header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-06-10 SECU 167

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Colleagues, it's 3:30, and I see quorum and Mr. Amos is in his place.

Welcome to the committee, Mr. Amos.

This is a study of rural digital infrastructure under motion 208 and under the name of Mr. Amos, the honourable member for Pontiac.

If you would proceed with your presentation, Mr. Amos, you have 10 minutes.

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to the members.[Translation]

Thank you for this opportunity to discuss what represents [technical difficulties] for my fellow Pontiac residents, but also for Canadians across the country. Whether in rural or urban areas, this is a very important issue.[English]

I believe the importance of this issue is clearly demonstrated by the unanimous vote. I thank each of you individually—and also your colleagues—for that support, because I think it was a unifying vote around motion 208.

When urban Canada recognizes the challenges that rural Canada faces with regard to what we now consider to be basic telecommunication services—good cellphone access, high-speed Internet—I think these are the things that bring Canada together when there's an appreciation of our challenges.

I think there's an appreciation at this point in time that rural Canada needs to make up for lost time with the digital divide. For too many years, private sector telecommunications companies did not invest sufficiently in that necessary digital infrastructure. Governments at that time, in the past, weren't up to the challenge of recognizing that the market needed to be corrected.

I feel fortunate, in a way, to have been able to bring this motion forward, because I feel that all I was doing was stating the obvious: that a Canadian in northern Alberta or the B.C. interior who is challenged with serious forest fires, just like a Canadian in New Brunswick, Quebec or Ontario who is dealing with floods, deserves access to the digital infrastructure that most Canadians take for granted, so as to ensure their public safety.

As your committee is well aware, the motion was divided into two follow-up components, one with respect to the economic and regulatory aspects of digital infrastructure. That process in the industry committee has been moving forward well. A number of witnesses have been brought forth. The process is proceeding apace. I'm looking forward to their conclusions. I've had an opportunity to participate, and I thank that committee for enabling that participation.

I'm particularly appreciative, Chair, that this committee has seen fit to move forward, even if only with a brief set of interactions on this subject matter, because Canadians across this country recognize that it is time to get to solutions on the public safety dimensions of digital infrastructure.

I'm constantly attempting to channel the voices of my small-town mayors, mayors such as David Rochon, the mayor of Waltham, Quebec. Waltham is about an hour and 45 minutes away from Parliament Hill. It's a straight shot down Highway 148 once you cross the Chaudière Bridge or the Portage Bridge. You get over to Gatineau and just drive straight west down Highway 148, and you can't miss it. It's just across the way from Pembroke.

In that community, they have no cellphone service. The 300-and-some souls who live there, when they're faced with flooding for the second time in three years, get extremely frustrated, and they have every right to be frustrated. I'm frustrated for them, and I'm channelling their voices as I sit before you. This is no more than me speaking on behalf of a range of small-town mayors.

I know the voices of those mayors are magnified by those of so many others across this country. That's why the Federation of Canadian Municipalities supported motion 208, because they hear those mayors' voices as well. That's why the rural caucus of the Quebec Union of Municipalities supported this motion, because they hear those same voices.[Translation]

It is our responsibility to address this issue directly. I am very pleased to see that since motion M-208 was introduced in the House of Commons, digital infrastructure has been a major success, thanks to Budget 2019. The investments are historic, very concrete and very targeted.

The goal is to have high-speed Internet access across Canada by 2030. The target is 95% by 2025. Our government is the first to set these kinds of targets and invest these amounts. In the past, we were talking about a few hundred million dollars, but now we are talking about billions of dollars. The issue is recognized. For a government, this recognition comes first and foremost through its budget. Our government has recognized this. I really appreciate the actions of our Liberal government.

With respect to wireless and cellular communications in the context of public safety, there is agreement that, in any emergency situation, a cellular phone is required. It is very useful for managing personal emergencies, but it is also very useful for public servants, mayors, councillors who are in the field and want to help their fellow citizens. These people need access to a reliable cellular network to be able to connect with and help their fellow citizens.

(1540)

[English]

I see that I'm being given the two-minute warning. I will conclude in advance of that simply by saying that I think it's important for us not to descend into rhetoric on this topic. Canadians deserve better than that. I read today's opposition day motion. With no disrespect intended, it didn't spend any time recognizing what our government has done but spent so much time focusing on the problems without getting to the solutions. In the Pontiac, people want solutions. They want to know how they're going to get their cellphone service, and soon. They want their high-speed Internet hookup yesterday, not two years from now. I know that every rural member of Parliament—Conservative, NDP, Liberal and otherwise—is working very hard in their own way to make sure that happens. I am as well. Right now I appreciate this opportunity to focus our attention very specifically on the public safety dimensions.

I also want to say a thank you to our local and national media, who have taken on this issue and are recognizing that in an era of climate change and extreme weather, we're going to need our cellphones more and more; we're going to need this digital infrastructure more and more, to ensure Canadians' safety and security.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Amos.

Mr. Graham, for seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Amos, when you brought forward M-208, it had two aspects to it. One was for the industry committee to study these services, and two, for SECU to study the public safety aspect of it. Would you like to expand a bit on how you saw the split committee approach to this.

Mr. William Amos:

My feeling was that there are most certainly economic dimensions to this issue. There are questions around competition. There are questions around the nature of a return on investment that can and cannot be made in rural Canada. These are real considerations that I think merit serious consideration. The independent regulator, the CRTC, has distinct responsibilities as established under the Telecommunications Act. Those obligations provide it, in many aspects, with a fair amount of latitude to achieve the public interest objectives of the Telecommunications Act.

I felt that those issues, both regulatory and economic, which ultimately help to frame how we will get to digital infrastructure access for rural Canada, are not the same issues necessarily, or they're not entirely the same, as the public safety issues. I felt that if the study were to be done by one committee on its own, public safety in particular might end up getting short shrift. I felt that would be inappropriate. I felt that one of the most important arguments in favour of making the massive investments that are necessary, and that our government is stepping forward to make, would be on the basis of public safety considerations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

In terms of public safety considerations, both your riding and mine have experienced significant problems with dispatching emergency services at a time of emergency. You've described it at great length in the past. When tornadoes hit your riding, when floods hit your riding and my riding, emergency services have to come to city hall, coordinate, and go back out in the field. Can you speak to that? Is that the basis of the focus?

(1545)

Mr. William Amos:

I think for the average Canadian who's thinking about how their family in a certain small town is dealing with an emergency related to extreme weather, it's plain to see that when a local official needs to spend an extra 20 to 40 minutes driving from a particular location on the ground—during a fire or a flood or a tornado or otherwise—back to town hall in order to make the necessary phone calls, it's inefficient. It brings about unnecessary delays in providing proper emergency response.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the same vein, a lot of citizens have trouble reaching 911 because there's no service available to do so. Phone lines are no longer up. If you're in a field or in the country—our ridings have recreational areas that are tens of thousands of kilometres—there is no means for people to reach emergency services. Would you find that to be true?

Mr. William Amos:

In fact, there are areas in the riding of Pontiac where a fixed wireline service is not available, or circumstances where the fixed wireline service, due to a falling tree or otherwise, has been cut off. Yes, it does create a public safety issue, because many, many seniors in my riding don't have a cellphone. Even if they wanted one, they wouldn't have access to the cellphone service.

Absolutely there are issues, and I think it's important to address these in their totality, but to my mind, the conversation is headed mostly to the access to cellular. That's how people will most often solve the predicament they may find themselves in. I can't tell you the number of times I've had constituents come to me to say, “My car broke down. I was between location X and location Y. There was no cellphone service. I thought I was going to die.” That is a run-of-the-mill conversation in the Pontiac. In this day and age, I think we have a mature enough and wealthy enough society to address these issues if we focus on them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To your point, though, there's been a lot of confusion in the public about what motion 208 is about, because it talks about “wireless” without being too specific. In your view, this is about cellphone service, and not about broadband Internet to the same extent. This is about making sure that we can reach emergency services, that emergency services can reach each other, and that the cellphone signal we need on our back roads is available to us.

Mr. William Amos:

That's correct. My greatest concern was the cellphone aspect. In M-208, where I refer to wireless, the intention is to mean cellphone, meaning mobile wireless.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When I was younger, we had cellphone service in the Laurentians through analog. When we switched to digital, we lost a lot of that service. Did you have the same experience?

Mr. William Amos:

That's going back a ways.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We had a cellphone in the car in 1985, and it was worth as much as the car, but it worked, which is not the case today. In most of my area, there is no signal, and it's becoming a very serious problem for us. I'm very happy to encourage this, and I'm glad you brought it forward. I'm running out of time here.

Where have the market forces been? We're always hearing from some people that market forces can fix everything. Why have market forces not solved these problems for us?

Mr. William Amos:

Since the advent of the Internet as a mainstream technology and wireless mobile coming in to a greater extent, the decision in the early 1990s to leave the development of this infrastructure to the private sector and not to nationalize it has had consequences.

Where the return on investment for the private sector is insufficient in a large area where the density of population is low, it's clear that's going to bring about a particular result. We see it all across rural Canada: patchiness, portions where there's coverage, and portions where there's not. That unreliability of coverage has serious impacts, both on the public security side but also on the economic development side.

Nowadays, prospective homebuyers in your riding, as well as mine and so many others, will make decisions premised on a full range of factors, including whether there is good Internet and cellphone coverage. It has serious ramifications both on a public safety and an economic and sustainable growth basis. I think we need to address those.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Amos, thank you for being here.

We also consider it important to establish a better connectivity system in Canada. This is a major problem for many regions, particularly in rural areas. I am glad a Liberal member is concerned about rural areas. The receptivity was not the same when we did a study on another subject. This current receptivity will please my colleagues who live in very remote rural areas and who are facing the same problem.

You must have met with the Canadian Communication Systems Alliance, which represents telephone companies and Internet service providers in the regions. Every year, they come to us and remind us that they have to use Bell Canada or Telus towers to transmit their signals and that this is a problem. In the end, it is always about revenues, complications and agreements.

Has this factor been assessed in order to facilitate things for those companies that are already in place?

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you for the question.

In fact, the executive director of the CCSA, Mr. Jay Thomson, is a Pontiac citizen. I met him several times.

This question has been important for some years now. All regulation and competition between large and smaller companies that would like to enter the market remains a challenge. Indeed, large companies have made significant investments and want to ensure their performance. Smaller players, on the other hand, have the right to access these infrastructures, under the Telecommunications Act, and want to use them. Ensuring competition and access as objectives in the act remains a challenge for the CRTC.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

If we start at the beginning, the motion raises important questions. I don't know anything about your meetings with the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, but have you ever considered the possibility of deregulating or regulating the sector otherwise? If companies are already established across the country and are just waiting for the opportunity to connect, this may be the first effort to make before going any further and saying that the government should invest hundreds of millions of dollars.

