header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-06-17 SECU 169

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1540)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

I see quorum. It is well past 3:30 p.m., and I see that the minister is in his place. The minister is obviously pretty serious, because he has taken off his jacket. I think we're ready to proceed.

As colleagues will know, we did have an understanding as of last week as to how this session on Bill C-98 would proceed. That agreement has changed. In exchange, there won't be any further debate in the House.

The way I intend to proceed is to give the minister his time, and perhaps when he can be brief, he will be brief. We'll go through one round of questions and see whether there's still an appetite for further questions. From there, we'll proceed to the witnesses and then to clause-by-clause consideration. I'm assuming this is agreeable to all members.

That said, I'll ask the minister to present.

Thank you.

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee.

In the spirit of brevity and efficiency, I think I will forgo the opportunity to put a 10-minute statement on the record and just speak informally for a couple of minutes about Bill C-98. Evan Travers and Jacques Talbot from Public Safety Canada are with me and can help to go into the intricacies of the legislation and then respond to any questions you may have. They may also be able to assist if any issues arise when you're hearing from other witnesses, in terms of further information about the meaning or the purpose of the legislation.

Colleagues will know that Bill C-98 is intended to fill the last major gap in the architecture that exists for overseeing, reviewing and monitoring the activities of some of our major public safety and national security agencies. This is a gap that has existed for the better part of 18 years.

The problem arose in the aftermath of 9/11, when there was a significant readjustment around the world in how security agencies would operate. In the Canadian context at that time, the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency was divided, with the customs part joining the public safety department and ultimately evolving into CBSA, the Canada Border Services Agency. That left CRA, the Canada Revenue Agency, on its own.

In the reconfiguration of responsibilities following 9/11, many interest groups, stakeholders and public policy observers noted that CBSA, as it emerged, did not have a specific review body assigned to it to perform the watchdog function that SIRC was providing with respect to CSIS or the commissioner's office was providing with respect to the Communications Security Establishment.

The Senate came forward with a proposal, if members will remember, to fix that problem. Senator Willie Moore introduced Bill S-205, which was an inspector general kind of model for filling the gap with respect to oversight of CBSA. While Senator Moore was coming forward with his proposal, we were moving on the House side with NSICOP, the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, by virtue of Bill C-22, and the new National Security and Intelligence Review Agency which is the subject of Bill C-59.

We tried to accommodate Senator Moore's concept in the new context of NSICOP and NSIRA, but it was just too complicated to sort that out that we decided it would not be possible to salvage Senator Moore's proposal and convert it into a workable model. What we arrived at instead is Bill C-98.

(1545)



Under NSICOP and NSIRA, the national security functions of CBSA are already covered. What's left is the non-security part of the activities of CBSA. When, for example, a person comes to the border, has an awkward or difficult or unpleasant experience, whom do they go to with a complaint? They can complain to CBSA itself, and CBSA investigates all of that and replies, but the expert opinion is that in addition to what CBSA may do as a matter of internal good policy, there needs to be an independent review mechanism for the non-security dimensions of CBSA's work. The security side is covered by NSICOP, which is the committee of parliamentarians, and NSIRA, the new security agency under Bill C-59, but the other functions of CBSA are not covered, so how do you create a review body to cover that?

We examined two alternatives. One was to create a brand new stand-alone creature with those responsibilities; otherwise, was there an agency already within the Government of Canada, a review body, that had the capacity to perform that function? We settled on CRCC, the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, which performs that exact function for the RCMP.

What is proposed in the legislation is a revamping of the CRCC to expand its jurisdiction to cover the RCMP and CBSA and to increase its capacity and its resources to be able to do that job. The legislation would make sure that there is a chair and a vice-chair of the new agency, which would be called the public complaints and review commission. It would deal with both the RCMP and the CBSA, but it would have a chair and a vice-chair. They would assume responsibilities, one for the RCMP and one for CBSA, to make sure that both agencies were getting top-flight attention—that we weren't robbing Peter to pay Paul and that everybody would be receiving the appropriate attention in the new structure. Our analysis showed that we could move faster and more expeditiously and more efficiently if we reconfigured CRCC instead of building a new agency from the ground up.

That is the legislation you have before you. The commission will be able to receive public complaints. It will be able to initiate investigations if it deems that course to be appropriate. The minister would be able to ask the agency to investigate or examine something if the minister felt an inquiry was necessary. Bill C-98 is the legislative framework that will put that all together.

That's the purpose of the bill, and I am very grateful for the willingness of the committee at this stage in our parliamentary life to look at this question in a very efficient manner. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

With that, we'll begin the first round of questions of seven minutes each, starting with Ms. Dabrusin.

I just offer a point of caution. I know all members are always relevant at all times about the subject matter that is before the committee, and I just point that out. Thank you.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have seven minutes.

(1550)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you.

I was very happy to see this bill because, Minister, as you know, pretty much every time you have been before this committee, I have asked you about CBSA oversight and when it would be forthcoming, so when I saw this bill had been tabled, it was a happy day for me.

You talked a little about the history of the bill. You talked about Senator Wilfred Moore's bill and how you dealt with the different oversights in Bill C-59 and NSICOP.

Why did we have to wait so long to see this bill come forward?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I think, Ms. Dabrusin, it's simply a product of the large flow of public safety business and activity that we have had to deal with. I added it up a couple of days ago. We have asked this Parliament to address at least 13 major pieces of legislation, which has kept this committee, as well as your counterparts in the Senate, particularly busy.

As you will know from my previous answers, I have wanted to get on with this legislation. It's part of the matrix that is absolutely required to complete the picture. It's here now. It's a pretty simple and straightforward piece of legislation. I don't think it involves any legal intricacies that make it too complex.

If we had had a slot on the public policy agenda earlier, we would have used it, but when I look at the list of what we've had to bring forward—13 major pieces of legislation—it is one that I hope is going to get to the finish line, but along the way, it was giving way to things like Bill C-66, Bill C-71, Bill C-83, Bill C-59 and Bill C-93. There's a lot to do.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Yes, thank you.

It's my understanding that when budget 2019 was tabled, there was a section within the budget that referred specifically to the funding for this oversight. Am I correct on that?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The funding is provided for. It will be coming through the estimates in due course. We're picking up the base funding that's available to the CRCC, and then, as the responsibilities for CBSA get added and the CRCC transforms into—I have to get the acronyms right—the PCRC, the public complaints and review commission, the necessary money will be added to add the required staff and operational capacity.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

You touched upon it briefly when you were talking about the different mechanisms and the decision for it to extend within the RCMP review system. Perhaps you can help me to understand it a bit better. Why not a separate review committee for the CBSA specifically? Why build it within the RCMP system and then expand it, as opposed to having a separate oversight?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It's simply because the expertise required on both sides is quite similar. It's not identical, granted, but it is quite similar. There is a foundation piece already in place with the CRCC. There are expertise and capacity that already exist, and the analysis that was done by officials and by Treasury Board and others led to the conclusion that we could move faster and we could move more cost effectively if we built on the existing structure and expanded it, rather than start a whole new agency from scratch.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

One of the issues that's come up is that I've had questions from constituents about privacy issues crossing the border, for example, border guards being able to access information on telephones and the like. How would this oversight be able to deal with that privacy issue?

(1555)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If an individual thought they had been mistreated in some way at the border, or if their privacy rights had been violated, or if a border officer conducted themselves in a manner that the traveller found to be intrusive or offensive, they would have now, or as soon as the legislation is passed, the ability to file an independent complaint with the new agency. The agency would investigate and offer their conclusions as to whether the procedure at the border had been appropriate or not.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I have a quick question, as I only have about a minute and a half left.

In the context of someone whose phone was being looked at and the basis for it being looked at was a national security concern, or what was proposed as a national security concern, would that go through the PCRC or would that go through...? How would that be managed between the different oversights?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The agency is going to be set up in such a way that wherever the person, the traveller, goes with their complaint...they may complain directly to the CBSA, not knowing there is a separate agency, or they may complain to the separate agency, or they may take it to NSIRA, the national security agency. If it's a grey area, the three possibilities—CBSA itself, the public complaints and review commission or NSIRA—will make sure that it lands in the right agency that has jurisdiction to hear it. There may be some jurisprudence that has to develop, informal jurisprudence, at the administrative level about what constitutes a national security complaint or question versus simple objectionable behaviour.

That will take time, but we will make sure that no complaint ends up in the wrong place. Wherever you go with your complaint, the agencies will ensure that it lands on the right desk and gets heard by the right authority.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I'm out of time.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Mr. Paul-Hus, for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Goodale, we're talking about organizations that are the subject of complaints. There's currently a complaint regarding the funding provided by Canada Summer Jobs to the Islamic Society of North America. It has been acknowledged and documented that the organization provided funding for terrorism purposes.

Has your department or any agency that operates under your department been informed of this issue or involved in the case? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Are you referring to the one that was referred to in question period today?

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Yes.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That is an issue that the employment department is examining. The funding involved was through the jobs fund and, as I understood the answer in the House today, the minister is asking her officials to investigate to ensure that whatever the decision-making process was with respect to that funding, it was fully and properly conducted. The matter is in fact being investigated. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you. I had urged members to stay with what we're on, which is Bill C-98. I'm not quite sure how a jobs funding application has much to do with Bill C-98, so I'd encourage the honourable member to direct his questions to Bill C-98 issues, please. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I was putting into practice the basis of the bill, which is the fact that Canadians are filing complaints. It's the same principle.

Let's go back to the commission, Minister Goodale. Is the commission currently experiencing any delays in the handling of complaints? Does it already have an excessive workload? Will adding more powers, duties and functions with regard to the Canada Border Services Agency create even more issues, or is everything fine? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Certainly, the expanded agency will have more work to do. At the moment, the CRCC looks exclusively at issues related to the RCMP. Under the new configuration, the review agency will examine both the RCMP and the CBSA. Presently—

(1600)

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Actually, sir, do you know if there are some delays in the treatment for the RCMP—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The CRCC I believe will be available to you later this afternoon—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus: Okay.

Hon. Ralph Goodale: —and they will be able to explain their workload, but on your basic point, Monsieur Paul-Hus, clearly the new agency is going to have more work to do. Therefore, it will need more resources, but we will be more cost-effective in applying those resources if we build on the platform the CRCC already has rather than building a brand new stand-alone agency for CBSA. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay.

If a person is removed by the Canada Border Services Agency for any reason, could they file a complaint regarding their forced removal in order to delay their removal? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's a question that may fall a bit in the grey area between a complaint about the behaviour of an officer, such as “was I treated roughly or rudely”, compared to “was I put out of the country for good and valid reasons”. If you have a dispute about the reason for which you are being removed from the country, there are legal appeal mechanisms available to you to contest the rationale for it. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Have we looked at whether people could use the complaint process to avoid being removed while the commission conducts an investigation? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No. The decision on removal or not, depending on which section of the act you're dealing with, is a decision made by either the Minister of Immigration or the Minister of Public Safety. It's not an administrative decision. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Who worked on Bill C-98? Was it just Public Safety Canada? Did the RCMP and the Canada Border Services Agency also participate? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'll ask Mr. Travers, who assisted with the policy preparation and the drafting, to comment on that.

Mr. Evan Travers (Acting Director General, Law Enforcement and Border Strategies Directorate, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thank you, Minister.

Public Safety consulted, within the strictures of cabinet confidence obviously, with the CBSA and with the RCMP in the development of the draft legislation. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay.

Is there a reason why the union wasn't consulted? [English]

Mr. Evan Travers:

The consultation with respect to the union was handled through the CBSA. My understanding is that the CBSA engaged with the union after the tabling of the bill. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Yet the union seems to be saying that it wasn't consulted at all on this issue. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The policy decision, Mr. Paul-Hus, was clearly made by the government based on all of the public representations that had been received that this was a gap that needed to be filled.

In terms of the structure or the method of filling the gap, we settled on that in the discussions between the public safety department, the CBSA and the RCMP. Once that policy decision was made and the legislation was in the public domain, the CBSA, as I understand it, talked further with their union.

The Chair:

You're pretty well out of time, Mr. Paul-Hus. You have 10 seconds.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Minister, thank you for being here.

I want to go back to the question Ms. Dabrusin was asking in terms of the time that this took. The fact is, there was a Senate report prior to the last election in 2015, legislation by Senator Segal in the previous Parliament and a recommendation from this committee in 2017.

Also, for anyone who wants to take a minute to google it, you can find articles from at least the last three years with you promising this legislation—it's coming, it's coming. Also, most of the bills you enumerated in responding to my colleague, if not all, were tabled in 2016 or 2017.

I'm wondering about this mechanism. You called it simple and straightforward, faster and cost-effective and said it builds on existing infrastructure. I'm having a hard time with this, especially in knowing that the legislation is only going to come into effect in 2020, if I'm understanding correctly, with regard to the ability of Canadians to make complaints.

I'm still not quite understanding why, with all those pieces on the table and at the very least two or three years in the lead-up.... To me, it doesn't seem to wash that you sort of dropped your arms and said, “Oh well, the senator's proposal won't work in Bill C-59.” That seemed to be what you were implying in response to the question.

I want to ask again why it took so long when there continue to be incidents with work relations for those who work at CBSA—allegations of harassment and things of that nature—and obviously, of course, the issues that some Canadians face in the way they are treated at the border.

(1605)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, as I said, Monsieur Dubé, we have had an enormous volume of work to get through, as has this committee, as has Parliament, generally. The work program has advanced as rapidly as we could make it. It takes time and effort to put it all together. I'm glad we're at this stage, and I hope the parliamentary machinery will work well enough this week that we can get it across the finish line.

It has been a very significant agenda, when you consider there has been Bill C-7, Bill C-21, Bill C-22, Bill C-23, Bill C-37, Bill C-46, Bill C-66, Bill C-71, Bill C-59, Bill C-97, Bill C-83, Bill C-93 and Bill C-98. It's a big agenda and we have to get it all through the same relatively small parliamentary funnel.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I think maybe three of those bills were tabled after 2017 or early 2018. I mean, for the C-20s and the single digits, we're talking days after your government was sworn in. I think there needs to be some accountability, because you've been on the record strongly saying that this needed to be done, and so I don't want to leave it being said that.... For example, with Bill C-59, why not make the change then?

I just want to understand, because my concern, Minister, is that I want to make sure there's no, for example, resistance internally to this issue. I can't understand, if this is a simple and straightforward mechanism in Bill C-98, why it took years to come to the conclusion that this was the way to go.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There is no internal resistance at all. In fact, the organization, CBSA, recognizes that this is a gap in the architecture and that it needs to be filled.

Part of it was filled by Bill C-22 with the committee of parliamentarians, as far as national security is concerned. Part of it was filled by Bill C-59 and the creation of the new NSIRA, again with respect to national security.

This legislation fills in the last piece. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I want to follow up on the questions asked by my colleague, Mr. Paul-Hus. I'm troubled by the fact that the union wasn't consulted in this case. One role of this mechanism is to protect workers in the event of allegations. The media sometimes reports on harassment allegations and things of that nature.

Mr. Travers, you can probably answer my question. You explained that the agency carried out the consultation. However, the workers are the ones who may be directly affected by the results of the complaints. Sometimes, they may be the ones who file complaints. Given the nature of the bill, why didn't you take the time to consult the union, which represents the workers? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Dubé, the issue was thoroughly debated within the government department and within CBSA. It's up to CBSA to have that interface with their employees. They conducted those conversations at what they considered to be the appropriate time.

The point is that the legislation is now ready to go. You'll have the opportunity to examine it in detail to ensure, through the democratic process in Parliament, that it's properly addressing the needs of the workers.

(1610)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Well, you'll forgive me, Minister. We support the bill and will be happy to see it get adopted, but that's just the issue. We don't have the time, because it took so long that now we have to do this quickly. I'm okay to do that, but I think we do have to qualify those comments.

Did you receive any kind of report from CBSA about the specifics of what the union had to say, or was it kind of like—not to be simplistic about it—just saying that you spoke to them and it's fine, and then moving on?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There were no negative issues reported to me from any part of the consultation. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

I have one last question for you.

