header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under secu...

  1. 2016-11-15: 2016-11-15 SECU 42
  2. 2019-03-18: 2019-03-18 SECU 152
  3. 2019-04-01: 2019-04-01 SECU 154
  4. 2019-04-03: 2019-04-03 SECU 155
  5. 2019-04-08: 2019-04-08 SECU 156
  6. 2019-04-10: 2019-04-10 SECU 157
  7. 2019-04-29: 2019-04-29 SECU 158
  8. 2019-05-01: 2019-05-01 SECU 159
  9. 2019-05-06: 2019-05-06 SECU 160
  10. 2019-05-08: 2019-05-08 SECU 161
  11. 2019-05-13: 2019-05-13 SECU 162
  12. 2019-05-15: 2019-05-15 SECU 163
  13. 2019-05-27: 2019-05-27 SECU 164
  14. 2019-05-29: 2019-05-29 SECU 165
  15. 2019-06-03: 2019-06-03 SECU 166
  16. 2019-06-10: 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  17. 2019-06-17: 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  18. 2019-07-15: 2019-07-15 SECU 171

Displaying the most recent stories under secu...

2019-07-15 SECU 171

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1330)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Folks, we're trying to get back on our timeline here. We are waiting for our other witness, but in the meantime, we will proceed with RCMP captain Mark Flynn.

You will make your presentation, and if the folks from the Communications Security Establishment come, we'll make arrangements for them to speak as well.

The meeting is now public, by the way.

For those who are presenters, the real issue here is that the members wish to ask questions. Therefore, shorter presentations are preferable to longer ones.

With that, Superintendent Flynn, I'll ask you to make your presentation.

Chief Superintendent Mark Flynn (Director General, Financial Crime and Cybercrime, Federal Policing Criminal Operations, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

You'll be happy to hear, as I understand the committee was informed, that I won't be making any opening remarks. I am present here today simply to address any questions you may have. As this, on its surface, does relate to an ongoing criminal investigative matter, it would be inappropriate for me to provide details of an investigation, particularly an investigation that is not being undertaken by the RCMP.

I welcome all questions. I am here to provide whatever assistance I can.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

It's a little harder to ask questions without an opening to work off.

The first question I have is this. If somebody calls the RCMP with a suspicion of data theft complaint, how does the RCMP treat that from the get-go?

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

That will depend on the jurisdiction where it occurs. In the jurisdiction where we are, the police have jurisdiction, so they have the provincial and municipal responsibility. It would be forwarded to our intake process there, whether it be our telecoms office, the front desk of a detachment or a particular investigative unit that's identified for that.

In cases where we are not the police of jurisdiction, like in Ontario and Quebec where we are the federal police, we will become aware of these instances through our collaboration with our provincial and municipal partners. We will look at the information and determine whether or not there are any connections to other investigations that we have ongoing, and offer our assistance to the police of jurisdiction should they require it, although on many occasions this type of incident is very well handled. We have very competent provincial and municipal police forces that are able to handle these on their own.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At what point does something become federal? If something is provincial jurisdiction but affects multiple provinces, does each province have to deal with it separately or is the RCMP able to step in at that point?

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

The RCMP doesn't automatically step in solely because it crosses multiple provinces. As occurs with traditional crimes, whether a theft ring on a border between two provinces, or homicides, the police forces in those jurisdictions are used to collaborating and do so very well.

When there's an incident that occurs from a cyber perspective, if it's going to have an impact on a Government of Canada system, a critical infrastructure operator or there are national security considerations to it, or if it's connected to a transnational, serious and organized crime group that already falls within the priority areas we're investigating, then that matter will be something we will step into.

From a cyber perspective, we have ongoing relationships and regular communication with most of the provinces and municipalities that have cyber capabilities within their investigative areas. We know that many of these incidents occur in multiple jurisdictions, whether they be domestic or international, so coordination and collaboration are really important.

That's why the national cybercrime coordination unit is being stood up as a national police service to aid in that collaboration, but prior to that being implemented, one of the responsibilities of my team in our headquarters unit is to have regular engagement, whether regular telephone conference calls or formal meetings where we discuss things that are happening in multiple jurisdictions to ensure that collaboration and deconfliction occurs, or on an ad hoc basis. When a significant incident occurs, our staff in the multiple police forces will be on the phone speaking to each other and identifying and ensuring that an appropriate and non-duplicating response is provided.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the case of the incident we're here to discuss, which is obviously a major incident, is the RCMP being kept apprised of what's happening, even if it's not their investigation?

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

I'd like to stay away from discussing this particular investigation, but I can tell you that investigations of this nature absolutely will lead to discussions occurring. That happens as a consequence of the fact that we do have those regular meetings, whether it be in cyber or other types of crime that are going on in different jurisdictions. These, obviously, on a scale of this nature, would lead to discussions.

I am not involved involved in any of those discussions at this time. It is not something I have knowledge about.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

Okay.

The Chair:

Mr. Drouin, welcome to the committee.

Mr. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Flynn, thank you for being here. I know that you will not comment on the ongoing investigation, but as a member of Parliament who represents a lot of members who have been impacted—I have been impacted as well—I am looking more at the potential impacts of fraud.

I know that many Canadians get fraudulent calls from CRA. I myself called back somebody who pretended they were you guys. They wanted to collect some money for a particular person. They were demanding. They were really adamant. They gave a callback number, and I provided that callback number to the police. Is that something you would advise Canadians to do where obviously the RCMP, or your local police force, is the first point of contact?

(1335)

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

Absolutely. We actually have a program at the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre and a close relationship with telecommunications service providers, who have been very helpful in addressing some of the challenges we've had around telemarketing and the mass fraud committed over the telephone. As we learn about numbers that are utilized for fraud, we are validating that, and the telecoms industry is blocking those numbers to reduce the victimization. We have adapted some of our practices to ensure that this occurs at a much more timely rate than it has historically.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Just from your experience, and learning from cases of fraud, we know that some of them may have my social insurance number. They may have my email address, as well as my civic address. It could be a very convincing case for them to pretend that they're either a government official or from some type of financial institution. What would you advise Canadians on the best way to protect themselves?

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

With any mass fraud campaign, whether it be tied to an instance like this or just in general, people need to have a strong sense of skepticism and take action to protect themselves. There are many resources under the Government of Canada, with such organizations as the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre and Get Cyber Safe, that provide a list of advice for Canadians. It simply comes down to protecting your information and having a good sense of doubt when somebody is calling you. If it's a bank calling, call your local branch and use your local number. Don't respond to the number they provide and don't immediately call back the number they provide. Go with your trusted sources to validate any questions that are coming in.

I have experienced calls similar to yours. I had a very convincing call from my own bank. I contacted my bank and they gave me the advice that it was not legitimate. It was interesting, because in the end it turned out to be legitimate, but we all felt very safe in the fact that the appropriate steps were taken. I would rather risk not getting a service than compromising my identity or my financial information.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay. Great.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Flynn. I'll come back to you in a few moments.

The leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, Andrew Scheer, asked me to contact my fellow committee members to convene this meeting. He sent an open letter to the media on July 12, and I'd like to paraphrase a few paragraphs. Like the vast majority of Quebecers and all Canadians, I am worried about the the security of our information technology systems, identity theft and privacy protection. This is a very serious situation, and I understand the fear and anxiety of the victims, whose personal information, including their social insurance number, was stolen. They are worried about how this will affect them in the future. They will have to spend considerable time and energy dealing with this. It is reassuring to see that the leadership at Desjardins Group is taking the matter seriously and working hard to protect and reassure members. The federal government, too, has a responsibility and duty to support all victims of identity theft by learning from the past and strengthening cybersecurity in partnership with all stakeholders across the industry.… I want the victims of this data breach, as well as all Canadians, to know that we stand with them and that a future Conservative government would be committed to tackling the privacy challenges confronting Canadians. [English]

The Chair:

Well, we thank Mr. Scheer for that wonderful message. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

We want to be very clear about what an important and serious issue this is—so important, in fact, that we felt it was necessary for the committee to meet on this sunny July 15.

Mr. Flynn, you answered the questions of my Liberal colleagues, but I find the RCMP's response to the situation rather weak. Allow me to explain. Some 2.9 million Desjardins account holders are very worried right now. About 2.5 million are Quebecers, and 300,000 are in Ontario and other parts of the country. For the past three weeks, constituents have been contacting our offices non-stop, and the government has yet to respond. The reason for today's emergency meeting is to figure out what the federal government can do to help affected Canadians.

You said the RCMP isn't really involved, but can't it do something given that it has its own cybersecurity unit, works with organizations like Interpol and has access to other resources? I don't want to interfere in a police investigation, but we heard that people's personal information was being sold abroad. Isn't there technology or techniques the RCMP can use to detect potential fraud?

(1340)

[English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

The RCMP's role, as I explained earlier, in many of these situations is to work with our provincial and municipal partners. It's important to recognize that our provincial and municipal partners are very skilled at responding to many of these incidents. It's not always the case that the RCMP has additional powers, authorities or capabilities to the ones they have when dealing with an incident that is singular in nature, where an individual is involved in a single event, as opposed to a broader one.

However, there's always a standing offer from the RCMP to our provincial and municipal partners, that should they require technical assistance, advice or guidance, we are available to them for that. It would be inappropriate for the RCMP to inject itself into the jurisdiction of another police force to run the investigation they are operating. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I understand what you're saying about the investigation probably being conducted by the Sûreté du Québec, but what the Conservatives and NDP want to know is this. What can the RCMP do about the personal information of 2.9 million people that was handed over to criminals? I don't want to discuss the investigation; I want to know whether you have resources. If you don't, we want to know. That's why we are here today. If personal data was sold on the international market, neither the Quebec provincial police nor Laval police is going to deal with it. I think it falls under RCMP jurisdiction. [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

Again, outside the scope of this particular investigation, cybercriminals do commit the majority of their crimes to gain access to personal or financial information for the purposes of gaining access to financial institutions and the money that's housed in those locations. The RCMP work continuously with the international community to identify and pursue the individuals who are committing a great number of these crimes.

The RCMP are working closely right now with those international partners, as well as many of the large financial institutions in Canada and the Canadian Bankers Association, to ensure that we are targeting the individuals who are causing the most significant harm. Our federal policing prevention and engagement team has hosted sessions with both the financial institutions and the cybersecurity industry. We have a new advisory group that's helping us target those individuals.

As far as knowledge goes, it's only in the hands of those cybersecurity and financial institutions. We're trying to ensure that as we are putting the resources we have into investigations, we are targeting those individuals who are causing the most harm.

We do that, as well, internationally. As incidents occur, we speak to our international law enforcement partners. We identify the behaviours we have in our cases or in our Canadian law enforcement partners' cases, so that if there are connections or individuals who are in those other jurisdictions, we're using the mutual legal assistance treaty, and we're using police-to-police collaborative efforts that we have to ensure that, internationally, all of those efforts are put towards a problem.

Now, I want to stay away again—and I apologize for doing that—from this exact incident. I cannot express what is or is not being done in this particular incident. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Since the problem came to light, has the RCMP set up a special unit to help deal with it? [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

I am unable to speak about this particular incident. It would be inappropriate for me to do so.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus.[Translation]

Mr. Dubé, you may go ahead for seven minutes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here today, Mr. Flynn.

It's important that we talk about this situation because, as my colleague pointed out, people are worried. It's essential that we find out more about the federal government's capacity to take action and the means we have at our disposal, especially since the committee just wrapped up a study on cybersecurity in the financial sector before Parliament rose in June. I'll touch on some of the things the committee looked at in its study because they pertain to the matter at hand.

I'd like to follow up on some of your answers. First of all, it is rumoured that personal data was sold to criminal organizations outside Quebec and Canada. I know you can't comment on this case specifically, but at what point does the RCMP step in to assist the highly competent people at such organizations as the Sûreté du Québec when a case involves a criminal organization operating outside Canada that the RCMP is already monitoring?

(1345)

[English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

We have formal, regular engagement with our policing partners across the country. That occurs on a monthly basis in the cyber area, as well as biweekly in some other areas. However, when there are incidents such as this, as you described, there are immediate calls that go out to ensure that collaboration is occurring and that any of our international partners' information that's relevant could be utilized to aid in those investigations. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

You said local police forces, the Sûreté du Québec and the Ontario Provincial Police were very competent when it came to dealing with cybersecurity issues and had significant powers. Does the RCMP have special expertise or information that could help them?

The reason I ask is that the government touted the consolidation of the cybersecurity capacity of the Communications Security Establishment, or CSE, the RCMP and all the other agencies concerned as a way to ensure information was shared and everyone was on the same page. I'll be asking Mr. Boucher, of the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security, about this as well when we hear from him.

Do you engage municipal or provincial police, as the case may be, in the same way? [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

Yes, we do. We work very closely, as I've stated, with our provincial and municipal police agencies. In fact, I take great pride in the fact that at some of those meetings that I described, where our federal policing prevention and engagement team brought together the private sector, financial institutions and cybersecurity, one of those policing partners actually stood up at the front of the room and thanked the RCMP for the collaboration they are seeing in the area of cyber, which is far better than anything they've ever seen in their career.

I take great pride in that because that has been a priority for me, my staff and our engagement folks, to ensure that we are not being competitive but are being collaborative and, in that collaboration, we are supporting each other. We are not superseding other police forces' authorities, but we're also ensuring that we can assist the others in that. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you. I don't mean to cut you off, but I have a limited amount of time.

When the committee was studying cybersecurity in the financial sector, we talked about the fact that people tend to think of state actors as being the threat. I won't name them, but I'm sure everyone has an idea of the countries that could pose a threat to Canada's cybersecurity.

I realize you can't talk about it, but in this particular case, we are dealing with an individual—an individual who poses a threat because the stolen data can be sold and could end up in the hands of state actors. One of the things the committee heard was that individuals represent the greatest threat. Is that always the case? Does a lone criminal wanting to steal data pose a greater threat than certain countries we would tend to suspect?

(1350)

[English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

The threat comes from multiple directions, and I can't say which is greater, because, in our experience, we have seen a significant number of organized groups or individuals perpetrating the crimes across the Internet. The Internet is an enabler as much as it's a tool for us to use in leveraging and utilizing all the fantastic services that are out there. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I have to cut you off because I'm almost out of time.

Has the presence of organized groups or countries with ill intentions seeking to buy personal data created some sort of marketplace? Do individuals like the alleged perpetrator in this case have an incentive, albeit a malicious one, to steal information and sell it to interested parties? Does the existence of these groups incentivize individuals who have the expertise to do things they wouldn't normally do? [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

Yes, absolutely. We have seen a rise in what we refer to as cybercrime as a service to aid others who are less skilled at committing cyber offences, whether they are creating the malware, operating the infrastructure, or creating the processes by which somebody can monetize the information that is stolen. That is a key target area for the RCMP under our federal policing mandate, and we are targeting those key enabling services so that we can have the most significant impact on the individual crimes that are occurring, as opposed to chasing each individual crime. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you again for taking the time to meet with us today. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

We have now been joined by Mr. André Boucher from the CSE, and I am going to give him an opportunity to make his statement.

I'll say to you what I said to Superintendent Flynn, that we are encouraging shorter statements rather than longer statements so that members will have more opportunity to ask questions.

Mr. Fortin, I see that you want to— [Translation]

Mr. Rhéal Fortin (Rivière-du-Nord, BQ):

If I may, Mr. Chair, I'd like to ask the witnesses questions. I'm not sure whether the agenda allows for that, but if so, I'd like a few moments. [English]

The Chair:

No, it's not, and I'm sorry, but you're not going to be able to speak to the witnesses. [Translation]

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

No? [English]

The Chair:

No, not right now. Thank you. We're still in this hour cycle.

Mr. Boucher, as I said, shorter is better than longer. Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. André Boucher (Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations, Canadian Centre for Cyber Security, Communications Security Establishment):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. As requested, I'll keep my presentation on the shorter side.

Mr. Chair and honourable members of the committee, my name is André Boucher, and I am the associate deputy minister of operations at the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security.

Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you this afternoon.

Let me begin with a brief overview of who we are.

The Canadian Centre for Cyber Security was launched on October 1, 2018 as part of the Communications Security Establishment. We are Canada's national authority on cybersecurity and we lead the government's response to cybersecurity events.

As Canada's national computer security incident response team, the cyber centre works in close collaboration with government departments, critical infrastructure, Canadian businesses and international partners to prepare for, respond to, mitigate and recover from cyber events. We do this by providing authoritative advice and support, and coordinating information sharing and incident response.

The cyber centre's partnerships with industry are key to this mission. Our goal is to promote the integration of cyber defence into the business model of industry partners to help strengthen Canada's overall resiliency to cyber threats. Despite these efforts and those of Canada's industry, cyber incidents do still happen.

This brings me to the topic we are here to discuss today. The cyber centre is not in a position to provide any details on this incident and does not comment on the cybersecurity practices of specific businesses or individuals. Any cyber breach, not just this specific instance, can be taken as an opportunity to revisit best practices and to refine systems, processes and safeguards.

In this case, media reporting and public statements indicate that the disclosure of personal information occurred as a result of the actions of an individual within the company—what is termed insider threat.[English]

In our recent introduction to the cyber-threat environment, the cyber centre described the insider threat as individuals working within an organization who are particularly dangerous because of their access to internal networks that are protected by security parameters. For any malicious actor, access is key. The privileged access of insiders within an organization eliminates the need to employ other remote means and makes their job of collecting valuable information that much easier. More broadly, what this incident underscores is the human element of cybersecurity. The insider threat is only one example of this.

Cybercriminals have proven especially adept at exploiting human behaviour through social engineering to deceive targets into handing over valuable information. Fundamentally, the security of our systems depends on humans—users, administrators and security teams.

What can we do in a world of increasing cyber-threats? At the enterprise level, adopting a holistic approach to security is critical. This means starting with a culture of security and putting in place the right policies, procedures and cybersecurity practices. This ensures that when something goes wrong, as it almost inevitably will, there is a plan in place to address it.

Then we need to invest in knowing and empowering our people. Training and awareness for individuals and businesses are very important. Only with awareness can we continue to develop and instill good security practices, a fundamental step in securing Canada's cybe systems.

As well, we always need to identify and protect critical assets. Know where your key data lives; protect it; monitor the protection, and be ready to respond.

At the cyber centre, we'll continue to work with industry and to publish cybersecurity advice and guidance on our website. We regularly issue alerts and advisories on potential, imminent or actual cyber-threats, vulnerabilities or incidents affecting Canada's critical infrastructure.

Under, we hope, different circumstances, we'll continue to participate in conversations like this one, which help to keep the spotlight on these issues.

Ultimately, there is no silver bullet when it comes to cybersecurity. We cannot be complacent; there is too much at stake. While long-promised advances in technology may make the task easier, the need for skilled and trustworthy individuals will remain a constant.

Thank you, and I look forward to answering your questions.

(1355)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Boucher.

Next is Monsieur Picard for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

I would like to preface my remarks by pointing out that the incident we are discussing today falls entirely within the parameters of the study we began in January on cybersecurity and financial crime.

As suggested by my fellow Liberal members, I put forward a motion that we study the issue. That shows how deeply concerned we are about cybersecurity in financial institutions. I'm delighted that Mr. Scheer commended our efforts in relation to the study. He fully supports my motion, and I'm glad that his party is joining the Liberal Party in its efforts to address the issue of cybersecurity in financial institutions, so thank you.

Mr. Flynn, I think it's important to speak to Canadians today to help people manage their expectations when something as serious as identity theft occurs.

The public wants the police to conduct a criminal investigation. Generally, people want something done about the loss of their personal information. They want their identity to be restored, without having to worry that five, 10 or 15 years down the road, they will once again be targeted. In terms of a criminal investigation, what are people's expectations? [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

From a policing perspective, I believe that the public expectation is that police are going to pursue the person and anyone associated with that person who is involved in either the theft or the monetization of information—whether through cyber-threat, cyber-compromise, insider threat, or so on—and hold them to account and bring them into the judicial process to ensure that there are consequences, and that steps are taken to prevent this type of incident from occurring. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

It's very hard for people to understand just how difficult it is to prove that you are the person you say you are. How are people supposed to prove their identity? It's extremely challenging when three different people are out there using the same name and social insurance number.

(1400)

[English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

It's not an area of expertise for me, as a police officer, to confirm identity. I would go back to my earlier statement about using your local resources, whether it be financial institutions or other types of service. If you're able to use a local service to confirm it, that is your best way to deal with those companies when there are questions about your identity. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

To a certain extent, the criminal investigation is a way to ensure justice is served, provided that it leads to the perpetrators being nabbed, the evidence being used to successfully prosecute them and their being punished, mainly sent to prison.

That said, data on the black market represent virtual assets, ones that aren't housed in a physical location. Data can be located in many places. I'm not trying to alarm people, but it's important for them to understand that, even if the perpetrators are arrested, it doesn't necessarily mean that their data are no longer vulnerable and their identity can be restored. [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

That is correct. It's important to point out that the only measure of success is not necessarily prosecution. In fact, in the cyber area many of those prosecutions will occur in other jurisdictions as we work collaboratively.

One of the approaches in the RCMP, and I know in some of our other police forces as well, is that we are bringing financial institutions and cybersecurity experts into our investigations. That is different from what we traditionally have done in our criminal investigative efforts. That has already borne fruit. It has already provided significant advantages. Those “partners”, as I refer to them, are able to see information that we as police officers might not know is important and we may not independently be able to identify that this could be used to provide protection for their customers. I know of at least one incident in a major investigation we've been undertaking where several financial institutions, through that collaboration, were able to identify and reduce potential harm to accounts that through that sharing were identified as compromised.

So I think the approach we are taking is providing benefits that are not solely measured by arrest and prosecutions. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

Mr. Boucher, your centre provides advice to other organizations. How can a business protect itself from its own staff? What advice do you have for businesses in that regard?

As we saw this winter, there is every reason to believe that banks, financial institutions and financial service companies have the best possible technology to protect their data from outside threats. What concerns us are threats from the inside. I don't think any software out there can protect against that risk. How do you advise organizations to safeguard against the human element when it comes to fraud?

Mr. André Boucher:

Thank you for your question.

That ties in with my opening statement. A few tools are available, but what works best is going back to the basics—in other words, taking a holistic approach to security.

First, that means a well-established internal security regime for staff. It is important to understand exactly where the information that needs protecting resides, to know the individuals the organization works with and to constantly update the security regime. An individual's personal situation can easily change after they've been interviewed, so an organization should have those kinds of conversations with staff members on a regular basis. For individuals, a clear training and education program should be in place, one that includes refreshers, and the underlying processes should be clear.

IT teams have access to data loss prevention tools that can help to detect fraud. By the time fraudulent activity is detected, however, it's often too late. It is therefore important that organizations invest as early as possible in measures that build trust and confidence and that they work with reliable people. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, witnesses, for being here.

Mr. Boucher, I was intrigued by your opening comments on the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security being the national authority on cybersecurity and leading the government's response to cybersecurity events: As Canada's national...security incident response team, the Cyber Centre works in close collaboration with government departments, critical infrastructure, Canadian businesses, and international partners to prepare for, respond to, mitigate, and recover from cyber incidents.

That's fantastic. It also leads to this question by me: What standards or measures do we have in place now? We consider banking in Canada to be a critical infrastructure in this country. What standards are in place at this moment to ensure that those are met? Do we have incentives? Do we have penalties? Do we have anything in the way of ensuring that we have a uniform approach across the industry to make sure that Canadians are safe? It's Canadians we are here for and are serving in that capacity. I'm curious to know if we have a mandatory baseline that everybody needs to operate at. If we don't, how come? And how can we?

(1405)

Mr. André Boucher:

Thank you for your question. It's a vast question. I think you will have testimony this afternoon from experts from that specific sector of financial institutions.

I would say that from a cybersecurity perspective, the financial sector is quite mature, where we have both regulators in place and best practices that are part of the community. As cybersecurity-focused experts, we put a lot of effort into that collaboration in those best practices. We leave it to the regulators who are sector-specific to put in those minimum standards and guidelines that need to be in place, enforced and reviewed. We in fact appeal to the best and try to tease that up as much as possible for entire sectors, in this case the financial sector. The financial sector is one that's very mature. It's one where collaboration is established. It is where reputational risks are measured at their true value. Significant investments are made in that regard.

From a Canadian perspective, I would feel quite reassured that as a sector, there are both minimum standards and applications through the regulators that are in place and teams that are working at bringing the best out of enterprises so that they perform as well as possible.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Approximately 2.9 million entities, individuals and Canadian businesses, are impacted by this particular occurrence, but millions of others across this country have also been victims of having their identities and credit card information stolen. They may not find solace in that particular statement that we have a mature banking industry in this country, because they continue to be victimized. I'm curious to know whether we are as vigorous in that way as we could or should be in pursuing the financial security of those institutions and of the people who put their trust in them.

Mr. André Boucher:

I can assure you that we're quite vigorous in taking all the measures at our disposal, whether they be best practices in collaboration or measures that are enforced and in place.

The sad or unfortunate reality that we all have to compose with is that, as was pointed out earlier, when data gets lost and gets in the wild, we never get to recover it. It is not like a tangible asset that you can go and purge and bring home. It is a new reality for clients, it is a new reality for customers and it is a new reality for enterprises.

I would go back to the comment I made earlier that it just puts more fuel into the need to invest early, with early investments in having programs, in choosing our employees better, and in making sure we have a holistic approach to security to make sure we don't find ourselves trying to recover our losses.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Thank you.

Chief Superintendent Flynn, as we've learned from this circumstance and from others, data is the hottest commodity on the dark web. We know that. People's names, addresses, dates of birth, social insurance numbers, IP addresses, email addresses—all those sorts of things are commodities that are traded at will on the web. I guess a couple of things come to mind for me. Can you help the Canadian public understand, number one, how that information is used by the criminal element, and number two, how they can then be vigilant? You answered Mr. Drouin partially with a response, but as the law enforcement agency in this country, what red flags or alarms could you make the Canadian public aware of that they need to be vigilant about if they've been compromised, and even before they become compromised?

The Chair:

Mr. Motz asks an important question. Unfortunately, he's left you no time to answer it. I would invite you to work an answer into a response to another member. We have three hours' worth of hearings here, and if I don't keep this on track, we'll get lost.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have five minutes, please.

(1410)

[Translation]

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you.

When we did our study on financial institutions and cybersecurity, we heard that banks had extensive security measures in place—something people may be questioning now. We also heard people being talked about as though they were cardboard boxes.

What can people do to better protect themselves? Can you give us any helpful information or details? Is there a place where members of the public can turn for information on how to better protect themselves—a website or a telephone line, perhaps? Is there anything you can tell us, Mr. Boucher?

Mr. André Boucher:

Thank you for your question.

We have an extensive program. On our website, cyber.gc.ca, people can find information on how to protect themselves. Of course, people have to be aware when they are online. That is the most basic rule of cybersecurity. People have to know not only how to use the Internet, but also what they are sharing with others online. We are constantly running campaigns to educate people on using their devices securely and being smart about who they choose to share confidential information with.

Having the best protection and keeping it up to date is the first step, but making smart choices is another. People should visit only the sites of companies they consider to be reliable and reputable. Once they've done those two things, people need to choose what information they agree to share with the company. It's a three-step approach, and it is all available in the information and guidance we provide to people.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I see.

I also saw a lot of information about passwords. For instance, it mentioned people who use the same password for all of their online accounts.

Can you share some things people can do to protect themselves when it comes to their passwords? That's an important element.

Mr. André Boucher:

Yes. I always look for opportunities to promote our website, so on our website, we talk specifically about how long and complex passwords should be. We also provide some tips. I encourage people to explore our website for themselves. It is often said that people should change their passwords regularly, but the problem with that is having to memorize a bunch of ever-changing passwords. The guideline has evolved over time. Nowadays, it is recommended that people choose at least one strong password, using certain parameters, which are available online, based on password length and/or complexity, depending on the available options. If it's possible to have a password containing up to 15 characters, people should try to choose a password that uses all 15 characters. If the password can have only eight characters, that's pretty bad, but people should at least choose a more complex password.

Constantly changing one's passwords is of minimal benefit if it means people have to write them down somewhere or use the same one for many different sites. What we want people to do is be diligent about choosing their passwords: choose something that is unique and as strong as the provider's parameters allow. People can use the same password, but if a data breach occurs, they have to act fast, changing their password and taking additional security measures. It's important to do a combination of things.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

The other problem is that once people have a password that works well, they use it for all their online accounts. Some sites tell users that their passwords have to be longer, more complex or what have you, but they never remind people not to use the same password all the time or to use a different password than they do for other accounts. Would you mind talking about that as well?

Mr. André Boucher:

Now you're asking me to be very pragmatic.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin: Yes, but this is pragmatic stuff.

Mr. André Boucher: What I would advise people, other than being very pragmatic, is to base their passwords on their level of uncertainty when it comes to the various online services they are using. For instance, for online banking, people should use a number of distinct passwords that are as complex as possible. However, for their online account with their local curling club, say, people may wish to be a little less rigorous and use the same password a few times, even though that isn't what I would recommend.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

What can banks do to better educate the people using their services?

Mr. André Boucher:

I believe most, if not all, banks require a minimum level of sophistication when it comes to the passwords they accept. They already have a certain standard in place to protect themselves from clients who are less diligent than they should be in selecting a password. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Mr. Clarke, welcome to the committee. You have five minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm very pleased to be here today.

Thank you, gentlemen, for being here and giving up your time to reassure Canadians and answer our questions.

One of the cornerstones of the social contract that exists across this land is the protection of citizens, not just the protection they offer one another, but also the protection provided to them by the government. For the past three weeks, constituents in all of our ridings have been profoundly concerned. Two days after the data breach was made public, people started coming to my office. When I would knock on people's doors, that's all they would talk about. That tells me people are genuinely concerned and feel that the government has done nothing in response.

The question my constituents want you to answer, Mr. Boucher, is very simple. Can the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security indeed ensure the 2.9 million Canadians affected by this data breach are properly protected, yes or no?

Does your centre have the tools to respond to the situation and ensure the victims of identity theft are protected?

(1415)

Mr. André Boucher:

It's fair to say that the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security has the resources to deal with all aspects of cybersecurity. The case we are talking about today involves an insider threat and stolen information. Strictly speaking, it's not a cybersecurity issue.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

I'm not talking about what's already happened. I'm talking about what's going to happen next. That's what worries people. I want to know whether the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security has the capacity to deal with international or national fraudsters who send text messages or whatever it may be.

Does your centre have the capacity to deal with that?

Mr. André Boucher:

I'm not trying to evade the question, but the issue actually comes down to legislation or fraud. It's not a cybersecurity problem. That's not to say, however, that, if we see something happening, we aren't going to respond.

The first thing we do every day is talk to our partners, including the RCMP, to share what we know and update them on anything new. We make sure that whoever is responsible for the matter does something with the information we provide. The national team is the best there is and won't let anything fall by the wayside. The members of the team endeavour to fix any problems and do everything they can to keep Canadians' information safe.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

I'm going to take advantage of your cybersecurity expertise.

Is Canada's current social insurance number regime appropriate in a modern age dominated by the Internet? We are at the point now where people shop on their cell phones and pay for their purchases at the cash in mere seconds. Is our system of social insurance numbers adequate in the world we live in?

Mr. André Boucher:

Thank you for your question. You don't ask easy ones, Mr. Clarke.

I'm not an expert in social insurance numbers or their use, but I can talk about identifiers. No matter what identifiers are used, whether they involve complex or simple cryptology, information management is always an issue and the potential for data theft always exists. It's a very complex issue, and I'm going to let the experts in social insurance numbers speak to your specific question.

The bigger problem, as I see it, is how identifiers are managed. They are key pieces of information, and learning how to manage them properly in the large security systems I was talking about earlier is crucial.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Superintendent, my next question is along the same lines as that of my fellow member, Mr. Motz.

Whether they've approached me on the street, come to my office or answered the door when I was canvassing, everyone has asked me the same question. They want to know what crimes these fraudsters are going to commit down the road. They want to know what to expect. What crimes will the 2.9 million victims of this massive data breach be the target of in the future?

In addition, how long will it be before those crimes are committed? The media are reporting all kinds of things. We are hearing that it will take five or 10 years before the fraudsters do anything—that they'll wait until the dust has settled. [English]

The Chair:

Again, that's an important question. You have about 15 seconds to respond to it.

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

The reality is that whenever personal information, passwords, etc., are released on the Internet, they are there forever. People need to be cautious and vigilant about that, and use the services that are available, like credit monitoring, etc., to ensure that triggers are put in place to notify them when someone's trying to use that information, to help prevent an actual fraud from occurring.

I'm trying to respect the timeline.

(1420)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Clarke.

Mr. Graham, you have five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

About 15 years ago, I was in an IRC channel—I'm not sure whether you're familiar with that forum—and someone was selling credit card numbers, along with the three-digit code on the back and the billing address. Everything was ready to go. The person was offering to sell them to people. I felt that was wrong and I wanted to call the police or some other authority, but no one replied or knew what to do.

If someone saw something similar happening on the Internet today, is there someplace they could call to report it? [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

The RCMP operates the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre in partnership with the Ontario Provincial Police and the Competition Bureau. That is one of your best places to go to report fraudulent activity, whether it be the telephone numbers that people are calling from, or an individual identity theft or fraud that occurred. They collate that information. They share that information. Police investigations are launched based on the collation of that. That would be the first place you should call, as well as your local police force.

Local police forces—whether they be the RCMP or, in Ontario and Quebec, another police force—need to hear about the crimes that are occurring. There are connections between organized crime involved in fraud and other criminal activities. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What powers does the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security have? What can the centre do?

Mr. André Boucher:

Do you mean generally or in this specific case?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I mean generally. At the centre, do you accept comments from people on the outside, or do you work only with businesses? Explain how it works, if you don't mind.

Mr. André Boucher:

As I explained earlier, the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security is responsible for providing advice. It prepares and protects information of national interest. It is responsible for incident management and response, including mitigation strategies. Every step is undertaken in coordination with the centre's partners, as per its mandate. When a fraud-related issue arises, the national team is called in. It is made up of centres that have already been appointed. We make sure all stakeholders have access to the available information so we can move forward. Work on the case continues, and if more information becomes available, it is shared with the person responsible.

Here's where the value of this business model lies. If something changes while the case is under way—for instance, if it ceases to be an investigation—the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security takes over until the victim receives or, rather, until the case is closed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Earlier, we were talking about passwords. Nowadays, we see two-factor authentication being used a lot more for bank accounts. Could the same thing be done for social insurance numbers?

Mr. André Boucher:

I'm going to say the same thing I did earlier. I'm not an expert in social insurance numbers, but we strongly advise people to use two factors whenever possible. It's not perfect, but it improves the security of their information.

Mr. Michel Picard:

I'd like to revisit the issue of a unique identifier.

Other models exist. On other committees, we've talked about the popular Estonian model, I believe. It's a system that's in line with our discussions on open banking. All the information is centralized and people can access it using a unique identification number.

At the end of the day, no matter what you call it, a social insurance number is a unique identification number, so it's important to understand the system's limitations. It's all well and good to have the ultimate ultra-modern system, but if a single unique identifier is assigned to an individual, the information will always be vulnerable if someone gets a hold of it.

Mr. André Boucher:

Absolutely. I can't name them today, but a number of countries around the world have endeavoured to adopt a system that relies on a national unique identification number. Some have been successful, and others, less so. As you said, the number becomes an essential piece of information and the slightest vulnerability puts the data at risk.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Does your centre manage its employees' personal information itself?

Mr. André Boucher:

Yes, absolutely, using all the measures I mentioned earlier.

Mr. Michel Picard:

How do you protect against an employee who wakes up in a foul mood one day and decides to help the other side?

Mr. André Boucher:

We have an extensive security program in place from the get-go, starting with the selection of personnel. Of course, a culture of security prevails throughout the organization, one that encompasses personnel security, physical security and computer system security.

The processes are in place. The system is evergreen, meaning that it's constantly updated. We don't rest on our laurels, so to speak. We review the system on a regular basis. It's an extensive and complex process, but the investment is worth it.

(1425)

Mr. Michel Picard:

Is your approach used elsewhere in the market? Has another organization established a culture of security similar to yours?

Mr. André Boucher:

Our approach is modern, but we don't have a monopoly on security programs. Documentation is available. Public Safety Canada put out a publication on developing appropriate security programs. It's an excellent reference that refers to the same models we use.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you, Mr. Boucher. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

Mr. Dubé, you have three minutes.

Mr. Fortin, we'll have a few minutes left. Do you wish to ask a couple of minutes of questions?

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

Yes, please.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Dubé. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Boucher, I didn't get a chance to ask you questions earlier.

My first question is about something your colleague Scott Jones said when he appeared before the committee as part of the other study we've been referring to a lot today. He said it was important that institutions and businesses report data breaches and thefts that affect them.

In its recommendation, the committee remained rather vague. Should it be mandatory to report such breaches to police in order to minimize the impact on the public and catch those responsible?

That brings me to two other questions. They're for you, Mr. Flynn.

Since the information remains online forever, should police treat these threats in the same way they do physical ones? If a murderer or someone else poses a physical threat, I imagine police investigations are conducted with a certain level of urgency. Should the same apply to cyberthreats? Desjardins contacted Quebec provincial police in December, if I'm not mistaken.

My last question is about background checks and ongoing security checks. Given how savvy individuals are these days, should these checks become the norm?

You can have the rest of my time to answer.

Mr. André Boucher:

Regarding your question about reporting incidents, I would just point out that we recommend organizations invest before an incident occurs. The organization has to have a security program in place, one that can detect threats and so forth. We always recommend that people report incidents and share them with their community because there are usually commonalities that everyone can learn from.

As the country's cybersecurity centre, we work to gather that information across all communities and to find commonalities in order to issue advice and guidance that could lead to enhanced security nationally. Yes, incidents should definitely be reported. [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

With respect to the physical versus the cyber harm, I agree with you. It's a very difficult thing to understand. We struggle in policing to determine where we are going to apply our resources, because we always look at where we're going to be able to have the most significant impact in reducing harm.

If you look at fraud, fraud is a very large and significant threat in Canada and globally. It is difficult to measure $400,000 worth of fraud or $2 million worth of fraud against a physical threat or a homicide, or an assault against an individual. We struggle with that, but I can tell you that we're aware of it and are examining how we measure that risk and how we prioritize. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Wouldn't it be appropriate to acknowledge that this kind of incident has a lifelong impact on a person and to respond with that in mind? [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

Yes, it's absolutely a consideration.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.[Translation]

Mr. Fortin, you have two minutes. Go ahead.

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

I have a quick question for Mr. Flynn. I say quick, because I have just two minutes and I also have a question for Mr. Boucher.

Two years ago, 19 million Canadians were the victims of fraud as a result of a data breach at Equifax. Similar data were stolen in that case. Last year, some 90,000 CIBC and BMO customers were targeted. This year, it's Desjardins members.

Can you tell us whether, further to these events, crime involving the use of the stolen data has increased? [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

The specific data from those compromises...? [Translation]

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

Yes, but I'm talking about this type of crime.

(1430)

[English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

We are seeing fraudsters utilizing information that is compromised in operations. The RCMP had a successful investigation into Leakedsource.com, which was reselling some of the information from the large compromises that were made public. There was a guilty plea in that case.

It is not an unusual circumstance that somebody is reselling that. We are seeing that occur. [Translation]

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

All right, but has there been an increase in crime involving data stolen as a result of these breaches? Has the crime rate gone up? [English]

C/Supt Mark Flynn:

I haven't taken note specifically of the rate of crime, but it is certainly a type of crime that we are seeing. [Translation]

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

I see.

My second question is for Mr. Boucher.

Mr. Boucher, in your brief, you give three recommendations to deal with increasing cyberthreats. The second is to invest in training and awareness so that people have the tools to respond. Has the federal government earmarked funding to work with the Quebec government to improve the security of Quebecers' information?

Mr. André Boucher:

I can speak for my organization. We have a national responsibility, and that includes working with our Quebec partners. We invest in education and training, and we also make our services available to Quebec businesses.

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

Sorry, I don't mean to rush you, but as you know, two minutes isn't much time.

Are any investments planned, and if so, how much? Has the federal government made so many millions available to work with Quebec on a training program or other cybercrime initiative, for example?

Mr. André Boucher:

I don't have that information with me today.

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

I see.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Unfortunately, you're not going to be able to answer that question.

Before I suspend I just want to go to point three of your presentation, Mr. Boucher, where it says, “Identify and protect critical assets. Know where your key data lives. Protect it and monitor the protection. Be ready to respond”. In other words, zero trust, which is what we've heard for the last six months.

Is that the standard by which any financial institution, let alone Desjardins, should be held?

Mr. André Boucher:

I think every large enterprise has to measure its own key assets and the value of those assets and make a risk-based decision on how much they're going to invest to protect those assets. Starting from a position of zero trust is the reality of the complex environment we live in today. Don't assume your system is going to work on its own. It takes a holistic investment in a security program—in the right people, the right processes and the right technology. The sum of these things will....

The Chair:

That's a consensus standard among the cyber community, if your will, your point number three—zero trust.

Mr. André Boucher:

It is a consensus that you have to invest in all of these aspects.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Boucher.

With that, we're going to suspend.

We are scheduled to hear government officials and are actually making some decent progress here. I am assuming, and I don't know quite correctly whether, if I suspend for two or three minutes, we can re-empanel with the government witnesses and keep on moving. Is that agreeable to colleagues?

Okay. With that, we will suspend and re-empanel with the government witnesses. Thank you.

(1430)

(1435)

The Chair:

We are back on. I want to thank the officials for their flexibility and ask them to indulge the committee with further potential flexibility as we are awaiting the arrival of representatives of Desjardins.

I'm going to ask the various representatives of Canada Revenue, the Department of Finance, the Department of Employment and Social Development, and the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions for brief statements. If, in fact, the representatives of Desjardins are under some time constraints and do arrive, at the end of those statements, I'm going to suspend for a moment, ask you folks to take your seats in the back of the room, and deal with Desjardins for a period of time. After that I'll ask you to come back, and the members will have questions, if that's an acceptable way. Even if it's not an acceptable way to proceed, that's how we're going to proceed, so with that, I'll simply go in this order of Revenue Canada or Department of Finance, whoever wants to make their statement first.

Ms. Annette Ryan (Associate Assistant Deputy Minister, Financial Sector Policy Branch, Department of Finance):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I will go first, if that's all right.[Translation]

My name is Annette Ryan. I am the associate assistant deputy minister of the financial sector policy branch within the Department of Finance. I am joined by Robert Sample, director general of the financial stability and capital markets division, as well as Judy Cameron, managing director of the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada, and her colleague. We are pleased to appear before you today.

(1440)

[English]

My remarks today will address two areas that, I believe, are pertinent to the issues before you. Specifically I will clarify the roles of government departments and agencies and private sector actors within the federal financial sector framework and update the committee on efforts being undertaken by the Department of Finance, federal regulatory agencies and banks in support of cybersecurity and data protection.

Protecting the privacy and security of Canadians' personal and financial data is an objective shared by both levels of government and the private sector, and it is one that's crucial for maintaining continued trust in Canada's banking system.

I'll address the roles within the federal government and then discuss provincial government and private sector roles.

The Department of Finance along with federal financial sector oversight agencies has responsibility for the laws and regulations that govern Canada's federally regulated banking system. We collectively set expectations and oversee implementation to ensure that operational risks related to cybersecurity and privacy are properly managed by the financial institutions that we regulate.

The Minister of Finance has overarching responsibility for the stability and integrity of Canada's financial system. Cybersecurity is a primary aspect of financial cyber-stability as it ensures the sector remains resilient in the face of cyber-threats and attacks

In turn, Public Safety has recognized the financial services industry as being a critically important sector within its wider national critical infrastructure strategy.

The Department of Finance works closely with a range of partners responsible for financial regulation and cybersecurity both domestically and internationally to ensure that the sector is adopting appropriate cyber-resiliency and data protection practices and that the specific needs of the financial sector are considered within economy-wide policies and statutes that relate to cybersecurity and data security.

I'll describe the general responsibilities among financial regulators. The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions is the prudential regulator of federally regulated financial institutions, including banks. OSFI develops standards and rules for managing cyber-risks as is consistent with its wider oversight of operational risks that institutions must manage.

The Bank of Canada monitors financial market infrastructures, such as payment systems, to enhance resilience to cyber-threats, and the bank coordinates sector-wide responses to systemic-level operational incidents.

Other federal agencies have responsibilities for laws of general application in respect of privacy. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada oversees the banks' compliance with Canada's private sector privacy legislation, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, known as PIPEDA. PIPEDA sets out requirements that businesses must follow when collecting, using or disclosing personal data in the course of commercial activities. These include putting in place appropriate security safeguards to protect personal data against loss, theft or unauthorized disclosure.

The Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development has overall policy responsibility for PIPEDA. In November of 2018 the Government of Canada implemented amendments to PIPEDA related to data breach reporting requirements and associated monetary penalties for failing to report.

As you've just heard, other federal departments and agencies, including Public Safety, the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security and the RCMP, share responsibilities with respect to broader Government of Canada cybersecurity initiatives. [Translation]

It is important to note that supervisory responsibility for the financial sector in Canada is divided between federal and provincial governments. Provinces are responsible for the supervision of securities dealers, mutual fund and investment advisers, provincial credit unions and provincially incorporated trust, loan and insurance companies.

Accordingly, federal and provincial financial sector authorities have protocols in place for information sharing, particularly where matters of financial stability are concerned. Financial institutions, themselves, of course, are most immediately responsible for maintaining cyber and data security on a day-to-day basis, directly managing operational risks through an extensive series of protective and preventative measures, both individually and through industry-level co-operation.

These are supported by policies and standards that are continually updated to address the evolving threat landscape and remain in line with industry best practices.

(1445)

[English]

Cyber-attacks are a serious and ongoing threat. I will focus on some of the steps being taken by the Government of Canada, the financial sector, regulatory agencies and the banks to ensure cybersecurity in the financial sector.

In budget 2018, the federal government invested over half a billion dollars in cybersecurity, and in October of 2018, it established the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security, which serves as a single window of technical expertise and advice to Canadians, governments and businesses. The centre defends against cyber-threat actors that target Canadian businesses, including federally or provincially regulated financial institutions, for their customer data, financial information and payment systems. Efforts to address cybercrime have been further bolstered by the newly created national cybercrime coordination unit within the RCMP, which provides a national cybercrime reporting mechanism for Canadians, including incidents related to data breaches or financial fraud.

More recently, in budget 2019, the government proposed legislation and funding to protect critical cyber systems in the Canadian financial, telecommunications, energy and transport sectors.[Translation]

Our colleagues at the Treasury Board Secretariat continue their work with provincial governments, financial institutions and federal partners toward a pan-Canadian trust framework for digital identity with the goal of strengthening digital ID protection in the context of cyberthreats.[English]

On the regulatory side, earlier this year OSFI published new expectations on technology and cybersecurity breach reporting via the technology and cybersecurity incident reporting advisory. This is intended to help OSFI identify areas where banks can take steps to proactively prevent cyber incidents, or in cases where incidents have occurred, to improve their cyber-resiliency.

While the first objective is to prevent data breaches, the reality is that these events happen and are not localized to the financial sector. Having said this, when cyber events occur at a federally regulated financial institution, control and oversight mechanisms are in place to manage them.

To summarize, cybersecurity is an area of critical importance for the Department of Finance. We are actively working with partners across government and in the private sector to ensure that Canadians are well-protected from cyber incidents and that when incidents do occur, they're managed in a way that mitigates the impact on consumers and the financial sector as a whole.

Thank you for your time. I'm happy to take questions. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC)):

Thank you, Ms. Ryan.

We now move on to Ms. Boisjoly.

Ms. Elise Boisjoly (Assistant Deputy Minister, Integrity Services Branch, Department of Employment and Social Development):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

My name is Elise Boisjoly, and I am the assistant deputy minister of the integrity services branch at Employment and Social Development Canada. I am joined by Anik Dupont, who is responsible for the social insurance number program.

Thank you for the opportunity to join you today. My remarks will focus on the social insurance number, or SIN, program. Specifically, I will clarify what the social insurance number is and provide information on its issuance and use; inform the committee on privacy protection related to the SIN; and provide information on our approach in the case of data breach.

What is the SIN? The SIN is a file identifier used by the Government of Canada to coordinate the administration of federal benefits and services and the revenue system. The SIN is required for every person working in insurable or pensionable employment in Canada and to file income tax returns.

It is issued prior to your first job, when you first arrive in Canada or even at birth. During the last fiscal year, over 1.6 million SINs were issued.

The SIN is used, among other things, to deliver over $120 billion in benefits and collect over $300 billion in taxes. It facilitates information sharing to enable the provision of benefits and services to Canadians throughout their life such as child care benefits, student loans, employment insurance, pensions and even death benefits. As such, the SIN is assigned to an individual for life.

The SIN is not a national identifier and cannot be used to obtain identification. In fact, it is not even used by all programs and services within the federal government; only a certain number use it. The SIN alone is never sufficient to access a government program or benefit or to obtain credit or services in the private sector. Additional information is always required.

(1450)

[English]

While data breaches are becoming increasingly commonplace, the Government of Canada follows strong and established procedures to protect the personal information of individuals. My colleague mentioned the Privacy Act and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, which is being administered by Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. They provide the legal framework for the collection, retention, use, disclosure and disposition of personal information in the administration of programs by government institutions and the private sector, respectively.

As my colleague mentioned, on November 1, 2018, a new amendment to the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act came into force, which requires organizations that experience a data breach and that have reason to believe there's a real risk of significant harm to notify the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, the affected individuals and associated organizations as soon as it's feasible. Violating this provision may result in a fine of up to $100,000 per offence.

At Employment and Social Development Canada, we have internal monitoring strategies, privacy policies, directives and information tools for privacy management, as well as a departmental code of conduct and mandatory training for employees on protecting personal information. We believe that any security breach affecting social insurance numbers is very serious and, in fact, we ourselves are not immune to such a situation. For example, in 2012, the personal information of Canada student loan borrowers was potentially compromised. The breach was a catalyst for further improvements to information management practices within the department.

Preventing social insurance number fraud starts with education and awareness. This is why our website and communication materials include information that can help Canadians better understand the steps they should take to protect their social insurance numbers. Canadians can visit the department websites, call us or visit us at one of our Service Canada centres to learn how best to protect themselves. It is important to note that protecting the information of Canadians is a shared responsibility among the government, the private sector and individuals. We strongly discourage Canadians from giving out their social insurance numbers unless they are sure that doing so is legally required or necessary. Canadians should also actively monitor their financial information, including by contacting Canada's credit bureau.[Translation]

A loss of a social insurance number does not necessarily mean that a fraud has occurred or will occur.

However, should Canadians notice any fraudulent activity related to their social insurance number, they must act quickly to minimize the potential impact by reporting any incidents to the police, contacting the Privacy Commissioner and the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, and informing Service Canada. In cases where there is evidence of the social insurance number being used for fraudulent purposes, Service Canada works closely with those affected.

Despite ever larger data breaches, the number of Canadians who have had their social insurance number replaced by Service Canada due to fraud has remained consistent at approximately 60 per year since 2014.

That being said, we understand that many Canadians have signed a petition asking Service Canada to issue new social insurance numbers for those impacted by this data breach. The main reason we do not automatically issue a new social insurance number in these circumstances is simple: getting a new social insurance number will not protect individuals from fraud. The former social insurance number continues to exist and is linked to the individual. If a fraudster uses someone else's former social insurance number and their identity is not fully verified, credit lenders may still ask the victim of fraud to pay the debts.

In addition, it would be the individual's responsibility to provide their new social insurance number to each of their financial institutions, creditors, pension providers, employers—current and past—and any other organizations. Failing to properly do so could put individuals at risk of not receiving benefits or leave the door open to subsequent fraud or identity theft.

It would also mean doubling the monitoring. Individuals would still need to monitor their accounts and credit reports for both social insurance numbers on a regular and ongoing basis. Having multiple social insurance numbers increases the risk of potential fraud.

Active monitoring through credit bureaus as well as regular reviewing of banking and credit card statements remain the best protection against fraud.

In closing, protecting the integrity of the social insurance number is critical to us, and I can assure you that we will continue to take all necessary action to do so, including reading this committee's report and considering advice from this committee and others on how to best improve.

Thank you for your time. I'd be happy to answer your questions.

(1455)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Ms. Boisjoly.

Would anyone else like to speak before we go to questions?

Mr. Guénette, you have the floor.

Mr. Maxime Guénette (Assistant Commissioner and Chief Privacy Officer, Public Affairs Branch, Canada Revenue Agency):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon to all committee members.[English]

My name is Maxime Guénette. I'm assistant commissioner of the public affairs branch and chief privacy officer at the Canada Revenue Agency. With me today is my colleague Gillian Pranke, deputy assistant commissioner of the assessment, benefit and service branch at the CRA.

The CRA is an organization that touches the lives of virtually all Canadians. We're one of the largest holders of personal information at the Government of Canada. We process more than 28 million individual income tax returns annually. It's therefore critical that the CRA has an extensive privacy framework in place to manage and protect personal information for all Canadians.[Translation]

Integrity in the workplace is the cornerstone of agency culture. The agency supports its people in doing the right thing by providing clear guidelines and tools to ensure privacy, security and the protection of personal information, our programs and our data.

The agency is subject to the Privacy Act and associated Treasury Board policies and directives for the management and protection of Canadians' personal information. Section 241 of the Income Tax Act also imposes confidentiality requirements on its employees and others with access to taxpayer information.

The agency also adheres to the policy on government security and direction provided by lead security agencies like the Communications Security Establishment and the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security.

In April 2013, the agency appointed its first chief privacy officer, who is also responsible for the access to information and privacy functions within the agency.[English]

Part of my role as the chief privacy officer is to ensure that the CRA's respect for the privacy of the information it holds is reinforced and strengthened by overseeing decisions related to privacy, including assessing the privacy impacts of our programs; championing privacy rights within the agency, including managing internal privacy breaches when they occur; and reporting to CRA senior management on the state of privacy management at the agency.

Our responsibility for sound privacy management goes beyond appointing a chief privacy officer, though. It's a responsibility that all employees share.

Protecting the CRA's integrity includes ensuring that we have the proper systems in place to safeguard sensitive information from external threats. Agency networks and workstations are equipped with malware and virus detection and removal software, which are updated daily and protect the CRA environment from the increasing threat of malicious code and viruses.[Translation]

At the agency employee level, computers are secured with a suite of security products ranging from anti-virus software to host intrusion software.

External services are conducted on secure platforms and protected by firewalls and intrusion prevention tools to detect and prevent unauthorized access to agency systems.

During online transactions we ensure that all sensitive information is encrypted when it is transmitted between a taxpayer's computer and our Web servers. Regardless of how Canadians choose to interact with the agency, they must complete a two-step authentication process before gaining access to their account.

These steps are crucial to making sure that access to personal information is only available to authorized individuals. The process includes validation of a number of personal and confidential data points, including a person's social insurance number, their month and year of birth, and information from the previous year's income tax return.[English]

The CRA will shortly also be implementing a new personal identification number for taxpayers who choose to use it when calling the individual inquiries line. In addition, the CRA is currently examining additional security procedures to safeguard the information of taxpayers. As cybercrime and phishing scams become more sophisticated and commonplace, the CRA is being proactive in warning the public about fraudulent communications claiming to be from the CRA.

One very simple way in which taxpayers can safeguard against fraudulent activity is to sign up for My Account, or for businesses to sign up for My Business Account, so that they can use the CRA's secure portals to access and manage their tax affairs easily and securely. When an individual is signed up for My Account, they can also sign up for online mail in order to receive account alerts informing them of possible scams or other fraudulent activity that may affect them.

CRA is proud of its reputation as a leading-edge organization committed to excellence in administering Canada's tax system. However, inappropriate fraudulent activity can occur in the workplace. CRA has incorporated a broad array of checks and balances to ensure that those who access taxpayer information are strictly limited to employees required to do so as part of their job and to detect misconduct when it does occur.

(1500)

[Translation]

Monitoring of employees' access to taxpayer information is centralized, ensuring an independent process that enables the agency to detect and, if necessary, address any suspect transactions in our systems. This provides assurance that authorized users are accessing only the applications and data they are allowed to access based on strict business rules.[English]

In 2017 the CRA implemented a new enterprise fraud management solution, which complements existing security controls and further reduces the risk of unauthorized access and privacy breaches. This solution enables proactive monitoring and detection of unauthorized access by CRA employees. Any allegations or suspicions of employee misconduct are taken very seriously and are thoroughly investigated. When wrongdoing or misconduct is founded, appropriate measures are taken, up to and including termination of employment. If criminal activity is suspected, the matter is referred to the proper authorities.[Translation]

Upon hire, agency employees are required to read and acknowledge the agency's code of integrity and professional conduct and the values and ethics code for the public sector.

The code clearly outlines the expected standard of conduct, including the obligation to protect taxpayer information in accordance with section 241 of the Income Tax Act. Unauthorized access to taxpayer information is considered to be serious misconduct, as reflected in the agency's directive on discipline.[English]

The code ensures that current and former employees are aware that the obligation to protect taxpayer information continues even after they leave the CRA. All employees are asked to review and affirm their obligations under the CRA's code of integrity every year.

In the event a privacy breach does occur, it is assessed in accordance with TBS policy and procedures to document and evaluate all potential risks to the affected individual. In such a case, the CRA offers support to the affected individual through a dedicated agency representative so that the client has the opportunity to ask questions and find information as well as, on a case-by-case basis, get access to free credit protection services.

On the rare occasion when a taxpayer's information is confirmed to have been compromised, the CRA will act to resolve all outstanding issues. This includes reviewing all fraudulent activity that may have occurred in the account, including fraudulent refund payments.[Translation]

We at the agency are deeply committed to safeguarding the trust Canadians place in our organization, and to meeting their expectations that we have the right checks and balances in place to secure the information entrusted to us. We have worked hard to earn the public's trust, because it is the foundation of our self-assessment tax system.[English]

A good reputation takes years to establish. We safeguard it by remaining vigilant in our efforts to protect taxpayers from security breaches and to protect Canada's tax administration system from misconduct and criminal wrongdoing.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I'd be pleased to answer any questions you may have. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Guénette.

If there is no one else, we will begin the question period.

Mr. Drouin, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I thank all witnesses for appearing before the committee on short notice.

I should mention that I am one of the victims of the data breach at Desjardins, as are many of my constituents.

Ms. Boisjoly, you referred to the online petition asking that the social insurance numbers of those affected be changed. Can you explain to the committee why that would not be done and why it would only complicate things without providing better security for Canadians?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

I briefly mentioned that in my presentation and I thank you for giving me the opportunity to talk about it at greater length.

First, an information leak does not necessarily mean that fraud or identity theft has occurred. Second, we do not automatically change social insurance numbers after a leak like this because it doesn't really solve the problem or automatically remove all risk of fraud.

Let me explain that first point a little more. If you do not change the social insurance number linked to a certain credit number and if a credit agency uses the old credit number, the person involved will not necessarily be able to get credit. In addition, if a lender does not properly check the identity of that person, and a fraudster borrows money using his name, the lender could ask him to pay the debt. So there can be other cases of fraud if lenders do not correctly check people's identity.

The second reason is that it can create serious problems of access to benefits and services. As I said in my presentation, victims of data breaches must warn everyone, financial institutions, credit agencies, past and future employers, and the managers of pension schemes to which they belonged with their old social insurance numbers, and make the necessary changes. Often, people no longer remember those to whom they have given their social insurance number, especially at the beginning of their careers. That can prevent people from receiving a pension, for example, because it is no longer possible to establish a link between an individual and the benefits to which they are entitled.

At federal level, we would certainly advise the Canadian Revenue Agency and all organizations involved. But changes could be made manually and there may be errors. This could complicate the calculation of pensions or employment insurance benefits. If someone forgets an employer and makes errors, the calculation of employment insurance benefits or the old age pension could be wrong.

(1505)

Mr. Francis Drouin:

In other words, changing our social insurance number does not necessarily protect our personal information.

Why is another social insurance number issued in cases where fraud has been proven?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

When fraud has been proven, we look at the type of fraud and discuss the matter with the person involved. Often people decide not to change their social insurance numbers. They register, or have someone register them, at a credit checking agency. By so doing, they will be better protected than they would be if they changed their social insurance number. Often, having been informed, people decide not to change their social insurance number. In a very small number of cases, 60 per year since 2014, people insist on making a change when fraud has been confirmed. At that point, we allow a new social insurance number to be issued, but we will also explain that it will not necessarily solve the problem.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Here is a more practical question.

Like everyone in the same situation as myself, I see a risk of fraud. How then can I advise the authorities, whether at Revenue Canada or Service Canada, that my social insurance number may perhaps be used fraudulently? Can I call Service Canada to advise them of that? Is there an internal process that allows the public to do that?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Absolutely. Let me make two points about that.

First, since this leak was made public, we have received between 1,400 and 1,500 requests directly from members of the public. They have called us to find out how to better protect their personal data and we have given them a lot of information about doing so. They will often take the steps that we advise them to take, such as looking at the credit agency reports and checking their bank transactions.

Second, if they notice a suspicious activity, they must follow the very clear procedures to give us that information. If suspicious transactions are detected, we ask them to contact Service Canada, which will be able to take the steps needed to help them.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay.

The website lists 29 cases in which Canadians are allowed to give out their social insurance numbers. To banking institutions and other entities, for example.

What does Service Canada do so that Canadians know when they should give out their social insurance number and when they should not? What recourse is possible when an organization asks for a social insurance number when it should not do so?

(1510)

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Our website, our call centres and the Service Canada centres tell Canadians who they may give their social insurance numbers to. When we issue social insurance numbers, we actually tell people who they should and should not give it to. A certain number of organizations are authorized to ask for social insurance numbers, for example when a bank or creditor pays interest, which the Canada Revenue Agency needs to know.

If someone not on that list asks for a social insurance number, people can refuse and ask to provide another form of information. For example, a long time ago, landlords often asked tenants for social insurance numbers in order to check their credit. They can simply provide a credit report rather than give out their social insurance number. The person asking the question must— [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

It's helpful if the witnesses look at the chair from time to time so that I can signal them.

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Thank you very much.

These glasses just— [Translation]

The Chair:

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My thanks to you all for being here today.

Listening to you is like being in The Twelve Tasks of Asterix. Let us put ourselves in people's shoes. Their concern is that they have no real idea of what will happen. We asked to meet with you so that we could have some information on the subject. We know that the social insurance number is one measure but is there anything else that should be done in the future to change the system? Could we do as other countries have done, such as providing more digital identification, whether it is by means of fingerprints or something else?

Ms. Boisjoly, you say that there about 60 cases per year, but look, 2.9 million people had their data stolen. Are you expecting a major increase in the number of requested changes of social insurance numbers following these identity thefts?

I also have a question for you, Mr. Guénette.

The people following what is currently happening want to know what is being done. You proposed a good solution, and solutions are what people need. You mentioned people going on the Government of Canada site and opening their financial records. If I understand correctly, by opening your records, you can receive alerts or warnings.

It has now been three weeks. We are here today as the result of an emergency request. Why was there no communication with the public, immediately or within a week following the thefts, to let people know what the Government of Canada can do to help? That's what we need to know.

I am all ears, Ms. Boisjoly.

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Thank you.

To answer your first question on new measures, every situation like this gives us the opportunity to review our security and privacy protection measures. All of our colleagues and myself certainly focus on that when there are incidents of this kind. The colleagues who have gone before us spoke a lot about the evolution of cybersecurity. They said that we always have to be ready. We are certainly always focused on that.

My colleague mentioned the Treasury Board, whose mandate includes identity management. They are focusing on ways in which we can better solve the problems associated with digital identity, specifically by conducting pilot projects with the provinces. We participate in those forums, and we are thinking of ways to move the discussion on digital identity forward.

Second, in terms of the number of identity thefts, we have been advised of many in the last 14 or 15 years. Probably millions of people have already been affected and, despite that, the number asking for a new social insurance number remains rather low. So I cannot answer your question, because I am not aware of the future, but I can say that there have been a lot of thefts and that the number seems constant, around 60 per year.

Mr. Maxime Guénette:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Paul-Hus.

As Ms. Boisjoly said, there is never a bad time to remind people about the things they can do. At tax time, we conducted advertising campaigns and communication initiatives online and on social media to remind people about the services at their disposal. However, more can always be done. We are always looking for opportunities to communicate more in this respect. So—

(1515)

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay, but the case before us is about managing a crisis. We are here to find out whether a federal organization can lend a hand to Desjardins, who are taking their own steps to rectify the situation as best they can. Currently, I see some inter-agency measures but really no proactive measures to help Canadians, aside from a message that has already been sent out.

In your opinion, why does the government seem to be so passive? Why is it saying nothing? Is it because nothing can be done? Is there no solution?

We are looking for solutions because people are concerned. If you are telling us that current agencies do not have the means or the tools to help them, we are going to look for other solutions.

Are solutions like the one Desjardins proposed, the Equifax services, quite effective in your experience and as you assess this situation? We are looking to reassure people with things that are true. We don’t want to say just anything.

Mr. Maxime Guénette:

Currently, because the investigation is still in progress, there is a lot of information…

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

The investigation has nothing to do with it because we know how the data breach happened. We also have an idea of where the data was sent, but, at the moment, that is not what we are interested in. We know that someone, somewhere on the planet, has our information and is in a position to harm us by stealing our identity. So we want to know whether our agencies can become proactively involved or, if not, what can be done.

You have a solution in my case, so that is already something that the public could be told about. It is important to do that quickly because people are not in a very good mood during their holidays. Then we will have to see if something else can be done.

The issue of the social insurance number has come up everywhere. A number of suggestions have been made. You are responsible for that file and you are saying that nothing can be done, at least not in that way. These are the answers that people need to hear. But the fact remains that we have to leave here telling people what the government can do to help, first Desjardins and second, the 2.9 million people who have been affected. We are hearing a lot about internal protocols, but, for the Canadians listening to us, that does not mean a lot. This is why I want to hear clear answers. I know that you are giving them when you can, but basically, when we leave here, we will need to know what can be done.

Mr. Maxime Guénette:

I can assure you that very proactive discussions are going on between the various departments involved.

As far as the revenue agency is concerned, as I said in my remarks, the social insurance number, the address and the date of birth are some of the pieces of information people need in order to identify themselves to the agency. We also need information on tax returns from previous years, which was not in the information stolen from Desjardins, according to the discussions we have had. However, once again, the investigation is still in progress. So these questions—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

As I told you, that really changes nothing.

How much time do I have left, Mr. Chair? [English]

The Chair:

You have about 10 seconds. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

What is the first thing people should do if their identity is stolen? Call the police?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Yes.

Mr. Maxime Guénette:

Certainly.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for taking the time to come here today.

Ms. Boisjoly, I was struck by one point in your reply to Mr. Drouin. You said that a personal data breach does not lead to identity theft. That is basically what brings us here today. Canadians want to avoid identity theft, of course; it’s their main concern. I have some questions about it.

You said that people should report suspicious activities associated with a social insurance number. I am a federal lawmaker and I don’t know what a suspicious activity associated with a social insurance number is. I have never been a victim of fraud, thank heavens, and the same goes for the people around me, touch wood. However, I do know people who have been victims. They find out when they receive a bill for a cellphone they do not have, or for a Canadian Tire credit card that they never applied for. They end up with debts and obligations that are not theirs.

Can you tell me exactly what a suspicious activity associated with a social insurance number is?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Thank you for your question.

You have certainly identified some suspicious activities, as you say. We ask people to protect themselves as best they can by working with a credit bureau so that transactions are monitored as closely as possible. They should look at their bank and credit card transactions. If they see actions in their name that they did not make, we asked them to contact the bureau—

(1520)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I am sorry for interrupting you, but my time is limited and I only have one round.

The suspicious activities or problematic transactions that we may be able to see on our credit card statements can be associated with all kinds of things. It may be someone who has stolen our mail and obtained our address. That is information that is probably easier to obtain. You rightly mentioned that, in terms of the situation we are discussing today, the person has complementary information. In principle, with all the information that has been stolen, that person could easily call Revenue Canada and obtain a new password. If you have someone’s entire file, you have all the information you need.

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Yes, and that is the most important point. We are talking about a number of identifiers. Each one of the organizations is responsible for checking people’s identity.

My colleague said that there must also be a line from the tax return. With employment insurance, there is an access code and you are asked to provide the two figures in that access code. When we are checking identities, we must make sure that we ask questions about identities that are secret and shared only with the people we know. That allows us to better verify people’s identity and to provide them with the service. For example, you would not be able to call Service Canada and obtain employment insurance benefits with the information that has been made public at the moment.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

As for getting a new social insurance number, I have a little difficulty understanding. Basically, the argument is that it becomes complicated for people. In principle, a social insurance number is issued for reasons of efficiency. A unique identifier makes transactions with government agencies easier.

Forgive me if this analogy may not be an exact one. If I see a problem with my credit card today, the bank or the company that issued it is still able to transfer a balance or to link the legitimate transactions on my credit card that has been used fraudulently and the new one it sent to me.

Why would a financial institution be able to do that, while you are not able to say that someone’s social insurance number has been compromised and to give them a new number? A former employer, for example, might have to take care of questions about that person’s pension. Knowing that is the same person, why are you not able to link the previous social insurance number to a new one? You may perhaps have to do some additional checking, given that the number has been compromised. But I am still having a little difficulty understanding why you can’t do it.

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

When you started, you said that the first reason we do not automatically give out social insurance numbers is that it can make life difficult for people. The first reason is actually that it would not really prevent fraud. This is a very important point. People have to continue to check their previous social insurance number because there are still—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I am sorry to interrupt you, but, if I lose my credit card, it does not necessarily mean that it has been stolen. It may have fallen down a sewer somewhere, meaning that it will never be seen or used again. I would still call my bank, Visa or whomever, to ask them to cancel the card. I would still keep checking and I would have some peace of mind, knowing that I am protected.

Why not use the same logic for victims of breaches of personal data, especially ones that are all over the news? To make sure they are protected, people want to dot all the i's and cross all the t's that they can. They change their credit cards and everything, as they do when they lose their wallets. Why not proceed in the same way?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

A social insurance number is not like a credit card, which is a bank's only way of identifying that person. It is an identifier used by employers for as long as people are in the workforce. It is also used for various programs and services.

At the moment, no computer system links all those systems so that social insurance numbers can be updated by employers and by the various groups and programs. That task would be done manually. That is why we do not know all the employers. In the federal government, it would be done manually. As I said, we have only done it a few times. There is a risk of errors. I am just mentioning this to the committee.

(1525)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I have less than a minute left.

At the risk of tangling ourselves up in technical details, I would like to understand this better. If an employer wants to use a social insurance number, how does that work? Surely, things come together in some way when you move up the ladder.

I have one final question, which goes back to what Mr. Paul-Hus rightly said.

Let me take Quebec as an example. When there is flooding, police forces and the Government of Quebec hold public consultations on the spot so that people can attend.

Mr. Guénette, I respect what you said, but perhaps advertising campaigns or posts on social media are not enough.

Given the extent of this theft, this breach, have you considered organizing consultations in person in the key places in Québec, the major centres of Longueuil, Montreal and elsewhere? [English]

The Chair:

Again, Mr. Dubé has asked an important question but has not left any time for an answer, so you'll have to work it in somewhere else.

Usually you're so good, Mr. Dubé. [Translation]

Welcome to the committee, Ms. Lapointe. You have seven minutes.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon to you all and thank you for joining us.

I do not normally sit on this committee, but I gladly agreed to replace one of its permanent members.

I have had discussions with a number of my constituents in Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, which is to the north of Montreal and includes Deux-Montagnes, Saint-Eustache, Boisbriand and Rosemère. They are very concerned. This is something that has come up all the time since the House adjourned on June 21. That is why I agreed to be here today without hesitation, even though I am not familiar with all the studies that this committee has done.

Ms. Ryan, earlier, you began by saying that the Department of Finance establishes the legislation and regulations that govern the Canadian banking system. You then said that oversight of the Canadian financial sector is shared between the federal and provincial governments.

Let us look specifically at Quebec. The provinces are responsible for real estate brokers, and mutual funds and investment representatives, and so on. Desjardins is a provincial cooperative institution. Just now, I mentioned my constituents, but my entire family and myself are also among the 2.9 million people affected. This concerns us a great deal and we are wondering what will be the future impact of this theft on our lives.

Have you had any requests from Desjardins? Mr. Guénette said that there are ongoing discussions between departments, but have people from Desjardins been in communication with you to get additional information? [English]

Ms. Annette Ryan:

To the extent that Desjardins is largely provincially regulated, their first point of contact with a government regulator would be with the Autorité des marchés financiers in Quebec. When I spoke of the system of banking rules and regulations in place federally, that applies to the institutions that have elected to be federally regulated.

To the extent that Desjardins is largely provincially regulated, many of the operational requirements put in place in advance of this incident would have been worked through with the Autorité des marchés financiers.

My colleague from OSFI can speak to how that is put in place at the federal level. In this incident the institution stepped forward and took a number of responsible measures very quickly to be transparent about the leak. That is consistent with both provincial law and federal law in terms of privacy, and the federal and provincial privacy commissioners have struck a joint investigation to look into this incident, but many of the provisions for not just the conduct of the financial regulation of Desjardins but also the consumer protections are provincial in this case. We can speak to the federal system, but I would direct many of the questions you may have to those responsible at the provincial level.

(1530)

[Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I have one other question. Are credit bureaus in federal jurisdiction? [English]

Ms. Annette Ryan:

It's largely provincial, and in this case it is provincial. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Have people from Equifax been in communication with you? [English]

Ms. Annette Ryan:

Equifax would not be in touch with us or the department, and they are largely regulated for consumer issues at the provincial level for this. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you.

I have used half of my time and so I am now going to turn to you, Mr. Guénette.

You talked earlier about the external rules on preventing identity theft, but you have not spoken a lot about the internal rules. I would like to know about the internal rules in the Canada Revenue Agency. After all, we are here today because data was stolen from the inside.

How do things work at the Canada Revenue Agency? Do the employees have to be at certain levels in order to have access to the systems? You talked about centralizing or detecting problems by intervening if necessary. You said that there are strict rules and I would like you to tell me a little more about them. Can people work with their own electronic equipment when they are in front of Canada Revenue Agency screens? I would like to know more about that.

Mr. Maxime Guénette:

Thank you for your question.

Of course, we have security rules at several levels. First, we screen the staff that we hire. People with more specific access have “Secret” security clearance instead of a lower level of clearance. A whole host of physical security measures are in place. People working in call centres, who have access to screens showing taxpayer information, may not have their personal phones with them. We have measures in that regard.

As for access to taxpayers' data, those data are on separate servers that are not connected to the Internet. There is a mechanism by which the employees' access to the data is reviewed annually, or each time they change jobs. Managers verify the access those employees have on a regular basis.

As for the workload, in my introductory remarks, I talked about the administrative rules. When we give employees their workload, our business fraud management system checks by using algorithms in real time. The system applies several dozen rules. For example, if employees check their own tax accounts, an alert is automatically issued and the system sees it immediately. If employees work on tasks that they have not been assigned, the system will immediately send an alert to the manager, who would then be able to ask an employee what he or she was doing in the system. Screen shots are captured per minute, which allows us to see which pages employees are consulting or which changes they have made. The system was implemented in 2017 and it is very advanced. It allows us to have controls in place.

In terms of preventing data breaches, employees are unable to copy information onto CDs, DVDs or USB keys. The system does not allow it.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Lapointe.[English]

We'll have Mr. Motz and Mr. Clarke.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

Again, thank you to the departmental officials for being here.

I have just two quick questions for the Department of Finance. You say that your first objective is to prevent data breaches. We know the reality is that these happen and are not localized to the financial sector.

Ms. Ryan, you said that when cybe events occur at a federally regulated institution, which is what we're talking about, control and oversight mechanisms are in place to manage them. Can you explain to Canadians in practical terms what that actually means when you play that out?

(1535)

Ms. Judy Cameron (Senior Director, Regulatory Affairs and Strategic Policy, Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions):

I'll take that question.

I represent the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions. Our mandate is to supervise financial institutions and set rules for them so as to protect the interests of depositors and creditors. Broadly speaking we're looking at safety and soundness, but we also make sure they comply with all federal rules. For example, we expect them to have systems in place to comply with privacy laws.

We set expectations around what institutions should be doing, such as complying with privacy laws. We also expect them to do cyber self-assessments to assess their own internal protections against cyber events. Then we supervise them to make sure they are complying with the expectations we have set out to make sure that they have good compliance management systems in place.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Basically, it's just oversight. Now, in this particular circumstance, it's oversight of what's happened to make sure that—

Ms. Judy Cameron:

It's oversight of their systems to prevent this, really.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, so that's one question. The other question is for Ms. Ryan, or whoever might....

I'm just going to read the summary that you gave. You said that “cybersecurity is an area of critical importance for the Department of Finance. We are actively working with partners across government and the private sector to ensure that Canadians are well-protected from cybe -incidents and that when incidents do occur, they're managed in a way that mitigates the impact on consumers and the financial sector as a whole.”

What does that actually look like to impacted consumers, to consumers at large, to the financial institution, to the banking industry, to various government departments? You can say that, but what does it actually look like?

Ms. Annette Ryan:

I think that the number of federal partners you have had as witnesses today speaks to that.

The investments in the cyber centre were part of the first line of defence in strengthening the ability to prevent cyber incidents, and they are focused, as André Boucher spoke to, on the appropriate response to a cyber event. In this case there was a specific type of cyber event, a breach by an employee, so many of those defences that have been built by the cyber centre were not triggered in this case, but the resources of the cyber centre are complemented by new resources for the RCMP. You heard the RCMP speak about the national cybercrime centre and their efforts at the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

We also realize that a cyber event or a data event does play out on the privacy side. Therefore, measures such as the new requirements for businesses to notify customers that there has been a breach are a key part of a citizen's ability to be vigilant about their own finances and to know that important information about them has been put into play. A monitoring service like Equifax is important because it helps put that person into the mix to know when something that's being done in their name is not right.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have just one quick follow-up question to that. If I were one of the 2.9 million Canadians impacted by this circumstance, or one of the millions in this country who have already been impacted by data breaches of various varieties, I would want assistance in getting my life back, like them. Right now there is a lot of talk about what that looks like, but in practical terms, Canadians want to know how to get their lives back. They want to mitigate the risks and the impacts that a breach like this has on their personal lives, on their financial futures and on those of their families.

I'm curious; it seems that the Department of Finance has a role to play in having a location from which Canadians can find the information they need, follow a template, call numbers, or whatever it may be to help get their lives in order, because this is, and will be, devastating to those whom these criminals are going to take advantage of.

As government, we have a responsibility to ensure that we protect Canadians as well as we can. This is not going to go away.

(1540)

The Chair:

I'm going to have to leave it there. I thank you for your witness.

Colleagues, I need some guidance here. Our next witnesses are outside, and, as you know, are under some time constraints. I propose suspending. The question, colleagues, is do you want to suspend and release these witnesses, or do you want to suspend and ask these witnesses to remain so that we can have our final rounds of questioning?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If they're willing to stay, I'd like to ask my questions.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

I would like to intervene with these witnesses, please.

The Chair:

With that, I'm going to suspend. I'm going to ask the witnesses to leave the room, but to stay nearby, and after we finish with the next witness to come back— [Translation]

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

Mr. Chair, I have some questions for the witnesses, but I will leave it up to you to decide on a good time for me to ask them. [English]

The Chair:

We'll look forward to that, Mr. Fortin.

With that, we'll suspend for a couple of minutes while we bring in our next panel. Thank you.

(1540)

(1540)

The Chair:

Colleagues, I'd ask you to take your seats.

I ask the next set of witnesses to come forward—Mr. Brun, Mr. Cormier, and Monsieur Berthiaume.

I would ask that the cameras leave, please. That's all of the cameras, including the CBC camera. Thank you.

I want to thank you and your colleagues for coming, Mr. Cormier. Apparently you're fairly popular these days.

We have encouraged witnesses to make brief statements, with the emphasis on their being brief, because there is an appetite on the part of members to ask questions. I'm informed of various times by which, I believe, you, Mr. Cormier, have to leave—and what time is that?

Mr. Guy Cormier (President and Chief Executive Officer, Desjardins Group):

We're supposed to leave around 4:30, but maybe we can add—

The Chair:

I'd encourage you to stretch that if you would.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Probably an hour would be okay.

(1545)

The Chair:

Okay. I think we can live with an hour. Possibly your colleagues can stay after you leave.

