header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under faae...

  1. 2019-02-05: 2019-02-05 FAAE 125
  2. 2019-02-19: 2019-02-19 FAAE 127

Displaying the most recent stories under faae...

2019-02-19 FAAE 127

Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Michael Levitt (York Centre, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone. I call to order the 127th meeting of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development.

This morning we will be continuing our study on Canada's support for international democratic development. We will be hearing from four individuals this morning. Our first two speakers are on the line.

First, from London, England, from the Westminster Foundation for Democracy, we have Anthony Smith, the chief executive officer.

Good morning, sir, or good afternoon.

Mr. Anthony Smith (Chief Executive Officer, Westminster Foundation for Democracy):

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

From Washington, D.C., from the National Endowment for Democracy, we have Carl Gershman, the president.

Gentlemen, I would ask you to deliver your introductions, each taking maybe slightly less than 10 minutes. I know that everybody will have lots of questions for you. We'll finish off the hour with those.

Mr. Smith, perhaps I could have you begin.

Mr. Anthony Smith:

Thank you very much, Chair. I'll try to be quicker than that.

I'm very grateful for your invitation to give evidence to this inquiry. Having read the remarks of some of your previous witnesses, I won't repeat some of the general points they made about the recent trends in democratic governance and what they said about the importance of supporting democracy around the world. I fully endorse what they said and I also strongly endorse the points they made about the importance of Canadian support for democratic governance.

I think the most useful contribution I can make to your committee is probably to describe the origins and governance of my organization, its current work and some of the factors that have affected our approach in recent years.

The Westminster Foundation for Democracy was established in 1992 at the initiative of a cross-party group of parliamentarians who wanted to support their counterparts in eastern Europe and in other regions that were enjoying new freedoms following the end of the Cold War. Since our Parliament did not have the means to fund such work, they approached the British government which, having looked at the practices in the U.S. and Germany in particular, decided to establish our foundation. Since then, our governance structure and mission have remained broadly the same.

We are an arm's-length body of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, so the board and the CEO are appointed by the foreign secretary. The board is non-executive and has six political members. At present, they are all members of Parliament—they don't have to be. It has four non-political members as well.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office approves our strategy, but we have operational independence in our work. Although we are not a parliamentary body, the Speaker of the House of Commons is our patron, and we work very closely with all the U.K.'s Parliaments, including the devolved Parliament and assemblies. The U.K. political parties are obviously critically important to us. Our mission remains the same now as it was in 1992: to support improvements in democratic governance in developing and transition countries.

Today we have offices in 30 countries and we work with four main stakeholders: Parliament, political parties, electoral bodies and civil society. Our focus is the quality of the political system in our partner countries, so our main areas of thematic focus are women's political participation, inclusion of marginalized groups, accountability and transparency.

Our dominant methodology is peer-to-peer support, sharing experiences among counterparts. The details of each program are different and tailored to the requirements of our individual partners. I can provide examples later on. There are also many in our annual report and on our website. We also have a small research program and a research partnership with the University of Birmingham in England.

On our funding, we receive an annual grant from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. This has been steady at £3.5 million in recent years. We also receive grants from the U.K. government, and from a range of other donors for programs in specific countries or regions for which we usually compete with other organizations. Our overall revenue this year will be about £17 million.

Let me just mention three factors that have affected our recent approach to the work in this area. The first factor is interests versus values. We are very much a values-driven organization, but we can no long rely on values alone to persuade donors to invest in democracy support. We also point out that democracy is a critical contributor to all the U.K.'s international priorities from security through to prosperity, from poverty reduction through to carbon reduction. My guess is that it's the same for Canada and all our other allies in their international priorities.

We also want to be clearer than in the past about the specific elements of democratic practice that count, be it financial oversight, policy-driven political parties or gender-sensitive parliaments. It's no good anymore just to say that we support the general idea of democracy. We have to be much more specific than that.

(0850)



The second factor that affects our work is that change takes time. We believe that progress comes through patient investment in a combination of institutions and leadership. Institutions need skills and a political culture that's adaptive, tolerant and resilient in the face of the inevitable challenges that every country will face, but every country also needs leadership to respond to those challenges and to take up opportunities when they arise.

In some ways, time in this work is more valuable than money. Democracy needs modest resources but abundant patience. I would add that for us as an organization, the position that we're in today, which is feeling pretty strong at home, has taken 25 years of work to get to. So we've needed patience domestically as well.

These two factors feed into the final one that I want to mention, namely, how to work as effectively as possible to support democracy. My feeling in the U.K., and my observation in other countries, is that effectiveness has to start with a clear policy. Each country, be it the U.K., the U.S., Canada or whichever it might be, needs a well-developed democracy support policy that will secure broad political consensus. We haven't all had that all of the time, but I think it is a very important element.

With a strong policy, we can establish a coherent approach across government and help to maintain support over a long period. Without a strong policy, there is a risk of incoherence and a short-term approach.

Mr. Chair, I'm happy to elaborate on any of those points, but those are the main things that I wanted to say to start off the discussion.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are now going to Carl Gershman.

Sir, please begin your remarks.

Mr. Carl Gershman (President, National Endowment for Democracy):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and thank you to the committee for inviting me to testify this morning.

I applaud the fact that you're initiating a study of Canada's role in democratic development around the world. I've long believed that Canada has a critically important role to play in this field, never more so than at the present time.

NED was founded 35 years ago, at a hopeful moment, when what was subsequently called the third wave of democratization was just beginning to gather momentum. As, of course, we well know, the current period is very, very different. The year 2018 marked the 13th consecutive year, according to Freedom House, in which democracy has declined around the world. This period has seen the rising power and assertiveness of authoritarian states like China, Russia and Iran; the backsliding of once democratic countries like Turkey, Venezuela, the Philippines, Thailand and Hungary; and the rise of populist and nationalist movements and parties in the established democracies. Autocratic regimes have tried to repress independent groups working to promote greater freedom and to cut them off from international assistance, from institutions like the National Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute, NED's party institutes. They've also passed harsh laws that make it illegal for NGOs to receive foreign assistance.

The work nonetheless goes on and has even been expanding, which is a testament to the determination and the courage of indigenous groups that want to continue to work and receive needed assistance despite the risks. We should not forget that despite all the backsliding, there have also been important gains over the past year in Ethiopia, Armenia and Malaysia. NED provided support to democrats in all of these countries before the political openings, which positioned us to quickly scale up our support once the openings occurred. This is an example of our commitment and ability to navigate around the obstacles created by authoritarian regimes and to continue to provide assistance, while taking care to protect the safety of our grantees.

NED is an unusual institution. It was built to take on tough challenges. Following President Reagan's historic Westminster address in 1982, which called for a new effort to support democracy throughout the world, NED was created as a non-governmental organization governed by a private and independent board of directors. NED receives its core funding in the form of an annual congressional appropriation that was authorized in the National Endowment for Democracy Act passed in 1983. The NED Act also built a firewall between the endowment and the executive branch of our government.

NED is a private, bipartisan, grant-making institution that steers clear of immediate policy disputes and takes a long-term approach to democratic development. In addition to supporting grassroots democratic initiatives, it also serves as a hub of activity, resources and intellectual exchange for democracy activists, practitioners and analysts around the world.

NED takes a multisectoral approach to democratic assistance, funding programs by its four core institutes, which represent our two major political parties, the business community and the labour movement. I'm aware that you heard from the presidents of our two party institutes, NDI and IRI, just two weeks ago. Each of the NED's four core institutes is able to access its sector's expertise and experience from all over the world. In addition, its targeted demand-driven small grants program responds directly to the needs of local NGOs, defends human rights, strengthens independent media and civic education, and empowers women and youth in a manner that enables them to establish credibility as independent democratizing forces in their own societies.

As an autonomous institution dedicated to supporting democracy, NED can steadily strengthen indigenous civil society organizations, learn through trial and error, and build important networks of trust and collaboration that can be effective over the long term.

As a nimble private organization with no field offices abroad, NED has developed a reputation for acting swiftly, flexibly and effectively in providing vital assistance to activists working in the most challenging environments. It also devotes enormous efforts to monitoring the work of our grantees and to fulfilling our fiduciary responsibilities in the careful management of taxpayer funds.

(0855)



NED further leverages its grants program through networking and recognition activities that provide political support and solidarity to front-line activists. These activities include the World Movement for Democracy, which networks democracy activists globally; the Center for International Media Assistance; the Reagan-Fascell democracy fellows program; and our own democracy award events on Capitol Hill.

NED also promotes scholarly research through the International Forum for Democratic Studies and the Journal of Democracy, giving activists access to the latest insights on aiding democratic transitions and strengthening liberal values, and also helping to inform thinking internationally on critical new challenges facing democracy.

In 2015, the Congress provided NED with additional funds to develop a strategic plan to respond to resurgent authoritarianism. As part of this plan, NED now funds programs that address six strategic priorities: helping civil society respond to repression; defending the integrity of the information space; countering extremism and promoting pluralism and tolerance; reversing the failure of governance in many transitional countries; countering the kleptocracy that is a pillar of modern authoritarianism; and strengthening co-operation among democracies in meeting the threat to democracy.

By pursuing common strategic objectives, the entire net effort has become stronger and more integrated, with greater co-operation taking place across the different regions and among the five institutions—NED and its four core institutes—that comprise what we call the NED family.

As Canada thinks about how to establish an effective, and cost-effective, way to advance democracy in the world, I suggest that you consider the distinction that is drawn in a new European report between what it calls top-down and bottom-up approaches to democracy assistance. In essence, the top-down approach supports the incremental reform of, for example, the judiciary or other institutions, often in a technocratic way and in partnership with governments that may be only superficially committed to democratic reform. The alternative bottom-up approach responds to and seeks to empower local actors in addressing immediate challenges that they face and developing their capacity to promote reform and institutional accountability over the long term. The report recommends a substantial strengthening of the bottom-up instruments, such as the European Endowment for Democracy, an organization modelled on NED, which the report says has been effective in dealing with the current difficult challenges.

I want to conclude by stating my strong and long-held belief that Canada has the ability to make an important contribution to strengthening democracy internationally, especially at this very uncertain moment when liberal democracy is under attack around the world. You have hundreds of dedicated democracy practitioners, many of them veterans of NDI and IRI programs, who have the experience to lead a new Canadian effort.

The U.S. is still engaged in this work, and there is strong bipartisan support in the Congress for what NED does and for human rights and democracy more generally. However, the American voice is now more muted than in the past, and the time has come for Canada to step up and provide a new source of democratic energy and drive.

There are many practical ways that you can help, but the decision to create a new instrument to provide such help will itself be an important act of democratic solidarity, one that will give hope to many brave activists and make our world a safer and more peaceful place.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

(0900)

The Chair:

Thank you very much to both of you.

We'll move right into questions. We're going to begin with MP Alleslev, please.

Ms. Leona Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill, CPC):

Thank you very much to both of you for being here and helping out with this important conversation.

My first question is for both of you.

It's quite concerning that we've seen 13 consecutive years of the erosion of democracy. I'd like to know, one, has that erosion over the past 13 years been equal, or have we seen it accelerating in recent history? Two, with all the work that the U.K. and all of us—the international bodies and even Canada without a specific institution—have been doing, why are we still seeing a significant erosion? To what would you attribute that erosion? What problem are we trying to solve?

Anthony.

(0905)

Mr. Anthony Smith:

My response to the first question is that I don't believe there is a continuing acceleration of decline. I think the decline coincided with a period of a range of crises in the world, including an economic crisis. The causes of it range from the political conflicts that resulted from those crises along with the phenomenon we've seen of countries adopting the form of democracy but in a hollow way, without the reality of a democratic culture underpinning that form. Many people who had an autocratic approach to government learned how best to maintain power without resorting to the more extreme forms of autocracy we've seen in the past.

As to why the erosion has taken place, I think that's partly covered by the answer I just gave. We mustn't forget that there has been a hugely welcome amount of progress in the world in terms of democracy over the last 50 years. If you look back even further, you should be even more encouraged. The erosion is something that has happened because politics is difficult in places. The ability of people to exploit weaknesses in democratic institutions has increased. People learn lessons and share those lessons about how to do that.

I think we all have to keep doing our work. As I said in my opening statement, this is slow, patient work in many places. The experience that the three countries represented in this meeting have of building our democracies over generations is something that many other countries don't have yet. They are still working on that. It does take time.

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

Mr. Gershman.

Mr. Carl Gershman:

I don't know that there has been an acceleration, but the trend is steady and very worrisome. I think we should start by at least recalling....

I referred earlier in my testimony to the third wave of democratization. That was the period that began with the fall of the Portuguese military in 1974 and then grew and expanded. It really covered the whole world except for the Arab Middle East, which then had the revolutions of 2011. This really came to a head at the end of the 1990s. The number of democracies in the world reached a peak in 2005 of about 125. We've seen this reversal since then.

I should point out that in the theory put forward by Samuel Huntington about the third wave, he said that the third wave assumes the possibility of a reverse wave, just as the first two waves of democratization had reverse waves with the rise of communism and fascism in the 1930s. Then there was the backsliding in the newly decolonized countries in the 1960s and 1970s, with the rise of military dictatorships in Latin America.

I might note that in 1976, Daniel Patrick Moynihan said that democracy is “where the world was, not where the world is going”. It was a very pessimistic moment. He had been ambassador in India, and India had an emergency at that time, yet that was at the very point where the third wave of democratization was beginning. We shouldn't get too upset by these reversals. They are sort of built into the process of development. In terms of reversal, obviously there are things like the economic crisis of 2008, globalization and the fact that many people have been left out of globalization, and the so-called dictator's learning curve, where dictators learn how to use forms of democratization while increasing repression, making it more difficult to attack them. All of these things are factors.

I did point out in my testimony that we should not forget that gains have been made. What's happening now in Ethiopia, Armenia, Malaysia and even Tunisia, the first Arab democracy, is very, very important. We need to be able to encourage those trends. The political scientists, in talking about the current period, do not use the term “reverse wave”. They do not feel we're in a reverse wave. It has been called a recession. It may get worse, and this is what we have to fight against, but I would not exaggerate the backlash and the backsliding.

(0910)

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

That leads to my next question.

Both of you have institutions that have been in place for quite some time. If you had to do it over again, and you were starting to create an institution at this moment, what key things would you do differently or focus on to set it up for success, recognizing this moment in time and where we're going next?

The Chair:

Gentlemen, we have about 30 seconds left, so you might want to address that as part of an answer to a subsequent question. If you want to take a very brief amount of time each, I'm happy to let you do so.

Mr. Anthony Smith:

I'll build that into a—

The Chair:

You'll build it into a future one. Okay.

We're going to move to MP Vandenbeld, please.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

Thank you, both of you, for coming here and showing models of what this could look like.

I'd like to direct my first question to Mr. Gershman.

It's good to see you again. In your opening remarks, you mentioned that Canada has a critical role to play. I wonder if you could elaborate on that. In what particular niche area do you think Canada could play a role? Particularly in terms of the previous question, how do you think we could learn from the institutions that exist around the world? What should we be doing in terms of our own democracy promotion?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

Canada is a parliamentary democracy, and I do think it has an important role to play in strengthening parliaments around the world. It also is a country that has played a lead role in a number of critical countries, like Iran, Ukraine and many others. I think Canada is primed to be able to help in those countries. These are very difficult countries, and I think Canada can develop the capacity to work in a low-profile way in these very difficult countries, especially the more authoritarian countries like Russia, Iran or even China. I think it's possible.

We have, frankly, a very significant program in North Korea. The programs are actually supporting groups in South Korea working in North Korea, but really, it's possible to find openings in many places around the world to work and to support democracy activists who are all over the world.

I think Canada, working closely and with its experience and the networks it already has, has the capacity to connect with all of these networks and to work quietly in these very difficult places.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

My second question is for both of you.

Both of you mentioned the importance of a long-term presence on the ground.

I think, Mr. Gershman, you said that in certain places you were able to scale up when there was a window because of the presence and the networks that were there.

I'd like to talk about not just the physical presence of having an office in a country but also the movements and the networks. I'm thinking of the World Movement for Democracy and other networks. How important is it?

Mr. Smith, you mentioned that time is more important than money, which is a very significant statement, I think.

Perhaps we could start with Mr. Gershman and then Mr. Smith about the importance of having a constant presence.

Mr. Carl Gershman:

Regarding the question of offices, first of all, let me underline that the NED is a unique institution with its four institutes. We are not a programmatic agency. We're a grant-making agency with an oversight responsibility. We don't have offices anywhere in the world. We sometimes say that if they don't like us, they can't kick us out because we're not there, but we find ways of supporting indigenous groups on the ground in all of these countries. That includes Russia, where we were declared undesirable in 2015, yet the program has expanded since then quite remarkably. We're able to work in this way.

The World Movement for Democracy is something that was established—it's now celebrating its 20th anniversary—and represents a network of activists all over the world. Thank you, Anita, for being a member of the steering committee of the World Movement for Democracy. As I think you know, it's going to be holding its 20th anniversary celebration in Malaysia in July. We just had Anwar Ibrahim deliver the Lipset lecture in Canada—in Toronto last week—and in Washington, so there's a lot of co-operation at that level.

These networks are able to connect people with each other to learn from each other and support each other. They become real learning and solidarity networks. I think they've been extremely valuable. When you supplement this with the research, the fellowships and other things, there are various ways you can support people in addition to providing grants to local NGOs and also the kind of programs that our institutes carry out, which are on-the-ground training programs in many countries.

(0915)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

Mr. Smith.

Mr. Anthony Smith:

Very quickly, the key issue for us about long-term presence is that what we're trying to support is a democratic culture. Helping to share rules and procedures and technical skills is one thing. What really counts is the leadership and the understanding at every level when political challenges arise. It is important for everyone within an institution to demonstrate tolerance, understanding and a commitment to democracy. Those things really are not learned overnight, as we know from our own countries. They take a long time. That's what it's about.

The presence for us is sometimes physical. We have 30 offices in different countries, but actually we have relationships with many more countries. That comes both through our own technical staff but also through the U.K. political parties, which are part of our foundation and have relationships that they've built up over a period that is coming up to generations now.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

Both your institutions mentioned autonomous, arm's-length from government. I think, Mr. Gershman, you mentioned a firewall.

If an entity is created, how important is it that it be arm's-length from the daily back and forth of government? How do you go about doing that?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

I think it's critically important.

There are different levels of independence. I should note that in his testimony, Mr. Smith noted that the board is appointed by the foreign secretary, and they approve the strategy and the budget. That's not the way it works. NED has a greater degree of independence. I think Canada is going to have to determine the level of independence this can have.

I think the firewall has been critically important in giving us the flexibility and independence to move quickly and to get into very tough situations, sometimes before our government is ready to do that, sometimes when our government may have diplomatic initiatives under way. Somebody may say that if this were connected by an institution without an arm's-length relationship, it may be very difficult.

We were able to be active in Egypt during the Mubarak period. We're active there today, and also in Russia. We're active in China. This gives us the freedom to work, despite the diplomatic engagement that our government may have. That's how Congress wanted it.

This process has worked. In other words, it has not created complications for our government. It strengthened it, as I pointed out. In countries such as Ethiopia, Armenia and Malaysia, when an autocratic government falls, the fact that we have been there and have been involved there has given us the capacity to move very quickly to begin to strengthen the groups that are involved in the transition process. I think that's absolutely critical. I call attention to these three countries because we have to work together to help democracy succeed in these countries. If it does succeed, it's possibly going to give new momentum to democracy in other countries around the world.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

MP Duncan, please.

Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NDP):

Thank you very much, both of you, for your work. What your countries are delivering is very profound.

Following up on what my colleague just mentioned, Mr. Gershman, I noted that you said your endowment is established by statute, and that creates a firewall by law. I'm wondering, Mr. Smith, if you could speak to that.

I'm interested in the issue of political interference or accountability. It would be a two-way street. Some people may object, saying that if all of these initiatives are being delivered by somebody at arm's length, then the government doesn't have to say it's accountable for how those monies are being spent. On the other hand, if you do have a firewall, then it does give you the independence from the government of the day.

I'm wondering if both of you could speak to that.

Mr. Anthony Smith:

Let me start.

Our operating model provides political stability in that we are a cross-party organization. All the parties in our Parliament are represented on our board. This means that in agreeing to a long-term strategy and in taking day-to-day operational decisions, we need to hit that sweet spot where we will maintain the support across our Parliament, across our political system, if you like, for what we do.

Certainly in my four and a half years at the foundation, we have not had any decision that has caused controversy between the members of the board from the governing party and the members of the board from the opposition parties. We have all been in a position whereby we've supported the type of action we're taking, because there is cross-party support for work on democracy. That's the way we have maintained our ability to operate in an objective way that retains cross-party support.

The second thing responds partly to that and partly to the previous questions.

I think the first question for Canada is not necessarily an institutional one; it's a policy one. The first thing we need in our system—and I think it would apply to Canada too—is clarity about that vision, that you, across the political spectrum in Canada, want to work on these issues, want to be committed to these issues over the long term and are willing to fund them.

The question of the institution is the next one. The foundation is not, by the way, the only instrument our government uses for democracy support. It uses many institutions, including the ones that Carl mentioned, our colleagues at NDI and IRI. The institutions question is, if you like, a secondary one. Different models can bind in the political support you need.

Thanks.

(0920)

Mr. Carl Gershman:

I'll quickly correct one thing.

The NED Act did not establish NED. The NED was incorporated as a private organization in the District of Columbia. What the NED Act did was build that firewall and also authorize the funding for the NED, but it did not establish the NED because the NED is really a non-governmental organization, which is critically important.

I think that at the same time, of course, it's completely accountable. It has to abide by all the financial regulations. It has to be transparent and open and to let the administration and the Congress and everyone know what it's doing. It is bipartisan. I think one of the critical factors that Canada needs to think about here is that, when our government changes, the NED does not change. The only thing we do differently, if the party in power changes, is that we have somebody in the chair of our organization, chosen by us to be the chair of the board, being of the same party as the party in power. We do nothing else. The board remains the same. The policies of the institution don't change. We adjust to the conditions in the world, to what's happening in the world, and we are able to pursue a consistent long-term policy. Obviously, it has to be consensual with what is consensual among our parties that we're not pushing in one direction or another. There's kind of a bipartisan and even labour-business balance built into the institution. I think that's critically important.

I think Canada had an experience 13 years ago with another democracy institution. I think a lot of the trouble came when the party in power changed and there developed a conflict between the board and the staff. You have to build stability into something like that over the long term so that it doesn't reflect all the changes in the politics.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Thank you very much.

I'm interested that your two organizations actually deliver your services and your support in different ways. Mr. Smith outlined that they actually have 30 in-country offices, whereas the NED does not have any in-country offices.

My question is for both of you. Who decides what the priorities are, and how do you move toward what Mr. Gershman mentioned, which I think is really important, that it be a bottom-up initiative? If you're going to build democracy, in my view, it will last longer if it's bottom-up. I'm interested in the two approaches.

How do you decide what the priorities are in the receiving country if you don't have in-country offices?

What is your experience, Mr. Smith, of having in-country offices in order to develop the priorities for your organization?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

Anthony, why don't you go first?

Mr. Anthony Smith:

Thank you, Carl.

Our programs can only exist and operate if we have a partner in the country. We do not go in with an agenda for a country and say, “This is what we want it to do.” Of course, we have an overall strategy that pulls out certain things that we think are critically important for good democratic practice around the world, but that's a pretty broad mandate for us.

Our methodology when we have an in-country office is that we have a partner, which would typically be a parliament, but it could be an electoral body or a civil society, which we think has an agenda that it is important to support and we can find added value in what we do to support it. We will take that agenda and use the contacts we have both in the U.K. and in other countries, including Canada, by the way, to share experiences that we think would be helpful to push that agenda forward. Although that in-country presence is very important, we do have relationships in other ways in other countries as well.

(0925)

The Chair:

Thank you.

MP Saini.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Are you not going to let Mr. Gershman answer? No?

The Chair:

We're—

Mr. Carl Gershman:

I'll come back and try to answer that.

The Chair:

You can answer that in responding to the next question. Exactly.

MP Saini, please.

Mr. Raj Saini (Kitchener Centre, Lib.):

Good afternoon, gentlemen.

Mr. Gershman, I'm going to start with you.

One difference between your two organizations that I noticed, and I think you mentioned this in your opening remarks, is something very important. You mentioned that you also support business organizations in the countries. The WFD does not. Can you tell me why you think it's important to support business organizations?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

Our Center for International Private Enterprise is unique in this field because business is often seen as a dimension of development and not democracy, whereas it's absolutely critical. A lot of the countries—Egypt, Ukraine and others—that had failed transitions failed because they couldn't get the economy right. We call it CIPE, Center for International Private Enterprise. It's able to work with the informal sector, with business associations and with think tanks. Really, it's not a development organization, but it helps in shaping the approach to the market economy to make the market economy work, to be democratic, to be free of cronyism and to be really a dynamic force in this.

I just want, in 30 seconds, to respond to the previous question to say that there are democracy activists throughout the world, including business associations, that need to be supported on the ground. It's not just a single local partner. We are responsive to demands that come from the ground, and our institutes are as well. We are a demand-driven organization.

Sorry, go ahead.

Mr. Raj Saini:

My next question is for both of you.

Mr. Gershman, in your opening remarks, you alluded to the changing geopolitical reality in the world. You have countries that are nascent democracies, that are having difficulty taking off. You have democracies that have been established over a short period of time, like the Visegrad nations, which are now reverting. You have the rise of populist movements. More important, out of all of that, it seems to me there's a vacuum of leadership because you have the involvement of China and Russia, whether it be in Latin America or in Africa or in Asia.

Democracy building 20 to 25 years ago was much different from what it is today because you have new actors who are trying to pursue their own prominence or their own reputation in that region of the world, i.e., China and Russia. How do you deal with this new set of factors, especially where China's been more involved in countries where democratic governance is an issue, and Russia's more involved, especially in the satellite states or the near abroad countries that it has in its sphere of influence? How are you going to deal with that impact but also continue your work in those parts of the world?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

First, let me say that the idea of having other actors is not new. When the NED was established, you had the Soviet Union, which was another actor. I think what happened after the collapse of communism in 1989 through 1991 was people assumed that challenge was over. Actually, somebody called it a vacation from history. We didn't face these challenges anymore. What we've learned since 9/11 in 2001, since the rise of China and Russia more recently, is that there are rivals and that if we retreat from the world, these vacuums will be filled by such powers.

Right now, today, we've seen the disruptions, the penetration caused by the Soviet Union, especially in using trolls on the Internet, but China represents a much more serious threat. It's wealthier. It's investing much more money. Our figures show that China is spending somewhere in the order of $10 billion a year on what it calls external propaganda or malign activities in different countries. This could be in the form of information activities. It could be in the form of penetrating societies through what we call sharp power.

This is a new issue that people are facing. They're just coming to the realization of this in Washington. It's something we have to get our hands around. It's something, of course, we're trying to respond to with the strategic priorities we've shaped.

(0930)

Mr. Anthony Smith:

If I have time to contribute, although very briefly, one thing we really have to fight against is the view that development can be separated from democracy. I think we all know that Amartya Sen argued strongly against that. Democracy is development.

What you see now is a Chinese editorial in The Economist magazine, paid for, which says that the old dichotomy between democracy and autocracy is dead; the new dichotomy is between bad governance and good governance. China is very good at governance, and therefore is a model that others should follow. That, literally, is what has been published by China.

I think we have to be very clear within our own administrations, including the development ministry where I used to work, that you cannot promote good governance without thinking about values and democracy. You need to think about the way in which people's voices are heard, and the ways in which accountability takes place, the mechanisms that are needed to prevent the abuse of power by those in the executive and in control. It's absolutely essential to push this argument, both with those whom we know are malign but also within our own communities, which sometimes want to avoid some of those choices around democracy support. I think that's another reason Canada is so important in this debate.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

MP Finnigan, first of all, welcome to the committee. Please go ahead with your questions.

Mr. Pat Finnigan (Miramichi—Grand Lake, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair. Thanks to our guests for being here.

As the chair said, I'm new on this committee, but very interested. As with anybody in this country, I follow democracy around the world, so I appreciate the chance to ask some questions.

I'll start with this. I'm the chair of the agriculture committee. International trade is very important for us and for most countries and it's growing. We're signing trade agreements across the world. How is it affecting democracy, or is it? Are we closing our eyes to authoritarian countries when we want to sign trade agreements? How would you describe how this new international trade or global trade is affecting democracy, or does it affect democracy?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

I think we want to keep a world order in which there is the rule of law and we have a rules-based world order in which countries can trade within a lawful system. We get into that only through promoting these values around the world and promoting movements in countries that want rules-based order in their own countries. If we have that, I think we will have a more open trading system. I think we have to find the right balance between defending our own sovereignty in many different areas and finding forms of international co-operation. I think we as an international community are struggling with that now.

Some countries are reacting against the pressures of globalization, but the need to maintain a rules-based international order is critical. If we can do that, I think that trade will proceed and will encourage economic growth. A lot of what China is doing today through its belt and road initiative is not promoting a rules-based international order. This is a geopolitical instrument that China is using. We've seen backlashes against this in countries like Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Malaysia. The Malaysian election in May was a reaction against the corruption encouraged in the way the Chinese are expanding their economic influence in other countries by buying off elites.

We need to defend the rules-based order. I think that's what's critical.

Mr. Pat Finnigan:

Thank you.

Mr. Smith, do you have any further comments?

Mr. Anthony Smith:

I have just a very brief addition to that. Within each country, obviously, you need to have democratic institutions that enable voices to be heard when the policies are made—the trade policy of the country—that provide confidence that the trade agreements the country is signing on to have been subject to oversight by the parliament and are subject to effective judicial oversight as well.

In the way that they're important for everything, democratic institutions within a country are critically important for an international trade agenda. They're important for a stable business environment. They're important for confidence in the democratic system of every country.

(0935)

Mr. Pat Finnigan:

Thank you very much.

Moving on, would you say there are threats of danger or evidence of threats of the democratic movement being eroded either from within or from outside of our countries, especially in the last 25 years with the arrival of the web? How has that affected the democratic movement around the world?

Either of you can answer.

Mr. Carl Gershman:

We once thought that social media would be a force strengthening indigenous democratic movements. Certainly these indigenous democratic movements use social media to strengthen their communications capability, their ability to get information out and their ability to network with each other. What we did not expect, and I think this is the surprise, was the way autocratic governments would master the Internet and use it to try to penetrate into societies, to disrupt democracy and democratic procedures and to encourage distrust. This has become very, very dangerous.

I want to really emphasize the need to maintain an open Internet. These issues are being negotiated every day. We don't want to see autocratic governments controlling the Internet. We have to fight for the independence of the Internet, but we also then have to defend ourselves against abuse from autocratic governments. We have to realize that this is the new frontier. This is the new front line of struggle for democracy in the field of information, and we have to master ways in which that can be done.

The NED published a report in December 2017 that really coined the term “sharp power” to distinguish it from soft power. Soft powers are our universities, our culture and the way it organically spreads around the world. Sharp power is the use of information and information tools by governments to penetrate and manipulate other societies. We have to understand that and we have to be able to defend ourselves against that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. The time is up.

We're going to move to MP Aboultaif, please.

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif (Edmonton Manning, CPC):

Good afternoon and thank you to both of you.

There is some mention of authoritarian capitalism and that makes it a challenge to protect and promote democracy, and from our perspective it keeps the challenge going. We know that democracy is a long process. It needs patience, determination and investment in many ways in order to maintain and continue promoting it in different places of the world. NED does excellent work supporting pro-democracy around the world.

Mr. Gershman, you spoke about the non-governmental character of the NED. You mentioned that this gives you a benefit of being more effective on the world stage. Are there any downsides to not operating as an arm, in this instance, of the U.S. government?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

Look, when I talk about a bottom-up approach and operating at arm's length from the government, I think this needs to be understood that this type of work is complementary to the things that our government does through its official policies and through the development agencies like USAID. Even now, our state department, through the democracy bureau, is funding programs. These are different types of programs. It's complementary. I think ultimately this type of diverse system works. The report I mentioned about bottom-up and top-down that was just done by a European organization doesn't talk about doing it all one way or the other. They recommend a strengthening of the bottom-up approach to complement what is being done by the governments in support of official institutions such as a judiciary and other official institutions in the country.

You need a complex and diverse approach.

(0940)

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:

We've known for the longest time that the free world is a free world. You mention the United States, Europe, Canada and Australia; this is the democratic world. It seems that the tie is always there between the government and the private or independent institutions out there. If you were to advise Canada in moving forward, how can we find a way to be more effective in engaging both sides?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

One thing that we have started doing in a number of African countries is to try to bring together the private sector, the government and civil society to have a common dialogue and a common approach. This is also something that can be done. The governments want this because they don't, on their own, have the capacity to do that. Again, I think it's a matter of bringing the different players together, understanding the importance of not just having a stable government but a rules-based order and a vigorous growth-oriented market economy. That's the role played by our business institute in trying to encourage that. We also have a labour institute which tries to make sure that the rights of workers are protected in the context of an open market economy.

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:

I have one more question.

Both of you mentioned in the introduction that there are some countries that are losing democratic institutions and democracy is actually in a recession, if you will. While we have made some improvements in other areas in the world, if we were to name a bright spot or optimistic area for us to operate in, where would that be? Can you name a few countries around the world where we must capitalize further?

Mr. Carl Gershman:

I did, and I really want to come back to this. I think that the transition that is now under way in Ethiopia is the most important transition taking place in the world. This is a country of 105 million people, 80 different ethnic groups. If they can make it work in Ethiopia, it will send a message around the world where the issue of ethnic division is so important. This is one area where Canada should go in right now—I'm sure you're already there in some ways—with whatever instruments you have because you have to move quickly in this kind of a situation.

I've also mentioned Armenia, which has a remarkable transition under way. It got The Economist's country of the year award for 2018. It's a remarkable transition. They are keeping it on balance and they are bringing in new forces.

The Malaysian transition, I think, is also critically important. Canada heard from Anwar Ibrahim when he spoke at the University of Toronto last Thursday.

If we can help make it work in those three countries, I think we will give democracy a shot in the arm.

Then there is also Tunisia, the first Arab democracy, which had local elections in May. They were important in spreading democracy to the grassroots. Tunisia is operating under a democratic constitution. It's a beachhead for democracy in a very unstable and undemocratic part of the world. I think we have to help make it succeed there.

The Chair:

Thank you to you both. That was a very interesting hour of questions and answers.

With that, we're going to pause for about five minutes to get our other witnesses ready, but for both of you, please enjoy the rest of your day.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Chair, may I ask a question?

The Chair:

Certainly.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

I'm wondering if Mr. Gershman can send us the citation to the report on top-down and bottom-up approaches. It sounds very interesting.

Mr. Carl Gershman:

Okay, but there is a hyperlink to the report in the testimony I sent to the committee.

If you want me to send a separate link to the report, I'm happy to do that.

The Chair:

That's fine. We'll be able to find the link and we'll make sure to distribute the report.

Mr. Carl Gershman:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, gentlemen.

We will suspend.

(0945)

(0950)

The Chair:

We are resuming for our second hour of testimony on Canada's support for international democratic development.

We have two guests for this hour of testimony.

With us is the Honourable Ed Broadbent.

Welcome back to Parliament Hill. It's really an honour to have you testifying before our committee.

We also have with us Jacqueline O'Neill, member of the Woodrow Wilson Center.

I want to thank you, Ms. O'Neill, for joining us from Washington, D.C. That's wonderful. Maybe we will get you to begin, because even though it's not too great a distance, these video connections sometimes can conk out on us. Would you please begin your testimony.

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill (Global Fellow, Canada Institute, Woodrow Wilson Center):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

Thank you for letting me appear from Washington. It would be cruel to tell you about the weather here today, so I won’t.[English]

Given that I am perhaps just slightly less well known in Canada than the Honourable Ed Broadbent, I thought I'd give you a bit of context on where I come from on this issue.

Several committee members and witnesses have talked about the prevalence of Canadians working in non-Canadian organizations on democracy promotion. Both my husband and I fit that description. He is from Vancouver Island, and after joining the Canadian Armed Forces, worked for the National Democratic Institute. He now works for a private U.S. firm, in Bosnia, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti and Iraq. I grew up and went to university in Edmonton. I lived in Ottawa for several years and have spent the last 15 years or so abroad.[Translation]

I helped Mr. Roméo Dallaire with the Child Soldiers Initiative.[English]

I worked in Sudan at both a UN peacekeeping mission and an all-women university. I also helped to lead one of the world's top organizations focused on implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1325. We've worked with institutions, with more than 30 governments and directly with coalitions of women in Colombia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Rwanda and many other places.

I'll just say that I've been lucky enough to see up close some of what works and some of what doesn't with regard to democracy promotion. Quite frankly, I will note that while I've always been a very proud Canadian, living in the U.S. for the last several years and having a front-row view of the erosion of democratic norms here has only reinforced my appreciation of what Canada has to offer on the world stage.

I've listened to all of the witnesses who have testified thus far, from two weeks ago and this morning, and agree totally with their headlines: democracy is under threat; authoritarians are emboldened; and Canada has a unique and important role.

Every speaker has also emphasized the importance of women's meaningful inclusion. What I'd like to do in my testimony this morning is unpack that a bit and discuss how Canada can do that in the smartest way possible, so here's a spoiler alert about my own headlines. They are, one, meaningful inclusion for women, with support for meaningful inclusion for women, is crucial; two, key to doing this well is thinking broadly about the ingredients of democracy promotion; and, three, we should energetically and unapologetically embrace this idea as core to Canada's brand and central to what we contribute to the global order.

I understand that part of objective of this study is to see how the field has developed since 2007. To start, we have important new data. Harvard researchers undertook a massive study and found that the single biggest predictor of whether a country goes to war with itself or with its neighbours is not its ethnic makeup, geographic location, GDP or dominant religion. It's how women are treated. Do they have access to their rights and are they included?

Another study found that even democracies with higher levels of violence against women are as insecure and as unstable as non-democracies. Why would that be? Researchers now propose that what occurs in a home is fundamentally a blueprint for how society runs and governs. If the dominant norm in the private sphere, in the home, is that men's interests trump women's, that differences are resolved with violence and that there is impunity for that violence, it becomes a template for dealing with all other forms of difference, including ethnic, ideological, etc.

Another new indicator of the centrality of women to democratization since 2007 is much more information about the fact that authoritarians have put women activists more squarely in their sights. The committee has heard about the shrinking space for civil society activism worldwide. Again, let's unpack that for a minute.

One of the most credible 2018 reports on the subject said that, by a large margin, women, including women's rights defenders and groups advocating for women's rights, are the most common target in the incidents they recorded. See the murder in Guatemala of indigenous environmental activist Berta Cáceres. See the arrest last week in the Philippines of Maria Ressa, a journalist and outspoken critic of President Duterte.

This weekend, I spoke with a friend in Sudan, who confirmed that women have been the primary organizers and front-line protestors of the demonstrations that have been going on there since late December. She confirmed that women are facing targeted rape and sexual assault and that in the last few days, security forces have taken on a new tactic of cutting off women's hair while they are exposed in the streets.

(0955)



In terms of women's political representation, where do we stand? As I think you know, about 24% of national parliamentarians globally are women, and that has doubled in the last 20 years. The fastest-growing area has been Latin America. Of particular note for this committee given your interest in promoting youth inclusion has been the fact that among women you see the greatest proportion of young people. About 18% of ministerial posts are held by women worldwide. Right now, there are only about 11 women serving as heads of state.

The trajectory is roughly good with some exceptions, but the overall pace of change is abysmal. How can Canada accelerate that pace of change?

I would argue that it is important to focus on the so-called traditional dimensions of political strengthening, such as building capacities of women candidates and members of Parliament, registering women voters, encouraging women to run and focusing on institutional capacities. I'd also argue that Canada can lead the way by thinking and acting more expansively, that is, by recognizing the connections between democratization and women's participation in a broad range of areas that determine governance. That includes areas like peace negotiations where forms of government are determined, constitution drafting where rights are enshrined or ignored, and non-violent civil resistance movements, which are the linchpins to sparking the democratic culture that Mr. Smith mentioned earlier.

That means playing a deliberate role in conflict environments, which are often the hardest and the messiest, but which also present opportunities for the most accelerated change. This bears out around the world. Of the 30 countries with the highest levels of women's representation, one-third are post-conflict.

In this case, strategic support for democratization means implementing Canada's national action plan on women, peace and security. It means funding the feminist international assistance policy and ensuring core funding for women's rights groups. It means insisting that women be at the table for negotiations in Afghanistan, North Korea, Venezuela and beyond, and maintaining a holistic perspective about the path to democratization, specifically resisting the idea that spending on defence equates to the only true investment in security.

I'm happy to speak to any of those issues, including technology, which I realize we haven't touched on.

If I may, to close, I want to address a notion that I've heard expressed several times, that Canada may already be pushing too hard or too fast on some of these issues, and that this could be alienating or counterproductive or harmful economically for us at home.

First, I say in response to this that this is no time to treat inclusion as a side item or merely nice to have. There are forces aggressively pulling people away from democracy. They are strong, well resourced and aggressive, and there is a profound cost to not meeting that pull with an equal and opposite reaction. It may not happen immediately but we will experience the costs from states that are more likely to traffic in drugs, weapons and people, to create or harbour terrorists, to enable criminal networks, to generate refugees, or even to suffer pandemics.

Very clearly, the fight for women's rights has never been isolated from the economy or from national security.

Finally, I have seen on too many occasions how people who want to hoard power often use the excuse that some changes that others are seeking are not “culturally appropriate” or are western driven. To be clear, culture has to inform tactics such as the messengers we use. It's a crucial consideration regarding our approach, but democratic values and the idea that women should have an influence on decisions that affect their own lives are not inherently western concepts. In my experience, those who tell outsiders to bring their capital but step back on anything related to power are usually the ones most fearful of being held accountable by their own constituencies.

I think our approach must always be respectful and humble, but we can and should talk about our values. It's more crucial now than ever.

Thank you.

(1000)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. O'Neill.

We will now move right along and I give the floor to you, Ed Broadbent.

Hon. Ed Broadbent (Chair and Founder, Broadbent Institute):

Mr. Chairman, and if I may say, my fellow colleagues or former colleagues, it's good to be back here, especially in consideration of such an important subject. I appreciate the opportunity of sharing some thoughts on how Canada can best support democratic development internationally. In particular, I will focus on the proposals made by an earlier incarnation of this committee in the report issued in 2007, in which it recommended the creation of two bodies: an arm's-length foundation for international democratic development and a centre for multi-party and parliamentary democracy, to be funded by that foundation.

I believe that in considering these proposals, the committee can do no better than to review the reasons for Parliament's decision in the 1980s to create the International Centre for Human Rights and Democratic Development, which fortunately has since been simply renamed Rights and Democracy, which is a little easier to say. Then, as now, much of the world was in turmoil and our parliamentarians came up with a modest, but effective, proposal for assisting people in developing nations in their efforts to develop democratic societies. In a unanimous report to Parliament, they recommended the creation of a single institution that would be clearly at arm's length from the government and would foster in developing countries provisions of the International Bill of Human Rights, and in so doing, would most effectively establish the foundation for a multi-party democracy. This key idea was accepted by the government of the day, Mr. Mulroney's government, and by the opposition parties, and resulted in the unanimous adoption of the bill creating Rights and Democracy that came into effect just before the election in 1988.

