header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-02-08 INDU 94

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody, to meeting number 94 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. We are continuing our study of broadband connectivity in rural Canada.

Today, we have a fun group of participants joining us. All the way from Montcalm Télécom et Fibres Optiques, we have Louis-Charles Thouin, president, and warden of the Regional County Municipality of Montcalm; as well as Pierre Collins, project manager.

Mr. Pierre Collins (Project Manager, Montcalm Télécom et fibres optiques):

Hello.

The Chair:

We have from SaskTel, John Meldrum, vice-president, and corporate counsel, regulatory affairs. We all met him earlier in Regina. We had breakfast with him, actually.

We have from SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology, Geoff Hogan, chief executive officer; and Donghoon Lee, research partner, economist, R2B2.

Is that really R2B2?

Dr. Donghoon Lee (Research Partner, Economist, R2B2, University of Guelph, SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology):

Yes.

The Chair:

Star Wars, the University of Guelph.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: We also have from the Wubim Foundation, William Chen, director.

Welcome, everybody. You each have seven minutes to present and then we will go to questions.

We'll start with the folks from Montcalm Télécom.

You're the first. Thank you. You have up to seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Collins:

If I understand correctly, you want us to present our project and to talk about what we are doing in our rural areas.

More than three years ago, the RCM of Montcalm began a project to deploy a fibre-optic network to homes. Fifteen years ago, as part of a provincial program called Villages branchés, the RCM had already installed a hundred or so kilometres of fibre-optic cable in order to connect the school boards. So it wanted to use that network and make it available to its residents.

The RCM did a detailed study to find out the number of residents and residences in its territory that were underserved. That turned out to be 7,100 of 22,000 residences. Those figures were very different from the ones that the Government of Canada had. Local service providers claimed that the region was being well served, but our audit of the municipality's residents showed us that the minimum speed was not being achieved.

The project had financial and technological aspects. The RCM obtained funding of $12.9 million through the usual processes for that kind of installation. The amount was approved by the Quebec Ministère des Affaires municipales et de l'Occupation du territoire and by the RCM.

A major federal grant program, called Connecting Canadians—Digital Canada 150, came to support the project in quite a significant way. We had submitted a grant application to the department of the day, known as Industry Canada. The Montcalm project was selected for its excellence. We received grants of $4.7 million, the largest amount to be awarded to a company that did not exist at the time. The RCM was actually still in the process of establishing a not-for-profit organization that would build the network.

This project is close to the RCM's heart. It is being carried out by and for all residents and it is being led by a not-for-profit organization of four non-elected and four elected officials. The project is currently under way.

We are perhaps in a good position to explain one matter of importance to us, an operational constraint on our project: rights of way. For more than 30 years, the field of telecommunications in the country has become increasingly deregulated, as illustrated, for example, by the historic decisions made in 1985, 1987, 1990 and 1992. The CRTC looks very favourably on competition in telecommunications and innovation in Canada. But one obstacle remains: rights of way. Support structures belong to the legal owners, those who built the network and who control access to it.

The number one rule for success in telecommunications is to obtain the right of way. It is still very difficult for us to get access to support structures in our province because all the poles are equally divided between Hydro-Québec and Bell Canada. We also have to modernize those networks at our own expense: the last group to ask for access to them is responsible for the costs of renovating them. That regularly requires us to bury the fibres and to use methods of communication and transmission that are much more costly. We are therefore prevented from progressing as fast and as far as we would like.

I do not know how much time I have left, and I could probably keep talking to you about this for many hours.

But that is basically where we are. The network is being built. The RCM decided that it would have one, and it will indeed have a network bringing optical fibre to the home.

Would you like to add anything, Mr. Thouin?

(1535)

Mr. Louis-Charles Thouin (President, Warden, Regional County Municipality of Montcalm, Montcalm Télécom et fibres optiques):

We are talking about 535 kilometres of fibres. As Mr. Collins said, there was already a network of 100 kilometres. We added 535 kilometres to that in order to connect every house and serve every resident who is poorly served or underserved at the moment.

That gives you a good summary of the general situation.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

It was a very quick summary.

Mr. Louis-Charles Thouin:

You seem to know the file well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

We'll now move to John Meldrum from SaskTel in Regina.

You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. John Meldrum (Vice-President, Corporate Counsel and Regulatory Affairs, SaskTel):

Thank you for the opportunity to appear.

I've had the pleasure of working for SaskTel for over 40 years, 30 of which have been in a senior executive capacity. I saw our crown corporation deliver individual line service, cellular, and Internet throughout the province for the very first time. As the most rural province in Canada, we have a very good understanding of the challenges that arise in meeting the Internet and cellular needs of our rural residents.

Before delving into those challenges, I want to address the issue of acceptable high-speed Internet service. In that regard, we support the commission's target of fifty-ten, but would note that ultimately what you think of that goal depends on where you are today with regard to Internet connectivity. For example, if you're relying solely on satellite Internet, or if your service is subject to congestion, most of the people we speak to in Saskatchewan would call fifty-ten a pipe dream, and would settle for a consistent five-one or ten-two service. We note that the CRTC acknowledges the challenges of achieving fifty-ten for rural customers and suggests that rural improvements may take up to 15 years. That is far too long a time frame. Rural Canada needs better Internet service today, not up to 15 years from now.

There are realities that we've overcome to provide service. As I said, Saskatchewan is the most rural province in Canada due to the wide open spaces between most rural residents. It is hard to bring this to life for people familiar with their own rural areas in eastern Canada. Basically, think about the distances between farms and houses in your rural areas that you're familiar with and multiply those distances by a factor of about seven.

We recently took DSL Internet to Kendal, Saskatchewan, a village of 77 people. While Kendal is in the middle of productive farmland, with other towns and villages dotting the highway every 13 kilometres, the biggest town around is Indian Head, with 1,900 people, some 35 kilometres away on a grid road. After that it's Regina, which is 80 kilometres away. The issue for us is that in telecommunications, the lack of density drives up capital costs per person served, and distances between groups of people drive up capital costs. We've overcome many things to meet the current situation in Saskatchewan, where virtually any community of any size has wireline Internet service, virtually any town of a decent size has adequate cellular service, and we've recently announced a plan to expand cellular service to those small towns.

The backbone, the backhaul, is a building block for our Internet service. We continue to invest heavily in backbone facilities, facilities that are all made available to competitors at prices that have what I would call the “oversight of regulation”. This job will never be 100% complete, as the data traffic will continue to grow, and we will continue to have to invest. But today, other than a few uneconomic backbone routes that are part of a Connect to Innovate application, our backbone will be meeting our current needs until we need more capacity.

For non-cellular, the next biggest challenge is “last-mile” facilities. If it's wired service, then we require the installation of more fibre, more cabinets and, ultimately, to meet the fifty-ten goal for us, fibre to the premise. We recently fibred Rosthern, Saskatchewan, for $1.8 million for 1,083 residences. That's $1,700 a residence. We won't get all the customers, because there is a cable competitor in that town. For a fixed wireless service, it's all about spectrum, and not cellular spectrum. In rural Saskatchewan we have lots of cellular spectrum. It's the non-cellular spectrum that we need, which is constraining our ability to meet customer demands.

In terms of cellular service, we've been doing a lot of work on the economics of expanding cell service to fill in many of the unserved and underserved areas of Saskatchewan. To cut to the chase, each unserved area requires a new fibre-fed cell tower and the equipment required to be installed at the cell site. On average, it's $1 million per cell tower. Basically, most of the expansion is uneconomic due to the relatively small number of people in the footprint of these new towers. I want to remind you that cellular spectrum is not at all an issue. We have all of our unused cellular spectrum available for these towers. It's the high initial capital costs involved in building a tower.

I have four recommendations for what we need.

(1540)



First, for fixed wireless Internet service, we need more spectrum suitable for fixed wireless Internet service. Currently, our fixed wireless service offering is spectrum-constrained and we have stopped cells in a number of sectors. Ultimately, in the absence of changes in technology spectrum utilization or spectrum assignment, we do not see a path to 50-10 for fixed wireless Internet service.

Second, rural Canada needs a program in addition to the CRTC program: $750 million, minus the money designed for far north satellite, is a drop in the bucket. The current timelines for deep rural essentially mean that the digital divide between rural and urban Canada will continue to grow.

Third, to meet the future need for speed, ultimately fibre will need to be installed for as many customers as Canada can afford; where fibre is unaffordable, those customers will need to be served by fixed wireless and satellite. That means in terms of fibre, we'll need a capital contribution for locations that are close to being economical. For those that are extremely uneconomical, in addition to a capital contribution, there will be a need for ongoing financial support.

Fourth, for unserved and underserved cellular areas, there will be a need for a capital contribution for those locations that are close to being economical, and—again for more sparsely populated areas—an ongoing subsidy program, because the capital for cellular does not stop with the initial installation, and that capital will be uneconomical as well.

The Chair:

Excellent. Thank you.

We're going to move to SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology, and Mr. Hogan.

Mr. Geoff Hogan (Chief Executive Officer, SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology):

Thank you for having us. Thanks for your time today, committee.

We at SWIFT in southwestern Ontario believe that broadband really should be an essential utility. We cannot participate in the modern economy today without it. We believe that SWIFT is the solution that is in place for southwestern Ontario today.

I'm not going to read this whole slide, but currently we have a lot of underserved areas. The density may be slightly higher than it is in Saskatchewan, but not by much in many of the rural areas in southwestern Ontario. Our residents have unequal access to digital services. Our urban residents have much better access than our rural residents, again, meaning access to education, health care, government services, the whole thing.

Even cows wear Fitbits now. Our agricultural communities are very dependent on technology. The third line in the fourth concession needs as much or, arguably, more broadband than their urban counterpart, because they have to drive farther to get to access services when they don't have broadband.

There are urban needs as well. We have a member of SWIFT who's building a data centre in Cambridge. There's not enough fibre for the customer to build the data centre in our technology triangle in southwestern Ontario.

It's a big problem. How does SWIFT solve this? Our catchment area, our project area, has 10% of Canada's population. We have an aggregated demand model. We have members who join our organization, and we do procurements on their behalf. When we go to the providers—we now have 1,500 sites today, and we hope to have 3,000 by May or June—that then gets on the table so that when providers bid for services, it's not only the current incumbents who are bidding for service but also, potentially, new providers coming into the area. That increases the competition, which is what we're hoping will solve the problem in the long term in these rural areas. If we get more competition, the market will take care of itself.

We have data-driven decisions. We'll get to that in a second with regard to the relationship with the University of Guelph.

Just as a quick snapshot of where we are, for the folks who aren't from Ontario, in southwestern Ontario we have 14 first nations in our catchment area and about 25% of Ontario's population.

I touched on our aggregated demand model. We're a membership-based organization. We have members from the public sector, the private sector, agriculture, all of those organizations that need connectivity. We're going to use that aggregated demand to have more say with the providers when we go to public procurement. We have one on the street right now.

The municipalities that started this project have $17 million to date, and we have a target of $18 million to $20 million for the project. The municipalities are very serious about helping their residents and want to partner with the federal and provincial governments to provide services to our residents.

Just to give you a quick cross-section of our members, we have four first nations that have joined the project already and, as I said, there are 14 in our group. They have the same challenges as our other rural residents. Their high school students can't do their homework when they get home. They can do their homework in school, but when they get home they have to drive to McDonald's to upload their homework, and that's really, in my opinion, not acceptable in Canada.

We have a really unique partnership with the University of Guelph. There are three professors, approximately, who do broadband research in Canada, and Helen Hambly is one of them. Dr. Jamie Lee is also with us here today.

It's very important to us that we measure how effective public investment is in providing incentives for private sector to improve broadband. We're doing a longitudinal study. We started collecting data back in 2012. When our program is done in 2021, we should have some very interesting stats. Jamie will talk about that in just a moment.

We collect data from three main data sets. There's the MUSH sector, including all of the public places, because they're the ones that provide the most revenue to the providers at the beginning of the project. We've collected provider data. We know where all of the providers' fibre in southwestern Ontario is. We have it mapped in a GIS system. We're also collecting residential, farm, and business data from people by using a survey mechanism through the university.

Just to go on to give you a quick snapshot of the data we've collected, we've collected the provider data under NDAs, because, obviously, Bell's not interested in sharing with Rogers where their infrastructure lies. This is a disaggregated view of the data that I'm showing you now on the slide. This is Middlesex County in the centre of southwestern Ontario. The blue areas are within 500 metres of fibre, and the yellow areas are not. You can't deliver high-quality wireless without the tower being connected to the base with fibre. You can see that the folks in the yellow areas shown there are at a serious disadvantage. This is really overstating how well it is in Middlesex, because the fibre that's running along may not have enough capacity to actually break out to connect people.

(1545)



I'm going to turn it over to Dr. Lee now, who is going to talk a bit about our analysis of the economic outcomes.

(1550)

Dr. Donghoon Lee:

Thank you, Geoff.

Hello, everyone. Since I have about a minute, I'm going to be brief.

At R2B2, we completed some preliminary estimates of the economic benefits, namely consumer surplus and telecommuter surplus. Depending on the assumption of consumer surplus, we see the private net benefit to consumers ranging essentially from $2.6 billion to $6.5 billion. Through our continued research, we'll be able to provide more precise estimates. Right now, the estimates are rather wide, but through our research we'll be able to provide more precise estimates.

Also, please note that this is actually not the social net benefit. To estimate the social benefit or its equivalent, which is a return for the broadband investment in terms of society's point of view, we will have to put a social cost on the total social benefits. This is what we are really hoping to answer in the near future. I think that is the most important question at R2B2.

Now I'll quickly introduce another type of benefit that we had estimated, which is the telecommuter surplus. As you can see in the second-last line, the benefits could be very significant to the average telecommuter—anywhere from $10,000 to $30,000.

Other economic analyses of broadband in our research include the impact of broadband on wages, income, property values, and so forth. At R2B2, the research topics extend further to other areas as well, such as precision agriculture, health care, and so forth.

Thank you.

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

I'm at seven minutes. Would you like me to stop, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You're over your seven minutes by 16 seconds, but that's okay.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: That's pretty good. Were you finished?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

One more minute would do it.

The Chair:

I'll give you 30 seconds. Wrap it up.

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

Okay. The way we are approaching this is to take a typical rural area where there is some existing fibre and a lot of services, and we are augmenting that fibre optics with the fibre optics that we're subsidizing, which will be owned by the private sector. The key to this is that the new fibre is going to have a very high capacity, and there are going to be entrances into that fibre every kilometre along the way. That begins to make the business case for the private sector to connect the people who are closer to the fibre—those in the orange areas on the chart. That's the model we have. Over time, we will fill in the black areas until everyone is connected.

That's our model. The summary is that we have an evidence-based solution. We're leveraging the voice of our 3.5 million Ontarians who are members. We're maximizing the existing broadband infrastructure investment. We're trying to create universal and equitable access to all services.

The Chair:

I'm glad I gave you extra time. Thank you very much.

Next, we have Mr. Chen from the Wubim Foundation.

How do you pronounce “Wubim”, Mr. Chen?

Mr. William Chen (Director, Wubim Foundation):

It's the “Woo-bim” Foundation. Don't worry. Everyone mispronounces it. I mispronounced it for the first year or so.

The Chair:

All right. You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. William Chen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. My name is William Chen, and I am here on behalf of the Wubim Foundation. We are a non-profit organization based in Vancouver, British Columbia, that advocates for the public interest in telecommunications development, civil society, and scholarly publishing.

First, I would like to thank you for your invitation to participate in this study. My organization is seeking solely to address the first question, “What constitutes high-speed service?”

So far, many of the submissions made in this study focus on numerical speeds, primarily on the 50-10 set by the CRTC. However, that number is insufficient to adequately define what acceptable high-speed service is in Canada. You can't limit what acceptable high-speed service is to a set of numbers. It just doesn't work.

We believe that for there to be acceptable high-speed service, Internet users must be able to make the most of their connection. They shouldn't have certain activities throttled, purposely made slow, or face arbitrary data limits that prevent them from completing certain activities using the Internet.

Acceptable high-speed service is acceptable only because you are actually able to use it, rather than it being a utility that is just there and is effectively unusable. You wouldn't consider it an acceptable service if a hydro company disallowed you to use your refrigerator because it consumes far more electricity.

There are two issues in this domain. One is the neutrality of telecommunications infrastructure, also known as net neutrality. The other is arbitrary data limits. Net neutrality, as you all know, is the basic principle that Internet service providers should treat all content on the Internet equally, whether it be a news article, a streamed television show, a research data set, or any other of the potentially millions of content types that exist on the Internet.

Internet service providers in a regulatory regime that upholds net neutrality would not discriminate, block, or deliberately slow down the acquisition and service of certain content types. This is a critical principle, because net neutrality allows for competition to thrive, and for Canadians to access new and innovative services, such as on-demand streaming, that have been made possible because of the significant technological innovations over recent years.

As communities grow, and as content types evolve to require even higher bandwidth and broadband specifications, Internet service providers who have little incentive, initiative, or urgency to improve rural broadband infrastructure will quite simply leave rural Canadians in the dark. Existing telecommunications infrastructure will become congested by the increased service demands of technological innovation.

In order to maintain a basic degree of service quality and to ensure continued usability, Internet service providers are very likely to seek to discriminate against certain content types that have a comparatively higher degree of bandwidth usage attached to them, such as activities undertaken by the video on-demand industry, by the health care sector, and by researchers. They will do so by deliberately slowing down these content types, or even by completely blocking the content as a whole.

Violations of net neutrality are like going to a golf course only to find that you are only allowed to use a putter. In addition, if you use any other golf club, security will tackle you.

At this moment, Canada enforces and upholds a strong regulatory regime for the telecommunications sector that significantly limits potential violations of net neutrality. However, attempts to overturn this current telecommunications regime will almost certainly occur in the future, and rural communities face the brunt of the loosening of regulations that protect net neutrality. This is likely because the funding of initiatives to develop telecommunications infrastructure in rural Canada is primarily short term in nature.

The goal of these programs is to immediately lay down infrastructure. However, these programs do not emphasize the need for a long-term plan for sustained development of existing telecommunications infrastructure to accommodate for technological innovation and continually increasing broadband speed standards.

The second concern we bring forward is that of arbitrary data limits, and this exists in a similar domain to net neutrality. Data limits are straightforward, as they are simply limits on the maximum usage that a broadband consumer may engage in. Without sustained investment and development in rural telecommunications infrastructures, Internet service providers struggling to maintain basic service quality may choose to implement arbitrary data limits on broadband consumers.

These arbitrary data limits will affect everyone in rural communities by limiting how certain consumers can utilize their broadband service, but they will especially hurt public institutions such as community centres, municipal governments, hospitals, public libraries, schools, and research facilities. These institutions, either by their nature or the size or their work, will either need to negotiate special agreements or pay exorbitant costs in order to maintain their broadband service in a useable state.

The only way to avert violations or a loosening pertaining to net neutrality, and to ensure that rural broadband users may make the most of their services in the future is through a concrete, long-term plan that ensures that Internet service providers will re-invest in improving rural telecommunications infrastructure.

(1555)



Competition would be the most potent solution, but it is difficult to effectively achieve or promote due to low population densities and the general lack of anchor users in rural communities.

Prioritization of funding, supports, and financing for telecommunications infrastructure operated by non-profit Internet service providers, municipal governments, crown corporations, and co-operatives would serve to be the most potent force as a not-for-profit mandate would help ensure that any profits were reinvested in improving broadband connectivity in rural areas.

Furthermore, the last solution that we propose is government intervention, primarily through continued regulation on net neutrality and arbitrary data limits, and continued existence of funding, financing, and incentives for Internet service providers to serve and improve their service within rural communities.

In summary, the definition of what constitutes acceptable high-speed service is not simply numerical. Acceptable high-speed service is service that can be fully utilized by broadband consumers, without discrimination as to how certain content types are handled, and without arbitrary data limits. Violations of net neutrality and the imposition of data limits are practices that hurt Canadian innovation, industry, rural institutions, and local businesses. Most of all, they hurt rural Canadians. The only way to avert changes in the regulatory regime in this sense is to ensure that there is continued and sustained development for telecommunications infrastructure in rural areas, through competition and prioritization of funding for community Internet service providers that do not operate on the for-profit model and through government intervention.

Thank you.

(1600)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to go right into questioning.