Mr. William Amos:

There are several aspects to be assessed, starting with the success of the Telecommunications Act in achieving its objectives of competition and access, among others. There is also a need to assess the investments and tax incentives put in place in this area by successive federal governments. It would be worthwhile to focus on these two elements in all cases.

I would like to mention, however, that the investments that were made by the previous Conservative government—your government—in successive budgets were not enough to solve the problem.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Fine.

With regard to public safety, have you assessed the current situation in Canada? Police and ambulance services already have autonomous communication systems and can therefore remain in contact during an emergency. Have you taken this into account? I believe your goal is to allow all citizens to use their phones anywhere. However, when it comes to public safety, do you know if we are well equipped?

(1555)

Mr. William Amos:

In general, these emergency services are well equipped, but there are still gaps. I had discussions again this year with the Gracefield Fire Department, which was having communication difficulties. However, when I spoke to the Canadian Armed Forces in the aftermath of the 2019 floods, they told me that their system was very functional.

What we are seeing more and more in the age of digital infrastructure, social media and technology is that anyone can help anyone. Public safety is increasingly managed by individuals and their neighbours, in collaboration with public services. It is therefore essential that everyone have access to a cellular signal.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Have you done any research on satellite communications? The satellite phone already exists, although its use is very expensive. Have any companies already suggested ways to reduce these user costs and focus on satellite calls in some areas where 3G or LTE networks are not available? Has this possibility already been evaluated?

Mr. William Amos:

I invite the Parliamentary Secretary, Mr. Serré, to fill any gaps I may have in my answer.

Our investments in satellite communications in Budget 2019 are very significant and this approach could prove to be one of the best solutions for remote and other communities that are hard to reach using fibre optics or cellular towers.

In terms of costs and whether this is the best way to cover the whole country, I am not an expert in this field. That is why I initiated this discussion both in the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology and in this committee. I can tell you that Telesat Canada appeared before the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology last week and its testimony was greatly appreciated.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. Amos, thank you for being here and for bringing this motion forward.

So long as we're talking about the content of different motions, I'd like to know something, because I'm intrigued. Why was a study commissioned at the outset? I listened to the discussions with Mr. Graham and Mr. Paul-Hus. For your part, you talked about the work of mayors, councillors or political leaders in your community. So there seems to be a clear consensus on the problem.

Rather than asking for further study by a parliamentary committee, why not introduce a motion or bill requiring the government to make changes and take action on this issue? Such a motion would have identified the problem and the House would have asked the government to do something about it. This would have had more impact, especially since there are only about ten days left in the current parliamentary session.

Mr. William Amos:

First, the motion was introduced in November 2018, before the 2019 budget. The Connect to Innovate program, the largest rural Internet investment program in Canadian history, was already in place. The motion and other political factors have put very constructive pressure on our government and have led to several new investments. As I mentioned, it plans to invest $1.7 billion in the Universal Broadband Fund, and make other investments in satellite technology and spectrum-related public policy measures. A whole series of measures have been taken. Given the slowness of the parliamentary process—

(1600)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Allow me to interrupt you.

Regarding the municipal actors in our ridings, I regularly speak with Mr. Jacques Ladouceur, who is the mayor of Richelieu as well as the reeve of the Rouville RCM. If there is not much traffic, it will take you 35 or 40 minutes to get from Richelieu to Montreal. It's not very far away. It is a constituency with rural areas, but it is not necessarily a rural constituency.

M. Ladouceur told me that you can throw all the money you want out the window, but—you recognize this in part in your motion—the CRTC relies on certain rules to assess the quality of the Internet connection. I am not an expert in this field and I rely, as we all do, on local actors who know about it. The CRTC measures the quality of the Internet connection in a certain way. If there is a place on the map where there is a certain band quality, the area is not considered a priority. Thirty-five minutes from Montreal, it is conceivable that we could find a house on one range that has a good quality band, but this is not the case for the other houses, and all of them are penalized.

I thank the minister for demonstrating an openness to speak to municipal officials in my riding. The mayors in my riding recognize the problem and I have no doubt that it is the same in yours.

Why limit ourselves to saying that the government has made investments and that we will look into the matter? Why didn't you approach this more forcefully? Money is all well and good, but you need something else. You and the elected municipal officials in your riding have identified the problem. Why don't you send a message to the House that something more needs to be done, such as changing the CRTC rules?

Mr. William Amos:

I believe that the process leading to these changes—whether legislative, regulatory or fiscal—has begun. The Telecommunications Act is being reformed. I am sure that this will be the subject of important discussions during this election period and following the election. This is the right time to present concrete solutions.

Yes, we can go directly to the CRTC, and that's what we did last week. Commission representatives appeared before the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology to discuss regulatory issues and its investments. Indeed, the CRTC has a $750 million fund that comes solely from telecommunications companies and not directly from taxpayers. All these discussions are taking place right now, but there is no easy solution. That is the issue. That is why I asked for these two studies. We cannot take certain things for granted. As a voter, I would like a political party to propose not one solution, but a range of solutions, whether it involves the spectrum, the tax aspect, investments or regulation.

Do we now have all the solutions to these problems? I don't think so. That is why I am opening the discussion. I believe in the potential of 338 members of Parliament who care about rural Canada.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

My last question is similar to the one Mr. Graham asked earlier. Two studies in tandem, we don't often see that. As for public safety, I appreciate that you don't want it to be an afterthought.

That being said, are there any specific actors we should talk to? We are talking about floods, and, in particular, various equipment. What could the committee focus on to be useful in this regard? The preamble largely deals with economic and regulatory aspects, but what do you see for us?

(1605)

The Chair:

May I ask you to answer quickly, please?

Mr. William Amos:

I am thinking here of firefighters' associations, police departments, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and other municipal groups, as well as mayors of small communities across Canada. We must listen to Canadians. To know their stories and experiences is to know the reality. I find that Parliament sometimes lacks representation from small communities. I am also thinking of the security services across the country. These were some suggestions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Picard, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Mr. Amos, you said that your fellow citizens were eager to see the establishment of a cellular telephony infrastructure. We can understand them.

How realistic are your fellow citizens about how long it will take to set up this system? This will not happen in a day or a week.

Mr. William Amos:

Honestly, this is the most difficult aspect of our work and, in this case, of mine. I know that by advocating for digital infrastructure solutions, I am open to criticism. That's for sure. People want solutions, but would have wanted them yesterday. It is not in two or three months and even less in two or three years that they want an Internet connection. They would have wanted it yesterday, and rightly so. It will be very difficult for me to get my electorate to fully consider how long it will take. However, we must start at the beginning and address this problem. For this reason, I am very pleased with the investments our government is making. With more than $5 billion over a decade, this is a serious investment.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Beyond the need, there is also the question of social acceptability. People want to have the infrastructure as soon as possible, but suffer from the "not in my backyard" syndrome.

I'll give you an example. I live 25 minutes from Montreal, between Montreal and my colleague Mr. Dubé's riding. Past the mountain, where I live, in what is an urban suburb, the cellular signal is weak or non-existent. So people who come to my house can't use their cell phones. Steps have been taken to address this very real problem, and cell phone towers will be erected in my riding and in Mr. Dubé's riding. Obviously, there will always be cases where the tower will not be in the right place, but these towers are needed. People want solutions, but they don't want the equipment they require.

What is the perception of people in your riding?

Mr. William Amos:

This kind of debate will always be ongoing. In rural areas, the discussion may be less difficult because the vast majority of my fellow citizens are in favour of these towers and accept this kind of compromise.

This question is not a new one. This is a concern that both the CRTC and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada have been trying to manage for years. The whole dynamic of "not in my backyard" is important and you have to manage these aspects.

The vast majority of public safety concerns arising from the lack of mobile phone services are raised in small communities far from large urban centres. Therefore, the question of not wanting a tower in your backyard is less relevant. This concern certainly remains, but it is less important.

(1610)

Mr. Michel Picard:

When it comes to infrastructure planning, setting the right priorities is key. In terms of economic drivers, cell phone and Internet service is a priority. It enables economic growth. In fact, it's a must-have. In order to do business, people need a cell phone and Internet access, without which, success is merely wishful thinking. This priority benefits the community as a whole.

We are talking about public safety, however, and the issue is whether the infrastructure to address the social, business and economic concerns raised should include bandwidth for the exclusive use of first responders in the event of a disaster, such as in the north. I remember what happened with the Fort McMurray fires. Police and firefighters weren't using the same bandwidth to communicate with one another, and, in some cases, they weren't able to communicate at all. In situations like that, having dedicated lines and matching infrastructure is necessary.

How, then, should requirements be prioritized when implementing the infrastructure?

Mr. William Amos:

That's a great question, and it's precisely why I'd like the committee to conduct a detailed study. I can tell you how I think the available spectrum should be divvied up between emergency responders and the public, but, as the member for Pontiac, I'm no expert. Although very pertinent, it's not a question I'm qualified to answer.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do we have the means, the capacity and the authority to make companies invest in expanding their networks? Eventually, it comes down to the return on investment. In all likelihood, companies haven't set up infrastructure in rural areas because the critical mass needed to generate a return on investment isn't there.

Mr. William Amos:

Through the CRTC, the government requires telecommunications companies to invest in digital infrastructure. Two years ago, the government announced $750 million in funding over five years for that purpose, and the CRTC began receiving the first applications a week ago. The funding comes directly from the telecommunications companies.

There's a central question that needs answering, and I certainly hope the CRTC gives it some thought. Is $750 million over five years sufficient? Should it be more? The fund was announced in December 2016. Following the 2019 budget, investments in the area have gone up considerably. [English]

The Chair:

It works better when the witness pays attention to the chair.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Amos, for being here today.

You won't get any argument from me or anyone in my riding about the need for rural infrastructure and connectivity. My riding is about 30,000 square kilometres and most of it is a rural area that struggles with connectivity issues from end to end.

As one example, one of the counties had asked for $2 million from the connect to innovate funding stream that came out a year and a half or so ago, for the beginning sections of a broadband plan for their region to provide a lot of necessary services to their constituents. They got $200,000 of their $2-million ask out of the $500 million that was rolled out across the country. That was a disappointment to them and to me, but it also put them in the very tough spot of how to move forward with one-tenth of what their ask was. How do you get things done?

I know you weren't here for this, but if you compare that with the rural crime study we just did, one of the things we looked at through this rural crime study was.... It was all about public safety and there are many areas where people couldn't access law enforcement through telephone service, 911, because there wasn't the infrastructure in place to do that.

Right now some of the people in rural Canada whom I've chatted with since that study on rural crime are wondering whether.... Now we're talking about doing digital infrastructure for rural Canada, but we couldn't give the same attention to crime and it's about public safety. They're wondering about how credible the ability to roll this out actually is.

I guess my question for you, sir, is this. Beyond the connect to innovate money that's been set aside for this and has been rolled out, is there any thought to or do you have any idea of whether the infrastructure bank that's been set up by this government...or how much of that has been rolled out to rural Internet projects?