Of particular concern to parliamentarians at that time, as it should be today, was to avoid any form of Canadian imperialism lite, if I may put it that way. Our objective should not be to replicate our form of parliamentary democracy or our Charter of Rights; rather, it should be to foster human rights, which are universally recognized in the International Bill of Human Rights. This includes the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the optional protocol on the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and finally, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

With this emphasis, it was understood in the 1980s as it is today that many states, for example, in Latin America, have so-called competitive elections, but what they lack is freedom of speech, freedom of association, freedom to have a union, freedom of the press, and broadly speaking, the rule of law. As the broad sweep of western European and North American history has shown, the core foundation for a multi-party democracy is a society that embodies in its institutions and practices universal rights, which now include social and economic rights. Without human rights and the rule of law, so-called elections more often than not are simply a sham. With rights in place, however, men and women who were once excluded from the franchise used those rights to organize and demand their right to it. The act creating Rights and Democracy specifically focused on what it said was the need to reduce the gap between what some states are formally committed to, for example, in their constitutions, and what actually takes place within those states.

Since that time and now, many states have signed onto the international covenants but have failed to meet international standards for their implementation. Much of Rights and Democracy's most useful work has been to help bridge this gap between principle and reality, for example in Guatemala, Mexico, El Salvador, Peru, Kenya, Tanzania, Pakistan and Thailand. It was to pick up, as some of the earlier presenters said, a bottom-up approach, not top down. Most often this work was done by the institution with civil society partners in those countries, and it was those partners, not we Canadians, who established the priority for action. In the same countries, CIDA often worked on a state-to-state basis for the same objectives with the government of the day.

(1005)



I believe it's of great importance to understand that by combining the words “democratic development” with “human rights”, the former was not seen as an add-on to the latter; rather, it was to make clear that the emphasis on rights is precisely what is involved in democratic development. It's for this reason that I do not believe Parliament needs to create two institutes, as recommended by the committee in 2007, one for international development and then another one for multi-party and parliamentary democracy. I believe one institution can suffice.

The principal reason the former Rights and Democracy did not have programs specifically aimed at the development of multi-party democratic states, during my six-year tenure as president, for example, was simply a matter of resources. Considering the global scope of the mandate and the limited financial resources, we thought we should restrict our support to human rights activists and programs. I now believe that with an enhanced budget, one institution would be sufficient, and it could be made clear in legislation that the development of multi-party democracies should be part of its mandate.

Some other suggestions might also be considered in contemplating the content of legislation creating a new institution. It should be spelled out in that legislation, in my view, that the institution is “not an agency of Her Majesty”.

To help ensure all-party support for its work, I believe board members should be appointed after serious consultation with leaders of all the opposition parties. In addition, consideration should be given to appointing up to one-quarter of the board's members from developing countries.

In conclusion, I would like to emphasize how unique the structure, independence and importance of Rights and Democracy were up until nearly the end of its existence. In operating independently of the government, it gained credibility both with international NGOs and foreign governments. At the same time, as a creation of the federal government with its president appointed by Privy Council and having the institutional support of the Department of Foreign Affairs, I as president had more access to heads of government than almost any other international NGO.

It was because of the special combination of independence from the government of the day, yet being on a Canadian diplomatic passport that I was able to seek and obtain meetings with President Clinton, the King of Thailand, and the presidents of Guatemala, Mexico, Rwanda, Eritrea and Kenya, among others. Such meetings and the usefulness they provide for serious human rights action and discussion are simply unavailable to heads of NGOs.

In summary, I believe Canada should help the emergence of more democracies in the world, and do so in part by establishing an arm's-length institution whose purpose is to help facilitate in developing countries the implementation of the rights found in the International Bill of Human Rights.

I'm very much aware that the ideas I've briefly outlined raise a lot of questions that I will now try to answer.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much to you both.

We will get right into questions. We're going to begin with MP O'Toole.

(1010)

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC):

Thank you very much, Chair.

It's nice to see you, Mr. Broadbent. I am an MP who now represents part of Oshawa. I grew up in your wider area. We've had some good interactions over the years. It's nice to see you on the Hill.

I like how you positioned potentially leveraging Rights and Democracy and some of the work that's been done now to perhaps build upon and repurpose what has been done rather than starting something from scratch. Do you think that's the better approach, particularly when there's some expertise and there's a bit of a track record? Do you think it would be a setback to create something that would then perhaps run contrary to what another organization is already doing?

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

To look back on the foundations is good in this case, because the foundations were excellent.

I didn't work on the committee at the time—I was party leader—but I can say it was a remarkable all-party report in the 1980s, with a lot of enthusiasm, which led to the creation of Rights and Democracy. It had the support not only of the government, but of all the parties in the opposition, and for many years, whether it was in Mr. Mulroney's government, with Joe Clark as foreign affairs minister, or in Jean Chrétien's government, with André Ouellet as foreign affairs minister, there was an arm's-length relationship with the institute, but the emphasis of the institute was on grassroots organizations.

I should add, because it was a big part of the mandate, that women's rights were at the front and centre of our priority in developing countries then, as they should be now.

By the way, all parties were represented on the board, not as MPs, but in terms of their backgrounds. They came from all political persuasions in Canada. It was built on experience, and the institutional work is there. I would recommend the committee look at some of the reasons why it was created and why it was quite successful.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Thank you.

My next question will be for both of you. I'll probably run out of time, so I'll speak and then give you both a chance to answer.

Mr. Broadbent, you mentioned the need for all-party support and an all-party approach several times.

Ms. O'Neill, certainly with your background, working internationally and within the Woodrow Wilson Center...exposing how the International Republican Institute and the NDI make sure they can see themselves reflected within a larger movement.... Not only is that appropriate for our parliamentary democracy, but it likely will mean more buy-in by future governments.

I don't think we've ever tackled it quite that strategically to make sure that all parties can see themselves reflected. Do you think that's critical for making sure this works?

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

I think it is. To be quite candid, I had discussions with Mr. Mulroney when he offered to appoint me as the founding president. For reasons everybody will understand, the board in a broad sense had to be accepting of me going into that position. There were very good and frank discussions about membership on the board that ended up reflecting, as I said, all parties, and which Mr. Mulroney, of course, as prime minister and ultimately responsible for the act, readily agreed to, as did the successor government, the Liberal government with Mr. Chrétien.

The all-party buy-in was a very important reason for its success.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Ms. O'Neill, would you care to comment on that aspect?

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

Yes, I would agree completely and say just two things. One is what we heard earlier about the need for a shared political objective. It's exactly as you're saying. It has to be a political objective that is shared across parties in order for this to be sustainable.

Then, to pick up on something which Mr. Broadbent said in his testimony, the idea about ensuring there are representatives from the so-called global south or developing countries, etc., on the board within the governance structure also ensures both relevance and cohesion and a sense of buy-in and commitment, as well as more direct representation to the service itself, which also increases buy-in over time.

(1015)

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

In terms of accountability, might it be something where we try to make sure there's an annual report to Parliament or some mechanism like that so that this isn't just an institution that sits on a shelf and has no active relationship with Parliament?

Are there any learnings there from both of you?

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

The act creating Rights and Democracy had that as a requirement. There was an annual report that went to Parliament. The institute was audited by the Auditor General annually as well.

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

[Inaudible—Editor] always all for parliamentary oversight.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Finally, in terms of the track record, Mr. Broadbent, you said that often the countries were held...and that we looked at the gap between their constitutional underpinnings and the reality on the ground. How did we assess the reality on the ground? Was it working in partnership with Global Affairs or Foreign Affairs, or was it specifically done by Rights and Democracy?

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

It was a mix. Especially in the early years, when Joe Clark was foreign affairs minister, there was active emphasis on human rights in developing countries. The embassies collaborated with us and had their own independent assessments. When we would go into a country, or when I would, we would check with the Canadian embassy to get their assessment, frankly, of what was going on for sure. Normally, there was a very constructive interplay. We would report later, too. It was a unique institution that Canada had.

Part of its reason for success, I think, was that we are not a big power. We are not the United Kingdom. We are not the United States. Even though my position was as an appointment of the government, a Privy Council appointment, we managed to be seen for what we were, legally independent of the government. We were not accountable, except through Parliament, to the government on a day-to-day basis at all, and we didn't run into suspicion, if I can put it that way, from NGOs or governments. There was no confusion that I was speaking for the government, as it wasn't the case. The independence was respected, but the connection with the government—I'll come back to that again—was very useful. The fact that I was in one sense institutionally representative of the Government of Canada opened the doors that would otherwise not be open to many NGOs, for example.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will now move to MP Vandenbeld, please.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you very much.

It's very good to have you back on the Hill, Mr. Broadbent. We could probably be here all morning asking questions.

I will be asking my questions to specifically Ms. O'Neill, because I would really like to delve a little bit more into the gender specific, the equality, the inclusion, and the complementarity of that with what we're talking about in terms of institutional development. When you think of political parties, when you think of parliaments, when you're looking at things like democracy, it's not immediately evident how this intersects with the feminist international assistance policy. We know, however, that if you don't have those inclusive institutions, if you don't have those voices of all members of the population represented, if you don't have the institutions right, you can't actually have gender equality in a particular geographic area.

If we created some kind of entity focused on democratic development, not just specifically women's participation in those institutions but also the structure of those institutions themselves, how would that actually contribute to the feminist international assistance policy? Perhaps I could ask you to elaborate on that.

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

Exactly as the speakers in the previous session mentioned, some of the biggest challenges we're seeing right now are with the most fragile or perhaps regressive democracies. I believe they call them shallow. They are the ones who have taken steps at an architectural level very quickly and have either not had the cultural change underpinning them or been genuinely inclusive. There is a quick-fix option that I think we're seeing that is not resulting in sustainable results.

What does that mean for women's representation, women's inclusion and its connection to this issue? Specifically to your question, if there were to be an institution set up, I would, number one, want to ensure that it's not very narrowly defined as being only, for example, political party strengthening or candidate strengthening. I think it has to be, as many other speakers have referenced, broadly inclusive of civil society. It would also be crucial that staff there understand, and the programming reflect, a really sophisticated understanding of different contexts and different ways and different responses for supporting women, i.e., when they are appropriate and when they are not.

A great deal of study and scholarship experience has been gathered on, for example, saying that different types of quotas are more likely to work in different contexts. We need to make sure we understand that. We need to understand the different types of support that women's civil society networks are more likely to need to receive than either mixed or primarily male-dominated civil society networks. We need to have a level of sophistication and understanding about how to do this embedded in any institution.

I think Canada's far better placed to do this than almost any other country I have worked with. I mean, we have members of the Canadian Armed Forces who know how to do gender-based analysis plus. The national action plan was generated through your committee, overseen through this committee, and done with massive consultation across the country. There are people who have the expertise on this and who can do more than say that women's rights are important and we must protect those as a means of ensuring inclusion. I'd say there should be a real depth of expertise and a professionalization of that service within any future institution or set of institutions.

(1020)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I noted in your testimony you said that gender equality is not a side issue, that it's actually core when you look at economy, at security. You talked about the costs of not doing this in terms of terrorism, criminality, the lack of security, refugee flows. Could you elaborate a little bit on that?

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

Sure. It's always been very difficult to quantify the cost of exclusion, but we're seeing that there's a strong correlation between countries that behave in ways that are, over time, costly to us—as you were saying, generating refugees, not playing by the rules in terms of trade internationally—and the ways they treat women internally. There are many different studies—and I'd be happy to point them out to the committee—to help substantiate this fact that it is no longer something that we can say is just a side issue, or is just nice to have. Rather, it's crucial.

Finally on that point, I'd say our enemies or our adversaries are very much understanding this point. They're understanding the power of women and of gender dynamics to advance their cause. They don't call it GBA+. They don't call it a gender analysis, but terrorist groups are recruiting women very deliberately. The majority of Boko Haram's suicide bombers are women. The majority of those are girls, child soldiers. There are numerous organizations pulling away from democracy that have understood the potential for women to help them advance their objectives. They're being much savvier about the way they do that. I think we need a response that's equally thoughtful.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You mentioned also in your testimony the specific targeting of women human rights defenders, women political figures. Is there a different or even more specific way that women are being targeted in these institutions and women in politics are being targeted?

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

Yes. Some of the first ways that women experience the shrinking of space for their work is through a reduction in freedom of movement, a suffocation of space. They're either less likely to be able to assemble internally within the country and meet together or to travel internationally. They get increasing amounts of physical threats online. They're being publicly defamed at a much higher rate, especially with their honour and their integrity being attacked. It's also much harder now for international organizations or governments to get money to organizations of women human rights defenders. There are escalating ways that these groups are being increasingly targeted.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Just as a reminder, Ms. O'Neill, if you want to send in any additional reports for consideration, please send them to the clerk and we'll make sure that we add them as part of the study material.

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

I would love to. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

MP Duncan, please.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Thank you very much.

Of course we'd like to have everybody here all day long. The most important discussion that should be going on is about building democracy.

By the way, Ms. O'Neill, of course you're fabulous, because you're from Edmonton, as am I.

Your testimony is raising lots of interesting questions in my head, and I'd be interested to hear both of you respond to this—particularly Mr. Broadbent. Mr. Gershman reminded us that the National Endowment for Democracy was not founded by government. It was founded through NGOs, and they set the terms and objectives for the organization. The federal government simply funds it.

That raises a question in my mind. Is it really going to be an independent organization if the government creates it? What do you think is the best direction to go in for establishing this to make sure that it is arm's-length from government?

(1025)

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

If you look at the Rights and Democracy act, you can see that very careful attention was paid to this question about the tenure of appointments, the accountability of the institution to Parliament—not just to the government—and the representation of non-Canadians on the board that came into being. All of these measures contributed significantly until right at the end, when it was a disaster.

To be candid, Mr. Harper's government.... The only time there was a sort of government departure from neutrality happened when Mr. Harper put a number of highly partisan people on the board. This led to very serious conflicts within the institution about priorities. The net result was, well.... The then president died of a heart attack, as a matter of fact. It was a terrible situation. The government then just abolished it. I would put down that the reason for this is that it was the one and only time a government moved to put a partisan shape on the board, which any government can do, of course. Up until then, whether it was a Conservative government or a Liberal government, there was no attempt by any government to interfere in any way, either by stacking a board or by issuing directions.

To get back to your question, it can't be foolproof. It can't have legislation that will be permanently protected from a government if a government decides to do something that is inappropriate.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Do you believe the appointments to this entity should be by government...?

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

Well, that's what they were in the past and there was consultation between the government and opposition parties. The government still made the decision, but there was serious consultation with the leaders of opposition parties to try to make sure that the appointments that were coming had some direct or indirect experience in human rights, for example, or activism of some kind, and were acceptable to all of the parties.

I have no apprehension in principle about the government making the appointments, as the government makes the appointments to the Supreme Court and by and large we've had a very impartial Supreme Court, certainly in terms of ideological orientation. Nothing's foolproof, but if you have a good act and then the government acts in good faith and in consultation with other parties, I think it can work.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Ms. O'Neill, I wonder if you could speak to this, and then you, Mr. Broadbent.

There's one thing that puzzles me. I think there is some interest in the current government in re-establishing such an organization, yet the Global Affairs budget right now doesn't see judicial development, democratic development, human rights, women's rights and so forth as working together. They're all separate lines in the Global Affairs budget and, in fact, democratic participation in civil society is given next to nothing.

Does the creation of this entity also mean that we need a rethink within Global Affairs and within the government, and how would they work together? That's a small little question.

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

My biggest concern, should there be the creation of an institute, would be to ensure that it wouldn't absorb too much funding away from local civil society organizations and networks. I can see a lot of compelling reasons why it would be useful for coordination and enabling the benefits that comes from arm's-length government.

I also thought that the earlier point about the act of symbolism of this right now, at this moment in time, is powerful, but I'd want to ensure that we wouldn't redirect too much funding, and that we wouldn't see, as I mentioned earlier, democratization as solely within the purview of that one institute. It's always a trade-off in these types of issues between mainstreaming and targeting funds, and I always want to see both. I want to see elements of support for democratization as core to various other line items.

I'd also like to see more funding very specifically for civil society and human rights organizations and networks, particularly women-led ones, as FIAP and the women's voice and leadership program have proposed. I think Canada has taken a huge step forward on that. I always like to see more, but it's a significant recognition thus far and I'd like to see that sustained.

(1030)

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

I would agree with all of that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We will now go to MP Graham, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Ms. O'Neill, in your opening comments you mentioned something about wanting to touch on technology but not having the time to. Do you want to touch on technology now?

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

Very briefly on technology, I really commend the committee, because I know that in the past you've talked about technology and this issue, recognizing its importance, and also recognizing that many of us talk about technology as though it's so-called gender neutral, as though it's something that's a great equalizer and it affects men and women in the same way. Again, I would love to unpack that.

For women, especially women democracy activists, technology can be really positive. Number one, it helps organize and helps overcome some of the barriers that I just mentioned in response to MP Vandenbeld about restrictions on movement. Technology is a way to overcome that. Civil society often needs permits to meet, to gather and to assemble more than 11 people at a time or something like that. It allows women to organize in a way they weren't able to do before.

It's also a very important way to bring young women into governance. I often tell the story about a friend in Tunisia who started a website, an app, to track Tunisia's constitutional drafting, and literally line by painstaking line she got consultation from young people. Her app ended up having more followers than the entire Tunisian national soccer team. When we're talking about getting young people involved in politics, transparency and oversight, it could be really useful.

It can also help share lessons globally. Solidarity is important and the sharing of good practices matters.

However, it also has a very negative potential impact for women specifically and for democracy promotion specifically. I don't need to tell all of you in this room the way that, number one, it can contribute to the external influence on elections, and the level of vitriol or backlash that men and women can face. Often much of it targeted at women is highly sexualized and is targeted at their honour and their place in families and communities.

I'd say that as we are supporting democratization worldwide, part of what we need to make sure we're doing is to ensure that we are supporting women with digital security training, data security, managing their online presence, etc.

I think we need to be wide-eyed about it, and like everything else, recognize that there are gender dimensions to even something that seems relatively innocuous from that perspective.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It leads to my next question quite well, which is how do we deal with players in established democracies, the people who are already there, who want to subvert it through things like gerrymandering, voter suppression and fake news, which are all technological? How do we deal with internal threats to democracy?

This question is for both of you.

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

I'd say the biggest way we can deal with this long term and fundamentally is by enhancing our critical thinking skills.

This is something that I've sharpened through engagement with a lot of women, working to counter poles of violent extremism and radicalization around the world. They're saying that some of what is getting foisted upon us by international donors is the idea of counter-narratives that we're going to put back out on social media, the ways that government is good and the ways that this government actually is supporting x, y and z.

They're saying combatting messages with messages is never going to be the winning path. What we need to do is focus on the critical thinking skills of our citizens and our populations. I think that's something that Canada can bring very directly.

In the shorter term, I think we have to make sure that there's a very close link between women and civil society activists and technology companies. I often hear from women mobilizing about new ways that technology is being used to subvert their activity, different apps that are being developed, different approaches of surveillance, etc. To the extent that there's a more direct connection between women fighting for democracy in any country, including our own, and the technology companies that are running these platforms, I think that's one of the best short-term things that we can do.

(1035)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

The only point I would add to that is the question of regulating institutions or multinational corporations like Facebook, for example, to head off the future use of this kind of technology in a way that undermines our elections and other elections around the world by creating dissent and conflict within societies. Without going into great detail—frankly, I couldn't in terms of technical expertise—the approach taken within the European Union about regulating Facebook, as an example, is something I think we should look more carefully at.

On the one hand, we don't want—as was suggested earlier in the day—the Internet to be controlled by government, but on the other hand, when you have large corporate entities that are acting on their own, which has led willy-nilly to the manipulation of their own technical possibilities to do harm to democracies, I think there is a place for some government regulation to make sure this doesn't happen.

As I say, I don't have personal expertise on this, but it seems to me from my reading that the European Union has moved sensibly in this kind of direction out of concern for democracy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned critical thinking as a critical element of this, so I guess the critical element we're missing then is equitable education around the world, and we can only hope to get to that spot.

I don't want to dwell on that too much as I only have about a minute left, but in the previous panel we heard, and we heard this before, that it's the 13th consecutive year of the decline of democracy in principle. We're talking about spreading democracy and encouraging other countries to have it. Is American democracy, which is the model of democracy that people look to, healthy? Do we do a good job of respecting democracy once it's established?

Ms. Jacqueline O'Neill:

I don't think it's fundamentally healthy. We've seen a lot in the last several years, when you scratch the veneer, some of the institutions crumble relatively quickly. While many people look to American democracy, that's changing. In relative terms, Canada's standing and our approach to democracy has significantly enhanced in many people's minds. I'd also note that one of the reasons there are so many Canadians working on democratization abroad is that our model of democracy is desired by other countries rather than the American one. Fewer are wanting an export of a congressional system, especially when it is so rife with money and outside influence.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We're actually out of time on that question.

We have about four minutes to go.

Mr. Saini.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Good morning to both of you.

Mr. Broadbent, I want to ask you a specific question, because I want to get your opinion. The subcommittee on human rights has had some sessions on Venezuela, and now our committee will be studying and maybe have a couple of meetings on Venezuela. You can appreciate the deteriorating situation right now. Canada recently pledged $53 million to help with the refugee crisis that's occurring in Brazil and Colombia.

As you are aware, there's the hyperinflation, the deteriorating economic situation, and the deteriorating political situation. Protestors are being beaten and dissidents are being jailed. Currently, the way we look at it, Mr. Guaido is being recognized on a daily basis as more the rightful ruler of Venezuela. Recently, as of today or yesterday or last week, Japan also supported him as the leader of Venezuela. What do you think of Canada's position? Do you think we're doing the right thing by supporting him and trying to mitigate the humanitarian crisis on the ground in Venezuela?

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

Would you like to ask me a different question? That's an immensely complex issue.

I've normally been on the side, in terms of international law and government, that whatever group happens to be in control of the major institutions—parliaments, courts, armies—whether we like that particular group or party or not, it should be recognized as the government of the day.

On the other hand, the government of the day in Venezuela is abominable, according to almost every human rights evaluation, in terms of recent elections, in terms of how it is treating people in terms of rights and concerns of the population. I can well understand why not only Canada but many other democracies, that I have a respect for in western Europe and elsewhere, are supporting the leader of the opposition. However, this is almost an unparalleled situation. All I can say is I understand that. Certainly, if I were a voting person, I would be voting for the opposition leader, my personal choice in all of this.

(1040)

Mr. Raj Saini:

The reason I ask you this is there's a certain element in the Venezuelan constitution which makes this even more complex. It's article 233, which states that if there's a vacuum of leadership, or if there's a vacuum in the presidency, then the head of the national assembly can temporarily take that position. Because of the fact that the previous elections were not fair or not free, where dissidents were jailed—this is the reason I wanted to ask the question—because of that stipulation within its own constitution, could that be seen as a legitimate way of trying to mitigate the crisis and change the political trajectory there?

Hon. Ed Broadbent:

Well, that's certainly what people in governments are looking to justify in supporting this opposition leader.

As I said, I understand that. However, it's not a normal healthy procedure internationally for our government or any other government to get involved in putting pressure on another country in terms of shaping its government. Therefore, as I said, it's a very exceptional situation and kind of a Hobson's choice: You're damned if you do and damned if you don't.

One thing I would not be in agreement with—and this is what's causing concern—is the forceful involvement of the President of the United States who is talking about using force, to use his words, not taking the option of force off the table. That's entirely counterproductive in my view, and it is what makes a lot of people apprehensive about any government getting involved in shaping the destiny, the formation, of a government of another society.

Mr. Raj Saini:

In terms of Canada's position with its leadership within the Lima Group, they have ruled out any attempt of force. As you know, the United States is not part of the Lima Group, so that's an isolated comment by the President.

I think Canada's position is quite clear. We want to work politically to find a solution and not use force in any way.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I want to thank Ms. O'Neill from Washington, Ed Broadbent with us here in Ottawa, and our previous two witnesses as well, for some very, very important testimony this morning.

I also want to thank all members for getting up early to meet at 8:45 on a Tuesday morning, and for being here sharply and with such good questions to ask.

With that, the meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des affaires étrangères et du développement international

[Énregistrement électronique]

(0845)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Michael Levitt (York-Centre, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Je déclare ouverte la 127e séance du Comité permanent des affaires étrangères et du développement international de la Chambre des communes.

Ce matin, nous poursuivons notre étude sur le soutien qu'offre le Canada au chapitre du développement de la démocratie. Nous entendrons quatre témoins ce matin. Les deux premiers d'entre eux sont en ligne.

Nous entendrons d'abord Anthony Smith, directeur général de la Westminster Foundation for Democracy, qui témoigne depuis Londres, en Angleterre.

Bonjour, monsieur, ou plutôt bon après-midi.

M. Anthony Smith (directeur général, Westminster Foundation for Democracy):

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

De plus, nous entendrons Carl Gershman, président du National Endowment for Democracy, qui comparaît à partir de Washington, D.C.

Messieurs, je vous demanderais de faire vos exposés, en prenant chacun peut-être un peu moins de 10 minutes. Je sais que tout le monde aura beaucoup de questions à vous poser. Nous terminerons l'heure avec ces questions.

Monsieur Smith, peut-être pourriez-vous prendre la parole en premier.

M. Anthony Smith:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je tenterai de prendre moins de temps que cela.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à témoigner dans le cadre de votre étude. Comme j'ai lu les exposés de certains témoins précédents, je ne reprendrai pas certains de leurs propos portant sur les tendances récentes en matière de gouvernance démocratique et sur l'importance du soutien de la démocratie dans le monde. J'appuie sans réserve ce qu'ils ont dit et les points qu'ils ont soulevés sur l'importance du soutien que le Canada offre sur le plan de la gouvernance démocratique.

Je pense que je peux probablement contribuer le plus utilement possible à votre étude en décrivant les origines et la gouvernance de mon organisation, le travail qu'elle accomplit actuellement et certains des facteurs qui ont influencé son approche ces dernières années.

La Westminster Foundation for Democracy a été établie en 1992 à l'initiative d'un groupe interpartis de parlementaires qui voulaient appuyer leurs homologues de l'Europe de l'Est et d'autres régions qui bénéficiaient de nouvelles libertés à la suite de la fin de la guerre froide. Comme notre Parlement ne disposait pas des moyens nécessaires pour entreprendre de tels travaux, il s'est adressé au gouvernement britannique, lequel, après avoir examiné les pratiques, notamment aux États-Unis et en Allemagne, a décidé de mettre sur pied notre fondation. Depuis lors, notre structure de gouvernance et notre mission sont demeurées généralement les mêmes.

Nous sommes un organisme indépendant du Foreign and Commonwealth Office; le conseil d'administration et le président-directeur général sont nommés par le secrétaire d'État aux Affaires étrangères. Le conseil d'administration n'a pas de pouvoir exécutif et est composé de six membres politiques. À l'heure actuelle, ce sont tous des députés, mais il n'est pas obligatoire qu'ils le soient. Le conseil compte également quatre membres apolitiques.

Le Foreign and Commonwealth Office approuve notre stratégie, tout en nous accordant l'indépendance opérationnelle dans le cadre de notre travail. Même si nous ne formons pas un organe parlementaire, nous relevons du Président de la Chambre des communes et nous collaborons étroitement avec les Parlements du Royaume-Uni, y compris le Parlement délégué et les assemblées. Les partis politiques du Royaume-Uni ont évidemment une importance cruciale pour nous. Notre mission demeure celle qu'elle était en 1992: soutenir la gouvernance démocratique dans les pays en développement et en transition.

Nous comptons aujourd'hui des bureaux dans 30 pays et nous travaillons avec quatre principales parties prenantes: le Parlement, les partis politiques, les organes électoraux et la société civile. Nous mettons l'accent sur la qualité du régime politique dans nos pays partenaires; nous nous intéressons donc principalement à la participation politique des femmes, à l'inclusion des groupes marginalisés, à la reddition de comptes et à la transparence.

Notre méthode consiste principalement à offrir du soutien de pair à pair afin de transmettre les expériences entre homologues. Les détails de chaque programme diffèrent et sont adaptés aux exigences des divers partenaires. Je pourrai vous donner des exemples plus tard. Vous pouvez aussi en trouver un grand nombre dans notre rapport annuel et notre site Web. Nous mettons aussi en oeuvre un petit programme et un partenariat de recherche avec l'Université de Birmingham, en Angleterre.

Sur le plan du financement, nous recevons une subvention annuelle du Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Ces dernières années, elle est demeurée stable à 3,5 millions de livres. Nous recevons également une subvention du gouvernement du Royaume-Uni et d'un éventail d'autres bailleurs de fonds afin de financer des programmes dans des pays ou des régions précis où nous faisons habituellement concurrence à d'autres organisations. Nos revenus globaux de cette année s'élèvent à quelque 17 millions de livres.

Permettez-moi d'énumérer trois facteurs qui ont influencé notre approche récente à l'égard de notre travail dans ce domaine. Le premier d'entre eux est celui des intérêts par rapport aux valeurs. Notre organisation est très axée sur les valeurs, mais nous ne pouvons plus nous fier seulement à ce facteur pour convaincre les donateurs d'investir dans le soutien de la démocratie. Nous faisons aussi remarquer que la démocratie contribue de manière substantielle à toutes les priorités internationales du Royaume-Uni, qu'il s'agisse de la sécurité, de la prospérité, de la lutte contre la pauvreté ou de la réduction des émissions de carbone. Je suppose qu'il en va de même au Canada et pour tous les autres alliés au chapitre des priorités internationales.

Nous voulons aussi être plus clairs que par le passé au sujet des éléments précis des pratiques démocratiques qui comptent, que cela concerne la supervision financière, les partis politiques axés sur les politiques ou les parlements attentifs à l'égalité entre les sexes. Il ne suffit plus de clamer notre appui au grand concept de démocratie; nous devons faire bien plus.

(0850)



Le deuxième facteur qui influence notre travail, c'est le fait que le changement exige du temps. Nous considérons que le progrès est le fruit d'investissements patients dans un ensemble d'institutions et d'instances dirigeantes. Les institutions ont besoin de compétences et d'une culture politique adaptables, tolérantes et résilientes face aux changements inévitables que tout pays devra affronter, mais chaque pays doit aussi avoir des dirigeants qui réagissent aux défis et qui profitent des occasions qui se présentent.

D'une certaine manière, le temps est plus précieux que l'argent. La démocratie a besoin de ressources modestes, mais d'énormément de patience. J'ajouterais qu'il a fallu à notre organisation 25 ans pour atteindre la solide position dont elle jouit aujourd'hui au Royaume-Uni. Nous avons donc dû faire preuve de patience dans notre pays également.

Ces deux facteurs ont un lien avec le dernier, c'est-à-dire la manière dont nous travaillons le plus efficacement possible pour soutenir la démocratie. D'après ce que j'observe au Royaume-Uni et dans d'autres pays, j'ai l'impression que l'efficacité doit commencer par une politique claire. Chaque pays, qu'il s'agisse du Royaume-Uni, des États-Unis, du Canada ou d'un autre pays, doit disposer d'une politique de soutien de la démocratie soigneusement élaborée qui créera un large consensus politique. Ces facteurs ne sont pas toujours tous présents, mais je pense que c'est un élément très important.

Forts d'une politique solide, nous pouvons établir une approche cohérente au sein du gouvernement et contribuer au maintien du soutien sur une longue période. Sans politique forte, nous risquons de faire preuve d'incohérence et d'adopter une approche à court terme.

Monsieur le président, je me ferai un plaisir de vous en dire plus à ce sujet, mais ce sont là les principaux points que je voulais soulever afin de lancer la discussion.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre Carl Gershman.

Monsieur, vous pouvez commencer votre exposé.

M. Carl Gershman (président, National Endowment for Democracy):

Merci, monsieur le président et distingués membres du Comité, de m'avoir invité à témoigner ce matin.

Je vous félicite d'entreprendre une étude sur le rôle du Canada dans le développement de la démocratie à l'échelle internationale. Je considère depuis longtemps que le Canada a un rôle primordial à jouer à cet égard, un rôle qui est maintenant plus important que jamais.

La National Endowment for Democracy, ou NED, a été fondée il y a 35 ans dans un moment plein d'espoir, alors que ce qui a par la suite été appelé la troisième vague de démocratisation commençait tout juste à gagner en force. Bien entendu, comme nous le savons bien, la période actuelle est très différente. Selon Freedom House, l'année 2018 constitue la 13e année consécutive de recul de la démocratie dans le monde. Cette période a été le théâtre de la montée en puissance et de l'affirmation d'États autoritaires comme la Chine, la Russie et l'Iran; de la dégradation de la situation dans des pays autrefois démocratiques comme la Turquie, le Venezuela, les Philippines, la Thaïlande et la Hongrie; et de la montée de mouvements et de partis populistes et nationalistes dans des démocraties établies. Des régimes autocratiques ont tenté de réprimer des groupes indépendants s'efforçant de favoriser la liberté et de les couper de l'aide internationale offerte par les organismes comme le National Democratic Institute et l'International Republican Institute, des constituants de la NED. Ces régimes ont aussi adopté des lois sévères pour rendre illégale l'aide étrangère aux ONG.

Le travail ne s'en poursuit pas moins et prend même de l'expansion; voilà qui témoigne de la détermination et du courage des groupes autochtones, qui veulent poursuivre leur travail et recevoir l'aide nécessaire malgré les risques. Il ne faudrait pas oublier qu'en dépit des reculs, des gains ont aussi été observés en Éthiopie, en Arménie et en Malaisie, des pays où la NED a fourni du soutien aux démocrates avant les ouvertures politiques, ce qui lui a permis d'élargir rapidement son soutien après ces ouvertures. Voilà qui illustre notre détermination et notre capacité à contourner les obstacles créés par des régimes autoritaires et à continuer de fournir du soutien, tout en prenant soin de protéger la sécurité de nos titulaires de subvention.

La NED est une organisation inhabituelle créée de manière à relever les défis difficiles. Dans la foulée du discours historique que le président Reagan a prononcé à Westminster en 1982, dans lequel il a réclamé un nouvel effort afin de soutenir la démocratie dans le monde, l'organisation non gouvernementale qu'est la NED a été créée sous la houlette d'un conseil d'administration privé et indépendant. La NED reçoit son financement de base sous la forme d'affectations annuelles accordées par le Congrès en vertu de la National Endowment for Democracy Act adoptée en 1983. Cette loi prévoit aussi un pare-feu entre les autorités de dotation et les pouvoirs exécutifs du gouvernement.

La NED est un organisme subventionnaire bipartite privé qui se tient à l'écart des conflits politiques du jour et adopte une approche à long terme à l'égard du développement de la démocratie. En plus d'appuyer des initiatives démocratiques communautaires, il agit à titre de pôle d'activités, de ressources et d'échanges intellectuels entre des activistes, des professionnels et des analystes des quatre coins du monde.

La NED emprunte une approche multisectorielle sur le plan du soutien de la démocratie, finançant des programmes par l'entremise de ses quatre instituts constitutifs, lesquels représentent nos deux principaux partis politiques, le milieu des affaires et le mouvement ouvrier. Je sais qu'il y a deux semaines, vous avez entendu les présidents de nos deux instituts représentant des partis, soit le National Democratic Institute et l'International Republican Institute. Chacun des quatre instituts constitutifs de la NED peut accéder à l'expertise et à l'expérience de son secteur à partir de toutes les régions du monde. Qui plus est, le programme dans le cadre duquel nous accordons de petites subventions ciblées en fonction de la demande comble directement les besoins des ONG locales, ce qui nous permet de défendre les droits de la personne, de renforcer l'éducation des médias et de la population, et de favoriser l'autonomie des femmes et des jeunes de manière à leur permettre d'établir leur crédibilité à titre de forces de démocratisation dans leurs propres sociétés.

Étant une organisation autonome qui soutient la démocratie, la NED peut renforcer continuellement les organisations autochtones de la société civile, apprendre de ses essais et de ses erreurs, et établir d'importants réseaux de confiance et de collaboration qui peuvent s'avérer efficaces à long terme.

Comme elle est une organisation privée souple n'ayant pas de bureaux à l'étranger, la NED est réputée pour agir rapidement, souplement et efficacement en fournissant une aide essentielle aux activistes qui oeuvrent dans des conditions très difficiles. Elle déploie aussi des efforts énormes pour surveiller le travail de ses titulaires de subvention et pour honorer ses responsabilités de fiduciaire en gérant soigneusement les fonds publics.

(0855)



La NED tire aussi parti de son programme de subventions dans le cadre d'activités de réseautage et de reconnaissance afin de manifester son soutien et sa solidarité politiques envers les activistes en première ligne. Ces activités incluent notamment le Mouvement mondial pour la démocratie, qui fait le lien entre des activistes qui oeuvrent pour la démocratie dans le monde entier; le Center for International Media Assistance; le Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program; et nos propres activités de remise de prix dans le domaine de la démocratie au Capitole.

La NED favorise aussi les travaux de recherche d'érudits par l'entremise de l'International Forum for Democratic Studies et du Journal of Democracy, permettant ainsi aux activistes d'accéder aux renseignements les plus récents sur la manière de soutenir les transitions vers la démocratie et de renforcer les valeurs libérales. Ces travaux alimentent aussi la réflexion internationale sur les nouveaux défis graves qui se présentent sur le plan de la démocratie.

En 2015, le Congrès a accordé de nouveaux fonds à la NED pour qu'elle élabore un plan stratégique afin de réagir à la résurgence de l'autoritarisme. Au titre de ce plan, la NED finance maintenant des programmes ciblant six priorités stratégiques, lesquelles consistent à aider la société civile à réagir à la répression; à défendre l'intégrité du secteur de l'information; à contrer l'extrémisme et à favoriser le pluralisme et la tolérance; à corriger les lacunes de la gouvernance dans de nombreux pays en transition; à lutter contre la kleptocratie, un pilier de l'autoritarisme moderne; et à renforcer la collaboration entre les démocraties afin de réagir à ce qui menace la démocratie.

Comme nous poursuivons des objectifs stratégiques communs, l'ensemble net de nos efforts est devenu plus fort et plus intégré, et la collaboration s'est renforcée entre les diverses régions et les cinq institutions, c'est-à-dire la NED et ses quatre instituts constitutifs, qui forment ensemble ce que nous appelons la famille NED.

Alors que le Canada réfléchit à la manière dont il peut établir une manière efficace et rentable de favoriser la démocratie dans le monde, je vous propose d'examiner la distinction faite dans un nouveau rapport publié en Europe entre les approches descendantes et ascendantes à l'égard du soutien de la démocratie. L'approche descendante consiste essentiellement à soutenir la réforme graduelle du système judiciaire ou d'autres institutions, par exemple, en agissant souvent de manière technocratique en partenariat avec des gouvernements qui peuvent n'être que superficiellement déterminés à apporter des réformes démocratiques. Pour sa part, l'approche ascendante vise à habiliter les acteurs locaux en les aidant à relever les défis auxquels ils sont confrontés dans l'immédiat et à renforcer leur capacité de favoriser la réforme et la responsabilisation des institutions à long terme. Les auteurs de ce rapport recommandent un renforcement substantiel des instruments ascendants, comme le Fonds européen pour la démocratie, une organisation inspirée de la NED qui, selon le rapport, réussit efficacement à relever les défis difficiles actuels.

Je veux conclure en indiquant que je suis depuis longtemps convaincu que le Canada a la capacité de faire une contribution substantielle au renforcement de la démocratie dans le monde, particulièrement en une ère de grande incertitude où la démocratie libérale est menacée de toutes parts. Votre pays compte en effet des centaines de professionnels dévoués à la défense de la démocratie, dont de nombreux vétérans des programmes du National Democratic Institute et de l'International Republican Institute qui possèdent l'expérience nécessaire pour diriger un nouvel effort canadien.

Les États-Unis participent toujours à ces démarches, et les deux partis du Congrès appuient fortement les activités de la NED et, de façon générale, les droits de la personne et la démocratie. La voix des États-Unis est toutefois moins forte qu'autrefois, et le temps est venu pour le Canada d'intervenir et de fournir une nouvelle source d'énergie et de dynamisme démocratiques.

Vous pouvez contribuer concrètement de bien des manières aux efforts, mais la décision de créer un nouvel instrument à cette fin constituera en soi un acte de solidarité démocratique important, un acte qui apportera de l'espoir à de nombreux activistes courageux et qui rendra le monde plus sûr et plus paisible.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(0900)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à vous deux.

Nous passerons immédiatement aux questions, en accordant d'abord la parole à Mme Alleslev.

Mme Leona Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill, PCC):

Je vous remercie tous les deux de témoigner pour nous aider dans le cadre de notre importante étude.

Ma première question s'adresse à vous deux.

Il est fort préoccupant que la démocratie ait reculé au cours de 13 années consécutives. J'aimerais d'abord savoir si ce recul est constant ou s'il est accéléré récemment. De plus, avec tous les efforts que le Royaume-Uni, les organismes internationaux et même le Canada — qui n'a pas d'institution précise à cette fin — ont déployés, pourquoi ce recul important se poursuit-il? À quelles causes attribueriez-vous ce recul? Quel problème tentons-nous de résoudre?

Anthony.

(0905)

M. Anthony Smith:

Je répondrai à la première question en disant que je ne pense pas que le recul accélère continuellement. Ce déclin coïncide avec plusieurs crises qui sévissent de par le monde, notamment sur le plan économique. La situation est attribuable aux conflits politiques découlant de ces crises, ainsi qu'au fait que certains pays ont adopté la forme de la démocratie, mais sans profondeur et sans réellement avoir de culture démocratique pour appuyer la réforme. Bien des gens ayant une approche autocrate sont passés maîtres dans l'art de conserver le pouvoir sans recourir aux formes extrêmes d'autocratie observées dans le passé.

Pour ce qui est des causes du recul, je pense avoir en partie traité de la question dans la réponse que je viens de donner. Il ne faut pas oublier que la démocratie a, fort heureusement, considérablement progressé dans le monde au cours des 50 dernières années. Si vous retournez encore plus loin en arrière, vous devriez être encore plus encouragés. Ce recul est le résultat de la situation politique difficile de certains pays. La capacité des gens d'exploiter les faiblesses des institutions démocratiques s'est accrue, car ils tirent des leçons de l'expérience et en font part à d'autres.

Je pense que nous devons tous poursuivre nos efforts à cet égard. Comme je l'ai souligné dans mon exposé, c'est un travail lent et patient dans bien des pays. L'expérience qu'ont acquise les trois pays représentés ici en édifiant des démocraties au fil des générations est un atout que bien d'autres pays ne possèdent pas encore. Ils continuent de déployer des efforts dans ce domaine. La démocratie est un travail de longue haleine.

