header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-03-08 OGGO 4

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1550)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen.

This will be the fourth meeting of government operations and estimates.

Before we hear from our witnesses, I have some business for the committee and I'd like to have some consensus on this, if possible.

The next two afternoons and evenings we will have ministers appearing before the committee. We have a request to make these appearances televised, and I would ask the committee if they would give their concurrence to allowing the meeting tomorrow evening and the meeting on Thursday afternoon to be televised.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

Yes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

Who is specifically requesting they be televised?

The Chair:

Broadcasting.

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you.

We have witnesses before us. The difficulty we have today is that because of votes we are running a little late. Normally we have 10-minute opening statements per witness. I have consulted with some of our committee members, and the consensus seems to be that we would like to have as much time as possible for questions, so I would ask both of our presenters to try to keep their comments to no more than 10 minutes a piece to allow enough time for the committee members to ask questions. Any unpresented information can be read into the record a little later.

With that, perhaps we can start with Madam Doucet. Would you mind introducing yourself, the officials you have with you, and your statement following that, please.

Ms. Michelle Doucet (Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services, Privy Council Office):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee. My name is Michelle Doucet and I am the assistant deputy minister of corporate services at the Privy Council Office. I'm here today with Madam Karen Cahill, who is the deputy chief financial officer and the executive director of the finance planning and administrative directorate at PCO. We're delighted to be here. We look forward to answering your questions.

I'm going to begin my remarks with some context by briefly explaining the mandate of PCO and its three principal roles. The mandate of the Privy Council Office is to serve Canada and Canadians by providing professional, non-partisan advice and support to the Prime Minister, the ministers within the Prime Minister's portfolio and cabinet. The Prime Minister is responsible for this organization.

PCO supports the development of the Government of Canada's policy, legislative, and government administration agendas, coordinates responses to issues facing the government and the country, and supports the effective operation of cabinet. PCO is led by the Clerk of the Privy Council. In addition to serving as the deputy head for PCO, the clerk also acts as secretary to cabinet and the head of the public service.

PCO has three main roles.

First, we provide non-partisan advice to the Prime Minister, portfolio ministers, cabinet and cabinet committees on matters of national and international importance. This includes providing advice and support on the full spectrum of policy, legislative, and government administration issues faced by the government.

Second, PCO is the secretariat to cabinet and all of its committees, except the Treasury Board, which is supported by the Treasury Board Secretariat.

Third, PCO fosters a high-performing and accountable public service.

We deliver all three roles to our people who provide advice, coordination, and support. Unlike many other departments, PCO doesn't deliver programs. We spend the funds that Parliament appropriates to us on salaries, operating costs, and services received from other government departments. As such, PCO is governed by the same financial and administrative requirements under which all departments operate.

I would also add that, like the Department of Finance and the Treasury Board Secretariat, PCO is something called the central agency, and as such, has the central coordinating role across the government to provide advice to the Prime Minister and cabinet and to ensure policy coherence and coordination on their behalf.

Now I'd like to give you some details on PCO's supplementary estimates (C) for the current fiscal year. In these supplementary estimates, PCO is seeking $4.2 million for the following items: $1.6 million to both complete the work related to the coordination of a government-wide communications approach for Canada's economic action plan under the former government and to begin to modernize the Prime Minister's digital presence.

Of that amount, $1 million is for the operation of what was the communications component of the economic action plan, which ended following the 2015 election. The EAP funding would support a team of five public servants within PCO. The focus of their work since the election has been on properly archiving the appropriate records, both digital and analog, and on closing out the EAP. As well, this team continues to provide support to the communication of government priorities.

The second portion of that funding is $0.6 million, and that's for activities relating to support of the Prime Minister's official web presence. The Privy Council Office provides support for the maintenance of the Prime Minister's Government of Canada website as well as all publishing to that site, and to the Prime Minister's Government of Canada's social media accounts.

The requirements for the site and those accounts have grown and become more complex with steady increases in volume and new features such as video, richer digital content, live streaming, and enhanced social media. These represent an additional pressure for PCO's web operations and associated IT support. The funds will be directed to meeting these requirements in support of the Prime Minister's web presence. [Translation]

PCO is seeking $1 million for activities related to the continued implementation of Canada's Migrant Smuggling Prevention Strategy. The Special Advisor on Human Smuggling and Illegal Migration took office in September 2010 and was charged with coordinating the Government of Canada's response to mass marine human smuggling ventures targeting Canada. Canada has implemented a whole-of-government strategy to prevent the further arrival of human smuggling vessels.

This is a priority national security file. Budget 2015 approved funding in the amount of $44.5 million over three years to continue Canada's coordinated efforts to identify and respond to such threats. Reporting to the National Security Advisor, the Special Advisor's mandate consists in the coordination of the Government of Canada's response to marine migrant smuggling. This includes working with key domestic partners to coordinate Canada's strategy, working with key international partners to promote cooperation, and advancing Canada's engagement with governments in transit countries and in regional and international fora.

PCO is also requesting $0.8 million for activities related to the continuation and advancement of the Border Implementation Team in support of the Beyond the Border Action Plan. By way of background, in February 2011, Canada and the U.S. issued a Declaration on a Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness. The declaration established a new long-term partnership accelerating the legitimate flow of people and goods between both countries, while strengthening security and economic competitiveness.

It focused on four areas of cooperation: addressing threats early; trade facilitation, economic growth and jobs; integrated cross-border law enforcement; and critical infrastructure and cybersecurity. This led to the announcement of the Beyond The Border Action Plan in December 2011. Consequently, concrete benefits have begun to accrue to industry and travellers through an increasingly efficient, modernized and secure border. Continued central coordination and oversight of Border Action Plan implementation has been important for ensuring its success.

PCO is seeking $0.2 million to support the creation of a new non-partisan, merit-based Senate appointment process. In December 2015, the government announced the establishment of a new, non-partisan, merit-based process to advise on Senate appointments. Under the new process, an Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments was established on January 19, 2016, to provide advice to the Prime Minister on candidates for the Senate.

The Independent Advisory Board is guided by public, merit-based criteria, in order to identify Canadians who would make a significant contribution to the work of the Senate. The criteria will help ensure a high standard of integrity, collaboration, and non-partisanship in the Senate. The government is moving quickly to reform this Senate and the new appointments process will be implemented in two phases.

In the first phase which is transitional, five appointments will be made to improve the representation of the provinces with the most vacancies, i.e., Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. The second phase will implement a permanent process to replenish the remaining vacancies, and will include an application process open to all Canadians.

The funding for PCO allows it to support the operations of the Independent Advisory Board and its secretariat in its work during the first transitional phase to provide advice and recommendations to the Prime Minister for his consideration.

In addition, PCO's statutory forecast increases by $0.1 million for the salary and motor car allowance for the Minister of Democratic Institutions.

(1555)



Following the election, the Honourable Maryam Monsef was appointed to the position of Minister of Democratic Institutions. To reflect the addition of this full ministerial position that includes both the salary and motor car allowance, a new item was included under PCO's statutory forecasts.[English]

This completes the explanation—

The Chair:

Madam Doucet, thank you very much. We're at just over 10 minutes now. I know you have yet to go into the departmental performance report, but if we could, I'd like to move on to the Public Service Commission for their presentation. We will make sure the rest of your presentation enters the record.

(1600)

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Madam Donoghue.

Ms. Christine Donoghue (Acting President, Public Service Commission):

Mr. Chair, honourable members, thank you.

I am pleased to introduce Omer Boudreau who is our corporate management vice-president at the commission.

We are pleased to be here today to discuss the Public Service Commission's departmental performance report for 2014-15 and supplementary estimates.[Translation]

The mandate of the Public Service Commission is to promote and safeguard merit-based appointments, and in collaboration with other stakeholders, to protect the non-partisan nature of the public service. While the Public Service Employment Act gives appointment authority to the PSC, the legislation also calls for this authority to be delegated to deputy heads.

In a decentralized system based on the delegation of authorities, the commission fulfils its mandate by providing policy guidance and expertise, conducting effective oversight, and delivering innovative staffing and assessment services. We also work with departments and agencies to promote a non-partisan federal public service that reflects Canada's diversity and draws on talents and skills from across the country.[English]

We report independently to Parliament on the overall integrity of the staffing system and non-partisanship of the public service. To that end, our 2014-15 annual report, which I notice is in front of you, was tabled in Parliament on February 23. We would be pleased to be back in front this committee to discuss it, should the committee wish us to do so.

Today, I will be focusing my remarks on three areas. First, I would like to highlight some of the key achievements found in our departmental performance report 2014-15. Second, I would like to speak to some of the areas of our supplementary estimates (C). Third, I would like to conclude by providing you with an update of the efforts that we're making to modernize our approach to staffing.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, a non-partisan public service is one in which appointments are based on merit and are free from political influence and where employees not only perform their duties in a politically impartial manner, but are also seen to do so. As part of our responsibilities, we communicate with public servants about the value of non-partisanship and remind them of their rights as well as their legal responsibilities with respect to political activities.

Any public servant who is interested in becoming a political candidate in a municipal, provincial, territorial or federal election must first obtain the permission of the commission, following its review. We approve these requests if the employee's ability to perform their duties in a politically impartial manner will not be impaired or be perceived as being impaired. In making this decision, we consider factors such as the nature of the election, the nature of the employee's duties in the organizational context, and the level and visibility of the employee's position. Approvals are often subject to conditions such as taking a leave without pay in order to seek nomination to be a candidate.[English]

I'd like to turn to the staffing system which accounts for the majority of our activities and resources. We provide guidance, tools, and support services to enable hiring managers and human resource advisers to staff effectively while meeting the intent of the Public Service Employment Act.

We also administer programs that recruit qualified Canadians from across the country. This involves extensive outreach and increased collaboration with departments and agencies, such as participating in career fairs and information sessions with academic institutions across the country. For example, over 39,000 applications were submitted under the fall federal student work experience campaign and over 6,500 students were hired.

We work closely with partners, including the office of the chief human resources officer, to create pools of qualified candidates that are available to federal organizations across the country. This collaboration helps to reduce duplication of efforts across the public service.[Translation]

We continue to expand our use of new technology. Online testing now accounts for 72% of all the tests administered by the PSC. More than 92% of the PSC's second language tests were completed online. Unsupervised online testing continued to increase, representing nearly 42,000 tests in 2014-2015.

(1605)



These tests allow applicants to take a test at a location of their choosing and to have greater access to public service jobs no matter where they live. This testing also helps to reduce barriers for persons with disabilities by allowing them to take exams from home using their own adaptive technologies.[English]

Our most important platform for recruitment is our site called jobs.gc.ca. In April 2015, the system provided Canadians with a single portal to access public service jobs. Nearly 8,800 internal and external job advertisements were posted, resulting in over 530,000 applications.

We continue to look for ways to further modernize the system and support in order to improve the user experience. This is a good segue to the funds that are in supplementary estimates (C), as departments and agencies contribute to the cost of operating this platform, which explains the transfer you see in the estimates.

This consolidated system also provides the foundation to support the implementation of the Veterans Hiring Act . On July 1 last year, the legislation came into force providing medically released veterans and members of the Canadian Armed Forces greater access to public service jobs.

We provided training and new tools to raise awareness of the skills and competencies that veterans have to offer to the public service. We ourselves at the commission have hired two veterans to serve as navigators in guiding their colleagues through the priority entitlements and staffing system. To date, more than 94 veterans have been hired, including 15 under the new statutory entitlement which gives the highest priority to veterans who have been released for medical reasons attributable to service.[Translation]

As part of our efforts to continuously improve our system, I would like to speak about changes that will come into effect on April 1 to simplify the staffing process. These changes build on the reforms introduced and our experience gained since 2005, with the goal of modernizing while ensuring the overall health of the staffing system.

Based on our observations over the past 10 years, we believe the staffing system has matured, along with the human resources capacity in departments and agencies. As such, we are streamlining our policies to remove duplication, going from 12 policies to one.

This single policy will more clearly articulate expectations for deputy heads and reinforce their discretion and accountability. As a result of these changes, departments and agencies will have greater scope to customize their staffing based on their operational realities and needs. Hiring managers will also have more room to exercise their judgment in their staffing decisions, and will also be accountable for their decisions.[English]

Mr. Chair, this context in which the public service operates is constantly evolving. Departments and agencies need to be able to respond effectively to ensure that they attract the right people with the right skills at the right time.

To that end, the commission will focus on integrating its guidance and support to respond to the unique needs of organizations, while also promoting best practices across the system. We will be reducing the reporting burden, in line with the recommendations of the Auditor General's report of 2015. Deputy heads will remain accountable to the Public Service Commission for the way in which they exercise their discretion, and we will continue to oversee the integrity of the staffing system through audits and investigations.

However, we will be adjusting our oversight activities to be more nimble in order to support continuous improvement. For instance, audits will shift from reviewing individual organizations to taking a system-wide approach with a focus on areas that need attention.

(1610)



Mr. Chair, for more than 100 years, the Public Service Commission has been entrusted by Parliament with the mandate of safeguarding merit and non-partisanship in the public service. We will continue to foster strong collaborative relationships with parliamentarians, deputy heads, bargaining agents, and other stakeholders so that Canadians continue to have confidence in their non-partisan and professional public service and to benefit from the skills and competencies to deliver results.

We'd be pleased to take questions at this point. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Madam Doucet and Madam Donoghue.

We'll go now to the seven-minute round and Madam Ratansi.

I'll remind all members that the time allowed for questions includes questions and answers.

Madam Ratansi, please.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Thank you. I'll be quite quick with my questions.

Madam Donoghue, my question is for you.

The Public Service Commission of Canada is asking, under vote 1c, to transfer a total of $504,000 from Parks Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency for the public service resource systems. I guess that is a recruitment system that you have.

Is this mandatory for the agencies to do?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

The system that we entertain is mandatory in fact for all departments that are subject to the Public Service Employment Act. When we come to Parks Canada and the CFIA, these organizations are not subject to the PSEA, the Public Service Employment Act. That is why they are paying for the services. They have chosen to use the services that we offer.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

You presented the view that with the aging population, with retirement, the challenges that the Public Service Commission faces across government.... How have you been able to meet the challenges of a very diverse population and reflect that diversity in your hiring practices?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

As the public service is responsible for the implementation of the Public Service Employment Act, we also have a responsibility for employment equity that is shared with diverse partners within the system. We have basically, through policy and through the use of legislation, been able to indicate that there is a possibility to advertise positions, with targeted intent, towards employment equity diversity groups. That in itself has allowed for easier access of diverse groups into public service jobs.

The other thing we do is conduct studies to look at what is happening within those communities, what their workforce availability is, and whether or not we are getting the right number of applicants and whether the jobs are being offered to the employment equity groups.

We have studies that will be coming out soon, in 2016, that will demonstrate some of the results we have. We have seen some increase in certain communities, but we recognize that there is still some more work to be done. We also do a lot of outreach to create more awareness and to inform departments as to how they can more easily get people on board from the employment equity groups.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

This gives rise to two questions, then. How accessible is your system? How easy is it for people who wish to apply but may have linguistic skill problems? I guess it is bilingual. That is number one. Number two is, how easy is it to access, and what monitoring mechanisms do you have in place to ensure that the PSC is successful?

I was looking at the audit reports and some of the observations, and the audit recommends that the monitoring has to be done and be more stringent. You're an umbrella for a lot of these agencies, so could you give me some idea as to the ease of access to that system and the monitoring and how you gauge success?

(1615)

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

The ease of access was facilitated through the fact that we integrated a single window. That basically made it very clear. Having a single window that Canadians can all go through to see what jobs are available in the public service is definitely a benefit.

Now, we are actually in the process of reviewing, once you know where the single window is, how easy it is to actually enter into the system. We recognize at this point in time that it could be a better user experience. As I was saying, we are looking at better ways of improving that system which was put in place in 2015, but we are also looking at what it would mean to actually do the system from the user perspective, as distinct from the government perspective.

We're looking at continuous improvement, facilitating easier language, trying to get rid of a lot of the very bureaucratic language, and seeing whether we can do a system that would, by the criteria the potential candidates could put in, more easily direct them towards jobs that would be suitable for their skill sets.

The system works well. Every department is using it. As well, we're asking departments to monitor a lot more the activities they have within that system. But we always recognize that it should be a bit more user-friendly, and we're going to be testing that in the months to come.

One thing we've also done is we've streamlined a lot of our policy requirements. We were an extremely rules-based system. As of April 1 we're really going back to the basic intent of the legislation, which was very clear and gave a lot of flexibility. One thing we're going to do is adapt that system so that it removes any extra information that is no longer required on the basis of policy.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

How many minutes do I have?

The Chair:

It's about 45 seconds.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

If you can, answer this for the second round: how do you measure your success? What is the measuring mechanism you use to show that we have hired the diverse population, whether it's the disabled, visible minorities, etc.?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Our system allows us to do a compilation of a lot of data. It allows us to actually measure through the data. This is data that I could provide to the committee to demonstrate exactly how we can use it and what the data is showing us. Then, we share it with all the deputy heads. Also, in conjunction with the human resources office, we try to encourage different approaches.

This is information that I could provide more specifically to the committee, which would outline much more detail.

The Chair:

Thank you. I request that you do that, Madam Donoghue.

Mr. McCauley, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

Thanks for the questions, Ms. Ratansi.

You note that on July 1, the Veterans Hiring Act came into force, and since then 94 veterans in total have been hired. What percentage is that of new hires, and how many have actually been hired by Veterans Affairs?

A voice: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Kelly McCauley: Is it 15? Was that 15 of those released who were hired under this special act, or is it 94 in total—it just happened to be that—and 15 under the statutory entitlement?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Omer, do you have the specific numbers here?

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

That is fine. I realize they're very specific.

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

In fact, 11 of the 15 were hired by DND. DND is probably one of the departments that rehire the most veterans or CAF-released members. Just as a reminder, some members are released because they were injured during the course of their tenure, and some are released for other medical reasons that are not related to service. There is a different level of priority.

We have two who were hired at Health Canada. As I indicated, we at the commission have as well hired some veterans to help manage the system. We know that there's continuous improvement as well.

One thing we know is that we've referred a lot more veterans, but not all veterans who have registered are necessarily without employment at this point in time. Some of them are employed but can benefit by being on the priority system and being able to look at whether or not their situation can be improved by entering into the public service. Thus, although many them have been referred, some of them choose to not follow the reference but still remain eligible for the system.

