header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under indu...

  1. 2017-11-30: 2017-11-30 INDU 87
  2. 2018-02-06: 2018-02-06 INDU 93
  3. 2018-02-08: 2018-02-08 INDU 94
  4. 2018-04-17: 2018-04-17 INDU 101
  5. 2018-04-24: 2018-04-24 INDU 102
  6. 2018-05-01: 2018-05-01 INDU 104
  7. 2018-05-24: 2018-05-24 INDU 117
  8. 2018-05-31: 2018-05-31 INDU 119
  9. 2018-06-19: 2018-06-19 INDU 124
  10. 2018-09-19: 2018-09-19 INDU 126
  11. 2018-09-24: 2018-09-24 INDU 127
  12. 2018-09-26: 2018-09-26 INDU 128
  13. 2018-10-01: 2018-10-01 INDU 129
  14. 2018-10-03: 2018-10-03 INDU 130
  15. 2018-10-22: 2018-10-22 INDU 133
  16. 2018-10-29: 2018-10-29 INDU 134
  17. 2018-10-31: 2018-10-31 INDU 135
  18. 2018-11-05: 2018-11-05 INDU 136
  19. 2018-11-07: 2018-11-07 INDU 137
  20. 2018-11-19: 2018-11-19 INDU 138
  21. 2018-11-26: 2018-11-26 INDU 139
  22. 2018-11-28: 2018-11-28 INDU 140
  23. 2018-12-03: 2018-12-03 INDU 141
  24. 2018-12-05: 2018-12-05 INDU 142
  25. 2018-12-10: 2018-12-10 INDU 143
  26. 2019-01-31: 2019-01-31 INDU 146
  27. 2019-05-09: 2019-05-09 INDU 161
  28. 2019-05-16: 2019-05-16 INDU 163
  29. 2019-05-30: 2019-05-30 INDU 165
  30. 2019-06-04: 2019-06-04 INDU 166
  31. 2019-06-06: 2019-06-06 INDU 167

Displaying the most recent stories under indu...

2019-06-06 INDU 167

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0915)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Okay, everybody. We only have an hour today, so we'll skip the preliminaries and get right to it.

Welcome to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. We pursue the reference from Wednesday, May 8, on the study of M-208 on rural digital infrastructure.

Today we have with us from the CRTC, Christopher Seidl, executive director, telecommunications; Ian Baggley, director general, telecommunications; and Renée Doiron, director, broadband and network engineering.

From the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association, we have Robert Ghiz, president and chief executive officer; and Eric Smith, vice-president, regulatory affairs.

From Telesat Canada we have Daniel Goldberg, president and chief executive officer; and Michele Beck, vice-president of sales, North America.

Welcome, everybody. We have a very short agenda today so you each have five minutes for your presentation and then we'll go into our rounds of questions. We'll be starting off with the CRTC, Mr. Seidl.

Mr. Christopher Seidl (Executive Director, Telecommunications, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

We appreciate this opportunity to contribute to your committee's study of M-208. This study addresses important areas within the scope of Canada's telecommunications regulators, being Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada as a spectrum regulator, and the CRTC.

Reliable and accessible digital infrastructure is indispensable to individuals, public institutions and businesses of all sizes in today's world, regardless of where Canadians live.[Translation]

That's why, in December 2016, the commission announced that broadband Internet is now considered a basic telecommunications service.

The CRTC's universal service objective calls for all Canadians to have access to fixed broadband at download speeds of at least 50 megabits per second (Mbps) and upload speeds of 10 Mbps, as well as an unlimited data option.

As well, the latest mobile wireless technology not only needs to be available to all homes and businesses, but also along major Canadian roads. Our goal is to achieve 90% coverage by the end of 2021 and 100% as soon as possible within the following decade. We want all Canadians—in rural and remote areas as well as in urban centres—to have access to voice and broadband Internet services on fixed and mobile wireless networks so they can be connected and effectively participate in the digital economy. Reaching this goal will require the efforts of federal, provincial and territorial governments, as well as of the private sector.[English]

We're taking action on multiple fronts to realize that goal. One of our most important initiatives this year is the CRTC broadband fund. The commission established the fund to improve broadband services in rural and remote regions that lack an acceptable level of access. The broadband fund will disburse up to $750 million over the first five years to build or upgrade access in transport infrastructure by fixed and mobile wireless broadband Internet services in underserved areas.

The contributions to the broadband fund are collected from telecommunications service providers based on their revenue.

The fund is meant to be complementary to, but not a replacement for, existing and future private investment and public funding. Up to 10% of the annual amount will be provided to satellite-dependent communities. Special consideration may also be given to projects targeted to indigenous or official language minority communities.

Earlier this week, we launched the first call for applications for funding from the broadband fund for projects in Canada's three territories as well as in satellite-dependent communities. According to the latest data, no households north of 60 currently have access to a broadband Internet service that meets the CRTC's universal service objective. Only about one quarter of major roads in the territories are covered by LTE mobile wireless service.

The digital divide is also evident in satellite-dependent communities across the country where there is no terrestrial connectivity.

Canadian corporations of all sizes: provincial, territorial and municipal government organizations; band councils and indigenous governments with the necessary experience or a consortium composed of any of these parties can apply for funding.

The CRTC will announce the selected projects from the first call for applications in 2020. A second call, open to all types of projects and all regions in Canada, will be launched this fall.

The CRTC's fund is only one part of the work that must be accomplished by the public and private sectors. To this end, we noted in the most recent federal budget a commitment of $1.7 billion in new funding to provide high-speed Internet to all Canadians. The government intends to coordinate its activities with the provinces, territories and federal institutions such as the CRTC to maximize the impact of these investments.

We support the government's efforts to the extent we can under our mandate and status as an independent regulator.

Mr. Chairman, even with the financial support from the CRTC broadband fund or other public sources, some Internet service providers may still face challenges and barriers that limit their ability to improve broadband access in rural and remote areas.

(0920)

[Translation]

For this reason, we are planning a new proceeding related to rural broadband deployment. We will examine factors such as the availability of both rural transport services and access to support structures. These services are crucial to expand broadband Internet access and to foster competition, particularly in rural and remote areas. Extending broadband to underserved households, businesses and along major roads is an absolute necessity in every corner of the country—including rural and remote areas.

Extending broadband to underserved households, businesses and along major roads is an absolute necessity in every corner of the country—including rural and remote areas.

Access to digital technologies will enhance public safety and enable all Canadians to take advantage of existing and new and innovative digital services that are now central to their daily lives.[English]

I'd be pleased to answer any of your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association.

Mr. Ghiz.

Mr. Robert Ghiz (President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association):

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Good morning.

Thank you for giving us the opportunity to speak here this morning.[English]

Motion M-208 asked this committee to study fiscal and regulatory approaches to encourage investment in rural wireless infrastructure.

Since Canada launched wireless services, Canada's facilities-based providers, the companies that invest capital to build networks and acquire spectrum rights, have embraced the challenge of building Canada's wireless network infrastructure across our country's vast and difficult geography.

To date, Canada's facilities-based wireless carriers have invested more than $50 billion to build our wireless networks. This is more, on a relative basis, than any other country in the G7 or Australia. They have also spent approximately $20 billion at spectrum auctions and in annual spectrum licence fees. Our members are also funding the new CRTC broadband fund.

As a result of these investments, Canadians enjoy the second-fastest networks in the world, twice as fast as those of the United States. According to the CRTC, 99% of Canadians have access to LTE wireless networks where they live.

While this is a great achievement, much work remains. In just the last few months we have seen announcements of significant investments that will bring increased coverage to rural areas.

For example, Bell announced expansion of its fixed wireless services to more than 30 small towns and rural communities in Ontario and Quebec. Rogers announced investments of $100 million to bring mobile wireless coverage for 1,000 kilometres of rural and remote highways across Canada. Similar investments are being made by regional wireless providers, such as Freedom Mobile, Vidéotron, Eastlink, Xplornet and SaskTel.

Unfortunately, investment, especially in rural areas, faces an uncertain future. As motion M-208 recognizes, regulation can encourage investment but can also have the opposite effect. [Translation]

Unfortunately, investment, especially in rural areas, faces an uncertain future. As motion 208 recognizes, regulation can encourage investment. But it can also have the opposite effect.[English]

Canada's telecommunications policy has long recognized the importance of facilities-based competition as the best way to encourage investment. Under policies supporting facilities-based competition, sustainable competition in the wireless retail market is starting to gain momentum, resulting in continuing growth in the number of wireless subscribers, increased data consumption, declining prices and more choice for consumers.

Equally important, ongoing investment by Canada's facilities-based carriers is continuing to expand the reach of Canada's wireless networks for both fixed and mobile wireless services. Yet at a time when the government is stressing the importance of continuing to invest in and expand wireless infrastructure and when they are introducing targeted fiscal measures towards this goal, government is considering measures that, if they proceed, will discourage investment and disproportionately harm rural Canadians.

Earlier this year, ISED issued a proposed policy direction that would direct the CRTC to give priority to the goals of increased competition and more affordable prices when making regulatory decisions. We support these goals, but we were surprised by the absence of any mention of investment in infrastructure by facilities-based carriers.

During the consultation period, we've asked the minister to revise the policy direction to include a reference to encourage investment in infrastructure as a key priority for the CRTC. At the same time, as part of its review of the regulatory framework for the wireless industry, the CRTC has stated its preliminary view that mobile virtual network operators or MVNOs should be given mandated wholesale access to the wireless networks of the national wireless providers.

MVNOs do not invest in wireless infrastructure or spectrum. Rather, they pay wholesale rates set by the regulator to use the facilities-based carriers' networks and use this mandated access to compete against facilities-based carriers for subscribers—the very carriers that are making the investments and expanding the networks.

In countries where this has been tried before, it has resulted in significant decreases in network investment. Those same countries are actually now trying to reverse course.

The CRTC has twice previously declined to mandate MVNO access, knowing it would undermine investments in wireless networks. It is not clear why it is now being considered, especially when both ISED and the CRTC have made connecting all Canadians such a large priority.

(0925)



If government truly believes that connecting Canadians is such a major priority, policies should be aligned with this goal. With respect, today's policy confusion will only harm rural connectivity. We want to work with government. We want to work with the CRTC to ensure that the 99% of coverage goes to 100%, and that Canadians can have access to the best wireless networks in the world.

Thank you very much. We look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Moving on to Telesat Canada, Mr. Goldberg, you have five minutes.

Mr. Daniel Goldberg (President and Chief Executive Officer, Telesat Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for inviting Telesat to participate today. Thanks also to each of the members of this committee for their commitment to improve rural broadband connectivity and to bridge the digital divide in Canada.

It would be difficult for my colleagues and me at Telesat to overstate how strongly we share your objective to deliver in a timely manner affordable, state-of-the art Internet connectivity to the millions of Canadians who lack it today. The good news is that Telesat has a concrete plan to do just that, and we can deliver. Telesat is one of the largest, most innovative and most successful satellite operators in the world. We have a proud 50-year history of delivering mission-critical satellite services to enterprises and governments operating throughout the world, including, of course, right here in Canada, where we started. We have offices and facilities across the globe, but our corporate headquarters is just down the hill on Elgin Street. That's where we fly our global satellite fleet, do all of our R and D and advanced engineering, and otherwise run our business in the highly competitive, rapidly evolving global communications services market. We invite any one of you to come down the street and visit us at our headquarters.

In addition to the millions of Canadians lacking high-quality broadband connectivity, there are another roughly four billion people in the world on the wrong side of the digital divide. Connecting them all is an enormous technical, operational and financial challenge. It's also a critical public interest objective, as well as a compelling business opportunity, for the companies that have the expertise and the ambition to take it on.

Telesat has been working intently on solving this challenge. I'm pleased to say we're on the cusp of moving forward with the most innovative, advanced, powerful and disruptive global broadband infrastructure ever conceived. That's not hyperbole. Specifically, we've designed a constellation of roughly 300 highly advanced satellites flying approximately 1,000 kilometres above the earth. The satellites, which will be connected to each other using optical laser technology, are in a patent-pending, low-earth orbit architecture—hence the term LEO. Picture a fully meshed, highly flexible, space-based Internet infrastructure capable of delivering terabits of fast, affordable, reliable and secure Internet connectivity anywhere in the world, including every square metre of Canada. It's a highly innovative design developed by Telesat's world-class engineers.

Our current satellites are in geostationary orbits nearly 36,000 kilometres above earth. Although there are many benefits from this, a big drawback is the amount of time it takes for signals to travel to and from our satellites. That signal delay is called latency. It's not a big deal when used for broadcasting TV shows to households, but it's a very big deal when trying to provide the kind of super-fast, low-latency broadband you need to surf the Internet, engage in e-commerce or use other Internet applications like e-health and distance education. Low latency is going to be even more critical in a 5G world. By moving the satellites roughly 30 times closer to earth, our LEO constellation can deliver connectivity with latency equal to, or better than, that which fibre or terrestrial wireless services can achieve.

At Telesat, we don't provide broadband service directly to consumers. Instead, we provide a broadband pipe to telephone companies, mobile network operators and ISPs, who then provide the last-mile connection to rural consumers and other users. Telesat's LEO constellation will support delivery of affordable Internet connectivity with minimum speeds matching the CRTC-mandated 50 megabits down, 10 megabits back, and it can readily reach gigabit speeds. Telesat LEO will also help wireless carriers to economically extend the boundaries of where they can provide both LTE and 5G.

We plan to select a prime contractor to build the Telesat LEO constellation in the coming months. Our objective is to start launching satellites in 2021, begin service in Canada's north in mid-2022 and commence full global service in 2023.

Although other companies—including Amazon, SpaceX and SoftBank—also have plans to develop LEO constellations, Telesat has a significant competitive advantage by virtue of our deep technical resources, strong track record of innovation and unsurpassed commercial and regulatory expertise.

(0930)



In this regard, Telesat’s LEO constellation represents not only the best opportunity to definitively bridge the digital divide, but also a unique opportunity for a Canadian company—and the Canadian space industry more broadly—to take the lead in the burgeoning new space economy. That, in turn, will promote sustainable high-tech job creation and economic growth throughout the country for years to come.

With industry and government working together, the Telesat LEO constellation will revolutionize the delivery of high-performing, affordable broadband service throughout Canada and the rest of the world. It will also place Canada at the forefront of the new space economy.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We're going to move right into questions.

We're going to start with Mr. Amos. You have seven minutes.

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll be sharing my time, if there's any left, with Member Graham. I'm going to be very clipped in my questions; we only have a very short period of time.

My first question is to our hard-working public servants at the CRTC. Thank you for being here.

My 41 mayors in the Pontiac are very frustrated with the state of Internet. Our constituents are extremely dissatisfied. When I knock on doors, this is a top issue. I would be telling an untruth if I didn't say that the disappointment was palpable when I had to inform constituents that the first call for applications for the CRTC broadband fund was only open to the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Can you please explain that?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Absolutely. We defined the first call for applications for the territories plus satellite-dependent communities—in other words, the north, where we felt the need was the greatest. That's the start of the commission's approach.

We did announce that we will be having a call in the fall for the rest of Canada, including all regions of Canada and all project types—be it transport, access or mobile—following the first call. We wanted to really address the areas where we felt the need was the greatest, which was the north, including those satellite-dependent communities. In 2016 we set aside a maximum of 10% of the fund for those satellite-dependent communities. We wanted to start there as a first step to get some decisions out quickly, and then look at the larger problem in the rest of Canada—again, including the north.

(0935)

Mr. William Amos:

I appreciate that. I have questions in the back of my mind. Perhaps this could be responded to in writing. On what basis was that determination of greatest need made? It can't have been made on a population basis. I'm just trying to channel the frustrations of so many constituents and mayors. I don't mean to direct it toward the CRTC as an institution, but to the situation.

The CRTC's “Let's Talk Broadband” report was finalized in December of 2016. At that time, it was announced that there would be a fund established—all good ideas. It's taken a very long time to get to this point right now, where my constituents and my mayors look at me and say that they still can't even apply for funding through the CRTC.

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

We do run all our proceedings through an open public process where everybody has a voice—it's very transparent—to get that decision out and get the best solution out there from everybody involved. That obviously does take some time. We had a few processes to get to where we are now. I think we've probably gone as fast as we could have on any of those activities.

We do share the desire to get broadband everywhere, but it is a shared responsibility. We are only one piece of the solution for the $750 million. In 2016, and many times, we said that it's a shared leadership from private and public sectors; all levels of government have to step up to the table to solve the digital divide.

Mr. William Amos:

To go specifically to the issue of cellular coverage, which has become a major discussion point, particularly around public safety.... This national capital region and my riding of Pontiac have gone through two tornadoes and two floods in the last three years. Your remarks this morning do not address the issue of cellular.

I wonder to what extent you think that gaps in wireless coverage...so people can use mobile telephones for any reason, including public safety.... To what extent do you feel like we're on the right path now toward addressing that, with the $750-million fund and the investments that have been made available by our government?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

In my opening remarks I did mention a few times that our basic service includes mobile. I think we're one of the first countries that includes mobile as part of our basic service where everybody should have that—not just in households, but on all major roads in Canada. We have that included in our eligible projects in both calls for applications that we have identified.

I think it's very important to get that in place. We do have fairly extensive coverage right now. There are still people without it, but we're at 99.4% coverage of mobile right now—98.5% for the latest technology—for households. About 10% of our major roads are not covered right now, so that is certainly a public safety issue that needs to be addressed. Obviously, that's where the business case is the hardest for anybody—to build out those long stretches of highway. As I mentioned, only 25% in the north carries.... That would be one of our first calls, in an area where there are long stretches where people don't have any connectivity and no other services around. It really is an issue that is exacerbated in that area.

Mr. William Amos:

I have two minutes. I don't want to completely run out the clock, so I'll pass it over to member Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you. I appreciate it.

To Mr. Ghiz, it's very rare that I'll say this, but I think I agree with everything you've said. With the [Inaudible—Editor], that doesn't happen too often. I appreciate having this opportunity.

When the CRTC mandate Minister Bains announced recently talked about competition, my concern was: what is the point of competition, if you don't have service to begin with? The biggest issue I have is this. Mr. Amos' riding and my riding are neighbouring. Together, they are much larger than Belgium. It's a very big territory. I have entire communities that have neither Internet nor cellphones. How do we get those communities connected on cellphones, so that emergency services, as Mr. Amos was talking about, don't have to meet at city hall every hour, and then go back out onto the ground? What's the fastest path to getting proper coverage of all our small towns?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

Great question.

You heard from the CRTC, and us. It's not easy, and doesn't always make economical sense. I think government now, and in the past, has been on the right path, in terms of supporting facilities-based carriers, because they're the ones that build the networks. Has coverage increased fast enough for everyone? I like to say that when we use the number 99%, with 35 million Canadians, that means there are still 350,000 Canadians who don't have access. You don't hear from the 34 million or 32 million who have it. You hear from the ones who don't have it.

What we need to do, moving into the future, is look at regulations—and this is why this motion is important—on how that connectivity is going to happen that much faster. I've listed a couple of things, but the announcement of the capital cost allowance was extremely beneficial, and encouraged investment to happen. We have the connect fund at ISED, which is very good. We have the CRTC fund, which our members are funding. Provinces have their own funds. Some municipalities have their own funds, such as EORN.

I think the key to all of that is coordination amongst them all, and also flexibility in the funds. SaskTel is one of our members. I was talking to them the other day. They have a large province. They want to see flexibility in these funds, so that broadband includes fixed wireless as well.

(0940)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move on to Mr. Albas.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all our witnesses for coming and sharing your expertise with our committee today.

I'd like to start by addressing something I heard today and something that has come up recently. First of all, to the CRTC, Mr. Amos has expressed frustration with the choice of starting with many of those rural and remote northern communities. Considering that many of them have very little, if no, coverage, because of market failure or cost, I can see why you'd want to start there. People who live that far away are Canadians too, and deserve to have the benefit of those kinds of programs. We should always be mindful of putting those who have the least first.

The government has announced a clawback of 3,500 MHz spectrum currently owned by, among others, Xplornet, which we heard from on Tuesday. When I asked about the impacts, they said they would be significant. I know the government has made some slight alterations to their plan, but it's still a major clawback.

I think it's somewhat absurd to study rural connectivity and not address the fact that a government decision may have cut off the Internet connections of thousands of rural customers. I'm prepared to move a motion to study this, but I'm also aware of the lack of time to do so, with the end of session fast approaching.

I think we must engage with the fact that we're talking about ways to increase rural connectivity, but the government is reducing it. In my opinion, we should at least make reference to the decision, and its impacts, in the report, or find out from the affected companies how many people will be affected by this policy choice.

I want to ensure the witnesses who made time for the committee have a chance to answer questions, so I'm going to end there. I hope the Liberal members who are clearly concerned about rural connectivity are willing to address the fact that the government may have just put a hatchet to it.

To the CRTC, I'm hoping you'll further indulge me for a quick second. A colleague has a constituent paying an extra $2.95 administration fee on their bill. They were told by their local provider that it's a mandated CRTC charge that only applies to a specific geographic area. If you can't answer this, could you please get me in touch with someone in your organization, so we can talk about the issue?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Do you know what the bill item is for?

Mr. Dan Albas:

It just says “admin fee” on the line item, and when the constituent phoned and asked, they said that the CRTC mandated that to their local area to collect that fee and gave no further explanation.

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Where we have tariffed services—this is going back in time now a little bit—local calling regions were extended. There were additional costs associated with that, where we regulated the rates that the incumbent had to provide, and they were allowed to charge extra to extend that local calling to a wider region. That might be what it is.

Mr. Dan Albas:

It may be something that the CRTC may want to revisit in terms of transparency so that people can know, because it just says “admin fee” and all people are told is a government body told the local provider to put it on there. I think there should be sufficient transparency on this.

To the CWTA, Mr. Ghiz, thank you for being here.

The minister of ISED said yesterday he did not know where the tipping point is for prices and investment. At what point would the revenue from customers be too low to discourage facility investment? What is the tipping point of your members?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

I'm not going to get into direct costs with our members, but I will say this: the tipping point is looking at the overall public policy. The overall public policy that we've had in Canada now for the last 10 or 15 years, since a policy directive came down in 2006 by the previous government that has been followed through by this government, is that investment by facilities-based carriers is extremely important. If you've looked at what's happened through this program, you have the three national providers, and now you have all these regional providers across the country. What the regional providers are doing is providing more competition, which is allowing prices to go down while also encouraging all members to expand their network so that they can gain new customers.

Just to demonstrate how well it is working right now, in the last quarter, out of all new net subscribers, Freedom and Vidéotron received 84% of those new subscribers, so it's showing that it is working.

I used this in my speech the other day at the telecom conference. It's like your doctor giving you a prescription, an antibiotic, for a cold you had. We had a cold; we had a problem with our wireless coverage and prices across the country. You're given that antibiotic, you take it for four days, and then you think the problem's gone away, even though the prescription said seven days, so you get sicker.

What I'm saying is that we're still in that process of taking our antibiotics to ensure that we can have great networks with reasonable prices in our country. It is working, and we just need more time to allow that to continue.

(0945)

Mr. Dan Albas:

We're studying rural wireless access here, and that is crucial. However, as my colleague has said, access does not mean much if it's too expensive. What kind of guarantees can we get from you and your organization, particularly your members, that expansion of service will not be met with hugely increased fees?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

I think you have to look at it. Our members are not going to go out to build in communities if they're not going to price it at a level that people are going to pay for. I think you get markets that will dictate what will happen, and what you will see is, because you have the new entrants and the three national providers involved, competition is leading to lower prices. I like to point out that, if you look between 2014 and 2018, believe it or not, the price for a gigabit of data has gone down by approximately 54%. It is working, and our members want to continue to build out. They want to work with government, the CRTC and municipalities, but flexibility is going to be a key in that.

Mr. Dan Albas:

We certainly all want to have world-class speed and access, but it's clear that, to virtually all Canadians, prices are a barrier to that access. The best coverage in the world does not mean a lot if people can't afford the service. I certainly don't want this to be an argument over these things.

How do you think we can work, government and industry, to see where we have both affordability and access to Internet?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

That's a great question and great point. We believe in quality coverage and affordable prices. The mechanisms that we have in place today are leading towards those lower prices, but now is not the time to pull a 180 and move in a direction that will hurt our new entrants in delivering the competition that will deliver those more affordable prices.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here.

Under testimony at another committee, the new Minister of Rural Economic Development has said that none of this motion will be made through either legislation or regulation. That was clarified. I was quite surprised by that, but they are important discussions that we're having. Some of these matters still have time to be done, but unfortunately, the government doesn't seem prepared to support that.

Having said that, I want to clarify something. The CRTC, with regard to your submissions today, talked about download speeds of at least 50 megabits per second, Mbps, and upload speeds of 10 Mbps. The original investment is 25 and five. Can you clarify that? You presented here today the overall of 50 and 10, but my understanding is that you've allowed 25 and five. Is this not correct?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

The universal service objective is 50/10 Mbps as a minimum. We want all Canadians to have that. In 2016, we indicated that some very remote regions may require incremental steps to get there. To allow for that, we'll be accepting applications that do not meet the 50/10 initially, but would be able to get there eventually.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's going to create quite a problem, though, because obviously that service requirement of 25/5 is a lot less and has technical problems. Is that to rural and remote communities? Are they communities that are identified, for example, as more indigenous areas? Are they more remote? What are the sacrificed areas? Quite frankly, if you're not willing to live up to your own objectives, why would the private sector actually have any incentive to do that?

(0950)

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

The design of the fund is such that it's a competitive process, so projects will be evaluated and we will be selecting only the high-quality projects. It's not tied to any specific regions. Of the projects that come in, the projects that get selected will have the high quality, the meeting of the universal service objective at 50/10 and the quality of service aspects, and—very important—unlimited data option, as well. I would expect that we may not select anything below 50/10, but we'll have to see what projects we get.

Mr. Brian Masse:

If you do, at 25/5 it'll have unlimited buffering. That's what's going to be happening with the users. Quite frankly, if $750 million was announced with regard to the 2016 decision to reorient the money that's being collected, I find it hard to believe that we'd build a second-class-citizen system in place right now. What's the duration of time that an applicant will get if they can actually have their speeds right now? What's going to be the timeline to meet what the rest of Canadians are going to be delivered in terms of the 50/10?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Our goal is to get everyone to 50/10, and the government has also indicated that, by 2030, it wants everybody at that particular target, and that's what we're working toward as well.

Mr. Brian Masse:

How long will they have from the 25/5 to the 50/10?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

There are people without broadband right now, and we're working to get them all there by 2030. That's the certain timeline right now.

Mr. Brian Masse:

This is completely outrageous. You don't even have a deadline for that. We're building a second-class-citizen system here.

I want to move to the spectrum auction coming on. Both the Conservative and Liberal governments have $20 billion of play money with regard to actually getting...and no actual cost. They have direct revenue from spectrum auction out there, and now we're going to actually build a second-class-citizen system.

I would like to move to Mr. Ghiz, with regard to the facilities-based auction. Can you outline that a little bit more? Part of this is that we've had a cash grab for the spectrum auction as a primary element, and you're suggesting a different type of auction.

I'd like you to detail that with regard to infrastructure being included as part of the bidding process.

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

In terms of the spectrum, what I was talking about with regard to the directive was around ensuring that infrastructure is involved in there. When it comes to spectrum, you're right. We believe that the fees that are being charged to our members are some of the highest in the world. That's happening in Canada. That's money that's directly going to be charged back to customers.

Mr. Brian Masse:

In other words, it affects your price.

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

Yes, it does. I think that, if we could look at a way to reduce spectrum fees, reduce spectrum auction costs, that would be something that would be beneficial in the long run, or as you've pointed out—and I've read some of your comments in the past—use that money to directly help connect Canadians.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I think that is the missing part of the equation that Canadians fail to understand—the $20 billion that we've received, really, for basically selling the skies and creating toll roads in the skies for consumers versus that of actually getting the infrastructure out there. The $750 million—let's be clear on this—is going to be collected from the companies as well, so that additionally will be rolled into prices for Canadians. Basically, $21 billion is out there as a public policy to collect for government revenue and for services versus actually achieving those objectives. I find, quite frankly, the CRTC's decision to do this quite offensive, given the fact that we have these opportunities.

I do want to return to the 10%. What 10% of the country is going to be left out? You said 90% by 2021. What 10% has been identified? What are those regions? We should know specifically those regions. I want to know where that 10% is located.

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Right now we have the information on our website; the maps indicate which regions are below the universal service objective. Part of that solution will be based on where the private sector goes; where other public funding extends the network and where—

Mr. Brian Masse:

I don't want the website. Tell Canadians, right now, what 10% of the country. Some of them can't even go on the website since they don't have service, so tell the country right now. What's that 10% that is going to be, basically, forsaken?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Well, in a general sense, it's really in the more remote regions of Canada, in the rural regions of Canada, and we need to address that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

How can you address that, then? Is the mandate you have not strong enough? What was the decision for basically carving off the 10%? It seems ridiculous to not finish the last 10% if we're actually saying that we're going to have it for everybody. What are you missing as a mandate, then, to get the whole country under this type of an umbrella?

(0955)

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

We're a part of the solution. We are stepping up to the table to get the $750 million out. We're looking to get everybody at that level. It does take time to build these networks—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Has there been an economic analysis done to say basically what you need for that 10%? I think it's a fair question. I mean, if we want to have this goal, and we say we're going to have it as a country, what do you need to get it done?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

The estimates are $8 billion to $9 billion total of investment. The Internet will continue to grow and evolve. I expect that there will be more requirements. As we get to other technologies, there will be more investment requirements. This is something that we will continue to review and address as best we can.

We take affordability very seriously as well. We're reducing local subsidy...because we did support phone service with a contribution regime similar to what we're doing with broadband. As we reduce the local subsidy, we're increasing the broadband subsidy so that it's almost a revenue-neutral aspect to the carriers. Broadband is a big issue. We started off with universal service on voice service. We were spending a billion dollars at the start to extend the voice network out to everybody in Canada.

So we're starting to do that work now. The network will not be built in a short period of time. It is extensive and difficult. You get to the hockey stick in the more remote regions. That's why we want to start there, to get at those areas first, and then get everywhere else. All levels of government—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Well, investing in obsolescence isn't necessarily a strategy.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll move to Mr. Longfield, please, for seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks for a very good discussion. I'm glad we're able to get some additional testimony for the report we'd started.

Mr. Goldberg, I wanted to talk about the Telesat network, the constellation. Our committee went to Washington a few years back and learned about the north-south network they were launching—about 4,200 satellites, if I remember correctly. I'm wondering how that interacts with the Canadian constellation. You talked about a “fully meshed” system. Do we mesh with other countries as well?

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

I can only imagine that the other constellation you're referring to is a constellation that SpaceX has in mind. These constellations are inherently global. There's not necessarily a Canadian one. There's not necessarily a U.S. one. They are backed by companies. Ours is a Canadian constellation in the sense that we're a Canadian company.

We'll need to coordinate our operations with theirs. We can operate on different portions of the radio frequencies of the spectrum; that's where most of the interference is. It's less an issue of the satellites physically bumping into each other—although that is an issue that we all have to be mindful of—and more an issue of us not creating interference to each other's signals.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

A body in Geneva that's part of the UN, that's called the International Telecommunication Union, allocates spectrum. I'm happy to say that Telesat Canada has priority rights to make use of the spectrum on a global basis, which we intend to use and our friends at SpaceX intend to use. They're secondary to us. They will need to work around our operations.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

The coordination of our spectrum with their spectrum and our technology with their technology is something that we're currently engaged with.

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

We are engaged. There will be engagement at the operator level, which is to say we are engaging with folks at SpaceX to make sure we don't interfere with one another, while recognizing that we are in the priority position. At the end of the day, it takes place at a government-to-government level. We'll need our regulator, our administration in Canada, ISED, standing up with their American counterparts to make sure this all works.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great. A lot of the solution will be the technology that's being employed, and—

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

We are big believers that there's a lot of opportunity to innovate. Significant capital investments are required, but we can solve this issue. We're working on it.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great.

In terms of innovation, we had testimony on ground-based mesh technology. In my previous lifetime, we looked at nodes of intelligence on machines and at having redundancy on the machines instead of having some central control system where, if it fails, the entire plant goes down. If we look at ground-based mesh technology, is that something you're also engaged with—for example, phone-to-phone communications rather than phone-to-satellite communications?

(1000)

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

Yes. When we're ultimately serving mobile users, it won't be directly from the satellite to those mobile handsets. We'll provide a great big broadband pipe to a wireless tower anywhere in the world and that wireless tower will then communicate with the handsets and people's households, our own constellation. We don't think of our constellation as just a space-based constellation. It's fully integrated with a very advanced ground network. It is fully meshed, fully redundant. It also relies on artificial intelligence and machine learning in terms of how it's managing the traffic and handing off the traffic. It's a very resilient network.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

How would Canadian innovators test new technology with you? What's the interaction?

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

They just come to us. We're doing it now. We've already launched one of these. We're running tests with companies all over the world. We performed a test with Vodafone in the U.K., demonstrating how LEO constellations can support 5G connectivity.

We are working with Canadian companies as well, testing user terminals, testing compression technologies, testing all sorts of things. We're all very motivated to work with each other and to push the envelope of innovation. The good news is that a lot of that collaboration and co-operation are already taking place.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Are you part of another network? I'm thinking in terms of machine technology. There was a network created that was called the Open Device Net Vendor Association. Anybody developing technology would have to be compatible with the DeviceNet technology so that Europe and North America could be on similar standards. Asia was always a little bit different.

Is Telesat part of a network or do people just directly connect with Telesat?

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

Our LEO constellation will be fully and, I would say, seamlessly integrated with other terrestrial networks, wireless networks and fixed-line networks all around the world. Our constellation will operate within the Metro Ethernet Forum standards. These are the standards that all tier 1 telcos use to run their traffic. Our constellation will be compatible with the same standards.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Mr. Ghiz or Mr. Seidl, you mentioned the regulatory confusion. Is there a regulatory gap that we need to be looking at filling with the Telesat network and ground-based networks? Do we handle all of this effectively through regulations now or is this part of the confusion that you mentioned?

Mr. Eric Smith (Vice-President, Regulatory Affairs, Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association):

I can answer that.

That wasn't really part of the policy confusion we were referring to.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

Mr. Eric Smith:

In terms of our industry, our members, being able to utilize technology such as Telesat, absolutely there's the possibility. Technology is evolving. The laws of physics don't evolve, but technology does. Our members try to utilize the best technology for the best-use case. Canada's a huge country, so some people use wireless and some people use satellite. There are definitely opportunities.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Is the CRTC fine with what's going on or are there any changes there that we need to look at?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

No, we're very technology-neutral. We have certain levels we want to get to. We look for innovative solutions to get there.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's great, so it's just a matter of getting people connected?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Yes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's what we're talking about.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'll be sharing my time with Mr. Lloyd.

This is for the CRTC and the CWTA.

A lot of people ask about the huge increases to mobile prices, and we hear that the services people are asking for have increased over time, and that the data used even five years ago is very cheap nowadays but that modern data demands have increased.

When I talk to my constituents, I have to agree with them. I think it's a bit of a cop-out answer. Technology always changes, and consumer demands increase. Other countries have data plans, sometimes unlimited, for far cheaper than we have here. Why is that?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

I'll start off with that. I think what you're seeing now—and what I talked about—is that the model we have in Canada today, in which we're supporting facilities-based competition, is actually starting to lead towards lower prices. Are we as low as everyone would like? Probably not. But I can say this: between Q1 2014 and Q2 2018 we saw a 53.6% decrease for a gigabit of data. Between May 2017 and November 2018 we saw a 67% decrease. The price is starting to come down as competition and the growth of the regional players are taking place.

Our point is that now is not the time to divert from supporting facilities-based competition, because, quite frankly, doing so will hurt in terms of growing out in rural areas and it will most likely hurt our new entrants first and worst.

(1005)

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

The CRTC launched a proceeding in February to look at the mobile wireless market...a very broad look at the affordability, the competitiveness and barriers to deployment. I can't discuss any of the specifics on that, because it's an open proceeding, but in the call for comments we did indicate a full review. We thought it was time maybe to mandate mobile virtual network operators to help with that, but it's a very extensive review that is well under way with a hearing next January.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'll pass my time to Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you.

Thank you for coming.

My first question is for Mr. Seidl.

We've been talking a lot about prices and access today, but what I want to talk about is the threat of natural disasters to our communications infrastructure systems. It's an issue really close to my heart. As was noted, we had tornadoes in Ottawa that took down some power, and the generators just couldn't last long enough before these facilities were prepared. I've also had constituents bring forward to me real, possible threats from coronal mass ejections and solar flares creating electromagnetic pulses that could impact our.... These are theoretical, but they could happen.

What lessons has the CRTC learned from natural disasters, and what steps are being taken to protect our communications infrastructure from the very real threat of natural disasters?

Thank you.

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

I'll talk from what we've done in the past.

We had a review a few years ago to look at our 911 system and networks. We did an extensive review making sure that they were resilient and survivable, and we set certain requirements. We found them to be very resilient. These are the networks that deliver the calls to the public safety answering points, and they interconnect to the local networks. We have best practices that we put in place, and we have some requirements there. We had an extensive review of that.

For emergency preparedness, that's the responsibility of ISED and Public Safety. We don't get involved in that particular space, but we are aware of their other aspects. We do, obviously, regulate the emergency alerting for the broadcasters and the cellphone companies now, so that's another aspect that we're involved with, plus managing the 911 system in general.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

My concern is that if our systems are down, people won't be able to receive those emergency alerts if they're not getting any access on their phones.

I guess maybe this is a question for Mr. Ghiz. What are our facilities-based companies doing to harden their systems so that we can ensure that we have continuity of service in the case of a natural disaster?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

I'll have Eric take that.

Mr. Eric Smith:

Thanks. It's a great question.

Obviously our members are the prime concern. They want their networks to be up and running. Natural disasters, as you mentioned, do happen, and I think you're probably referring to the time when there was a storm in Ottawa and the electrical generators blew up and cut off power for days.

There is resiliency built in the networks. Everything's theoretically possible. You can increase that resilience more and more times. It gets more expensive, and then we get into the affordability issue, so there's a balance there. I think we're confident in our members; we have some of the best carriers in the world. They're using best practices and are continually reviewing those, and I'm sure they have discussions with government about that as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now for the final five minutes, we have Mr. Sheehan.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much to all the presenters. That was very informative.

I represent an area that's called semi-rural. Sault Ste. Marie is a medium-sized community, and the outlying areas are combined with various sizes of communities and townships and local service boards to first nations. My area in Canada, along the Lake Superior shoreline, has different geographical topography to it. It also has a bunch of parks, both provincial and national. It's interesting. You're driving on Highway 17 and you'd think that on Highway 17 you'd get reception—well, not necessarily, for a variety of reasons.

It's like that all across Canada, where you'd think, “Oh, when we're talking about rural areas, we're talking about remote”—but not necessarily. We're talking about along our highway corridors, whether they're primary or secondary highways, where we don't have reception. In fact, I used to always pack a survival bag—just a big black bag that had everything I needed to live in case I got stuck. We still use those up in our neck of the woods.

When I was on the school board in the late 1990s, we did a lot of work putting towers up and partnering with different folks. My question is, overall, what kinds of steps are you taking, particularly with the MUSH sectors that are out there in those communities, to provide services to the areas they already serve? They're smaller. They don't quite have the big budgets. But there are a lot of people who have really innovative ideas. For instance, the CRTC just did a call for proposals. Who's applying for those kinds of things, and how are you reaching out? I might make my question more specific. How are you reaching out to rural Canada, specifically, to get uptake?

(1010)

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

For our broadband fund, part of our goal is to ensure there's community involvement. One of our criteria we'll be assessing in the projects is the level of support the projects that are put forward have from the communities. For the people who are going to be submitting applications—the service providers—their projects will be considered of a higher quality the more engaged they are with the local communities in understanding their needs. We expect that projects will come in, we'll have those conversations and we'll be looking to serve the priority for the areas.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I'm still trying to understand it. How are you marketing and making efforts, first of all, to get the information out to rural Canada, and are there special considerations for those particular applications in trying to get money out to the communities?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

As I mentioned, we have the criteria for that, and we expect local, provincial and territorial governments to play a role in helping to bring those priorities to us. We're looking for projects from all regions. As I mentioned, one of the criteria is the community involvement.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Robert, you mentioned in your remarks that you submitted some suggestions, if you will, policy suggestions, to lay this ground. You didn't mention what feedback or what kind of response you got. Could you please comment on that?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

Is this around the directive?

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Yes, the one you mentioned.

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

It's interesting. My understanding is that before Parliament rises the directive will be tabled in Parliament. I think the message I'm getting is that people at ISED and different officials are understanding that investment in infrastructure is extremely important. We've been going in to explain out our story.

I don't want to get too much into politics, but I will say that sometimes when you get closer to an election time, good public policy goes out the door for good politics. I will say that from everything I've seen, good public policy is about encouraging investments of our facilities-based carriers to help cover off the gaps—why we're here today. Any change in that direction, in our opinion, is going to slow down that investment we're seeing, the collaboration we're seeing and also the reduction in prices we're seeing, because the new entrants are creating that.

It's being heard. We'll wait to see what I guess ISED and the minister have to say, but I like to be optimistic, and I'm hoping that our message is being delivered.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That brings us to our time today.

Thank you to our witnesses for being here today for such an important matter.

Before we go, I just have a reminder to committee that we will likely be getting the draft report on Tuesday of next week, so we won't be meeting Tuesday, but we will be meeting on Thursday at our regular time.

Thank you, everybody, for being here today.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0915)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Comme nous n'avons qu'une heure à notre disposition aujourd'hui, nous allons renoncer aux préliminaires pour passer directement au vif du sujet.

Bienvenue à cette séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 8 mai 2019, nous poursuivons notre étude des infrastructures numériques rurales faisant suite à la motion M-208.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui trois représentants du CRTC, soit M. Christopher Seidl, directeur exécutif, Télécommunications; M. Ian Baggley, directeur général, Télécommunications; et Mme Renée Doiron, directrice, Ingénierie de la large bande et des réseaux.

De l'Association canadienne des télécommunications sans fil, nous recevons M. Robert Ghiz, président et chef de la direction; et M. Eric Smith, vice-président, Affaires réglementaires.

Nous accueillons enfin, de Télésat Canada, M. Daniel Goldberg, président et chef de la direction; et Mme Michele Beck, vice-présidente des ventes, Amérique du Nord.

Bienvenue à tous. Étant donné le peu de temps dont nous disposons, nous vous laissons à chacun cinq minutes pour votre exposé après quoi nous passerons directement aux questions. Nous commençons par M. Seidl du CRTC.

M. Christopher Seidl (directeur exécutif, Télécommunications, Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous vous remercions de nous donner l'occasion de contribuer à votre étude faisant suite à la motion M-208. Cette étude aborde d'importants domaines relevant de la compétence des organismes de réglementation des télécommunications au Canada, soit Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada (ISDE) à titre d'organisme de réglementation du spectre et le CRTC.

Au sein du monde dans lequel nous vivons aujourd'hui, peu importe l'endroit au Canada, une infrastructure numérique fiable et accessible est indispensable tant pour les particuliers que pour les institutions publiques et les entreprises de toutes tailles.[Français]

C'est pourquoi, en décembre 2016, le Conseil a annoncé que le service Internet à large bande était désormais considéré comme un service de télécommunications de base.

L'objectif du service universel du CRTC entend que tous les Canadiens doivent avoir accès à des services d'accès Internet à large bande fixes. Ces services devraient offrir des vitesses de téléchargement d'au moins 50 mégabits par seconde, et des vitesses de téléversement d'au moins 10 mégabits par seconde, en plus d'offrir une option de données illimitées.

De plus, la technologie sans fil mobile la plus récente doit être disponible pour tous les foyers et toutes les entreprises, ainsi que le long des principales routes canadiennes. Notre objectif est d'atteindre une couverture de 90 % d'ici la fin de 2021 et de 100 % le plus tôt possible pendant la décennie suivante. Nous voulons que tous les Canadiens, qu'ils vivent en région rurale, en région éloignée ou en centre urbain, aient accès à des services de voix et d'Internet à large bande sur des réseaux sans fil fixes et mobiles de manière qu'ils puissent être branchés et participer efficacement à l'économie numérique. L'atteinte de cet objectif demandera des efforts des gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux, ainsi que du secteur privé.[Traduction]

Nous agissons sur tous les fronts pour atteindre cet objectif. L'une de nos plus importantes initiatives est le Fonds pour la large bande du CRTC. Le conseil a établi ce fonds pour améliorer les services à large bande dans les régions rurales et éloignées pour lesquelles le niveau d'accès n'est pas acceptable. Le Fonds pour la large bande distribuera un maximum de 750 millions de dollars au cours des cinq premières années pour appuyer des projets de construction et de mise à niveau de l'infrastructure d'accès et de transport afin d'offrir des services d'accès Internet à large bande sans fil fixes et mobiles dans les régions mal desservies.

Les contributions au Fonds pour la large bande sont recueillies auprès des fournisseurs de services de télécommunication en fonction de leurs revenus.

Le Fonds vise à compléter, et non à remplacer, le financement public et l'investissement privé actuels et futurs. Jusqu'à 10 % du montant annuel sera accordé aux collectivités dépendantes des satellites. Une considération particulière peut aussi être accordée aux projets ciblant les communautés autochtones ou les communautés de langue officielle en situation minoritaire.

Plus tôt cette semaine, nous avons lancé le premier appel de demandes de financement provenant du Fonds pour la large bande pour les projets dans trois territoires ainsi que dans des collectivités dépendantes des satellites au Canada. Selon les plus récentes données, il n'y a actuellement aucun foyer au nord du 60e parallèle qui ait accès à un service Internet à large bande satisfaisant à l'objectif du service universel du CRTC. À peine le quart des routes principales dans les territoires sont couverts par le service sans fil mobile LTE.

Le fossé numérique est également évident dans les collectivités dépendantes des satellites à l'échelle du pays qui ne sont pas connectées par voie terrestre.

Les sociétés canadiennes de toutes tailles, les organismes des administrations provinciales, territoriales et municipales, les conseils de bande et les gouvernements autochtones qui ont l'expérience nécessaire peuvent — isolément ou dans le cadre d'un consortium — présenter une demande financement.

Le CRTC annoncera en 2020 les projets sélectionnés à l'issue du premier appel de demandes. Un deuxième appel, ouvert à tous les types de projets dans toutes les régions du Canada, sera lancé cet automne.

Le fonds du CRTC ne représente qu'une partie du travail qui doit être accompli par les secteurs public et privé. À cette fin, nous avons souligné dans le plus récent budget fédéral un nouveau financement de 1,7 milliard de dollars pour fournir un accès Internet haute vitesse à l'ensemble des Canadiens. Le gouvernement prévoit coordonner ses activités avec celles des provinces, des territoires et des institutions fédérales, comme le CRTC, afin de maximiser l'incidence de ces investissements.

Nous appuyons les efforts du gouvernement dans la mesure de ce que nous permet notre mandat et notre statut d'organisme de réglementation indépendant.

Monsieur le président, même avec le soutien financier provenant du Fonds pour la large bande du CRTC ou d'autres sources publiques, des fournisseurs de services Internet peuvent toujours se heurter à des défis et à des obstacles susceptibles de limiter leur capacité à faciliter l'accès aux services à large bande dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

(0920)

[Français]

C'est pourquoi nous planifions une nouvelle instance relative au déploiement de la large bande dans les régions rurales. Nous examinerons des facteurs tels que la disponibilité des services de transport dans les régions rurales et l'accès des structures de soutien. Ces services sont essentiels pour étendre les services d'accès Internet à large bande et favoriser la concurrence, en particulier dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

Étendre les services à large bande aux ménages, aux entreprises et aux routes principales mal desservis est une nécessité absolue dans les quatre coins du pays, y compris dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

L'accès aux technologies numériques améliorera la sécurité publique et permettra à tous les Canadiens de profiter des services numériques novateurs, existants et nouveaux, qui sont maintenant un élément central de leur vie de tous les jours.[Traduction]

Nous serons ravis de répondre à toutes vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à l'Association canadienne des télécommunications sans fil.

Monsieur Ghiz.

M. Robert Ghiz (président et chef de la direction, Association canadienne des télécommunications sans fil):

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Bonjour.

Je vous remercie de nous donner l'occasion de prendre la parole ici ce matin.[Traduction]

La motion M-208 demandait à ce comité d'étudier les approches fiscales et réglementaires visant à favoriser les investissements dans l'infrastructure sans fil en milieu rural.

Depuis que les services sans fil ont été lancés au Canada, les fournisseurs dotés d'installations, soit les entreprises qui investissent des capitaux pour bâtir des réseaux et acquérir des droits d'utilisation du spectre, se sont attaqués au défi que représente la construction de l'infrastructure de réseau sans fil dans un pays aussi vaste et à la géographie aussi complexe que le nôtre.

Jusqu'à maintenant, les entreprises de services sans fil dotées d'installations ont investi plus 50 milliards de dollars pour la mise en place de nos réseaux sans fil. Toutes proportions gardées, c'est davantage que dans tout autre pays du G7 et qu'en Australie. Ces entreprises ont également dépensé quelque 20 milliards de dollars pour participer à des ventes aux enchères du spectre et payer les droits annuels associés à leur licence de spectre. Nos membres financent également le nouveau Fonds pour la large bande du CRTC.

Grâce à tous ces investissements, les Canadiens peuvent bénéficier de réseaux se situant au deuxième rang parmi les plus rapides au monde, deux fois plus rapides que ceux des États-Unis. Selon le CRTC, 99 % des Canadiens ont accès depuis leur domicile à un réseau sans fil LTE.

Bien qu'il s'agisse là d'un important accomplissement, nous avons encore beaucoup de pain sur la planche. C'est ainsi que nous avons eu droit au cours des derniers mois à des annonces au sujet d'investissements considérables visant à assurer une plus grande couverture des régions rurales.

À titre d'exemple, Bell a annoncé que ses services sans fil fixes seraient étendus à plus de 30 petites villes et collectivités rurales de l'Ontario et du Québec. Rogers a annoncé pour sa part des investissements de 100 millions de dollars pour assurer une couverture sans fil pour appareils mobiles le long de 1 000 kilomètres de routes rurales et éloignées des différentes régions du Canada. Des investissements semblables sont également consentis par des fournisseurs régionaux de services sans fil, comme Freedom Mobile, Vidéotron, Eastlink, Xplornet et SaskTel.

Malheureusement, l'avenir des investissements est plutôt incertain, surtout dans les régions rurales. Comme on le reconnaît dans la motion M-208, la réglementation peut favoriser les investissements, mais aussi avoir l'effet contraire.[Français]

Malheureusement, les investissements futurs, en particulier en zone rurale, sont incertains. Comme le reconnaît la motion M-208, la réglementation peut parfois encourager les investissements, mais elle peut aussi avoir l'effet inverse.[Traduction]

Dans l'élaboration des politiques canadiennes en matière de télécommunications, on a longtemps considéré que la concurrence fondée sur la mise à disposition d'installations est la meilleure façon d'encourager les investissements. Grâce aux politiques basées sur ce principe, une concurrence durable sur le marché au détail des services sans fil est en train de prendre de l'ampleur, avec pour résultat une croissance continue du nombre d'abonnés à ces services, une consommation accrue de données, une réduction des prix et un plus large éventail de choix pour le consommateur.

Élément tout aussi important, les investissements réguliers des fournisseurs dotés d'installations au Canada continuent d'étendre la portée des réseaux sans fil au pays, aussi bien pour les services fixes que mobiles. Pendant qu'il insiste, d'une part, sur l'importance de continuer à investir dans notre infrastructure sans fil pour en étendre la portée tout en adoptant des mesures fiscales ciblées à cette fin, le gouvernement envisage, d'autre part, des mesures qui, si l'on va de l'avant, vont dissuader les investisseurs et défavoriser de façon disproportionnée les Canadiens des régions rurales.

Plus tôt cette année, Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada (ISDE) a proposé une orientation stratégique qui obligeait le CRTC à accorder la priorité aux objectifs liés à l'accroissement de la concurrence et à la diminution des prix lorsqu'il prend des décisions de nature réglementaire. Bien que nous soyons en faveur de ces objectifs, nous avons été étonnés qu'il ne soit fait aucunement mention des investissements dans les infrastructures consentis par les fournisseurs de services dotés d'installations.

Au cours de la période de consultation, nous avons demandé au ministre de revoir cette directive stratégique pour inclure une référence à la nécessité d'investir dans les infrastructures à titre de priorité clé pour le CRTC. Parallèlement à cela, dans l'un des constats préliminaires découlant de son examen du cadre réglementaire de l'industrie sans fil, le CRTC a indiqué que les exploitants de réseau mobile virtuel devraient bénéficier d'un accès garanti aux services de gros des réseaux sans fil opérés par les fournisseurs nationaux.

Ces exploitants de réseau mobile virtuel n'investissent pas dans les infrastructures sans fil ou dans les droits relatifs au spectre. Ils paient plutôt des tarifs de gros établis par l'instance réglementaire pour utiliser les réseaux des fournisseurs dotés d'installations et se servent de cet accès garanti pour accroître leur nombre d'abonnés en livrant concurrence à ces mêmes fournisseurs dotés d'installations qui investissent pour étendre leurs réseaux.

Dans les pays où l'on a fait l'essai d'une telle formule, les investissements dans les réseaux ont chuté considérablement. Ces pays s'emploient actuellement à renverser la vapeur.

Le CRTC a déjà refusé à deux reprises de rendre l'accès garanti pour les exploitants de réseau mobile virtuel, sachant très bien que cela allait réduire les investissements dans les réseaux sans fil. On ne sait pas trop exactement pourquoi on envisage maintenant une solution semblable, d'autant plus qu'ISDE et le CRTC se sont tous deux donné comme objectif prioritaire de connecter tous les Canadiens.

(0925)



Si le gouvernement estime vraiment qu'il est prioritaire à ce point de connecter tous les Canadiens, ses politiques devraient aller dans le sens de cet objectif. Ceci dit très respectueusement, la confusion qui règne actuellement à ce niveau va plutôt nuire aux efforts déployés pour étendre la connectivité en milieu rural. Nous voulons travailler de concert avec le gouvernement. Nous souhaitons collaborer avec le CRTC de telle sorte que le taux de couverture puisse passer de 99 % à 100 %, et que les Canadiens aient accès aux meilleurs réseaux sans fil au monde.

Merci beaucoup. Nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant aux représentants de Télésat Canada. Monsieur Goldberg, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Daniel Goldberg (président et chef de la direction, Télésat Canada):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, d'avoir invité Télésat à participer à votre séance d'aujourd'hui. Merci également à tous les membres de ce comité pour la détermination dont ils font preuve dans leurs efforts pour améliorer la connectivité à large bande en milieu rural et combler le fossé numérique qui existe au Canada.

Mes collègues de Télésat et moi-même ne saurions dire à quel point nous souscrivons à votre objectif d'offrir rapidement et à un coût abordable une connectivité Internet à la fine pointe de la technologie aux millions de Canadiens qui en sont privés actuellement. Heureusement, Télésat a un plan bien concret pour en arriver justement à un tel résultat, et dispose de tous les moyens nécessaires pour le mener à terme. Télésat est l'un des exploitants de satellites les plus importants, novateurs et prospères de la planète. Nous sommes fiers d'offrir depuis 50 ans déjà des services par satellite essentiels à la mission d'entreprises et de gouvernements d'un peu partout dans le monde, y compris bien sûr d'ici même au Canada, là où notre histoire a commencé. Nous avons des bureaux et des installations dans différents pays, mais notre siège social est situé sur la rue Elgin, juste en bas de la Colline parlementaire. C'est à partir d'ici que nous dirigeons notre flotte planétaire de satellites, que nous menons nos activités de recherche et développement et d'ingénierie de pointe, et que nous gérons l'ensemble de nos activités sur le marché mondial hautement concurrentiel et en rapide évolution des services de communication. Vous êtes d'ailleurs tous invités à descendre la rue Elgin pour venir visiter nos bureaux.

En plus des millions de Canadiens n'ayant pas accès à une connectivité à large bande de qualité, il y a quelques milliards de personnes sur la planète qui se retrouvent du mauvais côté du fossé numérique. Connecter tous ces gens-là représente un défi énorme du point de vue technique, opérationnel et financier. Pour les entreprises qui ont l'expertise nécessaire et l'ambition voulue pour relever un tel défi, c'est aussi un objectif d'intérêt public fondamental et une incontestable occasion d'affaires.

Télésat déploie des efforts considérables pour trouver une solution. Je suis d'ailleurs heureux de pouvoir vous dire que nous sommes sur le point de mettre en place l'infrastructure mondiale à large bande la plus novatrice, avancée, puissante et renversante à avoir jamais été conçue. Je n'exagère aucunement. Nous avons ainsi créé une constellation regroupant quelque 300 satellites à la fine pointe de la technologie se déplaçant à environ 1 000 kilomètres au-dessus de la surface terrestre. Ces satellites seront reliés les uns aux autres au moyen d'une technologie de laser optique à l'intérieur d'une architecture sur orbite terrestre basse (LEO) en attente de brevet. Essayez de vous imaginer une infrastructure Internet orbitale entièrement maillée et extrêmement souple capable d'offrir à coût raisonnable partout dans le monde, y compris sur chaque mètre carré du territoire canadien, une connectivité fiable et sécuritaire à une vitesse se calculant en térabits. Cette architecture de conception tout à fait novatrice est le fruit du travail des ingénieurs de Télésat, parmi les meilleurs de leur profession dans le monde.

Nos satellites actuels sont en orbite géostationnaire à près de 36 000 kilomètres au-dessus de la surface terrestre. Bien que cette situation présente de nombreux avantages, l'inconvénient principal réside dans le temps nécessaire pour la transmission des signaux à partir de ces satellites et en leur direction. C'est ce qu'on appelle le temps de latence. Ce n'est pas tellement grave lorsque ces satellites sont utilisés pour retransmettre des émissions de télé dans les foyers, mais c'est très problématique lorsqu'on essaie d'offrir les services à large bande ultrarapide et à faible latence qui sont requis pour naviguer sur Internet, faire du commerce en ligne ou utiliser différentes applications comme les services de cybersanté et l'éducation à distance. La faible latence deviendra même encore plus dommageable lorsque nous serons passés à l'univers 5G. En misant sur des satellites environ 30 fois plus proches de la surface terrestre, notre constellation LEO pourra offrir une connectivité avec temps de latence égal, voire plus court, que ce que peuvent permettre les services par fibre et les services sans fil terrestres.

Télésat n'offre pas de services à large bande directement aux consommateurs. Nous mettons plutôt une infrastructure à large bande à la disposition des entreprises téléphoniques, des exploitants de réseau mobile et des fournisseurs de services Internet qui assurent la connexion du dernier kilomètre pour les consommateurs en milieu rural et les autres utilisateurs. La constellation LEO de Télésat permettra d'offrir à un coût abordable une connectivité Internet satisfaisant aux exigences du CRTC (50 mégabits pour le téléchargement et 10 mégabits pour le téléversement) en atteignant facilement des vitesses se calculant en gigabits. Notre constellation aidera également les entreprises de services sans fil à étendre à un coût raisonnable la portée de leurs services pour les technologies LTE et 5G.

Nous prévoyons procéder à la sélection d'un entrepreneur principal pour la construction de notre constellation LEO au cours des mois à venir. Nous souhaitons pouvoir commencer à lancer des satellites en 2021 puis à offrir le service dans le nord du Canada au milieu de 2022 et à l'échelle planétaire en 2023.

Bien que d'autres entreprises, y compris Amazon, SpaceX et SoftBank, aient également des plans pour mettre en orbite des constellations de type LEO, Télésat dispose de l'avantage concurrentiel important que lui procurent ses insondables ressources techniques, ses solides antécédents en matière d'innovation et son expertise commerciale et réglementaire inégalée.

(0930)



La constellation LEO de Télésat représente donc non seulement la meilleure solution si l'on veut combler pour de bon le fossé numérique, mais aussi une occasion unique pour une entreprise canadienne — et notre industrie spatiale dans son ensemble — de devenir un véritable chef de file au sein de la nouvelle économie spatiale en pleine émergence. Il en résultera pour les années à venir une croissance économique durable assortie de la création d'emplois de haute technologie dans toutes les régions du Canada.

Grâce aux efforts combinés de l'industrie et du gouvernement, la constellation LEO de Télésat va complètement révolutionner l'offre de services à large bande à haut rendement et à coût abordable partout au Canada et dans le reste du monde. Notre pays deviendra ainsi un fer de lance de la nouvelle économie spatiale.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous allons passer directement aux questions des membres du Comité.

Nous commençons par M. Amos. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci. S'il me reste du temps, je le laisserai à M. Graham. Comme nous avons très peu de temps à notre disposition, je vais poser des questions très succinctes.

Ma première question s'adresse à nos vaillants fonctionnaires du CRTC. Merci de votre présence aujourd'hui.

La connectivité interne cause beaucoup de frustrations aux 41 maires que je représente dans le Pontiac. Nos citoyens sont très mécontents. C'est le sujet qui revient sans cesse lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte. Je vous mentirais si je ne vous disais pas que la déception était palpable lorsque j'ai dû informer mes commettants que le premier appel de demandes de financement via le Fonds pour la large bande du CRTC était ouvert uniquement pour le Yukon, les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et le Nunavut. Pourriez-vous m'expliquer cette décision?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Certainement. Le CRTC a déterminé que le premier appel de demandes allait se limiter aux territoires en plus des collectivités dépendantes des satellites. Autrement dit, nous ciblons le nord du pays, car nous estimons que c'est là que l'on trouve les besoins les plus criants.

Nous avons annoncé qu'un nouvel appel de demandes serait lancé à l'automne pour le reste du Canada, soit pour toutes les régions et tous les types de projets, qu'il s'agisse de transport, d'accès ou de services mobiles. Nous voulions vraiment intervenir d'abord dans les régions où nous jugeons les besoins les plus importants, c'est-à-dire dans le Nord et dans les localités qui dépendent des satellites. Nous avons d'ailleurs réservé en 2016 pour ces localités un maximum de 10 % des fonds. Nous voulions cibler ces secteurs dans un premier temps pour que des décisions puissent être prises rapidement avant de nous intéresser au problème dans son ensemble dans le reste du Canada, y compris bien sûr dans le Nord.

(0935)

M. William Amos:

Je comprends. J'aurais toutes sortes de questions à vous poser. Peut-être pourriez-vous nous répondre par écrit. Sur quoi vous êtes-vous fondés pour déterminer dans quelles régions les besoins étaient les plus criants? Ce n'est sûrement pas en fonction de la population. J'essaie simplement de canaliser les frustrations ressenties par tous ces citoyens et ces maires. Je ne veux viser d'aucune manière l'institution du CRTC, mais plutôt dénoncer la situation.

Le rapport Parlons large bande du CRTC a été rendu public en décembre 2016. On a alors annoncé qu'un fonds allait être établi, ce qui était une excellente idée. Il a fallu énormément de temps pour concrétiser le tout, mais les citoyens et les maires que je représente continuent de se plaindre à moi qu'il leur est impossible de présenter une demande de financement au CRTC.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Nos audiences sont toujours publiques. Elles se déroulent en toute transparence et chacun a la chance d'exprimer son point de vue dans la recherche de la meilleure solution possible avec la contribution de tous. Il faut bien sûr un certain temps pour y parvenir. Différents processus ont dû être menés à terme pour en arriver à la situation actuelle. Je crois que nous avons sans doute procédé aussi vite que possible dans ce contexte.

Nous souhaitons nous aussi offrir le service à large bande partout au pays, mais c'est une responsabilité partagée. Nous offrons seulement une partie de la solution avec ces 750 millions de dollars. En 2016, et à plusieurs occasions par la suite, nous avons indiqué que les secteurs privé et public ont tous les deux un rôle à jouer et que tous les ordres de gouvernement doivent apporter leur contribution pour que nous puissions combler le fossé numérique.

M. William Amos:

J'aimerais aborder la question de la couverture de téléphonie cellulaire qui a été à l'origine de nombreuses discussions, surtout concernant la sécurité publique... La région de la capitale nationale et ma circonscription de Pontiac ont connu deux tornades et deux inondations au cours des trois dernières années. Vous n'avez pas traité des services de téléphonie cellulaire dans vos observations de ce matin.

Jusqu'à quel point estimez-vous possible de combler les lacunes en matière de couverture sans fil de telle sorte que les gens puissent se servir de leur téléphone toutes les fois que cela est nécessaire, y compris lorsque leur sécurité est en jeu... Dans quelle mesure croyez-vous que nous pourrons apporter les correctifs nécessaires grâce à ce fonds de 750 millions de dollars et aux investissements consentis par notre gouvernement?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Dans mes observations préliminaires, j'ai bel et bien mentionné à quelques reprises que nos services de base comprennent la téléphonie mobile. Je pense que nous sommes l'un des premiers pays à inclure ainsi la téléphonie mobile dans nos services de base en affirmant que chacun devrait y avoir accès non seulement à domicile, mais aussi sur les principales routes canadiennes. Dans les deux appels de demandes de financement que nous avons lancés, cela fait partie des éléments à inclure pour qu'un projet soit admissible.

Je pense qu'il est primordial de mettre en place un tel service. Nous offrons d'ores et déjà une couverture très étendue. Il y a encore des gens qui n'y ont pas accès, mais le taux de couverture dans les foyers se situe à 99,4 % pour les services mobiles — 98,5 % pour la technologie la plus récente. Il n'y a actuellement aucune couverture pour environ 10 % de nos routes principales, ce qui crée certes un problème de sécurité publique qu'il nous faut régler. C'est bien sûr à ce dernier niveau que l'analyse de rentabilisation est la moins convaincante pour n'importe quelle entreprise. Il faut construire une infrastructure longeant ces routes sur de très longues distances. Comme je l'indiquais, la couverture n'est assurée qu'à 25 % dans le Nord... Ce serait pour nous l'un des premiers besoins à combler. Il faut agir dans ces secteurs où il y a de longues distances à parcourir alors que les gens n'ont accès à aucune connectivité et aucun autre service aux alentours. C'est la région où la problématique est la plus criante.

M. William Amos:

Il me reste deux minutes. Je vais céder la parole à M. Graham avant d'avoir épuisé tout le temps à ma disposition.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Ghiz, c'est très rare que je dise cela, mais je crois que je suis d'accord avec vous au sujet de tout ce que vous avez dit. Avec [Inaudible], cela n'arrive pas très souvent. Je suis ravi d'avoir cette possibilité.

Le mandat du CRTC que le ministre Bains a annoncé récemment parlait de concurrence, et je me suis demandé à quoi sert la concurrence s'il n'y a pas de service en premier lieu? Je vous explique ce qui me pose le plus problème. La circonscription de M. Amos et la mienne sont voisines. Ensemble, leur superficie est bien plus grande que celle de la Belgique. Elles couvrent un très grand territoire. Des communautés entières de ma circonscription n'ont ni Internet ni de cellulaires. Comment connecter ces communautés au réseau cellulaire, de sorte que les services d'urgence, comme le disait M. Amos, n'ont pas à se rencontrer à l'hôtel de ville chaque heure pour ensuite retourner sur le terrain? Quel est le moyen le plus rapide d'obtenir une bonne couverture pour toutes nos petites villes?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Excellente question.

Le CRTC et nous le disons. Ce n'est pas facile et ce n'est pas toujours sensé d'un point de vue économique. Je crois que le gouvernement est sur la bonne voie, comme il l'était dans le passé, pour ce qui est de soutenir les entreprises dotées d'installations, car ce sont elles qui bâtissent les réseaux. La couverture a-t-elle augmenté assez rapidement pour chacun? J'aime dire que lorsque nous parlons de 99 %, avec 35 millions de Canadiens, cela veut dire que 350 000 Canadiens n'ont toujours pas accès aux réseaux. On n'entend pas parler des 34 ou 32 millions de Canadiens qui y ont accès, mais de ceux qui n'ont pas d'accès.

Ce que nous devons faire, à l'avenir, c'est examiner la réglementation — et c'est pourquoi la motion est importante — quant à la façon d'accélérer grandement les choses pour la connectivité. J'ai énuméré deux ou trois choses, mais l'annonce de la déduction pour amortissement a été extrêmement bénéfique et a favorisé les investissements. Il y a le fonds à Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada, ce qui est très bien. Il y a le fonds du CRTC, que nos membres financent. Les provinces ont leurs propres fonds. Certaines municipalités ont leurs fonds également, comme le RREO.

Je crois que la clé de tout cela, c'est la coordination entre tous ces acteurs, de même qu'une certaine souplesse pour les fonds. SaskTel est l'un de nos membres. Je leur ai parlé l'autre jour. Ils ont une grande province. Ils veulent de la souplesse pour ces fonds, de sorte que la large bande inclut également le sans-fil fixe.

(0940)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci

Le président:

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Albas.

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence et des connaissances qu'ils communiquent à notre comité aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais commencer par parler d'une chose que j'ai entendue aujourd'hui et de quelque chose qui a été soulevé récemment. Tout d'abord, concernant le CRTC, M. Amos a exprimé sa frustration à l'égard du choix de commencer avec bon nombre de ces communautés rurales et du Nord. Étant donné que bon nombre d'entre elles ont très peu de couverture, sinon aucune, en raison de l'échec du marché ou des coûts, je peux comprendre pourquoi vous voulez commencer là. Les gens qui vivent si loin sont aussi des Canadiens et méritent de bénéficier de ce type de programmes. Nous devrions toujours nous soucier en premier lieu des gens qui en ont le moins.

Le gouvernement a annoncé une récupération de la bande de 3 500 MHz qui est détenue, entre autres, par Xplornet, dont une représentante a comparu devant notre comité mardi. Lorsque je l'ai interrogée au sujet des répercussions, elle a dit qu'elles seraient importantes. Je sais que le gouvernement a modifié son plan légèrement, mais il s'agit d'une récupération majeure.

Je pense qu'il est quelque peu absurde d'étudier la connectivité rurale sans tenir compte du fait qu'une décision gouvernementale peut avoir coupé les connexions Internet de milliers de clients ruraux. Je suis prêt à présenter une motion pour étudier cette question, mais je sais bien que nous manquons de temps pour le faire, étant donné que la fin de la session approche à grands pas.

Je pense que nous devons tenir compte du fait que nous parlons des moyens d'accroître la connectivité en milieu rural, mais que le gouvernement la réduit. À mon avis, nous devrions au moins faire référence à la décision et à ses répercussions dans le rapport ou demander aux entreprises concernées combien de personnes seront touchées par ce choix politique.

Je veux m'assurer que les témoins qui ont pris le temps de comparaître devant le Comité ont l'occasion de répondre aux questions, alors je vais m'arrêter ici. J'espère que les députés libéraux qui se soucient clairement de la connectivité en milieu rural sont prêts à se pencher sur le fait que le gouvernement vient peut-être de mettre un terme à cela.

Pour ce qui est du CRTC, j'espère que vous m'accorderez une petite seconde de plus. Un collègue a un électeur qui paie des frais d'administration supplémentaires de 2,95 $. Son fournisseur local lui a dit qu'il s'agit de frais du CRTC qui ne s'appliquent qu'à une région géographique précise. Si vous n'avez pas de réponse, pourriez-vous me mettre en contact avec quelqu'un de votre organisation pour que nous puissions en parler?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Savez-vous à quoi fait référence cet élément inscrit sur la facture?

M. Dan Albas:

Il est simplement indiqué qu'il s'agit de frais d'administration, et lorsque l'électeur a téléphoné au fournisseur, on lui a dit que le CRTC avait demandé à ce que ces frais soient perçus dans la région sans lui donner aucune autre explication.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Dans les localités où nos services sont tarifés — depuis un certain temps — nous avons agrandi les régions d'appel local. L'opération a entraîné des coûts supplémentaires, auquel cas nous avons réglementé les tarifs que le titulaire devait communiquer, et il a été autorisé à facturer des coûts supplémentaires pour élargir la région d'appel local. Ça pourrait être l'explication.

M. Dan Albas:

Le CRTC pourrait réviser ses normes de transparence, pour que les clients sachent ce qui se range sous cette rubrique non précisée. Tous se font dire que ça découle d'une consigne d'un organisme de l'État au fournisseur local. Ça devrait être transparent.

Je remercie M. Ghiz d'être ici.

Le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement a dit, hier, qu'il ne savait pas où se trouvait le point de bascule des prix et de l'investissement. À quel point les revenus des clients deviendraient-ils trop faibles et décourageraient-ils l'investissement dans des installations? Quel est le point de bascule de vos membres?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Sans aborder les coûts directs pour nos membres, je me contenterai de dire que le point de bascule tient compte de l'ensemble de la politique publique du Canada. En vigueur depuis maintenant 10 ou 15 ans, elle remonte à une directive stratégique publiée en 2006 par le gouvernement antérieur et suivie par le gouvernement actuel et elle affirme l'importance extrême des investissements des entreprises de télécommunication propriétaires des installations. Ce programme a conduit à l'existence de trois fournisseurs nationaux et à celle de tous les fournisseurs régionaux de l'ensemble du pays. Ces fournisseurs régionaux intensifient la concurrence, ce qui permet aux prix de diminuer, tout en encourageant tous les membres à agrandir leur réseau pour gagner des clients.

Preuve du bon fonctionnement de ce système, Freedom et Vidéotron, au dernier trimestre, ont recruté 84 % des nouveaux abonnés nets.

L'autre jour, à la conférence sur les télécommunications, j'ai comparé la mesure à la prescription d'un antibiotique contre le rhume. Nous avions un problème avec notre couverture sans fil et les prix pratiqués dans l'ensemble du pays. Nous avons pris l'antibiotique pendant un certain temps, en pensant que le problème était réglé, mais pas pendant la durée prescrite. Voilà pourquoi notre rhume s'est aggravé.

Il faut continuer à prendre l'antibiotique, pour doter notre pays d'excellents réseaux à prix raisonnables. Ça donne des résultats. Il faut seulement être patient, pour que ça dure.

(0945)

M. Dan Albas:

Nous étudions ici l'accès sans fil en milieu rural, et c'est capital. Mais, comme mon collègue l'a dit, l'accès perd presque tout son sens si le service est trop cher. Quelles sortes de garanties pouvons-nous obtenir de votre organisation et de vous, particulièrement de vos membres, pour que l'extension du service ne se traduise pas par des hausses énormes de tarifs?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Il faut savoir que nos membres n'iront pas construire d'infrastructures dans les communautés s'ils ne peuvent pas fixer le prix à un niveau que la clientèle est prête à payer. Je pense que les marchés dicteront la suite des choses, et vous verrez que, grâce à de nouveaux joueurs et aux trois fournisseurs nationaux, la concurrence conduit à une baisse des prix. J'aime faire remarquer que, de 2014 à 2018, croyez-le ou non, le prix du gigabit de données a diminué d'environ 54 %. Ça marche, et nos membres veulent continuer à agrandir leurs réseaux. Ils veulent collaborer avec le gouvernement, le CRTC et les municipalités, mais le facteur décisif sera la flexibilité.

M. Dan Albas:

Nous voulons tous certainement profiter d'une vitesse et d'un accès de premier ordre, mais il est évident que, pour presque tous les Canadiens, les prix sont un obstacle. La meilleure couverture du monde ne signifie pas grand-chose si le service est inabordable. Je ne veux certainement pas que ce soit un sujet de dispute.

Comment croyez-vous que nous, l'État et l'industrie, nous pouvons collaborer pour instaurer l'accès à Internet à un prix abordable?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Excellente question, excellente remarque. Nous croyons dans la couverture de qualité et dans les prix abordables. Les mécanismes actuels conduisent à une baisse des prix, mais ce n'est pas le temps de rebrousser chemin et de nous donner des orientations nuisibles aux nouveaux joueurs dans la concurrence qui rendra les prix plus abordables.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Masse.

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être ici.

Dans un témoignage livré devant un autre comité, la nouvelle ministre du Développement économique rural a déclaré que rien de ce qui fait partie de cette motion ne se fera par voie législative ou réglementaire. Cette clarification m'a beaucoup étonné, mais nos discussions sont importantes. Pour certaines de ces questions, nous avons encore du temps, mais, malheureusement, le gouvernement ne semble pas prêt à se rallier à ce point de vue.

Cela étant dit, j'ai besoin d'éclaircissements. Le CRTC a parlé de débits descendants d'au moins 50 mégabits par seconde et de débits ascendants de 10 mégabits par seconde. Les investissements originels en visaient 25 et 5 par seconde. Pouvez-vous m'éclairer? Dans vos exposés d'aujourd'hui, vous avez dit que, globalement, c'était 50 et 10, mais, si j'ai bien compris, n'est-ce pas qu'on vous en a autorisé 25 et 5?

M. Christopher Seidl:

L'objectif du service universel, que nous voulons pour tous les Canadiens, est d'au moins 50 et 10 mégabits par seconde. En 2016, nous avons fait savoir que, pour certaines régions très éloignées, on pourrait y arriver par étape. Pour l'autoriser, nous accepterons des demandes qui ne satisfont pas d'abord à l'objectif de 50 et de 10 mégabits, mais qui permettraient finalement d'y arriver.

M. Brian Masse:

Ça créera beaucoup de problèmes, parce que, visiblement, cette exigence du service de 25 et de 5 mégabits par seconde est très loin du compte et elle comporte des problèmes techniques. Est-ce l'objectif pour les régions rurales et les communautés éloignées? Ces communautés sont-elles désignées, par exemple, comme étant davantage autochtones? Sont-elles plus éloignées? Quelles sont les régions sacrifiées? Très honnêtement, si vous n'êtes pas disposés à respecter vos propres objectifs, pourquoi le secteur privé serait-il effectivement encouragé à le faire?

(0950)

M. Christopher Seidl:

Le fonds est conçu de manière à rendre le processus concurrentiel, ce qui permettra l'évaluation des projets et la sélection de seulement ceux qui sont de grande qualité. Ce n'est lié à aucune région particulière. Parmi les projets qui arrivent, ceux qui seront sélectionnés seront de grande qualité, ils satisferont à l'objectif de service universel de 50 et de 10 mégabits par seconde, ils répondront à des critères de qualité de service et, ce qui est très important, il y aura l'option de données illimitées. Je m'attendrais à ce que nous ne choisissions rien d'inférieur à 50 et à 10 mégabits, mais il faudra voir quels projets nous seront présentés.

M. Brian Masse:

Si vous optez pour 25 et 5 mégabits, il y aura tamponnage illimité chez les utilisateurs. Franchement, si on a annoncé 750 millions de dollars, relativement à la décision de 2016, pour réorienter le financement recueilli, il m'est difficile de croire que nous construirions un système pour citoyens de seconde zone actuellement en place. Quelle durée le demandeur obtiendra-t-il s'il peut obtenir dès maintenant ses débits? Quel sera l'échéancier pour donner aux autres Canadiens les débits de 50 et de 10 mégabits par seconde?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Notre objectif, pour tous, est de 50 et de 10 mégabits par seconde, et le gouvernement a également annoncé que, d'ici 2030, il tient à ce que cet objectif soit atteint pour tous, et nous y travaillons aussi.

M. Brian Masse:

De combien de temps disposera-t-on pour passer de 25 et 5 mégabits à 50 et 10 mégabits par seconde?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Actuellement, des gens n'ont pas accès à la large bande, et nous travaillons à la procurer à tous d'ici 2030. C'est, actuellement, l'échéancier certain.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est scandaleux. Vous n'avez même pas de délai. Nous construisons un système pour citoyens de seconde zone.

Parlons maintenant des prochaines enchères du spectre de fréquences. Les gouvernements conservateurs et libéraux peuvent jouer avec 20 milliards de dollars pour effectivement obtenir... mais aucun coût réellement engagé. Ils obtiendront des revenus directs des prochaines enchères des spectres de fréquences et, maintenant, nous nous préparons à construire un système pour citoyens de seconde zone.

Je veux questionner M. Ghiz sur les enchères fondées sur la mise à disposition d'installations. Pouvez-vous les décrire un peu plus? C'est que, en partie, les enchères sur les spectres de fréquences ont, comme principal élément, permis de rafler beaucoup d'argent, et vous proposez un différent type d'enchères.

Je voudrais que vous nous exposiez en détail les infrastructures incluses dans le processus d'offre.

M. Robert Ghiz:

Relativement aux fréquences, ce à quoi je faisais allusion dans la directive était d'assurer la prise en considération des infrastructures. Sur le spectre de fréquences, vous avez raison. Nous croyons que les droits imposés à nos membres sont parmi les plus élevés du monde. C'est au Canada que ça arrive. C'est de l'argent qui sera directement facturé aux consommateurs.

M. Brian Masse:

Autrement dit, ça influe sur vos prix.

M. Robert Ghiz:

Effectivement. Je pense que si nous pouvions trouver une façon de réduire les droits d'accès aux fréquences, de comprimer les coûts des enchères du spectre de fréquences, ce serait bénéfique à long terme ou, comme vous l'avez fait remarquer— et j'ai lu certaines de vos observations dans le passé — on pourrait employer l'argent économisé pour aider directement les Canadiens à se connecter.

M. Brian Masse:

Je pense que c'est l'élément qui échappe à la compréhension des Canadiens— les 20 milliards que nous avons reçus, vraiment, pour essentiellement vendre le ciel et créer, dans le ciel, des routes à péage pour les consommateurs, par rapport à l'extension des infrastructures. Les 750 millions, disons-le clairement, seront également obtenus des compagnies. Ils s'ajouteront donc à la facture des Canadiens. Essentiellement, la politique publique rapporte 21 milliards à l'État, pour des services plutôt que pour l'atteinte de ces objectifs. Je trouve la décision du CRTC d'agir en ce sens franchement choquante, compte tenu des occasions qui nous sont offertes.

Revenons aux 10 %. Quels 10 % du pays exclura-t-on? Vous avez dit 90 % d'ici 2021. Quels sont les 10 % sélectionnés? Quelles sont ces régions? Nous devrions en connaître précisément les noms. Je tiens à savoir où ces 10 % sont situés.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Actuellement, l'information est publiée sur notre site Web; les cartes montrent les régions qui se trouvent sous l'objectif de service universel. Une partie de la solution se fondera sur les régions où ira le secteur privé; ce sera les régions où le financement public permettra d'étendre le réseau et où...

M. Brian Masse:

Je ne veux pas du site Web. Dites aux Canadiens, dès maintenant, quels sont les 10 % du pays. Certains d'entre eux ne peuvent même pas accéder au site Web, faute de service. Dites-le dès maintenant au pays. Quels seront les 10 % essentiellement abandonnés à leur sort?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Eh bien, dans un sens général, c'est vraiment les régions les plus éloignées du Canada, les régions rurales, et nous devons corriger cette situation.

M. Brian Masse:

Comment ferez-vous alors? Est-ce que le mandat qui vous est confié n'est pas assez fort? Quelle a été la décision pour essentiellement retrancher les 10 %? Ça semble ridicule de ne pas parachever les 10 derniers pour cent si, en fait, nous disons que tous pourront en profiter. Que manque-t-il à votre mandat pour englober tout le pays dans ce service?

(0955)

M. Christopher Seidl:

Nous faisons partie de la solution. Nous réclamons le versement des 750 millions. Nous cherchons à ramener tout le monde à ce niveau. Il faut du temps pour construire ces réseaux...

M. Brian Masse:

Une analyse économique a-t-elle été faite pour essentiellement déterminer vos besoins pour ces 10 %? La question est légitime. Je veux dire que si nous voulons nous donner cet objectif, en précisant qu'il est national, que vous faut-il pour que ça se fasse?

M. Christopher Seidl:

On estime le total des investissements à 8 à 9 milliards de dollars. Internet continuera de croître et d'évoluer. Je m'attends à ce que les exigences augmentent. L'accès à d'autres technologies exigera plus d'investissements. Nous continuerons d'y veiller et d'y répondre du mieux que nous pourrons.

Nous prenons aussi au sérieux la question des prix abordables. Nous réduisons la subvention locale... parce que nous avons appuyé le service téléphonique par un régime de contributions semblable à celui avec lequel nous appuyons la large bande. En réduisant la subvention locale, nous augmentons la subvention à la large bande, ce qui en fait presque un aspect neutre, sur le plan des revenus, pour les entreprises de télécommunications. La large bande est un enjeu important. Nous avons débuté avec le service universel téléphonique. Nous dépensons un milliard de dollars en partant pour élargir le service téléphonique et rejoindre tous les Canadiens.

Nous commençons donc ce travail maintenant. Le réseau ne se construira pas rapidement. Il est vaste, et la tâche est difficile. On parvient à une croissance constante et importante dans les régions les plus éloignées. Voilà pourquoi nous voulons débuter à ce niveau, pour arriver les premiers dans ces régions, puis nous étendre partout ailleurs. Tous les niveaux de gouvernement...

M. Brian Masse:

L'investissement dans l'obsolescence n'est pas nécessairement une stratégie.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Longfield, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup pour cette discussion très intéressante. Je me réjouis que nous ayons pu obtenir des témoignages supplémentaires pour le rapport que nous avons commencé.

Monsieur Goldberg, parlons du réseau Télésat, la constellation. Notre comité est allé à Washington, il y a quelques années, et a pris connaissance du réseau nord-sud qu'on se destinait à y lancer, c'est-à-dire environ 4 200 satellites, si je me souviens bien. Je me demande comment cela interagit avec la constellation canadienne. Vous avez parlé d'un réseau entièrement maillé. Avons-nous aussi un maillage avec d'autres pays?

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Je peux seulement imaginer que l'autre constellation à laquelle vous faites allusion est une constellation que SpaceX a à l'esprit. Ces constellations sont en soi mondiales. Il n'y en a pas nécessairement une canadienne ni une autre nécessairement américaine. Elles s'appuient sur des compagnies. La nôtre est canadienne en ce sens que nous sommes une entreprise canadienne.

Nous avons besoin de coordonner nos opérations avec les leurs. Nous pouvons exploiter différentes plages de radiofréquences; on y observe le plus d'interférence. Au lieu d'un problème de collision entre satellites — bien que nous devions tous y être attentifs — c'est plutôt celui d'éviter de créer l'interférence des signaux de chacun.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui.

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Un organisme genevois de l'ONU, l'Union internationale des télécommunications, attribue les fréquences. Je suis heureux de dire que Télésat Canada a des droits de priorité d'utilisation des fréquences à l'échelle mondiale, dont nous avons l'intention de nous prévaloir, et nos amis de SpaceX ont la même intention, mais nous avons préséance sur eux. Ils devront s'arranger pour ne pas nous nuire.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Actuellement, nous travaillons à la coordination mutuelle de nos fréquences et des leurs ainsi que de nos technologies et des leurs.

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Nous sommes en contact. Au niveau des exploitants, nous veillerons, avec le personnel de SpaceX, à ne pas nous nuire mutuellement, tout en affirmant notre position prioritaire. En fin de compte, ça se passe au niveau intergouvernemental. Notre régie, notre administration au Canada, le ministère de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, devra veiller, au côté de ses homologues américains, au bon fonctionnement de l'ensemble.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Excellent! La solution proviendra en grande partie des technologies employées, et...

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Nous sommes persuadés que les occasions d'innovation sont nombreuses. Il faut des investissements considérables, mais nous pouvons résoudre ce problème. Nous y oeuvrons.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Formidable.

Pour ce qui est de l'innovation, nous avons entendu des témoignages sur la technologie de maillage au sol. Au cours de ma vie antérieure, d'autres personnes et moi nous sommes penchés sur les nœuds d'intelligence artificielle et sur la redondance des machines comme moyens de remplacer les systèmes de contrôle centraux, systèmes qui, lorsqu'ils ont une défaillance, entraînent l'arrêt de l'usine au grand complet. La technologie de maillage au sol est-elle aussi un domaine sur lequel vous travaillez, par exemple, pour favoriser les communications de téléphone à téléphone plutôt que de téléphone à satellite?

(1000)

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Oui. En fin de compte, lorsque nous servirons les utilisateurs mobiles, ce ne sera pas directement à partir du satellite jusqu'à ces combinés mobiles. Nous fournirons un support à large bande de grande capacité à une tour sans fil n'importe où dans le monde et cette tour sans fil communiquera ensuite avec les combinés et les foyers des gens, notre propre constellation. Nous ne considérons pas notre constellation comme une simple constellation spatiale. Elle est entièrement intégrée à un réseau terrestre très développé. Elle est entièrement maillée, entièrement redondante. Elle s'appuie également sur l'intelligence artificielle et l'apprentissage machine pour gérer le trafic et le relayer. C'est un réseau très résilient.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Comment les innovateurs canadiens pourraient-ils tester les nouvelles technologies en passant par vous? Comment interagissez-vous avec eux?

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Ce sont eux qui viennent nous voir. C'est ce qui se passe présentement. Nous en avons déjà lancé un. Nous faisons des tests avec des entreprises du monde entier. Nous en avons réalisé un avec Vodafone, au Royaume-Uni, pour démontrer comment les constellations LEO peuvent prendre en charge la connectivité 5G.

Nous travaillons également avec des entreprises canadiennes pour tester les terminaux utilisateurs, les technologies de compression et toutes sortes d'autres choses. Nous sommes tous très motivés à travailler ensemble et à repousser les limites de l'innovation. La bonne nouvelle, c'est que cette collaboration et cette coopération sont déjà bien amorcées.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Faites-vous partie d'un autre réseau? Je pense à la technologie des machines. Un réseau appelé Open Device Net Vendor Association a été mis sur pied. Toute personne qui développe une technologie doit s'assurer qu'elle est compatible avec DeviceNet. On cherche à faire en sorte que l'Europe et l'Amérique du Nord se conforment à des normes similaires. Les choses ont toujours été un peu différentes avec l'Asie.

Télésat fait-elle partie d'un réseau ou a-t-elle son propre réseau auquel les gens se branchent directement?

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Notre constellation LEO sera entièrement et, je dirais, parfaitement intégrée aux autres réseaux terrestres, réseaux sans fil et réseaux fixes du monde entier. Notre constellation fonctionnera selon les normes du Metro Ethernet Forum. Ce sont les normes que toutes les sociétés de télécommunications de niveau 1 utilisent pour gérer leur trafic. Notre constellation sera compatible avec ces normes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Ghiz ou monsieur Seidl, vous avez parlé de confusion en matière de réglementation. Y a-t-il une lacune réglementaire qu'il faut combler avec le réseau de Télésat et les réseaux au sol? Les règlements que nous avons actuellement nous permettent-ils de gérer tout cela efficacement ou est-ce que cet aspect fait partie de la confusion que vous évoquiez?

M. Eric Smith (vice-président, Affaires réglementaires, Association canadienne des télécommunications sans fil):

Je peux répondre à cette question.

Cela ne faisait pas vraiment partie de la confusion politique à laquelle nous faisions allusion.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

M. Eric Smith:

En ce qui concerne notre industrie, nos membres, l'utilisation d'une technologie comme celle de Télésat est assurément une possibilité. La technologie évolue. Les lois de la physique n'évoluent pas, mais la technologie, oui. Nos membres essaient d'utiliser la technologie qui répondra le mieux à leurs besoins. Le Canada est un vaste pays, alors certaines personnes utilisent le sans-fil et d'autres, le satellite. Il y a certainement des possibilités.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Le CRTC est-il d'accord avec ce qui se passe ou y a-t-il des changements que nous devrions envisager?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Non, nous sommes très neutres sur le plan technologique. Il y a certains niveaux que nous voulons atteindre et nous cherchons des solutions novatrices pour y arriver.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Très bien. Alors, c'est juste une question de brancher les gens.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Oui, ce n'est que cela.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Et c'est ce dont nous parlons.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Albas.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Lloyd.

Ceci s'adresse au CRTC et à l'ACTS.

Beaucoup de gens s'interrogent sur l'augmentation énorme des prix des services mobiles, et nous entendons dire que les services que les gens demandent ont augmenté au fil du temps. On dit que les données utilisées il y a cinq ans à peine sont très bon marché de nos jours, mais que les demandes de données modernes ont augmenté.

Quand je parle aux gens de ma circonscription, j'avoue que je dois me ranger de leur côté. Je pense que la réponse qu'on leur donne est un peu une façon de noyer le poisson. La technologie évolue sans cesse et les besoins des consommateurs augmentent. D'autres pays ont des forfaits de données — parfois illimités — beaucoup moins chers que ceux que nous avons ici. Pourquoi est-ce le cas?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Je vais commencer là. Je pense que ce que l'on voit aujourd'hui — et en ce qui a trait à ce que je disais tantôt —, c'est que notre modèle qui appuie la concurrence fondée sur les installations commence à faire baisser les prix. Sommes-nous aussi bas que tout le monde le voudrait? Probablement pas. Mais je peux dire ceci: entre le premier trimestre 2014 et le deuxième trimestre 2018, nous avons enregistré une baisse de 53,6 % pour un gigabit de données. Entre mai 2017 et novembre 2018, nous avons enregistré une baisse de 67 %. Le prix commence à baisser au fur et à mesure que la concurrence augmente et que les acteurs régionaux se multiplient.

Ce que nous voulons dire, c'est que ce n'est pas le moment de se détourner de la concurrence fondée sur les installations, car cela nuira assurément à la croissance dans les régions rurales, et parce que cela nuira très probablement d'abord et avant tout à nos nouveaux venus.

(1005)

M. Christopher Seidl:

En février, le CRTC a lancé une instance pour examiner le marché du sans-fil mobile. L'objectif était de faire un très vaste examen de l'abordabilité, de la compétitivité et des obstacles au déploiement. Je ne peux pas vous donner de détails à ce sujet, car il s'agit d'une instance publique, mais dans l'appel aux observations, nous avons bel et bien parlé d'un examen complet. Nous avons pensé qu'il était peut-être temps d'obliger les exploitants de réseaux virtuels mobiles à nous aider à cet égard, mais il s'agit d'un examen très exhaustif qui est déjà bien amorcé. Une audience aura lieu en janvier prochain.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci.

Merci de votre présence.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Seidl.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé aujourd'hui des prix et de l'accès, mais ce dont je veux parler, c'est de la menace que représentent les catastrophes naturelles pour nos infrastructures de communication. C'est une question qui me tient vraiment à cœur. Comme on l'a dit, il y a eu des tornades à Ottawa qui ont entraîné une panne d'électricité, et les génératrices ne pouvaient tout simplement pas maintenir le service jusqu'à ce que ces installations soient prêtes. Des gens de ma circonscription m'ont également fait part de menaces réelles et possibles d'éjections de matière coronale et d'éruptions solaires créant des impulsions électromagnétiques qui pourraient avoir une incidence sur notre... Bien qu'elles soient théoriques, ces choses pourraient se produire.