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Monsieur Gershman.

M. Carl Gershman:

Je ne sais pas s'il y a eu une accélération, mais la tendance se maintient et elle est très préoccupante. Je pense que nous devrions d'abord nous rappeler, au moins...

J'ai mentionné, au début de mon exposé, la troisième vague de démocratisation. Cette période a commencé avec la chute des forces armées portugaises en 1974, et la vague a ensuite pris de l'expansion. Elle a touché toute la planète, à l'exception du Moyen-Orient arabe, qui a connu par la suite les révolutions de 2011. Les choses sont arrivées au point critique à la fin des années 1990. Le nombre de démocraties dans le monde a atteint son plus haut niveau en 2005, avec environ 125 démocraties. Depuis, il y a eu un recul.

Je devrais souligner que, selon la théorie de M. Samuel Huntington concernant la troisième vague, il est possible que cette vague soit suivie d'un reflux, tout comme l'ont été les deux vagues de démocratisation précédentes, d'abord avec la montée du communisme et du fascisme dans les années 1930, puis avec la dégradation de la situation dans les pays nouvellement décolonisés, dans les années 1960 et 1970, avec la montée des dictatures militaires en Amérique latine.

En 1976, M. Daniel Patrick Moynihan a déclaré que la démocratie était la situation actuelle du monde et non sa destination. C'était un moment très pessimiste. Il avait été ambassadeur en Inde, et l'Inde vivait une situation d'urgence à l'époque. Pourtant, c'est justement à ce moment-là que la troisième vague de démocratisation commençait. Nous ne devrions pas trop nous inquiéter à propos des revirements, car ils font partie du processus de développement. Les facteurs qui contribuent aux revirements sont nombreux, par exemple, évidemment, la crise économique de 2008, la mondialisation et le fait que de nombreuses personnes en sont exclues, ainsi que ce qu'on appelle la courbe d'apprentissage des dictateurs: les dictateurs apprennent à utiliser des formes de démocratisation tout en augmentant la répression, ce qui fait qu'il est plus difficile de les attaquer. Tous ces éléments sont des facteurs.

Comme je l'ai souligné durant mon exposé, il ne faut pas oublier que des gains ont été réalisés. Ce qui se passe actuellement en Éthiopie, en Arménie, en Malaisie et même en Tunisie, la première démocratie arabe, est très, très important. Nous devons être en mesure de favoriser ces tendances. Les politologues ne croient pas que nous sommes actuellement dans une période de reflux. Ils parlent plutôt d'un recul. La situation pourrait empirer, et c'est ce que nous devons nous efforcer d'éviter, mais je n'exagérerais pas l'importance du recul et de la dégradation de la situation.

(0910)

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Votre réponse m'amène à ma question suivante.

Vous faites tous deux partie d'organismes qui existent depuis assez longtemps. Si c'était à refaire et si vous créiez aujourd'hui une nouvelle organisation, que feriez-vous différemment et sur quoi vous concentriez-vous pour en assurer le succès, en reconnaissant la situation actuelle et la direction dans laquelle nous nous dirigeons?

Le président:

Messieurs, il reste environ 30 secondes. Il serait donc peut-être préférable que vous abordiez ce sujet dans votre réponse à une question à venir. Je peux aussi vous accorder quelques secondes chacun, si vous voulez répondre maintenant.

M. Anthony Smith:

J'intégrerai ma réponse...

Le président:

Vous l'intégrerez à une autre réponse. D'accord.

Nous passons maintenant à la députée Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à vous deux d'être ici et merci de nous montrer des modèles de ce que nous pourrions faire.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Gershman.

Je suis ravie de vous revoir. Vous avez mentionné, dans votre exposé, que le Canada avait un rôle primordial à jouer. J'aimerais que vous nous en disiez plus à ce sujet. D'après vous, dans quel secteur précis le Canada pourrait-il jouer un rôle? Pour reprendre la question précédente, quelles leçons pourrions-nous tirer des organisations qui existent ailleurs dans le monde? Que devrions-nous faire pour promouvoir la démocratie à notre façon?

M. Carl Gershman:

Le Canada est une démocratie parlementaire, et à mon avis, il a un rôle important à jouer sur le plan du renforcement des Parlements partout dans le monde. Il a aussi joué un rôle de premier plan dans plusieurs pays importants, comme l'Iran, l'Ukraine et bien d'autres. Selon moi, le Canada est bien positionné pour aider ces pays. La situation dans ces pays est très difficile, et je pense que le Canada peut trouver des moyens de travailler discrètement à ces endroits, surtout dans les pays autoritaires comme la Russie, l'Iran ou même la Chine. Je crois que c'est possible.

Nous avons un programme, franchement, très important en Corée du Nord. Les programmes soutiennent des groupes de la Corée du Sud qui travaillent en Corée du Nord. C'est possible de trouver des débouchés dans de nombreux pays, des endroits où travailler et où soutenir les défenseurs de la démocratie qui oeuvrent partout dans le monde.

À mon avis, le Canada pourrait se servir de son expérience et des réseaux qu'il a déjà mis en place pour établir des relations d'étroite collaboration avec les autres réseaux et pour travailler discrètement dans les endroits où la situation est très difficile.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Ma deuxième question s'adresse à vous deux.

Vous avez parlé tous les deux de l'importance d'avoir une présence à long terme sur le terrain.

Je pense, monsieur Gershman, que vous avez dit qu'à certains endroits, vous avez été en mesure d'élargir votre soutien lorsqu'il y a eu des ouvertures parce que vous aviez déjà une présence et des réseaux sur le terrain.

J'aimerais parler non seulement de la présence physique d'un bureau dans un pays, mais aussi des mouvements et des réseaux. Je pense, entre autres, au Mouvement mondial pour la démocratie. À quel point est-ce important?

Monsieur Smith, vous avez dit que le temps comptait plus que l'argent, ce qui est une affirmation très importante, selon moi.

Je demanderais à M. Gershman, suivi de M. Smith, de nous parler de l'importance d'assurer une présence constante.

M. Carl Gershman:

En ce qui concerne les bureaux, tout d'abord, permettez-moi de souligner que la NED est un organisme unique constitué de quatre organisations. Nous ne sommes pas un organisme programmatique; nous sommes un organisme subventionnaire chargé de la surveillance. Nous n'avons des bureaux nulle part dans le monde. Nous disons parfois que ceux qui ne nous aiment pas ne peuvent pas nous mettre à la porte puisque nous ne sommes pas là, mais nous trouvons des moyens de soutenir les groupes autochtones sur le terrain dans tous ces pays. Cela comprend la Russie, où la NED a été déclarée « indésirable » en 2015, et pourtant, le programme a pris beaucoup d'expansion depuis. Nous arrivons à travailler de cette façon.

Le Mouvement mondial pour la démocratie a été fondé il y a 20 ans. Il représente un réseau d'activistes oeuvrant partout dans le monde. Merci, Anita, d'être membre du comité directeur du Mouvement mondial pour la démocratie. Comme vous le savez, je crois, il célébrera son 20e anniversaire au mois de juillet, en Malaisie. M. Anwar Ibrahim vient de donner la conférence Lipset au Canada — à Toronto la semaine dernière — et à Washington. Il y a donc beaucoup de coopération sur ce plan.

Les réseaux permettent de réunir les gens pour qu'ils apprennent les uns des autres et qu'ils se soutiennent mutuellement. Ils deviennent des réseaux d'apprentissage et de solidarité. À mon avis, ils sont extrêmement précieux. Ils viennent s'ajouter à la recherche, aux bourses et aux autres moyens d'appuyer les gens, par exemple, les subventions offertes aux ONG locales et les programmes de formation sur le terrain comme ceux que nos organisations offrent dans de nombreux pays.

(0915)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

Monsieur Smith.

M. Anthony Smith:

Très rapidement, pour nous, la présence à long terme est essentielle parce que ce que nous tentons de soutenir, c'est une culture démocratique. La transmission de règles, de procédures et de compétences techniques est une chose, mais ce qui compte réellement, c'est qu'il y ait de la compréhension et du leadership à tous les échelons afin d'être en mesure de réagir aux défis politiques lorsqu'ils surviennent. Tous les membres d'une institution doivent faire preuve de tolérance et de compréhension, et ils doivent s'engager à respecter la démocratie. On n'apprend pas ce genre de choses du jour au lendemain, comme l'histoire de nos propres pays le montre. Il faut beaucoup de temps. C'est de cela qu'il est question.

Pour nous, la présence est parfois physique. Nous avons 30 bureaux dans différents pays, mais nous avons aussi des relations avec un grand nombre d'autres pays. Ces relations sont entretenues à la fois par notre propre personnel technique et par les partis politiques du Royaume-Uni, qui font partie de notre fondation et qui ont bâti des relations sur plusieurs générations.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

Vous avez dit tous les deux que vos organisations étaient autonomes et indépendantes du gouvernement. Je pense que M. Gershman a mentionné un pare-feu.

Si un nouvel organisme devait être créé, dans quelle mesure est-il important qu'il soit indépendant des activités quotidiennes du gouvernement? Comment fait-on pour y arriver?

M. Carl Gershman:

À mon avis, c'est absolument essentiel.

Il y a différents niveaux d'indépendance. Je devrais souligner que dans son témoignage, M. Smith a précisé que le conseil d'administration est nommé par le secrétaire d'État aux Affaires étrangères, qui approuve aussi la stratégie et le budget. La NED fonctionne différemment; elle est plus indépendante. Le Canada devra déterminer à quel point son organisme pourra être indépendant.

D'après moi, c'est en grande partie grâce au pare-feu que nous avons la souplesse et l'indépendance nécessaires pour agir rapidement et pour intervenir dans des situations très difficiles, parfois avant que notre gouvernement soit prêt à passer à l'action ou pendant qu'il met en place des mesures diplomatiques. Il serait possible de dire que si notre organisme n'était pas indépendant, ce serait très difficile d'intervenir de la sorte.

Nous étions présents en Égypte durant le régime de Moubarak et nous y sommes encore aujourd'hui. Nous sommes aussi présents en Russie et en Chine. Notre indépendance nous donne la liberté de travailler, peu importe les relations diplomatiques entretenues par notre gouvernement. Telle était la volonté du Congrès.

Cette méthode fonctionne. Autrement dit, elle n'a pas entraîné de complications pour notre gouvernement. En fait, elle le soutient, comme je l'ai déjà dit. Dans des pays comme l'Éthiopie, l'Arménie et la Malaisie, lorsque le gouvernement autocratique est tombé, notre présence et nos activités sur le terrain nous ont permis d'intervenir très rapidement et de commencer à renforcer les groupes participant au processus de transition. Selon moi, c'est absolument essentiel. Si j'attire votre attention sur ces trois pays, c'est parce que nous devons travailler ensemble pour y assurer la réussite de la démocratie. Une telle réussite pourrait donner un nouvel élan à la démocratie dans d'autres pays partout dans le monde.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Duncan.

Mme Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NPD):

Merci beaucoup à vous deux pour votre travail. Vos pays accomplissent de très grandes choses.

J'aimerais poursuivre dans la même veine que ma collègue. Monsieur Gershman, vous avez dit que votre organisme avait été créé par une loi, qui prévoit aussi un pare-feu. Monsieur Smith, j'aimerais avoir votre avis à ce sujet.

Je m'intéresse à la question de l'ingérence politique et de la reddition de comptes. Cela peut aller dans les deux sens. D'un côté, on peut élever l'objection que si toutes les initiatives sont menées par une organisation indépendante, le gouvernement n'a pas à rendre de comptes sur la façon dont les fonds sont dépensés. De l'autre, l'existence d'un pare-feu rend l'organisation indépendante du gouvernement en place.

J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez tous les deux.

M. Anthony Smith:

Permettez-moi de commencer.

Notre modèle de fonctionnement est stable sur le plan politique parce que notre organisation regroupe l'ensemble des partis. Tous les partis représentés au Parlement sont aussi représentés au sein de notre conseil d'administration, ce qui veut dire que pour chacune des décisions que nous prenons relativement tant à notre stratégie à long terme qu'à nos activités quotidiennes, nous devons trouver un juste équilibre afin de maintenir le soutien de l'ensemble du Parlement et de notre système politique.

Je suis à la fondation depuis quatre ans et demi, et durant cette période, aucune décision n'a soulevé de controverse entre les membres du conseil d'administration appartenant au parti au pouvoir et ceux représentant les partis d'opposition. Nous appuyons tous le type de mesures que nous prenons, car tous les partis soutiennent la démocratisation. C'est ainsi que nous avons maintenu notre capacité de travailler d'une manière objective appuyée par tous les partis.

Ma deuxième observation répond en partie à cela et en partie aux questions précédentes.

À mon avis, la première question que le Canada doit se poser n'est pas nécessairement organisationnelle; elle est plutôt politique. La première chose qu'il faut dans notre système — et je pense qu'il en serait de même au Canada —, c'est une vision qui montre clairement que tous les partis canadiens, toutes allégeances politiques confondues, veulent s'engager à travailler sur ces dossiers à long terme et qu'ils sont prêts à financer les efforts en ce sens.

La question suivante concerne l'organisation. Soit dit en passant, la fondation n'est pas le seul instrument que notre gouvernement utilise pour soutenir la démocratie. Il fait appel à de nombreuses organisations, y compris celles que Carl a mentionnées, nos collègues du National Democratic Institute et de l'International Republican Institute. On pourrait dire que la question organisationnelle est secondaire. Différents modèles peuvent être réunis pour recueillir le soutien politique nécessaire.

Merci.

(0920)

M. Carl Gershman:

Je vais apporter une petite correction.

La NED n'a pas été créée par l'intermédiaire de la NED Act. La NED a été incorporée en société privée dans le District de Columbia. La NED Act visait à créer ce pare-feu et à autoriser le financement de la NED, mais elle ne portait pas sur sa création, car la NED est un organisme non gouvernemental, ce qui est extrêmement important.

Je pense également qu'il y a une entière reddition de comptes, évidemment. L'organisme est tenu de respecter l'ensemble de la réglementation en matière de finances. Il doit être transparent et ouvert, et doit tenir l'administration et le Congrès — tout le monde — au courant de ses activités. Il est bipartite. Vous devez savoir que lorsque nous changeons de gouvernement, la NED ne change pas. C'est un aspect essentiel auquel vous devez réfléchir, au Canada. La seule différence, c'est lorsqu'un autre parti prend le pouvoir. Notre président, que nous choisissons nous-mêmes, doit être issu du parti au pouvoir. C'est la seule chose qui change; la composition du conseil demeure la même. Nos politiques ne changent pas. Nous nous adaptons au contexte mondial, à ce qui se passe sur la scène internationale, et nous sommes en mesure d'adopter une politique cohérente à long terme. Elle doit évidemment être conforme à ce qui fait consensus au sein de nos partis, sans pencher plus d'un côté que de l'autre. Il existe au sein des institutions une sorte d'équilibre bipartite et même une sorte d'équilibre entre le personnel et les dirigeants. Je pense que c'est absolument essentiel.

Je crois savoir que le Canada en a fait l'expérience il y a 13 ans avec une autre institution consacrée à la démocratie. Je pense que beaucoup de problèmes étaient liés à l'arrivée d'un autre parti au pouvoir et au conflit qui est survenu entre le conseil et le personnel. Il faut assurer la stabilité à long terme afin d'éviter que l'institution ne soit influencée par les changements de nature politique.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Merci beaucoup.

Je m'intéresse au fait que vos deux organismes fonctionnent différemment pour la prestation des services et du soutien. M. Smith a indiqué que son organisme compte 30 bureaux dans divers pays, tandis que la NED n'en a aucun.

Ma question s'adresse à vous deux. Qui décide des priorités et que faites-vous pour tendre vers ce que M. Gershman a mentionné — et je pense que c'est vraiment important —, c'est-à-dire une initiative ascendante? Si on veut favoriser la démocratisation, commencer par la base donnera des résultats plus durables, à mon avis. Je m'intéresse aux deux approches.

Comment déterminez-vous les priorités dans les pays visés, si vous n'y avez pas de bureaux?

Monsieur Smith, pourriez-vous nous parler de votre expérience quant à l'utilité de ces bureaux pour promouvoir les priorités de votre organisation?

M. Carl Gershman:

Anthony, aimeriez-vous commencer?

M. Anthony Smith:

Merci, Carl.

Pour créer et mettre en oeuvre nos programmes, nous devons avoir un partenaire dans le pays. Nous n'arrivons pas là en disant que nous voulons faire ceci ou cela. Nous avons évidemment une stratégie globale axée sur certains aspects que nous considérons comme essentiels pour l'exercice de la démocratie à l'échelle mondiale, mais c'est un mandat assez large.

Voici comment cela fonctionne lorsque nous avons un bureau dans le pays. Nous avons un partenaire qui a un programme que nous jugeons important d'appuyer et qui ajoute de la valeur à nos activités de soutien. Il s'agit habituellement d'un parlement, mais cela pourrait aussi être un organisme électoral ou un organisme de la société civile. Donc, par rapport à ce programme, nous faisons appel à nos contacts au Royaume-Uni et dans d'autres pays, dont le Canada, pour faire connaître les expériences qui, selon nous, pourraient aider à promouvoir ce programme. Certes, il est très important d'avoir une présence dans le pays, mais nous avons aussi d'autres relations dans d'autres pays.

(0925)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Saini.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Vous ne permettez pas à M. Gershman de répondre?

Le président:

Nous...

M. Carl Gershman:

Je vais tenter d'y revenir.

Le président:

Vous pourrez inclure cela dans votre réponse à la prochaine question. Exactement.

Monsieur Saini, s'il vous plaît.

M. Raj Saini (Kitchener-Centre, Lib.):

Bon après-midi, messieurs.

Je vais commencer par vous, monsieur Gershman.

J'ai remarqué une différence très importante entre vos deux organismes, et je pense que vous l'avez mentionné dans votre exposé. Vous avez indiqué que dans ces pays, vous appuyez aussi les organisations commerciales, contrairement à la WFD. Pouvez-vous me dire pour quelles raisons vous jugez qu'il est important d'appuyer les entreprises?

M. Carl Gershman:

Le Center for International Private Enterprise est unique en son genre dans le domaine, car on considère souvent le commerce comme une dimension du développement et non de la démocratie, alors que c'est absolument essentiel. Dans beaucoup de pays — l'Égypte, l'Ukraine et d'autres — la transition a été un échec parce qu'ils n'ont pas réglé correctement les questions économiques. Le Centre, que nous appelons le CIPE, peut intervenir dans le secteur dit informel et auprès des associations d'affaires et des groupes de réflexion. Essentiellement, ce n'est pas un organisme de développement, mais il contribue à orienter l'approche à l'égard de l'économie de marché pour qu'elle soit fonctionnelle, démocratique et exempte de copinage, et pour en faire une véritable force dynamique.

J'aimerais simplement prendre 30 secondes pour répondre à la question précédente. Il y a des militants pour la démocratie, y compris des associations d'affaires, partout dans le monde. Il faut les appuyer sur le terrain. Ce n'est pas l'affaire d'un seul partenaire à l'échelle locale. Nous répondons aux demandes des intervenants sur le terrain et nos instituts le font aussi. Nos activités varient en fonction de la demande.

Désolée; allez-y.

M. Raj Saini:

Ma prochaine question est pour vous deux.

Monsieur Gershman, dans votre exposé, vous avez fait allusion à la réalité géopolitique changeante qu'on observe dans le monde. Certaines démocraties naissantes peinent à prendre leur envol. D'autres démocraties, qui ont été établies rapidement, comme les pays du « groupe de Visegrad », font un retour en arrière. Il y a une montée des mouvements populistes. Plus important encore, il semble y avoir dans tout cela une absence de leadership qui favorise l'intervention de la Chine et la Russie, que ce soit en Amérique latine, en Afrique ou en Asie.

Il y a 20 à 25 ans, la promotion de la démocratie était très différente de ce qu'elle est aujourd'hui, car de nouveaux acteurs — la Chine et la Russie — tentent de promouvoir leur importance ou leur réputation dans ces régions du monde. Comment composez-vous avec ce nouvel ensemble de facteurs, particulièrement par rapport à la présence accrue de la Chine dans des pays où la gouvernance démocratique pose problème, et à celle de la Russie dans les États satellites ou dans les pays limitrophes qui sont dans sa sphère d'influence? Comment tiendrez-vous compte de ces effets tout en poursuivant vos activités dans ces régions du monde?

M. Carl Gershman:

Premièrement, concernant les autres acteurs, je dirais que ce n'est pas nouveau. Il y avait un autre acteur lorsque la NED a été créée: l'Union soviétique. À mon avis, ce qui s'est produit après l'effondrement du communisme, de 1989 à 1991, c'est que les gens avaient l'impression que le problème n'existait plus, ce qu'on a appelé une « vacance de l'Histoire ». Nous n'étions plus confrontés à ces défis. Depuis le 11 septembre 2001 et depuis l'émergence de la Chine et la Russie, plus récemment, nous avons appris que nous avons des rivaux et que si nous nous retirons du monde, le vide sera comblé par ces puissances.

Actuellement, aujourd'hui, nous avons vu les perturbations et la pénétration causées par l'Union soviétique, en particulier par l'intermédiaire de trolls sur Internet, mais la Chine représente une menace bien plus sérieuse. Elle est plus riche; elle investit plus d'argent. Selon nos chiffres, la Chine dépense quelque 10 milliards de dollars par année pour ce qu'elle appelle la propagande externe ou les activités malveillantes dans divers pays. Il pourrait s'agir d'activités de renseignement ou d'une pénétration des sociétés par l'intermédiaire de ce qu'on appelle le pouvoir tranchant.

Voilà le nouveau défi auquel nous sommes confrontés. Washington vient tout juste d'en prendre conscience. Nous devons essayer de comprendre cet enjeu. Évidemment, nous essayons d'y répondre, avec les priorités stratégiques que nous avons établies.

(0930)

M. Anthony Smith:

Permettez-moi de faire un bref commentaire, si j'en ai le temps. Une des choses qu'il faut absolument combattre, c'est l'idée qu'on puisse promouvoir le développement et la démocratie séparément. Je pense que nous savons tous qu'Amartya Sen était résolument contre cela. Démocratie et développement vont de pair.

De nos jours, on voit des choses comme la publication d'un éditorial payé par les Chinois dans le magazine The Economist, dans lequel on dit que l'ancienne dichotomie entre la démocratie et l'autocratie n'existe plus et qu'elle est remplacée par la nouvelle dichotomie entre la mauvaise gouvernance et la bonne gouvernance. Comme la Chine excelle sur le plan de la gouvernance, elle constitue un exemple que les autres devraient suivre. Voilà, littéralement, ce que la Chine a publié.

Je pense qu'il faut établir clairement, au sein de nos propres administrations, y compris au ministère du Développement où je travaillais autrefois, qu'on ne peut promouvoir la bonne gouvernance sans tenir compte des valeurs et de la démocratie. Il faut penser aux mécanismes qui permettent aux gens de se faire entendre, aux mesures de reddition de comptes, aux mécanismes nécessaires pour empêcher le pouvoir exécutif et les dirigeants d'abuser de leur pouvoir. Il est absolument essentiel de faire valoir cet argument, tant auprès de ceux que nous savons malveillants qu'au sein de nos propres communautés, qui veulent parfois éviter de faire des choix liés au soutien de la démocratie. C'est une autre raison pour laquelle le Canada joue un rôle si important dans ce débat, à mon avis.

M. Raj Saini:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Finnigan, j'aimerais d'abord vous souhaiter la bienvenue au Comité. Vous pouvez poser vos questions.

M. Pat Finnigan (Miramichi—Grand Lake, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie nos invités d'être ici.

Comme le président l'a indiqué, je suis nouveau au Comité, mais j'ai un grand intérêt pour ces questions. Comme tout le monde au pays, je suis l'évolution de la démocratie dans le monde. Je suis donc reconnaissant d'avoir l'occasion de poser des questions.

Je vais commencer par la question suivante. Je préside le comité de l'agriculture. Le commerce international — qui est en croissance — est très important pour nous et pour la plupart des pays. Nous avons signé des accords commerciaux avec des pays de partout dans le monde. Quelle incidence cela a-t-il sur la démocratie, le cas échéant? Fermons-nous les yeux sur les politiques des pays autoritaires lorsque nous voulons signer des accords commerciaux? Selon vous, quelle est l'incidence du nouveau contexte du commerce international ou mondial sur la démocratie? Cela a-t-il un effet?

M. Carl Gershman:

Je pense que nous voulons maintenir un ordre mondial où règne la primauté du droit, un ordre mondial fondé sur des règles dans lequel les échanges commerciaux entre pays se font dans un cadre juridique. Nous y parviendrons uniquement par la promotion de ces valeurs partout dans le monde et en appuyant, dans divers pays, les mouvements favorables à l'établissement d'un ordre fondé sur des règles. Si nous y parvenons, je pense que nous aurons un système commercial plus ouvert. À mon avis, nous devons trouver le juste équilibre entre la défense de notre propre souveraineté dans de nombreuses régions et la recherche de diverses formes de coopération internationale. Je dirais qu'actuellement, la communauté internationale a de la difficulté à le faire.

Certains pays réagissent aux pressions de la mondialisation, mais il est essentiel de maintenir un ordre international fondé sur des règles. Si nous pouvons y arriver, le commerce pourra continuer, ce qui favorisera la croissance économique. De nombreuses actions menées actuellement par la Chine dans le cadre de son initiative de la Ceinture et de la Route vont en sens contraire. Voilà l'instrument géopolitique utilisé par la Chine, mais avec la résistance de pays comme le Sri Lanka, les Maldives et la Malaisie. Les élections tenues en Malaisie en mai étaient une réaction contre la corruption découlant des pratiques utilisées par les Chinois pour étendre leur influence économique à d'autres pays par le versement de pots-de-vin aux élites.

Nous devons défendre l'ordre fondé sur des règles. Je dirais que c'est primordial.

M. Pat Finnigan:

Merci.

Monsieur Smith, avez-vous d'autres commentaires?

M. Anthony Smith:

J'ai seulement un bref commentaire à ajouter. Dans chaque pays, évidemment, il est nécessaire d'avoir des institutions démocratiques pour permettre aux voix de se faire entendre lors de l'établissement des politiques — la politique commerciale du pays —, de façon à ce que la population ait confiance que les accords commerciaux conclus par le pays ont été examinés par le Parlement et font aussi l'objet d'une surveillance juridique efficace.

Les institutions démocratiques d'un pays ont leur importance en toute chose, mais elles ont un rôle essentiel pour l'établissement d'une politique en matière de commerce international. Elles sont importantes pour la stabilité du climat commercial ainsi que pour la confiance à l'égard du régime démocratique de chaque pays.

(0935)

M. Pat Finnigan:

Merci beaucoup.

Diriez-vous qu'il existe un risque de danger ou une menace réelle d'érosion du mouvement démocratique de l'intérieur ou de l'extérieur de nos pays, surtout depuis les 25 dernières années, avec l'avènement du Web? Quelle a été son incidence sur le mouvement démocratique dans le monde?

L'un ou l'autre d'entre vous peut répondre.

M. Carl Gershman:

Nous avons cru autrefois que les médias sociaux seraient une force qui renforcerait les mouvements démocratiques des peuples étrangers. On constate que ces mouvements utilisent les médias sociaux pour renforcer leurs capacités de communication, leur capacité de diffuser des informations et de faire du réseautage entre eux. Je dirais que la grande surprise, c'est que nous n'avions pas prévu que les gouvernements autocratiques maîtriseraient si bien Internet et s'en serviraient pour tenter d'infiltrer les sociétés, pour perturber la démocratie et les mécanismes démocratiques et pour attiser le sentiment de méfiance. C'est devenu extrêmement dangereux.

Je tiens à souligner la nécessité de maintenir un Internet ouvert. Nous composons avec ces enjeux tous les jours. Nous ne voulons pas que des gouvernements autocratiques contrôlent Internet. Nous devons protéger la neutralité d'Internet, mais nous devons aussi nous défendre contre les abus provenant de gouvernements autocratiques. Nous devons prendre conscience qu'il s'agit de la nouvelle frontière, de la nouvelle ligne de front dans la lutte pour la démocratie à l'ère de l'information, et nous devons maîtriser les façons d'y arriver.

En décembre 2017, la NED a publié un rapport dans lequel le terme « pouvoir tranchant » a été utilisé pour la première fois pour établir une distinction avec « pouvoir discret ». Le pouvoir discret, ce sont nos universités et notre culture, c'est la diffusion organique de tout cela dans le monde. Le pouvoir tranchant, c'est l'utilisation de l'information et des outils d'information par un gouvernement pour infiltrer et manipuler d'autres sociétés. Nous devons comprendre cela, puis avoir la capacité de nous défendre.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Votre temps est écoulé.

La parole est maintenant à M. Aboultaif,

M. Ziad Aboultaif (Edmonton Manning, PCC):

Bonjour et merci aux deux témoins d'être ici.

On a mentionné le capitalisme autoritaire et le fait qu'il nuit à la protection et à la promotion de la démocratie. Selon nous, il représente un défi perpétuel. Nous savons que la démocratie est un long processus; il faut de nombreuses formes de patience, de détermination et d'investissement pour maintenir et continuer de promouvoir la démocratie dans différents endroits du monde. National Endowment for Democracy fait un excellent travail pour appuyer les efforts liés à la démocratisation partout dans le monde.

Monsieur Gershman, vous avez parlé de l'aspect non gouvernemental de NED. Vous avez mentionné que cela vous permet d'être plus efficace sur la scène mondiale. Y a-t-il des inconvénients à ne pas fonctionner à titre d'organisme du gouvernement — du gouvernement américain, dans ce cas-ci?

M. Carl Gershman:

Écoutez, lorsque je parle d'adopter une approche ascendante et de fonctionner indépendamment du gouvernement, je pense qu'il faut comprendre que ce type de travail s'ajoute à ce que fait notre gouvernement par l'entremise de ses politiques officielles et d'organismes de développement comme USAID, l'Agence des États-Unis pour le développement international. Même maintenant, notre département d'État finance des programmes par l'entremise du Bureau de la démocratie. Il s'agit de programmes différents. Ils servent à compléter les mesures prises. Au bout du compte, je crois que ce type de système diversifié fonctionne. Le rapport, que j'ai mentionné au sujet de l'approche ascendante et de l'approche descendante, qui vient juste d'être produit par un organisme européen n'indique pas qu'il faut choisir une approche à l'exclusion de l'autre. Il recommande plutôt de renforcer l'approche ascendante, afin qu'elle vienne s'ajouter aux activités déjà menées par les gouvernements à l'appui d'institutions officielles comme un système judiciaire et d'autres institutions dans le pays.

Il faut donc adopter une approche complexe et diversifiée.

(0940)

M. Ziad Aboultaif:

Nous savons depuis très longtemps que le monde libre est un monde libre. Vous avez mentionné les États-Unis, l'Europe, le Canada et l'Australie; c'est le monde démocratique. Il semble que le gouvernement entretient toujours des liens avec les institutions privées ou indépendantes. Selon vous, à l'avenir, comment le Canada pourrait-il obtenir plus efficacement la participation des deux parties?

M. Carl Gershman:

Dans plusieurs pays d'Afrique, nous avons commencé à tenter d'établir un dialogue entre les intervenants du secteur privé, du gouvernement et de la société civile en vue d'adopter une approche commune. C'est aussi une option. Les gouvernements aiment ce type d'initiatives, car ils n'ont pas, à eux seuls, la capacité d'accomplir cela. Encore une fois, je crois qu'il s'agit de réunir les différents intervenants et de comprendre qu'il est important de ne pas se contenter d'avoir un gouvernement stable, car il faut également établir un ordre fondé sur des règles et créer une économie de marché vigoureuse et axée sur la croissance. C'est le rôle que joue notre institut commercial dans le cadre de ses efforts visant à encourager cette approche. Nous avons également un institut du travail qui tente de veiller à ce que les droits des travailleurs soient protégés dans le contexte d'une économie de marché ouverte.

M. Ziad Aboultaif:

J'ai une dernière question.

Vous avez tous les deux mentionné, dans votre exposé, que certains pays perdent des institutions démocratiques et que leur démocratie est en régression. Même si nous avons apporté des améliorations dans certaines régions du monde, si nous souhaitions intervenir dans un autre endroit qui offre de belles possibilités de réussite, où devrions-nous aller? Pouvez-vous nommer quelques pays sur lesquels nous devrions miser davantage?

M. Carl Gershman:

Je l'ai fait, et je tiens vraiment à revenir sur ce sujet. Je crois que la transition en cours en Éthiopie est la transition la plus importante dans le monde en ce moment. En effet, c'est un pays de 105 millions d'habitants qui compte 80 groupes ethniques différents. Si l'Éthiopie peut réussir cette transition, cela indiquera à tous les endroits du monde qui accordent une grande importance à la question de la division ethnique que c'est possible d'y arriver. Le Canada devrait se rendre là-bas dès maintenant — je suis sûr que vous assurez déjà une présence là-bas de plusieurs façons — avec les instruments dont il dispose, car il faut agir rapidement dans ce type de situation.

J'ai également mentionné l'Arménie, où une transition remarquable est aussi en cours. Ce pays a obtenu le prix du pays de l'année du magazine The Economist en 2018. C'est une transition remarquable, dans laquelle le pays conserve un équilibre tout en intégrant de nouvelles forces.

Je crois que la transition malaisienne est également extrêmement importante. Le Canada a entendu le témoignage d'Anwar Ibrahim, qui a parlé à l'Université de Toronto jeudi dernier.

Si nous pouvons aider ces trois pays à réussir leur transition, je crois que nous donnerons un bon coup de pouce à la démocratie.

Il y a aussi la Tunisie, la première démocratie arabe, qui a organisé des élections locales en mai dernier. Ces élections ont grandement contribué à la promotion de la démocratie au niveau communautaire. La Tunisie fonctionne dans le cadre d'une constitution démocratique. C'est un modèle de démocratie dans une région très instable et non démocratique du monde. Je crois que nous devons aider ce pays à réussir sa transition.

Le président:

J'aimerais remercier les deux témoins. Nous avons eu une discussion très intéressante.

Nous prendrons maintenant une pause d'environ cinq minutes pour permettre aux autres témoins d'arriver. Nous vous souhaitons à tous deux une très belle journée.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Monsieur le président, puis-je poser une question?

Le président:

Certainement.

Mme Linda Duncan:

J'aimerais savoir si M. Gershman peut nous envoyer la source du rapport sur les approches ascendantes et descendantes. Il semble très intéressant.

M. Carl Gershman:

D'accord, mais il y a un hyperlien pour le rapport dans le mémoire que j'ai envoyé au Comité.

Mais si vous souhaitez que je vous envoie un lien distinct pour le rapport, je serai heureux de le faire.

Le président:

C'est correct. Nous trouverons le lien et nous distribuerons le rapport.

M. Carl Gershman:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, messieurs.

La séance est suspendue.

(0945)

(0950)

Le président:

Nous reprenons nos travaux pour la deuxième heure de notre réunion sur le rôle du Canada dans les mesures internationales de soutien du développement de la démocratie.

Nous entendrons deux témoins dans cette partie de la réunion.

Nous accueillons donc l'honorable Ed Broadbent.

Bienvenue et bon retour sur la Colline du Parlement. C'est un honneur d'entendre votre témoignage.

Nous accueillons également Jacqueline O'Neill, membre du Woodrow Wilson Center.

J'aimerais vous remercier, madame O'Neill, de vous joindre à nous à partir de Washington D.C. C'est merveilleux. Nous vous entendrons en premier, car même si la distance n'est pas trop grande, les connexions vidéo peuvent parfois nous faire faux bond. Veuillez donc livrer votre exposé.

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill (membre, Canada Institute, Woodrow Wilson Center):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Je vous remercie de pouvoir comparaître devant vous à partir de Washington. Ce serait cruel de vous dire quel temps il fait ici aujourd'hui. Je ne vais donc pas le faire.[Traduction]

Étant donné que je suis peut-être un peu moins connue au Canada que l'honorable Ed Broadbent, j'ai pensé vous fournir un peu de contexte sur mes antécédents relatifs à cet enjeu.

Plusieurs membres du Comité et plusieurs témoins ont parlé de la prévalence des Canadiens qui travaillent à la promotion de la démocratie au sein d'organismes non canadiens. Mon mari et moi-même correspondons parfaitement à cette description. En effet, il vient de l'île de Vancouver, et après s'être enrôlé dans les Forces armées canadiennes, il a travaillé pour le National Democratic Institute. Il travaille maintenant pour une entreprise privée américaine en Bosnie, en Afghanistan, au Yémen, à Haïti et en Irak. J'ai grandi à Edmonton, où j'ai aussi fréquenté l'université. J'ai vécu à Ottawa pendant plusieurs années et j'ai passé les 15 dernières années à l'étranger.[Français]

J'ai assisté M. Roméo Dallaire dans son initiative relative aux enfants soldats.[Traduction]

J'ai travaillé au Soudan dans le cadre d'une mission de maintien de la paix des Nations unies et dans une université pour les femmes. J'ai également aidé à diriger l'une des principales organisations mondiales axées sur la mise en oeuvre de la Résolution 1325 du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies. Nous avons travaillé avec des institutions, avec plus de 30 gouvernements et directement avec des coalitions de femmes en Colombie, au Pakistan, en Afghanistan, au Rwanda et dans de nombreux autres endroits.

Je dirai seulement que j'ai eu la chance d'observer de près ce qui fonctionne et ce qui ne fonctionne pas dans la promotion de la démocratie. Bien honnêtement, je préciserai que même si j'ai toujours été très fière d'être canadienne, les dernières années que j'ai passées aux États-Unis, qui m'ont permis d'être aux premières loges pour observer l'érosion des normes démocratiques dans ce pays, n'ont fait que me rendre plus reconnaissante de ce que le Canada a à offrir sur la scène mondiale.

J'ai écouté tous les témoins qui ont comparu devant votre comité depuis les deux dernières semaines, y compris ceux d'aujourd'hui, et je suis tout à fait d'accord avec leurs thèmes principaux, c'est-à-dire que la démocratie est menacée, les régimes autoritaires sont enhardis et le Canada joue un rôle unique et important.

Chaque témoin a également mis l'accent sur l'importance de la pleine inclusion des femmes. Dans le témoignage que je livrerai aujourd'hui, j'aimerais étoffer ce point et discuter des moyens dont le Canada dispose pour y arriver le plus intelligemment possible. Voilà donc un avant-goût de mes propres thèmes. Ces thèmes sont, tout d'abord, qu'il est essentiel d'inclure pleinement les femmes et de prévoir les soutiens nécessaires à cette inclusion, deuxièmement, qu'il est nécessaire, pour y arriver, de réfléchir à l'ensemble des facteurs qui permettent la promotion de la démocratie et troisièmement, que nous devrions énergiquement et incontestablement placer cette notion au centre de la marque du Canada et de notre contribution à l'ordre mondial.

Je comprends que cette étude vise en partie à évaluer les progrès réalisés dans ce secteur depuis 2007. Tout d'abord, nous avons de nouvelles données importantes. En effet, des chercheurs de Harvard ont entrepris une vaste étude qui leur a permis de conclure que le plus grand indicateur de la probabilité qu'un pays déclenche une guerre civile ou une guerre avec ses voisins n'est pas sa composition ethnique, son emplacement géographique, son PIB ou sa religion dominante. C'est plutôt la façon dont les femmes sont traitées, c'est-à-dire si elles ont accès à leurs droits et si elles sont incluses.

Une autre étude a conclu que les démocraties qui ont les taux les plus élevés de violence contre les femmes sont aussi peu sûres et instables que les pays non démocratiques. Pourquoi? Les chercheurs avancent maintenant l'hypothèse selon laquelle la vie dans les foyers est fondamentalement représentatrice du fonctionnement et du système de gouvernance de la société en général. Si la norme dominante dans la sphère privée, c'est-à-dire dans les foyers, favorise les intérêts des hommes au détriment de ceux des femmes, et que les différences sont tranchées avec des actes violents commis en toute impunité, ces comportements servent de modèle à la gestion de tous les autres types de différences, notamment les différences ethniques, idéologiques, etc.

Un autre nouvel indicateur du rôle central des femmes dans la démocratisation depuis 2007, c'est que de nombreux nouveaux renseignements nous apprennent que les régimes autoritaires surveillent maintenant les femmes militantes de beaucoup plus près. Les membres de votre comité ont entendu parler du rétrécissement de l'espace accordé à l'activisme de la société civile à l'échelle mondiale. Encore une fois, nous approfondirons cette question.

L'un des rapports de 2018 les plus crédibles sur le sujet indique que, dans une grande mesure, les femmes, notamment les défenseuses des droits des femmes et les groupes qui défendent les droits des femmes, représentent la cible la plus commune dans les incidents qu'ils ont consignés. Vous n'avez qu'à penser au meurtre de la militante écologiste autochtone Berta Cáceres, au Guatemala. Vous pouvez également penser à l'arrestation aux Philippines, la semaine dernière, de Maria Ressa, une journaliste qui critiquait ouvertement le président Duterte.

La fin de semaine dernière, j'ai parlé avec une amie qui est au Soudan, et elle m'a confirmé que les femmes sont les principales organisatrices des manifestations qui se déroulent là-bas depuis la fin décembre, et qu'elles sont aux premières lignes de ces manifestations. Elle m'a confirmé que les femmes font face à des viols et à des agressions sexuelles ciblés et qu'au cours des derniers jours, les forces de sécurité ont adopté une nouvelle tactique qui consiste à couper les cheveux des femmes lorsqu'elles les exposent dans la rue.

(0955)



Où en sommes-nous en ce qui concerne la représentation des femmes dans l'arène politique? Comme vous le savez sûrement, à l'échelle mondiale, environ 24 % des parlementaires nationaux sont des femmes — et cela a doublé au cours des 20 dernières années. La région qui connaît la plus forte croissance dans ce domaine est l'Amérique latine. Étant donné que votre comité fait la promotion de l'inclusion des jeunes, il est important de souligner que c'est chez les femmes qu'on observe la plus grande proportion de jeunes. En effet, à l'échelle mondiale, environ 18 % des postes ministériels sont occupés par des femmes. Actuellement, seulement environ 11 femmes sont chefs d'État.

La trajectoire, malgré certaines exceptions, est donc assez bonne, mais dans l'ensemble, ces changements s'effectuent à un rythme épouvantable. Comment le Canada peut-il accélérer ces changements?

Je ferais valoir qu'il est important de se concentrer sur les soi-disant dimensions traditionnelles du renforcement politique, par exemple, en renforçant les capacités des candidates et des députées, en favorisant l'inscription d'électrices, en encourageant les femmes à se porter candidates et en se concentrant sur les capacités institutionnelles. Je ferais également valoir que le Canada peut devenir un chef de file à cet égard en réfléchissant et en agissant à plus grande échelle, c'est-à-dire en reconnaissant les liens entre la démocratisation et la participation des femmes dans une vaste gamme de domaines qui déterminent la gouvernance. Cela comprend des domaines comme les négociations de paix dans les endroits où des formes de gouvernement sont déterminées, la rédaction d'une constitution dans les pays où les droits sont enchâssés ou laissés de côté, et des mouvements de résistance civile non violents, qui sont les précurseurs de la culture démocratique mentionnée plus tôt par M. Smith.

