who could speak Inuktitut. By 2016 this number had risen by 34%, with more than 2,000 others who were available to speak other Inuit languages such as Inuinnaqtun or Inuvialuktun.

Not all indigenous languages fared well over this period. Languages with smaller and older populations are particularly vulnerable. The number of people who could speak one of the Wakashan languages, such as Haisla or Heiltsuk, declined by almost 25%. Similarity, the number of people who could speak Carrier went down by 27% over the 20-year period.

Past events have severely affected the vitality of indigenous languages in Canada. For example, the residential school system under which generations of indigenous children were not permitted to speak their mother tongue had enormous impacts upon intergenerational transmission of indigenous languages.

Unlike other language groups in Canada, people speaking in an indigenous language cannot rely on new immigrants to maintain or increase their population of speakers. Passing on the language from parents to children is critical for all indigenous languages to survive. High fertility rates and strong intergenerational language transmission thus contribute to a young and vibrant language community.

Moreover, although learning an indigenous language, at home in childhood, as a primary language is a crucial element of the long-term viability of indigenous languages, second-language learning can be an important part of language revitalization. Efforts to preserve and revitalize indigenous languages through second-language learning are under way across the country. These efforts include incorporating indigenous language instruction in classrooms, creating standard orthographies, and developing language immersion programs.

(1120)



This explains why, particularly among youth, the population able to conduct a conversation in an indigenous language is larger than the population with indigenous language as a mother tongue. Considering revitalization efforts is particularly important in light of the results of the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. In this survey we learned that 59% of first nations living off reserve and 37% of Métis reported that it is very important or somewhat important to speak or understand an indigenous language. Among Inuit, the proportion reached 81%.

Let me conclude by saying that numerous studies on indigenous languages point to a number of key factors that have an impact on the vitality and future of these languages. Although the numbers of speakers of indigenous languages could be considered precariously small, the domains in which these languages are spoken play a key role. For instance, the use of indigenous languages at home, at school, during social and cultural events, and throughout community life has a strong impact on their vitality and long-term viability.

The vitality of a given indigenous language also depends on the presence of a critical mass of speakers within the community, the presence of a network of social relations using the language, and the intergenerational transmission of a language from parents to children, as a mother tongue or as a second language. Studies have also shown that the vitality of indigenous languages also depends on the strong identity of their speakers and on whether there is an internal or external recognition of the language as distinct and unique within society. This recognition can therefore confer status and prestige through a language.

In conclusion, allow me to say that Statistics Canada recognizes the importance of engaging first nations people, Métis, and Inuit throughout all stages of the data life cycle, in understanding data needs and gaps, determining content, and ensuring relevance of the analysis and statistical products that we deliver. The high quality of the language and other data we gather would not be possible without their participation in the census and other surveys. Our measures of indigenous languages and other characteristics of the indigenous population of Canada have evolved and will continue to evolve over time as we work with communities and organizations to improve the way data are collected, in a way that is respectful of their rights to self-determination.

Thank you, and it is with pleasure that my colleagues Vivian O'Donnell, Pamela Best, and I will answer your questions.

The Chair:

Everyone has this report from Stats Canada. It was emailed to you.

Thank you very much. There's some very good information for our committee. It's very helpful.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Fizet, in your comments you mentioned extinct languages, but you neither enumerated nor elaborated. Can you enumerate or elaborate on extinct languages in the country?

Mr. William Fizet:

In terms of those languages that are extinct that—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I mean those we've lost. Do we have any way of quantifying them or qualifying them?

Mr. William Fizet:

I'll have to get back to you, because they know, but we don't have a list of them here with us. We can get back to you on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

For all of you, within your departments, what, if any, indigenous languages are used and what discussions have there been around using them in some way or somehow in the departments? Are there any?

(1125)

Mr. William Fizet:

Within our particular—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I mean Stats Canada or Heritage.

Mr. William Fizet:

I'll let Stats Canada go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's for anybody. Is there any use of any indigenous languages anywhere in government, basically?

Mr. Hubert Lussier (Assistant Deputy Minister, Citizenship, Heritage and Regions, Department of Canadian Heritage):

I can start by answering some of that. I know there have been some initiatives at ESDC. For instance, they have offered certain services in Quebec in Cree, because they happen to have an employee who volunteered to provide these services in the area of responsibility of ESDC in northern Quebec. These are the types of initiatives that exist at this point.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see.

Go ahead.

Ms. Pamela Best (Assistant Director, Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division, Statistics Canada):

At Statistics Canada when we are conducting our surveys, we do make the survey questionnaires available in different languages. The Aboriginal Peoples Survey was also translated into Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun, as was a Nunavut Government Employee Survey.

When required, we also have guides and interpreters to be able to translate our questionnaires into the languages for the census and the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do we keep any kind of a database or have any kind of stats on how many translators are available for what languages in this country, or any kind of database on who is available to teach them so we can expand these languages and help save them?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

We could certainly provide you with that information. We can gather the information.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that not something you keep as a matter of course?

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

It would be the translation bureau that would have the most accurate data on that kind of information.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If someone says they want to learn a language that's near extinction, who would they go to to bring it back, for example?

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

The translation bureau would be the source for professional interpreters. As William described, we have some information on certain types of programs that exist across the country. That is not systematically offered in the form you seem to be looking for.

Mr. William Fizet:

I would also like to point out that, for the programs we administer, it is the communities that determine the gaps they have and what they need in terms of language learning, language revitalization, and the promotion of language. Communities are the ones that are actually telling us what they need, and those are the types of projects that are actually supported.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Corbeil, you talked a bit about languages that have been brought back or helped through the use of at-home learning, child learning, and so forth. In the case of my own family, my wife and I speak six languages between us, but we only have one language in common, so that's the language my daughter speaks. What challenges are there in reintroducing or building a language when you don't have both parents who speak it natively? How do we get there?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

We know fairly well, from our statistics and our studies, that it's always a challenge when we have mixed marriages, because when the language is spoken at home usually it is the language that will be transmitted to children. As we mentioned, because there are many indigenous people who do not speak an indigenous language and they would like their children to learn it as a second language, it's often an issue because the first language transmitted was not an indigenous language, but often English or French. It's certainly a challenge, but we can see over time that those who are not using their language at home are usually more of an aging population, so the average age of the population is higher, so it's a big issue. It also depends on the place of residence. If you live in a place where there's a high concentration of speakers of a language, this will have an influence on the likelihood that the language will be transmitted.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A critical mass.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

A critical mass, that's right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that Dene, for example, has an increase of 15% over 20 years. I think you said an increase of 34% over the same period.... What can we credit that success to, and what lessons can we learn from it for others?

Ms. Vivian O'Donnell (Analyst, Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division, Statistics Canada):

We need to understand that growth within the context of the population growth as a whole. The Inuit population is growing quickly. A lot of that growth is because they have high fertility rates. We see the aboriginal population, as a whole, growing substantially over time. However, not all that growth is necessarily because of high fertility. It's because of people who are newly identifying as indigenous on the census.

Therefore, when you're looking specifically at Inuktitut, I think you could credit the growth of the number of speakers to high fertility. Most Inuit live in Inuit Nunangat, which would be Inuit homeland, where the language is more common and would be easier to maintain. Dene, I believe, would be similar in the sense that the speakers are concentrated in communities where there is a high number of speakers.

(1130)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough. If we were to find ways of bringing these languages into the House, as we are discussing in the study, could you help us understand how that helps languages themselves, for the record?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

As I mentioned, there are many factors that can have an influence on the vitality of those languages. All specialists mentioned that speaking a language at home is certainly a critical domain, but as we know, it's not only speaking a language at home, but also it involves social networks. It involves visibility, status, and prestige.

When a language is spoken in the public domains, in the administration for instance—when you look at Inuktitut you know that those using Inuktitut at work do so mostly in government agencies for the administration, for the delivery of services. This certainly has an impact on the future and vitality of these languages; so not only being spoken at home but being visible in the public domain will certainly have an impact on the status and use of these languages.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you to all our witnesses. Those were very interesting presentations.

I wanted to ask some additional questions about the strength of the languages and the measures you're using for determining those strengths.

In the information we were provided, you list off several columns: ability to conduct a conversation, mother tongue, language spoken most often at home, and other language spoken regularly at home, which implies the secondary use of the relevant indigenous language not as the primary source of conversation or means of conversation, but as another way of conducting some speech that takes place in a private environment. I assume that “mother tongue” refers to a mother tongue that is still understood, right?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Yes.

Mr. William Fizet:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I wrote a book on language policy back in the 1990s. That's it there. One of the measures that I used to try to determine the vitality of the language within a language community was to look at the ratio between mother tongue and language spoken most often in the home. The lower the proportion of people who are using it in the home, the weaker the situation for the language. I looked at the numbers you've provided on some of the larger language groups. I see that number contradicting another number you've provided. In the case of the Innu language, I see there are 10,710 individuals who have this as their mother tongue, and about 90%, so 9,500 individuals, use it primarily in the home. I looked at Ojibway and I see that of the 20,470 who have it as their mother tongue, only 9,005, or 43%, use it in the home. That implies a very significant rate of decline in a single generation. Yet when we look at the ability to conduct a conversation, we see something very different. We see that for Innu, only 9% of total speakers are those for whom it's not a mother tongue, and that figure for Ojibway is 20%.

I'm just wondering what the dynamic is there. That's something I've never experienced in looking at official language communities, which is the source of what I was looking at in my book.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

They're very relevant comments.

We use a term called “continuity index” when we look at the number of people speaking a language most often at home versus those having this language as their mother tongue. You're absolutely right, there's an enormous difference between language groups. You mentioned, for instance, Ojibway. In fact, what it means is that 44% of people having Ojibway as their mother tongue speak it most often at home. This index is 44. When you look at Cree, it's 62%. This means, obviously, there is a big difference, because, as we usually say, the language that is spoken most often at home is usually the one that will be transmitted. Many children will speak this language on a regular basis, although it's not the predominant language spoken at home. This can have an influence because in many cases these children learn the indigenous language at school, but it's not necessarily the main language at home. The dynamic can become very complex. It also, obviously, depends on whether we're within a mixed-marriage household or both partners or husband and wife, for instance, will speak—

(1135)

Mr. Scott Reid:

When you say mother tongue, you allow for people who have two mother tongues?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolutely.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Those are people who would be included in that?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolutely, so the minute an indigenous language is reported, whether it's “Cree and English”, because we know there are many multiple responses for indigenous people.... We see there is enormous variation, but what is very interesting is that when we look at the acquisition index, that is the number of people speaking a language who are able to conduct a conversation versus those who have it as their mother tongue, it can be surprisingly important versus the mother tongue. You just talked about Ojibway. We know the continuity index is 44, but when you look at the acquisition index, it's 1.4, so it really means that we have 40% more people learning this language as a second language versus those having it as their mother tongue.

The dynamic is very complex, there are many factors that can have an influence, but, clearly, it differs a great deal between languages.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

One of the things I did when I was looking at official languages communities in minority situations was to look at the age structure of speakers, but I broke it down a bit differently. I didn't simply work out the average age of the speaker. I apologize for the fact that I have to show a picture from this book. At the bottom here, you can see this is a robust francophone community in Quebec. What you're seeing is an age tree where children of all ages, adults as well, tend to retain a high percentage of using that language.

When you look at francophone communities in western Canada, you see something very different. It's primarily people in the highest age range, over age 65, and those who are under age five who are unilingual speakers. What that allowed me to do was determine whether it's only small children who only talk with their mom, and very old people who only are in a home environment who have the use of the language.

Do you track that sort of thing for indigenous languages?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolutely, you're right. We did it for official languages in minority communities. We even compared the age pyramid or age structure between 1971 and 2016, and it changed completely, because, over time, the population is aging, and the language is not being transmitted fully to their children, mostly because of the fact that there are mixed couples, exogamy. It's exactly what's happening with the indigenous community. In some cases, young children will learn the language as mother tongue, but in many other communities, they won't learn it. If you look at the age structure of the mother tongue, because the language is not being transmitted through generations, and if you track this over time, you will see the pyramid change dramatically and sometimes completely reverse.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I know I'm out of time, but I just want to say, if you have that information available in a form that doesn't require a vast amount of additional work but could be simply transmitted, would you be able to pass to our clerk as much as you are able for as many languages as possible?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolutely. It just depends on whether you want that for the overall indigenous languages all together or for specific languages. We could certainly provide that information.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Saganash. [Translation]

Mr. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to thank the witnesses for their presentations.

I have some questions for Mr. Fizet and Mr. Corbeil.

Mr. Corbeil, when the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was being negotiated in Geneva, one of my colleagues from Alberta and I sometimes spoke Cree so the members of the Canadian delegation could not understand us. It was very effective.

You mentioned Oji-Cree, Swampy Cree, Northern Quebec Cree, and Plains Cree. Who determines those categories?

(1140)

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

At one time, only Cree was included in the census. The census enumerated fewer languages than it does now. Further to consultations, we decided that, as long as there are variations of a language, we will prompt census respondents to specify which language. By asking respondents to specify the language, we became aware of the growth of these various dialects.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Okay.

I have a question and I think it is an important one. Do your statistics show a link between the survival of a language and entering into a treaty such as the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

The statistics do not indicate such a link, but we can certainly form hypotheses. Moreover, we have done that with respect of official language minorities, for example, for which there is official recognition and a structure in place.

We conduct surveys about perceptions. The importance of speaking a language is often associated with that language being recognized in treaties and laws. Yet we cannot directly measure that relationship using Statistics Canada data sources.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

It might be helpful to do that at some point, since the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement recognizes that the Cree school board has the right to teach Cree in the first years of school. So I think that would be an important statistic.

Mr. Fizet, in your presentation you said that the use of indigenous languages in the public sphere, in the House of Commons, for instance, would have great symbolic value. In your opinion, should indigenous languages be recognized as official languages of Canada?

Mr. William Fizet:

Allowing young indigenous persons to hear their language spoken in the Parliament of Canada, a country they are part of, is the direction we are going in. As to official languages, we cannot answer that question right now. As you know, a bill is being developed, in cooperation with indigenous groups. I think that idea will have to be developed with the indigenous peoples and not just with someone who represents them.