The issue is that this has been an emergency meeting and people have literally come from all over Canada to hear what you have to say.

With that, I'll ask you to make whatever remarks you have and then we'll turn it over to questions.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Thank you very much. [Translation]

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and members of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security. I'm joined this afternoon by Denis Berthiaume, Senior Executive Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer, and Bernard Brun, Vice-President, Government Relations, Desjardins Group.

First, I want to say that, at Desjardins, we were ambivalent about this exceptional committee meeting.

On the one hand, this meeting may seem premature, since we're in the process of managing this situation and the police investigations are ongoing. It's far too early to assess the situation. As such, we intend to tell you everything that we know, but in a way that won't interfere with the ongoing investigations.

On the other hand, we see this special meeting as an opportunity to inform legislators and the public about the security of personal information and the need to rethink the concept of digital identity in Canada. In my reflection process, this point prevailed.

First, I'll state the obvious. What happened at Desjardins has happened elsewhere and could happen again in any private company or public organization whose mission involves personal information management. We can think of several banks around the world, such as the American bank Chase, Sun Trust, the Korea Credit Bureau, or a number of government entities in Canada and the United States, to name a few, that have been the victims of malicious employees.

Desjardins is a leading financial institution and one of the largest cooperative financial groups in the world, with more than $300 billion in assets. In 2015, Bloomberg ranked the Desjardins Group as the strongest financial institution in North America, ahead of all Canadian banks. In other words, even the best aren't immune, and we believe that this message must be heard.

Personally, I've been working at the Desjardins Group for 27 years. I chose this organization at the start of my career because the financial institution has managed, after nearly 120 years, to successfully combine the economic and social aspects of our society.

The malicious actions of one employee led to this deplorable situation. That employee has now been dismissed. He violated all the rules of our cooperative. In this situation, we acted as quickly as possible and as transparently as possible, with the sole objective of protecting the interests of our members. That was our priority.

On June 20, a few days after learning of the extent of the situation, we went public and shared all the information available, in conjunction with the police forces. At that time, we also announced the measures implemented to address the privacy breach.

We've taken all the necessary measures to address the situation. We quickly implemented additional monitoring and protection measures to protect the personal and financial information of our members and clients. We informed all the relevant authorities, including the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, the Commission d'accès à l'information du Québec, the Autorité des marchés financiers, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, and the Quebec and federal departments of finance.

We've implemented additional measures to confirm the identity of individuals when they contact us. We're constantly monitoring all our members' accounts. The procedures for confirming the identity of our members and clients when they call the Desjardins caisses, Desjardins Business centres and our AccèsD call centre have also been the focus of additional measures.

We contacted the affected members through the AccèsD private messaging system and by personalized letter, to inform them of the situation and of the steps that they needed to take.

We've also added extra measures to help with the activation of the Equifax monitoring package. The affected members can now register in four ways. They can register on the Equifax website, through the AccèsD telephone service, through the AccèsD web and mobile application, and directly in our Desjardins caisses by speaking with their advisor.

We're actively working with the different police forces. Lastly, we're working with external experts to continue to protect our members' personal information.

I can confirm that we acted diligently. After we received information from the Laval police service, we conducted an internal investigation and quickly traced the source of the breach to a single employee. The employee was suspended and then dismissed.

At this time, our main priority is to reassure, assist, support and protect each and every member affected by the situation.

(1550)



Again this morning, we announced new protection measures for all our members. In this digital age, we at Desjardins believe that all our members must be protected.

As I was saying, Desjardins announced this morning that, from now on, all members of our cooperative will be protected from unauthorized financial transactions and identity theft. Membership is automatic and free of charge, regardless of whether they've been affected by the data breach. Since this morning, Desjardins has been protecting all its individual and corporate members. This sets a precedent in the financial services world in Canada. We're the first institution to take this step. In this situation, Desjardins is acting with rigour, a sense of duty and the willingness to honour its special relationship with its members.

We've entered an age where data is a resource on par with water, wood and the raw material needed to run entire sectors of our economy. Data is now the raw material for a whole innovative economy that will lead to tremendous productivity gains and make life easier for Canadians.

Canada is a few months away from the implementation of 5G mobile connectivity, which will increase the flow of data tenfold. According to experts, this ultra-fast connectivity will lead to futuristic applications related to artificial intelligence. Canada is already among the world leaders in this area with its three hubs, Montreal, Toronto and Edmonton. In addition, as we speak, the Department of Finance Canada is in the process of conducting a consultation on open banking, which would help open up the transactional sector. Several European countries have already made the shift.

I'll humbly ask you, the legislators, the following questions.

Is Canada currently well equipped to manage these promising technological developments, which also involve new risks? Should our identification systems be adapted to the digital age to ensure the protection of privacy and to better deal with cybercriminals? This issue is the whole notion of digital identity, which I referred to a few minutes ago.

I want to respectfully point out that these are real issues raised by the situation at Desjardins.

In closing, I want to make a proposal. I'd like to invite the committee to recommend to the Government of Canada the creation of an ad hoc multi-stakeholder working group to advise the government on how to regulate the management of personal data and digital identities. We believe that a group that listens to Canadians' concerns should at least include representatives of governments, the financial services and insurance sector, and the telecommunications sector, along with jurists and experts, or any other group that the government deems it appropriate to involve in the reflection process.

The mandate of this committee should consist of advising the government on legislation and regulations; ensuring the protection of the public; encouraging innovative technological development for the benefit of Canadians and communities; and ensuring the strategic monitoring of best practices around the world, so that Canada is always up to date.

I personally believe that Canada can't pursue excellence in digital technology and artificial intelligence without having the same ambition for data and personal information management. We must all learn from the current situation at the Desjardins Group.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cormier.

Mr. Picard, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Welcome, Mr. Brun, Mr. Cormier and Mr. Berthiaume. Thank you for participating in this exercise. Your presence is greatly appreciated.

Mr. Cormier, I'll start by reassuring you that, last January or even earlier, the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security and the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics began to address issues related to the unique identifier. We looked at models from abroad, including Estonia's model, which raises a number of other issues.

Before I ask you some more practical questions, I want to point out that the unique identifier is one of the cybersecurity issues. When someone gets their hands on the unique identifier, we'll be faced with the same issue.

I'm pleased to hear that you're offering protection to all your members. However, financial institutions tend to charge their clients to protect the clients' data from identity theft. The financial institutions themselves make the offer. Do you have the same philosophy?

To have my salary deposited into my bank account and to make transactions, automatic withdrawals and Interac payments, I must give my name, address and social insurance number to the institution that I'm dealing with. However, I must use a third party to protect this information. Why do I need to rely on someone other than the entity to which I give the information?

(1555)

Mr. Guy Cormier:

To answer the first part of your question, we made the decision this morning to set up a protection program for all our individual and corporate members. The corporate component sometimes isn't covered by other institutions or even by Equifax. We've decided to offer this service free of charge to our members as long as they stay at Desjardins. We won't charge them anything. I want to quickly reiterate that the program covers all unauthorized financial transactions involving a person's account, deposits and money. If a transaction hasn't been authorized, we'll reimburse the person. That's one thing.

Second, if a person is unfortunately a victim of identity theft, we'll provide assistance, not a list of the steps to take. We'll call on our experts to provide assistance, and the experts may even participate in conference calls to help the person recover their identity.

Third, we'll provide coverage of up to $50,000 to reimburse members for expenses that they may have incurred, such as lost wages, child care costs or the cost of obtaining documents.

This concept of free service is extremely important to us. If you're a member of the cooperative, you have access to the program.

We humbly propose that a committee be established to, among other things, address the issue of whether privacy should be managed by third party companies. I think that the status quo isn't an option.

Mr. Michel Picard:

There are two issues involved in what I consider the temporary solution of dealing with a third party. You're asking people to deal with a third party to protect their personal information. Two years ago, this third party was also the victim of hacking. We conducted a study on the matter here.

How liable would you be if your clients' personal information were hacked from the entity that you trust, such as Equifax?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

That's a relevant question. In Canada, Equifax is the firm with a market share of over 70% in data and information protection and management.

When the incident occurred, we decided to turn to the Canadian company that offered this service to Canadians. We worked with the company. However, in the days that followed, we noticed some issues. We quickly took our own steps to resolve the issues concerning member registration on the Equifax website. We went through this. We saw the need to improve the procedures and methods, and we took charge of the matter.

Now, should one, two or three private companies in Canada manage all this? We must think about it.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Identity theft is unique in that the data is active and will always remain on the market, unless the person using it dies. The data is virtually present all over the world. It can be used on the black market after 24 hours, as in cases of debit or credit card fraud.

The identity theft issue isn't about the security of the client's data at their own financial institution. I'm sure that your systems are up to date in terms of protection from external hacking and that you're fulfilling your responsibility to your clients by meeting the expectations of Quebecers and Canadians. If an issue arises in the account, you'll reimburse the criminally misappropriated money.

The identity theft issue is as follows. Let's say that a person goes to a bank tomorrow morning. The person says that his name is Guy Cormier and that he needs a mortgage to purchase a house. The mortgage would be at the other bank and not at Desjardins.

Identity theft causes damage in other areas. One example is the real estate flips in Saint-Lambert, in the South Shore, where people took out fake mortgages under fake identities. There were a baker's dozen, and that was only in Quebec. After that, it will be Canada and Europe. Identity theft has an impact, and it isn't limited to the Desjardins Group financial system.

The protection that you're offering is appreciated and necessary. However, if I may say so, the protection is limited to the client's financial situation within their institution.

(1600)

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Basically, the thought process behind the new measure announced this morning is that we're in the digital age. There will be fewer and fewer paper transactions in the coming years. This data becomes raw material for our economy. Given the importance of the data, at Desjardins, we've taken on the responsibility of offering protection to all our members.

I said that there were three pillars. The first pillar is the financial aspect that you're referring to. If Desjardins members see an unauthorized transaction in their transactions accounts, Desjardins will fully reimburse them. This answers the first part of your question on the financial transactions aspect.

In terms of other types of identity theft involving credit card transactions made elsewhere, such as cellphone purchases or car rentals, people can contact Desjardins and they'll be taken care of. Second, if they need help with recovering their identity, not from a financial perspective, but in relation to other aspects of their private lives, Desjardins will support them. If we need to call government agencies or private firms, or help them prepare notarized documents or a presentation, we'll do so. We're no longer talking about the financial aspect. We'll help the people with the other steps that they may need to take. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Monsieur Picard.[Translation]

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for joining us, Mr. Cormier.

We fully understand that this situation is very emotional and complicated for Desjardins. Mr. Cormier, you said that it was premature to hold a committee meeting. I want to point out to everyone again that the Conservatives requested this meeting, with the NDP's support, to see how the federal government could help Desjardins and the nearly three million affected members.

The objective isn't to investigate the situation or to find out how the data was stolen. The police are in charge of that aspect. For my part, I hope that the individual will be punished to the full extent of the law. I hope that the law is strong enough to send him to prison for a long time, but that's another matter.

We've met with officials from various departments, including the Department of Finance and the Canada Revenue Agency. These are large departments. However, it's difficult to know whether the Government of Canada can be useful in this situation.

I want to know whether you've received effective support from the government. If not, what could the government do to help you?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

There are two or three parts to my response. When this incident occurred, we contacted several federal and provincial government agencies. We spoke with the different departments of finance. I want to tell you that the departments were very helpful and supportive. Bernard Brun can confirm that very clear and open discussions were held.

I've noticed that both the federal and provincial government authorities want to reassure the public. You have no idea how important this is to us. Sometimes, we see what's being written and said. I understand that people have concerns and questions. As MPs, you must hear about many of them from the people in your constituencies.

I can see that the federal and provincial government officials want to reassure people and give them the proper information. This is very helpful to Desjardins. People must be told to contact us so that we can introduce them to the programs that we announced this morning. Whenever we meet with people in our caisses or client contact centres, we're in direct contact with them and we reassure them.

We don't want to trivialize the situation. However, according to several studies and several experts who are currently assisting us, there's a clear difference between a data breach and what happens in a real data theft. This isn't a “one-to-one” case. The proportions are very small.

By adding the protection that we announced this morning, we're telling all our members, including businesses, not to worry. If any issues arise, they should call Desjardins. We'll assist them.

(1605)

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Since the incident, you've offered the affected members a free five-year Equifax membership. Is the new protection announced this morning a lifetime membership, or is it new internal protection?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Exactly. There's new internal protection. As I said, it's the first pillar. If people see an unauthorized transaction posted to their account, they must notify Desjardins. We'll then review the transaction with them and give them a full reimbursement. I must point out that there's no limit, whether the amount is $10,000 or $100,000.

Second, if they're victims of identity theft, they must contact us. We'll assist them and hold conference calls. We even offer a period of psychological support, through our life insurance companies, to people who are going through this highly emotional situation.

Third, it's the new $50,000 protection for people who must incur personal expenses to recover their identity. Desjardins will cover these expenses. This is extremely important.

I want to reiterate that people who are victims of the data breach must continue to actively register for Equifax services, since this gives them access to the alert service. The alert service could notify them of an unauthorized transaction in the following weeks or months, and this service isn't included in the Desjardins package. The Desjardins Group strongly recommends that members who are victims of the breach register for Equifax services.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I'm a Desjardins member, but also a Royal Bank client—

Mr. Guy Cormier: Thank you.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus: The Royal Bank has a system that I didn't know about. I learned about it from an employee last weekend. The Royal Bank site has a link to the TransUnion site. When I click on the link, my credit report and credit rating appear. It's completely free.

Will Desjardins provide a similar service?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

I'll let Mr. Berthiaume answer that. He'll undoubtedly be very happy to do so.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume (Senior Executive Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer, Desjardins Group):

We provide the same type of service with TransUnion. On the web and on mobile devices, you can access your credit rating in real time. With regard to the alert system, I think that we've explained it well. We work with Equifax, but we're also considering the possibility of providing an alert system with TransUnion.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

You've done an extraordinary job of putting all this in place. Congratulations.

I now want to talk about Canadians who are afraid that their data, which has been sent somewhere in the world, will be used to make transactions or for any other purpose. You can't be responsible for everyone. You have a responsibility to your members, and 90% of Quebecers are Desjardins members. However, you can't know whether data sent abroad comes from this particular breach.

In other words, if my stolen data is sent abroad, will you still cover me, even though the data could have been sent from another source?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

The current situation at Desjardins was not our only reason for making this morning's proposal, but we certainly sped up the process. At the beginning of each year, we do some planning. Based on security, our new products and our new offers, we consider what we should offer our members according to their needs.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I'll interrupt you, because I made things unnecessarily complicated. What I meant was that even though a data breach occurred on your side, another organization may be sending my information elsewhere. In this case, wouldn't the government have some level of responsibility? You seem to be taking care of everyone's issues. At some point, shouldn't we suggest that the Government of Canada help all Canadians?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Look, right now, the important thing is to reassure the members and to offer protection to everyone. We won't start determining whether data sent abroad comes from the data breach at Desjardins or from an information leak in another organization. We want to cover and reassure our members.

To answer your question, if fraud occurs in a Desjardins account, we'll cover the member concerned. As is the case with other financial institutions, in the event of attempted fraud, whether the account is a current transactions account, a credit card account or another type of account, we don't hold the members liable.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Cormier, Mr. Brun and Mr. Berthiaume, thank you for being here. You're welcome here. I think that you've fully understood our objective, which is to share information to restore the confidence of people who are extremely worried. You said it well. Like you, we're hearing from these people. This is all the more beneficial to us, since we've just completed a study. We've opened the door for members of the next Parliament with respect to cybersecurity in the financial sector. As such, we're particularly interested in this matter.

Since it hasn't been mentioned yet, I'd say that, as Quebec MPs, we're not here to conduct a witch hunt. Based on the number of activities that we're involved in, we can clearly see that Desjardins is a local partner in the community. We want to work together, and I think that your recommendation today reflects that. Thank you very much.

I want to touch on a few points, in the hope that you can answer some questions. I understand the constraints that you're operating under. The first thing is very simple. It seems silly, but it concerns Equifax's French services. A few people have reported difficulties with obtaining services in French. Have you worked with Equifax to ensure that your members, the vast majority of whom are French-speaking, receive service in French?

(1610)

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Yes. First, we wanted to proceed quickly with Equifax, and I think that was the intent of the process. The people at Equifax have been very helpful. They've even adjusted their service offer to accommodate us in several ways. We've worked very well together.

Now, over time, we've learned about the limits of the French-language capacity at Equifax. As a result, we've introduced a number of additional measures. The president mentioned the four initiatives that have been implemented.

First, people can go online or use their cellphones to register directly for Equifax services. We'll take care of referring them to the services, establishing the link with Equifax and providing the authentication.

Second, people can obtain a French-language service by contacting our AccèsD call centres. Wait times are very reasonable. We act as a bridge, in a way, between our members and Equifax to improve the experience. We've been implementing this approach over the past few days and weeks. We believe that this approach has been successful.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

It's not necessarily specific to what we want to review, and it doesn't fall within the mandate of the committee. However, you'll appreciate that I still wanted to get the facts straight. Thank you.

I want to focus on regulations. We heard a bit about them from the government officials who spoke before you. Are the regulations becoming cumbersome when it comes to achieving your objectives and ensuring the security of your members' data? In your particular situation, you're subject to both Quebec and federal government regulations. Compared to traditional financial institutions and large banks, you're in a somewhat unique situation. You'll forgive me for perhaps not using the correct terminology, but I think that you understand what I mean. Can this different situation cause problems?

Simply put, would it be in our interest to ensure a better alignment between the Quebec government and the federal government requirements, so that you don't need to turn left and right to comply with two different regulatory entities?

Mr. Bernard Brun (Vice-President, Government Relations, Desjardins Group):

Thank you for your question.

It's extremely relevant because we operate in a bijurisdictional system. That said, overall, Desjardins is perfectly comfortable in the current framework. Obviously, with technological exchanges, the interconnectedness within the financial system is becoming more and more apparent. In this regard, we mustn't act in isolation.

Mr. Cormier pointed out earlier that we worked well together. We were able to speak with all the federal and provincial government stakeholders. We strongly encourage them to work together. We can see the collaborative efforts, but we urge the governments themselves to hold discussions.

With regard to the fact that an entity such as the Desjardins Group operates on both sides, I don't see this as an issue. However, we clearly need support in this area. We can feel it and we're focusing on it. This relates to our suggestion regarding the creation of a multi-stakeholder committee with people from different governments. This will enable us to move forward and adopt effective policies that will affect everyone.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

It may be more difficult to answer my next question, as the police investigation is still ongoing.

Given the growing cyber security expertise, especially among people who work in that field, do you think it would be appropriate to recommend ongoing background or behaviour checks for employees who have access to sensitive information and can use the information belonging to other users, other employees?

I am not saying that you have failed in that area, but everyone is starting to recognize the existence of people whose expertise is growing. Their expertise is being used, but it can also have more harmful consequences.

(1615)

Mr. Guy Cormier:

My colleague can talk about our practices, and then I will complement his comments based on my perspective.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

The first thing is that rigorous security investigations are constantly being conducted at Desjardins. Investigations are indeed related to the job level. That is an important element.

Regarding the situation before us, we could wonder whether anything could have been detected. I would like to point out that internal fraud by a malicious employee is the most difficult risk to protect against. That is recognized across industry, and there are many examples of it.

In addition to security investigations, security mechanisms were in place. Obviously, we are talking about a malicious employee who found a way to circumvent all the rules and used a scheme to extract data. That said, I want to reassure you that security mechanisms are in place.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

With time, will we be able to go further in terms of the situation we are going through? As I was saying, in the digital age, people handle personal data not only in financial institutions, but also in all kinds of businesses. Today, when someone wants to enrol their child in daycare, they must provide their social insurance number, and that number can remain on the table for five, 10 or 15 minutes, during the enrolment process. That is the reality in Canada.

I think that any business where employees handle personal information must ensure they have been screened. [English]

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave it there. [Translation]

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Ms. Lapointe, go ahead.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I will share my time.

Gentlemen, thank you very much for being here.

I have been a member of Desjardins since around 1980. Like my colleague was saying, Desjardins is omnipresent. My riding is Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, and it includes Deux-Montagnes, Saint-Eustache, Boisbriand and Rosemère. There is a caisse Desjardins in Deux-Montagnes and one in Thérèse-De Blainville. Those are two major institutions in the region. There are two RCMs and two caisses Desjardins.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

There is Mr. Bélanger.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Yes.

You said that internal fraud is the most difficult type of fraud to detect and protect against. Earlier today, officials from the Department of Finance and the Canada Revenue Agency talked to us.

How do things work internally at Desjardins? How could have supervisors detected that malicious employee? It is clear that he managed to get into the system. Are there access levels and screenshots? Does the system issue alerts when it identifies something unusual? Are your employees allowed to have their cellphone with them when they work with data?

I am sure you will re-evaluate the existing measures. You talked about a lone malicious employee, but what will you do to protect yourselves against other malicious employees? What are your rules? How does it work?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Mr. Berthiaume, can you talk about operations?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Yes.

Regarding operations, I first want to say that no one, when they turn on their computer in the morning, has access to all the data. That is not how things work. At Desjardins, jobs are categorized according to the data required to do the work. That's the first thing.

Moreover, our organization has implemented a number of internal security and control mechanisms, but we do not want to discuss those publicly, as even our employees are unaware of those mechanisms. So I cannot describe them in any great detail.

Concerning this particular situation, a police investigation is under way, and that makes the issue highly sensitive. Quite frankly, we don't want to hinder the ongoing police investigation in any way.

As I just said, we cannot provide details on our security mechanisms, as they are important for helping us prevent this from happening again. The situation involves a single employee, but I can tell you that our security mechanisms detect external or other elements of fraud. I want to reiterate that it is extremely difficult to completely protect against a malicious employee.

(1620)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Will you review your internal rules?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Concerning the security measures, we are constantly evolving. In any given year, Desjardins invests $70 million in security, and data and personal information protection. We are constantly improving in order to adapt to new technologies that create new fraud possibilities. People try to create new schemes, and we are constantly evolving to be able to identify them.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much.

I am glad you talked about the four procedures you have implemented. My parents are seniors and have no Internet. They went to their caisse Desjardins in person to get someone to assist them, and it did not work very well.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

In the early days, Equifax enrolment was a challenge for us.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

People without Internet access cannot sign up for it.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

So we made the decision to provide a service to people without Internet access. As of today, people who want to could still obtain the alert service. That service will be taken over by Desjardins, which will be able to communicate with them afterwards. We have innovated when it comes to Equifax to find a solution for those people.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Cormier, you and I, like Mr. Lapointe, are victims of the leak. I understand perfectly that it is difficult to fully control a malicious employee. It is virtually impossible.

That said, the leak will have various repercussions on Desjardins members. For some, nothing will come of it, while others will be victims of fraud at some point in the future. My constituents have asked me why you are offering the Equifax service free of charge for five years and not for 10, 15 or 20 years.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Mr. Berthiaume, you can answer the question on the five-year period, and then we will come back to the answer from this morning. That is a question we have already been asked.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

First, we wanted to respond quickly by providing five years of protection. As we were unhappy with that protection period, we decided to extend it. The president announced this morning that Desjardins was committing to provide protection for life. We did not settle for a five-year protection period. We have a partnership with Equifax to provide that protection, which is important in two ways.

We are noting a strong increase in the number of Equifax enrolments, but we are not satisfied with that number. Judging from the current trend, we fear that, at the end of the day, only 20% or 25% of our members will sign up for Equifax. That still leaves people without coverage who choose not to use the alert system for their own reasons. However, we do not want to leave 75% or 80% of our members without any protection. We want to provide them with an assistance service in case something happens. That is what led to this morning's announcement. We want to go beyond the Equifax protection and provide our members with umbrella-type coverage.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Yesterday, I experienced something while communicating with Equifax. Its website was down, and I called the company. Finally, between 45 minutes and one hour later, I could sign up.

In eastern Ontario, the Desjardins Group caisses are very popular and very represented in communities. Employees are trained to help seniors who cannot go online to enrol. I am lucky to go online and to check my credit report daily, but what about my grandmother, for instance? Will someone from Desjardins let her know that there has been movement in her credit report?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Yes, that is the new solution we just launched. We will get organized to ensure that people can sign up for Equifax. Then, instead of Equifax contacting the individual by email, Desjardins will liaise between Equifax and the person. We will receive alerts and make sure they are real, and then we will contact the affected members, like your grandmother, in a way that suits them. That is what we are implementing.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

I would like to briefly point out what the key message is. The Desjardins Group quickly decided to be transparent and to provide the information on June 20. When we looked at the data of 2.7 million people, we realized that some people did not have Internet access. There were also estate accounts. Situations arose, and we saw that we had to innovate and find solutions to them. So far, for all those cases, we are collaborating well with the Equifax people. They are helping us find a different solution, including for people like your grandmother.

(1625)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Drouin.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you for being here, gentlemen.

If we're to believe the information that we received, approximately 200,000 Canadians outside of Quebec have been impacted by this particular situation. Do you know about how many in each province were impacted? [Translation]

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

The affected members are primarily in Quebec. There are some affected members in Ontario and very few in other provinces. We are talking about people who no doubt moved to other provinces and are members of Desjardins. That is an important aspect. They are affected Desjardins members.

Clients of State Farm or Patrimoine Aviso, which are our partners, are unaffected. We are talking about only caisse members who may have moved to other provinces or members of our caisses in Ontario. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay.

You mentioned that you purchased State Farm in 2015. You're saying that none of them are impacted.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

They are not impacted at all, no.

Mr. Glen Motz:

In 2017 you created Aviso Wealth. That was the combination of a merged Credential Financial, Qtrade Canada and NEI Investments. Those all merged.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume: That's correct.

Mr. Glen Motz: Were any of those impacted?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Those were not impacted at all outside of the scope of what we talked about—

Mr. Glen Motz:

What about previous Desjardins clients whose accounts were closed? Has any of their data been impacted?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

I'm not sure I—

Mr. Glen Motz:

They used to be clients. Do you still store their data even though they are no longer clients? Was any of that data compromised?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Let me be very, very specific here. It's strictly the members of our caisse network who are impacted. Let's say you were a member a year ago and you closed your account for whatever reason. If you do not receive a letter, you will not be impacted. There is no impact. You haven't been impacted—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Just to be clear, if you do not have an active account with Desjardins, you have not been impacted by this data breach. Is that what I'm hearing you say?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

If you did not receive a letter.... The key is whether you have personally received a letter. If you received a letter, it means you're a member that may be affected and we encourage you to subscribe to Equifax.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It doesn't really answer my question. If I'm hearing you correctly, you have to have an active account with Desjardins to have been impacted by this data breach. Is that a yes or a no?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

The answer is no, because you could be a former member of Desjardins and you closed your account a year ago—

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's what I asked previously.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

—but you may be affected if you receive a letter.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'm not worried about the letter because Canadians don't care about the letter. They want to know, if I am a current member, is it yes or no? The answer is yes. Current or former clients could be impacted.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Yes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

In 2018, Desjardins Ontario merged with about 11 Ontario credit unions, if I remember correctly. Would any of those potential clients be impacted by this data breach?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

We're talking about the Ontario caisses....

Mr. Guy Cormier:

The answer is yes. For the caisses in Ontario, merged or not merged, it's possible that there are some members of these caisses who have been impacted by the breach.

Mr. Glen Motz:

In 2013 the Desjardins Group purchased insurance firms out west, particularly Coast Capital Insurance in B.C., First Insurance in B.C., Craig Insurance in Alberta, and Melfort Agencies and Prestige Insurance in Saskatchewan.

Would any of these clients be impacted by the Desjardins data breach?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

The answer is no.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Could the phones of clients who use Apple Pay or Android Pay as part of their banking practices be compromised by this data breach, and are they at higher risk for any fraudulent texts that could occur as a result of this?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

The data that has been leaked outside includes some phone numbers and some emails. The answer to your question is yes, there may be phishing, but again, that's if they are members of a caisse, not if they're clients. If they're clients of Aviso Wealth or of former insurance operations or of life and health insurance, or they're property and casualty clients, they are not impacted.

(1630)

Mr. Glen Motz:

It's only the financial side.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

It's only caisse members.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'll share my time with Mr.—

The Chair:

You're going to have to share six seconds with him.

We'll go to Mr. Graham for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will continue somewhat along the lines of Mr. Motz's comments. Many of those who have not received a letter are worrying and wondering whether they are affected or not.

Can we say to all those who have not received a letter that they are not affected?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

According to the information we have, only those who receive a letter are affected.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So if someone does not receive a letter, they are not affected. Is that right?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

If they have not received a letter, they are not affected.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

On June 14, we received information from the Laval police force. That information enabled our computer investigative teams to provide us with the figures of 2.7 million individuals and 173,000 businesses. We sent letters to those people.

Despite everything, we are hearing people's concerns. That is why, this morning, we decided to speed up the launch of this protection program for all members, be they affected or not.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That protection is a good thing, but in some of the towns in my riding, Laurentides—Labelle, a number of people don't have Internet access or a cellphone. They are fewer than when I first took office, but there are still some. A number of them have even lost their Desjardins branch. What can those people do?

I have had an account with Equifax for several years. When something changes, I receive an email, but I must go on the website to try to figure out what it is, as it is not clear at all. So for those with an Internet connection, the Equifax-provided information is unclear, and those without a connection have nothing at all.

You talked a bit about this, but could you elaborate further?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

There are two things to consider. First, it is urgent to connect Canadians across the country to the Internet if we want to enter the 21st century. On our end, as some of our members are not connected to the Internet—sometimes by choice, sometimes because they have no access to it—we have proposed an additional solution in partnership with Equifax. Mr. Berthiaume can explain that.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

People who don't go online and don't necessarily have an email address must still be reached. Therefore, we have set up a call centre so they can reach us by telephone. We will undertake to sign them up for the Equifax services.

We have implemented an innovative solution with Equifax, which will enrol them, take care of monitoring and alerts, and then send us the results. At that point, we will contact those without Internet or email access. That is what we implemented today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So Equifax, and not Desjardins, will take care of the technical aspect.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

Yes. Currently, Equifax has the ability to handle alerts. As we were saying earlier, Equifax holds 70% of the Canadian market when it comes to credit bureaus and detection and alert systems. So those are the services we use for this aspect.

Once again, we liaise for people who have more difficulty accessing the Internet or don't have an email address. We reassure people and, in case of alert, we contact them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fine.

In your statement, you talked about changing our digital identity system. What examples would you like us to follow?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Far be it from me to give you the perfect example that should be followed, because there will always be gaps in the perfect solutions that we think we have found. There will always be dishonest people who will try to get around these solutions. However, countries such as Estonia, India and even some European countries have put in place measures regarding unique identifiers or, at the very least, measures to ensure that government-issued cards, whether drivers' licences or health insurance cards, do not become ways of identifying people. The objective of these countries was to restore the primary role of these cards, which have become identification documents over time. Canada should draw inspiration from these countries.

(1635)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Very well.

I have one last question. What did the 2.9 million Desjardins clients who were affected have in common? Do we know why they were affected and not the others?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

On this subject, we have nothing conclusive. We relied on the data provided to us by the police services. We don't have conclusive data on why someone was on the list or not. We don't have that information.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Clarke. [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Mr. Cormier, I would just like to reiterate what my colleague said. The fundamental objective of today's meeting, for us Conservatives, is to determine what the government, its agencies and institutions could do to help you and, in turn, to help Desjardins members, which is the most important thing. They are Canadian and Quebec citizens.

As you know, I have contacted the three directors of the Desjardins branches in my riding to express my support.

Has Canada's Department of Employment and Social Development contacted you to obtain the list of the 2.9 million citizens? This is a very important question.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

The department is in contact with us and collaborates with us. We have been talking directly with its representatives for more than two weeks now, whether it is about social insurance numbers or the situation Desjardins is in.

I do not believe that the information was requested, at least not on an operational level. I don't have that information. I don't know if Mr. Brun or Mr. Berthiaume know more, but I don't think so.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

When you have the answer, could you give it to the analysts or the clerk? It would be important for us to know that. If the request has been made, could you provide a list of these Canadians? We are trying to find out what the government can do, but first it should know who it is talking about. So would you be able to send this list to the Canadian government? Unfortunately, it would still involve sending data, but the recipient would be the government.

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

We will have to see if this is possible. From a legal point of view, I am not sure.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Next, I would like to know if a member of the current cabinet has contacted you since June 20.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

When you talk about the current cabinet, you are talking about the cabinet....

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

I am talking about the federal cabinet. So it would be a minister.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Yes, that's right. I had a discussion with Minister Morneau on the situation. He offered me his support to see how the federal government could support Desjardins in this situation.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Fine.

In your introduction, you mentioned very humbly and respectfully that you had some questions. Personally, I would have liked to know your answers as an expert in your field. I don't remember your first question very well, but it was still interesting. You were wondering if Canada had an adequate system for social insurance numbers, for example. I would like to know your perspective on this.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

The first question was whether Canada is well equipped to manage technological development, which is full of promise, but also involves new risks.

Do we need to adapt our identification systems?

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

I would like to have your answers on both points.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

My two answers are simple: I think the status quo is not an option. The status quo in Canada today is not sufficient in the digital age, in the upcoming 5G era, and in the era of reflection about the world of financial services, including open financial services. On these two issues, I think we should not be satisfied with the status quo.

That is why we humbly propose the creation of a committee composed of several stakeholders, including citizens, governments, businesses—not just financial institutions, but companies that process data—to reflect on these issues and see if, using examples from other countries around the world, we can continue to be leaders.

As I mentioned in the beginning, I think that in artificial intelligence, Canada is taking an important leadership position in the world. At the same time, we must have the same ambition with regard to personal information and data protection. My answer revolves around these points.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

I have a supplementary question, which will probably be the last one. I am addressing Mr. Cormier, the citizen.

You made a very important announcement this morning. You said that the protection applies to all members, whether or not they are affected by this unfortunate event. You said all they have to do is call you and you can take care of them. You will establish contacts, take action and take the necessary steps.

Do you think that's exactly the kind of attitude that the government, the federal state, should have right now towards the 2.9 million Canadian citizens?

Citizens are being asked to contact us, and I think it is the federal government that should contact citizens. Let's say that citizens are communicating with the federal government, shouldn't the federal government have the same approach as you and say that it takes care of everything?

The representative of Employment and Social Development Canada said that, if citizens' social insurance numbers were changed, they would have to call all their former employers. That's not what you're doing. You, incredibly, say you're going to take care of everyone at the last minute.

As a citizen, would you like the federal government to act in the same way towards the affected members?

(1640)

Mr. Guy Cormier:

As a citizen, I would say that elected officials are elected to provide a framework and adopt laws. In the current digital age, regulatory parameters must be put in place to protect citizens in this regard. That's my message, as a citizen.

This is also why, despite the fact that we found this meeting premature, we still made the decision to be present. We feel that this situation is sounding the alarm and that there is an awareness and a real willingness on the part of elected officials to address this issue. We wanted to provide our point of view on this subject. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Clarke.

We'll go to Mr. Dubé for three minutes and then Mr. Fortin for three minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have a question that is somewhat similar to what Mr. Graham was saying about Internet and telephone access. Seniors have special needs.

Are we also looking at that?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

That's what I was saying. Often, seniors do not necessarily have an Internet connection or an email address. We take care of them. These people can call us. We will take charge of the situation from that moment on and act as intermediaries with Equifax regarding the alert system and what these people will receive as a message.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

There is an interesting article in La Presse, in today's issue, if I'm not mistaken. It talks about how credit watch agencies, companies like Equifax, are regulated and that this regulation focuses more on consumer issues.

It may be too much speculation for what you are comfortable talking about today, but given the somewhat symbiotic relationship they have with financial institutions and the breach Equifax has experienced, do you think it would be relevant in the digital age to review how these agencies are regulated?

This has become more important than consumer protection; they now have a responsibility to protect data. We see that there are important consequences.

Should we review this in the context of all these changes you alluded to?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

I told you a few minutes ago: I think the status quo is not an option. That's why we're here today. Desjardins will be very honoured to participate in the discussions, if they are held.

I think we need to bring together the stakeholders who work in the data field in Canada to think about how we want to change the situation. Sometimes it could be about regulation, sometimes it could be about business processes, sometimes it could be about working together. I think the status quo is not an option.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I have one minute left. In closing, I would like to say that we are pleased to have you here. We understand that this is a difficult situation. I appreciate the fact that you understand why we have a duty to do this.

Citizens are calling us. It affects them, they are worried. Our objective is not only to reassure them in this case, but also to ensure that they and other citizens who are clients of other financial institutions do not experience the same thing. You are sharing your experience, which is very useful not only today, but also for the future Parliament. We still want to put in place a roadmap in this rapidly evolving area.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

That is why we accepted the invitation.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Your presence is very much appreciated, thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Fortin, you have three minutes, please.

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Cormier, Mr. Brun and Mr. Berthiaume, I too will begin by congratulating you. I must admit that when I arrived here this morning, I had questions and concerns, which you answered. I think that your statement this morning is very beneficial to Desjardins. I too am affected by what happened at Desjardins, and I appreciate the measures you have taken.

About two or three weeks ago, the Bank of Canada established the Financial Sector Resiliency Group to address IT threats. As far as I know, Desjardins Group has not been invited to join this group. Chartered banks, among others, and systemically important banks were invited.

First, can you confirm that Desjardins Group has not been invited? Then, do you consider it would be appropriate for it to participate in such a working group?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

Mr. Brun, I know you've talked to this group. Can you give us the true story on that?

Mr. Bernard Brun:

Thank you for this very relevant question.

The Bank of Canada obviously has an extremely important role to play in ensuring financial stability. Recently, it announced the creation of a committee to develop supervision and review oversight by discussing matters with all kinds of partners. Naturally, it turned to the big banks and the regulator. We have had discussions with people at the Bank of Canada and we feel that they have an opportunity to explore this.

As already mentioned, the financial system is extremely interconnected. All the players in this sector have issues, regulations and regulators, but they must be able to work together, go beyond that and discuss matters. We certainly have a great interest in participating in all of this. We felt that there was an opening in this direction and we are waiting to see what form this will take.

Desjardins Group is certainly a Canadian and Quebec financial institution of systemic importance. If there are discussions, we should be involved.

(1645)

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

You have the support of the Bloc Québécois on this. I hope my colleagues across the way will follow up on this and propose that the Bank of Canada invite you.

Presently, there are discussions on the establishment of a national identity validation system. Previously, the social insurance number was used in the relationship between the employer and employees and the government. Now we see that it is used in almost every way. It is no longer clear how to behave in this regard, but it is clear that the simple social insurance number is no longer sufficient to ensure a certain level of security for citizens.

In your opinion, would an identity validation system, which would include a PIN, fingerprint or whatever, be useful in a situation like the one you have experienced?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

That is why we humbly submit a recommendation to the committee today.

In Canada, 30, 40 or 50 years ago, we put in place certain mechanisms, which today are no longer used for what they were created for. It is time for industry players to sit down together to rethink all of this, and try to draw inspiration from best practices around the world; this reflection, as I can see very well, has already begun. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Monsieur Fortin.

I want to thank the witnesses for their appearance here. I'm happy to note that your announcement of your package coincided with your appearance here. That's quite fortunate. There are four or five members of this committee who are uniquely vulnerable as members of your association. I'm wondering whether their unique vulnerabilities as public figures is covered by your announcement today.

Mr. Guy Cormier:

All of the information, per the announcement we made this morning, of all of the people who were on the list of the members who have been affected by this leak will be taken care of by this program. With this protection program, if it's their financial activities in their accounts, if it's having access to assistance for recovery of their identity, or if there are problems with some fees they have to pay regarding the recovery of their identity, they will be allowed to go under this program.

The Chair:

I have taken note of that, as you mentioned it earlier. However, what I'm talking about is the unique vulnerability of public officials. If that vulnerability arises, will it be addressed by this particular package?

Mr. Guy Cormier:

This is something that we are looking at right now in our files. Among these 2.7 million people, we are looking right now if there are some more sensitive people. You probably read about policemen, judges, people like officials. This is something that we're looking at right now. Our priority was to send the letters to make contact with the people. Now we're looking what may be other sensitivity that we should be more careful—

The Chair:

So in the initial thrust, not necessarily.

Mr. Guy Cormier: Yes. We will look at it.

The Chair: My question is that we've been doing this for awhile now and one of, if you will, the gold standards of protection is what's called “zero trust”, which was brought up by a previous witness, who said, “identify and protect critical assets. Know where your key data lives; protect it; monitor the protection, and be ready to respond.”

Do you feel that Desjardins adhered to the zero trust principle that seems to be the gold standard for protection of data?

Mr. Denis Berthiaume:

When we say “zero trust”, we need to identify what we are talking about. Zero trust, we have people who have access to data. They need it to actually do their work. With zero trust, clearly we want to make sure that we have security mechanisms in place that aim at the zero trust principle. However, when you put it in practical terms, sometimes there's a difference between the theory and what you can really do practically. The objective is there to make sure that the data given to us by our customers, by our clients, is fully secure. That's our goal.

(1650)

The Chair:

That's the goal.

With that I want to thank you again for your appearance here. We will suspend for a couple of minutes and re-empanel with the officials and finish our questioning with them. Thank you.

(1650)

(1650)

The Chair:

We're reconvened. Thank you to the officials all and sundry for your patience with us. We were in the middle of questioning and I believe it's Mr. Graham up for five minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Ms. Boisjoly, earlier you heard the people from Desjardins talk about the need to rethink the social insurance number system. Is research being done on the future of the social insurance number?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Thank you for your question.

As you know, the social insurance number is one identifier among many. As we have already mentioned, on our website, we are advising citizens that they should only give their social insurance number in very limited circumstances. This is explained to them. We tell them not to give their social insurance numbers to organizations that cannot legally request them. However, from what we hear, citizens often give it voluntarily to organizations that are not authorized to take it.

We are certainly aware of the discussions. We are still looking at what we can do to improve the protection of our systems and practices related to the social insurance number.

We want to hear the recommendations or see the report that this committee will publish, as well as other reports.

I can assure you that work on improving the security of our systems is ongoing. I know that Treasury Board is also very actively working on digital identity projects. We are participating in these discussions to see how we can improve the digital identity of citizens in Canada.

(1655)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Among the data that was taken, we know that there was a lot of information, not just social insurance numbers. There were also addresses, phone numbers, and so on. You have spoken several times about additional information to authenticate the social insurance number. Is all this information included in the data that was taken?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

The social insurance number is an identifier that provides access to federal programs and services, as well as to income and tax systems. In the case involving the federal government, with respect to benefits, for example, my colleague explained that at the Canada Revenue Agency you have to ask an additional, secret question to identify individuals, such as the amount entered on a certain line of the tax return. In the case of employment insurance, participants are given a program access code, and must give two digits of this code in order to access private information related to the employment insurance program.

The social insurance number is an identifier, but it is accompanied by other questions to validate the identity of the person with whom we do business.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are Service Canada officers in every city. If people come to their offices to find out what they need to do about the current situation, what instructions will they be given?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Thank you for your question.

All our call centres, Service Canada offices and agents have received very clear instructions. Our call centres and Service Canada offices answered questions from approximately 1,500 citizens. They have informed them of the steps to take, including contacting a credit bureau, verifying their financial and banking transactions, and exercising extra vigilance with respect to the transactions they make. If they identify activities that are not related to their transactions, they should contact the police, Service Canada offices and the various institutions so that we can resolve the situation. To date, no fraud has been reported.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The leak is recent, however.

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

As I was saying, despite the number of leaks detected in recent years, there are about 60 cases per year requiring a change in the social insurance number.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there a way to indicate somewhere that the social insurance number is no longer valid and then remove the liability associated with it?

If I change my social insurance number and I am still responsible for the old one, in my opinion, it doesn't make sense. Can you tell us more about this?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

One of the reasons is that we do not know to whom citizens have given their social insurance number. The social insurance number should only be used as an identifier to link certain information to provide benefits. Individuals are the only ones who know to whom they have given their social insurance number and for what purpose. You can give your social insurance number for private pensions, insurance and car rentals or purchases, for example.

The social insurance number should not be used to identify the person. This is a number that allows you to link certain files. We need this number to link the information. We now link the two social insurance numbers in our systems, but the first should never again be used by the individual.

(1700)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Clarke, for five minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, everyone.

Thank you for waiting and staying here.

Ms. Boisjoly, you are the assistant deputy minister at the Department of Employment and Social Development Canada. Did your minister instruct you to get the list? I asked the same question of Mr. Cormier. Have you received ministerial instructions to obtain the list of the 2.9 million Canadians affected by the massive data leak at Desjardins?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

You raise an interesting question.

The first thing to do, according to the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, is to inform third parties. As you have heard, Desjardins has contacted us to ensure that we will provide the information and help Desjardins branches obtain as much relevant information as possible to help their members. In this case, we have given a lot of information on how to protect their members.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

So there were no guidelines. In other words, you are reactive. I'm not talking about you, of course. You follow political orders, and we understand that. At the moment, everything is reactive and absolutely nothing is proactive.

You said you received 1,500 requests or calls about the social insurance number. Our goal is to know how the government can help people proactively. Since you don't know which Canadians are affected, you necessarily have to wait for them to contact you. That is what is happening right now. You wait for the people affected to contact you, not the other way around. That's impossible, because you don't have the data. Mr. Cormier, from Desjardins, seemed to say that they would be ready to send this data. I know I'm asking you to give a political opinion, but you can't.

I have to express something that royally disgusts the people in my riding. I went door-to-door a lot last week and the week before that. People have consistently told me that they doubt that the government can do anything. It saddened me very much. How is that possible? I would like to break the cynicism and listen to people. People contribute 50% of their income to the Canadian government. We Conservatives want the government to work for citizens, not the other way around.

Mr. Cormier said that when someone calls Desjardins, they are proactive and take care of things for them.

We learned something very important today. In fact, we already knew that because it had been mentioned here and there. I learned from an official like you that you can change your social insurance number. I know it's complex and that even if we change it, we still have to reach a myriad of institutions, our former employers, and so on. However, it is the government that requires that citizens have a social insurance number. It is a system that should perhaps even be called into question, and we are discussing it today, in a way.

Wouldn't it be your duty to contact the 2.9 million people? The Liberal government should do this to be proactive. It knows these people. For example, at the Pizzeria D'Youville, where I worked in 2004 when I was 17, it was the boss who sent the GST to the federal government. All these things are well known. Your departments could easily link this information and change the social insurance number, perhaps not in a comprehensive way, but it should support the citizen in the very difficult task of reaching all former employers or government agencies.

I really don't like this. I know it's not your fault. You have political directives from the Liberal government, but it is not proactive at the moment. I don't like it at all. What can you say about this?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

In view of the multiple leaks that can occur, the goal is to ensure that citizens and the benefits due to them, whether tax refunds or other benefits, are always protected. That is why we worked very closely with Desjardins to define what measures would enable us to support it in its relations with the affected citizens.

Desjardins has implemented measures. When there were leaks at the federal level, very similar measures were taken with respect to credit bureaus, because it is really the best way to protect citizens from fraud. We continue to work with Desjardins. If an exchange of information proved to be a good solution, we would consider it. However, at this stage, the measures put in place are the best that could have been taken.

(1705)

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Thank you, Ms. Boisjoly. [English]

The Chair:

Are there any questions over here? No.

Mr. Dubé, for three minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to come back to the question I asked, namely whether you want to hold information sessions in major centres in Quebec, among others. I know that people outside Quebec are also affected, but it is in Quebec that the leak had the greatest impact. The population must be informed.

I forgot what it was, but I have already received a letter in the mail regarding a change in federal policy. I would like to believe that it is possible to send letters by mail to the people of Quebec informing them of the schedule of public consultations or information sessions that will take place in the next two months. You are giving us information today and I think people are listening, of course. Nevertheless, we should make sure to reach as many people as possible. Despite the pervasiveness of social media, I am not convinced that this response is adequate.

Is this something you are open to? I believe that the Department of Finance and the Canada Revenue Agency also have a role to play.

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Absolutely.

To be proactive, we have put additional information on our website. We have issued press releases. We used social media, as you said. We hold workshops on the social insurance number in several communities. These are workshops that are given on a regular basis and I won't see why we can't use this method as well.

So, thanks for the recommendation. We will take it into consideration.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Perfect. We thank you for that because these are indeed special circumstances, and when there are natural disasters, for example, the local government—whether it is the municipalities or the Government of Quebec—always answers.

As my colleagues said, and not to insult anyone, the federal government is the furthest away. In this case, there are real impacts on people's lives.

Either way, if we ourselves—I'm just talking about myself right now—don't necessarily know how to navigate the social insurance number system when we are federal legislators, I don't think it's because of our own ignorance. It's just a very complex system. That's why you're here today, and that would be knowledge worth sharing.

Thank you for your openness. This completes my questions.

The Chair:

Fine.

You have two minutes, Mr. Fortin.

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'll start with Ms. Boisjoly.

If we consider that the social insurance number was created in 1964 to govern employer-employee and government-to-government relations, we see that it is used in every way now, but in any case, much more widely than before.

Wouldn't it be necessary to review the security regulations concerning its use? For example, there could be a PIN that matches the health card, fingerprints or other data, for example.

In your opinion, can anything be done with this?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

That is an excellent question.

As I always say, it is important, when you have situations like this, to review and rethink certain things.

As far as the social insurance number is concerned, as I said, it is one of several identifiers. At the federal level—and, of course, in many places— people are invited to add secret questions that only they can answer. It is not a PIN, but it is an additional way to ensure security and identify the right person.

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but the social insurance number is valid, regardless of whether or not we have matching questions.

I am asked for my social insurance number for a transaction, whatever it is, with a bank, or whatever. I don't have a PIN. I just have the number.

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

You are absolutely right. You do not have a PIN.

Is this something we could consider? Maybe. What is important to say is that, to access a service, you must give other identifiers such as the line...

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

It depends on the companies we request services from, but, I agree, you're right.

Wouldn't a penalty be appropriate? We see that retailers or banks frequently ask for social insurance numbers, and this is not always necessary. Shouldn't there be a system of penalties for those who ask for a social insurance number when they don't need it?

(1710)

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

That is an interesting question. I don't know if any predecessors have addressed this issue.

Currently, we have a very clear list of who can do so. We have very clear instructions for citizens. When someone asks them for a social insurance number and they are not on the list of people who should ask them for it, they can seek redress with the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

Couldn't we include criminal provisions in the act for this, whether it be a fine or some other sanction?

Ms. Elise Boisjoly:

Yes, it would be something to check, but I don't have any information on that today.

Mr. Rhéal Fortin:

All right. Fine.

I have one last question if you...

The Chair:

Unfortunately, your time is up, Mr. Fortin.[English]

That ends our questioning.

On behalf of the committee, I want to thank the officials not only for your initial appearance but also for your subsequent appearance and waiting for the other witnesses.

We are going to suspend and then go in camera. We will take a couple of minutes to clear the room.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1330)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Mesdames et messieurs, nous nous efforçons de respecter notre horaire. Nous attendons l’arrivée de nos autres témoins, mais, dans l’intervalle, nous allons entendre le témoignage du représentant de la GRC, le capitaine Mark Flynn.

Vous ferez votre exposé et, si les représentants du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications viennent, nous prendrons des dispositions afin qu'ils s'expriment eux aussi.

Soit dit en passant, la séance est maintenant publique.

En ce qui concerne les personnes qui témoignent devant nous, le véritable problème, c’est que les membres du Comité souhaitent poser des questions. Par conséquent, il est préférable de limiter la durée des exposés.

Et maintenant, je vous prie de faire votre exposé, surintendant Flynn.

Surintendant principal Mark Flynn (directeur général, Criminalité financière et la cybercriminalité, Opérations criminelles de la police fédérale, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Vous serez heureux d’apprendre que je ne ferai pas de déclaration préliminaire, et je crois comprendre que le Comité en a été informé. Je suis ici aujourd’hui simplement pour répondre à toutes les questions que vous pourriez avoir. Comme cet enjeu est, à première vue, lié à une enquête criminelle en cours, il serait toutefois inapproprié que je vous communique des détails relatifs à une enquête, en particulier une enquête qui n’est pas menée par la GRC.

Je suis disposé à répondre à toutes les questions. Je suis ici pour vous apporter toute l'aide que je suis autorisé à vous offrir.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Il est un peu plus difficile de poser des questions sans s’appuyer sur une déclaration préliminaire.

Ma première question est la suivante: si quelqu’un appelle la GRC pour déposer une plainte concernant un vol de données présumé, comment la GRC traite-t-elle cette plainte dès sa réception?

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Cela dépend de l’endroit où le vol présumé a eu lieu. Sur le territoire où nous nous trouvons, ces cas relèvent des services de police. Par conséquent, les services de police provinciaux et municipaux se partagent la responsabilité. La plainte serait transférée à notre processus de réception là-bas, que ce soit notre bureau des télécommunications, la réception du détachement ou une unité d’enquête particulière qui a été désignée à cet effet.

Dans les cas où nous ne sommes pas les policiers compétents, comme en Ontario et au Québec, où nous assumons le rôle d’agents de police fédéraux, nous prenons conscience de ces situations en collaborant avec nos partenaires provinciaux et municipaux. Nous examinons l’information, et nous déterminons si la situation est liée à d’autres enquêtes en cours. De plus, nous offrons aux services de police compétents notre appui s’ils en ont besoin, bien que, dans bon nombre de cas, ces types d’incidents soient très bien gérés. Nos forces de police provinciales et municipales sont fort compétentes et sont en mesure de gérer ces incidents par elles-mêmes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À quel moment un incident devient-il de compétence fédérale? Si un problème relève des provinces, mais touche plusieurs provinces, les services de police provinciaux doivent-ils le gérer séparément? La GRC est-elle en mesure d’intervenir à ce moment-là?

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

La GRC n'intervient pas automatiquement uniquement parce qu'un problème touche plusieurs provinces. Comme avec les crimes traditionnels, qu'il s'agisse d'un réseau de voleurs qui exerce ses activités près de la frontière entre deux provinces ou d'homicides, les corps policiers de ces administrations ont l'habitude de collaborer et ils le font très efficacement.

Lorsqu'un cyberincident survient, s'il aura des répercussions sur un système du gouvernement du Canada ou un exploitant d'infrastructures essentielles, que des facteurs liés à la sécurité nationale doivent être pris en compte ou que l'incident est lié à un groupe important de criminels qui opère à l'échelle nationale et qui fait déjà parti des enjeux prioritaires sur lesquels nous enquêtons, nous donnerons suite à cet incident.

Dans le domaine du cyberespace, nous entretenons des relations et communiquons régulièrement avec la plupart des provinces et des municipalités dotées de cybercapacités dans leurs secteurs d'enquête. Nous savons que bon nombre de ces incidents surviennent dans plusieurs administrations, que ce soit au pays ou à l'étranger. Par conséquent, la coordination et la collaboration sont vraiment importantes.

C'est pourquoi l'Unité nationale de coordination de la lutte contre la cybercriminalité agira comme le service de police national qui contribuera à cette collaboration. Toutefois, avant sa mise en œuvre, l'une des responsabilités de mon équipe au quartier général est de communiquer régulièrement, que ce soit en tenant régulièrement des conférences téléphoniques ou des rencontres officielles au cours desquelles nous discutons de ce qui se passe dans les diverses administrations pour assurer la collaboration et la déconfliction. De plus, de façon ponctuelle, lorsqu'un incident important survient, les employés des nombreux corps policiers communiquent entre eux par téléphone pour déterminer l'intervention appropriée et s'assurer qu'elle n'est pas réalisée en double.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le cas de l'incident dont il est question aujourd'hui, qui est, de toute évidence, un incident majeur, la GRC est-elle tenue au courant de ce qui se passe même s'il ne s'agit pas de son enquête?

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Je tiens à éviter de parler de cette enquête, mais je peux vous dire que les enquêtes de ce genre feront assurément l'objet de discussions. Ces discussions ont lieu en raison des rencontres régulières que nous tenons, que ce soit au sujet des cybercrimes ou d'autres types de crimes qui sont commis dans les différentes administrations. Il est évident qu'un incident de cette ampleur fera l'objet de discussions.

Pour l'instant, je n'ai pris part à aucune de ces discussions. Je ne sais pas s'il y en a.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

D'accord.

Le président:

Monsieur Drouin, bienvenue au Comité.

M. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Flynn, merci d'être venu. Je sais que vous ne ferez pas de commentaires sur l'enquête en cours, mais, en tant que député qui représente beaucoup de membres qui ont été touchés — je l'ai moi-même été —, je m'intéresse surtout aux répercussions possibles de la fraude.

Je sais que beaucoup de Canadiens reçoivent des appels frauduleux de gens qui se font passer pour des agents de l'Agence du revenu du Canada. J'ai moi-même rappelé une personne qui prétendait travailler pour la GRC. Elle voulait obtenir de l'argent pour une personne en particulier. Elle était très exigeante et insistante. Elle m'a donné un numéro où je pouvais rappeler, que j'ai transmis à la police. Est-ce quelque chose que vous conseillez aux Canadiens de faire où, de toute évidence, la GRC ou le service de police local est le premier point de contact?

(1335)

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Absolument. En fait, le Centre antifraude du Canada dispose d'un programme à cet effet et il entretient une relation étroite avec les fournisseurs de services de télécommunications, qui ont beaucoup aidé à résoudre certains des problèmes entourant le télémarketing et les fraudes massives commises au téléphone. Lorsque nous découvrons et que nous validons les numéros utilisés pour commettre des fraudes, l'industrie des télécommunications bloque ces numéros pour réduire la victimisation. Nous avons adapté certaines de nos pratiques pour faire en sorte que cela se produise beaucoup plus rapidement qu'autrefois.

M. Francis Drouin:

Selon votre expérience et ce qu'on a appris des cas de fraude, nous savons que certains fraudeurs ont peut-être mon numéro d'assurance sociale. Ils ont peut-être mon adresse de courriel ainsi que mon adresse municipale. Ils pourraient prétendre de façon très convaincante être un représentant du gouvernement ou d'une quelconque institution financière. À votre avis, quel est le meilleur moyen pour que les Canadiens se protègent?

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Dans toutes les campagnes de fraude massive, que ce soit un cas comme celui-ci ou en général, les gens doivent faire preuve d'un grand scepticisme et prendre des mesures pour se protéger. Le gouvernement du Canada offre de nombreuses ressources, comme le Centre antifraude du Canada et Pensez cybersécurité, qui fournissent une liste de conseils pour les Canadiens. Essentiellement, il faut protéger ses renseignements et émettre des doutes raisonnables quand quelqu'un nous appelle. Si une banque nous appelle, il faut composer le numéro de la succursale locale. Il ne faut pas répondre au numéro qu'on a fourni ni rappeler immédiatement à ce numéro. Il faut passer par des sources fiables pour valider les questions qu'on pose.

J'ai déjà reçu des appels semblables au vôtre. J'ai reçu un appel très convaincant de ma propre banque. J'ai communiqué avec cette dernière, qui m'a indiqué que l'appel était frauduleux. C'était intéressant parce que, au bout du compte, l'appel était réel, mais nous nous sommes tous sentis très en sécurité parce que nous avions pris les mesures appropriées. Je préfère risquer de ne pas obtenir un service plutôt que de compromettre mon identité ou mes renseignements financiers.

M. Francis Drouin:

Bien, parfait.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous disposez de sept minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Flynn. Je reviendrai à vous dans quelques instants.

Le chef du Parti conservateur du Canada, Andrew Scheer, m'a demandé d'appeler nos collègues afin d'organiser cette réunion, et j'aimerais lire quelques paragraphes d'une lettre ouverte qu'il a envoyée aux médias le 12 juillet: Comme la grande majorité des Québécois et de tous les Canadiens, je suis préoccupé par la sécurité des technologies de l'information, le vol d'identité et la protection des renseignements et informations personnels. La situation est très sérieuse et je comprends l'inquiétude et l'angoisse des victimes qui craignent les effets futurs de tels vols d'information personnelles, incluant les numéros d'assurance sociale, et qui doivent y consacrer temps et énergie pour y remédier. Il est rassurant de voir que les dirigeants du Mouvement Desjardins prennent la situation au sérieux en déployant beaucoup d'énergie à protéger et rassurer leurs membres. Le gouvernement fédéral a également la responsabilité et le devoir de soutenir toutes les victimes affectés par les vols d'identités, en travaillant avec tous les acteurs du secteur pour tirer des leçons et améliorer la sécurité informatique. [...] Je veux dire aux victimes de vol d'informations, ainsi qu'à tous les Canadiens, de notre solidarité et de la volonté d'un futur gouvernement conservateur de s'attaquer aux défis de la protection des renseignements et données personnelles des Canadiens. [Traduction]

Le président:

Eh bien, nous remercions M. Scheer pour ce merveilleux message. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Nous tenons à démontrer l'importance que nous accordons à ce dossier. C'est pourquoi il est important pour nous d'être ici en cette belle journée ensoleillée du 15 juillet 2019.

Monsieur Flynn, vous avez répondu à mes collègues libéraux, mais je trouve un peu faible la réponse de la GRC concernant une telle situation. Je m'explique. Il y a 2,9 millions de Canadiens, dont 2,5 millions de Québécois et quelque 300 000 Canadiens de l'Ontario et d'ailleurs au pays, qui ont un compte auprès du Mouvement Desjardins, et ces gens sont très inquiets. Nos bureaux sont constamment interpellés depuis trois semaines et on n'a pas eu de réponse du gouvernement. C'est pourquoi nous tenons cette réunion d'urgence aujourd'hui afin de déterminer ce que peuvent faire les ministères fédéraux pour aider les Canadiens.

Vous nous dites que la GRC n'est pas vraiment impliquée, mais avec son agence de cybersécurité, ses liens avec des organisations comme INTERPOL et tous les autres moyens à sa disposition, n'est-elle pas en mesure d'intervenir? Nous ne voulons pas nous immiscer dans l'enquête policière, mais nous avons appris que des données auraient été vendues à l'étranger. Alors, n'y a-t-il pas des moyens technologiques ou techniques pouvant permettre à la GRC d'intercepter d'éventuelles fraudes?

(1340)

[Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Comme je l'ai expliqué tout à l'heure, dans bon nombre des situations de ce genre, le rôle de la GRC est de collaborer avec ses partenaires provinciaux et municipaux. Il est important de reconnaître que nos partenaires provinciaux et municipaux sont très habiles pour intervenir dans beaucoup de ces incidents. Il n'est pas toujours vrai que la GRC dispose de pouvoirs, d'autorisations ou de capacités supérieurs à ceux que nos partenaires ont pour faire face à un incident unique en son genre, où une personne est impliquée dans un événement unique, contrairement à un événement plus vaste.

Toutefois, si les partenaires provinciaux et municipaux de la GRC ont besoin d'assistance technique ou de conseils, cette dernière est toujours prête à les lui offrir. Il serait inapproprié que la GRC s'immisce dans la compétence d'un autre corps policier pour diriger l'enquête qu'il mène. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je comprends ce que vous nous dites au sujet de l'enquête qui est probablement menée par la Sûreté du Québec. Cependant, ce que les conservateurs et le NPD veulent savoir, c'est ce que peut faire la GRC en ce qui concerne les données de 2,9 millions de personnes qui ont été transmises à des criminels. Je ne veux pas parler de l'enquête, je veux savoir si vous avez des ressources. Si ce n'est pas le cas, nous voulons le savoir. C'est pour cela que nous sommes ici aujourd'hui. Si des données ont été vendues à l'étranger, ce n'est pas la Sûreté du Québec ni la police de Laval qui va s'en occuper. Je crois que cela relève de la GRC. [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Au-delà de l'enquête, je peux dire que, dans la plupart des cas, les cybercriminels commettent leurs crimes pour avoir accès à des renseignements personnels ou financiers dans le but de mettre la main sur l'argent que détiennent les institutions financières. La GRC travaille constamment en étroite collaboration avec la communauté internationale pour trouver et poursuivre les personnes qui commettent une bonne partie de ces crimes.

En collaboration avec ses partenaires étrangers, de nombreuses grandes institutions financières du Canada et l'Association des banquiers canadiens, la GRC cible les personnes qui causent les dommages les plus importants. L'équipe du Programme de prévention et de mobilisation de la Police fédérale a organisé des rencontres avec les institutions financières et les intervenants du secteur de la cybersécurité. Nous avons un nouveau comité consultatif qui nous aide à cibler ces personnes.

Le savoir est entre les mains des institutions financières et des organismes de cybersécurité. Nous consacrons nos ressources d'enquête à cibler les personnes qui causent le plus de dommages.

Nous collaborons aussi avec les autres pays. Quand des cas se produisent, nous nous entretenons avec les forces de l'ordre des autres pays. Nous signalons les comportements que nous avons constatés dans nos dossiers ou dans ceux de nos partenaires canadiens. Si des liens peuvent être faits, ou si des personnes recherchées sont dans un de ces pays, nous invoquons le traité d'entraide juridique et nous collaborons entre services de police dans le but de concentrer tous les efforts internationaux vers un problème commun.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, je ne peux pas parler de ce cas en particulier, et je m'en excuse. Je ne peux pas dire ce qui est fait et ce qui n'est pas fait dans ce cas-ci. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Depuis qu’on est au fait de ce problème, est-ce qu’une cellule spéciale a été mise sur pied à la GRC pour aider à le résoudre? [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Je ne peux pas parler de ce cas. Ce serait inapproprié.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Paul-Hus.[Français]

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie M. Flynn d’être ici aujourd’hui.

Il est important de parler de cette situation, car les gens sont inquiets, comme mon collègue vient de le mentionner. Il est essentiel d'obtenir plus d’information sur les capacités du fédéral et les moyens dont nous disposons pour traiter cette question, d'autant plus que ce comité vient de terminer, juste avant la levée des travaux en juin, une étude sur la cybersécurité dans le secteur financier. Je reviendrai sur certains éléments auxquels nous avions touché et qui sont pertinents dans le cas qui nous concerne aujourd’hui.

J’aimerais revenir sur quelques éléments que vous avez mentionnés dans vos réponses. Tout d'abord, il y a des rumeurs selon lesquelles des données auraient été vendues à des organisations criminelles au-delà des frontières du Québec et du Canada. Je ne vais pas parler de ce cas précis, puisque vous ne pouvez pas le commenter, mais à quel moment la GRC s’active-t-elle pour venir en aide aux instances très compétentes comme la Sûreté du Québec quand il s’agit d’une organisation criminelle qu’elle surveille déjà et qui opère à l’étranger?

(1345)

[Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Nous avons régulièrement des rencontres officielles avec les autres services de police du pays. Dans le domaine de la cybercriminalité, ces rencontres ont lieu une fois par mois. Dans d'autres domaines, elles ont lieu toutes les deux semaines. Quoi qu'il en soit, lorsqu'un cas comme celui-ci se produit, des appels sont immédiatement faits, comme vous le décrivez, pour que la collaboration fonctionne et que les renseignements pertinents que détiennent nos partenaires étrangers puissent servir aux enquêtes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

En parlant des pouvoirs et des capacités de la police municipale, de la Sûreté du Québec et de la police provinciale de l'Ontario, vous avez dit qu'elles avaient des compétences importantes en matière de cybersécurité. Est-ce que la GRC détient une certaine expertise unique ou des informations qui pourraient leur être utiles?

Je pose la question parce que c'est que le gouvernement s'est vanté de la consolidation des compétences du CST, de la GRC et de toutes les agences qui œuvrent dans le domaine de la cybersécurité en nous disant qu'il voulait assurer une mise en commun de l'information afin que tout le monde soit sur la même longueur d'onde. D'ailleurs, j'y reviendrai quand ce sera le tour de M. Boucher, du Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité.

Est-ce que vous fonctionnez de la même façon avec la police municipale ou provinciale, le cas échéant? [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Oui, c'est ce que nous faisons. Comme je l'ai dit, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les services de police provinciaux et municipaux. En fait, je peux vous dire — et j'en suis très fier — que pendant certaines de ces rencontres, où l'équipe du Programme de prévention et de mobilisation de la Police fédérale avait réuni des intervenants du secteur privé, du secteur de la cybersécurité et des institutions financières, quelqu'un dans la salle a tenu à prendre la parole pour remercier la GRC de cette collaboration dans le domaine de la cybersécurité, qui était beaucoup mieux que cette personne n’avait jamais pu constater dans sa carrière.

J'en suis très fier parce que la collaboration et le soutien entre les forces de l'ordre, et non la concurrence, c'est une priorité pour mon équipe, mes employés et moi-même. Nous ne nous substituons pas aux autres services de police, nous cherchons à les aider. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci. Je ne veux pas vous couper la parole, mais le temps file.

Dans le cadre de notre étude sur la cybersécurité dans le monde financier, nous avons parlé du fait qu'on a tendance à se faire une image des acteurs étatiques. Sans les nommer, je suis certain que tout le monde a une idée des différents pays qui pourraient porter atteinte à la cybersécurité au Canada.

Je comprends que vous ne pouvez pas en parler, mais dans le cas qui nous concerne, on parle d’un individu. Il pose néanmoins une menace, car les données en question peuvent être vendues et se retrouver entre les mains d'acteurs étatiques. Une des choses que nous avons entendues, c'est que les individus posent la plus grande menace. Est-ce que c’est toujours le cas? Est-ce qu’un criminel qui voudrait procéder à un vol de données pose une plus grande menace que certains pays qu'on pourrait soupçonner?

(1350)

[Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

L'origine de la menace est multiple. Je ne peux pas dire laquelle des origines possibles est la pire parce que, selon mon expérience, il y a un nombre considérable de groupes organisés et de personnes qui commettent des crimes sur Internet. Internet est tout aussi bien un catalyseur qu'un outil permettant d'utiliser et de mettre à profit les extraordinaires services qui nous sont offerts. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je vais vous interrompre parce que mon temps de parole tire à sa fin.

La présence de groupes organisés ou de pays avec de mauvaises intentions et qui voudraient acheter les renseignements a-t-elle créé une espèce de marché? Y a-t-il un mauvais incitatif, mais néanmoins un incitatif, pour un individu comme l'individu allégué en question, de voler des renseignements pour ensuite les vendre à des groupes intéressés? La présence de tels groupes incite-t-elle des individus ayant une expertise en la matière à poser des gestes qu'ils ne poseraient pas normalement? [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Oui, tout à fait. Il y a des services de cybercriminalité qui aident d'autres acteurs moins compétents à commettre des crimes sur Internet, qu'il s'agisse de créer des logiciels malveillants, de faire fonctionner les infrastructures ou de créer les mécanismes par lesquels quelqu'un peut vendre de l'information volée. C'est l'une des cibles visées par la GRC dans le cadre de son mandat fédéral. Elle cible les principaux services qui facilitent les crimes afin de s'attaquer plus efficacement aux crimes commis au lieu de pourchasser individuellement les criminels. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je vous remercie encore d'avoir pris le temps de nous rencontrer aujourd'hui. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Dubé.

M. André Boucher, du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, vient de se joindre à nous. Je lui donne la parole pour qu'il puisse faire sa déclaration préliminaire.

Je vais redire ce que j'ai déjà dit au surintendant Flynn, c'est-à-dire que les déclarations courtes valent mieux que les longues, car les participants ont plus de temps pour poser des questions.

Monsieur Fortin, je vois que vous voulez... [Français]

M. Rhéal Fortin (Rivière-du-Nord, BQ):

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président, j'aimerais m'adresser aux témoins. Je ne sais pas si c'est prévu dans votre ordre du jour. Si oui, j'aimerais avoir quelques instants. [Traduction]

Le président:

Non, ce n'est pas prévu. Je regrette, mais vous ne pourrez pas vous adresser aux témoins. [Français]

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Non? [Traduction]

Le président:

Non, pas maintenant. Nous en sommes encore au premier groupe.

Monsieur Boucher, comme je le disais, plus ce sera court, mieux ce sera. Je vous remercie. [Français]

M. André Boucher (sous-ministre adjoint, Opérations, Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité, Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications):

Merci, monsieur le président. Comme vous l'avez demandé, ma présentation sera plutôt courte.

Monsieur le président et distingués membres du Comité, je m'appelle André Boucher. Je suis sous-ministre délégué des opérations au Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité.

Tout d'abord, je vous remercie d'avoir accepté de nous recevoir et d'entendre mon témoignage cet après-midi.

En guise de préambule, permettez-moi de vous présenter brièvement l'organisme que je représente.

Le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité a été institué le 1er octobre 2018 et relève du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. À titre d'autorité canadienne en matière de cybersécurité, l'organisme dirige les interventions du gouvernement suivant des événements liés à la cybersécurité.

Notre équipe nationale d'intervention travaille étroitement avec les ministères, les propriétaires et les exploitants d'infrastructures essentielles, les entreprises canadiennes et les partenaires internationaux pour intervenir en cas d'incidents de cybersécurité ou pour atténuer les conséquences qui découlent de ces incidents. Ce faisant, nous offrons des conseils et du soutien d'expert et coordonnons les communications d'information ainsi que les interventions en cas d'incident.

Les partenariats que le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité établit avec les intervenants de l'industrie représentent un élément clé de notre mission. Nous avons pour objectif de promouvoir l'intégration de la cyberdéfense dans le modèle d'affaires de nos partenaires de l'industrie, ce qui aura pour effet d'accroître le niveau global de résilience du Canada à l'égard des cybermenaces. Or, malgré les efforts que l'industrie et le Centre ont à déployer, force est de constater que des cyberincidents ont tout de même lieu.

Cela m'amène à aborder le sujet dont j'aimerais vous entretenir cet après-midi. Il convient tout d'abord d'indiquer que le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité n'est en mesure de fournir aucun détail concernant l'incident en question et qu'il n'émettra aucun commentaire quant aux pratiques de cybersécurité d'une entreprise particulière ou d'un individu. Au reste, toute forme d'atteinte à la cybersécurité peut être vue comme une occasion de réévaluer ses propres pratiques et de renforcer les systèmes, les processus ainsi que les mesures de protection.

Dans le cas présent, les articles de médias et les déclarations publiques indiquent qu'une divulgation de renseignements personnels a eu lieu suivant des actes commis par un individu œuvrant pour l'entreprise en cause, ce que l'on appelle communément une menace interne.[Traduction]

Dans sa récente publication intitulée Introduction à l'environnement de cybermenaces, le Centre pour la cybersécurité décrit la menace interne comme étant ces individus qui travaillent dans un organisme, mais que l'on considère comme particulièrement dangereux, puisqu'ils ont accès à des réseaux internes qui sont protégés par des périmètres de sécurité. Pour tout intervenant malintentionné, l'accès est l'élément déterminant. Comme ils jouissent d'un accès privilégié aux données protégées par l'organisme qui les emploie, les auteurs de menace internes ne sont pas contraints de recourir aux méthodes que l'on doit normalement appliquer à distance, ce qui leur permet de collecter assez aisément de précieux renseignements. De fait, cet incident nous rappelle l'importance du facteur humain en matière de cybersécurité. Or, les menaces internes ne sont qu'un exemple de ce type de problème.

Les cybercriminels ont été particulièrement ingénieux lorsqu'il s'est agi d'exploiter le comportement humain à des fins de piratage psychologique et d'inciter les personnes à divulguer, bien qu'à leur insu, des renseignements sensibles. La sécurité de nos systèmes dépend essentiellement de la fiabilité des humains, c'est-à-dire les utilisateurs, les administrateurs et les équipes responsables de la sécurité.

Il convient donc de nous demander ce que nous pouvons faire dans un environnement où les cybermenaces se multiplient. Sur le plan de l'entreprise, il est capital d'adopter une approche globale qui se caractérise d'abord par la promotion d'une culture de sécurité et par la mise en place des politiques, des procédures et des pratiques nécessaires en matière de cybersécurité. Nous disposerons ainsi d'un plan d'intervention en cas de problèmes; et nous savons que des problèmes, il y en aura toujours.

Il faut investir pour que les personnes détiennent les moyens d'agir. La formation et la sensibilisation des personnes et des entreprises s'avèrent essentielles. Ce n'est que par la sensibilisation que nous pourrons continuer de développer et d'inculquer de bonnes pratiques de sécurité, une mesure essentielle pour protéger les systèmes informatiques du Canada.

Il faut également déterminer et protéger les actifs essentiels. Il importe de savoir où se trouvent les données clés. Assurez-vous donc de leur protection et surveillez les mesures de protection prises. Soyez prêts à intervenir.

Au Centre pour la cybersécurité, nous continuerons à travailler avec les intervenants de l'industrie ainsi qu'à fournir des conseils et des avis en matière de cybersécurité par l'intermédiaire de notre site Web. En l'occurrence, nous publions des alertes et des avis lorsque des cybermenaces, des vulnérabilités ou des incidents possibles, imminents ou réels touchent ou pourraient toucher les infrastructures essentielles du Canada.

Quoi qu'il advienne, il conviendra de poursuivre le dialogue que nous tenons présentement, de redoubler de vigilance et de porter une attention particulière aux enjeux de cybersécurité.

En dernière analyse, on constate qu'il n'existe aucun remède miracle lorsqu'il est question de cybersécurité. Il nous est donc interdit de baisser la garde. Les enjeux sont beaucoup trop importants. Certes, les prochaines avancées technologiques pourraient très bien nous faciliter la tâche, mais il n'en demeure pas moins que nous devrons toujours pouvoir compter sur un effectif compétent et fiable.

Je vous remercie, et je suis maintenant disposé à répondre à vos questions.

(1355)

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Boucher.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Picard, qui dispose de sept minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

En guise de préambule, je rappelle que l'incident dont nous parlons aujourd'hui s'inscrit tout à fait dans l'étude que nous faisons depuis le mois de janvier sur la cybersécurité et les crimes financiers.

J'ai déposé une motion pour que nous fassions une étude sur ce sujet, tel que suggéré par mes collègues libéraux. Cela démontre notre grande préoccupation au sujet de la cybersécurité dans les institutions financières. Je me réjouis que M. Scheer ait salué les efforts que nous avons faits dans le cadre de cette étude. Finalement, il est tout à fait d'accord sur mon initiative et je suis content qu'on contribue aux efforts du Parti libéral pour traiter des préoccupations liées à cybersécurité dans les institutions financières. Alors, merci.

Monsieur Flynn, je pense qu'il est important de s'adresser au public maintenant et de gérer ses attentes dans une situation aussi grave qu'un vol d'identité.

On souhaite que la police intervienne dans l'enquête criminelle. Pour la plupart, les gens veulent qu'on remédie à la perte de leurs données et que leur identité soit restaurée, sans crainte qu'on l'usurpe à nouveau dans 5, 10 ou 15 ans. Quelles sont les attentes du public relativement aux résultats de l'enquête criminelle? [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Du point de vue des services de police, je crois que les gens s'attendent à ce qu'ils trouvent l'auteur du vol ou de la monétisation des données ainsi que tous ceux qui y ont participé de quelque façon, que ce soit par l'intermédiaire de cybermenaces, de cybercompromissions, de menaces internes, et j'en passe. Ils s'attendent à ce que ces personnes répondent de leurs actes devant la justice, à ce qu'il y ait des conséquences, puis à ce que l'on prenne des mesures pour éviter que de tels incidents se reproduisent. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

Les gens ont beaucoup de mal à comprendre jusqu'à quel point c'est difficile de prouver qu'on est bien la personne qu'on prétend être. De quelle façon peut-on prouver sa propre identité? Ce sera un grand défi lorsque trois personnes se présenteront avec le même nom et le même numéro d'assurance sociale éventuellement.

(1400)

[Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

En tant qu'agent de police, la confirmation de l'identité n'est pas mon domaine de compétence. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, je me tournerais vers les ressources locales, qu'il s'agisse d'institutions financières ou d'autres types de services. Si vous pouvez utiliser un service local pour confirmer votre identité, c'est la meilleure façon de gérer les demandes des entreprises à cet effet. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

Dans une certaine mesure, l’enquête criminelle va rendre justice. Si on met la main au collet des criminels à la suite du dépôt de la preuve, on les poursuivra en justice et il y aura une conséquence judiciaire, essentiellement leur emprisonnement.

Cela dit, la donnée sur le marché représente un actif virtuel et ne se trouve pas dans un endroit physique donné; elle peut être à plusieurs endroits. Je ne veux pas alarmer les gens, mais il est important qu'ils réalisent que, bien qu’on ait arrêté les criminels, cela ne veut pas dire nécessairement que la donnée a été éliminée et que l'identité a été restaurée. [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

C'est exact. Il est important de souligner que les poursuites ne sont pas forcément le seul indicateur de réussite. En fait, dans le milieu du cyber, beaucoup de poursuites peuvent, au fil de nos collaborations, relever d'autres compétences.

