header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-03-09 OGGO 5

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1830)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Ladies and gentlemen, I will call the meeting to order.

Welcome to the fifth meeting of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates.

A reminder to all members that the proceedings tonight are televised.

It is my pleasure to welcome Minister Brison.

Minister Brison, I understand you have an opening statement, and perhaps you could also introduce some of the officials with you.

Hon. Scott Brison (President of the Treasury Board):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm delighted to be here with you tonight, and with members of the committee.

We're going to be focusing tonight on supplementary estimates (C). I look forward to the discussion.

The mandate of this committee is to study the effectiveness and proper functioning of government operations, the estimates process, as well as the expenditure plans of central departments and agencies.

The Treasury Board is quite central to the work of this committee, so I'm looking forward to having a good working relationship with members of this committee. I'm delighted to be here tonight with Joyce Murray, our parliamentary secretary; Bill Matthews, the Comptroller General of Canada; Brian Pagan, the assistant secretary of the expenditure management sector at TBS; and, Renée Lafontaine, the assistant secretary, corporate services sector, and chief financial officer.

After my remarks, we'd be happy to take any questions you may have. [Translation]

Let me first talk about the overall estimates process.

As you know, the government prepares estimates to request Parliament's authority to spend public funds. The slide on page 3 shows this process.[English]

I believe each of your offices was provided with a deck that has that information.

The main estimates and the supplementary estimates (A), (B), and (C) provide information on the planned spending for each department and agency.[Translation]

Main estimates must be tabled in the House of Commons no later than March 1.

The supplementary estimates present information to Parliament on spending that was either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the main estimates, or that has since been refined to account for new developments in programs or services.[English]

Later in my remarks I would like to get back broadly to the estimates process to highlight how we believe it could be improved.

I would like to turn now to government-wide supplementary estimates (C). I want to put these estimates into context by going back to the 2015-16 supplementary estimates (B), which are presented to the committee of the whole in December.

Giving the timing of the election in October of last year, the fall parliamentary session opened much later than usual, and most parliamentary committees had not yet been struck.[Translation]

Out of respect for the newly formed Parliament, the fall supplementary estimates (B) only included the most urgent items that could not be temporarily cash-managed within existing authorities. As a result, there are more items in the supplementary estimates (C) tabled on February 19 than we would normally see.[English]

The supplementary estimates (C) provide information to support the government's request for Parliament to approve $2.8 billion in voted appropriations for 58 organizations. These funds are needed to continue government programs and initiatives.

Page 4 of the deck highlights major items over $100 million, and they include $435 million to restore financial health to the service income security insurance plan, SISIP, which provides long-term disability benefits to Canadian Forces members.[Translation]

There is also $216 million related to military support for Canada's assistance to Ukraine and to operations against the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.[English]

There's $176 million for employment and social development to write off debts owed to the crown for unrecoverable Canada student loans.

There's $168 million for the green climate fund, $147 million for the resettlement of Syrian refugees, $121 million for Global Affairs Canada to cover foreign exchange adjustments and also some contributions to international organizations. There's $116 million for the construction of three offshore fisheries science vessels for the Canadian Coast Guard.

With respect to my own Treasury Board supplementary estimates, the department is seeking Parliament's authority for an additional $511.9 million. That includes the $435 million for disability benefits for Canadian Forces members, which I referenced earlier, SISIP. It also includes $34 million to establish a contingency to cover any increase in expenditures under the public service health care plan.

(1835)



As well, there is $42.7 million in vote 1 for program expenditures, which mostly come from other government departments, to support Treasury Board-led government-wide back office transformation. This amount is offset by funding transferred from TBS to Shared Services Canada for IT infrastructure costs related to workplace renewal. [Translation]

Finally, let me say a few words about transparency.

We are firmly committed to providing Parliamentarians with the information they need to monitor and review government spending. Right now the system does not enable us to reach this goal because of difficulties with the timeline. Given the timing issues, determined in part by House Standing Orders, the budget items for a given year are not reflected in the main estimates for the same year.[English]

The current system is not transparent. The current system is, in my view, not functional or effective if the objective is that parliamentarians can hold government—I don't care which government, whether this government or a future government—to account. We aim to change that, and we look forward to working with you as part of this process.

The current system results in Parliament being asked to approve departmental spending plans without complete information on what the departments are actually planning to spend.

We understand that when it comes to the process of approving and reporting on government spending, this misalignment of the budget and estimates processes and the public accounts is an ongoing source of confusion for Parliament, the media, and Canadians. Some governments—we may hear more particulars later this evening—such as the Australian government have reformed their estimates and budget processes in a way that is more rational and effective if the objective is for Parliament to be given the information it needs to do its job.

These are problems that make it much more difficult for the Parliament of Canada, all members of Parliament regardless of party, to scrutinize government spending. Simply sequencing the main estimates so that they're presented to Parliament after the budget rather than before is, I believe, an important first step to better providing more complete and useful information to Parliament.

I want to work closely with parliamentarians and other key stakeholders and experts to achieve greater transparency and would welcome an opportunity to engage this committee. In fact, a few weeks ago we had a session for parliamentarians of all parties. MPs and senators from all parties were there to discuss potential opportunities to reform the budget and estimates process. Over 70 parliamentarians participated in that.

My officials are currently preparing a discussion paper on the subject of estimates alignment, which we'll be able to share with this committee. I'd welcome the opportunity to return in the future to have a more fulsome discussion on that. I know committees set their own agendas, but we would really appreciate your input on this in terms of looking at models that work better than the one we have now and ways we can improve accountability.

We've already taken some concrete steps to improve transparency in these supplementary estimates by reporting on government lapses.

(1840)



I draw your attention to page 6 of the presentation. For the first time, there is actually now an online annex. You can go to the Treasury Board website to the supplementary estimates. There's an online annex to the supplementary estimates, which provides Parliament with an early indication of the lapses expected for this fiscal year. We can discuss this further.

I know you want to talk about frozen allotments. I know that's exciting. Lapses and frozen allotments are something that get all of us really excited. It is an important issue and we can return to that.

I will tell you that it was a significant step to actually make public online this annex that lists the frozen allotments. This is a significant step forward that was recognized by the parliamentary budget officer, who said: The publication of these frozen allotments a full ten months prior to the Public Accounts of Canada represents an important increase in fiscal transparency, ensuring that parliamentarians are on a less unequal footing with the Government.

To paraphrase, it puts you on more equal footing, to eliminate a double negative.

We appreciate the support of the parliamentary budget office on this. As we move forward, we intend on taking further steps to provide more details and more useful information in a more useful format to parliamentarians.

On that note, I'll conclude my remarks. I look forward to our discussion this evening, Mr. Chair and members of this committee.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. I have a quick comment. I appreciate, and I think all members appreciate, your comments and your willingness to work with this committee, particularly in a shared concern to reform the budgetary and estimates process. You will find, as I have, that the members of this committee are not only extremely bright and well informed but they are also extremely engaged.

I believe you'll have a great time working with this committee. I'm sure that you'll find, during questions, that their level of knowledge and engagement will be apparent, which is a nice segue into the first round of questions, which will be a seven-minute round.

We'll start with Madam Ratansi.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister Brison, for being here. I was looking at your mandate letter and you have a huge mandate to fulfill. You have 11 priorities. I know that your goal is to lead the management agenda of the government.

One of the things you talked about is transparency and accountability. I appreciate the fact that you're trying to align both the estimates and the budget process. I was looking at annex B, which talks about cash versus accrual accounting. It confuses the living daylights when your public accounts are in a cash basis and something else is in an accrual basis. While your department is looking at things around making the cycles similar, could we please look at accrual accounting because those are the international financial standards, and accountants read financial statements that way and it's easy to explain.

Treasury Board is requesting $43 million-plus for the back office transformation initiative. My question would be about your desire to make operations move toward information technology, so that data is available, open, etc.

What are some of the challenges that Treasury Board will face, or has faced, as it moves toward that back office transformation? How can we avoid the problems that Shared Services is facing, for example, where the RFP process is not very transparent sometimes or it's not very well done?

I know that within your mandate you have to work to establish new performance standards with ministries like Public Services and Procurement. The minister will be coming tomorrow.

Could you give me some idea of how you're moving toward it, what challenges we face, and how can we make the process more accountable going forward?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much, Ms. Ratansi. You're a chartered accountant as well.

The question, first of all, of cash versus accrual accounting is an important one. I mentioned earlier this evening the Australian example of a country that in my opinion has done a good job of reforming its budget and estimates process to render it more transparent and accountable to Parliament.

One thing they did was move to similar systems, with accrual accounting across the board. There were problems with that. They ran into issues and ultimately reversed some of that change. In our work, as we look at options together, I'm open to the Australian model. It is an example of something I haven't said we won't do, but it is something that they ran into issues with.

I may ask Brian to speak to some of the challenges they had with the Australian model. Then I'll answer the second question.

(1845)

Mr. Brian Pagan (Assistant Secretary, Expenditure Management, Treasury Board Secretariat):

We have a number of issues that we would like to address with parliamentarians in terms of better alignment of the budget, the estimates, and the public accounts documents. Currently, we can say that the documents are aligned in the sense that the budget, in volume I of the Public Accounts, is on an accrual basis, and the estimates, in volume II of the Public Accounts, are on a cash basis.

When we look at experience in other jurisdictions, we believe that there is some merit in that, but we understand that there are differing views and would be happy to work with parliamentarians to better understand those.

As the minister said, we have looked at Australia, where there was was a significant problem. Unexpended accrual envelopes grew and considerable sums of money were accumulated without being spent for the purpose for which they were intended. That in itself is obviously a problem.

In the minister's reference to the estimates after the budget, we believe that if we can just get that very simple thing right, a whole bunch of other things with respect to these documents will be more coherent and more transparent, and therefore we will be better able to have those discussions.

We'll be returning to the committee to talk about that.

Hon. Scott Brison:

On the whole issue of back office transformation, enterprise-wide solutions are difficult, whether you're in a big company with a lot of divisions or in a government. The challenges at Shared Services that occurred under the previous government are not unique, so I'm not being partisan. These are difficult files. Because we at Treasury Board are a central agency that works across departments and agencies, as part of our mandate we work to establish good governance around these things, but it is not easy when you're trying to implement and procure enterprise-wide, particularly IT solutions.

All government procurement is murky; government IT solutions are murkier. I'd say defence procurement is probably the toughest file, but it's always a challenge. It's one we're engaged in very actively, because modernizing back office support and transforming the back office and IT solutions is not an option; it's something we have to do as a government to modernize and improve the services we provide to Canadians and the value we provide through those services for taxpayers.

We have to do this. It is a challenge the previous government faced; it's a challenge every government faces in managing this. Treasury Board is at the centre of it, and we take it very seriously, but it does take investments.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I have a question, just quickly.

The Chair:

Make it a very brief question.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

You need to institute proper budgeting, because accrual accounting is based on.... You made a statement that you are asking us to approve departmental estimates, without our knowing what the departments are doing. I think it is important that the departments budget properly, and then accrual accounting would help. Sheila Fraser would be an excellent asset.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I agree with everything you just said, Ms. Ratansi. It is something we should look at. As we're reforming the budget and estimates process, I don't want perfection to be the enemy of the good. If we can identify some concrete steps we can take to make things better, we can do a full portfolio of changes in the future. But I want to make some concrete changes to get things better before the next budget year.

(1850)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Blaney for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I welcome you, your officials, and your parliamentary secretary to this Committee meeting, Mr. Minister. It is a pleasure to have you here. It is also heartening to know that you want to work collaboratively. You can count on us to play a constructive role as the opposition.

In regard to the changes, I would say that it will be important to convince us of the need for those changes. If I look at, for example—and that brings me to my question, Mr. Minister—the Update of Fiscal and Economic Projections, 2015, which gathers government data, it is clear that there is a positive budget balance of $1.9 billion in the 2014-15 fiscal year.

You are just starting a new term in office, Mr. Minister. At this point, it is important to know that we are on the right track. In your election platform, you made it clear that in the short term you would post a modest deficit of less than $10 billion over the next two fiscal years, to make investments in infrastructure and Canada's middle class. You expected to return to a balanced budget in 2019.

I see headlines here.[English]

I have an article from February. The headline says, “Federal Deficits Could Exceed $52B Over 2 Years, If Liberals Keep Their Promises”.

Also, the headline from a National Bank study says, “Liberal deficits could total $90B after 4 years”.

Mr. Minister, you are the guardian of the taxpayer. You're the one who says “no”, and you're also the one who signs the cheques.[Translation]

We would not want you to develop tendinitis from signing cheques, since the sun will set on your sunny ways and the taxpayers will be the ones to pay the price.

I do have a question. At the dawn of your new term in office, you play an important role. Are you prepared to meet the commitment you made in your platform, and respect the opposition parties, which, as you know, want a balanced budget? I would like to hear your thoughts on that, Mr. Minister.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much, Mr. Blaney. I appreciate your question and I am very pleased to see you have our election platform. It is an outstanding document.