Mr. Longfield, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thanks, everybody, for being here, from the west coast all the way through Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Quebec.

Connecting Canadians is one of the things that we're looking at. I'm listening to the different presentations today, thinking about the role of not-for-profits, and how this might be scaled out.

Mr. Collins, is the not-for-profit you're operating a scalable model? Are you aware of that model being successful elsewhere?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Is it scalable? One of the things that are very important in our case is that it was decided to serve only the territory of the MRC, so there was no plan at all when they created the not-for-profit organization to expand and serve other communities. Within the community, currently we are planning to serve only the residents who are not well served, but eventually we will have access for the 22,000 residents, and therefore it's going to become more..... Until the subsidy is fully utilized, we're limited in the way that we expend that money: it's to serve not-well-served residents. Once this is done, we won't have any limitations on expanding our network into other places where we could guarantee the financials of the not-for-profit organization.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Moving west to Ontario, Mr. Hogan, it's great to see you again. You did a great job of taking what was a two-hour presentation that I saw at the University of Guelph and making it into about an eight-minute presentation.

You talk about SWIFT's model as a business model. How would you see this as a model that could be used in other communities? Would that be to make a bigger model, or to make multiple models of what you're doing?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

In my opinion, SWIFT is a very regional project. It covers a lot of Canada's population, but it's actually a fairly compact area. We are a not-for-profit model, and we don't own the infrastructure, but our needs, which are the community's needs, are taken into account. It's not just the bottom line of the providers that drives decision-making.

As to whether this would scale, I think we could scale a little bit more into some other rural areas adjacent to our catchment area, but after that I think it would need to be duplicated rather than expanded, because then it gets too large.

The one piece that I think is important is that we do have some urban and some rural in the area, and there's a symbiotic relationship between the urban and rural, as with a school board, for instance. Typically the school board office is in the centre of an urban area and all the schools are remote. Those organizations want to connect to one provider or two really good providers rather than one, so having a mix of that is, I think, an important piece of the model so that we can generate more funds over time.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

In our limited time, one of the pieces I saw in the more detailed, but also protected, information that you have showed that in some certain connection points, some providers would make more sense than others. Therefore, rather than going out in an open tender system, it would make sense for certain providers to go the rest of the distance into the smaller communities around where they already have services.

The procurement system is one that we would have to take a look at. Can you comment on that?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

We are following the broader public sector procurement guidelines, absolutely, because we've been funded by public funds. We've taken our large area and split it into about 30 smaller areas so that smaller providers are able to compete with larger providers when we do release RFPs. Our end goal is to have a lot of very successful providers with access to the funding so that we have a system with a lot of competition. As soon as there's more competition, the market should start to take care of itself. The oligopolistic situation we're in now makes the competition not work.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That was a point you were making, Mr. Chen, when you looked at the work on the social benefits you've been doing in British Columbia and at the other benefits as being part of the decision-making process. Did you have anything further to add on that?

(1605)

Mr. William Chen:

Non-profits work to an extent, but they work particularly effectively in areas that need to be served or aren't sufficiently served. I would not say that community ISPs would work as effectively in an urban area where there is substantial competition. Not-for-profits are effective in the sense that they have a mandate that ensures that they attempt to serve the communities their mandate covers. At at the same time, not-for-profits aren't motivated by absolute profit, so they might not necessarily make the most efficient or economic investment decisions. We've had cases in British Columbia where community ISPs, not-for-profit mandates, have failed to deliver on their expectations and have effectively gone bankrupt. That's left some rural communities in a worse state, but they are an effective option when there isn't sufficient private competition.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

With the minute I have left, I want to pivot to SaskTel and ask how you work with the not-for-profits in Saskatchewan. How do you work with the smaller providers that need access to your towers or your services?

Mr. John Meldrum:

Our towers are regulated by the CRTC and Industry Canada. We work with those entities through our wholesale group either to allow them to access our towers or provide them with what they need in backbone and those sorts of things. Probably the best example of a not-for-profit in our scenario would be Access Communications. That's a cable television co-operative that serves a lot of small towns that we also serve.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

I'll just say thank you to everybody, and I'll turn over my eight seconds to the chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

I want to start by thanking all the witnesses today for coming out.

Mr. Meldrum's comments struck close to home. I spend a lot of time in some of those small towns in rural Saskatchewan he's been talking about. I have a place that doesn't even have a telephone line, so I know all about that. I really appreciated his being quite forward that one of the big issues here is money. It's capital and ongoing sustainability costs.

I was wondering how your company works with the big players. What's the interaction among crown corporations, non-profits, and the Teluses and the Rogers?

Mr. John Meldrum:

Speaking about cellular service, we are the fourth provider in the province, so we have an extremely competitive marketplace here in cellular service. However, at the end of the day, Bell and Telus ride on our network, so they effectively resell SaskTel service. Rogers has their own network, but it's pretty well restricted to the major cities and the major highway corridors.

As for Internet service, the big players will resell our Internet service, but we don't have big players with lots of local facilities in the major centres. Shaw and Access would be our biggest competitors—Shaw in Saskatoon, and Access Communications in Regina.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

Mr. Hogan, I note that your area of focus is in the southwestern corridor that covers about 25% of the population of Ontario, and about 10% of Canada. I've read recently that Bell is advertising their fibre to every home in the Toronto area, I believe. Could you comment on those sorts of infinitives?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

Bell Canada announced last year that its spending $1.1 billion in Toronto, and has just announced $50 million in Sarnia and $45 million in Windsor. You'll notice the similarities, in that they're spending in high-density urban areas. In fact, even within the boundary of the city of Sarnia there are rural areas, and they're not putting fibre into the homes in those areas. It really goes right back to the return on investment. Here, I think there is a role for government to provide incentive for them to build in areas where they don't have a business case because they are responsible to their shareholders and not to the community.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Are these companies open to partnerships with groups such as yours to get this access broadened to the rural areas?

(1610)

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

We have 28 providers that were pre-qualified to bid on our proposals. We are doing our core and aggregation...on the street right now. We had five companies come forward and make an offer to bid. We are getting very significant interest from the private sector, but we have a large $200-million pot of funding, and we have a lot of sites on the table. Our members are saying, “We want you to bid together on all of these sites”, which makes it difficult for the existing providers because they may lose customers if they don't bid. Therefore, we have a carrot-and-stick approach. The carrot is that we have some money to help you build. The stick is that if you don't bid, we might take your best customers away. That's the way we're getting the competition to market.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I understand.

My final question is for Mr. Chen.

What have you been finding? You noted that some of these community ISPs have failed. Could you outline the reasons they are failing, and how we can learn what not to do from those models?

Mr. William Chen:

Overexpansion and poor governance tend to be the primary factors in the failure of not-for-profit ISPs. Overexpansion occurs when a community ISP starts in one community but decides to overexpand to communities nearby. That tends to be an issue. Poor governance is primarily an inability to effectively manage funds, to invest properly in infrastructure.

To a lesser extent, I would say that it also comes from increased transit costs. In British Columbia, Internet transit tends to be particularly expensive. Actually, with regard to a lot of what has been said so far about 50-10 and the comparisons made with Europe, where connectivity tends to be much higher, that is primarily because of open-peering policies and cheap transit costs. British Columbia doesn't necessarily have the same basis in place.

In general, Internet transit tends to be a lot more expensive. Internet service providers are sometimes very reluctant to peer. Just to outline what this is, settlement-free peering is when two Internet service providers connect and agree to deliver transit to each other for free, therefore bypassing any substantial Internet transit costs. That tends to be less of a thing here, where there are fewer things to peer to. The biggest thing that tends to be peered to is Netflix, but we lack major companies that can peer or that would substantially decrease Internet transit costs in British Columbia, such as Facebook, or mainland providers such as Baidu, which I think is a big thing there. The Ontario area is better placed to serve because it has more peering opportunities.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

I think my time is up.

Could you elaborate more on this peering process? You threw out some names there like Netflix and Facebook.

Mr. William Chen:

Peering is a really cool thing. Honestly, 90% of the time it tends to be a very beneficial process. It's when two major backbone Internet service providers peer together. They agree that transit between the two entities is free. That's in the case of settlement-free peering. There's also paid peering, where ISPs can charge lower rates for connecting directly to their network. However, in the United States, that has been used to extort companies like Netflix and other video-on-demand companies, by other ISPs refusing to peer and then making Netflix, etc., pay for the Internet transit, ultimately forcing them to cough up.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Does peering conflict with net neutrality in any way?

Mr. William Chen:

Peering actually supports net neutrality. I wouldn't necessarily say they're integrally related, but peering is a beneficial kind of process that ultimately is a mutual agreement that benefits ISPs. It decreases Internet transit costs and ensures that users of backbones and middle-mile connectivity tend to experience higher usability and less congestion in general. Generally, they occur within Internet exchanges.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Meldrum, first of all, it would be remiss if I did not recognize that SaskTel was one of the leaders in providing some justice for the deferral accounts decision that took place. For the people who aren't familiar with it, this was the overcharging of customers. Some of the private sector operators took it to the Supreme Court of Canada, which affected consumers, and SaskTel was actually one of the leaders in protecting consumers, so I appreciate that piece of history.

With regard to where you are now, what specific things—low-hanging fruit—could be done to expand service into the rural areas? What's the movement now? You have an interesting situation, because you actually have others building off of your towers. Often we hear from people trying to get on other people's towers. What's the difference now in terms of trying to get to the easy access points that may not be such a large investment? What things can connect people?

(1615)

Mr. John Meldrum:

Our huge focus at the moment is around cellular. Having listened to other witnesses, people tend to just talk about Internet in general, but cellular can take you a long way in terms of Internet connectivity. We are working with the provincial government at the moment to try to figure out the cost or do the cost-benefit analysis of expanding cellular into the underserved areas we have in the province. So far we're seeing that it's hugely problematic. For that $1 million per cell site, which covers maybe an additional 100 or 200 people, the economics just don't work at all.

Regarding fixed wireless Internet service, we are in the process of adding 34 towers ourselves in terms of sites. We have an application in to Connect to Innovate for another 17 towers, so we're continuing to expand our fixed wireless service, as are other competitors.

I don't want to overstate the extent to which competitors use our facilities. They use them when it makes sense for them. They're more inclined to put their facilities on top of grain elevators, or any kind of high location where it's possible. They will also do a lot of daisy-chaining to then either give it to us or perhaps even to somebody else. Sometimes they will break into the national fibre thing on the railroads, where the railroads go across.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You would just be one of several options, then, for the piggybacking that's taking place with the other providers.

Mr. Hogan, with regard to your access to others, especially the Bell expansion and others, how easy is it to work with the providers? Are the rules clear? To the extent that you can, could the next spectrum auction, for example, be more specific to terms and conditions, and could additional unused spectrum be made redundant rather quickly in a “use it or lose it” type of approach?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

We are very much a fibre-only project, so spectrum really doesn't enter into our conversation.

I will say one thing, though. We've been funded through the small communities fund, and one of its requirements is that any infrastructure we fund must be open access. Facilities-based competition, which is what we have in Canada today, in my opinion does not work in rural areas. We can barely afford to put the first piece of fibre down the road, so how could we possibly get competition by doing multiple pieces? Let's make the fibre we put down the road open access so that, like our roads—in the same way that UPS and FedEx deliver packages along a public road—we can deliver Internet or over-the-top services across a piece of fibre into people's homes and get competition that way.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's interesting. As that's happening, we have a difference between communities in terms of even Canada Post now with respect to traditional carrier service.

Mr. Chen, in your experience with bundling of ISP providers, to use laymen's terms if they were working together more comprehensively, is there more room for that? Right now a lot of competition is located in hot spots. Could there be an expectation that that competition or those areas would be expanded? For example, if we're allowing that into the one area, there's almost an expectation—or part of the contracts of new spectrum, and maybe others require—that it actually include a larger geographic area.

(1620)

Mr. William Chen:

Could you elaborate briefly on what you mean by bundling?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes. Exactly, it would be making sure, when the spectrums to be auctioned off are coming up, that we have terms and conditions that are in larger zones—for example, if you want to get into the GTA area. We heard from Milton, for example. It doesn't have the same services as downtown Toronto, so we would extend competition out there as well.

Mr. William Chen:

To be honest, I don't think I can recall any kind of experience in bundling or any kind of knowledge on how that would affect market conditions, and I don't want to give you a wrong answer.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's okay. That's some of the testimony we heard on Tuesday.

That's it, Mr. Chair. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're now going to move to Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.[Translation]

Welcome, Mr. Collins.

I want to congratulate you on your project. I especially want to thank you for telling the RCM of Antoine-Labelle about it, because they used your information and examined what you have done in order to carry out their own project. We appreciate that very much in our region.

I would like to address some technical questions with you.

You certainly have problems using power poles in the constituency. Can you tell us a little about the difficulties you have with using poles belonging to other companies?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Yes, we actually have supported a number of issues for the benefit of all RCMs.

In Quebec, RCMs were strong participants in the first wave of applications under the Digital Canada 150 program and the Connect to Innovate programs. Several tens of millions of dollars have been paid in grants and a number of RCMs have projects under way.

To respond to one of your questions just now, I would say that the approaches are reproducible, and they are being reproduced. Rural regions are becoming organized.

We are talking about the RCM of Antoine-Labelle, a major RCM. They have just started a $50-million project to establish a fibre-optic network to serve the homes in a very large rural area. The project will take several years.

As I was saying earlier, deregulation in Canada has happened in a very progressive and very organized way. We have all benefited. We are at the point where everything is completely deregulated, which allows us to have competitive infrastructures. That is what we are in the process of doing: we are building infrastructures in places where others do not want to go.

Our economic model needs grants. We have to reduce our capital costs in order to create sufficient cash flow to keep the companies operating. Rights of way are the final obstacle stopping us from deploying our networks. If we have no access to the structures, it is impossible, unless we dangle from clouds to get access. So we have to use the infrastructures of competing companies, like Bell Canada or other smaller local suppliers. Hydro-Québec is not actually a competitor, but it owns supporting infrastructures.

That is how we do it currently. We have to submit applications and plans. It is very organized and very structured, and the administrative processes come with very precise timelines. When the structures are in a state of disrepair and unable to take any extra load, the owner asks us, as the last group to want to install a cable, to pay all the costs of modifying, upgrading and modernizing the structures. Those costs make the project less profitable.

Let me take advantage of a forum like this one to emphasize that, at the end of the day, it is extremely important to understand that we must have access to the structures. We already have access to the capital, to the technology, and to the customer base, and that is important. When we sell a service to the people in our RCM, you can believe me when I say that they subscribe routinely and naturally, because it is a community project.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you tell us what it costs to connect these 7,000 homes in your RCM?

(1625)

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Because of the infrastructure?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, because of the physical infrastructure.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

There are rental charges associated with the infrastructure. Without going too much into the technical details, I'll say that renting poles is very expensive, and this directly influences the feasibility of a business model. New infrastructure is very expensive as well, but in our case, it would cost $13 million to connect 7,000 homes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I believe you offer three services. How much do these cost to your customers?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

The rate policy is yet to be defined, but it will allow us to compete. The principle behind such a policy is to be able to offer services at a reasonable price.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are the big companies stopping you from deploying your services?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

They only do so with regard to support structures.

Mr. Louis-Charles Thouin:

It's true that they're not stopping us from deploying our services, except with regard to access to infrastructure, for the simple reason that we choose markets that they don't cover. These markets do not have Internet access. They are leftover crumbs to these companies. They occupy the markets within town boundaries. They have a strong foothold, and compete with each other for the same customers. We take the customers that they don't want.

People quickly get on board with the model of not-for-profit organizations created and managed by the communities or public and private administrators. At the end of the day, all profits generated by our organization are redistributed to the communities. The profits don't go into the pockets of investors or shareholders, but into the taxpayers'. This is why it's easy to get people on board for a project.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Last Tuesday, a witness told us that, if we left the private sector alone, it would offer, with its own resources, rural access to Internet, and the problem would be solved. What do you think of this comment?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

If we left what?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we left the private sector companies alone, that they would solve the problem of rural Internet access with their own resources and without subsidies.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

No, it's the opposite.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's what I thought as well.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

These regions haven't been covered for 50 years, and there's no reason why they would get coverage overnight. This has nothing to do with the private sector. It has everything to do with the economic model. [English]

Everybody talks about density, that if they don't have enough density the cost of structure is so high that there is no way you can make a rate of return that typical telecom companies are looking for. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.[English]

I have only a few seconds left. I wanted to go very quickly to Mr. Chen, with a very quick question.

In terms of Internet neutrality, investment in rural Internet is often different from one town to the next. Would you say that should be a factor in net neutrality? If you invest in a differential manner, is that violating the neutrality of the net because you're not providing equal service to different people?

Mr. William Chen:

Net neutrality primarily refers to the discrimination in content, not necessarily the inadequacy of service in terms of numerical speeds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So it's not about discrimination in availability?

Mr. William Chen:

Discrimination in availability is not considered a net neutrality issue. Generally the way that people tend to phrase it is that it's better to have slower Internet if that would mean that all services are treated equally than fast Internet that discriminates against certain services by making them arbitrarily slower. With the slow Internet, it might be slow but at least you have competition.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I'm out of time.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Eglinski, you have five minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I'd like to thank all the witnesses for appearing before us today.

I have one question that I'd like to go through with all four of you to get your answer.

The Liberal Government has pledged $500 million for the Connect to Innovate program. Just doing some quick figuring here, we've spent close to $200 million of that. We've spent $195 million in Quebec and Newfoundland alone over the last couple of years. Manitoba and B.C. got about $65 million, and I know that they've pledged another $100 and some million for this upcoming year for part of B.C., and again the east.

Is $500 million anywhere near enough to connect?

We'll start at that end of the table over there and we'll end up with Saskatchewan at the end please.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

I can't directly answer your question because I don't know all of the data.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

People are talking about $1 billion just for the greater Vancouver area. We're talking about $500 million for Canada.

(1630)

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Yes, one of the major problems we have is the difficulty in identifying who really has the service and who does not. In our case, when we started to look and wanted to apply to the first program, what we got for the MRC was $4.7 million. This time we have multiple clients who are getting money. The first thing we do is to measure who does and doesn't have service among the people in the territory, because if you ask Telus, Bell, Rogers, all the incumbents—you know what?—everybody is well served. There's no need for money. However, if you check the reality of service, you will find that it's for 7,193 houses—it's only part of the 22,000. It's the same for any MRC in our province. Everybody would claim that they're well served.

We took the hexagon we got from the government, and they were all well served. We measure it. We do surveys. We knock at doors, and we go to the civil servants of the municipality, and we find out who is served and not served.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Mr. Chen.

Mr. William Chen:

As far as funding goes, it's a start. I wouldn't say it's sufficient for the long term, and I've emphasized the need for sufficient sustained investment, but it's a start.

But as my fellow witnesses have said, it's a drop in the bucket compared to what needs to be done. That doesn't necessarily mean that government should be footing the entire bill. Part of it should come from incentives to the private sector, particularly to engage in creating and building backbone and middle mile connectivity, so that the funding from the government can be directed effectively into more localized infrastructure projects. That would be the most efficient way to make use of it, but in the long run, yes, there needs to be a concrete plan for sustained development.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Mr. Hogan.

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

No, it's not enough. Our project area was awarded $180 million in 2016, and that is a good start, just for southwestern Ontario. When you look at the north, it has enormous challenges, much worse than Saskatchewan even has. One of the things that I think would make it easier for any kind of organization, whether a private sector-directed subsidy or a not-for-profit that has plan to do it, would be to have sustained annual investments rather than individual program areas where we have to wait to find out what it's going to be two years from now. That would make the planning and the execution far easier, and far more effective, and in the long term, I think it would reduce the amount of subsidy required by the private sector to finish the job.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Mr. Meldrum.

Mr. John Meldrum:

Well, to state the obvious, it doesn't come anywhere close to what's needed to get to 50-10, but I think the ISED program is to get to 5-1. It seems that the $500 million will get the country there, but I think the issue is that it comes down to these hexagons. I've heard people talk to the committee about the hexagons. I think the idea is to look at the hexagons of people to see whether the majority of the people have access. Well, that means the minority may not have access. So I think the answer to your question is to work hard with ISED to understand the hexagons and the information that's gone into saying that those hexagons are served—but served to what degree?

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

I'm a representative from one province. What would it cost the province of Saskatchewan to connect at 50-10?