Une des approches adoptées par la GRC, tout comme d'autres corps policiers d'ailleurs, est d'inclure des institutions financières et des experts en cybersécurité dans nos enquêtes criminelles, ce qui ne correspond pas à la façon dont nous procédons habituellement. Toutefois, nous en constatons déjà les résultats, puisque nous en tirons des avantages importants. Ces « partenaires », comme je les appelle, repèrent des renseignements qui ne paraissent pas forcément importants aux policiers. Sans leur aide, nous ne pourrions peut-être pas savoir que ces renseignements peuvent servir à protéger leurs clients. Je connais au moins un exemple dans le cadre d'une enquête majeure en cours où, grâce à une telle collaboration, plusieurs institutions financières ont pu repérer des comptes compromis et en atténuer les vulnérabilités.

Je crois donc que l'approche que nous avons adoptée engendre des avantages qui ne se quantifient pas seulement en arrestations et en poursuites. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

Monsieur Boucher, vous avez une approche-conseil auprès des organismes. Comment une entreprise peut-elle se protéger de ses propres employés? Quels conseils peut-on lui donner à cette fin?

Comme on l’a vu cet hiver, il n'y a aucune raison de croire que les banques, les institutions financières et les entreprises de services financiers ne profitent pas de la meilleure technologie possible pour protéger leurs données des menaces extérieures. Ce qui nous préoccupe, ce sont les menaces qui viennent de l'intérieur. À mon avis, il n’y a pas de logiciel qui aide à contrer ce genre de risque. Quelle approche conseil avez-vous auprès des organismes pour couvrir le risque humain de fraude?

M. André Boucher:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Cela revient à mes commentaires d'ouverture. Il existe quelques outils, mais ce qui est le plus efficace, c'est de retourner aux principes de base et d’avoir une approche holistique et large en matière de sécurité.

Il faut d'abord avoir un programme de sécurité bien établi relativement au personnel à l'interne, bien comprendre où sont les choses qu’on veut protéger, connaître les individus avec qui on s’associe et avoir un programme toujours renouvelé. Ce n’est pas parce qu’on rencontre quelqu’un une fois dans une entrevue que sa situation de vie ne va pas changer. On renouvelle périodiquement ces conversations. Pour les individus, il y a un programme clair d’entraînement, de formation et de rafraîchissement des connaissances, lequel est soutenu par des processus clairs.

Les équipes de technologie de l’information ont accès à certains outils de prévention de la perte de données, notamment, qui peuvent contribuer à la détection d'une fraude. Cependant, par le temps qu'on détecte une fraude, il est souvent trop tard. Il est donc important d’investir le plus tôt possible dans l'édification d'une confiance et de s’entourer de gens fiables. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Picard.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins de s'être déplacés.

Monsieur Boucher, vous avez déclaré dans vos commentaires d'ouverture que le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité est l'autorité nationale en matière de cybersécurité et dirige la réponse du gouvernement en cas d'incident lié à la sécurité informatique, ce qui a attiré mon attention: Notre équipe nationale d'intervention travaille étroitement avec les ministères, les propriétaires et les exploitants d'infrastructures essentielles, les entreprises canadiennes et les partenaires internationaux pour intervenir en cas d'incidents de cybersécurité ou pour atténuer les conséquences qui découlent de ces incidents.

C'est fantastique. Et cela m'amène aussi à vous poser la question suivante: quelles sont les normes ou mesures appliquées à l'heure actuelle? Pour nous, le système bancaire canadien est une infrastructure essentielle de notre pays. Quelles sont les normes appliquées actuellement pour veiller à ce que ces attentes soient respectées? Y a-t-il des incitatifs? Y a-t-il des pénalités? Y a-t-il quoi que ce soit qui assure une approche uniforme au sein de ce secteur pour veiller à la sécurité des Canadiens? Nous sommes là pour servir les Canadiens. Je serais curieux de savoir s'il y a des exigences opérationnelles de base auxquelles tous les acteurs du secteur doivent se plier. S'il n'y en a pas, pouvez-vous me dire pourquoi? Et comment pouvons-nous en établir?

(1405)

M. André Boucher:

Je vous remercie pour votre question. Sa portée est très large. Je crois que, cet après-midi, vous entendrez des experts de ce secteur précis des institutions financières.

Je vous dirais que, du point de vue de la cybersécurité, le secteur financier est fort développé, puisqu'il comprend tant des organismes de réglementation que des pratiques exemplaires bien établis. En tant qu'experts de la cybersécurité, nous déployons des efforts considérables pour qu'une telle collaboration s'inscrive dans ces pratiques exemplaires. Nous laissons les organismes de réglementation du secteur établir les normes et lignes directrices de base, les revoir et assurer leur application. En fait, nous misons sur ce que chacun a de mieux à offrir et en tirons le maximum dans des secteurs en entier. Dans le cas présent, il s'agit du secteur financier. C'est l'un des secteurs très développés où la collaboration va de soi. C'est un secteur qui accorde sa véritable valeur aux risques pour la réputation. Des investissements majeurs sont faits à cet égard.

Sur le plan national, je crois que la présence de normes de base et d'organismes de réglementation qui veillent à leur application, sans compter des équipes qui s'emploient à aider les entreprises à offrir le meilleur rendement possible, est fort rassurante.

M. Glen Motz:

Environ 2,9 millions de particuliers et d'entreprises au Canada sont touchés par cet incident, mais des millions d'autres au pays ont aussi été victimes d'un vol d'identité ou de renseignements relatifs à leur carte de crédit. Le fait d'apprendre que notre secteur bancaire est bien développé ne suffira peut-être pas à les réconforter, puisqu'ils continuent de subir les répercussions de ce méfait. Je serais curieux de savoir si nous sommes aussi énergiques que nous pourrions ou devrions l'être quant à la sécurité des institutions financières et des personnes qui leur accordent leur confiance.

M. André Boucher:

Je vous assure que nous mettons énergiquement à profit toutes les mesures à notre disposition, qu'il s'agisse de pratiques exemplaires en matière de collaboration ou de mesures en place.

La triste réalité, comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, c'est que nous devons malheureusement tous vivre avec la perte de données et le fait que nous ne pourrons jamais les récupérer. Contrairement à un actif tangible, il n'est pas possible d'aller les chercher pour les ramener à la maison. C'est une nouvelle réalité, tant pour les clients que les entreprises.

Comme je l'ai souligné un peu plus tôt, cela vient confirmer toute l'importance d'investir tôt, tant dans l'acquisition de programmes que dans le recrutement mieux avisé des employés et l'adoption d'une approche globale en matière de sécurité afin de ne pas se retrouver en position de rattrapage.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord, merci.

Monsieur Flynn, les circonstances actuelles et d'autres avant cela nous ont appris que les données constituent la marchandise la plus courue sur le Web profond. Nous le savons. Le nom, l'adresse, la date de naissance, le numéro d'assurance sociale, l'adresse IP et le courriel des gens, toutes ces données sont de la marchandise échangée à volonté en ligne. Quelques questions me viennent d'ailleurs à l'esprit. Pouvez-vous aider la population canadienne à comprendre de quelle façon le milieu interlope utilise ces renseignements, mais aussi de quelle façon nous pouvons faire preuve de vigilance? Vous avez déjà partiellement répondu à M. Drouin, mais, en votre qualité de représentant de l'organisme national d’application de la loi, à quels signaux d'alarme les Canadiens devraient-ils prêter attention, selon vous, si leurs données ont été compromises, et même avant qu'elles le soient?

Le président:

Monsieur Motz pose là une question importante. Malheureusement, il n'a plus de temps pour la réponse. Je vous invite donc à inclure votre réponse dans celle que vous ferez à une autre question. La séance dure trois heures et, si je ne respecte pas le temps alloué à chacun, nous ne nous en sortirons pas.

Madame Dabrusin, je vous en prie. Vous avez cinq minutes.

(1410)

[Français]

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci.

Quand nous avons fait notre étude au sujet des associations bancaires et de la cybersécurité, on a dit qu'il y avait beaucoup de sécurité du côté bancaire, ce qu'on remet peut-être en question maintenant, et on a parlé des individus comme s'ils étaient des boîtes de carton.

Qu'est-ce que les individus peuvent faire pour mieux se protéger? Pouvez-vous nous donner des informations et des données? Y a-t-il un endroit où les gens peuvent trouver de l'information, que ce soit sur des sites Web ou par téléphone, afin de mieux se protéger? Pouvez-vous nous aider, monsieur Boucher?

M. André Boucher:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Nous avons un très grand programme. Sur notre site Web, cyber.gc.ca, les gens peuvent trouver des mesures appropriées pour les individus. Effectivement, l'individu doit être alerte lorsqu'il navigue sur Internet. Cela est au cœur de la cybersécurité. Il faut savoir non seulement comment utiliser Internet, mais aussi ce qu'on met en commun avec les gens. Nous menons constamment des campagnes d'information sur l'utilisation des appareils et nous conscientisons les gens à l'importance de choisir ceux à qui ils communiquent de l'information privilégiée.

C'est une chose de se munir du meilleur appareil et de le tenir à jour, mais encore faut-il faire de bons choix. Il faut aller sur des sites Web d'entreprises qu'on considère comme fiables et qui ont une bonne réputation. Une fois qu'on a fait tout cela, il faut aussi choisir les renseignements qu'on transmet à l'entreprise en question. Il y a donc trois étapes, et toute cette information est disponible dans les avis que nous donnons aux gens.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

D’accord.

Il y avait aussi beaucoup d’information au sujet des mots de passe. Par exemple, on parlait des gens qui utilisent le même mot de passe pour toutes leurs activités sur Internet.

Est-ce que vous pouvez nous donner des informations sur les façons dont les gens peuvent mieux se protéger avec leurs mots de passe? C'est important.

M. André Boucher:

Oui. Sur notre site Web — j'en fais toujours la promotion —, nous donnons des conseils précis sur la longueur et la complexité des mots de passe. Il y a aussi quelques trucs. Je veux laisser la chance aux gens d'aller en prendre connaissance par eux-mêmes. Il y a souvent des rumeurs disant qu’il faut changer souvent son mot de passe. Le problème, c'est que cela signifie que l'on doit mémoriser plusieurs mots de passe qui sont constamment en changement. Au fil du temps, l’avis a évolué. Maintenant, on dit qu'il faut au moins choisir un mot de passe solide, ce qui est défini par certains paramètres, que l'on peut trouver en ligne, qu'il s'agisse de la longueur ou de la complexité, selon ce que le fournisseur offre. S'il offre d’utiliser 15 caractères, on doit essayer de tous les utiliser. Si on ne nous en offre que huit, c’est déplorable, mais on doit alors choisir un mot de passe plus complexe.

Changer souvent son mot de passe n'a pas beaucoup de valeur si cela nous force à les noter quelque part ou à utiliser le même sur plusieurs sites. Ce que nous demandons aux gens, c’est d’être diligents et de choisir un mot de passe unique et aussi fort que le permettent les paramètres du fournisseur. Ils peuvent garder le même mot de passe, mais s’il y a un incident, ils doivent réagir rapidement, le changer et mettre en place des mesures de sécurité additionnelles. Il y a donc une combinaison de choses à faire.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

L’autre problème, c'est qu’une fois qu'ils ont trouvé un mot de passe qui fonctionne bien, les gens l’utilisent sur tous les sites Web. Certains sites Web nous disent qu’on a besoin de plus de caractères ou d’autres choses, mais on ne nous rappelle jamais que nous devrions avoir d’autres mots de passe et non utiliser le même partout. Est-ce que vous pouvez dire quelque chose à ce sujet aussi?

M. André Boucher:

Là, vous me demandez d’être très pragmatique.

Mme Julie Dabrusin: Oui, mais c’est pragmatique.

M. André Boucher: Si je vais au-delà du conseil spécifique d’être très pragmatique, ce que je proposerais aux gens, c’est de regrouper leurs mots de passe selon le niveau d’incertitude qu'ils ont à l'égard des différents services qu'ils utilisent. Par exemple, pour leurs services bancaires, ils voudront utiliser plusieurs mots de passe distincts et les plus complexes possible. Par contre, pour leur compte sur le site de leur club local de curling ou d'autres comptes similaires, ils pourraient peut-être se donner la latitude d’utiliser le même mot de passe quelques fois, même si je ne le leur recommande pas.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Qu’est-ce que les banques peuvent faire pour donner de meilleures informations aux gens qui utilisent leurs services?

M. André Boucher:

Je crois que la plupart, sinon toutes les banques demandent un minimum de sophistication quant au mot de passe. Elles ont déjà établi une certaine norme pour se protéger elles-mêmes d’un client qui ne serait peut-être pas diligent dans la sélection de son mot de passe. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

Bienvenue au Comité, monsieur Clarke. La parole est à vous. Vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je suis très content d’être ici.

Je vous remercie, messieurs, d’être ici aujourd’hui et de donner de votre temps pour rassurer les Canadiens et répondre à nos questions.

Une des pierres angulaires du contrat social que nous avons sur notre territoire, c’est la protection des citoyens, non seulement celle qu'ils s'offrent réciproquement entre eux, mais aussi celle qu'ils reçoivent de l'État. Depuis trois semaines, les citoyens de toutes nos circonscriptions sont extrêmement préoccupés. Deux jours après que la fuite de données a été rendue publique, des gens venaient à mon bureau. Lorsque je faisais du porte-à-porte, c'est tout ce dont ils me parlaient. Il y a donc une vraie préoccupation et les gens sentent qu’il n’y a aucune réponse de la part du gouvernement.

Ce que mes concitoyens voudraient savoir de votre part, monsieur Boucher, est très simple: est-ce que le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité peut effectivement assurer la sécurité en bonne et due forme des 2,9 millions de Canadiens qui ont été touchés par ce vol de données personnelles, oui ou non?

Est-ce que votre institution a les outils nécessaires pour faire face à cette situation et assurer la protection des citoyens victimes de vol d'identité?

(1415)

M. André Boucher:

Il est juste de dire que le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité a les moyens de prendre des mesures concernant tous les aspects de la cybersécurité. Nous traitons aujourd'hui d'un cas de menace interne et de vol d’informations. Ce n’est pas, au sens strict, une question de cybersécurité...

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je ne parle pas de l’événement qui est arrivé, je parle de ce qui va arriver prochainement. C’est cela qui inquiète les citoyens. Je veux savoir si le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité a la capacité de faire face aux fraudeurs internationaux ou nationaux qui tentent d’envoyer des messages textes ou quoi que ce soit.

Votre organisme a-t-il la capacité de faire face à cela?

M. André Boucher:

Je ne tente pas d'échapper à votre question, mais elle concerne plutôt un problème de loi ou de fraude, et non un problème de cybersécurité. Cela ne veut pas dire que, si nous voyons des manifestations, nous les ignorerions.

Nous commençons chaque journée en discutant avec nos partenaires, incluant ceux de la GRC, afin de leur faire part de ce que nous savons et de ce qu'il y a de nouveau. Nous nous assurons que l'intervenant responsable du dossier fera quelque chose de cette information. L'équipe nationale est la meilleure qui soit et ces gens ne vont rien laisser tomber. Ils vont tenter de régler les problèmes et de faire le maximum pour prendre soin de la sécurité des Canadiens.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je vais profiter de votre expertise en cybersécurité.

Notre système actuel de numéros d'assurance sociale est-il adéquat dans ce monde contemporain où Internet prend toute la place? C'est rendu à un point où les gens font leurs achats avec leur téléphone ou paient en quelques secondes à une caisse. Notre système de numéros d'assurance sociale est-il adéquat dans le monde dans lequel nous vivons aujourd'hui?

M. André Boucher:

Je vous remercie encore de votre question. Vous ne posez pas des questions faciles, monsieur Clarke.

Je ne suis pas un expert en numéros d'assurance sociale et leur utilisation, mais je peux parler d'identifiants. Quels que soient les identifiants dont on se munit, que ce soit des identifiants cryptologiques complexes ou simples, il y a toujours un problème de gestion de l'information et de vol possible de l'information. C'est un problème très complexe et je vais laisser aux experts en numéros d'assurance sociale le soin de répondre à l'aspect spécifique de votre question.

Selon moi, le problème plus large est la gestion des identifiants. C'est un morceau d'information clé qu'il faut apprendre à gérer dans les systèmes de sécurité larges dont je parlais.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Monsieur le surintendant, j'ai une question qui va dans le même sens que celle de mon collègue M. Motz.

Tous les gens qui m'ont abordé dans la rue, au bureau ou lors d'un porte-à-porte m'ont posé la même question. Ils m'ont demandé quels actes criminels ces fraudeurs commettront ultérieurement et à quoi il faut s'attendre. Quels actes criminels seront posés en ce qui concerne les 2,9 millions de Canadiens touchés par cette immense fuite de données?

Ensuite, dans combien de temps ces actes seront-ils posés? En ce moment, les médias disent toutes sortes de choses. On dit notamment que cela prendra cinq ou dix ans avant que les fraudeurs n'agissent et qu'ils attendront que la poussière retombe. [Traduction]

Le président:

Ici encore, la question est importante. Vous avez une quinzaine de secondes pour y répondre.

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Le fait est que, dès que des renseignements personnels, des mots de passe, etc. se retrouvent sur Internet, ils y demeurent à perpétuité. Les gens doivent être vigilants par rapport à cela, et utiliser les services à leur disposition, comme la surveillance du crédit, pour s'assurer que des déclencheurs sont activés quand quelqu'un essaie d'utiliser ces renseignements, ce qui les prévient et contribue à lutter contre la fraude.

C'est ce que je peux vous dire avec le temps qui m'est imparti.

(1420)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Clarke.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a une quinzaine d'années, j'étais sur un canal d'IRC — je ne sais pas si vous connaissez cela —, et quelqu'un y offrait des numéros de cartes de crédit avec les trois chiffres derrière ainsi que l'adresse; tout était prêt. Il demandait aux gens s'ils souhaitaient les acheter. Je trouvais que cela n'avait pas d'allure et j'ai voulu appeler la police ou différents services, mais personne ne répondait ou ne savait quoi faire.

Si quelqu'un voyait quelque chose de semblable sur Internet aujourd'hui, y a-t-il un endroit où il pourrait le rapporter? [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

La GRC, en collaboration avec la Police provinciale de l'Ontario et le Bureau de la concurrence, exploite le Centre antifraude du Canada. C'est l'un des meilleurs endroits où signaler des activités frauduleuses, que ce soit un numéro de téléphone utilisé par les fraudeurs, un vol d'identité ou un cas de fraude. Le Centre compile ce type de renseignements. Il les transmet. Des enquêtes policières sont lancées d'après ces renseignements. C'est le premier endroit où vous devriez appeler, de même qu'à votre poste de police.

Les forces de l'ordre locales, que ce soit la GRC ou un autre corps policier dans le cas de l'Ontario et du Québec, doivent être mises au courant des crimes perpétrés. Il y a un lien entre le crime organisé impliqué dans les cas de fraude et les autres activités criminelles. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quels sont les pouvoirs du Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité? Que peut-il faire?

M. André Boucher:

Parlez-vous en général ou du cas qui nous occupe?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parle en général. Les gens de ce centre prennent-ils les commentaires de l'extérieur ou travaillent-ils seulement avec les entreprises? Expliquez-moi ce qu'ils font.

M. André Boucher:

Comme je l'expliquais tout à l'heure, le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité est responsable de donner des avis. Il prépare et protège l'information d'intérêt national. Il s'occupe de la gestion des incidents et des stratégies d'atténuation qui s'ensuivent. Toutes les étapes se déroulent en coordination avec les partenaires du Centre, conformément à son mandat. Quand il y a des problèmes de fraude, on fait appel à l'équipe nationale, qui est formée des centres qui ont déjà été nommés. On s'assure que l'information disponible est mise en commun et on va de l'avant. Le dossier se poursuit, et si plus d'information est disponible, on la transmet à la personne responsable.

Voici ce que ce modèle d'affaires a d'intéressant. S'il survient un changement pendant que le dossier est en cours, par exemple s'il ne s'agit plus d'une enquête, le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité va le prendre en charge jusqu'à ce que la victime ait eu... jusqu'à la fermeture du dossier, si vous voulez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tout à l'heure, on a parlé de mots de passe. Maintenant, on voit beaucoup plus l'authentification de deux facteurs en ce qui concerne les comptes de banque. Pourrait-on faire la même chose pour le numéro d'assurance sociale?

M. André Boucher:

Je vais répondre la même chose que tout à l'heure. Je ne suis pas un expert en numéros d'assurance sociale, mais nous recommandons fortement aux gens, quand c'est possible, de se servir des deux facteurs. Ce n'est pas parfait, mais cela améliore la sécurité de leurs renseignements.

M. Michel Picard:

J'aimerais revenir sur la question de l'identifiant unique.

Il y a d'autres modèles. Dans d'autres comités, on a parlé du fameux modèle de l'Estonie, je crois. Ce système va dans le sens des discussions que nous avons eues sur le système bancaire ouvert, où toute l'information est centralisée et où les gens peuvent y avoir accès en fournissant un numéro d'identification unique.

Au bout du compte, peu importe le nom qu'on lui donne, le numéro d'assurance sociale est un numéro d'identification unique. Il faut comprendre les limites de notre système. On a beau avoir un système ultra moderne et par excellence, si on revient à une seule et unique façon d'identifier quelqu'un, la donnée sera toujours vulnérable si quelqu'un met la main dessus.

M. André Boucher:

Tout à fait. On ne peut pas les nommer aujourd'hui, mais plusieurs pays ont tenté d'avoir un numéro d'identification unique national. Quelques-uns ont connu du succès et d'autres, un peu moins, parce que, comme vous l'avez dit, ce numéro devient une donnée essentielle et que, s'il y a la moindre faiblesse, il risque d'être exploité.

M. Michel Picard:

Votre organisation gère-t-elle elle-même les données personnelles de ses employés?

M. André Boucher:

Oui, absolument, avec toutes les mesures dont je parlais tout à l'heure.

M. Michel Picard:

Comment fait-on pour se protéger d'un employé qui est de mauvaise humeur un matin et qui décide de traverser la clôture?

M. André Boucher:

Nous avons un programme exhaustif de sécurité qui s'applique dès la sélection du personnel. Évidemment, il y a une culture de sécurité dans l'ensemble de notre organisation, ce qui comprend la sécurité du personnel, la sécurité physique et la sécurité des systèmes informatiques.

Les processus sont en place. C'est un système evergreen, c'est-à-dire qu'il doit toujours être mis à jour. On ne se repose pas sur le système en place, on revoit celui-ci périodiquement. C'est vaste et complexe, mais c'est un investissement qui en vaut la peine.

(1425)

M. Michel Picard:

Votre approche est-elle utilisée ailleurs sur le marché? Y a-t-il un organisme qui a mis en place une culture de sécurité semblable à celle que vous développez?

M. André Boucher:

Notre approche est moderne et nous n'avons pas le monopole en la matière. Vous pouvez trouver des documents. Sécurité publique Canada a publié un document décrivant la façon de se munir d'un système de sécurité. C'est une très bonne source de référence et cela touche les mêmes modèles que ceux que nous avons.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci, monsieur Boucher. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Picard.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez trois minutes.

Monsieur Fortin, il nous restera ensuite quelques minutes. Souhaitez-vous avoir un peu de temps pour poser des questions?

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Oui, s'il vous plaît.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Dubé. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Boucher, je n'ai pas eu la chance de vous poser des questions tout à l'heure.

Ma première question concerne ce qu'a dit votre collègue M. Scott Jones, qui a comparu devant notre comité dans le cadre de l'étude à laquelle on fait référence régulièrement aujourd'hui. Il a mentionné qu'il était important que les institutions et les entreprises signalent les vols ou les fuites de données qui les touchent.

La recommandation du Comité était plutôt vague. Devrait-on insister sur le fait qu'il faut signaler ce genre de fuites à la police, afin de minimiser les dégâts pour la population et arrêter ceux qui ont commis le crime?

Cela m'amène à deux autres questions, lesquelles s'adressent à vous, monsieur Flynn.

Étant donné que l'information va demeurer sur Internet à perpétuité, la police doit-elle traiter ces menaces de la même façon que les menaces physiques? Si un meurtrier ou quiconque pose une menace physique, j'imagine qu'il y a un certain sentiment d'urgence dans les enquêtes policières. Devrait-on faire la même chose dans le cas des cybermenaces? Desjardins a quand même communiqué avec la SQ au mois de décembre, si je ne m'abuse.

Ma dernière question concerne les vérifications d'antécédents et les vérifications continues de sécurité. Maintenant que des individus possèdent une expertise très élevée en la matière, ces vérifications doivent-elles devenir la norme?

Je vous laisse répondre dans le temps qui reste.

M. André Boucher:

Concernant le signalement d'incidents, je vous rappelle que nous recommandons d'investir avant l'incident. Il faut qu'il y ait un programme de sécurité et de détection, et ainsi de suite. Nous recommandons toujours aux gens de signaler un incident et d'en faire part à leur communauté, parce qu'il y a probablement des points communs. Ainsi, tous pourront apprendre de cet incident.

En tant que centre national de cybersécurité, nous essayons de recueillir de telles informations dans toutes les communautés, de trouver les points communs et d'émettre des avis qui pourraient augmenter la sécurité à l'échelle nationale. Effectivement, il faut signaler les incidents. [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

En ce qui a trait aux menaces physiques par rapport aux cybermenaces, je suis d'accord avec vous. C'est très difficile à comprendre. Les forces de l'ordre peinent à établir l'allocation de leurs ressources, car elles cherchent toujours à cibler ce qui aura le plus d'effet sur la réduction des méfaits.

Prenons la fraude. C'est une menace très grave, tant au Canada qu'à l'échelle mondiale. Il est difficile de comparer une fraude de 400 000 $ ou de 2 millions de dollars à une menace physique ou à un homicide, voire à une agression. Cela nous donne bien du mal, mais je peux vous confirmer que nous en sommes conscients et que nous évaluons actuellement notre façon de jauger ce risque et d'établir nos priorités. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ne serait-il pas pertinent de dire que cela a une incidence permanente sur la vie d'une personne et de voir les choses de cette façon? [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Oui, c'est indéniablement un facteur.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.[Français]

Monsieur Fortin, vous avez deux minutes.

M. Rhéal Fortin:

J'aimerais poser rapidement une question à M. Flynn. Je dis « rapidement » parce que je n’ai que deux minutes et que j'avais aussi une question à poser à M. Boucher.

Il y a deux ans, 19 millions de Canadiens ont été l’objet d’une fraude chez Equifax. Il s'agissait d'un vol de données semblables. L’an dernier, on parlait d’environ 90 000 clients de la CIBC et de la BMO. Cette année, il s'agit de clients de Desjardins.

Pouvez-vous nous dire s'il y a eu une augmentation des crimes liés à l'utilisation de ces données à la suite de ces événements? [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Des données tirées de ces comptes compromis en tant que telles? [Français]

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Oui, mais je parle de ce type de crime.

(1430)

[Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Nous constatons que les fraudeurs utilisent des renseignements compromis pour effectuer leurs transactions. L'enquête de la GRC sur Leakedsource.com s'est avérée concluante: ce site revendait des renseignements tirés d'une imposante banque de données compromises rendues publiques. L'accusé a plaidé coupable.

La revente de tels renseignements n'est pas inhabituelle, comme en témoignent divers incidents. [Français]

M. Rhéal Fortin:

D'accord, mais est-ce que le taux de criminalité lié à l'utilisation de ces données volées a augmenté? [Traduction]

Surint. pr. Mark Flynn:

Je n'ai pas pris en note le taux de criminalité en particulier, mais il va sans dire que c'est le genre d'activités criminelles dont nous sommes témoins. [Français]

M. Rhéal Fortin:

D'accord.

Ma seconde question s’adresse à M. Boucher.

Monsieur Boucher, dans votre témoignage écrit, vous donnez trois recommandations. La deuxième consiste à investir dans la formation et la sensibilisation pour que les personnes aient les moyens d’agir. Est-ce que le gouvernement fédéral a prévu des investissements pour collaborer avec le gouvernement du Québec en vue d’améliorer la sécurité des Québécois?

M. André Boucher:

Je peux parler de mon organisation. Nous avons une responsabilité nationale, et travailler avec nos partenaires du Québec en fait partie. Nous investissons dans l’éducation et la formation et nous offrons aussi nos services aux entreprises québécoises...

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Excusez-moi de vous interrompre, je ne veux pas vous bousculer, mais comme vous le savez, deux minutes, c’est court.

Y a-t-il des projets d’investissement, et si c'est le cas, pouvez-vous les chiffrer? Par exemple, le fédéral a-t-il dégagé une enveloppe d'un certain nombre de millions de dollars pour s’entendre avec Québec sur un programme de formation ou autre en lien avec la cybercriminalité?

M. André Boucher:

Je n'ai pas cette information avec moi aujourd'hui.

M. Rhéal Fortin:

D'accord.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Vous n'aurez malheureusement pas le temps de répondre à cette question.

Avant de suspendre la séance, je voudrais simplement revenir au point trois de votre présentation, monsieur Boucher, où vous dites: « II faut également déterminer et protéger les actifs essentiels. II importe de savoir où se trouvent les données clés. Assurez-vous donc de leur protection et surveillez les mesures de protection prises. Soyez prêts à intervenir. » Autrement dit, des réseaux à confiance zéro, ce dont nous entendons parler depuis six mois.

Est-ce la norme qui devrait s’appliquer à toute institution financière, pas seulement à Desjardins?

M. André Boucher:

Je crois que toute grande entreprise doit évaluer ses actifs essentiels et leur valeur, puis décider de l'ampleur de ses investissements dans leur protection en fonction du risque. En partant du principe de la confiance zéro, le fait est que nous vivons aujourd’hui dans un environnement complexe. Il ne faut donc pas présumer que le système va fonctionner en vase clos. Il faut investir dans un programme de sécurité de façon globale, soit dans les bonnes personnes, les bons processus et la bonne technologie. L'ensemble de ces éléments vont...

Le président:

C'est une norme qui fait l'unanimité dans le milieu du cyber, si je puis dire, cette idée de confiance zéro, à votre point trois.

M. André Boucher:

On s'entend pour dire qu'il faut investir dans tous ces éléments.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Boucher.

Sur ce, nous allons suspendre la séance.

Nous devons entendre des représentants du gouvernement et faisons somme toute des progrès intéressants. Je présume, mais sans savoir si j'ai raison, que si je suspends la séance pendant deux ou trois minutes, nous pouvons reprendre les travaux avec les témoins du gouvernement et poursuivre sur notre lancée. Est-ce que cela vous convient, chers collègues?

D'accord. Sur ce, la séance est suspendue et reprendra avec les témoins du gouvernement. Merci.

(1430)

(1435)

Le président:

Reprenons nos travaux. Je tiens à remercier les représentants du gouvernement pour leur souplesse et les prie de faire preuve d'un peu plus de patience, car le Comité attend toujours l'arrivée des représentants de Desjardins.

J'invite les divers représentants de Revenu Canada, du ministère des Finances, du ministère de l'Emploi et du Développement social et du Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières à être brefs. Si les représentants de Desjardins ont un temps limité à nous consacrer, je vais, s'ils se présentent, suspendre la séance un instant après vos déclarations et vous prier de vous asseoir au fond de la salle afin que nous puissions discuter avec eux pendant un certain temps. Ensuite, je vous demanderai de revenir devant le Comité, et les membres pourront vous poser des questions, si cela vous convient. Même si cela ne vous semble pas une façon convenable de mener la séance, c'est ainsi que nous allons procéder, donc je vais simplement demander au représentant de Revenu Canada ou du ministère des Finances de prendre la parole, selon celui qui souhaite s'exprimer en premier.

Mme Annette Ryan (sous-ministre adjointe déléguée, Direction de la politique du secteur financier, ministère des Finances):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais commencer, si cela vous convient.[Français]

Je m'appelle Annette Ryan. Je suis sous-ministre adjointe déléguée de la Direction de la politique du secteur financier au ministère des Finances. Je suis accompagnée de Robert Sample, directeur général de la Division de la stabilité financière et des marchés des capitaux, ainsi que de Judy Cameron, directrice principale du Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières du Canada, ainsi que de son collègue. Nous sommes heureux d'être ici avec vous aujourd'hui.

(1440)

[Traduction]

Mes remarques porteront sur deux sujets que je crois pertinents dans le contexte des questions dont vous êtes saisis. Plus particulièrement, je vais préciser les rôles des ministères et agences du gouvernement ainsi que des acteurs du secteur privé dans le cadre fédéral régissant le secteur financier, et fournir une mise à jour au Comité quant aux efforts entrepris par le ministère des Finances, les organismes fédéraux de réglementation et les banques pour appuyer la cybersécurité et la protection des données.

La protection de la vie privée et des données personnelles et financières des Canadiens est un objectif partagé du gouvernement et du secteur privé; il s'agit d'un objectif qui est essentiel au maintien continu de la confiance dans le système bancaire canadien.

Je vais aborder la question des rôles au sein du gouvernement fédéral, puis de celui des gouvernements provinciaux et des acteurs du secteur privé.

Le ministère des Finances et les organismes fédéraux de surveillance du secteur financier sont chargés des lois et des règlements qui régissent le système bancaire canadien sous juridiction fédérale. Collectivement, nous établissons les attentes et en surveillons la mise en œuvre afin de garantir que les risques opérationnels liés à la cybersécurité et à la protection de la vie privée sont convenablement gérés par les institutions financières que nous réglementons.

Le ministre des Finances a une responsabilité générale envers la stabilité et l'intégrité du système financier canadien. La cybersécurité est un aspect essentiel de la stabilité du secteur financier, car elle permet au secteur de demeurer résilient face aux cybermenaces et aux cyberattaques.

Le ministère de la Sécurité publique a, à son tour, reconnu le secteur des services financiers comme un secteur d'importance critique dans le cadre de sa Stratégie nationale sur les infrastructures essentielles.

Le ministère des Finances travaille étroitement avec un ensemble d'intervenants responsables de la réglementation du secteur financier et de la cybersécurité, tant au niveau national qu'avec nos partenaires internationaux, afin de s'assurer que le secteur adopte des pratiques appropriées pour favoriser la cyber-résilience et la protection des données et aussi afin de faire en sorte que les besoins du secteur financier soient pris en compte dans les politiques portant sur l'ensemble de l'économie et la législation ayant trait à la cybersécurité et à la protection des données.

Je vais maintenant aborder les responsabilités des différents régulateurs du secteur financier. Le Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières, l'organisme de réglementation prudentielle des institutions financières fédérales — par exemple, les banques — élabore des normes et des règles pour gérer les risques en matière de cybersécurité. Ceci est conforme à son mandat plus vaste de surveillance des risques opérationnels que les institutions financières doivent gérer.

La Banque du Canada surveille les infrastructures du marché financier, comme les systèmes de paiements, afin d'accroître leur résilience aux cybermenaces et coordonne les réponses de l'ensemble du secteur en cas d'incident opérationnel systémique.

D'autres organismes fédéraux sont responsables de la législation entourant le respect de la vie privée. Le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée veille à ce que les banques respectent la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, qui régit la protection des renseignements personnels dans le secteur privé canadien. Cette loi établit les exigences auxquelles les entreprises doivent satisfaire relativement à la collecte, à l'utilisation ou à la divulgation de données personnelles dans le cadre d'activités commerciales. Ces exigences comprennent la mise en place de mesures de protection appropriées pour protéger les données personnelles contre la perte, le vol ou la divulgation non autorisée.

Le ministère de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique a une responsabilité stratégique globale à l'égard de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques. En novembre 2018, le gouvernement du Canada a modifié les dispositions de la loi relatives au signalement d'atteinte à la protection des données et aux sanctions pécuniaires connexes pour ne pas avoir signalé une fraude.

Comme vous l'avez entendu plus tôt, d'autres agences et ministères fédéraux, y compris Sécurité publique, le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité et la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, partagent des responsabilités à l'égard de plus vastes initiatives de cybersécurité du gouvernement du Canada.[Français]

Il est important de noter que la responsabilité de la surveillance du secteur financier canadien est partagée entre les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux. Les provinces sont chargées de la surveillance des courtiers en valeurs mobilières, des conseillers en épargne collective et en fonds de placement, des coopératives provinciales, ainsi que des caisses d'épargne, des sociétés de fiducie, des compagnies d'assurances et des sociétés de prêt constituées par une loi provinciale.

Par conséquent, les autorités fédérales et provinciales du secteur financier ont des protocoles en place à l'égard de l'échange de renseignements, particulièrement pour les questions relatives à la stabilité financière. Les institutions financières ont bien sûr la responsabilité première quant au maintien de la cybersécurité et de la protection des données sur une base quotidienne, puisqu'elles gèrent directement les risques opérationnels grâce à un ensemble exhaustif de mesures de protection et de prévention sur le plan individuel et à la coopération avec les autres acteurs de l'industrie.

Ces mesures sont appuyées par des politiques et des normes qui sont constamment mises à jour pour répondre aux menaces changeantes et demeurent conformes aux pratiques exemplaires de l'industrie.

(1445)

[Traduction]

Les cyberattaques sont une menace sérieuse et permanente. J'aimerais aborder quelques-unes des mesures mises en place par le gouvernement du Canada, les organismes de réglementation du secteur financier et les banques afin de renforcer la cybersécurité dans le secteur financier.

Dans le budget de 2018, le gouvernement fédéral a investi plus d'un demi-milliard de dollars dans la cybersécurité et, en octobre 2018, le gouvernement a établi le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité, qui sert de guichet unique d'expertise et de conseils techniques pour les Canadiens, les gouvernements et les entreprises. Le Centre lutte contre les auteurs de cybermenaces qui ciblent des entreprises canadiennes, y compris les institutions financières fédérales et provinciales, en vue d'obtenir des données de leurs clients, des renseignements financiers et des systèmes de paiement. Les efforts de lutte contre la cybercriminalité ont été stimulés par le Centre national de coordination de la lutte contre la cybercriminalité nouvellement créé au sein de la GRC, qui fournit un mécanisme national de signalement des cybercrimes, y compris les atteintes à la protection des données ou les fraudes financières.

Plus récemment, dans le budget de 2019, le gouvernement a proposé une loi et un financement afin de protéger les cybersystèmes essentiels dans les secteurs canadiens des finances, des télécommunications, de l'énergie et des transports.[Français]

Nos collègues du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor continuent de travailler conjointement avec les gouvernements provinciaux, les institutions financières et les partenaires fédéraux à l'élaboration d'un cadre de confiance pancanadien sur l'identité numérique qui vise à renforcer la protection de l'identité numérique dans le contexte des cybermenaces.[Traduction]

En ce qui concerne la réglementation, plus tôt cette année, le Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières a publié un nouveau guide sur les exigences de signalement des incidents liés à la technologie et à la cybersécurité par l'entremise du préavis sur le signalement des incidents liés à la technologie et à la cybersécurité. Ces directives visent à aider le bureau à déterminer où les banques peuvent prendre des mesures pour prévenir de façon proactive les incidents liés à la cybersécurité ou, lorsqu'un incident survient, à améliorer leur résilience cybernétique.

Bien que notre principal rôle soit de prévenir les atteintes à la protection des données, la réalité est que ces incidents surviennent et ils ne se limitent pas qu'au secteur financier. Cela étant dit, lorsqu'un incident lié à la cybersécurité survient dans une institution fédérale sous réglementation fédérale, des mécanismes de contrôle et de surveillance sont en place pour le gérer.

En résumé, la cybersécurité est un domaine d'une importance critique pour le ministère des Finances. Nous collaborons activement avec des partenaires de l'ensemble du gouvernement et du secteur privé pour nous assurer que les Canadiens sont bien protégés contre des incidents liés à la cybersécurité et que, lorsqu'ils surviennent, les incidents sont gérés de façon à atténuer les répercussions sur les consommateurs et le secteur financier dans son ensemble.

Je vous remercie de votre temps. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC)):

Merci, madame Ryan.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Boisjoly.

Mme Elise Boisjoly (sous-ministre adjointe, Direction générale des services d'intégrité, ministère de l'Emploi et du Développement social):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je m'appelle Elise Boisjoly et je suis la sous-ministre adjointe responsable des services d'intégrité à Emploi et Développement social Canada. Je suis accompagnée par Mme Anik Dupont, responsable du programme du numéro d'assurance sociale.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de m'adresser à vous aujourd'hui. Mon allocution portera sur le programme du numéro d'assurance sociale. Plus précisément, j'aimerais clarifier ce qu'est le numéro d'assurance sociale, fournir des renseignements sur son émission et son utilisation, informer le Comité sur la protection de la vie privée en ce qui concerne le numéro d'assurance sociale, et fournir de l'information sur notre approche en cas de fuite d'informations personnelles.

Le numéro d'assurance sociale est un identificateur de dossier ou un numéro de compte utilisé par le gouvernement du Canada pour coordonner l'administration des prestations et services fédéraux, et par le système du revenu. Le numéro d'assurance sociale est requis pour chaque personne qui occupe un emploi assurable ou donnant droit à une pension au Canada, et pour produire une déclaration de revenus.

Un numéro d'assurance sociale est émis avant le premier emploi, en arrivant au Canada pour la première fois ou même à la naissance. Au cours de la dernière année financière, plus de 1,6 million de numéros d'assurance sociale ont été émis.

Le numéro d'assurance sociale sert, entre autres, à verser plus de 120 milliards de dollars en prestations et à percevoir plus de 300 milliards de dollars en impôts. Il facilite l'échange d'information pour permettre l'allocation de prestations et de services aux Canadiens tout au long de leur vie, comme les prestations pour la garde d'enfants, les prêts étudiants, l'assurance-emploi, les pensions et même les prestations de décès. Ainsi, un numéro d'assurance sociale est attribué à une personne pour la vie.

Le numéro d'assurance sociale n'est pas un identificateur national et ne peut pas être utilisé pour obtenir une identification. En fait, il n'est même pas utilisé par tous les programmes du gouvernement fédéral, seulement par un certain nombre. Le numéro d'assurance sociale seul n'est pas suffisant pour accéder à un programme ou à un avantage gouvernemental, ou même pour obtenir du crédit ou des services dans le secteur privé. Des informations supplémentaires sont toujours requises.

(1450)

[Traduction]

Bien que les fuites de données soient de plus en plus courantes, le gouvernement du Canada suit des procédures rigoureuses et établies pour protéger les renseignements personnels des particuliers. Ma collègue a fait mention de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, qui est administrée par Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada. Ces lois établissent le cadre juridique régissant la collecte, la conservation, l'utilisation, la divulgation et l'élimination des renseignements personnels dans le contexte de l'administration des programmes des institutions gouvernementales et des activités du secteur privé.

Comme l'a dit ma collègue, le 1er novembre 2018, une nouvelle modification a été apportée à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques exigeant que les organisations faisant face à une fuite de données et ayant des raisons de croire qu'il y a un risque réel de préjudice grave en informent le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée, les personnes affectées ainsi que les organisations associées dès que possible. La violation de cette disposition peut conduire à des amendes allant jusqu'à 100 000 $ par infraction.

Au sein d'Emploi et Développement social Canada , nous avons des stratégies de surveillance interne, des politiques de confidentialité, des directives et des outils d'information sur la gestion de la protection de la vie privée, ainsi qu'un code de conduite ministériel et des formations obligatoires pour nos employés sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Nous croyons que toute atteinte à la sécurité touchant le numéro d'assurance sociale est très grave et, en fait, le gouvernement du Canada n'est pas à l'abri de telles situations. Par exemple, en 2012, des informations concernant des prêts étudiants canadiens ont été potentiellement compromises. Cette fuite a servi de catalyseur à l'amélioration des pratiques de gestion de l'information au ministère.

La prévention de la fraude en matière de numéro d'assurance sociale commence par l'éducation et la sensibilisation. C'est pourquoi notre site Web et nos documents de communication contiennent des renseignements qui aident les Canadiens à mieux comprendre les mesures qu'ils devraient prendre pour protéger leur numéro d'assurance sociale. Les Canadiens peuvent visiter le site Web du ministère, nous appeler ou visiter l'un de nos centres Service Canada pour apprendre la meilleure façon de se protéger. II est important de noter que la protection des renseignements personnels des Canadiens est une responsabilité partagée entre le gouvernement, le secteur privé et les particuliers. Nous encourageons fortement les Canadiens à ne pas donner leur numéro d'assurance sociale à moins d'être certains qu'il est légalement requis ou que c'est nécessaire. Les Canadiens devraient également surveiller activement leurs renseignements financiers, notamment en communiquant avec les agences d'évaluation du crédit du Canada.[Français]

La perte d'un numéro d'assurance sociale ne signifie pas automatiquement qu'une fraude s'est produite ou se produira.

Cependant, si des Canadiens détectent une activité suspecte touchant leur numéro d'assurance sociale, ils doivent agir rapidement afin de minimiser les répercussions potentielles en signalant tout incident à la police, en contactant le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et le Centre antifraude du Canada, et en informer Service Canada. Dans les cas où il est prouvé que le numéro d'assurance sociale a été utilisé à des fins frauduleuses, Service Canada travaillera en étroite collaboration avec les personnes touchées.

Le nombre de Canadiens dont le numéro d'assurance sociale a été remplacé par Service Canada en raison d'une fraude est demeuré stable à environ 60 par année depuis 2014, malgré les fuites de données de plus en plus importantes.

Cela dit, nous savons que de nombreux Canadiens ont signé une pétition demandant à Service Canada d'attribuer un nouveau numéro d'assurance sociale aux personnes touchées par cette atteinte aux données. La raison principale pour laquelle nous n'attribuons pas automatiquement un nouveau numéro d'assurance sociale dans ces circonstances est simple: l'obtention d'un nouveau numéro d'assurance sociale ne protégera pas les particuliers contre la fraude. L'ancien numéro d'assurance sociale continue d'exister et est toujours lié aux particuliers. Par exemple, si un fraudeur utilise l'ancien numéro d'assurance sociale d'une personne et que son identité est mal vérifiée, les prêteurs peuvent quand même demander à la personne fraudée de payer les dettes.

Également, il incombera à la personne de fournir son numéro d'assurance sociale à chacune des institutions financières, à ses créanciers, à ses fournisseurs de régime de retraite, à ses employeurs actuels et passés, ou à toute autre organisation à laquelle elle aurait donné son numéro d'assurance sociale. Le faire incorrectement pourrait mettre à risque l'octroi de bénéfices ou laisserait la porte ouverte à la fraude ou au vol d'identité.

Cela signifierait aussi de doubler la surveillance. Les particuliers devraient quand même surveiller leur compte et leurs rapports de solvabilité pour leurs deux numéros d'assurance sociale de façon régulière et continue. La multiplication des numéros d'assurance sociale augmente donc le risque de fraude potentielle.

La surveillance active des bureaux de crédit ainsi que l'examen régulier des relevés bancaires et des relevés de cartes de crédit demeurent la meilleure protection contre la fraude.

En terminant, la protection de l'intégrité du numéro d'assurance sociale est importante pour nous. Je peux vous assurer que nous continuerons à prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour y parvenir, incluant la lecture du rapport de ce comité ou d'autres informations provenant de ce comité ou autres sur les meilleures façons d'améliorer la situation.

Je vous remercie de votre temps. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(1455)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, madame Boisjoly.

Y a-t-il d'autres intervenants qui veulent prendre de parole avant que nous passions aux questions?

Monsieur Guénette, vous avez la parole.

M. Maxime Guénette (sous-commissaire et chef de la protection des renseignements personnels, Direction générale des affaires publiques, Agence du revenu du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour à tous les membres du Comité. [Traduction]

Je m'appelle Maxime Guénette et je suis sous-commissaire de la Direction générale des affaires publiques et chef de la protection des renseignements personnels de l'Agence du revenu du Canada. Ma collègue Gillian Pranke, sous-commissaire adjointe de la Direction générale de cotisation, de prestation et de service de l'Agence, m'accompagne aujourd'hui.

L'Agence du revenu du Canada est une organisation qui touche la vie de pratiquement tous les Canadiens. Elle est l'un des plus importants détenteurs de renseignements personnels du gouvernement du Canada. À l'Agence, nous traitons plus de 28 millions de déclarations de revenus de particuliers chaque année. II est donc essentiel qu'elle dispose d'un cadre de protection des renseignements personnels exhaustif pour gérer et protéger les renseignements de tous les Canadiens.[Français]

L'intégrité en milieu de travail est la pierre angulaire de la culture mise en avant par l'Agence. L'Agence aide ses employés à bien agir en leur fournissant des lignes directrices claires et des outils visant à assurer la sécurité et la confidentialité ainsi qu'à protéger les renseignements personnels, les programmes et les données.

L'Agence est tenue de respecter la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels ainsi que les politiques et directives du Conseil du Trésor qui y sont liées pour assurer la gestion et la protection des renseignements personnels des Canadiens. L'article 241 de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu impose également des exigences en matière de confidentialité aux employés de l'Agence et aux autres personnes ayant accès aux renseignements sur les contribuables.

L'Agence observe aussi la Politique sur la sécurité du gouvernement et les orientations fournies par les principaux organismes de sécurité, comme le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications et le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité, qui sont intervenus tantôt.

En avril 2013, l'Agence a nommé son premier chef de la protection des renseignements personnels, qui est, entre autres, responsable des fonctions liées à l'accès à l'information et à la protection des renseignements personnels à l'Agence.[Traduction]

En tant que chef de la protection des renseignements personnels, mon rôle consiste, entre autres, à faire en sorte que la protection des renseignements que l'Agence détient soit assurée et renforcée par la supervision des décisions liées à la protection des renseignements personnels, y compris l'évaluation des répercussions de nos programmes sur la protection de ces renseignements; la défense des droits relatifs à la protection des renseignements personnels, ce qui comprend la gestion des atteintes à la vie privée à l'interne; et le rapport à la haute direction de l'Agence sur l'état de la gestion de la protection des renseignements personnels.

À l'Agence, la responsabilité quant à la saine gestion de la protection des renseignements personnels ne se limite pas à nommer un chef de la protection des renseignements personnels; il s'agit d'une responsabilité que partagent tous les employés.

Pour préserver son intégrité, l'Agence doit avoir en place les systèmes appropriés pour protéger les renseignements de nature délicate des menaces externes. Les réseaux et les postes de travail de l'Agence sont dotés de logiciels de détection et de suppression de logiciels malveillants et de virus. lls sont mis à jour quotidiennement et protègent l'environnement de l'Agence contre les menaces de virus et de codes malveillants.[Français]

Pour ce qui est des employés de l'Agence, leurs ordinateurs sont dotés d'un ensemble de produits de sécurité allant de logiciels antivirus à des logiciels de détection des intrusions au niveau de l'hôte.

Les services externes sont pris en charge par des plateformes sécurisées et protégées par des pare-feu et des outils de prévention des intrusions visant à détecter et à prévenir l'accès non autorisé aux systèmes de l'Agence.

Pour ce qui est des transactions en ligne, nous nous assurons que les renseignements de nature délicate sont chiffrés lors de la transmission entre l'ordinateur d'un contribuable et nos serveurs Web. Peu importe la façon dont les Canadiens choisissent d'interagir avec l'Agence, ils doivent suivre un processus d'authentification en deux étapes pour accéder à leur compte.

Ces étapes sont essentielles pour que seules les personnes autorisées aient accès aux renseignements personnels. Le processus comprend la validation d'un ensemble de points de données personnelles et confidentielles, dont, entre autres, le numéro d'assurance sociale d'une personne, mais aussi le mois et l'année de sa naissance, et des renseignements tirés de sa déclaration de revenus de l'année précédente.[Traduction]

L'Agence mettra sous peu en œuvre un nouveau numéro d'identification personnel pour les contribuables qui appellent la ligne des demandes de renseignements sur l'impôt des particuliers. De plus, l'Agence étudie actuellement des procédures de sécurité supplémentaires pour protéger les renseignements des contribuables. Comme la cybercriminalité et l'hameçonnage sont maintenant fréquents et que les techniques utilisées sont de plus en plus sophistiquées, l'Agence agit de façon proactive en avertissant le public que des fraudeurs communiquent avec les gens en prétendant travailler pour elle.

Une façon simple pour les contribuables de se protéger contre la fraude est de s'inscrire à Mon dossier ou à Mon dossier d'entreprise afin de gérer leur dossier fiscal facilement et en toute sécurité au moyen des portails sécurisés de l'Agence. Ceux qui sont inscrits à Mon dossier peuvent aussi s'inscrire au courrier en ligne afin de recevoir des alertes du compte qui les informent des arnaques possibles ou d'autres activités frauduleuses qui pourraient avoir une incidence sur eux.

L'Agence est fière de sa réputation d'organisation de pointe engagée à assurer l'excellence de l'administration du régime fiscal du Canada. Toutefois, des activités inappropriées ou frauduleuses peuvent se produire en milieu de travail. L'Agence a mis en place toute une gamme de contrôles pour s'assurer que les seules personnes qui accèdent aux renseignements des contribuables sont les employés tenus de le faire dans le cadre de leur travail. Elle peut ainsi détecter les cas d'inconduite qui pourraient se produire.

(1500)

[Français]

La surveillance de l'accès des employés aux renseignements des contribuables est centralisée, ce qui garantit un processus indépendant permettant à l'Agence de détecter des activités douteuses dans ses systèmes et d'intervenir quand c'est nécessaire. De cette façon, les utilisateurs autorisés ont accès uniquement aux applications et aux données auxquelles ils ont droit d'accéder en fonction de règles administratives strictes.[Traduction]

En 2017, l'Agence a mis en œuvre une solution de gestion de la fraude d'entreprise, qui complète les contrôles de sécurité existants et réduit encore plus les risques d'accès non autorisé et d'atteinte à la vie privée. La solution de gestion de la fraude d'entreprise permet la surveillance proactive et la détection de l'accès non autorisé des employés. L'Agence prend très au sérieux toute allégation ou tout soupçon d'inconduite de la part d'un employé et fait minutieusement enquête. Lorsque les soupçons d'actes répréhensibles ou d'inconduite sont fondés, des mesures disciplinaires appropriées sont prises, qui peuvent aller jusqu'au congédiement. Si l'on soupçonne une activité criminelle, la question est renvoyée aux autorités compétentes.[Français]

Au moment de leur embauche, les employés de l'Agence doivent attester avoir lu le Code d'intégrité et de conduite professionnelle ainsi que le Code de valeurs et d'éthique du secteur public.

Le code décrit de façon claire la norme de conduite que les employés doivent respecter, dont l'obligation de protéger les renseignements des contribuables, conformément à l'article 241 de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. L'accès non autorisé à ces renseignements est considéré comme une inconduite grave, comme l'indique la Directive sur la discipline de l'Agence.[Traduction]

Le code veille à ce que les employés, actuels et anciens, soient au courant que l'obligation de protéger les renseignements des contribuables se poursuit même après leur départ de l'Agence. Chaque année, on demande à tous les employés de relire et de confirmer leurs obligations en vertu du Code d'intégrité et de conduite professionnelle de l'Agence.

Toute atteinte à la vie privée qui survient est évaluée conformément aux politiques et aux procédures du Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor afin de consigner et d'évaluer tous les risques potentiels pour la personne touchée. Un représentant de l'Agence spécialisé lui offrira un soutien afin qu'elle puisse poser des questions et obtenir les renseignements dont elle a besoin, et selon le cas, accéder à des services gratuits de protection du crédit.

Dans les rares cas où les renseignements d'un contribuable sont véritablement compromis, l'Agence prend des mesures pour résoudre toutes les questions en suspens. Ces mesures comprennent l'examen de toutes les activités frauduleuses qui pourraient avoir eu lieu dans le compte, y compris les remboursements frauduleux.[Français]

L'Agence est fermement résolue à maintenir la confiance des Canadiens en notre organisation et à répondre à leurs attentes concernant la mise en place des contrôles nécessaires pour assurer la sécurité des renseignements qui lui sont confiés. Nous avons travaillé fort pour gagner la confiance du public, puisque celle-ci est à la base d'un régime fiscal fondé sur l'autocotisation.[Traduction]

II faut des années pour se forger une bonne réputation, et nous maintenons la nôtre en demeurant vigilants dans nos efforts pour protéger les contribuables contre les atteintes à la sécurité et pour protéger le système d'administration de l'impôt du Canada contre toute inconduite et infraction criminelle.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Je répondrai maintenant avec plaisir à vos questions. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Guénette.

S'il n'y a personne d'autre, nous allons commencer la période de questions.

Monsieur Drouin, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins de comparaître devant le Comité à court préavis.

Je tiens à dire que je suis une des victimes de la fuite de données chez Desjardins, tout comme plusieurs de mes concitoyens.

Madame Boisjoly, vous avez fait allusion à la pétition en ligne visant à faire changer les numéros d’assurance sociale des gens touchés. Pouvez-vous expliquer au Comité pourquoi on ne le ferait pas et pourquoi cela ne ferait que compliquer les choses sans donner plus de sécurité aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

J’en ai fait brièvement mention dans ma présentation, et je vous remercie de me donner l’occasion d’en parler plus longuement.

Tout d’abord, une fuite d’information ne signifie pas nécessairement qu’il y a eu fraude ou vol d’identité. Ensuite, si on ne change pas automatiquement les numéros d’assurance sociale à la suite d’une fuite comme celle-ci, c’est d'abord parce que cela ne résout pas vraiment le problème et n'écarte pas nécessairement tout risque de fraude.

Laissez-moi vous expliquer un peu plus ce premier point. Si on ne change pas le numéro d’assurance sociale associé à un certain numéro de crédit et qu’un bureau de crédit utilise l’ancien numéro de crédit, l'individu concerné ne pourra pas nécessairement obtenir du crédit. De plus, si un prêteur ne fait pas une bonne vérification de l'identité de ce dernier et qu'un fraudeur emprunte de l’argent en son nom, le prêteur pourrait lui demander de payer la dette. Il peut donc y avoir d'autres fraudes si le prêteur ne vérifie pas correctement l'identité de l'individu.

La deuxième raison, c’est que cela peut créer de graves problèmes d’accès à des avantages et à des services. Comme je l’ai dit dans ma présentation, la personne qui est victime d'une fuite d’information doit prévenir toutes les personnes, les institutions financières, les agences de crédit, les employeurs passés et futurs et les gestionnaires des régimes de pensions auxquels elle a adhéré avec son ancien numéro d’assurance sociale et faire les changements nécessaires. Souvent, les gens ne se souviennent plus des personnes à qui ils ont donné leur numéro d’assurance sociale, surtout au début de leur carrière. Cela peut empêcher une personne de recevoir sa pension, par exemple, car on ne pourrait plus faire le lien entre l'individu et les avantages auxquels il a droit.

Au sein du fédéral, nous aviserions certainement l’Agence du revenu et tous les organismes concernés, mais les changements pourraient se faire de façon manuelle et il pourrait y avoir des erreurs, ce qui pourrait compliquer le calcul des pensions ou des prestations d’assurance-emploi. Si on oublie un employeur et que celui-ci fait des erreurs, il pourrait y avoir un mauvais calcul des prestations d’assurance-emploi ou de la pension de vieillesse.

(1505)

M. Francis Drouin:

En d'autres mots, changer notre numéro d’assurance sociale ne protège pas nécessairement nos renseignements personnels.

Pourquoi émet-on un autre numéro d’assurance sociale dans les cas où la fraude a été prouvée?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Quand la fraude est prouvée, on en détermine le type et on discute avec le citoyen touché. Souvent, celui-ci va décider de ne pas changer son numéro d’assurance sociale. Il va s’inscrire ou être inscrit à un bureau de vérification de crédit. Par le fait même, il sera mieux protégé qu'il ne le serait en changeant son numéro d’assurance sociale. Souvent, après avoir été informé, le citoyen décide de ne pas changer son numéro d’assurance sociale. Dans un très petit nombre de cas, soit 60 cas par année depuis 2014, le citoyen tient absolument à faire un changement lorsque la fraude est confirmée. À ce moment-là, on va permettre l’émission d’un nouveau numéro d’assurance sociale, mais on va aussi lui faire comprendre que cela ne réglera pas nécessairement la situation.

M. Francis Drouin:

Voici une question plus pragmatique.

Comme les citoyens qui sont dans la même situation que moi, je me dis qu’il y a un risque de fraude. Comment puis-je donc aviser les autorités, que ce soit Revenu Canada ou Service Canada, que mon numéro d’assurance sociale va peut-être être utilisé de façon frauduleuse? Est-ce que je peux appeler Service Canada pour l'en aviser? Est-ce qu’il existe un processus interne qui permet aux citoyens de faire cela?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Absolument. Je dirais deux choses là-dessus.

Premièrement, depuis que la fuite a été rendue publique, nous avons reçu directement de 1 400 à 1 500 demandes de citoyens. Ils nous ont appelés pour savoir comment mieux protéger leurs renseignements personnels, et nous leur avons donné beaucoup d'information à ce sujet. Souvent, les citoyens prendront les mesures que nous leur conseillons de prendre, c'est-à-dire regarder les rapports des bureaux de crédit et vérifier leurs transactions bancaires.

Deuxièmement, s'ils constatent une activité suspecte, ils doivent suivre des procédures très claires pour nous en informer. Si des transactions suspectes sont détectées, nous leur demandons de communiquer avec Service Canada, qui pourra prendre les mesures nécessaires pour les aider.

M. Francis Drouin:

D'accord.

Sur le site Web, il est question de 29 cas où il est permis aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes de communiquer leur numéro d'assurance sociale, par exemple à des institutions bancaires ou à d'autres entités.

Que fait Service Canada pour que les Canadiens et les Canadiennes sachent quand ils devraient communiquer leur numéro d'assurance sociale et quand ils ne devraient pas le faire? Quel est le recours possible quand un organisme demande un numéro d'assurance sociale alors qu'il ne devrait pas le faire?

(1510)

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Notre site Web, nos centres d'appel et les centres de Service Canada indiquent aux citoyens à qui ils devraient donner leur numéro d'assurance sociale. À vrai dire, lorsque nous émettons un numéro d'assurance sociale à un citoyen, nous lui mentionnons à qui ils devraient le donner et à qui ils ne devraient pas le donner. Un certain nombre d'organismes sont réglementés pour obtenir le numéro d'assurance sociale, par exemple quand une banque ou un créditeur donne des intérêts, ce qui concerne l'Agence du revenu du Canada.

Si quelqu'un ne faisant pas partie de cette liste demande le numéro d'assurance sociale d'une personne, cette dernière peut refuser et demander de produire une autre forme d'information. Par exemple, il y a longtemps de cela, les propriétaires demandaient souvent le numéro d'assurance sociale d'un locataire potentiel pour vérifier son crédit. La personne concernée peut simplement remettre un rapport de crédit plutôt que donner son numéro d'assurance sociale. La personne qui pose la question doit... [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Il est utile que les témoins jettent un coup d'œil à la présidence de temps à autre afin que je puisse leur faire signe.

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Merci beaucoup.

Ces lunettes ne... [Français]

Le président:

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous tous d'être présents aujourd'hui.

À vous écouter, nous nous sentons comme dans Les Douze travaux d'Astérix. Nous nous mettons à la place des citoyens. Ce qui les inquiète, c'est qu'ils ne savent pas trop ce qui va arriver. Nous avons demandé à vous rencontrer pour avoir de l'information à cet égard. On sait que le numéro d'assurance sociale est une mesure en place, mais y a-t-il autre chose qui devrait être fait à l'avenir pour changer le système? Pourrait-on faire ce qu'ont fait d'autres pays, c'est-à-dire avoir plus d'identification numérique, que ce soit au moyen d'empreintes digitales ou d'autre chose?

Madame Boisjoly, vous avez dit qu'il y a environ 60 cas par année, mais là, les données de 2,9 millions de personnes ont été volées. Vous attendez-vous à une grande augmentation de changements requis du numéro d'assurance sociale à la suite de ces vols d'identité?

J'ai aussi une question pour vous, monsieur Guénette.

Les gens qui suivent ce qui se passe actuellement veulent savoir ce qu'on fait. Vous avez proposé une bonne solution, et c'est ce que les gens ont besoin qu'on donne, des solutions. On a parlé d'aller sur le site du gouvernement du Canada et d'ouvrir son dossier de finances. Si j'ai bien compris, en ouvrant son dossier, on peut recevoir des alertes ou des avis.

Cela fait trois semaines maintenant. Nous sommes ici aujourd'hui à la suite d'une demande d'urgence. Pourquoi n'a-t-on pas communiqué avec le public immédiatement ou dans la semaine qui a suivi les vols pour lui faire savoir ce que le gouvernement du Canada peut faire pour l'aider? C'est ce qu'on a besoin de savoir.

Je vous écoute, madame Boisjoly.

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Merci.

Pour répondre à votre première question sur les nouvelles mesures, toute situation comme celle-ci nous donne l'occasion de revoir nos mesures de sécurité et de protection de la vie privée. Tous nos collègues et moi nous penchons certainement là-dessus lorsqu'il y a de tels incidents. Nos collègues qui nous ont précédés ont beaucoup parlé de l'évolution de la cybersécurité. Ils ont dit qu'il fallait toujours être prêt. Il est certain que nous nous penchons toujours là-dessus.

Ma collègue a mentionné le Conseil du Trésor, dont le mandat comprend la gestion de l'identité. Il se penche sur les façons dont on peut mieux résoudre les problèmes liés à l'identité numérique, notamment en menant des projets pilotes avec les provinces. Nous participons à ces forums et nous pensons à des façons de faire avancer la discussion en ce qui concerne l'identité numérique.

Deuxièmement, au sujet du nombre de vols d'identité, on nous a signalé de nombreux vols d'identité au cours des 14 ou 15 dernières années. Ce sont probablement des millions de personnes qui ont déjà été touchées et, malgré cela, le nombre de personnes qui demandent un nouveau numéro d'assurance sociale demeure plutôt faible. Alors, je ne peux pas répondre à votre question, puisque je ne connais pas l'avenir, mais je peux dire qu'il y a eu beaucoup de vols et que le nombre semblait constant, soit près de 60 par année.

M. Maxime Guénette:

Je vous remercie de votre question, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Comme Mme Boisjoly le disait, toutes les occasions sont bonnes pour rappeler aux gens les choses qu'ils peuvent faire. Pendant la période des impôts, nous avons mené des campagnes publicitaires et des initiatives de communication sur le Web et sur les médias sociaux pour rappeler aux gens les services qui sont à leur disposition. Cela dit, il y a toujours plus à faire de ce côté-là. Nous cherchons toujours des occasions de communiquer davantage là-dessus. Alors...

(1515)

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord, mais dans le cas qui nous occupe, il s'agit de gérer une crise. Nous sommes ici pour savoir si un organisme fédéral peut donner un coup de main à Desjardins, qui prend ses propres mesures pour rectifier la situation du mieux qu'elle le peut. À l'heure actuelle, je vois des mesures interagences, mais il n'y a pas vraiment de mesures proactives pour aider les citoyens, mis à part un message qu'on a déjà fait passer.

Selon vous, pourquoi le gouvernement semble-t-il aussi passif et ne dit-il rien? Est-ce parce qu'il n'y a rien à faire? N'y a-t-il pas de solution?

Nous cherchons des solutions, parce que les gens sont inquiets. Si vous nous dites que les agences en place n'ont pas les moyens ou les outils pour les aider, nous allons nous tourner vers d'autres solutions.

Est-ce que les solutions comme celle proposée par Desjardins, c'est-à-dire les services d'Equifax, sont assez efficaces, selon votre expérience et votre évaluation de la situation? Nous cherchons à rassurer les gens avec les vraies choses; nous ne voulons pas dire n'importe quoi.

M. Maxime Guénette:

À l'heure actuelle, puisque l'enquête est encore en cours, il y a pas mal d'information...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

L'enquête n'a rien à y voir, car on sait comment la fuite de données a eu lieu. On a aussi une idée de l'endroit où elles ont été envoyées, mais, pour l'instant, ce n'est pas cela qui nous intéresse. On sait qu'il y a quelqu'un, quelque part sur la planète, qui a nos coordonnées et qui peut nous faire du mal en volant notre identité. Nous voulons donc savoir si nos agences peuvent intervenir de façon proactive ou non, et ce qu'on peut faire si ce n'est pas le cas.

Vous avez une solution concernant mon dossier, alors c'est déjà un élément qui pourrait être communiqué aux citoyens. Ce serait important de le faire rapidement, parce que les gens ne sont pas de très bonne humeur pendant leurs vacances. Ensuite, il faudra voir si on peut faire autre chose.

La question du numéro d'assurance sociale a été soulevée partout. Plusieurs ont fait des suggestions. Vous êtes responsable de ce dossier et vous dites qu'il n'y a rien à faire, du moins pas de cette façon. Ce sont des réponses qu'on doit entendre, mais il reste qu'il faut sortir d'ici en disant aux gens ce que le gouvernement peut faire pour aider Desjardins, premièrement, et deuxièmement, les 2,9 millions de personnes touchées. On entend beaucoup parler de protocoles internes, mais, pour les citoyens qui nous écoutent, cela ne veut pas dire grand-chose. Voilà pourquoi j'aime entendre des réponses claires. Je sais que vous en donnez quand vous le pouvez, mais en fin de compte, lorsqu'on va sortir d'ici, il faudra savoir ce qu'on peut faire.

M. Maxime Guénette:

Je peux vous assurer qu'il y a des discussions très proactives entre les différents ministères concernés.

Du côté de l'Agence du revenu, comme je le disais dans mon allocution, le numéro d'assurance sociale, l'adresse et la date de naissance sont certaines des informations dont on a besoin pour s'identifier auprès de l'Agence. Cela prend aussi de l'information sur les déclarations de revenus des années précédentes, ce qui ne fait pas partie de l'information qui a été volée chez Desjardins, selon les discussions que nous avons eues. Cela dit, encore une fois, l'enquête est toujours en cours. Alors, ces questions...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Comme je vous l'ai dit, cela ne change rien, en fin de compte.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président? [Traduction]

Le président:

Vous avez une dizaine de secondes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

S'il y a un vol d'identité, quelle est la première chose qu'un citoyen doit faire? Appeler la police?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Oui.

M. Maxime Guénette:

Effectivement.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous tous d'avoir pris le temps de venir ici aujourd’hui.

Madame Boisjoly, j’ai retenu un point dans votre réponse à M. Drouin. Vous avez dit qu’une fuite de données personnelles ne mène pas au vol d’identité. C’est un peu ce qui nous amène ici aujourd’hui. Les citoyens veulent justement éviter un vol d’identité; c’est la préoccupation principale. Dans ce contexte, j’ai quelques questions à poser.

Vous avez dit que les gens devraient rapporter les activités suspectes liées au numéro d’assurance sociale. Je suis un législateur fédéral et je ne sais pas ce qu'est une activité suspecte liée au numéro d’assurance sociale. Dieu merci, je n’ai jamais été victime de fraude, et c'est la même chose pour les gens de mon entourage. Je touche du bois. Cependant, je connais des gens qui en ont été victimes. Ils l'apprennent quand ils reçoivent une facture de téléphone cellulaire qu'ils n'ont pas ou une carte de crédit de Canadian Tire qu'ils n'ont jamais demandée. Ils se retrouvent avec des dettes et ont des obligations qui ne sont pas les leurs.

Pouvez-vous me dire ce qu'est exactement une activité suspecte liée au numéro d’assurance sociale?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Vous avez bien cerné certaines activités suspectes, comme vous le dites. Nous demandons aux gens de se protéger le mieux possible en faisant affaire avec un bureau de crédit, pour que les transactions soient suivies du plus près possible. Ils doivent regarder leurs transactions bancaires et de cartes de crédit. S’ils voient qu'on leur attribue une transaction qu'ils n'ont pas faite, nous leur demandons de contacter le bureau...

(1520)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Pardonnez-moi de vous interrompre, mais mon temps est limité et j'ai juste un tour.

Ces activités suspectes ou ces transactions problématiques que nous pourrions voir sur notre relevé de carte de crédit peuvent être liées à toutes sortes de choses. Ce peut être quelqu’un qui a volé notre courrier et qui a obtenu notre adresse. Il s'agit d'informations qui sont vraisemblablement plus faciles à obtenir. Vous avez justement mentionné qu'en ce qui concerne la situation dont nous discutons aujourd'hui, la personne a de telles informations complémentaires. En principe, avec toutes les informations qui ont été volées, la personne pourrait facilement appeler Revenu Canada et obtenir un nouveau mot de passe. On a toute l’information nécessaire, si on a le dossier complet d’un individu.

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Oui, et c’est le point le plus important. On parle du nombre d’identifiants. Il revient à chacune des organisations de vérifier l’identité du citoyen.

Mon collègue a dit qu’on doit aussi avoir une ligne de la déclaration de revenus. Dans le cas de l’assurance-emploi, il y a un code d’accès, et on vous demande de donner les deux chiffres de ce code d'accès. En tant que vérificateur d’identité, il faut nous assurer de poser des questions d’identification secrètes et qui ne sont partagées qu’avec les personnes que nous connaissons. Cela nous permet ainsi de mieux vérifier l’identité des gens et de leur fournir le service. Par exemple, vous ne pourriez pas appeler Service Canada et obtenir des prestations d’assurance-emploi avec l’information qui est divulguée présentement.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Concernant l'obtention d'un nouveau numéro d'assurance sociale, j’ai un peu de difficulté à comprendre. Dans le fond, l’argument, c’est que cela devient compliqué pour le citoyen. En principe, on attribue un numéro d’assurance sociale pour des raisons d'efficacité. Un identifiant unique vise à faciliter les transactions avec les instances gouvernementales.

Vous me pardonnerez cette comparaison qui n’est peut-être pas exacte. Si, aujourd’hui, je constate un problème lié à ma carte de crédit, la banque ou la compagnie émettrice est quand même en mesure de transférer un solde ou de faire le lien entre les transactions légitimes sur ma carte de crédit fraudée et le nouveau numéro de carte qu'elle m'a envoyée.

Pourquoi une institution financière pourrait-elle faire cela alors que, de votre côté, vous n’êtes pas capable de dire que le numéro d'assurance sociale d'une personne est compromis et qu’elle a un nouveau numéro? Un ancien employeur pourrait devoir s'occuper, par exemple, de questions qui concernent la pension de cette personne. Sachant que c'est la même personne, pourquoi n’êtes-vous pas capable de faire le lien entre l’ancien et le nouveau numéro d'assurance sociale? Il faudrait peut-être faire une vérification additionnelle, étant donné que le numéro a été compromis, mais il reste que j'ai un peu de difficulté à comprendre pourquoi vous ne pouvez pas faire cela.

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Au départ, vous avez énoncé que la première raison pour laquelle on ne donne pas automatiquement le numéro d’assurance sociale est que cela pourrait rendre la vie difficile aux citoyens. Or la première raison est plutôt que cela ne préviendrait pas nécessairement la fraude. C'est un point très important. Il faudrait que le citoyen continue à faire la vérification de son ancien numéro d’assurance sociale parce qu’il existe encore...

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais, si je perds ma carte de crédit, cela ne veut pas nécessairement dire qu'elle a été volée. Elle est peut-être tombée quelque part dans un égout, de sorte qu'on ne la reverra plus jamais et qu'elle ne sera pas utilisée. J'appellerais tout de même ma banque, Visa ou peu importe, pour lui demander d'annuler cette carte. Je ferais quand même des vérifications et j'aurais la paix d'esprit en sachant que je suis protégé.

Pourquoi ne pas suivre la même logique pour un citoyen victime d'une fuite de données personnelles, qui, en plus, est hautement médiatisée? Le citoyen veut mettre tous les points-virgules qu'il peut pour se protéger. Il change ses cartes de crédit et tout le reste, comme on le fait quand on perd son portefeuille. Pourquoi ne pas procéder de la même façon?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Le numéro d'assurance sociale n'est pas comme une carte de crédit, qui est le seul identifiant de cette personne pour la banque. C'est un identifiant utilisé par les employeurs d'une personne depuis qu'elle est sur le marché du travail. Ce numéro est aussi utilisé par différents programmes et services.

Présentement, il n'y a pas de système informatique qui relie tous ces systèmes pour faire une mise à jour du numéro d'assurance sociale utilisé par les employeurs et les différents groupes et programmes. Ce travail se ferait de façon manuelle. C'est pour cela que nous ne connaissons pas l'ensemble des employeurs. Au sein du gouvernement fédéral, cela se ferait de façon manuelle. Comme je l'ai dit, c'est ce que nous avons fait un petit nombre de fois. Il y a des risques d'erreur. Je ne fais que le mentionner au Comité.

(1525)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il me reste moins d'une minute.

Au risque de nous emmêler dans les détails techniques, j'aimerais mieux comprendre. Si un employeur veut utiliser le numéro d'assurance sociale, comment cela fonctionne-t-il? Il doit bien y avoir une sorte d'alignement, quand on remonte l'échelle.

J'ai une dernière question, qui revient à ce que M. Paul-Hus a dit à juste titre.

Je vais prendre l'exemple du Québec. Quand il y a des inondations, les forces de l'ordre et le gouvernement du Québec font des consultations publiques sur place pour que les gens puissent se déplacer.

Monsieur Guénette, je respecte ce que vous avez dit, mais les programmes publicitaires ou les publications sur les médias sociaux ne sont peut-être pas suffisants.

Compte tenu de l'ampleur du vol et de la fuite, avez-vous considéré organiser des consultations en personne dans des endroits névralgiques au Québec ou dans des grands centres à Longueuil, à Montréal ou ailleurs? [Traduction]

Le président:

Encore une fois, monsieur Dubé, vous avez posé une question importante, mais vous n'avez pas prévu de temps pour la réponse, alors vous devrez y revenir de quelque façon à un autre moment.

Vous êtes pourtant si efficace habituellement, monsieur Dubé.[Français]

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue au Comité, madame Lapointe. Vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonjour à vous tous et merci d'être avec nous.

Je ne siège pas à ce comité ordinairement, mais c'est avec plaisir que j'ai accepté de remplacer un de ses membres permanents.

J'ai discuté avec plusieurs concitoyens dans ma circonscription de Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, qui est au nord de Montréal et qui comprend Deux-Montagnes, Saint-Eustache, Boisbriand et Rosemère, et ils sont très inquiets. C'est quelque chose qui revient constamment depuis que la Chambre a ajourné, le 21 juin dernier. C'est pour cela que j'ai accepté avec empressement d'être ici aujourd'hui, même si je ne connais pas toutes les études qu'a faites ce comité.

Madame Ryan, tantôt, vous avez commencé par dire que c'est le ministère des Finances qui établit les lois et les règlements qui régissent le système bancaire canadien. Vous avez dit par la suite que la surveillance du secteur financier canadien est partagée entre les gouvernementaux fédéral et provinciaux.

Revenons au Québec spécifiquement. Les provinces sont chargées de la surveillance des courtiers en valeurs immobilières, des conseillers en épargne collective et en fonds de placement et des coopératives provinciales, entre autres. Desjardins est une coopérative provinciale. Je viens de parler de mes concitoyens, mais toute ma famille et moi faisons aussi partie des 2,9 millions de personnes touchées. Cela nous préoccupe énormément et nous nous demandons quelles seront les répercussions futures de ce vol sur notre vie.

Avez-vous reçu des demandes de Desjardins? M. Guénette a dit qu'il y a des discussions continues entre les ministères, mais les gens de Desjardins ont-ils communiqué avec vous pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires? [Traduction]

Mme Annette Ryan:

Puisque Desjardins est en grande partie régie par des lois provinciales, son premier interlocuteur gouvernemental serait l'Autorité des marchés financiers du Québec. Quand j'ai parlé de la réglementation qui régit le système bancaire au fédéral, il faut savoir qu'elle s'applique aux institutions qui ont opté pour une réglementation fédérale.

Puisque Desjardins est en grande partie régie par des lois provinciales, nombre des exigences d'exploitation mises en œuvre avant cet incident l'ont normalement été par l'intermédiaire de l'Autorité des marchés financiers.

Ma collègue du Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières peut vous expliquer de quelle façon cela fonctionne au fédéral. Dans l'incident en question, l'institution s'est empressée de prendre diverses mesures responsables afin de ne rien camoufler de la fuite, ce qui est conforme aux lois provinciales et fédérales en matière de confidentialité. Les commissaires à la protection de la vie privée du Canada et du Québec ont également entamé une enquête conjointe sur cet incident, quoique nombre des dispositions relatives à la réglementation financière de Desjardins, mais aussi à la protection des consommateurs, soient ici de compétence provinciale. Nous pouvons traiter du système fédéral, mais nombre des questions que vous pourriez avoir dans ce dossier devraient être posées aux responsables provinciaux.