We're hopeful, as we continue to grow the communication and the outreach department and as we're able to demonstrate the positive experience and the number of skill sets these veterans and CAF-released members have, that more and more departments will start engaging in the hiring of veterans.

(1620)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Yes. I understand they have a very sought-after skill set for leadership. I realize you may not have the number, so please get back to me, for Veterans Affairs, on how many were hired.

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Yes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Out of this 94, can you provide as well what percentage of new hires that actually is, and how many veterans, please, have actually applied for that?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Yes.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

You note a new car allowance for the Minister of Democratic Institutions due to the elevation from, I assume, minister of state to a full minister.

Were there any other examples of ministers of state receiving a car allowance because of an elevation or any other reasons?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I'm going to ask Ms. Cahill to answer that question. She will talk about the Privy Council Office, and then perhaps a broader application.

Ms. Karen Cahill (Deputy Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services, Privy Council Office):

Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair.

For ministers of state, the Parliament of Canada Act planned for a $2,000 motor car allowance. In previous years, PCO, the Privy Council Office, had ministers of state where we allocated and added into our estimates the $2,000 amount.

Of course, with the election, Minister Monsef is a full minister, so that's why we have added the statutory item to our supplementary estimates (C).

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I probably didn't ask the question properly. Were there any other ministers of state elevated to full minister who are receiving the added $80,000 car allowances, like that one?

Ms. Karen Cahill:

Not for PCO.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Certainly across the government there was, and I think that is your question.

Those other ministers would include ministers Qualtrough, Duncan, Hajdu, and Chagger.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

You mentioned, and several times there was mention about ensuring non-partisanship of the public service. Obviously, everyone has to work toward that.

We have seen some examples not only with a huge amount of spending by public service unions in the last election as registered by Elections Canada, but we saw an incident where the Prime Minister went into the foreign affairs building and the public service was surrounding him, all cheering, etc. A huge crowd came out.

What are you doing to ensure non-partisanship of the public service? I realize you mentioned you send out memos, you discuss with them, but what are you doing to ensure non-partisanship within the public service?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

There is part 7 of the legislation that we administer, which is very clearly dedicated to political activities and candidacy.

Over and above all of this, we are doing a lot of work with Treasury Board in the context of values and ethics. There's a very fine line when it comes to values and ethics, and also partisan activities per se.

When these things happen, we do a lot of work within the system to actually analyze what constitutes a political activity, and whether or not there's somebody who has been seen as not being able to continue to exercise their duties.

That's where the difference lies. When there's a group activity, there are a lot of things that are related to the values and ethics aspect, which basically falls within the scope of the deputy head to continue to brief and to educate the staff.

We do that as well. What we've done is gone back, and working directly with PCO have looked at continuing to inform public servants of the duty they have to act in a non-partisan manner.

When we have egregious cases, or when there are obvious...or we can identify individuals, we do have the possibility of conducting investigations to see whether or not there has been an issue of conduct and take the corrective measures that are necessary at that point.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. McCauley, I think I'll cut you off there. We only have about 10 seconds left.

Mr. Weir, for seven minutes, please.

(1625)

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

Thanks very much.

I have a question for the Privy Council Office. You're seeking $1.6 million for the communication strategy around the economic action plan as well as to modernize the Prime Minister's digital presence.

Could you provide any kind of breakdown of the money between those two initiatives?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I'm happy to do that. Let me divide it into two categories.

As I said in my opening remarks, we are asking for $1 million to complete the work under the economic action plan, which of course concluded following the election in October. That was a stand-alone website that was supported by a team of...how many FTEs, Karen? Remind me.

Ms. Karen Cahill:

For the EAP?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes.

Ms. Karen Cahill:

It was four FTEs.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

That's what I thought.

FTE means a public servant. There were four folks who were involved in the public service in supporting that work and led I believe by a director. As I also said, that work wound down after the election and they have been retasked to support the priorities of the current government and the Prime Minister.

Then there is a piece costing $600,000, which is in support of the Prime Minister's digital presence. The Prime Minister has a Government of Canada website and other social media accounts. That's what that money is for. It operates 24-7, 365 days a year. The money will be used to hire two additional people to work on it in communications. It will be used to acquire licences, and hire a contractor to assist us in things such as live streaming and more cutting-edge technology support. We have also contributed, over the last year and a half, approximately $1 million of our own money in addition to what we're asking for today.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I'm wondering if you could tell us a bit about what this modernized digital presence will look like. How would the success of that initiative be judged?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question. It's a good question.

Most of us increasingly live our lives through technology and on the Internet. Government has to work hard at staying relevant and being able to connect to Canadians. Technology evolves far more rapidly than we could ever keep up.

One of the pieces the Government of Canada has had to get its head around, especially in the last five or six years, is how we harness what we used to call web 2.0 technology and social media, and imbed that in the Government of Canada context. It's different in the public sector. We have obligations that reflect our values and ethics, like official languages and accessibility. If you have a handicap, say you can't see or hear, we need to make sure that as the Government of Canada that is accessible. Security matters and privacy are important considerations.

As we build the digital presence, we work within that operating framework, in that we're trying to satisfy Canadians' thirst for information and for knowledge. In the past it used to be that a lot was print media, but now they want to see it. Sometimes they want videos. Some people get all of their news via Twitter. I'm not a Twitter person, but I can assure you that many of my colleagues are Twitter people. My children live on YouTube. They will often report to me what they hear about what the government has done because they're watching YouTube.

The challenge for us is how to have a Government of Canada display on YouTube, on Twitter, or on Facebook in a way that respects the values and ethics of the Government of Canada.

Mr. Erin Weir:

It strikes me that the Prime Minister has a fairly active presence on Twitter as it stands right now. The previous prime minister had a whole online TV channel devoted to covering his activities. You alluded to that. I guess I'm wondering what's new in this modernization of the digital presence. Is it simply more videos and more pictures? I'm asking for as much specificity as possible.

(1630)

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I think that's a good question.

As you know, Prime Minister Trudeau has been the Prime Minister since November 4, and he is in the process of developing how he would want to communicate through the Government of Canada website. He had, prior to becoming the Prime Minister, his own social media and website tools for political purposes, but those are not part of what we do at PCO. The money we're seeking is not for that. It is for building the Government of Canada capability.

We're a bit behind in that regard, and this is to help us begin to catch up. Let me give you an example of beginning to catch up.

In this case I'll speak to the previous prime minister. We were asked, I think it was in September 2014, if we had the capacity to live stream an event for Prime Minister Harper. We did not have that imbedded in the department, but we recognized it was an important Government of Canada event and nothing to do with partisan politics. We recognized that we needed to be able to provide that service to the then prime minister and to any other prime minister who would be in office. That's what we're starting to do, and we are a bit behind.

The Chair:

We're at the seven minutes.

We have Mr. Graham for the final seven-minute round.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

My question is for Ms. Donoghue.

There's an investigation sub-activity that conducts investigations, and I'm reading directly, “into allegations of improper political activities by public servants to ensure the respect of the principle of non-partisanship.” Fair enough. According to the department's performance report, only 66% of investigations were completed in the 215-day standard, out of a target of 80%.

I have a number of questions. I'll ask a couple of them quickly.

How many actual investigations does that cover, and why did it take 215 days to investigate them?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

I'll ask my colleague, Omer, to respond.

Mr. Omer Boudreau (Vice-President, Corporate Management Branch, Public Service Commission):

There are a number of reasons that it took so long. We were getting investigation requests and, while working through that, realized that our processes could be better, so we made a commitment to streamline the process for investigation. Over the last few years, we've brought down the time it takes to carry out an investigation significantly, something in the order of 20% since 2014-15. We're now looking at undertaking some process, a re-engineering exercise, lean management, for example, to continue to do that. It's an ongoing process, but we're slowly working on it to reduce the amount of time that it takes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many investigations does that actually represent in real numbers? If it's 66% versus 80%, is it two out of three versus four out of five, or is there actually a large number of people we're dealing with here?

Mr. Omer Boudreau:

In the year that we're reporting on, we had 82 cases that were investigated.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Out of how many people?

Mr. Omer Boudreau:

How many people?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Was it 82 investigations of different people or was some person investigated 40 times?

Mr. Omer Boudreau:

No, those were 82 distinct cases that were investigated, so 82 different complaints.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see, okay.

Has the PSC noticed a change in the number of issues related to staffing and improper political activities in the past five years? To go back farther, is there a trend line that we can see?

Mr. Omer Boudreau:

There is a trend that we can observe. We have seen an increase in the number of cases of fraud allegations. Now, when we talk about fraud in the context of the Public Service Employment Act, it's not necessarily always the same as a criminal fraud case. We're talking about instances where someone might have falsified documents, misrepresented themselves in one way or another, cheated on exams, for example, that type of thing. We have seen an increase in the number of complaints and resulting investigations in the area that we call fraud, which I've just described.

We are seeing fewer investigations in cases of error, omissions, or improper conduct. We believe that's because the public service, the department deputies, and so on, are getting increasingly mature in their approach to staffing in the public service. The act changed in 2005. After that, there was a bit of a learning period. We're seeing fewer cases where there are allegations of error, omissions, or improper conduct.

(1635)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you look forward five years from now, where are you headed in terms of the number of investigations, how long they would take, and what your realistic target would be?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

We had an external panel who came in and did a review of some of the processes with us to see where we could increase our capacity or better our processes. Right now we are in the process of reviewing those. We are doing a lot of process mapping to see where we could improve our procedures.

The other aspect is we're doing a lot more outreach to departments to make them understand, and a lot more education about what constitutes fraud. We demonstrate what best practices departments should use to avoid fraudulent behaviour in the context of staffing. That in itself has proven to be of benefit. We are doing a lot more outreach when it comes to prevention in the context of the system.

We are going to continue to look at different procedures that can be used to shorten.... Not everything has to be done through a full-fledged investigation. For instance, in the past, if somebody were to admit to a fault committed, an investigation was the standard way. Now we have shorter processes when we have people who admit to having committed fraud, for instance. We are taking more diverse measures.

The important thing is that when we operate in the context of investigation, we fully recognize the importance of balance and the rights of all individuals to be heard and to be able to give their cases. We are looking for judicial fairness in the context of the processes we use. Sometimes these investigations are harder and more complex, and involve more people, and sometimes it's a one-on-one situation. Others involve a number of candidates in a broader process, which takes more time.

It varies because it is not necessarily a one-size-fits-all type of process, but at the same time, when you look at the number of appointments that happen within the public service in general, the number of investigations is minimal, which means that the system is actually doing very well and is very healthy. The investigations are still there to allow us to ensure that we are dealing with the most egregious cases.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For the 34% that take longer than seven and a half months, how long can they drag on for?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

We have some investigations that take a few weeks, as we have investigations that are more complex in nature and require a lot more witnesses to be interviewed or heard, and we also have to respect their availability. We've had cases of investigations that have gone on for over 18 months. Right now, we are really working to see how we can better our processes. For instance, we have done a lot more paper investigations, but we are constantly looking at best practices and learning from other departments that have investigative powers to see what they have done to streamline their process.

The Chair:

We'll have to cut it off there.

Now we are going into a five-minute round, but I should inform all committee members that, because our witnesses are here for the full two hours, after we go through the first rotation of seven, five, and three, we'll go back to seven-minute rounds, so those of you who have follow-up questions should have plenty of time to get them in.

We'll start the five-minute rounds with Monsieur Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I thank the witnesses from the Public Service Commission and the Privy Council.

My first question is addressed to Ms. Donoghue, who is the Acting President of the Public Service Commission.

In your report, we see the impact of our budget plan between 2011 and 2015 on the total number of public servants. It went from 216,000 to 195,000.

I note that the highest number of people hired last year were in the national capital region. Have you established a mechanism to ensure that there is a balance between the number of public servants in the national capital region and in the other regions? Is there a mechanism to ensure that there is a balance in the number of public servants in the regions, so as to avoid having a large concentration in the national capital region? Could you give us your comments in this regard?

(1640)

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Basically, the staffing mechanisms and decisions, as well as where positions will be staffed, are not the commission's responsibility. These decisions are made by the deputy heads of organizations. However, we monitor the situation to see where staffing takes place, which allows us to provide that information to deputy heads so that they are aware of activities throughout the system.

The data does indeed show that there has been a decrease in the size of the public service as of 2011. Even if staffing activities have begun again, the size of the public service has remained the same as at that time. Staffing has begun again, but its purpose is to fill positions that became vacant in the normal way. So the size of the public service does not increase. When you see an increase in the activity, it gives the impression that the entire public service is growing. At this time, this is a function of the planning of the deputy heads. When positions become vacant in the regions, the commission works with its regional offices to help with the recruiting and create processes to facilitate hiring in the regions.

We have done something else. We often hear it said that recruitment in the regions can be difficult. In light of the new policy aimed at ensuring a better balance and facilitating recruitment in the regions, as well as to resist the reflex of bringing positions back to Ottawa, we have made our policies more flexible to allow for exceptions in the context of a much more regional approach to staffing, under the direction of the department head.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you very much for your answer.

I'm going to move on immediately to the Privy Council representative.

Is there coordination at the Privy Council to ensure that the Canadian public service is distributed uniformly throughout Canada?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes, in a very general way.[English]

I said in my opening remarks that one of the roles of the Privy Council Office was to house Michael Wernick, who is the head of the public service, and to foster a high-performing public service.

In PCO we actually have one of our branches that is called the business transformation and renewal secretariat. Its mandate is to take a whole-of-government approach, which is to step back and see what's happening across the government, whether it be with respect to recruitment, to management mechanisms, or to compensation mechanisms.

We have a very important governance housed in that, and that is the management committee of deputy ministers, who meet on a regular basis to consider how the totality of the public service is operating. They're supported by very important departments, such as the Public Service Commission, the office of the chief human resources officer, and by other portions of the Treasury Board Secretariat. To answer your previous question, they will have a look at how many public servants we have in the regions and whether there is balance across the country. What is, to speak to Madam Ratansi's question, the balance in diversity? Are we getting the kind of talent that we need? Is there a problem in recruiting, for instance, women into the technology category, into the CS category? Does that go back into the university recruitment level? It's to dig through that.

In short, yes, but it's at what I would call a very high senior executive level.

(1645)

The Chair:

We'll have to cut you off there. We're past the five minutes.

Mr. Ayoub. [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I thank the witnesses for being here with us to answer our questions. I'm going to begin with you, Ms. Doucet.

You provided an overview of the mandate of the Privy Council Office and of the type or work you do, but could you give me a bit more information on how the internal services of your office operate? How do you function internally? [English]

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm delighted to talk about that, because as the ADM of corporate services, I am uniquely positioned to do so. As we said before, our main function at the Privy Council Office is to provide advice and support and coordination. We do that for fairly senior level decision-makers—the Prime Minister and his portfolio and the Clerk of the Privy Council.

We take an approach that we want those folks to focus on their work, on their day job, and that we support them on a corporate services basis completely. My colleague who runs the secretariat that I just discussed, the business transformation renewal secretariat, doesn't have to worry about looking after the mechanics of her human resources staffing or her budgets or any of her other corporate responsibilities, because my folks do that for her.

We have one-stop shopping in corporate services at the Privy Council Office. It includes all of the internal services that you would normally think of: finance—Karen is the head of my finance group—contracting, building facilities management, human resources, access to information and privacy, parliamentary returns for PCO. It also includes things you might not necessarily think about, such as passports and visas for people going on trips, security operations—security is really important at the Privy Council Office, and there is a workforce dedicated to doing it. In our legal services group we have lawyers, like other departments, but we also have a dedicated group that works on something called cabinet confidences. We include that in our internal services. Then finally, of course, there would be communication services and what I would call the senior level management oversight for the department, including the audit group, the audit division, and the clerk's office. [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Thank you.

I am going to put another question to Ms. Donoghue about her organization.

In your introduction you talked about the fact that a public servant who wants to run for political office must ask for permission, and this is true whether they intend to run at the federal, provincial or municipal level.

Today is International Women's Day. Since it is difficult to recruit women into the political arena, is there a plan in place to encourage them to get involved in politics? Is there something that deters them from doing so? What is the plan for employees with regard to their potential will and freedom to run for political office? How does that play out?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

First, I must say that the commission recognizes the right of Canadians, whether they are public servants or not, to participate in political activities. It recognizes that that is a fundamental right. However, we must ensure a balance to preserve another fundamental principle, that of non-partisanship in the public service.

When a public servant wants to run for office, at whatever level of government, that person must obtain the permission of the commission to do so. The reason for that is that we need to see what the impact of that initiative would be on preserving non-partisanship. It is very rare that permission is not granted. When we grant a permission, it comes with conditions that are often discussed with the employer of the potential candidate so as to define how that person will reintegrate their position if not elected. We take into consideration the nature of the position involved and its visibility.

Basically, the purpose is not to restrict the capacity of a public servant to run for office, quite the opposite. We have to make sure that if the person is not elected, he or she will be able to reintegrate their positions without adversely affecting the perception of the impartiality of the public service. Generally, when someone is elected, especially at the federal and provincial levels, the law requires that they resign from the public service because they will be accepting another full time job.

There are no particular provisions applying to different kinds of persons. Everyone is treated the same way. There is no different treatment, whether it is a man or a woman or in consideration of any other circumstance.

(1650)

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Are the rules very— [English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but we'll have to cut it off there. We're going to Mr. Weir in a three-minute round, and after that, we'll go back to a seven-minute round and there will be enough time for four more questions, if my clock is correct.

Mr. Weir, you have three minutes, so if you could, keep the questions as precise as possible.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Sure.

PCO is asking for $200,000 to set up an advisory board for Senate appointments. I wonder if you could provide some information about how much this board is going to cost going forward.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question.

Going forward, we will be seeking $1.5 million in 2016-17. Maybe I'll ask Karen to explain how that will manifest itself in the estimates process.

Ms. Karen Cahill:

Certainly. When the Senate appointments TB submission went to the Treasury Board, it was too late to add the information in our main estimates, so you will not have seen the $1.5 million for 2016-17 in the PCO's main estimates, which were tabled on February 26.