I gather that the mechanism will be implemented in 2020. People who wish to file a complaint can do so from that point on. Are any further clarifications needed or can we expect that, if the bill is passed, people will be able to file complaints under the proposed mechanism starting next year? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That would be the goal, Mr. Dubé. We're obviously working on the development of an expanded agency. We may run into administrative issues that we hadn't anticipated, but the objective is to get this in place as quickly as possible. The mechanism we're choosing will let us move more quickly than we could if we were creating an agency from the ground up.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

But, Minister—I have just 20 seconds left—

The Chair:

Actually, you don't.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

—if we get the bill through Parliament, will it be done, if it's adopted?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That is exactly what I want to achieve, yes.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Monsieur Picard, go ahead for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Goodale, as you know, I started my career as a customs officer. The threshold for tolerance or interpretation when it comes to people entering Canada varies depending on whether the people are visitors or residents returning to Canada.

My colleague Mr. Dubé talked about protecting employees. Of course, you need an external perspective to determine the merits of a complaint filed by someone who believes that their rights have been violated. It seems that the bill contains measures that enable the commission to accept or reject a complaint based on its content. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Yes, Monsieur Picard.

Do you see a problem with that?

Mr. Evan Travers:

I don't. I may have missed something in the translation.

Mr. Michel Picard:

People coming back into Canada, residents and visitors, don't have the same threshold for how they'd like to be treated, considering the nature of their complaints. The committee can analyze the grounds of those complaints and whether they make sense or not. With regard to protecting the officers, as Mr. Dubé said, this bill also looks at something to protect officers and employees from frivolous complaints.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The whole objective, Monsieur Picard, is to have fairness both ways. When someone is travelling, they deserve to expect an efficient professional experience at the border. The public servants who are administering border services should also expect to be able to function in a safe and respectful work environment. It works both ways.

I suspect that once a certain file of complaints has been received and heard, we'll be developing a pool of experience and expertise that will improve the border experience both ways.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Chances are that the committee will come to a conclusion that might not be accepted by the agency itself. Who has the final decision on the conclusion provided by the committee should it go against the interpretation of the agency?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'll ask either Mr. Travers or Mr. Talbot to comment on the ultimate authority, but in response to your last question, Mr. Picard, I'd refer to proposed subsection 32(2) in the act, which deals with how you handle trivial, frivolous or vexatious complaints or complaints made in bad faith, which is, I think, what you are concerned about.

Mr. Talbot or Mr. Travers, can you comment on the ultimate decision-making authority if there's an argument between the review body and the agency?

(1615)

Mr. Evan Travers:

The first body to investigate any complaint would be the CBSA, in most cases. They would be able to look at that, make findings and then give those findings back to the complainant. There are provisions throughout that require the subject employee to be notified and kept informed of the progress of the investigation. If after receiving that report from the CBSA the complainant is not satisfied with the contents of the report, they could refer it to the commission. The commission would take its own look at the complaint. The commission could either agree with the CBSA's conclusions or conduct its own investigation or ask the CBSA to conduct a further investigation of the complaint. Once the commission looked at the complaint, it would send that file back to the CBSA, and the CBSA could add comments to it.

There is a process by which differences of opinions and views can come out, but the commission's report will be the commission's report, at the end of the day. They will come to that with a full understanding and appreciation of the facts, and they will be able to go and get the facts they need to get that. In terms of the results of that, it is a final decision from the commission. It is not reviewable by a federal court or by another body, because the recommendations that come out of it aren't binding on the CBSA.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Are you saying that if an individual is not satisfied with the end result, after the commission has reviewed the issue he doesn't have any more legal recourse to sue anyone?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The discipline here, Monsieur Picard, is the process of having a formal investigation. If the review body comes to a very clear conclusion that the individual's rights have been infringed upon—they have been treated badly; there's something wrong in the way they were handled, and that's the very clear conclusion from the review body—and the agency fails to address that in a meaningful way, then the agency, I think, will have a very big policy and administrative problem on its hands. The issue will have been exposed publicly by an independent authority that will say you were either right or wrong. There will be a very strong obligation on the part of the agency to respond to that.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We've reached the end of our seven-minute round. Is there still an appetite to ask questions until 4:30 p.m.?

Okay. Then we'll run until 4:30 p.m. and that will be it.

Go ahead, Mr. Motz. You have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Minister, I've heard the term “oversight body” used here a couple of times today. I think that's a misnomer. As you have said before, we need to make sure it's a review body, a civilian complaints review commission, and not oversight of the CBSA. I want to make sure everybody understands that.

(1620)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's correct.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Thank you.

To go back to the earlier comments from Ms. Dabrusin, Pierre Paul-Hus and Mr. Dubé about the timing, I'm led to believe, sir, that the previous government and officials in the public safety division, if you will, were already drafting some bill similar to this about this issue to get oversight...sorry, to get civilian review for CBSA.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It's easy to fall off the wagon.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It took us until the last few hours of this session to get this here, but it was sort of being worked on before. This could have been in place years ago, and it wasn't. I support it, and I believe it's something we need, but again, I just echo the concerns that have been raised already. I just want to put on record that I'm concerned that it took this long.

My question is on the mechanism. Everything boils down to the mechanism, to how this is going to work. We know that the current RCMP complaints commission has six members, and I believe this legislation is going to maybe reduce that number to five. As Mr. Travers explained with regard to Mr. Picard's question, the CBSA will do the initial investigation of a complaint that comes to it from a civilian about the handling of whatever it might be. If that individual, the member of the public, is not satisfied with the disposition of that complaint, he or she can go to the complaints review commission and have that investigation reviewed again, if you will.

I don't understand the mechanism with regard to how the complaint commission does that. Does it do a paper review? If there's a complaint that the investigation wasn't done thoroughly, does it have its own investigative body that can interview witnesses and get more detail? How will that actually play out in the operations of this?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Again, I'll ask Mr. Travers to comment on the mechanical details.

The portion of the new commission that will be dealing with CBSA would function in a very similar way to how the existing commission does with respect to the RCMP.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Are there two different commissions?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No, but there will be two streams of activity within the same commission.

Mr. Glen Motz:

So, it's the same people hearing the same complaints. People on the RCMP side will hear RCMP matters, and the same people will also hear CBSA matters. Is that correct?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Let me just double-check that point.

The plan, Mr. Motz, is that the reviewers on the CBSA side would deal with CBSA issues and that the reviewers on the RCMP side would deal with RCMP issues. It would be up to the chair and the vice-chair to determine the allocation of the personnel to hear any particular case, but I would think—

Mr. Glen Motz:

They'd be two separate bodies inside of one commission.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Essentially, yes. There would be an RCMP stream and a CBSA stream.

Mr. Glen Motz:

From an expertise perspective—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Exactly, because the issues are similar, but they're not identical.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes.

Would there be an investigative ability inside that commission if the complainant isn't satisfied with the investigation with regard to the complaint?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The investigative function would be the same for the CBSA work as it would be for the RCMP work. They have the capacity to make inquiries, to receive information, and to pursue any complaint that's presented to them to make sure that they have the facts in front of them—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, so, it's separate from the—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

—so that they can make a decision.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It's separate from the CBSA. The CBSA has done the investigation. This commission could do another one on top of this, a separate one.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If they're not satisfied with what they've been presented, yes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Then the commission itself has the ability to do it, or would it farm that out to another investigative body?

The Chair:

This is going to have to be the last answer for you, Mr. Motz.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The chair and vice-chair of the commission would determine what resources, either internal or external, they require. They'll have a budget. Obviously, they want to get to the bottom of whatever a complaint is. They want to be able to satisfy either the employee who's complaining or the member of the public who's complaining, that the complaint has been treated fairly and competently and that the truth has been found.

(1625)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Graham, you have the final five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

In the event of a conflict of authority between the PCRC and the NSIRA, or even NSICOP, who prevails?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It would be up to the agencies to sort out their respective jurisdictions. I suspect it will be pretty clear in most cases as to whether it's a national security issue or not.

The agencies in the past have had jurisdictional questions where they've had to work on things together. They've been able to resolve disputes in a way that is satisfactory, so I don't anticipate there's going to be a jurisdictional fight here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When the RCMP is operating in a contract position, for example, as provincial police, or here on the Hill in PPS, is the PCRC's power and oversight the same as an RCMP native operation?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If they're functioning as a provincial police force—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

—the first line of complaint would be the provincial review agency. There is one in every province.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What about for the PPS side? The RCMP is contracted to provide a service, so—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

They're contracted to provide an officer. You'll have to consult the Speaker on that one, because that's the jurisdiction of the two Speakers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

In overseas operations, when the RCMP is doing training missions, for example, or the CBSA is doing pre-clearing, which is another one of the bills that you brought forward, is the PCRC empowered to investigate overseas in the same way as they are domestically?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The powers of the review body in relation to the RCMP will not change. Whatever exists now, continues. CBSA is then added to it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They would be able to go down to the U.S., for example, and find out what happened if there were a major complaint.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Go ahead, Evan.

Mr. Evan Travers:

They would certainly be able to access any of the information, whether those CBSA activities took place in Canada or abroad. If that would require them to go abroad, I don't know, or if they'd be able to interview people in Canada, but they'd be entitled to have access to CBSA information just as they would if the event had happened in Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final question.

Does the PCRC have any power to make a binding recommendation in any circumstance?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

That brings our questioning to an end.

I want to thank members and the minister for their co-operation in moving this through expeditiously.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Chairman, just let me say thank you to you and members of the committee for indicating your willingness to handle this matter very expeditiously in the time that's available to us.

The Chair:

Thank you.

With that, we will suspend and resume as soon as the witnesses are ready.

(1625)

(1630)

The Chair:

For the purpose of expediting this bill, I will say that we have a quorum and we are re-empanelled as of now.

Joining us by remote whatever, we have Mr. Sauvé, from the National Police Federation, and also Michelaine Lahaie, Lesley McCoy and Tim Cogan.

I'm going to give the opportunity to Mr. Sauvé to speak first, because one never knows with this technology whether it will survive.

Generally we have 10 minutes per presentation. Ideally, if it could be less than 10 minutes, we could get to members' questions more quickly.

With that, may I call on Mr. Sauvé to introduce himself and make his presentation.

Mr. Brian Sauvé (Co-Chair, National Police Federation):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I hope the technology is working and that you can hear me.

The Chair:

That is a nice piece of art behind you there.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

Thank you.

My name is Brian Sauvé. I'm a regular member. I'm also a sergeant in the RCMP. I've been on leave without pay to found and start the National Police Federation. Presently, I'm one of the interim co-chairs.

For those who have been following from the sidelines, we made an application to certify the first bargaining agent for members of the RCMP in April 2017. We have been going through every hoop and hurdle imaginable thrown at us since April 2017. A certification vote was held with all 18,000-plus members of the bargaining unit last November and December. We are still awaiting a decision from the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board on that vote with a constitutional challenge.

That being said, with respect to Bill C-98, we wanted to have input to provide the RCMP members' perspective on the CRCC and part VII of the RCMP Act as it deals with public complaints. I'm open to questions on that.

At the time, I saw Bill C-98 as an act to amend the RCMP Act. There are a number of concerns that our membership has expressed with respect to the 2014 amendments to the RCMP Act, otherwise known as Bill C-42, that would be nice to be broadcast or provided questions on.

For example, in Bill C-98, there is an amendment to section 45.37 of the RCMP Act imposing time frames in consultation with the force, and the newly worded public review and complaints commission, as to how long an investigation should take, what should be the result and the consultation between the force and the investigating body.

It would really be nice, from our perspective, from an RCMP member's perspective, to expand that to deal with other areas of the RCMP Act. One of the areas that would be lovely to have some form of consultation on timelines would be the internal disciplinary processes or even grievances or appeals of commissioner's decisions on suspensions and such.

Our experience has been that whether it's a complaint under part VII or an administrative process under part IV or a grievance under part III of the RCMP Act, the RCMP itself is not equipped to deal with these issues in a timely manner. The issues tend to lag on for six months, a year, a year and a half to two years, which leaves the accused or the subject member of either a public complaint or a code of conduct or a griever in a grievance in limbo in an administrative process that takes forever.

Should your committee have questions on that, I'd be more than happy to answer, and we'll go from there.

That would be my presentation. I'm sure you're not going to study all of the submissions I would have on Bill C-42 and how it has impacted the membership of the RCMP, and the sweeping powers of commissioners and commanding officers.

I would love to get into that in more detail some day, but I don't think this legislation is the venue for that. However, timelines in section 45.37 would be something that we would definitely appreciate your looking into.

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Sauvé.

The lights are flashing, and I'm obliged to suspend unless I have the unanimous consent of colleagues to carry on. My proposal would be, since we're in the building, that we carry on for 15 to 20 minutes. I believe it is a half-hour bell. Is 20 minutes reasonable?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: With that, we will probably get through the presentation of the next witnesses and at least start the questions.

The minister mentioned to me that he has a flowchart of the process which he's more than willing to make available to anyone who wishes. Regrettably, it's only in English. It will be in French and English in 24 hours, but for those who are interested in the flowchart, it is available.

I call upon Michelaine Lahaie, chairperson of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie (Chairperson, Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair. My name is Michelaine Lahaie and I'm accompanied today by Tim Cogan, who is my senior director of corporate services, as well as Lesley McCoy, who is my general counsel.

Given the short notice that we were provided for this particular hearing, we do not have any prepared comments, but I am indeed prepared to answer any questions the committee members may have.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota, go ahead for seven minutes.

(1640)

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

My first couple of questions will be for the commission.

In the time you've been serving, on average, how many complaints have you been getting from civilians? What range of issues are those complaints on? How long does the process generally take, whether for an initial review or, if you actually get into an investigation, for that? There are four questions in there.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

In terms of the number of complaints that we receive, we receive between 2,500 and 3,000 complaints per year about RCMP members. We are then normally asked to review somewhere in the neighbourhood of 250 to 300 of those complaints ourselves. As described by the minister during the last session, the complaints generally go to the RCMP for investigation first. If the individual lodging the complaint is not happy with the RCMP's disposition of the complaint, it will then come to us and we will conduct our review. On average, we're reviewing 250 to 300, and my call centre receives between 2,500 and 3,000 complaints per year.

In terms of timeline, it really depends. We do have service standards at the commission. Once we've received a complaint, our service standard is that within four business days we send that complaint to the RCMP for them to carry on with their investigation. Once the RCMP has completed their portion of the investigation or they've sent out their report, if the individual who made the complaint would like to have that complaint reviewed, they have 60 days to come back to us and ask for it to be reviewed.

Then, once we've received an indication from the individual that they would like the complaint reviewed, our service standard is 120 business days following that. However, that timeline starts as soon as we receive all the relevant material from the RCMP. We go to the RCMP and we ask for any information with respect to the investigation that they conducted, and we may ask for any other information that comes that may be related to that specific complaint.

The Chair:

Mr. Sauvé, I want to advise you, because you're new to this process, that if you wish to intervene on any question, just give some indication to me, and I'll make sure you can intervene.

Go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sorry, I lost my train of thought with that.

You ended by saying there was a 60-day review.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The individual who has requested a review has to indicate that they want the complaint reviewed after 60 days. From the time the RCMP has sent out their letter of disposition, the individual has 60 days to tell us they want it reviewed.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How long does it generally take for the RCMP to do their review after you've sent the complaint?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

At present, there are no service standards with respect to that piece. Sometimes it can take as little as a few months to as much as two years, depending upon from where the complaint has been lodged and depending upon the complexity of the complaint.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I know there must be a range of issues, but can you identify three or four main issues that do occur?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The main issues that we see are about improper attitude. We will see some that deal with improper use of resources, not responding to duty correctly, or what's deemed by the complainant to be improper use of force.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I believe Mr. Graham had a couple questions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have just a couple of short ones for Sergeant Sauvé if I may.

You're talking about the trouble you're having essentially unionizing the RCMP membership, if I understand correctly.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

Well, I wouldn't say.... I mean, it was a challenge. We live in a diverse and very geographically spread-out country, so it was a challenge in the first year getting all of the members on board. The challenge now is in pushing the FPSLREB process in order to get through the application for certification. The membership have shown their support. It's just, shall I say, the “pushing molasses uphill in January” governmental process that is providing us with a bit of a delay.