Quelles leçons le CRTC a-t-il tirées des catastrophes naturelles et quelles sont les mesures prises pour protéger nos infrastructures de communication face à la menace bien réelle de ces phénomènes?

Merci.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Je vais parler de ce que nous avons fait dans le passé.

Il y a quelques années, nous avons fait un examen de notre système 911 et de nos réseaux. Nous avons procédé à un examen approfondi pour nous assurer qu'ils étaient résilients et qu'ils pouvaient « survivre », et nous avons établi certaines exigences. Nous les avons trouvés très résistants. Il s'agit des réseaux qui acheminent les appels aux points de réponse de la sécurité publique et qui s'interconnectent aux réseaux locaux. Nous avons mis en place certaines pratiques exemplaires, et nous avons fixé certaines exigences en la matière. Nous avons examiné cette question en profondeur.

La préparation aux situations d'urgence relève d'Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada et de Sécurité publique Canada. Nous ne nous immisçons pas dans cet espace particulier, mais nous sommes conscients des autres aspects. De toute évidence, nous réglementons maintenant les alertes d'urgence pour les radiodiffuseurs et les compagnies de téléphonie cellulaire, en plus de voir à la gestion du système 911 en général.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est que si nos systèmes sont en panne, les gens ne pourront pas recevoir ces alertes d'urgence s'ils n'ont aucun accès à leur téléphone.

Je pense que ma prochaine question s'adresse surtout à M. Ghiz. Que font nos entreprises dotées d'installations pour renforcer leurs systèmes afin d'assurer le maintien du service en cas de catastrophe naturelle?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Je vais demander à Eric de répondre à cela.

M. Eric Smith:

Merci. C'est une excellente question.

De toute évidence, nos membres sont la principale préoccupation. Ils veulent que leurs réseaux soient opérationnels. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, des catastrophes naturelles se produisent, et je pense que vous faites probablement référence à cette fois où il y a eu cette tempête à Ottawa qui a fait sauter les génératrices et coupé l'électricité pendant quelques jours.

Les réseaux sont conçus pour être résilients. Théoriquement, tout est possible. Vous pouvez toujours augmenter cette résilience, sauf que cela entraîne des coûts additionnels. La question qui survient alors, c'est celle de l'abordabilité, de sorte qu'il faut chercher un certain équilibre. Je pense que nous avons confiance en nos membres. Nous avons certains des meilleurs transporteurs au monde. Ils utilisent les meilleures pratiques et ils les revoient continuellement. Je suis du reste convaincu qu'ils ont aussi des discussions avec le gouvernement à ce sujet.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant au dernier segment de cinq minutes, avec M. Sheehan.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup à tous les témoins. C'était très instructif.

Je représente une région que l'on appelle semi-rurale. Sault Ste. Marie est une collectivité de taille moyenne, et les régions périphériques sont combinées avec des collectivités et des comtés de diverses tailles. Il y a aussi des conseils de services locaux pour les Premières Nations. La topographie géographique de ma région — qui est située sur les rives du lac Supérieur — est différente de celle d'autres régions du Canada. Il y a aussi un tas de parcs, tant provinciaux que nationaux. C'est un endroit intéressant. Lorsque l'on roule sur la 17, on pourrait s'attendre à avoir une bonne réception — après tout, c'est la route 17 —, mais ce n'est pas nécessairement le cas, et ce, pour diverses raisons.

C'est comme ça partout au Canada. On pourrait croire que lorsqu'il est question de régions rurales, on fait référence aux régions éloignées, mais ce n'est pas nécessairement le cas. Le long de certains de nos grands axes routiers — qu'il s'agisse de routes principales ou secondaires —, il n'y a pas de réception. En fait, j'avais l'habitude de toujours emporter un sac de survie, c'est-à-dire un gros sac noir contenant tout ce dont j'avais besoin pour survivre au cas où je resterais coincé quelque part. Ces précautions sont encore de mise dans notre coin de pays.

À la fin des années 1990, lorsque j'étais membre du conseil scolaire, nous avons fait beaucoup de travail en construisant des tours et en établissant des partenariats avec différents intervenants. Ma question est la suivante: dans l'ensemble, quels genres de mesures prenez-vous — particulièrement en ce qui concerne les secteurs des municipalités, universités, écoles et hôpitaux de ces collectivités — pour fournir des services dans les régions que ces secteurs desservent déjà? Ils sont plus modestes et ils ne disposent pas vraiment de gros budgets. Il y a cependant beaucoup de gens qui ont des idées vraiment novatrices. Par exemple, le CRTC vient de lancer un appel de propositions. Qui fait une demande pour ce genre de choses, et que faites-vous pour attirer des candidatures? Je pourrais rendre ma question plus précise. Comment vous adressez-vous au Canada rural, en particulier, pour stimuler la participation?

(1010)

M. Christopher Seidl:

En ce qui concerne notre fonds pour les services à large bande, une partie de notre objectif est d'assurer la participation de la collectivité. L'un des critères que nous évaluons est l'ampleur du soutien que les projets mis de l'avant reçoivent des collectivités. Les projets soumis par les fournisseurs de services seront évalués en partie en fonction de l'engagement investi pour comprendre les besoins des communautés locales. Plus cet engagement sera profond, plus grande sera la qualité du projet. Voici comment nous voyons les choses: les projets seront soumis, nous aurons des discussions à ce sujet et nous chercherons à répondre aux priorités des régions visées.

M. Terry Sheehan:

J'essaie encore de comprendre. Que faites-vous pour, tout d'abord, faire parvenir l'information aux régions rurales du Canada et, dans vos efforts pour faire en sorte que l'argent se rende aux collectivités, y a-t-il des considérations spéciales pour ces applications particulières?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, nous avons des critères pour cela, et nous nous attendons à ce que les gouvernements locaux, provinciaux et territoriaux jouent un rôle dans la réalisation de ces priorités. Nous recherchons des projets dans toutes les régions. Comme je l'ai mentionné, l'un des critères est l'engagement communautaire.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Monsieur Ghiz, dans votre déclaration liminaire, vous avez dit avoir proposé des politiques pour jeter les bases de cela, mais vous ne nous avez pas dit comment vos propositions ont été reçues. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il en est?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Est-ce que vous parlez de la ligne directrice?

M. Terry Sheehan:

Oui, celle dont vous avez parlé.

M. Robert Ghiz:

C'est intéressant. Je crois comprendre que la ligne directrice sera déposée au Parlement avant qu'il ne mette fin à ses travaux. Je pense que le message que je reçois, c'est que les gens du ministère de l'Industrie et différents agents de l'État comprennent à quel point il est important d'investir dans l'infrastructure. Nous sommes allés y expliquer notre histoire.

Je ne veux pas m'engager outre mesure du côté de la politique, mais je dirais que parfois, à l'approche d'une élection, une bonne politique publique fait figure de ce que l'on appelle « de la bonne politique ». D'après ce que j'ai vu, une bonne politique publique viserait à encourager nos transporteurs dotés d'installations à investir pour aider à combler les lacunes — c'est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici aujourd'hui. À notre avis, tout changement de direction à cet égard ralentira l'investissement que nous constatons, la collaboration que nous constatons et la réduction des prix que nous constatons, parce que ce sont les nouveaux venus qui créent cela.

C'est ce que l'on entend. Nous allons attendre de voir ce qu'en disent le ministère de l'Industrie et le ministre, mais j'aime être optimiste, et j'espère que notre message est entendu.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup. C'est tout le temps que nous avions aujourd'hui.

Merci à nos témoins d'avoir été là pour discuter de cette question extrêmement importante.

Avant de partir, j'aimerais simplement rappeler aux membres du Comité que nous recevrons probablement l'ébauche du rapport mardi prochain, de sorte que nous ne nous réunirons pas mardi, mais jeudi, à notre heure habituelle.

Merci à tous d'avoir été là.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard indu 19732 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on June 06, 2019

2019-06-04 INDU 166

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0915)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good morning, everybody.

Good morning, Mr. Allison. Welcome to our committee.

Mr. Dean Allison (Niagara West, CPC):

It's good to be here.

The Chair:

And Ms. Rudd, welcome to our committee.

Ms. Kim Rudd (Northumberland—Peterborough South, Lib.):

Thank you.

The Chair:

Welcome, everybody, to meeting 166 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, May 8, we're continuing our study of M-208 on rural digital infrastructure.

We have with us by video conference, from Left, John Lyotier, co-founder and chief executive officer of RightMesh Project; Chris Jensen, co-founder and chief executive officer of RightMesh Project; and Jason Ernst, chief networking scientist and chief technology officer, RightMesh Project.

Welcome, gentlemen, from my home town.

Dr. Jason Ernst (Chief Networking Scientist and Chief Technology Officer, RightMesh Project, Left):

Good morning.

The Chair:

You can hear us. Right?

Dr. Jason Ernst:

We can.

The Chair:

Excellent.

From Xplornet we have Christine J. Prudham, executive vice-president and general counsel.

Do you hear us, Christine?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham (Executive Vice-President, General Counsel, Xplornet Communications Inc.):

Yes. Good morning.

The Chair:

Good morning. Great, that's two for two.[Translation]

We also have Mr. André Nepton, coordinator at the Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l'information et des communications.

Good morning, Mr. Nepton. How are you?

Mr. André Nepton (Coordinator, Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l'information et des communications):

I'm fine, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We're going to get started. We basically have five-minute presentations and then we'll get into our round of questioning.

We're going to start with Jason from Left.

Sir, you have the floor.

Mr. Chris Jensen (Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, RightMesh Project, Left):

Actually, it's going to be Chris from Left, but very similar.

Thank you for inviting us. We refer back to the mandate of this committee where you said that reliable and accessible digital infrastructure from broadband Internet to wireless telecommunications and beyond is essential. We're focused on the beyond part and John will tell you why.

Mr. John Lyotier (Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, RightMesh Project, Left):

I grew up in a small town in northern B.C., one of your classic rural communities. I was very fortunate to discover technology at an early age, which brings me here today. For the last several years I've been working on technology called RightMesh, which is mobile mesh networking technology focused on connectivity decisions around the world.

In large parts of the world, including Canada, connectivity is not sufficient. Our focus is on helping to bridge the digital divide. We know that 5G technology is not going to be sufficient in the future to address the needs of the population. There are large parts of the world where 5G will be inadequate due to cost structures, network infrastructure densities and other reasons.

We have been working on a project up in northern Canada in a town called Rigolet in northern Labrador for the last few years. Jason will talk a bit more about that.

Dr. Jason Ernst:

In Rigolet there are no cellphone towers and the throughput of the network there when we first started going there was about one megabit per second. It's now usually around two to four megabits per second, and there are still many people in the town who aren't connected. About 300 people live there and there are about a hundred houses. Many of the people don't actually have a direct connection to the Internet. So they gave us a map of everyone in the town showing the houses that have connections and the houses that are sharing with other people and the houses that aren't connected at all.

They've built this app to try to document the climate change that's going on there. They're monitoring the environment. They're documenting their experiences, but the problem is that it doesn't work very well because the Internet is so limited up there. They invited us in to try to use some of the technology we're building to be able to improve the connectivity in the town. So rather than going up through the Internet for everything, they're able to share from phone to phone to phone and offload some of the traffic from the Internet.

Some of the work that we're doing that supports this is through a Mitacs grant. We received this grant about six months ago now. It was a $2.13 million grant supporting 15 or 16 Ph.D. students and four post-docs over the next three to five years. That's mainly to help with the really technical challenges for some of this stuff, but it's also to support [Technical difficulty--Editor] within the community, doing trials and doing pilot projects up in the north.

We've also had a lot of interest from other communities in the north. This is just our first community up in Rigolet, but many of the other places in Nunatsiavut have also been interested, places like Nain. The other partner in the project, Dan Gillis from the University of Guelph—that's the main university we're working with—has also been meeting with people in Nunavut. We've also partnered with a bunch of the other universities involved in the project. The app they're building is called eNuk. It involves Memorial University and the University of Alberta. We're also working with UBC. This grant is really the way we've been bringing together universities across Canada to solve this problem in a unique way that doesn't necessarily depend on infrastructure.

We know about the types of initiatives where you can throw a lot of money out the window, build a lot of expensive infrastructure, but there are also unique ways to solve the problem using the things that people already have, the funds they already have. We're coming at it with that type of approach.

(0920)

Mr. John Lyotier:

Really from a technology standpoint, what we've created is a mesh networking software protocol that allows phones to talk to each other; so it's phone-to-phone communication. Should one person have connectivity, the entire network can have connectivity from that one person.

We're bringing this technology around the world. I'm flying next week to Columbia to meet with different government and industry officials who are looking at solutions, whether it's in Bangladesh or in Africa—really all around the world.

We know there is a growing digital divide and that it's being felt here at home as well. We want to do whatever we can to help the local communities as much as we can help the international community.

Mr. Chris Jensen:

Thank you for giving us a chance to present. The message we really wanted to get across was that it's not just about big pipe infrastructure. At the end of that pipe, you have to get the message out to the people and allow people to connect within their community and do things within it that are important and vital to them in times of need and times when the world is otherwise slipping by them. That's what RightMesh is about.

The Chair:

My apology, John. It said “Jason” for some reason on the notice of meeting, and I read it, but it's actually “John”. Thank you for your presentation.

We're going to move to Xplornet Communications with Christine Prudham. You have five minutes.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Thank you.

Good morning and thank you for the invitation to join you today. My apologies that I could not be there in person.

My name is actually C. J. Prudham, and I'm the executive vice-president and general counsel at Xplornet Communications.

I'm pleased to have the chance to put Xplornet's expertise at your disposal in this very important discussion. It's a subject we know very well.

Xplornet is Canada's largest rural-focused Internet service provider, connecting over 370,000 homes, or nearly 1 million Canadians. We're truly national, serving Canadians in every province and territory. We proudly serve those Canadians who choose to live outside of the cities.

Conquering our country's vast geography by bringing fast affordable Internet to rural Canada is more than just our business; it's our purpose. We've invested over $1.5 billion in our facilities and in our network, expanding coverage while increasing both speeds and data for our customers.

Recently, we were excited to announce a new investment of a further half a billion dollars to bring 5G services to rural Canadians. Starting later this year, Xplornet will double the download speeds we offer to 50 megabytes per second. Next year, we'll double them again, making 100 megabytes per second available to our customers.

To do so, we're using the same technology being deployed in Canadian cities—fibre, micro-cells and fixed wireless technology—to ensure that rural Canadians enjoy access to the same speed and data.

Through innovation and private investment, Xplornet is already hard at work to exceed the Government of Canada's target for broadband connectivity in 2030, well ahead of schedule.

It is against that backdrop that we thank the committee for allowing us to comment on motion 208 on rural digital infrastructure. The motion outlines a number of important measures the government can do to incent further investment.

While the Government of Canada does have a role to play, we would caution that there needs to be coordination and balance taken in financial investments. Otherwise, there is a risk of multiple well-meaning government agencies rushing to fund projects and crowding out sustainable private investment.

However, private investment and targeted financial support from government are only two of three key factors that lead to real improvements in Internet services for rural Canadians.

The third is access to spectrum. Spectrum is the oxygen that our wireless network needs to breathe. More literally, it's the radio waves that carry data between our customers and the Internet.

While data consumption by Canadians has exploded in recent years, all significant spectrum allocations by the Government of Canada in the last five years have focused exclusively on mobile needs. Rural Canada needs access to spectrum in order to keep pace.

We note that providing access to spectrum is regrettably absent in M-208, and we therefore propose that the committee consider an amendment to ensure that this essential ingredient is included in the motion.

Specifically, Mr. Chair, the committee may be aware of the 3500 megahertz spectrum band and the consultation currently under way via Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. This spectrum band is absolutely critical to serving rural Canadians. The decision, which we understand is imminent, will be the single biggest decision in a decade impacting rural broadband.

If either of the options proposed in the consultation is implemented, rural Canadians will be disconnected. They will lose access to Internet services that we all agree are vital. Instead of moving forward as the motion strives to do, rural broadband connectivity would be set back a decade.

Xplornet continues to have positive discussions with the Government of Canada, and we are hopeful for a solution that does not negatively impact rural Canadians.

Thank you once again, Mr. Chair, for the opportunity to speak to the committee. I'd be pleased to answer questions.

(0925)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We've had a bit of a technical difficulty with our translator.[Translation]

Mr. Nepton, you have five minutes to make your presentation. You can do it in French or English, as you wish.

Mr. André Nepton:

I'm going to speak in French. [English]

The Chair:

Sorry, I'm looking for the thumbs-up.

We're having technical difficulties.[Translation]

Please do not speak too quickly and that will be fine.

You may begin. You have five minutes.

Mr. André Nepton:

Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, good morning.

AIDE-TIC, which I have been coordinating since 2009, is a non-profit organization dedicated to the development of information technologies in rural Quebec. We work at the request of communities to establish partnership agreements with large corporations so that people in rural areas have access to services of the same quality and at the same cost as people in urban areas.

By next December, in collaboration with large corporations, AIDE-TIC will have set up 40 projects to develop large telecommunications sites, that is to say 300-foot telecommunications towers serving villages and LTE technology road access. Of the 47 sites that have been developed since 2009, 28 belong to us, on behalf of the communities that requested them. According to its model, AIDE-TIC develops the built infrastructure, and carriers use it on a colocation basis. Thirteen million was invested to provide service to 36 rural communities in Quebec that were without service, and to build five interregional access roads to them.

For the industry, cellular telephony and LTE high-speed Internet, and soon 5G, will require substantial changes that will oppose two needs. On the one hand, the major telecom operators obviously want to increase the number of these towers in view of the 5G technology, which is carried by much lower frequencies. On the other hand, rural communities are increasingly demanding access to equipment and technologies similar to those in urban areas, both on access roads for safety reasons and in the heart of the village.

While AIDE-TIC recognizes that carriers need to increase site density, it is concerned that the significant capital investment required will be at the expense of the last rural networks yet to be developed.

On the eve of 2020, we are talking about safety on our roads, but also about the competitiveness of rural businesses. Motion M-208 eloquently explains the issue of occupying Canada's vast territory. AIDE-TIC believes that this time, we cannot simply leave it to the carriers to set priorities. It is important that the communities with whom we work on a daily basis can also, as beneficiaries, set their priorities in the municipalities where services must be put in place.

We cannot continue to have programs that leave it up to the carriers to define their own priorities. When we call a telecom operator, they mention 100 municipalities they would like to serve. AIDE-TIC wants to intervene, but probably with regard to the hundredth, which is very far from the profitability line, because it is the one that should benefit more from government support and collective intervention. We continue to believe that communities must be involved in program development and that this should not be left to the carriers.

We are very satisfied with the motion that has been proposed. The evolution of wireless technologies means that equipment replacement takes place every 12 to 18 months, which is a very rapid physical obsolescence when it comes to meeting demand.

On two occasions, regarding the 2017 and 2018 budgets, AIDE-TIC argued to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance that an accelerated capital cost allowance, but strictly on large telecommunications sites covering access roads and unserviced rural villages, could be a major incentive for carriers to invest more in rural municipalities.

(0930)



In closing, allow me to thank you, on behalf of the company I represent, for allowing us to share with you part of our vision and to assure you, at the outset, that motion M-208 fully meets our expectations in this regard.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

We're going to jump right into questions because of our shortened schedule. We're going to start off with five-minute segments in the question period.

Mr. Longfield, you have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thanks to everybody who has joined us on short notice and using technology.

It's good to see you again, John. We saw each other at the Pint of Science in Guelph a few weeks ago. Dan Gillis put on great events across Guelph where we learned about some of these new technologies.

The presentation that you gave that night, is that something you could send in to our clerk, so that we could include some of those details in our report?

Mr. John Lyotier:

Yes, sure. I'd be happy to.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Terrific.

One of the main purposes of this study is looking at how we get cellphone coverage into rural areas.

It's an underlying purpose, I should say. How do we get cellphone coverage into areas experiencing floods, forest fires and disasters, where you need to communicate between teams of people to coordinate things like sandbags or water delivery?

When I saw what you've done in Rigolet, it seems that it's something that can be deployed quite quickly. Is that true, in terms of dropping in Android devices into an area and having them connect to each other?

Mr. John Lyotier:

Yes, you could do something like that. I think when it comes to a disaster situation when the cellphone towers might be down, that's probably one of the best options. I still think that, in situations where you can use infrastructure, that's definitely going to be the best. This is a good alternative if there is no option like it.

For example, in California when the wildfires were spreading so fast that they were was taking down the cellphone towers faster than people could get the warning messages, that might be a situation where something like this might be useful.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

There are some technology limitations. You mentioned in the presentation in Guelph that some makes of phone don't communicate very well with others. They don't have very good access unless you have certain pass codes. Androids seem to be one of the main focus points for you.

(0935)

Mr. John Lyotier:

Yes.

IOS, for example, is very locked down when it comes to how you can control the connectivity between phones. You can make some small, limited meshes. I think they are making efforts to sort of lock this down so they can control the entire thing. But on Android it's more open, and you can have networks that self-form and self-heal much easier than on other devices.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

In terms of deployment, if we looked at hitting areas that, let's say, are experiencing some kind of climate change disasters, you could deploy into that area and then leave the infrastructure behind so that those communities would then have access. I'm thinking of communities around lakes.

We had a study on rural broadband a few years ago. Again, the University of Guelph was here talking about the SWIFT network in southern Ontario and the way density is calculated. Quite often there are dense populations around a lake, and then through the whole rest of the area there isn't any requirement for broadband. Then those areas don't get served properly.

It seems to me this could be something that could complement our broadband hard infrastructure into some areas where we have density pockets.

Mr. John Lyotier:

I think that Rigolet really shows off that type of use case. There are 300 people there. If you look at the broader area, it's not a very dense place, but the town itself is so dense that you could actually cover it with a mesh of cellphones. We figure with 300 people, we could probably cover the whole town with about 50 phones. We did some tests just walking around with the phones that we brought with us, and with about 10 or so you could reach from one side of town to the other. Then it's just a matter of filling out the rest of the town with the phones.

You could use some actual hardware, some hardware off the shelf, and in addition to that you could make some longer links for the phones—maybe you don't reach as far. This type of strategy, I think, is really a low-cost and effective way you can combine that with maybe one fast Internet connection into town.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Finally from me, has Rigolet developed to a point where you could then scale it to other communities?

Could you take, let's say, the learning from Rigolet and apply it to other northern communities and then maybe some other communities, let's say, in southern Ontario that don't have access?

Mr. John Lyotier:

That's pretty much our plan right now, and beyond even Ontario and Canada, we're looking at places in India and Bangladesh and parts of the developing world as well. The challenges are a bit different in some of those places. The density is not so much a problem in those places.

We have learned a lot in Rigolet. With a lot of the interest that we've been generating at some of the events we've been going to, there are definitely other communities interested.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Terrific. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes, sir.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all the witnesses for taking the time out of your schedules to be with us and to share your expertise.

First, to the Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l’information et des communications, in a brief that you submitted to the finance committee in 2016 you were advocating prioritizing mobile wireless in your government's rural broadband funding programs. In a world with obviously limited money, do you still think focusing on mobile coverage is of higher priority than home broadband? [Translation]

The Chair:

Did you hear the question, Mr. Nepton?

Mr. André Nepton:

Yes, absolutely.

When we call on elected officials in our municipalities, the priority is cell phones. Indeed, since the advent of LTE technology, both Internet access and telephony can be offered. It is clear that for the Internet, costs are a little higher, but telephony is the basis of security, especially on our access roads.

Elected officials are constantly asking us for more than affordable access to the Internet. However, various technologies, including the advent of satellite transmission, have so far made it possible to meet current standards. As a result, the priority remains bandwidth, despite urban sprawl and low population densities. [English]

Mr. Dan Albas:

I certainly agree that safety is a priority, but as my colleague Mr. Chong has said a number of times, it's not just a question of accessibility; it's accessibility to make sure there's safety, but also affordability. When I hear from people in rural areas, I hear concerns about mobile coverage as well as home broadband. However, when most people don't have access to affordable Internet in their homes, that seems to be a top priority. Mobile data is inherently more expensive than land-line data. Is this not a concern when prioritizing mobile data over fibre to the home?

(0940)

[Translation]

Mr. André Nepton:

The industry is in the process of adjusting its pricing, which you can see.

Indeed, the residential fixed wireless industry is constantly reducing its prices and increasing its performance. In my opinion, to meet the competition, the residential fixed wireless industry will adjust in the medium term. [English]

Mr. Dan Albas:

No, I can appreciate that argument, but again, for many people, if there's no capacity to pay what the going premium is, it can be very difficult. I do thank you for the answer, and I do hope that the price differential does resolve itself.

Moving over to Xplornet, how many of your rural customers are currently on a fixed wireless solution?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Almost 60% of our customers.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I have been watching closely, but I still have not seen a decision from government on how much of the 3,500 megahertz spectrum they plan to claw back. According to your brief to ISED about this clawback, you indicated that it would negatively impact your business. Do you have any sense of how the government will proceed upon hearing that?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Upon hearing that it will negatively affect our business?

Mr. Dan Albas: Yes.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham: Well, they have certainly been concerned, obviously, about the potential impact of this. I think they have listened carefully to what we've had to say. We've been very transparent with them. We've mapped out all of our customers and indicated exactly the areas where there is potential for impact. When I say we've been trying to work towards a solution, we've certainly done everything we can to provide the information. At the end of the day, it will be up to the minister and the department.

Mr. Dan Albas:

If the government went with option one, how many of your customers would lose service?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

A significant percentage.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Can you put a rough estimate to it, approximately?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

I'm afraid we'd have to go through and revive those calculations. I think I'd prefer not to say on the public record, to be perfectly honest, but—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Would “significant” be over 50%?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Probably.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, you have five minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here today.

I'll quickly go around the table. We're running out of time.

What would be your number one priority for the government to act on if there were a regulatory change that could take place right now? I know that narrows it down quickly, but the current Parliament has a short runway, and regulations can take place right away.

The minister has already said that motion 208 will not be implemented through any type of legislation, so it's basically a lame duck, and anything that would be required will need some type of renewal, but there are regulatory changes that can take place, especially given the fact that the minister has already identified that the motion will not have any type of statutory movement.

Mr. John Lyotier:

For me, I think anything that increases competition and anything that opens up spectrum are the biggest issues in Canada.

Anyone else can add to that.

Dr. Jason Ernst:

I'll add to that. I think the biggest thing is that it's easy for the big telecoms to focus on the average revenue per user, and they can make a lot of money from the urban consumer. However, those in the northern markets or those in rural communities have a lot to offer, but right now we're at risk of leaving them behind.

As a pure action item, keep on talking to groups like us. Talk to the witnesses you have here. We all want to make sure that the rest of Canada is connected. The best thing to do is keep on talking about it. There will be solutions come out other than from the big telecom companies.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

We're running out of time.

With that, Mr. Longfield brought up some interesting aspects with regard to emergency services. So I'm going to move the following motion: That the Committee immediately hold two meetings for the purpose of understanding the current mobile phone services for Canadians during times of emergencies.

I can speak to the motion at the appropriate time, but I have moved the motion now, especially given the fact that we've had problems in the past with services, including in the Ottawa region.

(0945)

The Chair:

Because the motion is in line with our subject matter today, it is a moveable motion. It will be up for debate.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I would just like to say that I agree in principle about what you want to do. That is the half of M-208 that SECU was supposed to deal with, and SECU is starting to deal with it.

I propose that we discuss it at the end of the meeting so that we don't lose our time with our witnesses, but I do want to discuss that further. It is what SECU was supposed to be dealing with, as it's half of the M-208 motion.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I will speak, and you can call the question on the motion when you can, Mr. Chair.

We have a chance to have two meetings. Given the emergency situations that we've had.... This committee passed on an earlier opportunity to study cellphone coverage services during the tornado this region faced before, and we've subsequently had other problems. We have enough time to have two meetings to have the large telcos and other service providers provide some testimony to educate Canadians about what they and their families should receive during times of emergencies and also potential cracks, stresses or problems in the current system that we have.

There's no doubt that there is a lot of misinformation. There are also concerns related to the fact that people can't even get the coverage they thought they would get. Also, there's the planning aspect for municipal, provincial and federal services that have to coordinate.

Having two meetings, I think, is a responsible and a meaningful attempt to at least provide that basic sense of information so that there would be some great clarity with regard to what takes place during times of emergencies.

Also, more importantly, we use this opportunity so that people can plan appropriately and the government can respond. This Parliament is going to be wrapping up soon. Without that direction, we will be leaving Canadians in a grey zone with regard to coverage for half a year at least before Parliament resumes after the election.

I think that having two meetings is appropriate, and we have a time frame wherein we can do that. It would provide an opportunity to at least place some expectations for service delivery.

Last, Mr. Chair, is the opportunity to raise concerns about those services for the greater public.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have Mr. Longfield and then Mr. Chong.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I move that the debate now be adjourned.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Can we have the vote, then? We can have the vote and go from there. The vote will only take a second. Can we have the vote on the motion?

The Chair:

It is a non-debatable motion, so we will adjourn that motion, and we'll go back to our witnesses.

Yes, we'll go to a vote.

Mr. Brian Masse:

What are we voting on? I'll ask for a recorded vote.

So we're not going to have a discussion on—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Not with the witnesses here.

The Chair:

The motion is to adjourn the debate.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Before that, though, I called the question for the vote, so I called for the question to be.... Maybe you have an explanation of why, when I called the question before that, the debate was to adjourn.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's not procedurally valid.

The Chair:

Please, you gave up the floor. You can't call for a vote. Everybody has their chance. Mr. Longfield has asked to adjourn the debate, which is in line, so that's what we will do, and we'll put that up to.... Did I hear a request for a recorded vote?

(0950)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll have a recorded vote, please.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 8; nays 1)

The Chair: We're going to move to Mr. Graham.

You have five minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you to the witnesses. I would like to apologize to you for that little delay. This is what we're talking about, how to deal with these services. I think that's already the purpose of what we're doing here.

I just have a couple of quick questions and then I'll hand it off to others, because I know a lot of people want to ask questions today.

Xplornet, you have a lot of LTE antennas in my riding and a lot all across the country, as you discussed with Mr. Albas a minute ago.

C.J., what is the possibility in the long term of using the fixed mobile services infrastructure for mobile service as well? Is that a possibility, or are they two totally different worlds?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

It is a possibility. The 5G [Technical difficulty--Editor]

Sorry, there is tremendous feedback on the line.

The 5G technology will see a merging of the fixed wireless and mobile configurations. It's expected that the radius will be substantially similar, if not identical, so the ability to do exactly that is highly, highly likely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, that's wonderful.

For RightMesh, I'm going to ask the same type of question. I was surprised to be in Manawan last year, a reserve north of my riding, where everyone had cellphone service through WiFi on the reserve, but there is no actual cellphone service per se.

Using your technology and your systems, could we go so far as to stick mobile phones on top of a tower and have repeaters around an area that way to create a network?

Mr. John Lyotier:

Yes, I suppose you could do something like that. I think maybe another use case we could do in that type of situation is to extend out the WiFi beyond the coverage it currently has.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would have a lot more—

Sorry, go ahead.

Mr. John Lyotier:

Sorry, I wasn't sure if you could hear me there for a second.

Yes, you could extend the WiFi coverage beyond what was possible there. Rather than being within a one-hop range of the WiFi network, you may be able to be four or five hops away, a few phones away rather than right in the town.

I suppose you could stick it on top of a tower, but I think at that point you might as well make use of antennas and things that are designed for that type of thing. There is off-the-shelf hardware that you can use that's probably cheaper than going all the way to a cellphone tower, but you could use some hardware for that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair enough.

I have a lot more questions, but I don't have a lot of time, so I'll pass some of my time to Mr. Massé. [Translation]

Mr. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. Nepton, in your presentation, you mentioned that the carriers should not be the only ones to designate the locations to be served. You said that perhaps elected officials should be involved in this process. I would like to hear your comments on the CRTC's strategy, which has established a map with hexagons to determine which areas are served and which are not.

According to you, is this map appropriate to try to specify the areas to be served and the funds needed to provide these areas with infrastructure or technology?

Mr. André Nepton:

That is a relevant question.

Since we have conducted very exhaustive studies, mainly in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, on Internet and cellular coverage for speeds of 50 to 10 megabits per second, I can tell you that the CRTC's maps, like those produced by Industry Canada, unfortunately have some shortcomings. The design of these maps is based on voluntary declarations by the carriers. For the very large players, the map is quite accurate. When it comes to providing information, companies such as Rogers, Telus, Vidéotron and Cogeco are very rigorous. Unfortunately, for smaller players, it is also in some cases a strategic element aimed at limiting a competitor's development capacity in a given territory. Since the player must declare what speed he is offering in given places, it can happen that the lead of his pencil is a little thicker.

We noted in our area, particularly on the last CRTC map, that about 20% of municipalities designated as already well served were not, in fact. A lot of in-depth work must therefore be done to demonstrate that the map is not entirely accurate. The CRTC's position is that we must demonstrate that the territories are not well served. It will then request a new assessment from the carriers concerned. This basis is an excellent element for decision-making, but needs to be refined from local results.

(0955)

Mr. Rémi Massé:

Thank you. Your feedback was greatly appreciated. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you again, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to go back to Xplornet. In my previous questioning, I asked you for your opinion on option one and how many customers would lose service, and I do understand there's some reluctance to share exact information, but I'd also like to ask how many customers would potentially lose service with option two.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Our concern is not only who loses service, which is obviously extremely concerning if you're completely cut off, but with the reduction they are proposing, the net result would be a diminished service for those who [Technical difficulty--Editor] to be connected. You not only have the folks who are losing service, but you'd also have virtually everyone being impacted by diminished service.

Mr. Dan Albas:

As spectrum is very, very important when I speak to industry representatives, this obviously will harm rural areas, because people want to be able to access the economy and make use of different health initiatives. I know the Province of British Columbia has invested quite a bit in rural health initiatives via Internet. That would be an issue if the government proceeded with option two, correct?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Very definitely. The one key thing to understand is that, in urban areas, spectrum only carries the one to two gigs that the average person uses with cellphones. In rural areas, it carries 160 gigabytes per month, so it's magnified more than 150 times what the urban situation is in terms of per person usage.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I appreciate your pointing that out.

As the 3,500 megahertz spectrum has been used for rural deployment of fixed wireless, it is now very desirable for 5G coverage. In your opinion, should the government find new spectrum and set it aside for fixed wireless?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

There is. The international band being designated, which is referred to as “the 3,500” actually goes from 3,400 megahertz up to 3,800 megahertz. Currently, we're using only 175 megahertz of that. They don't need to actually displace the existing licensees. They can look at what the government has already identified as 75 megahertz below the existing band that could be made available, and 100 megahertz of what is currently referred to as the “C band”—3,700 megahertz to 3,800 megahertz—and make that available. It's currently used for satellite, but it is not fully utilized, and arguably could be shifted up into the 3,800 megahertz to 4,200 megahertz range.

Mr. Dan Albas:

So there are other options than what's on the table. Is that correct?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Absolutely. As I said, 175 megahertz is available today. There is approximately 175 megahertz that could be made available, literally, tomorrow.

Mr. Dan Albas:

When that is raised, what is the response?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

The government was very thoughtful and has taken that away.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

What is your opinion on the current consultation around smaller tier areas for spectrum auctions? Do you think that flexible spectrum and separating urban from rural areas could help alleviate the problem?

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

It could certainly help a great deal. Xplornet is supportive of that. If you're familiar with the current tier-four areas, you know that Calgary and everything through to the Rocky Mountains right up to the B.C. border is within one tier known as Calgary. That makes for a tremendous number of people who are definitely in rural Alberta who are trapped within the urban licence of Calgary.

(1000)

Mr. Dan Albas:

I've seen the same issue when it comes to Montreal. If you look at the amount of space, it incorporates a number of small outlying communities, and not just Montreal itself. This is something that's present right across the country.

Ms. Christine J. Prudham:

Absolutely. It's a huge issue in the greater Toronto area.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we're going to move to Mr. Amos.

You have five minutes, sir. [Translation]

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I thank the committee for this opportunity. I also thank the witnesses for their participation.

For my part, I would like to focus the discussion with Mr. Nepton on the role of our municipalities in the development of wireless cellular coverage. When I talk to the mayors—and there are more than 40 in the Pontiac riding—the feeling expressed is one of lack of control and frustration with the network and the relationships with the companies, which are not necessarily there to involve our municipalities directly and closely. If they do so, it is rather because it is in their own interest and not in the public interest.

In your opinion, how can we best involve our municipalities in the decision-making process regarding wireless telecommunications, first, and broadband Internet service, secondly?

Mr. André Nepton:

AIDE-TIC works directly with mayors, RCMs, governments and the departments involved. We always approach the issue in the same way.

For example, when we meet a group of mayors from the same RCM to discuss the construction of cell sites, we ask them which ones to prioritize in order to serve the population, for safety reasons or to provide adequate coverage to tourists, the latter being a concern that recurs on a regular basis.

Once we have established contact with the mayors, they take responsibility and become aware that the priorities also determine the development periods. We also make it clear to them that this site development project is often the beginning of regional coverage. In this context, I would say that these groups of mayors are systematically aware of the most pressing local concerns and therefore want to prioritize them.

On the other hand, current programs generally require that any development project be endorsed by a municipal resolution. No mayor will refuse this resolution to a company if it wishes to improve its network. However, previous programs always talked about the Internet, but never about cell phones. Allowing a company to offer Internet access at a download speed of five megabits per second therefore prevented the development of any other technology in the territory.

Because we work closely with the Fédération québécoise des municipalités, we see that mayors—particularly in Quebec—now want to be involved in setting these priorities. Again, if the decision were left to large companies, these priorities would depend on the size of the population and the number of vehicles passing through. We must therefore remember local concerns and involve our mayors, since they are accountable and want to establish their local priorities.

Mr. William Amos:

Does this also apply to municipalities in western Quebec and the Outaouais?

Mr. André Nepton:

We are starting to work a little more on the western Quebec side; we operate on demand.

You will understand that AIDE-TIC is not the watchdog for the interests of the major carriers. If one of these companies approaches us, it is because the site they want to develop is profitable. We will therefore not intervene, and the company will develop this site itself if it decides to do so. It is the environment that takes care of it.

We have projects in James Bay, the Lower St. Lawrence and the Laurentians, but we have not yet been approached in the Outaouais.

(1005)

Mr. William Amos:

I have one last question in the 40 seconds I have left.

I am particularly interested in how, in our government's future programs, we could better support our municipalities and allow them to participate in this process. For example, should we consider providing them with the services of engineers or specialists to save them these costs?

Mr. André Nepton:

Under the current model we have developed, municipalities give us the mandate to build telecommunications towers, offer them to major carriers and manage them on their behalf. We have proven that our installation costs are much lower than those of these companies. So that's the kind of support we could also provide to municipalities.

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you, Mr. Nepton.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Unfortunately, I hear bells for a vote. Can we get unanimous consent to stay 10 minutes further to finish off?

Some hon. members: No.

The Chair: No? Well, on that note, I'd like to thank all of our witnesses for being here today. Unfortunately, we are being cut off because we're being called to the House for a vote.

Thank you very much. We look forward to seeing the end result of our study.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0915)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour, tout le monde.

Bonjour, monsieur Allison. Bienvenue au Comité.

M. Dean Allison (Niagara-Ouest, PCC):

Je suis heureux d'être ici.

Le président:

Madame Rudd, bienvenue au Comité.

Mme Kim Rudd (Northumberland—Peterborough-Sud, Lib.):

Merci.

Le président:

Soyez tous les bienvenus à cette 166e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 8 mai 2019, nous poursuivons notre étude de M-208 sur l'infrastructure numérique rurale.

Nous accueillons par vidéoconférence, de gauche à droite, John Lyotier, cofondateur et directeur général du RightMesh Project; Chris Jensen, également cofondateur et directeur général du RightMesh Project; et Jason Ernst, scientifique et dirigeant principal de la Technologie au RightMesh Project.

Messieurs, soyez les bienvenus. Vous nous parvenez de ma ville natale.

M. Jason Ernst (scientifique et dirigeant principal de la Technologie, RightMesh Project, Left):

Bonjour.

Le président:

Vous pouvez nous entendre, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jason Ernst:

Nous vous entendons.

Le président:

Très bien.

De Xplornet, nous accueillons Christine J. Prudham, vice-présidente exécutive et avocate générale.

Madame Prudham, nous entendez-vous?

Mme Christine J. Prudham (vice-présidente exécutive, avocate générale, Xplornet Communications inc.):

Oui. Bonjour.

Le président:

Bonjour. Formidable. Ça fait deux sur deux.[Français]

Nous recevons également M. André Nepton, coordonnateur à l'Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l'information et des communications.

Bonjour, monsieur Nepton. Vous allez bien?

M. André Nepton (coordonnateur, Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l'information et des communications):

Ça va bien, merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous allons commencer. Il y aura d'abord des exposés d'une durée de cinq minutes, puis nous passerons aux questions des membres du Comité.

Nous allons commencer par Jason, de la gauche.

Monsieur, vous avez la parole.

M. Chris Jensen (co-fondateur et directeur général, RightMesh Project, Left):

En fait, de la gauche, ce serait Chris, mais c'est à peu près la même chose.

Merci de nous avoir invités. Nous partons du mandat de votre comité, mandat qui soutient que « des infrastructures numériques fiables et accessibles, qu’il s’agisse du service Internet à large bande, des télécommunications sans fil ou d’autres avenues, sont essentielles ». Nous nous concentrons sur ces autres avenues, et M. Lyotier va vous expliquer pourquoi.

M. John Lyotier (co-fondateur et directeur général, RightMesh Project, Left):

J'ai grandi dans une petite ville du nord de la Colombie-Britannique, une localité rurale on ne peut plus typique. Dès un très jeune âge, j'ai eu la chance de m'intéresser à la technologie, ce qui m'amène ici aujourd'hui. Au cours des dernières années, j'ai travaillé sur la technologie RightMesh, une technologie de réseau maillé mobile focalisée sur les décisions en matière de connectivité qui se prennent partout dans le monde.

Dans de grandes parties du monde, y compris au Canada, la connectivité n'est pas à la hauteur. Notre objectif est d'aider à combler le fossé numérique. Nous savons que la technologie 5G n'arrivera pas à répondre aux besoins de la population. Il y a de grandes parties du monde où la 5G sera inadéquate à cause des structures de coûts, de la densité de l'infrastructure du réseau et d'autres raisons.

Depuis quelques années, nous travaillons à un projet dans le nord du Canada — dans le nord du Labrador, en fait —, dans une ville appelée Rigolet. M. Ersnt va vous en parler un peu plus.

M. Jason Ernst:

À Rigolet, il n'y a pas de tours de téléphonie cellulaire et, lorsque nous avons commencé à y aller, le débit du réseau était d'environ un mégabit par seconde. Le débit est maintenant d'environ deux à quatre mégabits par seconde, et il y a encore beaucoup de gens dans la ville qui ne sont pas connectés. Rigolet compte environ 300 personnes et une centaine de maisons. Beaucoup de gens n'ont pas de connexion directe à Internet. On nous a remis une carte qui couvre l'ensemble de la population et qui montre les maisons qui ont une connexion, celles qui partagent une connexion avec d'autres personnes et celles qui ne sont pas connectées du tout.

Les gens de l'endroit ont mis au point une application pour essayer de documenter les changements climatiques dans cette région. Ils surveillent l'environnement et documentent comment les choses se passent. Le problème, c'est qu'en raison des grandes limitations de l'Internet, cela ne fonctionne pas très bien. Ils nous ont invités pour que nous essayions d'utiliser une partie de notre technologie afin d'améliorer la connectivité dans la localité. Plutôt que de passer par Internet pour tout, ils peuvent partager la communication d'un téléphone à l'autre et ainsi libérer l'Internet d'une partie de son trafic.

Une partie du travail que nous faisons dans le cadre de ce projet a été rendu possible grâce à une subvention de Mitacs. Nous avons reçu cette subvention il y a environ six mois. Le montant de la subvention était de 2,13 millions de dollars pour 15 ou 16 étudiants au doctorat et quatre post-doctorants au cours des trois à cinq prochaines années. L'objectif principal est d'aider à relever les défis vraiment techniques que posent certaines de ces situations, mais aussi d'appuyer [Difficultés techniques] au sein de la collectivité, en effectuant des essais et des projets pilotes dans le Nord.

D'autres collectivités du Nord ont manifesté leur grand intérêt. Rigolet est notre première collectivité, mais beaucoup d'autres endroits au Nunatsiavut se sont montrés intéressés, comme Nain. L'autre partenaire du projet, Dan Gillis, de l'Université de Guelph — c'est la principale université avec laquelle nous travaillons — a également rencontré des gens du Nunavut. Nous avons également établi des partenariats avec un certain nombre d'autres universités participant au projet. L'application qu'ils sont en train de mettre au point s'appelle eNuk. La Memorial University et l'Université de l'Alberta y participent. Nous travaillons aussi avec l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique. C'est vraiment grâce à cette subvention que nous avons pu réunir ces universités d'un peu partout au Canada afin de résoudre ce problème d'une façon originale qui ne dépend pas nécessairement de l'infrastructure.

Nous connaissons ces initiatives qui font jeter beaucoup d'argent par les fenêtres, qui nécessitent la construction d'infrastructures coûteuses et nombreuses. Or, il existe d'autres façons inédites de résoudre le problème en utilisant ce que les gens ont déjà, les ressources dont ils disposent déjà. C'est ce genre d'approche que nous préconisons.

(0920)

M. John Lyotier:

Du point de vue strictement technologique, disons que nous avons créé un protocole logiciel de réseau maillé qui permet aux téléphones de communiquer entre eux. Il s'agit donc d'une communication de téléphone à téléphone. Si une personne est connectée, l'ensemble du réseau peut l'être aussi à partir de cette seule connexion.

Nous faisons connaître cette technologie dans le monde entier. Je me rends la semaine prochaine en Colombie pour rencontrer différents représentants du gouvernement et de l'industrie qui cherchent des solutions. Que ce soit au Bangladesh ou en Afrique, nous avons vraiment des intéressés partout dans le monde.

Nous savons que dans le monde du numérique, y compris ici même au pays, il y a une fracture qui va en s'élargissant. Nous voulons faire tout ce que nous pouvons pour aider les communautés locales autant que nous pouvons aider la communauté internationale.

M. Chris Jensen:

Merci de nous donner l'occasion de témoigner. Le message que nous voulons vraiment faire passer, c'est que tout cela ne dépend pas uniquement de l'infrastructure des grands réseaux. Au bout de la canalisation, il faut acheminer le message aux gens et permettre à ces gens de se brancher avec leur collectivité et d'y faire des choses qui sont importantes et vitales pour eux en période de besoin et dans ces moments où, autrement, ils resteraient coupés du monde. C'est l'objectif de RightMesh.

Le président:

Mes excuses, monsieur Lyotier. Pour une raison quelconque, il était écrit « Jason » sur l'avis de convocation, et c'est ce que j'ai lu, mais c'est en fait « John ». Je vous remercie de votre exposé.

Nous allons passer à Xplornet Communications avec Mme Christine Prudham. Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Merci.

Bonjour. Merci de m'avoir invitée à me joindre à vous aujourd'hui. Je m'excuse de ne pas être là en personne.

En fait, mon nom est C. J. Prudham, et je suis vice-présidente exécutive et avocate générale chez Xplornet Communications.

Je suis ravie de cette chance qui m'est donnée de mettre le savoir-faire d'Xplornet à votre disposition dans le cadre de cette très importante discussion. C'est un sujet que nous connaissons très bien.

Xplornet est le plus important fournisseur de services Internet en milieu rural au Canada. Notre réseau rejoint plus de 370 000 foyers, soit près d'un million de Canadiens. Notre entreprise est vraiment nationale, car nos services sont utilisés par des Canadiens de toutes les provinces et de tous les territoires. Nous sommes fiers de servir les Canadiens qui choisissent de vivre à l'extérieur des villes.

Harnacher l'immensité territoriale de notre pays en offrant un accès rapide et abordable à Internet dans les régions rurales du Canada, ce n'est pas seulement l'objet de nos activités: c'est notre objectif. Nous avons investi plus de 1,5 milliard de dollars dans nos installations et dans notre réseau, ce qui nous a permis d'étendre la couverture tout en améliorant la vitesse et les données pour nos clients.

Récemment, nous avons eu le bonheur d'annoncer un nouvel investissement d'un demi-milliard de dollars supplémentaires pour offrir les services 5G aux Canadiens des régions rurales. À compter de cette année, Xplornet doublera la vitesse de téléchargement offerte pour la porter à 50 mégaoctets par seconde. L'année prochaine, nous la doublerons à nouveau, ce qui permettra à nos clients de bénéficier de 100 mégaoctets par seconde.

Pour ce faire, nous utilisons la même technologie que celle qui est déployée dans les villes canadiennes, c'est-à-dire la fibre optique, les microcellules et la technologie sans fil fixe. Nous cherchons à faire en sorte que les Canadiens des régions rurales aient accès au même débit et aux mêmes données que dans les villes.

Grâce à l'innovation et aux investissements privés, Xplornet est déjà à pied d'œuvre pour dépasser l'objectif de 2030 du gouvernement du Canada en matière de connectivité à large bande. Nous sommes bien en avance sur le calendrier prévu à cette fin.

C'est dans ce contexte que nous remercions le Comité de nous permettre de commenter la motion 208 sur l'infrastructure numérique rurale. La motion décrit un certain nombre de mesures importantes que le gouvernement peut prendre pour attirer d'autres investissements.

Bien que le gouvernement du Canada ait un rôle à jouer, nous tenons à souligner que la coordination et l'équilibre des investissements financiers doivent être assurés, sans quoi il y a un risque que de nombreux organismes gouvernementaux bien intentionnés se précipitent pour financer des projets et évincent en ce faisant les investissements privés durables.

Toutefois, l'investissement privé et le soutien financier ciblé du gouvernement ne sont que deux des trois facteurs clés qui mènent à de réelles améliorations des services Internet pour les Canadiens des régions rurales.

Le troisième aspect est l'accès au spectre. Le spectre est l'oxygène de notre réseau sans fil. Plus littéralement, disons que ce sont les ondes radio qui transmettent les données entre nos clients et Internet.

Bien que la consommation de données par les Canadiens ait explosé au cours des dernières années, toutes les attributions importantes de fréquences par le gouvernement du Canada au cours des cinq dernières années ont été axées exclusivement sur les besoins mobiles. Or, le Canada rural doit avoir accès au spectre pour suivre le rythme.

Nous constatons que l'accès au spectre est malheureusement absent de la motion M-208, et nous proposons donc que le Comité étudie un amendement visant à garantir que cet ingrédient essentiel soit inclus dans la motion.

Plus précisément, monsieur le président, le Comité est peut-être au courant de l'existence de la bande de fréquences de 3 500 mégahertz et de la consultation en cours par l'intermédiaire d'Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada. Cette bande de fréquences est absolument essentielle pour répondre aux besoins des Canadiens des régions rurales. Cette décision, que nous croyons imminente, sera la plus déterminante de la décennie en ce qui concerne le sort de l'accès à large bande en milieu rural.

Si l'une ou l'autre des options proposées dans la consultation est mise en œuvre, les Canadiens des régions rurales seront déconnectés. Ils perdront l'accès aux services Internet, ces services qui, convenons-en, sont tout à fait essentiels. Au lieu de progresser comme le voudrait la motion, la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales reculera de 10 ans.

Xplornet continue d'avoir des discussions de bonne tenue avec le gouvernement du Canada, et nous espérons trouver une solution qui n'aura pas de répercussions négatives sur les Canadiens des régions rurales.

Merci encore une fois, monsieur le président, de me donner l'occasion de m'adresser au Comité. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

(0925)

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Nous avons eu quelques difficultés techniques avec notre traducteur.[Français]

Monsieur Nepton, vous avez cinq minutes pour faire votre présentation. Vous pouvez la faire en français ou en anglais, à votre choix.

M. André Nepton:

Je vais parler en français. [Traduction]

Le président:

Désolé, je cherche le pouce levé.

Nous avons des problèmes techniques.[Français]

Je vous prie de ne pas parler trop vite et ce sera correct.

Vous pouvez commencer. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. André Nepton:

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, bonjour.

L'AIDE-TIC, que je coordonne depuis 2009, est un organisme sans but lucratif voué au développement des technologies de l'information dans le monde rural québécois. Nous intervenons à la demande des milieux pour établir des ententes de partenariat avec la grande entreprise, afin que les gens en milieu rural aient accès à des services de même qualité et au même coût que les gens en milieu urbain.

D'ici décembre prochain, en collaboration avec la grande entreprise, l'AIDE-TIC aura mis sur pied 40 projets de développement de grands sites de télécommunications, soit des tours de télécommunications de plus de 300 pieds qui desservent des villages et des accès routiers en technologie LTE. Des 47 sites qui ont été développés depuis 2009, 28 nous appartiennent, au nom des milieux qui en font la demande. Selon son modèle, l'AIDE-TIC développe l'infrastructure bâtie, et les télécommunicateurs l'utilisent sur une base de colocation. Une somme de 13 millions de dollars a été investie pour offrir un service à 36 communautés rurales du Québec qui étaient sans service, et cinq routes interrégionales d'accès à ces dernières.

Pour l'industrie, la téléphonie cellulaire et l'Internet haute vitesse LTE, et bientôt 5G, nécessiteront des modifications substantielles qui vont opposer deux besoins. D'un côté, les grands télécommunicateurs désirent, évidemment, densifier le nombre de ces tours compte tenu de la technologie 5G, qui est portée par des fréquences beaucoup plus faibles. De l'autre côté, les communautés rurales demandent de plus en plus à avoir accès à des équipements et des technologies similaires à celles en milieu urbain, tant sur les routes d'accès pour des questions de sécurité qu'au cœur du village.

Si l'AIDE-TIC reconnaît que les télécommunicateurs ont besoin de densifier les sites, elle s'inquiète que l'investissement de capitaux importants que cela nécessitera se fasse au détriment des derniers réseaux ruraux qu'il reste à développer.

À la veille de 2020, on parle de sécurité sur nos routes, mais également de compétitivité des entreprises rurales. La motion M-208 explique de façon éloquente l'enjeu lié à l'occupation de l'immense territoire canadien. L'AIDE-TIC est d'avis que, cette fois-ci, on ne peut pas simplement laisser aux télécommunicateurs le soin d'établir les priorités. Il est important que les milieux avec qui nous travaillons au quotidien puissent aussi, à titre de bénéficiaires, établir leurs priorités dans les municipalités où des services doivent être mis en place.

On ne peut pas continuer à avoir des programmes qui laissent aux télécommunicateurs le soin de définir leur propre ordre de priorité. Quand nous interpellons un télécommunicateur, il nous présente 100 municipalités qu'il voudrait desservir. L'AIDE-TIC veut intervenir, mais probablement en ce qui a trait à la centième, celle qui est très loin de la base de rentabilité, parce que c'est elle qui devrait bénéficier davantage du soutien de l'État et de l'intervention collective. Nous continuons à penser que les milieux doivent s'impliquer dans l'élaboration des programmes et qu'il ne faut pas laisser cela aux télécommunicateurs.

Nous sommes très satisfaits de la motion qui a été proposée. L'évolution des technologies du sans-fil fait que la rotation des équipements varie de 12 à 18 mois, ce qui est une obsolescence matérielle très rapide quand on veut répondre à la demande.

À deux reprises, lors du budget de 2017 et de celui de 2018, l'AIDE-TIC a fait valoir au Comité permanent des finances de la Chambre des communes qu'un mode d'amortissement accéléré sur les immobilisations, mais strictement sur les grands sites de télécommunications couvrant les routes d'accès et les villages ruraux sans service, pourrait être un incitatif de premier ordre pour décider les télécommunicateurs à investir davantage dans les municipalités rurales.

(0930)



En terminant, permettez-moi de vous remercier, au nom de la société que je représente, de nous avoir permis de vous faire part d'une partie de notre vision et de vous assurer, d'entrée de jeu, que la motion M-208 répond entièrement à nos attentes à cet égard.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Comme le temps que nous avions a été raccourci, nous allons passer directement aux questions, en commençant par des segments de cinq minutes.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous ceux qui, en tirant parti de la technologie, ont pu se joindre à nous malgré le court préavis.

C'est bon de vous revoir, monsieur Lyotier. Nous nous sommes vus au Pint of Science, à Guelph, il y a quelques semaines. Dan Gillis a organisé des activités formidables à Guelph, à l'occasion desquelles nous avons appris à connaître certaines de ces nouvelles technologies.

Pourriez envoyer la présentation que vous avez faite ce soir-là à notre greffier afin que nous puissions inclure certains aspects de vos propos dans notre rapport?

M. John Lyotier:

Oui, bien sûr. J'en serais ravi.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est formidable.

L'un des principaux objectifs de cette étude est d'examiner comment assurer la couverture de téléphonie cellulaire dans les régions rurales.

C'est un objectif sous-jacent, je devrais dire. Comment pouvons-nous garantir l'accès par téléphone cellulaire des régions touchées par des inondations, des feux de forêt ou d'autres catastrophes, et ainsi être en mesure de coordonner des choses comme la gestion des sacs de sable ou l'acheminement de l'eau?

Quand j'ai vu ce que vous avez fait à Rigolet, je me suis dit que c'était quelque chose qui pourrait être déployé assez rapidement. Ai-je raison de penser cela? Est-il possible d'équiper une zone d'appareils Android et de faire en sorte que ces appareils se connectent les uns aux autres?

M. John Lyotier:

Oui, vous pourriez faire quelque chose comme cela. Je pense que dans une situation de catastrophe où les tours de téléphonie cellulaire seraient peut-être en panne, ce serait probablement l'une des meilleures options. Je pense toujours que, dans les situations où vous pouvez utiliser l'infrastructure, cette voie reste assurément la meilleure solution. En l'absence de cette option, c'est une bonne alternative.

Par exemple, en Californie, lorsque les feux de forêt se propageaient si rapidement qu'ils pulvérisaient les tours de téléphonie cellulaire avant même que les gens aient pu recevoir les messages d'avertissement, cela aurait pu être une solution utile.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

Il y a certaines limites technologiques. Vous avez mentionné dans votre exposé à Guelph que certaines marques de téléphone ne communiquent pas très bien avec les autres. À moins d'avoir certains codes, leur accès est restreint. Les appareils Android semblent être parmi ceux qui vous intéressent le plus.

(0935)

M. John Lyotier:

Oui.

Par exemple, le système d'opération des iPhone est très fermé quand il s'agit de comprendre comment contrôler la connectivité entre les téléphones. Vous pouvez fabriquer de petites mailles limitées. Je pense qu'ils s'appliquent à verrouiller tout cela afin de pouvoir tout contrôler. Sur Android, c'est plus ouvert, et vous pouvez avoir des réseaux qui s'autoforment et s'autoguérissent beaucoup plus facilement qu'avec d'autres appareils.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Pour ce qui est du déploiement, si nous nous penchions sur des zones qui, disons, subissent des catastrophes liées aux changements climatiques. Nous pourrions nous déployer dans ces zones et laisser l'infrastructure derrière afin que ces collectivités puissent avoir un accès. Je pense aux collectivités situées autour des lacs.

Il y a quelques années, nous avons mené une étude sur les services à large bande en milieu rural. Encore une fois, l'Université de Guelph a parlé du réseau SWIFT dans le sud de l'Ontario et de la façon dont la densité est calculée. Très souvent, le tour des lacs est densément peuplé, mais le reste de la région ne se qualifie pas pour la large bande. Dans ce cas, ces zones ne sont pas desservies correctement.

Il me semble que cela pourrait compléter notre infrastructure matérielle à large bande dans certaines régions où nous avons des îlots de densité.

M. John Lyotier:

Je pense que le projet de Rigolet fait clairement valoir ce type d'utilisation. Cette collectivité compte 300 personnes et, si vous examinez la région en général, vous constaterez que sa densité est très faible. Par contre, la densité de la ville elle-même est tellement forte que vous pourriez, en fait, offrir une couverture complète au moyen d'un réseau maillé de téléphones cellulaires. Nous estimons qu'étant donné qu'il n'y a que 300 habitants là-bas, nous pourrions probablement couvrir la ville en entier avec environ 50 téléphones cellulaires. Nous avons mené quelques essais simplement en nous déplaçant à pied avec les téléphones que nous avions apportés. Et nous avons constaté qu'avec quelque 10 téléphones cellulaires, il était possible de joindre les deux côtés de la ville. Ensuite, il ne reste plus qu'à couvrir le reste de la ville avec les téléphones.

En fait, vous pourriez utiliser du matériel disponible sur le marché. De plus, vous pourriez établir des connexions un peu plus longues pour les téléphones — ce faisant, il se peut que votre couverture s'en trouve réduite. Selon moi, ce type de stratégie est une façon très économique et efficace d'offrir un accès à Internet, que vous pourriez combiner à l'installation en ville d'une éventuelle connexion Internet rapide.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Enfin, je vous pose la question suivante. Le projet de Rigolet a-t-il atteint un stade qui vous permettrait de déployer la technologie dans d'autres collectivités de diverses dimensions?

Pourriez-vous prendre, disons, les enseignements tirés de Rigolet et les appliquer à d'autres collectivités du Nord, pour ensuite les appliquer à d'autres collectivités, disons, du Sud de l'Ontario qui n'ont pas accès à Internet?

M. John Lyotier:

C'est pas mal notre plan pour le moment, et nous envisageons de la déployer même à l'extérieur de l'Ontario et du Canada. Nous examinons des endroits en Inde, au Bangladesh ainsi que dans certains pays en développement. Les défis à relever sont légèrement différents dans certains de ces endroits. La densité n'est pas tellement un problème dans ces lieux.

Nous avons appris beaucoup de choses à Rigolet. Compte tenu du grand intérêt que nous avons suscité au cours de certaines des activités auxquelles nous avons participé, je dirais qu'il y a assurément d'autres collectivités intéressées.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Formidable. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Albas, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins d'avoir pris le temps de comparaître devant nous et de nous transmettre leurs connaissances.

Je m'adresse premièrement à l'Agence interrégionale de développement des technologies de l’information et des communications. Dans un mémoire que vous avez présenté au Comité des finances en 2016, vous préconisiez que l'on accorde la priorité aux services sans fil mobiles dans le cadre de vos programmes gouvernementaux de financement du service à large bande rural. Dans un monde où les fonds sont évidemment limités, pensez-vous encore qu'il est plus prioritaire de mettre l'accent sur la couverture mobile que sur un service à large bande résidentiel? [Français]

Le président:

Monsieur Nepton, avez-vous entendu la question?

M. André Nepton:

Oui, tout à fait.

Lorsqu'on interpelle les élus dans nos municipalités, la priorité est la téléphonie cellulaire. En effet, depuis l'avènement de la technologie LTE, on peut offrir à la fois l'accès à l'Internet et la téléphonie. Il est clair que, pour l'Internet, les coûts sont un peu plus élevés, mais la mobilité est la base de la sécurité, particulièrement sur nos routes d'accès.

Les élus nous demandent constamment un accès plus qu'abordable à l'Internet. Or, différentes technologies, dont l'avènement de la transmission satellitaire, permettent pour le moment de répondre aux normes actuelles. En fonction de cela, la priorité demeure la largeur de la bande passante, et ce, malgré l'étalement urbain et les faibles densités de population. [Traduction]

M. Dan Albas:

Je conviens assurément que la sécurité est une priorité, mais, comme mon collègue M. Chong l'a déclaré à plusieurs reprises, ce n'est pas simplement une question d'accessibilité; l'accessibilité permet d'assurer la sécurité, mais aussi l'abordabilité. Lorsque j'entends des habitants des régions rurales parler, j'entends des préoccupations au sujet de la couverture mobile ainsi qu'au sujet des services à large bande résidentiels. Toutefois, lorsque la plupart des gens n'ont pas accès à des services Internet résidentiels abordables, cela me semble être prioritaire. Les données mobiles sont foncièrement plus coûteuses que les données transmises par ligne terrestre. Cette question n'est-elle pas préoccupante lorsqu'on accorde une plus grande priorité aux données mobiles qu'à la fibre optique jusqu'au domicile?

(0940)

[Français]

M. André Nepton:

L'industrie est en train d'ajuster sa tarification, ce dont vous pourriez faire le constat.

En effet, l'industrie du sans-fil fixe résidentiel ne cesse de diminuer ses prix et d'augmenter ses performances. Selon moi, pour répondre à la concurrence, l'industrie du sans-fil fixe résidentiel va s'ajuster à moyen terme. [Traduction]

M. Dan Albas:

Non, je peux comprendre cet argument, mais, je le répète, la situation peut être très difficile pour bon nombre de gens qui n'ont pas la capacité de payer le tarif courant. Cependant, je vous remercie de votre réponse, et j'espère que l'écart de prix se résorbera.

Passons à Xplornet. Combien de vos clients ruraux sont actuellement abonnés à une solution sans fil fixe?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Près de 60 % de nos clients.

M. Dan Albas:

J'ai surveillé attentivement, mais je n'ai pas encore vu le gouvernement prendre une décision à propos du pourcentage du spectre de 3 500 mégahertz qu'il planifie de récupérer. Dans le mémoire que vous avez présenté à ISDE à propos de cette récupération, vous avez indiqué qu'elle aurait une incidence négative sur votre entreprise. Avez-vous une idée de la façon dont le gouvernement procédera après avoir entendu ces commentaires?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Après avoir entendu dire que cela aurait une incidence négative sur notre entreprise?

M. Dan Albas: Oui.

Mme Christine J. Prudham: Eh bien, ils sont évidemment préoccupés par l'incidence que cela pourrait avoir. Je pense qu'ils ont écouté attentivement ce que nous avions à dire. Nous avons été complètement transparents avec eux. Nous avons défini sur une carte où se trouvent tous nos clients, et nous avons indiqué exactement les régions où cette récupération pourrait avoir des répercussions. Lorsque je dis que nous nous efforçons de trouver une solution, je veux dire que nous avons certainement fait tout en notre pouvoir pour fournir l'information au gouvernement. Au bout du compte, cette décision reviendra au ministre et au ministère.

M. Dan Albas:

Si le gouvernement choisit l'option 1, combien de vos clients perdront leur service?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Un pourcentage important d'entre eux.

M. Dan Albas:

Pouvez-vous nous fournir un chiffre approximatif?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

J'ai bien peur que nous soyons forcés de refaire ou revoir ces calculs. Pour être parfaitement honnête, je pense que je préférerais ne pas mentionner ce chiffre publiquement, mais...

M. Dan Albas:

Est-ce que ce pourcentage « important » dépasserait 50 %?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Probablement.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leur participation à la séance d'aujourd'hui.

Je vais faire un tour de table rapide. Nous manquons de temps.

Si la réglementation pouvait être modifiée en ce moment, quelle devrait être la priorité du gouvernement, selon vous? Je sais que cela vous limite énormément, mais la réglementation peut être modifiée immédiatement, même si la législature actuelle tire à sa fin.

Le ministre a déjà déclaré qu'aucune mesure législative ne serait utilisée pour mettre en œuvre la motion M-208. Cette motion est donc essentiellement une sorte de canard boiteux, et toute mesure qui s'imposerait nécessiterait un genre de renouvellement. Toutefois, des modifications pourraient être apportées à la réglementation, en particulier compte tenu du fait que le ministre a déjà affirmé que la motion n'entraînerait aucun type de mesure législative.

M. John Lyotier:

Selon moi, les plus importants enjeux au Canada sont liés à n'importe quelle mesure qui accroît la concurrence ou qui vise à vendre une partie du spectre.

N'importe qui d'autre peut formuler des observations à ce sujet.

M. Jason Ernst:

Je vais ajouter quelque chose à cet égard. À mon avis, le principal point, c'est qu'il est facile pour les grandes entreprises de télécommunication de se concentrer sur leurs revenus moyens par utilisateur, et elles peuvent réaliser d'importants profits grâce aux consommateurs des centres urbains. Cependant, les entreprises qui exercent leurs activités dans les collectivités du Nord ou les collectivités rurales ont beaucoup à offrir, mais, en ce moment, nous risquons de laisser ces collectivités de côté.

Comme action pure, je recommande que vous continuiez de parler à des groupes comme les nôtres. Parlez aux témoins que vous accueillez aujourd'hui. Nous voulons tous nous assurer que le reste du Canada est branché. La meilleure chose à faire est de continuer à parler de cet enjeu. Des intervenants autres que les grandes entreprises de télécommunication trouveront des solutions.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Nous manquons de temps.

Cela dit, M. Longfield a soulevé quelques questions intéressantes à propos des services d'urgence. Je vais donc présenter la motion suivante: Que le Comité organise immédiatement deux séances dans le but de comprendre les services de téléphonie cellulaire qui sont actuellement offerts aux Canadiens dans des situations d'urgence.

Je peux parler de la motion au moment approprié, mais je l'ai présentée maintenant, en particulier en raison du fait que ces services ont connu des problèmes dans le passé, en particulier dans la région d'Ottawa.

(0945)

Le président:

Étant donné que la motion cadre avec le sujet que nous abordons aujourd'hui, la motion est recevable, et elle sera débattue.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'aimerais simplement dire que j'approuve en principe ce que vous souhaitez faire. C'est la moitié de la motion M-208 que le Comité de la sécurité publique et nationale était censé étudier et qu'il commence maintenant à étudier.

Je propose que nous discutions de la motion à la fin de la séance, afin de ne pas abréger le temps dont nous disposons pour interroger nos témoins, mais je souhaite discuter plus à fond de cette motion. C'était la partie de la motion M-208 que le Comité de la sécurité publique et nationale était censé étudier.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vais parler de la motion, et vous pourrez la mettre aux voix quand vous serez en mesure de le faire, monsieur le président.

Nous avons la chance d’avoir deux séances. Compte tenu des situations d’urgence que nous avons vécues… Notre comité a manqué précédemment une occasion d’étudier la couverture des services de téléphonie cellulaire offerts pendant la tornade qui a frappé la région auparavant et pendant d’autres problèmes que nous avons traversés par la suite. Nous disposons de suffisamment de temps pour organiser deux séances et faire comparaître les grandes entreprises de télécommunication et d’autres fournisseurs de services afin d’obtenir quelques témoignages pour éduquer les Canadiens sur les services qu’eux et leur famille devraient recevoir pendant les situations d’urgence, ainsi que sur les failles et les lacunes potentielles du système dont nous disposons actuellement.

Il ne fait aucun doute que de nombreux renseignements erronés circulent à ce sujet. De plus, les gens sont préoccupés par le fait qu’ils n’obtiennent même pas la couverture qu’ils pensaient obtenir. En outre, il y a la question de la planification des services municipaux, provinciaux et fédéraux qui doivent être coordonnés.

À mon avis, l’organisation de deux séances représenterait une tentative constructive et responsable d’obtenir au moins des renseignements de base qui clarifiera grandement ce qui survient pendant les situations d’urgence.

Et, ce qui importe encore plus, c’est que nous utiliserons cette occasion pour permettre aux gens de planifier ces situations d’une façon appropriée et pour permettre au gouvernement d’intervenir. Le Parlement suspendra bientôt ses travaux et, sans cette orientation, nous laisserons les Canadiens dans une zone d’ombre en ce qui concerne la couverture des services de téléphonie cellulaire pendant au moins six mois, jusqu’à la reprise des travaux parlementaires après les élections.

Je pense qu’il est approprié d’organiser deux séances, et notre calendrier nous permet de le faire. Cela nous donnera au moins une occasion de définir certaines attentes en matière de prestation des services.

Enfin, monsieur le président, cela nous donnera l’occasion de soulever des préoccupations à propos de ces services au nom du grand public.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Le prochain intervenant est M. Longfield, qui est suivi de M. Chong.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je propose que le débat soit maintenant ajourné.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Brian Masse:

Pouvons-nous voter, alors? Nous pouvons voter, puis poursuivre la séance. Le vote prendra seulement quelques secondes. Pouvons-nous mettre la motion aux voix?

Le président:

Cette motion ne peut pas faire l’objet d’un débat. Par conséquent, nous allons ajourner le débat et recommencer à entendre nos témoins.

Oui, nous allons mettre la motion aux voix.

M. Brian Masse:

Sur quoi votons-nous? Je vais demander un vote par appel nominal.

Donc, nous n'aurons pas de discussion sur...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pas tant que les témoins sont ici.

Le président:

La motion vise à ajourner le débat.

M. Brian Masse:

Toutefois, avant cela, j'ai demandé que ma motion soit mise aux voix. J'ai donc demandé la mise aux voix... vous pouvez peut-être expliquer la raison pour laquelle, lorsque j'ai demandé que ma motion soit mise aux voix, le débat a porté sur la motion d'ajournement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est pas valide d'un point de vue procédural.

Le président:

Vous aviez cédé la parole. Vous ne pouviez donc pas demander la mise aux voix de la motion. Tous les membres du comité ont l'occasion d'intervenir. M. Longfield a demandé d'ajourner le débat, ce qui est approprié. C'est donc ce que nous ferons, et nous mettrons aux voix... Ai-je entendu quelqu'un demander un vote par appel nominal?

(0950)

M. Brian Masse:

Oui.

Le président:

D'accord, nous aurons un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion est adoptée par 8 voix contre 1.)

Le président: Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à M. Graham.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je remercie les témoins de leur participation. J'aimerais vous présenter nos excuses pour ce léger retard. La façon de gérer ces services est ce dont nous parlons en ce moment. Je pense que c'est déjà le but de nos délibérations.

J'ai simplement deux ou trois brèves questions à vous poser. Ensuite, je céderai la parole aux autres membres du comité, parce que je sais que bon nombre d'entre eux souhaitent poser des questions aujourd'hui.

Je m'adresse maintenant à la représentante de Xplornet. Vous avez de nombreuses antennes LTE dans ma circonscription et partout au pays, comme vous l'avez mentionné à M. Albas il y a une minute.

Madame Prudham, quelle est la possibilité à long terme d'utiliser l'infrastructure des services sans fil fixes pour offrir également des services sans fil mobiles? Est-ce une possibilité, ou s'agit-il de deux univers complètement différents?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

C'est une possibilité. La technologie 5G [Difficultés techniques]

Pardonnez-moi, il y a beaucoup d'écho sur la ligne.

La technologie 5G permettra de fusionner les configurations sans fil fixes et les configurations sans fil mobiles. On s'attend à ce que leur rayon soit très semblable, voire identique. Il est donc très probable que cette capacité existe.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, c'est merveilleux.

Je vais maintenant poser le même genre de questions aux représentants de RightMesh. Alors que, l'année dernière, j'étais à Manawan, une réserve au nord de ma circonscription, j'ai été étonné de constater que tous les habitants de la réserve bénéficiaient d'un service de téléphonie cellulaire grâce à l'accès WiFi de la réserve, et ce, même si un véritable service de téléphonie cellulaire n'était pas offert là-bas.

À l'aide de votre technologie et de vos systèmes, pourrions-nous aller jusqu'à installer des téléphones cellulaires au sommet d'une tour et des répéteurs dans une région afin de créer un réseau?

M. John Lyotier:

Oui, je suppose que vous pourriez faire quelque chose de ce genre. Je pense que, dans ce genre de situation, un autre type d'utilisation pourrait consister à élargir le WiFi au-delà de sa couverture actuelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais beaucoup d'autres...

Désolé, poursuivez.

M. John Lyotier:

Désolé. Pendant une seconde, je n'étais pas certain que vous pouviez m'entendre.

Oui, vous pourriez élargir la couverture du WiFi au-delà de ce qui est possible là-bas. Au lieu d'être à un bond du réseau WiFi, vous pourriez vous trouver à quatre ou cinq bonds du réseau, c'est-à-dire à quelques téléphones de distance plutôt qu'au milieu de la ville.

Je suppose que vous pourriez installer les téléphones au sommet d'une tour, mais, à ce moment-là, vous feriez aussi bien d'utiliser des antennes et du matériel conçu pour ce genre d'application. Il y a du matériel vendu sur le marché que vous pourriez utiliser et qui serait probablement moins coûteux que de communiquer avec une tour de téléphonie cellulaire éloignée. Toutefois, vous pourriez utiliser du matériel à cet effet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Fort bien.

J'ai bien d'autres questions, mais je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps. Je céderai donc une partie de mon temps à M. Massé. [Français]

M. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur de Burgh Graham.

Monsieur Nepton, dans votre présentation, vous avez mentionné que les télécommunicateurs ne devraient pas être les seuls à désigner les endroits devant être desservis. Vous avez dit que les élus devraient peut-être participer à ce processus. J'aimerais entendre vos commentaires sur la stratégie du CRTC, qui a établi une carte comportant des hexagones et visant à déterminer les endroits qui sont desservis et ceux qui ne le sont pas.

Selon vous, cette carte est-elle appropriée pour tenter de préciser les zones à desservir et les fonds nécessaires pour doter ces endroits d'infrastructures ou de technologies?

M. André Nepton:

C'est une question pertinente.

Comme nous avons mené des études très exhaustives, principalement au Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean, sur la couverture Internet et cellulaire pour des vitesses de 50 à 10  mégabits par seconde, je peux vous dire que les cartes du CRTC, tout comme celles qui étaient produites par Industrie Canada, comportent malheureusement certaines défaillances. En effet, la conception de ces cartes repose à la base sur des déclarations volontaires des télécommunicateurs. Pour les très grands joueurs, la carte est assez juste. En matière de déclarations, des compagnies comme Rogers, Telus, Vidéotron et Cogeco font preuve de beaucoup de rigueur. Malheureusement, pour les joueurs de plus petite taille, c'est aussi dans certains cas un élément stratégique visant à limiter la capacité de développement d'un concurrent sur un territoire d'application. Étant donné que le joueur doit déclarer quelle vitesse il offre à des endroits donnés, il peut arriver que la mine de son crayon soit un peu plus épaisse.

Nous avons noté chez nous, particulièrement sur la dernière carte du CRTC, qu'à peu près 20 % des municipalités désignées comme étant déjà bien desservies ne l'étaient pas, en réalité. Tout un travail de fond doit donc être réalisé pour démontrer que la carte n'est pas entièrement juste. La position du CRTC est que nous devons faire la preuve que les territoires ne sont pas bien desservis. Il va alors demander une nouvelle évaluation aux télécommunicateurs concernés. Cette base est un excellent élément pour la prise de décisions, mais qui doit être raffiné à partir des résultats locaux.

(0955)

M. Rémi Massé:

Merci. Votre commentaire a été fort apprécié. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Albas, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vous remercie encore, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir à Xplornet. Lors de mon intervention précédente, je vous ai demandé quel était votre avis sur la première option et combien de personnes perdraient le service. Je comprends que vous soyez réticente à fournir l'information exacte, mais je voudrais aussi vous demander combien de clients pourraient perdre le service avec la deuxième option.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Nous nous soucions non seulement des clients qui perdraient le service — un problème qui serait évidemment extrêmement préoccupant si les gens sont complètement privés de service —, mais aussi du fait que la réduction proposée aurait pour résultat net de réduire le service pour ceux qui [Difficultés techniques] être connectés. Non seulement des clients perdront le service, mais pratiquement tout le monde subira une diminution de service.

M. Dan Albas:

Comme le spectre est extrêmement important pour les représentants de l'industrie, ces mesures seront manifestement néfastes pour les régions rurales, car les gens veulent pouvoir accéder à l'économie et se prévaloir des diverses initiatives en matière de santé. Je sais que la Colombie-Britannique a investi des sommes substantielles dans des initiatives de santé offertes en région rurale par l'entremise d'Internet. Voilà qui poserait un problème si le gouvernement mettait la deuxième option en œuvre, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Certainement. L'une des principales choses qu'il faut comprendre, c'est que dans les régions urbaines, le spectre ne transmet que les un ou deux gigaoctets que la personne moyenne utilise avec son téléphone cellulaire. Dans les régions rurales, il transporte 160 gigaoctets par mois; c'est donc 150 fois le nombre de gigaoctets utilisés par personne en région urbaine.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vous remercie d'avoir apporté cette précision.

Comme la bande de 3 500 mégahertz a été utilisée pour le déploiement du service sans fil fixe en région rurale, elle présente maintenant un très grand intérêt pour le service 5G. À votre avis, le gouvernement devrait-il réserver une nouvelle bande pour le service sans fil fixe?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Sachez que la bande de fréquences internationale désignée sous l'appellation « 3 500 mégahertz » englobe en fait les fréquences allant de 3 400 à 3 800 mégahertz. À l'heure actuelle, nous utilisons seulement 175 mégahertz de cette bande. On n'a pas besoin de déplacer les titulaires de licence. On peut envisager d'utiliser 75 mégahertz de spectre que le gouvernement a déjà identifiés en dessous de la bande existante qui pourrait être rendue disponible, et 100 mégahertz de ce qui est actuellement appelé la « bande C » — soit les fréquences de 3 700 à 3 800 mégahertz — et les rendre disponibles. Ces fréquences sont actuellement utilisées pour les satellites, mais elles ne sont pas entièrement utilisées. On pourrait sans doute effectuer un transfert vers la bande de fréquences de 3 800 à 4 200 mégahertz.

M. Dan Albas:

D'autres options sont donc envisageables, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Absolument. Comme je l'ai indiqué, il y a approximativement 175 mégahertz libres qui pourraient littéralement être mis en disponibilité demain.

M. Dan Albas:

Quand vous avez soulevé la question, quelle a été la réponse?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Le gouvernement était très songeur et il a pris note de la proposition.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

Que pensez-vous de la consultation actuelle sur les zones de service réduites pour les enchères du spectre? Considérez-vous que le spectre souple et la séparation des régions urbaines et rurales pourraient permettre d'atténuer le problème?

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Cela aiderait certainement beaucoup. Xplornet considère cette solution d'un oeil favorable. Si vous connaissez les zones de niveau 4 actuelles, vous savez que Calgary et tout le territoire qui se trouvent entre cette ville et les Rocheuses, jusqu'à la frontière de la Colombie-Britannique, font partie de la zone de Calgary. Cette zone englobe un grand nombre de personnes qui vivent incontestablement dans les régions rurales de l'Alberta et qui sont coincées dans la région de licence urbaine de Calgary.

(1000)

M. Dan Albas:

J'ai observé le même problème à Montréal. Si on examine la superficie couverte, on constate qu'elle inclut un certain nombre de petites communautés périphériques et pas seulement Montréal. C'est un phénomène présent dans l'ensemble du pays.

Mme Christine J. Prudham:

Absolument. C'est un problème de taille dans la région de Toronto.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant accorder la parole à M. Amos.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes, monsieur. [Français]

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le Comité de m'offrir cette occasion. Je remercie également les témoins de leur participation.

Pour ma part, je voudrais concentrer la discussion avec M. Nepton sur le rôle de nos municipalités à l'égard du développement de la couverture cellulaire sans fil. Quand je discute avec les maires — et il y en a plus de 40 dans la circonscription de Pontiac —, le sentiment exprimé concerne le manque de contrôle ainsi que la frustration face au réseau et aux relations avec les compagnies, qui ne sont pas nécessairement là pour faire participer nos municipalités de façon directe et étroite. Si elles le font, c'est plutôt parce que c'est dans leur propre intérêt et non dans l'intérêt public.

À votre avis, quelle est la meilleure façon de faire participer nos municipalités au processus décisionnel concernant la télécommunication sans fil, d'abord, et le service Internet à large bande, ensuite?

M. André Nepton:

L'AIDE-TIC travaille directement avec les maires, les MRC, les gouvernements et les ministères impliqués. Nous abordons toujours la question de la même façon.

Par exemple, lorsque nous rencontrons un groupe de maires d'une même MRC pour discuter de la construction de sites cellulaires, nous leur demandons lesquels établir en priorité pour desservir la population, pour des questions de sécurité ou pour offrir une couverture adéquate à la clientèle touristique, cette dernière préoccupation en étant une qui revient régulièrement.

Une fois que nous avons établi le contact avec les maires, ils se responsabilisent et prennent conscience du fait que cet ordre de priorité détermine aussi les périodes de développement. Nous leur faisons également bien comprendre que ce projet d'établissement de sites est souvent l'amorce d'une couverture régionale. Dans ce contexte, je vous dirais que ces groupes de maires sont systématiquement conscients des préoccupations locales les plus pressantes et veulent donc établir cet ordre de priorité.

Par contre, les programmes actuels demandent généralement que tout projet de développement soit avalisé par une résolution municipale. Aucun maire ne refusera cette résolution à une compagnie si cette dernière souhaite améliorer son réseau. Cependant, les programmes antérieurs parlaient toujours de l'Internet, mais jamais de téléphonie cellulaire. Le fait d'autoriser une compagnie à offrir un accès à l'Internet à une vitesse de téléchargement de cinq mégabits par seconde empêchait donc le développement de toute autre technologie sur le territoire.

Parce que nous collaborons étroitement avec la Fédération québécoise des municipalités, nous constatons que les maires — particulièrement au Québec — veulent désormais s'impliquer dans l'établissement de ces priorités. Encore une fois, si la décision en était laissée aux grandes entreprises, ces priorités seraient fonction de la taille de la population et du nombre de véhicules de passage. Il faut donc se rappeler les préoccupations locales et impliquer nos maires, puisque ces derniers sont capables d'assumer leurs responsabilités et d'établir leurs priorités locales.

M. William Amos:

Cela vaut-il aussi pour les municipalités de l'ouest du Québec et de l'Outaouais?

M. André Nepton:

Nous commençons à travailler un peu plus du côté de l'ouest du Québec; nous fonctionnons à la demande.

Vous comprendrez que l'AIDE-TIC n'est pas le chien de garde des intérêts des grands télécommunicateurs. Si l'une de ces entreprises nous aborde, c'est parce que le site qu'elle souhaite voir développer est rentable. Nous n'interviendrons donc pas, et l'entreprise pourra développer elle-même ce site si elle le décide. C'est le milieu qui s'en charge.

Nous avons des projets à la Baie-James, dans le Bas-Saint-Laurent et dans les Laurentides, mais nous n'avons pas encore été sollicités en Outaouais.

(1005)

M. William Amos:

J'ai une dernière question dans les 40 secondes qu'il me reste.

Je m'intéresse tout particulièrement à la façon dont, dans les futurs programmes de notre gouvernement, nous pourrions davantage appuyer nos municipalités et leur permettre de participer à ce processus. Devrions-nous par exemple songer à leur fournir les services d'ingénieurs ou de spécialistes afin de leur épargner ces coûts?

M. André Nepton:

Selon le modèle actuel que nous avons mis sur pied, les municipalités nous confient le mandat d'ériger les tours de télécommunications, de les offrir aux grands télécommunicateurs et d'en faire la gestion en leur nom. Nous avons fait la preuve que nos coûts d'installation sont largement inférieurs à ceux de ces entreprises. C'est donc le genre d'appui que nous pourrions aussi offrir aux municipalités.

M. William Amos:

Merci, monsieur Nepton.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Malheureusement, j'entends la sonnerie qui nous appelle à aller voter. Pouvons-nous obtenir le consentement unanime pour continuer encore 10 minutes afin de terminer la séance?

Des députés: Non.

Le président: Non? Eh bien, sur cette note, je voudrais remercier nos témoins d'avoir comparu aujourd'hui. La séance est malheureusement écourtée parce que nous sommes appelés à aller voter à la Chambre.

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes impatients de voir le résultat final de notre étude.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard indu 15510 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on June 04, 2019

2019-05-30 INDU 165

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good morning, everybody. Welcome to meeting 165 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology.

Pursuant to Standing Order 81(4), we're resuming our study of the main estimates 2019-20.

With us today we have the honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Sport.

Welcome, Minister. Thank you for coming today.

From the Department of Industry we have David McGovern, Associate Deputy Minister, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

You have up to 10 minutes to tell us your story.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan (Minister of Science and Sport):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Esteemed committee members, thank you for the opportunity to be here on the occasion of the tabling of the main estimates for the 2019-20 fiscal year.

Science research and evidence-based decision-making matter. They matter more than ever as the voices that seek to undermine science, evidence and fact continue to grow.

Canadians understand that science and research lead to a better environment—cleaner air, cleaner water—new medical treatments or cures, stronger communities, and new and effective technologies.

Our talented researchers and students are developing robotic devices to help people recover from strokes and injuries, making it easier for seniors and persons with disabilities to lead fully independent lives.[Translation]

Researchers are also developing vaccines and technologies to combat infectious diseases.[English]

Canadians understand that science and research are essential to innovation and to the foundations of a 21st century economy. At the same time, the world's top economies systematically invest in research for its own sake.[Translation]

The growth of modern economies has been driven largely by science, technology and engineering.[English]

Investments in fundamental research come back to Canadians in the form of new jobs and higher wages. It's for these many reasons that our government has prioritized science and research since day one. We reinstated the long-form census, encouraged our scientists to speak freely and reinstated the position of the chief science adviser.

I requested that Canada's chief science adviser work with science-based departments to create departmental chief scientist positions in order to strengthen science advice to government and to develop a scientific integrity policy.

We have taken a very different approach in working with the science and research community. We have listened carefully to the community and have undertaken six major consultations.[Translation]

One of those consultations was the first review of federal funding for basic science in 40 years.[English]

We are committed to returning science and research to their rightful place. Four successive federal budgets have invested a total of more than $10 billion in science and research and in our researchers and students. We are putting them at the centre of everything we do. That means ensuring they have the necessary funding, state-of-the-art labs and tools, and digital tools to make discoveries and innovations.

(0850)

[Translation]

We invested $4 billion in science and research in 2018.[English]

This included the largest investment in fundamental research in Canadian history. In fact, we increased funding to the granting councils by 25% after 10 years of stagnant funding. The impact of this decision was profound and positive. We are hearing directly from researchers who say that because of increases to NSERC and SSHRC, they are able to hire students who gain the skills they need for the jobs of the future.

We provided $2 billion for 300 research and innovation infrastructure projects at post-secondary institutions from coast to coast to coast. We also invested $763 million over five years in the Canada Foundation for Innovation and have committed predictable, sustainable, long-term funding for the organization.

We also devoted $2.8 billion to renewing our federal science laboratories because we understand the critical role that government researchers play in Canada's science and research community.

In parallel to these historic investments, our government is making important changes to the research system itself. We will shortly announce the establishment of the council on science and innovation to help strengthen Canada's efforts to stimulate innovation across our country's economy. Minister Petitpas Taylor and I have already announced the establishment of the Canada research coordinating committee to better coordinate and harmonize programs of the three federal granting councils—CIHR, NSERC and SSHRC—as well as the CFI.

The Canada research coordinating committee's action over the last year has led to the creation of the new frontiers in research fund, which supports international, interdisciplinary, fast-breaking and high-reward research.

The committee also launched the first-ever dialogue with first nations, Métis and Inuit regarding research. We provided 116 research connection grants to support community workshops and the development of position papers to inform this effort. More than half of these grants were awarded to indigenous researchers and indigenous not-for-profit organizations to help chart a shared path to reconciliation.

As we put into place the foundations for this significant culture change, we vowed that each and every Canadian would benefit.[Translation]

To achieve our vision, the scientific and research communities must reflect Canada's diversity.[English]

We want as many people as possible experiencing our world-class institutions, but it is not enough to attract people. We also have to retain them. That's why I put in place new equity and diversity requirements for our internationally recognized Canada excellence research chairs and Canada research chairs.

Because of our changes, more than half of the Canada excellence research chairs resulting from the last competition are women. I'm thrilled to say that in the most recent competition, for the first time in Canadian history, we had 50% women nominated for the Canada research chairs, and we had the highest percentage of indigenous and racialized researchers and scholars, as well as researchers with a disability.

Earlier this month, we took the historic step of launching a program that we are calling “Dimensions: Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Canada”.[Translation]

This is a pilot program inspired by the internationally recognized Athena SWAN program.[English]

We are encouraging universities, colleges, polytechnics and CEGEPs to endorse the dimensions charter to signal their commitment to ensuring that everyone has access to equal opportunities, treatment and recognition in our post-secondary institutions. I am pleased to share that 32 institutions have already signed the charter.

We have repeatedly heard that inadequate parental leave creates many challenges, especially for early-career researchers who are women.

(0855)

[Translation]

No one should ever have to choose between having a research career and raising a family.[English]

We know that a delay in career progress early on can often mean that women achieve lower levels of academic seniority and earn a lower salary and pension. That's why, in budget 2019, we are doubling parental leave from six to 12 months for students and post-doctoral fellows who are funded by the granting councils.

Budget 2019 also plans to provide for 500 more master's level scholarships annually and 500 doctoral scholarships, so that more Canadian students can pursue research.

Remaking Canada's science and research culture is a huge and complex undertaking, but we are hearing from G7 countries that Canada is now viewed as a beacon for research because of the investments we are making. We saw it first-hand with the international interest in the Canada 150 research chairs.[Translation]

Obviously, there's still much more to do and it will take time.[English]

Canadians can be proud, however, that in a short period, the landscape of science and research has forever been altered. We want Canada to be an international research leader, continuing to make discoveries that positively impact the lives of Canadians, the environment, our communities and our economy.[Translation]

I'm sure that all committee members share this goal.[English]

Mr. Chair, I'd like to finish by saying thank you to all the members of this committee for the work they have done over these last three and a half years.

I'd be pleased to answer any questions you may have.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister, for your opening remarks.

We'll go right into questions. We're going to start off with Mr. Longfield.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thanks, Minister Duncan, for being here.

Thanks also for visiting the University of Guelph as many times as you have over the last four years.

I was meeting with one of our younger scientists, in fact, one who is being repatriated to Canada thanks to what we're doing by investing in science. In fact, five people on this team have come back to Canada as part of the brain gain. Jibran Khokhar is a neuropsychopharmacologist. He's working on addictions and mental health, studying the effects in mice.

His concern has to do with early stage investment and what we're doing for young scientists doing higher risk science versus the traditional larger investments in science.

Could you comment on the work of the Canada research coordinating committee or any other way that we're doing investment in younger stage scientists?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Lloyd, for being such a strong champion of research.

When I came into this role, I pulled the data. What I found is that, in one of our granting councils, our researchers weren't getting their first grant until age 43. You simply cannot build a research career when you're getting that first grant at 43. I've made a real focus on early-career researchers because if we don't, where will our country be in 10 to 15 years?

You talked about the Canada research coordinating committee. We've developed a new research fund. It's called the new frontiers in research fund. It is focused on international, interdisciplinary, fast-paced, high-risk, high-reward research. It's $275 million and will double over the next five years, and then we'll be adding $65 million a year to it. It will be the largest pod of funds available to researchers. The first stream, the exploration stream, we made available only to early-career researchers. We've announced the award winners; $38 million went to 157 researchers.