What PCO will do, in future supplementary estimates for 2016-17, is present the $1.5 million for Senate appointments. Ongoing, it will be in our main estimates.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Will that be the full cost of the advisory board?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Perhaps I will just talk about... I've just given you one year of information. Maybe I could be a bit more helpful.

The total funding that the PCO will be seeking for the next six fiscal years will be $5.4 million, and thereafter it will be $700,000 ongoing. What is this going to be used for? It's going to be used, really, for two things.

One is for the board itself, the honourable Canadians who have let their names stand to do this work. We have some permanent federal members, and then, as you know, there will be members named for every province. We are paying a fairly modest per diem to do this work, but we are paying them to do it, as well as paying their travel expenses when they need to come together to have conversations. We will, however, take advantage of technology whenever possible to keep expenses to a minimum.

There is the cost of standing up the board, which is something that you see in the $200,000 in these estimates—standing up that committee to fill the most immediate vacancies.

As I said, we're looking for money over six fiscal years, and that's based on the projection of vacancies in the Senate based on age of retirement. If you do the analysis on that, you have a kind of immediate work plan.

The second portion of the money will be used to pay for the public servants who will support this and act as a secretariat. We'll be absorbing some of that cost ourselves and have been already, but it will mean more work, because prior to this, PCO really didn't have a very big role in the appointment of senators. This is a new functionality for us, supporting the work of the committee and the technology required to support it as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I offer my apologies to the committee; I missed Mr. McCauley in the five-minute round.

I can pretend I was like Speaker Regan and say that you were heckling and so I cut you out of a question, but that just wouldn't be fair.

We'll go back to Mr. McCauley for a five-minute question-and-answer period, and then we'll get into the final seven-minute round.

Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

You mentioned $800,000 for the border implementation team to secure the border. I'm curious against what and whom you would secure the U.S. border. Do we not spend billions already on another department to secure us against invasion from the U.S.?

(1655)

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair, and I am grateful for it.

Maybe what I'll do is take a step back. I believe it was in February 2011 that Canada and the United States announced they were going to work together to establish a new long-term partnership to accelerate the legitimate flow of people and goods between both countries, while strengthening security and economic competitiveness. The plan for that was crystallized later on that year, in December 2011.

When we talk about the border, the border is a complicated place. We have people going back and forth for business and for pleasure and leisure all the time. Both governments are interested in finding ways to facilitate legitimate trade and the legitimate flow of business. Each country is driven by its own unique considerations, one of which is security.

The plan was quite a complicated one, and it involved on both sides of the border a multi-departmental approach to implementing it, including the modernization of complicated IT systems.

The work has been ongoing since late 2011. That work has been housed in Canada at the Privy Council Office because of our unique bird's-eye perspective and our ability to pull together all of the departments. It has come along well and has matured. We are seeking funding in these estimates and going over two years. We'll be in a position over the next year to synchronize the review of the work done to figure out a way forward.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you.

You have $1 million for the wind-down of Canada's economic action plan. I know it was much maligned over the years for the spending.

On what are you going to spend $1 million on winding it down when it's basically ended, and we have a commitment from the new government that there will be zero partisan advertising? Could you explain what $1 million is going to buy us when we've basically turned it off? What value do Canadians receive from this $1-million plan?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question.

The economic action plan was a one-stop shopping website where the priorities of the government were put so Canadians could go to one place to see what was going on with the government.

I've spoken about the winding down of it subsequent to the election. As you know, the election occurred in October, which meant this program operated up until the election, which is to say the first six months of the government's fiscal year. The funds would be required to support the work public servants did in accordance with the communications policy of the Government of Canada. Subsequent to that, they had to do the archiving and the winding down of it.

That is not as easy as it sounds, but it certainly wouldn't take the entire $1 million. If you pro-rate the $1 million, you can imagine that if the work were being done over the first six months of the fiscal year, you'd need half of it to support the work of the public servants working on it then.

The Chair:

Mr. McCauley, you may want to save that for the final seven-minute round as we're out of time. I'm sorry.

We'll go to the final seven-minute round and we'll start with Mr. Grewal.

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all of you for your testimony today.

My question is for Ms. Doucet.

What are the macro level challenges facing your organization in anticipating the delivery of your mandate?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question.

Mr. Chair, I suspect when I respond that my colleagues to the right will nod their heads.

Ms. Donoghue described the launch of the new website for the Public Service Commission last April. I would tell you that for folks in my position across government, probably their biggest preoccupation is technology. Technology evolves rapidly. It is a critical tool for all of us.

I talked earlier about how doing technology in government is different from doing it in the private sector, because they operate in a different value system. Candidly, the private sector folks are not necessarily going to be preoccupied with official languages and with accessibility the way the Government of Canada will be.

I'll obviously just speak for PCO, but I suspect it's similar in other departments. We have two portions in technology. One is the everyday run, making sure that the systems in which everybody does their work are up and operating, and that they are operating safely, because we're a pretty target-rich environment for cybersecurity, for the bad guys who are out there. We have to make sure we have the right kinds of firewalls that protect the folks who are working within that, but at the same time that they don't stymie their work. That's the day-to-day operations. Involved in the day-to-day operations is being able to do maintenance and patching and finding windows of opportunity when we can do that, and not disturbing the workflow.

Then, of course, the second piece is innovation. If the clerk of the public service wants to reach out to universities for post-secondary recruitment, and he wants to do Google Hangouts, if he came to me right now and said, “Michelle, I need you to make this happen for me”, I would say “Okay”. The money that we're seeking in these supplementary estimates is to begin to support us to do that.

I spoke earlier about live streaming. Right now we are supported in that by contract help. I want to be able to build the capacity within the Privy Council Office to have that embedded, to be able to respond in a nimble and agile way to Canadians who want to use technology to connect with their government.

I would say technology in being able to move in a safe but nimble way is probably my biggest preoccupation these days.

(1700)

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Does it make the government more efficient, your office more efficient with the investment in technology and innovation?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

For sure. As you know, we are the secretariat to cabinet. There's cabinet and the various cabinet committees. Ministers can't always be in Ottawa for cabinet committee meetings, and sometimes they want to call in. I've talked about the Internet, but let me talk about telecommunications. If you have a minister in another part of the world and the Prime Minister wants to speak with him or her, or there needs to be a meeting of a subcommittee on whatever topic, ministers need to be able to call in safely and securely. We have worked very hard over the last year with critical government partners such as PSPC and Shared Services Canada—a great partner—to put that in place. We are now a bit victims of our own success because now ministers are asking whether we can do secure video conferencing which requires lots of bandwidth and a different set-up altogether.

But these are the times in which we live, and in terms of creating better government, it creates more effective government.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

According to the departmental performance report, you guys did a review after the incident that occurred in Ottawa. What recommendations have you guys implemented from that review process and what specific changes, after the action review, have actually taken place?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question.

One of the things we did, which is something that we will always do to keep our security posture current, is that we worked across the government to make sure that business continuity plans were updated, streamlined, and linked to revised critical functionality. October 22 was a wake-up call in that regard.

At PCO we built our emergency response plans. We rebuilt them, and we reviewed them and the communications protocols. Awareness and training were enhanced. When an alarm went off a couple of weeks ago, the first question I asked myself was, “What is this? Is this a fire, or is this an earthquake, or is this a shooter?”

I wouldn't have thought to do that on October 22, but now as a result of that training, you have a different security protocol. In the event of an earthquake how you behave is different from how you behave in the event of a shooter. It's important to have education and awareness on that.

From a communications perspective, PCO has clarified its information exchange processes with other emergency response providers in making sure we're linked with the public safety operation centre and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. Treasury Board Secretariat is the employer of the public service and has an important role in any events like that.

We made physical improvements, but security considerations preclude me from going into the details on those. Some of them are perhaps evident and some less evident.

I think I'll stop at that.

(1705)

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're just about out of time. Perhaps one of your colleagues can follow up with a question if you have one.

Monsieur Blaney, for seven minutes.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.

I want to say that I support the $1 million for activities and for implementation of the strategy to prevent the further arrival of human smuggling vessels. I think it is well managed, and the special adviser is doing a fantastic job.[Translation]

I'd like to go back to the question raised by Mr. Ayoub concerning the Public Service Commission. He spoke of the opportunity for public servants of running for office.

I'd like to draw a parallel with the provincial public service. I have colleagues who are provincial elected representatives. When the time comes for them to leave political life, it will probably be too late, but the their status as public servants has been maintained. However, paragraph 3.21 of page 72 of your report states: “A public servant ceases to be an employee of the public service on the day on which they are elected in a federal, provincial or territorial election“.

Why be as uncompromising toward someone who would like to return to their position after having been in politics?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

That is a valid question and I thank you for asking it.

That is the legislative framework that was given to us by Parliament when that act was adopted. That was the context for that decision.

Allow me to give you some of the rationale behind this. Take the general career path of a public servant. When he asks for leave, the maximum that is granted is often five years. It may be a question of equity. We have often wondered how best to manage this. The matter does not arise if someone is elected at the municipal level, but only if he is elected at the federal or provincial level. The reason for that is probably that those are terms that more or less comply with the same standards as for any other type of leave granted to public servants.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Very well.

In 2006, I had to resign my position when I was elected to a minority government. At that time, I would have liked to keep my status with regard to that position which I liked very much. Today, I have turned the page and moved on to something else. But I wanted to mention it.

To give people the opportunity of running for office, perhaps you could grant them the status referred to as “indeterminate”, which would be an important asset for a public servant.

I'd like to go back to the Privy Council Office.[English]

I would like to come back to the process regarding the appointment of senators.[Translation]

Can you enlighten me in that regard?

You said that you were seeking an additional $200,000 for the Senate, but you spoke about costs of $5.4 million over the next six years.

Could you tell me more about those costs? Will the recommendations in this report be made public?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for that question.[English]

I apologize for any confusion. I was attempting to answer the other member's question about going forward how much money we would be spending. It's probably a little confusing because you don't have those figures before you. I know what those are, and as Karen explained, they're not in any of the estimates documents before you right now. But I can assure the committee, whenever I come to the committee and I know that these are going to be before you, I will always share those with you so you can have as big a picture as possible.

What I don't have with me today is the specific breakdown of the $1.5 million that we would spend in the next fiscal year, the one that will start in about three weeks. I know we'll be seeking that in supplementary estimates. We'll be seeking over six years $5.4 million, and in the next fiscal year we'll be seeking funding of $1.5 million as part of that $5.4 million.

If it's the will of the committee, I'm very happy to provide a breakdown of how we would propose to spend that money.

(1710)

Hon. Steven Blaney:

My understanding, as you said, is that this $5.4 million over six years is to cover the expenses of the appointees, Canadians who have been appointed to make recommendations, as well as creating a group of civil servants who will provide support. Do you have any idea of how many FTEs will actually be created for this kind of secretariat, this new structure?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

It's my understanding and I believe it's four additional FTEs who will be hired to support the work of the committee over the next five years. You can appreciate that in the first couple of years of the work, because it's a whole new process, they'll be pretty busy with that. Then as they get better at it and more efficient and regularize it, the workload will be less onerous.

It's four new public servants at PCO to do this work, plus the technology support, and then of course the fees for the committee members' participation.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Yes. It's a process that was already ongoing without this structure, but now this is a new structure and this certainly is reflected in those costs.

To get back to beyond the border, is it correct to say that you have the mandate to coordinate the overall operation of the government? Can you be a little more specific on your role in the implementation of the initial agreement and the pre-clearance agreement that was signed in March 2015? I have reason to believe that this is why you are seeking additional funding.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

As I said, the beyond the border action plan was announced in late December 2011 by the then prime minister and the then president of the United States, and I suspect the member is fairly acquainted with it. The role of PCO since that time has been to, as I said, coordinate the efforts of the department. What did that mean in the first couple of years? There were a number of initiatives that needed cabinet approval, that needed policy cover. What we saw were multiple departments coming before cabinet on one topic. They needed somebody to organize and coordinate that, so PCO played that role. It couldn't do it within its existing framework because the existing framework's role is to play a challenge function in proposals that come in to us, and that's what the existing PCO staff did. We built this new function that could play the coordinating role of all of the various departments involved. Those would include Public Safety, the RCMP, the then citizenship and immigration, now the Department of Immigration and Refugees, and the CBSA. The span of initiatives included cargo security, trusted traders, cross-border travellers, and—

The Chair:

Madam Doucet, I'm afraid I'm going to have to cut you off. I apologize for that but we're about a minute and a half over time. Perhaps in your subsequent answers to other committee members, you might be able to incorporate some of the answer you were providing to Monsieur Blaney.

Mr. Weir, please, for seven minutes.

(1715)

Mr. Erin Weir:

I would indeed like to pick up on a question posed by my colleague. I might have missed the answer.

Will the recommendations of the independent advisory board for Senate appointments be made public?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

The recommendations of the advisory board will be made to the Prime Minister for his consideration, and the decision is the prerogative of the Prime Minister.

Mr. Erin Weir:

It would be up to the Prime Minister to make the recommendations public or not.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

That's my understanding.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay. In terms of the cost of the advisory board, the figure you've provided and explained of $5.4 million, that would be a contribution through the Privy Council Office. Will there be any other government departments, or perhaps the Senate itself, providing any funding in support of this body?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I can't speak for the Senate. It is my understanding that any costs that are incurred by other departments with respect to Senate appointments would be absorbed within their existing budgets, and the only expenses that I could foresee would be security clearances. I think that would be easily absorbed into the security agency's ongoing work in security clearances.

This is really a new function for the public service. Up until the government's announcement of this function, this was not done within the public service. We really had an administrative role around coordinating security clearances and making sure that the paperwork was transmitted. This is very much a new function. It will be housed out of PCO and I don't anticipate that other departments will come in with other requests.

Mr. Erin Weir:

PCO is seeking just over $700,000 for professional and special services, and I wonder if this is for consultants. Could you elaborate on what that money will pay for?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

I'm going to let Karen answer that question for you.

Ms. Karen Cahill:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

No, that's not just for consultants. That category has multiple items, such as training, hospitality, and of course, professional services, but not just to hire consultants.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Is this specific $700,000 mostly for training? Is it mostly for hospitality? Can you give us some sense?

Ms. Karen Cahill:

You will understand, Mr. Chair, that what we have at this moment...we're still in the fiscal year. The fiscal year has not closed, so unfortunately, we will have to wait for the tabling of the public accounts to finalize this number and have a better understanding of the items that are involved.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I have a question about the economic action plan. Now that this initiative is coming to an end, looking back, could you speak to what public service, if any, it served, and how the success of the program might be evaluated?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question. The economic action plan grew out of the global economic crisis in 2009, as you're probably aware.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Sorry, just to clarify, I'm not asking about the whole economic action plan. I'm asking about the initiatives to advertise it.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes. The government was getting feedback that people didn't know where to go to get information. We were hearing that loud and clear. It was a profound glimpse of the obvious idea to put it all in one place. My understanding is that the site was accessed by a lot by people. The government saw that it was successful and looked for ways to leverage that success within the rubric of the communications policy of the Government of Canada.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thanks very much.

I have a question for the Public Service Commission about the hiring of veterans.

My colleague asked some very specific questions about the 94 veterans as a proportion of applicants or total public servants and I appreciate that those figures are coming, but I'd ask a more general question. It strikes me that's not a very large number of veterans in the context of the whole public service or in the context of the total number of veterans. Would you share that assessment and could you speak to it a bit?

(1720)

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

Thank you.

In the context of more specifics, we have been on-boarding veterans in the past, but not with the highest level of priority as we have done with the new legislation. We have had a lot of interest, so the activities are picking up and there is more knowledge that is being transferred across departments.

If I look at the activities we've had up to February 10, basically we have referred more than 876 veterans across 49 departments. As I said, many of them decide not to pursue the referral that is being made, for all kinds of reasons. Basically, out of those referrals we've had 11 appointments made to DND, one to ESDC, and one to Health Canada.

When it comes to referrals in the context of medical releases that are not attributable to service, 4,000 veterans have been referred to 60 departments, so there is a lot of activity that is picking up.

The question is whether veterans are seeing that there are opportunities that they want to embrace. It's not just a question of whether we want to hire; it's whether veterans are interested in the jobs that are being posted at this point. What's happening is that there's a lot more knowledge and awareness. We've been able to provide a lot more information on some of the successes we've had, on the skill sets we have from veterans and CAF members. I think that is going to grow.

It's important to keep in mind that some of these veterans have jobs, but they also have this entitlement with government for a five-year period. They may not necessarily look to do a move at this point in time in the context of the system. As they're making their way into the system....

It is a fairly complex system, when you don't really understand it. We as public servants have been part of it for a long time. That's why we're spending a lot of time providing information to veterans and teaching them how to make their way into the system. It is very different when going from CAF language to bureaucratic language. We're really trying to do some of the matching at this point, but we're confident that it will increase.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

For our final seven-minute slot, we'll go to Monsieur Drouin.

Mr. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here tonight—or almost tonight.

I have a quick question. I want to build on what my colleague Mr. Weir said with regard to the Senate appointments. For the Public Service Commission, is it normal practice to publish the names of all applicants who apply for a job? You don't make that public, do you?

Ms. Christine Donoghue:

No. It is not public information.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay.

Maybe this is a question for PCO regarding the public appointments process. Do you publish the names of all the applicants who apply for a public appointment?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

No. We wouldn't do that for privacy considerations.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Yes, there are privacy concerns.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Is it safe to assume that for those who apply for Senate positions who don't make it, their names, obviously for privacy reasons, may not be published?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

We will apply the privacy rules of the Government of Canada. It's my understanding that their names would not be published, unless they gave—

Mr. Francis Drouin:

—consent.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

—yes, unless they gave consent.

I'm not sure I can imagine a situation in which that would happen, but it might.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay. Thank you.

With the benefit of being last, everybody has asked the questions, but with regard to the $1.6 million for the Prime Minister's digital presence, you mentioned an important term. You said that at the time, the previous prime minister wanted access to “live streaming” and that you didn't have live-streaming capabilities.

Is there somebody at PCO who is watching for up-and-coming technologies? I'm thinking that kids today are not on Facebook anymore.

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

That's a really good question.

The number one watcher for new technologies and their impact on Canadians is Michael Wernick, who is the Clerk of the Privy Council.