(1645)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At least in January—

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, I warned Mr. Paul-Hus about the relevance to Bill C-98.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm about to bring it in, yes.

The Chair:

Okay. I'm hoping you'll bring it in.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll bring it back in. I have one more question before I get to that, but I will tie in with that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The reason I go down this road is that, as you're aware, there are three unionized services on Parliament Hill that report to the RCMP. I'm wondering if you've talked to SSEA and PSAC about their challenges. They've had many of them. I'm also wondering if Bill C-98 will give you any additional tools in dealing with this and if that's why you've come today.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

No, the reason I expressed my interest with the clerk when he called this morning—I appreciate the short timelines that this committee is dealing with—is that any opportunity to have the membership of the RCMP's voice heard with respect to amending the RCMP Act is an opportunity for us to speak on their behalf. If we didn't, it would be an opportunity lost.

In terms of consulting with those who represent the PPS or the membership on the Hill, you know, Bill C-7 kind of precluded any organization that was asking to represent the membership of the RCMP—it's a grey area in Bill C-7—from having any associational activity outside the law enforcement community. We've been very careful in the NPF about how we associate and who we hitch our banner to. Most of that has been within the Canadian police association community—the Ontario Provincial Police Association, la Fraternité des policiers et policières à Québec, and that sort of thing. We haven't really linked up with a PSAC or a CUPE or a UCCO, for example.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does the committee that we're talking about today give you more tools for the union to deal with, or is it a non-issue for you? When the certification has been received, will the union use this committee to deal with the RCMP? Is it a tool that would be in your arsenal as well?

The Chair:

Very briefly, please.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

I'm not sure I understand the question correctly.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In negotiating with the RCMP, does the creation of the committee as we're now seeing it improve your ability to negotiate? Does it give you extra tools, or is it a non-issue for you and it's strictly for the public, in your view?

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

With the CRCC as it is—I'll use the terminology “CRCC” because that's what it still is today—I don't see Bill C-98 impacting the membership of the RCMP or changing how we deal with or investigate public complaints.

As you heard from the chair of the CRCC, Ms. Lahaie, on the timelines with respect to the investigation of public complaints, the bottleneck that we see and that I hear about is the RCMP's ability to investigate in a timely manner. That extends—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Sauvé, but we'll have to leave it there. We've run past time.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

That's fine.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you.

You indicated, ma'am, that you have 2,500 to 3,000 complaints that the RCMP investigates on their members a year. The commission reviews about 250 to 300 of those. Has there been any thought given, based on what the CBSA is currently doing, because they already have complaints that they deal with internally, to how many more will be added to the commission's workload?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

We've been consulting extensively with CBSA on this issue. My understanding is that they receive approximately 3,000 complaints a year. We're expecting the numbers to be very similar. Having said that, there will of course be a public education process that will happen around the launch of the PCRC. Once that happens, there is a possibility that the number of complaints will go up. Right now our planned number is about 3,000 per year.

Mr. Glen Motz:

As I understand Bill C-98, you had six members of the commission coming in.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

We had five members of the commission under the old RCMP Act, so this will be five again.

(1650)

Mr. Glen Motz:

You have five RCMP, and will you have five new members for the CBSA?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

No, sir, that's incorrect. We'll just have five members. The commission will have—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Five full...?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

—five members. That's right.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. How do you then.... One of the issues of the RCMP membership now, which certainly will be a concern for CBSA, is dealing with these issues in a timely manner. Yes, we need to be responsive to the complaints from the public, but we also have to be understanding of what some of these complaints do to the membership. Frivolous and vexatious complaints need to be addressed in a timely way, as well as just the disposition, even if they're founded complaints.

How do you propose to accelerate the timeline that you've already talked about in terms of a few months on some of the smaller cases to several years for some of the more complex ones?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

One of the things this bill is going to help with is the fact that there will now be service standards. There will be service standards for the RCMP as well as service standards for CBSA in terms of their responding, which will assist the commission greatly, whereas right now, the RCMP, in the current RCMP Act, do not have a specific service standard in terms of when they have to reply back to us. We will be negotiating service standards with them and with the CBSA when the new act comes into force.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Does that service standard apply, then, if a member of the public doesn't complain to you? Here's what I'm getting at. You have a service standard that is going to be built in. If you are asked by a member of the public to intervene or to review a file that's already been investigated—either by CBSA in this case, in Bill C-98, or the RCMP, because they're both going to be similar—the RCMP and the CBSA, for that matter, will both have a service standard to meet.

What happens previous to that? Do they have service standards now? If a member of the public complains to CBSA or the RCMP now, is there a service standard such that they have to respond to a member of the public in a timely way?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I can't speak to what CBSA is doing right now, because we're looking at what we're doing in the future. In terms of the RCMP, they do have a policy document that's in place, but there's no requirement for them to articulate that service standard externally. Right now, there really isn't a service standard externally in place for that.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Mr. Sauvé, would you care to comment on that?

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

As I mentioned at the beginning, I think service standards are a fantastic idea. One of the comments I would make is that the implementation of service standards for the investigational side would be a huge win for the membership. As you mentioned, having something hanging over your head for a year to two or three years and not knowing the resolution is the bottleneck right now.

Mr. Glen Motz:

All right. Thank you.

I saw you sitting in the gallery when I asked the minister this question. You have five members as a commission. Do you have investigative resources that you have access to that provide you with the ability to reinvestigate if a complaint is found to be insufficient? Does that exist for both the RCMP side of your commission and the CBSA side of your commission? Who is the investigative body that you contract or go to for that?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The answer to your question is yes. We do have the ability to investigate. I have a team of seven investigators who currently work for me right now. I suspect that with the increase in funding, as well as the new mandate, we will be increasing the number of investigators we have. In some cases, if we require and need very specialized expertise, then we contract out for that specialized expertise. For example—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Who would you contract out to? Is it to other police services?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I'm sorry?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Is it other police services?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

No. It's not other police services. We go to civilian contracts and look at using those types of services.

Mr. Glen Motz:

On the investigators you have now, where are they from?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

They're a mix. I have some who are from other police services. I have some who have come from family and social services, so it really is—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Are they on secondment? Are they seconded positions?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

No. They're public servants who work directly for me.

Mr. Glen Motz:

They've had previous experience in those agencies.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Exactly.

Mr. Glen Motz:

All right.

This has been a long time in the making. You heard us talk about that with the minister. Is there anything as you see the bill.... I mean, as the commission, you're responsible. You're going to be tasked with making sure that now CBSA falls under the requirements of this commission as well for civilian complaints review.

In order to look after the public in a timely way or in any way to be efficient there, and to also be responsive to the RCMP and CBSA members who might be the subject of a complaint, is there anything that we should be considering in this bill but is void in this legislation now or anything that could strengthen it to be more effective on both sides?

(1655)

The Chair:

Answer very briefly, please.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The legislation as you have it before you is very similar to what we see in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act right now. There are probably a few minor housekeeping issues, but as we read it right now, as the commission, there are no showstoppers.

Mr. Glen Motz:

With regard to the housekeeping issues, if you could get them to us....

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Sure.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It's just that we have to go through this today or Wednesday.

The Chair:

With that, we're going to have to suspend and go off to vote.

I'm hoping that our witnesses can stay while we go exercise our democratic franchise.

(1655)

(1720)

The Chair:

We are back and we have quorum.

I think it's Mr. Dubé who has seven minutes.

Subject to what colleagues might say, my suggestion would be that we go for 20 minutes. Does that sound reasonable? Then we'll move to clause-by-clause consideration after that.

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. Dubé, go ahead for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Sauvé, I hope that you'll forgive me, but I have few questions that I think you can answer.

First, I want to take this opportunity to congratulate you for everything that you're doing. I know that things haven't been easy in recent years, but I think that it's a step in the right direction. It was something that needed to be done a long time ago. The people who have been following the debate know that this is about establishing fair representation for the men and women in uniform in the RCMP. Keep up the good work.

My questions pertain to some aspects of the commission's current operations and how the bill can change or affect this.

The proposed subclause 18(2) on page 8 of the bill states as follows: (2) In order to conduct a review on its own initiative, the Commission (a) must be satisfied that sufficient resources exist ... (b) must have taken reasonable steps to verify that no other review or inquiry has been undertaken ...

I'll address the reasonable steps described in paragraph (b). Let's start with paragraph (a), which concerns resources.

Take the case of an incident reported by the media. As a result, the complaint becomes a matter of public interest. If you don't have an adequate budget, you must make the handling of complaints a priority, even if the situation is high profile. Unless the president or the minister requests an investigation, you'll be limited by your budget capacity. That's basically what it means.

Is that correct?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Yes, Mr. Dubé, that's correct. We're certainly limited by our budgetary and human resources.

I should also point out that this part concerns what we call reviews, but reviews of specific activities. We're talking about cases involving a systemic issue that we decide to investigate. We're talking about these cases, rather than the normal complaints that we receive from the general public.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

That's fine.

In terms of paragraph (b), not only in the context of the proposed subclause 18(2), but in general, Mr. Graham spoke earlier about the risk of stepping on the other agency's toes. That's interesting. As part of our study of Bill C-59, we met with representatives of your commission. Forgive me, I don't remember whether the information came from you or other representatives, but we were told that there was no issue with regard to the RCMP, since the functions weren't national security functions. However, during the presentations and debate on Bill C-59, some people pointed out that, in the case of the Canada Border Services Agency, the issue still concerned national security, given that we're talking about border integrity.

Are you concerned that, in terms of the agency, it may be more difficult to determine what falls under the different oversight mechanisms for national security issues? For example, in the case of the committee created by Bill C-59 or the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, there's a clearer and more obvious distinction with respect to the RCMP.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I think that it may sometimes be difficult to make the distinction. However, I can tell you that we currently have a very good relationship with the Security Intelligence Review Committee and with what will become the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency. We often talk to these people. I think that we would be able to determine which agency should handle the complaint.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

As long as good relationships are maintained, this shouldn't cause any issues in terms of the work.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Indeed.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Good.

My next question concerns American customs officials. I think that it's important, because ordinary mortals, if you'll allow me to use that expression, don't always have a clear idea of who's responsible. Since the passage of Bill C-23, there has been increased use of pre-clearance, particularly during land crossings and at airports

Do you anticipate any complaints regarding how American officials treat Canadian citizens? Have you established a mechanism to deal with this? Will you pass on complaints to another agency? Will you raise public awareness? Will your approach include several components?

(1725)

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The approach will include several components. We'll undoubtedly receive complaints regarding American officials.

At this time, we sometimes receive complaints regarding officers other than Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers. With respect to the RCMP, we have a no wrong door policy. Under this policy, if we receive a complaint regarding a Toronto police officer, for example, we can send it to the provincial agency for processing. We share the information.

We'll certainly start building relationships with the Americans so that we can pass on these types of complaints to them.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I apologize for hurrying, but my time is running out.

During pre-clearance, the Americans operate on Canadian soil. Do you play any type of role if an incident that leads to a complaint takes place on Canadian soil, for example at a Canadian airport?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I don't think so, but this issue should be addressed.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

That's fine.

I have one last question.

On page 25, the proposed subclause 51(1) refers to the response of the president of the agency. Is this mechanism similar to the current mechanism of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP, whereby a written response is provided and, if no further action is taken, the reasons are also provided in writing? Forgive me for not knowing the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act by heart. Perhaps I should know it. Is it the same as the mechanism that currently exists in this legislation?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Yes, we're currently using the same mechanism.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

I understand there are no questions from the government side. Are there any further questions from the opposition side?

Mr. Eglinski, go ahead for five minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I'd like to thank you for coming out today and for presenting. I'm very pleased to be able to support Bill C-98, but I do have a couple of a misconceptions, which I've had for a number of years, regarding the similar situation you had with the RCMP.

Under “Powers of Commission in Relation to Complaints”, with regard to the powers in proposed section 44, you were talking about service standards for the RCMP and certain guidelines. You can compel a person to come before you and administer an oath, etc. If a member of the border security were involved in a criminal case, say for an alleged assault or something like that or for excessive force, would you require them to do that before the criminal trial, or would it be set over until after the criminal trial so that they could defend their actions? Would the evidence they gave your organization under oath be able to be used against them in a criminal trial?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I'll address the second part of your question first. Any information provided to us under oath by an individual we've compelled to come to speak to us cannot be used against them. Anything they're admitting personally cannot be used in any of our reports, so that information cannot be used against them.

The first part of your question is about a situation we deal with fairly often, that in which the courts are engaged in something about which we've received a public complaint. Generally, we tend to put those public complaints in abeyance while we wait to see what the courts are going to say, because oftentimes the courts will provide some form of direction or there'll be something in a decision.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

That's the question I had. There is a kind of abeyance there because there is a conflict.

I have a second part for you, and I'd like you to answer fairly quickly if you could, because I do have another question.

I was there when you guys first started with the RCMP public complaints commission. There was a bit of resentment on the part of members of the RCMP with regard to trust, and I think there was a little resentment the other way; both of us kind of didn't trust each other. But as time went by—not a very long time—a trust was built up from us having worked very closely together. I would think you'd find the same thing moving into this new era. Are you going to set up a bit of an education program for the members of the Canada Border Services Agency so they understand really what you're about? There is going to be that little bit of suspicion on their side, so I wonder if you have a plan for educating them.

(1730)

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Right now we are working on a plan to educate them. That is part of our intention, to educate them as well as the Canadian public on the process.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

The gentleman who is on the screen.... I'm sorry; I forget your name, Sergeant.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

Brian Sauvé.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Brian, you talk about service standards within the RCMP and completion of investigations. Do you believe that the service standards should go both ways?

I'm going back to 15 years ago when I was in charge of Fort St. John detachment. I can recall an incident where I had a member stationed there for four years who I never met. He was on a standby investigation. I never knew what it was about. I wasn't told what it was about, but he lived in my area. He never came to work. I wonder if you feel that there should be a service standard both ways.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

I'm not sure what you mean by a service standard both ways. Whether it's a public complaint, an internal investigation or a criminal investigation, those being investigated have a right to a procedurally fair and expedited investigation, period. That's the way I look at it.

The laws of natural justice should apply. Whether it's the CBSA being investigated or the RCMP being investigated, the member being investigated has a right to a timely completion of that investigation. He or she also has the right to silence. That's a common law: the right to silence. So, if that impedes the investigators, well, find another avenue.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

I think I've run out of time.

The Chair:

Yes, you have.

Mr. Manly, do you wish to ask any questions?

Mr. Paul Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, GP):

No.

The Chair:

Are there any other questions on this side? No.

With that, I will thank our witnesses.

I appreciate your patience while we went off to vote.

With that, we'll suspend and come back for the clause-by-clause study.

(1730)

(1735)

The Chair:

I see that our witnesses are at the table and members are here.

We are now moving to clause-by-clause.

(Clauses 1 and 2 agreed to)

(On clause 3)

The Chair: We have PV-1.

Mr. Manly.

Mr. Paul Manly:

This amendment would specify that neither current nor former officers nor employees of the Canada Border Services Agency may sit on the public complaints and review commission. This amendment does not appear in Bill C-98, but in the parent act, the RCMP Act. The ineligibility paragraph under subsection 45.29(2) of that act would exclude current or former members from service on the PCRC, and under that act, “member” has a specific definition that means an employee of the RCMP. Presumably, current and former agents of the CBSA should be excluded from sitting on the PCRC as well. This amendment would make that crystal clear.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have a couple of questions. One is for the officials that are here about this particular amendment, and one is for Mr. Picard, actually.

The Chair:

He won't be able to serve.

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, but seriously.... I appreciate what the RCMP Act says, but I've always been curious to know if there's some distance between service and a commission like this. Even as a public servant now, to work as an investigator on this end, how that would preclude someone from being impartial, someone who has some understanding of the business to be able to be of value to service to the public in this commission.... I'm at a loss to understand why that would be something we would want to even consider.

Could the officials help me understand whether this is something that is consistent with legislation or is the intent of Bill C-98?

Mr. Evan Travers:

The intent of this bill is not to impose a restriction on who could become a member of the commission by virtue of having formerly been employed by the CBSA. The amendment offered by Mr. Manly would impose on former CBSA members the same restriction that currently applies to former RCMP members. We have not put that forward as part of the bill.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Mr. Picard, you started out in the service this way, and you've had some distance since then. Do you see this as being something that would cause disruption or cause the public to be concerned about the fairness, the non-bias of a commission if it employed someone who used to work with CBSA in years past?