As I went across the country 25 years ago when I was teaching, people asked if I had a research career or a child. I didn't expect to hear that as I went across the country. That's why, as another action for early-career researchers, we are investing in extending parental leave from six months to 12 months. You shouldn't have to choose between having a research career and a baby. You should be able to have both, and we need to make it easier to do that.

(0900)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'll pass that on to Jibran. All the young researchers are connected—it's not a surprise—and they're all looking for these new avenues.

I also met with Dr. Beth Parker, who is the Canada research chair for groundwater. She's doing some work on groundwater, on geothermal, and what that could do in terms of climate change mitigation; working on urban buildings that could get heating and cooling from geothermal. She's a water research scientist.

You mentioned in your presentation the connections with Environment and Climate Change Canada. Could you expand a little bit on how Dr. Parker could connect with the programs around environment and climate change for retrofitting buildings, as an example?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Lloyd, please pass along, first of all, my best wishes to Jibran. I know his work.

If you have specific questions, they should absolutely go to Environment Canada.

One of the things I've brought in, though, is that we want.... Traditionally, academic science as the outside research community and government science have not worked together. There is some crossover and there are some research institutes on academic campuses, but we need to do a better job of doing this.

I've been very focused on government science. On day two of our government, we unmuzzled our scientists. It's one thing to say and it's another thing to create a communications policy to remind colleagues and other ministers that we want our scientists speaking freely and we want them out collaborating. We're also investing $2.8 billion in government science infrastructure to cut new labs. Many of our labs are 25 years of age. With these new labs we're not going to build them the same old way where you have one discipline, a weather lab, for example. We're going to bring environment and fisheries labs together. We're also going to have increased collaboration with researchers, universities, colleges and industry.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Along that line, I was in the Arctic last summer at the PEARL research station. Environment Canada has a weather station there, and there are about seven universities doing atmospheric research looking at climate change. In our budget we had $21.8 million for PEARL. I believe most of that came through Environment and Climate Change Canada, but we still have to do the science there.

Can you comment on the connection between our investments? I know Environment and Climate Change Canada isn't your file, but how do we keep that research centre going, doing important work that it's doing?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Lloyd.

I know you did visit PEARL, the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory. It's our most northerly lab in Canada. It studies atmosphere and the links between atmosphere and ocean biosphere. We believe it's an important lab. It was going to be shuttered under the previous government. That is why our government has committed to keeping PEARL open. Environment Canada will be keeping PEARL open.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

But they'll have to keep reapplying to NSERC in order to do the science. Is that what I'm understanding?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

It's important that the researchers apply for research funding just as any of our researchers across the country do. They can apply to NSERC. They can look at other funds. We're of course always happy to put our officials in touch to see what funding might be available.

(0905)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'll pass that on to Pierre Fogal, who comes from Guelph and runs that research lab.

Thank you very much, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to Mr. Chong.

You have seven minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for appearing and providing us testimony on the estimates.

I first want to correct the record that there's been some huge sea change in levels of higher education funding in Canada. While I acknowledge that the current government has somewhat increased funding for the four granting councils, if you look at the OECD's measures on higher education expenditures on research and development, they actually haven't changed much in the last 20 years. In 2005 it was 0.67% of GDP. In 2012 it was 0.7%. In 2013 it was 0.67%. In 2014, it was 0.65%. In 2015, it was 0.67%. In 2016, it was 0.68%. In 2017, the most recent year for which OECD has figures available, it was 0.65%. It's not as if there's been a massive sea change in levels of funding for higher education expenditures in this country. I think that's important to note on the record.

As far as being a world leader on higher education expenditures on research and development goes, while we place in the top 10, we're certainly not a world leader. We are behind countries like Austria, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, which spend considerably more than we do on higher education research and development. In fact, in the United States, the National Institutes of Health alone spend the equivalent of $49 billion Canadian a year on research, each and every year. Even on a pro rata basis, that dwarfs the budgets of the four granting councils in this country.

My question for you is quite simple. The Naylor report recommended increases to funding. The current government has spent considerably more than it had projected when it took office some four years ago. Why hasn't the government increased funding levels for the four granting councils to the levels recommended in the Naylor report?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'd like to thank my honourable colleague. He and I have worked together a very long time.

I, too, would like to correct the record. The data that you presented, the latest data, as you pointed out, was 2017, but 2018 was the historic investment in research, $6.8 billion in research, the largest investment in Canadian history, a 25% increase to our granting councils.

My goal was to put our researchers at the centre of everything we do to make sure they had the funding to do their research, that they have the labs and tools necessary to do their research and that they have the digital tools. That meant a 25% increase to our granting councils. It meant a $762-million investment in CFI and then the promise of predictable, sustainable, long-term funding of $462 million annually. Finally, after 20 years, there would be stable funding for CFI and, because so much of research today is big data, the digital research tools, there's an investment of $573 million.

When I go to a G7 meeting, what I hear from my G7 colleagues is that Canada is, and I quote, “a beacon for science and research”, and they are looking forward to collaborating, and because of that new frontiers in research funds, that $275-million fund that will double over the next few years, our researchers are going to have access to international money to be able to collaborate with Europe and the United States, and that really has not existed.

Hon. Michael Chong:

To be fair, the funding levels have increased, but the 2018 figures will not be much off from the 2017 figures.

What I hear from researchers is that they feel that they are at a competitive disadvantage when competing against the funds available to American researchers through the National Institutes of Health, for example.

I think that, while funding levels have increased, they still have not increased to the levels that the Naylor report recommended, and that's clear.

The other question I had—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I will respond to that. I was very pleased to commission the fundamental science review of which Dr. David Naylor was the chair. It was a blue ribbon panel. We had former UBC president Dr. Martha Piper. We had Nobel Prize winner Dr. Art McDonald. We had the chief scientist of Quebec, Dr. Rémi Quirion. It was the second consultation we had done. They listened to 1,500 researchers. It is a really important report. The first—

(0910)

Hon. Michael Chong:

I agree, but the funding levels—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I do want to respond.

Hon. Michael Chong:

I don't have a lot of time. I'd like to move on to my next question.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I do want to respond to you.

It was the first review of federal funding in 40 years. We took that report very seriously, and it led to the $6.8-billion budget, the largest in Canadian history. My last sentence—

Hon. Michael Chong:

On a nominal basis.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Under the previous government, your government also asked Dr. David Naylor to do a report. There was to be a press conference on a Friday and that report was buried.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Moving on to my next question, I have a question about the chief science adviser, Minister. The position of chief science adviser was created with a lot of fanfare but, frankly, a lot of people have been wondering why she wasn't given a sufficient mandate to do her job. A lot of people have been watching her try to fulfill her role to the best of her abilities but without any support from the government.

One of the questions that has been asked is: Why hasn't she been appointed to head up the coordinating council rather than the presidency, the chairing of that council, to rotate the presidents of the various granting councils?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

First of all, let me say that we decided to bring back the position of the chief science adviser, a position that was abolished by your government. We appointed Dr. Mona Nemer, an internationally renowned cardiologist with many awards. Your party's former INDU critic said it was an excellent choice, and we agree.

Hon. Michael Chong:

The problem is that she hasn't been given a sufficient mandate—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

She has been given—

Hon. Michael Chong:

—to do her job. She has been struggling to find that role in the government, so it's much like—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

If I could finish—

Hon. Michael Chong:

—a lot of the rhetoric coming out of the government—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

If I could finish—

Hon. Michael Chong:

There has been a big disconnect between the rhetoric and what has actually been delivered, whether it's the Naylor report, which recommended certain funding levels that have not been fulfilled; whether it's appointing a new chief science adviser who wasn't given a sufficient mandate to carry out her role—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

If I could actually respond—

Hon. Michael Chong:

—or whether it's the creation of a coordinating council—

The Chair:

Mr. Chong, sorry, but you are over time.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Fair enough, but just let me finish my sentence.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Well, I wasn't given that opportunity.

The Chair:

I would like to make sure the minister has a chance to respond to your question.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Fair enough.

The Chair:

You are over time. We're at eight minutes. I've allowed—

Hon. Michael Chong:

Mr. Chair, I agree. I just want to finish my sentence, please, if I might.

The Chair:

I would like the minister to be able to have a moment to respond to you, please.

Hon. Michael Chong:

May I finish my sentence?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Hon. Michael Chong:

There has been a huge disconnect between the rhetoric and the reality of what the government has delivered, and I believe that also includes the science portfolio.

The Chair:

I will allow the minister time to respond.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

With a $10-billion investment, we've changed the trajectory for science and research in this country.

Dr. Nemer is doing important work.

I will remind the honourable member, I'm glad to hear his respect for Dr. Naylor today, but I wish it was shown when his government was in power.

You buried the report. You ignored his report, and what he asked for was $1 billion for health innovation.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we move on to Mr. Masse, I want to remind everybody to try to not talk over each other. We want to have respectful dialogue and questions and answers here. It will make it easier for everybody to be able to get the questions and answers that they'd like.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

To start, I'm going to move to something a little easier to deal with. It's actually related to your position as Minister of Sport.

Given the fact that the Toronto Raptors are in a historic position today....

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Mr. Brian Masse: Exactly. Actually, my Chris Bosh jersey from the old times is out, as well.

I do have a serious question, though, with regard to the National Basketball League of Canada. I'm not sure if you're familiar with the league, but it has been important in terms of bringing sport and science to inner cities such as mine, in Windsor, where we have the Windsor Express.

The connection today, ironically, is the Oshawa franchise moved to Mississauga, which later folded for the Raptors 905 NBA D-League, affiliated with the current Raptors.

There are franchises in Cape Breton, Halifax, Charlottetown, Moncton, Saint John, Kitchener, London, Sudbury and Windsor.

What is your government doing to partner with leagues such as the NBL? I haven't seen anything yet to deal with concussion in sport and other supports. They have grassroots teams that are professional but also have a tremendous amount of community outreach.

For example, I know our Windsor Express were out for the Mayor's Walk recently, and also running a clinic on the street.

Before, when I had a different job, I ran an inner city youth basketball and sand volleyball program where we got kids off the street and did a lot of stuff for nutrition and so forth.

Specifically, has the government done anything with the National Basketball League of Canada? What opportunities are there for organizations such as that to deal with education on everything from nutrition to sport and culture, and most importantly, concussions?

(0915)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Brian, thank you for all the coaching you've done. I know you've been a long-time hockey coach. I didn't know about the basketball, so thank you.

Far too many children and athletes suffer from concussion. That's why we've worked with the health minister to develop new concussion guidelines that are being adopted by our national sport organizations. That's being done with the help of Parachute.

In this budget, we have invested $30 million for safe sport. I'm happy to talk about that if you would like. Part of that funding will be for protecting our children.

I'd also add that the House of Commons has undertaken a study on sport-related concussions. It's an all-party committee. I thank them for their work. The report will be tabled, and I'm really looking forward to their recommendations.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm going to move to another one, but I want to thank you. I'll leave it at that. It will be for another Parliament.

There have been some improvements with regard to science, and getting a profile here on the Hill. I have seen that evolve. I've been involved in this committee for a long time. I still think as a country we're underutilizing science and sport.

I'm not saying that nothing is being done, but it's one of the things that isn't often raised here. That's my personal criticism. Science and sport don't seem to get the attention they probably deserve for a country like Canada.

With some of my time, I want to move to what wouldn't be an unexpected topic for this table. My Bill C-440 on Crown copyright in Canada is very important for the science community. It's not only with regard to the universities, but is also related to a number of different academic associations, research think tanks and so forth.

Our law on Crown copyright is based on a 1911 U.K. law, which was put in place here in Canada in 1929. This is the restriction of government publications, scientific research and other materials that the public has paid for. Over 200 research academics testified here at our committee calling for the elimination of Crown copyright. It doesn't exist in the United States or in most Commonwealth nations. It's very rare to find it in Canada.

What is your position on Crown copyright as it currently is in Canada?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Brian.

You've touched on a number of areas. I'm going to touch on a number of them, and then I'll hand it over to my deputy minister.

You mentioned science and sport. The two absolutely go together. It's really important. If we want to improve performance and the health and safety of our athletes, it's through science. We do have the sport research institutes. I'd be happy to talk about that further.

You also talked about making research available. We absolutely agree. We want our scientists and researchers in government speaking freely. I take every opportunity to say that. We have to change that culture. We believe in open data and open—

(0920)

Mr. Brian Masse:

As the government, do you believe in Crown copyright? That's my specific question.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

We believe in open data and open science.

To pick up on Michael's question, he asked what the chief science adviser has been doing. I hope he has taken a look at her first annual report and the areas that she thinks we should be looking at.

I will turn it over to my deputy minister.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Madam Minister, I'm asking about a specific Crown copyright, the protection and prohibited use of government documents and research materials. I'm asking for your position on that. I don't need the deputy minister's position on that. We've studied it extensively in this House. It's a well-known fact that Canada has a unique system of protection, and I want to know whether you support the status quo of Crown copyright.

I think it's a fair question.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Brian.

This issue is raised with us all the time. We're aware of the issue and we're reviewing it.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

None.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Oh, there we go.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes, sir.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I sure hope that industry presents a report on copyright soon. I think it would be quite helpful.

Minister, could you explain to us what the Canada research chairs do and what they've accomplished so far?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

David, thank you for the question.

The Canada research chairs are some of our prestigious chairs. They were brought in in the year 2000. We have two kinds of chairs. Tier one Canada research chairs receive $200,000 over seven years, and tier two chairs receive $100,000 over five years.

We have made changes to the program. The tier one chairs used to be able to have seven years, then seven years and then seven years and that could go on forever. We have capped that at one renewal. Why? It gives more researchers access to these prestigious chairs.

We have actually made the first increase to the tier two funding in 19 years. That's because it is for early-career researchers.

We have made changes in terms of equity and diversity. Of course, I pulled the data; that's what I do as I want to see how we're doing. If we look at the history of the Canada research chairs program, we weren't close to our chairs reflecting the Canada we see today when you look at percentages of the population. I told our institutions that they had two years to make the voluntary targets that they had agreed to in 2006. I really want to thank our institutions. They really changed the way they do nominations and, for the first time, 50% women were nominated for these chairs. The highest percentage of indigenous, racialized and persons with disabilities were being nominated to these chairs.

I want to stress that, for the first time, we have five persons with disabilities holding a research chair. That's not 5%. It's five. That shows the work that needs to be done and that's why we're bringing in the dimensions charter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many research chairs are there?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

It's close to 2,000. Through budget 2018, the historic budget I talked about with the $6.8 billion, we're investing $210 million for another 285 Canada research chairs.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's more than I realized. I sense great pride in the program.

I do have another question related to the research. How does one motivate particular research to happen? One of the big issues in my rural riding, which has no research institutions, is that there are over 10,000 lakes in my riding. It's a big riding. We have Eurasian milfoil and other invasive species that are causing great problems. There seems to be no research being done on how to address them, mitigate them and prevent them from spreading further.

If somebody who isn't a scientist wants to take a particular topic up for research, how does that happen?

(0925)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm going to start right at the beginning.

I want to strengthen our culture of curiosity in Canada. All children are born curious. All children want to discover and explore. They'll pull apart this pen. They'll pull apart the microphone. They want to understand how things work. They're interested in nature. They want to go out and explore the lake and what's found at the bottom of the lake and what insects are there.

It's up to us to foster that natural-born curiosity through elementary school, high school and hopefully beyond. It's not enough to attract them in their institutions. We have to be able to retain them. I think it's about science literacy. It's about strengthening a culture of curiosity.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Massé wanted to ask a quick question as well, if I could pass some time to him.

The Chair:

You have two and a half minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Thank you. It's greatly appreciated.

Minister Duncan, first, I want to thank you for your commitment, passion and determination when it comes to science. It's extraordinary.

I've had the opportunity to meet with you several times with representatives of our research centres, both at the college and university levels. On a number of occasions, you and I have been told that regional research centres have difficulty accessing grants to continue their research. We've been told that these grants are mainly allocated to major research centres. However, some extraordinary research is also being conducted in the regions.

I'd like you to discuss potential measures to help our smaller regional college or university research centres access these funds.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I want to thank my colleague for his question.[English]

Rémi, thank you. Yes, we met with a number of your researchers, and it was just fascinating to know the research they were doing.

As you know, all the research that's done is peer reviewed. There are panels created, but we want to make sure those panels reflect Canada, and that has been changed.

We haven't talked about colleges yet. Colleges, polytechnics and CEGEPs play an incredible role in the research ecosystem. Just as we've made the largest investment in universities, we've also made the largest investment in our colleges, in applied research, of $140 million. That's the largest investment ever.

When I go across Canada, whether it's at Red River College—that's where Lloyd went—Humber College, Centennial or Seneca, the research that's being done is absolutely extraordinary, and they are able to make a difference in the community.

A company comes in. They need an answer, a quick turnaround, whether it's in robotics, artificial intelligence or virtual reality, and in three or four months the college is able to provide a solution.

At Niagara College, it was a certain type of nut they were able to do. At Niagara College, it's the help they're able to provide to the wine industry.

Thank you for raising this important question.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Minister and officials for attending today.

It has been reported as recently as May 2 in the Globe and Mail by Stephen Chase and Colin Freeze that in a National Research Council application process for advisory members of a committee related to a Huawei research grant, those with political opinions about Huawei need not apply for this process.

I think it's disturbing to Canadians when they're seeing that our federal agencies are screening people out for their political viewpoints in terms of their membership on committees. We have seen this trend in other departments, with the government putting political and personal values tests on whether or not you get government funding.

I'm just wondering, Minister, if we can trust the government in the future to protect Canadians and protect our processes from people being screened out for their political and personal viewpoints, and excluded from sharing in government programs and processes.

(0930)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Dane, thank you for your question.

I believe it is incredibly important that our researchers, whether in government or academia, are able to explore, to cross disciplines and to cross boundaries. That's how research works.

When it comes to academia, NSERC has very specific rules in terms of peer review. It needs to be hands-off. It is the specialists who review applications.

You mentioned foreign investment. As you know, there is a review being undertaken by security officials, and we will respect the results of that review.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you, Minister.

That is a separate matter. It is related. However, this is about an NSERC process for deciding who gets to sit on a site advisory committee related to Huawei's co-investment with the University of Laval. In the application process, people were asked if they had political views about Huawei. If they had political views, they would be excluded from this process.

When asked about this, Huawei stated that they did not request this screening process and do not expect a screening process for this application, so why is NSERC, a federal agency under your control, proactively going in and screening people out for their political views?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm going to turn this over to my deputy minister.

Mr. David McGovern (Associate Deputy Minister, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Department of Industry):

Thanks very much.

Let me preface my comments by telling you that, before I started with ISED, I was the deputy national security adviser to former prime minister Harper and then to Prime Minister Trudeau.

When these issues first emerged on our radar screen, Minister Duncan, as she's told you throughout, asked us to put together the data, to put together the fact base. We reached out to our granting councils, to the U15, which are the 15 most research intensive universities, to Universities Canada. We covered the whole spectrum. We just wanted to get a sense of what the issue of foreign investment in research in our academic institutions looked like. In the specific case that you're talking about, our granting councils want to ensure there's no bias in any of the people who do peer review. The way this story was portrayed in the newspaper suggests that it was focused on a single entity, single company, single country. But the notion of having no bias by the people who do the peer review, it applies to every grant application.

What we've been doing recently for Minister Duncan is trying to look at the broader issue of foreign investment in research at our universities. We're working with the universities. We brought in the national security community. We've reached out to foreign countries. We're putting together sort of the fact base, but we're also raising awareness on the part of all of the participants.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I have only 30 seconds left, and I do thank you for that thorough technical response.

I understand that we need to have strong protections from conflict of interest in these cases, and I do support that matter. However, when Canadians see that government granting agencies are asking people for their personal political viewpoints before they can apply for a process, I think that is crossing a line, and I think Canadians have a lot of concerns when that is a factor.

I only have four seconds left, so I just want to thank both of you again for appearing today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to Mr. Oliver.

You have five minutes.

Mr. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll be sharing my time with Mr. Jowhari.

We're spending a lot of time talking about science. I did want to thank you for your leadership on the sports file as well, the great work you've been doing across Canada to promote sports, inclusive sports, in particular.

I want to harken back to the conversation you had with Mr. Chong. I think it was Samuel Clemens who said there are lies, damned lies and statistics, which is basically the use of statistics to bolster weak arguments. I just wanted to reflect on that, because in this case, there were statistics being used that weren't relevant to the time period that was reflective of the work you've done as minister.

Here's the quick reality story. In my previous life, I chaired a peer review committee for CIHR, and over the previous government span we watched our allocation actually just dry up. We had people with Ph.D.s leaving Canada. Worst of all, we couldn't bring new students in to bring them up to Ph.D. level. There was a paucity of funds.

I've stayed in touch with the science officers and the others who are involved in it. They are all reporting incredible interest back into.... This is health research, which I know isn't NSERC or SSHRC, but it's been a phenomenal change and we're seeing now robust academic programs. We're seeing good Ph.D.-calibre people back in our universities, and we're seeing training happening across Canada. I just wanted to reflect that. As he said, there's reality and there's rhetoric. This is the reality. The rest is rhetoric.

(0935)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

John, thank you for highlighting it. Yes, it was disappointing to provide stats only to 2017, knowing the historic budget was in 2018.

Mr. John Oliver:

It's very obfuscating on his part, I think.

I did want to ask you a question, though. Part of what you've been working on is the Canada research chairs program, which I think has been a phenomenal statement about our commitment as a government to research and bringing long-lasting leadership—not just funding, but leadership positions—to make sure we keep research strong across Canada.

I was wondering if you could give us an update on how that's working, the early-career researchers and the work they're doing to retain very accomplished Ph.D.s and promote new researchers coming in.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'll give you a very specific example. Last week we announced the discovery grants, which are a large NSERC program. We made the largest investment in discovery grants in Canadian history. Some $588 million went to 5,000 researchers across Canada. What is particularly exciting is that 500 of those grants went to early-career researchers. There was an increase. They got an increase in the funding. They got a stipend as well as 1,700 scholarships for postgrads.

What we hear from the researchers is that they are feeling the difference. They understand that under the previous government, funds stagnated. No one was talking to the research community. It really was a broken relationship that needed repairing. When you stagnate funds it means there are small pools. The previous government added to the challenge by concentrating funds in a few hands.

The last thing they did was to tie research funding. For example, if you wanted a SSHRC grant, it had to have a business outcome. That's not how research works. We are saying the lifeblood of the research ecosystem is our researchers.

My goal is to put our researchers and our students at the centre of everything we do and to ensure that they have their funding, their labs and tools and digital tools.

Mr. John Oliver:

Sorry, Majid.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

No worries. With 45 seconds, I will say welcome.

Minister, there has been much talk about institutions, our educational institutions and our private sector when it comes to supporting research. However, I understand that the Government of Canada is also supporting a lot of researchers within the government.

With 30 seconds left, can you shed some light on the research that we are doing? What kind of researchers are we hiring?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Majid, thank you for highlighting our government scientists.

The Chair:

You have about 20 seconds for that one.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Okay.

We've given $2.8 billion for these new labs. I want to highlight the increase in our scientists and our technical experts since we have come into government. In 2015-16 to this time period there's been an increase of 2,000. That comes on top of the 2,500 that the previous—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

That's 2,000 that we have hired within the government?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

That's 2,000 scientists and technical experts. That's April StatsCan data.

The Chair:

Thanks very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Chong for five minutes.

We are going to go over by a couple of minutes. I just want to make sure that everybody keeps their time on track. The minister does have to go. We're going to try to finish off everything.

You have five minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I just want to respond to what Mr. Oliver said.

I use accurate statistics. We pulled out the latest OECD statistics. The reason I used 2017 is that's the latest year for which data was available from the OECD on the higher education research and development measures. That's why I used the 2017 figures and not those for 2018. I will put to the committee that I expect the 2018 figures will not be that far off from those for 2017 and previous years.

All of that is to say while I acknowledge that the current government has increased funding levels for the four granting councils, there has not been a sea change in funding levels relative to history and relative to the rest of the world. That's borne out by the facts. The facts are this: The four granting councils together in the estimates this year will receive approximately just under $4 billion. The National Institutes of Health in the United States will receive $49 billion Canadian alone for research. On a pro rata basis, that dwarfs what we're doing. So to suggest, as the minister has, that Canada is a world leader in funding levels simply is not true. While we are in the top 10 for HERD measures, we are not number one. That's clear on a variety of different measures.

I want to go to a specific question from the Naylor report. The Naylor report recommended that the government form a national advisory council on research and innovation. One of the concerns I've heard from the research community is that they fear that the board, which the report recommended be made up of 12 to 15 members, will be highly politicized. What they are looking for is to have framework legislation adopted by Parliament that would depoliticize the appointment process to ensure that this board and this advisory council are at arm's length from politics and serve their function.

Does the government have any plans to do that?

(0940)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I, too, am going to respond to you regarding funding.

We have absolutely changed—

Hon. Michael Chong:

Mr. Chair, with respect, I asked a question about—

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

—the trajectory of funding.

Hon. Michael Chong:

—the advisory council.

The Chair:

You prefaced with a comment. It's only fair that the minister respond to that comment in the process of answering your question.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We've absolutely changed the trajectory of funding in this country from stagnation to investment. First year, $2 billion.... I'll just give the example. In the first year, $95 million—

Hon. Michael Chong:

With respect, Minister, it's not to the levels recommended in the Naylor report.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

I'm trying, if you'll allow me—

Hon. Michael Chong:

You keep citing the Naylor report, and you have not—

The Chair:

Mr. Chong, please let the minister answer.

Hon. Michael Chong:

It's also my time, Mr. Chair, and the Naylor report was clear about its recommendations for increased funding levels. The fact of the matter is the government has not increased funding for the four granting councils to that level. That's a fact.

The Chair:

You don't need to make that point with me. Again, you are asking the minister—

Hon. Michael Chong:

—about the national advisory council and not about funding levels.

The Chair:

You are commenting and now you're.... Please let the minister answer. It's only fair. You prefaced all of that information—

Hon. Michael Chong:

I asked about the—

The Chair:

You're running out of time, Mr. Chong. We're running out of time, so if you'd like the minister to answer—

Hon. Michael Chong:

I'd like her to answer about the national advisory council.

The Chair:

She can answer to whatever she feels is appropriate.

Hon. Michael Chong:

And I can respond in any way I'd like to respond.

The Chair:

Well, your time is running out.

Minister.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In year one, we made a $95-million investment in the granting councils. It was heralded across the country because that $95 million was the largest investment in the granting councils in a decade. In budget 2018, we increased our funding to the granting councils by 25% to $1.7 billion.

Now I'm happy to answer. There will shortly be an announcement about the council on science and innovation. I'd like to thank the Science, Technology and Innovation Council, or STIC, for its work. This will be our council and we will take a different approach. It will be open and transparent. Agendas will be provided so Canadians know what will be discussed, and there will be reporting to Canadians. We are taking a very different approach and there will be the 12 members that you mentioned.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan for five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Minister, for bringing science back. In fact, you've brought it back to schools, back to government, back to industry and back to Canada.

Sault Ste. Marie is known as a steel town but we also have one of the highest rates of Ph.D.s per capita. There's a lot of scientific research happening on flora and fauna, forestry, the Great Lakes and the rivers. We also have Algoma University and Sault College. I noted that you had mentioned the dimension charter. Algoma University has signed that. It's a semi-rural university and they're leading the way. They have, since 2015, two research chairs. They're basically our front-line warriors in the battle against climate change. They're doing significant scientific research. They're working with both the private and public sectors there.

As you know, my daughter Kate was just accepted to the University of Ottawa for science. I really appreciate your leadership over the last few years in making things more diverse and giving a leg up.

I have a couple of questions. Can you explain some of the changes you have made to help women enter the scientific field and do their research? Can you explain in particular some of the changes that have been made to maternity leave?

As well, I noted with great significance that one of Doug Ford's first actions was to get rid of the chief science officer for Ontario. However, you were tasked with creating a chief science officer for Canada. Can you explain the importance of a chief science officer as well?

Last, Dr. Bondar says hi.

(0945)

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thanks, Terry. Congratulations to your daughter. Please give Dr. Bondar my very best. She's a Canadian hero.

Equity, diversity, inclusion: We have world-class institutions in this country, and they rank in the top 100. I think we should all be celebrating our researchers and our institutions.

I want as many people going through these institutions as possible. We have to attract them there, and we have to retain them. That's why we've put in place these equity, diversity, inclusion requirements for our prestigious research chairs. That's why we're increasing parental leave. When I came in, the parental leave for the three granting councils was three months, six months and six months. We got it to six months, and in this budget it's going to 12 months.

That's why we're bringing in the dimensions charter. This is based on the Athena SWAN program in the U.K., which has been replicated in Ireland, the United States and Australia. The Canadian program will be the most ambitious, and it's really exciting. In a matter of a few weeks, we will have 32 institutions signing on.

We want our institutions to be welcoming. I was at Dalhousie University on Friday, and there's really great excitement that people can be part of transformative change. In 1970, there was 0% full women professors in engineering. Roughly 50 years later, it's 11%. We've made progress, but it's incremental. There's excitement that together we can make transformative change. It's very exciting.

You asked about the chief science adviser. We believe in science advice to government so that our scientists can speak freely, so that they are not muzzled. They can be collaborating and going to international conferences. The chief science adviser has done really important work this year. She has worked on having departmental chief scientists to increase science advice to science-based departments.

I asked her to develop a scientific integrity policy—this is a first in Canada—to protect our scientists and researchers so we can never go back to as it was under the previous government. Nature, one of our most prestigious research journals, talked about Canada muzzling its scientists. We can never go back to that.

She has done an important aquaculture report that our government is now acting upon. She has done her first annual report. She is rebuilding the relationships with the research community outside and inside of government, as well as international relationships. Science and diplomacy matter.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

The final two minutes are yours, Mr. Masse.

(0950)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Again, thank you, Minister, for being here.

To continue along that line, there has been a lot of talk here about the silencing and muzzling of scientists in the previous government but your government right now does not allow scientists to release papers. Your scientists' papers are often redacted when they finally do get them released.

Your government right now has partial use and restrictions on papers in scientific research that is commissioned. It is not allowed, when you finally get them, to use them and share them.

Often requests from scientists and researchers are delayed or even ignored amongst departments. The situation has become so critical right now that your government also has lost information. As we go to the digital area, some departments treat it with respect, some do not, and information and research are also lost with regard to not moving into digital formats.

All of that has been expressed as part of the concerns on Crown copyright. Right now, you muzzle and restrict scientists, not by necessarily restricting what they say in public, but by denying the free access of their works for other Canadian researchers.

Aren't you then part of the problem?

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Brian, thank you for your question.

I will tell you what I am absolutely committed to. On day two, we unmuzzled our scientists.

Let me explain this. It is one thing to say it and it's another thing to act.

We developed a new communications policy from the previous government, because Nature magazine was reporting about Canada muzzling its scientists. I then wrote, along with the former president of the Treasury Board, to all ministers of the science-based departments to make sure they knew there was a new policy. We stressed that we want our scientists to speak. We want them communicating with Canadians. We want them speaking to the public.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Then why won't you let them share their papers? Why do you have restrictions?

The Chair:

Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That is the problem that we face here.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, the minister has actually stayed over her time. I wanted to make sure you got your time. Please do a quick wrap-up.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Fair enough.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Thank you.

We want them out speaking. Culture change takes time. I take every opportunity when I speak with government scientists. I'm the first science minister to ever meet with the deputy ministers of science-based departments throughout the year, and annually for eight hours, to discuss the challenges of government scientists. I am also committed to open science and open data—and I've asked our chief science adviser to work on this, because we want Canadians to have access.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

On that note, we've come to the end of our first hour.

Minister, thank you very much for being here today. Thank you for staying the extra minutes so that everybody could get in their time.

Hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Chair, thank you to you.

Once again, I'd really like to thank this committee for the opportunity to appear before you to answer your questions. Mostly, I'd like to thank you for the important work you've done over the last three and a half years.

Merci.

The Chair:

Thank you. We will suspend for a few minutes.

(0950)

(0955)

The Chair:

We're back.

Before we go into committee business, we need to vote on the main estimates. ATLANTIC CANADA OPPORTUNITIES AGENCY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$65,905,491 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$241,163,563 ç Vote 10—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$2,091,224 ç Vote 15—Increased Funding for the Regional Development Agencies..........$24,900,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10 and 15 agreed to on division) CANADIAN NORTHERN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$14,527,629 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$34,270,717 ç Vote 10—A Food Policy for Canada..........$3,000,000 ç Vote 15—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$1,709,192 ç Vote 20—Strong Arctic and Northern Communities..........$9,999,990

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 agreed to on division) CANADIAN SPACE AGENCY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$181,393,741 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$78,547,200 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$58,696,000

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) CANADIAN TOURISM COMMISSION ç Vote 1—Payments to the Commission..........$95,665,913 ç Vote 5—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$5,000,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division) COPYRIGHT BOARD ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$3,781,533

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures ..........$442,060,174 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$6,683,000 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$2,160,756,935 ç Vote L15—Payments pursuant to subsection 14(2) of the Department of Industry Act..........$300,000 ç Vote L20—Loans pursuant to paragraph 14(1)(a) of the Department of Industry Act..........$500,000 ç Vote 25—Access to High-Speed Internet for all Canadians..........$26,905,000 ç Vote 30—Giving Young Canadians Digital Skills..........$30,000,000 ç Vote 35—Preparing for a New Generation of Wireless Technology..........$7,357,000 ç Vote 40—Protecting Canada's Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Threats..........$964,000 ç Vote 45—Protecting Canada's National Security..........$1,043,354 ç Vote 50—Supporting Innovation in the Oil and Gas Sector Through Collaboration..........$10,000,000 ç Vote 55—Supporting Renewed Legal Relationships With Indigenous Peoples..........$3,048,333 ç Vote 60—Supporting the Next Generation of Entrepreneurs..........$7,300,000 ç Vote 65—Supporting the work of the Business/Higher Education Roundtable..........$5,666,667 ç Vote 70—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism (FedNor)..........$1,836,536

(Votes 1, 5, 10, L15, L20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65 and 70 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$37,981,906 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$209,531,630 ç Vote 10—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$3,607,224 ç Vote 15—Protecting Water and Soil in the Prairies..........$1,000,000 ç Vote 20—Increased Funding for the Regional Development Agencies..........$15,800,000 ç Vote 25—Investing in a Diverse and Growing Western Economy..........$33,300,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 agreed to on division) ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY OF CANADA FOR THE REGIONS OF QUEBEC ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$39,352,146 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$277,942,967 ç Vote 10—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$3,097,848

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) FEDERAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCY FOR SOUTHERN ONTARIO ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$29,201,373 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$224,900,252 ç Vote 10—Launching a Federal Strategy on Jobs and Tourism..........$3,867,976

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$436,503,800 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$58,320,000 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$448,814,193

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING RESEARCH COUNCIL ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$53,905,016 ç Vote 5—Grants..........$1,296,774,972 ç Vote 10—Paid Parental Leave for Student Researchers..........$1,805,000 ç Vote 15—Supporting Graduate Students Through Research Scholarships..........$4,350,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10 and 15 agreed to on division) SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$35,100,061 ç Vote 5—Grants..........$884,037,003 ç Vote 10—Paid Parental Leave for Student Researchers..........$1,447,000 ç Vote 15—Supporting Graduate Students Through Research Scholarships..........$6,090,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10 and 15 agreed to on division) STANDARDS COUNCIL OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Payments to the Council..........$17,910,000

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) STATISTICS CANADA ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$423,989,188 ç Vote 5—Monitoring Purchases of Canadian Real Estate..........$500,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall the chair report the main estimates for 2019-20, less the amounts voted in the interim estimates, to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you very much.

We will now go in camera to discuss M-208.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0845)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Soyez les bienvenus à cette 165e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie.

Conformément à l’article 81(4) du Règlement, le Comité reprend son examen du Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020.

Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons la ministre des Sciences et des Sports, l'honorable Kirsty Duncan.

Madame la ministre, soyez la bienvenue. Merci de nous honorer de votre présence.

Du ministère de l'Industrie, nous recevons David McGovern, sous-ministre délégué, Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada.

Vous avez un maximum de 10 minutes pour nous livrer vos observations liminaires.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan (ministre des Sciences et des Sports):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Distingués membres du Comité, merci de m’avoir invitée à l’occasion du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses pour l’exercice 2019-2020.

Les sciences, la recherche et les prises de décisions fondées sur des données probantes comptent plus que jamais, car de plus en plus de voix s’élèvent pour discréditer les sciences et les faits.

Les Canadiens sont conscients que les sciences et la recherche sont garantes d'un meilleur environnement, donc d'une eau et d'un air plus purs. Elles sont aussi source de nouveaux traitements médicaux et de technologies efficaces, et elles permettent de dynamiser les communautés.

Nos étudiants et chercheurs de talent conçoivent des appareils robotisés qui facilitent le rétablissement des patients à la suite d’un accident vasculaire cérébral ou d’une blessure et qui aident les aînés et les personnes handicapées à vivre en toute indépendance. [Français]

Les chercheurs mettent aussi au point des vaccins et des technologies pour combattre les maladies contagieuses.[Traduction]

Les Canadiens sont conscients du rôle important que jouent les sciences et la recherche en ce qui a trait à l’innovation. Ils savent qu’elles sont des assises essentielles de l’économie du XXIe siècle. À preuve, les grandes économies du monde investissent systématiquement dans la recherche pour soutenir leur propre avancement. [Français]

Les sciences, les technologies et le génie ont stimulé grandement la croissance des économies modernes.[Traduction]

Les investissements dans la recherche fondamentale se traduisent pour les Canadiens par la création d’emplois bien rémunérés. Voilà pourquoi nous avons mis les sciences et la recherche au cœur de nos préoccupations depuis notre arrivée au pouvoir. C’est d’ailleurs dans cette optique que nous avons rétabli le questionnaire détaillé du recensement, que nous avons invité nos scientifiques à s’exprimer publiquement et que nous avons rétabli la fonction de conseiller scientifique en chef.

J’ai d’ailleurs demandé à la conseillère scientifique en chef de travailler avec les ministères à vocation scientifique afin qu’ils se dotent eux-mêmes d’un poste de scientifique en chef. L’objectif est de rendre plus efficace la prestation de conseils scientifiques au gouvernement et d’appuyer l’élaboration d’une politique en matière d’intégrité scientifique.

L’approche que nous avons adoptée pour travailler avec la communauté scientifique et de la recherche est tout à fait originale. Nous sommes à l’écoute de ses préoccupations et nous avons entrepris six importantes consultations. [Français]

Parmi ces consultations, il y a eu le premier examen en 40 ans du soutien fédéral à la science fondamentale.[Traduction]

Nous nous sommes engagés à redonner aux sciences et à la recherche la place qui leur revient. Dans le cadre de quatre budgets successifs, le gouvernement fédéral a consacré un total de plus de 10 milliards de dollars aux sciences, à la recherche, aux chercheurs et aux étudiants. Les chercheurs et les étudiants sont au centre de notre action. Cela signifie que nous nous assurons qu’ils obtiennent le financement nécessaire, qu’ils disposent de laboratoires et d’instruments de recherche de pointe et qu’ils ont accès aux technologies numériques leur permettant d’innover et de faire des découvertes.

(0850)

[Français]

Nous avons donc investi 4 milliards de dollars dans les sciences et la recherche en 2018.[Traduction]

Ce montant comprend le plus important investissement ponctuel en recherche fondamentale jamais effectué au Canada. En fait, nous avons augmenté le financement consacré aux conseils subventionnaires de 25 %. Ce financement n’avait pas bougé depuis une décennie. Cette décision a eu d'importantes répercussions positives. Les chercheurs nous ont indiqué que l’augmentation du financement du Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie, le CRSNG, et du Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines, le CRSH, leur a permis d’engager plus d’étudiants des cycles supérieurs, lesquels ont ainsi pu acquérir des compétences qui leur seront utiles pour les emplois de demain.

Nous avons investi 2 milliards de dollars dans 300 projets d’infrastructure de recherche et d’innovation dans des établissements d’enseignement postsecondaire d’un peu partout au pays. Nous avons aussi investi 763 millions de dollars supplémentaires sur cinq ans dans la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. Nous nous sommes engagés à offrir à cet organisme un financement prévisible et stable à long terme.

Comme nous sommes bien conscients du rôle essentiel que jouent les chercheurs fédéraux au sein de la communauté scientifique et de la recherche du Canada, nous avons aussi consacré 2,8 milliards de dollars pour moderniser les laboratoires fédéraux.

Le gouvernement ne se contente pas de ces investissements sans précédent, puisqu'il apporte aussi des modifications importantes au système de recherche proprement dit. Nous allons annoncer sous peu la création du Conseil des sciences et de l’innovation, qui aura entre autres fonctions d'intensifier les efforts déployés pour stimuler l’innovation au pays. La ministre Petitpas Taylor et moi avons déjà annoncé la création du Comité de la coordination de la recherche au Canada, qui vise à améliorer la collaboration et l’harmonisation entre les trois conseils subventionnaires du gouvernement fédéral — les Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada (les IRSC), le CRSNG et le CRSH — et la Fédération canadienne des inventeurs, la FCI.

Les travaux de la dernière année du Comité de coordination de la recherche au Canada ont mené à la création du Fonds Nouvelles frontières en recherche, lequel soutient certaines recherches internationales et interdisciplinaires qui progressent rapidement et qui sont susceptibles de mener à des découvertes avantageuses pour tous.

Le Comité a aussi entamé le tout premier dialogue en matière de recherche avec les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits. Nous avons accordé 116 subventions Connexion afin de soutenir la tenue d’ateliers au sein des collectivités et l’élaboration d’exposés de position connexes. Plus de la moitié de ces subventions ont été accordées à des chercheurs autochtones et à des organismes autochtones sans but lucratif. Il s’agit là d’une façon de favoriser la délimitation d’une voie commune vers la réconciliation.

Monsieur le président, nous avons jeté les bases de cet important changement de culture et nous souhaitons que tous les Canadiens puissent en profiter.[Français]

Pour réaliser notre vision, il faut que le milieu scientifique et le milieu de la recherche reflètent la diversité canadienne.[Traduction]

Nous voulons que le plus de gens possible tirent profit de nos institutions de calibre mondial. Toutefois, il ne suffit pas d’attirer les gens; encore faut-il les garder. C’est pourquoi j’ai instauré de nouvelles exigences en matière d’équité et de diversité pour les chaires d’excellence en recherche du Canada et les chaires de recherche du Canada, qui sont reconnues dans le monde entier.

Grâce à ces changements, plus de la moitié des titulaires de chaire d’excellence en recherche du Canada nommés lors du dernier concours étaient des femmes. Je suis fière de mentionner que lors du dernier concours, pour la première fois dans l’histoire, 50 % de femmes ont été mises en candidature pour une chaire de recherche du Canada. Nous avons aussi vu le plus fort pourcentage de nominations de tous les temps provenant de chercheurs autochtones, handicapés ou membres de minorités visibles.

Plus tôt ce mois-ci, nous avons innové en lançant un programme que nous avons appelé Dimensions : équité, diversité et inclusion au Canada. [Français]

Il s'agit d'un programme pilote inspiré de l'initiative Athena SWAN, qui est reconnue à l'échelle internationale.[Traduction]

Nous incitons les universités, les collèges, les écoles polytechniques et les cégeps à adopter la charte Dimensions et à s’engager ainsi à veiller à ce que tous aient accès aux mêmes possibilités, au même traitement et à la même reconnaissance. Je suis heureuse de vous dire que 32 établissements ont déjà signé cette charte.

Monsieur le Président, on nous a souvent répété que le régime inadéquat des congés parentaux créait toutes sortes de problèmes pour les chercheuses en début de carrière.

(0855)

[Français]

Personne ne devrait avoir à choisir entre poursuivre une carrière en recherche et avoir des enfants.[Traduction]

Nous sommes conscients que, pour une femme, il peut être préjudiciable de mettre sa carrière en veilleuse alors qu’elle ne fait que commencer. Cela se traduit souvent par l’occupation de postes moins prestigieux, offrant un salaire moindre et par une pension de retraite moins élevée en fin de parcours. C’est la raison pour laquelle nous avons annoncé dans le budget de 2019 que le congé parental va passer de 6 à 12 mois pour les étudiants et les stagiaires postdoctoraux recevant des fonds des conseils subventionnaires.

Le budget de 2019 a aussi annoncé la création de 500 nouvelles bourses pour les étudiants à la maîtrise et de 500 bourses pour les doctorants, ce qui permettra à un nombre accru d’étudiants canadiens de poursuivre leurs activités de recherche.

Le fait de repenser du tout au tout la culture scientifique au Canada n’est pas une mince tâche. Nous sommes bien conscients de la complexité du travail qu'il y a à faire. Or, étant donné les investissements que nous consacrons à cela, les pays du G7 considèrent désormais le Canada comme étant un exemple à suivre en matière de recherche. Cet engouement a des effets bien concrets: des chercheurs du monde entier se sont intéressés au Programme des chaires de recherche Canada 150. [Français]

Évidemment, il y a encore beaucoup à faire et il faut du temps pour y arriver.[Traduction]

Les Canadiens peuvent toutefois être fiers. En peu de temps, le visage des sciences et de la recherche au Canada a changé pour de bon. Nous désirons faire du Canada un chef de file mondial dans le domaine de la recherche. Nous voulons continuer à faire des découvertes qui ont des incidences positives sur la vie des Canadiens, sur l’environnement, sur nos collectivités et sur notre économie. [Français]

Je suis convaincue que c'est aussi l'objectif de tous les membres de ce comité.

[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais terminer en remerciant chacun des membres de ce comité du travail qu'il a fait au cours des trois dernières années et demie.

Je serai heureuse de répondre à toutes vos questions.[Français]

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie de votre exposé.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions, en commençant par M. Longfield.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, merci de votre présence.

Merci également d'avoir visité l'Université de Guelph autant de fois que vous l'avez fait au cours des quatre dernières années.

J'ai rencontré l'un de nos jeunes scientifiques. En fait, c'en est un qui a été rapatrié au Canada en raison des investissements que nous faisons en sciences. À vrai dire, ce sont cinq membres de cette équipe qui sont revenus au Canada dans le cadre de ce recrutement de cerveaux. Jibran Khokhar est neuropsychopharmacologue. Il travaille sur les dépendances et la santé mentale, dont il étudie les effets chez la souris.

Ce qui le préoccupe, ce sont les ressources que nous consacrons aux premières démarches de jeunes scientifiques qui travaillent sur des sujets de recherche à haut risque par rapport à nos investissements traditionnels plus importants dans le domaine de la science en général.

Pourriez-vous nous parler du travail du Comité de la coordination de la recherche au Canada ou des autres façons que nous avons d'investir dans les jeunes scientifiques?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Longfield, d'être un si ardent défenseur de la recherche.

Quand j'ai assumé ce rôle, je suis allée chercher les données qu'il me fallait. Ce que j'ai constaté, c'est qu'avec l'un de nos conseils subventionnaires, nos chercheurs n'obtenaient pas leur première subvention avant l'âge de 43 ans. On ne peut tout simplement pas se bâtir une carrière de chercheur lorsqu'on reçoit sa première subvention à 43 ans. J'ai vraiment mis l'accent sur les chercheurs en début de carrière, car si personne ne le fait, où en sera notre pays dans 10 ou 15 ans?

Vous avez parlé du Comité de la coordination de la recherche au Canada. Nous avons créé un nouveau fonds de recherche, le Fonds Nouvelles frontières en recherche. Il est axé sur la recherche internationale, interdisciplinaire, à évolution rapide, à haut risque et à haut rendement. Il s'agit d'une enveloppe de 275 millions de dollars, montant qui sera doublé au cours des cinq prochaines années et bonifié subséquemment de 65 millions de dollars par année. Ce sera la plus importante réserve de fonds mise à la disposition des chercheurs. Or, nous avons fait en sorte que le premier volet, celui de l'exploration, ne soit accessible qu'aux chercheurs en début de carrière. Nous avons annoncé les récipiendaires; 157 chercheurs se sont partagé 38 millions de dollars.

Lorsque j'ai parcouru le pays il y a 25 ans, alors que j'enseignais, on m'a demandé si j'avais une carrière en recherche ou un enfant. Je ne m'attendais pas à cela. C'est pourquoi, dans le cadre d'une autre mesure pour les chercheurs en début de carrière, nous investissons dans le prolongement du congé parental, le faisant passer de 6 à 12 mois. Vous ne devriez pas avoir à choisir entre une carrière de chercheur et un bébé. Vous devriez pouvoir avoir les deux, et nous devons faciliter les choses à cet égard.

(0900)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vais dire cela à Jibran. Tous les jeunes chercheurs sont connectés — ce n'est pas une surprise — et ils sont tous à la recherche de ces nouvelles avenues.

J'ai également rencontré Mme Beth Parker, qui est titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les eaux souterraines. Dans le cadre de son travail sur les eaux souterraines, elle s'intéresse à la géothermie et sur ce que cela pourrait faire pour atténuer les changements climatiques. Ses recherches portent sur les bâtiments urbains qui pourraient être chauffés et refroidis par la géothermie. C'est une chercheuse scientifique dans le domaine de l'eau.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé des liens avec Environnement et Changement climatique Canada. Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur la façon dont Mme Parker pourrait établir des liens avec les programmes sur l'environnement et les changements climatiques pour faire avancer, par exemple, l'adaptation des bâtiments à cette forme d'énergie?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Monsieur Longfield, tout d'abord, je vous prie de transmettre à Jibran mes meilleurs vœux de réussite. Je connais son travail.

Si vous avez des questions précises, vous devriez assurément les adresser à Environnement Canada.

Toutefois, l'une des choses que j'ai retenues, c'est que nous voulons... Jusqu'ici, la science universitaire en tant que communauté de recherche externe et la science gouvernementale n'ont pas travaillé ensemble. Il y a un certain chevauchement et il y a des instituts de recherche sur les campus universitaires, mais nous devons définitivement faire un meilleur travail à cet égard.

Je me suis beaucoup focalisée sur la science gouvernementale. Le deuxième jour de notre gouvernement, nous avons démuselé nos scientifiques. C'est une chose de le dire, mais c'en est une autre d'instaurer une politique de communication pour rappeler à nos collègues et aux autres ministres que nous voulons que nos scientifiques parlent librement et collaborent. Nous avons également investi 2,8 milliards de dollars dans l'infrastructure scientifique du gouvernement pour mettre en place de nouveaux laboratoires. Plusieurs de nos laboratoires ont 25 ans. Contrairement aux anciens, les nouveaux laboratoires ne seront pas des établissements à fonction unique — un laboratoire météorologique, par exemple. Nous allons réunir les laboratoires pour l'environnement et ceux des pêcheries. Nous allons également collaborer davantage avec les chercheurs, les universités, les collèges et l'industrie.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

L'été dernier, j'étais dans l'Arctique à la station de recherche PEARL. Environnement Canada y a une station météorologique et environ sept universités y font de la recherche atmosphérique sur les changements climatiques. Dans notre budget, nous avions 21,8 millions de dollars pour le programme PEARL. Je crois que la plus grande partie de cette somme est venue d'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, mais il y a encore des travaux scientifiques qui se font là-bas.

Pouvez-vous nous parler des liens qui existent entre nos investissements? Je sais qu'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada n'est pas votre ministère, mais comment pouvons-nous faire en sorte que ce centre de recherche poursuive son important travail?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci de cette question.

Je sais que vous avez visité le PEARL, le laboratoire de recherche atmosphérique en environnement polaire. C'est notre laboratoire le plus septentrional. Il étudie l'atmosphère et les liens entre l'atmosphère et la biosphère océanique. Nous pensons que c'est un laboratoire important. Le gouvernement précédent avait l'intention de le fermer. C'est pourquoi notre gouvernement s'est engagé à le garder en fonction. Environnement Canada verra à garder le PEARL ouvert.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Sauf que, d'après ce que je comprends, ils devront continuer de présenter des demandes au CRSNG pour être en mesure de poursuivre leurs recherches. Est-ce exact?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Il est important que les chercheurs fassent des demandes de financement pour leurs recherches, comme c'est le cas pour n'importe quel chercheur au pays. Ils peuvent présenter une demande au CRSNG. Ils peuvent envisager d'autres fonds. Bien entendu, nous sommes toujours heureux de mettre nos fonctionnaires en contact pour voir quels fonds sont accessibles.

(0905)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je cède la parole à Pierre Fogal, qui vient de Guelph et qui dirige ce laboratoire de recherche.

Merci beaucoup, madame Duncan.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Chong.

Vous avez sept minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, d'être venue témoigner au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses.

J'aimerais d'abord rectifier les faits en ce qui concerne l'affirmation selon laquelle les niveaux de financement de l'enseignement supérieur au Canada ont subi un changement radical. Je reconnais que le gouvernement actuel a quelque peu augmenté le financement accordé aux quatre conseils subventionnaires, mais si vous examinez les données de l'OCDE sur les dépenses au titre de la recherche et du développement dans le secteur de l'enseignement supérieur, elles n'ont pas beaucoup changé au cours des 20 dernières années. En 2005, elles représentaient 0,67 % du PIB; en 2012, 0,7 %; en 2013, 0,67 %; en 2014, 0,65 %; en 2015, 0,67 %; en 2016, 0,68 %. Enfin, en 2017, dernière année pour laquelle l'OCDE dispose des chiffres, c'était de 0,65 %. Ce n'est donc pas comme s'il y avait un changement radical des niveaux de financement pour les dépenses dans le secteur de l'enseignement supérieur au Canada. Je crois qu'il est important de le souligner aux fins du compte rendu.

Pour ce qui est de notre position mondiale au chapitre des dépenses en recherche et développement dans le secteur de l'enseignement supérieur, même si nous nous classons parmi les 10 premiers pays, nous ne sommes certainement pas un chef de file mondial. Nous nous plaçons derrière des pays comme l'Australie, le Danemark, la Finlande, la Norvège et la Suède, qui dépensent considérablement plus d'argent que nous dans la recherche et le développement en milieu universitaire. En fait, aux États-Unis, les National Institutes of Health dépensent, à eux seuls, l'équivalent de 49 milliards de dollars canadiens par année dans la recherche. Toutes proportions gardées, les budgets des quatre conseils subventionnaires canadiens sont loin d'être de la même ampleur.

Ma question pour vous est assez simple. Le rapport Naylor avait recommandé d'augmenter le financement. Le gouvernement actuel a dépensé nettement plus que ce qu'il avait prévu à son arrivée au pouvoir il y a environ quatre ans. Pourquoi le gouvernement n'a-t-il pas augmenté le financement des quatre conseils subventionnaires aux niveaux recommandés dans le rapport Naylor?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je tiens à remercier mon collègue. Lui et moi travaillons ensemble depuis très longtemps.

J'aimerais, moi aussi, rectifier les faits. Les données que vous avez présentées — les plus récentes, comme vous l'avez souligné — étaient celles de 2017, mais en 2018, nous avons effectué un investissement historique de 6,8 milliards de dollars dans la recherche. C'est le plus important investissement jamais effectué au Canada. Il s'agit d'une hausse de 25 % pour nos conseils subventionnaires.

Mon objectif était de placer nos chercheurs au centre de tout ce que nous faisons afin de veiller à ce qu'ils aient les fonds, les laboratoires et les outils nécessaires, y compris les outils numériques, pour mener leurs recherches. À cette fin, nous avons augmenté de 25 % le financement consacré à nos conseils subventionnaires. Nous avons également investi 762 millions de dollars dans la Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation, en plus de lui promettre un financement prévisible, durable et à long terme de 462 millions de dollars par année. Ainsi, après 20 ans d'existence, la Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation aurait enfin droit à un financement stable. Par ailleurs, comme une grande partie des recherches menées aujourd'hui reposent sur les mégadonnées et les outils de recherche numériques, nous avons prévu un investissement de 573 millions de dollars à cet égard.

Lorsque je vais à une réunion du G7, mes collègues là-bas me disent que le Canada représente, et je cite, « le point de référence en matière de sciences et de recherche », et ils ont hâte de collaborer avec nous, car grâce au Fonds Nouvelles frontières en recherche, dont le montant de 275 millions de dollars sera doublé au cours des prochaines années, nos chercheurs auront accès à des fonds internationaux pour pouvoir collaborer avec leurs homologues en Europe et aux États-Unis. C'est vraiment du jamais vu.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Pour être juste, je reconnais que les niveaux de financement ont augmenté, mais les données de 2018 ne devraient pas être bien différentes de celles de 2017.

Ce que j'entends de la part des chercheurs, c'est qu'ils se sentent désavantagés par rapport aux chercheurs américains, compte tenu des fonds qui sont mis à la disposition de ces derniers par l'entremise des National Institutes of Health, par exemple.

À mon avis, même si les niveaux de financement ont augmenté, ils ne correspondent toujours pas aux niveaux recommandés dans le rapport Naylor, et cela saute aux yeux.

L'autre question que je...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais répondre à cette observation. J'ai été très heureuse de commander l'examen du soutien fédéral à la science fondamentale, sous la présidence du Dr David Naylor. Ce groupe d'experts était composé de membres triés sur le volet. Mentionnons, entre autres, l'ancienne rectrice de la UBC, Mme Martha Piper; le lauréat du prix Nobel, M. Art McDonald; le scientifique en chef du Québec, M. Rémi Quirion. C'était la deuxième consultation que nous organisions. Le groupe d'experts a entendu 1 500 chercheurs. Il s'agit d'un rapport très important. Le premier...

(0910)

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je suis d'accord, mais les niveaux de financement...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

J'aimerais bien répondre.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps. Je voudrais passer à ma prochaine question.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je tiens à vous répondre.

C'était le premier examen du soutien fédéral en 40 ans. Nous avons pris ce rapport très au sérieux, comme en témoigne le budget de 6,8 milliards de dollars, le plus important de l'histoire du Canada. Ma dernière phrase...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Il s'agit d'une valeur nominale.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Sous le gouvernement précédent, votre parti avait également demandé au Dr David Naylor de produire un rapport. Une conférence de presse devait avoir lieu un vendredi, mais ce rapport a été enterré.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Passons à ma prochaine question, madame la ministre, et cela concerne le mandat de la conseillère scientifique en chef. Ce poste a été créé en grande pompe, mais, bien franchement, de nombreuses personnes se demandent pourquoi la conseillère scientifique en chef n'a pas reçu un mandat suffisant pour faire son travail. Beaucoup de gens voient comment elle se démène pour exercer ses fonctions du mieux qu'elle peut, sans aucun soutien de la part du gouvernement.

Une des questions qui se posent est la suivante : pourquoi n'a-t-elle pas été nommée pour diriger le comité de la coordination, plutôt que d'en confier la présidence à tour de rôle aux présidents des divers conseils subventionnaires?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Tout d'abord, permettez-moi de dire que nous avons décidé de rétablir le poste de conseiller scientifique en chef, lequel avait été aboli par votre gouvernement. Nous avons nommé la Dre Mona Nemer, une cardiologue de renommée internationale qui a reçu de nombreux prix. D'ailleurs, l'ancien porte-parole de votre parti en matière d'industrie a dit que c'était un excellent choix, et nous sommes d'accord.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Le problème, c'est que le mandat qui lui a été attribué n'est pas suffisamment large...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Elle s'est vu attribuer...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... pour lui permettre d'accomplir son travail. Elle fait des pieds et des mains pour remplir ce rôle au sein du gouvernement. Il semble donc y avoir beaucoup...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Si vous pouviez me laisser terminer...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... de discours creux de la part du gouvernement...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

J'aimerais bien pouvoir terminer...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Il y a un énorme décalage entre les discours creux et les résultats concrets. Songeons au rapport Naylor, dans lequel certains niveaux de financement étaient recommandés, mais c'est resté lettre morte. Songeons à la nomination de la nouvelle conseillère scientifique en chef, qui n'a pas un mandat assez large pour exercer ses fonctions...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Si je pouvais bien répondre...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... ou encore, songeons à la création d'un comité de la coordination...

Le président:

Monsieur Chong, je suis désolé, mais votre temps est écoulé.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je comprends, mais permettez-moi de terminer ma phrase.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Eh bien, moi, je n'ai pas eu cette possibilité.

Le président:

J'aimerais m'assurer que la ministre a l'occasion de répondre à votre question.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Fort bien.

Le président:

Vous avez dépassé votre temps de parole. Nous en sommes à huit minutes. J'ai permis...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Monsieur le président, je suis d'accord. Je veux seulement terminer ma phrase, si vous me le permettez.

Le président:

J'aimerais que la ministre puisse vous répondre brièvement.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Puis-je terminer ma phrase?

Le président:

Allez-y.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Il y a un énorme décalage entre les discours creux et les résultats réels que le gouvernement a obtenus, et je crois que cela s'applique aussi au portefeuille des sciences.

Le président:

Je vais donner à la ministre le temps de répondre.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Grâce à notre investissement de 10 milliards de dollars, nous avons changé la donne pour les sciences et la technologie au Canada.

La Dre Nemer fait un travail important.

Je rappelle au député que je suis contente de l'entendre aujourd'hui parler avec respect du Dr Naylor, mais il aurait dû en faire autant lorsque son gouvernement était au pouvoir.

Vous avez enterré le rapport. Vous avez fait fi de ce que le Dr Naylor demandait dans son rapport, à savoir un financement de 1 milliard de dollars pour l'innovation en santé.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant de céder la parole à M. Masse, je tiens à rappeler à tout le monde qu'il faut éviter de parler en même temps. Nous voulons tenir un dialogue respectueux pendant la période des questions et réponses. Cela facilitera la tâche à tout le monde, car vous pourrez ainsi obtenir des réponses à vos questions.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais commencer par un sujet qui est un peu plus léger. En fait, c'est lié à votre poste de ministre des Sports.

Étant donné que les Raptors de Toronto se trouvent aujourd'hui dans une position historique...

Des députés: Bravo!

M. Brian Masse: Exactement. À vrai dire, j'ai également sorti mon vieux chandail de Chris Bosh.

Cela dit, j'ai une question sérieuse à vous poser sur la Ligue nationale de basketball du Canada. Je ne sais pas si vous connaissez la ligue, mais elle a joué un rôle important pour ce qui est de mettre à profit les sports et les sciences dans les quartiers défavorisés, comme le mien, à Windsor, où nous avons l'Express de Windsor.

Le lien avec la situation d'aujourd'hui, assez ironiquement, c'est qu'après le déménagement de la franchise d'Oshawa à Mississauga, elle a été intégrée aux Raptors 905 de la ligue D de la NBA, lesquels sont affiliés à l'équipe actuelle des Raptors.

Il y a des franchises au Cap-Breton, à Halifax, Charlottetown, Moncton, Saint John, Kitchener, London, Sudbury et Windsor.

Que fait le gouvernement pour collaborer avec des ligues comme la Ligue nationale de basketball? Je n'ai encore rien vu au sujet des commotions cérébrales dans le sport, entre autres. Ces ligues comptent des équipes professionnelles à l'échelle locale, mais elles offrent aussi beaucoup de services d'intervention communautaire.

Par exemple, je sais que l'Express de Windsor a récemment pris part à la marche organisée par le maire, en plus de diriger une clinique dans la rue.

Dans ma vie professionnelle antérieure, j'ai déjà dirigé un programme de basketball et de volleyball de plage pour les jeunes des quartiers défavorisés afin de les retirer de la rue. Nous faisions également beaucoup de choses sur le plan de la nutrition, et tout le reste.

À cet égard, le gouvernement a-t-il travaillé d'une manière quelconque avec la Ligue nationale de basketball du Canada? Quelles sont les possibilités qui s'offrent à de telles organisations pour contribuer aux efforts de sensibilisation dans une foule de domaines, dont la nutrition, le sport, la culture et, surtout, les commotions cérébrales?

(0915)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Monsieur Masse, je vous remercie de tout votre travail d'encadrement. Je sais que vous avez été entraîneur de hockey pendant longtemps, mais je n'étais pas au courant pour le basketball, alors merci.

Il y a beaucoup trop d'enfants et d'athlètes qui subissent des commotions cérébrales. C'est pourquoi nous avons collaboré avec la ministre de la Santé pour élaborer de nouvelles lignes directrices sur les commotions cérébrales, lesquelles sont adoptées par nos organismes nationaux de sport. Ce travail se fait avec l'aide de Parachute.

Dans le budget actuel, nous avons investi 30 millions de dollars pour la pratique sécuritaire des sports. Je serai ravie d'en parler, si vous voulez. Une partie de ce financement servira à protéger nos enfants.

J'ajouterai que la Chambre des communes a entrepris une étude sur les commotions cérébrales liées à la pratique d'activités sportives. Il s'agit d'un comité composé de représentants de tous les partis. Le rapport sera déposé, et j'ai vraiment hâte de savoir quelles seront les recommandations.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vais passer à un autre sujet, mais je tiens d'abord à vous remercier. Je n'en dirai pas plus. Ce sera pour une autre législature.

Il y a eu quelques améliorations en ce qui concerne les sciences et l'importance accordée à ce domaine sur la Colline. J'ai vu la situation évoluer, car je siège au Comité depuis longtemps. Je persiste à croire que notre pays ne mise pas assez sur les sciences et les sports.

Je ne dis pas que rien n'est fait à cet égard, mais nous n'en parlons pas souvent ici. Voilà ce que je déplore personnellement. Les sciences et les sports ne semblent pas recevoir l'attention qu'ils méritent peut-être dans un pays comme le Canada.

Dans le temps qu'il me reste, j'aimerais aborder un sujet qui ne devrait surprendre personne ici. Mon projet de loi C-440 sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne au Canada est très important pour la communauté scientifique. Cela ne concerne pas seulement les universités, mais aussi un certain nombre d'associations universitaires, de groupes de réflexion en matière de recherche, et tout le reste.

Notre loi sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne repose sur une loi britannique de 1911, qui a été adoptée au Canada en 1929. Cette mesure législative impose des restrictions aux publications gouvernementales, aux recherches scientifiques et à d'autres documents financés par la population. Plus de 200 chercheurs universitaires ont témoigné devant notre comité pour réclamer l'élimination du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Cela n'existe pas aux États-Unis ni dans la plupart des pays du Commonwealth. C'est très rare de trouver une telle loi au Canada.

Quelle est votre position sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, dans sa forme actuelle, au Canada?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Masse.

Vous avez soulevé un certain nombre de questions. Je vais en aborder quelques-unes, puis je céderai la parole à mon sous-ministre.

Vous avez mentionné les sciences et les sports. Les deux vont tout à fait de pair. C'est vraiment important. Si nous voulons améliorer la performance, la santé et la sécurité de nos athlètes, il faut miser sur les sciences. Nous avons des instituts de recherche sur le sport. Je serai heureuse d'en parler plus en détail.

Vous avez également évoqué l'importance de rendre les travaux de recherche accessibles. Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord. Nous voulons que les scientifiques et les chercheurs du gouvernement parlent librement. Je profite de chaque occasion pour le répéter. Nous devons changer cette culture. Nous croyons à l'accès aux données et aux...

(0920)

M. Brian Masse:

Le gouvernement libéral croit-il au droit d'auteur de la Couronne? Voilà précisément ma question.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Nous croyons à l'accès aux données et aux sciences.

Pour revenir à la question de M. Chong, il a demandé ce que la conseillère scientifique en chef a accompli. J'espère que le député a examiné le premier rapport annuel de la Dre Nemer et les domaines qu'elle nous propose d'étudier.

Sur ce, je cède la parole au sous-ministre.

M. Brian Masse:

Madame la ministre, ma question porte précisément sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, soit la protection des documents de recherche et des documents gouvernementaux et l'interdiction de les utiliser. Je vous demande votre opinion sur le sujet. Je n'ai pas besoin d'entendre celle du sous-ministre. Nous avons étudié en détail cette question à la Chambre des communes. C'est bien connu que le Canada a un système unique de protection, et j'aimerais savoir si vous êtes en faveur du statu quo par rapport au droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

J'estime que c'est une question légitime.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Masse.

Les gens nous parlent constamment de cet enjeu. Nous en sommes conscients et nous l'étudions.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

C'est fini.

M. Brian Masse:

Oh, je vois.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Graham.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'espère vraiment que l'industrie présentera dans un proche avenir un rapport sur le droit d'auteur. Je crois que ce serait très utile.

Madame la ministre, pouvez-vous nous expliquer ce que font les chaires de recherche du Canada et ce qu'elles ont permis d'accomplir jusqu'à présent?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Monsieur Graham, je vous remercie de votre question.

Les chaires de recherche du Canada sont parmi les plus prestigieuses. Elles ont été créées en 2000. Nous avons deux types de chaires. Les titulaires des chaires de recherche du Canada de niveau 1 reçoivent 200 000 $ sur 7 ans, et les titulaires des chaires de niveau 2 reçoivent 100 000 $ sur 5 ans.

Nous avons modifié ce programme. Les titulaires des chaires de niveau 1 pouvaient recevoir du financement pendant sept ans, puis encore sept ans et encore sept ans, et cela pouvait se répéter à l'infini. Nous avons limité cela à un renouvellement. Pourquoi? Cela permet à plus de chercheurs d'avoir accès à ces prestigieuses chaires.

Nous avons en fait augmenté pour la première en 19 ans le financement des chaires de niveau 2. Nous l'avons fait parce que cela vise les chercheurs en début de carrière.

Nous avons aussi apporté des changements en ce qui concerne l'équité et la diversité. J'ai bien entendu extrait les données. C'est ce que je fais, parce que je tiens à vérifier nos résultats. Si nous regardons l'histoire du Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada, les titulaires de nos chaires étaient très loin de refléter la composition actuelle du Canada sur le plan des pourcentages. J'ai expliqué à nos institutions qu'elles avaient deux ans pour atteindre les cibles volontaires dont elles avaient convenu en 2006. Je tiens à vraiment remercier nos institutions. Elles ont vraiment changé la manière dont elles procèdent aux nominations, et c'était la première fois que les femmes représentaient 50 % des personnes nommées à ces chaires de recherche. Un pourcentage record d'Autochtones, de personnes racialisées et de personnes handicapées a été nommé à ces chaires de recherche.

Je tiens à souligner que pour la première fois nous avons cinq personnes handicapées qui sont titulaires d'une chaire de recherche. Ce n'est pas 5 %. Ce sont cinq personnes. Cela montre bien tout le travail qu'il reste à faire, et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons adopté la charte Dimensions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien y a-t-il de chaires de recherche?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Il y en a près de 2 000. Grâce au budget de 2018, soit le budget historique dont j'ai parlé avec des investissements de 6,8 milliards de dollars, nous investissons 210 millions de dollars pour créer 285 nouvelles chaires de recherche du Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le nombre est plus élevé que je le pensais. Je note un grand sentiment de fierté à l'égard du programme.

J'ai une autre question concernant la recherche. Comment pouvons-nous inciter des gens à mener certaines recherches? L'un des gros enjeux dans ma circonscription rurale, où il n'y a aucune institution de recherche, c'est qu'il y a plus de 10 000 lacs. C'est une immense circonscription. Nous avons le myriophylle en épi et d'autres espèces envahissantes qui causent de graves problèmes. Il ne semble y avoir aucune recherche réalisée sur la manière de lutter contre ce problème, de l'atténuer et d'empêcher ces espèces de se propager ailleurs.

Si une personne qui n'est pas scientifique souhaite que des travaux soient réalisés sur un sujet précis, comment faut-il procéder?

(0925)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais commencer par le début.

Je souhaite renforcer notre culture de curiosité au Canada. Tous les enfants sont curieux de naissance. Tous les enfants souhaitent découvrir le monde et explorer. Ils démonteront ce stylo ou ce microphone. Ils veulent comprendre la façon dont les choses fonctionnent. La nature pique leur curiosité. Ils veulent explorer le lac et examiner ce qui se trouve au fond et les insectes présents.

Il nous incombe de stimuler cette curiosité naturelle et innée à l'école primaire, à l'école secondaire et, je l'espère, au-delà. Ce n'est pas suffisant de les attirer dans nos institutions. Nous devons être en mesure de les garder dans nos institutions. Je crois qu'il faut mettre l'accent sur la culture scientifique. Il faut renforcer une culture de curiosité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

M. Massé voulait aussi poser une petite question, si vous me permettez de lui céder mon temps de parole.

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes et demie. [Français]

M. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Je vous remercie. C'est fort apprécié.

Madame la ministre, j'aimerais d'abord vous remercier de votre engagement, de votre passion et de votre détermination à l'égard des sciences. C'est extraordinaire.

J'ai eu l'occasion de vous rencontrer à plusieurs reprises avec des représentants de nos centres de recherche, aussi bien collégiaux qu'universitaires. À plusieurs reprises, on vous a dit, ainsi qu' à moi, que les centres de recherche régionaux avaient de la difficulté à accéder à des subventions leur permettant de poursuivre leurs recherches. On nous a dit que celles-ci étaient accordées en grande partie à de grands centres de recherche. Or, il y a aussi de la recherche extraordinaire qui se fait en région.

J'aimerais que vous nous parliez des mesures qui pourraient être prises pour aider nos plus petits centres de recherche collégiaux ou universitaires en région à accéder à ces fonds.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je remercie mon cher collègue de sa question.[Traduction]

Merci, monsieur Massé. Oui. Nous avons rencontré un certain nombre de vos chercheurs, et c'était fascinant de voir leurs travaux.

Comme vous le savez, toutes les recherches réalisées font l'objet d'un examen par les pairs. Des comités sont en place, mais nous voulons nous assurer que ces comités sont le reflet du Canada, et des changements ont été apportés.

Nous n'avons pas encore parlé des collèges. Les collèges, les écoles polytechniques et les cégeps jouent un rôle incroyable dans l'écosystème de la recherche. Tout comme nous avons procédé au plus important investissement dans les universités, nous avons aussi procédé au plus important investissement dans les collèges dans le domaine de la recherche appliquée, soit un investissement de 140 millions de dollars; c'est l'investissement le plus important de tous les temps.

Lorsque je visite le Canada, que je sois au Red River College, là où M. Longfield est allé, au Humber College, au Centennial ou au Seneca, les recherches qui y sont menées sont tout à fait extraordinaires, et cela permet d'améliorer les choses dans la collectivité.

Une entreprise communique avec l'établissement. Elle a besoin rapidement d'une réponse dans le domaine de la robotique, de l'intelligence artificielle ou de la réalité virtuelle, et le collège est en mesure de lui offrir une solution trois ou quatre mois plus tard.

Au Niagara College, la recherche a porté sur un certain type de noix. Au Niagara College, c'est l'aide que l'établissement est en mesure d'offrir à l'industrie vinicole.

Je vous remercie d'avoir soulevé cette importante question.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Lloyd.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie également la ministre et son personnel de leur présence aujourd'hui.

Pas plus tard que le 2 mai, Stephen Chase et Colin Freeze rapportaient dans le Globe and Mail que les personnes ayant des opinions politiques concernant Huawei devaient s'abstenir de présenter leur candidature dans le cadre d'un processus du Conseil national de recherches pour la nomination de membres à un comité consultatif lié à une subvention de recherche de Huawei.

Je crois que c'est troublant pour les Canadiens de voir nos organismes fédéraux écarter des gens en raison de leurs opinions politiques pour les nominations à des comités. Nous avons vu cette tendance dans d'autres ministères, où le gouvernement imposait des critères liés aux valeurs personnelles et politiques en vue de déterminer si des fonds publics étaient accordés ou non.

Madame la ministre, pouvons-nous avoir l'assurance que le gouvernement protégera à l'avenir les Canadiens et nos processus pour éviter que des gens soient écartés en raison de leurs opinions politiques et personnelles et aussi éviter qu'ils se voient refuser le droit de participer à des programmes et à des processus gouvernementaux?

(0930)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci de votre question, monsieur Lloyd.

J'estime que c'est incroyablement important que nos chercheurs au gouvernement ou dans les universités soient en mesure d'explorer diverses disciplines et d'aller au-delà de leur secteur. C'est ainsi que fonctionne la recherche.

Pour ce qui est du milieu universitaire, le Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada a des règles très précises par rapport à l'examen par les pairs. Il faut que ce soit indépendant. Ce sont les experts qui examinent les demandes.

Vous avez parlé des investissements étrangers. Comme vous le savez, un examen est en cours par des responsables de la sécurité, et nous respecterons les résultats de cet examen.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci, madame la ministre.

C'est un enjeu distinct. C'est connexe. Toutefois, cela concerne le processus du Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada en vue de déterminer les membres d'un comité de consultation concernant le co-investissement de Huawei avec l'Université Laval. Dans le processus de demande, les candidats se sont fait demander s'ils avaient des opinions politiques à l'égard de Huawei. S'ils en avaient, ils étaient exclus du processus.

Lorsque la question a été posée à l'entreprise, Huawei a affirmé qu'elle n'a pas demandé une telle vérification et qu'elle ne s'attend pas à un tel processus dans le cas en question. Bref, pourquoi le CRSNG, un organisme fédéral qui relève de votre ministère, cherche-t-il proactivement à écarter des gens en raison de leurs opinions politiques?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais laisser mon sous-ministre vous répondre.

M. David McGovern (sous-ministre délégué, Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada, ministère de l'Industrie):

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais tout d'abord vous dire qu'avant de me joindre à ISED j'étais conseiller adjoint en sécurité nationale auprès de l'ancien premier ministre Harper et ensuite du premier ministre Trudeau.

Lorsque nous avons été informés pour la première fois de ces enjeux, la ministre Duncan, comme elle vous l'a expliqué, nous a demandé de recueillir des données et d'établir les faits. Nous avons communiqué avec nos conseils subventionnaires, le groupe U15, soit le regroupement des 15 universités canadiennes à forte intensité de recherche, et Universités Canada. Nous avons couvert l'ensemble du milieu. Nous voulions seulement avoir une idée de ce qu'était le problème avec les investissements étrangers dans la recherche dans nos institutions universitaires. En ce qui concerne le cas précis dont vous parlez, nos conseils subventionnaires veulent s'assurer de l'impartialité des membres des comités d'examen par les pairs. La manière dont cette histoire a été dépeinte dans le journal laisse entendre que cela visait une seule entité, une seule entreprise et un seul pays. Cependant, le critère d'impartialité pour les membres des comités d'examen par les pairs s'impose pour toutes les demandes de subvention.

Ce que nous faisons dernièrement pour la ministre Duncan, c'est d'essayer d'examiner l'enjeu plus vaste des investissements étrangers dans la recherche dans nos universités. Nous collaborons avec les universités. Nous avons demandé l'aide du milieu canadien de la sécurité nationale. Nous avons communiqué avec d'autres pays. Nous établissons une base factuelle, mais nous sensibilisons aussi tous les participants à la question.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Il ne me reste que 30 secondes, mais je vous remercie pour cette réponse technique détaillée.

Je comprends que nous ayons besoin de solides protections pour éviter les conflits d'intérêts dans de tels cas, et j'y suis favorable. Cependant, lorsque des Canadiens voient que des organismes subventionnaires publics demandent aux gens leurs opinions politiques personnelles avant de poser leur candidature à un processus, je crois que c'est inacceptable et que cela inquiète beaucoup les Canadiens lorsque c'est un facteur qui entre en ligne de compte.

Il ne me reste que quatre secondes. Je souhaite seulement vous remercier encore une fois de votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Oliver.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.):

Merci. Je partagerai mon temps avec M. Jowhari.

Nous consacrons beaucoup de temps à parler des sciences. Je souhaitais aussi vous féliciter de votre leadership dans le dossier des sports et de l'excellent travail que vous avez fait partout au Canada pour faire la promotion du sport et en particulier du sport inclusif.

Je souhaite revenir aux échanges que vous avez eus avec M. Chong. Je crois que c'est Samuel Clemens qui disait qu'il y a des mensonges, de vils mensonges et des statistiques, ce qui revient en gros à utiliser des statistiques pour renforcer des arguments boiteux. Je voulais seulement m'attarder sur cet aspect, parce que mon collègue a mentionné des statistiques qui ne portaient pas sur la période où vous avez été ministre.

Voici un résumé de la réalité. Dans une autre vie, j'ai présidé un comité d'examen par les pairs des IRSC, et nous avons vu nos fonds fondre comme neige au soleil sous le précédent gouvernement. Des gens avec des doctorats quittaient le Canada. Pire encore, nous n'arrivions pas à attirer de nouveaux étudiants pour les aider à obtenir leur doctorat. Il y avait un manque de fonds.

Je suis resté en contact avec les scientifiques et les autres dans le milieu. Ils me disent tous qu'il y a un incroyable regain d'intérêt dans... Cela concerne la recherche en santé, et je sais que cela ne touche pas le CRSNG ou le CRSH, mais c'est tout un changement, et nous voyons maintenant des programmes universitaires plus solides. Nous assistons à un retour de bons étudiants au doctorat dans nos universités, et nous constatons que de la formation est offerte partout au Canada. Je voulais seulement le souligner. Comme il l'a mentionné, il y a la réalité et il y a les beaux discours. C'est la réalité. Le reste, ce sont de beaux discours.

(0935)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Oliver, d'avoir souligné ces éléments. C'était décevant de seulement fournir des statistiques jusqu'en 2017, compte tenu du budget historique de 2018.

M. John Oliver:

Je crois que c'était vraiment trompeur de sa part.

J'aimerais aussi vous poser une question. Une partie de votre travail vise le Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada, et j'estime que cela traduit très bien l'engagement du gouvernement à l'égard de la recherche et de l'arrivée d'un leadership à long terme — non seulement du financement, mais aussi des postes de leadership — pour nous assurer de continuer d'avoir un solide milieu de la recherche partout au Canada.

Pouvez-vous faire le point sur la façon dont cela fonctionne, les chercheurs en début de carrière et le travail qui est fait pour garder ici des titulaires de doctorat très accomplis et attirer de nouveaux chercheurs au pays?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais vous donner un exemple bien précis. La semaine dernière, nous avons annoncé les subventions à la découverte, soit un important programme du Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada ou CRSNG. C'est le plus imposant investissement dans les subventions à la découverte dans l'histoire du pays. Quelque 588 millions de dollars ont été versés à 5 000 chercheurs partout au Canada. Ce qui est particulièrement emballant, c'est que 500 de ces subventions ont été versées à des chercheurs en début de carrière. Il y a eu une augmentation. Ils ont obtenu davantage de fonds. Ils ont reçu une allocation, sans compter les 1 700 bourses pour les étudiants des cycles supérieurs.

Et les chercheurs nous confirment qu'ils sentent les effets de ce changement. Ils comprennent que le financement était stagnant sous le gouvernement précédent. Personne ne consultait la communauté scientifique. La relation devait vraiment être rétablie. Quand les fonds demeurent toujours au même niveau, cela réduit le bassin de possibilités. Le gouvernement précédent a amplifié ce problème en allouant les fonds à seulement quelques bénéficiaires.

La dernière chose qu'il a faite a été de lier le financement de la recherche à ses résultats. Par exemple, si vous vouliez une subvention du Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines, elle devait avoir des retombées commerciales. Ce n'est pas de cette façon que la recherche fonctionne. Ce que nous affirmons, c'est que l'écosystème scientifique n'est rien sans ses chercheurs.

Mon objectif est de placer nos chercheurs et nos étudiants au cœur de tout ce que nous faisons et de veiller à ce qu'ils reçoivent du financement et qu'ils aient accès à des laboratoires, de même qu'à des outils, numériques et autres.

M. John Oliver:

Désolé, monsieur Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Pas de souci. Comme il me reste 45 secondes, permettez-moi de vous souhaiter la bienvenue.

Madame la ministre, on a beaucoup parlé des établissements, de nos établissements d'enseignement et du secteur privé, en ce qui a trait au soutien de la recherche. Cela dit, je crois comprendre que le gouvernement du Canada soutient également beaucoup de chercheurs au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental.

Dans les 30 secondes qu'il me reste, pourriez-vous nous fournir des détails sur la recherche que nous effectuons? Quel type de chercheurs embauchons-nous?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Jowhari, d'attirer notre attention sur les scientifiques fédéraux.

Le président:

Vous avez environ 20 secondes pour répondre.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

D'accord.

Nous avons consacré 2,8 milliards de dollars à la rénovation de ces laboratoires. J'insiste sur l'augmentation du nombre de scientifiques et d'experts techniques au sein du gouvernement depuis notre arrivée. De 2015-2016 à aujourd'hui, il y en a 2 000 de plus, qui viennent s'ajouter aux 2 500 que le gouvernement précédent...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Donc, 2 000 embauches au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Oui, 2 000 scientifiques et experts techniques. Ce chiffre est tiré des données d'avril de Statistique Canada.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à M. Chong, qui aura cinq minutes.

Nous allons dépasser l'heure prévue de quelques minutes. Je souhaite seulement m'assurer que tout le monde tient compte du temps qui lui est alloué. La ministre doit retourner à son travail. Nous allons essayer de conclure.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je souhaite d'abord répondre à M. Oliver.

J'ai utilisé les bonnes statistiques. Nous avons consulté les dernières statistiques de l'Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques ou OCDE. J'ai utilisé celles de 2017 parce que ce sont les dernières en date fournies par l'OCDE sur les résultats en matière de recherche et d'innovation dans l'enseignement supérieur. C'est pour cette raison que j'ai utilisé les données de 2017 et non celles de 2018. Je crois toutefois pouvoir affirmer au Comité que les données de 2018 ne devraient pas être bien différentes de celles de 2017 et des années antérieures.

Tout cela pour dire que, même si je reconnais que le gouvernement actuel a augmenté les fonds alloués aux quatre conseils subventionnaires, il n'y a pas eu de changement radical dans le financement quand on regarde les antécédents nationaux et ce qui se fait ailleurs dans le monde. C'est ce que confirment les faits, soit que les 4 conseils subventionnaires doivent globalement recevoir cette année presque 4 milliards de dollars. Aux États-Unis, les National Institutes of Health ont reçu à eux seuls 49 milliards de dollars canadiens pour la recherche. Toutes proportions gardées, ce que nous faisons est loin d'être de la même ampleur. Ainsi, faire valoir, comme la ministre l'a fait, que le Canada est un leader mondial dans le financement est tout simplement faux. Bien que nous soyons parmi les 10 premiers selon les résultats de l'OCDE, nous n'arrivons pas au premier rang. Et cela est évident pour bien des éléments évalués.

Cela dit, je souhaite aborder une question précise dans le rapport Naylor. Ce rapport recommande que le gouvernement crée un conseil consultatif national sur la recherche et l'innovation. Une des préoccupations soulevées par la communauté scientifique est la crainte que ce conseil, qui devrait être composé de 12 à 15 membres selon le rapport, soit très politisé. On m'a dit souhaiter l'adoption d'une législation-cadre par le Parlement qui rendrait le processus de nomination apolitique afin de veiller à ce que ce conseil consultatif et son conseil d'administration soient indépendants de toute entité politique et puissent assumer leurs fonctions.

Est-ce que le gouvernement a l'intention de procéder de cette façon?

(0940)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Je vais moi aussi vous répondre pour ce qui est du financement.

Nous avons indéniablement changé...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Monsieur le président, avec tout le respect que je dois à la ministre, j'ai posé une question sur...

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

... le niveau de financement.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... le conseil consultatif.

Le président:

Vous avez d'abord formulé un commentaire. Il est tout à fait normal que la ministre y revienne dans sa réponse à votre question.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous avons indéniablement changé le niveau de financement stagnant dans ce pays par l'apport d'argent frais. La première année, 2 milliards de dollars... Je vais juste donner un exemple. La première année, 95 millions de dollars...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, madame la ministre, ce n'est pas le niveau recommandé dans le rapport Naylor.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

J'essaie, si vous me le permettez...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Vous parlez constamment du rapport Naylor, et vous n'avez pas...

Le président:

Monsieur Chong, je vous prie de laisser la ministre répondre.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Ce temps est aussi le mien, monsieur le président, et les recommandations du rapport Naylor sur l'augmentation du financement sont claires. En réalité, le gouvernement n'a pas augmenté le financement des quatre conseils subventionnaires au niveau cité. C'est un fait.

Le président:

Vous n'avez pas à me convaincre. Comme je vous l'ai dit, vous avez posé une question à la ministre...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

... sur le conseil consultatif national et non sur le niveau de financement.

Le président:

Vous faites un commentaire, et maintenant vous... Je vous prie de laisser la ministre répondre. Ce n'est qu'un juste retour des choses. Vous avez commencé par fournir tous ces renseignements...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

J'ai posé une question sur...

Le président:

Vous n'avez presque plus de temps, monsieur Chong. Nous n'avons presque plus de temps, donc si vous voulez que la ministre réponde...

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je voudrais qu'elle réponde à ma question sur le conseil consultatif national.

Le président:

Elle peut répondre à tout ce qu'elle juge pertinent.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Et je peux répondre de la façon dont je le souhaite.

Le président:

Eh bien, votre temps est presque écoulé.

Madame la ministre, poursuivez.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur le président.

La première année, nous avons investi 95 millions de dollars dans les conseils subventionnaires. Cela a été salué à l'échelle du pays parce que ces 95 millions de dollars représentaient le plus grand investissement accordé aux conseils subventionnaires en une décennie. Dans le budget de 2018, nous avons augmenté de 25 % notre financement à ces mêmes conseils pour un total de 1,7 milliard de dollars.

Maintenant, je serai heureuse de répondre à votre question. Nous allons bientôt faire une annonce sur le conseil des sciences et de l'innovation. Je souhaite remercier le Conseil des sciences, de la technologie et de l'innovation pour son travail. Ce sera notre conseil et nous adopterons une approche différente, qui sera ouverte et transparente. L'ordre du jour sera diffusé afin que les Canadiens connaissent les sujets abordés. Ils seront aussi tenus au courant des activités du conseil. Nous adoptons une approche bien différente. Comme vous l'avez dit, ce conseil comptera 12 membres.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à M. Sheehan pour cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre, de ramener les sciences à l'avant-plan. En fait, vous les avez ramenées dans les écoles, au sein du gouvernement, dans l'industrie et au Canada.

Sault Ste. Marie est connue pour son acier, mais c'est aussi là qu'on trouve le taux le plus élevé de titulaires de doctorat par habitant. On y mène beaucoup de travaux sur la flore et la faune, la foresterie, les Grands Lacs et les cours d'eau. C'est aussi là qu'on trouve l'Université Algoma et le Collège Sault. J'ai noté que vous aviez mentionné la charte Dimensions. L'Université Algoma est l'une des institutions signataires. Cette université semi-rurale est un chef de file. Depuis 2015, elle a créé deux chaires de recherche. Elle fait essentiellement figure de combattante de première ligne contre le changement climatique. Elle mène des recherches scientifiques importantes et collabore tant avec le secteur privé que public.

Comme vous le savez, ma fille, Kate, vient d'être acceptée en sciences à l'Université d'Ottawa. Je suis très heureux du leadership dont vous faites preuve depuis quelques années pour diversifier les choses et propulser la recherche.

J'aimerais enchaîner avec quelques questions. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer certains des changements que vous avez apportés pour aider les femmes à accéder au milieu scientifique et à y mener des recherches? Pouvez-vous expliquer, notamment, certains des changements qui ont été apportés au congé de maternité?

J'ai aussi relevé avec beaucoup d'intérêt que l'une des premières mesures prises par Doug Ford a été de renvoyer le scientifique en chef de l'Ontario. Toutefois, on vous a chargée de créer un bureau du scientifique en chef du Canada. Pouvez-vous aussi nous expliquer l'importance de ce poste?

Enfin, sachez que Mme Bondar vous salue.

(0945)

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci, monsieur Sheehan. Et toutes mes félicitations à votre fille. Veuillez transmettre mes meilleures salutations à Mme Bondar. C'est une véritable héroïne nationale.

Équité, diversité et inclusion: Le Canada a des institutions de renommée internationale qui se classent parmi les 100 premières dans le monde. Je crois que nous devons tous être fiers des accomplissements de nos chercheurs et de nos institutions.

Je veux qu'un maximum de personnes fréquentent ces institutions. Nous devons les amener à y accéder, mais aussi à y rester. C'est pour cette raison que nous avons établi ces exigences en matière d'équité, de diversité et d'inclusion pour nos prestigieuses chaires de recherche. Et c'est aussi pour cette raison que nous prolongeons le congé parental. Quand je suis arrivée en poste, le congé parental des trois conseils subventionnaires était respectivement de trois mois, de six mois et de six mois. Nous avons normalisé la durée à 6 mois, puis, dans ce budget, l'établissons à 12 mois.

Et c'est pour cette raison que nous appliquons la charte Dimensions. Il s'agit d'un programme pilote inspiré du programme Athena SWAN du Royaume-Uni, qui a été repris en Irlande, aux États-Unis et en Australie. Sa version canadienne est toutefois la plus ambitieuse de toutes, et c'est vraiment exaltant. En quelques semaines, 32 institutions auront adhéré à cette charte.

Nous voulons que nos institutions soient accueillantes. Vendredi dernier, j'étais à l'Université Dalhousie, où on sentait un réel enthousiasme pour la mise en œuvre d'un changement transformateur auquel les gens peuvent participer. En 1970, il n'y avait aucune professeure titulaire en génie. Environ 50 ans plus tard, elles forment 11 % du corps professoral dans le domaine. Nous avons fait des progrès, mais ils sont graduels. Il y a un véritable désir d'œuvrer ensemble à un changement transformateur. C'est très excitant.

Vous avez posé une question sur la conseillère scientifique en chef. Le gouvernement reconnaît la valeur des conseils scientifiques pour que nos scientifiques puissent s'exprimer librement et ne pas être muselés. Ils peuvent collaborer avec des collègues et participer à des colloques internationaux. La conseillère scientifique en chef a fait un travail très important cette année pour amener les scientifiques en chef des différents ministères de nature scientifique à fournir davantage de conseils aux personnes concernées.

Je lui ai également demandé d'établir une politique sur l'intégrité scientifique — la première du genre au pays — pour protéger les scientifiques et les chercheurs afin de ne jamais revenir au climat qui régnait sous le gouvernement précédent. La revue scientifique Nature, l'une de nos plus prestigieuses, a traité du muselage des scientifiques par le gouvernement canadien. Nous ne devons jamais revenir à une telle situation.

La conseillère scientifique en chef a déposé un important rapport sur l'aquaculture dont notre gouvernement suit actuellement les recommandations. Elle a également déposé son premier rapport annuel, en plus de rétablir nos liens avec la communauté scientifique à l'extérieur du gouvernement ainsi qu'au sein de l'appareil gouvernemental, sans oublier nos liens à l'échelle internationale. Les sciences et la diplomatie sont importantes.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Il nous reste deux minutes et elles sont à vous, monsieur Masse.

(0950)

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Et, merci une fois de plus d'être ici, madame la ministre.

