header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under oggo...

  1. 2016-02-16: 2016-02-16 OGGO 1
  2. 2016-03-08: 2016-03-08 OGGO 4
  3. 2016-03-09: 2016-03-09 OGGO 5
  4. 2016-03-10: 2016-03-10 OGGO 6
  5. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 OGGO 50

Displaying the most recent stories under oggo...

2016-10-24 OGGO 50

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Colleagues, thank you for your attendance. For most of my colleagues, it's kind of like Groundhog Day—we're seeing you again. I didn't think we'd see each other this soon, but welcome back.

Welcome, Mr. Graham, Mr. Ayoub, and Mr. Grewal. It's good to see you back at the table again.

Welcome, Minister. I know we have only an hour, so I will, without further ado, turn it over to you and perhaps you can brief our colleagues around this table as to the purpose of your visit, and get right into your presentation.

Hon. Scott Brison (President of the Treasury Board):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

This is actually my twelfth appearance at either a Senate or a House parliamentary committee since the swearing-in of the new government last November. I'm delighted to be here.[Translation]

I am pleased to have with me from my department Yaprak Baltacioglu, the secretary of the Treasury Board; Brian Pagan, the assistant secretary of the Expenditure Management Sector; Marcia Santiago, from the Treasury Board Secretariat; and my colleague Joyce Murray, Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board, from our department.[English]

To have the opportunity to be here again is great. Since we last met, there has been significant progress made, as evidenced in the paper provided to you.

This committee has played an important role in budget and estimates reform for some time, going back to 2012, with the report “Strengthening Parliamentary Scrutiny of Estimates and Supply”, which provided a very thoughtful analysis and recommendations that have helped serve as a road map on estimates reform. In fact, a number of the steps already taken have been in response to that report and its recommendations. These included the creation of a searchable online database known as InfoBase, which has been recognized by the PBO as the authoritative source of government expenditure information; a pilot project with Transport Canada to test a new program-based vote structure; and the identification in estimates documents of all new funding according to the associated budget document to make it easier for parliamentarians to follow that.

We continue to move forward with this agenda, most notably on the question of budget and estimates timing and alignment, and I want to speak with you briefly on that this morning.

The ability to exercise oversight over government spending is the most important role that we as parliamentarians can play in representing Canadians.[Translation]

However, the current practice makes it difficult for MPs to carry out that function. Having been an MP for many years, I too have been dissatisfied with the various elements of the estimates process.[English]

The other night in a briefing, which some of you attended, I noted that on June 2 I will have been a member of Parliament for 20 years. By that time, I will have been three and a half years in government, and 16 and a half in opposition, so my perspective on some of these things is shaped not simply by having been a member of a government but also a member of Parliament. That's one of the reasons I'm excited to discuss with you the government's vision for estimates reform.

Change in this area is not easy. In fact, Robert Marleau, former Clerk of the House, noted that the form and content of the main estimates has been modified on only four occasions since Confederation, most recently in 1997. Clearly, there's a lot of work to be done in terms of strengthening the ability for Parliament to hold government to account.

I firmly believe the vision we're proposing will help address the many issues raised over the ineffectiveness of the estimates process in Canada. These include concerns of the Auditor General, who underlined the importance of better timing between the budget and estimates.

Our vision includes four areas that are currently the source of a lot of frustration for parliamentarians. To make things manageable and to achieve early progress, I would propose that we focus our attention on the first area right away. It deals with the timing of the main estimates in the budget and would require a simple change to the Standing Orders.

Once this important reform is implemented, we could take the necessary time to study and consider the other areas. I'd like to go through each area with the committee.

As I said, the first is in the area of timing of the main estimates and budget. Currently, the main estimates for the upcoming year need to be tabled in Parliament by March 1. In practice, this means that the main estimates can only reflect Treasury Board decisions as of January roughly, well before the budget actually comes out.

(1105)



This timing affects parliamentarians, because the main estimates, which MPs are meant to scrutinize and to vote on, end up not reflecting the government's plans and priorities as outlined in the budget for the same year.

The other thing is that all the work that goes into Parliament's scrutiny of the main estimates is rendered basically irrelevant when the budget comes out. Wasting Parliament's time doing irrelevant work is not my idea of a priority. We need to fix that and make sure Parliament is engaged in meaningful work, including holding governments to account.

Therefore, we propose that the main estimates be tabled by May 1, instead of March 1, so that the main estimates can include budget items.[Translation]

The second challenge is the differences in scope and accounting methods between the budget and the estimates. [English]

The challenge here is more than accounting concepts. The budget represents the entire universe of federal spending. This includes consolidated accounts—for example, EI, and tax expenditures such as the new Canada child benefit. The estimates, meanwhile, support the more limited appropriation requirements of departments and agencies.

Nonetheless, parliamentarians need to be able to compare items in the budget and the estimates. The government will build on recent efforts to improve accrual planning in departments and reconciliation to cash appropriations in the estimates. There has been some work done on that in terms of reconciliation between accrual and cash accounting. We want to deepen that and expand it. [Translation]

The third area is the difficulty MPs have in connecting the money we vote for with the program it will be used for. [English]

Departments get their expenditure authority from Parliament on the basis of votes in the appropriation acts. These describe how funds are spent on items such as capital, operating, and grants and contributions. We'd like to focus more on why we're spending, and strengthen the link between the votes and the actual, specific programs they fund.[Translation]

Lastly, many departmental reports are neither meaningful nor informative. [English]

Every department within government has a lot of people writing reports that aren't that useful in terms of the quality of information and that not a whole lot of people read. In the same way that I said I don't think it's a good idea to waste parliamentarians' time unnecessarily, I think we're wasting a lot of good public servants' time writing reports that people aren't using because they're not formatted in a way that they're useful.

Our new Treasury Board policy on results will simplify how government reports on the resources it uses and the results it achieves. Reports will now tell people what departments do, what they are trying to achieve, and how they measure success, with an increased focus on metrics and measuring results and delivery, so that ministers, Parliament, and ultimately Canadians can hold government to account and have an understanding of the effectiveness of programs. ln addition, detailed information on program spending and the number of FTEs or people working will be provided in a user-friendly online database.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, these are the broad outlines of our vision for fundamentally changing the estimates process so that MPs are better able to hold the government to account.

(1110)

[English]

With that goal in mind, I look forward to the committee's engagement in driving the reform of estimates to benefit all of parliamentarians. I look forward to engaging, in the short term, on the alignment of budget and estimates timing.

Thank you very much.

I'd like to turn it over to Brian, who will go through a more detailed presentation of the proposed reforms.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Go ahead, Mr. Pagan. [Translation]

Mr. Brian Pagan (Assistant Secretary, Expenditure Management, Treasury Board Secretariat):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As the president of the Treasury Board mentioned, the purpose of today's presentation is to explain to you the government's vision for estimates reform. We also want to explain how we plan to support parliamentarians more effectively by providing the best possible information for the purpose of approving government spending.[English]

I have several slides to go through. I propose quite quickly to go through the four pillars as presented by the estimates. I'll present pillar one, the question of timing, and then perhaps pause for questions around that crucial element of timing.

As we see here in the outline, the proposed approach of the four pillars builds on recommendations from this committee, the 2012 study of OGGO on the estimates process, as well as our initial briefing with this very committee in February of last year, where we laid out the challenges around timing.

We believe that once we have the timing properly sequenced, we will be able to move forward with a better understanding of needs and requirements around scope and accounting, the vote structure of appropriations, and results and reporting. [Translation]

The estimates are clearly essential to the proper operation of government. They form the basis of parliamentary oversight and control, reflect the government's spending priorities, and serve as the principal mechanism for establishing reports on plans and results.

However, parliamentarians have said on many occasions they are unable to perform their role of examining the estimates to ensure adequate control. That situation is attributable to the incoherent nature of the budgetary process, as a result of which budget initiatives are not included in the main estimates. Estimates funds are hard to understand and reconcile, and reports are neither relevant nor instructive.[English]

Accordingly, the government sets out a four-pillar approach to fundamental change, beginning with the first step of changing the timing of the main estimates. As the president mentioned, taking this step will present a more coherent document and allow for the inclusion of budget estimates.[Translation]

Then we can more easily reconcile the differences in scope and accounting methods between the budget and the estimates, ensure that vote structures for all departments reach parliamentarians, and reform the departments' annual reports so that parliamentarians are better informed about planned expenditures, expected outcomes, and actual outcomes.

Now I will discuss each pillar in detail.[English]

The issue of estimates timing is very critical to any comprehension of the government's aspirations related to the budget and Parliament's understanding and control of departmental expenditures.

According to existing Standing Order 84(1), the government must table on or before the 1st of March the main estimates for the year. In reality, to be able to do this by the 1st of March, we need to prepare a document that reflects Treasury Board decisions up until the end of January. We know that in a typical year the government will table its budget somewhere between mid-February and mid-March, so evidently locking down the main estimates by the end of January precludes any ability to reflect budget items in the main estimates.

As the president has mentioned, this presents the scenario where we are presenting to Parliament the certainty of program expenditures that do not reflect the new plans of government, the new priorities of government, as they are articulated in the budget that's tabled in February and March. This in itself presents a fundamental challenge and incoherence in terms of understanding the budget and estimates process.

To remedy this, the government is proposing that the main estimates be tabled on or before the 1st of May, instead of on or before the 1st of March. At this point the budget would have been presented, and we would have an opportunity to include budget items in the estimates for Parliament's scrutiny.

(1115)



This change would include a number of benefits, not the least of which is a more coherent sequencing of the documents, a timelier implementation of budget initiatives, the ability to reconcile the estimates back to the budget that was tabled in February or March, and the possibility of eliminating a supplementary exercise. Currently we have the main estimates and three supplementary estimates. We would be simplifying the process and presenting fewer documents to Parliament and therefore less confusion.

I would emphasize that in terms of beginning the fiscal year and the approval of interim supply, nothing would change. As was clear in the document, we would present an interim estimates and an interim supply bill that would be based on a continuation of the current-year existing authorities that would allow departments to begin the year, and then introduce full supply in June, according to the current supply calendar.

Before pausing for questions on the issue of timing, I would present this in a visual form where we see in the period now, October-November, the government preparing its fiscal and economic update. That becomes the basis for planning the budget. We understand that the government would be intending to present a budget to Parliament in the February-March time frame. We would introduce interim supply for the 1st of March, allowing departments to begin the fiscal year in April with authorities, and then we would follow up with main estimates that reflect budget priorities and a reconciliation to the budget in May for Parliament's consideration of full supply in June.

Mr. Chair, at this time I think it might be appropriate to pause and allow committee members to digest this issue of timing and perhaps ask questions on this very critical step.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Pagan.

Thank you, Minister, for your presentation. Before we turn it over to questions and answers, perhaps you'll permit me to make an observation or two.

I haven't been in Parliament as long as you, Minister. Outside of you, however, I believe I'm the longest-serving parliamentarian at this table. I agree with your assessment that the budgetary process, in terms of parliamentary oversight, has been, in my view at least, and I've been saying this for well over 12 years, almost a bit of a joke. We simply didn't have the ability to delve into the numbers effectively and to give the scrutiny that we have been charged with doing. I applaud you in your efforts to try to simplify this and try to streamline the process so that all parliamentarians at least have an opportunity to observe and make comment on a literally multibillion-dollar functioning of Parliament. I applaud you on that.

My question for you is this. In the last Parliament, I was charged with the review of the Standing Orders. As you know, each year a new Parliament sits, there is a finite period of time for Standing Orders to be reviewed. As a matter of fact, there was a debate in Parliament just a week or so ago when we were on the road.

The approach I took with the all-party committee studying changes to the Standing Orders—we made a few minor ones—was that I suggested we needed unanimity to make sure, since Standing Orders are really the backbone of what we do and how we operate in this institution.

Have you, Minister, considered Standing Order changes requiring unanimous consent, or exactly how did you plan to approach that?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

First of all, the change to the Standing Orders that is required for this would be moving the deadline for the main estimates from March 1 to May 1. This committee has the ability, as a committee, to recommend to Parliament a change. We will work on this with members of Parliament from all parties.

On the timing of it, really, in order to have this change apply to the next main estimates and budget, it would require something basically sometime in November. I would hate to see us lose a year in terms of this significant improvement. I view any change like this as part of an evergreening approach. We as Parliament should always look at ways we can strengthen parliamentary governance and good governance broadly on an ongoing basis.

In other words, from a change that we make now in terms of the Standing Orders, the next budget and estimates process will see a more logical sequencing of the budget and estimates, with the main estimates actually reflecting what's in the budget. Then, as time goes on....

I look at the Australia model, for instance, where the budget and main estimates appear almost at the same time, or even in Ontario, where it's about 12 days after. As the departments become accustomed to this new timing and sequencing, there will be a tightening of budget and estimates timing over time that will operationalize as a result of greater efficiency. I view this as the start. Over time you'll see a tightening of budget and estimates timing so that they're more coincident.

(1120)

The Chair:

Thank you.

I apologize to the committee for taking up some of your valuable time.

We'll start with a seven-minute round of questioning.

Madam Ratansi.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair. And it's your privilege to ask a question.

Minister, thank you, and thank you for taking the initiative. I've been in Parliament—from 2004 to 2011—and I understand, even as a financial person and as an accountant, it was really difficult to bring coherence and transparency.

In terms of the alignment between the estimates and the budget, what sort of co-operation will you need? The estimates are prepared by Treasury Board and the budget by Finance. What sort of collaboration currently exists, and what would you like to see going forward?

Hon. Scott Brison:

There is a great level of collaboration between Treasury Board and Finance. I think in recent years there's been an increased collaboration. In fact last year, in terms of items in the budget, 70% were in the supplementary (A)s, as an example.

In terms cash and accrual accounting, we are already doing more reconciliation in terms of tables to reconcile the cash and accrual accounting such that parliamentarians can easily reconcile the two. There are advantages to both systems. The Australians found that in moving to accrual there were some challenges.

I think you actually engaged with some of the Australians at this committee.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Yes, we did.

Hon. Scott Brison:

What we want to do is more reconciliation over time. We are open to this committee's recommendation on movement towards accrual. Again, there are advantages to both, and having reconciliation—

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

But you haven't faced challenges in collaboration. You have been working as a department very well. Alignment of the budget to the main estimates really makes for coherence. It is a strategy that is really important.

In your four pillars that you've presented, which is the first one you would like to approve? Is it a step-by-step process or is it a one-shot deal?

Hon. Scott Brison:

They're all really important. I'm enthusiastic about all of them. The one that requires a change to the Standing Orders is that of the first one, the budget and estimates timing. Again, over time, we have the May 1 date, which provides flexibility in the first couple of budget cycles. As departments, when you're changing these kinds of things, these are big departments. Government itself is a large, complex group of organizations. These are significant changes, so initially it will take some time. It will take a couple of budget cycles to get towards the full potential of this.

Again, in terms of the objective, I want to see a close alignment and a tightening of budget and main estimates timing.

(1125)

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu (Secretary of the Treasury Board Secretariat, Treasury Board Secretariat):

I'll add a bit to what the minister said.

Out of the four pillars, the results policy, making sure that departmental results and plans are meaningful to parliamentarians and also for government itself, has been approved by Treasury Board. We're rolling it out. The first better results documents will come this fall, and hopefully all of the departments by next fall.

On accrual and cash, more work needs to be done by us. Every year we're getting better at making sure that's reflected. Of the four pillars, the first one is the one that requires Parliament's approval. With the other ones, I think, with the committee's concurrence, we can just proceed and make the progress.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

My second question is on what the chair asked, on needing unanimous consent for the Standing Orders. Do you see any challenges? You're out there educating the parliamentarians. Do you find there will be any challenges or gaps in understanding that they may have?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thanks, Yasmin. The chair, Tom, has been involved in government in terms of procedural issues, and there are different ways you can accomplish this.

It's my strong view that everything we're doing is strengthening Parliament's ability to hold governments to account, not just our government but future governments. Are there changes in the future that we can do as we operationalize these changes? I believe there are, and we can consider those in the future.

I think it would be a mistake to let perfection be the enemy of the good—

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No problem.

Hon. Scott Brison:

—when we actually have the capacity to get some good things done.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So my next question is quite interesting. In the U.K., the treasury function and the financial function are in one minister. It's not that I want you out of your job or anything.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I thought you were talking about Minister Morneau.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, no. But what would be the challenges in a place like Canada? Would that function work? Would it make anything better? We've been hearing so many things. Perhaps you can give a quick answer on that.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Look, in Canada the Treasury Board role is not just in terms of government spending but also a challenge function on operational effectiveness across department and agency. It's not just in terms of financial results, but are the results consistent with those intended by the government, particularly in a new results and delivery framework that is a priority of the government?

The other thing is the regulatory: we have a role in terms of scrutinizing and approving regulatory changes, which are becoming more prominent now with the regulatory co-operation council with the Americans.

Our system itself in Treasury Board is the only permanent committee of cabinet going back to Confederation. It works really well, and there is a good relationship with Finance. Finance has been a good partner working with us even through these changes. There's a good collaborative relationship.

The Chair:

Mr. McCauley, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you for joining us. It's always a pleasure. I think we can all agree that aligning the estimates and the budget process is a very good thing.

I have a quick question for you. The 2012 OGGO report suggested March 31. You're suggesting May 1.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I think in time, as you go through a couple of budget cycles, we can operationalize this and strengthen and narrow that significantly.

(1130)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

What's the thinking behind May 1, though, instead of what OGGO said in 2012?

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's flexibility initially, as we operationalize this, because it will take a significant change in terms of the working of departments to do this. I want to see in time that we can have the main estimates by April 1. I want to see that, but I also want to ensure that as we move towards that, departments are able to respond. In time—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Do you think something has changed since a couple of years ago, or was the OGGO 2012 version just incorrect; they hadn't thought it through?

Hon. Scott Brison:

No, I think the OGGO report was actually very instructive.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

One of the issues we have about May 1, of course, is that we have to have by May 1 the two suggested departments for the committee as a whole, so we lose out on that. The whole purpose is expanded transparency, and we're losing a lot of time to review before our June cut-off.

I understand the need, but we seem to be going step-forward, step-backwards.

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's May 1 that we're proposing, and that is to provide flexibility in terms of government being able to ensure that the first couple of budget cycles are fine. I actually think we can do it earlier. I would hope that we can deliver main estimates by April 1. The priority for government to do that is one that I take seriously, but this is to provide some flexibility in the first couple of budget cycles as we move toward a narrowing of budget and estimates timing.

I hold Australia up as a model in terms of having the budget and estimates almost coincident. That's the gold standard.

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu:

The reason we are suggesting May 1 at the latest is to give that flexibility. If you apply it practically to this year, for example, we almost have to—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Right. But how do you address the concerns of, again, we introduce...and, by the way, the same day, opposition, give us your two departments for committee as a whole? I understand flexibility, but how do you address our concerns about a shortened period of time for us to review costs? It goes back to Westminster. That was the reason a parliament was put together, to review spending—

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu:

We totally agree with you, but currently Parliament really doesn't get the real accounts. It gets it in many, many pieces. For departments, for departmental managers, an expenditure can show up in the budget and may not get authority for 18 months. We're trying to find a sweet spot where we can actually implement this. As the minister said, ideally it should be no later than April 1.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I think we agree with the 2012 OGGO report. I understand, but I think we probably can get it done by then.

Have we looked at a fixed budget date, to move up the budget to, let's say, February? The Australians do a phenomenal job. I don't think they legislated it, but it is their tradition. I think it's the second Monday of May.

We hear, well, there are issues with minority governments, and this and that. But in Canada, both Liberal and Conservative governments, minority or not, every year going back 17 years, have done it within a period of a couple of weeks, except for one year. Could we not just move...?

Hon. Scott Brison:

The timing of the estimates is in the Standing Orders, but the timing of the budget is the purview of Finance.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

But you get along so well with Finance.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Over the years there have been times, post-9/11 and different times, when in fact Finance saw fit, appropriately, to bring in a budget or a significant economic statement that contained a lot of budgetary measures.

In terms of what we're tabling today, I'm going to ask Brian to speak to budget tabling dates from 2006 to 2016, to give some perspective.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

We're short on time, so you'll have to be fast.

Hon. Scott Brison:

What we are proposing will significantly improve the sequencing and alignment. It is what I can, as Treasury Board president.... These four have required a significant level of engagement with Finance and across government. They are a significant step forward. I think the sequencing one is very important in terms of changing the Standing Orders, but I don't view this as the last thing, Kelly. I think this is a first significant step, but we can do more.

If we have a moment, Brian can speak to the last 10 years.

(1135)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I agree, but I think moving up the estimates but also considering a fixed date for the budget...because we seem to be accomplishing it anyway, except for 2006.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'm not certain the 2012 OGGO report addressed the fixed budget date. There was some reference to it. In the same way that this committee has had an influence on the work we're doing now, it will continue to have an influence on it.

The other thing is that, going forward, on an iterative level we will be able to evaluate how things are going and how we can improve things. This is a partnership.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Mr. Pagan, before you go, because we're running out of time here, I think we will have to eventually decide again about some of the issues, if it is May 1, shortening our ability to review and scrutinize, but also some of the issues, with May 1 being the cut-off, in our ability to name the two departments.

The Chair:

The reply of Mr. Pagan will have to wait until perhaps the next intervention.

We have to go to Mr. Weir now for seven minutes.

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

Thanks.

We've had the discussion about May 1 versus April 1 as deadlines for the estimates. The other side of the sequencing question is when the budget happens, so I do want to pick up on this matter of a fixed budget date. We're kind of assuming that the federal government usually tables a budget in February or March, but of course there's no requirement for that. There was even a year, I believe 2002, when the federal government didn't put forward a budget.

I wonder why, in trying to fix this timing question, Mr. Minister, you're not proposing either a fixed budget date or a set range of dates for the budget.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you, Erin.

Again, what we're proposing today is a significant improvement in terms of sequencing a budget and estimates. This is something that will be a major improvement. Currently the budget is exclusively the purview of the Minister of Finance, whereas the estimates are subject to the Standing Orders. Changing the dates of that, of the Standing Orders, to better enable logical sequencing with the budget is something that as Treasury Board president I can propose, and it's in my purview to do that in conjunction with Parliament.

This will be a significant improvement over that which exists now in terms of the practice, but in reality, as you said, there is a custom in terms of budget introduction.

If I may, Brian has in fact budget tabling dates from 2006 to 2016 to put it into some perspective.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Minister.

As the minister said, we absolutely are working very closely with Finance to lessen the time or shorten the gap between the tabling of the budget and presentation of the main estimates. The fact remains, however, that there are instances when the Department of Finance needs some flexibility in terms of the timing of the budget. In the fall of 2008, there was a global economic recession, so the government of the day worked very hard to bring forward a budget quite quickly in the cycle to provide assurances to markets and to Canadians to take advantage of that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Yes, that would be fair enough where there was a need to present the budget early, but, I suppose, why not present a deadline for the budget in the same way we're suggesting a deadline for the estimates?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Right. As the minister said, what we have tried to do is reflect the spirit of the 2012 report from OGGO in which they requested a specific fixed budget date. But the reality is there is nothing in the Standing Orders, in the Financial Administration Act, or our Constitution about budgets, and therefore we are not in a position to specify what that tabling date is.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Mr. Minister, would your recommendation to the Minister of Finance be that there should be a fixed budget date, a set range of dates for the budget, a deadline by which a budget must be presented every year?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I think, first of all, we are going to accomplish, through the changes we're proposing here today, a better alignment of the budget and estimates process. That doesn't obviate the need to continue to consider improvements, including potentially in the future an earlier deadline on estimates, and a discussion. We're open to discussions. As we go through this change, as we evaluate the impact of these changes, I would be interested in the input of the committee. But again, perfection being the enemy of the good, I'd like to proceed with an improvement that makes a significant change in terms of accountability to Parliament and Parliament's ability to scrutinize.

(1140)

Mr. Erin Weir:

Just for—

Hon. Scott Brison:

With regard to the estimates Parliament scrutinizes right now, you spend a lot of time on those. To a large extent your time is wasted, because we come out with a budget shortly after, and a lot of that work, a lot of that analysis, is wasted. It's rendered irrelevant. What we want to do is make sure the work of parliamentarians is meaningful and impactful and holds government to account on the things that really matter.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Right. And in terms of that work, I do want to congratulate you, Mr. Minister, on your keen ability to have moved between the Liberal and Conservative parties to remain on the opposition benches for a maximum amount of time. You clearly do appreciate the importance of effective opposition.

Hon. Scott Brison:

It was the Progressive Conservatives; Progressive.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Indeed.

Mr. Kelly McCauley: We want you to make that point as well.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Well, thanks. I'm happy to facilitate that point.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I was actually born as a Liberal; I just came out in 2003.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Erin Weir:

You mentioned that these reforms might ultimately remove the need for supplementary estimates. While we certainly would value a more streamlined process, part of the importance of supplementary estimates is they provide an opportunity for scrutiny by the opposition to have ministers such as you before this committee.

So I wonder, in potentially eliminating supplementary estimates, what would be the replacement to ensure adequate opportunities over the course of the year for parliamentarians to scrutinize the budget.

Hon. Scott Brison:

There are a couple of things. I think over time the degree to which budget initiatives can be incorporated into main estimates will reduce the reliance on supplementary estimates. I don't see them being eliminated. I see our reliance on them being reduced over time.

You know, supplementary (A)s are actually more important, in some ways, than the main estimates. Last year 70% of the budget initiatives were delivered in supplementary (A)s, so in some ways you could argue that supplementary (A)s were more pertinent than the main estimates.

The big thing around here—I'm saying broadly Parliament—is that there are people who have been here a long time as members of Parliament who don't really understand the estimate and budget processes. It's not really their fault. If you were to design intentionally a system, and the objective was to design a system that was hard to understand, you would not do better than the one we have right now. But nobody wants to put their hand up and say they don't understand this.

Sometimes when you're doing something, it's hard to explain what it will look like after. This is one of the few changes, Erin, when it's actually easier to explain how the system will work after the change than what it is now. I can't explain—

Mr. Erin Weir:

In terms of how it would look—

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, we're out of time.

I will point out, Mr. Weir and Mr. McCauley, with your questioning about a fixed budget date, that in the 2012 OGGO report there was a recommendation that the budget be presented no later than February 1. It certainly would be within the purview of this committee to make such a recommendation again, should we wish.

Mr. Whalen, you're up for seven minutes.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, guys, for coming. As a new MP, it's interesting to see how the department's thinking on these four pillars of realigning the budget and the estimates process has evolved over the course of the last year. One of the first things we received when we came in November, whenever you were called last year, was a big stack of documents on estimates (B) and (C), which were almost indecipherable. Over time we learned how to figure them out, and now we're talking about changing them.

Just to follow up a little bit on Mr. Weir's question, do you see estimate (A)s being combined into the mains, and then only having estimates (A) and (B) and no need for a (C), or only in very rare circumstances? Or do we still see all three extra sets of estimates in addition to interim supply and in addition to the mains?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'll start, and then I'll get Brian to reply, because he has more of an institutional memory on this from Treasury Board's perspective.

I see that the reliance on supplementary estimates (A) and (B), as an example, will be less than it is right now. As you sequence the main estimates after the budget, the main estimates I think will take on a more important role, as they ought to, but this will take time. Again, some of the changes to operationalize within government will take at least a couple of budget cycles to get it closer to the full potential.

Brian, would you like to continue?

(1145)

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Minister.

Thank you, Mr. Whalen, for the question. Just to be clear, what we are proposing with this vision is not to eliminate supplementary estimates. It's to render the process more coherent and sequential, so that the main estimates tabled after the budget in fact reflect budget priorities.

In that scenario, as mentioned, last year we brought forward approximately 70% of the budget in supplementary estimates (A). We would replace that spring supplementary estimates with the main estimates that would have the budget initiatives. Then we would bring forward the remaining budget priorities in a fall supplementary estimate, which would become the first supplementaries of the year, with supplementary (A)s in the fall, and then a cleanup of accounts in the winter in supplementary (B)s. We would continue to have an estimates document in each supply period, which would encourage committees to continue to call on departments and continue their scrutiny of government expenditure plans.

I would also mention, just in terms of history, that we introduced the spring supplementaries in 2007 as a way of facilitating a more timely implementation of budget initiatives. That has proven to be helpful, as we saw last year, but we can make the process more efficient by simply presenting a better main estimates. That's the heart of the proposal.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

In the concern over whether or not there's a need for a fixed budget date to have this process aligned, what do you envision would happen if the first week of April rolls around and the government in the future is not ready to present its budget? Would the department then be forced to carry two sets of main estimates it's working on, one that reflects the old process and one that reflects a new process? How difficult and taxing would that be on the department to try to triage a situation like that?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for the question.

We have seen over the last 10 years a wide variation in terms of budget tabling. We've seen something as early as January, in 2009, in response to the global economic crisis. As recently as 2015, we had a different problem in the energy market and a precipitous drop in energy prices, which had all kinds of impacts and implications for the government's ability to forecast and project requirements. We saw a budget on April 21 of that year.

So because we do not have a fixed budget date, because the government will want to avail itself of the flexibility to take advantage of the best available information in setting its economic forecasts, a tabling date of May 1 would encompass anything we've seen over the last 10 years, and it should provide the government with the ability to, at the very least, table the estimates after the budget so that we can reconcile to the budget.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thanks, Mr. Pagan.

Mr. Brison, when we look at the different pillars, it seems the department is very close now on pillar one. It seems some of the changes that are being proposed also include certain aspects of pillar four, which is departmental reports, plans, and priorities.

Can you speak a little about how ready you feel the department is in implementing the changes of having those plans and priorities presented in a more coherent fashion on May 1 of next year, or sooner, along with the main estimates?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Actually, in Treasury Board policy, in terms of departmental reports, as part of a broader results and delivery approach for our government, we're already doing that, and we're moving toward that. Even in terms of the format of Treasury Board submissions and the degree to which departments and agencies...as they present submissions to Treasury Board—we are pushing and getting metrics and a commitment to a results and delivery model so that we understand, not just with regard to committing funds but actually establishing objectives or goals in terms of what they're going to accomplish.

That part of it we are doing at Treasury Board, as a central agency, already. In some of the other areas, we're doing more reconciliation between cash and accrual accounting, as part of what we're doing already. With program-based expenditure reportage, we've done that with Transport Canada, and we'll be doing more—

(1150)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Sorry, Mr. Brison, I have a very short question. We haven't seen a copy of any proposed text for what the new standing order would look like. Has the department advanced its thinking that far as to what the standing order would look like?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Well, it would involve changing the date. I don't want to assume, because the committee would—

The Chair:

Minister, perhaps I could interject.

Having some knowledge in this, Mr. Whalen, I can say that our committee could certainly propose the text.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Yes, that's right. Thank you.

The Chair:

Before the minister has to leave, we have two final interventions of five minutes each.

Mr. Clarke, you're up for five. [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. [English]

Hon. Scott Brison:

I think I can stay a little bit longer, if you folks are all right.

The Chair:

All right. Well, we'll try to complete an entire round of questioning.

Thank you for that, Minister.[Translation]

Mr. Clarke, you have five minutes.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for this candid approach. We are very pleased you can stay longer. Thank you for being here with us today. It is much appreciated.

For Her Majesty's official opposition, this is a very interesting reform. Of course we would like to see a reform that guarantees the well-being of all Canadians. We are considering this reform very seriously and have questions that are serious as well. First of all, we think it entirely laudable to provide more coherence in order to improve the estimates review process that members carry out on behalf of Canadians.

I would like to continue along the lines of what my colleague Mr. McCauley was saying. You seemed to be saying we need an adjustment period. We think it might be a good idea to do what they are doing in Australia and to publish the budget and main estimates on the same day. Your departmental colleague mentioned that adjustments would have to be made to ensure greater flexibility. Could you tell us what those adjustments are that would have to be spread over a number of years?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you, Mr. Clarke. I very much appreciate your question.

When significant changes are made to the departments' activities, departments that work together obviously need time to implement those changes. My objective is to arrive at a process in which the budget and main estimates are—

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Published simultaneously?

Hon. Scott Brison:

—presented at approximately the same time. My model is that of Australia. I have expressed my interest in that model for a long time, but it takes time to make changes. I think we may need two more years for the departments to adjust to those changes. I believe, just as you do, that the new model may possibly be an improvement.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Minister, that leads me to another question.

The official opposition wants to ensure that the period traditionally allotted to members to evaluate the budget will not be shortened. We understand the concepts of flexibility, adjustments, and so on. That brings me to another point.

You feel it will take two or three years for the adjustments to be made. To demonstrate your goodwill, would it not be a good idea to take this opportunity to include a clause in the act providing that, within two or three years, the budget and main estimates will be presented on the same day?

Do you consider that a good idea and would you agree to explore it?

(1155)

Hon. Scott Brison:

It is the prerogative of the committee and of Parliament to consider the possibility of amending the regulations. I am amenable to improvements being made on an ongoing basis. We call that an evergreen process. If we amend our process today, in a few months or years—perhaps two years or two budget cycles—we will have a better understanding of the changes and the possibility of making more of them. This is an important step. I am entirely amenable to the idea of other improvements being made in future.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you, Minister. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you so much.

Mr. Graham, welcome back to the committee, sir. You have five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Minister, I want to build on something you said at the beginning of your comments, and that was alluded to rather explicitly by Mr. Weir, that you have the most experience of any government caucus member in opposition and that you therefore have a tremendous amount of experience in reading the main estimates and the supplementaries.

I remember, as a staffer, going to your office and getting, from your staff, translation of the estimates into plain English, as I found them dissected on every horizontal and vertical surface of your office.

With this experience in that role, in concrete terms, how would this have changed your life if this had been the case over the last 10 years?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Well, we had to work awfully hard in opposition. I had a tremendous person—Tisha Ashton—who still works with me. In terms of budget and estimates work, there's been a handful of us over the years who have spent a lot of time on this.

You shouldn't have to work that hard, as a member of Parliament, or as a staff person of a member of Parliament, simply to understand what is fundamental to your job—that is, government spending and being able to hold the government to account. It is asinine that so much work goes into translating government documents and processes into an understandable format that we can scrutinize. It didn't make sense for me in opposition and it doesn't make sense to me in government.

To the credit of Treasury Board, I can say that a lot of good work was done there in the past. In fact I spoke to Tony Clement last week about some of this, and he told me that at that time he was aware of some of this work and understood the importance of it. This has been percolating within the public service for some time. I happen to feel very strongly about it.

As a member of Parliament, you don't want to admit that you don't understand this. There are ministers in any cabinet, however, who don't have a lot of parliamentary experience. There are people who have been around Parliament for a long time. As it is now, this is not a system that is designed to be understood. We want to change that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are people who don't do their own taxes who have to understand this stuff.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: In the same vein, are there other subtle improvements around the edges that you would want to see and that we have not addressed?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I really want to get some of these changes done and moved forward. The part that we have to spend a lot of time on is the departmental report. This morning we're not talking much about the departmental reports, but I think that's a big item. I think program-based budgeting for members of Parliament, parliamentarians....

I say “members of Parliament”, but I'm also talking about Senators. There is a lot of expertise in the Senate on budget estimates processes, particularly on the Senate finance committee.

It's my view that Parliament better engaged, parliamentary committees better engaged, Parliament as a whole better engaged, can help contribute to the analysis of budget items and measure the effectiveness of them. There should be some things we can agree on, on a non-partisan basis; one consists of measures that will clearly improve the ability of Parliament to do its job.

(1200)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the few seconds I have left, Mr. Whalen has one quick follow-up question.

Thank you, Minister.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you, David.

The Chair:

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Minister Brison, on the approach you're proposing to align the estimates with the budget now, but then to continue to examine the accounting methods, the votes, and the continuous improvement of departmental reports, I feel this aligns with what our committee has heard. I don't think we've heard enough yet on accounts and votes, accruals and different cost measures. We've engaged our study, but with respect to this first change, it sounds like it's something the department is able and ready to do.

If we were to recommend something, are we ready yet to put a date—like, no more than x days after the budget is tabled and no later than May 1? Would that be a more helpful formulation, or are we not quite ready for that type of restriction?

The Chair:

Please give a quick answer.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'll have a better idea of this over the next year or so. I'm being candid with you: what we're doing here is quite a fundamental change. We will be pushing to have a closer alignment of the budget and estimates, sequentially the main estimates after the budget. We'll have a better idea after the main estimates and budget process of 2017.

Any time this committee invites me, I'll gladly be here, and of course I will be here to defend estimates. One of the things we can talk about, in addition to those estimates specifically, is this process. We'll have a better idea then. It does take a while to operationalize these things.

Yaprak has a—

The Chair:

Unfortunately, we're....

Please go ahead.

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu:

I have a small explanation to maybe answer the question of why it is going to take us a few years.

It's because what's in the budget and what goes into estimates are completely different details of a program. For estimates we make sure that the full detail and the design is done. That is where we need the time. So when budget and estimates come, ideally where we want to be, hopefully in a few years, is where the budget makes the commitment and we give the green light to a program to be on the ground the day the main estimates are approved. That's what we're aiming for, but it's a little soon for the whole machine to turn that way.

The Chair:

Thank you for the clarification.

Minister, if we finish this round, it'll be about 15 minutes or just a little less, if you can spare the time. We thank you for that.

Mr. McCauley, you have five minutes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Very quickly, on pillar one, when it talks about alignment, again we're comparing ourselves to Australia. And you're right, they do everything great—although everything God created that can kill you and crawls is there.

It talks about Australia taking a very short period of time between policy and implementation of policy, and of course we're lagging behind at 19 months. Perhaps Yaprak could give us an idea of why it's like that.

Then it talks about how recent success demonstrates that such an internal alignment is possible for the Government of Canada. I'm just wondering if you could talk about what you're considering recent success.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'll say a couple of things, and then I'll ask Yaprak to reply. Again, Brian, Yaprak, and Marcia in our department have seen more of this. I was on the Treasury Board cabinet committee in the previous government, but it's different being President of the Treasury Board. You get to see it from a different perspective.

There is a closer alignment now in terms of collaboration between Treasury Board and Finance than I think existed in the past. There's a very close collaborative relationship and engagement throughout the budget process, stronger than in the past. So there has been some progress made.

As Yaprak said, the details involved in the main estimates are far greater than those in the budget. A budget gives a general view and a perspective. For instance, you could say we're going to invest so much money into indigenous education, but the details come out—

(1205)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

But a 19-month lag; is that all just the details?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I know; that's exactly the point, Kelly. Currently there is up to an 18-month lag. We're seeking to shorten that dramatically in terms of budget and estimates alignment process to get it closer together.

You've cited actually a key reason why we're saying May 1 initially. It's like that old country music song, “Give me 40 acres and I'll turn this rig around”. We're going to need a little time to work this through.

Go ahead, Yaprak.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I'm not familiar with that song, but maybe another time.

I have one more question, so please be brief, if you don't mind.

Ms. Yaprak Baltacioglu:

Absolutely—and I can't help with the country music song.

The way the Australians do it is that when the budget cycle starts, Treasury and Finance both work at the same time, not only in terms of the policy but also determining what a program could look like. Because it starts from the get-go, they can table it at the same time. That's where we should be. May 1 may sound like a long way away for designing all of these programs. Basically we are going to have to start from the beginning and design it at the same time. That's what we're aiming to do.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay. That's great.

I'll just bounce over to pillar three. Again, we're here about transparency and accountability, and one of the suggestions seems to be kind of the opposite. It says give higher votes but let the departments have more flexibility to use the money without parliamentary approval. That seems to be going backwards from what we're trying to do here.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. McCauley.

What we have learned in looking at other jurisdictions is that they do introduce what we call “purpose-based” votes so that parliamentarians have a better sense of how the resources are supporting specific programs. In doing that, in moving from a single operating vote in a department to three, four, or five purpose-based votes, you're necessarily—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Do you think the answer is just giving them a higher amount of money without any oversight?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

It's not a question of oversight—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Or without parliamentary approval to move it around...?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

For instance, in Quebec what they do with their supply bill is that they have purpose-based votes, but the supply bill allows departments to transfer up to 10% of funds between votes, and it's not done without full reporting by departments. There is transparency in the reporting. Other jurisdictions introduce either multi-year appropriations or enhanced carry-forward—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I want to quote you. This says that the balance could be achieved by establishing votes “at a relatively high level”—not moderate, but relatively high—and then allowing organizations to move monies without additional approval of Parliament.

Again, it seems to be the opposite of what we're trying to achieve. We're going to give a relatively high amount of money and then take away any ability for Parliament to approve—

Hon. Scott Brison:

If I may cut in, what we have now is that within a department you can move money around without really any—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Right, but this really doesn't seem to be helping that.

Hon. Scott Brison:

It is a step, and you can look at the work done at Transport in terms of the pilot. Again, when funding is approved by Parliament for a specific program, on the ability within a ministry to move it from there to somewhere else, you can have up to 10%, which provides.... Particularly to avoid lapsing in a particular area, it would make sense, but it's significantly improved over what exists now, and moving in this direction—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

It's a step, not a—

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's a step—

Mr. Kelly McCauley: Okay.

Hon. Scott Brison: —but all improvement begins with a step. You see how it works, and then say, can we move further? I'm open to that. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Ayoub, you have the floor for five minutes.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you, Minister, for being with us today. Thanks as well to the witnesses who are with you.

I am going to ask a more technical question about the Treasury Board Secretariat.

A pilot project is under way in cooperation with Transport Canada. You must have achieved results or received feedback on the subject. I would like you to tell me about that briefly. What have been the observed results, advantages, or disadvantages, and how will this help you plan other changes in the near future?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much. I appreciate the question.

Transport Canada's pilot project is an opportunity for us to consider taking the same approach to the changes with other departments. There have been positive results thus far, and perhaps Mr. Pagan can tell you about them and also address the other applications that could be tested in future using the same approach.

(1210)

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for your question.

In 2015-2016, the Department of Transport had a single vote of approximately $600 million for grants. In this pilot project, we are working with the department to test the way votes are used for ports of entry and corridors, transportation infrastructure, and so on. The idea is to separate votes based on the terms and conditions of each grant program. This is one way to give Parliament a clearer idea of exactly how the resources supporting certain programs are being used. Obviously, the fiscal year is under way, and we therefore have no final results for the moment. However, this way of doing things clearly poses no problems for the departments and provides parliamentarians with a better instrument for gauging the way these resources are used.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Am I mistaken in saying the Department of Transport has managed simultaneously to absorb this change, achieve results, and function? I suppose it has had to do both, that is to say continue using the old method while testing the new one?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

That is correct.

Consider the example of the nearly $600 million vote. In future, the department will be able to separate those resources and report results specific to each vote. Thus there will be one vote for corridors and another for transportation infrastructure. That will provide a more specific overview that focuses more on those programs.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Has any particular approach been taken to address preparation, training within the department, and employee training? How much time did it take to prepare before this pilot project was put in place?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

This pilot project stems from a report that this committee prepared in 2012. Since then, we have worked with the department to prepare the pilot project. There was no particular training and there were no problems with the financial system. We simply had to identify the best example and work with the department to demonstrate the benefits of this approach.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Were cost estimates established for the pilot project's large-scale implementation across all departments? The aim is to make changes to increase efficiency and transparency. What are the costs associated with those changes? Do you have any estimates of future costs? Is the pilot project providing that kind of information?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

For the moment, this is a pilot project involving a single department. In the next phase, it will be extended to include other votes and especially other operating votes to gain a clearer understanding of the costs and benefits of this approach.

Hon. Scott Brison:

There is another benefit to this approach. We are going to extend it to other programs. It will be easier for Parliament to measure results and thus to consider the objectives of this process and program. That will represent major change in overall government efficiency.

(1215)

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Our final intervention will come from Mr. Weir.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thank you, Mr. Minister, for sticking around.

I want to return to the theme of effective opposition. I'm wondering whether you could clarify if the proposed reforms would change the number of supply days in the House.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I don't have the answer to that, Mr. Weir, in terms of the impact on the number of supply days. I'll get back to you on that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay: so you can't provide any assurance that the number of supply days would not be reduced as a result of these changes?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Brian, do you have something...?

We'll get you an exact answer.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

I can tell you, Mr. Weir, that there is no intention to impact that in any way. The number of supply periods would remain the same. Supply days are negotiated by the government and opposition. There's no correlation here.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I don't see why there would be an impact, but I just want to make sure of that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay. If you could come back just a little more concretely on that one, I would appreciate it.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Yes, absolutely. But beyond that, the objective here is to improve committee scrutiny of the government in terms of expenditures.

Mr. Erin Weir:

We appreciate that. In terms of those expenditures, the majority of estimates for most departments would be to pay those departments' employees. This committee's been looking at the Phoenix payroll system. I appreciate that you're not the minister directly responsible, but the Treasury Board does provide the employer function for the federal government.

We've been told that the backlog in Phoenix will be cleared up by the end of October, which is a week away. I'm just wondering if you and Treasury Board have confidence that this will happen and the government will be properly paying its employees by the end of the month.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I believe last week the deputy minister at Public Services and Procurement Canada did an update on that and a briefing and addressed this situation. As the employer, we at Treasury Board work closely with Public Services and Procurement Canada, where the Phoenix system is housed. It is absolutely fundamental to the employer-employee relationship that people are paid on time and accurately. We're fixing this. I know that my colleague, Minister Foote, her deputy Marie Lemay—

Mr. Erin Weir:

Are you fixing it by October 31?

Hon. Scott Brison:

There was an update last week by the deputy minister at Public Services and Procurement Canada that described where it's at now. There have been a lot of additional resources applied in terms of people being brought in to address this. It's a lesson to government, both our government and the previous government. It's a lesson to any government. When you're doing enterprise-wide IT transformation, whether you're in a government or a business, it is very complex. It is fraught with challenges.

Those are not reasons not to do these things. The pay system needed to be modernized. But we would do things differently if given the opportunity. This was introduced by the previous government. We were brought in at a particular point in time. There are lessons to be learned from the implementation of the Phoenix pay system that would mean that any government in the future would do it differently.

The Chair:

Minister, once again, thank you for coming here today and for spending a little bit more time than you'd originally budgeted for.

To the committee, as I've said before and will say again for the record, I think this is an extremely, extremely important study that we're about to commence, for no other reason than this. Again I will go back to my 12 years' experience here and say that if we can get this right—and I think, Minister, you are on the right track—it would finally, and I mean finally, after generations, give the responsibility and the authority for the expenditures of monies away from the public service and into the hands of the parliamentarians. As far as I was concerned when I was first elected, that's what we were here to do.

Once again, thank you for your efforts. We will hopefully see you once again. You said you've made about 12 appearances. Hopefully you won't mind making it a baker's dozen if we invite you back here again sometime in the near future.

Thanks once again. We will suspend.

(1215)

(1220)

The Chair:

Colleagues, since we only have this room until one o'clock, the remainder of this meeting, questions and answers, will be somewhat truncated.

Mr. Pagan, I believe you have about five minutes more in your presentation. You have a few more slides.

Then, colleagues, we'll go into I think one round of seven-minute interventions so that we'll get every party involved. By then it should be close to one o'clock.

Mr. Pagan, without any further ado, I'll turn the floor over to you.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As presented, this is a four-pillar approach to estimates reform. We've just spent some time talking about the very critical element of timing. I'll quickly walk you through the three remaining pillars.

Once we can fix the timing of the estimates, there are other sources of incoherence and coordination that must be addressed. These include the scope and accounting, the nature of control, and reporting.

Pillar two is about scope and accounting, or what we refer to as the “universe” of the estimates. The problem is quite simple. The budget presents a complete and full picture of the totality of government spending, including crown corporations; consolidated accounts, such as employment insurance; and programs through the tax system, such as the Canada child benefit. In contrast, the estimates are simply a more narrow subset of government spending, and they're focused on the expenditures that must be authorized through an appropriation. That is the universe.

Then, of course, we have accounting differences. The budget is on an accrual basis; the estimates are on a cash basis. The problem has I think been oversimplified by talking about cash and accrual, and it's much broader than that.

What we see in slide 8 are the benefits of reconciling these accounting and universe challenges if we can table the main estimates after the budget. The president mentioned our interest in deepening the reconciliation between the two documents.

The federal budget last year presented an expense forecast of $317.1 billion. Supplementary estimates (A) provided authority to spend $251.4 billion. That's a $65.7-billion gap. The universe accounts for about $60 billion of that—that is to say, consolidated specified purpose accounts, such as employment insurance; expenditures through the tax system, such as the Canada child benefit; and then other expenses of government, such as consolidated crown corporations. That's about $60 billion. The actual accounting difference—the difference between accrual and cash—represents about $4.8 billion. This difference is explained by things like capital amortization, bad debt allowances, and interest on future obligations.

Finally, to complete the reconciliation, there would be items that are in the budget but have not yet been brought forward for approval. As we saw in supplementary estimates (A) last year, that was about $4.9 billion.

This is an example of how, if we can table the estimates after the budget, we would be able to provide a reconciliation to the budget and thus eliminate some of the confusion and frustration that parliamentarians and committees experience.

Quickly, in terms of vote structure—we did touch on this in the previous round—the objective here is to improve Parliament's line of sight on program costs and results. We are currently doing a pilot project with Transport Canada for their grants and contributions vote. The idea would be to expand that across all departmental operations and provide committees with a better line-of-sight relationship between resources and programs.

For example, as mentioned by the president, the Treasury Board Secretariat is the employer; we're the expenditure authority and we're the regulatory authority. Rather than having a single operating vote, perhaps we might want to experiment with votes related to each of those core responsibilities.

Mr. McCauley, that's what we mean by that high level related to our core responsibilities. We could do that for any other department.

Global Affairs, for instance, has a single operating vote, but we know that they have responsibilities for development, diplomacy, and trade. We can disaggregate that at almost any level, but of course there are costs and challenges. There are some jurisdictions that have as many as 12,000 votes. I would argue that they're not the best-run jurisdictions, but that's something we could study and work on with the committee.

(1225)



Finally, we have our last pillar around results and reporting. As was mentioned in the introduction, we have a new Treasury Board results policy. It came into effect on July 1. We are working with a handful of departments now to operationalize this and present new departmental results frameworks and new reports to Parliament that we would see in the spring cycle. This policy will be fully operational by all departments by November 2017.

Before I conclude, I'll say a word—a plug, if you will—for TBS InfoBase. As was mentioned in the introduction, in 2012 the committee recommended the creation of an accessible online database. We've made great strides in making this a reality. If members are not familiar with InfoBase, I would commend this to them as a way of facilitating an awareness and study of departmental operations.

The graphic presented here is simply a snapshot of the types of information that are available through InfoBase that include all kinds of indicators around actual costs, projected costs, FTE utilization, the distribution of FTEs across the country, demographic information, etc. As the minister mentioned, we have plans moving forward to deepen this and enrich the information available to committees.

(1230)

[Translation]

In conclusion, many complex issues must still be considered before we go ahead, particularly the accounting frameworks and the withdrawal of votes from the main estimates. Changes of that scope will require Parliament to change the way it operates and the way the departments publish their information.

We propose moving ahead by small steps in order to avoid large-scale failures. We recommend starting by changing the deadline for the main estimates and then working with the committee to develop options for the other aspects as that change is integrated into the process.[English]

Mr. Chair, that concludes the presentation. Madam Santiago and I would be very happy to respond to additional questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll start that line of questioning with Mr. Grewal. You have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, sir, for coming today to share your testimony. Coming from the private sector as a former corporate lawyer and a financial analyst, it's really surprising to me that the budget and the estimates process is done like this in government. It just basically makes no sense, in my humble opinion.

My concern is that we're looking at other models. We're looking at the Australian and the U.K. models. Are we prepared, once we implement the changes, for this not to fall apart in the interim period? Can you please give some colour as to how we're going to make sure that everything is accounted for in the transition period?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Grewal. You're absolutely right that the current process does not make much sense. It's very difficult to explain in its present sense. It's easier to describe what we want to do than how we're currently doing business.

That's very much the reason we propose a four-pillar approach: get the timing right, and in getting the timing right, bring greater clarity on some of the other interests and needs of committees, including accounting and universe and the control structure through the vote framework.

If we can proceed in an orderly fashion in that way, then yes, I do believe we are lined up to succeed. The change of Standing Orders is the prerogative of the House, but we understand it to be a fairly simple and straightforward question of simply changing on or before “March 1” to on or before “May 1”.

We are working very closely with the Department of Finance to deepen the coordination of the budget and TB approvals. Last year's success in bringing forward almost 70% of the budget in our supplementary estimates (A), tabled on May 10, suggests that we can succeed here in bringing forward budget items into the main estimates tabled on or before May 1.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you.

My next question is from a planning perspective. How much will the government and MPs benefit from the changes that we're about to implement?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

It's really a question of coherence and comprehension. Tabling main estimates last year in advance of the budget—everyone knew there was an important budget coming because of the platform commitments around infrastructure, environment, and aboriginals—made absolutely no sense. We put in front of Parliament a document that was of very little utility to committees. Then we had to race, to work very, very hard, to bring forward those budget items in the supplementary estimates.

By changing the process so that the estimates are presented after the budget, we are presenting a much more coherent picture to parliamentarians and rendering their study of the estimates, I believe, much more fruitful and useful. I make the point that we would also be simplifying processes so that in that June supply period, you would have a single supply bill for main estimates, as opposed to now where we have full supply for main estimates and supplementary estimates. It's somewhat confusing to have two appropriation acts presented on the same day. Then we would focus the supply periods in December and March on what would then become supplementaries (A) and (B).

Committees would be thereby engaged throughout the year in a continuous study of estimates. As the minister said, there is a commitment that if departments table estimates, ministers will appear and speak to and explain their estimate requirements.

(1235)

Mr. Raj Grewal:

How much is this transition going to cost internally?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

In terms of timing, we believe costs are negligible. It's simply a question of better sequencing the work in departments. In fact, by not having to produce spring supplementaries, which basically duplicate the main estimates, there would be very minor savings of some efforts.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you.

I think my colleague has a question to ask.

The Chair: Monsieur Poissant. [Translation]

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (La Prairie, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Good morning, everyone.

Mr. Pagan, I would like to hear you say a little more about transparency.

On June 14 last, representatives of Her Majesty's Treasury, in London, told the committee that harmonizing the budget and main estimates had helped improve transparency and facilitate monitoring of their spending plan.

What is the federal government doing to maximize the transparency of its finances? I would like us to discuss transparency at greater length.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for your question.

First of all, the process has to be simplified and made easier for the committees to understand. Overlaps between the estimates and supplementary estimates currently make the process more complicated than it ideally should be.

Minister Brison mentioned it is important to adopt a better, results-based approach and to present figures more clearly so that resources are aligned with results. Of course, we can move ahead with a new policy, but we can also look at votes based on program objectives.

So these are two measures that would make the process more comprehensible. The timing has to be clarified and votes aligned with program objectives.

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant:

I have a brief question for you.

What should the role of the Parliamentary Budget Officer be in ensuring transparency and accountability in the federal government's finances?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

I think the PBO's role is very clear. He must work with MPs and the committee to make the process more comprehensible in order to answer the questions identified by members. Since last year, we have worked closely with the PBO to identify parliamentarians' problems and needs and to move ahead with our programs.

As I also mentioned, the PBO noted that we had made an improvement. We included an annex in the supplementary estimates (C) providing for the identification of lapsed funds. He mentioned that the presentation of that information put MPs on the same level as the executive branch.

(1240)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Clarke, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thanks to the witnesses for being with us today.

Mr. Pagan, how long has Australia had its current budgetary cycle? It is in fact the one that Canada wants to adopt, according to this report on the adoption of a reform. Is that still the case in Australia or is it something recent?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for your question.

You are right in saying that we view the Australian system as a model, but Quebec and Ontario also have processes comparable to Australia's. I think the Australian system was adopted in 2006. It is more or less the same in Ontario.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Do you know whether there were adjustment periods in Quebec, Ontario, and Australia, as we anticipate here?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Yes, that was the case, particularly with regard to the accounting system, that is cash-basis accounting instead of accruals-basis accounting.

There are no major complications involved in presenting the budget and tabling the main estimates at the same time. We will have a certain amount of time, as the minister mentioned, but there is no problem as regards training.

Accounting is another matter altogether. The accruals-basis accounting system is complex and much more difficult than the cash-basis accounting system. We will have to train public service managers and parliamentarians so that they can have a clear understanding of the differences involved in the cash-basis accounting system.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

I would like to clarify—

Mr. Brian Pagan:

After adopting the cash-basis accounting system, Ontario and Australia experienced some problems in monitoring the allocation of votes within departments.[English]

They exceeded their parliamentary authorities, or in common parlance, they blew their votes. [Translation]

That was related to training problems and to the complex nature of that accounting system.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you for everything you are saying, but I would like to get a precise answer.

Were Australia's budget and main estimates presented on the same date starting in the first year?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Yes.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

All right.

I also read the following in the report:[English]

“...a program-based vote structure would reduce departmental flexibility to reallocate funding....” [Translation]

Based on that logic, do you expect we will establish a maximum for these inter-program transfers?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

We will have to have that examined by the committee and the departments. In Ontario, for example, votes are associated with the programs. Under legislation on votes, it is possible to transfer votes without statutory approval. In Quebec, vote transfers are limited to a maximum of 10%.

The departments must therefore understand the limits of flexibility and identify ways to ensure transparency while allowing a degree of flexibility in order to deliver programs and services.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

The document provides no specific figures such as 10% in Quebec, for example. Do we expect to establish a threshold?

(1245)

Mr. Brian Pagan:

We do not plan to propose a specific way to set limits. However, that is one thing that should be examined. We would like to work with the committee and the department to identify the best approach to adopt in this regard.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you once again for your answer.

Further on, the same report contains the following sentence:[English]

“This flexibility allows departments to minimize the amount of lapsed funding.” [Translation]

However, my Conservative Party colleagues on this committee and I are afraid that flexibility will be used[English] to mask true program costs and also to move money around in a less transparent way. [Translation]

What do you think of that?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

That is a good question.

For us, it is matter of establishing a clear understanding and aligning resources with programs.

Earlier I discussed the Department of Foreign Affairs. It currently has only one operating vote. In future, we may be able to consider an approach under which specific votes would be provided for development, diplomacy, and trade. That is one example of what is called[English]purpose-based votes.[Translation]

A larger number of votes obviously complicates matters for the departments. There are more likely to be lapsed votes because they will not have the flexibility to transfer them. We would like to look at the possibilities and identify a balanced approach between transparency and flexibility.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

All right. Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, seven minutes.

Mr. Erin Weir:

In terms of presenting the estimates by May 1, there would still be a need for interim supply for departments during the initial months in a fiscal year. I'm wondering if you could give us a sense of how that would work under the proposed reforms.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Weir.

In fact, in the discussion paper, there is an annex that presents an illustration of what interim estimates could look like. We would envision it being very much similar to the present case, where we would present interim estimates on or before the 1st of March. However, these would be based on a continuation of the current-year authorities rather than future-year, which we don't know yet because of the budget.

In our mind, this would have the advantage of avoiding some situations that we've seen in the past. This committee may remember the case of Marine Atlantic in 2015-16, where continuation of certain funding was contingent on a budget decision. Because the main estimates were presented before the budget, there was a fairly significant decrease in the main estimates for Marine Atlantic that year. It was assumed to be some sort of cut, and in fact it wasn't a cut; it was simply the fact that the continuation of the funding was ad referendum the budget.

By presenting interim estimates that would be based on a continuation of existing authorities, there would be no reductions unless those reductions were announced in the budget, and the interim main estimates would continue to be based on a fraction. We talk about “twelfths”. Interim supply is usually 3/12ths of a department's overall requirements.

That would continue to be the basis of interim supply, but we would work with departments. They could identify specific needs very early in the year. They would get incremental fractions to reflect that authority. For instance, grants and contributions that are made to aboriginal bands right at the beginning of the year would justify a higher—

Mr. Erin Weir:

That was one of the points I wanted to hit on. It does strike me that one of the potential pitfalls of basing interim supply on the current year is that you might have departments that actually need to spend more money for a legitimate reason right near the start of the fiscal year. I guess you're acknowledging that there would have to be some kind of special allowance for that.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Absolutely. I believe the interim document does present that possibility.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay. Excellent.

I have another question about the kind of overall system and the reforms proposed. Currently Treasury Board doesn't really get involved until after the budget is tabled. Would you envision, or should our committee be considering, the possibility of Treasury Board getting involved in the budget-making process at an earlier stage?

(1250)

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Weir, for the question. That's in fact at the heart of the issue of timing and our recommendation for a May 1 tabling of main estimates.

The development of the budget is the responsibility and prerogative of the Minister of Finance, so we have to be very mindful of that responsibility. At the same time, for a number of years now we have worked very closely with the Department of Finance, in advance of the tabling of the budget, to get a sense of those initiatives that are likely to be supported, so that we can begin working with departments to pre-position Treasury Board submissions and proposals to Treasury Board ministers for their approval.

As the minister was saying, we intend on deepening that relationship so that we can work ever more closely and lessen the gap between the budget and the presentation of main estimates.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay.

We had a fair bit of discussion about the Department of Transport as an example. It just reminded me to follow up with you on something that I asked you and the minister about at a previous meeting. It was about the Global Transportation Hub, which is a crown corporation in Saskatchewan that receives significant federal money. It has also spent millions of dollars buying land at grossly inflated prices from businessmen with close connections to the governing SaskParty.

The initial response to this was that you and the minister would look into it. The response subsequently was that it had been referred to the provincial Auditor General. The provincial Auditor General has now reported and confirms that there was vast overspending on this land.

In this work the Treasury Board has been doing with the Department of Transport, has there been any recourse with the federal money that's tied up in that project?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you, Mr. Weir. I'm not familiar with recent reports from the Auditor General or any response from the department. We would have to go back and look at that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I appreciate that. The provincial Auditor General has reported, so I'd be very interested to know the federal government's stance regarding the millions of dollars it has put into the Global Transportation Hub. If you could come back to us at a later date on that, it would be greatly appreciated.

The Chair:

You have about a minute left.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay.

Mr. Pagan, it struck me that there was some information you were hoping to present about budget timing that you hadn't had a chance to do due to the time constraints earlier. If you'd like to take a minute for that, you'd be most welcome.

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you.

I mentioned that over the last 10 years budgets have been presented as early as the end of January or as late as the 21st of April. There are good and valid reasons for that.

In 2009, the global economic crisis, it was very important for the government to send signals to Canadians and the Canadian marketplace about its ability to invest and support employment and the functioning of credit markets. That is an example of the government's acting early.

More recently, in 2015, with the dramatic drop in the energy market there was some confusion as to whether this was a temporary dip and was going to rebound quickly or if it was a more permanent feature that would impact underlying economic environment, capital investment, employment levels, etc. In that year the government actually delayed the budget, looking for the best information possible before presenting its plans.

Those two extremes, if you will, point to the benefits of some flexibility in the tabling of budgets. Our proposal of May 1 would accommodate either scenario and would present the main estimates after the budget, which would render the documents more coherent and reconcilable.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I have no one else on my list, unless—

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi: Can I ask a brief question?

The Chair: Go ahead, Ms. Ratansi.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Thank you, because I'm a little confused about something.

There was a question asked to you about the ability of parliamentarians to “study”. At the moment, we study the main estimates—we really don't study the budget, but we study the main estimates—and sometimes those main estimates are not in line with the budget. Help me understand: if you align it, how much time will parliamentarians have to study what the government is actually spending?

Mr. Brian Pagan:

Thank you for the question, Ms. Ratansi.

The issue of the first pillar, of timing, is very important, I believe, to all of us, because it would present a main estimates, or at least the possibility of a main estimates document, that is more useful, more reconciled to the budget. That in itself is a benefit. Nothing about the proposal is meant in any way to diminish the number of supply days or the ability of committees to examine the estimates on an ongoing basis.

There would continue to be three supply periods. We would be presenting estimates documents in each of the supply periods; therefore, committees would have the ability to call witnesses and hear from ministers and staff about not only the main estimates but also the ongoing operations of departments.

Bob Marleau, who the minister mentioned in the introduction, has underlined the fact that committees should be encouraged to look at the estimates on an ongoing basis rather than just episodically in the spring. We would support that.

(1255)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Pagan and Ms. Santiago. Thank you for your appearance here again today.

Committee members, we are back in this same room at 3:30 this afternoon for a continuing study on Canada Post.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Chers collègues, merci d'être venus. Pour la plupart d'entre vous, c'est comme le film Un jour sans fin, nous nous revoyons encore une fois. Je ne pensais pas que ce serait aussi tôt, mais je vous souhaite la bienvenue néanmoins.

Monsieur Graham, monsieur Ayoub, et monsieur Grewal, soyez les bienvenus également. Quel plaisir de vous revoir ici.

Monsieur le ministre, bonjour. Je sais que nous n'avons qu'une heure, donc sans plus tarder, je vais vous céder la parole afin que vous puissiez parler à nos collègues ici présents de l'objectif de votre visite et faire votre exposé.

L'hon. Scott Brison (président du Conseil du Trésor):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'en suis à ma douzième comparution devant un comité parlementaire, que ce soit du Sénat ou de la Chambre, depuis l'investiture du nouveau gouvernement en novembre dernier. Je suis ravi d'être ici.[Français]

J'ai le plaisir d'être accompagné aujourd'hui de Yaprak Baltacioglu, secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor du Canada; de Brian Pagan, secrétaire adjoint de la Gestion des dépenses de mon ministère; de Marcia Santiago, du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, et de ma collègue Joyce Murray, secrétaire parlementaire de notre ministère.[Traduction]

Quel plaisir de revenir. Depuis notre dernière rencontre, nous avons réalisé des progrès considérables, comme le montre bien le document que je vous ai remis.

Votre comité joue un rôle important pour ce qui est de la réforme des budgets et des prévisions budgétaires depuis un certain temps déjà, depuis 2012 en fait, lorsque vous avez déposé le rapport intitulé Renforcer l'examen parlementaire des prévisions budgétaires et des crédits, soit une analyse en profondeur et des recommandations qui ont servi de feuille de route à la réforme budgétaire. En fait, bon nombre des mesures déjà prises découlent de ce rapport et des recommandations qui y figuraient. Cela comprend notamment la création d'une base de données en ligne, soit InfoBase, qui peut être consultée et qui a été reconnue par le directeur parlementaire du budget comme étant la source de renseignements sur les dépenses gouvernementales. Il y a également un projet pilote mené avec Transports Canada afin d'essayer une nouvelle structure de crédits axée sur les programmes, et l'identification, dans le budget des dépenses, de tous les nouveaux crédits accordés dans les documents budgétaires connexes afin de rendre la consultation plus aisée pour les parlementaires.

Nous continuons à avancer dans le programme, notamment sur la question de l'échéancier et de l'alignement du budget et du budget des dépenses, et je voulais vous en parler rapidement ce matin.

Notre rôle le plus important, en notre qualité de parlementaires qui représentent les Canadiens, est d'assurer la surveillance des dépenses gouvernementales.[Français]

Toutefois, le processus actuel fait en sorte qu'il est difficile pour les députés d'assumer cette fonction. Étant député depuis de nombreuses années, moi aussi j'ai été mécontent de divers éléments du processus des prévisions budgétaires.[Traduction]

L'autre soir, lors d'une séance d'information à laquelle certains d'entre vous ont assisté, j'ai fait remarquer que le 2 juin prochain, j'aurai été député parlementaire depuis 20 ans. J'aurai siégé en qualité de député du parti ministériel pendant 3 ans et demi, et passé 16 ans dans l'opposition, donc ma perspective a été façonnée non simplement pour avoir été député du parti ministériel mais également député parlementaire. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles je suis heureux de discuter avec vous de la vision du gouvernement quant à la réforme budgétaire.

Il n'est pas facile d'apporter des changements dans ce domaine. En fait, Robert Marleau, l'ancien greffier de la Chambre, a fait remarquer que la présentation et le contenu du Budget principal des dépenses n'a été modifiée que quatre fois depuis la Confédération, le plus récemment en 1997. Il y a donc amplement de travail à faire pour ce qui est de renforcer la capacité du Parlement d'exiger des comptes du gouvernement.

Je suis convaincu que la vision que nous proposons nous aidera à régler les nombreux problèmes liés à l'inefficacité du processus budgétaire au Canada. Cela comprend les préoccupations du vérificateur général, qui a souligné la nécessité de mieux aligner le budget et le budget des dépenses.

Notre vision comprend quatre domaines qui constituent actuellement une grande source de frustration pour les parlementaires. Afin de rendre les choses plus gérables et pour réaliser des progrès dès le départ, je propose que nous examinions le premier domaine tout de suite. Il porte sur le moment où le Budget principal des dépenses est déposé et nécessiterait une petite modification du Règlement.

Une fois que cette réforme importante aura été apportée, nous pourrions prendre le temps qu'il faudra pour étudier les autres domaines. J'aimerais passer en revue chaque domaine avec le Comité.

Comme je l'ai dit auparavant, le premier domaine concerne l'alignement du Budget principal des dépenses et du budget. À l'heure actuelle, le Budget principal des dépenses pour l'exercice prochain doit être déposé au Parlement au plus tard le 1er mars. Dans la pratique, cela veut dire que le Budget principal des dépenses ne peut tenir compte des décisions prises par le Conseil du Trésor après janvier environ, bien avant la parution du budget.

(1105)



L'alignement concerne les parlementaires, car le Budget principal des dépenses, que les parlementaires doivent examiner et ensuite voter, est un document qui ne tient pas compte finalement des plans et priorités décrits dans le budget du même exercice.

L'autre problème, c'est que tout le travail consacré à l'examen par le Parlement du Budget principal des dépenses devient essentiellement inutile lorsque le budget est déposé. Moi, je n'ai pas comme priorité de faire perdre du temps au Parlement en lui demandant de faire du travail qui n'est pas utile. Nous devons régler le problème et nous assurer que le Parlement a du travail important, comme le fait d'exiger des comptes du gouvernement.

Nous proposons donc que le Budget principal des dépenses soit déposé au plus tard le 1er mai plutôt que le 1er mars, afin que ce document puisse contenir les postes budgétaires. [Français]

Le deuxième défi à relever est lié aux différences de portée et de méthodes comptables entre le budget et le Budget des dépenses.[Traduction]

Le problème ne concerne pas seulement des concepts comptables. Le budget présente l'ensemble des dépenses du gouvernement fédéral. Cela comprend des comptes consolidés, comme le compte de l'assurance-emploi, et des dépenses fiscales telles que la nouvelle Allocation canadienne pour enfants. Le budget des dépenses, quant à lui, renferme les demandes de crédit plus limitées des ministères et organismes.

Néanmoins, les parlementaires doivent pouvoir comparer les éléments du budget et du budget des dépenses. Le gouvernement misera sur les efforts déployés récemment pour améliorer la planification selon la comptabilité d'exercice dans les ministères et le rapprochement avec les crédits selon la comptabilité de caisse dans le budget des dépenses. Nous avons travaillé sur le rapprochement de la comptabilité d'exercice et de la comptabilité de caisse. Nous voulons poursuivre et même intensifier nos efforts.[Français]

Le troisième point concerne le fait que les députés ont de la difficulté à établir un lien entre les fonds que nous votons et les programmes auxquels ils serviront.[Traduction]

Le Parlement autorise les ministères à effectuer des dépenses en fonction des crédits prévus dans les lois de crédits. Ces lois décrivent comment les fonds sont dépensés sur des postes comme les immobilisations, le fonctionnement et les subventions et contributions. Nous aimerions plutôt mettre l'accent sur les raisons pour lesquelles nous prévoyons des dépenses et renforcer le lien entre les crédits et les programmes ainsi financés.[Français]

Finalement, beaucoup de rapports ministériels ne sont ni pertinents ni informatifs.[Traduction]

Chaque ministère dispose d'une grande équipe chargée de rédiger des rapports qui ne sont pas utiles en ce qui concerne la qualité de l'information présentée et qui ne sont pas grandement consultés. Ainsi, lorsque je vous ai dit qu'il n'est pas utile de faire perdre le temps des parlementaires, parallèlement, nous faisons perdre beaucoup de temps aux fonctionnaires chargés de rédiger ces rapports que les gens ne consultent pas puisqu'ils ne sont pas présentés d'une façon utile.

La nouvelle politique sur les résultats du Conseil du Trésor simplifiera la façon dont le gouvernement rend compte des ressources utilisées et des résultats obtenus. Les rapports renseigneront désormais les gens sur ce que font les ministères, ce qu'ils tentent de faire et comment ils mesurent leurs réussites. On accordera davantage d'importance aux méthodes utilisées pour mesurer les résultats et la prestation des services, afin que les ministres, le Parlement et au final, les Canadiens, puissent exiger des comptes du gouvernement et comprendre l'efficacité des programmes. De plus, nous fournirons des renseignements détaillés sur les dépenses liées aux programmes et au nombre d'employés à temps plein dans une base de données mise en ligne et conviviale. [Français]

Monsieur le président, ce sont les grandes lignes de notre vision pour changer fondamentalement le processus du Budget des dépenses afin que les députés puissent plus facilement obliger le gouvernement à rendre des comptes.

(1110)

[Traduction]

C'est notre objectif, et j'espère pouvoir compter sur l'appui de votre comité pour faire avancer la réforme budgétaire au profit de tous les parlementaires. À court terme, j'ai hâte de travailler avec vous pour ce qui est de l'alignement du budget et du budget des dépenses.

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Brian, qui vous décrira de façon plus détaillée les réformes proposées.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Pagan, je vous en prie. [Français]

M. Brian Pagan (secrétaire adjoint, Gestion des dépenses, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme le mentionnait le président du Conseil du Trésor, la présentation d'aujourd'hui vise à vous expliquer la vision du gouvernement en ce qui a trait à la réforme du Budget des dépenses. Nous voulons aussi vous expliquer comment nous prévoyons mieux appuyer les parlementaires avec la meilleure information possible quand vient le temps d'approuver les dépenses du gouvernement.[Traduction]

J'ai beaucoup de diapositives. Je vous propose de revoir rapidement les quatre piliers liés au budget. Je vais présenter le premier pilier qui concerne l'alignement, et ensuite faire une pause pour les questions sur cet élément essentiel.

Comme nous voyons ici dans l'aperçu, l'approche proposée des quatre piliers fait fond sur les recommandations avancées par votre comité dans l'étude effectuée en 2012 sur le processus budgétaire, ainsi que notre mémoire préliminaire déposé auprès de votre comité en février dernier, lorsque nous avons décrit les défis entourant l'alignement.

Nous croyons qu'une fois que les divers éléments seront alignés correctement, nous comprendrons davantage les besoins et les exigences pour ce qui est de la portée, de la comptabilité, de la structure des crédits, des résultats et des rapports.[Français]

Il est évident que les Budgets des dépenses sont essentiels au bon fonctionnement du gouvernement. Les Budgets des dépenses constituent la base de la surveillance et du contrôle parlementaires, ils reflètent les priorités du gouvernement en matière de dépenses et ils servent de mécanisme principal pour l'établissement de rapports sur les plans et résultats.

Cependant, les parlementaires ont mentionné à maintes reprises qu'ils ne sont pas en mesure de remplir leur rôle qui consiste à examiner les prévisions budgétaires afin d'assurer un contrôle suffisant. Cette situation est attribuable à l'incohérence du processus budgétaire qui fait que les initiatives du budget ne sont pas incluses dans le Budget principal des dépenses. Les fonds de dépenses sont difficiles à comprendre et à rapprocher, et les rapports ne sont ni pertinents ni instructifs. [Traduction]

Ainsi, le gouvernement a prévu une approche axée sur quatre piliers pour apporter des changements en profondeur, en commençant par le moment du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses. Comme le président l'a indiqué, cette mesure nous permettra de déposer un document plus cohérent et nous permettra d'y insérer les prévisions budgétaires.[Français]

Par la suite, on peut plus facilement concilier les différences de portée de la méthode comptable entre le budget et le Budget des dépenses, s'assurer que les structures des crédits votés pour chaque ministère rejoignent les parlementaires et réformer le rapport annuel des ministères de manière à ce que les parlementaires soient mieux informés sur les dépenses prévues, les résultats attendus et les résultats obtenus.

