header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-06-06 PROC 160

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

Welcome to the 160th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being held in public at the moment. The first order of business today is consideration of regulations respecting the non-attendance of members by reason of maternity or care for a newborn or newly adopted child.

We're pleased to be joined by Philippe Dufresne, the House law clerk and parliamentary counsel, and Robyn Daigle, director, members' HR services. Thank you both for being here.

Members will recall that our 48th report recommended that the Parliament of Canada Act be amended to provide members of Parliament with access to some form of pregnancy and parental leave. The legislation was subsequently amended to empower the House of Commons to make regulations. As you're aware, the Board of Internal Economy considered the matter last week and recommended that PROC consider a set of draft regulations that it unanimously endorsed.

I would note for the members that the draft regulations distributed in the morning have some slight differences from what we received from the board last week, and it's my understanding that the law clerk will explain the reasons for the changes.

With that I'll turn it over to you, Mr. Dufresne, for your opening remarks.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne (Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel, House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

Mr. Chair and members of the committee, following last week's letter from the Board of Internal Economy, I am pleased to appear before you today with my colleague Robyn Daigle, director of Members' Human Resources Services, to discuss the potential regulations on non-attendance related to maternity and paternity.

You will likely be familiar with this issue because, as the chair mentioned, it comes from a recommendation the committee itself issued in one of its reports presented to the House earlier in this session.[English]

Under the Parliament of Canada Act, a deduction of $120 is to be made to the sessional allowance of a member for each day the member does not attend a sitting of the House of Commons beyond 21 sitting days per session. Days in which a member is absent by reason of public or official business, illness or service in the armed forces are not computed as days of non-attendance and no deductions are made in such circumstances.

There is, however, no similar exemption if a member does not attend a sitting due to pregnancy or providing care for a newborn or a newly adopted child. Your committee considered this issue earlier in this session. In its 48th report entitled "Support for Members of Parliament with Young Children", this committee, after reviewing the relevant provisions respecting deductions for non-attendance, concluded and recommended as follows: It is the Committee’s view that a member should not be penalized monetarily for his or her absence from Parliament due to pregnancy and/or parental leave. Therefore, the Committee recommends That the minister responsible for the Parliament of Canada Act consider introducing legislation to amend section 57(3) of the Parliament of Canada Act to add that pregnancy and parental leave be reckoned as a day of attendance of the member during a parliamentary session for the purposes of tabulating deductions for non-attendance from the sessional allowance of a member. [Translation]

Following that committee recommendation, Bill C-74 was introduced in Parliament and passed. It amended the Parliament of Canada Act to authorize the two Houses of Parliament to make regulations regarding the attendance of their respective members and regarding amounts to be deducted from the sessional allowance for the parliamentarian missing meetings owing to their pregnancy or any parliamentarians missing meetings to take care of their new-born or newly adopted child.

Earlier this year, the Board of Internal Economy asked the House Administration to prepare a bill for its review. While preparing the proposal, the administration took into account the fact that members are not employees. Members hold public office and are not replaced when they are absent as would be, for example, an employee on parental leave. National emergencies or other important matters can always occur and force the member to return to the House or to take care of an issue in their riding.

So the issue before you is not a matter of leave in the strict sense. It is rather about whether absences related to maternity or paternity should be considered as less justified than those related to other motives such as illness, public or official business, or service in the armed forces.

The administration examined the rules in provincial and territorial legislative assemblies in Canada. We have also reviewed Great Britain's practice. That review helped us see that the majority of legislative assemblies allow members to miss sittings, without a financial deduction, by reason of maternity or paternity, over a definite or indefinite period of time.

(1105)

[English]

The members of the Board of Internal Economy unanimously endorsed the following proposal in terms of potential regulation: first, that no deduction be made to the sessional allowance of a pregnant member who does not attend a sitting during the period of four weeks before the due date; second, that there be no deduction to the sessional allowance of a member providing care for his or her newborn child during the period of 12 months from the child's date of birth; and, third, that there be no deduction to the sessional allowance of a member providing care for a newly adopted child during the period of 12 months from the date the child is placed with the member for the purpose of adoption.

This proposal is in line, in my view, with this committee's 48th report, presented in 2017, and with new section 59.1 of the Parliament of Canada Act.

I note that the proposal is not about a period where members will not attend at all to their parliamentary functions, but rather, as mentioned, members of Parliament are not replaced when absent. They are not in the same situation as employees and there will always be issues of either national or local importance that will warrant members and require members to attend either to Parliament or to their constituency. As such, the aim of the proposal is to make sure that no deduction is made to the sessional allowance of a member who misses a sitting of the House because the member is pregnant or providing care for his or her newborn or newly adopted child.

The document entitled “Draft Regulations”, which has been circulated to the members of the committee, contains the legal text that, if adopted by the House, would implement what is proposed. I note that we've made small editorial changes since it was first sent to the members by the board. They do not affect the substance of the proposal. We also removed the coming into force provision, presuming that the committee and the House would want the regulations to come into force immediately upon their adoption, but if the will is otherwise, a different date could be inserted.

I also note that the letter from the Board Of Internal Economy to this committee indicated that the board was also supportive of having no deductions made for the period of four weeks before the due date for a member whose partner is pregnant. In so doing, the board recognized the important role that the non-pregnant partner plays in the weeks leading up to the due date.[Translation]

That idea is certainly worth exploring. We have analyzed the provisions of the Parliament of Canada act to determine whether, in its current form, the act would make it possible to include those circumstances in the proposed regulations.

Following that analysis, I'm of the opinion that extending the application of the four-week non-deduction period to members whose spouse is pregnant would go beyond the wording of the new section 59.1 of the Parliament of Canada Act, which sets out situations where the House of Commons can make regulations. It states that non-attendance could apply to its members who are unable to attend a sitting of the House by reason of: (a) being pregnant; or (b) caring for a new-born or newly-adopted child ... or for a child placed with the member for the purpose of adoption. [English]

The English version is similarly drafted and does not include the situation of a member whose partner is pregnant, and so I note that under the existing regime a member whose partner is pregnant could still be absent prior to the due date for some or all of the 21 sitting days without any deductions.[Translation]

Under the circumstances, I am not suggesting that the committee recommend extending the application of the non-deduction period prior to the child's birth to members whose spouse is pregnant. The implementation of that suggestion would require an amendment to section 59.1 of the Parliament of Canada Act.

However, this is an important issue that is worthy of consideration. The committee could decide to explore this issue in the next session to find potential options. Those options could include legislative amendments or data analysis to clarify trends and measure the repercussions of the current rules on pregnant individuals' spouses.

(1110)

[English]

Last, the board raised the issue of vote pairing for members who are absent from the chamber for family reasons. The committee may also wish to consider this as a topic for a subsequent report.

This will conclude my presentation, but we will of course be happy to answer any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That adds some great clarity.

I have two things for the committee. One, I want to deal with just the recommendation first and come to a conclusion as to whatever we're going to do with this. Two, I'm going to do open rounds so anyone can ask questions, because there may be different interests here.

Madam Moore. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore (Abitibi—Témiscamingue, NDP):

I would like to clarify certain aspects, to ensure that we understand the situation properly.

Let's use the example of a pregnant member whose riding is very far. If ever, as of the 28th week of pregnancy, it became very complicated for her, medically speaking, to get to Parliament, she would have to provide a medical certificate justifying her absence from the House, as far as I understand. Basically, the days in the period between the 28th week and the 36th week of pregnancy would be considered sick days. As of the 36th week, they would be considered pregnancy days.

In short, before the 36th week of pregnancy, a member's non-attendance must be justified through medical reasons that prevent her from coming to Parliament. In that case, the individual must provide a medical certificate.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Yes, that's right.

In its current form, the Parliament of Canada Act already accepts absences due to illness. In any circumstances where medical or illness reasons can be established, be it related to pregnancy or not, members can miss sittings.

The idea behind the committee's recommendation is that the period leading up to the birth be included even without a medical certificate.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Great.

I want to clarify something else.

During those days of non-attendance, the member remains responsible for all the administrative aspects—so anything that cannot be delegated to employees. The member continues to fulfil their duties, such as by approving their employees' various absences and their office's spending. The whole administrative component related to the management of the member's office remains the member's responsibility, correct?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's correct.

In fact, the member also maintains their responsibilities toward their constituents. That is why, in the context of the rules defined here, we think that the situation of members cannot really be compared with that of employees on parental leave. Even the expression “parental leave”, in my opinion, is not the best expression to be used in this case. Members are in a different situation; they are not truly on leave in every respect.

What is proposed is to specify that, in some cases, it will not be possible to attend sittings of the House. At that point, the absence should not be treated more harshly than non-attendance for other reasons.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Ultimately, a member with a critic role can be called by their party to provide advice on positions to take, for example, while a nurse on maternity leave would not be called at home to be asked whether a patient should be given a particular medication.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Exactly.

In theory, an employee on parental leave is replaced by someone else, or it is expected that the individual will not be available to do the work. In the case of a member, the situation would be different.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Concerning the 12-month period, that is left to the member's discretion. There is no obligation to take 12 months of leave. A member can make a judgment call and decide to be present for two months because an important issue for them is under consideration, and then decide to take a month to be with their child.

The parliamentary calendar is often made up of three-week blocks of sitting, after which members can return to their riding for a week. The member could elect not to return to the House during the week in the middle of that block, to avoid having to make a round trip over the weekend. In general, members make a round trip in less than 48 hours, to make the trip less difficult. So a member could choose to spend the middle week in their riding, to avoid round trips over a weekend. That would be possible to do over a 12-month period.

(1115)

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's right. During the 12-month period following the birth of a child, the adoption of a child or the placement of a child for the purpose of adoption, the member's absences will not be counted. If there are no absences, it does not apply, of course. That does not mean the member cannot or must not be in the House. When they decide not to attend for those reasons, those reasons are good ones in the House's view.