Mr. Michel Picard:

In all cases, I don't think experience should diminish someone's capacity to act. I would vote against that.

The Chair:

Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I'm just wondering, through you Chair, if Mr. Travers can explain the inconsistency between the fact that the RCMP are forbidden but former CBSA members are allowed in this legislation.

Mr. Evan Travers:

We worked mostly on the CBSA-related elements. With respect to those elements, the decision was made not to impose a similar requirement for former employees of the CBSA. They are different kinds of workforces. The CBSA tends to engage summer students and the like, who may spend only a few months with the agency. In order to allow the Governor in Council, the body that would make appointments to the commission, discretion in picking the best candidates, we did not include that restriction in this part of the bill.

(1740)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Chair, if I may, it seems like a pretty glaring inconsistency. You're going to have an organization that's now going to handle complaints for two different public safety entities. On the one hand, certain individuals—I take your point about the types of experiences—will be allowed. That's a very specific example, but it basically means that someone who served 30 years as a border officer and who is, with all due respect to the great work that they do, in a bit of a conflict of interest....

I assume that is why the RCMP Act was drafted the way it was. It was to avoid the old adage of police investigating police. I know that it's called “public” now, but I'm just wondering if the civilian nature of it is a bit lost by this pretty important inconsistency that will now exist throughout what is supposed to be one organization. Could you perhaps offer us what the thinking was behind that?

Mr. Evan Travers:

I don't want to speak to the intent of the RCMP Act or the provisions that are there. I was not involved in their drafting or their development.

With respect to the bill that is before you, we've provided our advice to cabinet through our minister, and this is the bill the government has come forward with. If there are concerns or questions, it may be that the minister would be better placed to speak to the policy intent behind that distinction.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a very quick question.

I'm not going to support this amendment, but I just wanted to ask a question on the RCMP ban. Who is currently banned? Is it RCMP members in the meaning of the act, or any employee of the RCMP?

Mr. Evan Travers:

I'll turn to Mr. Talbot on that.

Mr. Jacques Talbot (Counsel, Legal Services, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Department of Justice):

Here, the persons who are subject to the current provision are the members of the RCMP, the members of the force.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Uniformed officers?

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So this amendment would apply to all CBSA employees, as you said, summer students.

That answers my question, thank you.

The Chair:

Matthew.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

I'll support Mr. Manly's amendment because I think it refers to a pretty important inconsistency.

Two big issues come to mind. One, which I think we heard in the testimony previously and through Mr. Eglinski's questions in particular, is the importance of building trust. I just feel that the inequity that this would create in this newly named commission would be problematic for building that trust.

Two, again, we're using such a specific example of a summer student working three months at the agency, when the reality is that the loophole would allow someone who is in a much more conflicted position to be there. Unfortunately, I don't have wording to entertain an amendment to the amendment, to make that exemption appear, but again, just for the record, I think it's a pretty stark inconsistency, and so I'll support Mr. Manly's amendment.

The Chair:

Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

First of all, I couldn't support this amendment.

However, Mr. Talbot, I'd like you to clarify what you said a moment ago.

When you referred to RCMP officers, were you referring to past and present?

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

I'm referring to the current regime.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Pardon? [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

I'm talking about the current regime. [English]

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I still didn't quite get that.

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

Oh, I'm referring also to the past members, the people who were subject to the former regime. As you know, a few years ago, we introduced a new piece of legislation that changed the statute for employees of the RCMP, particularly for—

(1745)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay. It just wasn't quite clear there. Thank you.

The Chair:

Are there any other questions on the amendment?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 3 agreed to)

(Clauses 4 to 14 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 15)

The Chair: We have amendment PV-2. It is deemed to be in front of us. Notwithstanding, there's no one here to speak to it unless someone wants to speak to it. Does anyone want to speak to it, in favour or against amendment PV-2?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have a question for the officials. I'm just curious to know whether this would work and if it's even necessary, given what we heard in the previous hour, that this complaints commission does not deal with matters of deportation. Is this amendment PV-2 even necessary in this legislation?

Mr. Evan Travers:

Amendment PV-2, as I understand it, relates to consultation and co-operation.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That could mean that I'm deported to another country, and I'm going to then employ the services of some agency in another country to fight my deportation.

Mr. Evan Travers:

If I understand your question correctly, the bill is not meant to interfere with the removal or extradition process. Complaints can be continued and can be brought from outside of Canada. Any person who felt they had a complaint could bring that forward, whether they were in Canada or not.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there any other commentary?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Amendment PV-3 is before us. Does anyone want to ask questions of the officials or speak to PV-3?

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

If he's not here, just skip it.

The Chair:

No, I can't skip it. It's properly before the committee so we have to deal with it.

Mr. T.J. Harvey:

It's not if he's not here to move it.

The Chair:

It's deemed moved.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 15 agreed to)

(Clauses 16 to 35 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: Shall the title carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the bill carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the chair report the bill to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: With that, thank you, officials.

Thank you, committee members.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1540)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Nous avons le quorum. Il est bien plus de 15 h 30. Le ministre est arrivé. Débarrassé de son veston, il a l'air assez sérieux. Je pense que nous pouvons commencer.

Chers collègues, vous savez que nous avions une entente, depuis la semaine dernière, sur le déroulement de la séance d'aujourd'hui sur le projet de loi C-98. Les bases de l'entente ont changé. En échange, il n'y aura plus de débat à la Chambre.

J'entends accorder au ministre tout le temps nécessaire. Il lui sera loisible d'être bref. Après une première série de questions, nous verrons bien si l'envie d'en poser d'autres tient toujours. Après, nous entendrons les témoins, puis nous passerons à l'étude article par article. Je suppose que tous les membres sont d'accord.

Cela dit, je vous demande, monsieur le ministre de bien vouloir commencer.

Merci.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale (ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Merci, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

Dans un souci de brièveté et d'efficacité, je renonce à faire une déclaration de 10 minutes pour simplement vous entretenir quelques minutes, à la bonne franquette, du projet de loi C-98. Je suis accompagné de MM. Evan Travers et Jacques Talbot, du ministère de la Sécurité publique, qui pourront m'aider à m'y retrouver dans les méandres de la loi et répondre à vos questions. Ils pourront aussi vous aider à clarifier le témoignage d'autres témoins, en ce qui concerne la signification ou la raison d'être de la loi.

Mesdames et messieurs, vous savez que le projet de loi C-98 vise à combler la dernière lacune importante qui existe dans l'architecture des dispositions régissant la surveillance, l'examen et le contrôle des activités de certains de nos principaux organismes chargés de la sécurité publique et nationale. Cette lacune existe depuis près de 18 ans.

Le problème s'est posé au lendemain du 11 septembre, quand, partout dans le monde, on a sensiblement corrigé le mode de fonctionnement des organismes de sécurité. À l'époque, l'Agence canadienne des douanes et du revenu a été subdivisée, les Douanes allant s'unir au ministère de la Sécurité publique et devenant finalement l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. L'Agence canadienne du revenu s'est alors retrouvée seule.

Dans la réorganisation des responsabilités qui a suivi le 11 septembre, beaucoup de groupes de pression, de parties prenantes et d'observateurs de la politique publique ont fait remarquer que la nouvelle Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ne possédait pas en propre d'organe d'examen qui jouerait un rôle de chien de garde analogue à celui du Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, le CSARS, à l'endroit du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité ou à celui du commissariat, à l'endroit du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications.

Vous vous rappellerez que le Sénat a proposé une solution pour combler cette lacune. Le sénateur Willie Moore a déposé le projet de loi S-205, qui s'inspirait d'un modèle qui confiait la surveillance de l'Agence des services frontaliers à un inspecteur général. Pendant ce temps, à la Chambre des communes, nous proposions le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, à la faveur du projet de loi C-22, et le nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, qui fait l'objet du projet de loi C-59.

Au milieu du nouveau comité des parlementaires et du nouvel office susmentionnés, nous avons essayé de faire de la place à l'idée du sénateur Moore, mais ça nous a semblé tellement compliqué que nous avons jugé impossible de récupérer son idée et de la transformer en un modèle fonctionnel. À la place, nous avons proposé le projet de loi C-98.

(1545)



Le comité des parlementaires et l'office de surveillance susmentionnés examinent les fonctions de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada en matière de sécurité nationale. Mais ce sont les activités de l'Agence qui ne concernent pas la sécurité qu'on laisse de côté. À qui peut se plaindre la personne qui, par exemple, se présente à la frontière et y subit une expérience désagréable, embarrassante ou difficile? À l'Agence, qui fera une enquête complète et qui lui répondra. Mais, d'après les experts, en sus de ce que l'Agence peut faire dans le cadre de sa politique interne, il faut un mécanisme indépendant d'examen pour le volet non sécuritaire du travail de l'Agence. Ce volet, contrairement au volet sécuritaire relevant du comité des parlementaires et du nouvel office chargé de la sécurité, sous le régime du projet de loi C-59, n'est pas visé. Comment, alors, créer l'organisme qui s'en chargera?

Nous avons étudié deux solutions de rechange. La première était de créer un organisme autonome pour le charger de ces responsabilités; sinon, existait-il un organisme fédéral d'examen déjà capable de s'en acquitter? Notre choix s'est fixé sur la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes qui s'occupe exactement de ces fonctions pour la GRC.

Le projet de loi propose la réorganisation de cette commission pour en élargir la compétence à l'Agence des services frontaliers et accroître ses capacités et ressources pour la rendre capable de ce travail. Il dote le nouvel organisme qui en sortira d'un président et d'un vice-président et lui donne le nom de Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. Elle s'occuperait de la GRC et de l'Agence, qui seraient du ressort du président et du vice-président, pour les faire bénéficier d'une attention de premier ordre — pour que nous ne déshabillions pas Pierre pour habiller Paul et que chacune, dans la nouvelle structure, reçoive l'attention appropriée. Notre analyse a montré que, en réorganisant l'ancienne commission, nous irions plus vite et serions plus efficaces que si nous créions un organisme à partir de zéro.

Voilà le projet de loi que vous avez sous les yeux. La nouvelle commission pourra recevoir les plaintes du public, lancer les enquêtes qu'elle jugera appropriées. Le ministre pourrait demander à l'organisme d'enquêter ou d'examiner une question s'il le jugeait nécessaire. Le projet de loi C-98 encadrera toutes ces fonctions.

Voilà la raison d'être du projet de loi. Je suis très reconnaissant à votre comité de sa volonté, à cette étape de notre vie parlementaire, d'examiner cette question de façon très efficace. Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Sur ce, passons à la première série d'interventions, chacune d'une durée de sept minutes. Commençons par Mme Dabrusin.

Petit avertissement: les questions sont toujours recevables si elles portent sur le sujet à l'ordre du jour. Je n'en dis pas plus. Merci.

Madame Dabrusin, à vous la parole.

(1550)

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci.

Ce projet de loi m'a rendue très heureuse, parce que, monsieur le ministre, vous savez que, à peu près à toutes vos comparutions devant notre comité, je vous ai questionné sur la surveillance de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et sur le moment où ça se produirait. Le dépôt du projet de loi m'a rendue heureuse.

Dans votre bref historique du projet de loi, vous avez évoqué celui qu'avait déposé le sénateur Wilfred Moore ainsi que les différentes lacunes du projet de loi C-59 et du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement.

Pourquoi a-t-il fallu attendre si longtemps pour qu'on accouche de ce projet de loi?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je pense, madame Dabrusin, que c'est simplement le résultat du grand nombre de dossiers que nous avons dû régler et d'activités que nous avons dû orchestrer en matière de sécurité publique. Je les ai ajoutés il y a deux ou trois jours. Nous avons demandé à la législature actuelle d'examiner au moins 13 projets importants de loi, ce qui a tenu particulièrement occupé votre comité ainsi que les comités homologues du Sénat.

J'ai toujours répondu que je voulais voir aboutir ce projet de loi. Cette pièce essentielle du programme législatif, la voici maintenant, simple, sans complexités juridiques excessives.

Si nous avions pu profiter plus tôt d'un moment libre dans le programme des politiques publiques, nous en aurions profité. Mais parmi les projets de loi que nous devions faire avancer — 13 lois importantes —, ce projet de loi fait partie de ceux qui, je l'espère, franchiront la ligne d'arrivée. Et, en cours de route, il a dû céder le passage aux projets de loi C-66, C-71, C-83, C-59 et C-93, notamment. Il y a beaucoup de pain sur la planche.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Oui. Merci.

Ai-je bien compris que le budget de 2019 prévoyait un poste faisant précisément allusion au financement de cette surveillance?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le financement est prévu. Il proviendra, en temps utile, du budget des dépenses. Nous prenons le financement de base de la commission civile puis, alors qu'elle se verra confier les responsabilités de l'Agence des services frontaliers et qu'elle deviendra la Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, elle recevra l'argent nécessaire à l'embauche du personnel supplémentaire et à son plein rendement.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Vous avez effleuré la question quand vous avez parlé des différents mécanismes et de la décision de les déployer à l'intérieur du système d'examen de la GRC. Peut-être pouvez-vous m'aider à comprendre un peu mieux. Pourquoi pas un comité distinct d'examen pour l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada? Pourquoi construire le mécanisme de surveillance à l'intérieur du système de la GRC, puis l'élargir, plutôt que d'en créer un, séparé?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Simplement parce que les compétences exigées pour les deux sont très semblables. Elles ne sont pas identiques, je vous le concède, mais elles se ressemblent beaucoup. La commission civile fournit déjà un socle. Les compétences et les capacités existent déjà, et l'analyse des fonctionnaires, du Conseil du Trésor et d'autres a mené à la conclusion que nous pouvions agir plus rapidement et plus efficacement en déployant la structure existante, plutôt que de partir de zéro.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Des électeurs se sont notamment dits préoccupés par la protection des renseignements personnels à la frontière, par exemple, quand des gardes-frontières peuvent accéder à des renseignements conservés dans les téléphones et des appareils semblables. Comment la surveillance de l'organisme pourrait-elle englober cette protection des renseignements personnels?

(1555)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Quiconque estime avoir subi un mauvais traitement à la frontière, un comportement d'un agent frontalier qu'il a jugé indiscret ou choquant, ou une violation de ses droits au respect de sa vie privée peut, dès maintenant ou dès l'adoption de la loi, déposer une plainte indépendante auprès du nouvel organisme. Cet organisme fera enquête et présentera ses conclusions sur le caractère approprié ou non du traitement subi à la frontière.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

J'ai une petite question, puisqu'il ne me reste qu'une minute et demie.

La fouille d'un téléphone pour des motifs ou sous couvert de sécurité nationale relèverait-elle de la Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public ou de...? Comment déterminerait-on l'organisme compétent de surveillance?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Peu importe l'organisme compétent... la plainte pourra se faire directement à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, à un organisme distinct ou, encore, à l'Office de surveillance, l'organisme chargé de la sécurité nationale. Si la plainte tombe dans une zone grise, les trois organismes — l'Agence des services frontaliers, la commission d'examen ou l'Office de surveillance — la feront aboutir à l'organisme compétent. Une certaine jurisprudence officieuse, administrative, devra se créer pour distinguer une plainte touchant la sécurité nationale d'une plainte pour un simple comportement répréhensible.

Ça ne se fera pas du jour au lendemain, mais nous nous assurerons qu'aucune plainte n'aboutira au mauvais endroit. Peu importe sa destination, les organismes veilleront à la faire aboutir au bon endroit et à la faire entendre par l'autorité compétente.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous disposez de sept minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, il est question d'organismes qui font l'objet de plaintes. Il y a actuellement une plainte concernant le financement accordé par le programme Emplois d'été Canada à la Société islamique de l'Amérique du Nord, car il a été reconnu, documents à l'appui, que cet organisme a offert du financement à des fins de terrorisme.

Votre ministère ou un des organismes qui relèvent de votre ministère a-t-il été mis au courant de cela ou impliqué dans le dossier? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Faites-vous allusion à celui dont on a parlé à la période des questions d'aujourd'hui?