(1530)

[Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

J'ai une autre question. Les bureaux de crédit sont-ils de compétence fédérale? [Traduction]

Mme Annette Ryan:

Ils sont en grande partie de compétence provinciale et, dans ce cas-ci, il est question de compétence provinciale. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Les gens d'Equifax ont-ils communiqué avec vous? [Traduction]

Mme Annette Ryan:

Equifax ne communiquerait pas avec nous ni avec le ministère; elle est principalement régie par les lois provinciales sur la protection des consommateurs dans ce cas-ci. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci.

J'ai écoulé la moitié de mon temps de parole et je vais maintenant m'adresser à vous, monsieur Guénette.

Vous avez parlé tantôt de règles externes sur la prévention des vols d'identité, mais vous n'avez pas parlé beaucoup des règles internes. J'aimerais savoir quelles sont les règles internes à l'Agence du revenu du Canada. Après tout, nous sommes ici aujourd'hui parce qu'il y a eu un vol de données à l'interne.

Comment cela fonctionne-t-il à l'Agence du revenu du Canada? Les employés doivent-ils être à certains échelons pour avoir accès aux systèmes? Vous avez parlé de centraliser ou de détecter les problèmes en intervenant, si nécessaire. Vous avez dit qu'il y a des règles strictes et j'aimerais que vous m'en parliez un peu plus. Les gens peuvent-ils travailler avec leur équipement électronique quand ils sont devant des écrans de l'Agence du revenu du Canada? J'aimerais en savoir plus.

M. Maxime Guénette:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Évidemment, nous appliquons des règles de sécurité à plusieurs niveaux. D'abord, nous faisons un filtrage du personnel que nous embauchons. Les gens qui ont des accès plus privilégiés ont une cote « Secret » plutôt qu'une cote moins élevée. Une panoplie de mesures de sécurité physique sont en place. Les gens qui travaillent dans les centres d’appel et qui ont accès à des écrans contenant de l’information sur des contribuables n’ont pas le droit d’avoir leur téléphone personnel avec eux. Il y a des mesures prises de ce côté-là.

Quant à l’accès aux données des contribuables, ces données sont sur des serveurs distincts et non branchés à l'Internet. Il y a un mécanisme selon lequel l’accès des employés aux données est révisé sur une base annuelle ou chaque fois qu’ils changent de poste. L’accès de ces employés est vérifié sur une base régulière par les gestionnaires.

En ce qui concerne la charge de travail, dans mes notes d'allocution, j'ai parlé des règles administratives. Quand nous confions une charge de travail à des employés, notre système de gestion de la fraude d’entreprise fait en temps réel une vérification par algorithme. Ce système applique plusieurs douzaines de règles. Par exemple, si un employé vérifie son propre compte d’impôt, une alerte est automatiquement émise et le système la voit tout de suite. Si un employé exécutait un travail ne lui ayant pas été confié, le système émettrait immédiatement une alerte au gestionnaire, qui serait alors en mesure de demander à l'employé ce qu’il faisait dans le système. Des captures d’écran sont faites à la minute près, ce qui nous permet de savoir quelles pages l’employé a consultées ou quels changements il y a apportés. Ce système a été mis en place en 2017 et il est très avancé. Il nous permet d’avoir des contrôles en place.

Pour ce qui est de la prévention de la fuite de données, les employés sont incapables de copier de l’information sur des CD, des DVD ou des clés USB. Le système ne le leur permet pas.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Lapointe.[Traduction]

Passons maintenant à M. Motz, puis à M. Clarke.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier une fois de plus les représentants des ministères qui sont ici.

Je n'ai que deux questions brèves pour la représentante du ministère des Finances. Vous dites que votre objectif premier est de prévenir la fuite de données. Nous savons cependant que ces fuites se produisent et qu'elles ne se limitent pas au secteur financier.

Madame Ryan, vous avez dit que, lorsqu'un incident lié à la cybersécurité survient dans une institution fédérale sous réglementation fédérale — ce dont il est question aujourd’hui —, il y a des mécanismes de contrôle et de surveillance en place pour le gérer. Pouvez-vous expliquer concrètement aux Canadiens ce qui arrive quand cela se produit?

(1535)

Mme Judy Cameron (directrice principale, Affaires réglementaires et politique stratégique, Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières):

Permettez-moi de vous répondre.

Je représente le Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières, dont le mandat est de surveiller les institutions financières et de leur imposer des règles afin de protéger les droits et les intérêts des déposants et des créditeurs. En gros, le bureau assure la sûreté et la fiabilité des institutions financières, mais il veille aussi à ce qu'elles se conforment à toute la réglementation fédérale. Par exemple, il s'attend à ce qu'elles aient des systèmes conformes aux lois sur la protection de la vie privée.

Le bureau établit les attentes par rapport aux activités des institutions, comme le respect des lois sur la protection de la vie privée. Il s'attend également à ce qu'elles effectuent des autoévaluations des risques pour établir les protections nécessaires contre les menaces internes de cybersécurité. Il supervise donc les institutions pour s'assurer qu'elles respectent les attentes établies de sorte à confirmer la présence de systèmes de gestion dûment conformes.

M. Glen Motz:

Essentiellement, c'est de la surveillance, sans plus. Et, dans le cas présent, c'est de la surveillance par rapport à ce qui s'est passé pour s'assurer que...

Mme Judy Cameron:

C'est la surveillance de leurs systèmes pour prévenir ce genre de situations, en fait.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Va pour cette question. L'autre question est pour Mme Ryan ou quiconque peut...

Je vais simplement lire le résumé que vous avez fourni. Vous avez dit: « ... la cybersécurité est un domaine d'une importance critique pour le ministère des Finances. Nous collaborons activement avec des partenaires de l'ensemble du gouvernement et du secteur privé pour nous assurer que les Canadiens sont bien protégés contre des incidents liés à la cybersécurité et que, lorsqu'ils surviennent, les incidents sont gérés de façon à atténuer les répercussions sur les consommateurs et le secteur financier dans son ensemble ».

À quoi est-ce que cela ressemble pour les consommateurs touchés, pour l'ensemble des consommateurs, pour l'institution financière, pour le secteur bancaire et pour les divers ministères? Vous pouvez certes faire ce genre de déclarations, mais à quoi cela ressemble-t-il concrètement?

Mme Annette Ryan:

Je pense que le nombre de partenaires fédéraux que vous avez entendus aujourd'hui en témoigne.

Les investissements dans le centre pour la cybersécurité faisaient partie de la première ligne de défense en vue du renforcement de la capacité de prévenir les atteintes à la cybersécurité et, comme l'a dit André Boucher, ils sont axés sur la mise en œuvre d'une réponse adaptée à celles-ci. Dans ce cas-ci, un type particulier d'atteinte à la cybersécurité s'est produit, une infraction commise par un employé, si bien qu'un grand nombre des moyens de défense mis en place par le centre pour la cybersécurité n'ont pas été déployés, mais les ressources de ce centre sont complétées par les nouvelles ressources de la GRC. Vous avez entendu cette dernière parler du centre national de lutte contre la cybercriminalité et de ses efforts au sein du Centre antifraude du Canada.

Nous sommes également conscients que les atteintes à la cybersécurité ou aux données relèvent de la protection de la vie privée. Par conséquent, des mesures telles que les nouvelles exigences obligeant les entreprises à aviser leurs clients de toute atteinte sont essentielles pour permettre aux citoyens de se montrer vigilants quant à leurs propres finances et de savoir que des renseignements importants à leur sujet ont été touchés. Il est important de faire appel à des services de surveillance comme Equifax parce qu'ils permettent à ces personnes de savoir quand quelque chose est fait en leur nom à leurs dépens.

M. Glen Motz:

J'ai une question complémentaire à ce sujet. Si j'étais l'un des 2,9 millions de Canadiens concernés par cette situation, ou l'un des millions de Canadiens qui ont déjà été victimes d'atteintes aux données de toutes sortes, je voudrais moi aussi obtenir de l'aide pour reprendre le contrôle de ma vie. On parle actuellement beaucoup de ce en quoi pourrait consister cette aide, mais concrètement, les Canadiens veulent savoir comment reprendre le contrôle de leur vie. Ils veulent atténuer les risques et les répercussions qu'une telle atteinte peut avoir sur leur vie personnelle, sur leur avenir financier et sur celui de leur famille.

Je suis curieux; il semble que le ministère des Finances a un rôle à jouer dans la création d'un lieu où les Canadiens puissent obtenir les renseignements dont ils ont besoin, suivre un modèle, trouver des numéros à appeler ou autre pour mettre de l'ordre dans leur vie, car ces événements sont et seront catastrophiques pour ceux dont ces criminels vont profiter.

En tant que gouvernement, nous avons la responsabilité de veiller à protéger les Canadiens du mieux que nous le pouvons. Ces problèmes ne vont pas disparaître.

(1540)

Le président:

Je vais devoir en rester là. Je vous remercie de votre témoignage.

Chers collègues, j'ai besoin de votre avis. Nos prochains témoins sont à l'extérieur et, comme vous le savez, ils sont soumis à des contraintes de temps. Je propose de suspendre la séance. Ma question, chers collègues, est la suivante: voulez-vous suspendre la séance et laisser ces témoins partir, ou voulez-vous suspendre la séance et leur demander de rester pour que nous puissions poser notre dernière série de questions?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'ils sont disposés à rester, j'aimerais poser mes questions.

M. Alupa Clarke:

J'aimerais poser mes questions à ces témoins, s'il vous plaît.

Le président:

Sur ce, je vais suspendre la séance. Je vais demander aux témoins de quitter la salle, mais de rester à proximité, et de revenir quand nous aurons terminé avec le prochain témoin... [Français]

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Monsieur le président, j'aurais des questions pour les témoins, mais je vous laisse décider à quel moment il sera opportun de les poser. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous avons hâte de les entendre, monsieur Fortin

Sur ce, nous allons suspendre la séance pour quelques minutes pendant que nous accueillons notre prochain groupe de témoins. Je vous remercie.

(1540)

(1540)

Le président:

Chers collègues, veuillez vous asseoir.

Je demande au prochain groupe de témoins de se joindre à nous —  M. Brun, M. Cormier et M. Berthiaume.

Je vais demander aux caméras de quitter la salle. Cela concerne toutes les caméras, y compris celle de CBC. Merci.

Monsieur Cormier, j'aimerais vous remercier, vous et vos collègues, de votre présence. Vous semblez être très populaires dernièrement.

Nous avons encouragé les témoins à faire de brèves déclarations, en insistant sur le fait qu'elles doivent être courtes, parce que les députés souhaitent vivement poser des questions. Monsieur Cormier, on m'a communiqué des renseignements contradictoires quant à l'heure à laquelle vous devez partir. À quelle heure devez-vous nous quitter au juste?

M. Guy Cormier (président et chef de la direction, Mouvement Desjardins):

Nous sommes censés partir vers 16 h 30, mais nous pouvons peut-être ajouter...

Le président:

Je vous encourage à rester plus longtemps si possible.

M. Guy Cormier:

Nous pourrions probablement rester une heure.

(1545)

Le président:

D'accord. Je pense que cela suffira. Vos collègues pourront peut-être rester après votre départ.

Le fait est qu'il s'agit d'une réunion d'urgence et que des gens sont venus de partout au Canada pour entendre ce que vous avez à dire.

Sur ce, je vous demande de formuler vos observations, après quoi nous passerons aux questions.

M. Guy Cormier:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, bonjour. Je suis accompagnée cet après-midi de M. Denis Berthiaume, premier vice-président exécutif et chef de l’exploitation, et de M. Bernard Brun, vice-président des relations gouvernementales, du Mouvement Desjardins.

D'entrée de jeu, j'aimerais dire que, chez Desjardins, nous étions ambivalents à l'égard de cette séance extraordinaire du Comité.

D’une part, cette séance peut paraître prématurée, dans la mesure où nous sommes en train de gérer cette situation et que des enquêtes policières sont en cours. Il est donc beaucoup trop tôt pour faire un bilan de la situation. Dans ce contexte, nous nous engageons à vous dire tout ce que nous savons de façon, toutefois, à ne pas nuire aux enquêtes en cours.

D’autre part, cette séance spéciale représente à nos yeux une occasion d’alerter les législateurs et l’opinion publique sur l'enjeu de la sécurité des renseignements personnels et sur la nécessité de repenser la notion d’identité numérique au Canada. Dans ma réflexion, c’est ce point qui l’a emporté.

Je vais d'abord dire une évidence: ce qui s’est produit chez Desjardins s’est produit ailleurs et pourrait se reproduire ailleurs, dans n’importe quelle entreprise privée ou n'importe quel organisme public dont la mission comporte la gestion de renseignements personnels. Qu’on pense à plusieurs banques dans le monde, par exemple Chase, aux États-Unis, Sun Trust, le Korea Credit Bureau ou, encore, plusieurs entités gouvernementales du Canada et des États-Unis, pour ne nommer que ceux-là, qui ont d’ailleurs été victimes d’employés malveillants.

Desjardins est une institution financière de premier plan et l'un des plus importants groupes financiers coopératifs dans le monde, avec plus de 300 milliards de dollars d’actifs. En 2015, le Mouvement Desjardins a été classé par Bloomberg au premier rang des institutions financières les plus sûres en Amérique du Nord, devant toutes les banques canadiennes. En d’autres mots, même les meilleurs ne sont pas à l’abri, et ce message doit être entendu, selon nous.

Personnellement, je travaille au Mouvement Desjardins depuis 27 ans. J’ai choisi cette organisation dès le début de ma carrière parce que c’est une institution financière qui réussit, après près de 120 ans, à très bien conjuguer l’économie et le social dans notre société.

Les agissements d’un employé malveillant sont à l'origine de cette situation déplorable, lequel est aujourd’hui congédié. Il a contrevenu à toutes les règles de notre coopérative. Dans cette situation, nous avons agi le plus rapidement possible et de la façon la plus transparente possible, avec pour seul objectif la protection de l’intérêt de nos membres. C’était notre priorité.

Dès le 20 juin, quelques jours après avoir appris l’ampleur de la situation, nous sommes sortis publiquement et avons donné toute l’information disponible, en concertation avec les forces policières. Nous avons aussi annoncé dès ce moment les mesures mises en place concernant la fuite des renseignements personnels.

Nous avons déployé tous les moyens que requiert la situation. Nous avons rapidement apporté des mesures additionnelles de surveillance et de protection, afin de protéger les renseignements personnels et financiers de nos membres et de nos clients. Nous avons avisé toutes les autorités compétentes: le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada, la Commission d’accès à l’information du Québec, l’Autorité des marchés financiers, le Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières, ainsi que les ministères des Finances du Québec et du Canada.

Nous avons mis en place des mesures additionnelles pour confirmer l’identité des personnes lorsqu’elles font appel à nous et assurons une vigie constante de l’ensemble des comptes de nos membres. Les procédures pour confirmer l’identité de nos membres et de nos clients, lorsqu’ils appellent les caisses Desjardins, les centres Desjardins Entreprises et notre centre d’appel AccèsD, ont également fait l’objet de mesures additionnelles.

Nous avons communiqué avec les membres concernés par la messagerie privée AccèsD et par lettre personnalisée, afin de les informer de la situation et des actions qu'ils devaient poser.

Nous avons aussi ajouté des mesures complémentaires pour faciliter l’activation du forfait de surveillance d’Equifax. Les membres touchés peuvent maintenant s’inscrire de quatre façons: sur le site Internet d’Equifax, par le service téléphonique d’AccèsD, par l’application Web et mobile d’AccèsD et directement dans nos caisses Desjardins en parlant avec leur conseiller.

Nous poursuivons activement notre collaboration avec les différents corps policiers. Finalement, nous travaillons avec des experts externes pour continuer à protéger les renseignements personnels de nos membres.

Je peux vous confirmer que nous avons agi avec diligence. À la suite des informations transmises par le Service de police de Laval, notre enquête interne a rapidement permis de remonter à la source de la fuite: un employé unique. Cet employé a été suspendu, puis congédié.

À l’heure actuelle, notre première priorité est de rassurer, d’accompagner, de soutenir et de protéger chacun des membres qui ont été touchés par cette situation.

(1550)



Encore ce matin, nous avons annoncé de nouvelles mesures de protection pour l'ensemble de nos membres. Dans cette ère du numérique, nous croyons, chez Desjardins, que tous nos membres doivent être protégés.

Comme je le disais, ce matin, Desjardins a annoncé qu'à compter de maintenant tous les membres de notre coopérative vont bénéficier d'une protection contre les transactions financières non autorisées et le vol d'identité. L'adhésion est automatique et sans frais, qu'ils aient été touchés ou pas par cette fuite de données. Depuis ce matin, Desjardins protège tous ses membres, tant les membres particuliers que les membres entreprises. C'est un précédent dans le monde des services financiers au Canada; nous sommes la première institution à faire cela. Dans cette situation, Desjardins agit avec rigueur, un sens du devoir et la volonté d'honorer son lien particulier avec ses membres.

Nous sommes entrés dans une ère où les données sont une ressource au même titre que l'eau, le bois et les matières premières essentielles au fonctionnement de pans entiers de notre économie. C'est la matière première, dorénavant, de toute une économie innovante qui va permettre des gains de productivité formidables et faciliter la vie des citoyens.

Le Canada est à quelques mois de l'opérationnalisation de la connectivité mobile 5G, qui va décupler les flots de données en circulation. Selon les spécialistes, cette connectivité ultrarapide sera le déclencheur d'applications futuristes liées à l'intelligence artificielle, un domaine où le Canada figure déjà parmi les leaders mondiaux avec ses trois pôles, Montréal, Toronto et Edmonton. Également, à l'heure où on se parle, le ministère des Finances du Canada est en consultation sur l'open banking, un système bancaire ouvert qui amènerait une ouverture du secteur transactionnel. Le virage a d'ailleurs déjà été entrepris dans plusieurs pays d'Europe.

À vous, législateurs, je me permets humblement de poser les questions suivantes.

Le Canada est-il bien outillé actuellement pour encadrer ces développements technologiques pleins de promesses, mais qui comportent aussi des risques nouveaux? Y a-t-il lieu d'adapter nos systèmes d'identification à cette ère du numérique pour garantir la protection des renseignements personnels et mieux lutter contre les cybercriminels? C'est toute la notion de l'identité numérique à laquelle j'ai fait allusion il y a quelques minutes.

Je vous soumets respectueusement que ce sont des questions réelles soulevées par la situation survenue chez Desjardins.

En terminant, je me permets de faire une proposition. J'invite ce comité à recommander au gouvernement du Canada la formation d'un groupe de travail spécial multipartite qui conseillerait le gouvernement sur la manière d'encadrer la gestion des données personnelles et l'identité numérique. Un tel groupe à l'écoute des préoccupations des citoyens devrait rassembler minimalement, selon nous, des représentants des gouvernements, du secteur des services financiers et des assurances, du secteur des télécommunications, ainsi que des juristes et des experts, ou tout autre groupe que le gouvernement trouverait pertinent de faire participer à la réflexion.

Le mandat de ce comité devrait consister en ceci: conseiller le gouvernement en matière de lois et de règlements; assurer la protection du public; favoriser un développement technologique innovant au bénéfice des citoyens et des communautés; et assurer une veille stratégique des meilleures pratiques dans le monde, afin que le Canada soit toujours à la page.

Personnellement, j'estime que le Canada ne peut viser l'excellence en technologie numérique et en intelligence artificielle sans avoir la même ambition en ce qui a trait à la gestion des données et des renseignements personnels. Nous devons tous tirer des leçons de la situation que vit le Mouvement Desjardins actuellement.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cormier.

Monsieur Picard, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Michel Picard:

Messieurs, bienvenue. Je vous remercie de vous prêter à l'exercice. Votre présence est très appréciée.

Monsieur Cormier, d'entrée de jeu, je vais vous rassurer en vous disant que le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale et le Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique ont commencé, en janvier dernier ou même avant, à traiter de questions entourant l'identifiant unique. Nous avons regardé des modèles de l'étranger, par exemple celui de l'Estonie, qui pose un certain nombre d'autres problèmes.

Avant de vous poser des questions d'ordre plus pratique, j'aimerais vous soumettre que l'identifiant unique fait partie des problèmes liés à la cybersécurité. La journée où quelqu'un mettra la main sur l'identifiant unique, on fera face au même problème.

Je suis content d'apprendre que vous offrez une protection à tous vos membres. Cependant, les institutions financières ont tendance à faire payer leurs clients pour protéger leurs données contre le vol d'identité. L'offre est faite par les institutions financières elles-mêmes. Avez-vous la même philosophie?

Pour que mon salaire soit déposé dans mon compte bancaire, pour faire des transactions, des retraits automatisés et des paiements Interac, je suis obligé de donner mon nom, mon adresse et mon numéro d'assurance sociale à l'institution avec laquelle je fais affaire. Or, je dois recourir à une tierce personne pour protéger ces informations. Pourquoi dois-je compter sur quelqu'un d'autre que l'entité à qui je donne ces informations?

(1555)

M. Guy Cormier:

Pour répondre à la première partie de votre question, je vous dirais que nous avons pris la décision, dès ce matin, de mettre en place un programme de protection pour l'ensemble de nos membres, tant les particuliers que les entreprises. Le volet entreprises n'est parfois pas couvert par d'autres institutions, voire par Equifax. Nous avons décidé d'offrir ce service gratuitement à nos membres tant qu'ils restent chez Desjardins. Il n'est pas question de leur facturer quoi que ce soit. Je répète très rapidement que le programme couvre toutes les transactions financières non autorisées sur le compte d'une personne, ses dépôts et son argent. Si une transaction n'a pas été autorisée, nous allons rembourser la personne. C'est une première chose.

Deuxièmement, si une personne est malheureusement victime d'un vol d'identité, nous lui offrirons une assistance, et non pas une liste de ce qu'elle doit faire. Nous allons lui offrir l'assistance de nos experts, qui pourront même participer à des conférences téléphoniques pour l'aider à restaurer son identité.

Troisièmement, nous allons offrir une protection allant jusqu'à 50 000 $ pour rembourser des frais que les membres auront pu subir, que ce soit une perte de salaire, des frais de gardiennage d'enfants ou d'obtention de documents.

Ce concept de gratuité est extrêmement important pour nous. Si vous êtes membre de la coopérative, vous avez accès à ce programme.

Nous proposons humblement qu'on mette sur pied un comité pour, entre autres, répondre à la question de savoir si la protection des données personnelles doit être gérée par des tierces entreprises. Je pense que le statu quo n'est pas une option.

M. Michel Picard:

Il y a deux problèmes à la solution que je considère comme temporaire de faire affaire avec une tierce partie. Vous demandez aux gens de faire affaire avec une tierce partie pour protéger leurs renseignements personnels, tierce partie qui, il y a deux ans, a aussi été victime d'actes de piratage. Nous avons fait une étude là-dessus ici.

Quelle serait la limite de votre responsabilité si l'entité à qui vous faites confiance, notamment Equifax, se faisait pirater les renseignements personnels de vos clients?

M. Guy Cormier:

C'est une question pertinente. Au Canada, la firme qui détient une part de marché de plus de 70 % dans le domaine de la protection et de la gestion de renseignements et de données est Equifax.

Quand cet événement est survenu, nous avons décidé de nous tourner vers l'entreprise canadienne qui offrait ce service aux Canadiens. Nous avons donc travaillé avec elle, mais, au cours des jours suivants, nous avons constaté qu'il y avait des problèmes. Nous avons rapidement pris nos propres mesures pour remédier aux problèmes liés à l'inscription des membres sur le site Internet d'Equifax. Nous l'avons vécu. Nous avons vu qu'il fallait améliorer les procédures et les façons de faire, et nous avons pris cela en charge.

Maintenant, faudrait-il que ce soit une seule, deux ou trois entreprises privées au Canada qui pilotent tout cela? La réflexion s'impose tout à fait.

M. Michel Picard:

Le vol d'identité a ceci de particulier que la donnée est active et à jamais sur le marché, à moins que la personne qui l'utilise ne meure. La donnée est virtuellement présente partout dans le monde. Elle peut être utilisée sur le marché noir après 24 heures, comme dans les cas de fraude de cartes de débit ou de crédit.

Le problème du vol d'identité ne concerne pas la sécurité des données du client à sa propre institution financière. Je suis convaincu que vos systèmes sont à jour quant à la protection contre le piratage de l'extérieur et que votre responsabilité envers vos clients est à la hauteur des attentes des Québécois et des Canadiens. S'il y a un problème dans le compte, vous allez rembourser l'argent qui a été détourné de façon criminelle.

Le problème du vol d'identité est le suivant. Disons qu'une personne se présente à une banque demain matin, dise s'appeler Guy Cormier et avoir besoin d'un prêt hypothécaire pour acheter une maison. L'hypothèque serait dans cette autre banque et non chez Desjardins.

Le vol d'identité fait des dommages dans d'autres milieux. Il y a eu les fameux flips immobiliers à Saint-Lambert, dans la Rive-Sud, où des personnes ont contracté de fausses hypothèques sous de fausses identités. Il y en a eu treize à la douzaine, et ce n'était qu'au Québec. Après cela, ce sera le Canada et l'Europe. Le vol d'identité a des répercussions et prend effet à l'extérieur du système financier du Mouvement Desjardins.

La protection que vous offrez, qui est appréciée et nécessaire, est quand même limitée à la vie financière du client, si je puis dire, au sein de son institution.

(1600)

M. Guy Cormier:

Essentiellement, la réflexion derrière la nouvelle mesure que nous avons annoncée ce matin, c'est qu'on est à l'ère numérique. Il y aura de moins en moins de transactions sur papier au cours des prochaines années. Cette donnée devient une matière première pour notre économie. Compte tenu de l'importance de ces données, chez Desjardins, nous avons pris la responsabilité d'offrir une protection à l'ensemble de nos membres.

Je disais qu'il y avait trois piliers. Le premier est la dimension financière à laquelle vous faites allusion. Si un membre de Desjardins voit une transaction non autorisée par lui-même apparaître dans ses comptes d'opération, Desjardins va totalement l'indemniser. Cela répond à la première partie de votre question sur la dimension des transactions financières.

S'il survient d'autres types de vol d'identité liés à des transactions de carte de crédit effectuées ailleurs, par exemple, des achats de téléphones cellulaires ou des locations de véhicules, la personne peut communiquer avec Desjardins et on va s'occuper d'elle. Deuxièmement, si elle a besoin de soutien pour restaurer son identité, pas sur le plan financier, mais relativement à d'autres éléments de la vie privée, Desjardins va l'accompagner. S'il faut appeler des agences gouvernementales ou des firmes privées, ou encore l'aider à préparer des documents notariés ou une présentation, nous allons le faire. On n'est donc plus dans la dimension financière, on accompagne la personne dans les autres démarches qu'elle pourrait avoir à entreprendre. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Picard.[Français]

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Cormier, messieurs, d'être avec nous.

Nous comprenons très bien que c'est une situation très émotive et très compliquée pour Desjardins. Monsieur Cormier, vous avez mentionné qu'il était prématuré de tenir une réunion de comité. Ce que je veux expliquer de nouveau à tout le monde, c'est que les conservateurs ont demandé cette réunion, avec l'appui du NPD, dans le but de voir ce que le gouvernement fédéral pouvait faire pour aider l'entreprise Desjardins et les quelque 3 millions de membres touchés.

L'objectif n'est pas d'enquêter sur la situation ou de connaître la façon dont les données ont été subtilisées. Ce sont les policiers qui s'en occupent. De mon côté, j'espère bien que l'individu va être puni avec toute la rigueur de la loi. J'espère que la loi est assez forte pour l'envoyer en prison longtemps, mais c'est une autre question.

Nous avons rencontré des fonctionnaires de différents ministères, notamment du ministère des Finances et de l'Agence du revenu du Canada. Ce sont de grands ministères, mais il est difficile de savoir si le gouvernement du Canada peut être utile dans cette situation.

Je veux savoir si vous avez reçu un soutien efficace du gouvernement. Sinon, que pourrait-il faire pour vous aider?

M. Guy Cormier:

Il y a deux ou trois éléments de réponse. Lorsque cet événement s'est produit, nous sommes entrés en contact avec plusieurs agences des gouvernements fédéral et provincial. Nous avons parlé aux différents ministères des Finances et, je tiens à vous le dire, nous avons senti une bonne collaboration et un bon soutien. M. Bernard Brun pourra confirmer qu'il y a eu des discussions très claires et très franches.

Ce que je constate, c'est que les autorités gouvernementales, tant fédérales que provinciales, veulent rassurer la population. Vous ne savez pas à quel point cela est important pour nous. Parfois, on voit ce qui s'écrit et ce qui se dit, et je comprends que les gens aient des inquiétudes et des questions. Comme députés, vous devez en recevoir beaucoup de vos concitoyens dans vos circonscriptions.

Je constate que les gens des gouvernements fédéral et provincial veulent rassurer les gens et les informer adéquatement. Cela aide beaucoup Desjardins. Il faut dire aux gens de communiquer avec nous afin que nous puissions leur présenter les programmes que nous avons annoncés ce matin. Chaque fois que nous rencontrons les gens, que ce soit dans nos caisses ou dans nos centres de contact avec la clientèle, nous sommes en contact direct et nous les rassurons.

Sans vouloir banaliser la situation, plusieurs études et plusieurs experts qui nous accompagnent actuellement nous disent très clairement qu'il y a une différence entre une fuite de données et ce qui se matérialise en un réel vol de données. Ce n'est pas un cas de « un pour un ». Ce sont des proportions très infimes.

En ajoutant la protection que nous avons annoncée ce matin, à nos yeux, nous venons dire à tous nos membres, y compris les entreprises, de ne pas s'inquiéter. S'il y a un problème, ils doivent appeler Desjardins. Nous nous occupons de les accompagner.

(1605)

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Depuis l'incident, vous offrez aux membres touchés un abonnement gratuit de cinq ans aux services d'Equifax. Est-ce que la nouvelle protection annoncée ce matin est un abonnement à vie aux mêmes services, ou s'agit-il d'une nouvelle protection interne?

M. Guy Cormier:

C'est exact, il y a une nouvelle protection interne. Comme je le disais, il s'agit du premier pilier. Si les gens voient une transaction non autorisée passée à leur compte, ils doivent aviser Desjardins. Nous allons ensuite regarder cela avec eux et les rembourser en totalité. Il est important de mentionner qu'il n’y a pas de plafond, que ce soit 10 000 $ ou 100 000 $.

Deuxièmement, s'ils sont victimes d’un vol d’identité, ils doivent communiquer avec nous. Nous allons les accompagner et faire des conférences téléphoniques. Nous offrons même des heures de soutien psychologique, par l'entremise de nos compagnies d'assurance-vie, aux gens qui vivent cette situation avec beaucoup d'émotion.

Troisièmement, il s'agit de la nouvelle protection de 50 000 $ pour les gens qui doivent engager des dépenses personnelles pour restaurer leur identité. Desjardins va assumer ces dépenses. C'est extrêmement important.

Pour ce qui est des services d'Equifax, je répète qu’il est important que les gens victimes de la fuite de données continuent de s'y inscrire activement, car cela leur donne le service d’alerte. Celui-ci pourrait les alerter d'une transaction non autorisée dans les semaines ou les mois suivants, ce qui n’est pas inclus dans le forfait de Desjardins. Le Mouvement Desjardins recommande très fortement aux membres victimes de cette fuite de s’inscrire aux services d'Equifax.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je suis membre de Desjardins, mais également client de la Banque Royale...

M. Guy Cormier: Merci.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus: La Banque Royale a un système que je ne connaissais pas. Je l'ai appris d'un employé la fin de semaine dernière. Sur son site, il y a un lien vers le site de TransUnion et, en cliquant dessus, mon dossier de crédit et ma cote de crédit apparaissent, et c’est tout à fait gratuit.

Est-ce que Desjardins va offrir un service semblable?

M. Guy Cormier:

Je vais laisser M. Berthiaume répondre à cela. Il va sûrement être très content.

M. Denis Berthiaume (premier vice-président exécutif et chef de l'exploitation, Mouvement Desjardins):

Nous offrons le même type de service avec TransUnion. Sur le Web et sur les appareils mobiles, on peut avoir accès à sa cote de crédit en temps réel. En ce qui a trait au système d’alerte, je pense que nous l'avons bien expliqué. Nous faisons affaire avec Equifax, mais nous considérons également la possibilité d'offrir un système d'alerte avec TransUnion.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Vous avez fait un travail extraordinaire pour mettre tout cela en place. Je vous félicite.

Maintenant, je voudrais parler des citoyens qui ont peur que leurs données qui ont été envoyées quelque part dans le monde soient utilisées pour faire des transactions ou quoi que ce soit. Vous ne pouvez pas être responsables de tout le monde. Vous avez une responsabilité envers vos membres, et 90 % des Québécois sont membres de Desjardins, mais vous ne pouvez pas savoir si une donnée envoyée à l'étranger provient de cette fuite précise.

En d'autres mots, si mes données volées sont envoyées à l’étranger, allez-vous me couvrir quand même, alors qu'elles auraient pu être envoyées par une autre source?

M. Guy Cormier:

Ce n'est pas seulement la situation que nous vivons chez Desjardins qui nous a amenés à faire la proposition de ce matin, mais nous avons certainement accéléré les choses. À chaque début d'année, nous faisons une planification et, en fonction de la sécurité, de nos nouveaux produits et de nos nouvelles offres, nous nous demandons ce qu'il est pertinent d'offrir à nos membres en fonction des besoins.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je vais vous interrompre, parce que j'ai compliqué les choses inutilement. Ce que je voulais dire, c’est que même s'il y a eu une fuite de données de votre côté, il se pourrait qu'une autre organisation envoie mes informations ailleurs. Dans un tel cas, le gouvernement n’aurait-il pas une certaine responsabilité? On dirait que vous vous occupez des problèmes de tout le monde. À un moment donné, ne devrait-on pas suggérer que le gouvernement du Canada donne un coup de main à tous les citoyens?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Écoutez, en ce moment, ce qui est important, c'est de rassurer les membres et d'offrir une protection à tout le monde. On ne va pas se mettre à déterminer si une donnée envoyée à l'étranger provient de la fuite de données chez Desjardins ou d'une autre fuite de renseignements dans une autre organisation. Nous voulons couvrir et rassurer nos membres.

Pour répondre à votre question, si une fraude survient dans un compte Desjardins, nous allons couvrir le membre concerné. Comme c'est le cas chez d'autres institutions financières, en cas de tentative de fraude, qu'il s'agisse d'un compte d'opérations courantes, d'un compte de carte de crédit ou d'un autre type de compte, nous n'en tenons pas les membres responsables.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Messieurs Cormier, Brun et Berthiaume, je vous remercie d’être ici. Vous êtes les bienvenus. Je crois que vous avez très bien saisi notre intention, c'est-à-dire échanger pour rétablir la confiance des personnes qui sont extrêmement inquiètes. Vous l’avez bien dit. Comme vous, nous entendons parler ces gens-là. C’est encore plus intéressant pour nous, puisque nous venons de terminer une étude. En fait, nous avons plutôt ouvert la porte aux députés de la prochaine législature en ce qui concerne la cybersécurité dans le secteur financier. Dans ce contexte-là, cela nous intéresse particulièrement.

Puisqu'on ne l’a pas mentionné encore, je dirais que, comme députés québécois, nous ne sommes pas ici pour faire une chasse aux sorcières. Avec le nombre d'activités auxquelles nous assistons, nous constatons clairement que Desjardins est un partenaire local de la communauté. Nous voulons travailler ensemble, et je pense que votre recommandation d'aujourd’hui va dans ce sens-là. Alors, je vous remercie.

J’aimerais aborder quelques éléments, en espérant que vous puissiez répondre à quelques questions. Je comprends les contraintes sous lesquelles vous vous présentez. La première chose est toute simple et semble niaiseuse, mais il s'agit des services français d'Equifax. Quelques personnes ont signalé qu'elles avaient de la difficulté à obtenir des services en français. Avez-vous collaboré avec eux pour vous assurer que vos membres, dont la très grande majorité est francophone, reçoivent un service en français?

(1610)

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Oui. Tout d'abord, nous voulions agir rapidement avec Equifax, et je pense que cela a été le sens de la démarche. Les gens d'Equifax ont été très collaboratifs. Ils ont même ajusté leur offre de service pour nous accommoder à plusieurs égards. Nous avons donc eu une excellente collaboration.

Maintenant, au fil du temps, nous avons réalisé effectivement que la capacité francophone atteignait certaines limites chez Equifax. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons apporté un certain nombre de mesures additionnelles. Le président vous a mentionné les quatre initiatives qui ont été mises en place.

Premièrement, les gens peuvent aller, que ce soit sur le Web ou sur leur téléphone cellulaire, s'inscrire directement aux services d'Equifax. Nous nous occupons de les diriger vers ces services, de faire le lien avec Equifax et de faire l'authentification.

Deuxièmement, les gens peuvent obtenir un service francophone en joignant nos centres d'appels AccèsD. Les temps d'attente sont très raisonnables. Nous faisons l'interface, en quelque sorte, entre nos membres et Equifax afin d'améliorer l'expérience. C'est ce que nous avons mis en place au cours des derniers jours et des dernières semaines. Nous croyons que cela a porté ses fruits.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ce n'est pas nécessairement propre à ce qu'on veut examiner, et cela ne relève pas du mandat du Comité, mais vous comprendrez que je voulais tout de même avoir l'heure juste là-dessus. Merci.

J'aimerais revenir sur la réglementation. On en a un peu entendu parler de la part des représentants du gouvernement qui vous ont précédés. Cela devient-il encombrant pour ce qui est d'atteindre vos objectifs et d'assurer la sécurité des données de vos membres? Vous êtes dans une situation particulière où vous êtes assujettis à la fois à la réglementation du gouvernement du Québec et à celle du gouvernement fédéral. Comparativement aux institutions financières traditionnelles et aux grandes banques, vous êtes dans une situation un peu unique. Vous me pardonnerez la terminologie qui n'est peut-être pas appropriée, mais je pense que vous comprenez ce que je veux dire. Cette situation différente peut-elle causer des ennuis?

Plus simplement, aurait-on intérêt à assurer une meilleure harmonie entre les exigences du gouvernement du Québec et celles du gouvernement fédéral, de sorte que vous n'ayez pas à tourner à gauche et à droite pour vous conformer à deux entités réglementaires différentes?

M. Bernard Brun (vice-président, Relations gouvernementales, Mouvement Desjardins):

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Effectivement, c'est extrêmement pertinent, parce que nous évoluons dans un système bijuridictionnel. Cela dit, dans l'ensemble, Desjardins est parfaitement à l'aise dans le cadre actuel. Évidemment, avec les échanges technologiques, l'interrelation au sein du système financier est de plus en plus manifeste. À ce sujet, il est primordial de ne pas agir en vase clos.

Plus tôt, M. Cormier a souligné que nous avions eu une bonne collaboration. Nous avons pu discuter avec tous les intervenants des gouvernements fédéral et provincial. Nous les incitons beaucoup à travailler ensemble. Nous sentons qu'il y a une collaboration, mais nous insistons pour que les gouvernements eux-mêmes discutent.

Quant au fait qu'une entité comme le Mouvement Desjardins navigue des deux côtés, je ne vois pas cela comme étant un problème. Cependant, nous avons manifestement besoin de soutien à cet égard. Nous le sentons et nous mettons l'accent là-dessus. Cela vient rejoindre notre suggestion de mettre sur pied un comité multipartite avec des gens des différents gouvernements. C'est ce qui nous permettra d'avancer et d'avoir des politiques efficaces qui vont toucher tout le monde.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

Il sera peut-être plus difficile de répondre à ma prochaine question, puisque l'enquête policière est toujours en cours.

Compte tenu de l'expertise en hausse en matière de cybersécurité, surtout chez les gens qui en font leur travail, croyez-vous qu'il serait approprié de recommander la vérification continue des comportements ou des antécédents d'employés qui ont accès à de l'information sensible et qui sont en mesure d'exploiter les informations d'autres utilisateurs, c'est-à-dire d'autres employés?

Je ne suis pas en train de dire que vous n'avez pas été à la hauteur à cet égard, mais tout le monde commence à reconnaître qu'il y a des personnes qui ont de plus en plus d'expertise. On se sert de leur expertise, mais cela peut aussi avoir des conséquences plus néfastes.

(1615)

M. Guy Cormier:

Mon collègue peut parler de nos pratiques, puis je compléterai ses remarques selon ma perspective.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

La première des choses, c'est qu'il y a des enquêtes de sécurité rigoureuses qui se déroulent chez Desjardins de façon continue. Ensuite, effectivement, les enquêtes sont liées au niveau d'emploi. C'est un élément important.

En ce qui concerne la situation qui nous occupe, on pourrait se demander si on aurait pu détecter quoi que ce soit. J'aime bien rappeler que la fraude interne par un employé malveillant est le risque contre lequel il est le plus difficile de se prémunir. C'est reconnu partout dans l'industrie, et il y a beaucoup de cas patents.

Outre les enquêtes de sécurité, il y avait des mécanismes de sécurité en place. Évidemment, on parle d'un employé malveillant qui a trouvé une façon de contourner toutes les règles et qui a utilisé un stratagème pour exfiltrer les données. Cela dit, je tiens à vous rassurer: il y a des mécanismes de sécurité en place.

M. Guy Cormier:

Est-ce qu'avec le temps nous pourrons aller plus loin en ce qui concerne la situation que nous vivons? Comme je le disais, à l'ère du numérique, des gens manipulent des données personnelles non seulement dans les institutions financières, mais également dans toutes sortes d'entreprises. Aujourd'hui, lorsqu'une personne veut inscrire son enfant à la garderie, elle doit donner son numéro d'assurance sociale, et ce numéro peut demeurer sur la table pendant cinq, dix ou quinze minutes, le temps de l'inscription. C'est la réalité au Canada.

Je crois que toute entreprise où des employés manipulent des renseignements personnels doit s'assurer que ces derniers ont fait l'objet de vérifications. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous allons devoir en rester là.[Français]

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Madame Lapointe, vous avez la parole.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je vais partager mon temps de parole.

Messieurs, je vous remercie beaucoup d'être ici.

Je suis membre de Desjardins depuis 1980 à peu près. Comme mon collègue le disait, Desjardins est partout. Ma circonscription est Rivière-des-Mille-Îles et elle comprend Deux-Montagnes, Saint-Eustache, Boisbriand et Rosemère. Il y a une caisse Desjardins à Deux-Montagnes et une à Thérèse-De Blainville. Ce sont deux grosses institutions dans la région. Il y a deux MRC et deux caisses Desjardins.

M. Guy Cormier:

Il y a M. Bélanger.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Oui.

Vous avez dit que la fraude interne est la plus difficile à détecter et contre laquelle il est le plus difficile de se prémunir. Un peu plus tôt aujourd'hui, des représentants du ministère des Finances et de l'Agence du revenu du Canada nous ont parlé.

Comment cela fonctionne-t-il à l'interne chez Desjardins? Comment les superviseurs auraient-ils pu repérer cet employé malveillant? Il est clair qu'il a été capable de se faufiler dans le système. Y a-t-il des niveaux d'accès et des captures d'écran? Le système émet-il des alertes s'il repère des choses inhabituelles? Vos employés ont-ils le droit d'avoir leur téléphone cellulaire avec eux lorsqu'ils travaillent sur des données?

Je suis sûre que vous allez réévaluer les mesures en place. Vous avez parlé d'un seul employé malveillant, mais qu'allez-vous faire pour vous prémunir contre d'autres employés malveillants? Quelles sont vos règles? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il?

M. Guy Cormier:

Monsieur Berthiaume, pouvez-vous parler des opérations?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Oui.

En ce qui concerne les opérations, je tiens d'abord à vous dire que personne, en ouvrant son ordinateur au bureau le matin, n'a accès à toutes les données. Ce n'est pas ainsi que cela fonctionne. Chez Desjardins, les emplois sont catégorisés en fonction des données qui sont nécessaires pour faire le travail. C'est la première chose.

Ensuite, notre organisation a mis en place plusieurs mécanismes internes de sécurité et de contrôle, mais nous ne voulons pas en parler publiquement, car même nos employés ne sont pas au courant de ces mécanismes. Je ne peux donc pas donner beaucoup de détails là-dessus.

Quant au cas particulier qui nous intéresse, une enquête policière est en cours, ce qui rend le sujet fort sensible. Honnêtement, nous ne voulons en aucun cas nuire à l'enquête policière en cours.

Comme je viens de le dire, nous ne voulons pas donner de détails sur nos mécanismes de sécurité, car ils sont importants pour éviter que la situation dont il est question aujourd'hui ne se reproduise. Cette situation met en cause un seul employé, mais je peux vous dire que nos mécanismes de sécurité détectent des éléments de fraude externe ou autres. Je réitère qu'il est extrêmement difficile de se protéger complètement d'un employé malveillant.

(1620)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Allez-vous revoir vos règles internes?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Concernant les mesures de sécurité, nous sommes en évolution constante. Bon an, mal an, Desjardins investit 70 millions de dollars par année dans la sécurité et la protection des données et des renseignements personnels. Nous nous améliorons continuellement pour nous adapter aux nouvelles technologies qui créent de nouvelles possibilités de fraude. Des gens essaient de créer de nouveaux stratagèmes et nous sommes en évolution constante pour nous permettre de les repérer.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis contente que vous ayez parlé des quatre procédures que vous avez mises en place. Mes parents sont des personnes âgées et n'ont pas Internet. Ils se sont rendus en personne à leur caisse Desjardins pour que quelqu'un les aide, et cela n'a pas très bien fonctionné.

M. Guy Cormier:

Dans les premiers jours, l'inscription à Equifax a représenté un défi pour nous.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Les gens qui n'ont pas accès à Internet ne sont pas capables de s'y inscrire.

M. Guy Cormier:

Nous avons donc pris la décision d'offrir un service aux gens qui n'ont pas accès à Internet. Dès aujourd'hui, les gens qui le souhaitent pourront quand même bénéficier du service d'alerte. Ce service sera pris en charge par Desjardins, qui pourra communiquer avec eux par la suite. Nous avons innové en ce qui concerne Equifax, afin de trouver une solution pour ces gens.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Cormier, vous et moi, comme Mme Lapointe, sommes victimes de cette fuite. Je comprends très bien qu'il soit difficile de contrôler complètement un employé malveillant. C'est quasi impossible.

Cela dit, cette fuite aura diverses répercussions sur les membres de Desjardins. Pour certains, rien ne va arriver, alors que d'autres seront victimes de fraude quelque temps dans le futur. Mes concitoyens m'ont demandé pourquoi vous offrez le service Equifax gratuitement pour 5 ans, et pas pour 10, 15 ou 20 ans.

M. Guy Cormier:

Monsieur Berthiaume, vous pouvez répondre à la question au sujet de la période de cinq ans, puis nous reviendrons à la réponse de ce matin. C'est une question qu'on nous a déjà posée.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Premièrement, nous avons voulu agir rapidement en offrant une protection de cinq ans. Comme nous n'étions pas satisfaits de cette période de protection, nous avons décidé de la prolonger. Le président a annoncé ce matin que Desjardins s’engage à fournir une protection à vie. Nous ne nous sommes pas contentés d'une période de protection de cinq ans. Nous avons un partenariat avec Equifax pour fournir cette protection, ce qui est important de deux façons.

Nous observons une bonne augmentation des inscriptions à Equifax, mais nous ne sommes pas satisfaits de ce nombre. À en juger par la tendance actuelle, nous craignons que, au bout du compte, seuls 20 % ou 25 % de nos membres s'inscrivent à Equifax. Cela laisse quand même des gens sans couverture et qui choisissent de ne pas bénéficier du système d’alerte, pour des raisons qui leur sont propres. Or nous ne voulons pas laisser 75 % ou 80 % de nos membres sans aucune protection. Nous voulons leur fournir un service d’assistance, s’il arrive quelque chose. C'est ce qui a mené à l’annonce de ce matin. Nous voulons aller au-delà de la protection d’Equifax et offrir à nos membres une couverture parapluie.

M. Francis Drouin:

Hier, j’ai vécu une expérience en communiquant avec Equifax. Son site Web ne fonctionnait pas et j'ai appelé. Finalement, entre 45 minutes et une heure et demie plus tard, j'ai pu m'inscrire.

Dans l’Est de l’Ontario, les caisses du Mouvement Desjardins sont très populaires et très présentes dans les communautés. Les employés sont formés pour aider les personnes âgées qui ne peuvent pas aller sur Internet pour s'inscrire. J’ai la chance d’aller sur Internet et de vérifier mon rapport de crédit chaque jour, mais qu'en est-il pour ma grand-mère, par exemple? Quelqu’un de Desjardins va-t-il l'aviser qu'il y a eu un mouvement sur son rapport de crédit?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Oui, c’est la nouvelle solution que nous venons de lancer. Nous allons nous organiser pour que les gens puissent s'inscrire à Equifax. Par la suite, plutôt qu'Equifax communique avec la personne par courriel, Desjardins va faire le lien entre Equifax et la personne. Nous allons recevoir les alertes et vérifier qu'elles sont réelles, puis nous allons contacter les membres concernés, comme votre grand-mère, de la façon qui leur convient. C'est ce que nous mettons en place.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci.

M. Guy Cormier:

J'aimerais souligner brièvement quel est le message important ici. Le Mouvement Desjardins a décidé rapidement d’être transparent et de donner l’information le 20 juin. Quand nous sommes entrés dans les données des 2,7 millions de gens, nous avons réalisé que des personnes n’avaient pas accès à Internet. Il y avait aussi des comptes de succession. Des situations ont émergé et nous avons vu qu’il fallait innover et trouver des solutions pour eux. Jusqu'à maintenant, pour tous ces cas, nous avons une bonne collaboration avec les gens d'Equifax. Ils nous aident à trouver une solution différente, notamment pour des personnes comme votre grand-mère.

(1625)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Drouin.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être présents, messieurs.

Si l'on en croit les renseignements que nous avons reçus, environ 200 000 Canadiens à l'extérieur du Québec ont été touchés par cette situation particulière. Savez-vous combien de personnes sont concernées dans chaque province? [Français]

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Les membres touchés sont principalement au Québec. Il y en a un certain nombre en Ontario et très peu dans les autres provinces. On parle de personnes qui ont sans doute déménagé dans d’autres provinces et qui sont membres de Desjardins. C’est un volet important. Ce sont les membres des caisses Desjardins qui sont touchés.

Les clients de State Farm ou de Patrimoine Aviso, avec qui nous avons un partenariat, ne sont pas touchés. On ne parle que des membres des caisses qui ont pu déménager dans d’autres provinces ou des membres de nos caisses en Ontario. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord.

Vous avez mentionné que vous avez acquis State Farm en 2015. Vous dites qu'aucun de ses clients n'est touché.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Ils n'ont pas du tout été touchés, non.

M. Glen Motz:

En 2017, vous avez créé Aviso Wealth. Il s'agit de la fusion de Credential Financial, de Qtrade Canada et de NEI Investments. Ces entreprises ont toutes été fusionnées.

M. Denis Berthiaume: C'est exact.

M. Glen Motz: Certains de ces clients ont-ils été touchés?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Ils n'ont pas été touchés du tout en dehors de la portée de ce dont nous avons parlé...

M. Glen Motz:

Qu'en est-il des anciens clients de Desjardins dont les comptes ont été fermés? Certaines de leurs données ont-elles été touchées?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Je ne suis pas certain que je...

M. Glen Motz:

Ils ont fait partie de vos clients. Conservez-vous toujours leurs données bien que ce ne soit plus le cas? Ces données ont-elles été compromises ?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Je tiens à me montrer très, très précis. Seuls les membres de notre réseau de caisses sont touchés. Supposons que vous en étiez membre il y a un an et que vous avez fermé votre compte pour une raison quelconque. Si vous ne recevez pas de lettre, vous ne serez pas touché. Il n'y a pas de répercussions. Vous n'avez pas été touché...

M. Glen Motz:

Pour que ce soit clair, si vous n'avez pas de compte actif chez Desjardins, vous n'avez pas été touché par cette atteinte à la protection des données. Ai-je bien compris?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Si vous n'avez pas reçu de lettre... La clé est de savoir si vous avez personnellement reçu une lettre. Si vous avez reçu une lettre, cela signifie que vous faites partie des membres qui pourraient être touchés, et nous vous encourageons à vous abonner à Equifax.

M. Glen Motz:

Cela ne répond pas vraiment à ma question. Si j'ai bien compris, il faut avoir un compte actif chez Desjardins pour avoir été touché par cette atteinte à la protection des données. C'est exact?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Non, parce que vous pourriez être un ancien membre de Desjardins et avoir fermé votre compte il y a un an...

M. Glen Motz:

C'est la question que j'ai posée plus tôt.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

... mais vous pourriez être touché si vous recevez une lettre.

M. Glen Motz:

Je ne me soucie pas de la lettre parce que les Canadiens s'en moquent. Ils veulent savoir si les membres actuels ont été touchés ou non. La réponse est oui. Les clients actuels ou les anciens clients pourraient être touchés.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Oui

M. Glen Motz:

Si je me souviens bien, en 2018, Desjardins Ontario a fusionné avec environ 11 coopératives de crédit de l'Ontario. Certains de ces clients potentiels seraient-ils touchés par cette atteinte à la protection des données?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Nous parlons des caisses de l'Ontario...

M. Guy Cormier:

La réponse est oui. Il est possible que certains membres des caisses de l'Ontario, fusionnées ou non, aient été touchés par cette atteinte.

M. Glen Motz:

En 2013, le Mouvement Desjardins a acheté des compagnies d'assurance dans l'Ouest, notamment Coast Capital Insurance, en Colombie-Britannique, First Insurance dans cette même province, Craig Insurance, en Alberta, et Melfort Agencies et Prestige Insurance, en Saskatchewan.

Certains de ces clients pourraient-ils être touchés par l'atteinte à la protection des données survenue chez Desjardins?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

La réponse est non.

M. Glen Motz:

Les téléphones des clients qui utilisent Apple Pay ou Android Pay pour effectuer leurs opérations bancaires peuvent-ils être compromis par cette atteinte à la protection des données, et courent-ils de plus grands risques de recevoir des messages frauduleux pouvant découler de cette situation?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Les données qui ont été extraites comprennent des numéros de téléphone et des courriels. Pour répondre à votre question, oui, il est possible que ces personnes fassent l'objet d’hameçonnage, mais encore une fois, uniquement s'ils sont membres d'une caisse, pas s'ils sont clients. S'ils sont clients d'Aviso Wealth, s'ils ont eu une assurance dans le passé, s'ils ont une assurance vie et santé, ou s'ils ont une assurance incendie, accidents et risques divers, ils ne sont pas touchés.

(1630)

M. Glen Motz:

Il ne s'agit que de l'aspect financier.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Il ne s'agit que de membres des caisses.

M. Glen Motz:

Je vais partager mon temps avec M....

Le président:

Vous allez devoir partager six secondes avec lui.

Passons à M. Graham, pour cinq minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais suivre un peu les propos de M. Motz. Parmi ceux qui n'ont pas reçu de lettre, beaucoup s'inquiètent et se demandent s'ils sont touchés ou non.

Peut-on dire clairement à tous ceux qui n'ont pas reçu de lettre qu'ils ne sont pas touchés?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Selon l'information que nous avons, seulement ceux qui reçoivent une lettre sont touchés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors si on ne reçoit pas de lettre, on n'est pas touché; c'est bien cela?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

S'ils n'ont pas reçu de lettre, ils ne sont pas touchés.

M. Guy Cormier:

Le 14 juin, nous avons reçu de l'information du corps policier de Laval. C'est grâce à cette information que nos équipes d'investigation informatique ont été capables de nous fournir les chiffres de 2,7 millions de particuliers et de 173 000 entreprises. Ce sont à ces gens-là que nous avons transmis des lettres écrites.

Malgré tout, nous entendons les préoccupations des gens. C'est pourquoi, ce matin, nous avons décidé d'accélérer le lancement de ce programme de protection pour tous les membres, qu'ils soient touchés ou non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cette protection est une bonne chose, mais dans certaines villes de ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, plusieurs gens n'ont pas d'accès à Internet ni de téléphone cellulaire. Ils sont moins nombreux que lorsque je suis arrivé, mais il y en a encore. Plusieurs ont même perdu leur succursale Desjardins. Qu'est-ce que ces gens peuvent faire?

J'ai un compte chez Equifax depuis plusieurs années. Quand il y a un changement, on m'envoie un courriel, mais je dois aller sur le site Web et essayer de comprendre de quoi il s'agit, car ce n'est pas clair du tout. Alors, pour ceux qui ont une connexion Internet, les renseignements d'Equifax ne sont pas clairs, et ceux qui n'ont pas de connexion n'ont rien du tout.

Vous en avez parlé un peu, mais pourriez-vous en parler un peu plus?

M. Guy Cormier:

Il y a deux choses. Premièrement, il est urgent de brancher les citoyens de partout au pays à Internet, si on veut arriver au XXIe siècle. De notre côté, puisque certains de nos membres ne sont pas branchés à Internet — parfois, c'est par choix, parfois, c'est parce qu'ils n'y ont pas accès —, nous avons proposé une solution supplémentaire en partenariat avec Equifax. M. Berthiaume peut l'expliquer.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Les personnes qui ne vont pas sur le Web et qui n'ont pas nécessairement d'adresse courriel doivent tout de même être jointes. Nous avons donc mis en place un centre d'appels afin qu'elles puissent communiquer avec nous par téléphone. Nous allons nous charger de les inscrire aux services d'Equifax.

Nous avons mis en place une solution innovante avec Equifax, qui va les enregistrer, s'occuper de la surveillance et des alertes, puis nous envoyer les résultats. À ce moment-là, nous nous chargerons de communiquer avec ces personnes qui n'ont pas d'accès à Internet ou au courriel. C'est ce que nous avons mis en place aujourd'hui même.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Equifax s'occupera donc de l'aspect technique, et non Desjardins.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Oui. Actuellement, c'est Equifax qui a la capacité de s'occuper des alertes. Comme nous le disions plus tôt, Equifax détient 70 % du marché canadien pour ce qui est des bureaux de crédit et des systèmes de détection et d'alerte. Ce sont donc ses services que nous utilisons pour ce volet.

Encore une fois, nous faisons le lien pour les personnes qui ont plus de difficulté à accéder à Internet ou qui n'ont pas d'adresse courriel. Nous rassurons les gens et, en cas d'alerte, nous prenons contact avec eux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Dans votre allocution, vous avez parlé de changer notre système d'identité numérique. Quels exemples voudriez-vous que l'on suive?

M. Guy Cormier:

Loin de moi l'idée de vous donner l'exemple parfait qui devrait être suivi, parce qu'il y aura toujours des lacunes dans les solutions parfaites qu'on pense avoir trouvées. Il y aura toujours des gens malhonnêtes qui essaieront de défaire ces solutions. Toutefois, des pays comme l'Estonie, l'Inde et même certains pays d'Europe ont mis en place des mesures concernant les identifiants uniques ou, à tout le moins, des mesures visant à ce que les cartes émises par le gouvernement, que ce soit les permis de conduire ou les cartes d'assurance-maladie, ne deviennent pas des façons d'identifier les gens. Ces pays avaient pour objectif de rétablir le rôle premier de ces cartes, qui sont devenues des pièces d'identification au fil du temps. Le Canada devrait s'inspirer de ces pays.

(1635)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

J'ai une dernière question. Qu'est-ce que les 2,9 millions de clients de Desjardins touchés avaient en commun? Est-ce qu'on sait pourquoi ils ont été touchés et pas les autres?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

À ce sujet, nous n'avons rien de concluant. Nous nous sommes basés sur les données que les services de police nous ont fournies. Nous n'avons pas de données concluantes sur ce qui fait que quelqu'un est sur la liste ou non. Nous n'avons pas cette information.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Clarke. [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke:

Monsieur Cormier, je voudrais simplement réitérer ce que mon collègue a dit. L'objectif fondamental de la réunion d'aujourd'hui, pour nous les conservateurs, était de déterminer ce que le gouvernement, ses agences et ses institutions pouvaient faire pour vous aider et, par ricochet, pour aider les membres de Desjardins, ce qui est le plus important. Ce sont des citoyens canadiens et québécois.

Par ailleurs, vous n'êtes pas sans savoir que j'ai joint les trois directeurs des caisses Desjardins de ma circonscription pour leur exprimer mon soutien.

Le ministère de l'Emploi et du Développement social du Canada a-t-il pris contact avec vous pour obtenir la liste des 2,9 millions de citoyens? C'est une question très importante.

M. Guy Cormier:

Le ministère est en contact avec nous et collabore avec nous. Cela fait plus de deux semaines que nous discutons directement avec ses représentants, que ce soit au sujet des numéros d'assurance sociale ou de la situation que vit Desjardins.

Je ne crois pas que la demande de transmission de l'information ait été faite, du moins sur le plan opérationnel. Je n'ai pas cette information. Je ne sais pas si M. Brun ou M. Berthiaume en savent plus, mais je ne pense pas.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Quand vous aurez la réponse, pourriez-vous la donner aux analystes ou au greffier? Ce serait important pour nous de le savoir. S'il se trouve que la demande a été faite, pourriez-vous fournir la liste de ces Canadiens? Nous, nous cherchons à savoir ce que le gouvernement peut faire, mais il faudrait d'abord qu'il sache de qui il est question. Alors, seriez-vous en mesure d'envoyer cette liste au gouvernement canadien? Malheureusement, il s'agirait encore d'envoyer des données, mais le destinataire serait le gouvernement.

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Il faudrait voir si cela est possible. D'un point de vue juridique, je n'en suis pas certain.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Ensuite, j'aimerais savoir si un membre du Cabinet actuel vous a contactés depuis le 20 juin.

M. Guy Cormier:

Lorsque vous parlez du Cabinet actuel, vous parlez du Cabinet...

M. Alupa Clarke:

Je parle du Cabinet fédéral. Ce serait donc un ministre.

M. Guy Cormier:

Oui, tout à fait. J'ai eu une discussion avec le ministre Morneau sur la situation. Il m'a offert son soutien pour voir comment le gouvernement fédéral pouvait accompagner Desjardins dans cette situation.

M. Alupa Clarke:

D'accord.

Dans votre introduction, vous avez mentionné très humblement et respectueusement que vous aviez quelques questions. Personnellement, j'aurais aimé connaître vos réponses en tant qu'expert dans votre domaine. Je ne me souviens pas très bien de votre première question, mais c'était quand même intéressant. Vous vous demandiez si le Canada avait un système adéquat en ce qui a trait aux numéros d'assurance sociale, par exemple. J'aimerais connaître votre perspective là-dessus.

M. Guy Cormier:

La première question était de savoir si le Canada est bien outillé pour encadrer le développement technologique, qui est plein de promesses, mais qui comporte aussi des risques nouveaux.

Y a-t-il lieu d'adapter nos systèmes d'identification?

M. Alupa Clarke:

J'aimerais avoir vos réponses sur les deux points.

M. Guy Cormier:

Mes deux réponses sont simples: je pense que le statu quo n'est pas une option. Le statu quo, actuellement, au Canada, n'est pas suffisant à l'ère du numérique, à l'ère du 5G qui s'en vient et à l'ère de réflexions sur le monde des services financiers, notamment les services financiers ouverts. Sur ces deux questions, je pense qu'on ne doit pas se satisfaire du statu quo.

C'est pour cela que nous proposons, humblement, la création d'un comité composé de plusieurs parties prenantes, y compris des citoyens, des gouvernements, des entreprises — pas seulement les institutions financières, mais les entreprises qui traitent des données —, pour réfléchir à ces questions et voir si, au moyen d'exemples d'autres pays du monde, on peut continuer d'être des leaders.

Comme je l'ai mentionné au début, je pense qu'en intelligence artificielle, le Canada est en train de prendre une position de leadership importante dans le monde. Parallèlement, il faut avoir la même ambition en ce qui a trait aux renseignements personnels et à la protection des données. Ma réponse tourne autour de ces points-là.

M. Alupa Clarke:

J'ai une question supplémentaire, qui sera probablement la dernière. Je m'adresse ici à M. Cormier, le citoyen.

Vous avez fait une annonce fort importante ce matin. Vous dites que la protection s'applique à l'ensemble des membres, qu'ils soient touchés ou non par ce malheureux événement. Vous avez dit qu'ils n'ont qu' à vous appeler pour que vous vous occupiez d'eux. Vous allez établir les contacts, prendre les mesures et entreprendre les démarches qui s'imposent.

Pensez-vous que ce soit exactement ce genre d'attitude que le gouvernement, l'État fédéral, devrait avoir en ce moment envers les 2,9 millions citoyens canadiens?

On demande aux citoyens de prendre contact avec nous, or je pense que c'est le gouvernement fédéral qui devrait prendre contact avec les citoyens. Disons que les citoyens entrent en communication avec le gouvernement fédéral, ce dernier ne devrait-il pas avoir la même approche que vous et dire qu'il s'occupe de tout?

La représentante d'Emploi et Développement social Canada disait que, si l'on changeait les numéros d'assurance sociale des citoyens, ceux-ci devraient appeler tous leurs anciens employeurs. Ce n'est pas ce que vous faites. Vous, incroyablement, vous dites que vous allez vous occuper de tout le monde à la dernière minute.

En tant que citoyen, aimeriez-vous que le gouvernement fédéral agisse de la même façon envers les membres touchés?

(1640)

M. Guy Cormier:

Je dirais, en tant que citoyen, que les élus sont élus, justement, pour assurer un encadrement et adopter des lois. Dans la situation qu'on vit actuellement à l'ère du numérique, il faut mettre en place des paramètres réglementaires qui protègent les citoyens à cet égard. C'est mon message, comme citoyen.

C'est aussi pourquoi, malgré le fait que nous trouvions cette réunion prématurée, nous avons quand même pris la décision d'être présents. Nous sentons que cette situation tire une sonnette d'alarme et qu'il y a une prise de conscience et une réelle volonté de la part des élus de se pencher sur cette question. Nous voulions apporter notre point de vue sur ce sujet. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Clarke.

Nous allons passer à M. Dubé pour trois minutes, puis à M. Fortin pour trois minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'avais une question qui rejoint un peu ce que M. Graham disait par rapport à l'accès à Internet et au téléphone. Les personnes âgées ont des besoins particuliers.

Veille-t-on à cela également?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

C'est ce que je disais. Souvent, les personnes âgées n'ont pas nécessairement une connexion Internet ou une adresse courriel. Nous nous occupons d'elles. Ces personnes peuvent nous téléphoner. Nous allons prendre la situation en charge à partir de ce moment et ferons office d'intermédiaires avec Equifax concernant le système d'alerte et ce que ces personnes vont recevoir comme message.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il y a un article intéressant dans La Presse d'aujourd'hui, si je ne me trompe pas. On y parle de la façon dont sont réglementées les agences de surveillance de crédit, soit les compagnies comme Equifax, et que cette réglementation porte davantage sur des questions liées aux consommateurs.

C'est peut-être trop de spéculation pour ce dont vous êtes à l'aise de parler aujourd'hui, mais, étant donné la relation un peu symbiotique qu'elles entretiennent avec les institutions financières et la brèche dont Equifax a été victime, croyez-vous qu'il serait pertinent, à l'ère numérique, de revoir la façon dont ces agences sont réglementées?

C'est devenu un plus important que la protection des consommateurs; elles ont maintenant une responsabilité au regard du maintien des données. On voit qu'il y a des conséquences importantes.

Devrait-on revoir cela dans le contexte de tous ces changements auxquels vous avez fait allusion?

M. Guy Cormier:

Je vous l'ai dit il y a quelques minutes: je pense que le statu quo n'est pas une option. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous comparaissons devant vous aujourd'hui. Desjardins sera très honoré de participer aux réflexions, le cas échéant.

Je crois qu'il faut rassembler les parties prenantes qui travaillent dans le domaine des données au Canada pour réfléchir à la façon dont on veut faire évoluer la situation. Parfois, il pourrait s'agir de réglementation, parfois, de processus d'affaires, ou, parfois, de façons de travailler ensemble. Je pense que le statu quo n'est pas une option.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il me reste une minute. J'aimerais vous dire, en terminant, que nous sommes heureux de votre présence ici. Nous comprenons que c'est une situation difficile. J'apprécie le fait que vous comprenez la raison pour laquelle nous avons le devoir de faire cela.

Des citoyens nous interpellent. Cela les touche, ils sont inquiets. Notre objectif n'est pas uniquement de les rassurer dans le cas présent, mais aussi de nous assurer qu'eux et d'autres citoyens qui sont des clients d'autres institutions financières ne vivent pas la même chose. Vous partagez votre expérience, ce qui est très utile non seulement aujourd'hui, mais aussi pour une prochaine législature. Nous voulons quand même mettre en place une feuille de route dans ce domaine qui évolue rapidement.

M. Guy Cormier:

C'est pour cela que nous avons accepté l'invitation.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est très apprécié, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Fortin, vous avez trois minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Messieurs Cormier, Brun et Berthiaume, je vais commencer par vous féliciter moi aussi. J'avoue qu'en arrivant ici ce matin, j'avais des questions et des inquiétudes, auxquelles vous avez répondu. Je pense que votre déclaration de ce matin est tout à l'avantage de Desjardins. Moi aussi, je suis affecté par ce qui s'est passé chez Desjardins, et j'apprécie les mesures que vous avez prises.

Il y a environ deux ou trois semaines, la Banque du Canada a mis en place le Groupe sur la résilience du secteur financier, afin de contrer les menaces informatiques. À ce que je sache, le Mouvement Desjardins n'a pas été invité à se joindre à ce groupe. On a invité des banques à charte, entre autres, et celles qui sont d'importance systémique.

D'abord, pouvez-vous me confirmer que le Mouvement Desjardins n'a pas été invité? Ensuite, considérez-vous qu'il serait opportun qu'il participe à un tel groupe de travail?

M. Guy Cormier:

Monsieur Brun, je sais que vous avez discuté avec ce groupe. Pouvez-vous donner l'heure juste à ce sujet?

M. Bernard Brun:

Je vous remercie de cette question bien pertinente.

La Banque du Canada a, évidemment, un rôle extrêmement important à jouer pour assurer la stabilité financière. Récemment, elle a annoncé la constitution d'un comité pour faire évoluer la supervision et revoir un peu l'encadrement en échangeant avec toutes sortes de partenaires. Naturellement, elle s'est tournée vers les grandes banques et le régulateur. Nous avons eu des discussions avec des gens de la Banque et nous sentons qu'ils ont une ouverture pour explorer cela.

Comme on l'a déjà évoqué, le système financier est extrêmement interrelié. Tous les acteurs de ce secteur ont des enjeux, une réglementation et des régulateurs, mais il faut qu'ils soient capables de travailler ensemble, d'aller au-delà de cela et de discuter. Nous avons certainement un grand intérêt à participer à tout cela. Nous avons senti qu'il y avait une ouverture en ce sens et nous attendons de voir comment ce sera articulé.

C'est sûr que le Mouvement Desjardins est une institution financière canadienne et québécoise d'importance systémique. S'il y a des discussions, il faudrait que nous y participions.

(1645)

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Vous avez l'appui du Bloc québécois là-dessus. J'espère que mes collègues d'en face y donneront suite et proposeront à la Banque du Canada de vous inviter.

Présentement, il y a des discussions sur l'établissement d'un système national de validation de l'identité. Avant, le numéro d'assurance sociale était utilisé dans les relations entre l'employeur et les employés et le gouvernement. Or maintenant, on voit qu'il est utilisé à presque toutes les sauces. On ne sait plus trop comment se comporter relativement à cela, mais il est clair que le simple numéro d'assurance sociale ne suffit plus à assurer une certaine sécurité des citoyens.

À votre avis, un système de validation de l'identité, qui inclurait un NIP, une empreinte ou je ne sais quoi, serait-il utile dans une situation comme celle que vous avez vécue?

M. Guy Cormier:

C'est pour cela que nous nous permettons humblement de faire une recommandation au Comité aujourd'hui.

Au Canada, il y a 30, 40 ou 50 ans, on a mis en place certains mécanismes, qui, aujourd'hui, ne servent plus à ce pour quoi ils ont été créés. Il est temps que les acteurs de l'industrie s'assoient ensemble pour relancer une réflexion, qui, comme je le vois très bien, a déjà débuté, et essaient de s'inspirer des meilleures pratiques partout dans le monde. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Fortin.

Je tiens à remercier les témoins de leur présence ici. Je suis heureux de constater que l'annonce de votre ensemble de mesures a coïncidé avec votre comparution ici. C'est assez heureux. Quatre ou cinq membres de ce comité sont particulièrement vulnérables en tant que membres de votre association. Je me demande si leurs vulnérabilités uniques en tant que personnalités publiques sont couvertes par l'annonce que vous faites aujourd'hui.

M. Guy Cormier:

Tous les renseignements, selon l'annonce que nous avons faite ce matin, de l'ensemble des personnes qui figuraient sur la liste des membres qui ont été touchés par cette atteinte à la sécurité des données seront pris en charge par ce programme. Qu'il s'agisse d'activités financières sur leurs comptes, de l'obtention d'une aide pour récupérer leur identité ou de problèmes relativement à certains frais liés à la récupération de leur identité, ils pourront se prévaloir de ce programme de protection.

Le président:

J'en ai pris note, car vous l'avez mentionné plus tôt. Cependant, je me réfère à la vulnérabilité unique des titulaires de charges publiques. Si cette vulnérabilité se manifeste, sera-t-elle traitée par cet ensemble de mesures particulier?

M. Guy Cormier:

C'est quelque chose que nous examinons actuellement dans nos dossiers. Nous cherchons actuellement à savoir si parmi ces 2,7 millions de personnes, certaines sont plus vulnérables que d'autres. Vous avez probablement lu des articles sur des policiers, des juges, des gens comme des titulaires de charges publiques. C'est quelque chose que nous sommes en train d'examiner. Notre priorité était d'envoyer les lettres pour prendre contact avec les gens. Nous étudions maintenant ce qui pourrait constituer une autre vulnérabilité à laquelle nous devrions faire plus attention...

Le président:

Donc, pas nécessairement dès le début.

M. Guy Cormier:Oui. Nous allons l'examiner.

Le président: Ma question concerne le fait que nous faisons cela depuis un certain temps déjà et que l'une des normes de protection de référence est ce qu'on appelle la « confiance zéro », qui a été mentionnée par un témoin précédent, qui a dit « repérez et protégez les biens essentiels. Sachez où se trouvent vos données clés, protégez-les, surveillez leur protection et soyez prêts à réagir. »

Pensez-vous que Desjardins a appliqué le principe de la confiance zéro qui semble être la norme de référence en matière de protection des données?

M. Denis Berthiaume:

Lorsque nous utilisons le terme « confiance zéro », nous devons définir ce dont nous parlons. Confiance zéro, certaines personnes ont accès aux données. Ils en ont besoin pour faire leur travail. Avec la confiance zéro, nous voulons clairement nous assurer d'avoir mis en place des mécanismes de sécurité qui visent à appliquer le principe de la confiance zéro. Cependant, il existe parfois une différence entre la théorie et ce que vous pouvez vraiment faire dans la pratique. L'objectif est de s'assurer que les données qui nous sont fournies par nos clients sont entièrement sécurisées. C'est notre objectif.

(1650)

Le président:

C'est l'objectif.

Sur ce, je tiens à vous remercier encore une fois pour votre présence ici. Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes, puis nous reprendrons avec les fonctionnaires et nous terminerons notre série de questions avec eux. Je vous remercie.

(1650)

(1650)

Le président:

Reprenons nos travaux. Merci à tous les fonctionnaires de leur patience. Nous étions au milieu de la période des questions, et je crois que la parole est à M. Graham pour cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Madame Boisjoly, vous avez entendu les gens de Desjardins tout à l’heure parler du besoin de repenser le système du numéro d’assurance sociale. Est-ce qu’on fait des recherches pour savoir quel est le futur du numéro d’assurance sociale?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Comme vous le savez, le numéro d’assurance sociale est un identifiant parmi tant d’autres. Comme nous l'avons déjà dit, sur notre site Web, nous indiquons aux citoyens qu'ils ne devraient donner leur numéro d’assurance sociale que dans des circonstances très limitées. Cela leur est expliqué. Nous leur disons de ne pas donner leur numéro d’assurance sociale à des organismes qui ne peuvent pas légalement le demander. Par contre, selon ce que nous entendons, les citoyens le donnent souvent volontairement à des organismes qui ne sont pas habilités à le prendre.

C'est certain que nous entendons les discussions. Nous regardons toujours ce que nous pouvons faire pour améliorer la protection de nos systèmes et de nos pratiques liées au numéro d’assurance sociale.

Nous souhaitons entendre les recommandations ou voir le rapport que va publier ce comité ainsi que d'autres rapports.

Je peux vous assurer que nous travaillons régulièrement à augmenter la sécurité de nos systèmes. Je sais que le Conseil du Trésor travaille aussi très activement à des projets sur l’identité numérique. Nous participons à ces discussions pour voir comment on peut améliorer l’identité numérique des citoyens sur le territoire du Canada.

(1655)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parmi les données qui sont sorties, on sait qu'il y avait beaucoup d'informations, et pas seulement des numéros d'assurance sociale. Il y avait aussi des adresses, des numéros de téléphone, notamment. Vous avez parlé à plusieurs reprises d'informations supplémentaires pour authentifier le numéro d'assurance sociale. Toutes ces informations figurent-elles parmi les données qui sont sorties?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Le numéro d'assurance sociale est un identifiant qui permet d'avoir accès à des programmes et à des services fédéraux, ainsi qu'aux systèmes de revenus et d'impôts. Dans le cas qui occupe le gouvernement fédéral, en ce qui a trait aux prestations, par exemple, mon collègue a expliqué qu'à l'Agence du revenu du Canada il faut poser une question supplémentaire, secrète, pour identifier les personnes, tel que le montant inscrit à une certaine ligne de la déclaration de revenus. Dans le cas de l'assurance-emploi, un code d'accès au programme est donné aux participants, et ceux-ci doivent donner deux chiffres de ce code afin d'avoir accès aux informations privées liées au programme de l'assurance-emploi.

Le numéro d'assurance sociale est un identifiant, mais il est accompagné d'autres questions afin de valider l'identité de la personne avec qui nous faisons affaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a des agents de Service Canada dans toutes les villes. Si des gens se présentent à leur bureau afin de savoir ce qu'ils doivent faire relativement à la situation actuelle, quelles instructions recevront-ils?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Tous nos centres d'appels, les bureaux de Service Canada et nos agents ont reçu des instructions très claires. Nos centres d'appels et les bureaux de Service Canada ont répondu aux questions d'environ 1 500 citoyens. Ils ont informé ces derniers des mesures à prendre, notamment de prendre contact avec un bureau de crédit, de vérifier leurs transactions financières et bancaires et de redoubler de vigilance relativement aux transactions qu'ils font. S'ils repèrent des activités qui ne sont pas liées avec leurs transactions, ils doivent communiquer avec la police, les bureaux de Service Canada et les différentes institutions pour que nous puissions régler la situation. À ce jour, aucune fraude n'a été signalée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La fuite est toutefois récente.

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Comme je le disais, malgré la quantité de fuites détectées depuis quelques années, il y a environ 60 cas par année exigeant un changement du numéro d'assurance sociale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Existe-t-il une manière d'indiquer quelque part que le numéro d'assurance sociale n'est plus valide et alors retirer la responsabilité qui y est liée?

Si je fais changer le numéro d'assurance sociale et que je suis toujours responsable de l'ancien, à mon avis, cela n'a pas entièrement d'allure. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Une des raisons est que nous ne savons pas à qui un citoyen a donné son numéro d'assurance sociale. Le numéro d'assurance sociale doit être utilisé seulement comme un identifiant pour relier certaines informations afin de donner des prestations. Les individus sont les seuls à savoir à qui ils ont donné leur numéro d'assurance sociale et à quelle fin. On peut donner son numéro d'assurance sociale pour des pensions privées, des assurances ainsi que des locations ou des achats de voitures, par exemple.

Le numéro d'assurance sociale ne devrait pas être utilisé pour identifier la personne. Il s'agit d'un numéro qui permet de relier certains dossiers. Nous avons besoin de ce numéro pour relier les informations. Nous relions maintenant les deux numéros d'assurance sociale dans nos systèmes, mais le premier ne devrait plus jamais être utilisé par l'individu.

(1700)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Clarke, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour à tous.

Je vous remercie d'avoir patienté et d'être demeurés sur place.