Ms. Christine Moore:

I have one last question. It's about financial penalties. Basically, that amendment shelters members from financial penalties.

Often, all the $120 deductions for every day of sitting that will be missed are added up. We tell ourselves that it may not be a very large amount, but Parliament could decide at any time to increase that amount. For example, it could decide that, from now on, there will be a $500 deduction per day of non-attendance. In that case, the estimated cost of absences for maternity reasons would no longer be the same at all.

Do you know when the $120 amount was last indexed or changed?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The $120 amount has always remained at $120. That amount has not been modified. However, the House can modify it. The act states that the House can, through regulations similar to the ones proposed here, decide to increase it. That is a possibility.

Ms. Christine Moore:

So, to your knowledge, the $120 amount has never been increased.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

No.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Okay.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Allow me to now answer your underlying question.

Indeed, the deduction may not be a very high amount, at the end of the day. Even if all the days of non-attendance over a period of time were not justified, the percentage of the session allowance received by the member would remain high. It is important to understand that this is not leave. A member's situation would be different from an employee's situation in those circumstances.

As it has been mentioned at the Board of Internal Economy, beyond the simple issue of the financial amount, there is also this willingness to recognize that the reason invoked is legitimate and that the deduction should not apply.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Thank you very much. That answers my questions. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses. I appreciate the clarity with which you've presented this, particularly the reasoning around the four weeks for the partner of a person who's giving birth.

I want to follow up a little bit on the thinking that went into preparing this specific proposal. I know that some provincial legislatures have a maternity and parental leave provision. Others leave it to the discretion of the speaker of the legislature. I'd be curious to know why the recommendation came for this versus leaving it to the discretion of a speaker or presiding officer.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The way the legislation is drafted, it really talks about covering those circumstances, the pregnancy situation and the caring for a child. The question became what period do you use. As you say, some legislatures will make no deductions at all, probably in line with the thinking that there are differences for members, who never cease to be members during the session and who continue to have pressures and obligations. Others have said that it's with leave of the speaker, with leave of the assembly. Others use such categories as extraordinary family or personal circumstances or situations. Some have no deductions but they have an ethics code where there's an expectation that you attend assiduously and if you do not, you need to justify that.

It was really an attempt to see, in looking at all of this, what makes sense in terms of the practice out there. The 12 months and the four weeks prior were proposed. It could have been something different, but that was something that we felt was reasonable in the circumstances.

(1120)

Mr. John Nater:

I think you're right. I think that is reasonable. It leaves the discretion and the responsibility and accountability to members themselves. I think that makes sense. It would be interesting to hear from some of the provinces to see their reasoning, but perhaps that's a discussion for another day.

I just want to clarify something about section 59.1, because I was listening through translation. The reasoning for not including the four weeks for the member whose partner is having the baby is that it would be ultra vires of that section of the act. It wouldn't be possible to implement that provision based on the amendment to the Parliament of Canada Act that was passed through last year's budget implementation legislation.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The act states: members who are unable to attend a sitting of that House by reason of

(a) being pregnant;

With that language, in both English and French versions, in my mind it's specific to those circumstances. PROC's recommendation was also similarly in that vein. Again, that's something that may warrant consideration as a policy matter. That would certainly be open to the committee to do.

Mr. John Nater:

That's something that would have to be done basically through an amendment to the Parliament of Canada Act, to permit that.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

To include that as part of the reasons, it would, in my view, require such a change.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that clarity as well.

You mentioned briefly the coming into force date. Is it your recommendation that we would proceed with that in the first sitting of the next Parliament?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

It could be the first sitting of the next Parliament. In the current form, it would enter into force immediately once adopted by the House. Assuming that the House would continue to sit in this session, after that, it would apply immediately.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm curious more generally about some of the statistics of members' absences.

Are there anonymized records kept of dates missed for medical reasons and public functions, and also for the “other” category that we see when we check off the boxes? Are those records kept? Are there statistics you'd be able to share with us based on that?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I don't believe there are statistics that we would be able to share.

I don't know if my colleague would want to add to that in terms of the—

Ms. Robyn Daigle (Director, Members’ HR Services, House of Commons):

I am not aware of any statistics either, except that they're kept and they're sent to HRS. If it were to be above 21 days, then deductions would be made.

Mr. John Nater:

Are you aware of any members having exceeded the 21 days during this Parliament?

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

Not recently, that I am aware of.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that.

I think we generally know when members have missed days for reasons of pregnancy and having given birth. It's less clear when the member's partner has given birth. I am assuming we also don't have statistics on the partners of....

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

The only stats we would have is what's included and provided to us in the monthly attendance form, and that's absolutely it.

Mr. John Nater:

I know that, for example, I missed five days when our third child was born, and four days when our first child was born, but they both had the good common sense to be born on break weeks, which helped lessen those days.

I appreciate that.

I think that's all I have at this point, Chair, in terms of questions.

The Chair:

Madam Moore. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore:

I would just like to clarify something about retroactivity of sorts.

Let's take the example of a new member with a six-month-old child at the time of election. Could they choose to have a lighter schedule over the first six months of their term?

If these regulations were implemented now, since there are not many sitting days left, I would be surprised if people decided to opt for that kind of a schedule. However, once the regulations have been implemented, any members with a child under the age of 12 months could decide to miss sittings on certain days for reason of parenthood.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Even if the regulations came into force as soon as the House made them, they define the period in question as the period that starts on the day of the child's birth or the day when the child is placed with the member for the purpose of adoption, depending on the case, and ends 12 months later. If, at the time of the regulations coming into force, the child has already been born, that 12-month period would have already begun and would continue. The 12-month period would not begin on the date the regulations are made.

(1125)

Ms. Christine Moore:

That's right. Essentially, that means that, if I had an 11-month-old child when the regulations went into force, I would have another month to benefit from that measure.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Yes.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

My first question is, how did this issue land in the lap of the House administration and then the Board of Internal Economy? What prompted this issue to be explored?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

In the initial PROC report—this was prior to the amendment of the act—there was a recommendation that if this happened, the House administration could be consulted on that. Then more recently there was an express request made in PROC for the House administration to look into this. I believe this was raised by the government House leader, and as a result of that request made at the board, we came forward with those proposals.

It was always understood that ultimately it's the House that makes those decisions in terms of regulations. The idea was that this would be presented to the board to seek the board members' views, but ultimately it would come here, which would be the body to then ultimately refer it to the House.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Have any members in the past faced challenges and approached the House administration about this issue?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I wouldn't have that information.

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

Yes, I am aware of cases where difficulties have been expressed, similar to where we have sometimes been engaged with helping accommodate members who are trying to be in the workplace and who might have some difficulty. We might put measures in place for them to assist them.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can you elaborate a little more without revealing who the members are? From your experience or from documented records—you can go back decades, if you like—what have some of the challenges been for them?

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

I think it's similar to a lot of the stuff that's already been studied in PROC over the last couple of years in making it a more family-friendly environment for the members. We know—it's very public—that some MPs are new mothers and fathers.

Some concerns have been expressed that there are no maternity provisions for some of these individuals. Sometimes measures are put in place to assist them if they need to travel. Sometimes regulations are in place when they need to travel on airplanes or if they have more than one child.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You stated that parental leave perhaps was not the best terminology for this but it was in line with what had been used in the past. Can you explain why you think leave wouldn't be the best terminology and if there's a way perhaps that we can rephrase it?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Certainly in the proposed regulation we are talking about maternity and parental arrangements and we're talking about justified absences from a House sitting. My point was that it's not the same type of leave that you would see an employee take, where the employee is not performing the functions of the job during that leave. That really is to answer questions about comparing this to the leave an employee takes, the length of leave and the benefits for employees who are on maternity leave, parental leave and so on. Does the member's so-called parental leave from this type of regime compare favourably or not?

My point is it's difficult and perhaps not the best way to compare those two things, because the member, unlike the employee, always continues to be a member. What we're talking about here is not the member being on leave from his or her role as a member, but it's the member having a justifiable reason for being absent from the chamber for a certain period of time. The member continues to be the member and continues to have all the functions.

(1130)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. The draft regulation referred to “paternity and parental arrangements” in the title.

Where does the term “leave” come from anyway?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I'm mentioning the fact that sometimes we talk about this in the sense of parental leave.

I believe in some of the previous reports the word “leave” might have been used as well as the justification. When we looked at this and the board looked at this it's not seen as a leave situation but more as the justifiable circumstances where a member would be absent from the chamber.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I believe you mentioned that exceptions are also made to this 21-day requirement for armed forces sick leave and public or official arrangements. Have any other exceptions ever been made on a per case basis, and if so, what were those exceptions?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

We have the listed exceptions in the act. They are the three that I've highlighted. The other one I did not mention is if the House has been adjourned that day. There's no concern about not having been there. That, to me, is one that is perhaps implicit. The three that are considered justifiable reasons are illness, public or official business, service in the armed forces. The question became while illness might cover some absences, certainly for the pregnant member during the pregnancy and perhaps after the birth as well, but there's a gap. If you only justify it when you consider it to be illness, that does not provide the full recognition and the full protection for parents and pregnant members.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kind of circumstances are the public and official engagements, for example?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's not defined. It would be raised by the member looking at their circumstances. There's certainly an understanding that members do many things outside the chamber that are part of their public or official business, such as attending events, following up on matters outside the chamber. It's a largely defined category.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

A member could be working in their riding and this exception would apply to them. They would not have to appear for 21 days if they can justify there's something relevant that they're doing there.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

It would be for the member to say that they were absent and this was public or official business, that they were following up on matters in their constituency.