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Oui.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le ministère chargé de l'emploi examine la question. Le financement était accordé par le programme d'emplois, et, d'après ce que j'ai compris de la réponse donnée à la Chambre, la ministre demande à ses fonctionnaires de s'assurer que le processus décisionnel concernant ce financement a suivi en tout point la voie normale. C'est en fait une enquête. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci. J'ai recommandé vivement aux membres de s'en tenir à la question de l'ordre du jour, c'est-à-dire le projet de loi C-98. Je ne suis pas tout à fait certain du rapport entre une demande de financement pour un programme d'emplois et le projet de loi. J'encourage donc le député à bien vouloir diriger ses questions sur le projet de loi C-98. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je mettais en pratique le fondement du projet de loi, soit le fait que les citoyens portent plainte. C'est le même principe.

Revenons à la Commission, monsieur le ministre. Y a-t-il actuellement des retards à la Commission dans le traitement des plaintes? A-t-elle déjà une surcharge de travail? Le fait de lui ajouter des attributions à l'égard de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada créera-t-il encore plus de problèmes ou est-ce que tout va bien? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il est sûr que l'organisme élargi aura plus de travail. Actuellement, la commission civile ne se saisit que des questions touchant la GRC. Le nouvel organisme d'examen se saisira de celles qui concernent la GRC et l'Agence des services frontaliers. Actuellement...

(1600)

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

En fait, monsieur le ministre, savez-vous si le traitement des plaintes concernant la GRC souffre de retards...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je crois que, plus tard, cet après-midi, des représentants de la commission civile seront accessibles...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus: D'accord.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:... pour expliquer leur charge de travail, mais, sur le fond de votre question, il est évident que le nouvel organisme aura plus de travail. En conséquence, il aura besoin de plus de ressources, mais nous serons plus efficaces dans l'emploi de ces ressources si nous partons du socle qu'offre déjà cette commission au lieu de créer à partir de zéro un organisme autonome pour l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord.

Si une personne est expulsée par l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada pour une raison quelconque, pourrait-elle porter plainte au sujet de son expulsion forcée dans le but de retarder son expulsion? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Cette question tombe peut-être dans la zone grise entre la plainte contre le comportement grossier ou brutal d'un agent et la plainte contre une expulsion pour des motifs valables. On peut faire juridiquement appel de motifs contestables d'expulsion. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

A-t-on évalué la possibilité que des gens se servent du processus de plainte pour empêcher leur expulsion, le temps que la Commission fasse une enquête? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non. L'expulsion, selon l'article de la loi, est décidée soit par le ministre de l'Immigration, soit par celui de la Sécurité publique. Elle ne résulte pas d'une décision administrative. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Qui a travaillé à la rédaction du projet de loi C-98? Est-ce seulement Sécurité publique Canada? La GRC et l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada y ont-elles aussi participé? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Travers, qui a participé à l'élaboration de la politique et à la rédaction du projet de loi, vous répondra.

M. Evan Travers (directeur général par interim, Direction générale d’application de la loi et stratégies frontalières, ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

La Sécurité publique a consulté, visiblement dans le respect du secret du cabinet, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et la GRC pour l'élaboration du projet de loi. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord.

Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle le syndicat n'a pas été consulté? [Traduction]

M. Evan Travers:

La consultation du syndicat s'est faite par l'entremise de l'Agence. D'après ce que j'ai compris, l'Agence l'a consulté après le dépôt du projet de loi. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Pourtant, le syndicat semble dire qu'il n'a pas du tout été consulté dans ce dossier. [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

La décision, monsieur Paul-Hus, a manifestement été prise par le gouvernement en s'appuyant sur tous les exposés publics selon lesquels il fallait combler cette lacune.

À propos de la structure ou de la méthode pour combler la lacune, nous nous sommes entendus dans les discussions entre le ministère de la Sécurité publique, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et la GRC. Une fois la décision prise et la mesure législative rendue publique, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, d'après ce que j'ai compris, a poursuivi les discussions avec son syndicat.

Le président:

Votre temps est presque écoulé, monsieur Paul-Hus. Il ne vous reste que 10 secondes.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Monsieur le ministre, merci de votre présence.

Je veux revenir à la question que Mme Dabrusin a posée au sujet du délai. Dans les faits, on a déposé un rapport sénatorial avant les dernières élections en 2015, le sénateur Segal a présenté un projet de loi à la législature précédente et notre comité a formulé une recommandation en 2017.

De plus, quiconque prend une minute pour faire une recherche Google peut trouver des articles qui remontent au moins aux trois dernières années dans lesquels vous promettez cette mesure législative, dans lesquels vous dites que c'est pour bientôt. En outre, la plupart, voire l'ensemble des projets de loi que vous avez énumérés en répondant à ma collègue ont été déposés en 2016 et en 2017.

Je me questionne sur ce mécanisme. Vous avez dit qu'il est simple et direct, rapide et rentable, et vous avez dit qu'il s'appuie sur une infrastructure existante. La capacité des Canadiens à porter plainte — surtout lorsqu'on sait que la loi n'entrera en vigueur qu'en 2020, si je comprends bien — me donne du fil à retordre.

Je ne comprends toujours pas vraiment pourquoi, après tout ce qui a été présenté et pendant au moins deux ou trois années de préparation... Pour moi, cela ne semble pas excuser le fait que vous ayez un peu baissé les bras et dit que la proposition de la sénatrice ne fonctionnera pas dans le projet de loi C-59. Cela semblait être ce que vous sous-entendiez dans votre réponse à la question.

Je veux vous demander encore une fois pourquoi il a fallu attendre si longtemps alors que les problèmes dans les relations de travail à l'ASFC — des allégations de harcèlement et autres choses du genre — ainsi que, de toute évidence, dans la façon dont certains Canadiens sont traités à la frontière se poursuivent.

(1605)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Eh bien, comme je l'ai dit, monsieur Dubé, nous avons eu énormément de travail à faire, tout comme ce comité et le Parlement de manière générale. Les travaux ont progressé aussi rapidement que nous le pouvions. Il faut du temps et des efforts pour tout mettre en place. Je suis heureux que nous soyons à cette étape, et j'espère que l'appareil parlementaire fonctionnera assez bien cette semaine pour que nous puissions franchir la ligne d'arrivée.

Le programme législatif a été très chargé quand on pense aux projets de loi  C-7, C-21, C-22, C-23, C-37, C-46, C-66, C-71, C-59, C-97, C-83, C-93 et C-98. C'est un programme chargé, et tout doit passer par un entonnoir parlementaire relativement petit.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je pense que trois de ces projets de loi ont été déposés après 2017 ou au début de 2018. Dans le cas des C-20 et de ceux à un seul chiffre, ils l'ont été quelques journées après l'assermentation de votre gouvernement. Je pense qu'on doit rendre des comptes, car vous avez dit publiquement et fermement que cela devait être fait, et je ne veux pas m'arrêter ici alors que le compte rendu dit... Par exemple, pourquoi ne pas avoir apporté le changement dans le projet de loi C-59?

Je veux juste comprendre, car ce que je veux, monsieur le ministre, c'est m'assurer qu'il n'y a pas, par exemple, de résistance interne à ce dossier. Je n'arrive pas à comprendre, si c'est un mécanisme simple et direct dans le projet de loi C-98, pourquoi il a fallu des années pour conclure qu'il fallait procéder ainsi.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il n'y a aucune résistance interne. En fait, l'ASFC reconnaît que c'est une lacune dans l'architecture et qu'il faut la combler.

Elle a été partiellement corrigée à l'aide du projet de loi C-22 et du comité de parlementaires, du moins pour ce qui est de la sécurité nationale. Elle a aussi été partiellement corrigée au moyen du projet de loi C-59 et de la création du nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement.

Cette dernière mesure législative représente le dernier morceau du casse-tête. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'aimerais faire suite aux questions posées par mon collègue M. Paul-Hus. Je trouve inquiétant qu'on n'ait pas consulté le syndicat, dans ce cas-ci, puisqu'une des fonctions de ce mécanisme est de protéger les travailleurs en cas d'allégations. Il est arrivé que les médias fassent état d'allégations de harcèlement et de choses de la sorte.

C'est probablement vous qui pourrez répondre à ma question, monsieur Travers. Vous avez expliqué que la consultation avait été faite par l'Agence. Pourtant, ce sont les travailleurs qui peuvent être touchés directement par ce qui ressortira des plaintes. Il peut aussi arriver que ce soit eux qui déposent des plaintes. Compte tenu de la nature du projet, pourquoi ne pas avoir pris la peine de consulter le syndicat, qui est le représentant de ces travailleurs? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Dubé, le ministère et l'ASFC ont étudié la question en profondeur. Il revient à l'ASFC d'avoir cette interaction avec ses employés. Ils ont discuté de ce qu'ils considéraient comme le bon moment.

Ce qu'il faut retenir, c'est que le projet de loi est maintenant prêt. Vous aurez l'occasion de l'examiner en détail pour vous assurer, dans le cadre du processus démocratique au Parlement, qu'il répond bien aux besoins des travailleurs.

(1610)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Eh bien, vous m'excuserez, monsieur le ministre. Nous appuyons le projet de loi et nous serons heureux de voir son adoption, mais le problème est là. Nous n'avons pas le temps, car il a fallu attendre si longtemps que nous devons maintenant procéder rapidement. Cela me va, mais je pense que nous devons nuancer ces observations.

Avez-vous reçu un rapport de l'ASFC sur les détails de ce que le syndicat a dit, ou avez-vous juste — je ne veux pas simplifier à outrance — parlé avec eux pour ensuite passer à autre chose?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

On ne m'a fait part d'aucun problème dans le cadre de la consultation. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

J'ai une dernière question pour vous.

J'ai cru comprendre que le mécanisme sera mis en œuvre en 2020. Ceux qui voudront déposer une plainte pourront le faire à partir de ce moment-là. Y a-t-il d'autres précisions à apporter ou peut-on s'attendre à ce que, si le projet de loi est adopté, les gens puissent déposer des plaintes selon le mécanisme proposé à partir de l'année prochaine? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ce serait le but, monsieur Dubé. Nous travaillons évidemment à l'élaboration d'une agence élargie. Nous aurons peut-être des problèmes administratifs inattendus, mais l'objectif est de mettre cela en place le plus rapidement possible. Le mécanisme que nous choisissons nous permettra de procéder plus rapidement que si nous avions décidé de créer une agence à partir de zéro.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Mais, monsieur le ministre — il ne me reste que 20 secondes...

Le président:

À vrai dire, non.

M. Matthew Dubé:

... si le Parlement adopte le projet de loi, est-ce que ce sera fait?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est exactement ce que j'essaie d'accomplir, oui.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Picard, allez-y, pour sept minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, comme vous le savez, j'ai commencé ma carrière comme agent de douane. Effectivement, le seuil de tolérance ou d'interprétation des gens qui entrent au Canada varie selon qu'il s'agit de visiteurs ou de résidents qui reviennent au Canada.

Mon collègue M. Dubé a parlé de la protection des employés. Évidemment, il faut un œil externe pour s'assurer du bien-fondé d'une plainte déposée par quelqu'un qui croit que ses droits ont été brimés. Il me semble que le projet de loi prévoit des mesures permettant à la Commission d'accepter ou non une plainte en fonction de sa teneur. [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Oui, monsieur Picard.

Est-ce que cela vous pose problème?

M. Evan Travers:

Non. J'ai peut-être raté quelque chose dans l'interprétation.

M. Michel Picard:

Les gens qui reviennent au Canada, les résidants et les visiteurs, n'ont pas tous la même tolérance par rapport au traitement qu'on leur réserve, vu la nature des plaintes. Le comité peut analyser les motifs de ces plaintes pour voir si elles sont sensées ou non. Pour ce qui est de la protection des agents, comme l'a dit M. Dubé, ce projet de loi vise également à protéger les agents et les employés contre des plaintes futiles.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

L'objectif, monsieur Picard, c'est que ce soit équitable dans les deux sens. Quand une personne voyage, elle mérite une expérience professionnelle et efficace à la frontière. Les fonctionnaires responsables des services frontaliers devraient aussi pouvoir travailler dans un milieu sécuritaire et respectueux. Cela s'applique dans les deux sens.

Je soupçonne qu'à mesure que nous recevrons et examinerons des plaintes, nous allons progressivement acquérir l'expérience et l'expertise nécessaire à l'amélioration de la situation à la frontière pour les deux groupes de personnes.

M. Michel Picard:

Il y a de fortes chances que le comité parvienne à une conclusion que l'Agence n'acceptera pas. Qui est chargé de prendre la décision définitive si la conclusion du comité va à l'encontre de l'interprétation de l'Agence?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vais demander à M. Travers ou à M. Talbot de dire qui a le pouvoir ultime, mais pour répondre à votre question, monsieur Picard, je vous propose de consulter le paragraphe 32(2) de la loi, qui porte sur la façon de traiter les plaintes futiles ou vexatoires ayant été portées de mauvaise foi. Je crois que c'est ce qui vous intéresse.

Monsieur Talbot, monsieur Travers, pouvez-vous dire qui a le pouvoir de décision ultime en cas de différend entre l'organisme de surveillance et l'agence?

(1615)

M. Evan Travers:

La première entité qui enquête sur une plainte est l'ASFC, dans la plupart des cas. Elle peut examiner la plainte, tirer des conclusions et ensuite les présenter au plaignant. La mesure législative est parsemée de dispositions selon lesquelles l'employé doit être avisé et informé de l'avancement de l'enquête. Si, après avoir reçu le rapport de l'ASFC, le plaignant est insatisfait du contenu, il peut saisir la commission du dossier. La commission examine alors la plainte à son tour. Elle peut adhérer aux conclusions de l'ASFC, mener sa propre enquête ou demander à l'ASFC de mener une enquête plus approfondie sur la plainte. Une fois que la commission a examiné la plainte, elle renvoie le dossier à l'ASFC, et l'ASFC peut y ajouter des observations.

Il existe un processus qui permet d'exprimer les divergences d'opinions, mais le rapport de la commission sera définitif. Il sera préparé après avoir pris pleinement connaissance des faits. Le résultat sera une décision définitive de la commission, qui ne pourra pas être revue par une cour fédérale ou une autre entité, car l'ASFC ne serait pas contraint de donner suite aux recommandations.

M. Michel Picard:

Dites-vous que si une personne est insatisfaite du résultat, après l'examen du dossier par la commission, il n'a plus de recours juridique pour poursuivre qui que ce soit?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les mesures disciplinaires, monsieur Picard, découlent d'une enquête officielle. Si l'organisme de surveillance démontre sans équivoque que les droits de la personne ont été violés — à la suite d'un mauvais traitement ou à cause de quelque chose de répréhensible dans le traitement qu'on lui a réservé — et que l'Agence ne prend pas de mesures significatives, je crois que l'Agence aura alors un très gros problème stratégique et administratif. Le problème aura été exposé publiquement par une autorité indépendante qui détermine ce qui est bien ou mal. L'Agence sera tenue de prendre des mesures.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous venons de terminer la série de questions de sept minutes. Voulez-vous poser d'autres questions jusqu'à 16 h 30?

D'accord. Nous allons donc poursuivre jusqu'à 16 h 30 avant de terminer.

Allez-y, monsieur Motz. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, j'ai entendu le terme « organisme de surveillance » à quelques reprises aujourd'hui. Je pense que le terme ne convient pas. Comme vous l'avez déjà dit, nous devons veiller à ce que ce soit un organisme d'examen, une commission civile d'examen des plaintes, pas un organisme de surveillance de l'ASFC. Je tiens à ce que tout le monde le comprenne.

(1620)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est exact.

M. Glen Motz:

Bien. Merci.

Pour revenir aux observations de Mme Dabrusin, de M. Paul-Hus et de M. Dubé à propos du délai, je suis porté à croire, monsieur, que le gouvernement et les fonctionnaires de la division de la sécurité publique, si je puis dire, rédigeaient déjà un projet de loi similaire sur cette question pour obtenir un organisme de surveillance — désolé... pour obtenir un organisme civil d'examen de l'ASFC.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il est facile de se tromper.