To answer your question, the whole population should have the opportunity to have their say on that. When I say the whole population, I mean indigenous and non-indigenous communities.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

As a senior official, do you personally think that would be important?

Mr. William Fizet:

Let's say we are about to tackle that.

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

If I may, Mr. Fizet and I have many opinions, but we do not think we are required to share them. We are here to provide facts or factual elements to help you in your work. I think it would be inappropriate for us as public servants to express our opinions.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

What is your role then in developing this act on indigenous languages?

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

My team includes a small team led by a federal government official, as part of the current dialogue with the three national organizations representing the three main indigenous groups in Canada, that is, the first nations, Inuit, and Métis. The purpose of the dialogue is to develop this act which, as the prime minister announced, will be developed jointly. That is what Mr. Fizet is referring to.

So our role is to develop the principles that will inform the future act, further to dialogue with the three groups represented.

(1145)

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

What are the broad principles you are currently suggesting to the government?

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

It would be a bit premature to disclose the status of discussions because we have to conduct them entirely jointly with the three partners in question. What I can say is that the Department of Canadian Heritage has thus far begun technical consultations with international experts on indigenous languages, education, learning, and transmission. This summer, once we have agreed on the topics to be included in the consultations, we will consult the communities, in partnership with the three indigenous groups, and we will go into much greater depth. These consultations will include not only experts, but the communities as well.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

To use Mr. Fizet's term, it will be more than symbolic, or at least I hope so.

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

That is certainly our intention. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we have Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, each of you, for being here this morning, and for your testimony and presentations.

The first couple of questions I have relate to the vitality of the language. We have heard testimony with respect to the number of dialects and how they lead to, potentially, a result where the vitality is lessened. I would just like your comments and advice with respect to how we would deal with that as a government, and I hope they're going to be based on fact and not opinion. Is there action we can take to ensure that languages are preserved?

Dialects are important, people have the right, but at the same time if they become so fragmented, the language is lost. Is there a way to bring people together who are speaking different dialects? Do you think that's useful? Will it ultimately lead to the vitality of language?

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

To answer your question, I'll refer to some things that William said.

We are, in our financial support, very responsive to what comes from communities. Therefore, we haven't dictated to communities what they should apply for, for funding. On the other hand, we know that certain things are very useful, like focusing on language nests. These are initiatives where fluent speakers provide an environment where very young children can grow and learn—in a kind of child care milieu—the language that will become, if not their mother tongue, at least a very early second language.

Another thing we see more and more, and we think are useful initiatives, are indigenous communities developing language plans that provide for a whole community working together. Having initiatives that are not isolated, but made aware of connecting with each other at the band council, at the school level, at the child care level, and at the cultural level. These language plans provide the type of environment that Jean-Pierre and William were talking about, that is propitious to the preservation and transmittal of their language.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Mr. Corbeil, do you have anything to add?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

We talk about school. We know that when we think about the future of communities, the fact that children know or are able to speak the language is a very strong indicator of the future and vitality of long-term viability of these languages.

We have seen many times—even among French official-language minority communities—that when there is a school, there is an environment of community centres and associations that are propitious to the transmission and use of these languages. Certainly it helps for a stronger creation of communities. I can't say more than that.

(1150)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Following the question that Mr. Graham asked with respect to the impact of having translation in the House of Commons, is there anything more specific that you can offer? This goes beyond recognizing a right. I'm looking at the impact it can have. Do you have data that shows the impact that it can and would have on communities if it was spoken in the House?

We don't delude ourselves in believing everybody is watching us. We know that our audiences are slim. Is there evidence that shows that making that step will result in greater preservation and greater vitality of the languages?

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

On this, Jean-Pierre and colleagues have something more intelligent than what I have to say. I'll try.

Every model we've used and worked with about the vitality of language—and the best ones we have are the ones that Jean-Pierre was talking about that have to do with minority language as an official language—involve an element of public use and public recognition in democratic institutions. It's difficult to say whether it counts for 5% or 25% of the vitality, but it is recognized.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

It counts for something, yes.

The Chair:

Ms. O'Donnell, do you want to comment on that?

Ms. Vivian O'Donnell:

We don't have a survey question that asks if there was simultaneous translation, so I can't say directly.

We do measure exposure to indigenous languages on the Aboriginal Peoples Survey, which reaches off-reserve first nations people, Métis, and Inuit. It asks: How often are you exposed to an indigenous language at home, and outside the home? In previous versions it was, “Are services available at school, in the community?”, and things like that.

I'm trying to think of research that's been done using that content. The one that comes to mind looks at children's exposure to indigenous language and positive outcomes in education. That's getting to—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

That's helpful. That's good.

Mr. William Fizet:

One area that could perhaps inform would be the New Zealand situation with the Maori. I don't have that data, but I think that could be a good example of a really good, yet complicated question.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you again to our witnesses for the very informative discussion so far.

I want to start with a couple of more specific questions on most of the data that was provided by Statistics Canada. I see some very small numbers among them. The one that jumped out was Southern East Cree, which has 40 people with the ability to conduct a conversation.

I'm curious. Do you have data that goes a little more deeply into the geographic distribution? For example, 40 people seems like one extended family, potentially. Is that an interpretation, a very small familial group?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Yes. Of course, we could provide that kind of information, but we always have to be careful because when we look at the Cree language families overall, we know for the most part they are concentrated. We find 28% in Saskatchewan, 24% in Alberta, and 22% in Manitoba. They could be dispersed. It depends whether these 40 people are all located in the same small area. We would have to double-check and look at this because then it creates a problem trying to understand more detailed information.

Ms. Vivian O'Donnell:

I want to add as well that there is a Cree NOS there. That means Cree “not otherwise specified”. That's someone writing just Cree on the questionnaire.

As we had mentioned, on the electronic questionnaire they would have been prompted to be more specific, and that's why we get better detail like Swampy Cree or Moose Cree.

While it says Southern East Cree is 40, it may well be larger than that because we have 86,000 people sitting in that other category.

(1155)

Mr. John Nater:

That's very good.

Beyond that, certainly one of the challenges we're going to hear from the translation bureau in the weeks to come, and the union representing them as well, is the ability of qualified professionals. Again, knowing that you can't get into extensive details in a census, do you have a sense of the educational background of the users of specific languages, what level of education they may have, and where that potential pool of translators may be?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolutely. Again, the challenge is whether you want to focus specifically on very small groups; then it becomes a problem. For larger groups, yes, we have the information sometimes on the main level, the major field of study. We have where they work, types of industry, and occupation. Yes, we can certainly make this data available.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

Quickly, to Mr. Fizet and Mr. Lussier, in the conclusion of your opening comments you talked a little about standardization of systems and some general solidifying of some of the languages, looking forward to some of the technological advances.

We all use Google Translate from time to time. Is there a similar program in place that would do that, not for oral communication, but for written communication, some kind of service being provided from the IT side?

Mr. William Fizet:

A number of groups in the media sector are very interested in this. Google is working with the First Peoples' Cultural Council in B.C. As you know, B.C. has the majority of indigenous languages. Apple is also doing work. In our program, we support applications being driven by indigenous people who have determined that to get their kids or the younger generation, that's what's going to be attractive.

So there are. The reason we wanted to put that in is the interpretation possibilities you're studying I think are going to be for a range of age groups. Like any other youthful group, indigenous youth are hooked, although there are certain cases...because of the remoteness difficulties.

If you have interpretation services, or however you want to see it, make sure there's that technological piece because you are probably going to get a buy-in.

To answer your question, yes. There's a great interest from a number.... Just from our program, we can speak of quite a few.

Mr. John Nater:

That's good. So there are some partnerships going on as well, beyond internal to government, but externally.

Mr. William Fizet:

Oh, yes. Some of these big groups are very interested because that technology can actually, in some cases, circumvent difficulties in trying to get some interpretation because, again, of the remoteness or the lack of language interlocutors.

Mr. John Nater:

That would be useful, potentially down the road, English and French to the indigenous languages—

Mr. William Fizet:

Yes, and some right now are going directly from indigenous to English or French, or even indigenous to indigenous.

Mr. John Nater:

That's great. Thank you.

The Chair:

I will give an example of what happens in my riding. My kids are six and nine, and they go to a school, Whitehorse Elementary, where maybe 10% are aboriginal, but they take Southern Tutchone lessons. Everyone in the school takes them every week. It's my daughter's favourite course. We've also just recently funded the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations in a mixed community, to have a day care that has total immersion in the Southern Tutchone language. Whether you're English or French, you'll only be speaking Southern Tutchone in that day care. That'll be an interesting experiment.

I have one last question. Do you know of any comparison to languages outside Canada? Are there any words similar to languages in Asia? I think the Navajo are very close to the Athabascan Dene language. Are you aware of any words in Canadian aboriginal languages that are found in languages somewhere else in the world?

Mr. Hubert Lussier:

I think the only example that comes to mind is the commonality of Inuit speakers of Canada and Greenland, Alaska, and Russia. Other than that, I don't think there is.

A voice: Northern Quebec.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. This has been very helpful and very interesting.

(1200)

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Before we break, I just have a couple of really quick housekeeping items.

The Chair:

Yes. Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The first one is that we got a brief from the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. I wonder if we could communicate with them to thank them for their brief but also to ask them if they could give us some more information about how they handle the use of the French language in their proceedings. It wasn't really something that was addressed in that.

The Chair:

Sure. Let's do that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

The second thing was if we could see if our analyst could look for uses of Inuktitut in the Senate proceedings, and then whether there was any indication of the type of interpretation used.

The Chair:

Sure. No problem.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you.

Thank you very much for coming.

We're just going to suspend for a bit to get on video conference with our next witnesses.



(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 97th meeting of the committee, as we continue our study on the use of indigenous languages in proceedings of the House of Commons.

We're joined by Cheryle Herman, Dene Language Revitalization Coach. She is appearing by video conference from Saskatoon. Thank you very much for making yourself available today. You can make an opening statement and then some of the committee members will have some questions.

Ms. Cheryle Herman (Dene Language Revitilization Coach, As an Individual):

Thank you.

[Witness speaks in Dene]

[English]

My name is Cheryle Herman. I am from Clearwater River Dene Nation located near La Loche, Saskatchewan. I am a fluent speaker of the Denesuline language. I am here as an ambassador of indigenous languages, to share my own and other individuals' thoughts on the importance of using our indigenous languages in House of Commons proceedings.

To use indigenous languages in the House of Commons would be an acknowledgement of the original inhabitants of the land and it would mean that the government honours and respects this fact. It would also demonstrate that the government is working toward righting historical injustices and toward a more inclusive and collaborative relationship.

Indigenous languages encompass who we are as indigenous people. Communication in our languages is sacred. Without our languages and our cultures, we are no longer indigenous. Our language defines who we are and where we come from, and is therefore essential to our survival as a nation.

Language connects us to the spiritual ground. The intent of all communication is embedded with strength, clarity, and purpose when spoken in our mother tongue.

Language impacts the daily lives of members of all races, creeds, and regions of the world. Language helps express our feelings, desires, and queries to the world around us. Words, gestures, and tone are utilized in union to portray a broad spectrum of emotion.

The unique and diverse methods that human beings can use to communicate through written and spoken language are a large part of what allows us to harness our innate ability to form lasting bonds with one another. They also separate humankind from the rest of the animal kingdom.

Additionally, the ability to communicate in multiple languages is becoming more and more important in the increasingly integrated global business community. Communicating directly with new clients and companies in their native language is one of the first steps to forming a lasting, stable international business relationship.

The strength and value of verbal agreements in our languages leads to stronger, respectful, and honourable relationships. Being able to do this automatically puts any multilingual person miles ahead of his or her peers in the competition for jobs in high-prestige positions.

Language is such a key aspect to setting up children for success in their future professional endeavours. The government can be a part of their successful future by using indigenous languages in the House of Commons. This may help our indigenous children pursue a future as a leader for their people, or for all of Canada, with confidence, knowing they can speak their indigenous language in the House of Commons.

Although indigenous languages are currently not recognized as official languages in this country, it is important that we value those languages just as we do English and French. In doing so, we affirm the significance of the people who use those languages as forms of communication.

Our languages are still very much alive and are the only form of communication for some of our elders. Therefore, when proceedings are conducted in French and English without any translation for indigenous people, those people do not receive the information that may be of relevance to them and to their government.

We need to continue to advocate to speak our indigenous languages in our places of business in order for them to thrive.

(1210)



I would like to share some additional points to ponder in consideration of our plight to maintain our indigenous languages. One, indigenous languages create more positive attitudes and less prejudice toward people who are different. Two, analytical skills improve when one speaks an indigenous language. Three, business skills plus indigenous language skills make employees more valuable in the marketplace. Four, dealing with another culture enables people to gain a more profound understanding of their own culture. Five, creativity is increased with the study of indigenous languages. Six, skills like problem-solving and dealing with abstract concepts are increased. Seven, speaking an indigenous language enhances one's opportunities in government, business, medicine, law, technology, military, industry, marketing, etc. Eight, a second language improves skills and grades. Nine, it provides a competitive edge in career choices when one is able to communicate in a second language. Ten, it enhances listening skills and memory. Eleven, one participates more effectively and responsibly in a multicultural world if one knows another language. Twelve, marketable skills in the global economy are improved if you master another language. Thirteen, it offers a sense of the past culturally and linguistically. Fourteen, it teaches and encourages respect for other peoples. It fosters an understanding of the interrelation of language and human nature. Fifteen, indigenous languages expand one's view of the world, liberalize one's experiences, and make one more flexible and tolerant. Sixteen, indigenous languages expand one's world view and limit the barriers between people. Barriers cause distrust and fear. Seventeen, indigenous language study leads to an appreciation of cultural diversity. Eighteen, as immigration increases, we need to prepare for changes in Canadian society. Nineteen, one is at a distinct advantage in the global market if one is as bilingual as possible. Twenty, indigenous languages open the door to art, music, dance, fashion, cuisine, film, philosophy, science, and so forth. Twenty-one, indigenous language study is simply part of a very basic liberal education. To educate is to lead out, to lead out of confinement, narrowness, and darkness.