There is, obviously, an expectation that members will try to organize their affairs so as to be able to be in the House. That's really part of the role of members, to balance those two things: the obligations in the constituency and the obligations in the House.

The act recognizes there will be times when the members cannot be in the House and it's going to be because they're engaged in other public or official business.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

As a comment at the end, I see this perhaps—I mean, we haven't seen it come into effect yet, but maybe Christine can speak from her experience—being used for flexibility and not in its entirety, from day one until the end of the 12th month. It might be that issues and circumstances arise from time to time in that first year of having a baby. Perhaps one month it would be difficult, or perhaps something happens in the fourth month and you were fine and able to come prior to that.

I'm sure we can learn a lot from Christine Moore, and there are other members who have had children as they've been serving.

Thank you for answering those questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go to Madam Moore and then Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore:

I can answer some of Ms. Sahota's questions.

You were wondering under what circumstances we may be talking about public or official business. I could tell you about a fairly plausible case. If a member becomes president of an international parliamentary association—for example, the Canadian NATO Parliamentary Association or the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly—we can assume they will often miss sittings because they will have to travel. Having known some presidents of international parliamentary associations, I know that the position leads to many absences. I also know that some members have been approached to seek candidacy with an international association, but they decided not to do it. In any case, if a member holds an internationally recognized position that takes up a lot of their time, that could be one of the plausible reasons for which they will not often be present in Parliament. That is an example of public or official business that would explain why a member is not present.

I can now explain to you how we came to these regulations.

While I was a member, I had three children, so three pregnancies. When I started working on this issue, I knew that, until the Parliament of Canada Act was amended, we could not move on to the next step, that of regulations.

The Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs first met on this issue and then produced a report containing that recommendation. The measure was then included in the budget. Once the Budget Implementation Act received royal assent and, consequently, the Parliament of Canada Act was amended, I provided draft regulations to the NDP House leader, who was then Ms. Brosseau. She was in charge of getting the regulations adopted. In fact, it was up to House leaders Ms. Bergen, Ms. Chagger and Ms. Brosseau to begin the discussion on the regulations.

Once I returned after giving birth, I came back to the issue to figure out why the regulations had not yet been adopted. I also tried to get this file on the agenda. So I know that other discussions were held among the House leaders of various parties to put it back on the agenda before the parliamentary session ends, so that a new Parliament would not have to finish the work on this.

That is what has happened concerning the regulations.

(1135)

[English]

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

To build on Ruby's first question, BOIE makes changes all the time to all kinds of things, and in my four years on this committee, they've never come to procedure and House affairs.

Why this one? Do we have to take an action for this to happen?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Yes, you do. The act talks about the House making a regulation by rule or order, and so the power really lies with the House.

What is being asked of this committee is to report to the House with a recommendation that the House could consider. It's not something that BOIE would have the authority to do, given the way it is set out in the Parliament of Canada Act.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, but BOIE changes things all the time, and there's nothing else they've done that would ever have had to come through PROC. I'm just surprised by that.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I'm guessing that the regulations they've done are not regulations under the Parliament of Canada Act. They must have been regulations under some other governing authority.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Under the book.... Whatever the book's called. Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If I understand correctly, the way it works is that normally a regulation is made by the Governor in Council on the recommendation of a minister, but in this case it's made by the Governor in Council on the recommendation of the House.

Is that how it works?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

This is a bit of a unique situation. This is really regulation made by the House on the authority in the Parliament of Canada Act, but in the exercise of its privileges in order to govern the presence of its members in the House.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The Governor in Council has no role in this at all.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

In my view, the Governor in Council does not have a role in this, because it would be looking at the manner in which the House is organizing and accepting the presence of its members in its proceedings. It's really at the heart of the proceedings of the House and the conduct of the proceedings in the House.

It's an unusual type of situation, but it is not something that the board would do by adopting one of its bylaws. It is something that the House would do. It could have been raised by the House, by a member, but in this circumstance, given PROC's role in studying this in the past, the board felt it was appropriate that PROC would be given the opportunity to look at this and report back.

(1140)

The Chair:

That's enough—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have just one tiny little thing.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We have to send a report to the House with the expectation that nothing will happen unless the House concurs in that report.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Thank you.

Sorry about that, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

It's okay.

You still have the floor, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Scott, I want to let you know that last week I briefly chaired the natural resources committee, and the Simms method is now in the wild.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's gone viral.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I've made it a precedent in other committees.

Thank you for that information. It's quite helpful.

On process, because I'm a processor, as you know, do we have a report ready to do something with?

The Chair:

The report will be this: We report that we approve this; we recommend this to the House.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, then, I guess I will suggest that we do that.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have one more question.

You had spoken about a comparison to other parliaments around the world.

Can you explain some of the research you've done?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Sure. We've considered the provincial legislatures.

Some of them will make no deductions to the allowance of members. In those cases, any absence does not result in a deduction. Others will have categories that are open-ended, like leave of the speaker, notice to the speaker, or extraordinary family circumstances or personal situations. Those could be covered. Some are explicit—maternity, parental—and some aren't.

In the U.K., there are no deductions, but they've put in place, on a pilot project, a system of proxy voting. They've also considered the impact on the House itself.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Proxy voting is given to members who are on some kind of leave, and only under that circumstance.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

It's a system in a temporary standing order that the U.K. House has put in place.

As indicated in the letter from PROC, this is something that this committee may wish to consider in a subsequent report.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In your opinion, is this the simplest way of dealing with it, rather than providing for numerous other exceptions, family circumstances, and then...?

My gut would say that most people, if they're in a certain situation, could figure out a way to justify it within a certain category anyway, if we were to provide other categories.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Well, that's the proposal that was put to the board in an attempt to meet the intent of section 59.1 of the Parliament of Canada Act and also the recommendation from this committee. In my view, it's something that would achieve that objective.

Ms. Robyn Daigle:

I might just add, too, that with the 21 days, presumably some of these other types of cases could be met with those 21 days that are already there.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Reid, did you want to be on the list even though you don't have a bow tie on bow tie day?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would be a dangerous precedent.

I think the answer is that I was trying to respond to David.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think it's all being resolved and getting straightened out by our staff.

The Chair:

I'm not sure why we don't have them sit at the table.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That would make things much more efficient.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments before we decide?

Okay. We'll vote on the report that members have been given.

Are you voting or commenting, Ms. Moore?

Ms. Christine Moore:

I will talk afterwards. I'm in favour, but I will propose something else afterwards.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll vote.

That's carried. This is a report to the House.

Christine.

Ms. Christine Moore:

I don't know if we can have in our report that we should later consider modifying the Parliament of Canada Act to include a member whose partner is pregnant. We are not able to right now, but maybe we could consider it later, or maybe the minister responsible should consider that.

(1145)

The Chair:

For the four weeks before? You're talking about that clause.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Yes.

The Chair:

PROC could discuss that now or at another time. It's up to the members. They only have to be there 21 days, so you're talking about only nine days or something in a month that, in the rare circumstances where that would....

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The 21 days is available to everyone for any reason, so it could be used for that.

The Chair:

It wouldn't very often be a problem.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Okay. That's good.

The Chair:

Okay.

While you're here, on another thing which is related, in the message from BOIE, they also said that we might discuss at sometime in the future the proxy pairing or the pairing. I've asked the researcher to do a report, because since we turned that down, England has passed a provision on that. I asked the clerk to give us some information later on what England has done and what other people have done, for the committee's information.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

I don't think we actually voted, the three Conservatives here. I think we were sort of.... In addition to the questions Ms. Moore had on the extension for those with partners having children, I think we wanted to look at more information relative to that, so that perhaps we could consider this.

It is a consideration, as my colleague Mr. Nater said. It's generally somewhat apparent when we have an expectant mother, for most cases here, in the House, but for someone who has a partner who will be having a child, we can't always see that, and we can't anticipate that. These people certainly deserve to be recognized and accommodated as well. We think that deserves some consideration. Perhaps we could look further into that. I think we wanted to do that.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll add it to a future agenda to discuss that, or do you want to discuss it—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We were thinking that maybe we could even look at it further now. That might be a positive thing to do.

Ms. Christine Moore:

It's possible to just add a line on the report that the minister should consider the question and maybe think about modifying the Parliament of Canada Act. Maybe we could refer that and ask the minister to consider it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think it's a good consideration. Even further to the consideration, we could find out more information about those who have faced such a challenge before. There was an indication that some provincial legislatures have adopted different formats, one of the two models, and perhaps it might be worthwhile to take some time to evaluate those provincial legislatures as well.

Ms. Christine Moore:

In the report, maybe we could add the different issues we want to go back to later. It will have to go back to proxy voting and to the question of the partner. In the report, maybe we could include what we refer to for a subsequent study.

The Chair:

I don't think we're going to change the report. We've done the report, but we're going to take Stephanie's advice and look into this further. We'll get some research on it and have a discussion on it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I think we should.

The Chair:

You don't want to necessarily discuss any—

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

I guess to tease it out a little bit, in terms of extending this and having.... My wife has given birth twice during this Parliament and to extend it beyond the 21 days, I'm looking for examples of it being necessary and whether there is a situation that exists where members need this time. I don't know if we're searching for a solution without a problem.

(1150)

The Chair:

Does Parliament ever sit more than 21 days in a row?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Twenty-one sitting days is already more than a month.

Mr. John Nater:

I think Mr. Bittle said it may be a solution in search of a problem. I want to see, perhaps, if there is in fact a problem because it is something that BOIE recommended. I'd be curious to look into those reasons.

The example I use for myself is that I wouldn't have needed those provisions. I only missed four or five days both times. In both examples, neither was prior to birth. I can see where there would be a situation in which—especially for those members who are significant distances from Ottawa—the due date is close, and they want to be there for the birth. They may take a week or so off prior to the birth to ensure they are at home in the riding. I know that in the lead-up to the births of my two children who were born during this Parliament, I was well aware of the flight schedules for all hours of the day to ensure I could quickly get home if I needed to.