Mr. John Meldrum:

At the moment that would require fibre to go to the farms and acreages. We don't have a number for that, but it—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Can you give me a rough guess?

Mr. John Meldrum:

It would be $5 billion, probably. It's not affordable, in our opinion, to plow fibre to every farm. I know there was somebody from the States who talked about it. Huge money has come out of their universal service funds to fund that fibre to the farms.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I think I'm out of time, aren't I?

The Chair:

You're way over time. It was a good question, though.

We're going to move to Mr. Bossio.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Mike Bossio (Hastings—Lennox and Addington, Lib.):

I couldn't agree more with Mr. Eglinski, but you're right that it's a start. It's still the largest investment that has ever happened in rural broadband, and if we get partnerships with the provinces, the municipalities, and the private sector, we can turn $500 million into a billion. Then it makes a significant start, but yes, we certainly have further to go.

Mr. Hogan, I'm from eastern Ontario, so I'm very familiar with EORN, and I know that SWIFT is actually modelled on EORN to a great extent. Is that fair to say?

(1635)

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

Our governance model is very similar, yes.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Okay.

From a modelling standpoint, one of the issues with EORN is that it was out of the gate early—it was before Netflix—and so of course a lot the investments it made did not foresee Netflix and the huge impact of video on the networks. It invested a lot more into wireless and backbone, not the mid-layer of the network, the backhaul piece of it, and bringing fibre to the POP.

Is the model you're looking at trying to ensure that fibre gets to every POP, and then to combine it with a fixed wireless or microcell type of model, where you have microcells taking in certain levels of that density, and then going to the microwave towers, which will fill in the larger areas, and then where you've got density you can bring fibre right to the home? Are you looking at all three levels of types of model?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

Our model is different from EORN's in that the only technology we are going to subsidize is fibre. We believe it's the only long-term infrastructure that has the scalability for future needs. I must say that we don't think of 5-1 or even 50-10, because that's today's number, and the future number....

When we compare ourselves with the OECD rankings, we're 24th and have 5.3% fibre penetration, compared to a reasonable country like Sweden, which is 50% fibre penetration. I hear that the $5 billion number is unaffordable, but if you can deliver health care more effectively and reduce the cost because you're well-connected, it would be a great investment to make. We actually did the math and found that it would be a great investment to spend $5 billion in Saskatchewan or southwestern Ontario.

If you can imagine every business, home, or person no longer being constrained by bandwidth, whether it's a cap or speed, the innovation that would come out of this country would be unbelievable. We now make decisions all the time like I can't make a phone call on Skype right now because my daughter's on Netflix. I have to yell across the house to—

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Sorry, I don't want to run out of time, and I really want to go to Mr. Meldrum. I think the $5 billion is difficult. It's difficult to all of a sudden say that we're going to put $5 billion into this immediately. There are certainly some hurdles there. While we're trying to get over those hurdles, though, the spectrum discussion becomes tantamount to that.

Does Saskatchewan operate on 3.5 spectrum for Internet, as most others do, as far as fixed wireless is concerned?

Mr. John Meldrum:

We do not, but others do.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Okay. Would you say that's part of the difficulty then, that you don't have an allocated spectrum band dedicated to Internet?

Mr. John Meldrum:

We're using the unpaired 2500 blocks for our service.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Right, which everyone can do.

Mr. John Meldrum:

No, that was auctioned off. In fact, some of the surplus 2500 is being auctioned off. We're not eligible because we have too much cellular 2500. That's why we're going to continue to be spectrum constrained.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Your cellular and Internet are both on the 2500? Right now, in Ontario 3500 is strictly for Internet and cellular is a different band, right?

Mr. John Meldrum:

Yes, it's just that in the 2500 there are these unpaired blocks, and they can be used for fixed wireless.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Have you looked at dynamic spectrum allocation as a potential solution for the spectrum problem?

Mr. John Meldrum:

I think that is more applicable to the cellular end of the business, and we're not running into spectrum constraints with respect to the cellular end of the business.

Mr. Mike Bossio:

No, actually, it can be applied to any level. Sorry, am I out of time? I apologize.

I think the technology is there now that we can actually allocate spectrum depending upon need and the technology being utilized, but that's another discussion. Sorry.

(1640)

The Chair:

All right, we're going to move to Mr. Eglinksi.

You have five minutes again.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Five minutes again, all right.

The Chair:

Unless you'd like to sell some of your five minutes to the other side.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

They might want me to.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jim Eglinski: I did have a question for Mr. Chen.

According to your lobbying profile, you're calling for the creation of a crown corporation Internet service provider that would provide Internet access to businesses and residential customers at a reasonable rate.

Mr. William Chen:

We've re-evaluated that priority and believe that it would be better accomplished at the provincial rather than federal level. Admittedly, at the federal level it would be a stretch, primarily because the diffusion of funds would not be as effective as it would be within localized regions. We've amended our goals here to focus primarily on service at the municipal and provincial levels. The smaller the level, the smaller the mandate and the better the service, in our opinion.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology, could you describe some of the challenges you've faced in obtaining either public funding or private capital to invest in rural broadband?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

It took us six years to get our first funding envelope. The municipality spent about a million dollars on studies and things like that. That was long.

For the private sector capital, we've done some analysis, so our project subsidizes cap funding for the providers up to 66%. The provider would have to provide 33¢, and we would provide 66¢ of subsidy. We've done some math and, through collaborative meetings, we've had feedback from providers that in areas with very low density, they won't bid with only a 66¢ subsidy, because they would not get enough revenue even if they had free capital to operate the system alone.

We're not having trouble getting the private sector money in the slightly denser areas, but when you look at it as a whole in our region, you get the very low density, the medium-density farm, and the small urban towns. If you mix them all together there's a business case if we look at it as a holistic system, but if we just look at the least dense, we're going to have to end up subsidizing it almost 100% for them to be able to even run the system, I think.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay.

I come from one of those areas you're describing. What regulatory changes do you think should be made federally that might assist provinces to accomplish our rural goals? I think we can do that fairly easily in the urban centres.

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

I think open access is one of the key tenets. The CRTC has forborne issuing regulations on the transit between points and, now, with the disaggregated model, competitive providers that want to deliver services to a local area have to buy their transit on the open market, back to, in Ontario, 151 Front Street. There isn't a lot of competition in these rural areas and there's a lot of investment that those small private sector companies need to make in that small area, and they don't trust that their costs won't escalate over time for their backhaul, so they don't make the investment.

If you make everything open access from end to end required by the larger providers, there would be much more competition in the market for the small providers. That would be my biggest ask.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have a minute and a half.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

To Montcalm Regional County, you talked about deciding to go with fibre and investing heavily in fibre. Did you consider other high-speed technologies? Why did you choose fibre over them? We had a person in here on Tuesday who said the satellite system might be a cheaper way to go. I wonder if you would just comment on that.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

I've been in the business forever and I've seen the evolution from copper to everything else. I think there's only one means to be able to have a sound investment for Canadians for the long term, and it's a wire. It's the photon going into a tube of glass. Nothing else can beat it terms of density, quality, robustness, and the long term and longevity.

Think about 50 years. Corning will tell you that there are networks that have been in operation for 50 years without any interruption and without any maintenance. If I had to put my own money into it, I would put money into fibre, no doubt whatsoever.

(1645)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

That was the reason before, right?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Yes. It's technology, basically. It's capacity. It's maintenance. It's all of that.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I hear rumours coming in my area that some people would like to use old gas lines and shove fibre in there. Do you see that realistically happening?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Yes. In one of my previous lives, we used abandoned water pipe in downtown Toronto. We purchased the old network and we pulled fibre into every single business. We were in a very good situation, because right-of-way is the key. Once you've decided on the right technology—fibre—the next thing to handle is the rights of way. You have to get access to the buildings. You have to get access to the customers.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

So it is realistic that we could pull fibre through pipe?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Absolutely. That can be done any time.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Baylis.

You have five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Good afternoon, Mr. Collins. I'll start with you.

On the subject of rights of way, you talked about Hydro-Québec and Bell Canada. Is there something in federal jurisdiction that could help you? We cannot regulate the activities of Hydro-Québec, but how could we help you with this issue of rights of way?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

In fact, you do regulate the activities of Bell Canada, which owns and operates 50% of the province's support structures. The other 50% is divided up into two areas in the province. Bell Canada has its poles and Hydro-Québec has theirs. Every time we want to install a cable, a strand or an anchor, we have to ask them for permission. That means that there is a regulated administrative process. The CRTC has been sticking its nose into these matters forever. The rates are clear. It costs $1.23 per month, per pole. It costs $0.55—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

For the moment, are all the fees charged by the CRTC reasonable?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

They are increasing.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

The fees are increasing?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Yes.

Despite these fees, I think that they haven't well maintained— Since you're asking for my opinion, I'll give it to you.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Go ahead, now is the time.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Now's the time, right? I think that they haven't maintained all of their infrastructure very well.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

They haven't maintained the infrastructure. So, if you want to use it, you unfortunately have to pay to repair it. Right?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Yes.

When a pole leans more than five degrees, it needs to be changed.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Five degrees?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Yes.

The fact that we work with municipalities helps us a lot, because they give us the rights of way. We can just start digging in the streets, you know—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let's just stick with what the federal government could do.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

The battle is endless. These costs are—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If we regain control via the CRTC, and we go over the rental fees—

Mr. Pierre Collins:

There are also maintenance fees, which are very high.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

There are maintenance fees?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Yes, that's what we call them.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

For the moment, you have to pay these fees. Right?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Absolutely.

The engineers will redo a design, realign the poles, decide to change the lines, and send us the bill, which we have to pay in full. The bill is one thing, but the time it all takes is another.

We are told that it will be done, but that our area isn't a priority.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

What solution would you suggest?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

First, I think that we should have realistic costs when we do maintenance work; the costs should therefore be standardized. We should say that a pole costs $1,500, and not $4,500 as is sometimes the case.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

So they will bill—

Mr. Pierre Collins:

That's engineering. Each project is evaluated and is given an identification number. I don't know if you remember a process called “special assembly”, which was a black box at the time in telecommunications. Things went in on one side, and came out on the other, and it cost $100,000. [English]

Mr. Frank Baylis:

SaskTel, do you have any issues with pole access or people accessing your pole?

Mr. John Meldrum:

We don't own very many poles. The vast majority of our backbone is buried. We don't have any issues there.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let me then go then to another point that you raised about spectrum. You said that you have an issue with fixed wireless spectrum, not with cellular spectrum. What is your issue there? I thought a lot of fixed wireless spectrum was open or unused spectrum. What is the particular the issue you have with that?

(1650)

Mr. John Meldrum:

We have not deployed unlicensed spectrum for our fixed—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You're not using unlicensed spectrum.

Mr. John Meldrum:

We're not using unlicensed spectrum. We are using licensed spectrum.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Why don't you use the unlicensed spectrum for your fixed wireless?

Mr. John Meldrum:

I did speak to our spectrum engineer the other day. It's a question of interference and quality of service. There are no guarantees. When people come to SaskTel for service, they're looking for something that's very robust.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If you use the unlicensed spectrum, you just don't have the quality you need. I got that.

Who has that spectrum? Why can't you get your hands on it?

Mr. John Meldrum:

Industry Canada is going to auction it off. They say there is a cap of 60 MHz. Our issue is that the spectrum in the 2,500 band is not all created equally. You have the single band in the middle that we're not using for cellular. It doesn't have the up and the down. That's the one we use, and they count that as part of the cap. We tried to make submissions—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You have a cap on your spectrum. Is that what you're telling me?

Mr. John Meldrum:

Yes. They're saying we have too much.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

But they're talking too much on the cellular side. Because you have a lot on the cellular side, they're encapsulating all that together and saying that you have too much, so you can't get fixed spectrum.

Mr. John Meldrum:

Right, and the cap is in that particular band, the 2,500 band.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That's also where you find the good fixed wireless spectrum that you want to use, right?

Mr. John Meldrum:

That's what we chose for the fixed wire, for offering the service, yes.

The problem is that the equipment we bought is Huawei equipment, so it's carrier grade, but it only works on the 2,500 at the moment. We're not eligible, and we have stop sales on sectors.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Industry Canada says you're not eligible. It's not a pricing issue for you; it's just an eligibility issue.

Mr. John Meldrum:

Yes. We will not be permitted to bid.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That's just because in Saskatoon, or in Saskatchewan, they say you have too much right now.

Mr. John Meldrum:

Right.

You've heard some of the other folks in the previous testimony talk about congestion with fixed wireless. We avoid that by stopping selling. We do not add more customers, so we're telling people today, “We can't provide you service because we don't have enough spectrum”.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

The issue that other people have mentioned is that big companies are hogging all the spectrum. We heard that two days ago, that you're hogging all the spectrum, and now you're telling me that you need more spectrum to be able to use it in the fixed wireless.

Mr. John Meldrum:

Yes, it's cellular spectrum versus fixed wireless spectrum.

I think I have to add, too, because I read all that about the big companies hogging the spectrum—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You're one of them.

Mr. John Meldrum:

—that there is a process with Industry Canada to be able to challenge the holder of the spectrum to say, “You're not deploying it; I'd like to deploy it”. and you can force it through Industry Canada to be able to get the sub-licence for that area you're interested in.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Yes, I'm—

Mr. John Meldrum:

It's typically deep rural.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

—I'm led to believe that they get around that challenge by putting white noise on the spectrum, or they're using it.... The way you challenge is that it's in use, but it's not serving people. That's the problem.

Is that true or not?

Mr. John Meldrum:

In terms of cellular, I would say no. This process doesn't occur with the fixed.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay.

I've run over my time, but thank you.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

We're going to wind it down. We have five more minutes on each side, and then we'll be done.

Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for giving us the extra time.

Mr. Meldrum, I'm in central Alberta. I go west of Edmonton to the B.C. border, and my colleague is between Edmonton and me. Of course, a big portion of our area is agricultural land like yours. It's flat with relatively good access by road every one or two miles, but then we move into very heavily forested areas with very little population and lots of rolling hills into the foothills of the Rockies, like my area. I know you have very similar terrain. The southern part is very flat and very remote, but then as you move north, you get into areas with very heavy bush and it's very similar to ours.

Have you had to take into account the differences in these terrains in any specific way, by using of different types of technology in northern or central Saskatchewan, or your heavily wooded areas, versus southern Saskatchewan, which has a very light population with very open terrain and not a lot of roads, etc.?

(1655)

Mr. John Meldrum:

Northern Saskatchewan is probably a little different from Alberta. The populations tend to be congregated, so they're easier to serve, and we're able to serve them with fibre. We have fibre that goes along the roadway, such as for La Ronge. We have fibre that goes up to La Ronge, and then we serve the people of La Ronge with terrestrial facilities.

We got some money from Connecting Canadians to take fibre up fairly close to the Athabasca basin, that area around Lake Athabasca, Stony Rapids, and those sorts of places. Again, once we can get there, we take microwave shots to get all the way into the Athabasca basin, but then we're able to provide Internet service to Stony Rapids via wire-line services.

That's probably the difference; whereas, the south is all about the lack of density and the lack of a business case to serve people because of the lack of density.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Do you see a need for this federal funding to assist the provinces or private corporations, or to feed areas like that, to give them the service that we're thinking we're going to provide them?

Mr. John Meldrum:

We do still have some applications to Connect to Innovate. They haven't dealt with the Saskatchewan applications yet. There is some backbone in there for which some assistance is being requested, because there is no business case to provide that backbone. In this case, it's running more or less south of La Ronge over to Flin Flon and Creighton to the Manitoba border.

So yes, there is still a need for money to be able to install even backbone in those northern areas.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay. Thank you.

Sir, old waterlines, pipelines—I loved your answer. That's good. I'm interested and I'm excited, because we have lots of those running all over our province. Can you just answer a question for me? Let's say you have a waterline running down your city. You buy the old waterline or you get permission to use it. You run your fibre and you “tee off” into a building. How do you tee off? Do you have to dig down to that place and do your joint, or do you have a mysterious way of sending that fibre? I know that we can drill wherever we want underground in Alberta and pinpoint it to the inch.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

Unfortunately, that was not me who was doing that.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You're not sure how they do it.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

No. I mean, there is the technology to do it today. I know that for sure. There's a way to pull cables and things like that. So don't worry, that can be done.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

All right. Thank you.

I'll turn over whatever time I have left to my friends across.

The Chair:

Actually, I want to ask a quick question.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay. You can have my time and a little of theirs.

The Chair:

Just to follow along the lines of where Mr. Eglinski was going, do you know if they are pre-wiring when they're doing infrastructure, building roads, and those sorts of things? Are they building it into the actual infrastructure?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

When they do a road?

The Chair:

When they're building a new road.

Mr. Pierre Collins: No.

The Chair: They're not doing that?

Mr. Pierre Collins:

No. They open the street three times, one year at a time, just to make sure they bother everybody.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Pierre Collins: We call that “planning”. Planning is something that exists here but nowhere else.

The Chair:

Interesting.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

It's funny, but that's the reality. Everybody knows that. An abandoned pipeline, abandoned waterline, abandoned conduit has value in the whole telecommunication infrastructure, no doubt.

The Chair:

In British Columbia, in my area, they are starting to do that. I'm just not sure if it's everywhere.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

No.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I was just going to say, Dan, in answer to you, that when I was the mayor of the City of Fort St. John, when our new subdivisions were going in, starting about 2002, we were fortunate to put in conduit for future connections.

Mr. Pierre Collins:

That is happening. That's something else. In new areas where they're planning to build houses and things like that, they will put in conduit. They're going to ask the facility providers, including the cable provider, the gas provider, the electricity provider, and the telecommunication provider, to join together and build conduit. In that case that exists, but on long routes they don't do that yet.

(1700)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Jowhari.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

At the tail end of your presentation, Mr. Hogan, you only had 30 seconds to talk about the very interesting solution you're proposing. From my point of view, it kind of balances between the cost and some of the obstacles. It brings in a private and public partnership, the way I understood it. As an organization, you claim not to own any infrastructure. Can I ask you to go through it and explain how you are planning to implement a solution like that?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

When we look at any normal rural area, there are services and buildings. The white square on this slide has the points of presence, and those are owned by private providers today. Let's say the outside ones are Bell Canada and some of the spurs are some smaller providers. All those services are privately held. We go to RFP. We've identified where all those yellow pieces are by doing a pre-qualification with the providers and requiring them to tell us where their fibre is.

We are going to go to public RFP and say these areas in the black spaces need fibre running through them. Not only are you going to run fibre through them, but you're also going to upgrade the telecom infrastructure, the switching stuff, where all the pieces of fibre plug into the existing points of presence, and we'll add some new ones: our little bird logo. The key point is that we have lots of points of interconnection. Some of that fibre could be owned by one company, and some could be owned by another company, but because our funding requires open access, they must be able to use each other's fibre. We can put in one piece of fibre, but all the providers can compete to deliver services across that fibre. That's where we think the competition comes from, and that's really how the private market works. When there's enough competition, it takes care of service and pricing naturally.

If you look at the left side, it's those orange areas where there's now a business case to connect a tower, a subdivision, a larger enterprise, like an on-farm operation that requires.... We have Mennonites in northern Grey County who have very sophisticated operations that require plans to be sent back and forth to their operation on a farm. They need high-capacity fibre to do that.

Does that answer your question?

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Who owns the infrastructure?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

The private sector company that wins our bid will be subsidized by our funding, but at the end of seven years, they will own 100% of the infrastructure. At the time of the RFP, we can place rules and restrictions on how that's used as part of the requirement to get our funding.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Okay, so the 16 regional and local municipalities come together. They've come up with a model, i.e., the model you just presented, and then they're bidding on it. In your auction, you are asking who will bid on this so long as they deliver this model.

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

That's correct.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Okay, and then the infrastructure is owned by a combination of the public and private sectors. How do you recover the costs?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

For seven years, it's a requirement that we own 51% as SWIFT, the not-for-profit. To get the private sector to bid, we have agreed that at the end of seven years they will own the infrastructure outright. Our rules will still apply because they've signed a contract with us. They will own it 100% at the end.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

How has the $500 million that we discussed played a role in this?

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

We were funded through the small communities fund, which is part of new building Canada, which is an infrastructure fund, not the Connect to Innovate program. Connect to innovate could have been used this way too, except they were more specific about their blue dots on the map that required service. As I said, some of the staff did analysis there.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

I have a follow-up question to that. These are the most questions I've asked in two years.