J'aimerais poursuivre dans la même veine; on a beaucoup parlé du muselage des scientifiques sous le gouvernement précédent, mais votre gouvernement ne leur permet pas de publier des articles à l'heure actuelle. Les articles de vos scientifiques sont souvent caviardés quand ils sont finalement rendus publics.

Actuellement, votre gouvernement permet seulement l'utilisation partielle des articles sur les recherches scientifiques commandées, en plus d'y imposer diverses restrictions. Il n'est donc pas permis, une fois les recherches terminées, de se servir des résultats ni de les diffuser.

Les demandes des scientifiques et des chercheurs sont souvent retardées, voire mises de côté, dans les ministères. La situation a atteint un tel point que votre gouvernement a aussi perdu des renseignements. Tandis que nous passons à l'ère numérique, certains ministères traitent ces renseignements avec respect, d'autres non, et des renseignements et des travaux de recherche sont aussi perdus puisqu'ils ne sont pas transférés en format numérique.

Tout cela a été soulevé dans le cadre des préoccupations associées aux droits d'auteur de la Couronne. En ce moment même, vous muselez et limitez les scientifiques, pas nécessairement en intervenant dans leurs déclarations publiques, mais en empêchant les autres chercheurs canadiens d'accéder librement à leurs travaux.

Ne pourrions-nous pas dire, alors, que vous faites partie du problème?

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci pour votre question, monsieur Masse.

Je vais vous dire envers quoi je suis totalement engagée. À mon deuxième jour en poste, j'ai permis à nos scientifiques de rompre le silence.

Cela dit, déclarer la fin du muselage est une chose, mais agir en ce sens en est une autre.

Nous avons élaboré une nouvelle politique en matière de communications, parce que la revue scientifique Nature affirmait que le Canada muselait ses scientifiques sous le gouvernement précédent. Ensuite, de concert avec l'ancien président du Conseil du Trésor, j'ai écrit à tous les ministres responsables de portefeuilles de nature scientifique pour m'assurer qu'ils étaient au fait de la nouvelle politique. Nous avons insisté sur notre volonté de laisser les scientifiques s'exprimer librement. Nous voulons qu'ils s'adressent aux Canadiens. Nous voulons qu'ils communiquent avec le public.

M. Brian Masse:

Alors pourquoi ne les laissez-vous pas partager leurs articles? Pourquoi imposez-vous des restrictions?

Le président:

Monsieur Masse.

M. Brian Masse:

Il est là, le problème.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, en fait, la ministre est restée plus longtemps que prévu. Je voulais m'assurer que vous ayez l'occasion de prendre la parole. Merci de conclure rapidement.

M. Brian Masse:

Très bien.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci.

Nous voulons qu'ils parlent. Les changements de culture prennent du temps. Je profite de chaque occasion où je m'adresse aux scientifiques du gouvernement fédéral. Je suis la première ministre responsable des sciences qui rencontre les sous-ministres des ministères de nature scientifique au cours de l'année, et chaque année pendant huit heures, pour discuter des défis auxquels les scientifiques fédéraux sont confrontés. Je suis aussi engagée à promouvoir l'accès aux sciences et aux données scientifiques — et j'ai demandé à notre conseillère scientifique en chef d'y travailler, car nous voulons que les Canadiens aient cet accès.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Sur ce, nous avons terminé la première heure de notre réunion.

Madame la ministre, merci beaucoup d'être venue ici aujourd'hui. Merci d'être restée quelques minutes de plus pour que tout le monde ait le temps de vous poser des questions.

L’hon. Kirsty Duncan:

Merci à vous, monsieur le président.

Encore une fois, je tiens vraiment à remercier les membres du Comité de m'avoir donné l'occasion de me présenter devant vous pour répondre à vos questions. J'aimerais surtout vous remercier pour l'important travail que vous avez accompli au cours des trois dernières années et demie.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci. Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes.

(0950)

(0955)

Le président:

Reprenons nos travaux.

Avant de passer aux affaires du Comité, nous devons voter sur le Budget principal des dépenses. AGENCE DE PROMOTION ÉCONOMIQUE DU CANADA ATLANTIQUE

Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........65 905 491 $ Crédit 5 — Subventions et contributions..........241 163 563 $ Crédit 10 — Lancement d'une stratégie fédérale pour l'emploi et le tourisme..........2 091 224 $ Crédit 15 — Financement accru pour les agences de développement national..........24 900 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10 et 15 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE CANADIENNE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE DU NORD Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........14 527 629 $ Crédit 5— Subventions et contributions..........34 270 717 $ Crédit 10— Une politique alimentaire pour le Canada..........3 000 000 $ Crédit 15— Lancement d'une stratégie fédérale pour l'emploi et le tourisme..........1 709 192 $ Crédit 20— Des collectivités arctiques et nordiques dynamiques..........9 999 990 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, 15 et 20 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE SPATIALE CANADIENNE Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........181 393 741 $ Crédit 5— Dépenses en immobilisations..........78 547 200 $ Crédit 10— Subventions et contributions..........58 696 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5 et 10 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) COMMISSION CANADIENNE DU TOURISME Crédit 1— Paiements à la Commission..........95 665 913 $ Crédit 5— Lancement d'une stratégie fédérale pour l'emploi et le tourisme..........5 000 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) COMMISSION DU DROIT D’AUTEUR Crédit 1— Dépenses du programme..........3 781 533 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DE L’INDUSTRIE Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........442 060 174 $ Crédit 5— Dépenses en capital..........6 683 000 $ Crédit 10— Subvention et contributions..........2 160 756 935 $ Crédit L15— Paiements effectués en vertu du paragraphe 14(2) de la Loi sur le ministère de l’Industrie..........300 000 $ Crédit L20— Prêts effectués en vertu de l’alinéa 14(1)a) de la Loi sur le ministère de l’Industrie..........500 000 $ Crédit 25— Accès au service Internet à haute vitesse pour tous les Canadiens..........26 905 000 $ Crédit 30— Donner des compétences numériques aux jeunes Canadiens..........30 000 000 $ Crédit 35— Préparatifs pour une nouvelle génération de technologie sans fil..........7 357 000 $ Crédit 40— Protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces..........964 000 $ Crédit 45— Protéger la sécurité nationale du Canada..........1 043 354 $ Crédit 50— Soutenir l’innovation dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier par la collaboration.........10 000 000 $ Crédit 55— Appuyer la relation juridique renouvelée avec les peuples autochtones..........3 048 333 $ Crédit 60— Appuyer la nouvelle génération d’entrepreneurs..........7 300 000 $ Crédit 65— Soutenir les travaux de la Table ronde sur le milieu des affaires et l’enseignement supérieur..........5 666 667 $ Crédit 70— Lancement d’une stratégie fédérale sur l’emploi et le tourisme (FedNor)..........1 836 536 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, L15, L20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65 et 70 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DE LA DIVERSIFICATION DE L’ÉCONOMIE DE L’OUEST CANADIEN Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........37 981 906 $ Crédit 5— Subventions et contributions..........209 531 630 $ Crédit 10— Lancement d’une stratégie fédérale sur l’emploi et le tourisme..........3 607 224 $ Crédit 15— Protéger l’eau et les terres dans les Prairies..........1 000 000 $ Crédit 20— Financement accru pour les agences de développement régional..........15 800 000 $ Crédit 25— Investir dans une économie de l’Ouest diversifiée et croissante..........33 300 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 et 25 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE DU CANADA POUR LES RÉGIONS DU QUÉBEC ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........39 352 146 $ ç Crédit 5— Subventions et contributions..........277 942 967 $ ç Crédit 10— Lancement d’une stratégie fédérale sur l’emploi et le tourisme..........3 097 848 $

(Les crédits 1, 5 et 10 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) AGENCE FÉDÉRALE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ÉCONOMIQUE POUR LE SUD DE L’ONTARIO ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........29 201 373 $ ç Crédit 5— Subventions et contributions..........224 900 252 $ ç Crédit 10— Lancement d’une stratégie fédérale sur l’emploi et le tourisme..........3 867 976 $

(Les crédits 1, 5 et 10 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL NATIONAL DE RECHERCHES DU CANADA ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........436 503 800 $ ç Crédit 5— Dépenses en capital..........58 320 000 $ ç Crédit 10— Subventions et contributions..........448 814 193 $

(Les crédits 1, 5 et 10 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL DE RECHERCHES EN SCIENCES NATURELLES ET EN GÉNIE ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........53 905 016 $ ç Crédit 5— Subventions..........1 296 774 972 $ ç Crédit 10— Congé parental payé pour les chercheurs étudiants..........1 805 000 $ ç Crédit 15— Des bourses de recherche pour soutenir les étudiants de deuxième et de troisième cycles..........4 350 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10 et 15 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL DE RECHERCHES EN SCIENCES HUMAINES ç Crédit 1— Dépenses de fonctionnement..........35 100 061 $ ç Crédit 5— Subventions.....884 037 003 $ ç Crédit 10— Congé parental payé pour les chercheurs étudiants..........1 447 000 $ ç Crédit 15— Des bourses de recherche pour soutenir les étudiants de deuxième et de troisième cycles..........6 090 000 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10 et 15 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) CONSEIL CANADIEN DES NORMES ç Crédit 1— Paiements au Conseil..........17 910 000 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) STATISTIQUE CANADA ç Crédit 1— Dépenses du programme..........423 989 188 $ ç Crédit 5— Surveiller les achats de biens immobiliers canadiens..........500 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

Le président: Le président peut-il faire rapport à la Chambre du Budget principal des dépenses pour 2019-2020, moins les montants votés dans le Budget provisoire des dépenses?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant poursuivre à huis clos pour discuter de M-208.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard indu 21532 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 30, 2019

2019-05-16 INDU 163

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody. Thank you for being here today.

Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, May 8, 2019, the committee is studying M-208, on rural digital infrastructure.

Today, we have with us the Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Rural Economic Development, along with her officials, from the Office of Infrastructure of Canada, Kelly Gillis, Deputy Minister, Infrastructure and Communities; and from the Department of Industry, Lisa Setlakwe, Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategy and Innovation Policy.

Minister, you have 10 minutes.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan (Minister of Rural Economic Development):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to acknowledge that we are gathered here on the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin peoples.

As you said, Mr. Chair, I am joined by Kelly Gillis, my deputy minister, and Lisa...I never say it right. Sorry.

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe (Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategy and Innovation Policy Sector, Department of Industry):

Setlakwe.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Setlakwe.

Thank you. Sorry.

Lisa Setlakwe is senior ADM of strategy and innovation policy at ISED.

I'd like to thank the distinguished members of this committee for the opportunity to update them on our government's efforts to bring high-speed Internet service and mobile wireless service to the millions of Canadians who live in rural and remote regions.

First, I want to acknowledge the valuable work that the committee has contributed and is contributing to our understanding of this complex and vitally important issue.

From day one, our government has been working to ensure that all Canadians have an equal opportunity to succeed no matter where they live. I know this committee shares that goal, as do all members of Parliament. The unanimous support that this House has given to Mr. Amos' motion shows government and private sector partners who are working together to address the Internet and wireless deficit across the country that there is a real commitment to get this important work done.

Since January, when I was appointed Canada's first Minister of Rural Economic Development, I have met and spoken with Canadians from all walks of life in rural and remote communities from coast to coast to coast.

From my own personal experience of living in rural Nova Scotia, I have seen how rural Canadians make our country a more vibrant and prosperous place to live and work.

Though small in population, rural communities account for roughly 30% of our country's gross domestic product. They are the drivers of Canada's natural resource and agricultural sectors, and they are supported by dedicated workers who are deeply committed to their communities.

In his mandate letter to me, the Prime Minister asked me to develop a rural economic development strategy.

Since I started travelling across this country in January, I have listened and learned, and while each community is unique and faces different challenges, the number one on most of their lists is the need to be connected.

Our rural economic development strategy is in its final stages of development, and I can assure you that it will fully reflect the concerns about broadband and wireless that I have heard repeatedly throughout my travels. We know that, when it comes to digital infrastructure, there is an urban-rural divide, and I'd like to take a moment to look at some of these disparities.

Although more than nine of 10 urban households have access to high-speed Internet service, only one in three rural households have the same access. Lack of high-speed service means that these communities lack the essential services that urban Canadians take for granted. It means that Canadians cannot sell their products and services online. They must resort to accessing government services over the phone instead of online. Many farmers with multi-million dollar agribusinesses still rely on phones and fax machines to run their operations. These realities are having a real impact on people in rural Canada and, in some cases, are leaving them behind.

It's incumbent upon us as the federal government to work with provincial, territorial and private sector partners to bridge that divide.

The divide that we're talking about shouldn't be limited specifically to the communities in rural and remote areas of our country. It exists on our roads and highways where there is no mobile wireless coverage. This lack of connectivity is a significant challenge for those working in the transportation industry, such as truckers, for example, and it is a risk to public safety, particularly for rural Canadians, who need to be able to communicate along remote roadways, fields and natural areas.

Wireless coverage is also essential to the national public alerting system, which relies on wireless service to deliver emergency alerts to Canadians.

On a more basic level, rural wireless mobile services are as important to rural communities as they are to urban communities in terms of economic development, as well as personal use. That is why we announced the accelerated capital cost allowance, which is helping telecommunications companies make investments in rural Canada. As announced by Bell, Rogers, Shaw, Telus and Xplornet, this change will connect thousands of people in their homes and provide cell coverage along unserved highway corridors across the country.

With respect to both broadband and mobile wireless access, this digital divide holds back rural Canadians from participating fully in the global and digital world. Through the connect to innovate program, we are extending high-speed Internet access to 900 rural and remote communities and an estimated 380,000 households, with more to come. That includes 190 indigenous communities across Canada. This program sets the stage for increased investments coast to coast to coast.

Since launching the connect to innovate program in budget 2016, the government has leveraged $554 million from the private sector and other levels of government for about 180 projects. These projects will improve Internet connectivity to those 380,000 households and 900 communities, more than tripling the 300 communities initially targeted. ln total, through the connect to innovate program, 20,000 kilometres of fibre network will be installed across this country.

(0850)



We are connecting households and business, schools and hospitals, as well as supporting mobile wireless networks. We are establishing fibre optic connections in the farthest point north in all of Canada.

These investments show that our government recognizes that access to high-speed Internet and mobile wireless service is not a luxury; it is a necessity. We're not finished making these investments.

ln budget 2019, our government has made an ambitious new commitment to ensure that, over time, every single household and business in Canada has high-speed connectivity. As you know, we anticipate having 95% of the country connected by 2026, and 100% of the country connected by 2030.

We are investing in tomorrow's technologies, such as 5G and low earth orbit satellite capacity, today. The budget announced $1.7 billion in new broadband investments, including a new universal broadband fund and a top-up for the connect to innovate program that will focus on extending backbone infrastructure to underserved communities. For the most difficult to reach communities, funding may also support last-mile connections to individual homes and businesses.

The Canada Infrastructure Bank will seek to invest up to $1 billion over the next 10 years and leverage at least $2 billion in private capital to increase broadband access for Canadians. The CRTC's $750-million broadband fund, launched last fall, will help to improve connectivity services across the country, including wireless mobile services. Broadband infrastructure projects are also eligible for funding under the $2-billion rural and northern communities stream of the investing in Canada infrastructure program.

We understand that our success depends not only on our government's commitment to invest, but also that of our provincial, territorial and private sector partners. That's the reason we created the Canada Infrastructure Bank, which is currently exploring opportunities to attract private sector investments in high-speed Internet infrastructure for unserved and underserved communities.

Overall, budget 2019 is proposing a new, co-ordinated plan that would deliver $5 billion to $6 billion in investments in rural broadband over the next 10 years to help build a fully connected Canada.

To ensure maximum efficiency and coordination and to bring maximum benefit to underserved Canadians, officials are currently drafting a national connectivity strategy that promotes collaboration and effective investments of public dollars. This strategy will outline clear objectives and targets against which progress can be measured; provide a tool to guide efforts and improve outcomes for all Canadian homes, businesses, public institutions and indigenous peoples; and create accountability and responsibility for all levels of government to contribute towards eliminating the digital divide.

I'm proud to be part of a government that recognizes that building our nation's high-speed Internet is as important as building our nation's roads. That's how we will ensure that all Canadians have equal opportunities to succeed, regardless of where they live.

Thank you for the opportunity to address the committee. I'm happy to take your questions.

(0855)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

We're going to get right into questions, starting with Mr. Longfield, for seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Minister Jordan, it's great to have you here representing rural Canada.

I'm picturing Nova Scotia's challenges. Rural Canada also extends beyond the land onto the sea, when people are trying to communicate from ship to shore.

I'm thinking of rural Ontario. I was managing a business in Welland. I was trying to get high-speed Internet into that business and it was going to cost me $75,000 to get the last part of the line done. I was connecting to our office in Germany and our offices across the States, upgrading our technology and hiring people, and then I had this limit to growth. So we know that it's there.

Could you could speak to what working with other orders of government might provide? We have the SWIFT project that we studied here at the committee, where Ontario, the Government of Canada and private industry are trying to reach out to rural Canada. How important is it that we have willing partners at the table from other orders of government?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you, Mr. Longfield.

You've made some very valid points with regard to how important it is for businesses to have good connectivity in order to grow. I come from a fishing community, and we know that access to international markets is extremely important, the same as it is for agriculture. We know that in rural Canada access to broadband is extremely critical in order for businesses to continue to grow and be able to compete on the world stage.

With regard to how we achieve that, we need to have all partners at the table. This would include the federal government and our provincial and territorial partners, as well as stakeholder groups. In some cases, municipalities are stepping up because they realize how important it is for them to have that connectivity. It's not going to be a one-size-fits-all solution. I think every area has to be looked at independently, but also in recognizing that this has to be done with a whole-of-government and a whole-of-country approach.

We have been very fortunate. As I've travelled across the country since being appointed in January, meeting with communities from coast to coast to coast, no matter where I've gone, no matter where I am in the country, this is the number one priority that we're hearing about. I will also say that in engagement with my provincial and territorial partners, it's their number one priority. Everyone recognizes that this is something that needs to be done, and I'm happy to say that in most cases all of our partners are on board with this and want to see us make sure that we connect 100% of Canadians.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

You mentioned the municipal partners. I'm thinking of my driving route from Welland back to Guelph: 131 kilometres to work every day. I had time in the car for hands-free calls, and I knew that as soon as I hit a certain bridge on Highway 20 that it was going to cut out, so I would have to interrupt my conversation and say, “I'm going to call you back when I get to the barn on the other side of the creek.”

I've now visited some of the farms in that area. We have egg farms that are doing amazing work with data in measuring thickness and composition of shell that relates to the feed the chickens are using, and for animal welfare in terms of watering and keeping the hens happy as they're laying eggs, but really connecting to the outside world.

The municipal partners often don't have funds. It's a small community. Just to pick a name, Grimsby, Ontario, is going to be different from Toronto, Ontario, so again, there's support back to us and our provincial partners. Could you speak to capacity-building within these small communities?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

You're right. There are some small communities that just don't have the capacity to build it on their own, but there are other small communities that have definitely made this a priority and are budgeting accordingly. I will say that we've been very fortunate, in that the rural and northern communities fund, which is a fund under Infrastructure Canada, has allowed connectivity to be one of the areas where they can apply for funding. We've also made it easier for smaller communities to access those funds by lowering the cost of their contribution.

These are all things that I think are really important when we listen to rural communities, because it's an expensive venture to connect people, and they know how important it is for them to stay sustainable. We also need to make sure that our provincial counterparts are at the table with us. In a lot of cases, they already are. There have been budget allocations in different provinces to make sure that broadband is one of the things that they see developing. The other thing, of course, is our stakeholder telco companies. They are also stepping up, as is the CRTC. There are a lot of different funds.

I think this is one of those things where right across the country and right across the spectrum everybody is on board in making sure that we do connect rural Canada.

(0900)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

In terms of your strategy development and working with other ministers, you have a new ministry, and we also have Minister Ng in a new position, a new ministry, with small business and export promotion. Minister Bains, of course, is in this area, as is Minister Bibeau, with agriculture. How do the ministers work together on developing strategies?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

That's a very good question.

Since I was first appointed, we have been very active in going across the country and talking to our provincial and municipal counterparts, but we also recognize that this is a whole-of-government approach. Twenty-one different departments have been involved in developing our strategy and in working on national connectivity. We recognize that it's not just one area that's affected—all areas are. It doesn't matter if it's natural resources, agriculture, fishing, business development, exports or tourism. We definitely have a number of departments that have to be involved in making sure that as we build this plan for national connectivity, we build it in the right way and we make sure that we hit all of the targets we're striving for.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

As well, we have limited time. Right now we have limited time, but we also have a very limited schedule ahead of us. Hopefully we can get to a break point where that can be picked up in the future Parliament.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

We've always been committed to connectivity, first of all with the connect to innovate program, which was announced in budget 2016. This is going to be able to connect to 900 communities, which is three times the number that we had originally anticipated. It's going to be 380,000 households.

We also have a top-up on the connect to innovate budget in 2019. Of course, the universal broadband fund that we're developing now will be used as we go forward.

Thank you.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We're going to Mr. Chong.

You have seven minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for appearing in front of us today to talk about this important issue. I think our ridings of South Shore—St. Margarets and rural Wellington County and the rural Halton region are very similar.

I would encourage the government to focus not only on accessible Internet for rural areas, but also affordable Internet. When we say that only a third of Canadians in rural areas have access to high-speed Internet, I think that's better and more accurately termed as a third of Canadians in rural areas have access to affordable high-speed Internet. Many more than that have access to Internet, but they choose not to put it in place because it is far too expensive.

I mentioned this in the last committee meeting and I'll emphasize it again. If you're living in the city of Guelph, you can get 100 gigabytes of high-speed Internet a month for $49.99. You can get unlimited high-speed Internet in the city of Guelph for $69.99. If you live a mile outside the city of Guelph in rural Wellington County, if you want 100 gigabytes of high-speed data, it will cost you about $300 per month. If you want 200 gigabytes of high-speed data, which is not unreasonable for a family of four with kids in high school who need to access online resources to do their homework, you're paying $500, $600 or $700 a month for that. Obviously, that's too expensive and out of reach for most rural families so they choose not to put it in place, because who's going to pay $600 a month for 200 gigabytes of data? That's $7,200 a year plus tax. It's far too expensive.

I think that is the bigger issue than actual accessibility to Internet in rural areas. It's the number one complaint that I've heard in the north Halton region and in southern Wellington County. They say that yes, they can get Internet, but how are they supposed to pay a monthly bill of $500. Especially, as you know, in the Maritimes you don't have access to natural gas, and neither do we, and you're paying $1,000 a month for oil heat. The marketplace isn't working for those rural customers.

Unfortunately, we didn't do what western Canadians did and roll out natural gas across all the Prairies to every single rural residence, and we didn't do what Bell telephone did and roll out Internet access, high-speed Internet, to every single rural household when we were rolling it out in cities. Now we have this problem where most rural families don't have access to affordable high-speed Internet. As I said, who's going to pay $600 a month, plus tax, for 200 gigabytes' worth of high-speed Internet access?

I think that is just as big an issue as making sure high speed is available. I bring that to your attention because I really think that's just as important, if not more important, than actually having access to high-speed Internet.

(0905)

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Mr. Chong, you're absolutely right. We've heard that across the country. It's not only a matter of accessing high-speed Internet; it's being able to afford it, and rural Canada is disadvantaged when it comes to costs in terms of how payments are initiated.

Before I turn to Lisa to comment on this, I will say that Minister Bains has actually directed the CRTC to look at the competitiveness of telcos, and with that we would hope with better competition there would be better pricing.

I'm going to ask Lisa if she would make some comments on where that process is right now.

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

Specifically on the policy direction, as you know, the minister is looking to issue a direction to the CRTC. It is in large part in response to what you've just talked about, which is affordability and competition. What we're asking them to do, as they are going to be making decisions on a variety of policy areas, is that they consider it through a consumer lens first. That's looking at affordability, consumer rights, encouraging competition and also encouraging innovation. That is in process now. We are welcoming comments on that.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Sure, and I'll add to that.

People say that there is more affordable Internet for 200 gigabytes a month than paying $600. The problem is that it's not low-latency, high-speed Internet access. The problem with satellite technology is that there's a great deal of latency in the service. The problem with direct line-of-sight radio frequency Internet access is that it's not as reliable.

Really, if you want reliable high-speed Internet access, the technology that's best suited for a lot of these rural areas is cellular high-speed mobile Internet access, which is often marketed under branded products like Turbo Hub for Bell or Rocket Hub for Rogers. That is actually reliable high-speed Internet access with low latency. The problem is, as I mentioned before, that those plans are prohibitively expensive.

Most rural customers I know, if they can't get Internet access right now through those services, are more than willing to pay $500 to $1,000 for a one-time installation fee to put up a big aerial antenna with a Yagi antenna at the top to boost the signal through a coax cable down to the Turbo Hub or Rocket Hub provided by Bell or Rogers. They're more than willing to pay that one-time fee. The challenge is that nobody's willing to pay an ongoing fee of $600-plus a month just to get some basic 200 gigabytes of data.

The affordability is the issue, then. The vast majority of households are within range of a cell tower, and if the signal isn't strong enough, they would be more than willing to pay the one-time $500 charge to get somebody to install a booster antenna on their roof. The issue is that paying an ongoing cost of $600 or $700 a month for 200 gigabytes of data is out of reach for the vast majority of families.

We can roll out more cell towers and do all that kind of stuff, but if the pricing of these plans is at that level, nobody's going to be able to afford it.

The Chair:

Please give a very brief answer.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I have a couple of comments with regard to that.

First of all, we know that there's no one-size-fits-all solution in connectivity, but making sure things are affordable and reliable is extremely important.

We are looking at things like the low earth orbit, LEO, satellites. We're looking at fibre. We're looking at the towers. How you get connected is going to depend on where you are.

Also, in co-operation with the CRTC and what they've been directed to do, we're hoping we can bring together better affordability and better access to all Canadians.

(0910)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Minister, for being here.

The 700 megahertz band mobile spectrum option was probably one of the most successful spectrum options in Canadian history. Brand names like Telus paid over $1 billion. SaskTel paid nearly $1 billion and Rogers paid over $3 billion. In total there was $5 billion, with $300 million allocated to the government. How much of that money, that $5 billion-plus the government received, has been directed to expanding broadband?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Mr. Masse, the money that is brought in from auction goes into general revenues, which actually pays for a lot of different programs. Of course, we're investing significantly in broadband and in high-speed Internet coverage.

We have $1.7 billion allocated in this budget that will be going to high-speed broadband.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's for this budget, but I'm asking about the previous money your government received, the $5 billion. That $1.7 billion is actually over 13 years and it's actually legacy for another government, be it yours or someone else's.

What did your government do with the 2015 spectrum auction, which netted a sum of $2.1 billion? Where did that $2.1 billion go? Did any of that go to rural broadband?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Money that comes from spectrum auctions goes into general revenues. General revenues would, of course, take into account broadband as well as other services and programs that the government provides. The money would go into the general revenues.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That also, then, includes the other 2015 auction, the 2,500 megahertz band, which is another $1 billion. There was the residential spectrum licences for the remaining 700 megahertz as well.

In total, Canadians have received from their government over $14 billion with regard to spectrum auctions in recent history, so it's hard to believe we've ended up with a revenue stream of $14 billion and some of the highest prices and some of the least coverage in rural areas. Why do you think that's the case? We've received record amounts of unaccounted-for money in terms of it being required for anything.

With the spectrum auction, for those who aren't aware, you're selling off land rights and air rights. That's like water. It's something that there is no cost to do for the Canadian government, so it's pure revenue for the government.

Why do you think there's been no allocation of these resources to rural broadband, especially given the high prices we have?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

We've invested in rural broadband significantly since we've been elected. The money that comes from the spectrum auction goes into general revenues, which pays for a lot of different programs. Rural broadband would probably be one of them.

We're making significant investments as well as commitments to making sure that we connect this country. We've already committed to connecting over 900 communities through the connect to innovate fund. We're looking at topping up that fund, as well as the universal broadband fund that's going to be rolling out shortly. We know that the money is necessary in order to connect communities across this country. It is something we are extremely committed to doing.

When you talk about the spectrum auction specifically, there's been a carve-out spectrum for rural communities. We know it's critical for rural areas to get that connectivity. We're making sure we're going to do it.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Given that, right now, you have two spectrum auctions under way, are you able to commit the revenues from those spectrum auctions, which will be in the billions, to broadband services?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Revenues from spectrum auctions go to the general revenues that pay for a number of different government programs, one of which may be broadband. We have committed to making sure that this country is connected. We've made sure that we're putting that money in the budget.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'll take that as a no.

Those are future budgets. Future revenues will come in. There are future spectrum auctions on top of that. There's an excessive amount of money being generated here. I know that you're seeking partners for the Canada Infrastructure Bank to the tune of $2 billion. At the same time, you're expecting Bell Mobility, Telus, Vidéotron, SaskTel and Rogers to spend billions of dollars on a spectrum auction.

I want to move towards consumer protection. The recent CRTC decision acknowledges that consumers in this country have been abused by predatory pricing practices and the telcos' behaviour toward customers. The decision is going to take a full year to put penalties on those companies for such behaviour.

Is that acceptable to you and the minister?

(0915)

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

As we talked about earlier, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development has already given a directive to the CRTC to look at the pricing of the telcos.

Mr. Brian Masse:

This is about their behaviour. There was an inquiry with regard to their behaviour and predatory practices with consumers, be it marketing, soliciting of business or moving customers to different elements. There is a ruling specifically identifying that they're guilty.

The CRTC has said they will take a year to bring consequences for that. Is that acceptable to you and the minister, that it would take a year to rebate or compensate Canadian consumers for behaviour the CRTC has ruled was inappropriate?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I'm going to ask Lisa to comment on that, since she is the person who deals mostly with ISED. She can maybe bring a little more to that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm really asking you. It's going to take a year. I want to know whether you find that acceptable for the CRTC, after they have issued a guilty decision. The penalty is not going to take a matter of days, weeks or months. It's going to take a year. There's been dead silence related to that. I want to know whether you find it acceptable that for abusive practices identified and acknowledged by the CRTC, the penalties and consequences will take a full year to benefit consumers.

Do you think that's appropriate for the CRTC to take that length of time?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Mr. Masse, as you are aware, the CRTC is an arm's-length organization of government. We have had a directive from the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development to ask the CRTC to look at the practices of the telcos and how they are doing.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You have had a directive letter, exactly.

You can have public comment with regard to whether or not it's acceptable for them to take that long—

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

—if the minister issued an actual directive to them—

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

—as you have acknowledged and expressed here.

The Chair:

Your time's up.

I would just remind everyone that ministers bring their deputy ministers and agents with them in order that they may help ministers answer questions. If ministers want to refer to them, that's well within their right.

We're going to move to Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Ms. Jordan, for being here for this. This is a very important issue we're discussing. I know we've talked about the Internet an awful lot, but I think cellphones are really what we're trying to get to here.

I'll continue with Brian's point for a bit. How do we get small companies, such as the ones in my riding, to get involved in cellphones, when it costs them $1 billion to get into the market?

Are we going to look at moving to a post-auction world for wireless spectrum?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Mr. Graham, thank you so much for all of your advocacy for cellphone and Internet coverage in rural communities. I know it's something that you've been extremely dedicated to since you were first elected here.

With regard to smaller companies being able to access spectrum, there was actually a carve-out in the spectrum auction for rural and smaller communities. I think that's one of the ways we are able to help address the smaller companies that want to get into the marketplace.

It's something that we've heard about across the country, in terms of making sure that those companies have the ability to compete. We know that sometimes in rural communities, they are the people who have the vested interest in making sure that they are able to be part of the planning and the go-forward and making sure we provide good cellphone coverage and connectivity.

As we've said many times, this is not going to be a one-size-fits-all solution, but we do know that small companies have a huge role to play.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

I can add one thing to that. What we do hear from smaller companies when we are selling off spectrum is that we sell it in blocks that sometimes are not affordable for them. We are actually in the process of consulting on a smaller block size, so that these kinds of service providers can participate in spectrum acquisition.

(0920)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

By smaller blocks, do you mean narrower band or a narrow geographic area?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

Narrow geographic area.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's helpful. We have an Internet service co-operative in my riding and it would be wonderful if they could bid on cellphones to provide it to that county, as opposed to having to do the province or the country. That's what I'd like to get to.

You mentioned in your opening comments, Minister, about the stakeholder telcos stepping up. With respect to that, it has not been my experience with the stakeholder telcos. They have been remarkably reluctant to invest in rural areas if it is not profitable.

If you as a community or an individual wanted them to install infrastructure in your area—for example, one of my communities that has no cellphone service, and I'll get back to that in a second—and went to one of the larger telco companies, they might say sure they'll install a tower for you if you pay 100% of it. There isn't even a cost-sharing option. When they start making money off that tower, because there are 1,000 residents around it, there is no revenue sharing back to the community that brought it in.

It's the same thing with Internet service. If I want to bring in a fibre optic line three kilometres down the road from where I am to the nearest connection of any sort, it would cost me about $75,000. If the 20 or so houses between us start connecting, then all the revenues go back to the original company. There's no revenue sharing once you force the private to invest.

I don't agree that stakeholders are stepping up. I think they're actually quite frustrating and slowing us down, not accelerating us.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I'd like to comment on that if I could.

As I've said, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. I would like to comment that in the fall economic statement, we allowed for the accelerated capital cost allowance, which has given the telcos the ability to invest money that they're basically saving because of that. We have actually seen a number of them stepping up and making sure that they are connecting rural communities because of that accelerated capital cost allowance.

I believe that one company has said it is going from 800,000 to 1.2 million connections because of it. Another one has already announced that it will be providing cellphone coverage on highways in British Columbia, as well as Nova Scotia, and that it has more rolling out.

So, we do see that the telcos are actually investing in rural communities because of that provision that we put in the fall economic statement. But, to your point earlier, I think the smaller companies have a large role to play as well. We see that as part of our go-forward plan for sure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

One of the things about your appointment as minister is that you are under infrastructure. I think it's really important to put Internet and cellphone service as infrastructure instead of as service and I wanted to thank you for that.

The first Internet as an infrastructure project last year was in my riding, so I'm very proud of that fact.

I want to come back to Michael Chong's point from earlier. He talked about having access and affordability. Everyone has access to a Porsche, but not everybody can afford a Porsche. We have to be careful in what words we use. When we say everyone has access, it's really quite not true for huge communities that have nominal access to Internet. When you actually look at it, as I said, it's not realistic.

When we are telling the CRTC that competition is the be-all and end-all, I don't agree that it's necessarily the case. When we're telling them competition will solve all the problems, it won't. If you don't have any service at all, competition doesn't fix it.

What we need to get to—and again, this is more of a comment, but you're welcome to comment on it—is a paradigm where Internet costs the same in downtown Montreal or downtown Toronto as it does at the end of dirt roads, just like electricity does. We did this generations ago. There's no argument that it is 3.9¢ a kilowatt hour, or whatever it is where you are, here and in the country. As long as you have a hydro pole, you pay the same.

Can we get there for Internet and cellphone service? Can we get to where the service, the infrastructure, is what you're paying for, regardless of where you are?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

It's imperative that we make sure that high-speed Internet is affordable as well as available.

Right now, we're building the national strategy on connectivity. We will take all those things into consideration as we go forward with that, recognizing that rural Canadians should have the same access to the same services as people who live in urban Canada. You shouldn't be disadvantaged for living in a rural community. I believe that's one of the reasons I was appointed, because we recognize that there is a divide between rural and urban, and not just in connectivity but a lot of different things.

We need to make sure that people who want to live, work, grow businesses and raise families in rural Canada are able to do so just as easily as people who want to live in urban areas. I'm quite passionate about rural specifically, because I am from rural Canada myself and I can't imagine living anywhere else. I know we have to make sure that we can keep our young people there and that people who want to live in the area are able to do so.

(0925)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, and good luck.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd, for five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Minister and your department, for being here.

There's a saying that all politics is local, so I'll start out with a bit of local advocacy here.

Parkland County, which I represent a large swath of, was recently a finalist in the smart cities challenge by Infrastructure Canada. Also, in 2018, they were listed as an ICF Smart21 community in relation to its advances towards increasing rural connectivity and broadband.

In anticipation of this meeting, I messaged my local mayor, Rod Shaigec of Parkland County, and asked whether the federal government has been supportive through the connect to innovate program. His answer was that, so far, the federal government has not been supportive through the program. To quote him exactly, “It has been limited.”

They have made huge investments in building cellular towers throughout the community in trying to advance rural broadband for their area. I know this is an issue for places that are adjacent to cities across the country. You don't have to be somewhere north of 60 or far outside an urban area to have digital broadband access problems. As my colleague Michael Chong said, you could be right next to a thriving metropolis with adequate and affordable high-speed Internet, yet still have a dead zone equivalent to being near the North Pole. That's my local advocacy piece.

My next piece is that we had spoken to this motion in the previous committee. I brought up a similar motion last fall in the wake of the Ottawa tornadoes. There are a lot of things we can laud in the wake of this natural disaster in the Ottawa area, such as the effectiveness of our emergency alert management system. That's hugely important for all Canadians, but particularly rural Canadians who don't always get their local newspaper or don't have access to cable TV all the time. How do they get these essential warnings or alerts?

Perhaps you, in your capacity as minister, or your department can answer. Is there any movement on this and do you believe the government should set a minimum standard to ensure that cellular infrastructure can be powered independently in case of a natural disaster for a minimum standard period of time?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Actually, I met some of the people from your community at the smart cities challenge reception the other night. We had a good conversation and I look forward to continuing that with them.

With regard to their connectivity specifically, the program was a $500-million commitment that we leveraged dollar for dollar with stakeholders. Unfortunately, it was an oversubscribed program. We do have the top-up that was announced in budget 2019. We know there is no one-size-fits-all solution for everybody, but we are working very hard to make sure that we do connect all Canadians. Hopefully we can continue to work with Parkland County to make sure that this is something we can go forward with.

With regard to the cellphone and emergency signal specifically, it's funny, because somebody was saying that when they drive, they hit an area and then they have to stop. It's so much more than being able to talk hands-free. We know that it's critical infrastructure during emergencies such as fires and floods. We saw it with the tornado here in Ottawa. Making sure that it is available to people is critical.

We're building the infrastructure now to help mitigate that, to make sure that we have that ability to connect people. We know that ISED works closely with national security whenever there is a crisis, so that they can get things up and running as soon as possible, working with the military and working with public safety so that—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

If I could briefly interrupt, in the case of the Ottawa tornadoes, we had areas that do have adequate cellular access, but when an electrical station is hit—and there are independent generators at these stations—they only run for a short time. People were in areas that previously had cellphone access but because the electrical stations weren't up and running quickly, these cellphones weren't up to snuff.

Is the government looking at having a minimum standard to ensure that these cellular stations can run for a reasonable amount of time to ensure that our electricity system can get back up and running?

(0930)

The Chair:

Reply very briefly, please.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I'm not aware of minimum standards at this point. It is up to telcos to make sure their infrastructure is up and running. However, as we go forward with the national connectivity strategy, that could be part of it. Thank you for the suggestion. We've written it down.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Amos.

You have five minutes, please.

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to committee members for allowing me to join these proceedings.

Thank you, Minister, and the hard-working public servants who support you.

I know that the good people of Pontiac, hundreds of whom are evacuated right now, many of whom are supporting family members, community members who are in the direst of straits, are thinking about the immediate term, about cleaning up and getting their house back to normal.

The conversations have already started around what we can do to make sure that next year or the year after if it happens again we won't be in a situation where we can't pick up our phone and call our mayor or our neighbour and get a sandbag or get some clean water or...you can imagine the scenario. This conversation has been repeated several times, and I appreciate that we can't change the lack of action, lack of investment from previous governments and the private sector overnight. It takes time.

What confidence can we give rural Canada that when it comes to ensuring that critical infrastructure is available, particularly cellphone infrastructure in those places where there isn't access, the investments we're making are going to help us to build that up?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you, Mr. Amos, and thank you for your emotion as well.

Thank you to all members for supporting it.

It's extremely important to all of us across the country that we make sure that adequate cellphone coverage is available in situations like we've had recently with the flooding, the tornadoes, the fires. We've seen right across the country what's happening in the extreme weather events we're having. It's important that Canadians are able to feel they have access to being able to make those calls that you said are so important, even about how to get sandbags.

We're making sure as we build this infrastructure that connects Canadians that we're building it for the future, that the investments we're making are going to be for critical infrastructure. People in urban areas don't understand the difference between having coverage and not having coverage until you put it down to something as critical as making sure you're able to make that 911 call if you have to.

Some of the investments we've already made in the telcos will be making a difference to cellphone coverage, investing in different highway systems, making sure they're connected. The infrastructure we're building for connect to innovate will help with our wireless component to make sure that cellphones are covered. We need to make sure we're aware of this as we go forward when we build the national connectivity strategy.

We're committed to making sure that Canadians have access to the services they need. It's very tough when you're in a situation like that and you're not able to get out that 911 call or the help you need. We know we have to continue to work to provide the service that most Canadians need and we've said right from the start that we're committed to making sure we get 100% coverage.

Mr. William Amos:

I really appreciate your saying that. I know that many rural communities across Canada right now are just wondering how this is going to help. In a similar vein, small communities, for example, like my small community of Waltham or the municipality of Pontiac have far fewer than 5,000 residents. They don't have the expertise necessarily to figure out how they can advance their local needs. If the big private telecom companies aren't willing to go there, they need the help to drive their own process forward. Thankfully, the Government of Canada has, through the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, flowed funding so that municipalities can apply to have environmental assessments done, technical assessments so that they have the support necessary to inform infrastructure decisions.

Could it be contemplated that there would be flow-through funding to small municipalities that don't have that capacity or the technical expertise so that they can help advance their own cellular infrastructure and Internet infrastructure building agenda?

(0935)

The Chair:

A very brief answer, please.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

One thing we've done to help the small municipalities has been with the top-up of the gas tax fund. This year we doubled it so that they are able to access more money and they can use that for infrastructure in their communities no matter what that infrastructure is. There is also the $60 million that was given to FCM for asset management help so that people in rural communities, or all communities, can make sure that they know what needs to be done in terms of maintaining their infrastructure; that they have good-quality infrastructure not only for what they are building but also for what is existing. These are all things that we've been doing. By recognizing also that small municipalities have oftentimes a more difficult challenge with accessing funds because of the application process, we're trying to help them in different ways with that as well.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will move to Mr. Albas.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister and officials, for the work you do.

We know through the Auditor General's report last fall that the connect to innovate program has been a disaster. He found specifically that there was not good value for the money spent. Now we see that of the 892 applicants applying for the money under this program, 532 have not even heard back.

Minister, the application process closed two years ago. How is it possible that 532 applicants have still not been contacted to let them know their status?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

First of all, thank you, Mr. Albas.

We accepted the Auditor General's report as well as the recommendations and thanked them for that. The program itself, connect to innovate, is going to be connecting 900 communities, which is three times the number that we had originally anticipated. We were able to also double the investment in the connect to innovate program, dollar for dollar, so we were actually able to do a lot more than we had planned.

With regard to the program itself, we learn from things that we do. It's always a learning process. We also saw that in budget 2019 there was a top-up of that fund—

Mr. Dan Albas:

But, Minister, none of that is new money—

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Excuse me, if I can—

Mr. Dan Albas:

The question I specifically asked is regarding 532 people who have not been told. Minister, yes, the people who were successful I'm sure are very happy with that, but by the same token, 532 people, two years out, have not been told.

Are you going to be able to apologize on behalf of the government because many of them may have gone on their own and are still waiting to hear from you as to whether or not they can go forward?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

The connect to innovate program was extremely popular with people. It was oversubscribed. That's one of the reasons we put new money in the budget, to make sure that we could top up that fund. We know there are people who need to be connected. That's one of the reasons we've committed to ambitious targets: 90% by 2021, 95% by 2026 and 100% by 2030. We know that Canadians need to be connected. There is no one-size-fits-all or one program that's going to do that. That's the reason we're making sure that we're looking at a lot of different options to connect Canadians. It will be our vision as we go forward.

Mr. Dan Albas:

My colleague asked earlier about what the status of the program was, and I have to say, Mr. Chair, the results were incredible. The information from your government shows that under 10%—10% of the funding for approved projects—has actually been paid. Now, Minister, many of these projects had start dates in 2017 and yet no money has been paid. Again, how is that even possible?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

On the program itself, once the approval process is completed, there is a lot of engineering work and planning that needs to be done. You don't build infrastructure quickly, as I'm sure you're aware. We know that 85% of the projects will have shovels in the ground this summer. We know that it has sometimes been a little bit longer than people would like to see, but it also takes time to make the designs for these communities.

We're making sure that we're not just building band-aid solutions. We're building this for the future. We want to make sure that the programs and the infrastructure that we build are scalable and able to meet the needs as we go forward.

Quite frankly, far too often, there have been band-aid solutions to things, and we don't want to see that anymore. We want to make sure when we're building this infrastructure that it's something we can use well into the future and meets the target of 50/10.

(0940)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Minister, people see that there's $17.7 million for projects in the County of Kings in Nova Scotia, and the project start date was supposed to be May 1, 2017, but the actual amount of funding provided to date is zero. I can refer to a whole host of different projects in Newfoundland, in Inuvik, and elsewhere.

I think it's very clear. You said earlier that you plan to have more of these things done in the summer. Your government wanted to announce these projects initially, and then you waited to spend the money so that you could reannounce them before the upcoming election. I think, Minister, that the Canadian public will see through that ruse.

Will the Liberals be making any announcements in the media around already announced projects?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

The contribution agreements that have been signed with these companies are when the programs start. They have to build the plans for this. They have to hire the people. They have to make sure that they have the plan in place. They have contribution agreements that they have to meet milestones with.

The agreements that have been signed are rolling out. When you look at every application, they are different, and they do have to meet milestones along the way in order to do that.

Mr. Dan Albas:

And after announcements, Minister, that's very politically convenient.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Minister, and congratulations on your appointment as the first Minister of Rural Economic Development for Canada. I think that underlines and highlights the commitment to the people of rural Canada. Obviously you're right in there, rolling up your sleeves. I appreciate that.

To Will Amos, the member for Pontiac, congratulations on your motion.

I would be remiss, Minister, not to mention the member for Nickel Belt, who was appointed as your parliamentary secretary.

I am from Sault Ste. Marie, in northern Ontario. Northern Ontario is 90% of the land mass of Ontario, and there are a number of geographical issues and a number of remoteness issues, but I'm not going to delve into those. I am going to specifically talk about first nations.

There was an announcement recently under the previous program. Matawa First Nations Management connects four or five remote first nations in the Ring of Fire. It was important to do that for education, health care and remoteness. You know that there are first nations that deal with high rates of suicide because of their remoteness, and one of the things we've read about is the ability to connect people. The ability for people to support one other is important.

Bernadette, with that, I want to also talk about something you alluded to about the private-public sector partnership, because the private sector is involved up there. This is just a general statement. How important is it to you philosophically for the private sector to be involved, not only the big ones but the small and medium-sized enterprises across Canada and in northern Ontario?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you, Mr. Sheehan.

With regard to indigenous communities, 190 of the connect to innovate program approvals were for indigenous communities. I think that's quite a significant amount and it's something I'm happy to see. Like you said, we know that in some of our more remote regions specifically, there are a lot of challenges. People there rely on the Internet for things like health care and support, so it's extremely important.

With regard to your question about small and medium-sized companies, I've seen such great, innovative programs coming out of smaller areas from these small companies. It's because they have a vested interest in their communities and they want to make sure that their communities are connected. Sometimes it's things like co-operatives. Other times it's municipalities that have started their own ISPs. I think it's extremely important to have them at the table as part of the conversations we are having with regard to connectivity.

I know that we have to look at...as I've said many times already today, there's no one-size-fits-all solution. Sometimes the best service will come from those smaller organizations. Sometimes it's going to come from the bigger companies. No matter how it comes about, though, it has to happen. I think that's the main thing I'd like to say: No matter who is connecting, we have to connect.

This isn't about a luxury anymore. This isn't about people binge-watching Netflix, although if that's what they want to do, that's great. This is about health care. This is about education. This is about banking. It's about growing businesses. It's about not having to go into a store. I was recently in a place in a rural area and I went to use my debit card. They said “Let's hope the phone doesn't ring.” They were still on dial-up. I mean, how do you grow a business when you don't have access to good-quality high-speed Internet? It's about safety.

All of the things you are saying are correct in terms of making sure we have all different partners at the table. We look at all different options when it comes to connecting people, but the ultimate goal is to connect them.

(0945)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

I'm going to share my time with the parliamentary secretary for innovation.

The Chair:

You have about a minute left. [Translation]

Mr. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

I, myself, am an example of someone in a rural area who has Internet connectivity issues. I have to be in a specific spot in my home in order to get cell phone service, and thus make and receive calls. In the mornings, if I want to check La Presse for the news, and one of my four sons is online doing homework, I have to tell him, or yell out to him, to get off the Internet so that I can access La Presse. It's a problem.

Now, there's light at the end of the tunnel. The $500 million that we've invested in the Connect to Innovate program is going to ensure all 58 municipalities in my riding have access to high-speed Internet at 50 megabytes per second. The installation work has already begun and will continue until next year. Now, we have ambitious goals.

Given all the funding that is now available, specifically, for infrastructure and the CRTC, how is everything coming together to continue the expansion of high-speed Internet connectivity further to your vision? [English]

The Chair:

Very briefly, please.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

With regard to the national connectivity strategy, we're working right now with all our partners to make sure that we look at all of the options available for funding. We want to make sure that we don't develop programs in silos, and that we look at umbrellas and at how we can best serve all members and what program is best for each area.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Excellent. Thank you.

For the final two minutes, we'll go to Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Amos' motion was a good motion. I'm happy to support it.

Motions can become law in regulation. My motion on microbeads did that and the previous government actually made it law.

How much of Mr. Amos' motion are you making law, and which sections, if not all?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Thank you, Mr. Masse.

You're right, motions can become law. I had one myself that became the abandoned and derelict vessels law—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes, and I worked with Sheila Malcolmson on that.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

—and I was very happy to see that happen.

With regard to Mr. Amos' motion, right now, we're looking at a broad range of ways we can address concerns with cellphone coverage and specifically with broadband.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Are you making it law? That's what I want to know.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I personally do not have any legislation in the works at the moment.

Mr. Brian Masse:

What about through regulation?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

That does not mean to say that it can't be. That does not mean to say that as we go forward with a national connectivity strategy and how we develop our cellphone coverage that we wouldn't look at how that would go.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Why wouldn't the government make this law? What would be holding it up, especially section (c)?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

I'm sorry. Section (c)?

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm sorry. Section (c) is about equality for “rural and remote” areas. You shouldn't be expected to know exactly what.... It's rural and remote connectivity, that's what it is, and it's about equality for those two. Why not make that law?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

We've actually committed to making sure that we look at rural and remote connectivity. It's something that we've committed to financially. It's something that we've committed to with a minister to look after it. I think it's obvious that as a government we take this very seriously and that we're making sure when we roll out programs we look at them and make sure connectivity is part of that—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Has there been analysis about making it law, though? Has the department done an analysis of that?

Hon. Bernadette Jordan:

At this point I would say no, but that's not to say that it can't happen.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay. Thanks. I'm just trying to drill down into that.

Hon. Bernadette Jordan: Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister, to you and to your officials for being here today with us to talk about M-208.

We are going to suspend for a quick two minutes because we have a lot of work to come back to.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0845)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Soyez tous les bienvenus. Je vous remercie de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 8 mai 2019, le Comité étudie le projet de loi M-208 sur l'infrastructure numérique rurale.

Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons l'honorable Bernadette Jordan, ministre du Développement économique rural, ainsi que ses hauts fonctionnaires. La représentante du Bureau de l'infrastructure du Canada est Mme Kelly Gillis, sous-ministre, Infrastructure et collectivités, et la représentante du ministère de l'Industrie est Mme Lisa Setlakwe, sous-ministre adjointe principale, Secteur des stratégies et politiques d'innovation.

Madame la ministre, la parole est à vous pendant 10 minutes.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan (ministre du Développement économique rural):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais d'abord souligner que nous sommes rassemblés sur le territoire traditionnel non cédé du peuple algonquin.

Comme vous l'avez dit, monsieur le président, je suis accompagnée de Mme Kelly Gillis, ma sous-ministre, et de Mme Lisa... Pardon, je ne prononce jamais votre nom correctement.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe (sous-ministre adjointe principale, Secteur des stratégies et politiques d'innovation, ministère de l'Industrie):

Setlakwe.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Setlakwe.

Merci. Pardon.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe est sous-ministre principale, Stratégie et Innovation, à ISDE.

J'aimerais remercier les distingués membres du Comité de me donner l'occasion de les informer des efforts déployés par notre gouvernement pour offrir un service Internet haute vitesse et un service mobile sans fil aux millions de Canadiens qui vivent dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

Je tiens tout d'abord à souligner le travail précieux que le Comité a réalisé, et qu'il continue de réaliser, pour nous aider à mieux comprendre cette question complexe et d'une importance vitale.

Depuis le premier jour, le gouvernement travaille pour faire en sorte que tous les Canadiens aient des chances égales de réussir, peu importe où ils vivent. Et je sais que le Comité partage cet objectif, tout comme l'ensemble des députés. L'appui unanime que la Chambre a accordé à la motion de M. Amos démontre aux partenaires du gouvernement et du secteur privé qui travaillent ensemble pour combler le déficit en matière de services Internet et sans-fil dans l'ensemble du pays qu'il existe une réelle détermination à atteindre cet important objectif.

Depuis janvier, moment où je suis devenue la toute première ministre du Développement économique rural du Canada, j'ai rencontré des Canadiens de tous les horizons dans les collectivités rurales et éloignées de tout le pays, et j'ai discuté avec eux.

Ayant moi-même fait l'expérience de la vie en milieu rural en Nouvelle-Écosse, j'ai vu comment les Canadiens des régions rurales font de notre pays un endroit plus dynamique et plus prospère où il fait bon vivre et travailler.

Même si elles sont peu peuplées, les collectivités rurales représentent environ 30 % du produit intérieur brut du pays. Elles sont les moteurs des secteurs des ressources naturelles et de l'agriculture du Canada, et elles sont soutenues par des travailleurs dévoués qui sont profondément engagés envers leurs collectivités.

Dans la lettre de mandat qu'il m'a adressée, le premier ministre m'a demandé d'élaborer une stratégie de développement économique rural.

Depuis que j'ai commencé à voyager dans tout le pays en janvier, j'ai écouté et appris, et bien que chaque collectivité soit unique et confrontée à des défis différents, le besoin d'être branché est la priorité numéro un qui figure sur la plupart de leurs listes.

On en est aux dernières étapes de l'élaboration de notre Stratégie de développement économique rural, et je peux vous assurer qu'elle tiendra pleinement compte des préoccupations que j'ai entendues à maintes reprises au cours de mes voyages au sujet des services à large bande et sans-fil. Nous savons qu'en ce qui concerne les infrastructures numériques, il existe de grandes disparités dans notre pays entre le monde rural et le monde urbain. Et j'aimerais prendre quelques instants pour examiner certaines de ces disparités.

Alors que neuf ménages urbains sur 10 ont accès à un service Internet haute vitesse, seulement un ménage rural sur trois dispose d'un même accès. L'absence de services haute vitesse a pour conséquence que les collectivités rurales n'ont pas accès aux services essentiels que les Canadiens des milieux urbains tiennent pour acquis. Cela signifie que des Canadiens ne peuvent pas vendre leurs produits et services en ligne. Ils doivent avoir recours aux services gouvernementaux par téléphone plutôt qu'en ligne. De nombreux agriculteurs qui ont des entreprises agricoles de plusieurs millions de dollars dépendent encore des téléphones et des télécopieurs pour mener leurs activités. Ces réalités ont une réelle incidence sur les résidents du Canada rural et, dans certains cas, ils sont laissés pour compte.

Il nous incombe, à titre de gouvernement fédéral, de travailler avec nos partenaires provinciaux, territoriaux et du secteur privé en vue de combler le fossé.

Le fossé dont nous parlons n'existe pas uniquement dans les collectivités rurales et éloignées. Il existe également sur certaines de nos routes et autoroutes qui ne sont pas desservies par le service mobile sans fil. Ce manque de connectivité sur les routes est un défi de taille pour ceux qui travaillent dans l'industrie du transport, comme les camionneurs, et représente un risque pour la sécurité publique, particulièrement pour les Canadiens des régions rurales, qui doivent pouvoir communiquer le long des routes, sur les terres et dans les zones naturelles éloignées.

La couverture sans fil est également essentielle au Système national d'alertes au public, qui dépend des services sans fil pour transmettre les alertes d'urgence aux Canadiens.

Sur un plan plus général, les services mobiles sans fil sont aussi importants pour les collectivités rurales que pour les collectivités urbaines, tant pour le développement économique que pour l'utilisation personnelle. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons annoncé la Déduction pour amortissement accéléré, qui aide les entreprises de télécommunications à investir dans les régions rurales du Canada. Comme l'ont annoncé Bell, Rogers, Shaw, Telus et Xplornet, ce changement permettra de connecter des milliers de personnes chez eux, et d'offrir une couverture cellulaire le long des axes routiers du pays où il n'y en a pas pour l'instant.

En ce qui concerne l'accès à large bande et l'accès sans fil mobile, ce fossé numérique empêche les Canadiens des régions rurales de participer pleinement au monde numérique et mondialisé. Dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover, nous étendons l'accès Internet haute vitesse à 900 collectivités rurales et éloignées et à environ 380 000 ménages, pour commencer. Cela comprend 190 collectivités autochtones partout au Canada. Ce programme ouvre la voie à des investissements accrus d'un océan à l'autre.

Depuis le lancement du programme Brancher pour innover dans le budget de 2016, le gouvernement a obtenu 554 millions de dollars du secteur privé et d'autres ordres de gouvernement pour environ 180 projets. Ces projets amélioreront la connectivité Internet pour ces 380 000 ménages et 900 collectivités, soit plus du triple des 300 collectivités initialement ciblées. Au total, 20 000 kilomètres de réseau de fibre optique seront installés dans tout le Canada au titre du programme Brancher pour innover.

(0850)



Nous connectons les ménages et les entreprises, les écoles et les hôpitaux, et nous soutenons les réseaux mobiles sans fil. Nous sommes en train d'établir des connexions par fibre optique au point le plus au nord de tout le Canada.

Ces investissements montrent que notre gouvernement reconnaît que l'accès à Internet haute vitesse et au service mobile sans fil n'est pas un luxe, mais une nécessité. Ces investissements se poursuivront.

Dans le budget de 2019, notre gouvernement a pris un nouvel engagement ambitieux pour s'assurer qu'au fil du temps, tous les ménages et toutes les entreprises du Canada auront accès à la connectivité haute vitesse. Comme vous le savez, nous prévoyons que 95 p. 100 du pays sera connecté d'ici 2026, et que d'ici 2030, nous atteindrons les 100 p. cent.

Nous investissons aujourd'hui dans les technologies de demain, comme le 5G et la capacité des satellites en orbite basse. Le budget a annoncé de nouveaux investissements de 1,7 milliard de dollars dans les services à large bande, ce qui comprend un nouveau Fonds pour la large bande universelle et un complément au programme Brancher pour innover qui sera axé sur la mise en place d'infrastructures de base dans les collectivités mal desservies. Dans le cas des collectivités les plus difficiles à joindre, le financement peut être utilisé pour permettre les raccordements de dernier kilomètre à des résidences et entreprises individuelles.

La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada cherchera à investir jusqu'à un milliard de dollars au cours des dix prochaines années et à mobiliser au moins deux milliards de dollars en capitaux privés pour accroître l'accès à large bande pour les Canadiens. Le Régime de financement de la large bande de 750 millions de dollars du CRTC — régime qui a été lancé l'automne dernier — permettra d'améliorer les services de connectivité partout au pays, y compris les services mobiles sans fil. Les projets d'infrastructure à large bande sont également admissibles à un financement dans le cadre du volet Collectivités rurales et nordiques du programme d'infrastructure Investir dans le Canada. L'enveloppe de ce volet est de 2 milliards de dollars.

Nous comprenons que notre succès dépend non seulement de l'engagement de notre gouvernement à investir, mais aussi de celui de nos partenaires provinciaux, territoriaux et du secteur privé. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons créé la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, qui sonde actuellement les possibilités d'attirer des investissements du secteur privé dans des projets d'infrastructure Internet haute vitesse pour les collectivités non desservies et mal desservies.

Dans l'ensemble, le budget de 2019 propose un nouveau plan coordonné qui prévoit des investissements de 5 à 6 milliards de dollars dans les services à large bande en milieu rural au cours des 10 prochaines années pour aider à bâtir un Canada entièrement branché.

Afin d'assurer une efficacité et une coordination maximales et d'offrir le maximum d'avantages aux Canadiens mal desservis, les fonctionnaires sont en train de rédiger une stratégie nationale de connectivité qui favorise la collaboration et l'investissement efficace des fonds publics. Cette stratégie définira des objectifs et des cibles clairs par rapport auxquels les progrès pourront être mesurés; elle fournira un outil pour orienter les efforts et améliorer les résultats pour l'ensemble des foyers, des entreprises, des institutions publiques et des peuples autochtones du Canada; et elle établira un mécanisme de reddition de comptes et de responsabilité pour tous les ordres de gouvernement afin d'assurer qu'ils contribueront à éliminer le fossé numérique.

Je suis fière de faire partie d'un gouvernement qui reconnaît que l'édification de notre réseau Internet haute vitesse national est aussi importante que la construction de nos routes. C'est ainsi que nous veillerons à ce que tous les Canadiens aient des chances égales de réussir, quel que soit l'endroit où ils vivent.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de prendre la parole devant le Comité. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

(0855)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions, en commençant par M. Longfield, pour sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre Jordan, c'est un plaisir de vous voir ici pour représenter le Canada rural.

J'imagine les problèmes auxquels la Nouvelle-Écosse doit faire face. Le Canada rural, c'est aussi les zones maritimes situées au large des terres. On n'a qu'à penser aux gens à bord des navires qui essaient de communiquer avec la côte.

Je pense à l'Ontario rural. Je dirigeais une entreprise à Welland. J'essayais de faire en sorte que l'Internet haute vitesse arrive jusqu'à mon entreprise et le dernier bout de ligne m'aurait coûté 75 000 $. Je me connectais à notre bureau en Allemagne et à nos bureaux aux États-Unis, je mettais à niveau notre technologie et j'embauchais du personnel. Sauf que j'avais cet obstacle qui limitait la croissance. Nous savons que c'est bien réel.

Pourriez-vous nous parler de ce que la collaboration avec d'autres ordres de gouvernement pourrait fournir? Il y a le projet SWIFT, que nous avons étudié ici, au Comité, au moyen duquel l'Ontario, le gouvernement du Canada et l'industrie privée tentent de rejoindre le Canada rural. Dans quelle mesure est-il important que nous ayons des partenaires d'autres ordres de gouvernement disposés à s'asseoir à la table?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci, monsieur Longfield.

Vous avez fait valoir des arguments pertinents quant à l'importance pour les entreprises d'avoir une bonne connexion. Leur croissance en dépend. Je viens d'une collectivité de pêcheurs, et nous savons que l'accès aux marchés internationaux est extrêmement important. C'est la même chose pour l'agriculture. Nous savons que, dans les régions rurales du Canada, l'accès aux services à large bande est absolument essentiel pour permettre aux entreprises de continuer à croître et d'être concurrentielles sur la scène mondiale.

Pour ce qui est de la façon d'y parvenir, nous avons besoin de tous les partenaires autour de la table. Cela comprendrait le gouvernement fédéral et nos partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux, ainsi que les regroupements de parties concernées. Dans certains cas, les municipalités intensifient leurs efforts parce qu'elles réalisent à quel point il est important pour elles d'avoir cette connectivité. Il n'y a pas de solution universelle. Je pense que chaque région doit être examinée individuellement, mais aussi en reconnaissant que cela doit se faire dans le cadre d'une approche pangouvernementale et pancanadienne.

Nous avons eu beaucoup de chance. Depuis ma nomination en janvier dernier, j'ai voyagé d'un bout à l'autre du pays et j'ai rencontré des représentants de collectivités d'un océan à l'autre. Or, peu importe où je vais, peu importe où je me trouve au pays, c'est la priorité numéro un dont on nous parle. Dans mes collaborations avec mes partenaires provinciaux et territoriaux, c'est aussi la priorité numéro un. Tout le monde reconnaît que c'est quelque chose qui doit être fait, et je suis heureux de dire que, dans la plupart des cas, nos partenaires sont d'accord. Ils veulent que nous nous assurions de brancher tous les Canadiens sans exception.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Vous avez parlé des partenaires municipaux. Je pense au trajet que je devais faire de Welland à Guelph: 131 kilomètres par jour pour aller travailler. J'avais du temps dans la voiture pour des appels mains libres, mais je savais que dès que j'atteindrais un certain pont sur la route 20, mon signal allait couper. Je devais donc interrompre ma conversation et dire: « Je vous rappellerai quand j'arriverai à la grange de l'autre côté de la crique. »

J'ai visité certaines des fermes de la région. Il y a des fermes de production d'oeufs qui font un travail incroyable sur le plan des données. Elles mesurent l'épaisseur et la composition de la coquille en fonction des aliments que les poules consomment et elles veillent au bien-être de leurs animaux en contrôlant l'abreuvement et l'état des poules pendant la ponte. Pour ces entreprises, le contact avec le monde extérieur est primordial.

Souvent, les partenaires municipaux n'ont pas de ressources. Ce sont de petites collectivités. Pour ne choisir qu'un exemple, disons que Grimsby, en Ontario, ce n'est pas la même chose que Toronto. Alors, encore une fois, il faut qu'il y ait un appui pour nous et pour nos partenaires provinciaux. Pourriez-vous nous parler du renforcement des capacités au sein de ces petites collectivités?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Vous avez raison. Il y a des petites municipalités qui n'en ont tout simplement pas les moyens, mais il y en a d'autres qui en font une priorité et qui montent leur budget en conséquence. Je vous dirais que nous avons beaucoup de chance parce que le Fonds des collectivités rurales et nordiques, qui fait partie du portefeuille d'Infrastructure Canada, s'applique aux projets de connectivité. Nous avons également facilité l'accès de ce fonds pour les petites collectivités en abaissant le coût de leur contribution.

Ce sont des choses que j'estime très importantes pour nous mettre à l'écoute des collectivités rurales, parce que la connectivité coûte cher, mais les dirigeants des municipalités sont conscients de son importance pour leur viabilité. Nous devons aussi veiller à ce que nos homologues des provinces fassent leur bout de chemin. Bien souvent, ils le font déjà. Dans diverses provinces, il y a des crédits budgétaires pour le développement des services à large bande. Ensuite, bien sûr, il y a toute la question des sociétés de télécommunication. Elles sont là, elles aussi, tout comme le CRTC. Il y différents fonds offerts.

Je pense que partout au pays, dans toutes les sphères, tout le monde veut assurer la connectivité des collectivités rurales au Canada.

(0900)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Pour ce qui est de la stratégie que vous êtes en train d'élaborer et de votre collaboration avec les autres ministres, vous avez un nouveau ministère, et nous avons aussi une nouvelle ministre, la ministre Ng, à la tête du nouveau ministère de la Petite Entreprise et de la Promotion des exportations. Cela touche également le ministre Bains, bien sûr, de même que la ministre Bibeau, à l'Agriculture. Comment les ministres collaborent-ils à l'élaboration de stratégies?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

C'est une très bonne question.

Depuis ma nomination, je me suis beaucoup appliquée à parcourir le pays pour aller discuter avec nos homologues des provinces et des municipalités, mais nous reconnaissons aussi qu'il doit y avoir une approche pangouvernementale. Il y a 21 ministères différents qui ont participé à l'élaboration de notre stratégie et qui travaillent à la connectivité nationale. Nous reconnaissons qu'il n'y a pas qu'un portefeuille qui est touché, qu'ils le sont tous. On peut penser aux ressources naturelles, à l'agriculture, aux pêches, au développement économique, aux exportations, au Tourisme. Il y a vraiment beaucoup de ministères qui doivent être mis à contribution pour établir un plan national de connectivité qui tienne la route et pour que nous puissions atteindre toutes les cibles que nous nous serons fixées.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

De même, le temps est compté. Il l'est aujourd'hui, mais il nous reste aussi très peu de temps devant nous. J'espère que nous pourrons parvenir à quelque chose avant la fin de la législature, pour que le prochain gouvernement puisse continuer le travail amorcé.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Nous avons toujours été déterminés à accroître la connectivité. Cela a commencé par le programme Brancher pour innover annoncé dans le budget de 2016. Celui-ci permettra de brancher 900 collectivités, soit trois fois plus que le nombre prévu au départ. On parle de 380 000 ménages.

Il y a également un financement complémentaire qui a été annoncé pour ce programme en 2019. Bien sûr, le fonds pour la large bande universelle que nous sommes en train de mettre sur pied contribuera aussi à l'atteinte de l'objectif.

Merci.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Passons à M. Chong.

Vous avez sept minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de comparaître devant nous aujourd'hui pour parler de cet enjeu important. Je pense que nos circonscriptions de South Shore—St. Margarets et des régions rurales du comté de Wellington et de Halton se ressemblent beaucoup.

J'inviterais le gouvernement à viser non seulement à assurer l'accessibilité à Internet dans les régions rurales, mais également à veiller à ce que les services offerts soient abordables. Quand on dit que seulement le tiers des Canadiens ont accès à Internet haute vitesse en région rurale, je pense qu'il serait plus exact de dire que le tiers des Canadiens a accès à Internet haute vitesse à prix abordable en région rurale. Ils sont beaucoup plus nombreux à avoir accès à Internet, mais ils choisissent de ne pas le faire installer parce qu'il coûte beaucoup trop cher.

Je l'ai mentionné lors de la dernière réunion du Comité, et je le répéterai. Un habitant de la ville de Guelph peut obtenir 100 gigaoctets de services Internet haute vitesse pour 49,99 $ par mois. Il peut obtenir l'accès illimité à Internet haute vitesse pour 69,99 $. En revanche, à deux kilomètres de la ville, dans le comté rural de Wellington, il faut payer 300 $ par mois pour obtenir 100 gigaoctets de données avec Internet haute vitesse. Pour 200 gigaoctets en haute vitesse, ce qui n'est pas déraisonnable pour une famille de quatre enfants d'âge secondaire qui ont besoin des ressources en ligne pour faire leurs devoirs, il en coûtera 500 $, 600 $ ou 700 $ par mois. C'est évidemment bien trop cher et même hors de prix pour la plupart des familles rurales, si bien qu'elles choisissent de ne pas prendre le service, parce que qui paiera 600 $ par mois pour 200 gigaoctets de données? Cela fait 7 200 $ par année, plus taxes. C'est exorbitant.

Je pense que c'est le grand problème, encore plus que l'accès à Internet en région rurale. C'est la principale plainte que j'entends dans le Nord de la région de Halton et dans le Sud du comté de Wellington. Les gens me disent qu'effectivement, ils pourraient avoir accès à Internet, mais comment sont-ils censés pouvoir payer une facture de 500 $ par mois. C'est encore plus vrai quand on sait que dans les Maritimes, les gens n'ont pas accès au gaz naturel, pas plus que chez nous, d'ailleurs, et qu'il en coûte 1 000 $ par mois pour se chauffer au mazout. Le marché ne fonctionne pas pour ces consommateurs des régions rurales.

Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas fait comme les Canadiens de l'Ouest, qui ont rendu le gaz naturel accessible dans toutes les Prairies, toutes les résidences rurales, et nous n'avons pas fait ce que Bell a fait pour le le téléphone en offrant l'accès à Internet haute vitesse à tous les ménages ruraux lorsque nous avons commencé à offrir le service dans les villes. C'est ce qui explique qu'aujourd'hui, la plupart des familles des régions rurales n'ont pas accès à Internet haute vitesse à prix abordable. Comme je l'ai dit, qui paiera 600 $ par mois, plus taxes, pour 200 gigaoctets de données en haute vitesse?

Je pense que c'est un enjeu tout aussi important que l'accès à la haute vitesse. Je porte la question à votre attention, parce que cela me semble tout aussi important, voire plus, que d'assurer l'accès à Internet haute vitesse.

(0905)

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Monsieur Chong, vous avez absolument raison. Nous avons entendu la même chose partout au pays. Il ne suffit pas d'avoir accès à Internet haute vitesse, il faut pouvoir se payer les services, et les habitants du Canada rural sont désavantagés sur le plan des coûts et du mode de paiement.

Avant de laisser la parole à Lisa sur cette question, je vous dirai que le ministre Bains a demandé au CRTC de se pencher sur la compétitivité des entreprises de télécommunications, et nous espérons qu'en améliorant la concurrence dans ce domaine, nous obtiendrons de meilleurs prix.

J'aimerais demander à Lisa de vous parler un peu de l'état de la situation.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Concernant la directive stratégique, comme vous le savez, le ministre souhaite émettre une directive à l'intention du CRTC. C'est en grande partie pour répondre aux besoins que vous venez d'exposer, soit la concurrence et l'abordabilité. Nous demandons au CRTC d'examiner les questions qui relèvent de sa compétence du point de vue des consommateurs avant tout lorsqu'il doit prendre des décisions stratégiques. Cela signifie de tenir compte de l'abordabilité, des droits des consommateurs, puis de favoriser la concurrence et l'innovation. Le processus est lancé. Nous sommes ouverts aux commentaires à ce sujet.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Certainement, j'ajouterai une chose.

Certains prétendent qu'on peut payer moins cher que 600 $ par mois pour 200 gigaoctets. Le problème, c'est que ce n'est pas pour un accès Internet à faible latence et haute vitesse. Le problème des technologies satellites, c'est leur grande latence. Le problème de l'accès Internet par faisceaux hertziens en visibilité directe, c'est qu'il n'est pas aussi fiable.

Vraiment, pour bénéficier d'un accès à Internet haute vitesse fiable, la meilleure technologie en région rurale est l'accès mobile à haute vitesse, soit les services cellulaires, des produits souvent offerts sous des noms comme la station Turbo chez Bell ou la Centrale sans fil chez Rogers. Ces technologies donnent accès à des services Internet haute vitesse fiables à faible latence. Le problème, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, c'est qu'elles coûtent excessivement cher.

La plupart des consommateurs des régions rurales que je connais, s'ils ne peuvent avoir accès à Internet grâce à ces services à l'heure actuelle, préféreraient de loin payer entre 500 $ et 1 000 $ une fois pour l'installation d'une grosse antenne munie d'une antenne Yagi pour amplifier le signal au moyen d'un câble coaxial relié à la station Turbo ou à la Centrale sans fil de Bell ou de Rogers. Ils préféreraient de loin payer des frais uniques d'installation. Le problème, c'est que personne ne veut payer des frais mensuels de 600 $ et plus pour un maigre 200 gigaoctets de données de base.

C'est l'abordabilité, le problème. La vaste majorité des ménages vit dans le rayon d'une station de base, et si le signal n'est pas assez fort, ces gens seraient tout à fait prêts à payer des frais ponctuels de 500 $ pour l'installation d'une antenne d'amplification sur leur toit. Par contre, des frais récurrents de 600 ou 700 $ par mois pour 200 gigaoctets de données sont hors de prix pour la grande majorité des familles.

Nous pourrions installer un plus grand nombre de stations de base, par exemple, mais tant que les prix de ces forfaits seront si hauts, personne ne pourra se les permettre.

Le président:

Je vous prierais de répondre brièvement à cela.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Je ferai quelques observations.

Premièrement, nous savons qu'il n'y a pas de solution unique pour tous en matière de connectivité, mais qu'il est extrêmement important de nous assurer l'accès à des services abordables et fiables.

Nous étudions des technologies comme celles des satellites en orbite basse (les satellites LEO), de la fibre optique, des stations de base. La façon de se brancher au réseau dépendra de l'endroit où la personne se trouve.

De même, en collaboration avec le CRTC, compte tenu de la tâche qui lui a été confiée, nous espérons pouvoir offrir à tous les Canadiens un meilleur accès à Internet à un coût plus abordable.

(0910)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Masse.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Merci, madame la ministre, d'être ici aujourd'hui.

La mise aux enchères dans la bande de 700 mégahertz pour les services mobiles est probablement l'une de celles qui a connu le plus de succès dans l'histoire canadienne. Des entreprises comme Telus ont payé plus d'un milliard de dollars pour obtenir leur part du gâteau. SaskTel a payé près d'un milliard de dollars et Rogers, plus de 3 milliards. En tout, elle a rapporté 5 milliards de dollars, dont 300 millions ont été attribués au gouvernement. Quelle part de cet argent, des plus de 5 milliards que le gouvernement a reçus, a servi à l'expansion du réseau à large bande?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Monsieur Masse, les sommes tirées des mises aux enchères font partie des recettes générales du gouvernement, qui servent à payer beaucoup de programmes différents. Bien sûr, nous investissons beaucoup dans la large bande et Internet haute vitesse.

Le budget de cette année prévoit 1,7 milliard de dollars pour la large bande à haute vitesse.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous parlez du budget de cette année, mais je vous interroge sur les sommes perçues par votre gouvernement avant cela, sur les 5 milliards de dollars. Vous avez annoncé 1,7 milliard de dollars sur 13 ans, en fait, et c'est un autre gouvernement qui en héritera, le vôtre ou un autre.

Que votre gouvernement a-t-il fait des produits de la mise aux enchères de 2015, qui a rapporté une somme nette de 2,1 milliards de dollars? Où sont allés ces 2,1 milliards de dollars? Y en a-t-il une partie qui a servi à financer la large bande en région rurale?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

L'argent recueilli lors de mises aux enchères fait partie de nos recettes générales. Les recettes générales servent, bien sûr, à financer la large bande, entre autres, de même que toutes sortes d'autres services et de programmes du gouvernement. Cet argent fait partie des recettes générales.

M. Brian Masse:

Elles comprennent donc les fruits de l'autre mise aux enchères faite en 2015, les enchères du spectre de la bande de 2 500 mégahertz, qui a rapporté 1 milliard de dollars elle aussi. Il y a également eu les enchères des licences de spectre restantes dans les bandes de 700 mégahertz.

Au total, les Canadiens ont reçu de leur gouvernement plus de 14 milliards de dollars grâce aux enchères du spectre au cours des dernières années. Il est donc incroyable que malgré une entrée de revenus de 14 milliards de dollars, nous ayons toujours des prix exorbitants et une couverture médiocre dans les régions rurales. Pourquoi est-ce ainsi, d'après vous? Nous avons reçu des sommes records d'argent imprévu, qui n'était affecté à rien de particulier.

Pour ceux qui ne le savent pas, lorsqu'on tient des enchères du spectre, on se trouve à vendre des droits de propriété terrestres et aériens. C'est comme pour l'eau. C'est à coût nul pour le gouvernement canadien, donc ce sont purement des revenus pour lui.

Pourquoi croyez-vous que ces ressources n'ont pas été affectées à la large bande en région rurale, surtout compte tenu des prix élevés auxquels nous faisons face?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Nous avons investi beaucoup dans la large bande en région rurale depuis notre élection. Les revenus tirés des enchères du spectre font partie des recettes générales, qui servent à payer beaucoup de programmes différents. La large bande en région rurale fait probablement partie des programmes visés.

Nous investissons beaucoup également dans nos engagements pour assurer la connectivité au Canada. Nous nous sommes déjà engagés à brancher plus de 900 collectivités au réseau grâce au fonds Brancher pour innover. Nous songeons à investir encore davantage dans ce fonds, de même que dans celui sur la large bande universelle qui sera annoncé sous peu. Nous savons que cet argent sera nécessaire pour brancher les collectivités de partout au pays au réseau. Nous sommes absolument déterminés à le faire.

Quand vous parlez des enchères du spectre, en particulier, il faut mentionner qu'il y a une partie du spectre qui a été réservée pour les collectivités rurales. Nous savons qu'il est essentiel d'assurer leur connectivité. Nous prenons donc des moyens pour y arriver.

M. Brian Masse:

Comme il y a actuellement deux mises aux enchères du spectre en cours, pouvez-vous vous engager à investir les revenus que vous en tirerez, qui se compteront en milliards de dollars, dans les services à large bande?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Les revenus tirés des enchères du spectre font partie des recettes générales qui servent à payer différents programmes gouvernementaux, qui peuvent comprendre les services à large bande. Nous nous sommes engagés à assurer le connectivité au Canada. Nous nous sommes assurés de prévoir de l'argent pour cela dans le budget.

M. Brian Masse:

Je le prendrai comme un non.

Ce sera pour des budgets futurs. Il y a d'autres revenus et d'autres enchères du spectre. Toutes ces mises aux enchères génèrent énormément de revenus. Je sais que vous cherchez des partenaires pour investir environ 2 milliards de dollars avec la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. En même temps, vous vous attendez à ce que Bell Mobilité, Telus, Vidéotron, SaskTel et Rogers dépensent des milliards de dollars dans les enchères du spectre.

J'aimerais parler aussi un peu de la protection des consommateurs. Selon une décision rendue dernièrement par le CRTC, les consommateurs canadiens ont fait l'objet d'une tarification et de comportements abusifs de la part des sociétés de télécommunications. Il faudra encore une bonne année avant que des peines soient imposées aux entreprises responsables de ces comportements.

Cela vous semble-t-il acceptable, à vous et au ministre?

(0915)

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Comme nous en avons déjà parlé, le ministre de l'Innovation des Sciences et du Développement économique a déjà transmis une directive au CRTC pour qu'il se penche sur la tarification des entreprises de télécommunications.

M. Brian Masse:

Je parle de leurs comportements. Il y a eu une enquête sur leurs comportements et leurs pratiques abusives à l'endroit des consommateurs, par le marketing, la sollicitation ou la réorientation de clients. Il vient d'y avoir une décision qui les rend coupables de ces actes.

Le CRTC a dit qu'il lui faudra un an avant que cette décision porte à conséquence. Est-ce que cela vous semble acceptable, à vous et au ministre, qu'il prenne un an pour indemniser les consommateurs canadiens pour des comportements que le CRTC juge inappropriés?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Je demanderai à Lisa de répondre à cette question, puisque c'est elle qui s'occupe le plus de nos rapports avec ISDE. Elle peut peut-être vous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est vraiment à vous que je pose la question. Cela prendra un an. J'aimerais savoir si vous trouvez cela acceptable de la part du CRTC, après qu'il ait rendu une décision de culpabilité. Il ne lui faudra pas quelques jours, quelques semaines, ni quelques mois pour imposer des peines aux coupables, mais un an. C'est le silence radio à ce sujet. J'aimerais savoir si vous trouvez acceptable qu'il faille un an au CRTC, après avoir reconnu qu'il s'agissait de pratiques abusives, pour imposer des peines et des conséquences aux coupables pour indemniser les consommateurs.

Trouvez-vous approprié qu'il lui faille tant de temps?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Monsieur Masse, comme vous le savez, le CRTC est une organisation indépendante du gouvernement. Le ministre de l'Innovation des Sciences et du Développement économique a émis une directive afin de demander au CRTC de se pencher sur les façons de faire des entreprises des télécommunications.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous lui avez fait parvenir une lettre directive, exactement.

Vous pouvez dire publiquement si vous trouvez que c'est acceptable ou non qu'il prenne tant de temps...

Le président:

Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

... puisque le ministre a émis une directive à l'endroit du CRTC...

Le président:

Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

... comme vous l'avez vous-même reconnu ici.

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

J'aimerais rappeler à tous que les ministres sont accompagnés de leurs sous-ministres et de fonctionnaires pour les aider à répondre aux questions. Si les ministres souhaitent leur demander de répondre à une question, c'est leur plein droit.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Graham.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, madame Jordan, d'être parmi nous. La question dont nous discutons aujourd'hui est très importante. Je sais que nous avons parlé énormément d'Internet, mais je pense que c'est vraiment sur la téléphonie cellulaire que nous voulons nous concentrer.

Je creuserai un peu la question soulevée par Brian. Comment pouvons-nous convaincre les petites entreprises comme celles présentes dans ma circonscription de tenter leur chance dans le domaine de la téléphonie cellulaire s'il en coûte un milliard de dollars pour avoir accès au marché?

Réfléchissons-nous à ce qui succédera au système des enchères pour le spectre sans fil?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Monsieur Graham, je vous remercie infiniment de tout ce que vous faites pour promouvoir la couverture cellulaire et l'accès à Internet dans les collectivités rurales. Je sais que vous vous êtes entièrement dévoué à ce dossier depuis que vous avez été élu pour la première fois ici.

En ce qui concerne l'accès au spectre pour les petites entreprises, une exception a été prévue dans les enchères du spectre pour les collectivités rurales et les petites collectivités. Je pense que c'est l'un des moyens par lesquels nous sommes en mesure d'aider les petites entreprises qui souhaitent pénétrer le marché.

Nous avons également entendu parler, d'un bout à l'autre du pays, de l'importance d'aider ces entreprises à être concurrentielles. Nous savons que parfois, dans les collectivités rurales, ces entreprises ont tout intérêt à s'assurer de pouvoir participer à la planification et aux activités qui visent à nous permettre d'offrir une connectivité et un accès adéquats au réseau de téléphonie cellulaire.

Comme nous l'avons dit à de nombreuses reprises, ce ne sera pas une solution universelle, mais nous savons que les petites entreprises ont un très grand rôle à jouer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

J'aimerais ajouter quelque chose. Les petites entreprises nous disent effectivement que lorsque nous vendons des parties du spectre, ces parties sont parfois trop chères pour elles. En fait, nous menons actuellement des consultations en vue de réduire la taille de ces parties du spectre, afin que ces types de fournisseurs de services puissent les acquérir.

(0920)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque vous parlez de réduire la taille des parties du spectre, parlez-vous d'une bande plus étroite ou d'une zone géographique plus restreinte?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Je parle d'une zone géographique restreinte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Dans ma circonscription, nous avons une coopérative de services Internet et ce serait merveilleux si elle pouvait présenter des soumissions pour offrir des services de téléphone cellulaire dans le comté, au lieu de devoir le faire à l'échelle de la province ou du pays. C'est ce que j'aimerais qu'on accomplisse.

Madame la ministre, dans votre déclaration, vous avez mentionné que les entreprises de télécommunications intensifiaient leurs efforts à cet égard. Toutefois, ce n'est pas ce que j'ai observé. En effet, ces entreprises sont extrêmement réticentes à investir dans les régions rurales si ce n'est pas rentable.

Si une collectivité ou une personne souhaitait que ces entreprises installent l'infrastructure nécessaire dans une région donnée — par exemple, l'une de mes collectivités qui n'a pas accès à un service de téléphone cellulaire, et je reviendrai sur ce point dans quelques secondes — et qu'elle s'adressait à l'une des grandes entreprises de télécommunications, il se peut que les représentants de cette entreprise répondent qu'ils installeront une tour si la collectivité ou la personne paie la totalité des frais liés à ce projet. Il n'y a même pas d'option de partage des coûts. De plus, lorsque cette tour commencera à engendrer des profits pour l'entreprise, car 1 000 personnes habitent dans les environs, ces revenus ne sont pas partagés avec la collectivité qui a installé la tour.

C'est la même chose pour les services Internet. Si je souhaitais prolonger la ligne de transmission à fibres optiques de trois kilomètres le long de la route où j'habite pour me brancher au point de raccordement le plus près, je devrais débourser environ 75 000 $. Si les 20 maisons situées sur cette ligne commençaient à s'y connecter aussi, l'entreprise initiale recevrait tous les revenus engendrés. Il n'y a aucun partage de revenus lorsque les particuliers sont obligés d'investir.

Je ne pense pas que ces entreprises intensifient leurs efforts. Je crois plutôt qu'elles engendrent une grande frustration et qu'elles ralentissent nos progrès au lieu de les accélérer.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais formuler des commentaires à cet égard.

Comme je l'ai dit, il n'y a pas de solution universelle. J'aimerais préciser que dans l'énoncé économique de l'automne, nous avions prévu une déduction pour amortissement accéléré, ce qui a permis aux entreprises de télécommunications d'investir l'argent épargné grâce à cette déduction. Nous avons effectivement observé qu'à la suite de cette déduction, plusieurs entreprises avaient intensifié leurs efforts pour veiller à connecter des collectivités rurales au réseau.

Je crois que les représentants d'une entreprise ont affirmé que cela leur avait permis de passer de 800 000 à 1,2 million de connexions. Une autre entreprise a déjà annoncé qu'elle offrira un réseau cellulaire le long de certaines routes de la Colombie-Britannique et de la Nouvelle-Écosse, et qu'elle élargira encore son réseau.

Nous observons donc que les entreprises de télécommunications investissent dans les collectivités rurales en raison de la disposition que nous avons ajoutée à l'énoncé économique de l'automne. Toutefois, pour revenir au point que vous avez fait valoir plus tôt, je pense que les petites entreprises ont également un grand rôle à jouer. Cela fait certainement partie de notre plan pour l'avenir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

L'une des caractéristiques de votre nomination au poste de ministre, c'est que vous vous occupez de l'infrastructure. Je pense qu'il est très important de mettre les services de téléphone cellulaire et d'Internet dans la catégorie de l'infrastructure plutôt que dans celle des services, et je tenais à vous en remercier.

Le premier projet qui mettait les services Internet dans la catégorie de l'infrastructure a été lancé l'an dernier dans ma circonscription, et j'en suis très fier.

J'aimerais revenir sur un point soulevé plus tôt par M. Chong. Il a parlé d'accessibilité et de prix abordables. Tout le monde a accès à une Porsche, mais tout le monde ne peut pas se payer une Porsche. Nous devons donc faire attention aux mots que nous utilisons. Lorsque nous disons que tout le monde a accès à quelque chose, ce n'est pas nécessairement vrai dans le cas de très grandes collectivités qui ont un accès limité à Internet. Comme je l'ai dit, lorsqu'on examine les faits, cette affirmation n'est pas réaliste.

Lorsque nous disons au CRTC que la concurrence est la solution à tous les problèmes, je ne crois pas que ce soit nécessairement vrai. Lorsque nous disons que la concurrence permettra de résoudre tous les problèmes, ce n'est pas le cas. En effet, si aucun service n'est offert, ce n'est pas la concurrence qui réglera le problème.

Il faut arriver à une situation — encore une fois, il s'agit surtout d'un commentaire, mais n'hésitez pas à donner votre avis à cet égard — dans laquelle les services Internet coûtent le même prix au bout des petites routes de terre qu'au centre-ville de Montréal ou de Toronto, comme c'est le cas pour l'électricité depuis plusieurs générations. Nul ne conteste que l'électricité coûte 3,9 ¢ le kilowattheure, peu importe l'endroit où l'on se trouve, que ce soit ici ou à la campagne. Pourvu qu'on soit connecté à un poteau électrique, on paie le même prix.

Pouvons-nous faire la même chose pour les services de téléphone cellulaire et d'Internet? Pouvons-nous faire en sorte qu'on paie le même prix pour le service ou l'infrastructure, peu importe l'endroit?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Il est impératif de faire en sorte que les services d'Internet haute vitesse soient abordables et accessibles.

Nous élaborons actuellement une stratégie nationale sur la connectivité. Nous tiendrons compte de tous ces éléments dans nos travaux à cet égard, en reconnaissant que les Canadiens qui vivent dans les régions rurales devraient avoir le même accès aux mêmes services que ceux qui vivent dans les régions urbaines du Canada. Les habitants des collectivités rurales ne devraient pas être désavantagés à cet égard. Je crois que c'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles j'ai été nommée à ce poste, car nous reconnaissons qu'il existe un écart entre les régions rurales et les régions urbaines, non seulement sur le plan de la connectivité, mais aussi sur de nombreux autres plans.

Nous devons veiller à ce que les gens qui souhaitent vivre, travailler, exploiter une entreprise et fonder une famille dans les régions rurales du Canada soient en mesure de le faire aussi facilement que les gens qui souhaitent vivre dans les régions urbaines. La question des régions rurales me tient beaucoup à cœur, car je viens moi-même d'une région rurale du Canada et je ne peux imaginer vivre ailleurs. Je sais que nous devons veiller à pouvoir permettre aux jeunes de rester dans ces régions et à ce que les personnes qui souhaitent y habiter puissent le faire.

(0925)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci et bonne chance.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à M. Lloyd. Il a cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Je tiens à remercier la ministre et les représentants ministériels d'être ici aujourd'hui.

On dit que toute politique est locale, et je commencerai donc par promouvoir quelques intérêts locaux.

Le comté de Parkland, dont je représente une grande partie, s'est récemment classé parmi les finalistes du Défi des villes intelligentes organisé par Infrastructure Canada. De plus, en 2018, le comté a fait partie de la liste des collectivités Smart21, un concours sur les collectivités ingénieuses organisé par l’Intelligent Community Forum, en raison de ses progrès dans l'amélioration de la connectivité et de l'accès à la large bande dans les régions rurales.

En prévision de cette réunion, j'ai communiqué avec Rod Shaigec, le maire du comté de Parkland, pour lui demander si le gouvernement fédéral avait offert son soutien dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover. Il a répondu qu'à ce jour, le gouvernement fédéral avait offert un soutien « limité » par l'entremise de ce programme.

Les intervenants locaux ont investi massivement dans la construction de tours de téléphonie cellulaire à l'échelle de la collectivité, afin d'améliorer l'accès à la large bande dans leur région rurale. Je sais que c'est un problème pour d'autres collectivités qui se trouvent à proximité d'une ville partout au pays. En effet, il n'est pas nécessaire de se trouver au nord du 60e parallèle ou loin d'une région urbaine pour éprouver des problèmes d'accès à la large bande numérique. Comme le disait mon collègue, M. Chong, vous pourriez habiter tout près d'un grand centre urbain offrant des services d'Internet haute vitesse adéquats à prix abordable, et tout de même vous retrouver dans une zone qui n'offre pas un meilleur accès que si vous étiez près du pôle Nord. C'est donc le point que je voulais faire valoir en ce qui concerne la sphère locale.

Maintenant, j'aimerais aborder le fait que nous avons parlé de cette motion dans le comité précédent. En effet, j'ai présenté une motion semblable l'automne dernier, à la suite des tornades d'Ottawa. Nous pouvons reconnaître que de nombreuses choses ont bien fonctionné après cette catastrophe naturelle dans la région d'Ottawa, par exemple notre système de gestion des alertes d'urgence. C'est extrêmement important pour tous les Canadiens, mais surtout pour les Canadiens des régions rurales qui n'ont pas toujours un journal local ou qui n'ont pas accès à la télévision par câble en tout temps. Comment ces gens peuvent-ils recevoir ces avertissements ou ces messages d'alerte essentiels?