We may not agree on that, but we still inherited a deficit from the previous government. Clearly, we also inherited a situation that requires us to create economic growth. Since 2011, our economy has seen anemic growth. For us, the priority is to make significant investments to renew our infrastructure across Canada, and to strategically invest in the middle class to create jobs. Economic growth is a priority for our government and we will work on it. That will be front and centre in our budget; that is exactly what we will do in the budget. It is important to recognize that the former government—your government—increased our national debt by $150 billion. We will make different decisions and invest strategically to boost economic growth.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Mr. Minister, it is true that during the economic crisis, our government made investments, with the agreement of the opposition parties, including the Liberals.

However, how can you claim you inherited a deficit? Data from the finance department shows that there was a budget surplus of $1.9 billion. At the time you took office, the budget was balanced. You committed to run modest deficits. Can you commit this evening, as president of the Treasury Board, to safeguard the interests of taxpayers? The taxpayers in my riding, as well as business people, are worried, Mr. Brison.

We must also think of our children. Sustainable development means that we will not saddle them with a system that is not sustainable. It has come to the point where we will be borrowing to buy groceries. This is what you will do, and this is not sustainable development.

You are the one who can act as the government's control valve. You can say that you have to meet your commitments. Indeed, this was in your platform, which was why you were elected. Of course, only 41% of the population voted for you, which means that 59% of the population said they did not want a deficit.

A $10-billion deficit is bad enough, but according to the headlines, you are on a slippery slope, Mr. President of the Treasury Board. Are you ready to take on your role as guardian of taxpayers' interests and guardian of the commitments made by the Liberal Party during the last election campaign?

I repeat, at the end of the year we had a $1.9-billion budget surplus. I can table the document; it is available online, on the Finance Canada website.

(1855)

[English]

The Chair:

I know it might be difficult, Minister, after a lengthy preamble like that, but please give as succinct an answer as you can. [Translation]

Hon. Scott Brison:

Mr. Blaney is a good guy. I like him a lot. We work out together at the gym, once in a while. [English]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

It shows a lot, doesn't it?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's why we're so strong. We have big muscles, Mr. Blaney and I. We're tough guys.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, it is very important to recognize that such experts as David Dodge, Kevin Lynch, and Larry Summers, former U.S. Treasury secretary, agree with us and say that we need to invest now, particularly in this time of anemic growth.[English]

We're investing strategically. We will invest strategically. You'll see that in the budget. We will do so in a disciplined way. We will grow the economy. We will invest in the middle class. We've committed to that. We believe in that. The OECD and some of the top economic thinkers in the world agree with us.

I very much welcome Mr. Blaney's questions today, and look forward to further conversations on this.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Weir, seven minutes, please.

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We've had some broad questions about the overall fiscal framework. I'd like to focus on a couple of specific areas.

As the Treasury Board is undoubtedly aware, the Global Transportation Hub near Regina is mired in a controversial land deal that saw this crown corporation pay more than twice what the land was worth to sellers with connections to the governing SaskParty. There have been calls for an RCMP investigation.

In Monday's adjournment debate, the parliamentary secretary for transport confirmed that her department had provided $27 million to the Global Transportation Hub, but did not seem particularly concerned about how the money was spent. Today's Globe and Mail reports that the Treasury Board has placed Transport Canada under special oversight. Will that include an investigation to ensure that federal tax dollars were not wasted in a suspicious SaskParty land deal?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much, Mr. Weir.

You worked at Treasury Board at one point or another.

(1900)

Mr. Erin Weir:

That's true.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I think Mr. Blaney worked at Public Works, my old department, a long time ago.

First of all, I want to broadly address the issue of Transport Canada's operating budget. We're working closely with Minister Garneau on this, and he will respond to specific questions related to Transport. I'm certainly willing to speak with Minister Garneau about that.

Treasury Board, particularly our comptroller general, Mr. Matthews, is engaged across every government department and agency, with which we work closely. Like me, Mr. Matthews is a Dalhousie University graduate. He has a commerce degree so he must be a smart fellow. We work closely with departments and agencies with the objective of establishing strong financial governance and identifying potential issues.

Would it be all right with you if I were to check into that, work with my colleague minister, and get back to you?

Mr. Erin Weir:

I would certainly appreciate that.

Just to clarify, you'll ask Minister Garneau specifically to look into the Global Transportation Hub to make sure that federal funds were not misspent.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I've been around long enough to know that when I don't know the answer to a question, I say I don't know the answer to the question. I will talk with Minister Garneau about that. I commit to get back to you on that.

The last thing I want to get drawn into is provincial politics from Saskatchewan. I don't know what the situation is there, but from a federal government perspective, we will certainly check into that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

That's fair enough.

To touch on another issue, yesterday at this committee, the Privy Council Office indicated that it will spend about $1 million annually to support the new Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments, and that its recommendations will not be made public.

Will other departments or the Senate itself spend additional funds on this process?

The Senate remains unelected, unaccountable, and under investigation. Why is the government pouring more money into this unnecessary institution rather than simply following the example of every provincial legislature and abolishing the upper House?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Well, I've checked my mandate letter extensively and Senate reform is not in it, but Senate reform is something that's important to our government. My colleague, Minister Monsef, has put forward proposals in conjunction with our House leader.

This is something we take seriously in terms of strengthening the Senate and improving the appointment process. That process is under way now. As you know, there's an interim process because of the urgency of the appointment of senators from certain provinces. There's a panel, an independent advisory board of eminent Canadians that has been appointed to that task. We are moving forward with Senate reform.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Can you confirm that $1 million a year will be the total federal contribution to the cost of that board, or might other departments be spending money on this new regime as well?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Ultimately, I think you're talking about disbursements that occur within the Senate and the Parliament. The appointment process is what we're talking about, and to reform any process requires investment. We believe these are sensible investments aimed at a greater good for a stronger Senate, and a process that's more transparent and ultimately renders the Senate appointment process more meritorious.

I want to be very clear though, Mr. Weir. My view is that the Senate of Canada does important work. We believe that the Senate can be strengthened, but there's some very important work that occurs in the Senate and at Senate committees.

We can have a difference of opinion, but I believe that there are important steps we can take, without the need for opening up the Constitution, for example. Through the appointment process, we can further strengthen the Senate, and I think Canadians want to see that.

Mr. Erin Weir:

There is a difference of opinion, but there's also an empirical question about the cost of this new process, and certainly that money could otherwise be used to fund good research and important studies for which the Senate is sometimes credited. There is a question about whether this is the most efficient use of money.

(1905)

Hon. Scott Brison:

Would you agree, if the process we're speaking of rendered the Senate more effective and the appointment process more transparent, that it would be a sensible thing?

Mr. Erin Weir:

If it rendered the process more transparent.

I was disappointed to learn that the recommendations won't be public.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Would that be a laudable objective, though? Is that a laudable objective with which you would agree?

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, you will have a three-minute round I believe toward the end of this. We're at our seven minutes now.

Hon. Scott Brison:

My problem there is you've got to understand that come June 19 I will have been around here elected for 19 years and by that point sixteen and a half of those years will have been in opposition so I'm more accustomed to asking questions sometimes. I apologize to my colleague.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Graham, seven minutes please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Minister, thank you for being here. You have more experience on this particular file than I think any of us wants.

I want to dive into your favourite topic of frozen allotments and uncommitted authorities, which I know you're very much looking forward to doing. When we look at these allotments of $5.1 billion, I'm wondering this. The Conservatives tell us they balanced the last budget. I find that very hard to believe. How much money went unspent in that toward the number they claim was a surplus?

Hon. Scott Brison:

There are a couple of things on this, David. I was joking a little bit with Mr. Blaney, but I don't want us to get into.... I've sat on committees that get too partisan and it's not a lot of fun.

On this, if you take a look at the “Fiscal Monitor” it's a picture in time of one month, one quarter, what have you, and it's like saying you check your bank account one day and you have $10,000 in it but you haven't paid your mortgage, you haven't paid your car payment. Or you think, I must have money in my account, I still have cheques left, kind of thing. It's not exactly a broader picture. It doesn't necessarily reflect the overall.

In terms of the frozen allotments in that question, I just want to give you some examples. These are funds that are approved by Parliament but the Treasury Board will restrict access to the monies for various reasons. I'll give you just a couple of examples.

One is, for instance, when there's a commitment to transfer dollars to another department or agency in exchange for a service. Another is the reprofiling to future years.

For instance, freezing allotments sometimes occurs with defence procurement where we set aside a certain amount of money with the expectation that money will be expended in the future. Again you can go to the Treasury Board website and see $5.1 billion laid out in terms of specific examples.

There's $2.8 billion of the frozen amounts that are funds that have been approved for reprofiling to future years. This includes $630 million in capital and operating funds for major defence projects like I mentioned; $675 million for claims settlements and other transfers supporting indigenous peoples.

I'll give you one example here that falls under Treasury Board, and that's $507 million for maternity and parental benefits and severance. That falls under “Treasury Board Central”. It's an important one because Treasury Board, by doing this centrally, takes that financial cost out of departments and agencies, and Treasury Board manages it. We do that because we believe there is a public good to not having departments and agencies making hiring decisions with limited budgets based on whether there's a possibility that somebody may need parental benefits or severance. There are some very important and progressive reasons why Treasury Board will manage some of these centrally.

We are managing government contingencies. This year, part of this for Treasury Board is $750 million of government contingencies that won't be allocated. There are carry-forwards from other years for operating capital budgets of $560 million. The rendering of this public “earlier in the budget” process, as the parliamentary budget officer has said, is a significant step in terms of transparency. It's an important step. It's just the beginning in terms of transparency and providing better information to parliamentarians and Canadians.

(1910)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have another question for you. You want to reform the supplements system and I think it's really interesting. Have there been recent reforms or has there been a fairly constant system for a long time?

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's been a process that, on a secular basis over a period of time, I think has become less meaningful. There was a time when the main estimates and the ministers coming before committees to defend their estimates was considered a big deal to parliamentarians, and it was central to the job of parliamentarians.

We were talking about the Senate earlier, and I have to tell you that within the Senate, there are senators who actually, I must say, understand this process more thoroughly and who make a point of holding ministers to account on estimates in a very effective way. I think my officials would agree with that. You might want to go to a Senate committee where ministers are appearing on their estimates.

This is something that's happened on a secular basis over a longer period of time. It's not purely a partisan thing. The question is, how do we fix it? This is something we take very seriously. I know there's been really good work done by the officials in our department on this. I pointed out earlier the Australian model.

I think, Mr. Graham, you were at the session we did with parliamentarians a few weeks ago.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I arrived very late because I had rural caucus before it.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'm a proud member of rural caucus as well.

I do want to come back to committee specifically to focus on some of the ideas around reforming. There is a deck that we presented to members of Parliament and senators who came to that meeting that night and, if I may, we will provide that deck to the committee. We haven't set a date to come back to this estimates and parliamentary supply process, but I would like to provide that to committee members soon, such that you can start thinking about this as we move forward. It's really important. It's in our wheelhouse at Treasury Board and it's in the wheelhouse of the OGGO parliamentary committee as well in terms of making this work better.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're out of time, but I'll just let you know, Minister, that Treasury Board has already given us that deck you referred to and it has already been distributed.

We'll go to the five-minute round now, starting with Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

Minister, thanks for joining us today. I appreciate your dedication to open government. I think if you attended yesterday's session, you would have felt, as we did, that it was like something out of an episode of Yes, Minister, the way we were getting answers, so I appreciate your commitment to transparency.

I won't go over the billion dollar questions as my cohort here did, but with regard to the $81 million to support increased demand for health, rehab, and support services for Veterans Affairs, is that for the reopening of those nine outlets that have been closed, or how is this money being divided up, spent, and prioritized, especially across such a large country and with a large number of vets requiring service? Is it based solely on the election promise to reopen those nine outlets or is it based on actual proven need by geographic region?

Hon. Scott Brison:

First of all, Veterans Affairs and treatment of our veterans and those who have served Canada so valiantly is something all of us as parliamentarians consider to be an important priority.

There are a couple of things. One is the nature of military service today, most recently in Afghanistan and now in terms of the members of the Canadian Armed Forces who are serving in the mission against ISIS as part of the training as we go forward. The nature of military service has changed. In fact, supporting veterans in the context of this changed environment—for instance, with the increase in the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder and some of these other related challenges—necessitates that governments change the way we treat veterans, and update and modernize that. We take that seriously.

The requested funds are to support an increase in the number of disability benefit applications being processed, increasing requirements for health services for such things as prescription drugs, and, I want to stress, for increased support for mental health services.

(1915)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I appreciate that. Is this specifically for those nine? Is it specifically for payment for the costs for reopening those nine or is it for separate services, as you're now saying?

Hon. Scott Brison:

We are reopening the nine offices.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

So it is separate.

Hon. Scott Brison:

The funding I'm speaking of here is to improve service delivery to veterans. I mentioned some of the areas, including improved mental health.

That doesn't obviate what we believe to be an important priority, and that is to reopen some of these offices.

We were told clearly by veterans that these offices, the physical location of these offices, and the capacity to go and to talk with people was very important to the services we provide.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I appreciate that and that's excellent. I think it's reflected as well in the extra $435 million. Is that $81 million for the cost of those nine offices, or is it for the extra pharmaceuticals you mentioned or extra services across the country?

Hon. Scott Brison:

The number of disability benefit applications processed is a big part of this, as well as the mental health side.