Christine is laughing, because she gets it from him, too, I'm sure. He is probably one of the most tech-savvy leaders I have ever encountered. My colleagues at Shared Services Canada would likely support that. He is constantly pushing the boundaries and the limits of the envelope on what we can do. He is ambitious in terms of timelines because he understands the importance of staying relevant to Canadians in real time.

(1725)

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you.

As you know, there has been a bit of reorganization at PCO. There's a new deputy secretary to cabinet for results delivery. Was that taken from internal resources to do this new position or this new branch?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Yes, currently we have reallocated within the Privy Council Office to support this new function.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

I just didn't see it in the supplementary estimates.

With regard to the continued implementation of Canada's migrant smuggling prevention strategy, I see that in budget 2015, $44.5 million over three years was budgeted. Is that just for PCO, or does it include other departments?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair.

I can assure you it's not just for PCO. What I can do, if you like, is give you a breakdown of it.

Karen, jump in, if I miss a portion of it.

For instance, for the year 2014-15, $14.9 million was spent, $5 million of it at what is now the department of Global Affairs; another $5 million by the RCMP; $3 million at Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada; and $700,000 by CSEC. PCO's portion of this piece is the smallest piece. By far the bulk of the overall amount is spent in the large line departments that actually have the front-line responsibility for contributing to the happy event of no migrant ship showing up with migrants on them in Canada.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay, thank you.

Concerning the $0.8 million for the beyond the border action plan, as you know, it's been reported in the papers recently that the shared police project hit a bit of a bump. I'm wondering whether PCO factors in those risks, because if there are two partners involved, obviously there are some issues with the police force concerning where the jurisdiction is in which they would be charged, if there were an issue.

Do you factor all those risks in when you make an ask for budget?

Ms. Michelle Doucet:

That's a really good question, and the short answer is yes.

You've talked about one initiative, and I'll give you another related initiative in terms of law enforcement agencies working together. That's the Regulatory Cooperation Council, which does not appear in these estimates, but has in previous estimates.

One thing they did as part of their work was a pilot project for enforcement on the Great Lakes between Canadian and American officials who patrol well-being and safety on the Great Lakes. The way they learned how to work together was to actually go out on 10 different missions to work through the kinks. That takes time and patience. We try to factor that into any spends that departments ask for, and certainly the spends that PCO asks for.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I think we'll call it quits there.

Thank you to all of our witnesses for appearing today. I'm sure I speak on behalf of all of the committee members in saying that all of the information you provided has been very helpful. We look forward in the months and perhaps years to come to speaking with you again.

You're now excused.

Committee, there is one thing for your consideration, and it deals with what happens when we come back from our break week. March 22, as everyone knows, is budget day. That's also a day we normally sit, so I think we would be precluded from sitting on that day. It is also a short week, because the Friday is Good Friday.

You do not have to give an answer today, but I would ask you to think about—and we'll deal with it before we end this week—whether we sit on the Thursday. Because of the short week. I'm sure many members will be making travel plans to get out of Ottawa a little earlier—

Pardon me?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we under a Friday sitting schedule or not?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, it's Good Friday.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But is the Thursday a Friday sitting schedule?

The Chair:

No, my understanding is that it's a regular Thursday.

(1730)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

The Chair:

You can check with your House leader on that, but that's my understanding, and I haven't heard anything different.

Even if we do not meet that week, I would suggest that the Subcommittee on Agenda meet so that we can start planning our witnesses and the studies we may want to consider after that, because following the next week that we sit in Parliament there is a two-week break. Think about whether we meet as a full committee or just as a subcommittee, and we'll deal with that over the next two meetings.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We'll take a [Inaudible—Editor] from the break.

The Chair:

All right. We are adjourned. Michelle-Doucet-Opening-Statement-E

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1550)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs.

Nous tenons aujourd'hui la quatrième séance du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires.

Avant de donner la parole à nos témoins, j'ai une question d'ordre administratif à soumettre au Comité, et j'aimerais si possible que nous parvenions à un consensus.

Des ministres comparaîtront devant le Comité au cours de nos deux prochaines séances de l'après-midi et du soir. Nous avons reçu une demande afin que ces comparutions soient télévisées, et je demanderais aux membres du Comité s'ils sont prêts à accepter que la séance de demain soir et celle de jeudi après-midi soient télévisées.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Oui.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Qui a demandé à ce qu'elles soient télévisées?

Le président:

La télédiffusion.

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci.

Nous accueillons des témoins parmi nous. La difficulté, aujourd'hui, c'est que nous commençons un peu en retard en raison des votes auxquels nous avons dû participer. Normalement, chaque témoin a 10 minutes pour sa déclaration préliminaire. J'ai consulté quelques membres du Comité, et tous semblent d'accord pour que nous essayions de nous réserver le plus de temps possible pour les questions, donc je demanderais à nos deux présentatrices de s'en tenir à 10 minutes maximum pour leurs exposés, question de laisser suffisamment de temps aux membres du Comité pour leur poser des questions. Toute l'information non présentée pourra être consignée au compte rendu un peu plus tard.

Sur ce, nous pourrions peut-être commencer par Mme Doucet. Pourriez-vous s'il vous plaît vous présenter, présenter les fonctionnaires qui vous accompagnent, puis prononcer votre exposé.

Mme Michelle Doucet (dirigeante principale des finances, Services ministériels, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Merci infiniment, monsieur le président et les membres du Comité. Je m'appelle Michelle Doucet, je suis sous-ministre adjointe à la Direction des services ministériels du Bureau du Conseil privé. Je suis en compagnie de Karen Cahill, directrice exécutive des Finances, de la planification et de l'administration à la Direction des services ministériels du BCP. Nous sommes ravies d'être ici et nous avons hâte de répondre à vos questions.

J'aimerais d'abord vous mettre en contexte et vous expliquer brièvement le mandat du BCP et ses trois principaux rôles. Le Bureau du Conseil privé, qui relève du premier ministre, a pour mandat de servir le Canada et la population canadienne en conseillant et en assistant, en toute impartialité et avec professionnalisme, le premier ministre, les ministres du portefeuille et le Cabinet.

Le BCP soutient l'élaboration de programmes stratégiques et législatifs du gouvernement, coordonne la prise de mesures en réaction aux enjeux auxquels doivent faire face le gouvernement et le pays, et contribue au bon fonctionnement du Cabinet. Le BCP est dirigé par le greffier du Conseil privé. En plus d'assumer les fonctions d'administrateur général du BCP, le greffier agit à titre de secrétaire du Cabinet et de chef de la fonction publique.

Le BCP exerce trois grands rôles.

Notre premier rôle consiste à conseiller de manière non partisane le premier ministre, les ministres du portefeuille ainsi que le Cabinet et les comités du Cabinet sur les questions d'envergure nationale et internationale. Cette responsabilité comprend notamment de prodiguer des conseils et d'apporter un soutien concernant l'ensemble des enjeux stratégiques, législatifs et administratifs du gouvernement.

Deuxièmement, le BCP est le secrétariat du Cabinet et de tous ses comités, sauf le Conseil du Trésor, qui est appuyé par le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor.

Troisièmement, le BCP favorise l'instauration d'une fonction publique hautement efficace et responsable.

Nous assumons ces trois rôles grâce à nos employés, qui donnent des conseils, assurent la coordination et fournissent du soutien. Contrairement à bien d'autres ministères, le BCP n'exécute pas de programmes. Nous utilisons les sommes affectées par le Parlement pour payer les salaires, les coûts de fonctionnement et les services reçus d'autres ministères. Le BCP doit donc respecter les mêmes exigences financières et administratives que les autres ministères.

Je tiens à ajouter que, tout comme le ministère des Finances et le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, le BCP est un organisme central. À ce titre, il joue un rôle de coordination centrale à l'échelle du gouvernement pour fournir des conseils au premier ministre et au Cabinet et pour veiller à la cohérence et à la coordination des politiques pour eux.

J'aimerais maintenant vous parler du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) de 2015-2016 du BCP. Dans son budget, le BCP demande 4,2 millions de dollars pour les crédits suivants: 1,6 million de dollars pour terminer le travail de coordination des communications pangouvernementales concernant le Plan d'action économique du Canada lancé par l'ancien gouvernement, ainsi que pour débuter la modernisation de la présence numérique du premier ministre.

De ce montant, 1 million de dollars est consacré au volet communications du Plan d'action économique (ou PAE), qui a pris fin après les élections de 2015. Le financement au titre du PAE servait à appuyer une équipe de cinq fonctionnaires du BCP. Depuis l'élection, le travail de cette équipe consiste à bien archiver les dossiers pertinents — tant les dossiers numériques que les documents analogiques — et à mettre fin au PAE. De plus, l'équipe continue de fournir du soutien pour la communication des priorités du gouvernement.

Les autres 600 000 $ sont investis dans la présence officielle du premier ministre sur le Web. Le Bureau du Conseil privé contribue à la maintenance du site Web du gouvernement du Canada pour le premier ministre ainsi qu'à la publication de tous les documents sur ce site et sur les comptes de réseautage social du premier ministre.

Les besoins du site et de ces comptes ne cessent de croître et de se complexifier, car le contenu est de plus en plus volumineux et de nouveaux éléments apparaissent, comme des vidéos, du contenu numérique plus élaboré, des diffusions en continu et des médias sociaux améliorés. Les services du Web et de la TI du BCP doivent donc en faire plus que jamais. Les fonds serviront à répondre aux nouveaux besoins et à financer la présence du premier ministre sur le Web.[Français]

Le BCP demande 1 million de dollars pour la mise en oeuvre continue de la Stratégie canadienne de prévention du passage de clandestins. Le poste de conseiller spécial en matière de passage de clandestins et de migration illégale a été créé en septembre 2010 dans le but de coordonner la réaction du Canada face à l'arrivée massive de clandestins venus par bateau. Le Canada a appliqué une stratégie pangouvernementale destinée à prévenir l'arrivée d'autres navires de migrants clandestins.

Ce dossier constitue une priorité pour la sécurité nationale. Le budget de 2015 investit 44,5 millions de dollars sur trois ans pour poursuivre les efforts coordonnés du Canada visant à découvrir et éradiquer les menaces à cet égard. Le conseiller spécial relève du conseiller à la sécurité nationale. Son rôle consiste à coordonner la réponse du gouvernement fédéral au problème de l'arrivée de clandestins par voie maritime. II doit notamment collaborer avec des partenaires au pays afin de coordonner la stratégie du Canada; travailler avec des partenaires importants sur la scène internationale pour favoriser la coopération; améliorer les relations du Canada avec les gouvernements des pays qui servent d'étape; et soutenir la présence du Canada dans les forums régionaux et internationaux.

Le BCP demande aussi 0,8 million de dollars pour l'Équipe de mise en oeuvre du plan frontalier, qui applique le plan d'action Par-delà la frontière. Je précise, pour vous mettre en contexte, qu'en février 2011, le Canada et les États-Unis ont publié une déclaration sur une vision commune de la sécurité du périmètre et de la compétitivité économique. La déclaration établit un partenariat à long terme qui facilite la circulation légitime des personnes et des biens entre les deux pays tout en renforçant la sécurité et la compétitivité économique.

La déclaration est axée sur quatre domaines de coopération: l'élimination des menaces le plus rapidement possible; la facilitation du commerce, de la croissance économique et de l'emploi; l'intégration transfrontalière en matière d'application de la loi; et l'amélioration des infrastructures essentielles et de la cybersécurité. La déclaration a mené à l'annonce du plan d'action Par-delà la frontière en décembre 2011. L'industrie et les voyageurs ont déjà commencé à profiter des avantages concrets d'une frontière plus efficace, moderne et sécuritaire. La coordination et la surveillance centralisées et continues ont joué un rôle important dans la réussite du plan d'action.

Le BCP demande 0,2 million de dollars pour financer l'élaboration d'un nouveau processus de nomination des sénateurs non partisan et fondé sur le mérite. En décembre 2015, le gouvernement a annoncé la mise en oeuvre d'un nouveau processus, non partisan et fondé sur le mérite, visant à fournir des conseils à propos des nominations au Sénat. Dans le cadre du nouveau processus, le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat a été créé, le 19 janvier 2016, afin de fournir au premier ministre des avis au sujet des candidats au Sénat.

Le Comité consultatif indépendant se base sur des critères transparents et fondés sur le mérite pour identifier des Canadiens qui pourraient apporter une contribution importante aux travaux du Sénat. Ces critères permettront d'assurer la formation d'un Sénat respectueux de normes rigoureuses en matière d'intégrité, de collaboration et d'impartialité politique. Le gouvernement procède rapidement à la réforme du Sénat, et le nouveau processus de nomination sera mis en oeuvre en deux phases.

Pendant la première phase, qui permet de faire la transition, on procédera à cinq nominations pour améliorer la représentation des provinces ayant le plus grand nombre de postes vacants, soit le Manitoba, I'Ontario et le Québec. La deuxième phase correspondra à la mise sur pied d'un processus permanent pour la dotation des autres postes vacants comprenant un processus de mise en candidature ouvert à tous les Canadiens.

Les fonds du BCP lui permettent d'appuyer les activités du Comité consultatif indépendant et de son secrétariat au cours de la première phase de transition afin que des conseils et des recommandations soient fournis au premier ministre.

En outre, les prévisions législatives du BCP ont augmenté de 0,1 million de dollars en raison du traitement et de l'allocation pour automobile de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques.

(1555)



À la suite de l'élection, l'honorable Maryam Monsef a été nommée au poste de ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Pour tenir compte de l'ajout de ce poste ministériel à part entière, associé à un traitement et à une allocation pour automobile, un nouvel élément a été ajouté aux prévisions législatives du BCP.[Traduction]

Voilà qui conclut l'explication...

Le président:

Madame Doucet, je vous remercie. Vous avez déjà pris un peu plus de 10 minutes. Je sais que vous devez également nous parler de votre rapport ministériel sur le rendement, mais si c'est possible, nous aimerions passer tout de suite à la présentation de la Commission de la fonction publique. Nous veillerons à ce que le reste de votre déclaration soit consigné au compte rendu.

(1600)

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame Donoghue.

Mme Christine Donoghue (présidente intérimaire, Commission de la fonction publique):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les députés, merci.

C'est avec plaisir que je vous présente Omer Boudreau, vice-président de la Direction générale de la gestion ministérielle de la Commission.

Nous sommes heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui pour discuter du rapport ministériel 2014-2015 sur le rendement de la Commission de la fonction publique et de notre Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.[Français]

Le mandat de la Commission de la fonction publique consiste à promouvoir et à protéger les nominations fondées sur le mérite et, de concert avec d'autres intervenants, à préserver l'impartialité politique de la fonction publique. Alors que la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique attribue les pouvoirs de nomination à la Commission de la fonction publique, elle prévoit aussi des pouvoirs qui peuvent être délégués aux administrateurs généraux.

C'est donc dans un système décentralisé fondé sur la délégation des pouvoirs que la Commission exerce son mandat en offrant son expertise et en présentant des orientations stratégiques, en menant des activités de surveillance efficaces, et en fournissant des services de dotation et d'évaluation novateurs. Nous travaillons également de concert avec les ministères et organismes afin de promouvoir une fonction publique non partisane qui reflète la diversité canadienne et met à profit les talents et les compétences des fonctionnaires issus de toutes les régions du pays.[Traduction]

À titre d'organisme indépendant, nous rendons directement compte au Parlement de l'intégrité du système de dotation, ainsi que de l'impartialité de la fonction publique. Dans cette optique, notre rapport annuel pour l'exercice 2014-2015 a été déposé au Parlement le 23 février. Nous serions heureux de revenir devant le Comité pour discuter de ce rapport s'il le souhaite.

Aujourd'hui, mes observations porteront principalement sur trois thèmes. Premièrement, je voudrais souligner quelques-unes des principales réalisations mentionnées dans notre rapport ministériel sur le rendement 2014-2015. Deuxièmement, je traiterai du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Troisièmement, je conclurai en présentant un compte rendu des efforts que nous avons déployés afin de moderniser notre approche en matière de dotation.[Français]

Monsieur le président, dans une fonction publique non partisane, les nominations doivent être fondées sur le mérite et être soustraites à toute influence politique. De plus, les fonctionnaires fédéraux doivent non seulement exercer leurs fonctions en toute impartialité, mais aussi être perçus comme tels. Dans le cadre de nos responsabilités, nous communiquons avec les fonctionnaires fédéraux pour souligner l'importance d'une fonction publique non partisane et leur rappeler qu'ils ont des droits tout comme des responsabilités juridiques en ce qui concerne leur participation à des activités politiques.

Tout fonctionnaire qui souhaite se porter candidat à une élection municipale, provinciale, territoriale ou fédérale doit au préalable en obtenir la permission à la suite d'un examen de la Commission. Nous approuvons généralement ces demandes lorsque nous sommes convaincus que ces activités ne porteront pas ou ne sembleront pas porter atteinte à la capacité du fonctionnaire d'exercer ses fonctions de façon politiquement impartiale. Pour rendre une décision, nous tenons notamment compte du type d'élection, du rôle particulier du fonctionnaire dans son contexte organisationnel, ainsi que du niveau de visibilité de son poste. Les demandes de permission sont généralement approuvées sous réserve de certaines conditions, incluant l'obligation de prendre un congé sans solde pour solliciter une nomination à titre de candidat.[Traduction]

J'aimerais maintenant parler du système de dotation, lequel représente la partie la plus importante de nos activités et de nos ressources. Nous fournissons une orientation stratégique, des outils et des services de soutien aux gestionnaires d'embauche et aux conseillers en ressources humaines pour les aider à doter des postes avec efficience, tout en respectant l'esprit de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique.

Nous administrons également des programmes visant à recruter des Canadiens qualifiés partout au pays. Cela exige d'importants efforts de liaison et une collaboration accrue avec les ministères et organismes, notamment afin de participer aux salons de l'emploi et aux séances d'information présentées dans les établissements d'enseignement partout au pays. À titre d'exemple, plus de 39 000 demandes d'emploi ont été soumises dans le cadre du Programme fédéral d'expérience de travail étudiant l'automne dernier. Plus de 6 500 étudiants ont été embauchés.

Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec nos partenaires, y compris le Bureau du dirigeant principal des ressources humaines, afin de créer des bassins de candidats qualifiés qui seront mis à la disposition des organisations fédérales d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Cette collaboration contribue à réduire les chevauchements inutiles dans l'ensemble de la fonction publique.[Français]

Nous continuons d'accroître et d'employer de nouvelles technologies, par exemple en utilisant des examens en ligne. Ceux-ci représentent maintenant 72 % de tous les examens administrés par la Commission. Plus de 92 % de nos examens de langue seconde sont administrés en ligne. Le nombre d'examens en ligne non supervisés ne fait qu'augmenter. Uniquement pour l'année 2014-2015, cela représentait quelque 42 000 examens.

(1605)



Ce type de test permet au postulant de passer un examen à l'endroit de son choix qui lui offre un meilleur accès à un emploi dans la fonction publique, peu importe où il demeure. Les examens en ligne contribuent également à réduire les obstacles pour les personnes handicapées en leur permettant de passer les examens chez elles au moyen de leur propre appareils adaptés.[Traduction]

Notre plateforme de recrutement la plus importante est accessible sur le site Web emplois.gc.ca. Depuis avril 2015, ce système offre à la population canadienne un portail unique qui lui donne accès à tous les emplois dans la fonction publique. Près de 8 800 annonces d'emploi ont été publiées pour des processus de nomination internes et externes, pour lesquels nous avons reçu plus de 530 000 demandes d'emploi.

Nous continuons de chercher des moyens de moderniser davantage nos systèmes et nos services de soutien pour améliorer l'expérience des utilisateurs. Voilà qui est une bonne transition vers les fonds prévus dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C), puisque les ministères et les organismes assument une partie des coûts de fonctionnement de ce système, ce qui explique le transfert de fonds qui figure dans les prévisions.

Le nouveau système consolidé sert également de fondement pour appuyer la mise en oeuvre de la Loi sur l'embauche des anciens combattants. Depuis le 1er juillet 2015, cette loi permet aux anciens combattants et aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes libérés pour des raisons médicales de bénéficier d'un meilleur accès aux emplois dans la fonction publique.

Nous avons offert de la formation et de nouveaux outils pour mettre en valeur les aptitudes et compétences que les anciens combattants peuvent offrir à la fonction publique. Nous avons nous-mêmes embauché deux anciens combattants pour guider leurs collègues et leur expliquer leurs droits de priorité et le fonctionnement du système de dotation. À ce jour, 94 anciens combattants ont été embauchés, y compris 15 bénéficiaires du nouveau droit de priorité statutaire qui accorde la préséance absolue aux anciens combattants libérés pour des raisons médicales attribuables au service militaire.[Français]

En vue de toujours améliorer notre système, permettez-moi de vous parler des changements qui entreront en vigueur le 1er avril prochain afin de simplifier le processus de dotation. Ces changements tirent partie des réformes amorcées et de l'expérience acquise depuis 2005 dans le but de moderniser le processus tout en assurant la santé globale du système de dotation.

Selon nos informations et nos observations, au cours des 10 dernières années, nous croyons que le système de dotation est parvenu à maturité, de même que les capacités des ministères et des organismes en matière de ressources humaines. C'est pourquoi nous avons décidé de simplifier nos lignes directrices afin de supprimer les chevauchements inutiles et de réduire à une seule politique les 12 lignes directrices antérieures.

Cette politique unique permettra d'exposer plus clairement les attentes à l'égard des administrateurs généraux et de renforcer leurs pouvoirs discrétionnaires ainsi que leurs responsabilités. Ces changements accorderont aux ministère et organismes une plus grande marge de manoeuvre pour adapter leur système de dotation en fonction de leur contexte particulier et de leurs besoins opérationnels. Les gestionnaires d'embauche disposeront donc d'une plus grande marge de manoeuvre pour exercer leur jugement en matière de dotation, mais seront aussi responsables de leurs décisions.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, le contexte dans lequel la fonction publique mène ses activités évolue continuellement. Il est important que les ministères et organismes soient en mesure de réagir promptement au changement afin d'attirer à point nommé les candidats qui possèdent les compétences dont ils ont besoin.

À cette fin, la Commission mettra l'accent sur l'intégration de ses conseils stratégiques et de ses services de soutien afin de répondre aux besoins particuliers des organisations, en plus de promouvoir les pratiques exemplaires dans l'ensemble du système de dotation. Nous nous efforcerons aussi de réduire le fardeau associé à la production de rapports, conformément aux recommandations du vérificateur général dans son rapport du printemps 2015. Les administrateurs généraux devront toujours rendre compte à la CFP de l'exercice de leurs pouvoirs discrétionnaires, et nous continuerons de surveiller l'intégrité du système de dotation dans le cadre de nos vérifications et enquêtes.

Nous adapterons cependant nos activités de surveillance pour être plus agiles de manière à contribuer à l'amélioration continue du système. Par exemple, nous remplacerons les examens individuels des organisations par une approche pangouvernementale qui mettra l'accent sur les domaines qui exigent une attention particulière.

(1610)



Je vous rappelle aussi, monsieur le président, qu'il y a plus de 100 ans que le Parlement confie à la Commission le mandat de protéger le mérite et l'impartialité dans la fonction publique. Nous continuerons de favoriser des relations solides et collaboratives avec les parlementaires, les administrateurs généraux, les agents de négociation et les autres intervenants afin que la population canadienne continue d'avoir confiance en une fonction publique impartiale et professionnelle, composée de fonctionnaires qui possèdent les aptitudes et compétences nécessaires pour répondre aux attentes du public canadien.

Nous nous ferons un plaisir de répondre à vos questions maintenant. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame Doucet et madame Donoghue.

Nous allons entreprendre une série de questions de sept minutes et commencer par Mme Ratansi.

Je rappelle à tous les députés que le temps imparti pour les questions comprend les questions et les réponses.

Madame Ratansi, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Merci. Je serai très brève dans mes questions.

Madame Donoghue, ma question s'adresse à vous.

La Commission de la fonction publique du Canada demande, au crédit 1c, un transfert de 504 000 $ en tout de Parcs Canada et de l'Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments pour le Système de ressourcement de la fonction publique. Je présume qu'il s'agit de l'un de vos systèmes de recrutement.

Est-il obligatoire pour ces agences?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

En fait, le système que nous administrons est obligatoire pour tous les ministères assujettis à la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique. Pour ce qui est de Parcs Canada et de l'ACIA, ces deux organisations ne sont pas assujetties à la LEFP, la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique. C'est pourquoi elles paient pour ces services. Elles ont choisi d'utiliser les services que nous offrons.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Vous dites que compte tenu du vieillissement de la population, des retraites, de tous les défis auxquels la Commission de la fonction publique est confrontée au sein du gouvernement... Réussissez-vous à répondre aux besoins d'une population très diversifiée et à adopter des pratiques d'embauche adaptées à cette diversité?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

À titre d'organisme public responsable de la mise en oeuvre de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique, nous avons également la responsabilité de l'équité en matière d'emploi avec divers partenaires dans le système. Essentiellement par des politiques et le recours à la législation, nous avons réussi à indiquer qu'on peut afficher des postes intentionnellement ciblés, afin de favoriser des groupes visés par l'équité en matière d'emploi et la diversité. Cette mesure a facilité l'accès à des emplois dans la fonction publique pour divers groupes désignés.

Nous effectuons également des études pour évaluer la situation dans ces collectivités, leur disponibilité sur le marché du travail et déterminer si nous recevons un nombre acceptable de demandes et si des emplois sont offerts aux groupes visés par l'équité en matière d'emploi.

Des rapports d'étude sortiront sous peu, en 2016, pour faire état de nos résultats. Nous observons une représentation accrue de certains groupes, mais nous reconnaissons qu'il reste du travail à faire. Nous menons aussi beaucoup d'activités de sensibilisation, notamment pour informer les ministères des moyens qu'ils peuvent prendre pour attirer un plus grand nombre de candidats des groupes visés par l'équité en matière d'emploi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Cela soulève deux questions, alors. À quel point votre système est-il accessible? À quel point est-il facile d'accès pour les gens qui souhaitent postuler, mais qui auraient des difficultés linguistiques? Je présume que votre système est bilingue. C'est la première question. La deuxième est la suivante: à quel point est-il facile d'accès et quels sont les mécanismes de suivi en place pour assurer le succès de la CFP?

J'ai lu les rapports de vérification et certaines observations, et je vois que le vérificateur recommande un suivi plus poussé et plus strict. Beaucoup d'organismes utilisent vos services, donc pouvez-vous me donner une idée de l'accessibilité au système et des mesures que vous prenez pour en évaluer le rendement?

(1615)

Mme Christine Donoghue:

L'accessibilité a augmenté depuis que nous avons un portail unique. Cela a rendu le processus très clair. Grâce au portail unique, les Canadiens peuvent tous aller voir quels sont les emplois disponibles dans la fonction publique, ce qui est clairement un avantage.

Cela dit, nous sommes en train d'évaluer à quel point il est facile d'entrer dans le système à partir du moment où l'on connaît le portail unique. Nous reconnaissons déjà que l'expérience utilisateur pourrait être meilleure. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nous cherchons des moyens d'améliorer le système qui a été mis en place en 2015, mais nous nous demandons également quelle forme prendrait le système du strict point de vue de l'utilisateur, plutôt que du point de vue du gouvernement.

Nous visons son amélioration continue, nous voulons simplifier le vocabulaire, nous essayons de nous débarrasser du jargon très bureaucratique et cherchons à établir si nous pourrions concevoir un système qui orienterait plus facilement les candidats potentiels, en fonction des critères qu'ils inscrivent, vers les emplois les mieux adaptés à leurs compétences.

Ce système fonctionne bien. Tous les ministères l'utilisent. Nous demandons également aux ministères de suivre de plus près toutes les activités qu'ils mènent au moyen de ce système, mais nous reconnaissons toujours qu'il devrait être plus convivial, et nous allons faire des tests dans les prochains mois.

Par ailleurs, nous avons simplifié beaucoup nos exigences. Notre système était extrêmement axé sur les règles. À partir du 1er avril, nous reviendrons à l'intention de base de la loi, qui était très claire et nous donnait beaucoup de marge de manoeuvre. Nous allons donc adapter le système pour en retirer toute l'information superflue qui n'est plus nécessaire selon cette politique.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Combien de minutes me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Environ 45 secondes.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Si vous le pouvez, vous pourrez me répondre au second tour: comment évaluez-vous votre rendement? Quel mécanisme d'évaluation utilisez-vous pour déterminer si nous avons embauché une population diversifiée, qu'on pense aux personnes handicapées, aux minorités visibles ou à d'autres?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Notre système nous permet de compiler beaucoup de données. Il nous permet de mesurer notre rendement en fonction de ces données. Je pourrais d'ailleurs fournir au Comité des renseignements qui montrent exactement comment nous pouvons les utiliser et ce que ces données nous apprennent. Nous les communiquons à tous les administrateurs généraux. De même, en collaboration avec le bureau des ressources humaines, nous essayons de favoriser différentes méthodes.

Je pourrais fournir au Comité des renseignements plus précis qui expliqueraient tout cela plus en détail.

Le président:

Merci. Je vous demande de le faire, madame Donoghue.

Monsieur McCauley, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Je vous remercie de ces questions, madame Ratansi.

Vous avez souligné que le 1er juillet dernier, la Loi sur l'embauche des anciens combattants est entrée en vigueur et que 94 anciens combattants au total ont été embauchés depuis. Quel pourcentage des nouvelles embauches cela représente-t-il et combien d'entre eux ont en fait été embauchés par le ministère des Anciens Combattants?

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. Kelly McCauley: Est-ce que c'est 15? Est-ce 15 anciens combattants libérés qui ont été embauchés en vertu de cette loi spéciale ou 94 en tout, dont 15 selon le nouveau droit de priorité prévu par la loi?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Omer, avez-vous ces chiffres sous la main?

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est bon. Je comprends que c'est une question très pointue.

Mme Christine Donoghue:

En fait, sur ces 15 personnes, 11 ont été embauchées par le MDN. Le MDN est probablement l'un des ministères qui embauchent le plus d'anciens combattants ou d'anciens membres des FC. Je vous rappelle que certains militaires sont libérés parce qu'ils ont été blessés dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions, alors que d'autres sont libérés pour d'autres raisons médicales non liées au service militaire. Ce n'est pas le même degré de priorité.

Santé Canada en a embauché deux. Comme je l'ai indiqué, la Commission a elle aussi embauché quelques anciens combattants pour l'aider à gérer le système. Nous savons que cela s'améliore continuellement aussi.

Quoi qu'il en soit, nous savons que nous avons présenté beaucoup plus de candidatures d'anciens combattants qu'auparavant, mais les anciens combattants inscrits ne sont pas nécessairement tous sans emploi. Certains ont un emploi, mais pourraient bénéficier du système prioritaire et voir s'ils peuvent améliorer leur situation en entrant au service de la fonction publique. Ainsi, bien que nous en ayons présenté beaucoup, certains ont choisi de ne pas en profiter, mais restent admissibles au régime.

Nous espérons que plus nous multiplierons nos efforts de communication et de sensibilisation auprès des ministères et plus nous réussirons à faire valoir l'expérience positive et toutes les compétences que possèdent ces anciens combattants et anciens membres des FC, plus il y aura de ministères qui les embaucheront.

(1620)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Oui. Je crois qu'ils ont des compétences en leadership très recherchées. Je comprends que vous n'ayez peut-être pas ces chiffres à portée de la main, donc je vous prierais de me répondre ultérieurement pour me dire combien ont été embauchés par le ministère des Anciens Combattants.

Mme Christine Donoghue:

D'accord.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Sur les 94 personnes embauchées, pouvez-vous me dire aussi quel pourcentage des nouvelles embauches cela représente et combien d'anciens combattants avaient postulé, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Oui.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Vous mentionnez la nouvelle allocation pour automobile de la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, probablement parce que son poste a été élevé au rang de ministre à part entière plutôt que de simple ministre d'État, je présume.

Y a-t-il d'autres exemples de ministres d'État qui se sont vus attribuer une allocation pour automobile pour des raisons de promotion ou pour d'autres raisons?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vais demander à Mme Cahill de répondre à cette question. Elle va vous parler du Bureau du Conseil privé, puis peut-être aussi d'une application plus générale.

Mme Karen Cahill (adjointe à la dirigeante principale des finances, Services ministériels, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Merci pour la question, monsieur le président.

Pour les ministres d'État, la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada prévoit une allocation pour automobile de 2 000 $. Dans les années antérieures, le Bureau du Conseil privé avait des ministres d'État pour lesquels nous inscrivions dans notre budget des dépenses d'un montant de 2 000 $ au titre de cette allocation.

Depuis la dernière élection, Mme Monsef a accédé à un poste ministériel à part entière, ce qui fait que nous avons ajouté ce poste législatif à notre Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

M. Kelly McCauley:

J'ai sans doute mal formulé ma question. Y a-t-il eu d'autres ministres d'État élevés au rang de ministre à part entière qui ont eu droit à ces sommes additionnelles de 80 000 $, notamment au titre de l'allocation pour voiture?

Mme Karen Cahill:

Pas au Conseil privé.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Il y en a certes eu d'autres au gouvernement, si c'est bien ce que vous voulez savoir.

Je pense notamment aux ministres Qualtrough, Duncan, Hajdu, et Chagger.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Vous avez mentionné, et plusieurs l'ont fait avant vous, l'importance de préserver l'impartialité politique de la fonction publique. C'est bien sûr un objectif que nous partageons tous.

En plus des sommes considérables dépensées par les syndicats de la fonction publique lors de la dernière campagne selon les données d'Élections Canada, il y a eu un incident où une foule bruyante de fonctionnaires s'est rassemblée pour accueillir et applaudir le premier ministre à son arrivée à l'édifice des Affaires étrangères.

Quelles mesures prenez-vous pour assurer l'impartialité politique de la fonction publique? Je sais que vous avez indiqué que vous envoyez des notes de service et que vous parlez aux fonctionnaires, mais quelles mesures concrètes prenez-vous pour préserver le caractère non partisan de notre fonction publique?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

La partie 7 de la loi que nous administrons traite notamment des activités politiques des fonctionnaires.

Il faut d'abord et avant tout préciser que nous accomplissons un travail considérable de concert avec le Conseil du Trésor pour assurer le respect des valeurs et des normes d'éthique de la fonction publique. Lorsqu'il est question d'activités partisanes, il n'y a souvent qu'un pas à franchir pour déroger à ces principes.

En pareil cas, nous faisons tout un travail d'analyse pour déterminer s'il y a vraiment activité politique et si la situation semble porter atteinte à la capacité de l'employé d'exercer ses fonctions.

C'est là toute la nuance. Dans le cas d'une activité de groupe, ce sont la plupart du temps les considérations liées aux valeurs et à l'éthique qui entrent en ligne de compte, et il revient alors essentiellement à l'administrateur général de poursuivre ses efforts de sensibilisation auprès du personnel.

C'est ce que nous faisons également. Nous devons, en collaboration avec le Conseil privé, revenir pour ainsi dire à la base en continuant à sensibiliser les fonctionnaires à leur obligation d'agir de façon non partisane.

Lorsque les cas sont flagrants ou qu'il nous est possible d'identifier les fonctionnaires que nous croyons fautifs, nous pouvons mener une enquête pour déterminer s'il y a eu inconduite et prendre des mesures correctives le cas échéant.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur McCauley, je vais vous interrompre tout de suite, car il ne vous reste qu'une dizaine de secondes.

Monsieur Weir, vous avez sept minutes.

(1625)

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai une question pour les représentantes du Bureau du Conseil privé. Vous demandez 1,6 million de dollars pour la stratégie de communication concernant le Plan d'action économique du Canada ainsi que pour la modernisation de la présence numérique du premier ministre.

Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée de la répartition des sommes demandées entre ces deux initiatives?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Avec plaisir. Je vais donc diviser le tout en deux catégories.

Comme je le disais dans mes observations préliminaires, nous demandons 1 million de dollars pour terminer les travaux relatifs au Plan d'action économique qui a bien sûr pris fin après les élections d'octobre. Un site Web était consacré à ce plan avec une équipe de soutien constituée de... Combien d'équivalents temps plein déjà, Karen? Je ne m'en souviens plus.

Mme Karen Cahill:

Pour le Plan d'action économique?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui.

Mme Karen Cahill:

C'était quatre équivalents temps plein.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est ce que je pensais.