In addition to the previously mentioned points, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples also acknowledges the importance of indigenous languages in places of business. Article 13 states: 1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literatures, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places and persons. States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected and also to ensure that indigenous peoples can understand and be understood in political, legal and administrative proceedings, where necessary through the provision of interpretation or by other appropriate means.

Lastly, we need to bring light to the TRC calls to action and ensure that the calls to action are being implemented. I would like to review two calls to action that speak directly to indigenous languages.

Call to action 13 states, “We call upon the federal government to acknowledge that Aboriginal rights include Aboriginal language rights.”

Call to action 14 states, “We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles: (i) Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them.”

Recognition of indigenous languages and support for indigenous language programs stand alongside land rights, health, justice, education, housing, employment, and other services as part of the overall process of pursuing social justice and reconciliation.

In conclusion, I would like to share a quote from Dr. Graham McKay: One might go so far as to say that without recognition of the Indigenous people and their languages, many other programs will be less effective, because this lack of recognition will show that the underlying attitudes of the dominant society have not changed significantly.

Thank you, mahsi cho for your time and consideration on this very important matter.

(1215)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, mahsi cho. That was a great outline of the importance of indigenous languages for our committee.

We're just going to have very open questions. We'll start with Mr. Saganash.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

What an honour. I'm starting to like this committee. Thank you.

Cheryle, thank you for that presentation. That was pretty thorough and succinct at the same time.

I don't know if you listened to the earlier panel, but we had some officials from the heritage department, as well as StatsCan. One of the questions I asked them you referred to, in a way, in your presentation; that is, whether we should recognize indigenous peoples' languages as official languages in this country. I know you referred to article 13 of the UN declaration, of course, but also Truth and Reconciliation Commission call to action 14.

I've been attending Assembly of First Nations chiefs' meetings over the last 30 years, and I have never seen a standing ovation such as the one that the current Prime Minister got when he announced the aboriginal languages act that they would enact. Everyone in the room was thrilled about that. I was thrilled about that too. I even stood up to applaud the Prime Minister.

In my view, the way that call to action 14 is written does not necessarily go in that direction. It says that the act must contain the following principles, the first one being “Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society”. What is your opinion on whether we should recognize aboriginal languages as official languages in this country?

(1220)

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

I think it would be going further in terms of preserving indigenous languages and maintaining indigenous languages and cultures.

I recently visited Northwest Territories, and they are a long way ahead of us in the work that they're doing to maintain their languages there. They're mandating things for curriculum and for language used in the places of business. As I stated in my opening remarks, some of our elders don't speak English or French, so when these proceedings happen in these two languages only, our elders are missing out on whatever is going on in terms of government.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I might have other questions later, but I'll let others have the opportunity.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Open sessions involve the chair's favourites getting to ask the questions, so it's going to be a rough ride for Mr. Graham.

I want to ask about translation. One of the members of Parliament who has come before this committee talking about the value that having translation would serve is a member of the Dene nation and a Dene speaker. One of the problems that occurred to my mind as she was giving her remarks to us was that we don't have ready availability here to translation services in the Dene language. This is a problem for all aboriginal languages, but it's less of a problem for some and more of a problem for others.

I believe it's a more resolvable problem, for example, for Inuktitut for a number of reasons, one of which is that there's a direct air link between Ottawa and Iqaluit. As well, many unilingual Inuktitut speakers come to Ottawa for medical services, and so on, with the result that there are translators already here. From our point of view, that's the easiest one. Then it gets progressively more difficult.

Dene, because it has a large number of speakers, is potentially one where we can overcome these problems. Let me structure the question this way: are there translators, people who would be capable of doing simultaneous translation in Saskatchewan now, and would they have the skills and the availability to provide these services if those were asked for?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

Absolutely. I know a couple of people who do that type of work specifically, simultaneous translations, and so I'm pretty sure they would be available, especially if they knew the cause, why we're trying to do this, and the importance of it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

The idea was suggested to us by one of our witnesses, the idea of people doing translation from a remote location. Does that ever arise, or are the people who do simultaneous translation normally set up onsite? I'm not sure how it works.

Here we typically have translators who are in a translation booth. I think you can kind of see behind me on one side the edge of our translation booth. Is that the manner in which simultaneous translation is done where you are, or is it done in some different manner?

(1225)

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

The way I've seen it done has always been the way you have it set up there, where you have the translators onsite, but I don't see why it couldn't be done remotely, just as we're doing here, through video conferencing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

The other issue that has arisen is the need for what's called a “relay language”. This is a term that comes out of the European Union where they have—I'm not sure of the number—some 18 languages that are official, or more.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a higher number.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Graham says it's higher. They have a large number of languages, and it becomes a practical difficulty. I think they ran into a problem with someone who spoke both Greek and Danish, and there was some key thing where apparently no one in Europe speaks this particular set of two languages. So what they do is have a member of the European Parliament speak his or her language, then a translator translates into some widely spoken language—English, French, or German perhaps—and then it gets translated into others.

I don't know what the situation is. Obviously, people are bilingual, and Dene and English would be widespread. Are there people who also speak French with a high degree of proficiency, as well?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

[Technical difficulty—Editor] or aboriginal languages in general.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm sorry, we lost the first part of your response. Would you repeat your response?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

Okay. Are you speaking to aboriginal languages?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm speaking to Dene in particular.

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

No, we don't speak French. There might be a handful of people who are trilingual and would speak English, French, and Dene, but there are not many. We mostly speak Dene and English.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. That's very helpful. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I'll build a bit on where Scott is going.

How many translators do you think there are available today for simultaneous interpretation of Dene? Do you have a sense or a ballpark number?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

In our area, the area I come from, and the Far North included, I think we have three simultaneous translators.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If interpretation of this type were to become more common, do you think there would be a large market of people who would get that education to be able to do that kind of work?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

I think so. Definitely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Perfect. What about for translation as opposed to interpretation, so after the fact, in written records? Everything we do in the House is translated after the fact into English or French, as the case may be. Part of the challenge of interpretation in the House is ensuring that our written record reflects accurately the language spoken. If it's not English or French, it'll just say “...speaks in Dene”, for example. Are there a lot of written translators available, or is it the same three people?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

No, actually, more people can write than translate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's good.

Your philosophical points in your opening statement were quite well taken. You made some very good points, but we are looking, of course, for practical and graduated solutions to implement things here. How would you see the first steps for us from your point of view?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

The first member spoke on this, saying that it will be difficult to do because of the array of languages in Canada—indigenous languages. I'm just coming from the viewpoint of Saskatchewan where we have Dene, Cree, Nakota, and Lakota. Looking at the bigger context, I can see that there would be difficulties in doing this.

I'm not exactly sure how we could overcome it unless we looked at, say, the bigger populations of languages first. Try it as a project with one of the bigger languages—say, Cree—because I know Cree has a bigger population than Dene. To give that a run and see how it works out, I think, would be the better way to go about it, rather than trying to find all these translators and setting ourselves up for failure. I think the better way to go would be to try to make it succeed for everyone.

(1230)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I might come back to you.

The Chair:

Thank you for your very wise counsel.

Are there different dialects in Dene? If we had an interpreter, would some Dene people not be able to understand them?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

There's the “t” dialect and the “k” dialect. In our area, only one other community speaks the k dialect, and that's Fond du Lac. If you got a translator who was speaking only in t dialect, the other communities in Saskatchewan would understand. So it wouldn't be an issue in terms of that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Of the translators you're aware of in Saskatchewan, what type of work are they currently doing within Saskatchewan? Are they being used for court proceedings or within hospitals? What types of services are they providing locally and across Saskatchewan? What type of work are they undertaking?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

They do court proceeding translations. They do assembly translations, such as for the FSIN and their local tribal councils. At their assemblies they do simultaneous translation as well. They also work with industry in terms of doing translation work.

Mr. John Nater:

That keeps them fairly busy, then? What I'm getting at is that we don't want to take someone away from somewhere else to fulfill our purposes. I'm looking at whether they have the availability and the time to maybe be flown to Ottawa for couple of days at a time for translation services. Do they have that availability?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

Some of these people work on a contract basis, so I think they would make themselves available. Speaking for myself, I'm taking a day off work to be here to speak to you. If they value the importance of what we're trying to do, I think they would make the effort and the time.

Mr. John Nater:

Great. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you for taking the time off work.

Mr. Saganash, did you have something...? No.

Do the kids learn Dene in school?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

In the Dene communities I work in currently, three of the schools I work with have Dene language programming. One is actually an immersion school from nursery to grade 3. All the rest of the other schools teach it as core, which is 30 minutes a day.

The Chair:

Are there other questions from committee members? No.

What happens in the courts and the hospitals with elders who speak only Dene and not English or French?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

They usually have people come with them. If they are a witness in court, then the court provides a translator for them.

The Chair:

Would you like to make any closing remarks? I think we've exhausted all the questions.

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

I just want to say that we have a group of probably 20 young people coming out of DTEP, the Dene teacher education program, in La Loche at the Clearwater River Dene Nation. Those people will be looking for jobs in two years.

You can see what I'm getting at here. I'm sure they would be open to doing this kind of work, because all of them are fluent speakers.

Mr. Robert Morrissey (Egmont, Lib.):

Do you want to repeat that in Dene?

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

In Dene? I could. Do you have a translator?

The Chair:

No, but we know what you're going to say.

Voices: Oh, oh!

(1235)

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

[Witness speaks in Dene]

[English]

The Chair:

Mahsi cho. Thanks for taking the day off work. This was very helpful.

Ms. Cheryle Herman:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Is there anything else for the committee?

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 97e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Ce matin, nous poursuivons notre étude de l’utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes. Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir des représentants de deux ministères. Ce ne sont pas les ministères qui fournissent la traduction, mais ils s'intéressent eux aussi à la question.

Nos témoins sont, du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, Hubert Lussier, sous-ministre adjoint, Citoyenneté, patrimoine et régions, et William Fizet, directeur général, Participation des citoyens. Nous accueillons également, de Statistique Canada, Jean-Pierre Corbeil, directeur adjoint, Division de la statistique sociale et autochtone, Pamela Best, directrice adjointe, Division de la statistique sociale et autochtone, et Vivian O’Donnell, analyste, Division de la statistique sociale et autochtone.

Merci d’être parmi nous.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à M. Fizet pour sa déclaration liminaire. Il sera suivi de M. Corbeil. [Français]

M. William Fizet (directeur general, Participation des citoyens, ministère du Patrimoine canadien):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Merci de nous permettre de comparaître pour fournir de l’information sur les langues autochtones au Canada dans le cadre de votre étude de l’interprétation des langues autochtones à la Chambre des communes.

Je tiens d’abord à souligner que nous sommes sur un territoire traditionnel algonquin et que la langue y était l'algonquin ou l'algonquin de Maniwaki.

Je m’appelle William Fizet. Je suis le directeur général de la Direction générale de la participation des citoyens, qui a un programme consacré aux peuples autochtones. [Français]

Le budget de 2017 a alloué à l'Initiative des langues autochtones 19,5 millions de dollars par année jusqu'à l'exercice financier 2019-2020, soit trois fois plus que les années précédentes. En 2017-2018, 203 projets d'activités participatives et de développement de ressources en langues autochtones ont été mis en oeuvre. Soixante-treize langues ou dialectes ont reçu du soutien de l'Initiative des langues autochtones cette année-là.

Le gouvernement du Canada reconnaît que les langues sont un élément essentiel de la culture. Ainsi, les langues autochtones sont un élément essentiel de la culture autochtone. Les peuples autochtones ont utilisé et continuent d'utiliser leur langue pour décrire le monde dans lequel ils vivent, y donner un sens et enseigner leurs cultures et leurs valeurs à leurs enfants.[Traduction]

On a empêché les Autochtones d’utiliser et de transmettre leurs langues au moyen de politiques comme celle des pensionnats. Les langues autochtones ont besoin de soutien pour retrouver une nouvelle vigueur. Leur utilisation dans le domaine public, à la Chambre des communes, aurait une grande valeur de symbole.

La discussion sur l’utilisation des langues autochtones dans nos institutions doit s'accompagner d'échanges sur la vitalité de ces langues et les importants efforts de revitalisation déployés par les collectivités autochtones elles-mêmes. La vitalité des langues autochtones est évaluée au moyen d'une série de facteurs, notamment la proportion de leurs locuteurs par rapport à la population totale et l’âge moyen des locuteurs pour qui il s'agit de la langue maternelle. À l'heure actuelle, ce ne sont pas tous les Autochtones qui peuvent s'exprimer dans leur langue. De plus, il est compliqué de dénombrer les langues et les dialectes.

Permettez-moi de vous communiquer quelques renseignements généraux de Statistique Canada à ce sujet. Le recensement de 2016 a révélé qu’environ 1,6 million de personnes réclament une identité autochtone. De ce nombre, un peu plus du sixième, soit environ 260 000 répondants, ont déclaré être en mesure de soutenir une conversation dans une langue autochtone. Un peu plus de 210 000 personnes ont dit avoir une langue autochtone comme langue maternelle. En 2016, l’âge moyen des locuteurs de langue maternelle a atteint 36,7 ans. En 2011, l’âge moyen était de 35 ans. Par rapport aux données de 1981, cet âge moyen aurait augmenté de plus de neuf ans. Il y a pourtant des exceptions, et elles sont relevées chez les locuteurs qui s'expriment en inuktitut, qui est une langue inuite, en atikamekw et en naskapi. L'âge moyen est d'environ 26 ans.

(1105)

[Français]

Nous observons une tendance globale à la baisse dans les pourcentages de langue maternelle autochtone ou de connaissance de la langue, ainsi qu'une tendance à la hausse de la moyenne d'âge des locuteurs de langue maternelle, tant chez les hommes que chez les femmes. Les diverses langues autochtones parlées au Canada reflètent la richesse des cultures autochtones du pays.