M. Glen Motz:

Nous avons dû attendre aux dernières heures de la session avant de voir le document ici, mais on peut dire qu'on se penchait déjà sur la question. Cette mesure législative aurait pu être adoptée il y a des années, mais cela n'a pas été le cas. Je l'appuie et je crois que c'est nécessaire, mais encore une fois, je me fais juste l'écho de ce qui a déjà été dit. Je veux juste dire pour le compte rendu que je déplore qu'il ait fallu autant de temps.

Ma question porte sur le mécanisme. Tout se rapporte au mécanisme, à la façon dont cela va fonctionner. Nous savons que la Commission des plaintes du public contre la GRC compte actuellement six membres, et je crois que cette mesure législative fera passer ce nombre à cinq. Comme l'a expliqué M. Travers en réponse à la question de M. Picard, l'ASFC fera la première enquête d'une plainte d'un civil, peu importe de quoi il s'agit. Si cette personne, le membre du public, est insatisfaite du traitement de la plainte, elle pourra en saisir la commission d'examen des plaintes pour un autre examen de l'enquête, si je puis dire.

Je ne comprends pas le mécanisme, la façon dont procédera la commission d'examen des plaintes. Est-ce un examen sur papier? Si l'enquête sur une plainte n'a pas été faite attentivement, la Commission a-t-elle son propre organisme d'enquête qui peut entendre des témoins et obtenir de plus amples détails? De quelle façon va-t-on procéder?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vais demander encore une fois à M. Travers de donner des précisions sur le mécanisme.

La partie de la nouvelle commission qui s'occupera de l'ASFC fonctionnera de manière très semblable à ce que fait la Commission existante pour la GRC.

M. Glen Motz:

Y a-t-il deux commissions distinctes?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non, mais il y aura deux catégories d'activités au sein de la même commission.

M. Glen Motz:

Ce sont donc les mêmes personnes qui traiteront les mêmes plaintes. Les gens de la GRC seront saisis des dossiers concernant la GRC et des dossiers concernant l'ASFC, n'est-ce pas?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Permettez-moi de revenir là-dessus.

L'idée, monsieur Motz, c'est que les examinateurs du côté de l'ASFC s'occuperont des dossiers de l'ASFC, et les examinateurs du côté de la GRC s'occuperont des dossiers de la GRC. Il reviendra au président et au vice-président de déterminer comment le personnel sera réparti pour entendre un cas, mais je pense que...

M. Glen Motz:

Il y aura deux entités distinctes dans une seule commission.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Essentiellement, oui. Il y aura un volet GRC et un volet ASFC.

M. Glen Motz:

Du point de vue de l'expertise...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Exactement, car les dossiers se ressemblent, mais ne sont pas identiques.

M. Glen Motz:

Oui.

La Commission sera-t-elle en mesure d'enquêter si le plaignant est insatisfait de l'enquête?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

La fonction d'enquête sera la même pour les dossiers de l'ASFC et ceux de la GRC. On pourra faire des enquêtes, recevoir de l'information et se pencher sur toutes les plaintes reçues pour avoir tous les faits sous les yeux...

M. Glen Motz:

Je vois. C'est donc distinct de...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

... dans le but de prendre une décision

M. Glen Motz:

C'est distinct de l'ASFC. L'ASFC a fait l'enquête. La Commission en fait une autre, une enquête distincte.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Si elle n'est pas satisfaite de l'enquête reçue, oui.

M. Glen Motz:

La Commission proprement dite peut alors enquêter, ou s'adresserait-elle à un autre organisme d'enquête?

Le président:

Ce sera la dernière réponse pour vous, monsieur Motz.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le président et le vice-président de la Commission détermineraient quelles sont les ressources, internes ou externes, nécessaires. Ils auront un budget. De toute évidence, ils veulent faire toute la lumière sur la plainte. Ils veulent être en mesure de satisfaire l'employé ou le membre du public qui se plaint en procédant équitablement et de manière compétente, en découvrant la vérité.

(1625)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez les cinq dernières minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

En cas de conflit de la Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, la CETPP, avec l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignements, ou OSSNR, ou même avec le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et de renseignements, ou CPSNR, qui l'emporte?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ce sont les organismes qui détermineraient leurs responsabilités respectives. J'ai l'impression que la question de savoir s'il s'agit d'une question de sécurité nationale ou pas serait très facile à trancher.

Dans le passé, les organismes ont eu à résoudre des questions de compétences en travaillant ensemble. Ils ont pu résoudre les différends d'une façon satisfaisante, et je ne m'attends donc pas à un conflit de compétences.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand la GRC fournit des services contractuels, par exemple à titre de police provinciale ou de service de sécurité ici, sur la Colline, au sein des Services de la Cité parlementaire, est-ce que la Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public exerce les mêmes pouvoirs et la même surveillance que la GRC dans un contexte autochtone?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Si elle agit à titre de police provinciale...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

... la première étape, pour les plaintes, serait l'organisme de surveillance provincial. Il y en a un dans chaque province.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et qu'en est-il des Services de la Cité parlementaire? La GRC a le mandat de fournir un service, et...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Elle a le mandat de fournir un agent. Vous devrez consulter le Président de la Chambre à ce sujet, car cela relève de la compétence des Présidents des deux chambres.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bon.

En ce qui concerne les opérations à l'étranger, quand la GRC s'adonne à des missions d'entraînement, par exemple, ou quand l'ASFC, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, fait du contrôle préalable, comme c'est prévu dans un autre des projets de loi que vous avez présentés, est-ce que la CETPP a le pouvoir de mener à l'étranger des enquêtes comme elle peut le faire au Canada?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les pouvoirs de l'organisme de surveillance par rapport à la GRC ne vont pas changer. Ce qui existe en ce moment sera maintenu. L'ASFC vient s'y ajouter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils pourraient aller aux États-Unis, par exemple, et chercher à trouver ce qui s'est passé en cas de plainte majeure.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Allez-y, monsieur Travers.

M. Evan Travers:

Ils pourraient certainement avoir accès à toute l'information, que les activités de l'ASFC se soient déroulées au Canada ou à l'étranger. Quant à savoir s'ils vont aller à l'étranger pour cela, ou s'ils seront en mesure d'interroger les gens au Canada, je ne le sais pas, mais ils auront le droit d'accéder à l'information de l'ASFC comme si l'événement s'était produit au Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question.

Est-ce que la CETPP a le pouvoir de faire des recommandations exécutoires, peu importe les circonstances?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Ce sera tout pour nos questions.

Je tiens à remercier les membres du Comité et le ministre d'avoir fait avancer les choses rapidement.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur le président, je tiens à vous remercier, vous-même et les membres du Comité, d'avoir affirmé votre volonté de vous occuper de cette question très rapidement, compte tenu du temps dont nous disposons.

Le président:

Merci.

Sur ce, nous allons suspendre la séance et reprendre dès que les témoins seront prêts.

(1625)

(1630)

Le président:

Pour accélérer les choses, je dirais que nous avons le quorum et que nos nouveaux témoins sont prêts.

Nous accueillons, à distance, M. Sauvé, de la Fédération de la police nationale, ainsi que Michelaine Lahaie, Lesley McCoy et Tim Cogan.

Je vais laisser M. Sauvé parler en premier, parce qu'on ne sait jamais si la technologie va tenir le coup.

En général, nous prévoyons 10 minutes par exposé. Idéalement, les exposés dureront moins de 10 minutes, et les députés pourront ainsi plus rapidement se mettre à poser leurs questions.

Sur ce, je vais demander à M. Sauvé de se présenter et de faire son exposé.

M. Brian Sauvé (co-président, Fédération de la Police Nationale):

Merci, monsieur le président. J'espère que la technologie fonctionne et que vous pouvez m'entendre.

Le président:

C'est une belle oeuvre d'art que vous avez là, derrière vous.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Merci.

Je m'appelle Brian Sauvé, et je suis un membre en titre. Je suis également sergent au sein de la GRC. J'ai pris un congé sans solde pour fonder et lancer la Fédération de la police nationale. En ce moment, je suis un des coprésidents par intérim.

Pour ceux qui observent depuis les coulisses, nous avons présenté une demande d'accréditation du premier agent négociateur pour les membres de la GRC en avril 2017. Nous avons dû surmonter tous les obstacles imaginables qu'on a mis sur notre chemin depuis avril 2017. Tous les membres de l'unité de négociation, qui sont plus de 18 000, ont participé à un vote d'accréditation en novembre et en décembre derniers. Nous attendons toujours, au sujet de ce vote, la décision de la CRTESPF, la Commission des relations de travail et de l'emploi dans le secteur public fédéral, sur une contestation constitutionnelle.

Cela étant dit, en ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-98, nous souhaitions exprimer le point de vue des membres de la GRC concernant la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes, ou CCETP, et la partie VII de la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, qui traite des plaintes du public. Je suis ouvert aux questions à ce sujet.

À ce moment-là, je voyais le projet de loi C-98 comme étant une loi modifiant la Loi sur la GRC. Nos membres ont exprimé diverses préoccupations concernant les modifications apportées en 2014 à la Loi sur la GRC, au moyen du projet de loi C-42, et nous aimerions les diffuser et poser des questions à ce sujet.

Par exemple, dans le projet de loi C-98, on modifie l'article 45.37 de la Loi sur la GRC pour imposer des délais en consultation avec la force, et avec la nouvelle Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, la CETPP, à savoir le temps qu'une enquête devrait prendre, le résultat qu'il faudrait obtenir et la consultation entre la force et l'organisme d'enquête.

De notre point de vue, du point de vue des membres de la GRC, il serait vraiment bien d'étendre cela à d'autres aspects de la Loi sur la GRC. L'un des aspects pour lesquels il serait formidable d'avoir une forme de consultation quant aux échéanciers serait celui des processus de discipline internes, ou même des griefs ou des appels des décisions du commissaire concernant les suspensions, par exemple.

Selon notre expérience, qu'il s'agisse d'une plainte relevant de la partie VII, d'un processus administratif relevant de la partie IV ou de griefs relevant de la partie III de la Loi sur la GRC, la GRC n'est pas elle-même équipée pour traiter de ces situations rapidement. Les dossiers ont tendance à traîner pendant six mois, un an, un an et demi et même deux ans, ce qui fait que les accusés ou les membres faisant l'objet d'une plainte du public ou d'une plainte relative au code de déontologie, ou encore les auteurs de griefs sont laissés en suspens à cause d'un processus administratif interminable.

Si les membres du Comité ont des questions à ce sujet, je serai plus que ravi d'y répondre, et nous pourrons poursuivre la discussion à partir de là.

C'est tout pour mon exposé. Je suis sûr que vous n'allez pas vous pencher sur toutes les observations que j'aurais à faire au sujet du projet de loi C-42 et de la façon dont il touche les membres de la GRC, ainsi qu'au sujet des vastes pouvoirs des commissaires et des commandants divisionnaires.

J'aimerais entrer dans les détails de cela un jour, mais je ne crois pas que ce soit le moment. Cependant, nous vous saurions gré de vous pencher sur les échéanciers de l'article 45.37.

(1635)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Sauvé.

Les lumières clignotent, et je suis obligé de suspendre la séance à moins que les membres du Comité consentent unanimement à ce que nous la poursuivions. Ce que je propose, puisque nous sommes dans l'édifice, c'est que nous poursuivions la réunion encore 15 ou 20 minutes. Je crois que la sonnerie nous avertit 30 minutes à l'avance. Est-ce qu'il serait raisonnable de poursuivre la séance encore 20 minutes?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Nous allons donc probablement entendre l'exposé de nos prochains témoins et amorcer au moins les questions.

Le ministre m'a indiqué qu'il a un diagramme du processus et qu'il serait heureux de le fournir à quiconque le souhaite. Malheureusement, il n'est qu'en anglais. Il sera en français et en anglais dans 24 heures, mais ceux qui le veulent peuvent l'avoir.

J'invite maintenant Michelaine Lahaie, présidente de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale à présenter son exposé.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie (présidente, Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Bonjour, monsieur le président. Je m'appelle Michelaine Lahaie, et je suis accompagnée de Tim Cogan, mon dirigeant principal des finances et directeur principal, et de Lesley McCoy, mon avocate générale.

En raison du court préavis que nous avons eu pour cette réunion, nous n'avons pas préparé d'exposé, mais je suis prête à répondre à toutes les questions des membres du Comité.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota, vous avez sept minutes.

(1640)

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vais commencer par quelques questions à l'intention de la Commission.

Depuis que vous y êtes, en moyenne, combien de plaintes recevez-vous de la part de civils? Quel est l'éventail des enjeux qui font l'objet de ces plaintes? Combien de temps le processus exige-t-il en général, pour un examen initial, et pour une enquête, si vous en menez une? Ce sont quatre questions.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Nous recevons de 2 500 à 3 000 plaintes par année au sujet de membres de la GRC. On nous demande alors normalement d'examiner environ 250 à 300 de ces plaintes nous-mêmes. Comme l'a décrit le ministre à la dernière séance, les plaintes sont généralement confiées initialement à la GRC pour enquête. Si la personne qui a déposé la plainte n'est pas satisfaite de la façon dont la GRC a réglé la plainte, elle va s'adresser à nous, et nous allons faire notre examen. En moyenne, nous examinons de 250 à 300 cas, et mon centre d'appels reçoit de 2 500 à 3 000 plaintes par année.

Quant à l'échéancier, cela dépend. Nous avons des normes de service, à la Commission. Selon ces normes, nous devons transmettre toute plainte reçue à la GRC dans les quatre jours ouvrables suivant sa réception, pour que la GRC mène son enquête. Une fois que la GRC a terminé sa partie de l'enquête ou qu'elle a transmis son rapport, si la personne qui a fait la plainte veut une révision, elle a 60 jours pour nous en faire la demande.

Une fois que nous avons reçu la demande de révision de la part de la personne qui a fait la plainte, selon nos normes de service, nous avons 120 jours à compter du moment où nous recevons toute la documentation pertinente de la GRC. Nous nous adressons à la GRC et nous lui demandons toute l'information relative à l'enquête qu'elle a menée, et nous pouvons lui demander toute autre information qui peut être liée à cette plainte particulière.

Le président:

Monsieur Sauvé, étant donné que vous n'êtes pas un habitué de nos réunions, je tiens à vous dire que si vous souhaitez répondre à une question, vous n'avez qu'à me le signaler et je vais m'assurer de vous donner la parole.

Continuez.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis désolée, mais j'ai perdu le fil de mes pensées.

Vous avez terminé en disant qu'il y avait un examen de 60 jours.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

La personne qui a demandé une révision doit indiquer qu'elle veut que la plainte soit révisée après 60 jours. À compter du moment où la GRC a transmis sa lettre de règlement, la personne a 60 jours pour nous dire qu'elle veut que le règlement soit révisé.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Combien de temps faut-il en général à la GRC pour mener son examen après que vous lui avez envoyé la plainte?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

En ce moment il n'y a pas de normes de service à cet égard. Il arrive que cela prenne deux mois, et cela peut aller jusqu'à deux ans, dépendant de l'origine de la plainte et de sa complexité.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je sais qu'il doit y avoir tout un éventail d'enjeux, mais pouvez-vous nous en donner trois ou quatre exemples?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Le plus souvent, il est question d'une mauvaise attitude. Il arrive que des plaintes portent sur une utilisation inappropriée des ressources, sur un appel de service resté sans réponse ou sur un recours à la force jugé abusif par le plaignant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que M. Graham a quelques questions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai seulement quelques brèves questions pour le sergent Sauvé, si vous me le permettez.

Vous avez parlé des problèmes que vous avez à syndiquer les membres de la GRC, si j'ai bien compris.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Je ne dirais pas... Ce que je veux dire, c'est que c'était difficile. Nous vivons dans un pays dont la population est diversifiée et très dispersée sur un vaste territoire, ce qui fait qu'il a été difficile, la première année, d'obtenir la participation de tous les membres. Le défi consiste maintenant à faire progresser le processus de la Commission des relations de travail de l'emploi dans le secteur public fédéral — la CRTESPF —, afin d'obtenir le traitement de la demande d'accréditation. Les membres ont manifesté leur appui. Ce qui nous retarde un peu, c'est le processus gouvernemental qui avance à la vitesse de la mélasse en janvier.