Cela signifie qu'il faut jouer un rôle plus délibéré dans les contextes de conflits, qui sont souvent les milieux les plus difficiles et les plus désordonnés, mais qui présentent également les meilleures occasions d'accélérer les changements. Cela vaut pour le reste du monde. En effet, le tiers des 30 pays où les femmes sont le plus représentées sont en situation d'après-conflit.

Dans ce cas-ci, pour offrir un appui stratégique à la démocratisation, il faut mettre en oeuvre le Plan d'action du Canada sur les femmes, la paix et la sécurité, financer la Politique d'aide internationale féministe et veiller à fournir du financement de base aux groupes de défense des droits des femmes. Cela signifie qu'il faut insister pour que les femmes participent aux négociations en Afghanistan, en Corée du Nord, au Venezuela et ailleurs, et qu'il faut adopter une perspective holistique de la démocratisation, en rejetant surtout la notion selon laquelle les dépenses consacrées à la défense représentent le seul investissement réel dans la sécurité.

Je serai heureuse de vous parler de tous ces enjeux, y compris celui de la technologie, car je me rends compte que nous ne l'avons pas abordé.

Si vous me le permettez, en terminant, j'aimerais aborder une notion dont j'ai entendu parler à plusieurs reprises, et c'est l'idée selon laquelle le Canada insiste peut-être déjà trop sur certains de ces enjeux ou il intervient trop rapidement, et cela pourrait entraîner des résultats aliénants, contre-productifs ou nuisibles à notre économie nationale.

Tout d'abord, je répondrai que ce n'est pas le moment de traiter l'inclusion comme étant un élément accessoire ou seulement souhaitable. En effet, certaines forces détournent agressivement les gens de la démocratie. Ce sont des forces redoutables et agressives qui ne manquent pas de ressources, et négliger de leur opposer une réaction égale et opposée engendrera un coût élevé. Nous ne ferons peut-être pas immédiatement face à ces coûts, mais nous devrons le faire un jour, lorsque des pays seront plus susceptibles de faire le trafic de drogues, d'armes et de personnes, de former ou d'héberger des terroristes, de renforcer des réseaux criminels, de produire des réfugiés ou même de souffrir de pandémies.

Il est clair que la lutte pour les droits des femmes n'a jamais été isolée de l'économie ou de la sécurité nationale.

Enfin, trop souvent, j'ai vu des gens qui veulent s'approprier le pouvoir utiliser l'excuse selon laquelle certains changements que d'autres pays tentent d'apporter ne sont pas « appropriés sur le plan culturel » ou sont pilotés par l'Occident. Soyons clairs: la culture doit orienter les moyens que nous utilisons, par exemple les messagers que nous envoyons. C'est un élément essentiel dont il faut tenir compte dans notre approche, mais les valeurs démocratiques et l'idée selon laquelle les femmes devraient exercer une influence sur les décisions qui ont des répercussions sur leur vie ne sont pas des notions uniquement occidentales. En effet, selon mon expérience, les personnes qui disent aux gens de l'extérieur de leur envoyer leurs capitaux, mais de se tenir à l'écart de tout ce qui est lié au pouvoir sont habituellement les personnes qui craignent le plus de devoir rendre des comptes à leurs électeurs.

Je crois que notre approche doit toujours être fondée sur le respect et l'humilité, mais nous pouvons et nous devrions parler de nos valeurs. C'est plus important que jamais.

Merci.

(1000)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame O'Neill.

Nous allons tout de suite passer au prochain intervenant; la parole est à vous, Ed Broadbent.

L'hon. Ed Broadbent (président et fondateur, Institut Broadbent):

Monsieur le président, si vous le permettez, je tiens à dire à mes collègues et anciens collègues que je suis ravi d'être de retour ici, surtout dans le cadre de l'étude de ce sujet important. Je vous suis reconnaissant de me donner l'occasion de vous faire part de mes réflexions sur la façon dont le Canada peut soutenir au mieux le développement démocratique sur le plan international. Plus particulièrement, je vais me concentrer sur les propositions qui ont été formulées par une version précédente de ce comité dans le rapport publié en 2007, dans lequel on recommandait la création de deux entités: une fondation indépendante pour le développement démocratique international et un centre pour la démocratie multipartite et parlementaire financé par cette fondation.

Je crois qu'en envisageant ces propositions, le Comité ne peut faire mieux que d'examiner les raisons qui sous-tendent la décision du Parlement dans les années 1980 de créer le Centre international des droits de la personne et du développement démocratique qui, heureusement, a été renommé simplement Droits et Démocratie, ce qui est un peu plus facile. À l'heure actuelle, de nombreuses régions du monde étaient plongées dans le chaos et nos parlementaires ont présenté une proposition modeste, mais efficace pour aider les gens dans des pays en développement dans leurs efforts pour bâtir des sociétés démocratiques. Dans un rapport unanime déposé au Parlement, on recommandait la création d'une institution qui serait clairement indépendante du gouvernement et qui ferait la promotion dans les pays en développement des dispositions de la Charte internationale des droits de l'homme et, ce faisant, jetterait efficacement les assises pour la création d'une démocratie multipartite. Cette idée clé a été acceptée par le gouvernement de l'époque, le gouvernement de M. Mulroney, et les partis de l'opposition, ce qui a donné lieu à l'adoption unanime du projet de loi qui a créé Droits et Démocratie, qui est entré en vigueur tout de suite après les élections en 1988.

Ce qui préoccupait plus particulièrement les parlementaires à l'époque, tout comme ça devrait l'être actuellement, c'était d'éviter toute forme de régime impérialiste canadien, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi. Notre objectif ne devrait pas être de reproduire notre forme de démocratie parlementaire ou notre Charte des droits. Nous devrions plutôt faire la promotion des droits de la personne, qui sont universellement reconnus dans la Charte internationale des droits de l'homme. Cela inclut la Déclaration universelle des droits de l'homme, le Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques, le protocole optionnel sur le Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques et, enfin, le Pacte international relatif aux droits économiques sociaux et culturels.

Dans cet esprit, on comprenait dans les années 1980, tout comme on le comprend maintenant, que de nombreux États en Amérique latine, par exemple, ont des prétendues élections compétitives, mais ce qui leur manque, c'est la liberté d'expression, la liberté d'association, la liberté d'avoir un syndicat, la liberté de la presse et, de façon générale, la primauté du droit. Comme l'histoire de la majorité de l'Europe de l'Ouest et de l'Amérique du Nord l'a montré, la base pour avoir une démocratie multipartite est une société qui inclut dans ses institutions et ses pratiques les droits universels, qui comprennent maintenant les droits sociaux et économiques. Sans droit de la personne et sans primauté du droit, les prétendues élections sont très souvent un simulacre. Sans droits en place, les hommes et les femmes qui ne pouvaient pas exercer leur droit de vote se sont prévalus de ces droits pour se regrouper et revendiquer leur droit de vote. La loi qui a créé Droits et Démocratie mettait plus précisément l'accent sur la nécessité de réduire l'écart entre ce que certains États s'engagent officiellement à inclure dans leurs constitutions, par exemple, et ce qui se passe réellement dans ces États.

Depuis ce temps, de nombreux États ont signé des ententes internationales, mais n'ont pas respecté les normes internationales pour leur mise en oeuvre. Une grande partie des travaux utiles qu'a menés Droits et Démocratie visaient à combler l'écart entre le principe et la réalité, par exemple au Guatémala, au Mexique, au Salvador, au Pérou, au Kenya, en Tanzanie, au Pakistan et en Thaïlande. C'était pour adopter, comment certains témoins l'ont dit plus tôt, une approche ascendante plutôt que descendante. Bien souvent, ces travaux étaient effectués par l'institution avec les partenaires de la société civile dans ces pays, et c'était ces partenaires, pas nous, les Canadiens, qui ont établi la priorité d'intervention. Dans ces mêmes pays, l'ACDI a souvent travaillé avec chaque État pour atteindre les mêmes objectifs avec le gouvernement du jour.

(1005)



Je crois qu'il est très important de comprendre qu'en combinant les expressions « développement démocratique » et « droits de la personne », la première n'était pas considérée comme un ajout à la deuxième. On voulait plutôt clarifier que l'on met l'accent sur les droits parce qu'ils font partie intégrante du développement démocratique. C'est pourquoi je ne crois pas que le Parlement doit créer deux instituts, comme le Comité l'a recommandé en 2007, un pour le développement international et un autre pour la démocratie multipartite et parlementaire. Je crois qu'une institution peut suffire.

La principale raison pour laquelle l'ancien organisme Droits et Démocratie n'avait pas de programmes ciblant précisément le développement d'États démocratiques multipartites, durant mon mandat de six ans comme président, par exemple, était simplement une question de ressources. Étant donné la portée mondiale du mandat et les ressources financières limitées, nous pensions que nous devrions réserver notre appui aux militants et aux programmes des droits de la personne. Je crois maintenant qu'avec des fonds supplémentaires, une institution suffirait, et on pourrait préciser dans la loi que le développement de démocraties multipartites devrait faire partie de son mandat.

D'autres suggestions pourraient également être envisagées dans le cadre de l'étude du contenu de la loi qui crée une nouvelle institution. À mon avis, la loi devrait préciser que l'institution n'est « pas un organisme de Sa Majesté ».

Pour contribuer à l'appui de tous les partis dans le cadre de ces efforts, je crois que des membres devraient être nommés au terme de consultations sérieuses avec les chefs des partis de l'opposition. De plus, on devrait envisager qu'un quart des membres du conseil proviennent de pays en développement.

Pour conclure, j'aimerais souligner la structure unique, l'indépendance et l'importance que l'organisme Droits et Démocratie avait jusqu'à la fin de son existence. En étant indépendant du gouvernement, il a acquis de la crédibilité auprès des ONG internationales et des gouvernements étrangers. Parallèlement, puisque l'organisme a été créé par le gouvernement fédéral, que le président était nommé par le Conseil privé et qu'il bénéficiait du soutien institutionnel du ministère des Affaires étrangères, en tant que président, j'avais un meilleur accès aux chefs des gouvernements que la plupart des autres ONG internationales.

En raison de l'indépendance du gouvernement du jour et du fait que je détenais un passeport diplomatique canadien, je pouvais demander la tenue de réunions avec le président Clinton, le roi de la Thaïlande et les présidents du Guatemala, du Mexique, du Rwanda, de l'Érythrée et du Kenya, notamment. Ces rencontres et leur utilité pour adopter des mesures sérieuses relatives aux droits de la personne ne sont tout simplement pas disponibles aux dirigeants des ONG.

En résumé, je crois que le Canada devrait contribuer à l'émergence d'un plus grand nombre de démocraties dans le monde, en partie en créant une institution indépendante dont le but consiste à aider les pays en développement à mettre en oeuvre les droits prévus dans la Charte internationale des droits de l'homme.

Je suis bien conscient que les idées que j'ai brièvement exposées soulèvent un grand nombre de questions auxquelles je suis maintenant disposé à répondre.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à vous deux.

Nous allons immédiatement passer aux questions. Nous allons commencer avec le député O'Toole.

(1010)

L’hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux de vous voir, monsieur Broadbent. Je suis un député qui représente une partie d'Oshawa. J'ai grandi dans votre grande région. Nous avons eu de bonnes interactions au fil des ans. Je suis ravi que vous soyez sur la Colline.

J'aime votre idée de mobiliser Droits et Démocratie et d'utiliser une partie des travaux qui ont été réalisés pour s'appuyer sur ce qui a déjà été fait plutôt que de recommencer à zéro. Pensez-vous que c'est la meilleure approche, à la lumière des connaissances que nous avons et de la feuille de route? Pensez-vous que ce serait un recul de créer une entité qui irait peut-être à l'encontre de ce qu'une organisation fait déjà?

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

Il serait bon de revoir les bases dans ce cas-ci, car elles étaient excellentes.

Je ne siégeais pas au Comité à l'époque — j'étais chef de parti —, mais je peux dire que c'était un rapport remarquable qui était appuyé par tous les partis dans les années 1980, qui a suscité beaucoup d'enthousiasme et qui a donné lieu à la création de Droits et Démocratie. Il avait non seulement l'appui du gouvernement, mais de tous les partis de l'opposition et, pendant de nombreuses années, que ce soit à l'époque du gouvernement de M. Mulroney, avec Joe Clark comme ministre des Affaires étrangères, ou à l'époque du gouvernement de Jean Chrétien, avec André Ouellet comme ministre des Affaires étrangères, il y avait une relation indépendante avec l'institut, mais l'institut mettait l'accent sur les organismes communautaires.

Je devrais ajouter, parce que c'était un élément important du mandat, que les droits des femmes étaient au coeur de notre priorité dans les pays en développement à l'époque, tout comme ça devrait l'être maintenant.

Soit dit en passant, tous les partis étaient représentés au conseil pour leurs expériences, et non pas en tant que députés. Ils venaient de toutes les allégeances politiques au Canada. Ils étaient choisis en fonction de leur expérience et de leur travail en établissement. Je recommanderais au Comité d'examiner quelques-unes des raisons pour lesquelles l'institution a été créée et a connu beaucoup de succès.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question s'adressera à vous deux. Je vais probablement manquer de temps, alors je vais intervenir, puis je vous donnerai l'occasion à tous les deux de répondre.

Monsieur Broadbent, vous avez mentionné à plusieurs reprises la nécessité d'avoir l'appui de tous les partis et une approche multipartite.

Madame O'Neill, compte tenu de votre expérience à travailler sur la scène internationale au sein du Woodrow Wilson Center... à faire connaître comment l'Institut républicain international et le NDI peuvent participer à un mouvement plus vaste... C'est non seulement approprié pour notre démocratie parlementaire, mais cela fera probablement accroître la participation des générations futures.

Je ne pense pas que nous ayons abordé la question de façon aussi stratégique pour nous assurer que tous les partis sont représentés. Pensez-vous que c'est essentiel pour que le processus fonctionne?

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

Je pense que oui. Pour être bien honnête, j'ai eu des discussions avec M. Mulroney lorsqu'il a offert de me nommer président-fondateur. Pour des raisons que tout le monde comprendra, le conseil devait accepter que j'occupe ce poste. Il y a eu de très bonnes discussions franches au sujet des membres du conseil pour représenter, comme je l'ai dit, tous les partis. Et M. Mulroney, bien entendu, en tant que premier ministre et responsable de la loi, a donné son approbation d'emblée, comme l'a fait aussi son successeur, le gouvernement libéral de M. Chrétien.

La participation de tous les partis était une raison très importante de son succès.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Madame O'Neill, pourriez-vous vous prononcer sur cet aspect?

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

Oui, je serais tout à fait d'accord et je dirai simplement deux choses. L'une est ce dont nous avons entendu parler plus tôt concernant la nécessité d'avoir un objectif politique commun. C'est exactement ce que vous dites. Il faut un objectif politique que tous les partis partagent pour que cela puisse être viable.

Ensuite, pour revenir à un point que M. Broadbent a soulevé dans sa déclaration, l'idée de veiller à ce qu'il y ait des représentants des pays du Sud ou des pays en développement au conseil dans le cadre de la structure de gouvernance assure la pertinence, une cohésion, une participation et un engagement, ainsi qu'une représentation plus directe du service en soi, ce qui fait augmenter la participation avec le temps.

(1015)

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

En ce qui concerne la reddition de comptes, est-ce que ce pourrait être une situation où nous veillons à ce qu'un rapport annuel soit déposé au Parlement ou qu'il y ait un mécanisme semblable, de manière à ce qu'il n'y ait pas seulement une institution qui n'entretient aucune relation active avec le Parlement?

Pourriez-vous tous les deux nous dire s'il y a des leçons à tirer?

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

La loi qui crée l'organisme Droits et Démocratie renfermait cette exigence. Un rapport annuel était déposé au Parlement. L'institut faisait l'objet d'une vérification réalisée par le vérificateur général chaque année également.

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

[Inaudible]... toujours pour assurer la surveillance parlementaire.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Enfin, pour ce qui est de la feuille de route, monsieur Broadbent, vous avez dit que les pays étaient souvent tenus... et que nous examinions l'écart entre leurs fondements constitutionnels et la réalité sur le terrain. Comment avons-nous évalué la réalité sur le terrain? Avons-nous travaillé en partenariat avec Affaires mondiales ou le ministère des Affaires étrangères, ou est-ce l'organisme Droits et Démocratie qui s'en est chargé?

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

C'était les deux. Surtout durant les premières années, lorsque Joe Clark était ministre des Affaires étrangères, on mettait davantage l'accent sur les droits de la personne dans les pays en développement. Les ambassades ont collaboré avec nous et ont réalisé leurs propres évaluations indépendantes. Lorsque nous allions dans un pays, ou quand j'y allais, nous demandions à l'ambassade canadienne de nous fournir son évaluation de ce qui se passe. Normalement, les relations étaient très constructives. Nous faisions rapport aussi par la suite. C'était une institution unique que le Canada avait.

Je pense que son succès est en partie dû au fait que nous ne sommes pas une grande puissance. Nous ne sommes pas le Royaume-Uni. Nous ne sommes pas les États-Unis. Même si mon poste était une nomination du gouvernement, une nomination du Conseil privé, nous avons réussi à être perçus pour ce que nous étions, une entité légalement indépendante du gouvernement. Nous ne devions pas du tout rendre des comptes, sauf par l'entremise du Parlement, au gouvernement au quotidien, et nous ne doutions pas, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi, des ONG ou de gouvernements. Il n'y avait pas de confusion que je parlais au nom du gouvernement, car ce n'était pas le cas. L'indépendance était respectée, mais la relation avec le gouvernement — je reviens encore une fois à cela — était très utile. Le fait que j'ai été en quelque sorte un représentant institutionnel du gouvernement du Canada a ouvert des portes qui n'auraient autrement pas été ouvertes à bon nombre d'ONG, par exemple.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre la députée Vandenbeld, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis très heureuse de vous revoir sur la Colline, monsieur Broadbent. Nous pourrions probablement être ici tout le matin à poser des questions.

Je vais adresser mes questions plus précisément à Mme O'Neill, car j'aimerais vraiment aborder brièvement la question liée au sexe, l'égalité, l'inclusion et la complémentarité de ces éléments au développement institutionnel. Lorsqu'on pense aux partis politiques, au Parlement, à la démocratie, on ne voit pas tout de suite le lien avec la Politique d'aide internationale féministe. On sait, cependant, que si on n'a pas ces institutions, les points de vue de tous les membres de la population représentée, des institutions efficaces, on ne peut pas atteindre l'égalité entre les sexes dans une région géographique donnée.

Si nous avons créé une entité axée sur le développement démocratique, et je ne parle pas seulement de la participation des femmes dans ces institutions, mais aussi de la structure de ces institutions en soi, comment cela contribuerait-il à la Politique d'aide internationale féministe? Je pourrais peut-être vous demander d'apporter des précisions à ce sujet.

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

Exactement comme l'ont dit les autres intervenants précédemment, ce sont dans les démocraties les plus fragiles ou peut-être les plus régressives que nous observons certains des plus grands problèmes. Je crois qu'on les dit superficielles. Ce sont celles qui ont pris très rapidement des mesures sur le plan architectural sans les appuyer par un changement culturel ou sans être véritablement inclusives. Nous voyons l'adoption d'une solution rapide qui ne donne pas des résultats durables.

Qu'est-ce que cela signifie pour la représentation et l'inclusion des femmes et les liens avec cette question? Concernant votre question, si un organisme devait être établi, tout d'abord, je voudrais m'assurer qu'il n'est pas défini comme étant seulement, par exemple, un organisme qui renforce les partis politiques ou les candidats. Je pense que comme bien d'autres l'ont dit, il doit inclure largement la société civile. Il serait également essentiel que le personnel ait, et que le programme reflète, une connaissance très fine de différents contextes et moyens pour aider les femmes, c'est-à-dire savoir quand cela convient et quand cela ne convient pas.

De nombreuses études et expériences universitaires révèlent, par exemple, que différents types de quotas sont plus susceptibles de fonctionner dans différents contextes. Nous devons nous assurer que nous le comprenons. Nous devons connaître les différents types d'aide dont les réseaux de femmes de la société civile ont probablement davantage besoin que les réseaux de la société civile mixtes ou ceux qui incluent principalement des hommes. Il faut que dans tout organisme, il y ait un niveau de compréhension élevé quant à la façon de procéder.

Je pense que le Canada est, de loin, mieux placé pour le faire que tout autre pays avec lequel j'ai collaboré. Des membres des Forces armées canadiennes savent comment faire une analyse comparative entre les sexes plus. Le plan d'action national a découlé des travaux de votre comité, a été surveillé par votre comité, et a été élaboré à l'aide de vastes consultations menées partout au pays. Il y a des gens qui ont les compétences voulues et qui peuvent faire plus que dire que les droits des femmes sont importants et que nous devons les protéger afin d'assurer leur inclusion. Je dirais que tout nouvel organisme ou tout ensemble d'organismes devraient comprendre une expertise approfondie et une professionnalisation de ce service.

(1020)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Dans votre témoignage, vous avez dit que l'égalité des sexes n'est pas une question secondaire, que c'est, en fait, une question centrale quand on pense à l'économie et à la sécurité. Vous avez parlé du coût de l'inaction en ce qui concerne le terrorisme, la criminalité, le manque de sécurité et les mouvements de réfugiés. Pouvez-vous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet?

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

Oui. Il est toujours très difficile d'estimer le coût de l'exclusion, mais nous constatons qu'il existe une forte corrélation entre les pays qui se comportent d'une manière qui, avec le temps, nous coûte cher — comme vous le disiez, des pays qui génèrent des réfugiés, qui ne respectent pas les règles commerciales à l'échelle internationale — et la manière dont ils traitent les femmes dans leur pays. De nombreuses études — et je serai ravie de les montrer au Comité — contribuent à étayer le fait que ce n'est plus quelque chose que nous pouvons qualifier de question secondaire ou qu'il est simplement bien d'avoir. C'est essentiel.

Enfin, à cet égard, je dirais que nos ennemis ou nos adversaires comprennent très bien ce point. Ils comprennent l'importance qu'ont les femmes et la dynamique des rapports de genres pour faire avancer leur cause. Ils n'appellent pas cela ACS+ ou une analyse comparative entre les sexes, mais les groupes terroristes recrutent des femmes de façon très délibérée. La majorité des kamikazes de Boko Haram sont des femmes. La majorité d'entre elles sont des filles, des enfants soldats. De nombreuses organisations qui se sont retirées de la démocratie ont compris que les femmes pouvaient les aider à réaliser leurs objectifs. Ils comprennent beaucoup mieux comment procéder. Je crois que nous devons répliquer de manière aussi judicieuse.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Dans votre témoignage, vous avez dit également qu'on ciblait les femmes qui défendent les droits de la personne et les femmes politiques. Y a-t-il une façon différente, voire plus précise, de cibler les femmes dans ces organismes et de cibler les femmes qui font de la politique?

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

Oui. L'une des premières façons dont les femmes se heurtent à la réduction de l'espace pour leur travail, c'est par une réduction de la liberté de mouvement, un rétrécissement étouffant de leur espace. Elles sont moins en mesure de se rassembler dans le pays et de se rencontrer ou de voyager. Elles font face à de plus en plus de menaces physiques en ligne. On les diffame beaucoup plus publiquement, surtout en attaquant leur honneur et leur intégrité. Il est également beaucoup plus difficile pour les organisations internationales ou les gouvernements d'appuyer financièrement des organisations de femmes qui défendent les droits de la personne. Ces groupes sont de plus en plus ciblés, de plus en plus de manières.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame O'Neill, je veux seulement rappeler que si vous voulez fournir d'autres informations, veuillez les envoyer à la greffière, et nous veillerons à les ajouter aux documents de l'étude.

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

J'en serais ravie. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Duncan, allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Merci beaucoup.

Bien entendu, nous aimerions que tout le monde puisse rester ici toute la journée. Le sujet de discussion le plus important devrait être la construction de la démocratie.

Soit dit en passant, madame O'Neill, il est bien certain que vous êtes merveilleuse, car vous venez d'Edmonton, comme moi.

Votre témoignage m'amène à me poser un grand nombre de questions intéressantes, et j'aimerais que vous répondiez tous les deux à la prochaine question — vous en particulier, monsieur Broadbent. M. Gershman nous a rappelé que la National Endowment for Democracy n'a pas été créée par le gouvernement, mais plutôt par des ONG, qui en ont établi les modalités et les objectifs. Le gouvernement fédéral finance simplement l'organisme.

Cela a soulevé une question dans mon esprit. S'agira-t-il d'un organisme vraiment indépendant si c'est le gouvernement qui le crée? Quelle est, à votre avis, la meilleure voie à suivre pour son établissement pour faire en sorte qu'il soit indépendant du gouvernement?

(1025)

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

Si l'on regarde comment on a procédé dans le cas de Droits et Démocratie, on constate qu'une très grande attention a été portée à cette question concernant la durée d'emploi, la nécessité de rendre des comptes au Parlement — et pas seulement au gouvernement — et la représentation des non-Canadiens au sein du conseil d'administration qui a été formé. Toutes ces mesures ont été grandement utiles jusqu'à la toute fin, où l'on a assisté à un désastre.

Pour être honnête, je dirais que le gouvernement de M. Harper... La seule fois où un gouvernement a dérogé, en quelque sorte, au principe de neutralité, c'est lorsque M. Harper a nommé un certain nombre de gens très impartiaux au conseil d'administration. Cela a entraîné des conflits majeurs au sein de l'organisme au sujet des priorités. Ce qui en a résulté, eh bien... Le président de l'époque est mort d'un infarctus, en fait. La situation était terrible. Par la suite, le gouvernement a aboli l'organisme. Je dirais que c'est que pour la première et seule fois, un gouvernement a décidé de donner une forme partisane au conseil d'administration, ce que tout gouvernement peut faire, bien sûr. Or, jusqu'à ce moment-là, aucun gouvernement, conservateur ou libéral, n'avait essayé de s'ingérer dans l'organisme d'une quelconque façon, qu'il s'agisse de noyauter un conseil d'administration ou de donner des directives.

Pour revenir à votre question, je dirais que cela ne peut être totalement sûr. Il ne peut y avoir de dispositions qui seront protégées de façon permanente d'un gouvernement s'il décide de faire quelque chose d'inacceptable.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Croyez-vous que c'est le gouvernement qui devrait procéder aux nominations pour cet organisme...?

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

Eh bien, c'est ce qu'on faisait auparavant et il y avait des consultations entre le gouvernement et l'opposition. Le gouvernement prenait tout de même la décision, mais de sérieuses consultations avaient lieu avec les chefs des partis de l'opposition pour essayer de s'assurer que les gens choisis avaient de l'expérience directe ou indirecte relative aux droits de la personne, par exemple, ou au militantisme en quelque sorte, que leur nomination était jugée acceptable par tous les partis.

En principe, l'idée que le gouvernement procède aux nominations ne m'inquiète pas, puisque c'est lui qui nomme les juges à la Cour suprême et qu'en règle générale, la Cour suprême est très impartiale, certainement quand on parle d'orientation idéologique. Rien n'est infaillible, mais si la loi est bonne et que le gouvernement agit de bonne foi et consulte les autres partis, je pense que cela peut fonctionner.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Madame O'Neill, je me demande si vous pouvez répondre à ma prochaine question, et vous aussi, par la suite, monsieur Broadbent.

Il y a une chose qui m'intrigue. Je crois que le gouvernement actuel voudrait rétablir un tel organisme, mais à l'heure actuelle, dans son budget, Affaires mondiales ne regroupe pas ensemble le développement des services judiciaires, le développement démocratique, les droits de la personne, les droits des femmes, etc. Ils sont tous séparés dans le budget d'Affaires mondiales et, en fait, il n'y a à peu près rien pour la participation démocratique dans la société civile.

La création de cet organisme signifie-t-elle également qu'Affaires mondiales et le gouvernement doivent reconsidérer les choses à cet égard et la façon dont ils fonctionnent ensemble? C'est une toute petite question.

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

Ma plus grande préoccupation, si un organisme était créé, ce serait de veiller à ce qu'il n'absorbe pas une trop grande partie du financement des organisations et réseaux de la société civile. Je peux voir de nombreuses bonnes raisons pour lesquelles ce serait utile pour la coordination et les avantages que présente un organisme indépendant.

J'ai aussi pensé que le point précédent concernant le symbolisme de ceci en ce moment, est puissant, mais je voudrais m'assurer que nous ne redirigeons pas trop de fonds, et que pour ce qui est de la démocratisation, les choses ne se fassent pas uniquement dans les limites de ce seul organisme. Dans ce type de questions, c'est toujours une question de compromis entre intégrer et cibler, et je veux toujours voir les deux. Je veux voir des éléments en appui à la démocratisation au coeur de diverses autres rubriques.

J'aimerais également que plus de fonds soient consacrés aux organismes et réseaux des droits de la personne et de la société civile, surtout ceux qui sont dirigés par des femmes, comme l'ont proposé la Politique d'aide internationale féministe et le Programme sur la voix et le leadership des femmes. Je crois que le Canada a fait d'énormes progrès à cet égard. J'aime toujours en voir plus, mais c'est une reconnaissance importante jusqu'à présent et j'aimerais que cela se poursuive.

(1030)

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec elle.

Le président:

Merci

C'est maintenant au tour du député Graham. Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame O'Neill, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez dit que vous vouliez parler de la technologie, mais que vous n'en aviez pas le temps. Voulez-vous le faire maintenant?

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

Très brièvement, en ce qui concerne la technologie, je félicite sincèrement le Comité, car je sais que dans le passé, vous avez parlé de la technologie et de cette question, en reconnaissant son importance, et en comprenant également que bon nombre d'entre nous parlent de la technologie comme si elle était non discriminatoire, comme si elle était un grand facteur d'égalisation et qu'elle touchait les hommes et les femmes de la même façon. Encore une fois, j'aimerais analyser cela.

Pour les femmes, en particulier celles qui militent pour la démocratie, la technologie peut vraiment être une bonne chose. Tout d'abord, elle les aide à s'organiser et à surmonter certains des obstacles que je viens de mentionner en répondant à la question de la députée Vandenbeld au sujet des entraves à la liberté de mouvement. La technologie offre un moyen de surmonter cet obstacle. Souvent, la société civile a besoin de permis pour se rassembler et pour réunir plus de 11 personnes à la fois, ou quelque chose du genre. La technologie permet aux femmes de s'organiser comme jamais auparavant.

C'est également un outil très important pour attirer des jeunes femmes vers la gouvernance. Je raconte souvent l'histoire d'une amie qui vit en Tunisie et qui a créé un site Web, une application, pour suivre la rédaction de la Constitution de la Tunisie, et des jeunes l'ont consulté minutieusement. Son application a fini par attirer plus d'abonnés que toute l'équipe de soccer nationale. Lorsque nous parlons d'attirer les jeunes en politique, de la transparence et de la surveillance, cela pourrait être très utile.

La technologie peut aider également à communiquer des leçons. La solidarité et la communication de pratiques exemplaires sont importantes.

Cependant, la technologie peut aussi avoir des répercussions très négatives, en particulier sur les femmes et la promotion de la démocratie. Je n'ai pas besoin de vous dire comment elle peut servir à exercer une influence sur les élections de l'extérieur, ni de vous parler des réactions brutales auxquelles des hommes et des femmes peuvent faire face. Souvent, celles qui ciblent les femmes sont en bonne partie très sexualisées et concernent leur honneur et leur place au sein de leur famille et de leur communauté.

Je dirais que puisque nous appuyons la démocratisation dans le monde, nous devons nous assurer, entre autres, de soutenir les femmes au moyen de formations sur la sécurité numérique, de la sécurité des données, de la gestion de leur présence en ligne, etc.

Je crois qu'il nous faut avoir les yeux grands ouverts à cet égard, et comme tout le reste, reconnaître que même une chose qui semble anodine comporte une dimension fondée sur le sexe.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela m'amène pour ainsi dire à ma prochaine question: comment devons-nous traiter les acteurs dans les démocraties établies, les gens qui sont déjà là, qui veulent ébranler cela au moyen, par exemple, d'un remaniement arbitraire des circonscriptions, de l'utilisation de stratagèmes pour empêcher les électeurs de voter et de fausses nouvelles, qui sont tous des moyens technologiques? Comment contrer les menaces internes à la démocratie?

La question s'adresse à vous deux.

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

Je dirais que la meilleure façon de s'attaquer à cela à long terme et fondamentalement est d'améliorer notre pensée critique.

C'est une chose que j'ai affûtée en nouant un dialogue avec beaucoup de femmes, qui travaillent pour combattre des pôles d'extrémisme violent et de radicalisation partout dans le monde. Elles disent que ce qui nous est imposé par des donateurs internationaux, c'est entre autres l'idée d'afficher sur les médias sociaux des messages contraires qui montrent les bonnes choses faites par le gouvernement et de quelles façons il soutient telle ou telle chose.

Elles disent que lutter contre des messages avec d'autres messages ne sera jamais la solution gagnante. Ce que nous devons faire, c'est mettre l'accent sur la pensée critique de nos citoyens et de nos populations. Je pense que c'est une chose que le Canada peut faire de manière très directe.

À court terme, je pense que nous devons veiller à avoir un lien très étroit entre les femmes, les activistes de la société civile et les entreprises de technologie. J'entends souvent des femmes qui se mobilisent parler des nouvelles façons dont la technologie est utilisée pour saboter leurs activités, à l'aide de diverses applications qui sont mises au point, de différentes approches de surveillance et ainsi de suite. Dans la mesure où il y a un lien plus direct entre les femmes qui se battent pour la démocratie dans un pays, y compris le nôtre, et les entreprises de technologie qui exploitent ces plateformes, je pense que c'est une des meilleures choses que nous pouvons faire à court terme.

(1035)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois.

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

La seule chose que j'ajouterais à cela, c'est la question de réglementer les institutions ou les multinationales comme Facebook, par exemple, pour prévenir à l'avenir l'utilisation de ce genre de technologie qui porte atteinte à nos élections et à d'autres élections partout dans le monde en créant de la dissension et du conflit au sein des sociétés. Sans trop entrer dans les détails — pour être honnête, je n'ai pas l'expertise technique nécessaire —, l'approche adoptée au sein de l'Union européenne pour réglementer Facebook, par exemple, est une chose que nous devrions examiner de plus près selon moi.

D'une part, nous ne voulons pas — comme on l'a proposé plus tôt aujourd'hui — que l'Internet soit régi par le gouvernement, mais d'autre part, quand de grandes sociétés agissent de leur propre chef, ce qui a mené bon gré mal gré à la manipulation de leurs propres possibilités techniques pour nuire à nos démocraties, je pense qu'il y a lieu de recourir à une certaine réglementation gouvernementale pour éviter cette situation.

Comme je l'ai dit, je ne suis pas un expert de la question, mais il me semble, d'après ce que j'ai lu, que l'Union européenne a raisonnablement procédé en ce sens afin de répondre aux préoccupations pour la démocratie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit que la pensée critique est un élément essentiel dans ce dossier. Je suppose donc que l'élément essentiel que nous n'avons pas est une éducation équitable partout dans le monde, et nous ne pouvons qu'espérer y parvenir.

Je ne veux pas trop m'attarder là-dessus comme il ne me reste qu'environ une minute, mais dans le groupe de témoins précédent, on a dit que c'est la 13e année consécutive du déclin de la démocratie en principe. Nous parlons de répandre la démocratie et d'encourager d'autres pays à l'adopter. La démocratie américaine, le modèle vers lequel les gens se tournent, est-elle saine? Veillons-nous bien au respect de la démocratie une fois qu'elle est établie?

Mme Jacqueline O'Neill:

Je ne pense pas qu'elle est fondamentalement saine. Nous avons vu beaucoup de choses au cours des dernières années. Quand on va au-delà des apparences, certaines institutions s'effondrent assez rapidement. Beaucoup de personnes s'inspirent de la démocratie américaine, mais les temps changent. Toutes proportions gardées, l'opinion de beaucoup de monde par rapport à la réputation du Canada et à notre façon d'aborder la démocratie s'est considérablement améliorée. Je mentionne aussi qu'une des raisons pour lesquelles il y a autant de Canadiens qui font un travail de démocratisation à l'étranger, c'est que d'autres pays préfèrent notre modèle de démocratie au pendant américain. Ils sont moins nombreux à vouloir exporter un système fondé sur un Congrès, surtout lorsqu'il est miné par l'argent et des influences extérieures.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Le temps accordé pour cette question est écoulé.

Il nous reste environ quatre minutes.

Allez-y, monsieur Saini.

M. Raj Saini:

Bonjour à vous deux.

Monsieur Broadbent, je veux vous poser une question précise pour connaître votre opinion. Le sous-comité des droits de la personne a tenu quelques séances sur le Venezuela, et notre comité fera maintenant une étude et tiendra peut-être quelques séances sur ce pays. Vous êtes au courant de la détérioration de la situation à l'heure actuelle. Le Canada a récemment promis 53 millions de dollars pour aider à gérer la vague de réfugiés au Brésil et en Colombie.

Comme vous le savez, il y a l'hyperinflation ainsi que la détérioration de la situation économique et politique. Les manifestants se font battre et les dissidents sont emprisonnés. Actuellement, selon notre point de vue, tous les jours, M. Guaido est de plus en plus reconnu comme le dirigeant légitime du Venezuela. Récemment, à compter d'aujourd'hui, d'hier ou de la semaine dernière, le Japon le soutient aussi comme le dirigeant du pays. Que pensez-vous de la position du Canada? Pensez-vous que nous faisons la bonne chose en le soutenant et en tentant d'atténuer la crise humanitaire sur le terrain au Venezuela?

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

Aimeriez-vous me poser une autre question? C'est un dossier extrêmement complexe.

J'ai normalement tendance à penser, en matière de droit international et de gouvernements, que le groupe ou le parti qui est aux commandes des grandes institutions — les Parlements, les tribunaux, les armées —, peu importe de qui il s'agit, que nous l'aimions ou non, devrait être reconnu comme le gouvernement du jour.

En revanche, le gouvernement du jour au Venezuela est abominable, selon presque toutes les évaluations des droits de la personne, à la suite des dernières élections, dans sa façon de traiter les droits et les préoccupations de la population. Je peux très bien comprendre pourquoi le Canada et beaucoup d'autres démocraties que je respecte en Europe de l'Ouest et ailleurs soutiennent le chef de l'opposition. C'est toutefois une situation presque sans précédent. Tout ce que je peux dire, c'est que je comprends cela. Personnellement, il ne fait aucun doute que je voterais pour le chef de l'opposition.

(1040)

M. Raj Saini:

Je vous pose la question parce qu'un passage de la Constitution du Venezuela rend la situation encore plus complexe. C'est l'article 233, qui stipule que s'il n'y a pas de leader ou de président, la personne à la tête de l'Assemblée nationale peut assumer temporairement ce rôle. Comme les dernières élections n'étaient pas justes ou libres et que des dissidents ont été mis en prison — c'est la raison pour laquelle je voulais poser la question —, compte tenu de ce passage de la Constitution, peut-on voir cela comme un moyen légitime de tenter d'atténuer la crise et de changer la trajectoire politique?

L'hon. Ed Broadbent:

Eh bien, c'est certainement ce que des membres des gouvernements tentent de faire valoir en soutenant le chef de l'opposition.

Comme je l'ai dit, je comprends. Ce n'est toutefois pas une procédure normale et saine à l'échelle internationale lorsque notre gouvernement ou un autre gouvernement exerce des pressions sur un autre pays pour influencer la formation de son gouvernement. Par conséquent, comme je l'ai dit, c'est une situation vraiment exceptionnelle et une sorte de choix qui n'en est pas un: on devra essuyer des critiques quoi qu'on fasse.

S'il y a une chose à laquelle je m'opposerais — et c'est ce qui est préoccupant —, c'est l'intervention ferme du président des États-Unis lorsqu'il a parlé de recourir à la force, pour reprendre ses mots, de ne pas écarter cette option. C'est totalement contre-productif selon moi, et c'est ce qui inquiète beaucoup de monde, à savoir l'intervention d'un gouvernement pour façonner la destinée d'une autre société, pour influencer la formation d'un autre gouvernement.

M. Raj Saini:

Au sein du Groupe de Lima, où le Canada joue un rôle de chef de file, on a écarté un éventuel recours à la force. Comme vous le savez, les États-Unis ne font pas partie du Groupe, et c'est donc un commentaire isolé du président.

Je pense que la position du Canada est très claire. Nous voulons travailler politiquement pour trouver une solution en ne recourant d'aucune façon à la force.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je remercie Mme O'Neill, qui est à Washington; Ed Broadbent, qui est avec nous à Ottawa; ainsi que nos témoins précédents. Vos témoignages sont très importants.

Je remercie également tous les membres de s'être levés tôt et d'être arrivés à l'heure, à 8 h 45, un jeudi matin, et d'avoir posé d'aussi bonnes questions.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee faae hansard 33421 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on February 19, 2019

2019-02-05 FAAE 125

Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Michael Levitt (York Centre, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone. I would like to call to order meeting 125 of the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development.

This is also our first session on the new study, which we will begin today, on Canada's support for international democratic development.

With that in mind, I would like to welcome our first two witnesses. We have Christopher MacLennan from the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development. He's the assistant deputy minister, global issues and development. We also have Shelley Whiting, director general, office of human rights, freedoms and inclusion.

We will ask you to provide your testimony. Then we will open it up to the members for questions.

Mr. MacLennan, please begin.

Mr. Christopher MacLennan (Assistant Deputy Minister, Global Issues and Development, Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development):

Thank you very much. I will provide a brief statement on behalf of the department. Then both Shelley and I, obviously, will be very pleased to take any questions you might have.

I will mention off the top that I am assistant deputy minister responsible for, basically, the development assistance aspects of Canada's involvement in democracy promotion. Shelley is more involved on the foreign affairs side, which has to do mostly with our diplomacy and democratic promotion through other means.

Thank you very much for the opportunity to discuss our support, past and present, to democratic development. Promoting democracy abroad, as everybody here is aware, has been a long-time integral part of Canada's foreign policy and international assistance, but as the 2007 committee report noted, despite remarkable progress, in their words, “the continued forward march of democracy is no sure thing, and that in the current environment retreat is threatening progress.

I think this is truer today in 2019 than it probably was in 2007. Indeed, the growing threats to the progress of democratic development 12 years ago have now resulted in an overall retreat in democracy, according to most experts.

Popular discontent has appeared in many countries as a result of the failure of these governments to provide effective solutions to important and legitimate domestic issues such as unemployment, a lack of opportunity, inequality and mass migration. Moreover, malicious actors, including authoritarian regimes and their proxies, have increased their efforts to shape public opinion and perception so as to undermine democracy and more broadly the rules-based international order.