Nous savons que les linguistes identifient 11 familles de langues autochtones qui traversent les frontières internationales. Toutefois, il n'y a pas de liste définitive des langues et des dialectes autochtones parlés au Canada, et nous en apprenons davantage tous les jours.

Les données du recensement de 2016 indiquent que les langues autochtones qui ont plus de 10 000 locuteurs sont les langues cries, l'inuktitut, l'ojibwé, l'oji-cri, le déné et l'innu.[Traduction]

Une autre grande source d’information sur les langues autochtones est l’UNESCO, c'est-à-dire l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’éducation, la science et la culture. Elle tient une liste de 90 langues autochtones qui seraient pratiquées au Canada. Cette liste a été établie pour la première fois en 2008 par la chercheuse canadienne Mary Jane Norris, qui a utilisé les données des recensements précédents et une recension de la littérature pour établir la nomenclature. La liste est mise à jour régulièrement et contient maintenant les données du recensement de 2011; il y aura d'autres mises à jour à mesure que des renseignements supplémentaires s'ajouteront.

Les langues figurant sur la liste sont liées à la collectivité qui compte le plus grand nombre de locuteurs. La liste n’illustre donc pas la dispersion réelle des locuteurs dans une province ou un territoire donné.

La liste de l’UNESCO comprend une classification des langues selon le niveau de danger auquel elles sont exposées. L’échelle est basée sur le niveau d’utilisation d’une langue dans les diverses générations. L’échelle de l’UNESCO comprend divers niveaux de danger. Par exemple, une langue est considérée comme « vulnérable » si elle est utilisée par certains enfants et dans tous les domaines comme l’école, la maison, le travail et les cérémonies. Une langue est « en situation critique » si elle n’est utilisée que par une partie de la génération des arrière-grands-parents. Les autres niveaux sont « en danger » et « sérieusement en danger ». Toutes les langues autochtones au Canada sont considérées comme « en danger » à divers degrés. Certaines langues ont une deuxième vie, comme le huron-wendat, c'est-à-dire qu'elles ont été ressuscitées, tandis que d’autres sont en dormance et pourraient être revitalisées. D’autres, soyons francs, sont éteintes.

Après le recensement de 2016, Statistique Canada a fait état de 70 langues autochtones. L’analyse montre que les peuples autochtones qui ont communiqué leur information ont déclaré plus de 70 langues autochtones. Statistique Canada n’a retenu dans l’information diffusée que les langues qui atteignent le seuil de 45 locuteurs . La nouvelle liste de 70 langues témoigne d'une augmentation par rapport aux 60 langues déclarées dans l’Enquête nationale auprès des ménages de 2011.

Une différence importante entre les données de Statistique Canada et la liste de l’UNESCO tient aux différences de classification des langues du Nord. Le recensement de 2016 fait état de quatre langues ou dialectes inuits, tandis que la liste de l’UNESCO relève huit langues ou dialectes. De plus, Statistique Canada désigne l'algonquin comme la langue parlée sur le territoire traditionnel où nous nous trouvons, tandis que, d'après l’UNESCO, il s'agit de l'algonquin de Maniwaki.

À l’heure actuelle, Patrimoine canadien appuie les recherches de Mary Jane Norris afin d’approfondir nos connaissances et d'améliorer la classification des langues autochtones au Canada. Je dois toutefois ajouter que la complexité de la question est telle qu’on ne s'entend pas sur le nombre de langues autochtones et qu'il n'y a pas de consensus au sujet de leur classification. La mise à jour que nous entreprenons permettra de s’assurer que les données de 2016 sont utilisées pour comprendre l'état de santé des langues autochtones et les tendances qu'on y observe. Ces travaux permettront également d’enrichir l’information disponible sur les divers noms utilisés pour identifier les langues autochtones.

Ces langues sont actuellement désignées par des noms qui peuvent avoir diverses origines linguistiques, comme la langue autochtone même, différentes langues autochtones, le français ou l’anglais. En fin de compte, cependant, les collectivités ont les connaissances voulues pour valider cette information et le dernier mot leur revient.

Enfin, il faut tenir compte des systèmes d’écriture utilisés pour les différentes langues autochtones. Entre autres, l’alphabet romain et le système syllabique servent à transcrire des langues autochtones. Des symboles graphiques sont tirés de l’alphabet phonétique international et des blocs ont été créés en 1999 et 2009 pour ajouter des caractères. Il s'agit du Syllabaire autochtone canadien d'Unicode et du Syllabaire autochtone canadien étendu d'Unicode.

La normalisation des systèmes est en cours, ce qui pourrait mener à l’examen de la façon dont les éléments de TI pourraient devoir être ajustés pour compléter le travail que vous faites.

Je vais maintenant passer aux niveaux de danger auxquels sont exposées les 90 langues dont parle l’UNESCO. Il y a 23 langues vulnérables et en danger. Il y a cinq langues qui sont « en danger », 27 qui sont « sérieusement en danger » et 35 qui, d'après l'UNESCO, sont « en situation critique ». Cette dernière catégorie signifie que la langue est principalement utilisée par la génération des arrière-grands-parents et par les générations antérieures. En moyenne, l’âge des locuteurs autochtones augmente.

(1110)

[Français]

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Je voudrais des éclaircissements ou des précisions au sujet de votre entrée en matière: le territoire où nous nous trouvons est-il celui des Anishinaabes, qui sont un sous-groupe d'Algonquins?

M. William Fizet:

Ici?

Oui

Le président:

Monsieur Corbeil.

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil (directeur adjoint, Division de la statistique sociale et autochtone, Statistique Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Je tiens d'abord à remercier les membres du Comité d'avoir invité Statistique Canada à comparaître devant eux afin de nourrir leur réflexion sur l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les travaux de la Chambre des communes.

Ma présentation portera sur trois principaux sujets. Dans un premier temps, je présenterai quelques statistiques générales sur la très grande diversité des langues autochtones parlées au Canada, sur leur nombre et leur répartition dans tout le pays, ainsi que sur les variables linguistiques du recensement disponibles pour présenter l'état de la situation des langues autochtones parlées au pays. Je présenterai ensuite quelques tendances historiques générales sur les langues autochtones parlées et sur leur vitalité relative. Finalement, je conclurai en présentant quelques facteurs et indicateurs clés de la vitalité et de la viabilité à long terme des langues autochtones au pays.

Les langues autochtones parlées au Canada sont d'une grande importance pour les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits. Lors du recensement de 2016, plus de 70 langues autochtones ont été déclarées. La vaste majorité de ces langues sont propres au Canada. Comme la plupart des langues autochtones sur la planète, elles ne sont parlées nulle part ailleurs dans le monde. C'est l'une des raisons principales pour lesquelles la préservation et la revitalisation de leurs langues sont d'une grande importance.

Le recensement de la population fournit plusieurs statistiques sur l'utilisation et la connaissance des langues autochtones. Sont en effet dénombrées les personnes ayant une langue autochtone comme langue maternelle, comme langue parlée le plus souvent ou de façon régulière à la maison, comme langue utilisée au travail, ainsi que comme langue dans laquelle elles peuvent soutenir une conversation.[Traduction]

En 2016, le taux de réponse national global au recensement a été de 97,4 %. Statistique Canada travaille de façon suivie avec les organismes et les collectivités autochtones pour améliorer la participation aux enquêtes et au recensement. Comme par les années passées, le personnel du recensement a effectué le dénombrement porte-à-porte des ménages dans les réserves ainsi que dans les collectivités éloignées et septentrionales. Les questionnaires du recensement ont été diffusés dans 11 langues autochtones: atikamekw, denesuline, dogrib, inuktitut, montagnais, cri du nord du Québec, oji-cri, ojibway, cri des plaines et cri des marais.

Dans l’ensemble, la portée du recensement de 2016 et la participation ont été excellentes. Bien que 14 des 984 subdivisions classées comme réserves aient été partiellement recensées en 2016, ce qui pourrait avoir une incidence sur les chiffres de certaines langues, la proportion de ces subdivisions partiellement recensées a systématiquement diminué au fil du temps.

Le recensement, dont la portée s'est étendue à l’ensemble du pays, demeure l’une des sources d’information les plus complètes sur les langues autochtones au Canada. Comme on l’a dit, plus de 70 langues ont été déclarées. En 2016, comme le montrent les tableaux fournis au Comité, environ 213 000 personnes ont déclaré une langue autochtone comme langue maternelle, c’est-à-dire la première langue apprise à la maison dans l’enfance et encore comprise. Près de 264 000 personnes ont déclaré être en mesure de tenir une conversation dans l’une des 70 langues autochtones. Cela veut dire qu’il y a 24 % plus de locuteurs d’une langue autochtone que de personnes dont la langue maternelle est autochtone. C’est une indication de l’importance de l’acquisition de ces langues comme langue seconde.

(1115)

[Français]

Des quelque 70 langues autochtones parlées, 36 comptaient au moins 500 locuteurs. Les langues cries, qui sont parlées principalement en Saskatchewan, en Alberta, au Manitoba et au Québec, comptaient un peu moins de 100 000 locuteurs, soit 37 % de tous les locuteurs d'une langue autochtone au Canada.

L'inuktitut, deuxième langue en importance numérique et parlée essentiellement au Nunavut et au Nunavik, comptait un peu moins de 41 000 locuteurs.

Quant à elles, l'ojibwé et l'oji-cri, parlées principalement en Ontario et au Manitoba, comptaient respectivement 28 000 et 15 600 locuteurs, alors que les quelque 13 000 locuteurs du déné se trouvaient principalement en Saskatchewan et en Alberta.

Quatre autres langues algonquiennes, soit le montagnais, le micmac, l'atikamekw et le pied-noir regroupaient ensemble près de 33 000 locuteurs.

Si l'on considère qu'au pays près de neuf locuteurs sur dix d'une langue autochtone parlaient l'une ou l'autre de ces neuf langues, ou groupe de langues, cela signifie que de nombreuses autres langues autochtones comptent très peu de locuteurs.

Par conséquent, ces dernières sont généralement considérées par plusieurs spécialistes comme menacées ou vouées à un avenir incertain. L'âge moyen des populations de langue autochtone varie considérablement d'une langue à l'autre. Par l'exemple, en 2016, l'âge moyen de la population ayant l'inuktitut comme langue maternelle était de 27 ans, comparativement à 61 ans pour la population ayant le michif pour la langue maternelle.

Les profils linguistiques diffèrent considérablement selon qu'il s'agisse de la population des Premières Nations, des Inuits ou des Métis. Ainsi, en 2016, deux Inuits sur trois pouvaient parler une langue inuite suffisamment bien pour soutenir une conversation, principalement l'inuktitut. Chez les Premières Nations, plus de 21 % d'entre elles déclaraient parler une langue autochtone, alors que chez les Métis, moins de 2 % déclaraient pouvoir en faire autant.

Chez les Inuits vivant dans l'Inuit Nunangat, soit 73 % d'entre eux, la proportion pouvant parler une langue inuite s'élevait à 84 %, alors qu'elle n'était que de 11 % parmi ceux résidant à l'extérieur de l'Inuit Nunangat. De même, 45 % des membres des Premières Nations ayant le statut d'Indien inscrit qui vivaient dans une réserve pouvaient parler une langue autochtone, comparativement à un peu moins de 13 % de ceux vivant à l'extérieur de la réserve.

Le lieu de résidence, la concentration et la proportion que représentent les membres d'une communauté sur son territoire sont parmi les facteurs qui ont une influence sur la propension à connaître et à utiliser une langue autochtone.[Traduction]

Le recensement nous permet d’examiner l'évolution au fil du temps. Entre 1996 et 2016, la population de ceux qui se disent capables de soutenir une conversation dans une langue autochtone est passée de 234 000 personnes à près de 264 000, soit une augmentation de 12,8 %. Il importe cependant de signaler que la population autochtone a progressé beaucoup plus rapidement. La croissance de la population capable de s'exprimer dans une langue autochtone ne suit pas celle de l’ensemble de la population autochtone.

Quant à la viabilité à long terme, la situation varie d'une langue à l'autre. Par exemple, en 2016, le nombre de personnes qui pouvaient parler le cri, l’ojibway ou l’oji-cri était à peu près le même qu’il y a 20 ans, c’est-à-dire plus de 125 000. Par contre, le nombre de locuteurs dénés a augmenté de près de 15 % au cours de ces 20 ans.

Le recensement montre que le nombre de personnes capables de parler une langue inuite est à la hausse. En 1996, il y avait un peu plus de 30 000 personnes au Canada qui pouvaient parler l’inuktitut. En 2016, ce nombre avait augmenté de 34 %, et plus de 2 000 autres personnes pouvaient parler d’autres langues inuites, comme l’inuinnaqtun ou l’inuvialuktun.

Les langues autochtones n’ont pas toutes connu une évolution favorable pendant cette période. Les langues parlées par les populations plus petites et plus âgées sont particulièrement vulnérables. Le nombre de personnes capables de parler l’une des langues wakashanes, comme les Haislas ou les Heiltsuk, a diminué de près de 25 %. De la même façon, le nombre de personnes qui pouvaient parler carrier a diminué de 27 % en 20 ans.

Les événements passés ont beaucoup nui à la vitalité des langues autochtones au Canada. Par exemple, le système des pensionnats qui a interdit à des générations d’enfants autochtones de parler leur langue maternelle a eu d’énormes répercussions sur la transmission intergénérationnelle des langues autochtones.

Contrairement aux autres groupes linguistiques au Canada, les personnes qui parlent une langue autochtone ne peuvent pas compter sur les nouveaux immigrants pour maintenir ou accroître leur population de locuteurs. La transmission de la langue des parents aux enfants est essentielle à la survie de toutes les langues autochtones. Des taux de fécondité élevés et une transmission linguistique intergénérationnelle forte contribuent ainsi à créer une communauté linguistique jeune et dynamique.