I think it's worthwhile to have a discussion at least as to whether this is an issue because BOIE did make that recommendation. I'd be curious to know where they're going with that and what the impetus was for that decision. I haven't read the blues or the notes from the BOIE meeting, so I can't see what their reasoning was for that, but I think it's worthwhile having a discussion at least.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, are you on the list? Madam Moore?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes I am, but I forget why.

The Chair:

Madam Moore. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore:

Basically, here is the problem I am seeing regarding the 21 days.

Let's take the example of a member who lives very far from Ottawa and would have to travel for 24 hours to be present when his spouse gave birth. He could completely miss the birth. So it can be expected for them to want to remain with their spouse as of the 36th week of pregnancy.

If, by misfortune, the 36th week of pregnancy happened to fall within a House sitting period, the 21 days could be used to cover the period when the member is staying at home, but he will be left with no days for any other leave reasons. Let's take the case of a member who has already had to miss two weeks of sittings for other reasons that are not covered, such as to attend his father's or mother's funeral. If he wanted to take another leave to stay with his wife who is close to giving birth, the 21 days may not be enough.

It is more in that kind of a situation that this could happen. It may not have happened in the past, but it could happen. [English]

The Chair:

What if we left it up to the subcommittee on agenda to determine when and if this came back?

Ms. Christine Moore:

Just on the proxy voting, maybe you should consider a meeting with technology services to figure out what could be used and what technology or which way we can do it. In terms of technical challenges, I think it could be interesting to have a meeting with technology services.[Translation]

This could help the committee decide whether that option is reasonable and reliable from a security point of view. That could also be added to the agenda of a subsequent meeting. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, I just suggested a possibility that we leave it up to the subcommittee on agenda—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

The Chair:

—to bring those two items back, the proxy and the four weeks in advance.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We might defer it to PROC 43.

The Chair:

Well, the subcommittee can decide that.

Okay, we're going to suspend for a few minutes to go in camera for the next items on the agenda.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour.

Bienvenue à la 160e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. La première partie de la séance est publique. Le premier point à l'ordre du jour est l'examen des règlements concernant les absences de députés dues à une grossesse ou à la nécessité de prendre soin d'un nouveau-né ou d'un enfant nouvellement adopté.

Nous sommes ravis d'accueillir M. Philippe Dufresne, légiste et conseiller parlementaire de la Chambre des communes, et Mme Robyn Daigle, directrice, Services en RH aux députés. Merci à vous deux de votre présence.

Comme les membres du Comité s'en souviennent sans doute, notre 48e rapport recommandait que la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada soit modifiée de façon à accorder aux députés une forme quelconque de congé de maternité et de congé parental. La loi a ensuite été modifiée de manière à conférer à la Chambre des communes le pouvoir de prendre des règlements. Comme vous le savez, le Bureau de régie interne s'est penché sur la question la semaine dernière et il a recommandé que notre comité examine un projet de règlement qu'il a approuvé à l'unanimité.

Je souligne, pour les membres, qu'il y a de légères différences entre le projet de règlement qui a été distribué ce matin et le document que le Bureau nous a envoyé la semaine dernière. Je crois que le légiste nous expliquera les raisons pour lesquelles les modifications ont été apportées.

Sur ce, je cède la parole à M. Dufresne, qui nous présentera sa déclaration préliminaire.

M. Philippe Dufresne (légiste et conseiller parlementaire, Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, à la suite de la lettre du Bureau de régie interne de la semaine dernière, cela me fait plaisir de comparaître aujourd'hui devant vous avec ma collègue Robyn Daigle, la directrice des Services en ressources humaines aux députés, afin de discuter du règlement potentiel sur les absences liées à la maternité et à la parentalité.

Ce sujet vous sera sans doute familier puisque, comme l'a mentionné le président, il résulte d'une recommandation formulée par le Comité lui-même dans un de ses rapports présentés à la Chambre plus tôt au cours de cette session.[Traduction]

En vertu de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, une somme de 120 $ est déduite de l'indemnité de session pour chaque jour où le parlementaire n'assiste pas à une séance de la Chambre des communes au-delà de 21 jours par session. Les jours où l'absence du parlementaire est attribuable à un engagement officiel ou public, à une maladie ou au service dans les forces armées ne font pas partie des absences comptabilisées, et dans ces circonstances, aucune somme n'est déduite de l'indemnité.

Or, il n'existe pas d'exemption pareille pour les cas dans lesquelles un député ou une députée n'assiste pas à une séance en raison d'une grossesse ou de la nécessité de prendre soin d'un nouveau-né ou d'un enfant nouvellement adopté. Votre comité a étudié la question plus tôt dans la session. Il a examiné les dispositions pertinentes portant sur les déductions en cas d'absence et il a présenté sa conclusion et sa recommandation dans son 48e rapport, intitulé Services destinés aux députés ayant de jeunes enfants: Le Comité est d'avis que les députés ne devraient pas être pénalisés financièrement s'ils s'absentent du Parlement en raison d'une grossesse ou d'un congé parental. Par conséquent, le Comité recommande: Que le ministre responsable de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada envisage de présenter un projet de loi afin de modifier le paragraphe 57(3) de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada pour qu'il y soit mentionné que les journées d'absence attribuables à une grossesse ou à un congé parental doivent être considérées comme un jour de présence du député ou de la députée pendant la session parlementaire aux fins du calcul des sommes à déduire de l'indemnité de session en cas d'absence. [Français]

À la suite de cette recommandation du Comité, le projet de loi C-74 a été déposé au Parlement et adopté. Cela a modifié la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada afin d'autoriser les deux Chambres du Parlement à prendre des règlements en ce qui a trait à la présence de leurs membres respectifs et aux montants à déduire de l'indemnité de session pour la parlementaire absente à des séances en raison de sa grossesse ou pour tout parlementaire absent pour prendre soin de son nouveau-né ou d'un enfant nouvellement adopté.

Plus tôt cette année, le Bureau de régie interne a demandé à l'Administration de la Chambre des communes de préparer un projet pour son examen. En préparant la proposition, l'Administration a notamment pris en considération le fait que les députés ne sont pas des employés. Les députés occupent une charge publique et ne sont pas remplacés lors de leur absence comme le serait, par exemple, un employé en congé parental. Des urgences nationales ou d'autres questions importantes peuvent toujours survenir et obliger le député ou la députée à revenir à la Chambre ou à s'occuper d'un dossier dans sa circonscription.

L'enjeu devant vous n'est donc pas une question de congé au sens strict. Il s'agit plutôt de savoir si les absences liées à la maternité ou à la parentalité devraient être considérées comme étant moins justifiées que celles liées aux autres motifs tels que la maladie, les engagements publics ou officiels, ou le service dans les forces armées.

L'Administration a examiné les règles dans les assemblées législatives des provinces et des territoires au Canada. Nous avons également revu la pratique en Grande-Bretagne. Cet examen a permis de constater que la majorité des assemblées législatives permettent aux députés de s'absenter, sans déduction financière, pour des raisons de maternité ou de parentalité, pour une période déterminée ou indéterminée.

(1105)

[Traduction]

Les membres du Bureau de régie interne ont adopté à l'unanimité la proposition de règlement suivante: premièrement, qu'aucune somme ne soit déduite de l'indemnité de session d'une députée enceinte qui n'assiste pas à une séance au cours de la période de 4 semaines précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement; deuxièmement, qu'aucune somme ne soit déduite de l'indemnité de session d'un député qui s'absente pour prendre soin de son nouveau-né au cours de la période de 12 mois suivant le jour de la naissance de l'enfant; et troisièmement, qu'aucune somme ne soit déduite de l'indemnité de session d'un député qui s'absente pour prendre soin d'un enfant nouvellement adopté au cours de la période de 12 mois suivant le jour où l'enfant est placé chez lui en vue de son adoption.

À mon avis, cette proposition est en phase avec le 48e rapport du Comité, présenté en 2017, et le nouvel article 59.1 de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

Je souligne qu'il n'est pas question, dans la proposition, d'accorder aux députés un congé au cours duquel ils n'exerceront pas du tout leurs fonctions parlementaires. Je le répète, les députés ne sont pas remplacés durant leur absence. Ils ne se trouvent pas dans la même situation que les employés, et il surviendra toujours des questions d'intérêt national ou local qui obligeront les parlementaires à se présenter au Parlement ou à s'occuper de dossiers dans leur circonscription. Par conséquent, l'objectif de la proposition est de veiller à ce qu'aucune déduction ne soit effectuée sur l'indemnité de session de la parlementaire qui n'assiste pas à une séance de la Chambre en raison de sa grossesse, ou de tout parlementaire qui s'absente pour prendre soin de son nouveau-né ou d'un enfant nouvellement adopté.

Le document intitulé Projet de règlement que vous avez reçu contient le texte juridique qui mettra en œuvre la proposition si celle-ci est adoptée par la Chambre. Je vous prie de noter que nous avons apporté quelques légères modifications au document depuis que le Bureau vous l'a envoyé. Ces modifications n'ont aucune incidence sur le fond de la proposition. Nous avons aussi retiré la disposition d'entrée en vigueur, en présumant que le Comité et la Chambre souhaiteraient que le règlement entre en vigueur dès son adoption. Si ce n'est pas le cas, une date peut être ajoutée.