While foreign interference is not new, its impact has grown in scale and speed due to cheaper and more accessible digital technology and data. As a result, we have seen declining citizen confidence and engagement in democratic institutions, growing distress between governments and civil society, and the manipulation and discrediting of political parties and their processes.

Of particular concern is the shrinking civic space, one of the key pillars of democracy. The largest democratic declines have taken place in the areas of civil liberties, freedom of expression, freedom of association and assembly, civil society participation and media integrity. It is in this context that we're working today.[Translation]

For its part, Global Affairs Canada has adapted. In 2013, the Canadian International Development Agency and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade were merged, which has resulted in a consistent use of government tools to promote democracy.

Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs and the Minister of International Development have now both made the commitment set out in their mandate letter to defend the values of inclusive and accountable governance, including through the promotion of human rights, gender equality, the empowerment of women and girls, peaceful pluralism, and inclusion and respect for diversity.

In June 2017, the government adopted its feminist international aid policy, which emphasizes inclusive governance focused on democracy and political participation, human rights and the rule of law for all citizens, regardless of their gender identity or any other aspect of their identity. This policy underscores the Government of Canada's commitment to provide inclusive and human rights-based development assistance as recommended in the committee's 2007 study.

Global Affairs Canada supports a wide range of programs and initiatives in all regions of the world to promote inclusive governance. In working with a wide range of partners, we leverage the expertise of Canadian NGOs, multilateral organizations and international institutions, and the engagement of grassroots civil society. What we do and who we do it with depends a lot on local context; we often have to adapt and seize on opportunities as they arise.

Through a feminist approach, the government is giving priority to the leadership and political participation of women. For example, it is working with the Interparliamentary Union to strengthen women's decision-making in parliaments and increase the capacity of parliamentarians—women and men—to adopt gender-sensitive reforms and laws.

In countries like Indonesia and Kenya, Canada supports the equitable access of marginalized or vulnerable groups, including youth and persons with disabilities, to participate in electoral processes.

(0850)



In addition, Canada is providing up to $24 million to support electoral observation missions in Ukraine in preparation for the 2019 presidential and parliamentary elections, as well as to support longer-term and sustainable electoral reform.[English]

Globally, programming focused on inclusive governance in areas such as government and civil society, democracy and political participation, and the rule of law and human rights totalled approximately $293 million in 2017-18, with approximately $170 million channelled specifically to promoting democracy.

As mentioned previously, Canada's efforts in this domain are not limited to international development assistance. As part of its feminist foreign policy, Canada has taken actions to strengthen democracy and resilience in peaceful and inclusive societies, at both the international level and through our work through our network of missions abroad.

In the G7, Canada has been a vocal supporter of democratic values. As part of our 2018 presidency, we spearheaded a joint declaration with G7 members that held up democracy as critical in defending against foreign threats. At the G7 summit in Charlevoix, leaders announced the G7 rapid response mechanism. This mechanism strengthens G7 coordination in identifying and responding to diverse and evolving threats to G7 democratic processes. The coordination unit is hosted in Canada on an ongoing basis.

Furthermore, through our broad network of diplomatic missions, Canada engages government officials of other like-minded states and civil society partners to advocate for and provide support to democratic development in those countries. Depending on the context, this is done through quiet diplomacy or through more public and open dialogue. This includes Canada's support for international election observation missions, including the deployment of hundreds of Canadians in recent years as observers, and co-sponsoring resolutions on human rights defenders in supporting their participation in international fora. Our missions are also provided with the “Voices at risk” guidelines to support and protect human rights defenders.

In conclusion, Global Affairs Canada welcomes the committee's interest in what we all agree is an important priority area.

We look forward to taking your questions.

The Chair:

Wonderful. Thank you very much.

We are going to begin with MP Alleslev, please.

Ms. Leona Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill, CPC):

Thank you very much for being here today.

This is certainly an important topic, and it's somewhat disconcerting. You're saying, if I understand you correctly, that democracy is in retreat.

We continue to invest and our investment hasn't drastically changed over the last 12 years.

If we continue on this path, what level of confidence do we have that the outcome will be different? Can you help us to understand the critical performance indicators? How do we know that the efforts we're making are achieving the objectives?

(0855)

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

This is a very difficult space to work in. In international development, everybody knows that we work in some of the most difficult places in the world with what is, relatively speaking, a very small amount of money to make a difference.

There are some types of development assistance where the opportunities are pretty direct to understanding what an investment will get you in terms of a return on your dollar. For example, when we invest in vaccinations, we have a clear understanding of how much the vaccination costs and what you get in return, which is a life saved if that person never contracts the disease.

This is fundamentally a different type of programming. Every country has a different culture, different understandings of governance, and all governance, as we understand in Canada, of course—

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

That's very fair, but I'm sorry, I don't have much time.

Of course, we understand the challenges. That's why we have experts like you to deal with those challenges. We need to be able to tell Canadian society that we're doing the right thing but that our investments, our efforts, are in fact achieving objectives and outcomes.

Can you please help us to understand how we are measuring that and, if democracy is in retreat, what are we doing differently that will achieve a different outcome?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

One of the things we're doing is placing a greater focus on working to ensure that there is a greater understanding at local levels, and a greater inclusion at local levels of a broader group of participation. In some of the places in which we're working, obviously the democratic space has been constricting. What we're trying to do is open up that democratic space.

We are doing that by ensuring that all communities are able to take part in democratic processes. For example, we're providing support to local women's organizations through the women's voice and leadership program to allow them to advocate on behalf of women's rights, including their right to take part in political processes. We are also working with LGBTQ groups to help them understand and exercise their rights within the context of the countries in which we're working.

The overall question of the retreat of democracy is obviously taking place at a global level, in terms of some of the Freedom House indices and whatnot. That's a really difficult indicator to move, because it's operating at a global perspective. What our programming attempts to achieve is to work at local levels, working directly with governments that are willing to work with us to strengthen their institutions, whether it be judicial institutions, their audit functions, to try to promote a better understanding of democracy.

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

Is there any relationship to peacekeeping operations and the role of setting the foundation for you to be able to go in and do that work? I don't like the term “peacekeeping”, because of course it's a little bit archaic and presumes that's there peace and war, but have you noticed whether the dramatic decline in peacekeeping operations has been having an effect on that shrinking democratic space within which you're trying to operate?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

We've already mentioned how difficult it is to work in many of the contexts. When you're working in a fragile state, it's even more difficult. Security, obviously, is the number one priority. It's difficult to have any type of good development result in a place that is so fragile that the security of its citizens is not maintained and that there's no stability. Peacekeeping is critically important.

That being said, there are many other ways as well of helping the stability of a country. Sometimes it's not necessarily, as you mentioned, a “peace-war” type of problem that's the problem of the fragility. It might also be environment related or drought related. Obviously, all of these factors contribute to these problems. That makes it a much more complex issue to deal with.

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

So, in your mind, you would argue that those two do need to go together. Stability and security are precursors to the ability to work in that democratic space.

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

Obviously, to do any development assistance you require an environment that is stable and secure to the greatest extent possible. That being said, we work in very fragile contexts nonetheless. You actually can accomplish stuff in very fragile places; it's just much more difficult and requires a different approach.

(0900)

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

MP Vandenbeld, please.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you very much for being here for what is a very important and timely study.

You mentioned, Mr. MacLennan, in your opening remarks that you believe the 2007 report of this committee, which recommended a large-scale entity in Canada that would coordinate and be a framework for democracy promotion, is even truer today than it was in 2007. Can you explain why you feel that way?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I think what I said was that in terms of the situation in the early 2000s which led to the House of Commons recommendation, the situation today is probably.... The demand for those types of institutions is probably higher. I have to admit that I don't know if it's necessarily a new institution that's required. I think what we need to think about is how the situation has evolved. In the early 2000 period we were still on that high of what's called the third wave in democratization and a belief that all countries were on a track to eventually become democratic. In the 2000s came the first signs that maybe that wasn't quite true. That's why you saw an uptick in the recognition that we needed more political approaches, for example, support to political parties and whatnot.

I think today we've seen that it was true what was happening in the 2000s. There's definitely a need to evolve the way we're doing our things and to really think closely about what's required to make the difference.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Obviously, long-term presence when you're doing democracy promotion in a country is very important. Many countries have dedicated entities of some sort. I'd like to define “democracy” more as the institutional development: legislative capacity building, political party support, elections, working with the institutions. Where does that actually sit within Global Affairs right now?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

It sits in a couple of places, but the majority of that type of spending lies with our bilateral programming, our country-level programming with individual projects according to country context and local context. We also have some programming through our peace and security operations.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

In 2005 something called a democracy council was created. It actually brought in a lot of the NGOs and other actors that were working in this field to try to perform coordinating functions. Does that exist now, or what happened to that?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

It does not exist, to my knowledge. I'm sure the people who made up the council still exist and their interest in the issue exists, but I don't think the council has met in a very long time.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Is there a space somewhere within Global Affairs where all of the things Canada is doing with regard to democracy promotion and institutional promotion are in one place, i.e., a place where the best practices can be found, where there's a policy piece to it, and where the capacity building and the technical assistance can be coordinated? Is there a place where this can happen within Global Affairs right now?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

The way I would describe it, the way we're organized at Global Affairs for the purposes of development assistance, is that under my team we're responsible for all of the sectoral policy advice and sectoral coordination. My team is responsible, in this case, for inclusive governance and democracy.

However, the budgets exist for this in the bilateral programming, and they take advantage of opportunities as they arise. What they do is that they follow the policies we devise and then institute them through their individual programming choices within the country context.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

You mentioned that there's $170 million specifically for democracy promotion, but we know, of course, that democracy promotion writ large includes a lot of things, such as civil society and that sort of thing. How much of that is actually dedicated to institutional capacity building?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

That's a difficult question. We'd have to probably see if we can give you that answer.

Basically, of the two numbers I gave you, one is larger and is what's called inclusive governance, which includes a broad variety of things. One example I'll give you is support to an audit office in a country, maybe in their agriculture department. That's not considered democracy promotion, but it is a governance activity.

The specifics of the democracy promotion speak to some of the things you're talking about, such as legislatures, parliaments, elections and whatnot. Is it all institution building? Not necessarily, but it's the smaller number, I think, that you were referring to.

(0905)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

So there's really no—

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

It's not a dedicated envelope, which I think is an important thing to recognize. There's no dedicated envelope of spending. Instead, there are the bilateral programs and other programs to take advantage of opportunities as they arise. That's the reason you see the number go up and down from one year to the next.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

On the lessons learned, if you're doing it through bilateral programs, of course, things tend to be in silos. You have experts in a particular country or region. Where are the coordination, the lessons learned and the building of best practices? Where does that happen?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

That happens in my shop.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay. Is that being done at the moment?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

Yes.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

We know that Canadians, when we go around the world.... Canada is particularly good at this kind of work.

Mr. Christopher MacLennan: Yes.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld: Most of the major international organizations, such as the UNDP, the OSCE and also a lot of other specific countries—the Netherlands, the U.S.—hire Canadians, yet a lot of that knowledge and a lot of that is happening outside of Canada. Is there a mechanism or a way such that Global Affairs is able to somehow coordinate?

In particular, we also have a lot of our diasporic communities that are going abroad and helping to build democracies in their home countries. Is there somewhere that this kind of knowledge is being collected and coordinated and best practices are being drawn from that? This is beneficial to Canada as well, because we would learn a lot about what's happening on the ground in these countries.

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

At the present time, we're not actually tracking Canadians who are working in other democracy promotion agencies and whatnot. That said, we're keenly aware of which Canadian CSOs are active in this space, and we often will work with them. For example, there is the Forum of Federations. We work with them for the promotion of more federalist approaches to governance and democracy, and CANADEM as well. We're actively using and working with Canadian organizations, but in terms of tracking Canadians who are working abroad, no.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

MP Laverdière, please. [Translation]

Ms. Hélène Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Mr. MacLennan, Ms. Whiting, thank you for being with us this morning.

I would like to make a comment before I begin. You mentioned the decline of democracy around the world, but this is not exclusive to developing countries. Take, for example, Poland, Turkey and even our neighbours to the south, not far from here. I would like to come back a little bit to the point that was raised, that is, that it only affects developing countries and that, as a result, our policies would have been a failure.

Can we also say that this is a general decline and not specific to developing countries?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

That's a very good question for theorists. I'm not one of them.

This is indeed a phenomenon that is not only widespread in developing countries at the moment. However, I think there is a big difference between well-established and less established democracies in terms of their ability to resist change. In some developing countries, where democracy is not necessarily very deeply rooted, it is more difficult.

There are, of course, fears and concerns about some countries such as Hungary and Poland, which are now referred to as non-liberal democracies, that is, countries where we want to continue to hold elections and respect some aspects of democracy, but eliminate some others. We hope that these democracies are well enough established to resist this phenomenon, but this remains to be seen.

Ms. Hélène Laverdière:

Okay.

You also mentioned support for women's organizations in the field, local organizations. I remember seeing the following figure a few years ago: 0.03% of our international development envelope went to local women's organizations.

Is this percentage still in the same range or has there been an improvement?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

There has been a significant improvement. The government has already announced the creation of the women's voice and leadership program, a five-year, $150-million program to help local organizations support women's rights and gender equality.

Last year, Ms. Bibeau, Minister of International Development, announced the creation of a new gender equality fund, which also aims to find processes or ways to channel more money to local organizations. It is still an announcement of $300 million Canadian, in partnership with the private sector.

(0910)

Ms. Hélène Laverdière:

Do we have an idea of the total amount of all these announcements in the overall envelope?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I don't have the figures with me, but we could find them and send them to you.

Ms. Hélène Laverdière:

That would be appreciated.

I would now like to come back to an aspect that has already been discussed. Many Canadian institutions are involved in democratic development, including your department, the International Development Research Centre, the Parliamentary Centre, the Canadian Council for International Cooperation and the Forum of Federations.

I am not one of those who believe that if we built a kind of new superstructure that would bring all this together, we would be more efficient. I think the diversified approach is preferable.

Are there any gaps? Is there an aspect of the issue that is not sufficiently covered by all these institutions?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

Democratic development assistance differs significantly from other sectors because it involves political aspects. As part of our bilateral relationship, it is very easy for a department to provide support to a developing country, whether it is to set up audit offices or to provide assistance in the training of judges. What is much more difficult, however, is to offer highly political things, such as support to opposition parties and organizations. This was recognized in the 2007 report, I believe. It is another path, when it comes to touching on much more political things. Offering political assistance can even put at risk our partners in countries where there is resistance to this type of assistance.

This is an issue for all donor countries. We are wondering how to provide services in a way that will ensure that they are well received. We are wondering how to encourage a country that may not be on the right track at the moment to do things differently. This is where it gets more difficult. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

MP Sidhu, please.

Mr. Jati Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both for coming in front of the committee this morning.

You touched on the very extensive study that was done in 2007, about 224 pages and 28 recommendations. The main theme from the committee was for Canada to become a large actor in democratic development. You did touch on the fact that, lately, there has been a gender lens and LGBTQ put into it.

My question is this: By doing this study, do we have more suggestions, more room to tell the government in which direction to go? You did mention that there's enough money put aside. Where do you go with this study? We have four meetings with people like you coming to talk to us. What would be the new recommendation on top of the extensive study? That committee travelled around the world, as well, so it was done up to that level. What else can we add on? Do we have more space in this to tell the government?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

More space? I think the study from 2007 was a very valid study, and as you mentioned, was very detailed and is still very helpful. I think the difference, in what advice would be helpful, is much better understanding of how the situation has changed since that time. I know you're going to be hearing testimony from actors in the space and from others, and I think it would be very helpful to understand that the recommendations from that committee made perfect sense at the time. Are they still the right recommendations for what we're facing today? Is there a need to increase or decrease the amount of money that we invest in these areas? Is this the best place for Canada to make a difference?

All of that is always welcome from a government department.

(0915)

Mr. Jati Sidhu:

With the changing world, as you said, even in 2007 the committee thought it would be very difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of the development. Can you describe any projects where the Canadian government has been successful in that regard?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I can give you an idea of some of the things that we're doing, but you've put your finger on one of the more difficult aspects of this.

The easier projects to measure in results achieved are the ones.... If we think about a scale between projects that are purely developmental—what I mean by that is projects supporting the audit function, ensuring that the audit office is capable of doing audits—through to opening up political space by working with dissidents, which is very political, our ability to measure progress over the short term of a project is much easier on that developmental side. We built the audit office. We helped them train the right people. We ensured that they had all the tools they needed, and they are now capable of doing audits of that particular department.

Supporting dissidents at the other end of the spectrum is even difficult to determine the proper measures. You provide support to them in, perhaps, a better understanding of how to use social media, and a better understanding of the options available that other countries have used to open up political space in a non-democratic country, and the results don't take place in a year. The results are maybe over a decade and you may not see those results for a long time.

Our ability to measure on that end has been quite difficult. This is why your previous question I think is important. Within that space, some recent studies have shown that drive to have measurable results has pushed a lot of spending down toward the development side and out of this space. It's called tame or non-tame democratic assistance.

By forcing us to work in purely developmental areas, you get results that are more easily explained, but there's a tendency now—talking obviously about the entire industry—to move out of the space that's more highly political and where it's more difficult to demonstrate true results.

Mr. Jati Sidhu:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will now move to MP Wrzesnewskyj.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. MacLennan, you began your presentation by talking about the retreat of democracy and then you expanded on that a little by saying we were still in the afterglow of the third wave of democratization with the collapse of the Warsaw Pact Soviet Union, but if we looked closely, we would have been able to see that democracy and the expansion of democracy were under attack at that time. We're still in that era, this hubris, the end of history, as many of the academics were talking about in the west.

Would you not agree that one of the first very clear signals to the west that democracy and that form of governance were under attack was the Orange Revolution of 2004? Some 50 million people in a country rose up because they saw their democratic aspirations being hijacked in a very methodical way by those who saw an alternate model of development, economic progress, under a system of autocracy. If we had looked closely, we would have seen that the beginnings were there in that time.

Would you agree with that premise?

(0920)

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I wouldn't disagree with it. I think I might add to it.

In “The End of History?”, Francis Fukuyama's very interesting way of describing that period, one thing was kind of right about the notions of the end of history: that there was no alternative to at least having the appearance of being a democracy.

Two things happened, I think, post the fall of the Soviet Union. One was that we underestimated the importance of nationalism, and the fact that nationalism was a core element of the way democracies see themselves and popular sovereignty. We didn't see that important strident element to democracy; hence, Yugoslavia and what happened in the early 1990s.

The other aspect was that I don't think we were really prepared for countries that were going to have the veneer of a democracy, and then subvert some core elements of democracy and democratic understanding in ways that we didn't expect. Yes, they still had elections, and yes, they still had parliaments, but they were not following the rule of law and they were closing democratic spaces.

Now in the social media age—and this is one of the key things we're dealing with now—it's kind of gone into hyperdrive, that ability to subvert on a daily basis the democratic spaces that are so critical to holding parliamentarians to account.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

You stated something else that I'd like to address: that the funding for democracy building is, in actual fact, modest. Considering those modest means we have to work with, the uniqueness of Canada—the word “unique” is overused and used incorrectly.... Canada is unique. We're a multicultural nation. We're not a melting pot. There are some other countries that are also built on immigration.

In Canada, especially considering our population, we see Canadians, more so than most people, doing incredible work right around the globe.

I'd like to return to 2004 because we did something that no other country had done. At that time, we directly engaged 500 Canadians who were vetted to make sure that they would be neutral in the electoral processes in Ukraine. We were able to reach into places and to find things that normal observer missions.... It wasn't just because of the number, but we didn't require translators. With modest resources, we leveraged such a great amount of work and cultural understanding. They knew what to look for, how to read people, and often in many of these countries translators and drivers actually work for the forces that may not be friends of democracy.

I mentioned this because.... After that major observer mission, did we have an assessment on whether we considered it a success or a failure? Would you be able to undertake to table that assessment for the committee?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I'm not familiar with whether there was an assessment post-2004, but we will definitely look to see if one was done. If there was, we'll present it.

If I could just mention that I do agree with you. Yes, there is a Canadian model. We're all a part of that model and a product of that model. I can tell you, when we're interacting with our developing country partners there is a great thirst for many aspects of the Canadian model. Federalism is one of them. Federalism should not be understated in terms of that importance in certain aspects of managing national conflict, religious minority conflict, and sometimes just grand variations from one region to another.

There are many places where they're looking for a Canadian voice, for a number of reasons. We're not an imperialist country; we've never had an empire. Many of those things sound a bit clichéd, but the truth is that we hear it on a regular basis from our partners.

(0925)

The Chair:

Thank you.

You're out of time.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

I'd like to request one quick undertaking. What year was Canada Corps eliminated and what were the reasons for that?

Ms. Hélène Laverdière:

I'm sorry, Mr. Chair. He will have another turn.

The Chair:

That's fine.

MP Ziad Aboultaif, go ahead, please.

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif (Edmonton Manning, CPC):

Good morning and thank you for being here today.

We know that you can't teach democracy. It's more of a practice. It takes so many sacrifices and years of development to get a society to adopt it. We also know that only about four and a half per cent of the world population lives in full democracies and the other 95% is really struggling to get there. We seem to be experiencing a comeback of old regimes in some of the empires that have been very significant at imposing their way through.

Besides that, we have the plans and the money and the know-how to go and promote our democracies. In major parts of the world, in every corner almost, we are having a comeback. I'm not going to call it an enemy, but we have another opinion coming forward more aggressively than ever. We have the money and the power, and we have two battles to fight, not just one.

That brings me back to the SDGs, the United Nations SDGs. For goal number 16, Canada coincides with about four or five elements—numbers 16.3, 16.5, 16.7 and 16.8. The question is, within those measures and within those areas that we're trying to improve and with millions of dollars that we're taking away from our own society to try to promote democracies and to help other communities out there or other countries, how is your department able to measure the effectiveness of what we do? In reality, we have to come back to Canadians and tell Canadians that we are spending this kind of money and we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars. So far, we really don't have any answers or enough answers to say how effective this is, or how much of a breakthrough we've made in Indonesia or Kenya or the DRC or the Americas region or anywhere.

On the measures, it's very important for us to know in this committee how your department is able to show or to tell us how much progress we are making.

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

For every single project, there is a set of indicators and a set of results identified specific to that project. Right now we have a project in which we're supporting the electoral processes in Indonesia because they have an election that's upcoming. The goal is to help Indonesia not only to manage its election effectively but also to avoid violence and to increase participation.

That project will have core indicators attached to it, which will be aligned with the department's departmental results framework. That is then reported publicly to Parliament in terms of what is accomplished. Obviously, there will be a roll-up of what you will see in the departmental results framework, which will include that project plus all of the other projects associated with our democracy assistance.

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:

From the records, it is good that we have mechanisms to monitor and we have some benchmarks at least to be able to measure where we're going from here.

When has a department—because, as you know, governments come and go but departments remain there—ever said, “We're failing here. This is not good. This is not based on expectations, so let's see if we can eliminate, recommend eliminating or changing or at least take a different direction in tracking how we're going to do this and how we are we going to move forward.”

Does the department stop and say, “This is the time to say forget about this, and let's try something else”?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I think you see that when you look at exactly where governments will decide to place the emphasis and where they spend their development assistance dollars. One of the key things that the present government identified was huge gaps in sexual reproductive health and rights and how these were actually core to advancing women in developing countries and allowing them to participate not only economically but also politically, and to promote democracy.

The government identified that as a clear gap and a place where increased funding was required. That's an example of saying we need to focus more here than we have been in the past here.

(0930)

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:

The focus that this government adopted, is it based on recommendations from the department or from within what the government's thinking that this is the way we're going to be more effective?

Can you advise us on that?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

It's the way it always works. The public service provides its best advice to a government. Then the government takes that advice along with its platform and its choices. Together those two streams produce a decision of the government.

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:

Just as a final note, you put your recommendations through and you wait for the politicians to make a decision. Is that correct?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

We provide advice to the political level.

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif:

And it's up to the politicians to make those decisions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will now move to MP Graham, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

We've heard some concerns from the other side about what we'll call bang for our buck on these investments.

Do we have any way of assessing what our adversaries are spending on undermining democracy?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

That's a very good question.

The short answer, I think, is no. It's very difficult. It's definitely one of those spaces that is evolving every single year as technology changes and as the stakes change.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can we see trends that they're investing more than they would have 20 years ago?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I don't know. I would presume so, but I don't know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's no way of quantifying that.

When we are talking about our investments, there's no way of comparing what we're spending against. There's no comparing that.

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

That's correct.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What are the risks for us of becoming insular and not spending on this outreach?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I think the risks to Canada obviously are that we are fully conscious of the fact that there are these actors out there that are actively looking to undermine democratic processes, including in our own country. We've watched the news over the last few weeks and the fact that this is a concern for Canadians and it's a concern for others.

The rapid response mechanism from the G7 is probably the very best example of all G7 countries taking this issue very seriously and looking to counter it to the best extent possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If, for example, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea announced that they were going to invest in democracy in Canada, how would we react?

In other words—

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

Surprised, probably would be....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But they call themselves democratic.

How do we define democracy for the purpose of promoting it, for the purpose of this study?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

For the purpose of this study, obviously there is no one definition of democracy. For us I think it's a couple of core elements.

A democracy is about popular sovereignty, with a wide understanding of what citizenship means. It means it's constitutional. There is the rule of law that determines how these things take place, how the democratic processes are to unfold. It also includes an open and free media and open and free accountability processes to ensure that governments are held to account.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

I have a note here that says we spend $12 million on International Foundation for Electoral Systems, $8.2 million on International Foundation for Electoral Systems, and $5.7 million on National Democratic Institute projects. These are all American organizations.

Are there equivalent Canadian organizations or is it all centralized in this way?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

It's not centralized. There are Canadian organizations as well. There's the Forum of Federations and CANADEM, which does electoral observations. There is a long list actually of Canadian organizations, particularly in the judicial area and judicial strengthening, that are available. There's a B.C. organization responsible....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm going to pass my remaining time to Mr. Wrzesnewskyj.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

I'd like to return to this whole question of alternate models that are being providing to other countries, different governance models. We see the Chinese being very active. They've increased their activity. They have this program of development in many countries that are undergoing important changes.

Are we tracking in any way whatsoever...? It comes back to Mr. Graham's question. Are we tracking these other actors, whether it's China or Russia, in terms of how they're involved and the resultant outcomes in terms of movement towards democracy or away from democracy? Are we tracking that?

(0935)

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I don't know if I would say we are tracking it, because sometimes it's a very intangible thing. It's not always a direct relationship between actions and which countries they're taking place in.

We're keenly aware...and this goes back to the conversation from the 1990s and the notions of the end of history. China, since basically the 1990s or since 2001 maybe when they joined the WTO, provides an alternative model for many developing countries about reducing poverty and creating economic growth. There are many developing countries that are looking to that model as one that will help them reduce poverty but also maintain their controls in their society.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Recently, the Chinese ambassador to Canada wrote an op-ed piece in which he used certain phraseology that we're beginning to encounter in other developing parts of the world: "western egotism” and “white supremacy”. This is almost like code wording. “Western egotism” is the assumption that democratic rights and human rights are innate, and “white supremacy” that the international rules-based order we developed post-World War II was just a system of white supremacy.

Would you like to comment on that?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

In the area of democratic assistance, we're keenly aware that every place we're working in has its own culture and its own approach to governance, and you have to be respectful of these. There is no monolithic way to have a democracy. Our democracy is very different from the democracy south of the border.

What we will always do, no matter what country we're operating in, is understand that there are certain core principles and elements to what we believe is a democracy, and we believe they're universal. We don't believe simply that democracy is only for westerners. We believe that in fact there are ways to adapt basic, core democratic principles to the local cultures we're working within. There are alternative views in the world, and that's exactly what we're trying to counter.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to jump to MP Laverdière for a short question, to wrap up. [Translation]

Ms. Hélène Laverdière:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My question will be brief. What is happening with CANADEM? I think the nature of the relationship between the government and CANADEM has changed. Could you tell us about this and the reasons for this change?

Mr. Christopher MacLennan:

I'm sorry, but I don't necessarily have an answer to your question. I'm not sure I understand correctly.

Ms. Hélène Laverdière:

Okay, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

I want to thank you both for being here with us this morning and for kicking off this study with some very interesting discussion.

Members, I am going to suspend for a few minutes while we get our next panel online.

(0935)

(0940)

The Chair:

We are very pleased to have two panellists with us from Washington, D.C., by video conference.

We have Derek Mitchell, president of the National Democratic Institute. Mr. Mitchell was named president of the National Democratic Institute, NDI, in 2018, having previously served as U.S. ambassador to Myanmar from 2012 to 2016. As a prior role, Ambassador Mitchell served as principal deputy assistant secretary of defense from 2001 to 2009 and also as a senior fellow for Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

As well, we have Dr. Daniel Twining, president of the International Republican Institute. He was named president of the IRI in September 2017, having previously served as counsellor and director of the Asia program at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. His past experience includes serving on the U.S. Secretary of State's policy planning staff and acting as foreign policy adviser to U.S. Senator John McCain. Dr. Twining holds a doctorate in philosophy from Oxford University, where he was a Fulbright Oxford scholar.

Welcome, gentlemen.

Ambassador Mitchell, you're going to go first, since you're on video conference. I might add that you're probably avoiding some really cold weather later today, so being where you are is probably a wise move. May I have you begin with ten minutes of testimony. Then we'll go to Dr. Twining, and then we'll turn it over to the members for lots of questions, I'm sure.

Please go ahead, sir.

Mr. Derek Mitchell (President, National Democratic Institute):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. I appreciate that.

We are getting a bit of a thaw down here in Washington, so it's nice to get out of the polar vortex for a few days.

I'm sorry I can't be there with you this morning, but I really am grateful for the opportunity to speak to you all on this topic.

I want to start by giving a little bit of historical context. I see us in three phases of democracy support work. Many of you know that in the United States, the NDI, the IRI and the National Endowment for Democracy were all established during the Reagan administration during a speech at Westminster he gave in 1982. That was the first phase of democracy support. That was during the Communist era, during the Cold War era, and they had very much an ideological bent, but this whole realm of democracy support really hadn't been defined precisely. Our institutes were among those who really sought to define it 35 years ago.

The second phase came with the end of the Cold War, as was mentioned before, the end-of-history phase when it seemed that the tide was coming in and that there was historical inevitability to democracy. It was just a matter, in our view, of working with democratic processes and institutions and with peoples around the world to just let it simmer for a generation or two, and things would naturally come our way. That inevitability was baked into the programming we did. We felt that the expansion of democracy, that the third wave of democratization, was taking off in a very comfortable way for 15 or 20 years.

I think we are in a fundamentally different moment now. I would call it “the autocrats strike back“, the authoritarian learning. Those who have a different view of the way their society should be ordered, and those authoritarians out there who saw the spread of democracy to be a challenge to them and somehow threatening to their very existence found a way to learn and push back in this moment. They took advantage of popular frustration, with expectations quite high that democracy perhaps.... In some societies, they felt that if they just went democratic, then it would be easy. They would become rich and powerful like the west.

It was evident that it wasn't going to be that simple; it wasn't going to be that easy or short term. Economic inequality emerged. Corruption emerged. Mindsets, we found, changed more slowly than institutions and processes. You found folks who would take over, who had the old mindsets, who would use the processes and maybe develop some of the institutions, but wouldn't necessarily ingrain the democratic mindsets in development. You had corrupt environments that people got frustrated with and associated with democracy.

You also had demagogues exploiting the politics of fear. That can happen in any country and in any democracy. Identity politics and immigration, we're seeing that in many different countries, focusing on the other. The general perception that democracy is not delivering became a defining issue for many of these democracies, even those democracies that we felt were entrenched, even our own democracies. That was creating a backlash, a recession.

One other development that was a wild card in all this was the rise of digital technologies, Silicon Valley and the social media platforms that were used and exploited by those who wanted to undermine unity and undermine democracy, to provide platforms for hate and division and to create uncertainty and play with the democratic forums. People didn't recognize soon enough just how pernicious that can be to democracy.

We've learned a bunch of lessons. Our different organizations have learned these lessons, many of which I've already discussed: that building a culture of democracy is not easy; that it takes time and it's as important as institutions and processes; that we need to develop a culture, and culture and mindsets change much more slowly; that we have to be patient and we have to work hard at that; that democracy has to deliver; and that economic inequality, corruption, fear and insecurity all work against democracy.

(0945)



We have to be alert to it. As Madeleine Albright likes to say, people don't just like to vote, but they like to eat, and I think they also need to feel that the government works for them.

I think what we've done, though, is provide some resilience that international networks like NDI, IRI and others have developed. They actually work, and we're seeing push-back in many countries with the expectation of democratic process. Even if there is a recession of democracy, in fact, the expectation of democratic process is there and there are resilient networks that exist that we can work with.

We need to be working on technology. We're slow to understand that the impact of technology is a lesson.

We also need to recognize inclusivity. Democracy and democratic societies must be fully inclusive. As Secretary Albright, our chair, says, democracy without women is impossible. We've learned over and over that, when women are engaged in politics, democracy is more resilient, development is more sustainable, compromise is more likely and peace processes are more lasting. Likewise, all segments of society must be part of democracy—youth, ethnic and religious minorities, LGBTI, and people with disabilities.

Without that inclusivity, you don't have the grounding, the foundations of democracy, and I have to say that—and I hope it's not a partisan thing to say—in the United States I think democracy will win out. We are being saved by women, people of colour and others who are going out and fighting for democracy in the United States. I think it's our wild card, and I think it demonstrates lessons learned for other countries. We need to be focusing on that.

I think this is absolutely a critical time. This is a critical moment. I think it's actually the defining issue of our time. When we look at national security and we look at our national well-being, what are the defining values, norms and rules of the international system in the 21st century? How will we define it?

I heard a question in the previous session that China talks about white supremacists or western egotism. In fact, what we had created in the previous century had worked for everyone. It had actually tied the hands of the west to allow everyone to grow. We've seen a remarkable development in the world in the past 50 years, a remarkable development, even for China and even for the underdeveloped nations.

It works. Democracy has worked. Freedom has worked. But now, there are challenges to that system and to those rules, values and norms that I think will have an impact on our own security and the security of others, and to human dignity, frankly. When I talk about some of the headwinds we have seen in recent years, the push-back of autocrats, I have to say that, in recent years, the last several years, the United States has been AWOL. There has not been leadership. But in fact, all countries need to be playing this.

This is not simply a western thing, or certainly not just a U.S. thing. We need Canada. Canada has been playing a strong role just in the past few weeks on Venezuela, in an exemplary fashion. This is not a U.S. assignment. NDI is a U.S. organization, but we have networks of people all over the world, and we represent something that works for people around the world.

I would very much encourage Canada and other countries to be part of that. We're trying to encourage Japan to be part of that, and anyone else who stands for these values, norms and rules as others try to shape them in their image going forward.

Very quickly, I don't want to take up much more time, because I do want to hear from Dan and the questions, but as for recommendations as to how you should think about this, I think there are things you're already thinking about in Canada, such as women in front. You have a feminist foreign policy. I think that's great. That is strategic, not just a nice thing, but it's a strategic thing for all of us and our security. I think you're in a good position to lead.

Number two, political parties need help. I think you have very strong political parties and activists who can share skills and strategy.

Number three is the youth bulge. Do not ignore the youth bulge. Young people under 30 are a majority in many of the countries in play around the world: in eastern Europe—they're on the move—in Africa absolutely, in Latin America, the Middle East, North Africa and Asia. This is a critical asset to invest in over the long term. This is not a short-term game but a long-term game we're talking about when it comes to democracy. They are also most at risk of radicalization, of extremism, so they are a point of opportunity but also a challenge, if we don't address that.

(0950)



In terms of technology programs, Canada has great internal capacity through your Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. We have been working at NDI with your Citizen Lab. Technology programs are very important.

As for citizen education and civics, you're already taking the lead on that. Focusing on Latin America, if you're thinking about a particular area, I think what you've done with the Lima Group is outstanding and exemplary.

In terms of connecting to economic aid, you're in TPP and CETA, and you are otherwise well placed to ensure that democracy delivers, that trade agreements and such are done with values, that we're working to build a common set of rules and norms, and that it is delivered to marginalized populations and regions equitably. This is all extremely important going forward. I think you are very well placed.

If we are now in a moment of democratic recession, it requires a democratic stimulus. Now is the time for us all to reinvest, recommit, and not succumb to fatalism but to lean forward.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I hope I didn't go too far past my time.

(0955)

The Chair:

No. You were good. Thank you very much, Ambassador Mitchell.

We're going to go straight away to Dr. Twining, please.

Dr. Daniel Twining (President, International Republican Institute):

Thanks, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee. It's wonderful to be here with you.

You see why Derek Mitchell is such a terrific colleague for us at IRI. Our teams at NDI and IRI work very closely together, so despite any judgments you may make about American politics, it's working in the democracy space, our bipartisan ethic.

I would like to begin by thanking all of you for Canada's terrific leadership. On Venezuela, on Ukraine, on women's empowerment, on so many issues in the world today, Canada remains a principled voice. We're just very grateful, at a period when the west—and the community of democracies writ large—is under so much pressure from within and without. Really, I would argue that our democratic way of life, the way Canadians and Americans live, is put at risk by a world in which authoritarian forces are on the march and playing offence. There is a strategic value to this discussion that you are having about modernizing democracy assistance for this new world that Derek sketched out.

Let me very quickly set the scene by talking about what has changed since you, this committee, really looked closely at democracy assistance over 10 years ago. I have four quick points.

One is the re-emergence of great power competition, which is real. I don't need to tell you. Russia and China, in different ways, are projecting authoritarian influence. They are trying to build a world that is more safe for authoritarian forms of government and for their leadership, elements of which are highly inimical to western interests and our way of life. That is a big difference from 2007. That includes Russia's disinformation assault on open societies, including the United States, Canada and our European allies. It includes the corruption and other forms of malign influence associated with China's belt and road initiative and other forms of global engagement, not all of which are insidious, but some of which do undercut our alliances and open societies.

Two is we're living in a world of refugees. I'm sorry to tell you, but you know this. There are more refugees in the world today than any time since 1945. It's worth reflecting on that. More than at any time since the end of the Second World War are people displaced by conflict in this world we live in today. Frankly, that's a failure, and we know why these people are trying to flee. They are trying to flee conflict-ridden societies that are not governed by law and institutions. They are driven by desperation. Migrants out of Central America, for instance, are trying to escape gangster societies where they and their families are not safe. This requires a greater level of engagement from all of us.

Three—Derek mentioned this very articulately—is the digital revolution that has done many great things, but has also empowered and amplified extreme voices in our societies, and created new forms of fragmentation. This is something we do need to come to grips with, because it foundationally affects our democratic order.

Four is the hollowing-out of democratic order by strongmen who preserve some forms of democracy but use their standing to concentrate executive power at the expense of other institutions: parliaments, free media, active civil societies, political competition.

That's the quick assessment. What do we need to do? I'm going to be quite brief here, but I do have five ideas, not inclusive.

One is to realize that we actually live in an increasingly middle-class world. When we think about development assistance writ large, the absolute focus on ending poverty was an appropriate target, I would argue, 10, 20, 30, 40 years ago. Today, given what we are working with in terms of this enormous rising middle-class in the world, I would argue that development assistance should focus on democracy, rights, governance, transparency, accountability and anti-corruption. It should focus on helping governments deliver for their citizens, so that we don't need to keep helping desperate people—migrants, refugees—and we don't need to backfill governments that are not meeting basic commitments to their citizens.

I would argue that democracy assistance actually should supersede other forms of assistance, because other forms of assistance are not very effective where you have a kleptocratic strongman in power, or a failed state.

Two is to really embrace a mission—Canada, America, the west—in helping our partners out there in the world build political resiliency to not only be effective democracies but also to avoid succumbing to insidious forms of influence from authoritarian actors, including China and Russia.

(1000)



We travel a lot, all of us. I've never been anywhere where anybody wanted to be part of a new Russian empire or part of a new Chinese sphere of influence. People everywhere care so much about their sovereign rights and are very anxious about threats to their sovereign independence from authoritarian great powers. So, helping our partners out there build resiliency, including strong civic institutions, effective media, free courts, etc., to help them maintain their independence, should be a strategy.

The third is to expose corruption. Tom Carothers, who is a scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, has done research showing that over the last five years, 10% of all governments in the world—sometimes through election, sometimes through street revolution—have changed due to civic activism against corruption and that the driving civic force out in the world today is anti-corruption sentiment. You see it today on the streets of Iran, where people are striking. You see it in Venezuela, where Venezuelans are fed up with living in a kleptocratic narco state where the elites live very well and everybody else cannot get enough to eat. This is a powerful force.

I would argue, when we think of Russia's assault on the west and our open societies, that with regard to Vladimir Putin who apparently is worth $95 billion, it's worth investigating, understanding and helping Russian citizens understand where that money came from because, actually, a lot of it was their money before the Kremlin oligarchs consolidated a form of power that made them all very rich.

Innovating in the democracy space to expose and to help partners on the ground expose corruption in their societies is a very powerful tool, including in countries that, frankly, may not be pro-western, pro-American. People care so deeply about this issue.

The fourth is to invest in recreating political balance in societies where politics have become imbalanced through strongman forms of control. That's stronger parliaments. That's more engaged women, youth and other marginalized communities, getting them much more involved in politics in their countries. That's free media. That's legal assistance and other forms of assistance. It's all to try to recreate the balance that has been lost through strongman forms of control.

An important part of this is investing in the next generation. In countries like the Philippines and Turkey, young political leaders, and young leaders writ large, do not want to live in a country that's run by one man in perpetuity. That's also true of young leaders in the ruling parties, leaders who actually want some space to emerge in their own right. Investing in young leaders as part of an effort to create balance is valuable.

Finally, invest in citizen security. Rather than build a wall on the southern border of the United States, I would argue that it would be much more effective to spend that money helping Central American societies govern themselves in just and effective ways so that all these desperate people don't want to leave. The same is true in the Middle East. The conflagration that has been Syria and the conflagration that has been Yemen are driving desperate people away. We've seen it in Southeast Asia in Myanmar: the Rohingya crisis. I could go on and on. Really, at the end of the day, we should be addressing the problem at the source.

The U.S. ambassador to Nigeria told me when I was there that there are going to be 400 million Nigerians by the year 2100. He said that if Nigeria cannot effectively govern itself and provide opportunity, 100 million of those people will leave. Guess where they will want to come? So, this is a big task for us, including in Africa.

Let me wrap up, in 10 seconds, by just arguing that we're in a competition with authoritarians—authoritarians externally and authoritarians within open societies. They're using what the National Endowment for Democracy has called sharp power. They're not using military instruments. They're using sharp power, which is like a malign form of soft power—a set of sharp power tools to erode, hollow out and assault democracies and democratic institutions. It's time for us in the west to modernize and revitalize our democracy assistance tool kit to try to level the playing field.

Thank you.

