header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-06-20 RNNR 140

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1605)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good afternoon, everybody. I hope everybody is doing well. I know that everybody's quite excited about today's events and the fact that this is our last official act before we can all go home.

Before we get going, Minister, I want to say thank you to a number of people, starting with our clerk and our analysts.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: We all started this journey three years ago. Richard, Shannon, T.J. and I were all original members of this committee and gang. We've come a long way since then.

Speaking for myself, I know that I never would have made it this far if it weren't for the support of everybody on this side of the table. Thank you very much. I honestly can't thank you enough. You've been tremendous. There were lots of times, I will readily admit, when I wasn't sure what I was doing.

A voice: We were going to point that out.

The Chair: Yes, I know. Actually, sometimes you did.

I also want to say thank you to all the committee members. For four years now, we've prided ourselves in having a committee in which we worked incredibly well together. We disagreed at times, but we did so respectfully.

As a result, we've had a committee that other people have looked at with envy, I think, and it's something that we should all be very, very proud of. Thanks to all of you. It's been my pleasure to work with all of you. Honestly, it has. I hope to see all of you again in the fall, and I know you feel the same way too.

Also, there are the other people behind us. They're the ones who really add a lot to this equation as well. Without all of you, none of us could do our jobs, so I want to thank everybody who's on the perimeter of this room.

Voices: Hear, hear!

The Chair: You make it all happen.

An hon. member: Except for the water people.

The Chair: Except for the water people. They want to make sure we get out of here quickly, David.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Minister, I want to thank you. I know you've had a busy schedule for the last couple of days. We've had to move the time for this meeting a number of times, and you've been quite gracious in accommodating us and making yourself available. I believe you're in Calgary right now. We're grateful that you were able to make some time to do this.

You only have an hour, we know, so I'm going to stop talking now and turn the floor over to you. Thank you for joining us, Minister.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi (Minister of Natural Resources):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and good afternoon, everyone.

I first of all want to acknowledge something that is on everyone's mind today, which is the passing of a colleague and a friend to many. On behalf of our government and my family, I want to extend my deepest condolences to the family of Mark Warawa, my colleague, and to our colleagues from the Conservative Party and many others who have lost a friend today.

I would also like to take a moment to recognize that I am speaking to you from Treaty No. 7 territory. Such acknowledgements are important, particularly when we are meeting to talk about doing resource development the right way. Our government's approach to the Trans Mountain expansion project and the start of the construction season is a great example of that—of resource development done right.

Let me also begin by recognizing that I know this expansion project inspires strong opinions on both sides—for and against—and with respect to both sides of the debate, I want to assure everyone that our government took the time required to do the hard work necessary to hear all voices, to consider all evidence and to be able to follow the guidance we received from the Federal Court of Appeal last August.

That included asking the National Energy Board to reconsider its recommendation, taking into account the environmental impact of project-related marine shipping. It also included relaunching phase III consultations with indigenous groups potentially impacted by the project, by doing things differently and engaging in a meaningful two-way dialogue.

On that note, I would like to take a moment to sincerely thank the many indigenous communities that welcomed me into their communities for meetings over the last several months. I appreciate your openness, your honesty and your constructive ideas and sincerity of views.

Honourable members, no matter where you stand on TMX, this decision is a positive step forward for all Canadians. It shows how in 2019, good projects can move forward when we do the hard work necessary to meet our duty to consult indigenous peoples and when we take concrete action to protect the environment for our kids, grandkids and future generations.

When we came into office, we took immediate steps to fix the broken review system the Conservatives left behind. When the risks made it too difficult for the private sector to move forward, we stepped in to save the project. When the Federal Court of Appeal made its decision back in August of 2018, we made the choice to move forward in the right way.

When we finished this process, we were able to come to the right decision to deliver for workers in our energy sector, for Albertans and for all Canadians, a decision to support a project that will create jobs, diversify markets, support clean energy and open up new avenues for indigenous economic prosperity in the process.

Where do we go from here, now that the expansion has been approved? While these are still early days, we have a clear path forward for construction to begin this season and beyond. The Prime Minister laid out a lot of this on Tuesday afternoon as he announced our decision. Minister Morneau expanded on some of these details when he was in Calgary yesterday, talking about the road ahead and about launching exploratory discussions with indigenous groups interested in economic participation and about using TMX's revenues to ensure Canada is a leader in providing more energy choices.

We have also heard from the Trans Mountain Corporation about both its readiness and its ambition to get started on construction. Ian Anderson, the CEO of the Trans Mountain Corporation, made this very clear yesterday.

(1610)



That's also what I heard when I visited with Trans Mountain Corporation workers yesterday in Edmonton. There were a number of contractors there. They are ready to proceed on the expansion of the Edmonton terminal, as well as on many of the pumping stations that are required to be built in this expansion.

The message is clear. We want to get shovels in the ground this season, while continuing to do things differently in the right way.

The NEB will soon issue an amended certificate of public convenience and necessity for the project. It will also ensure that TMC has met the NEB's binding pre-construction conditions. The Trans Mountain Corporation, meanwhile, will continue to advance its applications for municipal, provincial and federal permits. We stand ready to get the federal permits moving.

As all of that is happening, our government continues to consult with indigenous groups, building and expanding our dialogue with indigenous groups as part of phase IV consultations by discussing the potential impacts of the regulatory process on aboriginal and treaty rights and by working with indigenous groups to implement the eight accommodation measures that were co-developed during consultations, including building marine response capacity, restoring fish and fish habitats, enhancing spill prevention, monitoring cumulative effects and conducting further land studies.

We are also moving forward with the NEB's 16 recommendations for enhancing marine safety, protecting species at risk, improving how shipping is managed and boosting emergency response.

What is the bottom line? There is no doubt that there are a lot of moving parts. This is a project that stretches over 1,000 kilometres, but it is moving forward in the right way, as we have already proven with our $1.5-billion oceans protection plan, our $167-million whale initiative, our additional $61.5 million to protect the southern resident killer whale, and our investment of all of the new corporate tax revenues, as well as profits earned from the sale of TMX, in the clean energy projects that will power our homes, businesses and communities for generations to come.

Before making a decision, we needed to be satisfied that we had met our constitutional obligations, including our legal duty to consult with indigenous groups potentially affected by the project, upholding the honour of the Crown and addressing the issues identified by the Federal Court of Appeal last summer.

We have done that. We accomplished this by doing the hard work required by the court, not by invoking sections of the Constitution that don't apply or by launching fruitless appeals, both of which would have taken longer than the process we brought in.

While Conservatives were focused on making up solutions that wouldn't work, we focused on moving this process forward in the right way. We have confirmation of that, including from the Honourable Frank Iacobucci, former Supreme Court justice, who was appointed as a federal representative to provide us with oversight and direction on the revised consultation and accommodation process.

I will close where I began, which is by saying that we have done the hard work necessary to move forward on TMX in the right way, proving that Canada can get good resource projects approved and that we can grow the economy and deliver our natural resources to international markets to support workers, their families and their communities, all while safeguarding the environment, investing in clean growth and advancing reconciliation with indigenous peoples.

Mr. Chair, I think this is a good place to stop and invite questions.

Thank you so much once again for having me here today.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

Mr. Hehr, you're going to start us off, I believe.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Just prior to my asking questions of the minister, I'd like to applaud the chair for his exceptional work and leadership for this committee. You've done excellent work.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Hon. Kent Hehr: Minister, it's a thrill to have you back. I was in Calgary yesterday for Minister Morneau's presentation and his address to the Economic Club of Canada in Calgary. The excitement was present in the air, and there was a hop in the step of people in the room, which was good to see.

I think it's fair to say that last year's Federal Court of Appeal decision came somewhat out of the blue. The court said—and it was clear—that we needed to do our indigenous consultation better and our environmental considerations better.

I was chatting with Hannah Wilson in my office this morning, and I learned that this is happening not only here in Canada but also in the United States. In the case of Keystone XL, Enbridge Line 3 and other energy projects around the United States, the courts have been clear that this is the way things need to be done. Our government is trying to see that through, with indigenous consultation and environmental protections being at the forefront.

What was done differently this time, in consideration of the court decision that we were working with?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

The process we put in place this time was quite different from what was done in past consultations.

First of all, we co-developed the engagement process with input from indigenous communities. We provided proper training to our staff and we doubled the capacity of our consultation teams. They worked tirelessly to engage in a meaningful two-way dialogue.

We also provided participation funding to indigenous communities so they could properly participate in the consultation process. We held more meetings and we met with indigenous communities in their communities. I personally held 45 meetings with indigenous communities and met with more than 65 leaders to listen to and engage with their concerns.

I am very proud of the outcome. We are offering accommodations to indigenous communities to deal with their concerns over fish, fish habitat, protection of cultural sites and burial grounds, as well as issues related to oil spills, the health of the Salish Sea, the southern resident killer whales, underwater noise and many others.

The accommodations we are offering, Mr. Chair, actually go beyond mitigating the impact of this project and will also go a long way toward resolving some of the issues and repairing some of the damage that has been done through industrial development in the Salish Sea. They will respond to many of the outstanding issues that communities have identified, related not only to this project but also to many of the other cumulative effects of the development that communities have experienced.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you for that, Minister.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is important to Calgarians. In fact, it's in the public interest. It not only provides jobs for Albertans but also provides us an opportunity to get fair prices for our oil. None of that is possible without shovels being in the ground, so to speak. What steps must take place before that can happen? Will shovels be in the ground this construction season?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, as I said in my opening remarks, the National Energy Board will issue the certificate in the next couple of days. I was in Edmonton and had a chance to meet with workers and some of the contractors. They're ready to get down to work and they're preparing some of the work that does not require regulatory approval. The company can start mobilizing the contractors and subcontractors. They can start mobilizing their workers. They can start bidding for reconstruction work that is necessary and they can start applying for permits.

As we heard from the Trans Mountain Corporation, they're planning to put shovels in the ground by September. The goal is to complete the construction by mid-2022 so that we can start flowing the oil to markets beyond the United States.

It is very important, Mr. Chair, to understand that 99% of the oil we sell to the outside world goes to one customer, which is the United States. It is a very important customer for us. We need to expand our market with them, but we need to have more customers than one, because we are selling our oil at a discount and losing a lot of money. Over the last number of decades, the situation has remained the same. We want to make sure that this situation changes. That is why getting this project moving forward in the right way and starting construction is very important, not only to Alberta workers but also to all Canadians.

(1620)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Part of the approval of the pipeline was deeply linked to meaningful consultation with indigenous peoples. Are there ways we are ensuring that indigenous peoples meaningfully benefit from Trans Mountain in terms of jobs and other opportunities?

Also, I've heard some exciting things around possible equity stakes. Can you inform us about any of those conversations?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Yes, and a large number of indigenous communities have signed benefit agreements with the company. Those amount to close to $400 million of economic opportunities for indigenous communities. There are other communities that are still in discussions about economic benefits.

As Minister Morneau stated here in Calgary, he is launching a process whereby indigenous communities can explore options to purchase the pipeline or make other financial arrangements. This is something that I have personally heard, Mr. Chair, from a large number of communities that are interested in seeking economic opportunities for their communities to benefit from resource development. We see a lot of potential in that, and Minister Morneau is going to be leading that. Ownership by indigenous communities could be 25% or 50% or even 100%.

We are also providing funding for indigenous communities so that they'll be ready to participate in that process.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Hehr.

Ms. Stubbs is next.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Thank you, Chair. I too want to express that I've really enjoyed working with you and with all the members of this committee over the past four years.

Thank you, Minister, for joining us in committee today in response to my request, through a motion that was supported here, to give some concrete details about the Trans Mountain expansion, which your government has approved formally for the second time now in two and a half years.

I want to start with something you mentioned. The backgrounder indicated, and you have just stated as well, that the government-owned Trans Mountain Corporation is required to seek approvals from the National Energy Board for construction and continued operation. I understand there will be several hearings required by the NEB in relation to the route of the pipeline before construction can start. Can you tell us exactly what the timeline will be for those hearings?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

As many of us will remember, the National Energy Board imposed a number of conditions on this project. Trans Mountain Corporation, like any other private company, would have to comply with those conditions and respond to the NEB, and would need to apply for those permits. As you heard from CEO Ian Anderson, they are putting a process in place to work with the NEB to get those permits issued in an expedited way. The construction is supposed to be starting in mid-September.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Minister. Of course, the Trans Mountain expansion used to be owned by a private company, but now, of course, it's a wholly owned subsidiary of the Government of Canada, which is why I'm asking you. It's also one reason, I assume, that your government delayed by a month your decision, which was supposed to have been made by May 22. I think it would have been reasonable for Canadians to expect all of those authorizations required by the NEB, as well as permits and construction contracts, to be firmed up by the time you gave your second formal approval, after spending billions of dollars and promising that it would be built immediately.