(1615)

Mr. William Amos:

Maybe I'll start with the beginning of your question. You represent a riding of 30,000 square kilometres. Pontiac is 77,000 square kilometres. We're talking about big ridings here with great needs. All of our communities across rural Canada are playing catch-up. That is the simple reality. I'm not saying this to be partisan, but it is a simple fact that the previous Harper administration did not invest sufficiently in this, and that put us behind the eight ball.

We're now coming up with government programs that put carrots in front of telecommunications companies, that create incentives to invest more; and the connect to innovate program has had a number of major successes. The funding is rolling out presently, but I think there's a recognition that we need to do so much more because of situations like the one you're pointing out. I'm sure there is more than $200,000 worth of Internet infrastructure needs in your region, and we need to get to that point. Budget 2019 is really going to help us get there.

With respect to the Infrastructure Bank, the budget was quite clear that it would be contemplated as a source of financing. I'm looking forward to Minister Bernadette Jordan, our Minister of Rural Economic Development, coming forward with a plan for a rural economic development strategy, and to her collaboration with our Minister of Infrastructure, François-Philippe Champagne, to bring forth a plan to show us how more capital can be brought to bear, because at the end of the day, it is going to be about incentivizing private sector companies or—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Is that the way forward, to get more of a P3 approach to the whole concept of this?

Mr. William Amos:

I think it's part of the solution, but I don't think it's the whole solution, because there are going to circumstances where the private sector determines that it doesn't want to invest in particular corners and there are going to be little pockets that are left alone. We have to enable regional governments or non-profits to work together to fill those gaps. That's why this is going to take time, because there's going to be a process in which companies evaluate where they want to take advantage of these incentives and to invest, and then we're going to be doing gap analysis, and then going back in and doing more work. I think this is going to be an iterative process.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Ms. Sahota, you have five minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I've given my time over to David. He has a keen interest in this subject, so I think it's only fair.

An hon. member: He has 25 more questions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have as many as normal.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

(1620)

[Translation]

Mr. Amos, one of the bases of Quebec's forest fire protection agency—the Société de protection des forêts contre le feu, or SOPFEU—is located in your riding, in Maniwaki. Last weekend, an event was held for aviation enthusiasts, Rendez-vous aérien. It was no doubt great fun. I wish I could've been there.

The SOPFEU has a low-frequency radio service across all of Quebec. It works throughout southern Quebec, at 55° or 56° north latitude. The cell phone service is entirely high-frequency, beginning at 400 MHz and even higher.

Since you've been in Parliament, have any telecommunications companies come to you with creative solutions outside the box? The focus is always on 5G and 24 GHz. You and I will agree that 24 GHz service would be tough to implement. Have any companies ever approached you with creative solutions?

Mr. William Amos:

I must admit I'm no expert. I'm not aware of any companies providing solutions like that. I agree with what you said and with the premise of your question.

Yesterday, I had a chance to meet some people from the SOPFEU. They put on the Rendez-vous aérien event in Maniwaki, which I was delighted to attend. In the Gatineau valley, these people are heralded as heroes. They are Canadian heroes to us. I have no doubt they'll be present in Alberta and British Columbia this summer, and certainly in Quebec.

Coming back to your question, I wonder what innovative solutions would make it possible to access the various bands of the spectrum. I don't know the answer. It goes back to what Mr. Dubé said about the reason for undertaking a study like this. It can't be assumed that politicians will have the answers to technical questions. We need engineers and entrepreneurs to come up with different options so that, together, we can recommend the most promising and cost-effective solution.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You and Mr. Dubé were discussing potential witnesses earlier. You mentioned firefighters associations as well as the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, among others.

Should we be looking to telecommunications companies for creative solutions? I'm talking about non-traditional players, outside the Bells and Teluses. Should we study the whole issue of spectrum, as you mentioned, to figure out whether the current system is meeting regional needs?

Mr. William Amos:

Absolutely. Those are all key questions.

Yes, the telecommunications sector is home to a range of minor players. In the Pontiac, for instance, PioneerWireless holds tremendous potential, but it can be harder for small companies to access government programs. They no doubt have some ideas to suggest. I would be grateful to the committee if it were to examine the way telecommunications companies, big and small, view public safety and their role in the solutions process.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With this Parliament drawing to a close, we are running out of time. It'll basically be over next week.

If you could tell the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security of the 43rd Parliament something, what would it be?

Mr. William Amos:

I would start by stressing how important the issue is. Then, I would point out the need for a non-partisan approach given that there is unanimous agreement on the problem. In Canada, we do better when we tackle major issues in a non-partisan way. This issue is highly complex. It's way too easy to point fingers, assign blame and get caught up in politics. That's not what the constituents in my riding or rural Canadians, in general, need. Finally, I think it would be very helpful for the committee to recommend that the next Parliament revisit the issue. That would signal the possibility of the next Parliament taking up the issue even though we may not have time to examine it in depth.

(1625)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Eglinski, go ahead for five minutes, please.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I want to thank the presenter, Mr. Amos, for presenting this. As my counterpart said here, I'm very much in favour of trying to connect this country of ours to have cell coverage.

I notice that part (iii) of the text of your motion says: (iii) continue to work with telecommunication companies, provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities and relevant emergency response organizations

That's the part of this that kind of interests me. Most provinces have set up an emergency communications program that interconnects the ambulance service, police service and fire service. That has been in place for many years across most of the country that I'm aware of.

Have you talked to or approached the provincial governments, municipal governments or territorial counterparts to see what part they thought we should play? As I see it, it cannot be done by industry alone. It is not going to give us that connectivity on its own.

Your riding is about the same size as mine, Mr. Amos. I think I have about as much uninhabited land and about the same number of municipalities and counties. I have 11 counties and they're all fighting independently to try to get this service, but it's not profitable for industry. I think there is a need for our counties, our provinces, our federal government and industry to communicate.

I'm wondering if you have had any communications within your area as to where they think we should fit in. It's a big dollar amount. The money you mentioned—the $750 million—is just scratching the surface if we're going to give Canada equal coverage from one end to the other. It's going to be in the billions. Industry has told us that realistically it's probably more like $5 billion to $7 billion to connect Canada.

I wonder if you would comment on that.

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you for your question, and I would like to thank you also for being such a great colleague. We've worked together on the environment committee, and during our trip out west we had the pleasure of enjoying a little portion of your very special and very beautiful riding. I won't forget that.

You've asked about the role of the provincial governments and what my experience has been on that front as we try to amass the funding required to get to a multi-billion dollar solution. I think you're right. I've heard different numbers; I've heard the $15 billion figure bandied about.

Regardless of that, I think one of the things that has changed since our election in 2015 is a willingness of the provinces to engage in a more serious fashion with more serious provincial investments. I can speak for the situation in Quebec, where the connect to innovate program was matched by provincial funds. In the Pontiac, I've had the opportunity to announce over $20 million in new high-speed Internet funding. All of the federal contributions were matched by provincial contributions. I'd say roughly about a bit north of 50% of the total of that $20 million was federal and provincial investments.

I think we're turning a bit of a corner in the sense that despite the fact that the jurisdiction around telecommunications is clearly understood to be federal, there's a recognition that the fiscal responsibility is simply too large for one level of government to bear.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

If I'm hearing you correctly, in that innovation fund, I believe we gave Quebec almost $160 million. So did Quebec also invest $161 million in the last four years?

(1630)

Mr. William Amos:

I believe it was at least that. It may even have invested a little more. Perhaps Mr. Graham would have exact figures by memory. I don't have those by memory, but I'm sure I could come back with them.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Do you know if any of your counties have invested? I believe you have a very similar system to what I have back home, where you have a number of large counties. Are they looking at investing? Have you talked to them about that?

Mr. William Amos:

Absolutely. In fact, the riding of Pontiac has three regional municipal governments, each with roughly 15 municipalities within them. Two of those regional municipal governments partnered together and brought a submission forward and submitted it to the connect to innovate program. In the end, their project wasn't the one that was chosen, but it does go to show that this is where the projects are going to be coming from, not just from the major telecommunications companies but also from municipal governments working with small service providers, working with consultants who are advising them. This is one of the challenges that we're looking to help them with.

The Chair:

Ms. Dabrusin, you have five minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll give my time to Mr. Graham.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have another five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take it. Yes.[Translation]

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In the past, private companies didn't invest in digital infrastructure without some type of federal, provincial or other source of funding. You just said that Quebec funded a large chunk of the Internet service within its borders. I believe it was much more than 50% of the federal and provincial funding that came from Quebec. The province made a tremendous contribution.

What can be done to get around companies' refusal to invest before they receive government funding? Is the answer to build digital infrastructure that is entirely publicly owned?

Mr. William Amos:

Some companies would certainly argue that nationalizing the infrastructure is the way to go. I don't agree because that would be too costly for taxpayers. Taxpayers would have a very hard time covering the billions upon billions that have already been invested. However, the goal is definitely to prevent situations where investments aren't made unless government funding has been granted.

That said, we all realize how important the issue is. As I said in response to Mr. Eglinski's question, some competition is already happening. Municipal and regional governments, often in partnership with small companies, are competing with the major telecommunications players. I think it's important to ensure the competition is balanced when it comes to regional governments, small players and major companies. Of course, they are all looking for public money, whether it comes from the federal government, the CRTC, the province or some other source.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Under the connect to innovate program, a company receiving federal funding has to provide public access to the system. Might a similar requirement be applied to cell phone service, if the federal or provincial government helped to build towers and the system were more accessible than required by the CRTC? Conversely, would that be even more detrimental to investment?

Telecommunications companies such as Bell, Rogers and Telus have said setting up towers isn't worthwhile because a company that doesn't have a tower jumps onto their network right away.

What is the right balance between open access and a monopoly on investment?

Mr. William Amos:

That's a highly complex issue that the CRTC is looking into. As a politician and someone who is by no means an expert, I'm hesitant to say how the commission should go about finding that balance. Technical and economic considerations are equally important in coming up with the answer. A balance is clearly needed. Canadians benefit from greater competition, but, at the same time, companies need incentives to invest in fixed infrastructure, in other words, towers and fibre optics.

Our government is trying to find that balance with a directive that encourages companies to lower prices. It is asking the CRTC to move in that direction, but it has to provide incentives, whether through the connect to innovate program or other initiatives. Incentives are needed to give the private sector a reason to invest capital in infrastructure.

(1635)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Amos, if I wanted to digitally disappear, would I move to Pontiac?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes, we can arrange that in Ottawa.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Yes, I know. There is a certain element on this committee that would prefer that.

Mr. William Amos:

Well, I think you might start by speaking to your social media adviser. He could eliminate your accounts, and that would cause a degree of disappearance.

No, in the Pontiac, you don't disappear. In fact, there are many, many areas of the riding of Pontiac that are well covered. In fact, Pontiac, as a riding, starts with the northern suburbs of Gatineau, where there is 100% coverage, as one would expect in any major city in Canada, but as soon as you go 20 minutes outside of Gatineau, that's not—

The Chair:

So it is possible that I could digitally disappear 20 minutes outside of Gatineau.