Je souligne également que dans la lettre qu'il a envoyée au Comité, le Bureau de régie interne a écrit qu'il appuyait aussi la proposition de ne pas effectuer de déduction sur l'indemnité d'un député qui s'absente durant la période de quatre semaines précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement de sa conjointe. Ce faisant, le Bureau reconnaît le rôle important joué par le conjoint durant les semaines qui précèdent la date prévue de l'accouchement.[Français]

C'est certainement une idée qui mérite d'être explorée. Nous avons effectué une analyse des dispositions de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada afin de déterminer si, dans sa forme actuelle, celle-ci permettrait d'inclure ces circonstances dans le règlement proposé.

À la suite de cette analyse, je suis d'avis que le fait d'étendre l'application de la période de quatre semaines de non-déduction aux députés dont la conjointe est enceinte irait au-delà du libellé du nouvel article 59.1 de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, qui prévoit les situations où la Chambre des communes peut prendre des règlements. On indique que l'absence pourrait s'appliquer aux cas suivants: a) la parlementaire qui n’assiste pas à une séance de la chambre dont elle fait partie en raison de sa grossesse; b) le parlementaire qui [...] doit prendre soin de son nouveau-né [ou] d’un enfant nouvellement adopté [...] [Traduction]

Le libellé de la version anglaise est semblable; il n'inclut pas la situation d'un député dont la conjointe est enceinte. Cependant, je précise qu'en vertu du régime actuel, un député dont la conjointe est enceinte peut tout de même s'absenter durant la période précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement sans subir de déduction si le nombre total d'absences est inférieur à 21 jours de séance.[Français]

Dans les circonstances, je ne suggère pas que le Comité recommande d'étendre l'application de la période de non-déduction avant la naissance de l'enfant aux députés dont la conjointe est enceinte. La mise en œuvre de cette suggestion nécessiterait une modification à l'article 59.1 de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

C'est toutefois un enjeu important qui mérite d'être étudié. Le Comité pourrait décider d'explorer cette question lors de la prochaine session afin de trouver des options potentielles. Ces options pourraient inclure des modifications législatives ou encore une analyse des données afin de préciser des tendances et de mesurer les répercussions des règles actuelles sur les conjoints des personnes enceintes.

(1110)

[Traduction]

Enfin, le Bureau a soulevé la question du pairage pour les députés qui s'absentent de la Chambre et qui manquent un vote pour des raisons familiales. Le Comité pourrait également décider d'explorer ce sujet en vue d'un futur rapport.

Voilà qui met fin à ma déclaration préliminaire, mais bien sûr, nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup pour tous ces éclaircissements.

J'ai deux choses à dire au Comité. Premièrement, je veux que nous nous penchions d'abord strictement sur la recommandation et que nous décidions ce que nous allons en faire. Deuxièmement, la discussion sera libre; autrement dit, tous peuvent poser des questions, car il pourrait y avoir des champs d'intérêt différents.

La parole est à vous, madame Moore. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore (Abitibi—Témiscamingue, NPD):

J'aimerais clarifier certains aspects, pour m'assurer que nous comprenons bien ce qu'il en est.

Prenons le cas d'une députée enceinte dont la circonscription serait très éloignée. Si jamais, à partir de la 28e semaine de grossesse, il lui devenait très compliqué, sur le plan médical, de se rendre au Parlement, elle devrait présenter un certificat médical qui justifierait son absence de la Chambre, selon ce que je comprends. Au fond, les journées comprises entre la 28e et la 36e semaine de grossesse seraient considérées comme des journées de maladie. À partir de la 36e semaine, elles seraient considérées comme des journées de grossesse.

Bref, avant la 36e semaine de grossesse, l'absence d'une députée doit être justifiée par des raisons médicales qui l'empêchent de se rendre au Parlement. Cette personne doit alors présenter un certificat médical.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Oui, tout à fait.

Dans sa forme actuelle, la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada accepte déjà une absence pour des raisons de maladie. Dans n'importe quelles circonstances où l'on peut établir des raisons médicales ou de maladie, que ce soit lié à la grossesse ou non, il est possible de s'absenter.

L'idée derrière la recommandation du Comité, c'est que la période à l'approche de la naissance soit incluse même s'il n'y a pas de certificat médical.

Mme Christine Moore:

C'est parfait.

Je veux clarifier autre chose.

Pendant ses journées d'absence, le député ou la députée demeure responsable de tout le côté administratif, donc de tout ce qui ne peut pas être délégué à des employés. Le député continue de remplir ces fonctions, par exemple approuver les différentes absences de ses employés et les dépenses de son bureau. Tout le volet administratif en lien avec la gestion du bureau du député demeure la responsabilité du député, n'est-ce pas?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est exact.

En fait, le député conserve aussi ses responsabilités à l'égard des citoyens de sa circonscription. C'est pour cela que, dans le contexte des règles définies ici, selon nous, on ne peut pas vraiment comparer la situation de députés avec celle d'employés qui sont en congé parental. Même l'expression « congé parental », selon moi, n'est pas la meilleure expression qui convienne à ce dont on parle ici. Les députés sont dans une situation différente; ils ne sont pas véritablement en congé à tous les égards.

Ce qui est proposé, c'est de préciser que, dans certains cas, il ne sera pas possible d'assister aux séances de la Chambre. À ce moment-là, cela ne devrait pas être traité plus sévèrement que les autres motifs d'absence.

Mme Christine Moore:

Dans le fond, un député ayant une fonction de porte-parole peut se faire appeler par son parti afin qu'il fournisse des conseils sur les positions à prendre, par exemple, tandis qu'on n'appellerait pas à la maison une infirmière en congé de maternité pour lui demander si on devrait administrer tel ou tel médicament à un patient.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Exactement.

En théorie, un employé qui est en congé parental se fait remplacer par quelqu'un d'autre, ou encore on s'attend à ce que la personne ne soit pas disponible pour faire le travail. Dans le cas d'un député ou d'une députée, la situation sera différente.

Mme Christine Moore:

En ce qui concerne la durée de 12 mois, c'est laissé à la discrétion du député. Il n'y a pas d'obligation de prendre 12 mois de congé. Un député peut en juger et choisir d'être présent pendant deux mois parce qu'il y a un enjeu d'importance pour lui, et ensuite décider de prendre un mois pour être avec son enfant.

Le calendrier parlementaire est souvent constitué de blocs de trois semaines de séance, après quoi les députés peuvent retourner dans leur circonscription pendant une semaine. Le député pourrait choisir de ne pas revenir à la Chambre pendant la semaine située au milieu de ce bloc, pour éviter d'avoir à faire l'aller-retour pendant la fin de semaine. En général, les députés font l'aller-retour en moins de 48 heures, pour que le déplacement soit moins difficile. Donc, un député pourrait choisir de passer la semaine du milieu dans sa circonscription, pour éviter les allers-retours d'une fin de semaine. Ce serait possible de faire cela pendant une période de 12 mois.

(1115)

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est cela. Pendant cette période de 12 mois suivant la naissance d'un enfant, l'adoption d'un enfant ou l'accueil d'un enfant en vue de son adoption, les absences du député ou de la députée ne seront pas comptées. S'il n'y a pas d'absences, c'est sûr que cela ne s'applique pas. Cela ne veut pas dire que le député ou la députée ne peut pas ou ne doit pas être à la Chambre. Quand le choix est fait de ne pas y être pour ces raisons, ce sont de bonnes raisons aux yeux de la Chambre.

Mme Christine Moore:

J'ai une dernière question. C'est au sujet des pénalités financières. Dans le fond, cette modification met les députés à l'abri de pénalités financières.

Souvent, on fait la somme de toutes les déductions de 120 $ pour chacun des jours de séance où l'on devra s'absenter. On se dit que cela ne représente peut-être pas un si gros montant, mais le Parlement pourrait décider à tout moment d'augmenter ce montant. Par exemple, il pourrait décider que, dorénavant, il y aura une déduction de 500 $ par journée d'absence. Dans ce cas, le coût estimé des absences pour des raisons de maternité ne serait plus du tout le même.

Savez-vous à quand remonte la dernière fois que le montant de 120 $ a été indexé ou modifié?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Le montant de 120 $ est toujours resté à 120 $. Ce montant n'a pas été modifié. Cependant, la Chambre peut le modifier. La Loi prévoit que la Chambre peut, par l'entremise d'un règlement semblable à celui proposé ici, décider de l'augmenter. C'est une possibilité.

Mme Christine Moore:

Donc, à votre connaissance, le montant de 120 $ n'a jamais été augmenté.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Non.

Mme Christine Moore:

D'accord.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Permettez-moi maintenant de répondre à votre question sous-jacente.

Effectivement, la déduction ne représenterait peut-être pas un montant très élevé, au bout du compte. Même si toutes les journées d'absence pendant la période n'étaient pas justifiées, le pourcentage de l'indemnité de session touchée par le député demeurerait élevé. Il est important de comprendre qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un congé. La situation d'un député serait différente de celle d'un employé dans ces circonstances.

Comme cela a été mentionné au Bureau de régie interne, au-delà de la simple question du montant financier, il y a aussi cette volonté qu'on reconnaisse que la raison invoquée est légitime et que la déduction ne devrait pas s'appliquer.

Mme Christine Moore:

Merci beaucoup. Cela répond à mes questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins. Votre présentation de la proposition était très claire, surtout l'explication de la question des quatre semaines pour le conjoint de la personne enceinte.

J'aimerais en savoir plus sur la réflexion qui a mené à la proposition que nous avons devant nous. Je sais que certaines assemblées législatives provinciales ont des dispositions au sujet des congés de maternité et des congés parentaux. D'autres s'en remettent au président de l'assemblée législative. J'aimerais savoir pourquoi on a opté pour ces recommandations au lieu de s'en remettre au Président.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

La mesure législative est formulée de façon à tenir compte de situations précises, soit la grossesse et la nécessité de prendre soin d'un enfant. Il restait à fixer la période visée. Comme vous venez de le dire, certaines assemblées législatives n'effectuent aucune déduction, probablement parce que la situation des députés est unique: ils demeurent des députés tout au long de la session et ils continuent à subir des pressions et à avoir des obligations. D'autres assemblées législatives demandent la permission du président ou de l'assemblée. D'autres encore se servent de catégories comme des situations ou des circonstances familiales ou personnelles exceptionnelles. Certaines ne font pas de déduction, mais leur code d'éthique exige que les députés soient assidus et qu'ils justifient leurs absences.