Par équivalent temps plein, nous entendons l'équivalent d'un fonctionnaire travaillant à temps plein. Il y avait donc quatre employés affectés à cette tâche sous la gouverne, si je ne m'abuse, d'un directeur. Comme je l'indiquais, ce travail a pris fin après les élections, et ces fonctionnaires se sont vus confier de nouveaux mandats allant dans le sens des priorités du gouvernement actuel et de son premier ministre.

L'autre portion de 600 000 $ sert à appuyer la présence numérique du premier ministre. Celui-ci a un site Web du gouvernement du Canada et d'autres comptes sur les médias sociaux. C'est à cela que cet argent va servir. Le tout doit être fonctionnel 24 heures par jour, 365 jours par année. Les fonds permettront l'embauche de deux employés supplémentaires pour le service des communications. Ils serviront aussi à l'acquisition de licences et à l'établissement d'un contrat avec un entrepreneur capable d'offrir le soutien nécessaire à l'égard de la diffusion en continu et des différentes technologies de pointe. En outre, nous avons investi au cours des 18 derniers mois environ un million de dollars à même nos propres budgets en plus de ce que nous demandons aujourd'hui.

M. Erin Weir:

Est-ce que vous pourriez nous en dire plus long au sujet de la forme que prendra exactement cette présence numérique modernisée? Comment évaluera-t-on la réussite de cette initiative?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Merci pour cette excellente question.

La technologie et Internet sont de plus en plus au coeur de nos vies. Le gouvernement doit mettre les bouchées doubles pour se maintenir à jour et demeurer en connexion avec les Canadiens. La technologie évolue si rapidement que nous avons du mal à suivre.

À ce titre, le gouvernement du Canada a notamment dû s'employer, surtout depuis cinq ou six ans, à trouver le moyen d'exploiter dans son contexte de fonctionnement ce que nous appelions le Web 2.0, c'est-à-dire les médias sociaux. La situation est un peu différente dans le secteur public. Nos valeurs et nos normes d'éthique nous dictent des obligations, notamment en matière de langues officielles et d'accessibilité. Si vous avez un handicap, si vous êtes par exemple non-voyant ou malentendant, le gouvernement du Canada doit s'assurer que vous avez tout de même accès à ses services. Les questions de sécurité et de protection de la vie privée sont aussi des enjeux de premier plan.

C'est à l'intérieur de ce cadre de fonctionnement que nous devons établir cette présence numérique. Il s'agit de satisfaire aux besoins des Canadiens qui ont soif d'information et de connaissances. Auparavant, la presse écrite jouait un grand rôle à ce chapitre, mais les gens veulent maintenant voir ce qui se passe. Dans certains cas, il leur faut des images vidéos. Certains se tournent uniquement vers Twitter pour se tenir au fait de l'actualité. Je ne suis pas moi-même une adepte de Twitter, mais je peux vous assurer que bon nombre de mes collègues le sont. Mes enfants passent leur vie sur YouTube. Il n'est pas rare qu'ils me racontent ce qu'ils ont entendu dire au sujet des activités du gouvernement en syntonisant YouTube.

Il importe pour nous de trouver la façon de veiller à ce que le gouvernement du Canada soit présent sur YouTube, Twitter ou Facebook sans pour autant compromettre ses valeurs et ses normes d'éthique.

M. Erin Weir:

J'ai l'impression que le premier ministre est déjà passablement actif sur Twitter. Son prédécesseur avait sa propre chaîne de télé en ligne qui nous rapportait toutes ses activités. Vous y avez d'ailleurs fait allusion tout à l'heure. Je me demande simplement ce que nous apportera de plus cette modernisation de la présence numérique. Est-ce qu'il y aura simplement plus de vidéos et plus de photos? J'aimerais une réponse aussi précise que possible.

(1630)

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est vraiment une bonne question.

Comme vous le savez, le premier ministre Trudeau est en poste depuis le 4 novembre. Il s'emploie actuellement à déterminer la façon dont il entend communiquer avec les Canadiens par le truchement du site Web du gouvernement du Canada. Avant de devenir premier ministre, il avait ses propres outils sur le Web et les médias sociaux pour servir ses fins politiques, mais ces outils-là ne relèvent pas du Conseil privé. Ce n'est pas l'usage que nous comptons faire des fonds demandés; ils vont plutôt servir à renforcer la capacité du gouvernement du Canada à cet égard.

En toute franchise, je dois vous dire que nous accusons un peu de retard, et que cet argent va nous aider à combler le fossé. Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple qui concerne le premier ministre précédent.

En septembre 2014, si je ne m'abuse, on nous a demandé si nous pouvions diffuser en direct un événement auquel participait le premier ministre Harper. Nous ne disposions pas d'une telle capacité à l'interne, mais nous étions conscients qu'il s'agissait d'un événement important pour le gouvernement du Canada et qu'il était exempt de toute partisanerie politique. Nous avons alors déterminé que nous nous devions d'être capables d'offrir ce service au premier ministre en fonction ainsi qu'à tous ceux qui allaient lui succéder. Nous avons entrepris de nous donner cette capacité, mais nous accusons un peu de retard.

Le président:

Nous en sommes à sept minutes.

Monsieur Graham sera le dernier à avoir droit à sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Ma question s'adresse à Mme Donoghue.

Il y a une sous-activité qui comprend la tenue d'enquêtes, et je cite, « relativement aux allégations d'activités politiques irrégulières de la part des fonctionnaires, ce qui permet de s'assurer du respect de l'impartialité politique. » C'est bien, mais selon le Rapport ministériel sur le rendement, seulement 66 % des enquêtes ont été terminées dans le délai prescrit de 215 jours, alors que l'objectif était de 80 %.

J'ai différentes questions à vous poser. En voici deux très brèves.

De combien d'enquêtes s'agit-il et pourquoi a-t-il fallu plus de 215 jours pour les mener à terme?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Je vais demander à mon collègue, Omer, de vous répondre.

M. Omer Boudreau (vice-président, Direction générale de la gestion ministérielle, Commission de la fonction publique):

Différents facteurs expliquent le non-respect de ce délai. En traitant les demandes d'enquête que nous recevions, nous nous sommes rendu compte que nos processus pouvaient être améliorés, et nous nous sommes engagés à les rationaliser. Au cours des dernières années, nous avons réduit considérablement le temps nécessaire pour procéder à une enquête, soit dans une proportion d'environ 20 % depuis 2014-2015. Nous envisageons maintenant un exercice de restructuration suivant notamment une approche de gestion allégée afin de poursuivre dans le même sens. Il y a encore du travail à faire, mais nous progressons lentement dans cette réduction de la durée des enquêtes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien d'enquêtes est-ce que cela représente en fait? Si c'est 66 % par rapport à 80 %, est-ce deux enquêtes sur trois par rapport à quatre enquêtes sur cinq, ou y a-t-il un plus grand nombre de personnes qui sont touchées?

M. Omer Boudreau:

Pour le dernier exercice visé par notre rapport, il y a 82 cas qui ont fait l'objet d'une enquête.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ces cas concernaient combien de personnes?

M. Omer Boudreau:

Combien de personnes?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Était-ce 82 personnes différentes ou est-ce qu'une même personne pouvait être visée par 40 enquêtes?

M. Omer Boudreau:

Non, les enquêtes portaient sur 82 cas distincts, à savoir 82 plaintes différentes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois, d'accord.

Est-ce que la CFP a observé un changement dans le nombre de problèmes liés à la dotation et à des activités politiques irrégulières au cours des cinq dernières années? Si l'on retourne plus loin en arrière, y a-t-il une tendance que l'on peut dégager?

M. Omer Boudreau:

Il y a effectivement une tendance que nous pouvons observer. Il y a eu augmentation du nombre d'allégations de fraude. Il faut savoir que la notion de fraude dans le contexte de la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique ne renvoie pas nécessairement à ce qu'on entend par fraude criminelle. Il peut s'agir par exemple de cas de falsification de documents, de fausses déclarations de toutes sortes ou de tricherie lors d'un examen. Dans tous ces secteurs, nous avons noté une augmentation du nombre des plaintes et des enquêtes qui s'ensuivent.

En revanche, nous constatons qu'il y a moins d'enquêtes dans des cas d'erreur, d'omission ou de conduite irrégulière. Nous croyons que cette baisse est attribuable au fait que les sous-ministres et les autres gestionnaires de la fonction publique maîtrisent de mieux en mieux les règles et les pratiques de dotation. La Loi a été modifiée en 2005. Il y a eu par la suite une période d'apprentissage. Nous voyons maintenant moins de cas où il y a allégation d'erreur, d'omission ou de conduite inappropriée.

(1635)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle pourrait être selon vous la situation quant au nombre d'enquêtes et à leur durée dans cinq ans d'ici? Quel serait votre objectif réaliste?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Il y a un groupe de spécialistes externes qui ont examiné certains de nos processus pour déterminer les améliorations possibles en vue d'accroître notre capacité. Nous sommes en train d'analyser ces résultats. Nous misons grandement sur la schématisation de nos processus pour en arriver à dégager des pistes d'amélioration.

Par ailleurs, nous intervenons beaucoup plus auprès des ministères pour les aider à mieux comprendre ce qui peut constituer une fraude. Nous leur présentons des pratiques qui ont fait leur preuve pour éviter les comportements frauduleux dans le contexte de la dotation. C'est une approche qui a porté fruit. Nous tablons de plus en plus sur la sensibilisation à des fins de prévention dans tout le système.

Nous allons continuer à explorer différents moyens pouvant nous permettre d'accélérer le processus. Il n'est pas toujours nécessaire de mener une enquête complète. Par exemple, il était auparavant de mise de procéder à une enquête même lorsque quelqu'un avait admis sa faute. Nous avons désormais des processus allégés en pareil cas, notamment lorsqu'il y a fraude. Nos moyens d'intervention sont plus diversifiés.

Dans le contexte d'une enquête, il importe surtout de ne jamais perdre de vue que chacun a le droit de se faire entendre et de présenter ses arguments. Nous recherchons toujours l'équilibre nécessaire au maintien de cette équité judiciaire dans nos processus. Parfois ces enquêtes sont plus complexes et mettent en cause plusieurs individus à la fois, alors que dans d'autres situations, c'est une seule personne qui est concernée. Il arrive aussi qu'une enquête touche un grand nombre de candidats dans le cadre d'un processus plus général, et qu'elle nécessite ainsi davantage de temps. C'est donc variable, car il n'y a pas nécessairement un processus auquel nous pourrions avoir recours dans tous les cas.

Cependant, si l'on pense à la quantité de nominations effectuées dans l'ensemble de la fonction publique, le nombre d'enquêtes est minime, ce qui semble indiquer que le système fonctionne très bien. La capacité d'enquête demeure accessible pour les cas les plus graves.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a 34 % des enquêtes qui ne sont pas terminées au bout de sept mois et demi. Pourriez-vous me dire combien de temps il faut pour les mener à terme?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Il y a certaines enquêtes qui sont terminées en quelques semaines à peine, mais il y en a d'autres de nature plus complexe qui exigent d'entendre un plus grand nombre de témoins, en tenant compte des disponibilités de chacun. Nous avons donc des dossiers d'enquête qui n'étaient toujours pas réglés après 18 mois. Nous cherchons actuellement des moyens d'améliorer nos processus. Par exemple, nous faisons beaucoup plus d'enquêtes sur papier. Nous sommes sans cesse à l'affût des pratiques les plus efficaces utilisées par les autres ministères ayant des pouvoirs d'enquête pour voir comment nous pourrions nous en inspirer pour rationaliser nos processus.

Le président:

Nous devons nous arrêter là.

Nous passons maintenant aux interventions de cinq minutes, mais je dois informer les membres du Comité que, vu la présence de nos témoins pendant les deux heures que durera la séance, nous reviendrons à des interventions de sept minutes après avoir complété ce tour à sept, cinq et trois minutes, ce qui vous laissera amplement de temps pour poser vos questions de suivi.

C'est M. Blaney qui a la parole pour les cinq prochaines minutes. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de la Commission de la fonction publique et du Bureau du Conseil privé.

Ma première question s'adresse à Mme Donoghue, qui est présidente intérimaire de la Commission de la fonction publique.

Dans votre rapport, on voit les répercussions de notre plan budgétaire entre 2011 et 2015 sur le nombre total de fonctionnaires. Celui-ci est passé de 216 000 à 195 000.

Je remarque que la hausse la plus importante au chapitre de l'embauche l'année dernière s'est retrouvée dans la région de la capitale nationale. Avez-vous établi un mécanisme pour vous assurer qu'il y a un équilibre entre le nombre de fonctionnaires dans la région de la capitale nationale et celui dans les régions? Y a-t-il un mécanisme pour vous assurer qu'il y a un équilibre dans le nombre de fonctionnaires dans les régions afin d'éviter qu'il y ait une grande concentration de ceux-ci dans la région de la capitale nationale? Pouvez-vous formuler commentaires à ce sujet?

(1640)

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Essentiellement, les mécanismes et les décisions de dotation, ainsi que l'endroit où les postes dont dotés ne relèvent pas de la Commission. Ces décisions relèvent essentiellement des administrateurs généraux des organisations. Cependant, nous surveillons la situation pour voir où il y a de la dotation, ce qui nous permet de fournir cette information aux administrateurs généraux afin qu'ils prennent conscience des activités qui ont lieu dans tout le système.

Lorsqu'on regarde les données, on constate qu'effectivement, il y a eu réduction de la taille de la fonction publique à partir de 2011. Même si les activités de dotation ont repris, la taille de la fonction publique demeure aussi basse qu'à cette époque. Les activités ont repris, mais elles visent à combler des postes devenus vacants de façon normale. Donc, la taille de la fonction publique n'augmente pas. Quand on voit un accroissement de l'activité, on a l'impression que c'est la fonction publique au complet qui grossit. À l'heure actuelle, c'est contrôlé selon les planifications des administrateurs généraux. Quand des postes deviennent vacants dans les régions, la Commission travaille avec ses bureaux régionaux pour aider au recrutement et créer des processus pour faciliter l'embauche en région.

Nous avons fait autre chose. On entend souvent dire que le recrutement en région peut être difficile. Compte tenu de la nouvelle politique visant à assurer un meilleur équilibre et faciliter le recrutement en région, de même que pour résister au réflexe de ramener les postes à Ottawa, nous avons rendu nos politiques plus flexibles pour permettre des exceptions dans le cadre d'une approche beaucoup plus régionale en matière de dotation, et ce, sous la gouverne du gestionnaire du ministère.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci beaucoup de votre réponse.

Je vais tout de suite passer à la représentante du Conseil privé.

Y a-t-il une coordination au Conseil privé pour s'assurer que la fonction publique canadienne est uniformément répartie à l'échelle canadienne?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui, d'une façon très générale.[Traduction]

Comme je l'indiquais dans mes observations préliminaires, le Bureau du Conseil privé qui compte dans ses rangs le chef de la fonction publique en la personne du greffier du Conseil privé, Michael Wernick, a notamment pour rôle de favoriser l'instauration d'une fonction publique hautement efficace.

Au Bureau du Conseil privé, nous avons un Secrétariat de la transformation opérationnelle et du renouvellement dont le mandat consiste à examiner ce qui se passe dans l'ensemble du gouvernement, notamment en matière de recrutement, de mécanismes de gestion et de mesures de rémunération.

À l'intérieur de cette structure, nous retrouvons le comité de coordination des sous-ministres, une importante instance de gestion qui se réunit régulièrement pour voir comment les choses se déroulent dans l'ensemble de la fonction publique. Le travail de ce comité est appuyé par des groupes de premier plan comme la Commission de la fonction publique, le Bureau du dirigeant principal des ressources humaines et d'autres composantes du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor. Pour répondre à votre question, ce comité considère notamment le nombre de fonctionnaires travaillant dans les différentes régions en essayant de voir si un certain équilibre est maintenu. Et pour revenir à la question de Mme Ratansi, on se demande également si la fonction publique est un reflet fidèle de la diversité canadienne. Arrive-t-on à trouver les talents dont on a besoin? Est-il difficile de recruter des femmes pour des postes technologiques, dans la catégorie CS par exemple? Est-ce que le problème est relié au recrutement fait par les universités? On essaie d'analyser tout cela.

Bref, il y a effectivement coordination, mais aux niveaux supérieurs de la gestion.

(1645)

Le président:

Je dois vous interrompre, car nous avons dépassé les cinq minutes allouées.

Monsieur Ayoub. [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici parmi nous pour répondre à nos questions. Je vais commencer par vous, madame Doucet.

Vous avez déjà expliqué un peu le mandat du Bureau du Conseil privé et le genre de travail que vous faites, mais pouvez-vous me donner un peu plus d'informations sur la façon dont fonctionnent les services internes de votre bureau? Comment fonctionnez-vous à l'interne? [Traduction]

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Merci, monsieur le président. C'est un plaisir pour moi de répondre à cette question, car je suis la personne toute désignée pour le faire à titre de sous-ministre adjointe responsable des services ministériels. Comme nous l'avons déjà mentionné, le rôle principal du Bureau du Conseil privé consiste à conseiller, appuyer et coordonner. C'est le rôle que nous jouons auprès des têtes dirigeantes du gouvernement, à savoir le premier ministre et les ministres du portefeuille ainsi que le greffier du Conseil privé.

Nous voulons que ces gens-là puissent se concentrer sur le travail qu'ils ont à faire en sachant que nous nous occupons de tout du point de vue des services organisationnels. Ma collègue qui dirige le Secrétariat de la transformation opérationnelle et du renouvellement dont je viens de vous parler n'a ainsi pas à s'inquiéter des règles en matière de dotation, de ses budgets ou de ses autres responsabilités organisationnelles, car ce sont mes collaborateurs qui s'en chargent à sa place.

Les gestionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé ont accès à un guichet unique pour tous les services ministériels. Cela comprend tous les services internes que l'on peut imaginer: finances — Karen est la responsable de mon groupe des finances —, passation de marchés, gestion des locaux, ressources humaines, accès à l'information et protection des renseignements personnels, documents parlementaires, etc. Il y a également des services auxquels on ne pense pas nécessairement, comme ceux liés aux passeports et aux visas, lorsque des fonctionnaires partent en déplacement, ainsi qu'aux activités de sécurité, une préoccupation vraiment importante pour le Bureau du Conseil privé qui déploie des effectifs expressément à cette fin. Au sein de nos services juridiques, nous avons des avocats comme tous les autres ministères, mais nous avons aussi un groupe spécial qui se consacre à ce qu'on appelle les documents confidentiels du Cabinet. Cela fait partie de nos services internes. Enfin, il y a bien sûr nos services de communication et ce que j'appellerais les mécanismes de supervision de la gestion supérieure, y compris le groupe de la vérification et le bureau du greffier. [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Je vous remercie.