Je vais maintenant parler en détail de chaque pilier. [Traduction]

Le moment du dépôt des prévisions budgétaires est un élément critique pour ce qui est de prendre connaissance des intentions du gouvernement en ce qui concerne le Budget et de la compréhension et du contrôle des dépenses ministérielles par le Parlement.

Conformément à l'article 84(1) du Règlement, le gouvernement doit déposer au plus tard le 1er mars le Budget principal des dépenses pour l'exercice. Dans la réalité, afin de pouvoir respecter cette date butoir, nous devons préparer un document qui tient compte des décisions prises par le Conseil du Trésor jusqu'à la fin janvier. Nous savons que dans un exercice typique, le gouvernement déposera son Budget entre la mi-février et la mi-mars, et le fait de finaliser le Budget principal des dépenses à la fin janvier exclut toute possibilité de tenir compte des postes budgétaires dans le document.

Comme le président l'a indiqué, nous sommes donc confrontés à un scénario selon lequel nous présentons au Parlement la certitude de dépenses liées à des programmes qui ne tiennent pas compte des nouveaux plans du gouvernement, ni de ses nouvelles priorités, telles qu'elles sont exprimées dans le Budget déposé en février ou en mars. Cela crée donc un défi et des incohérences de taille pour ce qui est de comprendre le processus du Budget et du Budget principal des dépenses.

Pour y remédier, le gouvernement propose que le Budget principal des dépenses soit déposé au plus tard le 1er mai, plutôt que le 1er mars. À ce moment-là, le Budget aura été déposé, et nous aurons la possibilité d'inclure les postes budgétaires dans le Budget principal des dépenses soumis à l'examen du Parlement.

(1115)



Ce changement comporterait de nombreux avantages, y compris l'alignement plus cohérent des documents, la mise en oeuvre plus rapide des initiatives prévues dans le Budget, la capacité de rapprocher le Budget principal des dépenses avec le Budget déposé en février ou en mars, et la possibilité d'éliminer un budget supplémentaire. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons le Budget principal des dépenses et trois budgets supplémentaires. Nous pourrons simplifier le processus et déposer moins de documents au Parlement, ce qui réduira la confusion.

Je souligne le fait que rien ne changera par rapport au début de l'exercice et à l'approbation des crédits provisoires. Comme il est indiqué clairement dans le document, nous présenterions un budget provisoire accompagné d'un projet de loi des crédits provisoires qui serait fondé sur la prolongation des autorisations existantes pour l'exercice en cours et qui permettrait aux ministères de commencer l'exercice. Le budget principal serait ensuite déposé en juin, conformément au calendrier des crédits actuel.

Avant de faire une pause pour répondre à vos questions sur l'alignement, j'aimerais vous montrer un graphique où nous voyons la période actuelle, soit octobre-novembre, lorsque le gouvernement prépare sa mise à jour économique et financière. Ce document est utilisé pour planifier le Budget. Nous comprenons que le gouvernement aura l'intention de déposer son Budget auprès du Parlement pendant la période de février-mars. Nous déposerions des crédits provisoires au 1er mars, ce qui permet aux ministères de commencer l'exercice en avril dotés des autorisations nécessaires, et ensuite nous déposerions le Budget principal des dépenses qui tient compte des priorités budgétaires et fait le rapprochement avec le budget déposé en mai aux fins d'examen par le Parlement du projet de loi pour la dotation totale en juin.

Monsieur le président, je crois qu'il vaut mieux que je m'arrête maintenant pour permettre aux membres du Comité de digérer ces renseignements concernant l'alignement et peut-être poser des questions sur cette étape, qui est d'une importance critique.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Pagan.

Monsieur le ministre, merci pour votre exposé. Avant de commencer la série de questions, permettez-moi de faire quelques observations.

Monsieur le ministre, je ne siège pas au Parlement depuis aussi longtemps que vous. Or, mis à part vous-même, je crois que je suis le doyen de la table. Je suis d'accord avec votre évaluation du processus budgétaire et de la surveillance parlementaire. À mon avis du moins, et je le dis depuis plus de 12 ans, c'est presque risible. Nous n'avions tout simplement pas la capacité d'étudier les chiffres efficacement et de procéder à un examen comme il se doit. Je vous félicite de vos efforts visant à simplifier le processus et à le rationaliser afin que tous les parlementaires puissent au moins avoir la possibilité d'observer et de commenter le fonctionnement du Parlement, qui représente des milliards de dollars. Je vous en félicite.

J'ai une question pour vous. Au cours de la dernière législature, on m'a mandaté d'effectuer un examen du Règlement. Comme vous le savez, à chaque année de la législature, il y a une période délimitée pour l'examen du Règlement. En fait, lorsque nous étions en déplacement il y a une semaine ou deux, la Chambre a tenu un débat au Parlement à ce propos.

L'approche que j'ai retenue dans le cadre des travaux effectués par le comité multipartite chargé d'examiner le Règlement, c'était qu'il fallait prendre des décisions à l'unanimité parce que le Règlement constitue le fondement de nos travaux et du fonctionnement de notre établissement. Nous avons apporté quelques changements mineurs.

Monsieur le ministre, avez-vous songé à apporter des changements au Règlement moyennant l'approbation de tous, ou comment pensez-vous procéder?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, il faudra modifier le Règlement pour reporter la date limite du dépôt du budget principal du 1er mars au 1er mai. Votre comité peut recommander un tel changement au Parlement. Nous travaillerons là-dessus avec les députés parlementaires de tous les partis.

En ce qui concerne l'échéancier, afin de pouvoir apporter des changements au cycle budgétaire, il faudrait le faire en novembre. Je ne voudrais pas que nous perdions toute une année pour apporter une telle amélioration importante. Je perçois tout changement de ce genre comme faisant partie d'une approche de renouvellement continu. Le Parlement devrait toujours chercher des façons de renforcer la gouvernance parlementaire responsable sur une base permanente.

En d'autres termes, si nous apportons un changement maintenant au Règlement, le prochain cycle financier sera plus logique pour ce qui est de l'agencement du Budget et du Budget principal des dépenses, et ce dernier document tiendra véritablement compte du Budget. Ensuite, au fur et à mesure que nous avançons...

Si l'on prend le modèle australien, par exemple, le budget et le budget principal des dépenses paraissent presque en même temps, et même en Ontario, c'est avec un écart de 12 jours. Au fur et à mesure que les ministères s'habitueront au nouvel échéancier et à la nouvelle façon de faire, on pourra resserrer les délais et obtenir des gains d'efficacité avec le temps. Ce n'est que le début, à mon avis. Au fil du temps, le budget principal et les prévisions se rapprocheront et seront plus cohérents.

(1120)

Le président:

Merci.

Je m'excuse auprès du Comité, car j'ai pris un peu de votre temps précieux.

Nous commencerons par une série de questions de sept minutes.

À vous la parole, madame Ratansi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Vous avez bien le droit de poser une question.

Monsieur le ministre, merci d'être venu et d'avoir pris l'initiative. J'ai siégé au Parlement de 2004 à 2011, et moi-même, qui ai étudié les finances et suis comptable, je sais à quel point il a été difficile d'améliorer la cohérence et la transparence du processus.

Pour ce qui est de l'alignement du Budget principal des dépenses et du Budget, de quel genre de coopération aurez-vous besoin? Le Budget principal des dépenses est dressé par le Conseil du Trésor et le Budget par le ministère des Finances. Quelle collaboration a lieu actuellement, et que souhaiteriez-vous voir à l'avenir?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Il y a énormément de collaboration entre le Conseil du Trésor et le ministère des Finances. Au cours des dernières années, cette collaboration s'est intensifiée. En fait, l'année dernière, 70 % du Budget paraissait dans le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), par exemple.

Pour ce qui est de la comptabilité de caisse et la comptabilité d'exercice, nous effectuons de plus en plus de rapprochement au moyen de tableaux, afin que les parlementaires puissent facilement comprendre les deux méthodes. Les deux comportent des avantages. Les Australiens ont trouvé, lorsqu'ils ont adopté la comptabilité d'exercice, qu'elle était accompagnée de certains défis.

Il me semble que vous avez consulté les Australiens ici.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Oui, nous l'avons fait.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Nous voulons intensifier le rapprochement avec le temps. Nous sommes réceptifs à la recommandation de votre Comité concernant l'adoption de la comptabilité d'exercice. Je le répète, les deux méthodes comptables comportent des avantages, et le rapprochement...

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Mais vous n'avez pas éprouvé de difficultés pour ce qui est de la collaboration. Le ministère fonctionne très bien. Le rapprochement du Budget et du Budget principal améliore énormément la cohérence. C'est une stratégie qui est vraiment importante.

Parmi les quatre piliers que vous avez présentés, lequel voudriez-vous faire approuver d'abord? Est-ce un processus comportant des étapes distinctes, ou un ensemble?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Tous les piliers sont importants. Je tiens à la réussite de chacun d'entre eux. Le premier pilier exige la modification du Règlement pour ce qui est de l'alignement du Budget et du Budget principal des dépenses. Au fil du temps, nous aurons la date butoir du 1er mai, qui fournira une certaine souplesse pendant les premiers cycles budgétaires. Les ministères sont grands et ils doivent modifier leur façon de faire. Le gouvernement est une énorme structure complexe constituée d'organisations. Ce sont des changements de taille qui prendront du temps. Il faudra passer par quelques cycles budgétaires pour en tirer tous les avantages.

Pour ce qui est de notre objectif, j'aimerais voir un meilleur alignement et un resserrement de l'échéancier du Budget et du Budget principal des dépenses.

(1125)

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu (secrétaire du Conseil du Trésor du Canada, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Permettez-moi d'ajouter un complément d'information à ce qu'a dit le ministre.

L'un des quatre piliers, à savoir la politique sur les résultats, qui vise à s'assurer que les résultats et les plans ministériels viennent rejoindre les intentions des parlementaires et du gouvernement, a été approuvé par le Conseil du Trésor. Nous le mettons en oeuvre. Les premiers documents améliorés sur les résultats seront déposés cet automne, et nous espérons que tous les ministères emboîteront le pas d'ici l'automne prochain.

Nous devons travailler davantage sur le rapprochement de la comptabilité d'exercice et la comptabilité de caisse. Nous nous améliorons à chaque exercice. Parmi les quatre piliers, c'est le premier qui nécessite l'approbation du Parlement. Si le Comité est d'accord, nous pourrons mettre en oeuvre les trois autres piliers.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Ma deuxième question donne suite à celle du président au sujet du consentement unanime pour modifier le Règlement. Y voyez-vous des difficultés? Vous tentez de renseigner les parlementaires. Pensez-vous qu'il va y avoir des difficultés ou des lacunes pour ce qui est de la compréhension de ces derniers?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci, Yasmin. Le président, Tom, est au courant des questions de procédure. Il y a différentes façons d'atteindre l'objectif.

Je crois fermement que tout ce que nous faisons contribue à accroître la capacité du Parlement d'amener le gouvernement à rendre des comptes, et pas seulement notre gouvernement, mais les gouvernements futurs. Lorsque nous aurons mis en application ces changements, est-ce que nous pourrons en apporter d'autres? Je crois que oui, et nous nous pencherons là-dessus ultérieurement.

Je crois que ce serait une erreur de laisser la perfection être l'ennemi du bien...

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'accord.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

... alors que nous sommes en mesure d'effectuer de bons changements.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Ma prochaine question est assez intéressante. Au Royaume-Uni, le Conseil du Trésor et le ministère des Finances relèvent d'un seul ministre. Je ne dis pas que je veux vous évincer de votre poste.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je croyais que vous aviez en tête le ministre Morneau.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, pas du tout, mais quel problème cela poserait-il au Canada? Est-ce que cela fonctionnerait? Est-ce que cela améliorerait les choses? Nous avons entendu bien des commentaires. Peut-être que vous pourriez répondre brièvement à cela.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Au Canada, le rôle du Conseil du Trésor concerne non seulement les dépenses gouvernementales, mais aussi l'efficacité des activités de l'ensemble des ministères et des organismes. Il n'y a pas que les résultats financiers en tant que tels qui importent; il faut aussi savoir si les résultats correspondent à ceux attendus par le gouvernement, d'autant plus qu'un nouveau cadre des résultats et de prestation des services est devenu une priorité pour le gouvernement.

L'autre aspect concerne les règlements. Nous devons étudier et approuver les modifications réglementaires, qui sont davantage au premier plan depuis la mise sur pied du conseil Canada-États-Unis de coopération en matière de réglementation.

Le Conseil du Trésor est le seul comité permanent du cabinet qui existe depuis la Confédération. Il fonctionne très bien et il entretient une bonne relation avec le ministère des Finances. Nous avons bien travaillé en partenariat avec ce ministère malgré tous les changements. Nous avons une bonne relation de collaboration.

Le président:

Monsieur McCauley, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de votre présence. Nous sommes toujours ravis de vous recevoir. Je crois que nous convenons tous que c'est une très bonne chose de faire concorder le budget et le budget principal des dépenses.

J'ai une question rapide à vous poser. Dans le rapport de 2012 du Comité, on proposait le 31 mars, mais vous proposez le 1er mai.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je crois que, lorsque nous aurons vécu quelques cycles budgétaires, nous pourrons réduire l'écart considérablement.

(1130)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Pourquoi proposer le 1er mai plutôt que la date suggérée dans le rapport de 2012 du Comité?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est pour donner une marge de manoeuvre, car ce changement nécessitera beaucoup d'adaptation de la part des ministères. En temps et lieu, j'aimerais que nous présentions le budget principal des dépenses le 1er avril. C'est ce que je vise, mais je veux m'assurer qu'à mesure que nous progressons vers cet objectif, les ministères soient en mesure de s'adapter. Avec le temps...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Croyez-vous que quelque chose a changé au cours des dernières années, ou pensez-vous que le rapport de 2012 du Comité n'était pas valable; que le Comité n'avait pas réfléchi suffisamment?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Non, je crois que le rapport du Comité était très instructif.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Le problème que pose notamment la date du 1er mai, c'est qu'il faut entendre les deux ministères en question en comité plénier avant le 1er mai, ce qui nous enlève du temps. L'objectif global est d'accroître la transparence, mais nous avons beaucoup moins de temps pour procéder à l'examen avant le délai du mois de juin.

Je comprends le besoin, mais nous semblons faire un pas en avant puis un pas en arrière.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Nous proposons le 1er mai pour permettre au gouvernement de s'assurer que les premiers cycles budgétaires se déroulent bien. Je crois en fait que ce pourrait être plus tôt. J'aimerais qu'on puisse présenter le budget principal des dépenses le 1er avril. C'est l'une des priorités du gouvernement, que je prends au sérieux, mais la date du 1er mai vise à offrir une certaine marge de manoeuvre au cours des premiers cycles budgétaires, alors que nous progresserons vers un rapprochement des dates du budget et du budget principal des dépenses.

Je prends exemple sur l'Australie, où le budget et le budget principal des dépenses sont présentés à peu près en même temps. C'est le modèle d'excellence.

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu:

Nous proposons le 1er mai, au plus tard, pour offrir une certaine marge de manoeuvre. Si on applique ce changement pour l'année en cours, par exemple, nous avons pratiquement...

M. Kelly McCauley:

D'accord, mais qu'en est-il des préoccupations? Je le répète, on présente, ... et, soit dit en passant, le même jour, on demande à l'opposition de nommer les deux ministères pour le comité plénier. Je comprends qu'il faut donner une marge de manoeuvre, mais qu'en est-il de la période écourtée pour examiner les coûts? Il faut penser à Westminster. C'est la raison pour laquelle le Parlement a été créé, c'est-à-dire pour examiner les dépenses...

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu:

Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord avec vous, mais actuellement, le Parlement n'obtient pas les comptes réels. Il les obtient dans de nombreux documents différents. Une dépense pour un ministère peut se retrouver dans le budget mais être approuvée seulement 18 mois plus tard. Nous essayons de trouver un moment idéal pour faire cela. Comme le ministre l'a dit, on ne devrait pas dépasser la date du 1er avril.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je crois que nous sommes d'accord en ce qui concerne le rapport de 2012 du Comité. Je comprends, mais je crois que nous pouvons y arriver d'ici là.

Avons-nous envisagé de fixer une date pour le budget, pour qu'il soit présenté disons en février? Les Australiens font très bien à cet égard. Je ne crois pas que c'est dans la loi, mais c'est dans leur tradition. Je pense que c'est le deuxième lundi de mai.

On nous dit que ce n'est pas facile lorsqu'il y a des gouvernements minoritaires, mais au Canada, les gouvernements libéraux et conservateurs, qu'ils aient été minoritaires ou non, depuis les 17 dernières années, l'ont fait en l'espace de quelques semaines, à l'exception d'une année. Ne pourrions-nous pas simplement?...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

La date de présentation du budget principal des dépenses est établie dans le Règlement, mais celle de la présentation du budget est décidée par le ministère des Finances.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Mais vous vous entendez tellement bien avec le ministère des Finances.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Au fil des ans, par exemple après les événements du 11 septembre et à d'autres moments, le ministère des Finances a effectivement jugé approprié de présenter un budget ou un énoncé économique comportant de nombreuses mesures budgétaires.

Pour ce qui est des dates de dépôt du budget, je vais demander à Brian d'en parler pour la période allant de 2006 à 2016, pour vous donner une idée.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Le temps est restreint, alors vous devez être bref.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Ce que nous proposons contribuera à améliorer considérablement l'ordre de présentation et la concordance. C'est ce que je peux faire en tant que président du Conseil du Trésor... Ces quatre piliers exigent une grande collaboration de la part du ministère des Finances et de tous les autres ministères. Ils constituent un grand pas en avant. Je crois que l'ordre des dépôts est un aspect très important en ce qui a trait aux changements à apporter au Règlement, mais je ne considère pas que ce soit la dernière chose à faire, Kelly. Je crois que c'est un pas important, mais nous pouvons faire davantage.

Si c'est possible, Brian pourrait parler des 10 dernières années.

(1135)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je suis d'accord, mais reporter le dépôt du budget principal des dépenses et envisager de fixer une date pour le budget... parce qu'on semble l'avoir fait de toute façon, sauf en 2006.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je ne suis pas certain que le rapport de 2012 du Comité abordait la question d'une date fixe pour le dépôt du budget. On y faisait seulement référence. Le Comité a eu une influence sur le travail que nous effectuons maintenant, et il continuera d'en avoir une.

Par ailleurs, nous allons être en mesure d'évaluer comment les choses se déroulent et comment nous pouvons les améliorer. C'est un partenariat.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Monsieur Pagan, le temps file, et je crois que nous devrons déterminer ce que nous allons faire à propos de certains des problèmes que nous aurons si la date du 1er mai est retenue, notamment la période écourtée pour procéder à l'examen et convoquer les deux ministères.

Le président:

M. Pagan devra attendre votre prochaine intervention pour répondre.

La parole est maintenant à M. Weir pour sept minutes.

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Je vous remercie.

Nous avons discuté de la date du 1er mai par rapport à la date du 1er avril pour le dépôt du budget principal des dépenses. L'autre aspect est la date de dépôt du budget, alors j'aimerais qu'on parle de la question de la date fixe pour la présentation du budget. Nous assumons que le gouvernement fédéral dépose habituellement un budget en février ou en mars, mais rien ne l'exige. Il y a même eu une année, je crois que c'était en 2002, où le gouvernement fédéral n'a pas présenté de budget.

Je me demande, monsieur le ministre, puisqu'on essaie de régler cette question du calendrier, pourquoi vous ne proposez pas une date fixe pour le dépôt du budget ou une fourchette de dates.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je vous remercie, Erin.

Je le répète, ce que nous proposons aujourd'hui représente une amélioration considérable en ce qui concerne l'ordre des dépôts du budget et du budget principal des dépenses. Cela représentera une nette amélioration. Actuellement, la date de dépôt du budget relève exclusivement du ministre des Finances, tandis que la date de dépôt du budget principal des dépenses est établie dans le Règlement. Modifier la date établie dans le Règlement pour que l'ordre soit plus logique est un changement que je peux proposer à titre de président du Conseil du Trésor en collaboration avec le Parlement.

Il s'agira d'une amélioration importante par rapport à la pratique actuelle, mais dans la réalité, comme vous l'avez dit, le dépôt du budget procède d'une coutume.

Si vous le permettez, Brian peut vous donner les dates de dépôt du budget pour la période allant de 2006 à 2016, pour mettre les choses en perspective.

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Comme le ministre l'a dit, nous travaillons très étroitement avec le ministère des Finances pour réduire l'écart entre le dépôt du budget et la présentation du budget principal des dépenses. Toutefois, il peut arriver que le ministère des Finances ait besoin d'une certaine marge de manoeuvre en ce qui concerne le dépôt du budget. À l'automne 2008, nous avons été confrontés à une récession mondiale, alors le gouvernement de l'époque a travaillé très fort pour présenter très rapidement un budget afin de rassurer les marchés et les Canadiens.

M. Erin Weir:

Oui, je comprends lorsqu'il faut présenter un budget plus tôt, mais pourquoi ne pas fixer un délai pour la présentation du budget comme nous proposons de le faire pour la présentation du budget principal des dépenses?

M. Brian Pagan:

Comme le ministre l'a dit, nous avons essayé de tenir compte du rapport de 2012 du Comité, qui proposait qu'on établisse une date fixe pour le budget. Toutefois, comme on ne précise rien à propos du dépôt du budget dans le Règlement, dans la Loi sur la gestion des finances publiques ou la Constitution, nous ne sommes pas en mesure de fixer une date pour le dépôt du budget.

M. Erin Weir:

Monsieur le ministre, est-ce que vous recommanderiez au ministre des Finances de fixer une date pour le dépôt du budget ou une fourchette de dates, bref, de fixer une date à laquelle un budget doit être présenté tous les ans?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je crois tout d'abord que, grâce aux changements que nous proposons aujourd'hui, il y aura une meilleure concordance entre le budget et le budget principal des dépenses. Cela ne nous empêche pas de continuer à envisager d'autres changements, notamment peut-être devancer le délai pour le budget principal des dépenses. Nous sommes prêts à en discuter. À mesure que les changements vont s'opérer et que nous évaluerons leurs répercussions, il serait intéressant que le Comité formule des commentaires. Mais je le répète, puisque la perfection est l'ennemi du bien, j'aimerais d'abord aller de l'avant avec des changements qui modifient considérablement la reddition des comptes au Parlement et sa capacité d'examiner minutieusement les dépenses.

(1140)

M. Erin Weir:

Simplement pour...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Vous passez beaucoup de temps à l'heure actuelle à examiner le budget principal des dépenses. Dans une large mesure, vous perdez votre temps, car nous présentons un budget peu de temps après, ce qui signifie qu'une grande partie du travail et de l'analyse que vous effectuez est inutile. Ce n'est plus pertinent. Nous voulons faire en sorte que le travail des parlementaires ait une incidence et permette de demander des comptes au gouvernement à propos des aspects qui importent vraiment.

M. Erin Weir:

Oui, et au sujet de ce travail, je tiens à vous féliciter, monsieur le ministre, d'avoir réussi, en passant des conservateurs aux libéraux, à demeurer dans l'opposition le plus longtemps possible. Il est clair que vous comprenez l'importance d'une opposition efficace.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Il s'agissait du Parti progressiste-conservateur, j'insiste sur progressiste.

M. Erin Weir:

En effet.

M. Kelly McCauley: Nous voulons faire valoir ce point également.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci, je suis ravi que vous souligniez cela également.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je suis en fait un libéral depuis ma naissance, mais je suis sorti du placard seulement en 2003.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Erin Weir:

Vous avez mentionné que ces changements pourraient au bout du compte éliminer la nécessité de présenter des budgets supplémentaires des dépenses. Même si nous souhaitons un processus simplifié, les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses sont importants parce qu'ils offrent à l'opposition une occasion d'examiner les dépenses, car des ministres comme vous comparaissent devant le Comité au sujet de ces budgets.

Alors, je me demande, si on élimine les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses, comment ferait-on pour s'assurer qu'il y ait suffisamment d'occasions durant l'année pour les parlementaires d'examiner le budget?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je vais faire quelques observations. Je crois qu'au fil du temps, à mesure que les initiatives budgétaires seront incluses dans le budget principal des dépenses, on aura moins besoin des budgets supplémentaires des dépenses. Je ne crois pas qu'ils seront éliminés, mais je crois seulement que nous en aurons de moins en moins besoin.

Vous savez, le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) est plus important, à certains égards, que le budget principal des dépenses. L'année dernière, 70 % des initiatives budgétaires figuraient dans le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), alors, d'une certaine façon, on peut dire que ce budget est plus pertinent que le budget principal des dépenses.

Le principal problème — et je parle du Parlement dans son ensemble — c'est qu'il y a des députés de longue date qui ne comprennent pas vraiment les processus entourant le budget et les prévisions budgétaires. Ce n'est pas vraiment de leur faute. Si nous avions pour objectif de concevoir un système qui est difficile à comprendre, le système actuel en serait un exemple parfait. Toutefois, personne ne veut avouer qu'il ne le comprend pas.

Parfois, lorsqu'on apporte des changements, il est difficile d'expliquer le résultat final. Dans le cas des changements que nous voulons apporter, Erin, il est plus facile d'expliquer comment le système fonctionnera après la mise en oeuvre de ces changements que d'expliquer son fonctionnement actuel. Je ne peux pas expliquer...

M. Erin Weir:

S'agissant de la façon dont il fonctionnerait...

Le président:

Monsieur Weir, votre temps est écoulé.

Pour ce qui est de vos questions, monsieur Weir et monsieur McCauley, au sujet d'une date fixe pour le budget, je peux vous dire qu'on recommandait dans le rapport de 2012 du Comité que le budget soit présenté au plus tard le 1er février. Si le Comité le souhaite, il a tout à fait le droit de formuler à nouveau une telle recommandation.

Monsieur Whalen, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous pour votre présence. Comme je suis un nouveau député, je trouve intéressant de voir comment la vision du ministère en ce qui concerne cette approche à quatre piliers visant à faire concorder le budget et le budget principal des dépenses a évolué au cours de la dernière année. Ce qu'on nous a remis en premier lieu lorsque nous avons entamé nos travaux en novembre, ce sont les budgets des dépenses (B) et (C), qui étaient pratiquement incompréhensibles. Avec le temps, nous avons appris à les comprendre, et maintenant nous proposons de les modifier.

Pour poursuivre un peu dans la même veine que M. Weir, je vais vous demander si vous envisagez de combiner le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) au budget principal des dépenses, de sorte que nous ayons uniquement les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses (A) et (B) et que le budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) soit éliminé, de façon permanente ou seulement lors de très rares occasions. Ou bien est-ce que les trois budgets supplémentaires des dépenses seront maintenus en plus du budget des dépenses provisoire et du budget principal des dépenses?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je vais commencer et ensuite je vais demander à Brian de poursuivre, car il possède la mémoire institutionnelle nécessaire pour vous répondre du point de vue du Conseil du Trésor.

Je crois qu'on aura moins besoin qu'à l'heure actuelle des budgets supplémentaires des dépenses (A) et (B), par exemple. Si le budget principal des dépenses est présenté après le budget, le budget principal des dépenses aura davantage d'importance, comme ce devrait être le cas, mais cela prendra du temps. Je le répète, la mise en oeuvre de certains des changements au sein du gouvernement s'effectuera sur quelques cycles budgétaires.

Brian, voulez-vous continuer?

(1145)

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Whalen, je vous remercie de votre question. Je tiens à préciser que ce que nous proposons dans le cadre de notre vision n'est pas d'éliminer les budgets supplémentaires. L'objectif est plutôt de rendre le processus uniforme et séquentiel, de sorte que le Budget principal des dépenses qui suit le dépôt du budget reflète bel et bien les priorités budgétaires.

Comme il a été mentionné, environ 70 % du budget se trouvait dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) au dernier exercice. Nous voulons remplacer le budget supplémentaire du printemps par un budget principal des dépenses qui comprendrait les initiatives budgétaires. Nous présenterions ensuite les autres priorités budgétaires dans un budget supplémentaire de l'automne, qui deviendrait le premier budget supplémentaire de l'année. Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) viendrait à l'automne, puis le nettoyage des comptes se ferait en hiver dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B). Il y aurait encore un document budgétaire pour chaque période de crédits, ce qui encouragerait les comités à soumettre encore des demandes aux ministères et à continuer d'examiner les plans de dépenses du gouvernement.

Je voudrais également vous rappeler que nous avons introduit le budget supplémentaire du printemps en 2007 afin de pouvoir mettre en oeuvre rapidement les initiatives budgétaires. L'outil s'est avéré utile, comme nous l'avons constaté l'année dernière, mais nous pourrions améliorer l'efficacité du processus budgétaire en soumettant tout bonnement un meilleur budget principal des dépenses. Voilà l'essence de notre proposition.

M. Nick Whalen:

Pour ce qui est de déterminer s'il faut fixer la date de dépôt du budget afin d'harmoniser le processus, qu'arriverait-il si le gouvernement n'était pas prêt à présenter son budget la première semaine d'avril? Le ministère serait-il alors tenu de soumettre deux séries de budgets principaux des dépenses, l'un qui refléterait l'ancien processus budgétaire, et l'autre le nouveau? Dans quelle mesure serait-il difficile et exigeant pour le ministère de composer avec une situation semblable?

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Ces 10 dernières années, nous avons constaté que la date de dépôt du budget variait grandement. En 2009, il avait été soumis dès janvier en réaction à la crise économique mondiale. Pas plus tard qu'en 2015, nous étions aux prises avec un tout autre problème concernant le marché de l'énergie et la chute spectaculaire des prix de l'énergie, ce qui a eu toutes sortes de répercussions sur la capacité du gouvernement à prévoir ses besoins. Le budget avait été déposé le 21 avril cette année-là.

Par conséquent, étant donné que nous n'avons pas de date fixe pour le dépôt du budget, et que le gouvernement souhaitera avoir toute la souplesse voulue pour tirer parti des meilleures informations disponibles afin d'établir ses prévisions économiques, une date de dépôt du 1er mai engloberait toutes les situations observées ces 10 dernières années. Voilà qui devrait à tout le moins permettre au gouvernement de déposer ses prévisions budgétaires après le budget, pour que nous puissions harmoniser nos travaux avec le budget.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci, monsieur Pagan.

Monsieur Brison, pour ce qui est des différents piliers, le ministère semble être sur le point d'atteindre le premier objectif. Certains des changements proposés comprennent aussi des aspects du quatrième pilier, qui porte sur les rapports ministériels, les plans et les priorités.

Pouvez-vous nous dire brièvement à quel point le ministère est prêt à opérer les changements pour que ces plans et priorités soient présentés avec plus de cohérence le 1er mai prochain, ou même plus tôt, lors du dépôt du Budget principal des dépenses?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

À vrai dire, conformément à la politique du Conseil du Trésor concernant les rapports ministériels, nous allons déjà dans ce sens, dans une démarche générale relative aux résultats et à la prestation de services de notre gouvernement. Même en ce qui a trait au format des présentations au Conseil du Trésor et à la mesure dans laquelle les ministères et les organismes... Lorsqu'ils soumettent leurs présentations au Conseil du Trésor, nous leur demandons de soumettre des critères et de s'engager à suivre un modèle que nous comprendrons relatif aux résultats et à la prestation des services. Je parle non seulement d'engager des fonds, mais aussi de fixer des objectifs ou des buts conformes à ce qu'ils souhaitent accomplir.

En tant qu'organisme central, le Conseil du Trésor le fait déjà. Dans d'autres domaines, nous nous occupons davantage du rapprochement entre la comptabilité de caisse et d'exercice dans le cadre de nos fonctions. Pour ce qui est des rapports sur les dépenses par programme, nous avons procédé ainsi dans le cas de Transports Canada, et nous allons en faire plus...

(1150)

M. Nick Whalen:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Brison, mais j'ai une question très brève. Nous n'avons pas vu la proposition de libellé du nouveau règlement. Le ministère a-t-il poussé sa réflexion à ce sujet?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Eh bien, le libellé portera sur le changement de date. Je ne veux pas émettre de supposition, étant donné que le Comité...

Le président:

Permettez-moi d'intervenir, monsieur le ministre.

Puisque j'ai une certaine connaissance de la question, monsieur Whalen, je peux dire que notre Comité pourra bel et bien proposer un libellé.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Oui, c'est exact. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Avant que le ministre nous quitte, il nous reste deux dernières interventions de cinq minutes chacune.

Monsieur Clarke, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. [Traduction]

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je pense que je peux rester un peu plus longtemps, si vous êtes d'accord.

Le président:

Très bien. Nous allons donc essayer de faire un tour complet.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.[Français]

Monsieur Clarke, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre de cette approche candide. Nous sommes très heureux que vous puissiez rester plus longtemps. Je vous remercie d'être avec nous aujourd'hui. C'est très apprécié.

Pour l'opposition officielle de Sa Majesté, cette réforme semble très intéressante. Bien entendu, nous souhaitons une réforme qui assure le bien-être de tous les Canadiens. Nous considérons cette réforme d'une façon très sérieuse et nous avons des questions qui sont sérieuses également. D'abord, il nous apparaît tout à fait louable d'apporter davantage de cohérence dans le but d'améliorer le processus d'étude des dépenses budgétaires que suivent les députés pour le compte des Canadiens.

J'aimerais poursuivre sur ce que disait mon collègue M. McCauley. Vous sembliez dire que nous avons besoin d'une période d'ajustement. Nous pensons que ce pourrait être intéressant de faire comme en Australie, c'est-à-dire que soient publiés le même jour le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses. Votre collègue du ministère a mentionné que des ajustements devaient être apportés pour assurer une plus grande flexibilité. Est-ce que vous pourriez nous dire quels sont ces ajustements qui devraient s'échelonner sur quelques années?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci, monsieur Clarke. J'apprécie beaucoup votre question.

Lorsque des changements importants sont apportés aux activités des ministères, il est évident que les ministères qui travaillent ensemble ont besoin de temps pour appliquer les changements. Mon objectif est d'arriver à un processus où le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses seront... .

M. Alupa Clarke:

Publiés en même temps?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

...présentés approximativement en même temps. Mon modèle est celui de l'Australie. J'exprime depuis longtemps mon intérêt pour ce modèle, mais il faut du temps pour apporter les changements. À mon avis, il faudra peut-être encore deux ans avant que les ministères s'adaptent à ces changements. Tout comme vous, je crois que le nouveau modèle constituera possiblement une amélioration.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Cela m'amène, monsieur le ministre, à vous poser une autre question.

L'opposition officielle veut s'assurer que la période traditionnellement allouée aux députés pour évaluer un budget ne sera pas écourtée. Nous comprenons très bien les notions de flexibilité, d'ajustements et autres. Cela m'amène à un autre point.

Vous estimez que cela prendra deux ou trois ans avant que tous les ajustements soient apportés. Pour démontrer votre bonne volonté, ne serait-il pas intéressant de profiter de l'occasion pour inclure dans la loi une clause établissant que, d'ici deux ou trois ans, le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses seront présentés le même jour?

Cette avenue vous semble-t-elle intéressante et acceptez-vous de l'explorer?

(1155)

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est la prérogative du Comité et du Parlement de considérer la possibilité d'apporter des modifications au Règlement. Je suis ouvert à ce que des améliorations soient apportées sur une base continue. En anglais, on parle d'un processus evergreen. Si nous modifions aujourd'hui notre processus, nous aurons après quelques mois ou quelques années — peut-être deux ans ou deux cycles budgétaires — une meilleure compréhension des changements et la possibilité d'en apporter d'autres. Il s'agit d'une étape importante. Je suis complètement ouvert à ce que d'autres améliorations soient apportées dans l'avenir.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham, je vous souhaite bon retour au sein de notre Comité. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, j'aimerais revenir sur une chose que vous avez dite au début de votre exposé, et à laquelle M. Weir a fait allusion assez explicitement. En fait, vous avez plus d'expérience de l'opposition que tout autre membre du caucus gouvernemental, de sorte que vous avez l'habitude d'interpréter le budget principal des dépenses et les budgets supplémentaires.

Lorsque j'étais membre du personnel, je me souviens être allé à votre bureau et avoir reçu de votre personnel une transcription du budget en anglais ordinaire. Le document était disséqué sur chaque surface horizontale et verticale de votre bureau.

Compte tenu de votre expérience dans ce rôle, dans quelle mesure votre proposition aurait-elle changé votre vie, concrètement, si elle avait été appliquée ces 10 dernières années?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Eh bien, nous devions travailler très fort dans l'opposition. J'avais une alliée formidable, Tisha Ashton, qui travaille toujours avec moi d'ailleurs. En ce qui a trait au travail entourant le budget et les prévisions budgétaires, nous sommes quelques-uns à y avoir consacré beaucoup de temps au fil des ans.

Un député ou un membre du personnel d'un député ne devrait pas devoir travailler si fort simplement pour comprendre un document essentiel à son travail — en l'occurrence, les dépenses gouvernementales et la capacité de demander des comptes au gouvernement. Il est stupide de consacrer autant d'efforts à transcrire des documents gouvernementaux et des processus budgétaires dans un format intelligible que nous pouvons ensuite examiner. Cette pratique me paraissait illogique lorsque j'étais dans l'opposition, et elle l'est encore maintenant que je suis au gouvernement.

Il faut reconnaître que le Conseil du Trésor a fait beaucoup de travail à ce chapitre dans le passé. J'en ai d'ailleurs parlé à Tony Clement la semaine dernière, et il m'a dit qu'il était conscient de ces travaux à l'époque, et qu'il en comprenait l'importance. C'est une pratique qui s'infiltre dans la fonction publique depuis un certain temps. La question me tient énormément à coeur.

En tant que députés, vous ne pouvez pas dire que vous ne comprenez pas. Il y a toutefois des ministres du Cabinet qui n'ont pas beaucoup d'expérience parlementaire. D'autres sont au Parlement depuis longtemps. À l'heure actuelle, le système n'est pas conçu pour être compris, et nous voulons changer la donne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Des gens qui ne font même pas leurs propres impôts doivent comprendre ces documents.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Dans le même ordre d'idées, aimeriez-vous apporter d'autres améliorations légères que nous n'avons pas abordées?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je veux vraiment que des changements soient mis en place. Nous devons consacrer beaucoup de temps aux rapports ministériels. Nous n'en parlons pas beaucoup ce matin, mais je trouve ce volet important. Je pense que la budgétisation par programme à l'intention des députés et des parlementaires...

Quand je dis « députés », j'englobe aussi les sénateurs. Il y a une grande expertise au Sénat relative aux processus budgétaires, en particulier au sein du Comité sénatorial des finances nationales.

À mon avis, si le Parlement, les comités parlementaires et l'ensemble de la Colline participent davantage, ils pourront contribuer à analyser les postes budgétaires et à en évaluer l'efficacité. Il y a des choses sur lesquelles nous pouvons nous entendre de façon non partisane, notamment l'adoption de mesures qui permettent d'améliorer nettement la capacité du Parlement à faire son travail.

(1200)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais céder les quelques secondes qui me restent à M. Whalen, qui souhaite poser une petite question de suivi.

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci, David.

Le président:

Monsieur Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen:

Ministre Brison, je trouve que votre proposition est conforme à ce que notre Comité a entendu, en ce qui a trait à l'harmonisation des prévisions budgétaires et du budget, à la vérification continue des méthodes comptables et des crédits, et à l'amélioration continuelle des rapports ministériels. Je doute que nous ayons suffisamment entendu parler de comptes, de votes, d'ajustements et d'évaluations différentes des coûts. Nous avons lancé notre étude, mais on dirait que le ministère est prêt à aller de l'avant en ce qui concerne le premier changement.

Si nous devions faire une recommandation, serions-nous prêts à fixer une date — par exemple, pas plus de x jours après le dépôt du budget, et au plus tard le 1er mai? Cette formulation serait-elle plus utile, ou ne sommes-nous pas encore prêts à déterminer ce genre de restriction?

Le président:

Veuillez répondre brièvement.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

J'aurai une meilleure idée de la situation au cours de la prochaine année. Pour être franc, notre proposition est plutôt fondamentale. Nous allons faire en sorte que le budget et les prévisions budgétaires soient mieux harmonisés, et que le budget principal des dépenses vienne après le budget. Nous aurons donc une meilleure idée après le Budget principal des dépenses et le processus budgétaire de 2017.

Je serai ravi de venir chaque fois que le Comité souhaitera m'inviter, et je viendrai bien sûr défendre les prévisions budgétaires. Nous pourrons d'ailleurs parler du processus en plus de ces prévisions budgétaires. Nous aurons alors une meilleure idée de la situation. Il faut un certain temps pour opérationnaliser ce genre de choses.

Yaprak a un...

Le président:

Malheureusement, nous...

Allez-y.

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu:

J'ai une petite explication qui pourrait répondre à la question et dire pourquoi il nous faudra quelques années.

En fait, les particularités d'un programme qui se trouvent dans le budget et celles qui vont dans les prévisions budgétaires sont complètement différentes. Dans les prévisions budgétaires, nous nous assurons d'avoir terminé tous les détails de la conception. C'est d'ailleurs ce qui nous prendra beaucoup de temps. Par conséquent, ce que nous aimerions qu'il arrive d'ici quelques années lors du dépôt du budget et des prévisions budgétaires, c'est que le budget prenne un engagement et que nous donnions le feu vert à un programme le jour de l'approbation du budget principal des dépenses. C'est notre objectif, mais il est encore tôt pour que toute la machine fonctionne ainsi.

Le président:

Je vous remercie de cette précision.

Si vous avez le temps, monsieur le ministre, il nous faudrait environ 15 minutes, ou même un peu moins pour terminer le tour. Nous vous en remercions.

Monsieur McCauley, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Kelly McCauley:

J'aimerais très brièvement parler du premier pilier. Lorsqu'il est question d'harmonisation, notre pays est encore une fois comparé à l'Australie. Et vous avez raison de le faire, car l'Australie fait les choses correctement — même si on y trouve toutes les créatures rampantes et mortelles que Dieu a créées.

En Australie, il semble s'écouler très peu de temps entre le dépôt d'une politique et sa mise en œuvre, alors que nous accusons un retard de 19 mois à ce chapitre. Yaprak pourra peut-être nous expliquer pourquoi.

On dit ensuite que les réussites récentes démontrent qu'une telle harmonisation interne est possible au sein du gouvernement canadien. J'aimerais simplement que vous expliquiez ce que vous entendez par « réussite récente ».

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je vais vous dire deux ou trois choses, après quoi je demanderai à Yaprak de répondre. Au sein de notre ministère, Brian, Yaprak et Marcia sont plus au courant, encore une fois. Je siégeais au Comité du Cabinet sur le Conseil du Trésor lors du gouvernement précédent, mais être président du Conseil du Trésor est différent et permet de voir les choses autrement.

Je crois qu'il y a désormais une meilleure harmonisation grâce à la collaboration entre le Conseil du Trésor et le ministère des Finances. La collaboration et la participation sont plus fortes qu'auparavant tout au long du processus budgétaire. Des progrès ont donc été réalisés.

Comme Yaprak l'a dit, les détails présentés dans le Budget principal des dépenses sont beaucoup plus précis que ceux du budget. Un budget donne une vue d'ensemble et une perspective. Par exemple, on pourrait y apprendre qu'un montant donné sera investi dans l'éducation des Autochtones, mais les détails viendront...

(1205)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Mais il est question d'un retard de 19 mois; est-il entièrement attribuable aux détails?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je sais, et c'est justement là où je veux en venir, Kelly. À l'heure actuelle, le retard peut atteindre 18 mois, mais nous cherchons à le réduire considérablement grâce à une meilleure harmonisation du budget et des prévisions budgétaires.

En fait, vous avez énoncé une des principales raisons pour lesquelles nous proposons d'emblée le 1er mai. Comme le dit une vieille chanson de musique country, « Donnez-moi 40 acres, et je vais changer les choses ». Nous aurons besoin d'un peu de temps pour trouver une solution.

Allez-y, Yaprak.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je ne connais pas la chanson, mais je l'écouterai peut-être une autre fois.

Puisque j'ai une autre question, je vous serais reconnaissant de bien vouloir répondre brièvement.

Mme Yaprak Baltacioglu:

Sans problème... et je ne peux pas faire autrement avec la chanson country.

Voici comment les Australiens s'y prennent. Au tout début du cycle budgétaire, le Conseil du Trésor et le ministère des Finances travaillent ensemble, non seulement pour formuler la politique, mais aussi pour établir à quoi le programme pourrait ressembler. Puisque la réflexion commence dès le départ, les documents peuvent être déposés en même temps. Voilà ce que nous devrions faire. Le 1er mai peut sembler loin pour la conception de tous ces programmes. Au fond, nous allons devoir entamer le processus dès le début et concevoir les programmes parallèlement. C'est notre objectif.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Très bien. C'est excellent.

Je vais maintenant passer au troisième pilier. Encore une fois, nous sommes ici pour parler de transparence et de reddition de comptes, et une des suggestions semble en quelque sorte aller dans le sens contraire. Il est question d'accorder plus de crédits, mais de laisser plus de souplesse aux ministères pour qu'ils puissent utiliser l'argent sans l'approbation du Parlement. Cette proposition semble aller à l'encontre de ce que nous essayons de faire ici.

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur McCauley.

Ce que nous avons appris en regardant d'autres administrations, c'est qu'ils adoptent des crédits « fondés sur un but » pour que les parlementaires aient une meilleure idée de la façon dont les ressources financent des programmes précis. En procédant ainsi, en passant d'un crédit unique pour dépenses de fonctionnement d'un ministère à trois, quatre ou cinq crédits fondés sur un but, vous avez nécessairement...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Pensez-vous que la solution est tout simplement de leur donner un plus grand montant d'argent sans qu'aucune surveillance ne soit exercée?

M. Brian Pagan:

Ce n'est pas une question de surveillance...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Ou sans approbation du Parlement pour décider du transfert...

M. Brian Pagan:

À titre d'exemple, au Québec, le projet de loi de crédits comprend des crédits fondés sur le but, mais les ministères peuvent transférer jusqu'à 10 % des fonds entre crédits, et ils ne transfèrent pas les fonds sans en faire pleinement rapport. C'est transparent grâce aux rapports. D'autres administrations ont recours à des crédits pluriannuels ou à des dispositions améliorées de report...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je vais vous citer. Il est écrit ici que l'équilibre pourrait être obtenu en approuvant des crédits « à une échelle plus globale » et en permettant ensuite aux organismes de réaffecter l'argent sans qu'il soit nécessaire d'obtenir une autre approbation du Parlement.

Encore une fois, cela semble être le contraire de ce que nous essayons de faire. Nous donnerions un montant d'argent relativement élevé et nous empêcherions ensuite le Parlement d'approuver...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Si je peux me permettre de vous interrompre, à l'heure actuelle, on peut réaffecter de l'argent au sein d'un ministère sans vraiment...

M. Kelly McCauley:

En effet, mais cela ne semble pas aider.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est un pas dans la bonne direction, et vous pouvez regarder le travail fait au ministère des Transports dans le cadre du projet pilote. Une fois de plus, lorsque le financement d'un programme est approuvé par le Parlement, pour ce qui est de la capacité d'un ministère de réaffecter de l'argent ailleurs, on peut en transférer jusqu'à 10 %, ce qui permet... Ce serait logique, surtout pour éviter la non-utilisation de fonds dans un domaine donné, mais cette façon de faire constitue une amélioration considérable par rapport à la situation actuelle, et s'engager dans cette voie...

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est un pas dans la bonne direction, pas une...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est un pas dans la bonne direction...

M. Kelly McCauley: Bien.

L'hon. Scott Brison: ... et toute amélioration commence par un premier pas. On regarde comment cela fonctionne, et on se demande ensuite s'il faut aller plus loin. Je suis ouvert à cela. [Français]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Ayoub, vous avez la parole et vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, de votre présence parmi nous aujourd'hui. Je remercie également les témoins qui vous accompagnent.

Je vais poser une question plus technique au sujet du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor.

Un projet pilote, en collaboration avec Transports Canada, est en cours de réalisation. Vous devez déjà avoir obtenu des résultats ou de la rétroaction à ce sujet. J'aimerais que vous m'en parliez brièvement. Quels ont été les résultats, les inconvénients ou les avantages observés et comment cela va-t-il vous aider à planifier d'autres changements dans un avenir rapproché?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup. J'apprécie la question.

Le projet pilote de Transports Canada représente une occasion pour nous de considérer la même approche auprès des autres ministères en ce qui a trait aux changements. Il y eu des résultats positifs jusqu'à maintenant et peut-être que M. Pagan peut vous en parler et aborder également les autres applications qui pourraient être mises à l'essai à l'avenir en utilisant la même approche.

(1210)

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Merci.

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de la question.

En 2015-2016, le ministère des Transports a obtenu un seul crédit d'un montant d'environ 600 millions de dollars pour les subventions. Dans le cadre de ce projet pilote, nous travaillons avec le ministère pour tester l'utilisation des crédits pour les portes d'entrée et les corridors, pour les infrastructures de transport et ainsi de suite. Il s'agit de séparer les crédits selon les termes et les conditions de chaque programme de subvention. C'est une façon de donner au Parlement une meilleure idée de l'utilisation exacte des ressources qui viennent appuyer certains programmes. Évidemment, l'année financière est en cours et nous n'avons donc pas de résultat final en ce moment. Cependant, de toute évidence, cette façon de faire ne pose aucun problème pour les ministères et cela donne aux parlementaires une meilleure mesure de l'utilisation de ces ressources.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Est-ce que je me trompe en disant que le ministère des Transports a pu absorber ce changement, apporter des résultats et fonctionner en parallèle? Je suppose qu'il a dû faire les deux, c'est-à-dire continuer à se servir de l'ancienne méthode tout en testant la nouvelle?

M. Brian Pagan:

C'est exact.

Prenons l'exemple de ce crédit de presque 600 millions de dollars. À l'avenir, le ministère pourra séparer ces ressources et présenter des résultats spécifiques à chaque crédit. Il y aura donc un crédit pour des corridors et un autre pour les infrastructures de transport. De cette manière, cela donnera un aperçu plus spécifique et plus axé sur ces programmes.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

En ce qui concerne la préparation, la formation au sein du ministère et la formation des employés, y a-t-il eu une démarche particulière qui a été entreprise? Combien de temps a duré cette préparation avant de pouvoir mettre en place ce projet pilote?

M. Brian Pagan:

Ce projet pilote découle d'un rapport de ce comité qui a été produit en 2012. Depuis ce temps, nous avons travaillé avec le ministère afin de préparer le projet pilote. Il n'y a eu aucune formation particulière et aucun problème du côté du système financier. Il s'agissait simplement d'identifier le meilleur exemple et de travailler avec ce ministère pour démontrer les bénéfices de cette approche.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Des prévisions de coûts ont-elles été établies relativement à l'implantation à grande échelle du projet pilote dans l'ensemble des ministères. Le but est d'effectuer des changements afin d'être plus efficaces et plus transparents. Quels sont les coûts liés à ces changements? Avez-vous des estimations à cet égard en ce qui concerne l'avenir? Est-ce que le projet pilote fournit ce genre d'informations?

M. Brian Pagan:

À l'heure actuelle, c'est un projet pilote avec un seul ministère. La prochaine étape est de l'étendre à d'autres crédits et surtout aux crédits opérationnels pour mieux comprendre les coûts et les bénéfices d'une telle approche.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Il y a un autre avantage à cette approche. Nous allons l'étendre à d'autres programmes. Ce sera plus facile pour le Parlement de mesurer les résultats et donc de considérer les objectifs de ce processus et de ce programme. Cela va représenter un changement important en ce qui concerne l'efficacité du gouvernement en général.

(1215)

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Notre dernier intervenant sera M. Weir.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci d'être resté, monsieur le ministre.

Je veux revenir au thème de l'opposition efficace. Pouvez-vous nous dire si les réformes proposées changeraient le nombre de jours désignés à la Chambre.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je n'ai pas la réponse à cette question, monsieur Weir, concernant l'incidence sur le nombre de jours désignés. Je vais vous revenir là-dessus.

M. Erin Weir:

Bien. Vous ne pouvez donc pas garantir que ces modifications ne réduiraient pas le nombre de jours désignés.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Brian, avez-vous quelque chose...

Nous allons vous donner une réponse exacte.

M. Brian Pagan:

Je peux vous dire, monsieur Weir, qu'on n'a aucunement l'intention de modifier le nombre de jours. Le nombre de périodes des subsides demeurerait le même. Le nombre de jours désignés fait l'objet d'une négociation entre le gouvernement et l'opposition. Il n'y a aucune corrélation.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je ne vois pas pourquoi il y aurait une incidence, mais je tiens juste à m'en assurer.

M. Erin Weir:

Bien. Je vous serais reconnaissant de nous faire parvenir une réponse un peu plus concrète à ce sujet.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Oui, tout à fait, mais au-delà de cette question, l'objectif est d'améliorer l'examen des dépenses du gouvernement par les comités.

M. Erin Weir:

Nous en sommes conscients. Pour ce qui est des dépenses, le paiement des employés représente la majorité des prévisions budgétaires de la plupart des ministères. Notre Comité s'est penché sur le système de paye Phénix. Je sais que vous n'êtes pas le ministre directement responsable, mais le Conseil du Trésor assume la fonction d'employeur dans l'administration fédérale.

On nous a dit que l'arriéré dans Phénix sera réglé d'ici la fin d'octobre, c'est-à-dire dans une semaine. Je me demande seulement si le Conseil du Trésor et vous êtes convaincus que ce sera fait, si le gouvernement paiera ses employés comme il se doit d'ici la fin du mois.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je crois que la sous-ministre de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a fait le point à ce sujet lors d'une séance d'information la semaine dernière. En tant qu'employeur, le Conseil du Trésor travaille étroitement avec Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, qui est responsable du système Phénix. Il est absolument essentiel à la relation employeur-employé que les gens soient payés à temps et correctement. Nous réglons le problème. Je sais que ma collègue, la ministre Foote, sa sous-ministre, Marie Lemay...

M. Erin Weir:

Allez-vous le régler d'ici le 31 octobre?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

La semaine dernière, la sous-ministre de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a fait le point sur la situation. Beaucoup de ressources humaines supplémentaires ont été déployées pour s'attaquer au problème. C'est une leçon pour le gouvernement, tant pour le gouvernement actuel que le précédent. C'est une leçon pour tous les gouvernements. Il est très complexe de réaliser une transformation des TI à l'échelle d'une organisation, qu'il s'agisse d'une administration ou d'une entreprise. Cela comporte de nombreux défis.

Ce n'est pas une raison de ne pas faire ces choses. Le système de paye devait être modernisé, mais nous procéderions autrement si nous en avions l'occasion. Ce système a été mis en place par le gouvernement précédent. Nous avons pris le pouvoir au moment de sa mise en oeuvre. Il y a des leçons à apprendre de la mise en oeuvre du système de paye Phénix, et tous les gouvernements procéderaient différemment à l'avenir.

Le président:

Monsieur le ministre, encore une fois, merci d'être ici aujourd'hui et de rester un peu plus longtemps que ce que vous aviez prévu au départ.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, et je vais le répéter pour le compte rendu, le Comité s'apprête à commencer une étude extrêmement importante, pour cette seule raison. Je vais une fois de plus faire allusion à mes 12 années d'expérience ici et dire que si nous pouvons bien faire les choses — et je pense que vous êtes sur la bonne voie, monsieur le ministre —, nous pourrions enfin — et j'insiste là-dessus —, après des générations, transférer la responsabilité et l'autorité en matière de dépenses de la fonction publique aux parlementaires. En ce qui me concerne, quand j'ai été élu pour la première fois, c'est ce que nous devions faire ici.

Je vous remercie une fois de plus de vos efforts. Espérons que nous allons vous revoir. Vous dites que vous avez comparu 12 fois. J'espère que nous pourrons vous voir une treizième fois en vous invitant de nouveau dans un proche avenir.

Merci encore. Nous allons suspendre la séance.

(1215)

(1220)

Le président:

Chers collègues, comme la réservation de la salle prendra fin à 13 heures, le reste de la séance, de la période de questions et de réponses, sera un peu écourté.

Monsieur Pagan, je pense qu'il reste plus de cinq minutes à votre exposé. Vous avez quelques diapositives supplémentaires.

Par la suite, chers collègues, je pense que nous commencerons une série de questions de sept minutes afin que tous les partis puissent intervenir. Il ne devrait pas être loin de 13 heures lorsque nous aurons terminé.

Monsieur Pagan, sans plus tarder, je vous donne la parole.

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme il a été dit, il s'agit d'une approche de réforme du processus budgétaire fondée sur quatre piliers. Nous venons tout juste de parler de l'alignement, qui fait partie intégrante de l'approche. Je vais rapidement passer en revue les trois autres piliers.

Une fois que nous serons en mesure de régler la question de l'alignement du budget des dépenses, nous devrons nous attaquer à d'autres sources d'incohérence et de coordination, y compris la portée et la méthode comptable, la nature du contrôle et la production de rapports.

Le deuxième pilier concerne la portée et la méthode comptable, ou ce que nous appelons l'« univers » du budget des dépenses. Le problème est plutôt simple. Le budget présente une vue d'ensemble complète de la totalité des dépenses gouvernementales, y compris pour ce qui est des sociétés d'État; des comptes consolidés; comme l'assurance-emploi; et des programmes offerts au moyen du régime fiscal, comme l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants. En revanche, le budget des dépenses est tout simplement une sous-catégorie plus restreinte de dépenses gouvernementales, qui met l'accent sur les dépenses qui doivent être approuvées au moyen d'un crédit. Voilà l'univers dont nous parlons.

Bien entendu, nous avons ensuite les différentes méthodes comptables. Le budget est présenté selon la méthode de comptabilité d'exercice, tandis que le budget des dépenses l'est selon la comptabilité de caisse. Je pense qu'on a trop simplifié le problème en parlant de comptabilité de caisse et de comptabilité d'exercice, car il est plus vaste.

À la huitième diapositive, nous voyons les avantages du rapprochement de ces méthodes et de l'univers du budget des dépenses en déposant le budget principal des dépenses après le budget. Le président a d'ailleurs mentionné que nous voulons accentuer le rapprochement entre les deux documents.

Dans le budget fédéral de l'année dernière, les dépenses prévues se chiffraient à 317,1 milliards de dollars. Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) a autorisé des dépenses de 251,4 milliards de dollars. La différence se chiffre à 65,7 milliards de dollars. L'univers du budget des dépenses représente environ 60 milliards de dollars de ce montant — c'est-à-dire les comptes à fins déterminées consolidés, comme pour l'assurance-emploi; les dépenses engagées par l'entremise du régime fiscal, comme pour l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants; et les autres dépenses gouvernementales, comme celles engagées pour les sociétés d'État consolidées. La différence entre les méthodes comptables — entre la comptabilité d'exercice et la comptabilité de caisse — est d'environ 4,8 milliards de dollars. Cette différence s'explique par des choses comme l'amortissement des immobilisations, la provision pour créances douteuses et les intérêts sur les obligations futures.

Enfin, pour compléter le rapprochement, il y aurait des postes budgétaires qui n'ont pas encore été soumis aux fins d'approbation. Comme nous l'avons vu l'année dernière dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), ce montant était d'environ 4,9 milliards de dollars.

C'est un exemple de la façon, si nous déposons le budget des dépenses après le budget, dont nous pouvons rapprocher les deux documents et éliminer ainsi une partie de la confusion et de la frustration éprouvées par les parlementaires et les comités.

Brièvement, pour ce qui est de la structure des crédits — il en a été question dans la dernière série de questions —, l'objectif est de permettre au Parlement de porter un meilleur regard sur les coûts et les résultats des programmes. Nous menons actuellement avec Transports Canada un projet pilote portant sur le crédit pour les subventions et les contributions du ministère. L'idée serait d'en faire autant pour l'ensemble des activités ministérielles et de permettre ainsi aux comités de porter un meilleur regard sur le lien entre les ressources et les programmes.

Par exemple, comme le président l'a mentionné, le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor assume la fonction d'employeur; nous approuvons les dépenses et possédons un pouvoir de réglementation. Plutôt que d'avoir un seul crédit pour dépenses de fonctionnement, nous pourrions peut-être faire l'essai de crédits liés à chacune des responsabilités essentielles.

Monsieur McCauley, voilà ce que nous entendons par une approbation à une « échelle plus globale » pour ce qui est des responsabilités essentielles. Nous pourrions en faire autant pour tous les ministères.

Affaires mondiales, par exemple, n'a qu'un seul crédit pour dépenses de fonctionnement, mais nous savons que le ministère assume des responsabilités en matière de développement, de diplomatie et de commerce. Nous pouvons diviser ces responsabilités à presque tous les niveaux, mais il y a évidemment des coûts et des difficultés. Certaines administrations utilisent jusqu'à 12 000 crédits. Je dirais que ce ne sont pas les administrations les mieux dirigées, mais c'est une chose que nous pourrions étudier et examiner avec le Comité.

(1225)



Enfin, nous avons notre dernier pilier qui porte sur les résultats et les rapports. Comme il a été dit dans l'introduction, le Conseil du Trésor a une nouvelle politique en matière de résultats. Elle est entrée en vigueur le 1er juillet. Nous travaillons maintenant avec une poignée de ministères pour la mettre en oeuvre et présenter de nouveaux cadres ministériels des résultats et de nouveaux rapports au Parlement que nous devrions voir au cycle du printemps. Cette politique sera pleinement opérationnelle dans tous les ministères d'ici novembre 2017.

Avant de conclure, je vais dire un mot — une annonce, si vous voulez — concernant l'InfoBase du SCT. Comme on l'a mentionné dans l'introduction, le Comité a recommandé en 2012 la création d'une base de données accessible en ligne. Nous avons réalisé de grands progrès pour que cela se concrétise. Je recommande aux députés qui ne connaissent pas InfoBase de s'en servir pour mieux connaître les activités ministérielles et faciliter leur étude.

Le graphique présenté ici est tout simplement un instantané du genre de renseignements disponibles grâce à Infobase, y compris toutes sortes d'indicateurs liés aux dépenses réelles et prévues, à l'utilisation des ETP et à leur distribution au pays, à des renseignements démographiques et ainsi de suite. Comme le ministre l'a mentionné, nous prévoyons élargir la base de données et enrichir l'information à la disposition des comités.

(1230)

[Français]

En conclusion, pour aller de l'avant, il reste encore de nombreuses questions complexes à considérer, notamment en ce qui concerne les cadres comptables et le retrait des crédits du Budget principal des dépenses. Des changements de cette ampleur obligeront le Parlement à modifier sa manière de fonctionner ainsi que la façon dont les ministères publient leurs informations.

Nous proposons d'y aller par petites étapes afin d'éviter des échecs à grande échelle. Nous recommandons de commencer par un changement de la date d'échéance du Budget principal des dépenses et par la suite, au fur et à mesure que ce changement sera intégré dans le processus, de travailler avec le Comité pour développer des options pour les autres aspects.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, voilà qui conclut l'exposé. Madame Santiago et moi serons très heureux de répondre à d'autres questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons commencer cette série de questions par M. Grewal. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Raj Grewal (Brampton-Est, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur, d'être venu témoigner. Je viens du secteur privé, où j'ai été avocat spécialisé en droit des sociétés et analyste financier, et je trouve très surprenant que le processus budgétaire du gouvernement fonctionne ainsi. À mon humble avis, cela n'a essentiellement aucun sens.

Ce que je veux, c'est que nous examinions d'autres modèles. Nous nous penchons sur le modèle de l'Australie et celui du Royaume-Uni. Sommes-nous prêts, une fois que les modifications seront apportées, à faire en sorte que cela ne tombe pas en morceaux entre-temps? Pouvez-vous nous aider à y voir plus clair concernant la façon dont nous allons nous y prendre pour être certains que tout sera comptabilisé pendant la période de transition?

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur Grewal. Vous avez tout à fait raison lorsque vous dites que le processus actuel n'est pas très sensé. Il est très difficile d'expliquer ce qu'il a de logique. Il est plus facile d'expliquer ce que nous voulons faire que notre façon actuelle de procéder.

C'est précisément pour cette raison que nous proposons une approche à quatre piliers, qui consiste à bien aligner le budget des dépenses et, pendant ce temps, à apporter des éclaircissements concernant certains des autres intérêts et des autres besoins des comités, notamment en ce qui a trait à la méthode comptable et à l'univers budgétaire ainsi qu'à la structure de contrôle au moyen du cadre des crédits.

Si nous arrivons à procéder ainsi de façon ordonnée, je crois alors que nous réussirons. La modification du Règlement est la prérogative de la Chambre, mais nous savons que c'est une question plutôt simple et directe qui consiste tout simplement à substituer « au plus tard le 1er mai » à « au plus tard le 1er mars ».

Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le ministère des Finances pour renforcer la coordination entre le budget et les approbations du Conseil du Trésor. L'année dernière, nous avons réussi à présenter près de 70 % du budget dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), qui a été déposé le 10 mai, ce qui laisse croire que nous pouvons réussir à présenter des postes budgétaires dans le Budget principal des dépenses déposé au plus tard le 1er mai.

M. Raj Grewal:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question concerne la planification. Dans quelle mesure le gouvernement et les députés profiteront-ils des modifications que nous nous apprêtons à apporter?

M. Brian Pagan:

C'est en fait une question de cohérence et de compréhension. Déposer le Budget principal des dépenses l'année passée avant le budget — parce que tout le monde savait qu'il y aurait bientôt un important budget en raison des engagements du programme relatifs à l'infrastructure, à l'environnement et aux Autochtones — n'avait absolument aucun sens. Nous avons présenté au Parlement un document qui avait très peu d'utilité pour les comités. Puis nous avons dû courir — travailler très très fort — pour faire figurer ces postes budgétaires dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

En changeant le processus pour que le Budget principal des dépenses soit présenté après le budget, nous brossons pour les parlementaires un tableau beaucoup plus cohérent et rendons leur étude du Budget principal des dépenses beaucoup plus fructueuse et utile, je pense. J'insiste pour dire que nous simplifierions aussi le processus de sorte que pendant la période des crédits de juin, vous ayez un seul projet de loi de crédits portant sur le Budget principal des dépenses, plutôt que d'avoir comme maintenant la totalité des crédits pour le Budget principal des dépenses et pour le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. La présentation des deux lois de crédits le même jour cause un peu de confusion. Nous concentrions ensuite les périodes des crédits de décembre et mars sur ce qui deviendrait alors les Budgets supplémentaires des dépenses (A) et (B).

Les comités feraient par conséquent toute l'année l'étude en continu des prévisions budgétaires. Comme le ministre l'a dit, selon l'engagement, si les ministères soumettent un budget, les ministres vont comparaître pour parler de leurs besoins et les expliquer.

(1235)

M. Raj Grewal:

Combien cette transition coûtera-t-elle à l'interne?

M. Brian Pagan:

En ce qui concerne le moment, nous croyons que les coûts sont négligeables. Il s'agit simplement de mieux ordonner le travail au sein des ministères. En fait, s'il n'est plus nécessaire de produire le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses du printemps, qui ne fait que répéter le Budget principal des dépenses, il y aurait de très modestes économies sur le plan des efforts à déployer.

M. Raj Grewal:

Merci.

Je pense que mon collègue a une question à poser.

Le président: Monsieur Poissant. [Français]

M. Jean-Claude Poissant (La Prairie, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Bonjour à toutes et à tous.

Monsieur Pagan, j'aimerais vous entendre parler un peu plus de la transparence.

Le 14 juin 2016, des représentants de Her Majesty's Treasury, à Londres, ont dit au Comité que l’harmonisation du budget et du Budget de dépenses contribuait à améliorer la transparence et à faciliter le suivi de leur plan des dépenses.

Que fait le gouvernement fédéral pour optimiser la transparence de ses finances? J'aimerais qu'on parle davantage de la question de la transparence.

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Tout d'abord, il faut simplifier le processus et le rendre plus facile à comprendre pour les comités. À l'heure actuelle, les chevauchements entre le Budget des dépenses et le Budget des dépenses supplémentaires rendent le processus plus complexe qu'il ne devrait l'être idéalement.

Le ministre Brison a mentionné l'importance d'une meilleure approche axée sur les résultats et de mieux présenter les chiffres de façon à ce que les ressources soient alignées sur les résultats obtenus. On peut bien sûr aller en avant avec une nouvelle politique, mais on peut aussi regarder les crédits qui sont axés sur les objectifs des programmes.

Ce sont donc deux mesures qui rendraient le processus plus compréhensible. Il faut clarifier le synchronisme et aligner les crédits sur les objectifs des programmes.

M. Jean-Claude Poissant:

J'ai une brève question à vous poser.

Quel devrait être le rôle du directeur parlementaire du budget pour assurer la transparence et la responsabilisation à l'égard des finances du gouvernement fédéral?

M. Brian Pagan:

Je pense que le rôle du DPB est très clair. Il doit travailler avec les députés et le Comité pour rendre le processus plus compréhensible afin de pouvoir répondre aux questions identifiées par les députés. Depuis l'année dernière, nous travaillons étroitement avec le DPB afin d'identifier les problèmes et les besoins des parlementaires et d'aller en avant avec nos programmes.

J'ai aussi mentionné que le DPB a souligné que nous avions apporté une amélioration. Ainsi, on a inclus dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) une annexe qui prévoit l'identification des fonds inutilisés. Il a mentionné qu'avec la présentation de cette information, on a mis les députés sur le même pied que le pouvoir exécutif.

(1240)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Clarke, vous avez la parole et vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie les témoins d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Monsieur Pagan, depuis quand le cycle budgétaire actuel en Australie existe-t-il? C'est en fait celui que le Canada veut adopter selon ce rapport pour l'adoption d'une réforme? En a-t-il toujours été ainsi en Australie ou est-ce quelque chose de récent?

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Vous avez raison de dire que nous prenons le système australien comme modèle, mais le Québec et l'Ontario ont aussi des processus assez comparables à celui qui existe en Australie. Je pense que le système australien a été adopté en 2006. C'est plus ou moins la même chose en Ontario.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Savez-vous s'il y a eu des périodes d'ajustement au Québec, en Ontario ou en Australie, comme on le prévoit ici?

M. Brian Pagan:

Oui, ce fut le cas, surtout en ce qui concerne le système de comptabilité, soit la comptabilité de caisse au lieu de la comptabilité d'exercice.

En ce qui concerne le fait de présenter le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses en même temps, il n'y a pas de complications majeures. On aura un certain temps, comme le ministre l'a mentionné, mais il n'y a aucun problème en ce qui concerne la formation.

En ce qui concerne la comptabilité, c'est une autre paire de manches. Le système de comptabilité d'exercice est complexe, c'est beaucoup plus difficile que le système de comptabilité de caisse. On devra former les gestionnaires de la fonction publique et les parlementaires afin qu'ils comprennent mieux les différences qu'implique le système de comptabilité de caisse.

M. Alupa Clarke:

J'aimerais préciser...

M. Brian Pagan:

Après l'adoption du système de comptabilité de caisse, l'Ontario et l'Australie ont connu certains problèmes en ce qui concerne le contrôle de l'affectation des crédits au sein de ministères.[Traduction]

Ils ont dépassé leurs autorisations parlementaires ou, comme on dit, ils ont excédé leurs crédits.[Français]

C'était lié aux problèmes de formation et à la complexité de ce système de comptabilité.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je vous remercie de tout ce que vous nous dites, mais j'aimerais avoir une réponse précise.

En Australie, dès la première année, le budget et le Budget principal des dépenses étaient-ils présentés à la même date?

M. Brian Pagan:

Oui.

M. Alupa Clarke:

D'accord.

Dans le document, je lis aussi ce qui suit:[Traduction]

« ... qu’une structure de crédits fondée sur les programmes restreindrait la latitude des ministères en ce qui concerne la réaffectation, dans un même crédit, de fonds d’un programme à l’autre... »[Français]

En vertu de cette logique, prévoyez-vous qu'on établira un maximum pour ces transferts d'un programme à l'autre?

M. Brian Pagan:

Il faut faire examiner cela par le Comité et les ministères. En Ontario, par exemple, les crédits sont liés aux programmes. Une loi sur les crédits a permis le transfert de crédits sans qu'il y ait une approbation législative. Au Québec, il y a un maximum de transferts des crédits de 10 %.

Il faut donc que les ministères comprennent les limites de la flexibilité et il faut identifier des façons d'assurer la transparence tout en permettant une certaine flexibilité pour livrer les programmes et les services.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Dans le document, il n'y a pas de chiffres précis comme, par exemple, les 10 % au Québec. Prévoit-on établir un seuil?

(1245)

M. Brian Pagan:

On ne prévoit pas proposer une façon spécifique de déterminer les limites. C'est toutefois une chose à examiner. On voudrait travailler avec le Comité et le ministère pour identifier la meilleure approche à adopter à ce sujet.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je vous remercie encore une fois de la réponse.

Dans le même document, il y a une phrase plus loin qui se lit comme suit:[Traduction]

« Cette latitude permet aux ministères de réduire les fonds inutilisés. »[Français]

Toutefois, mes collègues du Parti conservateur qui siège au sein de ce comité et moi craignons que cette flexibilité ne soit utilisée[Traduction]

pour masquer les coûts réels des programmes et réaffecter les fonds d'une façon moins transparente.[Français]

Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Brian Pagan:

C'est une bonne question.

Pour nous, c'est une question de bien comprendre et d'aligner les ressources sur les programmes.

J'ai parlé plus tôt du ministère des Affaires étrangères. Présentement, il n'a qu'un seul crédit opérationnel. Dans le futur, il est possible d'envisager une approche où il y aurait des crédits spécifiques dans les domaines du développement, de la diplomatie et des échanges. C'est un exemple de ce qu'on appelle[Traduction]

des crédits fondés sur l'objet des crédits.[Français]

Évidemment, avec un plus grand nombre de crédits, c'est plus complexe pour les ministères. Il y a plus de chances qu'il y ait des fonds inutilisés parce qu'ils n'auront pas la flexibilité de faire des transferts de crédits. On voudrait examiner les possibilités et identifier une approche équilibrée entre la transparence et la flexibilité.

M. Alupa Clarke:

D'accord. Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

C'est au tour de M. Weir, pour sept minutes.

M. Erin Weir:

Si le Budget principal des dépenses est présenté pour le 1er mai, il faudrait quand même aux ministères des crédits provisoires pour les premiers mois de l'exercice. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de la façon dont cela fonctionnerait avec les réformes proposées?

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur Weir.

En fait, dans le document de discussion, il y a une annexe qui présente une illustration du budget des dépenses provisoire. Ce serait très semblable à ce qui existe en ce moment; nous présenterions le budget des dépenses provisoire au plus tard le 1er mars. Cependant, il se fonderait sur les autorisations de l'exercice en cours plutôt que sur celles de l'exercice à venir, qui sont encore inconnues en raison du budget.