Something else that Ian Anderson said was, as you've indicated, that construction may start in September at the earliest, but that there could still be delays in the construction and completion of the pipeline caused by anti-energy activists and legal challenges. Unfortunately, those are the same risks that were posed to the project when you first approved it in 2016.

Can you tell us specifically what your government's plan is to deal with multiple legal challenges that will be filed by the project's opponents and other levels of government?

(1625)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, first of all, we have done the consultations in a way that reduces the chances of litigation. If somebody does challenge this decision in the Federal Court of Appeal, we are in a very good position to demonstrate that we have discharged our duty to consult by having extensive consultations and by keeping a record of the consultations.

It's also very important, Mr. Chair, to understand that unlike Conservatives, we will not undermine the due process that needs to be followed. We will not cut corners on the regulatory steps that need to be taken by the proponent in this case in relation to the NEB. Conservatives wanted us to cut corners at every step; we refused to do that. That is why we have reached this decision.

We owe it to Alberta workers. We owe it to the energy sector workers to do this.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It is not the case that Conservatives have ever advocated for any steps at the NEB to be skipped. Those steps, of course, were all followed and completed when Kinder Morgan, the private sector proponent, was advancing the Trans Mountain expansion, after which you failed to provide the legal and political certainty for them to go ahead.

Ian Anderson has also indicated that the court injunction remains in place, so what is your government prepared to do if foreign-funded or domestic anti-energy protestors seek to hold up construction?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

As I said earlier, unfortunately energy sector projects such as [Technical difficulty—Editor] controversial because of the steps taken by the Stephen Harper government to polarize Canadians by not respecting Canadians' right to participate and by gutting the environmental protections that were put in place. We will do whatever we can to ensure that this project moves forward in the right way.

In the case of an injunction, I understand that an injunction is in place and we expect anyone who is going to participate in any form of activity to do that within the rule of law. The rule of law will be respected, but I'm not going to speculate on something that has not happened. Our goal is to reduce the tension. Our goal is to reduce the polarization.

I'm confident that the work we have done over the last seven months will allow us to demonstrate to Canadians that we followed due process and are offering accommodations that appropriately deal with the concerns of indigenous communities.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Part of the concern is that literally last year, one week before the Federal Court of Appeal said you failed in your indigenous consultations last time around, you said you believed that your process would hold up. Then the Prime Minister, the finance minister and the natural resources minister all promised legislation to give the legal and political certainty needed for the private sector proponent to proceed. Then you didn't deliver, and then you attacked anyone who suggested the very thing your own Prime Minister promised.

Let's just look at costs quickly, since this is a really important aspect to taxpayers now that you've put them on the hook. The Parliamentary Budget Officer says that if you miss this year's construction season, it will cost taxpayers billions of dollars more and that these increases in construction costs will reduce the sale value of the pipeline and drop the value of the asset.

Can you explain exactly what the cost to taxpayers will be for the construction and completion of the Trans Mountain expansion?

(1630)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

It is very important that we see moving forward on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion as an investment in Alberta's economy, in the Canadian economy, in the workers of Alberta. They deserve that support. We are providing them that support because having not a single pipeline to get our resources to non-U.S. markets has hurt our potential in Canada.

We—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Of course, Minister, the vast majority of—

The Chair:

Your time is up, Ms. Stubbs—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

—product shipped through TMX will go to U.S. refineries, and the only two export pipelines have been cancelled by your government.

The Chair:

Ms. Stubbs, your time is up. Thank you.

Mr. Cannings is next.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you, Minister, for being with us today.

I'm going to pick up on that commentary about first nations consultation and accommodation. It was this aspect that caused the Federal Court of Appeal to rule against the government last year.

After the announcement that you were okaying the permit, I heard an interview with Chief Lee Spahan of the Coldwater band on CBC, and I've read interviews with him in the press since then. He said that “the meaningful dialogue that was supposed to happen never happened”. This is since the court case, and in that court case, the appeal court said that “missing from Canada's consultation was any attempt to explore how Coldwater's concerns could be addressed.”. This was a band that really wanted accommodation and demanded meaningful accommodation, as the courts have said, and they're saying that it hasn't happened.

I talked to Rueben George of the Tsleil-Waututh recently. They're not happy either.

How confident are you that we're not going back to litigation? It seems that the hard work that needed to be done still has not been done.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

First of all, we acknowledge and appreciate the diversity of opinions on this project among indigenous communities, as among other Canadians.

I have met with Chief Lee a number of times. I have met with leadership of the Tsleil-Waututh, with the former chief and with Chief Leah, who is the current chief, to talk about these issues. As far as Coldwater is concerned, our discussions with them are continuing. There are a number of options we are exploring with them to deal with their outstanding issues.

Our consultation doesn't end because the approval of this project has been given. We will continue to work with them.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

They're saying that the questions they asked last February—February of 2018—still haven't been answered.

You've just said, I think twice—both in your introductory remarks and in your responses to Ms. Stubbs—that really the only reason we need to build this pipeline.... We've gone through a heck of a lot in this country to try to get this pipeline built, and apparently the only reason is to get our product to tidewater so that we'll have access to Asia and we'll get better prices.

You know this isn't true. This is just a false narrative. Nobody in the industry is saying that we're going to get better prices in Asia. The best prices for our product are in the United States, and they will be for many, many years to come.

Why are we doing this?

We have these price differentials that happen occasionally. They have nothing to do with the fact that the U.S. is our only customer. It's because there are temporary shutdowns of pipelines to fix leaks or because refineries are getting repairs. That seems to be the reason we have this price differential, which covers only about 20% of our oil exports. Eighty per cent of them get world prices because they're exported by companies that are vertically integrated and have their own upgraders and refineries.

Why are we continuing with his false narrative that we're going to get a better price by getting oil to tidewater when that is simply not true?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I know that this issue has been raised by the NDP before. If you talk to industry folks and to premiers in Alberta who have been advocating this project, from Premier Notley to Premier Kenney, 80% of the capacity of the expansion has already been booked by shippers for up to 20 years. That demonstrates to you that there's a demand. The existing pipeline has been full for the last number of years. There's a capacity that is required, and we believe that building this capacity will allow us to get those resources to the global market.

I'm really disappointed to hear the Conservative members saying that TMX will not get our resources to global markets. I hope that the Conservative members will have discussions with Premier Kenney and will be better engaged on that file. The premier has been advocating for this project because it allows us to get a better price and expand our markets beyond the U.S.

(1635)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I want to get one more question in before my time is up.

Basically, you're admitting that we're not going to get a better price and that the reason we're building this pipeline is that it's an expansion project because the industry wants to expand its operations in the oil sands.

None of the risks that caused Kinder Morgan to walk away from this project have been alleviated. B.C. is still asserting its rights to protect the environment. Many first nations are still steadfastly against it. Vancouver-Burnaby is against it. The Prime Minister has said repeatedly that the government can give the permits, but only communities can give permission. How are you going to convince them that this pipeline is in the national interest?

It's a project that will fuel expansion of the oil sands and increase our carbon emissions when we're desperately trying to reduce them. This isn't about getting a better price for our oil; it's about expanding our oil production.

I think this is an opportune time.... When you were considering this decision, you could have said, “Let's join the rest of the world and move toward a no-carbon future.” Building a pipeline is locking us into a future that just won't be there in 20 or 30 years, so why are we doing this?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

The building of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion does not undermine or hinder our ability to meet our Paris Agreement commitments. We are putting a price on pollution. We are phasing out coal. We are supporting investment in public transit. Every dollar earned from revenue from this project will actually be invested back into a greener and cleaner economy so that we can accelerate our transition to a clean economy.

We all know that as the world transitions, there will still be a demand for oil, and our oil resources are developed in a sustainable way. The intensity of the emissions from the oil sands is continuing to decline, and we are supporting the industry to further reduce that intensity. We want to be the supplier of the energy that the world needs and at the same time use the resources and the revenue to accelerate that transition. It's a win-win situation for our economy: creating jobs at the same time as protecting our environment and dealing with the impacts of climate change.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Whalen is next.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I also wanted to pass along some thanks to the interpreters in the booth, the technical folks and the staff who sit behind us and prepare us for these meetings. This wouldn't be able to happen without you.

Minister, this is a great week for Canada. I'm really excited about the prospect of Trans Mountain. You've been a leader in our party not only on the infrastructure file, but since you've taken over this very delicate but economically vital matter of twinning of the Trans Mountain pipeline. You've been a very steady hand at the wheel.

I just want to get a sense from you of how important it is not only to you personally but also to Albertans to have this significant victory in finally getting an opportunity to triple the capacity of this pipeline.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

This is a very important project for our country. This is a project that is in the public interest. This is a project that will create thousands of jobs in Alberta, in British Columbia and in the Atlantic provinces.

As we all know, the growth of the energy sector in Alberta has provided opportunities for many people throughout this country from the Atlantic provinces through Ontario, Quebec and the prairie provinces. When we were in Fort McMurray the last time with the Prime Minister, we met with workers from British Columbia who were working in Fort McMurray.

This is about prosperity for all Canadians. It's very important for us to recognize and communicate this. This is about expanding our global markets. It's very disappointing that the Conservatives say that we don't need to expand our global markets and that we can continue to rely on the U.S. The U.S. is a very important customer for us, but we did the hard work necessary to get to this stage and we will continue to do the hard work necessary to ensure it gets to completion.

(1640)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much, Minister.

In your opening remarks, you chastised the Conservatives for wanting to do appeals and for taking the legislative route. I must admit that I was also nervous about the path that had been chosen. You and the Minister of Finance convinced me that it was the right way and, of course, I guess now I have to admit that I was wrong on this and you were right, so congratulations on that.

I also have found that some of the opposition rhetoric on this project—including at today's meeting, when the member suggested that somehow we should have begun the process of obtaining permits and entering into construction contracts prior to the completion of the process—demonstrates a fundamental misunderstanding of how this process is meant to work. How irresponsible would it have been to prejudge the outcome or to have rushed this court-required and constitutionally required process?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think it is very important that we make sure to follow the proper processes and procedures put in place for the NEB and our proponents. Whenever you undermine them, whenever you undercut them, you get into trouble and good projects get delayed.

Going back to why the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion got into this situation in the first place, in 2013 and 2014, when the initial review was started, the decision was made by the Stephen Harper government to not do the review to understand the impact of marine shipping on the marine environment and to—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'm sorry, Mr. Minister, but were all those decisions and mistakes that were highlighted in the Federal Court of Appeal decision made when the Conservatives where in power?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

No. I think we need to take some responsibility as well. They made the mistake of not including the marine shipping and its impact on the marine environment, and we did not do a good job on the consultation. I take full responsibility for that. That's why we need to do better. We need to improve our process to ensure that good projects can move forward.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

We've had a lot of difficulty until very recently on clearing exploratory drilling on the east coast, and of course we have the injunction on TMX. Bill C-69 seems to achieve the right balance and seems to push us beyond the mistakes that existed in CEAA 2012 to ensure these types of mistakes don't happen again. Are you confident that's the case?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I am a firm believer that if Bill C-69 had been in place in 2013 when this review was started, the Trans Mountain pipeline would have been completed by now and would have been in operation, delivering our resources to non-U.S. markets. It is very important, because we are fixing a broken system.

As far as the exploratory oil wells in the Atlantic provinces are concerned, having a regional review done actually expedited some of that work.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

We were very excited to see that completed in December to provide an off-ramp from exploratory drilling and massive environmental assessments on a well-by-well basis. That's a great initiative from your and Minister McKenna's departments.

Another concern that's been expressed to me is that we want to make sure the Canadian building trades have access to as much of the work on the Trans Mountain expansion as possible. I know there are different thresholds and limits in other projects. How can we ensure that Canadian workers benefit as much as possible from this megaproject?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

When we creating jobs, we want to make sure that Canadian workers are able to benefit from that job growth. The building trades have been engaging with Minister Morneau's officials to see what role they can play. They have the expertise and the know-how, and they are workers who have been building pipelines for a long time. We want to tap into their expertise, and Minister Morneau is exploring options with them to see what role they can play in the construction of the pipeline.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

As a final very short question, there's been some scuttlebutt at the table here about whether or not a constitutional right is implicated in this process. I'm perhaps not as close to this issue as you are, but do you feel that the section 35 rights of indigenous peoples are implicated by the expansion, and was that something that we were trying to make sure we got right with Bill C-69?

(1645)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

In the work we have done on the consultation of late for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in the thoroughness and the meaningful two-way conversation and engagement that we had, and the assurance from Justice Iacobucci that we have corrected the defects and remedied what the Federal Court of Appeal wanted us to by engaging in meaningful two-way dialogue, I am confident that we have fully discharged our duty to consult with indigenous communities.