Madame Boisjoly, vous êtes la sous-ministre adjointe au ministère de l'Emploi et du Développement social du Canada. Est-ce que votre ministre vous a donné la directive d'obtenir la liste? J'ai posé la même question à M. Cormier. Avez-vous reçu la directive ministérielle d'obtenir la liste des 2,9 millions de Canadiens touchés par la fuite de données massive chez Desjardins?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Vous soulevez une question intéressante.

Selon la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, la première chose à faire est d'informer les tierces parties. Comme vous l'avez entendu, Desjardins a communiqué avec nous pour s'assurer que nous fournirons l'information et que nous aiderons les caisses Desjardins à obtenir le plus de renseignements pertinents possible pour aider leurs membres. Dans ce cas-ci, nous avons donné beaucoup d'informations sur la façon de protéger leurs membres.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Donc, il n’y a pas eu de directives. Autrement dit, vous êtes réactifs. Je ne parle pas de vous, bien entendu. Vous suivez les ordres politiques, et nous comprenons cela. En ce moment, tout est réactif et absolument rien n'est proactif.

Vous avez dit avoir reçu 1 500 demandes ou appels au sujet du numéro d’assurance sociale. Notre objectif est de savoir comment le gouvernement peut aider les gens de façon proactive. Comme vous ne savez pas quels Canadiens sont touchés, vous devez nécessairement attendre qu’ils communiquent avec vous. C’est ce qui se passe en ce moment. Vous attendez que les gens touchés prennent contact avec vous, et non l’inverse. C’est impossible, parce que vous n’avez pas les données. M. Cormier, de Desjardins, semblait dire qu’eux seraient prêts à envoyer ces données. Je sais que je vous demande d'émettre une opinion politique, mais que vous ne le pourrez pas.

Je dois exprimer quelque chose qui écœure royalement les gens de ma circonscription. J’ai fait beaucoup de porte-à-porte la semaine dernière et l'autre avant. Les gens m'ont dit systématiquement qu'ils doutaient que le gouvernement puisse faire quelque chose. Cela m’a beaucoup attristé. Comment est-ce possible? Moi, je voudrais briser le cynisme et écouter les gens. Les gens versent 50 % de leurs revenus à l’État canadien. Nous, les conservateurs, voulons que le gouvernement travaille pour les citoyens, et non l’inverse.

M. Cormier a dit que, quand une personne appelle chez Desjardins, ils sont proactifs et ils s'occupent de choses pour elle.

Nous avons appris quelque chose de très important aujourd’hui. En fait, nous le savions déjà parce que cela avait été ébruité ici et là. J'ai appris d’un officiel comme vous qu’on peut changer de numéro d’assurance sociale. Je sais que c'est complexe et que, même si on le changeait, il faudrait tout de même joindre une myriade d’institutions, ses anciens employeurs, et ainsi de suite. Or c’est le gouvernement qui oblige le citoyen à avoir un numéro d’assurance sociale. C'est un système qui devrait peut-être même être remis en cause et nous en discutons aujourd’hui, en quelque sorte.

Ne serait-il pas de votre devoir de prendre contact avec les 2,9 millions de personnes? Le gouvernement libéral devrait faire cela pour être proactif. Il connaît ces personnes. Par exemple, à la Pizzeria D'Youville où je travaillais en 2004 quand j’avais 17 ans, c'est le patron qui s’occupait d'envoyer la TPS au gouvernement fédéral. Toutes ces choses sont très connues. Vos ministères pourraient facilement relier ces informations et changer le numéro d’assurance sociale, peut-être pas de manière exhaustive, mais il devrait épauler le citoyen dans ce très lourd travail qui consiste à joindre tous ses anciens employeurs ou les agences gouvernementales.

C’est ce qui me déplaît énormément. Je sais que ce n’est pas votre faute. Vous avez des directives politiques qui viennent du gouvernement libéral, mais on n'est pas proactif en ce moment. Cela me déplaît énormément. Que pouvez-vous dire à ce sujet?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Dans l'optique des multiples fuites qui peuvent survenir, le but est de s’assurer de toujours protéger les citoyens et les prestations qui leur sont dues, que ce soit des remboursements d'impôt ou d'autres prestations. C’est pour cela que nous avons travaillé très étroitement avec Desjardins pour définir quelles mesures nous permettraient de l'épauler dans ses relations avec les citoyens touchés.

Desjardins a mis des mesures en place. Quand il y a eu des fuites au niveau fédéral, on a pris des mesures très similaires relativement aux bureaux de crédit, parce que c’est vraiment le meilleur moyen de protéger les citoyens contre la fraude. Nous continuons à travailler avec Desjardins. Si un échange d’information s’avérait une bonne solution, nous l'envisagerions. Par contre, à ce stade-ci, les mesures mises en place sont les meilleures qu'on aurait pu prendre.

(1705)

M. Alupa Clarke:

Merci, madame Boisjoly. [Traduction]

Le président:

Y a-t-il des questions ici? Non.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez trois minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais revenir à la question que j’ai posée, à savoir si on souhaite tenir des séances d’information dans les grands centres au Québec, entre autres. Je sais qu’il y a des gens à l’extérieur du Québec qui sont aussi touchés, mais c'est au Québec que la fuite a eu le plus gros impact. Il faut renseigner la population.

J’ai oublié ce que c’était, mais j’ai déjà reçu une lettre par la poste concernant un changement de politique fédérale. J’ose croire qu'il est possible d’envoyer des lettres par la poste à la population du Québec pour l'informer de l'horaire des consultations publiques ou des séances d’information qui auront lieu dans les deux prochains mois. Vous nous donnez de l'information aujourd'hui et je pense que les gens nous écoutent, bien entendu. Il faudrait néanmoins s'assurer de joindre le plus de gens possible. Malgré l’omniprésence des médias sociaux, je ne suis pas convaincu que cette réponse est adéquate.

Est-ce une chose à laquelle vous êtes ouverts? Je crois que le ministère des Finances et l’Agence du revenu du Canada ont aussi un rôle à jouer.

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Absolument.

De façon proactive, nous avons mis de l'information supplémentaire sur notre site Web. Nous avons diffusé des communiqués. Nous avons utilisé les médias sociaux, comme vous le disiez. Nous tenons des ateliers sur le numéro d'assurance sociale, et ce, dans plusieurs communautés. Ce sont des ateliers qui sont donnés de façon régulière et je ne verrai pas pourquoi nous ne pourrions pas utiliser ce moyen aussi.

Alors, merci de la recommandation. Nous allons la prendre en considération.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Parfait. Nous vous en remercions parce qu'effectivement, il s'agit de circonstances particulières, et quand il y a des catastrophes naturelles, par exemple, le gouvernement de proximité — que ce soit les municipalités ou le gouvernement du Québec — répond toujours.

Comme mes collègues le disaient, et ce n'est pas pour insulter qui que ce soit, le fédéral est le plus loin. Dans le cas qui nous concerne, il y a des répercussions réelles sur la vie des gens.

Quoi qu'il en soit, si nous-mêmes — je parle juste de moi pour l'instant — ne savons pas nécessairement comment naviguer dans le système de numéro d'assurance sociale alors que nous sommes législateurs au fédéral, je ne pense pas que cela soit dû à notre propre ignorance. C'est simplement un système très complexe. C'est pour cela que vous êtes là aujourd'hui, et ce serait des connaissances qu'il vaudrait la peine de transmettre.

Je vous remercie de votre ouverture. Cela complète mes questions.

Le président:

D'accord.

Vous avez deux minutes, monsieur Fortin.

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais commencer avec Mme Boisjoly.

Si l'on considère que le numéro d'assurance sociale a été créé en 1964 pour régir les relations employeurs-employés et avec l'État, on voit qu'il est utilisé à toutes les sauces maintenant, mais en tout cas, beaucoup plus largement qu'auparavant.

N'y aurait-il pas lieu de revoir les règles de sécurité concernant son utilisation? Par exemple, avoir un NIP assorti à la carte d'assurance-maladie, à des empreintes ou autres données, par exemple.

À votre avis, y a-t-il quelque chose à faire avec cela?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

C'est une excellente question.

Comme je le dis toujours, il est important, quand on a des situations comme cela, de revoir et de repenser certaines choses.

En ce qui concerne le numéro d'assurance sociale, comme je l'ai dit, c'est un identifiant parmi plusieurs. Nous, au fédéral — et bien sûr à plusieurs endroits —, les gens sont invités à ajouter des questions secrètes auxquelles eux seuls peuvent répondre. Ce n'est pas un NIP, mais ce sont des façons supplémentaires d'assurer la sécurité et d'identifier la bonne personne.

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais le numéro d'assurance sociale est valide, peu importe qu'on ait ou non des questions assorties.

On me demande mon numéro d'assurance sociale pour une transaction, quelle qu'elle soit, avec une banque, ou peu importe. Je n'ai pas de NIP. J'ai juste le numéro.

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Vous avez absolument raison. Vous n'avez pas de NIP.

Est-ce quelque chose que l'on pourrait considérer? Peut-être. Ce qu’il est important de dire, c'est que, pour avoir accès à un service, vous devez donner d'autres identifiants comme la ligne...

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Cela dépend des entreprises à qui l'on demande des services, mais, j'en conviens, vous avez raison.

N'y aurait-il pas lieu d'imposer une pénalité? On voit que des commerçants ou des banques demandent fréquemment les numéros d'assurance sociale, et cela n'est pas toujours nécessaire. N'y aurait-il pas lieu d'instaurer un système de pénalités pour ceux qui font une demande de numéro d'assurance sociale alors qu'ils n'en ont pas besoin?

(1710)

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

C'est une question intéressante. Je ne sais pas si des prédécesseurs se sont penchés sur cette question.

Actuellement, nous avons une liste très claire énumérant qui peut le faire. Nous avons des instructions très claires pour les citoyens. Lorsque quelqu'un leur demande un numéro d'assurance sociale et que cela ne fait pas partie de la liste des gens qui devraient le leur demander, ils ont des recours auprès du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada.

M. Rhéal Fortin:

Ne pourrait-on pas inclure à la Loi des dispositions pénales pour cela, que ce soit une amende ou autre?

Mme Elise Boisjoly:

Oui, ce serait quelque chose qu'il faudrait vérifier, pour lequel je n'ai pas d'information aujourd'hui.

M. Rhéal Fortin:

D'accord. Parfait.

J'ai une dernière question si vous...

Le président:

C'est fini, malheureusement, monsieur Fortin.[Traduction]

Cela conclut notre période des questions.

Au nom du Comité, je tiens à remercier les fonctionnaires non seulement d'avoir témoigné au début, mais de l'avoir fait aussi plus tard et d'avoir attendu les autres témoins.

Nous allons suspendre la séance et poursuivre à huis clos. Nous prendrons quelques minutes pour vider la salle.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard secu 65897 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on July 15, 2019

2019-06-17 SECU 169

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1540)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

I see quorum. It is well past 3:30 p.m., and I see that the minister is in his place. The minister is obviously pretty serious, because he has taken off his jacket. I think we're ready to proceed.

As colleagues will know, we did have an understanding as of last week as to how this session on Bill C-98 would proceed. That agreement has changed. In exchange, there won't be any further debate in the House.

The way I intend to proceed is to give the minister his time, and perhaps when he can be brief, he will be brief. We'll go through one round of questions and see whether there's still an appetite for further questions. From there, we'll proceed to the witnesses and then to clause-by-clause consideration. I'm assuming this is agreeable to all members.

That said, I'll ask the minister to present.

Thank you.

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee.

In the spirit of brevity and efficiency, I think I will forgo the opportunity to put a 10-minute statement on the record and just speak informally for a couple of minutes about Bill C-98. Evan Travers and Jacques Talbot from Public Safety Canada are with me and can help to go into the intricacies of the legislation and then respond to any questions you may have. They may also be able to assist if any issues arise when you're hearing from other witnesses, in terms of further information about the meaning or the purpose of the legislation.

Colleagues will know that Bill C-98 is intended to fill the last major gap in the architecture that exists for overseeing, reviewing and monitoring the activities of some of our major public safety and national security agencies. This is a gap that has existed for the better part of 18 years.

The problem arose in the aftermath of 9/11, when there was a significant readjustment around the world in how security agencies would operate. In the Canadian context at that time, the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency was divided, with the customs part joining the public safety department and ultimately evolving into CBSA, the Canada Border Services Agency. That left CRA, the Canada Revenue Agency, on its own.

In the reconfiguration of responsibilities following 9/11, many interest groups, stakeholders and public policy observers noted that CBSA, as it emerged, did not have a specific review body assigned to it to perform the watchdog function that SIRC was providing with respect to CSIS or the commissioner's office was providing with respect to the Communications Security Establishment.

The Senate came forward with a proposal, if members will remember, to fix that problem. Senator Willie Moore introduced Bill S-205, which was an inspector general kind of model for filling the gap with respect to oversight of CBSA. While Senator Moore was coming forward with his proposal, we were moving on the House side with NSICOP, the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, by virtue of Bill C-22, and the new National Security and Intelligence Review Agency which is the subject of Bill C-59.

We tried to accommodate Senator Moore's concept in the new context of NSICOP and NSIRA, but it was just too complicated to sort that out that we decided it would not be possible to salvage Senator Moore's proposal and convert it into a workable model. What we arrived at instead is Bill C-98.

(1545)



Under NSICOP and NSIRA, the national security functions of CBSA are already covered. What's left is the non-security part of the activities of CBSA. When, for example, a person comes to the border, has an awkward or difficult or unpleasant experience, whom do they go to with a complaint? They can complain to CBSA itself, and CBSA investigates all of that and replies, but the expert opinion is that in addition to what CBSA may do as a matter of internal good policy, there needs to be an independent review mechanism for the non-security dimensions of CBSA's work. The security side is covered by NSICOP, which is the committee of parliamentarians, and NSIRA, the new security agency under Bill C-59, but the other functions of CBSA are not covered, so how do you create a review body to cover that?

We examined two alternatives. One was to create a brand new stand-alone creature with those responsibilities; otherwise, was there an agency already within the Government of Canada, a review body, that had the capacity to perform that function? We settled on CRCC, the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission, which performs that exact function for the RCMP.

What is proposed in the legislation is a revamping of the CRCC to expand its jurisdiction to cover the RCMP and CBSA and to increase its capacity and its resources to be able to do that job. The legislation would make sure that there is a chair and a vice-chair of the new agency, which would be called the public complaints and review commission. It would deal with both the RCMP and the CBSA, but it would have a chair and a vice-chair. They would assume responsibilities, one for the RCMP and one for CBSA, to make sure that both agencies were getting top-flight attention—that we weren't robbing Peter to pay Paul and that everybody would be receiving the appropriate attention in the new structure. Our analysis showed that we could move faster and more expeditiously and more efficiently if we reconfigured CRCC instead of building a new agency from the ground up.

That is the legislation you have before you. The commission will be able to receive public complaints. It will be able to initiate investigations if it deems that course to be appropriate. The minister would be able to ask the agency to investigate or examine something if the minister felt an inquiry was necessary. Bill C-98 is the legislative framework that will put that all together.

That's the purpose of the bill, and I am very grateful for the willingness of the committee at this stage in our parliamentary life to look at this question in a very efficient manner. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

With that, we'll begin the first round of questions of seven minutes each, starting with Ms. Dabrusin.

I just offer a point of caution. I know all members are always relevant at all times about the subject matter that is before the committee, and I just point that out. Thank you.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have seven minutes.

(1550)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you.

I was very happy to see this bill because, Minister, as you know, pretty much every time you have been before this committee, I have asked you about CBSA oversight and when it would be forthcoming, so when I saw this bill had been tabled, it was a happy day for me.

You talked a little about the history of the bill. You talked about Senator Wilfred Moore's bill and how you dealt with the different oversights in Bill C-59 and NSICOP.

Why did we have to wait so long to see this bill come forward?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I think, Ms. Dabrusin, it's simply a product of the large flow of public safety business and activity that we have had to deal with. I added it up a couple of days ago. We have asked this Parliament to address at least 13 major pieces of legislation, which has kept this committee, as well as your counterparts in the Senate, particularly busy.

As you will know from my previous answers, I have wanted to get on with this legislation. It's part of the matrix that is absolutely required to complete the picture. It's here now. It's a pretty simple and straightforward piece of legislation. I don't think it involves any legal intricacies that make it too complex.

If we had had a slot on the public policy agenda earlier, we would have used it, but when I look at the list of what we've had to bring forward—13 major pieces of legislation—it is one that I hope is going to get to the finish line, but along the way, it was giving way to things like Bill C-66, Bill C-71, Bill C-83, Bill C-59 and Bill C-93. There's a lot to do.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Yes, thank you.

It's my understanding that when budget 2019 was tabled, there was a section within the budget that referred specifically to the funding for this oversight. Am I correct on that?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The funding is provided for. It will be coming through the estimates in due course. We're picking up the base funding that's available to the CRCC, and then, as the responsibilities for CBSA get added and the CRCC transforms into—I have to get the acronyms right—the PCRC, the public complaints and review commission, the necessary money will be added to add the required staff and operational capacity.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

You touched upon it briefly when you were talking about the different mechanisms and the decision for it to extend within the RCMP review system. Perhaps you can help me to understand it a bit better. Why not a separate review committee for the CBSA specifically? Why build it within the RCMP system and then expand it, as opposed to having a separate oversight?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It's simply because the expertise required on both sides is quite similar. It's not identical, granted, but it is quite similar. There is a foundation piece already in place with the CRCC. There are expertise and capacity that already exist, and the analysis that was done by officials and by Treasury Board and others led to the conclusion that we could move faster and we could move more cost effectively if we built on the existing structure and expanded it, rather than start a whole new agency from scratch.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

One of the issues that's come up is that I've had questions from constituents about privacy issues crossing the border, for example, border guards being able to access information on telephones and the like. How would this oversight be able to deal with that privacy issue?

(1555)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If an individual thought they had been mistreated in some way at the border, or if their privacy rights had been violated, or if a border officer conducted themselves in a manner that the traveller found to be intrusive or offensive, they would have now, or as soon as the legislation is passed, the ability to file an independent complaint with the new agency. The agency would investigate and offer their conclusions as to whether the procedure at the border had been appropriate or not.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I have a quick question, as I only have about a minute and a half left.

In the context of someone whose phone was being looked at and the basis for it being looked at was a national security concern, or what was proposed as a national security concern, would that go through the PCRC or would that go through...? How would that be managed between the different oversights?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The agency is going to be set up in such a way that wherever the person, the traveller, goes with their complaint...they may complain directly to the CBSA, not knowing there is a separate agency, or they may complain to the separate agency, or they may take it to NSIRA, the national security agency. If it's a grey area, the three possibilities—CBSA itself, the public complaints and review commission or NSIRA—will make sure that it lands in the right agency that has jurisdiction to hear it. There may be some jurisprudence that has to develop, informal jurisprudence, at the administrative level about what constitutes a national security complaint or question versus simple objectionable behaviour.

That will take time, but we will make sure that no complaint ends up in the wrong place. Wherever you go with your complaint, the agencies will ensure that it lands on the right desk and gets heard by the right authority.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I'm out of time.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Mr. Paul-Hus, for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Goodale, we're talking about organizations that are the subject of complaints. There's currently a complaint regarding the funding provided by Canada Summer Jobs to the Islamic Society of North America. It has been acknowledged and documented that the organization provided funding for terrorism purposes.

Has your department or any agency that operates under your department been informed of this issue or involved in the case? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Are you referring to the one that was referred to in question period today?

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Yes.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That is an issue that the employment department is examining. The funding involved was through the jobs fund and, as I understood the answer in the House today, the minister is asking her officials to investigate to ensure that whatever the decision-making process was with respect to that funding, it was fully and properly conducted. The matter is in fact being investigated. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you. I had urged members to stay with what we're on, which is Bill C-98. I'm not quite sure how a jobs funding application has much to do with Bill C-98, so I'd encourage the honourable member to direct his questions to Bill C-98 issues, please. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I was putting into practice the basis of the bill, which is the fact that Canadians are filing complaints. It's the same principle.

Let's go back to the commission, Minister Goodale. Is the commission currently experiencing any delays in the handling of complaints? Does it already have an excessive workload? Will adding more powers, duties and functions with regard to the Canada Border Services Agency create even more issues, or is everything fine? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Certainly, the expanded agency will have more work to do. At the moment, the CRCC looks exclusively at issues related to the RCMP. Under the new configuration, the review agency will examine both the RCMP and the CBSA. Presently—

(1600)

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Actually, sir, do you know if there are some delays in the treatment for the RCMP—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The CRCC I believe will be available to you later this afternoon—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus: Okay.

Hon. Ralph Goodale: —and they will be able to explain their workload, but on your basic point, Monsieur Paul-Hus, clearly the new agency is going to have more work to do. Therefore, it will need more resources, but we will be more cost-effective in applying those resources if we build on the platform the CRCC already has rather than building a brand new stand-alone agency for CBSA. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay.

If a person is removed by the Canada Border Services Agency for any reason, could they file a complaint regarding their forced removal in order to delay their removal? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's a question that may fall a bit in the grey area between a complaint about the behaviour of an officer, such as “was I treated roughly or rudely”, compared to “was I put out of the country for good and valid reasons”. If you have a dispute about the reason for which you are being removed from the country, there are legal appeal mechanisms available to you to contest the rationale for it. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Have we looked at whether people could use the complaint process to avoid being removed while the commission conducts an investigation? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No. The decision on removal or not, depending on which section of the act you're dealing with, is a decision made by either the Minister of Immigration or the Minister of Public Safety. It's not an administrative decision. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Who worked on Bill C-98? Was it just Public Safety Canada? Did the RCMP and the Canada Border Services Agency also participate? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'll ask Mr. Travers, who assisted with the policy preparation and the drafting, to comment on that.

Mr. Evan Travers (Acting Director General, Law Enforcement and Border Strategies Directorate, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thank you, Minister.

Public Safety consulted, within the strictures of cabinet confidence obviously, with the CBSA and with the RCMP in the development of the draft legislation. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay.

Is there a reason why the union wasn't consulted? [English]

Mr. Evan Travers:

The consultation with respect to the union was handled through the CBSA. My understanding is that the CBSA engaged with the union after the tabling of the bill. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Yet the union seems to be saying that it wasn't consulted at all on this issue. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The policy decision, Mr. Paul-Hus, was clearly made by the government based on all of the public representations that had been received that this was a gap that needed to be filled.

In terms of the structure or the method of filling the gap, we settled on that in the discussions between the public safety department, the CBSA and the RCMP. Once that policy decision was made and the legislation was in the public domain, the CBSA, as I understand it, talked further with their union.

The Chair:

You're pretty well out of time, Mr. Paul-Hus. You have 10 seconds.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Minister, thank you for being here.

I want to go back to the question Ms. Dabrusin was asking in terms of the time that this took. The fact is, there was a Senate report prior to the last election in 2015, legislation by Senator Segal in the previous Parliament and a recommendation from this committee in 2017.

Also, for anyone who wants to take a minute to google it, you can find articles from at least the last three years with you promising this legislation—it's coming, it's coming. Also, most of the bills you enumerated in responding to my colleague, if not all, were tabled in 2016 or 2017.

I'm wondering about this mechanism. You called it simple and straightforward, faster and cost-effective and said it builds on existing infrastructure. I'm having a hard time with this, especially in knowing that the legislation is only going to come into effect in 2020, if I'm understanding correctly, with regard to the ability of Canadians to make complaints.

I'm still not quite understanding why, with all those pieces on the table and at the very least two or three years in the lead-up.... To me, it doesn't seem to wash that you sort of dropped your arms and said, “Oh well, the senator's proposal won't work in Bill C-59.” That seemed to be what you were implying in response to the question.

I want to ask again why it took so long when there continue to be incidents with work relations for those who work at CBSA—allegations of harassment and things of that nature—and obviously, of course, the issues that some Canadians face in the way they are treated at the border.

(1605)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, as I said, Monsieur Dubé, we have had an enormous volume of work to get through, as has this committee, as has Parliament, generally. The work program has advanced as rapidly as we could make it. It takes time and effort to put it all together. I'm glad we're at this stage, and I hope the parliamentary machinery will work well enough this week that we can get it across the finish line.

It has been a very significant agenda, when you consider there has been Bill C-7, Bill C-21, Bill C-22, Bill C-23, Bill C-37, Bill C-46, Bill C-66, Bill C-71, Bill C-59, Bill C-97, Bill C-83, Bill C-93 and Bill C-98. It's a big agenda and we have to get it all through the same relatively small parliamentary funnel.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I think maybe three of those bills were tabled after 2017 or early 2018. I mean, for the C-20s and the single digits, we're talking days after your government was sworn in. I think there needs to be some accountability, because you've been on the record strongly saying that this needed to be done, and so I don't want to leave it being said that.... For example, with Bill C-59, why not make the change then?

I just want to understand, because my concern, Minister, is that I want to make sure there's no, for example, resistance internally to this issue. I can't understand, if this is a simple and straightforward mechanism in Bill C-98, why it took years to come to the conclusion that this was the way to go.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There is no internal resistance at all. In fact, the organization, CBSA, recognizes that this is a gap in the architecture and that it needs to be filled.

Part of it was filled by Bill C-22 with the committee of parliamentarians, as far as national security is concerned. Part of it was filled by Bill C-59 and the creation of the new NSIRA, again with respect to national security.

This legislation fills in the last piece. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I want to follow up on the questions asked by my colleague, Mr. Paul-Hus. I'm troubled by the fact that the union wasn't consulted in this case. One role of this mechanism is to protect workers in the event of allegations. The media sometimes reports on harassment allegations and things of that nature.

Mr. Travers, you can probably answer my question. You explained that the agency carried out the consultation. However, the workers are the ones who may be directly affected by the results of the complaints. Sometimes, they may be the ones who file complaints. Given the nature of the bill, why didn't you take the time to consult the union, which represents the workers? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Dubé, the issue was thoroughly debated within the government department and within CBSA. It's up to CBSA to have that interface with their employees. They conducted those conversations at what they considered to be the appropriate time.

The point is that the legislation is now ready to go. You'll have the opportunity to examine it in detail to ensure, through the democratic process in Parliament, that it's properly addressing the needs of the workers.

(1610)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Well, you'll forgive me, Minister. We support the bill and will be happy to see it get adopted, but that's just the issue. We don't have the time, because it took so long that now we have to do this quickly. I'm okay to do that, but I think we do have to qualify those comments.

Did you receive any kind of report from CBSA about the specifics of what the union had to say, or was it kind of like—not to be simplistic about it—just saying that you spoke to them and it's fine, and then moving on?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There were no negative issues reported to me from any part of the consultation. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

I have one last question for you.

I gather that the mechanism will be implemented in 2020. People who wish to file a complaint can do so from that point on. Are any further clarifications needed or can we expect that, if the bill is passed, people will be able to file complaints under the proposed mechanism starting next year? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That would be the goal, Mr. Dubé. We're obviously working on the development of an expanded agency. We may run into administrative issues that we hadn't anticipated, but the objective is to get this in place as quickly as possible. The mechanism we're choosing will let us move more quickly than we could if we were creating an agency from the ground up.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

But, Minister—I have just 20 seconds left—

The Chair:

Actually, you don't.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

—if we get the bill through Parliament, will it be done, if it's adopted?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That is exactly what I want to achieve, yes.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Monsieur Picard, go ahead for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Goodale, as you know, I started my career as a customs officer. The threshold for tolerance or interpretation when it comes to people entering Canada varies depending on whether the people are visitors or residents returning to Canada.

My colleague Mr. Dubé talked about protecting employees. Of course, you need an external perspective to determine the merits of a complaint filed by someone who believes that their rights have been violated. It seems that the bill contains measures that enable the commission to accept or reject a complaint based on its content. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Yes, Monsieur Picard.

Do you see a problem with that?

Mr. Evan Travers:

I don't. I may have missed something in the translation.

Mr. Michel Picard:

People coming back into Canada, residents and visitors, don't have the same threshold for how they'd like to be treated, considering the nature of their complaints. The committee can analyze the grounds of those complaints and whether they make sense or not. With regard to protecting the officers, as Mr. Dubé said, this bill also looks at something to protect officers and employees from frivolous complaints.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The whole objective, Monsieur Picard, is to have fairness both ways. When someone is travelling, they deserve to expect an efficient professional experience at the border. The public servants who are administering border services should also expect to be able to function in a safe and respectful work environment. It works both ways.

I suspect that once a certain file of complaints has been received and heard, we'll be developing a pool of experience and expertise that will improve the border experience both ways.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Chances are that the committee will come to a conclusion that might not be accepted by the agency itself. Who has the final decision on the conclusion provided by the committee should it go against the interpretation of the agency?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'll ask either Mr. Travers or Mr. Talbot to comment on the ultimate authority, but in response to your last question, Mr. Picard, I'd refer to proposed subsection 32(2) in the act, which deals with how you handle trivial, frivolous or vexatious complaints or complaints made in bad faith, which is, I think, what you are concerned about.

Mr. Talbot or Mr. Travers, can you comment on the ultimate decision-making authority if there's an argument between the review body and the agency?

(1615)

Mr. Evan Travers:

The first body to investigate any complaint would be the CBSA, in most cases. They would be able to look at that, make findings and then give those findings back to the complainant. There are provisions throughout that require the subject employee to be notified and kept informed of the progress of the investigation. If after receiving that report from the CBSA the complainant is not satisfied with the contents of the report, they could refer it to the commission. The commission would take its own look at the complaint. The commission could either agree with the CBSA's conclusions or conduct its own investigation or ask the CBSA to conduct a further investigation of the complaint. Once the commission looked at the complaint, it would send that file back to the CBSA, and the CBSA could add comments to it.

There is a process by which differences of opinions and views can come out, but the commission's report will be the commission's report, at the end of the day. They will come to that with a full understanding and appreciation of the facts, and they will be able to go and get the facts they need to get that. In terms of the results of that, it is a final decision from the commission. It is not reviewable by a federal court or by another body, because the recommendations that come out of it aren't binding on the CBSA.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Are you saying that if an individual is not satisfied with the end result, after the commission has reviewed the issue he doesn't have any more legal recourse to sue anyone?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The discipline here, Monsieur Picard, is the process of having a formal investigation. If the review body comes to a very clear conclusion that the individual's rights have been infringed upon—they have been treated badly; there's something wrong in the way they were handled, and that's the very clear conclusion from the review body—and the agency fails to address that in a meaningful way, then the agency, I think, will have a very big policy and administrative problem on its hands. The issue will have been exposed publicly by an independent authority that will say you were either right or wrong. There will be a very strong obligation on the part of the agency to respond to that.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We've reached the end of our seven-minute round. Is there still an appetite to ask questions until 4:30 p.m.?

Okay. Then we'll run until 4:30 p.m. and that will be it.

Go ahead, Mr. Motz. You have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Minister, I've heard the term “oversight body” used here a couple of times today. I think that's a misnomer. As you have said before, we need to make sure it's a review body, a civilian complaints review commission, and not oversight of the CBSA. I want to make sure everybody understands that.

(1620)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's correct.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Thank you.

To go back to the earlier comments from Ms. Dabrusin, Pierre Paul-Hus and Mr. Dubé about the timing, I'm led to believe, sir, that the previous government and officials in the public safety division, if you will, were already drafting some bill similar to this about this issue to get oversight...sorry, to get civilian review for CBSA.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It's easy to fall off the wagon.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It took us until the last few hours of this session to get this here, but it was sort of being worked on before. This could have been in place years ago, and it wasn't. I support it, and I believe it's something we need, but again, I just echo the concerns that have been raised already. I just want to put on record that I'm concerned that it took this long.

My question is on the mechanism. Everything boils down to the mechanism, to how this is going to work. We know that the current RCMP complaints commission has six members, and I believe this legislation is going to maybe reduce that number to five. As Mr. Travers explained with regard to Mr. Picard's question, the CBSA will do the initial investigation of a complaint that comes to it from a civilian about the handling of whatever it might be. If that individual, the member of the public, is not satisfied with the disposition of that complaint, he or she can go to the complaints review commission and have that investigation reviewed again, if you will.

I don't understand the mechanism with regard to how the complaint commission does that. Does it do a paper review? If there's a complaint that the investigation wasn't done thoroughly, does it have its own investigative body that can interview witnesses and get more detail? How will that actually play out in the operations of this?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Again, I'll ask Mr. Travers to comment on the mechanical details.

The portion of the new commission that will be dealing with CBSA would function in a very similar way to how the existing commission does with respect to the RCMP.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Are there two different commissions?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No, but there will be two streams of activity within the same commission.

Mr. Glen Motz:

So, it's the same people hearing the same complaints. People on the RCMP side will hear RCMP matters, and the same people will also hear CBSA matters. Is that correct?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Let me just double-check that point.

The plan, Mr. Motz, is that the reviewers on the CBSA side would deal with CBSA issues and that the reviewers on the RCMP side would deal with RCMP issues. It would be up to the chair and the vice-chair to determine the allocation of the personnel to hear any particular case, but I would think—

Mr. Glen Motz:

They'd be two separate bodies inside of one commission.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Essentially, yes. There would be an RCMP stream and a CBSA stream.

Mr. Glen Motz:

From an expertise perspective—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Exactly, because the issues are similar, but they're not identical.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes.

Would there be an investigative ability inside that commission if the complainant isn't satisfied with the investigation with regard to the complaint?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The investigative function would be the same for the CBSA work as it would be for the RCMP work. They have the capacity to make inquiries, to receive information, and to pursue any complaint that's presented to them to make sure that they have the facts in front of them—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, so, it's separate from the—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

—so that they can make a decision.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It's separate from the CBSA. The CBSA has done the investigation. This commission could do another one on top of this, a separate one.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If they're not satisfied with what they've been presented, yes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Then the commission itself has the ability to do it, or would it farm that out to another investigative body?

The Chair:

This is going to have to be the last answer for you, Mr. Motz.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The chair and vice-chair of the commission would determine what resources, either internal or external, they require. They'll have a budget. Obviously, they want to get to the bottom of whatever a complaint is. They want to be able to satisfy either the employee who's complaining or the member of the public who's complaining, that the complaint has been treated fairly and competently and that the truth has been found.

(1625)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Graham, you have the final five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

In the event of a conflict of authority between the PCRC and the NSIRA, or even NSICOP, who prevails?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It would be up to the agencies to sort out their respective jurisdictions. I suspect it will be pretty clear in most cases as to whether it's a national security issue or not.

The agencies in the past have had jurisdictional questions where they've had to work on things together. They've been able to resolve disputes in a way that is satisfactory, so I don't anticipate there's going to be a jurisdictional fight here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When the RCMP is operating in a contract position, for example, as provincial police, or here on the Hill in PPS, is the PCRC's power and oversight the same as an RCMP native operation?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If they're functioning as a provincial police force—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

—the first line of complaint would be the provincial review agency. There is one in every province.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What about for the PPS side? The RCMP is contracted to provide a service, so—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

They're contracted to provide an officer. You'll have to consult the Speaker on that one, because that's the jurisdiction of the two Speakers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

In overseas operations, when the RCMP is doing training missions, for example, or the CBSA is doing pre-clearing, which is another one of the bills that you brought forward, is the PCRC empowered to investigate overseas in the same way as they are domestically?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The powers of the review body in relation to the RCMP will not change. Whatever exists now, continues. CBSA is then added to it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They would be able to go down to the U.S., for example, and find out what happened if there were a major complaint.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Go ahead, Evan.

Mr. Evan Travers:

They would certainly be able to access any of the information, whether those CBSA activities took place in Canada or abroad. If that would require them to go abroad, I don't know, or if they'd be able to interview people in Canada, but they'd be entitled to have access to CBSA information just as they would if the event had happened in Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final question.

Does the PCRC have any power to make a binding recommendation in any circumstance?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

That brings our questioning to an end.

I want to thank members and the minister for their co-operation in moving this through expeditiously.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Chairman, just let me say thank you to you and members of the committee for indicating your willingness to handle this matter very expeditiously in the time that's available to us.

The Chair:

Thank you.

With that, we will suspend and resume as soon as the witnesses are ready.

(1625)

(1630)

The Chair:

For the purpose of expediting this bill, I will say that we have a quorum and we are re-empanelled as of now.

Joining us by remote whatever, we have Mr. Sauvé, from the National Police Federation, and also Michelaine Lahaie, Lesley McCoy and Tim Cogan.

I'm going to give the opportunity to Mr. Sauvé to speak first, because one never knows with this technology whether it will survive.

Generally we have 10 minutes per presentation. Ideally, if it could be less than 10 minutes, we could get to members' questions more quickly.

With that, may I call on Mr. Sauvé to introduce himself and make his presentation.

Mr. Brian Sauvé (Co-Chair, National Police Federation):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I hope the technology is working and that you can hear me.

The Chair:

That is a nice piece of art behind you there.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

Thank you.

My name is Brian Sauvé. I'm a regular member. I'm also a sergeant in the RCMP. I've been on leave without pay to found and start the National Police Federation. Presently, I'm one of the interim co-chairs.

For those who have been following from the sidelines, we made an application to certify the first bargaining agent for members of the RCMP in April 2017. We have been going through every hoop and hurdle imaginable thrown at us since April 2017. A certification vote was held with all 18,000-plus members of the bargaining unit last November and December. We are still awaiting a decision from the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board on that vote with a constitutional challenge.

That being said, with respect to Bill C-98, we wanted to have input to provide the RCMP members' perspective on the CRCC and part VII of the RCMP Act as it deals with public complaints. I'm open to questions on that.

At the time, I saw Bill C-98 as an act to amend the RCMP Act. There are a number of concerns that our membership has expressed with respect to the 2014 amendments to the RCMP Act, otherwise known as Bill C-42, that would be nice to be broadcast or provided questions on.

For example, in Bill C-98, there is an amendment to section 45.37 of the RCMP Act imposing time frames in consultation with the force, and the newly worded public review and complaints commission, as to how long an investigation should take, what should be the result and the consultation between the force and the investigating body.

It would really be nice, from our perspective, from an RCMP member's perspective, to expand that to deal with other areas of the RCMP Act. One of the areas that would be lovely to have some form of consultation on timelines would be the internal disciplinary processes or even grievances or appeals of commissioner's decisions on suspensions and such.

Our experience has been that whether it's a complaint under part VII or an administrative process under part IV or a grievance under part III of the RCMP Act, the RCMP itself is not equipped to deal with these issues in a timely manner. The issues tend to lag on for six months, a year, a year and a half to two years, which leaves the accused or the subject member of either a public complaint or a code of conduct or a griever in a grievance in limbo in an administrative process that takes forever.

Should your committee have questions on that, I'd be more than happy to answer, and we'll go from there.

That would be my presentation. I'm sure you're not going to study all of the submissions I would have on Bill C-42 and how it has impacted the membership of the RCMP, and the sweeping powers of commissioners and commanding officers.

I would love to get into that in more detail some day, but I don't think this legislation is the venue for that. However, timelines in section 45.37 would be something that we would definitely appreciate your looking into.

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Sauvé.

The lights are flashing, and I'm obliged to suspend unless I have the unanimous consent of colleagues to carry on. My proposal would be, since we're in the building, that we carry on for 15 to 20 minutes. I believe it is a half-hour bell. Is 20 minutes reasonable?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: With that, we will probably get through the presentation of the next witnesses and at least start the questions.

The minister mentioned to me that he has a flowchart of the process which he's more than willing to make available to anyone who wishes. Regrettably, it's only in English. It will be in French and English in 24 hours, but for those who are interested in the flowchart, it is available.

I call upon Michelaine Lahaie, chairperson of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie (Chairperson, Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair. My name is Michelaine Lahaie and I'm accompanied today by Tim Cogan, who is my senior director of corporate services, as well as Lesley McCoy, who is my general counsel.

Given the short notice that we were provided for this particular hearing, we do not have any prepared comments, but I am indeed prepared to answer any questions the committee members may have.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota, go ahead for seven minutes.

(1640)

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

My first couple of questions will be for the commission.

In the time you've been serving, on average, how many complaints have you been getting from civilians? What range of issues are those complaints on? How long does the process generally take, whether for an initial review or, if you actually get into an investigation, for that? There are four questions in there.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

In terms of the number of complaints that we receive, we receive between 2,500 and 3,000 complaints per year about RCMP members. We are then normally asked to review somewhere in the neighbourhood of 250 to 300 of those complaints ourselves. As described by the minister during the last session, the complaints generally go to the RCMP for investigation first. If the individual lodging the complaint is not happy with the RCMP's disposition of the complaint, it will then come to us and we will conduct our review. On average, we're reviewing 250 to 300, and my call centre receives between 2,500 and 3,000 complaints per year.

In terms of timeline, it really depends. We do have service standards at the commission. Once we've received a complaint, our service standard is that within four business days we send that complaint to the RCMP for them to carry on with their investigation. Once the RCMP has completed their portion of the investigation or they've sent out their report, if the individual who made the complaint would like to have that complaint reviewed, they have 60 days to come back to us and ask for it to be reviewed.

Then, once we've received an indication from the individual that they would like the complaint reviewed, our service standard is 120 business days following that. However, that timeline starts as soon as we receive all the relevant material from the RCMP. We go to the RCMP and we ask for any information with respect to the investigation that they conducted, and we may ask for any other information that comes that may be related to that specific complaint.

The Chair:

Mr. Sauvé, I want to advise you, because you're new to this process, that if you wish to intervene on any question, just give some indication to me, and I'll make sure you can intervene.

Go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sorry, I lost my train of thought with that.

You ended by saying there was a 60-day review.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The individual who has requested a review has to indicate that they want the complaint reviewed after 60 days. From the time the RCMP has sent out their letter of disposition, the individual has 60 days to tell us they want it reviewed.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How long does it generally take for the RCMP to do their review after you've sent the complaint?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

At present, there are no service standards with respect to that piece. Sometimes it can take as little as a few months to as much as two years, depending upon from where the complaint has been lodged and depending upon the complexity of the complaint.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I know there must be a range of issues, but can you identify three or four main issues that do occur?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The main issues that we see are about improper attitude. We will see some that deal with improper use of resources, not responding to duty correctly, or what's deemed by the complainant to be improper use of force.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I believe Mr. Graham had a couple questions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have just a couple of short ones for Sergeant Sauvé if I may.

You're talking about the trouble you're having essentially unionizing the RCMP membership, if I understand correctly.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

Well, I wouldn't say.... I mean, it was a challenge. We live in a diverse and very geographically spread-out country, so it was a challenge in the first year getting all of the members on board. The challenge now is in pushing the FPSLREB process in order to get through the application for certification. The membership have shown their support. It's just, shall I say, the “pushing molasses uphill in January” governmental process that is providing us with a bit of a delay.

(1645)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At least in January—

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, I warned Mr. Paul-Hus about the relevance to Bill C-98.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm about to bring it in, yes.

The Chair:

Okay. I'm hoping you'll bring it in.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll bring it back in. I have one more question before I get to that, but I will tie in with that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The reason I go down this road is that, as you're aware, there are three unionized services on Parliament Hill that report to the RCMP. I'm wondering if you've talked to SSEA and PSAC about their challenges. They've had many of them. I'm also wondering if Bill C-98 will give you any additional tools in dealing with this and if that's why you've come today.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

No, the reason I expressed my interest with the clerk when he called this morning—I appreciate the short timelines that this committee is dealing with—is that any opportunity to have the membership of the RCMP's voice heard with respect to amending the RCMP Act is an opportunity for us to speak on their behalf. If we didn't, it would be an opportunity lost.

In terms of consulting with those who represent the PPS or the membership on the Hill, you know, Bill C-7 kind of precluded any organization that was asking to represent the membership of the RCMP—it's a grey area in Bill C-7—from having any associational activity outside the law enforcement community. We've been very careful in the NPF about how we associate and who we hitch our banner to. Most of that has been within the Canadian police association community—the Ontario Provincial Police Association, la Fraternité des policiers et policières à Québec, and that sort of thing. We haven't really linked up with a PSAC or a CUPE or a UCCO, for example.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does the committee that we're talking about today give you more tools for the union to deal with, or is it a non-issue for you? When the certification has been received, will the union use this committee to deal with the RCMP? Is it a tool that would be in your arsenal as well?

The Chair:

Very briefly, please.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

I'm not sure I understand the question correctly.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In negotiating with the RCMP, does the creation of the committee as we're now seeing it improve your ability to negotiate? Does it give you extra tools, or is it a non-issue for you and it's strictly for the public, in your view?

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

With the CRCC as it is—I'll use the terminology “CRCC” because that's what it still is today—I don't see Bill C-98 impacting the membership of the RCMP or changing how we deal with or investigate public complaints.

As you heard from the chair of the CRCC, Ms. Lahaie, on the timelines with respect to the investigation of public complaints, the bottleneck that we see and that I hear about is the RCMP's ability to investigate in a timely manner. That extends—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Sauvé, but we'll have to leave it there. We've run past time.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

That's fine.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you.

You indicated, ma'am, that you have 2,500 to 3,000 complaints that the RCMP investigates on their members a year. The commission reviews about 250 to 300 of those. Has there been any thought given, based on what the CBSA is currently doing, because they already have complaints that they deal with internally, to how many more will be added to the commission's workload?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

We've been consulting extensively with CBSA on this issue. My understanding is that they receive approximately 3,000 complaints a year. We're expecting the numbers to be very similar. Having said that, there will of course be a public education process that will happen around the launch of the PCRC. Once that happens, there is a possibility that the number of complaints will go up. Right now our planned number is about 3,000 per year.

Mr. Glen Motz:

As I understand Bill C-98, you had six members of the commission coming in.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

We had five members of the commission under the old RCMP Act, so this will be five again.

(1650)

Mr. Glen Motz:

You have five RCMP, and will you have five new members for the CBSA?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

No, sir, that's incorrect. We'll just have five members. The commission will have—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Five full...?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

—five members. That's right.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. How do you then.... One of the issues of the RCMP membership now, which certainly will be a concern for CBSA, is dealing with these issues in a timely manner. Yes, we need to be responsive to the complaints from the public, but we also have to be understanding of what some of these complaints do to the membership. Frivolous and vexatious complaints need to be addressed in a timely way, as well as just the disposition, even if they're founded complaints.

How do you propose to accelerate the timeline that you've already talked about in terms of a few months on some of the smaller cases to several years for some of the more complex ones?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

One of the things this bill is going to help with is the fact that there will now be service standards. There will be service standards for the RCMP as well as service standards for CBSA in terms of their responding, which will assist the commission greatly, whereas right now, the RCMP, in the current RCMP Act, do not have a specific service standard in terms of when they have to reply back to us. We will be negotiating service standards with them and with the CBSA when the new act comes into force.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Does that service standard apply, then, if a member of the public doesn't complain to you? Here's what I'm getting at. You have a service standard that is going to be built in. If you are asked by a member of the public to intervene or to review a file that's already been investigated—either by CBSA in this case, in Bill C-98, or the RCMP, because they're both going to be similar—the RCMP and the CBSA, for that matter, will both have a service standard to meet.

What happens previous to that? Do they have service standards now? If a member of the public complains to CBSA or the RCMP now, is there a service standard such that they have to respond to a member of the public in a timely way?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I can't speak to what CBSA is doing right now, because we're looking at what we're doing in the future. In terms of the RCMP, they do have a policy document that's in place, but there's no requirement for them to articulate that service standard externally. Right now, there really isn't a service standard externally in place for that.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Mr. Sauvé, would you care to comment on that?

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

As I mentioned at the beginning, I think service standards are a fantastic idea. One of the comments I would make is that the implementation of service standards for the investigational side would be a huge win for the membership. As you mentioned, having something hanging over your head for a year to two or three years and not knowing the resolution is the bottleneck right now.

Mr. Glen Motz:

All right. Thank you.

I saw you sitting in the gallery when I asked the minister this question. You have five members as a commission. Do you have investigative resources that you have access to that provide you with the ability to reinvestigate if a complaint is found to be insufficient? Does that exist for both the RCMP side of your commission and the CBSA side of your commission? Who is the investigative body that you contract or go to for that?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The answer to your question is yes. We do have the ability to investigate. I have a team of seven investigators who currently work for me right now. I suspect that with the increase in funding, as well as the new mandate, we will be increasing the number of investigators we have. In some cases, if we require and need very specialized expertise, then we contract out for that specialized expertise. For example—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Who would you contract out to? Is it to other police services?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I'm sorry?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Is it other police services?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

No. It's not other police services. We go to civilian contracts and look at using those types of services.

Mr. Glen Motz:

On the investigators you have now, where are they from?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

They're a mix. I have some who are from other police services. I have some who have come from family and social services, so it really is—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Are they on secondment? Are they seconded positions?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

No. They're public servants who work directly for me.

Mr. Glen Motz:

They've had previous experience in those agencies.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Exactly.

Mr. Glen Motz:

All right.

This has been a long time in the making. You heard us talk about that with the minister. Is there anything as you see the bill.... I mean, as the commission, you're responsible. You're going to be tasked with making sure that now CBSA falls under the requirements of this commission as well for civilian complaints review.

In order to look after the public in a timely way or in any way to be efficient there, and to also be responsive to the RCMP and CBSA members who might be the subject of a complaint, is there anything that we should be considering in this bill but is void in this legislation now or anything that could strengthen it to be more effective on both sides?

(1655)

The Chair:

Answer very briefly, please.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The legislation as you have it before you is very similar to what we see in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act right now. There are probably a few minor housekeeping issues, but as we read it right now, as the commission, there are no showstoppers.

Mr. Glen Motz:

With regard to the housekeeping issues, if you could get them to us....

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Sure.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It's just that we have to go through this today or Wednesday.

The Chair:

With that, we're going to have to suspend and go off to vote.

I'm hoping that our witnesses can stay while we go exercise our democratic franchise.

(1655)

(1720)

The Chair:

We are back and we have quorum.

I think it's Mr. Dubé who has seven minutes.

Subject to what colleagues might say, my suggestion would be that we go for 20 minutes. Does that sound reasonable? Then we'll move to clause-by-clause consideration after that.

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. Dubé, go ahead for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Sauvé, I hope that you'll forgive me, but I have few questions that I think you can answer.

First, I want to take this opportunity to congratulate you for everything that you're doing. I know that things haven't been easy in recent years, but I think that it's a step in the right direction. It was something that needed to be done a long time ago. The people who have been following the debate know that this is about establishing fair representation for the men and women in uniform in the RCMP. Keep up the good work.

My questions pertain to some aspects of the commission's current operations and how the bill can change or affect this.

The proposed subclause 18(2) on page 8 of the bill states as follows: (2) In order to conduct a review on its own initiative, the Commission (a) must be satisfied that sufficient resources exist ... (b) must have taken reasonable steps to verify that no other review or inquiry has been undertaken ...

I'll address the reasonable steps described in paragraph (b). Let's start with paragraph (a), which concerns resources.

Take the case of an incident reported by the media. As a result, the complaint becomes a matter of public interest. If you don't have an adequate budget, you must make the handling of complaints a priority, even if the situation is high profile. Unless the president or the minister requests an investigation, you'll be limited by your budget capacity. That's basically what it means.

Is that correct?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Yes, Mr. Dubé, that's correct. We're certainly limited by our budgetary and human resources.

I should also point out that this part concerns what we call reviews, but reviews of specific activities. We're talking about cases involving a systemic issue that we decide to investigate. We're talking about these cases, rather than the normal complaints that we receive from the general public.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

That's fine.

In terms of paragraph (b), not only in the context of the proposed subclause 18(2), but in general, Mr. Graham spoke earlier about the risk of stepping on the other agency's toes. That's interesting. As part of our study of Bill C-59, we met with representatives of your commission. Forgive me, I don't remember whether the information came from you or other representatives, but we were told that there was no issue with regard to the RCMP, since the functions weren't national security functions. However, during the presentations and debate on Bill C-59, some people pointed out that, in the case of the Canada Border Services Agency, the issue still concerned national security, given that we're talking about border integrity.

Are you concerned that, in terms of the agency, it may be more difficult to determine what falls under the different oversight mechanisms for national security issues? For example, in the case of the committee created by Bill C-59 or the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, there's a clearer and more obvious distinction with respect to the RCMP.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I think that it may sometimes be difficult to make the distinction. However, I can tell you that we currently have a very good relationship with the Security Intelligence Review Committee and with what will become the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency. We often talk to these people. I think that we would be able to determine which agency should handle the complaint.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

As long as good relationships are maintained, this shouldn't cause any issues in terms of the work.

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Indeed.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Good.

My next question concerns American customs officials. I think that it's important, because ordinary mortals, if you'll allow me to use that expression, don't always have a clear idea of who's responsible. Since the passage of Bill C-23, there has been increased use of pre-clearance, particularly during land crossings and at airports

Do you anticipate any complaints regarding how American officials treat Canadian citizens? Have you established a mechanism to deal with this? Will you pass on complaints to another agency? Will you raise public awareness? Will your approach include several components?

(1725)

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

The approach will include several components. We'll undoubtedly receive complaints regarding American officials.

At this time, we sometimes receive complaints regarding officers other than Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers. With respect to the RCMP, we have a no wrong door policy. Under this policy, if we receive a complaint regarding a Toronto police officer, for example, we can send it to the provincial agency for processing. We share the information.

We'll certainly start building relationships with the Americans so that we can pass on these types of complaints to them.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I apologize for hurrying, but my time is running out.

During pre-clearance, the Americans operate on Canadian soil. Do you play any type of role if an incident that leads to a complaint takes place on Canadian soil, for example at a Canadian airport?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I don't think so, but this issue should be addressed.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

That's fine.

I have one last question.

On page 25, the proposed subclause 51(1) refers to the response of the president of the agency. Is this mechanism similar to the current mechanism of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP, whereby a written response is provided and, if no further action is taken, the reasons are also provided in writing? Forgive me for not knowing the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act by heart. Perhaps I should know it. Is it the same as the mechanism that currently exists in this legislation?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Yes, we're currently using the same mechanism.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

I understand there are no questions from the government side. Are there any further questions from the opposition side?

Mr. Eglinski, go ahead for five minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I'd like to thank you for coming out today and for presenting. I'm very pleased to be able to support Bill C-98, but I do have a couple of a misconceptions, which I've had for a number of years, regarding the similar situation you had with the RCMP.

Under “Powers of Commission in Relation to Complaints”, with regard to the powers in proposed section 44, you were talking about service standards for the RCMP and certain guidelines. You can compel a person to come before you and administer an oath, etc. If a member of the border security were involved in a criminal case, say for an alleged assault or something like that or for excessive force, would you require them to do that before the criminal trial, or would it be set over until after the criminal trial so that they could defend their actions? Would the evidence they gave your organization under oath be able to be used against them in a criminal trial?

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

I'll address the second part of your question first. Any information provided to us under oath by an individual we've compelled to come to speak to us cannot be used against them. Anything they're admitting personally cannot be used in any of our reports, so that information cannot be used against them.

The first part of your question is about a situation we deal with fairly often, that in which the courts are engaged in something about which we've received a public complaint. Generally, we tend to put those public complaints in abeyance while we wait to see what the courts are going to say, because oftentimes the courts will provide some form of direction or there'll be something in a decision.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

That's the question I had. There is a kind of abeyance there because there is a conflict.

I have a second part for you, and I'd like you to answer fairly quickly if you could, because I do have another question.

I was there when you guys first started with the RCMP public complaints commission. There was a bit of resentment on the part of members of the RCMP with regard to trust, and I think there was a little resentment the other way; both of us kind of didn't trust each other. But as time went by—not a very long time—a trust was built up from us having worked very closely together. I would think you'd find the same thing moving into this new era. Are you going to set up a bit of an education program for the members of the Canada Border Services Agency so they understand really what you're about? There is going to be that little bit of suspicion on their side, so I wonder if you have a plan for educating them.

(1730)

Ms. Michelaine Lahaie:

Right now we are working on a plan to educate them. That is part of our intention, to educate them as well as the Canadian public on the process.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

The gentleman who is on the screen.... I'm sorry; I forget your name, Sergeant.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

Brian Sauvé.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Brian, you talk about service standards within the RCMP and completion of investigations. Do you believe that the service standards should go both ways?

I'm going back to 15 years ago when I was in charge of Fort St. John detachment. I can recall an incident where I had a member stationed there for four years who I never met. He was on a standby investigation. I never knew what it was about. I wasn't told what it was about, but he lived in my area. He never came to work. I wonder if you feel that there should be a service standard both ways.

Mr. Brian Sauvé:

I'm not sure what you mean by a service standard both ways. Whether it's a public complaint, an internal investigation or a criminal investigation, those being investigated have a right to a procedurally fair and expedited investigation, period. That's the way I look at it.

The laws of natural justice should apply. Whether it's the CBSA being investigated or the RCMP being investigated, the member being investigated has a right to a timely completion of that investigation. He or she also has the right to silence. That's a common law: the right to silence. So, if that impedes the investigators, well, find another avenue.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

I think I've run out of time.

The Chair:

Yes, you have.

Mr. Manly, do you wish to ask any questions?

Mr. Paul Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, GP):

No.

The Chair:

Are there any other questions on this side? No.

With that, I will thank our witnesses.

I appreciate your patience while we went off to vote.

With that, we'll suspend and come back for the clause-by-clause study.

(1730)

(1735)

The Chair:

I see that our witnesses are at the table and members are here.

We are now moving to clause-by-clause.

(Clauses 1 and 2 agreed to)

(On clause 3)

The Chair: We have PV-1.

Mr. Manly.

Mr. Paul Manly:

This amendment would specify that neither current nor former officers nor employees of the Canada Border Services Agency may sit on the public complaints and review commission. This amendment does not appear in Bill C-98, but in the parent act, the RCMP Act. The ineligibility paragraph under subsection 45.29(2) of that act would exclude current or former members from service on the PCRC, and under that act, “member” has a specific definition that means an employee of the RCMP. Presumably, current and former agents of the CBSA should be excluded from sitting on the PCRC as well. This amendment would make that crystal clear.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have a couple of questions. One is for the officials that are here about this particular amendment, and one is for Mr. Picard, actually.

The Chair:

He won't be able to serve.

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, but seriously.... I appreciate what the RCMP Act says, but I've always been curious to know if there's some distance between service and a commission like this. Even as a public servant now, to work as an investigator on this end, how that would preclude someone from being impartial, someone who has some understanding of the business to be able to be of value to service to the public in this commission.... I'm at a loss to understand why that would be something we would want to even consider.

Could the officials help me understand whether this is something that is consistent with legislation or is the intent of Bill C-98?

Mr. Evan Travers:

The intent of this bill is not to impose a restriction on who could become a member of the commission by virtue of having formerly been employed by the CBSA. The amendment offered by Mr. Manly would impose on former CBSA members the same restriction that currently applies to former RCMP members. We have not put that forward as part of the bill.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Mr. Picard, you started out in the service this way, and you've had some distance since then. Do you see this as being something that would cause disruption or cause the public to be concerned about the fairness, the non-bias of a commission if it employed someone who used to work with CBSA in years past?

Mr. Michel Picard:

In all cases, I don't think experience should diminish someone's capacity to act. I would vote against that.

The Chair:

Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I'm just wondering, through you Chair, if Mr. Travers can explain the inconsistency between the fact that the RCMP are forbidden but former CBSA members are allowed in this legislation.

Mr. Evan Travers:

We worked mostly on the CBSA-related elements. With respect to those elements, the decision was made not to impose a similar requirement for former employees of the CBSA. They are different kinds of workforces. The CBSA tends to engage summer students and the like, who may spend only a few months with the agency. In order to allow the Governor in Council, the body that would make appointments to the commission, discretion in picking the best candidates, we did not include that restriction in this part of the bill.

(1740)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Chair, if I may, it seems like a pretty glaring inconsistency. You're going to have an organization that's now going to handle complaints for two different public safety entities. On the one hand, certain individuals—I take your point about the types of experiences—will be allowed. That's a very specific example, but it basically means that someone who served 30 years as a border officer and who is, with all due respect to the great work that they do, in a bit of a conflict of interest....

I assume that is why the RCMP Act was drafted the way it was. It was to avoid the old adage of police investigating police. I know that it's called “public” now, but I'm just wondering if the civilian nature of it is a bit lost by this pretty important inconsistency that will now exist throughout what is supposed to be one organization. Could you perhaps offer us what the thinking was behind that?

Mr. Evan Travers:

I don't want to speak to the intent of the RCMP Act or the provisions that are there. I was not involved in their drafting or their development.

With respect to the bill that is before you, we've provided our advice to cabinet through our minister, and this is the bill the government has come forward with. If there are concerns or questions, it may be that the minister would be better placed to speak to the policy intent behind that distinction.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a very quick question.

I'm not going to support this amendment, but I just wanted to ask a question on the RCMP ban. Who is currently banned? Is it RCMP members in the meaning of the act, or any employee of the RCMP?

Mr. Evan Travers:

I'll turn to Mr. Talbot on that.

Mr. Jacques Talbot (Counsel, Legal Services, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Department of Justice):

Here, the persons who are subject to the current provision are the members of the RCMP, the members of the force.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Uniformed officers?

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So this amendment would apply to all CBSA employees, as you said, summer students.

That answers my question, thank you.

The Chair:

Matthew.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

I'll support Mr. Manly's amendment because I think it refers to a pretty important inconsistency.

Two big issues come to mind. One, which I think we heard in the testimony previously and through Mr. Eglinski's questions in particular, is the importance of building trust. I just feel that the inequity that this would create in this newly named commission would be problematic for building that trust.

Two, again, we're using such a specific example of a summer student working three months at the agency, when the reality is that the loophole would allow someone who is in a much more conflicted position to be there. Unfortunately, I don't have wording to entertain an amendment to the amendment, to make that exemption appear, but again, just for the record, I think it's a pretty stark inconsistency, and so I'll support Mr. Manly's amendment.

The Chair:

Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

First of all, I couldn't support this amendment.

However, Mr. Talbot, I'd like you to clarify what you said a moment ago.

When you referred to RCMP officers, were you referring to past and present?

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

I'm referring to the current regime.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Pardon? [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

I'm talking about the current regime. [English]

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I still didn't quite get that.

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

Oh, I'm referring also to the past members, the people who were subject to the former regime. As you know, a few years ago, we introduced a new piece of legislation that changed the statute for employees of the RCMP, particularly for—

(1745)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay. It just wasn't quite clear there. Thank you.

The Chair:

Are there any other questions on the amendment?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 3 agreed to)

(Clauses 4 to 14 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 15)

The Chair: We have amendment PV-2. It is deemed to be in front of us. Notwithstanding, there's no one here to speak to it unless someone wants to speak to it. Does anyone want to speak to it, in favour or against amendment PV-2?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have a question for the officials. I'm just curious to know whether this would work and if it's even necessary, given what we heard in the previous hour, that this complaints commission does not deal with matters of deportation. Is this amendment PV-2 even necessary in this legislation?

Mr. Evan Travers:

Amendment PV-2, as I understand it, relates to consultation and co-operation.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That could mean that I'm deported to another country, and I'm going to then employ the services of some agency in another country to fight my deportation.

Mr. Evan Travers:

If I understand your question correctly, the bill is not meant to interfere with the removal or extradition process. Complaints can be continued and can be brought from outside of Canada. Any person who felt they had a complaint could bring that forward, whether they were in Canada or not.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there any other commentary?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Amendment PV-3 is before us. Does anyone want to ask questions of the officials or speak to PV-3?

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

If he's not here, just skip it.

The Chair:

No, I can't skip it. It's properly before the committee so we have to deal with it.

Mr. T.J. Harvey:

It's not if he's not here to move it.

The Chair:

It's deemed moved.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 15 agreed to)

(Clauses 16 to 35 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: Shall the title carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the bill carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the chair report the bill to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: With that, thank you, officials.

Thank you, committee members.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1540)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Nous avons le quorum. Il est bien plus de 15 h 30. Le ministre est arrivé. Débarrassé de son veston, il a l'air assez sérieux. Je pense que nous pouvons commencer.

Chers collègues, vous savez que nous avions une entente, depuis la semaine dernière, sur le déroulement de la séance d'aujourd'hui sur le projet de loi C-98. Les bases de l'entente ont changé. En échange, il n'y aura plus de débat à la Chambre.

J'entends accorder au ministre tout le temps nécessaire. Il lui sera loisible d'être bref. Après une première série de questions, nous verrons bien si l'envie d'en poser d'autres tient toujours. Après, nous entendrons les témoins, puis nous passerons à l'étude article par article. Je suppose que tous les membres sont d'accord.

Cela dit, je vous demande, monsieur le ministre de bien vouloir commencer.

Merci.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale (ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Merci, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

Dans un souci de brièveté et d'efficacité, je renonce à faire une déclaration de 10 minutes pour simplement vous entretenir quelques minutes, à la bonne franquette, du projet de loi C-98. Je suis accompagné de MM. Evan Travers et Jacques Talbot, du ministère de la Sécurité publique, qui pourront m'aider à m'y retrouver dans les méandres de la loi et répondre à vos questions. Ils pourront aussi vous aider à clarifier le témoignage d'autres témoins, en ce qui concerne la signification ou la raison d'être de la loi.

Mesdames et messieurs, vous savez que le projet de loi C-98 vise à combler la dernière lacune importante qui existe dans l'architecture des dispositions régissant la surveillance, l'examen et le contrôle des activités de certains de nos principaux organismes chargés de la sécurité publique et nationale. Cette lacune existe depuis près de 18 ans.

Le problème s'est posé au lendemain du 11 septembre, quand, partout dans le monde, on a sensiblement corrigé le mode de fonctionnement des organismes de sécurité. À l'époque, l'Agence canadienne des douanes et du revenu a été subdivisée, les Douanes allant s'unir au ministère de la Sécurité publique et devenant finalement l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. L'Agence canadienne du revenu s'est alors retrouvée seule.

Dans la réorganisation des responsabilités qui a suivi le 11 septembre, beaucoup de groupes de pression, de parties prenantes et d'observateurs de la politique publique ont fait remarquer que la nouvelle Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ne possédait pas en propre d'organe d'examen qui jouerait un rôle de chien de garde analogue à celui du Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, le CSARS, à l'endroit du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité ou à celui du commissariat, à l'endroit du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications.

Vous vous rappellerez que le Sénat a proposé une solution pour combler cette lacune. Le sénateur Willie Moore a déposé le projet de loi S-205, qui s'inspirait d'un modèle qui confiait la surveillance de l'Agence des services frontaliers à un inspecteur général. Pendant ce temps, à la Chambre des communes, nous proposions le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, à la faveur du projet de loi C-22, et le nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, qui fait l'objet du projet de loi C-59.

Au milieu du nouveau comité des parlementaires et du nouvel office susmentionnés, nous avons essayé de faire de la place à l'idée du sénateur Moore, mais ça nous a semblé tellement compliqué que nous avons jugé impossible de récupérer son idée et de la transformer en un modèle fonctionnel. À la place, nous avons proposé le projet de loi C-98.

(1545)



Le comité des parlementaires et l'office de surveillance susmentionnés examinent les fonctions de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada en matière de sécurité nationale. Mais ce sont les activités de l'Agence qui ne concernent pas la sécurité qu'on laisse de côté. À qui peut se plaindre la personne qui, par exemple, se présente à la frontière et y subit une expérience désagréable, embarrassante ou difficile? À l'Agence, qui fera une enquête complète et qui lui répondra. Mais, d'après les experts, en sus de ce que l'Agence peut faire dans le cadre de sa politique interne, il faut un mécanisme indépendant d'examen pour le volet non sécuritaire du travail de l'Agence. Ce volet, contrairement au volet sécuritaire relevant du comité des parlementaires et du nouvel office chargé de la sécurité, sous le régime du projet de loi C-59, n'est pas visé. Comment, alors, créer l'organisme qui s'en chargera?

Nous avons étudié deux solutions de rechange. La première était de créer un organisme autonome pour le charger de ces responsabilités; sinon, existait-il un organisme fédéral d'examen déjà capable de s'en acquitter? Notre choix s'est fixé sur la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes qui s'occupe exactement de ces fonctions pour la GRC.

Le projet de loi propose la réorganisation de cette commission pour en élargir la compétence à l'Agence des services frontaliers et accroître ses capacités et ressources pour la rendre capable de ce travail. Il dote le nouvel organisme qui en sortira d'un président et d'un vice-président et lui donne le nom de Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. Elle s'occuperait de la GRC et de l'Agence, qui seraient du ressort du président et du vice-président, pour les faire bénéficier d'une attention de premier ordre — pour que nous ne déshabillions pas Pierre pour habiller Paul et que chacune, dans la nouvelle structure, reçoive l'attention appropriée. Notre analyse a montré que, en réorganisant l'ancienne commission, nous irions plus vite et serions plus efficaces que si nous créions un organisme à partir de zéro.

Voilà le projet de loi que vous avez sous les yeux. La nouvelle commission pourra recevoir les plaintes du public, lancer les enquêtes qu'elle jugera appropriées. Le ministre pourrait demander à l'organisme d'enquêter ou d'examiner une question s'il le jugeait nécessaire. Le projet de loi C-98 encadrera toutes ces fonctions.

Voilà la raison d'être du projet de loi. Je suis très reconnaissant à votre comité de sa volonté, à cette étape de notre vie parlementaire, d'examiner cette question de façon très efficace. Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Sur ce, passons à la première série d'interventions, chacune d'une durée de sept minutes. Commençons par Mme Dabrusin.

Petit avertissement: les questions sont toujours recevables si elles portent sur le sujet à l'ordre du jour. Je n'en dis pas plus. Merci.

Madame Dabrusin, à vous la parole.

(1550)

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci.

Ce projet de loi m'a rendue très heureuse, parce que, monsieur le ministre, vous savez que, à peu près à toutes vos comparutions devant notre comité, je vous ai questionné sur la surveillance de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et sur le moment où ça se produirait. Le dépôt du projet de loi m'a rendue heureuse.

Dans votre bref historique du projet de loi, vous avez évoqué celui qu'avait déposé le sénateur Wilfred Moore ainsi que les différentes lacunes du projet de loi C-59 et du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement.

Pourquoi a-t-il fallu attendre si longtemps pour qu'on accouche de ce projet de loi?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je pense, madame Dabrusin, que c'est simplement le résultat du grand nombre de dossiers que nous avons dû régler et d'activités que nous avons dû orchestrer en matière de sécurité publique. Je les ai ajoutés il y a deux ou trois jours. Nous avons demandé à la législature actuelle d'examiner au moins 13 projets importants de loi, ce qui a tenu particulièrement occupé votre comité ainsi que les comités homologues du Sénat.

J'ai toujours répondu que je voulais voir aboutir ce projet de loi. Cette pièce essentielle du programme législatif, la voici maintenant, simple, sans complexités juridiques excessives.

Si nous avions pu profiter plus tôt d'un moment libre dans le programme des politiques publiques, nous en aurions profité. Mais parmi les projets de loi que nous devions faire avancer — 13 lois importantes —, ce projet de loi fait partie de ceux qui, je l'espère, franchiront la ligne d'arrivée. Et, en cours de route, il a dû céder le passage aux projets de loi C-66, C-71, C-83, C-59 et C-93, notamment. Il y a beaucoup de pain sur la planche.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Oui. Merci.

Ai-je bien compris que le budget de 2019 prévoyait un poste faisant précisément allusion au financement de cette surveillance?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le financement est prévu. Il proviendra, en temps utile, du budget des dépenses. Nous prenons le financement de base de la commission civile puis, alors qu'elle se verra confier les responsabilités de l'Agence des services frontaliers et qu'elle deviendra la Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, elle recevra l'argent nécessaire à l'embauche du personnel supplémentaire et à son plein rendement.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Vous avez effleuré la question quand vous avez parlé des différents mécanismes et de la décision de les déployer à l'intérieur du système d'examen de la GRC. Peut-être pouvez-vous m'aider à comprendre un peu mieux. Pourquoi pas un comité distinct d'examen pour l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada? Pourquoi construire le mécanisme de surveillance à l'intérieur du système de la GRC, puis l'élargir, plutôt que d'en créer un, séparé?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Simplement parce que les compétences exigées pour les deux sont très semblables. Elles ne sont pas identiques, je vous le concède, mais elles se ressemblent beaucoup. La commission civile fournit déjà un socle. Les compétences et les capacités existent déjà, et l'analyse des fonctionnaires, du Conseil du Trésor et d'autres a mené à la conclusion que nous pouvions agir plus rapidement et plus efficacement en déployant la structure existante, plutôt que de partir de zéro.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Des électeurs se sont notamment dits préoccupés par la protection des renseignements personnels à la frontière, par exemple, quand des gardes-frontières peuvent accéder à des renseignements conservés dans les téléphones et des appareils semblables. Comment la surveillance de l'organisme pourrait-elle englober cette protection des renseignements personnels?

(1555)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Quiconque estime avoir subi un mauvais traitement à la frontière, un comportement d'un agent frontalier qu'il a jugé indiscret ou choquant, ou une violation de ses droits au respect de sa vie privée peut, dès maintenant ou dès l'adoption de la loi, déposer une plainte indépendante auprès du nouvel organisme. Cet organisme fera enquête et présentera ses conclusions sur le caractère approprié ou non du traitement subi à la frontière.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

J'ai une petite question, puisqu'il ne me reste qu'une minute et demie.

La fouille d'un téléphone pour des motifs ou sous couvert de sécurité nationale relèverait-elle de la Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public ou de...? Comment déterminerait-on l'organisme compétent de surveillance?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Peu importe l'organisme compétent... la plainte pourra se faire directement à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, à un organisme distinct ou, encore, à l'Office de surveillance, l'organisme chargé de la sécurité nationale. Si la plainte tombe dans une zone grise, les trois organismes — l'Agence des services frontaliers, la commission d'examen ou l'Office de surveillance — la feront aboutir à l'organisme compétent. Une certaine jurisprudence officieuse, administrative, devra se créer pour distinguer une plainte touchant la sécurité nationale d'une plainte pour un simple comportement répréhensible.

Ça ne se fera pas du jour au lendemain, mais nous nous assurerons qu'aucune plainte n'aboutira au mauvais endroit. Peu importe sa destination, les organismes veilleront à la faire aboutir au bon endroit et à la faire entendre par l'autorité compétente.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous disposez de sept minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, il est question d'organismes qui font l'objet de plaintes. Il y a actuellement une plainte concernant le financement accordé par le programme Emplois d'été Canada à la Société islamique de l'Amérique du Nord, car il a été reconnu, documents à l'appui, que cet organisme a offert du financement à des fins de terrorisme.

Votre ministère ou un des organismes qui relèvent de votre ministère a-t-il été mis au courant de cela ou impliqué dans le dossier? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Faites-vous allusion à celui dont on a parlé à la période des questions d'aujourd'hui?

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Oui.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le ministère chargé de l'emploi examine la question. Le financement était accordé par le programme d'emplois, et, d'après ce que j'ai compris de la réponse donnée à la Chambre, la ministre demande à ses fonctionnaires de s'assurer que le processus décisionnel concernant ce financement a suivi en tout point la voie normale. C'est en fait une enquête. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci. J'ai recommandé vivement aux membres de s'en tenir à la question de l'ordre du jour, c'est-à-dire le projet de loi C-98. Je ne suis pas tout à fait certain du rapport entre une demande de financement pour un programme d'emplois et le projet de loi. J'encourage donc le député à bien vouloir diriger ses questions sur le projet de loi C-98. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je mettais en pratique le fondement du projet de loi, soit le fait que les citoyens portent plainte. C'est le même principe.

Revenons à la Commission, monsieur le ministre. Y a-t-il actuellement des retards à la Commission dans le traitement des plaintes? A-t-elle déjà une surcharge de travail? Le fait de lui ajouter des attributions à l'égard de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada créera-t-il encore plus de problèmes ou est-ce que tout va bien? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il est sûr que l'organisme élargi aura plus de travail. Actuellement, la commission civile ne se saisit que des questions touchant la GRC. Le nouvel organisme d'examen se saisira de celles qui concernent la GRC et l'Agence des services frontaliers. Actuellement...

(1600)

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

En fait, monsieur le ministre, savez-vous si le traitement des plaintes concernant la GRC souffre de retards...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je crois que, plus tard, cet après-midi, des représentants de la commission civile seront accessibles...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus: D'accord.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:... pour expliquer leur charge de travail, mais, sur le fond de votre question, il est évident que le nouvel organisme aura plus de travail. En conséquence, il aura besoin de plus de ressources, mais nous serons plus efficaces dans l'emploi de ces ressources si nous partons du socle qu'offre déjà cette commission au lieu de créer à partir de zéro un organisme autonome pour l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord.

Si une personne est expulsée par l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada pour une raison quelconque, pourrait-elle porter plainte au sujet de son expulsion forcée dans le but de retarder son expulsion? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Cette question tombe peut-être dans la zone grise entre la plainte contre le comportement grossier ou brutal d'un agent et la plainte contre une expulsion pour des motifs valables. On peut faire juridiquement appel de motifs contestables d'expulsion. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

A-t-on évalué la possibilité que des gens se servent du processus de plainte pour empêcher leur expulsion, le temps que la Commission fasse une enquête? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non. L'expulsion, selon l'article de la loi, est décidée soit par le ministre de l'Immigration, soit par celui de la Sécurité publique. Elle ne résulte pas d'une décision administrative. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Qui a travaillé à la rédaction du projet de loi C-98? Est-ce seulement Sécurité publique Canada? La GRC et l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada y ont-elles aussi participé? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Travers, qui a participé à l'élaboration de la politique et à la rédaction du projet de loi, vous répondra.

M. Evan Travers (directeur général par interim, Direction générale d’application de la loi et stratégies frontalières, ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

La Sécurité publique a consulté, visiblement dans le respect du secret du cabinet, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et la GRC pour l'élaboration du projet de loi. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord.

Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle le syndicat n'a pas été consulté? [Traduction]

M. Evan Travers:

La consultation du syndicat s'est faite par l'entremise de l'Agence. D'après ce que j'ai compris, l'Agence l'a consulté après le dépôt du projet de loi. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Pourtant, le syndicat semble dire qu'il n'a pas du tout été consulté dans ce dossier. [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

La décision, monsieur Paul-Hus, a manifestement été prise par le gouvernement en s'appuyant sur tous les exposés publics selon lesquels il fallait combler cette lacune.

À propos de la structure ou de la méthode pour combler la lacune, nous nous sommes entendus dans les discussions entre le ministère de la Sécurité publique, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et la GRC. Une fois la décision prise et la mesure législative rendue publique, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, d'après ce que j'ai compris, a poursuivi les discussions avec son syndicat.

Le président:

Votre temps est presque écoulé, monsieur Paul-Hus. Il ne vous reste que 10 secondes.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Monsieur le ministre, merci de votre présence.

Je veux revenir à la question que Mme Dabrusin a posée au sujet du délai. Dans les faits, on a déposé un rapport sénatorial avant les dernières élections en 2015, le sénateur Segal a présenté un projet de loi à la législature précédente et notre comité a formulé une recommandation en 2017.

De plus, quiconque prend une minute pour faire une recherche Google peut trouver des articles qui remontent au moins aux trois dernières années dans lesquels vous promettez cette mesure législative, dans lesquels vous dites que c'est pour bientôt. En outre, la plupart, voire l'ensemble des projets de loi que vous avez énumérés en répondant à ma collègue ont été déposés en 2016 et en 2017.

Je me questionne sur ce mécanisme. Vous avez dit qu'il est simple et direct, rapide et rentable, et vous avez dit qu'il s'appuie sur une infrastructure existante. La capacité des Canadiens à porter plainte — surtout lorsqu'on sait que la loi n'entrera en vigueur qu'en 2020, si je comprends bien — me donne du fil à retordre.

Je ne comprends toujours pas vraiment pourquoi, après tout ce qui a été présenté et pendant au moins deux ou trois années de préparation... Pour moi, cela ne semble pas excuser le fait que vous ayez un peu baissé les bras et dit que la proposition de la sénatrice ne fonctionnera pas dans le projet de loi C-59. Cela semblait être ce que vous sous-entendiez dans votre réponse à la question.

Je veux vous demander encore une fois pourquoi il a fallu attendre si longtemps alors que les problèmes dans les relations de travail à l'ASFC — des allégations de harcèlement et autres choses du genre — ainsi que, de toute évidence, dans la façon dont certains Canadiens sont traités à la frontière se poursuivent.

(1605)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Eh bien, comme je l'ai dit, monsieur Dubé, nous avons eu énormément de travail à faire, tout comme ce comité et le Parlement de manière générale. Les travaux ont progressé aussi rapidement que nous le pouvions. Il faut du temps et des efforts pour tout mettre en place. Je suis heureux que nous soyons à cette étape, et j'espère que l'appareil parlementaire fonctionnera assez bien cette semaine pour que nous puissions franchir la ligne d'arrivée.