D'après nous, cela aurait l'avantage d'éviter certaines situations que nous avons connues dans le passé. Le Comité se rappellera peut-être le cas de Marine Atlantique en 2015-2016, alors que le maintien de certains fonds dépendait d'une décision qui allait être prise dans le budget. Étant donné que le Budget principal des dépenses avait été présenté avant le budget, il y a eu une diminution assez importante des fonds dans le Budget principal des dépenses pour Marine Atlantique, cette année-là. On avait présumé qu'il y avait une réduction, alors qu'en fait il n'y en avait pas; le maintien des fonds dépendait tout simplement de la décision finale donnée dans le budget.

En présentant un budget des dépenses provisoire fondé sur le maintien des autorisations existantes, il n'y aurait aucune réduction, sauf celles qui ont été annoncées dans le budget, et le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses continuerait de se fonder sur une fraction. Nous parlons de « douzièmes ». Les crédits provisoires correspondent habituellement à trois douzièmes des besoins globaux d'un ministère.

Cela demeurerait la base des crédits provisoires, mais nous travaillerions avec les ministères. Ils pourraient cerner les besoins particuliers très tôt dans l'année. Ils obtiendraient des fractions croissantes en fonction de cette autorisation. Par exemple, les subventions et les contributions qui sont versées aux bandes autochtones dès le début de l'année justifieraient un...

M. Erin Weir:

C'est un des points dont je voulais parler. D'après moi, si l'on fonde les crédits provisoires sur l'exercice en cours, entre autres problèmes possibles, il pourrait y avoir des ministères qui ont en fait besoin de dépenser plus d'argent pour une raison légitime au début de l'exercice financier. J'imagine que vous reconnaissez qu'il pourrait y avoir un genre d'affectation spéciale pour cela.

M. Brian Pagan:

Absolument. Je crois que le document provisoire présente cette possibilité.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord. Excellent.

J'ai une autre question à propos du type de système général et des réformes proposées. En ce moment, le Conseil du Trésor n'intervient pas vraiment tant que le budget n'est pas déposé. Envisageriez-vous, ou le Comité devrait-il envisager la possibilité que le Conseil du Trésor intervienne plus tôt dans le processus de préparation du budget?

(1250)

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de votre question, monsieur Weir. C'est en fait au coeur de la question du moment choisi et de notre recommandation de déposer le Budget principal des dépenses le 1er mai.

La préparation du budget incombe au ministre des Finances et c'est à lui qu'il appartient de décider, alors nous sommes bien conscients de cette responsabilité. En même temps, depuis plusieurs années maintenant, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le ministère des Finances avant le dépôt du budget afin d'avoir une idée des initiatives qui seront vraisemblablement financées, de manière à pouvoir commencer à travailler avec les ministères pour prépositionner les présentations au Conseil du Trésor et les propositions aux membres du Conseil du Trésor pour approbation.

Comme le ministre le disait, nous avons l'intention d'approfondir cette relation de manière à travailler encore plus étroitement et à réduire l'écart entre le budget et la présentation du Budget principal des dépenses.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord.

Nous avons beaucoup discuté du ministère des Transports, par exemple. Je me suis souvenu de faire un suivi avec vous sur quelque chose que je vous ai demandé, au ministre et à vous, à une réunion antérieure. Il était question du Global Transportation Hub — la plaque tournante mondiale de transport —, une société d'État de la Saskatchewan qui reçoit d'importants fonds fédéraux. Cette société a aussi dépensé des millions de dollars pour acheter des terrains à des prix grossièrement exagérés auprès de gens d'affaires ayant des liens étroits avec le SaskParty, qui est au pouvoir.

La réponse initiale, c'était que le ministre et vous alliez vous pencher là-dessus. La réponse qui a suivi était que le vérificateur général de la province avait été saisi de la question. Le vérificateur général de la province a présenté son rapport dans lequel il confirme que les sommes consacrées à ces terrains étaient excessives.

Dans le cadre du travail réalisé par le Conseil du Trésor avec le ministère des Transports, est-ce qu'il y a eu un recours concernant les fonds fédéraux qui sont pris dans ce projet?

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci, monsieur Weir. Je ne suis pas au courant des derniers rapports du vérificateur général ou de quelque réponse que ce soit du ministère. Il nous faudra regarder cela.

M. Erin Weir:

Je comprends. Le vérificateur général de la province a produit un rapport, alors j'aimerais beaucoup connaître la position du gouvernement fédéral concernant les millions de dollars qu'il a consacrés au Global Transportation Hub. Nous vous saurions gré de bien vouloir faire le point pour nous à ce sujet à une date ultérieure.

Le président:

Il vous reste à peu près une minute.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord.

Monsieur Pagan, j'ai réalisé que vous espériez nous donner de l'information à propos du moment du dépôt du budget, mais vous n'avez pas pu à cause du manque de temps tout à l'heure. Si vous voulez prendre une minute pour le faire, ce serait fort apprécié.

M. Brian Pagan:

Merci.

J'ai mentionné que les budgets des 10 dernières années avaient été présentés parfois très tôt, en janvier, ou très tard — une fois le 21 avril. Il y a de bonnes raisons pour cela.

En 2009, avec la crise économique mondiale, il était très important pour le gouvernement de montrer aux Canadiens et au marché canadien qu'il était capable d'investir dans l'emploi et dans le fonctionnement des marchés du crédit et d'en assurer le soutien. Dans cet exemple, le gouvernement a agi rapidement.

Plus récemment, en 2015, la chute marquée du marché de l'énergie a causé de la confusion. On ne savait pas s'il s'agissait d'une baisse temporaire qui serait suivie d'une remontée rapide, ou d'une situation permanente qui aurait des incidences sur le contexte économique sous-jacent, sur les investissements en immobilisations, sur les niveaux d'emplois, etc. Cette année-là, le gouvernement a en fait repoussé la présentation du budget et a cherché la meilleure information possible avant de présenter ses plans.

Ces deux situations extrêmes montrent bien les avantages d'une certaine latitude pour le dépôt des budgets. Notre proposition de présenter le budget le 1er mai conviendrait aux deux scénarios, et le Budget principal des dépenses serait présenté après le budget, ce qui se traduirait par des documents plus cohérents et pouvant être rapprochés.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je n'ai plus personne sur ma liste, à moins que...

Mme Yasmin Ratansi: Puis-je poser une question rapide?

Le président: Allez-y, madame Ratansi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je vous remercie, parce qu'il y a quelque chose que je ne comprends pas très bien.

Quelqu'un vous a posé une question sur la capacité des parlementaires à faire des « études ». En ce moment, nous étudions le Budget principal des dépenses — nous n'étudions pas vraiment le budget, mais nous étudions le Budget principal des dépenses —, et il arrive que le Budget principal des dépenses ne corresponde pas au budget. Aidez-moi à comprendre: si vous harmonisez cela, combien de temps les parlementaires auront-ils pour étudier les dépenses réelles du gouvernement?

M. Brian Pagan:

Je vous remercie de votre question, madame Ratansi.

Le premier pilier, celui du moment choisi pour déposer le budget, est très important pour nous tous, je crois, parce que cela signifie que le Budget principal des dépenses qui sera présenté sera, ou risque d'être plus utile, mieux harmonisé au budget. C'est en soi un avantage. Rien dans la proposition ne vise la diminution du nombre de jours désignés ou de la capacité des comités d'examiner les documents budgétaires de façon continue.

Il y aurait toujours trois périodes de subsides. Nous présenterions des documents budgétaires à chacune des périodes de subsides; par conséquent, les comités seraient en mesure de convoquer des témoins et d'entendre les ministres et le personnel parler du Budget principal des dépenses, mais aussi des activités en cours des ministères.

Bob Marleau, que le ministre a mentionné dans sa déclaration liminaire, a souligné qu'il faut encourager les comités à examiner les documents budgétaires de façon continue plutôt que de ne le faire qu'épisodiquement au printemps. Nous sommes d'accord avec lui.

(1255)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Pagan et madame Santiago. Merci d'avoir comparu devant nous aujourd'hui.

Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, nous nous retrouverons dans cette même pièce à 15 h 30 aujourd'hui pour poursuivre notre étude sur Postes Canada.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard oggo 31914 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on October 24, 2016

2016-03-10 OGGO 6

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Ladies and gentlemen, this is meeting number 6 of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. We are dealing with the supplementary estimates (C) for the Department of Public Works and Government Services, and Shared Services Canada.

We have the minister with us today, the Honourable Judy Foote, Minister of Public Services and Procurement.

Minister Foote, would you care to introduce the officials who are with you. Then we'd ask you to commence with your opening statement. Hopefully, it's no longer than 10 minutes.

Again, I remind all witnesses, ministers, and committee members that we are in a televised environment.

Minister, please go ahead.

Hon. Judy Foote (Minister of Public Services and Procurement):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's a pleasure to be here.

I'm going to ask my colleagues to introduce themselves.

Julie.

Ms. Julie Charron (Acting Chief Financial Officer, Finance and Administration, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Thank you.

Good afternoon. My name is Julie Charron. I am the acting chief financial officer at Public Services and Procurement.

Mr. George Da Pont (Deputy Minister, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Good afternoon. I'm George Da Pont, the deputy minister of Public Services and Procurement.

Mr. Ron Parker (President, Shared Services Canada):

I'm Ron Parker, the president of Shared Services Canada.

Ms. Manon Fillion (Director General and Deputy Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services, Shared Services Canada):

I'm Manon Fillion, the DG of finance at SSC. Sorry, I was mixing French and English. I should have said it in French, but that's okay.

The Chair:

The floor is yours, Minister.

Hon. Judy Foote:

Thank you.[Translation]

Good afternoon to all members of the committee.[English]

I am honoured to be here and to have been named Minister of Public Services and Procurement. I look forward to establishing a constructive relationship with all of you on this committee.[Translation]

Thank you for inviting me to testify before your committee.[English]

Our Prime Minister has emphasized the importance of these committees, and I am committed to treating this committee with respect, given the important work that you will be doing. I look forward to working with all of you. Your work will be important in helping me advance the priorities set out in the mandate letter I received from the Prime Minister. I welcome our exchanges on these issues as we move forward.

Departmental officials and I are here today to answer your questions about the supplementary estimates (C) as well as the departmental performance reports for Public Services and Procurement Canada and for Shared Services Canada.

Public Services and Procurement Canada acts as government's principal treasurer, accountant, and real property manager. As the government's central purchasing agent, it buys everything from pencils to military equipment. It also supports our efforts to communicate with and provide services for Canadians in the official language of their choice.

Shared Services Canada was established to deliver one email system, consolidated data centres, reliable and secure telecommunications networks, and non-stop protection against cyber-threats. The department does this across 43 departments, 50 networks, 485 data centres, and 23,000 servers, all to make information more secure and easier for Canadians to access.

At the heart of both of these organizations is a commitment to service and an ongoing effort to operate more efficiently and cost effectively. A great deal of the work takes place behind the scenes, but that makes it no less vital. For instance, Public Services and Procurement Canada was directly involved in meeting our government's commitment to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees. The department secured essentials like winter jackets, travel, housing, and food, while Shared Services provided necessary IT services and operational support.

Many of our key priorities were laid out in our mandate letter, including prioritizing the national shipbuilding strategy. Our government is renewing the Canadian Coast Guard fleet and outfitting the Royal Canadian Navy so it can operate as a true blue-water maritime force. Seaspan's Vancouver shipyards and Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax have invested millions of dollars to rebuild their facilities to allow them to build Canada's vessels efficiently. Work is well under way on the LEED projects, the offshore fisheries science vessel in Vancouver, and the Arctic offshore patrol vessels in Halifax. The shipbuilding strategy is good for Canada. It is creating jobs, building industrial capacity, and renewing the fleets. Canada has not built ships for a generation. That is why we have recently hired a shipbuilding expert to provide us with advice on all facets of shipbuilding.

We are also looking at ways to ensure more accurate planning and costing. The government is developing new costing methodologies to enable more precise budgeting forecasts. Going forward, we will be regularly refreshing our budgets and timelines so that we are not working with outdated costing.

We are determined to ensure that all of our activities are conducted as openly and transparently as possible. Canadians and stakeholders should be well informed of our shipbuilding plans, costs, progress, and challenges. Therefore, Canadians, journalists, and parliamentarians will receive regular updates on where we stand with our various shipbuilding projects.

We are committed to making progress in other areas as well. The Build in Canada innovation program bridges the pre-commercialization gap for the many Canadian businesses that have new and innovative products and technologies to sell. We will improve administration of the program so that matches between innovative companies and government testing departments are made much more quickly.

Departmental officials and I are partnering with suppliers and these key stakeholders to make it easier for Canadian companies to do business with the government. We are determined to simplify and better manage government procurement and to focus on practices such as green and social procurement that support our government's economic policy goals.

Improvements are also at the core of the work at Shared Services Canada, where modernizing the government's IT infrastructure is key to the digital array of information services that Canadians expect. Sixty legacy data centres have been consolidated into three enterprise-class data centres. This cuts costs, increases data security, and improves services to partner and client organizations.

(1535)



SSC plays a vital role in protecting our national cyber infrastructure and Canadians' data on all federal networks. Security has been upgraded through a new 24/7 security operations centre that monitors and responds quickly to cybersecurity incidents, reducing both the number of critical IT incidents and the time it takes to resolve them.

Both Public Services and Procurement Canada and Shared Services Canada are refining procurement. They are speeding up the process of informing industry of solicitations being tendered. This allows bidders more time to respond with innovative solutions that meet the government's needs.

Another example of innovation, modernization, and the future direction of government operations is the transformation of the Government of Canada's inefficient 40-year-old pay system.

The new pay system, called Phoenix, was implemented just two weeks ago, on February 24, and the first pay cycle has proven to be a success. So far, it covers 34 departments involving 120,000 employees. The remaining 67 departments are scheduled to come online soon.

The department is also pushing forward in real property management, design, and green construction. Public Services and Procurement Canada has been recognized for high-quality work in infrastructure projet planning, design, construction, and heritage expertise, and for other services to clients.

The Des Allumettes Bridge, which connects Ontario and Quebec near Pembroke, Ontario won a Canadian Institute of Steel Construction 2015 design award for excellence in steel construction. The Tunney's Pasture master plan received a national award for comprehensive planning-best practices, as well as a national award of merit for urban design. The James Michael Flaherty Building, at 90 Elgin Street, received a city of Ottawa award of merit in the Ottawa Urban Design Awards.

Public Services and Procurement Canada is also a world leader in sourcing property management services from the private sector. This approach has saved Canadian taxpayers about $700 million over the past two decades. It was one of the first organizations in Canada to commit to meeting the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, LEED, gold standard in new construction. Major renovations must meet the silver standard.

Nine of the ten new buildings constructed for the government across Canada in recent years are certified LEED gold. The tenth, 30 Victoria, across the river in Gatineau is LEED platinum, the highest level possible. This underscores our commitment to green, energy efficient buildings.

Construction work led by the department is happening around the country and generating important work for Canadians. Over the next two years, we anticipate major repair projects will be completed on several key assets. These include the Esquimalt graving dock in British Columbia and the Alexandra Bridge, which connects Ottawa and Gatineau, a few blocks from here. In addition, a new Government of Canada pay centre is currently under construction in Miramichi, New Brunswick under a lease contract arrangement.

Parts of Parliament Hill and the surrounding blocks are also undergoing significant renovations. The rehabilitation of the Sir John A. Macdonald Building has been completed. The revitalization of the Wellington Building is nearly finished. Work continues on the significant West Block rehabilitation project, as well as others. Committee members will be happy to know that each one is on time and on budget.

As part of my mandate, I have also been asked to undertake a review of Canada Post to ensure Canadians receive high-quality postal service at a reasonable price. The independent review will consider all viable options and provide Canadians with an opportunity to have a say in the decisions about Canada Post's future.

I am hoping that this committee will play an important role in the Canadian consultation process as we reach out to Canadians to get their feedback once a task force, that we will be putting in place, will have done its work. This is an important task and we are taking steps to ensure that we get the process right.

Turning now to the 2015 supplementary estimates (C), Public Services and Procurement Canada is seeking net funding of just over $83 million, increasing its approved funding to $3.22 billion.

This requested funding is needed mainly for the management of federal real property, the reconstruction of the Grande Allée Armoury in Quebec City, and the continuing rehabilitation of the Parliamentary precinct, as well as for fees that will allow Canadians to do business with the government using credit and debit cards.

The 2015-2016 supplementary estimates (C) for Shared Services Canada represents an increase of just over $54 million to $1.58 billion. The funding requested is needed mostly to enhance the Government of Canada network and cyber system security, to support the government response to the Syrian refugee crisis, and to offset the incremental costs of providing core information technology services to client departments and agencies.

(1540)



While we have made progress on several fronts, there is still much work to be done. Both departments will look for opportunities to better deliver programs and services and to improve results for Canadians through sound management. Overall, the keys to success are innovation, process-busting, and common-sense changes. I have confidence in the ability of the public service to embrace all three. Already I have met hundreds of dedicated, enthusiastic, and professional departmental employees in so many communities, and I intend to continue to do so. I know that we can work together to meet the expectations of Canadians.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm happy to take the committee's questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

My understanding is that you are with us for one hour.

Hon. Judy Foote:

I am.

The Chair:

At 4:30 p.m., then, Minister, we'll break the proceedings to let you get on to your other ministerial duties.

We will go into a seven-minute round. The first questioner will be Mr. Drouin.

Mr. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank the minister and her department for being here today. I really appreciate you guys taking the time for us to pose some questions.

I'll get to the supplementary estimates soon, but I want to ask you a question, Minister, about your mandate letter. You were charged with modernizing procurement and making it more open and accessible to small and medium-sized enterprises. I am from Ottawa and the national capital region, and I do represent a lot of SMEs. It's important that they procure and do business with the government.

How will you modernize this so that SMEs can participate in the procurement process?

Hon. Judy Foote:

We have started already by having an extensive consultation process with small and medium-sized businesses, and industry generally. We have a supplier advisory group that we meet with on a regular basis. It's really important to engage them to find out what the barriers have been to small and medium-sized enterprises being successful in accessing government opportunities.

We are making sure that we take the time to reach out to all of those involved in industry, get their advice, and learn from them about how we can do things more efficiently and more effectively. We have been doing that throughout the department, again to focus on not just small and medium enterprises but industry overall. Government is a big business in the country, and we want to make sure everyone who can takes advantage of that because of the jobs that come with it and the opportunities that come for companies.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Great. Thank you.

Moving on to Shared Services, I know there have been some challenges.

I want to start by saying that I am a firm believer in the goals of Shared Services. In the supplementary estimates, you ask for $54 million for cybersecurity. What steps are being taken by SSC to ensure that we have a proper cybersecurity strategy? I remember a few years ago there was the Heartbleed problem, and then the problem at NRC. What is SSC doing to ensure that those kinds of situations don't happen again?

Hon. Judy Foote:

As you know, what we've attempted to do with an enterprise-wide system is not an easy task. It's fair to say that what we are doing is probably the largest undertaking in the country, in putting in place an enterprise-wide solution.

What we have to do is to look at where things have gone wrong and fix those. We're doing that. Those at Shared Services have undertaken to step back, evaluate the work that's been done to date, and on a go-forward basis find ways to ensure that any mistakes that happened in the past won't happen in the future. We're very cognizant of the responsibility we have from a cybersecurity perspective, working closely with Public Safety and security, working with our counterparts throughout government, to make sure that everything we possibly can do will be done to secure the security of our country and Canadians.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

That's great. Thank you.

I have one more question with regard to Shared Services. Does consolidating data centres make it easier to provide security with regard to cyber-threats? Other than saving costs, does that help prevent cyber-threats?

(1545)

Hon. Judy Foote:

Of course. The fewer avenues we have to ensure that we do get this right and that we have the types of services in place to respond quickly is important. When you're dealing with several entities, it becomes much more difficult. It makes a difference working closely with Public Safety and with other entities to ensure that we're of the same mind, and that we're working cohesively.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

That's great. Thank you.

I have one last request as a millennial. Many millennials were elected recently, and we have to fill out forms to get speakers, and we know how to do it. I always think about my father, so I'm not putting everybody else in the same boat. Minister Brison mentioned that he wants to hire more millennials as they come on board. I'm hoping that your department thinks of a strategy to ensure that millennials are well served and that perhaps they're more tech savvy.

Hon. Judy Foote:

I appreciate the comment. We are working very closely with Treasury Board through all of this, because of course we're very much partners in this enterprise. Absolutely, I'm there with Minister Brison in terms on who we need to be hiring, and to work with those who also have experience.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Did you care to cede your time to any other member?

Okay, Madam Ratansi, you have about a minute and a half.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

Minister, thank you for being here. You request a funding increase of $83 million for federal real property. You're also requesting $13.7 million in operating expenditures for the reinvestment of revenues.

First, how many real properties were been sold in the previous year, and what was the result of the sale? Second, there was an old practice of storing all our excess furniture in real estate. Is that practice still there? If we want to be efficient, that's really not good value for our real estate.

Hon. Judy Foote:

I'm going to turn to the deputy to address that in terms of the actual numbers.

Mr. George Da Pont:

We sold 21 for a total of about $10.3 million.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Okay, but my next question is, are we still using real estate to store excess furniture, which is probably useless?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I would hope not, but we certainly recognize that there are some issues in that area. There is also the issue of us having real estate and occupying buildings that are not completely full, while in the same communities we're leasing other space. One of our priorities, which touches very much on the point you raised, is to really try to maximize the use of our space. If we have half-empty buildings or buildings that are one-third empty and we're leasing elsewhere, we want to move people into those buildings, and maximize their use to reduce the costs. Similarly, if we're using space in a fashion that's not productive—and you gave us one example—then we're looking to phase that out. Space optimization is really a key priority of the real property area.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Da Pont.

We'll turn to Monsieur Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Madam Minister, welcome to the committee. It is a pleasure to have you here. I would also like to acknowledge the officials you have with you. You can count on robust and constructive opposition from our side, I hope, in the greater interest of Canadians. That is why we are all here for, after all.

Madam Minister, in your presentation, I liked your commitment to the shipbuilding strategy which, as you have recognized, is a major engine of job creation here, especially in Vancouver, Halifax and Lévis. I am also delighted that you intend to provide us with regular updates about the evolving costs and the progress of the projects. Canadians expect us to be sure that the contracts awarded by the Canadian government are completed on time because we are dealing with taxpayers' money and, of course, because we are in a competitive environment. We have been entrusted with a great responsibility.

My first question is about the shipbuilding strategy issue specifically.

After the election, I printed this passage from your election platform, your plan. You say that you want to strengthen the navy while complying with the requirements of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Of course, those are investments that will allow the navy to be operational, but that will also create jobs. Clearly, we want to create jobs in Canada.

I had the opportunity to tell you about an article about the tugboats, as they are called. It raised the possibility of having them built somewhere else. So, can you confirm this afternoon that the jobs will be created in Canada, as part of the shipbuilding strategy, as you committed to do?

(1550)

[English]

Hon. Judy Foote:

Thank you for the question.

Like you, I recognize the importance of the shipbuilding industry. We have not had a shipbuilding industry in this country for over 25 years, and we need to have one. We need to have a robust shipbuilding industry in our country. We need to respond to the needs of the navy and the Canadian Coast Guard. In having that robust shipbuilding industry, we need to involve companies throughout the country and in doing so create jobs. That's what this is about.

No decision has been made yet by the Department of National Defence with respect to the tugboats. We're very early in the planning stages for that. There was a competitive process that enabled the government of the day to come up with two centres of excellence, one in Halifax and one in Vancouver, which you already referred to. That doesn't preclude other shipyards from availing themselves of the opportunities, because there will be opportunities for smaller ships. While Halifax will be building combat ships, and Seaspan will be building non-combat ships, there will be other opportunities for companies throughout the country to avail themselves of and employ Canadians from coast to coast to coast.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Yes, and there are certainly many smaller shipyards throughout the country that have the capability to build those tugboats. My colleague, Mr. MacAulay, and I visited the designer of tugboats in Vancouver. I would argue this person is the best designer in the world. He's in Canada. We have the expertise.

Madam Minister, I was a little surprised that when it came time to hire an expert, you couldn't find any Canadians and went to hire a independent British consultant. Is there any reason why you chose not to rely on Canadian expertise in shipyards to advise you on moving forward with the strategy?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Allow me to repeat that we have not had a shipbuilding industry in this country for 20 to 25 years. We did look for a Canadian. There were Canadians who were working abroad, but in the interviews that were held, it became obvious from those who were doing the interview process that Mr. Brunton was highly qualified and came with shipbuilding experience. He's a rear admiral who is used to naval acquisitions. We wanted to get the best possible person and we did that. It was determined through all of the interviews that were held that he was the individual we should hire.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

In the mandate you have provided to this consultant, have you clearly specified that in his recommendations the ships would have to be built in Canada?

Hon. Judy Foote:

We will be looking to Mr. Brunton for advice, but clearly he knows that our goal is to build the shipbuilding industry in this country. We want to make sure that we get 100% Canadian profits for all ships that are built. He is well aware of that, just as we've indicated before. We're working closely with him, but our priority will always be to have ships built in the country.

We also have to bear in mind that we're talking about Canadian taxpayer dollars here. We want them to be spent effectively and efficiently. A number of factors come into play, but first and foremost are jobs for Canadians.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Absolutely. Regarding the taxpayer, you mentioned you would be willing to provide an update on the procurement process. When do you expect you will be able to provide this committee with the current status of the shipyard strategy either for the combat or the non-combat ships, the estimated costs, and the schedule for those ships?

(1555)

Hon. Judy Foote:

We're expecting to have our first report ready in the fall, and after that we'll be doing quarterly reports. Bear in mind that we are going down a different path in the shipbuilding strategy. We want to make sure that we get it right. We're doing consultations on an ongoing basis with industry. We will not preclude anything in how we're going to roll out the strategy, bearing in mind that we know that we already have the two centres of excellence. We know what we have committed to them to do. They're our partners in this process. We're looking at the fall for a complete report of where we are, and then we'll do quarterly reports.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Weir, you have seven minutes for questions and answers with the minister.

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

Thank you.

As the NDP critic for Public Services and Procurement Canada, it's great to have you here, Minister. I'd like to pick up on a point raised across the table about real property. A practice of the last Conservative government, and indeed the preceding Liberal government, was to sell off government buildings and then lease them back at much higher costs. I wonder whether the new government will continue that practice? Specifically, of the $32.8 million requested for increases in non-discretionary expenses associated with crown-owned buildings and leased space, how much of that is crown-owned buildings as opposed to leased space?

Hon. Judy Foote:

I'm going to ask the deputy to speak to those details.

Mr. George Da Pont:

In terms of the approach on buildings I think what you're referring to are situations when we are in buildings that are close to the end of their life and need very significant refurbishment. That's the bulk of what the real property folks deal with.

When buildings get to that situation, there's a cost-benefit analysis done, where we look at all the options: would it be better to sell the building, would it be better to invest and refurbish the entire building, would it be better to look at some public-private partnership to see if one could build a new building?

I think the approach is to look carefully at all the available options, look at which one has the best value for the taxpayer and still meets the needs of the public service, the people who will be working in those buildings.

The answer is different depending on that analysis.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Perhaps that should be the approach. I'm still wondering if there's a breakdown of that figure between crown-owned and leased buildings. The more general question is about the oft-taken approach of selling these assets for upfront cash, which might make the public finances look better, but cost taxpayers more in the long run.

Can we get some kind of commitment from the minister that this won't be the approach of this government?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Certainly it's not all about getting cash for the buildings. It's about looking at how the property will be used.

We're very conscious sometimes of the need to take a different approach and we have not ruled that out on a number of fronts within the department. We're reviewing all of the...whether it's real property, Canada lands, different entities within the department, and looking at different approaches to delivering on our mandate. Real property, of course, is one of them.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Another item in the estimates that relates to procurement is $61.8 million for a new bridge to replace the Champlain Bridge. The new government has indicated that it will remove the requirement from federal funding that infrastructure projects be conducted as public-private partnerships.

I'm wondering if you could update us on whether that has been done and whether it makes sense to push ahead with the new Champlain Bridge as a P3.

Hon. Judy Foote:

We are cognizant of a need to spend taxpayers' dollars as efficiently and as effectively as we possibly can. In looking at any new builds, we're bearing that in mind, so that as we go down the path of new builds we're looking at what the actual cost will be, what the best route to take is, and the signed contract for that particular bridge is a P3.

Mr. Erin Weir:

That's part of the reason I raised the topic.

Whether or not it's a P3, the bridge will require a large amount of steel. The Canadian steel industry is currently depressed, and I'm wondering if the new bridge will be built with Canadian-made steel, and also what type of fair wages policy if any will be applied for the workers engaged in that project?

(1600)

Hon. Judy Foote:

We're looking at optimizing the benefits for Canadians and for Canadian companies with everything we're doing. That is something we're undertaking to do as a department.

Mr. Erin Weir:

But on this specific construction project, which is a huge one, can you give any indication of whether it will be built with Canadian-made steel?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Have we funded the P3?

Mr. George Da Pont:

As the minister said, significant Canadian companies are part of the consortium that won the contract, so there will be very significant Canadian content. I would have to look into the question you raise about whether they intend to use Canadian steel because, off the top of my head, I don't have the answer to that. We'll undertake to send that afterwards.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I appreciate that.

I know your mandate letter speaks to a modernized fair wages policy, and I'm not sure exactly what that means. Will it be in effect for all the workers employed in building this new bridge?

Hon. Judy Foote:

That is the intention.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Can you tell us anything about what the policy will be?

Hon. Judy Foote:

What have we done?

Mr. George Da Pont:

In terms of the fair wages policy, under this contract and any other contract we enter into, anyone building in Canada has to comply with all federal and provincial legislation and meet all the existing requirements—

Mr. Erin Weir:

On complying with labour legislation, isn't it a fair wages policy? It used to be that if you wanted to bid on a federal construction project, you had to pay certain wage rates for different trades. The Conservatives eliminated that good policy. The new government has talked about bringing back some version of it. Will this be done?

Mr. George Da Pont:

And that's what I was explaining. At the moment that's the situation. There are no longer those provisions in contracts. I think the government is looking at the issue.

Mr. Erin Weir:

So we're not sure whether it will be applied to the new Champlain Bridge.

Hon. Judy Foote:

It may very well be, and a fair wages policy is part of the mandate letter. I guess we're not sure whether or not it's going to happen with this particular procurement, but it's certainly something that we're committed to do.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We'll go now to Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

There is a point of order. I believe it's Mr. Grewal.

The Chair:

I'm sorry.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

But I may jump in if he shares his time with me.

The Chair:

Mr. Grewal, you may concede any unused time you wish.

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Minister and your staff for coming today. We really appreciate it.

My question was going to be on the national shipbuilding procurement strategy, but my hon. colleague has had a detailed discussion on that, so I'll move on.

A lot of people in my riding, especially during the campaign, talked about Canada Post. A lot of these people work for Canada Post. A number of people were concerned about door-to-door delivery. The issue of an independent task force review of Canada Post has come up quite often in question period and in the media. Can you please update us on what's going on in that process?

Hon. Judy Foote:

We are determined to get this right and that means making sure that we find the right individuals to lead the task force. We know that there has been substantial work done in the past on Canada Post. Under the previous government, there was a five-point plan. We need to access all of the information that Canada Post has used in making its decisions. We want to have a more independent review than was done by Canada Post itself, but we also want access to information that Canada Post has gathered.

We want to hire the right individuals to make up the task force. These people will do the legwork to collect this research and determine whether or not there are other business lines that Canada Post can be engaged in. We need a consultation process with Canadians, but it would be very time-consuming for the committee to do this itself. For this reason, we'd like to have an independent task force undertake that work, co-operating with the secretariat out of the department. They would be able to provide you with all the information you need, if you think this is an appropriate exercise for the committee to undertake.

(1605)

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you, Minister.

Throughout the campaign we talked about the shortage of affordable housing. I have the privilege of sitting on the finance committee, and we just went through pre-budget consultations. A lot of organizations across the country came and spoke about the importance of affordable housing.

Your mandate letter said that you're working with the Minister of Infrastructure on an inventory of all federally owned real estate, with a view to seeing what can be converted to affordable housing. I think this is a great use of government resources. Can you please give the committee an update on that process?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Interestingly enough, I attended a session on homelessness last night. Part of the discussion was on the availability of existing federal buildings and how we could make them available, instead of selling them for the maximum dollar, as was previously done. From this government's perspective, we have to have more of a social conscience. We need to recognize that there could be other uses for that property. In fact, what I said last night at this meeting was that anyone who's aware of excess federal government property should feel free to get in touch with the department. We can look at possible uses of that property, rather than trying to sell it off. A number of departments might have property that could be made available for social housing.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you, Minister.

You mentioned today the rehabilitation of the Sir John A. Macdonald Building and the Wellington Building. The key point I noted was that they're on time and on budget, which is very important. In the spirit of accountability and transparency, I would just ask that if these things change, you let the committee know so we can update Canadians if the budget changes. I worked in finance and I know that budgets can come and go, so I would request that you please update the committee if the numbers change.

I will now cede the remainder of my time to my colleague.

Hon. Judy Foote:

If I could speak to that one point, that is certainly what we have committed to do in terms of being open and transparent with respect to procurement to take the mystery out of it and to make sure that Canadians know exactly what is happening. It's the same with members of Parliament: we want you to know where we are. We want you to know if costs go up, as well. It's one thing to be on time and on budget, which is really good, but things do happen and we want to make sure that you're aware when they do.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Mr. Whalen, you have about two minutes.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much.

Just continuing along the line of questions regarding Canada Post, I have to say that in addition to issues about housing for seniors, questions about Canada Post were probably the second most frequent ones I had during the campaign. Every street had someone who was being affected by the reductions in service. Indeed, in the dying days of the campaign, Canada Post shut down door-to-door mail delivery in a couple of ridings in the country—St. John's East, St. John's South—Mount Pearl, and Charlottetown—only days before the Prime Minister stated that this practice should cease. Indeed, many of the complaints were from people who had legitimate concerns about the location of mailboxes.

I have a couple of questions on that. First, I didn't see anything in the estimates allocating any additional funding or allotments towards the task force. Is this being done under existing estimates or will it be in the next budget?

Second, will the task force reach out to Canadians who made complaints and find out if Canada Post, in response, kept pushing forward with bad ideas or if took those complaints seriously and addressed them properly rather than simply using them as an opportunity to punish the people of my riding?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Well, if they did it in your riding, they did it in mine too.

The cost of the task force will be covered by the department, as will be the secretariat out of the department. That's why you don't see additional requests for money. We will ask the task force to look at every possible decision made by Canada Post, and whether or not they responded to the complaints they received. That's all part and parcel of doing a complete independent review of Canada Post. Again, on a go-forward basis, they will make sure that if there are outstanding issues, those issues are addressed.

One of the issues we recognize, of course, is that Canada Post is an arm's-length corporation. In its operations, it does what it does because it has to be self-sustainable, and it will continue to have to be self-sustainable. At the same time, it delivers a service to Canadians from coast to coast to coast, and we want to make sure that this service will continue to be delivered. What that service will be will depend on what Canada Post can afford, because there will not be any money forthcoming from the government, as it is an arm's-length crown corporation. At the same time, we're expecting that the task force in its independent review will look at other avenues of business that could possibly be explored that will enable Canada Post to have more revenue to carry out its responsibility to deliver mail, or whatever else it intends to do or can do with the finances available to it.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We're now going to a five-minute round, starting with Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

I'm going to give the first 30 seconds to my colleague here.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

For the record, I would just like to mention regarding the disposal of assets that the Canada Lands Company, which already exists, produces this. The goal is to work with the industry and work on a consultation-based approach in pursuing community-oriented goals, environmental stewardship, and heritage commemoration. I've worked with the Canada Lands Company for the last decade and they are very good at the disposal of land.

With that, I'll switch to Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you, sir.

I just want to follow up on my colleague's questions regarding your mandate letter. I'm probably approaching it from a different point of view. Instituting a modern fair wage policy contradicts your comment about making procurement easier for Canadian companies to do business with the government. You will end up excluding a huge number of family businesses, small businesses, and those who are working at a different competitive level.

How far down the path have you gone so far with the fair wage policy? We hear again and again: consult with Canadians, consult, consult, consult, and then we'll consult more. Are we doing this process with small businesses, non-union businesses, to discuss this fair wage policy and how it will affect procurement and a fairness process?

Hon. Judy Foote:

The fair wage policy, of course, is something that would be looked at government-wide, not just through the Department of Public Services and Procurement Canada.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

The same comments apply government-wide. Thank you.

Hon. Judy Foote:

Having said that, it's something that we haven't engaged in at this point. It would be led by another agency of government. I would expect Treasury Board would be heavily involved in this.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

But it's in your mandate letter.

Hon. Judy Foote:

I expect it's in everybody's mandate letter.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I don't see it.

Hon. Judy Foote:

It's something we've been asked to look at, and we will look at it; but again, it would be government-wide.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay.

Are you committing to consult, consult, consult as we're hearing again, again, again?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Absolutely.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Perfect.

It sounds like you're not really far down the path of that right now.

Hon. Judy Foote:

Not right now.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I think I've maybe answered Mr. Weir's question.

Getting back to the shipbuilding, we've seen in several reports that you're considering sending south the weapons packaging, some of the high-tech stuff and the real value-added stuff, the real industry-creating part of the shipbuilding industry. I realize there's money involved and we need the best value. However, a big part of the NSPS was recreating this dead industry. You've said you're not going to preclude anything. But how far down the path has government gone on looking to send this business outside the country?

Hon. Judy Foote:

It is not our intention to send business outside the country. We are looking to make sure that work being done in Canada is of a high-tech nature, as well as any other opportunities that would become available.

We do realize we have to spend Canadian taxpayers' dollars wisely, but at the same time you bear in mind the trade-off in terms of the jobs that come with this.

It's a matter of consultation with industry, and we're doing that all the time, because they are our partners in this. So while we're the only—

(1615)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I think the report said that from the tech side, they hadn't been consulted. They were taken a bit by surprise. Is that incorrect, then, maybe?

Hon. Judy Foote:

We've been consulting. I'm surprised to hear that. We've been consulting with the Canadian industry on all facets of procurement.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I have one last question, because I'm almost out of time.

With Shared Services, I realize it's been a very difficult process, Mr. Parker, but I wonder if you could very briefly update us on where we are with it. What other resources do you need to get everything working properly? We saw recently that there was a plan to put in a server station at Trenton, but no one had discussed it with DND, and they're in dispute about it. How far down the road are we to getting all these issues fixed?

In the audit report, you were short about 800 people. Is it lack of skilled people, a shortage of people, or a myriad of issues? We obviously want it to succeed.

The Chair:

We're running out of time.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Answer in three seconds.

Mr. Ron Parker:

We're in the process, Mr. Chair, of looking at all of the assumptions underpinning the transformation plan and working towards putting forward a new, revised, and updated plan in the fall of this year.

The Chair:

Thank you so much, sir.

My list has Mr. Whalen next, for five minutes.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, everyone, for coming today.

I'll pick up again on the shipbuilding strategy. Many companies throughout Atlantic Canada are very encouraged by the independent process that allowed Irving Shipbuilding to win the award of the contract, and then there was silence, nothing. It almost feels as if the industry in Atlantic Canada, and indeed the country, on the shipbuilding side has atrophied after neglect. What is your department planning to do to move this file forward so that Canadians can get the ships built and the expected services delivered?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Actually, we're very happy with what's happening with the shipyard in Halifax and Seaspan in Vancouver. They have started on their first builds, and we're very impressed with what we're seeing. They have invested the money. On Seaspan's front, they invested their own money to upgrade their facility. Halifax has also invested a considerable amount of money to upgrade the facility there.

We're very pleased with what we're seeing. We also see a real opportunity there for employment and other companies. Right now, 300 companies have benefited from the work that has already taken place both in Halifax and in Vancouver, and those are companies throughout the country.

That will be part of our update when we give our quarterly updates. It will certainly be part of our fall update. You will be able to see exactly where the money's being spent, what companies are availing of opportunities through the shipbuilding industry, how many people are being employed, and the types of contracts they are getting.

You will see it isn't just windows and doors, as was suggested, but some high-tech work as well. It's important that we take advantage of every opportunity for Canadian companies to avail of the work and offer the jobs.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

It's great to hear that this is finally moving forward.

I'll go on to the issue of cybersecurity, and I thank Mr. Drouin for opening with his comments earlier.

From the perspective of the estimates process, it seems like quite a large increase is being request on that particular line item. I realize it's extremely important. I can't tell from the way the estimates are structured how much of the line item was dedicated to cybersecurity in the larger, whatever it is, $1.5 billion, or how much of that was cybersecurity before.

What does the department expect the rate of increase to be in the costs of cybersecurity protection efforts going forward? What can Canadians expect on that front? What is the delta we're currently looking at year over year in terms of increases in the costs of protecting our network infrastructure from cyberterrorism?

Mr. Ron Parker:

Mr. Chair, I'm afraid I don't have the year-over-year growth rates in front of me, but we would be happy to get the numbers for you. In terms of cybersecurity overall, I can tell you that there have been steady increments in recent years. This underscores the importance of cybersecurity overall.

As well, the department has stood up from within the overall allocation it receives. The security operation centre provides 24/7/365 monitoring of the perimeter of the attempts to penetrate the Government of Canada network. There have been very significant efforts since the creation of Shared Services to bring this forward and advance this initiative.

(1620)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Along the same lines, having one network to protect makes it a little bit easier versus trying to protect 63, so we can see some real benefits from the strategy on that front. In terms of downtime when networks go down, there's a concern that, if the government network goes down, then it's not just one of 63 networks that has gone down; now everyone is down.

What types of efforts are being put into place, and from a budgetary perspective, how much effort are you devoting towards protecting our downtime? What sort of redundancy plans are being put in place? How much effort is going into making sure that uptime is maximized on this now-consolidated network?

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Mr. Ron Parker:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The efforts are significant. We're moving from 50 siloed separate networks to one network. In the design of the network, we're paying very close attention to the redundancy and high availability of the network. That work is just starting. At this point, the contracts have been let to work on the new network, but it has not yet tangibly begun. The planning phase is under way. Those issues are front and centre. We look to have network availability that's very high.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Parker.

Mr. Blaney, you have five minutes, please.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Foote, there was a troubling article in The Hill Times that Canada Post could be distributing material that is not complying with Canadian law—hate speech, and not really interesting attitudes toward minorities. Would you like to comment on this? Do you have any capability to ensure that Canada Post makes sure that the material it is distributing is complying with the law?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Thank you for the question.

I am aware of the situation. I too have issues with the information that's being distributed, so much so that we've asked for a legal opinion on the content, to see if there's any criminal aspect to it. I am concerned about the content.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Is there any mechanism to ensure that the material being distributed overall is in compliance with Canadian law?

Or is it more on a case-by-case basis when such a thing occurs?

Hon. Judy Foote:

That's right. That's why we've talked to Canada Post. My understanding is that the initial....

There was one instance where they had legal advice, and it wasn't an issue that would have them withdraw it. But now that there's another piece of literature that's being disseminated, there are concerns. I too have concerns with it, and we've asked for a legal opinion.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay. We certainly would like to be informed of your intention regarding this certainly regrettable course of action that has been undertaken.

Second, you mentioned that we would expect Immigration to be involved, but you mentioned that you were involved in the welcoming of Syrians. Can you explain more specifically what your involvement was, and how much was invested in that operation? Is it part of your estimates? Do you expect there will be growing costs, as there's an increasing number of Syrian refugees who will arrive? Especially in terms of training and housing, are you expecting any cost increases in that regard?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Yes. We have indicated that our request is in fact for more money to enable us to do more. Our job was actually in terms of procurement, and that was with winter jackets, housing, or anything that would be required to accommodate the refugees while they are here. We are expecting that we will need additional resources to be able to respond to more refugees coming to our country.

(1625)

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay.

My colleague has to leave, but I'd like him to be able to ask his last question before he does.

The Chair:

You have two minutes, Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Perfect. I'll ask very quickly.

You stated, and I was very pleased for the taxpayers about Canada Post, no other taxpayers' money from the government. I agree that they have to find new revenue streams to increase their service, but can we commit that they will not be moving into areas already well served by private companies, smaller companies, or using their inherent competitive advantage to drive out already operating small businesses and other private businesses?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Well, you know, there are some areas where Canada Post is already competitive with existing business. What we have to do, if we're going to deliver a service to Canadians, is find a way to do that. Again, Canada Post is a crown corporation and has to be self-sustainable. What other lines of business they'll be able to do, I don't know, but that's why we want to have a comprehensive, independent review, to see what the opportunities are.

I recognize the concern you raise in terms of competitiveness with small and medium-sized enterprises. I'm sure all of that will be factored into the review that's done.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Yes, but we would just like assurances that the big guy will not trample on small businesses that are already offering courier or other home delivery services right now.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

For the final five-minute round, we'll go to Monsieur Ayoub.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.[Translation]

Madam Minister, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for joining us today.

I need some information specifically about the process involved in requesting additional funds.

Let me give you an example. You may possibly find others if you look around. The Quebec City Armoury, on the Grande Allée, was destroyed by fire in 2008. That is eight years ago now. I see that the first funds to rebuild it, some $72 million, were approved only last year. If you take away a year, it means that it took seven years before a decision was made to rebuild the famous Quebec City Armoury. I know the building well because it is located in an area I lived in as a child.

A year later, additional funds were requested. So I am trying to find out about the budget forecasting process that led to those funds being requested. We know what the Quebec City Armoury was and what it should be. One year later, which is not very long, why is there a request for a 30% increase over the amount of $72 million? Was the planning poor to start with? Why, one year later, do you as the new minister end up with this problem on your hands? [English]

Mr. George Da Pont:

That actually does come up from time to time, particularly when you're renovating buildings that have significant historical features that have to be preserved.

Obviously, we do inspections of the buildings as part of setting the initial estimates and we often engage third-party experts to do that. It's not unusual when you actually start the work and you begin taking out things and you discover things that did not come out in the initial inspection.

It's not that different from homeowners doing their own project and once they get into it you, they find there are things that they had not anticipated doing, so we do have that happen from to time.

When that happens, if it cannot be covered in the initial budget that was set, you would look at supplementary funding to cover it. That's often the explanation.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Is it reasonable to say that from time to time it would be 30% over budget?

Mr. George Da Pont:

Well— [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

In all projects, there is always usually an amount identified as a contingency. My concern is that, a year later, there is request for an additional 30%. The project itself does not concern me because, of course, the Quebec City Armoury is a jewel that needs to be rebuilt. I do not know the details, but I am worried about the planning and about the fact that we have all this to deal with one year later.

(1630)

Mr. George Da Pont:

The last thing I would add is that sometimes work is distributed over two or three contracts. There is not one single contract for everything.[English]

In this case, this is a new contract. It's not an extension of a previous contract. It does go to finding things you didn't expect and basically having not just one contract for everything but contracts for different parts of the work. [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

I am Syrian by origin and welcoming Syrians affects me somewhat.

Last year, the Liberal party wanted to bring in a certain number of Syrians. To start with, it was 10,000 Syrians, then another 15,000 were added for a total of 25,000. An additional amount of $5.4 million was requested to deal with the intake of those Syrians.

Will that amount be used now, or is it spread over a number of years? How is that additional amount broken down? [English]

The Chair:

A very short response, Minister.

Hon. Judy Foote:

In terms of the money we require, the request would be made through the immigration department. They would identify the number of refugees and then, based on our work with them, we would determine what costs we would incur to do more of what we've already done for the 25,000 who came.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Minister, I have the time as 4:32. You indicated you had to leave at approximately 4:30, so on behalf of the committee, we thank you for your attendance, and you are excused.

Hon. Judy Foote:

Thank you. I look forward to continuing to work with the committee, particularly on the Canada Post file. If that is something the committee feels is appropriate, then I would appreciate that.

The Chair:

Thank you, again, Minister.

For the benefit of committee members, I have two quick points. We'll find this becoming more commonplace as we go down the road with committee meetings, but normally, if we have meetings for two hours and there are two separate panels coming in, after the first panel is finished their presentations, wherever we are in the speaking order, we go back to the initial rotation.

However, after consultations with Madam Ratansi, and given the fact that we have a similar panel before us, we'll continue with the ongoing rotation, which means that the next question will be to Mr. Weir, for three minutes, and then we'll go back to the seven-minute round.

However, as I mentioned at the last meeting, we also have to allow at least 10 minutes toward the end of this meeting for a series of votes on the supplementary estimates (C). At approximately 5:20 I will adjourn our hearing from the witnesses and we'll go to the votes on the various supplementary estimates (C).

Mr. Weir, for three minutes, please, questions and answers combined.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I'd like to pick up on the point from across the table about the importance of affordable housing. This past week a troubling story emerged about the Government of Saskatchewan putting some homeless people on buses to British Columbia.

I wonder if the officials could provide some information about how quickly the federal government's proposed measures for affordable housing could be put in place in our province of Saskatchewan.

Mr. George Da Pont:

The role of our department in affordable housing will be a support role, but a very significant support role.

To date, we have a full inventory of buildings and structures that the department has, which have some potential for being turned over to affordable housing. That is feeding into work being led by CMHC, which is taking the broad policy lead across government because, as the minister mentioned, other departments have potential properties and structures that could be used. That is all feeding in and they're leading the development of an approach to strengthen affordable housing possibilities.

(1635)

Mr. Erin Weir:

Might I ask how many of those properties are in Saskatchewan?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I don't have that information, but I'll turn that over to my colleague, Kevin Radford, who heads up our real property area. He may or may not have it, and if he doesn't, we'll make that available.

Mr. Kevin Radford (Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

With respect to Saskatchewan specifically, we have provided a list of all of our properties that are up for disposal. We've categorized them by criteria: are they in an urban setting; are they in a rural setting; are they commercial; are they possibly residential, etc.?

The idea is that we take 30% of the holdings that we have and provide a mechanism, or at least a catalyst for other custodians of property, like the RCMP, National Defence, etc., to follow up pro forma to move the program and at least understand our asset base much more clearly.

Within that list, there certainly are some properties in Saskatchewan, and I would need to dig into those and provide them to you.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Yes, could you come back to the committee with that information?

There are also some items here that we're going to look into, around the use of Canadian-made steel in the Champlain Bridge replacement. That would be very interesting.

The Chair:

We'll go back to a seven-minute round and we'll start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

As a former technology journalist specializing in free and open-source software, I intend to get a bit into the weeds of Shared Services, so if there are any technical staff accompanying you I'd encourage them to move up to the table and identify themselves.

First of all, of the 23,000 servers across 485 data centres the minister referred to, how many of them run on open-source software? Are we exploring a significant migration away from proprietary software models toward open-source software options as you transition toward seven data centres? For example, on the Hill, I cannot use anything but Internet Explorer because we are told that it is the only browser that meets our security standards, which anyone who has been in the industry more than a few hours knows is kind of funny.

On the server side, the various flavours of Linux make very nice replacements for the various flavours of UNIX and Windows. I want to ensure that we're considering open-source software in a serious way, as we move forward.

Mr. Ron Parker:

I'm not a technologist, I'm afraid. I'll say that right up front. I'm going to ask the technology expert, Patrice Rondeau, to take on that question.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau (Acting Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Data Centers, Shared Services Canada):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair.

Open source has been and continues to be an area that we focus our attention on when we have to expand our platform. Especially as part of the workload migration in moving from the older legacy environment to the new, we're looking at opportunities to exploit open source software.

On the data center side, we have 26,000 physical servers, but we have up to 74,000 OS instances, so we have virtual servers sitting on physical servers, and I would say that approximately 15% are running Linux.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What are the other 85% running, generally?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

The remainder, you mean?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. Are they legacy Unix systems or are we looking at Windows servers or some combination?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

We're running Windows servers for a large percentage. We're running all flavours of Unix. We have HP-UX. We have IBM AIX. We have a lot of mainframe capability also. The larger departments still rely heavily on mainframe computers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we still using 32-bit signed integers to store time anywhere in government or are we going to be vulnerable to the Y2K38?

(1640)

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

I'm sorry. I didn't hear the question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we still using 32-bit signed integers to store dates anywhere in government or are we ready for the Y2K38 bug?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

We're still using 32-bit machines, but mostly 64-bit machines, if that's what the question is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's the question.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

We still have a lot of RISC-based environments. We still run some Solaris, some HP-UX, and some IBM pSeries. What we inherited four or five years ago were all the flavours of probably every type of server and computer that existed at the time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm always surprised to hear RISC still exists, but that's another story.

I am probably the only member of Parliament to have a PGP key, and I'm definitely the only member of Parliament to be in the Debian keyring. Will government employees be encouraged to adopt PGP key signatures, trust rings, or another cryptographic authentication system?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

I cannot really respond to this question, but I can follow up and get back to the committee.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor] what is it?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

I'm looking for some translation here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's not the kind of translation they can help us with.

PGP is “Pretty Good Privacy”. It's a fairly old standard, but it allows cryptographically signed or encrypted emails. It's something that I've used in the open-source community for many years.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

It's good privacy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it's pretty good privacy, implemented to the GNU privacy guard. It's a long thing.... But it's a very reliable and very well-known system outside of government in the technology community, and I would like to see it or some kind of variant used in government. It's another level of security to have PGP signed emails with a trust ring, where I've sign your key and you've signed my key.

I'd like to at least have the government explore that, if that's possible.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

Okay. We can explore and get back to the committee.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When the response comes back, I'll translate it back for you, Mr. Blaney.

Mr. Ron Parker:

Mr. Chair, we'll come back with an explanation of what we do in terms of secure keys and that type of service, but I'll just note that Shared Services Canada does not provide services to the House of Commons.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, that's fair, but this is government-wide. This is a lot of email accounts, a lot of servers, and a lot of systems.

Are we moving the government over to full IPv6 support across the network?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

IPv6? I'm the data centre ADM at—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then we can have a nice long conversation and nobody will have a clue as to what we're talking about.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

No, no. I'm quite familiar with IPv6.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I know that you and I will.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

We have initiatives under way, mostly with our network area or our network branch. They've been implementing and looking at implementing IPv6, but I couldn't give you all the details. I would have to go back to our network branch specialists.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kind of hardware are we running mostly? Do you know?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

For network?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the network and the server side.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

On the server side, we're running all existing hardware, probably from the last 15 years, that we have in our 400 or so data centres right now, but the newer platforms are mainly blade-type servers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have about 45 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. That's a little bit.

Out of morbid curiosity, perhaps, can I ask how many domain names we own as a government? Do you have any idea?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

I couldn't respond. We have one main domain, which is “.ca”.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's CIRA. That's not us.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

Yes, it's NFS. For a specific domain names count, I would have to check with our security person. Our network experts would probably be able to give you that count.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. I look forward to doing this again sometime. It's very interesting.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

Would you like us to go back?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, I believe my time is up.

The Chair:

Perhaps if you could get that information to the committee at a later date, that would be appreciated.

Now, speaking of someone who's still trying to figure out how a fax machine works, I'll turn the conversation over to Mr. Blaney for seven minutes.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. That's not to call me a dinosaur, but I appreciate that.

My question will be on the mandate letter, on the replacement of the CF-18s, and also on the parliamentary precinct rehabilitation program.[Translation]

I would like to have asked the minister some questions about the CF-18s. We are aware of the exceptional contribution that the fighters made to the mission against the so-called Islamic State. But we know that the CF-18s are reaching the end of their life. The minister's mandate letter calls for a process to replace the CF-18s. This afternoon, we heard that we will have an update about the shipbuilding strategy in November.

Can you give us an overview of this situation and tell us what are the next steps in replacing the CF-18s, a process that is already underway, and when those steps will be taken? Can you give me any information about that this afternoon?

(1645)

[English]

Mr. George Da Pont:

Thank you for the question. As you've noted, the government has made a commitment to replace the CF-18, and to make sure, obviously, that the air force has the plane it needs to do its job.

The department is working with the Department of National Defence to design, as the government committed to, an open and transparent competition process to replace the CF-18 fighter jets. That work is under way. I think an update will come at a point when the government has made a choice on how to proceed.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay. We're certainly looking forward to that.

If I bring you into the domain of the parliamentary rehabilitation program. I was pleased to see that the projects have been accomplished on time and on delivery. I understand that eventually we will have to leave Centre Block and move to East Block. Can you tell us when this will happen?

Mr. George Da Pont:

The intent is to vacate the Centre Block in 2018 and to move people into alternate locations while, obviously, the rehabilitation work is done in the Centre Block.

I'll turn to Rob Wright, who is the assistant deputy minister in charge of our parliamentary precinct. I'm sure he can provide you a little more detail, if you'd like, on where people are being moved.

Mr. Rob Wright (Assistant Deputy Minister, Parliamentary Precinct Branch, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Absolutely. Thank you very much for the question.

The projects, as you noted, are all proceeding on time and on schedule. By 2018 a suite of five major projects will be completed, which will enable the Centre Block to be completely emptied, and for its restoration to begin.

Last year we completed the Sir John A. MacDonald facility, which provided new conference facilities for the Parliament of Canada. Within the next couple of months we will complete the Wellington Building at the corner of Wellington and Bank, which will allow MPs to be accommodated, and which is a critical part of being able to empty the Centre Block. As well, at the very end of 2017, we will complete the West Block and phase 1 of the visitor welcome centre. That will enable the chamber to be relocated from the Centre Block into the West Block, and all the legislative functions will take place in the West Block.

On the Senate side, we are rehabilitating the government conference centre, directly across from the Château Laurier. The Senate chamber and legislative functions will be relocated to the Government Conference Centre. The combination of these projects will enable the Centre Block to be completely emptied and its restoration to begin.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Following what took place and the fact that all the security services were grouped, has it had any impact on the design of the project?

Also, can you mention the visitors' centre and its impact on the parliamentary precinct and access to it, because this is certainly an issue that has generated some concern given what's been experienced.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Absolutely.

We work very closely with the new Parliamentary Protective Service, which was put in place last summer. I would note that prior to its creation, we worked very closely with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as well as the security services of the Senate and the House of Commons.

In many respects, for us there has been little change. We've continued to work with the security forces as we had before. The design and construction of all these projects have adhered to the requirements that have been laid out by the RCMP as well as the Senate and House security forces and now we're working with the Parliamentary Protective Service.

(1650)

Hon. Steven Blaney:

So the visitor centre will be located on Wellington Street and prior to accessing the precinct, you would undergo some security check?

Mr. Rob Wright:

The visitor welcome centre, phase 1, will be located in-between the West Block and the Centre Block. You may note a large excavation in that area right now. That excavation is specifically for phase 1 of the visitor welcome centre. You will enter essentially from the east into the visitor welcome centre, phase 1, which will provide security screening before entering the West Block, as well as visitor greeting services.

When the Centre Block undergoes rehabilitation, the visitor welcome centre will be expanded to connect underground with the Centre Block and the West Block. So the visitor welcome centre will be largely underground and will provide a secure screening before entering into the main Parliament Buildings.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, it would certainly be interesting to have a maybe more in-depth presentation of this important project and also the budgetary envelope.[Translation]

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much for that answer, Mr. Wright. I know all parliamentarians are going to be very interested in the progress being made as we change Hill locations, particularly of the House of Commons.

We're now have seven minutes for Mr. Weir.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I think we have an all-party consensus at this committee about the need for greater clarity on the government's shipbuilding strategy.

I'd like to take up my colleague's line of questioning about aircraft procurement.

It was said that the government has committed to finding a replacement for the CF-18. I would note that the governing party also very clearly committed during the election campaign not to purchase the F-35. Yet it was recently revealed that the Government of Canada paid $45 million to remain part of the F-35 consortium and keep open the option of purchasing that aircraft.

I wonder if, from a public service perspective, you could confirm whether or not the F-35 is actively being considered in this procurement competition.

Mr. George Da Pont:

No, all I can confirm, as I said earlier, is that we are working with the Department of National Defence to develop an open competitive process, and when the government makes a decision it will obviously announce it.

In terms of one point you raised, participation in the joint strike fighter program, I think the important point to note is participation in the program does not commit anyone to purchasing the F-35.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I certainly take the point that it's not a commitment, although it does seem strange that a government would spend that much money if it didn't have much interest in buying the aircraft.

To ask the question a different way, it doesn't sound as though the F-35 has been excluded from the process at this point.

Mr. George Da Pont:

No, I think the main consideration is that by participating in the program, it provides the mechanism whereby Canadian companies can compete for contracts and become part of the supply chain for the F-35 process, which quite a number have already done.

I think significantly more money has been provided to Canadian companies under those contracts than the government has paid to be part of the program. However, if you are not paid up as part of the program, the companies in your jurisdiction can't compete. The important point is that it's a benefit and an opportunity for Canadian companies, but there's absolutely no commitment, no requirement, to purchase the F-35.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Understood.

To shift gears a little bit, in the estimates we also have Shared Services Canada seeking some funding for increased biometric screening at the Canadian border. I wonder what the rationale for that screening would be. Is it something we feel that we have to do as part of bilateral agreements with the United States, or is there another reason?

Mr. Ron Parker:

Mr. Chair, thank you for the question.

Our participation in this initiative, which is mainly the immigration department's responsibility, is to support the IT infrastructure side of this initiative.

In terms of the broader initiative, Graham, do you want to say something about the purpose?

(1655)

Mr. Graham Barr (Director General, Strategic Policy, Planning and Reporting, Shared Services Canada):

Sure. As Mr. Parker said, it's the Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship that's leading the initiative. More broadly, it's to expand the use of biometric screening to all travellers requiring visas who are seeking entry into Canada. Our responsibility is to provide the IT hardware, the servers and the storage, etc., and the software to support that activity.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Is that a totally new initiative for Shared Services Canada, or are you engaged in some biometric screening already?

Mr. Graham Barr:

Our role is to provide the IT infrastructure for it.

Mr. Erin Weir:

[Inaudible--Editor] bought an IT infrastructure for it already, or is this a new item?

Mr. Graham Barr:

It's not new. It's incremental.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay.

I guess another thing in the estimates I was interested in was the $5 million to remediate contaminated federal government sites. I'm just looking for some information on how many sites there might be, how contaminated they might be, and what the risk might be to public health?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I'll turn the details over again to my colleague Kevin Radford, but this is part of a long-standing program to remediate many contaminated sites across the country, and they vary from very large sites with significant problems to small sites throughout the country. A lot of the information is posted on websites, as to where the sites are and what's being cleaned up.

The funding for this happens on a regular basis in tranches of two or three years, usually. That's the way the funding has been going. The sites have been rated in terms of risk, and obviously the sites with the greatest risk are addressed first.

Kevin.

Mr. Kevin Radford:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the question.

I don't have much to add. Suffice it to say that there is a list, as my colleague George has mentioned, of decontaminated sites.

I will mention, though, that these decontaminated sites are part of our optional services that we provide to other departments. If the decontaminated site is on an air force base, it's part of National Defence. It's quite probable they could come to us and ask for our expertise, or if it's a property that's owned or run by another department, it's part of that suite of services that we offer. We bill those departments for our services.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thank you.

Shared Services Canada is also seeking funding to help with the implementation of the government's response to the Syrian refugee crisis. There's no doubt that the government response to that crisis is a big initiative that has costs associated with it. I'm just wondering if you can zero in on the role that Shared Services Canada would play in that.

Mr. Ron Parker:

Mr. Chair, I'm happy to.

Our role is principally to supply the support tools necessary for the public service employees engaged in the initiative, such as mobile telephony and mobile laptops, and to help make sure the servers that support the initiative and the screening of the refugees are up and running on a very high availability basis. It's those types of services that we're providing through the funds we're requesting from Parliament in the supplementary estimates (C).

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Parker.

The final seven-minute round goes to Madame Ratansi.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for being here.

As I have been listening to your presentations and your responses, I am glad you are taking your role of due diligence and the minister's mandate very seriously and consulting so that we have the right answers.

The first thing I'd like are a few examples of how you are modernizing procurement and how are you making it simple. Everybody knows that government is a mammoth body. Sometimes they feel like it's an elephant that can't move. I come from Africa. Elephants move pretty fast, so I think they're being maligned for nothing.

Number one, could you just give me an example of how we simplify things? Then I'll ask the other questions.

Mr. George Da Pont:

I can give you several examples, and the general point you made is exactly the feedback that we've gotten from consultations with a very large number of companies, most of which are small and medium-sized companies, that do business with the Government of Canada. They've made the same point that you've made. It's complicated. It's difficult. It's more expensive than it needs to be.

We have worked with what we now call the “supplier advisory committee” and they've given us a list of quite a number of things they'd like to see as improvements to the procurement process. Some of them are under way and some of them are major initiatives that we need to tackle.

I'll give you an example. I think one of the number one things we heard was that the systems that we use when businesses go online to see what opportunities there might be, or to actually put bids in, are overly complicated. They're really archaic, they're old, and there are about 40-odd different systems that are used right now. One of our biggest initiatives is that we're looking at putting in place as quickly as we can what we call an “e-procurement package”, so we will have one system. It's off the shelf. It's proven. It's user-friendly and I think it will be one big simple improvement in companies' ability both to find opportunities and to put in bids. We've accelerated that project and we intend to have the system roll out in 2017-18.

If I go to the other end, we are looking at correcting a series of chronic administrative issues or problems. If someone puts in a bid and somehow a page gets lost—a minor administrative thing—they're rejected. We're looking at putting in place a series of those administrative fixes so that as long as it doesn't affect, obviously, the critical points and are not changing the bid in any way or affecting price or content, they can repair that.

Another significant refinement will be our initiative to simplify our contracts, which are very complicated and often out of proportion to the value of the actual expenditure. Obviously, if you're replacing the Champlain Bridge, a multi-billion dollar project, you would expect a big, complicated contract. Of course you would. But ours are overly complicated, so we're looking at an initiative to simplify our contracting and are aiming at the same rough timeframe of 2017-18 for that. So those are three specific examples.

(1700)

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

That's good. I'm sure all of us as MPs have small and medium-sized enterprises in our ridings. Do you have any idea how many small enterprises have succeeded in bidding?

I remember my days from 2004 to 2011 when I was on this committee and addressed the same problems. Has there been any solution? We have too many small businesses telling us that they cannot get government contracts. If you don't have figures in front of you, that's okay. You can supply those to us.

Mr. George Da Pont:

I actually do have figures in front of me and I think it's 80%. Eighty per cent of the contracts basically do go to small and medium-sized businesses, so they are very successful in an aggregate sense. Now that's 80% of the contracts. That's not 80% of the value of procurement. I want to make sure that this distinction is recognized.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I quite concur with you, because I do not think that the small and medium-sized enterprises have the capacity to bid on large contracts.

Mr. George Da Pont:

Yes.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

We have been talking about Canada Post and how consultation is taking place and we get people who want the service and Canada Post employees who are talking about new ways of doing business. So my next question is, have you any idea when the task force is going out there to consult and get answers?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I really can't add anything to the comments the minister has already made on Canada Post.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Okay, fair enough.

My third question is this. I see that PWGS is transferring $19.6 million and $4.4 million to the Canada Revenue Agency and the Communications Security Establishment respectively for underutilization of the rent. I can see that you have a large real property database. How do you decide which stock will go to social housing, and what are some of the challenges that you will face when you transfer stock to social housing? Are there any buildings containing asbestos? Who will be responsible for those costs when the stock is converted to social housing?

(1705)

The Chair:

Mr. Da Pont, we only have about 20 seconds.

Mr. George Da Pont:

Then I'll give you a 20-second answer. I think you've already flagged in your question that some of the significant challenges are that many of these properties might well need investments, repairs, and conversions to be suitable for social housing. That really would be the biggest challenge when the opportunities are there.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, sir.

We're down to our last two five-minute question and answer sessions. Then we'll excuse our witnesses as we go into voting on supplementary (C)s.

The first five-minute question and answer period is for Monsieur Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My question is about replacing the visitors' centre at Vimy.

The veterans have reached an agreement with what was formerly Public Works and Government Services Canada so that a new visitors' centre will be built for the 150th anniversary of Canada and the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. The present centre is run-down and completely inadequate.

I was wondering if it is possible to have an update on that.

Can you confirm that the visitors' centre at Vimy will be operational on June 9, 2017? [English]

Mr. George Da Pont:

Again, thank you for the question. Actually, I received an update on that a few weeks ago, and at that time it was on schedule.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay. Is it possible to get the pricing, because I believe there's a partner, the Vimy Foundation. Is that correct?

Mr. George Da Pont:

Again, I'll ask Kevin Radford.

Mr. Kevin Radford:

Yes, we can provide the costing data, etc. Actually, George is being modest. He asks me for an update every Monday morning on this particular project, so we provide an update and it is, so far, on schedule.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

It's on schedule. That's good to know.

You referred to the Champlain Bridge. This is a very important project, and again I believe you are on track. Can you provide us with an update as well on this very important project for the Montreal and south shore region?

Mr. George Da Pont:

The one thing I should say that I probably should have said in my initial response, which I'm sure you know, is that the overall responsibility for that project is with Transport and Infrastructure; it is not with our department. We've worked with and supported them very closely on handling all of the contracting aspects of that. For instance, in response to the question on steel, I will have to go back to them for the information, but I do know that, again, it's part of the regular updating I get, and it is on its projected schedule. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.[English]

Were you involved in the tender process for the Champlain Bridge and, if so, since it's the will of the new government not to have the toll system, is it having an impact on the mandate or the modifications of the project?

Should I ask that of you or Transport maybe?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I think the question is better asked to Transport, because it is a policy question around tolls.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay. Good.

You mentioned—and maybe this will be a more interesting question—that you were proud of this new pay system, Phoenix. It seems like I didn't notice—I still get my due—but is it working well?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I think you've answered the question. If you had noticed, I think we would be having a much more difficult discussion at this committee.

Hon. Steven Blaney: Good.

Mr. George Da Pont: I think people often say that in government you can't effectively manage big projects. I want to say that this was an enormous project of consolidating pay administration that was divided among every department and agency in government. Consolidating it into a pay centre in Miramichi and at the same time introducing a new system that automates a fair bit of the work should be significant improvements.

I think people sometimes underestimate how challenging managing projects of that size and that nature are. I'm not going to declare victory yet, but we went through the first pay period this week, and it worked very well. I'd feel a little more comfortable going through at least one or two more pay periods before I crack the champagne open, but I do want to say that I think this has been a remarkable job by the team that has worked on that in our department and in other departments. The fact that you didn't notice a difference is exactly what we were aiming for.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Good.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.

(1710)

The Chair:

Our final five-minute question-and-answer session will be led by Monsieur Drouin.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I just have one comment. Before I said that millennials were tech savvy. We're not tech savvy like Mr. Graham over here is.

I have just one more comment before I go on to questions. I want to thank Mr. Blaney for being passionate about defending shipbuilding jobs in Canada. I hope he looks to have her platform. I am reading with interest how in budget 2010 the Conservative government had announced a 25% tariff reduction to allow imports of vessels into Canada so shipowners could buy vessels abroad, thereby not protecting Canadian jobs. I hope he shares the same passion that he had back in 2010.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

We called it free trade.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

I have a question for Shared Services. This has to do with PSPC now. How is SSC managing the transition between legacy technologies and their related contracts and new technologies and their contracts? Just as one example, I know PWGSC or PSPC is managing some of the older contracts, legacy contracts like NESS.

I am asking because some companies are finding themselves in limbo. They are awaiting a new procurement vehicle. SSC wants to buy new technology, but it can't because it doesn't have the procurement vehicle. Is there a strategy you have adapted towards transition? I know we won't be talking about this in five years, because everything will be resolved, but in the meantime, is there a strategy that's being applied?

Mr. Ron Parker:

Absolutely. The procurement instruments have been developed, and as of September 1 last year, the remainder of the national standing offers moved over to Shared Services Canada. We are operating on the basis of that, taking the orders from the departments to fulfill their needs. So the instruments are there, and they're working very effectively.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Pardon my ignorance; I was in a campaign.

Mr. Blaney was mentioning the Vimy monument. He said it was on time and on budget. When exactly is it going to be completed?

Mr. Kevin Radford:

Unfortunately, I don't have that specific information with me, but it's something we can certainly provide for you. I just didn't bring the data with me. I apologize.

Mr. George Da Pont:

I can supply the actual date.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay. It's just that the 150th anniversary is coming up.

Mr. George Da Pont:

Obviously it will be in time for the 150th anniversary, but I've forgotten the specific date.

Mr. Kevin Radford:

Or there will be a new ADM of real property here the next time.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Francis Drouin:

I wanted to ask another question for the benefit of the committee. I know that SSC is working on the ETI initiative in the data centres, but what other initiatives is SSC working on as well?

Mr. Ron Parker:

Those are very large initiatives to start with. But there's also a network initiative related to consolidating the 50 siloed networks down into one network for the Government of Canada. Those three projects comprise work that is of an unprecedented scale in terms of the transformation. We also undertake many projects on behalf of the partners, our clients. Whether it's the biometrics project or other projects that are in the portfolio, we're involved in practically every initiative a department undertakes that involves IT infrastructure. There's a big suite of projects that are running for the RCMP, DND, or whichever department. There are literally hundreds of projects there.

(1715)

Mr. Francis Drouin:

I know a few years ago there were a few orders in council, and then you guys were responsible for the workplace technology initiative, and applications were still with Treasury Board. Is that still the case today, or are you guys completely responsible for everything related to IT?

The Chair:

Mr. Parker.

Mr. Ron Parker:

I couldn't hear the question.

Mr. Graham Barr:

No, Shared Services Canada is not responsible for the applications.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That takes us to the end of our five-minute round.

Gentlemen and ladies, I thank you on behalf of all committee members for your appearances here today. The information that you have provided committee members has been very helpful and informative. Thank you again for taking time out to visit us today, and we hope to be talking with you again sometime in the upcoming years.

Yes, Mr. Drouin, go ahead.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Mr. Chair, I hope the whole committee will wish the deputy minister a happy retirement, which he announced last week. You share my comments.

The Chair:

Thank you for your years of service.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Mr. George Da Pont:

Thank you very much. I will certainly miss these appearances.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

To those officials who had to deliver answers in very constrained timelines, I thank you for your economy of words.

We will wait a few moments while our witnesses depart the table. In the interim, I will advise committee members that over the break week I will be asking the clerk to send out a communiqué indicating what we will be doing at the following Thursday's meeting. If we are able to bring in a group of witnesses to deal with some of the work identified by the subcommittee on agenda, we will have a full meeting. If not, then we will have a subcommittee meeting, but it will be during that time frame, between 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m., on Thursday, March 24.

Now we have votes before us, lady and gentlemen. These are on the supplementary estimates (C).

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Where are the votes? Did I go and do something funny with my papers?

The Chair:

I will be verbally going through them and asking for either your approval or your non-approval.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Mr. Chair, which document in SharePoint should I open? I closed SharePoint by accident. Could somebody point me to the information?

The Chair:

That's fine. Basically, all I will be doing is asking you verbally, for example, shall vote 1c under Privy Council carry?

You have all seen the estimates, so you have a determination now whether you want to approve them, amend them, or negative them. We will be going through that process verbally and asking for your show of hands.

Unless anyone wants a recorded vote, I will just be asking for yeas or nays. PRIVY COUNCIL ç Vote 1c—Program expenditures..........$3,644,076

(Vote 1c agreed to) PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION ç Vote 1c—Program expenditures..........$1

(Vote 1c agreed to) PUBLIC WORKS AND GOVERNMENT SERVICES ç Vote 1c—Operating expenditures..........$72,238,881 ç Vote 5c—Capital expenditures..........$40,231,331

(Votes 1c and 5c agreed to) SHARED SERVICES CANADA ç Vote 1c—Operating expenditures..........$20,712,999 ç Vote 5c—Capital expenditures..........$12,326,933

(Votes 1c and 5c agreed to) TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT ç Vote 1c—Program expenditures..........$43,981,086 ç Vote 20c—Public service insurance..........$469,200,000

(Votes 1c and 20c agreed to)

The Chair: Finally, shall the committee request the chair to report the supplementary estimates back to the House tomorrow?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you very much.