Mr. William Amos:

You can virtually disappear, but not within 20 minutes. You'd have to go a bit farther than that. You could—

The Chair:

This is a public safety/public security committee, and what we look at are people who are not necessarily working in the public interest, shall we say. Is there any group, or are there any groups, of people who would prefer to digitally disappear, if you will, and who in turn would create a public safety issue? I'm thinking particularly of some of the people we might have heard of in our previous study on rural crime, but is there a group that we're not thinking about that does actually create security issues?

Mr. William Amos:

Just so I can be sure that I've understood the question clearly, are you asking if there's a public interest in maintaining digital obscurity to be set aside from the predominant digital culture that we should be protecting?

The Chair: Yes.

Mr. William Amos: If there is one, they're not knocking at my doors regularly in the Pontiac—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. William Amos: —and the mayors and municipal councillors who represent them are not knocking on my door requesting that assistance. It is certainly quite possible in my riding to live off the grid with a reclusive lifestyle, to enjoy the benefits of the national capital and have access to an international airport and a modern transportation system and all of the amenities of urban life on a day-to-day basis and still live in the woods.

The Chair:

Does anybody actively oppose your motion?

Mr. William Amos:

Actually, there are certain individuals who have raised health concerns about cell tower frequencies. That issue is still the subject of scientific inquiry, and I think that should continue. It's important that we have that kind of research being done. They would be in the minority, the very small minority.

The Chair:

I have a final question. A lot of these rural communities are in pretty vulnerable states. There was an article a week or two ago about Huawei offering access at an inexpensive rate. That has been a subject of this committee's study over the last number of months. Do you have any opinion with respect to Huawei's offering services at supremely discounted rates to rural communities?

(1640)

Mr. William Amos:

My sense is that there are many companies that offer the technologies that Huawei offers, such as Nokia and Ericsson, to name just a couple. The national security considerations in relation to Huawei are being undertaken by our government at the highest levels. I have every faith that it will be done appropriately. I trust that process.

No matter what transpires on that ledger, we will have access in Canada to the necessary 5G technologies to build out digital infrastructure for all of rural Canada. It's just a question of which company would provide those technologies and services.

The Chair:

Okay. With that, on behalf of the committee, I want to thank you for your appearance here.

We will now adjourn.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Distingués collègues, il est 15 h 30; je constate que nous avons le quorum, et que M. Amos est présent.

Bienvenue devant le Comité, monsieur Amos.

Le Comité étudie la motion M-208 sur les infrastructures numériques en milieu rural, proposée par M. Amos, député de Pontiac.

Si vous voulez bien enchaîner avec votre déclaration, monsieur Amos, vous avez 10 minutes.

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président, de même qu'à tous les membres du Comité.[Français]

Je vous remercie de m'accorder ce moment pour discuter de ce qui représente [difficultés techniques] pour mes concitoyens du Pontiac, mais aussi pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes partout au pays. Que ce soit en région rurale ou urbaine, c'est un enjeu très important.[Traduction]

Je crois que le vote unanime en faveur de la motion témoigne clairement de l'importance de cet enjeu. Je remercie donc chacun d'entre vous, de même que vos collègues, pour votre soutien, car je crois que le vote sur la motion M-208 était rassembleur.

Quand les Canadiens en région urbaine constatent à quel point leurs concitoyens en région rurale ont du mal à obtenir ce que l'on considère aujourd'hui comme des services de télécommunications de base, soit un bon accès au réseau cellulaire et Internet haute vitesse, je crois que c'est le genre d'enjeux qui unifient le pays parce que tout le monde peut comprendre nos difficultés.

Je pense qu'il est aujourd'hui accepté qu'il faut rattraper le temps perdu en milieu rural au Canada et combler le fossé numérique. Depuis trop d'années maintenant, les compagnies privées du secteur des télécommunications négligent les investissements dans des infrastructures numériques pourtant nécessaires. À l'époque, les gouvernements n'étaient pas en mesure de comprendre la nécessité de corriger la tendance du marché.

D'une certaine façon, je me sens privilégié d'avoir pu proposer cette motion, car j'avais l'impression de simplement affirmer une évidence: pour assurer sa sécurité, un Canadien dans le Nord de l'Alberta ou dans les terres intérieures de la Colombie-Britannique qui fait face à un grave incendie de forêt, tout comme un Canadien au Nouveau-Brunswick, au Québec ou en Ontario confronté à des inondations, a le droit d'avoir accès aux infrastructures numériques que la majorité des Canadiens tiennent pour acquises.

Comme le Comité le sait très bien, la motion portait sur deux études, dont une sur les aspects économiques et réglementaires des infrastructures numériques. Ce processus avance rondement au sein du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Un certain nombre de témoins ont été entendus, et les travaux se poursuivent rapidement. J'ai hâte d'en connaître les conclusions. J'ai eu l'occasion de participer aux travaux du Comité et je l'en remercie.

Je suis particulièrement heureux, monsieur le président, de constater que votre comité a jugé bon d'aller de l'avant, même si les interactions sur la question doivent être brèves, car les Canadiens de partout au pays savent qu'il est temps d'adopter des mesures qui confirment le rôle des infrastructures numériques en matière de sécurité publique.

J'essaie constamment de me faire le porte-parole des maires des petites collectivités de ma circonscription, comme David Rochon, qui est maire de Waltham, au Québec. Waltham se trouve à environ 1 h 45 de route de la Colline du Parlement. Une fois de l'autre côté du pont des Chaudières ou du Portage, on file sur la route 148. Il suffit de traverser à Gatineau et de suivre la route 148 en direction ouest. Vous ne pouvez pas vous tromper. C'est juste en face de Pembroke.

Dans cette collectivité, il n'y a pas de réseau cellulaire. Pour les quelque 300 âmes qui vivent là, cela devient extrêmement frustrant, un sentiment tout à fait justifié quand on sait que ces personnes viennent de connaître des inondations pour la deuxième fois en trois ans. Je partage leur frustration, et je me fais leur porte-parole, ici, aujourd'hui. Je suis là strictement pour parler au nom d'un groupe de maires de petites collectivités.

Je sais qu'un très grand nombre de maires à l'échelle du pays joignent leur voix à celle de leurs collègues du Pontiac. C'est pour cette raison que la Fédération canadienne des municipalités a appuyé la motion M-208, car elle est, elle aussi, à l'écoute de ces maires. C'est aussi pour cette raison que le Caucus des municipalités locales de l'Union des municipalités du Québec a appuyé cette motion, car il entend lui aussi les mêmes voix.[Français]

Il nous incombe d'aborder cet enjeu de façon directe. Je suis très heureux de voir que, depuis que la motion M-208 a été déposée devant la Chambre des communes, l'infrastructure numérique a connu un important succès, et ce, grâce au budget de 2019. Les investissements sont historiques, très concrets et très ciblés.

L'objectif est que l'ensemble du Canada ait accès à Internet à haute vitesse d'ici 2030. On vise une cible de 95 % pour 2025. Notre gouvernement est le premier à établir ce genre de cibles et à investir de telles sommes. Dans le passé, on parlait d'à peine quelques centaines de millions de dollars alors que, maintenant, il s'agit de milliards de dollars. L'enjeu est reconnu. Pour un gouvernement, cette reconnaissance passe avant tout par son budget. Notre gouvernement l'a reconnu. J'apprécie vraiment beaucoup les gestes posés par notre gouvernement libéral.

En ce qui concerne les communications sans fil et cellulaires dans le contexte de la sécurité publique, on s'entend pour dire que, dans n'importe quelle situation d'urgence, on a besoin d'un téléphone cellulaire. C'est très utile pour gérer les urgences personnelles, mais ce l'est aussi pour les fonctionnaires, les maires, les conseillers et les conseillères qui sont sur le terrain et veulent aider leurs concitoyens. Ces personnes ont besoin d'accéder à un réseau cellulaire fiable pour pouvoir entrer en contact avec leurs concitoyens et leur venir en aide.

(1540)

[Traduction]

Je vois qu'il ne me reste que deux minutes. Je vais conclure plus rapidement que cela en vous disant simplement que j'estime important d'éviter les joutes oratoires sur le sujet. Les Canadiens méritent mieux que cela. J'ai pris connaissance de la motion de l'opposition qui doit être proposée aujourd'hui. Sans vouloir manquer de respect à qui que ce soit, cette motion ne dit rien de ce que notre gouvernement a accompli, mais est strictement axée sur les problèmes, sans proposer de solution. Dans le Pontiac, les gens veulent du concret. Ils veulent savoir de quelle façon ils vont accéder à un réseau cellulaire, et vite. Ils veulent leur connexion Internet haute vitesse et l'auraient voulue hier, pas dans deux ans. Je sais que tous les députés de circonscriptions rurales, qu'ils soient conservateurs, néo-démocrates, libéraux ou d'une autre affiliation, travaillent très dur, à leur façon, pour s'assurer que cela se concrétise. Je le fais aussi. Je suis donc très heureux aujourd'hui de pouvoir attirer votre attention tout spécialement sur les aspects liés à la sécurité publique.

Je souhaite également remercier les médias locaux et nationaux qui ont traité de cet enjeu et qui savent que, en cette ère de changements climatiques et de phénomènes météorologiques extrêmes, nous avons plus que jamais besoin de nos téléphones cellulaires; nous aurons aussi un besoin grandissant d'infrastructures numériques pour assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Amos.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous pour sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Amos, quand vous avez proposé la motion M-208, elle comportait deux volets. Un était à l'intention du comité de l'industrie, qui devait se pencher sur ces services, puis l'autre s'adressait au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, qui devait étudier ce qui relève de la sécurité publique. Souhaiteriez-vous expliquer un peu le raisonnement derrière votre idée de confier la tâche à deux comités?

M. William Amos:

J'étais d'avis qu'il y avait indéniablement des aspects économiques à cet enjeu. Il y a des questions relatives à la concurrence. D'autres, sur la nature du rendement du capital qu'on peut investir ou non en milieu rural au Canada. Ce sont des questions légitimes qui méritent, selon moi, une étude sérieuse. Le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes ou CRTC, à titre d'organe de réglementation indépendant, a des responsabilités distinctes conformément à la Loi sur les télécommunications. À bien des égards, ces obligations lui donnent passablement de latitude pour atteindre les objectifs de la loi en matière d'intérêt public.

Ces questions, qui sont à la fois réglementaires et économiques, vont ultimement nous aider à établir quel accès aux infrastructures numériques offrir aux régions rurales du pays. J'estimais donc qu'elles n'étaient pas nécessairement de la même nature, du moins pas tout à fait, que celle de la sécurité publique. Je craignais que, si l'étude était menée strictement par un comité, la sécurité publique ne devienne qu'une réflexion après coup. Et cela me semblait inapproprié. J'estimais que la sécurité publique serait l'un des arguments les plus importants en faveur d'investissements majeurs, des investissements qui sont nécessaires et que notre gouvernement a pris la décision de faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Fort bien.