You, as a company, SWIFT, are doing this. Would a small city be able to use that model in your place?

(1705)

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

In a small city, there's a business case for the private sector to do the work. We don't see the need to subsidize them.

The Chair:

In some cases you don't have a lot of providers going to smaller cities because there's just not that business case. However, if the city were to look at this type of model, not only could they expand their broadband coverage but they could also bring in revenue if they were to sell their services.

Mr. Geoff Hogan:

We've had some smaller municipalities in our region do a model where the municipality puts the conduit and the fibre in, and then rents it to providers to provide services.

The Chair:

All right, I want to thank everybody for testifying today. It has been very interesting.

This is our last day of testimony, and we will—

Mr. Mike Bossio:

Thank you, Chair, for allowing me to be part of this.

The Chair:

You're very welcome.

Before we say goodbye to everybody—

Some hon. members: Goodbye everybody.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Connection reset by peer.

The Chair:

Connection reset by peer? That's a geek thing, isn't it?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Ruining the connection.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: All right.

Thank you all for coming.

Just to remind everybody, next Tuesday we have our technical briefing. We had word back that rather than having the Copyright Board on Thursday, all of the officials coming on Tuesday will be able to speak to what the Copyright Board does. That means that on Thursday we will give our drafting instructions on our broadband study to our analysts, and then we will start to strategize for our review of the Copyright Act after the technical briefings.

Thank you all very much. Have a super-duper weekend.[Translation]

Thank you very much everyone.[English]

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tous à la 94e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Nous poursuivons notre étude de la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales du Canada.

Aujourd'hui, nous avons un groupe intéressant de participants qui se joignent à nous. Nous recevons Louis-Charles Thouin, président, préfet, Municipalité régionale de comté de Montcalm, de même que Pierre Collins, chargé de projet de Montcalm Télécom et fibres optiques.

M. Pierre Collins (chargé de projet, Montcalm Télécom et fibres optiques):

Bonjour.

Le président:

Nous avons John Meldrum, vice-président, Conseil de sociétés et affaires réglementaires de SaskTel. Nous l'avons tous rencontré, plus tôt, à Regina. En fait, nous avons déjeuné avec lui.

Nous avons Geoff Hogan, président-directeur général, et Donghoon Lee, partenaire de recherche, économiste, R2B2 de SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology.

Est-ce bien R2B2?

M. Donghoon Lee (partenaire de recherche, économiste, R2B2, University of Guelph, SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology):

Oui.

Le président:

Star Wars, l'Université de Guelph.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

Le président: Nous avons également William Chen, directeur de la Fondation Wubim.

Bienvenue à tous. Vous avez chacun sept minutes pour votre déclaration préliminaire, et nous passerons ensuite à la série de questions.

Nous allons commencer par les gens de Montcalm Télécom.

Vous êtes les premiers. Merci. Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Collins:

Si je comprends bien, vous voulez que nous présentions notre projet et parlions de ce que nous faisons dans les régions rurales.

Il y a plus de trois ans, la MRC de Montcalm a entamé un projet pour déployer un réseau de fibres optiques jusqu'au domicile. Il y a une quinzaine d'années, dans le cadre d'un programme de la province qui s'appelait Villages branchés, la MRC avait déjà installé une centaine de kilomètres de fibres optiques pour relier les commissions scolaires. Elle a donc voulu utiliser ce réseau et le rendre accessible à sa population.

La MRC a fait une étude détaillée pour connaître le nombre de résidants et de résidences qui étaient mal desservis sur son territoire: c'était le cas pour 7 100 des 22 000 résidences. Ces données étaient très différentes de celles que possédait le gouvernement canadien. Les fournisseurs de service locaux prétendaient que la région était bien desservie, mais notre vérification auprès des résidants de la municipalité nous a appris que la vitesse minimale n'était pas atteinte.

Le projet avait des composantes financières et technologiques. Un financement de 12,9 millions de dollars a été obtenu par la MRC au moyen des processus habituels pour ce genre d'installations, et ce montant a été autorisé par le ministère québécois des Affaires municipales et de l'Occupation du territoire et la MRC.

Un premier programme fédéral de subvention, Un Canada branché — Canada numérique 150 est venu appuyer ce projet de façon assez importante. Nous avions déposé une demande de subvention auprès du ministère à l'époque, Industrie Canada, et le projet de Montcalm a été retenu pour son excellence. Nous avons obtenu 4,7 millions de dollars de subventions, ce qui était le montant le plus important à être accordé pour une entreprise qui n'existait pas encore à l'époque. En effet, la MRC était encore en train de mettre sur pied un organisme sans but lucratif pour construire le réseau.

C'est un projet que la MRC a à coeur, qui est réalisé par et pour les citoyens, et qui est mené par un organisme sans but lucratif constitué de quatre non élus et de quatre élus. À l'heure actuelle, le projet est en cours de réalisation.

Nous sommes peut-être bien placés pour vous expliquer ce qui est important pour nous, c'est-à-dire une contrainte opérationnelle à notre projet: les droits de passage. Depuis plus de 30 ans, le domaine des télécommunications ne cesse d'être déréglementé au pays, ce qu'illustrent les décisions historiques qui ont été prises en 1985, 1987, 1990 et 1992, notamment. Le CRTC a vu d'un oeil très favorable la compétition en matière de télécommunications et d'innovations au Canada. Il reste cependant un dernier obstacle: les droits de passage. Les structures de soutènement appartiennent aux propriétaires titulaires, ceux qui ont construit les réseaux et qui en gèrent l'accès.

Pour réussir en télécommunications, la règle no 1 est d'obtenir des droits de passage. Il nous est encore très difficile d'avoir accès aux structures de soutènement dans notre province parce que le parc de poteaux est divisé à parts égales entre Hydro-Québec et Bell Canada. De plus, nous devons moderniser ces réseaux à nos frais: le dernier à y demander accès est responsable des coûts de rénovation de ces structures. Cela nous oblige régulièrement à enfouir les fibres et à utiliser des moyens de communication et de transmission beaucoup plus dispendieux, ce qui nous empêche de progresser aussi vite et aussi loin que nous l'aimerions.

Je ne sais pas combien de temps il me reste, et je pourrais fort probablement continuer de vous parler de cela pendant de nombreuses heures.

Voilà où nous en sommes. Le réseau est en construction. La MRC a décidé de l'exploiter et elle aura un réseau de fibres optiques jusqu'au domicile.

Souhaitez-vous ajouter quelque chose, monsieur le préfet?

(1535)

M. Louis-Charles Thouin (président, préfet, Municipalité régionale de comté de Montcalm, Montcalm Télécom et fibres optiques):

Nous parlons de 535 kilomètres de fibres. Comme M. Collins l'a dit, il y avait déjà un réseau de 100 kilomètres. Nous y avons ajouté 535 kilomètres afin de brancher chaque maison et de desservir tous les citoyens qui sont peu ou mal desservis à l'heure actuelle.

Cela fait le tour de la question, dont nous avons fait un bon résumé.

M. Pierre Collins:

C'était un résumé très rapide.

M. Louis-Charles Thouin:

Vous semblez bien connaître le dossier.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Nous allons maintenant passer à John Meldrum, à Regina.

Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. John Meldrum (vice-président, Conseil de sociétés et affaires réglementaires, SaskTel):

Merci de m'offrir la possibilité de témoigner devant le Comité.

J'ai le plaisir de travailler pour SaskTel depuis plus de 40 ans, dont 30 en tant que cadre supérieur. J'ai vu notre société d'État offrir pour la toute première fois le service de ligne individuelle, le service cellulaire et Internet partout dans la province. Provenant de la province la plus rurale du Canada, nous comprenons très bien les défis liés aux besoins de nos résidants ruraux en matière d'Internet et de cellulaire.

Avant d'aborder ces défis, j'aimerais parler de la question d'un service Internet haute vitesse acceptable. À cet égard, nous appuyons la cible du Conseil de 50-10, mais nous soulignerions que, au final, ce qu'on pense de cette cible dépend de la position actuelle concernant la connectivité à Internet. Par exemple, si on dépend uniquement d'Internet par satellite, ou si le service connaît des problèmes de congestion, la plupart des gens à qui nous parlons en Saskatchewan diraient que 50-10 est utopique et qu'ils se contenteraient d'un service constant 5-1 ou 10-2. Nous notons que le CRTC reconnaît qu'il est difficile d'offrir un service 50-10 aux clients ruraux et laisse entendre que les améliorations dans les régions rurales pourraient prendre jusqu'à 15 ans. C'est une période beaucoup trop longue. Les régions rurales du Canada ont besoin d'un meilleur service Internet aujourd'hui, pas dans 15 ans.

Nous avons dû composer avec certaines réalités pour offrir ce service. Comme je l'ai dit, la Saskatchewan est la province la plus rurale du Canada en raison des grands espaces entre la plupart des résidants ruraux. Il est difficile de présenter cette réalité à des gens qui ont pour référence leurs propres régions rurales dans l'Est du Canada. Essentiellement, pensez aux distances entre les exploitations agricoles et les maisons dans les régions rurales que vous connaissez et multipliez ces distances par environ sept.

Nous avons récemment amené le service Internet DSL jusqu'à Kendal, en Saskatchewan, un village de 77 personnes. Même si Kendal est située au milieu de terres agricoles productives et que d'autres villes et villages se trouvent le long de l'autoroute à tous les 13 kilomètres, la plus grande ville dans le secteur est Indian Head, qui compte 1 900 personnes, et est située à environ 35 kilomètres sur une route de section. Après cette ville, c'est Regina, à 80 kilomètres. Le problème que cela représente pour nous, c'est que, en télécommunications, l'absence de densité et les distances entre les groupes de personnes font augmenter les dépenses en immobilisations par habitant desservi. Nous avons surmonté de nombreux problèmes pour nous adapter à la situation actuelle en Saskatchewan, où toutes les collectivités, quelle que soit leur taille, reçoivent un service Internet sans fil et pratiquement n'importe quelle ville de bonne taille a un service cellulaire adéquat; nous avons récemment annoncé un plan pour étendre le service cellulaire aux petites villes.

Le réseau fédérateur, la liaison terrestre, est la pierre angulaire de notre service Internet. Nous continuons à investir massivement dans les installations du réseau fédérateur, installations qui sont rendues accessibles à nos concurrents à des prix qui incluent une « surveillance de la réglementation ». Ce travail ne sera jamais complètement terminé, car le trafic de données continuera d'augmenter, et nous continuerons de devoir investir. Mais aujourd'hui, à l'exception de quelques routes du réseau fédérateur non rentables qui font partie d'une demande de financement en vertu de Brancher pour innover, notre réseau fédérateur répondra à nos besoins actuels jusqu'à ce que nous ayons besoin de plus de capacité.

Pour le service de ligne terrestre, le prochain grand défi est les installations du « dernier kilomètre ». S'il s'agit d'un service filaire, alors nous avons besoin de l'installation de plus de fibre optique et de plus de sous-répartiteurs et, au final, pour pouvoir atteindre la cible de 50-10, fibre optique jusqu'aux locaux de l'abonné. Nous avons récemment installé de la fibre optique à Rosthern, en Saskatchewan, au coût de 1,8 million de dollars pour 1 083 résidences. C'est 1 700 $ par résidence. Nous n'aurons pas tous les clients parce qu'il y a un câblodistributeur concurrent dans cette ville. Pour un service sans fil fixe, tout revient au spectre de fréquences, et non pas à celui du service cellulaire. Dans les régions rurales de la Saskatchewan, nous avons beaucoup de spectres de fréquences cellulaires. Nous avons besoin du spectre non cellulaire, lequel limite notre capacité de répondre aux demandes des clients.

Pour ce qui est du service cellulaire, nous travaillons beaucoup sur les aspects économiques d'élargir le service cellulaire pour servir nombre de régions de la Saskatchewan qui ne reçoivent pas ou peu de services. Pour aller droit au but, chaque région qui n'est pas desservie a besoin d'une nouvelle station cellulaire alimentée par des câbles de fibre optique et de l'équipement qu'on doit installer sur le site de la station. En moyenne, une station cellulaire coûte 1 million de dollars. Essentiellement, la plus grande partie de l'expansion n'est pas rentable en raison du nombre relativement faible de personnes à proximité de ces nouvelles stations. Je désire vous rappeler que le spectre de fréquences cellulaires ne pose pas du tout problème. Nous avons l'ensemble de notre spectre de fréquences cellulaires non utilisé disponible pour ces stations. Ce sont plutôt les dépenses initiales élevées en immobilisations qu'engendre la construction d'une station.

J'ai quatre recommandations sur ce dont nous avons besoin.

(1540)



D'abord, pour le service Internet sans fil fixe, nous avons besoin de plus de spectre de fréquences qui convient à un service Internet sans fil fixe. Actuellement, notre offre de service sans fil fixe est restreinte pour ce qui est du spectre de fréquences, et nous avons cessé d'offrir le service cellulaire dans un certain nombre de secteurs. Au final, en l'absence de changements en ce qui a trait à l'utilisation du spectre technologique ou à l'attribution de spectres de fréquences, nous ne voyons pas de voie permettant d'atteindre le service Internet sans fil fixe 50-10.

En second lieu, les régions rurales du Canada ont besoin d'un autre programme en plus de celui du CRTC: 750 millions de dollars, moins l'argent prévu pour un satellite pour le Grand Nord est une goutte d'eau dans l'océan. Les échéanciers actuels pour les régions rurales éloignées supposent essentiellement que le fossé numérique entre les régions rurales et les régions urbaines du Canada continuera de se creuser.

Ensuite, pour répondre au besoin futur en matière de vitesse, il faudra installer de la fibre optique, au final, pour autant de clients que le Canada peut se permettre; dans les endroits où la fibre optique est inabordable, les clients devront être desservis par un service sans fil fixe ou par satellite. Cela signifie que, pour ce qui est de la fibre optique, nous aurons besoin d'une contribution pour dépenses en capital destinée aux endroits qui sont presque rentables. Quant aux endroits qui ne sont pas du tout rentables, en plus de ce type de contribution, on aura besoin de soutien financier continu.

Enfin, dans les régions qui reçoivent peu ou pas de service cellulaire, on aura également besoin d'une contribution pour dépenses en capital pour celles qui sont presque rentables, et — encore une fois, pour les régions très peu peuplées — on aura besoin d'un programme continu de subvention parce que le capital destiné au service cellulaire ne s'arrête pas à l'installation initiale, et ce capital n'est pas rentable non plus.

Le président:

Excellent. Merci.

Nous allons passer à M. Hogan de SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology.

M. Geoff Hogan (président-directeur général, SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology):

Nous remercions le Comité du temps qu'il nous accorde aujourd'hui.

Chez SWIFT, dans la région du Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario, nous croyons que la large bande devrait vraiment être un service essentiel. Sans elle, nous ne pouvons pas participer à l'économie moderne d'aujourd'hui. Nous croyons que, à l'heure actuelle, SWIFT est la solution toute désignée pour le Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario.

Je ne vais pas lire toute la diapositive, mais nous avons actuellement beaucoup de régions mal desservies. La densité peut être légèrement plus élevée que celle de la Saskatchewan, mais de peu dans nombre de régions rurales du Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario. Nos résidants ont un accès inégal aux services numériques. Nos résidants urbains ont un bien meilleur accès que nos résidants ruraux, ce qui signifie, encore une fois, un meilleur accès à l'éducation, aux soins de santé, aux services gouvernementaux, à tout.

Même les vaches portent maintenant un Fitbit. Nos communautés agricoles dépendent beaucoup de la technologie. Les personnes des milieux les plus reculés ont besoin d'autant ou, probablement, de plus de large bande que leurs homologues urbains, parce qu'elles doivent se rendre plus loin en automobile pour accéder à des services lorsqu'elles n'ont pas de large bande.

Il y a également les besoins urbains. Un membre de SWIFT construit un centre de données à Cambridge. Le client n'a pas assez de fibre optique pour le construire dans notre triangle technologique du Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario.

C'est un gros problème. Comment SWIFT peut-elle le résoudre? Notre zone d'attraction commerciale, la région de notre projet, compte 10 % de la population du Canada. Nous avons un modèle de la demande globale. Nous avons des membres qui se joignent à notre organisation et nous sommes chargés de l'approvisionnement en leur nom. Lorsque nous allons voir les fournisseurs — nous avons maintenant 1 500 emplacements aujourd'hui et nous espérons en avoir 3 000 d'ici le mois de mai ou le mois de juin —, c'est ce que nous mettons sur la table dans le but que, lorsque les fournisseurs soumissionnent pour la prestation de services, ce ne soient pas seulement les fournisseurs actuels qui soumissionnent, mais également, possiblement, de nouveaux fournisseurs dans la région. Cela augmente la concurrence, ce qui résoudra, nous l'espérons, le problème à long terme dans ces régions rurales. S'il y a plus de concurrence, le marché se portera bien.

Nous prenons des décisions fondées sur les faits. Nous y viendrons dans une seconde pour ce qui est de la relation avec l'Université de Guelph.

Pour seulement vous donner un bref aperçu d'où nous nous trouvons, pour les gens qui ne viennent pas de l'Ontario, nous avons 14 Premières Nations dans notre zone d'attraction commerciale dans le Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario et environ 25 % de la population de l'Ontario.

J'ai parlé de notre modèle de la demande globale. Nous sommes une organisation axée sur les membres. Nous avons des membres des secteurs public, privé et agricole et de toutes ces organisations qui ont besoin de connectivité. Nous allons utiliser cette demande globale pour avoir davantage notre mot à dire aux fournisseurs lorsque nous pénétrerons les marchés publics. Un processus est en cours à l'heure actuelle.

Les municipalités qui ont lancé ce projet ont 17 millions de dollars jusqu'à maintenant, et notre cible est de 18 à 20 millions de dollars pour le projet. Les municipalités sont déterminées à aider leurs résidants et désirent établir un partenariat avec les gouvernements fédéral et provincial afin d'offrir des services à leurs résidants.

Juste pour vous donner un échantillon de nos membres, nous avons quatre Premières Nations qui se sont déjà jointes au projet et, comme je l'ai dit, il y en a 14 dans notre groupe. Elles font face aux mêmes défis que nos résidants ruraux. Leurs étudiants du secondaire ne peuvent pas faire leurs devoirs lorsqu'ils sont à la maison. Ils peuvent les faire à l'école, mais lorsqu'ils reviennent à la maison, ils doivent aller au McDonald pour télécharger leurs devoirs, et c'est vraiment, à mon avis, inacceptable au Canada.

Nous avons un partenariat vraiment unique avec l'Université de Guelph. Il y a environ trois professeurs qui font une recherche sur la large bande au Canada, et Helen Hambly est l'une d'eux. M. Jamie Lee est également avec nous ici aujourd'hui.

Il est très important pour nous de mesurer l'efficacité de l'investissement public, dans le cadre duquel on offre des mesures incitatives au secteur privé afin d'améliorer la large bande. Nous effectuons une étude longitudinale. Nous avons commencé à recueillir des données en 2012. Au terme de notre programme, en 2021, nous devrions avoir des statistiques très intéressantes. Jamie en parlera dans un moment.

Nous recueillons des données de trois principaux ensembles de données. Il y a le secteur MSPEH, y compris tous les endroits publics parce que ce sont eux qui fournissent le plus de revenus aux fournisseurs au début du projet. Nous avons recueilli les données des fournisseurs. Nous savons où se trouvent toutes les fibres optiques des fournisseurs dans le Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario. Nous les avons cartographiées dans un SIG. Nous recueillons également des données des secteurs résidentiel, agricole et commercial au moyen d'un mécanisme de sondage par l'intermédiaire de l'Université.

Je poursuis en vous donnant un bref aperçu des données que nous avons recueillies; nous avons recueilli les données des fournisseurs en vertu d'accords de divulgation parce que, évidemment, Bell ne souhaite pas divulguer à Rogers l'endroit où se trouvent ses infrastructures. Il s'agit d'un aperçu ventilé des données que je vous montre maintenant sur la diapositive. C'est le comté de Middlesex au centre du Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario. Les régions en bleu se trouvent dans un rayon de 500 mètres de la fibre optique, et les régions en jaune sont plus loin. On ne peut pas offrir de service sans fil de haute qualité sans que la station soit connectée à la base avec de la fibre optique. Vous pouvez voir que les gens dans les régions en jaune ici sont grandement désavantagés. Cela montre en réalité la situation du comté de Middlesex sous un meilleur jour parce que la fibre optique installée dans le comté peut ne pas posséder une capacité suffisante pour arriver à connecter les gens.