Je vais poser une autre question à Mme Donoghue au sujet de son organisme.

Dans votre introduction, vous avez parlé de la permission que doit obligatoirement demander un fonctionnaire qui désire se présenter en politique, et ce, à tous les paliers de gouvernement, que ce soit au palier fédéral, provincial ou municipal.

C'est aujourd'hui la Journée de la femme. Alors qu'on a de la difficulté à recruter des femmes dans le domaine politique, y a-t-il un plan en place qui les incite à s'engager en politique? Y a-t-il quelque chose qui les en dissuade? Quel est le plan pour les employés en ce qui a trait à leur volonté éventuelle et à leur liberté de se présenter en politique? Comment cela se passe-t-il?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

D'abord, je dois dire que la Commission reconnaît le droit de tous les Canadiens, qu'ils soient fonctionnaires ou non, à participer à des activités politiques. Elle reconnaît que c'est un droit fondamental. Il faut cependant assurer un équilibre pour préserver un autre principe fondamental, à savoir la non-partisanerie au sein de la fonction publique.

Lorsqu'un fonctionnaire veut se présenter comme candidat politique, peu importe le palier de gouvernement, il faut qu'il nous demande la permission pour le faire. Il en est ainsi parce que nous voulons voir quelle serait l'incidence de cette initiative sur la préservation de la non-partisanerie. Très rares sont les cas où cette permission est refusée. Quand nous octroyons une permission, elle est assortie de conditions qui sont souvent discutées avec l'employeur du candidat potentiel afin de définir de quelle façon il réintégrerait son poste s'il n'était pas élu. Nous prenons en considération le genre d'emploi qu'il exerce et sa visibilité.

Essentiellement, le but est de ne pas restreindre la capacité d'un fonctionnaire de se porter candidat, au contraire. Il faut s'assurer que, s'il n'est pas élu, il pourra réintégrer ses fonctions sans nuire à la perception d'impartialité de la fonction publique. Généralement, quand une personne est élue, surtout aux niveaux fédéral et provincial, la loi exige qu'elle démissionne de la fonction publique parce qu'elle va accepter un autre emploi à temps plein.

Il n'y a pas de dispositions particulières s'appliquant à différents types de personnes. Tout le monde est traité de la même façon. Il n'y a pas de traitement différent, qu'il s'agisse d'un homme ou d'une femme ou pour toute autre situation.

(1650)

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Est-ce que les règles sont bien... [Traduction]

Le président:

Excusez-moi, mais je dois vous interrompre. C'est au tour de M. Weir, qui dispose de trois minutes. Par la suite, nous retournerons à une série de questions dont le temps alloué est de sept minutes, et si mes calculs sont justes, il restera suffisamment de temps pour que quatre membres puissent poser des questions.

Monsieur Weir, vous disposez de trois minutes. Veuillez poser des questions précises, si possible.

M. Erin Weir:

Oui.

Le BCP demande 200 000 $ pour la création d'un comité consultatif pour la nomination des sénateurs. Je me demande si vous pouvez nous dire quels seront les coûts liés au comité.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question.

En 2016-2017, nous demanderons 1,5 million de dollars. Karen pourrait vous expliquer comment cela se manifestera dans le processus budgétaire.

Mme Karen Cahill:

Certainement. Lorsque nous avons présenté cela au Conseil du Trésor, il était trop tard pour ajouter l'information dans notre Budget principal des dépenses, de sorte que le montant de 1,5 million de dollars pour 2016-2017 ne figure pas dans le Budget principal des dépenses du BCP, qui a été déposé le 26 février.

Dans le cadre du prochain Budget supplémentaire des dépenses de 2016-2017, le BCP présentera le montant de 1,5 million de dollars pour la nomination des sénateurs. Ce sera dans notre Budget principal des dépenses.

M. Erin Weir:

Cela correspondra-t-il au coût total du comité consultatif?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je pourrais peut-être parler... Je viens de vous donner des renseignements couvrant une année. Je pourrais vous aider un peu plus.

Le total des fonds que demandera le BCP pour les six prochains exercices sera de 5,4 millions de dollars, et par la suite, il demandera 700 000 $ pour les années subséquentes. À quoi serviront-ils? À deux choses.

Ils serviront au comité en tant que tel, aux honorables Canadiens qui ont présenté leur candidature pour faire ce travail. Nous avons des membres permanents et, comme vous le savez, des membres seront nommés pour chaque province. Nous payons un montant journalier assez modeste pour l'exécution de ce travail, mais nous les payons pour l'effectuer, et nous payons leurs frais de déplacement lorsqu'ils doivent se réunir. Toutefois, nous nous servirons des technologies dans la mesure du possible pour réduire les dépenses au minimum.

Il y a les coûts liés à la formation du comité qui, comme vous le voyez dans les prévisions, tournent autour de 200 000 $ — mettre le comité sur pied pour pourvoir les postes vacants les plus pressants.

Comme je l'ai dit, notre demande de fonds couvre six exercices et s'est basé sur les postes qui se libéreront au Sénat parce que certains sénateurs auront atteint l'âge de la retraite. En analysant les choses, on voit qu'il s'agit d'un plan de travail immédiat.

L'autre partie des fonds servira à payer les fonctionnaires qui participeront au processus et qui auront le rôle d'un secrétariat. Nous absorberons une partie des coûts, et nous le faisons déjà, mais cela se traduira par une augmentation de la charge de travail, car avant cela, le BCP ne jouait vraiment pas de rôle majeur dans la nomination des sénateurs. Il s'agit d'une nouvelle fonction pour notre organisation: aider le comité sur le plan de ses travaux et des technologies dont il a besoin.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je m'excuse auprès du Comité; j'ai oublié M  McCauley, qui disposait de cinq minutes.

Je peux prétendre que j'ai fait comme le président Regan et dire que vous faisiez du chahut et que je vous ai exclus, mais ce ne serait pas juste.

Je cède la parole à M. McCauley pour cinq minutes, et nous passerons ensuite aux interventions de sept minutes.

Monsieur McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Vous avez parlé d'un montant de 800 000 $ destiné à l'Équipe de mise en oeuvre du plan frontalier visant à assurer la sécurité à la frontière. J'aimerais savoir contre quoi et qui il faut se protéger à la frontière américaine. N'y a-t-il pas un autre ministère qui dépense déjà des milliards pour nous protéger contre des intrusions à cette frontière?

(1655)

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question, monsieur le président. J'en suis ravie.

Je vais revenir un peu en arrière. En février 2011, je crois, le Canada et les États-Unis ont annoncé qu'ils allaient collaborer pour établir un nouveau partenariat à long terme afin d'accélérer la circulation légitime des personnes et des biens entre les deux pays, tout en renforçant leur sécurité et leur compétitivité économique. Le plan à cet égard s'est concrétisé au mois de décembre de la même année.

La frontière est un endroit complexe. Il y a constamment des gens qui la traversent pour le travail ou pour leurs loisirs. Les deux gouvernements veulent trouver des moyens de faciliter le commerce et le déroulement des activités légitimes. Chaque pays est mû par des facteurs en particulier, dont la sécurité.

Le plan était assez compliqué. Pour les deux pays, il s'agissait d'adopter une démarche faisant intervenir différents ministères pour la mise en oeuvre du plan, y compris la modernisation de systèmes complexes de TI.

Le travail est en cours depuis la fin de 2011. Au Canada, il est rattaché au Bureau du Conseil privé en raison de sa perspective d'ensemble et de sa capacité de réunir tous les ministères. Les choses se déroulent bien et ont progressé. Nous demandons des fonds, et il s'agit de deux ans. Au cours de la prochaine année, nous serons en mesure de synchroniser l'examen du travail accompli pour trouver une marche à suivre.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci.

Vous demandez 1 million de dollars pour terminer le travail concernant le Plan d'action économique du Canada. Je sais qu'il a été beaucoup critiqué au fil des ans pour ce qui est des dépenses.

À quoi servira ce montant de 1 million de dollars étant donné que le plan a essentiellement pris fin et que le nouveau gouvernement s'est engagé à n'utiliser aucune publicité partisane? Pouvez-vous nous expliquer à quoi servira ce million de dollars puisque nous y avons mis fin? Quels avantages en tireront les Canadiens?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Le Plan d'action économique était un guichet unique sur les priorités du gouvernement, de sorte que les Canadiens n'avaient qu'une source à consulter pour voir ce qui se passait au gouvernement.

J'ai dit qu'il avait pris fin après les élections. Comme vous le savez, elles ont eu lieu en octobre, ce qui signifie que le programme a été exécuté jusqu'aux élections, c'est-à-dire qu'il a été administré durant les six premiers mois de l'exercice. Les fonds servent à soutenir le travail qu'ont accompli les fonctionnaires conformément à la politique de communication du gouvernement du Canada. Par la suite, ils ont dû s'occuper de l'archivage et mettre fin au plan.

Ce n'est pas aussi facile que cela en a l'air, mais cela ne nécessite pas la totalité du montant de 1 million de dollars. Si on le calcule au prorata, on peut imaginer que si le travail est accompli au cours des six premiers mois de l'exercice, on n'a besoin que de la moitié du montant pour le travail des fonctionnaires.

Le président:

Monsieur McCauley, vous voudrez peut-être garder vos autres questions pour les dernières interventions de sept minutes. Veuillez m'excuser, mais nous n'avons plus de temps.

Nous passons à la dernière série de questions, dont le temps alloué sera de sept minutes. C'est M. Grewal qui commence.

M. Raj Grewal (Brampton-Est, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous de votre témoignage.

Ma question s'adresse à Mme Doucet.

Quels défis votre organisme prévoit-il avoir généralement dans l'exécution de son mandat?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Monsieur le président, je pense que mes collègues à ma droite hocheront la tête en entendant ma réponse.

Mme Donoghue a parlé du lancement du nouveau site Web de la Commission de la fonction publique qui a eu lieu en avril, l'an dernier. Je vous dirais que la plus grande préoccupation de mes homologues dans l'ensemble du gouvernement et moi, c'est la technologie. Elle change rapidement et c'est un outil essentiel pour nous tous.

J'ai dit un peu plus tôt que le gouvernement et le secteur privé n'utilisent pas la technologie de la même façon, car leurs systèmes de valeurs sont différents. Franchement, les questions liées aux langues officielles et à l'accessibilité ne préoccupent pas autant les gens du secteur privé que le gouvernement du Canada.

Évidemment, je parle au nom du BCP, mais j'imagine que c'est la même chose dans d'autres organismes. Nous avons deux volets sur le plan de la technologie. Il y a d'abord le travail de tous les jours, c'est-à-dire s'assurer que les systèmes que tous les gens utilisent pour faire leur travail fonctionnent, et ce, de façon sécuritaire, car notre milieu est une cible pour les malfaiteurs. Nous devons nous assurer que nous avons les pare-feu qu'il faut pour protéger les gens qui les utilisent, sans entraver leur travail. Il s'agit des activités quotidiennes, ce qui comprend faire des mises à jour et l'application de correctifs et trouver des possibilités, sans pour autant nuire au déroulement du travail.

L'autre volet, c'est bien sûr l'innovation. Si, par exemple, le greffier du Conseil privé voulait entrer en contact avec des universités pour faire du recrutement postsecondaire, qu'il voulait utiliser Google Hangouts et qu'il venait me voir pour me demander de rendre cela possible, je lui dirais « d'accord ». L'argent que nous demandons dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses est destiné à nous aider à faire cela.

J'ai déjà parlé de la diffusion en continu en direct. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons de l'aide contractuelle. J'aimerais être en mesure de créer cette capacité au sein du Bureau du Conseil privé pour pouvoir répondre rapidement aux attentes des Canadiens qui veulent utiliser la technologie pour communiquer avec le gouvernement.

Je dirais que l'utilisation de la technologie, c'est-à-dire pouvoir agir de façon sécuritaire, mais rapide, est probablement ma plus grande préoccupation ces jours-ci.

(1700)

M. Raj Grewal:

Les investissements dans la technologie et l'innovation améliorent-ils l'efficacité du gouvernement, de votre bureau?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Sans aucun doute. Comme vous le savez, le BCP est le secrétariat du Cabinet. Il y a le Cabinet et tous ses différents comités. Les ministres ne peuvent pas toujours venir à Ottawa pour assister aux réunions des comités, et parfois, ils veulent appeler. J'ai parlé d'Internet, mais permettez-moi de vous parler des télécommunications. Si un ministre se trouve dans un autre pays et que le premier ministre veut lui parler ou qu'une réunion d'un sous-comité doit avoir lieu, il faut que le ministre puisse appeler en toute sécurité. Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons beaucoup travaillé avec des partenaires du gouvernement importants, comme SPAC et Services partagés Canada — un excellent partenaire — pour mettre cela en place. Nous sommes un peu victimes de notre succès, car maintenant, les ministres nous demandent si nous pouvons faire des vidéoconférences protégées, ce qui nécessite une grande largeur de bande et une organisation complètement différente.

Or, c'est l'époque à laquelle nous vivons, et la technologie améliore l'efficacité du gouvernement.

M. Raj Grewal:

Selon le rapport sur le rendement, vous avez fait un examen après le drame qui s'est produit à Ottawa. Quelles recommandations avez-vous mises en oeuvre à partir de ce processus d'examen et quels changements sont survenus?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Entre autres — et nous le ferons toujours pour maintenir nos mesures de sécurité à jour —, nous avons collaboré avec l'ensemble du gouvernement pour nous assurer que les plans de continuité des opérations étaient à jour, simplifiés et liés à des fonctions essentielles révisées. Les événements du 22 octobre ont été un avertissement sur ce plan.

Au BCP, nous avons créé nos plans d'intervention en cas d'urgence. Nous les avons refaits, et nous avons révisé ces plans ainsi que les protocoles de communication. Nous avons renforcé la sensibilisation et la formation. Il y a deux ou trois semaines, lorsqu'une alarme s'est déclenchée, je me suis tout d'abord demandé de quoi il s'agissait. « S'agit-il d'un incendie, d'un tremblement de terre ou d'un tireur? »

Je n'aurais jamais pensé faire cela le 22 octobre, mais la formation amène un protocole de sécurité différent. Si un tremblement de terre se produit, on ne se comportera pas de la même façon que s'il y a présence d'un tireur. Il est important d'être formé et informé à cet égard.

Sur le plan des communications, le BCP a clarifié ses processus de communication d'échange d'information avec d'autres fournisseurs de services d'intervention d'urgence pour s'assurer qu'il est lié au centre des opérations pour la sécurité publique et le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor. Le SCT est l'employeur de la fonction publique et joue un rôle important lorsqu'un événement de ce type se produit.

Nous avons apporté des améliorations physiques, mais pour des raisons de sécurité, je ne peux pas donner de détails. Certaines sont évidentes et d'autres, moins.

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

(1705)

M. Raj Grewal:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous avons dépassé le temps alloué. Un de vos collègues pourrait poser une question pour vous, si vous en avez une.

Monsieur Blaney, vous disposez de sept minutes.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.

Je veux dire que j'appuie le montant de 1 million de dollars destiné à des activités et à la mise en oeuvre de la stratégie de prévention de l'arrivée de navires de migrants clandestins. Je pense que c'est bien géré et que la personne qui agit à titre de conseiller spécial fait un travail remarquable.[Français]

J'aimerais revenir sur la question abordée par M. Ayoub au sujet la Commission de la fonction publique. Il a parlé de la possibilité, pour les fonctionnaires, de se présenter en politique.

J'aimerais faire un parallèle avec la fonction publique provinciale. J'ai des collègues qui sont des élus provinciaux. Quand viendra le temps de quitter la vie politique, il sera probablement trop tard, mais ils ont gardé leur statut de fonctionnaires. Or le paragraphe 3.21 de la page 72 de votre rapport stipule ceci: « La personne perd sa qualité de fonctionnaire le jour où elle est élue au terme d'une élection fédérale, provinciale ou territoriale ».

Pourquoi être aussi intransigeant à l'égard d'une personne qui, après avoir été en politique, souhaite réintégrer sa fonction?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

C'est une question qui est valable et je vous remercie de l'avoir posée.

C'est le cadre législatif qui nous a été confié par le Parlement au moment de l'adoption de cette loi. C'est dans ce contexte que cela a été déterminé.

Je vais rationaliser un peu les choses. Prenons le profil de carrière général d'un fonctionnaire. Lorsqu'il demande un congé, le maximum de temps qui est souvent alloué est de cinq ans. C'est peut-être une question d'équité. On s'est souvent posé la question sur la façon de gérer cela. La question ne se pose pas si une personne est élue au niveau municipal, mais seulement si elle est élue au niveau fédéral ou provincial. Il en est probablement ainsi parce que ce sont des termes qui respectent à peu près les mêmes normes que tout autre congé qui est accordé à un fonctionnaire.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Très bien.

En 2006, j'ai dû démissionner de mon poste quand j'ai été élu dans un gouvernement minoritaire. À ce moment-là, j'aurais aimé garder mon statut dans ce poste que j'aimais beaucoup. Aujourd'hui, j'ai tourné la page et je suis passé à autre chose. Je tenais quand même à le préciser.

Pour donner la chance aux gens de faire de la politique, on pourrait accorder un statut dit « indéterminé », ce qui est un atout important pour un fonctionnaire.

Je vais revenir au Bureau du Conseil privé.[Traduction]

J'aimerais revenir sur le processus de nomination des sénateurs.[Français]

Pouvez-vous éclairer ma lanterne à cet égard?

Vous avez dit chercher un montant additionnel de 200 000 $ pour le Sénat, mais vous avez parlé d'un coût de 5,4 millions de dollars au cours des six prochaines années.