There are also five years to improve service delivery to veterans and their families.

We're talking about the estimates now in supplementary estimates (C). In a couple of weeks we'll have a budget as well, which will have more—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I realize this is a question out of the dark, and if you haven't got the exact details, that's fine, we can—

Hon. Scott Brison:

These are not related to reopening those offices.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Yes. That's what I'm asking.

Hon. Scott Brison:

No, it's not specific to the opening of those offices, but we are reopening those offices—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

That's what I'm asking.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Sure. Thanks, Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay. We're short on time.

I want to pull up another issue we had yesterday that we could not get a clear answer on. There was $1 million asked for shutting down Canada's economic action plan. We realize it's a controversial issue from the past, but seeking $1 million...I'm trying to figure out what that $1 million is for.

My understanding is they're looking for $1 million extra to shut it down. The answer we got was, “No, this is money already spent this year before the change of government.”

The Chair:

I'm going to have to cut it off now. Perhaps your colleague Mr. Blaney, in his next round, would be able to pursue that line of questioning, and perhaps the minister would be able to respond at that time.

Hon. Scott Brison:

It's up to you, Mr. Chair. I'm prepared if—

The Chair:

We'll move on if we can because I want to make sure everyone has an opportunity to question the minister before we have to adjourn.

We'll go to another five-minute round for Monsieur Ayoub. [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Brison, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for being here this evening to answer our questions. Of course, transparency is an important element, as is the new way of seeing things, and I am very proud of this.

I would like to ask you a question about the Service Income Security Insurance Plan. There is a call for new money, amounting to almost half a billion dollars, specifically $435 million. It is an enormous sum. I wonder what the initial budget was and what will be the percentage increase as a result of this request.

What are the main reasons for this request? Was the forecast wrong to begin with? How long has it been known that sooner or later such a significant increase would be required? Did someone bring this file to your attention right away and advise you that there was a shortfall of half a billion dollars in the forecasts, or did this happen suddenly, within the last few weeks ?

I would like to have some idea about the process used to determine that there was a shortfall of 435 million dollars.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much, Mr. Ayoub. I appreciate your question.

In the current economic environment, with very low interest rates, we must invest to make our public-sector pension plans stronger.

Please allow me to answer in English, since this is a very technical question.

(1920)

[English]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Go ahead.

Hon. Scott Brison:

There are a couple of factors here. One is the demands on the military pension and disability. SISIP and the SISIP disability have been increasing for a number of reasons. I mentioned earlier to Mr. McCauley's question some of the issues around investing in mental health, and supporting mental health is part of that.

The other thing is in the very low interest rate environment that we have now, pension plans have faced some challenges, and we are committed to first of all maintaining the prudential strength of our public pension plans, but also maintaining transparency around our pension plans. This investment reflects that.

I've been informed by my official Brian that there's been a 66% increase in benefits over three years resulting from Afghanistan veterans, as an example. This is something that whatever government was there would be faced with. There's a very real need to maintain the prudential strength of our pension plans during a time when, in the case of SISIP, as an example, payout will grow. We're in a very low interest rate environment. This investment reflects that. [Translation]

Mr. Bill Matthews (Comptroller General of Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat):

I would just like to add one thing.[English]

The minister already mentioned the factors of the low interest rates and the increasing number of claims because of the service in Afghanistan. The third piece is the amount of benefits that are actually being paid out has increased recently because of a settlement related to a lawsuit, the Manuge case. That's actually driving up the payments of individual claims.

I believe your first question was around what was the starting point of the fund for the current year. We started the year with about $370 million—I think $368 million to be exact. We're adding $435 million, so we're basically more than doubling what's there. But it's those three factors now that you have: interest rates, increasing numbers of claims, plus the Manuge settlement.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Is there a way to plan those kinds of differences a little ahead?

Hon. Scott Brison:

The answer to that is that we are taking a look at public sector pension plans across the board in the Treasury Board to try to be able to foresee and predict the need for these investments. Rest assured, as we're making these investments we will do so in a very transparent way, and we will be accountable to Parliament and vote for them, and explain them, and engage parliamentarians in them.

I think we would all agree that in terms of public sector pension plans we need to first of all maintain their prudential strength, but we have to do so in an open and transparent way. We also have to make sure that we are utilizing the best possible pension management approaches in terms of long-term pension security for pension holders and maximizing return in a responsible way.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Blaney, for five minutes, please. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Minister, I will repeat that it is truly a pleasure to welcome you this evening. As the saying goes, we must give people a chance. However, you have not convinced me yet that you will be the one to say no. Is there someone at the controls? Will you protect the taxpayers from this propensity to create huge deficits?

My first question is on an awareness campaign that appears on page 19 of the supplementary estimates (C). The overall advertising budget is $9.5 million. One of the goals of the campaign is to prevent illegal use of marijuana among young people. We are aware of the devastating effects of marijuana. A total of $1 million is provided for this purpose. Can you confirm that this amount will be spent on that goal?

If there is time, the people with you could answer my other question, which is about the shipbuilding program. There is a sum of $116 million. Would it be possible to have a detailed explanation for the additional cost of the ships?

I will repeat my first question. Out of the the total $9.5-million advertising budget, will the $1 million allocated to preventing the illegal use of marijuana, especially among young people, be invested for this purpose?

(1925)

[English]

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you very much.

From marijuana to shipbuilding, we run the gamut here.[Translation]

Let me begin by discussing the marijuana legislation. For many years the Government of Canada's approach has failed to reduce marijuana use, particularly among young people. Our responsibility is to implement an evidence-based approach.[English]

The evidence is quite clear. Nobody is condoning, supporting, or promoting the use of marijuana, Mr. Blaney. We want a legal framework in laws that are more effective. Some countries that have chosen to focus efforts on health promotion, prevention, mental health services, and addiction services have found that to be more effective in reducing the use of drugs, marijuana being one, than simply a criminal justice approach. We can differ on the approach, but I want to be very clear, Mr. Blaney, that nobody here is advocating or promoting the use of marijuana.

You've raised a question on shipbuilding, and I think you may be speaking specifically to the three offshore fisheries science vessels, the $116 million.

As you know, we are committed to a national shipbuilding program across Canada. For the funding of the three offshore fisheries science vessels, I've been working most recently with Minister Tootoo. It's part of replacing the aging fleet, which is important.

What's important is you're managing shipbuilding, which falls broadly between Fisheries and Defence, and also Public Works, which is now Public Services and Procurement, and Industry. As a government we seek to balance Public Services and Procurement, my old department. Their job is to have an open and transparent process that gets the best value for taxpayers. Industry seeks to maximize industrial regional benefits, IRBs, most recently called ITBs, or technology benefits, and then the departments, Defence or Fisheries, have their needs in that.

Treasury Board overall plays a leadership and coordinating role and works with all departments and agencies to have the most efficient procurement processes that address those three government objectives: jobs for Canadians, value for tax dollars, and the best possible equipment for our military and our Coast Guard, as examples.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. That's the end of our time.

I'm sorry, Mr. Blaney, we're out of time.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Mr. Chair, not as a question but as a follow-up, if I could have a confirmation of the $1 million that is invested I would appreciate it.

(1930)

Hon. Scott Brison:

I'm sorry about that. I'm not being evasive, I'm being long-winded, and that's different.

Mr. McCauley's question earlier was related to funds being used, and we're updating the Prime Minister's website to improve communications to Canadians with a digital process. The previous Prime Minister had the 24 Seven thing—

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

It's completely different.

Hon. Scott Brison:

But we're not cancelling the action plan as it were, Mr. McCauley. The action will still occur, but we're just not going to advertise it as much.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thanks very much.

The Chair:

Minister, it is 7:30, and you've graciously given us an hour; however, normally in our rotation we end with a three-minute round that goes to the third party. Would you agree to sit through another gruelling three-minute question and answer session?

Hon. Scott Brison:

I have to tell you, Mr. Chair, that over the various years, I've been in opposition and I've been in government. It's like Mae West, “I've been rich and I've been poor, and rich is better.” Between opposition and government, government's a little better, but I have great respect for the work of opposition members. I think that at one point I was in the fifth-place party in the House of Commons, so the answer is absolutely yes, I will stay.

The Chair:

We have three minutes. Please be as precise as possible, because the three minutes are for the question and the answer.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I was part of a 12-member caucus at one point.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I'll pick up on the point about marijuana. While the government figures out its framework to legalize marijuana, will it decriminalize marijuana to at least ensure that people are not receiving criminal records or going to jail for simple possession and use?

Hon. Scott Brison:

That process is currently.... My colleagues Minister Wilson-Raybould and Mr. Blair, as parliamentary secretary, are working on this. There is a process. I'm not an expert on that process.

We want to get it right. I think that having Mr. Blair there, given his law enforcement background, is very helpful, but we want to do the right thing, not based on ideology but based on evidence. I'm confident that we will get it right, but I'm not aware of some stopgap measure in the interim.

The Chair:

Mr. Weir, if I may have a quick interjection, I won't penalize your time for it.

Again, the primary function of Minister Brison's being here is to talk about the supplementary (C)s. I know there's always a tendency to get into the political sphere, but again, if we could concentrate our comments, please, on the reason for the minister's appearance tonight, I would appreciate it.

Mr. Erin Weir:

No problem, Mr. Chair.

The supplementary (C)s include a request from the Canada Revenue Agency for additional funding for tax compliance measures, which I support, but given the revelation that the Canada Revenue Agency violated its own guidelines by offering a secret deal to millionaires who had avoided taxes through the Isle of Man, how much can we expect it to collect through these compliance programs?

Hon. Scott Brison:

Mr. Weir, the last government that I was part of back in 2004-06 made a significant investment at that time in the capacity of Revenue Canada to go after offshore tax havens. In fact, my understanding is that the investment yielded significant financial returns to the government in terms of identifying them.

We are investing in the capacity for Revenue Canada to ensure that Canadians can have confidence in the tax system. That people will be paying their fair share is something we take very seriously as a government. I've had this discussion with Minister Lebouthillier. It's a priority for our finance minister and our Minister of National Revenue.

Unreported tax is identified by the audit program. Just as an example, it grew 24% in three years, to $11.7 billion. The international large business program detected $7.8 billion in unreported tax last year.

I'll tell you that one of the best articles I've read on this was in The Economist magazine, sometime in the last couple of years. The Economist Intelligence Unit did a very good study of offshore tax havens to try to quantify this and, of course, our officials in the Department of Finance and in the ministry or CRA have.

This is a very important issue. The integrity of our tax system is an important question of fairness, and we take it seriously.

(1935)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. I'll have to stop it there.

Ladies and gentlemen, we are out of time.

On behalf of all our committee members, I thank the minister and the officials for being here.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We do have a couple of very brief items to discuss, if I could ask the committee members to stay at the table.

Minister, thank you very much. You are excused. We appreciate your appearance.

Hon. Scott Brison:

Thanks very much.

If you'll have me back, I would like to come back to talk about the main estimates, but also about reforming the budget and estimates process. Having served in opposition, I referenced the fact that I have some time, so if you want to talk about some other things too, I am open to that as well.

I want to make it very clear to all members of this committee that committees are the place in Parliament where effective work should be done across party lines. If committees can't function in an effective and constructive way, developing good public policy and holding government of any stripe to account, that is a real problem. I have a personal commitment, having served sometimes in committees that didn't operate that way. I think it is really important. I say this particularly to new members of Parliament. The work you do on parliamentary committees is incredibly meaningful, incredibly important, and to your staff and the team who support you—the work that they do in supporting your work—this is meaningful work where you can develop good public policy and really make a difference in the lives of Canadians.

I look forward to working with this committee as we move forward, and, Mr. Chair, I really appreciate the opportunity.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. We appreciate your appearance.

Hon. Scott Brison:

I want to thank those who accompanied me here.

I just want to finish on this note. We have exceptional public servants in the Government of Canada. We have some members of this committee who have worked in the public service and who would share that view. We are well served, and I really want to thank them for being here tonight.

Thank you all.

The Chair:

Since this is still being televised, I would ask the committee to go in camera for about two minutes.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I just want to remind you that you missed one of our members. You skipped the schedule. It should have been a Liberal member for five minutes. You went straight to....

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Can I just make a point of order to have it on the record that you skipped over my time and gave it to the NDP?

The Chair:

The schedule I have indicates I did not skip over that. The schedule that we adopted at the start shows that in the first seven-minute round we go Liberal, Conservative, New Democratic Party, and Liberal.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Yes.

The Chair:

In the second round, we have Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, and in the third round, three minutes for the New Democratic Party.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

No. That is, in fact, incorrect.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Where did you get the third round from, Mr. Chair? This is what we adopted.

The Chair:

This is what I have been given. My understanding is that this is what we adopted.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, we have been following this for the past....

Mr. Nick Whalen:

No, that is not what was adopted.

The Chair:

We'll go back and check exactly the record. Our clerk is going to examine....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There was never a third round.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

There was no third round, and it was Conservative, Liberal, Conservative, Liberal.

The Chair:

Nick, I know you weren't here yesterday, but we did exactly this rotation yesterday.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

No, we didn't. We followed this rotation, but it was not Mr. Weir. It was first Mr. Grewal.