Le programme législatif a été très chargé quand on pense aux projets de loi  C-7, C-21, C-22, C-23, C-37, C-46, C-66, C-71, C-59, C-97, C-83, C-93 et C-98. C'est un programme chargé, et tout doit passer par un entonnoir parlementaire relativement petit.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je pense que trois de ces projets de loi ont été déposés après 2017 ou au début de 2018. Dans le cas des C-20 et de ceux à un seul chiffre, ils l'ont été quelques journées après l'assermentation de votre gouvernement. Je pense qu'on doit rendre des comptes, car vous avez dit publiquement et fermement que cela devait être fait, et je ne veux pas m'arrêter ici alors que le compte rendu dit... Par exemple, pourquoi ne pas avoir apporté le changement dans le projet de loi C-59?

Je veux juste comprendre, car ce que je veux, monsieur le ministre, c'est m'assurer qu'il n'y a pas, par exemple, de résistance interne à ce dossier. Je n'arrive pas à comprendre, si c'est un mécanisme simple et direct dans le projet de loi C-98, pourquoi il a fallu des années pour conclure qu'il fallait procéder ainsi.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il n'y a aucune résistance interne. En fait, l'ASFC reconnaît que c'est une lacune dans l'architecture et qu'il faut la combler.

Elle a été partiellement corrigée à l'aide du projet de loi C-22 et du comité de parlementaires, du moins pour ce qui est de la sécurité nationale. Elle a aussi été partiellement corrigée au moyen du projet de loi C-59 et de la création du nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement.

Cette dernière mesure législative représente le dernier morceau du casse-tête. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'aimerais faire suite aux questions posées par mon collègue M. Paul-Hus. Je trouve inquiétant qu'on n'ait pas consulté le syndicat, dans ce cas-ci, puisqu'une des fonctions de ce mécanisme est de protéger les travailleurs en cas d'allégations. Il est arrivé que les médias fassent état d'allégations de harcèlement et de choses de la sorte.

C'est probablement vous qui pourrez répondre à ma question, monsieur Travers. Vous avez expliqué que la consultation avait été faite par l'Agence. Pourtant, ce sont les travailleurs qui peuvent être touchés directement par ce qui ressortira des plaintes. Il peut aussi arriver que ce soit eux qui déposent des plaintes. Compte tenu de la nature du projet, pourquoi ne pas avoir pris la peine de consulter le syndicat, qui est le représentant de ces travailleurs? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Dubé, le ministère et l'ASFC ont étudié la question en profondeur. Il revient à l'ASFC d'avoir cette interaction avec ses employés. Ils ont discuté de ce qu'ils considéraient comme le bon moment.

Ce qu'il faut retenir, c'est que le projet de loi est maintenant prêt. Vous aurez l'occasion de l'examiner en détail pour vous assurer, dans le cadre du processus démocratique au Parlement, qu'il répond bien aux besoins des travailleurs.

(1610)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Eh bien, vous m'excuserez, monsieur le ministre. Nous appuyons le projet de loi et nous serons heureux de voir son adoption, mais le problème est là. Nous n'avons pas le temps, car il a fallu attendre si longtemps que nous devons maintenant procéder rapidement. Cela me va, mais je pense que nous devons nuancer ces observations.

Avez-vous reçu un rapport de l'ASFC sur les détails de ce que le syndicat a dit, ou avez-vous juste — je ne veux pas simplifier à outrance — parlé avec eux pour ensuite passer à autre chose?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

On ne m'a fait part d'aucun problème dans le cadre de la consultation. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

J'ai une dernière question pour vous.

J'ai cru comprendre que le mécanisme sera mis en œuvre en 2020. Ceux qui voudront déposer une plainte pourront le faire à partir de ce moment-là. Y a-t-il d'autres précisions à apporter ou peut-on s'attendre à ce que, si le projet de loi est adopté, les gens puissent déposer des plaintes selon le mécanisme proposé à partir de l'année prochaine? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ce serait le but, monsieur Dubé. Nous travaillons évidemment à l'élaboration d'une agence élargie. Nous aurons peut-être des problèmes administratifs inattendus, mais l'objectif est de mettre cela en place le plus rapidement possible. Le mécanisme que nous choisissons nous permettra de procéder plus rapidement que si nous avions décidé de créer une agence à partir de zéro.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Mais, monsieur le ministre — il ne me reste que 20 secondes...

Le président:

À vrai dire, non.

M. Matthew Dubé:

... si le Parlement adopte le projet de loi, est-ce que ce sera fait?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est exactement ce que j'essaie d'accomplir, oui.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Picard, allez-y, pour sept minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, comme vous le savez, j'ai commencé ma carrière comme agent de douane. Effectivement, le seuil de tolérance ou d'interprétation des gens qui entrent au Canada varie selon qu'il s'agit de visiteurs ou de résidents qui reviennent au Canada.

Mon collègue M. Dubé a parlé de la protection des employés. Évidemment, il faut un œil externe pour s'assurer du bien-fondé d'une plainte déposée par quelqu'un qui croit que ses droits ont été brimés. Il me semble que le projet de loi prévoit des mesures permettant à la Commission d'accepter ou non une plainte en fonction de sa teneur. [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Oui, monsieur Picard.

Est-ce que cela vous pose problème?

M. Evan Travers:

Non. J'ai peut-être raté quelque chose dans l'interprétation.

M. Michel Picard:

Les gens qui reviennent au Canada, les résidants et les visiteurs, n'ont pas tous la même tolérance par rapport au traitement qu'on leur réserve, vu la nature des plaintes. Le comité peut analyser les motifs de ces plaintes pour voir si elles sont sensées ou non. Pour ce qui est de la protection des agents, comme l'a dit M. Dubé, ce projet de loi vise également à protéger les agents et les employés contre des plaintes futiles.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

L'objectif, monsieur Picard, c'est que ce soit équitable dans les deux sens. Quand une personne voyage, elle mérite une expérience professionnelle et efficace à la frontière. Les fonctionnaires responsables des services frontaliers devraient aussi pouvoir travailler dans un milieu sécuritaire et respectueux. Cela s'applique dans les deux sens.

Je soupçonne qu'à mesure que nous recevrons et examinerons des plaintes, nous allons progressivement acquérir l'expérience et l'expertise nécessaire à l'amélioration de la situation à la frontière pour les deux groupes de personnes.

M. Michel Picard:

Il y a de fortes chances que le comité parvienne à une conclusion que l'Agence n'acceptera pas. Qui est chargé de prendre la décision définitive si la conclusion du comité va à l'encontre de l'interprétation de l'Agence?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vais demander à M. Travers ou à M. Talbot de dire qui a le pouvoir ultime, mais pour répondre à votre question, monsieur Picard, je vous propose de consulter le paragraphe 32(2) de la loi, qui porte sur la façon de traiter les plaintes futiles ou vexatoires ayant été portées de mauvaise foi. Je crois que c'est ce qui vous intéresse.

Monsieur Talbot, monsieur Travers, pouvez-vous dire qui a le pouvoir de décision ultime en cas de différend entre l'organisme de surveillance et l'agence?

(1615)

M. Evan Travers:

La première entité qui enquête sur une plainte est l'ASFC, dans la plupart des cas. Elle peut examiner la plainte, tirer des conclusions et ensuite les présenter au plaignant. La mesure législative est parsemée de dispositions selon lesquelles l'employé doit être avisé et informé de l'avancement de l'enquête. Si, après avoir reçu le rapport de l'ASFC, le plaignant est insatisfait du contenu, il peut saisir la commission du dossier. La commission examine alors la plainte à son tour. Elle peut adhérer aux conclusions de l'ASFC, mener sa propre enquête ou demander à l'ASFC de mener une enquête plus approfondie sur la plainte. Une fois que la commission a examiné la plainte, elle renvoie le dossier à l'ASFC, et l'ASFC peut y ajouter des observations.

Il existe un processus qui permet d'exprimer les divergences d'opinions, mais le rapport de la commission sera définitif. Il sera préparé après avoir pris pleinement connaissance des faits. Le résultat sera une décision définitive de la commission, qui ne pourra pas être revue par une cour fédérale ou une autre entité, car l'ASFC ne serait pas contraint de donner suite aux recommandations.

M. Michel Picard:

Dites-vous que si une personne est insatisfaite du résultat, après l'examen du dossier par la commission, il n'a plus de recours juridique pour poursuivre qui que ce soit?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les mesures disciplinaires, monsieur Picard, découlent d'une enquête officielle. Si l'organisme de surveillance démontre sans équivoque que les droits de la personne ont été violés — à la suite d'un mauvais traitement ou à cause de quelque chose de répréhensible dans le traitement qu'on lui a réservé — et que l'Agence ne prend pas de mesures significatives, je crois que l'Agence aura alors un très gros problème stratégique et administratif. Le problème aura été exposé publiquement par une autorité indépendante qui détermine ce qui est bien ou mal. L'Agence sera tenue de prendre des mesures.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous venons de terminer la série de questions de sept minutes. Voulez-vous poser d'autres questions jusqu'à 16 h 30?

D'accord. Nous allons donc poursuivre jusqu'à 16 h 30 avant de terminer.

Allez-y, monsieur Motz. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, j'ai entendu le terme « organisme de surveillance » à quelques reprises aujourd'hui. Je pense que le terme ne convient pas. Comme vous l'avez déjà dit, nous devons veiller à ce que ce soit un organisme d'examen, une commission civile d'examen des plaintes, pas un organisme de surveillance de l'ASFC. Je tiens à ce que tout le monde le comprenne.

(1620)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est exact.

M. Glen Motz:

Bien. Merci.

Pour revenir aux observations de Mme Dabrusin, de M. Paul-Hus et de M. Dubé à propos du délai, je suis porté à croire, monsieur, que le gouvernement et les fonctionnaires de la division de la sécurité publique, si je puis dire, rédigeaient déjà un projet de loi similaire sur cette question pour obtenir un organisme de surveillance — désolé... pour obtenir un organisme civil d'examen de l'ASFC.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il est facile de se tromper.

M. Glen Motz:

Nous avons dû attendre aux dernières heures de la session avant de voir le document ici, mais on peut dire qu'on se penchait déjà sur la question. Cette mesure législative aurait pu être adoptée il y a des années, mais cela n'a pas été le cas. Je l'appuie et je crois que c'est nécessaire, mais encore une fois, je me fais juste l'écho de ce qui a déjà été dit. Je veux juste dire pour le compte rendu que je déplore qu'il ait fallu autant de temps.

Ma question porte sur le mécanisme. Tout se rapporte au mécanisme, à la façon dont cela va fonctionner. Nous savons que la Commission des plaintes du public contre la GRC compte actuellement six membres, et je crois que cette mesure législative fera passer ce nombre à cinq. Comme l'a expliqué M. Travers en réponse à la question de M. Picard, l'ASFC fera la première enquête d'une plainte d'un civil, peu importe de quoi il s'agit. Si cette personne, le membre du public, est insatisfaite du traitement de la plainte, elle pourra en saisir la commission d'examen des plaintes pour un autre examen de l'enquête, si je puis dire.

Je ne comprends pas le mécanisme, la façon dont procédera la commission d'examen des plaintes. Est-ce un examen sur papier? Si l'enquête sur une plainte n'a pas été faite attentivement, la Commission a-t-elle son propre organisme d'enquête qui peut entendre des témoins et obtenir de plus amples détails? De quelle façon va-t-on procéder?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vais demander encore une fois à M. Travers de donner des précisions sur le mécanisme.

La partie de la nouvelle commission qui s'occupera de l'ASFC fonctionnera de manière très semblable à ce que fait la Commission existante pour la GRC.

M. Glen Motz:

Y a-t-il deux commissions distinctes?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non, mais il y aura deux catégories d'activités au sein de la même commission.

M. Glen Motz:

Ce sont donc les mêmes personnes qui traiteront les mêmes plaintes. Les gens de la GRC seront saisis des dossiers concernant la GRC et des dossiers concernant l'ASFC, n'est-ce pas?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Permettez-moi de revenir là-dessus.

L'idée, monsieur Motz, c'est que les examinateurs du côté de l'ASFC s'occuperont des dossiers de l'ASFC, et les examinateurs du côté de la GRC s'occuperont des dossiers de la GRC. Il reviendra au président et au vice-président de déterminer comment le personnel sera réparti pour entendre un cas, mais je pense que...

M. Glen Motz:

Il y aura deux entités distinctes dans une seule commission.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Essentiellement, oui. Il y aura un volet GRC et un volet ASFC.

M. Glen Motz:

Du point de vue de l'expertise...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Exactement, car les dossiers se ressemblent, mais ne sont pas identiques.

M. Glen Motz:

Oui.

La Commission sera-t-elle en mesure d'enquêter si le plaignant est insatisfait de l'enquête?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

La fonction d'enquête sera la même pour les dossiers de l'ASFC et ceux de la GRC. On pourra faire des enquêtes, recevoir de l'information et se pencher sur toutes les plaintes reçues pour avoir tous les faits sous les yeux...

M. Glen Motz:

Je vois. C'est donc distinct de...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

... dans le but de prendre une décision

M. Glen Motz:

C'est distinct de l'ASFC. L'ASFC a fait l'enquête. La Commission en fait une autre, une enquête distincte.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Si elle n'est pas satisfaite de l'enquête reçue, oui.

M. Glen Motz:

La Commission proprement dite peut alors enquêter, ou s'adresserait-elle à un autre organisme d'enquête?

Le président:

Ce sera la dernière réponse pour vous, monsieur Motz.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le président et le vice-président de la Commission détermineraient quelles sont les ressources, internes ou externes, nécessaires. Ils auront un budget. De toute évidence, ils veulent faire toute la lumière sur la plainte. Ils veulent être en mesure de satisfaire l'employé ou le membre du public qui se plaint en procédant équitablement et de manière compétente, en découvrant la vérité.

(1625)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez les cinq dernières minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

En cas de conflit de la Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, la CETPP, avec l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignements, ou OSSNR, ou même avec le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et de renseignements, ou CPSNR, qui l'emporte?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ce sont les organismes qui détermineraient leurs responsabilités respectives. J'ai l'impression que la question de savoir s'il s'agit d'une question de sécurité nationale ou pas serait très facile à trancher.

Dans le passé, les organismes ont eu à résoudre des questions de compétences en travaillant ensemble. Ils ont pu résoudre les différends d'une façon satisfaisante, et je ne m'attends donc pas à un conflit de compétences.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand la GRC fournit des services contractuels, par exemple à titre de police provinciale ou de service de sécurité ici, sur la Colline, au sein des Services de la Cité parlementaire, est-ce que la Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public exerce les mêmes pouvoirs et la même surveillance que la GRC dans un contexte autochtone?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Si elle agit à titre de police provinciale...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

... la première étape, pour les plaintes, serait l'organisme de surveillance provincial. Il y en a un dans chaque province.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et qu'en est-il des Services de la Cité parlementaire? La GRC a le mandat de fournir un service, et...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Elle a le mandat de fournir un agent. Vous devrez consulter le Président de la Chambre à ce sujet, car cela relève de la compétence des Présidents des deux chambres.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bon.

En ce qui concerne les opérations à l'étranger, quand la GRC s'adonne à des missions d'entraînement, par exemple, ou quand l'ASFC, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, fait du contrôle préalable, comme c'est prévu dans un autre des projets de loi que vous avez présentés, est-ce que la CETPP a le pouvoir de mener à l'étranger des enquêtes comme elle peut le faire au Canada?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les pouvoirs de l'organisme de surveillance par rapport à la GRC ne vont pas changer. Ce qui existe en ce moment sera maintenu. L'ASFC vient s'y ajouter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils pourraient aller aux États-Unis, par exemple, et chercher à trouver ce qui s'est passé en cas de plainte majeure.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Allez-y, monsieur Travers.

M. Evan Travers:

Ils pourraient certainement avoir accès à toute l'information, que les activités de l'ASFC se soient déroulées au Canada ou à l'étranger. Quant à savoir s'ils vont aller à l'étranger pour cela, ou s'ils seront en mesure d'interroger les gens au Canada, je ne le sais pas, mais ils auront le droit d'accéder à l'information de l'ASFC comme si l'événement s'était produit au Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question.

Est-ce que la CETPP a le pouvoir de faire des recommandations exécutoires, peu importe les circonstances?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Ce sera tout pour nos questions.

Je tiens à remercier les membres du Comité et le ministre d'avoir fait avancer les choses rapidement.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur le président, je tiens à vous remercier, vous-même et les membres du Comité, d'avoir affirmé votre volonté de vous occuper de cette question très rapidement, compte tenu du temps dont nous disposons.

Le président:

Merci.

Sur ce, nous allons suspendre la séance et reprendre dès que les témoins seront prêts.

(1625)

(1630)

Le président:

Pour accélérer les choses, je dirais que nous avons le quorum et que nos nouveaux témoins sont prêts.

Nous accueillons, à distance, M. Sauvé, de la Fédération de la police nationale, ainsi que Michelaine Lahaie, Lesley McCoy et Tim Cogan.

Je vais laisser M. Sauvé parler en premier, parce qu'on ne sait jamais si la technologie va tenir le coup.

En général, nous prévoyons 10 minutes par exposé. Idéalement, les exposés dureront moins de 10 minutes, et les députés pourront ainsi plus rapidement se mettre à poser leurs questions.

Sur ce, je vais demander à M. Sauvé de se présenter et de faire son exposé.

M. Brian Sauvé (co-président, Fédération de la Police Nationale):

Merci, monsieur le président. J'espère que la technologie fonctionne et que vous pouvez m'entendre.

Le président:

C'est une belle oeuvre d'art que vous avez là, derrière vous.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Merci.

Je m'appelle Brian Sauvé, et je suis un membre en titre. Je suis également sergent au sein de la GRC. J'ai pris un congé sans solde pour fonder et lancer la Fédération de la police nationale. En ce moment, je suis un des coprésidents par intérim.

Pour ceux qui observent depuis les coulisses, nous avons présenté une demande d'accréditation du premier agent négociateur pour les membres de la GRC en avril 2017. Nous avons dû surmonter tous les obstacles imaginables qu'on a mis sur notre chemin depuis avril 2017. Tous les membres de l'unité de négociation, qui sont plus de 18 000, ont participé à un vote d'accréditation en novembre et en décembre derniers. Nous attendons toujours, au sujet de ce vote, la décision de la CRTESPF, la Commission des relations de travail et de l'emploi dans le secteur public fédéral, sur une contestation constitutionnelle.

Cela étant dit, en ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-98, nous souhaitions exprimer le point de vue des membres de la GRC concernant la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes, ou CCETP, et la partie VII de la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, qui traite des plaintes du public. Je suis ouvert aux questions à ce sujet.

À ce moment-là, je voyais le projet de loi C-98 comme étant une loi modifiant la Loi sur la GRC. Nos membres ont exprimé diverses préoccupations concernant les modifications apportées en 2014 à la Loi sur la GRC, au moyen du projet de loi C-42, et nous aimerions les diffuser et poser des questions à ce sujet.

Par exemple, dans le projet de loi C-98, on modifie l'article 45.37 de la Loi sur la GRC pour imposer des délais en consultation avec la force, et avec la nouvelle Commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes du public, la CETPP, à savoir le temps qu'une enquête devrait prendre, le résultat qu'il faudrait obtenir et la consultation entre la force et l'organisme d'enquête.

De notre point de vue, du point de vue des membres de la GRC, il serait vraiment bien d'étendre cela à d'autres aspects de la Loi sur la GRC. L'un des aspects pour lesquels il serait formidable d'avoir une forme de consultation quant aux échéanciers serait celui des processus de discipline internes, ou même des griefs ou des appels des décisions du commissaire concernant les suspensions, par exemple.

Selon notre expérience, qu'il s'agisse d'une plainte relevant de la partie VII, d'un processus administratif relevant de la partie IV ou de griefs relevant de la partie III de la Loi sur la GRC, la GRC n'est pas elle-même équipée pour traiter de ces situations rapidement. Les dossiers ont tendance à traîner pendant six mois, un an, un an et demi et même deux ans, ce qui fait que les accusés ou les membres faisant l'objet d'une plainte du public ou d'une plainte relative au code de déontologie, ou encore les auteurs de griefs sont laissés en suspens à cause d'un processus administratif interminable.

Si les membres du Comité ont des questions à ce sujet, je serai plus que ravi d'y répondre, et nous pourrons poursuivre la discussion à partir de là.

C'est tout pour mon exposé. Je suis sûr que vous n'allez pas vous pencher sur toutes les observations que j'aurais à faire au sujet du projet de loi C-42 et de la façon dont il touche les membres de la GRC, ainsi qu'au sujet des vastes pouvoirs des commissaires et des commandants divisionnaires.

J'aimerais entrer dans les détails de cela un jour, mais je ne crois pas que ce soit le moment. Cependant, nous vous saurions gré de vous pencher sur les échéanciers de l'article 45.37.

(1635)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Sauvé.

Les lumières clignotent, et je suis obligé de suspendre la séance à moins que les membres du Comité consentent unanimement à ce que nous la poursuivions. Ce que je propose, puisque nous sommes dans l'édifice, c'est que nous poursuivions la réunion encore 15 ou 20 minutes. Je crois que la sonnerie nous avertit 30 minutes à l'avance. Est-ce qu'il serait raisonnable de poursuivre la séance encore 20 minutes?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Nous allons donc probablement entendre l'exposé de nos prochains témoins et amorcer au moins les questions.

Le ministre m'a indiqué qu'il a un diagramme du processus et qu'il serait heureux de le fournir à quiconque le souhaite. Malheureusement, il n'est qu'en anglais. Il sera en français et en anglais dans 24 heures, mais ceux qui le veulent peuvent l'avoir.

J'invite maintenant Michelaine Lahaie, présidente de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale à présenter son exposé.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie (présidente, Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Bonjour, monsieur le président. Je m'appelle Michelaine Lahaie, et je suis accompagnée de Tim Cogan, mon dirigeant principal des finances et directeur principal, et de Lesley McCoy, mon avocate générale.

En raison du court préavis que nous avons eu pour cette réunion, nous n'avons pas préparé d'exposé, mais je suis prête à répondre à toutes les questions des membres du Comité.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota, vous avez sept minutes.

(1640)

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vais commencer par quelques questions à l'intention de la Commission.

Depuis que vous y êtes, en moyenne, combien de plaintes recevez-vous de la part de civils? Quel est l'éventail des enjeux qui font l'objet de ces plaintes? Combien de temps le processus exige-t-il en général, pour un examen initial, et pour une enquête, si vous en menez une? Ce sont quatre questions.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Nous recevons de 2 500 à 3 000 plaintes par année au sujet de membres de la GRC. On nous demande alors normalement d'examiner environ 250 à 300 de ces plaintes nous-mêmes. Comme l'a décrit le ministre à la dernière séance, les plaintes sont généralement confiées initialement à la GRC pour enquête. Si la personne qui a déposé la plainte n'est pas satisfaite de la façon dont la GRC a réglé la plainte, elle va s'adresser à nous, et nous allons faire notre examen. En moyenne, nous examinons de 250 à 300 cas, et mon centre d'appels reçoit de 2 500 à 3 000 plaintes par année.

Quant à l'échéancier, cela dépend. Nous avons des normes de service, à la Commission. Selon ces normes, nous devons transmettre toute plainte reçue à la GRC dans les quatre jours ouvrables suivant sa réception, pour que la GRC mène son enquête. Une fois que la GRC a terminé sa partie de l'enquête ou qu'elle a transmis son rapport, si la personne qui a fait la plainte veut une révision, elle a 60 jours pour nous en faire la demande.

Une fois que nous avons reçu la demande de révision de la part de la personne qui a fait la plainte, selon nos normes de service, nous avons 120 jours à compter du moment où nous recevons toute la documentation pertinente de la GRC. Nous nous adressons à la GRC et nous lui demandons toute l'information relative à l'enquête qu'elle a menée, et nous pouvons lui demander toute autre information qui peut être liée à cette plainte particulière.

Le président:

Monsieur Sauvé, étant donné que vous n'êtes pas un habitué de nos réunions, je tiens à vous dire que si vous souhaitez répondre à une question, vous n'avez qu'à me le signaler et je vais m'assurer de vous donner la parole.

Continuez.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis désolée, mais j'ai perdu le fil de mes pensées.

Vous avez terminé en disant qu'il y avait un examen de 60 jours.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

La personne qui a demandé une révision doit indiquer qu'elle veut que la plainte soit révisée après 60 jours. À compter du moment où la GRC a transmis sa lettre de règlement, la personne a 60 jours pour nous dire qu'elle veut que le règlement soit révisé.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Combien de temps faut-il en général à la GRC pour mener son examen après que vous lui avez envoyé la plainte?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

En ce moment il n'y a pas de normes de service à cet égard. Il arrive que cela prenne deux mois, et cela peut aller jusqu'à deux ans, dépendant de l'origine de la plainte et de sa complexité.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je sais qu'il doit y avoir tout un éventail d'enjeux, mais pouvez-vous nous en donner trois ou quatre exemples?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Le plus souvent, il est question d'une mauvaise attitude. Il arrive que des plaintes portent sur une utilisation inappropriée des ressources, sur un appel de service resté sans réponse ou sur un recours à la force jugé abusif par le plaignant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que M. Graham a quelques questions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai seulement quelques brèves questions pour le sergent Sauvé, si vous me le permettez.

Vous avez parlé des problèmes que vous avez à syndiquer les membres de la GRC, si j'ai bien compris.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Je ne dirais pas... Ce que je veux dire, c'est que c'était difficile. Nous vivons dans un pays dont la population est diversifiée et très dispersée sur un vaste territoire, ce qui fait qu'il a été difficile, la première année, d'obtenir la participation de tous les membres. Le défi consiste maintenant à faire progresser le processus de la Commission des relations de travail de l'emploi dans le secteur public fédéral — la CRTESPF —, afin d'obtenir le traitement de la demande d'accréditation. Les membres ont manifesté leur appui. Ce qui nous retarde un peu, c'est le processus gouvernemental qui avance à la vitesse de la mélasse en janvier.

(1645)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au moins en janvier...

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, j'ai averti M. Paul-Hus au sujet du rapport avec le projet de loi C-98.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis sur le point d'en parler, oui.

Le président:

D'accord. J'espère que vous le ferez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais le faire. J'ai une autre question avant d'en arriver à cela, mais je vais établir le lien.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La raison pour laquelle je m'engage dans cette voie, c'est qu'il y a, comme vous le savez, trois services syndiqués relevant de la GRC sur la Colline du Parlement. Je me demande si vous avez parlé de ces difficultés à l'AESS et à l'AFPC. Ils en ont eu beaucoup. Je me demande aussi si le projet de loi C-98 va vous donner des outils additionnels à cette fin et si c'est la raison pour laquelle vous êtes venu aujourd'hui.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Non. La raison pour laquelle j'ai manifesté mon intérêt au greffier quand il m'a téléphoné ce matin — je comprends que les délais sont courts, au Comité —, c'est que toute occasion de faire entendre la voix des membres de la GRC concernant la modification de la Loi sur la GRC nous offre une occasion de parler en leur nom. Si nous ne le faisions pas, ce serait une occasion ratée.

En réponse à votre question concernant la consultation de ceux qui représentent les employés des SCP ou les membres qui travaillent sur la Colline du Parlement, le projet de loi C-7 empêche en quelque sorte toute organisation qui demande de représenter des membres de la GRC — c'est une zone grise du projet de loi C-7— de tenir des activités d'association en dehors du milieu de l'application de la loi. À la FPN, nous sommes très prudents quant à notre façon de nous associer et aux choix que nous faisons pour accrocher notre bannière. Pratiquement tout s'est fait à l'intérieur de l'Association canadienne des policiers — l'Ontario Provincial Police Association et la Fraternité des policiers et policières au Québec, par exemple. Nous n'avons pas vraiment créé de liens avec l'AFPC, le SCFP ou le SACC, par exemple.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que le comité dont nous parlons aujourd'hui vous donne plus d'outils pour le syndicat? Est-ce que cela ne change rien pour vous? Une fois l'accréditation obtenue, est-ce que le syndicat va utiliser ce comité pour traiter avec la GRC? Est-ce un outil qui vous servirait également?

Le président:

Très brièvement, je vous prie.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Je ne suis pas sûr de bien comprendre la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans vos négociations avec la GRC, est-ce que la création du comité comme nous l'envisageons en ce moment améliorera votre capacité de négocier? Est-ce qu'il vous donnera des outils supplémentaires? Est-ce que cela ne change rien pour vous? Est-ce strictement pour le public?

M. Brian Sauvé:

Avec l'actuelle CCETP — je vais l'appeler selon son appellation actuelle —, je ne vois pas comment le projet de loi C-98 aura un effet sur les membres de la GRC ou changera la façon de traiter les plaintes du public ou d'enquêter sur ces plaintes.

Comme la présidente de la CCETP, Mme Lahaie, l'a dit concernant le temps qu'il faut pour les enquêtes sur les plaintes du public, le goulot d'étranglement que nous constatons et dont nous entendons parler est lié à la capacité de la GRC d'enquêter rapidement. Cela allonge...

Le président:

Je suis désolé, monsieur Sauvé, mais allons devoir nous arrêter là. Nous avons dépassé le temps imparti.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Fort bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci.

Vous avez dit, madame, qu'il y a entre 2 500 et 3 000 plaintes sur lesquelles la GRC fait enquête chaque année au sujet de ses membres. La Commission en examine entre 250 et 300. Étant donné ce que l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, l'ASFC, fait actuellement — parce qu'elle a déjà des plaintes à traiter à l'interne —, a-t-on pensé au nombre de plaintes qui viendront s'ajouter à la charge de travail de la Commission?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Nous avons consulté l'ASFC en long et en large à ce sujet. D'après ce que j'ai compris, ils reçoivent environ 3 000 plaintes par année. Nous nous attendons à ce que les chiffres soient très semblables à cela. Bien entendu, des efforts devront être déployés pour informer le public du lancement de la Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes. Lorsque cela se produira, il se peut que le nombre de plaintes augmente. Pour le moment, nous nous attendons à ce qu'il y en ait environ 3 000 par année.

M. Glen Motz:

D'après ce que j'ai compris du projet de loi C-98, vous allez recueillir six membres de la Commission.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Aux termes de l'ancienne Loi sur la GRC, nous avions cinq membres à la Commission, alors il y en aura encore cinq.

(1650)

M. Glen Motz:

Vous avez cinq membres de la GRC. Aurez-vous cinq nouveaux membres pour l'ASFC?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Non, monsieur. Nous n'aurons que cinq membres. La Commission devra...

M. Glen Motz:

Cinq membres à plein...

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

... cinq membres. C'est ce que nous aurons, oui.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Comment faites-vous alors... L'un des problèmes actuels des membres de la GRC, et c'est quelque chose qui préoccupera probablement l'ASFC, c'est de régler ces questions en temps opportun. Oui, nous devons répondre aux plaintes du public, mais nous devons aussi comprendre ce que certaines de ces plaintes font à nos membres. Les plaintes frivoles et vexatoires doivent être traitées et réglées promptement, même si elles sont fondées.

Comment comptez-vous raccourcir le temps de traitement? Vous avez parlé de quelques mois pour les cas les plus légers à plusieurs années pour les cas les plus lourds.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

L'un des aspects positifs de ce projet de loi, c'est qu'il permettra la mise en place de normes de service. En matière de réponse, il y aura des normes de service, et pour la GRC, et pour l'ASFC, ce qui aidera grandement la Commission. Présentement, la GRC n'a pas de délai précis à l'intérieur duquel elle est tenue de répondre à une demande. Des normes de service seront négociées avec la GRC et l'ASFC lorsque la nouvelle loi entrera en vigueur.

M. Glen Motz:

Cette norme de service s'appliquera-t-elle si un membre du public ne se plaint pas à vous? Voilà où je veux en venir. Vous avez une norme de service qui sera intégrée. Si un membre du public vous demande d'intervenir ou d'examiner un dossier qui a déjà fait l'objet d'une enquête — soit par l'ASFC dans ce cas-ci, dans le projet de loi C-98, soit par la GRC, parce qu'ils seront semblables —, la GRC et l'ASFC auront toutes deux une norme de service à respecter.

Que se passera-t-il d'ici là? Ont-ils présentement des normes de service? Si un membre du public se plaint maintenant à l'ASFC ou à la GRC, existe-t-il une norme de service l'obligeant à répondre en temps opportun?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je ne peux pas vous dire ce que fait l'ASFC en ce moment, parce que nous sommes en train d'examiner ce que nous ferons dans l'avenir. En ce qui concerne la GRC, elle a un document de politique en place, mais elle n'est pas tenue d'énoncer cette norme de service à l'externe. À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a pas vraiment de norme de service externe à cet effet.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur Sauvé, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. Brian Sauvé:

Comme je l'ai mentionné au début, je pense que les normes de service sont une idée formidable. L'une des choses que j'aimerais dire, c'est que la mise en oeuvre de normes de service en ce qui concerne les enquêtes sera un énorme gain pour les membres. Comme vous l'avez dit, le problème en ce moment, c'est le fait d'avoir quelque chose qui vous pend au-dessus de la tête pendant un an, deux ans ou trois ans sans savoir comment cela va se résoudre.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien. Je vous remercie.

Je vous ai vu assis à la tribune lorsque j'ai posé cette question au ministre. La Commission compte cinq membres. Disposez-vous de ressources vous permettant de mener une nouvelle enquête si la preuve d'une plainte est jugée insuffisante? Cela existe-t-il tant du côté de la GRC de votre commission que du côté ASFC de votre commission? Quel est l'organisme d'enquête que vous engagez ou auquel vous vous adressez pour cela?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

La réponse à votre question est oui. Nous avons la capacité d'enquêter. J'ai actuellement une équipe de sept enquêteurs qui travaillent pour moi. Je présume qu'avec la bonification du financement et le nouveau mandat, nous allons augmenter le nombre d'enquêteurs que nous avons. Dans certains cas, si nous avons besoin d'une expertise très pointue, nous avons recours à la sous-traitance. Par exemple...

M. Glen Motz:

À qui vous adressez-vous? Est-ce à d'autres services de police?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je vous demande pardon?

M. Glen Motz:

S'agit-il d'autres services de police?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Non. Ce ne sont pas d'autres services de police. Nous faisons affaire avec des civils. Nous examinons ce genre de services.

M. Glen Motz:

D'où viennent les enquêteurs que vous avez maintenant?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

C'est un mélange. J'en ai qui proviennent d'autres services de police. J'en ai qui proviennent des services familiaux et sociaux. C'est donc vraiment...

M. Glen Motz:

Sont-ils en détachement? S'agit-il de postes de détachement?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Non. Ce sont des fonctionnaires qui travaillent directement pour moi.

M. Glen Motz:

Ils ont déjà travaillé dans ces organismes.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Exactement.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien.

Il a fallu beaucoup de temps pour en arriver là. Vous nous avez entendus en parler avec le ministre. Dans votre façon de percevoir le projet de loi, y a-t-il quelque chose... Je veux dire, en tant que commission, vous êtes responsable. Vous allez être chargé de veiller à ce que l'ASFC soit désormais assujettie, elle aussi, aux exigences de la Commission pour l'examen des plaintes civiles.

Pour faire en sorte de répondre au public en temps opportun ou d'être efficace dans ce domaine — d'une manière ou d'une autre — et de répondre aussi aux besoins des membres de la GRC et de l'ASFC qui pourraient faire l'objet d'une plainte, y a-t-il quelque chose que nous devrions envisager dans ce projet de loi et qui n'existe pas dans la loi?

(1655)

Le président:

Répondez très brièvement, je vous prie.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Le projet de loi tel que vous l'avez devant vous est très semblable à ce que l'on retrouve actuellement dans la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada. Il y a peut-être quelques petits irritants d'ordre administratif, mais d'après ce que nous savons à l'heure actuelle et en ce qui concerne la Commission, il n'y a rien de majeur.

M. Glen Motz:

Pour ce qui est des irritants d'ordre administratif, si vous pouviez nous en fournir une description...

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Bien sûr.

M. Glen Motz:

Le hic, c'est que nous devrons nous occuper de cela aujourd'hui ou mercredi.

Le président:

Sur ce, nous allons devoir suspendre la séance et aller voter.

J'espère que nos témoins pourront rester pendant que nous exercerons notre droit démocratique.

(1655)

(1720)

Le président:

Nous sommes de retour et nous avons le quorum.

Je crois que c'est au tour de M. Dubé, qui dispose de sept minutes.

Sous réserve de ce que mes collègues pourraient dire, je propose de poursuivre les questions pendant 20 minutes encore. Cela vous semble-t-il raisonnable? Nous passerons ensuite à l'étude article par article.

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: D'accord.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Sauvé, j'espère que vous me pardonnerez, mais j'ai peu de questions auxquelles je crois que vous serez en mesure de répondre.

Je veux tout d'abord profiter de l'occasion pour vous féliciter de tout ce que vous faites. Je sais que les choses n'ont pas été faciles au cours des dernières années, mais je pense que c'est un pas dans la bonne direction. C'était quelque chose qu'il fallait faire depuis longtemps. Ceux qui ont suivi le débat savent qu'il s'agit d'établir une représentation équitable pour les hommes et les femmes qui portent l'uniforme à la GRC. Ne lâchez pas.

Mes questions concernent certains aspects du fonctionnement actuel de la Commission et la façon dont le projet de loi peut changer ou toucher cela.

On dit ceci au paragraphe 18(2) proposé, à la page 8 du projet de loi: (2) Pour effectuer un examen de sa propre initiative, la Commission doit : a) être convaincue qu'elle dispose des ressources nécessaires [...] b) avoir pris les mesures nécessaires pour vérifier qu’aucun autre examen ou aucune autre enquête n’a été entrepris [...]

Je vais revenir sur les mesures nécessaires décrites à l'alinéa b). Commençons par l'alinéa a), qui traite des ressources.

Prenons le cas d'un incident qui serait rapporté par les médias, à la suite de quoi une plainte deviendrait d'intérêt public. Si votre budget n'est pas adéquat, vous devrez accorder la priorité au traitement des plaintes, même si la situation est hautement médiatisée. À moins que le président ou le ministre ne demande une enquête, vous serez restreint par vos capacités budgétaires. En gros, c'est ce que cela veut dire.

Ai-je bien compris?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Effectivement, monsieur Dubé, vous avez bien compris. Nous sommes certainement restreints par nos ressources budgétaires et humaines.

Je dois aussi souligner que cette partie concerne ce qu'on appelle des révisions, mais qu'il s'agit en fait de révisions portant sur des activités précises. On parle ici de cas où il y aurait un problème systémique, sur lequel nous déciderions de faire une enquête. Il s'agit de cela plutôt que des plaintes normales que nous recevons du grand public.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est parfait.

Pour ce qui est de l'alinéa b), non seulement dans le contexte du paragraphe 18(2) proposé, mais dans l'ensemble, M. Graham a parlé plus tôt du risque de marcher sur les pieds de l'autre organisme. C'est intéressant. Dans le contexte de notre étude du projet de loi C-59, nous avons reçu des représentants de votre commission. Pardonnez-moi, je ne me souviens plus si c'était vous ou d'autres représentants, mais on nous a dit qu'il n'y avait pas de problème du côté de la GRC, étant donné qu'il ne s'agissait pas de fonctions liées à la sécurité nationale. Par contre, lors des témoignages et du débat sur le projet de loi C-59, certains ont soulevé que, dans le cas de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, il s'agit toujours de sécurité nationale, étant donné qu'on parle de l'intégrité des frontières.

Êtes-vous préoccupés du fait que, dans le contexte de l'Agence, il sera peut-être plus difficile de déterminer ce qui relève des différents mécanismes de surveillance pour les questions de sécurité nationale? Dans le cas du comité créé par le projet de loi C-59 ou du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, par exemple, il y a une distinction plus claire et plus évidente en ce qui concerne la GRC.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je crois qu'il pourrait parfois être difficile de faire la distinction. Cependant, je peux vous dire qu'en ce moment, nous entretenons de très bonnes relations avec le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité et avec ce qui deviendra l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. Nous parlons souvent à ces personnes. Je crois donc que nous serions en mesure de déterminer lequel des organismes devrait traiter la plainte.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Pourvu que les bonnes relations se maintiennent, cela ne devrait pas causer d'ennuis pour le travail.

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

En effet.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est excellent.

Ma prochaine question concerne les douaniers américains. Je crois qu'elle est importante, parce que le commun des mortels, si vous me permettez l'expression, ne sait pas toujours clairement qui est responsable. Depuis l'adoption du projet de loi C-23, on a davantage recours au prédédouanement, notamment lors des traversées terrestres et dans les aéroports.

Prévoyez-vous qu'il y aura des plaintes concernant des agissements d'agents américains à l'égard de citoyens canadiens? Avez-vous établi un mécanisme pour composer avec cela? Allez-vous transmettre les plaintes à un autre organisme? Allez-vous sensibiliser le public? Votre approche comprendra-t-elle plusieurs composantes?

(1725)

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Cela comprendra plusieurs composantes. Il n'y a aucun doute que nous allons recevoir des plaintes visant des agents américains.

En ce moment, nous recevons parfois des plaintes concernant d'autres policiers que ceux de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada. En ce qui concerne la GRC, nous avons une politique d'ouverture à toutes les plaintes. Selon cette politique, si nous recevons une plainte visant un policier de Toronto, par exemple, nous pouvons l'envoyer à l'agence provinciale pour qu'elle la traite. Nous transmettons l'information.

C'est sûr que nous allons commencer à nouer des liens avec les Américains pour pouvoir leur transmettre de telles plaintes.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Pardonnez-moi de me dépêcher, mais mon temps file.

Lors du prédédouanement, les Américains interviennent en sol canadien. Avez-vous un rôle à jouer si un incident qui fait l'objet d'une plainte a lieu en sol canadien, par exemple dans un aéroport canadien?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je ne le crois pas, mais c'est une question qui devrait être abordée.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est parfait.

J'ai une dernière question.

À la page 25, au paragraphe 51(1) proposé, il est question de la réponse du président de l'Agence. Ce mécanisme ressemble-t-il à celui qui existe déjà à la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC, selon lequel on fournit une réponse écrite et, si des mesures additionnelles ne sont pas prises, on en fournit également les raisons par écrit? Pardonnez-moi si je ne connais pas par cœur la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada; peut-être le devrais-je. Est-ce le même mécanisme que celui qui existe actuellement dans cette loi?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Oui, c'est le même mécanisme que celui que nous utilisons en ce moment.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord, merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Je crois comprendre qu'il n'y a pas de questions de la part du gouvernement. Y en a-t-il du côté de l'opposition?

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais vous remercier d'être venue aujourd'hui et d'avoir présenté cet exposé. Je suis très heureux de pouvoir appuyer le projet de loi C-98, mais il y a une ou deux questions que je traîne depuis un certain nombre d'années concernant une dynamique semblable que vous avez connue avec la GRC.

En ce qui concerne les pouvoirs prévus à l'article 44 proposé sous le titre « Pouvoirs de la Commission relativement aux plaintes », vous parliez des normes de service de la GRC et de certaines lignes directrices. Vous pouvez obliger une personne à se présenter devant vous et à lui faire prêter serment, etc. Or, si un membre de la sécurité frontalière était impliqué dans une affaire criminelle — par exemple pour une agression présumée ou quelque chose du genre ou pour l'usage d'une force excessive —, feriez-vous cela avant le procès criminel ou choisiriez-vous d'attendre après le procès criminel pour qu'il puisse se défendre des actions qu'on lui reproche? Les preuves que cette personne aurait fournies sous serment à votre organisation pourraient-elles être utilisées contre elle dans un procès criminel?

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

Je vais d'abord répondre à la deuxième partie de votre question. Aucun renseignement qui nous est fourni sous serment par une personne que nous avons obligée à venir nous parler ne peut être utilisé contre elle. Rien de ce qu'elle admet personnellement ne peut être utilisé dans le moindre de nos rapports. Bref, cette information ne peut être utilisée contre elle.

La première partie de votre question porte sur une situation assez commune pour nous, une situation dans laquelle les tribunaux sont saisis d'une chose au sujet de laquelle nous avons reçu une plainte du public. En général, nous avons tendance à mettre ces plaintes du public en suspens en attendant de voir ce que les tribunaux vont dire, car il arrive souvent que les tribunaux donnent une certaine orientation ou qu'une décision fournisse un éclairage particulier.

M. Jim Eglinski:

C'est la question que je me posais. Il y a une sorte de suspens parce qu'il y a conflit.

Il y a un deuxième volet à ma question, et j'aimerais que vous répondiez assez rapidement si vous le pouvez, car j'en ai une autre à vous poser.

J'étais là lorsque vous avez commencé à travailler à la Commission des plaintes du public contre la GRC. Il y a eu un peu de ressentiment de la part des membres de la GRC — la confiance n'était pas au rendez-vous — et je pense qu'il y a eu un peu de ressentiment dans l'autre sens aussi; nous ne nous faisions pas mutuellement confiance en quelque sorte. Mais assez rapidement, une confiance s'est installée du fait que nous avons dû collaborer très étroitement. J'aurais tendance à croire que vous allez vous retrouver dans une situation semblable en entrant dans cette nouvelle ère. Allez-vous mettre sur pied un programme de sensibilisation à l'intention des membres de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada pour qu'ils comprennent vraiment ce que vous faites? Il y aura un peu de suspicion de leur part, alors je me demande si vous avez un plan pour leur donner l'heure juste.

(1730)

Mme Michelaine Lahaie:

À l'heure actuelle, nous travaillons à l'élaboration d'un plan pour les mettre au courant. Cela fait partie de nos intentions: nous voulons les éduquer et éduquer le public canadien au sujet du processus.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Le monsieur qui est à l'écran... Je suis désolé, j'ai oublié votre nom, sergent.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Je m'appelle Brian Sauvé.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Monsieur Sauvé, vous parlez des normes de service au sein de la GRC et de l'achèvement des enquêtes. Croyez-vous que les normes de service devraient aller dans les deux sens?

Je reviens à l'époque où j'étais responsable du détachement de Fort St. John, il y a 15 ans de cela. Je me souviens qu'il y avait eu un incident au sujet d'un membre qui était en poste là-bas pendant quatre ans, mais que je n'avais jamais rencontré. Son cas était en attente d'une enquête. Je n'ai jamais su de quoi il s'agissait. On ne me l'a jamais dit. Je sais qu'il vivait dans ma région, mais il ne venait jamais travailler. J'aimerais savoir si vous croyez qu'il devrait y avoir une norme de service dans les deux sens.

M. Brian Sauvé:

Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre ce que vous entendez par « norme de service dans les deux sens ». Qu'il s'agisse d'une plainte du public, d'une enquête interne ou d'une enquête criminelle, les personnes faisant l'objet d'une enquête ont droit à une enquête équitable sur le plan procédural et rapide, point final. C'est comme cela que je vois les choses.

Les lois de la justice naturelle devraient s'appliquer. Qu'il s'agisse de l'ASFC ou de la GRC, le membre faisant l'objet de l'enquête a droit à ce que ladite enquête soit menée rondement. Il a également le droit de garder le silence. Cela fait partie du droit commun: le droit au silence. Donc, si cela gêne les enquêteurs, trouvez une autre avenue.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Je crois que je mon temps de parole est épuisé.

Le président:

Oui, il l'est.

Monsieur Manly, y a-t-il des questions que vous aimeriez poser?

M. Paul Manly (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, PV):

Non, je n'en ai pas.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres questions de ce côté-ci? Non.

Sur ce, je remercie nos témoins.

Je vous remercie d'avoir été patients pendant que nous allions voter.

Nous allons maintenant suspendre la séance avant de revenir pour l'étude article par article.

(1730)

(1735)

Le président:

Je vois que nos témoins sont à la table et que les membres du Comité sont ici.

Passons maintenant à l'étude article par article.

(Les articles 1 et 2 sont adoptés.)

(Article 3)

Le président: Nous avons l'amendement PV-1.

Monsieur Manly, nous vous écoutons.

M. Paul Manly:

Cette modification préciserait que ni les agents actuels, ni les anciens agents, ni les employés de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ne peuvent siéger à la Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public. Cette modification ne figure pas dans le projet de loi C-98, mais dans la Loi sur la GRC. L'alinéa sur l'inadmissibilité prévue au paragraphe 45.29(2) de cette loi exclurait les « membres » actuels ou anciens de la Commission d’examen et de traitement des plaintes du public et, en vertu de cette loi, le terme « membre » a une définition bien précise: il désigne un employé de la GRC. Vraisemblablement, les agents actuels et anciens de l'ASFC devraient également être exclus de cette commission. Cet amendement permettrait de l'établir de façon explicite.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous avez la parole.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai quelques questions. L'une d'elles s'adresse aux fonctionnaires qui sont ici au sujet de cet amendement, et l'autre s'adresse à M. Picard.

Le président:

Il ne pourra pas servir.

M. Glen Motz:

Non, mais sérieusement... Je comprends ce que dit la Loi sur la GRC, mais j'ai toujours voulu savoir s'il y a une certaine distance entre le service et une commission comme celle-ci. Même en tant que fonctionnaire, pour travailler de ce côté-ci comme enquêteur, comment cela pourrait-il empêcher quelqu'un d'être impartial, quelqu'un qui aurait une certaine compréhension de la dynamique lui permettant de bien servir le public au sein de cette commission... Je n'arrive pas à comprendre pourquoi nous voudrions même envisager une telle chose.

Les fonctionnaires pourraient-ils m'aider à comprendre s'il s'agit d'une mesure conforme à la loi ou à l'intention du projet de loi C-98?

M. Evan Travers:

Le projet de loi n'a pas pour objet d'imposer une restriction quant aux personnes qui peuvent devenir membres de la Commission, une restriction liée au fait qu'elles ont déjà été employées par l'ASFC. L'amendement proposé par M. Manly imposerait aux anciens membres de l'ASFC la même restriction qui s'applique aux anciens membres de la GRC. Cela ne fait pas partie du projet de loi que nous avons présenté.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur Picard, vous avez commencé votre service de cette façon, mais vous avez pris un certain recul depuis. Pensez-vous que la nomination de personnes qui ont déjà travaillé à l'ASFC dans le passé serait perturbante ou que cela inciterait le public à se soucier de l'équité ou de l'objectivité de la Commission?

M. Michel Picard:

Dans tous les cas, l'expérience ne devrait pas, selon moi, restreindre la capacité d'agir d'une personne. Je voterais contre cet amendement.

Le président:

Monsieur Dubé, la parole est à vous.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je me demande simplement si M. Travers peut expliquer l'incohérence liée au fait que les anciens membres de la GRC ne sont pas autorisés à travailler pour la Commission, alors que la mesure législative autorise les anciens membres de l'ASFC à le faire.

M. Evan Travers:

Nous avons travaillé principalement à régler les questions liées à l'ASFC. En ce qui concerne ces questions, la décision a été prise de ne pas assujettir les anciens employés de l'ASFC à la même exigence. Les effectifs de ces deux organisations sont différents. En été, l'ASFC a tendance à employer des étudiants ou des personnes de ce genre, qui peuvent n'avoir travaillé à l'Agence que pendant quelques mois. Nous n'avons pas intégré cette restriction au projet de loi afin d'accorder au gouverneur en conseil, c'est-à-dire à l'organe qui nommera les membres de la Commission, le pouvoir discrétionnaire de choisir les meilleurs candidats.

(1740)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Monsieur le président, si je peux me permettre d'intervenir, je dirais que cette incohérence semble plutôt flagrante. Cette organisation gérera maintenant les plaintes liées à deux différentes entités responsables de la sécurité publique. D'une part, certaines personnes seront autorisées à y travailler — je comprends l'argument que vous faites valoir à propos des types d'expérience, mais il s'agit là d'un exemple très particulier et, essentiellement, cela signifie que des gens ayant travaillé à titre d'agents des services frontaliers pendant 30 ans qui, avec tout le respect que je dois à l'excellent travail qu'ils accomplissent, seront un peu en conflit d'intérêts...

Je présume que c'est la raison pour laquelle la Loi sur la GRC a été rédigée de cette façon, c'est-à-dire afin d'éviter le vieux dicton de la police qui enquête sur la police. Je sais qu'on qualifie maintenant la Commission de « publique », mais je me demande si son caractère civil ne sera pas légèrement dilué par cette incohérence plutôt importante qui existera maintenant au sein de ce qui est censé être une seule organisation. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer le raisonnement qui a motivé cette décision?

M. Evan Travers:

Je ne veux pas parler du but de la Loi sur la GRC ou des dispositions qui la composent. Je n'ai pas participé à leur élaboration ou à leur rédaction.

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi dont vous êtes saisis, nous avons conseillé le Cabinet par l'entremise de notre ministre, et c'est le projet de loi que le gouvernement a présenté. Si cette décision suscite des préoccupations ou des questions, le ministre serait peut-être mieux placé pour parler de l'intention qui sous-tend cette distinction.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une très brève question à poser.

Je ne vais pas appuyer cet amendement, mais je tenais simplement à poser une question à propos de l'interdiction frappant les membres de la GRC. À qui s'applique-t-elle en ce moment? Est-ce aux membres de la GRC aux termes de la loi, ou à n'importe quel employé de la GRC?

M. Evan Travers:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Talbot à ce sujet.

M. Jacques Talbot (conseiller juridique, Services juridiques, Ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile, ministère de la Justice):

Dans le cas présent, les personnes assujetties à la disposition en vigueur sont les membres de la GRC, c'est-à-dire les membres de la force policière.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les agents en uniforme?

M. Jacques Talbot:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, l'amendement qui nous occupe s'appliquerait à tous les employés de l'ASFC, y compris, comme vous l'avez dit, les étudiants employés pendant les mois d'été.

Cela répond à ma question, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Dubé, la parole est à vous.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'appuierai l'amendement de M. Manly parce que, selon moi, il distingue une incohérence plutôt importante.

Il y a deux enjeux importants qui me passent par la tête. Le premier, dont nous avons entendu parler, je crois, au cours des témoignages antérieurs et, en particulier, dans le cadre des questions posées par M. Eglinski, c'est l'importance de gagner la confiance du public. J'ai simplement le sentiment que l'iniquité, que cela créerait au sein de cette commission nouvellement renommée, nuirait à l'établissement de ce climat de confiance.

Deuxièmement, je le répète, nous utilisons l'exemple particulier d'un étudiant au service de l'Agence pendant trois mois de la période estivale quand, en fait, l'échappatoire permet la nomination de personnes dont le point de vue serait beaucoup plus ambivalent. Malheureusement, je ne sais pas comment formuler un amendement pour modifier l'amendement en vue de faire ressortir cette exception, mais je tiens à mentionner de nouveau, pour le compte rendu, qu'à mon avis, cette incohérence est plutôt flagrante. J'appuierai donc l'amendement de M. Manly.

Le président:

Monsieur Eglinski, la parole est à vous.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Premièrement, je ne pourrais pas appuyer cet amendement.

Toutefois, monsieur Talbot, j'aimerais que vous clarifiiez ce que vous avez dit il y a un moment.

Lorsque vous avez fait allusion aux agents de la GRC, parliez-vous du passé du présent?

M. Jacques Talbot:

Je fais allusion au régime actuel.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Pardon? [Français]

M. Jacques Talbot:

Je parle du régime actuel. [Traduction]

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je n'ai toujours pas compris ce que vous avez dit.

M. Jacques Talbot:

Oh, je fais également allusion aux anciens membres, aux personnes qui étaient assujetties à l'ancien régime. Comme vous le savez, il y a quelques années, nous avons mis en oeuvre une nouvelle mesure législative qui a changé le statut des employés de la GRC, en particulier pour...

(1745)

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord. Ce n'était pas tout à fait clair. Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres questions au sujet de l'amendement?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 3 est adopté.)

(Les articles 4 à 14 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(L'article 15)

Le président: Nous sommes saisis de l'amendement PV-2, qui est réputé avoir été proposé. Malgré cela, personne n'est ici pour en parler, à moins que quelqu'un souhaite prendre la relève. Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il parler de l'amendement PV-2, en vue de l'appuyer ou de s'y opposer?

M. Glen Motz:

J'ai une question à poser aux hauts fonctionnaires. Je suis curieux de savoir si cet amendement fonctionnerait ou s'il est même nécessaire, étant donné que nous avons entendu dire au cours de la première heure de la séance que la commission d'examen et de traitement des plaintes ne s'occupe pas des questions d'expulsion. L'amendement PV-2 est-il même nécessaire dans le contexte de la mesure législative?

M. Evan Travers:

Si j'ai bien compris, l'amendement PV-2 concerne la consultation et la collaboration.

M. Glen Motz:

Cela pourrait vouloir dire que, si je suis expulsé dans un autre pays, j'utiliserai les services d'un organisme quelconque de l'autre pays pour contester mon exclusion.

M. Evan Travers:

Si je comprends bien votre question, je dirais que le projet de loi n'est pas censé entraver le processus d'expulsion ou d'extradition. Des plaintes peuvent être déposées ou continuer d'être déposées de l'extérieur du Canada. Toute personne qui a l'impression qu'elle devrait présenter une plainte peut le faire, qu'elle soit au Canada ou non.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous sommes saisis de l'amendement PV-3. Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il poser des questions aux hauts fonctionnaires ou parler de l'amendement PV-3?

M. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

Si le parrain de l'amendement n'est pas là, sautez simplement l'amendement.

Le président:

Non, je ne peux pas sauter l'amendement. Le Comité a été adéquatement saisi de l'amendement. Par conséquent, nous devons nous en occuper.

M. T.J. Harvey:

Ce n'est pas le cas si le parrain n'est pas là pour proposer la motion.

Le président:

L'amendement est réputé avoir été proposé.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 15 est adopté.)

(Les articles 16 à 35 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: Le titre est-il adopté?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Le projet de loi est-il adopté?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Le Comité ordonne-t-il à la présidence de faire rapport à la Chambre du projet de loi?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: Cela dit, j'aimerais remercier les hauts fonctionnaires.

Merci, chers membres du Comité.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard secu 26723 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on June 17, 2019

2019-06-10 SECU 167

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Colleagues, it's 3:30, and I see quorum and Mr. Amos is in his place.

Welcome to the committee, Mr. Amos.

This is a study of rural digital infrastructure under motion 208 and under the name of Mr. Amos, the honourable member for Pontiac.

If you would proceed with your presentation, Mr. Amos, you have 10 minutes.

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to the members.[Translation]

Thank you for this opportunity to discuss what represents [technical difficulties] for my fellow Pontiac residents, but also for Canadians across the country. Whether in rural or urban areas, this is a very important issue.[English]

I believe the importance of this issue is clearly demonstrated by the unanimous vote. I thank each of you individually—and also your colleagues—for that support, because I think it was a unifying vote around motion 208.

When urban Canada recognizes the challenges that rural Canada faces with regard to what we now consider to be basic telecommunication services—good cellphone access, high-speed Internet—I think these are the things that bring Canada together when there's an appreciation of our challenges.

I think there's an appreciation at this point in time that rural Canada needs to make up for lost time with the digital divide. For too many years, private sector telecommunications companies did not invest sufficiently in that necessary digital infrastructure. Governments at that time, in the past, weren't up to the challenge of recognizing that the market needed to be corrected.

I feel fortunate, in a way, to have been able to bring this motion forward, because I feel that all I was doing was stating the obvious: that a Canadian in northern Alberta or the B.C. interior who is challenged with serious forest fires, just like a Canadian in New Brunswick, Quebec or Ontario who is dealing with floods, deserves access to the digital infrastructure that most Canadians take for granted, so as to ensure their public safety.

As your committee is well aware, the motion was divided into two follow-up components, one with respect to the economic and regulatory aspects of digital infrastructure. That process in the industry committee has been moving forward well. A number of witnesses have been brought forth. The process is proceeding apace. I'm looking forward to their conclusions. I've had an opportunity to participate, and I thank that committee for enabling that participation.

I'm particularly appreciative, Chair, that this committee has seen fit to move forward, even if only with a brief set of interactions on this subject matter, because Canadians across this country recognize that it is time to get to solutions on the public safety dimensions of digital infrastructure.

I'm constantly attempting to channel the voices of my small-town mayors, mayors such as David Rochon, the mayor of Waltham, Quebec. Waltham is about an hour and 45 minutes away from Parliament Hill. It's a straight shot down Highway 148 once you cross the Chaudière Bridge or the Portage Bridge. You get over to Gatineau and just drive straight west down Highway 148, and you can't miss it. It's just across the way from Pembroke.

In that community, they have no cellphone service. The 300-and-some souls who live there, when they're faced with flooding for the second time in three years, get extremely frustrated, and they have every right to be frustrated. I'm frustrated for them, and I'm channelling their voices as I sit before you. This is no more than me speaking on behalf of a range of small-town mayors.

I know the voices of those mayors are magnified by those of so many others across this country. That's why the Federation of Canadian Municipalities supported motion 208, because they hear those mayors' voices as well. That's why the rural caucus of the Quebec Union of Municipalities supported this motion, because they hear those same voices.[Translation]

It is our responsibility to address this issue directly. I am very pleased to see that since motion M-208 was introduced in the House of Commons, digital infrastructure has been a major success, thanks to Budget 2019. The investments are historic, very concrete and very targeted.

The goal is to have high-speed Internet access across Canada by 2030. The target is 95% by 2025. Our government is the first to set these kinds of targets and invest these amounts. In the past, we were talking about a few hundred million dollars, but now we are talking about billions of dollars. The issue is recognized. For a government, this recognition comes first and foremost through its budget. Our government has recognized this. I really appreciate the actions of our Liberal government.

With respect to wireless and cellular communications in the context of public safety, there is agreement that, in any emergency situation, a cellular phone is required. It is very useful for managing personal emergencies, but it is also very useful for public servants, mayors, councillors who are in the field and want to help their fellow citizens. These people need access to a reliable cellular network to be able to connect with and help their fellow citizens.

(1540)

[English]

I see that I'm being given the two-minute warning. I will conclude in advance of that simply by saying that I think it's important for us not to descend into rhetoric on this topic. Canadians deserve better than that. I read today's opposition day motion. With no disrespect intended, it didn't spend any time recognizing what our government has done but spent so much time focusing on the problems without getting to the solutions. In the Pontiac, people want solutions. They want to know how they're going to get their cellphone service, and soon. They want their high-speed Internet hookup yesterday, not two years from now. I know that every rural member of Parliament—Conservative, NDP, Liberal and otherwise—is working very hard in their own way to make sure that happens. I am as well. Right now I appreciate this opportunity to focus our attention very specifically on the public safety dimensions.

I also want to say a thank you to our local and national media, who have taken on this issue and are recognizing that in an era of climate change and extreme weather, we're going to need our cellphones more and more; we're going to need this digital infrastructure more and more, to ensure Canadians' safety and security.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Amos.

Mr. Graham, for seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Amos, when you brought forward M-208, it had two aspects to it. One was for the industry committee to study these services, and two, for SECU to study the public safety aspect of it. Would you like to expand a bit on how you saw the split committee approach to this.

Mr. William Amos:

My feeling was that there are most certainly economic dimensions to this issue. There are questions around competition. There are questions around the nature of a return on investment that can and cannot be made in rural Canada. These are real considerations that I think merit serious consideration. The independent regulator, the CRTC, has distinct responsibilities as established under the Telecommunications Act. Those obligations provide it, in many aspects, with a fair amount of latitude to achieve the public interest objectives of the Telecommunications Act.

I felt that those issues, both regulatory and economic, which ultimately help to frame how we will get to digital infrastructure access for rural Canada, are not the same issues necessarily, or they're not entirely the same, as the public safety issues. I felt that if the study were to be done by one committee on its own, public safety in particular might end up getting short shrift. I felt that would be inappropriate. I felt that one of the most important arguments in favour of making the massive investments that are necessary, and that our government is stepping forward to make, would be on the basis of public safety considerations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

In terms of public safety considerations, both your riding and mine have experienced significant problems with dispatching emergency services at a time of emergency. You've described it at great length in the past. When tornadoes hit your riding, when floods hit your riding and my riding, emergency services have to come to city hall, coordinate, and go back out in the field. Can you speak to that? Is that the basis of the focus?

(1545)

Mr. William Amos:

I think for the average Canadian who's thinking about how their family in a certain small town is dealing with an emergency related to extreme weather, it's plain to see that when a local official needs to spend an extra 20 to 40 minutes driving from a particular location on the ground—during a fire or a flood or a tornado or otherwise—back to town hall in order to make the necessary phone calls, it's inefficient. It brings about unnecessary delays in providing proper emergency response.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the same vein, a lot of citizens have trouble reaching 911 because there's no service available to do so. Phone lines are no longer up. If you're in a field or in the country—our ridings have recreational areas that are tens of thousands of kilometres—there is no means for people to reach emergency services. Would you find that to be true?

Mr. William Amos:

In fact, there are areas in the riding of Pontiac where a fixed wireline service is not available, or circumstances where the fixed wireline service, due to a falling tree or otherwise, has been cut off. Yes, it does create a public safety issue, because many, many seniors in my riding don't have a cellphone. Even if they wanted one, they wouldn't have access to the cellphone service.

Absolutely there are issues, and I think it's important to address these in their totality, but to my mind, the conversation is headed mostly to the access to cellular. That's how people will most often solve the predicament they may find themselves in. I can't tell you the number of times I've had constituents come to me to say, “My car broke down. I was between location X and location Y. There was no cellphone service. I thought I was going to die.” That is a run-of-the-mill conversation in the Pontiac. In this day and age, I think we have a mature enough and wealthy enough society to address these issues if we focus on them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To your point, though, there's been a lot of confusion in the public about what motion 208 is about, because it talks about “wireless” without being too specific. In your view, this is about cellphone service, and not about broadband Internet to the same extent. This is about making sure that we can reach emergency services, that emergency services can reach each other, and that the cellphone signal we need on our back roads is available to us.

Mr. William Amos:

That's correct. My greatest concern was the cellphone aspect. In M-208, where I refer to wireless, the intention is to mean cellphone, meaning mobile wireless.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When I was younger, we had cellphone service in the Laurentians through analog. When we switched to digital, we lost a lot of that service. Did you have the same experience?

Mr. William Amos:

That's going back a ways.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We had a cellphone in the car in 1985, and it was worth as much as the car, but it worked, which is not the case today. In most of my area, there is no signal, and it's becoming a very serious problem for us. I'm very happy to encourage this, and I'm glad you brought it forward. I'm running out of time here.

Where have the market forces been? We're always hearing from some people that market forces can fix everything. Why have market forces not solved these problems for us?

Mr. William Amos:

Since the advent of the Internet as a mainstream technology and wireless mobile coming in to a greater extent, the decision in the early 1990s to leave the development of this infrastructure to the private sector and not to nationalize it has had consequences.

Where the return on investment for the private sector is insufficient in a large area where the density of population is low, it's clear that's going to bring about a particular result. We see it all across rural Canada: patchiness, portions where there's coverage, and portions where there's not. That unreliability of coverage has serious impacts, both on the public security side but also on the economic development side.

Nowadays, prospective homebuyers in your riding, as well as mine and so many others, will make decisions premised on a full range of factors, including whether there is good Internet and cellphone coverage. It has serious ramifications both on a public safety and an economic and sustainable growth basis. I think we need to address those.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Amos, thank you for being here.

We also consider it important to establish a better connectivity system in Canada. This is a major problem for many regions, particularly in rural areas. I am glad a Liberal member is concerned about rural areas. The receptivity was not the same when we did a study on another subject. This current receptivity will please my colleagues who live in very remote rural areas and who are facing the same problem.

You must have met with the Canadian Communication Systems Alliance, which represents telephone companies and Internet service providers in the regions. Every year, they come to us and remind us that they have to use Bell Canada or Telus towers to transmit their signals and that this is a problem. In the end, it is always about revenues, complications and agreements.

Has this factor been assessed in order to facilitate things for those companies that are already in place?

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you for the question.

In fact, the executive director of the CCSA, Mr. Jay Thomson, is a Pontiac citizen. I met him several times.

This question has been important for some years now. All regulation and competition between large and smaller companies that would like to enter the market remains a challenge. Indeed, large companies have made significant investments and want to ensure their performance. Smaller players, on the other hand, have the right to access these infrastructures, under the Telecommunications Act, and want to use them. Ensuring competition and access as objectives in the act remains a challenge for the CRTC.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

If we start at the beginning, the motion raises important questions. I don't know anything about your meetings with the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, but have you ever considered the possibility of deregulating or regulating the sector otherwise? If companies are already established across the country and are just waiting for the opportunity to connect, this may be the first effort to make before going any further and saying that the government should invest hundreds of millions of dollars.

Mr. William Amos:

There are several aspects to be assessed, starting with the success of the Telecommunications Act in achieving its objectives of competition and access, among others. There is also a need to assess the investments and tax incentives put in place in this area by successive federal governments. It would be worthwhile to focus on these two elements in all cases.

I would like to mention, however, that the investments that were made by the previous Conservative government—your government—in successive budgets were not enough to solve the problem.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Fine.

With regard to public safety, have you assessed the current situation in Canada? Police and ambulance services already have autonomous communication systems and can therefore remain in contact during an emergency. Have you taken this into account? I believe your goal is to allow all citizens to use their phones anywhere. However, when it comes to public safety, do you know if we are well equipped?

(1555)

Mr. William Amos:

In general, these emergency services are well equipped, but there are still gaps. I had discussions again this year with the Gracefield Fire Department, which was having communication difficulties. However, when I spoke to the Canadian Armed Forces in the aftermath of the 2019 floods, they told me that their system was very functional.

What we are seeing more and more in the age of digital infrastructure, social media and technology is that anyone can help anyone. Public safety is increasingly managed by individuals and their neighbours, in collaboration with public services. It is therefore essential that everyone have access to a cellular signal.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Have you done any research on satellite communications? The satellite phone already exists, although its use is very expensive. Have any companies already suggested ways to reduce these user costs and focus on satellite calls in some areas where 3G or LTE networks are not available? Has this possibility already been evaluated?

Mr. William Amos:

I invite the Parliamentary Secretary, Mr. Serré, to fill any gaps I may have in my answer.

Our investments in satellite communications in Budget 2019 are very significant and this approach could prove to be one of the best solutions for remote and other communities that are hard to reach using fibre optics or cellular towers.

In terms of costs and whether this is the best way to cover the whole country, I am not an expert in this field. That is why I initiated this discussion both in the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology and in this committee. I can tell you that Telesat Canada appeared before the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology last week and its testimony was greatly appreciated.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. Amos, thank you for being here and for bringing this motion forward.

So long as we're talking about the content of different motions, I'd like to know something, because I'm intrigued. Why was a study commissioned at the outset? I listened to the discussions with Mr. Graham and Mr. Paul-Hus. For your part, you talked about the work of mayors, councillors or political leaders in your community. So there seems to be a clear consensus on the problem.

Rather than asking for further study by a parliamentary committee, why not introduce a motion or bill requiring the government to make changes and take action on this issue? Such a motion would have identified the problem and the House would have asked the government to do something about it. This would have had more impact, especially since there are only about ten days left in the current parliamentary session.

Mr. William Amos:

First, the motion was introduced in November 2018, before the 2019 budget. The Connect to Innovate program, the largest rural Internet investment program in Canadian history, was already in place. The motion and other political factors have put very constructive pressure on our government and have led to several new investments. As I mentioned, it plans to invest $1.7 billion in the Universal Broadband Fund, and make other investments in satellite technology and spectrum-related public policy measures. A whole series of measures have been taken. Given the slowness of the parliamentary process—

(1600)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Allow me to interrupt you.

Regarding the municipal actors in our ridings, I regularly speak with Mr. Jacques Ladouceur, who is the mayor of Richelieu as well as the reeve of the Rouville RCM. If there is not much traffic, it will take you 35 or 40 minutes to get from Richelieu to Montreal. It's not very far away. It is a constituency with rural areas, but it is not necessarily a rural constituency.

M. Ladouceur told me that you can throw all the money you want out the window, but—you recognize this in part in your motion—the CRTC relies on certain rules to assess the quality of the Internet connection. I am not an expert in this field and I rely, as we all do, on local actors who know about it. The CRTC measures the quality of the Internet connection in a certain way. If there is a place on the map where there is a certain band quality, the area is not considered a priority. Thirty-five minutes from Montreal, it is conceivable that we could find a house on one range that has a good quality band, but this is not the case for the other houses, and all of them are penalized.

I thank the minister for demonstrating an openness to speak to municipal officials in my riding. The mayors in my riding recognize the problem and I have no doubt that it is the same in yours.

Why limit ourselves to saying that the government has made investments and that we will look into the matter? Why didn't you approach this more forcefully? Money is all well and good, but you need something else. You and the elected municipal officials in your riding have identified the problem. Why don't you send a message to the House that something more needs to be done, such as changing the CRTC rules?

Mr. William Amos:

I believe that the process leading to these changes—whether legislative, regulatory or fiscal—has begun. The Telecommunications Act is being reformed. I am sure that this will be the subject of important discussions during this election period and following the election. This is the right time to present concrete solutions.

Yes, we can go directly to the CRTC, and that's what we did last week. Commission representatives appeared before the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology to discuss regulatory issues and its investments. Indeed, the CRTC has a $750 million fund that comes solely from telecommunications companies and not directly from taxpayers. All these discussions are taking place right now, but there is no easy solution. That is the issue. That is why I asked for these two studies. We cannot take certain things for granted. As a voter, I would like a political party to propose not one solution, but a range of solutions, whether it involves the spectrum, the tax aspect, investments or regulation.

Do we now have all the solutions to these problems? I don't think so. That is why I am opening the discussion. I believe in the potential of 338 members of Parliament who care about rural Canada.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

My last question is similar to the one Mr. Graham asked earlier. Two studies in tandem, we don't often see that. As for public safety, I appreciate that you don't want it to be an afterthought.

That being said, are there any specific actors we should talk to? We are talking about floods, and, in particular, various equipment. What could the committee focus on to be useful in this regard? The preamble largely deals with economic and regulatory aspects, but what do you see for us?

(1605)

The Chair:

May I ask you to answer quickly, please?

Mr. William Amos:

I am thinking here of firefighters' associations, police departments, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and other municipal groups, as well as mayors of small communities across Canada. We must listen to Canadians. To know their stories and experiences is to know the reality. I find that Parliament sometimes lacks representation from small communities. I am also thinking of the security services across the country. These were some suggestions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Picard, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Mr. Amos, you said that your fellow citizens were eager to see the establishment of a cellular telephony infrastructure. We can understand them.

How realistic are your fellow citizens about how long it will take to set up this system? This will not happen in a day or a week.

Mr. William Amos:

Honestly, this is the most difficult aspect of our work and, in this case, of mine. I know that by advocating for digital infrastructure solutions, I am open to criticism. That's for sure. People want solutions, but would have wanted them yesterday. It is not in two or three months and even less in two or three years that they want an Internet connection. They would have wanted it yesterday, and rightly so. It will be very difficult for me to get my electorate to fully consider how long it will take. However, we must start at the beginning and address this problem. For this reason, I am very pleased with the investments our government is making. With more than $5 billion over a decade, this is a serious investment.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Beyond the need, there is also the question of social acceptability. People want to have the infrastructure as soon as possible, but suffer from the "not in my backyard" syndrome.

I'll give you an example. I live 25 minutes from Montreal, between Montreal and my colleague Mr. Dubé's riding. Past the mountain, where I live, in what is an urban suburb, the cellular signal is weak or non-existent. So people who come to my house can't use their cell phones. Steps have been taken to address this very real problem, and cell phone towers will be erected in my riding and in Mr. Dubé's riding. Obviously, there will always be cases where the tower will not be in the right place, but these towers are needed. People want solutions, but they don't want the equipment they require.

What is the perception of people in your riding?

Mr. William Amos:

This kind of debate will always be ongoing. In rural areas, the discussion may be less difficult because the vast majority of my fellow citizens are in favour of these towers and accept this kind of compromise.

This question is not a new one. This is a concern that both the CRTC and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada have been trying to manage for years. The whole dynamic of "not in my backyard" is important and you have to manage these aspects.

The vast majority of public safety concerns arising from the lack of mobile phone services are raised in small communities far from large urban centres. Therefore, the question of not wanting a tower in your backyard is less relevant. This concern certainly remains, but it is less important.

(1610)

Mr. Michel Picard:

When it comes to infrastructure planning, setting the right priorities is key. In terms of economic drivers, cell phone and Internet service is a priority. It enables economic growth. In fact, it's a must-have. In order to do business, people need a cell phone and Internet access, without which, success is merely wishful thinking. This priority benefits the community as a whole.

We are talking about public safety, however, and the issue is whether the infrastructure to address the social, business and economic concerns raised should include bandwidth for the exclusive use of first responders in the event of a disaster, such as in the north. I remember what happened with the Fort McMurray fires. Police and firefighters weren't using the same bandwidth to communicate with one another, and, in some cases, they weren't able to communicate at all. In situations like that, having dedicated lines and matching infrastructure is necessary.

How, then, should requirements be prioritized when implementing the infrastructure?

Mr. William Amos:

That's a great question, and it's precisely why I'd like the committee to conduct a detailed study. I can tell you how I think the available spectrum should be divvied up between emergency responders and the public, but, as the member for Pontiac, I'm no expert. Although very pertinent, it's not a question I'm qualified to answer.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do we have the means, the capacity and the authority to make companies invest in expanding their networks? Eventually, it comes down to the return on investment. In all likelihood, companies haven't set up infrastructure in rural areas because the critical mass needed to generate a return on investment isn't there.

Mr. William Amos:

Through the CRTC, the government requires telecommunications companies to invest in digital infrastructure. Two years ago, the government announced $750 million in funding over five years for that purpose, and the CRTC began receiving the first applications a week ago. The funding comes directly from the telecommunications companies.

There's a central question that needs answering, and I certainly hope the CRTC gives it some thought. Is $750 million over five years sufficient? Should it be more? The fund was announced in December 2016. Following the 2019 budget, investments in the area have gone up considerably. [English]

The Chair:

It works better when the witness pays attention to the chair.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Amos, for being here today.

You won't get any argument from me or anyone in my riding about the need for rural infrastructure and connectivity. My riding is about 30,000 square kilometres and most of it is a rural area that struggles with connectivity issues from end to end.

As one example, one of the counties had asked for $2 million from the connect to innovate funding stream that came out a year and a half or so ago, for the beginning sections of a broadband plan for their region to provide a lot of necessary services to their constituents. They got $200,000 of their $2-million ask out of the $500 million that was rolled out across the country. That was a disappointment to them and to me, but it also put them in the very tough spot of how to move forward with one-tenth of what their ask was. How do you get things done?

I know you weren't here for this, but if you compare that with the rural crime study we just did, one of the things we looked at through this rural crime study was.... It was all about public safety and there are many areas where people couldn't access law enforcement through telephone service, 911, because there wasn't the infrastructure in place to do that.

Right now some of the people in rural Canada whom I've chatted with since that study on rural crime are wondering whether.... Now we're talking about doing digital infrastructure for rural Canada, but we couldn't give the same attention to crime and it's about public safety. They're wondering about how credible the ability to roll this out actually is.

I guess my question for you, sir, is this. Beyond the connect to innovate money that's been set aside for this and has been rolled out, is there any thought to or do you have any idea of whether the infrastructure bank that's been set up by this government...or how much of that has been rolled out to rural Internet projects?

(1615)

Mr. William Amos:

Maybe I'll start with the beginning of your question. You represent a riding of 30,000 square kilometres. Pontiac is 77,000 square kilometres. We're talking about big ridings here with great needs. All of our communities across rural Canada are playing catch-up. That is the simple reality. I'm not saying this to be partisan, but it is a simple fact that the previous Harper administration did not invest sufficiently in this, and that put us behind the eight ball.

We're now coming up with government programs that put carrots in front of telecommunications companies, that create incentives to invest more; and the connect to innovate program has had a number of major successes. The funding is rolling out presently, but I think there's a recognition that we need to do so much more because of situations like the one you're pointing out. I'm sure there is more than $200,000 worth of Internet infrastructure needs in your region, and we need to get to that point. Budget 2019 is really going to help us get there.

With respect to the Infrastructure Bank, the budget was quite clear that it would be contemplated as a source of financing. I'm looking forward to Minister Bernadette Jordan, our Minister of Rural Economic Development, coming forward with a plan for a rural economic development strategy, and to her collaboration with our Minister of Infrastructure, François-Philippe Champagne, to bring forth a plan to show us how more capital can be brought to bear, because at the end of the day, it is going to be about incentivizing private sector companies or—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Is that the way forward, to get more of a P3 approach to the whole concept of this?