En votre qualité de ministre, vous pouvez peut-être répondre à cette question. Les représentants de votre ministère peuvent également répondre. Fait-on quelque chose à cet égard et croyez-vous que le gouvernement devrait établir une norme minimale pour veiller à ce que l'infrastructure de téléphone cellulaire puisse profiter d'une alimentation indépendante pendant une certaine période minimale en cas de catastrophe naturelle?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

En fait, l'autre soir, j'ai rencontré quelques représentants de votre collectivité à la réception organisée dans le cadre du Défi des villes intelligentes. Nous avons eu une conversation intéressante et j'ai hâte de poursuivre cette discussion avec eux.

En ce qui concerne plus précisément la connectivité, le programme prévoyait un engagement de 500 millions de dollars, et les parties intéressées devaient verser un financement correspondant. Malheureusement, le programme a reçu un nombre trop élevé de demandes. Nous disposons toutefois du financement supplémentaire qui a été annoncé dans le budget de 2019. Nous savons qu'il n'existe pas de solution universelle, mais nous travaillons très fort pour veiller à ce que tous les Canadiens puissent se connecter au réseau. Nous espérons que nous pourrons continuer de travailler avec le comté de Parkland pour veiller à poursuivre ces efforts.

En ce qui concerne les services de téléphone cellulaire et le signal d'urgence, c'est drôle, parce que quelqu'un disait que lorsqu'il parle en conduisant, il doit s'arrêter lorsqu'il arrive à un certain endroit. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de pouvoir parler en mode mains libres; nous savons également qu'il s'agit d'une infrastructure essentielle en situation d'urgence, par exemple un incendie ou une inondation. Nous l'avons constaté lorsque des tornades ont frappé Ottawa. Il est donc essentiel de veiller à ce que ces services soient accessibles.

Nous bâtissons maintenant l'infrastructure nécessaire pour aider à réduire ces risques et à renforcer la capacité d'offrir l'accès au réseau aux gens. Nous savons qu'ISDE collabore étroitement avec les organismes de sécurité nationale en situation de crise, afin que ces systèmes soient fonctionnels le plus tôt possible, et qu'ils travaillent avec l'armée et les intervenants en matière de sécurité publique afin que...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais vous interrompre brièvement, car dans le cas des tornades d'Ottawa, certaines régions ont habituellement un accès adéquat aux services de téléphone cellulaire, mais lorsqu'une centrale électrique est touchée — et ces centrales sont munies de générateurs indépendants —, elle fonctionne seulement pendant un temps limité. Dans ces régions, les gens avaient donc accès à des services de téléphone cellulaire, mais ils ne fonctionnaient plus correctement, car les centrales électriques n'avaient pas pu être remises en état assez rapidement.

Le gouvernement envisage-t-il d'établir une norme minimale pour veiller à ce que les services de téléphone cellulaire puissent fonctionner pendant une période raisonnable, afin de pouvoir attendre que le réseau électrique soit remis en état de fonctionnement?

(0930)

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Je ne suis pas au courant de l'établissement de normes minimales pour le moment. Il incombe aux entreprises de télécommunications de veiller à ce que leur infrastructure soit en état de fonctionner. Toutefois, cela pourrait faire partie de la stratégie nationale sur la connectivité. Je vous remercie de cette suggestion. Nous l'avons notée.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Amos.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier les membres du comité de m'avoir permis de participer à ces délibérations.

J'aimerais remercier la ministre et les fonctionnaires dévoués qui l'appuient.

Je sais que les citoyens de Ponctiac, dont plusieurs centaines sont en cours d'évacuation et de nombreux autres appuient des membres de leur famille ou de leur collectivité qui vivent des moments extrêmement difficiles, pensent en termes immédiats, c'est-à-dire qu'ils pensent à nettoyer leur maison et à la remettre en état.

On a déjà entamé des discussions sur ce que nous pouvons faire pour veiller à ce que si un tel évènement se reproduit l'année prochaine ou l'année suivante, nous ne nous retrouverons pas dans une situation dans laquelle nous ne pouvons pas utiliser notre téléphone cellulaire pour appeler notre maire ou notre voisin pour obtenir des sacs de sable ou de l'eau potable ou... vous pouvez imaginer le scénario. Cette discussion a été répétée à plusieurs reprises, et je comprends que nous ne pouvons pas changer, du jour au lendemain, l'inaction et le manque d'investissement des gouvernements précédents et du secteur privé. Cela prend du temps.

Comment pouvons-nous rassurer les habitants des régions rurales du Canada sur le fait que les investissements que nous effectuons actuellement nous aideront à rendre l'infrastructure essentielle et surtout l'infrastructure de téléphone cellulaire accessibles dans les endroits où elles sont actuellement inaccessibles?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci, monsieur Amos. J'aimerais également vous remercier de la passion que vous manifestez.

Je tiens également à remercier tous les députés d'appuyer cet enjeu.

Il est extrêmement important pour tous les habitants du pays que nous veillions à ce qu'un réseau cellulaire soit accessible lors de situations comme celles que nous avons vécues récemment, par exemple des inondations, des tornades et des incendies. Nous avons observé les conséquences des évènements météorologiques extrêmes que nous subissons à l'échelle du pays. Il est important que les Canadiens sentent qu'ils ont la capacité de faire ces appels très importants, comme vous l'avez dit, même ceux qui servent à obtenir des sacs de sable.

Nous bâtissons cette infrastructure qui permet aux Canadiens d'avoir accès au réseau en tenant compte de l'avenir, afin que les investissements que nous effectuons servent à bâtir une infrastructure essentielle. Les gens qui habitent dans les régions urbaines ne comprennent pas la différence entre avoir accès et ne pas avoir accès au réseau avant de vivre une situation dans laquelle il est nécessaire de pouvoir appeler le 911 au besoin.

Certains des investissements que nous avons déjà effectués dans les entreprises de télécommunications apporteront des changements concrets en ce qui concerne l'accessibilité au réseau cellulaire, car nous avons investi dans des systèmes d'inforoute pour veiller à ce qu'ils soient connectés au réseau. L'infrastructure que nous bâtissons dans le cadre de Brancher pour innover aidera notre secteur sans fil à veiller à offrir un accès adéquat au réseau cellulaire. Nous devons veiller à garder cela à l'esprit au cours de l'élaboration de la stratégie nationale sur la connectivité.

Nous nous sommes engagés à veiller à ce que les Canadiens aient accès aux services dont ils ont besoin. Il est très difficile de se retrouver dans une telle situation et de ne pas être en mesure d'appeler le 911 ou d'obtenir l'aide nécessaire. Nous savons que nous devons continuer de nous efforcer d'offrir les services dont ont besoin les Canadiens et nous avons dit dès le départ que nous nous engagions à veiller à offrir à tous l'accès au réseau.

M. William Amos:

Je suis vraiment heureux de vous l'entendre dire. Je sais que de nombreuses collectivités rurales du Canada se demandent en quoi cela leur sera utile. Dans la même veine, les petites communautés, par exemple ma petite communauté de Waltham ou la municipalité de Pontiac, comptent bien moins de 5 000 habitants. Elles n'ont pas nécessairement l'expertise nécessaire pour déterminer comment répondre à leurs propres besoins. Si les grandes sociétés privées de télécommunications ne sont pas prêtes à s'y rendre, il faut aider les petites communautés à le faire elles-mêmes. Heureusement, le gouvernement du Canada a versé des fonds aux municipalités par l'intermédiaire de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités pour qu'elles puissent demander une évaluation environnementale et une évaluation technique. Cela les aidera à prendre des décisions éclairées en matière d'infrastructure.

Pourrait-on envisager d'offrir du financement accréditif aux petites municipalités qui n'ont pas la capacité ou l'expertise technique nécessaire pour qu'elles puissent contribuer à la mise en oeuvre de leurs propres programmes de développement de l'infrastructure de téléphonie cellulaire et de l'infrastructure Internet?

(0935)

Le président:

Veuillez répondre brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Pour aider les petites municipalités, nous avons majoré le Fonds de la taxe sur l'essence. Cette année, nous l'avons doublé pour que les municipalités aient accès à des fonds supplémentaires à utiliser pour les infrastructures dans leurs collectivités. Cela s'applique à toute forme d'infrastructure. À cela s'ajoutent les 60 millions de dollars accordés à la FCM pour l'appui à la gestion des biens. Ainsi, les gens des communautés rurales — toutes les collectivités — pourront déterminer les mesures à prendre en matière d'entretien des infrastructures et avoir des infrastructures de qualité, et ce, tant pour les nouvelles infrastructures que pour les infrastructures existantes. Ce sont toutes des mesures que nous avons prises. Nous essayons de les aider de différentes façons, car nous reconnaissons également que les petites municipalités ont souvent plus de difficulté à obtenir des fonds en raison du processus de demande.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Albas.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie la ministre et les fonctionnaires de leur travail.

Le rapport du vérificateur général de l'automne dernier nous a appris que le programme Brancher pour innover a été un désastre. Plus particulièrement, le vérificateur général a constaté que l'argent n'était pas utilisé à bon escient. On constate maintenant que 532 des 892 demandeurs qui ont présenté une demande de financement dans le cadre de ce programme n'ont même pas eu de nouvelles.

Madame la ministre, le processus de présentation des demandes a pris fin il y a deux ans. Comment se fait-il que 532 demandeurs attendent toujours une réponse quant au statut de leur demande et n'aient même pas été contactés?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci de la question, monsieur Albas.

Nous avons accepté le rapport du vérificateur général ainsi que les recommandations, et nous avons transmis nos remerciements au BVG. Dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover, 900 collectivités seront connectées. C'est trois fois plus que ce que nous avions prévu au départ. Nous avons également pu doubler l'investissement à financement égal dans le programme Brancher pour innover. Nous avons donc été en mesure de faire beaucoup plus de choses que prévu.

Quant au programme lui-même, nous tirons des leçons de nos activités. C'est un apprentissage continu. En outre, dans le budget de 2019, le fonds était majoré...

M. Dan Albas:

Toutefois, madame la ministre, il n'y a pas de nouveaux fonds...

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Excusez-moi; j'aimerais...

M. Dan Albas:

Ma question porte sur les 532 personnes qui n'ont pas été informées. Madame la ministre, je suis certain que ceux qui ont réussi en sont très heureux, mais en même temps, 532 personnes n'ont eu aucune réponse après deux ans.

Pourrez-vous présenter des excuses au nom du gouvernement? Bon nombre de ces personnes ont peut-être décidé de se débrouiller seules, mais attendent toujours une réponse du ministère pour savoir s'ils peuvent aller de l'avant ou non.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Le programme Brancher pour innover a été extrêmement populaire auprès des gens; les demandes ont excédé les fonds disponibles. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles le budget comprend de nouveaux fonds, pour majorer le programme. Nous savons que des gens ont besoin d'une connexion. Cela fait partie des raisons pour lesquelles nous sommes déterminés à atteindre des objectifs ambitieux, soit 90 % d'ici 2021, 95 % d'ici 2026 et 100 % d'ici 2030. Nous savons que les Canadiens ont besoin d'être branchés et il n'y a pas de programme universel ou unique pour y arriver. Voilà pourquoi nous veillons à examiner une multitude d'options différentes pour connecter les Canadiens. Ce sera notre vision pour l'avenir.

M. Dan Albas:

Plus tôt, mon collègue a cherché à savoir où en était le programme. Je dois avouer, monsieur le président, que les résultats étaient stupéfiants. Selon les renseignements fournis par votre gouvernement, moins de 10 % des fonds ont été versés. Il s'agit de 10 % du financement des projets approuvés. Or, madame la ministre, beaucoup de ces projets devaient être lancés en 2017, et pourtant, aucune somme d'argent n'a été versée. La même question se pose: comment est-ce possible?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Concernant le programme lui-même, il y a beaucoup de travail d'ingénierie et de planification à faire après la fin du processus d'approbation. Comme vous le savez, j'en suis certaine, il faut du temps pour construire des infrastructures. Nous savons que 85 % des projets seront mis en œuvre cet été. Nous sommes conscients que c'est parfois plus long que ce que les gens espèrent, mais préparer les plans pour ces communautés prend du temps.

Nous veillons à mettre en place des solutions qui ne sont pas temporaires. Nous bâtissons pour l'avenir. Nous voulons nous assurer de mettre en place des programmes et des infrastructures évolutifs qui pourront être adaptés aux besoins futurs.

Très franchement, on a trop souvent eu recours à des solutions temporaires, et nous n'en voulons plus. Pour la construction de cette infrastructure, nos objectifs sont qu'elle puisse servir à l'avenir tout en permettant d'atteindre nos cibles de 50 Mo/s et 10 Mo/s.

(0940)

M. Dan Albas:

Madame la ministre, les gens voient qu'un montant de 17,7 millions de dollars est réservé pour des projets dans le comté de Kings, en Nouvelle-Écosse, et que le projet devait débuter le 1er mai 2017, mais qu'en réalité, aucun financement n'a été versé jusqu'à maintenant. Je peux citer une multitude de projets différents à Terre-Neuve, à Inuvik et ailleurs.

Je pense que c'est très clair. Tout à l'heure, vous avez indiqué avoir l'intention d'intensifier les activités au cours de l'été. À l'origine, votre gouvernement voulait annoncer ces projets, puis vous avez attendu pour dépenser l'argent afin de pouvoir annoncer les projets de nouveau avant les prochaines élections. Madame la ministre, je pense que la population canadienne verra clair dans ce jeu.

Les libéraux feront-ils dans les médias de nouvelles annonces pour des projets déjà annoncés?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Les programmes commencent après la signature des accords de contribution avec les entreprises. Ensuite, elles doivent préparer les plans et embaucher des gens. Elles doivent s'assurer d'avoir un plan. Les entreprises sont tenues de respecter les jalons des accords de contribution.

Les accords qui ont été signés sont à l'étape de la mise en œuvre. Si vous examinez les demandes, vous constaterez qu'elles sont toutes différentes, et il y a diverses étapes importantes à franchir pour qu'elles se concrétisent.

M. Dan Albas:

Et lorsque cela arrive après les annonces, madame la ministre, c'est très commode sur le plan politique.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Sheehan.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre. Je vous félicite de votre nomination à titre de première ministre du Développement économique rural du Canada. Je pense que cela témoigne de l'engagement envers les populations des régions rurales du pays. Vous vous êtes manifestement mise au travail sans tarder. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Je tiens à féliciter M. Will Amos, le député de Pontiac, de sa motion.

Madame la ministre, je m'en voudrais de ne pas mentionner le député de Nickel Belt, votre secrétaire parlementaire.

Je viens de Sault Ste-Marie, dans le nord de l'Ontario, une région qui représente 90 % de la masse terrestre de la province. Il y a un certain nombre de problèmes liés à la géographie et à éloignement, mais je ne m'y attarderai pas. Je vais parler plus précisément des Premières Nations.

Une annonce a été faite récemment dans le cadre du programme précédent. La Matawa First Nations Management regroupe quatre ou cinq Premières Nations du Cercle de feu, en région éloignée. C'était quelque chose d'important en raison d'enjeux liés à l'éducation, aux soins de santé et à l'éloignement. Vous savez que dans certaines Premières Nations, il y a une corrélation entre les taux de suicide élevés et l'éloignement. Nous avons notamment lu qu'une des solutions consiste à établir des liens entre les gens. L'entraide est un facteur important.

Cela dit, madame la ministre, je veux aussi parler d'un aspect auquel vous avez fait allusion par rapport aux partenariats public-privé, car le secteur privé est présent dans le Nord. C'est un commentaire général. Pour vous, d'un point de vue philosophique, dans quelle mesure la participation du secteur privé est-elle importante? Je ne parle pas seulement des grandes entreprises, mais aussi des PME canadiennes, notamment celles du nord de l'Ontario.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci, monsieur Sheehan.

Concernant les communautés autochtones, je dirais que parmi les demandes du programme Brancher pour innover qui ont été approuvées, 190 demandes provenaient de ces communautés. C'est un nombre assez important, à mon avis, et je m'en réjouis. Comme vous l'avez dit, nous savons que les défis sont nombreux, en particulier dans certaines de nos régions les plus éloignées. Les gens dépendent d'Internet pour des choses comme les soins de santé et les services de soutien. Donc, c'est extrêmement important.

Pour ce qui est de votre question sur les PME, j'ai constaté qu'elles ont présenté de bonnes initiatives novatrices. Elles ont des intérêts directs dans leur collectivité. Elles veulent donc s'assurer que leurs collectivités sont reliées. Il s'agit parfois de coopératives, ou encore de municipalités qui ont lancé leur propre entreprise de services Internet. Je pense qu'il est extrêmement important qu'ils participent aux discussions sur la connectivité.

Je sais que nous devons examiner... Comme je l'ai indiqué à maintes reprises aujourd'hui, il n'y a pas de solution universelle. Le meilleur service sera tantôt offert par ces petites entreprises, tantôt par les grandes entreprises. Quoi qu'il en soit, une chose est certaine: il faut que cela se concrétise. Je pense que c'est le principal point à retenir. Peu importe qui s'en charge, il faut établir la connexion.

Ce n'est plus un luxe. On ne parle pas de gens qui écoutent des séries en rafale sur Netflix. Si c'est ce qu'ils veulent, soit, mais nous parlons de soins de santé, d'éducation, de transactions bancaires, de la croissance des entreprises, de ne pas être obligé d'aller dans un magasin pour faire des achats. Récemment, j'étais en milieu rural et j'ai utilisé ma carte de débit. On m'a dit: « Espérons que le téléphone ne sonnera pas. » Ils utilisaient toujours une ligne commutée. Comment peut-on faire croître une entreprise sans accès à un service Internet haute vitesse de bonne qualité? C'est aussi une question de sécurité.

Tout ce que vous avez dit est exact. Il faut s'assurer de la présence de tous les partenaires à la table. Nous examinons toutes les différentes options pour que les gens soient branchés, mais le but ultime, c'est d'y parvenir.

(0945)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

Je vais partager mon temps avec le secrétaire parlementaire à l'innovation.

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute. [Français]

M. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.):

Merci, madame la ministre, d'être avec nous.

Je suis un exemple qui illustre la réalité du problème de l'accès à Internet en milieu rural. À la maison, je dois me déplacer à un endroit précis pour capter la téléphonie cellulaire et être en mesure d'appeler ainsi que recevoir des appels. Si je veux télécharger La Presse, le matin, et que l'un de mes quatre garçons est en ligne pour faire ses travaux, je dois lui dire, ou crier dans la maison, de se déconnecter d'Internet pour que je puisse avoir accès à La Presse. C'est un problème.

Maintenant, il y a de la lumière au bout du tunnel. Les 500 millions de dollars que nous avons attribués au programme Brancher pour innover vont permettre à l'ensemble des 58 municipalités de ma circonscription d'être branchées à Internet haute vitesse, soit à une vitesse de 50 mégabits par seconde. Les travaux d'installation ont déjà commencé et se poursuivront jusqu'à l'année prochaine. Maintenant, nous avons des objectifs ambitieux.

Compte tenu de l'ensemble des fonds maintenant disponibles, notamment les fonds en infrastructure et les fonds au CRTC, comment est-ce que tout cela s'organise pour qu'on puisse poursuivre le développement de l'accès à Internet haute vitesse en fonction de votre vision? [Traduction]

Le président:

Très brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Concernant la Stratégie nationale de connectivité, nous travaillons actuellement avec tous nos partenaires pour veiller à examiner toutes les options de financement. L'objectif est d'éviter d'élaborer les programmes en vase clos. Nous voulons aussi examiner les solutions générales, trouver la meilleure façon de servir l'ensemble de la population et choisir le programme le mieux adapté pour chaque région.

Merci.

Le président:

Excellent. Merci.

Nous passons à M. Masse pour les deux dernières minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

La motion de M. Amos était une bonne motion et je suis heureux de l'appuyer.

Les motions peuvent devenir loi par règlement. C'est d'ailleurs le cas de ma motion sur les microbilles. Le gouvernement précédent en a fait une loi.

Dans quelle mesure ferez-vous de la motion de M. Amos une loi? Quels points choisiriez-vous, si vous ne les acceptiez pas tous?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Merci, monsieur Masse.

Vous avez raison, les motions peuvent devenir des lois. Une de mes motions est devenue une loi sur les navires abandonnés et négligés...

M. Brian Masse:

Oui, et j'ai travaillé avec Mme Sheila Malcolmson sur ce dossier.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

... et j'en étais très heureuse.

En ce qui concerne la motion de M. Amos, nous examinons actuellement une multitude de solutions pour régler les problèmes liés à la couverture du réseau de téléphonie cellulaire et plus particulièrement aux services à large bande.

M. Brian Masse:

En faites-vous une loi? C'est ce que je veux savoir.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Personnellement, je n'ai pas préparé de projet de loi à cet égard pour le moment.

M. Brian Masse:

Et par voie de règlement?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Cela ne veut pas dire que c'est impossible ou que nous n'examinerions pas des solutions possibles pendant la mise en oeuvre de la Stratégie nationale de connectivité et l'élargissement de la couverture du réseau de téléphonie cellulaire.

M. Brian Masse:

Pourquoi le gouvernement ne légiférerait-il pas? Qu'est-ce qui l'en empêche, notamment par rapport au point (c)?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Pardon, vous dites le point (c)?

M. Brian Masse:

Je suis désolé. Le point (c) traite de l'égalité des chances pour les régions rurales et éloignées. On ne devrait pas s'attendre à ce que vous sachiez exactement ce que... C'est lié à la connectivité en régions rurales et éloignées. Voilà de quoi il s'agit. C'est une question d'égalité entre les deux. Pourquoi n'en fait-on pas une loi?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Nous nous sommes engagés à examiner l'enjeu de la connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées. Notre engagement s'est traduit en investissement. La nomination d'une ministre témoigne de cet engagement. Je pense qu'il est évident que le gouvernement accorde une grande importance à cet enjeu. Lorsque nous mettons en oeuvre des programmes, nous faisons un suivi pour nous assurer que la connectivité en fait partie...

M. Brian Masse:

A-t-on envisagé d'en faire une loi? Le ministère a-t-il fait une analyse à ce sujet?

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan:

Pour l'instant, je dirais non, mais cela ne veut pas dire que cela ne peut pas arriver.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord. Merci. J'essaie juste d'approfondir la question.

L’hon. Bernadette Jordan: Merci.

Le président:

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie, vous et vos fonctionnaires, de vous être joints à nous aujourd'hui pour parler de la motion M-208.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour deux minutes seulement, parce que nous avons beaucoup de travail à faire.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard indu 21563 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 16, 2019

2019-05-09 INDU 161

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0950)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

We're moving on to the second portion of our committee today. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we're going to do a study of the subject matter of private member's motion 208 on rural digital infrastructure.

Today we have with us the mover of that private member's motion, William Amos, MP from Pontiac.

Sir, you have 10 minutes. You have the floor.

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I appreciate the speed with which you and our colleagues here have agreed to address this issue. I want to thank the members, both of the party I belong to but also members opposite for their unanimous support yesterday. I think that puts Parliament in a good light, and I think this is obviously a crucial issue for Canadians coast to coast. Whether you live in urban or rural Canada, you care that rural Canada is connected.

The exclamation point was placed on this issue in the Pontiac context by the tornado last year and the floods this year. I don't want to wax poetic about that stuff. People who are suffering from floods currently, who have basements underwater, want us to get down to brass tacks, so I'll try to do that today.

I appreciate the opportunity to speak to this before you and I appreciate also that you organized as a committee to get to this quickly. [Translation]

I know that the people in my riding of Pontiac are grateful to you, as well as all of those who live in Canada's rural regions.

Of course the digital infrastructure is an important issue that includes various aspects touching on regulation, finances and the private sector, and the influence of federal, provincial and municipal governments is not always clear.

Since last November, that is to say since I tabled the motion, the situation has changed somewhat because of Budget 2019. We have to be very honest and very clear about that. When a government makes promises and plans for large budgets of approximately $5 billion, it is because, in my opinion, it recognizes the importance of this issue.[English]

Since this motion was first brought forward, the government, with its 2019 budget, has really taken a major step forward. Major steps were taken prior. In the 2016 budget, there was $500 million over five years for connect to innovate. That money has been brought forward in a variety of ridings, my own included, where 20 million dollars' worth of projects have been announced as compared with $1.2 million to $1.3 million in the riding of Pontiac in the decade prior. Major steps are being taken already, but this new budgetary investment is really important.

Where do we go from here? How does the study that would move forward through INDU advance this? I think we need to look to the new Minister of Rural Economic Development. I think we need to appreciate the fact that the government has seen fit to establish this new institution, which is great news for rural Canada, and recognize the responsibility of Minister Bernadette Jordan to develop that strategy and incorporate the issue of digital infrastructure. When one reads the text of the motion, which goes specifically to cellular infrastructure, it's there that we find the first nexus of interest between where this Liberal government is going and where this unanimous motion brings us.

The connection is the following. Such significant investments are planned to be made for the next several years, over $5 billion in a decade, including a new universal broadband fund of $1.7 billion and the CRTC's fund of $750 million over five years that is on the cusp of opening. These are such significant funds that Canadians have reason to be optimistic, but there needs to be greater clarity, in my mind, as to how cellular infrastructure is enabled through this.

Like most Canadians, I'm not a technical expert. I don't know how fibre-to-home infrastructure outlay can enable cellphone service, but I am led to believe that it does. I think that what we need to see is clarity so that the Canadian public has confidence that these investments that are forthcoming will deliver not just high-speed Internet results on the ground for rural Canada, but also cellphone results. Obviously, both are crucial for economic development reasons, for community preservation and development reasons, and also for public safety reasons, as has been discussed in the House during the course of debate around M-208.

I think that it would be a valuable contribution on the part of this committee to discuss how cellular infrastructure can be accelerated through the government's own plans and to also draw upon witness testimony to secure the best ideas possible for achieving this.

I note that this committee has done very good work in relation to Internet in rural Canada. I appreciate that. I applaud that.

(0955)

[Translation]

However, the specific issue of mobile or cellular telephony infrastructure has not been discussed in a complete manner. It would be essential to do so. About ten mayors in the Pontiac believe that this is one of three priorities in the region, and I know that this is also true in other regions of Canada.

In addition to the technical and economic aspects, I would like to see this committee discuss the public safety aspect. The mayor of Waltham, Mr. David Rochon, told me that he would like us to send carrier pigeons to his community so that people can communicate better. He does not think that there will be a mobile telephony system to respond to emergencies, such as when people ask for sandbags or more precise information about water levels.

If the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security does not have time to consider this matter, it would be important for this committee to do so.[English]

I think I'll conclude by requesting that a critical eye be brought, with regard to the role of the CRTC and its regulatory and incentive-creating functions, to help generate a greater impetus towards Internet and cellphone infrastructure development. The 2016 report, “Let's Talk Broadband”, brought some significant advances in terms of establishing standard upload and download rates, defining what high speed is, identifying this as a crucial issue and enabling the creation of a fund. That $750 million over five years I'm sure will be put to good use. I think, though, that we as parliamentarians need to engage in a dialogue with the CRTC to explore what more can be done, and this committee, I believe, is the ideal organ for that dialogue.

We now have before us the CRTC's preferred approach. Does Parliament believe this is adequate?

I for one don't believe that $750 million over five years is sufficient. I believe that the CRTC can go further, and I would like to also explore the Telecommunications Act, which is presently being reviewed. I would like to see how the act enables the deployment of cellphone and Internet infrastructure, and how it could be augmented to better enable it.

With those comments, colleagues, I appreciate the opportunity. Thank you also for the support. I think this motion is demonstrating some positive collegiality, and that's appreciated.

(1000)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to rush right into questions, starting off with Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Amos, for guiding us in the right direction on the matter of cellular services.

At 7:00 a.m. this morning I took part in an interview with Ghislain Plourde, from CIME FM, to discuss your motion. I think it's extremely important.

Since our meeting in the beginning of 2016, we have worked very hard on telecommunications. Together we made presentations to the CRTC in 2016 to move this file forward. We had some major successes with Internet services. We studied the Internet services file in this committee, but we aren't making much headway on the cellular services file.

We have experienced problems in connection with this in our respective ridings, in the context of the current disasters.

Can you give us a picture of what is happening with cellular services in your riding?

In Amherst, in my riding, people from various services have to meet at city hall to discuss the situation and then go back out into the field, precisely because they are unable to communicate on the ground.

Is the situation the same in your riding?

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you for your very relevant question. I commend your efforts on this issue since you were elected. I know that your fellow citizens in the Laurentides—Labelle riding are really grateful to you for the way you have focused on these issues, not only Internet services, but also cellular telephone services.

As to public safety, it's clear that we could imagine extremely serious consequences for people who happen to be in regions where there is no signal, but it's also a matter of effectiveness, as you mentioned.

It's not only about the mayors, councillors, municipal employees or first responders who are on the ground. Clearly, all of these individuals whose responsibility it is to respond to emergencies must be able to communicate. However, there are also neighbours helping each other out and communities that get together to support each other, as is the case at present. We see that these people are much less effective without cell services.

We also know that members of communities like Waltham will no longer be able to use the pager service as of June.

The lack of technological capability to allow for a proper response to emergencies is another aspect of this issue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Should we be looking for regulatory solutions, and not just financial ones?

We will not have access to the paging system either after June 30. It will no longer exist. We will no longer be able to call our first responders to have them respond to emergencies on the ground. This is very serious.

Are there regulatory solutions we could look at?

When we ask Bell what it's doing to re-establish or extend the paging service, it replies that it is not obliged to do so. When we ask the CRTC if it is obligatory to provide a paging service, it answers no, there is no obligation to provide that service, which is nevertheless essential in our regions.

Do you see any regulatory solutions?

Mr. William Amos:

With regard to regulations, I would say that what is essential is the way in which the CRTC interprets its mandate under the Telecommunications Act.

The act sets out public policy priorities, priorities as regards competition or the promotion of competition, or the advancement of access to services. There are a whole series of objectives described in the law. However, these objectives are not classified in order of priority.

Some years ago, in 2007 or 2008, I believe, Mr. Bernier, who was the minister at that time, sent a directive wherein he asked the CRTC to put the emphasis on competition. In my opinion, we should find a way to send the CRTC a clear message and even perhaps a directive on the overriding importance of access.

I do believe the CRTC understands the issue, but there is a need to provide direction to it about this.

(1005)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It has to be guided in the right direction.

If furthering competition is the main objective, but there is no access to the service, we have accomplished nothing. Zero is still zero. We can't support competition until there are at least two service providers. Even if there were only one, we wouldn't be any further ahead.

Do you agree with that opinion?

Mr. William Amos:

Absolutely. We have to set objectives, and the CRTC must take all the needed legislative, regulatory and financial measures to enable complete access. The budget set an objective of access for 100% of households by 2030. In order to reach that, we have to take all of the necessary regulatory and financial means.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are steps before we reach the 100% target; we are aiming for 90% by 2022, and 95% by 2026. The last segment of 5% by 2030 will probably be the most difficult to attain. Is that correct?

Mr. William Amos:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fine.

Thank you for working so hard on this file, Mr. Amos.

I will give the minute I have left to Mr. Longfield. [English]

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

I have less than a minute, but I'd like to, first of all, thank you for bringing this forward.

The committee here has studied broadband. We talked about it in 2017 and 2018. We've gone to Washington to talk about connectivity, the north-south satellite network and the opportunity that might provide us.

We talked about 5G, but you're talking about areas that don't have 3G or 4G. You're talking about carrier pigeons now. I know it was a bit of a joke from the mayor, but some way or another we have to connect, whether it's via satellite or via towers. Is it a 5G play that you're looking at, or is it just getting some basic 3G service?

Mr. William Amos:

I must admit that I'm not a technical expert. As regards the particular technology that would be brought to bear, I would have to say I'm agnostic. I just wouldn't be able to provide a sufficiently informed opinion.

What I would suggest though on cellular is just any access. There are just dead zones. If one drives from Parliament Hill directly west down Highway 148 on the north side of the Ottawa River, the phone will cut off about five or six times between here and the end of my riding, which is about a two and a half hour drive. Those are just the dead zones. There are black holes, entire communities, that aren't served.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Thanks, William.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Amos, for being here and congratulations on your bill being passed in the House. It's a motion, really. There's a big difference between a bill and a motion, and I've passed both, but it's good that it's a subject that continues to rise.

You're aware that the committee had an extensive review on this. What was missing out of the committee's report that you'd like to have on another review? What specifically did we miss out or not adequately cover in our report?

Mr. William Amos:

I think that's an important question. Specifically what was missing in my estimation was a comprehensive treatment of the cellular issue, and the linkage between the provision of high-speed Internet—whether that's through fibre to the home, satellite technology or otherwise—and the advancement of cellular infrastructure and coverage across rural Canada.

It's one thing to have access to high-speed Internet—and every Canadian deserves it, absolutely—but it's another thing to go into the regulatory and fiscal measures that would enable better cellphone coverage. They are similar problems that we have throughout rural Canada, but it's not obvious that the two have identical solutions.

(1010)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Is there any other part, other than just the cellular, in the report? Did you agree with all the recommendations of the report? I don't have time to go through them, but is that something I'm assuming is correct? Is there anything else you thought was missing that we could enhance?

Mr. William Amos:

What I would like to see treated more comprehensively is the issue of how the CRTC in its regulatory function, and how the Telecommunications Act as it currently stands, could be augmented to better enable both regulatory and fiscal solutions. There may be limitations that—

Mr. Brian Masse:

I don't disagree with that.

I'm going to move on to another quick question, if I can. You mentioned the tornadoes and their affect on Ottawa. What were the failings of the cellular service at that time?

Mr. William Amos:

In September of 2018, I was on the ground in the small community of Breckenridge in the municipality of Pontiac the day after the tornado. The Premier of Quebec; the Minister of Transport at the time, André Fortin; and Mayor Joanne Labadie were there. We were on the ground—

Mr. Brian Masse:

What was missing though?

Mr. William Amos:

We would be 500 metres away from each other at different homes asking what we could bring—if they needed water, or what support did they needed right then—and we weren't able to relay the message to the emergency response officials or to each other. If the mayor needed to come to meet with an individual I had just encountered, I would have to go and meet up with her personally.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Are you aware that this committee turned down an opportunity to study that—by your members from the Liberal Party? Why do you think this was not an appropriate body then to study it, if you agreed or disagreed with them?

Mr. William Amos:

I don't have comments to make on the decisions made previously by this committee. I would say that members of this committee have treated motion 208 with all of the seriousness that it—

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's not about motion 208. It's about whether or not we actually had an opportunity to study the situation in Ottawa with the tornadoes, which was was turned down by this committee. There was a particular motion moved and it was a study. Do you think that should be studied here at this committee, or why do you think that was turned down?

Mr. William Amos:

As I said, I won't speculate on motives for any—

The Chair:

If I could interject for a moment....

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's a fair question. It was raised by the witness here.

The Chair:

Hold on.

The witness is not a part of the committee and can't really speak to why something was turned down in committee, especially as we might have been in camera at the time.

Mr. Brian Masse:

No, we weren't.

The Chair:

I don't see how the witness can speak to why the committee as a whole turned something down.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's a part of your caucus. I expect those conversations might have taken place, given the fact that the member raised it as a serious issue as part of something here. I think that would have brought some light to it.

Mr. William Amos:

I'm happy to answer. As the chair indicates, I'm not going to speculate on decisions made in meetings where I wasn't present.

The focus today ought not to be on what might have been in the past. Who is to say if the wording of the motion that was previously brought was adequate or if the study that would have been proposed was going to be comprehensive?

What is proposed here in motion 208 enables both the public security and the economic development aspects of both Internet and cellphones and the connection between the two. Perhaps it was a missed opportunity at that point, but maybe this is a more comprehensive opportunity right now.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Those are my questions.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks for introducing this motion. I'm looking forward to the committee's study.

I just want to make a point on this, Mr. Chair. I think this lack of access to Internet is certainly a problem in rural and remote Canada, but I think there's another thing that we also need to focus on. I think the bigger problem is less about accessibility to Internet services and more about the unaffordability of Internet in rural and remote areas. I'm going to give you one example to highlight what I'm talking about.

If you live in a city in this country, or in an urban area, you can get 100 gigabytes of Internet for $49.99 a month. You can get unlimited Internet access for about $69.99. Those are the latest pricing plans on the big telecoms' websites. If you wanted 200 gigabytes of access in a rural or remote area over a wireless Internet, which is often the only option available, you can get that wireless Internet, but that 200 gigabytes would cost you somewhere between $800 and $1,000 a month.

I have constituents in my riding who have this issue. It's not that they can't get the Internet access. It's that they can't afford to pay upwards of $500 a month for that access. I put that in front of the committee as something to consider.

You can look at products such as Rogers' Rocket Hub and Bell's Turbo Hub. That covers most rural and remote areas, and even if it doesn't, for about $500 as a one-time installation charge, you can get somebody to install a Yagi antenna to boost the signal to get the Internet. I think most rural residents would be prepared to pay $500 for installation costs. The problem is that the ongoing monthly costs can be well upwards of $500 a month for pretty moderate Internet usage.

That's an issue that as a committee we need to consider when we're drafting our report: It's not only access to the Internet, but it's the cost of that Internet for rural and remote households, many of which are actually in the exurban areas of some of the country's largest city regions. My riding is in the greater Toronto area, and large parts of the north part of Halton region and the southern part of Wellington county have access to Internet, but most people don't have it because it's just so expensive to have.

(1015)

The Chair:

Mr. Oliver.

Mr. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.):

Thanks very much for bringing forward motion 208 and for the discussion on it. Congratulations on how quickly it went through the House and the all-party support for it.

Like Mr. Chong, I live in Halton. I live in Oakville. We have great coverage down there, but I drive up to Guelph and along the way I lose cellphone access and I'm out of touch. That's almost something that you expect to have with you all the time, and I'm out of touch for about 15 to 20 minutes. I'm driving by farms and houses knowing that all those people are living without wireless. They probably have fixed service, but they don't have that wireless service. It is a real issue and it's closer to home than I think many people think it is. When I think about how reliant we are on our wireless communications, it's a really important issue.

I'm also aware that you've brought the motion forward and there's limited time left in this sitting. There are three areas that you targeted for INDU. One was looking at the causes of and solutions to the gaps in infrastructure for wireless. The second was fiscal and regulatory approaches to improve investments in wireless infrastructure. The third was the regulatory role of the CRTC.

Of those three, what is the priority? When you were speaking to Mr. Masse, I kind of heard that it would be the CRTC regulatory role, or do you think it's incentivizing more investment? What do you think the priority would be for the committee in the time that we might have to look at this?

Mr. William Amos:

Thanks for that question. I really appreciate it, because I did want to provide, in a respectful manner, that kind of prioritization. I do think the CRTC ought to be the focus, and that's just simply because we are legislators and we have the opportunity to review the Telecommunications Act. That is ongoing.

I think it would be important to appreciate that major aspects of the fiscal component have been addressed. The CRTC is providing a degree of financing. The federal government has provided financing over the past several years and is looking to provide even more.

I think the question is, what more can be done? How can the telecommunications sector and the private sector be further stimulated? What options—

Mr. John Oliver:

Could you give us some examples? You've looked at this, obviously, and thought about it quite carefully. Like you, I'm a non-technical guy. Other than net neutrality, I haven't ventured too far into the CRTC space. What specific recommendations would you have to improve the regulatory role, in terms of the provision of wireless infrastructure?

Mr. William Amos:

If I were in the seats of members of this committee, I would want to ask the CRTC what options there are, in terms of legislative reform, to better enable the institution of the CRTC, as regulator, to generate superior access outcomes. That's what we're talking about in this motion: access. I do appreciate Member Chong's comment about affordability. It's important to all Canadians. In the areas that are most affected in my riding, just in the past couple of weeks, we're talking about a region that has a median income of $22,500 per capita. These are individuals who can ill afford to pay the exorbitant amounts being charged right now.

The CRTC has been challenged with the affordability question, as well. Indeed, previous governments have had the opportunity to address that affordability question. It continues to bedevil both regulators and governments.

I think we need to be asking the CRTC about the access question. As Member Graham pointed out, if you don't have access, the affordability question is moot. We need to get to that access question.

With respect to, for example, the objectives of the Telecommunications Act, when the regulator is balancing affordability and access, how is that being done? Are there opportunities to change how that's done?

I do note that the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development recently brought forward a directive to go to that issue of affordability. There's clearly a willingness on the part of our government to address that question. I think Canadians do understand that our government is very strong on the affordability question, but could there not be consideration given to a directive around access? I would ask this question of the CRTC as well. What would best enable them, or what is limiting them right now, from achieving access as an outcome they have identified themselves?

(1020)

Mr. John Oliver:

Again, I'm a bit new to this, but the committee has done a study on broadband connectivity in rural Canada. This is the linking of spectrum and breadth of spectrum to infrastructure. The committee heard from witnesses that they felt one licence was often too broad and covered both rural and urban areas. The rural areas then got insufficient attention when the company that owned the spectrum divvied it up.

Is there an issue with connecting infrastructure investment to licensing for spectrum? Have you thought that through, or am I off the mark on that one?

Mr. William Amos:

Again, I acknowledge my technical limitations. If spectrum auctions—and I understand that specific spectrum auctions are in the offing—can be focused on particular rural-access outcomes, I believe that would be the appropriate policy approach to adopt.

Mr. John Oliver:

Exactly, yes. Do you think part of the awarding of that would be evidence of willingness to invest in infrastructure, in terms of incentivizing that investment?

Mr. William Amos:

Exactly. In some cases, a fiscal tool is required to stimulate. In other cases, a regulatory mechanism is required to force. In other situations, such as the spectrum auction circumstance, I think it's a question of directing the auction to achieve that policy outcome.

Again, an all-of-the-above strategy is required. I look forward to that kind of issue being addressed in the rural economic development strategy, when it's prepared.

Mr. John Oliver:

Absolutely. That's good.

The Chair:

We're going back to Michael Chong. Go ahead.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to go back to this issue of affordability. I represent a rural riding. We don't often get a lot of.... Rural Canada often is overlooked just because it's a lower and lower percentage of the overall population as the country increasingly urbanizes.

However, the example that I'm going to give you next reflects the reality of rural residents not just in Ontario, but also in Quebec and the Maritimes, as well as in Newfoundland and Labrador. I'm just going to use a very local example to Wellington county to really draw to the attention of the committee what I'm talking about.

The monthly cost of Internet and heat for a resident of the City of Guelph in Ontario is about $150 a month. Because residents are on natural gas, they'll pay about $100 a month maximum to the local gas company to heat their homes in the winter, and their Internet bills are about $50 a month. That gives them about 100 gigabytes of high-speed Internet access.

A resident who literally lives two miles outside of the City of Guelph in rural Wellington county will be paying $1,300 a month to get the same service for heat and Internet access. It is $1,000 for heat because there is no access to natural gas. Most rural residents are on oil heat and that costs about $1,000 a month. Most rural residents spend $4,000 to $6,000 a winter to heat their homes through oil heat. Internet access for 100 gigabytes is about $300 a month.

I bring those figures to the attention of the committee. That's very similar to residents of rural Pontiac and rural Gatineau where there is no access to natural gas and where there is no access to affordable high-speed Internet. When you drive through much of the countryside in eastern Canada and see homes being torn down, there's a reason for that. They're just too expensive to carry because the regulators, both federally and provincially, over many decades did not roll out rural natural gas or rural Internet the way that we rolled out rural electricity and rural, plain old telephone service.

As a result, we are now struggling to keep up to try to fix this problem with regard to the heating of homes and access to the modern information highway. Like I said, the example that I've given is the reality of rural Canadians throughout much of central and eastern Canada. It's $1,300 a month to heat your home and to get high-speed Internet access, versus somebody literally a mile away in a built-up urban area who is paying $150 a month. That's one of the things that I think our committee needs to look at.

(1025)

Mr. William Amos:

Could I comment on that, Chair?

(1030)

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. William Amos:

Again, I agree 100% with regard to affordability being a crucial issue for every single family and every household in Canada. We are all confronted with this reality, and in rural Canada, it's often even more acute because there is less competition.

I would pose this question to the honourable member: What lessons should be drawn from a decade in government where a directive was issued by the then-minister of industry to the CRTC around the prioritization of competition? I think the results speak for themselves. That directive did not work. That effort on the part of the Conservative government of the time did not achieve affordability outcomes that Canadians can appreciate now. We are still suffering from unaffordable plans in comparison with other jurisdictions.

On top of that affordability problem, we have major rural access problems, which is what motion 208 goes to. The amounts of fiscal stimulus applied by the previous government were by any measure inadequate, as you point out, to roll out Internet in rural Canada in any manner that provides for equity in digital infrastructure. That seems clear to me.

I did not seek in my motion, nor am I looking today, to turn this into a partisan issue. I think that governments—present, past and prior to the Harper government—bear responsibility for these inequitable outcomes. On affordability and on access to high-speed Internet and cellphone availability in rural Canada, I think there has to be a recognition that the past policies of the Conservative government didn't work. We owe it to our constituents collectively to work in the present, live in the present and deal with the fact that all of our constituents wanted high-speed Internet yesterday and wanted cellphone coverage yesterday. My constituents wanted it two weeks ago when their houses were flooding and they were trying to put sandbags all around them.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move back to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Whatever happened with the motion last year—I looked at the record and I wasn't there for it—we are under a directive of the House. I think it's incumbent upon us to act seriously on it.

To Michael's comments before, I have a large rural riding that's quite a bit bigger than Wellington—Halton Hills, which I know quite well because I used to live in Guelph. I'm sure you're not allowed to talk on a cellphone or a CB radio when you're driving, but in my riding there are signs saying which channel of the CB radio you have to announce yourself on to pass safely through these roads. It's a very different environment that we live in. I have to go 200 kilometres at a time on dirt roads to get to events in my riding. This is the reality we have. It's channel 10 in some areas and channel 5 in some areas. You have to use them.

Enough of that. I know that Rémi and Richard both have very large rural Quebec ridings and I want them to get in on this. I'd like to give Richard a quick chance to jump in. [Translation]

Mr. Richard Hébert (Lac-Saint-Jean, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Amos, thank you for being here.

We know that access to digital infrastructure is extremely important for Canadians today, to secure safety and health or economic development in our regions. This is what your motion indicates.

As stated in the pre-Budget 2019 brief I tabled, in my riding of Lac-Saint-Jean, 22 of the inhabited regions of the territory have neither cell service nor Internet. That is the case for the RCMs of Maria-Chapdelaine and Domaine-du-Roy.

In your opinion, what measures could be taken to advance and facilitate co-operation and the deployment of wireless infrastructure in our rural areas?

Can you tell us how your study of motion M-208 could help your riding and others such as mine, Lac-Saint-Jean, to obtain better digital wireless infrastructure?

Mr. William Amos:

Let me begin, Mr. Hébert, by thanking you for your presence, as parliamentary secretary and government representative for small and medium businesses. We know very well how important it is to support SMEs in the regions with the necessary digital infrastructure, so as to ensure their success. If we want to export, be on the cutting edge and seize business opportunities, we must have this technology.

In my riding as in yours, there are reeves, mayors, councillors and municipal managers who are crying out for help, loudly. Since our election, we have seen an increase in investments and financial support.

I am thinking here particularly of Connect to Innovate, a $500-million program over five years, which in its turn called on the financial participation of the province and the private sector. This program led to overall investments of over $1 billion. However, the Connect to Innovate program did have one gap: cellular services. The program was focused on high-speed Internet services.

I wish the new multi-year budget investments announced by our government also included cellular services, or that the investments in high-speed Internet included improved cell services. We see the convergence of wireless and Internet technologies. However, neither I, nor the electors, the elected representatives, the reeves or mayors in my riding, are technical experts. We want to better understand the path to follow if these two components are to meet with equal success.

We also want to see various models in action. I'll give you an example. In my riding, projects of about $13.4 million in total are being carried out by a private company, Bell Canada, in order to help about 3,200 households in 29 communities. There is also a $7-million project, and half of the funds for that are provided by the non-profit organization 307net; financial support is also provided by the municipality of Cantley.

So, those are some examples of different models made possible by the financial measures taken by the federal government and the support of the provincial government. I think that the discussions that will take place over the next months or years will be aimed at determining the most appropriate and affordable models, with a particular focus on non-profit organizations. Not only must these models satisfy technical requirements, they must be affordable, as the opposition member just said.

(1035)

Mr. Richard Hébert:

Do I still have some time?

The Chair:

You have a few minutes left.

Mr. Richard Hébert:

Thank you, Mr. Amos. We are very grateful to you for having introduced this motion. As you know, this important matter has been under study for some time. I myself live in an outlying region, and I can bear witness to the difficulties we have because of the lack of cell services and access to the Internet.

Let me give you some examples. In my own house, I have to stand in a particular place to be able to get a cell signal and use my phone for calls. It's impossible anywhere else in the house. In addition, if I want to download La Presse in the morning to read it, I have to shout to my boys to get off the Internet so that I can have access to my newspaper. There is an upside: when my boys disconnect and go and play outside, this is probably better for their health.

So this is a big concern in the regions. As you know, studies were done and our government included $1.7 billion in the 2019 budget to ensure that necessary infrastructure is put in place.

The government has just finished auctioning off the 600-megahertz band of the spectrum. It had reserved 43% of the available spectrum for regional suppliers in order to facilitate access to the Internet in the regions.

You mentioned the directive sent to the CRTC by former minister Bernier to get that organization to encourage increased and more affordable access in its decisions.

My question is both simple and complex. In your opinion, what more must we do to ensure that, without further delay, Canadians in all regions have access to wireless or wired Internet services? What is missing in all of the measures we have put in place over the last years? [English]

The Chair:

A very brief answer, please. [Translation]

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you for your question.

I well remember that time once when I was driving toward Rivière-du-Loup for a Liberal Caucus. It was one in the morning, I was a bit lost in the Parliamentary Secretary's riding, and I could not consult my mobile phone GPS, for the reason we are discussing today. It also raises the whole issue of public safety.

Your question is indeed complex, but I will try to give you a simple answer.

In your study, aside for the opinion of private sector experts, it might be useful to find out about the academic opinion on the Telecommunications Act. For instance, it might be useful to ask ourselves whether, rather than trying to count on non-binding objectives, we should not strengthen the current legal provisions around access to the Internet, to give the CRTC a hand and obtain better results.

I'm asking the question without knowing the answer. It may be that we have to amend the act itself to enable this stricter and stronger regulation and impose solutions not only on the private sector, but also on governments.

(1040)

[English]

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, you have the final two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to follow up on that. It's a good point.

You mentioned the notice directives by Maxime Bernier and then subsequently Navdeep Bains, and the differences between the two.

If you had a directive right now, where would you focus that in terms of the CRTC, to direct the companies? I believe that the system is broken, but if a directive is what we're at right now, what would you do with that?

Mr. William Amos:

To return to the earlier question that I just responded to, I think my starting point would be that one does have to look at the law itself. If a directive is being applied, it's to provide greater clarity to the regulator as to how certain objectives should be achieved. Perhaps if the law were more clear, and particular outcomes were sought, for example, rural access, then better outcomes could be achieved without having to provide specific direction.

Is it a good thing, generally speaking, to seek greater competition? Absolutely, for the consumer, that's a good thing. Is it proper and appropriate to seek greater affordability? Absolutely, but I'm not sure—

Mr. Brian Masse:

What would your directive be? What would be helpful? I guess that's what I'm looking for. Is there a special carve-out that you're looking for that the CRTC should really zero in on right away? You could send them that message now. That's what I'm trying to provide the opportunity for.

Mr. William Amos:

Sure. I think the regulator is listening to this conversation. It's hearing the desire and has heard the desire through its own “Let's Talk Broadband” and has heard that desire for rural Canada to achieve universal access. Standards have been established. Funds have been allocated.

Of course, as a rural MP who is representing many communities that suffer from a lack of access, I would love to see greater direction provided with regard to the importance of rural access. Our government has taken such a giant leap in terms of the fiscal measures that I think there's great hope for rural Canada through the universal broadband fund, through the CRTC's fund, and potentially, through the Canada Infrastructure Bank. These mechanisms are there. I think the question is, how will this funding roll out and incentivize further behaviour?

We can also assume that the corporate sector, the telecommunications companies across Canada, are going to read this testimony. They're going to hear the voices of members from across Canada and they are going to recognize that this is a national issue that has received unanimous approval from Parliament.

The Chair:

Thank you.

That's all the time we have left for today.

Thank you, everybody. We will see you next Tuesday.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0950)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Nous passons à la deuxième partie de notre séance d'aujourd'hui. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous allons examiner l'objet de la motion d'initiative parlementaire M-208 sur l'infrastructure numérique rurale.

Nous accueillons le député qui a présenté la motion d'initiative parlementaire, M. William Amos, député de Pontiac.

Monsieur, vous disposez de 10 minutes. La parole est à vous.

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de la rapidité avec laquelle vous et nos collègues avez accepté de vous pencher sur cette question. Je veux remercier les députés, non seulement ceux de mon propre parti, mais aussi ceux des partis de l'opposition, pour leur appui unanime hier. Je pense que cela fait voir le Parlement sous un jour favorable, et je crois que c'est évidemment une question cruciale pour tous les Canadiens. Qu'on vive en milieu urbain ou en milieu rural, on veut que le Canada rural soit branché.

La question a été fortement soulevée dans le Pontiac avec la tornade de l'an dernier et les inondations de cette année. Je ne veux pas m'épancher là-dessus. Les victimes d'inondations, les gens qui ont des sous-sols inondés présentement, veulent que nous passions aux choses sérieuses, alors je vais essayer de le faire aujourd'hui.

Je suis ravi d'avoir l'occasion d'en parler devant vous et je vous remercie également d'avoir organisé aussi rapidement ma comparution sur cette question.[Français]

Je sais que les gens dans ma circonscription, Pontiac, vous en sont reconnaissants, ainsi que tous ceux qui habitent dans des régions rurales du Canada.

Bien sûr, l'infrastructure numérique est un enjeu complexe, qui comprend plusieurs aspects touchant la réglementation, la fiscalité et le secteur privé, et l'influence des gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et municipaux n'est pas toujours claire.

Depuis novembre dernier, c'est-à-dire depuis que j'ai déposé la motion, la donne a un peu changé, en raison du budget de 2019. Il faut être très honnête et très clair à ce sujet. Quand un gouvernement fait des promesses et prévoit des budgets très importants qui se chiffrent à environ 5 milliards de dollars, c'est à mon avis parce qu'il reconnaît l'importance de cet enjeu.[Traduction]

Depuis que la motion a été présentée, le gouvernement, dans son budget de 2019, a vraiment franchi une étape décisive. D'autres importantes étapes avaient été franchies auparavant. Le budget de 2016 incluait un montant de 500 millions de dollars sur cinq ans pour le programme Brancher pour innover. Cet argent a été versé dans différentes circonscriptions, dont la mienne, où des projets de 20 millions de dollars ont été annoncés comparativement à entre 1,2 et 1,3 million, dans la circonscription de Pontiac, au cours de la décennie antérieure. D'importantes mesures sont déjà prises, mais ce nouvel investissement prévu dans le budget est vraiment important.

Qu'arrivera-t-il ensuite? Comment l'étude qui sera menée par le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie fera-t-elle avancer les choses? Je crois que nous devons nous tourner vers la nouvelle ministre du Développement économique rural. Nous devons comprendre que le gouvernement a jugé bon d'établir ce nouveau ministère, ce qui est une très bonne nouvelle pour le Canada rural, et reconnaître la responsabilité de la ministre Bernadette Jordan d'élaborer cette stratégie et d'inclure la question des infrastructures numériques. Dans le texte de la motion, qui porte précisément sur l'infrastructure cellulaire, c'est là que nous trouvons le premier lien d'intérêt entre l'orientation du gouvernement libéral et celle de la motion unanime.

Je vous explique le lien. Des investissements importants sont prévus pour les prochaines années, plus de 5 milliards dollars en 10 ans, y compris un nouveau fonds pour la large bande universelle de 1,7 milliard de dollars et le fonds du CRTC de 750 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, ce qui est sur le point de commencer. Ce sont des fonds tellement importants que les Canadiens ont raison d'être optimistes, mais il faut, à mon avis, que les choses soient plus claires quant à la façon dont l'infrastructure cellulaire sera développée dans ce cadre.

Comme la plupart des Canadiens, je ne suis pas un expert technique. Je ne sais pas comment les investissements dans l'infrastructure de fibre optique jusqu'au domicile peuvent permettre d'offrir un service de téléphonie cellulaire, mais je suis porté à croire que c'est le cas. Je pense qu'il faut que les choses soient claires pour que la population canadienne soit convaincue que les investissements à venir produiront des résultats non seulement pour l'Internet haute vitesse dans les régions rurales du Canada, mais aussi pour la téléphonie cellulaire. Évidemment, les deux sont cruciaux pour des raisons de développement économique, de préservation et de développement des collectivités, mais aussi pour des raisons de sécurité publique, comme on en a discuté à la Chambre au cours du débat sur la motion M-208.

Je pense que votre comité apporterait une contribution précieuse s'il discutait de la façon dont l'infrastructure cellulaire peut être déployée de façon accélérée dans le cadre des plans du gouvernement et s'il faisait comparaître des témoins pour obtenir les meilleures idées possible pour y parvenir.

Je constate que votre comité a fait du très bon travail relativement à la question du réseau Internet dans le Canada rural. Je vous en remercie.

(0955)

[Français]

Cependant, l'enjeu précis de l'infrastructure de la téléphonie mobile ou cellulaire n'a pas été abordé de façon exhaustive. Il serait capital de le faire. Une dizaine de maires dans le Pontiac croient que c'est l'une des trois priorités dans la région, et je sais que c'est la même chose dans d'autres régions du Canada.

En plus des aspects économique et technique, j'aimerais que ce comité aborde l'aspect de la sécurité publique. Cet aspect a été clairement évoqué. Le maire de Waltham, M. David Rochon, m'a dit qu'il aimerait qu'on amène des pigeons voyageurs dans sa municipalité pour qu'on puisse mieux communiquer. Il ne croit pas qu'il y aura un service de téléphonie mobile pour répondre aux urgences, entre autres lorsque des gens demandent des sacs de sable ou des informations plus précises sur les niveaux de l'eau.

Advenant le cas où le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale n'aurait pas le temps d'examiner cette question, il serait important que ce comité-ci l'aborde.[Traduction]

Je crois que je vais conclure en demandant qu'un regard critique soit porté sur le rôle du CRTC et sur ses fonctions de réglementation et de création d'incitatifs, afin d'aider à donner une plus grande impulsion au développement des infrastructures Internet et de téléphonie cellulaire. Le rapport de 2016, Parlons large bande, a apporté des avancées significatives pour ce qui est d'établir des taux téléversement et de téléchargement standards; de définir ce qu'est la haute vitesse; de considérer cela comme une question cruciale; et de créer un fonds. Je suis sûr que les 750 millions de dollars sur cinq ans seront utilisés à bon escient. Je pense cependant qu'en tant que parlementaires, nous devons engager un dialogue avec le CRTC pour explorer ce qu'on peut faire de plus, et je crois que votre comité est l'instance idéale pour ce dialogue.

Nous avons l'approche qui est privilégiée par le CRTC. Est-ce que le Parlement croit que cela convient?

Personnellement, je ne crois pas que 750 millions sur cinq ans, c'est suffisant. Je pense que le CRTC peut aller plus loin, et j'aimerais également examiner la Loi sur les télécommunications, qui fait présentement l'objet d'un examen. J'aimerais voir comment la loi permet le déploiement de l'infrastructure Internet et de téléphonie cellulaire, et comment on pourrait l'améliorer à cet égard.

Cela dit, chers collègues, je vous remercie de m'avoir donné cette occasion. Je vous remercie également pour votre appui. Je pense que la motion montre qu'il y a un bel esprit de collégialité, et c'est apprécié.

(1000)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons tout de suite aux questions. C'est M. Graham qui commence.

Vous disposez de sept minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur Amos, de nous amener dans une bonne direction sur la question des services cellulaires.

À 7 heures ce matin, j'ai eu une entrevue avec Ghislain Plourde, de CIME FM, pour parler précisément de votre motion. Je pense que c'est extrêmement important.

Depuis notre rencontre au début de 2016, nous avons travaillé très fort sur l'enjeu des télécommunications. Nous avons fait ensemble, en 2016, des présentations devant le CRTC pour faire avancer ce dossier. Nous avons connu de grandes réussites dans le domaine des services Internet. Nous avons étudié le dossier des services Internet au sein de ce comité-ci, mais le dossier des services cellulaires avance très peu.

Nous avons vécu des problèmes liés à ce sujet dans nos circonscriptions respectives, dans le contexte des sinistres en cours.

Pouvez-vous nous dépeindre ce qui se passe dans votre circonscription du côté des services cellulaires?

Dans le cas d'Amherst, dans ma circonscription, les gens des divers services doivent se réunir à l'hôtel de ville pour jaser de la situation et ensuite repartir sur le terrain, justement parce qu'ils ne sont pas capables de communiquer sur le terrain.

Vivez-vous la même situation dans votre circonscription?

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de votre question très pertinente. Je salue vos efforts sur cet enjeu depuis votre élection. Je sais que vos concitoyens de la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle vous sont réellement reconnaissants de la façon dont vous avez misé sur ces enjeux, non seulement sur les services Internet, mais aussi sur les services cellulaires.

Sur le plan de la sécurité publique, il est clair qu'on pourrait imaginer des conséquences extrêmement graves au fait de se trouver dans une région où il n'y a aucun signal, mais il est question aussi d'efficacité, comme vous le mentionnez.

Il n'est pas uniquement question des maires ou mairesses, des conseillers ou conseillères, des employés municipaux ou des premiers répondants qui sont sur le terrain. Il est clair que tous ces individus qui ont la responsabilité de répondre aux urgences doivent être capables de communiquer ensemble. Cependant, il y a aussi les voisins qui s'entraident et les communautés qui se regroupent pour s'appuyer les unes les autres, comme c'est le cas présentement. On voit que ces gens sont beaucoup moins efficaces sans services cellulaires.

On sait très bien aussi que les membres des communautés comme celle de Waltham n'auront plus, dès le mois de juin, la capacité d'utiliser le service de téléavertisseur.

Le manque de capacité technologique pour bien répondre aux situations d'urgence est un autre aspect de cet enjeu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'il y a des solutions qu'on doit chercher en matière de réglementation, et non seulement en matière de finances?

Nous non plus ne pourrons plus avoir accès au service de téléavertisseur dès le 30 juin. Cela n'existera plus. Nous ne serons plus capables d'appeler nos premiers répondants afin qu'ils répondent aux urgences sur le terrain. C'est très grave.

Est-ce qu'il y a des solutions qu'on pourrait regarder sur le plan de la réglementation?

Quand nous demandons à Bell ce qu'elle fait pour rétablir ou prolonger le service de téléavertisseur, elle dit qu'elle n'a pas l'obligation de le faire. Quand nous demandons au CRTC s'il est obligatoire de fournir un service de téléavertisseur, le CRTC répond que non, il n'est pas obligatoire de fournir ce service, qui est pourtant essentiel à nos régions.

Est-ce que vous voyez des solutions en matière de réglementation?

M. William Amos:

Sur le plan de la réglementation, je dirais que l'essentiel, c'est la manière dont le CRTC interprète son mandat émanant de la Loi sur les télécommunications.

On y indique les priorités en matière de politiques publiques, les priorités en matière de concurrence ou de promotion de la concurrence, par exemple, ou de promotion de l'accès aux services. Il y a toute une série d'objectifs décrits dans la Loi. Cependant, aucune priorité n'est établie parmi ces objectifs.

Il y a des années, en 2007 ou 2008, je crois, M. Bernier, qui était ministre à cette époque, avait envoyé une directive où il demandait au CRTC de mettre l'accent sur l'aspect de la concurrence. À mon avis, il faudrait trouver la façon d'envoyer au CRTC un message clair, même une directive, sur l'importance primordiale de l'accès.

Je crois bien que le CRTC comprend l'enjeu, mais il est nécessaire de diriger le CRTC à cet égard.

(1005)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faut le diriger dans la bonne direction.

Si on établit pour principal objectif la promotion de la concurrence, mais qu'il n'y a pas d'accès au service, cela ne donne rien. Zéro, c'est toujours zéro. Nous ne pouvons pas appuyer la concurrence tant qu'il n'y a pas au moins deux fournisseurs de services. Même s'il y en avait un seul, nous ne serions pas plus avancés.

Êtes-vous d'accord sur cette opinion?

M. William Amos:

Absolument. Il faut que nous nous fixions des objectifs et que le CRTC prenne toutes les mesures législatives, réglementaires et financières pour qu'il y ait un accès complet. Dans le budget, nous avons établi comme objectif un accès pour 100 % des foyers d'ici à 2030. Pour l'atteindre, il faut prendre toutes les mesures réglementaires et fiscales nécessaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a des étapes avant d'atteindre la cible de 100 %: nous visons 90 % d'ici à 2022 et 95 % d'ici à 2026. La dernière tranche de 5 % d'ici à 2030 sera probablement la plus difficile à atteindre. Est-ce exact?

M. William Amos:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Je vous remercie de travailler très fort sur ce dossier, monsieur Amos.

Je donne la minute de parole qu'il me reste à M. Longfield. [Traduction]

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Je dispose de moins d'une minute, mais j'aimerais tout d'abord vous remercier d'avoir présenté la motion.

Notre comité a examiné la question de la large bande. Nous en avons parlé en 2017 et en 2018. Nous sommes allés à Washington pour parler de connectivité, du réseau satellite nord-sud et de l'occasion que cela pourrait nous offrir.

Nous avons discuté de la 5G, mais on parle de régions qui n'ont pas la 3G ou la 4G. On parle de pigeons voyageurs maintenant. Je sais que c'était une blague du maire, mais d'une façon ou d'une autre, nous devons nous connecter les gens, que ce soit par satellite ou par tours. Pensez-vous à la 5G ou à un service 3G de base?

M. William Amos:

Je dois admettre que je ne suis pas un expert technique. En ce qui concerne la technologie qui serait utilisée, je dois dire que je suis neutre. Je ne serais pas en mesure de donner une opinion suffisamment éclairée.

Ce que je dirais toutefois au sujet du cellulaire, c'est n'importe quel accès. Il y a des zones mortes. Si l'on part de la Colline du Parlement et que l'on prend la route 148, du côté nord de la rivière des Outaouais, le téléphone sera coupé environ cinq ou six fois entre ici et ma circonscription, qui est située à environ deux heures et demie de route. Ce sont des zones mortes. Il y a des trous noirs, des communautés entières qui n'ont pas de services.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur Amos.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Masse, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Amos, je vous remercie de votre présence et je vous félicite pour l'adoption de votre projet de loi à la Chambre. C'est une motion. Il y a une grande différence entre un projet de loi et une motion, et j'ai adopté les deux, mais c'est une bonne chose qu'on continue de soulever cette question.

Vous savez que le Comité a mené un examen approfondi sur le sujet. Que manquait-il dans le rapport du Comité que vous aimeriez voir dans un autre examen? Qu'avons-nous omis ou qu'est-ce que nous aurions dû mieux couvrir dans notre rapport?

M. William Amos:

Je crois que c'est une question importante. Ce qu'il manquait, à mon avis, c'était un examen complet de la question de la téléphonie cellulaire et du lien entre la prestation de services Internet haute vitesse — que ce soit par fibre optique jusqu'au domicile, par satellite ou autre — et l'amélioration de l'infrastructure et de la couverture cellulaires dans tout le Canada rural.

C'est une chose d'avoir accès à Internet haute vitesse — et tous les Canadiens le méritent, absolument —, mais c'en est une autre d'adopter des mesures réglementaires et fiscales qui permettraient une meilleure couverture de téléphonie cellulaire. Ce sont des problèmes semblables à ceux que nous avons dans l'ensemble du Canada rural, mais les solutions à prendre ne sont pas nécessairement les mêmes pour les deux.

(1010)

M. Brian Masse:

Y a-t-il d'autres éléments que le cellulaire, dans le rapport? Approuvez-vous toutes les recommandations du rapport? Je n'ai pas le temps de les passer en revue, mais est-ce que cela va? Manquait-il des choses, à votre avis, que nous pourrions améliorer?

M. William Amos:

J'aimerais que l'on examine plus à fond la question de savoir comment le CRTC, dans sa fonction de réglementation, et comment la Loi sur les télécommunications, dans sa forme actuelle, pourraient être améliorés pour qu'il y ait des solutions tant réglementaires que fiscales. Il peut y avoir des limites qui...

M. Brian Masse:

Je ne m'y oppose pas.

Je vais passer rapidement à une autre question, si possible. Vous avez parlé des tornades et de leurs effets sur Ottawa. Quels étaient les problèmes de service cellulaire à ce moment-là?

M. William Amos:

En septembre 2018, j'étais sur le terrain dans la petite communauté de Breckenridge, dans la municipalité de Pontiac, le lendemain de la tornade. Le premier ministre du Québec, le ministre des Transports de l'époque, André Fortin, et la mairesse, Joanne Labadie, étaient là. Nous étions sur le terrain...

M. Brian Masse:

Qu'est-ce qu'il manquait?

M. William Amos:

Nous étions à 500 mètres de distance, à des endroits différents, à nous demander ce que nous pouvions apporter — si les gens avaient besoin d'eau, ou quels étaient leurs besoins immédiats —, et nous étions incapables de transmettre le message aux responsables des services d'interventions d'urgence ou entre nous. Si la mairesse devait rencontrer une personne que je venais de rencontrer, il m'aurait fallu aller la rencontrer en personne.

M. Brian Masse:

Savez-vous que notre comité a rejeté une occasion de se pencher là-dessus — que les députés libéraux ont refusé de le faire? Pourquoi, à votre avis, il n'était pas approprié qu'il examine cela, si vous étiez d'accord ou non avec eux?

M. William Amos:

Je n'ai pas de commentaires à faire sur les décisions que le Comité a prises précédemment. Je dirais que les membres du Comité ont traité la motion 208 de la façon la plus sérieuse...

M. Brian Masse:

Il ne s'agit pas de la motion 208. Il s'agit de la question de savoir si nous avions une occasion de nous pencher sur la situation causée par les tornades à Ottawa, ce qu'a refusé le Comité. Une motion a été présentée et il s'agissait d'une étude. Pensez-vous que la question devrait être examinée ici, au Comité? Pourquoi la motion a-t-elle été rejetée, à votre avis?

M. William Amos:

Comme je l'ai dit, je n'avancerai pas d'hypothèses sur les motifs...

Le président:

Si je peux intervenir un instant...

M. Brian Masse:

C'est une question légitime. Elle a été soulevée par le témoin.

Le président:

Attendez.

Le témoin n'est pas membre du Comité et il ne peut pas vraiment expliquer pourquoi le Comité a rejeté quelque chose, surtout que nous siégeons peut-être à huis clos à ce moment-là.

M. Brian Masse:

Non, ce n'est pas le cas.

Le président:

Je ne vois pas comment le témoin peut parler des raisons pour lesquelles le Comité a rejeté quelque chose.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est une partie de votre caucus. J'imagine que des discussions ont eu lieu, compte tenu du fait que le député a lui-même soulevé qu'il s'agissait d'une question sérieuse. Je pense que cela aurait pu nous aider à comprendre.

M. William Amos:

Je suis ravi de répondre à la question. Comme le président l'a dit, je ne vais pas faire des hypothèses sur les décisions qui ont été prises lors de réunions auxquelles je n'ai pas participé.

Aujourd'hui, l'accent ne devrait pas être mis sur ce qu'on aurait pu faire dans le passé. Qui sait si le libellé de la motion qui a été présentée auparavant était adéquat ou si l'étude proposée aurait été exhaustive?

Ce qui est proposé dans la motion 208 donne des moyens d'agir à la fois pour ce qui est des aspects de la sécurité publique et du développement économique concernant Internet et les téléphones cellulaires, ainsi que du lien entre les deux. On a peut-être raté une occasion à ce moment-là, mais on a peut-être maintenant une occasion plus complète.

M. Brian Masse:

J'ai posé toutes mes questions.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'avoir présenté la motion. J'attends avec impatience que le Comité commence cette étude.

Je veux seulement soulever un point à cet égard, monsieur le président. Il va sans dire que le manque d'accès à Internet est un problème dans les régions rurales et éloignées du Canada, mais je crois qu'il y a un autre élément sur lequel nous devons nous concentrer. Je crois que le plus gros problème n'est pas tant l'accessibilité aux services Internet que le fait que c'est inabordable dans les régions rurales et éloignées. Je vais vous donner un exemple pour illustrer ce que je veux dire.

Dans ce pays, si l'on vit dans une ville ou en zone urbaine, on peut obtenir 100 gigaoctets pour 49,99 $ par mois. On peut avoir un accès illimité à Internet pour environ 69,99 $. Ce sont les derniers plans de tarification offerts sur les sites Web des géants des télécommunications. Si l'on veut 200 gigaoctets dans une région rurale ou éloignée par Internet sans fil, qui est souvent la seule option disponible, on peut avoir accès à Internet sans fil, mais ces 200 gigaoctets coûteraient entre 800 et 1 000 $ par mois.

Dans ma circonscription, il y a des gens qui ont ce problème. Ce n'est pas qu'ils ne peuvent pas avoir accès à Internet. C'est plutôt qu'ils ne peuvent pas se permettre de payer plus de 500 $ par mois pour avoir cet accès. Je soulève cette question au Comité pour qu'il en tienne compte.

On peut examiner certains produits, comme la centrale sans fil de Rogers et la station Turbo de Bell. Cela couvre la plupart des régions rurales et éloignées, et même si ce n'est pas le cas, pour environ 500 $ de frais d'installation, on peut demander à quelqu'un d'installer une antenne Yagi pour amplifier le signal et accéder à Internet. Je pense que la plupart des habitants des régions rurales seraient prêts à payer 500 $ pour les frais d'installation. Le problème, c'est que les coûts mensuels peuvent s'élever à plus de 500 $ par mois pour une utilisation assez modérée d'Internet.

C'est une question dont le Comité doit tenir compte au moment de rédiger son rapport: il ne s'agit pas seulement de l'accès à Internet, mais aussi du coût de ces services Internet pour les ménages des régions rurales et éloignées, dont bon nombre se trouvent en fait dans les zones situées près de certaines des plus grandes régions urbaines du pays. Ma circonscription se trouve dans la région du Grand Toronto, et une bonne proportion de la partie nord de la région de Halton et de la partie sud du comté de Wellington a accès à Internet, mais la plupart des gens ne l'ont pas parce que cela coût tellement cher.

(1015)

Le président:

Monsieur Oliver.

M. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.):

Je vous remercie beaucoup d'avoir proposé la motion 208 et je vous remercie de la discussion que nous avons à ce sujet. Je vous félicite pour la rapidité avec laquelle la motion a franchi l'étape de la Chambre et pour le soutien qu'elle a obtenu de tous les partis.

Comme M. Chong, j'habite dans la région de Halton. J'habite à Oakville. Nous avons une très bonne connexion là-bas, mais lorsque je me rends en voiture à Guelph, je perds la connexion au réseau cellulaire et personne ne peut communiquer avec moi. De nos jours, on s'attend presque à l'avoir en tout temps, mais je perds la connexion pendant 15 à 20 minutes. Je passe devant des exploitations agricoles et des maisons et je sais que ces gens n'ont pas accès à une connexion sans fil. Ils ont probablement accès à un service de connexion fixe, mais ils n'ont pas de service de connexion sans fil. C'est un véritable problème, et cela se passe beaucoup plus près de nous que nous le pensons habituellement. Étant donné que nous comptons énormément sur nos communications sans fil, je trouve que c'est un enjeu très important.

Je sais aussi que vous avez présenté la motion et qu'il reste peu de temps. Vous avez ciblé trois volets pour le Comité permanent de l’industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Le premier vise à examiner les causes et les solutions liées aux lacunes dans l'infrastructure du réseau sans fil. Le deuxième volet concerne les approches financières et réglementaires visant à améliorer les investissements dans l'infrastructure du réseau sans fil. Le troisième porte sur le rôle du CRTC en matière de réglementation.

Parmi ces trois volets, lequel représente une priorité? Lorsque vous parliez à M. Masse, j'ai en quelque sorte compris que ce serait le rôle du CRTC en matière de réglementation — ou pensez-vous que c'est l'encouragement à accroître les investissements? Selon vous, à quel volet notre comité devrait-il accorder la priorité dans le temps qu'il nous reste pour examiner ce dossier?

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Je vous suis très reconnaissant, car je souhaitais établir, de façon très respectueuse, l'ordre des priorités. Je pense effectivement que nous devrions nous concentrer sur le rôle du CRTC, simplement parce que nous sommes des législateurs et que nous avons l'occasion d'examiner la Loi sur les télécommunications. Cet examen est en cours.

Je crois qu'il serait important de comprendre que les principaux éléments de la composante financière ont été abordés. Le CRTC fournit un certain niveau de financement. Le gouvernement fédéral fournit du financement depuis plusieurs années et il envisage même d'augmenter ce financement.

Il ne reste donc qu'à nous demander ce que nous pouvons faire de plus. Comment pouvons-nous stimuler davantage le secteur des télécommunications et le secteur privé? Quelles options...

M. John Oliver:

Pouvez-vous nous donner quelques exemples? Vous avez visiblement étudié la question et vous y avez réfléchi de façon approfondie. Tout comme vous, je n'ai pas beaucoup de connaissances techniques. À l'exception de la neutralité de l'Internet, je ne me suis pas aventuré trop loin dans le domaine du CRTC. Quelles recommandations précises formuleriez-vous pour améliorer son rôle en matière de réglementation lorsqu'il s'agit de fournir l'infrastructure de réseau sans fil nécessaire?

M. William Amos:

Si j'étais à la place des membres de votre comité, je demanderais aux représentants du CRTC de me parler des possibilités de renforcer la capacité du CRTC, à titre d'organisme de réglementation, pour améliorer les résultats en matière d'accès par l'entremise d'une réforme législative. C'est l'objectif de cette motion; elle parle de l'accessibilité. Je suis reconnaissant envers M. Chong pour son commentaire sur les prix abordables. C'est important pour tous les Canadiens. Dans les régions les plus touchées de ma circonscription, ces deux dernières semaines, nous parlons d'une région dont le revenu médian est 22 500 $ par habitant. Ces gens ne peuvent pas vraiment se permettre de payer les montants exorbitants qui sont actuellement facturés.

Le CRTC est également aux prises avec la question des prix abordables. En effet, les gouvernements précédents ont eu l'occasion de se pencher sur la question des prix abordables. Cette question continue d'ailleurs de tourmenter les organismes de réglementation et les gouvernements.

Je crois que nous devons demander au CRTC de se pencher sur la question de l'accessibilité. Comme l'a dit M. Graham, si le service n'est pas accessible, la question des prix abordables ne se pose même pas. Nous devons nous attaquer à la question de l'accessibilité.

Dans le cadre, par exemple, des objectifs de la Loi sur les télécommunications, lorsque l'organisme de réglementation tente d'atteindre l'équilibre entre les prix abordables et l'accessibilité, comment s'y prend-il? Est-il possible de modifier ce processus?

J'aimerais toutefois préciser que le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique a récemment émis une directive liée à la question des prix abordables. Le gouvernement est visiblement prêt à s'attaquer à cette question. Je crois que les Canadiens comprennent que notre gouvernement se préoccupe grandement de la question des prix abordables, mais ne pourrait-on pas envisager aussi d'adopter une directive sur l'accessibilité? Je poserais également une autre question aux représentants du CRTC, à savoir qu'est-ce qui les aiderait le plus — ou à quel obstacle font-ils face maintenant — lorsqu'il s'agit d'atteindre l'objectif lié à l'accessibilité qu'il se sont fixé?

(1020)

M. John Oliver:

Encore une fois, c'est un peu un nouveau dossier pour moi, mais le Comité a mené une étude sur la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales du Canada. Il s'agit de connecter la portée du spectre à l'infrastructure. Des témoins précédents ont dit aux membres du comité qu'ils étaient d'avis qu'une licence était souvent trop vaste lorsqu'elle visait à la fois des régions rurales et urbaines. Dans ces cas, les régions rurales recevaient moins d'attention lorsque l'entreprise propriétaire du spectre le répartissait.

L'établissement d'un lien entre les investissements dans l'infrastructure et les licences de spectre pose-t-il un problème? Avez-vous réfléchi à cela ou ai-je fait fausse route avec cette question?

M. William Amos:

Encore une fois, je reconnais mes limites sur le plan technique. Si la mise aux enchères du spectre — et d'après ce que je comprends, des enchères du spectre précises seront bientôt ouvertes — peut se concentrer sur des résultats précis en matière d'accessibilité dans les régions rurales, je crois que ce serait l'approche stratégique appropriée à adopter.

M. John Oliver:

Oui, c'est exact. À votre avis, une partie de cette attribution pourrait-elle servir à prouver qu'il existe une volonté d'investir dans l'infrastructure, afin de motiver cet investissement?

M. William Amos:

Exactement. Dans certains cas, il est nécessaire d'avoir recours à un outil financier pour les stimuler. Dans d'autres cas, il faut utiliser un mécanisme de réglementation pour les forcer. Dans d'autres situations, par exemple en cas d'enchères du spectre, je crois qu'il s'agit d'orienter les enchères pour atteindre ce résultat stratégique.

Encore une fois, il est nécessaire d'adopter une stratégie globale. J'ai hâte que ce type d'enjeu soit abordé dans le cadre de l'élaboration de la stratégie de développement économique rural.

M. John Oliver:

Certainement. C'est bien.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Chong. Allez-y.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir sur la question des prix abordables. Je représente une circonscription rurale. Nous n'obtenons pas souvent beaucoup de... Les régions rurales du Canada sont souvent mises de côté tout simplement parce que leurs habitants représentent un pourcentage de moins en moins élevé de l'ensemble de la population à mesure que le pays s'urbanise.

Toutefois, l'exemple que je suis sur le point de vous donner illustre la réalité des habitants des régions rurales non seulement en Ontario, mais aussi au Québec et dans les provinces maritimes, ainsi qu'à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador. J'utiliserai un exemple à l'échelle locale, c'est-à-dire le comté de Wellington, afin d'attirer réellement l'attention des membres du comité sur ce que j'essaie d'illustrer.

Un résident de la ville de Guelph, en Ontario, paie environ 150 $ par mois pour Internet et le chauffage. Puisque les résidents sont alimentés au gaz naturel, ils paient un montant maximum d'environ 100 $ par mois à l'entreprise locale de distribution de gaz pour chauffer leur logement en hiver, et leur facture d'Internet s'élève à environ 50 $ par mois. Cela leur donne accès à Internet haute vitesse d'une capacité d'environ 100 gigaoctets.

Par contre, un résident qui habite littéralement deux milles à l'extérieur de la Ville de Guelph, dans le comté rural de Wellington, paiera 1 300 $ par mois pour obtenir les mêmes services en matière d'accès à Internet et de chauffage. Le chauffage coûte 1 000 $ par mois, car ces gens n'ont pas accès au gaz naturel. La plupart des habitants des régions rurales chauffent à l'huile et cela leur coûte environ 1 000 $ par mois. La plupart d'entre eux paient donc de 4 000 à 6 000 $ chaque hiver pour chauffer leur logement à l'huile. L'accès à Internet avec une capacité de 100 gigaoctets coûte environ 300 $ par mois.

Je tiens à attirer l'attention des membres du comité sur ces données. La situation est similaire dans les régions rurales de Pontiac et de Gatineau, où les résidents n'ont pas accès au gaz naturel et à Internet haute vitesse à un prix abordable. Lorsqu'on conduit dans la plupart des régions rurales de l'Est du Canada et qu'on voit des maisons en démolition, ce n'est pas sans raison. En effet, ces maisons coûtent maintenant trop cher à entretenir, car les organismes de réglementation, que ce soit à l'échelon fédéral ou provincial, n'ont pas déployé les services nécessaires en matière de gaz naturel ou d'Internet dans les régions rurales de la même façon qu'ils ont déployé les services en matière d'électricité et de téléphone traditionnel dans ces régions.

Par conséquent, nous avons maintenant de la difficulté à régler les problèmes liés au chauffage des logements et à l'accès à l'inforoute moderne. Comme je l'ai dit, l'exemple que j'ai donné représente la réalité des Canadiens qui habitent dans la plupart des régions rurales de l'Est et du centre du Canada. Ces gens paient 1 300 $ par mois pour chauffer leur logement et avoir accès à Internet haute vitesse, alors qu'une personne qui habite littéralement un mille plus loin dans une nouvelle région urbaine paie 150 $ par mois pour les mêmes services. Je pense que c'est l'un des dossiers sur lesquels notre comité doit se pencher.

(1025)

M. William Amos:

Puis-je formuler des commentaires à cet égard, monsieur le président?

(1030)

Le président:

Oui, allez-y.

M. William Amos:

Encore une fois, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec le fait que les prix abordables représentent un enjeu extrêmement important pour chaque famille et chaque foyer au Canada. Nous faisons tous face à cette réalité et dans les régions rurales du Canada, la situation est souvent plus difficile, car il y a moins de concurrence.

J'aimerais poser la question suivante à l'honorable député: quelles leçons doit-on tirer d'une décennie de gouvernement pendant laquelle le ministre de l'Industrie de l'époque a émis une directive au CRTC qui visait à accorder la priorité à la question de la concurrence? Je crois que les résultats sont éloquents. Cette directive n'a pas fonctionné. Cet effort déployé par le gouvernement conservateur de l'époque n'a pas produit des résultats en matière de prix abordables dont les Canadiens pourraient profiter maintenant. Nous sommes toujours aux prises avec des plans à prix inabordables comparativement à d'autres pays.

En plus du problème des prix inabordables, nous avons de gros problèmes liés à l'accessibilité en milieu rural, et c'est le sujet de la motion 208. Les montants affectés à la relance budgétaire par le gouvernement précédent n'étaient absolument pas suffisants, comme vous l'avez indiqué, pour offrir l'accès à Internet dans les régions rurales du Canada de façon à rétablir l'équilibre en matière d'infrastructure numérique. Cela me semble évident.

Avec ma motion, je n'ai pas tenté de transformer cet enjeu en enjeu partisan — et je n'essaie pas de le faire aujourd'hui. Je pense que le gouvernement actuel et les gouvernements précédents — y compris ceux qui ont précédé le gouvernement Harper — sont responsables de ces résultats inéquitables. Je crois qu'il faut reconnaître que les politiques adoptées par le gouvernement conservateur précédent n'ont pas permis d'avoir des prix abordables et l'accès à Internet haute vitesse et aux services de téléphone cellulaire dans les régions rurales du Canada. Tous les électeurs méritent que nous travaillions et que nous vivions dans le présent et que nous nous rendions compte qu'ils veulent avoir accès à Internet haute vitesse et à des services de téléphone cellulaire depuis longtemps. Mes électeurs voulaient avoir accès à ces services il y a deux semaines, lorsque leurs maisons étaient menacées par l'inondation et qu'ils tentaient de les protéger avec des sacs de sable.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Peu importe ce qui est arrivé avec la motion l'an dernier — j'ai consulté le compte rendu et je n'étais pas là —, nous sommes visés par une directive de la Chambre. Je pense qu'il nous revient de prendre des mesures sérieuses à cet égard.

Pour revenir sur les commentaires formulés plus tôt par M. Chong, j'ai une circonscription rurale qui est un peu plus vaste que celle de Wellington—Halton Hills, une circonscription que je connais très bien, car j'ai déjà habité à Guelph. Je suis sûr qu'il est interdit d'utiliser un téléphone cellulaire ou un poste bande publique au volant, mais dans ma circonscription, il y a des panneaux qui indiquent quelle chaîne de poste bande publique il faut utiliser pour annoncer sa présence, afin de conduire sur ces routes en toute sécurité. Nous vivons dans un environnement très différent. Je dois conduire 200 kilomètres sur des chemins de terre pour participer à des évènements organisés dans ma circonscription. C'est notre réalité. Il faut utiliser la chaîne 10 dans certaines régions et la chaîne 5 dans d'autres régions. Il faut les utiliser.

Mais c'est assez. Je sais que Rémi et Richard ont chacun une très vaste circonscription dans une région rurale du Québec et je veux les rallier à cette cause. J'aimerais donner à Richard la chance de faire un bref commentaire. [Français]

M. Richard Hébert (Lac-Saint-Jean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Amos, je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

On sait que l'accès à l'infrastructure numérique joue aujourd'hui un rôle extrêmement important pour les Canadiens, tant sur le plan de la sécurité qu'en matière de santé ou de développement économique dans nos régions. C'est ce qu'indique votre motion.

Comme il est précisé dans le mémoire que j'ai déposé en vue du budget de 2019, dans ma circonscription, Lac-Saint-Jean, 22 portions habitées du territoire ne disposent ni de connexion cellulaire ni de connexion Internet. C'est le cas des MRC de Maria-Chapdelaine et du Domaine-du-Roy.

Selon vous, quelles mesures pourraient être mises sur pied pour favoriser et faciliter la collaboration et le déploiement d'infrastructures sans fil dans nos milieux ruraux?

Pouvez-vous nous dire de quelle façon votre étude sur la motion M-208 pourrait aider votre circonscription et d'autres comme la mienne, Lac-Saint-Jean, à obtenir une meilleure infrastructure numérique sans fil?

M. William Amos:

Pour commencer, monsieur Hébert, je vous remercie de votre présence, en votre qualité de secrétaire parlementaire et représentant du gouvernement en matière de petites et moyennes entreprises. Nous savons très bien à quel point il est important d'appuyer les PME en région au moyen de l'infrastructure numérique nécessaire pour assurer leur succès. Si nous voulons réaliser des exportations, être à la fine pointe et saisir les occasions d'affaires, il faut avoir cette technologie.

Comme dans la vôtre, il y a dans ma circonscription des préfets, des maires et des mairesses, des conseillers et des conseillères ainsi que des dirigeants municipaux qui crient à l'aide haut et fort. Or depuis notre élection, nous voyons une augmentation des appuis fiscaux et des investissements.

Je songe notamment ici à Brancher pour innover, un programme de 500 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, qui a à son tour entraîné une participation financière des secteurs provincial et privé. En tout, ce programme a permis des investissements de plus de 1 milliard de dollars. Cependant, Brancher pour innover souffrait d'une lacune: les services cellulaires. En effet, ce programme était axé sur les services Internet haute vitesse.

Ce que j'aimerais, c'est que les nouveaux investissements pluriannuels annoncés par notre gouvernement dans le budget fassent une part aux services cellulaires, ou encore que les investissements dans les services Internet haute vitesse réussissent du même coup à améliorer les services cellulaires. Nous constatons une convergence des technologies sans fil et Internet. Cependant, ni moi ni les électeurs, les élus, les préfets, les maires et les mairesses de ma circonscription ne sommes des experts techniques. Nous voulons mieux comprendre la voie à suivre afin que ces deux volets connaissent un égal succès.

Nous voulons également voir différents modèles en action. Je vous donne un exemple. Dans ma circonscription, des projets d'une valeur totale d'environ 13,4 millions de dollars sont menés par une compagnie privée, Bell Canada, afin d'aider environ 3 200 foyers répartis dans 29 collectivités. Nous avons aussi un projet de 7 millions de dollars, dont la moitié des fonds est fournie par l'organisme sans but lucratif 307net et qui reçoit aussi l'appui financier de la municipalité de Cantley.

Voilà donc des exemples de modèles différents rendus possibles par les mesures financières du gouvernement fédéral et l'appui du gouvernement provincial. Je crois que les discussions qui auront lieu dans les prochains mois ou les prochaines années viseront à déterminer les modèles les plus appropriés et les plus abordables, et plus particulièrement du côté des OSBL. Non seulement ces modèles doivent satisfaire aux exigences techniques, mais il faut que ce soit abordable, comme le député de l'opposition vient de le mentionner.

(1035)

M. Richard Hébert:

Me reste-t-il encore un peu de temps?

Le président:

Il vous reste quelques minutes.

M. Richard Hébert:

Merci, monsieur Amos. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants d'avoir proposé cette motion. Comme vous le savez, cette question importante est à l'étude depuis quelque temps. Je vis moi-même en région et je peux témoigner des difficultés que nous pose le manque de services cellulaires et d'accès à Internet.

Permettez-moi de vous en donner des exemples. Dans ma propre maison, je suis obligé de me placer à un endroit précis pour être capable de capter un signal cellulaire et d'utiliser mon téléphone pour des appels. Partout ailleurs dans la maison, c'est impossible. De plus, si je veux télécharger La Presse le matin pour la lire, je dois crier à mes garçons de se débrancher de leur connexion Internet pour que je puisse avoir accès à mon journal. Remarquez bien qu'il y a un bon côté à la chose: quand mes garçons se débranchent, ils vont s'amuser dehors, ce qui est probablement meilleur pour leur santé.

Il s'agit donc d'une grande préoccupation dans les régions. Comme vous le savez, des études ont été réalisées et notre gouvernement a prévu 1,7 milliard de dollars dans le budget de 2019 pour s'assurer de mettre en place les infrastructures nécessaires.

Le gouvernement vient également de conclure la mise aux enchères du spectre de la bande de 600 mégahertz. Le gouvernement avait réservé 43 % du spectre disponible à des fournisseurs régionaux, de façon à faciliter l'accès à Internet en région.

Vous avez soulevé la directive envoyée au CRTC par l'ancien ministre Bernier pour que cet organisme favorise dans ses décisions un accès accru et plus abordable aux services.

Ma question est à la fois simple et complexe. Selon vous, que devons-nous faire de mieux pour nous assurer que les Canadiens de toutes les régions auront, sans plus tarder, accès à des services Internet sans fil ou câblés? Que manque-t-il à l'ensemble des mesures que nous avons mises en place au cours des dernières années? [Traduction]

Le président:

Veuillez être bref, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Je me souviens bien de cette fois où je conduisais vers Rivière-du-Loup pour un caucus libéral. Il était 1 heure du matin, j'étais un peu perdu dans la circonscription du secrétaire parlementaire et je ne pouvais pas consulter le géonavigateur de mon téléphone cellulaire, pour la raison dont nous discutons aujourd'hui. Cela soulève aussi toute cette dimension de sécurité publique.

Votre question est effectivement complexe, mais j'essaierai de vous donner une réponse brève et simple.

Dans votre étude, outre l'avis des experts du secteur privé, il pourrait être utile de connaître le point de vue du milieu universitaire sur la Loi sur les télécommunications. Par exemple, il y aurait lieu de se demander si, au lieu de s'en remettre à des objectifs non obligatoires, on ne devrait pas plutôt renforcer les dispositions législatives actuelles entourant l'accès à Internet, pour ainsi prêter main-forte au CRTC et obtenir de meilleurs résultats.