De plus, bien que l’apprentissage d’une langue autochtone à la maison, dans l’enfance, en tant que langue principale soit un élément crucial de la viabilité à long terme des langues autochtones, son apprentissage comme langue seconde peut être un élément important de la revitalisation des langues. Des efforts sont déployés partout au Canada pour préserver et revitaliser les langues autochtones grâce à leur apprentissage comme langue seconde. Ces efforts comprennent l’intégration de l’enseignement des langues autochtones dans les salles de classe, la création d’orthographes normalisées et l’élaboration de programmes d’immersion linguistique.

(1120)



Voilà qui explique pourquoi, particulièrement chez les jeunes, la population capable de tenir une conversation dans une langue autochtone est plus importante que la population dont la langue maternelle est autochtone. Il est particulièrement important de tenir compte des efforts de revitalisation à la lumière des résultats de l’Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2012, qui nous a appris que 59 % des membres des Premières Nations vivant hors réserve et 37 % des Métis estiment très important ou assez important de parler ou de comprendre une langue autochtone. Chez les Inuits, la proportion atteint 81 %.

Je vais conclure en disant que de nombreuses études sur les langues autochtones mettent en lumière un certain nombre de facteurs clés qui influent sur la vitalité et l’avenir de ces langues. Bien que le nombre de locuteurs puisse être considéré comme si faible que ces langues en deviennent précaires, les domaines où elles sont parlées comptent beaucoup. Par exemple, si elles sont utilisées à la maison, à l’école, lors d’événements sociaux et culturels et dans toute la vie communautaire, cela a une forte incidence sur leur vitalité et leur pérennité.

La vitalité d’une langue autochtone donnée dépend aussi de la présence d’une masse critique de locuteurs au sein de la communauté, de la présence d’un réseau de relations sociales utilisant la langue et de sa transmission intergénérationnelle, entre parents et enfants, comme langue maternelle ou comme langue seconde. Des études ont également montré que la vitalité des langues autochtones dépend aussi de la solidité de l'identité de leurs locuteurs et de la reconnaissance de la langue, à l'interne comme à l'extérieur, comme distincte et unique dans la société. Cette reconnaissance peut donc conférer un statut et un prestige grâce à la langue.

Je conclus en disant que Statistique Canada reconnaît qu'il est important de faire participer les membres des Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits à toutes les étapes du cycle de vie des données, de comprendre les besoins et les lacunes en matière de données, de déterminer le contenu et d’assurer la pertinence de l’analyse et des produits statistiques que nous fournissons. La grande qualité des données linguistiques et autres que nous recueillons ne serait pas possible sans leur participation au recensement et à d’autres enquêtes. Nos mesures des langues autochtones et d’autres caractéristiques de la population autochtone du Canada ont évolué et continueront d’évoluer au fil du temps, car nous travaillons avec les collectivités et les organisations à l'amélioration de la collecte des données, qui doit respecter leur droit à l’autodétermination.

Merci, et c’est avec plaisir que mes collègues Vivian O’Donnell et Pamela Best et moi-même répondrons à vos questions.

Le président:

Tout le monde a ce rapport de Statistique Canada. Il vous a été envoyé par courriel.

Merci beaucoup. Il y a là de très bons renseignements pour le Comité. C’est très utile.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Fizet, dans vos observations, vous avez parlé de langues éteintes, mais vous n’avez donné ni chiffres ni autres précisions. Pouvez-vous nous donner de plus amples explications sur les langues éteintes au Canada?

M. William Fizet:

En ce qui concerne les langues éteintes...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux parler de celles que nous avons perdues. Avons-nous un moyen de les dénombrer ou de les décrire?

M. William Fizet:

Je vais devoir vous communiquer cette information plus tard. Eux, ils sont au courant, mais nous n'avons pas de liste sous les yeux. Nous pourrons vous faire parvenir l'information.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Je m'adresse à vous tous. Dans vos ministères, employez-vous des langues autochtones? Si oui, lesquelles? Y a-t-il eu des discussions sur la possibilité de les utiliser d'une façon ou d'une autre? Y a-t-il des discussions de cet ordre?

(1125)

M. William Fizet:

Dans notre cas particulier...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux parler de Statistique Canada ou de Patrimoine canadien.

M. William Fizet:

Je vais laisser la parole aux témoins de Statistique Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La question s'adresse à tout le monde. Y a-t-il des langues autochtones qui sont utilisées quelque part dans l'appareil gouvernemental?

M. Hubert Lussier (sous-ministre adjoint, Citoyenneté, patrimoine et régions, ministère du Patrimoine canadien):

Je peux donner une réponse partielle. Je sais qu’EDSC a pris des initiatives. Par exemple, on y a offert des services en cri au Québec, parce que ce ministère a un fonctionnaire qui s’est porté volontaire pour offrir ces services dans le domaine de responsabilité d’EDSC dans le nord du Québec. Voilà le genre d’initiatives qui existe pour le moment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois.

Allez-y.

Mme Pamela Best (directrice adjointe, Division de la statistique sociale et autochtone, Statistique Canada):

À Statistique Canada, lorsque nous menons nos enquêtes, nous proposons les questionnaires dans différentes langues. L’Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones a également été traduite en inuktitut et en inuinnaqtun, tout comme une enquête auprès des employés du gouvernement du Nunavut.

Au besoin, nous avons aussi des guides et des interprètes pour traduire nos questionnaires dans les langues du recensement et de l’Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tenons-nous une base de données ou avons-nous des statistiques sur le nombre de traducteurs capables de traduire telle ou telle langue au Canada, ou avons-nous une base de données sur ceux qui peuvent enseigner les langues autochtones afin que nous puissions soutenir l'expansion de ces langues et aider à les sauver?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Nous pourrions certainement vous fournir cette information. Nous allons la recueillir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ne va-t-il pas de soi que vous conserviez ces données?

M. Hubert Lussier:

Ce serait le Bureau de la traduction qui aurait les données de cette nature qui sont les plus exactes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si quelqu’un souhaite apprendre une langue qui est sur le point de disparaître, à qui s’adresserait-il pour la sauver, par exemple?

M. Hubert Lussier:

C'est le Bureau de la traduction qui fournit les interprètes professionnels. Comme William l’a dit, nous avons des renseignements sur certains types de programmes qui existent partout au Canada. Ils ne sont pas offerts systématiquement de la façon que vous semblez souhaiter.

M. William Fizet:

J’aimerais aussi souligner que, pour les programmes que nous administrons, ce sont les collectivités qui repèrent leurs lacunes et définissent ce dont elles ont besoin en matière d’apprentissage des langues, de revitalisation des langues et de promotion linguistique. Ce sont elles qui nous disent en fait ce dont elles ont besoin, et ce sont ces types de projets qui reçoivent un soutien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Corbeil, vous avez dit un mot des langues qui ont été rétablies ou aidées grâce à l’apprentissage à la maison, à l’apprentissage chez les enfants, et ainsi de suite. Dans le cas de ma propre famille, ma femme et moi parlons à nous deux six langues, mais nous n’avons qu’une seule langue en commun, donc c’est la langue que ma fille parle. Quels sont les défis liés à la réintroduction ou à la reconstitution d’une langue lorsque les deux parents ne la parlent pas depuis l'enfance? Comment pouvons-nous nous y prendre?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

D’après nos statistiques et nos études, nous savons assez bien que c’est toujours un défi lorsque nous avons des mariages mixtes, parce que la langue parlée à la maison est habituellement celle qui sera transmise aux enfants. Comme nous l’avons mentionné, parce qu’il y a beaucoup d’Autochtones qui ne parlent pas une langue autochtone et qu'ils aimeraient que leurs enfants l’apprennent comme langue seconde, c’est souvent un problème du fait que la première langue transmise n’était pas une langue autochtone, mais souvent l’anglais ou le français. Il ne fait aucun doute que c’est un défi, mais nous pouvons constater au fil du temps que les personnes qui n’utilisent pas leur langue à la maison sont habituellement plus âgées, de sorte que l’âge moyen de la population est plus élevé, ce qui est un gros problème. Cela dépend aussi du lieu de résidence. Si vous vivez dans un endroit où il y a une forte concentration de locuteurs d’une langue, cela aura une incidence sur la probabilité que la langue sera transmise.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Une masse critique.

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Une masse critique, précisément.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez mentionné que le déné, par exemple, a enregistré une augmentation de 15 % en 20 ans. Je pense que vous avez parlé d’une augmentation de 34 % au cours de la même période... À quoi pouvons-nous attribuer ce succès et quelles leçons pouvons-nous en tirer pour les autres?

Mme Vivian O'Donnell (analyste, Division de la statistique sociale et autochtone, Statistique Canada):

Nous devons comprendre cette augmentation dans le contexte de la croissance démographique dans son ensemble. La population inuite croît rapidement. Une bonne partie de cette croissance est attribuable aux taux de fécondité élevés. Nous constatons que la population autochtone dans son ensemble augmente considérablement au fil du temps. Cependant, cette croissance n’est pas nécessairement attribuable à la seule fécondité élevée, c’est aussi parce que des gens viennent de s’identifier comme Autochtones dans le recensement.

Par conséquent, en ce qui concerne l’inuktitut en particulier, je pense que vous pouvez attribuer l'augmentation du nombre de locuteurs à une fécondité élevée. La plupart des Inuits vivent dans l’Inuit Nunangat, les territoires où vivent les Inuits au Canada, où la langue est plus répandue et serait plus facile à maintenir. Je crois que c’est semblable pour le déné en ce sens que les locuteurs sont concentrés dans des collectivités où ils sont nombreux.

(1130)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Si nous trouvions des façons d’introduire ces langues à la Chambre, comme nous en discutons dans le cadre de l’étude, pourriez-vous nous aider à comprendre en quoi cela aide les langues elles-mêmes, aux fins du compte rendu?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Comme je l’ai mentionné, de nombreux facteurs peuvent avoir une influence sur la vitalité de ces langues. Tous les spécialistes ont mentionné que le fait de parler une langue à la maison est certainement un aspect critique, mais comme nous le savons, il ne s’agit pas seulement de parler une langue à la maison, mais aussi cela fait intervenir les réseaux sociaux. Cela fait intervenir la visibilité, le statut et le prestige.

Lorsqu’une langue est parlée dans les domaines publics, par exemple dans l’administration — quand on prend l’inuktitut, on sait que ceux qui l’utilisent au travail le font surtout dans des organismes gouvernementaux pour l’administration, pour la prestation de services. Cela a certainement une incidence sur l’avenir et la vitalité de ces langues. Donc, non seulement le fait que la langue soit parlée à la maison, mais le fait qu’elle soit visible dans le domaine public aura certainement une incidence sur le statut et l’utilisation de ces langues.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci à tous nos témoins. Vos exposés ont été très intéressants.

J’aimerais poser quelques questions supplémentaires au sujet de la vigueur des langues et des mesures que vous utilisez pour déterminer cette vigueur.

Dans les renseignements qui nous ont été remis, vous avez plusieurs colonnes: capacité de soutenir une conversation, langue maternelle, langue parlée le plus souvent à la maison, autre langue parlée régulièrement à la maison, ce qui sous-entend l’usage secondaire de la langue autochtone pertinente non pas comme la source principale de conversation ou le moyen de conversation, mais comme une autre façon de soutenir une conversation dans un environnement privé. Je suppose que la « langue maternelle » renvoie à une langue maternelle qui est toujours comprise, n’est-ce pas?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Oui.

M. William Fizet:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans les années 1990, j’ai écrit un livre sur la politique linguistique. C’est là. L’une des mesures que j’ai utilisées pour essayer de déterminer la vitalité de la langue au sein d’une communauté linguistique a consisté à examiner le rapport entre la langue maternelle et la langue parlée le plus souvent à la maison. Plus la proportion de personnes qui l’utilisent à la maison est faible, plus la situation pour la langue est faible. J’ai examiné les chiffres que vous avez fournis pour certains des grands groupes linguistiques. Je constate que ce chiffre contredit un autre chiffre que vous avez fourni. Dans le cas de la langue innue, je vois que 10 710 personnes l’ont comme langue maternelle, et environ 90 %, donc 9 500 personnes, l’utilisent principalement à la maison. J’ai pris l’ojibway et je constate que sur les 20 470 personnes qui l’ont comme langue maternelle, seulement 9 005, ou 43 %, l’utilisent à la maison. Cela laisse entendre un taux de déclin très important en une seule génération. Pourtant, lorsque nous examinons la capacité de soutenir une conversation, nous voyons quelque chose de très différent. Nous constatons que pour l’innu, seulement 9 % des locuteurs sont des personnes dont ce n’est pas une langue maternelle et ce chiffre est de 20 % pour l’ojibway.

Je me demande simplement quelle est la dynamique. Je n’ai jamais vu une telle chose dans le cas des communautés de langue officielle, la source de ce que j’examinais dans mon livre.

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Vos commentaires sont très pertinents.

Nous utilisons l'expression « indice de continuité » lorsque nous examinons le nombre de personnes qui parlent une langue le plus souvent à la maison par rapport à celles dont c’est la langue maternelle. Vous avez tout à fait raison, il y a une énorme différence entre les groupes linguistiques. Par exemple, vous avez mentionné l’ojibway. De fait, cela signifie que 44 % des personnes dont la langue maternelle est l’ojibway l’utilisent le plus souvent à la maison. Cet indice est de 44. Si vous prenez le cri, c'est 62 %. Évidemment, cela veut dire qu’il y a une grande différence, parce que, comme on le dit habituellement, la langue qui est parlée le plus souvent à la maison est celle qui sera généralement transmise. Beaucoup d’enfants parlent cette langue régulièrement, même si ce n’est pas la langue prédominante parlée à la maison. Cela peut avoir une influence, parce que, dans bien des cas, ces enfants apprennent la langue autochtone à l’école, mais ce n’est pas nécessairement la langue principale parlée à la maison. La dynamique peut devenir très complexe. De plus, cela dépend bien entendu si nous faisons partie d’un ménage mixte ou si les deux partenaires ou le mari et la femme, par exemple, vont parler...