I know some people, particularly Conservative politicians, wanted us to make consultation with indigenous communities optional in Bill C-69, which could have been devastating for energy sector projects. Then people would have taken us to court and we would have lost every time we went to court, because you cannot fail to fulfill your duty to consult and to meet the constitutional obligation for meaningful consultation with indigenous communities.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I agree.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. Thank you, Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Schmale, you have five minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

It seems the Liberals want it both ways here. They want to criticize this process, yet they approved the pipeline a few years ago in 2016.

I cannot understand how you want to have it both ways. You talk about indigenous consultation. Kinder Morgan had 51 indigenous groups that had signed benefit agreements. Because of your government's handling of this file, it went down to 42, and now you're expecting us to pat you on the back because it's at 48. I can't figure this one out.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think it is very important, and I will encourage the honourable member to look at the Federal Court of Appeal decision. The appeal was very clear that when the decision was made to not undertake the study of tanker traffic and its impact on the marine environment, it was done completely under the Stephen Harper government.

We were in a good process—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We're talking about consultation. You could have used the transport report as your transportation study. You chose not to. We're talking about consultation here.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

You cannot do that. You have to discharge your duty to consult, which means that you have to engage in a two-way meaningful dialogue. Relying on a transportation report is not a substitute for discharging your section 35 obligations.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Now that the pipeline is owned by the Canadian taxpayer, the finance minister says that your government will sell it only once it has been built. Are Canadians on the hook for any cost overruns? According to the PBO, the cost to build the twinning is around $14 billion.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

As I said earlier, through you, Mr. Chair, this is an investment in Canada. This is an investment in Canadian workers and Canada's energy sector. This is a commercially viable project. We have professionals at the Trans Mountain Corporation who will undertake further analysis and refine cost estimates now that approval has been given. They will refine construction timelines. This is a project that's going to generate close to $70 billion in revenue for Alberta oil producers. This is a project that will generate close to $45 billion of additional revenue for governments. This is a project that will generate half a billion dollars for the federal government, which we will use to transition and accelerate investments in green technologies and green products to make sure that other future generations have clean water, clean air and clean land, and to make sure that we are reducing the impact of climate change.

From every angle you look at it, this is a good investment in Canada and in Canadians.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It didn't have to be an investment in Canadian taxpayer dollars. It could have been private sector dollars that wouldn't cost taxpayers a cent or put them on the hook for these cost overruns that are potentially very real, considering that dozens of permits still need to be given before construction can start.

How much longer will it take to get the permits? How much will it cost?

This week you announced for the first time that Trans Mountain will have to purchase offsets for construction emissions. How much will that cost Canadian taxpayers?

(1650)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

As far as the offsets for the emissions are concerned, that was part of the NEB conditions that were imposed earlier on and part of the commitments the company has made.

As far as permits are concerned, there is a process to get those permits issued. NEB is going to work with the Trans Mountain Corporation to issue those permits.

I think it's very important that we follow due process. I know Conservatives don't respect due process. They don't respect the rule of law and they always encourage us to cut corners, and that's how you get into trouble. We will not cut corners. We want to get the construction going on this project in the right way.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Under the Conservative government, four pipelines were built and three more were in the queue. Now none of those major companies that build pipelines are doing business in Canada. They are now doing business in other countries, but you keep going on with your line of answer.

Going back to federal permits again, you didn't really give me an idea of how many more permits need to be administered and given before construction can be built. Also, will Canadian taxpayers will be on the hook for the overruns, and have you budgeted for that possibility?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, for large projects such as this, there are always municipal, provincial and federal permits required, and there's a process in place to get those—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Since you've had nine months since the court order was given, how come you did not instruct your department to start work on applying for these permits and getting them ready to go so that you could start construction immediately?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

After the NEB recommended approval, it was just two months.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, what the honourable member is saying would have been devastating for this project. The member is suggesting that we should have approved permits prior to having approval—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It's in response to the NEB recommendation.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, your time is up. I'm going to let him finish.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, it's very important to understand that giving approval to permits prior to the approval of the projects would have undermined administrative justice and would have undermined the due process. It is irresponsible for anyone to suggest that we not respect the process for proper approval of this project, because that is very important and it would have been devastating for energy workers.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's an NEB problem.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Thank you, Mr. Schmale.

Ms. Damoff is next.

Ms. Pam Damoff (Oakville North—Burlington, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to the members of the committee for letting me join you today.

Minister, I'm proud to be part of a government that takes climate change seriously and knows that pollution can no longer be free. We can't just sit back and do nothing, which is what the Conservatives are doing. We know that a price on pollution is recognized globally as the most effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and change behaviours.

Minister, I've heard from constituents in my riding who are expressing concern over the approval of TMX and the fact that the government is building a pipeline at the same time that we declared a climate change emergency. People like Chris, a young man who's passionate about climate change and feels we need to be doing more to transition from a carbon economy, has spoken to me a number of times. I know that he was very upset about the TMX approval. I have constituents in Oakville North—Burlington who are passionate about climate change and the environment. Groups like Halton Environmental Network, the Halton Climate Collective, Citizens' Climate Lobby, Oakvillegreen and BurlingtonGreen work tirelessly in our communities to combat climate change.

Minister, could you explain to these groups and to my constituents like Chris how we can justify TMX while also seriously tackling the climate change emergency that we face in Canada?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

First of all, I'd like to thank the member so much for her leadership on sustainability. We've often discussed how we can provide options for people so that they can make choices that are sustainable.

I want to assure Chris and I want to assure the environmental leaders and people in your constituency that building the Trans Mountain pipeline does not in any way compromise or hinder our ability to meet our Paris commitments. As a matter of fact, it will help us accelerate our investments into a clean economy, into a green economy, and allow us to meet our Paris commitments. The revenue we will generate from this project will be half a billion dollars once the construction is completed. Multiply that over the next 20 or 30 years. On top of the billions of dollars we're already investing into fighting climate change, that will allow us to do more.

At the same time, we also understand that the production that is happening in the oil sector now needs to move. The best way, the safest way and the most cost-effective way to do that is through pipelines, not through railways, as railways cross so many urban centres. As I heard from many of my colleagues, they would prefer oil moving by pipelines, not rail, because rail, even though it's safe, is not as safe as pipelines, so this is a very good investment. It will allow putting a price on pollution, and it's leadership that our government is demonstrating.

Investing in a thousand public transit projects throughout this country, having better fuel standards, investing in new technologies that allow emissions to go down, building RV electrical vehicle charging stations and investing millions of dollars in incentives for people to buy electric vehicles—all of those things are making a real difference and giving people choices so that they can reduce their impact on the environment.

We are committed. I can tell you that I am so excited about what we are doing. With the building of this pipeline and taking action on climate change, we can grow our economy. We can create thousands of jobs for hard-working Canadians and at the same time make a real difference in the protection of the environment.

(1655)

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Thank you, Minister. I have only about a minute left.

When the previous government talked about consultation, it really just meant showing up, telling people what they were doing and then moving ahead anyway. From a number of meaningful conversations I've had with your parliamentary secretary, I know you went into communities, talked to stakeholders and indigenous communities, and took that feedback. How did those consultations result in changes to what we're doing with TMX?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think one of the fundamental differences is how we engaged with the communities, and also how we responded to their concerns. There are more accommodations offered in this than ever was done in the past. We're actually dealing with the cumulative impacts of development. We are engaging in how we better respond to spills; how we prevent spills from happening; how we protect water, fish, fish habitat, southern resident killer whales; how we protect cultural sites and burial grounds and all of those things that have been identified by indigenous communities.

Another thing that we have done differently is that we have engaged at the political level. You know, pipelines are controversial. The northern gateway was controversial. Energy east was controversial. The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion was controversial and is still controversial, but I compare the effort that we have put in and the effort that I have personally put in through the 45 meetings that I have held with indigenous communities. I compare that effort with the few meetings the Conservative ministers held with indigenous communities. For 10 years under Stephen Harper, ministers made no effort to actually meet with indigenous communities and listen to their concerns and then work with them to resolve those concerns. We have put our time in and we are very proud of the work we have done.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. Thank you, Ms. Damoff.

We can go for about 10 more minutes. We're in a five-minute round. What I propose is to go four minutes, four minutes and two minutes. That way Mr. Cannings gets to finish it off. I think that's fair under the circumstances.

Ms. Stubbs, you have four minutes with a hard cap.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thanks, Chair.

Minister, as a person who is part Ojibwa and as a person who represents nine indigenous communities in Lakeland that are all involved in oil and gas and support pipelines, I really hope that this time the indigenous consultation process implemented by your government holds up. I did want to say this: I thought the one that you guys implemented in 2016, before you approved it, would have held up too. I mean that sincerely, and I hope, for the sake of all Canadians and for the execution of the project, that this remains the case. There was of course a missed opportunity in cancelling the northern gateway and losing the opportunity to redo it.

I just want to clarify what we are saying in terms of your government's mismanagement of the timelines around ensuring certainty around the permits, the contracts and the hearings, and why this is a detriment to the project.

What we are talking about is that when the NEB recommendation for approval was made in April—for the second time—your cabinet was supposed to have responded on May 22, and I suggest to you that every Canadian would think it would be utter insanity to think that your cabinet was even considering rejecting the Trans Mountain expansion, given that you spent $4.5 billion on it in tax dollars last year.

What we are talking about is the timeline that elapsed between the NEB's second approval of the Trans Mountain expansion and the announcement your cabinet made on Tuesday. That is when all of the details and all of the specifics should have been firmed up and certain so that the Tuesday announcement was not just literally the same announcement you made in November of 2016, after which literally nothing got done. Construction could have been able to start immediately. You could have been accountable to Canadians and taxpayers by giving the precise start date, end date, completion date, operation and cost.

It's mind-boggling to me that a federally owned project with a federally owned builder, with a federal government decision, failed to secure the federal government authorizations, as well as the provincial and municipal authorizations that surely you would have known were required for construction to start. That is the certainty you must provide Canadians so that they believe you that the Trans Mountain expansion will actually be built.

I think it's very clear that there never has been a concrete plan for construction to start.

(1700)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think that—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I want to tell you I've heard from drillers in my riding that banks are revoking their loans—

The Chair:

Ms. Stubbs, if he does want to answer the question, I suggest you give him an opportunity.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It wasn't a question. I was just clarifying that point.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

With due respect, your understanding is completely wrong. With the utmost respect for you, MP Stubbs, what you were suggesting would have actually gotten us into trouble, because when the Federal Court made the decision in August of 2018, they quashed the decision. There was no project.

We gave new approval on Tuesday to this project. Issuing any permits prior to Tuesday's decision would have been in violation of the procedures under NEB. It would have been taken to court, and we would have lost. We would have done more damage with what you were suggesting.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The reality is that you spent $4.5 billion tax dollars last year and promised Canadians that the expansion would be built immediately.

Here we are today. You have given a second approval and you have not a single concrete detail or specific plan to assure Canadians when it will start being built, when it will be completed, when it will be in operation and what the costs will be.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Stubbs. That's all of your time.

Mr. Graham is next.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister.

Very quickly, Mr. Chair, I just want to add to the comments. This is the fifth standing committee that I have joined in this Parliament, and you have been a very easy-going chair, very easy to get along with. When things get tense, you just go zen. It's a really good skill to have. Don't lose it.

Minister, when Kinder Morgan owned Trans Mountain, where did the profits go?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

They went to their shareholders.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Where will they go now?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Now, as long as government owns it, they will remain with the government, so Canadians will benefit from those profits.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That money will go to the green transition, as we've talked about.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

That is the goal. The half billion dollars that government will earn in additional tax revenue and corporate revenue will go into a green fund to accelerate our investments into a clean and green economy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many conditions are attached to this approval? Can you give us a sense?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

There are 156 conditions by the NEB, and there were 16 recommendations made by the NEB that we have adopted that allow us to deal with the cumulative impact of the project.

If I may say so, I think it's very important, Mr. Chair, to note that what MP Stubbs was suggesting would actually have gotten us into trouble. Issuing permits or even talking about permits prior to the approval would have been a violation of the procedures, and they would have been challenged.

We do have a plan in place to start construction, and the NEB is going to issue a certificate. They're going to put a process in place for the permits to be issued, and the construction is going to start. The preliminary work can start any time and the construction is going to start on this project in September.

(1705)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kind of pressure is not having this expansion in place putting on our rail system, and is it affecting, for example, our grain shipments?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Thank you so much for actually raising that question. It is very important, because if we don't build the pipeline capacity, oil going to be transported and it will be transported by rail. We have at least seen more oil being shipped by rail, putting pressure on other commodities that need to be shipped. There are not only issues around safety, but growth in other natural resource sectors such as forestry and mining is being hindered, and farmers have also identified issues with not being able to ship their products because of the lack of capacity in the rail system.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

We were talking about the green transition earlier. Norway, as an example, managed to put a trillion dollars into their heritage fund, and their debt-to-GDP ratio is negative 90%.