Pour ce qui est de la sécurité publique, votre circonscription et la mienne ont connu de graves problèmes de répartition des services d'urgence. Vous l'avez déjà décrit par le menu. Quand une tornade frappe votre circonscription, que des inondations se déclarent dans nos circonscriptions, les services d'urgence doivent se rendre à l'hôtel de ville, coordonner leurs efforts, puis retourner sur le terrain. Pouvez-vous en parler? Est-ce le fondement de l'étude sur la sécurité publique?

(1545)

M. William Amos:

Pour Monsieur ou Madame Tout-le-Monde qui songe à ses proches, installés dans une petite localité, et aux interventions d'urgence provoquées par des phénomènes météorologiques extrêmes, je pense que c'est évident: demander à un représentant local de faire de 20 à 40 minutes de route de plus pour partir d'un site précis sur le terrain et revenir à l'hôtel de ville, d'où il doit faire les appels nécessaires en cas d'incendie, d'inondations, de tornade ou d'une autre catastrophe, c'est tout sauf efficace. Cela provoque des retards indus dans les interventions d'urgence.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans un même ordre d'idées, beaucoup de citoyens ont du mal à joindre le 9-1-1 parce qu'il n'y a plus de service téléphonique, plus de ligne fixe. Dans des circonscriptions comme les nôtres, où les aires de loisir couvrent des dizaines de milliers de kilomètres, si vous êtes en plein champ ou à la campagne, il n'est pas possible de joindre les services d'urgence. Êtes-vous de cet avis?

M. William Amos:

En fait, il y a des secteurs dans la circonscription de Pontiac où il n'y a pas de ligne fixe, d'autres où ce service est temporairement inaccessible en raison de la chute d'un arbre, par exemple. Oui, cela pose un risque pour la sécurité publique, car un très grand nombre d'aînés dans ma circonscription n'ont pas de téléphone cellulaire. Même s'ils en voulaient un, ils n'auraient pas accès au réseau cellulaire.

Il va sans dire qu'il y a des problèmes, et je crois qu'il est important d'y remédier en bloc, mais, à mon sens, la conversation est surtout axée sur l'accès au réseau cellulaire. C'est le plus souvent de cette façon que les gens remédient à une situation délicate. C'est incroyable le nombre de fois où des électeurs m'ont dit: « Ma voiture est tombée en panne. J'étais entre X et Y. Il n'y avait pas de réseau cellulaire. Je pensais que j'allais mourir. » C'est une conversation banale dans le Pontiac. À une époque comme la nôtre, je crois que, en tant que société, nous sommes assez riches et évolués pour remédier à ces problèmes. Il suffit de s'y mettre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela dit, pour revenir au réseau cellulaire, le public ne semble pas trop savoir sur quoi porte la motion M-208, parce qu'elle parle de télécommunications sans fil sans vraiment entrer dans les détails. De votre point de vue, elle porte sur le réseau cellulaire d'abord, puis sur le service Internet à large bande dans une moindre mesure. Elle vise essentiellement à assurer l'accès aux services d'urgence, la capacité des services d'urgence de communiquer entre eux et la présence du signal cellulaire dont nous avons besoin sur les routes secondaires.

M. William Amos:

C'est exact. Ma plus grande préoccupation était l'accès au réseau cellulaire. Dans la motion M-208, toutefois, où je parle de télécommunications sans fil, l'intention est de faire référence au cellulaire, c'est-à-dire aux services sans fil mobiles.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand j'étais jeune, nous avions un réseau cellulaire analogique dans les Laurentides. Quand nous sommes passés au numérique, nous avons perdu une bonne partie de ce réseau. Avez-vous connu une expérience semblable?

M. William Amos:

Voilà qui ne date pas d'hier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avions un cellulaire dans la voiture en 1985, et il valait autant que la voiture, mais il fonctionnait, ce qui n'est pas le cas aujourd'hui. Dans la majeure partie de ma région, il n'y a pas de signal, et c'est maintenant un grave problème pour nous. Je suis très heureux de soutenir cette motion, et que vous l'ayez proposée. Je n'ai presque plus de temps.

Pourquoi ne sent-on pas l'effet des lois du marché? Certains répètent que les lois du marché peuvent tout régler. Pourquoi n'ont-elles pas réglé ces problèmes pour nous?

M. William Amos:

Puisque Internet est aujourd'hui une technologie de masse et que les services mobiles sans fil se banalisent, la décision prise au début des années 1990 de laisser le secteur privé déployer cette infrastructure plutôt que de la nationaliser a eu des conséquences.

Quand le rendement sur le capital investi du secteur privé ne justifie pas sa présence dans une grande région où la densité de population est faible, le résultat est on ne peut plus prévisible, comme on le constate partout dans les régions rurales du pays: il y a fragmentation de la couverture, avec des zones couvertes et d'autres pas. Le manque de fiabilité de la couverture a de graves répercussions tant sur la sécurité publique que sur le développement économique.

De nos jours, les éventuels acheteurs d'une propriété dans votre circonscription, dans la mienne et dans bien d'autres, prennent leur décision en fonction d'une gamme complète de facteurs, y compris la qualité des services Internet et cellulaires. Cela a d'importantes conséquences pour la sécurité publique et une croissance économique durable. Je crois qu'il faut en tenir compte.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.[Français]

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Amos, je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

Nous considérons également qu'il est important d'établir un meilleur système de connectivité au Canada. C'est un problème majeur pour bon nombre de régions, particulièrement en milieu rural. Je suis content qu'un député libéral se préoccupe des régions rurales. La réceptivité n'a pas été la même lorsque nous avons fait une étude sur un autre sujet. La réceptivité que nous connaissons présentement fera plaisir à mes collègues qui vivent dans des régions rurales très éloignées et qui font face à ce même problème.

Vous avez sûrement rencontré les gens de la Canadian Communication Systems Alliance, qui représente les compagnies de téléphonie et les fournisseurs de services Internet dans les régions. Chaque année, ils viennent nous rencontrer et nous rappeler qu'ils doivent se servir des tours de Bell Canada ou de Telus pour transmettre leurs signaux et que cela constitue un problème. En fin de compte, il s'agit toujours de revenus, de complications et d'ententes.

Ce facteur a-t-il été évalué dans le but de faciliter les choses pour ces compagnies qui sont déjà en place?

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de la question.

En fait, le directeur général de la CCSA, M. Jay Thomson, est un citoyen de Pontiac. Je l'ai rencontré à plusieurs reprises.

Cette question est importante depuis quelques années déjà. Toute la réglementation et la concurrence entre les grandes compagnies et les plus petites qui voudraient entrer dans le marché demeurent un défi. En effet, les grandes compagnies ont fait des investissements importants et veulent s'assurer du rendement de ces derniers. De leur côté, les plus petits joueurs ont le droit d'accéder à ces infrastructures, en vertu de la Loi sur les télécommunications, et veulent s'en prévaloir. Assurer la concurrence et l'accès en tant qu'objectifs dans la Loi demeure un défi pour le CRTC.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Si nous commençons par le début, c'est que la motion soulève des questions importantes. Je ne sais rien des rencontres que vous avez eues avec le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, mais avez-vous déjà évalué la possibilité de déréglementer ou de réglementer autrement le secteur? Si des compagnies sont déjà implantées partout au pays et qu'elles n'attendent que la possibilité de se connecter, c'est peut-être le premier effort à mettre avant d'aller plus loin et de dire que le gouvernement devrait investir des centaines de millions de dollars.

M. William Amos:

Il y a plusieurs aspects à évaluer, à commencer par le succès de la Loi sur les télécommunications dans l'atteinte de ses objectifs de concurrence et d'accès, parmi d'autres. Il faut également évaluer les investissements et les incitatifs fiscaux mis en place dans ce domaine par les gouvernements fédéraux qui se sont succédé. Il vaudrait la peine de mettre l'accent sur ces deux éléments dans tous les cas.

Je voudrais cependant mentionner que les investissements qui ont été faits par le gouvernement conservateur précédent — votre gouvernement — dans ses budgets successifs n'ont pas suffi à régler le problème.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord.

En ce qui a trait à la sécurité publique, avez-vous fait une évaluation de la situation actuelle au Canada? Les corps policiers et ambulanciers ont déjà des systèmes de communication autonomes et peuvent donc demeurer en contact en situation d'urgence. En avez-vous tenu compte? Je crois que votre objectif est de permettre à tous les citoyens de se servir de leur téléphone n'importe où. Cependant, en matière de sécurité publique, savez-vous si nous sommes bien équipés?

(1555)

M. William Amos:

En général, ces services d'urgence sont bien équipés, mais il y a toujours des lacunes. J'ai eu des discussions encore cette année avec le service des incendies de Gracefield, lequel éprouvait des difficultés de communications. En revanche, lorsque j'ai parlé aux Forces armées canadiennes dans la foulée des inondations de 2019, elles m'ont indiqué que leur système était très fonctionnel.

Ce que nous constatons de plus en plus à l'ère des infrastructures numériques, des médias sociaux et de la technologie, c'est que n'importe qui peut venir en aide à n'importe qui. La sécurité publique est gérée de plus en plus par l'individu et par ses voisins, en collaboration avec les services publics. Il est donc essentiel que tout le monde ait accès à un signal cellulaire.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Avez-vous fait des recherches sur les communications par satellite? Le téléphone satellite existe déjà, bien que son utilisation soit très dispendieuse. Des entreprises ont-elles déjà suggéré des façons de diminuer ces coûts d'utilisation et de privilégier les appels par satellite dans certaines régions où les réseaux 3G ou LTE ne sont pas disponibles? Cette possibilité a-t-elle déjà été évaluée?

M. William Amos:

J'invite le secrétaire parlementaire, M. Serré, à combler tout oubli que je pourrais avoir dans ma réponse.

Nos investissements prévus dans le budget de 2019 pour les télécommunications par satellite sont très importants et cette approche pourrait s'avérer être l'une des meilleures solutions pour les communautés éloignées et difficiles à atteindre par fibre optique ou tour cellulaire.

Pour ce qui est des coûts et la question de savoir s'il s'agit de la meilleure façon de couvrir tout le pays, je ne suis pas expert dans ce domaine. C'est d'ailleurs pour cette raison que j'ai amorcé cette discussion tant au Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie qu'à ce comité-ci. Je peux vous dire que Telesat Canada a comparu devant le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie la semaine passée et que son témoignage a été fort apprécié.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Amos, je vous remercie de votre présence et d'avoir présenté cette motion.

Tant qu'à parler du contenu de différentes motions, j'aimerais savoir quelque chose, car je suis intrigué. Pourquoi, d'entrée de jeu, a-t-on demandé une étude? J'ai écouté les échanges avec MM. Graham et Paul-Hus. Pour votre part, vous avez parlé du travail des maires, des conseillers ou des leaders politiques dans votre communauté. Il semble donc y avoir un consensus clair sur le problème.