The Chair:

No, I have the lineup from yesterday, and I can assure you we followed the exact rotation we did today. I am not going to get into an argument.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

It's not a problem.

The Chair:

We'll go back and check the rotation that was adopted. The committee obviously has an opportunity to adopt whatever speaking rotation it wishes, so let us first check and see exactly what our records indicate, and we will deal with that tomorrow. There was certainly no intent to skip over anyone.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I don't want to take it away from Mr. Weir, either.

The Chair:

We'll go back and find out exactly what we adopted.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Okay.

The Chair:

Very briefly, these are the two issues that I had. One, as I mentioned yesterday, is for everyone to give consideration to the meeting schedule the week of March 21. The Tuesday meeting will not be held because it is budget day. My question to you for consideration was whether we have a full meeting on Thursday, March 24. That is the day before we break for two weeks for our Easter constituency weeks. If we do not have a full meeting—and it will be up to this committee to determine that—I suggested that we have a subcommittee meeting on agenda, so we can get our work plan established, but I will leave it up to the consensus, hopefully, of this committee. Did you wish a committee meeting to be held on Thursday afternoon, prior to Good Friday, or not?

(1940)

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Do we have an agenda for the meeting? If we don't, then let's go with the subcommittee.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

I would defer that to the subcommittee, to see if there's a witness.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I'm fine with the subcommittee.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

We already have some extra meetings this week, so it balances.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I would prefer, and would quite strongly advocate for, a full meeting on that Thursday, especially given that we're missing the meeting on Tuesday.

The Chair:

Since we don't seem to have unanimity, maybe let me check on it.

I'll make a decision on that, but first I'll find out if there would be a full two-hour agenda for the Thursday. If not, then I would suggest we go to a subcommittee to develop the work plan. I'm not one to have a meeting for a meeting's sake. I like to have a meeting with a firm agenda in front of us.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I absolutely agree, although I guess I would note that the subcommittee did recommend some items that were pushed back to make room for the estimates. Certainly it would be possible to explore those topics on the Thursday.

The Chair:

Duly noted.

The second point I have is more a point of information than anything else. If we want to have our supplementary estimates (C) voted upon, we'll have to deal with that tomorrow, because we have to report it back to the House by this Friday.

I'd like to keep open about 10 minutes toward the end of tomorrow's meeting for the votes. Okay?

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Perfect. Thank you.

The Chair:

With that, we're adjourned.

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1830)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Mesdames et messieurs, je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bienvenue à la cinquième séance du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires.

Je rappelle à tous les députés que les délibérations ce soir sont télévisées.

Je suis heureux d'accueillir le ministre Brison.

Monsieur le ministre, je crois comprendre que vous souhaitez faire une déclaration préliminaire. Je vous demanderais également de présenter certains des fonctionnaires qui vous accompagnent.

L'hon. Scott Brison (président du Conseil du Trésor):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux d'être ici ce soir avec vous et les membres du Comité.

Nous allons nous concentrer ce soir sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). J'ai bien hâte d'en discuter.

Le Comité a pour mandat d'examiner l'efficacité et le fonctionnement des opérations gouvernementales, du processus budgétaire, ainsi que des plans de dépenses des ministères et agences gouvernementales centraux.

Le rôle du Conseil du Trésor est au coeur des travaux du Comité. Je me réjouis à l'idée d'établir de bonnes relations de travail avec les membres du Comité. Je suis heureux d'être ici ce soir en compagnie de Joyce Murray, notre secrétaire parlementaire, de Bill Matthews, le contrôleur général du Canada, de Brian Pagan, le secrétaire adjoint au Secteur de la gestion des dépenses du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor du Canada, et de Renée Lafontaine, secrétaire adjointe, Secteur des services ministériels, et dirigeante principale des finances.

C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons, après mes observations, à toute question que vous pourriez vouloir nous poser. [Français]

Permettez-moi de commencer en vous parlant du processus du Budget des dépenses.

Comme vous le savez, le gouvernement prépare le Budget des dépenses afin de demander l'autorisation du Parlement de dépenser des fonds publics. La diapositive à la troisième page de ma présentation illustre ce processus.[Traduction]

Je crois que chacun de vos bureaux a reçu un document de présentation à cet égard.

Le Budget principal des dépenses et le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), (B) et (C) fournissent des renseignements sur les dépenses prévues pour chaque ministère et agence.[Français]

Le Budget principal des dépenses doit être déposé à la Chambre des communes au plus tard le 1er mars.

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses présente de l'information au Parlement sur des dépenses qui n'ont pas été assez définies pour être incluses dans le Budget principal des dépenses ou qui ont été précisées pour tenir compte de nouveaux développements dans les programmes ou les services.[Traduction]

J'aimerais revenir plus tard sur le processus budgétaire pour souligner les améliorations pouvant y être apportées.

Je vais maintenant passer au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Je veux remettre ce budget des dépenses en contexte en revenant au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de 2015-2016, qui est présenté en comité plénier en décembre.

Comme les élections ont eu lieu en octobre dernier, la session parlementaire de l'automne s'est ouverte beaucoup plus tard qu'à l'habitude, et la plupart des comités parlementaires n'avaient pas encore été créés.[Français]

Alors, par respect pour le nouveau Parlement, le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de l'automne ne contenait que les éléments les plus urgents qui ne pouvaient pas être gérés pour le moment dans les limites des autorisations actuelles. Ainsi, le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) déposé le 19 février contient plus d'éléments que d'habitude.[Traduction]

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) fournit des renseignements à l'appui de la demande du gouvernement afin que le Parlement approuve 2,8 milliards de dollars de crédits votés destinés à 58 organisations. Ces fonds sont nécessaires pour maintenir des programmes et des initiatives du gouvernement.

À la page 4 du document d'information figurent les principaux postes de plus de 100 millions de dollars. Ceux-ci comprennent les 435 millions de dollars prévus pour rétablir la santé financière du Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire, le RARM, qui offre des prestations d'invalidité de longue durée aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes.[Français]

Il y a aussi 216 millions de dollars liés au soutien militaire pour l'aide que le Canada accorde à l'Ukraine et aux opérations contre le groupe connu sous le nom d'État islamique.[Traduction]

La somme de 176 millions de dollars est destinée à l'emploi et au développement social, afin de radier des dettes dues à la Couronne pour des prêts canadiens aux étudiants irrécouvrables.

En outre, 168 millions de dollars sont destinés au Fonds vert pour le climat, 147 millions de dollars, à la réinstallation des réfugiés syriens, 121 millions de dollars, à Affaires mondiales Canada pour couvrir l'ajustement du taux de change, ainsi que certaines contributions à des organisations internationales. La somme de 116 millions de dollars est destinée à la construction de trois navires hauturiers de sciences halieutiques pour la Garde côtière canadienne.

En ce qui concerne le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses du Conseil du Trésor, le ministère demande l'autorisation du Parlement pour l'affectation d'une somme supplémentaire de 511,9 millions de dollars. Cela inclut les 435 millions de dollars pour les prestations d'invalidité destinées aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes, que j'ai mentionnées auparavant, c'est-à-dire le RARM. Cela comprend également 34 millions de dollars pour un plan d'urgence, qui couvrirait toute augmentation des dépenses dans le cadre du Régime de soins de santé de la fonction publique.

(1835)



De plus, il y 42,7 millions de dollars au titre du crédit 1 pour les dépenses de programmes, qui proviennent surtout d'autres ministères et qui serviront à appuyer la transformation, sous la direction du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, des services administratifs à l'échelle du gouvernement. Ce montant sera compensé par un financement transféré du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor à Services partagés Canada pour les coûts d'infrastructure en matière de technologie de l'information, qui découlent du renouvellement des milieux de travail.[Français]

Finalement, permettez-moi de dire quelques mots sur la transparence.

Nous nous sommes engagés à fournir aux parlementaires l'information dont ils ont besoin pour surveiller et examiner les dépenses du gouvernement. En ce moment, le système ne nous permet pas de le faire, parce que les délais sont problématiques. En raison de problèmes liés à l'échéancier, qui est déterminé en partie par le Règlement de la Chambre, les éléments du budget d'une année donnée n'apparaissent pas dans le Budget principal des dépenses de cette même année. [Traduction]

Le système actuel n'est pas transparent. À mon avis, il n'est ni fonctionnel ni efficace si l'objectif est de faire en sorte que les parlementaires puissent demander des comptes au gouvernement — peu importe le gouvernement, qu'il s'agisse du gouvernement actuel ou du prochain gouvernement. Nous voulons changer cela, et nous nous réjouissons à l'idée de travailler de concert avec vous dans le cadre de ce processus.

Selon le système actuel, le Parlement se voit demander d'approuver les plans de dépenses des ministères sans qu'il dispose de tous les renseignements sur les dépenses prévues de ces ministères.

Nous savons que, en ce qui concerne l'approbation des dépenses du gouvernement et l'approbation de rapports sur ces dépenses, le déséquilibre entre les comptes publics et le budget et processus budgétaire est une source de confusion permanente pour le Parlement, les médias et les Canadiens. Certains gouvernements — nous aurons peut-être d'autres détails à cet égard plus tard ce soir — dont le gouvernement de l'Australie, ont restructuré leurs processus budgétaires d'une façon plus sensée et efficace, puisque l'objectif est de faire en sorte que le Parlement reçoive les renseignements dont il a besoin pour faire son travail.

Compte tenu des difficultés mentionnées, il est beaucoup plus difficile pour le Parlement du Canada, ainsi que tous les députés, peu importe leur parti, d'examiner les dépenses du gouvernement. Le simple fait d'enchaîner les Budgets supplémentaires des dépenses de façon à ce qu'ils soient présentés au Parlement après le dépôt du budget plutôt qu'avant constitue, selon moi, une étape importante afin de fournir des renseignements plus exhaustifs et utiles au Parlement.

Je veux collaborer étroitement avec les parlementaires, ainsi que d'autres experts et intervenants clés, afin d'accroître la transparence et je serais heureux d'avoir l'occasion de mobiliser le Comité. En fait, il y a quelques semaines, nous avons tenu une séance pour les parlementaires de tous les partis. Les députés et les sénateurs de tous les partis y ont assisté et ont discuté des possibilités de réforme des processus budgétaires. Plus de 70 parlementaires y ont assisté.

Des fonctionnaires de mon ministère préparent actuellement un document de travail sur la question de l'harmonisation des budgets, et nous ferons parvenir ce document au Comité. Je serais heureux d'avoir l'occasion de comparaître de nouveau devant le Comité pour participer à des discussions plus approfondies sur le sujet. Je suis conscient que les comités établissent leur propre programme, mais nous vous saurions gré de fournir une rétroaction au sujet de modèles qui fonctionneraient mieux que le modèle actuel et au sujet de façons d'améliorer la reddition de comptes.

Nous avons déjà pris des mesures concrètes pour accroître la transparence du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses en faisant état des lacunes du gouvernement.

(1840)



J'attire votre attention sur la page 6 de la présentation. Pour la première fois, il y a une annexe en ligne. Il suffit de consulter la partie portant sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses dans le site Web du Conseil du Trésor. Vous y trouverez une annexe en ligne au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, qui fournit au Parlement une première indication des péremptions prévues pour l'exercice en cours. Nous pouvons en discuter plus longuement.

Je sais que vous souhaitez parler des affectations bloquées. Cette question suscite l'enthousiasme. Les péremptions et les affectations bloquées suscitent notre enthousiasme à tous. Il s'agit d'un point important, et nous pourrons y revenir.

Je peux vous dire que le fait de publier en ligne cette annexe, qui fait état des affectations bloquées, a été une étape importante. Il s'agit d'un important pas dans la bonne direction, qui a été reconnu par le directeur parlementaire du budget. Celui-ci a affirmé: La publication de ces affectations bloquées dix mois avant la publication des Comptes publics du Canada représente un pas important dans la voie de la transparence budgétaire, si bien que les parlementaires sont plus au courant de ce que fait le gouvernement.

Si vous me permettez de paraphraser le directeur principal des dépenses, c'est plus équitable.

Nous remercions le directeur parlementaire du budget de son appui à cet égard. À mesure que nous progressons, nous prendrons d'autres mesures afin de fournir plus de détails et plus de renseignements utiles aux parlementaires, et ce, dans un format plus utile.

Je conclus ainsi mes observations. Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, je suis impatient d'entamer la discussion ce soir.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre. J'ai une brève observation à faire. Je vous remercie, tout comme l'ensemble des membres du Comité, de vos observations et de votre volonté de travailler de concert avec le Comité, tout particulièrement en ce qui concerne une préoccupation commune, c'est-à-dire la réforme des processus budgétaires. Vous constaterez, comme je l'ai fait, que, non seulement les membres du Comité sont brillants et bien informés, mais ils sont aussi très enthousiastes.

Je crois que vous aimerez beaucoup travailler avec ce Comité. Vous pourrez constater, au moment des questions, que leur niveau de connaissances et leur engagement sont évidents, vous pourrez ainsi enchaîner avec la première ronde de questions, qui durera sept minutes.

Nous commençons avec Mme Ratansi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Merci de votre présence, M. Brison. En examinant votre lettre de mandat, on constate que vous avez d'énormes responsabilités qui sont axées sur 11 priorités. Je sais que vous avez comme objectif de diriger le programme de gestion du gouvernement.