Ladies and gentlemen, I think we've completed that. Thank you very much. I appreciate all your efforts.

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Mesdames et messieurs, bienvenue à la 6e séance du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Elle est consacrée au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) sous les rubriques Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux ainsi que Services partagés Canada.

Nous accueillons la ministre des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement, l'honorable Judy Foote.

Madame la ministre, voudriez-vous nous présenter vos adjoints? Vous pourrez ensuite nous faire votre déclaration préliminaire, en essayant de la limiter à 10 minutes.

Encore une fois, je rappelle à tous les participants, ministres, témoins et membres du Comité, que la séance est télévisée.

Madame la ministre, vous avez la parole.

L’hon. Judy Foote (ministre des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement):

Merci, monsieur le président. Quel plaisir d'être ici!

Je vais demander à mes adjoints de se présenter.

Julie.

Mme Julie Charron (dirigeante principale des finances par intérim, Direction générale des finances et de l'administration, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Merci.

Bonjour. Je suis Julie Charron, dirigeante principale des finances par intérim à Services publics et Approvisionnement.

M. George Da Pont (sous-ministre, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Bonjour. Je suis George Da Pont, sous-ministre à Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux.

M. Ron Parker (président, Services partagés Canada):

Je suis Ron Parker, président de Services partagés Canada.

Mme Manon Fillion (directrice générale et adjointe au dirigeant principal des finances, Services ministériels, Services partagés Canada):

Je suis Manon Fillion, directrice générale des finances à Services partagés Canada.

Le président:

Madame la ministre, vous avez la parole.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Merci.[Français]

Bonjour à tous les membres du Comité.[Traduction]

Je suis honorée d'être ici et d'avoir été nommée ministre des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement. Je suis impatiente d'établir avec tout le comité une relation constructive.[Français]

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invitée à venir témoigner devant votre comité.[Traduction]

Notre premier ministre a mis l'accent sur l'importance de ces comités, et je suis déterminée à traiter ce comité avec respect, vu l'important travail que vous accomplirez. Je suis impatiente de travailler avec vous tous. Votre travail sera important afin de m'aider à faire progresser les priorités établies dans la lettre de mandat que j'ai reçue du premier ministre. Je discuterai avec plaisir de ces enjeux avec vous.

Mes adjoints et moi sommes ici pour répondre à vos questions sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) et sur les rapports ministériels sur le rendement de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada ainsi que de Services partagés Canada.

Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada agit à titre de trésorier principal, de comptable et de gestionnaire immobilier du gouvernement. Organisme central d'achat du gouvernement, il achète tout, des crayons au matériel militaire. Il appuie également nos efforts visant à communiquer avec les Canadiens et les Canadiennes et à leur offrir des services dans la langue officielle de leur choix.

Services partagés Canada a été mis sur pied pour unifier le système de courriel, regrouper les centres de données ainsi qu'assurer des réseaux de télécommunications fiables et sûrs et une protection de tous les instants contre les cybermenaces. Le Ministère réalise ses activités dans 43 ministères, 50 réseaux, 485 centres de données et 23 000 serveurs, dans le but de rendre l'information plus sûre et plus accessible pour les Canadiens.

Ces deux organisations sont dévouées au service et elles déploient des efforts continus pour fonctionner de manière plus efficiente et rentable. Une grande partie de leurs travaux est réalisée en arrière-plan, mais ces activités n'en sont pas moins essentielles. Par exemple, Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a participé directement à la concrétisation de l'engagement que le gouvernement a pris pour accueillir 25 000 réfugiés syriens. Il s'est procuré des nécessités comme des manteaux d'hiver, des services de transport, de l'hébergement et de la nourriture, alors que Services partagés Canada s'est chargé d'offrir les services de technologie de l'information et le soutien opérationnel nécessaires.

Bon nombre de nos priorités clés ont été énoncées dans notre lettre de mandat, y compris la Stratégie nationale en matière de construction navale. Notre gouvernement s'affaire à renouveler la flotte de la Garde côtière canadienne et à armer la Marine royale canadienne en véritable flotte de haute mer. Les chantiers navals Seaspan, à Vancouver, et Irving Shipbuilding, à Halifax, ont investi des millions pour reconstruire leurs installations afin d'être en mesure de bâtir les navires du Canada de manière efficace. Les travaux avancent bien dans le cadre de projets d'avant-plan, c'est-à-dire le navire hauturier de sciences halieutiques, à Vancouver, et les navires de patrouille extracôtiers et de l'Arctique, à Halifax. La stratégie de construction navale est avantageuse pour le Canada. Elle crée des emplois, bâtit la capacité industrielle et renouvelle les flottes. Le Canada n'a pas construit de navires depuis une génération. C'est pourquoi nous avons récemment retenu les services d'un expert en la matière, pour nous conseiller sur tous les aspects de cette industrie.

Nous étudions aussi des manières d'assurer une planification et un établissement des coûts plus justes. Le gouvernement élabore de nouvelles méthodes d'établissement des coûts pour permettre les prévisions budgétaires plus précises. À l'avenir, nous examinerons régulièrement nos budgets et nos échéances pour nous assurer que nous ne travaillons pas en fonction de renseignements désuets sur les coûts.

Nous sommes déterminés à nous assurer que toutes nos activités sont réalisées de manière aussi transparente que possible. La population canadienne et les joueurs du secteur devraient être bien informés de nos plans, des coûts, des progrès réalisés et des défis en matière de construction navale. Par conséquent, la population canadienne, les journalistes et les parlementaires seront régulièrement informés sur l'avancement des divers travaux.

Nous sommes déterminés à réaliser aussi des progrès dans d'autres domaines. Le Programme d'innovation Construire au Canada comble les lacunes à l'étape de la précommercialisation pour les nombreuses entreprises canadiennes qui ont des technologies et des produits nouveaux et innovants à vendre. Nous améliorerons l'administration du Programme, pour que les jumelages entre les entreprises innovantes et les ministères effectuant les essais se fassent plus rapidement.

Les fonctionnaires et moi-même travaillons en partenariat avec les fournisseurs et les principaux joueurs du secteur pour faciliter, pour les entreprises canadiennes, la façon de faire affaire avec le gouvernement. Nous sommes déterminés à simplifier et à mieux gérer les approvisionnements gouvernementaux ainsi qu'à nous concentrer sur des pratiques telles que les approvisionnements écologiques et sociaux, qui appuient les objectifs de la politique économique de notre gouvernement.

Les améliorations sont aussi à la base des travaux réalisés à Services partagés Canada, où la modernisation de l'infrastructure de technologie de l'information du gouvernement est essentielle à l'offre numérique de renseignements et de services auxquels la population canadienne s'attend. En tout, 60 centres de données ont été regroupés dans trois centres de données d'entreprise, ce qui permet de réduire les coûts, d'accroître la sécurité des données et d'améliorer le service offert aux organisations partenaires et clientes.

(1535)



Services partagés Canada joue un rôle primordial dans la protection de notre infrastructure cybernétique nationale et des données de la population canadienne qui sont hébergées dans tous les réseaux fédéraux. La sécurité a été accrue, grâce à un nouveau centre des opérations de sécurité, qui, en permanence, surveille les incidents liés à la cybersécurité et y répond rapidement, ce qui réduit le nombre d'incidents informatiques critiques et le temps requis pour les résoudre.

Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada ainsi que Services partagés Canada participent tous les deux à l'amélioration des approvisionnements. Leurs efforts permettent d'accélérer le processus visant à informer l'industrie lorsque des appels d'offres sont diffusés. Ainsi, les soumissionnaires ont plus de temps pour proposer des solutions innovantes, adaptées aux besoins du gouvernement.

La transformation du système de paie, inefficace et vieux de 40 ans, du gouvernement du Canada constitue un autre exemple d'innovation, de modernisation et d'orientation vers l'avenir des opérations gouvernementales.

Le nouveau système Phénix a été mis en oeuvre il y a à peine deux semaines, le 24 février, et le premier cycle de paie a été un succès. Jusqu'ici, le système est utilisé pour 34 ministères, soit 120 000 employés. Les 67 autres ministères s'ajouteront bientôt.

Le Ministère réalise également des progrès en matière de gestion immobilière, de conception et de construction écologiques. Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a été reconnu pour son travail novateur et de grande qualité dans la planification de projets d'infrastructures, son expertise en matière de conception, de construction et de conservation du patrimoine et d'autres services qu'il fournit aux clients.

Le pont des Allumettes, qui relie l'Ontario et le Québec, près de Pembroke, en Ontario, s'est vu attribuer le Prix d'excellence 2015 de la construction en acier par l'Institut canadien de la construction en acier. Le Plan directeur pour le pré Tunney a reçu le prix pour les pratiques exemplaires - planification détaillée et un prix national d'excellence en urbanisme. L'édifice James-Michael-Flaherty, du 90, rue Elgin, s'est vu accorder un prix d'excellence dans le cadre du Prix de l'esthétique urbaine d'Ottawa, remis par la ville d'Ottawa.

Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada est également un chef de file mondial en matière d'impartition de services de gestion immobilière au secteur privé. Cette approche a permis d'économiser 700 millions de dollars aux contribuables canadiens au cours des deux dernières décennies. Le Ministère a également été l'une des premières organisations au Canada à s'engager à obtenir la certification Or de la Norme Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, ou LEED, pour ses nouveaux immeubles. Les grands travaux de rénovation doivent obtenir la certification Argent.

Au cours des dernières années, neuf des dix nouveaux immeubles construits pour le gouvernement dans l'ensemble du Canada ont obtenu la certification LEED Or. Le dixième, au 30 de la rue Victoria, à Gatineau, en face d'Ottawa, a reçu la certification Platine, la plus élevée possible. Ces réalisations mettent en lumière notre engagement envers les immeubles écologiques et écoénergétiques.

Des travaux de construction dirigés par le Ministère sont réalisés dans l'ensemble du pays et génèrent d'importants emplois pour la population canadienne. Au cours des deux prochaines années, nous prévoyons de grands travaux de réparation, notamment de la cale sèche d'Esquimalt , en Colombie-Britannique, et du pont Alexandra, entre Ottawa et Gatineau, à quelques rues d'ici. De plus, un nouveau centre de paie du gouvernement du Canada est en construction, à Miramichi, au Nouveau-Brunswick, dans le cadre d'un contrat de location.

Des parties de la Colline du Parlement et des environs sont également visées par d'importants travaux de rénovation. La réhabilitation de l'édifice Sir-John-A.-Macdonald est maintenant terminée et la revitalisation de l'édifice Wellington est presque terminée. Les travaux se poursuivent dans le cadre d'un important projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice de l'Ouest, entre autres. Les membres du Comité seront heureux de savoir que chacun de ces projets respecte les délais et le budget.

Dans le cadre mon mandat, on m'a également demandé d'entreprendre un examen de Postes Canada pour veiller à ce que la population canadienne reçoive des services postaux de qualité, à prix raisonnable. Cet examen indépendant vise à étudier toutes les options viables et à offrir à la population canadienne l'occasion d'avoir son mot à dire sur l'avenir de Postes Canada.

J'espère que votre comité jouera un rôle important dans la consultation prochaine du public canadien, qui commencera dès qu'un groupe de travail, que nous créerons, aura terminé sa mission. Il s'agit d'une tâche importante, et nous prenons les mesures nécessaires pour établir le bon processus.

Parlons maintenant du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2015-2016. Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada sollicite un financement net d'un peu plus de 83 millions de dollars, ce qui fera passer son financement approuvé à 3,22 milliards.

Ce financement demandé est requis principalement pour la gestion de biens immobiliers fédéraux, la reconstruction du manège militaire de la Grande Allée, à Québec, la poursuite des travaux de réhabilitation de la Cité parlementaire et les frais engagés afin de permettre aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes de faire affaire avec le gouvernement au moyen de cartes de crédit et de débit.

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2015-2016 pour Services partagés Canada représente une augmentation d'un peu plus de 54 millions, ce qui fait passer son financement à 1,58 milliard. Le financement demandé est principalement requis pour améliorer la sécurité des réseaux et des systèmes informatiques du gouvernement du Canada, appuyer la réponse du gouvernement du Canada à la crise des réfugiés syriens et compenser les coûts supplémentaires de la prestation de services de technologies de l'information de base aux ministères et organismes clients.

(1540)



Bien que nous ayons fait de grands progrès à plusieurs égards, nous avons encore beaucoup de travail à accomplir. Les deux ministères chercheront les possibilités d'améliorer la réalisation des programmes et la prestation des services afin d'offrir de meilleurs résultats à la population canadienne au moyen d'une saine gestion. Dans l'ensemble, les clés du succès sont l'innovation, la refonte des processus et des changements inspirés par le gros bon sens. Je suis persuadée que notre fonction publique est capable d'adhérer à ces trois principes. J'ai déjà rencontré des centaines d'employés dévoués, enthousiastes et hautement qualifiés de ces ministères dans de si nombreuses collectivités, et j'ai l'intention de continuer. Je sais que nous pouvons collaborer pour répondre aux attentes de la population canadienne.

Merci, monsieur le président. Je serai heureuse de répondre aux questions du comité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Si j'ai bien compris, vous restez avec nous encore une heure.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Effectivement.

Le président:

Eh bien, à 16 h 30, nous interromprons la séance pour vous laisser aller à vos autres tâches ministérielles.

Chaque intervenant a droit à sept minutes. Le premier est M. Drouin.

M. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie la ministre et ses adjoints d'être ici. Je vous suis vraiment reconnaissant du temps que vous nous accordez pour vous questionner.

Avant d'en venir bientôt au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, je tiens à vous poser une question sur votre lettre de mandat. On vous a chargée de moderniser les achats et d'ouvrir davantage le processus aux PME. Je viens d'Ottawa et de la région de la capitale nationale et je représente beaucoup de PME. Les achats et la clientèle du gouvernement sont importants pour elles.

Comment se fera la modernisation, sous votre houlette, pour que les PME puissent en retirer quelque chose?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous avons déjà commencé par un vaste processus de consultations auprès des PME et de l'industrie en général. Nous rencontrons régulièrement un groupe consultatif de fournisseurs. Il est vraiment important de les amener à découvrir les obstacles qui ont entravé les PME et les ont empêchées de profiter des occasions offertes par l'État.

Nous nous assurons de bien prendre le temps d'atteindre tous les industriels, d'obtenir leur avis et d'en tirer les leçons nécessaires à une plus grande efficacité de notre part. C'est ce que nous avons fait dans tout le ministère, encore une fois pour nous concentrer non seulement sur les PME, mais sur l'ensemble de l'industrie. L'État est une grosse entreprise au pays, et nous voulons que chacun puisse en profiter, en raison des emplois qui en découlent et des occasions offertes aux entreprises.

M. Francis Drouin:

Excellent. Merci.

En ce qui concerne Services partagés Canada, j'éprouve des difficultés.

D'abord, je crois fermement en ses objectifs. Dans le budget supplémentaire des dépenses, vous demandez 54 millions pour la cybersécurité. Quelles mesures prend-il pour s'assurer que sa stratégie de cybersécurité convient? Je me souviens du problème de la faille Heartbleed, il y a quelques années, puis du problème survenu au Conseil national de recherches Canada. Que fait Services partagés pour en éviter la répétition?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Comme vous le savez, nous avons entrepris une tâche difficile, avec un système à l'échelle de l'organisation. Il est juste de dire que notre projet est probablement le plus ambitieux au pays, la mise en place d'une solution applicable à l'ensemble de l'organisation.

Nous devons d'abord localiser puis résoudre les problèmes qui sont survenus. C'est ce que nous faisons. Les fonctionnaires de Services partagés ont décidé de faire une pause, d'évaluer le travail réalisé jusqu'ici, puis, dorénavant, de trouver des moyens pour éviter de répéter les erreurs du passé. Nous connaissons très bien nos responsabilités en matière de cybersécurité, en ce qui concerne une collaboration étroite avec Sécurité publique, avec nos homologues dans toute l'administration fédérale, pour tout faire pour assurer la sécurité de notre pays et des Canadiens.

M. Francis Drouin:

Excellent. Merci.

J'ai encore une question sur Services partagés. Est-ce que la fusion des centres de données facilite la protection contre les cybermenaces? À part les économies, est-ce qu'elle aide à prévenir les cybermenaces?

(1545)

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Bien sûr. Il est important pour nous d'avoir le moins de terrain à couvrir pour savoir que nous sommes sur la bonne piste et que nous avons prévu les types de services qui permettront de réagir vite. Plus on est nombreux, plus c'est difficile. C'est vraiment un gros changement que de collaborer étroitement avec Sécurité publique et d'autres entités pour faire corps avec eux, être à l'unisson.

M. Francis Drouin:

Excellent. Merci.

Je fais partie de la génération Y et j'ai une dernière demande à formuler. Beaucoup de nouveaux élus appartiennent à cette génération, et nous devons remplir des formulaires pour obtenir des haut-parleurs, et nous savons comment faire. Je pense toujours à mon père. Je ne mets donc pas tout le monde dans la même galère. Leministre Brison a manifesté son intention d'embaucher plus de personnes de cette génération, à mesure qu'il en arrivera. J'espère que votre ministère songe à une stratégie pour bien les accueillir. Peut-être qu'ils sont mieux calés en technologie.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Je vous suis reconnaissante de vos observations. Nous collaborons étroitement avec le Conseil du Trésor, pour tous ces détails, parce que, bien sûr, nous sommes vraiment des partenaires dans cette entreprise. Je suis en communication avec le ministre Brison sur le genre d'employés que nous avons besoin d'embaucher et en ce qui concerne le travail avec ceux qui ont aussi de l'expérience.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Avez-vous prévu de céder une partie de votre temps à un collègue?

D'accord. Madame Ratansi, vous disposez d'une minute et demie.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Je vous remercie de votre présence, madame la ministre. Vous demandez une augmentation de 83 millions de dollars pour les biens immobiliers fédéraux. Vous demandez également 13,7 millions de dollars au titre des dépenses de fonctionnement aux fins d'un réinvestissement des revenus.

Premièrement, combien de biens immobiliers ont-ils été vendus au cours de la dernière année, et combien ces ventes ont-elles rapporté? Deuxièmement, le gouvernement avait l'habitude d'utiliser des biens immobiliers pour entreposer l'ensemble du mobilier inutilisé. Est-ce toujours le cas? Si nous voulons être efficaces, cette utilisation de nos biens immobiliers n'est pas judicieuse.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Je vais demander au sous-ministre de répondre à cette question en vous donnant les chiffres exacts.

M. George Da Pont:

Nous avons vendu 21 biens immobiliers; ce qui nous a rapporté environ 10,3 millions de dollars.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'accord, mais j'ai aussi demandé si nous continuons d'utiliser des biens immobiliers pour entreposer du mobilier, qui est probablement inutile?

M. George Da Pont:

J'espère que non, mais nous sommes certes conscients qu'il y a des problèmes à cet égard. Un autre problème est que, dans une même localité, nous possédons et nous occupons des immeubles qui ne sont pas entièrement occupés alors que nous louons des locaux dans d'autres immeubles. L'une de nos priorités, qui est étroitement liée au point que vous avez soulevé, est d'essayer de maximiser l'utilisation des locaux. Si nous possédons des immeubles où la moitié ou le tiers des locaux sont vides et que nous louons des locaux ailleurs, il faut alors amener des gens dans ces immeubles de façon à maximiser leur utilisation pour réduire les coûts. De même, si notre utilisation des locaux n'est pas efficace — vous nous en avez donné un exemple — alors nous allons remédier à ce problème. L'optimisation de l'espace est véritablement une priorité dans le domaine de la gestion des biens immobiliers.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur Da Pont.

La parole est maintenant à M. Blaney. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vous souhaite la bienvenue au Comité. C'est un plaisir de vous recevoir ici. Je tiens également à saluer les fonctionnaires qui vous accompagnent. Vous pouvez compter sur une opposition constructive et robuste de notre part, je l'espère, dans l'intérêt supérieur des Canadiens. Nous sommes d'ailleurs tous ensemble ici pour cette raison.

Madame la ministre, dans votre présentation, j'ai aimé votre engagement envers la stratégie navale qui, vous l'avez reconnu, est un important moteur de création d'emplois ici, notamment à Vancouver, à Halifax et aussi à Lévis. Également, je me réjouis que vous ayez l'intention de nous fournir des mises à jour régulières de l'évolution des coûts et de l'avancement des projets. Les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que nous nous assurions que les contrats donnés par le gouvernement canadien sont faits dans les délais prévus, puisqu'il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables et que, bien sûr, nous sommes dans un environnement compétitif. C'est une responsabilité importante qui nous est confiée.

Ma première question porte précisément sur cet enjeu de la stratégie navale.

Après l'élection, j'ai imprimé cet extrait de votre plateforme électorale, de votre plan. Vous dites que vous souhaitez renforcer la marine tout en respectant les exigences de la Stratégie nationale d'approvisionnement en matière de construction navale. Ce sont bien sûr des investissements qui vont permettre à la marine de fonctionner, mais également de créer des emplois. Évidemment, nous voulons créer des emplois ici, au Canada.

J'avais eu l'occasion de vous faire part d'un article concernant les navires d'escorte, les tugboats comme on les appelle. On y évoquait la possibilité de les faire construire à l'extérieur. Alors, cet après-midi, pouvez-vous nous confirmer que les emplois seront créés au Canada, dans le cadre de la stratégie navale, conformément à votre engagement?

(1550)

[Traduction]

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Je vous remercie pour votre question.

Comme vous, je reconnais l'importance de l'industrie de la construction navale. Cette industrie bat de l'aile au pays depuis plus de 25 ans, alors il faut faire quelque chose. Nous avons besoin d'une solide industrie de la construction navale au Canada. Nous devons répondre aux besoins de la marine et de la Garde côtière. Pour bâtir une solide industrie, nous devons faire participer des entreprises de partout au pays, ce qui permettra de créer des emplois. C'est véritablement ce qu'il faut faire.

Le ministère de la Défense nationale n'a encore pris aucune décision en ce qui concerne les remorqueurs. Nous en sommes au tout début de la planification. Un processus concurrentiel a permis au gouvernement de l'époque de mettre sur pied deux centres d'excellence, un à Halifax et l'autre à Vancouver, comme vous l'avez mentionné. Cela n'empêche pas d'autres chantiers navals de profiter des occasions qui s'offriront, car il y en aura pour la construction de plus petits navires. Même si des bâtiments de combat seront construits à Halifax et que l'entreprise Seaspan construira des navires non destinés au combat, des occasions s'offriront à des compagnies de partout au Canada, qui pourront embaucher des Canadiens d'un bout à l'autre du pays.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Oui, et il existe certainement de nombreux chantiers navals de plus petite taille qui sont en mesure de construire ces remorqueurs. Mon collègue, M. MacAulay, et moi-même avons rencontré le concepteur des remorqueurs à Vancouver. Je dirais qu'il s'agit du meilleur concepteur au monde. Il habite au Canada. Nous avons de l'expertise au pays.

Madame la ministre, j'ai été un peu étonné de constater que, lorsqu'est venu le temps d'embaucher un expert, vous n'avez pu trouver aucun Canadien et vous avez engagé un consultant britannique indépendant. Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle vous n'avez pas choisi un expert canadien en matière de chantiers navals pour vous conseiller en ce qui a trait à la stratégie?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Permettez-moi de répéter que l'industrie de la construction navale au Canada bat de l'aile depuis les 20 à 25 dernières années. Nous avons essayé de choisir un Canadien. Il y avait des Canadiens qui travaillaient à l'étranger, mais lors des entrevues, il est apparu évident que M.  Brunton était très compétent et qu'il possédait de l'expérience dans le domaine. Il est un contre-amiral qui connaît bien le domaine des acquisitions de fournitures navales. Nous voulions choisir le meilleur candidat possible et c'est ce que nous avons fait. Parmi toutes les personnes que nous avons rencontrées, nous avons déterminé que M. Brunton était la personne que nous devions embaucher.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Dans le mandat que vous lui avez remis, avez-vous clairement précisé que les navires devront être construits au Canada?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous allons demander conseil à M. Brunton, qui sait très bien que notre objectif est de favoriser la croissance de l'industrie canadienne de la construction navale. Nous voulons nous assurer que le Canada profite pleinement de la construction de chaque navire. Il le sait très bien, comme nous l'avons déjà mentionné. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec lui, mais notre priorité sera toujours de nous assurer que les navires seront construits au pays.

Nous devons aussi garder en tête qu'il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables canadiens. Nous voulons que cet argent soit dépensé à bon escient. Un certain nombre de facteurs entrent en jeu, mais d'abord et avant tout, nous voulons créer des emplois pour les Canadiens.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Tout à fait. S'agissant des contribuables, vous avez mentionné que vous seriez disposés à faire le point sur le processus d'acquisition. Quand pensez-vous être en mesure de faire le point à l'intention du comité sur la stratégie en matière de construction navale en ce qui concerne les bâtiments de combat ou les navires non destinés au combat, les coûts estimés et l'échéancier prévu pour la construction de ces navires?

(1555)

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous prévoyons diffuser notre premier rapport à l'automne, et par la suite, nous publierons des rapports trimestriels. Il faut garder en tête que nous prenons une orientation différente dans le cadre de la stratégie en matière de construction navale. Nous ne voulons pas faire fausse route. Nous menons régulièrement des consultations auprès de l'industrie. Nous ne voulons rien exclure en ce qui concerne les modalités de mise en oeuvre de la stratégie. Nous savons que nous avons déjà deux centres d'excellence et que nous avons pris des engagements envers eux. Ils sont nos partenaires dans ce processus. Nous nous attendons à diffuser à l'automne un rapport complet sur l'état d'avancement, et ensuite nous publierons des rapports trimestriels.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Monsieur Weir, vous disposez de sept minutes pour poser vos questions à la ministre.

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Je vous remercie.

En tant que porte-parole du NPD en matière de services publics et d'approvisionnement, je suis ravi que vous soyez parmi nous, madame la ministre. J'aimerais revenir sur un point soulevé par un député d'en face au sujet des biens immobiliers. Le gouvernement conservateur précédent et le gouvernement libéral avant lui avaient l'habitude de vendre des immeubles appartenant à l'État pour ensuite les louer à un coût beaucoup plus élevé. Je me demande si le nouveau gouvernement continuera à faire de même? Précisément, j'aimerais savoir quelle proportion des 32,8 millions de dollars demandés au titre des dépenses non discrétionnaires liées aux immeubles appartenant à l'État et à des locaux loués sera affectée aux immeubles de l'État par rapport aux espaces loués?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Je vais demander au sous-ministre de répondre à cette question.

M. George Da Pont:

En ce qui concerne les immeubles, je crois que vous voulez parler des immeubles qui sont pratiquement désuets et qui nécessitent d'importantes rénovations. C'est surtout ce à quoi sont confrontées les personnes qui gèrent les biens immobiliers.

Dans le cas des immeubles désuets, une analyse de rentabilité est effectuée, dans le cadre de laquelle nous examinons toutes les options: vendre l'immeuble, investir pour rénover l'immeuble ou envisager un partenariat public-privé pour la construction d'un nouvel immeuble.

Je crois qu'il faut examiner soigneusement toutes les options pour évaluer laquelle est la plus profitable pour le contribuable et répond le mieux aux besoins de la fonction publique, car ce sont les fonctionnaires qui travailleront dans ces immeubles.

La réponse diffère selon le résultat de l'analyse.

M. Erin Weir:

C'est sans doute l'approche à adopter. Je me demande encore quelle proportion de cette somme est consacrée aux immeubles appartenant à l'État par rapport aux locaux loués. La question plus générale concerne l'approche qui a été souvent adoptée, c'est-à-dire vendre les immeubles pour obtenir de l'argent comptant, ce qui paraît bien sur le plan des finances publiques, mais qui, à long terme, coûte plus cher aux contribuables.

La ministre peut-elle s'engager à ne pas adopter cette approche?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Il est certain que l'idée n'est pas seulement d'obtenir de l'argent comptant en vendant des immeubles. Il faut examiner l'usage qu'on fera des immeubles.

Nous sommes très conscients qu'il faut parfois adopter une approche différente et nous en tenons compte dans plusieurs domaines au sein du ministère. Nous examinons toutes... qu'il s'agisse des biens immobiliers, des terres du Canada, des différentes entités au sein du ministère, nous examinons différentes façons de nous acquitter de notre mandat. C'est ce que nous faisons bien entendu dans le domaine des biens immobiliers.

M. Erin Weir:

La somme de 61,8 millions de dollars pour un nouveau pont Champlain constitue un autre poste budgétaire lié aux acquisitions. Le nouveau gouvernement a fait savoir qu'il supprimera l'obligation d'avoir recours à un partenariat public-privé dans le cadre de projets d'infrastructure.

Pouvez-vous nous dire si cela a été fait et s'il est logique d'aller de l'avant avec la construction du nouveau pont Champlain dans le cadre d'un PPP.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous sommes conscients de la nécessité de dépenser l'argent des contribuables aussi efficacement que possible. Dans le cas de nouveaux ouvrages, nous gardons cela en tête tout en examinant le coût réel et la meilleure option. Dans le cas du pont Champlain, on a conclu un PPP.

M. Erin Weir:

C'est pourquoi j'ai soulevé ce sujet.

Qu'il s'agisse ou non d'un PPP, la construction du pont nécessitera l'utilisation d'une grande quantité d'acier. L'industrie sidérurgique canadienne traverse une période difficile, alors je me demande si le nouveau pont sera construit avec de l'acier produit au Canada, et j'aimerais aussi savoir quel type de politique de rémunération équitable, le cas échéant, s'appliquera aux travailleurs qui participeront au projet.

(1600)

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous veillons à ce que les Canadiens et les entreprises canadiennes profitent le plus possible de chaque projet. C'est ce que nous cherchons à faire au ministère.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord, mais dans le cas de ce projet de construction en particulier, qui est un projet de grande envergure, pouvez-vous nous dire si on utilisera de l'acier produit au Canada?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Avons-nous établi le financement du PPP?

M. George Da Pont:

Comme la ministre l'a dit, un grand nombre d'entreprises canadiennes font partie du consortium qui a obtenu le contrat, alors il est certain que le contenu canadien sera très important. Je vais devoir m'informer pour répondre à votre question concernant l'utilisation d'acier produit au Canada, car je n'ai pas cette information. Nous allons faire en sorte de vous fournir cette réponse ultérieurement.

M. Erin Weir:

Je comprends.

Je sais que votre lettre de mandat fait mention d'une politique moderne de rémunération équitable, mais je ne sais pas exactement ce que cela signifie. Est-ce qu'elle s'appliquera à tous les travailleurs embauchés pour la construction de ce nouveau pont?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

C'est ce qui est prévu.

M. Erin Weir:

Pouvez-vous nous parler de cette politique?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Qu'avons-nous fait?

M. George Da Pont:

En vertu de la politique de rémunération équitable, que ce soit pour ce contrat ou n'importe quel autre contrat, toute entreprise qui entreprend des travaux de construction au Canada doit respecter la législation fédérale et provinciale et toutes les exigences en vigueur...

M. Erin Weir:

Lorsqu'on respecte la législation du travail, ne doit-on pas appliquer une politique de rémunération équitable? Auparavant, lorsqu'on voulait soumissionner pour un projet de construction fédéral, on devait respecter certains taux de rémunération pour différents métiers. Les conservateurs ont aboli cette bonne politique. Le nouveau gouvernement a parlé de mettre en place une certaine version de cette politique. Est-ce qu'il le fera?

M. George Da Pont:

C'est ce que j'ai expliqué. Actuellement, les contrats ne contiennent plus ce genre de dispositions. Je crois que le gouvernement se penche là-dessus.

M. Erin Weir:

Alors nous ne savons pas si la politique sera appliquée dans le cadre de la construction du nouveau pont Champlain.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Elle pourrait très bien l'être. La lettre de mandat fait état d'une politique de rémunération équitable. Nous ne savons pas exactement si elle sera appliquée dans le cadre de ce projet en particulier, mais je peux vous dire que nous sommes résolus à la mettre en application.

M. Erin Weir:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

La parole est maintenant à M. Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

J'invoque le Règlement. Je crois que c'est au tour de M. Grewal.

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je peux prendre la parole ensuite s'il accepte de partager son temps de parole avec moi.

Le président:

Monsieur Grewal, vous pouvez céder une partie de votre temps de parole.

M. Raj Grewal (Brampton-Est, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je remercie la ministre et les fonctionnaires d'être venus aujourd'hui. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants.

Ma question devait porter sur la stratégie nationale d'approvisionnement en matière de construction navale, mais mon collègue en a discuté en détail, alors je vais passer à un autre sujet.

Bien des gens dans ma circonscription, particulièrement durant la campagne, ont parlé de Postes Canada. Un bon nombre d'entre eux travaillent pour Postes Canada. Beaucoup de personnes sont préoccupées par la livraison du courrier à domicile. La question d'un examen de Postes Canada par un groupe de travail indépendant est revenue souvent sur le tapis durant la période des questions et dans les médias. Pouvez-vous nous dire où nous en sommes dans ce processus?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous sommes déterminés à bien faire les choses, ce qui signifie que nous devons trouver les bonnes personnes pour former ce groupe de travail. Je sais que bien des choses ont été faites en ce qui concerne Postes Canada. Sous le gouvernement précédent, un plan en cinq points a été mis en oeuvre. Nous devons obtenir toute l'information que Postes Canada a utilisée pour prendre ses décisions. Nous voulons un examen plus indépendant que celui qui a été effectué par Postes Canada, mais nous voulons aussi obtenir l'information que cette société a rassemblée.

Nous voulons embaucher les bonnes personnes pour composer le groupe de travail. Ces personnes s'occuperont de recueillir cette information et de déterminer s'il y a d'autres secteurs d'activités auxquels Postes Canada pourrait s'intéresser. Nous devons entreprendre des consultations auprès des Canadiens mais le comité ne peut s'en charger seul, car ce processus lui prendrait beaucoup de temps. C'est pour cette raison que nous aimerions confier cette tâche à un groupe de travail indépendant. Il pourrait vous fournir toute l'information dont vous avez besoin, si vous estimez que le comité devrait se pencher là-dessus.

(1605)

M. Raj Grewal:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Tout au long de la campagne, nous avons parlé de la pénurie de logements abordables. J'ai le privilège de siéger au Comité des finances, qui vient de procéder à des consultations prébudgétaires. Un grand nombre d'organismes de partout au pays sont venus nous parler de l'importance des logements abordables.

Dans votre lettre de mandat, on mentionne que vous collaborez avec le ministre de l'Infrastructure pour dresser l'inventaire de tous les biens immobiliers appartenant au gouvernement fédéral dans le but de voir lesquels peuvent être convertis en logements abordables. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une excellente utilisation des ressources gouvernementales. Pouvez-vous dire au Comité où vous en êtes rendus dans ce processus?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Justement, j'ai assisté hier soir à une séance sur l'itinérance. On a discuté notamment de la possibilité de mettre à la disposition de la collectivité des immeubles fédéraux plutôt que de les vendre pour en retirer le plus d'argent possible, comme c'était le cas auparavant. Notre gouvernement est d'avis qu'il faut avoir une plus grande conscience sociale. Nous devons penser qu'il peut y avoir d'autres utilisations pour les biens immobiliers. En effet, j'ai dit hier soir lors de la réunion que quiconque constate qu'un bien immobilier fédéral est excédentaire ne devrait pas hésiter à communiquer avec le ministère. Nous pouvons envisager d'autres utilisations possibles plutôt que d'essayer de le vendre. Un certain nombre de ministères possèdent peut-être des immeubles qui pourraient être convertis en logements sociaux.

M. Raj Grewal:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Vous avez parlé aujourd'hui de la réfection de l'édifice Sir John A. Macdonald et de l'édifice Wellington. J'ai remarqué que ces projets de réfection respectent l'échéancier et le budget, ce qui est très important. Par souci de responsabilité et de transparence, je vous demanderais d'aviser le Comité de tout changement concernant le budget pour que nous puissions en informer les Canadiens. J'ai travaillé dans le domaine des finances et je sais que les budgets sont souvent touchés, alors je vous demande de bien vouloir informer le Comité s'il y a des changements à cet égard.

Je vais maintenant céder le reste de mon temps de parole à mon collègue.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Si je peux me permettre, j'aimerais dire, au sujet de ce dernier point, que nous nous sommes engagés à être ouverts et transparents en ce qui concerne les processus d'acquisition afin que les Canadiens sachent exactement ce qui se passe. Il en va de même avec les députés: nous voulons que vous sachiez où nous en sommes. Si les coûts augmentent, nous voulons que vous soyez au courant. Il est très bien de respecter l'échéancier et le budget, mais des changements peuvent survenir et nous voulons nous assurer que vous en soyez informés.

M. Raj Grewal:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Le président:

Monsieur Whalen, vous avez deux minutes.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Pour continuer dans la même veine au sujet de Postes Canada, je dois dire que, mis à part les logements pour les aînés, Postes Canada est probablement le deuxième sujet dont on m'a le plus souvent parlé durant la campagne. Dans chacune des rues, quelqu'un était touché par les réductions de service. En effet, vers la fin de la campagne, Postes Canada a mis fin à la livraison du courrier à domicile dans quelques circonscriptions du pays — St. John's-Est, St. John's-Sud-Mount Pearl et Charlottetown — quelques jours à peine avant que le premier ministre déclare que cette initiative devrait être abandonnée. Un grand nombre des plaintes étaient formulées par des gens qui s'inquiétaient à juste titre de l'endroit où se trouvaient les boîtes aux lettres.

J'ai quelques questions à vous poser à ce sujet. Premièrement, je n'ai vu dans le budget aucun fonds supplémentaire destiné au groupe de travail. Utilise-t-on des fonds du budget actuel ou est-ce que cela va figurer dans le prochain budget?

Deuxièmement, est-ce que le groupe de travail s'adressera aux Canadiens qui ont formulé des plaintes pour savoir si Postes Canada a persisté à aller de l'avant avec de mauvaises idées ou si la société a pris ces plaintes au sérieux et y a répondu correctement plutôt que de simplement y réagir en punissant les gens de ma circonscription?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Eh bien, s'ils l'ont fait pour votre circonscription, ils l'ont fait pour la mienne aussi.

Les coûts rattachés au groupe de travail, et au secrétariat, seront couverts par le ministère. C'est pour cette raison qu'il n'y a pas de demande de fonds supplémentaires. Le groupe de travail aura le mandat de vérifier toutes les décisions prises par Postes Canada, sans exception, et de voir si la société a donné suite ou non aux plaintes qu'elle a reçues. Tout cela fera partie intégrante d'un examen indépendant exhaustif de Postes Canada. Désormais, on veillera à ce qu'aucune situation problématique ne soit laissée en suspens et à ce que solutions soient appliquées.

Nous devons bien sûr reconnaître que Postes Canada est une société sans lien de dépendance. Elle doit mener ses activités de manière à s'autosuffire, et cela va rester ainsi. Il n'en demeure pas moins qu'elle offre un service aux Canadiens d'un bout à l'autre du pays, et nous voulons nous assurer qu'elle continuera de le faire. Le service offert est tributaire des moyens financiers de Postes Canada, parce que le gouvernement n'injectera pas de fonds supplémentaires dans ses activités, puisqu'il s'agit d'une société d'État indépendante. Nous nous attendons cependant à ce que le groupe de travail explore d'autres avenues dans son examen indépendant pour permettre à Postes Canada de toucher des revenus supplémentaires, et ainsi de s'acquitter de ses responsabilités liées à la distribution du courrier, ou de toute autre tâche que lui permettrait son statut financier.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Nous passons maintenant à des tours de cinq minutes, en commençant par M. McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Je vais laisser les 30 premières secondes à mon collègue.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Je veux simplement souligner au passage, concernant l'aliénation des biens, que c'est ce que fait la Société immobilière du Canada, une entité déjà en place. L'objectif est de travailler avec l'industrie selon une approche consultative en vue d'établir des cibles axées sur la collectivité, d'assurer une intendance environnementale et de préserver le patrimoine. Je collabore avec la Société immobilière du Canada depuis une dizaine d'années, et je peux vous assurer qu'elle excelle dans l'aliénation de terrains.

Là-dessus, je cède la parole à M. McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci, monsieur.

Je veux revenir à la question de mon collègue concernant votre lettre de mandat. Peut-être que je vois les choses d'un autre oeil. L'objectif de mettre en oeuvre un régime moderne de justes salaires détonne avec votre commentaire selon lequel vous souhaitez faciliter le processus d'approvisionnement pour les entreprises canadiennes qui veulent faire des affaires avec le gouvernement. Au bout du compte, vous allez exclure énormément d'entreprises familiales, de petites entreprises, et ceux qui ne peuvent pas se mesurer à la concurrence des grandes entreprises.

Où en êtes-vous avec la politique des justes salaires? Nous l'entendons sans arrêt: il faut consulter les Canadiens, consulter, consulter, consulter, et les consulter encore. Est-ce qu'on donne voix aux petites entreprises, aux entreprises non syndiquées, dans ce processus, et est-ce qu'on leur permet de s'exprimer sur la politique des justes salaires et les répercussions qu'elle aura sur l'approvisionnement et le processus d'équité?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

La politique des justes salaires est l'affaire de l'ensemble du gouvernement, pas seulement du ministère des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Ma question s'applique à l'ensemble du gouvernement. Merci.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Cela dit, nous n'avons pas encore entamé ce processus. L'exercice sera mené par un autre organisme du gouvernement. Je m'attends à ce que le Conseil du Trésor soit une figure de proue dans ce dossier.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Mais c'est dans votre lettre de mandat.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

J'imagine que c'est dans la lettre de mandat de tous les ministres.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je ne le vois pas.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

On nous a demandé de nous pencher sur la question, et nous allons le faire; mais encore là, c'est l'affaire de l'ensemble du gouvernement.

M. Kelly McCauley:

D'accord.

Est-ce que vous vous engagez à consulter, consulter, consulter, comme on nous le répète encore et encore?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Absolument.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Parfait.

Il semble qu'il n'y ait pas encore eu beaucoup de progrès de ce côté.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Pas pour l'instant.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je crois que cela répond à la question de M. Weir.

Pour revenir à la construction navale, différentes sources indiquent que vous envisagez envoyer au Sud l'empaquetage des armes, les activités de haute technologie et les vraies choses à valeur ajoutée, ce qui est réellement à la base d'une industrie dans ce secteur. Je comprends que de l'argent est en jeu et que nous devons obtenir le meilleur rapport qualité-prix. Cependant, la Stratégie nationale d'approvisionnement en matière de construction navale visait principalement à raviver cette industrie à la dérive. Vous avez dit ne vouloir exclure aucune possibilité. Mais est-ce que le gouvernement a déjà entrepris des démarches pour exporter ces activités?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous n'avons pas l'intention d'exporter des activités. Nous voulons que le travail effectué au Canada soit du travail hautement technologique, et pouvoir saisir toute autre occasion qui s'offrirait à nous.

Nous sommes conscients que nous devons dépenser l'argent des contribuables judicieusement, mais nous devons aussi tenir compte des retombées en fait de création d'emplois.

Il s'agira de consulter l'industrie, et nous sommes en consultation constante avec elle, parce que nous travaillons en partenariat. Alors, tandis que...

(1615)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je crois avoir lu que pour le volet technologique, l'industrie n'avait pas été consultée. Les joueurs de l'industrie ont été pris un peu de court par cette nouvelle. Ce n'est donc pas le cas?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous avons mené des consultations. Je suis étonnée d'entendre cela. Nous avons consulté l'industrie sur tous les volets de l'approvisionnement.

M. Kelly McCauley:

J'ai une dernière question, parce que le temps me presse.

Monsieur Parker, je sais que le processus avec Services partagés a été très compliqué, mais j'aimerais que vous nous disiez où en sont les choses en ce moment. De quoi auriez-vous besoin pour que tout fonctionne correctement? Nous avons appris récemment qu'on prévoyait installer un serveur à Trenton, mais que personne n'en avait discuté avec le ministère de la Défense nationale, qui s'objecte au projet. Sommes-nous en voie de régler tous les problèmes qui subsistent?

Le rapport d'audit indiquait qu'il manquait 800 personnes. Y a-t-il une pénurie de travailleurs qualifiés, un manque d'employés, ou une myriade de problèmes? Nous voulons évidemment que tout cela fonctionne.

Le président:

Le temps nous presse.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Une réponse en trois secondes.

M. Ron Parker:

Monsieur le président, nous examinons toutes les hypothèses qui sous-tendent le plan de transformation et nous travaillons à la mise en oeuvre d'un nouveau plan, révisé et mis à jour, pour l'automne de cette année.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

Le prochain intervenant sur ma liste est M. Whalen, pour cinq minutes.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous tous de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Je veux moi aussi revenir à la stratégie de construction navale. Bien des entreprises du Canada atlantique sont très encouragées par le processus indépendant qui a permis à Irving Shipbuilding de remporter le contrat. Cependant, cela a été suivi d'un silence radio. C'est à croire que l'industrie au Canada atlantique s'est atrophiée après avoir été ainsi négligée. Que prévoit faire votre ministère pour faire progresser ce dossier, de façon à ce que les navires soient construits et les services attendus offerts?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

En fait, nous sommes très satisfaits de ce qui se passe au chantier naval de Halifax et à celui de Seaspan, à Vancouver. Les premiers ouvrages ont été entrepris, et nous avons été très impressionnés par ce que nous avons vu. L'argent a été investi. Du côté de Seaspan, l'entreprise a investi de sa propre poche pour rénover ses installations. D'importantes sommes ont aussi été investies à Halifax pour améliorer les installations là-bas.

C'est très encourageant ce qui se passe en ce moment. Nous croyons aussi que cela pourra permettre à d'autres entreprises de créer de l'emploi. À l'heure actuelle, 300 entreprises ont tiré profit des travaux en cours à Halifax et à Vancouver, et ce sont des entreprises de partout au pays.

Nous allons faire le point là-dessus, entre autres, dans notre mise à jour trimestrielle. Nous allons certainement en parler dans notre mise à jour de l'automne. Vous pourrez voir exactement comment l'argent a été dépensé, quelles compagnies bénéficient des occasions offertes par l'industrie de la construction navale, combien on emploie de personnes, et quels types de contrats sont accordés.

Vous constaterez qu'il ne s'agit pas que de portes et de fenêtres, comme on l'a laissé entendre, mais aussi d'activités hautement technologiques. Il est important de saisir toutes les occasions qui permettront aux entreprises canadiennes d'obtenir des contrats et d'offrir des emplois.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis très heureux de savoir que les choses ont fini par bouger.

J'aimerais parler de la cybersécurité, et je remercie M. Drouin d'avoir entamé la discussion sur ce sujet plus tôt.

Du point de vue du processus budgétaire, il semble y avoir une assez grande augmentation des crédits demandés à cet égard. Je comprends que c'est extrêmement important. D'après la façon le budget est structuré, je ne peux pas voir quel était le montant attribué à la cybersécurité avant, si c'était 1,5 milliard de dollars ou autre.

À quoi s'attend le ministère en ce qui a trait à la hausse future des coûts liés à la cybersécurité? À quoi doivent s'attendre les Canadiens de ce côté? À quoi correspond la hausse année après année des coûts rattachés à la protection de notre infrastructure de réseau contre le cyberterrorisme?

M. Ron Parker:

Monsieur le président, je crains de ne pas avoir l'augmentation annuelle sous les yeux, mais je pourrai certainement trouver ces données pour vous. Pour ce qui est des dépenses générales liées à la cybersécurité, je peux vous dire qu'elles ont connu une hausse stable au cours des dernières années. Cela souligne l'importance de la cybersécurité de façon générale.

Le ministère a su optimiser les crédits qui lui sont accordés. Le centre des opérations de sécurité est en fonction 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, toute l'année. Il assure la surveillance du périmètre des tentatives d'accès au réseau du gouvernement du Canada. Des efforts considérables ont été déployés depuis la création de Services partagés pour faire avancer cette initiative.

(1620)

M. Nick Whalen:

Dans le même ordre d'idées, il est un peu plus facile de protéger un seul réseau que d'en protéger 63, alors nous sommes conscients des avantages que présente cette stratégie. Mais quand il est question de panne, si le réseau du gouvernement flanche, c'est tout le monde qui est touché, par seulement les utilisateurs d'un des 63 réseaux.

Quelles sont les mesures prises à cet égard et, sur le plan budgétaire, que faites-vous pour éviter les temps d'arrêt? Quels types de plans de redondances sont mis en place? Que fait-on pour s'assurer qu'on maximise le temps exploitable sur le nouveau réseau consolidé?

Le président:

Vous avez 20 secondes.

M. Ron Parker:

Merci, monsieur le président.

De nombreux efforts sont déployés en ce sens. Nous passons d'une cinquantaine de réseaux en silo à un seul. La conception du réseau accorde beaucoup d'importance aux redondances et la grande disponibilité du réseau. Les travaux ne font que commencer. À ce stade-ci, les entreprises retenues ont pu toucher au nouveau réseau, mais rien n'est officiellement démarré. La phase de planification est en cours. Ces questions sont au coeur de cet exercice. Nous prévoyons mettre en place un réseau offrant une très grande disponibilité.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Parker.

Monsieur Blaney, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre Foote, un article troublant a été publié dans le The Hill Times, à l'effet que Postes Canada allait distribuer du matériel qui contrevient aux lois canadiennes — des propos haineux, et du matériel très peu indulgent envers les minorités. Pourriez-vous commenter cela? Avez-vous le pouvoir de vous assurer que Postes Canada ne distribue que du matériel qui est conforme à la loi?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Merci de me poser la question.

Je suis au courant de la situation. Je suis moi-même contrariée par l'information distribuée, à un point tel que nous avons sollicité des conseils juridiques à ce sujet, pour savoir si le tout constituait une infraction criminelle. Le contenu de ces messages me préoccupe.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Y a-t-il des mécanismes en place pour s'assurer que le matériel distribué est conforme aux lois canadiennes?

Ou y va-t-on plutôt au cas par cas quand de telles choses se produisent?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

C'est exact. C'est pourquoi nous nous sommes adressés à Postes Canada. Si je ne me trompe pas, la première chose...

Il est arrivé que Postes Canada demande un avis juridique au sujet d'un envoi, mais rien ne justifiait de le retirer. Mais maintenant qu'un autre document est distribué, on s'inquiète. Cela me préoccupe moi aussi, et nous avons demandé des conseils juridiques à ce sujet.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

D'accord. Nous aimerions être informés de votre intention concernant ce regrettable incident.

En outre, vous avez mentionné que vous vous attendez à ce que le ministère de l'Immigration soit mis à contribution, mais vous avez aussi dit que votre ministère participait à l'accueil des réfugiés syriens. Pouvez-vous nous dire plus précisément de quelle manière vous y avez participé et combien a été investi dans ce projet? Est-ce que ces sommes sont incluses au budget? Prévoyez-vous une augmentation des coûts? Est-ce qu'on va accueillir plus de réfugiés syriens? Notamment en ce qui concerne la formation et l'hébergement, prévoyez-vous une augmentation des dépenses à cet égard?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Oui. Notre demande vise en fait à obtenir plus de fonds pour en faire plus à cet égard. Notre travail consistait à assurer l'approvisionnement, qu'on parle de manteaux d'hiver, de logements ou de tout ce dont pourraient avoir besoin les réfugiés à leur arrivée. Nous prévoyons avoir besoin de ressources supplémentaires pour répondre aux besoins des autres réfugiés qui viendront s'établir chez nous.

(1625)

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

D'accord.

Mon collègue doit partir, alors j'aimerais lui permettre de poser une dernière question avant qu'il s'en aille.

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes, monsieur McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Parfait, je serai très bref.

Vous avez dit, et j'étais très heureux de l'entendre, que le gouvernement ne donnerait pas plus de l'argent des contribuables à Postes Canada. Je suis d'accord pour dire que la société doit trouver d'autres sources de revenus pour lui permettre d'accroître ses services, mais pouvons-nous nous assurer qu'elle n'empiétera pas sur des secteurs déjà très bien desservis par les entreprises privées, les petites entreprises, ou qu'elle ne se servira pas de son avantage concurrentiel pour éliminer les petites entreprises et les autres entreprises privées déjà établies?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Eh bien, vous savez, Postes Canada est déjà en concurrence avec les entreprises privées pour certains services. Si le mandat est d'offrir un service aux Canadiens, il faut trouver un moyen d'y arriver. Je répète que Postes Canada est une société d'État et qu'elle doit s'autosuffire. Je ne sais pas vers quels autres secteurs elle pourra se tourner, et c'est pour cette raison que nous voulons d'un examen exhaustif indépendant, pour voir quelles sont les possibilités.

Je comprends vos inquiétudes concernant la concurrence avec les petites et moyennes entreprises. Je suis persuadée que l'examen tiendra compte de tout cela.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Oui, mais nous aimerions avoir l'assurance que le géant ne va pas piétiner les petites entreprises qui offrent uniquement des services de messagerie ou de livraison à domicile.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Pour la dernière série de questions de cinq minutes, la parole est à M. Ayoub.

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Madame la ministre, messieurs et madame, merci d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

J'ai besoin d'information surtout sur le processus qui mène à demander des fonds supplémentaires.

Je vais prendre un exemple. On en retrouve peut-être de semblables quand on fait le tour. Le Manège militaire de Québec, dans la Grande-Allée, a passé au feu en 2008. Cela fait maintenant huit ans. Je vois que les premiers fonds pour sa reconstruction, d'un montant de 72 millions de dollars, ont été adoptés seulement l'année dernière. Si l'on soustrait une année, c'est donc dire qu'on a pris sept ans avant de prendre une décision pour refaire le fameux Manège militaire de Québec. Je connais bien ce bâtiment, puisqu'il se trouve dans la région où j'ai habitée pendant toute mon enfance.

Un an plus tard, on demande des fonds supplémentaires. Je cherche donc à savoir quel est le processus de prévisions budgétaires ayant mené à la demande de ces fonds. On sait ce que le Manège militaire de Québec était et ce qu'il devra être. Pourquoi, un an plus tard, ce qui n'est pas très long, on demande une augmentation de 30 % de la somme de 72 millions de dollars? Y a-t-il eu une mauvaise planification au départ? Pourquoi se retrouve-t-on, un an plus tard, avec ce problème qui vous retombe entre les mains en tant que nouvelle ministre? [Traduction]

M. George Da Pont:

C'est quelque chose qui peut arriver, surtout quand on rénove des immeubles qui possèdent d'importantes caractéristiques historiques à préserver.

Évidemment, pour établir les premières estimations, nous procédons à l'inspection des immeubles, et il arrive souvent que nous engagions des spécialistes indépendants pour cela. Il n'est pas inhabituel qu'on découvre en cours de route des choses que l'inspection n'avait pas permis de détecter avant le début des travaux.

La même chose arrive aux propriétaires qui entreprennent un projet et qui se butent à des imprévus. C'est donc quelque chose qui peut se produire de temps à autre.

Quand c'est le cas, si les dépenses excèdent ce qui avait été prévu au budget initial, nous devons demander des fonds supplémentaires. C'est souvent ce qui explique de telles demandes.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Est-ce raisonnable de dire qu'il arrive de temps à autre de dépasser le budget de 30 %?

M. George Da Pont:

Eh bien... [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub:

D'habitude, dans toutes les propositions, il y a toujours un pourcentage prévu justement pour les imprévus. Ma préoccupation est que, un an plus tard, on demande 30 % de plus. Ce n'est pas le projet en lui-même qui me préoccupe, car effectivement le Manège militaire de Québec est un joyau à reconstruire. Je ne connais pas les détails, mais je suis préoccupé par la planification et par le fait qu'on se retrouve un an plus tard avec tout cela.

(1630)

M. George Da Pont:

La dernière chose que j'ajouterais est qu'il arrive parfois qu'on répartisse les travaux sur deux ou trois contrats. Ce n'est pas un seul contrat pour tout. [Traduction]

Dans ce cas-ci, c'est un nouveau contrat. Ce n'est pas une prolongation de contrat. C'est attribuable à des circonstances inattendues et, en gros, à la conclusion de différents contrats, pas d'un seul, pour différents aspects du travail. [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Je suis d'origine syrienne et la question de l'accueil de Syriens me touche un peu.

L'année dernière, le Parti libéral voulait accueillir un certain nombre de Syriens. Au départ, il était question d'accueillir 10 000 Syriens, puis on en a ajouté 15 000 de plus, pour un total de 25 000. Un montant de 5,4 millions de dollars supplémentaires est demandé pour faire face à l'accueil de ces Syriens.

Ce montant servira-t-il maintenant ou s'étale-t-il sur plusieurs années? Quelle est la ventilation de ce montant supplémentaire? [Traduction]

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très brièvement, madame la ministre.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Pour obtenir le financement dont nous avons besoin, une demande serait présentée par l'entremise du ministère de l'Immigration. Le ministère établirait le nombre de réfugiés, et, en fonction du travail que nous aurons accompli ensemble, nous déterminerions ensuite ce qu'il faudrait dépenser pour en faire davantage, pour dépasser le nombre de 25 000 réfugiés que nous avons déjà fait venir.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Madame la ministre, il est 16 h 32. Vous avez dit que vous devez partir vers 16 h 30. Au nom du Comité, je vous remercie donc de votre participation. Vous pouvez partir.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Merci. J'ai hâte de continuer de travailler avec le Comité, surtout dans le dossier de Postes Canada. Si le Comité pense que c'est pertinent, je lui en serais reconnaissante.

Le président:

Merci encore, madame la ministre.

Dans l'intérêt des membres du Comité, j'ai deux brèves questions à aborder. Nous verrons que cela deviendra de plus en plus fréquent à mesure que nous tiendrons des séances, mais, normalement, lorsque nous avons une séance de deux heures et que deux groupes distincts de témoins comparaissent, après avoir entendu le premier groupe, nous reprenons l'ordre d'intervention initial, peu importe où nous étions rendus.

Toutefois, après avoir consulté Mme Ratansi, et compte tenu du fait que nous avons un groupe de témoins similaire devant nous, nous allons reprendre où nous étions rendus, ce qui signifie que M. Weir sera le prochain à intervenir, pour trois minutes. Nous reviendrons ensuite aux questions de sept minutes.

Cela dit, comme je l'ai mentionné à la dernière séance, nous devons également réserver au moins 10 minutes à la fin de la présente séance pour une suite de votes portant sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Vers 17 h 20, je mettrai fin à notre discussion avec les témoins, et nous passerons aux différents votes portant sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

Monsieur Weir, vous avez trois minutes pour poser vos questions et entendre les réponses.

M. Erin Weir:

J'aimerais revenir au point soulevé par mon collègue d'en face à propos de l'importance du logement abordable. La semaine dernière, un article troublant a été publié au sujet du gouvernement de la Saskatchewan qui enverrait des sans-abri par autobus en Colombie-Britannique.

Je me demande si les témoins pourraient fournir certains renseignements sur la rapidité avec laquelle les mesures proposées par le gouvernement fédéral pourraient être mises en place dans notre province, la Saskatchewan.

M. George Da Pont:

Dans le dossier du logement abordable, notre ministère jouera un rôle de soutien, qui sera néanmoins très important.

Pour l'instant, nous avons l'inventaire complet des immeubles et des infrastructures du ministère qui pourraient être transformés en logements abordables. Cet inventaire contribue au travail dirigé par la SCHL, qui est responsable de la politique dans l'ensemble de l'administration, car, comme l'a dit la ministre, d'autres ministères ont des propriétés et des structures qui pourraient être utilisées. Tout cela apporte une contribution, et la SCHL dirige l'élaboration d'une approche visant à accroître les possibilités en matière de logement abordable.

(1635)

M. Erin Weir:

Puis-je demander combien de ces propriétés se trouvent en Saskatchewan?

M. George Da Pont:

Je n'ai pas cette information, mais mon collègue, Kevin Radford, qui dirige notre Direction générale des biens immobiliers, pourrait répondre. Il a peut-être ce chiffre. Sinon, nous vous le ferons parvenir.

M. Kevin Radford (sous-ministre adjoint, Direction générale des biens immobiliers, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

À propos du cas précis de la Saskatchewan, nous avons fourni une liste de toutes nos propriétés disponibles. Nous les avons classées en fonction de critères: sont-elles situées dans un milieu urbain ou rural; s'agit-il d'immeubles commerciaux ou résidentiels; et ainsi de suite?

L'idée est de prendre 30 % de nos avoirs et de mettre en place un mécanisme, ou du moins un catalyseur visant d'autres gardiens de propriétés, comme la GRC, la Défense nationale et ainsi de suite, afin de donner suite à notre démarche dans le but de faire avancer le programme et d'avoir ne serait-ce qu'une bien meilleure idée de ce que sont nos immobilisations.

Il ne fait aucun doute que certaines propriétés figurant sur cette liste sont en Saskatchewan. Il faudrait que j'examine la liste pour vous dire lesquelles.

M. Erin Weir:

Oui, pourriez-vous fournir cette information au Comité?

Nous nous pencherons également sur certaines questions liées à l'utilisation d'acier canadien pour le remplacement du pont Champlain. Ce serait très intéressant.

Le président:

Nous allons reprendre les interventions de sept minutes en commençant par M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

En tant qu'ancien journaliste spécialisé en technologie, plus précisément en logiciels libres avec code source ouvert, j'ai l'intention de m'aventurer un peu dans les méandres de Services partagés. Par conséquent, si des techniciens vous accompagnent, je les encourage à se manifester et à prendre place à la table.

Tout d'abord, parmi les 23 000 serveurs répartis dans 485 centres de données auxquels la ministre a fait allusion, combien y en a-t-il qui fonctionnent au moyen d'un logiciel libre? Dans le cadre de votre transition vers sept centres de données, observe-t-on une migration des logiciels privés vers des logiciels libres? À titre d'exemple, sur la Colline, je peux seulement utiliser Internet Explorer étant donné que c'est le seul navigateur conforme à nos normes de sécurité, ce qui est plutôt drôle pour quiconque à travailler dans l'industrie plus que quelques heures.

Pour ce qui est des serveurs, les diverses possibilités offertes par Linux sont intéressantes pour remplacer le système UNIX et Windows. À l'avenir, je veux être certain que l'on envisage sérieusement les logiciels libres.

M. Ron Parker:

Je regrette, mais je ne suis pas technologue. Je le dis d'emblée. Je vais demander à notre spécialiste de la technologie, Patrice Rondeau, de répondre à cette question.

M. Patrice Rondeau (sous-ministre adjoint principal par intérim, Centres de données, Services partagés Canada):

Bon après-midi, monsieur le président.

Lorsqu'il s'agit d'élargir notre plateforme, nous concentrons notre attention sur les logiciels de code source libre. Dans le cadre de la migration des tâches vers un nouvel environnement, nous examinons les possibilités d'exploiter des logiciels libres.

Au Centre de données, on compte 26 000 serveurs physiques, mais jusqu'à 74 000 systèmes d'exploitation, ce qui signifie que des serveurs virtuels sont embarqués dans des serveurs physiques. Je dirais qu'approximativement 15 % de ces serveurs exécutent Linux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En général, quel système d'exploitation exécutent les autres serveurs, qui représentent une portion de 85 %?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Le reste des serveurs, vous voulez dire?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. S'agit-il d'anciens serveurs Unix, de serveurs Windows ou d'une combinaison?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Dans une large mesure, il s'agit de serveurs Windows. On utilise tous les types de serveurs Unix, entre autres HP-UX et IBM AIX. De plus, on trouve encore de nombreux ordinateurs centraux surtout dans les grands ministères.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Utilise-t-on encore des nombres entiers signés de 32 bits pour mettre en mémoire des données temporelles à l'échelle du gouvernement ou allons-nous être vulnérables au bogue de l'an 2038?

(1640)

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Désolé. Je n'ai pas entendu la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Utilise-t-on encore des nombres entiers signés de 32 bits pour stocker des données temporelles au gouvernement ou sommes-nous prêts à faire face au bogue de l'an 2038?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

On utilise encore des ordinateurs de 32 bits, mais surtout de 64 bits, si c'est ce que vous demandez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était effectivement ma question.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Il y a encore de nombreux environnements où dominent les ordinateurs à jeu d'instruction réduit, ou RISC. On utilise encore certaines versions des systèmes Solaris, HP-UX et série p d'IBM. Il y a quatre ou cinq ans, nous avons hérité de probablement toutes les versions de chaque type de serveurs et d'ordinateurs qui existaient à l'époque.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis toujours étonné d'entendre dire qu'il y a encore des ordinateurs RISC, mais c'est un autre sujet.

Je suis probablement le seul député à la Chambre des communes à avoir une clé de chiffrement PGP et je suis certainement le seul à faire partie de l'infrastructure à clé publique Debian. Incitera-t-on les fonctionnaires à adopter des signatures PGP, des réseaux de confiance ou un autre système d'authentification cryptographique?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Je ne peux pas vraiment répondre à cette question, mais je peux me renseigner et fournir l'information au Comité.

Une voix: [Inaudible] Qu'est-ce que c'est?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Ramez Ayoub:

J'aimerais avoir une traduction.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est pas la traduction qui peut aider dans ce domaine.

PGP correspond à la norme de cryptage assez ancienne « Pretty Good Privacy » qui permet d'envoyer des courriels signés et codés de façon numérique. Il s'agit d'un outil que j'utilise depuis des années dans la communauté à source ouverte.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Il s'agit d'un bon outil de protection.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, c'est un outil de protection assez fiable, mis en oeuvre dans l'application d'encryptage GNU. L'histoire est longue... Il suffit de dire qu'il s'agit d'un système externe très fiable et très bien connu utilisé par la communauté technologique à l'extérieur du gouvernement. J'aimerais qu'on utilise ce logiciel au niveau gouvernemental ou à tout le moins une variante. Il est souhaitable que les courriels soient signés et codés conformément à la norme PGP dans un réseau de confiance auquel les utilisateurs accèdent avec la clé d'un autre utilisateur.

J'aimerais que le gouvernement envisage cette possibilité.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

D'accord. Nous pouvons nous renseigner et informer le Comité du résultat de nos recherches.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque nous aurons une réponse, je vous expliquerai de quoi il s'agit, monsieur Blaney.

M. Ron Parker:

Monsieur le président, nous fournirons une explication en ce qui concerne les clés d'encryptage et ce genre de service, mais je tiens à préciser que Services partagés Canada ne fournit pas de services à la Chambre des communes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non. Ça me convient, mais cela concerne l'ensemble du gouvernement. Il y a un grand nombre de comptes de courriels, de serveurs et de systèmes.

Entend-on mettre en place dans l'ensemble du réseau gouvernemental le protocole Internet version six, appelé IPv6?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

IPv6? À titre de sous-ministre adjoint principal, je suis responsable du Centre des données à...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons donc avoir une longue et intéressante conversation sans que personne ne comprenne de quoi nous parlons.

M. Patrice Rondeau :

Non, ce n'est pas le cas. Je connais bien le protocole IPv6.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je sais que vous et moi le connaissons.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Patrice Rondeau :

Des initiatives sont actuellement en cours, principalement en ce qui concerne les réseaux, entre autres à la Direction générale. Le protocole IPv6 a été mis en oeuvre dans certains réseaux et on envisage sa mise en oeuvre dans d'autres, mais je ne peux vous fournir de détails à ce sujet. Je dois me renseigner auprès de nos spécialistes des réseaux à la Direction générale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel genre de matériel est principalement utilisé à l'heure actuelle? Le savez-vous?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Pour les réseaux?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour les réseaux et les serveurs.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Pour ce qui est des serveurs, on utilise tout le matériel informatique existant, qui date probablement des 15 dernières années et qui se trouve dans nos quelque 400 centres de données. Cependant, les nouvelles plateformes sont surtout des serveurs lame.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste environ 45 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. C'est assez court.

Puis-je demander, par curiosité malsaine peut-être, combien de noms de domaines possède le gouvernement. Avez-vous une idée?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Je ne saurais vous répondre, mais il y a entre autres le nom de domaine « .ca ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce domaine relève de l'ACEI. Ce n'est pas le gouvernement.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Effectivement. Il s'agit du serveur de fichiers réseau. Pour pouvoir vous donner le nombre précis de noms de domaine, je dois consulter le responsable de la sécurité au ministère. Nos experts réseau pourraient probablement vous fournir cette information.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. J'ai hâte de refaire cet exercice que j'ai trouvé fort intéressant.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Aimeriez-vous que nous revenions sur quelque chose?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que mon temps de parole est écoulé.

Le président:

Nous apprécierions que vous fournissiez au Comité l'information demandée.

Je cède maintenant la parole à une personne qui se demande encore comment fonctionne le télécopieur. Monsieur Blaney, vous disposez de sept minutes.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci, monsieur le président. Vous m'avez presque qualifié de dinosaure, mais ce n'est pas grave.

Ma question porte sur la lettre de mandat, plus précisément sur le remplacement des CF-18 et sur les travaux de réhabilitation de la Cité parlementaire. [Français]

J'aurais aimé poser des questions à la ministre au sujet des CF-18. Nous sommes conscients de la contribution exceptionnelle que les avions de chasse ont apportée à la mission de lutte conte le soi-disant État islamique, mais nous savons que ces avions de chasse arrivent à la fin de leur vie. Or, dans la lettre de mandat de la ministre, il est prévu d'enclencher un processus de remplacement des avions CF-18. Nous avons appris, cet après-midi, que nous aurons une mise à jour de la stratégie navale en novembre.

Êtes-vous en mesure de nous donner un état de la situation et de nous dire quelles sont les prochaines étapes du processus de remplacement des CF-18, qui est déjà en cours, et à quel moment elles seront enclenchées? Êtes-vous en mesure de me donner des informations à ce sujet cet après-midi?

(1645)

[Traduction]

M. George Da Pont:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Comme vous l'avez indiqué, le gouvernement s'est engagé à remplacer les CF-18 de toute évidence pour que l'aviation canadienne dispose des appareils dont elle a besoin pour s'acquitter de sa tâche.

Les fonctionnaires de mon ministère collaborent avec leurs pendants de la Défense nationale pour élaborer, comme le gouvernement s'est engagé à le faire, un appel d'offres ouvert et transparent pour le remplacement des chasseurs CF-18. Le travail est déjà amorcé à cet égard. Je crois que le gouvernement fera le point sur ce dossier lorsqu'il aura arrêté son choix sur une formule en particulier.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

D'accord. Il va sans dire que nous sommes impatients d'en savoir davantage.

Je passe maintenant aux travaux de réhabilitation de la Cité parlementaire. J'ai été ravi de constater que, jusqu'ici, les travaux ont été exécutés dans le respect des délais et des devis. Si je ne m'abuse, nous devrons à un moment donné quitter l'édifice du Centre pour nous installer dans l'édifice de l'Est. Pourriez-vous nous dire quand ce déménagement aura lieu?

M. George Da Pont:

On prévoit libérer l'édifice du Centre en 2018 pour y effectuer les travaux nécessaires. Les occupants seront temporairement installés à divers endroits.

Je me tourne vers Rob Wright qui est le sous-ministre adjoint responsable de la Cité parlementaire. Si vous le souhaitez, il peut certainement vous fournir plus de détails au sujet des endroits où seront temporairement installés les occupants de l'édifice du Centre.

M. Rob Wright (sous-ministre adjoint, Direction générale de la Cité parlementaire, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Absolument. Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre question.

Comme vous l'avez indiqué, les projets vont bon train dans le respect des échéanciers. D'ici 2018, cinq grands projets seront achevés, ce qui permettra de complètement libérer l'édifice du Centre pour y commencer les travaux prévus.

L'an dernier, la conclusion des travaux à l'édifice Sir John A. MacDonald a permis de mettre à la disposition du Parlement du Canada un nouvel espace pour les conférences. Au cours des prochains mois, la réhabilitation de l'édifice Wellington, à l'angle des rues Wellington et Bank, sera achevée. Cela permettra d'y accueillir les députés, une condition essentielle pour libérer les locaux de l'édifice du Centre. De plus, à la toute fin de 2017, les travaux à l'édifice de l'Ouest et la phase 1 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs seront terminés. À ce moment-là, la Chambre pourra emménager dans l'édifice de l'Ouest où se dérouleront toutes les activités législatives.

Pour ce qui est du Sénat, nous procédons actuellement à la réhabilitation du Centre de conférences du gouvernement situé directement en face du Château Laurier. Les travaux du Sénat et toutes les activités législatives qui y sont liées se dérouleront au Centre de conférences du gouvernement. L'achèvement de ces deux projets permettra de libérer complètement l'édifice du Centre pour y débuter les travaux de réhabilitation.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Les événements qui sont survenus et le regroupement des services de sécurité ont-ils eu une incidence sur le projet de réhabilitation?

Pourriez-vous également parler du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, notamment de son importance dans la Cité parlementaire et de la façon d'y accéder? Il va sans dire que ces questions suscitent certaines préoccupations étant donné ce qui s'est passé.

M. Rob Wright:

Absolument.

Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le Service de protection parlementaire qui a été mis sur pied l'été dernier. Auparavant, nous collaborions de très près avec la Gendarmerie royale du Canada de même qu'avec les services de sécurité du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes.

À maints égards, il n'y a pas eu beaucoup de changements en ce qui nous concerne. Nous continuons de collaborer avec les forces de sécurité comme auparavant. La conception et la réalisation de tous ces projets se font dans le respect des exigences énoncées par la GRC et par les forces de sécurité du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes et, dorénavant, par le Service de protection parlementaire.

(1650)

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Si j'ai bien compris, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera situé sur la rue Wellington et les visiteurs seront soumis à une vérification de sécurité avant de pouvoir entrer dans la Cité parlementaire.

M. Rob Wright :

La phase 1 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera située entre l'édifice de l'Ouest et l'édifice du Centre. Dans le moment, on peut voir une profonde excavation à cet endroit. C'est le site réservé à la phase 1 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs dont l'accès sera situé à l'Est. On y effectuera les vérifications de sécurité nécessaires avant de permettre aux visiteurs d'entrer dans l'édifice de l'Ouest et d'aller aux services d'accueil.

Pendant les travaux de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera agrandi par un passage souterrain qui reliera l'édifice du Centre et l'édifice de l'Ouest. À ce moment-là, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera en grande partie souterrain et on y effectuera les vérifications de sécurité avant de laisser les visiteurs entrer dans les principaux édifices du Parlement.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.

Monsieur le président, je serais fort intéressé à avoir une présentation plus détaillée sur cet important projet et sur l'enveloppe budgétaire correspondante.[Français]

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de votre réponse, monsieur Wright. Je sais que tous les parlementaires, particulièrement ceux qui siègent à la Chambre des communes, seront très intéressés de suivre l'évolution des travaux, notamment au moment des déménagements sur la Colline.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Weir qui dispose de sept minutes.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je pense que le Comité en est arrivé à un consensus général quant à la nécessité d'avoir des précisions sur la stratégie du gouvernement en matière de construction navale.

À l'instar de mon collègue, j'aimerais moi aussi poser des questions sur l'acquisition d'aéronefs.

On a dit que le gouvernement s'est engagé à trouver un appareil de remplacement pour les CF-18. Je note que le parti au pouvoir a aussi promis très clairement pendant la campagne électorale de ne pas acheter de F-35. Or, il a récemment été révélé que le gouvernement du Canada avait versé 45 millions de dollars pour continuer à faire partie du consortium des F-35 et pour garder l'option d'achat de cet aéronef.