Je pose la question sans savoir la réponse. Il est possible qu'il faille modifier la Loi elle-même pour permettre cette réglementation plus forte et plus stricte et pour imposer des solutions non seulement au secteur privé, mais aussi aux gouvernements.

(1040)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, vous avez les deux dernières minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais faire un suivi sur cette question, car c'est un bon point.

Vous avez mentionné les avis de directive émis par Maxime Bernier et ensuite par Navdeep Bains, et vous avez parlé des différences entre les deux.

Si vous aviez une directive maintenant, que diriez-vous au CRTC, afin d'orienter les entreprises? Je crois que le système est déficient, mais si nous décidions maintenant d'émettre une directive, que feriez-vous?

M. William Amos:

Pour revenir à la question précédente à laquelle je viens de répondre, je pense que je commencerais par dire qu'il faut d'abord examiner les lois. Si on émet une directive, c'est pour fournir à l'organisme de réglementation des précisions sur la façon d'atteindre certains objectifs. Si les lois étaient plus précises, et surtout si des objectifs étaient établis, par exemple en ce qui concerne l'accessibilité dans les régions rurales, on pourrait peut-être obtenir de meilleurs résultats sans avoir à émettre des directives précises.

En général, est-ce une bonne chose de chercher à accroître la concurrence? C'est certainement une bonne chose pour les consommateurs. Est-il approprié de tenter d'obtenir des prix abordables? Certainement, mais je ne suis pas sûr...

M. Brian Masse:

Quelle serait votre directive? Qu'est-ce qui serait utile? Je présume que c'est ce que je tente de savoir. Cherchez-vous une exclusion spéciale sur laquelle le CRTC devrait se concentrer immédiatement? Vous pourriez lui envoyer ce message dès maintenant. Je tente de vous offrir l'occasion de le faire.

M. William Amos:

Certainement. Je pense que les représentants de l'organisme de réglementation écoutent cette discussion. Ils entendent et ils ont entendu ce souhait par l'entremise de l'initiative intitulée « Parlons large bande » et ils ont entendu les gens souhaiter obtenir l'accès universel dans les régions rurales du Canada. Des normes ont été établies. Des fonds ont été affectés.

Manifestement, à titre de député d'une circonscription rurale qui représente de nombreuses collectivités qui souffrent d'un manque d'accessibilité, j'aimerais beaucoup qu'on précise davantage comment améliorer l'accessibilité dans les régions rurales. Notre gouvernement a fait un pas de géant en ce qui concerne les mesures financières, et je pense que la situation est très encourageante pour les régions rurales du Canada grâce au Fonds pour la large bande universelle et au fonds du CRTC et, possiblement, grâce à la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. Ces mécanismes existent. Je pense qu'il faut maintenant se demander comment ce financement sera versé et comment il encouragera d'autres initiatives de ce genre.

Nous pouvons également présumer que les intervenants du secteur des entreprises de télécommunications d'un bout à l'autre du Canada liront ces témoignages. Ils entendront les voix des députés de partout au Canada et ils reconnaîtront qu'il s'agit d'un enjeu national qui a reçu l'approbation unanime du Parlement.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est tout le temps que nous avions aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais remercier tous les participants. À mardi prochain.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard indu 14908 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 09, 2019

2019-01-31 INDU 146

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1035)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I move that we approve and report back the supplementary estimates (B) at this time.

The Chair:

Mr. Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

I'd like to state, for the record, that I believe, in having this motion go forward without having the capacity to bring in the minister or officials for us to review, that, on principle, we are not doing our job as parliamentarians. The public should judge this move by what it is, a deflection of our parliamentary duties and functions in this place.

The Chair:

We have a motion on the floor. We'll go to a vote.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would like a recorded vote.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 6; nays 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

The motion is adopted.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1035)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je propose d'approuver le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) et d'en faire rapport maintenant.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Albas.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Je tiens à mentionner, pour le compte rendu, que je crois que l'adoption de cette motion sans avoir pu faire venir devant nous le ministre ou des fonctionnaires à des fins d'examen revient, en principe, à ne pas faire notre travail de parlementaires. La population devrait juger cette façon de procéder pour ce qu'elle est, à savoir une façon de se dérober à nos devoirs et à nos fonctions parlementaires au sein du Comité.

Le président:

Nous sommes saisis d'une motion. Nous allons la mettre aux voix.

M. Dan Albas:

J'aimerais un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion est adoptée par 6 voix contre 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

La motion est adoptée.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard indu 332 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on January 31, 2019

2018-12-10 INDU 143

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody.

Can you feel the excitement in the air? I'm not talking about Christmas. We should all be excited now. This is the second-to-last witness panel on copyright—

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

That you know of.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Don't do that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I've been here for a while.

The Chair:

Welcome, everybody, to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, meeting 143, as we continue our five-year statutory review of copyright.

Today we have with us Casey Chisick, a partner with Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP; Michael Geist, Canada research chair in Internet and e-commerce law, faculty of law, University of Ottawa; Ysolde Gendreau, a full professor, faculty of law, Université de Montréal; and then, from the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada, we have Bob Tarantino, chair, copyright policy committee and Catherine Lovrics, vice-chair, copyright policy committee.

You'll each have up to seven minutes for your presentation, and I will cut you off after seven minutes because I'm like that. Then, we'll go into questions because I'm sure we have lots of questions for you.

We're going to get started with Mr. Chisick.

I want to thank you. You were here once before, and you didn't get a chance to do your thing, so thank you for coming from Toronto to see us again.

Mr. Casey Chisick (Partner, Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP, As an Individual):

I'm happy to be here. Thank you for inviting me back.

My name is Casey Chisick. I'm a partner at Cassels Brock in Toronto. I'm certified as a specialist in copyright law and I've been practising and teaching in that area for almost 20 years. That includes many appearances before the Copyright Board and in judicial reviews of decisions of the board, including five appeals to the Supreme Court of Canada.

In my practice, I act for a wide variety of clients, including artists, copyright collectives, music publishers, universities, film and TV producers, video game developers, broadcasters, over-the-top services and many others, but the views I express here today will be mine alone.

I want to begin by thanking and congratulating the committee for its dedication to this important task. You've heard from many different stakeholders over the course of many months, and I agree with many of their views. When I was first invited to appear last month, I planned to focus on Copyright Board reform, but that train has now left the station through Bill C-86, so I'm going to comment today a bit more broadly on other aspects of the act. I will come back to the board, though, toward the end of my remarks.

On substantive matters, I'd like to touch on five specific issues.

First, it's my view that Parliament should clarify some of the many new and expanded exceptions from copyright infringement that were introduced in the 2012 amendments. Some of those have caused confusion and have led to unnecessary litigation and unintended consequences.

For example, a 2016 decision of the Copyright Board found that backup copies of music made by commercial radio stations accounted for more than 22% of the commercial value of all of the copies that radio stations make. As a result of the expansion of the backup copies exception, the Copyright Board then proceeded to discount the stations' royalty payments by an equivalent percentage of over 22%. It took that money directly out of the pockets of creators and rights holders, even though the copies were found in that case to have very significant economic value.

In my view, that can't be the kind of balance that Parliament intended when it introduced that exception in 2012.

Second, the act should be amended to ensure that statutory safe harbours for Internet intermediaries work as intended. They need to be available only to truly passive entities, not to sites or services that play more active roles in facilitating access to infringing content. I agree that intermediaries who do nothing more than offer the means of communication or storage should not be liable for copyright infringement, but too many services that are not passive, including certain cloud services and content aggregators, are resisting payment by claiming that they fall within the same exceptions. To the extent that it's a loophole in the act, it should be closed.

Third, it's important to clarify ownership of copyright in movies and television shows, mostly because the term of copyright in those works is so uncertain under the current approach, but I disagree with the suggestion that screenwriters or directors ought to be recognized as the authors. I haven't heard any persuasive explanation from their representatives as to why that should be the case or, more importantly, what they would do with the rights they're seeking if those rights were to be granted.

In my view, given the commercial realities of the industry, which has dealt with this for years under collective agreements, a better solution would be to deem the producer to be the author, or at least the first owner of copyright, and deal with the term of copyright accordingly.

Fourth, Parliament should reconsider the reversion provisions of the Copyright Act. Currently, assignments and exclusive licences terminate automatically 25 years after an author's death, with copyright then reverting to the author's estate. That was once standard in many countries, but it's now more or less unique to Canada, and it can be quite disruptive in practice.

Imagine spending millions of dollars turning a book into a movie or building a business around a logo commissioned from a graphic designer only to wake up one day and find that you no longer have the right to use that underlying material in Canada. There are better and more effective ways to protect the interests of creators, many of whom I represent, without turning legitimate businesses upside down overnight.

(1535)



Fifth, the act should provide a clear and efficient path to site blocking and website de-indexing orders on a no-fault basis to Internet intermediaries and with an appropriate eye on balance among the competing interests of the various stakeholders. Although the Supreme Court has made clear that these injunctions may be available under equitable principles, the path to obtaining them is, in my view, far too long and expensive to be helpful to most rights holders. Canada should follow the lead of many of its major trading partners, including the U.K. and Australia, by adopting a more streamlined process—one that keeps a careful eye on the balance of competing interests among the various stakeholders.

In my remaining time, I'd like to address the recent initiatives to reform the operations of the Copyright Board.

The board is vital to the creative economy. Rights holders, users and the general public all rely on it to set fair and equitable rates for the uses of protected material. For the Canadian creative market to function effectively, the board needs to do its work and render its decisions in a timely, efficient and predictable way.

I was glad to see the comprehensive reforms in Bill C-86. I'm also mindful that the bill is well on its way to becoming law, so what I say here today may not have much immediate impact. For that reason, and in the interest of time, I'll just refer you to the testimony I gave before the Senate banking committee on November 21. I'll then touch on two specific issues.

First, the introduction of mandatory rate-setting criteria, including both the public interest and what a willing buyer would pay to a willing seller, is a very positive development. Clear and explicit criteria should result in a more timely, efficient and predictable tariff process. That's important because unpredictable rates can lead to severe market disruption, especially in emerging markets, like online music.

I'm concerned that the benefits of the provision in Bill C-86 will be undermined by its language, which also empowers the board to consider “any other criterion” it deems appropriate. An open-ended approach like this will create more mandatory boxes for the parties to check, in addition to things like technological neutrality and balance, which the Supreme Court introduced in 2015, but it won't guarantee that the board won't simply discard the parties' evidence in favour of other, totally unpredictable factors. That could increase the cost of board proceedings, with no corresponding increase in efficiency or predictability.

If it's too late to delete that provision from Bill C-86, I suggest that the government move quickly to provide regulatory guidance as to how the criteria should be applied, including what to look for in the willing buyer, willing seller analysis.

Last, very briefly, I understand that some committee witnesses have suggested that rather than doing it voluntarily, as the act currently provides, collectives should be required to file their licensing agreements with the Copyright Board. I agree that having access to all relevant agreements could help the board develop a more complete portrait of the markets it regulates. That's a laudable goal.

However, there's also an important counterweight to consider: Users may be reluctant to enter into agreements with collectives if they know they're going to be filed with the Copyright Board and thus become a matter of public record. The concern would be, of course, that services in the marketplace are operating in a very competitive environment. The last thing they want to do is make the terms of their confidential agreements known to everyone, including their competitors. I can say more about this in the question and answer session to follow.

Thank you for your attention. I do look forward to your questions.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Michael Geist.

You have seven minutes, please, sir.

Dr. Michael Geist (Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-Commerce Law, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa, As an Individual):

Thank you.

Good afternoon. My name is Michael Geist. I am a law professor at the University of Ottawa, where I hold the Canada research chair in Internet and e-commerce law and where I am a member of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society. I appear today in a personal capacity as an independent academic, representing only my own views.

I have been closely following the committee's work, and I have much to say about copyright reform in Canada. Given the limited time, however, I'd like to quickly highlight five issues: educational copying, site blocking, the so-called value gap, the impact of the copyright provisions in the CUSMA, and potential reforms in support of Canada's innovation strategy. My written submission to the committee includes links to dozens of articles I have written on these issues.

First, on educational copying, notwithstanding the oft-heard claim that the 2012 reforms are to blame for current educational practices, the reality is that the current situation has little to do with the inclusion of education as a fair dealing purpose. You need not take my word for it. Access Copyright was asked in 2016 by the Copyright Board to describe the impact of the legal change. It told the board that the legal reform did not change the effect of the law. Rather, it said, it merely codified existing law as interpreted by the Supreme Court.

Further, the claim of 600 million uncompensated copies that lies at the heart of allegations of unfair copying is the result of outdated guesswork using decades-old data and deeply suspect assumptions. The majority of the 600 million, or 380 million, involves kindergarten to grade 12 copying data that goes back to 2005. The Copyright Board warned years ago that the survey data was so old it may not be representative. The remaining 220 million comes from a York University study, much of which is as old as the K-to-12 data. Regardless of its age, however, extrapolating some old copying data from a single university to the entire country does not provide a credible estimate.

In fact, this committee has received copious data on the state of educational copying, and I would argue that it is unequivocal. The days of printed course packs have largely disappeared in favour of digital access. As universities and colleges shift to digital course management systems, the content used changes too. An Access Copyright study at Canadian colleges found that books comprised only 35% of the materials. Moreover, the amount of copying that occurs within these course management systems is far lower than exists with print.

Perhaps most importantly, CMS allows for the incorporation of licensed e-books, open access materials and hyperlinks to other content. At the University of Ottawa, there are now 1.4 million licensed e-books, many of which involve perpetual licences that require no further payment and can be used for course instruction. Further, governments have invested tens of millions in open educational resources, and educational institutions still spend millions annually on transactional pay-per-use licences even where those schools have a collective licence.

What this means is that the shift away from the Access Copyright licence is not grounded in fair dealing. Rather, it reflects the adoption of licences that provide both access and reproduction rights. These licences provide universities with access to content and the ability to use it in their courses. The Access Copyright licence offers far less, granting only copying rights for previously acquired materials. Therefore, efforts to force the Access Copyright licence on educational institutions by either restricting fair dealing or implementing statutory damages reform should be rejected. The prospect of restricting fair dealing would represent an anti-innovation and anti-education step backwards, and run counter to the experience of the past six years of increased licensing, innovation and choice for both authors and educational users.

With respect to statutory damages, supporters argue that a massive escalation in potential statutory damage awards is needed for deterrence and to promote settlement negotiations, but there is nothing to deter. Educational institutions are investing in licensing in record amounts. Promoting settlement negotiations amounts to little more than increasing the legal risks for students and educational institutions.

Second, on site blocking, the committee has heard from several witnesses who have called for the inclusion of an explicit site-blocking provision in the Copyright Act. I believe this would be a mistake. First, the CRTC proceeding into site blocking earlier this year led to thousands of submissions that identified serious problems with the practice, including from the UN special rapporteur for freedom of expression, who raised freedom of expression concerns, and technical groups who cited risks of over-blocking and net neutrality violations. Second, even if there is support for site blocking, the reality is that it already exists under the law, as we saw with the Google v. Equustek case at the Supreme Court.

Third, on the value gap, two issues are not in dispute here. First, the music industry is garnering record revenues from Internet streaming. Second, subscription streaming services pay more to creators than ad-based ones. The question for the copyright review is whether Canadian copyright law has anything to do with this. The answer is no.

(1545)



The notion of a value gap is premised on some platforms or services taking advantage of the law to negotiate lower rates. Those rules, such as notice and take down, do not exist under Canadian copyright laws. The committee talked about this in the last meeting. That helps explain why industry demands to this committee focus instead on taxpayer handouts, such as new taxes on iPhones. I believe these demands should be rejected.

Fourth is the impact of the new CUSMA. The copyright provisions in this new trade agreement significantly alter the copyright balance by extending the term of copyright by an additional 20 years, a reform that Canada rightly long resisted. By doing so, the agreement represents a major windfall that could result in hundreds of millions for rights holders and creates the need to recalibrate Canadian copyright law to restore the balance.

Finally, there are important reforms that would help advance Canada's innovation strategy, for example, greater fair dealing flexibility. The so-called “such as” approach would make the current list of fair dealing purposes illustrative rather than exhaustive and would place Canadian innovators on a level playing field with fair use countries such as the U.S. That reform would still maintain the full fairness analysis, along with the existing jurisprudence, to minimize uncertainty. In the alternative, an exception for informational analysis or text and data mining is desperately needed by the AI sector.

Canada should also establish new exceptions for our digital lock rules, which are among the most restrictive in the world. Canadian businesses are at a disadvantage relative to the U.S., including the agriculture sector, where Canadian farmers do not have the same rights as those found in the United States.

Moreover, given this government's support for open government—including its recent funding of Creative Commons licensed local news and its support for open source software—I believe the committee should recommend addressing an open government copyright barrier by removing the Crown copyright provision from the Copyright Act.

I look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Your timing was really good.[Translation]

Ms. Gendreau, you have seven minutes.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau (Full Professor, Faculty of Law, Université de Montréal, As an Individual):

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for agreeing to hear me.

My name is Ysolde Gendreau, and I am a full professor at the Université de Montréal's Faculty of Law.

Since my master's studies, I have specialized in copyright law—I am the first in Canada to have completed a doctorate in this field. With few exceptions, my publications have always focused on this area of law. I am appearing here in a purely personal capacity.

I would like to read an excerpt from the discussions at the Revision Conference of the Bern Convention in Rome in 1928 on the right to broadcasting, recognized in article 11bis.

Comments on that text state:

In the first paragraph, the article... strongly confirms the author's right; in the second, it leaves it to national laws to regulate the conditions under which the right in question may be exercised, while acknowledging that, in recognition of the general public interest of the State, limitations to copyright may be put in force; however it is understood that a country shall only make use of the possibility of introducing such limitations where their necessity has been established by the experience of that country itself; such limitations shall not in any case lessen the moral right of the author; nor shall they affect the author’s right to equitable remuneration, which shall be fixed, failing agreement, by the competent authorities.

The principle of the 1928 article remains today.

Were the economic players who benefited from the broadcasting of works, that is, the broadcasters, and who had liability imposed on them at the time happy with it? Of course not. Today, the economic players who benefit from the distribution of works on the Internet continue to resist the imposition of copyright liability.

We don't have to wait 90 years to reach the consensus that exists in the broadcasting world. Just 20 years later, in 1948, no one batted an eyelid to see broadcasters pay for the works they use. In the future, the resistance of today's digital communications industry will be considered just as senseless as that of broadcasters 90 years ago if we act.

(1550)

[English]

I would now like to turn your attention to enforcement issues with respect to the Internet. Because it is tied to the right to communicate, the making available right has become part of the general regime that governs this right to communicate. Additional provisions have, however, generated antinomies that sap the new right of the very consequences of its recognition. Here are examples, which I do not expect you to read as I refer to them, but that I am showing to you now because I'll refer to them generally later on.

The general ISP liability requires the actual infringement of a work in order to engage the liability of a service provider. This condition is reinforced by a provision on statutory damages. The hosting provision also requires an actual infringement of a work, this time recognized by a court decision in order to engage the liability of a hosting provider. Our famous UGC exception is very much premised on the use of a single work or very few works by a single individual for whom the copyright owner will be claiming that the exception does not apply. Within the statutory damages provisions, several subsections seriously limit the interest of a copyright owner to avail himself of this mechanism. One of them even impacts other copyright owners who would have a similar right of action. Of course, our notice and notice provisions are again premised on the issuance of a notice to a single infringer by one copyright owner.

The functional objectives of these provisions are completely at odds with the actual environment in which they are meant to operate. Faced with mass uses of works, collective management started in the 19th century precisely because winning a case against a single user was perceived as a coup d'épée dans l'eau. The Internet corresponds to a much wider phenomenon of mass use, yet our Copyright Act has retreated to the individual enforcement model. This statutory approach is totally illogical and severely undermines the credibility of any copyright policy aimed at the Internet phenomenon.

As you may have seen, the texts I refer to are fairly wordy, and many are based on conditions that are stacked against copyright owners. Just imagine how long it may take to get a judgment before using section 31.1, or how difficult it is for a copyright owner to claim that the dissemination of a new work actually has “a substantial adverse effect, financial or otherwise, on the exploitation or potential exploitation” of the work”. These provisions rely on unrealistic conditions that can only lead to abuses by their beneficiaries.

The direction that our Copyright Act has taken in 2012 goes against the very object that it was supposed to harness. The response to mass uses can only be mass management—that is, collective management—in a manner that must match the breadth of the phenomenon. The demise of the private copying regime in the 2012 amendments, by the deliberate decision not to modernize it, was in line with this misguided approach of individual enforcement of copyright on the Internet.

(1555)

[Translation]

Given the time available, I'm not able to raise the points that should logically accompany these comments, but you may want to use the period for questions to get more details. I would be pleased to provide you with that information.

Thank you for your attention.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

We're going to move to, finally, the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada.

Mr. Tarantino.

Mr. Bob Tarantino (Chair, Copyright Policy Committee, Intellectual Property Institute of Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My name is Bob Tarantino. I'm here with Catherine Lovrics. We are here in our capacities as former chair and current chair, respectively, of the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada's copyright policy committee. We are speaking in those capacities and not on behalf of the law firms with which we are associated, or on behalf of any of our respective clients.

We'd like to thank you for inviting IPIC to present to you our committee's recommendations with respect to a statutory review of the act.

IPIC is the Canadian professional association of patent agents, trademark agents and lawyers practising in intellectual property law. IPIC represents the views of Canadian IP professionals, and in our submissions to the committee we strove to represent the diversity of views among copyright law practitioners in as balanced a manner as possible.

You have our committee's written submissions, so in this speech I will be highlighting only a few of the recommendations contained therein. That being said, I'd like to provide a framing device for our comments, which I think is important for this committee to bear in mind as it deliberates, and that is the need for evidence-based policy-making. The preamble to the 2012 Copyright Modernization Act described one of the purposes of its amendments as promoting “culture and innovation, competition and investment in the Canadian economy”.

However, the extent to which any of those desired goals have been achieved because of changes to the act in 2012 remains unknown. There is little to no publicly available empirical data about the effects of copyright reform. We recommend that work commence now in anticipation of the next mandated review of the act to ensure that copyright reform proceeds in a manner informed by rigorous, transparent and valid data about the results, if any, which copyright reform has already achieved. Parliament should identify what would constitute success in copyright reform, mandate funding to enable the collection of data that speak to those identified criteria for success and ensure that the data is publicly accessible.

As noted in our written submission, we think some easy and granular fixes can be made to the act that will facilitate copyright transactions. Those changes include allowing for the assignment of copyright in future works and clarifying the rights of joint owners. The remainder of my comments will highlight four bigger picture recommendations, each of which should be implemented in a way that respects the rights and interests of copyright authors, owners, intermediaries, users and the broader public.

On data and databases, it is now trite to say that increasing commercial value is attributed to data and databases. However, the current legal basis for according copyright protection to them remains uncertain. Consideration should be given to amendments that effect a balance between the significant investments made in creating databases and avoiding inadvertently creating monopolies on the individual facts contained within those databases or deterring competition in fact-driven marketplaces. One approach to this issue that we flag for your attention is the European Union's sui generis form of protection for databases.

Regarding artificial intelligence and data mining, continuing with the theme of uncertainty, the interface between copyright and artificial intelligence remains murky. The development of machine learning and natural language processing often relies on large amounts of data to train AI systems, the process referred to as data mining. Those techniques generally require copying copyright-protected works, and can also require access to large datasets that may be protected by copyright.

We recommend that the committee consider text and data access and mining requirements in the context of AI. In particular, we refer you to amendments enacted in the United Kingdom that permit copying for the purposes of computational analysis.

Relatedly, whether works created using AI are accorded copyright protection is ambiguous, given copyright's originality requirement and the need for human authorship. A possible solution is providing copyright protection to works created without a human author in certain circumstances. Again, we refer you to provisions contained in the copyright legislation of the United Kingdom and to the approach the Canadian Copyright Act takes in respect to makers of sound recordings.

One the $1.25-million tariff exemption for radio broadcasters, the first $1.25 million of advertising revenue earned by commercial broadcasters is exempt from Copyright Board-approved tariffs in respect of performer's performances and sound recordings, other than a nominal $100 payment. In other words, of the first $1.25 million of advertising revenue earned by a commercial broadcaster, only $100 is paid to performers and sound recording owners. By contrast, songwriters and music publishers collect payments from every dollar earned by the broadcaster. The exemption is an unnecessary subsidy for broadcasters at the expense of performers and sound recording owners and should be removed.

Regarding injunctive relief against intermediaries, Internet intermediaries that facilitate access to infringing materials are best placed to reduce the harm caused by unauthorized online distribution of copyright-protected works. This principle is reflected in the EU copyright directive and has provided the foundation for copyright owners to obtain injunctive relief against intermediaries whose services are used to infringe copyright. The act should be amended to expressly allow copyright owners to obtain injunctions such as site blocking and de-indexing orders against intermediaries.

(1600)



The act should be amended to expressly allow copyright owners to obtain injunctions such as site blocking and de-indexing orders against intermediaries. This recommendation is supported by a broad range of Canadian stakeholders, including ISPs. Moreover, more than a decade of experience in over 40 countries demonstrates that site blocking is a significant, proven and effective tool to help reduce access to infringing online materials.

I'd like to thank you again for inviting IPIC to present you with our comments today.

We're happy to answer any questions you may have about our submission.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to jump right into questions, starting with Mr. David Graham.

You have seven minutes, sir.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I have enough questions to go around. It might be a bit of a game of whack-a-mole here.

We talked a bit about the need to go to basically collective enforcement rather than individual enforcement of copyright because it's no longer manageable. How can collective copyright enforcement work without just empowering larger users and owners to trample on users and small producers?

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

The difficulty I see behind your question is that people tend to see the collective administration of copyright as a big business issue. People tend to forget that behind the CMOs, collective management organizations, or the collectives, there are actual individuals. The collective management of rights for these people is actually the only solution for them to make sure that they receive some sort of remuneration in this kind of mass environment, and indeed they require getting together in order to fight off GAFA. This is the elephant in the room. We know that so much money is being siphoned off the country because not enough people who are involved in the business of making all these works available to the public are paying their fair share of this kind of material.

This kind of management is possible. There are enough safeguards in the act, and even in the Competition Act, to ensure that this is not being abused.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Talking about abuse, we certainly see the abuse. Google and Facebook were here a couple of weeks ago. They admitted they only look at larger copyright holders when they're doing their enforcement systems. They admit they don't care about Canadian exemptions under fair dealing. The abuse is already there.

I don't see how removing protections for individuals is going to improve that.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I'm not saying that we should remove protections from individuals. I'm just saying that when all is looked at globally, everybody should be paying a fair share for the use of the works. I have trouble imagining that people who are willing to pay $500 and more for an iPhone would find it damaging to pay an extra.... I certainly don't want to be bound by whatever number we may imagine. We'd say that this is going to prevent them from having free expression or from having access to the work. Even if, on the price of an iPhone or other equipment, extra money were not added, given the profit margin on these products, this is something that will certainly not put these companies into bankruptcy.

I see the advent of a better functioning collective management system as something that actually protects the individuals.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have a lot of time so I'll move on.

Mr. Geist, I mentioned Facebook and Google's testimony a minute ago where they identified that they don't make any effort to enforce fair dealing. You are familiar with that. Do you have any comments or thoughts on that from your sense or background?

Dr. Michael Geist:

Yes, it's been a significant source of frustration. In fact, I had a personal experience with my daughter, who created a video after she participated in a program called March of the Living, where she went to concentration camps in Europe and then on to Israel. As part of the Ottawa community, she interviewed all the various participants who were alongside her, created a video that was going to be displayed here to 500 people. There was some background music along with the interviews. They posted it to YouTube, and on the day this was to be shown the sound was entirely muted because the content ID system had identified this particular soundtrack.

They were able to fix that, but if that isn't a classic example of what non-commercial, user-generated content is supposed to protect, I'm not sure what is. The fact that Google hasn't tried to ensure that the UGC provision that Professor Gendreau mentioned, which, as this example illustrates, has tremendous freedom of expression potential for lots of Canadians, is for me not just disappointing but a real problem.

(1605)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Chisick, I have a question for you too.

You talked about 22% of the value for broadcasters' backup copies. If they're actual backup copies, where is the problem?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

The problem is this. The Copyright Board conducted an overall valuation of all of the copies used by radio broadcasters. It determined that if it were forced to allocate value among the different types of copies, some value would go to backup copies, some value would go to main automation system copies and so on and so forth, until you get to 100%.

The Copyright Board found that 22% of that value was allocable to backup copies. In other words, radio stations derive commercial value from the copies they make and 22% of that is allocable to backup copies. There is therefore significant commercial value to those backup copies, yet the Copyright Board felt compelled, under the expanded backup copies exception, to remove that value from the royalties that are paid to rights holders.

Now, if that was a correct interpretation of the backup copies exception, then the Copyright Board may have had no choice but to do what it did. My point is simply that the intention of these exceptions must not be to exempt large commercial interests from paying royalties for copies from which they themselves derive significant commercial value. That's an example to me of a system of exemptions that's out of whack in the grand scheme of balance between the interests of rights holders, users and the public interest.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have only a half a minute left here, but I'm just trying to understand the issue, because you've brought up this major point about the money that they're not spending on.... If they use the main copy or the backup copy to broadcast something, what's the difference?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I'm sorry. I didn't understand your question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've always had the right to format shifting. If I buy something that I convert to the computer and I broadcast it, that's the backup copy, and if you add a monetary value.... This all doesn't connect very well to me.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I understand the question.

This requires a review of 20 years of Copyright Board radio broadcasting tariffs, which obviously we don't have time for here, but the point of the matter is that, until 2016, radio broadcasters paid a certain amount for all of the copies they made. It was only in 2016, after the 2012 amendments had come into force, that the Copyright Board felt that it had to go through the exercise of slicing and dicing those copies and determining what value was allocable to which. It was then that the 22% exemption was instituted.

Your point is a valid one, because nothing had changed. The approach that radio stations take to copying music hadn't changed. The value that they derived from the copies hadn't changed. The only thing that had changed was the introduction of an exception that the Copyright Board believed needed to lead inexorably to a royalty reduction.

That's what I am reacting to, and that's what I'm suggesting to the committee ought to be re-examined.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My time is up. Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank all of our witnesses for their testimony here today.

In recent weeks we've been hearing from various witnesses favouring a change in approach in how we do copyright and moving to a more American-style fair use model. I would like to survey the group here.

What are the benefits of looking at American-style fair use? What should we take from that and what should we be very wary of?

That's for any of the panellists.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I'll start by reiterating why I think it's a good idea, although I would argue not to jump in with the U.S. fair use provision but rather to use, as I mentioned, the “such as” approach and turn the current fair dealing purposes into a group of illustrative purposes rather than an exhaustive list.

I think that both provides the benefits of being able to rely on our existing jurisprudence, as it represents an evolution of where we're at rather than starting from scratch, and makes it a far more technologically neutral approach. Rather than every five years having people coming up and saying that you need to deal with AI or with some other new issue that pops up, that kind of provision has the ability to adapt as time goes by. We're seeing many countries move in that direction.

I would lastly note that in what's critical as part of this, whether you call it fair dealing or fair use, what's important is whether or not it's fair. The analysis about whether or not it is fair remains unchanged, whether it's an illustrative group or an exhaustive group. That's what matters: to take a look at what's being copied and assess whether it's fair. The purpose is really just a very small part of that overall puzzle, yet by limiting the list we then lock ourselves into a particular point in time and aren't able to adapt as easily as technology changes.

(1610)

Mr. Casey Chisick:

If I may, I agree with Professor Geist that the most important aspect of the fair dealing analysis by far is fairness, but there's a reason that Canada is one of the vast majority of countries in the world that does maintain a fair dealing system. There are really only, last I checked, three or four jurisdictions in the world—the U.S., obviously, Israel and the Philippines—that have a fair use system.

Most of the world subscribes to fair dealing, and there is a reason why. The reason is that governments want to reserve for themselves the ability from time to time to assess what sorts of views in the grand scheme of things are eligible for a fair dealing type of exception, and if we just simply throw the categories open to everything such as X, Y and Z, the predictability of that system becomes far less, and it becomes far more difficult for stakeholders and the copyright system to order their affairs. It becomes more difficult to know what will be considered fair dealing or what's eligible to be considered fair dealing and to plan accordingly.

Overall, Canada has exhibited a fair sensitivity to these issues. The fair dealing categories, obviously, were expanded in 2012 and may well be expanded again in the future when the government sees fit, but I think that to expand it to the entire realm of potential dealings runs the risk of going too far.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I am against the idea of having a fair use exception for several reasons.

First of all, I think that in reality what we have already is very close to the U.S. system. We have purposes that are extremely similar to the fair use purposes. We have criteria that are paraphrases of the fair use criteria, and I really don't think that there is that much of a difference in terms of what the situation is doing. What is happening, though, is that, for the examples we have, it's not just “such as”. I see a very dangerous slope. “Such as” does not mean anything that is fair. “Such as” should mean that we keep within the range of what is already enumerated as possible topics, which is what we already have with our fair dealing exception.

Second, many of these fair use exceptions in the United States have led to results that are extremely difficult to reconcile with a fair use system. They are very criticized, and lastly, I would say that, in order for a fair use system to work in the magnitude that people would want it to work, you would need an extremely litigious society. We are about a 10th of the size of the U.S. We don't have the same kind of court litigation attitude as in the U.S., and I think that this is an important factor in order not to create uncertainties.

Thank you.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Chair, I'd like to share the rest of my time with Mr. Lloyd, if that's all right.

The Chair:

You have two minutes left.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses today.

I have a couple of quick questions for Mr. Chisick. I wish all of you had been here earlier in the study. You could have helped us frame the debate a little more clearly.

One of your points was about closing the loophole about intermediaries. Could you expand on that and give us some real-life examples to help illustrate what you mean?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

Obviously, as a lawyer in private practice, I have to be careful about the examples I give, because many of them come from the real lives of my clients and the companies they deal with from day to day.

What I can tell you is that it has been my experience that certain services—and I gave a couple of examples, both services that are engaged in cloud storage with a twist, helping users to organize their cloud lockers in a way that facilitates quicker access to various types of content and potentially by others than just the locker owner, as well as services that basically operate as content aggregators by a different name—are very quick to try to rely on the hosting exception or the ISP exception, the communications exception, as currently worded to say, “Sure, somebody else might have to pay royalties, but we don't have to pay royalties because our use is exempt. So if it's all the same to you, we just won't”.

(1615)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

They're going further than just being a dumb pipe. They're facilitating.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

They are. That's right. They are, so my view is that the exception needs to be adjusted, not repealed but adjusted, to make very clear that any service that plays an active role in the communication of works or other subject matter that other people store within the digital memory doesn't qualify for the exception.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I will come back to you because I do have another question.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

Okay.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I just wanted to get a quick question to Mr. Geist.

Am I out? Okay. Never mind.

The Chair:

Sorry, but I'm glad you knew those terms that you were using.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

The USMCA changes things in a couple of parameters. How does it change your presentations here?

I was just in Washington and there's no clear path for this to get passed. We could be back to the original NAFTA, and if that goes away then we're back to the original free trade, but that requires Trump to do a six-month exit and notification, and there's debate about whether or not that's on the presidential side or whether it's Congress and there will be lawyers involved and so forth. We're at a point now where we have a potential deal in place. Vegas is making the odds about whether it's going to pass or not.

Maybe we can go around the table here in terms of how you think it affects your presentations here and our review. We're going to have to report back with it basically being...and there are many with the opinion that Congress won't accept it because they don't have enough concessions from Canada.

I put that out there because it's something that changed during the process of our discussions from the beginning of this study to where we are right now, and again where we'll have to give advice to the minister.

We can start on the left side here and move to the right.

Ms. Catherine Lovrics (Vice-Chair, Copyright Policy Committee, Intellectual Property Institute of Canada):

Among our committee there was no consensus with respect to term extension, so it wouldn't have been an issue that we addressed as part of our submission.

But as a result of term extension clearly being covered in USMCA we touched upon reversionary rights, because I think if copyright term is extended it's incumbent upon the government to also consider reversionary rights within that context. This is because at present you are effectively adding those 20 years if the first owner of copyright would have been the author and the author had assigned rights, and reversionary rights under the current regime with everything except for collective works, you would be extending copyright for those who have the reversionary interest and not for the current copyright owners. That was the way that IPIC submissions were impacted.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You're pretty well split within an organization about the benefits and detractions from—

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

For term extension, I think it's a very contentious issue and there was no consensus among our committee.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Would it be fair to say, though, it has significant consequences for opinions on both sides? It's not a minor thing. It's a significant one.

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

I think most definitely. I think there are both very strong advocates for term extension who look to international rights as being one justification for the reason to extend term, and I think there are those who view extending the term as limiting the public domain in Canada in a way that's not appropriate. Again, there's no consensus.

With USMCA proposing it, reversionary rights should be looked at.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Mr. Chisick.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I would agree with that. I mentioned reversionary rights in my presentation, and I don't want to be understood as necessarily suggesting that the way to deal with reversionary rights is to eliminate reversion from the copyright altogether. That's one possible solution, maybe a good solution. There are also other solutions, and certainly with the extension of the term of copyright, which I do think is a good idea, and I've been on the record saying that for some time, how you deal with copyright over that extended term is certainly an issue.

My main point, and it remains regardless of whether the term is life plus 50 or life plus 70, is where reversion is concerned we need to look at it in a way that's less disruptive to the commercial exploitation of copyright. I think the point remains either way.

(1620)

Mr. Brian Masse:

If it was not to be extended, would that change your position on other matters or is it isolated to basically the 50 and 70?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I don't think, sitting here right now—maybe I'll come up with something more intelligent when I'm done—that anything particularly turns on 50 versus 70 in my view.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Mr. Geist.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I think there were three different types of rules within this agreement related to copyright. There are those provisions that, quite frankly, we already caved on under U.S. pressure back in 2012—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

Dr. Michael Geist:

—so our anti-circumvention rules are consistent with the USMCA, but only because there was enormous U.S. pressure leading up to the 2012 reforms, and in fact, we are now more restrictive than the United States, which creates disadvantages for us.

Then there's the one area, the notice-and-notice rules, that the government clearly prioritized and took a stand on to ensure the Canadian rules could continue to exist.

The term extension has an enormous impact, and quite frankly, it's obvious that the government recognized that. It's no coincidence that when we moved from the TPP to the CPTPP, one of the key provisions that was suspended was the term extension. Economist after economist makes it very clear that it doesn't lead to any new creativity. Nobody woke up this morning thinking about writing the great Canadian novel and decided to instead sleep in, because their heirs get 50 years' worth of protection right now rather than 70 years.

For all of the other work that's already been created, that gift of an additional 20 years—quite literally locking down the public domain in Canada for an additional 20 years—comes at an enormous cost, particularly at a time when we move more and more to digital. The ability to use those works in digital ways for dissemination, for education, for new kinds of creativity will now quite literally be lost for a generation.

If there's a recommendation to come out of this committee, it would be, number one, recognize that this is a dramatic shift. When groups come in saying, “Here are all the things we want as rights holders”, they just won the lottery with the USMCA. It's a massive shift in terms of where the balance is at.

Second, the committee ought to recommend that we explore how we can best implement this to limit the damage. It isn't something we wanted. It's something we were forced into. Is there any flexibility in how we ultimately implement this that could lessen some of the harm?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Ms. Gendreau.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I'm indifferent to whether it's 50 years or 70 years, for two reasons.

I just finished a book last month that was about literary social life in France in the 19th century. They had salons where people would go, and artists and politicians would mix. In that book there were lists of the artists and the writers who showed up there, and three-quarters of them were names we don't know.

In terms of copyright term protection, I think very few works manage to be relevant 50 years—or even less so—70 years after the death of the author. I don't know why we should be having so much difficulty over an issue that is important for only a minority of authors. That is one reason.

Second, if we are worried about the copyright term, then I think perhaps we should worry about that because of the fact that copyright covers computer programs. Do you realize that because of their nature, there is never a public domain for copyright programs, given the life of copyright programs? This is an industry that's getting absolutely no public domain.

Lastly, I would say it is possible to have a commercial life beyond term, and I think this is right. As to whether that term is 50 or 70 years, as I said, I'm indifferent. I would never walk outside or march for that one way or another, but 70 years is the term that we have for our major G7 partners; therefore, being a member of the G7 comes with a price, and the extra 20 years is a minority issue.

Mr. Brian Masse:

We all know the G7 plays with rules.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

That's interesting, though. That question gives the whole spectrum on it.

Thank you very much to the witnesses.

The Chair:

That's why we left them to the end.

We're going to jump to Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to share a couple of minutes with Mr. Lametti.

I'd like to start with the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada. First of all, thank you for helping us through the study that we had on intellectual property. It was good to see the implementation of some of the ideas we discussed.

I'm thinking of the interaction between the Intellectual Property Institute and the Copyright Board or collectives. How much engagement do you have in terms of guiding artists towards protecting their works, finding the right path forward for them?

I know you do that in other ways with intellectual property, but what about...?

(1625)

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I'm not sure I'll be able to answer the question with respect to the institutional work that IPIC does, although it maintains relationships, obviously, with those bodies.

As individual advisers, that's a significant part of our day-to-day function, to counsel our clients in terms of how best they can realize the value of the works they've created and exploit those in the marketplace.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

One of the shortfalls that we found in our previous study was with regard to the transparency—not purposely being non-transparent, but just the fact that people didn't know where to go for solutions or to protect themselves.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

Right. I think one thing that we have to contend with as advisers, and that you have to contend with as legislators, is the fact that the copyright system is incredibly complex. It's incredibly opaque for non-experts. I think a guiding principle that everybody would be on board with would be an effort to make the Copyright Act—and the copyright system, more generally—a little more user-friendly.

There are a number of items that we've canvassed in this discussion already, such as reversionary interest, that add additional complexity to the operation of the act and that, I think, should be assessed with an eye towards making it something that you don't need to engage a lawyer for and pay x number of hundreds of dollars an hour in order to navigate.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

In fact, one of the Google representatives said that it is a “complicated and opaque web of music licensing agreements” that people face.

Now we're just talking about guiding principles. We're very late in the study. When we were working on developing an economic development program for the city of Guelph, we looked at guiding principles. When we looked at our community energy initiative, we looked at guiding principles.

In terms of our act and our study, how can we get some of these guiding principles put up at the front of our study? Do you have other guiding principles that we should look towards?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I think, broadly speaking, you can identify a handful of guiding principles, drawn from various theoretical approaches, to justify why copyright exists. Among those are providing an incentive for the creation and dissemination of works by ensuring that authors get rewarded. However, I think it's absolutely critical to maintain or to keep in mind that this principle has to be balanced against a broader communal and cultural interest in ensuring the free flow of ideas and cultural expressive activity.

The challenge that you face, of course, is finding a way to calibrate all of the various interests and various mechanisms that you're putting at play here to achieve those quite disparate functions. There's a tension at play there. It's an ongoing tension.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I don't think that there is a resolution to it necessarily, but I think that it can be implemented and then assessed on an ongoing basis to identify where there have been shortfalls, overreaches and under-compensation.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

In the minute that I have left.... Ms. Gendreau, you mentioned the collectives. I am very interested in how collectives are managed or not managed, and the transparency of collectives. Were you leading towards discussing that? If so, maybe you can put that out here.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

Yes, I'd be happy to talk about that.

I understand that people may have concerns about the way that collectives are run. I think the fact that some collectives will no longer be obliged to go before the board will perhaps raise even further concerns.

However, I know that there are rules, for instance, in the European Union that look at the internal management of collective societies. I would think that such rules, even though they are probably perceived by collectives as annoying, should actually be embraced precisely because they would give greater legitimacy to their work. I would see such rules as legitimacy enhancers rather than as obstacles to working.

(1630)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Over to you, Mr. Lametti.

Mr. David Lametti:

Thank you.

I think my challenge is more that of addressing people by their last names when I've known them for 20 years.

Mr. Tarantino, copying for the purposes of computational analysis is what you potentially suggested as an AI and data mining exception. Do you think that gets us there? Do we need to go with “such as”, or—as someone else suggested a couple of weeks ago—do we make an exception for making incidental copies apply to informational analysis? Give me your thoughts on that.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I'd have to defer to the views of our committee. It's not a point that we specifically canvass them on, beyond what you find in our submission, which is that the U.K. approach is something to consider. What I would suggest is taking it back to our framing device. Let's examine what the result has been in the United Kingdom of implementing their exception for computational analysis.

Mr. David Lametti:

Mr. Chisick, do you want to jump in on that?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

If what you're referring to is temporary copying for technological processes, exception 30.71, that's a good example of an exception that is framed really broadly in a way that is prone to misunderstanding or abuse.

An example is broadcasters arguing that all of broadcasting, from the ingestion of content until the public performance of the work, is one technological process and, therefore, all copies need to be exempt. It may be that, properly framed, an exception like that is an appropriate mechanism to deal with data mining and artificial intelligence. We have to be very careful to frame these exceptions in such a way that really targets them toward the intended purpose and doesn't leave them prone to exploitation in other senses.

Mr. David Lametti:

I'll turn to Mr. Geist, if we have time.

The Chair:

Please answer very briefly.

Dr. Michael Geist:

As I've mentioned, my preference would be for a broad-based “such as” approach. I do think we need something. Even if we do have it, “such as” should include informational analysis.

I saw the Prime Minister on Friday speaking about the importance of AI. Quite frankly, I don't think the U.K. provision goes far enough. Almost all the data we get comes by way of contract. The ability to, in effect, contract out of an informational analysis exception represents a significant problem. We need to ensure that where you acquire those works, you have the ability.... We're not talking about republishing or commercializing these works. We're talking about using them for informational analysis purposes. You shouldn't have to negotiate those out by way of contract. It should be a policy clearly articulated in the law.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Lloyd, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'll finish where I started.

The Chair:

Actually, you have five minutes. Sorry.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay. That changes everything.

Mr. Geist, there seem to be a lot of negatives to the collective model. If there weren't a collective model, it seems there would need to be a collective model because the transaction costs of an individual artist or writer are so high that they would need to band together. Is there any alternative to the collective model in your academics that you could propose as an idea?

Dr. Michael Geist:

The market is providing an alternative right now. I mentioned the 1.4 million licensed e-books that the University of Ottawa has. Those are not acquired through any collective. They're acquired through any number of different publishers or other aggregators. In fact, in many instances we will license the same book on multiple occasions, sometimes in perpetuity, because the rights holder has made it available for this basket of books and for that basket of books and for another basket of books. In fact, authors are doing it all the time, or publishers are doing it all the time right now.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

It does seem very appealing. I like that sort of free market movement idea, but from what we're hearing from the authors who have spoken to us, it doesn't seem.... I'll come back to you.

Mr. Chisick, could you comment on that? Is that a good enough alternative for an author, licensing it through e-books as a replacement for collectives?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

From what I'm seeing from authors who are struggling with developments in the market, it may not be a complete solution. There is no question that transactional licensing, particularly in the book publishing area, has made strides over the last decade or so. It doesn't seem to be capturing the full value of all the works that are in use, though. It's something that, arguably, needs to exist alongside a collective licensing model that can pick up the residue.

In other areas of licensing, market-based solutions haven't been effective yet at all—for example, in music, where the entire viability of an author's or an artist's career depends on the ability to collect millions and millions of micro-payments, fractions of pennies.

(1635)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

What about authors defending their work from copyright infringement? For the average authors, is it within the realm of their financial resources to pursue that litigation without a collective licensing model? Is that something they could do?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

No, it isn't. It's almost impossible for all but the most successful artists or frankly, the most successful rights holders, by which I mean publishers and others—the 1% or very close to it—to actually pursue remedies for copyright infringement. Ironically, that's one of the reasons, in the previous round of copyright reform in 1997, that attempts were made through policy to encourage artists and authors to pursue collective management.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I do want to give Mr. Geist a chance to rebut because it would only be fair, I think.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

It's not that I'm saying that no collectives ought to exist. I think there is a role for them. I'm saying that what we have seen, especially in the academic publishing market, is that they have been replaced, in effect, by alternatives. That is the free market at work. Together with some students, I did studies looking at major Canadian publishers, including a number that came before you, and virtually everything they were making available under licence is what our universities have been licensing.

When you get certain authors saying, “I'm getting less from Access Copyright, why is that?”, we need to recognize that a chunk of Access Copyright's revenues go outside the country, a chunk go towards administration, and then a big chunk goes to what they call a payback system, which is for a repertoire. It doesn't have anything to do with use at all. It simply has to do with the repertoire. That repertoire excludes any works that are more than 20 years old and excludes all digital works.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

What about defending people, like Mr. Chisick was talking about? It's outside the realm of 99% of authors to defend themselves, if their works are being infringed in copyright. What's your replacement for that? What's the alternative?

Dr. Michael Geist:

In many instances, where those works are being licensed, the publishers do have the wherewithal to take action, if need be. However, the notion that somehow we need collective management, largely to sue educational institutions, strikes me as a bit wrong.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Well, to protect....

Dr. Michael Geist:

With all respect, I don't think anybody is credibly making the case that educational institutions are out there trying to infringe copyright. In fact, we see some educational institutions, even in Quebec, that have a collective management licence with Copibec and are still engaged in additional transactional licences because they need to go ahead and pay them. The bad guys here or the infringers, so to speak, are not the educational institutions.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Who are they?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I'm not convinced that there are major infringers in the area of book publishing.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

To be clear, the point that I made about licensing and collective management existing alongside one another is that it's not primarily for the purpose of enforcement. I agree with Professor Geist. The purpose is to make enforcement unnecessary, by making sure that all of the uses that are capable of being licensed and that are appropriate to license are licensed in practice.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

May I also add that one aspect that is not often mentioned, I believe, is that with all these new licences that publishers are giving to universities, perhaps one of the sources of discontent is that I'm not sure the money trickles down to the authors who sign up with the publishers. You have licences between publishers and universities or any kind of group and, yes, you look at the terms. Again, licensing for having your book on the shelf in the library is different from licensing for having the book used in a classroom, but put that aside. I'm not sure the current structure actually helps the authors, who may not necessarily see the money for all these licences.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. It's nice to see all the heads go up and down at the same time.

Ms. Caesar-Chavannes, you have five minutes.

(1640)

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank all the witnesses. I have five minutes, so I'm going to try to ask as many questions as possible.

Mr. Chisick, at the opening of your statement, you said that you agreed with the views from many of the witnesses who came ahead of us. In your opinion, what didn't you agree with, as we look to consider some of the recommendations that we are going to put forward?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

That's a great question. I'm certainly concerned. I disagree with the view that Dr. Geist has expressed about term extension, for example. The example he gave about the author waking up and deciding not to write because of a 50-year term post-mortem rather than 70 years may be true, but the term of copyright is highly relevant to the decision of the publisher as to whether to invest and how much to invest in the publication and promotion of that work.

It may or may not be relevant to the writer—although I'm sure there are writers who do wake up wondering when they're going to have to get a different job—but from the commercial aspect of things, that's becoming more and more difficult every day, considering the level of investment in the dissemination of creativity, which is also a critical part of the copyright system. In my view, the extension of term from life plus 50 to life plus 70 is something that's long overdue.

Some before the committee have been suggesting that copyright in an audiovisual work ought to go to the writer or the director or some combination thereof. I disagree with that for similar reasons. It all has to do with the practical workings of the copyright system and how these ideas would work out in practice. As a lawyer in private practice dealing with all sorts of different copyright stakeholders, my primary concern is not to introduce aspects of the system that will get in the way of or perpetuate barriers to successful exploitation of commercial works. It's so important now in the digital era to make sure that there's less friction, not more.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you very much.

Dr. Geist, you talked about the windfall that would be created with the life plus 70. How do you recalibrate the windfall that would be created by the USMCA? More specifically, can it be recalibrated within the confines of the act?

Dr. Michael Geist:

It's a great question. There are really two aspects.

First, is there an implementation that would meet the requirements that we have within the act that would lessen some of the harm? When Mr. Chisick says it's about a company making a decision about whether or not to invest in a book, perhaps that's fine for any books that start getting written once we have term today, but this will capture all sorts of works that haven't entered into the public domain yet. They are now going to have that additional 20 years where they already made a decision and now get that windfall.

We ought to consider if there is the possibility of putting in some sort of registration requirement for the additional 20 years. As Ms. Gendreau noted, there are a small number of works that might have economic value. Those people will go ahead and register those for that extra 20 years, because they see value. The vast majority of other works would fall into the public domain.

Moreover, when we're thinking about broader reforms and getting into that balance, recognize that the scale has already been tipped. I think that has to have an impact on the kind of recommendations and, ultimately, reforms that we have, if one of our biggest reforms has already been decided for us.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

If each of you were to make one recommendation that we should consider as part of the review, what would it be?

I'll let you start.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

The one recommendation I would make would be to make sure that digital businesses—wherever they are—that are actively making business decisions on the basis of works that are protected by copyright should become liable for some payment. Yes, if they are totally passive then they are totally passive, but I think that by now, the experience we have is that a lot of people who are claiming to be passive are not, and are therefore avoiding liability. That would be my greatest concern.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can I go over to...? No?

It's the same question. Anybody who's ready for it, go ahead.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Sure, I'll jump in.

I would say we need to ensure that the Copyright Act can continue to adjust to technological change. The way we best do that is by ensuring we have flexibility in fair dealing—that's the “such as”—and ensuring that fair dealing works both in the analogue and digital worlds. That means ensuring that there's an exception in digital lock anti-circumvention rules for fair dealing.

(1645)

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I think that introducing a provision in the Copyright Act for site blocking and de-indexing injunctions is a critical piece. I say that because so much potentially legitimate exploitation is still being diverted to offshore sites that escape the scrutiny of Canadian courts. I don't know why anybody would argue that's a good thing. Putting a balanced system in place in the Copyright Act that deals with the concerns Dr. Geist highlighted about over-blocking and freedom of expression and so on, while still making sure that Canadians can't accomplish indirectly what they can't do directly, strikes me as a very positive development in the act.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can you pick one recommendation that you would make?

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

We'll put in a recommendation that really is a practitioner's problem. There are some technical fixes to the act that I think would allow for a great deal of certainty, and those may not be issues that were raised generally before this committee.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

That's okay.

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

The first relates to clarifying the rights of joint authors and joint owners under the Copyright Act. Currently, under the Copyright Act, absent an agreement, what are the rights of joint owners of a copyrighted work? Can they exploit a work? Do they need the permission of another joint owner? I think that's a problem of which we're acutely aware as practitioners, and of which our client may not be.

The other is rights in commissioned works and in future works. Particularly with respect to future works, I think that oftentimes agreements will cover a future assignment. Technically, whether or not those are valid under the act is a live question. I will put those forward on behalf of IPIC.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you. I think I'm over time, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Just a wee bit. Thank you very much.

It's back to you, Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

My apologies to the other witnesses. I'm not picking on you enough, but I'll go with Mr. Chisick.

I had some questions about the reversionary right. A Canadian artist appeared before the heritage committee to talk about his concerns with the reversionary right, and I was wondering if you could further comment on what the replacement is and what the impact of it is.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I assume you're talking about Bryan Adams—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

—and his proposal to adopt an American-style termination regime.

That's one of the possible approaches. What the American-style termination regime has to commend it over the current system that we have in Canada is that at least it requires some positive act by the artist to reclaim those rights. There's a window within which the rights can be claimed. Notice needs to be given, and it allows people to order their affairs accordingly. I think that the timing of Mr. Adams' submission was off. I think that it would be ill conceived to allow for termination after a 35-year period, the way it is in the United States. I think that's too short, for a variety of reasons, including reasons related to incentives to invest, but that's one approach that could be looked at.

Another approach to be looked at is the approach that's been taken almost everywhere else in the world, which is to eliminate reversion entirely and leave it to the market to deal with those longer-term interests in copyright. I don't think it's any coincidence that in literally every other jurisdiction in the world where reversion once existed—including in the United Kingdom, where it was invented—it has either been repealed or amended so that it can be dealt with by contract during the lifetime of the author. Canada is the only remaining jurisdiction, as far as I know, where that's no longer the case. That, too, should tell us something.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Mr. Geist, maybe you could comment on that briefly. You were talking about repealing or amending Crown copyright provisions. I was hoping that you could elaborate on the application of Crown copyright. It's something that has been talked about at committee but never really fully so. Then, talk about the impact of how we can improve things by possibly getting rid of it.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Sure. I'll touch on Crown copyright in just a second.

I did want to pick up on this reversion issue. It does seem to me that the U.S. is a market where there's quite a lot of investment taking place in this sector, without concern about the way their system has worked, which has given rights back to the author.

You asked earlier how individual creators handle enforcement issues, and the notion that we should take an approach that says, “You ought to handle everything. You ought to be able to negotiate every single right with large record companies or large publishers,” leaves them without much power.

If there's consistency between Professor Gendreau's comments about part of the problem being the agreement between authors and publishers as we move into the digital world and your question about what Bryan Adams is doing, it's that, in a sense, we're looking in the wrong place. Much of the problem exists between creators and the intermediaries that help facilitate the creation and bring those products to market—the publishers, the record labels and the like—where there is a significant power imbalance and these are attempts to try to remedy that.

With respect to Crown copyright, I served on the board of CanLII, the Canadian Legal Information Institute, for many years, and what we found there was that the challenge of taking legal materials—court decisions and other government documents—represented a huge problem. In fact, there were some discussions regarding that earlier today on Twitter, where people were talking specifically about the challenge that aggregators funded by lawyers across the country face in trying to ensure that the public has free and open access to the law. This represents a really significant problem. This is typified by a Crown copyright approach where the default is that the government holds it, so you have to clear the rights. You can't even try to build on and commercialize some of the works that the government may make available.

(1650)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Are there any legitimate reasons to have a Crown copyright? It seems there could be some good reasons why it should be kept.

Dr. Michael Geist:

My colleague Elizabeth Judge has written a really good piece that traces some of the history around this.

Initially, I think some of the concerns were to ensure that a government document could be relied upon, that it was credible and authoritative. I think that is far less of an issue today than it once was.

I also think that the kinds of possibilities we had to use government works didn't exist in the early days of this in the way that it does today. We think of the development of GPS services or other kinds of services built on open government or government data. The idea that we would continue to have a copyright provision that would restrict that seems anathema to the vision of a law that has adapted to the current technological environment.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Let's say the government develops something of value to the government that would lose its value if it were to be subject to open provisions. Do you think there is still some legitimacy to Crown copyright in those cases?

Dr. Michael Geist:

We are the government. The public is funding this. One of the things that I was so excited to see from Treasury Board, I believe it is, just over the last few days was taking a new position on open-source software where the priority will be to use open-source software where available. I think it recognizes that these are public dollars, and we ought to be doing that where we can. So too with funding Creative Commons licensed local journalism, which is another example of that.

Even if there are areas where we can ask, “Can't government profit?”, copyright is the wrong place to be doing it. We shouldn't be using copyright law to stop that.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to Mr. Sheehan. You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much for all your testimony. It is good to have you here towards the end as well because it allows us to ask you questions about what we heard. We've been coast to coast to coast, hearing from various people with great ideas.

We heard from the Fédération nationale des communications, the FNC. They proposed the creation of a new category of copyrighted works, a journalistic work. That would provide journalists a collective administration. It would oblige Google and the Facebooks of the world to compensate journalists for their works that are put on the Internet through them. Do you have any comments about that? Also, in particular, how might it compare to article 11 of the European Union's proposed directive on copyright in the digital single market?

Michael, I'll start with you.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I think article 11 is a problem. I think where we've seen that approach attempted in other jurisdictions, it doesn't work. There are a couple of European jurisdictions where it was attempted. The aggregators engaged in this simply stopped linking, and the publishers ultimately found that it hurt more than it helped.

I think we need to recognize that journalists rely on copyright and fair dealing in particular just as much as so many other players. The idea of restricting in favour of journalism really runs significant risks, given how important news reporting is.

I think it's also worth noting that I look at some of the groups that have come forward to talk about this. Some of them are the same groups that have licensed their work to educational institutions in perpetuity. To give you a perfect example, I know the publisher of the Winnipeg Free Press has been one of the people who have been outspoken on this issue. The University of Alberta has a great open access site about everything they license. They have quite literally licensed every issue of the Winnipeg Free Press in perpetuity for over a hundred years. In effect, the publishers sold the rights to be used in classrooms for research purposes, for a myriad of different purposes, on an ongoing basis.

With respect, it feels a bit rich for someone on the one hand to sell the rights through a licensing system and on the other hand ask, “How come we're not getting paid these extra ways and don't we need some sort of new copyright change?”

(1655)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Does anyone else have a comment?

Yes, Ms. Gendreau.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

What we've seen, of course, is the slow disappearance of the traditional media under the influence of online media.

It was said that in our last provincial elections in Quebec, 70% or even 80% of the advertising budget of the political parties went to service providers based outside of the country.

We're seeing closures of newspapers, and the media have difficulty keeping on giving us current news. We're now being presented with the idea that because the media are having some difficulty, because they're closing down, they should be receiving government subsidies to help them. We have people not buying newspapers or lacking access to traditional media, while the advertising revenue is going to outside companies that are not paying taxes here. The government is losing its tax base with that process and moreover is being asked to fund these newspapers and media because they need help to survive. Guess who's laughing all the way to the bank.

I think the idea of a right to remuneration for the use of newspaper articles is a way to address this kind of problem. It may not be technically the best way to do it, I'm sure, but I think there are ways to ensure that media, who have to pay journalists and want to get investigative journalism done in the country for our public good, are able to recoup the money and make sure that theirs is a real, living business, not one that is disappearing, such that people are being fed only by the lines they're getting on their phones.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

That's very interesting.

We've talked a lot about protecting indigenous knowledge and culture through copyright. We've had a lot of testimony. I was going to read some of it, but does anybody have any suggestions concerning indigenous copyright?

This can perhaps go back to you.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

This is a very sensitive issue and a very international issue. It is very difficult to deal with in a concrete manner because of many fundamental aboriginal issues with respect to copyright that differ from the basis of copyright as we know it. However, we can look for inspiration to our cousin countries. Australia and New Zealand have already attempted to set up systems that would help first nations in the protection of their works.

My only concern is that we must not forget that there are also contemporary native authors. I wouldn't want all native authors to feel that they are being pushed out of the current Copyright Act to go to a different kind of regime. I think there are different policy games at play here.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Masse is next for two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm going to go back to Crown copyright.

In the United States, they don't even have it, in effect. I think people think about the academic aspect of this, but how does it affect us also with respect to film and private sector ventures?

Perhaps you can quickly weigh in. I know we only have a couple of minutes. It's more of an economic question than is given credence.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

Trying to navigate through the thickets of whether the National Archives owns something or what form of licence a particular item might be available under poses enormous challenges for certain sectors, such as documentary filmmakers—even with legal advice.

(1700)

Mr. Casey Chisick:

It's made that much more complicated by the lack of uniformity in licensing, by the fact that in order to license certain types of works you need to figure out which department of which provincial government you need to go to to even seek a licence, let alone worry about whether your inquiry will ever get a response. It poses enormous challenges, which I think may be associated with vesting copyright in entities that aren't really that invested in the idea of managing it.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Geist.

Dr. Michael Geist:

To go even further, the Supreme Court of Canada will hear a case in February, Keatley Surveying Inc. v. Teranet Inc.—and for disclosure, I've been assisting one of the parties involved—which deals with Ontario land registry records. In fact, we have governments making the argument that the mere submission of surveys to the government as part of that process renders those cases of Crown copyright.

Not only are we not moving away from lessening Crown copyright. We have arguments before the court wherein governments are trying to argue that private sector-created works become part of Crown copyright when they are submitted subject to a regulation.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I would think also that there's already in the Canadian system a licence scheme that allows us to reproduce statutes with the government's permission—without seeking a specific permission. However, this is a very tiny aspect of the Crown copyright.

I think that lots of countries can live without the equivalent of a Crown copyright. This is a system where they have reinforced Crown copyright in the U.K. I don't think we should follow that train. I think it makes sense, because they are government works, that they should belong to the public, because the government represents the public. I mean, the public is the fictional author of these works. I think it also creates problems with not only statutes, but also court documents and judgments. There are interesting cases of judges who copy the notes of their lawyers. There's been a case on that, which was really interesting.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

Despite all of that, I don't think we would be losing much by abrogating many issues of Crown copyright.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Government knows fiction.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Thank you.

We still have time, so we're going to do another round. I rarely ask questions, but I would like a question put on the floor here.

In regard to the five-year legislative review, we've heard different thoughts. Very quickly, I want to get your thoughts on that. Should it be a five-year legislative review? Should it be something else?

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

Of course, Parliament can do anything and decide not to have five-year review next time.

I've been thinking about that, and I think that in this instance a five-year review is important. In my eyes, the clock has gone so far on the side of giving rights that it's not even Swiss cheese anymore. It's Canadian copyright cheese. It's full of holes everywhere.

We've had a bit of an example: If you don't use the private copying exception, then perhaps we can use the incidental copying exception. I mean, it's just that if one doesn't work, let's try another.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I think that for this kind of situation, a review now is something that we would need.

Do you want to do this exercise every five years? I'm not so sure.

The Chair:

I probably won't be the chair.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

Also, we have to give time to cases and so on.

I think now it is important, in order not to get entrenched in the view that we have in the act currently.

Dr. Michael Geist:

It's been a very interesting review. I would at the same time say that I think it is early.

If we look at it historically, there were major reforms that took place in the late eighties, major reforms again in the late nineties, and then, of course, 2012. We look at roughly a ten- to 15-year timeline historically for significant reforms.

Five years, in my view, is oftentimes too short for the market and the public to fully integrate the reforms and then to have the evidence-based analysis to make judgment calls on new reforms.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Chisick.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I agree in principle with what Professor Gendreau said, which is that this is a good window for a five-year review given what happened in 2012. However, in principle, I think there should be flexibility for Parliament in deciding when to review the act, as there is for most other pieces of legislation.

(1705)

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

As a preliminary comment—we didn't canvass the committee on this—I think our personal views are that a five-year review is completely appropriate in this case.

If you look at artificial intelligence, it is a very simple example. In 2012, that wasn't being considered, so it's for things like that, perhaps to limit shorter reviews to emerging technology, or to respond to the evolution of the law within that period of time.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I want to get back to Crown copyright, but I want to make a quick observation first. If the Berne convention had been written under current law, I think it would be coming out of copyright just about now. That's just food for thought.

If we wanted to, as a committee, make a point on Crown copyright, under what licence should we release our report? Anyone?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I think the government has led by example just now with its local news and Creative Commons. Quite frankly, I don't know why almost everything isn't released by government under a Creative Commons licence.

There is an open licence that it uses. However, I think for the purposes of better recognition and standardization and the ability for computers to read it, adopting a very open Creative Commons licence would be the way to go.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there any other comments?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

Speaking personally, I would support Professor Geist's proposal, and I would recommend either a CC0 licence or a CC BY licence.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I don't have strong opinion on a particular form of licence, but I do agree that for most government works, the more dissemination and the broader dissemination, the better.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I concur.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I like it when it's fast. Thank you.

There's a topic we haven't discussed at all in this study, and I think we probably should have. That's software patents. I'm sure you all have positions and thoughts on that.

First of all, what are your positions, very quickly, on software patents? Are they a good thing or a bad thing? Does anybody want to discuss that?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I mean, we're not talking strictly copyright here, but I think that if we take a look at the experience we've seen in other jurisdictions, I think the over-patenting approach we often see creates patent thickets that become a burden to innovation, which isn't a good thing.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I'd say computer patents are the hidden story of computer programs, because initially, computer programs were not supposed to be patented and that's why they went to copyright. Copyright was quick, easy and long-lasting. I think this prevented an exercise, in order to have something much more appropriate for this kind of creative activity, which has a relatively short lifespan and is based on incremental improvements.

I don't think that nationally this is something we can do, but internationally, this is an issue that should be looked at in a much more interesting way. There are so many issues that are purely computer-oriented. It would be interesting to see to what extent these issues would go with a specific kind of protection for computer programs, as opposed to bringing everything into copyright.

To a certain extent, since we've had computer programs in a copyright law, it's been difficult.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair. I don't have time for long answers, but I appreciate your comments.

Mr. Tarantino?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I would concur with Professor Gendreau's position.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I like the concurrence motions.

Yes, go for it.

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

The Intellectual Property Institute of Canada has a committee that is currently collaborating with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office on this very issue.

There may be guidance that comes jointly out of CIPO and that committee's work.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was just looking at it quickly. If software was always written under current copyright law, I think that stuff written for any act would now be out of copyright. That's sort of a worrisome way of looking at it. It's kind of obsolete.

Is our copyright regime not actually strong enough to protect software, per se?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I must admit, I don't think we're.... Given the proliferation of software that runs just about every aspect of our lives, from the devices in our homes to the cars we drive to a myriad of different things, there seems to be no shortage of incentive for people to create, and no significant risks in that regard.

It highlights why always looking to stronger intellectual property rules, whether patent or copyright, as a market-incentive mechanism, misses the point of what takes place in markets. Very often, it isn't the IP laws at all that are critically important. It's first to market, the way you market and the continual innovation cycle that becomes important. IP protection is truly secondary.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

There are a lot of issues, some of which we've talked about today, and software patents is one, where if we're going to look at them in a serious way, we need to look at them in a serious way. We need to take a step back and consider what sort of behaviour we're trying to promote, what kinds of laws promote that behaviour and how we can best strike that balance in Canada, also with an eye to our international obligations under various treaties.

Software patents is one. Crown copyright is another. I think that if we want to look at whether Crown copyright is necessary or whether it's accomplishing its intended ends, we need to figure out what it's supposed to do before we can figure out whether we're doing it. Reversion is a third.

(1710)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The reason I want to ask about all this is to tie it back to a rising movement, especially in the U.S., called right to repair. I'm sure you're familiar with that as well. You're aware of the John Deere case. Are there any comments on that and how we can tie that into copyright, to make sure that when you buy a product like this BlackBerry...? If I want to service it, then I should have that right to do that.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Yes. The 2012 reforms on anti-circumvention rules established some of the most restrictive digital lock rules to be found anywhere in the world. Even the United States, which pressured us to adopt those rules, has steadily recognized that new exceptions to it are needed.

At the very top, I noted that one area. We just saw the U.S. create a specific exception around right to repair. The agricultural sector is very concerned about their ability to repair some of the devices and equipment they purchase. Our farmers don't have that. The deep restrictions we have represent a significant problem, and I would strongly recommend that this committee identify where some of the most restrictive areas are in those digital locks. We will still be complying with our international obligations by building in greater flexibility there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I had a couple of questions going back to the beginning, so it's less exciting.

The Chair:

You have about 30 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's enough for this.

Mr. Chisick, you mentioned at the very beginning that you are certified to practice copyright law, specifically. Just out of curiosity, who certifies lawyers to practice copyright law?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I didn't say that I'm certified to practice copyright law. What I said was I'm certified as a specialist in copyright law. That's a designation that was given to me by the Law Society of Ontario.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. That's what I was curious about.

Do we have 10 seconds to get into...? No, we don't have 10 seconds.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thanks.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's always a mad dash to get in as many interventions as we can.

I will address this question to the Intellectual Property Institute. You support changing safe harbour provisions yet we were told by a major tech company that they simply could not operate without safe harbour. Do you think a legal framework that denies Canadian consumers access to services is acceptable?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

Thank you for the question.

I think we recommended an assessment of whether the safe harbour provisions should operate without reference to any of the other mechanisms, such as the notice and notice regime, within the act.

I think the answer to the particular question you posed about consumers is probably no.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

We don't want consumers to be disadvantaged in that way.

I think it's an open question: How do we ensure entities and individuals don't shelter themselves under the auspices of those safe harbour provisions in a way that doesn't reflect the steps they take or the policies they put in place with respect to policing infringement on their platforms?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yesterday on Twitter—I didn't have the opportunity, and this is outside of your role, because I don't think you were speaking on behalf of the Intellectual Property Institute—I posted a CBC article outlining the case of someone who was suing the company that makes Fortnite for allegedly using a dance that he invented.

I put it out there and we did hear from the Canadian Dance Assembly. They wanted to see choreography of specific movements that could be copyrighted by an individual artist. You seem to say that it would be under a particular provision. Could you just clarify that a bit, so it's part of the testimony?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I'm happy to do that.

Let this be a lesson to those who willy-nilly engage on Twitter with members of Parliament.

Yes. Choreographic works are protected if they are original. They are protected as works under the Copyright Act. I would also note that performers' performances are protected under the Copyright Act without the need for originality. I'm not sure there's a current gap in the legislative scheme, which would mean that dance moves are not protected.

(1715)

Mr. Dan Albas:

I think what the Canadian Dance Assembly was pointing out was that if someone choreographs a particular dance and posts it on YouTube, then someone else uses those moves in a performance of some sort, some credit should be due or some sort of copyright owed to the original person.

I think it would be very, very difficult to say who created a particular work of choreography or a dance. I even gave the example of martial arts.

I asked indigenous groups if it might cause huge issues for a particular community if someone were suddenly to claim copyright for a very traditional dance. There were some questions as to whether copyright would even apply to indigenous knowledge.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I think we need to separate the analytical question of whether something would qualify for protection under the act from the practical reality of enforcing any rights that might be afforded under the act. I think those are two very different inquiries.

I would like to just freelance a little bit here and pivot on the point that you've made. I think it ties into some of the other questions that have been put forward here today.

Speaking personally, I think there is a tendency in the copyright community for the ratchet to go only in a single direction, and for rights to continually expand. I think we have to be cognizant of the fact that all of us—whether as individuals, as consumers, as creators or as entities who disseminate or otherwise exploit copyright—simultaneously occupy multiple roles within the copyright ecosystem. We both benefit and—I hesitate to say we are the victims—bear the burden of those expanded rights.

It's not always the case that copyright is the proper mechanism for recognizing what are otherwise entirely justifiable claims.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I certainly agree with that.

Ms. Gendreau, in your presentation you argue that online platforms should be liable for infringing work on their platforms in the same way traditional broadcasters are.

Do you not acknowledge that a TV station where a producer determines everything on the air is different from a platform where users upload their content?

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

They are different in the sense that they are leading different activities. They're not programming the way broadcasters are programming.

What we're facing is precisely something different because we have, again, an industry that exists because there are works to showcase or to let go on and disseminate through its services. It is making money, and it will be obtaining the possibility of making business out of these works and maybe is not paying for that primary material.

It's like mining royalties. Mining companies have to pay royalties because they are extracting primary resources. I think we have to see that our creative industries, our creative works, are our new primary resources in a knowledge economy, and those who benefit from it have to pay for it.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Ms. Gendreau, you cannot create an equivalent between a physical asset that once it's mined is exclusively taken away versus an idea or a piece of work that can be transmitted where someone isn't less off. We've been told that if such a system would be in place, online platforms would have no choice but to seriously restrict what users can upload.

Do you feel severely restricting innovation is a reasonable outcome in this case?

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

No, I don't think it would limit innovation or dissemination. I think on the contrary it would guarantee payment to creative authors, and because creative authors would be receiving payments for the use of their works, they wouldn't be trying to sue for negligible types and silly uses that have given a very bad name to copyright enforcement.

If copyright owners knew that when their works were being used they were being remunerated, then if they saw somebody making a video with their grandchild dancing to some music, and they nevertheless receive some sort of payment, they would not sue that grandmother and make a fool of themselves.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you for that.

Mr. Geist, you have strongly argued against extending statutory damages to Access Copyright. If the worst penalty they are allowed to seek is the amount of the original tariff, then won't educational institutions just ignore the tariff because the only penalty is their having to pay what they would have to pay to begin with?

(1720)

Dr. Michael Geist:

No. First off, educational institutions are not looking to infringe anything, as I've talked about. They license more now than they ever have before. Statutory damages, by and large, are the exception rather than the rule. The way that the law typically works is that you make someone whole. You don't give them multiples beyond what they have lost.

Where we have statutory damages right now within the copyright collective system, it's part of a quid pro quo. It's used for groups like SOCAN because they have no choice but to enter into this system, and so because it's mandatory for competition-related reasons, they have that ability to get that.

Access Copyright can use the market, and as we've been talking about, it is now one of many licences that are out there. This has become so critical, as we've learned over these months, the different ways education groups license. The idea that it would specifically be entitled to massive damages strikes me as incredible market intervention that's unwarranted.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's good that we're talking copyright. I feel that I've been infringed in my right to have a repair bill passed. There was a voluntary agreement instead. Bill C-273 was amending the Competition Act and the Environmental Protection Act to provide aftermarket service for vehicles, for technicians, for information technology. It's an environmental thing, but also a competition issue and so forth. It is pretty germane to today, because even the United States was allowing this under their laws in terms of gaining this information. I could get a vehicle fixed in the United States at an after-service garage, but I couldn't get it done in Windsor. We spent several years getting that amended, but I see that it's been moved towards I guess the larger picture of things, which is the ability to alter and change devices.

I do want to move on a bit with regard to the Copyright Board. I know that some of the testimony today was kind of removed from that, but what was interesting about the Copyright Board coming here was that they asked for three significant changes that weren't part of Bill C-86. One of the things—and I'm interested to hear if there would be an opinion—was that they wanted a scrub of the actual act, which hadn't been done since 1985.

Are there any thoughts on the Copyright Board's presentation and the fact that they don't feel that Bill C-86 is going to solve all the problems they have? They had three major points. One of them was on that. Also, the protection of their ability to make interim decisions and not be overturned was another thing they mentioned. I don't know if there are any thoughts on that, but that's one of the things that I thought was interesting about their presentation in front of us.

Anybody...? If nobody has anything because you're happy with the way it's going to be, then it's going to be that way. It's fine.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I've expressed in another forum certain concerns about Bill C-86 that are not necessarily the same as those that were expressed by the board. I don't think Bill C-86 is perfect by any means in terms of addressing the issues with the Copyright Board, but I do think it's a good start. That's the kind of legislation that certainly should be reviewed within a relatively short time frame—probably five years is about appropriate—to make sure that it's having its intended effect.

Perhaps I should have studied the transcript of that appearance a little more closely. Do I understand correctly that the suggestion was the act itself be scrubbed and that we start afresh?

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's their suggestion. It's to go through it and make it consistent. I think their concern is—

Mr. Casey Chisick:

Oh, I see.

Mr. Brian Masse:

—that they have changes to it again. It was interesting to have their presentation about that, because it's not a holistic approach, in their opinion, and it's going to create some inconsistencies.

I know that it's a lot to throw at you right here if you haven't seen it. They talked about transparency, access and efficiency as some of the common things to be fixed. Some of those things do happen in Bill C-86, but it still hasn't gone through a review.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

Any time you have successive incremental amendments to a statute, I think there are bound to be some unintended consequences when you look back on that approach. If there were an appetite for a really fulsome review, or a scrub, as you put it, of the Copyright Act, it would be an interesting idea for that reason alone: just to look at what the unintended consequences or the inconsistencies that have emerged might be. I don't know if that's what the board was getting at, but it's an interesting idea, to my mind.

(1725)

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's interesting.

Does anybody have any other thoughts?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I don't have any response in particular to the question you pose. I just want to commend to you the submissions that IPIC did make on Bill C-86 and also the submissions that were made in 2017 on Copyright Board reform.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes, I've seen some of those, sir. Thank you.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Mr. Chair, I would note that to me this actually highlights—to come back to the chair's question about a five-year review—why five-year reviews are a bit problematic. First, the fact that we're able to address things like the Copyright Board or the Marrakesh treaty in between the period of 2012 and now highlights that where there are significant issues there is the ability for the government to act.

Second, on the idea that we would have by far the biggest changes the board has seen in decades, with new money and almost an entirely new board, that's going to take time. We know that these things still do take time, so the idea we would come back in three or four years—or even five years—to judge what takes place, much less scrub the act, strikes me as crazy. We need time to see how this works. If the board is suggesting that it needs an overhaul to make sense of things, then I think that's problematic.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's kind of the trajectory. This is what worries me right now with Bill C-86 in terms of what we've done and also the USMCA. We have three significant balls in the air all at the same time. They're all going to land, and we're going to be dealing with it at that time.

I don't have any other questions. I'm done.

Thank you, witnesses.

The Chair:

Thanks.

Mr. Longfield, you have three minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you, Chair.

I'm going to go back to the right to repair. I also sit on the agriculture committee. I was also working in the innovation space in agriculture. The J1939 standard is the vehicle standard. There's an ISO standard for on-vehicle things, like steering systems, the ISO 11898, and then on the trailer for fertilizer spreaders, seeders and applicators, it's the ISO 11992. How specific do we need to go, so that innovators can get on tractors and do their work?

We could work on anything but John Deere, but I knew a guy in Regina who knew how to get around the John Deere protocols as well. People have to get around protocols and then semi-legally give you access to the equipment. How specific should the act get in terms of technology?

Dr. Michael Geist:

First off, they shouldn't have to semi-legally be able to work on their own equipment. In fact, the copyright law ought not to be applying to these kinds of issues. One of the very early cases around this intersection between digital locks and devices involved a company based in Burlington, Ontario, called Skylink, which made a universal garage door remote opener. It's not earth-shattering technology, but they spent years in court, as they were sued by another garage door opener company, Chamberlain, saying that they were breaking their digital lock in order for this universal remote to work.

The idea that we apply copyright to devices in this way is where the problem lies. The origins are these 2012 reforms on digital locks. The solution is to ensure that we have the right exceptions in there, so that the law isn't applied in areas where it shouldn't be applied to begin with.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Could we cover those under the “such as” clause?

Dr. Michael Geist:

No, you have to deal with this specifically under the anti-circumvention rules. I think it's section 41.25. The exception that you would be looking for, an ideal one, would be to bring in that fair dealing exception and make that an exception as part of the anti-circumvention rules, too. In other words, it shouldn't be the case that I'm entitled to exercise fair dealing where something's in paper but I lose those fair dealing rights once it becomes electronic or digital or it happens to be code on a tractor.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

In terms of our innovation agenda, section 41.25 is a section we would have to take a good look at.

Dr. Michael Geist:

We created a series of limited exceptions. In fact, they were so limited that we had to go back and fix them when we entered into the Marrakesh treaty for the visually impaired. The United States has, meanwhile, established a whole series of additional exceptions. Other countries have gone even further than the U.S. We are now stuck with one of the most restrictive rules in the world.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

But we have the most innovative farmers. They can get around these things.

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we adjourn for the day, I'll just remind you that, on Wednesday, in room 415, for the first hour we have witnesses and for the second hour we have drafting instructions.

Also, for those listening to these proceedings throughout Canada, here is a gentle reminder that today is the last day for online submissions, by midnight Eastern Standard Time. I suspect the word is out because today we've already received 97 online submissions.

Notice that our analysts are saying, “Oh, no.”

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: I want to thank our panel for being here today. It was a great session and a great wrap-up to where we've been going for this past year. Thank you all very much.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous.

Ressentez-vous la fébrilité dans l'air? Je ne parle pas de Noël. Nous devrions tous être fébriles en ce moment. C'est l'avant-dernier groupe de témoins sur le droit d'auteur...

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

À votre connaissance.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Ne faites pas ça.

M. Brian Masse:

Je suis ici depuis longtemps.

Le président:

Bienvenue à tous à la 143e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, tandis que nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal prévu par la loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Aujourd'hui, nous recevons Casey Chisick, associé au sein de Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP; Michael Geist, titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique, faculté de droit, Université d'Ottawa; Ysolde Gendreau, professeure titulaire, faculté de droit, Université de Montréal; puis Bob Tarantino, président, Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur et Catherine Lovrics, vice-présidente, Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur, de l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada.

Vous aurez chacun jusqu'à sept minutes pour présenter votre exposé, et je vais vous interrompre après sept minutes, parce que je suis comme ça. Nous passerons ensuite aux questions, car, j'en suis sûr, nous aurons beaucoup de questions à vous poser.

Commençons par M. Chisick.

J'aimerais vous remercier. Vous êtes déjà venu ici une fois et n'avez pas eu la chance de faire ce que vous vouliez faire, donc merci d'être venu de Toronto encore une fois pour nous voir.

M. Casey Chisick (associé, Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP, à titre personnel):

Je suis heureux d'être ici. Merci de m'avoir invité de nouveau.

Je m'appelle Casey Chisick et je suis associé au sein de Cassels Brock, à Toronto. Je détiens une certification de spécialiste de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, et je pratique et j'enseigne dans ce domaine depuis près de 20 ans. J'ai notamment comparu à maintes reprises devant la Commission du droit d'auteur et dans des contrôles judiciaires de décisions de la Commission, dont cinq appels devant la Cour suprême du Canada.

Dans ma pratique, j'agis pour un grand éventail de clients, y compris des artistes, des sociétés de gestion des droits d'auteur, des éditeurs de musique, des universités, des producteurs de films et de télévision, des développeurs de jeux vidéo, des radiodiffuseurs, des services par contournement et bien d'autres clients, mais les points de vue que j'exprime ici aujourd'hui ne sont que les miens.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais remercier et féliciter le Comité de son dévouement à l'égard de cette tâche importante. Vous avez entendu un bon nombre d'intervenants différents au cours de nombreux mois, et je souscris à une bonne partie de leurs points de vue. Lorsque j'ai été invité à comparaître pour la première fois le mois dernier, j'avais prévu de me concentrer sur la réforme de la Commission du droit d'auteur, mais le train a déjà quitté la gare dans le cadre du projet de loi C-86, donc aujourd'hui, je m'intéresserai un peu plus largement à d'autres aspects de la loi. Je reviendrai toutefois à la Commission vers la fin de ma déclaration.

Pour ce qui est des questions de fond, j'aimerais aborder cinq enjeux particuliers.

Premièrement, je suis d'avis que le Parlement devrait clarifier certaines des nombreuses exceptions, nouvelles et élargies, touchant la violation du droit d'auteur qui ont été introduites dans les amendements de 2012. Certaines de ces exceptions ont causé de la confusion et ont entraîné des litiges inutiles et des conséquences imprévues.

Par exemple, une décision de 2016 de la Commission du droit d'auteur a révélé que des copies de sauvegarde de musique faites par des stations de radio commerciales ont représenté plus de 22 % de la valeur commerciale de toutes les copies faites par les stations de radio. À la suite de l'élargissement de l'exception sur les copies de sauvegarde, la Commission du droit d'auteur a ensuite procédé à la réduction des paiements de redevances des stations d'un pourcentage équivalant à plus de 22 %. Elle a retiré cet argent directement des poches des créateurs et des titulaires de droits, même si, dans ce cas, on avait constaté que les copies avaient une très grande valeur économique.

À mon avis, ce n'est pas le genre d'équilibre que visait le Parlement quand il a présenté l'exception en 2012.

Deuxièmement, la loi devrait être modifiée de manière à ce que les règles d'exonération prévues par la loi pour les intermédiaires Internet fonctionnent comme prévu. Elles doivent n'être à la disposition que des entités réellement passives, et pas à celles de sites ou de services qui jouent des rôles actifs pour faciliter l'accès à du contenu qui viole le droit d'auteur. Je suis d'accord pour dire que les intermédiaires qui ne font rien d'autre que d'offrir les moyens de communication ou le stockage ne devraient pas être responsables de la violation du droit d'auteur, mais trop de services qui ne sont pas passifs, y compris certains services nuagiques et agrégateurs de contenu, s'opposent aux paiements, affirmant qu'ils sont visés par les mêmes exceptions. Dans la mesure où c'est une échappatoire dans la loi, celle-ci devrait être éliminée.

Troisièmement, il importe de clarifier la propriété du droit d'auteur dans des films et des émissions de télévision, surtout parce que la durée du droit d'auteur dans ces oeuvres est très incertaine dans le cadre de l'approche actuelle, mais je n'approuve pas la suggestion selon laquelle les scénaristes ou les réalisateurs devraient être reconnus au même titre que les auteurs. Je n'ai entendu aucune explication convaincante de leurs représentants quant à la raison pour laquelle ce devrait être le cas, ou fait plus important encore, quant à ce qu'ils feraient avec les droits qu'ils cherchent à obtenir si ceux-ci leur étaient accordés.

À mon avis, compte tenu des réalités commerciales de l'industrie, qui s'occupe de cette question depuis des années dans le cadre des conventions collectives, une meilleure solution serait de considérer le producteur comme l'auteur, ou, à tout le moins, le premier détenteur du droit d'auteur, et de traiter en conséquence la durée du droit d'auteur.

Quatrièmement, le Parlement devrait réexaminer les dispositions de réversion de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. En ce moment, les cessions de droits et les licences exclusives prennent fin automatiquement 25 ans après le décès d'un auteur, et le droit d'auteur revient ensuite à la succession de l'auteur. Jadis, c'était la norme dans de nombreux pays, mais c'est maintenant plus ou moins unique au Canada, et cela peut être très dérangeant dans la pratique.

Imaginez que vous dépensiez des millions de dollars pour transformer un livre en film ou pour fonder une entreprise à partir d'un logo commandé à un graphiste avant de vous réveiller un jour et de découvrir que vous n'avez plus le droit d'utiliser ce matériel sous-jacent au Canada. Il y a des moyens meilleurs, et plus efficaces, de protéger les intérêts des créateurs, dont je représente un grand nombre, sans chambouler du jour au lendemain des entreprises légitimes.

(1535)



Cinquièmement, la loi devrait fournir une avenue claire et efficace concernant les ordonnances de blocage de sites et de désindexation de sites Web sans égard à la responsabilité des intermédiaires Internet et en surveillant de façon appropriée l'équilibre entre les intérêts concurrentiels des divers intervenants. Même si la Cour suprême a exprimé clairement que ces injonctions peuvent être disponibles en vertu des principes d'équité, l'avenue pour les obtenir est, à mon avis, bien trop longue et coûteuse pour être utile à la plupart des détenteurs de droits. Le Canada devrait suivre l'exemple de bon nombre de ses partenaires commerciaux principaux, y compris le Royaume-Uni et l'Australie, en adoptant un processus plus rationalisé — qui surveille attentivement l'équilibre des intérêts concurrentiels entre les divers intervenants.

Durant le temps qu'il me reste, j'aimerais aborder les initiatives récentes visant à réformer les activités de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

La Commission est essentielle à l'économie créatrice. Les détenteurs de droits, les utilisateurs et le public général comptent tous sur elle pour établir des tarifs justes et équitables aux fins de l'utilisation de matériel protégé. Pour que le marché créatif canadien puisse fonctionner efficacement, la Commission doit faire son travail et rendre ses décisions de façon opportune, efficace et prévisible.

J'ai été heureux de voir les réformes exhaustives apportées dans le projet de loi C-86. Je garde aussi à l'esprit que le projet de loi est bien en voie de devenir une loi, donc ce que je dis ici aujourd'hui n'aura peut-être pas beaucoup d'effets immédiats. Pour cette raison, et faute de temps, je vais juste vous renvoyer au témoignage que j'ai présenté le 21 novembre devant le comité sénatorial des banques. J'aborderai ensuite deux questions particulières.

D'abord, l'introduction de critères obligatoires concernant l'établissement des tarifs, y compris tant l'intérêt public que ce qu'un acheteur consentant paierait à un vendeur consentant, est une très bonne chose. Des critères clairs et explicites devraient déboucher sur un processus tarifaire plus opportun, efficace et prévisible. C'est important, parce que les tarifs imprévisibles peuvent grandement perturber le marché, particulièrement les nouveaux marchés, comme la musique en ligne.

Je m'inquiète du fait que les avantages de la disposition figurant dans le projet de loi C-86 seront minés par son libellé, qui habilite aussi la Commission à examiner « tout autre critère » qu'elle estime approprié. Une telle approche d'ouverture fera en sorte que les parties devront respecter des critères de façon beaucoup plus obligatoire, en plus de choses comme la neutralité et l'équilibre technologiques, que la Cour suprême a introduits en 2015, mais cela ne va pas garantir que la Commission ne rejettera pas simplement les témoignages des parties au profit d'autres facteurs totalement imprévisibles. Cela pourrait augmenter le coût des instances de la Commission, sans qu'il y ait une augmentation correspondante sur les plans de l'efficacité ou de la prévisibilité.

S'il est trop tard pour retirer cette disposition du projet de loi C-86, je suggère que le gouvernement fournisse rapidement une orientation réglementaire quant à la façon dont les critères devraient être appliqués, y compris ce qu'on doit rechercher dans l'analyse des acheteurs et des vendeurs consentants.

Enfin, très brièvement, je crois savoir que certains témoins du Comité ont suggéré que, plutôt que de le faire de façon volontaire, comme la loi le prévoit actuellement, les sociétés de gestion collective devraient être tenues de déposer leurs contrats de licence auprès de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Je suis d'accord pour dire que le fait d'avoir accès à des contrats pertinents pourrait aider la Commission à brosser un tableau plus complet des marchés qu'elle réglemente. C'est un objectif louable.

Toutefois, il y a aussi un contrepoids important à prendre en considération: les utilisateurs pourraient être réticents à conclure des contrats avec des sociétés de gestion collective s'ils savent que ceux-ci seront déposés auprès de la Commission du droit d'auteur et qu'ils finiront donc par appartenir au domaine public. Bien sûr, on s'inquiéterait du fait que les services sur le marché fonctionnent dans un environnement très compétitif. La dernière chose que nous voulons, c'est communiquer à tous les modalités de leurs contrats confidentiels, y compris à leurs compétiteurs. Je peux en dire davantage à ce sujet durant la période de questions et de réponses qui suivra.

Merci de votre attention. J'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons à Michael Geist.

Vous avez sept minutes, monsieur, s'il vous plaît.

M. Michael Geist (titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique, Faculté de droit, Université d'Ottawa, à titre personnel):

Merci.

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Michael Geist et je suis professeur en droit à l'Université d'Ottawa, où je détiens la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique et où je suis membre du Centre de recherche en droit, technologie, et société. Je comparais aujourd'hui à titre personnel comme chercheur indépendant, représentant uniquement mes propres points de vue.

J'ai suivi de très près le travail du Comité et j'ai beaucoup de choses à dire au sujet de la réforme du droit d'auteur au Canada. Compte tenu du temps limité, j'aimerais toutefois souligner rapidement cinq enjeux: la reproduction à des fins éducatives, le blocage de sites, le prétendu écart de valeur, les effets des dispositions sur le droit d'auteur dans l'Accord Canada-États-Unis-Mexique, ou l'ACEUM, et les réformes possibles à l'appui de la Stratégie d'innovation du Canada. Mon mémoire à l'intention du Comité renferme des liens vers des dizaines d'articles que j'ai écrits sur ces enjeux.