Vous avez notamment parlé de transparence et de responsabilité. Je crois comprendre que vous tentez de faire concorder les prévisions budgétaires avec le processus budgétaire. En examinant l'annexe B, qui suit à la fois la comptabilité de caisse et la comptabilité d'exercice, je trouve fort déroutant que les comptes publics suivent la comptabilité de caisse, tandis que d'autres éléments se fondent sur la comptabilité d'exercice. Étant donné que votre ministère s'emploie à harmoniser les cycles, je me demande si nous pourrions nous fonder sur la comptabilité d'exercice, puisque c'est la norme internationale en matière de finances, que c'est de cette façon que les comptables examinent les états financiers, et que cette méthode facilite les explications.

Le Conseil du Trésor demande plus de 43 millions de dollars pour l'Initiative de transformation des services administratifs. Ma question a trait à votre volonté que les services se tournent vers la technologie de l'information afin que les données soient disponibles, ouvertes, etc.

Quels sont les défis que le Conseil du Trésor devra relever ou a dû relever au cours de la transformation des services administratifs? Comment pouvons-nous éviter les problèmes auxquels doivent faire face, par exemple, les Services partagés, dont le processus de demande de propositions manque parfois de transparence ou n'est pas très bien conçu?

Je sais que votre mandat prévoit l'établissement de nouvelles normes de rendement pour des ministères comme le ministère des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement. La ministre comparaîtra demain.

Pourriez-vous me donner un aperçu de la façon dont vous procédez, des difficultés qui nous attendent, et de la façon de rendre le processus plus transparent à l'avenir?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup, madame Ratansi. Vous êtes aussi comptable agréée.

Premièrement, la question sur la comptabilité de caisse et la comptabilité d'exercice est importante. Plus tôt dans la soirée, j'ai cité l'exemple de l'Australie, un pays qui, à mon avis, a bien réussi à réformer ses pratiques en ce qui concerne le processus budgétaire et les prévisions budgétaires afin de les rendre plus transparentes et de faciliter la reddition de comptes au Parlement.

L'Australie a notamment harmonisé les systèmes en appliquant la comptabilité d'exercice partout. Cela a créé des problèmes, et on a finalement dû revenir en partie sur cette décision. Pour ce qui est d'examiner ensemble les options qui s'offrent à nous, je dirais que je suis ouvert au modèle australien. Je ne dis pas que ce n'est pas une approche que nous envisageons, mais elle a causé des problèmes.

Je pourrais demander à Brian de parler de certaines difficultés observées dans le modèle australien. Ensuite, je répondrai à la deuxième question.

(1845)

M. Brian Pagan (secrétaire adjoint, Gestion des dépenses, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Il y a un certain nombre de problèmes dont nous aimerions discuter avec les parlementaires afin de mieux harmoniser les documents liés au budget, aux prévisions budgétaires et aux comptes publics. À l'heure actuelle, nous pouvons dire que les documents sont harmonisés dans la mesure où le budget, dans le volume I des Comptes publics, se fonde sur la comptabilité d'exercice, alors que les prévisions budgétaires, dans le volume II des Comptes publics, suivent la comptabilité de caisse.

Pour ce qui est des méthodes employées par d'autres gouvernements, je crois qu'elles ont du mérite, mais nous sommes conscients qu'il y a différentes opinions sur la question, et nous sommes heureux de collaborer avec les parlementaires pour mieux comprendre les différentes approches.

Comme le ministre l'a souligné, nous nous sommes penchés sur la situation en Australie, où on a noté un problème de taille. Il y a eu une augmentation de la part non utilisée des crédits affectés selon la comptabilité d'exercice, de telle sorte que des sommes considérables s'accumulaient sans être dépensées aux fins prévues. C'est évidemment un problème en soi.

Pour ce qui est de la question soulevée par le ministre au sujet de l'harmonisation du budget et des prévisions budgétaires, nous croyons que, si nous pouvons seulement réussir à mettre en oeuvre cette solution très simple, beaucoup d'autres aspects entourant ces documents seront plus cohérents et transparents, et il nous sera alors plus facile de tenir ce genre de discussions.

Nous comparaîtrons de nouveau devant le Comité pour discuter de ce genre de questions.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

En ce qui concerne la transformation des services administratifs, notons qu'il est difficile d'appliquer des solutions à l'ensemble d'une organisation, qu'il s'agisse d'une grande entreprise qui comprend de nombreux services ou d'une fonction publique. Les problèmes qu'ont connus les Services partagés sous le gouvernement précédent ne sont pas uniques; ma position n'est donc pas partisane. Ce sont des dossiers complexes. Étant donné que le Conseil du Trésor est un organisme central qui touche l'ensemble des ministères et des organismes, nous avons comme mandat d'établir de bonnes pratiques de gouvernance dans ces dossiers, mais il n'est pas facile de se procurer et de mettre en place des solutions qui touchent l'ensemble de l'organisation, en particulier lorsqu'il est question de technologie de l'information.

La question des marchés publics est toujours complexe, et elle l'est encore plus lorsqu'il s'agit de solutions de technologie de l'information pour la fonction publique. Je dirais que les marchés publics qui concernent la défense représentent probablement le dossier le plus difficile à gérer, mais ce genre de dossier pose toujours des difficultés. C'est un dossier auquel nous consacrons beaucoup d'efforts parce que la modernisation et la transformation des services administratifs ne sont pas une option, mais une nécessité, car le gouvernement doit moderniser et améliorer ses services aux Canadiens afin que les contribuables en aient davantage pour leur argent.

Nous devons relever ce défi. Le gouvernement précédent a dû y faire face; ce genre de dossier est difficile à gérer pour tous les gouvernements. Le Conseil du Trésor en est le principal responsable, et nous prenons cette responsabilité très au sérieux, mais elle nécessite des investissements.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

J'aimerais seulement poser une brève question.

Le président:

Soyez très brève.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Il faut mettre en place un processus budgétaire approprié, puisque la comptabilité d'exercice est fondée sur... Vous avez dit qu'on nous demande d'approuver les prévisions budgétaires des ministères sans que nous sachions ce que font les ministères. Je pense qu'il est important que les ministères adoptent un bon processus budgétaire, et que la comptabilité d'exercice les aiderait en ce sens. Sheila Fraser serait d'une aide précieuse.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

J'approuve tout ce que vous venez de dire, madame Ratansi. C'est un aspect que nous devrions étudier. Lorsqu'il s'agit de réformer les pratiques concernant le processus budgétaire et les prévisions budgétaires, je ne voudrais pas que le mieux soit l'ennemi du bien. Si nous arrivons à cerner des mesures concrètes que nous pourrions prendre, nous serions à même d'apporter toute une série de changements à l'avenir. Cependant, je tiens à apporter certains changements concrets afin d'améliorer les choses avant la prochaine année budgétaire.

(1850)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Blaney, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue au Comité, monsieur le ministre, ainsi qu'à vos fonctionnaires et à votre secrétaire parlementaire. C'est un plaisir de vous avoir ici. C'est également réjouissant de savoir que vous souhaitez travailler de façon coopérative. Vous pouvez compter sur nous pour jouer un rôle constructif d'opposition.

Pour ce qui est des changements, je mentionnerais simplement qu'il va être important de nous convaincre de la nécessité de ceux-ci. Si je regarde, par exemple — et j'enchaîne avec ma question, monsieur le ministre —, la Mise à jour des projections économiques et budgétaires 2015, qui relève des données gouvernementales, il est clairement indiqué qu'il y a un solde budgétaire positif de 1,9 milliard de dollars dans l'exercice financier 2014-2015.

Or, vous êtes à l'aube d'un nouveau mandat, monsieur le ministre. En ce moment, il est important de savoir qu'on est sur la bonne voie. Dans votre plan électoral, vous indiquez clairement que vous enregistrerez à court terme un modeste déficit de moins de 10 milliards de dollars au cours des deux prochains exercices financiers, pour faire des investissements dans les infrastructures et la classe moyenne du Canada. Vous prévoyez retourner à l'équilibre budgétaire en 2019.

Je vois ici des manchettes de journaux.[Traduction]

J'ai sous la main un article publié en février, intitulé « Les déficits fédéraux pourraient dépasser les 52 milliards de dollars sur deux ans si les libéraux tiennent leurs promesses ».

Il y a également un article sur une étude de la Banque nationale intitulé « Les déficits des libéraux pourraient atteindre un total de 90 milliards de dollars après quatre ans ».

Monsieur le ministre, vous êtes le protecteur des contribuables. Vous êtes celui qui doit dire non, mais aussi celui qui doit signer les chèques.[Français]

Comme on dit en bon français, on ne voudrait pas que vous « pogniez » une tendinite à force de signer des chèques, parce que les voies ensoleillées vont carrément tourner en éclipse, et ce sont les contribuables qui vont en faire les frais.

Voici donc ma question. À l'aube de votre nouveau mandat, vous jouez un rôle important. Êtes-vous prêt à respecter l'engagement que vous avez pris dans votre plateforme, ainsi que les partis de l'opposition qui, comme vous le savez, visent un équilibre budgétaire? J'aimerais vous entendre là-dessus, monsieur le ministre.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Blaney. J'apprécie beaucoup votre question et je suis très heureux de vous voir avec notre programme électoral. C'est un document extraordinaire.

Nous ne sommes pas d'accord là-dessus, mais nous avons quand même hérité d'un déficit de la part du précédent gouvernement. C'est clair que nous avons hérité aussi d'une situation où il est nécessaire de créer de la croissance économique. Depuis 2011, nous avions une économie dont la croissance était anémique. Pour nous, la priorité est de faire des investissements importants pour renouveler nos infrastructures partout au Canada, et d'investir de façon stratégique dans la classe moyenne en visant la création d'emplois. La croissance économique est une priorité pour notre gouvernement et nous allons y travailler. Ce sera évident dans notre budget; c'est exactement ce que nous allons faire dans le budget. Il est important de reconnaître que l'ancien gouvernement — votre gouvernement — a augmenté notre dette nationale de 150 milliards de dollars. Pour la relance de la croissance économique, nous allons prendre des décisions différentes et nous allons investir d'une manière stratégique.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Monsieur le ministre, il est vrai qu'au moment de la crise économique, notre gouvernement a investi, avec l'accord des partis de l'opposition, notamment des libéraux.

Cependant, comment pouvez-vous affirmer avoir hérité d'un déficit? Les données du ministère des Finances indiquent qu'il y a eu un surplus budgétaire de 1,9 milliard de dollars. Au moment où vous arrivez au pouvoir, le budget est équilibré. Vous vous engagez à de modestes déficits. Pouvez-vous vous engager ce soir, en tant que président du Conseil du Trésor, à garder le but pour les contribuables? Les contribuables dans mon comté ainsi que les gens d'affaires sont inquiets, monsieur Brison.

Il faut aussi penser à nos enfants. Le développement durable consiste à ne pas leur refiler un système qui n'est pas durable. C'est maintenant rendu que l'on va emprunter pour faire l'épicerie. C'est ce que vous allez faire, et ce n'est pas du développement durable.

Vous êtes celui qui a la capacité de jouer le rôle de goulot d'étranglement du gouvernement. Vous avez beau dire que vous devez respecter vos engagements. En effet, c'était contenu dans votre plateforme et c'est grâce à celle-ci que vous avez été élus. Par contre, 41 % de la population a voté pour vous, ce qui veut dire que 59 % de la population a dit ne pas vouloir de déficit.

Un déficit de 10 milliards de dollars, c'est déjà bien suffisant. Or, d'après ce que disent les manchettes des journaux, vous êtes sur une pente dangereuse, monsieur le président du Conseil du Trésor. Êtes-vous prêt à assumer votre rôle de gardien des contribuables et de gardien des engagements pris par le Parti libéral lors de la dernière campagne électorale?

Je le répète, nous avons fini l'année avec un surplus budgétaire de 1,9 milliard de dollars. Je peux déposer le document, il est disponible sur Internet, sur le site du ministère des Finances du Canada.

(1855)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Après un aussi long préambule, je sais que cela pourrait être difficile, monsieur le ministre, mais je vous prie de répondre le plus brièvement possible. [Français]

L'hon. Scott Brison:

M. Blaney est un bon gars. Je l'aime beaucoup. Nous faisons nos entraînements dans le gymnase ensemble de temps en temps. [Traduction]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Cela se voit bien, n'est-ce pas?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Scott Brison:

C'est pour cela que nous sommes si forts. Nous sommes très musclés, M. Blaney et moi. Nous sommes des durs.[Français]

Monsieur le président, il est très important de reconnaître que des experts comme David Dodge, Kevin Lynch et Larry Summers, ancien secrétaire du trésor des États-Unis, sont d'accord avec nous et disent qu'il faut faire des investissements maintenant, particulièrement en cette période de croissance anémique.[Traduction]

Nous investissons de façon stratégique. Nous allons investir de manière stratégique. C'est ce que vous verrez dans le budget. Nous le ferons avec discipline. Nous allons stimuler l'économie. Nous allons investir pour soutenir la classe moyenne. C'est ce que nous nous sommes engagés à faire. Nous y croyons. L'OCDE et plusieurs des plus grands penseurs du monde en matière d'économie sont d'accord avec nous.