Dans l'optique de la fonction publique, pouvez-vous dire si, dans le cadre de cet appel d'offres, on envisage toujours l'acquisition de F-35.

M. George Da Pont:

Non. Comme je l'ai indiqué plus tôt, tout ce que je peux dire c'est que nous collaborons avec le ministère de la Défense nationale pour préparer un appel d'offres ouvert. Par ailleurs, il va sans dire que lorsque le gouvernement aura pris une décision, il en fera l'annonce.

J'estime important de préciser que la participation au programme des avions de combat interarmées dont vous avez fait mention n'oblige pas à faire l'acquisition de F-35.

M. Erin Weir:

Je comprends fort bien qu'il n'y a pas d'engagement. Néanmoins, il semble étrange qu'un gouvernement dépense autant d'argent s'il n'est absolument pas intéressé à faire l'acquisition de cet aéronef.

Si on envisage les choses sous un angle différent, on peut dire que, pour l'instant, les F-35 ne semblent pas avoir été exclus du processus d'appel d'offres.

M. George Da Pont:

Non. Je crois que le gouvernement tient compte du fait que sa participation au programme permet aux entreprises canadiennes d'obtenir des contrats et de faire partie de la chaîne d'approvisionnement pour la fabrication des F-35. D'ailleurs, bon nombre de nos entreprises en ont profité.

À mon avis, ces contrats ont rapporté nettement plus d'argent aux entreprises canadiennes que ce qu'il n'en a coûté au gouvernement pour participer au programme. D'autre part, si un État ne paie pas pour participer au programme, les compagnies qui se trouvent sur son territoire ne peuvent faire des soumissions dans le cadre d'appels d'offres. Il est important de souligner que la participation du gouvernement offre un avantage et des possibilités aux entreprises canadiennes et qu'elle n'entraîne aucune obligation ou exigence en ce qui concerne l'acquisition de F-35.

M. Erin Weir:

J'ai bien compris.

Pour passer à un autre niveau, dans le budget des dépenses, Services partagés Canada demande un financement pour accroître les activités de contrôle biométrique à la frontière canadienne. J'aimerais connaître la raison qui sous-tend l'accroissement de ces activités de contrôle. Le Canada estime-t-il qu'il s'agit d'une obligation qui lui incombe en vertu des accords bilatéraux qu'il a conclus avec les États-Unis ou y a-t-il une autre raison?

M. Ron Parker:

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de la question.

Notre participation à cette initiative, qui relève principalement du ministère de l'Immigration, vise à appuyer l'infrastructure TI.

Par ailleurs, j'invite mon collègue Graham Barr à vous dire quelques mots au sujet de l'objectif général de cette initiative.

(1655)

M. Graham Barr (directeur général, Politique stratégique, planification et établissement de rapports, Services partagés Canada):

Avec plaisir. Comme M. Parker l'a indiqué, c'est le ministère de l'Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté qui dirige l'initiative. Grosso modo, elle vise à soumettre dorénavant à un contrôle biométrique tous les voyageurs qui ont besoin d'un visa pour entrer au Canada. Il nous incombe de fournir entre autres le matériel informatique, les serveurs et les dispositifs de stockage de même que les logiciels pour appuyer ces activités.

M. Erin Weir:

S'agit-il d'une initiative totalement nouvelle à Services partagés Canada ou le ministère fait-il déjà du contrôle biométrique?

M. Graham Barr:

Notre rôle est de fournir l'infrastructure TI nécessaire.

M. Erin Weir:

[Inaudible] A-t-on déjà fait l'acquisition d'une infrastructure TI pour le contrôle biométrique ou s'agira-t-il d'une nouveauté?

M. Graham Barr:

Ce n'est pas une nouvelle activité. Il s'agit plutôt d'un accroissement.

M. Erin Weir:

D’accord.

Un autre point m’intéresse dans le Budget principal des dépenses, je veux parler de la somme de 5 millions de dollars destinée à assainir les sites contaminés du gouvernement fédéral. J’aimerais avoir de l’information sur le nombre de sites que cela pourrait représenter, leur degré de contamination et les risques qu’ils peuvent présenter pour la santé publique?

M. George Da Pont:

Je vais laisser mon collègue Kevin Radford vous donner plus de détails, mais cette mesure fait partie du programme permanent que nous avons pour assainir les nombreux sites contaminés qu’il y a dans tout le pays. Cela va de très grands sites où les problèmes sont majeurs à de tout petits sites. Pas mal d’informations sont affichées sur les sites Web, concernant la localisation des sites et les substances faisant l’objet du nettoyage.

Le financement se fait régulièrement, habituellement sur deux ou trois ans. C’est de cette manière que nous procédons. Les sites sont classés selon le degré de risque, les plus contaminés étant traités en priorité.

Kevin.

M. Kevin Radford:

Merci de la question, monsieur le président.

Je n’ai pas grand-chose à ajouter, sinon qu’il existe, comme l’a dit mon collègue Georges, une liste de sites contaminés.

Je mentionnerai toutefois que la décontamination fait partie des services facultatifs que nous offrons à d’autres ministères. Si le site contaminé se trouve sur une base aérienne, c’est la Défense nationale qui s’en charge. Le ministère ferait probablement appel à notre expertise. Si la propriété appartient à un autre ministère où est exploité par ce dernier, nous avons toute une gamme de services disponibles. Nous facturons nos services au ministère concerné.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci.

Services partagés Canada veut en outre faire financer les mesures prises par le gouvernement face à la crise des réfugiés syriens. Il ne fait aucun doute qu’il s’agit là d’une énorme initiative qui a des coûts. Pourriez-vous parler du rôle que Services partagés Canada jouerait dans ce dossier?

M. Ron Parker:

Avec plaisir, monsieur le président.

Notre rôle consiste essentiellement à offrir aux fonctionnaires les outils dont ils ont besoin pour mettre en œuvre l’initiative. Nous leur offrons par exemple des services de téléphonie mobile et des ordinateurs portables. Nous nous assurons que les serveurs utilisés à cette fin, notamment pour contrôler les réfugiés, fonctionnent à très haute disponibilité. Voilà le type de services que nous offrons grâce au crédit demandé au Parlement dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Parker.

Le dernier tour de sept minutes revient à Mme Ratansi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous d’être venus.

En entendant vos exposés et les réponses que vous avez données, je me félicite de vous voir prendre avec diligence et sérieux votre rôle et le mandat du ministre, en menant les consultations appropriées afin d’avoir les bonnes réponses.

J’ai bien aimé les quelques exemples que vous avez donnés de la façon dont vous modernisez l’approvisionnement en le simplifiant. Nous savons tous que le gouvernement est un mastodonte, qui ne se déplace pas facilement. Venant d’Afrique, je sais par contre que les éléphants se déplacent très vite et je pense donc qu’on les décrie à tort.

Pouvez-vous me donner tout d’abord un exemple de la façon dont on simplifie les procédures? Je vous poserai ensuite d’autres questions.

M. George Da Pont:

Je peux vous en donner plusieurs. Le commentaire d’ordre général que vous avez fait est exactement celui que font les très nombreuses entreprises que nous consultons, qui sont pour la plupart des petites et moyennes entreprises qui font affaire avec le gouvernement du Canada. Elles disent exactement la même chose que vous, à savoir que faire affaire avec le gouvernement fédéral est compliqué, difficile et plus coûteux que cela ne devrait l’être.

Nous travaillons avec ce que nous appelons désormais le « comité consultatif des fournisseurs » qui nous a fourni toute une liste des améliorations qu’il voudrait voir apporter au processus d’approvisionnement. Certaines de ces améliorations sont en cours, mais il y a aussi de grandes initiatives à entreprendre.

Je vais vous en donner un exemple. On nous a dit notamment que les systèmes que les entreprises utilisent en ligne pour consulter les possibilités de contrats, ou même pour soumettre des propositions, sont beaucoup trop compliqués. Ils sont vraiment archaïques, dépassés, et on utilise actuellement une quarantaine de systèmes différents. L’une de nos plus grandes initiatives est de mettre sur pied le plus rapidement possible ce que nous appelons un dossier d’approvisionnement en ligne, de façon à n’avoir qu’un seul système. C’est un matériel standard qui a fait ses preuves. Il est facile d’utilisation et, à lui seul, facilitera la consultation des débouchés et la présentation de soumissions. Nous avons accéléré le projet qui devrait être déployé en 2017-2018.

À l’autre bout du spectre, nous essayons de régler toutes sortes de problèmes administratifs chroniques. Si quelqu’un présente une soumission, par exemple, et qu’une page du document se perd — ce qui n’est pas grave au plan administratif —, sa soumission est rejetée. Nous envisageons donc de mettre en place une série de correctifs administratifs qui n’influeront évidemment pas sur des éléments critiques tels que le prix ou le contenu de la soumission.

Un autre perfectionnement majeur portera sur la simplification des contrats, qui sont très compliqués et souvent hors de proportion avec les dépenses engagées. S’il s’agit par exemple de remplacer le pont Champlain, qui est un projet de plusieurs milliards de dollars, on s’attend évidemment à un contrat énorme et compliqué, cela va de soi. Mais nos propres contrats sont beaucoup trop compliqués. Nous envisageons donc de les simplifier et visons à cette fin le même calendrier de 2017-2018. C’étaient là trois exemples précis.

(1700)

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

C’est très bien. Nous avons certainement tous, en tant que députés, des petites et moyennes entreprises dans nos circonscriptions. Avez-vous une idée du nombre de petites entreprises dont la soumission a été retenue?

Je me rappelle la période de 2004 à 2011, pendant laquelle je siégeais à ce comité et m’attelais au même genre de problèmes. Avons-nous trouvé une solution? Trop de petites entreprises nous disent qu’elles n’arrivent pas à obtenir des contrats du gouvernement. Si vous n’avez pas de chiffres sous la main, vous pouvez nous les communiquer ultérieurement.

M. George Da Pont:

En fait j’ai un chiffre, il s’agit d’un pourcentage de 80 %. Autrement dit et de façon générale, 80 % des contrats sont essentiellement attribués à des petites et moyennes entreprises. Il s’agit évidemment de 80 % des contrats et non 80 % de la valeur des achats. Je tenais à faire cette distinction.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je suis bien d’accord avec vous, car je ne pense pas que les petites et moyennes entreprises aient la capacité de soumissionner pour des gros contrats.

M. George Da Pont:

Oui.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Nous avons parlé de Postes Canada et des consultations qui se tiennent à son sujet. Des gens veulent le maintien du service et les employés de la société parlent de nouveaux modes d’affaires. Je vous demande donc si vous savez à quel moment le groupe de travail va commencer les consultations et recevoir des réponses?

M. George Da Pont:

Je n'ai vraiment rien à ajouter aux commentaires qu'a fait le ministre au sujet de Postes Canada.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Très bien.

Ma troisième question porte sur TPSGC qui transfère les montants de 19,6 millions et 4,4 millions de dollars respectivement à l’Agence du revenu du Canada et au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications pour loyers sous-utilisés. Je vois que vous avez une très grande base de données sur les biens immobiliers. Sur quels critères décidez-vous que des biens immobiliers serviront au logement social et quels défis devez-vous relever en l’occurrence? Est-ce que certains immeubles contiennent de l’amiante? Qui assume les coûts de la conversion de ces immeubles?

(1705)

Le président:

Il ne vous reste qu’à peu près 20 secondes, monsieur Da Pont.

M. George Da Pont:

Je vous donnerai donc une réponse en 20 secondes. Vous laissiez déjà entendre dans votre question que la conversion de ces immeubles en logements sociaux présente de nombreux défis par rapport aux investissements et aux réparations. C’est justement les problèmes que nous devons régler quand ces possibilités de conversion se présentent.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

Nous en arrivons à nos deux dernières questions et réponses de cinq minutes. Nous libérerons ensuite nos témoins pour voter sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

La première période de questions et réponses de cinq minutes revient à M. Blaney. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question porte sur le remplacement du centre des visiteurs de Vimy.

Les anciens combattants ont conclu une entente avec ce qui était anciennement Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada afin que, lors du 150e anniversaire du Canada et du 100e anniversaire de la bataille de la crête de Vimy, un nouveau centre des visiteurs soit construit. Le présent centre est vétuste et tout à fait inadéquat.

Je me demandais s'il était possible d'avoir une mise à jour à ce sujet.

Êtes-vous en mesure de nous confirmer que le centre des visiteurs de Vimy sera fonctionnel le 9 juin 2017? [Traduction]

M. George Da Pont:

Merci de votre question. En fait, on m’a communiqué une mise à jour il y a quelques semaines et le projet progresse comme prévu.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Bien. Est-il possible d’en connaître le prix, parce que je crois qu’un partenaire, je veux parler de la Fondation Vimy, est associé au projet, n’est-ce pas?

M. George Da Pont:

Je vais encore demander à Kevin Radford de vous répondre.

M. Kevin Radford:

Oui, nous pouvons vous fournir des données sur les coûts, entre autres. En fait, Georges est trop modeste. Tous les lundis matin, il me demande un bilan du projet, que nous lui fournissons, et jusqu’à maintenant, les travaux avancent comme prévu.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

C’est bon à savoir.

Vous avez parlé du pont Champlain. C’est un projet très important et, lui aussi, il avance comme prévu. Pouvez-vous nous donner un bilan sur ce projet très important pour Montréal et la Rive Sud?

M. George Da Pont:

Ce que j’aurais dû vous dire d’emblée, mais vous le savez sans doute, c’est que globalement, le projet relève de Transports et Infrastructure, qui est un autre ministère. Nous l’avons aidé pour tout ce qui concerne les contrats. En réponse à la question sur l’acier, par exemple, je vous fournirai ultérieurement de l’information à ce sujet, mais je sais que cette question fait partie des mises à jour régulières que je reçois et que les travaux avancent comme prévu. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.[Traduction]

Avez-vous été associé au processus d’appel d’offres pour le pont Champlain et, dans l’affirmative, est-ce que le fait que le nouveau gouvernement ne veut pas de péage a des conséquences sur le mandat?

Pouvez-vous répondre ou dois-je m’adresser au ministère des Transports?

M. George Da Pont:

Je pense qu’il vaudrait mieux poser la question à ce ministère, dont relèvent les politiques de péage.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Bon, d'accord.

Vous trouverez peut-être cette autre question plus intéressante, vous avez mentionné que vous étiez fier du nouveau système de rémunération Phénix. Je ne m’en suis pas rendu compte — je reçois toujours mon salaire —, mais est-ce que ce système fonctionne bien?

M. George Da Pont:

Je pense que vous avez répondu à la question. Si vous aviez remarqué quelque chose, je crois que notre discussion d’aujourd’hui serait beaucoup plus difficile.

L'hon. Steven Blaney: Bon.

M. George Da Pont: On dit souvent que le gouvernement n’est pas capable de bien gérer de grands projets. Je tiens à dire qu’il s’agissait d’un énorme projet visant à consolider l’administration de la paye, dont se chargeaient auparavant chaque ministère et chaque agence. Le fait de regrouper les services dans un seul centre de rémunération situé à Miramichi et de mettre en même temps sur pied un nouveau système automatisant diverses fonctions devraient entraîner d’importantes améliorations.

On sous-estime quelquefois la difficulté de gérer des projets de cette envergure et de cette nature. Il n’est pas encore temps de crier victoire, mais nous sommes passés sans encombre à travers la première période de rémunération et tout a bien marché. Je préfère attendre encore au moins une ou deux périodes avant de sabrer le champagne. Je tiens toutefois à souligner le travail remarquable qu’a accompli l’équipe composée d’agents de notre ministère et d’autres ministères. Le fait que vous n’ayez rien remarqué est exactement ce que nous attendions.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Bon.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.

(1710)

Le président:

Notre dernière période de questions et réponses de cinq minutes revient à M. Drouin.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je n’ai qu’un commentaire. J’ai dit que la génération du millénaire était férue de technologie. Mais nous ne le sommes pas autant que M. Graham.

Je ferai un autre commentaire avant de passer aux questions. Je tiens à remercier M. Blaney qui défend avec passion les emplois dans le domaine de la construction navale au Canada. J’espère qu’il cherchera à obtenir sa plate-forme. J’ai trouvé intéressant que, dans le budget de 2010, le gouvernement conservateur ait annoncé une réduction tarifaire de 25 % sur les importations de navires au Canada. Cela aurait permis aux armateurs d’acheter des navires à l’étranger et les emplois canadiens n’auraient pas été protégés. J’espère qu’il a la même passion qu’en 2010.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Nous l'appelons le libre-échange.

M. Francis Drouin:

J’ai une question pour Services partagés, qui concerne le Comité des programmes et de planification stratégique. Comment Services partagés gère-t-il la transition entre les technologies existantes et les nouvelles technologies, ainsi que les contrats qui y sont associés? Pour ne citer qu’un exemple, je sais que TPSGC ou le Comité des programmes et de planification stratégique gère certains des anciens contrats comme celui des Services de soutien de l'équipement de réseau .

Je pose la question parce que certaines entreprises se retrouvent dans l’incertitude. Elles attendent un nouveau mécanisme d’approvisionnement. Services partagés souhaite acheter une nouvelle technologie, mais il ne peut pas le faire sans mécanisme d’approvisionnement. Avez-vous mis au point une stratégie pour la transition? Je sais que dans cinq ans on n’en parlera plus, que tout sera réglé, mais pour l’instant, y a-t-il une stratégie en place?

M. Ron Parker:

Absolument. Les instruments d’approvisionnement ont été mis au point et depuis le 1er septembre dernier, les offres à commandes nationales restantes sont passées à Services partagés. Nous prenons en charge les commandes des ministères afin de répondre à leurs besoins. Par conséquent, les instruments sont là et fonctionnent très bien.

M. Francis Drouin:

Pardonnez mon ignorance, j’étais en campagne.

M. Blaney a mentionné le monument de Vimy. Selon lui, le projet progresse selon le calendrier et les budgets prévus. Quand exactement sera-t-il terminé?

M. Kevin Radford:

Malheureusement, je n’ai pas cette information sous la main et je vous prie de m’en excuser, mais nous pouvons certainement vous la communiquer.

M. George Da Pont:

Je peux vous donner la date exacte.

M. Francis Drouin:

D’accord. C’est simplement que le 150e anniversaire approche.

M. George Da Pont:

Évidemment, ce sera terminé à temps pour le 150e anniversaire, mais j'ai oublié la date précise.

M. Kevin Radford:

Ou il y aura un nouveau sous-ministre adjoint de la Direction générale des biens immobiliers ici la prochaine fois.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Francis Drouin:

J'aimerais poser une autre question pour la gouverne du Comité. Je sais que Services partagés Canada travaille sur l'ITSC dans les centres de données, et j'aimerais connaître d'autres initiatives sur lesquelles travaille Services partagés Canada.

M. Ron Parker:

Ce sont d'entrée de jeu des initiatives de très grande envergure. Néanmoins, il y a aussi une initiative concernant la consolidation des 50 réseaux en vase clos en un seul réseau pour le gouvernement du Canada. Ces trois projets représentent un travail sans précédent en matière de transformation. Nous réalisons également de nombreux projets au nom de nos partenaires et de nos clients. Il peut s'agir d'un projet de biométrie ou d'autres projets qui relèvent de notre portefeuille, mais nous participons à pratiquement toute initiative ayant trait à l'infrastructure des TI qu'un ministère entreprend. Il y a une vaste gamme de projets en ce qui concerne la GRC, le MDN ou d'autres ministères. Il y a littéralement des centaines de projets.

(1715)

M. Francis Drouin:

Je sais qu'il y a quelques années il y a eu quelques décrets et que vous étiez chargés de l'initiative concernant les appareils technologiques en milieu de travail, mais le Conseil du Trésor était encore responsable des demandes. Est-ce encore le cas aujourd'hui ou êtes-vous complètement responsables de tout ce qui touche les TI?

Le président:

Monsieur Parker, allez-y.

M. Ron Parker:

Je n'ai pas réussi à entendre la question.

M. Graham Barr:

Non. Services partagés Canada n'est pas responsable des demandes.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Voilà qui conclut notre série de questions de cinq minutes.

Mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie au nom de tous les membres du Comité de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. Les renseignements que vous nous avez fournis ont été très utiles et très instructifs. Merci encore une fois d'avoir pris le temps de venir nous voir aujourd'hui, et nous espérons avoir l'occasion de vous reparler au cours des prochaines années.

Oui, monsieur Drouin. Allez-y.

M. Francis Drouin:

Monsieur le président, je crois que l'ensemble du Comité aimerait souhaiter au sous-ministre une merveilleuse retraite, dont il a fait l'annonce la semaine dernière. Je sais que vous êtes du même avis.

Le président:

Merci de vos années de service.

Des voix: Bravo!

M. George Da Pont:

Merci beaucoup. Je vais certainement m'ennuyer de témoigner devant vos comités.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Je remercie de leur concision les représentants qui ont dû donner des réponses très brèves.

Nous attendrons quelques instants pour donner le temps à nos témoins de quitter la table. Entre-temps, je vous informe qu'au cours de la semaine de relâche je vais demander au greffier de vous envoyer un communiqué concernant ce que nous ferons à l'occasion de la prochaine réunion du jeudi. Si nous sommes en mesure d'avoir un groupe de témoins pour traiter des travaux retenus par le Sous-comité du programme, nous aurons une réunion en bonne et due forme. Autrement, nous aurons une réunion du Sous-comité à cette occasion, soit le jeudi 24 mars de 15 h 30 à 17 h 30.

Mesdames et messieurs, passons maintenant aux crédits. Il s'agit du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Où sont les crédits? Est-ce que j'ai égaré quelque chose dans mes documents?

Le président:

Je vais les passer en revue de vive voix et vous demander si vous les approuvez ou si vous ne les approuvez pas.

M. Nick Whalen:

Monsieur le président, quel document SharePoint devrais-je ouvrir? J'ai fermé SharePoint par accident. Quelqu'un pourrait-il m'indiquer où se trouve l'information?

Le président:

Ce n'est pas un problème. En gros, je vais simplement vous demander de vive voix si, par exemple, le crédit 1c sous la rubrique Conseil privé est adopté.

Vous avez tous vu le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Vous devez donc maintenant décider si vous voulez approuver, modifier ou réduire les crédits. Ce processus se fera de vive voix, et le vote se fera à main levée.

À moins que l'un d'entre vous demande un vote par appel nominal, je vais simplement demander qui dit oui et qui dit non. CONSEIL PRIVÉ ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de programme..........3 644 076 $

(Le crédit 1c est adopté.) COMMISSION DE LA FONCTION PUBLIQUE ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de programme..........1 $

(Le crédit 1c est adopté.) TRAVAUX PUBLICS ET SERVICES GOUVERNEMENTAUX ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........72 238 881 $ ç Crédit 5c — Dépenses en capital..........40 231 331 $

(Les crédits 1c et 5c sont adoptés.) SERVICES PARTAGÉS CANADA ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........20 712 999 $ ç Crédit 5c — Dépenses en capital..........12 326 933 $

(Les crédits 1c et 5c sont adoptés.) SECRÉTARIAT DU CONSEIL DU TRÉSOR ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de programme..........43 981 086 $ ç Crédit 20c — Assurance de la fonction publique..........469 200 000 $

(Les crédits 1c et 20c sont adoptés.)

Le président: Enfin, la présidence doit-elle faire rapport demain à la Chambre du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Merci beaucoup.

Mesdames et messieurs, je crois que nous avons terminé. Merci beaucoup. Je vous suis reconnaissant de vos efforts.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard oggo 33090 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on March 10, 2016

2016-03-09 OGGO 5

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1830)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Ladies and gentlemen, I will call the meeting to order.

Welcome to the fifth meeting of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates.

A reminder to all members that the proceedings tonight are televised.

It is my pleasure to welcome Minister Brison.

Minister Brison, I understand you have an opening statement, and perhaps you could also introduce some of the officials with you.

Hon. Scott Brison (President of the Treasury Board):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm delighted to be here with you tonight, and with members of the committee.

We're going to be focusing tonight on supplementary estimates (C). I look forward to the discussion.

The mandate of this committee is to study the effectiveness and proper functioning of government operations, the estimates process, as well as the expenditure plans of central departments and agencies.

The Treasury Board is quite central to the work of this committee, so I'm looking forward to having a good working relationship with members of this committee. I'm delighted to be here tonight with Joyce Murray, our parliamentary secretary; Bill Matthews, the Comptroller General of Canada; Brian Pagan, the assistant secretary of the expenditure management sector at TBS; and, Renée Lafontaine, the assistant secretary, corporate services sector, and chief financial officer.

After my remarks, we'd be happy to take any questions you may have. [Translation]

Let me first talk about the overall estimates process.

As you know, the government prepares estimates to request Parliament's authority to spend public funds. The slide on page 3 shows this process.[English]

I believe each of your offices was provided with a deck that has that information.

The main estimates and the supplementary estimates (A), (B), and (C) provide information on the planned spending for each department and agency.[Translation]

Main estimates must be tabled in the House of Commons no later than March 1.

The supplementary estimates present information to Parliament on spending that was either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the main estimates, or that has since been refined to account for new developments in programs or services.[English]

Later in my remarks I would like to get back broadly to the estimates process to highlight how we believe it could be improved.

I would like to turn now to government-wide supplementary estimates (C). I want to put these estimates into context by going back to the 2015-16 supplementary estimates (B), which are presented to the committee of the whole in December.

Giving the timing of the election in October of last year, the fall parliamentary session opened much later than usual, and most parliamentary committees had not yet been struck.[Translation]

Out of respect for the newly formed Parliament, the fall supplementary estimates (B) only included the most urgent items that could not be temporarily cash-managed within existing authorities. As a result, there are more items in the supplementary estimates (C) tabled on February 19 than we would normally see.[English]

The supplementary estimates (C) provide information to support the government's request for Parliament to approve $2.8 billion in voted appropriations for 58 organizations. These funds are needed to continue government programs and initiatives.

Page 4 of the deck highlights major items over $100 million, and they include $435 million to restore financial health to the service income security insurance plan, SISIP, which provides long-term disability benefits to Canadian Forces members.[Translation]

There is also $216 million related to military support for Canada's assistance to Ukraine and to operations against the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.[English]

There's $176 million for employment and social development to write off debts owed to the crown for unrecoverable Canada student loans.

There's $168 million for the green climate fund, $147 million for the resettlement of Syrian refugees, $121 million for Global Affairs Canada to cover foreign exchange adjustments and also some contributions to international organizations. There's $116 million for the construction of three offshore fisheries science vessels for the Canadian Coast Guard.

With respect to my own Treasury Board supplementary estimates, the department is seeking Parliament's authority for an additional $511.9 million. That includes the $435 million for disability benefits for Canadian Forces members, which I referenced earlier, SISIP. It also includes $34 million to establish a contingency to cover any increase in expenditures under the public service health care plan.

(1835)



As well, there is $42.7 million in vote 1 for program expenditures, which mostly come from other government departments, to support Treasury Board-led government-wide back office transformation. This amount is offset by funding transferred from TBS to Shared Services Canada for IT infrastructure costs related to workplace renewal. [Translation]

Finally, let me say a few words about transparency.

We are firmly committed to providing Parliamentarians with the information they need to monitor and review government spending. Right now the system does not enable us to reach this goal because of difficulties with the timeline. Given the timing issues, determined in part by House Standing Orders, the budget items for a given year are not reflected in the main estimates for the same year.[English]

The current system is not transparent. The current system is, in my view, not functional or effective if the objective is that parliamentarians can hold government—I don't care which government, whether this government or a future government—to account. We aim to change that, and we look forward to working with you as part of this process.

The current system results in Parliament being asked to approve departmental spending plans without complete information on what the departments are actually planning to spend.

We understand that when it comes to the process of approving and reporting on government spending, this misalignment of the budget and estimates processes and the public accounts is an ongoing source of confusion for Parliament, the media, and Canadians. Some governments—we may hear more particulars later this evening—such as the Australian government have reformed their estimates and budget processes in a way that is more rational and effective if the objective is for Parliament to be given the information it needs to do its job.

These are problems that make it much more difficult for the Parliament of Canada, all members of Parliament regardless of party, to scrutinize government spending. Simply sequencing the main estimates so that they're presented to Parliament after the budget rather than before is, I believe, an important first step to better providing more complete and useful information to Parliament.

I want to work closely with parliamentarians and other key stakeholders and experts to achieve greater transparency and would welcome an opportunity to engage this committee. In fact, a few weeks ago we had a session for parliamentarians of all parties. MPs and senators from all parties were there to discuss potential opportunities to reform the budget and estimates process. Over 70 parliamentarians participated in that.

My officials are currently preparing a discussion paper on the subject of estimates alignment, which we'll be able to share with this committee. I'd welcome the opportunity to return in the future to have a more fulsome discussion on that. I know committees set their own agendas, but we would really appreciate your input on this in terms of looking at models that work better than the one we have now and ways we can improve accountability.

We've already taken some concrete steps to improve transparency in these supplementary estimates by reporting on government lapses.

(1840)



I draw your attention to page 6 of the presentation. For the first time, there is actually now an online annex. You can go to the Treasury Board website to the supplementary estimates. There's an online annex to the supplementary estimates, which provides Parliament with an early indication of the lapses expected for this fiscal year. We can discuss this further.

I know you want to talk about frozen allotments. I know that's exciting. Lapses and frozen allotments are something that get all of us really excited. It is an important issue and we can return to that.

I will tell you that it was a significant step to actually make public online this annex that lists the frozen allotments. This is a significant step forward that was recognized by the parliamentary budget officer, who said: The publication of these frozen allotments a full ten months prior to the Public Accounts of Canada represents an important increase in fiscal transparency, ensuring that parliamentarians are on a less unequal footing with the Government.

To paraphrase, it puts you on more equal footing, to eliminate a double negative.

We appreciate the support of the parliamentary budget office on this. As we move forward, we intend on taking further steps to provide more details and more useful information in a more useful format to parliamentarians.

On that note, I'll conclude my remarks. I look forward to our discussion this evening, Mr. Chair and members of this committee.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. I have a quick comment. I appreciate, and I think all members appreciate, your comments and your willingness to work with this committee, particularly in a shared concern to reform the budgetary and estimates process. You will find, as I have, that the members of this committee are not only extremely bright and well informed but they are also extremely engaged.

I believe you'll have a great time working with this committee. I'm sure that you'll find, during questions, that their level of knowledge and engagement will be apparent, which is a nice segue into the first round of questions, which will be a seven-minute round.

We'll start with Madam Ratansi.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister Brison, for being here. I was looking at your mandate letter and you have a huge mandate to fulfill. You have 11 priorities. I know that your goal is to lead the management agenda of the government.

One of the things you talked about is transparency and accountability. I appreciate the fact that you're trying to align both the estimates and the budget process. I was looking at annex B, which talks about cash versus accrual accounting. It confuses the living daylights when your public accounts are in a cash basis and something else is in an accrual basis. While your department is looking at things around making the cycles similar, could we please look at accrual accounting because those are the international financial standards, and accountants read financial statements that way and it's easy to explain.

Treasury Board is requesting $43 million-plus for the back office transformation initiative. My question would be about your desire to make operations move toward information technology, so that data is available, open, etc.

What are some of the challenges that Treasury Board will face, or has faced, as it moves toward that back office transformation? How can we avoid the problems that Shared Services is facing, for example, where the RFP process is not very transparent sometimes or it's not very well done?

I know that within your mandate you have to work to establish new performance standards with ministries like Public Services and Procurement. The minister will be coming tomorrow.

Could you give me some idea of how you're moving toward it, what challenges we face, and how can we make the process more accountable going forward?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much, Ms. Ratansi. You're a chartered accountant as well.

The question, first of all, of cash versus accrual accounting is an important one. I mentioned earlier this evening the Australian example of a country that in my opinion has done a good job of reforming its budget and estimates process to render it more transparent and accountable to Parliament.

One thing they did was move to similar systems, with accrual accounting across the board. There were problems with that. They ran into issues and ultimately reversed some of that change. In our work, as we look at options together, I'm open to the Australian model. It is an example of something I haven't said we won't do, but it is something that they ran into issues with.

I may ask Brian to speak to some of the challenges they had with the Australian model. Then I'll answer the second question.

(1845)

Mr. Brian Pagan (Assistant Secretary, Expenditure Management, Treasury Board Secretariat):

We have a number of issues that we would like to address with parliamentarians in terms of better alignment of the budget, the estimates, and the public accounts documents. Currently, we can say that the documents are aligned in the sense that the budget, in volume I of the Public Accounts, is on an accrual basis, and the estimates, in volume II of the Public Accounts, are on a cash basis.

When we look at experience in other jurisdictions, we believe that there is some merit in that, but we understand that there are differing views and would be happy to work with parliamentarians to better understand those.

As the minister said, we have looked at Australia, where there was was a significant problem. Unexpended accrual envelopes grew and considerable sums of money were accumulated without being spent for the purpose for which they were intended. That in itself is obviously a problem.

In the minister's reference to the estimates after the budget, we believe that if we can just get that very simple thing right, a whole bunch of other things with respect to these documents will be more coherent and more transparent, and therefore we will be better able to have those discussions.

We'll be returning to the committee to talk about that.

Hon. Scott Brison:

On the whole issue of back office transformation, enterprise-wide solutions are difficult, whether you're in a big company with a lot of divisions or in a government. The challenges at Shared Services that occurred under the previous government are not unique, so I'm not being partisan. These are difficult files. Because we at Treasury Board are a central agency that works across departments and agencies, as part of our mandate we work to establish good governance around these things, but it is not easy when you're trying to implement and procure enterprise-wide, particularly IT solutions.

All government procurement is murky; government IT solutions are murkier. I'd say defence procurement is probably the toughest file, but it's always a challenge. It's one we're engaged in very actively, because modernizing back office support and transforming the back office and IT solutions is not an option; it's something we have to do as a government to modernize and improve the services we provide to Canadians and the value we provide through those services for taxpayers.

We have to do this. It is a challenge the previous government faced; it's a challenge every government faces in managing this. Treasury Board is at the centre of it, and we take it very seriously, but it does take investments.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I have a question, just quickly.

The Chair:

Make it a very brief question.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

You need to institute proper budgeting, because accrual accounting is based on.... You made a statement that you are asking us to approve departmental estimates, without our knowing what the departments are doing. I think it is important that the departments budget properly, and then accrual accounting would help. Sheila Fraser would be an excellent asset.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I agree with everything you just said, Ms. Ratansi. It is something we should look at. As we're reforming the budget and estimates process, I don't want perfection to be the enemy of the good. If we can identify some concrete steps we can take to make things better, we can do a full portfolio of changes in the future. But I want to make some concrete changes to get things better before the next budget year.

(1850)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Blaney for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I welcome you, your officials, and your parliamentary secretary to this Committee meeting, Mr. Minister. It is a pleasure to have you here. It is also heartening to know that you want to work collaboratively. You can count on us to play a constructive role as the opposition.

In regard to the changes, I would say that it will be important to convince us of the need for those changes. If I look at, for example—and that brings me to my question, Mr. Minister—the Update of Fiscal and Economic Projections, 2015, which gathers government data, it is clear that there is a positive budget balance of $1.9 billion in the 2014-15 fiscal year.

You are just starting a new term in office, Mr. Minister. At this point, it is important to know that we are on the right track. In your election platform, you made it clear that in the short term you would post a modest deficit of less than $10 billion over the next two fiscal years, to make investments in infrastructure and Canada's middle class. You expected to return to a balanced budget in 2019.

I see headlines here.[English]

I have an article from February. The headline says, “Federal Deficits Could Exceed $52B Over 2 Years, If Liberals Keep Their Promises”.

Also, the headline from a National Bank study says, “Liberal deficits could total $90B after 4 years”.

Mr. Minister, you are the guardian of the taxpayer. You're the one who says “no”, and you're also the one who signs the cheques.[Translation]

We would not want you to develop tendinitis from signing cheques, since the sun will set on your sunny ways and the taxpayers will be the ones to pay the price.

I do have a question. At the dawn of your new term in office, you play an important role. Are you prepared to meet the commitment you made in your platform, and respect the opposition parties, which, as you know, want a balanced budget? I would like to hear your thoughts on that, Mr. Minister.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much, Mr. Blaney. I appreciate your question and I am very pleased to see you have our election platform. It is an outstanding document.

We may not agree on that, but we still inherited a deficit from the previous government. Clearly, we also inherited a situation that requires us to create economic growth. Since 2011, our economy has seen anemic growth. For us, the priority is to make significant investments to renew our infrastructure across Canada, and to strategically invest in the middle class to create jobs. Economic growth is a priority for our government and we will work on it. That will be front and centre in our budget; that is exactly what we will do in the budget. It is important to recognize that the former government—your government—increased our national debt by $150 billion. We will make different decisions and invest strategically to boost economic growth.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Mr. Minister, it is true that during the economic crisis, our government made investments, with the agreement of the opposition parties, including the Liberals.

However, how can you claim you inherited a deficit? Data from the finance department shows that there was a budget surplus of $1.9 billion. At the time you took office, the budget was balanced. You committed to run modest deficits. Can you commit this evening, as president of the Treasury Board, to safeguard the interests of taxpayers? The taxpayers in my riding, as well as business people, are worried, Mr. Brison.

We must also think of our children. Sustainable development means that we will not saddle them with a system that is not sustainable. It has come to the point where we will be borrowing to buy groceries. This is what you will do, and this is not sustainable development.

You are the one who can act as the government's control valve. You can say that you have to meet your commitments. Indeed, this was in your platform, which was why you were elected. Of course, only 41% of the population voted for you, which means that 59% of the population said they did not want a deficit.

A $10-billion deficit is bad enough, but according to the headlines, you are on a slippery slope, Mr. President of the Treasury Board. Are you ready to take on your role as guardian of taxpayers' interests and guardian of the commitments made by the Liberal Party during the last election campaign?

I repeat, at the end of the year we had a $1.9-billion budget surplus. I can table the document; it is available online, on the Finance Canada website.

(1855)

[English]

The Chair:

I know it might be difficult, Minister, after a lengthy preamble like that, but please give as succinct an answer as you can. [Translation]

Hon. Scott Brison:

Mr. Blaney is a good guy. I like him a lot. We work out together at the gym, once in a while. [English]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

It shows a lot, doesn't it?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's why we're so strong. We have big muscles, Mr. Blaney and I. We're tough guys.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, it is very important to recognize that such experts as David Dodge, Kevin Lynch, and Larry Summers, former U.S. Treasury secretary, agree with us and say that we need to invest now, particularly in this time of anemic growth.[English]

We're investing strategically. We will invest strategically. You'll see that in the budget. We will do so in a disciplined way. We will grow the economy. We will invest in the middle class. We've committed to that. We believe in that. The OECD and some of the top economic thinkers in the world agree with us.

I very much welcome Mr. Blaney's questions today, and look forward to further conversations on this.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Weir, seven minutes, please.

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We've had some broad questions about the overall fiscal framework. I'd like to focus on a couple of specific areas.

As the Treasury Board is undoubtedly aware, the Global Transportation Hub near Regina is mired in a controversial land deal that saw this crown corporation pay more than twice what the land was worth to sellers with connections to the governing SaskParty. There have been calls for an RCMP investigation.

In Monday's adjournment debate, the parliamentary secretary for transport confirmed that her department had provided $27 million to the Global Transportation Hub, but did not seem particularly concerned about how the money was spent. Today's Globe and Mail reports that the Treasury Board has placed Transport Canada under special oversight. Will that include an investigation to ensure that federal tax dollars were not wasted in a suspicious SaskParty land deal?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much, Mr. Weir.

You worked at Treasury Board at one point or another.

(1900)

Mr. Erin Weir:

That's true.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I think Mr. Blaney worked at Public Works, my old department, a long time ago.

First of all, I want to broadly address the issue of Transport Canada's operating budget. We're working closely with Minister Garneau on this, and he will respond to specific questions related to Transport. I'm certainly willing to speak with Minister Garneau about that.

Treasury Board, particularly our comptroller general, Mr. Matthews, is engaged across every government department and agency, with which we work closely. Like me, Mr. Matthews is a Dalhousie University graduate. He has a commerce degree so he must be a smart fellow. We work closely with departments and agencies with the objective of establishing strong financial governance and identifying potential issues.

Would it be all right with you if I were to check into that, work with my colleague minister, and get back to you?

Mr. Erin Weir:

I would certainly appreciate that.

Just to clarify, you'll ask Minister Garneau specifically to look into the Global Transportation Hub to make sure that federal funds were not misspent.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I've been around long enough to know that when I don't know the answer to a question, I say I don't know the answer to the question. I will talk with Minister Garneau about that. I commit to get back to you on that.

The last thing I want to get drawn into is provincial politics from Saskatchewan. I don't know what the situation is there, but from a federal government perspective, we will certainly check into that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

That's fair enough.

To touch on another issue, yesterday at this committee, the Privy Council Office indicated that it will spend about $1 million annually to support the new Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments, and that its recommendations will not be made public.

Will other departments or the Senate itself spend additional funds on this process?

The Senate remains unelected, unaccountable, and under investigation. Why is the government pouring more money into this unnecessary institution rather than simply following the example of every provincial legislature and abolishing the upper House?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Well, I've checked my mandate letter extensively and Senate reform is not in it, but Senate reform is something that's important to our government. My colleague, Minister Monsef, has put forward proposals in conjunction with our House leader.

This is something we take seriously in terms of strengthening the Senate and improving the appointment process. That process is under way now. As you know, there's an interim process because of the urgency of the appointment of senators from certain provinces. There's a panel, an independent advisory board of eminent Canadians that has been appointed to that task. We are moving forward with Senate reform.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Can you confirm that $1 million a year will be the total federal contribution to the cost of that board, or might other departments be spending money on this new regime as well?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Ultimately, I think you're talking about disbursements that occur within the Senate and the Parliament. The appointment process is what we're talking about, and to reform any process requires investment. We believe these are sensible investments aimed at a greater good for a stronger Senate, and a process that's more transparent and ultimately renders the Senate appointment process more meritorious.

I want to be very clear though, Mr. Weir. My view is that the Senate of Canada does important work. We believe that the Senate can be strengthened, but there's some very important work that occurs in the Senate and at Senate committees.

We can have a difference of opinion, but I believe that there are important steps we can take, without the need for opening up the Constitution, for example. Through the appointment process, we can further strengthen the Senate, and I think Canadians want to see that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

There is a difference of opinion, but there's also an empirical question about the cost of this new process, and certainly that money could otherwise be used to fund good research and important studies for which the Senate is sometimes credited. There is a question about whether this is the most efficient use of money.

(1905)

Hon. Scott Brison:

Would you agree, if the process we're speaking of rendered the Senate more effective and the appointment process more transparent, that it would be a sensible thing?

Mr. Erin Weir:

If it rendered the process more transparent.

I was disappointed to learn that the recommendations won't be public.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Would that be a laudable objective, though? Is that a laudable objective with which you would agree?

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, you will have a three-minute round I believe toward the end of this. We're at our seven minutes now.

Hon. Scott Brison:

My problem there is you've got to understand that come June 19 I will have been around here elected for 19 years and by that point sixteen and a half of those years will have been in opposition so I'm more accustomed to asking questions sometimes. I apologize to my colleague.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Graham, seven minutes please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Minister, thank you for being here. You have more experience on this particular file than I think any of us wants.

I want to dive into your favourite topic of frozen allotments and uncommitted authorities, which I know you're very much looking forward to doing. When we look at these allotments of $5.1 billion, I'm wondering this. The Conservatives tell us they balanced the last budget. I find that very hard to believe. How much money went unspent in that toward the number they claim was a surplus?

Hon. Scott Brison:

There are a couple of things on this, David. I was joking a little bit with Mr. Blaney, but I don't want us to get into.... I've sat on committees that get too partisan and it's not a lot of fun.

On this, if you take a look at the “Fiscal Monitor” it's a picture in time of one month, one quarter, what have you, and it's like saying you check your bank account one day and you have $10,000 in it but you haven't paid your mortgage, you haven't paid your car payment. Or you think, I must have money in my account, I still have cheques left, kind of thing. It's not exactly a broader picture. It doesn't necessarily reflect the overall.

In terms of the frozen allotments in that question, I just want to give you some examples. These are funds that are approved by Parliament but the Treasury Board will restrict access to the monies for various reasons. I'll give you just a couple of examples.

One is, for instance, when there's a commitment to transfer dollars to another department or agency in exchange for a service. Another is the reprofiling to future years.

For instance, freezing allotments sometimes occurs with defence procurement where we set aside a certain amount of money with the expectation that money will be expended in the future. Again you can go to the Treasury Board website and see $5.1 billion laid out in terms of specific examples.

There's $2.8 billion of the frozen amounts that are funds that have been approved for reprofiling to future years. This includes $630 million in capital and operating funds for major defence projects like I mentioned; $675 million for claims settlements and other transfers supporting indigenous peoples.

I'll give you one example here that falls under Treasury Board, and that's $507 million for maternity and parental benefits and severance. That falls under “Treasury Board Central”. It's an important one because Treasury Board, by doing this centrally, takes that financial cost out of departments and agencies, and Treasury Board manages it. We do that because we believe there is a public good to not having departments and agencies making hiring decisions with limited budgets based on whether there's a possibility that somebody may need parental benefits or severance. There are some very important and progressive reasons why Treasury Board will manage some of these centrally.

We are managing government contingencies. This year, part of this for Treasury Board is $750 million of government contingencies that won't be allocated. There are carry-forwards from other years for operating capital budgets of $560 million. The rendering of this public “earlier in the budget” process, as the parliamentary budget officer has said, is a significant step in terms of transparency. It's an important step. It's just the beginning in terms of transparency and providing better information to parliamentarians and Canadians.

(1910)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have another question for you. You want to reform the supplements system and I think it's really interesting. Have there been recent reforms or has there been a fairly constant system for a long time?

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's been a process that, on a secular basis over a period of time, I think has become less meaningful. There was a time when the main estimates and the ministers coming before committees to defend their estimates was considered a big deal to parliamentarians, and it was central to the job of parliamentarians.

We were talking about the Senate earlier, and I have to tell you that within the Senate, there are senators who actually, I must say, understand this process more thoroughly and who make a point of holding ministers to account on estimates in a very effective way. I think my officials would agree with that. You might want to go to a Senate committee where ministers are appearing on their estimates.

This is something that's happened on a secular basis over a longer period of time. It's not purely a partisan thing. The question is, how do we fix it? This is something we take very seriously. I know there's been really good work done by the officials in our department on this. I pointed out earlier the Australian model.

I think, Mr. Graham, you were at the session we did with parliamentarians a few weeks ago.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I arrived very late because I had rural caucus before it.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'm a proud member of rural caucus as well.

I do want to come back to committee specifically to focus on some of the ideas around reforming. There is a deck that we presented to members of Parliament and senators who came to that meeting that night and, if I may, we will provide that deck to the committee. We haven't set a date to come back to this estimates and parliamentary supply process, but I would like to provide that to committee members soon, such that you can start thinking about this as we move forward. It's really important. It's in our wheelhouse at Treasury Board and it's in the wheelhouse of the OGGO parliamentary committee as well in terms of making this work better.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're out of time, but I'll just let you know, Minister, that Treasury Board has already given us that deck you referred to and it has already been distributed.

We'll go to the five-minute round now, starting with Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

Minister, thanks for joining us today. I appreciate your dedication to open government. I think if you attended yesterday's session, you would have felt, as we did, that it was like something out of an episode of Yes, Minister, the way we were getting answers, so I appreciate your commitment to transparency.

I won't go over the billion dollar questions as my cohort here did, but with regard to the $81 million to support increased demand for health, rehab, and support services for Veterans Affairs, is that for the reopening of those nine outlets that have been closed, or how is this money being divided up, spent, and prioritized, especially across such a large country and with a large number of vets requiring service? Is it based solely on the election promise to reopen those nine outlets or is it based on actual proven need by geographic region?

Hon. Scott Brison:

First of all, Veterans Affairs and treatment of our veterans and those who have served Canada so valiantly is something all of us as parliamentarians consider to be an important priority.

There are a couple of things. One is the nature of military service today, most recently in Afghanistan and now in terms of the members of the Canadian Armed Forces who are serving in the mission against ISIS as part of the training as we go forward. The nature of military service has changed. In fact, supporting veterans in the context of this changed environment—for instance, with the increase in the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder and some of these other related challenges—necessitates that governments change the way we treat veterans, and update and modernize that. We take that seriously.

The requested funds are to support an increase in the number of disability benefit applications being processed, increasing requirements for health services for such things as prescription drugs, and, I want to stress, for increased support for mental health services.

(1915)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I appreciate that. Is this specifically for those nine? Is it specifically for payment for the costs for reopening those nine or is it for separate services, as you're now saying?

Hon. Scott Brison:

We are reopening the nine offices.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

So it is separate.

Hon. Scott Brison:

The funding I'm speaking of here is to improve service delivery to veterans. I mentioned some of the areas, including improved mental health.

That doesn't obviate what we believe to be an important priority, and that is to reopen some of these offices.

We were told clearly by veterans that these offices, the physical location of these offices, and the capacity to go and to talk with people was very important to the services we provide.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I appreciate that and that's excellent. I think it's reflected as well in the extra $435 million. Is that $81 million for the cost of those nine offices, or is it for the extra pharmaceuticals you mentioned or extra services across the country?

Hon. Scott Brison:

The number of disability benefit applications processed is a big part of this, as well as the mental health side.

There are also five years to improve service delivery to veterans and their families.

We're talking about the estimates now in supplementary estimates (C). In a couple of weeks we'll have a budget as well, which will have more—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I realize this is a question out of the dark, and if you haven't got the exact details, that's fine, we can—

Hon. Scott Brison:

These are not related to reopening those offices.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Yes. That's what I'm asking.

Hon. Scott Brison:

No, it's not specific to the opening of those offices, but we are reopening those offices—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

That's what I'm asking.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Sure. Thanks, Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay. We're short on time.

I want to pull up another issue we had yesterday that we could not get a clear answer on. There was $1 million asked for shutting down Canada's economic action plan. We realize it's a controversial issue from the past, but seeking $1 million...I'm trying to figure out what that $1 million is for.

My understanding is they're looking for $1 million extra to shut it down. The answer we got was, “No, this is money already spent this year before the change of government.”

The Chair:

I'm going to have to cut it off now. Perhaps your colleague Mr. Blaney, in his next round, would be able to pursue that line of questioning, and perhaps the minister would be able to respond at that time.

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's up to you, Mr. Chair. I'm prepared if—

The Chair:

We'll move on if we can because I want to make sure everyone has an opportunity to question the minister before we have to adjourn.

We'll go to another five-minute round for Monsieur Ayoub. [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Brison, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for being here this evening to answer our questions. Of course, transparency is an important element, as is the new way of seeing things, and I am very proud of this.

I would like to ask you a question about the Service Income Security Insurance Plan. There is a call for new money, amounting to almost half a billion dollars, specifically $435 million. It is an enormous sum. I wonder what the initial budget was and what will be the percentage increase as a result of this request.

What are the main reasons for this request? Was the forecast wrong to begin with? How long has it been known that sooner or later such a significant increase would be required? Did someone bring this file to your attention right away and advise you that there was a shortfall of half a billion dollars in the forecasts, or did this happen suddenly, within the last few weeks ?

I would like to have some idea about the process used to determine that there was a shortfall of 435 million dollars.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much, Mr. Ayoub. I appreciate your question.

In the current economic environment, with very low interest rates, we must invest to make our public-sector pension plans stronger.

Please allow me to answer in English, since this is a very technical question.

(1920)

[English]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Go ahead.

Hon. Scott Brison:

There are a couple of factors here. One is the demands on the military pension and disability. SISIP and the SISIP disability have been increasing for a number of reasons. I mentioned earlier to Mr. McCauley's question some of the issues around investing in mental health, and supporting mental health is part of that.

The other thing is in the very low interest rate environment that we have now, pension plans have faced some challenges, and we are committed to first of all maintaining the prudential strength of our public pension plans, but also maintaining transparency around our pension plans. This investment reflects that.

I've been informed by my official Brian that there's been a 66% increase in benefits over three years resulting from Afghanistan veterans, as an example. This is something that whatever government was there would be faced with. There's a very real need to maintain the prudential strength of our pension plans during a time when, in the case of SISIP, as an example, payout will grow. We're in a very low interest rate environment. This investment reflects that. [Translation]

Mr. Bill Matthews (Comptroller General of Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat):

I would just like to add one thing.[English]

The minister already mentioned the factors of the low interest rates and the increasing number of claims because of the service in Afghanistan. The third piece is the amount of benefits that are actually being paid out has increased recently because of a settlement related to a lawsuit, the Manuge case. That's actually driving up the payments of individual claims.

I believe your first question was around what was the starting point of the fund for the current year. We started the year with about $370 million—I think $368 million to be exact. We're adding $435 million, so we're basically more than doubling what's there. But it's those three factors now that you have: interest rates, increasing numbers of claims, plus the Manuge settlement.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Is there a way to plan those kinds of differences a little ahead?

Hon. Scott Brison:

The answer to that is that we are taking a look at public sector pension plans across the board in the Treasury Board to try to be able to foresee and predict the need for these investments. Rest assured, as we're making these investments we will do so in a very transparent way, and we will be accountable to Parliament and vote for them, and explain them, and engage parliamentarians in them.

I think we would all agree that in terms of public sector pension plans we need to first of all maintain their prudential strength, but we have to do so in an open and transparent way. We also have to make sure that we are utilizing the best possible pension management approaches in terms of long-term pension security for pension holders and maximizing return in a responsible way.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Blaney, for five minutes, please. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Minister, I will repeat that it is truly a pleasure to welcome you this evening. As the saying goes, we must give people a chance. However, you have not convinced me yet that you will be the one to say no. Is there someone at the controls? Will you protect the taxpayers from this propensity to create huge deficits?

My first question is on an awareness campaign that appears on page 19 of the supplementary estimates (C). The overall advertising budget is $9.5 million. One of the goals of the campaign is to prevent illegal use of marijuana among young people. We are aware of the devastating effects of marijuana. A total of $1 million is provided for this purpose. Can you confirm that this amount will be spent on that goal?

If there is time, the people with you could answer my other question, which is about the shipbuilding program. There is a sum of $116 million. Would it be possible to have a detailed explanation for the additional cost of the ships?

I will repeat my first question. Out of the the total $9.5-million advertising budget, will the $1 million allocated to preventing the illegal use of marijuana, especially among young people, be invested for this purpose?

(1925)

[English]

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much.

From marijuana to shipbuilding, we run the gamut here.[Translation]

Let me begin by discussing the marijuana legislation. For many years the Government of Canada's approach has failed to reduce marijuana use, particularly among young people. Our responsibility is to implement an evidence-based approach.[English]

The evidence is quite clear. Nobody is condoning, supporting, or promoting the use of marijuana, Mr. Blaney. We want a legal framework in laws that are more effective. Some countries that have chosen to focus efforts on health promotion, prevention, mental health services, and addiction services have found that to be more effective in reducing the use of drugs, marijuana being one, than simply a criminal justice approach. We can differ on the approach, but I want to be very clear, Mr. Blaney, that nobody here is advocating or promoting the use of marijuana.

You've raised a question on shipbuilding, and I think you may be speaking specifically to the three offshore fisheries science vessels, the $116 million.

As you know, we are committed to a national shipbuilding program across Canada. For the funding of the three offshore fisheries science vessels, I've been working most recently with Minister Tootoo. It's part of replacing the aging fleet, which is important.

What's important is you're managing shipbuilding, which falls broadly between Fisheries and Defence, and also Public Works, which is now Public Services and Procurement, and Industry. As a government we seek to balance Public Services and Procurement, my old department. Their job is to have an open and transparent process that gets the best value for taxpayers. Industry seeks to maximize industrial regional benefits, IRBs, most recently called ITBs, or technology benefits, and then the departments, Defence or Fisheries, have their needs in that.

Treasury Board overall plays a leadership and coordinating role and works with all departments and agencies to have the most efficient procurement processes that address those three government objectives: jobs for Canadians, value for tax dollars, and the best possible equipment for our military and our Coast Guard, as examples.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. That's the end of our time.

I'm sorry, Mr. Blaney, we're out of time.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Mr. Chair, not as a question but as a follow-up, if I could have a confirmation of the $1 million that is invested I would appreciate it.

(1930)

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'm sorry about that. I'm not being evasive, I'm being long-winded, and that's different.

Mr. McCauley's question earlier was related to funds being used, and we're updating the Prime Minister's website to improve communications to Canadians with a digital process. The previous Prime Minister had the 24 Seven thing—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

It's completely different.

Hon. Scott Brison:

But we're not cancelling the action plan as it were, Mr. McCauley. The action will still occur, but we're just not going to advertise it as much.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thanks very much.

The Chair:

Minister, it is 7:30, and you've graciously given us an hour; however, normally in our rotation we end with a three-minute round that goes to the third party. Would you agree to sit through another gruelling three-minute question and answer session?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I have to tell you, Mr. Chair, that over the various years, I've been in opposition and I've been in government. It's like Mae West, “I've been rich and I've been poor, and rich is better.” Between opposition and government, government's a little better, but I have great respect for the work of opposition members. I think that at one point I was in the fifth-place party in the House of Commons, so the answer is absolutely yes, I will stay.

The Chair:

We have three minutes. Please be as precise as possible, because the three minutes are for the question and the answer.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I was part of a 12-member caucus at one point.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I'll pick up on the point about marijuana. While the government figures out its framework to legalize marijuana, will it decriminalize marijuana to at least ensure that people are not receiving criminal records or going to jail for simple possession and use?

Hon. Scott Brison:

That process is currently.... My colleagues Minister Wilson-Raybould and Mr. Blair, as parliamentary secretary, are working on this. There is a process. I'm not an expert on that process.

We want to get it right. I think that having Mr. Blair there, given his law enforcement background, is very helpful, but we want to do the right thing, not based on ideology but based on evidence. I'm confident that we will get it right, but I'm not aware of some stopgap measure in the interim.

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, if I may have a quick interjection, I won't penalize your time for it.

Again, the primary function of Minister Brison's being here is to talk about the supplementary (C)s. I know there's always a tendency to get into the political sphere, but again, if we could concentrate our comments, please, on the reason for the minister's appearance tonight, I would appreciate it.

Mr. Erin Weir:

No problem, Mr. Chair.

The supplementary (C)s include a request from the Canada Revenue Agency for additional funding for tax compliance measures, which I support, but given the revelation that the Canada Revenue Agency violated its own guidelines by offering a secret deal to millionaires who had avoided taxes through the Isle of Man, how much can we expect it to collect through these compliance programs?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Mr. Weir, the last government that I was part of back in 2004-06 made a significant investment at that time in the capacity of Revenue Canada to go after offshore tax havens. In fact, my understanding is that the investment yielded significant financial returns to the government in terms of identifying them.

We are investing in the capacity for Revenue Canada to ensure that Canadians can have confidence in the tax system. That people will be paying their fair share is something we take very seriously as a government. I've had this discussion with Minister Lebouthillier. It's a priority for our finance minister and our Minister of National Revenue.

Unreported tax is identified by the audit program. Just as an example, it grew 24% in three years, to $11.7 billion. The international large business program detected $7.8 billion in unreported tax last year.

I'll tell you that one of the best articles I've read on this was in The Economist magazine, sometime in the last couple of years. The Economist Intelligence Unit did a very good study of offshore tax havens to try to quantify this and, of course, our officials in the Department of Finance and in the ministry or CRA have.

This is a very important issue. The integrity of our tax system is an important question of fairness, and we take it seriously.

(1935)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. I'll have to stop it there.

Ladies and gentlemen, we are out of time.

On behalf of all our committee members, I thank the minister and the officials for being here.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We do have a couple of very brief items to discuss, if I could ask the committee members to stay at the table.

Minister, thank you very much. You are excused. We appreciate your appearance.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thanks very much.

If you'll have me back, I would like to come back to talk about the main estimates, but also about reforming the budget and estimates process. Having served in opposition, I referenced the fact that I have some time, so if you want to talk about some other things too, I am open to that as well.

I want to make it very clear to all members of this committee that committees are the place in Parliament where effective work should be done across party lines. If committees can't function in an effective and constructive way, developing good public policy and holding government of any stripe to account, that is a real problem. I have a personal commitment, having served sometimes in committees that didn't operate that way. I think it is really important. I say this particularly to new members of Parliament. The work you do on parliamentary committees is incredibly meaningful, incredibly important, and to your staff and the team who support you—the work that they do in supporting your work—this is meaningful work where you can develop good public policy and really make a difference in the lives of Canadians.

I look forward to working with this committee as we move forward, and, Mr. Chair, I really appreciate the opportunity.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. We appreciate your appearance.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I want to thank those who accompanied me here.

I just want to finish on this note. We have exceptional public servants in the Government of Canada. We have some members of this committee who have worked in the public service and who would share that view. We are well served, and I really want to thank them for being here tonight.

Thank you all.

The Chair:

Since this is still being televised, I would ask the committee to go in camera for about two minutes.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I just want to remind you that you missed one of our members. You skipped the schedule. It should have been a Liberal member for five minutes. You went straight to....

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Can I just make a point of order to have it on the record that you skipped over my time and gave it to the NDP?

The Chair:

The schedule I have indicates I did not skip over that. The schedule that we adopted at the start shows that in the first seven-minute round we go Liberal, Conservative, New Democratic Party, and Liberal.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Yes.

The Chair:

In the second round, we have Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, and in the third round, three minutes for the New Democratic Party.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

No. That is, in fact, incorrect.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Where did you get the third round from, Mr. Chair? This is what we adopted.

The Chair:

This is what I have been given. My understanding is that this is what we adopted.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, we have been following this for the past....

Mr. Nick Whalen:

No, that is not what was adopted.

The Chair:

We'll go back and check exactly the record. Our clerk is going to examine....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There was never a third round.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

There was no third round, and it was Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, Liberal.

The Chair:

Nick, I know you weren't here yesterday, but we did exactly this rotation yesterday.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, we didn't. We followed this rotation, but it was not Mr. Weir. It was first Mr. Grewal.

The Chair:

No, I have the lineup from yesterday, and I can assure you we followed the exact rotation we did today. I am not going to get into an argument.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

It's not a problem.

The Chair:

We'll go back and check the rotation that was adopted. The committee obviously has an opportunity to adopt whatever speaking rotation it wishes, so let us first check and see exactly what our records indicate, and we will deal with that tomorrow. There was certainly no intent to skip over anyone.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I don't want to take it away from Mr. Weir, either.

The Chair:

We'll go back and find out exactly what we adopted.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Okay.

The Chair:

Very briefly, these are the two issues that I had. One, as I mentioned yesterday, is for everyone to give consideration to the meeting schedule the week of March 21. The Tuesday meeting will not be held because it is budget day. My question to you for consideration was whether we have a full meeting on Thursday, March 24. That is the day before we break for two weeks for our Easter constituency weeks. If we do not have a full meeting—and it will be up to this committee to determine that—I suggested that we have a subcommittee meeting on agenda, so we can get our work plan established, but I will leave it up to the consensus, hopefully, of this committee. Did you wish a committee meeting to be held on Thursday afternoon, prior to Good Friday, or not?

(1940)

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Do we have an agenda for the meeting? If we don't, then let's go with the subcommittee.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

I would defer that to the subcommittee, to see if there's a witness.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I'm fine with the subcommittee.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

We already have some extra meetings this week, so it balances.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I would prefer, and would quite strongly advocate for, a full meeting on that Thursday, especially given that we're missing the meeting on Tuesday.

The Chair:

Since we don't seem to have unanimity, maybe let me check on it.

I'll make a decision on that, but first I'll find out if there would be a full two-hour agenda for the Thursday. If not, then I would suggest we go to a subcommittee to develop the work plan. I'm not one to have a meeting for a meeting's sake. I like to have a meeting with a firm agenda in front of us.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I absolutely agree, although I guess I would note that the subcommittee did recommend some items that were pushed back to make room for the estimates. Certainly it would be possible to explore those topics on the Thursday.

The Chair:

Duly noted.

The second point I have is more a point of information than anything else. If we want to have our supplementary estimates (C) voted upon, we'll have to deal with that tomorrow, because we have to report it back to the House by this Friday.

I'd like to keep open about 10 minutes toward the end of tomorrow's meeting for the votes. Okay?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Perfect. Thank you.

The Chair:

With that, we're adjourned.

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1830)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Mesdames et messieurs, je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bienvenue à la cinquième séance du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires.

Je rappelle à tous les députés que les délibérations ce soir sont télévisées.

Je suis heureux d'accueillir le ministre Brison.

Monsieur le ministre, je crois comprendre que vous souhaitez faire une déclaration préliminaire. Je vous demanderais également de présenter certains des fonctionnaires qui vous accompagnent.

L'hon. Scott Brison (président du Conseil du Trésor):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux d'être ici ce soir avec vous et les membres du Comité.

Nous allons nous concentrer ce soir sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). J'ai bien hâte d'en discuter.

Le Comité a pour mandat d'examiner l'efficacité et le fonctionnement des opérations gouvernementales, du processus budgétaire, ainsi que des plans de dépenses des ministères et agences gouvernementales centraux.

Le rôle du Conseil du Trésor est au coeur des travaux du Comité. Je me réjouis à l'idée d'établir de bonnes relations de travail avec les membres du Comité. Je suis heureux d'être ici ce soir en compagnie de Joyce Murray, notre secrétaire parlementaire, de Bill Matthews, le contrôleur général du Canada, de Brian Pagan, le secrétaire adjoint au Secteur de la gestion des dépenses du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor du Canada, et de Renée Lafontaine, secrétaire adjointe, Secteur des services ministériels, et dirigeante principale des finances.

C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons, après mes observations, à toute question que vous pourriez vouloir nous poser. [Français]

Permettez-moi de commencer en vous parlant du processus du Budget des dépenses.

Comme vous le savez, le gouvernement prépare le Budget des dépenses afin de demander l'autorisation du Parlement de dépenser des fonds publics. La diapositive à la troisième page de ma présentation illustre ce processus.[Traduction]

Je crois que chacun de vos bureaux a reçu un document de présentation à cet égard.

Le Budget principal des dépenses et le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), (B) et (C) fournissent des renseignements sur les dépenses prévues pour chaque ministère et agence.[Français]

Le Budget principal des dépenses doit être déposé à la Chambre des communes au plus tard le 1er mars.

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses présente de l'information au Parlement sur des dépenses qui n'ont pas été assez définies pour être incluses dans le Budget principal des dépenses ou qui ont été précisées pour tenir compte de nouveaux développements dans les programmes ou les services.[Traduction]

J'aimerais revenir plus tard sur le processus budgétaire pour souligner les améliorations pouvant y être apportées.

Je vais maintenant passer au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Je veux remettre ce budget des dépenses en contexte en revenant au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de 2015-2016, qui est présenté en comité plénier en décembre.

Comme les élections ont eu lieu en octobre dernier, la session parlementaire de l'automne s'est ouverte beaucoup plus tard qu'à l'habitude, et la plupart des comités parlementaires n'avaient pas encore été créés.[Français]

Alors, par respect pour le nouveau Parlement, le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de l'automne ne contenait que les éléments les plus urgents qui ne pouvaient pas être gérés pour le moment dans les limites des autorisations actuelles. Ainsi, le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) déposé le 19 février contient plus d'éléments que d'habitude.[Traduction]

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) fournit des renseignements à l'appui de la demande du gouvernement afin que le Parlement approuve 2,8 milliards de dollars de crédits votés destinés à 58 organisations. Ces fonds sont nécessaires pour maintenir des programmes et des initiatives du gouvernement.

À la page 4 du document d'information figurent les principaux postes de plus de 100 millions de dollars. Ceux-ci comprennent les 435 millions de dollars prévus pour rétablir la santé financière du Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire, le RARM, qui offre des prestations d'invalidité de longue durée aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes.[Français]

Il y a aussi 216 millions de dollars liés au soutien militaire pour l'aide que le Canada accorde à l'Ukraine et aux opérations contre le groupe connu sous le nom d'État islamique.[Traduction]

La somme de 176 millions de dollars est destinée à l'emploi et au développement social, afin de radier des dettes dues à la Couronne pour des prêts canadiens aux étudiants irrécouvrables.

En outre, 168 millions de dollars sont destinés au Fonds vert pour le climat, 147 millions de dollars, à la réinstallation des réfugiés syriens, 121 millions de dollars, à Affaires mondiales Canada pour couvrir l'ajustement du taux de change, ainsi que certaines contributions à des organisations internationales. La somme de 116 millions de dollars est destinée à la construction de trois navires hauturiers de sciences halieutiques pour la Garde côtière canadienne.

En ce qui concerne le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses du Conseil du Trésor, le ministère demande l'autorisation du Parlement pour l'affectation d'une somme supplémentaire de 511,9 millions de dollars. Cela inclut les 435 millions de dollars pour les prestations d'invalidité destinées aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes, que j'ai mentionnées auparavant, c'est-à-dire le RARM. Cela comprend également 34 millions de dollars pour un plan d'urgence, qui couvrirait toute augmentation des dépenses dans le cadre du Régime de soins de santé de la fonction publique.

(1835)



De plus, il y 42,7 millions de dollars au titre du crédit 1 pour les dépenses de programmes, qui proviennent surtout d'autres ministères et qui serviront à appuyer la transformation, sous la direction du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, des services administratifs à l'échelle du gouvernement. Ce montant sera compensé par un financement transféré du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor à Services partagés Canada pour les coûts d'infrastructure en matière de technologie de l'information, qui découlent du renouvellement des milieux de travail.[Français]

Finalement, permettez-moi de dire quelques mots sur la transparence.

Nous nous sommes engagés à fournir aux parlementaires l'information dont ils ont besoin pour surveiller et examiner les dépenses du gouvernement. En ce moment, le système ne nous permet pas de le faire, parce que les délais sont problématiques. En raison de problèmes liés à l'échéancier, qui est déterminé en partie par le Règlement de la Chambre, les éléments du budget d'une année donnée n'apparaissent pas dans le Budget principal des dépenses de cette même année. [Traduction]

Le système actuel n'est pas transparent. À mon avis, il n'est ni fonctionnel ni efficace si l'objectif est de faire en sorte que les parlementaires puissent demander des comptes au gouvernement — peu importe le gouvernement, qu'il s'agisse du gouvernement actuel ou du prochain gouvernement. Nous voulons changer cela, et nous nous réjouissons à l'idée de travailler de concert avec vous dans le cadre de ce processus.

Selon le système actuel, le Parlement se voit demander d'approuver les plans de dépenses des ministères sans qu'il dispose de tous les renseignements sur les dépenses prévues de ces ministères.

Nous savons que, en ce qui concerne l'approbation des dépenses du gouvernement et l'approbation de rapports sur ces dépenses, le déséquilibre entre les comptes publics et le budget et processus budgétaire est une source de confusion permanente pour le Parlement, les médias et les Canadiens. Certains gouvernements — nous aurons peut-être d'autres détails à cet égard plus tard ce soir — dont le gouvernement de l'Australie, ont restructuré leurs processus budgétaires d'une façon plus sensée et efficace, puisque l'objectif est de faire en sorte que le Parlement reçoive les renseignements dont il a besoin pour faire son travail.

Compte tenu des difficultés mentionnées, il est beaucoup plus difficile pour le Parlement du Canada, ainsi que tous les députés, peu importe leur parti, d'examiner les dépenses du gouvernement. Le simple fait d'enchaîner les Budgets supplémentaires des dépenses de façon à ce qu'ils soient présentés au Parlement après le dépôt du budget plutôt qu'avant constitue, selon moi, une étape importante afin de fournir des renseignements plus exhaustifs et utiles au Parlement.

Je veux collaborer étroitement avec les parlementaires, ainsi que d'autres experts et intervenants clés, afin d'accroître la transparence et je serais heureux d'avoir l'occasion de mobiliser le Comité. En fait, il y a quelques semaines, nous avons tenu une séance pour les parlementaires de tous les partis. Les députés et les sénateurs de tous les partis y ont assisté et ont discuté des possibilités de réforme des processus budgétaires. Plus de 70 parlementaires y ont assisté.

Des fonctionnaires de mon ministère préparent actuellement un document de travail sur la question de l'harmonisation des budgets, et nous ferons parvenir ce document au Comité. Je serais heureux d'avoir l'occasion de comparaître de nouveau devant le Comité pour participer à des discussions plus approfondies sur le sujet. Je suis conscient que les comités établissent leur propre programme, mais nous vous saurions gré de fournir une rétroaction au sujet de modèles qui fonctionneraient mieux que le modèle actuel et au sujet de façons d'améliorer la reddition de comptes.

Nous avons déjà pris des mesures concrètes pour accroître la transparence du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses en faisant état des lacunes du gouvernement.

(1840)



J'attire votre attention sur la page 6 de la présentation. Pour la première fois, il y a une annexe en ligne. Il suffit de consulter la partie portant sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses dans le site Web du Conseil du Trésor. Vous y trouverez une annexe en ligne au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, qui fournit au Parlement une première indication des péremptions prévues pour l'exercice en cours. Nous pouvons en discuter plus longuement.

Je sais que vous souhaitez parler des affectations bloquées. Cette question suscite l'enthousiasme. Les péremptions et les affectations bloquées suscitent notre enthousiasme à tous. Il s'agit d'un point important, et nous pourrons y revenir.

Je peux vous dire que le fait de publier en ligne cette annexe, qui fait état des affectations bloquées, a été une étape importante. Il s'agit d'un important pas dans la bonne direction, qui a été reconnu par le directeur parlementaire du budget. Celui-ci a affirmé: La publication de ces affectations bloquées dix mois avant la publication des Comptes publics du Canada représente un pas important dans la voie de la transparence budgétaire, si bien que les parlementaires sont plus au courant de ce que fait le gouvernement.

Si vous me permettez de paraphraser le directeur principal des dépenses, c'est plus équitable.

Nous remercions le directeur parlementaire du budget de son appui à cet égard. À mesure que nous progressons, nous prendrons d'autres mesures afin de fournir plus de détails et plus de renseignements utiles aux parlementaires, et ce, dans un format plus utile.

Je conclus ainsi mes observations. Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, je suis impatient d'entamer la discussion ce soir.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre. J'ai une brève observation à faire. Je vous remercie, tout comme l'ensemble des membres du Comité, de vos observations et de votre volonté de travailler de concert avec le Comité, tout particulièrement en ce qui concerne une préoccupation commune, c'est-à-dire la réforme des processus budgétaires. Vous constaterez, comme je l'ai fait, que, non seulement les membres du Comité sont brillants et bien informés, mais ils sont aussi très enthousiastes.

Je crois que vous aimerez beaucoup travailler avec ce Comité. Vous pourrez constater, au moment des questions, que leur niveau de connaissances et leur engagement sont évidents, vous pourrez ainsi enchaîner avec la première ronde de questions, qui durera sept minutes.

Nous commençons avec Mme Ratansi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Merci de votre présence, M. Brison. En examinant votre lettre de mandat, on constate que vous avez d'énormes responsabilités qui sont axées sur 11 priorités. Je sais que vous avez comme objectif de diriger le programme de gestion du gouvernement.