(1005)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will go straight into questions from members.

We are going to begin with MP Alleslev.

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

Thank you very much for the incredible and powerful testimony from both of you. It's highly complex with a lot of moving pieces. It feels as though the erosion is increasing exponentially, and it's not limited to them. It's also within our own democracies.

Can you help us to understand and prioritize what we should be doing at home? We still believe that we don't have, necessarily, a problem with our own democracy. Can we achieve democratic institution support in other countries while our own home flank is rapidly under pressure as well?

Dr. Daniel Twining:

I would argue very briefly that in America we have been working on our democracy for 200 years and we obviously have a lot more work to do, but you are seeing why we have checks and balances, mid-term elections, a separation of power between the executive and legislative, strong institutions and a vibrant media.

When I travel in the world, our interlocutors, NDI and IRI partners, don't say that democracy in America is under such stress that we have no standing to talk to them. They say our system is incredibly resilient, and it's a system, not any form of personalized rule. They need our help. We can offer it in humility, not saying we're trying to project some American or Canadian model. We're not trying to impose anything, but just those foundational building blocks of a successful democracy and a successful civil society are things that we know something about in America, in Canada, and we can help other countries establish them. I think the point that our democracies are continual works in progress is a powerful one that speaks to people.

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

I was thinking around social media and the undermining from other great powers within our own democracy while perhaps we're not either keeping up or paying attention to be able to address it. I didn't necessarily mean from within our own structures, and yet those same instruments are being used to even greater effect in those emerging democracies. Do we need to address that?

Dr. Daniel Twining:

Derek, do you want to take that one?

Mr. Derek Mitchell:

Sure.

Yes, Silicon Valley is a country unto itself in some ways. Some countries have sent ambassadors to Silicon Valley to work with them. We have a Silicon Valley program. We have an office there because I consider this an absolutely essential component of getting democracy right. What these social media platforms are doing to seep in and undermine the sinews of democracy, to alienate, isolate and divide people, and enabling others from the outside—and inside—to push disinformation and undermine facts, which are the foundation of democracy.... We have to get their assistance, and we're doing what we can to try to do that.

NDI has 50-plus offices around the world, so we feel as if we have a unique opportunity to take what we know of context on the ground, then feed what's going on there back through Washington or right back to Silicon Valley to get them to respond quickly, both to the initial issue of the moment, as well as the bigger issues that their platforms create. We're also creating networks of folks who are themselves on the ground, who are organizing themselves, who are their own tech geniuses, who are countering disinformation, to network them between countries to develop best practices.

We're doing our best, given the facts of these platforms, to try to counter the worst effects of it, as well as trying to figure out how we harness it for a positive agenda, because they will exist for the foreseeable future. More technologies are coming down the road, and we all have to understand the best way of harnessing them.

(1010)

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

That's excellent.

To change themes a bit, could we talk about security and stability and what you would argue is the role or opportunity for what we would have called peacekeeping, but peacekeeping in a modern context toward the promotion of democratic structures?

Dr. Daniel Twining:

Peacekeeping is a means to an end. Peacekeeping cannot be a permanent thing that we do. Fundamentally, the reason there is a need for peacekeeping operations is some kind of political failure in a society like the Balkans, ethnic conflict in parts of Africa, all forms of struggle, civil war. Again, coming back to my argument, let's attack the problem at the source. Peacekeeping is a valuable tool, but at the end of the day, we need to create societies that work so our peacekeepers can come home.

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

Yes, but do we need more peacekeeping? In many of those countries that are facing those kinds of challenges, is it more difficult to build institutions when there is insecurity and instability as a foundational element?

Dr. Daniel Twining:

Yes.

Ms. Leona Alleslev:

It would appear from the outside that what we were doing in the late 1980s and 1990s was significantly greater as a world than what we're doing today.

Dr. Daniel Twining:

Yes, if peacekeeping can buy time, as it can, for a political settlement, or a cooling of political conflict, military conflict, absolutely, yes.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are now going to move to MP Vandenbeld, please.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you very much.

Actually, it's very refreshing to see the bipartisan support for this kind of democracy promotion that we see with the republican institute and the democratic institute. How much of that do you think is because of the larger funding mechanism, the National Endowment for Democracy, which is under Congress, as opposed to being part of the administration? Of course, that has created funding—you mentioned 35 years—which then has created space for the emergence of these wide networks. Really, I'd say that the NDI and the IRI are primarily networks of democracy promotion.

How much of that was allowed to flourish because of the fact that you had an endowment fund under Congress that was long term and allowed for the building of the resiliency and that kind of consistency and constant presence?

I'll start with Mr. Mitchell and then go to Mr. Twining.

Mr. Derek Mitchell:

Thank you very much for that question.

I do think the fact that it has been under Congress has been a benefit to us. I think the fact of bipartisanship.... We get that question a lot, even from those in Congress. Why is there a republican institute and why is there a democratic institute? We were patterned after the German stiftungs, which divided their work according to ideology, but the NDI decided not to do its work based only on ideology. It was based on small-d democracy, on democrats, whatever their ideology, going forward. I think it helps that we have two institutes when it comes to Congress, because it switches back and forth between different partisan or party leadership.

I suppose it can be a double-edged sword in a way, but it has worked out well for us overall. We have had consistent support because of Congress, which traditionally has been the repository of national norms and values in the country. The executive can get overwhelmed by big picture policy, realism and how to get along with other countries, and values can get lost or downgraded in the list of important interests, but the legislature is always the one that says, “No, we have a certain meaning behind our country that the American people want to maintain.”

If we didn't have Congress in the past few years...this administration was cutting us drastically, by 30% to 40%. It would go up to the Hill and the Hill would say, “Thank you for your interest in national security, and we do the budget, so we're putting back all this money and in fact increasing it a little bit.”

We can't rely on that. We have to be able to explain to the American people why we do what we do and why it's important, and not rely on individual senators or staff members, but it has worked very well so far that it has been in Congress.

(1015)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Mr. Twining.

Dr. Daniel Twining:

Of course, I agree with all of that. Can I just add one thing? As all of you think about your institutional structures here, one thing that has helped us is that the IRI, NDI and the National Endowment for Democracy, are one and two degrees removed from the government, from the executive branch and from the Congress.

Governments do have to walk a diplomatic fine line with sensitive relationships: Russia, China, Saudi Arabia, Iran, etc. The Congress appropriates money that we compete for through grants and we then go out as non-profit, non-governmental organizations to do that work to empower citizens and leaders around the world. Our government is supporting it, but in a removed way that does not complicate diplomatic relations unduly, so it is worth thinking about that, rather than having it be bureaucratized in a ministry.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

I note that our 2007 report also recommended that something be “under Parliament”.

In terms of the funding, we talked about the costs of democracy promotion, but what are the costs of not promoting democracy? What are the costs in terms of what you mentioned, Mr. Twining, such as migration, refugee flows and conflict? Not having inclusive democracies obviously has great costs for the world, but also in our own countries when those refugee flows are coming in.

I noted, Mr. Mitchell, you mentioned that it's actually a time for democratic stimulus

Mr. Twining, you said—and this is quite significant—that democracy promotion should perhaps “supersede other forms of assistance”, because without democracy, when you have corruption and authoritarianism, a lot of the other assistance isn't as effective. I wonder if you could elaborate a bit for our committee. If we're looking at some sort of a larger investment in democracy, particularly something under Parliament, that costs money. What is the flip side? What is the cost of not investing in this area?

We'll start with Mr. Twining this time and then go to Mr. Mitchell.

Dr. Daniel Twining:

The cost is horrific. My wife is British, and she's working on Brexit. I would argue that there's a direct line from the rise of ISIS in Iraq and Syria and the refugee crisis that flowed from that to the pressure on the European Union that has produced some extremist politics in the continent and has helped lead to Brexit. That is the cost. I don't know what the cost of that is, but that is an extraordinary line to trace: two or three million Syrian and Iraqi refugees actually cracking up our core alliance in the west, the European Union.

We know the cost of wars because we help pay for them and participate in them. Democracy assistance looks to me like cents on the dollar. Of course the great thing about democracy assistance is that ultimately countries graduate from it—and they want to graduate from it. They don't want to be conflict-ridden people, and these societies don't want to be dependants. So you are making an investment that yields dividends, which allows those countries over time to graduate, because they succeed.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Mr. Mitchell.

Mr. Derek Mitchell:

It's always difficult to prove a negative—the dog that didn't bark, and how much is the opportunity cost there—but as Dan says, you can see the results of places that fail. There is a logic to democracy. It's not simply an ideology. When you don't have accountability of abusive power, lack of transparency leads to corruption, which leads to injustice and tyranny of majorities, which leads to refugee flows and instability that crosses borders. That has monetary impact. It means we have to pay for more in our security services.

I've worked in the Pentagon. Actually I worked at NDI before but went for 20 years to the Pentagon, and I saw it very much connected not because you impose democracy. That goes too far. That's an oxymoron. As Madeleine Albright says, you can't impose democracy. But you don't want to have to spend so much on security. You'd much rather spend on the preventives, and democracy is a preventive. It promotes human dignity. It promotes human rights, which creates then a self-sustaining and self-corrective inside countries, so you don't have the cross-border impacts that affect our national security, that cost billions of dollars rather than the millions that typically go into democracy work.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

And—

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Sorry, but your time is up.

Next is MP Laverdière. [Translation]

Ms. Hélène Laverdière:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

My first question is for Mr. Mitchell, but the other witnesses can also comment.

Among the threats to democracy, you mentioned economic inequalities. This is a phenomenon we see, not only in Venezuela, Russia and other countries where there is corruption, but also in Canada—although not necessarily at the same level—where it is growing.

Could you tell us more or comment on it?

(1020)

[English]

Mr. Derek Mitchell:

You're exactly right. I'm not suggesting that we're any different. In fact, I would use us as an example of how economic inequality can lead to people's frustrations and lead to extreme measures when it comes to their voting or in terms of their politics. So we're not excluded from the dynamics that we've been seeing over the past generation, which means we have to be alert to not just the political components of democracy but to how democracy has to be ingrained into how we think about economic policy, how we do economic policy, how we think about corruption issues as well, which also feed into the inequality questions and injustice that people feel and get angry about.

One of the lessons learned is not just that if the economy goes up, then democracy is more likely sustained. The economy writ large can go up, but if some people move ahead or if there is a high level of corruption or there is inequality and people feel that it's not working for them and that there are elites, a rural-urban divide, an alienation from the system, a sense that politicians are not there for them, then a demagogue can come in and say, “I represent you; I'm a populist; I speak for you”. They denigrate the institutions, and once the institutions are gone and the norms are gone, then it's a free-for-all. Then it's rule by an individual.

If you don't get people's daily life at the heart of these questions, that people don't just have to vote but they have to eat and have to feel that they are recognized and that minorities have rights, then you're not going to get at the real big picture of democratic development. That's just a lesson we've learned. It's not enough to have institutions and processes; there has to be this culture and there has to be an economic component as well.

Dr. Daniel Twining:

I would add that in many developing countries, people go into government to get rich. You don't do that in Canada. This is still the pathway to material prosperity, because of corruption, kleptocracy, etc. Tackling those at the source, making it clear that taxpayer stewardship is not a means to personal enrichment.... Only open politics can do that. Only politics that are transparent and accountable, and involve alternation in power and a degree of accountability between institutions and with courts, etc., can do that. Otherwise, you just have this open wound of public money going into private purses.

Open politics should be a leveller, because by definition, they crack up any kind of closed, elite structure in which one tribe, or one family or one party monopolizes political control and steers the economy accordingly.

In Malaysia, one reason you had this extraordinary democratic transition last year is that one party had been in power for 61 years. Every big businessman in Malaysia needed to be quite intimate with that ruling party in order for his prosperity, his business, to thrive. You've had an alternation in power there, and that has trickled down into the private sector and into the economy.

I will close with one thought. The populist wave in the west right now may fail, because populists arguably cannot deliver on their promises. They are too expensive. I would include populism of the left and of the right in this. There are lots of promises being thrown around in America now, as we look towards our 2020 presidential election, about new benefits for people. I'm not sure how we're going to pay for those. I would say the same things about the populism on the right that you see in places like Italy. At the end of the day, it's budget busting, and it's not sustainable. [Translation]

Ms. Hélène Laverdière:

Thank you very much.

You also mentioned inclusiveness. With regard to the representation of women, I am proud to belong to a political party where 40% of the members of Parliament are women, which beats all the other parties. Forgive me for that little partisan comment. You also mentioned young people. This is an issue that concerns me very much.

What can be done to encourage political participation among young people?

(1025)

[English]

Dr. Daniel Twining:

Derek, go ahead.

Mr. Derek Mitchell:

It's interesting to note up front that many of the reports that have come out.... Freedom House came out today with its democracy index, but The Economist issued their democracy index a few weeks ago. They said that faith in democratic institutions is down, but actually political participation is up, particularly among women, and also, to some degree, youth. A lot of the participation is taking to the streets or in frustration. They're not confident about political parties. They think they're exclusive and dominated by the older generation. These are cultural as well as political issues.

In fact, participation is up, and there is a thirst to participate in a way that works for them. This idea that young people—even in the United States we hear these facts, and overseas—are not interested in democracy.... I think you disaggregate democracy, and say, “Would you like to participate in your public affairs? Would you like to have accountability? Do you want to have freedom to associate, free speech, transparency and the ability to represent your communities?” “Yes, yes, yes and yes.” “Then that means you want democracy.” They don't have the way to participate. They don't feel confident that the rules and institutions now work for them, which is a huge challenge. It's not something necessarily that an NDI or an IRI can fix.

We have to think about how we provide different guidance or assistance, or learn lessons where young people can productively engage.

If you look at Africa, there is a youth explosion, and a youth network out of Nigeria that is extremely exciting and very interesting. The future of democracy will be based on these young people. Investing in them now and trying to find a way for them to engage and get some of the establishment to allow them to engage in the interest of broader national development will be very important.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I will move to MP Saini.

Mr. Raj Saini (Kitchener Centre, Lib.):

Thank you.

Good morning to both of you. Thank you very much. It's been very informative today.

Mr. Twining, I'll start with you.

In 1944 part of the reason for the Bretton Woods conference was to maintain a stable world order. Fast-forward about 70 years and that's beginning to fray. You've written quite forcefully that there should be trilateral co-operation between Asia, Europe and America, and that now the compact would be useful in bringing back the liberal international order.

My question for you is simple in a way and complex in a way. You mentioned Russia and China. When you have two countries that are implicating themselves in the domestic affairs of other countries, either through force or economically....

I'll give you one example right now, and that's Venezuela. People may not realize that the biggest investor in Venezuela right now is China. The only three countries that are supporting the current regime are China, Russia and Turkey. I'm just pointing out one example, but if you look at Latin America, at Africa, or at parts of Asia, the economic implications of certain countries are so strong that half the economies are dependent on that one country or the investment of that one country.

If we go into those countries, the ones that need the most help, where there are no free and fair elections, where you have corruption, where you don't have freedom of the press, how do we change the nature of that country or promote democratic institutions when that same leadership is profiting from non-democratic institutions?

Dr. Daniel Twining:

It's a hard question. I'll begin where you did, with North American co-operation with Europe and Asia. We talk about the west these days, but of course the west is actually global. It certainly includes Japan as part of the G7 and core rich democracies, but I would argue that over time, it increasingly should include India. India is the world's biggest democracy.

Frankly, they may have a lot more to offer developing societies as they come up in terms of their own level of development than obviously rich countries like Canada and the United States have. Thinking about the challenge, the Indian system is more acutely aware of the China challenge writ large, I would argue, than many of us are in the west. The Japanese have so much at stake because they are marooned in this region with these rising autocracies, powerful autocracies, in Russia and China. When we think about democratic co-operation in new ways, that should mean a core group of big democracies acting in concert together, because we are all dealing with the same challenges.

That's one. Two, the Venezuela thing is very interesting, because it is exposing Russia's interest in controlling oil prices by sustaining the Maduro regime in power. It's exposing China's enormous investments in this kleptocracy in the form of bonds and energy resources. Frankly, part of what we see in the IRI and NDI work around the world is resentment in countries—in Africa, in the Pacific, in the Indian Ocean—of foreign countries' claims to their resources through corrupt political dealings with their leaders.

In the Maldives there was just a democratic transition a few months ago. You had an elected dictator who took power and abolished the Supreme Court and consolidated all control. He held an election because he thought he could win it, as these people often do, and 90% of voters turned out and deposed him. It turns out that they are now swimming in a sea of Chinese investment and infrastructure crooked dealings, just like the new Malaysian government is swimming in a sea of crooked dealings and trying to get out of it.

I think the more we collectively can expose some of these deals that often happen behind closed doors—behind, say, the Maduro regime and Beijing, or the Maduro regime and Russian oligarchic interests—the better, because citizens really resent that in those countries.

(1030)

Mr. Raj Saini:

In certain countries where you want to do democratic development, there might be some resistance because they don't want any foreign influence or any foreigners telling them how they should do this or do that. How do we maintain that fine line between being perceived as trying to revitalize or strengthen institutions as opposed to directly having an internal effect on the domestic politics of any country?

Dr. Daniel Twining:

Perhaps I could just do 10 seconds on this and then I'll defer to Derek.

I went to Bosnia on one of my first IRI trips. It turned out that everybody was there in the Balkans doing all sorts of things. You had the Turks, the Saudis, the Iranians, the Chinese and the Russians. Every Bosnian political leader I met said, “Where is America? Where is the west? Where is Europe? All these other countries are here.”

So the situation we're in today, and so many, as you've seen in Venezuela, is that other actors are there, whether we are there or not.

Derek has more to say on this, I'm sure.

Mr. Derek Mitchell:

Yes. Your question gets to the heart of how NDI does its work in essence. This is the challenge in every country we go to. We work in the most sensitive part of a country, its politics, where power and often money is in the balance. We have to prove ourselves, through our record in the past and through understanding context and very careful diplomacy with a full range of people in the country to say, “This is what we are. This is what we do. We are here because you have invited us in. We won't be there if you don't invite us in, but we seek your success. We don't seek an outcome to your policies. What we want to do is assist you in developing a process for you to determine your own futures, in fact, excluding external interference and allow you to have a say in your own futures.”

The theory behind this is that if they do that, they will be a more stable society, be a better market for our business, and it will not be a fount of insecurity in a region. It will be a good partner to the United States when it comes to us or any country that cares about democracy, because we tend to have similar values. It doesn't exclude anybody. It's not anti anybody. We don't come with an agenda. But in every country we go to—at least when I was working there 20 years ago; maybe it's easier now—we would have to prove ourselves and have to explain why we were not there to impose and that we are not America trying to impose an American system but we are trying to share experiences around the world and we come with a great deal of humility.

That's the best way to do it. I think it has demonstrated results in the past 35 years.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

MP Wrzesnewskyj, please.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you.

Dr. Twining, I would like to thank you on a personal level, as the son and grandson of refugees, for referencing—it's not a perfect correlation—the correlation between what has been labelled as a retreat of democracy and the rising number of refugees globally. There is an important point here when you talk about having an opportunity to feed yourself as opposed to vote. On a very personal level, Canada was freedom's shore for my family. They had never experienced democracy but they had experienced how your right to eat very literally could be taken from you if you don't have democracy. Voting was sacrosanct in our family. I just wanted to thank you for referencing that.

I'd like to turn to a comment that was made that technology today is almost pernicious, I believe that's the wording that was used, to democracy. I was quite encouraged to hear from Mr. Mitchell that you are working with Silicon Valley. Could you comment on, or do we know, what is happening with organizations like Huawei which are going around the world and saying, “Look, we'll sell you this technology at a cheaper price, plus you can monitor your citizens in ways that you've never been able to in the past”?

(1035)

Mr. Derek Mitchell:

Yes, it's extremely dangerous. There's 5G and AI and all the different technologies that are developing now that will dominate our lives and shape what we hear, what we know, and in some ways how we think and our perspective on facts. The Chinese are quite strategic about this. They are pretty conscious about their desire to reach out to the world and shape things. In some ways it's defensive. They want to protect the Communist Party, but certainly there is an offensive component to it where it comes at the expense of others' sovereignty and others' well-being.

There is no company in China that is purely independent of the government. There is always going to be a Communist Party member in its leadership. The head of Huawei is a former PLA officer. I think countries are waking up to the challenge. The key, again, as in everything with democracy and international affairs, is transparency. The Chinese and others will work very well in the shadows. Huawei was a very easy way to get into the systems of other countries and undermine, I think, the sovereignty of others. But I think countries are alert to that now and are now thinking about ways to counter it.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you.

I have one quick, last point. In the past, during the Cold War, we had Voice of America and Radio Canada International, which, by the way, has pretty much wrapped up all their work. They were quite effective in reaching into countries. We seem to have been leapfrogged by organizations like Russia Today. Do you have any comments on investments and that sort of reaching out to people in countries, and NGOs being closed up in Russia itself? It's an embattled democracy in so many ways. Do you have any commentary when it comes to that?

Dr. Daniel Twining:

Just to be clear, this is not just about broadcasting but about the whole suite of tools.

During the Cold War, we created a suite of tools to project our message of the open society into this totalitarian space controlled by the Soviet empire. We let many of those tools wither after the end of the Cold War. Derek talked about that phase, phase two. We let them wither and we need to recreate them. I'm not sure we need exactly the same instruments. We probably need some different instruments, but when we think about broadcasting, when we think about democracy assistance, when we think about exchanges and scholarships and all of these human engagements, we need more of that. Frankly, we walked away from the tool kit. We let it get rusty.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to go for our final questions to MP O'Toole, please.

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both very much. You were very informative. This is a study that all members, all sides politically, have a lot of interest in.

The big problem the Trudeau government has had on foreign policy has been where there are countries that don't share our values, but we may share interests. This is the balance we see in foreign policy. China, Saudi Arabia, Cuba and the Philippines.... There are a number where we don't share values and we've had diplomatic rows. Those are the countries where we have to be promoting democratic reform, human rights and a range of things.

Mr. Mitchell, you talked about how building a culture of democracy is not easy. It's a slow-going process.

My question is for both of you. How is the challenge...? I'll use this as an example. In Canada, we didn't legalize same-sex marriage until 2005. I think we all agree that's a positive thing. The U.S., at the federal level, is still really having that debate. How can we best advance bare-bones democratic rights to liberty, freedom of association and expression, those sorts of things, when we also import a number of our progressive values, as we might say, to countries that are in the Stone Age, comparatively, on a democratic level? Sometimes I worry, with the Trudeau government, that a lot of their progressive agenda on trade and all these sorts of things are far more for their domestic political audience than they are for the countries for which they are intended.

I'd love to hear you both on this, because I'm wondering whether that will slow the process of democratic reform in some of these countries.

(1040)

Dr. Daniel Twining:

I would just say—Derek will probably have more thoughts—values are different in different societies, but our principle is that citizens should be free to decide whether women can drive or participate in a country like Saudi Arabia or Iran.

I was testifying on Capitol Hill with Derek's predecessor, and somebody asked us about the women's empowerment agenda on a set of specific issues, abortion, etc. Our response, collectively, was that those are for those countries, those people, to decide, but if we can empower women to be political deciders, that solves a whole lot of other problems. The main thing for us, I think, is making sure that politics in these countries is inclusive of the spectrum of that society, so that women, marginalized communities and other voices have an equal vote and an equal voice in those countries which, in all of the countries you mentioned, they currently do not.

Mr. Derek Mitchell:

We have to explain to these countries or share the experience of our countries that we are stronger when we are inclusive to make it also in their interest. If you seek national development, if you truly care about your national power, then you must include women. Every study suggests that. You must include all. You must empower folks. Not every autocrat is going to listen to that. All of the elites are not going to listen to that, because power is the currency, and they may not want to loosen that power. You do want to encourage folks in the country, the broad swath of the citizenry, to recognize that keeping anybody down or leaving anybody behind is going to come at their expense, that if they leave anybody out, then they might be next.

I like to quote Martin Luther King, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere”. Nobody is excluded from injustice if you start chipping away at it. In fact, the more inclusive you are, the more stable and secure you will be.

We try to share those experiences. It will take time, because cultures, as you say, are at different levels of development. They have different histories, but I don't think we walk away from that. I think we defend that and do it with confidence, but do it with, again, humility and understanding of local contexts, of how we do it in a way that might take root sooner rather than later.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll have a very short, final engagement from MP Laverdière—

Oh, you didn't want another one. Sorry, I got the wires crossed there.

To those in Washington, D.C. and to Dr. Twining here, this was a tremendous way for us to start our engagement on this very important issue. I want to thank all of you for giving us so much food for thought as we start to dig deeper into this issue.

With that, we shall adjourn.

Comité permanent des affaires étrangères et du développement international

[Énregistrement électronique]

(0845)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Michael Levitt (York-Centre, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. La 125e séance du Comité permanent des affaires étrangères et du développement international est ouverte.

C'est également la première séance que nous consacrons à la nouvelle étude sur le soutien du Canada au développement de la démocratie à l'échelle internationale.

Avec cette idée en tête, je souhaite la bienvenue à nos deux premiers témoins. Accueillons les représentants du ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement: le sous-ministre adjoint à Enjeux mondiaux et du développement, M. Christopher MacLennan; la directrice générale du Bureau des droits de la personne, des libertés et de l'inclusion, Mme Shelley Whiting.

Après votre témoignage, nous passerons aux questions.

Monsieur MacLennan, veuillez commencer.

M. Christopher MacLennan (sous-ministre adjoint, Enjeux mondiaux et du développement, ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement):

Merci beaucoup. Après ma courte déclaration au nom de mon ministère, Shelley et moi, visiblement, serons ravis de répondre à vos questions.

Je m'écarte du texte pour préciser que je suis le sous-ministre adjoint chargé essentiellement de l'aide au développement dans ce qui constitue la participation du Canada à la promotion de la démocratie. De son côté, Shelley est davantage plongée dans les questions d'affaires étrangères, qui relèvent principalement de notre diplomatie et de la promotion de la démocratie par d'autres moyens.

Je vous remercie de votre invitation à venir discuter de notre appui, passé et actuel, au développement de la démocratie. La promotion de la démocratie à l'étranger, comme vous tous ici présents le savez, fait depuis longtemps partie intégrante de la politique étrangère du Canada et de son aide internationale, mais, comme vous l'avez fait remarquer dans votre rapport de 2007, en dépit de progrès remarquables, la marche vers l'avant de la démocratie n'est pas assurée et, dans le climat actuel, les reculs menacent le progrès.

Je pense que c'est encore plus vrai en 2019 que peut-être en 2007. De fait, d'après la plupart des spécialistes, les menaces croissantes pour le développement de la démocratie d'il y a 12 ans ont maintenant provoqué son recul général.

Le mécontentement populaire s'est manifesté dans de nombreux pays, faute, pour leurs gouvernements, de trouver des solutions efficaces à des problèmes intérieurs importants et légitimes comme le chômage, un avenir bouché, les inégalités et la migration en masse. De plus, des acteurs malveillants, notamment des régimes autoritaires et leurs exécutants, ont déployé plus d'efforts pour manipuler l'opinion et les perceptions de manière à fragiliser la démocratie et, de manière plus générale, l'ordre international fondé sur des règles.

L'ingérence étrangère n'a rien de nouveau, mais son influence a augmenté d'échelle et gagné en vitesse, grâce aux données et aux techniques numériques moins coûteuses et plus accessibles. La confiance et l'engagement des citoyens dans les institutions démocratiques ont donc diminué, tandis qu'augmentaient la méfiance de la société civile à l'égard des gouvernements et la manipulation et le discrédit des partis politiques et de leurs mécanismes.

Particulièrement inquiétant est le rétrécissement de l'espace civique, l'un des principaux piliers de la démocratie. Les plus grands reculs de la démocratie ont touché les libertés civiles, la liberté d'expression, la liberté de réunion et d'association, la participation à la société civile et l'intégrité des médias. Voilà le contexte dans lequel nous travaillons aujourd'hui.[Français]

Pour sa part, Affaires mondiales Canada s'est adapté. En 2013, l'Agence canadienne de développement international et le ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Commerce international ont été fusionnés. Cette fusion a entraîné une utilisation cohérente des outils du gouvernement pour promouvoir la démocratie.

La ministre des Affaires étrangères et la ministre du Développement international du Canada ont maintenant toutes deux pris l'engagement établi dans leur lettre de mandat de défendre les valeurs d'une gouvernance inclusive et responsable, notamment par la promotion des droits de la personne, de l'égalité des genres, du renforcement du pouvoir des femmes et des filles, du pluralisme pacifique ainsi que de l'inclusion et du respect pour la diversité.

En juin 2017, le gouvernement a adopté sa politique d'aide internationale féministe, qui met l'accent sur la gouvernance inclusive centrée sur la démocratie et la participation politique, les droits de la personne et la primauté du droit pour tous les citoyens, peu importe leur identité de genre ou toute autre facette de leur identité. Cette politique souligne l'engagement du gouvernement du Canada à fournir une aide de développement inclusive et fondée sur les droits de la personne, conformément à la recommandation de l'étude du Comité en 2007.

Affaires mondiales Canada soutient, dans toutes les régions du monde, un large éventail de programmes et d'initiatives visant à favoriser la gouvernance inclusive. En travaillant avec un grand nombre de partenaires, nous mettons à profit l'expertise des ONG canadiennes, des organisations multilatérales et des institutions internationales, de même que l'engagement de la base de la société civile. Ce que nous faisons, et avec qui nous le faisons, dépend beaucoup du contexte local, qui nous oblige souvent à ajuster notre approche et à saisir les occasions qui se présentent.

Suivant une approche féministe, le gouvernement accorde la priorité au leadership et à la participation politique des femmes. Par exemple, il collabore avec l'Union interparlementaire pour renforcer la prise de décisions des femmes dans les Parlements et augmenter la capacité des parlementaires — femmes et hommes — à adopter des réformes et des lois intégrant les questions de genre.

En Indonésie et au Kenya, le Canada soutient la participation équitable aux processus électoraux des groupes marginalisés ou vulnérables, y compris les jeunes et les personnes handicapées.

(0850)



De plus, le Canada alloue jusqu'à 24 millions de dollars à l'appui de missions d'observation électorale en Ukraine en prévision des élections présidentielles et parlementaires de 2019, ainsi qu'en soutien à une réforme électorale à plus long terme et durable.[Traduction]

De manière générale, sur les 293 millions de dollars qui sont allés, en 2017-2018, aux programmes axés sur la gouvernance inclusive dans des secteurs tels que le gouvernement et la société civile, la démocratie et la participation politiques ainsi que la primauté du droit et les droits de la personne, 170 millions sont allés précisément à la promotion de la démocratie.

Comme je l'ai dit, les efforts du Canada dans ce domaine ne se bornent pas à l'aide au développement international. Dans le cadre de sa politique étrangère féministe, le Canada a entrepris de renforcer la démocratie et la résilience dans les sociétés pacifiques et inclusives, à l'échelle internationale et grâce à notre travail par notre réseau de missions à l'étranger.

Dans le G7, le Canada a énergiquement défendu les valeurs démocratiques. En 2018, dans le cadre de sa présidence de l'organisation, nous avons piloté une déclaration commune avec les membres de l'organisation, qui soutenait que la démocratie était essentielle à la défense contre la menace étrangère. Au sommet de Charlevoix, les dirigeants ont annoncé le mécanisme de réponse rapide du G7, qui y renforce la coordination de l'identification des menaces diverses et en évolution constante contre les processus démocratiques du G7 et la réponse à ces menaces. L'unité de coordination réside en permanence au Canada.

De plus, son vaste réseau de missions diplomatiques permet au Canada de mobiliser les fonctionnaires d'autres États attachés aux mêmes principes et ses partenaires de la société civile pour qu'ils appuient verbalement et concrètement le développement de la démocratie dans ces pays. Selon le contexte, ils pratiquent la diplomatie discrète ou un dialogue plus ouvert et plus public, y compris l'appui aux missions internationales d'observation des élections à l'étranger par, notamment, le déploiement de centaines de Canadiens, ces dernières années, et le coparrainage de résolutions sur les défenseurs des droits de la personne, qui visaient à appuyer leur participation dans les forums internationaux. Nos missions sont également munies de lignes directrices intitulées « Voix à risque », pour appuyer et protéger les défenseurs des droits de la personne.

Pour conclure, Affaires mondiales Canada applaudit l'intérêt de votre comité à l'égard de ce qui forme, nous en convenons tous, un axe prioritaire important.

Nous sommes impatients d'entendre vos questions.

Le président:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

La députée Alleslev sera la première à vous interroger.

Mme Leona Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill, PCC):

Merci beaucoup d'être ici.

C'est certainement un sujet important et quelque peu déroutant. Vous dites, si j'ai bien compris, que la démocratie recule.

Nous continuons d'investir, et notre investissement n'a pas radicalement changé ces 12 dernières années.

Si nous poursuivons sur cette voie, qu'est-ce qui nous assure que nous aurons un résultat différent? Pouvez-vous expliquer quels sont les indicateurs essentiels du rendement? Comment savons-nous que nos efforts permettent d'atteindre les objectifs?

(0855)

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Notre marge de manoeuvre est très délicate. C'est avéré que le développement international est l'un des domaines les plus difficiles du monde pour, toute proportion gardée, vraiment changer quelque chose avec très peu d'argent.

Il existe des types d'aide au développement où les occasions permettent de comprendre assez directement quel sera le retour sur l'investissement de chaque dollar. Par exemple, dans la vaccination, on a une idée claire des coûts et des résultats, c'est-à-dire une vie sauvée si la personne n'attrape jamais la maladie.

Ici, nos programmes sont essentiellement différents. Chaque pays possède sa culture, sa compréhension de la gouvernance, et toutes les formes de gouvernance, comme nous le comprenons au Canada, bien sûr...

Mme Leona Alleslev:

C'est bien beau, mais je suis désolée, je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps.

Bien sûr, nous comprenons les difficultés. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons des spécialistes comme vous pour vous en occuper. Nous devons pouvoir dire à la société canadienne que nous faisons bien, mais que nos investissements, nos efforts, atteignent néanmoins leurs objectifs et obtiennent les résultats escomptés.

Pouvez-vous, s'il vous plaît, expliquer comment nous le mesurons et, si la démocratie recule, que faisons-nous de différent pour atteindre un résultat différent?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Nous intensifions notamment nos efforts locaux pour une compréhension plus grande, une meilleure inclusion, une participation élargie. Sur certains de nos chantiers, visiblement l'espace démocratique s'est rétréci. Nous essayons de l'ouvrir.

À cette fin, nous assurons la participation de toutes les communautés aux processus démocratiques. Par exemple, nous appuyons les organismes féminins locaux, à la faveur du programme Voix et leadership des femmes, pour leur permettre de militer pour les droits des femmes, y compris celui de participer à la vie politique. Nous collaborons aussi avec les groupes de LGBTQ, pour les aider à comprendre leurs droits et à les exercer dans le contexte des pays où nous travaillons.

La question générale du recul de la démocratie se pose visiblement à l'échelle mondiale, relativement à certains des indices de Freedom House et ainsi de suite. C'est un indicateur très difficile à manipuler, parce qu'il est mondial. Dans nos programmes, nous essayons, aux échelons locaux, de collaborer directement avec les gouvernements qui désirent notre collaboration pour renforcer leurs institutions, même judiciaires, ainsi que leurs fonctions d'audit pour essayer de promouvoir une meilleure compréhension de la démocratie.

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Y a-t-il une relation avec les opérations de maintien de la paix et le rôle, pour vous, de jeter les bases de ce qui vous permettrait d'aller là-bas et de faire ce travail? Je n'aime pas l'expression « maintien de la paix », parce que, bien sûr, elle fait un peu vieilli et qu'elle suppose un état de paix et un état de guerre. Avez-vous remarqué si le recul spectaculaire des opérations de maintien de la paix a influé sur ce rétrécissement de l'espace démocratique dans lequel vous essayez de fonctionner?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Nous avons déjà dit à quel point il était difficile de travailler dans beaucoup des contextes. Dans un État fragilisé, c'est encore plus difficile. La sécurité, manifestement, est la priorité. Il est difficile d'obtenir pour le développement un bon résultat dans un endroit si fragile que la sécurité des citoyens ne se maintient pas et qu'il n'existe pas de stabilité. Le maintien de la paix est d'une importance capitale.

Cela étant dit, il y a beaucoup d'autres façons, aussi, de contribuer à la stabilité d'un pays. Parfois, la fragilité n'est pas nécessairement imputable, comme vous l'avez dit, à la guerre. Elle pourrait découler de l'environnement ou d'une sécheresse. Visiblement, tous ces facteurs comptent. Ça rend les problèmes d'autant plus complexes.

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Alors, dans votre esprit, vous diriez que les deux doivent aller de pair. La stabilité et la sécurité sont les précurseurs de la capacité d'évoluer dans cet espace démocratique.

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Visiblement et dans toute la mesure du possible, pour toute aide au développement, il faut un climat stable et sûr. Cela étant dit, nous travaillons néanmoins dans des contextes de très grande fragilité. Ça n'empêche pas d'obtenir des résultats; c'est simplement plus difficile et ça exige seulement des méthodes différentes.

(0900)

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

À vous, madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci d'être ici pour une étude très importante, qui arrive à point nommé.

Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez dit croire, monsieur MacLennan, que le rapport de 2007 de notre comité, dans lequel était recommandée une entité à grande échelle au Canada pour coordonner et encadrer la promotion de la démocratie, est encore plus près de la vérité aujourd'hui qu'à cette époque. Pouvez-vous expliquer pourquoi vous le ressentez?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je crois avoir dit que la situation d'aujourd'hui, par rapport à celle du début du siècle actuel, qui a conduit à la recommandation de la Chambre des communes, est peut-être... Aujourd'hui, on réclame peut-être plus ces institutions. Je dois admettre que j'ignore si nous avons nécessairement besoin d'une institution nouvelle. Je pense que nous devons réfléchir à l'évolution de la situation. Au début de la période, nous surfions encore ce que nous appelions la troisième vague de démocratisation et nous croyions que tous les pays deviendraient des démocraties. C'est alors que nous avons commencé à recevoir les premiers démentis. Voilà pourquoi vous avez perçu une reconnaissance plus grande du besoin de plus de méthodes politiques, par exemple, le soutien des partis politiques et ainsi de suite.

Je pense que, aujourd'hui, nous savons que ce qui arrivait dans les années 2000 était vrai. Il est absolument nécessaire de faire évoluer nos méthodes et de vraiment réfléchir de façon cohérente à ce qu'il faut pour y changer quelque chose.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Visiblement, une présence durable est très importante pour la promotion de la démocratie dans un pays. Beaucoup de pays possèdent des entités spécialisées. Je voudrais définir la démocratie davantage par son développement des institutions: augmentation de la capacité d'adopter des lois, appui aux partis politiques, élections, collaboration avec les institutions. Qu'en est-il de tout ça à Affaires mondiales Canada?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Il existe quelques postes budgétaires, mais la majorité relève de nos programmes bilatéraux, de nos programmes pour chaque pays dans lesquels chaque projet varie selon le contexte national et local. Certains de nos programmes relèvent aussi de nos opérations de maintien de la paix et de sécurité.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

En 2005, on a créé un conseil pour la démocratie. En fait, il a attiré beaucoup d'ONG et d'autres acteurs du domaine, qui ont voulu essayer de remplir des fonctions de coordination. Est-ce qu'il existe encore? Sinon qu'en est-il advenu?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

À ma connaissance, il n'existe plus. Je suis sûr que ses créateurs sont encore actifs et qu'ils s'intéressent toujours à la question, mais je crois que le conseil ne s'est pas réuni depuis très longtemps.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Existe-t-il, à Affaires mondiales Canada, un centre, un guichet unique, qui concentre tout le travail du Canada pour la promotion de la démocratie et des institutions, c'est-à-dire où on peut trouver des pratiques exemplaires, un volet stratégique de ces pratiques et un centre de coordination de la construction de capacités et de l'assistance technique? Un tel endroit existe-t-il là, actuellement?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

À Affaires mondiales Canada, l'aide au développement est organisée comme suit: mon équipe est chargée de la prestation de tous les conseils en matière de politiques sectorielles et de coordination sectorielle. Elle est chargée, dans ce cas, de la gouvernance inclusive et de la démocratie.

Mais les budgets existent pour ça dans les programmes bilatéraux, en fonction des occasions qui se présentent. En fonction des politiques du moment, on les institue jusqu'au niveau des choix de programme, compte tenu du contexte de chaque pays.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Vous avez dit que 170 millions de dollars étaient précisément affectés à la promotion de la démocratie, mais nous savons, bien sûr, que cette promotion, manifestement, englobe beaucoup de choses, par exemple la société civile et ce genre de notion. Quelle est la proportion de ce montant qui est effectivement consacrée à la création d'institutions?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Difficile à dire. Nous devrons peut-être nous renseigner pour savoir si nous pouvons répondre.

Essentiellement, le plus gros des deux chiffres que j'ai cités concerne la gouvernance inclusive, qui englobe diverses notions. Par exemple, l'appui à un bureau d'audit dans un pays, peut-être dans son ministère de l'agriculture, n'est pas considéré comme la promotion de la démocratie, mais c'est une activité favorisant la gouvernance.

Les particularités de la promotion de la démocratie ont des points communs avec certaines des notions dont vous parlez, par exemple les assemblées législatives, les parlements, les élections et ainsi de suite. Est-ce que, dans tous les cas, c'est de la création d'institutions? Pas nécessairement, mais je pense que vous faisiez allusion au petit chiffre.

(0905)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Il n'y a donc vraiment pas...

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Ce n'est pas une enveloppe réservée, et il importe de le reconnaître. Au lieu d'une telle enveloppe, les programmes bilatéraux et d'autres programmes permettent de profiter des occasions qui se présentent. Voilà qui explique la fluctuation des montants, d'un exercice à l'autre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Concernant les leçons qu'on tire de nos expériences, quand on a recours à des programmes bilatéraux, il y a souvent du cloisonnement, bien sûr. Il y a des experts dans un pays ou une région en particulier. Qui assure la coordination, qui évalue les résultats pour en tirer des leçons et en retenir des pratiques exemplaires? Où se fait cette réflexion?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Dans mon équipe.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord. Le faites-vous en ce moment?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Oui.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Nous savons que les Canadiens qui interviennent un peu partout dans le monde... Le Canada est particulièrement bon pour ce type de travail.

M. Christopher MacLennan: Oui.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld: La plupart des grandes organisations internationales, comme le PNUD, l'OSCE, de même que bien des pays, comme les Pays-Bas et les États-Unis, embauchent des Canadiens, mais une grande partie du savoir et du travail se situe à l'extérieur du Canada. Y a-t-il un mécanisme quelconque qui permette à Affaires mondiales d'effectuer une certaine coordination?

Il y a notamment beaucoup de membres des communautés diasporiques qui vont participer à la construction de la démocratie dans leur pays d'origine. Rassemblons-nous ces connaissances quelque part? Assurons-nous une coordination pour pouvoir nous inspirer des pratiques exemplaires? C'est bon pour le Canada aussi, parce que nous pouvons ainsi en apprendre beaucoup sur ce qui se passe sur le terrain dans ces pays.