Mr. William Amos:

I think it's part of the solution, but I don't think it's the whole solution, because there are going to circumstances where the private sector determines that it doesn't want to invest in particular corners and there are going to be little pockets that are left alone. We have to enable regional governments or non-profits to work together to fill those gaps. That's why this is going to take time, because there's going to be a process in which companies evaluate where they want to take advantage of these incentives and to invest, and then we're going to be doing gap analysis, and then going back in and doing more work. I think this is going to be an iterative process.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Ms. Sahota, you have five minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I've given my time over to David. He has a keen interest in this subject, so I think it's only fair.

An hon. member: He has 25 more questions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have as many as normal.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

(1620)

[Translation]

Mr. Amos, one of the bases of Quebec's forest fire protection agency—the Société de protection des forêts contre le feu, or SOPFEU—is located in your riding, in Maniwaki. Last weekend, an event was held for aviation enthusiasts, Rendez-vous aérien. It was no doubt great fun. I wish I could've been there.

The SOPFEU has a low-frequency radio service across all of Quebec. It works throughout southern Quebec, at 55° or 56° north latitude. The cell phone service is entirely high-frequency, beginning at 400 MHz and even higher.

Since you've been in Parliament, have any telecommunications companies come to you with creative solutions outside the box? The focus is always on 5G and 24 GHz. You and I will agree that 24 GHz service would be tough to implement. Have any companies ever approached you with creative solutions?

Mr. William Amos:

I must admit I'm no expert. I'm not aware of any companies providing solutions like that. I agree with what you said and with the premise of your question.

Yesterday, I had a chance to meet some people from the SOPFEU. They put on the Rendez-vous aérien event in Maniwaki, which I was delighted to attend. In the Gatineau valley, these people are heralded as heroes. They are Canadian heroes to us. I have no doubt they'll be present in Alberta and British Columbia this summer, and certainly in Quebec.

Coming back to your question, I wonder what innovative solutions would make it possible to access the various bands of the spectrum. I don't know the answer. It goes back to what Mr. Dubé said about the reason for undertaking a study like this. It can't be assumed that politicians will have the answers to technical questions. We need engineers and entrepreneurs to come up with different options so that, together, we can recommend the most promising and cost-effective solution.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You and Mr. Dubé were discussing potential witnesses earlier. You mentioned firefighters associations as well as the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, among others.

Should we be looking to telecommunications companies for creative solutions? I'm talking about non-traditional players, outside the Bells and Teluses. Should we study the whole issue of spectrum, as you mentioned, to figure out whether the current system is meeting regional needs?

Mr. William Amos:

Absolutely. Those are all key questions.

Yes, the telecommunications sector is home to a range of minor players. In the Pontiac, for instance, PioneerWireless holds tremendous potential, but it can be harder for small companies to access government programs. They no doubt have some ideas to suggest. I would be grateful to the committee if it were to examine the way telecommunications companies, big and small, view public safety and their role in the solutions process.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With this Parliament drawing to a close, we are running out of time. It'll basically be over next week.

If you could tell the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security of the 43rd Parliament something, what would it be?

Mr. William Amos:

I would start by stressing how important the issue is. Then, I would point out the need for a non-partisan approach given that there is unanimous agreement on the problem. In Canada, we do better when we tackle major issues in a non-partisan way. This issue is highly complex. It's way too easy to point fingers, assign blame and get caught up in politics. That's not what the constituents in my riding or rural Canadians, in general, need. Finally, I think it would be very helpful for the committee to recommend that the next Parliament revisit the issue. That would signal the possibility of the next Parliament taking up the issue even though we may not have time to examine it in depth.

(1625)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Eglinski, go ahead for five minutes, please.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I want to thank the presenter, Mr. Amos, for presenting this. As my counterpart said here, I'm very much in favour of trying to connect this country of ours to have cell coverage.

I notice that part (iii) of the text of your motion says: (iii) continue to work with telecommunication companies, provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities and relevant emergency response organizations

That's the part of this that kind of interests me. Most provinces have set up an emergency communications program that interconnects the ambulance service, police service and fire service. That has been in place for many years across most of the country that I'm aware of.

Have you talked to or approached the provincial governments, municipal governments or territorial counterparts to see what part they thought we should play? As I see it, it cannot be done by industry alone. It is not going to give us that connectivity on its own.

Your riding is about the same size as mine, Mr. Amos. I think I have about as much uninhabited land and about the same number of municipalities and counties. I have 11 counties and they're all fighting independently to try to get this service, but it's not profitable for industry. I think there is a need for our counties, our provinces, our federal government and industry to communicate.

I'm wondering if you have had any communications within your area as to where they think we should fit in. It's a big dollar amount. The money you mentioned—the $750 million—is just scratching the surface if we're going to give Canada equal coverage from one end to the other. It's going to be in the billions. Industry has told us that realistically it's probably more like $5 billion to $7 billion to connect Canada.

I wonder if you would comment on that.

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you for your question, and I would like to thank you also for being such a great colleague. We've worked together on the environment committee, and during our trip out west we had the pleasure of enjoying a little portion of your very special and very beautiful riding. I won't forget that.

You've asked about the role of the provincial governments and what my experience has been on that front as we try to amass the funding required to get to a multi-billion dollar solution. I think you're right. I've heard different numbers; I've heard the $15 billion figure bandied about.

Regardless of that, I think one of the things that has changed since our election in 2015 is a willingness of the provinces to engage in a more serious fashion with more serious provincial investments. I can speak for the situation in Quebec, where the connect to innovate program was matched by provincial funds. In the Pontiac, I've had the opportunity to announce over $20 million in new high-speed Internet funding. All of the federal contributions were matched by provincial contributions. I'd say roughly about a bit north of 50% of the total of that $20 million was federal and provincial investments.

I think we're turning a bit of a corner in the sense that despite the fact that the jurisdiction around telecommunications is clearly understood to be federal, there's a recognition that the fiscal responsibility is simply too large for one level of government to bear.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

If I'm hearing you correctly, in that innovation fund, I believe we gave Quebec almost $160 million. So did Quebec also invest $161 million in the last four years?

(1630)

Mr. William Amos:

I believe it was at least that. It may even have invested a little more. Perhaps Mr. Graham would have exact figures by memory. I don't have those by memory, but I'm sure I could come back with them.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Do you know if any of your counties have invested? I believe you have a very similar system to what I have back home, where you have a number of large counties. Are they looking at investing? Have you talked to them about that?

Mr. William Amos:

Absolutely. In fact, the riding of Pontiac has three regional municipal governments, each with roughly 15 municipalities within them. Two of those regional municipal governments partnered together and brought a submission forward and submitted it to the connect to innovate program. In the end, their project wasn't the one that was chosen, but it does go to show that this is where the projects are going to be coming from, not just from the major telecommunications companies but also from municipal governments working with small service providers, working with consultants who are advising them. This is one of the challenges that we're looking to help them with.

The Chair:

Ms. Dabrusin, you have five minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll give my time to Mr. Graham.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have another five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take it. Yes.[Translation]

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In the past, private companies didn't invest in digital infrastructure without some type of federal, provincial or other source of funding. You just said that Quebec funded a large chunk of the Internet service within its borders. I believe it was much more than 50% of the federal and provincial funding that came from Quebec. The province made a tremendous contribution.

What can be done to get around companies' refusal to invest before they receive government funding? Is the answer to build digital infrastructure that is entirely publicly owned?

Mr. William Amos:

Some companies would certainly argue that nationalizing the infrastructure is the way to go. I don't agree because that would be too costly for taxpayers. Taxpayers would have a very hard time covering the billions upon billions that have already been invested. However, the goal is definitely to prevent situations where investments aren't made unless government funding has been granted.

That said, we all realize how important the issue is. As I said in response to Mr. Eglinski's question, some competition is already happening. Municipal and regional governments, often in partnership with small companies, are competing with the major telecommunications players. I think it's important to ensure the competition is balanced when it comes to regional governments, small players and major companies. Of course, they are all looking for public money, whether it comes from the federal government, the CRTC, the province or some other source.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Under the connect to innovate program, a company receiving federal funding has to provide public access to the system. Might a similar requirement be applied to cell phone service, if the federal or provincial government helped to build towers and the system were more accessible than required by the CRTC? Conversely, would that be even more detrimental to investment?

Telecommunications companies such as Bell, Rogers and Telus have said setting up towers isn't worthwhile because a company that doesn't have a tower jumps onto their network right away.

What is the right balance between open access and a monopoly on investment?

Mr. William Amos:

That's a highly complex issue that the CRTC is looking into. As a politician and someone who is by no means an expert, I'm hesitant to say how the commission should go about finding that balance. Technical and economic considerations are equally important in coming up with the answer. A balance is clearly needed. Canadians benefit from greater competition, but, at the same time, companies need incentives to invest in fixed infrastructure, in other words, towers and fibre optics.

Our government is trying to find that balance with a directive that encourages companies to lower prices. It is asking the CRTC to move in that direction, but it has to provide incentives, whether through the connect to innovate program or other initiatives. Incentives are needed to give the private sector a reason to invest capital in infrastructure.

(1635)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Amos, if I wanted to digitally disappear, would I move to Pontiac?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes, we can arrange that in Ottawa.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Yes, I know. There is a certain element on this committee that would prefer that.

Mr. William Amos:

Well, I think you might start by speaking to your social media adviser. He could eliminate your accounts, and that would cause a degree of disappearance.

No, in the Pontiac, you don't disappear. In fact, there are many, many areas of the riding of Pontiac that are well covered. In fact, Pontiac, as a riding, starts with the northern suburbs of Gatineau, where there is 100% coverage, as one would expect in any major city in Canada, but as soon as you go 20 minutes outside of Gatineau, that's not—

The Chair:

So it is possible that I could digitally disappear 20 minutes outside of Gatineau.

Mr. William Amos:

You can virtually disappear, but not within 20 minutes. You'd have to go a bit farther than that. You could—

The Chair:

This is a public safety/public security committee, and what we look at are people who are not necessarily working in the public interest, shall we say. Is there any group, or are there any groups, of people who would prefer to digitally disappear, if you will, and who in turn would create a public safety issue? I'm thinking particularly of some of the people we might have heard of in our previous study on rural crime, but is there a group that we're not thinking about that does actually create security issues?

Mr. William Amos:

Just so I can be sure that I've understood the question clearly, are you asking if there's a public interest in maintaining digital obscurity to be set aside from the predominant digital culture that we should be protecting?

The Chair: Yes.

Mr. William Amos: If there is one, they're not knocking at my doors regularly in the Pontiac—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. William Amos: —and the mayors and municipal councillors who represent them are not knocking on my door requesting that assistance. It is certainly quite possible in my riding to live off the grid with a reclusive lifestyle, to enjoy the benefits of the national capital and have access to an international airport and a modern transportation system and all of the amenities of urban life on a day-to-day basis and still live in the woods.

The Chair:

Does anybody actively oppose your motion?

Mr. William Amos:

Actually, there are certain individuals who have raised health concerns about cell tower frequencies. That issue is still the subject of scientific inquiry, and I think that should continue. It's important that we have that kind of research being done. They would be in the minority, the very small minority.

The Chair:

I have a final question. A lot of these rural communities are in pretty vulnerable states. There was an article a week or two ago about Huawei offering access at an inexpensive rate. That has been a subject of this committee's study over the last number of months. Do you have any opinion with respect to Huawei's offering services at supremely discounted rates to rural communities?

(1640)

Mr. William Amos:

My sense is that there are many companies that offer the technologies that Huawei offers, such as Nokia and Ericsson, to name just a couple. The national security considerations in relation to Huawei are being undertaken by our government at the highest levels. I have every faith that it will be done appropriately. I trust that process.

No matter what transpires on that ledger, we will have access in Canada to the necessary 5G technologies to build out digital infrastructure for all of rural Canada. It's just a question of which company would provide those technologies and services.

The Chair:

Okay. With that, on behalf of the committee, I want to thank you for your appearance here.

We will now adjourn.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Distingués collègues, il est 15 h 30; je constate que nous avons le quorum, et que M. Amos est présent.

Bienvenue devant le Comité, monsieur Amos.

Le Comité étudie la motion M-208 sur les infrastructures numériques en milieu rural, proposée par M. Amos, député de Pontiac.

Si vous voulez bien enchaîner avec votre déclaration, monsieur Amos, vous avez 10 minutes.

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président, de même qu'à tous les membres du Comité.[Français]

Je vous remercie de m'accorder ce moment pour discuter de ce qui représente [difficultés techniques] pour mes concitoyens du Pontiac, mais aussi pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes partout au pays. Que ce soit en région rurale ou urbaine, c'est un enjeu très important.[Traduction]

Je crois que le vote unanime en faveur de la motion témoigne clairement de l'importance de cet enjeu. Je remercie donc chacun d'entre vous, de même que vos collègues, pour votre soutien, car je crois que le vote sur la motion M-208 était rassembleur.

Quand les Canadiens en région urbaine constatent à quel point leurs concitoyens en région rurale ont du mal à obtenir ce que l'on considère aujourd'hui comme des services de télécommunications de base, soit un bon accès au réseau cellulaire et Internet haute vitesse, je crois que c'est le genre d'enjeux qui unifient le pays parce que tout le monde peut comprendre nos difficultés.

Je pense qu'il est aujourd'hui accepté qu'il faut rattraper le temps perdu en milieu rural au Canada et combler le fossé numérique. Depuis trop d'années maintenant, les compagnies privées du secteur des télécommunications négligent les investissements dans des infrastructures numériques pourtant nécessaires. À l'époque, les gouvernements n'étaient pas en mesure de comprendre la nécessité de corriger la tendance du marché.

D'une certaine façon, je me sens privilégié d'avoir pu proposer cette motion, car j'avais l'impression de simplement affirmer une évidence: pour assurer sa sécurité, un Canadien dans le Nord de l'Alberta ou dans les terres intérieures de la Colombie-Britannique qui fait face à un grave incendie de forêt, tout comme un Canadien au Nouveau-Brunswick, au Québec ou en Ontario confronté à des inondations, a le droit d'avoir accès aux infrastructures numériques que la majorité des Canadiens tiennent pour acquises.

Comme le Comité le sait très bien, la motion portait sur deux études, dont une sur les aspects économiques et réglementaires des infrastructures numériques. Ce processus avance rondement au sein du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Un certain nombre de témoins ont été entendus, et les travaux se poursuivent rapidement. J'ai hâte d'en connaître les conclusions. J'ai eu l'occasion de participer aux travaux du Comité et je l'en remercie.

Je suis particulièrement heureux, monsieur le président, de constater que votre comité a jugé bon d'aller de l'avant, même si les interactions sur la question doivent être brèves, car les Canadiens de partout au pays savent qu'il est temps d'adopter des mesures qui confirment le rôle des infrastructures numériques en matière de sécurité publique.

J'essaie constamment de me faire le porte-parole des maires des petites collectivités de ma circonscription, comme David Rochon, qui est maire de Waltham, au Québec. Waltham se trouve à environ 1 h 45 de route de la Colline du Parlement. Une fois de l'autre côté du pont des Chaudières ou du Portage, on file sur la route 148. Il suffit de traverser à Gatineau et de suivre la route 148 en direction ouest. Vous ne pouvez pas vous tromper. C'est juste en face de Pembroke.

Dans cette collectivité, il n'y a pas de réseau cellulaire. Pour les quelque 300 âmes qui vivent là, cela devient extrêmement frustrant, un sentiment tout à fait justifié quand on sait que ces personnes viennent de connaître des inondations pour la deuxième fois en trois ans. Je partage leur frustration, et je me fais leur porte-parole, ici, aujourd'hui. Je suis là strictement pour parler au nom d'un groupe de maires de petites collectivités.

Je sais qu'un très grand nombre de maires à l'échelle du pays joignent leur voix à celle de leurs collègues du Pontiac. C'est pour cette raison que la Fédération canadienne des municipalités a appuyé la motion M-208, car elle est, elle aussi, à l'écoute de ces maires. C'est aussi pour cette raison que le Caucus des municipalités locales de l'Union des municipalités du Québec a appuyé cette motion, car il entend lui aussi les mêmes voix.[Français]

Il nous incombe d'aborder cet enjeu de façon directe. Je suis très heureux de voir que, depuis que la motion M-208 a été déposée devant la Chambre des communes, l'infrastructure numérique a connu un important succès, et ce, grâce au budget de 2019. Les investissements sont historiques, très concrets et très ciblés.

L'objectif est que l'ensemble du Canada ait accès à Internet à haute vitesse d'ici 2030. On vise une cible de 95 % pour 2025. Notre gouvernement est le premier à établir ce genre de cibles et à investir de telles sommes. Dans le passé, on parlait d'à peine quelques centaines de millions de dollars alors que, maintenant, il s'agit de milliards de dollars. L'enjeu est reconnu. Pour un gouvernement, cette reconnaissance passe avant tout par son budget. Notre gouvernement l'a reconnu. J'apprécie vraiment beaucoup les gestes posés par notre gouvernement libéral.

En ce qui concerne les communications sans fil et cellulaires dans le contexte de la sécurité publique, on s'entend pour dire que, dans n'importe quelle situation d'urgence, on a besoin d'un téléphone cellulaire. C'est très utile pour gérer les urgences personnelles, mais ce l'est aussi pour les fonctionnaires, les maires, les conseillers et les conseillères qui sont sur le terrain et veulent aider leurs concitoyens. Ces personnes ont besoin d'accéder à un réseau cellulaire fiable pour pouvoir entrer en contact avec leurs concitoyens et leur venir en aide.

(1540)

[Traduction]

Je vois qu'il ne me reste que deux minutes. Je vais conclure plus rapidement que cela en vous disant simplement que j'estime important d'éviter les joutes oratoires sur le sujet. Les Canadiens méritent mieux que cela. J'ai pris connaissance de la motion de l'opposition qui doit être proposée aujourd'hui. Sans vouloir manquer de respect à qui que ce soit, cette motion ne dit rien de ce que notre gouvernement a accompli, mais est strictement axée sur les problèmes, sans proposer de solution. Dans le Pontiac, les gens veulent du concret. Ils veulent savoir de quelle façon ils vont accéder à un réseau cellulaire, et vite. Ils veulent leur connexion Internet haute vitesse et l'auraient voulue hier, pas dans deux ans. Je sais que tous les députés de circonscriptions rurales, qu'ils soient conservateurs, néo-démocrates, libéraux ou d'une autre affiliation, travaillent très dur, à leur façon, pour s'assurer que cela se concrétise. Je le fais aussi. Je suis donc très heureux aujourd'hui de pouvoir attirer votre attention tout spécialement sur les aspects liés à la sécurité publique.

Je souhaite également remercier les médias locaux et nationaux qui ont traité de cet enjeu et qui savent que, en cette ère de changements climatiques et de phénomènes météorologiques extrêmes, nous avons plus que jamais besoin de nos téléphones cellulaires; nous aurons aussi un besoin grandissant d'infrastructures numériques pour assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Amos.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous pour sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Amos, quand vous avez proposé la motion M-208, elle comportait deux volets. Un était à l'intention du comité de l'industrie, qui devait se pencher sur ces services, puis l'autre s'adressait au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, qui devait étudier ce qui relève de la sécurité publique. Souhaiteriez-vous expliquer un peu le raisonnement derrière votre idée de confier la tâche à deux comités?

M. William Amos:

J'étais d'avis qu'il y avait indéniablement des aspects économiques à cet enjeu. Il y a des questions relatives à la concurrence. D'autres, sur la nature du rendement du capital qu'on peut investir ou non en milieu rural au Canada. Ce sont des questions légitimes qui méritent, selon moi, une étude sérieuse. Le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes ou CRTC, à titre d'organe de réglementation indépendant, a des responsabilités distinctes conformément à la Loi sur les télécommunications. À bien des égards, ces obligations lui donnent passablement de latitude pour atteindre les objectifs de la loi en matière d'intérêt public.

Ces questions, qui sont à la fois réglementaires et économiques, vont ultimement nous aider à établir quel accès aux infrastructures numériques offrir aux régions rurales du pays. J'estimais donc qu'elles n'étaient pas nécessairement de la même nature, du moins pas tout à fait, que celle de la sécurité publique. Je craignais que, si l'étude était menée strictement par un comité, la sécurité publique ne devienne qu'une réflexion après coup. Et cela me semblait inapproprié. J'estimais que la sécurité publique serait l'un des arguments les plus importants en faveur d'investissements majeurs, des investissements qui sont nécessaires et que notre gouvernement a pris la décision de faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Fort bien.

Pour ce qui est de la sécurité publique, votre circonscription et la mienne ont connu de graves problèmes de répartition des services d'urgence. Vous l'avez déjà décrit par le menu. Quand une tornade frappe votre circonscription, que des inondations se déclarent dans nos circonscriptions, les services d'urgence doivent se rendre à l'hôtel de ville, coordonner leurs efforts, puis retourner sur le terrain. Pouvez-vous en parler? Est-ce le fondement de l'étude sur la sécurité publique?

(1545)

M. William Amos:

Pour Monsieur ou Madame Tout-le-Monde qui songe à ses proches, installés dans une petite localité, et aux interventions d'urgence provoquées par des phénomènes météorologiques extrêmes, je pense que c'est évident: demander à un représentant local de faire de 20 à 40 minutes de route de plus pour partir d'un site précis sur le terrain et revenir à l'hôtel de ville, d'où il doit faire les appels nécessaires en cas d'incendie, d'inondations, de tornade ou d'une autre catastrophe, c'est tout sauf efficace. Cela provoque des retards indus dans les interventions d'urgence.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans un même ordre d'idées, beaucoup de citoyens ont du mal à joindre le 9-1-1 parce qu'il n'y a plus de service téléphonique, plus de ligne fixe. Dans des circonscriptions comme les nôtres, où les aires de loisir couvrent des dizaines de milliers de kilomètres, si vous êtes en plein champ ou à la campagne, il n'est pas possible de joindre les services d'urgence. Êtes-vous de cet avis?

M. William Amos:

En fait, il y a des secteurs dans la circonscription de Pontiac où il n'y a pas de ligne fixe, d'autres où ce service est temporairement inaccessible en raison de la chute d'un arbre, par exemple. Oui, cela pose un risque pour la sécurité publique, car un très grand nombre d'aînés dans ma circonscription n'ont pas de téléphone cellulaire. Même s'ils en voulaient un, ils n'auraient pas accès au réseau cellulaire.

Il va sans dire qu'il y a des problèmes, et je crois qu'il est important d'y remédier en bloc, mais, à mon sens, la conversation est surtout axée sur l'accès au réseau cellulaire. C'est le plus souvent de cette façon que les gens remédient à une situation délicate. C'est incroyable le nombre de fois où des électeurs m'ont dit: « Ma voiture est tombée en panne. J'étais entre X et Y. Il n'y avait pas de réseau cellulaire. Je pensais que j'allais mourir. » C'est une conversation banale dans le Pontiac. À une époque comme la nôtre, je crois que, en tant que société, nous sommes assez riches et évolués pour remédier à ces problèmes. Il suffit de s'y mettre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela dit, pour revenir au réseau cellulaire, le public ne semble pas trop savoir sur quoi porte la motion M-208, parce qu'elle parle de télécommunications sans fil sans vraiment entrer dans les détails. De votre point de vue, elle porte sur le réseau cellulaire d'abord, puis sur le service Internet à large bande dans une moindre mesure. Elle vise essentiellement à assurer l'accès aux services d'urgence, la capacité des services d'urgence de communiquer entre eux et la présence du signal cellulaire dont nous avons besoin sur les routes secondaires.

M. William Amos:

C'est exact. Ma plus grande préoccupation était l'accès au réseau cellulaire. Dans la motion M-208, toutefois, où je parle de télécommunications sans fil, l'intention est de faire référence au cellulaire, c'est-à-dire aux services sans fil mobiles.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand j'étais jeune, nous avions un réseau cellulaire analogique dans les Laurentides. Quand nous sommes passés au numérique, nous avons perdu une bonne partie de ce réseau. Avez-vous connu une expérience semblable?

M. William Amos:

Voilà qui ne date pas d'hier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avions un cellulaire dans la voiture en 1985, et il valait autant que la voiture, mais il fonctionnait, ce qui n'est pas le cas aujourd'hui. Dans la majeure partie de ma région, il n'y a pas de signal, et c'est maintenant un grave problème pour nous. Je suis très heureux de soutenir cette motion, et que vous l'ayez proposée. Je n'ai presque plus de temps.

Pourquoi ne sent-on pas l'effet des lois du marché? Certains répètent que les lois du marché peuvent tout régler. Pourquoi n'ont-elles pas réglé ces problèmes pour nous?

M. William Amos:

Puisque Internet est aujourd'hui une technologie de masse et que les services mobiles sans fil se banalisent, la décision prise au début des années 1990 de laisser le secteur privé déployer cette infrastructure plutôt que de la nationaliser a eu des conséquences.

Quand le rendement sur le capital investi du secteur privé ne justifie pas sa présence dans une grande région où la densité de population est faible, le résultat est on ne peut plus prévisible, comme on le constate partout dans les régions rurales du pays: il y a fragmentation de la couverture, avec des zones couvertes et d'autres pas. Le manque de fiabilité de la couverture a de graves répercussions tant sur la sécurité publique que sur le développement économique.

De nos jours, les éventuels acheteurs d'une propriété dans votre circonscription, dans la mienne et dans bien d'autres, prennent leur décision en fonction d'une gamme complète de facteurs, y compris la qualité des services Internet et cellulaires. Cela a d'importantes conséquences pour la sécurité publique et une croissance économique durable. Je crois qu'il faut en tenir compte.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.[Français]

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Amos, je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

Nous considérons également qu'il est important d'établir un meilleur système de connectivité au Canada. C'est un problème majeur pour bon nombre de régions, particulièrement en milieu rural. Je suis content qu'un député libéral se préoccupe des régions rurales. La réceptivité n'a pas été la même lorsque nous avons fait une étude sur un autre sujet. La réceptivité que nous connaissons présentement fera plaisir à mes collègues qui vivent dans des régions rurales très éloignées et qui font face à ce même problème.

Vous avez sûrement rencontré les gens de la Canadian Communication Systems Alliance, qui représente les compagnies de téléphonie et les fournisseurs de services Internet dans les régions. Chaque année, ils viennent nous rencontrer et nous rappeler qu'ils doivent se servir des tours de Bell Canada ou de Telus pour transmettre leurs signaux et que cela constitue un problème. En fin de compte, il s'agit toujours de revenus, de complications et d'ententes.

Ce facteur a-t-il été évalué dans le but de faciliter les choses pour ces compagnies qui sont déjà en place?

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de la question.

En fait, le directeur général de la CCSA, M. Jay Thomson, est un citoyen de Pontiac. Je l'ai rencontré à plusieurs reprises.

Cette question est importante depuis quelques années déjà. Toute la réglementation et la concurrence entre les grandes compagnies et les plus petites qui voudraient entrer dans le marché demeurent un défi. En effet, les grandes compagnies ont fait des investissements importants et veulent s'assurer du rendement de ces derniers. De leur côté, les plus petits joueurs ont le droit d'accéder à ces infrastructures, en vertu de la Loi sur les télécommunications, et veulent s'en prévaloir. Assurer la concurrence et l'accès en tant qu'objectifs dans la Loi demeure un défi pour le CRTC.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Si nous commençons par le début, c'est que la motion soulève des questions importantes. Je ne sais rien des rencontres que vous avez eues avec le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, mais avez-vous déjà évalué la possibilité de déréglementer ou de réglementer autrement le secteur? Si des compagnies sont déjà implantées partout au pays et qu'elles n'attendent que la possibilité de se connecter, c'est peut-être le premier effort à mettre avant d'aller plus loin et de dire que le gouvernement devrait investir des centaines de millions de dollars.

M. William Amos:

Il y a plusieurs aspects à évaluer, à commencer par le succès de la Loi sur les télécommunications dans l'atteinte de ses objectifs de concurrence et d'accès, parmi d'autres. Il faut également évaluer les investissements et les incitatifs fiscaux mis en place dans ce domaine par les gouvernements fédéraux qui se sont succédé. Il vaudrait la peine de mettre l'accent sur ces deux éléments dans tous les cas.

Je voudrais cependant mentionner que les investissements qui ont été faits par le gouvernement conservateur précédent — votre gouvernement — dans ses budgets successifs n'ont pas suffi à régler le problème.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord.

En ce qui a trait à la sécurité publique, avez-vous fait une évaluation de la situation actuelle au Canada? Les corps policiers et ambulanciers ont déjà des systèmes de communication autonomes et peuvent donc demeurer en contact en situation d'urgence. En avez-vous tenu compte? Je crois que votre objectif est de permettre à tous les citoyens de se servir de leur téléphone n'importe où. Cependant, en matière de sécurité publique, savez-vous si nous sommes bien équipés?

(1555)

M. William Amos:

En général, ces services d'urgence sont bien équipés, mais il y a toujours des lacunes. J'ai eu des discussions encore cette année avec le service des incendies de Gracefield, lequel éprouvait des difficultés de communications. En revanche, lorsque j'ai parlé aux Forces armées canadiennes dans la foulée des inondations de 2019, elles m'ont indiqué que leur système était très fonctionnel.

Ce que nous constatons de plus en plus à l'ère des infrastructures numériques, des médias sociaux et de la technologie, c'est que n'importe qui peut venir en aide à n'importe qui. La sécurité publique est gérée de plus en plus par l'individu et par ses voisins, en collaboration avec les services publics. Il est donc essentiel que tout le monde ait accès à un signal cellulaire.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Avez-vous fait des recherches sur les communications par satellite? Le téléphone satellite existe déjà, bien que son utilisation soit très dispendieuse. Des entreprises ont-elles déjà suggéré des façons de diminuer ces coûts d'utilisation et de privilégier les appels par satellite dans certaines régions où les réseaux 3G ou LTE ne sont pas disponibles? Cette possibilité a-t-elle déjà été évaluée?

M. William Amos:

J'invite le secrétaire parlementaire, M. Serré, à combler tout oubli que je pourrais avoir dans ma réponse.

Nos investissements prévus dans le budget de 2019 pour les télécommunications par satellite sont très importants et cette approche pourrait s'avérer être l'une des meilleures solutions pour les communautés éloignées et difficiles à atteindre par fibre optique ou tour cellulaire.

Pour ce qui est des coûts et la question de savoir s'il s'agit de la meilleure façon de couvrir tout le pays, je ne suis pas expert dans ce domaine. C'est d'ailleurs pour cette raison que j'ai amorcé cette discussion tant au Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie qu'à ce comité-ci. Je peux vous dire que Telesat Canada a comparu devant le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie la semaine passée et que son témoignage a été fort apprécié.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Amos, je vous remercie de votre présence et d'avoir présenté cette motion.

Tant qu'à parler du contenu de différentes motions, j'aimerais savoir quelque chose, car je suis intrigué. Pourquoi, d'entrée de jeu, a-t-on demandé une étude? J'ai écouté les échanges avec MM. Graham et Paul-Hus. Pour votre part, vous avez parlé du travail des maires, des conseillers ou des leaders politiques dans votre communauté. Il semble donc y avoir un consensus clair sur le problème.

Plutôt que demander une autre étude à un comité parlementaire, pourquoi ne pas avoir présenté une motion ou un projet de loi exigeant du gouvernement de faire des changements et d'agir dans ce dossier? Une telle motion aurait cerné le problème et la Chambre aurait demandé au gouvernement d'agir en ce sens. Cela aurait eu plus de force, d'autant plus qu'il reste seulement une dizaine de jours à la session parlementaire actuelle.

M. William Amos:

En premier lieu, la motion a été soumise en novembre 2018, c'est-à-dire avant le budget de 2019. Il y avait déjà le programme Brancher pour innover, le plus important programme de l'histoire du Canada au chapitre des investissements dans l'Internet en milieu rural. La motion et d'autres facteurs politiques ont exercé des pressions très constructives sur notre gouvernement et l'ont amené à faire plusieurs nouveaux investissements. Comme je l'ai mentionné, il prévoit investir 1,7 milliard de dollars dans le Fonds pour la large bande universelle, d'autres investissements dans la technologie satellitaire et des mesures de politique publique relativement au spectre. Toute une série de mesures a été prise. Étant donné la lenteur du processus parlementaire...

(1600)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je me permets de vous interrompre.

Au sujet des acteurs municipaux dans nos circonscriptions, je parle régulièrement avec M. Jacques Ladouceur, qui est le maire de Richelieu ainsi que le préfet de la MRC de Rouville. S'il n'y a pas beaucoup de circulation, cela vous prendra 35 ou 40 minutes pour vous rendre de Richelieu à Montréal. Ce n'est pas très loin. C'est une circonscription où il y a des zones rurales, mais ce n'est pas forcément une circonscription rurale.

M. Ladouceur m'a dit qu'on peut lancer tout l'argent qu'on veut par la fenêtre, mais — vous le reconnaissez en partie dans votre motion — le CRTC se fonde sur certaines règles pour évaluer la qualité de la connexion Internet. Je ne suis pas un expert en la matière et je me fie, comme nous tous, aux acteurs locaux qui s'y connaissent. Le CRTC mesure la qualité de la connexion Internet d'une certaine façon. S'il y a un endroit sur la carte où il y a une certaine qualité de bande, la zone n'est pas considérée comme prioritaire. À 35 minutes de Montréal, il est concevable qu'on puisse trouver une maison dans un rang qui a une bande de bonne qualité, mais ce n'est pas le cas des autres maisons, et toutes ces dernières s'en trouvent pénalisées.

Je remercie la ministre de démontrer une ouverture à parler aux élus municipaux de ma circonscription. Les maires de ma circonscription reconnaissent le problème et je n'ai aucun doute que c'est la même chose dans la vôtre.

Pourquoi se limiter à dire que le gouvernement a fait des investissements et qu'on va se pencher sur la question? Pourquoi ne pas y avoir été avec plus de force? C'est bien beau, l'argent, mais il faut autre chose. Vous-même et les élus municipaux de votre circonscription avez cerné le problème. Pourquoi ne portez-vous pas le message à la Chambre qu'il faut faire quelque chose de plus, par exemple changer les règles du CRTC?

M. William Amos:

Je crois que le processus menant à ces changements — aussi bien législatifs que réglementaires ou fiscaux — est entamé. La Loi sur les télécommunications est en train d'être réformée. Je suis certain que cela va faire l'objet de discussions importantes en cette période électorale et à la suite de l'élection. C'est le moment opportun pour présenter des solutions concrètes.

Oui, nous pouvons nous adresser directement au CRTC et c'est ce que nous avons fait la semaine dernière. Des représentants du Conseil ont comparu devant le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie pour discuter des aspects réglementaires et de ses investissements. En effet, le CRTC a un fonds de 750 millions de dollars qui provient uniquement de compagnies de télécommunication et non des contribuables directement. Toutes ces discussions ont lieu présentement, mais il n'y a pas de solution facile. Voilà l'enjeu. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai demandé ces deux études. Nous ne pouvons pas considérer que certaines choses sont acquises. En tant qu'électeur, je voudrais qu'un parti politique me propose non pas une solution, mais une gamme de solutions, qu'il s'agisse du spectre, du côté fiscal des investissements ou de la réglementation.

Avons-nous maintenant toutes les pistes de solution pour remédier à ces problèmes? Je ne le crois pas. C'est pour cette raison que j'ouvre la discussion. Je crois au potentiel de 338 députés qui ont à cœur la ruralité canadienne.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ma dernière question rejoint celle qu'a posée M. Graham plus tôt. Deux études qui forment un tandem, on ne voit pas cela souvent. Pour ce qui est de la sécurité publique, j'apprécie que vous ne vouliez pas qu'il s'agisse d'une réflexion après coup.

Cela dit, y a-t-il des acteurs précis à qui nous devrions parler? Il est question des inondations et, notamment, des divers équipements. Sur quoi le Comité pourrait-il se pencher pour être utile en ce sens? Le préambule touche largement les aspects économiques et réglementaires, mais qu'envisagez-vous pour nous?

(1605)

Le président:

Répondez rapidement, s'il vous plaît.

M. William Amos:

Je pense ici à des associations de pompiers, à des services de police, à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités et aux autres regroupements municipaux ainsi qu'à des maires de petites collectivités situées d'un bout à l'autre du Canada. Il faut écouter les Canadiens. Connaître leurs histoires et leurs expériences, c'est connaître la réalité. Je trouve que la représentation des petites collectivités manque parfois au Parlement. Je pense aussi aux services de sécurité de l'ensemble du pays. C'était là quelques pistes.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Picard, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Monsieur Amos, vous disiez que vos concitoyens étaient impatients de voir l'établissement d'une infrastructure de téléphonie cellulaire. On peut les comprendre.

Quel est le degré de réalisme de vos concitoyens quant au temps que prendra la mise sur pied de ce système? Cela ne se fera ni en un jour ni en une semaine.

M. William Amos:

Honnêtement, c'est l'aspect le plus difficile de notre travail et, en l'occurrence, du mien. Je sais qu'en militant pour obtenir des solutions concernant l'infrastructure numérique, je m'expose aux critiques. C'est certain. Les gens veulent des solutions, mais les auraient voulues hier. Ce n'est pas dans deux ou trois mois et encore moins dans deux ou trois ans qu'ils veulent une connexion Internet. Ils l'auraient voulue hier, et avec raison. Il sera très difficile pour moi d'amener mon électorat à envisager entièrement le temps que cela va prendre. Pourtant, il faut commencer par le début et s'attaquer à ce problème. Pour cette raison, je suis très heureux des investissements que fait notre gouvernement. Plus de 5 milliards de dollars étalés sur une décennie, cela constitue un investissement sérieux.

M. Michel Picard:

Au-delà du besoin, il y a aussi la question de l'acceptabilité sociale. Les gens veulent avoir les infrastructures le plus rapidement possible, mais souffrent du syndrome du « pas dans ma cour ».

Je vous donne un exemple. Je demeure à 25 minutes de Montréal, entre cette ville et la circonscription de mon collègue M. Dubé. Du côté de la montagne où j'habite, dans ce qui est pourtant une banlieue urbaine, le signal cellulaire est faible, voire inexistant. Les gens qui viennent chez moi ne peuvent donc pas se servir de leur cellulaire. Des démarches ont été entreprises pour régler ce problème très réel, et des tours de téléphonie cellulaire vont être érigées dans ma circonscription et dans celle de M. Dubé. Évidemment, il y aura toujours des cas où la tour ne sera pas au bon endroit, mais il faut ces tours. Les gens veulent des solutions, mais ils ne veulent pas l'équipement qu'elles exigent.

Quelle est la perception des gens dans votre circonscription?

M. William Amos:

Ce genre de débat aura toujours cours. En milieu rural, la discussion est peut-être moins difficile du fait que la grande majorité de mes concitoyens sont en faveur de ces tours et acceptent ce genre de compromis.

Cette question n'est pas nouvelle. C'est une préoccupation que tentent de gérer tant le CRTC qu'Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada depuis des années. Toute la dynamique du « pas dans ma cour » est importante et il faut gérer ces aspects.

C'est dans de petites collectivités loin des grands centres urbains que sont soulevées la grande majorité des préoccupations de sécurité publique découlant du manque de services de téléphonie mobile. Par conséquent, la question de ne pas vouloir de tour dans son arrière-cour se pose moins. Il est sûr que cette préoccupation demeure, mais elle est moins importante.

(1610)

M. Michel Picard:

Quand on planifie la mise sur pied d'une infrastructure, il faut savoir établir des priorités. Or, la téléphonie cellulaire et l'Internet sont un vecteur économique prioritaire, un élément de croissance économique, voire une obligation. En effet, si l'on veut faire des affaires, il faut avoir un cellulaire et être branché à l'Internet. Sinon, il est illusoire d'espérer réussir. Cette priorité en est une dont bénéficie l'ensemble de la communauté.

Cependant, nous parlons ici de sécurité publique. La question est donc de savoir si, dans la planification, il faut consacrer une partie de nos efforts à répondre aux préoccupations sociales, commerciales, économiques ou industrielles tout en réservant une bande passante à l'usage exlusif des premiers répondants en cas de catastrophe, par exemple dans le Nord. Je me souviens notamment de ce qui s'était passé à Fort McMurray, où la police et les pompiers ne communiquaient pas entre eux sur la même bande et ne parvenaient parfois même pas à se parler. Dans pareil cas, il est nécessaire d'avoir des lignes dédiées et une infrastructure correspondante.

De quelle façon devrait-on alors établir les priorités lors de la mise sur pied?

M. William Amos:

C'est une très bonne question et c'est exactement la raison pour laquelle je souhaiterais que ce comité mène une étude approfondie. Je peux offrir mon avis sur la façon de partager le spectre disponible entre les services de sécurité et ceux offerts au grand public, mais le député de Pontiac n'est pas un expert en la matière. Je ne peux donc pas répondre à ce genre de question, pourtant très pertinente.

M. Michel Picard:

Avons-nous les moyens, la capacité et l'autorité d'imposer aux compagnies d'investir pour développer leurs réseaux? À un certain stade, cela soulève la question du rendement du capital investi. La raison pour laquelle on ne voit pas ces compagnies en milieu rural est probablement qu'il ne s'y trouve pas la masse critique nécessaire à ce rendement.

M. William Amos:

L'État impose aux compagnies de télécommunications d'investir dans l'infrastructure numérique par l'entremise du CRTC et a annoncé, il y a deux ans, un fonds de 750 millions de dollars sur cinq ans. Il y a une semaine, le CRTC a commencé à recevoir les premières soumissions et ces fonds proviennent directement des compagnies de télécommunications.

La question qu'il faut se poser, et je voudrais certainement que le CRTC y songe, est la suivante: cette somme de 750 millions de dollars sur cinq ans est-elle appropriée? Faudrait-il l'augmenter? Cet investissement a été annoncé en décembre 2016. Après le budget de 2019, les investissements dans ce domaine viennent d'augmenter de façon appréciable. [Traduction]

Le président:

Il est plus facile de respecter le déroulement de la séance quand le témoin tient compte de la présidence.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Amos, d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

Ce n'est pas moi, ni qui que ce soit dans ma circonscription, qui va vous contredire sur la nécessité d'une infrastructure en milieu rural et d'une meilleure connectivité. Ma circonscription couvre environ 30 000 kilomètres carrés et est principalement rurale; les problèmes de connectivité y sont courants, partout sur le territoire.

Par exemple, un comté a demandé 2 millions de dollars au programme Brancher pour innover qui a été lancé il y a un an et demi; il souhaitait ainsi mettre en place les premiers jalons d'un plan de services Internet à large bande dans la région afin de fournir bon nombre des services dont ses résidants ont besoin. Sur les 500 millions de dollars versés à l'échelle du pays, le comté a reçu 200 000 $ des 2 millions demandés. Les responsables et moi étions certes déçus, mais cela les place aussi dans une position très délicate où ils doivent déterminer comment ils peuvent aller de l'avant avec le dixième des fonds demandés. Comment peuvent-ils faire le travail qui s'impose?

Je sais que vous n'y avez pas participé, mais si vous comparez cet enjeu à l'étude sur la criminalité en milieu rural au Canada que nous venons de faire, l'une des choses que nous avons étudiées au cours de ces travaux était... C'était la sécurité publique, et il y a beaucoup d'endroits où les gens ne peuvent pas joindre les forces de l'ordre parce qu'ils n'ont pas accès au 9-1-1, et c'est parce que l'infrastructure nécessaire n'est pas en place.

En ce moment même, des Canadiens en milieu rural avec qui j'ai échangé depuis la tenue de cette étude sur la criminalité se demandent si... Maintenant, nous parlons d'infrastructures numériques pour les régions rurales, mais nous n'avons pas réussi à accorder la même attention à la criminalité, et c'est une question de sécurité publique. Les gens se demandent à quel point il est crédible que ces infrastructures soient déployées.

En somme, ma question pour vous est la suivante: au-delà des fonds du programme Brancher pour innover qui ont été mis de côté pour cela et qui ont été versés, a-t-on envisagé de recourir à la Banque de l'infrastructure mise en place par ce gouvernement, ou savez-vous s'il est possible de l'utiliser de cette façon... ou encore quel montant a déjà été versé pour des projets de connexion Internet en milieu rural?

(1615)

M. William Amos:

Je vais peut-être commencer par répondre au début de votre question. Vous représentez une circonscription de 30 000 kilomètres carrés. La circonscription de Pontiac a une superficie de 77 000 kilomètres carrés. Nous parlons d'énormes circonscriptions dont les besoins sont importants. Toutes les collectivités rurales du Canada font du rattrapage. Voilà la simple réalité. Je ne dis pas cela pour faire preuve de partisanerie, mais la réalité est que le gouvernement Harper n'a pas investi suffisamment dans ce secteur, et nous accusons du retard.

Nous mettons maintenant en oeuvre des programmes gouvernementaux qui agitent une carotte au bout du nez des entreprises de télécommunications, qui les incitent à investir davantage, et le programme Brancher pour innover a remporté un certain nombre de succès majeurs. Les fonds sont versés en ce moment, mais je pense que nous avons conscience que nous devons prendre de nombreuses autres mesures en raison des situations comme celle que vous avez décrite. Je suis sûr que les besoins de votre région en matière d'infrastructure Internet s'élèvent à plus de 200 000 $, et nous devons parvenir à satisfaire ces besoins. Le budget de 2019 va vraiment nous aider à parvenir à ce stade.

En ce qui concerne la Banque de l'infrastructure, le budget a indiqué clairement qu'elle serait envisagée comme source de financement. J'ai hâte que la ministre Bernadette Jordan, notre ministre du Développement économique rural, présente un plan relatif à une stratégie de développement économique rural et collabore avec notre ministre de l'Infrastructure, François-Philippe Champagne, pour proposer un plan visant à nous démontrer comment des capitaux supplémentaires pourraient être affectés à ce projet parce qu'en fin de compte, la tâche consistera à inciter des entreprises du secteur privé ou...

M. Glen Motz:

L'adoption d'une approche liée davantage aux partenariats public-privé est-elle la bonne façon de faire avancer ce projet?

M. William Amos:

Je pense que cela fait partie de la solution, mais que ce n'est pas la solution en entier, parce que, dans certaines circonstances, le secteur privé décidera de ne pas investir dans certaines régions, qui seront alors laissées pour compte. Nous devons permettre aux gouvernements régionaux et aux organismes sans but lucratif de travailler ensemble à combler ces manques. C'est la raison pour laquelle cela exigera du temps. Il y aura une période pendant laquelle les entreprises évalueront les endroits où elles souhaitent tirer parti des mesures d'incitation et investir. Ensuite, nous procéderons à une analyse des manques, puis nous réexaminerons la situation et nous prendrons des mesures supplémentaires. Je pense que ce sera un processus itératif.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Madame Sahota, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je cède mon temps de parole à M. de Burgh Graham. Ce sujet l'intéresse vivement. Par conséquent, je crois qu'il est juste de lui accorder plus de temps.

Une voix: Il a 25 questions de plus à poser.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'en ai pas autant que d'habitude.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

(1620)

[Français]

Monsieur Amos, il y a une base de la SOPFEU, à Maniwaki, dans votre circonscription. La fin de semaine dernière, il y a eu le Rendez-vous aérien. C'était sûrement intéressant et j'aurais aimé être là.

La SOPFEU a un service de radio à basse fréquence qui traverse la province du Québec. Cela fonctionne dans tout le secteur sud du Québec, à 55 ou 56 degrés de latitude Nord. Tous les services cellulaires sont à haute fréquence, à partir de 400 mégahertz et même plus haut.

Depuis que vous êtes député, y a-t-il des compagnies de télécommunications qui vous ont parlé de solutions créatives et hors normes? On parle toujours du 5G et du 24 gigahertz. Entre vous et moi, le service de 24 gigahertz sera difficile à mettre en place. Vous a-t-on déjà fait part de solutions créatives?

M. William Amos:

J'avoue que je ne suis pas expert dans le domaine. Je ne connais pas d'entreprise qui offre ce genre de solutions. Je suis d'accord sur ce que vous avez dit et sur la prémisse de votre question.

Hier, j'ai eu l'occasion de rencontrer des gens de la SOPFEU. Ils ont organisé le Rendez-vous aérien, à Maniwaki, auquel j'ai eu le grand plaisir de participer. Nous considérons ces gens comme des héros dans la Vallée-de-la-Gatineau. Nous les considérons comme des héros canadiens et des héroïnes canadiennes. Je suis certain qu'ils seront en Alberta et en Colombie-Britannique cet été, et certainement au Québec.

Je reviens à votre question. Quelles sont les solutions novatrices qui permettront d'accéder aux différentes bandes du spectre? Je ne le sais pas. Cela revient à la question qu'a posée M. Dubé sur la tenue de ce genre d'étude. On ne peut pas supposer que les politiciens auront les réponses à des questions techniques. Nous avons besoin que nos ingénieurs et nos entrepreneurs nous proposent différentes options, afin de recommander ensemble les pistes qui nous semblent les plus abordables et les plus prometteuses.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Plus tôt, vous avez discuté avec M. Dubé des autres témoins possibles. Vous avez mentionné notamment les associations de pompiers et la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, ainsi que d'autres.

Devrions-nous nous tourner vers des compagnies de télécommunication qui pourraient nous fournir des solutions créatives? Je parle ici de compagnies autres que des entreprises traditionnelles comme Bell ou Telus. Devrions-nous étudier la question du spectre, comme vous venez de le mentionner, et déterminer si le système de spectre actuel répond à nos besoins dans les régions?

M. William Amos:

Absolument. Ce sont toutes des questions très importantes.

Oui, il y a une gamme de petits acteurs dans le secteur des télécommunications. Dans le Pontiac, par exemple, la compagnie PioneerWireless a beaucoup de potentiel. Cependant, il est parfois plus difficile pour les petites compagnies d'accéder aux programmes gouvernementaux. Ces gens auront certainement des suggestions à faire. Je serais très reconnaissant envers le Comité s'il abordait la façon dont les compagnies de télécommunication — les grandes, mais aussi les petites — voient l'enjeu de la sécurité publique et la façon dont elles pourraient présenter des solutions à cet égard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme cette législature tire à sa fin, il ne reste pas beaucoup de temps. La semaine prochaine, ce sera pratiquement terminé.

Si vous pouviez envoyer un message au Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de la 43e législature, quel serait-il?

M. William Amos:

D'abord, je voudrais réitérer l'importance de cet enjeu. Ensuite, je voudrais souligner qu'il est considéré de façon unanime comme un enjeu non partisan. Je crois que les choses vont mieux, au Canada, lorsque nous nous attaquons aux grands problèmes de façon non partisane. C'est un enjeu très complexe. Il est trop facile de pointer du doigt, de blâmer les autres et de faire le jeu de la politique. Mes concitoyens et ceux de l'ensemble du Canada rural n'ont pas besoin de cela. Enfin, jetrouve qu'il serait très utile que le Comité recommande au futur Parlement de revenir sur cet enjeu. Il faudrait reconnaître que nous n'aurons peut-être pas l'occasion d'aller au bout de ce dossier, mais qu'il serait possible d'y revenir lors de la prochaine législature.

(1625)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci.

Je tiens à remercier l'intervenant, c'est-à-dire M. Amos, d'avoir fait un exposé sur cet enjeu. Comme mon homologue l'a déclaré, je suis entièrement en faveur de la tentative de brancher notre pays afin de bénéficier d'une couverture cellulaire.

Je remarque que la partie (iii) du libellé de votre motion indique ce qui suit: (iii) continuer à collaborer avec les entreprises de télécommunications, les provinces, les territoires, les municipalités, les communautés autochtones et les organismes d'interventions d'urgence concernés.

C'est la partie de cette motion qui m'intéresse un peu. La plupart des provinces ont établi un programme de communications d'urgence qui relie entre eux les services d'ambulance, les services de police et les services d'incendie. À ma connaissance, ce programme est en place dans la majeure partie du pays depuis de nombreuses années.

Avez-vous parlé aux gouvernements provinciaux, aux gouvernements municipaux ou à leurs homologues territoriaux, ou les avez-vous abordés, afin de déterminer quel rôle nous devrions jouer, selon eux? D'après moi, ce travail ne peut être accompli uniquement par l'industrie. L'industrie ne nous fournira pas cette connectivité par elle-même.

Votre circonscription a environ la même dimension que la mienne, monsieur Amos. Je crois que ma circonscription comporte à peu près la même superficie de terres inhabitées et à peu près le même nombre de municipalités et de comtés que la vôtre. Ma circonscription compte 11 comtés, qui luttent tous séparément pour tenter d'obtenir ce service, mais ce n'est pas rentable pour l'industrie. J'estime qu'il faut que nos comtés, nos provinces, notre gouvernement fédéral et l'industrie communiquent entre eux.

Je me demande si les habitants de votre région ont discuté du secteur dans lequel nous devrions intervenir, selon eux. Le montant à investir est important. La somme que vous avez mentionnée, à savoir les 750 millions de dollars, est seulement un léger aperçu de l'argent qui devra être investi si nous voulons offrir au Canada une couverture égale d'un océan à l'autre. Cela coûtera des milliards de dollars. L'industrie nous a dit que, de façon réaliste, l'investissement requis pour assurer une couverture nationale serait probablement de l'ordre de 5 à 7 milliards de dollars.

Je me demande si vous pourriez formuler des observations à ce sujet.

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de me poser cette question. Je voudrais aussi vous remercier d'être un excellent collègue. Nous travaillons ensemble au sein du comité de l'environnement, et au cours de notre voyage dans l'Ouest, nous avons eu le plaisir de visiter une petite partie de votre circonscription, qui est magnifique et toute spéciale. Voilà une expérience que je n'oublierai pas.

Vous avez parlé du rôle des gouvernements provinciaux et m'avez interrogé sur mon expérience à ce sujet alors que nous tentons de réunir les fonds nécessaires pour acquérir une solution de plusieurs milliards de dollars. Je pense que vous avez raison. J'ai entendu divers chiffres, dont celui de 15 milliards de dollars.

Je pense néanmoins que quelque chose a changé depuis les élections de 2015: les provinces sont maintenant disposées à s'impliquer plus sérieusement en effectuant des investissements d'envergure. Je peux parler de la situation au Québec, où la province a fourni des fonds de contrepartie dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover. Dans le Pontiac, j'ai eu l'occasion d'annoncer des investissements de plus de 20 millions de dollars dans les services Internet à haute vitesse. Le gouvernement provincial a fourni du financement de contrepartie pour toutes les contributions du gouvernement fédéral. Je dirais que les investissements fédéraux et provinciaux constituent un peu plus de 50 % environ du montant total de 20 millions de dollars.

Je pense que nous entrons un peu dans une nouvelle ère, car malgré le fait que les télécommunications relèvent sans contredit du gouvernement fédéral, on admet que la responsabilité financière est tout simplement trop lourde pour qu'un ordre de gouvernement l'assume à lui seul.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Si je vous comprends bien, je pense que nous avons accordé près de 160 millions de dollars au Québec dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover. Le Québec a-t-il investi 161 millions de dollars au cours des quatre dernières années?

(1630)

M. William Amos:

Je pense qu'il a investi au moins cette somme, voire légèrement plus. M. Graham aurait peut-être les chiffres exacts en tête. Je ne les ai pas en mémoire, mais je suis certain que je pourrais vous les communiquer ultérieurement.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Savez-vous si certains de vos comtés ont investi? Je pense que votre circonscription, à l'instar de la mienne, comprend un certain nombre de grands comtés. Ces derniers cherchent-ils à investir? Avez-vous abordé le sujet avec eux?

M. William Amos:

Mais certainement. En fait, la circonscription du Pontiac compte trois administrations municipales, qui gèrent chacune une quinzaine de municipalités. Deux de ces administrations ont uni leurs forces pour présenter une soumission au programme Brancher pour innover. Leur projet n'a finalement pas été retenu, mais cela montre que les projets viendront non seulement des grandes entreprises de télécommunications, mais aussi des municipalités qui travaillent en collaboration avec de petits fournisseurs de service et des consultants qui leur prodiguent des conseils. C'est un des défis que nous voulons les aider à relever.

Le président:

Madame Dabrusin, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci. Je céderai mon temps à M. Graham.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez cinq minutes de plus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais certainement m'en prévaloir.[Français]

Merci, monsieur le président.

Dans le passé, les entreprises privées n'investissaient pas dans l'infrastructure numérique tant qu'il n'y avait pas une subvention fédérale, provinciale ou d'une autre source. Vous venez de dire que le Québec a subventionné en grande partie les services Internet sur son territoire. Je pense que c'est beaucoup plus que 50 % des subventions fédérales et provinciales qui venaient du Québec, qui a largement contribué à cela.

Comment peut-on contourner le problème lié au fait que les compagnies refusent d'investir avant de recevoir des subventions? Doit-on commencer à construire des infrastructures numériques entièrement publiques?

M. William Amos:

Il y a certainement des entreprises qui donneront pour argument que la nationalisation de cette infrastructure est la direction à prendre. Je n'appuie pas cette vision ou cette perspective parce que cela coûterait trop cher aux contribuables. Il serait très difficile pour les contribuables de couvrir les milliards de dollars déjà investis. Effectivement, on veut se protéger d'une situation où les investissements n'auront pas lieu tant que des subventions n'auront pas été accordées.

Cela dit, nous accordons tous à cet enjeu une grande importance. Il y a déjà une forme de concurrence, comme je l'ai dit en réponse à une question de M. Eglinski. Les municipalités et les gouvernements régionaux, souvent en collaboration avec les petites compagnies, sont en concurrence avec les grandes compagnies de télécommunications. Selon moi, il faut s'assurer qu'il y a une bonne gestion de la concurrence entre les gouvernements régionaux, les petites et les grandes compagnies. C'est sûr qu'ils seront tous à la recherche de fonds publics, qu'ils proviennent du fédéral, du CRTC, du provincial ou d'autres sources.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le programme Brancher pour innover, si une entreprise bénéficiait d'un investissement du fédéral, il fallait qu'elle donne un accès public au système. Pourrait-on envisager une exigence semblable pour les services cellulaires, si le fédéral ou le provincial contribue à la construction des tours et qu'il y a un accès plus ouvert que ce que le CRTC prévoit, ou cela nuira-t-il encore plus à l'investissement?

Des compagnies de télécommunications comme Bell, Rogers et Telus nous disent qu'il ne vaut pas la peine qu'elles installent une tour parce qu'une compagnie qui n'a pas de tour embarque immédiatement sur leur système.

Quel est l'équilibre entre un accès ouvert et un monopole d'investissement?

M. William Amos:

C'est une question très complexe que le CRTC aborde. En tant que politicien et non-expert, je suis réticent à dire comment il devrait trouver cet équilibre. C'est une question tant technique qu'économique. Il faut certainement trouver un équilibre. Il est dans l'intérêt des Canadiens qu'il y ait une concurrence accrue, mais, en même temps, il faut encourager les compagnies à investir dans des infrastructures fixes, c'est-à-dire dans les tours et la fibre optique.

Je crois que notre gouvernement essaie de trouver cet équilibre avec une directive qui pousse les compagnies à baisser leurs prix. Il demande au CRTC d'aller dans ce sens, mais, en même temps, il doit offrir des incitatifs, que ce soit par l'entremise du programme Brancher pour innover ou par d'autres programmes. Il faut des incitatifs pour donner de bonnes raisons aux entreprises privées d'investir des capitaux dans cette infrastructure.

(1635)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Amos, si je voulais disparaître numériquement, devrais-je déménager dans le Pontiac?

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Glen Motz:

Oui, nous pouvons organiser le tout à Ottawa.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Oui, je sais. Il y a au sein du Comité un certain élément qui préférerait cela.

M. William Amos:

Eh bien, je pense que vous pourriez commencer par parler avec votre conseiller en médias sociaux. Il pourrait effacer vos comptes, ce qui vous ferait disparaître quelque peu.

Non, vous ne disparaîtrez pas dans le Pontiac. En fait, cette circonscription comprend un très grand nombre de régions bien servies. Elle commence dans les banlieues nord de Gatineau, qui sont servies à 100 %, comme on pourrait s'y attendre dans une grande ville du Canada, mais dès qu'on est à 20 minutes de Gatineau, ce n'est pas...

Le président:

Je pourrais donc disparaître numériquement à 20 minutes de Gatineau.

M. William Amos:

Vous le pouvez, mais pas à 20 minutes. Vous devriez aller un peu plus loin. Vous pourriez...

Le président:

Notre comité de la sécurité publique s'intéresse à des personnes qui ne travaillent pas nécessairement dans l'intérêt public, si l'on peut dire. Est-ce que certains groupes préféreraient disparaître numériquement, si l'on veut, créant ainsi un problème de sécurité publique? Je pense notamment à certaines des personnes dont nous avons peut-être entendu parler dans le cadre de notre étude précédente sur la criminalité en région rurale, mais est-ce qu'un groupe auquel nous ne pensons pas constitue un problème de sécurité publique?

M. William Amos:

Juste pour être certain de bien comprendre la question, me demandez-vous si certains ont intérêt à maintenir l'obscurité numérique afin de se tenir à l'écart de la culture numérique prédominante que nous devrions protéger?

Le président: Oui.

M. William Amos: S'il existe de telles personnes, elles ne viennent certainement pas frapper à ma porte dans le Pontiac...

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. William Amos: ... et les maires et les conseillers municipaux ne viennent pas me voir pour réclamer de l'aide. Dans ma circonscription, il est certainement possible de vivre en dehors du réseau en menant une vie de reclus, profitant des avantages de la capitale nationale, ayant accès à un aéroport international et à un réseau de transport moderne et jouissant de tous les bonheurs de la vie urbaine quotidiennement, tout en vivant dans les bois.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un s'oppose activement à votre motion?

M. William Amos:

De fait, certaines personnes ont soulevé des préoccupations en matière de santé au sujet des fréquences émises par les stations cellulaires. La question fait toujours l'objet de recherches scientifiques, et je pense que ces recherches devraient se poursuivre, car il est important qu'elles soient réalisées. Ce n'est qu'une infime minorité qui s'oppose à la motion.

Le président:

J'ai une dernière question. Nombre de communautés rurales se trouvent en situation de grande vulnérabilité. Selon un article paru il y a une ou deux semaines, Huawei offre l'accès à bas prix. Notre comité se penche d'ailleurs sur la question depuis quelques mois. Avez-vous une opinion sur les services que Huawei propose aux communautés rurales à des taux suprêmement bas?

(1640)

M. William Amos:

Il me semble que de nombreuses entreprises — comme Nokia et Ericsson, pour n'en nommer que quelques-unes — proposent les technologies que Huawei offre. Les hautes instances de notre gouvernement étudient les questions de sécurité nationale que soulève cette entreprise. Je suis convaincu que tout sera fait dans les règles de l'art. Je fais confiance au processus.

Peu importe ce qu'il se passe de ce côté, le Canada aura accès aux technologies 5G nécessaires pour construire des infrastructures numériques dans toutes ses régions rurales. Il ne s'agit plus que de trouver l'entreprise qui fournira ces technologies et les services.

Le président:

D'accord. Sur ce, au nom du Comité, je vous remercie d'avoir comparu.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard secu 17175 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on June 10, 2019

2019-06-03 SECU 166

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

I'm calling this meeting to order.

I want to thank Minister Goodale for his presence. He is here to talk about the main estimates.

Before he starts, I want to note that this is possibly the last time the minister will appear before this particular committee. On behalf of the committee, I want to thank him not only for his attendance here, but for his willingness to co-operate with the committee and to review all of the amendments that have been put forward by this committee to him, and his willingness to accept quite a high percentage of them.

Minister, I want to thank you for your co-operation and for your relationship with the committee.

With that—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

You mean in this Parliament, right?

The Chair:

Pardon?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: You mean in this Parliament, right?

The Chair: Yes, in this Parliament. We're not going back to the days of Laurier or anything of that nature.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: It's not the last time ever.

The Chair:

No. Thank you.

Minister.

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Mr. Chairman, thank you for your very kind remarks. They are much appreciated, and I'm glad to be back with the committee once again, this time, of course, presenting the 2019-20 main estimates for the public safety portfolio.

To help explain all of those numbers in more detail and to answer your questions today, I am pleased to be joined by Gina Wilson, the new deputy minister of Public Safety Canada. I believe this is her first appearance before this committee. She is no stranger, of course, in the Department of Public Safety, but she has been, for the last couple of years, the deputy minister in the Department for Women and Gender Equality, a department she presided over the creation of.

With the deputy minister today, we have Brian Brennan, deputy commissioner of the RCMP; David Vigneault, director of CSIS; John Ossowski, president of CBSA; Anne Kelly, commissioner of the Correctional Service of Canada; and Anik Lapointe, chief financial officer for the Parole Board of Canada.

The top priority of any government, Mr. Chair, is to keep its citizens safe and secure, and I'm very proud of the tremendous work that is being done by these officials and the employees who work following their lead diligently to serve Canadians and protect them from all manner of public threats. The nature and severity of those threats continue to evolve and change over time and, as a government, we are committed to supporting the skilled men and women who work so hard to protect us by giving them the resources they need to ensure that they can respond. The estimates, of course, are the principal vehicle for doing that.

The main estimates for 2019-20 reflect that commitment to keep Canadians safe while safeguarding their rights and freedoms. You will note that, portfolio-wide, the total authorities requested this year would result in a net increase of $256.1 million for this fiscal year, or 2.7% more than last year's main estimates. Of course, some of the figures go up and some go down, but the net result is a 2.7% increase.

One key item is an investment of $135 million in fiscal year 2019-20 for the sustainability and modernization of Canada's border operations. The second is $42 million for Public Safety Canada, the RCMP and CBSA to take action against guns and gangs. Minister Blair will be speaking in much more detail about the work being done under these initiatives when he appears before the committee.

For my part today I will simply summarize several other funding matters affecting my department, Public Safety Canada, and all of the related agencies.

The department is estimating a net spending decrease of $246.8 million this fiscal year, 21.2% less than last year. That is due to a decrease of $410.7 million in funding levels that expired last year under the disaster financial assistance arrangements. There is another item coming later on whereby the number goes up for the future year. You have to offset those two in order to follow the flow of the cash. That rather significant drop in the funding for the department itself, 21.2%, is largely due to that change in the DFAA, for which the funding level expired in 2018-19.

There was also a decrease of some $79 million related to the completion of Canada's presidency of the G7 in the year 2018.

These decreases are partially offset by a number of funding increases, including a $25-million grant to Avalanche Canada to support its life-saving safety and awareness efforts; $14.9 million for infrastructure projects related to security in indigenous communities; $10.1 million in additional funding for the first nations policing program; and $3.3 million to address post-traumatic stress injuries affecting our skilled public safety personnel.

(1535)



The main estimates also reflect measures announced a few weeks ago in budget 2019. For Public Safety Canada, that is, the department, these include $158.5 million to improve our ability to prepare for and respond to emergencies and natural disasters in Canada, including in indigenous communities, of which $155 million partially offsets that reduction in DFAA that I just referred to.

There's also $4.4 million to combat the truly heinous and growing crime of child sexual exploitation online.

There is $2 million for the security infrastructure program to continue to help communities at risk of hate-motivated crime to improve their security infrastructure.

There is $2 million to support efforts to assess and respond to economic-based national security threats, and there's $1.8 million to support a new cybersecurity framework to protect Canada's critical infrastructure, including in the finance, telecommunications, energy and transport sectors.

As you know, in the 2019 federal budget, we also announced $65 million as a one-time capital investment in the STARS air rescue system to acquire new emergency helicopters. That important investment does not appear in the 2019-20 main estimates because it was accounted for in the 2018-19 fiscal year, that is, before this past March 31.

Let me turn now to the 2019-20 main estimates for the other public safety portfolio organizations, other than the department itself.

I'll start with CBSA, which is seeking a total net increase this fiscal year of $316.9 million. That's 17.5% over the 2018-19 estimates. In addition to that large sustainability and modernization for border operations item that I previously mentioned, some other notable increases include $10.7 million to support activities related to the immigration levels plan that was announced for the three years 2018 to 2020. Those things include security screening, identity verification, the processing of permanent residents when they arrive at the border and so forth—all the responsibilities of CBSA.

There's an item for $10.3 million for the CBSA's postal modernization initiative, which is critically important at the border. There is $7.2 million to expand safe examination sites, increase intelligence and risk assessment capacity and enhance the detector dog program to give our officers the tools they need to combat Canada's ongoing opioid crisis.

There's also approximately $100 million for compensation and employee benefit plans related to collective bargaining agreements.

Budget 2019 investments affecting CBSA main estimates this year include a total of $381.8 million over five years to enhance the integrity of Canada's borders and the asylum system. While my colleague Minister Blair will provide more details on this, the CBSA would be receiving $106.3 million of that funding in this fiscal year.

Budget 2019 also includes $12.9 million to ensure that immigration and border officials have the resources to process a growing number of applications for Canadian visitor visas and work and study permits.

There is $5.6 million to increase the number of detector dogs deployed across the country in order to protect Canada's hog farmers and meat processors from the serious economic threat posed by African swine fever.

Also, there's $1.5 million to protect people from unscrupulous immigration consultants by improving oversight and strengthening compliance and enforcement measures.

I would also note that the government announced through the budget its intention to introduce the legislation necessary to expand the role of the RCMP's Civilian Review and Complaints Commission so it can also serve as an independent review body for CBSA. That proposed legislation, Bill C-98, was introduced in the House last month.

(1540)



I will turn now to the RCMP. Its estimates for 2019-20 reflect a $9.2-million increase over last year's funding levels. The main factors contributing to that change include increases of $32.8 million to compensate members injured in the performance of their duties, $26.6 million for the initiative to ensure security and prosperity in the digital age, and $10.4 million for forensic toxicology in Canada's new drug-impaired driving regime.

The RCMP's main estimates also reflect an additional $123 million related to budget 2019, including $96.2 million to strengthen the RCMP's overall policing operations, and $3.3 million to ensure that air travellers and workers at airports are effectively screened on site. The increases in funding to the RCMP are offset by certain decreases in the 2019-20 main estimates, including $132 million related to the completion of Canada's G7 presidency in 2018 and $51.7 million related to sunsetting capital infrastructure projects.

I will now move to the Correctional Service of Canada. It is seeking an increase of $136 million, or 5.6%, over last year's estimates. The two main factors contributing to the change are a $32.5-million increase in the care and custody program, most of which, $27.6 million, is for employee compensation, and $95 million announced in budget 2019 to support CSC's custodial operations.

The Parole Board of Canada is estimating a decrease of approximately $700,000 in these main estimates or 1.6% less than the amount requested last year. That's due to one-time funding received last year to assist with negotiated salary adjustments. There is also, of course, information in the estimates about the Office of the Correctional Investigator, CSIS and other agencies that are part of my portfolio. I simply make the point that this is a very busy portfolio and the people who work within Public Safety Canada and all the related agencies carry a huge load of public responsibilities in the interests of public safety. They always put public safety first while at the same time ensuring that the rights and freedoms of Canadians are properly protected.

With that, Mr. Chair, my colleagues and I would be happy to try to answer your questions.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

With that, Mr. Picard, go ahead for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to welcome Minister Goodale and everyone who has joined us. Thank you for participating in this exercise once again.

First, I'll talk about my favourite subject, which is financial crime. If I combine the funding from the RCMP and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, the total is just over $7 million in investments — [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There's no translation coming through.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Let's look at the money-laundering aspect of the estimates. Combined Public Safety and RCMP is about $7 million more.

What kind of improvement are we looking for? Is it just the money-laundering unit or is it IM/IT as well and other units working closely with financial crimes and/or terrorism financing?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Let me ask Deputy Commissioner Brennan to comment.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Incidentally, he is brand new on the job, just in the last number of months, but he will get used to the very pleasant experience of committee hearings of the House of Commons.

Deputy Commissioner Brian Brennan (Contract and Indigenous Policing, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

Thank you, Minister and Chairman.

The increase in funding would go to all of those areas. I'm not in a position to speak specifically to the numbers, exactly where all the dollars will go, but that investment is intended to increase our investigational capability and to support systems needed around those types of very specific investigations.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If I could add to that, Monsieur Picard, the estimates show $4.1 million going to the RCMP directly for enhanced federal policing capacity. There's about $819,000 to Finance Canada to support its work related to money laundering. There's $3.6 million to FINTRAC to strengthen operational capacity. There's $3.28 million to the Department of Public Safety to create the anti-money laundering action, coordination and enforcement team, which is an effort to bring all of these various threads more coherently together so that everybody is operating on exactly the same page with the greatest efficiency and inter-agency co-operation.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you, sir.

With respect to CSIS and the Canadian strategy with respect to the Middle East, what do we have to change in our strategy? What doesn't work or what has to be changed?

Also, with respect to recent events here and close to us, the Middle East doesn't seem to be the only nature of the threats we have, so why the focus on the Middle East?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

David.

Mr. David Vigneault (Director, Canadian Security Intelligence Service):

Thank you, Minister.

Specifically, it's our effort to support the whole-of-government approach to the Middle East operations, the military and diplomatic operations in Syria and Iraq. The monies you see here for the main estimates are the specific allocations for CSIS to support those activities. We do intelligence collection in the region and here in Canada to support that activity.

Also, on your question, the focus of this estimate was on the Middle East, but as you pointed out, Mr. Picard, we are obviously concerned about activities and terrorism all over the world, not just in the Middle East.

(1550)

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Picard, could I add just one small anecdote?

I had the opportunity at an earlier stage to have a discussion with the person who was then the U.S. Secretary of Defense with respect to the the change that had been made in Canada's deployment in the Middle East with respect to the international coalition against Daesh. I noted the very significant increase in the investment we were making with respect to intelligence activities. The U.S. secretary commented very favourably on the work by Canadians in that particular zone, particularly the intelligence work, which he indicated was first class and very helpful to all members of that coalition in dealing effectively with the threats posed by Daesh.

Mr. Michel Picard:

This is my first experience and my first mandate, and I understand that we have to justify why we spend money. My next question would be why we don't spend a specific amount of money on a specific topic, so we'd be justifying to spend more money.... In terms of infrastructure on cyber-threats, I see that we have more than $1.7 million for cyber-threats. My concern is not that we have money for cyber-threats; it's that we don't have money anywhere else.

Based on what we've studied on democratic institutions, ethics and public information here, on cyber-threats and financial crimes, this subject was all over the place. People are getting scared in learning what we learn day in and day out about this threat, which is multi-faceted. I don't see anything about this topic specifically in this budget, so would you please take this chance to explain?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I would be happy to, Monsieur Picard, because it is quite possible for people to look at that one number, $1.8 million, and wonder how that covers the field. Well, it doesn't. This is one little snapshot of one portion of the spending that we are devoting to the whole cause of cybersecurity.

Through our last two or three budgets, we have included a series of investments. They of course roll forward through the estimates process, but you actually need to examine the sections of the budget that lay out the more complete picture.

Through various departments, we are investing, through the budget last year, $750 million to enhance cybersecurity in Canada. A portion of that creates the new cyber response centre. A portion of that creates the new cybercrime unit within the RCMP. There is a whole series of investments to enhance our approach to cybercrime and cybersecurity.

In the last budget, the key investment was $145 million, of which this is the first very small tranche, to support the security of our critical cyber-systems. We have identified four in particular: finance, telecommunications....

Remind me of what they are. I want to make sure I get the four critically....

The Chair:

We can come back to that. Mr. Picard is well over time.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'm trying to recite the budget speech.

There are four particular areas in which we will be investing to support new legislation that will require certain standards of these critical sectors and create the enforcement mechanisms to make sure those standards are met. It is so vital, Mr. Picard, that our critical cyber-systems protect themselves and employ all the procedures that are necessary to keep themselves safe and secure. We are creating the legislative framework to make sure that happens, with the right kind of enforcement mechanisms backing it up and the funding, of which the $1.8 million is just the very first small tranche. We'll make sure that these systems are indeed safe and secure with the right enforcement to enforce the requirements.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister Goodale, for that lengthy response.

Mr. Paul-Hus, go ahead for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, Minister Goodale and everyone who has joined us.

Minister Goodale, my question concerns several of your agencies. It relates to the information broadcast by the Quebec media, particularly TVA, regarding the Mexican drug cartels doing business in Canada. This morning, I met with His Excellency Mr. Camacho, the Mexican ambassador to Canada. We discussed the situation.

I know that you were already asked about this during the oral question period, and you responded that the information was false. I want to find out what you know and what's really being done in Canada to deal with the Mexican cartels. Canada does business with Mexico, one of its largest partners and a friend. We're not focusing on Mexico here, but on the people who come to Canada with a Mexican passport to work for the Mexican drug cartels. We want to deal with these people. How are we dealing with them? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I appreciate the question, Monsieur Paul-Hus. It is important to get accurate information in the public domain. The figures that you have referred to in certain media outlets are figures that have been very perplexing to CBSA because they have not been able to verify where that arithmetic came from. Mr. Ossowski may well want to comment on this, because over the last number of days he has had his officials in CBSA scouring the records to see where this arithmetic originates, and it simply cannot be verified.

What I can tell you is that CBSA has determined that the number of inadmissibility cases for all types of criminality by Mexican foreign nationals during the period of the last 18 months, from January 2018 until now, is 238. Of these 238, only 27 were reported to be inadmissible due to links to known organized criminality, three of which were for suspected links to cartels.

The real numbers are substantially lower than the numbers that have been referred to in the media. All 27 of those people who were reported to be inadmissible due to links to organized criminality have been removed from Canada. They are no longer in the country. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you for your response, Minister Goodale.

The fact remains that one individual has been clearly identified. Why was this person, whom Mexico has identified as a criminal, able to cross our border? Don't the two countries share information on everyone arriving in Canada? Since Mexico has identified this person as a criminal, isn't that information entered in a database? What process does CBSA follow? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

All of the proper checks in terms of identity, records, background immigration issues and criminality have been done thoroughly by CBSA at the border.

Mr. Ossowski, can you comment on the specific individual that Mr. Paul-Hus is referring to?

Mr. John Ossowski (President, Canada Border Services Agency):

Thank you.

I would just say that, in the first instance, I think it's important to understand the layers of security. We work in airports and with Mexican officials in Mexico to, first, try to prevent people from even getting on flights to Canada if they don't have the proper documentation or if there are any concerns in terms of misrepresentation or criminality. That being said, if they do arrive and there are concerns, our officers are very well trained to deal with those upon arrival. They could be allowed to leave at that point, if they stay at the airport until the next flight and then go home. If they do come in and we suspect that there is some work that we need to do, we will check in secondary inspection for any criminality.

During that same reporting period, I can say that we found 18 people who had used fraudulent travel documents and whom we were able to prevent from entering. There are layers of security.

With respect to that specific individual, he has been removed from the country.

(1600)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I understand that you can have this information in advance since I know that there are officers in Mexico and agreements with that country. Thousands of Mexicans come to Canada. Aren't there adequate computer mechanisms in CBSA's systems? Isn't passport data available, especially for convicted criminals? Isn't there an exchange of information on these criminals, a bit like Interpol? [English]

Mr. John Ossowski:

I think it's important to understand the differences. With Mexico, visas are not required in order to come to Canada. We lifted the visa requirement a couple of years ago. They travel now on what's called the electronic travel authorization program. That's a lighter touch in terms of criminality.

As I mentioned, if they arrive and there are some concerns or some indicators, we do those criminal checks at the port of entry upon their arrival. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you.

Minister Goodale, on May 10, a fuel tanker collided with an aircraft at Pearson airport. The Globe and Mail informed us that the vehicle had made three attempts to crash into the plane. Peel police are conducting the investigation. However, the situation is very suspicious and the incident could constitute a deliberate attack. Do you have more information on the matter? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There's no information that I'm in a position to share at this time, Mr. Paul-Hus, with respect to that particular incident. I would, however, undertake to see if there is some further detail that I can share with you, as a colleague in the House of Commons. I will inquire and determine what information can be put into the public domain.

The Chair:

Thank you for that, Mr. Paul-Hus and Minister.

Mr. Dubé, go ahead for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank all the witnesses for joining us today.

Minister Goodale, we met with David McGuinty when he presented the first annual report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. I forget the exact part of the report and please forgive me, but the report stated that the amounts spent on national security couldn't be disclosed.

Nevertheless, the report provided the amounts and the division of the amounts for Australia. When I pointed out this contradiction to Mr. McGuinty, he confirmed that the committee members had raised the issue with the officials giving the presentation. However, the committee members were told that it was a matter of national security and that the information couldn't be disclosed.

I was wondering whether you could clarify why Australia, an ally and member of the Five Eyes, feels that its expenses can be disclosed, but not Canada. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Our concern, Monsieur Dubé, is with providing information in the public domain that could, in fact, reveal sensitive and very critical operational details of the RCMP, CSIS or CBSA in a way that would compromise their ability to keep Canadians safe.