(1645)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au moins en janvier...

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, j'ai averti M. Paul-Hus au sujet du rapport avec le projet de loi C-98.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis sur le point d'en parler, oui.

Le président:

D'accord. J'espère que vous le ferez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais le faire. J'ai une autre question avant d'en arriver à cela, mais je vais établir le lien.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La raison pour laquelle je m'engage dans cette voie, c'est qu'il y a, comme vous le savez, trois services syndiqués relevant de la GRC sur la Colline du Parlement. Je me demande si vous avez parlé de ces difficultés à l'AESS et à l'AFPC. Ils en ont eu beaucoup. Je me demande aussi si le projet de loi C-98 va vous donner des outils additionnels à cette fin et si c'est la raison pour laquelle vous êtes venu aujourd'hui.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Non. La raison pour laquelle j'ai manifesté mon intérêt au greffier quand il m'a téléphoné ce matin — je comprends que les délais sont courts, au Comité —, c'est que toute occasion de faire entendre la voix des membres de la GRC concernant la modification de la Loi sur la GRC nous offre une occasion de parler en leur nom. Si nous ne le faisions pas, ce serait une occasion ratée.

En réponse à votre question concernant la consultation de ceux qui représentent les employés des SCP ou les membres qui travaillent sur la Colline du Parlement, le projet de loi C-7 empêche en quelque sorte toute organisation qui demande de représenter des membres de la GRC — c'est une zone grise du projet de loi C-7— de tenir des activités d'association en dehors du milieu de l'application de la loi. À la FPN, nous sommes très prudents quant à notre façon de nous associer et aux choix que nous faisons pour accrocher notre bannière. Pratiquement tout s'est fait à l'intérieur de l'Association canadienne des policiers — l'Ontario Provincial Police Association et la Fraternité des policiers et policières au Québec, par exemple. Nous n'avons pas vraiment créé de liens avec l'AFPC, le SCFP ou le SACC, par exemple.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que le comité dont nous parlons aujourd'hui vous donne plus d'outils pour le syndicat? Est-ce que cela ne change rien pour vous? Une fois l'accréditation obtenue, est-ce que le syndicat va utiliser ce comité pour traiter avec la GRC? Est-ce un outil qui vous servirait également?

Le président:

Très brièvement, je vous prie.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Je ne suis pas sûr de bien comprendre la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans vos négociations avec la GRC, est-ce que la création du comité comme nous l'envisageons en ce moment améliorera votre capacité de négocier? Est-ce qu'il vous donnera des outils supplémentaires? Est-ce que cela ne change rien pour vous? Est-ce strictement pour le public?

M. Brian Sauvé:

Avec l'actuelle CCETP — je vais l'appeler selon son appellation actuelle —, je ne vois pas comment le projet de loi C-98 aura un effet sur les membres de la GRC ou changera la façon de traiter les plaintes du public ou d'enquêter sur ces plaintes.

Comme la présidente de la CCETP, Mme Lahaie, l'a dit concernant le temps qu'il faut pour les enquêtes sur les plaintes du public, le goulot d'étranglement que nous constatons et dont nous entendons parler est lié à la capacité de la GRC d'enquêter rapidement. Cela allonge...

Le président:

Je suis désolé, monsieur Sauvé, mais allons devoir nous arrêter là. Nous avons dépassé le temps imparti.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Fort bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci.

Vous avez dit, madame, qu'il y a entre 2 500 et 3 000 plaintes sur lesquelles la GRC fait enquête chaque année au sujet de ses membres. La Commission en examine entre 250 et 300. Étant donné ce que l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, l'ASFC, fait actuellement — parce qu'elle a déjà des plaintes à traiter à l'interne —, a-t-on pensé au nombre de plaintes qui viendront s'ajouter à la charge de travail de la Commission?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Nous avons consulté l'ASFC en long et en large à ce sujet. D'après ce que j'ai compris, ils reçoivent environ 3 000 plaintes par année. Nous nous attendons à ce que les chiffres soient très semblables à cela. Bien entendu, des efforts devront être déployés pour informer le public du lancement de la Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes. Lorsque cela se produira, il se peut que le nombre de plaintes augmente. Pour le moment, nous nous attendons à ce qu'il y en ait environ 3 000 par année.

M. Glen Motz:

D'après ce que j'ai compris du projet de loi C-98, vous allez recueillir six membres de la Commission.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Aux termes de l'ancienne Loi sur la GRC, nous avions cinq membres à la Commission, alors il y en aura encore cinq.

(1650)

M. Glen Motz:

Vous avez cinq membres de la GRC. Aurez-vous cinq nouveaux membres pour l'ASFC?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Non, monsieur. Nous n'aurons que cinq membres. La Commission devra...

M. Glen Motz:

Cinq membres à plein...

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

... cinq membres. C'est ce que nous aurons, oui.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Comment faites-vous alors... L'un des problèmes actuels des membres de la GRC, et c'est quelque chose qui préoccupera probablement l'ASFC, c'est de régler ces questions en temps opportun. Oui, nous devons répondre aux plaintes du public, mais nous devons aussi comprendre ce que certaines de ces plaintes font à nos membres. Les plaintes frivoles et vexatoires doivent être traitées et réglées promptement, même si elles sont fondées.

Comment comptez-vous raccourcir le temps de traitement? Vous avez parlé de quelques mois pour les cas les plus légers à plusieurs années pour les cas les plus lourds.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

L'un des aspects positifs de ce projet de loi, c'est qu'il permettra la mise en place de normes de service. En matière de réponse, il y aura des normes de service, et pour la GRC, et pour l'ASFC, ce qui aidera grandement la Commission. Présentement, la GRC n'a pas de délai précis à l'intérieur duquel elle est tenue de répondre à une demande. Des normes de service seront négociées avec la GRC et l'ASFC lorsque la nouvelle loi entrera en vigueur.

M. Glen Motz:

Cette norme de service s'appliquera-t-elle si un membre du public ne se plaint pas à vous? Voilà où je veux en venir. Vous avez une norme de service qui sera intégrée. Si un membre du public vous demande d'intervenir ou d'examiner un dossier qui a déjà fait l'objet d'une enquête — soit par l'ASFC dans ce cas-ci, dans le projet de loi C-98, soit par la GRC, parce qu'ils seront semblables —, la GRC et l'ASFC auront toutes deux une norme de service à respecter.

Que se passera-t-il d'ici là? Ont-ils présentement des normes de service? Si un membre du public se plaint maintenant à l'ASFC ou à la GRC, existe-t-il une norme de service l'obligeant à répondre en temps opportun?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je ne peux pas vous dire ce que fait l'ASFC en ce moment, parce que nous sommes en train d'examiner ce que nous ferons dans l'avenir. En ce qui concerne la GRC, elle a un document de politique en place, mais elle n'est pas tenue d'énoncer cette norme de service à l'externe. À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a pas vraiment de norme de service externe à cet effet.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur Sauvé, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. Brian Sauvé:

Comme je l'ai mentionné au début, je pense que les normes de service sont une idée formidable. L'une des choses que j'aimerais dire, c'est que la mise en oeuvre de normes de service en ce qui concerne les enquêtes sera un énorme gain pour les membres. Comme vous l'avez dit, le problème en ce moment, c'est le fait d'avoir quelque chose qui vous pend au-dessus de la tête pendant un an, deux ans ou trois ans sans savoir comment cela va se résoudre.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien. Je vous remercie.

Je vous ai vu assis à la tribune lorsque j'ai posé cette question au ministre. La Commission compte cinq membres. Disposez-vous de ressources vous permettant de mener une nouvelle enquête si la preuve d'une plainte est jugée insuffisante? Cela existe-t-il tant du côté de la GRC de votre commission que du côté ASFC de votre commission? Quel est l'organisme d'enquête que vous engagez ou auquel vous vous adressez pour cela?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

La réponse à votre question est oui. Nous avons la capacité d'enquêter. J'ai actuellement une équipe de sept enquêteurs qui travaillent pour moi. Je présume qu'avec la bonification du financement et le nouveau mandat, nous allons augmenter le nombre d'enquêteurs que nous avons. Dans certains cas, si nous avons besoin d'une expertise très pointue, nous avons recours à la sous-traitance. Par exemple...

M. Glen Motz:

À qui vous adressez-vous? Est-ce à d'autres services de police?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je vous demande pardon?

M. Glen Motz:

S'agit-il d'autres services de police?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Non. Ce ne sont pas d'autres services de police. Nous faisons affaire avec des civils. Nous examinons ce genre de services.

M. Glen Motz:

D'où viennent les enquêteurs que vous avez maintenant?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

C'est un mélange. J'en ai qui proviennent d'autres services de police. J'en ai qui proviennent des services familiaux et sociaux. C'est donc vraiment...

M. Glen Motz:

Sont-ils en détachement? S'agit-il de postes de détachement?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Non. Ce sont des fonctionnaires qui travaillent directement pour moi.

M. Glen Motz:

Ils ont déjà travaillé dans ces organismes.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Exactement.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien.

Il a fallu beaucoup de temps pour en arriver là. Vous nous avez entendus en parler avec le ministre. Dans votre façon de percevoir le projet de loi, y a-t-il quelque chose... Je veux dire, en tant que commission, vous êtes responsable. Vous allez être chargé de veiller à ce que l'ASFC soit désormais assujettie, elle aussi, aux exigences de la Commission pour l'examen des plaintes civiles.

Pour faire en sorte de répondre au public en temps opportun ou d'être efficace dans ce domaine — d'une manière ou d'une autre — et de répondre aussi aux besoins des membres de la GRC et de l'ASFC qui pourraient faire l'objet d'une plainte, y a-t-il quelque chose que nous devrions envisager dans ce projet de loi et qui n'existe pas dans la loi?

(1655)

Le président:

Répondez très brièvement, je vous prie.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Le projet de loi tel que vous l'avez devant vous est très semblable à ce que l'on retrouve actuellement dans la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada. Il y a peut-être quelques petits irritants d'ordre administratif, mais d'après ce que nous savons à l'heure actuelle et en ce qui concerne la Commission, il n'y a rien de majeur.

M. Glen Motz:

Pour ce qui est des irritants d'ordre administratif, si vous pouviez nous en fournir une description...

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Bien sûr.

M. Glen Motz:

Le hic, c'est que nous devrons nous occuper de cela aujourd'hui ou mercredi.

Le président:

Sur ce, nous allons devoir suspendre la séance et aller voter.

J'espère que nos témoins pourront rester pendant que nous exercerons notre droit démocratique.

(1655)

(1720)

Le président:

Nous sommes de retour et nous avons le quorum.

Je crois que c'est au tour de M. Dubé, qui dispose de sept minutes.

Sous réserve de ce que mes collègues pourraient dire, je propose de poursuivre les questions pendant 20 minutes encore. Cela vous semble-t-il raisonnable? Nous passerons ensuite à l'étude article par article.

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: D'accord.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Sauvé, j'espère que vous me pardonnerez, mais j'ai peu de questions auxquelles je crois que vous serez en mesure de répondre.

Je veux tout d'abord profiter de l'occasion pour vous féliciter de tout ce que vous faites. Je sais que les choses n'ont pas été faciles au cours des dernières années, mais je pense que c'est un pas dans la bonne direction. C'était quelque chose qu'il fallait faire depuis longtemps. Ceux qui ont suivi le débat savent qu'il s'agit d'établir une représentation équitable pour les hommes et les femmes qui portent l'uniforme à la GRC. Ne lâchez pas.

Mes questions concernent certains aspects du fonctionnement actuel de la Commission et la façon dont le projet de loi peut changer ou toucher cela.

On dit ceci au paragraphe 18(2) proposé, à la page 8 du projet de loi: (2) Pour effectuer un examen de sa propre initiative, la Commission doit : a) être convaincue qu'elle dispose des ressources nécessaires [...] b) avoir pris les mesures nécessaires pour vérifier qu’aucun autre examen ou aucune autre enquête n’a été entrepris [...]

Je vais revenir sur les mesures nécessaires décrites à l'alinéa b). Commençons par l'alinéa a), qui traite des ressources.

Prenons le cas d'un incident qui serait rapporté par les médias, à la suite de quoi une plainte deviendrait d'intérêt public. Si votre budget n'est pas adéquat, vous devrez accorder la priorité au traitement des plaintes, même si la situation est hautement médiatisée. À moins que le président ou le ministre ne demande une enquête, vous serez restreint par vos capacités budgétaires. En gros, c'est ce que cela veut dire.

Ai-je bien compris?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Effectivement, monsieur Dubé, vous avez bien compris. Nous sommes certainement restreints par nos ressources budgétaires et humaines.

Je dois aussi souligner que cette partie concerne ce qu'on appelle des révisions, mais qu'il s'agit en fait de révisions portant sur des activités précises. On parle ici de cas où il y aurait un problème systémique, sur lequel nous déciderions de faire une enquête. Il s'agit de cela plutôt que des plaintes normales que nous recevons du grand public.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est parfait.

Pour ce qui est de l'alinéa b), non seulement dans le contexte du paragraphe 18(2) proposé, mais dans l'ensemble, M. Graham a parlé plus tôt du risque de marcher sur les pieds de l'autre organisme. C'est intéressant. Dans le contexte de notre étude du projet de loi C-59, nous avons reçu des représentants de votre commission. Pardonnez-moi, je ne me souviens plus si c'était vous ou d'autres représentants, mais on nous a dit qu'il n'y avait pas de problème du côté de la GRC, étant donné qu'il ne s'agissait pas de fonctions liées à la sécurité nationale. Par contre, lors des témoignages et du débat sur le projet de loi C-59, certains ont soulevé que, dans le cas de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, il s'agit toujours de sécurité nationale, étant donné qu'on parle de l'intégrité des frontières.

Êtes-vous préoccupés du fait que, dans le contexte de l'Agence, il sera peut-être plus difficile de déterminer ce qui relève des différents mécanismes de surveillance pour les questions de sécurité nationale? Dans le cas du comité créé par le projet de loi C-59 ou du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, par exemple, il y a une distinction plus claire et plus évidente en ce qui concerne la GRC.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je crois qu'il pourrait parfois être difficile de faire la distinction. Cependant, je peux vous dire qu'en ce moment, nous entretenons de très bonnes relations avec le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité et avec ce qui deviendra l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Nous parlons souvent à ces personnes. Je crois donc que nous serions en mesure de déterminer lequel des organismes devrait traiter la plainte.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Pourvu que les bonnes relations se maintiennent, cela ne devrait pas causer d'ennuis pour le travail.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

En effet.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est excellent.

Ma prochaine question concerne les douaniers américains. Je crois qu'elle est importante, parce que le commun des mortels, si vous me permettez l'expression, ne sait pas toujours clairement qui est responsable. Depuis l'adoption du projet de loi C-23, on a davantage recours au prédédouanement, notamment lors des traversées terrestres et dans les aéroports.

Prévoyez-vous qu'il y aura des plaintes concernant des agissements d'agents américains à l'égard de citoyens canadiens? Avez-vous établi un mécanisme pour composer avec cela? Allez-vous transmettre les plaintes à un autre organisme? Allez-vous sensibiliser le public? Votre approche comprendra-t-elle plusieurs composantes?

(1725)

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Cela comprendra plusieurs composantes. Il n'y a aucun doute que nous allons recevoir des plaintes visant des agents américains.

En ce moment, nous recevons parfois des plaintes concernant d'autres policiers que ceux de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada. En ce qui concerne la GRC, nous avons une politique d'ouverture à toutes les plaintes. Selon cette politique, si nous recevons une plainte visant un policier de Toronto, par exemple, nous pouvons l'envoyer à l'agence provinciale pour qu'elle la traite. Nous transmettons l'information.

C'est sûr que nous allons commencer à nouer des liens avec les Américains pour pouvoir leur transmettre de telles plaintes.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Pardonnez-moi de me dépêcher, mais mon temps file.

Lors du prédédouanement, les Américains interviennent en sol canadien. Avez-vous un rôle à jouer si un incident qui fait l'objet d'une plainte a lieu en sol canadien, par exemple dans un aéroport canadien?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je ne le crois pas, mais c'est une question qui devrait être abordée.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est parfait.