M. Christopher MacLennan:

À l'heure actuelle, nous ne tenons pas de registre des Canadiens qui travaillent au sein d'autres organisations d'avancement de la démocratie, par exemple. Cela dit, nous savons pertinemment quelles organisations canadiennes sont actives dans ce domaine, et nous travaillons souvent avec elles. Par exemple, il y a le Forum des fédérations. Nous travaillons avec lui à la promotion de modèles fédéralistes de gouvernance et de démocratie, comme nous travaillons avec CANADEM. Nous collaborons activement avec les organisations canadiennes, mais non, nous ne tenons pas de registre des Canadiens qui travaillent à l'étranger.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Laverdière, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

Mme Hélène Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Monsieur MacLennan, madame Whiting, je vous remercie d'être avec nous ce matin.

D'abord, j'aimerais faire un premier commentaire. Vous mentionniez le recul de la démocratie aux quatre coins du monde, mais ce n'est pas exclusif aux pays en développement. Pensons, par exemple, à la Pologne, à la Turquie et même à nos voisins au sud, pas très loin d'ici. Je reviens un peu sur le point qui a été abordé, c'est-à-dire que cela touche exclusivement les pays en développement et que, par conséquent, nos politiques auraient été un échec.

Peut-on dire aussi que c'est un recul généralisé et non particulier aux pays en développement?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

C'est une très bonne question pour les théoriciens. Je n'en suis pas un.

Il s'agit effectivement d'un phénomène qui, en ce moment, n'est pas uniquement répandu dans les pays en développement. En revanche, je crois qu'il y a une grande différence entre les démocraties qui sont bien établies et celles qui le sont moins, en ce qui a trait à leur capacité de résister aux changements. Dans certains pays en développement, là où la démocratie pas nécessairement enracinée très profondément, on voit que c'est plus difficile.

Il y a bien sûr des craintes et des inquiétudes concernant certains pays comme la Hongrie et la Pologne, dont on parle maintenant comme des démocraties non libérales, c'est-à-dire des pays où l'on veut continuer à tenir des élections et à respecter certains aspects de la démocratie, mais à en éliminer certains autres. On espère que ces démocraties sont assez bien ancrées pour résister à ce phénomène, mais cela reste à voir.

Mme Hélène Laverdière:

D'accord.

Vous avez aussi parlé de l'appui aux organismes de femmes sur le terrain, des organismes locaux. Je me souviens avoir vu il y a quelques années le chiffre suivant: 0,03 % de notre enveloppe consacrée au développement international allait aux organismes locaux de femmes.

Ce pourcentage est-il encore du même ordre ou y a-t-il eu une amélioration?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Il y a une amélioration assez importante. Le gouvernement a déjà annoncé la création du programme Voix et leadership des femmes. Il s'agit d'un programme de 150 millions de dollars sur cinq ans pour aider les organisations locales à soutenir les droits des femmes et l'égalité des genres.

L'an passé, Mme Bibeau, la ministre du Développement international, a annoncé la création d'un nouveau fonds pour l'égalité des genres, qui a aussi pour but de trouver des processus ou des façons d'acheminer plus d'argent aux organisations locales. C'est quand même une annonce de 300 millions de dollars canadiens, en partenariat avec le secteur privé.

(0910)

Mme Hélène Laverdière:

A-t-on une idée du montant total que représentent toutes ces annonces dans l'enveloppe globale?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je n'ai pas les chiffres avec moi, mais nous pourrons les trouver et vous les faire parvenir.

Mme Hélène Laverdière:

Ce serait apprécié.

J'aimerais maintenant revenir sur un aspect qui a déjà été abordé. Beaucoup d'institutions canadiennes travaillent dans le dossier du développement démocratique, notamment votre ministère, le Centre de recherches pour le développement international, le Centre parlementaire, le Conseil canadien pour la coopération internationale et le Forum des fédérations.

Je ne suis pas de ceux qui croient que, si on bâtissait une espèce de nouvelle superstructure qui rassemblait tout cela, on serait plus efficace. Je pense que l'approche diversifiée est préférable.

Y a-t-il des lacunes? Y a-t-il un aspect de l'enjeu qui n'est pas suffisamment couvert par toutes ces institutions?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

L'aide au développement démocratique diffère beaucoup des autres secteurs parce qu'elle met en jeu des aspects politiques. Dans le cadre de nos relations bilatérales, il est très facile pour un ministère d'offrir du soutien à un pays en développement, que ce soit pour mettre sur pied des bureaux de vérification ou pour lui fournir de l'aide à la formation de juges. Ce qui est beaucoup plus difficile, cependant, c'est d'offrir des choses hautement politiques, par exemple du soutien à des partis d'opposition et à des organisations. Cela a d'ailleurs été reconnu dans le rapport de 2007, je crois. C'est un autre chemin, quand il s'agit de toucher à des choses beaucoup plus politiques. Le fait d'offrir de l'aide politique peut même mettre en danger nos partenaires qui se trouvent dans les pays où il y a une résistance à ce type d'aide.

C'est un enjeu pour tous les pays donateurs. On se demande comment offrir des services de manière à ce que ce soit bien reçu. On se demande comment s'y prendre pour inciter un pays qui n'est peut-être pas dans la bonne voie en ce moment à faire les choses autrement. C'est là que cela devient plus difficile. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Sidhu, s'il vous plaît.

M. Jati Sidhu (Mission—Matsqui—Fraser Canyon, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous deux d'être devant le Comité ce matin.

Vous avez mentionné l'étude très approfondie réalisée en 2007, dont le rapport compte environ 224 pages et contient 28 recommandations. L'un des thèmes centraux du Comité était que le Canada devienne un grand acteur du développement démocratique. Vous avez souligné que dernièrement, il accorde une importance particulière à l'égalité des sexes et à la réalité des personnes LGBTQ.

Voici ma question: cette étude-ci nous permettra-t-elle vraiment de faire d'autres propositions au gouvernement, est-il encore opportun de vouloir lui indiquer l'orientation à prendre? Vous avez mentionné que nous avons mis assez d'argent de côté. Quel est le but de cette étude? Nous tiendrons quatre réunions avec des gens comme vous, qui viendront nous parler. Quelle sera la nouvelle recommandation qui s'ajoutera à celles de l'étude approfondie de 2007? Le Comité s'est déjà rendu dans divers pays du monde, aussi, donc cela a été fait. Que pouvons-nous ajouter? Nous reste-t-il de la place pour dire au gouvernement quoi faire?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

De la place? Je pense que l'étude réalisée en 2007 est très pertinente, et comme vous l'avez mentionné, elle est très approfondie et demeure très utile. Je pense que vous pouvez encore nous donner des conseils utiles parce que vous comprenez bien mieux aujourd'hui comment la situation a changé depuis. Je sais que vous allez entendre des témoignages d'acteurs de ce domaine et d'autres, qui vous aideront sûrement beaucoup à comprendre que les recommandations faites par le Comité à l'époque étaient parfaitement logiques à ce moment-là. S'agit-il toujours des bonnes recommandations à suivre dans le contexte actuel? Y a-t-il lieu d'augmenter ou de diminuer notre financement en la matière? Est-ce vraiment la meilleure façon pour le Canada d'exercer son influence?

Ce genre de conseil est toujours le bienvenu dans un ministère.

(0915)

M. Jati Sidhu:

Le monde change, et comme vous l'avez dit, même en 2007, le Comité estimait qu'il serait très difficile d'évaluer l'efficacité du développement. Pouvez-vous décrire des projets où le gouvernement canadien s'en est particulièrement bien tiré à cet égard?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je peux vous donner une idée de ce que nous faisons, mais vous mettez le doigt sur l'un des éléments les plus difficiles.

Les projets où il est le plus facile de mesurer les résultats sont ceux... Si l'on compare un projet de nature exclusivement développementale — par exemple, un projet visant à appuyer la fonction de vérification, à habiliter un bureau de vérification à mener des audits — avec un projet visant à ouvrir l'espace politique grâce à une intervention auprès des dissidents, un travail très politique, il sera beaucoup plus facile de mesurer les résultats à court terme du projet de développement. Nous avons ouvert un bureau. Nous avons contribué à former des gens compétents. Nous avons veillé à ce qu'ils aient tous les outils nécessaires pour pouvoir mener des audits dans un ministère donné.

Quand on appuie des dissidents, à l'autre bout du spectre, il est difficile ne serait-ce que de déterminer quelles sont les mesures appropriées. On peut les aider à mieux comprendre comment utiliser les médias sociaux ou leur présenter les options qui s'offrent à eux, que d'autres ont utilisées pour ouvrir l'espace politique dans d'autres pays non démocratiques, mais les résultats n'en seront pas visibles en un an. C'est peut-être plus de 10 ans plus tard qu'on en verra les résultats, donc cela prend du temps.

Notre aptitude à mesurer ce genre de chose est très limitée, d'où l'importance de votre question précédente, selon moi. Des études récentes montrent que la volonté d'obtenir des résultats mesurables a fait beaucoup augmenter les dépenses en développement au détriment des dépenses dans ce type d'intervention. C'est ce qu'on appelle de l'aide démocratique structurée ou non.

Si vous nous forcez à nous consacrer à des projets strictement de développement, vous obtiendrez des résultats plus faciles à expliquer, mais il semble y avoir une tendance actuellement — et c'est vrai partout dans le domaine — à se désinvestir des enjeux les plus hautement politiques, pour lesquels il est plus difficile d'obtenir des résultats tangibles.

M. Jati Sidhu:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à M. Wrzesnewskyj.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur MacLennan, vous avez commencé votre exposé en parlant du recul de la démocratie, puis vous vous êtes expliqué un peu en disant que nous étions toujours dans l'euphorie de la troisième vague de démocratisation qui a suivi l'effondrement de l'Union soviétique du Pacte de Varsovie, mais que si nous analysions la situation plus attentivement, nous pourrions nous rendre compte du fait que la démocratie et son avancement étaient déjà attaqués à ce moment-là. Nous sommes toujours à cette époque, nous avons toujours l'arrogance de croire que c'est la fin de l'histoire, comme beaucoup de professeurs le disent en Occident.

Ne seriez-vous pas d'accord pour dire que l'un des premiers signaux très clairs, en Occident, que la démocratie et cette forme de gouvernance étaient attaquées a été la révolution orange de 2004? Quelque 50 millions de personnes se sont révoltées dans un pays parce qu'elles voyaient leurs aspirations démocratiques torpillées de façon très méthodique par ceux qui souhaitaient mettre en place un autre modèle de développement, de progrès économique, un régime autocratique. Si nous avions analysé la chose plus attentivement, nous aurions vu que quelque chose prenait forme à ce moment-là.

Seriez-vous d'accord avec cette prémisse?

(0920)

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Ce n'est pas faux. J'irais même un peu plus loin.

Dans The End of History?, Francis Fukuyama décrit cette période sous un angle très intéressant et il a plutôt raison sur la fin de l'histoire: il n'y avait pas d'autre option que de se donner au moins l'apparence d'une démocratie.

Je pense qu'il y a deux choses qui se sont passées après la chute de l'Union soviétique. D'abord, nous avons sous-estimé l'importance du nationalisme et le fait que le nationalisme est un élément de base de la façon dont les démocraties se voient et de la souveraineté populaire. Nous ne voyions pas cet aspect important pourtant manifeste de la démocratie; c'est ce qui explique ce qui s'est passé en Yougoslavie au début des années 1990.

Ensuite, je pense que nous n'étions pas vraiment prêts à voir des pays prendre l'apparence d'une démocratie, pour ensuite pervertir certains éléments de base de la démocratie et de la compréhension que nous en avions d'une façon que nous n'avions pas prévue. Certes, il y avait toujours des élections et des parlements dans ces pays, mais ils ne respectaient pas la primauté du droit et fermaient les espaces démocratiques.

Aujourd'hui, à l'ère des médias sociaux, qui sont l'un des facteurs déterminants de notre époque, c'est encore plus exacerbé, et il est encore plus facile de pervertir tous les jours les espaces démocratiques si essentiels pour exiger une reddition de comptes des parlementaires.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Vous avez affirmé une autre chose à laquelle j'aimerais revenir, c'est-à-dire que le financement de la promotion de la démocratie est modeste, en fait. Compte tenu des moyens modestes à notre disposition et du caractère unique du Canada — et le mot « unique » est surutilisé, souvent mal, d'ailleurs... Le Canada est unique. Nous sommes un pays multiculturel. Nous ne sommes pas un creuset. Il y a d'autres pays aussi qui ont été construits grâce à l'immigration.

Compte tenu de la taille de notre population, les Canadiens, plus que la plupart des autres, font un travail incroyable dans le monde.

J'aimerais toutefois revenir à 2004, parce que nous avons alors fait une chose qu'aucun autre pays n'avait faite avant. À l'époque, nous avons déployé directement 500 Canadiens, dûment sélectionnés pour leur neutralité quant aux processus électoraux en Ukraine. Nous avons ainsi réussi à voir des choses que les missions d'observation ordinaires... Ce n'était pas qu'une question de nombre. Nous n'avons pas eu besoin d'interprètes. Avec nos ressources modestes, nous avons réussi à accomplir énormément de travail et à comprendre la culture. Les Canadiens savaient ce qu'ils cherchaient, ils savaient lire les gens. Bien souvent, dans ce genre de pays, les interprètes et les chauffeurs travaillent en fait pour des forces qui ne sont peut-être pas toujours des amies de la démocratie.

Je le mentionne parce que... Après cette grande mission d'observation, avons-nous évalué si notre travail était un succès ou un échec? Seriez-vous prêt à vous engager à transmettre cette évaluation au Comité?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je ne saurais vous dire s'il y a eu une évaluation après les événements de 2004, mais je peux vous garantir que nous vérifierons. S'il y en a eu une, nous vous la soumettrons.

J'aimerais seulement mentionner que je suis d'accord avec vous. Il y a effectivement un modèle canadien. Nous faisons tous partie de ce modèle et nous en sommes tous le produit. Je peux vous dire que quand nous interagissons avec nos partenaires des pays en développement, beaucoup d'aspects du modèle canadien suscitent leur intérêt. Le fédéralisme en est un. Il ne faut pas sous-estimer l'importance du fédéralisme dans la gestion des conflits nationaux, des conflits avec les minorités religieuses ou parfois juste des grandes divergences d'une région à une autre.

Il y a beaucoup d'endroits où les gens réclament une voix canadienne, pour diverses raisons. Nous ne sommes pas un pays impérialiste; nous n'avons jamais eu d'empire. Cela semble un peu cliché, mais la vérité, c'est que nous l'entendons constamment de la bouche de nos partenaires.

(0925)

Le président:

Merci.

Votre temps est écoulé.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

J'aimerais pouvoir poser une dernière question, rapidement. En quelle année le Corps canadien a-t-il été démantelé et pour quelles raisons?

Mme Hélène Laverdière:

Je suis désolée, monsieur le président. Il devra attendre le prochain tour.

Le président:

C'est bon.

Monsieur Ziad Aboultaif, allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Ziad Aboultaif (Edmonton Manning, PCC):

Bonjour. Je vous remercie d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Nous savons que la démocratie ne s'enseigne pas, qu'elle se vit. Il faut tellement de sacrifices et d'années de développement pour qu'une société en arrive à l'adopter. Nous savons aussi que seulement quatre pour cent et demi de la population mondiale, environ, vit dans une pleine démocratie, alors que les 95 % qui restent ont vraiment du mal à y arriver. Nous semblons assister à un retour des anciens régimes de certains empires très puissants pour imposer leurs moeurs et coutumes.

À part cela, nous avons les plans, l'argent et le savoir-faire nécessaires pour faire la promotion de nos démocraties, mais dans de grandes parties du monde, presque partout, nous assistons à un retour de ce que je n'appellerai pas l'ennemi, mais d'une autre opinion, affirmée avec plus de vigueur que jamais. Nous avons l'argent et le pouvoir, mais il y a ici deux batailles à mener et non une seule.

Cela me fait penser aux ODD de l'ONU. Il y a environ quatre ou cinq éléments du seizième objectif qui concernent particulièrement le Canada, soit les numéros 16.3, 16.5, 16.7 et 16.8. Voici ma question: compte tenu de toutes les mesures que nous prenons, de tout ce que nous essayons d'améliorer et des millions de dollars dont nous privons notre propre société pour venir en aide aux autres démocraties ou pays du monde, comment votre ministère arrive-t-il à mesurer l'efficacité de ce que nous faisons? Il faut rendre des comptes aux Canadiens et leur dire comment nous dépensons cet argent, puisqu'il s'agit de centaines de millions de dollars. Jusqu'à maintenant, nous n'avons pas vraiment de réponse ou pas assez pour leur expliquer l'efficacité de nos actions. À quel point peut-on dire que nous avons réussi une percée en Indonésie, au Kenya, en RDC, dans la région des Amériques ou ailleurs?

Concernant ces mesures, il est très important que notre comité sache comment votre ministère arrive à attester de son succès ou à nous dire à quel point nous progressons.

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Pour chaque projet, il y a une série d'indicateurs et de résultats escomptés. En ce moment, nous menons un projet d'aide aux processus électoraux en Indonésie parce qu'il y a des élections qui s'en viennent là-bas. L'objectif est d'aider l'Indonésie non seulement à gérer ses élections, mais aussi à éviter la violence et à faire augmenter le taux de participation.

Il y aura des indicateurs de base associés à ce projet, qui seront conformes au cadre des résultats du ministère. Il y aura ensuite un rapport public déposé au Parlement sur ce que nous avons accompli. Évidemment, il comprendra une synthèse de ce qu'on trouve dans le cadre des résultats du ministère et portera non seulement sur ce projet, mais sur tous nos autres projets d'aide à la démocratie.

M. Ziad Aboultaif:

Au sujet des documents officiels, il est bon d'avoir des mécanismes en place pour suivre nos progrès et d'avoir des paramètres de base, au moins, pour évaluer ce que nous pourrons faire ensuite.

Or, comme vous le savez, les gouvernements passent, mais les ministères restent. Quand un ministère n’a-t-il jamais avoué un échec? Quand a-t-on vu écrit dans un rapport: « Nous avons raté notre coup. Ce n'est pas bon. Cela ne répond pas aux attentes, donc voyons si nous pouvons éliminer ce programme, en recommander l'élimination, le modifier ou au moins changer notre façon d'évaluer ce que nous voulons faire à partir de maintenant. »

Les dirigeants d'un ministère diront-ils jamais « c'est le temps d'oublier cela et d'essayer autre chose »?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je pense qu'on peut le déduire des mesures précises auxquelles les gouvernements décident d'accorder la priorité et de la façon dont ils dépensent leur budget d'aide au développement. L'un des principaux besoins que le gouvernement actuel a relevés concerne la santé reproductive sexuelle et les droits qui y sont associés, où il y avait des manques énormes. Il juge ces questions fondamentales pour améliorer la situation des femmes dans les pays en développement et leur permettre de participer non seulement à la vie économique, mais aussi à la vie politique et pour promouvoir la démocratie.

C'est l'un des enjeux sur lesquels le gouvernement a vu un manque clair et un besoin de financement accru. C'est une façon de dire que nous devons mettre plus l'accent là-dessus que nous ne l'avons fait par le passé.

(0930)

M. Ziad Aboultaif:

Les priorités qu'a fixées ce gouvernement se fondent-elles sur les recommandations du ministère ou viennent-elles de ses propres positions sur ce qui sera le plus efficace?

Pouvez-vous nous éclairer à ce sujet?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

C'est toujours la même chose. La fonction publique prodigue les meilleurs conseils possible au gouvernement. Celui-ci voit ensuite comment ils s'intègrent à sa plateforme et à ses choix. Ce sont donc les deux éléments qui orientent la décision d'un gouvernement.

M. Ziad Aboultaif:

Pour conclure, vous faites des recommandations, puis vous attendez que les politiciens prennent une décision, c'est bien cela?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Nous prodiguons des conseils au niveau politique.

M. Ziad Aboultaif:

Il revient ensuite aux politiciens de prendre des décisions.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci infiniment.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Graham, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Nous avons entendu les députés de l'autre côté s'inquiéter de ce qu'on peut appeler le rendement de nos investissements.

Avons-nous le moyen d'évaluer ce que dépensent nos adversaires pour miner la démocratie?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

C'est une très bonne question.

Je pense qu'en gros, la réponse est non. C'est très difficile à savoir. C'est évidemment une chose qui évolue chaque année, parallèlement à la technologie et aux enjeux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvons-nous observer des tendances qui montreraient qu'ils investissent plus là-dedans qu'ils ne le faisaient il y a 20 ans?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je ne le sais pas. Je présume que oui, mais je ne le sais pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous n'avons aucune façon de le quantifier.

Quand nous parlons de nos investissements, nous n'avons aucun moyen de les comparer aux dépenses de nos adversaires. Nous ne pouvons pas les comparer.

M. Christopher MacLennan:

C'est juste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quels sont les risques que nous devenions isolés et que nous ne dépensions pas assez en sensibilisation?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je pense que le risque pour le Canada, c'est évidemment que nous sommes pleinement conscients du fait qu'il y a des acteurs dans le monde qui cherchent activement à nuire aux processus démocratiques, y compris dans notre propre pays. Nous l'avions vu dans les nouvelles ces dernières semaines. C'est une préoccupation pour les Canadiens comme pour bien d'autres.

Le mécanisme de réponse rapide du G7 est probablement le meilleur exemple du fait que tous les pays du G7 prennent cette question très au sérieux et cherchent à contrer l'offensive le mieux possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si, par exemple, la République populaire démocratique de la Corée annonçait qu'elle compte investir dans la démocratie au Canada, comment réagirions-nous?

Autrement dit...

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Surpris serait probablement le mot...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Elle se targue pourtant d'être une république démocratique.

Comment définissons-nous la démocratie quand nous en faisons la promotion ou aux fins de cette étude?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Aux fins de cette étude, il n'y a évidemment pas une seule définition de la démocratie. Pour nous, elle comprend un certain nombre d'éléments de base.

La démocratie est une forme de souveraineté du peuple, qui se fonde sur une compréhension large de la citoyenneté. Il y a une base constitutionnelle. Il y a aussi la primauté du droit qui détermine comment les choses se passent et comment les processus démocratiques s'articulent. La démocratie comprend aussi une presse ouverte et libre, de même que des mécanismes de reddition de comptes ouverts et libres pour que les gouvernements soient tenus responsables de leurs actions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

J'ai une note, ici, qui indique que nous consacrons 12 millions de dollars à la Fondation internationale pour les systèmes électoraux, 8,2 millions à la Fondation internationale pour les systèmes électoraux et 5,7 millions à des projets du National Democratic Institute. Ce sont tous des organismes américains.

Existe-t-il des organismes équivalents au Canada ou sont-ils tous centralisés de cette façon?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Ils ne sont pas centralisés. Le Canada compte des organismes également. Il y a le Forum des fédérations et CANADEM, qui fait de l'observation électorale. En fait, la liste des organismes canadiens est longue, en particulier dans le domaine de la justice et son renforcement. Un organisme de la Colombie-Britannique est responsable...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais céder le temps qu'il me reste à M. Wrzesnewskyj.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

J'aimerais revenir sur la question des modèles de rechange offerts dans d'autres pays, des modèles de gouvernance différents. Nous voyons que les Chinois sont très actifs. Ils ont augmenté leurs activités. Ils ont un programme de développement dans bon nombre de pays qui sont dans une période de changements importants.

Faisons-nous un suivi de quelque manière...? Cela nous ramène à la question de M. Graham. Surveillons-nous ces autres acteurs, qu'il s'agisse de la Chine ou de la Russie, c'est-à-dire leur façon d'intervenir et ce qui en résulte quant au progrès ou au recul de la démocratie? Suivons-nous cela?

(0935)

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je ne sais pas si je dirais que nous le faisons, car parfois, c'est très intangible. Il ne s'agit pas toujours d'un lien direct entre les actions et les pays dans lesquels elles sont menées.

Nous sommes bien conscients... et cela nous ramène à ce qu'on disait dans les années 1990 et aux notions de la fin de l'histoire. Depuis essentiellement les années 1990, ou peut-être depuis 2001, lorsqu'elle est devenue membre de l'OMC, la Chine fournit un modèle de rechange à de nombreux pays en développement pour réduire la pauvreté et créer de la croissance économique. Bon nombre de pays en développement considèrent que ce modèle les aidera non seulement à réduire la pauvreté, mais aussi à garder le contrôle dans leur société.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Récemment, l'ambassadeur chinois au Canada a écrit une lettre d'opinion dans laquelle il a utilisé une phraséologie que nous commençons à voir apparaître dans d'autres pays en développement: « égotisme occidental » et « suprématie blanche ». On parle presque ici de mots-codes. « Égotisme occidental » signifie qu'on part du principe que les droits démocratiques et les droits de la personne sont innés, et « suprématie blanche » signifie que l'ordre international fondé sur des règles que nous avons créé après la Seconde Guerre mondiale était en réalité un système de suprématie blanche.

Voulez-vous nous donner votre point de vue là-dessus?

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Dans le domaine de l'aide démocratique, nous sommes bien conscients du fait que chaque endroit où nous travaillons a sa propre culture et sa propre approche de gouvernance, ce qu'il faut respecter. Il n'y a pas qu'une seule façon de bâtir une démocratie. Notre démocratie est bien différente de celle de nos voisins du Sud.

Peu importe le pays dans lequel nous travaillons, nous comprendrons toujours qu'il y a des principes et des éléments centraux à notre conception de la démocratie, et nous croyons qu'ils sont universels. Nous ne sommes pas d'avis que la démocratie n'existe que pour les Occidentaux. Nous pensons qu'en fait, il y a des façons d'adapter les principes démocratiques de base aux cultures locales dans lesquelles nous travaillons. Il existe des points de vue différents dans le monde, et c'est exactement ce que nous essayons de contrer.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons conclure avec une brève question de la députée Laverdière. [Français]

Mme Hélène Laverdière:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question sera brève. Que se passe-t-il au sujet de CANADEM? Je pense que la nature de la relation entre le gouvernement et CANADEM a changé. J'aimerais que vous nous en parliez et que vous nous communiquiez les raisons de ce changement.

M. Christopher MacLennan:

Je suis désolé, mais je n'ai pas nécessairement de réponse à votre question. Je ne suis pas sûr de bien comprendre.

Mme Hélène Laverdière:

D'accord, je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je vous remercie tous les deux d'avoir comparu devant nous ce matin et d'avoir lancé notre étude avec des discussions fort intéressantes.

Chers collègues, je vais suspendre la séance pour quelques minutes afin que nous accueillions nos prochains témoins qui comparaîtront par vidéoconférence.

(0935)

(0940)

Le président:

Nous sommes très heureux d'accueillir deux témoins qui comparaissent par vidéoconférence de Washington, D.C.

Nous accueillons M. Derek Mitchell, président du National Democratic Institute. Il est devenu président de cet organisme en 2018. Il a été ambassadeur des États-Unis au Myanmar, de 2012 à 2016. Auparavant, et il a exercé les fonctions de secrétaire adjoint principal à la Défense de 2001 à 2009 et de chercheur principal sur l'Asie au Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Nous accueillons également M. Daniel Twining, président de l'International Republican Institute. Il a été nommé à la présidence de cet organisme en septembre 2017, après avoir été conseiller et directeur du programme de l'Asie du German Marshall Fund des États-Unis. Auparavant, il a fait partie de l’équipe de la planification des politiques du secrétaire d’État des États-Unis et a été conseiller à la politique étrangère auprès du sénateur américain John McCain. M. Twining est titulaire d’un doctorat en philosophie de l’Université d’Oxford, où il était boursier Fulbright/Oxford.

Bienvenue, messieurs.

Monsieur Mitchell, puisque vous comparaissez par vidéoconférence, vous serez le premier. J'ajouterais que vous avez probablement évité d'affronter du temps très froid qu'on prévoie plus tard aujourd'hui, et c'était probablement une sage décision de votre part de vous rendre là où êtes aujourd'hui. Je vous invite à commencer votre déclaration préliminaire de 10 minutes. Nous entendrons celle de M. Twining par la suite, et je suis sûr que les membres du Comité auront beaucoup de questions à vous poser.

Veuillez commencer s'il vous plaît, monsieur.

M. Derek Mitchell (président, National Democratic Institute):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Il y a un dégel en quelque sorte ici, à Washington, et c'est bien de sortir du vortex polaire pendant quelques jours.

Je suis désolé de ne pas pouvoir être des vôtres ce matin, mais je suis très heureux d'avoir l'occasion de vous parler de ce sujet.

Je veux tout d'abord expliquer brièvement le contexte historique. Je considère que nos efforts de soutien à la démocratie comportent trois phases. Bon nombre d'entre vous savent qu'aux États-Unis, le National Democratic Institute, l'International Republican Institute et le National Endowment for Democracy ont tous été créés sous le gouvernement Reagan durant un discours que le président a prononcé au Parlement de Westminster en 1982. C'était la première phase du soutien à la démocratie. C'était à l'époque du communisme, pendant la guerre froide, et il y avait une forte orientation idéologique, mais tout ce domaine du soutien à la démocratie n'avait vraiment pas été défini de façon précise. Nos instituts font partie des acteurs qui ont vraiment essayé de le faire il y a 35 ans.

La deuxième phase est arrivée avec la fin de la guerre froide, comme on l'a mentionné précédemment, la phase de la fin de l'histoire, moment où, semblait-il, la vague était imminente et, d'un point de vue historique, le triomphe de la démocratie était inévitable. Nous estimions qu'il s'agissait simplement de travailler à l'aide de processus et d'institutions démocratiques et avec des gens de partout dans le monde et de laisser cela mijoter pendant une ou deux générations, et les choses se produiraient naturellement. Ce caractère inévitable faisait partie intégrante de notre programme. Nous croyions que l'expansion de la démocratie, que la troisième vague de démocratisation, était en train de prendre son envol très facilement pour 15 ou 20 ans.

Je crois que nous en sommes maintenant à une époque complètement différente, à un moment où l'on assiste à la vengeance des autocrates. Ceux qui ont une conception différente de la façon dont leur société devrait fonctionner, et les pays autoritaires qui voyaient l'expansion de la démocratie comme un problème pour eux et comme une menace en quelque sorte à leur existence, ont trouvé un moyen d'apprendre et de résister. Ils ont profité de la grogne populaire; on s'attendait fortement à ce que peut-être la démocratie... Dans certaines sociétés, on a cru qu'avec la démocratisation, ce serait facile. On deviendrait riches et puissants comme les pays occidentaux.

Il était évident que les choses ne seraient pas aussi simples; ce ne serait pas aussi facile ou rapide. Les inégalités économiques sont apparues. Il y a la corruption. Nous avons constaté que les mentalités changeaient plus lentement que les institutions et les processus. Il y a des gens aux vieilles mentalités qui prenaient les commandes, qui utilisaient les processus et peut-être créaient certaines des institutions, sans nécessairement favoriser l'enracinement de la mentalité démocratique en développement. Il y avait des environnements corrompus qui ont excédé des gens, qui les ont associés à la démocratie.

Il y avait également des démagogues qui jouaient la carte de la peur, ce qui peut se produire dans n'importe quel pays, n'importe quelle démocratie. Nous constatons que dans bien des pays, au chapitre de la politique identitaire et de l'immigration, l'accent est mis sur l'autre. L'impression générale que la démocratie ne livre pas la marchandise est devenue un enjeu décisif pour bon nombre de démocraties, même celles que nous croyions inébranlables, même nos propres démocraties. Cela créait de vives réactions, un recul.

Un autre phénomène qui était imprévisible dans tout cela, c'est l'essor des technologies numériques, de la Silicon Valley et des plateformes de médias sociaux qui ont été utilisées par ceux qui voulaient miner l'unité et la démocratie; fournir des plateformes favorisant la haine et la division; et créer de l'incertitude et jouer avec les tribunes démocratiques. Les gens ont tardé à se rendre compte à quel point cela peut nuire à la démocratie.

Nous avons appris beaucoup de leçons. Nos différents organismes les ont apprises, et j'ai déjà mentionné bon nombre d'entre elles: il n'est pas facile de créer une culture démocratique; il faut du temps et c'est aussi important que les institutions et les processus; nous devons créer une culture, et la culture et les mentalités changent beaucoup plus lentement; nous devons être patients et travailler fort à cet égard; la démocratie doit livrer la marchandise; et les inégalités économiques, la corruption, la peur et l'insécurité nuisent à la démocratie.

(0945)



Nous devons être vigilants sur ce plan. Comme Madeleine Albright se plaît à le dire, les gens aiment voter, mais ils aiment aussi manger, et je pense qu'ils ont besoin de sentir que le gouvernement travaille pour eux.

Je crois que ce que nous avons fait, toutefois, c'est offrir de la résilience que des réseaux internationaux comme le National Democratic Institute, l'International Republican Institute et d'autres ont développée. Ils fonctionnent, en fait, et nous voyons de la résistance dans bon nombre de pays avec les attentes envers le processus démocratique. Même si la démocratie connaît un recul, en fait, l'attente quant à un processus démocratique existe et il y a des réseaux résilients que nous pouvons utiliser.

Nous devons travailler à la technologie. Nous ne comprenons pas vite que les répercussions de la technologie constituent une leçon.

Il nous faut également tenir compte du caractère inclusif. La démocratie et les sociétés démocratiques doivent être complètement inclusives. Comme le dit la secrétaire Albright, notre présidente, on ne peut bâtir la démocratie sans les femmes. Nous avons constaté à maintes reprises que lorsque des femmes s'engagent en politique, la démocratie est plus résiliente, le développement est plus durable, le compromis est plus probable et les processus de paix sont plus durables. De plus, tous les groupes de la société doivent faire partie de la démocratie — jeunes, minorités ethniques et religieuses, personnes LGBTI et personnes handicapées.

Sans ce caractère inclusif, il manque les fondements de la démocratie, et je dois dire — et j'espère que cela n'a pas un caractère partisan — qu'aux États-Unis, la démocratie l'emportera, à mon avis. Les femmes, les personnes de couleur et d'autres qui luttent pour la démocratie aux États-Unis sont en train de nous sauver. Je crois qu'il s'agit de notre atout et que d'autres pays pourront en tirer des leçons. Nous devons axer nos efforts là-dessus.

Je pense que nous sommes dans une période cruciale. Il s'agit d'un moment critique. À mon avis, c'est en fait l'enjeu déterminant de notre époque. Quand on pense à la sécurité nationale et au bien-être national, quelles sont les valeurs, les normes et les règles fondamentales du système international au XXIe siècle? Comment les définirons-nous?

On a dit durant la première partie de la réunion que la Chine parle de suprémacistes blancs ou d'égotisme occidental. En fait, ce que nous avions créé au siècle précédent avait fonctionné pour tout le monde. Cela avait en fait lié les mains de l'Occident pour favoriser la croissance de chacun. Nous avons assisté à un développement remarquable dans le monde au cours des 50 dernières années, même en Chine et dans d'autres nations sous-développées.

Cela fonctionne. La démocratie fonctionne. La liberté fonctionne. Or, maintenant, le système et les règles, les valeurs et les normes font face à des défis qui, je crois, auront des répercussions sur notre propre sécurité et celle d'autres, ainsi que sur la dignité humaine, pour dire franchement. Quand je parle de certains des obstacles que nous avons vus ces dernières années, concernant les autocrates, je dois dire que depuis plusieurs années, les États-Unis manquent à l'appel. Il y a un manque de leadership. Or, en fait, tous les pays doivent participer.

Cela ne concerne pas simplement l'Occident, et certainement pas uniquement les États-Unis. Nous avons besoin du Canada. Il a joué un rôle très important et exemplaire ces dernières semaines concernant ce qui se passe au Venezuela. Il ne s'agit pas d'une mission des États-Unis. Le National Democratic Institute est un organisme américain, mais nous avons des réseaux de personnes partout dans le monde, et nous représentons quelque chose qui fonctionne pour des gens dans le monde entier.

J'encourage donc très fortement le Canada et d'autres pays à participer. Nous essayons d'inciter le Japon à le faire, et tout autre pays qui défend ces valeurs, ces normes et ces règles, et d'autres essayeront de les façonner à leur image.

Très brièvement, je ne veux pas prendre encore beaucoup de temps, car je veux entendre l'exposé de Dan et vous nous poserez des questions, mais quant à mes recommandations sur le point de vue que vous devriez adopter, je crois qu'il y a des choses auxquelles vous réfléchissez déjà au Canada, comme en ce qui concerne les femmes. Vous avez adopté une politique étrangère féministe. Je pense que c'est formidable. C'est stratégique et il ne s'agit pas seulement d'une bonne chose, mais de quelque chose de stratégique pour nous tous et notre sécurité. Je crois que vous êtes bien placés pour être des chefs de file.

Ensuite, les partis politiques ont besoin d'aide. Je pense que vous avez de très bons partis politiques et militants qui peuvent faire connaître des compétences et des stratégies.

Par ailleurs, il y a la poussée démographique chez les jeunes. Les jeunes de moins de 30 ans constituent un groupe majoritaire dans bon nombre des pays: en Europe de l'Est — ça bouge —, en Afrique assurément, en Amérique latine, au Moyen-Orient, en Afrique du Nord et en Asie. C'est une force essentielle dans laquelle il faut investir à long terme. Lorsqu'il s'agit de la démocratie, on ne parle pas du court terme, mais bien du long terme. En outre, ils sont plus vulnérables à la radicalisation et à l'extrémisme, de sorte qu'ils ne représentent pas que des possibilités, mais aussi un défi, si nous ne faisons rien à cet égard.

(0950)



Par l'entremise du Citizen Lab de l'École Munk des affaires internationales et des politiques publiques, le Canada a une excellente capacité interne en matière de programmes de technologies. Notre organisme a travaillé avec votre Citizen Lab. Les programmes de technologie sont très importants.

Vous assumez déjà un rôle de chef de file dans l'éducation à la citoyenneté et l'éducation civique. Si vous voulez un exemple précis, je pense que vous avez accompli quelque chose d'exceptionnel et d'exemplaire en Amérique latine avec le Groupe de Lima.

En ce qui concerne l'aide économique, vous faites partie du PTP et de l'AECG, et vous êtes également bien placés pour veiller à ce que la démocratie tienne ses promesses, que les accords commerciaux et d'autres accords sont avantageux, que nous collaborions pour bâtir un ensemble de règles et de normes communes, et que tout cela soit mis en oeuvre, de façon équitable, au sein des populations et des régions marginalisées. Ce sont toutes des choses extrêmement importantes pour l'avenir. Je crois que vous êtes dans une position très avantageuse.

Si nous subissons actuellement une récession démocratique, nous devons stimuler le processus démocratique. C'est le moment, pour nous tous, de réinvestir, de renouveler nos engagements et de ne pas abandonner, mais plutôt de poursuivre les efforts.

Merci, monsieur le président. J'espère que je n'ai pas pris trop de temps.

(0955)

Le président:

Non, c'était très bien. Merci beaucoup, monsieur Mitchell.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Twining.

M. Daniel Twining (président, International Republican Institute):

Merci, monsieur le président. J'aimerais également remercier les membres du Comité. Je suis très heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Vous pouvez comprendre pourquoi Derek Mitchell est un excellent collègue pour les intervenants de l'IRI. En effet, les équipes du NDI et de l'IRI collaborent étroitement et malgré les jugements que vous pourriez formuler sur la politique américaine, notre éthique bipartisane fonctionne dans l'espace démocratique.

J'aimerais d'abord vous remercier de l'excellent leadership exercé par le Canada. Qu'il s'agisse du Venezuela, de l'Ukraine, de l'autonomisation des femmes ou d'un grand nombre d'autres enjeux, le Canada continue de faire valoir ses principes à l'égard de ces enjeux. Nous sommes très reconnaissants, car en ce moment, l'Occident — et l'ensemble de la communauté des démocraties — subit une grande pression de l'extérieur et de l'intérieur. Je ferais valoir que notre mode de vie démocratique, c'est-à-dire la façon dont vivent les Canadiens et les Américains, est menacé par un monde dans lequel les régimes autoritaires avancent constamment et adoptent une position offensive. La discussion que vous menez sur la modernisation de l'aide à la démocratie dans le nouveau monde esquissé par Derek a une valeur stratégique.

Permettez-moi d'établir très brièvement le contexte en vous décrivant, en quatre brefs points, les changements qui se sont produits depuis que votre comité s'est penché sérieusement sur l'aide à la démocratie, il y a plus de 10 ans.

Tout d'abord, il y a la réapparition de la rivalité entre de grandes puissances, un phénomène bien réel. Je n'ai pas besoin de vous le dire, mais la Russie et la Chine, de différentes façons, projettent une influence autoritaire. Ces pays tentent de bâtir un monde plus sûr pour les formes autoritaires de gouvernement et pour leur leadership, dont certains éléments sont très hostiles aux intérêts occidentaux et à notre mode de vie. La situation a donc beaucoup changé comparativement à 2007. Il y a par exemple la campagne de désinformation menée par la Russie contre les sociétés ouvertes, notamment les États-Unis, le Canada et nos alliés européens. Il y a également la corruption et d'autres formes d'influence malveillante associées à l'initiative « une ceinture, une route » de la Chine et d'autres formes d'engagement mondial, qui ne sont pas toutes insidieuses, mais dont certaines minent nos alliances et nos sociétés ouvertes.

Deuxièmement, nous vivons dans un monde de réfugiés. Je suis désolé de vous le dire, mais vous le savez. Il y a plus de réfugiés dans le monde aujourd'hui qu'à tout autre moment depuis 1945. Cela vaut la peine d'y réfléchir. Plus qu'à tout autre moment depuis la fin de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, des personnes sont déplacées par les conflits qui sévissent dans le monde dans lequel nous vivons. Honnêtement, c'est un échec, et nous savons pourquoi ces gens tentent de fuir. En effet, ils tentent de fuir des sociétés déchirées par les conflits qui ne sont pas régies par des lois et des institutions. Ils sont poussés par le désespoir. Les migrants qui viennent d'Amérique centrale, par exemple, tentent d'échapper aux sociétés de gangsters où eux-mêmes et leurs familles ne sont pas en sécurité. Face à cette situation, nous devons tous nous engager à un niveau plus élevé.

Troisièmement — et Derek l'a exprimé très clairement —, la révolution numérique a accompli de grandes choses, mais elle a aussi aidé et intensifié les voix extrêmes dans nos sociétés, et créé de nouvelles formes de fragmentation. C'est un problème auquel nous devons nous attaquer, car il a une incidence fondamentale sur notre ordre démocratique.

Quatrièmement, il y a l'affaiblissement de l'ordre démocratique par des dirigeants autoritaires qui préservent certaines formes de démocratie, mais qui utilisent leur position pour concentrer le pouvoir exécutif au détriment d'autres institutions, par exemple les parlements, les médias libres, les sociétés civiles actives et la concurrence politique.