Le but était de comparer les différentes pratiques et de déterminer ce qui conviendrait ici. Nous avons proposé 12 mois et 4 semaines précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement. Notre proposition aurait pu être différente, mais nous trouvions ces périodes raisonnables et bien adaptées aux circonstances.

(1120)

M. John Nater:

Je suis d'accord avec vous. Je trouve la proposition raisonnable. Elle responsabilise les députés en leur permettant de prendre leurs propres décisions. Je trouve cela logique. Ce serait intéressant de discuter avec des représentants des provinces pour comprendre leurs points de vue, mais ce sera une discussion pour une autre séance.

J'aimerais demander une clarification au sujet de l'article 59.1, car j'écoutais l'interprétation. La raison pour laquelle les quatre semaines précédant la date prévue de l'accouchement de la conjointe d'un député ne sont pas incluses, c'est qu'une telle mesure serait ultra vires. Il ne serait pas possible de l'appliquer en vertu de la modification qui a été apportée à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada au moyen de la loi d'exécution du budget de l'année dernière.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

La loi stipule: pour:

a) la parlementaire qui n'assiste pas à une séance de la chambre dont elle fait partie en raison de sa grossesse;

À mes yeux, le libellé des versions française et anglaise vise très précisément cette situation. La recommandation de votre comité allait aussi dans le même sens. Je le répète, c'est une question qui pourrait faire l'objet d'un examen. Le Comité pourrait certainement se pencher là-dessus.

M. John Nater:

Pour ce faire, il faudrait modifier la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Pour inclure cette situation dans les raisons, oui, d'après moi, il faudrait modifier la loi.

M. John Nater:

Merci pour cette précision.

Vous avez mentionné brièvement la date d'entrée en vigueur. Recommandez-vous que la mesure entre en vigueur à la première séance de la prochaine législature?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est une possibilité. Sous sa forme actuelle, elle entrerait en vigueur dès qu'elle serait adoptée par la Chambre. Si la Chambre continuait à siéger durant la session en cours, elle serait applicable immédiatement.

M. John Nater:

J'ai des questions générales concernant les données relatives aux absences des députés.

Conserve-t-on des dossiers anonymes sur les absences attribuables à des raisons médicales et à des engagements publics, ainsi qu'à la catégorie « autre » que nous pouvons cocher? Conserve-t-on de tels dossiers? Avez-vous des données à ce sujet que vous pourriez nous transmettre?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait de données que nous puissions vous transmettre.

Ma collègue voudrait peut-être ajouter quelque chose par rapport...

Mme Robyn Daigle (directrice, Services en RH aux députés, Chambre des communes):

Moi non plus, je ne crois pas qu'il y ait de données, mises à part celles qui sont envoyées aux Services en RH. Si un député était absent plus de 21 jours, il y aurait des déductions.

M. John Nater:

À votre connaissance, des députés ont-ils excédé la période de 21 jours durant la législature actuelle?

Mme Robyn Daigle:

Pas récemment, à ce que je sache.

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie.

Je pense que de façon générale, nous le savons quand une députée s'absente en raison de sa grossesse et de son accouchement. C'est moins évident lorsque c'est la conjointe d'un député qui a accouché. Je présume que nous n'avons pas non plus de données sur les conjoints...

Mme Robyn Daigle:

Les seules données que nous avons sont celles qui sont incluses dans les rapports mensuels des présences qui nous sont envoyés. C'est vraiment tout.

M. John Nater:

Je sais, par exemple, que j'ai été absent pendant cinq jours à la naissance de mon troisième enfant et pendant quatre jours à la naissance de mon aînée, mais les deux ont eu le bon sens de venir au monde durant des semaines de relâche, ce qui m'a aidé à réduire mon nombre d'absences.

Je vous remercie.

Ce sont toutes les questions que j'ai pour l'instant, monsieur le président.

Le président:

La parole est à vous, madame Moore. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore:

Je voudrais seulement clarifier quelque chose au sujet d'une certaine rétroactivité, si l'on peut dire.

Prenons l'exemple d'un nouveau député qui a un enfant âgé de 6 mois au moment où il est élu. Pourrait-il choisir d'avoir un horaire allégé pour les six premiers mois de son mandat?

Si l'on mettait ce règlement en vigueur maintenant, étant donné qu'il ne reste plus beaucoup de jours de séance, je serais étonnée que des gens décident d'opter pour un tel horaire. Par contre, dès qu'il sera mis en vigueur, tous les députés ayant un enfant âgé de moins de 12 mois pourraient choisir de s'absenter pendant certaines journées pour des raisons de parentalité.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Même si le règlement entrait en vigueur dès son adoption par la Chambre, la période visée y est définie comme étant la période qui commence le jour de la naissance de l'enfant ou le jour où l'enfant est placé chez le député en vue de son adoption, selon le cas, et qui se termine 12 mois après ce jour. Si, au moment de l'entrée en vigueur du règlement, la naissance de l'enfant avait déjà eu lieu, cette période de 12 mois aurait déjà commencé et se poursuivrait. La période de 12 mois ne commencerait pas le jour où le règlement est adopté.

(1125)

Mme Christine Moore:

Non, effectivement. En gros, cela veut dire que, si j'avais un enfant âgé de 11 mois au moment de l'entrée en vigueur du règlement, j'aurais encore un mois pour bénéficier de cette mesure.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Oui.

Mme Christine Moore:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

La parole est à vous, madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

D'abord, j'aimerais savoir comment le dossier s'est retrouvé sur le bureau de l'Administration de la Chambre, puis du Bureau de régie interne? Qu'est-ce qui a donné lieu à l'examen de cette question?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Le rapport initial du Comité, qui a précédé la modification de la loi, recommandait de demander l'avis de l'Administration de la Chambre si la loi était modifiée. Puis, plus récemment, le Comité a demandé expressément que l'Administration de la Chambre se penche sur la question. Je crois que c'est le leader parlementaire du gouvernement qui en a fait la demande. La proposition est le résultat de la demande présentée au Bureau.

Il a toujours été entendu que les décisions relatives à la réglementation relèvent de la Chambre. L'idée était de présenter le dossier au Bureau pour obtenir l'avis de ses membres, puis de renvoyer la proposition au Comité, qui la présenterait ensuite à la Chambre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-il déjà arrivé que des parlementaires connaissent des difficultés et s'adressent à l'Administration de la Chambre à ce sujet?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je n'ai pas d'information là-dessus.

Mme Robyn Daigle:

Oui, je sais qu'il est arrivé que des parlementaires fassent part de difficultés. Comme dans le cas de députés qui veulent être présents malgré certains défis, nous pouvons mettre des mesures d'adaptation en place pour les aider.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de détails sans révéler qui sont les parlementaires en question? D'après votre expérience ou d'après d'anciens dossiers — vous pouvez remonter à il y a plus de 10 ans, si vous voulez —, quelles sont les difficultés que ces parlementaires connaissent?

Mme Robyn Daigle:

Je pense qu'elles sont semblables à de nombreux dossiers que le Comité a étudiés au cours des dernières années en vue d'offrir aux députés un milieu plus favorable à la conciliation travail-famille. Nous savons — c'est très public — que certaines députées sont de nouvelles mères et que certains députés sont de nouveaux pères.

Des préoccupations ont été soulevées relativement à l'absence de dispositions sur la maternité. Parfois, des mesures sont mises en place pour venir en aide aux parlementaires qui doivent voyager. Parfois, des règles sont adoptées pour les déplacements par avion ou pour les députés ayant plus d'un enfant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez dit que l'expression « congé parental » n'est peut-être pas la meilleure expression qui convienne à ce dont on parle ici, mais que c'est conforme à ce qui a été utilisé dans le passé. Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi vous pensez que « congé parental » ne serait pas la meilleure terminologie? Est-il possible de reformuler?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Dans le règlement proposé, il est question de mesures liées à la maternité et à la parentalité et des absences justifiées à une séance de la Chambre. Ce que je voulais dire, c'est que ce n'est pas le même genre de congé qu'un employé prendrait s'il n'exerçait pas les fonctions de l'emploi pendant ce congé. Il s'agit de répondre aux questions qui se posent lorsque l'on compare ce régime au congé que prend un employé, à la durée du congé et aux avantages sociaux des employés qui sont en congé de maternité, en congé parental, etc. Ce qu'on appelle le congé parental du député dans ce type de régime se compare-t-il avantageusement, ou non?

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que la comparaison des deux est difficile, et peut-être pas la meilleure façon de procéder, car contrairement à l'employé, le député exerce toujours ses fonctions. Ce dont il est question, ce n'est pas de gens qui n'exercent plus leur fonction de député, ce rôle, mais de gens qui ont une raison valable de s'absenter de la Chambre pendant un certain temps. Le député est toujours député et continue d'en exercer les fonctions.

(1130)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Dans le titre du projet de règlement, on faisait référence aux « mesures liées à la paternité et à la parentalité ».

D'où vient le terme « congé »?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je note qu'on en parle parfois dans le sens de « congé parental ».