(1135)

M. Scott Reid:

Quand vous parlez de langue maternelle, vous tenez compte des gens qui ont deux langues maternelles?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolument.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que ces personnes seraient incluses?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolument, de sorte dès qu’une langue autochtone est déclarée, que ce soit « le cri et l'anglais », parce que nous savons qu'il y a de nombreuses réponses multiples dans le cas des peuples autochtones... Nous constatons que l’écart est très grand, mais ce qui est très intéressant, c’est que lorsque nous examinons l’indice d'acquisition, c’est-à-dire le nombre de personnes qui parlent une langue et qui sont en mesure de soutenir une conversation par rapport à celles dont c’est la langue maternelle, cela peut être étonnamment important par rapport à la langue maternelle. Vous venez de parler de l’ojibway. Nous savons que l’indice de continuité est de 44, mais quand on prend l’indice d’acquisition, il est de 1,4, ce qui signifie vraiment que 40 % plus de gens apprennent cette langue comme langue seconde que ceux dont c’est la langue maternelle.

La dynamique est très complexe. Il y a beaucoup de facteurs qui peuvent avoir une influence, mais il est évident que cela diffère beaucoup entre les langues.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Lorsque j’examinais les communautés de langue officielle en situation minoritaire, j’ai examiné la structure d’âge des locuteurs, mais je l’ai ventilée un peu différemment. Je n’ai pas simplement calculé l’âge moyen du locuteur. Je m’excuse d'avoir à montrer une photo tirée de ce livre. En bas, ici, vous pouvez voir qu’il s’agit d’une solide communauté francophone au Québec. Ce que vous voyez, c’est un arbre des âges où des enfants de tous âges, des adultes aussi, ont tendance à conserver un pourcentage élevé d’utilisation de cette langue.

Quand on prend les communautés francophones de l’Ouest canadien, on voit quelque chose de très différent. Ce sont principalement les personnes de la tranche d’âge la plus élevée, plus de 65 ans, et celles de moins de 5 ans qui sont unilingues. Ce que cela m’a permis de faire, c’est de déterminer si ce sont seulement les jeunes enfants qui parlent seulement avec leur mère, et les personnes très âgées qui sont uniquement dans un milieu familial qui utilise la langue.

Faites-vous ce genre de suivi dans le cas des langues autochtones?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Tout à fait, vous avez raison. Nous l’avons fait pour les communautés de langue officielle en situation minoritaire. Nous avons même comparé la pyramide des âges ou la structure par âge entre 1971 et 2016, ce qui a complètement changé, parce qu’avec le temps la population vieillit et la langue n’est pas entièrement transmise à leurs enfants, principalement parce qu’il y a des couples mixtes, l’exogamie. C’est exactement ce qui se passe avec la communauté autochtone. Dans certains cas, les jeunes enfants apprennent la langue comme langue maternelle, mais dans beaucoup d’autres collectivités, ils ne l’apprendront pas. Si vous prenez la structure par âge de la langue maternelle, parce que la langue n’est pas transmise de génération en génération, et si vous suivez cela au fil du temps, vous verrez que la pyramide change radicalement et est parfois complètement à l’inverse.

M. Scott Reid:

Je sais qu’il ne me reste plus de temps, mais j’aimerais simplement vous demander, si vous disposez de cette information sous une forme qui n’exige pas beaucoup de travail supplémentaire, mais qui pourrait tout simplement être communiquée. Pourriez-vous la transmettre à notre greffier dans toute la mesure du possible pour le grand nombre de langues?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolument. Tout dépend si vous voulez cela pour l’ensemble des langues autochtones ou pour des langues précises. Nous pourrions certainement vous fournir cette information.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Saganash. [Français]

M. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leurs présentations.

J'aimerais m'adresser à M. Fizet et à M. Corbeil.

Monsieur Corbeil, lorsqu'on a négocié la Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, à Genève, un de mes collègues de l'Alberta et moi parlions parfois en cri lorsque nous ne voulions pas que les représentants de la délégation canadienne nous comprennent. Cela fonctionnait très bien.

Vous avez fait référence à l'oji-cri, au moskégon, au cri du Nord-du-Québec et au cri des Plaines. Qui détermine ces catégories?

(1140)

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Il fut un temps où seulement « cri » était inscrit dans le recensement. Le recensement dénombrait moins de langues que maintenant. À la suite de consultations, nous avons décidé que, à partir du moment où il existe des variations d'une langue, nous incluons au questionnaire du recensement une incitation qui demande aux gens de préciser la langue. En envoyant une demande de précision, nous nous sommes rendu compte de la croissance de ces différents dialectes.

M. Romeo Saganash:

D'accord.

Je me pose une question, et j'estime qu'elle est importante. Vos statistiques indiquent-elles un lien entre le fait d'avoir un traité comme la Convention de la Baie-James et du Nord québécois et la survie d'une langue?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Les statistiques ne permettent pas de faire un tel lien. Cependant, nous pouvons certainement faire des hypothèses. D'ailleurs, nous l'avons fait dans le cas des minorités de langue officielle, par exemple, où il y a une reconnaissance officielle et une structure en place.

Nous menons des enquêtes sur les perceptions. L'importance de parler une langue est souvent associée au fait que cette langue est reconnue dans le cadre de traités et de lois. Cependant, nous ne pouvons pas mesurer directement ce rapport dans les sources de données de Statistique Canada.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il serait peut-être opportun de le faire éventuellement, puisque la Convention de la Baie-James et du Nord québécois reconnaît à la Commission scolaire crie le droit d'enseigner le cri durant les premières années de scolarisation. Je pense donc qu'il s'agirait d'une statistique importante.

Monsieur Fizet, dans votre présentation, vous avez dit que l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans le domaine public, par exemple à la Chambre des communes, aurait une grande valeur symbolique. Selon vous, n'y aurait-il pas lieu de reconnaître les langues autochtones comme des langues officielles du Canada?

M. William Fizet:

Permettre aux jeunes Autochtones d'entendre parler leur langue au Parlement du Canada, un pays dont ils font partie, est un peu ce que nous voulions essayer de mettre en place. Pour ce qui est des langues officielles, nous ne pouvons pas répondre à cette question actuellement. Comme vous le savez, un projet de loi est en branle, en coopération avec les groupes autochtones. Je pense que cette notion devra être élaborée avec les peuples autochtones et non pas seulement avec quelqu'un qui les représente.

Pour répondre à votre question, c'est un sujet sur lequel l'ensemble de la population devrait être capable de s'exprimer. Quand je parle de l'ensemble de la population, je parle des communautés autochtones et des communautés non autochtones.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Personnellement, en tant que haut fonctionnaire, estimez-vous que ce serait important?

M. William Fizet:

Disons que nous sommes sur le point d'y travailler.

M. Hubert Lussier:

Si je peux me permettre, M. Fizet et moi avons beaucoup d'opinions, mais nous ne considérons pas qu'il est de notre devoir de les partager. Nous sommes ici pour vous fournir des faits ou des éléments factuels qui appuient votre propre travail. Je pense que ce serait inapproprié que nous exprimions des opinions en tant que fonctionnaires.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Quel est votre rôle, alors, dans l'élaboration de cette loi sur les langues autochtones?

M. Hubert Lussier:

Dans mon équipe, se trouve une petite équipe dirigée par un représentant du gouvernement fédéral, dans le cadre du dialogue qui se tient en ce moment avec les trois organismes nationaux représentant les trois grands groupes autochtones du pays, c'est-à-dire les Premières Nations, les Inuits et les Métis. Ce dialogue vise l'élaboration de cette loi dont le premier ministre a annoncé qu'elle se ferait en codéveloppement. C'est le concept dont parle M. Fizet.

En effet, notre rôle consiste à élaborer des principes qui vont nourrir la loi prévue à la suite d'un dialogue avec les trois groupes représentés.

(1145)

M. Romeo Saganash:

Quels grands principes suggérez-vous actuellement au gouvernement?

M. Hubert Lussier:

Ce serait un peu prématuré de vous dévoiler l'état des discussions, puisque nous devons les mener en toute logique de codéveloppement avec les trois partenaires en question. Ce que je peux dire, c'est que, jusqu'ici, le ministère du Patrimoine canadien a engagé des consultations techniques avec des experts du monde des langues autochtones, de l'enseignement, de l'apprentissage et de la transmission. Cet été, une fois qu'on se sera entendu sur la nature des éléments devant faire l'objet de consultations, on consultera les communautés, en partenariat avec les trois groupes autochtones, et cela ira beaucoup plus en profondeur. Ces consultations ne se feront plus simplement auprès des experts, mais auprès des communautés elles-mêmes.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Pour reprendre l'expression de M. Fizet, cela va donc aller au-delà du symbolisme, du moins je l'espère.

M. Hubert Lussier:

C'est bien notre intention. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci à chacun d'entre vous d’être ici ce matin, merci de vos témoignages et merci de vos exposés.

Mes premières questions portent sur la vitalité de la langue. Nous avons entendu des témoignages au sujet du nombre de dialectes et de la façon dont ils mènent, éventuellement, à un résultat où la vitalité est amoindrie. J’aimerais avoir tout simplement vos commentaires et vos conseils sur comment nous, comme gouvernement, traiterions cette question et j'espère que vos commentaires seront fondés sur des faits et non une opinion. Y a-t-il des mesures que nous pouvons prendre pour nous assurer que les langues sont préservées?

Les dialectes sont importants, les gens ont le droit, mais en même temps, s’ils deviennent si fragmentés, la langue est perdue. Y a-t-il moyen de réunir des gens qui parlent des dialectes différents? Pensez-vous que c’est utile? Cela mènera-t-il ultimement à la vitalité de la langue?

M. Hubert Lussier:

Pour répondre à votre question, je vais me reporter à certains propos de William.

En ce qui concerne notre soutien financier, nous sommes très sensibles à ce qui vient des collectivités. Par conséquent, nous n'avons pas dicté aux collectivités ce qu’elles devraient demander en matière de financement. Par ailleurs, nous savons que certaines choses sont très utiles, notamment se concentrer sur les foyers de revitalisation linguistique. Il s’agit d’initiatives dans le cadre desquelles des personnes qui parlent couramment une langue offrent un environnement dans lequel de très jeunes enfants peuvent grandir et apprendre — dans une sorte de garderie — la langue qui deviendra sinon leur langue maternelle, du moins une langue seconde à un âge très précoce.

Une autre chose que nous voyons de plus en plus, et nous pensons que ce sont des initiatives utiles, ce sont des collectivités autochtones qui élaborent des plans linguistiques qui permettent à toute la collectivité de travailler ensemble. Avoir des initiatives qui ne sont pas isolées, mais qui permettent d’établir des liens entre elles au conseil de bande, dans les écoles, dans les garderies et au niveau culturel. Ces plans linguistiques fournissent le genre d’environnement dont Jean-Pierre et William parlaient, qui est propice à la préservation et à la transmission de leur langue.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Monsieur Corbeil, avez-vous autre chose à ajouter?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Nous parlons de l'école. Nous savons que lorsque nous pensons à l’avenir des collectivités, le fait que les enfants connaissent la langue ou sont en mesure de la parler est un solide indicateur de l’avenir et de la vitalité à long terme de ces langues.

Nous avons vu à maintes reprises — même parmi les communautés francophones de langue officielle en situation minoritaire — que lorsqu’il y a une école, il y a un environnement de centres et d'associations communautaires qui sont propices à la transmission et à l’utilisation de ces langues. Cela contribue certainement à la création de collectivités plus fortes. C’est tout ce que je peux dire à ce sujet.

(1150)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

À la suite de la question que M. Graham a posée au sujet de l’incidence de l’interprétation à la Chambre des communes, y a-t-il quelque chose de plus précis que vous pourriez offrir? Cela va au-delà de la reconnaissance d’un droit. J'examine l’incidence que cela peut avoir. Avez-vous des données qui montrent l’incidence que cela peut avoir et que cela aurait sur les collectivités si la langue était parlée à la Chambre?

Nous ne nous leurrons pas en croyant que tout le monde nous regarde. Nous savons que nos auditoires sont faibles. Y a-t-il des preuves qui démontrent que cette mesure se traduira par une plus grande préservation et une plus grande vitalité des langues?

M. Hubert Lussier:

À ce sujet, Jean-Pierre et ses collègues ont quelque chose de plus intelligent que ce que j’ai à dire. Je vais essayer.

Chaque modèle que nous avons utilisé et avec lequel nous avons travaillé sur la vitalité de la langue — et les meilleurs que nous avons sont ceux dont Jean-Pierre a parlé et qui ont trait à la langue officielle en situation minoritaire — comporte un élément d’utilisation publique et de reconnaissance publique dans des institutions démocratiques. Il est difficile de dire si cela compte pour 5 % ou 25 % de la vitalité, mais c’est reconnu.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Oui, cela compte pour quelque chose.

Le président:

Madame O'Donnell, avez-vous autre chose à ce sujet?

Mme Vivian O'Donnell:

Nous n’avons pas une question de sondage qui demande s’il y a eu interprétation simultanée, alors je ne peux pas vous répondre directement.

Nous mesurons l’exposition aux langues autochtones dans l’Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones, qui concerne les membres des Premières Nations vivant hors réserve, les Métis et les Inuits. On y demande à quelle fréquence les personnes sont exposées à une langue autochtone à la maison et à l’extérieur. Dans les versions précédentes, on demandait si des services étaient disponibles à l’école, dans la collectivité, des choses du genre.

J’essaie de penser aux recherches qui ont été faites à l’aide de ce contenu. Celle qui me vient à l'esprit concerne l’exposition des enfants à la langue autochtone et les résultats positifs en éducation. On arrive à...

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C’est utile. C’est bien.

M. William Fizet:

La situation de la Nouvelle-Zélande avec les Maoris pourrait peut-être nous éclairer. Je n’ai pas ces données, mais je pense que ce pourrait être un bon exemple d'une excellente question, quoique compliquée.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Encore une fois, merci à nos témoins de la discussion très instructive que nous avons jusqu'à maintenant.

J’aimerais commencer par quelques questions précises sur la plupart des données fournies par Statistique Canada. Je vois de très petits chiffres. Celui qui m'a sauté aux yeux est celui du cri du Sud-Est, soit 40 personnes ayant la capacité de soutenir une conversation.