Je suis ravi de répondre aux questions de M. Blaney aujourd'hui, et j'ai hâte de poursuivre la discussion à ce sujet.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Weir, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Il y a eu des questions générales sur le cadre financier. J'aimerais me concentrer sur certains aspects en particulier.

Le Conseil du Trésor sait sans doute que la Régie de la plaque tournante de transport mondial, près de Regina, est dans l'embarras en raison de l'achat de terres pour lesquelles la société d'État a payé plus du double du montant demandé par les vendeurs, et le Parti de la Saskatchewan est impliqué dans cette affaire. Certains ont réclamé une enquête de la GRC.

Lors du débat d'ajournement de lundi, la secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Transports a confirmé que son ministère avait versé 27 millions de dollars à la Régie de la plaque tournante de transport mondial, mais elle n'a pas semblé particulièrement préoccupée par la façon dont l'argent a été dépensé. Aujourd'hui, le Globe and Mail révèle que le Conseil du Trésor a pris des mesures de surveillance spéciales à l'endroit de Transports Canada. Ces mesures comprendront-elles une enquête visant à s'assurer que les recettes fiscales fédérales n'ont pas été gaspillées dans une transaction foncière suspecte conclue par le Parti de la Saskatchewan?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Weir.

Vous avez déjà travaillé au Conseil du Trésor.

(1900)

M. Erin Weir:

C'est vrai.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je crois que M. Blaney a travaillé au ministère des Travaux publics, mon ancien ministère, il y a un certain temps.

Premièrement, je tiens à parler brièvement du budget de fonctionnement de Transports Canada. Nous collaborons étroitement avec le ministre Garneau dans ce dossier, et il répondra aux questions directement liées à Transports Canada. Je suis certainement disposé à en parler avec le ministre Garneau.

Le Conseil du Trésor, et plus particulièrement le contrôleur général, M. Matthews, collabore étroitement avec l'ensemble des ministères et des organismes. Comme moi, M. Matthews est diplômé de l'Université Dalhousie. Comme il a un diplôme en commerce, il doit être intelligent. Nous collaborons étroitement avec les ministères et les organismes afin d'établir un cadre rigoureux en matière de gestion des finances et de cerner les problèmes potentiels.

Voudriez-vous que je consulte mon collègue, le ministre, à ce sujet, et que je recommunique avec vous?

M. Erin Weir:

J'en serais ravi.

J'aimerais seulement obtenir une précision. Vous allez demander expressément au ministre Garneau d'examiner le dossier de la Régie de la plaque tournante de transport mondial pour s'assurer qu'il n'y a pas eu de gaspillage de fonds fédéraux.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je suis ici depuis suffisamment longtemps pour savoir que, lorsque je ne connais pas la réponse à la question, je dois l'admettre. Je vais en parler avec le ministre Garneau. Je m'engage à vous donner une réponse à ce sujet.

Je ne tiens pas du tout à me mêler de la politique provinciale de la Saskatchewan. Je ne suis pas au courant de la situation en question, mais nous allons certainement nous pencher sur les aspects de ce dossier qui concernent le gouvernement fédéral.

M. Erin Weir:

Très bien.

J'aimerais aborder une autre question. Hier, le Bureau du Conseil privé a dit à notre comité qu'il dépensera environ 1 million de dollars par année pour financer le nouveau Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat, et que les recommandations de ce comité ne seront pas publiées.

Est-ce que d'autres ministères, ou le Sénat lui-même, dépenseront des fonds supplémentaires dans le cadre de ce processus?

Le Sénat demeure une entité non élue qui n'a pas de comptes à rendre et qui fait l'objet d'une enquête. Pourquoi le gouvernement verse-t-il plus d'argent à cette institution inutile au lieu de suivre l'exemple de toutes les assemblées législatives provinciales en abolissant la Chambre haute?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Eh bien, j'ai examiné en détail ma lettre de mandat, et la réforme du Sénat n'y est pas mentionnée, mais c'est un dossier important pour le gouvernement. Ma collègue, la ministre Monsef, a fait des propositions en collaboration avec notre leader à la Chambre.

L'amélioration du Sénat et de son processus de nomination est un dossier que nous prenons au sérieux. Ce processus est en cours. Comme vous le savez, un processus provisoire est mis en oeuvre parce qu'il est urgent de nommer des sénateurs provenant de certaines provinces. Un comité consultatif indépendant composé d'éminents Canadiens a été mis sur pied à cette fin. Nous mettons en oeuvre la réforme du Sénat.

M. Erin Weir:

Pouvez-vous confirmer que le total de la contribution annuelle que ce comité recevra du gouvernement fédéral s'élève à 1 million de dollars, ou y a-t-il d'autres ministères qui feront également des dépenses pour ce nouveau régime?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je pense que vous faites plutôt allusion aux dépenses faites par le Sénat et le Parlement. Nous sommes en train de parler du processus de nomination, et toute réforme d'un processus nécessite un investissement. Nous croyons que ce sont des investissements judicieux qui visent à améliorer le Sénat et à mettre en place un processus plus transparent qui, au bout du compte, amènera le processus de nomination au Sénat à être davantage axé sur le mérite.

Cependant, monsieur Weir, je tiens à dire très clairement que, selon moi, le Sénat du Canada fait un travail important. Nous croyons que le Sénat peut être amélioré, mais le Sénat et ses comités font un travail très important.

Nous pouvons avoir des opinions différentes, mais je crois qu'il y a des mesures importantes que nous pouvons prendre sans avoir à ouvrir la Constitution, par exemple. Le processus de nomination peut nous permettre d'améliorer le Sénat, et je pense que c'est ce que veulent les Canadiens.

M. Erin Weir:

Il y a effectivement une divergence d'opinions, mais il y a aussi la question concrète du coût de ce nouveau processus, et cet argent pourrait certainement servir à d'autres fins, notamment à financer des activités de recherche utiles et d'importantes études que l'on attribue parfois au Sénat. On peut se demander si c'est la manière la plus efficace d'utiliser cet argent.

(1905)

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Seriez-vous d'accord pour dire qu'il serait judicieux de mettre en oeuvre le processus dont nous parlons s'il rendait le Sénat plus efficace et le processus de nomination plus transparent?

M. Erin Weir:

S'il rendait le processus plus transparent...

J'ai été déçu d'apprendre que les recommandations ne seront pas rendues publiques.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Serait-ce vraiment souhaitable? S'agit-il vraiment d'un objectif souhaitable auquel vous souscririez?

Le président:

Monsieur Weir, vous aurez droit à une autre période de trois minutes. Nous en sommes encore aux périodes de sept minutes.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

N'oubliez pas que, le 19 juin prochain, cela fera 19 ans que je suis député, dont 16 et demi dans l'opposition. Disons que je suis davantage habitué à poser les questions qu'à y répondre. Je prie mon collègue de m'excuser.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole pendant sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci d'être ici aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre. Vous avez plus d'expérience dans ce dossier que ce que nous pourrions tous souhaiter.

J'aimerais aborder votre sujet préféré, celui des affectations bloquées et des autorisations non engagées, car je sais que vous en brûlez d'envie. Présentement, ces affectations s'élèvent à 5,1 milliards de dollars, alors je me pose une question: les conservateurs nous ont dit qu'ils avaient équilibré le budget, mais je trouve cela plutôt difficile à croire. Combien d'argent non dépensé a donc pu servir à faire croire à un excédent?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Il y a une ou deux choses à savoir à ce sujet-là, David. Je badinais peut-être un peu, tout à l'heure avec M. Blaney, mais je ne voudrais pas que nous... Disons que j'ai déjà fait partie de comités qui étaient trop partisans, et c'était loin d'être drôle.

Pour répondre à votre question, il ne faut pas oublier que La revue financière nous donne une idée de la situation financière seulement pour tel ou tel mois, trimestre ou que sais-je encore. C'est comme si, un de ces jours, vous vous aperceviez en consultant votre relevé bancaire que vous avez 10 000 $ en liquidités mais que vous n'avez remboursé ni votre prêt hypothécaire, ni votre prêt auto. Ou comme si vous vous disiez: « Il doit bien me rester de l'argent, puisque j'ai encore des chèques », ce genre de choses. Ce n'est pas ce qu'on pourrait appeler un portrait complet de la situation, il vous manque trop de données.

Pour ce qui est des affectations bloquées, voici quelques exemples qui devraient mieux vous situer. Il s'agit de fonds qui ont été approuvés par le Parlement, mais auquel le Conseil du Trésor restreint l'accès, pour toutes sortes de raisons. Je vous donne quelques exemples.

Peut-être qu'on s'est engagé à transférer de l'argent à un autre ministère ou organisme en échange d'un service donné. Peut-être encore qu'on souhaite reporter des fonds à l'exercice suivant.

Il arrive par exemple assez fréquemment que l'acquisition de matériel de défense donne lieu à des affectations bloquées, puisqu'il faut mettre de côté l'argent nécessaire jusqu'à ce qu'on en ait besoin. Si vous allez sur le site Web du Conseil du Trésor, vous verrez des exemples concrets de ce à quoi renvoient ces 5,1 milliards de dollars.

Sur cette somme, 2,8 milliards de dollars seront reportés aux exercices suivants. Là-dessus, il y a 630 millions de dollars en capitaux et en fonds d'administration pour divers grands projets de la défense, comme je le disais, et 675 millions pour les revendications territoriales et autres transferts destinés aux Autochtones.

Voici un exemple qui touche directement le Conseil du Trésor: 507 millions de dollars sont bloqués pour les congés parentaux et les indemnités de cessation d'emploi. C'est ce qu'on appelle les « crédits centraux du Conseil du Trésor ». Il s'agit d'un poste important, parce que le Conseil du Trésor, en gérant ces fonds de manière centralisée, enlève des coûts aux ministères et aux agences en les gérant lui-même. Selon nous, il vaut mieux, pour l'intérêt public, que les ministères et organismes, avec leurs budgets limités, n'embauchent pas leurs employés en songeant tout de suite aux prestations de congé parental ou aux indemnités de cessation d'emploi qu'ils pourraient devoir leur verser. Les raisons pour lesquelles ces sommes sont gérées de manière centralisée par le Conseil du Trésor sont aussi importantes que progressives.

Nous gérons aussi les crédits pour éventualités du gouvernement. Cette année, en ce qui concerne le Conseil du Trésor, c'est 750 millions de dollars de crédits pour éventualités qui ne seront pas affectés. Il y a aussi l'équivalent de 560 millions de dollars en sommes reportées d'années précédentes qui sont destinés aux budgets de fonctionnement. Comme le disait le directeur parlementaire du budget, en rendant ces données publiques plus tôt au cours du cycle budgétaire, nous contribuons à le rendre substantiellement plus transparent. C'est non négligeable. Et ce n'est que le début en matière de transparence et de communication d'information de meilleure qualité aux parlementaires et aux Canadiens.

(1910)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une autre question à vous poser. Vous dites vouloir réformer les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses, et à mon avis, je crois qu'il s'agit d'une proposition intéressante. Y a-t-il eu d'autres réformes dernièrement, ou le système est-il demeuré inchangé depuis longtemps?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Selon moi, ce processus a constamment perdu de son utilité au fil des ans. Il fut une époque où la comparution d'un ministre devant un comité pour défendre son Budget principal des dépenses était considérée comme un véritable événement par les parlementaires. Il s'agissait en fait d'un de leurs rôles centraux.

Nous parlions du Sénat tout à l'heure, et je dois vous dire qu'à l'heure où on se parle, il y a des sénateurs qui, il faut le dire, comprennent mieux ce processus que quiconque et qui se font un point d'honneur de demander rigoureusement des comptes aux ministres. Les fonctionnaires de mon ministère vous le confirmeraient sans doute. Allez voir par vous-même en assistant à un comité sénatorial où un ministre est appelé à défendre son énoncé budgétaire.

Cette érosion s'est faite progressivement mais irrémédiablement. Il n'y a rien de partisan dans ce que je dis. Cela étant dit, une question demeure: que fait-on, maintenant? Nous prenons cette question très au sérieux. Je sais d'ailleurs que les fonctionnaires de mon ministère ont fait du bon travail dans ce dossier. J'ai aussi fait allusion au modèle australien, tout à l'heure.

Je crois me rappeler, monsieur Graham, que vous étiez présent à la séance d'information à l'intention des parlementaires que nous avons organisée il y a quelques semaines, non?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis arrivé très tard parce que je devais d'abord assister à la rencontre du caucus des députés des régions rurales.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Moi aussi, j'en fais partie, et j'en suis fier.

Il y a certaines choses que j'aimerais faire connaître au Comité au sujet de la réforme. Nous avons montré une présentation aux députés et aux sénateurs qui étaient là ce soir-là, et si vous le permettez, j'aimerais vous la faire parvenir aussi. Nous n'avons pas encore fixé de date pour l'examen des budgets des dépenses et des crédits parlementaires, mais j'aimerais quand même que vous ayez ce document dès maintenant, afin que vous puissiez commencer à y réfléchir. C'est très important. C'est le rôle du Conseil du Trésor d'améliorer ce processus, et c'est aussi celui du comité des opérations gouvernementales.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Le temps est écoulé. Je voulais juste que vous sachiez, monsieur le ministre, que le Conseil du Trésor nous a déjà fait parvenir la présentation dont vous parlez, et elle a déjà été distribuée à tous.