(1545)



Je vais maintenant laisser la parole à M. Lee, qui va parler un peu de notre analyse des résultats économiques.

(1550)

M. Donghoon Lee:

Merci, Geoff.

Bonjour à tous. Comme j'ai environ une minute, je serai bref.

À R2B2, nous avons réalisé des estimations préliminaires des avantages économiques, à savoir le surplus du consommateur et du travailleur à distance. Selon l'estimation du surplus du consommateur, le bénéfice privé net pour les consommateurs va essentiellement de 2,6 à 6,5 milliards de dollars . Dans le cadre de notre recherche continue, nous serons en mesure de fournir des estimations plus précises. À l'heure actuelle, les estimations sont plutôt larges, mais grâce notre recherche, nous serons en mesure d'en fournir des plus précises.

Veuillez également noter qu'il ne s'agit pas réellement du bénéfice net pour la société. Pour estimer ce bénéfice ou son équivalent, c'est-à-dire le rendement des investissements dans la large bande du point de vue de la société, nous devrons attribuer un coût social au total des bénéfices pour la société. C'est ce que nous espérons vraiment déterminer dans un avenir proche. Je crois qu'il s'agit de la question la plus importante à R2B2.

Je vais maintenant présenter rapidement un autre type de bénéfice que nous avons estimé, soit le surplus du travailleur à distance. Vous pouvez voir à l'avant-dernière ligne, les bénéfices qui pourraient être très importants pour le travailleur à distance moyen... de 10 000 à 30 000 $.

Parmi les autres analyses économiques de la large bande menées dans le cadre de notre recherche, notons l'effet de la large bande sur les salaires, les revenus, la valeur des propriétés et ainsi de suite. À R2B2, les sujets de recherche s'appliquent également à d'autres domaines, comme l'agriculture de précision, les soins de santé, entre autres.

Merci.

M. Geoff Hogan:

J'en suis à sept minutes. Voulez-vous que je m'arrête, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Vous avez dépassé vos 7 minutes de 16 secondes, mais cela ne pose pas de problème.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

Le président: C'est très bien. Aviez-vous terminé?

M. Geoff Hogan:

J'aurais besoin d'encore une minute.

Le président:

Je vais vous donner 30 secondes. Il faut conclure.

M. Geoff Hogan:

D'accord. La façon dont nous abordons la situation, c'est de prendre une région rurale typique où il y a déjà de la fibre optique et beaucoup de services, et nous augmentons cette fibre optique avec une fibre optique que nous subventionnons, laquelle appartiendra au secteur privé. L'élément clé dans tout cela, c'est que la nouvelle fibre optique aura une très grande capacité, et il y aura un accès à cette fibre à chaque kilomètre. Cela commence à montrer l'utilité, pour le secteur privé, de connecter les gens qui se trouvent le plus près de la fibre optique... ceux qui se trouvent dans les régions de l'image indiquées en orange. C'est le modèle que nous avons. Au fil du temps, nous allons remplir les régions en noir jusqu'à ce que tout le monde soit connecté.

C'est notre modèle. En résumé, nous avons une solution fondée sur les faits. Nous tirons profit de la voix de nos 3,5 millions d'Ontariens qui sont membres. Nous optimisons l'investissement actuel en infrastructure à large bande. Nous tentons de créer un accès universel et équitable à tous les services.

Le président:

Je suis heureux de vous avoir donné plus de temps. Merci beaucoup.

Ensuite, nous avons M. Chen de la Fondation Wubim.

Comment prononcez-vous « Wubim », monsieur Chen?

M. William Chen (directeur, Fondation Wubim):

Il s'agit de la Fondation « Wou-bim ». Ne vous en faites pas. Tout le monde le prononce mal. Je l'ai mal prononcé pendant la première année.

Le président:

D'accord. Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. William Chen:

Merci, monsieur le président. Mon nom est William Chen, et je suis ici au nom de la Fondation Wubim. Nous sommes une organisation sans but lucratif située à Vancouver, en Colombie-Britannique, qui défend l'intérêt public dans le domaine du développement des télécommunications, de la société civile et de l'édition savante.

En premier lieu, j'aimerais remercier le Comité de nous avoir invités à participer à cette étude. Mon organisation souhaite répondre seulement à la première question sur ce qui constitue un service haute vitesse acceptable.

Jusqu'à maintenant, bon nombre des mémoires présentés dans le cadre de cette étude portent sur les valeurs numériques de la vitesse, principalement la vitesse 50-10 établie par le CRTC. Toutefois, ce chiffre est insuffisant pour définir adéquatement ce qu'est un service haute vitesse acceptable au Canada. On ne peut pas limiter un service haute vitesse acceptable à un ensemble de chiffres. Cela ne fonctionne tout simplement pas.

Selon nous, pour qu'un service haute vitesse soit acceptable, les utilisateurs d'Internet doivent pouvoir tirer le meilleur parti de leur connexion. Ils ne devraient pas avoir à constater que certaines de leurs activités sont plus lentes ou volontairement ralenties ou restreintes, ou se heurter à des limites de données arbitraires qui les empêchent de mener à bien certaines activités à l'aide d'Internet.

Un service haute vitesse est acceptable seulement s'il est véritablement utilisable et non pas parce qu'il s'agit d'un service public « accessible », mais en réalité inutilisable. On ne considérerait pas un service d'ydroélectricité comme acceptable si l'entreprise qui l'offre vous empêchait d'utiliser votre réfrigérateur parce qu'il consomme beaucoup trop d'électricité.

Deux enjeux se rapportent à ce domaine: la neutralité de l'infrastructure de télécommunications, aussi connue comme la neutralité du Net, et les limites arbitraires de données. La neutralité du Net est le principe de base selon lequel tous les fournisseurs de services Internet doivent traiter tout le contenu sur Internet de manière égale, qu’il s’agisse d’un article de nouvelles, d’une émission de télévision diffusée en mode continu, d’un ensemble de données de recherche ou de tout autre type de contenu, parmi les millions qui existent possiblement sur Internet.

Dans le cadre d’un régime réglementaire qui défend la neutralité du Net, les fournisseurs de services Internet ne bloqueraient pas ni ne ralentiraient délibérément l’acquisition et les services de certains types de contenu et ne feraient pas non plus de discrimination à cet égard. Ce principe est essentiel dans la mesure où la neutralité du Net favorise la concurrence et permet aux Canadiens d’accéder à des services nouveaux et novateurs, comme la diffusion en continu sur demande, qui peuvent être offerts grâce aux innovations technologiques importantes des dernières années.

Vu la croissance des collectivités et l’évolution des types de contenu qui nécessitent désormais des spécifications plus élevées quant à la largeur de bande, les fournisseurs de services Internet qui ont peu d’intérêt ou qui sont peu pressés à améliorer l’infrastructure à large bande en milieu rural ou qui ont peu d’esprit d’initiative pour le faire abandonneront tout simplement les Canadiens des régions rurales. L’infrastructure de télécommunications actuelle deviendra congestionnée par la demande de service accrue relative aux innovations technologiques.

Afin de maintenir la qualité du service à un niveau de base et d’assurer une utilisabilité continue, les fournisseurs de services Internet feront fort probablement preuve de discrimination à l’égard de certains types de contenu qui nécessitent une utilisation supérieure de la bande passante, comme les activités menées par l’industrie de la vidéo sur demande, le secteur des soins de santé et les chercheurs. À cette fin, ils ralentiront délibérément ces types de contenu ou bloqueront même complètement l’ensemble du contenu.

Une atteinte à la neutralité du Net est similaire au fait d’aller sur un terrain de golf et de seulement pouvoir jouer avec un fer droit. En outre, si vous utilisez un autre bâton de golf, la sécurité va vous arrêter.

À l’heure actuelle, le Canada applique un robuste régime réglementaire pour le secteur des télécommunications qui limite considérablement les atteintes potentielles à la neutralité du Net. Cependant, il y aura presque inévitablement des tentatives afin de renverser ce régime réglementaire ultérieurement, et les collectivités rurales seront les premières à souffrir de l’adoucissement des règlements qui protègent la neutralité du Net. Cette situation s’explique probablement par le fait que les fonds consacrés aux initiatives de développement de l’infrastructure de télécommunications dans le Canada rural sont principalement à court terme.

Ces programmes ont pour objectif de mettre immédiatement en place l’infrastructure. Ils ne mettent toutefois pas l’accent sur le besoin d’établir un plan de développement durable à long terme de l’infrastructure de télécommunications existante pour qu'elle s’adapte aux innovations technologiques et aux normes de vitesse à large bande de plus en plus élevées.

La deuxième préoccupation que nous portons à votre attention est celle des limites de données arbitraires, qui existent également dans un domaine similaire à celui de la neutralité du Net. Les limites de données sont simples, car il s’agit tout simplement de limites quant à l’utilisation maximale de la large bande par un consommateur. En l’absence d’investissements soutenus dans les infrastructures de télécommunications rurales et d’un aménagement continu de celles-ci, les fournisseurs de services Internet qui arrivent difficilement à maintenir la qualité de base du service décideront possiblement d’imposer des limites de données arbitraires aux consommateurs de services à large bande.

Ces limites de données arbitraires toucheront tous les résidants des collectivités rurales en restreignant les utilisations possibles du service à large bande pour certains consommateurs, mais nuiront tout particulièrement aux institutions publiques comme les centres communautaires, les administrations municipales, les hôpitaux, les bibliothèques publiques, les écoles et les installations de recherche. Ces institutions, que ce soit en raison de leur taille ou de leur vocation, devront négocier des ententes spéciales ou payer des coûts exorbitants afin de maintenir leur service à large bande dans un état utilisable.

La seule façon de prévenir les atteintes à la neutralité du Net ou l’adoucissement des règlements connexes et de veiller à l’avenir à ce que les utilisateurs de large bande en milieu rural puissent tirer le meilleur parti du service qui leur est fourni est d’établir un plan concret à long terme qui permettra de s’assurer que les fournisseurs de services Internet réinvestissent dans l’amélioration de l’infrastructure de télécommunications des régions rurales.

(1555)



La solution la plus efficace serait de maintenir une concurrence, mais cette dernière est difficile à établir ou à accroître en réalité en raison de la faible densité des populations et du manque général d’utilisateurs principaux dans les collectivités rurales.

Il serait également efficace d’accorder la priorité à l’appui financier, aux mesures de soutien et au financement de l’infrastructure de télécommunications des fournisseurs de services Internet à but non lucratif, des administrations municipales, des sociétés d’État et des coopératives, car un mandat à l’égard des organisations à but non lucratif aiderait à assurer le réinvestissement de tous les profits dans l’amélioration de la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales.

De plus, la dernière solution que nous proposons est une intervention du gouvernement, principalement au moyen de la mise en place de règlements permanents sur la neutralité du Net et les limites de données arbitraires, et le maintien d’un financement et d’incitatifs pour les fournisseurs de services Internet grâce auxquels ils pourront dispenser et améliorer leurs services dans les collectivités rurales.

En résumé, ce qui constitue un service haute vitesse acceptable ne se définit pas seulement par des chiffres. Un service haute vitesse acceptable est un service qui est pleinement utilisable par les consommateurs de services à large bande, ne fait aucune discrimination quant à la façon dont sont manipulés certains types de contenu et est exempt de limites de données arbitraires. Les atteintes à la neutralité du Net et l’imposition de limites de données sont des pratiques nuisibles pour l’innovation, l’industrie, les institutions rurales et les entreprises locales au Canada, mais surtout pour les Canadiens des régions rurales. Le seul moyen d’éviter tout changement du genre au régime réglementaire est d’assurer l'aménagement continu et soutenu de l’infrastructure de télécommunications dans les régions rurales, grâce à la concurrence, à la priorité du financement des fournisseurs de services Internet communautaires à but non lucratif et à l’intervention du gouvernement.

Merci.

(1600)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer directement à la série de questions.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous d'être ici, de la côte Ouest jusqu'en Saskatchewan, en Ontario et au Québec.

La connexion des Canadiens est une des choses que nous examinons. J'écoute les différents exposés aujourd'hui et je pense au rôle des organisations à but non lucratif et à la façon dont on peut élargir cela à plus grande échelle.

Monsieur Collins, votre organisation à but non lucratif gère-t-elle un modèle évolutif? Savez-vous si ce modèle a fonctionné ailleurs?

M. Pierre Collins:

Est-ce évolutif? Une des choses qui sont très importantes dans notre cas, c'est qu'on a décidé de servir seulement le territoire de la MRC, alors, lorsqu'on a créé l'organisation à but non lucratif, il n'y avait aucun plan visant à élargir le service et à servir d'autres collectivités. Au sein de la collectivité, nous planifions actuellement de servir seulement les résidants qui ne sont pas bien servis, mais nous finirons par donner un accès à 22 000 résidants, et, par conséquent, cela deviendra encore... Jusqu'à ce qu'on ait utilisé complètement la subvention, nous sommes limités quant à la façon dont nous dépensons cet argent: c'est pour servir les résidants qui ne sont pas bien servis. Une fois que ce sera fait, nous n'aurons aucune limite pour étendre notre réseau vers d'autres endroits où nous pourrions garantir la santé financière de l'organisation à but non lucratif.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Je vais un peu plus à l'ouest, en Ontario; il est bon de vous revoir, monsieur Hogan. Vous avez fait un excellent travail pour résumer en environ huit minutes l'exposé de deux heures que j'ai vu à l'Université de Guelph.

Vous parlez du modèle de SWIFT comme d'un modèle d'affaires. Selon vous, comment pourrait-on utiliser ce modèle dans d'autres collectivités? S'agirait-il d'un plus grand modèle ou de multiples modèles de ce que vous faites?

M. Geoff Hogan:

Selon moi, SWIFT est un projet très régional. Il couvre une grande partie de la population canadienne, mais il s'agit en fait d'un secteur assez dense. Nous proposons un modèle à but non lucratif et nous ne possédons pas l'infrastructure, mais nos besoins, qui sont ceux de la collectivité, sont pris en considération. Il n'y a pas que les résultats des fournisseurs qui orientent la prise de décisions.

Quant à la question de savoir si nous prendrions de l'expansion, je pense que nous pourrions étendre nos services un peu plus dans certaines autres régions rurales adjacentes à notre zone desservie, mais plus loin que cela, je pense qu'il faudrait reproduire le processus plutôt que l'élargir, puisque la surface devient trop grande.

L'un des éléments importants, selon moi, tient au fait qu'il y a des régions urbaines et des régions rurales dans le secteur, et il y a une relation symbiotique entre les deux, un peu comme avec une commission scolaire, par exemple. Habituellement, le bureau de la commission scolaire est situé au centre d'une région urbaine, et toutes les écoles sont éloignées. Les organisations veulent se brancher sur un seul fournisseur ou deux très bons fournisseurs plutôt qu'un, donc, selon moi, cette combinaison est un aspect important du modèle pour nous permettre de générer plus de fonds au fil du temps.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Pendant le peu de temps qui nous est imparti, l'un des éléments que j'ai remarqués dans les renseignements plus détaillés, mais aussi protégés que vous avez présentés montrait que, à certains points de connexion, certains fournisseurs seraient plus appropriés que d'autres. Par conséquent, plutôt que de passer par un processus d'appel d'offres ouvert, il serait logique pour certains fournisseurs de couvrir le reste de la distance qui les sépare des petites collectivités qui entourent l'endroit où ils offrent déjà des services.

Le système d'approvisionnement est un aspect sur lequel il faudrait nous pencher. Pourriez-vous nous faire des commentaires à ce sujet?

M. Geoff Hogan:

Nous suivons les lignes directrices générales du secteur public en matière d'approvisionnement, certainement, parce que nous sommes financés à même les fonds publics. Nous avons réparti notre grand secteur en environ 30 plus petits secteurs de sorte que les petits fournisseurs arrivent à soutenir la concurrence des grands fournisseurs lorsque nous publions les demandes de proposition. Notre objectif final est d'avoir beaucoup de fournisseurs très efficaces qui ont accès au financement afin que nous puissions avoir un système avec beaucoup de concurrence. Aussitôt qu'il y aura plus de concurrence, le marché devrait commencer à évoluer par lui-même. La situation oligopolistique dans laquelle nous sommes actuellement nuit à la concurrence.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est un point que vous avez soulevé, monsieur Chen, lorsque vous vous êtes penché sur les travaux que vous faisiez en Colombie-Britannique sur les bénéfices pour la société et les autres bénéfices dans le cadre du processus décisionnel. Aviez-vous autre chose à ajouter sur le sujet?

(1605)

M. William Chen:

Les organismes à but non lucratif fonctionnent dans une certaine mesure, mais ils sont particulièrement efficaces dans des secteurs qui sont peu ou pas desservis. Je ne dirais pas que les fournisseurs de services Internet communautaires travailleraient aussi efficacement dans une région urbaine où la concurrence est considérable. Les organismes sans but lucratif sont efficaces en ce sens qu'ils ont un mandat selon lequel ils doivent desservir les collectivités visées par leur mandat. Par ailleurs, les organismes sans but lucratif ne sont pas motivés par le profit absolu, ils ne prendront pas nécessairement les décisions les plus efficientes ou rentables en matière d'investissement. Nous avons vu des cas en Colombie-Britannique où les fournisseurs de services Internet communautaires, ayant un mandat sans but lucratif, n'ont pas réussi à combler leurs attentes et ont effectivement fait faillite. Cela a laissé certaines collectivités rurales dans une situation encore pire, mais ces organismes sont une solution efficace lorsqu'il n'y a pas suffisamment de concurrence dans le secteur privé.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Avec la minute qu'il me reste, je veux me tourner vers SaskTel et vous demander de quelle manière vous travaillez avec les organismes sans but lucratif en Saskatchewan. De quelle façon travaillez-vous avec les petits fournisseurs qui doivent accéder à vos tours ou à vos services?

M. John Meldrum:

Nos tours sont réglementées par le CRTC et Industrie Canada. Nous travaillons avec ces entités par l'entremise de notre groupe de fournisseurs d'accès de gros soit pour leur donner accès à nos tours, soit pour leur fournir ce dont ils ont besoin en matière de réseau de base et ce genre de choses. Le meilleur exemple d'organisme sans but lucratif de notre côté serait probablement Access Communications. Il s'agit d'une coopérative de câblodistribution qui dessert un grand nombre de petites villes que nous desservons également.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Je veux simplement remercier tout le monde, et je vais céder les huit secondes qu'il me reste au président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons entendre M. Lloyd. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

J'aimerais commencer en remerciant tous les témoins d'aujourd'hui d'être venus.

Les commentaires de M. Meldrum me touchent de près. Je passe beaucoup de temps dans certaines de ces petites villes des régions rurales de la Saskatchewan dont ils parlaient. J'ai une résidence qui ne possède même pas de ligne téléphonique, donc j'en sais quelque chose. J'ai bien apprécié qu'il dise en toute franchise qu'un des grands problèmes dans ce dossier est l'argent. Il s'agit de coûts d'immobilisation et de coûts permanents liés à la durabilité.

Je me demandais de quelle manière votre entreprise travaillait avec les grands joueurs. Quelle est l'interaction entre les sociétés d'État, les organismes sans but lucratif et les entreprises comme Telus et Rogers?

M. John Meldrum:

Parlant de service cellulaire, nous sommes le quatrième fournisseur en importance dans la province, il y a donc un marché extrêmement concurrentiel ici en matière de service cellulaire. Toutefois, au bout du compte, Bell et Telus utilisent notre réseau, donc ils revendent en réalité le service de SaskTel. Rogers a son propre réseau, mais il est essentiellement limité aux grandes villes et aux principaux corridors routiers.

En ce qui concerne le service Internet, les gros joueurs vont revendre notre service Internet, mais il n'y a pas de gros joueurs ayant beaucoup d'installations locales dans les centres majeurs. Shaw et Access seraient nos plus grands compétiteurs, Shaw à Saskatoon, et Access Communications à Regina.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Monsieur Hogan, je remarque que vous vous concentrez sur le corridor sud-ouest qui couvre environ 25 % de la population de l'Ontario, et environ 10 % du Canada. J'ai lu récemment que Bell fait la publicité de sa fibre optique dans toutes les résidences de la région de Toronto, je crois. Pourriez-vous formuler des commentaires à propos de ce genre d'initiative?