Vous avez notamment parlé de transparence et de responsabilité. Je crois comprendre que vous tentez de faire concorder les prévisions budgétaires avec le processus budgétaire. En examinant l'annexe B, qui suit à la fois la comptabilité de caisse et la comptabilité d'exercice, je trouve fort déroutant que les comptes publics suivent la comptabilité de caisse, tandis que d'autres éléments se fondent sur la comptabilité d'exercice. Étant donné que votre ministère s'emploie à harmoniser les cycles, je me demande si nous pourrions nous fonder sur la comptabilité d'exercice, puisque c'est la norme internationale en matière de finances, que c'est de cette façon que les comptables examinent les états financiers, et que cette méthode facilite les explications.

Le Conseil du Trésor demande plus de 43 millions de dollars pour l'Initiative de transformation des services administratifs. Ma question a trait à votre volonté que les services se tournent vers la technologie de l'information afin que les données soient disponibles, ouvertes, etc.

Quels sont les défis que le Conseil du Trésor devra relever ou a dû relever au cours de la transformation des services administratifs? Comment pouvons-nous éviter les problèmes auxquels doivent faire face, par exemple, les Services partagés, dont le processus de demande de propositions manque parfois de transparence ou n'est pas très bien conçu?

Je sais que votre mandat prévoit l'établissement de nouvelles normes de rendement pour des ministères comme le ministère des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement. La ministre comparaîtra demain.

Pourriez-vous me donner un aperçu de la façon dont vous procédez, des difficultés qui nous attendent, et de la façon de rendre le processus plus transparent à l'avenir?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup, madame Ratansi. Vous êtes aussi comptable agréée.

Premièrement, la question sur la comptabilité de caisse et la comptabilité d'exercice est importante. Plus tôt dans la soirée, j'ai cité l'exemple de l'Australie, un pays qui, à mon avis, a bien réussi à réformer ses pratiques en ce qui concerne le processus budgétaire et les prévisions budgétaires afin de les rendre plus transparentes et de faciliter la reddition de comptes au Parlement.

L'Australie a notamment harmonisé les systèmes en appliquant la comptabilité d'exercice partout. Cela a créé des problèmes, et on a finalement dû revenir en partie sur cette décision. Pour ce qui est d'examiner ensemble les options qui s'offrent à nous, je dirais que je suis ouvert au modèle australien. Je ne dis pas que ce n'est pas une approche que nous envisageons, mais elle a causé des problèmes.

Je pourrais demander à Brian de parler de certaines difficultés observées dans le modèle australien. Ensuite, je répondrai à la deuxième question.

(1845)

M. Brian Pagan (secrétaire adjoint, Gestion des dépenses, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Il y a un certain nombre de problèmes dont nous aimerions discuter avec les parlementaires afin de mieux harmoniser les documents liés au budget, aux prévisions budgétaires et aux comptes publics. À l'heure actuelle, nous pouvons dire que les documents sont harmonisés dans la mesure où le budget, dans le volume I des Comptes publics, se fonde sur la comptabilité d'exercice, alors que les prévisions budgétaires, dans le volume II des Comptes publics, suivent la comptabilité de caisse.

Pour ce qui est des méthodes employées par d'autres gouvernements, je crois qu'elles ont du mérite, mais nous sommes conscients qu'il y a différentes opinions sur la question, et nous sommes heureux de collaborer avec les parlementaires pour mieux comprendre les différentes approches.

Comme le ministre l'a souligné, nous nous sommes penchés sur la situation en Australie, où on a noté un problème de taille. Il y a eu une augmentation de la part non utilisée des crédits affectés selon la comptabilité d'exercice, de telle sorte que des sommes considérables s'accumulaient sans être dépensées aux fins prévues. C'est évidemment un problème en soi.

Pour ce qui est de la question soulevée par le ministre au sujet de l'harmonisation du budget et des prévisions budgétaires, nous croyons que, si nous pouvons seulement réussir à mettre en oeuvre cette solution très simple, beaucoup d'autres aspects entourant ces documents seront plus cohérents et transparents, et il nous sera alors plus facile de tenir ce genre de discussions.

Nous comparaîtrons de nouveau devant le Comité pour discuter de ce genre de questions.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

En ce qui concerne la transformation des services administratifs, notons qu'il est difficile d'appliquer des solutions à l'ensemble d'une organisation, qu'il s'agisse d'une grande entreprise qui comprend de nombreux services ou d'une fonction publique. Les problèmes qu'ont connus les Services partagés sous le gouvernement précédent ne sont pas uniques; ma position n'est donc pas partisane. Ce sont des dossiers complexes. Étant donné que le Conseil du Trésor est un organisme central qui touche l'ensemble des ministères et des organismes, nous avons comme mandat d'établir de bonnes pratiques de gouvernance dans ces dossiers, mais il n'est pas facile de se procurer et de mettre en place des solutions qui touchent l'ensemble de l'organisation, en particulier lorsqu'il est question de technologie de l'information.

La question des marchés publics est toujours complexe, et elle l'est encore plus lorsqu'il s'agit de solutions de technologie de l'information pour la fonction publique. Je dirais que les marchés publics qui concernent la défense représentent probablement le dossier le plus difficile à gérer, mais ce genre de dossier pose toujours des difficultés. C'est un dossier auquel nous consacrons beaucoup d'efforts parce que la modernisation et la transformation des services administratifs ne sont pas une option, mais une nécessité, car le gouvernement doit moderniser et améliorer ses services aux Canadiens afin que les contribuables en aient davantage pour leur argent.

Nous devons relever ce défi. Le gouvernement précédent a dû y faire face; ce genre de dossier est difficile à gérer pour tous les gouvernements. Le Conseil du Trésor en est le principal responsable, et nous prenons cette responsabilité très au sérieux, mais elle nécessite des investissements.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

J'aimerais seulement poser une brève question.

Le président:

Soyez très brève.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Il faut mettre en place un processus budgétaire approprié, puisque la comptabilité d'exercice est fondée sur... Vous avez dit qu'on nous demande d'approuver les prévisions budgétaires des ministères sans que nous sachions ce que font les ministères. Je pense qu'il est important que les ministères adoptent un bon processus budgétaire, et que la comptabilité d'exercice les aiderait en ce sens. Sheila Fraser serait d'une aide précieuse.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

J'approuve tout ce que vous venez de dire, madame Ratansi. C'est un aspect que nous devrions étudier. Lorsqu'il s'agit de réformer les pratiques concernant le processus budgétaire et les prévisions budgétaires, je ne voudrais pas que le mieux soit l'ennemi du bien. Si nous arrivons à cerner des mesures concrètes que nous pourrions prendre, nous serions à même d'apporter toute une série de changements à l'avenir. Cependant, je tiens à apporter certains changements concrets afin d'améliorer les choses avant la prochaine année budgétaire.

(1850)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Blaney, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue au Comité, monsieur le ministre, ainsi qu'à vos fonctionnaires et à votre secrétaire parlementaire. C'est un plaisir de vous avoir ici. C'est également réjouissant de savoir que vous souhaitez travailler de façon coopérative. Vous pouvez compter sur nous pour jouer un rôle constructif d'opposition.

Pour ce qui est des changements, je mentionnerais simplement qu'il va être important de nous convaincre de la nécessité de ceux-ci. Si je regarde, par exemple — et j'enchaîne avec ma question, monsieur le ministre —, la Mise à jour des projections économiques et budgétaires 2015, qui relève des données gouvernementales, il est clairement indiqué qu'il y a un solde budgétaire positif de 1,9 milliard de dollars dans l'exercice financier 2014-2015.

Or, vous êtes à l'aube d'un nouveau mandat, monsieur le ministre. En ce moment, il est important de savoir qu'on est sur la bonne voie. Dans votre plan électoral, vous indiquez clairement que vous enregistrerez à court terme un modeste déficit de moins de 10 milliards de dollars au cours des deux prochains exercices financiers, pour faire des investissements dans les infrastructures et la classe moyenne du Canada. Vous prévoyez retourner à l'équilibre budgétaire en 2019.

Je vois ici des manchettes de journaux.[Traduction]

J'ai sous la main un article publié en février, intitulé « Les déficits fédéraux pourraient dépasser les 52 milliards de dollars sur deux ans si les libéraux tiennent leurs promesses ».

Il y a également un article sur une étude de la Banque nationale intitulé « Les déficits des libéraux pourraient atteindre un total de 90 milliards de dollars après quatre ans ».

Monsieur le ministre, vous êtes le protecteur des contribuables. Vous êtes celui qui doit dire non, mais aussi celui qui doit signer les chèques.[Français]

Comme on dit en bon français, on ne voudrait pas que vous « pogniez » une tendinite à force de signer des chèques, parce que les voies ensoleillées vont carrément tourner en éclipse, et ce sont les contribuables qui vont en faire les frais.

Voici donc ma question. À l'aube de votre nouveau mandat, vous jouez un rôle important. Êtes-vous prêt à respecter l'engagement que vous avez pris dans votre plateforme, ainsi que les partis de l'opposition qui, comme vous le savez, visent un équilibre budgétaire? J'aimerais vous entendre là-dessus, monsieur le ministre.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Blaney. J'apprécie beaucoup votre question et je suis très heureux de vous voir avec notre programme électoral. C'est un document extraordinaire.

Nous ne sommes pas d'accord là-dessus, mais nous avons quand même hérité d'un déficit de la part du précédent gouvernement. C'est clair que nous avons hérité aussi d'une situation où il est nécessaire de créer de la croissance économique. Depuis 2011, nous avions une économie dont la croissance était anémique. Pour nous, la priorité est de faire des investissements importants pour renouveler nos infrastructures partout au Canada, et d'investir de façon stratégique dans la classe moyenne en visant la création d'emplois. La croissance économique est une priorité pour notre gouvernement et nous allons y travailler. Ce sera évident dans notre budget; c'est exactement ce que nous allons faire dans le budget. Il est important de reconnaître que l'ancien gouvernement — votre gouvernement — a augmenté notre dette nationale de 150 milliards de dollars. Pour la relance de la croissance économique, nous allons prendre des décisions différentes et nous allons investir d'une manière stratégique.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Monsieur le ministre, il est vrai qu'au moment de la crise économique, notre gouvernement a investi, avec l'accord des partis de l'opposition, notamment des libéraux.

Cependant, comment pouvez-vous affirmer avoir hérité d'un déficit? Les données du ministère des Finances indiquent qu'il y a eu un surplus budgétaire de 1,9 milliard de dollars. Au moment où vous arrivez au pouvoir, le budget est équilibré. Vous vous engagez à de modestes déficits. Pouvez-vous vous engager ce soir, en tant que président du Conseil du Trésor, à garder le but pour les contribuables? Les contribuables dans mon comté ainsi que les gens d'affaires sont inquiets, monsieur Brison.

Il faut aussi penser à nos enfants. Le développement durable consiste à ne pas leur refiler un système qui n'est pas durable. C'est maintenant rendu que l'on va emprunter pour faire l'épicerie. C'est ce que vous allez faire, et ce n'est pas du développement durable.

Vous êtes celui qui a la capacité de jouer le rôle de goulot d'étranglement du gouvernement. Vous avez beau dire que vous devez respecter vos engagements. En effet, c'était contenu dans votre plateforme et c'est grâce à celle-ci que vous avez été élus. Par contre, 41 % de la population a voté pour vous, ce qui veut dire que 59 % de la population a dit ne pas vouloir de déficit.

Un déficit de 10 milliards de dollars, c'est déjà bien suffisant. Or, d'après ce que disent les manchettes des journaux, vous êtes sur une pente dangereuse, monsieur le président du Conseil du Trésor. Êtes-vous prêt à assumer votre rôle de gardien des contribuables et de gardien des engagements pris par le Parti libéral lors de la dernière campagne électorale?

Je le répète, nous avons fini l'année avec un surplus budgétaire de 1,9 milliard de dollars. Je peux déposer le document, il est disponible sur Internet, sur le site du ministère des Finances du Canada.

(1855)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Après un aussi long préambule, je sais que cela pourrait être difficile, monsieur le ministre, mais je vous prie de répondre le plus brièvement possible. [Français]

L'hon. Scott Brison:

M. Blaney est un bon gars. Je l'aime beaucoup. Nous faisons nos entraînements dans le gymnase ensemble de temps en temps. [Traduction]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Cela se voit bien, n'est-ce pas?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est pour cela que nous sommes si forts. Nous sommes très musclés, M. Blaney et moi. Nous sommes des durs.[Français]

Monsieur le président, il est très important de reconnaître que des experts comme David Dodge, Kevin Lynch et Larry Summers, ancien secrétaire du trésor des États-Unis, sont d'accord avec nous et disent qu'il faut faire des investissements maintenant, particulièrement en cette période de croissance anémique.[Traduction]

Nous investissons de façon stratégique. Nous allons investir de manière stratégique. C'est ce que vous verrez dans le budget. Nous le ferons avec discipline. Nous allons stimuler l'économie. Nous allons investir pour soutenir la classe moyenne. C'est ce que nous nous sommes engagés à faire. Nous y croyons. L'OCDE et plusieurs des plus grands penseurs du monde en matière d'économie sont d'accord avec nous.

Je suis ravi de répondre aux questions de M. Blaney aujourd'hui, et j'ai hâte de poursuivre la discussion à ce sujet.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Weir, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Il y a eu des questions générales sur le cadre financier. J'aimerais me concentrer sur certains aspects en particulier.

Le Conseil du Trésor sait sans doute que la Régie de la plaque tournante de transport mondial, près de Regina, est dans l'embarras en raison de l'achat de terres pour lesquelles la société d'État a payé plus du double du montant demandé par les vendeurs, et le Parti de la Saskatchewan est impliqué dans cette affaire. Certains ont réclamé une enquête de la GRC.

Lors du débat d'ajournement de lundi, la secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Transports a confirmé que son ministère avait versé 27 millions de dollars à la Régie de la plaque tournante de transport mondial, mais elle n'a pas semblé particulièrement préoccupée par la façon dont l'argent a été dépensé. Aujourd'hui, le Globe and Mail révèle que le Conseil du Trésor a pris des mesures de surveillance spéciales à l'endroit de Transports Canada. Ces mesures comprendront-elles une enquête visant à s'assurer que les recettes fiscales fédérales n'ont pas été gaspillées dans une transaction foncière suspecte conclue par le Parti de la Saskatchewan?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Weir.

Vous avez déjà travaillé au Conseil du Trésor.

(1900)

M. Erin Weir:

C'est vrai.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je crois que M. Blaney a travaillé au ministère des Travaux publics, mon ancien ministère, il y a un certain temps.

Premièrement, je tiens à parler brièvement du budget de fonctionnement de Transports Canada. Nous collaborons étroitement avec le ministre Garneau dans ce dossier, et il répondra aux questions directement liées à Transports Canada. Je suis certainement disposé à en parler avec le ministre Garneau.

Le Conseil du Trésor, et plus particulièrement le contrôleur général, M. Matthews, collabore étroitement avec l'ensemble des ministères et des organismes. Comme moi, M. Matthews est diplômé de l'Université Dalhousie. Comme il a un diplôme en commerce, il doit être intelligent. Nous collaborons étroitement avec les ministères et les organismes afin d'établir un cadre rigoureux en matière de gestion des finances et de cerner les problèmes potentiels.

Voudriez-vous que je consulte mon collègue, le ministre, à ce sujet, et que je recommunique avec vous?

M. Erin Weir:

J'en serais ravi.

J'aimerais seulement obtenir une précision. Vous allez demander expressément au ministre Garneau d'examiner le dossier de la Régie de la plaque tournante de transport mondial pour s'assurer qu'il n'y a pas eu de gaspillage de fonds fédéraux.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je suis ici depuis suffisamment longtemps pour savoir que, lorsque je ne connais pas la réponse à la question, je dois l'admettre. Je vais en parler avec le ministre Garneau. Je m'engage à vous donner une réponse à ce sujet.

Je ne tiens pas du tout à me mêler de la politique provinciale de la Saskatchewan. Je ne suis pas au courant de la situation en question, mais nous allons certainement nous pencher sur les aspects de ce dossier qui concernent le gouvernement fédéral.

M. Erin Weir:

Très bien.

J'aimerais aborder une autre question. Hier, le Bureau du Conseil privé a dit à notre comité qu'il dépensera environ 1 million de dollars par année pour financer le nouveau Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat, et que les recommandations de ce comité ne seront pas publiées.

Est-ce que d'autres ministères, ou le Sénat lui-même, dépenseront des fonds supplémentaires dans le cadre de ce processus?

Le Sénat demeure une entité non élue qui n'a pas de comptes à rendre et qui fait l'objet d'une enquête. Pourquoi le gouvernement verse-t-il plus d'argent à cette institution inutile au lieu de suivre l'exemple de toutes les assemblées législatives provinciales en abolissant la Chambre haute?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Eh bien, j'ai examiné en détail ma lettre de mandat, et la réforme du Sénat n'y est pas mentionnée, mais c'est un dossier important pour le gouvernement. Ma collègue, la ministre Monsef, a fait des propositions en collaboration avec notre leader à la Chambre.

L'amélioration du Sénat et de son processus de nomination est un dossier que nous prenons au sérieux. Ce processus est en cours. Comme vous le savez, un processus provisoire est mis en oeuvre parce qu'il est urgent de nommer des sénateurs provenant de certaines provinces. Un comité consultatif indépendant composé d'éminents Canadiens a été mis sur pied à cette fin. Nous mettons en oeuvre la réforme du Sénat.

M. Erin Weir:

Pouvez-vous confirmer que le total de la contribution annuelle que ce comité recevra du gouvernement fédéral s'élève à 1 million de dollars, ou y a-t-il d'autres ministères qui feront également des dépenses pour ce nouveau régime?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je pense que vous faites plutôt allusion aux dépenses faites par le Sénat et le Parlement. Nous sommes en train de parler du processus de nomination, et toute réforme d'un processus nécessite un investissement. Nous croyons que ce sont des investissements judicieux qui visent à améliorer le Sénat et à mettre en place un processus plus transparent qui, au bout du compte, amènera le processus de nomination au Sénat à être davantage axé sur le mérite.

Cependant, monsieur Weir, je tiens à dire très clairement que, selon moi, le Sénat du Canada fait un travail important. Nous croyons que le Sénat peut être amélioré, mais le Sénat et ses comités font un travail très important.

Nous pouvons avoir des opinions différentes, mais je crois qu'il y a des mesures importantes que nous pouvons prendre sans avoir à ouvrir la Constitution, par exemple. Le processus de nomination peut nous permettre d'améliorer le Sénat, et je pense que c'est ce que veulent les Canadiens.

M. Erin Weir:

Il y a effectivement une divergence d'opinions, mais il y a aussi la question concrète du coût de ce nouveau processus, et cet argent pourrait certainement servir à d'autres fins, notamment à financer des activités de recherche utiles et d'importantes études que l'on attribue parfois au Sénat. On peut se demander si c'est la manière la plus efficace d'utiliser cet argent.

(1905)

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Seriez-vous d'accord pour dire qu'il serait judicieux de mettre en oeuvre le processus dont nous parlons s'il rendait le Sénat plus efficace et le processus de nomination plus transparent?

M. Erin Weir:

S'il rendait le processus plus transparent...

J'ai été déçu d'apprendre que les recommandations ne seront pas rendues publiques.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Serait-ce vraiment souhaitable? S'agit-il vraiment d'un objectif souhaitable auquel vous souscririez?

Le président:

Monsieur Weir, vous aurez droit à une autre période de trois minutes. Nous en sommes encore aux périodes de sept minutes.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

N'oubliez pas que, le 19 juin prochain, cela fera 19 ans que je suis député, dont 16 et demi dans l'opposition. Disons que je suis davantage habitué à poser les questions qu'à y répondre. Je prie mon collègue de m'excuser.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole pendant sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci d'être ici aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre. Vous avez plus d'expérience dans ce dossier que ce que nous pourrions tous souhaiter.

J'aimerais aborder votre sujet préféré, celui des affectations bloquées et des autorisations non engagées, car je sais que vous en brûlez d'envie. Présentement, ces affectations s'élèvent à 5,1 milliards de dollars, alors je me pose une question: les conservateurs nous ont dit qu'ils avaient équilibré le budget, mais je trouve cela plutôt difficile à croire. Combien d'argent non dépensé a donc pu servir à faire croire à un excédent?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Il y a une ou deux choses à savoir à ce sujet-là, David. Je badinais peut-être un peu, tout à l'heure avec M. Blaney, mais je ne voudrais pas que nous... Disons que j'ai déjà fait partie de comités qui étaient trop partisans, et c'était loin d'être drôle.

Pour répondre à votre question, il ne faut pas oublier que La revue financière nous donne une idée de la situation financière seulement pour tel ou tel mois, trimestre ou que sais-je encore. C'est comme si, un de ces jours, vous vous aperceviez en consultant votre relevé bancaire que vous avez 10 000 $ en liquidités mais que vous n'avez remboursé ni votre prêt hypothécaire, ni votre prêt auto. Ou comme si vous vous disiez: « Il doit bien me rester de l'argent, puisque j'ai encore des chèques », ce genre de choses. Ce n'est pas ce qu'on pourrait appeler un portrait complet de la situation, il vous manque trop de données.

Pour ce qui est des affectations bloquées, voici quelques exemples qui devraient mieux vous situer. Il s'agit de fonds qui ont été approuvés par le Parlement, mais auquel le Conseil du Trésor restreint l'accès, pour toutes sortes de raisons. Je vous donne quelques exemples.

Peut-être qu'on s'est engagé à transférer de l'argent à un autre ministère ou organisme en échange d'un service donné. Peut-être encore qu'on souhaite reporter des fonds à l'exercice suivant.

Il arrive par exemple assez fréquemment que l'acquisition de matériel de défense donne lieu à des affectations bloquées, puisqu'il faut mettre de côté l'argent nécessaire jusqu'à ce qu'on en ait besoin. Si vous allez sur le site Web du Conseil du Trésor, vous verrez des exemples concrets de ce à quoi renvoient ces 5,1 milliards de dollars.

Sur cette somme, 2,8 milliards de dollars seront reportés aux exercices suivants. Là-dessus, il y a 630 millions de dollars en capitaux et en fonds d'administration pour divers grands projets de la défense, comme je le disais, et 675 millions pour les revendications territoriales et autres transferts destinés aux Autochtones.

Voici un exemple qui touche directement le Conseil du Trésor: 507 millions de dollars sont bloqués pour les congés parentaux et les indemnités de cessation d'emploi. C'est ce qu'on appelle les « crédits centraux du Conseil du Trésor ». Il s'agit d'un poste important, parce que le Conseil du Trésor, en gérant ces fonds de manière centralisée, enlève des coûts aux ministères et aux agences en les gérant lui-même. Selon nous, il vaut mieux, pour l'intérêt public, que les ministères et organismes, avec leurs budgets limités, n'embauchent pas leurs employés en songeant tout de suite aux prestations de congé parental ou aux indemnités de cessation d'emploi qu'ils pourraient devoir leur verser. Les raisons pour lesquelles ces sommes sont gérées de manière centralisée par le Conseil du Trésor sont aussi importantes que progressives.

Nous gérons aussi les crédits pour éventualités du gouvernement. Cette année, en ce qui concerne le Conseil du Trésor, c'est 750 millions de dollars de crédits pour éventualités qui ne seront pas affectés. Il y a aussi l'équivalent de 560 millions de dollars en sommes reportées d'années précédentes qui sont destinés aux budgets de fonctionnement. Comme le disait le directeur parlementaire du budget, en rendant ces données publiques plus tôt au cours du cycle budgétaire, nous contribuons à le rendre substantiellement plus transparent. C'est non négligeable. Et ce n'est que le début en matière de transparence et de communication d'information de meilleure qualité aux parlementaires et aux Canadiens.

(1910)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une autre question à vous poser. Vous dites vouloir réformer les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses, et à mon avis, je crois qu'il s'agit d'une proposition intéressante. Y a-t-il eu d'autres réformes dernièrement, ou le système est-il demeuré inchangé depuis longtemps?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Selon moi, ce processus a constamment perdu de son utilité au fil des ans. Il fut une époque où la comparution d'un ministre devant un comité pour défendre son Budget principal des dépenses était considérée comme un véritable événement par les parlementaires. Il s'agissait en fait d'un de leurs rôles centraux.

Nous parlions du Sénat tout à l'heure, et je dois vous dire qu'à l'heure où on se parle, il y a des sénateurs qui, il faut le dire, comprennent mieux ce processus que quiconque et qui se font un point d'honneur de demander rigoureusement des comptes aux ministres. Les fonctionnaires de mon ministère vous le confirmeraient sans doute. Allez voir par vous-même en assistant à un comité sénatorial où un ministre est appelé à défendre son énoncé budgétaire.

Cette érosion s'est faite progressivement mais irrémédiablement. Il n'y a rien de partisan dans ce que je dis. Cela étant dit, une question demeure: que fait-on, maintenant? Nous prenons cette question très au sérieux. Je sais d'ailleurs que les fonctionnaires de mon ministère ont fait du bon travail dans ce dossier. J'ai aussi fait allusion au modèle australien, tout à l'heure.

Je crois me rappeler, monsieur Graham, que vous étiez présent à la séance d'information à l'intention des parlementaires que nous avons organisée il y a quelques semaines, non?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis arrivé très tard parce que je devais d'abord assister à la rencontre du caucus des députés des régions rurales.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Moi aussi, j'en fais partie, et j'en suis fier.

Il y a certaines choses que j'aimerais faire connaître au Comité au sujet de la réforme. Nous avons montré une présentation aux députés et aux sénateurs qui étaient là ce soir-là, et si vous le permettez, j'aimerais vous la faire parvenir aussi. Nous n'avons pas encore fixé de date pour l'examen des budgets des dépenses et des crédits parlementaires, mais j'aimerais quand même que vous ayez ce document dès maintenant, afin que vous puissiez commencer à y réfléchir. C'est très important. C'est le rôle du Conseil du Trésor d'améliorer ce processus, et c'est aussi celui du comité des opérations gouvernementales.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Le temps est écoulé. Je voulais juste que vous sachiez, monsieur le ministre, que le Conseil du Trésor nous a déjà fait parvenir la présentation dont vous parlez, et elle a déjà été distribuée à tous.

Passons à la série de question de cinq minutes, en commençant par M. McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Merci d'être ici parmi nous, monsieur le ministre. Le gouvernement ouvert est très important pour vous, et je vous en remercie. Si vous aviez été ici hier, vous auriez eu l'impression, comme nous, d'être dans un épisode de la série Yes, Minister, au rythme où nous obtenions des réponses. Je vous remercie donc d'avoir autant la transparence à coeur.

Je vais laisser de côté les questions à 1 milliard de dollars, contrairement à mes collègues, et m'intéresser plutôt aux 81 millions pour les services de santé, de réadaptation et de soutien du ministère des Anciens Combattants. Ces sommes serviront-elles à rouvrir les neuf centres de services qui ont fermé leurs portes, ou seront-elles plutôt divisées et dépensées selon les priorités, surtout quand on sait à quel point notre pays est vaste et le nombre d'anciens combattants qui ont besoin de services? Vous en tiendrez-vous uniquement à votre promesse électorale en rouvrant ces centres ou tiendrez-vous plutôt compte des besoins établis dans chaque région?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Premièrement, tous les parlementaires s'entendent pour dire que le ministère des Anciens Combattants et la manière dont sont traités les hommes et les femmes qui ont si vaillamment servi leur patrie constituent une priorité de premier plan.

Il y a une ou deux choses à dire pour répondre à votre question, à commencer par la nature du service militaire de nos jours. J'en veux pour preuve la mission Afghanistan ou celle contre l'EIIS et son volet « formation ». La nature du service militaire a évolué. En fait, le soutien aux anciens combattants dans ce nouveau contexte — pensons par exemple au nombre accru de troubles de stress post-traumatique et aux difficultés qui s'ensuivent — oblige les gouvernements à revoir la manière dont ils traitent les anciens combattants, et à actualiser et moderniser leurs façons de faire. Nous prenons cette question au sérieux.

Les fonds demandés serviront à traiter un plus grand nombre de demandes de prestations d'invalidité, à répondre aux besoins croissants en santé, par exemple pour les médicaments sur ordonnance, et, je tiens à le préciser, à bonifier les services en santé mentale.

(1915)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je vous remercie. Mais qu'en est-il des neuf centres? Ces sommes serviront-elles à les rouvrir ou à financer d'autres types de services, comme vous semblez maintenant le dire.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Nous allons rouvrir les neuf centres en question.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Il s'agit donc de toute autre chose.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Les fonds dont je parle serviront à améliorer les services offerts aux anciens combattants. J'ai donné quelques exemples, en insistant sur les services en santé mentale.

Cela ne nous empêche aucunement de donner suite à ce que nous considérons comme une priorité, c'est-à-dire la réouverture de certains de ces bureaux.

Les anciens combattants nous ont clairement dit que ces bureaux étaiet très importants pour eux, à cause de l'endroit où ils étaient situés et parce qu'ils leur permettaient de se rendre eux-mêmes sur place et de parler à quelqu'un.

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est excellent, et je ne dis pas le contraire. Je crois que ces coûts entrent aussi dans les 435 millions de dollars supplémentaires. Les 81 millions de dollars en question serviront-ils à couvrir les coûts de ces neuf bureaux ou à payer les produits pharmaceutiques et services supplémentaires qui seront offerts partout au pays et dont vous parliez à l'instant?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Le nombre de demandes de prestations d'invalidité traitées constitue une bonne part de ce montant, tout comme les services en santé mentale.

Nous disposons aussi de cinq ans pour améliorer les services aux anciens combattants et à leurs proches.

Nous parlons aujourd'hui de ce qui se trouve dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Dans quelques semaines, le budget sera annoncé, et il y aura plus...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je suis conscient que ma question sort un peu de nulle part, alors je peux comprendre que vous n'ayez pas les chiffres exacts; nous pouvons...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Ils n'ont rien à voir avec la réouverture des bureaux.

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est justement ce que j'aimerais savoir.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Non, elles ne serviront pas expressément à la réouverture de ces bureaux, que nous allons bel et bien rouvrir...

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est ce que je veux savoir.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je sais. Je vous remercie, monsieur McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Bon, le temps commence à nous manquer.

J'aimerais revenir sur une question qui a été abordée hier et à laquelle nous n'avons pas pu obtenir de réponse claire. Il était question d'une somme de 1 million de dollars pour mettre fin au Plan d'action économique du Canada. Nous savons que cette question a déjà prêté à controverse par le passé, mais de là à demander 1 million de dollars... J'essaie juste de comprendre à quoi servira cet argent.

Si j'ai bien compris, il devait servir à mettre fin à cette initiative. Or, tout ce qu'on a eu comme réponse, c'est: « Non non, cet argent était déjà dépensé avant même l'arrivée au pouvoir du nouveau gouvernement. »

Le président:

Je suis obligé de vous interrompre. Peut-être que votre collègue, M. Blaney, pourra poursuivre à votre place pendant sa prochaine série de questions, et sans doute le ministre pourra-t-il répondre à ce moment-là.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je m'en remets à vous, monsieur le président. Je suis prêt, si...

Le président:

Nous allons poursuivre, parce que je tiens à ce que tout le monde puisse interroger le ministre avant la fin de la séance.

M. Ayoub a maintenant cinq minutes pour poser ses questions. [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Brison, madame, messieurs, je vous remercie d'être ici ce soir pour répondre à nos questions. Évidemment, la transparence est un élément important, tout comme la nouvelle façon de voir les choses, et j'en suis très fier.

J'aimerais vous poser une question par rapport au Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire. On demande de nouvelles sommes d'argent. Il est question de presque un demi-milliard de dollars, soit 435 millions de dollars. C'est énorme. Je me demande quel était le budget initial et quel sera le pourcentage d'augmentation à la suite de cette demande.

Quelles sont les raisons principales de cette demande? Est-ce que la prévision était erronée au départ? Depuis combien de temps sait-on qu'on va arriver tôt ou tard à une augmentation importante comme celle-là? Est-ce un dossier qu'on vous a signalé rapidement, en vous disant qu'il manquait un demi-milliard de dollars dans les prévisions, ou est-ce arrivé tout d'un coup, dans les dernières semaines?

J'aurais aimé savoir un peu par quel processus on a établi qu'il fallait 435 millions de dollars.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Ayoub. J'apprécie beaucoup votre question.

Dans le contexte économique actuel, avec des taux d'intérêts qui sont très bas, il faut investir pour augmenter la force de nos régimes de pension du secteur public.

Permettez-moi de répondre en anglais, puisque c'est une question très technique.

(1920)

[Traduction]

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Je vous en prie.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Deux facteurs entrent en jeu, à commencer par la demande touchant les prestations de retraite et d'invalidité. Le Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire et son volet « invalidité » ont augmenté pour toutes sortes de raisons. J'énumérais tout à l'heure à M. McCauley certains des facteurs touchant les investissements en santé mentale, et il s'agit d'un facteur très important.

Ensuite, avec les très bas taux d'intérêt que nous connaissons actuellement, les régimes de retraite ont la vie dure, et nous tenons par-dessus tout à maintenir la force prudentielle de nos régimes de retraite publics, mais sans pour autant négliger la transparence. C'est là qu'entre en scène l'investissement dont vous parlez.

Brian ici présent me disait que les demandes de prestations provenant de vétérans de l'Afghanistan ont crû de 66 % en trois ans. C'est un exemple. Or, cette situation serait la même peu importe le parti au pouvoir. Il faut absolument maintenir la force prudentielle de nos régimes de retraite malgré la hausse des versements, notamment dans le cadre du Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire. C'est aussi à cela que sert cet investissement. [Français]

M. Bill Matthews (contrôleur général du Canada, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Je voudrais simplement ajouter une chose.[Traduction]

Le ministre a déjà parlé des faibles taux d'intérêt et du nombre sans cesse croissant de demandes de prestations depuis la mission en Afghanistan, mais il y a un troisième facteur: le montant des prestations a lui aussi augmenté à cause du règlement intervenu dans une poursuite, dans l'affaire Manuge pour être exact. Résultat: les prestations versées à chaque personne sont plus élevées.

Je crois comprendre que vous vouliez savoir quel était le point de départ pour l'exercice en cours. Eh bien nous avons commencé l'exercice avec environ 370 millions de dollars — 368 pour être exact, si mes souvenirs sont bons. À cela s'ajoutent les 435 millions de dollars dont vous parliez, ce qui veut dire qu'on a doublé le budget et même plus. Mais tout s'explique par ces trois facteurs: les taux d'intérêt, le nombre de demandes et l'affaire Manuge.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

N'y a-t-il pas moyen de prévoir ces écarts un peu d'avance?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

En fait, le Conseil du Trésor examine l'ensemble des régimes de retraite du secteur public afin de prévoir et voir venir ces investissements. Mais n'ayez crainte, le tout se fera de manière tout à fait transparente, nous rendrons des comptes au Parlement, à qui nous les expliquerons et à qui nous demanderons de se prononcer au moyen d'un vote, et nous ferons participer les parlementaires au processus.

Tout le monde conviendra sans doute que la priorité numéro un concernant les régimes de retraite publics, c'est d'en maintenir la force prudentielle, mais de manière ouverte et transparente. Nous devons adopter la meilleure approche qui soit pour gérer ces régimes sans compromettre l'avenir des futurs prestataires mais en en tirant le meilleur rendement possible, tant que c'est fait de manière responsable.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

On vous écoute, monsieur Blaney. Vous disposez de cinq minutes. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je répète que c'est un véritable plaisir de vous recevoir ce soir. Comme on dit, il faut donner la chance au coureur. Cependant, vous ne me convainquez pas encore que vous serez celui qui va dire non. Y a-t-il un pilote dans l'avion? Allez-vous protéger les contribuables de cette propension à créer des déficits immenses?

Ma première question porte sur une campagne de sensibilisation dont il est question à la page 19 du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Le budget de publicité global est de 9,5 millions de dollars. Cette campagne de sensibilisation vise entre autres à prévenir l'utilisation illégale de la marijuana chez les jeunes. On connaît les effets dévastateurs de la marijuana. Un montant de 1 million de dollars est prévu à cette fin. Êtes-vous en mesure de me confirmer que ce montant va être consacré à cela?

S'il reste du temps, les gens qui vous accompagnent pourront répondre à mon autre question, au sujet du programme de construction navale. Il y a un montant de 116 millions de dollars. Serait-il possible d'avoir des détails sur la raison du coût additionnel pour les vaisseaux?

Je répète donc ma première question. Du budget de publicité total de 9,5 millions de dollars, le montant de 1 million de dollars prévu pour prévenir l'utilisation illégale de marijuana, particulièrement chez les jeunes, sera-t-il investi à cette fin?

(1925)

[Traduction]

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup.

De la marijuana à la construction navale: on va d'un extrême à l'autre, en tout cas. [Français]

J'aimerais commencer par discuter de la loi sur la marijuana. Depuis longtemps, l'approche du gouvernement du Canada n'arrive pas à réduire l'utilisation de la marijuana, particulièrement chez les jeunes. Notre responsabilité est de mettre en oeuvre une approche fondée sur des données probantes.[Traduction]

Les preuves sont claires. Personne n'approuve, n'appuie ou promeut la consommation de la marijuana, monsieur Blaney. Nous voulons seulement un cadre juridique plus efficace. Certains pays qui ont choisi de mettre l'accent sur la promotion de la santé, la prévention, ainsi que les services de santé mentale et de traitement de la toxicomanie, ont trouvé que cette approche est plus efficace pour réduire la consommation de drogues, y compris de la marijuana, qu'une approche simplement fondée sur la justice pénale. Nous ne sommes peut-être pas d'accord sur l'approche à adopter, mais je tiens à préciser clairement, monsieur Blaney, que personne ici ne préconise ou ne promeut la consommation de la marijuana.

Vous avez posé une question sur le programme de construction navale, et je pense que vous parlez des 116 millions de dollars prévus pour la construction de trois navires hauturiers de science halieutique.

Comme vous le savez, nous nous sommes engagés à mettre en place un programme national de construction navale au Canada. Pour ce qui est du financement des trois navires hauturiers de science halieutique, j'ai travaillé récemment avec le ministre Tootoo. C'est l'une des mesures prises dans le cadre du remplacement de notre flotte vieillissante, ce qui est une initiative importante.

Il est important que vous sachiez que la construction navale relève des ministères des Pêches et de la Défense, ainsi que de Travaux publics — qui s'appelle maintenant Services publics et Approvisionnement — et du ministère de l'Industrie. Le gouvernement cherche à équilibrer Services publics et Approvisionnement, mon ancien ministère, dont le travail consiste à élaborer un processus ouvert et transparent qui permet de tirer le meilleur profit de l'argent des contribuables. Le ministère de l'Industrie tente de maximiser les retombées industrielles régionales, qui s'appelaient récemment des retombées industrielles technologiques, et les ministères de la Défense et des Pêches ont également des besoins à cet égard.

Globalement, le Conseil du Trésor joue un rôle de leadership et de coordination, et il travaille avec tous les ministères et les organismes afin de mettre en place les processus d'approvisionnement les plus efficients qui permettront de répondre aux trois objectifs gouvernementaux suivants: création d'emplois pour les Canadiens, optimisation de l'utilisation des deniers publics, et acquisition du meilleur équipement possible pour nos militaires et la Garde côtière, par exemple.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. C'est tout le temps que nous avons.

Désolé, monsieur Blaney, le temps est écoulé.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Monsieur le président, je ne veux pas poser de question, mais j'aimerais que le ministre me confirme comment le 1 million de dollars qui est prévu va être investi.

(1930)

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je suis désolé. Je ne suis pas évasif. Je suis intarissable. C'est différent.

M. McCauley a posé une question plus tôt sur la façon dont les fonds sont utilisés. Nous mettons à jour le site Web du premier ministre pour améliorer les communications avec les Canadiens au moyen d'un processus numérique. Le premier ministre précédent diffusait ces espèces de vidéos intitulées 24 SEPT...

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est complètement différent.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Mais nous n'annulons pas le Plan d'action économique, monsieur McCauley. Il existera encore, mais nous n'allons pas faire autant de publicité pour le promouvoir.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci beaucoup de votre réponse.

Le président:

Monsieur le ministre, il est 19 h 30, et vous nous avez gracieusement donné une heure de votre temps. Toutefois, dans le cadre de notre rotation, nous terminons normalement par une troisième série de questions qui sont posées par le troisième parti. Accepteriez-vous de rester pour une autre séance éreintante de questions et de réponses de trois minutes?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je dois vous dire, monsieur le président, que, au fil des années, j'ai fait partie de l'opposition et du gouvernement. Comme Mae West l'a dit : « J'ai été riche et j'ai été pauvre, et je préfère être riche. » Il est un peu préférable de faire partie du gouvernement que de l'opposition, mais je respecte beaucoup le travail des députés de l'opposition. Je pense que, à une époque, j'étais membre du cinquième parti à la Chambre des communes. Ma réponse est donc oui absolument, je vais rester.

Le président:

Nous disposons de trois minutes. Veuillez être le plus précis possible parce que les trois minutes sont pour la question et la réponse.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je faisais partie d'un caucus de 12 députés à un moment donné.

M. Erin Weir:

Je vais revenir sur la question de la marijuana. Tandis que le gouvernement détermine un cadre de légalisation pour la marijuana, décriminalisera-t-il cette dernière pour s'assurer au moins que des gens ne se retrouvent pas avec un casier judiciaire ou ne sont pas emprisonnés pour simple possession et consommation de marijuana?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Ce processus est en cours... Mes collègues, la ministre Wilson-Raybould et son secrétaire parlementaire, M. Blair, y travaillent. Il y a un processus en cours, mais je ne suis pas un expert là-dedans.

Nous voulons bien faire les choses. Je pense qu'il est très utile d'avoir M. Blair avec nous, étant donné son expérience dans la police. Cependant, nous voulons faire ce qui s'impose, pas pour des raisons idéologiques, mais en fonction des faits. Je suis convaincu que nous ferons bien les choses, mais j'ignore si des mesures provisoires seront mises en place en attendant.

Le président:

Monsieur Weir, je souhaite brièvement dire quelque chose. Vous ne perdrez pas de temps à cause de cela.

La principale raison pour laquelle le ministre Brison comparaît devant nous est pour parler du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Je sais que les membres sont toujours enclins à faire des commentaires de nature politique. Cependant, j'aimerais qu'ils puissent concentrer leurs observations sur la raison pour laquelle le ministre est devant nous ce soir.

M. Erin Weir:

Cela ne me pose aucun problème, monsieur le président.

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) comprend une demande de l'Agence du revenu du Canada, qui réclame des fonds supplémentaires pour des mesures d’observation des règles fiscales, ce que j'appuie, mais, étant donné la révélation que l'ARC a enfreint ses propres lignes directrices en offrant une amnistie secrète à des millionnaires s'étant servis de l'île de Man comme paradis fiscal, quelles sommes pouvons-nous prévoir qu'ellle percevra au moyen de ces mesures d'observation?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Monsieur Weir, le dernier gouvernement dont j'ai fait partie, de 2004 à 2006, a effectué ce qui était alors un investissement majeur afin de permettre à l'Agence du revenu du Canada de traquer les paradis fiscaux à l'étranger. Je crois savoir que cet investissement a beaucoup aidé le gouvernement à trouver les paradis fiscaux, ce qui a été très financièrement rentable pour lui.

Nous investissons dans l'ARC pour nous assurer que les Canadiens peuvent avoir confiance dans le régime fiscal. Il est très important pour le gouvernement de veiller à ce que les gens payent leur juste part. J'ai eu cette discussion avec la ministre Lebouthillier. Il s'agit là d'une priorité pour notre ministre des Finances et notre ministre du Revenu national.

Les impôts non déclarés sont décelés par le programme de vérification. Ils ont augmenté de 24 % en trois ans pour atteindre 11,7 milliards de dollars. La Direction du secteur international et des grandes entreprises a détecté 7,8 milliards de dollars en impôts non déclarés l'année dernière.

Un des meilleurs articles que j'ai lus sur le sujet a été publié dans le magazine The Economist il y a quelques années. L'Economist Intelligence Unit a mené une très bonne étude sur les paradis fiscaux à l'étranger pour tenter de quantifier le problème et, bien sûr, c'est ce qu'ont fait nos fonctionnaires du ministère des Finances et de l'ARC.

Il s'agit d'un enjeu très important. L'intégrité de notre régime fiscal est une question d'équité, et c'est quelque chose que nous prenons au sérieux.

(1935)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Je vais devoir vous interrompre.

Mesdames et messieurs, notre temps est écoulé.

Au nom de tous les membres du Comité, je remercie le ministre et les hauts fonctionnaires qui l'ont accompagné d'avoir comparu devant nous.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous avons quelques points dont nous devons discuter brièvement. J'aimerais donc demander aux membres du Comité de rester.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre. Vous pouvez nous quitter. Je vous remercie de votre présence.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup.

Si vous m'invitez de nouveau, je serais heureux de parler du Budget principal des dépenses, ainsi que de la réforme des processus du budget et du budget des dépenses. Comme j'ai dit, ayant été membre de l'opposition, je suis prêt à vous consacrer une partie de mon temps. Alors, si vous voulez parler d'autres sujets, je suis disposé à le faire.

Je tiens à faire comprendre très clairement à tous les membres du Comité que les comités sont l'endroit au Parlement où nous devrions faire un travail efficace, peu importe notre allégeance politique. Si les comités ne peuvent fonctionner de manière efficace et constructive, en élaborant de bonnes politiques publiques et en exigeant des comptes de tous les partis, c'est là un véritable problème. C'est quelque chose qui me tient à coeur parce que j'ai moi-même parfois siégé dans des comités qui ne fonctionnaient pas de cette manière. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un enjeu très important. Je tiens à dire, surtout aux nouveaux députés, que le travail que vous faites au sein des comités parlementaires est extrêmement important et significatif. Je veux aussi dire aux membres de votre personnel et de votre équipe, qui vous soutiennent dans votre travail, qu'ils font un travail très important dans le cadre duquel ils peuvent élaborer de bonnes politiques publiques et améliorer réellement la vie des Canadiens.

J'ai hâte de travailler avec ce comité à l'avenir. Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître devant vous, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Nous vous remercions d'être venu.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je veux remercier les personnes qui m'ont accompagné ici.

Je tiens à dire une dernière chose. Nous avons des fonctionnaires exceptionnels au sein du gouvernement du Canada. Il y a quelques membres de ce comité qui ont travaillé dans la fonction publique et qui partagent certainement ce point de vue. Nous sommes bien servis par les fonctionnaires, et je tiens vraiment à les remercier d'être ici ce soir.

Merci à vous tous.

Le président:

Puisque les délibérations sont encore télévisées, je demande aux membres du Comité de poursuivre à huis clos pendant approximativement deux minutes.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je tiens seulement à vous rappeler que vous avez oublié de donner la parole à l'un de nos députés. Vous n'avez pas suivi l'horaire. Un député libéral aurait dû avoir la parole pendant cinq minutes. Au lieu de cela, vous avez immédiatement donné la parole...

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Puis-je invoquer le Règlement pour faire inscrire dans le compte rendu que vous avez pris mon temps et que vous l'avez donné au NPD?

Le président:

Selon l'horaire que j'ai, ce n'est pas ce que j'ai fait. L'horaire que nous avons adopté au début montre que, durant le premier tour de sept minutes, nous suivons l'ordre suivant: Parti libéral, Parti conservateur, Nouveau Parti démocratique, Parti libéral.

M. Nick Whalen:

Oui.

Le président:

Dans la deuxième série de questions, nous donnons d'abord la parole aux conservateurs, qui sont suivis des libéraux, puis des conservateurs à nouveau. Ensuite, lors du troisième tour, le Nouveau Parti démocratique dispose de trois minutes de parole.

M. Nick Whalen:

Non, c'est inexact.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'où sortez-vous ce troisième tour, monsieur le président? Voici ce que nous avons adopté.

Le président:

C'est ce que l'on m'a donné. Selon ce que j'ai cru comprendre, c'est ce que nous avons adopté.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, nous suivons cet horaire depuis...

M. Nick Whalen:

Non, ce n'est pas ce qui a été adopté.

Le président:

Nous allons vérifier le compte rendu. Notre greffier examinera...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n'y a jamais eu de troisième tour.

M. Nick Whalen:

Il n'y a pas eu de troisième tour, et l'ordre était le suivant: conservateur, libéral, conservateur, libéral.

Le président:

Nick, je sais que vous n'étiez pas ici hier, mais nous avons suivi cet ordre.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, nous ne l'avons pas fait. M. Grewal était le premier à prendre la parole, pas M. Weir.

Le président:

Non, j'ai la liste d'intervenants d'hier, et je peux vous assurer que nous avons suivi exactement le même ordre qu'aujourd'hui. Je ne veux pas me disputer.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Ce n'est pas un problème.

Le président:

Nous allons vérifier l'ordre qui a été adopté. Le Comité peut, bien sûr, adopter l'ordre des interventions qu'il souhaite. Vérifions donc d'abord ce que notre compte rendu indique, et nous nous pencherons sur la situation demain. Je n'avais certainement pas l'intention d'oublier quelqu'un.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je ne veux pas empiéter sur le temps de parole de M. Weir.

Le président:

Nous allons vérifier ce qui a été adopté.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'accord.

Le président:

Je tiens à soulever brièvement deux enjeux. Premièrement, comme je l'ai mentionné hier, j'aimerais connaître l'opinion de tout le monde sur l'horaire des réunions que nous devrions adopter pour la semaine du 21 mars. La réunion de mardi n'aura pas lieu parce que c'est le jour où le budget sera présenté. Je vous ai demandé si nous devrions nous réunir le jeudi 24 mars. C'est la journée avant que nous fassions relâche pendant deux semaines pour le congé de Pâques. J'ai suggéré que si nous ne nous réunissons pas cette journée-là — et ce sera au Comité de prendre cette décision — les membres du Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure se réunissent afin que nous puissions établir notre plan de travail. Je laisserai cependant cette décision au Comité. J'espère pouvoir obtenir le consensus des membres. Souhaitez-vous que le Comité se réunisse jeudi après-midi, avant le Vendredi saint, ou non?

(1940)

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Avons-nous un ordre du jour pour cette réunion? Si nous n'en avons pas, les membres du sous-comité devraient se réunir à la place.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Je soumettrais la question au sous-comité pour voir s'il y a un témoin.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Cela ne me poserait aucun problème.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Nous avons déjà prévu des réunions supplémentaires cette semaine. Les choses s'équilibrent donc.

M. Erin Weir:

Je préférerais, et je recommanderais vivement, que nous nous réunissions jeudi, surtout puisque nous allons manquer la réunion mardi.

Le président:

Puisqu'il ne semble pas y avoir unanimité à ce sujet, laissez-moi procéder à quelques vérifications.

Je prendrai une décision, mais je déterminerai d'abord s'il serait possible d'avoir un ordre du jour de deux heures pour jeudi. Sinon, je suggère que nous fassions appel à un sous-comité pour élaborer le plan de travail. Je ne veux pas tenir une réunion pour le simple plaisir de la chose. Je préfère avoir un ordre du jour définitif.

M. Erin Weir:

Je suis complètement d'accord. Cependant, je tiens à signaler que le sous-comité a recommandé certains sujets de discussion qui ont été reportés pour faire place au débat sur les prévisions budgétaires. Nous pourrions certainement nous pencher sur ces sujets jeudi.

Le président:

Bien noté.

Le deuxième point que je veux soulever est surtout un élément d'information. Si nous voulons que le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) fasse l'objet d'un vote, nous devrons nous en occuper demain parce que nous devons en faire rapport à la Chambre d'ici vendredi.

J'aimerais réserver environ 10 minutes à la fin de la réunion de demain pour les votes. Êtes-vous d'accord?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Parfait. Merci.

Le président:

Sur ce, la séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard oggo 20594 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on March 09, 2016

2016-03-08 OGGO 4

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1550)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen.

This will be the fourth meeting of government operations and estimates.

Before we hear from our witnesses, I have some business for the committee and I'd like to have some consensus on this, if possible.

The next two afternoons and evenings we will have ministers appearing before the committee. We have a request to make these appearances televised, and I would ask the committee if they would give their concurrence to allowing the meeting tomorrow evening and the meeting on Thursday afternoon to be televised.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

Yes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

Who is specifically requesting they be televised?

The Chair:

Broadcasting.

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you.

We have witnesses before us. The difficulty we have today is that because of votes we are running a little late. Normally we have 10-minute opening statements per witness. I have consulted with some of our committee members, and the consensus seems to be that we would like to have as much time as possible for questions, so I would ask both of our presenters to try to keep their comments to no more than 10 minutes a piece to allow enough time for the committee members to ask questions. Any unpresented information can be read into the record a little later.

With that, perhaps we can start with Madam Doucet. Would you mind introducing yourself, the officials you have with you, and your statement following that, please.

Ms. Michelle Doucet (Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services, Privy Council Office):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee. My name is Michelle Doucet and I am the assistant deputy minister of corporate services at the Privy Council Office. I'm here today with Madam Karen Cahill, who is the deputy chief financial officer and the executive director of the finance planning and administrative directorate at PCO. We're delighted to be here. We look forward to answering your questions.

I'm going to begin my remarks with some context by briefly explaining the mandate of PCO and its three principal roles. The mandate of the Privy Council Office is to serve Canada and Canadians by providing professional, non-partisan advice and support to the Prime Minister, the ministers within the Prime Minister's portfolio and cabinet. The Prime Minister is responsible for this organization.

PCO supports the development of the Government of Canada's policy, legislative, and government administration agendas, coordinates responses to issues facing the government and the country, and supports the effective operation of cabinet. PCO is led by the Clerk of the Privy Council. In addition to serving as the deputy head for PCO, the clerk also acts as secretary to cabinet and the head of the public service.

PCO has three main roles.

First, we provide non-partisan advice to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, cabinet and cabinet committees on matters of national and international importance. This includes providing advice and support on the full spectrum of policy, legislative, and government administration issues faced by the government.

Second, PCO is the secretariat to cabinet and all of its committees, except the Treasury Board, which is supported by the Treasury Board Secretariat.

Third, PCO fosters a high-performing and accountable public service.

We deliver all three roles to our people who provide advice, coordination, and support. Unlike many other departments, PCO doesn't deliver programs. We spend the funds that Parliament appropriates to us on salaries, operating costs, and services received from other government departments. As such, PCO is governed by the same financial and administrative requirements under which all departments operate.

I would also add that, like the Department of Finance and the Treasury Board Secretariat, PCO is something called the central agency, and as such, has the central coordinating role across the government to provide advice to the Prime Minister and cabinet and to ensure policy coherence and coordination on their behalf.

Now I'd like to give you some details on PCO's supplementary estimates (C) for the current fiscal year. In these supplementary estimates, PCO is seeking $4.2 million for the following items: $1.6 million to both complete the work related to the coordination of a government-wide communications approach for Canada's economic action plan under the former government and to begin to modernize the Prime Minister's digital presence.

Of that amount, $1 million is for the operation of what was the communications component of the economic action plan, which ended following the 2015 election. The EAP funding would support a team of five public servants within PCO. The focus of their work since the election has been on properly archiving the appropriate records, both digital and analog, and on closing out the EAP. As well, this team continues to provide support to the communication of government priorities.

The second portion of that funding is $0.6 million, and that's for activities relating to support of the Prime Minister's official web presence. The Privy Council Office provides support for the maintenance of the Prime Minister's Government of Canada website as well as all publishing to that site, and to the Prime Minister's Government of Canada's social media accounts.

The requirements for the site and those accounts have grown and become more complex with steady increases in volume and new features such as video, richer digital content, live streaming, and enhanced social media. These represent an additional pressure for PCO's web operations and associated IT support. The funds will be directed to meeting these requirements in support of the Prime Minister's web presence. [Translation]

PCO is seeking $1 million for activities related to the continued implementation of Canada's Migrant Smuggling Prevention Strategy. The Special Advisor on Human Smuggling and Illegal Migration took office in September 2010 and was charged with coordinating the Government of Canada's response to mass marine human smuggling ventures targeting Canada. Canada has implemented a whole-of-government strategy to prevent the further arrival of human smuggling vessels.

This is a priority national security file. Budget 2015 approved funding in the amount of $44.5 million over three years to continue Canada's coordinated efforts to identify and respond to such threats. Reporting to the National Security Advisor, the Special Advisor's mandate consists in the coordination of the Government of Canada's response to marine migrant smuggling. This includes working with key domestic partners to coordinate Canada's strategy, working with key international partners to promote cooperation, and advancing Canada's engagement with governments in transit countries and in regional and international fora.

PCO is also requesting $0.8 million for activities related to the continuation and advancement of the Border Implementation Team in support of the Beyond the Border Action Plan. By way of background, in February 2011, Canada and the U.S. issued a Declaration on a Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness. The declaration established a new long-term partnership accelerating the legitimate flow of people and goods between both countries, while strengthening security and economic competitiveness.

It focused on four areas of cooperation: addressing threats early; trade facilitation, economic growth and jobs; integrated cross-border law enforcement; and critical infrastructure and cybersecurity. This led to the announcement of the Beyond The Border Action Plan in December 2011. Consequently, concrete benefits have begun to accrue to industry and travellers through an increasingly efficient, modernized and secure border. Continued central coordination and oversight of Border Action Plan implementation has been important for ensuring its success.

PCO is seeking $0.2 million to support the creation of a new non-partisan, merit-based Senate appointment process. In December 2015, the government announced the establishment of a new, non-partisan, merit-based process to advise on Senate appointments. Under the new process, an Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments was established on January 19, 2016, to provide advice to the Prime Minister on candidates for the Senate.

The Independent Advisory Board is guided by public, merit-based criteria, in order to identify Canadians who would make a significant contribution to the work of the Senate. The criteria will help ensure a high standard of integrity, collaboration, and non-partisanship in the Senate. The government is moving quickly to reform this Senate and the new appointments process will be implemented in two phases.

In the first phase which is transitional, five appointments will be made to improve the representation of the provinces with the most vacancies, i.e., Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. The second phase will implement a permanent process to replenish the remaining vacancies, and will include an application process open to all Canadians.

The funding for PCO allows it to support the operations of the Independent Advisory Board and its secretariat in its work during the first transitional phase to provide advice and recommendations to the Prime Minister for his consideration.

In addition, PCO's statutory forecast increases by $0.1 million for the salary and motor car allowance for the Minister of Democratic Institutions.

(1555)



Following the election, the Honourable Maryam Monsef was appointed to the position of Minister of Democratic Institutions. To reflect the addition of this full ministerial position that includes both the salary and motor car allowance, a new item was included under PCO's statutory forecasts.[English]

This completes the explanation—

The Chair:

Madam Doucet, thank you very much. We're at just over 10 minutes now. I know you have yet to go into the departmental performance report, but if we could, I'd like to move on to the Public Service Commission for their presentation. We will make sure the rest of your presentation enters the record.

(1600)

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Madam Donoghue.

Ms. Christine Donoghue (Acting President, Public Service Commission):

Mr. Chair, honourable members, thank you.

I am pleased to introduce Omer Boudreau who is our corporate management vice-president at the commission.

We are pleased to be here today to discuss the Public Service Commission's departmental performance report for 2014-15 and supplementary estimates.[Translation]

The mandate of the Public Service Commission is to promote and safeguard merit-based appointments, and in collaboration with other stakeholders, to protect the non-partisan nature of the public service. While the Public Service Employment Act gives appointment authority to the PSC, the legislation also calls for this authority to be delegated to deputy heads.

In a decentralized system based on the delegation of authorities, the commission fulfils its mandate by providing policy guidance and expertise, conducting effective oversight, and delivering innovative staffing and assessment services. We also work with departments and agencies to promote a non-partisan federal public service that reflects Canada's diversity and draws on talents and skills from across the country.[English]

We report independently to Parliament on the overall integrity of the staffing system and non-partisanship of the public service. To that end, our 2014-15 annual report, which I notice is in front of you, was tabled in Parliament on February 23. We would be pleased to be back in front this committee to discuss it, should the committee wish us to do so.

Today, I will be focusing my remarks on three areas. First, I would like to highlight some of the key achievements found in our departmental performance report 2014-15. Second, I would like to speak to some of the areas of our supplementary estimates (C). Third, I would like to conclude by providing you with an update of the efforts that we're making to modernize our approach to staffing.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, a non-partisan public service is one in which appointments are based on merit and are free from political influence and where employees not only perform their duties in a politically impartial manner, but are also seen to do so. As part of our responsibilities, we communicate with public servants about the value of non-partisanship and remind them of their rights as well as their legal responsibilities with respect to political activities.

Any public servant who is interested in becoming a political candidate in a municipal, provincial, territorial or federal election must first obtain the permission of the commission, following its review. We approve these requests if the employee's ability to perform their duties in a politically impartial manner will not be impaired or be perceived as being impaired. In making this decision, we consider factors such as the nature of the election, the nature of the employee's duties in the organizational context, and the level and visibility of the employee's position. Approvals are often subject to conditions such as taking a leave without pay in order to seek nomination to be a candidate.[English]

I'd like to turn to the staffing system which accounts for the majority of our activities and resources. We provide guidance, tools, and support services to enable hiring managers and human resource advisers to staff effectively while meeting the intent of the Public Service Employment Act.

We also administer programs that recruit qualified Canadians from across the country. This involves extensive outreach and increased collaboration with departments and agencies, such as participating in career fairs and information sessions with academic institutions across the country. For example, over 39,000 applications were submitted under the fall federal student work experience campaign and over 6,500 students were hired.

We work closely with partners, including the office of the chief human resources officer, to create pools of qualified candidates that are available to federal organizations across the country. This collaboration helps to reduce duplication of efforts across the public service.[Translation]

We continue to expand our use of new technology. Online testing now accounts for 72% of all the tests administered by the PSC. More than 92% of the PSC's second language tests were completed online. Unsupervised online testing continued to increase, representing nearly 42,000 tests in 2014-2015.

(1605)



These tests allow applicants to take a test at a location of their choosing and to have greater access to public service jobs no matter where they live. This testing also helps to reduce barriers for persons with disabilities by allowing them to take exams from home using their own adaptive technologies.[English]

Our most important platform for recruitment is our site called jobs.gc.ca. In April 2015, the system provided Canadians with a single portal to access public service jobs. Nearly 8,800 internal and external job advertisements were posted, resulting in over 530,000 applications.

We continue to look for ways to further modernize the system and support in order to improve the user experience. This is a good segue to the funds that are in supplementary estimates (C), as departments and agencies contribute to the cost of operating this platform, which explains the transfer you see in the estimates.

This consolidated system also provides the foundation to support the implementation of the Veterans Hiring Act . On July 1 last year, the legislation came into force providing medically released veterans and members of the Canadian Armed Forces greater access to public service jobs.

We provided training and new tools to raise awareness of the skills and competencies that veterans have to offer to the public service. We ourselves at the commission have hired two veterans to serve as navigators in guiding their colleagues through the priority entitlements and staffing system. To date, more than 94 veterans have been hired, including 15 under the new statutory entitlement which gives the highest priority to veterans who have been released for medical reasons attributable to service.[Translation]

As part of our efforts to continuously improve our system, I would like to speak about changes that will come into effect on April 1 to simplify the staffing process. These changes build on the reforms introduced and our experience gained since 2005, with the goal of modernizing while ensuring the overall health of the staffing system.

Based on our observations over the past 10 years, we believe the staffing system has matured, along with the human resources capacity in departments and agencies. As such, we are streamlining our policies to remove duplication, going from 12 policies to one.

This single policy will more clearly articulate expectations for deputy heads and reinforce their discretion and accountability. As a result of these changes, departments and agencies will have greater scope to customize their staffing based on their operational realities and needs. Hiring managers will also have more room to exercise their judgment in their staffing decisions, and will also be accountable for their decisions.[English]

Mr. Chair, this context in which the public service operates is constantly evolving. Departments and agencies need to be able to respond effectively to ensure that they attract the right people with the right skills at the right time.

To that end, the commission will focus on integrating its guidance and support to respond to the unique needs of organizations, while also promoting best practices across the system. We will be reducing the reporting burden, in line with the recommendations of the Auditor General's report of 2015. Deputy heads will remain accountable to the Public Service Commission for the way in which they exercise their discretion, and we will continue to oversee the integrity of the staffing system through audits and investigations.

However, we will be adjusting our oversight activities to be more nimble in order to support continuous improvement. For instance, audits will shift from reviewing individual organizations to taking a system-wide approach with a focus on areas that need attention.

(1610)



Mr. Chair, for more than 100 years, the Public Service Commission has been entrusted by Parliament with the mandate of safeguarding merit and non-partisanship in the public service. We will continue to foster strong collaborative relationships with parliamentarians, deputy heads, bargaining agents, and other stakeholders so that Canadians continue to have confidence in their non-partisan and professional public service and to benefit from the skills and competencies to deliver results.

We'd be pleased to take questions at this point. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Madam Doucet and Madam Donoghue.

We'll go now to the seven-minute round and Madam Ratansi.

I'll remind all members that the time allowed for questions includes questions and answers.

Madam Ratansi, please.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Thank you. I'll be quite quick with my questions.

Madam Donoghue, my question is for you.

The Public Service Commission of Canada is asking, under vote 1c, to transfer a total of $504,000 from Parks Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency for the public service resource systems. I guess that is a recruitment system that you have.

Is this mandatory for the agencies to do?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

The system that we entertain is mandatory in fact for all departments that are subject to the Public Service Employment Act. When we come to Parks Canada and the CFIA, these organizations are not subject to the PSEA, the Public Service Employment Act. That is why they are paying for the services. They have chosen to use the services that we offer.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

You presented the view that with the aging population, with retirement, the challenges that the Public Service Commission faces across government.... How have you been able to meet the challenges of a very diverse population and reflect that diversity in your hiring practices?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

As the public service is responsible for the implementation of the Public Service Employment Act, we also have a responsibility for employment equity that is shared with diverse partners within the system. We have basically, through policy and through the use of legislation, been able to indicate that there is a possibility to advertise positions, with targeted intent, towards employment equity diversity groups. That in itself has allowed for easier access of diverse groups into public service jobs.

The other thing we do is conduct studies to look at what is happening within those communities, what their workforce availability is, and whether or not we are getting the right number of applicants and whether the jobs are being offered to the employment equity groups.

We have studies that will be coming out soon, in 2016, that will demonstrate some of the results we have. We have seen some increase in certain communities, but we recognize that there is still some more work to be done. We also do a lot of outreach to create more awareness and to inform departments as to how they can more easily get people on board from the employment equity groups.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

This gives rise to two questions, then. How accessible is your system? How easy is it for people who wish to apply but may have linguistic skill problems? I guess it is bilingual. That is number one. Number two is, how easy is it to access, and what monitoring mechanisms do you have in place to ensure that the PSC is successful?

I was looking at the audit reports and some of the observations, and the audit recommends that the monitoring has to be done and be more stringent. You're an umbrella for a lot of these agencies, so could you give me some idea as to the ease of access to that system and the monitoring and how you gauge success?

(1615)

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

The ease of access was facilitated through the fact that we integrated a single window. That basically made it very clear. Having a single window that Canadians can all go through to see what jobs are available in the public service is definitely a benefit.

Now, we are actually in the process of reviewing, once you know where the single window is, how easy it is to actually enter into the system. We recognize at this point in time that it could be a better user experience. As I was saying, we are looking at better ways of improving that system which was put in place in 2015, but we are also looking at what it would mean to actually do the system from the user perspective, as distinct from the government perspective.

We're looking at continuous improvement, facilitating easier language, trying to get rid of a lot of the very bureaucratic language, and seeing whether we can do a system that would, by the criteria the potential candidates could put in, more easily direct them towards jobs that would be suitable for their skill sets.

The system works well. Every department is using it. As well, we're asking departments to monitor a lot more the activities they have within that system. But we always recognize that it should be a bit more user-friendly, and we're going to be testing that in the months to come.

One thing we've also done is we've streamlined a lot of our policy requirements. We were an extremely rules-based system. As of April 1 we're really going back to the basic intent of the legislation, which was very clear and gave a lot of flexibility. One thing we're going to do is adapt that system so that it removes any extra information that is no longer required on the basis of policy.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

How many minutes do I have?

The Chair:

It's about 45 seconds.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

If you can, answer this for the second round: how do you measure your success? What is the measuring mechanism you use to show that we have hired the diverse population, whether it's the disabled, visible minorities, etc.?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Our system allows us to do a compilation of a lot of data. It allows us to actually measure through the data. This is data that I could provide to the committee to demonstrate exactly how we can use it and what the data is showing us. Then, we share it with all the deputy heads. Also, in conjunction with the human resources office, we try to encourage different approaches.

This is information that I could provide more specifically to the committee, which would outline much more detail.

The Chair:

Thank you. I request that you do that, Madam Donoghue.

Mr. McCauley, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

Thanks for the questions, Ms. Ratansi.

You note that on July 1, the Veterans Hiring Act came into force, and since then 94 veterans in total have been hired. What percentage is that of new hires, and how many have actually been hired by Veterans Affairs?

A voice: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Kelly McCauley: Is it 15? Was that 15 of those released who were hired under this special act, or is it 94 in total—it just happened to be that—and 15 under the statutory entitlement?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Omer, do you have the specific numbers here?

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

That is fine. I realize they're very specific.

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

In fact, 11 of the 15 were hired by DND. DND is probably one of the departments that rehire the most veterans or CAF-released members. Just as a reminder, some members are released because they were injured during the course of their tenure, and some are released for other medical reasons that are not related to service. There is a different level of priority.

We have two who were hired at Health Canada. As I indicated, we at the commission have as well hired some veterans to help manage the system. We know that there's continuous improvement as well.

One thing we know is that we've referred a lot more veterans, but not all veterans who have registered are necessarily without employment at this point in time. Some of them are employed but can benefit by being on the priority system and being able to look at whether or not their situation can be improved by entering into the public service. Thus, although many them have been referred, some of them choose to not follow the reference but still remain eligible for the system.

We're hopeful, as we continue to grow the communication and the outreach department and as we're able to demonstrate the positive experience and the number of skill sets these veterans and CAF-released members have, that more and more departments will start engaging in the hiring of veterans.

(1620)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Yes. I understand they have a very sought-after skill set for leadership. I realize you may not have the number, so please get back to me, for Veterans Affairs, on how many were hired.

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Yes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Out of this 94, can you provide as well what percentage of new hires that actually is, and how many veterans, please, have actually applied for that?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Yes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

You note a new car allowance for the Minister of Democratic Institutions due to the elevation from, I assume, minister of state to a full minister.

Were there any other examples of ministers of state receiving a car allowance because of an elevation or any other reasons?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I'm going to ask Ms. Cahill to answer that question. She will talk about the Privy Council Office, and then perhaps a broader application.

Ms. Karen Cahill (Deputy Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services, Privy Council Office):

Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair.

For ministers of state, the Parliament of Canada Act planned for a $2,000 motor car allowance. In previous years, PCO, the Privy Council Office, had ministers of state where we allocated and added into our estimates the $2,000 amount.

Of course, with the election, Minister Monsef is a full minister, so that's why we have added the statutory item to our supplementary estimates (C).

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I probably didn't ask the question properly. Were there any other ministers of state elevated to full minister who are receiving the added $80,000 car allowances, like that one?

Ms. Karen Cahill:

Not for PCO.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Certainly across the government there was, and I think that is your question.

Those other ministers would include ministers Qualtrough, Duncan, Hajdu, and Chagger.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

You mentioned, and several times there was mention about ensuring non-partisanship of the public service. Obviously, everyone has to work toward that.

We have seen some examples not only with a huge amount of spending by public service unions in the last election as registered by Elections Canada, but we saw an incident where the Prime Minister went into the foreign affairs building and the public service was surrounding him, all cheering, etc. A huge crowd came out.

What are you doing to ensure non-partisanship of the public service? I realize you mentioned you send out memos, you discuss with them, but what are you doing to ensure non-partisanship within the public service?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

There is part 7 of the legislation that we administer, which is very clearly dedicated to political activities and candidacy.

Over and above all of this, we are doing a lot of work with Treasury Board in the context of values and ethics. There's a very fine line when it comes to values and ethics, and also partisan activities per se.

When these things happen, we do a lot of work within the system to actually analyze what constitutes a political activity, and whether or not there's somebody who has been seen as not being able to continue to exercise their duties.

That's where the difference lies. When there's a group activity, there are a lot of things that are related to the values and ethics aspect, which basically falls within the scope of the deputy head to continue to brief and to educate the staff.

We do that as well. What we've done is gone back, and working directly with PCO have looked at continuing to inform public servants of the duty they have to act in a non-partisan manner.

When we have egregious cases, or when there are obvious...or we can identify individuals, we do have the possibility of conducting investigations to see whether or not there has been an issue of conduct and take the corrective measures that are necessary at that point.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. McCauley, I think I'll cut you off there. We only have about 10 seconds left.

Mr. Weir, for seven minutes, please.

(1625)

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

Thanks very much.

I have a question for the Privy Council Office. You're seeking $1.6 million for the communication strategy around the economic action plan as well as to modernize the Prime Minister's digital presence.

Could you provide any kind of breakdown of the money between those two initiatives?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I'm happy to do that. Let me divide it into two categories.

As I said in my opening remarks, we are asking for $1 million to complete the work under the economic action plan, which of course concluded following the election in October. That was a stand-alone website that was supported by a team of...how many FTEs, Karen? Remind me.

Ms. Karen Cahill:

For the EAP?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes.

Ms. Karen Cahill:

It was four FTEs.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

That's what I thought.

FTE means a public servant. There were four folks who were involved in the public service in supporting that work and led I believe by a director. As I also said, that work wound down after the election and they have been retasked to support the priorities of the current government and the Prime Minister.

Then there is a piece costing $600,000, which is in support of the Prime Minister's digital presence. The Prime Minister has a Government of Canada website and other social media accounts. That's what that money is for. It operates 24-7, 365 days a year. The money will be used to hire two additional people to work on it in communications. It will be used to acquire licences, and hire a contractor to assist us in things such as live streaming and more cutting-edge technology support. We have also contributed, over the last year and a half, approximately $1 million of our own money in addition to what we're asking for today.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I'm wondering if you could tell us a bit about what this modernized digital presence will look like. How would the success of that initiative be judged?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question. It's a good question.

Most of us increasingly live our lives through technology and on the Internet. Government has to work hard at staying relevant and being able to connect to Canadians. Technology evolves far more rapidly than we could ever keep up.

One of the pieces the Government of Canada has had to get its head around, especially in the last five or six years, is how we harness what we used to call web 2.0 technology and social media, and imbed that in the Government of Canada context. It's different in the public sector. We have obligations that reflect our values and ethics, like official languages and accessibility. If you have a handicap, say you can't see or hear, we need to make sure that as the Government of Canada that is accessible. Security matters and privacy are important considerations.

As we build the digital presence, we work within that operating framework, in that we're trying to satisfy Canadians' thirst for information and for knowledge. In the past it used to be that a lot was print media, but now they want to see it. Sometimes they want videos. Some people get all of their news via Twitter. I'm not a Twitter person, but I can assure you that many of my colleagues are Twitter people. My children live on YouTube. They will often report to me what they hear about what the government has done because they're watching YouTube.

The challenge for us is how to have a Government of Canada display on YouTube, on Twitter, or on Facebook in a way that respects the values and ethics of the Government of Canada.

Mr. Erin Weir:

It strikes me that the Prime Minister has a fairly active presence on Twitter as it stands right now. The previous prime minister had a whole online TV channel devoted to covering his activities. You alluded to that. I guess I'm wondering what's new in this modernization of the digital presence. Is it simply more videos and more pictures? I'm asking for as much specificity as possible.

(1630)

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I think that's a good question.