Is investing our revenue and investing in the green transition good for our economy?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

It is, absolutely. Investing in a green economy—in wind, solar, tidal, and geothermal, all of which we are doing—supports and creates green jobs. Those allow us to actually have a better energy mix. Oil and gas will continue to be our energy mix for decades to come, but as we transition, we need to build more renewables. This investment of half a billion dollars ongoing every year will allow us to do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Cannings, you get the last questions and you have only two minutes to do it.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I get the last questions of the Parliament. Okay.

The Chair:

No pressure.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

On Monday we passed a motion here in the House of Commons to declare that we are in a climate crisis, a climate emergency. The IPCC, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, says that we have to act immediately, right now, to tackle climate change.

You talked about spending the profits of this pipeline, $500 million a year, on green initiatives. We've spent $4.5 billion buying this pipeline. That's where the profits of that pipeline went. They went to Texas when we bought that pipeline. Now we're going to spend another $10 billion building it over the next two years. That's about $15 billion we could invest right now in fighting climate change, instead of spending all that money and then waiting two years and then dribbling it out over the next 10, 20 or 30 years. We have to do this now.

I just wonder what sort of economics you are using to try to spin this as a win for climate change. It's just Orwellian.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, we are investing today. We are investing $28 billion in public transit over the next 10 years, and that started in 2016.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

That has nothing to do with the pipeline.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

We are investing $9 billion in green infrastructure, also starting in 2016. We have put a price on pollution that is actually reducing emissions; you have seen that in British Columbia. We are bringing in better fuel standards.

I was in my province supporting a solar farm, where two-cycled capturing of energy is tested. We were in my province a couple of months ago, where we are investing in geothermal energy. If that demonstration is commercialized, it will create 50,000 jobs in Alberta. We are doing all those things. We want to accelerate that by investing this additional revenue.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cannings.

Minister, thank you. You get the last word.

Thank you all again.

Minister, I appreciate your making the effort to accommodate us today. Your schedule has been tight, to say the least. We wish you a safe journey back home.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Alberta is my home, so I am home.

The Chair:

You've always been very gracious in accommodating us and coming to the committee too, so thank you for that.

A voice: And thank you for sparing us for tomorrow morning.

The Chair: Yes, thank you for sparing us for tomorrow morning. There's ending on a high note.

Thank you, everybody. We will see you when we see you. Good luck to all.

Let me just say again that it's been a real honour to do this. Thank you.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: We are adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1605)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bonjour à tous. J'espère que vous vous portez tous bien. Je sais que vous êtes tous très emballés par les événements d'aujourd'hui et par le fait que c'est la dernière loi officielle que nous allons étudier avant de pouvoir rentrer à la maison.

Avant d'amorcer nos délibérations, monsieur le ministre, je tiens à remercier un certain nombre de personnes, en commençant par notre greffière et nos analystes.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Nous avons tous entrepris cette aventure il y a trois ans. M. Canning, Mme Stubbs, M. Harvey et moi étions tous des membres du Comité original et de cette bande. Nous avons fait beaucoup de chemin depuis.

Personnellement, je sais que je n'aurais jamais survécu aussi longtemps sans le soutien de tous les membres de ce côté de la table. Je vous en remercie infiniment. En toute honnêteté, je ne saurais trop vous remercier, car vous avez été formidables. J'admets volontiers que, bon nombre de fois, je n'étais pas sûr de prendre les bonnes mesures.

Une voix: Nous allions le mentionner.

Le président: Oui, je sais. En fait, vous l'avez parfois mentionné.

Je tiens également à remercier tous les membres du Comité. Pendant quatre ans, nous nous sommes enorgueillis de siéger au sein d'un comité dont les membres travaillaient incroyablement bien ensemble. Nous n'étions pas toujours d'accord, mais nous exprimions notre désaccord de façon respectueuse.

Par conséquent, les autres députés regardaient notre comité avec envie et, selon moi, c'est un résultat dont nous devrions tous être très fiers. Je vous en remercie tous. J'ai été heureux de travailler avec chacun de vous. Honnêtement, c'est le cas. J'espère vous revoir tous, cet automne, et je sais que vous ressentez la même chose.

De plus, il y a d'autres personnes qui nous appuient, des personnes qui apportent vraiment une importante contribution. Sans vous tous, aucun de nous ne pourrait faire son travail. Je tiens donc à remercier toutes les personnes qui travaillent dans le périmètre de cette salle.

Des voix: Bravo!

Le président: Vous assurez le succès de toute l'opération.

Un député: Sauf en ce qui concerne les porteurs d'eau.

Le président: Sauf en ce qui concerne les porteurs d'eau. Ils veulent s'assurer que nous quittons la salle rapidement, monsieur de Burg Graham.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur le ministre, je tiens à vous remercier de votre présence. Je sais que votre emploi du temps des deux ou trois derniers jours a été bien rempli. Nous avons été forcés de modifier l'heure de la séance à plusieurs reprises, et vous avez eu la bonne grâce de nous accommoder et de vous rendre disponible. Je crois que vous êtes à Calgary en ce moment. Nous sommes contents que vous ayez été en mesure de prendre le temps de comparaître devant notre comité.

Nous savons que vous disposez d'une heure seulement. Je vais donc cesser de parler et vous céder la parole. Merci de vous être joint à nous, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi (ministre des Ressources naturelles):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Bonjour à tous

Je tiens tout d'abord à reconnaître ce que tout le monde a en tête aujourd'hui, c'est-à-dire le décès d'un collègue et ami d'un grand nombre de personnes. Au nom du gouvernement et de ma famille, je tiens à offrir mes plus sincères condoléances à la famille de mon collègue, Mark Warawa, à mes collègues du Parti conservateur et aux nombreuses autres personnes qui ont perdu un ami aujourd'hui.

Je voudrais aussi prendre un moment pour reconnaître que je vous adresse la parole depuis le territoire du Traité no 7. Cette reconnaissance est importante, en particulier au moment où nous nous réunissons pour parler de l'exploitation adéquate des ressources. L'approche adoptée par notre gouvernement à l'égard du projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain, ainsi que le début de la construction au cours de cette saison, en est un parfait exemple.

Permettez-moi également de commencer par reconnaître que je suis conscient que cet agrandissement suscite des arguments solides des deux côtés — des « pour » et des « contre ». Nous respectons les deux côtés du débat, et je tiens à vous assurer que notre gouvernement a pris le temps nécessaire et n'a ménagé aucun effort pour faire le travail nécessaire, pour entendre toutes les voix, pour examiner tous les éléments probants et pour être en mesure de suivre l'orientation donnée par la Cour d'appel fédérale en août dernier.

Ce travail consistait, entre autres, à demander à l'Office national de l'énergie de réexaminer sa recommandation, en tenant compte des incidences environnementales de la navigation maritime liée au projet. Il s'agissait également de relancer les consultations de la phase III auprès des Autochtones potentiellement touchés par le projet, en faisant les choses différemment et en nouant un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif.

À ce sujet, j'aimerais prendre quelques instants pour remercier sincèrement les nombreuses collectivités autochtones qui m'ont accueilli sur leur territoire pour des rencontres au cours des derniers mois. J'ai aimé votre ouverture, votre honnêteté, vos idées constructives et la sincérité de vos opinions.

Honorables députés, peu importe votre position sur le projet TMX, cette décision est un pas dans la bonne voie pour tous les Canadiens. Elle montre qu'en 2019, les bons projets peuvent aller de l'avant lorsque nous faisons le travail acharné qui est nécessaire pour nous acquitter de notre obligation de consulter les peuples autochtones, et lorsque nous prenons des mesures concrètes pour protéger notre environnement pour nos enfants, nos petits-enfants et les générations futures.

À notre arrivée au pouvoir, nous sommes intervenus immédiatement pour corriger le système d'examen brisé que les conservateurs nous avaient légué. Lorsque les risques ont rendu trop difficiles les démarches du secteur privé, nous sommes intervenus pour sauver le projet. Lorsque la Cour d'appel fédérale a rendu sa décision en août 2018, nous avons fait le choix d'avancer de la bonne façon.

Et lorsque nous avons terminé ce processus, nous avons pu en venir à la bonne décision, c'est-à-dire celle de servir les travailleurs de notre secteur de l'énergie, les Albertains et tous les Canadiens, une décision visant à soutenir un projet qui créera des emplois, diversifiera les marchés, favorisera l'énergie propre et, ce faisant, ouvrira de nouvelles voies à la prospérité économique des Autochtones.

Alors, quelles seront les prochaines étapes maintenant que l'agrandissement a été approuvé? Même si nous n'en sommes qu'au tout début, nous disposons d'un plan à suivre clair pour que la construction commence cette saison. Le premier ministre a décrit une grande partie du travail qui nous attend mardi après-midi, lorsqu'il a annoncé notre décision. Le ministre Morneau a donné de plus amples renseignements à ce sujet à Calgary hier, lorsqu'il a présenté les prochaines étapes du projet, soit le lancement des discussions exploratoires avec des groupes autochtones intéressés par une participation économique au projet d'agrandissement, et l'utilisation des recettes du projet TMX pour garantir que le Canada est un chef de file pour ce qui est d'offrir plus de choix énergétiques.

La Trans Mountain Corporation nous a également parlé de son état de préparation et de sa hâte de commencer la construction. Ian Anderson, le président-directeur général de la Trans Mountain Corporation, l'a exposé très clairement hier.

(1610)



Et c'est aussi ce que j'ai entendu en rendant visite à des travailleurs de la Trans Mountain Corporation hier, à Edmonton. Il y avait un certain nombre d'entrepreneurs là-bas qui étaient prêts à amorcer l'agrandissement du terminal d'Edmonton, ainsi que la construction de nombreuses stations de pompage qui seront requises pour agrandir le réseau.

Le message est clair. Nous voulons que les travaux commencent cette saison, tout en continuant de faire les choses différemment, mais de la bonne façon.

L'ONE délivrera bientôt le certificat de commodité et de nécessité publiques modifié pour le projet. De plus, l'ONE veillera à ce que la Trans Mountain Corporation remplisse les conditions imposées par l'ONE avant la construction. Entretemps, la Trans Mountain Corporation poursuivra ses démarches pour obtenir les autorisations municipales, provinciales et fédérales nécessaires. Nous sommes prêts à démarrer le processus d'obtention des permis fédéraux.

Au cours de ce processus, notre gouvernement poursuit ses consultations avec des groupes autochtones. Nous renforçons et nous élargissons notre dialogue avec des groupes autochtones dans le cadre de la phase IV des consultations, en discutant des incidences potentielles du processus réglementaire sur les Autochtones et les droits issus de traités et en unissant nos efforts avec ceux des Autochtones afin de mettre en œuvre les huit mesures d'accommodement élaborées conjointement au cours des consultations. Ces mesures consistent, entre autres, à renforcer la capacité d'intervention en mer, à rétablir les poissons et leurs habitats, à améliorer la prévention des déversements, à surveiller les effets cumulatifs et à réaliser d'autres études en milieu terrestre.

Nous allons aussi de l'avant avec les 16 recommandations de l'ONE, des recommandations qui visent à améliorer la sécurité maritime, à protéger les espèces en péril, à améliorer la gestion de la navigation et à renforcer les mesures d'intervention en cas d'urgence.

Quel est le bilan? Il ne fait aucun doute que le train des mesures est en marche. Il s'agit d'un projet qui s'étend sur 1 000 kilomètres, et il avance de la bonne façon. Nous l'avons d'ailleurs déjà prouvé avec notre Plan de protection des océans de 1,5 milliard de dollars, avec notre initiative sur les baleines de 167 millions de dollars, avec notre investissement supplémentaire de 61,5 millions de dollars visant à protéger la population des épaulards résidant dans le Sud, et avec notre réinvestissement de tous les nouveaux revenus de l'impôt des sociétés et des produits de la vente du projet TMX dans les projets d'énergie propre qui alimenteront nos résidences, nos entreprises et nos collectivités pendant des générations à venir.

Avant de prendre une décision, nous devrions être convaincus d'avoir respecté nos obligations constitutionnelles, y compris notre obligation juridique de consulter les groupes autochtones potentiellement touchés par le projet, en plus de maintenir l'honneur de la Couronne et d'aborder les problèmes relevés par la Cour d'appel fédérale l'été dernier.

Nous l'avons fait, et nous l'avons accompli en faisant le travail difficile que le tribunal exigeait, non pas en évoquant des articles de la Constitution qui ne s'appliquent pas ou en lançant des appels futiles, ce qui aurait dans les deux cas été plus long que le processus que nous avons établi.

Alors que les conservateurs cherchaient à inventer des solutions qui ne fonctionneraient pas, nous avons cherché à faire avancer ce processus de la bonne façon. Et nous en avons eu la confirmation, y compris par l'ancien juge de la Cour suprême, l'honorable Frank Iacobucci, qui a été nommé représentant fédéral pour superviser notre travail et orienter le processus révisé des consultations et des accommodements.