Premièrement, par rapport à la reproduction à des fins éducatives, nonobstant l'affirmation souvent entendue selon laquelle les réformes de 2012 sont à blâmer pour les pratiques éducatives actuelles, la réalité, c'est que la situation actuelle a peu à voir avec l'inclusion de l'éducation comme fin d'utilisation équitable. Vous n'avez pas besoin de me prendre au mot. Access Copyright a été invité par la Commission du droit d'auteur en 2016 à décrire les répercussions du changement juridique. L'organisation a dit à la Commission que la réforme juridique n'avait pas changé l'effet de la loi. Elle a plutôt affirmé qu'elle n'avait que codifié la loi existante telle qu'elle est interprétée par la Cour suprême.

En outre, la prétention de 600 millions de copies non rémunérées qui repose au coeur des allégations de reproductions déloyales est le résultat d'estimations dépassées qui utilisent des données vieilles de dizaines d'années et des hypothèses profondément suspectes. La majorité des 600 millions ou 380 millions, concerne des enfants de la maternelle à la 12e année qui copient des données remontant à 2005. Il y a quelques années, la Commission du droit d'auteur a fait une mise en garde selon laquelle les données des études étaient tellement vieilles qu'elles pourraient ne pas être représentatives. Les 220 millions qui restent proviennent d'une étude de l'Université York, et une bonne partie est aussi vieille que les données des enfants de la maternelle à la 12e année. Peu importe l'âge des données, toutefois, l'extrapolation de quelques vieilles données de reproduction d'une seule université au pays entier ne fournit pas une estimation crédible.

En fait, le Comité a reçu des données abondantes sur l'état de la reproduction à des fins éducatives, et je ferais valoir que c'est sans équivoque. Les jours des notes de cours imprimées ont grandement disparu au profit de l'accès numérique. À mesure que les universités et les collèges adoptent des systèmes de gestion des cours numériques, le contenu utilisé change également. Une étude d'Access Copyright dans des collèges canadiens a révélé que les livres ne formaient que 35 % des documents. De plus, le nombre de reproductions qui sont faites au sein de ces systèmes de gestion des cours est de beaucoup inférieur à ce qui est imprimé.

Ce qui est sans doute plus important encore, c'est que le système de gestion de cours permet l'intégration des livres électroniques autorisés, de documents en libre accès et d'hyperliens vers d'autres contenus. À l'Université d'Ottawa, on retrouve maintenant 1,4 million de livres électroniques autorisés, dont bon nombre supposent des licences perpétuelles, qui n'exigent aucun autre paiement et qui peuvent être utilisés pour les cours. De plus, les gouvernements ont investi des dizaines de millions de dollars dans des ressources pédagogiques en libre accès et les établissements d'enseignement continuent de dépenser chaque année des millions de dollars pour des licences transactionnelles de paiement à l'utilisation, même quand ces écoles détiennent une licence collective.

Ce que cela veut dire, c'est que l'abandon de la licence d'Access Copyright ne repose pas sur l'utilisation équitable. Il reflète plutôt l'adoption de licences qui fournissent des droits d'accès et de reproduction. Ces licences donnent aux universités l'accès au contenu et la capacité de l'utiliser dans leurs cours. La licence d'Access Copyright offre bien moins de choses, n'accordant seulement que des droits de reproduction pour des documents déjà acquis. Par conséquent, les efforts visant à forcer la licence d'Access Copyright dans les établissements d'enseignement, en limitant l'utilisation équitable ou en mettant en oeuvre une réforme sur les dommages-intérêts préétablis, devraient être abandonnés. La perspective de limiter l'utilisation équitable représenterait un pas en arrière au chapitre de l'innovation et de l'éducation et irait à l'encontre de l'expérience acquise, au cours des six dernières années, en matière d'accroissement des licences, de l'innovation et des choix pour les auteurs et les utilisateurs à des fins éducatives.

En ce qui concerne les dommages-intérêts préétablis, les défenseurs font valoir qu'une escalade massive du coût des dommages-intérêts possibles est nécessaire pour avoir un effet dissuasif et promouvoir des négociations de règlement, mais il n'y a personne à dissuader. Les établissements d'enseignement investissent dans des licences à des niveaux record. La promotion de négociations de règlement ne représente rien de plus que l'augmentation des risques juridiques pour les étudiants et les établissements d'enseignement.

Deuxièmement, par rapport au blocage de sites, le Comité a entendu plusieurs témoins qui ont demandé l'inclusion d'une disposition explicite sur le blocage de sites dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Je crois que ce serait une erreur. D'abord, l'instance du CRTC sur le blocage de sites plus tôt cette année a entraîné des milliers de mémoires révélant de graves problèmes dans la pratique, y compris du Rapporteur spécial des Nations unies pour la liberté d'expression, qui a soulevé des préoccupations en matière de liberté d'expression, et de groupes techniques qui ont cité des risques de blocage excessif et de violation de la neutralité du Net. Ensuite, même si on appuie le blocage de sites, la réalité, c'est qu'il existe déjà en vertu de la Loi, comme nous l'avons vu dans l'arrêt Google c. Equustek de la Cour suprême.

Troisièmement, par rapport à l'écart de valeur, deux enjeux ne sont pas contestés ici. D'abord, l'industrie de la musique attire des revenus record en raison de la diffusion en continu sur Internet. Ensuite, les services d'abonnement à la diffusion en continu paient davantage les créateurs que ceux qui reposent sur les publicités. En ce qui concerne l'examen du droit d'auteur, on se demande si la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada a quoi que ce soit à voir avec cela. La réponse est non.

(1545)



La notion d'un écart de valeur est fondée sur certaines plateformes ou certains services qui profitent de la Loi pour négocier des tarifs plus bas. Ces règles, comme le régime d'avis et de retrait, n'existent pas en vertu des lois sur le droit d'auteur du Canada. Le Comité en a parlé au cours de la dernière réunion. Cela aide à expliquer pourquoi l'industrie demande au Comité de miser plutôt sur l'argent des contribuables, comme les nouvelles taxes sur les iPhones. Je crois que ces demandes devraient être rejetées.

Quatrièmement, ce sont les répercussions de l'ACEUM. Les dispositions sur le droit d'auteur dans ce nouvel accord commercial modifient de façon importante l'équilibre du droit d'auteur en prolongeant de 20 ans la durée du droit d'auteur, une réforme à laquelle le Canada s'est, avec raison, opposé. Ainsi, l'Accord représente d'importantes retombées qui pourraient engendrer des centaines de millions de dollars pour les titulaires de droit et créer le besoin de recalibrer la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada afin de rétablir l'équilibre.

Enfin, des réformes importantes contribueraient à faire avancer la Stratégie d'innovation du Canada, par exemple une plus grande flexibilité en ce qui a trait à l'utilisation équitable. La soi-disant approche qui consiste à donner l'exemple ferait en sorte que la liste actuelle des fins de l'utilisation équitable serait illustrative, plutôt qu'exhaustive, et mettrait les innovateurs canadiens sur un même pied d'égalité que les pays qui font une utilisation efficace, comme les États-Unis. Cette réforme maintiendrait tout de même l'analyse complète de l'équité, ainsi que la jurisprudence existante, afin de réduire au minimum l'incertitude. À titre subsidiaire, une exception concernant l'analyse de l'information ou l'extraction de textes et de données est désespérément requise par le secteur de l'intelligence artificielle.

Le Canada devrait aussi établir de nouvelles exceptions pour nos règles sur les verrous numériques, qui sont parmi les plus restrictives au monde. Les entreprises canadiennes sont désavantagées par rapport aux États-Unis, y compris le secteur agricole, où les agriculteurs canadiens ne jouissent pas des mêmes droits que ceux des États-Unis.

De plus, étant donné le soutien du présent gouvernement à un gouvernement ouvert — y compris son récent financement de nouvelles locales visées par des licences Creative Commons et son soutien d'un logiciel ouvert — je crois que le Comité devrait recommander l'examen des restrictions imposées au droit d'auteur par un gouvernement ouvert en éliminant la disposition sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Vous êtes tout à fait dans les temps. [Français]

Madame Gendreau, vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau (professeure titulaire, Faculté de droit, Université de Montréal, à titre personnel):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie d'avoir accepté de m'entendre.

Je m'appelle Ysolde Gendreau et je suis professeure titulaire à la Faculté de droit de l'Université de Montréal.

Depuis mes études de maîtrise, je me suis spécialisée en droit d'auteur — je suis la première au Canada à avoir fait un doctorat en la matière. À de rares exceptions près, mes publications ont toujours porté sur ce domaine de droit. Je comparais ici à titre purement personnel.

Permettez-moi de vous lire un extrait des discussions de la Conférence de révision de la Convention de Berne, tenue à Rome, en 1928, qui ont porté sur le droit de radiodiffusion reconnu par l'article 11bis.

Les commentaires sur ce texte disaient:

Dans le premier alinéa, l'article [...] confirme énergiquement le droit de l'auteur; dans le second, il laisse aux lois nationales la faculté de régler les conditions d'exercice du droit en question, tout en admettant qu'en considération de l'intérêt public général de l'État, des limitations au droit d'auteur peuvent être établies; mais il est entendu qu'un Pays ne doit faire usage de la possibilité d'introduire de telles limitations que dans le cas où leur nécessité a été constatée par l'expérience de ce Pays-même; ces limitations ne peuvent en tout cas pas amoindrir le droit moral de l'auteur; elles ne peuvent non plus porter atteinte à son droit à une rémunération équitable qui serait établie soit à l'amiable, soit, faute d'accord, par les autorités compétentes.

Le principe de cet article de 1928 demeure aujourd'hui.

Les acteurs économiques qui bénéficiaient de la radiodiffusion des oeuvres, c'est-à-dire les radiodiffuseurs, et qui se voyaient imposer une responsabilité à cette époque en étaient-ils heureux? Bien sûr que non. Aujourd'hui, les acteurs économiques qui bénéficient de la diffusion des oeuvres sur Internet continuent de résister à l'imposition d'une responsabilité liée au droit d'auteur.

Il n'est pas nécessaire d'attendre 90 ans pour en arriver au consensus qui a cours dans le monde de la radiodiffusion. Même 20 ans plus tard, en 1948, on ne sourcillait plus à voir les radiodiffuseurs payer pour les oeuvres qu'ils utilisaient. Dans l'avenir, la résistance de l'industrie numérique des communications d'aujourd'hui sera jugée tout aussi insensée que celle des radiodiffuseurs il y a 90 ans, si on agit.

(1550)

[Traduction]

J'aimerais maintenant attirer votre attention sur des questions liées à l'application en ce qui concerne l'Internet. Puisqu'il est associé au droit de communiquer, le droit de mise à disposition fait désormais partie du régime général qui régit ce droit de communiquer. Toutefois, des dispositions supplémentaires ont généré des antinomies qui inhibent le nouveau droit des conséquences réelles de sa reconnaissance. Voici des exemples, que je ne m'attends pas à ce que vous lisiez à mesure que je les nomme, mais je vous les montre maintenant, parce que j'y ferai référence de façon générale plus tard.

En fonction de la responsabilité générale des fournisseurs de services Internet, pour qu'un fournisseur de services soit tenu responsable, il doit y avoir une réelle violation d'une oeuvre. Cette condition est renforcée par une disposition sur les dommages-intérêts. La disposition sur l'hébergement prévoit également une violation réelle d'une oeuvre, cette fois-ci reconnue par une décision du tribunal afin d'engager la responsabilité d'un fournisseur de solutions d'hébergement. Notre exception CGU, condition générale d'utilisation, qui est bien connue, repose fortement sur l'utilisation d'une seule oeuvre ou de très peu d'oeuvres par une seule personne à qui le titulaire de droit d'auteur va affirmer que l'exception ne s'applique pas. Dans le cadre des dispositions sur les dommages-intérêts, plusieurs paragraphes limitent grandement l'intérêt d'un titulaire de droit d'auteur de se prévaloir de ce mécanisme. Une de ces dispositions se répercute même sur d'autres titulaires de droit d'auteur qui bénéficieraient de droits de recours semblables. Bien sûr, nos dispositions relatives au régime d'avis et avis reposent encore une fois sur la délivrance d'un avis à un contrevenant unique par un titulaire de droit d'auteur.

Les objectifs fonctionnels de ces dispositions sont tout à fait contraires à l'environnement actuel dans lequel ils sont censés fonctionner. Confrontée à des utilisations massives des oeuvres, la gestion collective a démarré au XIXe siècle précisément parce que le fait d'avoir gain de cause contre un utilisateur unique était perçu comme un coup d'épée dans l'eau. L'Internet correspond à un phénomène beaucoup plus vaste de l'utilisation de masse, et pourtant, notre Loi sur le droit d'auteur s'est repliée sur le modèle de l'application individuelle. Cette approche prévue par la loi est tout à fait illogique et mine grandement la crédibilité de toute politique du droit d'auteur axée sur le phénomène Internet.

Comme vous l'avez peut-être vu, les textes auxquels je fais allusion sont très volumineux, et bon nombre d'entre eux reposent sur des conditions qui défavorisent les titulaires de droit d'auteur. Imaginez seulement combien de temps il faut attendre pour obtenir un jugement avant d'utiliser l'article 31.1 ou à quel point il est difficile pour un titulaire de droit d'auteur d'affirmer que la diffusion d'une nouvelle oeuvre a, en réalité, « un effet négatif important, pécuniaire ou autre, sur l'exploitation — actuelle ou éventuelle — » de l'oeuvre. Ces dispositions s'appuient sur des conditions irréalistes qui ne peuvent entraîner que des abus par leurs bénéficiaires.

La direction qu'a empruntée notre Loi sur le droit d'auteur en 2012 va à l'encontre de l'objet même qu'elle était censée exploiter. La réponse à l'utilisation de masse ne peut être que la gestion de masse — c'est-à-dire la gestion collective — d'une façon qui doit correspondre à l'ampleur du phénomène. La disparition du régime de copie privée dans les amendements de 2012, par la décision délibérée de ne pas le moderniser, allait dans le sens de cette approche malavisée de l'application individuelle du droit d'auteur sur Internet.

(1555)

[Français]

Dans le temps qui m'est imparti, il m'est impossible de soulever des points qui devraient logiquement accompagner ces commentaires, mais vous voudrez peut-être profiter de la période de questions pour obtenir plus de détails. Il me fera plaisir de vous les fournir.

Je vous remercie de votre attention.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Enfin, passons à l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada.

Monsieur Tarantino.

M. Bob Tarantino (président, Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur, Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je m'appelle Bob Tarantino et je suis accompagné de Catherine Lovrics. Nous sommes ici en notre capacité d'ancien président et de présidente actuelle, respectivement, du Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur de l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada. C'est en cette qualité que nous prenons la parole aujourd'hui, et non au nom des cabinets d'avocats auxquels nous sommes associés ni au nom de l'un de nos clients.

Nous vous remercions d'avoir invité l'IPIC à présenter les recommandations de notre comité en ce qui concerne l'examen obligatoire de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

L'IPIC est l'association professionnelle canadienne des agents de brevets, des agents de marques de commerce et des avocats en droit de propriété intellectuelle. L'IPIC représente le point de vue des professionnels canadiens de la PI, et, dans les mémoires que nous avons transmis au Comité, nous nous sommes efforcés de représenter, de la façon la plus équilibrée possible, la diversité des points de vue qui existe parmi les juristes spécialisés dans le droit d'auteur.

Vous avez reçu les mémoires de notre comité, de sorte que dans cette présentation, je mettrai l'accent uniquement sur quelques recommandations qu'ils contiennent. Cela dit, j'aimerais fournir un cadre pour nos commentaires qu'il me semble important de garder à l'esprit pendant les délibérations du Comité, à savoir la nécessité d'élaborer des politiques fondées sur des données probantes. Le préambule de la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur de 2012 décrivait comme suit l'un des buts de sa modification: « favorise[r] la culture ainsi que l'innovation, la concurrence et l'investissement dans l'économie canadienne ».

Il reste cependant à déterminer dans quelle mesure les buts visés — quels qu'ils soient — ont été atteints grâce aux changements apportés à la Loi en 2012. Il y a peu de données empiriques accessibles au public sur les effets de la réforme du droit d'auteur, voire aucune. Nous recommandons que ce travail commence maintenant, en prévision du projet d'examen obligatoire de la Loi, de façon à nous assurer que la réforme du droit d'auteur se base sur des données rigoureuses, transparentes et valides sur les résultats que la réforme a déjà permis d'obtenir, le cas échéant. Le Parlement doit définir ce qui constituerait une réussite de la réforme, imposer un financement aux fins de la collecte de données qui satisfont aux critères de la réussite et veiller à ce que les données soient accessibles au public.

Comme nous l'avons indiqué dans notre mémoire, nous pensons que certaines retouches faciles et précises peuvent être apportées à la Loi, lesquelles faciliteront les transactions de droit d'auteur, notamment le fait de permettre la cession de droit d'auteur sur les oeuvre futures et la clarification des droits des cotitulaires. Dans le reste de mes observations, je soulignerai les recommandations d'ordre plus général, dont chacune devrait être mise en oeuvre de façon à respecter les droits et les intérêts des auteurs et des titulaires du droit d'auteur, des intermédiaires, des utilisateurs et du grand public.

En ce qui concerne les données et les bases de données, il est maintenant banal de dire qu'une valeur commerciale croissante est attribuée aux données et aux bases de données. Toutefois, le fondement juridique actuel pour leur accorder la protection du droit d'auteur demeure incertain. Il faut envisager des modifications qui établissent un équilibre entre les investissements importants consacrés à la création des bases de données, tout en évitant de créer involontairement des monopoles sur les faits particuliers qu'elles contiennent ou de fausser la concurrence sur des marchés basés sur des faits. Une manière d'aborder cette question sur laquelle nous attirons votre attention est la forme de protection sui generis prévue par l'Union européenne pour les bases de données.

En ce qui concerne l'intelligence artificielle et l'exploration de données, poursuivant sur le thème de l'incertitude, nous dirons que le rapport entre droit d'auteur et intelligence artificielle (IA) demeure obscur. Le développement de l'apprentissage machine et du traitement du langage naturel repose souvent sur les grandes quantités de données requises pour former les systèmes d'IA, un processus que l'on appelle « exploration de données ». En général, ces techniques nécessitent la copie d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur et elles peuvent nécessiter l'accès à de vastes ensembles de données qui peuvent également être protégés par le droit d'auteur.

Nous recommandons que le Comité étudie les exigences en matière d'exploration de textes et de données dans le contexte de l'IA. Nous vous invitons en particulier à lire les modifications adoptées au Royaume-Uni qui permettent la copie aux fins de l'analyse informatique.

Corollairement, il n'est pas évident de décider d'octroyer la protection au titre du droit d'auteur à des oeuvres créées à l'aide de l'IA compte tenu de l'exigence d'originalité et de la nécessité de rattachement de l'oeuvre à une personne humaine. Une solution possible consisterait à accorder une protection au titre du droit d'auteur aux oeuvres créées sans auteur humain dans certaines circonstances, et là encore, nous vous renvoyons vers les dispositions continues dans la loi sur le droit d'auteur mise en oeuvre au Royaume-Uni et vers l'approche adoptée par la Loi pour les créateurs en ce qui concerne les enregistrements sonores.

Pour ce qui est de l'exemption tarifaire de 1,25 million de dollars pour les radiodiffuseurs, la première tranche de 1,25 million de dollars de revenus publicitaires gagnés par les radiodiffuseurs commerciaux est exemptée des tarifs approuvés par la Commission du droit d'auteur à l'égard des prestations et des enregistrements sonores des artistes-interprètes, sauf un paiement nominal de 100 $. Autrement dit, sur la première tranche de 1,25 million de dollars de revenus publicitaires gagnés par un radiodiffuseur commercial, seulement 100 $ sont versés aux interprètes et aux propriétaires d'enregistrements sonores. En revanche, les auteurs-compositeurs et les éditeurs de musique perçoivent des paiements pour chaque dollar gagné par le radiodiffuseur. L'exemption est une subvention inutile aux radiodiffuseurs aux dépens des artistes-interprètes et des propriétaires d'enregistrements sonores, et elle devrait être supprimée.

Par rapport aux mesures injonctives contre les intermédiaires, les intermédiaires de l'Internet qui facilitent l'accès aux documents contrefaits sont les mieux placés pour réduire les dommages causés par la distribution en ligne non autorisée d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur. Ce principe, qui figure dans la directive européenne sur le droit d'auteur, a permis aux titulaires de droit d'auteur d'obtenir une injonction contre les intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés pour violer le droit d'auteur.

(1600)



La Loi devrait être modifiée pour permettre expressément aux titulaires de droit d'auteur d'obtenir des injonctions telles que des ordonnances de blocage et de désindexation de sites contre des intermédiaires. Cette recommandation est soutenue par un large éventail d'intervenants canadiens, y compris les FSI. En outre, plus d'une décennie d'expériences dans plus de 40 pays démontre que le blocage de sites est un outil important, éprouvé et efficace pour aider à réduire l'accès aux contenus en ligne portant atteinte au droit d'auteur.

Je tiens à vous remercier une fois de plus d'avoir invité l'IPIC à vous présenter ces observations aujourd'hui.

Nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions au sujet de notre mémoire.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions, en commençant par M. David Graham.

Vous avez sept minutes, monsieur.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai assez de questions pour faire le tour. Ça ressemblera peut-être un peu au jeu de la taupe.

Nous avons un peu parlé de la nécessité d'adopter essentiellement l'application collective, plutôt que l'application individuelle du droit d'auteur, parce que ce n'est plus gérable. Comment l'application collective du droit d'auteur peut-elle fonctionner sans juste donner les moyens aux grands utilisateurs et aux détenteurs de piétiner les utilisateurs et les petits producteurs?

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

La difficulté que sous-tend votre question, c'est que les gens ont tendance à voir l'administration collective du droit d'auteur comme une affaire de grandes sociétés. Ils ont tendance à oublier que derrière les organisations de gestion collective, ou les sociétés collectives, se trouvent des personnes réelles. La gestion collective des droits pour ces personnes n'est en fait que la seule solution pour qu'elles puissent s'assurer de recevoir une certaine forme de rémunération dans ce type d'environnement de masse, et elles ont en fait besoin de se réunir pour se défendre contre les GAFA. C'est la question dont personne ne parle. Nous savons qu'énormément d'argent est détourné du pays, parce qu'il n'y a pas assez de gens participant aux activités qui consistent à rendre toutes ces oeuvres accessibles au public et payant leur juste part de ce type de matériel.

Ce type de gestion est possible. La Loi comporte assez de mesures de protection, tout comme la Loi sur la concurrence, pour faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait pas d'abus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parlant d'abus, nous le voyons certainement. Des représentants de Google et de Facebook étaient ici il y a quelques semaines et ils ont avoué n'avoir examiné que les grands détenteurs de droit d'auteurs lorsqu'ils ont créé leur système d'application de la loi. Ils avouent ne pas se soucier des exemptions canadiennes dans le cadre de l'utilisation équitable. L'abus est déjà présent.

Je ne vois pas comment l'élimination des mesures de protection pour les personnes va permettre d'améliorer cette situation.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je ne dis pas que nous devrions éliminer les mesures de protection des personnes. Je dis juste que, quand on regarde tout cela à l'échelle mondiale, tout le monde devrait payer sa juste part de l'utilisation des oeuvres. J'ai du mal à imaginer que des gens qui sont prêts à payer 500 $ et plus pour un iPhone trouveraient nuisible de payer en plus... Je ne veux certainement pas être liée par le chiffre que nous pourrions imaginer, quel qu'il soit. Nous dirions que cela va les empêcher de s'exprimer librement ou d'accéder à l'oeuvre. Même si on n'ajoutait aucune somme au prix d'un iPhone ou d'un autre équipement, étant donné la marge bénéficiaire sur ces produits, c'est quelque chose qui ne mènera certainement pas ces entreprises à la faillite.

Je vois l'avènement d'un meilleur fonctionnement du système de gestion collective comme quelque chose qui pourrait en fait protéger les personnes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps, donc je vais passer à autre chose.

Monsieur Geist, j'ai mentionné le témoignage de Facebook et de Google il y a une minute, quand ces sociétés ont souligné qu'elles ne font pas d'efforts pour faire appliquer l'utilisation équitable. Vous connaissez bien cette situation. Avez-vous des commentaires ou des opinions à ce sujet issus de votre expérience?

M. Michael Geist:

Oui, c'est une source de frustration importante. En fait, j'ai vécu une expérience personnelle avec ma fille, qui a créé une vidéo après avoir participé à un programme qui s'appelle la Marche des vivants, dans le cadre duquel elle est allée dans des camps de concentration en Europe, puis en Israël. Puisqu'elle fait partie de la collectivité d'Ottawa, elle a interrogé tous les divers participants qui l'accompagnaient et a créé une vidéo qui allait être présentée ici à 500 personnes. Une musique de fond accompagnait les entrevues. La vidéo a été mise en ligne sur YouTube, et le jour où elle devait être présentée, le son a été entièrement mis en sourdine, parce que le contenu du système d'identification avait repéré cette bande sonore particulière.

On a été en mesure de régler le problème, mais si ce n'est pas un exemple classique de ce que le contenu non commercial généré par les utilisateurs est censé protéger, je ne sais pas ce que c'est. Le fait que Google n'ait pas essayé de veiller à ce que la disposition sur le CGU que Mme Gendreau a mentionnée, qui, comme cet exemple l'illustre, offre une énorme possibilité de liberté d'expression pour beaucoup de Canadiens, est pour moi non seulement décevant, mais c'est aussi un réel problème.

(1605)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Chisick, j'ai aussi une question pour vous.

Vous avez mentionné la proportion de 22 % de la valeur des copies de sauvegarde pour les radiodiffuseurs. Si ce sont de réelles copies de sauvegarde, quel est le problème?

M. Casey Chisick:

Le problème est le suivant. La Commission du droit d'auteur a effectué une évaluation globale de toutes les copies utilisées par les radiodiffuseurs. Elle a déterminé que si elle était forcée d'attribuer une valeur aux différents types de copies, une certaine valeur serait attribuée aux copies de sauvegarde, une certaine valeur serait accordée aux principales copies du système d'automatisation, et ainsi de suite, jusqu'à ce que vous obteniez 100 %.

La Commission du droit d'auteur a conclu que 22 % de cette valeur était attribuée aux copies de sauvegarde. Autrement dit, les stations de radio tirent une valeur commerciale des copies qu'elles produisent, et 22 % de cette valeur est attribuée aux copies de sauvegarde. Par conséquent, ces copies de sauvegarde ont une grande valeur commerciale; pourtant, la Commission du droit d'auteur s'est sentie obligée, en vertu de l'exception élargie touchant les copies de sauvegarde, de retirer cette valeur des redevances versées aux titulaires de droit d'auteur.

Maintenant, si c'était une interprétation correcte de l'exception sur les copies de sauvegarde, la Commission du droit d'auteur pourrait n'avoir aucun autre choix que de faire ce qu'elle a fait. Mon argument, c'est simplement que l'intention de ces exceptions ne doit pas être d'exempter les grands intérêts commerciaux de payer des redevances pour des copies dont ils tirent eux-mêmes une valeur commerciale importante. C'est pour moi un exemple d'un système d'exemptions qui est détraqué dans le grand système d'équilibre entre les intérêts des titulaires de droit d'auteur, les utilisateurs et l'intérêt public.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me reste seulement 30 secondes, mais j'essaie de comprendre ce dont on parle, parce que vous avez soulevé un point important au sujet de l'argent qui n'est pas dépensé sur... Si on n'utilise pas la copie principale ou la copie de sauvegarde pour diffuser quelque chose, quelle est la différence?

M. Casey Chisick:

Je suis désolé. Je n'ai pas compris votre question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons toujours eu le droit de modifier le format. Si j'achète quelque chose que je convertis pour mon ordinateur pour ensuite le diffuser, c'est une copie de sauvegarde, et si on ajoute une valeur pécuniaire... Je ne réussis pas vraiment à comprendre tous les rouages.

M. Casey Chisick:

Je comprends la question.

Il faudrait réaliser un examen des tarifs de radiodiffusion de la Commission du droit d'auteur sur les 20 dernières années, ce que, évidemment, nous n'avons pas le temps de faire ici, mais ce qui est important, c'est que, jusqu'en 2016, les radiodiffuseurs payaient un certain montant pour toutes les copies qui étaient faites. C'est seulement en 2016, après l'entrée en vigueur des modifications de 2012, que la Commission du droit d'auteur a décidé qu'elle devait examiner de près ces copies afin de déterminer la valeur de chacune. C'est à ce moment-là que l'exception des 22 % a été mise en place.

Votre point est valide, parce que rien n'a changé. L'approche des stations de radio en matière de copie de la musique n'a pas changé. La valeur qu'elles tirent des copies n'a pas changé. La seule chose qui a changé, c'est l'introduction d'une exception, qui, selon la Commission du droit d'auteur, devait mener inexorablement à une réduction des redevances.

C'est ce à quoi je réagis, et ma suggestion au Comité, c'est qu'il faudrait revoir ça.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier nos témoins de leur témoignage aujourd'hui.

Au cours des dernières semaines, nous avons rencontré divers témoins favorables à une modification de notre approche en matière de droit d'auteur, de façon à adopter un modèle plus américain, un système d'usage équitable. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

Quels sont les avantages liés au fait de se tourner vers le modèle américain d'usage équitable? Que devrait-on retenir et à quoi devrait-on faire très attention?

Ma question est destinée à n'importe quel témoin.

M. Michael Geist:

Je vais commencer par répéter les raisons pour lesquelles je crois que c'est une bonne idée, même si, selon moi, il faut non pas tout simplement adopter la disposition américaine en matière d'usage équitable, mais plutôt utiliser, comme je l'ai mentionné, une approche misant sur l'expression « tels que » et faire des fins d'utilisation équitable actuelles une liste à des fins d'illustration plutôt qu'une liste exhaustive.

Selon moi, on aurait ici l'avantage de pouvoir s'appuyer sur notre propre jurisprudence — puisqu'elle tient compte de la façon dont on s'est rendu à la situation actuelle — plutôt que d'avoir à tout recommencer à zéro, tout en constituant une approche beaucoup plus neutre sur le plan technologique. Plutôt que de prévoir un processus quinquennal en vertu duquel les gens se présenteraient pour dire qu'il faut tenir compte de l'intelligence artificielle ou d'un autre nouvel enjeu, ce genre de dispositions a la capacité de s'adapter au fil du temps. Nous constatons que beaucoup de pays procèdent de cette façon.

Pour terminer, j'aimerais souligner que, ce qui est important, ici, qu'on parle d'utilisation équitable ou d'usage équitable, c'est le caractère équitable. L'analyse qui permet de déterminer si une utilisation est équitable ou non ne change pas, qu'on mise sur une liste à titre d'illustration ou une liste exhaustive. C'est ça, l'important: examiner ce qui est copié et évaluer si c'est équitable. Les fins visées ne sont qu'un petit aspect du tout, mais, en limitant la liste, on se fige dans le temps, à un moment précis, et on ne peut pas s'adapter aussi facilement aux changements technologiques.

(1610)

M. Casey Chisick:

Si vous me permettez, je suis d'accord avec M. Geist: l'aspect le plus important de l'analyse de l'utilisation équitable, c'est de loin la détermination du caractère équitable, mais il y a une raison pour laquelle le Canada et la vaste majorité des pays à l'échelle internationale maintiennent un système fondé sur l'utilisation équitable. Il y a seulement — la dernière fois que j'ai vérifié — trois ou quatre administrations dans le monde — les États-Unis, évidemment, Israël et les Philippines — qui misent plutôt sur un système d'usage équitable.

La plupart des administrations à l'échelle internationale ont adopté la notion d'utilisation équitable, et ce n'est pas pour rien. C'est parce que les gouvernements veulent se réserver le droit, de temps en temps, d'évaluer le genre de choses qui, lorsqu'on regarde la situation dans son ensemble, peuvent constituer des exceptions accordées dans les cas d'utilisation équitable. Si on ouvre tout simplement les catégories à un peu tout et n'importe quoi, la prévisibilité d'un tel système est grandement réduite, et il devient beaucoup plus difficile pour les intervenants et les responsables du système de droit d'auteur de gérer tout ça. Il devient plus difficile de savoir ce qui sera considéré comme une utilisation équitable et ce qui sera jugé admissible à cet égard et de prévoir en conséquence.

De façon générale, le Canada a fait preuve d'une bonne sensibilité à l'égard de ces enjeux. Les catégories liées à l'utilisation équitable, évidemment, ont été élargies en 2012 et elles le seront peut-être à nouveau à l'avenir lorsque le gouvernement le jugera bon, mais je crois que le fait de les élargir pour inclure à peu près toutes les utilisations potentielles risque d'aller trop loin.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je suis contre l'idée d'adopter une exception dans les cas d'usage équitable, et ce, pour diverses raisons.

Premièrement, je crois que, en réalité, ce qu'on a à l'heure actuelle se rapproche déjà beaucoup du système américain. Nous avons des fins qui sont extrêmement similaires aux fins d'usage équitable. Nous avons des critères qui paraphrasent les critères liés à l'usage équitable, et je ne crois pas qu'il y a une grande différence du point de vue des résultats. Ce qui se produit, cependant, c'est que, pour ce qui est des exemples que nous avons, ils ne sont pas assortis de la mention « tels que ». Je vois là une pente très glissante. « Tels que » ne signifie pas que tout est équitable et devrait vouloir dire qu'il faut s'en tenir aux choses énumérées en tant qu'utilisations possibles, et c'est déjà ce que propose notre système grâce à l'exception pour l'utilisation équitable.

Deuxièmement, bon nombre des exceptions pour usage équitable aux États-Unis ont mené à des résultats qui sont extrêmement difficiles à concilier avec un tel système d'usage équitable. Il y a beaucoup de critiques, et, pour terminer, pour qu'un système d'usage équitable fonctionne à la hauteur de ce que les gens envisagent, il faudrait avoir une société très portée sur les litiges. Nous représentons environ le dixième de la population américaine. Nous n'avons pas le même genre d'attitude procédurière qu'aux États-Unis, et je crois que c'est un facteur important dont il faut tenir compte afin de ne pas créer d'incertitude.

Merci.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais donner le temps qu'il me reste à M. Lloyd, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient.

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins aujourd'hui.

J'ai deux ou trois questions rapides pour M. Chisick. J'aurais aimé que vous participiez tous plus tôt à l'étude. Vous nous auriez aidés à circonscrire le débat de façon un peu plus précise.

L'un des points que vous avez soulevés concernait l'élimination de l'échappatoire liée aux intermédiaires. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet et nous fournir des exemples concrets pour illustrer ce que vous voulez dire?

M. Casey Chisick:

Évidemment, en tant qu'avocat en pratique privée, je dois faire attention lorsque je fournis des exemples, parce que bon nombre d'entre eux viennent des situations réelles vécues par mes clients et les entreprises avec lesquelles ils interagissent au quotidien.

Ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que, à la lumière de mon expérience, certains services — et j'ai donné quelques exemples déjà, tant des services d'infonuagique qui offrent un petit quelque chose de plus et qui aident leurs utilisateurs à organiser leur contenu en ligne de façon à ce qu'ils aient plus facilement accès aux divers types de contenu et, possiblement, de façon à ce qu'ils puissent permettre à d'autres personnes d'y avoir aussi accès, que des services qui, essentiellement, sont des agrégateurs de contenu, mais qui utilisent un nom différent — n'hésitent pas à essayer de s'appuyer sur l'exception concernant l'hébergement ou l'exception visant les FSI, l'exception liée aux communications, telle qu'elle est libellée actuellement, pour dire: « Bien sûr, quelqu'un d'autre devra peut-être payer des redevances, mais pas nous, parce que notre utilisation est exemptée. Et donc, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, nous n'en paierons pas ».

(1615)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ils ne servent pas seulement de simple canal, ils jouent un rôle de facilitation.

M. Casey Chisick:

Effectivement. C'est vrai. C'est ce qu'ils font, et c'est la raison pour laquelle je crois que l'exception doit être rajustée, pas éliminée, mais rajustée, pour que ce soit très clair que tout service qui joue un rôle actif dans la communication d'oeuvres ou d'autres contenus que les gens stockent de façon numérique ne sont pas admissibles à l'exception.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je reviendrai à vous, parce que j'ai une autre question.

M. Casey Chisick:

D'accord.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je voulais poser rapidement une question à M. Geist.

Je n'ai plus de temps? D'accord. Laissez faire.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais je suis heureux de voir que vous connaissiez les termes que vous utilisiez.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Masse.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

L'AEUMC a changé la donne relativement à deux ou trois paramètres. En quoi a-t-il modifié ce que vous nous avez présenté ici?

Je reviens tout juste de Washington, et il n'y a pas de voie claire pour que ce soit adopté. Nous pourrions être de retour à l'ALENA original, et, si cet accord aussi est éliminé, à l'accord initial sur le libre-échange, mais Trump devrait alors mettre en branle un processus de sortie et d'avis de six mois, et il y a un débat quant à savoir si c'est quelque chose qui relève du président ou du Congrès. En outre, tout ça ferait intervenir des avocats et ainsi de suite. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons un accord potentiel en place. Vegas a ouvert les paris sur son adoption ou son échec.

Nous pourrions peut-être faire un tour de table, afin que vous nous disiez de quelle façon, selon vous, tout ça influe sur ce que vous avez présenté, ici, et notre examen. Nous allons devoir produire un rapport alors que, essentiellement, c'est... Et beaucoup croient que le Congrès n'acceptera pas, parce qu'il n'y a pas eu assez de concessions canadiennes.

Je pose la question, parce que c'est quelque chose qui a changé dans le cadre de nos discussions depuis le début de l'étude comparativement au point où nous en sommes à l'heure actuelle, et, encore une fois, nous allons devoir prodiguer des conseils au ministre.

Nous pouvons commencer du côté gauche, là, puis aller vers la droite.

Mme Catherine Lovrics (vice-présidente, Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur, Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada):

Au sein de notre comité, il n'y a pas de consensus en ce qui concerne la prolongation de la durée, alors ce n'est pas quelque chose que nous avons abordé dans le cadre de notre mémoire.

Cependant, puisqu'il est évident que la prolongation de la durée est un thème abordé dans l'AEUMC, nous avons abordé la question du droit réversif, parce que je crois que si la durée du droit d'auteur est prolongée, il revient au gouvernement d'aussi tenir compte des droits réversifs dans un tel contexte. C'est parce que, actuellement, on ajoute effectivement ces 20 ans si le premier détenteur du droit d'auteur est l'auteur et qu'il a cédé ses droits, et les droits réversifs en vertu du régime actuel pour tout, sauf les oeuvres collectives... eh bien, on prolongerait la durée des droits d'auteur de ceux qui ont l'intérêt réversif et pas des détenteurs actuels des droits. C'est de cette façon que le mémoire de l'IPIC a été touché.

M. Brian Masse:

Les avis sont assez partagés au sein de votre organisation, quant aux avantages et aux détracteurs de...

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

En ce qui concerne la prolongation de la durée, je crois que c'est un enjeu très litigieux et qu'il n'y a pas eu de consensus au sein de notre comité.

M. Brian Masse:

Aurais-je cependant raison de dire que cela a d'importantes conséquences quant aux avis des deux parties? Ce n'est pas quelque chose de mineur. C'est important.

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

Tout à fait. Selon moi, il y a de très bons défenseurs de la prolongation de la durée des droits pour qui les droits internationaux sont une justification d'une telle prolongation, mais je crois qu'il y a ceux qui considèrent que la prolongation limite de façon inappropriée ce qui relève du domaine public au Canada. Encore une fois, il n'y a pas de consensus.

Puisque l'AEUMC le propose, il faudrait se pencher sur la question des droits réversifs.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Chisick.

M. Casey Chisick:

Je suis d'accord. J'ai mentionné les droits réversifs dans mon exposé, et je ne veux pas que vous pensiez que, selon moi, la façon de composer avec les droits réversifs, c'est nécessairement d'éliminer complètement cette notion du système du droit d'auteur. C'est une des solutions, et elle est peut-être bonne, mais il y a aussi d'autres solutions, et, assurément lorsqu'on parle de la prolongation de la durée des droits d'auteur — ce qui selon moi, est une bonne idée, et je le dis publiquement depuis un certain temps —, la façon dont on composera avec les droits d'auteur durant cette plus longue période est de toute évidence un enjeu qu'il faut aborder.

Mon point principal, et ce, que la durée soit la vie de l'auteur plus 50 ans ou la vie de l'auteur plus 70 ans, c'est que, lorsqu'il est question des droits réversifs, il faut aborder cette question de la façon la moins perturbatrice pour l'exploitation commerciale des droits d'auteur. Selon moi, ce point reste valide dans les deux cas.

(1620)

M. Brian Masse:

Le fait qu'on ne procède pas à la prolongation changerait-il votre position sur d'autres enjeux ou est-ce que tout ça concerne essentiellement l'enjeu des 50 ans ou des 70 ans?

M. Casey Chisick:

Je ne crois pas — pas en ce moment en tout cas, je penserai peut-être à quelque chose de plus intelligent à dire quand ce sera fini — qu'il y ait quoi que ce soit qui tienne particulièrement à la question de savoir si la durée est de 50 ans ou de 70 ans.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Geist.

M. Michael Geist:

Si je ne m'abuse, il y avait trois types de règles différents dans l'accord lié au droit d'auteur. Il y a les dispositions relativement auxquelles, franchement, nous avons déjà cédé sous les pressions américaines en 2012...

M. Brian Masse:

Oui.

M. Michael Geist:

... et donc, nos dispositions anticontournement sont conformes à l'AEUMC, mais on l'a fait seulement en raison de l'énorme pression américaine avant les réformes de 2012 et, en fait, notre système est maintenant plus restrictif que celui des États-Unis, ce qui nous désavantage.

Puis, il y a un domaine — les règles d'avis et avis — que le gouvernement a clairement jugé prioritaire et qu'il a défendu pour permettre le maintien des règles canadiennes.

La prolongation de la durée a une incidence énorme, et, franchement, il est évident que le gouvernement le reconnaît. Ce n'est pas une coïncidence si, lorsque nous sommes passés du PTP au PTPGP, l'une des dispositions clés qui ont été suspendues, c'était la prolongation de la durée. De nombreux économistes ont très bien montré clairement que cela n'entraînait pas une augmentation de la créativité. Personne ne s'est réveillé avec l'intention d'écrire un grand roman canadien pour ensuite décider de se rendormir, parce que ses descendants bénéficieront d'une protection des droits durant 50 ans plutôt que 70 ans.

Pour toutes les autres oeuvres déjà créées, ce cadeau de 20 années supplémentaires — qui verrouillera littéralement le domaine public au Canada pour 20 ans de plus — se fera à un coût énorme, particulièrement à une époque où l'on passe de plus en plus au numérique. La capacité d'utiliser ces oeuvres de façon numérique à des fins de communication ou d'éducation ou pour permettre de nouveaux types de créativité sera littéralement retirée à toute une génération.

Si le Comité doit formuler une recommandation, ce doit être, dans un premier temps, de reconnaître qu'il s'agit là d'un changement majeur. Lorsque des groupes viennent et disent: « Voici toutes les choses que nous voulons en tant que détenteurs de droits », avec l'AEUMC, ils viennent de gagner à la loterie. C'est un changement majeur dans l'équilibre des forces.

Ensuite, le Comité devrait recommander la détermination de la meilleure façon d'appliquer tout ça pour limiter les dommages. Ce n'est pas quelque chose que nous voulions; ça nous a été imposé. Y a-t-il une certaine souplesse quant à la façon dont, au bout du compte, on mettra tout ça en oeuvre afin d'atténuer une partie des préjudices?

M. Brian Masse:

Madame Gendreau.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

La question de savoir si la durée sera de 50 ou de 70 ans m'indiffère, et ce, pour deux raisons.

Je viens de terminer le mois passé la lecture d'un livre sur la vie sociale en France au XIXe siècle. Il y avait, à l'époque, des salons où les gens se rendaient, et les artistes et les politiciens se côtoyaient. Le livre contenait des listes des artistes et des écrivains qui se rendaient dans ces salons, et je ne connaissais par le nom des trois quarts d'entre eux.

Lorsqu'on parle de protection du droit d'auteur, je crois que très peu d'oeuvres sont encore pertinentes 50 ans — et encore moins — 70 ans après le décès de l'auteur. Je ne sais pas pourquoi nous faisons tout un plat d'un enjeu qui sera important seulement pour une minorité d'auteurs. Voilà pour la première raison.

Ensuite, si nous sommes préoccupés par la durée de la protection du droit d'auteur, alors, selon moi, nous devrions peut-être nous en inquiéter parce que le droit d'auteur couvre les programmes informatiques. Vous rendez-vous compte que, de par leur nature, les programmes de droit d'auteur ne seront jamais du domaine public, en raison de leur cycle de vie? Il s'agit d'une industrie où jamais rien ne relèvera du domaine public.

Pour terminer, je tiens à souligner qu'il est possible pour des oeuvres de continuer d'avoir une vie commerciale après le décès de l'auteur. Je pense que c'est juste. Quant à savoir si ce devrait être 50 ou 70 ans, comme je l'ai dit, ça m'est indifférent. Je ne participerais jamais à une manifestation ou une marche à ce sujet, ni pour une position ni pour l'autre, mais 70 ans est la durée choisie par nos principaux partenaires du G7. Par conséquent, être membre du G7 a un prix, et les 20 années supplémentaires constituent un enjeu de peu d'importance.

M. Brian Masse:

Nous savons tous que le G7 joue avec les règles.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

C'est intéressant, cependant. Cette question nous permet de voir l'enjeu dans son ensemble.

Merci beaucoup aux témoins.

Le président:

C'est la raison pour laquelle on les a gardés pour la fin.

Nous allons passer à M. Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais céder deux ou trois minutes à M. Lametti.

J'aimerais commencer par l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada. Pour commencer, je vous remercie de nous aider dans le cadre de l'étude que nous avons réalisée sur la propriété intellectuelle. C'était bien de voir certaines des idées dont nous avons discuté être mises en oeuvre.

Je pense à l'interaction entre l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle et la Commission du droit d'auteur ou des sociétés de gestion collective connexes. Dans quelle mesure participez-vous pour encadrer les artistes afin qu'ils protègent leurs oeuvres, qu'ils trouvent le bon chemin à suivre?

Je sais que vous le faites d'autres façons en ce qui a trait à la propriété intellectuelle, mais qu'en est-il de...?

(1625)

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je ne suis pas sûr de pouvoir répondre à cette question du point de vue du travail institutionnel réalisé par l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada, l'IPIC, même s'il maintient des relations, évidemment, avec ces organismes.

En tant que conseillers pour les particuliers, c'est là une composante importante de nos activités quotidiennes, soit de conseiller nos clients sur la meilleure façon de tirer profit des oeuvres qu'ils ont créées et de les exploiter au sein du marché.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

L'une des limites que nous avons constatées dans notre étude précédente concernait la transparence, pas le fait que ce n'était pas transparent, mais simplement le fait que les gens ne savaient pas où se tourner pour obtenir des solutions ou se protéger.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Oui. Je crois que l'une des choses avec lesquelles nous devons composer en tant que conseillers, tout comme vous, en tant que législateurs, c'est que le système de droit d'auteur est extrêmement complexe. C'est extrêmement opaque pour le commun des mortels. Je crois qu'un principe directeur que tout le monde devrait se rappeler, c'est qu'il faudrait rendre la Loi sur le droit d'auteur — et le système, aussi, de façon plus générale — un peu plus convivial.

Il y a un certain nombre de choses qu'on a abordées dans le cadre de la discussion, déjà, comme l'intérêt réversif, qui rendent l'application de la loi encore plus complexe et qui, selon moi, devraient faire l'objet d'un examen afin qu'on puisse en faire un processus dans le cadre duquel on n'a pas nécessairement à retenir les services d'un avocat ou payer telle ou telle personne des centaines de dollars l'heure pour s'y retrouver.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

En fait, l'un des représentants de Google a dit qu'il s'agissait d'un « système très complexe et opaque de licences conventionnelles de musique ». C'est ce à quoi les gens sont confrontés.

Et là, on parle seulement de principes directeurs. L'étude est déjà très avancée. Lorsque nous avons travaillé en vue de l'élaboration d'un programme de développement économique pour la Ville de Guelph, nous nous sommes tournés vers des principes directeurs. Lorsque nous avons examiné notre Initiative d'énergie communautaire, nous nous sommes appuyés sur des principes directeurs.

En ce qui concerne la loi et notre étude, de quelle façon pouvons-nous définir certains de ces principes directeurs d'entrée de jeu, dans notre étude? Avez-vous d'autres principes directeurs que nous devrions avoir en tête?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Selon moi, de façon générale, vous pouvez cerner un ensemble de principes directeurs, tirés de diverses approches théoriques, pour justifier pourquoi le droit d'auteur existe. Parmi ces principes, il y a le fait d'inciter la création et la communication d'oeuvres en s'assurant que les auteurs sont récompensés. Cependant, je crois qu'il est absolument crucial d'affirmer ou de ne pas oublier que ce principe doit être contrebalancé par un intérêt communautaire et culturel plus global pour permettre la libre circulation des idées et des activités d'expression culturelle.

Le défi auquel vous êtes confronté, bien sûr, c'est de trouver une façon de trouver un juste équilibre entre les divers intérêts et les divers mécanismes que vous mettez en place, ici, pour réaliser ces fonctions très distinctes. Il y a une tension, ici. C'est une tension permanente.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je ne crois pas nécessairement qu'il y a une façon de régler ça, mais je crois qu'on peut mettre en place un système, puis l'évaluer de façon continue pour cerner ses limites, là où il va trop loin et là où l'indemnisation est déficiente.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Dans la minute qu'il me reste... Madame Gendreau, vous avez mentionné les sociétés de gestion collective. J'aimerais vraiment savoir de quelle façon ces sociétés sont gérées, et savoir dans quelle mesure elles sont transparentes. Aviez-vous l'intention d'en discuter? Dans l'affirmative, ce serait peut-être le temps de nous le dire.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Oui. Je serai heureuse d'en parler.

Je comprends que les gens peuvent être préoccupés par la façon dont les sociétés sont gérées. Je crois que le fait que certaines sociétés ne seront plus obligées de se présenter devant la Commission suscitera peut-être encore plus de préoccupations.

Cependant, je sais qu'il y a des règles, par exemple, au sein de l'Union européenne, qui concernent la gestion interne de ces sociétés. Selon moi, de telles règles, même si les sociétés les trouvent probablement embêtantes, devraient être bien vues, précisément parce qu'elles donneraient à ces sociétés plus de légitimité dans le cadre de leur travail. Je vois de telles règles comme des façons d'améliorer la légitimité, plutôt que comme des obstacles au travail.

(1630)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Je vous cède la parole, monsieur Lametti.

M. David Lametti:

Merci.

Je pense que mon principal problème, c'est plus d'appeler les gens par leur nom de famille alors que je les connais depuis 20 ans.

Monsieur Tarantino, vous avez suggéré que les copies aux fins d'analyse computationnelle pourraient faire l'objet d'une exception liée à l'intelligence artificielle, l'IA, et à l'exploration de données. Vous croyez qu'une telle mesure nous permettrait d'atteindre nos objectifs? Faut-il y aller avec des « tels que » ou — comme quelqu'un d'autre l'a suggéré il y a deux ou trois semaines — faut-il prévoir une exception dans le cas des copies accessoires utilisées pour réaliser des analyses d'information? J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je dois m'en remettre aux vues de notre comité. Ce n'est pas un point que nous avons abordé précisément auprès des membres, à part ce qui figure dans notre mémoire, soit que l'approche britannique pourrait être envisagée. Ce que je suggérerais, c'est d'en revenir à notre dispositif d'encadrement structurel. Regardons quel a été le résultat de la mise en place d'une exception pour l'analyse computationnelle au Royaume-Uni.

M. David Lametti:

Monsieur Chisick, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter à ce sujet?

M. Casey Chisick:

Si ce à quoi vous faites référence concerne les reproductions temporaires pour les processus technologiques, l'exception 30.71, c'est un bon exemple d'une exception qui est décrite de façon vraiment générale, ce qui la rend vulnérable aux malentendus ou à l'abus.

Mentionnons par exemple la situation des diffuseurs qui affirment que tout le domaine de la diffusion, de l'intégration du contenu jusqu'à la prestation en public de l'oeuvre, mise sur des processus technologiques et que, par conséquent, il convient d'exempter toutes les copies. Il est possible que, si elle est bien définie, une telle exception pourrait être un mécanisme approprié pour composer avec les enjeux de l'exploration de données et de l'intelligence artificielle, mais il faut faire très attention à la façon dont on définit ces exceptions, de façon à vraiment cibler les fins escomptées et de façon, aussi, à ce qu'il ne soit pas possible de les exploiter à d'autres fins.

M. David Lametti:

Je vais m'adresser à M. Geist, si nous avons le temps.

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très rapidement.

M. Michael Geist:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, ma préférence serait une approche globale qui s'appuie sur l'expression « tels que ». Je crois vraiment qu'il faut quelque chose. Même si c'est prévu, les choses visées par l'expression « tels que » devraient inclure l'analyse informationnelle.

J'ai vu le premier ministre parler vendredi de l'importance de l'IA. Franchement, je ne crois pas que la disposition britannique va assez loin. Presque toutes les données que nous obtenons nous parviennent en raison de contrats. La capacité de conclure des contrats pour bénéficier de l'exception touchant l'analyse informationnelle représente un problème important. Il faut s'assurer que, lorsqu'on acquiert ces oeuvres, on a la capacité... On ne parle pas de republier ou de commercialiser de telles oeuvres: on parle de les utiliser à des fins d'analyse informationnelle. On ne devrait pas avoir à négocier ce droit dans le cadre de contrats. Il devrait s'agir d'une politique clairement définie dans la loi.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Lloyd, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je vais poursuivre là où j'étais rendu.

Le président:

En fait, vous avez cinq minutes. Désolé.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ça change tout.

Monsieur Geist, il semble y avoir beaucoup de problèmes liés au modèle de gestion collective. Si un tel modèle n'existait pas, j'ai l'impression qu'on en aurait besoin d'un, parce que les coûts de transaction pour un artiste ou un écrivain sont tellement élevés qu'un regroupement est nécessaire. Y a-t-il une solution de rechange au modèle de gestion collective mentionnée dans vos recherches, une idée que vous pourriez proposer?

M. Michael Geist:

Actuellement, le marché offre une solution de rechange. J'ai mentionné les 1,4 million de livres électroniques que possède sous licence l'Université d'Ottawa. Ces livres ont été acquis par l'intermédiaire non pas d'une société de gestion collective, mais d'un certain nombre d'éditeurs et d'autres agrégateurs. En fait, dans bon nombre de cas, on offre sous différentes licences un même livre — parfois à perpétuité — parce que le détenteur du droit d'auteur offre le livre en question dans plusieurs ensembles de livres, différents forfaits. En fait, c'est quelque chose que les auteurs ou les éditeurs font tout le temps de nos jours.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ça semble vraiment très intéressant. J'aime cette idée d'une mouvance vers le libre-marché, en quelque sorte, mais, d'après ce que nous ont dit les auteurs à qui nous avons parlé, ça ne semble pas... Je reviendrai à vous.

Monsieur Chisick, pouvez-vous formuler un commentaire à ce sujet? Est-ce que la possibilité pour les auteurs d'accorder des licences pour des livres numériques est une solution de remplacement appropriée aux sociétés de gestion collective?

M. Casey Chisick:

De ce que j'ai vu des auteurs qui ont de la difficulté à suivre ce qui se passe au sein du marché, ce n'était pas une solution complète. Il ne fait aucun doute que les licences transactionnelles — particulièrement dans le domaine de l'édition des livres — ont fait de grands pas au cours de la dernière décennie, environ. Cependant, ce modèle ne semble pas tenir compte de la pleine valeur de toutes les oeuvres qui sont utilisées. On pourrait dire que c'est quelque chose qui doit exister parallèlement à un modèle de licences collectives pouvant ramasser les restes.

Dans d'autres domaines où des licences sont accordées, les solutions axées sur le marché n'ont pas été efficaces du tout, comme, par exemple, dans le domaine de la musique, où la viabilité en tant que telle de la carrière d'un auteur ou d'un artiste dépend de sa capacité de recueillir des millions et des millions de micropaiements, des fractions de sous.

(1635)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Qu'en est-il des auteurs qui défendent leurs oeuvres contre la violation du droit d'auteur? Les auteurs moyens ont-ils les ressources financières pour intenter des poursuites sans modèle de licence collective? Pourraient-ils le faire?

M. Casey Chisick:

Non, ils ne pourraient pas. C'est quasiment impossible pour la grande majorité d'entre eux, sauf pour les artistes qui ont le plus de succès ou, franchement, les détenteurs de droits d'auteur qui ont plus de succès, et je parle ici des éditeurs et des autres intervenants — le 1 % ou très près de ça — qui peuvent demander réparation en cas de violation du droit d'auteur. Ironiquement, dans le cadre de la ronde précédente de réforme du droit d'auteur, en 1997, c'était l'une des raisons pour lesquelles on avait tenté, par l'intermédiaire de politiques, d'encourager les artistes et les auteurs à miser sur la gestion collective.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je veux permettre à M. Geist d'avoir la possibilité de répliquer. Selon moi, ça ne serait que juste.

M. Michael Geist:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Merci.

Je ne dis pas qu'il ne devrait y avoir aucune société de gestion collective; je crois qu'elles ont un rôle à jouer. Ce que je dis, c'est que nous avons vu, surtout dans le marché de la publication universitaire, qu'elles ont été remplacées, dans les faits, par des solutions de rechange. C'est le libre-marché à l'oeuvre. Avec certains étudiants, j'ai réalisé des études sur les principaux éditeurs canadiens, y compris un certain nombre de ceux qui ont comparu devant le Comité, et quasiment tout ce qu'ils ont rendu accessible sous licence est ce pour quoi nos universités ont obtenu des licences.

Lorsque certains auteurs demandent: « Pourquoi est-ce que j'obtiens moins d'Access Copyright? » il faut reconnaître qu'une partie des revenus d'Accès Copyright sortent du pays. Il y a aussi une part destinée à l'administration, puis il y en a une grosse partie destinée à ce que les responsables appellent le système de remboursement, pour un répertoire. Ça n'a absolument rien à voir avec l'utilisation. C'est tout simplement lié au répertoire. Le répertoire exclut toutes les oeuvres qui ont plus de 20 ans et toutes les oeuvres numériques.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Et que dites-vous de la défense des gens, comme M. Chisick en a parlé? Au total, 99 % des auteurs ne peuvent pas se défendre eux-mêmes en cas de violation du droit d'auteur de leurs oeuvres. De quelle façon remplacez-vous ça? Quelle est la solution de rechange?

M. Michael Geist:

Dans de nombreux cas, lorsque ces oeuvres sont octroyées par licence, les éditeurs ont les ressources nécessaires pour passer à l'action, le cas échéant. Cependant, la notion que, pour une raison quelconque, nous ayons surtout besoin de sociétés de gestion collective pour intenter des poursuites contre des établissements d'enseignement me semble un peu erronée.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Eh bien, pour protéger...

M. Michael Geist:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je ne crois pas que quiconque propose de façon crédible que les établissements d'enseignement essaient de violer les droits d'auteur. En fait, nous voyons certains établissements d'enseignement — même au Québec — qui se dotent de licences de gestion collective auprès de Copibec et qui obtiennent, en plus, des licences transactionnelles supplémentaires parce qu'ils doivent le faire et les payer. Les méchants, ici, ce ne sont pas les établissements d'enseignement.

M. Dane Lloyd:

De qui parlez-vous?

M. Michael Geist:

Je ne crois pas qu'il y a des contrefacteurs majeurs dans le domaine de l'édition de livres.

M. Casey Chisick:

Pour que ce soit clair, le point que j'ai formulé au sujet du fait que les licences et la gestion collective pourraient exister parallèlement ne consistait pas à dire que c'était principalement à des fins d'application de la loi. Je suis d'accord avec M. Geist: l'objectif, c'est de rendre inutile la prise de mesures d'application de la loi en s'assurant que toutes les utilisations pour lesquelles on peut accorder des licences et relativement auxquelles des licences sont appropriées font l'objet de licences dans la pratique.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Puis-je ajouter qu'un des aspects qu'on ne mentionne pas souvent, selon moi, c'est que, avec toutes les nouvelles licences que les éditeurs fournissent aux universités, eh bien, peut-être qu'une des sources de mécontentement tient au fait que je ne suis pas sûre que l'argent se rende jusqu'aux auteurs qui ont signé un contrat avec les éditeurs. Il y a des licences entre des éditeurs et des universités ou n'importe quel autre genre de groupe et, oui, on regarde les modalités. Encore une fois, le fait d'accorder une licence pour qu'un de nos livres se retrouve dans une bibliothèque est différent du fait d'accorder une licence pour qu'un livre soit utilisé dans une salle de classe, mais oublions cette différence pour l'instant. Je ne suis pas sûr que la situation actuelle soit vraiment bénéfique pour les auteurs, qui ne reçoivent peut-être pas nécessairement d'argent malgré toutes ces licences octroyées.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. C'est bien de voir toutes les têtes qui se lèvent et qui se baissent en même temps.

Madame Ceasar-Chavannes, vous avez cinq minutes.

(1640)

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier tous les témoins. J'ai cinq minutes, alors je vais essayer de poser le plus de questions possible.

Monsieur Chisick, au début de votre déclaration, vous avez dit être d'accord avec les points de vue de nombreux témoins qui ont comparu ici avant vous. Selon vous, quelles sont les choses avec lesquelles vous n'étiez pas d'accord tandis que nous évaluons certaines des recommandations que nous allons formuler?

M. Casey Chisick:

C'est une excellente question. Il est évident que je suis préoccupé. Je suis en désaccord avec le point de vue que M. Geist a exprimé au sujet de la prolongation de la durée, par exemple. L'exemple qu'il a donné de l'auteur qui se réveille et décide de ne pas écrire de livre en raison de la durée du droit d'auteur de 50 ans après son décès, plutôt que de 70 ans est peut-être approprié, mais la durée du droit d'auteur est extrêmement pertinente à la décision des éditeurs d'investir ou non, et à quel niveau, dans la publication et la promotion de l'oeuvre.

C'est peut-être pertinent ou non pour la personne qui écrit — même si je suis sûr que des écrivains se réveillent le matin en se demandant s'ils vont devoir se trouver un autre emploi —, mais du point de vue commercial, c'est quelque chose qui devient de plus en plus difficile chaque jour, lorsqu'on regarde le niveau d'investissement dans la communication de la créativité, qui est aussi une composante cruciale du système de droit d'auteur. Selon moi, la prolongation de la durée de la vie plus 50 ans à la durée de la vie plus 70 ans est quelque chose qu'on attend depuis longtemps.

Certains témoins devant le Comité ont laissé entendre que le droit d'auteur lié à une oeuvre audiovisuelle devrait revenir à l'écrivain ou au directeur ou aux deux. Je suis en désaccord là aussi pour des raisons similaires. Tout est lié au fonctionnement pratique du système de droit d'auteur et à la façon dont ces idées peuvent être appliquées en pratique. En tant qu'avocat d'un cabinet privé qui interagit avec toutes sortes d'intervenants différents du milieu du droit d'auteur, ma principale préoccupation est de ne pas mettre en place des composantes du système qui nuiront ou constitueront les obstacles perpétuels à l'exploitation couronnée de succès des oeuvres commerciales. Il est très important, maintenant, à l'ère numérique, de s'assurer qu'il y a moins de friction, pas plus.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Geist, vous avez parlé de la manne associée au fait qu'on prolonge la protection à la durée à la durée de vie plus 70 ans. De quelle façon réévalueriez-vous la « manne » qui découlerait de l'adoption de l'AEUMC. Plus précisément, de quelle façon tout ça pourrait-il être recalibré dans les limites de la loi?

M. Michael Geist:

C'est une excellente question. Il y a vraiment, en fait, deux aspects.

Premièrement, y a-t-il une application qui respecterait les exigences prévues dans la loi tout en permettant de réduire un peu les préjudices? Lorsque M. Chisick dit que, ce dont il est question ici, c'est une entreprise qui prend une décision d'investir ou non dans un livre, c'est peut-être très bien pour tous les livres qui commenceront à être écrits une fois la durée définie, à partir d'aujourd'hui, mais la durée s'appliquera à toutes sortes d'oeuvres qui ne relèvent pas encore du domaine public. Les maisons d'édition bénéficieront maintenant de 20 années de plus puisqu'une décision avait déjà été prise et auront droit à des revenus supplémentaires.

Il faudrait envisager la mise en place d'un genre d'exigence d'enregistrement pour ces 20 années supplémentaires. Comme Mme Gendreau l'a souligné, il y a un petit nombre d'oeuvres qui peuvent avoir une valeur économique. Les propriétaires des droits décideront d'inscrire ces oeuvres pour les 20 années de plus, parce qu'ils peuvent en tirer quelque chose, mais la vaste majorité des autres oeuvres pourraient relever du domaine public.

De plus, lorsqu'on envisage des réformes plus générales et qu'on parle du besoin de trouver un juste équilibre, il ne faut pas oublier que la balance penche déjà d'un côté. Je crois que cette situation doit avoir une incidence sur le genre de recommandations et, au bout du compte, de réforme pour lesquelles nous opterons, si l'une des principales réformes nous a déjà été imposée.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Si vous aviez chacun de vous une recommandation à formuler, par rapport à ce que nous devrions étudier dans le cadre de notre examen, qu'est-ce que ce serait?

Allez-y.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je vous recommanderais de veiller à ce que les entreprises numériques — au Canada ou à l'étranger — qui prennent activement des décisions d'affaires où il est question d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur aient une responsabilité et paient quelque chose. D'accord, si elles sont entièrement passives, alors elles sont entièrement passives, mais, d'après ce que nous savons aujourd'hui, il semble que la plupart des entités qui se déclarent passives ne le sont pas vraiment; elles essaient seulement de se soustraire à leur responsabilité. C'est ma plus grande préoccupation.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Est-ce que je pourrais...? Non?

Je pose la même question à quiconque voudrait y répondre.

M. Michael Geist:

D'accord, je vais me lancer.

Je dirais qu'il faut s'assurer que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur puisse continuer à s'adapter à l'évolution de la technologie. La meilleure façon de le faire, c'est de s'assurer que l'utilisation équitable offre une certaine souplesse — ce qui revient à donner l'exemple — et que l'utilisation équitable s'applique autant au monde numérique qu'au monde analogique. Cela supposerait de prévoir une exception aux règles interdisant le contournement des mesures de protection technologiques lorsqu'il s'agit d'utilisation équitable.

(1645)

M. Casey Chisick:

Je crois qu'il serait crucial d'ajouter dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur une disposition concernant les injonctions de blocage de sites et de désindexation. Je dis cela parce que énormément de gens se tournent vers des sites à l'étranger pour échapper à la surveillance des tribunaux canadiens, alors que ce qu'ils font est potentiellement légitime. Je ne comprends pas comment quiconque pourrait affirmer que c'est une bonne chose. Selon moi, il faudrait intégrer un système équilibré à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur de façon à régler les problèmes soulignés par M. Geist relativement au blocage excessif, à la liberté d'expression, etc., tout en faisant en sorte que les Canadiens ne puissent pas faire indirectement ce qui leur est interdit de faire directement. Je crois que ce serait une modification de la loi dans le bon sens.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Pourriez-vous choisir une recommandation que vous aimeriez faire?

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

La recommandation que nous voulons faire concerne surtout les professionnels. Il y a des détails techniques dans la loi qui, une fois réglés, permettraient d'augmenter de beaucoup la certitude, mais ce n'est probablement pas le genre de détails qui ont été communiqués au Comité jusqu'ici.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

D'accord.

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

Premièrement, il faut des éclaircissements en ce qui concerne les droits des auteurs sur les oeuvres créées en collaboration et les droits des copropriétaires en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Présentement, sous le régime de la loi, qui peut dire quels sont les droits des copropriéaires d'une oeuvre protégée s'il n'y a pas d'entente? Peuvent-ils exploiter l'oeuvre? Un copropriétaire a-t-il besoin de la permission de l'autre? Pour nous, à titre de professionnels, c'est un problème très évident, mais ce ne l'est pas nécessairement pour nos clients.

Deuxièmement, il y a les droits d'une oeuvre commandée ou d'une oeuvre future. En ce qui concerne les oeuvres futures, je crois que la plupart du temps, les ententes couvrent la cession à venir. Néanmoins, sur le plan technique, le débat n'est pas réglé quant à la question de savoir si cela est valide sous le régime de la loi. Voilà les recommandations que je fais au nom de l'IPIC.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci, je crois que j'ai un peu dépassé mon temps, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Juste un tout petit peu. Merci beaucoup.

Vous avez à nouveau la parole, monsieur Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Je tiens à présenter mes excuses aux autres témoins. Je sais que je ne m'adresse pas assez à vous, mais j'ai encore une question à poser à M. Chisick.

Je m'interroge à propos du droit réversif. Un artiste canadien a témoigné devant le comité du patrimoine à propos du droit réversif. Il avait des préoccupations à ce sujet, et je me demandais si vous pouviez nous parler d'une solution de rechange et des répercussions.

M. Casey Chisick:

Vous parlez sans doute de Bryan Adams...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui.

M. Casey Chisick:

... et de sa proposition d'adopter un modèle de résiliation de certains droits, similaire à celui des Américains.

C'est effectivement une approche possible. L'un des avantages du modèle américain sur le modèle canadien de résiliation des droits, c'est qu'il exige au moins que l'artiste se manifeste pour réclamer ses droits. Il y a une période définie durant laquelle les droits peuvent être réclamés. Il faut qu'un avis soit présenté, ce qui permet aux gens de mettre leurs affaires en ordre en conséquence. Je crois que la proposition de M. Adams n'arrive pas au bon moment. Je crois qu'il serait malavisé de permettre la résiliation des droits après une période de 35 ans, comme cela se fait aux États-Unis. Selon moi, c'est trop rapide, et ce, pour toutes sortes de raisons. Par exemple, il y a les incitatifs à l'investissement. Malgré tout, c'est une approche que l'on pourrait prendre en considération.

Une autre approche qu'il faudrait étudier et qui a été adoptée pratiquement partout dans le monde serait d'éliminer entièrement le droit réversif et de laisser au marché le soin des intérêts à long terme en matière de droits d'auteur. Je doute que ce soit par coïncidence que, dans littéralement tous les pays du monde où il y a déjà eu un droit réversif — y compris au Royaume-Uni, où ce droit a été inventé —, il a été abrogé ou modifié de façon à être géré par contrat pendant la vie de l'auteur. D'après ce que j'en sais, il n'y a qu'au Canada où ce n'est plus le cas. Cela aussi en dit long.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Monsieur Geist, peut-être pourriez-vous faire un commentaire rapide: vous avez parlé d'abroger ou de modifier les dispositions relatives au droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Je me demandais si vous pouviez fournir plus de détails sur l'application du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Le sujet a déjà été abordé ici au Comité, mais jamais en profondeur. Ensuite, pourriez-vous parler des avantages que l'on pourrait obtenir si on l'éliminait?

M. Michael Geist:

Bien sûr. Je vais parler du droit d'auteur de la Couronne dans un instant.

Avant, je voulais faire un commentaire sur le droit réversif. J'ai l'impression qu'il y a eu énormément d'investissements dans ce secteur aux États-Unis, sans qu'on se préoccupe de la façon dont le système fonctionne, pour redonner leurs droits aux auteurs.

Vous avez demandé plus tôt comment chaque créateur s'y prenait pour faire appliquer le droit d'auteur. Selon moi, le concept d'une approche qui reviendrait à dire: « Vous devez vous occuper de tout. Vous devriez être en mesure de négocier l'ensemble des droits avec les grandes maisons de disque et les grands éditeurs », désavantage clairement les créateurs.

Mme Gendreau a mentionné que les ententes entre les auteurs et les éditeurs dans un monde de plus en plus numérique faisaient partie du problème, et vous avez posé une question sur ce que fait Bryan Adams. Cela m'amène à dire que nous n'avons pas choisi la bonne cible. Le gros du problème, entre les créateurs et les intermédiaires qui aident à faciliter la création et qui acheminent les produits jusqu'au marché — les éditeurs, les maisons de disque, etc. —, c'est que le déséquilibre des forces est important. C'est ce qu'on veut corriger avec ces solutions.

En ce qui concerne le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, j'ai siégé pendant de nombreuses années au conseil de CanLII, l'Institut canadien d'information juridique, et nous avons constaté qu'il est extrêmement difficile d'utiliser des documents juridiques comme des décisions du tribunal ou d'autres documents gouvernementaux. D'ailleurs, il y a eu des discussions sur Twitter à ce sujet aujourd'hui: il était question précisément des problèmes auxquels font face les agrégateurs financés par les avocats du pays lorsqu'ils essaient de s'assurer que le public a un accès libre et gratuit aux documents juridiques. C'est un problème très important. C'est un exemple typique du modèle de droit d'auteur de la Couronne où le gouvernement est le propriétaire par défaut, ce qui fait qu'une autorisation d'utilisation est requise. Vous ne pouvez même pas essayer de regrouper à des fins commerciales certains des documents publiés par le gouvernement.

(1650)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Y a-t-il des raisons légitimes d'avoir un droit d'auteur de la Couronne? Il me semble qu'il y a de bonnes raisons pour lesquelles on devrait le conserver.

M. Michael Geist:

Ma collègue, Mme Elizabeth Judge, a écrit un excellent article qui aborde l'histoire du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Au départ, je crois qu'on voulait s'assurer que les documents du gouvernement étaient fiables et crédibles et qu'ils fassent autorité. De nos jours, je crois que cet enjeu est beaucoup moins important.

J'imagine aussi que toutes les façons que nous avons aujourd'hui d'utiliser les documents gouvernementaux n'existaient pas, lorsque cela a été adopté. Il suffit de penser à l'évolution des systèmes GPS et à d'autres types de services s'appuyant sur le gouvernement ouvert ou les données ouvertes du gouvernement. L'idée de conserver une disposition sur le droit d'auteur qui restreint cela me semble aux antipodes de la conception d'une loi adaptée au contexte technologique actuel.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Disons que le gouvernement crée une chose qui a de la valeur pour lui, mais qui perdrait cette valeur si elle devait être libre en vertu de la loi. Croyez-vous que le droit d'auteur de la Couronne est légitime dans ce genre de cas?

M. Michael Geist:

Nous sommes le gouvernement. C'est nous qui finançons ce genre de choses. J'étais ravi d'apprendre que le Conseil du Trésor — je crois — a annoncé il y a quelques jours qu'il allait changer sa position sur les logiciels ouverts: lorsque c'est possible, il priorisera l'utilisation des logiciels ouverts. Je crois que cette approche tient compte du fait qu'il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables, et que c'est la chose à faire lorsque c'est possible. Un autre exemple serait l'octroi de licences aux journaux locaux par Creative Commons.

Dans certains domaines, on peut se demander pourquoi le gouvernement ne pourrait pas réaliser un profit, mais le droit d'auteur n'est pas un de ces domaines. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur ne devrait pas être utilisée pour empêcher cela.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

La parole va à M. Sheehan. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci à tous de votre témoignage. Nous en arrivons à la fin de notre étude, alors c'est une bonne chose que vous soyez ici. Nous pouvons vous poser des questions sur ce que nous avons entendu. Le Comité a parcouru le pays d'une côte à l'autre, et nous avons entendu le témoignage de toutes sortes de personnes qui avaient de très bonnes idées.

Les représentants de la Fédération nationale des communications, la FNC, ont proposé de créer une nouvelle catégorie d'oeuvres assujetties au droit d'auteur: les oeuvres journalistiques, qui seraient gérées collectivement. Ainsi, les Google et les Facebook de ce monde devraient rémunérer les journalistes pour les articles publiés sur Internet, sur leurs sites. Avez-vous des commentaires à ce sujet? J'aimerais aussi surtout savoir comment cela se distingue de l'article 11 de la proposition de Directive sur le droit d'auteur dans le marché unique numérique de l'Union européenne.

Michael, vous pouvez commencer.

M. Michael Geist:

Je crois que l'article 11 est un problème. Je crois que cette approche a déjà été tentée dans d'autres pays, et elle ne fonctionne pas. Il y a deux ou trois pays en Europe où cela a été tenté. Les agrégateurs assujettis à cette disposition ont simplement arrêté de partager les liens, et les éditeurs ont conclu, au bout du compte, que cela créait plus de problèmes que cela n'en réglait.

Je crois que nous devons prendre conscience du fait que les journalistes ont besoin du droit d'auteur et des dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable, tout autant que nombre d'autres acteurs. La mise en place des restrictions qui favorisent les journalistes entraîne des risques considérables, surtout vu l'importance de la presse.

Je me suis aussi intéressé aux groupes qui sont venus témoigner à ce sujet, et je crois qu'il faut souligner que certains d'entre eux ont octroyé des licences à titre perpétuel pour leurs oeuvres à des établissements d'enseignement. J'ai un exemple parfait à vous donner. Je sais que l'éditeur du Winnipeg Free Press a beaucoup parlé de cet enjeu. L'Université de l'Alberta a un excellent site Web où toutes ses oeuvres sous licence sont accessibles au public. Des licences ont été octroyées à titre perpétuel pour tous les numéros, littéralement, du Winnipeg Free Press pour plus d'une centaine d'années. Les éditeurs ont effectivement vendu les droits pour utilisation dans les salles de classe à des fins d'études ou pour une foule d'utilisations, et de façon permanente.

Respectueusement, je trouve un peu inconvenant qu'une personne, d'un côté, vende des droits grâce à un système de licence et demande, d'autre part, pourquoi elle ne serait pas rémunérée pour ces nouvelles utilisations et pourquoi on ne modifierait pas le régime du droit d'auteur en conséquence.

(1655)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Quelqu'un d'autre veut-il faire des commentaires?

Oui, madame Gendreau.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Il est clair que nous sommes en train d'assister à la disparition des médias traditionnels devant les médias en ligne.

Certains affirment que, aux dernières élections provinciales au Québec, 70 ou même 80 % du budget publicitaire des partis politiques est allé à des fournisseurs de services de l'étranger.

Il y a des journaux qui ferment, et les médias ont de la difficulté à nous tenir au courant des dernières nouvelles. À présent que les médias sont en difficulté et qu'il y a des fermetures, certains avancent l'idée que le gouvernement devrait les subventionner. D'un côté, il y a des gens qui n'achètent pas de journaux ou qui ne peuvent même pas accéder aux médias traditionnels, et de l'autre, les recettes publicitaires vont à des entreprises étrangères qui ne paient pas d'impôt ici. Le gouvernement perd une part de l'assiette fiscale à cause de cela, et, en plus, on lui demande de subventionner les journaux et les médias parce qu'ils ont besoin d'aide pour survivre. Devinez qui s'en met plein les poches.

Je crois que la solution à ce genre de problème est d'offrir une rémunération adéquate aux journalistes lorsque leurs articles sont utilisés. Ce n'est peut-être pas, d'un point de vue technique, la meilleure façon de procéder — j'en suis consciente —, mais je crois qu'il y a moyen de veiller à ce que les médias, qui doivent payer leurs journalistes et qui veulent que des enquêtes journalistiques soient menées au Canada, pour le bien du pays, puissent récupérer leur argent et s'assurer que leur secteur est dynamique et utile. Ils ne veulent pas disparaître et que les gens ne reçoivent plus que les gros titres sur leur téléphone.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Ce vous dites est très intéressant.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé de la protection du savoir et de la culture autochtones par le droit d'auteur. Nous avons eu beaucoup de témoignages à ce sujet. J'allais en lire quelques-uns, mais peut-être que l'un d'entre vous aurait des recommandations à formuler à propos du droit d'auteur autochtone.

Peut-être voudriez-vous poursuivre.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

C'est une question très délicate, ainsi qu'une question de portée internationale. C'est très difficile de prendre des mesures concrètes par rapport aux droits d'auteur autochtones, étant donné qu'ils diffèrent fondamentalement à de nombreux égards des droits d'auteur habituels. Malgré tout, nous pouvons prendre exemple sur d'autres pays qui nous ressemblent. L'Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande ont essayé de mettre en place des systèmes pour aider les Aborigènes à défendre leurs oeuvres.

J'ai tout de même une préoccupation: il ne faut pas oublier qu'il y a aussi des auteurs autochtones contemporains. Je voudrais éviter que tous les auteurs autochtones aient l'impression d'être exclus de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur actuelle, au profit d'un autre type de régime. Je crois qu'il y a différents enjeux stratégiques ici.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Masse a la parole pour deux minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vais revenir au sujet du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Aux États-Unis, cela n'existe pas, essentiellement. Je crois que les gens tiennent surtout compte de l'aspect théorique, mais j'aimerais aussi savoir quelle incidence cela aura ici sur les projets cinématographiques dans le secteur privé?

Peut-être pourriez-vous répondre rapidement. Je sais que j'ai seulement deux minutes. Il y a des considérations d'ordre économique plus grandes qu'on le croit.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Dans certains secteurs, par exemple de celui des documentaristes, il peut être extrêmement ardu — même avec les conseils d'un expert juridique — de déterminer si une oeuvre appartient aux Archives nationales ou s'il existe un type de licence donnée pour une oeuvre en particulier.

(1700)

M. Casey Chisick:

Le manque d'uniformité dans le processus d'octroi de licence vient compliquer encore plus la tâche. Pour obtenir la licence de certaines oeuvres, vous devez d'abord déterminer à quel ministère de quelle province vous devez présenter votre demande, et vous n'êtes même pas certain d'obtenir une réponse. Cela rend les choses extrêmement compliquées, et je crois que cela tient au fait qu'on confie la gestion du droit d'auteur à des organisations qui n'en voient pas vraiment l'intérêt.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur Geist.

M. Michael Geist:

En outre, la Cour suprême du Canada entendra en février l'affaire Keatley Surveying Inc. c. Teranet Inc. Pour être parfaitement transparent, je dois dire que j'ai fourni des services à l'une des parties en cause. L'affaire concerne les dossiers de registres fonciers de l'Ontario. Dans les faits, les gouvernements avancent que le simple fait que des documents d'arpentage ont été présentés au gouvernement dans le cadre du processus fait que ces documents sont assujettis aux droits d'auteur de la Couronne.

On s'éloigne donc d'une application moins restrictive du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. En outre, des gouvernements soutiennent devant les tribunaux que des créations du secteur privé sont assujetties aux droits d'auteur de la Couronne lorsqu'elles ont été présentées sous le régime de la loi.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je crois aussi qu'il existe déjà dans le système canadien un mécanisme d'octroi de licence qui autorise la reproduction de lois avec l'autorisation générale du gouvernement, sans autorisation particulière. Ce n'est cependant qu'une toute petite partie du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Il y a beaucoup de pays qui vivent très bien sans droit d'auteur de la Couronne. D'un autre côté, nous avons repris le régime du droit d'auteur de la Couronne britannique et l'avons renforcé, mais je ne crois pas que nous devrions continuer sur cette voie. Je crois que cela tombe sous le sens que les documents gouvernementaux devraient être publics, étant donné que le gouvernement représente le public. Ce que je veux dire, c'est que le public est théoriquement l'auteur des oeuvres. Je crois que cela cause des problèmes non seulement pour les lois, mais également pour les documents et les décisions juridiques. Un fait intéressant, il arrive que des juges reproduisent les notes de leurs avocats. Il y a eu une affaire là-dessus, et c'était très intéressant.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Malgré tout, je doute que nous perdions beaucoup en abrogeant la plupart des dispositions relatives au droit de la Couronne.

M. Brian Masse:

Le gouvernement s'y connaît dans la fiction.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Merci.

Il nous reste encore du temps, alors nous allons faire un autre tour. J'interviens rarement, mais il y a une question que j'aimerais poser aux témoins.

Nous avons entendu des opinions divergentes à propos de l'examen quinquennal prévu par la loi. Très rapidement, pourriez-vous nous donner votre opinion là-dessus? Devrait-il y avoir un examen quinquennal prévu par la loi ou devrait-il y avoir autre chose?

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Évidemment, le Parlement peut faire ce qu'il veut et décider de ne pas entreprendre d'examen quinquennal la prochaine fois.

J'ai réfléchi à la question, et je crois que, dans ce cas-ci, l'examen quinquennal est important. À mon sens, nous avons tellement tardé à accorder des droits que le régime des droits d'auteur canadien est maintenant rempli de lacunes. Si c'était un fromage suisse, il aurait plus de trous que de fromage.

Un exemple a déjà été effleuré: si on n'utilise pas l'exception de copie pour usage privé, alors peut-être qu'on pourrait utiliser l'exception pour la reproduction accessoire. Essentiellement, si l'une ne fonctionne pas, alors essayons l'autre.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je crois que dans ce contexte, un examen serait maintenant nécessaire.

Avons-nous besoin d'un examen tous les cinq ans? Selon moi, peut-être pas.

Le président:

Je ne serai probablement plus président.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Nous devons aussi laisser aux tribunaux le temps de trancher les affaires et tout le reste.

Je crois que c'est important maintenant, si nous voulons éviter de demeurer ancrés dans ce qu'il y a dans la loi présentement.

M. Michael Geist:

L'examen s'est avéré très intéressant. J'ajouterais aussi qu'il est peut-être un peu tôt.

Revenons en arrière. Les grandes modifications de la loi ont été faites vers la fin des années 1980, puis vers la fin des années 1990, puis à nouveau, bien sûr, en 2012. Il s'écoule habituellement de 10 à 15 ans entre chaque modification importante.

À mon avis, cinq ans, c'est habituellement trop peu pour que le marché et le public intègrent pleinement les modifications, et ça ne nous donne pas le temps de procéder à des analyses fondées sur des données probantes pour savoir s'il faut de nouvelles réformes.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Chisick.

M. Casey Chisick:

Je suis d'accord sur le fond avec ce que Mme Gendreau a dit, soit qu'un examen quinquennal était approprié, vu ce qui s'est passé en 2012. Cependant, en principe, je crois que le Parlement devrait avoir une certaine marge de manoeuvre pour décider du moment où examiner la loi, comme c'est le cas pour d'autres lois.

(1705)

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

Nous n'avons pas soumis la question à notre comité, alors prenez ce que je dis comme une sorte de commentaire préliminaire: je crois, personnellement, qu'un examen quinquennal est tout à fait approprié dans ces circonstances.

Un exemple très simple serait l'intelligence artificielle. En 2012, cela n'avait pas été pris en considération, alors c'est surtout pour ce genre de choses. Il faudrait penser à des examens plus courts, qui portent seulement sur les technologies émergentes ou sur l'évolution du droit pendant la période.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'aimerais revenir au droit d'auteur de la Couronne, mais avant, j'ai un commentaire rapide à faire. Si la Convention de Berne avait été rédigée sous le régime de la loi en vigueur, je crois que son droit d'auteur serait sur le point de s'éteindre. C'était juste pour vous faire réfléchir.

Disons que le Comité voulait attirer l'attention sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, quelle devrait être la licence de publication de notre rapport? Quelqu'un le sait-il?

M. Michael Geist:

Je crois que le gouvernement a montré l'exemple jusqu'ici avec ses nouvelles locales et Creative Commons. Pour être parfaitement honnête, je ne sais pas pourquoi tout ce que le gouvernement produit n'est pas publié en vertu d'une licence Creative Commons.

Le gouvernement utilise effectivement une licence ouverte. Cependant, pour avoir une meilleure visibilité et aux fins de l'uniformisation et de la prise en charge informatique, je crois qu'il faudrait utiliser une licence Creative Commons très ouverte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Personnellement, je soutiens la proposition de M. Geist. Je recommanderais soit une licence CC0, soit une licence CC BY.

M. Casey Chisick:

Je n'ai pas vraiment de préférence pour un type de licence ou un autre, mais je suis d'accord pour dire que la majeure partie des documents gouvernementaux devraient être diffusés en plus grande quantité et plus largement. C'est pour le mieux.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je suis d'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aime quand cela va vite. Merci.

Il y a un sujet que nous n'avons pas abordé du tout au cours de l'étude, et je le regrette. Je parle des brevets de logiciel. J'imagine que vous avez tous une opinion sur le sujet.

Pour commencer, très rapidement, quelle est votre position quant aux brevets de logiciel? Est-ce une bonne chose ou une mauvaise chose? Quelqu'un voudrait-il en parler?

M. Michael Geist:

Eh bien, on ne parle pas ici de droit d'auteur au sens propre, mais je crois que, si nous nous fions à ce qui s'est fait dans d'autres pays, le brevetage à l'excès qu'on voit souvent finit par créer un enchevêtrement de brevets qui fait obstacle à l'innovation. Ce n'est pas une bonne chose.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je dirais que les brevets informatiques sont la face cachée des programmes informatiques. Au départ, les programmes informatiques n'étaient pas censés être brevetés, alors c'est pourquoi on a commencé à utiliser le droit d'auteur. Le droit d'auteur était une solution simple, rapide et à long terme. Je crois que cela a empêché d'examiner la question et de trouver quelque chose de beaucoup plus approprié pour ce genre d'activité créatrice qui, généralement, a une durée de vie plutôt courte et qui évolue par paliers.

Je ne crois pas que c'est quelque chose que nous pourrions faire au Canada, mais, à l'échelle internationale, c'est une question que l'on devrait étudier, parce qu'elle offre des possibilités très intéressantes. Il y a une foule de problèmes qui tiennent uniquement aux ordinateurs. Ce serait intéressant de chercher à régler ces problèmes à l'aide de mesures de protection adaptées spécifiquement aux logiciels, au lieu de tout assujettir aux droits d'auteur.

Dans une certaine mesure, depuis que les logiciels sont assujettis à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, la situation est difficile.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends. Je n'ai pas suffisamment de temps pour de longues réponses, mais je vous suis reconnaissant de vos commentaires.

Monsieur Tarantino?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je suis de l'avis de Mme Gendreau.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aime les motions d'adoption.

Oui, allez-y.

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

L'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada a un comité qui collabore actuellement avec l'Office de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada sur cette même question.

Il se peut que des conseils viennent conjointement de l'OPIC et du travail de ce comité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne faisais que jeter un coup d'oeil rapide. Si les logiciels étaient toujours conçus en vertu de la loi actuelle sur le droit d'auteur, je pense que ce qui est élaboré pour n'importe quelle loi ne s'appliquerait pas au droit d'auteur. C'est une manière inquiétante de voir les choses. C'est un peu dépassé.

Notre régime de droit d'auteur n'est-il pas assez solide en soi pour protéger les logiciels?

M. Michael Geist:

Je dois admettre que je ne pense pas que nous... Étant donné la prolifération des logiciels qui s'appliquent à presque tous les aspects de notre vie, des appareils dans nos maisons aux voitures que nous conduisons en passant par une myriade de choses différentes, il semble que les gens ne manquent pas de motivation pour créer et que les risques à cet égard ne sont pas importants.

Cela met en évidence la raison pour laquelle le fait de toujours chercher à renforcer les règles de propriété intellectuelle, qu'il s'agisse de brevets ou de droits d'auteur, en tant que mécanisme de stimulation du marché, ne tient pas compte de ce qui se passe sur les marchés. Très souvent, ce ne sont pas du tout les lois sur la PI qui sont essentiellement importantes. Ce qui devient important, c'est le fait d'être le premier à mettre son produit sur le marché, la façon de le faire et le cycle continuel d'innovation. La protection de la PI est vraiment secondaire.

M. Casey Chisick:

Il y a beaucoup de problèmes, dont nous avons abordé certains aujourd'hui, et les brevets de logiciel en sont un, et si nous sommes pour les examiner sérieusement, nous devons le faire ainsi. Nous devons prendre du recul et examiner le genre de comportement que nous essayons de promouvoir, les types de lois qui favorisent ce comportement et la meilleure façon d'atteindre cet équilibre au Canada, tout en tenant compte de nos obligations internationales en vertu de divers traités.

Les brevets de logiciel sont un problème. Le droit d'auteur de la Couronne en est un autre. Je pense que, si nous voulons déterminer si le droit d'auteur de la Couronne est nécessaire ou s'il atteint ses objectifs, nous devons comprendre ce qu'il est censé faire avant de pouvoir déterminer si nous le faisons. La réversibilité en est un troisième.

(1710)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La raison pour laquelle je pose des questions au sujet de tout cela, c'est pour établir un lien avec un mouvement émergent, surtout aux États-Unis, appelé le droit de réparer. Je suis certain que vous connaissez cela également. Vous êtes au courant de l'affaire John Deere. Y a-t-il des commentaires à ce sujet et sur la façon dont nous pouvons lier cela au droit d'auteur, afin que l'on puisse s'assurer que, lorsqu'on achète un produit comme un BlackBerry...? Si je veux en faire l'entretien, je devrais avoir le droit de le faire.

M. Michael Geist:

En effet. Les réformes de 2012 sur les règles anti-contournement ont établi certaines des règles de verrouillage numérique les plus restrictives au monde. Même les États-Unis, qui ont fait pression sur nous pour que nous adoptions ces règles, ont reconnu de façon soutenue que de nouvelles exceptions doivent s'y appliquer.

Selon moi, ce point figure tout en haut de la liste. Nous venons de voir les États-Unis créer une exception précise concernant le droit de réparer. Le secteur agricole est très préoccupé par sa capacité de réparer certains des appareils et équipements qu'il achète. Nos agriculteurs n'ont pas ce droit. Les restrictions sévères que nous avons présentent un problème important, et je recommande fortement au Comité de déterminer où se trouvent certaines des zones les plus restrictives dans ces verrous numériques. Nous continuerons de respecter nos obligations internationales en renforçant la flexibilité à cet égard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une ou deux questions qui reviennent sur ce dont nous discutions au début, c'est moins stimulant.

Le président:

Vous avez environ 30 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est suffisant.

Monsieur Chisick, vous avez mentionné au tout début que vous êtes autorisé à pratiquer le droit en matière de droits d'auteur, en particulier. Juste par curiosité, qui autorise les avocats à pratiquer le droit en matière de droits d'auteur?

M. Casey Chisick:

Je n'ai pas dit que j'étais autorisé à pratiquer le droit en matière de droits d'auteur. Ce que j'ai dit, c'est que je suis accrédité en tant que spécialiste en droits d'auteur. C'est un titre qui m'a été donné par le Barreau de l'Ontario.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. C'est ce qui m'intriguait.

Avons-nous 10 secondes pour aborder...? Non, nous n'avons pas 10 secondes.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

C'est toujours une course folle pour faire le plus d'interventions possible.