Plutôt que demander une autre étude à un comité parlementaire, pourquoi ne pas avoir présenté une motion ou un projet de loi exigeant du gouvernement de faire des changements et d'agir dans ce dossier? Une telle motion aurait cerné le problème et la Chambre aurait demandé au gouvernement d'agir en ce sens. Cela aurait eu plus de force, d'autant plus qu'il reste seulement une dizaine de jours à la session parlementaire actuelle.

M. William Amos:

En premier lieu, la motion a été soumise en novembre 2018, c'est-à-dire avant le budget de 2019. Il y avait déjà le programme Brancher pour innover, le plus important programme de l'histoire du Canada au chapitre des investissements dans l'Internet en milieu rural. La motion et d'autres facteurs politiques ont exercé des pressions très constructives sur notre gouvernement et l'ont amené à faire plusieurs nouveaux investissements. Comme je l'ai mentionné, il prévoit investir 1,7 milliard de dollars dans le Fonds pour la large bande universelle, d'autres investissements dans la technologie satellitaire et des mesures de politique publique relativement au spectre. Toute une série de mesures a été prise. Étant donné la lenteur du processus parlementaire...

(1600)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je me permets de vous interrompre.

Au sujet des acteurs municipaux dans nos circonscriptions, je parle régulièrement avec M. Jacques Ladouceur, qui est le maire de Richelieu ainsi que le préfet de la MRC de Rouville. S'il n'y a pas beaucoup de circulation, cela vous prendra 35 ou 40 minutes pour vous rendre de Richelieu à Montréal. Ce n'est pas très loin. C'est une circonscription où il y a des zones rurales, mais ce n'est pas forcément une circonscription rurale.

M. Ladouceur m'a dit qu'on peut lancer tout l'argent qu'on veut par la fenêtre, mais — vous le reconnaissez en partie dans votre motion — le CRTC se fonde sur certaines règles pour évaluer la qualité de la connexion Internet. Je ne suis pas un expert en la matière et je me fie, comme nous tous, aux acteurs locaux qui s'y connaissent. Le CRTC mesure la qualité de la connexion Internet d'une certaine façon. S'il y a un endroit sur la carte où il y a une certaine qualité de bande, la zone n'est pas considérée comme prioritaire. À 35 minutes de Montréal, il est concevable qu'on puisse trouver une maison dans un rang qui a une bande de bonne qualité, mais ce n'est pas le cas des autres maisons, et toutes ces dernières s'en trouvent pénalisées.

Je remercie la ministre de démontrer une ouverture à parler aux élus municipaux de ma circonscription. Les maires de ma circonscription reconnaissent le problème et je n'ai aucun doute que c'est la même chose dans la vôtre.

Pourquoi se limiter à dire que le gouvernement a fait des investissements et qu'on va se pencher sur la question? Pourquoi ne pas y avoir été avec plus de force? C'est bien beau, l'argent, mais il faut autre chose. Vous-même et les élus municipaux de votre circonscription avez cerné le problème. Pourquoi ne portez-vous pas le message à la Chambre qu'il faut faire quelque chose de plus, par exemple changer les règles du CRTC?

M. William Amos:

Je crois que le processus menant à ces changements — aussi bien législatifs que réglementaires ou fiscaux — est entamé. La Loi sur les télécommunications est en train d'être réformée. Je suis certain que cela va faire l'objet de discussions importantes en cette période électorale et à la suite de l'élection. C'est le moment opportun pour présenter des solutions concrètes.

Oui, nous pouvons nous adresser directement au CRTC et c'est ce que nous avons fait la semaine dernière. Des représentants du Conseil ont comparu devant le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie pour discuter des aspects réglementaires et de ses investissements. En effet, le CRTC a un fonds de 750 millions de dollars qui provient uniquement de compagnies de télécommunication et non des contribuables directement. Toutes ces discussions ont lieu présentement, mais il n'y a pas de solution facile. Voilà l'enjeu. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai demandé ces deux études. Nous ne pouvons pas considérer que certaines choses sont acquises. En tant qu'électeur, je voudrais qu'un parti politique me propose non pas une solution, mais une gamme de solutions, qu'il s'agisse du spectre, du côté fiscal des investissements ou de la réglementation.

Avons-nous maintenant toutes les pistes de solution pour remédier à ces problèmes? Je ne le crois pas. C'est pour cette raison que j'ouvre la discussion. Je crois au potentiel de 338 députés qui ont à cœur la ruralité canadienne.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ma dernière question rejoint celle qu'a posée M. Graham plus tôt. Deux études qui forment un tandem, on ne voit pas cela souvent. Pour ce qui est de la sécurité publique, j'apprécie que vous ne vouliez pas qu'il s'agisse d'une réflexion après coup.

Cela dit, y a-t-il des acteurs précis à qui nous devrions parler? Il est question des inondations et, notamment, des divers équipements. Sur quoi le Comité pourrait-il se pencher pour être utile en ce sens? Le préambule touche largement les aspects économiques et réglementaires, mais qu'envisagez-vous pour nous?

(1605)

Le président:

Répondez rapidement, s'il vous plaît.

M. William Amos:

Je pense ici à des associations de pompiers, à des services de police, à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités et aux autres regroupements municipaux ainsi qu'à des maires de petites collectivités situées d'un bout à l'autre du Canada. Il faut écouter les Canadiens. Connaître leurs histoires et leurs expériences, c'est connaître la réalité. Je trouve que la représentation des petites collectivités manque parfois au Parlement. Je pense aussi aux services de sécurité de l'ensemble du pays. C'était là quelques pistes.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Picard, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Monsieur Amos, vous disiez que vos concitoyens étaient impatients de voir l'établissement d'une infrastructure de téléphonie cellulaire. On peut les comprendre.

Quel est le degré de réalisme de vos concitoyens quant au temps que prendra la mise sur pied de ce système? Cela ne se fera ni en un jour ni en une semaine.

M. William Amos:

Honnêtement, c'est l'aspect le plus difficile de notre travail et, en l'occurrence, du mien. Je sais qu'en militant pour obtenir des solutions concernant l'infrastructure numérique, je m'expose aux critiques. C'est certain. Les gens veulent des solutions, mais les auraient voulues hier. Ce n'est pas dans deux ou trois mois et encore moins dans deux ou trois ans qu'ils veulent une connexion Internet. Ils l'auraient voulue hier, et avec raison. Il sera très difficile pour moi d'amener mon électorat à envisager entièrement le temps que cela va prendre. Pourtant, il faut commencer par le début et s'attaquer à ce problème. Pour cette raison, je suis très heureux des investissements que fait notre gouvernement. Plus de 5 milliards de dollars étalés sur une décennie, cela constitue un investissement sérieux.

M. Michel Picard:

Au-delà du besoin, il y a aussi la question de l'acceptabilité sociale. Les gens veulent avoir les infrastructures le plus rapidement possible, mais souffrent du syndrome du « pas dans ma cour ».

Je vous donne un exemple. Je demeure à 25 minutes de Montréal, entre cette ville et la circonscription de mon collègue M. Dubé. Du côté de la montagne où j'habite, dans ce qui est pourtant une banlieue urbaine, le signal cellulaire est faible, voire inexistant. Les gens qui viennent chez moi ne peuvent donc pas se servir de leur cellulaire. Des démarches ont été entreprises pour régler ce problème très réel, et des tours de téléphonie cellulaire vont être érigées dans ma circonscription et dans celle de M. Dubé. Évidemment, il y aura toujours des cas où la tour ne sera pas au bon endroit, mais il faut ces tours. Les gens veulent des solutions, mais ils ne veulent pas l'équipement qu'elles exigent.

Quelle est la perception des gens dans votre circonscription?

M. William Amos:

Ce genre de débat aura toujours cours. En milieu rural, la discussion est peut-être moins difficile du fait que la grande majorité de mes concitoyens sont en faveur de ces tours et acceptent ce genre de compromis.

Cette question n'est pas nouvelle. C'est une préoccupation que tentent de gérer tant le CRTC qu'Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada depuis des années. Toute la dynamique du « pas dans ma cour » est importante et il faut gérer ces aspects.

C'est dans de petites collectivités loin des grands centres urbains que sont soulevées la grande majorité des préoccupations de sécurité publique découlant du manque de services de téléphonie mobile. Par conséquent, la question de ne pas vouloir de tour dans son arrière-cour se pose moins. Il est sûr que cette préoccupation demeure, mais elle est moins importante.

(1610)

M. Michel Picard:

Quand on planifie la mise sur pied d'une infrastructure, il faut savoir établir des priorités. Or, la téléphonie cellulaire et l'Internet sont un vecteur économique prioritaire, un élément de croissance économique, voire une obligation. En effet, si l'on veut faire des affaires, il faut avoir un cellulaire et être branché à l'Internet. Sinon, il est illusoire d'espérer réussir. Cette priorité en est une dont bénéficie l'ensemble de la communauté.

Cependant, nous parlons ici de sécurité publique. La question est donc de savoir si, dans la planification, il faut consacrer une partie de nos efforts à répondre aux préoccupations sociales, commerciales, économiques ou industrielles tout en réservant une bande passante à l'usage exlusif des premiers répondants en cas de catastrophe, par exemple dans le Nord. Je me souviens notamment de ce qui s'était passé à Fort McMurray, où la police et les pompiers ne communiquaient pas entre eux sur la même bande et ne parvenaient parfois même pas à se parler. Dans pareil cas, il est nécessaire d'avoir des lignes dédiées et une infrastructure correspondante.

De quelle façon devrait-on alors établir les priorités lors de la mise sur pied?

M. William Amos:

C'est une très bonne question et c'est exactement la raison pour laquelle je souhaiterais que ce comité mène une étude approfondie. Je peux offrir mon avis sur la façon de partager le spectre disponible entre les services de sécurité et ceux offerts au grand public, mais le député de Pontiac n'est pas un expert en la matière. Je ne peux donc pas répondre à ce genre de question, pourtant très pertinente.

M. Michel Picard:

Avons-nous les moyens, la capacité et l'autorité d'imposer aux compagnies d'investir pour développer leurs réseaux? À un certain stade, cela soulève la question du rendement du capital investi. La raison pour laquelle on ne voit pas ces compagnies en milieu rural est probablement qu'il ne s'y trouve pas la masse critique nécessaire à ce rendement.

M. William Amos:

L'État impose aux compagnies de télécommunications d'investir dans l'infrastructure numérique par l'entremise du CRTC et a annoncé, il y a deux ans, un fonds de 750 millions de dollars sur cinq ans. Il y a une semaine, le CRTC a commencé à recevoir les premières soumissions et ces fonds proviennent directement des compagnies de télécommunications.