Je terminerai donc là où j'ai commencé, c'est-à-dire en mentionnant que nous avons fait le travail nécessaire pour avancer de la bonne façon relativement au projet TMX, prouvant ainsi que le Canada peut faire approuver de bons projets de ressources et que nous pouvons développer notre économie et vendre nos ressources naturelles sur les marchés internationaux pour appuyer les travailleurs, leur famille et leur collectivité, tout en préservant l'environnement, en investissant dans la croissance propre et en faisant progresser la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones.

Monsieur le président, je pense que c'est le moment d'arrêter pour que les membres du Comité puissent poser des questions.

J'aimerais vous remercier infiniment une fois de plus de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Hehr, vous allez amorcer les séries de questions, je crois.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Avant de poser des questions au ministre, j'aimerais féliciter le président de son travail exceptionnel et du leadership dont il a fait preuve au sein du Comité. Vous avez fait un excellent travail.

Des députés: Bravo!

L'hon. Kent Hehr: Monsieur le ministre, nous sommes ravis de vous revoir. J'étais à Calgary hier pour assister à l'exposé du ministre Morneau et à son discours devant l'Economic Club of Canada. Il y avait de l'électricité dans l'air, et les gens dans la salle marchaient avec entrain, ce qui était beau à voir.

Je crois qu'il est juste de dire que la décision rendue l'année dernière par la Cour d'appel fédérale a été plutôt inattendue. La cour a indiqué — et c'était clair — que nous devions mener de meilleures consultations auprès des Autochtones et que nous devions mieux évaluer les incidences environnementales.

Pendant que je clavardais avec Hannah Wilson dans mon bureau ce matin, j'ai découvert que le Canada n'était pas le seul pays à faire face à ce genre de situation. Les tribunaux des États-Unis ont indiqué clairement que, dans le cas du pipeline Keystone XL, de la Canalisation 3 d’Enbridge et d'autres projets énergétiques en voie d'élaboration aux États-Unis, c'est ainsi que les choses doivent être faites. Notre gouvernement tente de donner suite à ces exigences en prévoyant dès le début des consultations auprès des Autochtones et la prise de mesures de protection de l'environnement.

Compte tenu de la décision rendue par la cour, qu'avons-nous fait différemment cette fois?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Le processus que nous avons mis en place cette fois-ci était très différent des consultations menées dans le passé.

Premièrement, nous avons élaboré conjointement le processus de participation, en tenant compte des commentaires des collectivités autochtones. Nous avons offert à nos employés une formation adéquate, et nous avons doublé la capacité de nos équipes de consultation. Nos employés ont travaillé sans relâche afin de nouer un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif.

Nous avons également fourni aux collectivités autochtones un financement afin qu'elles puissent participer adéquatement au processus de consultation. Nous avons organisé un plus grand nombre de réunions, et nous avons rencontré les Autochtones dans leur collectivité. J'ai personnellement participé à 45 réunions avec des collectivités autochtones, et j'ai rencontré plus de 65 dirigeants pour écouter leurs préoccupations et nouer un dialogue avec eux.

Je suis très fier du résultat. Nous offrons des accommodements aux collectivités autochtones afin d'apaiser leurs préoccupations relatives aux poissons, à leurs habitats, à la protection des sites culturels et des lieux de sépulture, ainsi qu'aux problèmes liés aux déversements de pétrole, à la santé de la mer des Salish, aux épaulards résidant dans le Sud, au bruit sous-marin et à un grand nombre d'autres enjeux.

Les accommodements que nous offrons, monsieur le président, vont en fait plus loin que l'atténuation des répercussions du projet TMX, et ils contribueront grandement à résoudre certains des problèmes causés par le développement industriel de la mer des Salish et à réparer certains des dommages occasionnés. Les accommodements régleront bon nombre des problèmes en attente que les collectivités ont signalés, qui sont liés non seulement au projet, mais aussi aux nombreux autres effets cumulatifs du développement de ces collectivités.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je vous remercie de votre réponse, monsieur le ministre.

Le pipeline Trans Mountain revêt une grande importance pour les habitants de Calgary. En fait, ce projet est d'intérêt public. Il fournira non seulement des emplois aux Albertains, mais aussi une occasion pour nous d'obtenir des prix équitables pour notre pétrole. Toutefois, rien de cela ne sera possible sans l'amorce du projet de construction, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi. Quelles mesures doivent être prises avant que cela puisse se produire? La construction commencera-t-elle cette saison?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, l'Office national de l'énergie délivrera le certificat d'ici quelques jours. Je suis allé à Edmonton, récemment, où j'ai eu la chance de rencontrer des travailleurs et des entrepreneurs. Ils sont prêts à se mettre au travail et font tout ce qui ne nécessite pas d'approbation réglementaire pour s'y préparer. L'entreprise peut commencer à mobiliser les entrepreneurs et les sous-traitants. Ceux-ci peuvent commencer à mobiliser leurs travailleurs. Ils peuvent commencer à soumissionner pour les travaux de reconstruction nécessaires et à faire des demandes de permis.

Comme nous l'avons entendu de la bouche des dirigeants de la Trans Mountain Corporation, ils prévoient commencer les travaux d'ici septembre. L'objectif est que la construction du réseau soit terminée d'ici la moitié de 2022, pour que nous puissions commencer à acheminer notre pétrole vers d'autres marchés que les États-Unis.

Monsieur le président, il est très important de comprendre que 99 % du pétrole que nous vendons à l'étranger aboutit chez un seul et même client, soit les États-Unis. C'est un client très important pour nous. Nous devons élargir notre marché avec ce client, mais il nous faut aussi plus qu'un client, parce que nous vendons notre pétrole au rabais et perdons beaucoup d'argent. C'est ainsi depuis des dizaines d'années. Nous voulons que les choses changent. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous voulons que ce projet aille de l'avant de la bonne façon et c'est pourquoi il est si important que la construction commence maintenant, non seulement pour les travailleurs de l'Alberta, mais pour l'ensemble des Canadiens.

(1620)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

L'approbation du pipeline dépendait beaucoup de la tenue de consultations véritables auprès des peuples autochtones. Prenons-nous des moyens pour nous assurer que les peuples autochtones tireront véritablement avantage au projet Trans Mountain, par des emplois et autrement?

De même, j'ai entendu des rumeurs emballantes sur de possibles participations en capital. Pouvez-vous nous informer un peu de la teneur des conversations qui ont lieu?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Oui, il y a un grand nombre de communautés autochtones qui ont signé des ententes sur les avantages avec l'entreprise. Celles-ci représentent des débouchés économiques de près de 400 millions de dollars pour ces communautés autochtones. Il y en a d'autres aussi qui sont toujours en pourparlers pour en signer une.

Comme le ministre Morneau le disait ici, à Calgary, il a entrepris une démarche qui permettra aux communautés autochtones d'explorer les options à leur disposition pour acheter le pipeline ou prendre d'autres dispositions financières. C'est ce que j'ai entendu personnellement, monsieur le président, d'un grand nombre de communautés qui souhaitent vivement profiter des retombées économiques de l'exploitation des ressources. Nous y voyons un grand potentiel, et c'est le ministre Morneau qui dirigera le processus en ce sens. Les communautés autochtones pourraient détenir 25, 50 ou même 100 % du pipeline.

Nous leur offrons aussi du financement pour qu'elles soient prêtes à participer au processus.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Hehr.

C'est au tour de Mme Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je souhaite à mon tour souligner que j'ai beaucoup aimé travailler avec vous et tous les membres du Comité au cours des quatre dernières années.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, de vous joindre au Comité aujourd'hui en réponse à ma demande, grâce à une motion qui a reçu l'appui du Comité, pour que vous veniez nous fournir de l'information concrète sur le projet d'expansion du réseau de Trans Mountain, que votre gouvernement a approuvé officiellement pour la deuxième fois en deux ans et demi.

J'aimerais d'abord vous interroger sur une chose que vous avez mentionnée. Il est écrit dans les notes d'information, et vous venez de le dire aussi vous-même, que l'Office national de l'énergie doit approuver la construction et l'exploitation du réseau de Trans Mountain, qui appartient désormais au gouvernement. Je crois comprendre que l'ONE devra tenir plusieurs audiences pour établir le tracé du pipeline avant que sa construction ne puisse commencer. Pouvez-vous nous dire exactement quel sera le calendrier de ces audiences?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous serons nombreux à nous rappeler que l'Office national de l'énergie a imposé un certain nombre de conditions à la réalisation de ce projet. La Trans Mountain Corporation, comme n'importe quelle autre société privée, devra s'y conformer et répondre aux demandes de l'ONE. Elle devra demander des permis. Comme vous avez entendu le PDG Ian Anderson le dire, l'entreprise est en train de mettre un processus en place, en collaboration avec l'ONE, pour que ces permis lui soient délivrés de manière accélérée. La construction devrait commencer à la mi-septembre.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Bien sûr, le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain était le fait d'une société privée, a priori, mais c'est désormais une filiale en propriété exclusive du gouvernement du Canada. C'est la raison pour laquelle je vous pose la question. Je présume que c'est aussi l'une des raisons pour lesquelles votre gouvernement a retardé sa décision d'un mois, alors qu'elle aurait dû être prise au plus tard le 22 mai. Je pense qu'il aurait été raisonnable de la part des Canadiens de s'attendre à ce que toutes les autorisations exigées de l'ONE, de même que les permis et les contrats pour la construction, soient prêts et assurés avant que vous ne donniez votre deuxième approbation officielle au projet, après avoir dépensé des milliards de dollars et nous avoir promis que ce réseau serait construit immédiatement.

Il y a autre chose qu'Ian Anderson a dit. Il est vrai, comme vous l'avez mentionné, que la construction pourrait commencer en septembre, au plus tôt, mais il pourrait quand même y avoir des retards dans la construction et l'achèvement du pipeline à cause des militants anti-énergie et de contestations judiciaires. Malheureusement, ce sont les mêmes risques que ceux que comportait le projet quand vous l'avez approuvé pour la première fois en 2016.

Pouvez-vous nous dire plus exactement ce que votre gouvernement prévoit faire pour réagir aux multiples contestations judiciaires que déposeront les opposants au projet et les autres ordres de gouvernement?

(1625)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, pour commencer, je dois dire que nous avons fait toutes les consultations nécessaires pour réduire les risques de poursuite. Si quiconque conteste cette décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale, nous sommes très bien placés pour faire la preuve que nous nous sommes acquittés de notre devoir de consultation. Nous avons mené de vastes consultations, dont nous avons tenu des comptes rendus.

Il est très important aussi, monsieur le président, de comprendre que contrairement aux conservateurs, nous ne porterons pas entrave à l'application régulière de la loi. Nous ne tournerons pas les coins ronds quant aux mesures réglementaires que le promoteur doit prendre pour répondre aux exigences de l'ONE, comme dans ce cas-ci. Les conservateurs voulaient que nous tournions les coins ronds à chaque étape, ce que nous avons refusé. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons pris cette décision.

Nous le devons aux travailleurs de l'Alberta. Nous le devons aux travailleurs du secteur de l'énergie.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce n'est pas vrai, les conservateurs n'ont jamais réclamé de négliger l'une ou l'autre des mesures à prendre pour répondre aux exigences de l'ONE. Bien entendu, nous avons pris toutes les mesures requises quand Kinder Morgan, le promoteur privé, a voulu agrandir le réseau de Trans Mountain, c'est vous qui n'avez pas voulu lui fournir les assurances juridiques et politiques nécessaires pour que ce projet aille de l'avant ensuite.

Ian Anderson a également rappelé que l'injonction de lacour demeure en vigueur, donc que votre gouvernement est-il prêt à faire si des militants anti-énergie, financés par des sources étrangères ou nationales, cherchent à freiner la construction du pipeline?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Comme je l'ai dit un peu plus tôt, malheureusement, les projets énergétiques comme [difficultés techniques] sont controversés à cause de tous les efforts déployés par le gouvernement de Stephen Harper pour polariser les Canadiens en ne respectant pas leur droit de participer au processus et en vidant de leur substance les protections environnementales mises en place. Nous ferons tout en notre pouvoir pour que ce projet aille de l'avant de la bonne façon.

Pour ce qui est de l'injonction, je sais très bien qu'il y a une injonction en vigueur, et nous nous attendons à ce que quiconque participe à une quelconque forme d'activité le fasse dans le respect de la loi. La primauté du droit sera respectée, mais je ne m'avancerai pas sur des événements fictifs. Notre objectif est de réduire les tensions. Notre objectif est de réduire la polarisation.