As you know, Prime Minister Trudeau has been the Prime Minister since November 4, and he is in the process of developing how he would want to communicate through the Government of Canada website. He had, prior to becoming the Prime Minister, his own social media and website tools for political purposes, but those are not part of what we do at PCO. The money we're seeking is not for that. It is for building the Government of Canada capability.

We're a bit behind in that regard, and this is to help us begin to catch up. Let me give you an example of beginning to catch up.

In this case I'll speak to the previous prime minister. We were asked, I think it was in September 2014, if we had the capacity to live stream an event for Prime Minister Harper. We did not have that imbedded in the department, but we recognized it was an important Government of Canada event and nothing to do with partisan politics. We recognized that we needed to be able to provide that service to the then prime minister and to any other prime minister who would be in office. That's what we're starting to do, and we are a bit behind.

The Chair:

We're at the seven minutes.

We have Mr. Graham for the final seven-minute round.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

My question is for Ms. Donoghue.

There's an investigation sub-activity that conducts investigations, and I'm reading directly, “into allegations of improper political activities by public servants to ensure the respect of the principle of non-partisanship.” Fair enough. According to the department's performance report, only 66% of investigations were completed in the 215-day standard, out of a target of 80%.

I have a number of questions. I'll ask a couple of them quickly.

How many actual investigations does that cover, and why did it take 215 days to investigate them?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

I'll ask my colleague, Omer, to respond.

Mr. Omer Boudreau (Vice-President, Corporate Management Branch, Public Service Commission):

There are a number of reasons that it took so long. We were getting investigation requests and, while working through that, realized that our processes could be better, so we made a commitment to streamline the process for investigation. Over the last few years, we've brought down the time it takes to carry out an investigation significantly, something in the order of 20% since 2014-15. We're now looking at undertaking some process, a re-engineering exercise, lean management, for example, to continue to do that. It's an ongoing process, but we're slowly working on it to reduce the amount of time that it takes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many investigations does that actually represent in real numbers? If it's 66% versus 80%, is it two out of three versus four out of five, or is there actually a large number of people we're dealing with here?

Mr. Omer Boudreau:

In the year that we're reporting on, we had 82 cases that were investigated.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Out of how many people?

Mr. Omer Boudreau:

How many people?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Was it 82 investigations of different people or was some person investigated 40 times?

Mr. Omer Boudreau:

No, those were 82 distinct cases that were investigated, so 82 different complaints.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see, okay.

Has the PSC noticed a change in the number of issues related to staffing and improper political activities in the past five years? To go back farther, is there a trend line that we can see?

Mr. Omer Boudreau:

There is a trend that we can observe. We have seen an increase in the number of cases of fraud allegations. Now, when we talk about fraud in the context of the Public Service Employment Act, it's not necessarily always the same as a criminal fraud case. We're talking about instances where someone might have falsified documents, misrepresented themselves in one way or another, cheated on exams, for example, that type of thing. We have seen an increase in the number of complaints and resulting investigations in the area that we call fraud, which I've just described.

We are seeing fewer investigations in cases of error, omissions, or improper conduct. We believe that's because the public service, the department deputies, and so on, are getting increasingly mature in their approach to staffing in the public service. The act changed in 2005. After that, there was a bit of a learning period. We're seeing fewer cases where there are allegations of error, omissions, or improper conduct.

(1635)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you look forward five years from now, where are you headed in terms of the number of investigations, how long they would take, and what your realistic target would be?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

We had an external panel who came in and did a review of some of the processes with us to see where we could increase our capacity or better our processes. Right now we are in the process of reviewing those. We are doing a lot of process mapping to see where we could improve our procedures.

The other aspect is we're doing a lot more outreach to departments to make them understand, and a lot more education about what constitutes fraud. We demonstrate what best practices departments should use to avoid fraudulent behaviour in the context of staffing. That in itself has proven to be of benefit. We are doing a lot more outreach when it comes to prevention in the context of the system.

We are going to continue to look at different procedures that can be used to shorten.... Not everything has to be done through a full-fledged investigation. For instance, in the past, if somebody were to admit to a fault committed, an investigation was the standard way. Now we have shorter processes when we have people who admit to having committed fraud, for instance. We are taking more diverse measures.

The important thing is that when we operate in the context of investigation, we fully recognize the importance of balance and the rights of all individuals to be heard and to be able to give their cases. We are looking for judicial fairness in the context of the processes we use. Sometimes these investigations are harder and more complex, and involve more people, and sometimes it's a one-on-one situation. Others involve a number of candidates in a broader process, which takes more time.

It varies because it is not necessarily a one-size-fits-all type of process, but at the same time, when you look at the number of appointments that happen within the public service in general, the number of investigations is minimal, which means that the system is actually doing very well and is very healthy. The investigations are still there to allow us to ensure that we are dealing with the most egregious cases.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For the 34% that take longer than seven and a half months, how long can they drag on for?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

We have some investigations that take a few weeks, as we have investigations that are more complex in nature and require a lot more witnesses to be interviewed or heard, and we also have to respect their availability. We've had cases of investigations that have gone on for over 18 months. Right now, we are really working to see how we can better our processes. For instance, we have done a lot more paper investigations, but we are constantly looking at best practices and learning from other departments that have investigative powers to see what they have done to streamline their process.

The Chair:

We'll have to cut it off there.

Now we are going into a five-minute round, but I should inform all committee members that, because our witnesses are here for the full two hours, after we go through the first rotation of seven, five, and three, we'll go back to seven-minute rounds, so those of you who have follow-up questions should have plenty of time to get them in.

We'll start the five-minute rounds with Monsieur Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I thank the witnesses from the Public Service Commission and the Privy Council.

My first question is addressed to Ms. Donoghue, who is the Acting President of the Public Service Commission.

In your report, we see the impact of our budget plan between 2011 and 2015 on the total number of public servants. It went from 216,000 to 195,000.

I note that the highest number of people hired last year were in the national capital region. Have you established a mechanism to ensure that there is a balance between the number of public servants in the national capital region and in the other regions? Is there a mechanism to ensure that there is a balance in the number of public servants in the regions, so as to avoid having a large concentration in the national capital region? Could you give us your comments in this regard?

(1640)

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Basically, the staffing mechanisms and decisions, as well as where positions will be staffed, are not the commission's responsibility. These decisions are made by the deputy heads of organizations. However, we monitor the situation to see where staffing takes place, which allows us to provide that information to deputy heads so that they are aware of activities throughout the system.

The data does indeed show that there has been a decrease in the size of the public service as of 2011. Even if staffing activities have begun again, the size of the public service has remained the same as at that time. Staffing has begun again, but its purpose is to fill positions that became vacant in the normal way. So the size of the public service does not increase. When you see an increase in the activity, it gives the impression that the entire public service is growing. At this time, this is a function of the planning of the deputy heads. When positions become vacant in the regions, the commission works with its regional offices to help with the recruiting and create processes to facilitate hiring in the regions.

We have done something else. We often hear it said that recruitment in the regions can be difficult. In light of the new policy aimed at ensuring a better balance and facilitating recruitment in the regions, as well as to resist the reflex of bringing positions back to Ottawa, we have made our policies more flexible to allow for exceptions in the context of a much more regional approach to staffing, under the direction of the department head.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you very much for your answer.

I'm going to move on immediately to the Privy Council representative.

Is there coordination at the Privy Council to ensure that the Canadian public service is distributed uniformly throughout Canada?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes, in a very general way.[English]

I said in my opening remarks that one of the roles of the Privy Council Office was to house Michael Wernick, who is the head of the public service, and to foster a high-performing public service.

In PCO we actually have one of our branches that is called the business transformation and renewal secretariat. Its mandate is to take a whole-of-government approach, which is to step back and see what's happening across the government, whether it be with respect to recruitment, to management mechanisms, or to compensation mechanisms.

We have a very important governance housed in that, and that is the management committee of deputy ministers, who meet on a regular basis to consider how the totality of the public service is operating. They're supported by very important departments, such as the Public Service Commission, the office of the chief human resources officer, and by other portions of the Treasury Board Secretariat. To answer your previous question, they will have a look at how many public servants we have in the regions and whether there is balance across the country. What is, to speak to Madam Ratansi's question, the balance in diversity? Are we getting the kind of talent that we need? Is there a problem in recruiting, for instance, women into the technology category, into the CS category? Does that go back into the university recruitment level? It's to dig through that.

In short, yes, but it's at what I would call a very high senior executive level.

(1645)

The Chair:

We'll have to cut you off there. We're past the five minutes.

Mr. Ayoub. [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I thank the witnesses for being here with us to answer our questions. I'm going to begin with you, Ms. Doucet.

You provided an overview of the mandate of the Privy Council Office and of the type or work you do, but could you give me a bit more information on how the internal services of your office operate? How do you function internally? [English]

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm delighted to talk about that, because as the ADM of corporate services, I am uniquely positioned to do so. As we said before, our main function at the Privy Council Office is to provide advice and support and coordination. We do that for fairly senior level decision-makers—the Prime Minister and his portfolio and the Clerk of the Privy Council.

We take an approach that we want those folks to focus on their work, on their day job, and that we support them on a corporate services basis completely. My colleague who runs the secretariat that I just discussed, the business transformation renewal secretariat, doesn't have to worry about looking after the mechanics of her human resources staffing or her budgets or any of her other corporate responsibilities, because my folks do that for her.

We have one-stop shopping in corporate services at the Privy Council Office. It includes all of the internal services that you would normally think of: finance—Karen is the head of my finance group—contracting, building facilities management, human resources, access to information and privacy, parliamentary returns for PCO. It also includes things you might not necessarily think about, such as passports and visas for people going on trips, security operations—security is really important at the Privy Council Office, and there is a workforce dedicated to doing it. In our legal services group we have lawyers, like other departments, but we also have a dedicated group that works on something called cabinet confidences. We include that in our internal services. Then finally, of course, there would be communication services and what I would call the senior level management oversight for the department, including the audit group, the audit division, and the clerk's office. [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Thank you.

I am going to put another question to Ms. Donoghue about her organization.

In your introduction you talked about the fact that a public servant who wants to run for political office must ask for permission, and this is true whether they intend to run at the federal, provincial or municipal level.

Today is International Women's Day. Since it is difficult to recruit women into the political arena, is there a plan in place to encourage them to get involved in politics? Is there something that deters them from doing so? What is the plan for employees with regard to their potential will and freedom to run for political office? How does that play out?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

First, I must say that the commission recognizes the right of Canadians, whether they are public servants or not, to participate in political activities. It recognizes that that is a fundamental right. However, we must ensure a balance to preserve another fundamental principle, that of non-partisanship in the public service.

When a public servant wants to run for office, at whatever level of government, that person must obtain the permission of the commission to do so. The reason for that is that we need to see what the impact of that initiative would be on preserving non-partisanship. It is very rare that permission is not granted. When we grant a permission, it comes with conditions that are often discussed with the employer of the potential candidate so as to define how that person will reintegrate their position if not elected. We take into consideration the nature of the position involved and its visibility.

Basically, the purpose is not to restrict the capacity of a public servant to run for office, quite the opposite. We have to make sure that if the person is not elected, he or she will be able to reintegrate their positions without adversely affecting the perception of the impartiality of the public service. Generally, when someone is elected, especially at the federal and provincial levels, the law requires that they resign from the public service because they will be accepting another full time job.

There are no particular provisions applying to different kinds of persons. Everyone is treated the same way. There is no different treatment, whether it is a man or a woman or in consideration of any other circumstance.

(1650)

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Are the rules very— [English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but we'll have to cut it off there. We're going to Mr. Weir in a three-minute round, and after that, we'll go back to a seven-minute round and there will be enough time for four more questions, if my clock is correct.

Mr. Weir, you have three minutes, so if you could, keep the questions as precise as possible.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Sure.

PCO is asking for $200,000 to set up an advisory board for Senate appointments. I wonder if you could provide some information about how much this board is going to cost going forward.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question.

Going forward, we will be seeking $1.5 million in 2016-17. Maybe I'll ask Karen to explain how that will manifest itself in the estimates process.

Ms. Karen Cahill:

Certainly. When the Senate appointments TB submission went to the Treasury Board, it was too late to add the information in our main estimates, so you will not have seen the $1.5 million for 2016-17 in the PCO's main estimates, which were tabled on February 26.

What PCO will do, in future supplementary estimates for 2016-17, is present the $1.5 million for Senate appointments. Ongoing, it will be in our main estimates.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Will that be the full cost of the advisory board?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Perhaps I will just talk about... I've just given you one year of information. Maybe I could be a bit more helpful.

The total funding that the PCO will be seeking for the next six fiscal years will be $5.4 million, and thereafter it will be $700,000 ongoing. What is this going to be used for? It's going to be used, really, for two things.

One is for the board itself, the honourable Canadians who have let their names stand to do this work. We have some permanent federal members, and then, as you know, there will be members named for every province. We are paying a fairly modest per diem to do this work, but we are paying them to do it, as well as paying their travel expenses when they need to come together to have conversations. We will, however, take advantage of technology whenever possible to keep expenses to a minimum.

There is the cost of standing up the board, which is something that you see in the $200,000 in these estimates—standing up that committee to fill the most immediate vacancies.

As I said, we're looking for money over six fiscal years, and that's based on the projection of vacancies in the Senate based on age of retirement. If you do the analysis on that, you have a kind of immediate work plan.

The second portion of the money will be used to pay for the public servants who will support this and act as a secretariat. We'll be absorbing some of that cost ourselves and have been already, but it will mean more work, because prior to this, PCO really didn't have a very big role in the appointment of senators. This is a new functionality for us, supporting the work of the committee and the technology required to support it as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I offer my apologies to the committee; I missed Mr. McCauley in the five-minute round.

I can pretend I was like Speaker Regan and say that you were heckling and so I cut you out of a question, but that just wouldn't be fair.

We'll go back to Mr. McCauley for a five-minute question-and-answer period, and then we'll get into the final seven-minute round.

Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

You mentioned $800,000 for the border implementation team to secure the border. I'm curious against what and whom you would secure the U.S. border. Do we not spend billions already on another department to secure us against invasion from the U.S.?

(1655)

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair, and I am grateful for it.

Maybe what I'll do is take a step back. I believe it was in February 2011 that Canada and the United States announced they were going to work together to establish a new long-term partnership to accelerate the legitimate flow of people and goods between both countries, while strengthening security and economic competitiveness. The plan for that was crystallized later on that year, in December 2011.

When we talk about the border, the border is a complicated place. We have people going back and forth for business and for pleasure and leisure all the time. Both governments are interested in finding ways to facilitate legitimate trade and the legitimate flow of business. Each country is driven by its own unique considerations, one of which is security.

The plan was quite a complicated one, and it involved on both sides of the border a multi-departmental approach to implementing it, including the modernization of complicated IT systems.

The work has been ongoing since late 2011. That work has been housed in Canada at the Privy Council Office because of our unique bird's-eye perspective and our ability to pull together all of the departments. It has come along well and has matured. We are seeking funding in these estimates and going over two years. We'll be in a position over the next year to synchronize the review of the work done to figure out a way forward.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

You have $1 million for the wind-down of Canada's economic action plan. I know it was much maligned over the years for the spending.

On what are you going to spend $1 million on winding it down when it's basically ended, and we have a commitment from the new government that there will be zero partisan advertising? Could you explain what $1 million is going to buy us when we've basically turned it off? What value do Canadians receive from this $1-million plan?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question.

The economic action plan was a one-stop shopping website where the priorities of the government were put so Canadians could go to one place to see what was going on with the government.

I've spoken about the winding down of it subsequent to the election. As you know, the election occurred in October, which meant this program operated up until the election, which is to say the first six months of the government's fiscal year. The funds would be required to support the work public servants did in accordance with the communications policy of the Government of Canada. Subsequent to that, they had to do the archiving and the winding down of it.

That is not as easy as it sounds, but it certainly wouldn't take the entire $1 million. If you pro-rate the $1 million, you can imagine that if the work were being done over the first six months of the fiscal year, you'd need half of it to support the work of the public servants working on it then.

The Chair:

Mr. McCauley, you may want to save that for the final seven-minute round as we're out of time. I'm sorry.

We'll go to the final seven-minute round and we'll start with Mr. Grewal.

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all of you for your testimony today.

My question is for Ms. Doucet.

What are the macro level challenges facing your organization in anticipating the delivery of your mandate?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question.

Mr. Chair, I suspect when I respond that my colleagues to the right will nod their heads.

Ms. Donoghue described the launch of the new website for the Public Service Commission last April. I would tell you that for folks in my position across government, probably their biggest preoccupation is technology. Technology evolves rapidly. It is a critical tool for all of us.

I talked earlier about how doing technology in government is different from doing it in the private sector, because they operate in a different value system. Candidly, the private sector folks are not necessarily going to be preoccupied with official languages and with accessibility the way the Government of Canada will be.

I'll obviously just speak for PCO, but I suspect it's similar in other departments. We have two portions in technology. One is the everyday run, making sure that the systems in which everybody does their work are up and operating, and that they are operating safely, because we're a pretty target-rich environment for cybersecurity, for the bad guys who are out there. We have to make sure we have the right kinds of firewalls that protect the folks who are working within that, but at the same time that they don't stymie their work. That's the day-to-day operations. Involved in the day-to-day operations is being able to do maintenance and patching and finding windows of opportunity when we can do that, and not disturbing the workflow.

Then, of course, the second piece is innovation. If the clerk of the public service wants to reach out to universities for post-secondary recruitment, and he wants to do Google Hangouts, if he came to me right now and said, “Michelle, I need you to make this happen for me”, I would say “Okay”. The money that we're seeking in these supplementary estimates is to begin to support us to do that.

I spoke earlier about live streaming. Right now we are supported in that by contract help. I want to be able to build the capacity within the Privy Council Office to have that embedded, to be able to respond in a nimble and agile way to Canadians who want to use technology to connect with their government.

I would say technology in being able to move in a safe but nimble way is probably my biggest preoccupation these days.

(1700)

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Does it make the government more efficient, your office more efficient with the investment in technology and innovation?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

For sure. As you know, we are the secretariat to cabinet. There's cabinet and the various cabinet committees. Ministers can't always be in Ottawa for cabinet committee meetings, and sometimes they want to call in. I've talked about the Internet, but let me talk about telecommunications. If you have a minister in another part of the world and the Prime Minister wants to speak with him or her, or there needs to be a meeting of a subcommittee on whatever topic, ministers need to be able to call in safely and securely. We have worked very hard over the last year with critical government partners such as PSPC and Shared Services Canada—a great partner—to put that in place. We are now a bit victims of our own success because now ministers are asking whether we can do secure video conferencing which requires lots of bandwidth and a different set-up altogether.

But these are the times in which we live, and in terms of creating better government, it creates more effective government.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

According to the departmental performance report, you guys did a review after the incident that occurred in Ottawa. What recommendations have you guys implemented from that review process and what specific changes, after the action review, have actually taken place?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question.

One of the things we did, which is something that we will always do to keep our security posture current, is that we worked across the government to make sure that business continuity plans were updated, streamlined, and linked to revised critical functionality. October 22 was a wake-up call in that regard.

At PCO we built our emergency response plans. We rebuilt them, and we reviewed them and the communications protocols. Awareness and training were enhanced. When an alarm went off a couple of weeks ago, the first question I asked myself was, “What is this? Is this a fire, or is this an earthquake, or is this a shooter?”

I wouldn't have thought to do that on October 22, but now as a result of that training, you have a different security protocol. In the event of an earthquake how you behave is different from how you behave in the event of a shooter. It's important to have education and awareness on that.

From a communications perspective, PCO has clarified its information exchange processes with other emergency response providers in making sure we're linked with the public safety operation centre and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. Treasury Board Secretariat is the employer of the public service and has an important role in any events like that.

We made physical improvements, but security considerations preclude me from going into the details on those. Some of them are perhaps evident and some less evident.

I think I'll stop at that.

(1705)

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're just about out of time. Perhaps one of your colleagues can follow up with a question if you have one.

Monsieur Blaney, for seven minutes.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.

I want to say that I support the $1 million for activities and for implementation of the strategy to prevent the further arrival of human smuggling vessels. I think it is well managed, and the special adviser is doing a fantastic job.[Translation]

I'd like to go back to the question raised by Mr. Ayoub concerning the Public Service Commission. He spoke of the opportunity for public servants of running for office.

I'd like to draw a parallel with the provincial public service. I have colleagues who are provincial elected representatives. When the time comes for them to leave political life, it will probably be too late, but the their status as public servants has been maintained. However, paragraph 3.21 of page 72 of your report states: “A public servant ceases to be an employee of the public service on the day on which they are elected in a federal, provincial or territorial election“.

Why be as uncompromising toward someone who would like to return to their position after having been in politics?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

That is a valid question and I thank you for asking it.

That is the legislative framework that was given to us by Parliament when that act was adopted. That was the context for that decision.

Allow me to give you some of the rationale behind this. Take the general career path of a public servant. When he asks for leave, the maximum that is granted is often five years. It may be a question of equity. We have often wondered how best to manage this. The matter does not arise if someone is elected at the municipal level, but only if he is elected at the federal or provincial level. The reason for that is probably that those are terms that more or less comply with the same standards as for any other type of leave granted to public servants.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Very well.

In 2006, I had to resign my position when I was elected to a minority government. At that time, I would have liked to keep my status with regard to that position which I liked very much. Today, I have turned the page and moved on to something else. But I wanted to mention it.

To give people the opportunity of running for office, perhaps you could grant them the status referred to as “indeterminate”, which would be an important asset for a public servant.

I'd like to go back to the Privy Council Office.[English]

I would like to come back to the process regarding the appointment of senators.[Translation]

Can you enlighten me in that regard?

You said that you were seeking an additional $200,000 for the Senate, but you spoke about costs of $5.4 million over the next six years.

Could you tell me more about those costs? Will the recommendations in this report be made public?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for that question.[English]

I apologize for any confusion. I was attempting to answer the other member's question about going forward how much money we would be spending. It's probably a little confusing because you don't have those figures before you. I know what those are, and as Karen explained, they're not in any of the estimates documents before you right now. But I can assure the committee, whenever I come to the committee and I know that these are going to be before you, I will always share those with you so you can have as big a picture as possible.

What I don't have with me today is the specific breakdown of the $1.5 million that we would spend in the next fiscal year, the one that will start in about three weeks. I know we'll be seeking that in supplementary estimates. We'll be seeking over six years $5.4 million, and in the next fiscal year we'll be seeking funding of $1.5 million as part of that $5.4 million.

If it's the will of the committee, I'm very happy to provide a breakdown of how we would propose to spend that money.

(1710)

Hon. Steven Blaney:

My understanding, as you said, is that this $5.4 million over six years is to cover the expenses of the appointees, Canadians who have been appointed to make recommendations, as well as creating a group of civil servants who will provide support. Do you have any idea of how many FTEs will actually be created for this kind of secretariat, this new structure?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

It's my understanding and I believe it's four additional FTEs who will be hired to support the work of the committee over the next five years. You can appreciate that in the first couple of years of the work, because it's a whole new process, they'll be pretty busy with that. Then as they get better at it and more efficient and regularize it, the workload will be less onerous.

It's four new public servants at PCO to do this work, plus the technology support, and then of course the fees for the committee members' participation.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Yes. It's a process that was already ongoing without this structure, but now this is a new structure and this certainly is reflected in those costs.

To get back to beyond the border, is it correct to say that you have the mandate to coordinate the overall operation of the government? Can you be a little more specific on your role in the implementation of the initial agreement and the pre-clearance agreement that was signed in March 2015? I have reason to believe that this is why you are seeking additional funding.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

As I said, the beyond the border action plan was announced in late December 2011 by the then prime minister and the then president of the United States, and I suspect the member is fairly acquainted with it. The role of PCO since that time has been to, as I said, coordinate the efforts of the department. What did that mean in the first couple of years? There were a number of initiatives that needed cabinet approval, that needed policy cover. What we saw were multiple departments coming before cabinet on one topic. They needed somebody to organize and coordinate that, so PCO played that role. It couldn't do it within its existing framework because the existing framework's role is to play a challenge function in proposals that come in to us, and that's what the existing PCO staff did. We built this new function that could play the coordinating role of all of the various departments involved. Those would include Public Safety, the RCMP, the then citizenship and immigration, now the Department of Immigration and Refugees, and the CBSA. The span of initiatives included cargo security, trusted traders, cross-border travellers, and—

The Chair:

Madam Doucet, I'm afraid I'm going to have to cut you off. I apologize for that but we're about a minute and a half over time. Perhaps in your subsequent answers to other committee members, you might be able to incorporate some of the answer you were providing to Monsieur Blaney.

Mr. Weir, please, for seven minutes.

(1715)

Mr. Erin Weir:

I would indeed like to pick up on a question posed by my colleague. I might have missed the answer.

Will the recommendations of the independent advisory board for Senate appointments be made public?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

The recommendations of the advisory board will be made to the Prime Minister for his consideration, and the decision is the prerogative of the Prime Minister.

Mr. Erin Weir:

It would be up to the Prime Minister to make the recommendations public or not.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

That's my understanding.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay. In terms of the cost of the advisory board, the figure you've provided and explained of $5.4 million, that would be a contribution through the Privy Council Office. Will there be any other government departments, or perhaps the Senate itself, providing any funding in support of this body?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I can't speak for the Senate. It is my understanding that any costs that are incurred by other departments with respect to Senate appointments would be absorbed within their existing budgets, and the only expenses that I could foresee would be security clearances. I think that would be easily absorbed into the security agency's ongoing work in security clearances.

This is really a new function for the public service. Up until the government's announcement of this function, this was not done within the public service. We really had an administrative role around coordinating security clearances and making sure that the paperwork was transmitted. This is very much a new function. It will be housed out of PCO and I don't anticipate that other departments will come in with other requests.

Mr. Erin Weir:

PCO is seeking just over $700,000 for professional and special services, and I wonder if this is for consultants. Could you elaborate on what that money will pay for?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I'm going to let Karen answer that question for you.

Ms. Karen Cahill:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

No, that's not just for consultants. That category has multiple items, such as training, hospitality, and of course, professional services, but not just to hire consultants.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Is this specific $700,000 mostly for training? Is it mostly for hospitality? Can you give us some sense?

Ms. Karen Cahill:

You will understand, Mr. Chair, that what we have at this moment...we're still in the fiscal year. The fiscal year has not closed, so unfortunately, we will have to wait for the tabling of the public accounts to finalize this number and have a better understanding of the items that are involved.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I have a question about the economic action plan. Now that this initiative is coming to an end, looking back, could you speak to what public service, if any, it served, and how the success of the program might be evaluated?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question. The economic action plan grew out of the global economic crisis in 2009, as you're probably aware.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Sorry, just to clarify, I'm not asking about the whole economic action plan. I'm asking about the initiatives to advertise it.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes. The government was getting feedback that people didn't know where to go to get information. We were hearing that loud and clear. It was a profound glimpse of the obvious idea to put it all in one place. My understanding is that the site was accessed by a lot by people. The government saw that it was successful and looked for ways to leverage that success within the rubric of the communications policy of the Government of Canada.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thanks very much.

I have a question for the Public Service Commission about the hiring of veterans.

My colleague asked some very specific questions about the 94 veterans as a proportion of applicants or total public servants and I appreciate that those figures are coming, but I'd ask a more general question. It strikes me that's not a very large number of veterans in the context of the whole public service or in the context of the total number of veterans. Would you share that assessment and could you speak to it a bit?

(1720)

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Thank you.

In the context of more specifics, we have been on-boarding veterans in the past, but not with the highest level of priority as we have done with the new legislation. We have had a lot of interest, so the activities are picking up and there is more knowledge that is being transferred across departments.

If I look at the activities we've had up to February 10, basically we have referred more than 876 veterans across 49 departments. As I said, many of them decide not to pursue the referral that is being made, for all kinds of reasons. Basically, out of those referrals we've had 11 appointments made to DND, one to ESDC, and one to Health Canada.

When it comes to referrals in the context of medical releases that are not attributable to service, 4,000 veterans have been referred to 60 departments, so there is a lot of activity that is picking up.

The question is whether veterans are seeing that there are opportunities that they want to embrace. It's not just a question of whether we want to hire; it's whether veterans are interested in the jobs that are being posted at this point. What's happening is that there's a lot more knowledge and awareness. We've been able to provide a lot more information on some of the successes we've had, on the skill sets we have from veterans and CAF members. I think that is going to grow.

It's important to keep in mind that some of these veterans have jobs, but they also have this entitlement with government for a five-year period. They may not necessarily look to do a move at this point in time in the context of the system. As they're making their way into the system....

It is a fairly complex system, when you don't really understand it. We as public servants have been part of it for a long time. That's why we're spending a lot of time providing information to veterans and teaching them how to make their way into the system. It is very different when going from CAF language to bureaucratic language. We're really trying to do some of the matching at this point, but we're confident that it will increase.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

For our final seven-minute slot, we'll go to Monsieur Drouin.

Mr. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here tonight—or almost tonight.

I have a quick question. I want to build on what my colleague Mr. Weir said with regard to the Senate appointments. For the Public Service Commission, is it normal practice to publish the names of all applicants who apply for a job? You don't make that public, do you?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

No. It is not public information.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay.

Maybe this is a question for PCO regarding the public appointments process. Do you publish the names of all the applicants who apply for a public appointment?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

No. We wouldn't do that for privacy considerations.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Yes, there are privacy concerns.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Is it safe to assume that for those who apply for Senate positions who don't make it, their names, obviously for privacy reasons, may not be published?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

We will apply the privacy rules of the Government of Canada. It's my understanding that their names would not be published, unless they gave—

Mr. Francis Drouin:

—consent.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

—yes, unless they gave consent.

I'm not sure I can imagine a situation in which that would happen, but it might.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay. Thank you.

With the benefit of being last, everybody has asked the questions, but with regard to the $1.6 million for the Prime Minister's digital presence, you mentioned an important term. You said that at the time, the previous prime minister wanted access to “live streaming” and that you didn't have live-streaming capabilities.

Is there somebody at PCO who is watching for up-and-coming technologies? I'm thinking that kids today are not on Facebook anymore.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

That's a really good question.

The number one watcher for new technologies and their impact on Canadians is Michael Wernick, who is the Clerk of the Privy Council.

Christine is laughing, because she gets it from him, too, I'm sure. He is probably one of the most tech-savvy leaders I have ever encountered. My colleagues at Shared Services Canada would likely support that. He is constantly pushing the boundaries and the limits of the envelope on what we can do. He is ambitious in terms of timelines because he understands the importance of staying relevant to Canadians in real time.

(1725)

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you.

As you know, there has been a bit of reorganization at PCO. There's a new deputy secretary to cabinet for results delivery. Was that taken from internal resources to do this new position or this new branch?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes, currently we have reallocated within the Privy Council Office to support this new function.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

I just didn't see it in the supplementary estimates.

With regard to the continued implementation of Canada's migrant smuggling prevention strategy, I see that in budget 2015, $44.5 million over three years was budgeted. Is that just for PCO, or does it include other departments?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair.

I can assure you it's not just for PCO. What I can do, if you like, is give you a breakdown of it.

Karen, jump in, if I miss a portion of it.

For instance, for the year 2014-15, $14.9 million was spent, $5 million of it at what is now the department of Global Affairs; another $5 million by the RCMP; $3 million at Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada; and $700,000 by CSEC. PCO's portion of this piece is the smallest piece. By far the bulk of the overall amount is spent in the large line departments that actually have the front-line responsibility for contributing to the happy event of no migrant ship showing up with migrants on them in Canada.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay, thank you.

Concerning the $0.8 million for the beyond the border action plan, as you know, it's been reported in the papers recently that the shared police project hit a bit of a bump. I'm wondering whether PCO factors in those risks, because if there are two partners involved, obviously there are some issues with the police force concerning where the jurisdiction is in which they would be charged, if there were an issue.

Do you factor all those risks in when you make an ask for budget?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

That's a really good question, and the short answer is yes.

You've talked about one initiative, and I'll give you another related initiative in terms of law enforcement agencies working together. That's the Regulatory Cooperation Council, which does not appear in these estimates, but has in previous estimates.

One thing they did as part of their work was a pilot project for enforcement on the Great Lakes between Canadian and American officials who patrol well-being and safety on the Great Lakes. The way they learned how to work together was to actually go out on 10 different missions to work through the kinks. That takes time and patience. We try to factor that into any spends that departments ask for, and certainly the spends that PCO asks for.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I think we'll call it quits there.

Thank you to all of our witnesses for appearing today. I'm sure I speak on behalf of all of the committee members in saying that all of the information you provided has been very helpful. We look forward in the months and perhaps years to come to speaking with you again.

You're now excused.

Committee, there is one thing for your consideration, and it deals with what happens when we come back from our break week. March 22, as everyone knows, is budget day. That's also a day we normally sit, so I think we would be precluded from sitting on that day. It is also a short week, because the Friday is Good Friday.

You do not have to give an answer today, but I would ask you to think about—and we'll deal with it before we end this week—whether we sit on the Thursday. Because of the short week. I'm sure many members will be making travel plans to get out of Ottawa a little earlier—

Pardon me?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we under a Friday sitting schedule or not?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, it's Good Friday.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But is the Thursday a Friday sitting schedule?

The Chair:

No, my understanding is that it's a regular Thursday.

(1730)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

The Chair:

You can check with your House leader on that, but that's my understanding, and I haven't heard anything different.

Even if we do not meet that week, I would suggest that the Subcommittee on Agenda meet so that we can start planning our witnesses and the studies we may want to consider after that, because following the next week that we sit in Parliament there is a two-week break. Think about whether we meet as a full committee or just as a subcommittee, and we'll deal with that over the next two meetings.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We'll take a [Inaudible—Editor] from the break.

The Chair:

All right. We are adjourned. Michelle-Doucet-Opening-Statement-E

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1550)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs.

Nous tenons aujourd'hui la quatrième séance du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires.

Avant de donner la parole à nos témoins, j'ai une question d'ordre administratif à soumettre au Comité, et j'aimerais si possible que nous parvenions à un consensus.

Des ministres comparaîtront devant le Comité au cours de nos deux prochaines séances de l'après-midi et du soir. Nous avons reçu une demande afin que ces comparutions soient télévisées, et je demanderais aux membres du Comité s'ils sont prêts à accepter que la séance de demain soir et celle de jeudi après-midi soient télévisées.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Oui.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Qui a demandé à ce qu'elles soient télévisées?

Le président:

La télédiffusion.

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci.

Nous accueillons des témoins parmi nous. La difficulté, aujourd'hui, c'est que nous commençons un peu en retard en raison des votes auxquels nous avons dû participer. Normalement, chaque témoin a 10 minutes pour sa déclaration préliminaire. J'ai consulté quelques membres du Comité, et tous semblent d'accord pour que nous essayions de nous réserver le plus de temps possible pour les questions, donc je demanderais à nos deux présentatrices de s'en tenir à 10 minutes maximum pour leurs exposés, question de laisser suffisamment de temps aux membres du Comité pour leur poser des questions. Toute l'information non présentée pourra être consignée au compte rendu un peu plus tard.

Sur ce, nous pourrions peut-être commencer par Mme Doucet. Pourriez-vous s'il vous plaît vous présenter, présenter les fonctionnaires qui vous accompagnent, puis prononcer votre exposé.

Mme Michelle Doucet (dirigeante principale des finances, Services ministériels, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Merci infiniment, monsieur le président et les membres du Comité. Je m'appelle Michelle Doucet, je suis sous-ministre adjointe à la Direction des services ministériels du Bureau du Conseil privé. Je suis en compagnie de Karen Cahill, directrice exécutive des Finances, de la planification et de l'administration à la Direction des services ministériels du BCP. Nous sommes ravies d'être ici et nous avons hâte de répondre à vos questions.

J'aimerais d'abord vous mettre en contexte et vous expliquer brièvement le mandat du BCP et ses trois principaux rôles. Le Bureau du Conseil privé, qui relève du premier ministre, a pour mandat de servir le Canada et la population canadienne en conseillant et en assistant, en toute impartialité et avec professionnalisme, le premier ministre, les ministres du portefeuille et le Cabinet.

Le BCP soutient l'élaboration de programmes stratégiques et législatifs du gouvernement, coordonne la prise de mesures en réaction aux enjeux auxquels doivent faire face le gouvernement et le pays, et contribue au bon fonctionnement du Cabinet. Le BCP est dirigé par le greffier du Conseil privé. En plus d'assumer les fonctions d'administrateur général du BCP, le greffier agit à titre de secrétaire du Cabinet et de chef de la fonction publique.

Le BCP exerce trois grands rôles.

Notre premier rôle consiste à conseiller de manière non partisane le premier ministre, les ministres du portefeuille ainsi que le Cabinet et les comités du Cabinet sur les questions d'envergure nationale et internationale. Cette responsabilité comprend notamment de prodiguer des conseils et d'apporter un soutien concernant l'ensemble des enjeux stratégiques, législatifs et administratifs du gouvernement.

Deuxièmement, le BCP est le secrétariat du Cabinet et de tous ses comités, sauf le Conseil du Trésor, qui est appuyé par le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor.

Troisièmement, le BCP favorise l'instauration d'une fonction publique hautement efficace et responsable.

Nous assumons ces trois rôles grâce à nos employés, qui donnent des conseils, assurent la coordination et fournissent du soutien. Contrairement à bien d'autres ministères, le BCP n'exécute pas de programmes. Nous utilisons les sommes affectées par le Parlement pour payer les salaires, les coûts de fonctionnement et les services reçus d'autres ministères. Le BCP doit donc respecter les mêmes exigences financières et administratives que les autres ministères.

Je tiens à ajouter que, tout comme le ministère des Finances et le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, le BCP est un organisme central. À ce titre, il joue un rôle de coordination centrale à l'échelle du gouvernement pour fournir des conseils au premier ministre et au Cabinet et pour veiller à la cohérence et à la coordination des politiques pour eux.

J'aimerais maintenant vous parler du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) de 2015-2016 du BCP. Dans son budget, le BCP demande 4,2 millions de dollars pour les crédits suivants: 1,6 million de dollars pour terminer le travail de coordination des communications pangouvernementales concernant le Plan d'action économique du Canada lancé par l'ancien gouvernement, ainsi que pour débuter la modernisation de la présence numérique du premier ministre.

De ce montant, 1 million de dollars est consacré au volet communications du Plan d'action économique (ou PAE), qui a pris fin après les élections de 2015. Le financement au titre du PAE servait à appuyer une équipe de cinq fonctionnaires du BCP. Depuis l'élection, le travail de cette équipe consiste à bien archiver les dossiers pertinents — tant les dossiers numériques que les documents analogiques — et à mettre fin au PAE. De plus, l'équipe continue de fournir du soutien pour la communication des priorités du gouvernement.

Les autres 600 000 $ sont investis dans la présence officielle du premier ministre sur le Web. Le Bureau du Conseil privé contribue à la maintenance du site Web du gouvernement du Canada pour le premier ministre ainsi qu'à la publication de tous les documents sur ce site et sur les comptes de réseautage social du premier ministre.

Les besoins du site et de ces comptes ne cessent de croître et de se complexifier, car le contenu est de plus en plus volumineux et de nouveaux éléments apparaissent, comme des vidéos, du contenu numérique plus élaboré, des diffusions en continu et des médias sociaux améliorés. Les services du Web et de la TI du BCP doivent donc en faire plus que jamais. Les fonds serviront à répondre aux nouveaux besoins et à financer la présence du premier ministre sur le Web.[Français]

Le BCP demande 1 million de dollars pour la mise en oeuvre continue de la Stratégie canadienne de prévention du passage de clandestins. Le poste de conseiller spécial en matière de passage de clandestins et de migration illégale a été créé en septembre 2010 dans le but de coordonner la réaction du Canada face à l'arrivée massive de clandestins venus par bateau. Le Canada a appliqué une stratégie pangouvernementale destinée à prévenir l'arrivée d'autres navires de migrants clandestins.

Ce dossier constitue une priorité pour la sécurité nationale. Le budget de 2015 investit 44,5 millions de dollars sur trois ans pour poursuivre les efforts coordonnés du Canada visant à découvrir et éradiquer les menaces à cet égard. Le conseiller spécial relève du conseiller à la sécurité nationale. Son rôle consiste à coordonner la réponse du gouvernement fédéral au problème de l'arrivée de clandestins par voie maritime. II doit notamment collaborer avec des partenaires au pays afin de coordonner la stratégie du Canada; travailler avec des partenaires importants sur la scène internationale pour favoriser la coopération; améliorer les relations du Canada avec les gouvernements des pays qui servent d'étape; et soutenir la présence du Canada dans les forums régionaux et internationaux.

Le BCP demande aussi 0,8 million de dollars pour l'Équipe de mise en oeuvre du plan frontalier, qui applique le plan d'action Par-delà la frontière. Je précise, pour vous mettre en contexte, qu'en février 2011, le Canada et les États-Unis ont publié une déclaration sur une vision commune de la sécurité du périmètre et de la compétitivité économique. La déclaration établit un partenariat à long terme qui facilite la circulation légitime des personnes et des biens entre les deux pays tout en renforçant la sécurité et la compétitivité économique.

La déclaration est axée sur quatre domaines de coopération: l'élimination des menaces le plus rapidement possible; la facilitation du commerce, de la croissance économique et de l'emploi; l'intégration transfrontalière en matière d'application de la loi; et l'amélioration des infrastructures essentielles et de la cybersécurité. La déclaration a mené à l'annonce du plan d'action Par-delà la frontière en décembre 2011. L'industrie et les voyageurs ont déjà commencé à profiter des avantages concrets d'une frontière plus efficace, moderne et sécuritaire. La coordination et la surveillance centralisées et continues ont joué un rôle important dans la réussite du plan d'action.

Le BCP demande 0,2 million de dollars pour financer l'élaboration d'un nouveau processus de nomination des sénateurs non partisan et fondé sur le mérite. En décembre 2015, le gouvernement a annoncé la mise en oeuvre d'un nouveau processus, non partisan et fondé sur le mérite, visant à fournir des conseils à propos des nominations au Sénat. Dans le cadre du nouveau processus, le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat a été créé, le 19 janvier 2016, afin de fournir au premier ministre des avis au sujet des candidats au Sénat.

Le Comité consultatif indépendant se base sur des critères transparents et fondés sur le mérite pour identifier des Canadiens qui pourraient apporter une contribution importante aux travaux du Sénat. Ces critères permettront d'assurer la formation d'un Sénat respectueux de normes rigoureuses en matière d'intégrité, de collaboration et d'impartialité politique. Le gouvernement procède rapidement à la réforme du Sénat, et le nouveau processus de nomination sera mis en oeuvre en deux phases.

Pendant la première phase, qui permet de faire la transition, on procédera à cinq nominations pour améliorer la représentation des provinces ayant le plus grand nombre de postes vacants, soit le Manitoba, I'Ontario et le Québec. La deuxième phase correspondra à la mise sur pied d'un processus permanent pour la dotation des autres postes vacants comprenant un processus de mise en candidature ouvert à tous les Canadiens.

Les fonds du BCP lui permettent d'appuyer les activités du Comité consultatif indépendant et de son secrétariat au cours de la première phase de transition afin que des conseils et des recommandations soient fournis au premier ministre.

En outre, les prévisions législatives du BCP ont augmenté de 0,1 million de dollars en raison du traitement et de l'allocation pour automobile de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques.

(1555)



À la suite de l'élection, l'honorable Maryam Monsef a été nommée au poste de ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Pour tenir compte de l'ajout de ce poste ministériel à part entière, associé à un traitement et à une allocation pour automobile, un nouvel élément a été ajouté aux prévisions législatives du BCP.[Traduction]

Voilà qui conclut l'explication...

Le président:

Madame Doucet, je vous remercie. Vous avez déjà pris un peu plus de 10 minutes. Je sais que vous devez également nous parler de votre rapport ministériel sur le rendement, mais si c'est possible, nous aimerions passer tout de suite à la présentation de la Commission de la fonction publique. Nous veillerons à ce que le reste de votre déclaration soit consigné au compte rendu.

(1600)

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame Donoghue.

Mme Christine Donoghue (présidente intérimaire, Commission de la fonction publique):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les députés, merci.

C'est avec plaisir que je vous présente Omer Boudreau, vice-président de la Direction générale de la gestion ministérielle de la Commission.

Nous sommes heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui pour discuter du rapport ministériel 2014-2015 sur le rendement de la Commission de la fonction publique et de notre Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.[Français]

Le mandat de la Commission de la fonction publique consiste à promouvoir et à protéger les nominations fondées sur le mérite et, de concert avec d'autres intervenants, à préserver l'impartialité politique de la fonction publique. Alors que la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique attribue les pouvoirs de nomination à la Commission de la fonction publique, elle prévoit aussi des pouvoirs qui peuvent être délégués aux administrateurs généraux.

C'est donc dans un système décentralisé fondé sur la délégation des pouvoirs que la Commission exerce son mandat en offrant son expertise et en présentant des orientations stratégiques, en menant des activités de surveillance efficaces, et en fournissant des services de dotation et d'évaluation novateurs. Nous travaillons également de concert avec les ministères et organismes afin de promouvoir une fonction publique non partisane qui reflète la diversité canadienne et met à profit les talents et les compétences des fonctionnaires issus de toutes les régions du pays.[Traduction]

À titre d'organisme indépendant, nous rendons directement compte au Parlement de l'intégrité du système de dotation, ainsi que de l'impartialité de la fonction publique. Dans cette optique, notre rapport annuel pour l'exercice 2014-2015 a été déposé au Parlement le 23 février. Nous serions heureux de revenir devant le Comité pour discuter de ce rapport s'il le souhaite.

Aujourd'hui, mes observations porteront principalement sur trois thèmes. Premièrement, je voudrais souligner quelques-unes des principales réalisations mentionnées dans notre rapport ministériel sur le rendement 2014-2015. Deuxièmement, je traiterai du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Troisièmement, je conclurai en présentant un compte rendu des efforts que nous avons déployés afin de moderniser notre approche en matière de dotation.[Français]

Monsieur le président, dans une fonction publique non partisane, les nominations doivent être fondées sur le mérite et être soustraites à toute influence politique. De plus, les fonctionnaires fédéraux doivent non seulement exercer leurs fonctions en toute impartialité, mais aussi être perçus comme tels. Dans le cadre de nos responsabilités, nous communiquons avec les fonctionnaires fédéraux pour souligner l'importance d'une fonction publique non partisane et leur rappeler qu'ils ont des droits tout comme des responsabilités juridiques en ce qui concerne leur participation à des activités politiques.

Tout fonctionnaire qui souhaite se porter candidat à une élection municipale, provinciale, territoriale ou fédérale doit au préalable en obtenir la permission à la suite d'un examen de la Commission. Nous approuvons généralement ces demandes lorsque nous sommes convaincus que ces activités ne porteront pas ou ne sembleront pas porter atteinte à la capacité du fonctionnaire d'exercer ses fonctions de façon politiquement impartiale. Pour rendre une décision, nous tenons notamment compte du type d'élection, du rôle particulier du fonctionnaire dans son contexte organisationnel, ainsi que du niveau de visibilité de son poste. Les demandes de permission sont généralement approuvées sous réserve de certaines conditions, incluant l'obligation de prendre un congé sans solde pour solliciter une nomination à titre de candidat.[Traduction]

J'aimerais maintenant parler du système de dotation, lequel représente la partie la plus importante de nos activités et de nos ressources. Nous fournissons une orientation stratégique, des outils et des services de soutien aux gestionnaires d'embauche et aux conseillers en ressources humaines pour les aider à doter des postes avec efficience, tout en respectant l'esprit de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique.

Nous administrons également des programmes visant à recruter des Canadiens qualifiés partout au pays. Cela exige d'importants efforts de liaison et une collaboration accrue avec les ministères et organismes, notamment afin de participer aux salons de l'emploi et aux séances d'information présentées dans les établissements d'enseignement partout au pays. À titre d'exemple, plus de 39 000 demandes d'emploi ont été soumises dans le cadre du Programme fédéral d'expérience de travail étudiant l'automne dernier. Plus de 6 500 étudiants ont été embauchés.

Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec nos partenaires, y compris le Bureau du dirigeant principal des ressources humaines, afin de créer des bassins de candidats qualifiés qui seront mis à la disposition des organisations fédérales d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Cette collaboration contribue à réduire les chevauchements inutiles dans l'ensemble de la fonction publique.[Français]

Nous continuons d'accroître et d'employer de nouvelles technologies, par exemple en utilisant des examens en ligne. Ceux-ci représentent maintenant 72 % de tous les examens administrés par la Commission. Plus de 92 % de nos examens de langue seconde sont administrés en ligne. Le nombre d'examens en ligne non supervisés ne fait qu'augmenter. Uniquement pour l'année 2014-2015, cela représentait quelque 42 000 examens.

(1605)



Ce type de test permet au postulant de passer un examen à l'endroit de son choix qui lui offre un meilleur accès à un emploi dans la fonction publique, peu importe où il demeure. Les examens en ligne contribuent également à réduire les obstacles pour les personnes handicapées en leur permettant de passer les examens chez elles au moyen de leur propre appareils adaptés.[Traduction]

Notre plateforme de recrutement la plus importante est accessible sur le site Web emplois.gc.ca. Depuis avril 2015, ce système offre à la population canadienne un portail unique qui lui donne accès à tous les emplois dans la fonction publique. Près de 8 800 annonces d'emploi ont été publiées pour des processus de nomination internes et externes, pour lesquels nous avons reçu plus de 530 000 demandes d'emploi.

Nous continuons de chercher des moyens de moderniser davantage nos systèmes et nos services de soutien pour améliorer l'expérience des utilisateurs. Voilà qui est une bonne transition vers les fonds prévus dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C), puisque les ministères et les organismes assument une partie des coûts de fonctionnement de ce système, ce qui explique le transfert de fonds qui figure dans les prévisions.

Le nouveau système consolidé sert également de fondement pour appuyer la mise en oeuvre de la Loi sur l'embauche des anciens combattants. Depuis le 1er juillet 2015, cette loi permet aux anciens combattants et aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes libérés pour des raisons médicales de bénéficier d'un meilleur accès aux emplois dans la fonction publique.

Nous avons offert de la formation et de nouveaux outils pour mettre en valeur les aptitudes et compétences que les anciens combattants peuvent offrir à la fonction publique. Nous avons nous-mêmes embauché deux anciens combattants pour guider leurs collègues et leur expliquer leurs droits de priorité et le fonctionnement du système de dotation. À ce jour, 94 anciens combattants ont été embauchés, y compris 15 bénéficiaires du nouveau droit de priorité statutaire qui accorde la préséance absolue aux anciens combattants libérés pour des raisons médicales attribuables au service militaire.[Français]

En vue de toujours améliorer notre système, permettez-moi de vous parler des changements qui entreront en vigueur le 1er avril prochain afin de simplifier le processus de dotation. Ces changements tirent partie des réformes amorcées et de l'expérience acquise depuis 2005 dans le but de moderniser le processus tout en assurant la santé globale du système de dotation.

Selon nos informations et nos observations, au cours des 10 dernières années, nous croyons que le système de dotation est parvenu à maturité, de même que les capacités des ministères et des organismes en matière de ressources humaines. C'est pourquoi nous avons décidé de simplifier nos lignes directrices afin de supprimer les chevauchements inutiles et de réduire à une seule politique les 12 lignes directrices antérieures.

Cette politique unique permettra d'exposer plus clairement les attentes à l'égard des administrateurs généraux et de renforcer leurs pouvoirs discrétionnaires ainsi que leurs responsabilités. Ces changements accorderont aux ministère et organismes une plus grande marge de manoeuvre pour adapter leur système de dotation en fonction de leur contexte particulier et de leurs besoins opérationnels. Les gestionnaires d'embauche disposeront donc d'une plus grande marge de manoeuvre pour exercer leur jugement en matière de dotation, mais seront aussi responsables de leurs décisions.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, le contexte dans lequel la fonction publique mène ses activités évolue continuellement. Il est important que les ministères et organismes soient en mesure de réagir promptement au changement afin d'attirer à point nommé les candidats qui possèdent les compétences dont ils ont besoin.

À cette fin, la Commission mettra l'accent sur l'intégration de ses conseils stratégiques et de ses services de soutien afin de répondre aux besoins particuliers des organisations, en plus de promouvoir les pratiques exemplaires dans l'ensemble du système de dotation. Nous nous efforcerons aussi de réduire le fardeau associé à la production de rapports, conformément aux recommandations du vérificateur général dans son rapport du printemps 2015. Les administrateurs généraux devront toujours rendre compte à la CFP de l'exercice de leurs pouvoirs discrétionnaires, et nous continuerons de surveiller l'intégrité du système de dotation dans le cadre de nos vérifications et enquêtes.

Nous adapterons cependant nos activités de surveillance pour être plus agiles de manière à contribuer à l'amélioration continue du système. Par exemple, nous remplacerons les examens individuels des organisations par une approche pangouvernementale qui mettra l'accent sur les domaines qui exigent une attention particulière.

(1610)



Je vous rappelle aussi, monsieur le président, qu'il y a plus de 100 ans que le Parlement confie à la Commission le mandat de protéger le mérite et l'impartialité dans la fonction publique. Nous continuerons de favoriser des relations solides et collaboratives avec les parlementaires, les administrateurs généraux, les agents de négociation et les autres intervenants afin que la population canadienne continue d'avoir confiance en une fonction publique impartiale et professionnelle, composée de fonctionnaires qui possèdent les aptitudes et compétences nécessaires pour répondre aux attentes du public canadien.

Nous nous ferons un plaisir de répondre à vos questions maintenant. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame Doucet et madame Donoghue.

Nous allons entreprendre une série de questions de sept minutes et commencer par Mme Ratansi.

Je rappelle à tous les députés que le temps imparti pour les questions comprend les questions et les réponses.

Madame Ratansi, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Merci. Je serai très brève dans mes questions.

Madame Donoghue, ma question s'adresse à vous.

La Commission de la fonction publique du Canada demande, au crédit 1c, un transfert de 504 000 $ en tout de Parcs Canada et de l'Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments pour le Système de ressourcement de la fonction publique. Je présume qu'il s'agit de l'un de vos systèmes de recrutement.

Est-il obligatoire pour ces agences?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

En fait, le système que nous administrons est obligatoire pour tous les ministères assujettis à la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique. Pour ce qui est de Parcs Canada et de l'ACIA, ces deux organisations ne sont pas assujetties à la LEFP, la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique. C'est pourquoi elles paient pour ces services. Elles ont choisi d'utiliser les services que nous offrons.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Vous dites que compte tenu du vieillissement de la population, des retraites, de tous les défis auxquels la Commission de la fonction publique est confrontée au sein du gouvernement... Réussissez-vous à répondre aux besoins d'une population très diversifiée et à adopter des pratiques d'embauche adaptées à cette diversité?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

À titre d'organisme public responsable de la mise en oeuvre de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique, nous avons également la responsabilité de l'équité en matière d'emploi avec divers partenaires dans le système. Essentiellement par des politiques et le recours à la législation, nous avons réussi à indiquer qu'on peut afficher des postes intentionnellement ciblés, afin de favoriser des groupes visés par l'équité en matière d'emploi et la diversité. Cette mesure a facilité l'accès à des emplois dans la fonction publique pour divers groupes désignés.

Nous effectuons également des études pour évaluer la situation dans ces collectivités, leur disponibilité sur le marché du travail et déterminer si nous recevons un nombre acceptable de demandes et si des emplois sont offerts aux groupes visés par l'équité en matière d'emploi.

Des rapports d'étude sortiront sous peu, en 2016, pour faire état de nos résultats. Nous observons une représentation accrue de certains groupes, mais nous reconnaissons qu'il reste du travail à faire. Nous menons aussi beaucoup d'activités de sensibilisation, notamment pour informer les ministères des moyens qu'ils peuvent prendre pour attirer un plus grand nombre de candidats des groupes visés par l'équité en matière d'emploi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Cela soulève deux questions, alors. À quel point votre système est-il accessible? À quel point est-il facile d'accès pour les gens qui souhaitent postuler, mais qui auraient des difficultés linguistiques? Je présume que votre système est bilingue. C'est la première question. La deuxième est la suivante: à quel point est-il facile d'accès et quels sont les mécanismes de suivi en place pour assurer le succès de la CFP?

J'ai lu les rapports de vérification et certaines observations, et je vois que le vérificateur recommande un suivi plus poussé et plus strict. Beaucoup d'organismes utilisent vos services, donc pouvez-vous me donner une idée de l'accessibilité au système et des mesures que vous prenez pour en évaluer le rendement?

(1615)

Mme Christine Donoghue:

L'accessibilité a augmenté depuis que nous avons un portail unique. Cela a rendu le processus très clair. Grâce au portail unique, les Canadiens peuvent tous aller voir quels sont les emplois disponibles dans la fonction publique, ce qui est clairement un avantage.

Cela dit, nous sommes en train d'évaluer à quel point il est facile d'entrer dans le système à partir du moment où l'on connaît le portail unique. Nous reconnaissons déjà que l'expérience utilisateur pourrait être meilleure. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nous cherchons des moyens d'améliorer le système qui a été mis en place en 2015, mais nous nous demandons également quelle forme prendrait le système du strict point de vue de l'utilisateur, plutôt que du point de vue du gouvernement.

Nous visons son amélioration continue, nous voulons simplifier le vocabulaire, nous essayons de nous débarrasser du jargon très bureaucratique et cherchons à établir si nous pourrions concevoir un système qui orienterait plus facilement les candidats potentiels, en fonction des critères qu'ils inscrivent, vers les emplois les mieux adaptés à leurs compétences.

Ce système fonctionne bien. Tous les ministères l'utilisent. Nous demandons également aux ministères de suivre de plus près toutes les activités qu'ils mènent au moyen de ce système, mais nous reconnaissons toujours qu'il devrait être plus convivial, et nous allons faire des tests dans les prochains mois.

Par ailleurs, nous avons simplifié beaucoup nos exigences. Notre système était extrêmement axé sur les règles. À partir du 1er avril, nous reviendrons à l'intention de base de la loi, qui était très claire et nous donnait beaucoup de marge de manoeuvre. Nous allons donc adapter le système pour en retirer toute l'information superflue qui n'est plus nécessaire selon cette politique.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Combien de minutes me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Environ 45 secondes.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Si vous le pouvez, vous pourrez me répondre au second tour: comment évaluez-vous votre rendement? Quel mécanisme d'évaluation utilisez-vous pour déterminer si nous avons embauché une population diversifiée, qu'on pense aux personnes handicapées, aux minorités visibles ou à d'autres?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Notre système nous permet de compiler beaucoup de données. Il nous permet de mesurer notre rendement en fonction de ces données. Je pourrais d'ailleurs fournir au Comité des renseignements qui montrent exactement comment nous pouvons les utiliser et ce que ces données nous apprennent. Nous les communiquons à tous les administrateurs généraux. De même, en collaboration avec le bureau des ressources humaines, nous essayons de favoriser différentes méthodes.

Je pourrais fournir au Comité des renseignements plus précis qui expliqueraient tout cela plus en détail.

Le président:

Merci. Je vous demande de le faire, madame Donoghue.

Monsieur McCauley, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Je vous remercie de ces questions, madame Ratansi.

Vous avez souligné que le 1er juillet dernier, la Loi sur l'embauche des anciens combattants est entrée en vigueur et que 94 anciens combattants au total ont été embauchés depuis. Quel pourcentage des nouvelles embauches cela représente-t-il et combien d'entre eux ont en fait été embauchés par le ministère des Anciens Combattants?

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. Kelly McCauley: Est-ce que c'est 15? Est-ce 15 anciens combattants libérés qui ont été embauchés en vertu de cette loi spéciale ou 94 en tout, dont 15 selon le nouveau droit de priorité prévu par la loi?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Omer, avez-vous ces chiffres sous la main?

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est bon. Je comprends que c'est une question très pointue.

Mme Christine Donoghue:

En fait, sur ces 15 personnes, 11 ont été embauchées par le MDN. Le MDN est probablement l'un des ministères qui embauchent le plus d'anciens combattants ou d'anciens membres des FC. Je vous rappelle que certains militaires sont libérés parce qu'ils ont été blessés dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions, alors que d'autres sont libérés pour d'autres raisons médicales non liées au service militaire. Ce n'est pas le même degré de priorité.

Santé Canada en a embauché deux. Comme je l'ai indiqué, la Commission a elle aussi embauché quelques anciens combattants pour l'aider à gérer le système. Nous savons que cela s'améliore continuellement aussi.

Quoi qu'il en soit, nous savons que nous avons présenté beaucoup plus de candidatures d'anciens combattants qu'auparavant, mais les anciens combattants inscrits ne sont pas nécessairement tous sans emploi. Certains ont un emploi, mais pourraient bénéficier du système prioritaire et voir s'ils peuvent améliorer leur situation en entrant au service de la fonction publique. Ainsi, bien que nous en ayons présenté beaucoup, certains ont choisi de ne pas en profiter, mais restent admissibles au régime.

Nous espérons que plus nous multiplierons nos efforts de communication et de sensibilisation auprès des ministères et plus nous réussirons à faire valoir l'expérience positive et toutes les compétences que possèdent ces anciens combattants et anciens membres des FC, plus il y aura de ministères qui les embaucheront.

(1620)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Oui. Je crois qu'ils ont des compétences en leadership très recherchées. Je comprends que vous n'ayez peut-être pas ces chiffres à portée de la main, donc je vous prierais de me répondre ultérieurement pour me dire combien ont été embauchés par le ministère des Anciens Combattants.

Mme Christine Donoghue:

D'accord.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Sur les 94 personnes embauchées, pouvez-vous me dire aussi quel pourcentage des nouvelles embauches cela représente et combien d'anciens combattants avaient postulé, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Oui.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Vous mentionnez la nouvelle allocation pour automobile de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, probablement parce que son poste a été élevé au rang de ministre à part entière plutôt que de simple ministre d'État, je présume.

Y a-t-il d'autres exemples de ministres d'État qui se sont vus attribuer une allocation pour automobile pour des raisons de promotion ou pour d'autres raisons?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vais demander à Mme Cahill de répondre à cette question. Elle va vous parler du Bureau du Conseil privé, puis peut-être aussi d'une application plus générale.

Mme Karen Cahill (adjointe à la dirigeante principale des finances, Services ministériels, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Merci pour la question, monsieur le président.

Pour les ministres d'État, la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada prévoit une allocation pour automobile de 2 000 $. Dans les années antérieures, le Bureau du Conseil privé avait des ministres d'État pour lesquels nous inscrivions dans notre budget des dépenses d'un montant de 2 000 $ au titre de cette allocation.

Depuis la dernière élection, Mme Monsef a accédé à un poste ministériel à part entière, ce qui fait que nous avons ajouté ce poste législatif à notre Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

M. Kelly McCauley:

J'ai sans doute mal formulé ma question. Y a-t-il eu d'autres ministres d'État élevés au rang de ministre à part entière qui ont eu droit à ces sommes additionnelles de 80 000 $, notamment au titre de l'allocation pour voiture?

Mme Karen Cahill:

Pas au Conseil privé.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Il y en a certes eu d'autres au gouvernement, si c'est bien ce que vous voulez savoir.

Je pense notamment aux ministres Qualtrough, Duncan, Hajdu, et Chagger.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Vous avez mentionné, et plusieurs l'ont fait avant vous, l'importance de préserver l'impartialité politique de la fonction publique. C'est bien sûr un objectif que nous partageons tous.

En plus des sommes considérables dépensées par les syndicats de la fonction publique lors de la dernière campagne selon les données d'Élections Canada, il y a eu un incident où une foule bruyante de fonctionnaires s'est rassemblée pour accueillir et applaudir le premier ministre à son arrivée à l'édifice des Affaires étrangères.

Quelles mesures prenez-vous pour assurer l'impartialité politique de la fonction publique? Je sais que vous avez indiqué que vous envoyez des notes de service et que vous parlez aux fonctionnaires, mais quelles mesures concrètes prenez-vous pour préserver le caractère non partisan de notre fonction publique?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

La partie 7 de la loi que nous administrons traite notamment des activités politiques des fonctionnaires.

Il faut d'abord et avant tout préciser que nous accomplissons un travail considérable de concert avec le Conseil du Trésor pour assurer le respect des valeurs et des normes d'éthique de la fonction publique. Lorsqu'il est question d'activités partisanes, il n'y a souvent qu'un pas à franchir pour déroger à ces principes.

En pareil cas, nous faisons tout un travail d'analyse pour déterminer s'il y a vraiment activité politique et si la situation semble porter atteinte à la capacité de l'employé d'exercer ses fonctions.

C'est là toute la nuance. Dans le cas d'une activité de groupe, ce sont la plupart du temps les considérations liées aux valeurs et à l'éthique qui entrent en ligne de compte, et il revient alors essentiellement à l'administrateur général de poursuivre ses efforts de sensibilisation auprès du personnel.

C'est ce que nous faisons également. Nous devons, en collaboration avec le Conseil privé, revenir pour ainsi dire à la base en continuant à sensibiliser les fonctionnaires à leur obligation d'agir de façon non partisane.

Lorsque les cas sont flagrants ou qu'il nous est possible d'identifier les fonctionnaires que nous croyons fautifs, nous pouvons mener une enquête pour déterminer s'il y a eu inconduite et prendre des mesures correctives le cas échéant.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur McCauley, je vais vous interrompre tout de suite, car il ne vous reste qu'une dizaine de secondes.

Monsieur Weir, vous avez sept minutes.

(1625)

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai une question pour les représentantes du Bureau du Conseil privé. Vous demandez 1,6 million de dollars pour la stratégie de communication concernant le Plan d'action économique du Canada ainsi que pour la modernisation de la présence numérique du premier ministre.

Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de la répartition des sommes demandées entre ces deux initiatives?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Avec plaisir. Je vais donc diviser le tout en deux catégories.

Comme je le disais dans mes observations préliminaires, nous demandons 1 million de dollars pour terminer les travaux relatifs au Plan d'action économique qui a bien sûr pris fin après les élections d'octobre. Un site Web était consacré à ce plan avec une équipe de soutien constituée de... Combien d'équivalents temps plein déjà, Karen? Je ne m'en souviens plus.

Mme Karen Cahill:

Pour le Plan d'action économique?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui.

Mme Karen Cahill:

C'était quatre équivalents temps plein.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est ce que je pensais.

Par équivalent temps plein, nous entendons l'équivalent d'un fonctionnaire travaillant à temps plein. Il y avait donc quatre employés affectés à cette tâche sous la gouverne, si je ne m'abuse, d'un directeur. Comme je l'indiquais, ce travail a pris fin après les élections, et ces fonctionnaires se sont vus confier de nouveaux mandats allant dans le sens des priorités du gouvernement actuel et de son premier ministre.

L'autre portion de 600 000 $ sert à appuyer la présence numérique du premier ministre. Celui-ci a un site Web du gouvernement du Canada et d'autres comptes sur les médias sociaux. C'est à cela que cet argent va servir. Le tout doit être fonctionnel 24 heures par jour, 365 jours par année. Les fonds permettront l'embauche de deux employés supplémentaires pour le service des communications. Ils serviront aussi à l'acquisition de licences et à l'établissement d'un contrat avec un entrepreneur capable d'offrir le soutien nécessaire à l'égard de la diffusion en continu et des différentes technologies de pointe. En outre, nous avons investi au cours des 18 derniers mois environ un million de dollars à même nos propres budgets en plus de ce que nous demandons aujourd'hui.

M. Erin Weir:

Est-ce que vous pourriez nous en dire plus long au sujet de la forme que prendra exactement cette présence numérique modernisée? Comment évaluera-t-on la réussite de cette initiative?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Merci pour cette excellente question.

La technologie et Internet sont de plus en plus au coeur de nos vies. Le gouvernement doit mettre les bouchées doubles pour se maintenir à jour et demeurer en connexion avec les Canadiens. La technologie évolue si rapidement que nous avons du mal à suivre.

À ce titre, le gouvernement du Canada a notamment dû s'employer, surtout depuis cinq ou six ans, à trouver le moyen d'exploiter dans son contexte de fonctionnement ce que nous appelions le Web 2.0, c'est-à-dire les médias sociaux. La situation est un peu différente dans le secteur public. Nos valeurs et nos normes d'éthique nous dictent des obligations, notamment en matière de langues officielles et d'accessibilité. Si vous avez un handicap, si vous êtes par exemple non-voyant ou malentendant, le gouvernement du Canada doit s'assurer que vous avez tout de même accès à ses services. Les questions de sécurité et de protection de la vie privée sont aussi des enjeux de premier plan.

C'est à l'intérieur de ce cadre de fonctionnement que nous devons établir cette présence numérique. Il s'agit de satisfaire aux besoins des Canadiens qui ont soif d'information et de connaissances. Auparavant, la presse écrite jouait un grand rôle à ce chapitre, mais les gens veulent maintenant voir ce qui se passe. Dans certains cas, il leur faut des images vidéos. Certains se tournent uniquement vers Twitter pour se tenir au fait de l'actualité. Je ne suis pas moi-même une adepte de Twitter, mais je peux vous assurer que bon nombre de mes collègues le sont. Mes enfants passent leur vie sur YouTube. Il n'est pas rare qu'ils me racontent ce qu'ils ont entendu dire au sujet des activités du gouvernement en syntonisant YouTube.

Il importe pour nous de trouver la façon de veiller à ce que le gouvernement du Canada soit présent sur YouTube, Twitter ou Facebook sans pour autant compromettre ses valeurs et ses normes d'éthique.

M. Erin Weir:

J'ai l'impression que le premier ministre est déjà passablement actif sur Twitter. Son prédécesseur avait sa propre chaîne de télé en ligne qui nous rapportait toutes ses activités. Vous y avez d'ailleurs fait allusion tout à l'heure. Je me demande simplement ce que nous apportera de plus cette modernisation de la présence numérique. Est-ce qu'il y aura simplement plus de vidéos et plus de photos? J'aimerais une réponse aussi précise que possible.

(1630)

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est vraiment une bonne question.

Comme vous le savez, le premier ministre Trudeau est en poste depuis le 4 novembre. Il s'emploie actuellement à déterminer la façon dont il entend communiquer avec les Canadiens par le truchement du site Web du gouvernement du Canada. Avant de devenir premier ministre, il avait ses propres outils sur le Web et les médias sociaux pour servir ses fins politiques, mais ces outils-là ne relèvent pas du Conseil privé. Ce n'est pas l'usage que nous comptons faire des fonds demandés; ils vont plutôt servir à renforcer la capacité du gouvernement du Canada à cet égard.

En toute franchise, je dois vous dire que nous accusons un peu de retard, et que cet argent va nous aider à combler le fossé. Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple qui concerne le premier ministre précédent.

En septembre 2014, si je ne m'abuse, on nous a demandé si nous pouvions diffuser en direct un événement auquel participait le premier ministre Harper. Nous ne disposions pas d'une telle capacité à l'interne, mais nous étions conscients qu'il s'agissait d'un événement important pour le gouvernement du Canada et qu'il était exempt de toute partisanerie politique. Nous avons alors déterminé que nous nous devions d'être capables d'offrir ce service au premier ministre en fonction ainsi qu'à tous ceux qui allaient lui succéder. Nous avons entrepris de nous donner cette capacité, mais nous accusons un peu de retard.

Le président:

Nous en sommes à sept minutes.

Monsieur Graham sera le dernier à avoir droit à sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Ma question s'adresse à Mme Donoghue.

Il y a une sous-activité qui comprend la tenue d'enquêtes, et je cite, « relativement aux allégations d'activités politiques irrégulières de la part des fonctionnaires, ce qui permet de s'assurer du respect de l'impartialité politique. » C'est bien, mais selon le Rapport ministériel sur le rendement, seulement 66 % des enquêtes ont été terminées dans le délai prescrit de 215 jours, alors que l'objectif était de 80 %.

J'ai différentes questions à vous poser. En voici deux très brèves.

De combien d'enquêtes s'agit-il et pourquoi a-t-il fallu plus de 215 jours pour les mener à terme?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Je vais demander à mon collègue, Omer, de vous répondre.

M. Omer Boudreau (vice-président, Direction générale de la gestion ministérielle, Commission de la fonction publique):

Différents facteurs expliquent le non-respect de ce délai. En traitant les demandes d'enquête que nous recevions, nous nous sommes rendu compte que nos processus pouvaient être améliorés, et nous nous sommes engagés à les rationaliser. Au cours des dernières années, nous avons réduit considérablement le temps nécessaire pour procéder à une enquête, soit dans une proportion d'environ 20 % depuis 2014-2015. Nous envisageons maintenant un exercice de restructuration suivant notamment une approche de gestion allégée afin de poursuivre dans le même sens. Il y a encore du travail à faire, mais nous progressons lentement dans cette réduction de la durée des enquêtes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien d'enquêtes est-ce que cela représente en fait? Si c'est 66 % par rapport à 80 %, est-ce deux enquêtes sur trois par rapport à quatre enquêtes sur cinq, ou y a-t-il un plus grand nombre de personnes qui sont touchées?

M. Omer Boudreau:

Pour le dernier exercice visé par notre rapport, il y a 82 cas qui ont fait l'objet d'une enquête.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ces cas concernaient combien de personnes?

M. Omer Boudreau:

Combien de personnes?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Était-ce 82 personnes différentes ou est-ce qu'une même personne pouvait être visée par 40 enquêtes?

M. Omer Boudreau:

Non, les enquêtes portaient sur 82 cas distincts, à savoir 82 plaintes différentes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois, d'accord.

Est-ce que la CFP a observé un changement dans le nombre de problèmes liés à la dotation et à des activités politiques irrégulières au cours des cinq dernières années? Si l'on retourne plus loin en arrière, y a-t-il une tendance que l'on peut dégager?

M. Omer Boudreau:

Il y a effectivement une tendance que nous pouvons observer. Il y a eu augmentation du nombre d'allégations de fraude. Il faut savoir que la notion de fraude dans le contexte de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique ne renvoie pas nécessairement à ce qu'on entend par fraude criminelle. Il peut s'agir par exemple de cas de falsification de documents, de fausses déclarations de toutes sortes ou de tricherie lors d'un examen. Dans tous ces secteurs, nous avons noté une augmentation du nombre des plaintes et des enquêtes qui s'ensuivent.

En revanche, nous constatons qu'il y a moins d'enquêtes dans des cas d'erreur, d'omission ou de conduite irrégulière. Nous croyons que cette baisse est attribuable au fait que les sous-ministres et les autres gestionnaires de la fonction publique maîtrisent de mieux en mieux les règles et les pratiques de dotation. La Loi a été modifiée en 2005. Il y a eu par la suite une période d'apprentissage. Nous voyons maintenant moins de cas où il y a allégation d'erreur, d'omission ou de conduite inappropriée.

(1635)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle pourrait être selon vous la situation quant au nombre d'enquêtes et à leur durée dans cinq ans d'ici? Quel serait votre objectif réaliste?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Il y a un groupe de spécialistes externes qui ont examiné certains de nos processus pour déterminer les améliorations possibles en vue d'accroître notre capacité. Nous sommes en train d'analyser ces résultats. Nous misons grandement sur la schématisation de nos processus pour en arriver à dégager des pistes d'amélioration.

Par ailleurs, nous intervenons beaucoup plus auprès des ministères pour les aider à mieux comprendre ce qui peut constituer une fraude. Nous leur présentons des pratiques qui ont fait leur preuve pour éviter les comportements frauduleux dans le contexte de la dotation. C'est une approche qui a porté fruit. Nous tablons de plus en plus sur la sensibilisation à des fins de prévention dans tout le système.