Passons à la série de question de cinq minutes, en commençant par M. McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Merci d'être ici parmi nous, monsieur le ministre. Le gouvernement ouvert est très important pour vous, et je vous en remercie. Si vous aviez été ici hier, vous auriez eu l'impression, comme nous, d'être dans un épisode de la série Yes, Minister, au rythme où nous obtenions des réponses. Je vous remercie donc d'avoir autant la transparence à coeur.

Je vais laisser de côté les questions à 1 milliard de dollars, contrairement à mes collègues, et m'intéresser plutôt aux 81 millions pour les services de santé, de réadaptation et de soutien du ministère des Anciens Combattants. Ces sommes serviront-elles à rouvrir les neuf centres de services qui ont fermé leurs portes, ou seront-elles plutôt divisées et dépensées selon les priorités, surtout quand on sait à quel point notre pays est vaste et le nombre d'anciens combattants qui ont besoin de services? Vous en tiendrez-vous uniquement à votre promesse électorale en rouvrant ces centres ou tiendrez-vous plutôt compte des besoins établis dans chaque région?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Premièrement, tous les parlementaires s'entendent pour dire que le ministère des Anciens Combattants et la manière dont sont traités les hommes et les femmes qui ont si vaillamment servi leur patrie constituent une priorité de premier plan.

Il y a une ou deux choses à dire pour répondre à votre question, à commencer par la nature du service militaire de nos jours. J'en veux pour preuve la mission Afghanistan ou celle contre l'EIIS et son volet « formation ». La nature du service militaire a évolué. En fait, le soutien aux anciens combattants dans ce nouveau contexte — pensons par exemple au nombre accru de troubles de stress post-traumatique et aux difficultés qui s'ensuivent — oblige les gouvernements à revoir la manière dont ils traitent les anciens combattants, et à actualiser et moderniser leurs façons de faire. Nous prenons cette question au sérieux.

Les fonds demandés serviront à traiter un plus grand nombre de demandes de prestations d'invalidité, à répondre aux besoins croissants en santé, par exemple pour les médicaments sur ordonnance, et, je tiens à le préciser, à bonifier les services en santé mentale.

(1915)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je vous remercie. Mais qu'en est-il des neuf centres? Ces sommes serviront-elles à les rouvrir ou à financer d'autres types de services, comme vous semblez maintenant le dire.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Nous allons rouvrir les neuf centres en question.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Il s'agit donc de toute autre chose.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Les fonds dont je parle serviront à améliorer les services offerts aux anciens combattants. J'ai donné quelques exemples, en insistant sur les services en santé mentale.

Cela ne nous empêche aucunement de donner suite à ce que nous considérons comme une priorité, c'est-à-dire la réouverture de certains de ces bureaux.

Les anciens combattants nous ont clairement dit que ces bureaux étaiet très importants pour eux, à cause de l'endroit où ils étaient situés et parce qu'ils leur permettaient de se rendre eux-mêmes sur place et de parler à quelqu'un.

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est excellent, et je ne dis pas le contraire. Je crois que ces coûts entrent aussi dans les 435 millions de dollars supplémentaires. Les 81 millions de dollars en question serviront-ils à couvrir les coûts de ces neuf bureaux ou à payer les produits pharmaceutiques et services supplémentaires qui seront offerts partout au pays et dont vous parliez à l'instant?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Le nombre de demandes de prestations d'invalidité traitées constitue une bonne part de ce montant, tout comme les services en santé mentale.

Nous disposons aussi de cinq ans pour améliorer les services aux anciens combattants et à leurs proches.

Nous parlons aujourd'hui de ce qui se trouve dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Dans quelques semaines, le budget sera annoncé, et il y aura plus...

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je suis conscient que ma question sort un peu de nulle part, alors je peux comprendre que vous n'ayez pas les chiffres exacts; nous pouvons...

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Ils n'ont rien à voir avec la réouverture des bureaux.

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est justement ce que j'aimerais savoir.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Non, elles ne serviront pas expressément à la réouverture de ces bureaux, que nous allons bel et bien rouvrir...

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est ce que je veux savoir.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je sais. Je vous remercie, monsieur McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Bon, le temps commence à nous manquer.

J'aimerais revenir sur une question qui a été abordée hier et à laquelle nous n'avons pas pu obtenir de réponse claire. Il était question d'une somme de 1 million de dollars pour mettre fin au Plan d'action économique du Canada. Nous savons que cette question a déjà prêté à controverse par le passé, mais de là à demander 1 million de dollars... J'essaie juste de comprendre à quoi servira cet argent.

Si j'ai bien compris, il devait servir à mettre fin à cette initiative. Or, tout ce qu'on a eu comme réponse, c'est: « Non non, cet argent était déjà dépensé avant même l'arrivée au pouvoir du nouveau gouvernement. »

Le président:

Je suis obligé de vous interrompre. Peut-être que votre collègue, M. Blaney, pourra poursuivre à votre place pendant sa prochaine série de questions, et sans doute le ministre pourra-t-il répondre à ce moment-là.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je m'en remets à vous, monsieur le président. Je suis prêt, si...

Le président:

Nous allons poursuivre, parce que je tiens à ce que tout le monde puisse interroger le ministre avant la fin de la séance.

M. Ayoub a maintenant cinq minutes pour poser ses questions. [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Brison, madame, messieurs, je vous remercie d'être ici ce soir pour répondre à nos questions. Évidemment, la transparence est un élément important, tout comme la nouvelle façon de voir les choses, et j'en suis très fier.

J'aimerais vous poser une question par rapport au Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire. On demande de nouvelles sommes d'argent. Il est question de presque un demi-milliard de dollars, soit 435 millions de dollars. C'est énorme. Je me demande quel était le budget initial et quel sera le pourcentage d'augmentation à la suite de cette demande.

Quelles sont les raisons principales de cette demande? Est-ce que la prévision était erronée au départ? Depuis combien de temps sait-on qu'on va arriver tôt ou tard à une augmentation importante comme celle-là? Est-ce un dossier qu'on vous a signalé rapidement, en vous disant qu'il manquait un demi-milliard de dollars dans les prévisions, ou est-ce arrivé tout d'un coup, dans les dernières semaines?

J'aurais aimé savoir un peu par quel processus on a établi qu'il fallait 435 millions de dollars.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Ayoub. J'apprécie beaucoup votre question.

Dans le contexte économique actuel, avec des taux d'intérêts qui sont très bas, il faut investir pour augmenter la force de nos régimes de pension du secteur public.

Permettez-moi de répondre en anglais, puisque c'est une question très technique.

(1920)

[Traduction]

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Je vous en prie.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Deux facteurs entrent en jeu, à commencer par la demande touchant les prestations de retraite et d'invalidité. Le Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire et son volet « invalidité » ont augmenté pour toutes sortes de raisons. J'énumérais tout à l'heure à M. McCauley certains des facteurs touchant les investissements en santé mentale, et il s'agit d'un facteur très important.

Ensuite, avec les très bas taux d'intérêt que nous connaissons actuellement, les régimes de retraite ont la vie dure, et nous tenons par-dessus tout à maintenir la force prudentielle de nos régimes de retraite publics, mais sans pour autant négliger la transparence. C'est là qu'entre en scène l'investissement dont vous parlez.

Brian ici présent me disait que les demandes de prestations provenant de vétérans de l'Afghanistan ont crû de 66 % en trois ans. C'est un exemple. Or, cette situation serait la même peu importe le parti au pouvoir. Il faut absolument maintenir la force prudentielle de nos régimes de retraite malgré la hausse des versements, notamment dans le cadre du Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire. C'est aussi à cela que sert cet investissement. [Français]

M. Bill Matthews (contrôleur général du Canada, Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor):

Je voudrais simplement ajouter une chose.[Traduction]

Le ministre a déjà parlé des faibles taux d'intérêt et du nombre sans cesse croissant de demandes de prestations depuis la mission en Afghanistan, mais il y a un troisième facteur: le montant des prestations a lui aussi augmenté à cause du règlement intervenu dans une poursuite, dans l'affaire Manuge pour être exact. Résultat: les prestations versées à chaque personne sont plus élevées.

Je crois comprendre que vous vouliez savoir quel était le point de départ pour l'exercice en cours. Eh bien nous avons commencé l'exercice avec environ 370 millions de dollars — 368 pour être exact, si mes souvenirs sont bons. À cela s'ajoutent les 435 millions de dollars dont vous parliez, ce qui veut dire qu'on a doublé le budget et même plus. Mais tout s'explique par ces trois facteurs: les taux d'intérêt, le nombre de demandes et l'affaire Manuge.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

N'y a-t-il pas moyen de prévoir ces écarts un peu d'avance?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

En fait, le Conseil du Trésor examine l'ensemble des régimes de retraite du secteur public afin de prévoir et voir venir ces investissements. Mais n'ayez crainte, le tout se fera de manière tout à fait transparente, nous rendrons des comptes au Parlement, à qui nous les expliquerons et à qui nous demanderons de se prononcer au moyen d'un vote, et nous ferons participer les parlementaires au processus.

Tout le monde conviendra sans doute que la priorité numéro un concernant les régimes de retraite publics, c'est d'en maintenir la force prudentielle, mais de manière ouverte et transparente. Nous devons adopter la meilleure approche qui soit pour gérer ces régimes sans compromettre l'avenir des futurs prestataires mais en en tirant le meilleur rendement possible, tant que c'est fait de manière responsable.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

On vous écoute, monsieur Blaney. Vous disposez de cinq minutes. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je répète que c'est un véritable plaisir de vous recevoir ce soir. Comme on dit, il faut donner la chance au coureur. Cependant, vous ne me convainquez pas encore que vous serez celui qui va dire non. Y a-t-il un pilote dans l'avion? Allez-vous protéger les contribuables de cette propension à créer des déficits immenses?

Ma première question porte sur une campagne de sensibilisation dont il est question à la page 19 du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Le budget de publicité global est de 9,5 millions de dollars. Cette campagne de sensibilisation vise entre autres à prévenir l'utilisation illégale de la marijuana chez les jeunes. On connaît les effets dévastateurs de la marijuana. Un montant de 1 million de dollars est prévu à cette fin. Êtes-vous en mesure de me confirmer que ce montant va être consacré à cela?

S'il reste du temps, les gens qui vous accompagnent pourront répondre à mon autre question, au sujet du programme de construction navale. Il y a un montant de 116 millions de dollars. Serait-il possible d'avoir des détails sur la raison du coût additionnel pour les vaisseaux?

Je répète donc ma première question. Du budget de publicité total de 9,5 millions de dollars, le montant de 1 million de dollars prévu pour prévenir l'utilisation illégale de marijuana, particulièrement chez les jeunes, sera-t-il investi à cette fin?

(1925)

[Traduction]

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup.

De la marijuana à la construction navale: on va d'un extrême à l'autre, en tout cas. [Français]

J'aimerais commencer par discuter de la loi sur la marijuana. Depuis longtemps, l'approche du gouvernement du Canada n'arrive pas à réduire l'utilisation de la marijuana, particulièrement chez les jeunes. Notre responsabilité est de mettre en oeuvre une approche fondée sur des données probantes.[Traduction]

Les preuves sont claires. Personne n'approuve, n'appuie ou promeut la consommation de la marijuana, monsieur Blaney. Nous voulons seulement un cadre juridique plus efficace. Certains pays qui ont choisi de mettre l'accent sur la promotion de la santé, la prévention, ainsi que les services de santé mentale et de traitement de la toxicomanie, ont trouvé que cette approche est plus efficace pour réduire la consommation de drogues, y compris de la marijuana, qu'une approche simplement fondée sur la justice pénale. Nous ne sommes peut-être pas d'accord sur l'approche à adopter, mais je tiens à préciser clairement, monsieur Blaney, que personne ici ne préconise ou ne promeut la consommation de la marijuana.

Vous avez posé une question sur le programme de construction navale, et je pense que vous parlez des 116 millions de dollars prévus pour la construction de trois navires hauturiers de science halieutique.

Comme vous le savez, nous nous sommes engagés à mettre en place un programme national de construction navale au Canada. Pour ce qui est du financement des trois navires hauturiers de science halieutique, j'ai travaillé récemment avec le ministre Tootoo. C'est l'une des mesures prises dans le cadre du remplacement de notre flotte vieillissante, ce qui est une initiative importante.

Il est important que vous sachiez que la construction navale relève des ministères des Pêches et de la Défense, ainsi que de Travaux publics — qui s'appelle maintenant Services publics et Approvisionnement — et du ministère de l'Industrie. Le gouvernement cherche à équilibrer Services publics et Approvisionnement, mon ancien ministère, dont le travail consiste à élaborer un processus ouvert et transparent qui permet de tirer le meilleur profit de l'argent des contribuables. Le ministère de l'Industrie tente de maximiser les retombées industrielles régionales, qui s'appelaient récemment des retombées industrielles technologiques, et les ministères de la Défense et des Pêches ont également des besoins à cet égard.