Je crois que dans certains des rapports précédents, le mot « congé » a aussi pu être utilisé à titre de justification. Lorsque nous avons étudié la question, tout comme le Bureau de régie interne, nous avons conclu qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un congé, mais plutôt de circonstances qui justifient l'absence d'un député à la Chambre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que vous avez mentionné qu'il y a aussi des exceptions à la règle des 21 jours, soit pour les congés de maladie, le service dans les forces armées et les engagements publics ou officiels. D'autres exceptions ont-elles déjà été accordées? Si oui, quelles étaient-elles?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Il y a les exceptions énoncées dans la loi. Ce sont les trois que j'ai mentionnées, et une autre dont je n'avais pas parlé, soit en cas d'ajournement de la Chambre. À ce moment-là, l'absence ne pose pas problème, ce qui va de soi, à mon avis. Les trois raisons considérées comme justifiables sont la maladie, les fonctions publiques ou officielles et le service dans les forces armées. On s'est demandé si certaines absences pourraient être considérées comme des congés de maladie, notamment pendant la grossesse d'une députée enceinte et peut-être aussi après l'accouchement, mais il y a un vide. Si l'absence n'est justifiée qu'en cas de maladie, on n'assure pas une pleine reconnaissance et une pleine protection des parents et des députées enceintes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous des exemples d'un engagement public et officiel?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Ce n'est pas défini. Il reviendrait au député de le déterminer en fonction des circonstances. Il est entendu que beaucoup d'activités des députés à l'extérieur de la Chambre sont des fonctions publiques ou officielles, notamment la présence à certains événements ou le suivi de dossiers. C'est une catégorie largement définie.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

L'exception s'appliquerait à un député qui travaillerait dans sa circonscription, et il pourrait s'absenter pendant 21 jours s'il peut justifier le travail qu'il y fait.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Il reviendrait au député de dire qu'il s'est absenté pour des fonctions publiques ou officielles, qu'il faisait un suivi dans sa circonscription.

On s'attend évidemment à ce que les députés essaient d'organiser leur horaire pour être présents à la Chambre. Il incombe aux députés de concilier leurs obligations dans leur circonscription et leurs obligations à la Chambre.

La loi reconnaît que les députés ne pourront pas être présents à la Chambre, dans certaines circonstances, pour exercer d'autres fonctions publiques ou officielles.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pour terminer, je dirais qu'il est possible — ce n'est pas encore en vigueur, mais Mme Moore pourrait parler de son expérience — qu'on y ait recours avec une certaine latitude et non de façon intégrale, du premier jour à la fin du 12e mois. Toutes sortes de choses peuvent survenir, de temps à autre, au cours de la première année avec un bébé. Il pourrait être difficile de venir avant un mois, ou la personne pourrait être obligée de s'absenter pour une raison quelconque au quatrième mois, alors qu'elle était déjà revenue.

Je suis certaine que Mme Christine Moore pourra nous en apprendre beaucoup. D'autres députées ont eu des enfants pendant qu'elles exerçaient ces fonctions.

Merci d'avoir répondu à ces questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Moore, suivie de M. Graham. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore:

Je vais pouvoir répondre à certaines questions de Mme Sahota.

Vous vous demandiez dans quelles circonstances il peut s'agir d'engagements publics ou officiels. Je pourrais vous décrire un cas qui est quand même raisonnablement plausible. Si un député devient président d'une association parlementaire internationale, par exemple l'Association parlementaire canadienne de l'OTAN ou l'Assemblée parlementaire de l'OSCE, on peut supposer qu'il s'absentera souvent en raison des voyages qu'il aura à faire. Ayant connu certains présidents ou certaines présidentes d'associations parlementaires internationales, je sais que cela cause beaucoup d'absences. Je sais aussi que certains députés ont été pressentis pour présenter leur candidature à une association internationale, mais ont choisi de ne pas le faire. Quoi qu'il en soit, si un député occupe un poste reconnu à l'international qui prend beaucoup de son temps, cela pourrait être une des raisons plausibles pour lesquelles il ne serait pas souvent présent au Parlement canadien. C'est un exemple d'engagement public ou officiel qui expliquerait pourquoi un député n'est pas présent.

Je peux maintenant vous expliquer de quelle façon nous en sommes venus à ce règlement.

J'ai eu trois enfants, donc trois grossesses, alors que j'étais députée. Quand j'ai entrepris le travail sur cette question, je savais que, tant que la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada n'était pas modifiée, on ne pourrait pas procéder à l'étape suivante, soit celle du règlement.

Il y a eu une première rencontre au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Par la suite, le Comité a produit un rapport qui contenait cette recommandation. La mesure a ensuite été incluse dans le budget. Une fois que la loi d'exécution du budget a reçu la sanction royale et que, par conséquent, la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada a été modifiée, j'ai fourni une ébauche de règlement à la leader à la Chambre du NPD, qui était Mme Brosseau à ce moment-là. C'est elle qui était responsable de faire adopter le règlement. En effet, il revenait aux leaders à la Chambre, Mmes Bergen, Chagger et Brosseau, de commencer à discuter du règlement.

À mon retour après avoir accouché, je suis revenue sur la question afin de savoir pourquoi le règlement n'était toujours pas adopté. J'ai aussi tenté qu'on remette ce dossier à l'ordre du jour. Je sais donc qu'il y a eu d'autres discussions entre les leaders à la Chambre des différents partis pour le remettre à l'ordre du jour avant la fin de la session parlementaire, pour ne pas qu'un nouveau Parlement ait à finaliser le travail là-dessus.

Voilà donc ce qui s'est passé concernant le règlement.

(1135)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Dans la même veine que la première question de Mme Sahota, le Bureau de régie interne apporte fréquemment des modifications à toutes sortes de choses, et au cours de mes quatre années au Comité, aucun de ses représentants n'est venu au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Pourquoi dans ce cas-ci? Devons-nous prendre des mesures pour que cela se concrétise?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Oui. Aux termes de la loi, la Chambre peut, au moyen de règles ou d'ordres, prendre un règlement. Donc, cela relève essentiellement de la Chambre.

Nous demandons au comité de faire rapport à la Chambre en lui présentant une recommandation, aux fins d'examen. Le Bureau de régie interne n'en a pas le pouvoir, étant donné le libellé de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, mais le Bureau de régie interne change tout le temps les choses, et c'est la première fois qu'il saisit le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cela me surprend, c'est tout.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je suppose que les règlements qui ont été pris n'avaient pas été pris en vertu de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Ce sont probablement des règlements pris en vertu d'une autre autorité de gouvernance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sous le livre... Quel qu'en soit le titre. Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Habituellement, si j'ai bien compris, le règlement est pris par le gouverneur en conseil sur recommandation d'un ministre, mais dans ce cas-ci, c'est le gouverneur en conseil qui le prend sur recommandation de la Chambre.

Est-ce ainsi que cela fonctionne?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est une situation un peu particulière. Il s'agit en fait d'un règlement pris par la Chambre en vertu de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, mais dans l'exercice de ses privilèges, afin de régir la présence des députés à la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

Le gouverneur en conseil n'a aucun rôle à jouer à cet égard.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

À mon avis, le gouverneur en conseil n'a aucun rôle à jouer à cet égard, car cela reviendrait à examiner la façon dont la Chambre gère la présence des députés lors de ses travaux. C'est intimement lié aux délibérations de la Chambre et à leur déroulement.

La situation est inhabituelle, mais ce n'est pas quelque chose que le Bureau de régie interne peut faire par l'intermédiaire de règlements administratifs. Cela relèverait de la Chambre. La question aurait pu être soulevée par la Chambre, par un député, mais dans ces circonstances, étant donné le rôle du Comité dans l'étude de cette question par le passé, le Bureau de régie interne a jugé bon que le Comité ait l'occasion d'étudier la question et d'en faire rapport.

(1140)

Le président:

C'est assez...

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai seulement un petit commentaire.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous devons envoyer un rapport à la Chambre en espérant que rien ne se passera à moins que la Chambre n'entérine le rapport.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Merci.

Toutes mes excuses, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Il n'y a pas de souci.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Reid, je tiens à vous faire savoir que la semaine dernière, j'ai brièvement présidé le Comité des ressources naturelles et que la méthode Simms est maintenant répandue dans la nature.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est devenu viral.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'en ai fait un précédent dans d'autres comités.

Merci de cette information. C'est très utile.

En ce qui concerne le processus, parce que je suis spécialiste du processus, comme vous le savez, avons-nous un rapport qui pourrait être utile?

Le président:

Le rapport sera le suivant: nous indiquons que le Comité approuve le projet de loi et qu'il en recommande l'adoption à la Chambre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce cas, je suppose que je vais proposer d'aller de l'avant.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, la parole est à vous.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai une autre question.

Vous avez parlé d'une comparaison avec d'autres parlements dans le monde.

Pouvez-vous parler de certaines de vos recherches?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Bien sûr. Nous avons étudié les assemblées législatives des provinces.

Certaines d'entre elles ne font aucune déduction à l'allocation des députés. Donc, il n'y a pas de déduction en cas d'absence. D'autres ont des catégories ouvertes, comme le congé du Président, l'avis au Président, les circonstances familiales extraordinaires ou les situations personnelles. Ces situations pourraient être couvertes. Certaines sont explicites — congé de maternité, congé parental —, et d'autres non.

Au Royaume-Uni, il n'y a pas de déductions, mais on a mis en place un système de vote par procuration dans le cadre d'un projet pilote. L'incidence sur la Chambre elle-même a aussi été prise en compte.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le vote par procuration est accordé aux députés qui sont en congé, et seulement dans ces circonstances.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est un système prévu dans un règlement temporaire adopté par la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni.

Comme indiqué dans la lettre du Comité, il s'agit d'une question que le Comité voudra peut-être examiner dans un rapport ultérieur.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

À votre avis, est-ce la façon la plus simple de régler la question, plutôt que de prévoir de nombreuses autres exceptions, des circonstances familiales, puis...?