Nous allons continuer à explorer différents moyens pouvant nous permettre d'accélérer le processus. Il n'est pas toujours nécessaire de mener une enquête complète. Par exemple, il était auparavant de mise de procéder à une enquête même lorsque quelqu'un avait admis sa faute. Nous avons désormais des processus allégés en pareil cas, notamment lorsqu'il y a fraude. Nos moyens d'intervention sont plus diversifiés.

Dans le contexte d'une enquête, il importe surtout de ne jamais perdre de vue que chacun a le droit de se faire entendre et de présenter ses arguments. Nous recherchons toujours l'équilibre nécessaire au maintien de cette équité judiciaire dans nos processus. Parfois ces enquêtes sont plus complexes et mettent en cause plusieurs individus à la fois, alors que dans d'autres situations, c'est une seule personne qui est concernée. Il arrive aussi qu'une enquête touche un grand nombre de candidats dans le cadre d'un processus plus général, et qu'elle nécessite ainsi davantage de temps. C'est donc variable, car il n'y a pas nécessairement un processus auquel nous pourrions avoir recours dans tous les cas.

Cependant, si l'on pense à la quantité de nominations effectuées dans l'ensemble de la fonction publique, le nombre d'enquêtes est minime, ce qui semble indiquer que le système fonctionne très bien. La capacité d'enquête demeure accessible pour les cas les plus graves.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a 34 % des enquêtes qui ne sont pas terminées au bout de sept mois et demi. Pourriez-vous me dire combien de temps il faut pour les mener à terme?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Il y a certaines enquêtes qui sont terminées en quelques semaines à peine, mais il y en a d'autres de nature plus complexe qui exigent d'entendre un plus grand nombre de témoins, en tenant compte des disponibilités de chacun. Nous avons donc des dossiers d'enquête qui n'étaient toujours pas réglés après 18 mois. Nous cherchons actuellement des moyens d'améliorer nos processus. Par exemple, nous faisons beaucoup plus d'enquêtes sur papier. Nous sommes sans cesse à l'affût des pratiques les plus efficaces utilisées par les autres ministères ayant des pouvoirs d'enquête pour voir comment nous pourrions nous en inspirer pour rationaliser nos processus.

Le président:

Nous devons nous arrêter là.

Nous passons maintenant aux interventions de cinq minutes, mais je dois informer les membres du Comité que, vu la présence de nos témoins pendant les deux heures que durera la séance, nous reviendrons à des interventions de sept minutes après avoir complété ce tour à sept, cinq et trois minutes, ce qui vous laissera amplement de temps pour poser vos questions de suivi.

C'est M. Blaney qui a la parole pour les cinq prochaines minutes. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de la Commission de la fonction publique et du Bureau du Conseil privé.

Ma première question s'adresse à Mme Donoghue, qui est présidente intérimaire de la Commission de la fonction publique.

Dans votre rapport, on voit les répercussions de notre plan budgétaire entre 2011 et 2015 sur le nombre total de fonctionnaires. Celui-ci est passé de 216 000 à 195 000.

Je remarque que la hausse la plus importante au chapitre de l'embauche l'année dernière s'est retrouvée dans la région de la capitale nationale. Avez-vous établi un mécanisme pour vous assurer qu'il y a un équilibre entre le nombre de fonctionnaires dans la région de la capitale nationale et celui dans les régions? Y a-t-il un mécanisme pour vous assurer qu'il y a un équilibre dans le nombre de fonctionnaires dans les régions afin d'éviter qu'il y ait une grande concentration de ceux-ci dans la région de la capitale nationale? Pouvez-vous formuler commentaires à ce sujet?

(1640)

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Essentiellement, les mécanismes et les décisions de dotation, ainsi que l'endroit où les postes dont dotés ne relèvent pas de la Commission. Ces décisions relèvent essentiellement des administrateurs généraux des organisations. Cependant, nous surveillons la situation pour voir où il y a de la dotation, ce qui nous permet de fournir cette information aux administrateurs généraux afin qu'ils prennent conscience des activités qui ont lieu dans tout le système.

Lorsqu'on regarde les données, on constate qu'effectivement, il y a eu réduction de la taille de la fonction publique à partir de 2011. Même si les activités de dotation ont repris, la taille de la fonction publique demeure aussi basse qu'à cette époque. Les activités ont repris, mais elles visent à combler des postes devenus vacants de façon normale. Donc, la taille de la fonction publique n'augmente pas. Quand on voit un accroissement de l'activité, on a l'impression que c'est la fonction publique au complet qui grossit. À l'heure actuelle, c'est contrôlé selon les planifications des administrateurs généraux. Quand des postes deviennent vacants dans les régions, la Commission travaille avec ses bureaux régionaux pour aider au recrutement et créer des processus pour faciliter l'embauche en région.

Nous avons fait autre chose. On entend souvent dire que le recrutement en région peut être difficile. Compte tenu de la nouvelle politique visant à assurer un meilleur équilibre et faciliter le recrutement en région, de même que pour résister au réflexe de ramener les postes à Ottawa, nous avons rendu nos politiques plus flexibles pour permettre des exceptions dans le cadre d'une approche beaucoup plus régionale en matière de dotation, et ce, sous la gouverne du gestionnaire du ministère.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci beaucoup de votre réponse.

Je vais tout de suite passer à la représentante du Conseil privé.

Y a-t-il une coordination au Conseil privé pour s'assurer que la fonction publique canadienne est uniformément répartie à l'échelle canadienne?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui, d'une façon très générale.[Traduction]

Comme je l'indiquais dans mes observations préliminaires, le Bureau du Conseil privé qui compte dans ses rangs le chef de la fonction publique en la personne du greffier du Conseil privé, Michael Wernick, a notamment pour rôle de favoriser l'instauration d'une fonction publique hautement efficace.

Au Bureau du Conseil privé, nous avons un Secrétariat de la transformation opérationnelle et du renouvellement dont le mandat consiste à examiner ce qui se passe dans l'ensemble du gouvernement, notamment en matière de recrutement, de mécanismes de gestion et de mesures de rémunération.

À l'intérieur de cette structure, nous retrouvons le comité de coordination des sous-ministres, une importante instance de gestion qui se réunit régulièrement pour voir comment les choses se déroulent dans l'ensemble de la fonction publique. Le travail de ce comité est appuyé par des groupes de premier plan comme la Commission de la fonction publique, le Bureau du dirigeant principal des ressources humaines et d'autres composantes du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor. Pour répondre à votre question, ce comité considère notamment le nombre de fonctionnaires travaillant dans les différentes régions en essayant de voir si un certain équilibre est maintenu. Et pour revenir à la question de Mme Ratansi, on se demande également si la fonction publique est un reflet fidèle de la diversité canadienne. Arrive-t-on à trouver les talents dont on a besoin? Est-il difficile de recruter des femmes pour des postes technologiques, dans la catégorie CS par exemple? Est-ce que le problème est relié au recrutement fait par les universités? On essaie d'analyser tout cela.

Bref, il y a effectivement coordination, mais aux niveaux supérieurs de la gestion.

(1645)

Le président:

Je dois vous interrompre, car nous avons dépassé les cinq minutes allouées.

Monsieur Ayoub. [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici parmi nous pour répondre à nos questions. Je vais commencer par vous, madame Doucet.

Vous avez déjà expliqué un peu le mandat du Bureau du Conseil privé et le genre de travail que vous faites, mais pouvez-vous me donner un peu plus d'informations sur la façon dont fonctionnent les services internes de votre bureau? Comment fonctionnez-vous à l'interne? [Traduction]

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Merci, monsieur le président. C'est un plaisir pour moi de répondre à cette question, car je suis la personne toute désignée pour le faire à titre de sous-ministre adjointe responsable des services ministériels. Comme nous l'avons déjà mentionné, le rôle principal du Bureau du Conseil privé consiste à conseiller, appuyer et coordonner. C'est le rôle que nous jouons auprès des têtes dirigeantes du gouvernement, à savoir le premier ministre et les ministres du portefeuille ainsi que le greffier du Conseil privé.

Nous voulons que ces gens-là puissent se concentrer sur le travail qu'ils ont à faire en sachant que nous nous occupons de tout du point de vue des services organisationnels. Ma collègue qui dirige le Secrétariat de la transformation opérationnelle et du renouvellement dont je viens de vous parler n'a ainsi pas à s'inquiéter des règles en matière de dotation, de ses budgets ou de ses autres responsabilités organisationnelles, car ce sont mes collaborateurs qui s'en chargent à sa place.

Les gestionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé ont accès à un guichet unique pour tous les services ministériels. Cela comprend tous les services internes que l'on peut imaginer: finances — Karen est la responsable de mon groupe des finances —, passation de marchés, gestion des locaux, ressources humaines, accès à l'information et protection des renseignements personnels, documents parlementaires, etc. Il y a également des services auxquels on ne pense pas nécessairement, comme ceux liés aux passeports et aux visas, lorsque des fonctionnaires partent en déplacement, ainsi qu'aux activités de sécurité, une préoccupation vraiment importante pour le Bureau du Conseil privé qui déploie des effectifs expressément à cette fin. Au sein de nos services juridiques, nous avons des avocats comme tous les autres ministères, mais nous avons aussi un groupe spécial qui se consacre à ce qu'on appelle les documents confidentiels du Cabinet. Cela fait partie de nos services internes. Enfin, il y a bien sûr nos services de communication et ce que j'appellerais les mécanismes de supervision de la gestion supérieure, y compris le groupe de la vérification et le bureau du greffier. [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Je vous remercie.

Je vais poser une autre question à Mme Donoghue au sujet de son organisme.

Dans votre introduction, vous avez parlé de la permission que doit obligatoirement demander un fonctionnaire qui désire se présenter en politique, et ce, à tous les paliers de gouvernement, que ce soit au palier fédéral, provincial ou municipal.

C'est aujourd'hui la Journée de la femme. Alors qu'on a de la difficulté à recruter des femmes dans le domaine politique, y a-t-il un plan en place qui les incite à s'engager en politique? Y a-t-il quelque chose qui les en dissuade? Quel est le plan pour les employés en ce qui a trait à leur volonté éventuelle et à leur liberté de se présenter en politique? Comment cela se passe-t-il?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

D'abord, je dois dire que la Commission reconnaît le droit de tous les Canadiens, qu'ils soient fonctionnaires ou non, à participer à des activités politiques. Elle reconnaît que c'est un droit fondamental. Il faut cependant assurer un équilibre pour préserver un autre principe fondamental, à savoir la non-partisanerie au sein de la fonction publique.

Lorsqu'un fonctionnaire veut se présenter comme candidat politique, peu importe le palier de gouvernement, il faut qu'il nous demande la permission pour le faire. Il en est ainsi parce que nous voulons voir quelle serait l'incidence de cette initiative sur la préservation de la non-partisanerie. Très rares sont les cas où cette permission est refusée. Quand nous octroyons une permission, elle est assortie de conditions qui sont souvent discutées avec l'employeur du candidat potentiel afin de définir de quelle façon il réintégrerait son poste s'il n'était pas élu. Nous prenons en considération le genre d'emploi qu'il exerce et sa visibilité.

Essentiellement, le but est de ne pas restreindre la capacité d'un fonctionnaire de se porter candidat, au contraire. Il faut s'assurer que, s'il n'est pas élu, il pourra réintégrer ses fonctions sans nuire à la perception d'impartialité de la fonction publique. Généralement, quand une personne est élue, surtout aux niveaux fédéral et provincial, la loi exige qu'elle démissionne de la fonction publique parce qu'elle va accepter un autre emploi à temps plein.

Il n'y a pas de dispositions particulières s'appliquant à différents types de personnes. Tout le monde est traité de la même façon. Il n'y a pas de traitement différent, qu'il s'agisse d'un homme ou d'une femme ou pour toute autre situation.

(1650)

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Est-ce que les règles sont bien... [Traduction]

Le président:

Excusez-moi, mais je dois vous interrompre. C'est au tour de M. Weir, qui dispose de trois minutes. Par la suite, nous retournerons à une série de questions dont le temps alloué est de sept minutes, et si mes calculs sont justes, il restera suffisamment de temps pour que quatre membres puissent poser des questions.

Monsieur Weir, vous disposez de trois minutes. Veuillez poser des questions précises, si possible.

M. Erin Weir:

Oui.

Le BCP demande 200 000 $ pour la création d'un comité consultatif pour la nomination des sénateurs. Je me demande si vous pouvez nous dire quels seront les coûts liés au comité.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question.

En 2016-2017, nous demanderons 1,5 million de dollars. Karen pourrait vous expliquer comment cela se manifestera dans le processus budgétaire.

Mme Karen Cahill:

Certainement. Lorsque nous avons présenté cela au Conseil du Trésor, il était trop tard pour ajouter l'information dans notre Budget principal des dépenses, de sorte que le montant de 1,5 million de dollars pour 2016-2017 ne figure pas dans le Budget principal des dépenses du BCP, qui a été déposé le 26 février.

Dans le cadre du prochain Budget supplémentaire des dépenses de 2016-2017, le BCP présentera le montant de 1,5 million de dollars pour la nomination des sénateurs. Ce sera dans notre Budget principal des dépenses.

M. Erin Weir:

Cela correspondra-t-il au coût total du comité consultatif?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je pourrais peut-être parler... Je viens de vous donner des renseignements couvrant une année. Je pourrais vous aider un peu plus.

Le total des fonds que demandera le BCP pour les six prochains exercices sera de 5,4 millions de dollars, et par la suite, il demandera 700 000 $ pour les années subséquentes. À quoi serviront-ils? À deux choses.

Ils serviront au comité en tant que tel, aux honorables Canadiens qui ont présenté leur candidature pour faire ce travail. Nous avons des membres permanents et, comme vous le savez, des membres seront nommés pour chaque province. Nous payons un montant journalier assez modeste pour l'exécution de ce travail, mais nous les payons pour l'effectuer, et nous payons leurs frais de déplacement lorsqu'ils doivent se réunir. Toutefois, nous nous servirons des technologies dans la mesure du possible pour réduire les dépenses au minimum.

Il y a les coûts liés à la formation du comité qui, comme vous le voyez dans les prévisions, tournent autour de 200 000 $ — mettre le comité sur pied pour pourvoir les postes vacants les plus pressants.

Comme je l'ai dit, notre demande de fonds couvre six exercices et s'est basé sur les postes qui se libéreront au Sénat parce que certains sénateurs auront atteint l'âge de la retraite. En analysant les choses, on voit qu'il s'agit d'un plan de travail immédiat.

L'autre partie des fonds servira à payer les fonctionnaires qui participeront au processus et qui auront le rôle d'un secrétariat. Nous absorberons une partie des coûts, et nous le faisons déjà, mais cela se traduira par une augmentation de la charge de travail, car avant cela, le BCP ne jouait vraiment pas de rôle majeur dans la nomination des sénateurs. Il s'agit d'une nouvelle fonction pour notre organisation: aider le comité sur le plan de ses travaux et des technologies dont il a besoin.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je m'excuse auprès du Comité; j'ai oublié M  McCauley, qui disposait de cinq minutes.

Je peux prétendre que j'ai fait comme le président Regan et dire que vous faisiez du chahut et que je vous ai exclus, mais ce ne serait pas juste.

Je cède la parole à M. McCauley pour cinq minutes, et nous passerons ensuite aux interventions de sept minutes.

Monsieur McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Vous avez parlé d'un montant de 800 000 $ destiné à l'Équipe de mise en oeuvre du plan frontalier visant à assurer la sécurité à la frontière. J'aimerais savoir contre quoi et qui il faut se protéger à la frontière américaine. N'y a-t-il pas un autre ministère qui dépense déjà des milliards pour nous protéger contre des intrusions à cette frontière?

(1655)

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question, monsieur le président. J'en suis ravie.

Je vais revenir un peu en arrière. En février 2011, je crois, le Canada et les États-Unis ont annoncé qu'ils allaient collaborer pour établir un nouveau partenariat à long terme afin d'accélérer la circulation légitime des personnes et des biens entre les deux pays, tout en renforçant leur sécurité et leur compétitivité économique. Le plan à cet égard s'est concrétisé au mois de décembre de la même année.

La frontière est un endroit complexe. Il y a constamment des gens qui la traversent pour le travail ou pour leurs loisirs. Les deux gouvernements veulent trouver des moyens de faciliter le commerce et le déroulement des activités légitimes. Chaque pays est mû par des facteurs en particulier, dont la sécurité.

Le plan était assez compliqué. Pour les deux pays, il s'agissait d'adopter une démarche faisant intervenir différents ministères pour la mise en oeuvre du plan, y compris la modernisation de systèmes complexes de TI.

Le travail est en cours depuis la fin de 2011. Au Canada, il est rattaché au Bureau du Conseil privé en raison de sa perspective d'ensemble et de sa capacité de réunir tous les ministères. Les choses se déroulent bien et ont progressé. Nous demandons des fonds, et il s'agit de deux ans. Au cours de la prochaine année, nous serons en mesure de synchroniser l'examen du travail accompli pour trouver une marche à suivre.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Vous demandez 1 million de dollars pour terminer le travail concernant le Plan d'action économique du Canada. Je sais qu'il a été beaucoup critiqué au fil des ans pour ce qui est des dépenses.

À quoi servira ce montant de 1 million de dollars étant donné que le plan a essentiellement pris fin et que le nouveau gouvernement s'est engagé à n'utiliser aucune publicité partisane? Pouvez-vous nous expliquer à quoi servira ce million de dollars puisque nous y avons mis fin? Quels avantages en tireront les Canadiens?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Le Plan d'action économique était un guichet unique sur les priorités du gouvernement, de sorte que les Canadiens n'avaient qu'une source à consulter pour voir ce qui se passait au gouvernement.

J'ai dit qu'il avait pris fin après les élections. Comme vous le savez, elles ont eu lieu en octobre, ce qui signifie que le programme a été exécuté jusqu'aux élections, c'est-à-dire qu'il a été administré durant les six premiers mois de l'exercice. Les fonds servent à soutenir le travail qu'ont accompli les fonctionnaires conformément à la politique de communication du gouvernement du Canada. Par la suite, ils ont dû s'occuper de l'archivage et mettre fin au plan.

Ce n'est pas aussi facile que cela en a l'air, mais cela ne nécessite pas la totalité du montant de 1 million de dollars. Si on le calcule au prorata, on peut imaginer que si le travail est accompli au cours des six premiers mois de l'exercice, on n'a besoin que de la moitié du montant pour le travail des fonctionnaires.

Le président:

Monsieur McCauley, vous voudrez peut-être garder vos autres questions pour les dernières interventions de sept minutes. Veuillez m'excuser, mais nous n'avons plus de temps.

Nous passons à la dernière série de questions, dont le temps alloué sera de sept minutes. C'est M. Grewal qui commence.

M. Raj Grewal (Brampton-Est, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous de votre témoignage.

Ma question s'adresse à Mme Doucet.

Quels défis votre organisme prévoit-il avoir généralement dans l'exécution de son mandat?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Monsieur le président, je pense que mes collègues à ma droite hocheront la tête en entendant ma réponse.

Mme Donoghue a parlé du lancement du nouveau site Web de la Commission de la fonction publique qui a eu lieu en avril, l'an dernier. Je vous dirais que la plus grande préoccupation de mes homologues dans l'ensemble du gouvernement et moi, c'est la technologie. Elle change rapidement et c'est un outil essentiel pour nous tous.

J'ai dit un peu plus tôt que le gouvernement et le secteur privé n'utilisent pas la technologie de la même façon, car leurs systèmes de valeurs sont différents. Franchement, les questions liées aux langues officielles et à l'accessibilité ne préoccupent pas autant les gens du secteur privé que le gouvernement du Canada.

Évidemment, je parle au nom du BCP, mais j'imagine que c'est la même chose dans d'autres organismes. Nous avons deux volets sur le plan de la technologie. Il y a d'abord le travail de tous les jours, c'est-à-dire s'assurer que les systèmes que tous les gens utilisent pour faire leur travail fonctionnent, et ce, de façon sécuritaire, car notre milieu est une cible pour les malfaiteurs. Nous devons nous assurer que nous avons les pare-feu qu'il faut pour protéger les gens qui les utilisent, sans entraver leur travail. Il s'agit des activités quotidiennes, ce qui comprend faire des mises à jour et l'application de correctifs et trouver des possibilités, sans pour autant nuire au déroulement du travail.

L'autre volet, c'est bien sûr l'innovation. Si, par exemple, le greffier du Conseil privé voulait entrer en contact avec des universités pour faire du recrutement postsecondaire, qu'il voulait utiliser Google Hangouts et qu'il venait me voir pour me demander de rendre cela possible, je lui dirais « d'accord ». L'argent que nous demandons dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses est destiné à nous aider à faire cela.

J'ai déjà parlé de la diffusion en continu en direct. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons de l'aide contractuelle. J'aimerais être en mesure de créer cette capacité au sein du Bureau du Conseil privé pour pouvoir répondre rapidement aux attentes des Canadiens qui veulent utiliser la technologie pour communiquer avec le gouvernement.

Je dirais que l'utilisation de la technologie, c'est-à-dire pouvoir agir de façon sécuritaire, mais rapide, est probablement ma plus grande préoccupation ces jours-ci.

(1700)

M. Raj Grewal:

Les investissements dans la technologie et l'innovation améliorent-ils l'efficacité du gouvernement, de votre bureau?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Sans aucun doute. Comme vous le savez, le BCP est le secrétariat du Cabinet. Il y a le Cabinet et tous ses différents comités. Les ministres ne peuvent pas toujours venir à Ottawa pour assister aux réunions des comités, et parfois, ils veulent appeler. J'ai parlé d'Internet, mais permettez-moi de vous parler des télécommunications. Si un ministre se trouve dans un autre pays et que le premier ministre veut lui parler ou qu'une réunion d'un sous-comité doit avoir lieu, il faut que le ministre puisse appeler en toute sécurité. Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons beaucoup travaillé avec des partenaires du gouvernement importants, comme SPAC et Services partagés Canada — un excellent partenaire — pour mettre cela en place. Nous sommes un peu victimes de notre succès, car maintenant, les ministres nous demandent si nous pouvons faire des vidéoconférences protégées, ce qui nécessite une grande largeur de bande et une organisation complètement différente.

Or, c'est l'époque à laquelle nous vivons, et la technologie améliore l'efficacité du gouvernement.

M. Raj Grewal:

Selon le rapport sur le rendement, vous avez fait un examen après le drame qui s'est produit à Ottawa. Quelles recommandations avez-vous mises en oeuvre à partir de ce processus d'examen et quels changements sont survenus?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Entre autres — et nous le ferons toujours pour maintenir nos mesures de sécurité à jour —, nous avons collaboré avec l'ensemble du gouvernement pour nous assurer que les plans de continuité des opérations étaient à jour, simplifiés et liés à des fonctions essentielles révisées. Les événements du 22 octobre ont été un avertissement sur ce plan.

Au BCP, nous avons créé nos plans d'intervention en cas d'urgence. Nous les avons refaits, et nous avons révisé ces plans ainsi que les protocoles de communication. Nous avons renforcé la sensibilisation et la formation. Il y a deux ou trois semaines, lorsqu'une alarme s'est déclenchée, je me suis tout d'abord demandé de quoi il s'agissait. « S'agit-il d'un incendie, d'un tremblement de terre ou d'un tireur? »

Je n'aurais jamais pensé faire cela le 22 octobre, mais la formation amène un protocole de sécurité différent. Si un tremblement de terre se produit, on ne se comportera pas de la même façon que s'il y a présence d'un tireur. Il est important d'être formé et informé à cet égard.

Sur le plan des communications, le BCP a clarifié ses processus de communication d'échange d'information avec d'autres fournisseurs de services d'intervention d'urgence pour s'assurer qu'il est lié au centre des opérations pour la sécurité publique et le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor. Le SCT est l'employeur de la fonction publique et joue un rôle important lorsqu'un événement de ce type se produit.

Nous avons apporté des améliorations physiques, mais pour des raisons de sécurité, je ne peux pas donner de détails. Certaines sont évidentes et d'autres, moins.

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

(1705)

M. Raj Grewal:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous avons dépassé le temps alloué. Un de vos collègues pourrait poser une question pour vous, si vous en avez une.

Monsieur Blaney, vous disposez de sept minutes.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.

Je veux dire que j'appuie le montant de 1 million de dollars destiné à des activités et à la mise en oeuvre de la stratégie de prévention de l'arrivée de navires de migrants clandestins. Je pense que c'est bien géré et que la personne qui agit à titre de conseiller spécial fait un travail remarquable.[Français]

J'aimerais revenir sur la question abordée par M. Ayoub au sujet la Commission de la fonction publique. Il a parlé de la possibilité, pour les fonctionnaires, de se présenter en politique.

J'aimerais faire un parallèle avec la fonction publique provinciale. J'ai des collègues qui sont des élus provinciaux. Quand viendra le temps de quitter la vie politique, il sera probablement trop tard, mais ils ont gardé leur statut de fonctionnaires. Or le paragraphe 3.21 de la page 72 de votre rapport stipule ceci: « La personne perd sa qualité de fonctionnaire le jour où elle est élue au terme d'une élection fédérale, provinciale ou territoriale ».

Pourquoi être aussi intransigeant à l'égard d'une personne qui, après avoir été en politique, souhaite réintégrer sa fonction?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

C'est une question qui est valable et je vous remercie de l'avoir posée.

C'est le cadre législatif qui nous a été confié par le Parlement au moment de l'adoption de cette loi. C'est dans ce contexte que cela a été déterminé.

Je vais rationaliser un peu les choses. Prenons le profil de carrière général d'un fonctionnaire. Lorsqu'il demande un congé, le maximum de temps qui est souvent alloué est de cinq ans. C'est peut-être une question d'équité. On s'est souvent posé la question sur la façon de gérer cela. La question ne se pose pas si une personne est élue au niveau municipal, mais seulement si elle est élue au niveau fédéral ou provincial. Il en est probablement ainsi parce que ce sont des termes qui respectent à peu près les mêmes normes que tout autre congé qui est accordé à un fonctionnaire.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Très bien.

En 2006, j'ai dû démissionner de mon poste quand j'ai été élu dans un gouvernement minoritaire. À ce moment-là, j'aurais aimé garder mon statut dans ce poste que j'aimais beaucoup. Aujourd'hui, j'ai tourné la page et je suis passé à autre chose. Je tenais quand même à le préciser.

Pour donner la chance aux gens de faire de la politique, on pourrait accorder un statut dit « indéterminé », ce qui est un atout important pour un fonctionnaire.

Je vais revenir au Bureau du Conseil privé.[Traduction]

J'aimerais revenir sur le processus de nomination des sénateurs.[Français]

Pouvez-vous éclairer ma lanterne à cet égard?

Vous avez dit chercher un montant additionnel de 200 000 $ pour le Sénat, mais vous avez parlé d'un coût de 5,4 millions de dollars au cours des six prochaines années.

Pourriez-vous m'éclairer sur les coûts? Est-ce que les recommandations de ce rapport seront rendues publiques?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de cette question.[Traduction]

Je m'excuse s'il y a pu avoir une certaine confusion. J'essayais de répondre à la question de l'autre membre sur nos dépenses à venir. C'est probablement un peu déroutant parce que vous n'avez pas les chiffres. Je les connais, et comme l'a expliqué Karen, ils ne figurent pas dans les documents budgétaires que vous avez devant vous. Je peux toutefois assurer les membres du Comité que chaque fois que je comparais devant vous — et je sais que vous serez saisis de ces chiffres —, je vous donne ces renseignements pour que vous ayez une vue d'ensemble.

Ce que je n'ai pas avec moi aujourd'hui, c'est la ventilation détaillée du montant de 1,5 million de dollars que nous dépenserons au cours du prochain exercice, celui qui commencera dans environ trois semaines. Je sais que cela fera partie du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Nous demandons 5,4 millions de dollars sur six ans et, de ce montant, 1,5 million de dollars au prochain exercice.

Si le Comité le souhaite, je serais ravie de lui fournir une ventilation de la façon dont nous prévoyons dépenser ces fonds.

(1710)

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Je crois comprendre que le montant de 5,4 millions de dollars sur six ans est destiné à couvrir les dépenses des personnes nommées, des Canadiens chargés de faire des recommandations. Il couvre également la création d'un groupe de fonctionnaires qui fournira de l'aide. Avez-vous une idée du nombre d'équivalents temps plein qui seront embauchés pour ce nouveau secrétariat, cette nouvelle structure?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

D'après ce que je comprends, je crois qu'on embauchera quatre ETP supplémentaires pour appuyer les travaux du Comité au cours des cinq prochaines années. Vous pouvez comprendre que pendant les deux premières années des travaux, ils se concentreront sur le tout nouveau processus. Ensuite, à mesure qu'ils maîtriseront le processus et qu'ils seront plus efficaces, la charge de travail sera moins coûteuse.

Il s'agit donc de quatre nouveaux fonctionnaires au BCP pour accomplir ce travail, plus le soutien technologique et bien sûr les frais de participation au Comité.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Oui. Ce processus existait avant la structure, mais cette nouvelle structure est maintenant présente et elle est certainement reflétée dans ces coûts.

Pour revenir au Plan d'action Par-delà la frontière, est-il exact que votre mandat consiste à coordonner le fonctionnement général du gouvernement? Pourriez-vous préciser votre rôle dans la mise en oeuvre de l'accord initial et de l'accord de prédédouanement qui a été signé en mars 2015? J'ai des motifs de croire que c'est la raison pour laquelle vous demandez du financement supplémentaire.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Comme je l'ai dit, le Plan d'action Par-delà la frontière a été annoncé à la fin décembre 2011 par le premier ministre de l'époque et le premier ministre américain de l'époque, et je soupçonne que le député connaît très bien ce plan. Depuis ce temps, comme je l'ai dit, le rôle du BCP a consisté à coordonner les efforts du ministère. Qu'est-ce que cela a signifié pour les deux premières années? On devait obtenir l'approbation du Cabinet et une couverture stratégique pour plusieurs initiatives. Nous avons constaté que de nombreux ministères mentionnaient le même sujet au Cabinet, c'est-à-dire qu'ils avaient besoin de quelqu'un pour organiser et coordonner ce processus, et c'est donc le BCP qui a assumé cette responsabilité. Il ne pouvait pas le faire dans le cadre existant, car il jouait un rôle de remise en question pour les propositions qui lui étaient présentées, et c'est ce que le personnel du BCP a fait à l'époque. Nous avons établi cette nouvelle fonction qui pouvait jouer un rôle de coordination de tous les ministères participants, notamment Sécurité publique, la GRC, le ministère de la Citoyenneté et de l'Immigration de l'époque, maintenant le ministère de l'Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté, et l'ASFC. L'éventail des initiatives comprenait la sécurité du fret, les négociants dignes de confiance, les voyageurs transfrontaliers et...

Le président:

Madame Doucet, je dois vous interrompre. Je suis désolé, mais nous avons dépassé le temps imparti d'une minute et demie. Vous serez peut-être en mesure de mentionner certains éléments de votre réponse à M. Blaney lorsque vous répondrez à d'autres questions des membres du Comité.

Monsieur Weir, vous avez sept minutes.

(1715)

M. Erin Weir:

J'aimerais effectivement reprendre une question posée par mon collègue. Il se peut que je n'aie pas entendu la réponse.

Les recommandations formulées par le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat seront-elles rendues publiques?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Les recommandations du comité consultatif seront présentées au premier ministre aux fins d'étude, et la décision lui revient.

M. Erin Weir:

Il revient au premier ministre de rendre les recommandations publiques ou non.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est ce que je comprends.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord. En ce qui concerne les coûts liés au comité consultatif, la somme de 5,4 millions de dollars que vous avez mentionnée et expliquée représente une contribution par l'entremise du Bureau du Conseil privé. D'autres ministères, ou peut-être même le Sénat, offriront-ils un financement pour appuyer cet organisme?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je ne peux pas parler pour le Sénat. D'après ce que je comprends, tous les coûts engagés par les autres ministères pour les nominations au Sénat seront absorbés dans leurs budgets existants, et les seules dépenses que je peux prévoir sont celles liées aux cotes de sécurité. Je crois qu'elles pourraient être facilement absorbées dans les activités habituelles liées aux cotes de sécurité menées par l'organisme responsable de la sécurité.

Il s'agit réellement d'une nouvelle fonction pour la fonction publique. En effet, jusqu'à ce que le gouvernement annonce cette nouvelle fonction, ces activités n'étaient pas réalisées au sein de la fonction publique. Notre rôle consistait vraiment à administrer et à coordonner les cotes de sécurité et à veiller à ce que les documents soient transmis. Il s'agit réellement d'une nouvelle fonction. Le BCP s'en occupera, et je ne m'attends pas à ce que d'autres ministères envoient d'autres demandes.

M. Erin Weir:

Le BCP demande un peu plus de 700 000 $ pour des services professionnels et spéciaux, et j'aimerais savoir s'il s'agit de services d'experts-conseils. Pourriez-vous préciser à quoi servira cet argent?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vais laisser Karen répondre à cette question.

Mme Karen Cahill:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Non, ce n'est pas seulement pour les experts-conseils. Cette catégorie comprend plusieurs postes budgétaires, notamment la formation, les services d'accueil et, évidemment, les services professionnels, mais il ne s'agit pas seulement d'embaucher des experts-conseils.

M. Erin Weir:

Ces 700 000 $ sont-ils principalement destinés à la formation? Seront-ils surtout investis dans les services d'accueil? Pouvez-vous nous éclairer?

Mme Karen Cahill:

Vous comprendrez, monsieur le président, que ce que nous avons en ce moment... L'année financière est toujours en cours. L'exercice n'est pas encore terminé et malheureusement, nous devrons attendre le dépôt des comptes publics pour finaliser ce montant et mieux comprendre les postes visés.

M. Erin Weir:

J'ai une question au sujet du Plan d'action économique. Maintenant que cette initiative tire à sa fin, avec le recul, pourriez-vous nous dire quel service public il a servi, s'il y a lieu, et comment on pourrait évaluer la réussite de ce programme?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie d'avoir posé la question. Comme vous le savez probablement, le Plan d'action économique découle de la crise économique mondiale de 2009.

M. Erin Weir:

Je suis désolé, mais je tiens à préciser que ma question ne concerne pas l'ensemble du Plan d'action économique, mais les initiatives qui en ont fait la promotion.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui. On a dit au gouvernement que les gens ne savaient pas où obtenir des renseignements. Ce message s'est clairement fait entendre. Il s'agissait d'un aperçu de l'idée prévisible de tout rassembler dans un seul endroit. D'après ce que je comprends, le site a été visité par de nombreuses personnes. Le gouvernement a constaté que l'initiative était couronnée de succès et a tenté de trouver des façons de tirer parti de cette réussite dans la catégorie des politiques en matière de communication du gouvernement du Canada.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai une question pour les témoins de la Commission de la fonction publique; elle concerne l'embauche des anciens combattants.

Mon collègue a posé quelques questions très précises sur la proportion représentée par les 94 anciens combattants dans l'ensemble des candidats ou des fonctionnaires et je comprends que ces données sont à venir, mais j'aimerais poser une question plus générale. Il me semble que ce n'est pas un très grand nombre d'anciens combattants dans le contexte de l'ensemble de la fonction publique ou du nombre total d'anciens combattants. Êtes-vous d'accord avec cette évaluation et pourriez-vous approfondir la question?

(1720)

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Merci.

En ce qui concerne les détails, nous avons embauché des anciens combattants dans le passé, mais le degré de priorité accordé à cet enjeu était moins élevé que dans la nouvelle loi. On a manifesté un grand intérêt, les activités reprennent dans ce domaine et les ministères s'échangent davantage de renseignements.

Selon nos activités en date du 10 février, nous avons essentiellement présenté la candidature de plus de 876 anciens combattants dans 49 ministères. Comme je l'ai dit, un grand nombre d'entre eux décident de ne pas donner suite à la démarche pour différentes raisons. Essentiellement, parmi ces présentations de candidature, 11 nominations ont été faites au MDN, une à EDSC, et une à Santé Canada.

En ce qui concerne la présentation de candidatures dans le contexte de libération pour raisons médicales non attribuables au service, 4 000 anciens combattants ont été aiguillés vers 60 ministères; il y a donc beaucoup d'activités dans ce domaine.

Il faut toutefois savoir si les anciens combattants souhaitent saisir les occasions qui leur sont présentées. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de savoir si nous souhaitons embaucher, mais également si les anciens combattants s'intéressent aux emplois offerts à ce moment-là. Il y a beaucoup plus de connaissances et de sensibilisation à cet égard. Nous avons été en mesure de fournir beaucoup plus de renseignements sur nos réussites et sur les compétences qu'apportent les anciens combattants et les membres des Forces armées canadiennes. Je crois que les activités vont augmenter dans ce domaine.

Il est important de se rappeler que certains de ces anciens combattants ont des emplois, mais le gouvernement leur donne également ce droit pendant une période de cinq ans. Il se peut qu'ils ne cherchent pas à changer d'emploi à ce moment-là dans le contexte du système. À mesure qu'ils progressent dans le système...

Il s'agit d'un système assez complexe, surtout lorsqu'on ne le comprend pas vraiment. Nous, les fonctionnaires, en faisons partie depuis longtemps. C'est pourquoi nous passons beaucoup de temps à fournir des renseignements aux anciens combattants et à leur enseigner comment se débrouiller dans le système. Le langage utilisé au sein des FAC est très différent du langage bureaucratique. Nous nous efforçons vraiment de faire les jumelages en ce moment, mais nous sommes sûrs qu'ils vont augmenter.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Drouin. Il sera le dernier intervenant dans la série de questions de sept minutes.

M. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'être ici aujourd'hui.

J'ai une brève question. J'aimerais faire suite à la question de mon collègue, M. Weir, sur les nominations au Sénat. La Commission de la fonction publique publie-t-elle habituellement le nom de tous les candidats qui font une demande d'emploi? Rendez-vous ces renseignements publics?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Non. Il ne s'agit pas de renseignements publics.

M. Francis Drouin:

D'accord.

Ma prochaine question concerne le processus de nominations publiques et s'adresse peut-être davantage au BCP. Publiez-vous les noms des candidats qui postulent dans le cadre du processus de nominations publiques?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Non. Nous ne le faisons pas pour des raisons liées à la protection de la vie privée.

M. Francis Drouin:

Oui, il y a des préoccupations liées à la protection de la vie privée.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui.

M. Francis Drouin:

Peut-on présumer que les noms des candidats non retenus pour des postes au Sénat ne seront pas publiés, manifestement pour des raisons liées à la protection de la vie privée?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Nous appliquons les règlements en matière de protection de la vie privée du gouvernement du Canada. D'après ce que je comprends, les noms ne seraient pas publiés, à moins que les candidats donnent....

M. Francis Drouin:

... leur consentement.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

... oui, à moins qu'ils donnent leur consentement.

Je ne pense pas pouvoir imaginer une situation dans laquelle cela pourrait se produire, mais c'est possible.

M. Francis Drouin:

D'accord. Merci.

Lorsqu'on est le dernier, toutes les questions ont déjà été posées, mais vous avez mentionné un élément important en ce qui concerne les 1,6 million de dollars visant à assurer la présence numérique du premier ministre. Vous avez dit que l'ancien premier ministre souhaitait avoir accès à la « diffusion en continu », et que vous n'aviez pas les capacités nécessaires à l'époque.

Y a-t-il quelqu'un au BCP qui surveille les nouvelles technologies? Je pense que les enfants d'aujourd'hui ne sont plus sur Facebook.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est une très bonne question.

La personne qui surveille le plus activement les nouvelles technologies et leurs effets sur les Canadiens est Michael Wernick, le greffier du Conseil privé.

Christine rit, car il est aussi sa source de renseignements, j'en suis sûre. Il est probablement l'un des leaders les plus informés en matière de technologies que j'ai rencontrés. Mes collègues de Services partagés Canada seraient sûrement du même avis. Il repousse toujours les limites de ce que nous pouvons faire. Il est ambitieux en ce qui concerne les échéances, car il comprend l'importance de rester pertinent pour les Canadiens en temps réel.

(1725)

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci.

Comme vous le savez, le BCP a subi une réorganisation. Il y a un nouveau sous-secrétaire du Cabinet, Résultats et livraison. Ce nouveau poste — ou cette nouvelle direction — est-il alimenté par les ressources internes?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui. Nous avons réaffecté des ressources au sein du Bureau du Conseil privé pour appuyer cette nouvelle fonction.

M. Francis Drouin:

Je n'ai pas vu cela dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

Je vois qu'on a prévu 44,5 millions de dollars sur trois ans dans le budget de 2015 pour la mise en oeuvre continue de la stratégie canadienne de prévention du passage de clandestins. Est-ce seulement pour le BCP, ou cela inclut-il d'autres ministères?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question, monsieur le président.

Je peux vous assurer que ce n'est pas seulement pour le BCP. Si vous le souhaitez, je peux vous donner la ventilation.

Karen, veuillez m'aider si j'oublie quelque chose.

Par exemple, pour l'année 2014-2015, on a dépensé 14,9 millions de dollars, dont 5 millions de dollars pour ce qui est maintenant le ministère des Affaires mondiales, 5 millions de dollars pour la GRC, 3 millions de dollars pour le ministère de l'Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté et 700 000 $ pour le CSTC. La portion du BCP est la plus petite partie. La plus grosse partie de la somme totale est dépensée dans les grands ministères qui assument la responsabilité de première ligne qui consiste à éviter que des bateaux remplis d'immigrants se présentent au Canada.

M. Francis Drouin:

D'accord. Merci.

En ce qui concerne les 0,8 million de dollars pour le Plan d'action Par-delà la frontière, comme vous le savez, les journaux ont récemment annoncé que le projet partagé entrepris par les services de police a fait face à un obstacle. J'aimerais savoir si le BCP tient compte de ces risques, car s'il y a deux partenaires participants, cela entraîne manifestement des problèmes avec les services de police lorsqu'il s'agit de déterminer le territoire où les accusations seront portées en cas de problème.

Tenez-vous compte de tous ces risques lorsque vous faites une demande dans le cadre du budget?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est une très bonne question, et la réponse courte est oui.

Vous avez parlé d'une initiative, et je vais vous parler d'une autre initiative connexe liée à la collaboration entre les organismes d'application de la loi. Il s'agit du Conseil de coopération en matière de réglementation; il n'est pas mentionné dans ce budget, mais il l'a été dans des budgets précédents.

Les membres de ce conseil ont notamment, dans le cadre de leur travail, mis sur pied un projet pilote visant l'application de la loi entre les agents canadiens et américains responsables du bien-être et de la sécurité sur les Grands Lacs. Ils ont appris à collaborer en réalisant 10 missions différentes pour régler les problèmes. Il faut du temps et de la patience. Nous tentons de tenir compte de cela dans les dépenses demandées par les ministères, et certainement dans les dépenses demandées par le BCP.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci.

Le président:

Je crois que nous allons nous arrêter ici.

J'aimerais remercier tous les témoins d'avoir comparu aujourd'hui. Je suis sûr que je parle au nom de tous les membres du Comité lorsque je vous affirme que tous les renseignements que vous avez fournis ont été très utiles. Nous avons hâte de reparler avec vous au cours des mois ou des années à venir.

Les témoins peuvent partir.

J'aimerais demander aux membres du Comité d'examiner une question qui concerne notre retour de la semaine de relâche. Comme tout le monde le sait, le 22 mars est le jour du dépôt du budget. Il s'agit également d'un jour de réunion, et je crois que nous ne pourrons pas la tenir ce jour-là. C'est aussi une semaine abrégée, car vendredi, c'est Vendredi saint.

Vous n'avez pas à me répondre aujourd'hui, mais je vous demande de réfléchir à la question de savoir si nous nous réunirons le jeudi même s'il s'agit d'une semaine abrégée — nous réglerons cette question avant la fin de la semaine. Je suis sûr qu'un grand nombre de députés souhaitent quitter Ottawa un peu plus tôt.

Excusez-moi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce jour-là suivra-t-il l'horaire du vendredi ou non?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, c'est Vendredi saint.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais le jeudi suivra-t-il l'horaire du vendredi?

Le président:

Non, d'après ce que je comprends, il s'agit d'un jeudi normal.

(1730)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Le président:

Vous pouvez vérifier auprès de votre leader à la Chambre, mais c'est ce que je comprends, et je n'ai rien entendu d'autre.

Même si nous ne nous réunissons pas cette semaine-là, je suggère que les membres du Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure se réunissent, afin que nous puissions commencer à planifier notre liste de témoins et les études que nous envisageons d'entreprendre, car la prochaine semaine où nous siégeons au Parlement sera suivie d'une pause de deux semaines. Réfléchissez à la question de savoir si nous organiserons une réunion du Comité ou seulement une réunion du Sous-comité, et nous réglerons la question au cours des deux prochaines réunions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous prendrons [Inaudible] de la pause.

Le président:

D'accord. La séance est levée. Michelle-Doucet-Declaration-dOuverture-F

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard oggo 29060 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on March 08, 2016

2016-02-16 OGGO 1

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1535)

[English]

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Leif-Erik Aune):

Honourable members, I see a quorum. My name is Leif-Erik Aune. I'm the clerk of your committee.

I must inform members that the clerk of the committee can only receive motions for the election of the chair. The clerk cannot receive other types of motions, cannot entertain points of order, nor participate in debate.

We can now proceed with the election of the chair. Pursuant to Standing Order 106(2), the chair must be a member of the official opposition. I am ready to receive motions for the chair. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC):

I nominate Tom Lukiwski.

The Clerk:

Mr. Blaney has nominated Mr. Lukiwski.

Are there any further motions?[English]

No. Is it the pleasure of the committee to adopt the motion?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

(Motion agreed to)

The Clerk: The motion is carried and Mr. Lukiwski is duly elected chair of the committee.

Sir, would you like to take the chair?

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Thank you very much and good afternoon, everyone.

I noticed when I was speaking with Frank a few moments ago that this is a unique committee. Even though we have over 200 new members in Parliament this year, this committee only has three returning members: myself, Madam Ratansi, and Monsieur Blaney.

I welcome all of you new to Parliament. Erin and I know each other, both being from Saskatchewan. I am pleased to say I'm looking forward to chairing this committee. I think it's going to be a good committee.

Traditionally this has been fairly non-partisan, although over time there has been the odd controversial issue that has appeared before the committee, as Madam Ratansi would know, having been a chair of this committee. The studies and the work that we do affects all parliamentarians and all levels of government within all ministries.

I think we should be able to get along well. I certainly pledge to you I'll be doing my utmost to make sure I'm as fair as possible in all rulings. That's the way I like to operate. We're not looking to try to gain any political strokes here, at least not from the chair. I am looking forward to working with all of you over the course of the next months and hopefully years to come.

With that, I would like to recommend that the clerk of this committee now move on to the appointment of the vice-chairs.

The Clerk:

Pursuant to Standing Order 106(2), the first vice-chair must be a member of the government party. I'm now prepared to receive motions for the first vice-chair.

Mr. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

I'd like to nominate Ms. Yasmin Ratansi as vice-chair.

The Clerk:

Monsieur Drouin has moved that Yasmin Ratansi be elected as first vice-chair of the committee.

Are there further motions? Seeing none, is it the pleasure of the committee to adopt the motion?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

(Motion agreed to)

The Clerk: Yasmin Ratansi has been duly elected first vice-chair of the committee.

Pursuant to Standing Order 106(2) the second vice-chair must be a member of an opposition party other than the official opposition. I'm now ready to receive motions for the second vice-chair.

Mr. David Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I nominate Mr. Erin Weir as the second vice-chair.

The Clerk:

David Graham has nominated Erin Weir. Are there other motions?

Seeing none, is it the pleasure of the committee to adopt the motion?

Some hon. members: Agreed,

(Motion agreed to)

The Clerk: Mr. Weir, you are the second vice-chair, sir.

The Chair:

I'll ask for the will of the committee. We have a number of routine motions and all of you probably have copies of them in front of you. Most of them are fairly pro forma, but there's two that I think will have the interest of this committee and I would suggest that we perhaps deal with those now.

The first is the length of time and the rotation for questioning witnesses. I know there has been a suggestion brought forward by the government as to the rotation length of time for questioning for a traditional meeting of approximately 50 minutes. For new members I would point out that these committees meet for a two-hour period. Many times witnesses are brought in for one-hour blocks. If that is the case, normally the committees allow up to ten minutes for opening comments, and then the remaining 50 minutes would be for questioning from the committee. The government has proposed a rotation list and a timeframe, but the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs has also adopted a separate rotation and timeframe. I would ask that if there are any comments we can deal with them now, but I would think it would be in the best interest of this committee if we could determine, before we leave this afternoon's meeting, which one of those two rotations and time allocations we would take. I would invite anyone who has a question or a comment to identify yourself.

The clerk has informed me that the routine commissions are the routine motions that were adopted by the last Parliament's committee. Does everyone have a copy of the government's submission as to rotation and length of time?

The Clerk:

It hasn't been distributed yet, sir.

The Chair:

It has not been distributed?

Erin, can I just ask you straight out, have you seen the proposed rotation list for questioning and the length of time allocated?

(1540)

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

I haven't seen it in writing. We have heard some things about it, but no I haven't seen it.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

The clerk has extra copies.

The Chair:

Has the government all seen your own submission? I think we're all fine except for Mr. Weir.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Only Mr. Weir needs one.

The Chair:

The opposition has copies and Erin has one now. Erin, do you have both the government's suggested rotation and the rotation agreed upon by PROC?

Mr. Erin Weir:

Yes.

The Chair:

Does anyone want to either open up discussion or perhaps make a motion? As I told Madam Ratansi, I'm speaking a little bit out of turn here as the chair, but I can say that the opposition has met. We've taken a look at both these submissions, both the government's proposal and the one adopted by PROC. The opposition has no issue with either one. I'm just looking for someone to make a recommendation and a motion.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I move that we adopt the time for opening remarks and questioning as presented by the government.

The Chair:

Monsieur Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Mr. Chair, I would like to offer a quick reminder while our colleague is looking over the proposal. As a member of the committee, I always expect to receive documents in both official languages when they are formally distributed to the committee.

Thank you. [English]

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Mr. Chair, it is in both languages.

The Chair:

Erin, any questions or comments?

Mr. Erin Weir:

I think we're good with the PROC recommendation.

The Chair:

All right.

We have a motion on the floor to adopt the government submission. I would ask for any further comments.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

If Mr. Weir wants the PROC recommendation, which is seven-seven-seven-seven, that gives you one extra minute. We have—

Mr. David Graham:

PROC lets the Liberals go first.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, we're fine.

Mr. David Graham:

No, but that PROC is different.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Okay. So the PROC submission is Liberal, Conservative, NDP, and Liberal; then Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, Liberal, and NDP. If you're fine with that, we have no problem.

Mr. Chair, we are flexible.

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, the NDP would like the Procedure and House Affairs committee submission.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Yes, we would go with the PROC submission.

The Chair:

We do have a motion upon the floor. We need to vote, unless the government wants to withdraw its motion.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I will withdraw that motion.

The Chair:

All right.

The clerk, quite correctly, has suggested that it would be helpful if we could have the entire motion read into the record.

If we're going to go with PROC, Erin, could I have you please make a motion to adopt the Procedure and House Affairs rotation and time?

Mr. Erin Weir:

Sure, I'm happy to make a motion that we adopt the Procedure and House Affairs recommendation on the time allocation for this committee.

(1545)

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

And speaking rotation.

The Chair:

And speaking rotation.

Mr. Erin Weir:

That's correct.

The Chair:

Seconded by Mr. Whalen? Okay.

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: The second point that I think would be helpful to the committee is if we could determine whether or not we need a subcommittee on agenda and procedure.

Just in the way of background for new members, committees themselves determine how they wish to set their own agenda. It can be done one of two ways. We could adopt a subcommittee, which many committees do, composed of the chair of the committee, the two vice-chairs, and a further member from the official opposition. The subcommittee would meet on an ad hoc basis to discuss future business for the committee. They would normally agree by consensus on what studies or business this committee should be engaged in and bring that back to the full committee for ratification.

The second method would be to have the full committee discuss what business we want to deal with.

It's a matter of whether or not we take a subcommittee approach to it, which is obviously a smaller committee, and some would suggest more efficient, or do it as a full committee.

Are there any comments? I look to the government to open that.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

In the past, when we were in opposition, we adopted the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure because it keeps the focus, and you can bring back all the information that you want to the committee at large. This does not disallow the committee to vote on it, as they have the right to.

I think a small committee determining the agenda would be a better fit. We have a long list of agencies, boards, and everything under our belt. It would help if we kept that process.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Any other comments?

Would you care to put that in the form of a motion?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Yes. That the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure be established and be composed of the Chair, the two Vice-Chairs, and one government member.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

I support that.

The Chair:

Monsieur Blaney seconds that.

(Motion agreed to)

The whip of the party will determine which one of you gentlemen....

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

Sorry, did I hear wrong that the motion said it would be a government member?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Yes.

The Chair:

No, an opposition member.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, I said “government member”. That's what is written on my agenda and procedure, maybe.

The Chair:

I'm going from last year, Madame Ratansi, and that was the government.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Yes, it was the government, and I'm looking at the previous session.

The Chair:

This just says “Conservative”, but it was previously.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Yes, so it is government.

The Chair:

Once you have determined who that additional member is, you can let the clerk know.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Sure.

The Chair:

The only other question I would have for the clerk right now is whether there are any outstanding issues from the previous Parliament that are left unresolved or studies that the previous committee recommended be passed along to this committee.

The Clerk:

From the perspective of procedure and administration, there are several remaining routine motions that committees ordinarily consider and adopt, regarding the services of the Library of Parliament, meeting without a quorum, the distribution of documents, working meals, and others. A complete list of those routine motions adopted by this standing committee in the last session has been distributed to each member. It's in a bilingual column format.

If members wish to either propose or discuss those routine motions, that then would be the normal practice of the committee. Regarding any substantive work, I would propose waiting until after the committee has made up its mind on whether to retain the services of the Library of Parliament before considering the substantive work of the committee.

The Chair:

I should also point out that the routine motions you've seen that were adopted by this committee in the previous Parliament are pretty pro forma. They are usually the same routine motions that are adopted by the vast majority of committees. For example, on “Analysts services”, it's as follows: That the Committee retain the services of one or more analysts from the Library of Parliament to assist it in its work.

This is very necessary, obviously.

There are things we've already dealt with, such as the time and opening remarks of witnesses, working meals, meeting without a quorum, etc. I don't have to go through the entire list, because you have them in front of you.

(1550)

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Just go one by one and table it. That way, it is on the record, so there's no confusion.

The Chair:

If you wish to deal with it in that manner, we can. We can do it as a package. Why don't we start at the beginning, then, with “Analysts services”?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So moved.

The Chair:

All in favour?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: We do have analysts in the room with us. I invite them now to come and sit with us at the head of the table.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Mr. Chair, taking up on your suggestion, would you like a block motion to go through?

The Chair:

That's what I was referring to earlier.

The only point I would make to all members—and the clerk pointed this out again—is on point three, “Witnesses belonging to the same organization”. Apparently, only that routine motion was adopted only by this committee.

The chair has the power to determine some of the things contained in that one motion, so what I would like to do, perhaps, since this was a routine motion of the previous Parliament, is to go down to point five, “Meeting without a quorum”, continue on until we finish on “Notice of motion”, and then go back to “Witnesses belonging to the same organization”, since it was so unique. Does that meet with the agreement of the committee?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Yes.

The Chair:

We're at “Meeting without a quorum”.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So moved.

The Chair: All in favour?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Next is “Documents distribution”.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So moved.

The Chair: All in favour?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Number seven is “Working meals”.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So moved.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi: They're not waking up, so I have to say “so moved”.

The Chair:

All in favour?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Next is “Travel accommodation and living expenses of witnesses”.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So moved.

The Chair:

All in favour?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Next is “Access to in camera meetings”.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So moved.

The Chair:

All in favour?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Next is “Transcripts of in camera meetings”.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So moved.

The Chair: All in favour?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Finally, we have “Notice of motion”.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

So moved.

The Chair: All in favour?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Now we can go back just quickly to “Witnesses belonging to the same organization”.

Madam Ratansi, perhaps I could ask you to make comments, since this apparently was the only committee that adopted this particular routine motion. Can you give us some background as to why the committee felt that it would be in its best interest to adopt this, if you can recall?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Mr. Chair, I wasn't here from 2011 to 2014, so I'm not sure which committee adopted it. Was it the committee during 2011?

The Chair:

It was in the last session.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

That means I wasn't here.

The Chair:

We can take a quick look at it.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Yes, if the analysts or somebody can shed light on it, because I don't remember seeing this. We used to group everybody together, so I have no idea.

The Chair:

Yes, I'm not sure. Frankly, I can't understand the relevance of this and why the committee adopted it in the last session. I don't think we have any corporate knowledge of this, frankly.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

If we don't, is it possible to delete it?

The Chair:

I believe we probably could.

If we do not adopt it now, it will not be part of the package of routine motions. However, in the future, the committee can always revisit routine motions any time it wishes. If you wish to just ignore that and go on as every other standing committee does, and if we see a need to adopt this sometime in the future, the committee can certainly recommend it. We can discuss it and vote upon it then.

(1555)

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I concur with you, because I see no reason for such a motion to be there.

The Chair:

Yes. Frankly, I can't understand it, unless there's somebody who sees a reason.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Is there no history for that?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Nothing? Nobody knows why it's there?

The Chair:

Not here.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Are you serious?

The Chair:

Seriously—

An hon. member: Then we won't miss it.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Mr. Chair, I've reread it. It will confuse the living daylights out of the committee itself, so we might as well remove it.

The Chair:

All agreed?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Since we now have a Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure, I would suggest that the subcommittee meet at its earliest opportunity and perhaps invite the analysts to see if they have any other information they could bring to us from the previous Parliament as to ongoing studies. If that is the case, the chair then will call the meeting of the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure after consultation with all parties, particularly the government and Mr. Weir. We'll have that sometime in the next 24 to 48 hours, hopefully.

We have a meeting established for this coming Thursday. That's our regular sitting time, but until such time as we have an agenda, it will be at the call of the chair. Does that meet with the approval of the committee?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay. Not seeing any further questions, I call this meeting adjourned.

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le greffier du comité (M. Leif-Erik Aune):

Honorables députés, il y a quorum. Je m'appelle Leif-Erik Aune. Je suis le greffier de votre Comité.

Je vous informe que le greffier du comité ne peut recevoir des motions que pour l'élection à la présidence. Le greffier ne peut recevoir aucune autre motion, ni entendre des rappels au Règlement ou participer aux débats.

Nous pouvons maintenant procéder à l'élection à la présidence. Conformément au paragraphe 106(2) du Règlement, le président doit être un député de l'opposition officielle. Je suis prêt à recevoir les motions à cet effet. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, PCC):

Je propose la candidature de M. Tom Lukiwski.

Le greffier:

Monsieur Blaney propose M. Lukiwski.

Y a-t-il d'autres motions?[Traduction]

Non. Plaît-il au Comité d'adopter la motion?

Des députés: Oui.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le greffier: La motion est adoptée et M. Lukiwski est dûment élu président du Comité.

Monsieur, voulez-vous occuper le fauteuil?

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Merci beaucoup et bon après-midi, tout le monde.

En discutant avec Frank il y a un instant, j'ai remarqué que nous avions un comité plutôt unique. Malgré l'arrivée de plus de 200 nouveaux députés au Parlement cette année, trois anciens membres de notre Comité sont de retour: moi-même, Mme Ratansi et M. Blaney.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à tous les nouveaux députés. Nous nous connaissons, Erin et moi, car nous sommes tous les deux de la Saskatchewan. C'est avec joie et impatience que je présiderai le Comité. Je crois que nous allons bien travailler ensemble.

Notre Comité n'a jamais été très partisan, même s'il y a eu quelques accrochages dans le passé. Mme Ratansi en sait quelque chose, car elle a déjà été présidente du Comité. Les études et le travail que nous faisons ont une incidence sur l'ensemble des parlementaires et sur tous les échelons des différents ministères.

Nous devrions bien nous entendre. Je vous promets que je vais tout faire pour m'assurer d'être le plus équitable possible dans mes décisions. C'est ainsi que j'aime fonctionner. Le but n'est pas de faire des gains politiques, du moins ce n'est pas le mien. Je suis impatient de travailler avec chacun d'entre vous au cours des prochains mois et, je l'espère, des prochaines années.

Sur ce, je propose que le greffier procède à la nomination des vice-présidents.

Le greffier:

Conformément au paragraphe 106(2) du Règlement, le premier vice-président doit être un député du gouvernement. Je suis maintenant prêt à recevoir les motions à cet effet.

M. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Je propose que Mme Yasmin Ratansi soit élue vice-présidente.

Le greffier:

M. Drouin propose que Yasmin Ratansi soit élue vice-présidente du Comité.

Y a-t-il d'autres motions? Puisqu'il n'y en a pas, plaît-il au Comité d'adopter la motion?

Des députés: Oui.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le greffier: Yasmin Ratansi est élue première vice-présidente du Comité.

Conformément au paragraphe 106(2) du Règlement, le deuxième vice-président doit être un député de l'opposition, mais pas de l'opposition officielle. Je suis maintenant prêt à recevoir des motions à cet effet.

M. David Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je propose que M. Erin Weir soit élu deuxième vice-président.

Le greffier:

David Graham propose la nomination d'Erin Weir. D'autres motions?

Puisqu'il n'y en a pas, plaît-il au Comité d'adopter la motion?

Des députés: Oui.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le greffier: Monsieur Weir, vous êtes élu deuxième vice-président.

Le président:

J'aimerais avoir l'avis du Comité. Nous devons examiner différentes motions de régie interne, et vous en avez probablement tous reçu une copie. La plupart des motions sont assez standard, mais il y en a deux en particulier qui devraient intéresser le Comité, et je vous propose de commencer par celles-là.

La première porte sur le temps alloué pour les déclarations préliminaires et l'interrogation des témoins. Je sais que le gouvernement a proposé une formule pour le temps alloué aux séries de questions pour une séance habituelle d'environ 50 minutes. Je précise pour les nouveaux députés que les réunions des comités durent deux heures. Bien souvent, le comité invite des témoins à comparaître par blocs d'une heure. Lorsque c'est le cas, les témoins ont normalement 10 minutes pour présenter leurs déclarations préliminaires, et les 50 minutes qui restent sont consacrées aux questions du comité. Le gouvernement a proposé une liste de rotation et le temps alloué pour chaque tour, mais le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre a adopté une liste de rotation différente. Si vous avez des commentaires à ce sujet, j'aimerais que vous les fassiez maintenant, mais je crois que ce serait dans l'intérêt de notre Comité de déterminer avant la fin de notre séance de cet après-midi laquelle de ces deux listes de rotation nous devrions adopter. Je vous prie de vous nommer si vous désirez poser une question ou formuler un commentaire.

Le greffier m'a informé que les motions de régie interne sont celles adoptées par le Comité lors de la dernière législature. Est-ce que tout le monde a reçu une copie de la proposition du gouvernement concernant la liste de rotation et les temps alloués?

Le greffier:

Les copies n'ont pas encore été distribuées, monsieur.

Le président:

Elles n'ont pas été distribuées?

Erin, puis-je vous demander si vous avez vu la liste de rotation proposée et les temps alloués?

(1540)

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Je ne l'ai pas vu noir sur blanc. J'en ai entendu parler, mais je ne l'ai pas vu.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Le greffier en a des copies supplémentaires.

Le président:

Est-ce que les députés du gouvernement ont vu leur propre proposition? Je crois que nous l'avons tous, sauf M. Weir.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Seul M. Weir a besoin d'une copie.

Le président:

L'opposition en a des copies, et Erin aussi maintenant. Erin, avez-vous la rotation proposée par le gouvernement et celle adoptée par le Comité de la procédure?

M. Erin Weir:

Oui.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut lancer le débat ou peut-être présenter une motion? Comme je l'indiquais à Mme Ratansi, ce n'est pas le tour au président de parler, mais je précise que les députés de l'opposition se sont rencontrés. Nous avons jeté un coup d'oeil aux deux propositions, soit celle soumise par le gouvernement et celle adoptée par le Comité de la procédure. L'opposition n'a pas d'objection pour ni l'une ni l'autre. J'aimerais seulement que quelqu'un fasse une recommandation et présente une motion.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je propose que nous adoptions la proposition du gouvernement concernant le temps alloué pour les déclarations préliminaires et les questions.

Le président:

Monsieur Blaney. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais faire un simple rappel pendant que notre collègue examine la proposition. En tant que membre du comité, je m'attends à toujours recevoir les documents dans les deux langues officielles lorsqu'ils sont distribués officiellement au comité.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Monsieur le président, le document est dans les deux langues.

Le président:

Erin, des questions ou des commentaires?

M. Erin Weir:

Je crois que la recommandation du Comité de la procédure nous convient.

Le président:

Très bien.

Une motion a été présentée pour adopter la proposition du gouvernement. Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

M. Weir vote pour la recommandation du Comité de la procédure, qui prévoit quatre tours de sept minutes, et cela vous donne une minute supplémentaire. Nous avons...

M. David Graham:

Celle du Comité de la procédure donne le premier tour aux libéraux.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, ça va.

M. David Graham:

Non, mais la proposition du Comité de la procédure est différente.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'accord, alors la proposition du Comité de la procédure est libéral, conservateur, NPD et libéral; puis conservateur, libéral, conservateur, libéral et NPD. Si cela vous convient, nous n'y voyons pas d'inconvénient.

Monsieur le président, nous sommes ouverts aux suggestions.

Le président:

Monsieur Weir, le NPD aimerait adopter la proposition du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre?

M. Erin Weir:

Oui, nous irions avec celle-là.

Le président:

Une motion a été présentée. Nous devons passer au vote, à moins que le gouvernement décide de retirer sa motion.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je retire la motion.

Le président:

Très bien.

Le greffier me fait remarquer, avec raison, qu'il serait utile de lire la motion dans son intégralité aux fins du compte rendu.

Si nous adoptons la proposition du Comité de la procédure, Erin, puis-je vous demander de présenter une motion à cet effet?

M. Erin Weir:

Bien sûr, je suis heureux de soumettre une motion proposant d'adopter la recommandation du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre sur le temps alloué pour notre Comité.

(1545)

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Et la liste de rotation.

Le président:

Et la liste de rotation.

M. Erin Weir:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Appuyée par M. Whalen? D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Le deuxième point que nous devrions aborder est de savoir si nous devrions former un sous-comité du programme et de la procédure.

À titre d'information pour les nouveaux membres du Comité, les comités décident eux-mêmes de la façon dont ils souhaitent établir leur programme. On peut procéder de deux manières. Nous pourrions former un sous-comité, ce que font plusieurs comités, composé des deux vice-présidents et un autre membre de l'opposition officielle. Le sous-comité pourrait se réunir de façon ponctuelle pour discuter des travaux futurs du comité. Le sous-comité convient normalement par consensus des études ou des travaux à entreprendre et soumet le tout à l'approbation du comité.

La deuxième façon de faire est de discuter en comité plénier des travaux à entreprendre.

Nous devons décider si nous voulons confier cette tâche à un sous-comité, moins nombreux, et selon certains, plus efficace qu'un comité plénier.

D'autres commentaires? Je m'attends à une première intervention de la part du gouvernement.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Lorsque nous étions dans l'opposition, nous avons adopté une motion portant création d'un sous-comité du programme et de la procédure, car cela permet de garder le cap et de présenter toute l'information voulue à l'ensemble du Comité. Cela n'empêche pas le Comité de se prononcer; c'est son droit.

Je pense qu'il serait préférable d'avoir un petit comité pour établir l'ordre du jour. Nous avons à notre disposition une longue liste d'organismes, de commissions et autres. Il serait utile de continuer de procéder ainsi.

Le président:

Merci.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Auriez-vous l'obligeance de présenter une motion à cette fin?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Oui. Que le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure soit créé et composé du président, des deux vice-présidents et d'un député ministériel.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

J'appuie la motion.

Le président:

M. Blaney appuie la motion.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le whip du parti déterminera lequel d'entre vous, messieurs...

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Je suis désolé. Ai-je mal compris, ou la motion dit-elle qu'il s'agira d'un député ministériel?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Oui.

Le président:

Non, ce sera un député de l'opposition.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, j'ai dit « député ministériel ». C'est peut-être ce qui est écrit ici pour le Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure.

Le président:

C'est la motion de l'année dernière, madame Ratansi, et il s'agit d'un député ministériel.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Oui, c'était un député ministériel, et je regarde la motion de la session précédente.

Le président:

Il est seulement écrit « conservateur », mais cela remonte à la dernière session.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Oui, il s'agit donc d'un député ministériel.

Le président:

Une fois que vous aurez déterminé qui sera le membre additionnel, vous pourrez en informer le greffier.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Bien sûr.

Le président:

Je n'ai plus qu'une chose à demander au greffier: y a-t-il des questions en suspens qui n'ont pas été résolues au cours de la législature précédente ou des études que les membres précédents du Comité ont recommandé de poursuivre?

Le greffier:

Pour ce qui est de la procédure et de l'administration, les comités examinent et adoptent plusieurs autres motions de régie interne, qui portent sur les services de la Bibliothèque du Parlement, la séance quorum, la distribution de documents, les repas de travail et ainsi de suite. Une liste complète des motions de régie interne adoptées par le comité permanent au cours de la dernière session a été distribuée aux membres du Comité. Ces motions sont présentées sous forme de colonnes bilingues.

Si les députés souhaitent proposer ces motions de régie interne ou en discuter, c'est habituellement ainsi que le Comité procède. Pour ce qui est du travail de fond du Comité, je propose d'attendre que le Comité ait pris une décision concernant le recours aux services de la Bibliothèque du Parlement.

Le président:

Je devrais également signaler que les régies de motion interne que le Comité a adoptées au cours de la législature précédente sont plutôt pour la forme. La grande majorité des comités adoptent habituellement les mêmes. À titre d'exemple, en ce qui a trait au « Service d'analystes », la motion est la suivante: Que le Comité retienne les services d'un ou de plusieurs analystes de la Bibliothèque du Parlement pour l'aider dans ses travaux.

C'est évidemment très nécessaire.

Nous avons déjà réglé certaines choses, dont le temps alloué pour les allocutions d'ouverture et l'interrogation des témoins, les repas de travail, la séance quorum et ainsi de suite. Il est inutile que je lise la liste au complet étant donné que vous l'avez sous les yeux.

(1550)

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Nous pouvons examiner et présenter une motion à la fois. De cette façon, cela figurera au compte rendu pour qu'il n'y ait aucune confusion.

Le président:

Nous pouvons procéder ainsi si vous le voulez. Nous pouvons les rassembler. Pourquoi alors ne pas commencer par le début, avec le « Service d'analystes »?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

J'en fais la proposition.

Le président:

Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Des analystes sont présents dans la salle. Je les invite à venir s'asseoir avec nous au bout de la table.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Monsieur le président, pour donner suite à votre proposition, voulez-vous que nous présentions une motion d'ensemble?

Le président:

C'est à cela que j'ai fait allusion plus tôt.

La seule chose que j'aimerais dire à tous les députés — et le greffier en a parlé encore une fois — concerne le troisième point: « Témoins appartenant à une même organisation ». Apparemment, notre Comité est le seul à avoir adopté cette motion de régie interne.

La présidence a le pouvoir de décider de certains aspects du contenu de cette motion. Donc, ce que j'aimerais peut-être faire, étant donné que c'est une motion de régie interne qui date de la législature précédente, c'est de passer au cinquième point, « Séance quorum », et de poursuivre jusqu'au dernier, « Avis de motions ». Nous pourrions ensuite revenir à « Témoins appartenant à une même organisation », puisqu'elle est unique. Cela convient-il aux membres du Comité?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Oui.

Le président:

Nous sommes rendus à « Séance quorum ».

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je propose la motion.

Le président: Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Le prochain point est « Distribution des documents ».

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je propose la motion.

Le président: Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Le numéro sept est « Repas de travail ».

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je propose la motion.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Yasmin Ratansi: Ils ne réveillent pas; je dois donc la proposer.

Le président:

Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il y a ensuite « Frais de déplacement et de séjour des témoins ».

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je propose la motion.

Le président:

Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Le prochain point est « Accès aux séances à huis clos ».

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je propose la motion.

Le président:

Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il y a ensuite « Transcriptions des séances à huis clos ».

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je propose la motion.

Le président: Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Pour terminer, nous avons « Avis de motions ».

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je propose la motion.

Le président: Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous pouvons maintenant revenir rapidement à « Témoins appartenant à une même organisation ».

Madame Ratansi, puis-je vous demander de faire des observations, car notre Comité est apparemment le seul à avoir adopté cette motion de régie interne. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi il pensait qu'il serait utile de l'adopter, si vous vous en souvenez?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Monsieur le président, je n'étais pas ici de 2011 à 2014, et je ne suis donc pas certaine de savoir quel comité l'a adoptée. Était-ce en 2011?

Le président:

C'était pendant la dernière session.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Cela veut dire que je n'étais pas ici.

Le président:

Nous pouvons l'examiner rapidement.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Oui, un analyste ou quelqu'un d'autre peut peut-être faire la lumière là-dessus. Nous avions l'habitude de regrouper tout le monde, et je ne sais donc pas ce qu'il en est.

Le président:

Oui, je ne suis pas certain. Honnêtement, je n'arrive pas à comprendre en quoi c'est pertinent ni pourquoi le Comité l'a adoptée au cours de la dernière session. En toute honnêteté, je ne pense pas que nous ayons de renseignements institutionnels à ce sujet.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

À défaut d'en avoir, pouvons-nous la supprimer?

Le président:

C'est probablement ce que nous devrions faire.

Si nous ne l'adoptons pas maintenant, elle ne fera pas partie des motions de régie interne. Toutefois, à l'avenir, le Comité peut toujours revoir des motions de régie interne au moment qui lui convient. Nous pouvons tout simplement l'ignorer et passer à autre chose, comme le font les autres comités permanents. S'il s'avère nécessaire de l'adopter à un moment donné, le Comité peut certainement en faire la recommandation. Nous pourrons alors en discuter et la mettre aux voix.

(1555)

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je suis d'accord avec vous, car je ne vois pas l'utilité d'une telle motion.

Le président:

Oui. Honnêtement, je ne la comprends pas. À moins que quelqu'un voie une raison...

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Y a-t-il des renseignements à ce sujet?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Rien? Quelqu'un sait-il pourquoi elle est là?

Le président:

Personne ici.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Êtes-vous sérieux?

Le président:

Sérieusement...

Une voix: Elle ne sera donc pas nécessaire.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Monsieur le président, je l'ai relue. Elle plongera le Comité dans une grande confusion. Il vaut donc mieux la supprimer.

Le président:

Que tous ceux qui sont pour se manifestent.

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Étant donné que nous avons maintenant un Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure, je propose que ses membres se rencontrent à la première occasion. Ils pourraient peut-être aussi inviter les analystes s'ils peuvent présenter d'autres renseignements de la dernière législature au sujet d'études en cours. Si c'est le cas, la présidence convoquera alors toutes les parties concernées à une séance du Sous-comité, en particulier les représentants du gouvernement et M. Weir. Espérons que nous pourrons tenir une séance dans un jour.

Nous avons une séance prévue jeudi. C'est le moment où nous nous rencontrons habituellement, mais, d'ici là, étant donné que nous avons un ordre du jour, la présidence se chargera de convoquer les députés. Cela convient-il aux membres du Comité?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Bien. Comme il n'y a aucun autre point à aborder, la séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard oggo 6415 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on February 16, 2016

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.