M. Geoff Hogan:

L'an dernier, Bell Canada a annoncé qu'elle dépensait 1,1 milliard de dollars à Toronto, et elle vient tout juste d'annoncer une dépense de 50 millions de dollars à Sarnia, et de 45 millions de dollars à Windsor. Vous remarquerez les similarités, en ce sens qu'elle dépense dans des zones urbaines à forte densité. De fait, même à l'intérieur de la frontière de la ville de Sarnia, il y a des régions rurales, et Bell n'installe pas de fibre optique dans les foyers de ces régions. Cela nous ramène vraiment au rendement du capital investi. Ici, je pense que le gouvernement doit fournir des incitatifs pour qu'elle construise dans des régions qui ne sont pas rentables, parce qu'elle a une responsabilité à l'égard de ses actionnaires, et non pas à l'égard de la collectivité.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ces entreprises sont-elles ouvertes à conclure des partenariats avec des groupes comme le vôtre pour que cet accès soit élargi jusqu'aux régions rurales?

(1610)

M. Geoff Hogan:

Nous avons 28 fournisseurs qui étaient déjà qualifiés pour soumissionner à nos propositions. Notre réseau de base principal et notre regroupement... sur la rue à l'heure actuelle. Nous avons eu cinq entreprises qui se sont manifestées et qui ont présenté une soumission. Le secteur privé manifeste beaucoup d'intérêt à notre égard, mais nous avons une grosse enveloppe budgétaire de 200 millions de dollars, et il y a beaucoup d'emplacements concernés. Nos membres disent « nous voulons que vous soumissionniez ensemble pour tous ces emplacements », ce qui rend la tâche difficile aux fournisseurs existants, parce qu'ils risquent de perdre des clients s'ils ne soumissionnent pas. Par conséquent, nous employons l'approche de la carotte et du bâton. La carotte, c'est l'argent que nous avons pour vous aider à construire. Le bâton, c'est que, si vous ne soumissionnez pas, nous pourrions prendre vos meilleurs clients. C'est la façon d'amener de la concurrence sur le marché.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je comprends.

Ma dernière question s'adresse à M. Chen.

Qu'avez-vous conclu? Vous avez fait observer que certains fournisseurs de services Internet communautaires avaient échoué. Pourriez-vous expliquer les raisons pour lesquelles ils ont échoué, et nous dire quelles sont les leçons apprises quant à ce qu'il ne faut pas faire avec ces modèles?

M. William Chen:

L'expansion excessive et la mauvaise gouvernance tendent à être les principaux facteurs d'échec des fournisseurs de services Internet sans but lucratif. On parle d'expansion excessive lorsqu'un fournisseur de services Internet communautaire commence à offrir des services dans une collectivité, mais qu'il décide de s'étendre de façon excessive jusqu'aux collectivités à proximité. Cela a tendance à être un problème. La mauvaise gouvernance est principalement l'incapacité de gérer efficacement des fonds, d'investir adéquatement dans l'infrastructure.

Dans une moindre mesure, je dirais que cela vient également de l'augmentation des frais de transit. En Colombie-Britannique, le transit Internet tend à être particulièrement coûteux. En fait, en ce qui concerne nombre de choses qui ont été dites jusqu'à présent à propos de la vitesse de téléchargement et de téléversement de 50-10 et les comparaisons faites avec l'Europe, où la connectivité a tendance à être beaucoup plus grande, cela est principalement attribuable aux politiques d'appairage ouvert et aux frais de transit moins élevés. La Colombie-Britannique n'a pas nécessairement la même base en place.

De façon générale, le transit Internet a tendance à être beaucoup plus coûteux. Les fournisseurs de services Internet sont parfois très réticents à l'appairage. Pour vous donner une idée de ce que c'est, l'appairage sans paiement, c'est lorsque deux fournisseurs de services Internet se connectent et s'entendent pour distribuer le transit de l'un à l'autre gratuitement, en évitant tout coût important de transit Internet. Cela a tendance à être moins important ici, puisqu'il y a moins de possibilités d'appairage. C'est Netflix qui suscite le plus d'appairage, mais nous manquons de grandes entreprises qui peuvent en faire ou qui pourraient faire diminuer considérablement les coûts du transit Internet en Colombie-Britannique, comme Facebook, ou des fournisseurs de régions continentales, comme Baidu, qui est géant là-bas, je crois. La région de l'Ontario est mieux placée pour offrir du service, puisqu'elle a plus de possibilités d'appairage.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Je crois que mon temps est écoulé.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus à propos de ce processus d'appairage? Vous avez lancé quelques noms comme Netflix et Facebook.

M. William Chen:

L'appairage est une chose vraiment bien. Honnêtement, 90 % du temps, c'est un processus très bénéfique. C'est lorsque deux importants fournisseurs de services Internet du réseau de base s'associent pour faire de l'appairage. Ils conviennent que le transit entre les deux entités est gratuit, dans le cas de l'appairage sans paiement. Il y a aussi l'appairage payant, dans le cadre duquel les fournisseurs de services Internet peuvent facturer un taux plus bas pour qu'on se connecte directement à leur réseau. Toutefois, aux États-Unis, ce processus a été employé pour extorquer des entreprises comme Netflix et d'autres entreprises de vidéos sur demande par d'autres fournisseurs de services Internet qui refusaient de faire de l'appairage et qui faisaient ensuite payer des entreprises comme Netflix pour le transit Internet, les forçant au bout du compte à payer.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Est-ce que l'appairage entre en conflit avec la neutralité du Net d'une quelconque manière?

M. William Chen:

En fait, l'appairage soutient la neutralité du Net. Je ne dirais pas nécessairement qu'ils sont directement liés, mais l'appairage est un type de processus bénéfique qui, au final, est une entente mutuelle profitable aux fournisseurs de services Internet. Cela permet de diminuer les coûts de transit Internet et de s'assurer que les utilisateurs du réseau de base et de la connectivité intermédiaire puissent utiliser facilement le réseau et qu'il y ait moins d'engorgements. En général, cela se produit durant les échanges Internet.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

D'abord, monsieur Meldrum, ce serait une négligence de ma part de ne pas reconnaître que SaskTel a été l'un des chefs de file en assurant une certaine justice quant aux décisions sur les comptes de report qui ont été prises. Pour les gens qui ne connaissent pas très bien cela, il était question d'une surfacturation des clients. Certains exploitants du secteur privé ont porté l'affaire devant la Cour suprême du Canada, ce qui a touché les clients, et SaskTel a en fait été l'un des chefs de file en matière de protection des consommateurs, donc je reconnais cet élément de l'histoire.

Au point où vous en êtes en ce moment, quelles mesures précises — à notre portée — pourraient être prises pour étendre le service dans les régions rurales? Quelle est la chose à faire maintenant? Vous avez une situation intéressante, parce que vous avez d'autres personnes qui s'appuient sur vos tours. On entend souvent parler de ceux qui essaient d'avoir accès aux tours des autres. Quelle est la différence à l'heure actuelle en ce qui concerne le fait d'essayer d'obtenir des points d'accès faciles et qui ne représenteraient pas un grand investissement? Comment peut-on connecter les gens?

(1615)

M. John Meldrum:

À l'heure actuelle, nous accordons beaucoup d'importance aux services cellulaire. J'ai écouté les autres témoins, et les gens ont tendance à ne parler que d'Internet en général, mais la téléphonie cellulaire peut vous mener très loin en ce qui a trait à la connectivité Internet. En ce moment, nous travaillons avec le gouvernement provincial pour essayer d'évaluer les coûts ou de réaliser une analyse coûts-avantages en ce qui concerne l'expansion de la téléphonie cellulaire dans les régions mal desservies de la province. Jusqu'à présent, nous constatons que cela est très problématique. Pour 1 million de dollars par station cellulaire, qui couvre peut-être 100 ou 200 personnes de plus, l'aspect économique ne fonctionne tout simplement pas.

À propos du service Internet sans fil fixe, nous sommes en train d'ajouter 34 tours en ce qui a trait aux sites. Nous avons présenté une demande dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover pour 17 autres tours, alors nous poursuivons l'expansion de notre de service sans fil fixe, comme le font les autres concurrents.

Je ne veux pas exagérer la mesure dans laquelle les concurrents utilisent nos installations. Ils les utilisent lorsque c'est pour eux un choix logique. Ils sont plus enclins à poser leurs installations au sommet des élévateurs à grains ou tout autre point élevé lorsqu'il est possible de le faire. Ils vont aussi faire beaucoup de connexions en série pour ensuite nous les donner à nous ou peut-être même à quelqu'un d'autre. Parfois, ils vont pénétrer dans le réseau de fibre optique national qui passe sur les chemins de fer, lorsque les chemins de fer passent par là.

M. Brian Masse:

Vous ne seriez qu'une option parmi plusieurs, alors, pour l'accès à califourchon qui se fait avec d'autres fournisseurs.

Monsieur Hogan, en ce qui concerne votre accès à d'autres fournisseurs, particulièrement l'expansion de Bell et d'autres, à quel point est-il facile de travailler avec les fournisseurs? Les règles sont-elles claires? Dans la mesure où vous le pouvez, est-ce que, lors des prochaines enchères du spectre, par exemple, les conditions pourraient être plus spécifiques, et est-ce que le spectre supplémentaire inutilisé pourrait devenir superflu assez rapidement selon un type de principe de préemption?

M. Geoff Hogan:

Notre projet est vraiment axé sur la fibre optique uniquement, donc nous ne parlons pas vraiment de spectre.

Mais je vais dire une chose. Nous avons été financés grâce aux Fonds des petites collectivités, et l'une des exigences est que toute infrastructure que nous finançons doit être libre d'accès. La concurrence fondée sur la mise à disposition d'installations, ce que nous avons au Canada à l'heure actuelle, ne fonctionne pas dans les régions rurales à mon avis. Nous pouvons à peine nous permettre d'installer un peu de fibre optique, comment pourrions-nous possiblement rivaliser la concurrence en en installant beaucoup? Faisons en sorte que la fibre optique que nous installons soit libre d'accès de sorte que nous puissions offrir Internet ou des services par contournement dans les foyers au moyen d'un segment de fibre optique et avoir ainsi de la concurrence — tout comme, si on fait un parallèle avec nos routes, UPS et FedEx livrent des paquets le long d'une route publique.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est intéressant. Comme c'est le cas, il y a une différence entre les collectivités, même à propos de Postes Canada maintenant, en ce qui concerne le service de facteurs traditionnel.

Monsieur Chen, d'après votre expérience avec le regroupement de fournisseurs de services Internet, en termes simples, est-il possible qu'ils travaillent ensemble de manière plus approfondie? À l'heure actuelle, il y a beaucoup de concurrence dans les points chauds. Pouvons-nous nous attendre à ce que la concurrence dans ces régions soit élargie? Par exemple, si nous le permettons dans une région, on s'attend pratiquement — ou des parties des contrats concernant le nouveau spectre, et peut-être d'autres qui l'exigent — à ce que cela inclut en fait une plus grande zone géographique.

(1620)

M. William Chen:

Pourriez-vous expliquer brièvement ce que vous entendez par regroupement?

M. Brian Masse:

Oui. Exactement, cela permettrait de nous assurer que, lorsque les spectres à mettre en vente aux enchères vont arriver, que nous avons des conditions concernant de plus grandes zones, par exemple, si vous voulez entrer dans la région du Grand Toronto. Nous avons entendu parler de Milton, par exemple. Elle n'offre pas les mêmes services qu'au centre-ville de Toronto, nous pourrions étendre la concurrence jusque-là également.

M. William Chen:

Pour être honnête, je ne pense pas me rappeler d'aucune expérience de regroupement ou de quelque connaissance que ce soit quant à la façon dont cela pourrait toucher les conditions du marché, et je ne veux pas vous donner une réponse erronée.

M. Brian Masse:

Ce n'est pas grave. Cela fait partie des témoignages que nous avons entendus mardi.

C'est tout, monsieur le président. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Graham.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci. [Français]

Monsieur Collins, soyez le bienvenu.

Je veux vous féliciter pour votre projet. Je veux surtout vous remercier d'en avoir parlé à la MRC d'Antoine-Labelle, parce qu'elle a utilisé vos informations et tenu compte de ce que vous avez fait pour mener son projet à bien. Nous l'apprécions beaucoup dans notre région.

J'aimerais aborder plusieurs questions d'ordre technique avec vous.

Vous avez sûrement des problèmes quant à l'utilisation des poteaux d'électricité dans la circonscription. Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu des difficultés que vous avez pour ce qui est d'utiliser les poteaux des autres compagnies?

M. Pierre Collins:

Nous avons effectivement défendu plusieurs dossiers pour des MRC, au bénéfice de tous.

Au Québec, les MRC ont beaucoup participé à la première vague de demandes de subvention déposées dans le cadre du programme Canada numérique 150 de même que dans celui du programme Brancher pour innover. Plusieurs dizaines de millions de dollars ont été versés en subventions, et plusieurs MRC ont des projets en cours.

En réponse à l'une de vos questions de tout à l'heure, je dirais que ce sont des approches reproductibles et que c'est en train de se faire. Le milieu rural est donc en train de s'organiser.

Nous parlons de la MRC d'Antoine-Labelle, une MRC de très grande envergure, qui vient de lancer un projet de 50 millions de dollars pour la construction d'un réseau de fibres optiques jusqu'à domicile dans un milieu rural très étendu. Le projet va s'étaler sur quelques années.

Comme je le disais plus tôt, la déréglementation au Canada s'est faite de façon très progressive et très organisée. Nous en avons tous bénéficié. Nous en sommes à un point où tout est pleinement déréglementé, ce qui nous permet d'avoir des infrastructures compétitives. C'est ce que nous sommes en train de faire: nous bâtissons des infrastructures là où les autres ne veulent pas aller.

Notre modèle économique nécessite une subvention. Il faut réduire nos coûts en capital pour être capables de produire des flux de trésorerie suffisants pour faire fonctionner ces entreprises. Les droits de passage sont le dernier obstacle qui nous empêche de déployer nos réseaux. Si nous n'avons pas accès aux structures, c'est impossible, à moins de nous accrocher à un nuage pour y avoir accès. Donc, nous devons utiliser les infrastructures des entreprises compétitrices, comme celles de Bell Canada ou d'autres plus petits fournisseurs locaux. Pour sa part, Hydro-Québec n'est pas une compétitrice, mais elle possède des infrastructures de soutènement.

Voici la façon dont cela se fait à l'heure actuelle. Nous devons faire des demandes et des plans. C'est très organisé et très structuré, et les processus administratifs sont assortis de délais très précis. Quand les structures sont déjà vétustes et incapables de supporter une charge supplémentaire, le propriétaire nous demande, à nous qui sommes les derniers à souhaiter installer un câble, de payer la totalité des coûts de modification, d'amélioration ou de modernisation de ces structures. Ces dépenses rendent donc le projet encore moins rentable.

Je profite d'une tribune comme la vôtre pour souligner qu'il est extrêmement important de comprendre qu'au bout du compte, nous devons avoir accès aux structures. Nous avons déjà accès au capital, à la technologie et à la clientèle, ce qui est très important. Quand nous vendons un service à des gens de la MRC, croyez-moi, leur adhésion est normale et naturelle, car c'est un projet du milieu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il en coûte, dans votre MRC, pour brancher ces 7 000 maisons?

(1625)

M. Pierre Collins:

À cause des infrastructures?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, à cause des infrastructures physiques.

M. Pierre Collins:

Il y a des frais de location des infrastructures. Sans trop entrer dans les détails de nature technique, je dirais que la location des poteaux coûte très cher, ce qui influe directement sur la viabilité d'un modèle d'affaires. Changer les structures coûte très cher aussi, mais dans notre cas, il nous en coûtera 13 millions de dollars pour brancher 7 000 maisons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que vous offrez trois services. Combien cela coûte-t-il à vos clients?

M. Pierre Collins:

La politique tarifaire n'est pas encore définie, mais elle nous permettra de compétitionner. Le principe d'une telle politique est d'être capable d'offrir des services à un prix adéquat.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les grandes compagnies existantes vous mettent-elles des bâtons dans les roues quant au déploiement de vos services?

M. Pierre Collins:

Elles le font uniquement en ce qui concerne les infrastructures de soutènement.

M. Louis-Charles Thouin:

C'est certain qu'elles ne nous mettent pas de bâtons dans les roues pour l'instant quant au déploiement, sinon en ce qui a trait à l'accès aux infrastructures, pour la simple raison que nous prenons des marchés qu'elles ne couvrent pas. Ces marchés n'ont pas accès à Internet. Ce sont les miettes que ces compagnies ne veulent pas prendre. Elles occupent le marché des périmètres urbains. Elles y ont une forte présence et se font concurrence pour les mêmes clients. Nous prenons les clients dont ces compagnies ne veulent pas.

Les citoyens adhèrent facilement au modèle d'organismes sans but lucratif créés et gérés par le milieu ou par des administrateurs privés et publics. Au bout de la chaîne, tous les bénéfices générés par notre organisation seront redistribués aux collectivités. Cet argent n'ira pas dans les poches d'investisseurs ou d'actionnaires, mais dans celles des contribuables. Pour cette raison, il est facile d'amener les gens à adhérer à un projet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mardi dernier, un témoin nous a dit que, si on laissait faire le secteur privé, il offrirait, par ses propres moyens, un service Internet en région et que ce serait réglé. Que pensez-vous de ce commentaire?

M. Pierre Collins:

Si on laissait quoi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si on laissait faire les entreprises du secteur privé, par leurs propres moyens et sans qu'elles bénéficient de subventions, elles régleraient le problème d'accès à Internet en région.

M. Pierre Collins:

Non, c'est l'inverse.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est aussi ce que j'ai pensé.

M. Pierre Collins:

Cela fait 50 ans que ces régions ne sont pas desservies et il n'y a pas de raison pour qu'elles le soient du jour au lendemain. Cela n'a rien à voir avec l'entreprise privée, mais tout à voir avec le modèle économique.[Traduction]

Tout le monde parle de la densité, que si la densité n'est pas suffisante, le coût de la structure est tellement élevé qu'il n'y a aucune façon d'obtenir un rendement comme le recherchent habituellement les entreprises de télécommunication. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.[Traduction]

Il ne me reste que quelques secondes. J'aimerais poser une toute petite question à M. Chen.

En ce qui a trait à la neutralité du Net, l'investissement pour l'Internet dans les milieux ruraux est souvent différent d'une ville à l'autre. Diriez-vous que cela devait être un facteur au chapitre de la neutralité du Net? Si vous investissez d'une manière différente, est-ce que cela viole la neutralité du Net parce que vous n'offrez pas de services égaux à différentes personnes?

M. William Chen:

La neutralité du Net se reporte essentiellement à la discrimination à l'égard du contenu, pas nécessairement au caractère inadéquat du service en ce qui a trait à la vitesse numérique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc cela ne concerne pas la discrimination en matière de disponibilité?

M. William Chen:

La discrimination en matière de disponibilité n'est pas considérée comme un enjeu de la neutralité du Net. Généralement, comme le disent les gens, il vaut mieux avoir une connexion Internet plus lente assortie de services traités également qu'une connexion Internet rapide qui discrimine certains services en les ralentissant de façon arbitraire. Avec une connexion Internet lente, c'est peut-être lent, mais au moins vous avez de la concurrence.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je n'ai plus de temps.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci.

J'aimerais remercier tous les témoins d'être venus comparaître aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais vous poser une question à tous les quatre et savoir ce que vous en pensez.

Le gouvernement libéral s'est engagé à verser 500 millions de dollars au programme Brancher pour innover. Je vais faire un petit calcul rapide. Nous avons dépensé près de 200 millions de dollars de ce montant. Nous avons dépensé 195 millions de dollars au Québec et à Terre-Neuve seulement au cours des deux ou trois dernières années. Le Manitoba et la Colombie-Britannique ont reçu environ 65 millions de dollars, et je sais qu'on s'est engagé à verser quelque 100 millions de dollars supplémentaires pour l'année à venir pour une partie de la Colombie-Britannique, et encore une fois l'Est.

Est-ce que 500 millions de dollars suffisent pour assurer la connexion?