La question qu'il faut se poser, et je voudrais certainement que le CRTC y songe, est la suivante: cette somme de 750 millions de dollars sur cinq ans est-elle appropriée? Faudrait-il l'augmenter? Cet investissement a été annoncé en décembre 2016. Après le budget de 2019, les investissements dans ce domaine viennent d'augmenter de façon appréciable. [Traduction]

Le président:

Il est plus facile de respecter le déroulement de la séance quand le témoin tient compte de la présidence.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Amos, d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

Ce n'est pas moi, ni qui que ce soit dans ma circonscription, qui va vous contredire sur la nécessité d'une infrastructure en milieu rural et d'une meilleure connectivité. Ma circonscription couvre environ 30 000 kilomètres carrés et est principalement rurale; les problèmes de connectivité y sont courants, partout sur le territoire.

Par exemple, un comté a demandé 2 millions de dollars au programme Brancher pour innover qui a été lancé il y a un an et demi; il souhaitait ainsi mettre en place les premiers jalons d'un plan de services Internet à large bande dans la région afin de fournir bon nombre des services dont ses résidants ont besoin. Sur les 500 millions de dollars versés à l'échelle du pays, le comté a reçu 200 000 $ des 2 millions demandés. Les responsables et moi étions certes déçus, mais cela les place aussi dans une position très délicate où ils doivent déterminer comment ils peuvent aller de l'avant avec le dixième des fonds demandés. Comment peuvent-ils faire le travail qui s'impose?

Je sais que vous n'y avez pas participé, mais si vous comparez cet enjeu à l'étude sur la criminalité en milieu rural au Canada que nous venons de faire, l'une des choses que nous avons étudiées au cours de ces travaux était... C'était la sécurité publique, et il y a beaucoup d'endroits où les gens ne peuvent pas joindre les forces de l'ordre parce qu'ils n'ont pas accès au 9-1-1, et c'est parce que l'infrastructure nécessaire n'est pas en place.

En ce moment même, des Canadiens en milieu rural avec qui j'ai échangé depuis la tenue de cette étude sur la criminalité se demandent si... Maintenant, nous parlons d'infrastructures numériques pour les régions rurales, mais nous n'avons pas réussi à accorder la même attention à la criminalité, et c'est une question de sécurité publique. Les gens se demandent à quel point il est crédible que ces infrastructures soient déployées.

En somme, ma question pour vous est la suivante: au-delà des fonds du programme Brancher pour innover qui ont été mis de côté pour cela et qui ont été versés, a-t-on envisagé de recourir à la Banque de l'infrastructure mise en place par ce gouvernement, ou savez-vous s'il est possible de l'utiliser de cette façon... ou encore quel montant a déjà été versé pour des projets de connexion Internet en milieu rural?

(1615)

M. William Amos:

Je vais peut-être commencer par répondre au début de votre question. Vous représentez une circonscription de 30 000 kilomètres carrés. La circonscription de Pontiac a une superficie de 77 000 kilomètres carrés. Nous parlons d'énormes circonscriptions dont les besoins sont importants. Toutes les collectivités rurales du Canada font du rattrapage. Voilà la simple réalité. Je ne dis pas cela pour faire preuve de partisanerie, mais la réalité est que le gouvernement Harper n'a pas investi suffisamment dans ce secteur, et nous accusons du retard.

Nous mettons maintenant en oeuvre des programmes gouvernementaux qui agitent une carotte au bout du nez des entreprises de télécommunications, qui les incitent à investir davantage, et le programme Brancher pour innover a remporté un certain nombre de succès majeurs. Les fonds sont versés en ce moment, mais je pense que nous avons conscience que nous devons prendre de nombreuses autres mesures en raison des situations comme celle que vous avez décrite. Je suis sûr que les besoins de votre région en matière d'infrastructure Internet s'élèvent à plus de 200 000 $, et nous devons parvenir à satisfaire ces besoins. Le budget de 2019 va vraiment nous aider à parvenir à ce stade.

En ce qui concerne la Banque de l'infrastructure, le budget a indiqué clairement qu'elle serait envisagée comme source de financement. J'ai hâte que la ministre Bernadette Jordan, notre ministre du Développement économique rural, présente un plan relatif à une stratégie de développement économique rural et collabore avec notre ministre de l'Infrastructure, François-Philippe Champagne, pour proposer un plan visant à nous démontrer comment des capitaux supplémentaires pourraient être affectés à ce projet parce qu'en fin de compte, la tâche consistera à inciter des entreprises du secteur privé ou...

M. Glen Motz:

L'adoption d'une approche liée davantage aux partenariats public-privé est-elle la bonne façon de faire avancer ce projet?

M. William Amos:

Je pense que cela fait partie de la solution, mais que ce n'est pas la solution en entier, parce que, dans certaines circonstances, le secteur privé décidera de ne pas investir dans certaines régions, qui seront alors laissées pour compte. Nous devons permettre aux gouvernements régionaux et aux organismes sans but lucratif de travailler ensemble à combler ces manques. C'est la raison pour laquelle cela exigera du temps. Il y aura une période pendant laquelle les entreprises évalueront les endroits où elles souhaitent tirer parti des mesures d'incitation et investir. Ensuite, nous procéderons à une analyse des manques, puis nous réexaminerons la situation et nous prendrons des mesures supplémentaires. Je pense que ce sera un processus itératif.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Madame Sahota, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je cède mon temps de parole à M. de Burgh Graham. Ce sujet l'intéresse vivement. Par conséquent, je crois qu'il est juste de lui accorder plus de temps.

Une voix: Il a 25 questions de plus à poser.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'en ai pas autant que d'habitude.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

(1620)

[Français]

Monsieur Amos, il y a une base de la SOPFEU, à Maniwaki, dans votre circonscription. La fin de semaine dernière, il y a eu le Rendez-vous aérien. C'était sûrement intéressant et j'aurais aimé être là.

La SOPFEU a un service de radio à basse fréquence qui traverse la province du Québec. Cela fonctionne dans tout le secteur sud du Québec, à 55 ou 56 degrés de latitude Nord. Tous les services cellulaires sont à haute fréquence, à partir de 400 mégahertz et même plus haut.

Depuis que vous êtes député, y a-t-il des compagnies de télécommunications qui vous ont parlé de solutions créatives et hors normes? On parle toujours du 5G et du 24 gigahertz. Entre vous et moi, le service de 24 gigahertz sera difficile à mettre en place. Vous a-t-on déjà fait part de solutions créatives?

M. William Amos:

J'avoue que je ne suis pas expert dans le domaine. Je ne connais pas d'entreprise qui offre ce genre de solutions. Je suis d'accord sur ce que vous avez dit et sur la prémisse de votre question.

Hier, j'ai eu l'occasion de rencontrer des gens de la SOPFEU. Ils ont organisé le Rendez-vous aérien, à Maniwaki, auquel j'ai eu le grand plaisir de participer. Nous considérons ces gens comme des héros dans la Vallée-de-la-Gatineau. Nous les considérons comme des héros canadiens et des héroïnes canadiennes. Je suis certain qu'ils seront en Alberta et en Colombie-Britannique cet été, et certainement au Québec.

Je reviens à votre question. Quelles sont les solutions novatrices qui permettront d'accéder aux différentes bandes du spectre? Je ne le sais pas. Cela revient à la question qu'a posée M. Dubé sur la tenue de ce genre d'étude. On ne peut pas supposer que les politiciens auront les réponses à des questions techniques. Nous avons besoin que nos ingénieurs et nos entrepreneurs nous proposent différentes options, afin de recommander ensemble les pistes qui nous semblent les plus abordables et les plus prometteuses.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Plus tôt, vous avez discuté avec M. Dubé des autres témoins possibles. Vous avez mentionné notamment les associations de pompiers et la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, ainsi que d'autres.

Devrions-nous nous tourner vers des compagnies de télécommunication qui pourraient nous fournir des solutions créatives? Je parle ici de compagnies autres que des entreprises traditionnelles comme Bell ou Telus. Devrions-nous étudier la question du spectre, comme vous venez de le mentionner, et déterminer si le système de spectre actuel répond à nos besoins dans les régions?

M. William Amos:

Absolument. Ce sont toutes des questions très importantes.

Oui, il y a une gamme de petits acteurs dans le secteur des télécommunications. Dans le Pontiac, par exemple, la compagnie PioneerWireless a beaucoup de potentiel. Cependant, il est parfois plus difficile pour les petites compagnies d'accéder aux programmes gouvernementaux. Ces gens auront certainement des suggestions à faire. Je serais très reconnaissant envers le Comité s'il abordait la façon dont les compagnies de télécommunication — les grandes, mais aussi les petites — voient l'enjeu de la sécurité publique et la façon dont elles pourraient présenter des solutions à cet égard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme cette législature tire à sa fin, il ne reste pas beaucoup de temps. La semaine prochaine, ce sera pratiquement terminé.

Si vous pouviez envoyer un message au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de la 43e législature, quel serait-il?

M. William Amos:

D'abord, je voudrais réitérer l'importance de cet enjeu. Ensuite, je voudrais souligner qu'il est considéré de façon unanime comme un enjeu non partisan. Je crois que les choses vont mieux, au Canada, lorsque nous nous attaquons aux grands problèmes de façon non partisane. C'est un enjeu très complexe. Il est trop facile de pointer du doigt, de blâmer les autres et de faire le jeu de la politique. Mes concitoyens et ceux de l'ensemble du Canada rural n'ont pas besoin de cela. Enfin, jetrouve qu'il serait très utile que le Comité recommande au futur Parlement de revenir sur cet enjeu. Il faudrait reconnaître que nous n'aurons peut-être pas l'occasion d'aller au bout de ce dossier, mais qu'il serait possible d'y revenir lors de la prochaine législature.

(1625)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci.

Je tiens à remercier l'intervenant, c'est-à-dire M. Amos, d'avoir fait un exposé sur cet enjeu. Comme mon homologue l'a déclaré, je suis entièrement en faveur de la tentative de brancher notre pays afin de bénéficier d'une couverture cellulaire.

Je remarque que la partie (iii) du libellé de votre motion indique ce qui suit: (iii) continuer à collaborer avec les entreprises de télécommunications, les provinces, les territoires, les municipalités, les communautés autochtones et les organismes d'interventions d'urgence concernés.

C'est la partie de cette motion qui m'intéresse un peu. La plupart des provinces ont établi un programme de communications d'urgence qui relie entre eux les services d'ambulance, les services de police et les services d'incendie. À ma connaissance, ce programme est en place dans la majeure partie du pays depuis de nombreuses années.

Avez-vous parlé aux gouvernements provinciaux, aux gouvernements municipaux ou à leurs homologues territoriaux, ou les avez-vous abordés, afin de déterminer quel rôle nous devrions jouer, selon eux? D'après moi, ce travail ne peut être accompli uniquement par l'industrie. L'industrie ne nous fournira pas cette connectivité par elle-même.