Pourriez-vous m'éclairer sur les coûts? Est-ce que les recommandations de ce rapport seront rendues publiques?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de cette question.[Traduction]

Je m'excuse s'il y a pu avoir une certaine confusion. J'essayais de répondre à la question de l'autre membre sur nos dépenses à venir. C'est probablement un peu déroutant parce que vous n'avez pas les chiffres. Je les connais, et comme l'a expliqué Karen, ils ne figurent pas dans les documents budgétaires que vous avez devant vous. Je peux toutefois assurer les membres du Comité que chaque fois que je comparais devant vous — et je sais que vous serez saisis de ces chiffres —, je vous donne ces renseignements pour que vous ayez une vue d'ensemble.

Ce que je n'ai pas avec moi aujourd'hui, c'est la ventilation détaillée du montant de 1,5 million de dollars que nous dépenserons au cours du prochain exercice, celui qui commencera dans environ trois semaines. Je sais que cela fera partie du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Nous demandons 5,4 millions de dollars sur six ans et, de ce montant, 1,5 million de dollars au prochain exercice.

Si le Comité le souhaite, je serais ravie de lui fournir une ventilation de la façon dont nous prévoyons dépenser ces fonds.

(1710)

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Je crois comprendre que le montant de 5,4 millions de dollars sur six ans est destiné à couvrir les dépenses des personnes nommées, des Canadiens chargés de faire des recommandations. Il couvre également la création d'un groupe de fonctionnaires qui fournira de l'aide. Avez-vous une idée du nombre d'équivalents temps plein qui seront embauchés pour ce nouveau secrétariat, cette nouvelle structure?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

D'après ce que je comprends, je crois qu'on embauchera quatre ETP supplémentaires pour appuyer les travaux du Comité au cours des cinq prochaines années. Vous pouvez comprendre que pendant les deux premières années des travaux, ils se concentreront sur le tout nouveau processus. Ensuite, à mesure qu'ils maîtriseront le processus et qu'ils seront plus efficaces, la charge de travail sera moins coûteuse.

Il s'agit donc de quatre nouveaux fonctionnaires au BCP pour accomplir ce travail, plus le soutien technologique et bien sûr les frais de participation au Comité.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Oui. Ce processus existait avant la structure, mais cette nouvelle structure est maintenant présente et elle est certainement reflétée dans ces coûts.

Pour revenir au Plan d'action Par-delà la frontière, est-il exact que votre mandat consiste à coordonner le fonctionnement général du gouvernement? Pourriez-vous préciser votre rôle dans la mise en oeuvre de l'accord initial et de l'accord de prédédouanement qui a été signé en mars 2015? J'ai des motifs de croire que c'est la raison pour laquelle vous demandez du financement supplémentaire.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Comme je l'ai dit, le Plan d'action Par-delà la frontière a été annoncé à la fin décembre 2011 par le premier ministre de l'époque et le premier ministre américain de l'époque, et je soupçonne que le député connaît très bien ce plan. Depuis ce temps, comme je l'ai dit, le rôle du BCP a consisté à coordonner les efforts du ministère. Qu'est-ce que cela a signifié pour les deux premières années? On devait obtenir l'approbation du Cabinet et une couverture stratégique pour plusieurs initiatives. Nous avons constaté que de nombreux ministères mentionnaient le même sujet au Cabinet, c'est-à-dire qu'ils avaient besoin de quelqu'un pour organiser et coordonner ce processus, et c'est donc le BCP qui a assumé cette responsabilité. Il ne pouvait pas le faire dans le cadre existant, car il jouait un rôle de remise en question pour les propositions qui lui étaient présentées, et c'est ce que le personnel du BCP a fait à l'époque. Nous avons établi cette nouvelle fonction qui pouvait jouer un rôle de coordination de tous les ministères participants, notamment Sécurité publique, la GRC, le ministère de la Citoyenneté et de l'Immigration de l'époque, maintenant le ministère de l'Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté, et l'ASFC. L'éventail des initiatives comprenait la sécurité du fret, les négociants dignes de confiance, les voyageurs transfrontaliers et...

Le président:

Madame Doucet, je dois vous interrompre. Je suis désolé, mais nous avons dépassé le temps imparti d'une minute et demie. Vous serez peut-être en mesure de mentionner certains éléments de votre réponse à M. Blaney lorsque vous répondrez à d'autres questions des membres du Comité.

Monsieur Weir, vous avez sept minutes.

(1715)

M. Erin Weir:

J'aimerais effectivement reprendre une question posée par mon collègue. Il se peut que je n'aie pas entendu la réponse.

Les recommandations formulées par le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat seront-elles rendues publiques?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Les recommandations du comité consultatif seront présentées au premier ministre aux fins d'étude, et la décision lui revient.

M. Erin Weir:

Il revient au premier ministre de rendre les recommandations publiques ou non.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est ce que je comprends.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord. En ce qui concerne les coûts liés au comité consultatif, la somme de 5,4 millions de dollars que vous avez mentionnée et expliquée représente une contribution par l'entremise du Bureau du Conseil privé. D'autres ministères, ou peut-être même le Sénat, offriront-ils un financement pour appuyer cet organisme?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je ne peux pas parler pour le Sénat. D'après ce que je comprends, tous les coûts engagés par les autres ministères pour les nominations au Sénat seront absorbés dans leurs budgets existants, et les seules dépenses que je peux prévoir sont celles liées aux cotes de sécurité. Je crois qu'elles pourraient être facilement absorbées dans les activités habituelles liées aux cotes de sécurité menées par l'organisme responsable de la sécurité.

Il s'agit réellement d'une nouvelle fonction pour la fonction publique. En effet, jusqu'à ce que le gouvernement annonce cette nouvelle fonction, ces activités n'étaient pas réalisées au sein de la fonction publique. Notre rôle consistait vraiment à administrer et à coordonner les cotes de sécurité et à veiller à ce que les documents soient transmis. Il s'agit réellement d'une nouvelle fonction. Le BCP s'en occupera, et je ne m'attends pas à ce que d'autres ministères envoient d'autres demandes.

M. Erin Weir:

Le BCP demande un peu plus de 700 000 $ pour des services professionnels et spéciaux, et j'aimerais savoir s'il s'agit de services d'experts-conseils. Pourriez-vous préciser à quoi servira cet argent?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vais laisser Karen répondre à cette question.

Mme Karen Cahill:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Non, ce n'est pas seulement pour les experts-conseils. Cette catégorie comprend plusieurs postes budgétaires, notamment la formation, les services d'accueil et, évidemment, les services professionnels, mais il ne s'agit pas seulement d'embaucher des experts-conseils.

M. Erin Weir:

Ces 700 000 $ sont-ils principalement destinés à la formation? Seront-ils surtout investis dans les services d'accueil? Pouvez-vous nous éclairer?

Mme Karen Cahill:

Vous comprendrez, monsieur le président, que ce que nous avons en ce moment... L'année financière est toujours en cours. L'exercice n'est pas encore terminé et malheureusement, nous devrons attendre le dépôt des comptes publics pour finaliser ce montant et mieux comprendre les postes visés.

M. Erin Weir:

J'ai une question au sujet du Plan d'action économique. Maintenant que cette initiative tire à sa fin, avec le recul, pourriez-vous nous dire quel service public il a servi, s'il y a lieu, et comment on pourrait évaluer la réussite de ce programme?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie d'avoir posé la question. Comme vous le savez probablement, le Plan d'action économique découle de la crise économique mondiale de 2009.

M. Erin Weir:

Je suis désolé, mais je tiens à préciser que ma question ne concerne pas l'ensemble du Plan d'action économique, mais les initiatives qui en ont fait la promotion.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui. On a dit au gouvernement que les gens ne savaient pas où obtenir des renseignements. Ce message s'est clairement fait entendre. Il s'agissait d'un aperçu de l'idée prévisible de tout rassembler dans un seul endroit. D'après ce que je comprends, le site a été visité par de nombreuses personnes. Le gouvernement a constaté que l'initiative était couronnée de succès et a tenté de trouver des façons de tirer parti de cette réussite dans la catégorie des politiques en matière de communication du gouvernement du Canada.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai une question pour les témoins de la Commission de la fonction publique; elle concerne l'embauche des anciens combattants.

Mon collègue a posé quelques questions très précises sur la proportion représentée par les 94 anciens combattants dans l'ensemble des candidats ou des fonctionnaires et je comprends que ces données sont à venir, mais j'aimerais poser une question plus générale. Il me semble que ce n'est pas un très grand nombre d'anciens combattants dans le contexte de l'ensemble de la fonction publique ou du nombre total d'anciens combattants. Êtes-vous d'accord avec cette évaluation et pourriez-vous approfondir la question?

(1720)

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Merci.

En ce qui concerne les détails, nous avons embauché des anciens combattants dans le passé, mais le degré de priorité accordé à cet enjeu était moins élevé que dans la nouvelle loi. On a manifesté un grand intérêt, les activités reprennent dans ce domaine et les ministères s'échangent davantage de renseignements.

Selon nos activités en date du 10 février, nous avons essentiellement présenté la candidature de plus de 876 anciens combattants dans 49 ministères. Comme je l'ai dit, un grand nombre d'entre eux décident de ne pas donner suite à la démarche pour différentes raisons. Essentiellement, parmi ces présentations de candidature, 11 nominations ont été faites au MDN, une à EDSC, et une à Santé Canada.

En ce qui concerne la présentation de candidatures dans le contexte de libération pour raisons médicales non attribuables au service, 4 000 anciens combattants ont été aiguillés vers 60 ministères; il y a donc beaucoup d'activités dans ce domaine.

Il faut toutefois savoir si les anciens combattants souhaitent saisir les occasions qui leur sont présentées. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de savoir si nous souhaitons embaucher, mais également si les anciens combattants s'intéressent aux emplois offerts à ce moment-là. Il y a beaucoup plus de connaissances et de sensibilisation à cet égard. Nous avons été en mesure de fournir beaucoup plus de renseignements sur nos réussites et sur les compétences qu'apportent les anciens combattants et les membres des Forces armées canadiennes. Je crois que les activités vont augmenter dans ce domaine.

Il est important de se rappeler que certains de ces anciens combattants ont des emplois, mais le gouvernement leur donne également ce droit pendant une période de cinq ans. Il se peut qu'ils ne cherchent pas à changer d'emploi à ce moment-là dans le contexte du système. À mesure qu'ils progressent dans le système...

Il s'agit d'un système assez complexe, surtout lorsqu'on ne le comprend pas vraiment. Nous, les fonctionnaires, en faisons partie depuis longtemps. C'est pourquoi nous passons beaucoup de temps à fournir des renseignements aux anciens combattants et à leur enseigner comment se débrouiller dans le système. Le langage utilisé au sein des FAC est très différent du langage bureaucratique. Nous nous efforçons vraiment de faire les jumelages en ce moment, mais nous sommes sûrs qu'ils vont augmenter.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Drouin. Il sera le dernier intervenant dans la série de questions de sept minutes.

M. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'être ici aujourd'hui.

J'ai une brève question. J'aimerais faire suite à la question de mon collègue, M. Weir, sur les nominations au Sénat. La Commission de la fonction publique publie-t-elle habituellement le nom de tous les candidats qui font une demande d'emploi? Rendez-vous ces renseignements publics?

Mme Christine Donoghue:

Non. Il ne s'agit pas de renseignements publics.

M. Francis Drouin:

D'accord.

Ma prochaine question concerne le processus de nominations publiques et s'adresse peut-être davantage au BCP. Publiez-vous les noms des candidats qui postulent dans le cadre du processus de nominations publiques?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Non. Nous ne le faisons pas pour des raisons liées à la protection de la vie privée.

M. Francis Drouin:

Oui, il y a des préoccupations liées à la protection de la vie privée.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui.

M. Francis Drouin:

Peut-on présumer que les noms des candidats non retenus pour des postes au Sénat ne seront pas publiés, manifestement pour des raisons liées à la protection de la vie privée?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Nous appliquons les règlements en matière de protection de la vie privée du gouvernement du Canada. D'après ce que je comprends, les noms ne seraient pas publiés, à moins que les candidats donnent....

M. Francis Drouin:

... leur consentement.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

... oui, à moins qu'ils donnent leur consentement.

Je ne pense pas pouvoir imaginer une situation dans laquelle cela pourrait se produire, mais c'est possible.

M. Francis Drouin:

D'accord. Merci.

Lorsqu'on est le dernier, toutes les questions ont déjà été posées, mais vous avez mentionné un élément important en ce qui concerne les 1,6 million de dollars visant à assurer la présence numérique du premier ministre. Vous avez dit que l'ancien premier ministre souhaitait avoir accès à la « diffusion en continu », et que vous n'aviez pas les capacités nécessaires à l'époque.

Y a-t-il quelqu'un au BCP qui surveille les nouvelles technologies? Je pense que les enfants d'aujourd'hui ne sont plus sur Facebook.

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est une très bonne question.

La personne qui surveille le plus activement les nouvelles technologies et leurs effets sur les Canadiens est Michael Wernick, le greffier du Conseil privé.

Christine rit, car il est aussi sa source de renseignements, j'en suis sûre. Il est probablement l'un des leaders les plus informés en matière de technologies que j'ai rencontrés. Mes collègues de Services partagés Canada seraient sûrement du même avis. Il repousse toujours les limites de ce que nous pouvons faire. Il est ambitieux en ce qui concerne les échéances, car il comprend l'importance de rester pertinent pour les Canadiens en temps réel.

(1725)

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci.

Comme vous le savez, le BCP a subi une réorganisation. Il y a un nouveau sous-secrétaire du Cabinet, Résultats et livraison. Ce nouveau poste — ou cette nouvelle direction — est-il alimenté par les ressources internes?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Oui. Nous avons réaffecté des ressources au sein du Bureau du Conseil privé pour appuyer cette nouvelle fonction.

M. Francis Drouin:

Je n'ai pas vu cela dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

Je vois qu'on a prévu 44,5 millions de dollars sur trois ans dans le budget de 2015 pour la mise en oeuvre continue de la stratégie canadienne de prévention du passage de clandestins. Est-ce seulement pour le BCP, ou cela inclut-il d'autres ministères?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

Je vous remercie de la question, monsieur le président.

Je peux vous assurer que ce n'est pas seulement pour le BCP. Si vous le souhaitez, je peux vous donner la ventilation.

Karen, veuillez m'aider si j'oublie quelque chose.

Par exemple, pour l'année 2014-2015, on a dépensé 14,9 millions de dollars, dont 5 millions de dollars pour ce qui est maintenant le ministère des Affaires mondiales, 5 millions de dollars pour la GRC, 3 millions de dollars pour le ministère de l'Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté et 700 000 $ pour le CSTC. La portion du BCP est la plus petite partie. La plus grosse partie de la somme totale est dépensée dans les grands ministères qui assument la responsabilité de première ligne qui consiste à éviter que des bateaux remplis d'immigrants se présentent au Canada.

M. Francis Drouin:

D'accord. Merci.

En ce qui concerne les 0,8 million de dollars pour le Plan d'action Par-delà la frontière, comme vous le savez, les journaux ont récemment annoncé que le projet partagé entrepris par les services de police a fait face à un obstacle. J'aimerais savoir si le BCP tient compte de ces risques, car s'il y a deux partenaires participants, cela entraîne manifestement des problèmes avec les services de police lorsqu'il s'agit de déterminer le territoire où les accusations seront portées en cas de problème.

Tenez-vous compte de tous ces risques lorsque vous faites une demande dans le cadre du budget?

Mme Michelle Doucet:

C'est une très bonne question, et la réponse courte est oui.

Vous avez parlé d'une initiative, et je vais vous parler d'une autre initiative connexe liée à la collaboration entre les organismes d'application de la loi. Il s'agit du Conseil de coopération en matière de réglementation; il n'est pas mentionné dans ce budget, mais il l'a été dans des budgets précédents.

Les membres de ce conseil ont notamment, dans le cadre de leur travail, mis sur pied un projet pilote visant l'application de la loi entre les agents canadiens et américains responsables du bien-être et de la sécurité sur les Grands Lacs. Ils ont appris à collaborer en réalisant 10 missions différentes pour régler les problèmes. Il faut du temps et de la patience. Nous tentons de tenir compte de cela dans les dépenses demandées par les ministères, et certainement dans les dépenses demandées par le BCP.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci.

Le président:

Je crois que nous allons nous arrêter ici.

J'aimerais remercier tous les témoins d'avoir comparu aujourd'hui. Je suis sûr que je parle au nom de tous les membres du Comité lorsque je vous affirme que tous les renseignements que vous avez fournis ont été très utiles. Nous avons hâte de reparler avec vous au cours des mois ou des années à venir.

Les témoins peuvent partir.

J'aimerais demander aux membres du Comité d'examiner une question qui concerne notre retour de la semaine de relâche. Comme tout le monde le sait, le 22 mars est le jour du dépôt du budget. Il s'agit également d'un jour de réunion, et je crois que nous ne pourrons pas la tenir ce jour-là. C'est aussi une semaine abrégée, car vendredi, c'est Vendredi saint.

Vous n'avez pas à me répondre aujourd'hui, mais je vous demande de réfléchir à la question de savoir si nous nous réunirons le jeudi même s'il s'agit d'une semaine abrégée — nous réglerons cette question avant la fin de la semaine. Je suis sûr qu'un grand nombre de députés souhaitent quitter Ottawa un peu plus tôt.

Excusez-moi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce jour-là suivra-t-il l'horaire du vendredi ou non?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, c'est Vendredi saint.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais le jeudi suivra-t-il l'horaire du vendredi?

Le président:

Non, d'après ce que je comprends, il s'agit d'un jeudi normal.

(1730)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Le président:

Vous pouvez vérifier auprès de votre leader à la Chambre, mais c'est ce que je comprends, et je n'ai rien entendu d'autre.

Même si nous ne nous réunissons pas cette semaine-là, je suggère que les membres du Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure se réunissent, afin que nous puissions commencer à planifier notre liste de témoins et les études que nous envisageons d'entreprendre, car la prochaine semaine où nous siégeons au Parlement sera suivie d'une pause de deux semaines. Réfléchissez à la question de savoir si nous organiserons une réunion du Comité ou seulement une réunion du Sous-comité, et nous réglerons la question au cours des deux prochaines réunions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous prendrons [Inaudible] de la pause.

Le président:

D'accord. La séance est levée. Michelle-Doucet-Declaration-dOuverture-F

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 08, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.