Je suis curieux. Avez-vous des données qui examinent un peu plus en profondeur la répartition géographique? Par exemple, 40 personnes, il pourrait s’agir d'une famille élargie. Est-ce une interprétation, un très petit groupe familial?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Oui. Bien sûr, nous pourrions fournir ce genre d'information, mais il faut toujours faire attention, parce que lorsqu’on regarde l’ensemble des familles de langue crie, nous savons que pour la plupart elles sont concentrées. Nous en trouvons 28 % en Saskatchewan, 24 % en Alberta et 22 % au Manitoba. Elles pourraient être dispersées. Cela dépend si ces 40 personnes sont toutes situées dans la même petite région. Il faudrait que nous contre-vérifiions et que nous examinions cela, parce que cela crée un problème d’essayer de comprendre des renseignements plus détaillés.

Mme Vivian O'Donnell:

J’aimerais ajouter qu’il y a une mention crie n.d.a. Cela signifie Cri « non déclaré autrement ». Il s’agit d'une personne qui a inscrit tout simplement cri sur le questionnaire.

Comme nous l’avons mentionné, dans le questionnaire électronique, on leur aurait demandé d’être plus précis et c’est pourquoi nous obtenons de meilleures précisions comme cri des marais ou cri de Moose.

Même si l’on dit qu’il y a 40 personnes qui parlent le cri du Sud-Est, il se peut fort bien qu’il y en ait plus, car cette catégorie compte 86 000 personnes.

(1155)

M. John Nater:

Très bien.

Par ailleurs, l’un des défis pour le Bureau de la traduction dans les semaines à venir, et le syndicat en cause, c'est la capacité de professionnels qualifiés. Encore une fois, sachant que vous ne pouvez pas entrer dans les menus détails dans un recensement, avez-vous une idée des antécédents scolaires des utilisateurs de langues précises, leur niveau de scolarité et où l’on peut trouver ce bassin potentiel de traducteurs?

M. Jean-Pierre Corbeil:

Absolument. Encore une fois, la difficulté est de savoir si vous voulez vous concentrer sur de très petits groupes. Si c’est le cas, cela devient alors un problème. Pour les groupes plus grands, oui, nous avons parfois l’information au niveau principal, le principal domaine d’études. Nous savons où ils travaillent, le genre d’industrie et l’emploi. Oui, nous pouvons certainement vous fournir ces données.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Rapidement, monsieur Fizet et monsieur Lussier, dans la conclusion de votre déclaration liminaire, vous avez parlé un peu de normalisation des systèmes et de consolidation générale de certaines des langues, compte tenu de certains progrès technologiques.

Nous utilisons tous Google Translate de temps à autre. Existe-t-il un programme semblable qui permettrait de faire cela, non pas pour la communication orale, mais pour la communication écrite, un service quelconque du côté de la TI?

M. William Fizet:

De nombreux groupes du secteur des médias sont très intéressés par cela. Google travaille avec le First Peoples’ Cultural Council en Colombie-Britannique. Comme vous le savez, la Colombie-Britannique a la majorité des langues autochtones. Apple fait aussi du travail. Dans le cadre de notre programme, nous appuyons les applications répondant aux besoins des Autochtones qui ont décidé que ce serait attrayant pour leurs enfants ou la jeune génération.

Il y en a donc. La raison pour laquelle nous voulions inclure cela, c’est que les possibilités d’interprétation que vous étudiez vont, je crois, s’appliquer à divers groupes d’âge. Comme tout autre groupe de jeunes, les jeunes autochtones accrochés, bien qu’il y ait certains cas... en raison des difficultés liées à l’éloignement.

Si vous avez des services d’interprétation, ou peu importe comment vous voulez les voir, assurez-vous qu’il y a cet élément technologique parce que vous obtiendrez probablement l’adhésion.

Pour répondre à votre question, oui. On constate un vif intérêt de la part de nombreux... Dans le cadre de notre programme, nous pouvons en mentionner un bon nombre.

M. John Nater:

C’est bien. Il y a donc des partenariats en cours, non seulement à l’interne, mais à l’externe.

M. William Fizet:

Oh, oui. Certains de ces grands groupes sont très intéressés parce que la difficulté d'obtenir un service d’interprétation en raison, encore une fois, de l’éloignement ou de l’absence d’interlocuteurs linguistiques, peut en fait être contournée grâce à cette technologie dans certains cas.

M. John Nater:

Ce serait utile, peut-être plus tard, de l'anglais et du français aux langues autochtones...

M. William Fizet:

Oui, et certaines vont directement des langues autochtones à l’anglais ou au français, ou même d’une langue autochtone à une autre.

M. John Nater:

C’est excellent. Merci.

Le président:

Je vais donner un exemple de ce qui se passe dans ma circonscription. Mes enfants ont six et neuf ans et ils fréquentent une école, Whitehorse Elementary, où peut-être 10 p. 100 des écoliers sont autochtones, mais ils suivent des cours de langue tutchone du Sud. Tout le monde à l’école les prend chaque semaine. C’est le cours préféré de ma fille. Nous venons tout juste de financer les Premières Nations Champagne et Aishihik dans une communauté mixte, afin d’avoir une garderie qui offre une immersion totale en tutchone du Sud. Que vous soyez anglophone ou francophone, vous ne parlerez que le tutchone du Sud dans cette garderie. Ce sera une expérience intéressante.

J’ai une dernière question. Savez-vous s’il existe des études comparatives avec des langues qu'on ne trouve pas au Canada? Y a-t-il des mots semblables à ceux des langues asiatiques? Je pense que les langues navajos sont très proches de la langue dénée athabascan. À votre connaissance, est-ce qu'on retrouve des mots des langues autochtones canadiennes dans d'autres langues du monde?

M. Hubert Lussier:

Le seul exemple qui me vienne à l’esprit est celui de la communauté inuite du Canada, du Groenland, de l’Alaska et de la Russie. À part cela, je ne pense pas qu’il y en ait.

Une voix: Le Nord du Québec.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Cela a été très utile et très intéressant.

(1200)

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Avant de lever la séance, j’ai quelques petites questions administratives à régler.

Le président:

Oui. D’accord.

M. Blake Richards:

Premièrement, nous avons reçu un mémoire de l’Assemblée législative du Manitoba. Je me demande si nous pourrions communiquer avec eux pour les remercier de leur mémoire, mais aussi pour leur demander s’ils pourraient nous donner plus d’information sur la façon dont ils traitent l’utilisation de la langue française dans leurs délibérations. C'est un point qui n'a pas vraiment été abordé.

Le président:

Bien sûr. Faisons cela.

M. Blake Richards:

En second lieu, il s'agissait de voir si notre analyste pouvait trouver des utilisations de l’inuktitut dans les délibérations du Sénat, puis s’il y avait une indication du type d’interprétation utilisée.

Le président:

Bien sûr. Pas de problème.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci.

Le président:

D’accord, merci.

Merci beaucoup d’être venus.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un instant pour permettre à nos prochains témoins de se joindre à nous par vidéoconférence.



(1205)

Le président:

Bienvenue à la 97e séance du Comité. Nous poursuivons notre étude sur l’utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

Cheryle Herman, accompagnatrice en revitalisation de la langue dénée, se joint à nous. Elle comparaît par vidéoconférence depuis Saskatoon. Merci beaucoup de vous être rendue disponible aujourd’hui. Vous pouvez faire une déclaration liminaire, puis les membres du Comité vous poseront des questions.

Mme Cheryle Herman (accompagnatrice en revitalisation de la langue dénée, à titre personnel):

Merci.

[Le témoin s’exprime en déné.]

[Anglais]

Je m’appelle Cheryle Herman. Je viens de la nation dénée de Clearwater River, située près de La Loche, en Saskatchewan. Je parle couramment la langue denesuline. Je suis ici à titre d’ambassadrice des langues autochtones pour vous faire part de mes réflexions et de celles d’autres personnes sur l’importance d’utiliser nos langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes.

L’utilisation des langues autochtones à la Chambre des communes serait une reconnaissance des premiers habitants du pays et signifierait que le gouvernement honore et respecte ce fait. Cela montrerait également que le gouvernement travaille à redresser les injustices historiques et à établir des relations plus inclusives et plus axées sur la collaboration.

Les langues autochtones englobent ce que nous sommes en tant que peuples autochtones. La communication dans nos langues est sacrée. Sans nos langues et nos cultures, nous ne sommes plus autochtones. Notre langue définit qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons et est donc essentielle à notre survie en tant que nation.

La langue nous relie au terrain spirituel. Notre langue maternelle apporte force, clarté et finalité a ce que nous tentons de communiquer.

La langue a une incidence sur la vie quotidienne des membres de toutes les races, croyances et régions du monde. La langue aide à exprimer nos sentiments, nos désirs et nos interrogations au monde qui nous entoure. On combine les mots, les gestes et le ton pour représenter un large éventail d’émotions.

Notre capacité innée de former des liens durables entre nous tient en grande partie aux méthodes uniques et diversifiées que les êtres humains mettent en oeuvre pour communiquer au moyen de la langue écrite et de la langue parlée. Ces méthodes distinguent également l’humanité du reste du règne animal.

De plus, la capacité de communiquer dans plusieurs langues devient de plus en plus importante dans le milieu mondial des affaires de plus en plus intégré. Communiquer directement avec les nouveaux clients et entreprises dans leur langue maternelle est l’une des premières étapes de l’établissement d’une relation d’affaires internationale stable et durable.

La force et la valeur des ententes verbales dans nos langues mènent à des relations plus solides, respectueuses et honorables. Le fait de pouvoir le faire fait automatiquement passer n’importe quelle personne multilingue loin devant ses pairs dans la compétition pour des postes de prestige.

La langue est un aspect essentiel pour préparer les enfants à réussir dans leurs futures entreprises professionnelles. Le gouvernement peut contribuer à leur avenir en utilisant les langues autochtones à la Chambre des communes. Cela pourrait aider nos enfants autochtones à poursuivre un avenir de leader pour leur peuple, ou pour tout le Canada, en toute confiance, sachant qu’ils peuvent parler leur langue autochtone à la Chambre des communes.

Bien que les langues autochtones ne soient pas actuellement reconnues comme langues officielles au pays, il est important que nous accordions de la valeur à ces langues tout comme nous le faisons pour l’anglais et le français. Ce faisant, nous affirmons l’importance des personnes qui utilisent ces langues comme moyens de communication.

Nos langues sont encore très vivantes et constituent la seule forme de communication pour certains de nos aînés. Par conséquent, lorsque les délibérations se déroulent en français et en anglais sans traduction pour les peuples autochtones, ces derniers ne reçoivent pas l’information qui pourrait être pertinente pour eux et pour leur gouvernement.

Nous devons continuer de promouvoir les langues autochtones dans nos entreprises pour qu’elles puissent prospérer.

(1210)



J’aimerais vous faire part de quelques points supplémentaires à prendre en considération dans le contexte de notre situation difficile en ce qui concerne le maintien de nos langues autochtones. Premièrement, les langues autochtones suscitent des attitudes plus positives et moins de préjugés à l’égard des personnes différentes. Deuxièmement, ceux qui parlent une langue autochtone voient leurs compétences analytiques s’améliorer. Troisièmement, les compétences en affaires et en langue autochtone rendent les employés plus précieux sur le marché du travail. Quatrièmement, le fait de traiter avec une autre culture permet aux gens d’acquérir une compréhension plus profonde de leur propre culture. Cinquièmement, l’étude des langues autochtones accroît la créativité. Sixièmement, des compétences comme la résolution de problèmes et la gestion de concepts abstraits s'en trouvent accrues. Septièmement, le fait de parler une langue autochtone ouvre davantage de portes au gouvernement, dans les affaires, la médecine, le droit, la technologie, l’armée, l’industrie, le marketing, etc. Huitièmement, une langue seconde améliore les compétences et les notes. Neuvièmement, la capacité de communiquer dans une langue seconde procure un avantage concurrentiel dans les choix de carrière. Dixièmement, elle stimule les facultés d'écoute et la mémoire. Onzièmement, qui connaît une autre langue participe de manière plus efficace et responsable dans un monde multiculturel. Douzièmement, la maîtrise d'une autre langue dans une économie globalisée élargit les débouchés. Treizièmement, elle ouvre une fenêtre sur le passé sur le plan culturel et linguistique. Quatorzièmement, elle enseigne et promeut le respect de l'autre. Elle facilite la compréhension des rapports entre le langage et la nature humaine. Quinzièmement, qui connaît les langues autochtones tend à avoir une vision plus large du monde, un comportement plus libéral et à se montrer plus souple et tolérant. Seizièmement, les langues autochtones élargissent la vision du monde et limitent les barrières entre les personnes. Les obstacles suscitent la méfiance et la peur. Dix-septièmement, l’étude des langues autochtones mène à l’appréciation de la diversité culturelle. Dix-huitièmement, à mesure que l’immigration s’accroît, nous devons nous préparer à des changements dans la société canadienne. Dix-neuvièmement, une personne est nettement avantagée sur le marché mondial si elle est aussi bilingue que possible.Vingtièmement, les langues autochtones ouvrent la porte à l’art, à la musique, à la danse, à la mode, à la cuisine, au cinéma, à la philosophie, à la science, etc. Vingt et unièmement, l'étude d'une langue autochtone fait simplement partie d’une éducation libérale de base. Éduquer, c’est faire sortir de l’isolement, de l’étroitesse et de l’obscurité.

En plus des points mentionnés précédemment, la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones reconnaît également l’importance des langues autochtones dans les lieux d’affaires. L’article 13 dit: 1. Les peuples autochtones ont le droit de revivifier, d’utiliser, de développer et de transmettre aux générations futures leur histoire, leur langue, leurs traditions orales, leur philosophie, leur système d’écriture et leur littérature, ainsi que de choisir et de conserver leurs propres noms pour les communautés, les lieux et les personnes. 2. Les États prennent des mesures efficaces pour protéger ce droit et faire en sorte que les peuples autochtones puissent comprendre et être compris dans les procédures politiques, juridiques et administratives, en fournissant, si nécessaire, des services d’interprétation ou d’autres moyens appropriés.