Mon instinct me dit que si nous adoptions d'autres catégories, la plupart des gens qui se trouveraient dans une situation particulière trouveraient tout de même un moyen de la justifier pour une certaine catégorie.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Eh bien, c'est ce qui a été proposé au Bureau de régie interne pour que ce soit conforme à l'esprit de l'article 59.1 de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada ainsi qu'à la recommandation du Comité. Je pense que c'est quelque chose qui permettrait d'atteindre cet objectif.

Mme Robyn Daigle:

J'ajouterais simplement qu'avec les 21 jours, on peut supposer que ce serait suffisant pour que certains des autres types de cas se règlent d'eux-mêmes.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Reid, vouliez-vous être sur la liste même si vous ne portez pas le nœud papillon, en ce jour du nœud papillon?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait un dangereux précédent.

Je pense que la réponse, c'est que je tentais de répondre à M. de Burgh Graham.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense que notre personnel s'affaire à régler tout cela.

Le président:

Je ne sais pas pourquoi on ne leur demande pas de se présenter à la table.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait beaucoup plus efficace.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires avant que nous décidions?

D'accord. Nous allons voter sur le rapport qui vous a été remis.

Allez-vous voter ou faire des commentaires, madame Moore?

Mme Christine Moore:

Je parlerai après. Je suis pour, mais je proposerai autre chose après.

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons voter.

C'est adopté. Il s'agit d'un rapport à la Chambre.

Madame Moore, la parole est à vous.

Mme Christine Moore:

Je ne sais pas s'il est possible d'inclure dans notre rapport que nous devrions envisager plus tard une modification à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada pour inclure un député dont la partenaire est enceinte. Nous ne pouvons pas le faire pour l'instant, mais nous pourrions peut-être examiner la question plus tard. Cela pourrait aussi être le ministre responsable.

(1145)

Le président:

Pour la période de quatre semaines précédant la date de l'accouchement? Vous parlez de cette disposition-là?

Mme Christine Moore:

Oui.

Le président:

Le Comité pourrait en discuter maintenant ou à un autre moment. C'est aux membres de décider. Seulement 21 jours de présence sont requis. Donc, vous ne parlez que d'environ neuf jours en un mois, ce qui, dans les rares cas où...

M. Philippe Dufresne:

La règle des 21 jours s'applique à tous, quelle qu'en soit la raison. Ils peuvent donc être utilisés à cette fin.

Le président:

Cela ne poserait pas problème souvent.

Mme Christine Moore:

D'accord; très bien.

Le président:

Très bien.

Pendant que vous êtes ici, sur une question connexe, dans le message du Bureau de régie interne, on indique aussi que nous pourrions discuter, un moment donné, de procuration ou de jumelage. J'ai demandé à notre analyste de préparer un rapport, parce que depuis que nous avons rejeté l'idée, l'Angleterre a adopté une disposition à cet égard. J'ai demandé au greffier de nous donner, plus tard, des renseignements sur les mesures prises par l'Angleterre et d'autres, à titre d'information.

Madame Kusie, la parole est à vous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Je ne pense pas que nous ayons voté, nous, les trois conservateurs présents. Je pense que nous étions en quelque sorte... Je pense que nous voulions avoir plus de renseignements à ce sujet, outre les questions de Mme Moore sur la prolongation pour ceux dont la partenaire attend un enfant, afin de pouvoir étudier la question.

C'est une considération, comme l'a dit mon collègue, M. Nater. C'est généralement assez évident dans la plupart des cas ici, à la Chambre, lorsqu'une députée est enceinte, mais pour la personne dont la partenaire attend un enfant, nous ne le voyons pas toujours, et nous ne pouvons le prévoir. Ces personnes méritent certainement qu'on reconnaisse leur situation et qu'on les accommode. Nous pensons que cela mérite d'être étudié. Nous pourrions approfondir la question. C'est ce que nous voulions faire, à mon avis.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous l'ajouterons à l'ordre du jour d'une prochaine réunion pour en discuter. Voulez-vous plutôt en discuter...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous pensions qu'on pourrait peut-être approfondir la question maintenant. Cela pourrait être une bonne chose à faire.

Mme Christine Moore:

C'est possible de simplement ajouter une phrase au rapport pour dire que la ministre devrait étudier la question et peut-être envisager de modifier la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Peut-être que nous pourrions renvoyer le document et demander à la ministre d'étudier la question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que c'est un bon point. Nous pourrions même aller plus loin et trouver plus de renseignements concernant les personnes qui se sont déjà retrouvées en pareille situation. On a indiqué que certaines assemblées législatives provinciales avaient adopté différents formats, un des deux modèles, et peut-être qu'il vaudrait la peine de prendre le temps de les évaluer aussi.

Mme Christine Moore:

Dans le rapport, peut-être que nous pourrions ajouter les différentes questions auxquelles nous voulons revenir plus tard. Il faudra reparler du vote par procuration et de la question de la conjointe qui est enceinte. Nous pourrions peut-être ajouter au rapport les éléments que nous renvoyons à une étude ultérieure.

Le président:

Je ne pense pas que nous changions le rapport. Nous l'avons rédigé, mais nous allons suivre le conseil de Mme Kusie et étudier la question plus à fond. Nous ferons des recherches à ce sujet et en discuterons.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, je pense que nous devrions le faire.

Le président:

Vous ne voulez pas nécessairement discuter de...

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je suppose que pour faire un peu la lumière sur la question de prolonger les absences et d'avoir... Ma conjointe a accouché deux fois au cours de la présente législature, et je cherche à trouver des exemples où il serait nécessaire de prolonger l'absence au-delà des 21 jours actuellement prévus et à déterminer s'il existe une situation dans laquelle les députés ont besoin de le faire. Je ne sais pas si nous cherchons une solution pour laquelle il n'y a pas de problème.

(1150)

Le président:

Le Parlement siège-t-il parfois plus de 21 jours d'affilée?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vingt et un jours de séance représentent déjà plus d'un mois.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que M. Bittle a dit qu'il pourrait s'agir d'une solution en quête d'un problème. Je veux voir s'il y a vraiment un problème, car c'est quelque chose que le Bureau de régie interne a recommandé. Je serais curieux de me pencher sur ces raisons.

L'exemple que j'utilise pour moi-même est que je n'aurais pas eu besoin de ces dispositions. Je n'ai manqué que quatre ou cinq jours à chaque accouchement. Dans les deux cas, ce n'était jamais avant la naissance. Je peux voir une situation où — surtout pour les députés qui habitent très loin d'Ottawa — à l'approche de la date d'accouchement, on souhaite être présents au moment de l'accouchement. Ils pourraient prendre une semaine environ avant le fait pour s'assurer d'être chez eux dans leur circonscription. Je sais qu'à l'approche de la naissance de mes deux enfants au cours de la présente législature, je connaissais bien l'horaire des vols à toutes les heures de la journée pour m'assurer de pouvoir rentrer rapidement chez moi au besoin.

Je pense qu'il vaut la peine de discuter au moins de la question de savoir si c'est problématique vu qu'il s'agit d'une recommandation du Bureau de régie interne. Je serais curieux de savoir où ils veulent en venir et ce qui a motivé cette décision. Je n'ai pas lu la transcription ou les notes de la réunion du Bureau de régie interne, alors je n'arrive pas à comprendre leur raisonnement, mais je pense qu'il vaut la peine d'en discuter, à tout le moins.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, êtes-vous sur la liste? Madame Moore?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je le suis, mais j'ai oublié pourquoi.

Le président:

Madame Moore, la parole est à vous. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore:

Dans le fond, voici le problème que je vois en ce qui concerne les 21 jours.

Prenons l'exemple d'un député qui habite très loin d'Ottawa et qui aurait à voyager pendant 24 heures pour assister à l'accouchement de sa conjointe. Il pourrait rater complètement l'accouchement. On peut donc s'attendre à ce qu'il veuille rester près de sa conjointe à partir de la 36e semaine de grossesse.

Si, par malheur, la 36e semaine de grossesse tombe pendant une période de séance de la Chambre, les 21 jours peuvent servir à couvrir le temps où le député reste à la maison, sauf qu'il ne lui en restera plus aucun pour tous les autres motifs de congé. Prenons le cas d'un député qui a déjà dû s'absenter pendant deux semaines pour d'autres raisons qui ne sont pas couvertes, par exemple pour assister aux funérailles de son père ou de sa mère. S'il veut prendre un autre congé pour rester auprès de sa femme qui est près d'accoucher, les 21 jours risquent de ne pas être suffisants.

C'est davantage dans une telle situation que cela pourrait arriver. Ce n'est peut-être pas arrivé dans le passé, mais cela pourrait arriver. [Traduction]

Le président:

Que diriez-vous qu'on laisse au Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure le soin de trancher cette question quand elle sera à nouveau soulevée, le cas échéant?

Mme Christine Moore:

En ce qui concerne le vote par procuration, peut-être que vous devriez envisager de tenir une réunion avec les services technologiques pour déterminer ce qu'on pourrait utiliser — le type de technologie — ou comment on pourrait procéder. D'un point de vue technique, je pense qu'il pourrait être intéressant de tenir une réunion avec les services technologiques.[Français]

Cela pourrait permettre au Comité de juger si cette option est raisonnable et fiable du point de vue de la sécurité. Cela pourrait aussi être inscrit à l'ordre du jour d'une réunion subséquente. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, j'ai simplement suggéré la possibilité de nous en remettre au Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure...

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

Le président:

... pour soulever à nouveau ces deux points, la procuration et les quatre semaines anticipées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions remettre l'étude de ces questions à la réunion PROC 43.

Le président:

Le sous-comité pourra en décider.

D'accord, nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes pour passer à huis clos afin de couvrir les prochains points à l'ordre du jour.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 06, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.