Globalement, le Conseil du Trésor joue un rôle de leadership et de coordination, et il travaille avec tous les ministères et les organismes afin de mettre en place les processus d'approvisionnement les plus efficients qui permettront de répondre aux trois objectifs gouvernementaux suivants: création d'emplois pour les Canadiens, optimisation de l'utilisation des deniers publics, et acquisition du meilleur équipement possible pour nos militaires et la Garde côtière, par exemple.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. C'est tout le temps que nous avons.

Désolé, monsieur Blaney, le temps est écoulé.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Monsieur le président, je ne veux pas poser de question, mais j'aimerais que le ministre me confirme comment le 1 million de dollars qui est prévu va être investi.

(1930)

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je suis désolé. Je ne suis pas évasif. Je suis intarissable. C'est différent.

M. McCauley a posé une question plus tôt sur la façon dont les fonds sont utilisés. Nous mettons à jour le site Web du premier ministre pour améliorer les communications avec les Canadiens au moyen d'un processus numérique. Le premier ministre précédent diffusait ces espèces de vidéos intitulées 24 SEPT...

M. Kelly McCauley:

C'est complètement différent.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Mais nous n'annulons pas le Plan d'action économique, monsieur McCauley. Il existera encore, mais nous n'allons pas faire autant de publicité pour le promouvoir.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci beaucoup de votre réponse.

Le président:

Monsieur le ministre, il est 19 h 30, et vous nous avez gracieusement donné une heure de votre temps. Toutefois, dans le cadre de notre rotation, nous terminons normalement par une troisième série de questions qui sont posées par le troisième parti. Accepteriez-vous de rester pour une autre séance éreintante de questions et de réponses de trois minutes?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je dois vous dire, monsieur le président, que, au fil des années, j'ai fait partie de l'opposition et du gouvernement. Comme Mae West l'a dit : « J'ai été riche et j'ai été pauvre, et je préfère être riche. » Il est un peu préférable de faire partie du gouvernement que de l'opposition, mais je respecte beaucoup le travail des députés de l'opposition. Je pense que, à une époque, j'étais membre du cinquième parti à la Chambre des communes. Ma réponse est donc oui absolument, je vais rester.

Le président:

Nous disposons de trois minutes. Veuillez être le plus précis possible parce que les trois minutes sont pour la question et la réponse.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je faisais partie d'un caucus de 12 députés à un moment donné.

M. Erin Weir:

Je vais revenir sur la question de la marijuana. Tandis que le gouvernement détermine un cadre de légalisation pour la marijuana, décriminalisera-t-il cette dernière pour s'assurer au moins que des gens ne se retrouvent pas avec un casier judiciaire ou ne sont pas emprisonnés pour simple possession et consommation de marijuana?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Ce processus est en cours... Mes collègues, la ministre Wilson-Raybould et son secrétaire parlementaire, M. Blair, y travaillent. Il y a un processus en cours, mais je ne suis pas un expert là-dedans.

Nous voulons bien faire les choses. Je pense qu'il est très utile d'avoir M. Blair avec nous, étant donné son expérience dans la police. Cependant, nous voulons faire ce qui s'impose, pas pour des raisons idéologiques, mais en fonction des faits. Je suis convaincu que nous ferons bien les choses, mais j'ignore si des mesures provisoires seront mises en place en attendant.

Le président:

Monsieur Weir, je souhaite brièvement dire quelque chose. Vous ne perdrez pas de temps à cause de cela.

La principale raison pour laquelle le ministre Brison comparaît devant nous est pour parler du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Je sais que les membres sont toujours enclins à faire des commentaires de nature politique. Cependant, j'aimerais qu'ils puissent concentrer leurs observations sur la raison pour laquelle le ministre est devant nous ce soir.

M. Erin Weir:

Cela ne me pose aucun problème, monsieur le président.

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) comprend une demande de l'Agence du revenu du Canada, qui réclame des fonds supplémentaires pour des mesures d’observation des règles fiscales, ce que j'appuie, mais, étant donné la révélation que l'ARC a enfreint ses propres lignes directrices en offrant une amnistie secrète à des millionnaires s'étant servis de l'île de Man comme paradis fiscal, quelles sommes pouvons-nous prévoir qu'ellle percevra au moyen de ces mesures d'observation?

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Monsieur Weir, le dernier gouvernement dont j'ai fait partie, de 2004 à 2006, a effectué ce qui était alors un investissement majeur afin de permettre à l'Agence du revenu du Canada de traquer les paradis fiscaux à l'étranger. Je crois savoir que cet investissement a beaucoup aidé le gouvernement à trouver les paradis fiscaux, ce qui a été très financièrement rentable pour lui.

Nous investissons dans l'ARC pour nous assurer que les Canadiens peuvent avoir confiance dans le régime fiscal. Il est très important pour le gouvernement de veiller à ce que les gens payent leur juste part. J'ai eu cette discussion avec la ministre Lebouthillier. Il s'agit là d'une priorité pour notre ministre des Finances et notre ministre du Revenu national.

Les impôts non déclarés sont décelés par le programme de vérification. Ils ont augmenté de 24 % en trois ans pour atteindre 11,7 milliards de dollars. La Direction du secteur international et des grandes entreprises a détecté 7,8 milliards de dollars en impôts non déclarés l'année dernière.

Un des meilleurs articles que j'ai lus sur le sujet a été publié dans le magazine The Economist il y a quelques années. L'Economist Intelligence Unit a mené une très bonne étude sur les paradis fiscaux à l'étranger pour tenter de quantifier le problème et, bien sûr, c'est ce qu'ont fait nos fonctionnaires du ministère des Finances et de l'ARC.

Il s'agit d'un enjeu très important. L'intégrité de notre régime fiscal est une question d'équité, et c'est quelque chose que nous prenons au sérieux.

(1935)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Je vais devoir vous interrompre.

Mesdames et messieurs, notre temps est écoulé.

Au nom de tous les membres du Comité, je remercie le ministre et les hauts fonctionnaires qui l'ont accompagné d'avoir comparu devant nous.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous avons quelques points dont nous devons discuter brièvement. J'aimerais donc demander aux membres du Comité de rester.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre. Vous pouvez nous quitter. Je vous remercie de votre présence.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Merci beaucoup.

Si vous m'invitez de nouveau, je serais heureux de parler du Budget principal des dépenses, ainsi que de la réforme des processus du budget et du budget des dépenses. Comme j'ai dit, ayant été membre de l'opposition, je suis prêt à vous consacrer une partie de mon temps. Alors, si vous voulez parler d'autres sujets, je suis disposé à le faire.

Je tiens à faire comprendre très clairement à tous les membres du Comité que les comités sont l'endroit au Parlement où nous devrions faire un travail efficace, peu importe notre allégeance politique. Si les comités ne peuvent fonctionner de manière efficace et constructive, en élaborant de bonnes politiques publiques et en exigeant des comptes de tous les partis, c'est là un véritable problème. C'est quelque chose qui me tient à coeur parce que j'ai moi-même parfois siégé dans des comités qui ne fonctionnaient pas de cette manière. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un enjeu très important. Je tiens à dire, surtout aux nouveaux députés, que le travail que vous faites au sein des comités parlementaires est extrêmement important et significatif. Je veux aussi dire aux membres de votre personnel et de votre équipe, qui vous soutiennent dans votre travail, qu'ils font un travail très important dans le cadre duquel ils peuvent élaborer de bonnes politiques publiques et améliorer réellement la vie des Canadiens.

J'ai hâte de travailler avec ce comité à l'avenir. Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître devant vous, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Nous vous remercions d'être venu.

L'hon. Scott Brison:

Je veux remercier les personnes qui m'ont accompagné ici.

Je tiens à dire une dernière chose. Nous avons des fonctionnaires exceptionnels au sein du gouvernement du Canada. Il y a quelques membres de ce comité qui ont travaillé dans la fonction publique et qui partagent certainement ce point de vue. Nous sommes bien servis par les fonctionnaires, et je tiens vraiment à les remercier d'être ici ce soir.

Merci à vous tous.

Le président:

Puisque les délibérations sont encore télévisées, je demande aux membres du Comité de poursuivre à huis clos pendant approximativement deux minutes.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je tiens seulement à vous rappeler que vous avez oublié de donner la parole à l'un de nos députés. Vous n'avez pas suivi l'horaire. Un député libéral aurait dû avoir la parole pendant cinq minutes. Au lieu de cela, vous avez immédiatement donné la parole...

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Puis-je invoquer le Règlement pour faire inscrire dans le compte rendu que vous avez pris mon temps et que vous l'avez donné au NPD?

Le président:

Selon l'horaire que j'ai, ce n'est pas ce que j'ai fait. L'horaire que nous avons adopté au début montre que, durant le premier tour de sept minutes, nous suivons l'ordre suivant: Parti libéral, Parti conservateur, Nouveau Parti démocratique, Parti libéral.

M. Nick Whalen:

Oui.

Le président:

Dans la deuxième série de questions, nous donnons d'abord la parole aux conservateurs, qui sont suivis des libéraux, puis des conservateurs à nouveau. Ensuite, lors du troisième tour, le Nouveau Parti démocratique dispose de trois minutes de parole.

M. Nick Whalen:

Non, c'est inexact.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'où sortez-vous ce troisième tour, monsieur le président? Voici ce que nous avons adopté.

Le président:

C'est ce que l'on m'a donné. Selon ce que j'ai cru comprendre, c'est ce que nous avons adopté.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, nous suivons cet horaire depuis...

M. Nick Whalen:

Non, ce n'est pas ce qui a été adopté.

Le président:

Nous allons vérifier le compte rendu. Notre greffier examinera...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n'y a jamais eu de troisième tour.

M. Nick Whalen:

Il n'y a pas eu de troisième tour, et l'ordre était le suivant: conservateur, libéral, conservateur, libéral.

Le président:

Nick, je sais que vous n'étiez pas ici hier, mais nous avons suivi cet ordre.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Non, nous ne l'avons pas fait. M. Grewal était le premier à prendre la parole, pas M. Weir.

Le président:

Non, j'ai la liste d'intervenants d'hier, et je peux vous assurer que nous avons suivi exactement le même ordre qu'aujourd'hui. Je ne veux pas me disputer.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Ce n'est pas un problème.

Le président:

Nous allons vérifier l'ordre qui a été adopté. Le Comité peut, bien sûr, adopter l'ordre des interventions qu'il souhaite. Vérifions donc d'abord ce que notre compte rendu indique, et nous nous pencherons sur la situation demain. Je n'avais certainement pas l'intention d'oublier quelqu'un.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je ne veux pas empiéter sur le temps de parole de M. Weir.

Le président:

Nous allons vérifier ce qui a été adopté.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'accord.

Le président:

Je tiens à soulever brièvement deux enjeux. Premièrement, comme je l'ai mentionné hier, j'aimerais connaître l'opinion de tout le monde sur l'horaire des réunions que nous devrions adopter pour la semaine du 21 mars. La réunion de mardi n'aura pas lieu parce que c'est le jour où le budget sera présenté. Je vous ai demandé si nous devrions nous réunir le jeudi 24 mars. C'est la journée avant que nous fassions relâche pendant deux semaines pour le congé de Pâques. J'ai suggéré que si nous ne nous réunissons pas cette journée-là — et ce sera au Comité de prendre cette décision — les membres du Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure se réunissent afin que nous puissions établir notre plan de travail. Je laisserai cependant cette décision au Comité. J'espère pouvoir obtenir le consensus des membres. Souhaitez-vous que le Comité se réunisse jeudi après-midi, avant le Vendredi saint, ou non?

(1940)

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Avons-nous un ordre du jour pour cette réunion? Si nous n'en avons pas, les membres du sous-comité devraient se réunir à la place.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Je soumettrais la question au sous-comité pour voir s'il y a un témoin.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Cela ne me poserait aucun problème.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Nous avons déjà prévu des réunions supplémentaires cette semaine. Les choses s'équilibrent donc.

M. Erin Weir:

Je préférerais, et je recommanderais vivement, que nous nous réunissions jeudi, surtout puisque nous allons manquer la réunion mardi.

Le président:

Puisqu'il ne semble pas y avoir unanimité à ce sujet, laissez-moi procéder à quelques vérifications.

Je prendrai une décision, mais je déterminerai d'abord s'il serait possible d'avoir un ordre du jour de deux heures pour jeudi. Sinon, je suggère que nous fassions appel à un sous-comité pour élaborer le plan de travail. Je ne veux pas tenir une réunion pour le simple plaisir de la chose. Je préfère avoir un ordre du jour définitif.

M. Erin Weir:

Je suis complètement d'accord. Cependant, je tiens à signaler que le sous-comité a recommandé certains sujets de discussion qui ont été reportés pour faire place au débat sur les prévisions budgétaires. Nous pourrions certainement nous pencher sur ces sujets jeudi.

Le président:

Bien noté.

Le deuxième point que je veux soulever est surtout un élément d'information. Si nous voulons que le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) fasse l'objet d'un vote, nous devrons nous en occuper demain parce que nous devons en faire rapport à la Chambre d'ici vendredi.

J'aimerais réserver environ 10 minutes à la fin de la réunion de demain pour les votes. Êtes-vous d'accord?

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Parfait. Merci.

Le président:

Sur ce, la séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 09, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.