J'ai confiance que le travail que nous avons abattu au cours des sept derniers mois nous permettra de montrer aux Canadiens que nous avons pris toutes les mesures nécessaires, en bonne et due forme, et que nous avons offert des mesures d'accommodement appropriées pour répondre aux préoccupations des communautés autochtones.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Une partie du problème, c'est qu'il y a un an, littéralement une semaine avant que la Cour d'appel fédérale affirme que vous n'aviez pas respecté les exigences de consultations des communautés autochtones la dernière fois, vous disiez croire que les mesures que vous aviez prises suffiraient. Ensuite, le premier ministre, le ministre des Finances et le ministre des Ressources naturelles ont tous promis une loi afin de procurer au promoteur privé toute la certitude juridique et politique nécessaire pour aller de l'avant. Vous n'avez pas tenu promesse et ensuite, vous vous êtes mis à attaquer quiconque proposait exactement ce que votre propre premier ministre avait promis.

Examinons brièvement les coûts, comme c'est un élément très important pour les contribuables, maintenant que vous leur refilez la facture. Le directeur parlementaire du budget affirme que si vous ratez la saison de construction de cette année, il leur en coûtera des milliards de dollars de plus, que cela fera bondir les coûts de construction et réduire la valeur marchande du pipeline, ainsi que la valeur de l'actif.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer exactement combien il en coûtera aux contribuables pour la construction et l'achèvement de l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain?

(1630)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Il faut vraiment voir l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain comme un investissement dans l'économie de l'Alberta, dans l'économie canadienne et dans les travailleurs de l'Alberta. Ils en ont besoin. Nous leur fournissons cette aide parce que nous n'avons aucun pipeline pour acheminer nos ressources jusqu'aux marchés en dehors des États-Unis, ce qui limite beaucoup notre potentiel, au Canada.

Nous...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Bien sûr, monsieur le ministre, la grande majorité des...

Le président:

Vous n'avez plus de temps, madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

... des produits expédiés par TMX aboutiront dans les raffineries américaines, et les deux seuls projets de pipeline d'exportation ont été annulés par votre gouvernement.

Le président:

Madame Stubbs, vous n'avez plus de temps. Merci.

Je donne la parole à M. Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Je vous remercie d'être avec nous aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre.

J'aimerais revenir aux commentaires exprimés sur les consultations et les mesures d'accommodement visant les Premières Nations. C'est justement cet élément qui a poussé la Cour d'appel fédérale à trancher en défaveur du gouvernement l'an dernier.

Après l'annonce selon laquelle vous approuviez le permis, j'ai entendu une entrevue avec le chef Lee Spahan de la bande Coldwater, à la CBC, et j'ai lu divers extraits d'entrevues avec lui dans les journaux depuis. Il affirme que le véritable dialogue qui devait avoir lieu n'a jamais eu lieu, et cela, depuis la décision de la Cour qui a statué ce qui suit: « Le Canada n'a pas exploré les façons de répondre aux préoccupations des Coldwater. » Cette bande souhaitait vraiment obtenir des mesures d'accommodement, elle exigeait de véritables mesures d'accommodement, comme la cour l'a souligné, et son chef affirme qu'on ne leur en a pas consenti.

J'ai également parlé à Rueben George de la Première Nation des Tsleil-Waututh récemment, qui n'était pas content non plus.

Comment pouvez-vous être sûr que vous ne serez pas poursuivi de nouveau? Le travail difficile qui était jugé nécessaire ne semble toujours pas avoir été fait.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Premièrement, nous reconnaissons et accueillons la diversité des opinions à l'égard de ce projet parmi les communautés autochtones, et les autres Canadiens aussi.

J'ai rencontré le chef Lee à maintes reprises. J'ai également rencontré les chefs des Tsleil-Waututh, soit l'ancien chef, ainsi que le chef actuel, le chef Leah, pour parler de toutes ces questions. Dans le cas des Coldwater, nos discussions se poursuivent. Il y a un certain nombre d'options que nous sommes en train d'étudier avec eux pour répondre à leurs préoccupations.

Nous n'arrêterons pas de les consulter parce que ce projet a été approuvé. Nous continuerons de travailler avec tous ces groupes.

M. Richard Cannings:

Ils affirment qu'ils n'ont toujours pas de réponses aux questions qu'ils ont posées en février dernier, en février 2018.

Vous venez de dire, à deux reprises même, tant pendant votre exposé qu'en réponse aux questions de Mme Stubbs, que la seule raison pour laquelle nous avions besoin de construire ce pipeline... On fait des pieds et des mains au Canada pour essayer de construire ce pipeline, mais il semble que la seule raison pour laquelle on veut avoir accès à un port en eaux profondes, c'est pour pouvoir accéder au marché de l'Asie et y obtenir de meilleurs prix.

Vous savez pourtant que ce n'est pas vrai. C'est de la fabulation. Il n'y a personne dans l'industrie qui affirme que nous obtiendrons de meilleurs prix en Asie. C'est aux États-Unis que nous pouvons obtenir les meilleurs prix pour nos produits, et il en sera ainsi encore longtemps.

Pourquoi faisons-nous tout cela?

Il y a occasionnellement des écarts de prix, mais ils n'ont rien à voir avec le fait que les États-Unis soient notre seul client. C'est à cause des fermetures temporaires de pipelines pour colmater les fuites ou parce que les raffineries nécessitent des réparations. Cela semble être ce qui explique les écarts de prix, mais cela ne concerne qu'environ 20 % de nos exportations de pétrole. Pour 80 % de nos exportations, nous obtenons le prix mondial, parce que ce sont des entreprises à intégration verticale qui exportent ce pétrole et qu'elles ont leurs propres raffineries et usines de valorisation.

Pourquoi perpétuer ce mensonge que nous obtiendrons de meilleurs prix en exportant notre pétrole depuis un port en eaux profondes, alors que ce n'est pas vrai?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je sais que ce n'est pas la première fois que le NPD soulève cette question. Parlez-en aux gens de l'industrie et aux premiers ministres de l'Alberta qui ont milité pour ce projet, à la première ministre Notley comme au premier ministre Kenney, et vous verrez que 80 % de la capacité supplémentaire du réseau est déjà réservée par les expéditeurs pour une bonne vingtaine d'années. Cela montre qu'il y a de la demande. L'oléoduc existant fonctionne à plein régime depuis des années. Nous avons besoin de cette infrastructure, et nous croyons que la construction de ce réseau nous permettra d'acheminer ces ressources vers le marché mondial.

Je suis très déçu d'entendre des députés conservateurs prétendre que le projet TMX ne nous permettra pas d'acheminer nos ressources vers les marchés mondiaux. J'espère que les députés conservateurs en discuteront avec le premier ministre Kenney et qu'ils sauront s'informer un peu mieux sur ce dossier. Le premier ministre réclame ce projet, parce qu'il nous permettra d'obtenir de meilleurs prix et d'élargir nos marchés au-delà des États-Unis.

(1635)

M. Richard Cannings:

Je veux poser une autre question avant que mon temps soit écoulé.

Pour l'essentiel, vous admettez que nous n'obtiendrons pas un meilleur prix et que si nous construisons ce pipeline, c'est qu'il s'agit d'un projet d'expansion parce que l'industrie veut étendre ses activités dans les sables bitumineux.

Aucun des risques qui ont fait en sorte que Kinder Morgan a abandonné le projet n'a été atténué. La Colombie-Britannique fait toujours valoir ses droits de protéger l'environnement. De nombreuses Premières Nations sont encore fermement contre le projet. Il en est de même pour les gens de Vancouver-Burnaby. Le premier ministre a dit à maintes reprises que le gouvernement peut donner les permis, mais que seules les communautés peuvent donner la permission. Comment allez-vous les convaincre que ce pipeline sert l'intérêt national?

C'est un projet qui renforcera l'expansion des sables bitumineux et qui augmentera nos émissions de carbone alors que nous tentons désespérément de les réduire. Il ne s'agit pas d'obtenir un meilleur prix pour notre pétrole; il s'agit d'accroître notre production de pétrole.

Je pense que c'est un bon moment... Lorsque vous avez envisagé cette décision, vous auriez pu dire « joignons-nous au reste du monde et allons vers un avenir sans carbone ». La construction d'un pipeline nous enferme dans un avenir qui ne sera tout simplement pas là dans 20 ou 30 ans, alors pourquoi faisons-nous cela?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

La réalisation du projet d'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain ne nuit pas à notre capacité de respecter les engagements que nous avons pris dans l'Accord de Paris. Nous mettons un prix sur la pollution. Nous éliminons progressivement le charbon. Nous appuyons les investissements dans le transport en commun. Chaque dollar tiré des recettes du projet sera réinvesti, en fait, dans une économie plus verte et plus propre de sorte que nous puissions accélérer notre transition vers une économie propre.

Nous savons tous que pendant que le monde opère sa transition, il y aura toujours une demande de pétrole, et nos ressources pétrolières sont exploitées de façon durable. L'intensité des émissions produites par les sables bitumineux continue de diminuer, et nous aidons l'industrie à réduire davantage cette intensité. Nous voulons être le fournisseur de l'énergie dont le monde a besoin et, en même temps, utiliser les ressources et les recettes pour accélérer cette transition. C'est une situation avantageuse pour notre économie: créer des emplois tout en protégeant notre environnement et en faisant face aux répercussions des changements climatiques.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cannings.

C'est au tour de M. Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je veux également remercier les interprètes dans les cabines, les techniciens et les membres du personnel qui sont assis derrière nous et qui nous préparent aux réunions. Tout cela ne serait pas possible sans vous.

Monsieur le ministre, c'est une grande semaine pour le Canada. Je suis très emballé par le projet Trans Mountain. Vous êtes un chef de file au sein de notre parti, non seulement dans le dossier de l'infrastructure, mais aussi depuis que vous avez pris en charge cette question très délicate, mais vitale sur le plan économique du doublement du pipeline Trans Mountain. Vous avez tenu la barre d'une main ferme.

J'aimerais que vous me disiez à quel point c'est important non seulement pour vous personnellement, mais également pour les Albertains d'avoir remporté cette victoire, d'avoir enfin la possibilité de tripler la capacité du pipeline.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

C'est un projet très important pour notre pays. C'est un projet d'intérêt public. Il créera des milliers d'emplois en Alberta, en Colombie-Britannique et dans les provinces de l'Atlantique.

Comme nous le savons tous, la croissance du secteur de l'énergie en Alberta a offert des possibilités à bon nombre de personnes au pays, qu'il s'agisse de gens des provinces de l'Atlantique, de l'Ontario, du Québec ou des provinces des Prairies. Lorsque nous étions à Fort McMurray la dernière fois, avec le premier ministre, nous avons rencontré des gens de la Colombie-Britannique qui travaillaient à Fort McMurray.

Il s'agit de prospérité pour tous les Canadiens. Il est très important pour nous de le reconnaître et de le communiquer. Il s'agit d'élargir nos marchés à l'échelle internationale. Il est très décevant que les conservateurs disent que nous n'avons pas besoin d'élargir nos marchés à l'étranger et que nous pouvons continuer à nous fier aux États-Unis. Les États-Unis sont un client très important pour nous, mais nous avons déployé les efforts qu'il faut pour en arriver là et nous continuerons à le faire pour assurer l'achèvement du travail.

(1640)

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez reproché aux conservateurs de vouloir faire appel et emprunter la voie législative. Je dois admettre que la démarche qui avait été choisie me rendait nerveux moi aussi. Le ministre des Finances et vous m'avez convaincu que c'était la bonne façon de procéder et, bien entendu, j'imagine que je dois maintenant admettre que j'avais tort à cet égard et que vous aviez raison, alors je vous en félicite.

J'ai également constaté qu'une partie de la rhétorique de l'opposition sur ce projet — y compris dans la réunion d'aujourd'hui, lorsque la députée a laissé entendre que nous aurions dû, en quelque sorte, commencer les démarches d'obtention des permis et de passation de contrats de construction avant la fin du processus — révèle une mauvaise compréhension de la façon dont les choses sont censées fonctionner. À quel point aurait-il été irresponsable de préjuger de l'issue ou de précipiter le processus exigé par la cour et par la Constitution?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je crois qu'il est très important que nous veillions à suivre les processus établis pour l'Office national de l'énergie et nos promoteurs. Chaque fois qu'on les compromet, on s'attire des ennuis et de bons projets sont retardés.

Pour revenir à la raison pour laquelle on s'est retrouvé dans cette situation en premier lieu concernant l'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain, en 2013 et en 2014, lorsque l'examen initial a commencé, le gouvernement de Stephen Harper a décidé de ne pas faire l'examen pour comprendre les répercussions du transport maritime sur le milieu marin et...

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis désolé, monsieur le ministre, mais est-ce que toutes ces décisions et ces erreurs qui ont été soulevées dans la décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale ont été respectivement prises et commises lorsque les conservateurs étaient au pouvoir?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Non. Je crois que nous devons assumer une part de responsabilité également. Ils ont commis l'erreur de ne pas inclure le transport maritime et ses répercussions sur le milieu marin, et nous n'avons pas fait du bon travail de consultation. J'en assume l'entière responsabilité. C'est pourquoi nous devons faire mieux. Il nous faut améliorer notre processus pour faire en sorte que les bons projets puissent aller de l'avant.