Enfin, nous devons faire la lumière sur les appels à l’action de la CVR et veiller à ce que ces appels soient mis en œuvre. J’aimerais passer en revue deux appels à l’action qui visaient directement les langues autochtones.

L’appel à l’action no 13 se lit comme suit: « Nous demandons au gouvernement fédéral de reconnaître que les droits des Autochtones comprennent les droits linguistiques autochtones. »

L’appel à l’action no 14 se lit comme suit: « Nous demandons au gouvernement fédéral d’adopter une Loi sur les langues autochtones qui incorpore les principes suivants: (i) les langues autochtones représentent une composante fondamentale et valorisée de la culture et de la société canadiennes, et il y a urgence de les préserver. »

Reconnaître les langues autochtones et appuyer les programmes linguistiques autochtones, ainsi que les droits fonciers, la santé, la justice, l’éducation, le logement, l’emploi et les autres services, dans le cadre du processus global de justice sociale et de réconciliation.

En conclusion, j’aimerais citer M. Graham McKay: On pourrait aller jusqu’à dire que sans la reconnaissance des peuples autochtones et de leurs langues, beaucoup d’autres programmes seront moins efficaces, parce que ce manque de reconnaissance montrera que les attitudes sous-jacentes de la société dominante n’ont pas beaucoup changé.

Merci, Mahsi cho, de votre temps et de votre attention sur cette question très importante.

(1215)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, Mahsi cho. C’était un excellent aperçu de l’importance des langues autochtones pour notre comité.

Nous allons simplement avoir des questions très ouvertes. Nous allons commencer par M. Saganash.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Quel honneur! Je commence à aimer ce comité. Merci.

Cheryle, je vous remercie de cet exposé tout à la fois assez complet et succinct.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez écouté le groupe de témoins précédent, mais nous avons reçu des fonctionnaires du ministère du Patrimoine, ainsi que des représentants de Statistique Canada. Une des questions que je leur ai posées, à laquelle vous avez fait allusion, d’une certaine façon, dans votre présentation, était la question de savoir si nous devrions reconnaître les langues autochtones comme langues officielles dans ce pays. Je sais que vous avez parlé de l’article 13 de la Déclaration des Nations unies, bien sûr, mais aussi de l’appel à l’action no 14 de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation.

J’ai assisté aux réunions des chefs de l’Assemblée des Premières Nations au cours des 30 dernières années et je n’ai jamais vu d’ovation comme celle qu’a reçue l’actuel premier ministre lorsqu’il a annoncé la Loi sur les langues autochtones qu’ils allaient adopter. Tout le monde dans la salle en était ravi. J’en étais aussi ravi. Je me suis même levé pour applaudir le premier ministre.

À mon avis, la façon dont l’appel à l’action no 14 est rédigé ne va pas nécessairement dans cette direction. Il dit que la loi doit contenir les principes suivants, le premier étant « les langues autochtones sont un élément fondamental et valorisé de la culture et de la société canadiennes ». À votre avis, devrions-nous reconnaître les langues autochtones comme langues officielles au Canada?

(1220)

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Je pense que cela irait plus loin en ce qui concerne la préservation des langues autochtones et le maintien des langues et des cultures autochtones.

J’ai récemment visité les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, et ils sont très en avance sur nous pour ce qui est du travail qu’ils font pour maintenir leurs langues là-bas. Ils exigent des choses pour les programmes d’études et la langue utilisée dans les lieux d’affaires. Comme je l’ai dit dans ma déclaration liminaire, certains de nos aînés ne parlent ni l’anglais ni le français, de sorte que lorsque ces audiences se déroulent dans ces deux langues seulement, nos aînés ne savent pas ce qui se passe au sein du gouvernement.

M. Romeo Saganash:

J’aurai peut-être d’autres questions plus tard, mais je laisse la parole à d’autres.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Les séances ouvertes permettent aux préférés du président de poser des questions, alors ce sera difficile pour M. Graham.

J’aimerais poser une question au sujet de la traduction. Une députée qui a comparu devant le Comité pour parler de la valeur de la traduction est membre de la nation dénée et elle parle le déné. L’un des problèmes qui m’est venu à l’esprit pendant qu’elle nous faisait son exposé, c’est que nous n’avons pas ici de services de traduction en langue dénée. C’est un problème pour toutes les langues autochtones, mais moins pour certaines et plus pour d’autres.

Je crois qu’il s’agit d’un problème plus facile à résoudre, par exemple, pour l’inuktitut, pour un certain nombre de raisons, notamment parce qu’il y a une liaison aérienne directe entre Ottawa et Iqaluit. De plus, beaucoup de locuteurs unilingues inuktituts viennent à Ottawa pour obtenir des services médicaux, etc., ce qui fait qu’il y a déjà des traducteurs ici. De notre point de vue, c’est le plus facile. Ensuite, cela devient de plus en plus difficile.

Dans le cas des Dénés, qui comptent un grand nombre de locuteurs, on pourra peut-être surmonter ces problèmes. Permettez-moi de formuler la question de la façon suivante: y a-t-il des traducteurs, des gens qui seraient capables de faire de la traduction simultanée en Saskatchewan à l’heure actuelle, et auraient-ils les compétences et la disponibilité nécessaires pour fournir ces services si on le leur demandait?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Absolument. Je connais deux ou trois personnes qui font ce genre de travail, des traductions simultanées, et je suis donc pas mal sûre qu’elles seraient disponibles, surtout si elles connaissaient la cause, la raison pour laquelle nous essayons de le faire, et l’importance de cela.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord.

L’idée nous a été suggérée par un de nos témoins, l’idée de faire la traduction à partir d’un endroit éloigné. Est-ce que cela se produit, ou est-ce que les gens qui font l’interprétation simultanée sont normalement installés sur place? Je ne sais pas comment cela fonctionne.

Ici, nous avons habituellement des traducteurs qui sont dans une cabine d’interprétation. Je pense que vous pouvez voir derrière moi, d’un côté, le bord de notre cabine d’interprétation. Est-ce la façon dont la traduction simultanée se fait là où vous êtes, ou est-ce que cela se fait d’une façon différente?

(1225)

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Je l'ai toujours vu faire comme vous l'avez organisé là-bas, où les traducteurs sont sur place, mais je ne vois pas pourquoi cela ne pourrait pas se faire à distance, comme nous le faisons ici, par vidéoconférence.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord.

L’autre question qui a été soulevée est la nécessité de ce qu’on appelle une « langue relais ». C’est un terme qui vient de l’Union européenne où il y a — je ne suis pas sûr du nombre — quelque 18 langues officielles ou plus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est un chiffre plus élevé.

M. Scott Reid:

M. Graham dit qu'il y en a davantage. Ils ont un grand nombre de langues et cela devient une difficulté pratique. Je pense qu’ils ont eu un problème avec quelqu’un qui parlait à la fois le grec et le danois, et il y avait quelque chose d’important où, apparemment, personne en Europe ne parle cet ensemble particulier de deux langues. Ce qu’ils font, c’est qu’un député du Parlement européen parle sa langue, puis un traducteur traduit en une langue largement parlée — l’anglais, le français ou l’allemand peut-être — et ensuite il est traduit en d’autres langues.

Je ne sais pas quelle est la situation. Évidemment, les gens sont bilingues et le déné et l’anglais seraient très répandus. Y a-t-il aussi des gens qui parlent français avec un haut niveau de compétence?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

[Note de la rédaction: difficultés techniques]... ou langues autochtones en général.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis désolé, nous avons perdu la première partie de votre réponse. Pourriez-vous répéter?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

D’accord. Parlez-vous des langues autochtones?

M. Scott Reid:

Je parle du déné en particulier.

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Non, nous ne parlons pas français. Il y a peut-être une poignée de personnes trilingues qui parlent anglais, français et déné, mais il n’y en a pas beaucoup. Nous parlons surtout le déné et l'anglais.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord. C’est très utile. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je vais poursuivre dans la même veine que Scott.

Combien de traducteurs pensez-vous qu’il y a aujourd’hui pour l’interprétation simultanée du déné? Avez-vous une idée ou un chiffre approximatif?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Dans notre région, la région d’où je viens, et le Grand Nord inclus, je crois que nous avons trois traducteurs simultanés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si ce type d'interprétation devenait plus courant, pensez-vous qu’il y aurait un grand nombre de personnes qui étudieraient dans ce domaine pour pouvoir faire ce genre de travail?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Je pense que oui. Absolument.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parfait. Qu’en est-il de la traduction, à distinguer de l'interprétation, car elle se fait après coup, dans les documents écrits? Tout ce que nous faisons à la Chambre est ensuite traduit en anglais ou en français, selon le cas. Une partie du défi de l’interprétation à la Chambre est de s’assurer que notre document écrit reflète fidèlement ce qui a été dit. Si la personne ne parle pas en anglais ni en français, on indique dans le compte rendu « ...s'exprime en déné », par exemple. Y a-t-il beaucoup de traducteurs, ou s’agit-il des trois mêmes personnes?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Non, en fait, il y a plus de traducteurs que d'interprètes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est bien.

Vos observations philosophiques dans votre déclaration liminaire étaient tout à fait pertinentes. Vous avez soulevé de très bons points, mais nous cherchons, bien sûr, des solutions pratiques et progressives pour mettre les choses en oeuvre ici. À votre avis, quelles seraient les premières étapes?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Le premier député en a parlé, soulignant que ce sera difficile à faire en raison de la diversité des langues au Canada — des langues autochtones. Uniquement en Saskatchewan, nous avons des Dénés, des Cris, des Nakota et des Lakota. En examinant la situation dans son ensemble, je peux voir que ce ne sera pas facile à réaliser.

Je ne sais pas exactement comment nous pourrions surmonter le problème. À moins de nous pencher en premier lieu sur les langues parlées par un plus grand nombre de personnes. Tenter l'expérience d'abord sous la forme d'un projet avec l’une des langues les plus parlées, disons, le cri, parce que je sais que la population crie est plus importante que la population dénée. On l'essaie pour voir comment cela fonctionne. Je pense que ce serait la meilleure façon de faire, plutôt que d’essayer de trouver tous ces traducteurs et de faire fausse route. Je pense que la meilleure façon de procéder serait d’essayer de faire en sorte que ce soit un succès pour tout le monde.

(1230)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je reviendrai peut-être à vous.

Le président:

Merci de vos conseils très judicieux.

Y a-t-il différents dialectes dénés? Si nous avions un interprète, est-ce que certains Dénés pourraient ne pas le comprendre?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Il y a le dialecte « t » et le dialecte « k ». Dans notre région, une seule autre communauté parle le dialecte k, et c’est Fond du Lac. Si vous avez un traducteur qui ne parle que le dialecte t, les autres communautés de la Saskatchewan vont le comprendre. Ce ne serait donc pas un problème.

Le président:

D’accord.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Quel genre de travail font les traducteurs que vous connaissez en Saskatchewan? A-t-on recours à eux pour les procédures judiciaires ou dans les hôpitaux? Quels services offrent-ils à l’échelle locale et partout en Saskatchewan? Quel type de travail font-ils?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Ils traduisent des procédures judiciaires, des procès-verbaux d'assemblées, par exemple pour la FSIN et pour leurs conseils tribaux locaux. Au cours des assemblées, ils font aussi de l’interprétation simultanée. Ils traduisent également pour l’industrie.

M. John Nater:

Ces personnes sont donc bien occupées? Là où je veux en venir, c’est que nous ne voulons pas que quelqu’un déménage ici pour combler nos besoins. Je veux savoir si elles ont la disponibilité nécessaire pour peut-être prendre l'avion et venir passer quelques jours à la fois à Ottawa pour offrir des services de traduction. Ont-elles cette disponibilité?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Certaines de ces personnes travaillent sur une base contractuelle, alors je pense qu’elles se rendraient disponibles. Pour ma part, je prends une journée de congé pour venir vous parler. Si elles reconnaissent la valeur et l’importance de ce que nous tentons de faire, je pense qu’elles feront les efforts nécessaires et prendront le temps de le faire.

M. John Nater:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci d'avoir pris une journée de congé.

Monsieur Saganash, aviez-vous quelque chose...? Non.

Les enfants apprennent-ils le déné à l’école?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Dans les communautés dénées où je travaille actuellement, trois des écoles avec lesquelles je travaille offrent des programmes en langue dénée. L’une est en fait une école d’immersion de la maternelle à la 3e année. Toutes les autres écoles l’enseignent comme matière fondamentale, soit 30 minutes par jour.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité ont-ils d’autres questions? Non.

Que se passe-t-il dans les tribunaux et les hôpitaux avec les aînés qui ne parlent que le déné, pas l'anglais ni le français?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Habituellement, des gens les accompagnent. S’ils sont témoins en cour, le tribunal leur fournit un traducteur.

Le président:

Voulez-vous faire un dernier commentaire? Je pense que nous avons épuisé toutes les questions.

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Je veux simplement souligner que nous avons un groupe d'environ 20 jeunes inscrits au programme de formation des enseignants dénés, à La Loche, dans la communauté de la nation dénée de la rivière Clearwater. Ces personnes chercheront un emploi dans deux ans.

Vous voyez où je veux en venir. Je suis sûre qu’elles seront disposées à faire ce genre de travail, car ce sont toutes des personnes qui s'expriment facilement.

M. Robert Morrissey (Egmont, Lib.):

Voulez-vous répéter cela en déné?

Mme Cheryle Herman:

En déné? Je pourrais le faire. Avez-vous un interprète?

Le président:

Non, mais nous savons ce que vous allez dire.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

(1235)

Mme Cheryle Herman:

[La témoin s’exprime en déné.]

[Anglais]

Le président:

Mahsi cho. Merci d’avoir pris une journée de congé. Cela a été très utile.

Mme Cheryle Herman:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose pour le Comité?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 19, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.