J'ai une dernière question.

À la page 25, au paragraphe 51(1) proposé, il est question de la réponse du président de l'Agence. Ce mécanisme ressemble-t-il à celui qui existe déjà à la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC, selon lequel on fournit une réponse écrite et, si des mesures additionnelles ne sont pas prises, on en fournit également les raisons par écrit? Pardonnez-moi si je ne connais pas par cœur la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada; peut-être le devrais-je. Est-ce le même mécanisme que celui qui existe actuellement dans cette loi?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Oui, c'est le même mécanisme que celui que nous utilisons en ce moment.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord, merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Je crois comprendre qu'il n'y a pas de questions de la part du gouvernement. Y en a-t-il du côté de l'opposition?

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais vous remercier d'être venue aujourd'hui et d'avoir présenté cet exposé. Je suis très heureux de pouvoir appuyer le projet de loi C-98, mais il y a une ou deux questions que je traîne depuis un certain nombre d'années concernant une dynamique semblable que vous avez connue avec la GRC.

En ce qui concerne les pouvoirs prévus à l'article 44 proposé sous le titre « Pouvoirs de la Commission relativement aux plaintes », vous parliez des normes de service de la GRC et de certaines lignes directrices. Vous pouvez obliger une personne à se présenter devant vous et à lui faire prêter serment, etc. Or, si un membre de la sécurité frontalière était impliqué dans une affaire criminelle — par exemple pour une agression présumée ou quelque chose du genre ou pour l'usage d'une force excessive —, feriez-vous cela avant le procès criminel ou choisiriez-vous d'attendre après le procès criminel pour qu'il puisse se défendre des actions qu'on lui reproche? Les preuves que cette personne aurait fournies sous serment à votre organisation pourraient-elles être utilisées contre elle dans un procès criminel?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je vais d'abord répondre à la deuxième partie de votre question. Aucun renseignement qui nous est fourni sous serment par une personne que nous avons obligée à venir nous parler ne peut être utilisé contre elle. Rien de ce qu'elle admet personnellement ne peut être utilisé dans le moindre de nos rapports. Bref, cette information ne peut être utilisée contre elle.

La première partie de votre question porte sur une situation assez commune pour nous, une situation dans laquelle les tribunaux sont saisis d'une chose au sujet de laquelle nous avons reçu une plainte du public. En général, nous avons tendance à mettre ces plaintes du public en suspens en attendant de voir ce que les tribunaux vont dire, car il arrive souvent que les tribunaux donnent une certaine orientation ou qu'une décision fournisse un éclairage particulier.

M. Jim Eglinski:

C'est la question que je me posais. Il y a une sorte de suspens parce qu'il y a conflit.

Il y a un deuxième volet à ma question, et j'aimerais que vous répondiez assez rapidement si vous le pouvez, car j'en ai une autre à vous poser.

J'étais là lorsque vous avez commencé à travailler à la Commission des plaintes du public contre la GRC. Il y a eu un peu de ressentiment de la part des membres de la GRC — la confiance n'était pas au rendez-vous — et je pense qu'il y a eu un peu de ressentiment dans l'autre sens aussi; nous ne nous faisions pas mutuellement confiance en quelque sorte. Mais assez rapidement, une confiance s'est installée du fait que nous avons dû collaborer très étroitement. J'aurais tendance à croire que vous allez vous retrouver dans une situation semblable en entrant dans cette nouvelle ère. Allez-vous mettre sur pied un programme de sensibilisation à l'intention des membres de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada pour qu'ils comprennent vraiment ce que vous faites? Il y aura un peu de suspicion de leur part, alors je me demande si vous avez un plan pour leur donner l'heure juste.

(1730)

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

À l'heure actuelle, nous travaillons à l'élaboration d'un plan pour les mettre au courant. Cela fait partie de nos intentions: nous voulons les éduquer et éduquer le public canadien au sujet du processus.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Le monsieur qui est à l'écran... Je suis désolé, j'ai oublié votre nom, sergent.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Je m'appelle Brian Sauvé.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Monsieur Sauvé, vous parlez des normes de service au sein de la GRC et de l'achèvement des enquêtes. Croyez-vous que les normes de service devraient aller dans les deux sens?

Je reviens à l'époque où j'étais responsable du détachement de Fort St. John, il y a 15 ans de cela. Je me souviens qu'il y avait eu un incident au sujet d'un membre qui était en poste là-bas pendant quatre ans, mais que je n'avais jamais rencontré. Son cas était en attente d'une enquête. Je n'ai jamais su de quoi il s'agissait. On ne me l'a jamais dit. Je sais qu'il vivait dans ma région, mais il ne venait jamais travailler. J'aimerais savoir si vous croyez qu'il devrait y avoir une norme de service dans les deux sens.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre ce que vous entendez par « norme de service dans les deux sens ». Qu'il s'agisse d'une plainte du public, d'une enquête interne ou d'une enquête criminelle, les personnes faisant l'objet d'une enquête ont droit à une enquête équitable sur le plan procédural et rapide, point final. C'est comme cela que je vois les choses.

Les lois de la justice naturelle devraient s'appliquer. Qu'il s'agisse de l'ASFC ou de la GRC, le membre faisant l'objet de l'enquête a droit à ce que ladite enquête soit menée rondement. Il a également le droit de garder le silence. Cela fait partie du droit commun: le droit au silence. Donc, si cela gêne les enquêteurs, trouvez une autre avenue.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Je crois que je mon temps de parole est épuisé.

Le président:

Oui, il l'est.

Monsieur Manly, y a-t-il des questions que vous aimeriez poser?

M. Paul Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, PV):

Non, je n'en ai pas.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres questions de ce côté-ci? Non.

Sur ce, je remercie nos témoins.

Je vous remercie d'avoir été patients pendant que nous allions voter.

Nous allons maintenant suspendre la séance avant de revenir pour l'étude article par article.

(1730)

(1735)

Le président:

Je vois que nos témoins sont à la table et que les membres du Comité sont ici.

Passons maintenant à l'étude article par article.

(Les articles 1 et 2 sont adoptés.)

(Article 3)

Le président: Nous avons l'amendement PV-1.

Monsieur Manly, nous vous écoutons.

M. Paul Manly:

Cette modification préciserait que ni les agents actuels, ni les anciens agents, ni les employés de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ne peuvent siéger à la Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. Cette modification ne figure pas dans le projet de loi C-98, mais dans la Loi sur la GRC. L'alinéa sur l'inadmissibilité prévue au paragraphe 45.29(2) de cette loi exclurait les « membres » actuels ou anciens de la Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public et, en vertu de cette loi, le terme « membre » a une définition bien précise: il désigne un employé de la GRC. Vraisemblablement, les agents actuels et anciens de l'ASFC devraient également être exclus de cette commission. Cet amendement permettrait de l'établir de façon explicite.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous avez la parole.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai quelques questions. L'une d'elles s'adresse aux fonctionnaires qui sont ici au sujet de cet amendement, et l'autre s'adresse à M. Picard.

Le président:

Il ne pourra pas servir.

M. Glen Motz:

Non, mais sérieusement... Je comprends ce que dit la Loi sur la GRC, mais j'ai toujours voulu savoir s'il y a une certaine distance entre le service et une commission comme celle-ci. Même en tant que fonctionnaire, pour travailler de ce côté-ci comme enquêteur, comment cela pourrait-il empêcher quelqu'un d'être impartial, quelqu'un qui aurait une certaine compréhension de la dynamique lui permettant de bien servir le public au sein de cette commission... Je n'arrive pas à comprendre pourquoi nous voudrions même envisager une telle chose.

Les fonctionnaires pourraient-ils m'aider à comprendre s'il s'agit d'une mesure conforme à la loi ou à l'intention du projet de loi C-98?

M. Evan Travers:

Le projet de loi n'a pas pour objet d'imposer une restriction quant aux personnes qui peuvent devenir membres de la Commission, une restriction liée au fait qu'elles ont déjà été employées par l'ASFC. L'amendement proposé par M. Manly imposerait aux anciens membres de l'ASFC la même restriction qui s'applique aux anciens membres de la GRC. Cela ne fait pas partie du projet de loi que nous avons présenté.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur Picard, vous avez commencé votre service de cette façon, mais vous avez pris un certain recul depuis. Pensez-vous que la nomination de personnes qui ont déjà travaillé à l'ASFC dans le passé serait perturbante ou que cela inciterait le public à se soucier de l'équité ou de l'objectivité de la Commission?

M. Michel Picard:

Dans tous les cas, l'expérience ne devrait pas, selon moi, restreindre la capacité d'agir d'une personne. Je voterais contre cet amendement.

Le président:

Monsieur Dubé, la parole est à vous.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je me demande simplement si M. Travers peut expliquer l'incohérence liée au fait que les anciens membres de la GRC ne sont pas autorisés à travailler pour la Commission, alors que la mesure législative autorise les anciens membres de l'ASFC à le faire.

M. Evan Travers:

Nous avons travaillé principalement à régler les questions liées à l'ASFC. En ce qui concerne ces questions, la décision a été prise de ne pas assujettir les anciens employés de l'ASFC à la même exigence. Les effectifs de ces deux organisations sont différents. En été, l'ASFC a tendance à employer des étudiants ou des personnes de ce genre, qui peuvent n'avoir travaillé à l'Agence que pendant quelques mois. Nous n'avons pas intégré cette restriction au projet de loi afin d'accorder au gouverneur en conseil, c'est-à-dire à l'organe qui nommera les membres de la Commission, le pouvoir discrétionnaire de choisir les meilleurs candidats.

(1740)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Monsieur le président, si je peux me permettre d'intervenir, je dirais que cette incohérence semble plutôt flagrante. Cette organisation gérera maintenant les plaintes liées à deux différentes entités responsables de la sécurité publique. D'une part, certaines personnes seront autorisées à y travailler — je comprends l'argument que vous faites valoir à propos des types d'expérience, mais il s'agit là d'un exemple très particulier et, essentiellement, cela signifie que des gens ayant travaillé à titre d'agents des services frontaliers pendant 30 ans qui, avec tout le respect que je dois à l'excellent travail qu'ils accomplissent, seront un peu en conflit d'intérêts...

Je présume que c'est la raison pour laquelle la Loi sur la GRC a été rédigée de cette façon, c'est-à-dire afin d'éviter le vieux dicton de la police qui enquête sur la police. Je sais qu'on qualifie maintenant la Commission de « publique », mais je me demande si son caractère civil ne sera pas légèrement dilué par cette incohérence plutôt importante qui existera maintenant au sein de ce qui est censé être une seule organisation. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer le raisonnement qui a motivé cette décision?

M. Evan Travers:

Je ne veux pas parler du but de la Loi sur la GRC ou des dispositions qui la composent. Je n'ai pas participé à leur élaboration ou à leur rédaction.

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi dont vous êtes saisis, nous avons conseillé le Cabinet par l'entremise de notre ministre, et c'est le projet de loi que le gouvernement a présenté. Si cette décision suscite des préoccupations ou des questions, le ministre serait peut-être mieux placé pour parler de l'intention qui sous-tend cette distinction.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une très brève question à poser.

Je ne vais pas appuyer cet amendement, mais je tenais simplement à poser une question à propos de l'interdiction frappant les membres de la GRC. À qui s'applique-t-elle en ce moment? Est-ce aux membres de la GRC aux termes de la loi, ou à n'importe quel employé de la GRC?

M. Evan Travers:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Talbot à ce sujet.

M. Jacques Talbot (conseiller juridique, Services juridiques, Ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile, ministère de la Justice):

Dans le cas présent, les personnes assujetties à la disposition en vigueur sont les membres de la GRC, c'est-à-dire les membres de la force policière.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les agents en uniforme?

M. Jacques Talbot:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, l'amendement qui nous occupe s'appliquerait à tous les employés de l'ASFC, y compris, comme vous l'avez dit, les étudiants employés pendant les mois d'été.

Cela répond à ma question, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Dubé, la parole est à vous.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'appuierai l'amendement de M. Manly parce que, selon moi, il distingue une incohérence plutôt importante.

Il y a deux enjeux importants qui me passent par la tête. Le premier, dont nous avons entendu parler, je crois, au cours des témoignages antérieurs et, en particulier, dans le cadre des questions posées par M. Eglinski, c'est l'importance de gagner la confiance du public. J'ai simplement le sentiment que l'iniquité, que cela créerait au sein de cette commission nouvellement renommée, nuirait à l'établissement de ce climat de confiance.

Deuxièmement, je le répète, nous utilisons l'exemple particulier d'un étudiant au service de l'Agence pendant trois mois de la période estivale quand, en fait, l'échappatoire permet la nomination de personnes dont le point de vue serait beaucoup plus ambivalent. Malheureusement, je ne sais pas comment formuler un amendement pour modifier l'amendement en vue de faire ressortir cette exception, mais je tiens à mentionner de nouveau, pour le compte rendu, qu'à mon avis, cette incohérence est plutôt flagrante. J'appuierai donc l'amendement de M. Manly.

Le président:

Monsieur Eglinski, la parole est à vous.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Premièrement, je ne pourrais pas appuyer cet amendement.

Toutefois, monsieur Talbot, j'aimerais que vous clarifiiez ce que vous avez dit il y a un moment.

Lorsque vous avez fait allusion aux agents de la GRC, parliez-vous du passé du présent?

M. Jacques Talbot:

Je fais allusion au régime actuel.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Pardon? [Français]

M. Jacques Talbot:

Je parle du régime actuel. [Traduction]

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je n'ai toujours pas compris ce que vous avez dit.

M. Jacques Talbot:

Oh, je fais également allusion aux anciens membres, aux personnes qui étaient assujetties à l'ancien régime. Comme vous le savez, il y a quelques années, nous avons mis en oeuvre une nouvelle mesure législative qui a changé le statut des employés de la GRC, en particulier pour...

(1745)

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord. Ce n'était pas tout à fait clair. Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres questions au sujet de l'amendement?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 3 est adopté.)

(Les articles 4 à 14 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(L'article 15)

Le président: Nous sommes saisis de l'amendement PV-2, qui est réputé avoir été proposé. Malgré cela, personne n'est ici pour en parler, à moins que quelqu'un souhaite prendre la relève. Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il parler de l'amendement PV-2, en vue de l'appuyer ou de s'y opposer?

M. Glen Motz:

J'ai une question à poser aux hauts fonctionnaires. Je suis curieux de savoir si cet amendement fonctionnerait ou s'il est même nécessaire, étant donné que nous avons entendu dire au cours de la première heure de la séance que la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes ne s'occupe pas des questions d'expulsion. L'amendement PV-2 est-il même nécessaire dans le contexte de la mesure législative?

M. Evan Travers:

Si j'ai bien compris, l'amendement PV-2 concerne la consultation et la collaboration.

M. Glen Motz:

Cela pourrait vouloir dire que, si je suis expulsé dans un autre pays, j'utiliserai les services d'un organisme quelconque de l'autre pays pour contester mon exclusion.

M. Evan Travers:

Si je comprends bien votre question, je dirais que le projet de loi n'est pas censé entraver le processus d'expulsion ou d'extradition. Des plaintes peuvent être déposées ou continuer d'être déposées de l'extérieur du Canada. Toute personne qui a l'impression qu'elle devrait présenter une plainte peut le faire, qu'elle soit au Canada ou non.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous sommes saisis de l'amendement PV-3. Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il poser des questions aux hauts fonctionnaires ou parler de l'amendement PV-3?

M. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

Si le parrain de l'amendement n'est pas là, sautez simplement l'amendement.

Le président:

Non, je ne peux pas sauter l'amendement. Le Comité a été adéquatement saisi de l'amendement. Par conséquent, nous devons nous en occuper.

M. T.J. Harvey:

Ce n'est pas le cas si le parrain n'est pas là pour proposer la motion.

Le président:

L'amendement est réputé avoir été proposé.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 15 est adopté.)

(Les articles 16 à 35 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: Le titre est-il adopté?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Le projet de loi est-il adopté?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Le Comité ordonne-t-il à la présidence de faire rapport à la Chambre du projet de loi?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Cela dit, j'aimerais remercier les hauts fonctionnaires.

Merci, chers membres du Comité.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 17, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.