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous avons eu beaucoup de difficultés jusqu'à tout récemment concernant les forages exploratoires sur la côte Est, et bien sûr, il y a l'injonction concernant TMX. Le projet de loi C-69 semble établir un juste équilibre et semble nous permettre de nous pousser au-delà des erreurs qui existaient dans la LCEE 2012 pour que ces erreurs ne se reproduisent plus. En êtes-vous convaincu?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je suis convaincu que si le projet de loi C-69 avait été adopté en 2013, lorsque cet examen a commencé, le pipeline Trans Mountain serait déjà terminé et serait opérationnel, ce qui nous aurait permis d'offrir nos ressources sur des marchés non américains. C'est très important, car nous sommes en train de réparer un système défaillant.

En ce qui concerne les puits de pétrole exploratoires dans les provinces de l'Atlantique, le fait qu'un examen régional ait été effectué a permis d'accélérer une partie des travaux.

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous étions très enthousiastes de voir cela se terminer en décembre pour fournir une sortie concernant les forages exploratoires et de vastes évaluations environnementales, puits par puits. C'est une excellente initiative de votre ministère et de celui de la ministre McKenna.

Une autre préoccupation qui m'a été exprimée, c'est que nous voulons nous assurer que les métiers du bâtiment canadiens aient accès à la plus grande partie possible des travaux d'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain. Je sais qu'il y a différents seuils et différentes limites dans d'autres projets. Comment faire en sorte que les travailleurs canadiens bénéficient le plus possible de ce mégaprojet?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Lorsque nous créons des emplois, nous voulons nous assurer que les travailleurs canadiens peuvent profiter de cette croissance de l'emploi. Les métiers du bâtiment ont collaboré avec les collaborateurs du ministre Morneau pour voir quel rôle ils peuvent jouer. Ils ont l'expertise qu'il faut et ce sont des travailleurs qui construisent des pipelines depuis longtemps. Nous voulons tirer profit de leur expertise et le ministre Morneau explore avec eux des options pour voir quel rôle ils peuvent jouer dans la construction du pipeline.

M. Nick Whalen:

Ma dernière question sera très brève. Il y a eu des discussions à cette table sur la question de savoir si un droit constitutionnel est visé dans ce processus. Je ne suis peut-être pas touché par cette question autant que vous, mais pensez-vous que l'article 35 sur les droits des peuples autochtones est visé par l'élargissement, et était-ce un élément au sujet duquel nous essayions de bien faire les choses dans le cadre du projet de loi C-69?

(1645)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Dans le cadre des consultations que nous avons menées récemment sur l'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain, avec rigueur et dans un véritable dialogue, ainsi qu'avec l'assurance du juge Iacobucci que nous avons corrigé les défauts et les aspects que la Cour d'appel fédérale voulait que nous corrigions en engageant un véritable dialogue, je suis convaincu que nous avons pleinement rempli notre devoir de consulter les collectivités autochtones.

Je sais que certaines personnes, particulièrement des politiciens conservateurs, voulaient que nous rendions facultative la consultation des communautés autochtones dans le projet de loi C-69, ce qui aurait pu être dévastateur pour les projets du secteur énergétique. Les gens nous auraient alors traînés devant les tribunaux et nous aurions perdu chaque fois, parce que nous ne pouvons pas manquer à notre obligation de consulter et de respecter l'obligation constitutionnelle de mener de véritables consultations auprès des collectivités autochtones.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis d'accord avec vous.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Merci, monsieur Whalen.

Monsieur Schmale, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Il semble que les libéraux veulent le beurre et l'argent du beurre ici. Ils veulent critiquer le processus, mais ils ont approuvé le pipeline il y a quelques années, en 2016.

Je ne comprends pas comment vous voulez avoir le beurre et l'argent du beurre. Vous parlez des consultations auprès des Autochtones. Pour Kinder Morgan, 51 groupes autochtones avaient signé des ententes sur les avantages. À cause de la façon dont votre gouvernement a géré ce dossier, ce nombre est tombé à 42, et vous vous attendez maintenant à ce que nous vous félicitions parce qu'il y en a 48. Je n'arrive pas à comprendre.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je pense que c'est très important, et j'encouragerais l'honorable député à examiner la décision de la Cour d’appel fédérale. On y indique très clairement que la décision de ne pas entreprendre l'étude sur le trafic de pétroliers et sur son incidence sur l'environnement marin a été entièrement prise sous le gouvernement de Steven Harper.

Nous étions dans un bon processus…

M. Jamie Schmale:

Nous parlons de consultations. Vous auriez pu utiliser le rapport sur les transports pour votre étude sur les transports. Vous avez choisi de ne pas le faire. Nous parlons de consultations dans ce cas-ci.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Vous ne pouvez pas faire cela. Vous devez remplir votre obligation de consulter, ce qui signifie que vous devez participer à un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif. Vous ne pouvez pas remplacer vos obligations en vertu de l'article 35 par un rapport sur les transports.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Maintenant que le pipeline appartient aux contribuables canadiens, le ministre des Finances affirme que votre gouvernement ne le vendra qu'une fois qu'il aura été construit. Les Canadiens seront-ils responsables des dépassements des coûts? Selon le directeur parlementaire du budget, le coût de construction de l'élargissement est d'environ 14 milliards de dollars.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt par votre entremise, monsieur le président, il s'agit d'un investissement dans le Canada. C'est un investissement dans les travailleurs canadiens et dans le secteur canadien de l'énergie. C'est un projet viable sur le plan commercial. Des professionnels de la société Trans Mountain mèneront une analyse plus approfondie et préciseront les estimations des coûts maintenant que le projet a été approuvé. Ils préciseront également le calendrier des travaux de construction. Ce projet générera près de 70 milliards de dollars en revenus pour les producteurs pétroliers de l'Alberta et près de 45 milliards de dollars en revenus supplémentaires pour les gouvernements. Il générera également un demi-milliard de dollars pour le gouvernement fédéral, et nous utiliserons cet argent pour faciliter la transition vers les technologies et les produits écologiques et pour accélérer les investissements dans ce secteur, afin de veiller à ce que les générations futures aient accès à de l'eau, de l'air et des terres de qualité, et pour veiller à réduire l'impact du changement climatique.

Peu importe l'angle sous lequel on considère la question, c'est un bon investissement pour le Canada et les Canadiens.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Il n'était pas nécessaire d'investir l'argent des contribuables canadiens. On aurait pu utiliser l'argent du secteur privé, ce qui n'aurait rien coûté aux contribuables et ne les aurait pas rendus responsables des dépassements des coûts qui sont potentiellement très réels, étant donné que des douzaines de permis doivent encore être délivrés avant le début des travaux de construction.

Combien de temps faudra-t-il attendre pour obtenir ces permis? Combien cela coûtera-t-il?

Cette semaine, vous avez annoncé pour la première fois que Trans Mountain devra acheter des crédits compensatoires pour les émissions produites par les travaux de construction. Combien cela coûtera-t-il aux contribuables canadiens?

(1650)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Les crédits compensatoires pour les émissions faisaient partie des conditions imposées plus tôt par l'Office national de l'énergie et des engagements pris par l'entreprise.

En ce qui concerne les permis, il faut passer par un processus de délivrance des permis pour les obtenir. L'Office national de l'énergie collaborera avec la société Trans Mountain pour délivrer ces permis.

Je crois qu'il est très important de respecter la procédure établie. Je sais que les conservateurs ne respectent pas la procédure établie. Ils ne respectent pas la primauté du droit et ils nous encouragent toujours à prendre des raccourcis, et c'est ce qui crée des problèmes. Nous ne prendrons pas de raccourcis. Nous voulons suivre le processus approprié pour lancer la construction de ce projet.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Sous le gouvernement conservateur, quatre pipelines ont été construits et trois autres étaient en attente. Maintenant, aucune de ces grandes entreprises qui ont construit des pipelines ne mène ses activités au Canada; elles sont actives dans d'autres pays, mais vous continuez à donner les mêmes réponses.

Pour revenir aux permis fédéraux, vous ne m'avez pas vraiment donné une idée du nombre de permis qui doivent encore être administrés et délivrés avant le début des travaux de construction. De plus, les contribuables canadiens devront-ils payer les dépassements des coûts et avez-vous établi un budget pour cette possibilité?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, dans le cas de grands projets comme celui-ci, des permis municipaux, provinciaux et fédéraux sont toujours exigés, et il faut suivre un processus établi pour les obtenir…

M. Jamie Schmale:

Puisque neuf mois se sont écoulés depuis l'ordonnance du tribunal, pourquoi n'avez-vous pas indiqué à votre ministère de commencer à demander ces permis pour que vous puissiez commencer les travaux de construction immédiatement?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Il s'est écoulé seulement deux mois depuis que l'Office national de l'énergie a recommandé l'approbation du projet.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, ce que dit l'honorable député aurait été catastrophique pour ce projet. En effet, le député laisse entendre que nous aurions dû approuver les permis avant d'obtenir l'approbation…

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est en réponse à la recommandation de l'Office national de l'énergie.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, votre temps est écoulé, mais je vais le laisser terminer.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, il est très important de comprendre que le fait d'approuver les permis avant que le projet soit approuvé aurait nui à la justice administrative et à la procédure établie. Il est irresponsable de suggérer que nous ne respections pas le processus approprié pour l'approbation de ce projet, car il est très important et cela aurait eu des conséquences catastrophiques sur les travailleurs du secteur de l'énergie.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est un problème lié à l'Office national de l'énergie.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Merci, monsieur Schmale.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Damoff.

Mme Pam Damoff (Oakville-Nord—Burlington, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. J'aimerais également remercier les membres du Comité de me permettre de participer à la réunion d'aujourd'hui.

Monsieur le ministre, je suis fière de faire partie d'un gouvernement qui prend le changement climatique au sérieux et qui sait que la pollution ne peut plus être gratuite. Nous ne pouvons plus nous contenter de rester passifs, et c'est ce que font les conservateurs. Nous savons qu'il est reconnu à l'échelle mondiale que l'établissement d'un prix pour la pollution est la façon la plus efficace de réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre et de modifier les comportements.

Monsieur le ministre, des électeurs de ma circonscription m'ont communiqué leurs préoccupations au sujet de l'approbation du projet de TMX et du fait que le gouvernement construit un pipeline en même temps qu'il déclare une situation d'urgence climatique. Des gens comme Chris, un jeune homme qui s'intéresse énormément au changement climatique et qui croit que nous devons favoriser la transition vers une économie zéro carbone, m'a parlé à plusieurs reprises. Je sais qu'il était très mécontent de l'approbation du projet de TMX. Des électeurs de ma circonscription d’Oakville North—Burlington s'intéressent énormément au changement climatique et à l'environnement. Des groupes comme Halton Environmental Network, Halton Climate Collective, Citizens' Climate Lobby, Oakvillegreen et BurlingtonGreen travaillent sans relâche dans nos collectivités pour lutter contre le changement climatique.

Monsieur le ministre, pourriez-vous expliquer à ces groupes et à des électeurs comme Chris comment nous pouvons justifier l'approbation du projet de TMX tout en nous attaquant sérieusement à la situation d'urgence climatique à laquelle nous faisons face au Canada?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

J'aimerais tout d'abord remercier chaleureusement la députée de son leadership en matière de durabilité. Nous discutons souvent des façons d'offrir à la population la possibilité de faire des choix durables.

Je tiens à garantir à Chris, aux chefs de file en matière d'environnement et aux électeurs de votre circonscription que la construction du pipeline de Trans Mountain ne nuira en aucun cas à notre capacité de respecter les engagements que nous avons pris dans le cadre de l'Accord de Paris. En fait, cela nous aidera à accélérer nos investissements dans une économie propre et écologique et à respecter nos engagements liés à l'Accord de Paris. Une fois la construction terminée, nous tirerons des revenus d'un demi-milliard de dollars de ce projet. Vous pouvez multiplier ces revenus au cours des 20 à 30 prochaines années. Cela nous permettra donc d'en faire davantage, en plus des milliards de dollars que nous investissons déjà dans la lutte contre le changement climatique.

En même temps, nous comprenons aussi que la production en cours dans le secteur pétrolier doit maintenant évoluer. La façon la plus efficace, la plus sécuritaire et la plus rentable d'y arriver consiste à utiliser des pipelines, et non le transport ferroviaire, car les chemins de fer traversent de nombreux centres urbains. J'ai entendu un grand nombre de mes collègues affirmer qu'ils préféreraient que le pétrole soit transporté par pipeline plutôt que par chemin de fer, car même si le transport ferroviaire est sécuritaire, il ne l'est pas autant que les pipelines. C'est donc un très bon investissement. Il nous permettra de fixer un prix pour la pollution et le gouvernement fait preuve de leadership à cet égard.