J'adresserai cette question à l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle. Vous êtes en faveur de la modification des dispositions d'exonération, mais une grande entreprise technologique nous a dit qu'elle ne pourrait tout simplement pas fonctionner sans exonération. Pensez-vous qu'un cadre juridique qui empêche les consommateurs canadiens d'avoir accès aux services est acceptable?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Je pense que nous avons recommandé d'évaluer si les dispositions d'exonération devraient s'appliquer sans tenir compte des autres mécanismes prévus dans la loi, comme le régime d'avis et avis.

Je pense que la réponse à la question que vous avez posée au sujet des consommateurs est probablement non.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Nous ne voulons pas que les consommateurs soient désavantagés de cette façon.

Je pense que c'est une question ouverte: comment peut-on s'assurer que les entités et les particuliers ne s'abritent pas sous les auspices de ces dispositions d'exonération d'une manière qui ne reflète pas les mesures qu'ils prennent ou les politiques qu'ils mettent en place sur leurs plateformes en ce qui concerne la surveillance de la violation du droit d'auteur?

M. Dan Albas:

Hier, sur Twitter — je n'en ai pas eu l'occasion, et ça ne relève pas de vous, parce que je ne pense pas que vous parliez au nom de l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle —, j'ai publié un article de CBC qui décrivait le cas d'une personne qui poursuivait l'entreprise qui a créé Fortnite pour avoir prétendument utilisé une danse qu'il aurait inventée.

J'en ai parlé, et nous avons entendu l'Assemblée canadienne de la danse. Ses représentants voulaient que des chorégraphies de mouvements particuliers réalisées par un artiste individuel puissent être protégées par le droit d'auteur. Vous semblez dire que cela se ferait en vertu d'une disposition particulière. Pourriez-vous éclaircir un peu cette question, afin que cela fasse partie du témoignage?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je suis heureux de le faire.

Que cela serve de leçon à ceux qui, bon gré mal gré, communiquent sur Twitter avec des députés.

Oui. Les oeuvres chorégraphiques sont protégées si elles sont originales. Elles sont protégées en tant qu'oeuvres en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Je signale également que les prestations d'artistes-interprètes sont protégées en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur sans qu'elles aient besoin d'être originales. Je ne suis pas certain qu'il y ait actuellement une lacune dans le régime législatif, ce qui voudrait dire que les mouvements de danse ne sont pas protégés.

(1715)

M. Dan Albas:

Je pense que ce que l'Assemblée canadienne de la danse soulignait, c'est que, si quelqu'un fait une chorégraphie d'une danse particulière et la publie sur YouTube et qu'ensuite quelqu'un d'autre utilise ces mouvements dans une prestation quelconque, la personne à l'origine de la chorégraphie devrait se voir accorder un certain mérite ou un genre de droit d'auteur.

Je pense qu'il serait vraiment très difficile de dire qui a créé une chorégraphie ou une danse en particulier. J'ai même donné l'exemple des arts martiaux.

J'ai demandé aux groupes autochtones si cela pouvait causer de très gros problèmes à une collectivité en particulier si quelqu'un revendiquait soudainement le droit d'auteur pour une danse très traditionnelle. On s'est demandé si le droit d'auteur s'appliquerait même aux connaissances autochtones.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je pense qu'il faut séparer la question analytique de savoir si quelque chose serait admissible à la protection en vertu de la loi de la réalité pratique de l'application des droits qui pourraient être accordés en vertu de la loi. Je pense que ce sont deux questions très différentes.

J'aimerais travailler un peu pour moi-même et revenir sur ce que vous avez dit. Je pense que c'est lié à certaines des autres questions qui ont été soulevées ici aujourd'hui.

Personnellement, je pense que la communauté du droit d'auteur a tendance à n'aller que dans une seule direction et à faire en sorte que les droits s'élargissent continuellement. Je pense que nous devons être conscients du fait que nous — en tant que particuliers, consommateurs, créateurs ou entités qui diffusent ou exploitent autrement le droit d'auteur — jouons tous de multiples rôles simultanés dans l'écosystème du droit d'auteur. Nous bénéficions et — j'hésite à dire que nous sommes les victimes — portons à la fois le fardeau de ces droits élargis.

Il n'est pas toujours vrai que le droit d'auteur est le mécanisme approprié pour reconnaître ce qui constitue par ailleurs des revendications tout à fait justifiables.

M. Dan Albas:

Je souscris certainement à cette idée.

Madame Gendreau, dans votre exposé, vous soutenez que les plateformes en ligne devraient être responsables des oeuvres contrefaites publiées sur leurs plateformes au même titre que les radiodiffuseurs traditionnels.

Ne reconnaissez-vous pas qu'une station de télévision pour laquelle un producteur détermine tout ce qui passe à l'antenne est différente d'une plateforme sur laquelle les utilisateurs téléchargent leur contenu?

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Elles sont différentes en ce sens qu'elles mènent des activités différentes. Elles ne font pas de programmation comme le font les radiodiffuseurs.

Ce à quoi nous faisons face, c'est précisément quelque chose de différent, parce que nous avons, encore une fois, une industrie qui existe parce qu'il y a des oeuvres à mettre en valeur ou à exposer et à diffuser par l'intermédiaire de ses services. Elle fait de l'argent et elle aura la possibilité de faire des affaires grâce à ces oeuvres, et elle ne paie peut-être pas pour ces matières premières.

C'est comme les redevances minières. Les sociétés minières doivent payer des redevances parce qu'elles exploitent des ressources primaires. Je pense que nous devons réaliser que nos industries créatives, nos oeuvres créatives, sont nos nouvelles ressources primaires dans une économie du savoir, et que ceux qui en bénéficient doivent payer pour cela.

M. Dan Albas:

Madame Gendreau, vous ne pouvez pas considérer comme équivalents un bien matériel qui, une fois extrait, est exclusivement envoyé ailleurs et une idée ou une oeuvre qui peuvent être transmises sans que quelqu'un soit laissé pour compte. On nous a dit que, si un tel système était en place, les plateformes en ligne n'auraient pas d'autres choix que de restreindre sérieusement ce que les utilisateurs peuvent télécharger.

Pensez-vous que le fait de restreindre de façon importante l'innovation est une solution raisonnable dans ce cas?

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Non, je ne pense pas que cela limiterait l'innovation ou la diffusion. Je pense que, au contraire, cela garantirait la rémunération des auteurs créatifs, et, parce que ceux-ci recevraient des paiements pour l'utilisation de leurs oeuvres, ils n'intenteraient pas de poursuites pour des utilisations négligeables ou stupides qui ont donné une très mauvaise réputation à l'application du droit d'auteur.

Si les titulaires de droits d'auteur savaient qu'ils seraient rémunérés lorsque leurs oeuvres seraient utilisées, et si, ensuite, ils voyaient une grand-mère faire une vidéo dans laquelle ses petits-enfants dansent sur une certaine musique et qu'ils recevaient néanmoins un paiement quelconque, ils ne poursuivraient pas cette grand-mère et ne se rendraient pas ridicules.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Geist, vous avez fortement plaidé contre l'octroi de dommage-intérêts à Access Copyright. Si la pire pénalité qu'il est autorisé à demander est le montant du tarif initial, les établissements d'enseignement ne vont-ils pas seulement faire fi de ce tarif parce que la seule pénalité qu'ils doivent payer est celle qu'ils auraient à payer au départ?

(1720)

M. Michael Geist:

Non. Tout d'abord, les établissements d'enseignement ne cherchent pas à enfreindre quoi que ce soit, comme je l'ai dit. Ils ont plus de licences maintenant qu'ils n'en ont jamais eu auparavant. Dans l'ensemble, les dommages-intérêts sont l'exception plutôt que la règle. La façon dont le droit fonctionne généralement, c'est que l'on préserve l'intégrité de la personne. On ne lui donne pas plus que ce qu'elle a perdu.

Lorsque nous avons des dommages-intérêts préétablis dans le cadre du système des sociétés collectives de gestion, cela fait partie d'une contrepartie. On l'utilise pour des groupes comme la SOCAN, parce que des responsables n'ont pas d'autre choix que d'adhérer à ce système et parce que c'est obligatoire pour des raisons liées à la concurrence, ils ont la capacité de le faire.

Access Copyright peut se servir du marché et, comme nous en avons parlé, il s'agit maintenant de l'une des nombreuses licences qui existent. Comme nous l'avons appris au cours de ces derniers mois, la situation est devenue vraiment critique en ce qui concerne les différentes façons dont les groupes d'éducation accordent des licences. L'idée que la société aurait spécifiquement droit à des dommages-intérêts massifs me semble être une intervention incroyable et injustifiée sur le marché.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est une bonne chose que nous parlions du droit d'auteur. J'estime qu'il y a eu atteinte à mon droit qu'un projet de loi de réparation soit adopté. Il y a plutôt eu un accord volontaire. Le projet de loi C-273 modifiait la Loi canadienne sur la concurrence et la Loi sur la protection de l'environnement pour qu'un service de marché secondaire soit offert pour les véhicules, les techniciens et les technologies de l'information. Il s'agit d'une question environnementale, mais qui porte également sur la concurrence et ainsi de suite. C'est tout à fait pertinent aujourd'hui, puisque même les États-Unis permettaient l'obtention de ces renseignements sous le régime de leurs lois. Je pouvais faire réparer un véhicule aux États-Unis dans un garage offrant un service de marché secondaire, mais je ne pouvais pas le faire à Windsor. Nous avons passé plusieurs années à tenter d'obtenir cet amendement, mais je remarque que cela a évolué vers quelque chose de plus large, c'est-à-dire la possibilité de modifier et de changer les appareils.

J'aimerais parler un peu de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Je sais qu'une partie des témoignages d'aujourd'hui se sont quelque peu éloignés de ce point, mais ce qui était intéressant avec la comparution des représentants de la Commission du droit d'auteur est qu'ils ont demandé trois modifications importantes qui ne faisaient pas partie du projet de loi C-86. L'une des modifications — et je serais curieux d'entendre votre avis à ce sujet —, c'est qu'ils souhaitaient voir une refonte de la Loi, puisque la dernière refonte date de 1985.

Y a-t-il un commentaire sur l'exposé des représentants de la Commission du droit d'auteur et sur le fait qu'ils ne pensent pas que le projet de loi C-86 réussira à régler tous les problèmes auxquels ils font face? Ils ont présenté trois points importants. L'un d'entre eux portait là-dessus. Également, ils ont abordé la protection de leur capacité de rendre des décisions intérimaires qui ne peuvent être renversées. Je ne sais pas s'il y a des observations à ce sujet, mais c'est l'une des choses que j'estimais intéressantes dans l'exposé qu'ils ont présenté.

Quelqu'un... Si personne n'a quoi que ce soit à dire et que vous êtes satisfaits de la façon dont vont les choses, alors nous nous en tiendrons à cela. C'est très bien.

M. Casey Chisick:

J'ai exprimé, dans un autre forum, certaines de mes préoccupations concernant le projet de loi C-86, lesquelles ne sont pas nécessairement les mêmes que celles qui ont été soulevées par la Commission. Je ne pense pas que le projet de loi C-86 corrige parfaitement les problèmes soulevés par la Commission du droit d'auteur, mais j'estime qu'il s'agit d'un bon départ. C'est le genre de mesure législative qui devrait certainement faire l'objet d'un examen très rapide — une période de cinq ans serait probablement adéquate — afin que l'on puisse s'assurer qu'elle a l'effet escompté.

Peut-être aurais-je dû étudier la transcription des témoignages d'un peu plus près. Est-ce que j'ai bien compris que la proposition était que l'on fasse une refonte de la Loi et que l'on reparte à zéro?

M. Brian Masse:

C'est leur proposition. Il s'agit d'examiner la Loi et de la rendre cohérente. Je crois que leur préoccupation est...

M. Casey Chisick:

D'accord, je vois.

M. Brian Masse:

... que des modifications y soient apportées une fois de plus. Leur exposé à ce sujet était intéressant, car, selon eux, il ne s'agit pas d'une approche globale, et cela donnerait lieu à des incohérences.

Je sais que cela vous en fait beaucoup à absorber si vous n'aviez pas pu y jeter un coup d'oeil. Ils ont mentionné la transparence, l'accès et l'efficacité comme étant des aspects à être corrigés. Certains d'entre eux figurent dans le projet de loi C-86, mais n'ont toujours pas fait l'objet d'un examen.

M. Casey Chisick:

Chaque fois qu'il y a une série de modifications progressives apportées à une loi, j'estime qu'il y a forcément des conséquences imprévues lorsqu'on jette un regard rétrospectif sur cette approche. S'il y avait une volonté d'effectuer un examen très approfondi, ou une refonte, comme vous l'avez mentionné, de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, il s'agirait d'une idée intéressante pour cette seule raison: se pencher sur les conséquences imprévues ou sur les incohérences qui en ont découlé. Je ne sais pas si c'est là où la Commission voulait en venir, mais il s'agit d'une idée intéressante, selon moi.

(1725)

M. Brian Masse:

Voilà qui est intéressant.

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre souhaite faire une observation?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je n'ai pas de réponse particulière à la question que vous avez posée. Je veux simplement vous recommander les observations que l'IPIC a faites en ce qui a trait au projet de loi C-86 et également les observations qui ont été faites en 2017 sur le remaniement de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

M. Brian Masse:

Oui, j'en ai vu quelques-unes, monsieur. Merci.

M. Michael Geist:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais préciser que, selon moi, cela met en lumière — pour en revenir à la question du président à propos d'un examen quinquennal — pourquoi les examens quinquennaux sont en quelque sorte problématiques. Premièrement, le fait que nous soyons en mesure de nous pencher sur des choses telles que la Commission du droit d'auteur ou le traité de Marrakech entre 2012 et maintenant montre que, lorsqu'il y a des problèmes importants, le gouvernement a la possibilité d'agir.

Deuxièmement, puisqu'il s'agirait, de loin, des plus gros changements que la Commission a vus depuis des décennies, avec de nouveaux fonds et une Commission presque entièrement nouvelle, cela va prendre du temps. Nous savons que ce type de choses prend encore du temps, donc il me semble insensé que nous revenions dans trois ou quatre ans — ou même cinq ans — afin de juger ce qui est en place, et encore moins que nous effectuions une refonte de la Loi. Nous avons besoin de temps pour voir comment vont les choses. Si la Commission dit avoir besoin d'une refonte pour trouver un sens à tout cela, j'estime alors qu'il y a un problème.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est en quelque sorte la trajectoire. Ce qui me préoccupe actuellement avec le projet de loi C-86, c'est ce que nous avons effectué et également l'AEUMC. Trois points importants ont été soulevés en même temps. Ils finiront par se concrétiser, et nous devrons nous en occuper à ce moment-là.

Je n'ai pas d'autres questions. J'ai terminé.

Je remercie les témoins.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez trois minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais revenir sur le droit de réparer. Je fais également partie du comité de l'agriculture. J'ai travaillé également dans le domaine de l'innovation en agriculture. La norme J1939 est la norme en matière de véhicule. Il y a une norme ISO pour les composantes des véhicules, comme la direction, soit la norme ISO 11898, et puis pour la remorque, c'est-à-dire les distributeurs d'engrais, les épandeurs et les pulvérisateurs, c'est la norme ISO 11992 qui s'applique. À quel point devons-nous être précis pour faire en sorte que les innovateurs puissent monter à bord des tracteurs et faire leur travail?

Nous pourrions travailler sur tout sauf John Deere, bien que je connaisse une personne à Regina qui sait comment contourner les protocoles de John Deere également. Les gens doivent contourner les protocoles et puis, de façon presque illégale, vous donner accès à l'équipement. Quel degré de précision la loi devrait-elle atteindre au chapitre de la technologie?

M. Michael Geist:

Tout d'abord, les gens ne devraient pas avoir à travailler de façon presque illégale sur leur propre équipement. En fait, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ne devrait pas s'appliquer à ce type de questions. L'un des premiers cas d'intersection entre des serrures numériques et des appareils concernait une entreprise située à Burlington, en Ontario, du nom de Skylink, qui avait conçu une télécommande universelle qui permettait d'ouvrir les portes de garage. Il ne s'agit pas d'une technologie exceptionnelle, mais l'entreprise a passé bon nombre d'années devant les tribunaux, après avoir été poursuivie par une autre entreprise d'ouvre-porte de garage, Chamberlain, laquelle affirmait que l'entreprise en question contournait sa serrure numérique afin que cette télécommande universelle puisse fonctionner.

Le problème vient du fait que l'on applique le droit d'auteur à des appareils de cette façon. Cela tire son origine des réformes de 2012 sur les serrures numériques. La solution est de nous assurer que nous avons en place les bonnes exceptions, afin que la loi ne s'applique pas dans les secteurs où elle ne devrait pas être appliquée.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Pourrions-nous utiliser l'expression « tel que » à cet égard?

M. Michael Geist:

Non, il faut l'aborder spécifiquement en vertu des dispositions anticontournement. Il me semble que c'est à l'article 41.25. Idéalement, il s'agirait d'intégrer l'exception relative à l'utilisation équitable et de l'appliquer également aux dispositions anticontournement. En d'autres mots, je ne devrais pas avoir le droit de faire une utilisation équitable si quelque chose est sur papier, mais perdre ce droit lorsque c'est électronique ou numérique ou s'il s'agit d'un code sur un tracteur.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

En ce qui a trait à notre programme en matière d'innovation, il nous faudrait examiner attentivement l'article 41.25.

M. Michael Geist:

Nous avons mis en place une série d'exceptions limitées. En fait, elles étaient si limitées que nous avons dû revenir les modifier lorsque nous avons signé le traité de Marrakech visant à faciliter l'accès aux personnes ayant des déficiences visuelles. Les États-Unis ont, pendant ce temps, établi une série d'exceptions supplémentaires. D'autres pays sont allés bien plus loin que les États-Unis. Nous sommes maintenant aux prises avec des dispositions parmi les plus restrictives au monde.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Cependant, nous avons les agriculteurs les plus innovateurs. Ils peuvent s'adapter à ce genre de choses.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant que nous levions la séance, j'aimerais juste vous rappeler que, mercredi, dans la pièce 415, nous entendrons des témoins pendant la première heure, et pour la deuxième heure, nous recevrons des instructions de rédaction.

Également, pour ceux qui suivent les séances partout au Canada, je vous rappelle qu'aujourd'hui est le dernier jour pour les mémoires présentés en ligne, au plus tard à minuit, heure normale de l'Est. Je pense que le mot s'est donné, car aujourd'hui, nous en avons déjà reçu 97.

Veuillez noter que nos analystes viennent de dire: « Oh, non. »

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le président: Je tiens à remercier les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui. C'était une excellente session et une bonne récapitulation du travail effectué au cours de la dernière année. Merci à tous.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard indu 40788 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on December 10, 2018

2018-12-05 INDU 142

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1620)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody. We're going to get started, because we are almost an hour behind—which happens in the House.

Welcome, everybody, as we continue our five-year statutory review of the Copyright Act.

Today we have with us, from the Copyright Board, Nathalie Théberge, vice-chair and chief executive officer; Gilles McDougall, secretary general; and Sylvain Audet, general counsel.

From the Department of Canadian Heritage, we have Kahlil Cappuccino, director of copyright policy in the creative marketplace and innovation branch. We also have Pierre-Marc Lauzon, policy analyst, copyright policy, creative marketplace and innovation branch.

And finally, from the Department of Industry, we have Mark Schaan, director general, marketplace framework policy branch; and Martin Simard, director, copyright and trademark policy directorate.

As we discussed on Monday, the witnesses will have their regular seven-minute introduction. We do have a second panel, so each party will get that initial seven minutes of questions and then we'll suspend. We'll bring in the second round, and we'll do the same thing all over again. We'll finish when we finish, so that will be good.

We're going to get started right away with the Copyright Board.

Ms. Théberge, go ahead. [Translation]

You have seven minutes.

Ms. Nathalie Théberge (Vice-Chair and Chief Executive Officer, Copyright Board):

Mr. Chair and distinguished members of this committee, thank you.

My name is Nathalie Théberge. I am the new vice-chair and CEO of the Copyright Board, as of October. I will be speaking today as CEO.

As you said, Gilles McDougall, secretary general, and Sylvain Audet, general counsel, both from the board, are with me today. I would like to thank the committee for giving us the opportunity to speak on the parliamentary review of the Copyright Act.

First, I'd like to provide a reminder: The Copyright Board of Canada is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal created under the Copyright Act. The board's role is to establish the royalties to be paid for the use of works and other subject matters protected by copyright, when the administration of these rights is entrusted to a collective society. The direct value of royalties set by the board's decisions is estimated to almost $500 million annually.

The board sits at the higher end of the independent spectrum for administrative tribunals. Its mandate is to set fair and equitable tariffs in an unbiased, impartial and unimpeded fashion. This is not an easy task, especially as information required to support the work of the board is not easily acquired. The board is on the onset of a major reform following the introduction of changes to the Copyright Act imbedded in the Budget Implementation Act, Bill C-86.

If I may, I would like to state how committed the board is towards implementing the reform proposals. Of course, the impact of these proposals will take some time to assess as there will be a transition period during which all players involved, including the board and the parties that appear before it, will need to adapt and change their practices, behaviours and, to some extent, their organizational culture.

This transition period is to be expected due to the ambitious scope of the reform proposals, but we believe that the entire Canadian intellectual property ecosystem will benefit from a more efficient pricing system under the guidance of the Copyright Board.

However, reforming the board is not a panacea for all woes affecting the ability for creators to get fairly compensated for their work and for users to have access to these works. As such, the board welcomes the opportunity to put forward a few pistes de réflexion to the committee, hoping its experience in the actual operationalization of many provisions of the Copyright Act may be useful.

Today, we would like to suggest three themes the committee may want to consider. We were very careful as to choose only issues of direct implication for the board's mandate and operations, as defined in the Copyright Act and amended through the Budget Implementation Act 2018, No. 2, currently under review by Parliament.

(1625)

[English]

The first theme relates to transparency. Committee members who are familiar with the board know that our ability to render decisions that are fair and equitable and that reflect the public interest depends on our ability to understand and consider the broader marketplace. For that, you need information, including on whether other agreements covering similar uses of copyrighted material exist in a given market. This is a little bit like real estate, where to properly establish the selling price of a property you need to consider comparables, namely, the value of similar properties in the same neighbourhood, the rate of the market, etc.

Currently, filing of agreements with the board is not mandatory, which often leaves the board having to rely on an incomplete portrait of the market. We believe that the Copyright Act should provide a meaningful incentive for parties to file agreements between collectives and users. Some may argue that the board already has the authority to request from parties that they provide the board with relevant agreements. We think that legislative guidance would avoid the board having to exert pressure via subpoena to gain access to those agreements, which in turn can contribute to delays that we all want to avoid.

More broadly, we encourage the committee to consider in its report how to increase the overall transparency within the copyright ecosystem in Canada. As part of the reform, we will do our part at the board by adding to our own processes steps and practices that incentivize better sharing of information among parties and facilitate the participation of the public.

The second theme relates to access. We encourage the committee to include in its report a recommendation for a complete scrub of the act, since the last time it was done was in 1985. Successive reforms and modifications have resulted in a legislative text that is not only hard to understand but that at times appears to bear some incoherencies. In a world where creators increasingly have to manage their rights themselves, it is important that our legislative tools be written in a manner that facilitates comprehension. As such, we offer as an inspiration the Australian copyright act.

We further encourage the committee to consider modifying the publication requirements in the orphan works regime. Currently, where the owner of copyright cannot be located, the board cannot issue licences in relation to certain works, such as works that are solely available online or deposited in a museum. We believe the act should be amended to permit the board to issue a licence in those cases, with safeguards.

Finally, our third theme relates to efficiency. The board reform as proposed in Bill C-86 would go a long way in making the tariff-setting process in Canada more efficient and predictable and ultimately a better use of public resources. I believe the committee has heard the same message from various experts.

We recommend two other possible means to achieve these objectives.

First, we encourage the committee to consider changing the act to grant the board the power to issue interim decisions on its motion. Currently, the board can only do so on application from a party. This power would provide the board with an additional tool to influence the pace and dynamics of tariff-setting proceedings.

(1630)

[Translation]

Second, we encourage the committee to explore whether the act should be modified to clarify the binding nature of board tariffs and licences. This proposal follows a relatively recent decision of the Supreme Court of Canada where the court made a statement to the effect that when the board sets royalties within licences in individual cases—the arbitration regime—such licences did not have a mandatory binding effect against users in certain circumstances. Some commentators have also expressed different views on how that statement would be applicable to the tariff context before the board.

We are aware that this is a controversial issue, but would still invite you to study it if only because parties and the board spend time, efforts and resources in seeking a decision from the board.

On that happy note, we congratulate each member of the committee for the work accomplished thus far, and thank you for your attention.

The Chair:

Thank you.[English]

We're going to move directly to the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Mr. Cappuccino, you have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Kahlil Cappuccino (Director, Copyright Policy, Creative Marketplace and Innovation Branch, Department of Canadian Heritage):

It's actually Mark Schaan who will start.

The Chair:

Okay. We're going to go to the Department of Industry.

Mr. Schaan, you have up to seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Mark Schaan (Director General, Marketplace Framework Policy Branch, Department of Industry):

The Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada will share the time available with the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, distinguished members of the committee.

It is a pleasure for me to be before you again to discuss copyright. My name is Mark Schaan. I am the director general of the Marketplace Framework Policy Branch at Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

I am accompanied by Martin Simard, who is the director of the Copyright and Trademarks Policy Directorate in my branch.

We are here with our Canadian Heritage colleagues, Kahlil Cappuccino and Pierre-Marc Lauzon, to update the committee on two recent developments that relate to your review of the Copyright Act.

First, we will speak about the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement and the obligations the agreement contains regarding copyright.

Second, we will highlight the comprehensive actions taken by the government to modernize the Copyright Board of Canada, including the legislative proposals contained in Bill C-86, the Budget Implementation Act 2018, No. 2, which were generally noted as forthcoming in the first letter to your committee on the review and then again more specifically in Minister Bains and Minister Rodriguez's recent letter to you.[English]

On November 30, Canada, the United States and Mexico signed a new trade agreement that preserves key elements of the North American trading relationship and incorporates new and updated provisions to address modern trade issues. Particularly germane to your review of the Copyright Act, the new agreement updates the intellectual property chapter and includes shared commitments specific to copyright and related rights, which will allow Canada to maintain many of the important features in our copyright system with some new obligations as well. As a result, the modernized agreement requires Canada to change its legal and policy framework with respect to copyright in some limited areas, including the following.[Translation]

First, the agreement requires parties to provide a period of copyright protection of life of the author plus 70 years for works of authorship, a shift from Canada's current term of life of the author plus 50 years. The extension to life plus 70 is consistent with the approach in the United States, Europe and other key trading partners, including Japan. It will also benefit creators and cultural industries by giving them a longer period to monetize their works and investments.

That said, we are aware that term extension also brings challenges, as stated by several witnesses during your review. Canada negotiated a two-and-a-half-year transition period that will commence on the agreement entering into force, which will ensure that this change is implemented thoughtfully, in consultation with stakeholders, and with the full knowledge of the results of your review.[English]

The provisions on rights management information will also require Canada to add criminal remedies for altering and removing a copyright owner's rights management information to what it already provides in respect of civil rights management information. In addition, there is an obligation to provide full national treatment to copyright owners from each of the other signatories.

(1635)

[Translation]

The agreement includes important flexibilities that will allow Canada to maintain its current regime for technological protection measures and Internet service providers' liability, such as Canada's notice and notice regime. The government has stated it intends to implement the agreement in a fair and balanced manner, with an eye towards continued competitiveness of the Canadian marketplace.

Moving now to the Copyright Board of Canada. My colleague Kahlil Cappuccino, director of Copyright Policy in the Creative Marketplace and Innovation Branch at Canadian Heritage, will now provide you with an overview of recent measures to modernize the Copyright Board. [English]

Mr. Kahlil Cappuccino:

Thanks very much, Mark.

Mr. Chair and distinguished members of the committee, as the ministers of ISED and PCH committed to in their first letter to your committee in December 2017, and pursuant to public consultations and previous studies by committees of both the House of Commons and the Senate, the government has taken comprehensive action to modernize the board.

First, budget 2018 increased by 30% the annual financial resources of the board. Second, the government appointed a new vice-chair and CEO of the board, Madame Nathalie Théberge, who is sitting with us, as well as appointing three additional members of the board. With these new appointments and additional funding, the Copyright Board is on its way and ready for modernization. Third, Bill C-86, which is now before the Senate, proposes legislative changes to the Copyright Act to modernize the framework in which the board operates.[Translation]

As numerous witnesses stated to you as part of your review, more efficient and timely decision-making processes at the Copyright Board are a priority. The proposed amendments in the bill seek to revitalize the board and empower it to play its instrumental role in today's modern economy.

It would do this by introducing more predictability and clarity in board processes, codifying the board's mandate, setting clear criteria for decision-making and empowering case management. To tackle the delays directly, the proposed amendments would require tariff proposals to be filed earlier and be effective longer, and a proposed new regulatory power would enable the Governor-in-Council to establish decision-making deadlines. Finally, the proposed amendments would allow direct negotiation between more collectives and users, ensuring that the board is only adjudicating matters when needed, thus freeing resources for more complex and contested proceedings.

These reforms would eliminate barriers for businesses and services wishing to innovate or enter the Canadian market. They would also better position Canadian creators and cultural entrepreneurs to succeed so they can continue producing high-quality Canadian content. Overall, these measures would ensure that the board has the tools it needs to facilitate collective management and support a creative marketplace that is both fair and functional.[English]

However, the changes do not address broad concerns that have been raised around the applicability and enforceability of board-set rates. Certain stakeholders asked that the government clarify when users have to pay rates set by the board and provide stronger tools for enforcement when those rates are not paid. The ministers felt that these important issues were more appropriately considered as part of the review of the Copyright Act, with the benefit of the in-depth analysis being undertaken by this committee and the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.

We look forward to recommendations that will help foster sustainability across all creative sectors, including the educational publishing industry.

At this point, I'd like to hand things back over to Mark to conclude. [Translation]

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Thank you, Mr. Cappuccino.

Allow me to also mention that, as committed in the government's intellectual property strategy, Bill C-86 proposes a change to the notice and notice provisions of the Copyright Act to protect consumers while ensuring that the notice and notice regime remains effective in discouraging infringement.

The proposed amendments would clarify that notices that include settlement offers or payment demands do not comply with the regime. This was an important shift, given the consensus of all parties in the copyright system, and the continued fear of consumer harm in the face of the continued use of settlement demands.

(1640)

[English]

In closing, we would like to applaud the committee for the thorough review of the Copyright Act that you've conducted so far. We've particularly noted members' efforts to raise issues related to indigenous traditional knowledge throughout the exercise. Such probing and open consultations are invaluable to the development of strong public policy.

We would be pleased to answer your questions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much for your presentations.

We're going to move directly into questions, starting with Mr. Longfield.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for being here. It's good timing when we're trying to pull it all together.

Particularly, Mr. Schaan, I was pleased to see that you were on the witness list, and I want to start with you.

We're talking about a market, and how the market efficiency doesn't work for creators and how it works for other people. When we talk about the market itself, transparency seems to be an issue. I'm trying to picture a flow chart in my head that goes from creator through the Copyright Board, Access Copyright and all the holders.

Do you have that type of a flow chart in your department?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

There certainly exists a flow chart about how board-set rates and other aspects of copyright are adjudicated. When there's a public role in those, it can get quite complicated, in terms of the mechanical right, the reproduction right, the performance right and other sorts of rights. It does exist, in some regard, of how that all flows through.

There is also a significant amount of copyright that's negotiated directly between those who own the rights and those who seek to utilize or draw upon those rights. In many cases, that information is proprietary and held within.

Is it possible to understand, for instance, on a board-set rate, how a musician or a photographer or a choreographer may be remunerated for their work? The answer is yes.

In the case where it's potentially engaging with a third party in terms of the distribution within a given contract—what an artist makes from Spotify or from any of the other platforms—that's more complicated, because much of that is proprietary and is a function of the marketplace in terms of how they negotiate those rates.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

In terms of our report, maybe you've just answered part of the question, which is that we can't get some of that information. We've been trying to get it, as a committee, to find out where the money is being made and where it's not being made at each stage of the process. Maybe we could have that as a recommendation, that it be developed, so people in the marketplace know where they sit in the marketplace and how it works.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

There have definitely been significant efforts on the part of my colleagues at Canadian Heritage to try to ensure that creators at least understand where there are value gains to be made from their creative works.

I won't speak for my colleagues at Canadian Heritage, but I think part of it is also, as I said, the significant variation within the marketplace. In a board-set rate, everyone is compensated equally based on use, but in many other, proprietary cases.... A rock star doesn't necessarily make what someone with a YouTube channel makes, and might be compensated differently.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

And we have different markets. We're focusing a little bit on the heritage markets—I'm seeing nodding of heads on that—but we also have the educational markets. We have similar streams, similar points of contact within the Copyright Act, but there are also divergent areas where they don't work in the same way.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

It's also where you have a huge variety of content. You raised the subject of education. In the educational context, you have digital licences, potentially, that allow people access on a per-user basis or sometimes on a per-use basis, on a transactional basis that amounts to a certain amount of compensable copyrighted material. You then potentially have other subscription services, and you have a tariff licence that exists in both cases, which covers other uses.

In all of these cases, you'd have to amass...to know what is all the potential n or openness of content, and then the various mechanisms they're using to draw on that. I think what you probably found in the course of your study, and what we often find, is that the ubiquity of copyrighted content means we're accessing it in dozens of ways through dozens of providers, and each one of those has a remuneration stream that may or may not be governed by a tariff or a contract or a subscription fee, and it may be per use, per year.

(1645)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes, or it may be per stream that gets created, so we don't know what's going to be the next stream of creation.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

And then it's divvied up within that by who contributed to it.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes, okay.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Even in the case of a musical work, you're looking at who the background artists are, who the songwriter was, and the producer.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

I'm sorry I'm cutting you short—

Mr. Mark Schaan:

No, no.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

—but it is a complex landscape.

Ms. Théberge, it's great to have you here. It's great to have you on the board and to see the changes on the board. I've heard some positive feedback already from some of the witnesses we've had.

Among the jurisdictions of the world, Australia was mentioned, but also France. The collective rights administration in France involves a significant amount of government oversight, maybe more than what we have here, to look at the behaviour and internal management of copyright collectives.

Is your board engaged in or looking at the tariff-setting power and the scrutiny and oversight of copyright collectives in a new way? We've heard a lot from collectives and how they're managed. It seems that there's.... On the record, I guess I'll watch how far I go with that comment, but it was very hard for me to understand how the collectives work, how they're managed and what role the Copyright Board could play in helping us to understand that situation.

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I'll invite my colleagues to jump in if they have something to say.

We don't oversee copyright collectives. They come to the board as a party, as part of the process, just as other user organizations are part of the processes that are arbitrated by award. If ever there was an appetite to think from a policy perspective about how collective management in Canada should behave, what it should look like, it would be more of a policy question under the responsibility of the two lead departments.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Which departments?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

It would be Canadian Heritage and ISED.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I just wanted to get that on the record.

We see how even in our study, both the heritage committee and us, trying to understand how we both get information and put it together has been a challenge, but a creative one.

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I would just add that where we can have an influence is in the overseeing or monitoring and management of the process once it's before the board. One of the things we will be doing in the following months is trying to instill more discipline—on ourselves, certainly, but also among parties, because it takes two to tango. In this case it takes three to tango, and if you want a fully efficient process before the Copyright Board, everybody has to play nice; everybody has to show discipline from the get-go.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

That would be called line dancing.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to start with the Copyright Board.

We've had witnesses say that decisions from the board can take years. I believe one witness stated it was seven years.

How is it even possible to take that long to get a decision on a tariff? Does one case take years of process, or does it just take years for the board to get to it?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I'll start with a few preliminary comments, and then I'll turn to the secretary general, who is one of the key persons involved in managing the process before the board. A lot of numbers fly around the board and a lot of myths as well.

The seven years assumes no stop between the beginning and the end of the process, but in reality a process can be stop-and-go. There are moments during the process when parties come to the board and say to hold off, because they're negotiating. That adds time to the clock.

That being said, we're fully conscious that there's pressure for the board to render decisions more quickly, hence the proposals that were presented by the government in Bill C-86, which would put in regulation a specific time frame for one piece of the process, which is the piece of the process that the board controls, the rendering of decision.

Gilles, I don't know if you want to add something.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Will simply legislating a time period improve the system? How fundamentally will you address the current process?

(1650)

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

It will be addressed based on that, but in addition the government will probably be introducing some regulations, and we will be introducing regulations because currently in the act, the board has a Governor in Council authority to be able to put in regulation—for instance, how we will be using case management to run a tighter ship so that eventually it leads to decisions being more thorough, still based on the evidence provided by the parties and still reflective of the public interest, which is a particular characteristic of the mandate of the Copyright Board, and ultimately to render decisions within the time frame the government will impose.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I am mindful of the time that the chair will impose.

I questioned the deputy minister in regard to your not having asked for any budget extension or expansion, and he said it's simply because you have more than enough supply to be able to meet the demand.

How can you overhaul the Copyright Board and at the same time deliver or at least continue to process files without any extra resources?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Additional resources have been provided to the Copyright Board. They weren't in supplementary (A)s because our Treasury Board process is continuing. You wouldn't have seen an increase in the supplementary (A)s process, but it's a 30% increase in the total resources afforded to the board, so it's an increase of a third of their annual budget.

Mr. Dan Albas:

That would have been really helpful to hear from the deputy.

Lastly, to the board, you say you would like the ability to issue licence for works the owner of which cannot be located. If the owner is not in the picture to make a claim, why would a licence even be necessary?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I'm going to ask my general counsel to take that question, if you don't mind.

Mr. Sylvain Audet (General Counsel, Copyright Board):

That regime is one where the copyright subsists in the work; somebody wants to make use, so the rights are still protected. You cannot locate the owner, but the rights still subsist.

A regime under the act is provided for so there's a request, an application that can be submitted to the board. Some reasonable searches have to be done, and then the board oversees that process. Currently, one of the requirements is that it has to be a published work or published sound recording. Lately, especially, we've been facing a lot of situations where it's really hard to assess, and a lot of requests are based.... We're not able to determine with certainty that the work has been published.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would go back to it, then. If you're having difficulty resolving the fallacy you have where you have active rights holders who are seeking redress, then why would you want to have jurisdiction over areas where you cannot even locate someone who has it? To me, it sounds as if you're spending more time rather than servicing the people who are before the board.

Mr. Sylvain Audet:

It is in the act. It doesn't mean that they don't exist. There is still a provision, and a period of time where the rightful owner can come forward—there's a mechanism for them to come forward—and the licence provides for that eventuality.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Lloyd, you can have the remainder of my time.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you.

Thank you to the witnesses.

Madame Théberge, you noted in your written testimony here that you're recommending we change the act to grant the board the power to issue interim decisions. To your knowledge, why wasn't this included in Bill C-86?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I think it's probably a question more for the department than for the Copyright Board.

Mr. Martin Simard (Director, Copyright and Trademark Policy Directorate, Department of Industry):

Yes, it was a request that we were conscious of. It was part of the consultation we ran. Some stakeholders were in favour of this; others were against it. Ultimately, the government felt that if either party can now request an interim decision, it seemed superfluous to have the board be able to come at it of its own volition, if neither the demander nor the opponent feel there's a need for an interim tariff.

It was not consensual in our consultation, so ultimately it was not included in the reforms.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Madame Théberge, do you think we missed an opportunity? Your second recommendation was to clarify the binding nature of the board tariffs. Do you think that in Bill C-86 we missed the opportunity, and that maybe this committee could, in part of its recommendations, encourage government to further clarify the binding nature of board tariffs and licences?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

The board operates within a legislative framework that is imposed on the board. It is the government's prerogative to decide which is the most appropriate legislative vehicle to make changes to the act.

What we wanted to do here was acknowledge what we feel is an issue worthy of some study by the committee, because it is an issue that has an impact on what we do, on our business. What we hear through our business, or what we can certainly see from our business, is that there is some uncertainty with the interpretation of a Supreme Court decision. So we felt it was appropriate, given the scope of the parliamentary review, to put that forward.

I believe my colleague from the Department of Canadian Heritage also raised it. We just felt that it was appropriate to at least signal that this is something we think the committee members should be thinking about. It echoes a little bit what both department ministers have said in their letter to the chair of the committee.

(1655)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Continuing on that line, it's really great to hear the eagerness to reform the Copyright Board. It's actually one of the things on which we see some consensus on this file. The noting of transparency, access and efficiency is, I think, hitting the mark with regard to what we're seeing on building consensus.

You suggested everything from a scrub to pre-emptive decision-making. My understanding is that the three suggestions you're making are all legislative requirements. Is that correct, that those would require some legislative amendments? My question is for your legal counsel.

Mr. Sylvain Audet:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

My question is for Mr. Simard. Did you consult the Copyright Board, and did they make these suggestions to your department for Bill C-86?

Mr. Martin Simard: Go ahead, Mark.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

We can both take that.

Yes, the legislative effort related to Bill C-86 was conceived and worked on by the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, and the Copyright Board.

Mr. Brian Masse:

And at the end of the day, you just decided to leave those out.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Obviously, at the end of the day, the government holds policy authority for the overall process, and so they came to decisions that they felt were in the best interests of the overall system and that reflected what we heard from all parties.

Mr. Brian Masse:

This is what the Prime Minister said: We will not resort to legislative tricks to avoid scrutiny. Stephen Harper has...used omnibus bills to prevent Parliament from properly reviewing and debating...proposals. We will change the House of Commons Standing Orders to bring an end to this undemocratic practice.

Here we are again today, back to going through a process on which we are actually spending our time and resources. We are now seeing a legislative requirement—not even a regulatory requirement, which I've been asking for for a period of time, whereby we could have actually seen a proper fix. It's very disappointing and frustrating, especially given the fact that we have this opportunity in front of us.

I want to move now to the USMCA.

Mr. Schaan, you mentioned two and a half years for implementation. Is that ratification of the agreement by the United States or by Canada, with regard to the USMCA? How long does the two and a half years...? What triggers the start time?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

It's from the signing of the agreement. Is that correct?

Mr. Martin Simard:

It would be the coming into force of the agreement, so that would have to be the mechanism. We can come back to you with the exact.... It's the three countries, so I would assume that when the three countries have ratified it through their Parliament, the USMCA, or CUSMA, would come into force. I would have to confirm the understanding of the coming into force of the agreement.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay. That's fine, to make sure that it's not just.... People who have a vested interest, a financial interest, in this are going to want to know when the two and a half years starts exactly, whether it's Canada, the United States, or Mexico that is the final signatory to that deal. If they sign on, it will still have to wait, because in the U.S., Congress still has to pass it. It's also highly debatable whether this will be passed.

What particular studies were done by the department—and will you table those—about the economic implications of a two-and-a-half-year notification process and introduction of that change? What has the department done with regard to studying the economic repercussions for those affected by the two and a half years?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Obviously, we take a broad analysis of the overall impacts of trade negotiations. On the specifics of the enhanced term of protection, it's very difficult to model.

Mr. Brian Masse:

There was no study done, then, on the two and a half years.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

There was considerable analysis of the overall provisions, but not a specific modelling of those, because it's very difficult to do.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Why two and a half years—and not three years, or three and a half years, or one and a half years—or why have a notification process for the transition? Why two and a half years versus any other option?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

The transition period was negotiated among all parties, and it was agreed that this was a sufficient time period to allow for appropriate study and implementation.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Would you be willing to table that information so that we can see what the decision-making process was based upon? If there is no actual study for the two and a half years, in particular, it would be interesting for the financial interests of people who are involved in this to know exactly why two and a half years and what data was used to accumulate that actual decision at the end of the day.

(1700)

Mr. Mark Schaan:

There was no economic modelling done of a transition period of two and a half years. Two and a half years was a dialogue between those who would have to implement the system to understand how long we thought we would need to consult appropriately.

Mr. Brian Masse:

There you have it.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Those were all of my questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we break off, because we didn't have a full round of questions, if any of the members have any questions they want to submit in writing, could we get them in by Friday at noon to the clerk, and then we could submit them to our panellists?

On that note, thank you very much to our first panel. There is lots of work ahead of us.

We will suspend briefly to change panels, and we'll come right back. Thank you.

(1700)

(1705)

The Chair:

We will resume.

We're moving into the second panel. With us we have, as individuals, Warren Sheffer, from Hebb & Sheffer; Pascale Chapdelaine, associate professor in the faculty of law at the University of Windsor; and Myra Tawfik, professor in the faculty of law at the University of Windsor.

You will each have seven minutes to present. Again, we're going to do the same pattern, with one round of seven minutes.

Mr. Warren Sheffer (Hebb & Sheffer, As an Individual):

Thank you Chair, and members of the committee, for giving me an opportunity to address you today.

I've practised law for 15 years. For 12 of those years, I've worked in association with my colleague Marian Hebb. Together, we are Hebb & Sheffer. My practice largely consists of advising and representing authors and performers who are the original owners of copyright.

In addition to my regular practice, I've spent over a decade serving as duty counsel with Artists' Legal Advice Services, known by its acronym ALAS. At ALAS, a small group of lawyers provide pro bono summary legal advice to creators of all artistic disciplines.

I also currently sit on the board of directors of the West End Phoenix. The West End Phoenix is a not-for-profit, artist-run broadsheet community newspaper, produced and circulated door to door in the west end of Toronto. It contains great writing, illustrations and photography, and the occasional great crossword puzzle. This is a copy of it, here. Our tag line is “Slow print for fast times”.

The West End Phoenix is solely funded by subscriptions and donations. Our freelance contributors include well-known voices like Margaret Atwood, Claudia Dey, Waubgeshig Rice, Michael Winter, rapper Michie Mee, and Alex Lifeson of the iconic Canadian rock band Rush. Other contributors are emerging writers like Alicia Elliott and Melissa Vincent.

The West End Phoenix pays decent rates and prides itself on seeking from authors only a six-month period of exclusivity within which we may publish their works. Our freelancers remain the copyright owners, as they should. After the six-month period of exclusivity, they are free to relicense their works to other parties or to sell or self-publish their contributions for extra income.

The West End Phoenix will typically pay a few hundred dollars for an article, which may seem modest. However, reliance on modest streams of income is a reality for most of Canada's professional writers.

Indeed, many of the creators I work with or have advised at ALAS, or who contribute to the West End Phoenix, rely on several streams of income to get by. For example, there are royalties from publishers and collective licensing, public lending rights payments, speaking engagements, and part-time work in or outside of the publishing industry.

As a lawyer to Canadian authors, I'd like to speak with you today about the general decline in their average income and its relation to the education exception in the Copyright Act. I'd also like to propose a statutory correction to help fix that decline in income, which accords with what the Supreme Court of Canada has declared about the purpose of the Copyright Act.

Specifically concerning the act's purpose, the Supreme Court stated in the 2002 Théberge case, and has repeated in other cases since that time, that the Copyright Act is meant to promote: a balance between promoting the public interest in the encouragement and dissemination of works of the arts and intellect and obtaining a just reward for the creator (or, more accurately, to prevent someone other than the creator from appropriating whatever benefits may be generated).

In my view, the federal government missed the mark badly in 2012, when it boldly introduced into the Copyright Act education as a fair dealing exception. Prior to that 2012 amendment, education sector representatives testifying before legislative committees were insistent that the education exception would not be about getting copyright-protected works for free, and that, instead, the exception would only facilitate taking advantage of teachable moments without disrupting the market for published works.

In other words, using the language of the Supreme Court of Canada employed in Théberge, the exception was to be about ad hoc dissemination of works of art and intellect, and not about systematically appropriating benefits or royalties from creators.

The past six years have shown that notion, that it would do little harm, to be patently false. Royalties have been appropriated from creators on a massive scale.

We know from the Writers' Union of Canada's recently published 2018 income survey that the average net income from writing currently sits at $9,380, with a median net income of less than $4,000. We also know from that same survey that the authors' royalties earned in the education sector have declined precipitously with the implementation of the education exception.

In that regard, Access Copyright reports in its 2017 audited financial statements that since 2012 the amount of revenue collected from the K-to-12 and post-secondary sectors has declined dramatically, by 89.1%.

I won't repeat or drill down into all of the other lost income figures, which I know this committee has been supplied by the Writers' Union of Canada and Access Copyright. Instead of repeating numbers you've already seen or heard, I'd like to focus on the education sector's 2012 fair dealing guidelines, which the education sector unilaterally crafted.

(1710)



In substance, these fair dealing guidelines look substantially similar to the Access Copyright licences that the education sector negotiated and paid for prior to 2012. In short, the education sector has substituted their own fair dealing guidelines for Access Copyright licences.

As you know, the fair dealing guidelines are the centrepiece of the litigation between Access Copyright and York University. In that matter, the federal court found that York created the fair dealing guidelines to reproduce copyright-protected works on a massive scale without licence, primarily to obtain for free that which they had previously paid for. The federal court also found that the guidelines were not fair, either in their terms or in their application. The Federal Court of Appeal will hear that matter next March.

I ask this committee to absorb the consequences of the declaration that York seeks in the appeal in the name of fair dealing, and I would ask that you consider what such a declaration would mean for artists who make publications like the West End Phoenix possible.

As you likely know, York and others in the education sector wish for the Federal Court of Appeal to declare, for example, that it's presumptively fair for York to take a publication like the West End Phoenix and systematically make multiple free copies of entire articles, entire illustrations and entire poems, and then include those works for its own financial benefit in course packs that it sells to students. It's hard to see how anyone could possibly find such an arrangement fair, let alone for Canadian creators getting by on incomes that are very low and declining. However, that has not stopped education bureaucrats from trying to get their fair dealing declaration.

Given the damage done since 2012, I think it's critically important that Parliament make it clear in the Copyright Act that the kind of institutional copying that is the subject of the York litigation does not qualify as fair dealing.

The statutory amendment I propose to fix the damage caused would simply make fair dealing exceptions inapplicable to educational institutions' use of works that are commercially available. In my view, the proposed amendment that Access Copyright submitted to this committee, in its submission dated July 20, 2018, would achieve that goal.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Pascale Chapdelaine.

Ms. Myra Tawfik (Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor, As an Individual):

If you don't mind, we'll do it together. I will start the presentation and then hand it over to Pascale.

The Chair:

Okay. Go for it.

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair and members of the standing committee, thank you very much for having invited us here to address you regarding the review of Canada's Copyright Act. My colleague Pascale Chapdelaine and I are both law professors at the University of Windsor, and we're appearing here to elaborate further on the recommendations that we made in two briefs that were co-signed by 11 Canadian copyright scholars. Together, we represent a multidisciplinary group that includes librarians, copyright officers, communications scholars as well as legal scholars.

We'd like to begin our remarks with three overarching principles that guide the specific recommendations contained in the briefs, some of which we will elaborate on further in a moment.

We approached our submissions in light of three governing principles. The first is a matter of process with a view to expanding the framework of our law. We recommend, or urge that you consider, a process of consultation with indigenous peoples. In this respect, meaningful consultation must be had with Canada's indigenous peoples, which would seek to implement Canada's obligations under article 31 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. In the context of copyright, this means suitable recognition and protection of indigenous traditional cultural expressions, particularly those that are not currently protected by the act.

Second, in relation to the existing framework, there are two overarching principles that should govern. I'll address the first one, and then I'll turn the floor over to my colleague, who will address the second.

First—and I think everyone seems to be in general agreement about this—copyright involves a balancing act of various interests and is an integrated system of incentives whose overarching policy objective is to advance knowledge and culture.

I have been a law professor at the University of Windsor for close to 30 years. My primary area of research and teaching has been focused on copyright law. For the last 15 years, I have been studying Canada's early copyright history to try to tease out from the archival records an understanding of the policy rationale that led to its first enactment at a time when we could boast no professional authors and no publishing industry.

What, then, would have motivated those early parliamentarians to provide for copyright? At its inception, copyright was literally for the encouragement of learning. It was introduced to provide incentives for schoolteachers to write and print schoolbooks and other didactic works to encourage literacy and learning. This meant not only encouraging book production per se, but making sure that the books were affordable: in other words, accessible to the readership.

I am in no way suggesting that this history can automatically be transplanted to current constructions of copyright, but I believe that the foundational principles remain as relevant today. Copyright back then, as now, was not and should not be about rewarding creators for the mere fact of having created. In a similar vein, copyright back then was not about providing a monopoly to printers and publishers as an end in itself. Creators in industry were the means to a larger public policy end. In order to fulfill the law's overarching policy, copyright, which is a monopoly right, needs to be counterbalanced with the establishment and maintenance of robust spaces that can't be captured or owned. It's in this public interest that intellectual property rights should remain limited rights, and there's nothing suspect or ahistorical about this—to the contrary.

Copyright is a calibrated system that mediates the competing interests of creators, industry and users with the ultimate goal of advancing knowledge and facilitating innovation. The user side of copyright policy is integral to the system and manifests itself in our fair dealing provisions and the other statutory limitations and exceptions to copyright.

(1715)

[Translation]

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine (Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor, As an Individual):

Mr. Chair and members of the committee, to continue on the theme of a balanced approach to copyright introduced by my colleague Myra Tawfik, allow me to briefly present the journey that has brought me here today.

My many years of practice as a lawyer, during which I ensured the protection of the intellectual property of my clients, as well as the findings of my academic research and my doctorate in law, which led to the publication of a book on the rights of users of copyrighted works in 2017 at Oxford University Press, allow me to assess the issues at stake, both on the side of copyright holders and on the side of users and the public. My remarks are, therefore, in line with this perspective.

Copyright has unique characteristics, but it should not be treated in an exceptional way. It is part of a framework of law and established standards that it must a priori respect. Any derogation from these principles must be taken seriously and cannot be done without thinking about the ramifications it may have on the credibility and legitimacy of copyright, in the eyes of the public as well. Recognizing that copyright must respect fundamental rights, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and freedoms, property law and contract law is in fact one of the corollaries of the balanced and measured approach that we advocate in our brief.[English]

My colleague and I will now address specific recommendations in passing that reflect these two guiding principles of a balanced system that must respect fundamental rights and general laws. I will start by making a few recommendations, as contained in the brief, with respect to solidifying exceptions to copyright infringement and user rights.

The specific recommendations made in our briefs regarding the rights of users of copyrighted works are in fact a continuum of the evolution in Canada toward a more balanced approach to copyright, recognizing that users play an integral part in fulfilling the objectives of copyright. We promote continuing an evaluation of recognizing the rights of users, but to the extent that it does promote the objectives of copyright—to the same extent that any expansion of the rights of copyright holders should be made only to the extent that it promotes the objectives of copyright, that is, the promotion of the creation of works and their dissemination to the public.

To begin, a fair use style of approach should replace fair dealing provisions. Eliminating a closed list of specific purposes—such as research, private study, criticism and parody, as in our current act—and replacing them with illustrative purposes, while maintaining a test of fairness justifying some uses of works without the authorization of the copyright holder, would continue to protect copyright holders' interests while offering more adaptability to include new purposes. For example, as we were contemplating, addressing text mining and data mining would come to mind. It wouldn't need to be added each time new technologies evolve. That would also be in keeping with the principle of technological neutrality.

Second, the act needs to clarify that copyright owners cannot contract out of exceptions to copyright infringement, and certainly that would be the case in non-negotiated standard form agreements. A “no contracting out” approach recognizes that exceptions to copyright infringement are an important engine to ensure that copyright respects fundamental rights and other interests that are essential to optimizing users' participation to the objectives of copyright. Such an approach has been taken by other jurisdictions, recently the U.K.

Third, and consistent with a “no contracting out” approach to user rights, technological protection measures should not override exceptions to copyright infringement, as they currently do to a large extent. Copyright holders choosing to secure access and use of their works through TPMs should have the obligation to provide access to the exercise of exceptions to copyright infringement through built-in architecture or other mechanisms.

Fourth, in relation to the constraining effects of TPMs on the legitimate exercise of user rights, specific remedies need to be built into the act when copyright holders fail to provide access to the legitimate exercises of user rights. In addition, proper administrative oversight should be in place to monitor automated business practices of copyright self-enforcement—here, content ID used on Google platforms such as YouTube comes to mind—to ensure that non-infringing material is not inappropriately removed and that freedom of expression is protected.

(1720)

[Translation]

Just as copyright owners benefit from a wide range of legal remedies when their rights are infringed, it goes without saying that users should also have recourse against copyright owners when their rights of use are not respected. Unfortunately, this is not the case in the act at this time. The creation of specific remedies for users in the act would rectify this imbalance and crystallize the need to respect the rights of users of protected works. Specific remedies for users are provided for, for example, in legislation such as that of France and the United Kingdom. [English]

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

I'll just briefly highlight a couple more of our recommendations before concluding.

Again, and similar to the overarching approach upon which we have based our assessment of the Copyright Act review process, one of the recommendations we make is to introduce a provision relating to open access to research and scientific publications, especially in the context of publicly funded research. The federal government has already introduced a tri-agency open access policy for publicly funded research. Our recommendation is to provide for this type of open access provision as a principle within the Copyright Act, and this could be done in a manner that doesn't unduly interfere with the reasonable expectations of the copyright holder in that the publications could be deposited in an institutional repository after a reasonable period of time, with appropriate attribution.

In a similar vein, new technologies and new practices like text and data mining, which allow you to capture large amounts of data that offer insights and innovative solutions to pressing problems, have become important research methods for researchers at academic institutions. The risk of copyright infringement for reproducing copyright works when scraping, mining or downloading is an inhibiting factor that should militate in favour of a reasonable measure to remove some of the copyright barriers to this kind of research.

Finally, with regard to works generated by artificial intelligence, we take it that the rationale underlying copyright is to incentivize human beings to create, disseminate and learn, so we recommend that works entirely created by AI should not be subject to copyright protection. If a human being has exercised sufficient skill and judgment in the way in which they use software or other technologies to produce an original work, then the established copyright principles would apply. There is no policy consistent with history, theory or practice that would justify expanding copyright to works entirely created by artificial intelligence and without any direct human intervention.

The recommendations made in our briefs are modest and incremental steps to maintain a fair balance between the rights of copyright holders, users and the public interest. They are consistent with governing principles that inform our approach to the law. This approach advocates for a continuum on the evolution of copyright that takes a broader approach to competing interests rather than constantly increasing the protection of copyright holders as soon as new technologies emerge, without any consideration of the impact of such enlarged protection on copyright users.

This concludes our remarks. We'd like to thank you very much for hearing us out, and we'd be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Thank you.

(1725)

The Chair:

Thank you very much for your presentation.

We're going to go right into questions, and we're going to start with Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm going to share my time with Mr. Longfield. If you can cut me off at the halfway point, I'd appreciate it.

The Chair:

Okay, I'll cut you off.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Ms. Chapdelaine, you talked about fair dealing as a more fluid model, if we could call it that. How do you see that actually looking, in the law? If there aren't specific fair dealing exceptions, what would it say?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

Basically, it would be similar to the model in the U.S. The U.S., as you probably know—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair use—

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

—has a fair use model. So it does refer to purposes, but only in an illustrative way, not in a limiting way, as it does in Canada. Expanding that to not stating specific purposes would, I think, bring more flexibility and allow the act to evolve as new technologies arise. Still, there would be a test of fairness—that's very important—to determine whether use could be allowed without the authorization of the copyright holder. It would need to meet the fairness test.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would you see this fair use model as something that would permit us to finally have right to repair, for example? Are you familiar with the movement to right to repair?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

That would be one example, which is the common law, something that has been recognized in common law.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You also mentioned content ID. We heard from Google and Facebook here last week, and they admitted that their content ID systems don't really care about fair dealing exceptions. What kind of action should we be entitled to take, or should we be taking, against companies that have a system of copyright enforcement that doesn't actually follow Canadian law?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

Actually, right now there is not much that is provided. That's the whole point of making sure to clarify that there's no contracting out possible of fair dealing, or let's say fair use. That's one of our recommendations, to actually build it in, make it a right, an obligation. Basically, they would be held liable to make sure access is being granted. That's what we're proposing in our recommendations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that. I don't have much time at all, so I'm going to jump to Mr. Sheffer.

I want to learn a bit more about ALAS, because it seems to be quite relevant to our study. I'll ask three questions together, so you can answer them in the 70 seconds or so I have remaining.

How many clients does ALAS have? What are the most common issues they face? What are the most common resolutions you see?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

On the question of how many clients ALAS has, we don't carry any caseload, so the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kind of legal advice are you providing?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

It's summary legal advice.

I should mention, too, that ALAS is the administrative end of things and is run by U of T law students. We have anywhere from three to four appointments a night on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Toronto. They're half-hour sessions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it not-for-profit?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

It is not-for-profit, yes.

The corporation that runs ALAS is Artists and Lawyers for the Advancement of Creativity. The acronym is ALAC, so we have ALAS and ALAC.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

ALAS and ALAC...I gotcha.

I'm already out of time, so thank you very much for that.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Thank you all for another interesting session.

Mr. Sheffer, the model that you put out, and the presentations we had in the last hour, made me think about value chains. There's no room in the value chain for legal advice, which is not what we need to see going forward. I think the artists need to have the right protection.

With regard to the value chain analysis of this, I was talking about flow charts and where value gets created. Who gets paid for it? How could we have legislation that gives fair value within the value chain?

You have a micromodel with the publication West End Phoenix that we could be using.

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

I think it starts with solid copyright protection for the original owner of copyright, which is the author. Beyond that, one hopes that the author or performer is aware of his or her rights and doesn't go about signing those away. If the author or performer does retain his or her rights, that creator is in a good position to negotiate remuneration.

As I said in my presentation, I'm very proud of the fact that at the West End Phoenix, we make a point of—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield: Right.

Mr. Warren Sheffer: Sorry, I don't want to take up your time.

(1730)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

No, no. That's exactly where I was heading with that.

To the other two presenters, before we began this study, I read a couple of books on copyright history to understand where we're coming from. I remember one of the books talked about the history of copyright in the U.K. versus the U.S. and how very different the history was, and how Canada is somewhere in the middle, as we always are.

When you're looking at us taking ideas from the States—and looking at France and Germany—where are we in that continuum right now?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

I can tell you that at the very earliest, we modelled ourselves on American copyright law. In effect, some of the recommendations we have—to adopt an American fair use-style provision, for example—are actually quite consistent with our history. However, we're talking about over 200 years of history.

Although Canada has chosen traditions and had traditions imposed on us in the 20th century—the British tradition particularly—we've always taken some elements from the French, British, and American and incorporated them into things that are uniquely Canadian, to try to develop the flexibilities we need to manoeuvre.

In a sense, the quick answer is that it's all of the above, but we've done it differently and our approach has been different.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I loved your approach. I could picture you both having coffee over this and thinking of the guiding principles, going back to the guiding principles.

It seems that we've missed that whole piece in our study: What are our guiding principles as Canadians, and how does our legislation reflect our guiding principles?

That seems like the most common-sense place to start. Thank you for that.

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

We thought so.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's terrific.

Thank you very much. That's good insight.

The Chair:

Knowing Mr. Longfield, he'll probably set up coffee with you.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'd like to split my time, if I can, with Mr. Lloyd.

Thank you, everyone, for your presentations.

Ms. Chapdelaine, I'm going to start with you. You argue that Canada should adopt fair use-style provisions. That is something we've started to hear quite a bit. Can you state why you think that fair use is a superior system?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

It's superior for the reasons I mentioned earlier. There's no limited purpose to begin the analysis as to what would be a use that can be done without the authorization of the copyright holder. We would develop it with our own values and our own legal system. We're not suggesting that we would have to copy what has been done in the U.S., but as an approach at the legislative level, we think it's a good start that would be less limiting and more flexible.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Ms. Tawfik, in your brief, you state that scientific works should be available after “a reasonable period of time”. Could you state what the “reasonable period of time” is in this context?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

Well, it's reasonable time, obviously, to give the publisher or whomever the return on their initial run. There have already been practices in the context, for example, of the arts and humanities law publishing, where after a period in which the journal gets a return, you can deposit it in an institutional repository, with attribution, for publicly funded research.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I totally understand that the context may differ by industry and industry norms. The challenge for anyone in government is that obviously there needs to be a delineated line at some point, and it's the line in the sand that we're often contemplating on behalf of the government. Can you give any indication in the case of scientific works?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

For pure science, I can't, no.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Your brief also states that the risk of being liable to statutory damages for infringement “creates a serious chill on socially desirable activities”. Can you explain what you mean by “socially desirable activities”?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

Again, it's obviously the other side of the coin: users being able to adapt or do whatever copyright permits them to do without the threat or the fear that they will be subject to statutory damages without the plaintiff having to prove them. Anything that short-circuits the regular system is potentially chilling on those people who want to adapt, create, build on knowledge, and use what's out there in a way that is legitimate within the confines of what's reasonable and fair but without these hammers hanging over their heads, which would be huge damages.

Again, this is not to suggest that people who are downloading music or whatever for commercial purposes—there was a big case in the United States involving this—should not be subject to whatever the remedies are. The hammers that are incorporated, and the statutory damages as a hammer, would have a chilling effect on those who might do things that are legitimate but would be inhibited from doing them.

(1735)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay. Thank you for that explanation.

One of the concerns I've raised a number of times is with content ID. Many of the platforms have said they are doing the best they can within the contextual environment they're operating in.

One of the cases is where someone pays a tariff for a sound clip and then finds that, even though they've paid the tariff, they can't post the content because Sony or another company will have it pulled down. Another, more extreme, example I cited at the last meeting was a YouTube clip that a network television show clipped, put it in the show, and then had the original clip taken down because it was violating their content.

How do we deal with this? A lot of smaller companies—and not even companies, just creators themselves—are posting real, innovative work but are unable to defend themselves. Can you give us any ideas on that?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

What we're recommending is an administrative body that would have oversight to address such complaints, basically. In cases where it would inhibit user-generated content, which is one of the possibilities under our act, there should be rectification of the information to allow the copyright work to be posted or whatever. That's the oversight part of giving true remedies to users that we were referring to.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I like the word “remedies”, too.

It's over to Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you as witnesses.

Mr. Sheffer, you've laid out a case about institutional abuse in copyright. I think most Canadians would agree that education, as a fundamental principle of fair use, is completely legitimate. If the committee were to recommend clarifying the scope of what we mean by “education” to mean an individual's right to education, as opposed to an institutional right to use education as fair use, do you think that would have a significant impact on the rights of authors?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

Yes, I think it could. I think what you just described squares nicely with the proposal I'm suggesting would work, and it's the one that Access Copyright gave you.

Nobody is disputing a student's ability to make a copy of a work for that student's education and private study—research and what have you. What creators take exception to is when institutions engage in massive copying of copyright-protected works, then turn around and put them in course packs, sell them to students and call it fair dealing.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Do you think that our government—at all levels, but I guess mostly federally—is doing enough to protect the cultural tapestry of our literary sector in this country? Are we really at risk of losing what makes us unique as Canadians in the literary sense?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

Yes. I think if the education exception is allowed....

I will just back up for a second. If there's one thing I could leave this committee with, it's that if you haven't already read the York University case, I implore you to do that. You can see exactly how York University—the third-largest institution in this country, with 50,000-plus students—has actually used their fair dealing guidelines.

There's no disputing the findings of fact. I really implore you to read that decision, because if that is allowed to stand as something that's fair dealing, then yes, creators are definitely harmed by that.

(1740)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

That's what I have left for my questioning. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Masse, you have the final seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks for being here.

Let's just finish with Mr. Sheffer. Really, at the end of the day, your concern is that the publication they're using is actually creating income for them, and a source of revenue and so forth, but at the end of the day the people are not getting any compensation for that. Is that really the...?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I just wanted to make sure.

I'm going to skip over to artificial intelligence, actually. We haven't heard a lot about that, so I want to spend a little time here on it. Thank you for raising that. It hasn't been raised a lot.

Can you highlight what the concern is? We've heard an argument that if you're the creator of the artificial intelligence, you should then be the owner of the work of the artificial intelligence. Could you perhaps talk a little about that?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

That's a position we don't uphold. Copyright can't be the policy vehicle or legislative vehicle to deal with everything that's emerging in technology or otherwise today.

Artificial intelligence as technology can be protected through patents, and there are other ways of protecting the technology itself. Copyright, really, is about incenting human beings to create and disseminate, etc. To the extent that we have moved into areas in which copyright is actually protecting technologies, or software and those things, it has already created a distortion not only in the way in which copyright originated, but also, frankly, in its fundamental principle, the intention behind it.

We're not saying that one could never hold copyright in a work that's produced through artificial intelligence, but the copyright tests should not be changed. We should apply the same tests. If a human being has exercised sufficient skill and judgment in the creation of that work using artificial intelligence, then they should be able to claim copyright. If it's just that they've produced the technology that enables the artificial intelligence to create something new, then our position is that copyright ought not to extend to that.

If there is a need to protect the creative output of a robot, then other mechanisms can come into play, not copyright.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's an interesting aspect that we haven't gone into a lot.

I raised this argument at the beginning of these hearings. Especially when we look at artificial intelligence and the massive government and public subsidization of research into that technology and its products, we see there is an argument for the public expectation for some of that to be shared as well, in my opinion. When we do these public-private partnerships, there is a considerable amount of public resources—be it money, infrastructure, or processes and government resources and so forth—that the public has paid as part of that equity. There needs to be a little discussion there.

I want to quickly turn, with the rest of my time, to sharing information coming from the government. We heard just prior to your coming to the table here that apparently there have been some work and some studies done. I was asking about the USMCA and the extension of copyright and what information they were using for it. There has been no particular study, but they have some government information and documents and so forth. We still don't even know what that is, although government resources and research have been used to do that.

How does Canada rank as a government, among our neighbours and other Commonwealth nations, with regard to disclosure of public information of government materials, research and other types of work that have been done?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

I have an example.

Because I've been going back into the archives, I made a number of requests to look at 19th century copyright works and 19th century patents. I was blocked and asked to do an ATIP to get the patent information. This is a 19th century patent. The copyright was protected under a Crown prerogative rather than.... In terms of my experience of these kinds of capture of what should otherwise be public documents, it's a very small example, but there isn't a sort of openness in the same way as one sees perhaps in other jurisdictions, although I understand there may be constraints in certain circumstances.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I know that we rank very poorly with our economic partners in the OECD for public disclosure of public-gathered works.

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the opportunity.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here today.

(1745)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

It was a short session, but I think we got quite a bit out of it. Again, for the members, if there are any extra questions that you would like us to forward to the witnesses, please give them to the clerk by noon on Friday.

Finally, for Monday, just be aware of the room, because we're not sure where the room is going to be. The clerk will advise you.

On that note, thank you to our guests.

We are now adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1620)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Je vous souhaite tous la bienvenue. Nous allons commencer immédiatement, car nous avons presque une heure de retard — cela se produit parfois à la Chambre.

Bienvenue. Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons, de la Commission du droit d'auteur, Nathalie Théberge, vice-présidente et première dirigeante, Gilles McDougall, secrétaire général et Sylvain Audet, avocat général.

Du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, nous accueillons Kahlil Cappuccino, directeur, Politique du droit d'auteur, Direction générale du marché créatif et innovation. Nous accueillons également Pierre-Marc Lauzon, analyste de politiques, Politique du droit d'auteur, Direction générale du marché créatif et innovation.

Enfin, du ministère de l'Industrie, nous accueillons Mark Schaan, directeur général, Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché et Martin Simard, directeur, Direction de la politique du droit d'auteur et des marques de commerce.

Conformément à notre discussion de lundi, les témoins auront sept minutes pour livrer leurs exposés. Nous aurons également un deuxième groupe de témoins. Chaque parti aura donc sept minutes de questions et nous suspendrons ensuite la séance. Nous accueillerons le deuxième groupe et nous ferons la même chose. Nous terminerons la réunion lorsque nous aurons terminé, et cela devrait fonctionner.

Sans plus attendre, nous entendrons les témoins de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Allez-y, madame Théberge.[Français]

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Nathalie Théberge (vice-présidente et première dirigeante, Commission du droit d'auteur):

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, je vous remercie.

Je m'appelle Nathalie Théberge. Depuis octobre dernier, je suis la nouvelle vice-présidente et première dirigeante de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Je m'exprimerai aujourd'hui à titre de première dirigeante.

Comme vous l'avez dit, je suis accompagnée de Gilles McDougall, secrétaire général, et de Sylvain Audet, avocat général, tous deux de la Commission. Je vous remercie de nous donner l'occasion de nous prononcer sur l'examen parlementaire de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Je ferai d'abord un rappel: la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada est un tribunal quasi judiciaire indépendant, créé par la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Il est chargé d'établir les redevances relatives à l'utilisation d'oeuvres et d'autres objets protégés par le droit d'auteur lorsque l'administration de ces droits a été confiée à une société de gestion collective. La valeur directe des redevances homologuées par la Commission est estimée à près de 500 millions de dollars par année.

La Commission se situe à l'échelon supérieur des tribunaux administratifs en matière d'indépendance. Son mandat consiste à fixer des tarifs justes et équitables d'une manière neutre, impartiale et libre d'entraves. Ce n'est pas une tâche facile, notamment dans la mesure où l'information nécessaire au travail de la Commission est parfois difficile à obtenir. La Commission est à la veille d'une réforme majeure à la suite des changements à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur proposés dans le projet de loi C-86 sur la mise en oeuvre du budget de 2018.

Si vous me le permettez, je voudrais en profiter pour réaffirmer l'engagement de la Commission envers la mise en oeuvre de cette réforme. Évidemment, il faudra un certain temps avant de pouvoir apprécier l'impact de ces propositions, puisqu'il y aura une période de transition pendant laquelle toutes les parties en cause, incluant la Commission et les parties qui se présentent devant elle, devront s'adapter et changer leurs pratiques, leurs comportements et, dans une certaine mesure, leur culture organisationnelle.

Cette période de transition est à prévoir en raison de la portée ambitieuse des propositions de réforme, mais nous croyons que c'est tout l'écosystème de propriété intellectuelle canadien qui profitera d'un système de tarification plus efficace sous la gouverne de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Cela étant, réformer la Commission n'est pas un remède à tous les maux affectant la capacité des créateurs d'être rémunérés de façon juste pour leurs oeuvres et celle des utilisateurs d'avoir accès à ces oeuvres. De ce fait, la Commission profite de l'occasion pour vous soumettre quelques pistes de réflexion en espérant que son expérience dans la mise en oeuvre effective de plusieurs dispositions de la Loi puisse vous être profitable.

Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais proposer trois thèmes pour votre considération. Nous avons choisi seulement des enjeux ayant une incidence directe sur le mandat et les activités de la Commission, tels que définis dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur et modifiés par la Loi no 2 d'exécution du budget de 2018, présentement à l'étude au Parlement.

(1625)

[Traduction]

Le premier terme concerne la transparence. Les membres du Comité qui connaissent la Commission savent que pour être en mesure de prendre des décisions qui sont justes et équitables, et qui reflètent l'intérêt public, nous devons pouvoir comprendre et apprécier le marché dans son ensemble. Pour cela, il faut de l'information, notamment sur l'existence d'autres ententes couvrant des usages similaires de matériel protégé au sein d'un même marché. C'est un peu comme en immobilier où, pour établir le prix de vente d'une propriété, il faut nécessairement tenir compte des comparables, soit de la valeur des propriétés similaires dans le même secteur, le taux du marché, etc.

À l'heure actuelle, le dépôt des ententes auprès de la Commission n'est pas obligatoire, ce qui laisse souvent la Commission devant un portrait incomplet du marché. Nous sommes d'avis que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur devrait encourager le dépôt par les parties des ententes entre les sociétés de gestion et les utilisateurs. Certaines personnes pourraient faire valoir que la Commission a déjà le pouvoir de demander aux parties de leur soumettre les ententes pertinentes. Nous sommes d'avis qu'un incitatif législatif ferait en sorte que la Commission n'aurait pas à faire pression par l'entremise d'une assignation à comparaître afin d'avoir accès à ces ententes, ce qui crée des délais que nous voulons tous éviter.

De façon plus générale, nous encourageons le Comité à considérer, dans son rapport, les meilleurs moyens d'accroître la transparence globale de l'écosystème du droit d'auteur au Canada. Dans le cadre de la réforme, nous ferons notre part en ajoutant à nos propres processus des étapes et des pratiques qui encourageront un meilleur échange de renseignements entre les parties, et qui faciliteront la participation du public.

Le deuxième thème est lié à l'accès. Nous encourageons le Comité à inclure dans son rapport une recommandation pour une refonte complète de la Loi, puisque la dernière refonte date de 1985. Les réformes et les modifications successives ont contribué à rendre le texte législatif difficile à comprendre et lui donnent parfois l'air d'être incohérent. Dans un monde où les créateurs doivent de plus en plus gérer seuls leurs droits, il est important que nos outils législatifs soient rédigés de façon compréhensible et à cette fin, nous vous suggérons de vous inspirer de la loi australienne sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous encourageons le Comité à envisager de modifier les exigences de publication propres au régime d'oeuvres orphelines. Actuellement, lorsqu'on ne peut pas trouver le titulaire d'un droit d'auteur, la Commission ne peut pas émettre de licences pour certaines oeuvres, notamment celles qui ne sont disponibles qu'en ligne ou celles qui sont déposées dans un musée. Nous sommes d'avis que la Loi devrait être modifiée de façon à permettre à la Commission d'émettre une licence dans ces cas, avec des précautions.

Enfin, notre troisième thème est lié à l'efficacité. La réforme de la Commission, telle que proposée dans le projet de loi C-86, permettra d'améliorer l'efficacité et la prévisibilité du processus de tarification au Canada et, au bout du compte, elle devrait assurer une meilleure utilisation des ressources publiques. Je crois que les membres du Comité ont entendu le même message de divers experts.

Nous recommandons deux autres moyens de réaliser ces objectifs.

Tout d'abord, nous encourageons le Comité à envisager de modifier la Loi, afin de permettre à la Commission de rendre des décisions intérimaires de sa propre initiative. Actuellement, la Commission ne peut rendre de telles décisions que sur requête d'une partie. Ce pouvoir offrirait à la Commission un autre outil pour influencer le rythme et les dynamiques propres aux procédures de tarification.

(1630)

[Français]

Deuxièmement, nous encourageons le Comité à s'interroger sur l'opportunité de préciser dans la Loi que les tarifs et licences de la Commission sont contraignants. Cette proposition fait suite à une décision relativement récente de la Cour suprême du Canada voulant que, lorsque la Commission établit des redevances propres à une licence dans les cas individuels — le régime d'arbitrage —, ces licences ne sont pas contraignantes pour les utilisateurs dans certaines circonstances. Certains commentateurs se sont aussi demandé si cette affirmation s'appliquait également aux tarifs fixés par la Commission.

Nous sommes conscients qu'il s'agit d'un enjeu controversé, mais nous vous invitons néanmoins à vous y attarder, ne serait-ce que parce que les parties et la Commission dépensent temps, efforts et ressources afin d'obtenir une décision de la Commission.

Sur cette note, nous félicitons évidemment chaque membre du Comité pour le travail accompli à ce jour et nous vous remercions de votre attention.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.[Traduction]

Nous entendrons maintenant les témoins du ministère du Patrimoine canadien.

Monsieur Cappuccino, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Kahlil Cappuccino (directeur, Politique du droit d'auteur, Direction générale du marché créatif et innovation, ministère du Patrimoine canadien):

En fait, Mark Schaan parlera en premier.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous entendrons donc le ministère de l'Industrie.

Monsieur Schaan, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Mark Schaan (directeur général, Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché, ministère de l'Industrie):

Le ministère de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique du Canada va partager le temps disponible avec le ministère du Patrimoine canadien.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, distingués membres du Comité.

Je suis heureux d'être ici devant vous encore une fois pour discuter de droit d'auteur. Je m'appelle Mark Schaan. Je suis le directeur général de la Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché à Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada.

Je suis accompagné de Martin Simard, qui est le directeur de la Direction de la politique du droit d'auteur et des marques de commerce au sein de ma direction générale.

Nous sommes ici avec nos collègues de Patrimoine canadien, Kahlil Cappuccino et Pierre-Marc Lauzon, pour informer le Comité de deux faits récents qui se rapportent à son examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous parlerons d'abord de l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique et des obligations qu'il contient eu égard au droit d'auteur.

Ensuite, nous soulignerons les mesures globales prises par le gouvernement pour moderniser la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada, notamment les propositions législatives contenues dans le projet de loi C-86, Loi no 2 d'exécution du budget de 2018, qui avaient été annoncées de manière générale dans notre première lettre à votre Comité sur l'examen, et ensuite de manière plus précise dans la récente lettre des ministres Bains et Rodriguez à votre intention.[Traduction]

Le 30 novembre, le Canada, les États-Unis et le Mexique ont signé un nouvel accord commercial qui préserve des éléments clés de la relation commerciale nord-américaine et qui intègre de nouvelles dispositions mises à jour pour aborder les enjeux liés au commerce moderne. D'intérêt particulier pour votre examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, le nouvel accord met à jour le chapitre sur la propriété intellectuelle et comprend des engagements communs propres au droit d'auteur et aux droits connexes, ce qui permettra au Canada de maintenir de nombreux éléments importants qui font partie de notre système de droit d'auteur, ainsi que certaines nouvelles obligations. Ainsi, l'accord modernisé exige que le Canada modifie son cadre juridique et stratégique en ce qui a trait au droit d'auteur dans certains secteurs limités, y compris ce qui suit.[Français]

D'abord, l'Accord stipule que les parties prévoient, dans le cas des oeuvres d'auteurs, une période de protection du droit d'auteur couvrant la durée de la vie de l'auteur plus 70 ans, ce qui représente un changement de la période actuelle au Canada, qui couvre la durée de la vie de l'auteur plus 50 ans. Le fait d'étendre cette période à la durée de la vie de l'auteur plus 70 ans est compatible avec l'approche adoptée par les États-Unis, l'Europe et d'autres partenaires commerciaux clés, dont le Japon. Elle sera avantageuse pour les créateurs et les industries culturelles, puisqu'elle leur accorde une plus longue période pour monétiser leurs oeuvres et leurs investissements.

Cela étant dit, nous sommes conscients que la prolongation de cette période présente aussi des défis, comme l'ont mentionné plusieurs témoins au cours de votre examen. Le Canada a négocié une période de transition de deux ans et demi, qui commencera lorsque l'Accord entrera en vigueur. Cela permettra de veiller à ce que le changement soit mis en oeuvre avec soin, en consultation avec les parties intéressées et en pleine connaissance des résultats de votre examen.[Traduction]

Les dispositions relatives aux renseignements sur la gestion des droits exigeront également que le Canada prévoie des recours en justice pénale pour la modification ou le retrait de renseignements sur la gestion des droits d'un titulaire de droit d'auteur en plus de ce que le pays prévoit déjà relativement aux renseignements sur la gestion des droits civils. Il y a aussi l'obligation d'offrir un traitement national complet aux titulaires de droits d'auteur relevant de chacun des autres signataires.

(1635)

[Français]

L'Accord comprend d'importants éléments flexibles qui permettront au Canada de maintenir son régime actuel touchant les mesures de protection technologique et la responsabilité des fournisseurs de service Internet, comme le régime d'avis et avis du Canada, par exemple. Le gouvernement a indiqué qu'il entendait mettre en oeuvre l'Accord de manière équitable et équilibrée, en vue d'assurer le maintien de la compétitivité du marché canadien.

Passons maintenant à la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada. Mon collègue Kahlil Cappuccino, le directeur de la Politique du droit d'auteur à la Direction générale du marché créatif et innovation, du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, vous donnera maintenant un aperçu des mesures récentes adoptées en vue de moderniser la Commission du droit d'auteur. [Traduction]

M. Kahlil Cappuccino:

Merci beaucoup, Mark.

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, comme les ministres d'ISDE et de Patrimoine canadien se sont engagés à le faire dans la première lettre qu'ils ont envoyée à votre comité en décembre 2017, et à la suite des consultations publiques et des études précédentes menées par des comités de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat, le gouvernement a pris des mesures complètes pour moderniser la Commission.

Tout d'abord, dans le budget de 2018, on a augmenté de 30 % les ressources financières annuelles de la Commission. Deuxièmement, le gouvernement a nommé une nouvelle vice-présidente et première dirigeante de la Commission, soit Mme Nathalie Théberge, qui est avec nous aujourd'hui. Il a également nommé trois membres supplémentaires à la Commission. Grâce à ces nouvelles nominations et au financement supplémentaire, la Commission du droit d'auteur est sur la voie de la modernisation. Troisièmement, le projet de loi C-86, qui se trouve maintenant au Sénat, propose des changements législatifs à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, afin de moderniser le cadre dans lequel la Commission mène ses activités.[Français]

Comme de nombreux témoins vous l'ont mentionné au cours de votre examen, des processus décisionnels plus efficaces et opportuns à la Commission du droit d'auteur constituent une priorité. Les modifications proposées dans le projet de loi visent à revitaliser la Commission et à l'habiliter à jouer un rôle de premier plan dans l'économie moderne actuelle.

Pour ce faire, elles intégreraient plus de prévisibilité et de clarté aux processus de la Commission, codifieraient son mandat, tout en établissant des critères précis pour la prise de décisions et en encourageant la gestion responsable des dossiers. Pour aborder directement la question des délais, les modifications proposées exigeraient que les propositions tarifaires soient déposées plus rapidement et soient en vigueur plus longtemps, tandis qu'un nouveau pouvoir réglementaire permettrait au gouverneur en conseil d'établir des délais pour la prise de décision. Enfin, les modifications proposées permettraient des négociations directes entre plus de sociétés de gestion et d'utilisateurs, de sorte que la Commission ne se prononcerait sur des questions qu'au besoin, ce qui libérerait des ressources pour les procédures plus complexes et contestées.

Ces réformes élimineraient les obstacles pour les entreprises et les services qui souhaitent innover ou pénétrer le marché canadien. Elles permettraient de mieux positionner les créateurs et les entrepreneurs culturels canadiens afin qu'ils continuent de produire du contenu canadien de grande qualité. Dans l'ensemble, ces mesures veilleraient à ce que la Commission puisse disposer des outils nécessaires pour faciliter la gestion collective et appuyer un marché créatif qui soit à la fois équitable et fonctionnel.[Traduction]

Toutefois, ces changements ne règlent pas les préoccupations générales qui ont été soulevées sur l'applicabilité et la mise en oeuvre des taux établis par la Commission. Certaines parties intéressées ont demandé que le gouvernement précise le moment où les utilisateurs doivent payer les taux établis par la Commission et qu'il fournisse des outils plus efficaces pour les faire respecter lorsqu'ils ne sont pas payés. Les ministres ont jugé que ces questions importantes seraient étudiées de façon plus appropriée dans le cadre de l'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, avec l'avantage d'une analyse plus approfondie effectuée par votre comité et le Comité permanent du Patrimoine canadien.

Nous avons hâte de connaître les recommandations qui aideront à favoriser la pérennité dans tous les secteurs créatifs, y compris dans l'industrie de l'édition pédagogique.

J'aimerais maintenant demander à Mark de terminer la présentation. [Français]

M. Mark Schaan:

Merci, monsieur Cappuccino.

Permettez-moi de mentionner également que, selon l'engagement pris dans la Stratégie en matière de propriété intellectuelle du gouvernement, le projet de loi C-86 propose un changement aux dispositions d'avis et avis de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur afin de protéger les consommateurs, tout en veillant à ce que le régime d'avis et avis reste efficace pour dissuader l'atteinte aux droits d'auteur.

Les modifications proposées préciseraient que les avis qui comprennent des offres de règlement ou des demandes de paiement ne sont pas conformes au régime. Il s'agit d'un virage important, étant donné le consensus de toutes les parties du système du droit d'auteur et la crainte continue de préjudice aux consommateurs face à l'utilisation continue des demandes de règlement.

(1640)

[Traduction]

En terminant, nous aimerions remercier le Comité de son examen rigoureux de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur à ce jour. Nous avons remarqué particulièrement les efforts des membres du Comité pour soulever des questions liées au savoir traditionnel des Autochtones tout au long de l'exercice. Ces consultations ouvertes et approfondies sont inestimables pour l'élaboration d'une saine politique publique.

Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Merci.

Le président:

J'aimerais remercier les témoins de leurs exposés.

Nous passons maintenant directement aux questions. Nous entendrons d'abord M. Longfield.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui. Vous tombez pile, car nous tentons justement de faire une synthèse.

Monsieur Schaan, j'étais particulièrement heureux de constater que vous étiez sur la liste des témoins. J'aimerais vous poser mes premières questions.

Nous parlons du marché et de la façon dont il n'est pas efficace pour les créateurs, tout en l'étant pour d'autres personnes. Lorsque nous parlons du marché en tant que tel, il semble que la transparence soit un problème. Je tente de m'imaginer un diagramme qui montre les liens entre les créateurs, la Commission sur le droit d'auteur, Access Copyright et tous les titulaires de droits.

Votre ministère a-t-il ce type de diagramme?

M. Mark Schaan:

Il existe certainement un diagramme sur la façon dont les frais établis par la Commission et d'autres éléments du régime de droit d'auteur sont adjugés. Lorsque ces éléments ont un rôle public, cela peut devenir assez complexe en ce qui concerne le droit mécanique, c'est-à-dire le droit de reproduction, le droit de représentation, etc. Il y a donc un type de diagramme qui explique les relations entre tous ces éléments.

De plus, une grande partie des droits d'auteurs sont négociés directement entre les titulaires des droits et les personnes qui souhaitent les utiliser ou en tirer profit. Dans de nombreux cas, les renseignements sur ces transactions sont exclusifs et confidentiels.

Est-il possible de comprendre, par exemple, dans le cadre d'un taux établi par la Commission, comment un musicien ou une photographe ou une chorégraphe peut être rémunéré pour son travail? La réponse est oui.

Dans le cas où une tierce partie s'occupe de la distribution dans le cadre d'un contrat — ce qu'un artiste gagne par l'entremise de Spotify ou d'une autre plateforme —, c'est plus complexe, car une grande partie de ces renseignements sont exclusifs et la négociation de ces taux dépend du marché.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

En ce qui concerne votre rapport, vous venez peut-être de répondre à une partie de la question, c'est-à-dire que nous ne pouvons pas obtenir certains de ces renseignements. Le Comité a tenté d'obtenir ces renseignements pour déterminer où l'argent est gagné et où il n'est pas gagné à chaque étape du processus. Nous pourrions peut-être recommander que cela soit éclairci, afin que les gens connaissent leur place dans le marché et qu'ils connaissent son fonctionnement.

M. Mark Schaan:

Mes collègues de Patrimoine canadien ont certainement déployé de gros efforts pour tenter de veiller à ce que les créateurs comprennent au moins où ils peuvent réaliser des gains avec leurs oeuvres.

Je ne parlerai pas au nom de mes collègues de Patrimoine canadien, mais je crois que, comme je l'ai dit, c'est également attribuable, en partie, aux grandes variations sur le marché. Dans le cadre d'un taux établi par la Commission, tous les intervenants sont rémunérés de façon égale selon l'usage, mais dans de nombreux autres cas exclusifs... Par exemple, une vedette de rock ne gagne pas nécessairement la même chose qu'une personne qui exploite une chaîne YouTube, et elle pourrait être rémunérée de façon différente.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Et nous avons des marchés différents. Nous nous concentrons un peu sur les marchés patrimoniaux — je vois des personnes hocher la tête —, mais nous avons également des marchés éducatifs. Il y a des sources et des points de contact semblables dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, mais également des sources différentes qui ne fonctionnent pas de la même façon.

M. Mark Schaan:

Il y a aussi une énorme diversité de contenu. Vous avez soulevé la question de l'éducation. Dans le contexte de l'éducation, il existe des licences de services numériques qui permettent potentiellement aux gens d'avoir accès selon l'utilisateur ou parfois selon l'utilisation, par transaction qui représente une certaine quantité de matériel visé par le droit d'auteur donnant droit à une rémunération. Ensuite, il y a potentiellement d'autres services d'abonnement et il existe une licence de tarifs dans ces deux cas, et elle couvre les autres utilisations.

Dans tous ces cas, il faut amasser... pour connaître le potentiel n ou l'ouverture du contenu, et ensuite les divers mécanismes utilisés pour tirer profit de cela. Je crois que dans le cadre de votre étude, vous avez probablement conclu — comme nous l'avons souvent conclu — que l'omniprésence du contenu protégé par le droit d'auteur signifie que nous y avons accès de dizaines de façons différentes par l'entremise de dizaines de fournisseurs, et que chacun d'eux a une catégorie de rémunération qui pourrait ou pourrait ne pas être régie par un tarif ou un contrat ou des frais d'abonnement, et que cela peut s'appliquer par utilisation, par année.

(1645)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, ou cela peut s'appliquer par catégorie créée, et nous ne savons donc pas ce qui sera dans la prochaine catégorie d'oeuvres.

M. Mark Schaan:

Ensuite, c'est réparti entre ceux qui ont contribué.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, d'accord.

M. Mark Schaan:

Même dans le cas d'une oeuvre musicale, on parle des artistes en arrière-plan, par exemple l'auteur-compositeur et le producteur.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre...

M. Mark Schaan:

Non, non.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

... mais c'est un sujet complexe.

Madame Théberge, nous sommes très heureux que vous soyez ici. C'est formidable que vous fassiez partie de la Commission et que des changements soient apportés à la Commission. J'ai déjà entendu des commentaires positifs de certains témoins qui ont comparu devant le Comité.

On a mentionné quelques pays, par exemple l'Australie, mais également la France. En France, l'administration des sociétés de gestion de droits fait l'objet d'un niveau élevé de surveillance gouvernementale, peut-être plus élevé qu'ici, dans le cas du comportement et de la gestion interne des sociétés de gestion des droits d'auteur.

Votre Commission aborde-t-elle le pouvoir d'établir des tarifs et la surveillance et la supervision des sociétés de gestion de droits d'auteur d'une nouvelle façon? Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de ces sociétés et de la façon dont elles sont gérées. Il semble qu'il y a... Je présume que je vais surveiller la portée de mon commentaire, en raison du compte rendu, mais j'ai trouvé très difficile de comprendre le fonctionnement des sociétés de gestion du droit d'auteur, la façon dont elles sont gérées et le rôle que la Commission du droit d'auteur pourrait jouer pour nous aider à comprendre cette situation.

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

J'aimerais inviter mes collègues à prendre la parole s'ils ont quelque chose à ajouter.

Nous ne supervisons pas les sociétés de gestion du droit d'auteur. Elles s'adressent à la Commission à titre de partie au processus, tout comme d'autres organismes d'utilisation font partie des processus qui sont réglés par attribution. Si on jugerait utile de réfléchir, dans une perspective str