Nous allons commencer à cette extrémité de la table et nous allons terminer avec la Saskatchewan s'il vous plaît.

M. Pierre Collins:

Je ne peux pas répondre directement à votre question, car je ne connais pas toutes les données.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Il est question de 1 milliard de dollars seulement pour la grande région de Vancouver. Nous parlons de 500 millions de dollars pour le Canada.

(1630)

M. Pierre Collins:

Oui, l'un des principaux problèmes auxquels nous nous butons est la difficulté à déterminer qui possède réellement le service et qui ne l'a pas. En ce qui nous concerne, lorsque nous avons commencé à examiner la question et que nous avons voulu participer au premier programme, nous avons obtenu 4,7 millions de dollars pour la MRC. Cette fois-ci, nous avons de multiples clients qui obtiennent de l'argent. La première chose que nous faisons vise à déterminer qui possède le service et qui ne l'a pas à l'échelle du territoire, car si vous demandez à Telus, à Bell, à Rogers, à tous les députés, vous savez quoi? Tout le monde est bien servi. Nous n'avons pas besoin d'argent. Toutefois, si vous vérifiez la réalité du service, vous constaterez que seules 7 193 maisons ont le service, ce n'est qu'une partie des 22 000. C'est la même chose qui se produit dans toutes les MRC de notre province. Tout le monde va prétendre être bien servi.

Nous avons pris la carte hexagonale du gouvernement, et selon elle, tout le monde était bien servi. Nous avons pris des mesures. Nous avons réalisé des sondages. Nous avons fait du porte-à-porte et nous nous sommes adressés aux fonctionnaires de la municipalité, et nous avons déterminé qui était desservi et qui ne l'était pas.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Monsieur Chen.

M. William Chen:

Pour ce qui est du financement, c'est un début. Je ne dirais pas que c'est suffisant à long terme, et j'ai insisté sur la nécessité d'obtenir un investissement soutenu suffisant, mais c'est un début.

Cependant, comme l'ont dit d'autres témoins, c'est une goutte d'eau dans l'océan par rapport à ce qui doit être fait. Cela ne veut pas nécessairement dire que le gouvernement devrait payer la note en totalité. Une partie des frais devrait découler de mesures incitatives dans le secteur privé, particulièrement pour favoriser la création et l'établissement d'un réseau de base et d'une connectivité intermédiaire, de sorte que le financement venant du gouvernement puisse être affecté efficacement à des projets d'infrastructure plus localisés. Ce serait la manière la plus efficiente de l'utiliser, mais à long terme, oui, il est nécessaire d'établir un plan concret en vue d'un développement durable.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Monsieur Hogan.

M. Geoff Hogan:

Non, ce n'est pas suffisant. La zone de notre projet s'est vue accorder 180 millions de dollars en 2016, et c'est un bon début seulement pour le sud-ouest de l'Ontario. Si on regarde au nord, il y a d'énormes défis, encore pires que ceux de la Saskatchewan. Je crois que l'une des choses qui faciliteraient la tâche à tous les types d'organisations, qu'il s'agisse d'une organisation subventionnée directement par le secteur public ou d'un organisme sans but lucratif qui prévoit le faire, ce serait qu'il y ait des investissements annuels soutenus plutôt que des programmes distincts où il faut attendre pour savoir ce qui se passera dans deux ans. Cela faciliterait grandement la planification et l'exécution, et ce serait beaucoup plus efficace. À long terme, je pense que cela diminuerait le nombre de subventions nécessaires au secteur privé pour finir le travail.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Monsieur Meldrum.

M. John Meldrum:

Bien, pour souligner une évidence, cela est très loin de ce dont on a besoin pour obtenir la vitesse de 50-10, mais je crois que le programme d'ISDE vise à en arriver à une vitesse de 5-1. Il semble que les 500 millions de dollars vont permettre au pays d'y arriver, mais je pense que le problème tient au fait que cela nous ramène à ces cartes hexagonales. J'ai entendu des gens parler des cartes hexagonales au Comité. Je pense que l'idée est de se pencher sur les cartes hexagonales pour voir si la majorité des gens ont un accès. Cela veut dire que la minorité n'a peut-être pas d'accès. Je pense donc que la réponse à votre question, c'est qu'il faut travailler d'arrache-pied avec ISDE pour comprendre les cartes hexagonales et l'information qui a été prise en compte pour que l'on puisse affirmer que certaines régions sont desservies — mais dans quelle mesure sont-elles desservies?

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Je représente une seule province. Combien pourrait-il en coûter à la province de la Saskatchewan pour obtenir une vitesse de téléchargement et de téléversement de 50-10?

M. John Meldrum:

À l'heure actuelle, il faudrait que la fibre optique se rende jusqu'aux surfaces agricoles. Nous n'avons pas les chiffres à cet égard, mais...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Pouvez-vous me donner une idée approximative?

M. John Meldrum:

Il en coûterait probablement 5 milliards de dollars. Selon nous, il n'est pas rentable d'enfouir de la fibre optique jusqu'à chaque ferme. Je sais qu'il y a quelqu'un des États-Unis qui en a parlé. Beaucoup d'argent provient de leurs fonds de service universel pour financer la fibre optique jusqu'aux fermes.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je crois que je n'ai plus de temps, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Vous avez plus que dépassé votre temps. Mais c'était une bonne question.

Nous allons passer à M. Bossio.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Mike Bossio (Hastings—Lennox and Addington, Lib.):

Je suis entièrement d'accord avec M. Eglinski, mais vous avez raison de dire que c'est un début. Il s'agit tout de même du plus important investissement qu'il n'y a jamais eu en ce qui concerne le service à large bande en milieu rural, et si nous arrivons à conclure des partenariats avec les provinces, les municipalités et le secteur privé, nous pourrions transformer ces 500 millions de dollars en 1 milliard de dollars. C'est un très bon départ, oui, mais nous devons en faire davantage.

Monsieur Hogan, je viens de l'est de l'Ontario, je connais donc très bien le Réseau régional de l'Est ontarien, le RREO, et je sais que SWIFT est inspiré du modèle du RREO en grande partie. Est-ce bien exact?

(1635)

M. Geoff Hogan:

Notre modèle de gouvernance est très semblable, en effet.

M. Mike Bossio:

Très bien.

Du point de vue du modèle, un des problèmes avec le RREO, c'est qu'il a été créé assez tôt — avant l'arrivée de Netflix — et, en conséquence, on a pris bon nombre des décisions liées aux investissements sans prévoir la création de Netflix et les énormes incidences des contenus vidéo sur les réseaux. Les responsables ont consacré beaucoup plus d'investissements au réseau sans fil et de base qu'à la couche intermédiaire du réseau, à ses liaisons terrestres et au fait d'amener la fibre jusqu'au POP.

Le modèle que vous proposez vise-t-il à essayer d'assurer que la fibre se rende à chaque POP, pour ensuite être combinée à un modèle d'accès sans fil fixe ou microcellulaire, dans lequel des microcellules prendront en charge un certain degré de densité, et seront ensuite raccordées à des tours hertziennes qui couvrent les grandes zones, et à faire en sorte que dans les endroits à forte densité il sera possible d'amener la fibre jusqu'aux maisons? Êtes-vous en train d'évaluer les trois niveaux de modèles possibles?

M. Geoff Hogan:

Notre modèle est différent de celui du RREO vu que la fibre est la seule technologie que nous allons utiliser. Nous croyons que c'est la seule infrastructure qui, à long terme, peut être adaptée pour satisfaire aux besoins futurs. Je dois dire que nous n'envisageons pas les vitesses de téléchargement en amont et en aval de 5-1 ou même de 50-10, parce que c'est ce qui existe aujourd'hui, et qu'à l'avenir...

Si nous nous comparons aux autres pays qui figurent au classement de l'OCDE, nous sommes au 24e rang, et la pénétration de la fibre optique se situe à 5,3 %, alors que dans un pays de taille raisonnable comme la Suède, la pénétration de la fibre optique est de 50 %. J'entends dire que la somme de 5 milliards de dollars est inabordable, mais si vous êtes en mesure de fournir des soins de santé de façon plus efficace et d'en réduire le coût parce que vous avez accès à une bonne connexion, cette somme représente un excellent investissement. De fait, nous avons effectué des calculs, et il en est ressorti que ce serait un très bon investissement que de dépenser 5 milliards de dollars en Saskatchewan ou dans le Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario.

Imaginez un instant si chaque entreprise, foyer ou personne n'avait plus de contraintes liées à la bande passante, qu'il s'agisse de limites de données ou de vitesse, combien notre pays pourrait produire d'innovations. Actuellement, nous devons toujours nous demander si nous pouvons faire un appel par Skype maintenant, parce que notre fille est en train d'utiliser Netflix. Personnellement, je dois crier d'un bout à l'autre de la maison pour...

M. Mike Bossio:

Je suis désolé, je ne veux pas manquer de temps, et je souhaite vraiment poser des questions à M. Meldrum. Je crois qu'il sera difficile de trouver les 5 milliards de dollars. Il est difficile de soudainement décider que nous allons investir 5 milliards de dollars dans ce projet immédiatement. Il y a assurément certains obstacles à surmonter. Toutefois, pendant que nous tentons de les franchir, la discussion portant sur le spectre de fréquences devient pertinente.

Est-ce que le spectre de fréquences de 3,5 GHz pour Internet est utilisé en Saskatchewan, comme dans la plupart des autres endroits, pour ce qui est de l'accès sans fil fixe?

M. John Meldrum:

Nous ne l'offrons pas, mais d'autres le font.

M. Mike Bossio:

Très bien. Alors, diriez-vous que cette situation fait partie du problème, c'est-à-dire le fait de ne pas avoir de portion du spectre de la bande réservée à l'utilisation d'Internet?

M. John Meldrum:

Nous utilisons les blocs de fréquences de 2 500 MHz non appariés pour notre service.

M. Mike Bossio:

Je vois, comme tous les autres fournisseurs peuvent faire.

M. John Meldrum:

Non, les blocs ont été vendus aux enchères. De fait, une partie de l'excédent de la bande de 2 500 MHz est mise aux enchères. Notre entreprise n'est pas admissible parce que nous détenons trop d'avoirs du spectre de la bande de 2 500 MHz pour des services cellulaires. C'est pourquoi nous continuerons d'être soumis à des contraintes en ce qui concerne le spectre.

M. Mike Bossio:

Vos services cellulaires et Internet sont tous les deux offerts sur la bande de 2 500 MHz? Actuellement, en Ontario, la bande de 3 500 MHz est réservée aux services Internet, et les services cellulaires sont offerts sur une bande différente, n'est-ce pas?

M. John Meldrum:

Oui. C'est que, dans la bande de 2 500 MHz, il y a des blocs non appariés, et ils peuvent être utilisés pour des services d'accès sans fil fixe.

M. Mike Bossio:

Avez-vous examiné la possibilité d'utiliser l'attribution dynamique du spectre comme solution au problème de spectre des fréquences?

M. John Meldrum:

Je crois que cela s'applique davantage aux services cellulaires offerts par notre entreprise, et nous n'avons pas de contraintes relativement au spectre pour ce qui est de ces services.

M. Mike Bossio:

Non, en fait, on peut l'appliquer à n'importe quel niveau. Pardonnez-moi, me reste-t-il du temps? Je suis désolé.

Je crois que la technologie est suffisamment avancée maintenant pour nous permettre d'attribuer le spectre de fréquences selon les besoins et la technologie utilisée; mais c'est un autre sujet. Je suis désolé.

(1640)

Le président:

Très bien, nous allons maintenant donner la parole à M. Eglinski.

Vous avez de nouveau cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Cinq minutes, très bien.

Le président:

À moins que vous ne souhaitiez vendre une partie de ces cinq minutes aux membres de l'opposition.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Ils le souhaitent peut-être.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Jim Eglinski: J'ai une question pour M. Chen.

D'après votre profil de lobbyiste, vous demandez la création d'une société de la Couronne, soit un fournisseur de services Internet, qui offrirait des services d'accès Internet aux entreprises et aux particuliers à un prix raisonnable.

M. William Chen:

Nous avons réévalué cette priorité et croyons qu'il serait préférable de réaliser une telle initiative au palier provincial plutôt que fédéral. Il faut convenir que ce serait difficile à réaliser par le gouvernement fédéral, principalement parce que la distribution des fonds ne serait pas aussi efficace à cette échelle qu'à celle des régions. Nous avons modifié nos objectifs à cet égard pour nous concentrer principalement sur des services offerts par les administrations municipales et provinciales. Plus l'échelon est bas, plus la portée du mandat est petite, et meilleur est le service, à notre avis.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Je vais m'adresser aux représentants de SouthWestern Integrated Fibre Technology. Pourriez-vous décrire certains des défis auxquels vous avez fait face pour obtenir du financement public ou privé dans le but d'effectuer des investissements dans les larges bandes en région?

M. Geoff Hogan:

Il nous a fallu six ans pour obtenir notre première subvention. L'administration municipale a dépensé environ 1 million de dollars pour des études et d'autres choses du genre. C'était long.

Pour ce qui est du capital provenant du secteur privé, nous avons effectué certaines analyses, et notre projet permet de fournir jusqu'à 66 % des fonds pour les dépenses en capital des fournisseurs. Les fournisseurs paieraient 33 ¢, et nous verserions 66 ¢ en subvention. Nous avons effectué certains calculs et, grâce à des rencontres collaboratives, nous avons reçu des commentaires des fournisseurs dans des zones à très faible densité, et ils ne sont pas prêts à faire une offre s'il n'y a que 66 ¢ en subvention, parce qu'ils ne pourraient tirer un revenu suffisant, même s'ils disposaient de capital libre pour exploiter le système de façon indépendante.

Ce n'est pas difficile pour nous de trouver du financement du secteur privé pour les zones un peu plus denses, mais si l'on prend la région dans son ensemble, il y a les zones à très faible densité, les fermes, qui sont de densité moyenne, et les petites agglomérations urbaines. Si vous les réunissez, l'affaire peut être rentable si on l'examine en tant que système global, mais si on ne retient que les zones les moins denses, nous devrons fournir une subvention presque complète pour que les fournisseurs puissent même exploiter le système, selon moi.

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord.

Je viens d'un de ces endroits que vous décrivez. Selon vous, quelles modifications réglementaires à l'échelle fédérale pourraient aider les provinces à atteindre nos objectifs pour les régions rurales? Je crois qu'on peut y arriver assez facilement dans les centres urbains.

M. Geoff Hogan:

Je crois que l'accès ouvert est l'un des principes clés. Le CRTC s'est abstenu de créer des règlements relatifs à la transmission entre deux points et, maintenant, en raison du modèle dégroupé, les fournisseurs concurrentiels qui souhaitent offrir des services dans une zone locale doivent acheter leur transit dans un marché libre, situé en Ontario, au 151, rue Front. Il n'y a pas beaucoup de concurrence dans ces régions rurales, et les petites entreprises privées doivent effectuer des investissements importants dans ces endroits, et elles ne sont pas assurées que les coûts liés à leur liaison terrestre ne monteront pas en flèche au fil du temps; c'est pourquoi elles n'investissent pas.

Si on obligeait les grands fournisseurs à donner un accès ouvert, de bout en bout, cela créerait beaucoup plus de concurrence dans le marché pour les petits fournisseurs. Ce serait là ma plus grande demande.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vous avez une minute et demie.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je vais m'adresser aux représentants de la municipalité régionale de comté de Montcalm. Vous avez mentionné le fait d'avoir choisi la fibre optique et d'avoir consenti des investissements importants en ce sens. Avez-vous examiné d'autres technologies à haute vitesse? Pourquoi avez-vous choisi la fibre optique, et non une autre de ces technologies? Nous avons reçu un témoin ce mardi qui a affirmé qu'un système par satellite pourrait être une solution plus économique. Je me demandais si vous pouviez vous exprimer à ce sujet.

M. Pierre Collins:

Je travaille dans ce domaine depuis très longtemps et j'ai été témoin de son évolution, de l'utilisation des câbles en cuivre à tout le reste. Je crois qu'il y a seulement une façon d'arriver à obtenir un bon investissement pour les Canadiens à long terme, et c'est en utilisant le câble. Il s'agit d'un photon qui traverse un tube de verre. Rien ne peut l'égaler pour ce qui est de la densité, de la qualité, de la robustesse, de l'utilisation à long terme et de la durée.

Il faut tenir compte d'un horizon de 50 ans. Les responsables de Corning vous diront qu'il existe des réseaux que l'on utilise depuis 50 ans sans aucune interruption ni entretien. Si je devais investir mon propre argent, je l'investirais dans la fibre, sans hésiter.

(1645)

M. Jim Eglinski:

C'est la raison mentionnée précédemment, n'est-ce pas?

M. Pierre Collins:

Oui. C'est en raison de sa technologie, essentiellement, ainsi que de sa capacité et de l'entretien requis. Ce sont tous ces éléments.

M. Jim Eglinski:

J'ai entendu des rumeurs dans ma région voulant que certaines personnes aimeraient se servir d'anciennes conduites de gaz pour y passer de la fibre optique. D'après vous, est-ce réaliste?

M. Pierre Collins:

Oui. Parmi mes expériences passées, j'ai vu l'utilisation de conduites d'eau inutilisées au centre-ville de Toronto. Nous avons acheté le vieux réseau et avons amené la fibre jusqu'à chaque entreprise. Nous étions dans une excellente situation, parce que les droits de passage constituent un élément clé. Après avoir choisi la bonne technologie — la fibre optique —, il faut ensuite obtenir des droits de passage. Vous devez obtenir l'accès aux édifices. Vous devez avoir accès aux clients.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Donc c'est réaliste de penser que l'on pourrait passer des câbles de fibre optique dans des conduites?

M. Pierre Collins:

Absolument. Cela peut être fait à tout moment.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Baylis.

Vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Bonjour, monsieur Collins. Je vais commencer par vous.

En ce qui a trait aux droits de passage, vous avez parlé d'Hydro-Québec et de Bell Canada. Y a-t-il quelque chose qui relève de la compétence du gouvernement fédéral et qui pourrait vous aider? On ne peut pas réglementer les activités d'Hydro-Québec, en effet, mais comment pourrait-on vous aider relativement à cette question de droits de passage?

M. Pierre Collins:

En fait, vous réglementez les activités de Bell Canada, qui détient 50 % des structures de soutènement dans la province. Les autres 50 % sont divisés dans deux territoires de la province. Bell Canada a ses poteaux et Hydro-Québec a les siens. Chaque fois que nous voulons installer un câble, un toron ou une ancre, nous devons leur demander la permission. Il existe donc un processus administratif, qui est réglementé. Le CRTC met son nez dans ces affaires depuis toujours. Les tarifs sont déposés. Cela coûte 1,23 $ par mois, par poteau. Cela coûte 0,55 $...

M. Frank Baylis:

Tous ces frais mis en place par le CRTC sont-ils raisonnables?

M. Pierre Collins:

Ils sont en croissance.

M. Frank Baylis:

Ces frais sont en croissance?

M. Pierre Collins:

Oui.

Malgré ces frais, je crois qu'ils n'ont pas tout à fait entretenu... Puisque vous me demandez mon opinion, je me permets de vous la donner.

M. Frank Baylis:

Allez-y, c'est le temps de le faire.

M. Pierre Collins:

C'est le temps de le faire, n'est-ce pas? Je crois qu'ils n'ont pas très bien entretenu toutes leurs infrastructures.

M. Frank Baylis:

Ils n'ont pas entretenu les infrastructures. Alors, si vous voulez les utiliser, malheureusement, il faut que vous payiez pour les réparer. C'est cela?

M. Pierre Collins:

Oui.

Quand le poteau a une pente de plus de cinq degrés, il faut le changer.

M. Frank Baylis:

De cinq degrés?

M. Pierre Collins:

Oui.

Le fait que nous travaillions avec les municipalités nous aide beaucoup parce qu'elles nous accordent les droits de passage. Vous comprenez, nous pouvons creuser dans la rue...

M. Frank Baylis:

Restons-en strictement à ce que le gouvernement fédéral pourrait faire.

M. Pierre Collins:

C'est une bataille éternelle. Ce sont des coûts...

M. Frank Baylis:

Si nous revenons au contrôle par le CRTC et que nous évaluons les frais de location...

M. Pierre Collins:

Il y aussi les frais de mise à niveau, lesquels sont très élevés.