Les investissements dans des milliers de projets de transport en commun au pays, l'amélioration des normes en matière de combustibles, les investissements dans les nouvelles technologies qui permettent de réduire les émissions, la construction de bornes de recharge pour véhicules électriques et les millions de dollars investis pour inciter les gens à acheter des véhicules électriques sont des initiatives qui ont des effets réels et qui offrent des choix aux gens, afin de leur permettre de réduire leur impact sur l'environnement.

Nous avons pris des engagements. Je peux vous assurer que je suis très enthousiaste à l'égard de nos initiatives. Grâce à la construction de ce pipeline et à la prise de mesures contre le changement climatique, nous pouvons favoriser la croissance de notre économie. Nous pouvons aussi créer des milliers d'emplois pour les travailleurs canadiens tout en posant des gestes concrets pour la protection de l'environnement.

(1655)

Mme Pam Damoff:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Il me reste environ une minute.

Lorsque le gouvernement précédent parlait de mener des consultations, cela signifiait seulement qu'il envoyait des représentants dire aux gens ce qu'il avait l'intention de faire et qu'il se mettait ensuite au travail, peu importe le résultat des consultations. Selon plusieurs conversations informatives que j'ai eues avec votre secrétaire parlementaire, je sais que vous êtes allés dans les collectivités pour parler avec les parties intéressées et les communautés autochtones, et que vous avez recueilli leurs commentaires. Quels changements ces consultations ont-elles permis d'apporter au projet de TMX?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je crois que l'une des différences principales, c'est la façon dont nous avons interagi avec les communautés et la façon dont nous avons répondu à leurs préoccupations. Il y a plus de mesures d'adaptation offertes dans le cadre de ce projet que jamais auparavant. Nous nous occupons des répercussions cumulatives du développement. Nous nous efforçons d'améliorer nos interventions en cas de déversement, de déterminer comment prévenir les déversements, de déterminer comment protéger les plans d'eau, les poissons, leur habitat et les épaulards résidents du Sud, de déterminer comment protéger les sites culturels et les cimetières et toutes les choses qui ont été cernées par les communautés autochtones.

Une autre chose que nous avons faite différemment, c'est que nous nous sommes engagés au niveau politique. Comme vous le savez, les pipelines soulèvent la controverse. La porte d'entrée du Nord a également soulevé la controverse, tout comme Énergie Est. Le projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain a soulevé et soulève toujours la controverse, mais je compare les efforts que nous avons déployés et les efforts que j'ai personnellement investis dans les 45 rencontres avec les communautés autochtones auxquelles j'ai participé au petit nombre de rencontres organisées par les ministres conservateurs avec les communautés autochtones. Au cours des 10 années sous le gouvernement Harper, les ministres n'ont déployé aucun effort pour rencontrer les communautés autochtones et écouter leurs préoccupations et ensuite collaborer avec ces gens pour régler leurs préoccupations. Nous avons consacré le temps nécessaire à ces initiatives et nous sommes très fiers du travail que nous avons accompli.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Madame Damoff, je vous remercie aussi.

Nous pouvons nous donner encore 10 minutes. Comme les interventions sont maintenant de cinq minutes, j'en propose trois, qui dureront respectivement quatre, quatre et deux minutes. Ainsi, M. Cannings pourra conclure. Vu les circonstances, ça me semble équitable.

Madame Stubbs, vous disposez de quatre minutes, pas une seconde de plus.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, mon ascendance est en partie ojibwa et je représente neuf communautés autochtones de ma circonscription de Lakeland, qui participent toutes à l'exploitation pétrolière et gazière et qui appuient les oléoducs. À ce titre, j'espère que, cette fois-ci, la consultation des Autochtones par votre gouvernement ne foirera pas. J'ai cru que celle que vous avez entreprise en 2016, avant votre autorisation, aurait aussi tenu. Je le souhaite sincèrement, pour tous les Canadiens et pour la réalisation du projet. Vous avez bien sûr raté une belle occasion en annulant le projet Northern Gateway et en ratant celle de le relancer.

Je tiens seulement à préciser notre opinion sur la mauvaise gestion des échéanciers par votre gouvernement pour donner de la certitude aux permis, aux contrats et aux audiences, et expliquer pourquoi c'est nuisible au projet.

En effet, quand l'Office national de l'énergie a recommandé l'autorisation du projet, en avril — pour la deuxième fois — votre Cabinet était censé répondre au plus tard le 22 mai, et, je vous le dis, tous les Canadiens considéreraient comme le comble de la démence que votre Cabinet ait même songé à rejeter l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, après y avoir englouti 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables l'année dernière.

Le hic, c'est le délai écoulé entre la deuxième autorisation de l'agrandissement de Trans Mountain par l'Office et l'annonce faite par votre Cabinet, mardi dernier. Tous les détails et toutes les précisions auraient dû alors être confirmés pour éviter de faire de cette annonce la simple copie conforme de celle que vous avez faite en novembre 2016, après quoi absolument rien ne s'est fait. Les travaux auraient dû pouvoir débuter immédiatement. Vous auriez pu vous montrer responsables devant les Canadiens et les contribuables en précisant la date du début et de la fin des travaux, les coûts d'exploitation et les autres coûts.

Je suis frappée de constater qu'un projet décidé par le gouvernement fédéral, dont le maître d'ouvrage et le maître d'œuvre sont fédéraux, n'ait pas réussi à obtenir les autorisations fédérales ni même les autorisations des provinces et des municipalités que vous saviez certainement nécessaires au lancement des travaux. Voilà la certitude à assurer aux Canadiens pour qu'ils croient en la réalité de l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain.

Il est manifeste qu'il n'y a jamais eu de plan concret pour lancer les travaux.

(1700)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je crois que...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Sachez que des entreprises de forage de ma circonscription m'ont annoncé que les banques annulaient leurs prêts...

Le président:

Madame Stubbs, laissez-le répondre à la question.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce n'était pas une question. Je ne faisais que clarifier la situation.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Sans vouloir vous offenser, vous avez tout faux. Très respectueusement, nous serions dans le pétrin si nous suivions vos conseils, parce que le jugement de la Cour fédérale, en août 2018, a annulé la décision. Il n'y avait pas de projet.

Mardi, nous avons accordé une nouvelle autorisation au projet. L'octroi de permis avant mardi aurait contrevenu aux procédures de l'Office, on nous aurait traînés en justice, et nous aurions perdu. Vos idées auraient été plus dommageables.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

La réalité est que vous avez dépensé, l'année dernière, 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables et promis aux Canadiens le début immédiat de l'agrandissement.

Mais aujourd'hui, après une deuxième autorisation, vous êtes incapables de communiquer le moindre détail ou plan pour annoncer aux Canadiens le moment du début des travaux, de leur fin, du début de l'exploitation et les coûts.

Le président:

Merci, madame Stubbs. Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Graham, à vous la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Très rapidement, monsieur le président, voici quelques observations. C'est le cinquième comité dont je fais partie dans la présente législature, et vous avez été un président très facile à vivre, très accommodant. Dans les moments de tension, vous accédez simplement à la zénitude. Ne perdez pas ce beau talent.

Monsieur le ministre, quand Trans Mountain appartenait à Kinder Morgan, où allaient les profits?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Aux actionnaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et désormais, où iront-ils?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Tant que l'État en sera propriétaire, à l'État, pour le bien, donc, des Canadiens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'argent ira à la transition verte, comme nous en avons discuté.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

C'est l'objectif. Le demi-milliard de dollars de revenus fiscaux supplémentaires et de revenus de l'entreprise iront dans un fonds vert pour accélérer nos investissements dans une économie propre et verte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de conditions sont liées à cette autorisation? Pouvez-vous en donner une idée?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

L'Office national de l'énergie a fixé 156 conditions et formulé 16 recommandations que nous avons adoptées et qui nous autorisent à réagir à l'impact cumulatif de la réalisation du projet.

Si je puis me permettre, il importe beaucoup, monsieur le président, de noter que l'idée de Mme Stubbs nous aurait plongés dans le pétrin. Octroyer des permis ou même parler de permis avant l'autorisation du projet aurait contrevenu aux règles, et ces actions auraient été contestées.

Nous avons un plan pour commencer la construction, et l'Office émettra un certificat. Il instituera un processus pour la délivrance des permis, et les travaux commenceront. Le travail préliminaire peut débuter n'importe quand, et la construction débutera en septembre.

(1705)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel genre de pression exerce sur notre réseau ferroviaire le fait de retarder cet agrandissement, et quelles sont les répercussions sur le transport de nos grains, par exemple?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Grand merci de cette question. C'est très important, parce que, faute d'oléoduc, il faudra continuer de transporter le pétrole par wagons. Nous avons au moins constaté qu'il s'en transporte plus par wagons, ce qui soumet à des pressions les autres produits qui ont besoin d'être transportés. Ça ne concerne pas seulement la sécurité, mais ça entrave également la croissance d'autres secteurs de nos richesses naturelles comme la forêt et les mines, et les agriculteurs ont également cerné des problèmes qu'ils éprouvent à écouler leurs produits parce que le réseau ferroviaire ne suffit pas à la tâche.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Nous avons parlé, tout à l'heure, de transition verte. La Norvège, par exemple, est parvenue à placer mille milliards de dollars dans son fonds du patrimoine, et le ratio de sa dette à son PIB est de moins 90 %.

L'investissement de nos revenus dans la transition verte est-il bon pour notre économie?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Oui, absolument. Nos investissements dans l'économie verte — solaire, éolien, géothermique, énergie marémotrice — créent des emplois verts et y subviennent. Ils optimisent notre bouquet énergétique. Le pétrole et le gaz continueront d'en faire partie pendant encore des décennies, mais, dans la transition, nous devons miser davantage sur les énergies renouvelables, ce que permettront ces investissements annuels d'un demi-milliard de dollars.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Cannings, vous êtes le dernier intervenant, mais vous ne disposez que de deux minutes.

M. Richard Cannings:

À moi les dernières questions de la législature. Très bien.

Le président:

Aucune pression.

M. Richard Cannings:

Lundi, la Chambre des communes a adopté une motion pour déclarer que nous traversons une crise, une situation d'urgence climatiques. Le Groupe d'experts intergouvernemental sur l'évolution du climat, le GIEC, nous incite à agir immédiatement, dès maintenant, pour nous attaquer au changement climatique.

Vous avez évoqué l'affectation des profits annuels tirés de cet oléoduc, 500 millions, à des initiatives vertes. L'achat de cet oléoduc nous a coûté 4,5 milliards. Voilà où sont allés ses profits. Envolés au Texas, au moment de l'achat. Nous consacrerons encore 10 milliards à sa construction, dans les deux prochaines années. C'est environ 15 milliards que nous pourrions investir à la place, dès maintenant, contre le changement climatique, au lieu d'attendre deux ans puis de distribuer l'argent au compte-gouttes dans les 10 à 30 prochaines années. Nous devons le faire maintenant.

Je me demande seulement quelles notions économiques vous permettent de le présenter comme un gain pour la lutte contre le changement climatique. C'est simplement orwellien.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, nos investissements ont lieu aujourd'hui même. Depuis 2016, 28 milliards vont et iront pendant encore 10 ans dans les transports en commun.

M. Richard Cannings:

Ça n'a rien à voir avec l'oléoduc.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous investissons, également depuis 2016, 9 milliards dans les infrastructures vertes. Grâce à notre tarification de la pollution, nous réduisons effectivement les émissions; c'est visible en Colombie-Britannique. Nous adoptons de meilleures normes pour les combustibles et les carburants.

Je suis allé dans ma province appuyer une centrale solaire, où on éprouvait la capture de l'énergie en deux cycles. Il y a quelques mois, dans ma province encore, nous investissions dans l'énergie géothermique. Si la démonstration est commercialisée, on créera 50 000 emplois en Alberta. Voilà nos diverses réalisations. Nous voulons les accélérer par l'investissement de revenus supplémentaires.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cannings.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie. Vous avez le dernier mot.

Merci à vous tous, encore une fois.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous suis reconnaissant de votre effort pour satisfaire nos besoins, malgré votre programme très chargé, c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire. Bon retour sans encombre chez vous.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je suis en Alberta, donc chez moi.

Le président:

Vous avez toujours été très affable et très accommodant pour nous et bien disposé à comparaître devant notre comité aussi. Je vous en remercie.

Une voix: Et merci de nous avoir dégagés pour demain matin.

Le président: Oui, merci pour cette faveur. Ça se termine sur une belle note.

Merci à vous tous. Au revoir. Bonne chance à tous.

Permettez-moi de me répéter: Ç'a été un véritable honneur. Merci.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 20, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.