Votre circonscription a environ la même dimension que la mienne, monsieur Amos. Je crois que ma circonscription comporte à peu près la même superficie de terres inhabitées et à peu près le même nombre de municipalités et de comtés que la vôtre. Ma circonscription compte 11 comtés, qui luttent tous séparément pour tenter d'obtenir ce service, mais ce n'est pas rentable pour l'industrie. J'estime qu'il faut que nos comtés, nos provinces, notre gouvernement fédéral et l'industrie communiquent entre eux.

Je me demande si les habitants de votre région ont discuté du secteur dans lequel nous devrions intervenir, selon eux. Le montant à investir est important. La somme que vous avez mentionnée, à savoir les 750 millions de dollars, est seulement un léger aperçu de l'argent qui devra être investi si nous voulons offrir au Canada une couverture égale d'un océan à l'autre. Cela coûtera des milliards de dollars. L'industrie nous a dit que, de façon réaliste, l'investissement requis pour assurer une couverture nationale serait probablement de l'ordre de 5 à 7 milliards de dollars.

Je me demande si vous pourriez formuler des observations à ce sujet.

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de me poser cette question. Je voudrais aussi vous remercier d'être un excellent collègue. Nous travaillons ensemble au sein du comité de l'environnement, et au cours de notre voyage dans l'Ouest, nous avons eu le plaisir de visiter une petite partie de votre circonscription, qui est magnifique et toute spéciale. Voilà une expérience que je n'oublierai pas.

Vous avez parlé du rôle des gouvernements provinciaux et m'avez interrogé sur mon expérience à ce sujet alors que nous tentons de réunir les fonds nécessaires pour acquérir une solution de plusieurs milliards de dollars. Je pense que vous avez raison. J'ai entendu divers chiffres, dont celui de 15 milliards de dollars.

Je pense néanmoins que quelque chose a changé depuis les élections de 2015: les provinces sont maintenant disposées à s'impliquer plus sérieusement en effectuant des investissements d'envergure. Je peux parler de la situation au Québec, où la province a fourni des fonds de contrepartie dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover. Dans le Pontiac, j'ai eu l'occasion d'annoncer des investissements de plus de 20 millions de dollars dans les services Internet à haute vitesse. Le gouvernement provincial a fourni du financement de contrepartie pour toutes les contributions du gouvernement fédéral. Je dirais que les investissements fédéraux et provinciaux constituent un peu plus de 50 % environ du montant total de 20 millions de dollars.

Je pense que nous entrons un peu dans une nouvelle ère, car malgré le fait que les télécommunications relèvent sans contredit du gouvernement fédéral, on admet que la responsabilité financière est tout simplement trop lourde pour qu'un ordre de gouvernement l'assume à lui seul.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Si je vous comprends bien, je pense que nous avons accordé près de 160 millions de dollars au Québec dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover. Le Québec a-t-il investi 161 millions de dollars au cours des quatre dernières années?

(1630)

M. William Amos:

Je pense qu'il a investi au moins cette somme, voire légèrement plus. M. Graham aurait peut-être les chiffres exacts en tête. Je ne les ai pas en mémoire, mais je suis certain que je pourrais vous les communiquer ultérieurement.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Savez-vous si certains de vos comtés ont investi? Je pense que votre circonscription, à l'instar de la mienne, comprend un certain nombre de grands comtés. Ces derniers cherchent-ils à investir? Avez-vous abordé le sujet avec eux?

M. William Amos:

Mais certainement. En fait, la circonscription du Pontiac compte trois administrations municipales, qui gèrent chacune une quinzaine de municipalités. Deux de ces administrations ont uni leurs forces pour présenter une soumission au programme Brancher pour innover. Leur projet n'a finalement pas été retenu, mais cela montre que les projets viendront non seulement des grandes entreprises de télécommunications, mais aussi des municipalités qui travaillent en collaboration avec de petits fournisseurs de service et des consultants qui leur prodiguent des conseils. C'est un des défis que nous voulons les aider à relever.

Le président:

Madame Dabrusin, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci. Je céderai mon temps à M. Graham.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez cinq minutes de plus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais certainement m'en prévaloir.[Français]

Merci, monsieur le président.

Dans le passé, les entreprises privées n'investissaient pas dans l'infrastructure numérique tant qu'il n'y avait pas une subvention fédérale, provinciale ou d'une autre source. Vous venez de dire que le Québec a subventionné en grande partie les services Internet sur son territoire. Je pense que c'est beaucoup plus que 50 % des subventions fédérales et provinciales qui venaient du Québec, qui a largement contribué à cela.

Comment peut-on contourner le problème lié au fait que les compagnies refusent d'investir avant de recevoir des subventions? Doit-on commencer à construire des infrastructures numériques entièrement publiques?

M. William Amos:

Il y a certainement des entreprises qui donneront pour argument que la nationalisation de cette infrastructure est la direction à prendre. Je n'appuie pas cette vision ou cette perspective parce que cela coûterait trop cher aux contribuables. Il serait très difficile pour les contribuables de couvrir les milliards de dollars déjà investis. Effectivement, on veut se protéger d'une situation où les investissements n'auront pas lieu tant que des subventions n'auront pas été accordées.

Cela dit, nous accordons tous à cet enjeu une grande importance. Il y a déjà une forme de concurrence, comme je l'ai dit en réponse à une question de M. Eglinski. Les municipalités et les gouvernements régionaux, souvent en collaboration avec les petites compagnies, sont en concurrence avec les grandes compagnies de télécommunications. Selon moi, il faut s'assurer qu'il y a une bonne gestion de la concurrence entre les gouvernements régionaux, les petites et les grandes compagnies. C'est sûr qu'ils seront tous à la recherche de fonds publics, qu'ils proviennent du fédéral, du CRTC, du provincial ou d'autres sources.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le programme Brancher pour innover, si une entreprise bénéficiait d'un investissement du fédéral, il fallait qu'elle donne un accès public au système. Pourrait-on envisager une exigence semblable pour les services cellulaires, si le fédéral ou le provincial contribue à la construction des tours et qu'il y a un accès plus ouvert que ce que le CRTC prévoit, ou cela nuira-t-il encore plus à l'investissement?

Des compagnies de télécommunications comme Bell, Rogers et Telus nous disent qu'il ne vaut pas la peine qu'elles installent une tour parce qu'une compagnie qui n'a pas de tour embarque immédiatement sur leur système.

Quel est l'équilibre entre un accès ouvert et un monopole d'investissement?

M. William Amos:

C'est une question très complexe que le CRTC aborde. En tant que politicien et non-expert, je suis réticent à dire comment il devrait trouver cet équilibre. C'est une question tant technique qu'économique. Il faut certainement trouver un équilibre. Il est dans l'intérêt des Canadiens qu'il y ait une concurrence accrue, mais, en même temps, il faut encourager les compagnies à investir dans des infrastructures fixes, c'est-à-dire dans les tours et la fibre optique.

Je crois que notre gouvernement essaie de trouver cet équilibre avec une directive qui pousse les compagnies à baisser leurs prix. Il demande au CRTC d'aller dans ce sens, mais, en même temps, il doit offrir des incitatifs, que ce soit par l'entremise du programme Brancher pour innover ou par d'autres programmes. Il faut des incitatifs pour donner de bonnes raisons aux entreprises privées d'investir des capitaux dans cette infrastructure.

(1635)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Amos, si je voulais disparaître numériquement, devrais-je déménager dans le Pontiac?

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Glen Motz:

Oui, nous pouvons organiser le tout à Ottawa.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Oui, je sais. Il y a au sein du Comité un certain élément qui préférerait cela.

M. William Amos:

Eh bien, je pense que vous pourriez commencer par parler avec votre conseiller en médias sociaux. Il pourrait effacer vos comptes, ce qui vous ferait disparaître quelque peu.

Non, vous ne disparaîtrez pas dans le Pontiac. En fait, cette circonscription comprend un très grand nombre de régions bien servies. Elle commence dans les banlieues nord de Gatineau, qui sont servies à 100 %, comme on pourrait s'y attendre dans une grande ville du Canada, mais dès qu'on est à 20 minutes de Gatineau, ce n'est pas...

Le président:

Je pourrais donc disparaître numériquement à 20 minutes de Gatineau.

M. William Amos:

Vous le pouvez, mais pas à 20 minutes. Vous devriez aller un peu plus loin. Vous pourriez...

Le président:

Notre comité de la sécurité publique s'intéresse à des personnes qui ne travaillent pas nécessairement dans l'intérêt public, si l'on peut dire. Est-ce que certains groupes préféreraient disparaître numériquement, si l'on veut, créant ainsi un problème de sécurité publique? Je pense notamment à certaines des personnes dont nous avons peut-être entendu parler dans le cadre de notre étude précédente sur la criminalité en région rurale, mais est-ce qu'un groupe auquel nous ne pensons pas constitue un problème de sécurité publique?

M. William Amos:

Juste pour être certain de bien comprendre la question, me demandez-vous si certains ont intérêt à maintenir l'obscurité numérique afin de se tenir à l'écart de la culture numérique prédominante que nous devrions protéger?

Le président: Oui.

M. William Amos: S'il existe de telles personnes, elles ne viennent certainement pas frapper à ma porte dans le Pontiac...

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. William Amos: ... et les maires et les conseillers municipaux ne viennent pas me voir pour réclamer de l'aide. Dans ma circonscription, il est certainement possible de vivre en dehors du réseau en menant une vie de reclus, profitant des avantages de la capitale nationale, ayant accès à un aéroport international et à un réseau de transport moderne et jouissant de tous les bonheurs de la vie urbaine quotidiennement, tout en vivant dans les bois.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un s'oppose activement à votre motion?

M. William Amos:

De fait, certaines personnes ont soulevé des préoccupations en matière de santé au sujet des fréquences émises par les stations cellulaires. La question fait toujours l'objet de recherches scientifiques, et je pense que ces recherches devraient se poursuivre, car il est important qu'elles soient réalisées. Ce n'est qu'une infime minorité qui s'oppose à la motion.

Le président:

J'ai une dernière question. Nombre de communautés rurales se trouvent en situation de grande vulnérabilité. Selon un article paru il y a une ou deux semaines, Huawei offre l'accès à bas prix. Notre comité se penche d'ailleurs sur la question depuis quelques mois. Avez-vous une opinion sur les services que Huawei propose aux communautés rurales à des taux suprêmement bas?

(1640)

M. William Amos:

Il me semble que de nombreuses entreprises — comme Nokia et Ericsson, pour n'en nommer que quelques-unes — proposent les technologies que Huawei offre. Les hautes instances de notre gouvernement étudient les questions de sécurité nationale que soulève cette entreprise. Je suis convaincu que tout sera fait dans les règles de l'art. Je fais confiance au processus.

Peu importe ce qu'il se passe de ce côté, le Canada aura accès aux technologies 5G nécessaires pour construire des infrastructures numériques dans toutes ses régions rurales. Il ne s'agit plus que de trouver l'entreprise qui fournira ces technologies et les services.

Le président:

D'accord. Sur ce, au nom du Comité, je vous remercie d'avoir comparu.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 10, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.