Je viens de vous fournir une évaluation rapide. Que devons-nous faire? Je répondrai très brièvement avec cinq idées qui ne forment pas une liste exhaustive.

Tout d'abord, nous devons nous rendre compte que nous vivons dans un monde dans lequel la classe moyenne est en plein essor. Quand on pense à l'aide au développement dans son ensemble, je dirais qu'il y a 10, 20, 30 ou 40 ans, il était approprié de mettre complètement l'accent sur l'élimination de la pauvreté. Toutefois, de nos jours, compte tenu de la réalité avec laquelle nous travaillons dans le cadre de la montée fulgurante de la classe moyenne partout dans le monde, je dirais que l'aide au développement devra se concentrer sur la démocratie, les droits, la gouvernance, la transparence, la responsabilité et la lutte contre la corruption. Nous devrions veiller à aider les gouvernements à respecter leurs engagements envers leurs citoyens, afin que nous n'ayons pas à continuer d'aider les personnes désespérées — les migrants et les réfugiés — et que nous n'ayons pas à remplacer les gouvernements qui ne respectent pas leurs engagements fondamentaux envers leurs citoyens.

Je ferais valoir que l'aide à la démocratie devrait en fait l'emporter sur d'autres formes d'aide, car ces dernières ne sont pas très efficaces lorsqu'un dirigeant autoritaire et kleptocratique est au pouvoir ou qu'un État est en déroute.

Deuxièmement, le Canada, l'Amérique et l'Occident doivent réellement adopter une mission qui vise à aider leurs partenaires mondiaux à renforcer leur résilience politique non seulement en vue de devenir des démocraties efficaces, mais aussi pour éviter de succomber aux formes d'influence insidieuses d'acteurs autoritaires, dont la Chine et la Russie.

(1000)



Nous voyageons tous beaucoup. Je ne suis jamais allé dans un endroit où les gens voulaient faire partie d'un nouvel empire russe ou d'une nouvelle sphère d'influence chinoise. Partout dans le monde, les gens tiennent énormément à leurs droits souverains et sont très préoccupés par les menaces que font planer les grandes puissances autoritaires sur leur indépendance souveraine. Par conséquent, nous devrions adopter une stratégie qui consiste à aider nos partenaires à renforcer leur résilience, notamment par des institutions civiques solides, des médias efficaces, des tribunaux libres, etc., afin de les aider à conserver leur indépendance.

Troisièmement, il faut dénoncer la corruption. Des recherches menées par Tom Carothers, un chercheur de la Dotation Carnegie pour la paix internationale, à Washington, révèlent qu'au cours des cinq dernières années, 10 % de tous les gouvernements du monde — parfois après des élections, parfois après une révolution populaire — ont changé en raison de l'activisme social contre la corruption et parce que la principale force civique dans le monde d'aujourd'hui est le sentiment anticorruption. Cela se voit aujourd'hui dans les rues d'Iran, où les gens sont en grève. Cela se voit au Venezuela, où les habitants en ont assez de vivre dans un état kleptocratique dirigé par des narcotrafiquants et où les élites vivent très bien, mais où tous les autres ne mangent pas à leur faim. C'est une force puissante.

À mon avis, quand on pense à l'assaut de la Russie contre l'Occident et nos sociétés ouvertes, en ce qui concerne Vladimir Poutine, qui vaut apparemment 95 milliards de dollars, il serait bon d'enquêter, de comprendre et d'aider les citoyens russes à comprendre d'où vient cet argent, car en réalité, une grande partie de cet argent leur appartenait avant que les oligarques du Kremlin n'aient consolidé un pouvoir qui les a tous rendus très riches.

Innover dans l'espace démocratique pour exposer la corruption et aider nos partenaires sur le terrain à dénoncer cette corruption dans leur société représente un moyen d'action très puissant, notamment dans des pays qui, honnêtement, ne sont peut-être pas proaméricains ou prooccidentaux, mais où les gens se préoccupent beaucoup de cet enjeu.

Quatrièmement, il faut investir dans le rétablissement de l'équilibre politique de sociétés où la politique a été déséquilibrée par des formes de contrôle autoritaire. Il faut donc renforcer les parlements. Il faut que les femmes, les jeunes et d'autres communautés marginalisées soient plus engagés et participent beaucoup plus à la politique de leur pays. Il faut favoriser la liberté dans les médias. Il faut promouvoir l'aide juridique et d'autres formes d'aide. Tout cela contribuera à recréer l'équilibre qui a été détruit par des formes de contrôle autoritaire.

À cette fin, il est important de miser sur la génération suivante. Dans des pays comme les Philippines et la Turquie, de jeunes dirigeants politiques et les jeunes leaders en général ne veulent pas vivre dans un pays dirigé à perpétuité par une seule personne. C'est également le cas de jeunes leaders dans les partis au pouvoir, car ils souhaitent obtenir une certaine marge de manoeuvre pour leur propre compte. Il est donc avisé d'investir dans les jeunes leaders dans le cadre d'un effort visant à créer un équilibre.

Enfin, il faut investir dans la sécurité des citoyens. Plutôt que de construire un mur à la frontière sud des États-Unis, je dirais qu'il serait beaucoup plus efficace de dépenser cet argent pour aider les sociétés centre-américaines à se gouverner de façon juste et efficace, afin que toutes ces personnes désespérées n'aient plus besoin de partir. Il en va de même au Moyen-Orient. La situation catastrophique de la Syrie et celle du Yémen poussent des gens désespérés à fuir. C'est la même chose en Asie du Sud-Est, plus précisément au Myanmar, avec la crise des Rohingyas. Je pourrais continuer pendant longtemps. Au bout du compte, nous devrions nous attaquer à la source du problème.

L'ambassadeur des États-Unis au Nigeria m'a dit, lorsque j'étais là-bas, qu'il y aura 400 millions de Nigérians d'ici l'an 2100. Il a dit que si le Nigeria ne peut pas se gouverner de manière efficace et offrir des possibilités à ses habitants, 100 millions d'entre eux partiront. Devinez où ils voudront aller? C'est donc une tâche d'envergure pour nous, notamment en Afrique.

Permettez-moi de conclure en 10 secondes, en soulignant simplement que nous sommes en concurrence avec des régimes autoritaires — à l'extérieur et à l'intérieur des sociétés ouvertes. Ils utilisent ce que le National Endowment for Democracy a appelé un pouvoir tranchant. Ils n'utilisent pas d'instruments militaires, mais plutôt un pouvoir tranchant, qui est comme une forme malveillante de pouvoir souple — un ensemble d'outils tranchants pour éroder, affaiblir et attaquer les démocraties et les institutions démocratiques. Il est temps pour l'Occident de moderniser et de revitaliser sa trousse d'aide à la démocratie, afin de tenter d'uniformiser les règles du jeu.

Merci.

(1005)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant aux questions des membres du Comité.

Nous entendrons d'abord Mme Alleslev.

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de vos témoignages incroyables et impressionnants. C'est un sujet complexe qui contient de nombreux éléments en mouvement. On a l'impression que l'érosion s'accélère de façon exponentielle et qu'elle ne se limite pas à ces éléments. Cela se passe également dans nos propres démocraties.

Pouvez-vous nous aider à comprendre ce que nous devrions faire chez nous et nous aider à établir des priorités? Nous croyons toujours que nous n'avons pas nécessairement de problèmes dans notre propre démocratie. Pouvons-nous offrir du soutien aux institutions démocratiques d'autres pays pendant que notre propre démocratie subit une pression de plus en plus importante?

M. Daniel Twining:

Je ferais valoir très brièvement qu'aux États-Unis, nous travaillons sur notre démocratie depuis 200 ans et que manifestement, il nous reste beaucoup de travail à faire, mais vous comprenez pourquoi nous avons des systèmes de freins et contrepoids, des élections de mi-mandat, la séparation des pouvoirs entre le système exécutif et le système législatif, des institutions solides et des médias dynamiques.

Lorsque je voyage dans le monde, nos interlocuteurs — les partenaires du NDI et de l'IRI — ne nous disent pas que la démocratie américaine subit une telle pression que nous ne sommes pas en position de leur parler. Ils disent que notre système est incroyablement résilient, et qu'il s'agit d'un système et non d'un type de pouvoir personnel. Ils ont besoin de notre aide. Nous pouvons leur offrir cette aide en toute humilité, et non en leur disant que nous tentons de projeter un modèle américain ou canadien. Nous ne tentons pas d'imposer quoi que ce soit, mais les États-Unis et le Canada connaissent certaines choses au sujet des fondements d'une démocratie et d'une société civile prospère et nous pouvons aider d'autres pays à établir ces fondements. Je crois que la notion selon laquelle nos démocraties sont des ouvrages inachevés sur lesquels nous continuons de travailler sans relâche est une image puissante que les gens peuvent comprendre.

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Je pensais aux médias sociaux et aux tentatives d'affaiblissement déployées par d'autres grandes puissances au sein de notre propre démocratie, car nous ne surveillons ou ne suivons peut-être pas la situation d'assez près pour pouvoir prendre les mesures nécessaires. Je ne parlais pas nécessairement de nos propres structures, mais ces instruments sont pourtant utilisés avec une incidence encore plus grande dans ces démocraties émergentes. Devrions-nous faire quelque chose à cet égard?

M. Daniel Twining:

Derek, voulez-vous répondre à cette question?

M. Derek Mitchell:

Certainement.

Oui, d'une certaine façon, Silicon Valley est comme un pays. Certains pays ont même envoyé des ambassadeurs à Silicon Valley pour collaborer avec ses représentants. Nous avons un programme Silicon Valley. Nous avons un bureau là-bas, car je crois que c'est un élément essentiel à la démocratisation. Ce que font ces plateformes de médias sociaux pour s'infiltrer et nuire aux rouages de la démocratie, pour aliéner, isoler et diviser les gens, et permettre à des intervenants de l'extérieur — et de l'intérieur — de disséminer de fausses informations et de déformer les faits, qui sont le fondement d'une démocratie... Nous devons obtenir leur aide et nous faisons ce que nous pouvons pour l'obtenir.

Le NDI a plus de 50 bureaux partout dans le monde, et nous croyons donc que nous avons une occasion unique d'utiliser ce que nous savons au sujet du contexte sur le terrain et ensuite d'envoyer ces renseignements, par l'entremise de Washington ou directement à Silicon Valley, afin de leur permettre de réagir rapidement, à la fois à l'égard de l'enjeu initial du moment, ainsi qu'à l'égard des gros enjeux créés par leurs plateformes. Nous créons également des réseaux internationaux d'intervenants qui sont sur le terrain, qui s'organisent, qui sont des experts techniques et qui luttent contre la désinformation, afin d'élaborer des pratiques exemplaires.

Nous faisons de notre mieux pour tenter de limiter les effets les plus négatifs de ces plateformes et pour tenter de déterminer comment nous pouvons utiliser ces plateformes à des fins positives, car elles ne disparaîtront pas de sitôt. De plus, d'autres technologies émergeront bientôt, et nous devons tous comprendre la meilleure façon de les exploiter.

(1010)

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Excellent.

J'aimerais aborder un autre sujet, car je souhaite parler de sécurité et de stabilité et du rôle qu'on pourrait confier, selon vous, à ce que nous aurions appelé les activités de maintien de la paix, mais dans un contexte moderne qui favorise la promotion des structures démocratiques.

M. Daniel Twining:

Les activités de maintien de la paix représentent un moyen d'atteindre un objectif; elles ne peuvent pas devenir une activité permanente. Essentiellement, les activités de maintien de la paix sont nécessaires dans le cas, par exemple, de l'échec politique d'une société comme celle des Balkans, d'un conflit ethnique dans certaines régions de l'Afrique, de toutes sortes de problèmes et d'une guerre civile. Encore une fois, pour revenir à mon argument, il faut s'attaquer à la source du problème. Les activités de maintien de la paix représentent un outil précieux, mais au bout du compte, nous devons créer des sociétés qui fonctionnent, afin que nos Casques bleus puissent revenir au pays.

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Oui, mais devons-nous mener plus d'activités de maintien de la paix? Dans un grand nombre de ces pays qui sont confrontés à ces types de défis, est-il plus difficile de bâtir des institutions lorsque les éléments fondamentaux sont l'insécurité et l'instabilité?

M. Daniel Twining:

Oui.

Mme Leona Alleslev:

Vu de l'extérieur, il semble que les efforts mondiaux déployés à la fin des années 1980 et dans les années 1990 étaient beaucoup plus importants que ceux que nous déployons aujourd'hui.

M. Daniel Twining:

Oui, si les activités de maintien de la paix peuvent nous faire gagner le temps nécessaire — et c'est le cas — pour parvenir à un règlement politique ou si elles nous permettent d'attendre l'essoufflement d'un conflit politique ou militaire, oui, absolument.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci beaucoup.

Il est très intéressant d'observer le soutien bipartisan apporté par l'International Republican Institute et le National Democratic Institute à l'égard de la promotion de la démocratie. À votre avis, dans quelle mesure est-ce attribuable au fait que vous profitez des grands mécanismes de financement du National Endowment for Democracy, qui relève du Congrès, plutôt que de faire partie de l'administration? Manifestement, cela a créé du financement — vous avez parlé de 35 ans —, ce qui a ensuite créé l'espace nécessaire à l'émergence de ces vastes réseaux. Je dirais donc que le NDI et l'IRI sont principalement des réseaux de promotion de la démocratie.

Dans quelle mesure cet épanouissement est-il attribuable au fait que vous aviez un fonds de dotation du Congrès à long terme qui vous a permis de renforcer cette résilience et d'assurer ce type de présence constante?

J'aimerais d'abord entendre M. Mitchell, et ensuite M. Twining.

M. Derek Mitchell:

Je vous remercie pour votre question.

Je crois que c'est un avantage que de relever du Congrès. Je crois que le bipartisanisme... On nous pose souvent cette question, même au Congrès. Pourquoi y a-t-il un institut républicain et un institut démocrate? Notre système se fond sur les stiftungs allemands, qui séparaient le travail en fonction des idéologies, mais le NDI a choisi de ne pas fonder son travail uniquement sur une idéologie. Il se fonde sur la démocratie, sur les démocrates avec un « d » minuscule et sur leur idéologie pour l'avenir. Je crois qu'il est utile d'avoir deux instituts au Congrès, parce qu'on peut passer d'un parti ou d'un leadership à l'autre.

Je suppose que ce peut être une arme à deux tranchants d'une certaine façon, mais cela fonctionne bien pour nous de façon générale. Nous recevons un appui continu, puisque, selon la tradition, le Congrès est le dépôt des normes et valeurs nationales. L'exécutif est parfois dépassé par les grandes politiques, le réalisme et les relations avec les autres pays; on pourrait perdre certaines valeurs ou les voir perdre leur place sur la liste des intérêts d'importance, mais la loi est toujours là pour dire: « Non, nous avons une idéologie et les Américains veulent la préserver. »

Si nous n'avions pas eu le Congrès au cours des dernières années... L'administration a appliqué des compressions draconiennes, de l'ordre de 30 à 40 %. Sur la Colline, on a dit: « Nous vous remercions pour votre intérêt à l'égard de la sécurité nationale; nous sommes responsables du budget et nous allons réinjecter tous ces fonds, et même les augmenter. »

On ne peut pas se fier là-dessus. Il faut pouvoir expliquer aux Américains pourquoi nous faisons ce travail et pourquoi il est important, et ne pas miser uniquement sur les sénateurs ou les membres du personnel. Cela fonctionne très bien jusqu'à maintenant au Congrès.

(1015)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Monsieur Twining.

M. Daniel Twining:

Je suis d'accord avec tout cela, bien sûr. Est-ce que je peux ajouter une chose? Alors que vous étudiez nos structures institutionnelles, je dirais que ce qui nous a aidés, c'est cette distance de deux ou trois niveaux entre l'IRI, le NDI et le National Endowment for Democracy, et le gouvernement, le pouvoir exécutif et le Congrès.

Les gouvernements doivent trouver le juste équilibre dans leurs relations délicates avec la Russie, la Chine, l'Arabie saoudite, l'Iran, etc. Le Congrès affecte des fonds pour lesquels nous nous livrons concurrence, par l'entremise des subventions. Ensuite, les organismes à but non lucratif et les organisations non gouvernementales font leur travail pour habiliter les citoyens et les leaders du monde. Notre gouvernement appuie ces mesures, mais de manière distante, afin de ne pas compliquer les relations diplomatiques de façon indue. Il est donc important d'en tenir compte, plutôt que d'accroître la bureaucratie par l'entremise d'un ministère.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

Je remarque que notre rapport de 2007 recommandait aussi quelque chose qui relevait du Parlement.

En ce qui a trait au financement, nous avons parlé des coûts associés à la promotion démocratique, mais quel est le coût de l'absence d'une telle promotion? Quels sont les coûts associés à la migration, au flux des réfugiés et aux conflits, à ce dont vous avez parlé, monsieur Twining? L'absence de démocraties inclusives entraîne des coûts importants dans le monde, bien sûr, mais aussi dans nos pays respectifs, puisque les réfugiés y viennent.

Monsieur Mitchell, vous avez dit qu'il était temps de stimuler la démocratie

Monsieur Twining, vous avez dit — et c'est assez important — que la promotion de la démocratie devait l'emporter sur les autres formes d'aide, parce que sans la démocratie, lorsqu'il y a corruption et autoritarisme, les autres formes d'aide ne sont pas aussi efficaces. Pourriez-vous nous en parler davantage? Un investissement plus large dans la démocratie coûte cher, surtout par l'entremise du Parlement. Quel est l'autre côté de la médaille? Quel est le coût associé à l'absence d'investissement dans ce domaine?

Nous allons commencer avec M. Twining cette fois-ci, puis nous entendrons M. Mitchell.

M. Daniel Twining:

Le coût est énorme. Ma femme est Anglaise et elle travaille sur le Brexit. Je dirais qu'il y a un lien direct entre la montée de l'État islamique en Irak et en Syrie et la crise des réfugiés qui s'en est suivie, et la pression sur l'Union européenne exercée par certaines politiques extrémistes du continent, ce qui a mené au Brexit. Voilà le coût. Je ne sais pas quelle valeur on peut y attribuer, mais c'est une ligne importante à tracer: deux ou trois millions de réfugiés syriens et irakiens et notre alliance occidentale, l'Union européenne, se fissure.

Nous connaissons le coût de la guerre parce que nous aidons à la financer et nous y participons. Pour moi, l'aide démocratique est un investissement. Ce qui est bien, c'est que les pays finissent par obtenir leur diplôme... c'est ce qu'ils souhaitent. Ils ne veulent pas être en conflit, et ces sociétés ne veulent pas dépendre des autres. C'est donc un investissement qui entraîne des retombées, ce qui permet aux pays de réussir au fil du temps.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Allez-y, monsieur Mitchell.

M. Derek Mitchell:

C'est toujours difficile de prouver l'absence de quelque chose, comme le chien qui n'a pas jappé ou le coût associé aux occasions, mais comme l'a dit Dan, on peut voir les résultats dans les endroits qui connaissent un échec. Il y a une logique derrière la démocratie. Ce n'est pas une simple idéologie. Lorsqu'il y a des abus de pouvoir, le manque de transparence entraîne la corruption, ce qui mène à l'injustice et à la tyrannie de la part de la majorité; les réfugiés s'enfuient et l'instabilité traverse les frontières. Cela entraîne des coûts. Il faut payer plus pour nos services de sécurité.

J'ai travaillé au Pentagone. En fait, je travaillais au NDI avant, mais j'ai aussi travaillé pendant 20 ans au Pentagone et j'ai vu un lien direct, non pas en raison de l'imposition de la démocratie... Cela va trop loin; c'est un oxymoron. Madeleine Albright a dit qu'on ne pouvait imposer la démocratie. Or, on ne veut pas trop dépenser pour la sécurité. On préfère de beaucoup investir dans les mesures préventives, comme la démocratie. Elle favorise la dignité humaine. Elle favorise les droits de la personne, ce qui donne lieu à l'autosuffisance et à la prise de mesures autocorrectives au sein des pays. Ainsi, il n'y a pas de répercussions au-delà des frontières pour notre sécurité nationale, ce qui coûte des milliards de dollars plutôt que les millions de dollars qui sont habituellement investis dans le travail démocratique.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Et...

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Je suis désolé, mais vous n'avez plus de temps.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Laverdière. [Français]

Mme Hélène Laverdière:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Mitchell, mais les autres témoins peuvent également émettre des commentaires.

Vous avez mentionné, parmi les menaces contre la démocratie, les inégalités économiques. C'est un phénomène que nous observons, non seulement au Venezuela, en Russie et dans d'autres pays où il y a de la corruption, mais aussi au Canada — bien que pas nécessairement au même niveau —, où il prend de l'ampleur.

Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage ou émettre des commentaires à ce propos?

(1020)

[Traduction]

M. Derek Mitchell:

Vous avez tout à fait raison. Je ne dis pas que nous sommes différents. En fait, je nous utiliserais comme exemple pour montrer comment les inégalités économiques peuvent entraîner la frustration chez les gens et mener à des mesures extrêmes en ce qui a trait au vote ou à la politique. Nous faisons donc partie de cette dynamique que l'on a pu observer chez la génération précédente. Il faut faire attention non pas seulement aux composantes politiques de la démocratie, mais aussi à la façon dont la démocratie oriente notre façon de voir et de faire la politique économique, notre façon de voir la corruption aussi, qui alimentent les questions relatives aux inégalités et à l'injustice, qui affectent les gens et les fâchent.

La leçon voulant que si l'économie se porte mieux, alors la démocratie sera plus facile à maintenir n'est pas la seule à tirer. L'économie au sens large peut s'améliorer, mais si certaines personnes se placent devant les autres, si la corruption est importante ou s'il y a des inégalités, qu'il y a une élite et que certaines personnes se sentent exclues, qu'il y a une division entre les régions rurales et les régions urbaines, une certaine aliénation du système, un sentiment que les politiciens ne sont pas là pour les gens, alors un démagogue pourrait arriver et dire: « Je vous représente; je suis populiste; je parle en votre nom. » Les gens vont alors dénigrer les institutions. Lorsque ces institutions et les normes disparaissent, alors c'est le chaos. Une seule personne fait la loi.

Si l'on ne place pas la vie quotidienne de ces gens au coeur des enjeux et si l'on oublie qu'avant de voter, les gens doivent manger et se sentir reconnus, et que les minorités ont des droits, alors on ne comprendra pas tout à fait le développement démocratique. C'est une leçon que nous avons tirée. Les institutions et les processus ne suffisent pas: il faut une culture et une composante économique également.

M. Daniel Twining:

J'ajouterais que dans bon nombre de pays en développement, les gens intègrent le gouvernement pour devenir riches. Ce n'est pas le cas au Canada. En certains endroits, c'est encore le chemin vers la prospérité matérielle, en raison de la corruption, de la cleptocratie, etc. Il faut s'attaquer à la source des problèmes, établir clairement que la gouvernance n'est pas un moyen personnel de s'enrichir... Seule la politique ouverte peut nous permettre d'y arriver. Seule une politique transparente, associée à la reddition de comptes, où il y a alternance des pouvoirs et une certaine responsabilisation des institutions, des tribunaux, etc. permet cela. Sinon, l'argent public se retrouve dans des comptes privés.

La politique ouverte doit permettre un nivellement parce que, par définition, elle défait toutes les structures élitistes au sein desquelles une seule tribu, une seule famille ou un seul parti monopolise le contrôle politique et oriente l'économie en conséquence.

L'an dernier, la Malaisie a connu une transition démocratique extraordinaire. Le même parti était au pouvoir depuis 61 ans. Tous les gens d'affaires de la Malaisie devaient entretenir des relations étroites avec le parti au pouvoir pour que leurs entreprises prospèrent. Il y a eu alternance du pouvoir, ce qui a eu une incidence sur le secteur privé et sur l'économie.

Une dernière pensée, pour conclure: la vague populiste qui déferle en Occident pourrait être un échec, parce que les populistes ne pourront probablement pas tenir leurs promesses. Elles coûtent trop cher. Je parle ici du populisme de gauche comme de celui de droite. À l'heure actuelle, alors qu'on se dirige vers les élections présidentielles de 2020, on fait beaucoup de promesses au sujet des nouveaux avantages pour les Américains. Je ne sais pas comment nous allons payer pour cela. Je crois qu'il en va de même pour le populisme de droite en Italie, par exemple. Au bout du compte, on ne respecte pas le budget et ce n'est pas durable. [Français]

Mme Hélène Laverdière:

Merci beaucoup.

Vous avez aussi parlé d'inclusivité. En ce qui concerne la représentation des femmes, je suis fière d'appartenir à un parti politique où 40 % des députés sont des femmes, ce qui bat tous les autres partis. Pardonnez-moi cette petite note partisane. Vous avez aussi parlé des jeunes. C'est une question qui me préoccupe énormément.

Que peut-on faire pour encourager la participation politique des jeunes?

(1025)

[Traduction]

M. Daniel Twining:

Allez-y, Derek.

M. Derek Mitchell:

C'est intéressant de souligner que bon nombre des rapports qui ont été publiés... Freedom House a publié son indice de démocratie aujourd'hui, mais l'Economist a publié le sien il y a quelques semaines. On a fait valoir que la confiance à l'égard des institutions démocratiques diminuait, mais que la participation politique augmentait, surtout parmi les femmes et les jeunes, dans une certaine mesure. La participation se traduit souvent par des manifestations dans les rues ou par la frustration. Les gens ne font pas confiance aux partis politiques. Ils croient que les partis sont exclusifs et dominés par l'ancienne génération. Ces questions sont aussi culturelles, en plus d'être politiques.

En fait, la participation est à la hausse et les gens ont soif de contribuer à leur façon. L'idée que les jeunes — on l'entend même aux États-Unis, et à l'étranger — ne s'intéressent pas à la démocratie... Je crois que si l'on morcelait la démocratie et qu'on demandait aux gens s'ils veulent participer aux affaires publiques, s'ils souhaitent une reddition de comptes, s'ils veulent la liberté d'association et la liberté de parole, la transparence et la possibilité de représenter leur communauté, la réponse serait oui, oui, oui et oui. Cela signifie donc que les gens veulent la démocratie, mais qu'ils n'ont pas le moyen d'y participer. Ils ne croient pas que les règles et les institutions fonctionnent pour eux, ce qui représente un grand défi, que le NDI et l'IRI ne peuvent pas nécessairement relever.

Il faut penser à la façon dont nous offrons l'aide et l'orientation, ou dont on tire des leçons, pour que les jeunes puissent participer de manière productive.

En Afrique, on assiste à une explosion de la jeunesse. Le Nigeria compte un réseau des jeunes: c'est très intéressant et excitant. Le futur de la démocratie repose sur eux. Il est très important d'investir dans ces jeunes et de trouver une façon de les intégrer aux institutions pour qu'ils contribuent au développement national dans son ensemble.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Saini.

M. Raj Saini (Kitchener-Centre, Lib.):

Merci.

Bonjour à vous deux. Nous vous remercions d'être ici aujourd'hui: notre séance est très instructive.

Monsieur Twining, je vais commencer avec vous.

En 1944, la Conférence de Bretton Woods a été mise sur pied notamment pour maintenir l'ordre international. Maintenant, environ 70 ans plus tard, il commence à s'effriter. Vous avez fait valoir avec force que la coopération trilatérale entre l'Asie, l'Europe et l'Amérique était nécessaire et que le pacte serait utile en vue de rétablir l'ordre international libéral.

Ma question est à la fois simple et complexe. Vous avez parlé de la Russie et de la Chine. Lorsque deux pays s'ingèrent dans les affaires nationales des autres, que ce soit par l'entremise de la force ou de l'économie...

Je vais vous donner l'exemple du Venezuela. Les gens ne réalisent peut-être pas qu'à l'heure actuelle, la Chine est le plus grand investisseur dans ce pays. Les trois seuls pays qui appuient le régime actuel sont la Chine, la Russie et la Turquie. Je ne fais que vous donner un exemple, mais si l'on pense à l'Amérique latine, à l'Afrique ou à certaines régions de l'Asie, l'implication économique de certains pays est tellement grande que la moitié des économies en dépendent ou dépendent de l'investissement de ces pays.

Ce sont ces pays qui ont le plus besoin d'aide. Ils n'ont pas d'élections libres et équitables. La corruption est bien présente. La liberté de presse n'existe pas. Comment peut-on changer la nature de ces pays ou promouvoir les institutions démocratiques alors que les leaders profitent des institutions non démocratiques?

M. Daniel Twining:

C'est une question difficile. Je vais commencer par le même aspect que vous, soit la collaboration de l'Amérique du Nord avec l'Europe et l'Asie. De nos jours, on parle de l'Occident, mais le terme a une dimension mondiale, car cela englobe le Japon, qui fait partie du G7 et des principales démocraties riches. Toutefois, je dirais qu'au fil du temps, il faudra inclure l'Inde de plus en plus, car il s'agit du plus grand pays démocratique du monde.

En toute franchise, ils ont beaucoup plus à offrir aux sociétés en développement qui cherchent à atteindre leur niveau de développement que les pays riches comme le Canada et les États-Unis. Concernant le défi que pose la Chine, je dirais que le régime indien est plus conscient des enjeux en général que beaucoup d'entre nous en Occident. Les Japonais ont beaucoup en jeu, car ils se retrouvent isolés dans cette région, avec les autocraties émergentes, les autocraties puissantes, en Russie et en Chine. Lorsqu'on pense à de nouveaux modèles de coopération démocratique, il faut tendre vers l'action concertée d'un noyau de grandes démocraties, car nous sommes tous confrontés aux mêmes défis.

Voilà le premier point. Deuxièmement, le cas du Venezuela est très intéressant, car il expose l'intérêt de la Russie pour le contrôle des prix du pétrole en soutenant le maintien au pouvoir du régime de Maduro. Il met aussi en lumière les énormes investissements de la Chine dans cette kleptocratie, soit des investissements dans les obligations et les ressources énergétiques. Honnêtement, l'une des choses qui révèlent les activités de l'IRI et du NDI dans le monde, c'est le ressentiment de divers pays — en Afrique, dans la région du Pacifique et de l'océan Indien — à l'égard de pays étrangers qui s'approprient leurs ressources grâce à des manoeuvres politiques corrompues avec leurs dirigeants.

Les Maldives ont traversé une transition démocratique il y a quelques mois. Un dictateur avait pris le pouvoir, aboli la Cour suprême et consolidé son emprise sur tout le pays. Convaincu de sa victoire, comme le sont souvent ces gens, il a déclenché des élections, et 90 % des électeurs ont voté sa destitution. Actuellement, le pays est inondé d'investissements chinois et la corruption mine le secteur des infrastructures. Le nouveau gouvernement malaisien est également aux prises avec une corruption endémique et tente de s'en sortir.

Je pense que plus nous parviendrons, collectivement, à faire la lumière sur certains de ces accords souvent négociés en secret — par exemple entre le régime de Maduro et Beijing ou entre le régime de Maduro et les intérêts oligarchiques russes —, mieux ce sera, car cela suscite beaucoup de ressentiment dans la population de ces pays.

(1030)

M. Raj Saini:

Il pourrait y avoir une certaine résistance dans certains pays où vous voulez mener des activités de développement démocratique, car les gens n'aiment pas l'influence étrangère et ne veulent pas que les étrangers leur disent comment gérer leurs affaires. La démarcation est mince. Que peut-on faire pour que l'on considère toujours que nous visons à revitaliser ou à renforcer les institutions plutôt qu'à influencer la politique nationale d'un pays?

M. Daniel Twining:

Je pourrais faire un commentaire à ce sujet, en 10 secondes, puis céder la parole à Derek.

Un de mes premiers voyages pour l'IRI était en Bosnie. À l'époque, tout le monde menait toutes sortes d'activités dans les Balkans. Il y avait des Turcs, des Saoudiens, des Iraniens, des Chinois et des Russes. Tous les dirigeants politiques bosniaques que j'ai rencontrés me demandaient où était l'Amérique, où était l'Occident, où était l'Europe, puisque tous ces autres pays étaient là.

Donc, ce qu'on voit aujourd'hui, comme dans bien des cas, notamment au Venezuela, c'est que d'autres acteurs sont là, que nous soyons présents ou non.

Je suis certain que Derek a quelque chose à ajouter à ce sujet.

M. Derek Mitchell:

Oui. Essentiellement, votre question porte directement sur la façon dont NDI mène ses activités. C'est le défi que nous devons relever dans tous les pays où nous allons. Nos activités sont liées à l'aspect le plus délicat d'un pays, la politique, où le pouvoir et l'argent, souvent, sont en jeu. Nous devons faire nos preuves. Nous nous appuyons sur nos réalisations antérieures, nous tenons compte du contexte et nous faisons preuve d'une grande diplomatie avec un large éventail de personnes au pays. Nous disons: « Voilà qui nous sommes; voilà ce que nous faisons. Nous sommes là parce que vous nous avez invités. Nous ne serions pas là sans votre accord. Nous voulons vous aider à réussir; notre but n'est pas de tirer parti de vos politiques. Nous voulons vous aider à créer un mécanisme qui vous permettra de déterminer votre propre avenir, d'avoir votre mot à dire à cet égard, à l'abri de toute ingérence extérieure. »

Théoriquement, les pays qui y parviennent sont plus stables et représentent un meilleur marché pour nos activités commerciales, et cela les empêche de devenir un foyer d'insécurité dans la région. Ils peuvent ainsi devenir de bons partenaires pour les États-Unis, lorsqu'ils se tournent vers nous, ou pour tout pays soucieux de la démocratie, parce que nous tendons à avoir des valeurs semblables. Cela n'exclut personne; ce n'est pas dirigé contre qui que ce soit. Nous n'avons aucun objectif caché. Toutefois, c'est peut-être plus facile maintenant, mais lorsque j'y travaillais il y a 20 ans, nous devions à tout le moins faire nos preuves et expliquer que nous n'étions pas là pour imposer quelque chose, que nous n'étions pas des Américains tentant d'imposer un système américain, mais plutôt des gens tentant de partager leurs expériences partout dans le monde, et ce, avec une grande humilité.

C'est la meilleure façon de procéder. Je pense que cela a donné des résultats concluants au cours des 35 dernières années.

M. Raj Saini:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Wrzesnewskyj.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci.

Monsieur Twining, en tant que fils et petit-fils de réfugiés, je tiens à vous remercier personnellement d'avoir parlé de la corrélation — quoiqu’imparfaite — entre ce qu'on appelle le recul de la démocratie et l'augmentation du nombre de réfugiés à l'échelle mondiale. Vous avez touché un point important lorsque vous avez parlé du choix entre manger et voter. Je vais parler d'un point de vue très personnel. Pour ma famille, le Canada était synonyme de liberté. Mes proches n'avaient jamais connu la démocratie, mais ils savaient d'expérience que sans elle, on pouvait même être privé du droit de manger. Dans notre famille, voter était sacré. Je tenais simplement à vous remercier d'en avoir parlé.

J'aimerais revenir à un commentaire antérieur, selon lequel la technologie d'aujourd'hui a un effet presque pernicieux sur la démocratie. Je crois que c'est le mot qui a été utilisé. J'ai été très encouragé d'entendre M. Mitchell dire qu'il collaborait avec les gens de Silicon Valley. J'aimerais avoir vos commentaires. Qu'en est-il de sociétés comme Huawei qui parcourent le monde en se disant prêtes à vendre une technologie donnée, à meilleur prix, mais qui permettra aussi de surveiller la population comme jamais auparavant? Savons-nous ce qu'il en est?

(1035)

M. Derek Mitchell:

Oui, c'est extrêmement dangereux. La technologie 5G, l'intelligence artificielle et toutes les technologies différentes actuellement en développement domineront nos vies et auront une incidence sur ce que nous entendrons, sur nos connaissances et, à certains égards, sur notre façon de penser et nos opinions concernant les faits. Les Chinois sont de fins stratèges sur ce plan. Ils sont très conscients de leur désir de communiquer avec le monde et de le façonner. C'est une approche défensive, à certains égards. Ils veulent protéger le parti communiste, mais il y a évidemment une dimension offensive, en ce sens que cela se fait aux dépens de la souveraineté et du bien-être des autres.

En Chine, il n'existe aucune entreprise véritablement indépendante du gouvernement. On trouve toujours un membre du parti communiste parmi les dirigeants. La présidente de Huawei est une ancienne officière de l'Armée populaire de libération. Je pense que les pays commencent à prendre conscience de cet enjeu. Encore une fois, comme en toute chose en démocratie et dans les affaires internationales, la transparence est essentielle. Les Chinois, notamment, travaillent très bien dans l'ombre. Huawei offrait un accès très facile aux systèmes des autres pays afin de miner leur souveraineté. Toutefois, je pense que les pays en sont maintenant conscients et cherchent des contre-mesures.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci.

J'ai une dernière petite question. Dans le passé, pendant la guerre froide, nous avions Voice of America et Radio-Canada international, qui réussissaient très bien à se faire entendre dans d'autres pays. En passant, ils ont essentiellement cessé leurs activités. Nous semblons avoir été dépassés par des organisations comme Russia Today. Avez-vous des commentaires concernant les investissements, les mesures prises pour communiquer avec les gens d'ailleurs et sur la fermeture des ONG en Russie? La démocratie est attaquée de toutes parts. Avez-vous des commentaires à ce sujet?

M. Daniel Twining:

Pour que ce soit clair, ce n'est pas seulement la radiodiffusion, mais un ensemble d'outils.

Pendant la guerre froide, nous avons créé un ensemble d'outils pour transmettre notre message d'une société ouverte dans l'espace totalitaire contrôlé par l'empire soviétique. Au terme de la guerre froide, nous les avons laissés dépérir. Derek a parlé de cette étape, la phase deux. Nous avons laissé ces outils dépérir, et il faut les recréer. Je ne suis pas certain qu'il faut les reproduire à l'identique. Nous avons probablement besoin d'outils différents, mais nous devons reprendre la radiodiffusion, accroître le soutien à la démocratie, multiplier les échanges, les bourses et la participation humaine. À vrai dire, nous avons abandonné ces outils; nous les avons laissé rouiller.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Pour les dernières questions, nous passons à M. O'Toole, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup à tous les deux. Vos commentaires sont très instructifs. Cette étude suscite un grand intérêt chez tous les députés de toutes allégeances politiques.

Sur le plan de politique étrangère, le principal problème du gouvernement Trudeau est lié aux pays qui ne partagent pas nos valeurs, mais qui pourraient avoir les mêmes intérêts que nous. Voilà l'équilibre que l'on voit en politique étrangère. La Chine, l'Arabie saoudite, Cuba et les Philippines... Nous n'avons pas toujours les mêmes valeurs, et nous avons eu des conflits diplomatiques. Voilà les pays où nous devons promouvoir la réforme démocratique, les droits de la personne et bien d'autres choses.

Monsieur Mitchell, vous avez parlé de la difficulté de créer une culture de démocratie. C'est un long processus.

Ma question s'adresse à vous deux. En quoi le défi... Prenons l'exemple suivant: au Canada, le mariage entre personnes de même sexe n'a été légalisé qu'en 2005. Je pense que nous conviendrons tous que c'est positif. Aux États-Unis, le débat se poursuit toujours à l'échelon fédéral. Comment pouvons-nous promouvoir le plus efficacement possible les droits démocratiques fondamentaux que sont la liberté, le droit à la liberté d'association et d'expression, entre autres choses, lorsque nous exportons certaines de nos valeurs progressistes, pourrait-on dire, dans des pays qui, comparativement à nous, en sont encore à l'âge de pierre sur le plan démocratique? Concernant le gouvernement Trudeau, je crains parfois que son programme progressiste en matière de commerce, et autres choses du genre, ne vise plus à plaire à son public partisan au Canada qu'à aider les pays auxquels il est censé s'adresser.

J'aimerais avoir vos commentaires à tous les deux à ce sujet, car je me demande si cela aura pour effet de freiner la réforme démocratique dans certains de ces pays.

(1040)

M. Daniel Twining:

Je dirais simplement — Derek aura probablement plus de commentaires — que les valeurs varient d'une société à l'autre, mais nous partons du principe que dans des pays comme l'Arabie saoudite ou l'Iran, les citoyens doivent être libres de décider si les femmes peuvent conduire un véhicule ou jouer un rôle actif dans la société.

J'ai témoigné au Capitole avec le prédécesseur de Derek. Quelqu'un a posé des questions très précises sur divers enjeux liés à notre programme d'autonomisation des femmes, comme l'avortement, etc. Nous avons répondu, ensemble, que la décision relevait de ces pays, de ces gens, mais que donner aux femmes la possibilité de participer activement à la vie politique permettrait de régler une multitude de problèmes. Je pense que pour nous, l'important est de veiller à ce que sur la scène politique de ces pays, les gens de toutes les sphères de la société soient inclus, pour que les femmes, les communautés marginalisées et d'autres voix aient un droit de vote égal et une voix égale, ce qui n'est pas le cas actuellement dans tous les pays que vous avez mentionnés.

M. Derek Mitchell:

Dans ces pays, nous devons expliquer ou démontrer, d'après notre expérience, que l'inclusion fait une société plus forte, et que c'est aussi dans leur intérêt. Si vous voulez favoriser le développement du pays, si vous accordez vraiment de l'importance au pouvoir national, vous devez alors inclure les femmes. Toutes les études le démontrent. Il faut habiliter les gens. Ce ne sont pas tous les autocrates qui sont prêts à l'entendre. Ce ne sont pas toutes les élites qui écouteront ce discours, parce que le pouvoir est la monnaie d'échange, et ils ne voudront peut-être pas perdre une partie de leur emprise. L'objectif est d'amener les citoyens du pays à reconnaître que s'ils laissent tomber les autres, qui que ce soit, ce sera à leurs dépens, et que s'ils le font, ils pourraient être les prochains.

J'aime citer Martin Luther King: « Une injustice commise quelque part est une menace pour la justice dans le monde entier. » Personne n'est prémuni contre l'injustice si on commence à s'attaquer à la justice. En fait, plus vous êtes inclusifs, plus grandes seront votre stabilité et votre sécurité.

Nous essayons de partager ces expériences. Cela prendra du temps, car les cultures ne sont pas toutes au même stade de développement, comme vous l'avez indiqué. Leurs histoires sont différentes, mais je pense que cela ne nous effraie pas. Je pense que nous défendons ces idées avec confiance. Cela dit, encore une fois, nous le faisons avec humilité, en fonction du contexte local, pour que nos actions permettent à ces idées de prendre racine plus tôt que tard.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous avons une dernière intervention, très brièvement, avec Mme Laverdière.

Oh, vous ne vouliez pas poser une autre question. Désolé; je me suis fourvoyé.

Messieurs, à Washington, monsieur Twining, ici à Ottawa, c'était une excellente façon de commencer notre étude sur cet enjeu très important. Je tiens à vous remercier de nous avoir donné amplement matière à réflexion alors que nous commençons à examiner cette question de plus près.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee faae hansard 34133 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on February 05, 2019

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.