M. Frank Baylis:

Ce sont des frais de mise à niveau?

M. Pierre Collins:

Oui, c'est comme cela qu'on les appelle.

M. Frank Baylis:

Pour le moment, ces frais retombent sur vos épaules. C'est cela?

M. Pierre Collins:

Absolument.

Les ingénieurs refont un dessin, réalignent les poteaux, décident de changer les lignes et nous envoient la facture, que nous devons payer en totalité. Si ce n'était que de la facture, mais c'est aussi le temps que cela prend.

On nous dit qu'on le fera, mais que notre territoire n'est pas une priorité.

M. Frank Baylis:

Quelle solution suggérez-vous?

M. Pierre Collins:

Premièrement, je pense que nous devrions avoir des coûts réalistes quand nous faisons des mises à niveau; il devrait donc y avoir des coûts standard. On devrait dire qu'un poteau coûte 1 500 $, et pas 4 500 $, comme c'est parfois le cas.

M. Frank Baylis:

Alors, ils vont facturer...

M. Pierre Collins:

C'est de l'ingénierie. Chaque projet est examiné et chacun se voit attribué un numéro d'identification. Je ne sais pas si vous vous rappelez du procédé nommé montage spécial, qui était une boîte noire à l'époque en télécommunications. Cela rentrait dedans et sortait de l'autre côté, et cela coûtait 100 000 $. [Traduction]

M. Frank Baylis:

Je vais m'adresser au représentant de SaskTel. Avez-vous des problèmes quant à l'accès à des poteaux, ou d'autres ont-ils de la difficulté à avoir accès à vos poteaux?

M. John Meldrum:

Nous ne possédons pas un grand nombre de poteaux. La majorité de notre réseau de base est enfoui. Nous n'avons aucun problème à cet égard.

M. Frank Baylis:

Permettez-moi alors d'aborder un autre point que vous avez soulevé concernant le spectre. Vous avez dit que vous avez un problème lié au spectre sans fil fixe, et non au spectre cellulaire. Quel est ce problème? Je croyais qu'une grande partie du spectre sans fil fixe était ouvert ou inutilisé. Quel est précisément le problème qui vous touche à cet égard?

(1650)

M. John Meldrum:

Nous n'avons pas déployé de spectre sans licence pour notre technologie sans fil fixe...

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous n'utilisez pas de spectre sans licence.

M. John Meldrum:

Nous n'utilisons pas de fréquences du spectre sans licence. Nous utilisons des spectres avec licence.

M. Frank Baylis:

Pourquoi est-ce le cas pour votre service sans fil fixe?

M. John Meldrum:

J'ai discuté avec notre ingénieur du spectre l'autre jour. C'est une question d'interférences et de qualité de service. Il n'y a aucune garantie. Les personnes qui se tournent vers SaskTel pour obtenir des services cherchent un produit très robuste.

M. Frank Baylis:

Si vous utilisez les spectres sans licence, vous n'obtenez pas la qualité dont vous avez besoin. J'ai compris cela.

Qui possède ce spectre? Pourquoi ne pouvez-vous pas l'obtenir?

M. John Meldrum:

Industrie Canada le mettra aux enchères. Les responsables ont déclaré qu'il y aurait une limite de 60 MHz. Notre problème tient au fait que le spectre de la bande de 2 500 MHz n'est pas uniforme. Il y a la fourchette au centre, que nous n'utilisons pas pour les services cellulaires. Elle ne présente pas les valeurs supérieures et inférieures recherchées. C'est celle que nous utilisons, et les responsables en tiennent compte dans leurs calculs relativement à la limite. Nous avons tenté de faire valoir notre point de vue...

M. Frank Baylis:

Il y a une limite imposée sur votre spectre. Est-ce bien ce que vous dites?

M. John Meldrum:

Oui. Les responsables disent que nous en avons trop.

M. Frank Baylis:

Mais ils font référence aux fréquences utilisées pour le service cellulaire. Parce que vous avez beaucoup d'avoirs qui servent au service cellulaire, ils mettent tout dans le même panier et disent que vous en avez trop; en conséquence, vous ne pouvez obtenir du spectre sans fil fixe.

M. John Meldrum:

C'est exact, et la limite s'applique à cette bande en particulier, la bande de 2 500 MHz.

M. Frank Baylis:

C'est aussi dans cette bande que se trouve le bon spectre sans fil fixe que vous souhaitez utiliser, n'est-ce pas?

M. John Meldrum:

C'est ce que nous avons choisi pour la technologie sans fil fixe, pour offrir ce service, oui.

Le problème, c'est que nous avons acheté de l'équipement de marque Huawei, destiné aux fournisseurs, et qu'il ne fonctionne qu'avec la bande de 2 500 MHz actuellement. Nous ne sommes pas admissibles, et nous devons cesser les ventes de services dans certains secteurs.

M. Frank Baylis:

Les responsables d'Industrie Canada disent que vous n'êtes pas admissible. Pour votre entreprise, il ne s'agit pas d'une question de prix; c'est uniquement une question d'admissibilité.

M. John Meldrum:

Oui. Nous n'aurons pas la permission de soumissionner.

M. Frank Baylis:

C'est simplement parce qu'à Saskatoon — ou en Saskatchewan —, on dit que vous en avez trop actuellement.

M. John Meldrum:

Exact.

Vous avez entendu certains des autres témoins du groupe précédent aborder la congestion dans le cas du service fixe sans fil. Nous évitons cette congestion en arrêtant de vendre nos services. Nous ne prenons pas d'autres clients, alors, nous disons aux gens aujourd'hui: « Nous ne pouvons pas vous fournir de service parce que notre spectre n'est pas suffisant. »

M. Frank Baylis:

Le problème que d'autres personnes ont mentionné tient au fait que les grandes entreprises accaparent tout le spectre. Il y a deux jours, nous avons entendu dire que vous accapariez tout le spectre, et, maintenant, vous me dites que vous avez besoin d'un spectre plus large afin de pouvoir l'utiliser pour fournir le service fixe sans fil.

M. John Meldrum:

Oui, c'est le spectre cellulaire par rapport au spectre fixe sans fil.

Je pense devoir également ajouter que, comme je lis tout cela au sujet des grandes entreprises qui accaparent le spectre...

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous en faites partie.

M. John Meldrum:

... qu'Industrie Canada offre un processus permettant de contester le titulaire du spectre et de lui dire: « Vous ne l'utilisez pas; je voudrais m'en servir », et qu'on peut forcer la main à Industrie Canada, afin de pouvoir obtenir la sous-licence pour la région qu'on souhaite desservir.

M. Frank Baylis:

Oui, je suis...

M. John Meldrum:

Il s'agit habituellement de régions rurales très éloignées.

M. Frank Baylis:

... je suis porté à croire que les entreprises contournent ce problème en mettant du bruit blanc dans le spectre, ou bien elles l'utilisent... Il y a moyen de soumettre une contestation si le spectre est en cours d'utilisation, mais qu'il ne sert pas aux gens. Voilà le problème.

Est-ce vrai ou pas?

M. John Meldrum:

Du point de vue du spectre cellulaire, je dirais que non. Ce processus n'a pas lieu dans le cas du service fixe.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord.

J'ai dépassé le temps qui m'était alloué, mais merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous allons abréger. Nous disposons de cinq minutes supplémentaires de chaque côté, puis nous aurons terminé.

Monsieur Eglinski.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de nous accorder le temps supplémentaire.

Monsieur Meldrum, je suis dans le centre de l'Alberta. Ma circonscription va de l'ouest d'Edmonton jusqu'à la frontière de la Colombie-Britannique, et celle de mon collègue se trouve entre Edmonton et la mienne. Bien entendu, les terres agricoles comme la vôtre comptent pour une grande partie de notre région. Elle est plate et dispose d'un relativement bon accès routier à tous les deux ou trois kilomètres, mais, ensuite, nous arrivons dans des régions très densément boisées avec une très petite population et beaucoup de collines onduleuses menant jusqu'au pied des Rocheuses, comme dans ma région. Je sais que votre terrain est très semblable. La partie sud est très plate et très éloignée, mais, ensuite, à mesure que vous avancez vers le nord, vous arrivez dans des régions très densément boisées, et c'est très semblable à la nôtre.

Avez-vous dû tenir compte des différences entre ces terrains d'une manière précise en utilisant divers types de technologies dans le Nord ou le Centre de la Saskatchewan, ou bien dans vos régions densément boisées par rapport au Sud de la Saskatchewan, qui comptent une très petite population, un terrain très ouvert et peu de routes, etc.?

(1655)

M. John Meldrum:

Le Nord de la Saskatchewan est probablement un peu différent de l'Alberta. Les populations tendent à être regroupées, alors elles sont plus faciles à servir, et nous sommes en mesure de leur offrir la fibre. Notre fibre longe la route, comme dans le cas de La Ronge. Notre fibre va jusqu'à La Ronge, puis nous servons les gens de cette ville grâce à des installations terrestres.

Nous avons obtenu un peu d'argent d'Un Canada branché afin de pouvoir amener la fibre assez près du bassin d'Athabasca, cette région autour du lac Athabasca, de Stony Rapids et de ces genres d'endroits. Encore une fois, une fois que nous pouvons nous rendre là-bas, nous recourons aux micro-ondes afin de nous rendre jusque dans le bassin d'Athabasca, mais, ensuite, nous sommes en mesure de fournir le service Internet à Stony Rapids par câble.

Il s'agit probablement de la différence: dans le Sud, il s'agit du manque de densité et de l'absence d'une analyse de rentabilisation pour servir les gens en raison du manque de densité.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Pensez-vous que ce financement fédéral sera nécessaire pour aider les provinces ou des sociétés privées, ou bien pour alimenter des régions comme celles-là, afin de leur offrir le service que nous pensons que nous allons leur fournir?

M. John Meldrum:

Nous avons encore certaines demandes faites à Brancher pour innover. Les responsables ne se sont pas encore occupés des demandes de la Saskatchewan. Le programme contient un certain réseau de base à l'égard duquel une aide est demandée, parce qu'aucune analyse de rentabilisation n'a été établie pour ce réseau de base. Dans ce cas, il s'étend plus ou moins au sud de La Ronge, jusqu'à la frontière du Manitoba, en passant par Flin Flon et Creighton.

Alors oui, on a encore besoin d'argent pour être en mesure d'installer même le réseau de base dans ces régions nordiques.

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord. Merci.

Monsieur, les vieilles canalisations d'eau, les oléoducs... j'ai adoré votre réponse. C'est bien. Je suis intéressé et enthousiaste, car nous en avons beaucoup qui sillonnent l'ensemble de notre province. Pouvez-vous simplement répondre à une question pour moi? Disons qu'une canalisation d'eau parcourt votre ville. Vous achetez la vieille canalisation ou bien vous obtenez la permission de l'utiliser. Vous faites passer votre fibre et vous raccordez un câble qui entre dans un immeuble. Comment effectuez-vous ce raccord? Devez-vous creuser jusqu'à l'endroit en question et raccorder les câbles, ou bien disposez-vous d'un moyen mystérieux d'envoyer cette fibre? Je sais que nous pouvons percer là où nous le voulons sous le sol en Alberta et localiser le raccord à un pouce près.

M. Pierre Collins:

Malheureusement, ce n'était pas moi qui faisais cela.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous n'êtes pas certain de la façon dont on procède.

M. Pierre Collins:

Non. On possède la technologie pour le faire, aujourd'hui. Je le sais et j'en suis certain. Il y a un moyen de tirer des câbles et des choses du genre. Alors, ne vous inquiétez pas, cela peut être fait.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Très bien. Merci.

Je vais céder le temps qu'il me reste à mon ami d'en face.

Le président:

En fait, je voulais poser une question rapide.

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord. Vous pouvez avoir mon temps de parole et un peu du sien.

Le président:

Simplement pour poursuivre dans la même veine que M. Eglinski, savez-vous si on installe des câbles au préalable quand on construit des infrastructures, des routes et ce genre de choses? Les intègre-t-on dans l'infrastructure?

M. Pierre Collins:

Quand on fait une route?

Le président:

Quand on construit une nouvelle route.

M. Pierre Collins: Non.

Le président: On ne le fait pas?

M. Pierre Collins:

Non. On ouvre la rue trois fois, une année à la fois, simplement pour s'assurer de déranger tout le monde.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Pierre Collins: Nous appelons cela la « planification ». C'est quelque chose qui existe ici, mais pas ailleurs.

Le président:

Intéressant.

M. Pierre Collins:

C'est drôle, mais c'est la réalité. Tout le monde le sait. Toute autre canalisation abandonnée, que ce soit un oléoduc, une canalisation d'eau ou un autre conduit, a de la valeur dans l'ensemble de l'infrastructure des télécommunications, sans aucun doute.

Le président:

En Colombie-Britannique, dans ma région, on commence à le faire. Je ne suis tout simplement pas certain que ce soit le cas partout.

M. Pierre Collins:

Non.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Dan, j'allais justement dire, en réponse à votre question, que, quand j'étais le maire de la Ville de Fort St. John, au moment où on établissait nos nouveaux lotissements résidentiels, à compter d'environ 2002, nous avons eu la chance d'intégrer des canalisations à des fins de connexions ultérieures.

M. Pierre Collins:

Cela se fait. C'est autre chose. Dans les nouveaux secteurs où on prévoit construire des maisons et des choses du genre, on intègre des canalisations. On va demander aux fournisseurs d'installations, notamment aux fournisseurs de services de câblodistribution, de gaz, d'électricité et de services de télécommunications, de collaborer pour construire une canalisation. Cela existe dans de tels contextes, mais on ne le fait pas encore dans le cas des longues routes.

(1700)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

À la toute fin de votre exposé, monsieur Hogan, vous n'avez eu que 30 secondes pour aborder la solution très intéressante que vous proposez. De mon point de vue, elle établit un équilibre en quelque sorte entre les coûts et certains des obstacles. De la façon dont je l'interprète, elle repose sur un partenariat public-privé. En tant qu'organisation, vous prétendez ne posséder aucune infrastructure. Puis-je vous demander d'en faire un survol et de nous expliquer comment vous prévoyez mettre en oeuvre une solution de ce genre?

M. Geoff Hogan:

Si nous regardons toute région rurale normale, il y a des services et des immeubles. Le carré blanc figurant sur cette diapositive comporte les points de présence, et, aujourd'hui, ils appartiennent à des fournisseurs privés. Disons que ceux de l'extérieur sont à Bell Canada et que certains des embranchements sont à de petits fournisseurs. Tous ces services appartiennent au privé. Nous optons pour des DP. Nous avons déterminé où se trouvent toutes les parties jaunes en procédant à une préqualification des fournisseurs et en exigeant qu'ils nous fournissent l'emplacement de leur fibre.

Nous allons procéder à une DP publique et affirmer que la fibre doit passer par ces zones dans les espaces noirs. On va non seulement y faire passer la fibre, mais aussi mettre à niveau les infrastructures de télécommunications, les éléments de brassage où toutes les pièces de fibre se branchent dans les points de présence existants, et nous allons en ajouter de nouveaux portant notre logo de petit oiseau. L'élément clé, c'est que nous avons beaucoup de points d'interconnexion. Une partie de cette fibre pourrait appartenir à une entreprise, et une autre partie, à une autre entreprise, mais, comme notre financement requiert un accès ouvert, les entreprises doivent pouvoir utiliser la fibre des autres. Nous pouvons installer un segment de fibre, mais tous les fournisseurs peuvent se livrer concurrence afin de fournir les services qui passent par cette fibre. Selon nous, c'est de là que vient la concurrence, et c'est vraiment ainsi que fonctionne le marché privé. Quand il y a assez de concurrence, elle règle la question des services et des prix naturellement.

Si vous regardez du côté gauche, ce sont ces zones orange où il y a maintenant une analyse de rentabilisation visant à connecter une tour, un lotissement résidentiel, une grande entreprise, comme une exploitation agricole qui a besoin... Dans le nord du comté de Grey, nous avons des mennonites qui possèdent des exploitations très complexes, lesquelles requièrent qu'ils reçoivent et envoient continuellement des plans. Ils ont besoin d'une fibre haute capacité pour ce faire.

Est-ce que cela répond à votre question?

M. Majid Jowhari:

À qui appartient l'infrastructure?

M. Geoff Hogan:

L'entreprise du secteur privé qui remportera notre soumission sera subventionnée, mais, à la fin de la période de sept ans, la totalité de l'infrastructure lui appartiendra. Au moment de la DP, nous pouvons établir des règles et des limites quant à ce qui est utilisé dans le cadre des exigences à respecter pour recevoir notre financement.

M. Majid Jowhari:

D'accord, alors, les 16 municipalités régionales et locales se rassemblent. Elles élaborent un modèle, c'est-à-dire celui que vous venez tout juste de présenter, puis les entreprises soumissionnent à son égard. Dans le cadre de vos enchères, vous demandez qui soumissionnera à cet égard, pourvu que l'entreprise retenue offre ce modèle.

M. Geoff Hogan:

C'est exact.

M. Majid Jowhari:

D'accord, et ensuite, l'infrastructure appartient à la fois aux secteurs public et privé. Comment recouvrez-vous les coûts?

M. Geoff Hogan:

Pendant sept ans, il est exigé que SWIFT, l'organisme sans but lucratif, possède 51 % de l'infrastructure. Pour amener le secteur privé à soumissionner, nous avons accepté qu'à la fin de la période de sept ans, l'entreprise retenue possèdera toute l'infrastructure. Nos règles s'appliqueront encore parce qu'elle aura signé un contrat avec nous. La totalité lui appartiendra, à la fin.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Quel rôle la somme de 500 millions de dollars dont nous avons discuté joue-t-elle là-dedans?

M. Geoff Hogan:

Nous avons été financés par le Fonds des petites collectivités, qui fait partie du Nouveau Fonds Chantiers Canada, un fonds destiné aux infrastructures, pas le programme Brancher pour innover. Ce programme aurait aussi pu être utilisé de cette manière, sauf qu'il était plus précis au sujet des points bleus sur la carte qui requièrent du service. Comme je l'ai dit, certains des employés ont effectué une analyse, là.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

J'ai une question de suivi à ce sujet. Je n'ai jamais posé autant de questions en deux ans.

Vous, en tant qu'entreprise — SWIFT —, faites ceci. Une petite ville pourrait-elle utiliser ce modèle à votre place?

(1705)

M. Geoff Hogan:

Dans une petite ville, on procède à une analyse de rentabilisation afin que le secteur privé fasse le travail. Nous ne voyons pas le besoin de le subventionner.

Le président:

Dans certains cas, peu de fournisseurs vont dans les petites villes parce qu'il n'y a tout simplement pas cette analyse de rentabilisation. Toutefois, si la ville étudiait ce type de modèle, non seulement elle pourrait étendre la portée de sa large bande, mais elle pourrait aussi générer des revenus, si elle vendait ses services.

M. Geoff Hogan:

Dans notre région, certaines petites municipalités ont réalisé un modèle selon lequel la municipalité installe la canalisation et la fibre, puis les loue à des fournisseurs afin qu'ils offrent les services.

Le président:

Très bien, je veux remercier tout le monde d'avoir témoigné aujourd'hui. C'était très intéressant.

C'est notre dernier jour de témoignage, et nous allons...

M. Mike Bossio:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de m'avoir permis de prendre part à cette étude.

Le président:

Je vous en prie.

Avant que nous disions au revoir à tout le monde...

Des députés: Au revoir, tout le monde.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Connexion rétablie par un homologue.

Le président:

Connexion rétablie par un homologue? C'est une expression de maniaque de la technologie, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham: Vous ruinez la connexion.

Des députés: Ah, ah!

Le président: Très bien

Merci à tous de vous être présentés.

Simplement pour rappeler à tout le monde que mardi prochain, nous tiendrons notre séance d'information technique. On nous a dit qu'au lieu que nous accueillions la Commission du droit d'auteur jeudi, tous les représentants qui se présenteront mardi pourront parler de ce que fait cette commission. Cela signifie que, jeudi, nous donnerons à nos analystes nos directives concernant la rédaction du rapport sur notre étude de la large bande, puis que nous allons commencer à établir une stratégie aux fins de notre examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur après la séance d'information technique.

Merci beaucoup à tous. Je vous souhaite une formidable fin de semaine. [Français]

Merci beaucoup à tous.[Traduction]

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 08, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.