The information can be shared in the context of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. It would also be available to the new national security and intelligence review agency, which will be created under Bill C-59. Those are classified environments in which members of Parliament around the table have the appropriate clearance level. It's more difficult to share that information here. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I understand that the information is classified and that certain limits must be imposed. I don't want to go on about this issue too much, because I have questions regarding other topics. However, as I said, Australians disclose this information, as stated in the report.

Mr. McGuinty told us that the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians hadn't received an adequate response regarding this matter. Why is there a difference between Canada and Australia? I understand the applicable mechanisms. However, your reasoning seems to contradict the reasoning of the Australians.

(1605)

[English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, far be it from me to be critical of the Australians, but we have our own Canadian logic, and our obligation here is to protect the public safety and national security of Canadians.

Monsieur Dubé, I would simply encourage Mr. McGuinty and the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians to pursue this issue with the various security agencies, which they have the authority to do under the legislation, to secure the information that they believe they need. I would encourage the agencies to be forthcoming—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Minister, I'm going to have to interrupt you, because my time is limited and this is probably the only round I'll get to ask you questions.

I just want to say that I do think it's an important thing to raise, because on expenditures there's a particular role for all parliamentarians to play beyond just the committee with clearance, where it can pertain more to operational details. Money is a whole different game, as Monsieur Picard was alluding to in his questions about the role that even we can play as those around this table at this committee.

On that note, I do want to move on to CBSA and the CRCC. We know that Bill C-98 is before the House. I'm wondering if you can clarify. There's $500,000 for CBSA and there's $420,000 for CRCC. I have two questions about that.

One, is that all the money that's going to come out of the Bill C-98 mechanism, or is there more money following that to implement those measures? Two, what explains that discrepancy? If it's $500,000 for CBSA, are they doing the work internally for review and oversight, or is that going to be sent off back to CRCC once Bill C-98 has become law?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Again, the numbers that are in this set of estimates are the initial snapshot, a one-year slice, of the beginning of a process. This is a very significant process. Where the CRCC has previously, as you know, totally focused on the RCMP, we will now be broadening the agency. It will continue its review function with respect to the RCMP, but it will also assume responsibility for the review function with respect to CBSA.

The expectation is that for any complaint the public has with respect to officer behaviour or a particular situation that developed at the border, or some other topic such as the handling of detention, for example, a complaint could be filed with this new expanded body, and they would have the complete jurisdiction to investigate that complaint from the public.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Well, with all due respect, it's better late than never, and I certainly hope it has time to pass before Parliament rises.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

So do I, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

My last question is on vote 15, which talks about “economic-based national security threats” as part of CSIS's mandate. What is an economic-based national security threat in the context of what you're allowed to tell us here today?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, I could give my layman's explanation of that.

David, would you like to provide the official definition?

Mr. David Vigneault:

Yes. Thank you, Minister.[Translation]

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.[English]

Essentially, this is related to overall foreign investment into the country when we're looking at a different country's different state-owned enterprises, different entities, trying to invest in greenfield investment here in Canada.

It's the ability for the service to contribute to the efforts of the national security community to assess if there are any national security links to these transactions. Sometimes it's because of ownership. Sometimes it's because of the nature of the technology that might be acquired. It's our overall ability to investigate and produce the right analysis to support the decision-making of Public Safety, other agencies and ultimately the cabinet, under the Investment Canada Act.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Spengemann, please, for seven minutes.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Goodale, we're coming up on the end of the parliamentary term. I just want to take a moment to thank you and your senior team, on behalf of the people of Mississauga—Lakeshore, the riding I represent, for your work and through you, the women and men, the members of our civil service, who do this incredibly important work in public safety and national security day by day.

A couple of days ago I had an opportunity to meet with a group of amazing grades 7 and 8 students at Olive Grove School, which is an Islamic school in my riding. It was part of CIVIX Canada's Rep Day, which is a day to bring elected representatives into the classroom.

There was a great discussion. One of the points we discussed was violent crime, and specifically gun violence. I know Minister Blair will be with us later on. We straw polled the students on the issues that are of importance, and when it came to gun violence and violent crime, almost every hand went up among grades 7s and 8s.

We have a $2-million commitment towards a program to protect community gathering places from hate-motivated crimes, but we also have the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence. What are we doing at the moment with respect to addressing the root causes of violent crime, and also to make sure there is a level of security for grades 7 and 8 students who belong to a faith-based school so that they feel safe when they study in their community and in their centre of learning?

(1610)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's a very important question, Mr. Spengemann, and there are several answers to that.

Thank you for flagging the good work of the Canada community outreach centre within my department. Their whole objective is to coordinate and support activities at the community level across the country, some run by municipalities, some run by provincial governments, some run by academic organizations, some run by police services that reach out to the community to counter that insidious process of radicalization to violence.

Some of their work is purely research; other is program delivery; other is assisting groups that provide the countervailing messages to people who are on a negative trajectory towards extremism and violence. The Canada centre has been up and running now for two and a half years, and it has done some very important work.

The specific program I think you're referring to is a different one. It's the security infrastructure program which, when we started in government three and a half years ago, was funded at the rate, I believe, of about $1 million a year. It was a good initiative but fairly limited in its scope. We have quadrupled the funds, so it's now up to $4 million a year. We've expanded the criteria for what this program can, in fact, support.

One of the recent changes, for example, is to allow some of the funding from the security infrastructure program to be used for training in schools or in places of worship or community centres where that training can actually assist with knowing what to do if there is an incident. It's like a fire drill in school. How do you react, say, to an active shooter or to an incident of violence?

It was found, in the case of the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh last fall, that training in advance made a real difference in that situation. There were people on the scene who knew, because they had been properly trained, exactly how to react to an active shooter situation. It's the considered opinion of people in that synagogue that the training made a material difference in saving lives.

We have adjusted the terms of the security infrastructure program to allow for that to be part of what the program can pay for, in addition to closed-circuit television, better doors, barriers and other protective features within the design of a building, and the renovation of the building itself to make it as effective as it can be to keep people safe.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Thank you for that.

Let me shift gears and take you to the cyber domain. I think there is $9.2 million going towards protecting the rights and freedoms of Canadians. One concern that's raised is about cyber-bullying, particularly with respect to LGBTQ2+ youth and people but also for other vulnerable communities.

Can you tell the committee what the department is doing with respect to online bullying specifically?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

This is an initiative that involves not only my department but other departments within the Government of Canada as well. The whole purpose is to first of all raise the level of awareness about some of the insidious activity that's going on online. It might be bullying. It might be child sexual exploitation. Often one leads to the other. It might be human trafficking. It might be violent extremism. In another cadre, it could be attacks on our democratic institutions. There is a whole range of social harms perpetrated on the Internet. Our objective is to raise the level of public awareness so that people understand better and have a higher level of digital literacy in terms of what they're being subjected to online and are able to distinguish between what is legitimate activity and what is not.

As I said earlier, we've also created new cyber response systems—one within the Communications Security Establishment, another within the RCMP—making it, in terms of the police unit, more accessible to the public with a one-window reporting mechanism. People know where they can go to report cybercrime and incidents on the Internet that need to be drawn to the attention of public officials.

This is such an all-pervasive problem. It is, quite literally, in our hands every minute. We need to engage all Canadians in this effort to understand their vulnerabilities online, and then make the response mechanisms at all levels of government readily available. That's what we're trying to do.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Spengemann—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

To answer one final little point, Mr. Chair, the critical infrastructure systems that I was referring to earlier are finance, telecommunications, energy and transport.

The Chair:

Thank you for that.

I'm sure Mr. Motz appreciated that.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

I did. Thank you.

The Chair: You have five minutes, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz: Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister and team, for being here.

Minister, there have been lots of rumours floating around recently about your government considering a ban on certain types of firearms, maybe as early as this week. I'll ask you a very simple, clear question: Are you considering an order in council to ban certain firearms, yes or no?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The Prime Minister—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes or no.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

—invited Minister Blair to examine that question, and he will be reporting his recommendations very shortly. No final decision has been taken at this stage. He'll be able to give you an accurate description of where he is in his deliberations when he appears.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Minister, I know that generally your party tends to treat law-abiding Canadian firearms owners as second-class citizens—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No, that's not true.

Mr. Glen Motz:

—but I want to be clear that the firearm industry in Canada does hundreds of millions of dollars annually in sales and is responsible for thousands upon thousands of jobs. There are real-world consequences to attempts to shore up your left flank for an election year, with precious little in the way of accomplishments so far in your government.

Again, yes or no, do you have plans to ban firearms in this country?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Motz, you know very well that this is a specific policy area that the Prime Minister has asked Minister Blair to examine and report upon. He has conducted extensive consultations, probably the largest in Canadian history. He will make his recommendations known very shortly.

Mr. Glen Motz:

All right. So we're still waiting.

I'll go to my other question. We know that the majority of firearms-related homicides in this country are not by those who have a valid firearms licence. In the last 15 years or so, that percentage has been extremely low. Targeting a population that is law-abiding to begin with, with Bill C-71, rather than going after the gangs and guns issue that we have in this country.... Your government has loosened penalties for gangs and gang affiliation and made things more difficult for those who are already law-abiding gun owners. How do you reconcile that?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, we have invested $327 million in a strategy directly aimed at guns and gangs. Of that total, $214 million is going to provinces and communities to support their local anti-gang strategies. There's about $50 million that's going to CBSA to assist in the interdiction of illegal guns coming across the border, and there's about $35 million going to the RCMP to support their efforts at combatting illegal gun trafficking.

There is a whole collection of—

(1620)

Mr. Glen Motz:

In 2017, you promised $500 million to policing to combat gangs and guns, and then it was $327 million. I wonder how much of that money has actually been given out to provinces to deal with their gang and gun issues.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The agreements with the provinces are in the process of being concluded.

In my own province of Saskatchewan, the agreement has been concluded, and announced by me and the provincial minister together. The announcements have been made in several provinces and territories across the country. The process is rolling forward.

The commitment that we made was to get to the level of $100 million per year ongoing, and we will meet that target. The $327 million that I referred to is the beginning of that commitment, to help all levels of government be as effective as they possibly can be in dealing with the issue of illegal guns and gangs. You can probably add a third component in that, because it's usually present, and that is drugs.

Guns, gangs and drugs are what this money is to be used for, coupled with the changes in the law that improve background checks, require licence verification and standardize best practices in record-keeping.

The Chair:

You have a little less than a minute.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

Just so you know, we won't get into the Bill C-71 debate, because that's not exactly what's going to happen.

Your colleague, Mr. Blair, said there is no reason for anyone to own what in reality is a modern hunting rifle, because they're purpose built to harm people. That statement isn't only offensive, but it is incredibly misinformed, misguided and deliberately misleads Canadians.

I wonder what your response would be, sir, to the men and women on our Canadian Olympic shooting team, for example, who are representing Canada in Tokyo, when they hear of such a statement by a minister of this government.

The Chair:

You're going to have to save that answer.

Your time has expired, Mr. Motz. I'm sure you'll have an opportunity to ask Mr. Blair directly what he means by his own comment.

Next is Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for being here today, and for all the other occasions you've been before this committee. Your answers are always enlightening.

You mentioned in your statement something about funding going toward enforcement measures for unscrupulous immigration consultants. I know that it's not just from your department, but from Citizenship and Immigration as well.

Can you give me a bit more information as to what that amount is and how enforcement measures will be enacted?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Let me ask Mr. Ossowski to provide some detail on that.

Mr. John Ossowski:

Thank you.

We get about 200 leads a year, which result in about 50 investigations. The additional funds that we're going to be receiving will help us to deal with some of the more complex cases and overall increase our capacity to pursue these investigations and hopefully stop the problem.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can you elaborate on the leads?

Do clients of these consultants call CBSA and report them?

Mr. John Ossowski:

It could be a variety of different sources that we catch wind of. Sometimes it's our own analysis in terms of working with the Immigration and Refugee Board, if they see something suspicious. It could be a number of different ways that we would be apprised of somebody who is worthy of an investigation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kind of actions or measures can you take against them?

Mr. John Ossowski:

Ultimately, they could face criminal charges.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That would be within your realm, that—

Mr. John Ossowski:

If it were a criminal offence, then it would depend on whether or not we did something with the RCMP. It depends on the nature of the outcome of the investigation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Is this increase for the first time, or is this the regular amount that's usually allocated?

Mr. John Ossowski:

No. This is an increase of $10 million over five years, so it's actually around $2 million a year, if I remember the profile correctly. It's just, as I say, to increase our capacity, because we are starting to see a bit more and, as I said, there's the complexity of some of these cases representing multiple clients and trying to sift through that information and focus our efforts better.

(1625)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Recently, Minister, we've heard so much news in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick about flooding. How much of your budget has been spent on mitigating the effects or dealing with the aftermath of the flooding that has occurred?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

We can actually get you a statement of the DFAA, disaster financial assistance arrangements, payments over the course of the last number of years. It really is instructive. I would be glad to supply that information to the committee, because it shows that the losses covered by DFAA in the last six years, mostly for floods and wildfires, are larger than the amount the program spent in all the previous years, going right back to 1970.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: Wow.

Hon. Ralph Goodale: Something obviously is happening with the climate and with the incidence of wildfires and the incidence of floods in the last number of years. The pace has accelerated dramatically.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

More in the last six years than since 1970?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Have the criteria changed as to under which conditions the government would be funding, or is it mostly just due to climate change and these events occurring more often?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It is a larger number of incidents that tend to be more serious and more expensive with every passing year. The criteria are essentially the same. In fact, a few years ago, the previous government adjusted the funding formula so that the provinces would pay for a larger portion before the federal share would kick in, and that would tend to reduce the amount that the federal government would be paying because the cost-sharing formula was adjusted a bit. Despite that, the volume of federal payments is higher because the losses are larger.

You can just think of the spectacular ones, such as the flooding around High River, Alberta, a few years ago. I think that was the most expensive flood in Canadian history. Fort McMurray in northern Alberta had the most expensive fire disaster in Canadian history. That was followed by two very expensive years in British Columbia.

We're also having serious issues this spring, with the floods a few weeks ago in Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick, and now, in the last week or so, with the fires at Pikangikum First Nation in northwestern Ontario, and in northern Alberta. I think that it's about 11,000 people now who are evacuated in northern Alberta, and the entire community at Pikangikum is in the process of being evacuated.

It is a very serious problem. Climate change has its consequences, and they are growing more serious.

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave it there.

We're getting close to the end, but I think Mr. Eglinski might have a couple of minutes to ask a question if he wishes to.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I hope it's about Grande Cache.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Not that lucky this time....

Thank you to all the witnesses, and congratulations, Brian, on your recent promotion.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

These are former colleagues.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Minister, as you are aware, we did a public safety report on rural crime. My Alberta colleagues and I did quite an extensive round table consultation throughout the province. People are very concerned not only in Alberta but also in Saskatchewan. I understand that you heard from some of their mayors about the shortage of RCMP. Crime increased by about 30% in rural Canada versus in urban.

What really alarms me is that I just looked at the RCMP 2018-19 plan, and it has your manpower progressions over the last five years up to the year 2019-20. Actually, the law enforcement program is calling for a reduction in police officers from 1,366 to 1,319. These are just the manpower numbers. You are increasing the overall strength of the force by 1,033, and you're increasing the administration by 460. Your increase is only about 0.6%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.2% over the next few years. The attrition rate has to be 10 times that number.

How are you going to provide policing? How can you tell the people in rural Canada, whether in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, B.C. or Alberta, where that policing is going to come from? Are you going to look at your contract to look at strengthening those numbers? The numbers you have here show that you don't have the manpower.

(1630)

The Chair:

You have about 10 seconds.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'll ask the deputy commissioner to respond to that as well.

Mr. Eglinski, I would just point out that we have tripled the capacity of new recruits coming out of the Depot training academy in Regina, with over 1,100 compared to a much smaller number earlier. Also, if I remember correctly, the number last year of new people going into Saskatchewan was about 135, which was a significant increase. This coming year about 90 new officers will be going into that particular region.

Part of your answer is that we're increasing the capacity of training at Depot to generate officers more rapidly. As you know, you can't do this overnight. You want to be sending officers who are fully trained and qualified to do the job of protecting Canadians. It's a serious business, and we are accelerating the recruits.

The commanding officers in both Alberta and Saskatchewan have also taken initiatives in the last two to three years to deploy officers based more on criminal intelligence so that they're being deployed more strategically than was perhaps previously the case.

I note that both the Attorney General of Saskatchewan and the commanding officer in Alberta have observed that in the last year they've actually seen an improvement in the crime statistics.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I have just one quick question, if I may.

The Chair:

You can have one question.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Regarding the recruiting needs, are you getting the recruits?

The Chair:

I'm very pleased to have given you this 10 seconds which has, in the history of our parliamentary procedure, stretched into a couple of minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I love you for it, big guy.

The Chair:

It's what you call a buzzer beater.

Can you answer that briefly, Mr. Brennan?

D/Commr Brian Brennan:

We're meeting the recruiting numbers to make sure that we are on track for 40 troops a year to go through Depot, and we're continuing to examine ways to increase our recruiting capacity to ensure that it is sustained over a long period of time.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

At 40 out of 52 weeks in the year, that's a graduating class of almost one a week coming out of Depot.

The Chair:

You're going to have to live with that answer, Mr. Eglinski.

I did pick up on Ms. Sahota's question with respect to the increase in the disaster assistance money. I think that would be of interest to all of us, so if that could be made available to the committee, that would be useful.

With that, again I want to thank you for your appearance here, Minister, and I thank your colleagues. I suspect that you will be leaving and your colleagues remaining. Minister Blair is also up next.

With that we'll suspend.

(1630)

(1635)

The Chair:

We're resuming. I see that we still have quorum.

Welcome, Minister Blair.

We have Minister Blair, but we also have to deal with the estimates themselves. We have another motion to pass with respect to Bill C-93, the recommendations that we would like also to get done.

My proposal is that we leave ourselves 10 minutes at the end of the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What about my questions?

The Chair:

I don't know; that may be a problem.

I would encourage colleagues, ministers and witnesses to be economical in their questions and their answers, if that's at all possible.

With that, I welcome Minister Blair to the committee once again.

We look forward to your remarks. Questions are after.

Hon. Bill Blair (Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I will endeavour to be judicious in my responses, to adhere to your direction.

It's a pleasure to once again have the opportunity to join the committee to discuss the 2019-20 main estimates. These estimates will include authorities for measures that, of course, were announced in budget 2019.

I'd like to take the opportunity to focus on some of the important measures that will fall within my mandate of ensuring that our borders remain secure and leading efforts to reduce organized crime. On the latter, as I've noted to this committee previously, taking action against gun and gang violence remains a top priority. We've seen an increase in gun violence across the country in recent years. Guns are still getting into the hands of people who would commit crimes with them. While I think the measures in Bill C-71 are exceptional and will go a long way to reversing the trend, I also believe there is more we can do.

Earlier this month, we issued a report outlining what we heard in an extensive cross-country engagement on this issue. In the meantime, funding through these estimates and budget 2019 can and will make a real difference right away.

I've noted before that the $327 million over five years, which the government announced in 2017, is already beginning to help support a variety of initiatives to reduce gun and gang activity in our communities across Canada. Over the past few months, I have been pleased to work with provinces, territories and municipalities as we roll out their portions of that funding specific to initiatives in their regions.

The Government of Canada is investing an additional $42 million through this year's estimates in the guns and gangs initiative. This is a horizontal initiative, which is being led by Public Safety Canada, and it is working in partnership, as always, with the Canada Border Services Agency and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

With respect to policing more specifically, in this year's budget there's substantial funding for policing, including $508.6 million over five years to support the RCMP in strengthening policing operations. Of that $508.6 million, there is $96.2 million allotted for the RCMP policing operations in the estimates provided today. The RCMP is, of course, absolutely key to protecting our national security, to reducing the threat of organized crime and to supporting prevention, intervention and enforcement initiatives right across Canada.

The CBSA supports the RCMP and other law enforcement partners in Canada to counter organized crime and gang activity. Investments made through the estimates and budget will support new technologies, increased detector dog teams, specialized training and tools, and an augmented intelligence and risk assessment capacity. All of this will help to enhance the CBSA's operational responses to better interdict illicit goods, such as firearms and opioids, from crossing our borders. I'm confident the funding we're providing will help all of our partners keep Canada's evolving safety and security needs in place and include addressing gun and gang challenges.

With respect to the border security aspects of my mandate, I'm pleased to report that the government is making significant investments, through the budget and these estimates, to better manage, discourage and prevent irregular migration. Budget 2019 provides $1.2 billion over five years, starting this year, to IRCC, IRB, CBSA, RCMP and CSIS to implement a comprehensive asylum reform and border action plan. While IRCC is the lead on this action plan, the public safety portfolio has a very significant contribution to make.

As the committee is aware, the CBSA is responsible for processing refugee claims, which are made at official points of entry and at their inland offices. The funding approved under budget 2019 will enable the CBSA to strengthen its processes at our border, to help increase the asylum system's capacity and to accelerate claim processing. It will facilitate the removal of individuals found not to be in need of genuine protection from Canada in a more efficient and timely way. The strategy, supported by that funding, will guide these efforts.

Before I close, I'd like to take the opportunity to highlight one further item. Canadians have been hearing a great deal lately about money laundering, terrorism financing and tax evasion happening within our country, and they are rightly concerned. Money laundering is not only a threat to public safety, but it also harms the integrity and stability of the financial sector and the economy more broadly. The government is not waiting to take action to protect Canada's safety, security and quality of life. I'm pleased to note that in budget 2019, the government will invest $24 million over five years for Public Safety Canada to create an anti-money laundering action coordination and enforcement unit, or ACE. This is a pilot project that will strengthen inter-agency action against money laundering and financial crimes.

(1640)



In addition, a further $68.9 million will be invested over five years, allocated to the RCMP, to enhance federal policing capacity, including the effort to fight money laundering, beginning with $4.1 million allocated in this fiscal year.

In addition, $28 million over five years is being invested in CBSA to support a new centre of expertise. The centre will work to identify and prosecute incidents of trade fraud, as well as potential cases of trade-based money laundering to be referred to the RCMP for investigation and prosecution.

As always, these are just a few examples of the important and vital work that the public safety portfolio and, in this case, the many departments that support my mandate are doing to protect Canadians.

Once again, I thank the committee members for their consideration of these estimates and for their ongoing efforts.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I look forward to members' questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

With that, Ms. Dabrusin, you have seven minutes, please.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for being with us today.

I've had the opportunity to raise this before. I would like to continue with the conversation about guns and gangs. You mentioned it in your opening, and I was looking through the main estimates about the work that's being done on border operations as well.

On my first question, when we're looking at gun issues, all the conversations I've had were really talking about supply and demand, both pieces. If we're first looking at the supply side of things, you mentioned it briefly, but could you tell us a bit more about what's being done by the CBSA to prevent gun smuggling?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Yes. Thank you very much, Ms. Dabrusin.

Guns that end up in the hands of criminals and are used to commit violent crimes in our community have a number of different sources. There are various estimates available from the various police services and agencies across the country that are determining the source of those illicit guns. It's quite clear that a significant portion of the guns used by gangs to commit criminal offences in our communities across Canada are illicitly imported into Canada across our borders. CBSA, of course, has a very important role in interdicting that supply.

I had the opportunity on the weekend to go down and visit the Point Edward CBSA facility and had the opportunity to speak about some of the work they're doing there, with the use of new technologies, the dog teams and, frankly, some really extraordinary and dedicated individuals—

(1645)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

If I could jump in, when you're talking about dog teams, are you actually talking about dogs?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Yes, real dogs. I actually met the dog. His name is Bones.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Bill Blair: They showed me how he searched a car. It's a really extraordinary use of even that. It's low-tech, but it works, and it works really well.

They were able to also share with me some of the extraordinary successes they've been able to achieve, including, for example, the seizure of a very high-powered assault rifle over the May 24 weekend, along with a number of large capacity magazines and ammunition. There is some excellent work that's taking place across our borders.

I will also tell you that there's an acknowledgement within CBSA and within the law enforcement community that to interdict the supply of guns coming across the border from the United States.... The United States is essentially the largest handgun arsenal in the world. There are many firearms there. Criminals know that if they can bring those guns across our border, they can be sold at a significant premium above what would be paid in the U.S., because they're not as readily available in Canada. It's a crime motivated by profit.

The police and CBSA understand that you can't just interdict the supply at the border, so there are some extraordinary efforts taking place. We are investing in the RCMP and municipal and provincial police services right across Canada that work in integrated border enforcement teams and conduct organized crime investigations to identify the individuals and the criminal organizations who are responsible for purchasing these guns in the United States, smuggling them across the border and then subsequently selling them to criminals in our country.

We have seen some extraordinary successes as a result of that partnership as well, but the work continues and is ongoing. We are making significant investments in this budget in CBSA and in law enforcement's capacity to conduct those investigations to improve the quality of the intelligence they gather and how they use that data to effect good success in their investigations and successful prosecution of the individuals who are responsible.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.

Staying on the supply side—I'm hoping we have a few minutes for demand—you have had a study. It was part of your mandate letter. You were asked to study a possible ban on handguns and assault weapons. It was, I believe, a “what we heard” report that was released. Would you be able to tell us about what the next steps are?

Hon. Bill Blair:

We identified a number of ways in which guns were getting into the hands of criminals. As I've already mentioned, a portion of those—some estimate 50%, some estimate as much as 70%—are in fact smuggled across the border. We also know that a number of those firearms that are subsequently used to commit criminal offences in Canada are domestically sourced.

Essentially, there are a number of reasonably well-identified ways in which that takes place. With regard to the first one, there have been a significant number of large-scale thefts where guns have been stolen either from a gun retailer or from an individual Canadian gun owner. Those guns are then subsequently made available on the street, sold to criminal organizations and used in criminal acts across the country. One of the things I heard, and we discussed very extensively, was how we might improve the secure storage of firearms to prevent those thefts, to make it harder for criminals to steal those guns and subsequently for them to go on the street.

There were also a number of cases where firearms were identified that had been purchased legally in this country, but then subsequently diverted into the criminal market by an individual with the intent of profiting by resale of those guns. It's a process that is sometimes referred to as straw purchasing. Essentially, it's an individual who has the legal authority to purchase a handgun, who sometimes tries to conceal its origin by removing the serial number, and then resells it on the street to somebody at a significant profit.

We identified in conversations across the country, and particularly with law enforcement, the importance of improving the tracing of those firearms that are used in criminal offences, so we can determine their origin of sale and better identify—and by detecting, thereby deterring—and hold accountable those individuals who are involved in that criminal activity. There were a number of other measures that we also heard about on interdicting the supply.

I've also heard from a number of people who have expressed concern that certain types of weapons, frankly, are a significant risk, and that additional steps should be considered in making them less available to those who would use them to harm others.

(1650)

The Chair:

You're not quite finished yet, but I'm sure that Mr. Graham will thank you if in fact we finish before seven minutes.

You have 40 seconds left.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I do. Thank you.

On the demand piece, quickly, we were at an announcement in Toronto in December, specifically about how we help youth and how we help the communities who have been impacted.

Can you tell me a bit about that, please?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Ms. Dabrusin, much of my earlier comments were with respect to interdicting the supply of guns that get into the hands of criminals. However, our government recognizes that you also have to reduce the demand for those guns, so we are also making significant investments in communities and in kids. We are working particularly with municipalities, but I've been to each province and we're providing resources to each of the provinces and territories to make investments in their communities and in those community organizations that do an extraordinary job of working with young people to help them make better choices, safer and more socially responsible choices, to avoid getting involved in gangs in the first place.

There are also a number of initiatives that we are supporting, working with young people who have already been involved in gangs, to help them leave that gang lifestyle and to not engage in violent criminal activity that causes so much trauma in our communities across the country.

There's no one single response. Frankly, it requires very significant investments, and also looking more broadly—

The Chair:

I think we're going to have to leave the answer.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Perhaps I will have the opportunity to come back to some of the other things we're doing that are making a difference.

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

The talent for stretching seconds into minutes is quite extraordinary today.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Blair, I want to talk about illegal border crossings.

The Auditor General submitted a damning report on refugee claims. You said that the system was very efficient. However, it was confirmed that the system was overloaded. The main agencies have difficulty working together, and it will take four to five years simply to return to normal.

Do you regret telling us in the committee that everything was fine and wonderful? Do you regret providing inaccurate information? [English]

Hon. Bill Blair:

Of course, I'm telling you the truth, Mr. Paul-Hus.

I was acknowledging the exceptional work that's being done by CBSA and by the RCMP, the police, provincial and municipal, right across the country. Given the resources and support they have had available to them, I think they do an extraordinary job.

We recognize that more needs to be done. It's precisely why we're making significant new investments and increasing their capacity to conduct these very complex investigations. For example, we recognize the importance of all law enforcement and departments and agencies working more collaboratively together. It's one of the reasons we're establishing for the money-laundering thing an action, coordination and enforcement centre. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

At the time, you told us that everything was fine. However, the Auditor General told us that this wasn't true. Basically, you're confirming that you provided the wrong information at that time. [English]

Hon. Bill Blair:

Could you be specific about which Auditor General's report you are referring to, sir? [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I'm talking about the parliamentary budget officer's report, which confirmed the issues associated with the $1.1 billion cost of handling asylum seekers. This report was published a few months ago. Do you know what I'm referring to? [English]

Hon. Bill Blair:

I'm sorry, I was referring to guns and money laundering. If you're talking about asylum claimants, one of the things that was identified, I believe, in that report was the work that was being done in security screening by CBSA.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

My question, sir, is quite simple.

A few months ago when you came to committee, we asked a question about the issue, and you said everything was fine. But the Auditor General said that there are many issues with that. My question was just whether you are ready to apologize to the committee because you said something wrong at that time.

That was my question, but I've lost too much time for that, so I'll go to my next question, sir.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Do you want an answer to that?

Sir, I'm happy to try to answer your question.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I've lost enough time, sir. I will ask another question, okay?

Hon. Bill Blair:

If there are any other questions you don't want answered, let me know.

(1655)

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

That's all right because you understand my question.

Your speaking notes refer to that. In the budget, you talk about an investment of $1.2 billion over five years, but is this the same money that the Auditor General mentioned, $1.1 billion in three years?

Is it the same money?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I believe the Auditor General concluded his report and his estimates on what was required last spring, in 2018, and since that time our government.... First of all, budget 2018 made significant new investments in the IRB and CBSA, and of course, in the budget we've just presented before you today, which is $1.18 billion....

Just as an example, we're increasing the capacity of IRB from where it was when the Auditor General conducted his report. They had the ability then to do about 26,000 hearings per year. Under these new investments, by the end of next year, they'll be at approximately 50,000, so it responds very directly to the deficiency that was identified as a result of understaffing and underfunding that had previously been experienced. We made those investments in budgets 2018 and 2019.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay, you make a lot of detours.

Your title is Minister of Organized Crime Reduction and Border Security.

On organized crime reduction, you're supposed to talk about the Mexican cartels, drug cartels, too, but why does Minister Goodale's office always answer questions from the media and not your office?

Hon. Bill Blair:

First off, he's the Minister of Public Safety and—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

But you're the Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction. Is that true?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I've listened very carefully to Minister Goodale's response and even his response earlier today, and I have exactly the same information as he provided to this committee.

It is a direct result of information provided by our agencies. I believe he did confirm that CBSA has determined that the number of inadmissibility cases for the period was 238 and also mentioned that we have been unable to determine any evidence that suggests—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I don't want his, Minister, I want your—

Hon. Bill Blair:

—that on the number you've raised in the House, 400 foreign nationals in Canada, we haven't been able to find any evidence that supports the veracity of that statement.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I'll go to my next question.

Last week, U.S. Vice President Pence came to meet the Prime Minister. Do you think they raised the question of the safe third country agreement? Did they?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I believe that it did come up—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Do you have an answer for us or do you think we will change the agreement on safe third countries?

Hon. Bill Blair:

There are discussions. I've been involved in discussions with U.S. officials as well as our officials at both IRCC and CBSA. I know that it has been raised at a number of different levels of discussion, and I think there is an acknowledgement or recognition that it's an agreement that can be modernized and improved to the benefit of both countries, and those discussions are ongoing.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

By "modernized" do you mean like we suggested last year?

Hon. Bill Blair:

As I recall, your suggestion was that we just unilaterally change a bilateral agreement, and that's not how that works. We have begun to have discussions with our treaty partner, the United States, to discuss many aspects of that agreement because we believe there is an opportunity for it to be improved and enhanced. Those discussions are ongoing.

It is not possible nor is it appropriate to simply unilaterally change a bilateral agreement.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

We haven't said that. I know we would never say that. We've said that we have to deal—

Hon. Bill Blair:

Just to be clear, you said you would change it, and we said no, we would enter into discussions with our partner on how it could be improved.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Of course we have—

I have no more questions.

The Chair:

Thank you Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for joining us, Minister Blair.

I'll ask you about your responsibilities regarding the border and the migrant situation. Some long responses have been provided. I'll provide a lengthy introduction and focus on the past, so that you can understand the context of my question. If my colleagues haven't seen the Radio-Canada report, I'd encourage them to watch it.

In 2011, I believe, the previous government implemented a program following two incidents where boats arrived in Canada with Tamil asylum seekers on board. The program still exists and spending has increased. Over $18 million is being spent on the program. People from CSIS, the RCMP and even CSE deal with shady individuals abroad, in countries that could be involved in smuggling migrants into Canada. We can agree that human rights are an issue in these places.

I want to know the following. How can you reconcile the government's approach of showing compassion for people in this situation with the fact that agencies are working for a ban abroad? People are being detained in countries where they may be subject to human rights violations.

If you aren't able to answer the question, I know that the people accompanying you today could do so. In the Radio-Canada report, neither the RCMP nor CSIS was able or willing to respond.

I'll let you answer my question. I'm sorry for the lengthy context, but it was important for my colleagues.

(1700)

[English]

Hon. Bill Blair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Dubé.

If I understand your question appropriately—and I'll certainly invite officials to add any background that will assist you—in my experience there are, unfortunately, individuals.... Those who are seeking refuge and those who are fleeing war and persecution are in a very vulnerable state. Quite often, they are subject to exploitation by those who would intend to profit from that. So we have a responsibility as well to ensure that, to maintain the integrity of our refugee determination system and our borders, CBSA, the RCMP and others who work together have a responsibility, and we do work internationally.... Frankly, we are very concerned, and we've taken a number of steps to deal with those who would exploit people in a vulnerable position.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Certainly I don't disagree with that characterization of individuals who want to take advantage of people in vulnerable situations. The issue in this media report, which I'm raising here, is that the Government of Canada has a program and invests millions of dollars—it's $1 million for CSIS and $9 million for the RCMP, if I remember correctly, but I could be mistaken—for them to operate abroad to deal with those unscrupulous individuals in regions where you're dealing with equally, if not more, unscrupulous regimes in those particular countries.

An individual in the Prime Minister's Office, or who at any rate advises the Prime Minister on this program, has gone to these places to thank these regimes on behalf of Canada.

At what cost do we ensure the integrity of the border? In other words, it's not only a responsibility to ensure the integrity of the border and take on these unscrupulous individuals, but also to ensure that we're not, pardon the expression, getting into bed with some pretty problematic individuals abroad, if I may say so diplomatically, as the report outlines, which, again, I would invite colleagues to read, and would be more than happy to provide to members of the committee who haven't seen it.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Yes, sir. I will simply acknowledge, because I don't have particular insight into—and colleagues, if any of you do, I wish you'd jump in.... We deal with transnational organized crime, including the exploitation of vulnerable people, in human trafficking, and with those who would be involved in exploiting those fleeing persecution. It is necessary for our federal officials and our security establishment to extend their work beyond our borders in order.... Some of the most effective work they do in preventing problems and crimes in Canada is by preventing it from coming to our borders in the first place. They are working in some very difficult places in the world, but we expect they would continue to uphold Canadian law and Canadian standards. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I don't have much time left.

Mr. Vigneault or Mr. Brennan, do you want to talk about your organization's perspective?

Mr. David Vigneault:

Yes. Thank you, Mr. Dubé.[English]

Thank you, Minister.

I would just add, Monsieur Dubé, that the program you referred to has been in place for a number of years now to prevent, as the minister mentioned and as you referred to in your prelude, traffickers from bringing people to Canada irregularly. The reason we are engaged is to protect the integrity of the system in Canada and make sure that criminals...national security concerns or people are not victimized through these processes.

The work we do abroad is governed by our act and by ministerial directives. I cannot go into all the operational details, but I can say that when we do share information with foreign entities, we are under ministerial directives to make sure that the information does not lead to a human rights violation or to mistreatment. I'm familiar with what the media was reporting on this, but I can say that there's been a review of these programs and that all agencies involved are covered by this ministerial directive. So there's another perspective as well to that story.

(1705)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Ms. Sahota, you have seven minutes, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

Thank you, Minister Blair, for being here today.

I want to start with the agreements you were speaking of earlier with the different provinces in relation to the funding in terms of gangs and guns. Can you tell me a little bit about how much funding is being provided from the federal level to specifically the Doug Ford government in Ontario?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Approximately $214 million has been identified in the guns and gangs funding for the entire country. That's in addition to the money that's been allocated, some $89 million, for CBSA and RCMP. Of the $214 million, $65 million is allocated to the Province of Ontario. There have been ongoing discussions with the Province of Ontario on how that money will flow to them and what they will do with it. I recently made a joint announcement with the Minister of Community Safety and the Attorney General for Ontario where they accepted $11 million over the first two years of this funding program. I'm not yet aware of whether they've made announcements as to how they intend to allocate that, but it's a total funding allocation over a five-year period of $65 million. So far the Province of Ontario has received $11 million of that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Why is it only $11 million at this point? Who makes that choice, and how was that decided?

Hon. Bill Blair:

It's part of the ongoing discussions between us. That was all they were prepared to identify various initiatives for. The money remains there for allocation to the Province of Ontario when they're ready to use it. They've identified so far, just in the first two years of the program, $11 million in initiatives that they're prepared to undertake with that money.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are you telling me there's $65 million available to Ontario? I know that my counterparts in the City of Brampton have been taking a keen interest in wanting to reduce crime in the city. However, they've only accepted $11 million of the $65 million that's been offered.

Hon. Bill Blair:

In fairness, these are ongoing discussions between our government and all the provinces. We've been working out funding allocations for each of the provinces, and so far that has been identified. This money is for municipal and indigenous police services across the provinces and territories but it is appropriately and necessarily allocated through the provincial governments. I would simply encourage all municipalities to reach out to their respective provincial government for discussions on how they might access the money that's coming from the federal government through the provincial governments.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is there any way to provide the money directly to the municipal governments? I know that my city, Brampton, is very eager to be able to get access to some of these funds to help them with some of the problems they're dealing with. Is the only way to get access to this money to go through the province?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I think it is incumbent upon us to do our very best to work with our provincial partners across the country. I will tell you that in my experience in some other jurisdictions, it's been a very positive experience. I remain hopeful about those allocations in Ontario. I have a strong interest in that place myself. I know the municipalities and policing agencies that are involved. Again, with those decisions, I think the appropriate way....

Policing is administered and overseen by the provincial governments across Canada. We are working with community safety ministers, public safety ministers and attorneys general across the country in each of the provinces and territories. We've certainly done our best. There are some other funding opportunities available that are done directly. That's more with community organizations. There have been a number of significant announcements in Ontario, in addition to the money I've already referenced, where we're supporting community organizations, various crime prevention initiatives and other types of investments in communities.

(1710)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

When you compare the $65 million offer to past allocated amounts, is this more or less than what the Government of Canada has provided provinces, or Ontario specifically?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I'm not aware of funding of this magnitude previously. I've been involved in a different capacity in dealing with guns and gangs issues. Generally our relationship was with only the provincial government. There was actually some funding made available in 2008 for what was called the police officers recruitment fund, but that money was terminated in 2013.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is this kind of funding the first of its kind from the federal government to the provinces?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Public Safety and our government last year brought forward a significant investment in guns and gangs initiatives, and there was also recognition and acknowledgement, after we talked with the provinces and municipal and indigenous police services, that there was important work that needed to be done. When we began making investments, we made sure there was money to flow through the provinces to those municipal and indigenous police services, as well as our federal authorities in the RCMP, CBSA and others, because the guns and gangs issue is a very real concern right across the country. We've seen a significant increase in gun violence and gun murders in our country. Much of that is directly related to drugs and gang activity, so we're making significant investments to support those efforts.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

From my experience in just these last few years of paying attention and monitoring, because issues now tend to come to the members of Parliament, I've seen that as the weather gets better and the summer comes along, in general there's an increase in criminal activity in Brampton.

Is there a different approach or are different allocations of funding budgeted for certain months? Can you speak from your past experience as to why that is?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Those operational decisions regarding how to allocate their resources and use these new resources are really the responsibility of police services and their leaders under the direction of their boards and their municipalities, and they are made very much in collaboration with the provincial authority.

There are also very significant partnerships that exist right across this country among law enforcement. For example, there are a number of important initiatives led by the RCMP in what we call combined forces special enforcement units. As an example, we have the integrated national security enforcement teams and others in which all police services will participate. I should mention, because they are quite relevant to my mandate, the integrated border enforcement teams, which are usually led by the federal agency but in which other police services participate as well. These types of initiatives are supported by the funding that we provide.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, witnesses, for being here.

Minister, last week you said assault-style rifles are military weapons “designed to hunt people”. I don't know what you refer to as an assault-style rifle, but I suspect you're referring to automatic rifles, automatic firearms, and you know that those firearms have been prohibited in this country since 1976. Could you tell us exactly what firearms you're referring to in that statement?

Hon. Bill Blair:

We've had a number of discussions. As I said, I've travelled across the country, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Exactly what firearms are you referring to specifically with that statement?

Hon. Bill Blair:

They are firearms that were designed for a military purpose, firearms that—

Mr. Glen Motz:

I don't know what that means. With that statement, to me, you're referring to, in reality, modern hunting rifles, modern sporting rifles. The very fact that you made that statement.... I find it extremely offensive. I find it misguided. I find it misinformed, and you're misleading the Canadian public with that. Again, what firearms are you referring to specifically?

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, let Mr. Blair answer.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I'm sorry you were offended, but I was thinking about—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Canadian licensed firearm owners are offended by this statement.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, let Mr. Blair answer the question.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I was thinking about the firearm that was used to kill three Mounties in Moncton. That was a firearm that was designed for military use. It was originally created and used by the military. It was a weapon that was used by that individual to hunt three police officers.

Mr. Glen Motz:

What was it? What was the rifle? What was the firearm?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I believe it was an M14. I was also thinking about the weapons that were used to kill the two officers in Fredericton and two private citizens. I was also thinking about the weapon that was used to kill 14 women at École Polytechnique—

Mr. Glen Motz:

You referred to the AR-15—

Hon. Bill Blair:

—and the weapon that was used to kill worshippers in the mosque in Quebec.

These were all weapons that were not designed as hunting weapons. They were designed for soldiers, soldiers who—

(1715)

Mr. Glen Motz:

You've identified the AR-15 specifically, Mr. Minister. You've identified it. Do you know whether the AR-15 has ever been used in a crime committed in Canada?

Hon. Bill Blair:

The AR-15.... Again, I have mentioned some of the other.... The AR-15 is the number one weapon used—

Mr. Glen Motz:

—a drive-by shooting in 2004, and no one was injured.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, we're just not getting the answers to these questions.

Mr. Glen Motz:

He needs to answer the question. He doesn't need to dance around the issue.

Hon. Bill Blair:

The AR-15 is the weapon that was used to kill a whole bunch of little kids at Sandy Hook. It was also used to murder 50 people in Christchurch—

Mr. Glen Motz:

We're talking Canada here, Mr. Minister.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, if you want to ask your question, ask your question, and then let the minister finish his answer. Then you can go back to asking another question.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Minister, can you describe the difference between an AR-15, which is currently restricted in this country, and the WK180-C?

The Chair:

Okay, there's a specific question. A specific answer, if you may, please.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Frankly, I don't consider myself an expert in the classification of those firearms, although I am familiar with both. I don't know whether any of the other witnesses has the expertise to define it. As you know, the classification is determined now by the RCMP.

The Chair:

Okay, we now have a specific answer to a specific question.

The second specific question.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Let me answer the question for you. They are virtually the same firearm. They fire a .223 round. They have the same operational mechanisms. The only difference is—and I'm glad you identified the idea of classifications; the Canadian public wants firearms classified by what they can do, not by what they look like, and that challenge has been ongoing. Bill C-71 is a prime example. We need facts to guide these decisions, not cosmetics, Mr. Minister.

The Chair:

That's a comment, not a question.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It is.

So is there any truth—

The Chair:

Excuse me, Mr. Motz.

Does the Minister wish to respond to Mr. Motz's comment?

Hon. Bill Blair:

No.

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Motz, your question.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Some rumours have been floating around over the last while about your government's plans to ban firearms, ranging from banning specific firearms to banning semi-automatic firearms, to handguns.

So I have a simple yes or no question. Will an order in council be issued banning certain classes of firearms?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Mr. Motz, I don't normally respond to rumours. What we are—

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's not a rumour. I'm asking a direct question.

Hon. Bill Blair:

If I may—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Is an order in council—

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, you've asked a specific question. It took you half a minute to do that. I should allocate similar time to Minister Blair to respond to your question.

Hon. Bill Blair:

We are looking at all the measures that we believe could help keep Canadians safe, and we are examining the right way to deal with those measures.

Mr. Glen Motz:

So no order in council is being planned. Do you have a different plan to ban firearms, as you've indicated?

The Chair:

Okay, that's the end of that question.

Briefly respond to Mr. Motz, and then he has finished his five minutes.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I have a plan to examine every way in which we can keep Canadians safe.

Mr. Glen Motz:

You continue to dance.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Minister, as you know, I'm a rural Canadian who has firearms in the house and I fire them from time to time. The last time I fired an AR-15 was only a month ago, so I want to put that in perspective.

What are you doing to protect lawful users of firearms going forward?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I also want to be very clear. The mandate I was given by the government was to examine every measure that could keep people safe with a very important specific caveat and that was an acknowledgement and a recognition that the overwhelming majority of firearm owners in this country are law abiding and responsible in their ownership. They acquire their firearms legally. They store them securely. They use them responsibly and they dispose of them according to the law.

Firearm ownership in this country is a privilege that is predicated on people's willingness and acceptance of our laws and regulations as they pertain to firearms. In my experience the overwhelming majority of Canadians are exceptionally responsible and law abiding with respect to their firearms, and I think it's really critically important that we always respect that. They are not dangerous people, and particularly hunters and farmers and sport shooters are very careful with their weapons.

At the same time, we have a responsibility to make sure that those weapons don't end up in the hands of people who would commit violent crimes with them. In my experience and from my discussions across the country, I believe those responsible gun owners are equally concerned with public safety and ensuring that their firearms don't end up in the hands of criminals.

(1720)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

Do I still have time, Chair?

The Chair:

You have a full five minutes, Mr. Graham, in part due to the efficiency of—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I thought you wanted 10 minutes left at the end.

I appreciate your responses.

I wanted to ask Mr. Tousignant—I believe you're from CSC—a very quick question before I come back to Mr. Blair.

I would have asked this at the previous panel, but I didn't have a chance. In my riding there is the La Macaza Institution, which has 28 Bomarc missile silos. I would like to know if CSC can help us prevent those from being torn down.

Mr. Alain Tousignant (Senior Deputy Commissioner, Correctional Service of Canada):

I'd have to get back to you on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They're on La Macaza Institution land. That's why I ask you.

Mr. Alain Tousignant:

Yes.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I don't have an answer for that either.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I just want it on the record because it is part of our heritage. I don't want to lose that heritage. It is used as storage units and it has asbestos and they want to take it out. They want to remove these silos. I don't want that to happen.

The Chair:

So we want to save—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Save the Bomarc silos. Save the missile silos.

The Chair:

—the missile silos. Okay.

That's different.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Blair, I don't know if it's you or Health or both, but I'd like to dive into the marijuana laws a bit.

As you know, it's a large rural riding. There are a lot of medical marijuana operations being set up. A lot of towns are complaining to me that they're not finding out about them. I would like to know what responsibility a licence requester has to notify the police, fire and municipalities. Could you help me with that?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Those are regulations that are outside of the Cannabis Act, where someone gets an authorization for growing cannabis, but they still have to adhere to, first of all, Health Canada's regulations with respect to those facilities, and they are also subject to municipal bylaws and zoning regulations, where they exist. I say that because not every place has such bylaws.

We've had a number of these incidents where there have been issues with respect to smell, light pollution, noise and other things that are problematic. In those circumstances, Health Canada has a role, and there are regulations that apply specifically to those authorized growers of medical marijuana, which are not the licensed producers under the Cannabis Act. There is also a significant role for local regulatory authorities, particularly bylaw enforcement, to address those things.

I would encourage you, if you have such facilities in your riding that are problematic for your community, to reach out to us and we'll make sure that Health Canada, to the extent it is able, assists with their regulations. In many circumstances we're able to work with the local municipal authority or regional authority in order to address those concerns.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

With that, I'm going to bring questioning to a close.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Wait. I had a really nice question.

The Chair:

It would be the first time in a long time that you've had a nice question.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I'd love to answer your nice question.

The Chair:

You can ask your nice question offline. We do have to pass the estimates, which is the purpose for which we're here.

On behalf of the committee I want to thank you, Minister Blair, and all your officials for being here while we go through these estimates.

With that, I'm going to suggest, and it's up to the colleagues whether we want to do roughly 30 votes all at once, presumably all with one vote on division. Is that a preferable way to proceed, or do you want to divide up the votes?

We're agreed that it will all be done at one. CANADA BORDER SERVICES AGENCY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$1,550,213,856 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$124,728,621 ç Vote 10—Addressing the Challenges of African Swine Fever..........$5,558,788 ç Vote 15—Enhancing Accountability and Oversight of the Canada Border Services Agency..........$500,000 ç Vote 20—Enhancing the Integrity of Canada's Borders and Asylum System..........$106,290,000 ç Vote 25—Helping Travellers Visit Canada..........$12,935,000 ç Vote 30—Modernizing Canada's Border Operations..........$135,000,000 ç Vote 35—Protecting People from Unscrupulous Immigration Consultants..........$1,550,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 agreed to on division) CANADIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$535,592,804 ç Vote 5—Enhancing the Integrity of Canada's Borders and Asylum System..........$2,020,000 ç Vote 10—Helping Travellers Visit Canada..........$890,000 ç Vote 15—Protecting Canada’s National Security..........$3,236,746 ç Vote 20—Protecting the Rights and Freedoms of Canadians..........$9,200,000 ç Vote 25—Renewing Canada's Middle East Strategy..........$8,300,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 agreed to on division) CIVILIAN REVIEW AND COMPLAINTS COMMISSION FOR THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$9,700,400 ç Vote 5—Enhancing Accountability and Oversight of the Canada Border Services Agency..........$420,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division) CORRECTIONAL SERVICE OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures, grants and contributions..........$2,062,950,977 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$187,808,684 ç Vote 10—Support for the Correctional Service of Canada..........$95,005,372

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$130,135,974 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$597,655,353 ç Vote 10—Ensuring Better Disaster Management Preparation and Response..........$158,465,000 ç Vote 15—Protecting Canada's Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Threats..........$1,773,000 ç Vote 20—Protecting Canada’s National Security..........$1,993,464 ç Vote 25—Protecting Children from Sexual Exploitation Online..........$4,443,100 ç Vote 30—Protecting Community Gathering Places from Hate Motivated Crimes..........$2,000,000 ç Vote 35—Strengthening Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime..........$3,282,450

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 agreed to on division) OFFICE OF THE CORRECTIONAL INVESTIGATOR OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$4,735,703

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) PAROLE BOARD OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$41,777,398

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$2,436,011,187 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$248,693,417 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$286,473,483 ç Vote 15—Delivering Better Service for Air Travellers..........$3,300,000 ç Vote 20—Enhancing the Integrity of Canada's Borders and Asylum System..........$18,440,000 ç Vote 25—Protecting Canada’s National Security..........$992,280 ç Vote 30—Strengthening Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime..........$4,100,000 ç Vote 35—Support for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police..........$96,192,357

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 agreed to on division) ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE EXTERNAL REVIEW COMMITTEE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$3,076,946

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) SECRETARIAT OF THE NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTELLIGENCE COMMITTEE OF PARLIAMENTARIANS ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$3,271,323

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) SECURITY INTELLIGENCE REVIEW COMMITTEE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$4,629,028

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall the chair report the votes on the 2019-20 main estimates, less the amounts voted in interim estimates, to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Je veux remercier le ministre Goodale de sa présence. Il est ici pour parler du Budget principal des dépenses.

Avant qu'il ne commence, j'aimerais mentionner que c'est peut-être la dernière fois que le ministre comparaîtra devant le Comité. Au nom du Comité, je tiens à le remercier, non seulement de sa présence ici, mais de sa volonté pour ce qui est de coopérer avec le Comité et d'examiner tous les amendements qu'il lui a présentés, ainsi que de sa volonté d'accepter un pourcentage assez élevé d'entre eux.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie de votre coopération et de votre relation avec le Comité.

Cela dit...

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Vous voulez dire dans la présente législature, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Pardon?

M. Graham: Vous voulez dire dans la présente législature, n'est-ce pas?

Le président: Oui, dans la présente législature. Nous n'allons pas revenir aux jours de Laurier ou de quoi que ce soit de cette nature.

M. Graham: Ce n'est pas la toute dernière fois.

Le président:

Non, merci.

Monsieur le ministre, allez-y.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale (ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Monsieur le président, merci de vos très aimables paroles. Je vous en suis très reconnaissant, et je suis heureux de revenir encore une fois au Comité, cette fois-ci, bien sûr, pour présenter le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020 pour le portefeuille de la Sécurité publique.

Pour m'aider à expliquer tous ces chiffres plus en détail et répondre à vos questions aujourd'hui, je suis heureux d'être accompagné de Gina Wilson, la nouvelle sous-ministre de Sécurité publique Canada. Je crois que c'est sa première comparution devant le Comité. Bien sûr, elle n'est pas étrangère au ministère de la Sécurité publique, mais elle a été au cours des dernières années sous-ministre des Femmes et de l'Égalité des genres, un ministère dont elle a présidé la création.

Aux côtés de la sous-ministre aujourd'hui, nous accueillons Brian Brennan, sous-commissaire de la GRC; David Vigneault, directeur du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité; John Ossowski, président de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada; Anne Kelly, commissaire du Service correctionnel du Canada; et Anik Lapointe, dirigeante principale des finances de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada.

La priorité absolue de tout gouvernement, monsieur le président, est d'assurer la sécurité des citoyens, et je suis très fier de l'immense travail qui est réalisé par ces représentants et les employés qui travaillent sous leur gouverne afin de servir les Canadiens et de les protéger contre toutes sortes de menaces publiques. La nature et la gravité de ces menaces continuent d'évoluer et de changer au fil du temps, et, en tant que gouvernement, nous sommes déterminés à appuyer les femmes et les hommes qualifiés qui travaillent d'arrache-pied afin de nous protéger en leur fournissant les ressources dont ils ont besoin pour pouvoir intervenir. Le budget des dépenses est bien sûr le principal véhicule qui permet de le faire.

Le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020 reflète l'engagement d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens tout en protégeant leurs droits et leurs libertés. Vous remarquerez que, à l'échelle du portefeuille, les autorisations totales demandées cette année entraîneraient une augmentation nette de 256,1 millions de dollars pour le présent exercice, ou 2,7 % de plus que le budget principal de l'an dernier. Bien sûr, certains des chiffres augmentent, et d'autres diminuent, mais le résultat net est une augmentation de 2,7 %.

Un élément clé est un investissement de 135 millions de dollars au cours de l'exercice 2019-2020 pour assurer la durabilité et la modernisation des opérations frontalières du Canada. Le deuxième est 42 millions de dollars pour Sécurité publique Canada, la GRC et l'ASFC, afin qu'elles puissent prendre des mesures contre les armes et les gangs. Le ministre Blair parlera plus en détail du travail qui est réalisé dans le cadre de ces initiatives lorsqu'il comparaîtra devant le Comité.

Pour ma part, aujourd'hui, je vais simplement résumer plusieurs autres mesures de financement qui touchent mon ministère, Sécurité publique Canada, et tous les organismes connexes.

Le ministère prévoit une diminution des dépenses nettes de 246,8 millions de dollars au cours de l'exercice, soit 21,2 % de moins que l'an dernier. C'est attribuable à une diminution de 410,7 millions de dollars dans les niveaux de financement qui ont expiré l'an dernier dans le cadre des Accords d'aide financière en cas de catastrophe. Il y a un autre poste que je présenterai plus tard où le chiffre augmente pour le prochain exercice. Nous devons compenser ces deux postes afin de respecter le flux de trésorerie. Cette baisse assez importante du financement pour le ministère lui-même, 21,2 %, est en grande partie attribuable au changement des AAFCC, pour lesquels le niveau de financement a expiré en 2018-2019.

Nous avons aussi vu une diminution de quelque 79 millions de dollars liée à la présidence par le Canada du G7 en 2018.

Ces diminutions sont partiellement compensées par un certain nombre d'augmentations au chapitre du financement, y compris une subvention de 25 millions de dollars attribuée à Avalanche Canada pour soutenir ses efforts de sensibilisation, de sécurité et de sauvetage; 14,9 millions de dollars pour des projets d'infrastructure liés à la sécurité dans les collectivités autochtones; 10,1 millions de dollars de financement supplémentaire pour le Programme de services de police des Premières Nations; et 3,3 millions de dollars pour réagir aux blessures de stress post-traumatique qui touchent notre personnel qualifié de la Sécurité publique.

(1535)



Le Budget principal des dépenses reflète aussi des mesures annoncées il y a quelques semaines dans le budget de 2019. Pour Sécurité publique Canada, c'est-à-dire le ministère, ces mesures renferment 158,5 millions de dollars pour veiller à une meilleure préparation et intervention pour la gestion des urgences et des catastrophes naturelles au Canada, y compris dans les collectivités autochtones, dont 155 millions de dollars pour compenser en partie cette réduction dans les AAFCC que je viens de mentionner.

On prévoit aussi 4,4 millions de dollars pour lutter contre les crimes vraiment haineux et grandissants de l'exploitation sexuelle en ligne des enfants.

Il y a une somme de 2 millions de dollars pour le programme d'infrastructure, afin de continuer d'aider les collectivités à risque de crimes haineux à améliorer leur infrastructure de sécurité.

On prévoit 2 millions de dollars pour soutenir les efforts visant à évaluer les menaces pour la sécurité nationale fondées sur l'économie et à intervenir en conséquence, et 1,8 million de dollars pour soutenir un nouveau cadre de cybersécurité pour protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada, notamment dans le secteur des finances, de l'énergie, des télécommunications et du transport.

Comme vous le savez, dans le budget fédéral de 2019, nous avons également annoncé 65 millions de dollars comme investissement de capitaux ponctuel dans le système de sauvetage aérien STARS afin d'acquérir de nouveaux hélicoptères d'urgence. Cet investissement important ne figure pas dans le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020, puisqu'il a été comptabilisé dans l'exercice 2018-2019, c'est-à-dire avant le 31 mars.

Je vais maintenant passer au Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020 pour les autres organisations du portefeuille de la Sécurité publique, qui ne sont pas le ministère lui-même.

Je vais commencer par l'ASFC, qui sollicite pour le présent exercice une augmentation nette totale de 316,9 millions de dollars. C'est 17,5 % de plus que le budget des dépenses 2018-2019. En plus de ce poste important concernant la durabilité et la modernisation des opérations frontalières dont j'ai déjà parlé, quelques autres augmentations notables comprennent 10,7 millions de dollars pour soutenir les activités liées au Plan des niveaux d'immigration qui a été annoncé pour les trois années 2018 à 2020. Ces activités comptent notamment le contrôle de sécurité, la vérification de l'identité, le traitement des résidents permanents lorsqu'ils arrivent à la frontière et ainsi de suite — toutes les responsabilités de l'ASFC.

Il y a un poste qui prévoit 10,3 millions de dollars pour l'Initiative de modernisation des opérations postales de l'ASFC; il est d'une importance capitale. On prévoit 7,2 millions de dollars pour élargir les sites d'examen sécuritaires, accroître la capacité en matière de renseignement et d'évaluation du risque et renforcer le programme des chiens de détection afin de donner à nos agents les outils dont ils ont besoin pour lutter contre la crise des opioïdes qui continue de sévir au Canada.

Le budget renferme aussi environ 100 millions de dollars en rémunération et régimes d'avantages sociaux des employés liés aux conventions collectives.

Les investissements du budget de 2019 qui ont une incidence sur le Budget principal des dépenses de l'ASFC cette année comprennent un total de 381,8 millions de dollars sur 5 ans pour accroître l'intégrité des frontières et du système d'octroi de l'asile. Même si mon collègue, le ministre Blair, fournira plus de détails sur cette mesure, l'ASFC recevra 106,3 millions de dollars de ce financement au cours du présent exercice.

Le budget de 2019 prévoit aussi 12,9 millions de dollars pour faire en sorte que les agents d'immigration et les agents frontaliers détiennent les ressources nécessaires pour traiter un nombre croissant de demandes de visas canadiens de visiteur et de permis de travail et d'études.

On prévoit 5,6 millions de dollars pour accroître le nombre de chiens de détection déployés dans l'ensemble du pays, afin de protéger les producteurs de porcs et les transformateurs de viande contre les graves menaces économiques posées par la peste porcine africaine.

De plus, il y a 1,5 million de dollars pour protéger les personnes contre les consultants en immigration sans scrupule, en améliorant la surveillance et en renforçant les mesures de conformité et d'application de la loi.

Je souligne également que le gouvernement a annoncé dans le cadre du budget son intention d'introduire la législation nécessaire pour élargir le rôle de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes de la GRC, de manière à ce qu'elle serve d'organisme d'examen indépendant pour l'ASFC. Cette législation proposée, le projet de loi C-98, a été présentée à la Chambre le mois dernier.

(1540)



Je vais maintenant passer à la GRC. Son budget pour 2019-2020 reflète une augmentation de 9,2 millions de dollars par rapport aux niveaux de financement de l'an dernier. Les principaux facteurs qui contribuent à ce changement comprennent des augmentations de 32,8 millions de dollars pour indemniser les membres blessés dans l'exécution de leurs fonctions, 26,6 millions de dollars pour l'initiative visant à assurer la sécurité et la prospérité à l'ère numérique et 10,4 millions de dollars pour des services de toxicologie judiciaire dans le cadre du nouveau régime concernant la conduite avec facultés affaiblies par la drogue.

Le Budget principal des dépenses pour la GRC reflète aussi 123 millions de dollars supplémentaires liés au budget de 2019, y compris 96,2 millions de dollars pour renforcer les opérations policières et globales de la GRC, et 3,3 millions de dollars pour que l'on puisse s'assurer que les voyageurs aériens et les travailleurs des aéroports font l'objet d'un contrôle efficace sur place. Les augmentations du financement pour la GRC sont contrebalancées par certaines diminutions dans le Budget principal de dépenses 2019-2020, y compris 132 millions de dollars liés à la présidence par le Canada du G7 en 2018 et 51,7 millions de dollars liés à l'élimination progressive de projets d'infrastructure.

Je vais maintenant passer au Service correctionnel du Canada. Il sollicite une augmentation de 136 millions de dollars, ou 5,6 %, par rapport au budget de l'an dernier. Les deux principaux facteurs qui contribuent au changement sont une augmentation de 32,5 millions de dollars dans le programme de prise en charge et garde, dont la plus grande partie, 27,6 millions de dollars, vise la rémunération des employés, et 95 millions de dollars annoncés dans le budget de 2019 pour soutenir les activités de détention du SCC.

La Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada prévoit une diminution d'environ 700 000 $ dans le Budget principal des dépenses ou 1,6 % de moins que le montant demandé l'an dernier. Et c'est attribuable à un financement ponctuel reçu l'an dernier pour appuyer les rajustements salariaux négociés. Bien sûr, le budget des dépenses renferme également des renseignements au sujet de Bureau de l'enquêteur correctionnel, du SCRS et d'autres organismes qui font partie de mon portefeuille. Je vais simplement mentionner que c'est un portefeuille très chargé, et que les gens qui travaillent au sein de Sécurité publique Canada et de tous les organismes connexes assument d'énormes responsabilités publiques dans l'intérêt de la sécurité publique. Ils mettent toujours la sécurité publique au premier plan tout en s'assurant que les droits et les libertés des Canadiens sont correctement protégés.

Cela dit, monsieur le président, mes collègues et moi serons heureux d'essayer de répondre à vos questions.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Picard, allez-y, pour sept minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, mesdames et messieurs, je vous souhaite la bienvenue et je vous remercie de vous prêter encore une fois à cet exercice.

D'entrée de jeu, je vais aborder mon sujet favori: la criminalité financière. Si je combine les crédits de la GRC et du ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile du Canada, le total fait un peu plus de sept millions de dollars en investissements... [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je ne reçois aucune interprétation.

M. Michel Picard:

Examinons l'aspect du budget des dépenses qui porte sur le blanchiment d'argent. Le montant combiné pour Sécurité publique et la GRC est d'environ 7 millions de dollars de plus.

Quel type d'amélioration recherchons-nous? S'agit-il seulement du Groupe de lutte contre le blanchiment d'argent ou bien aussi du secteur de GI/TI et d'autres unités qui travaillent en étroite collaboration avec le secteur des crimes financiers ou du financement du terrorisme?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Permettez-moi de demander au sous-commissaire Brennan de répondre.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Incidemment, il vient tout juste d'arriver en poste, au cours des derniers mois, mais il s'habituera à l'expérience très plaisante des audiences des comités à la Chambre des communes.

Sous-commissaire Brian Brennan (Services de police contractuels et autochtones, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le ministre et monsieur le président.

L'augmentation du financement servirait à tous ces secteurs. Je ne suis pas en mesure de parler précisément des chiffres, de l'endroit où l'argent sera exactement affecté, mais cet investissement vise à accroître notre capacité d'enquête et à soutenir les systèmes nécessaires par rapport à ces types d'enquêtes très particulières.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Si je peux ajouter quelque chose, monsieur Picard, le Budget des dépenses montre 4,1 millions de dollars qui s'en vont directement à la GRC pour rehausser la capacité des services de police fédérale. Environ 819 000 $ sont attribués à Finances Canada pour soutenir son travail lié au blanchiment d'argent. Au total, 3,6 millions de dollars sont destinés à CANAFE pour renforcer sa capacité opérationnelle. On prévoit 3,28 millions de dollars à l'intention du ministère de la Sécurité publique pour la création de l'Équipe d'action, de coordination et d'application de la loi pour la lutte contre le blanchiment d'argent, dans un effort pour réunir avec plus de cohésion tous ces divers filons, de sorte que tout le monde fonctionne exactement de la même manière avec la plus grande efficacité et coopération inter-agences possible.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci, monsieur.

Par rapport au SCRS et à la Stratégie du Canada au Moyen-Orient, qu'avons-nous à changer dans notre stratégie? Qu'est-ce qui ne fonctionne pas ou qui doit être changé?

De plus, par rapport aux récents événements ici et près de nous, le Moyen-Orient ne semble pas être la seule source des menaces que nous recevons, donc pourquoi nous concentrons-nous sur cette région?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Allez-y, monsieur Vigneault.

M. David Vigneault (directeur, Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité):

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Concrètement, nous nous efforçons de soutenir l'approche pangouvernementale à l'égard des activités au Moyen-Orient, et des activités militaires et diplomatiques en Syrie et en Irak. L'argent que vous voyez ici dans le Budget principal des dépenses représente les affectations particulières pour le SCRS afin de soutenir ces activités. Nous procédons à la collecte du renseignement dans la région et ici, au Canada, pour soutenir cette activité.

De plus, par rapport à votre question, le Budget s'est concentré sur le Moyen-Orient, mais comme vous l'avez signalé, monsieur Picard, nous sommes évidemment préoccupés par les activités et le terrorisme dans le monde entier, pas seulement au Moyen-Orient.

(1550)

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Picard, puis-je ajouter juste une petite anecdote?

J'ai eu l'occasion précédemment de discuter avec la personne qui était alors secrétaire à la Défense des États-Unis concernant le changement qui a été apporté au déploiement du Canada au Moyen-Orient dans le cadre de la coalition internationale contre Daech. J'ai remarqué l'augmentation très importante de l'investissement que nous réalisons relativement aux activités du renseignement. Le secrétaire des États-Unis s'est dit très en faveur du travail effectué par les Canadiens dans cette zone particulière, particulièrement les activités du renseignement, qu'il a désignées comme étant de première classe et très utiles pour tous les membres de cette coalition afin qu'ils puissent composer efficacement avec les menaces que présente Daech.

M. Michel Picard:

C'est ma première expérience et mon premier mandat, et je crois savoir que nous devons justifier les postes où nous dépensons de l'argent. Comme prochaine question, j'aimerais savoir pourquoi nous ne dépensons pas un montant d'argent précis sur un sujet précis, et nous justifierions donc des dépenses accrues... Pour ce qui est de l'infrastructure relative aux cybermenaces, je vois que nous avons prévu plus de 1,7 million de dollars. Mon inquiétude, ce n'est pas que nous ayons de l'argent pour les cybermenaces; c'est que nous n'en ayons pas ailleurs.

D'après nos études sur les institutions démocratiques, l'éthique et l'information publique ici, sur les cybermenaces et les crimes financiers, ce sujet était partout. Les gens prennent peur lorsqu'ils entendent parler de ce que nous apprenons chaque jour au sujet de cette menace qui comporte plusieurs facettes. Je ne vois rien dans le budget à propos de ce sujet précisément, donc pourriez-vous profiter de l'occasion pour donner des explications?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je serai heureux de le faire, monsieur Picard, car il est fort possible que des gens examinent ce chiffre de 1,8 million de dollars et se demandent comment cela couvre le domaine. Eh bien, ça ne le fait pas. C'est un petit aperçu d'une partie des dépenses que nous consacrons à toute la cause de la cybersécurité.

Dans nos deux ou trois derniers budgets, nous avons inclus une série d'investissements. Bien sûr, ils sont reportés dans le cadre du processus du Budget des dépenses, mais vous devez en fait examiner les sections du budget qui brossent le portrait le plus complet.

Dans divers ministères, nous investissons, dans le cadre du budget de l'an dernier, 750 millions de dollars pour renforcer la cybersécurité au Canada, dont une partie permet de créer le nouveau Centre pour la cybersécurité, et une partie crée la nouvelle Unité de coordination de la lutte contre la cybercriminalité au sein de la GRC. Il y a toute une série d'investissements pour renforcer notre approche en matière de cybercriminalité et de cybersécurité.

Dans le dernier budget, l'investissement principal était de 145 millions de dollars, dont cet investissement constitue la première très petite tranche, pour soutenir la sécurité de nos cybersystèmes essentiels. Nous avons recensé quatre domaines en particulier: les finances, les télécommunications...

Rappelez-moi ce qu'ils sont. Je veux m'assurer que j'ai bien les quatre cybersystèmes essentiels...

Le président:

Nous pouvons y revenir. M. Picard a largement dépassé le temps.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

J'essaie de réciter le discours sur le budget.

Il y a quatre domaines particuliers dans lesquels nous investirons pour soutenir une nouvelle législation qui exigera certaines normes à l'égard de ces secteurs essentiels et créera les mécanismes d'application de la loi pour que l'on s'assure que ces normes sont respectées. Il est d'une importance capitale, monsieur Picard, que nos cybersystèmes essentiels se protègent et emploient toutes les procédures nécessaires pour rester sécuritaires. Nous travaillons à créer le cadre législatif pour nous assurer que ça se passe, avec le bon type de mécanismes d'application de la loi qui l'appuient et le financement, dont la somme de 1,8 million de dollars ne représente que la toute première petite tranche. Nous nous assurerons que ces systèmes sont bel et bien sécuritaires et sûrs et que nous possédons les bons mécanismes d'application de la loi pour appliquer les exigences.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci, ministre Goodale, de cette réponse détaillée.

Monsieur Paul-Hus, allez-y, pour sept minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, mesdames et messieurs, bonjour.

Monsieur le ministre, j'ai une question qui touche plusieurs de vos agences, en lien avec l'information diffusée par les médias du Québec, particulièrement TVA, concernant les cartels mexicains de la drogue qui brassent des affaires au Canada. Ce matin, j'ai rencontré Son Excellence l'ambassadeur du Mexique au Canada, M. Camacho , et nous avons discuté de la situation.

Je sais que l'on vous a déjà interrogé à ce sujet pendant la période des questions orales et que vous avez répondu que cette information était fausse. Je voudrais donc savoir ce que vous savez et ce qui est vraiment fait au Canada pour y contrer les cartels mexicains. Le Canada fait affaire avec le Mexique, qui est l'un de ses plus grands partenaires et un ami. Ce n'est pas le Mexique qui est visé ici, mais plutôt les gens qui arrivent au Canada avec un passeport mexicain pour travailler pour les cartels mexicains de la drogue. C'est à ces gens que nous voulons nous attaquer. Que fait-on pour les contrer? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vous remercie de poser la question, monsieur Paul-Hus. Il est important d'obtenir des renseignements exacts dans le domaine public. Les chiffres que vous avez mentionnés au sujet de certains médias ont laissé l'ASFC perplexe, car elle n'a pas été en mesure de vérifier d'où provenaient ces calculs. M. Ossowski pourrait vouloir se prononcer à ce sujet, car au cours des derniers jours, il a demandé à ses représentants de l'ASFC d'éplucher les dossiers pour voir d'où provenaient ces calculs, et on ne peut simplement pas les vérifier.

Ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que l'ASFC a déterminé que le nombre de cas d'interdiction de territoire pour tous les types de criminalité touchant les ressortissants mexicains durant les 18 derniers mois, de janvier 2018 jusqu'à aujourd'hui, s'élève à 238. Sur ces 238 personnes, seulement 27 ont été déclarées interdites de territoire en raison de liens avec une organisation criminelle connue, dont trois concernaient des liens suspects avec des cartels.

Les chiffres réels sont considérablement plus bas que ceux qui ont été mentionnés dans les médias. Toutes ces 27 personnes qui ont été déclarées interdites de territoire en raison de liens avec la criminalité organisée ont été renvoyées du Canada. Elles ne se trouvent plus au pays. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci de votre réponse, monsieur le ministre.

Il reste qu'un individu a été clairement identifié. Comment se fait-il que cette personne, reconnue comme un criminel par le Mexique, ait pu franchir notre frontière? N'y a-t-il pas d'échange d'information entre les deux pays sur toute personne arrivant au Canada? Le fait que cette personne est reconnue comme un criminel par le Mexique n'est-il pas inscrit dans une banque de données? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il avec l'ASFC? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Toutes les vérifications appropriées pour ce qui est de l'identité, des dossiers, des questions d'immigration liées aux antécédents et de la criminalité ont été soigneusement effectuées par l'ASFC à la frontière.

Monsieur Ossowski, pouvez-vous parler de la personne précise à laquelle M. Paul-Hus fait allusion?

M. John Ossowski (président, Agence des services frontaliers du Canada):

Merci.

Je dirais juste que, dans le premier cas, je crois qu'il est important de comprendre les niveaux de sécurité. Nous travaillons dans des aéroports et auprès de représentants mexicains au Mexique, d'abord pour empêcher des gens de monter à bord de vols vers le Canada s'ils ne détiennent pas la documentation appropriée ou s'il y a des préoccupations en matière de fausses déclarations ou de criminalité. Cela dit, si ces gens arrivent et que des préoccupations sont soulevées, nos agents sont très bien formés pour composer avec celles-ci dès leur arrivée. Les personnes pourraient être autorisées à partir à ce moment-là, si elles restent à l'aéroport jusqu'au prochain vol, puis retournent chez elles. Si elles arrivent et que nous soupçonnons que nous devons faire un certain travail, nous vérifierons la possibilité de toute criminalité durant l'inspection secondaire.

Durant cette même période de référence, je peux dire que nous avons repéré 18 personnes qui avaient utilisé de faux titres de voyage et avons été en mesure de les empêcher d'entrer. Il y a des niveaux de sécurité.

Pour ce qui est de cette personne particulière, elle a été renvoyée du pays.

(1600)

[Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je comprends que vous pouvez avoir cette information d'avance puisque je sais qu'il y a des agents au Mexique et des ententes avec ce pays. Il y a des milliers de Mexicains qui viennent au Canada. N'y a-t-il pas de mécanismes informatiques adéquats dans les systèmes de l'ASFC? Les données des passeports n'y sont-elles pas disponibles, surtout dans le cas de criminels reconnus? N'y a-t-il pas d'échanges d'information sur ces criminels, un peu comme Interpol? [Traduction]

M. John Ossowski:

Je crois qu'il est important de comprendre les différences. Pour ce qui est du Mexique, les visas ne sont pas nécessaires pour pouvoir venir au Canada. Nous avons levé l'obligation relative au visa il y a quelques années. Les Mexicains voyagent maintenant grâce à ce qui s'appelle le programme d'autorisation de voyage électronique. C'est allégé sur le plan de la criminalité.

Comme j'ai dit, s'ils arrivent et que l'on cerne quelques préoccupations ou indicateurs, nous procédons à ces vérifications criminelles au point d'entrée dès leur arrivée. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, le 10 mai, un camion-citerne est entré en collision avec un avion à l'aéroport Pearson. Le Globe and Mail nous a appris que le véhicule avait tenté à trois reprises d'emboutir l'avion. La police de Peel mène l'enquête, mais la situation est très suspecte et il pourrait s'agir d'un attentat délibéré. Avez-vous plus d'information là-dessus? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il n'y a aucun renseignement que je suis en mesure de fournir en ce moment, monsieur Paul-Hus, relativement à cet incident particulier. Toutefois, je m'engage à voir s'il y a d'autres détails que je pourrai vous communiquer, en tant que collègue à la Chambre des communes. Je vais faire enquête et déterminer quel type de renseignements peuvent être diffusés dans le domaine public.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus et monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Dubé, allez-y, pour sept minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui.

Monsieur le ministre, nous avons accueilli M. David McGuinty lorsqu'il est venu nous présenter le premier rapport annuel du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. J'oublie l'endroit précis du rapport et je vous prie de me le pardonner, mais il y était indiqué qu'on ne pouvait pas dévoiler les montants consacrés à la sécurité nationale.

Pourtant, le rapport fournissait ces montants et leur ventilation pour l'Australie. Quand j'ai soulevé cette contradiction avec M. McGuinty, il m'a confirmé que les membres du Comité avaient posé la question aux fonctionnaires qui faisaient la présentation, mais s'étaient fait répondre qu'il s'agissait d'une question de sécurité nationale et que l'on ne pouvait donc pas divulguer cette information.

Je me demandais si vous pouviez clarifier la raison pour laquelle l'Australie, une alliée et membre du Groupe des cinq, estime que ses dépenses peuvent être rendues publiques, mais pas le Canada. [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Dubé, notre préoccupation tient à la fourniture de renseignements dans le domaine public qui pourrait en fait révéler des détails opérationnels sensibles et très critiques concernant la GRC, le SCRS ou l'ASFC d'une façon qui pourrait compromettre leur capacité d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.

L'information peut être communiquée dans le contexte du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. Elle serait également accessible au nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, qui sera créé en vertu du projet de loi C-59. Ce sont des environnements classifiés pour lesquels les députés autour de la table possèdent le niveau d'autorisation approprié. C'est plus difficile de communiquer cette information ici. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je comprends que c'est classifié et que cela impose certaines limites. Je ne veux pas trop m'acharner là-dessus, parce que j'ai des questions à poser sur d'autres sujets. Cependant, comme je l'ai évoqué, les Australiens rendent cette information publique, ce dont le rapport fait état.

M. McGuinty nous a confié que le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement n'avait pas reçu de réponse adéquate à ce sujet. Pourquoi cette différence entre le Canada et l'Australie? Je comprends les mécanismes qui s'appliquent, mais il semblerait que votre logique va à l'encontre de celle des Australiens.

(1605)

[Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Loin de moi l'idée de critiquer les Australiens, mais nous avons notre propre logique canadienne, et notre obligation ici consiste à protéger la sécurité publique et la sécurité nationale des Canadiens.

Monsieur Dubé, j'aimerais simplement encourager M. McGuinty et le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement à suivre avec attention cette question auprès des divers organismes de sécurité, ce qu'ils ont le pouvoir de faire en vertu de la législation, pour obtenir l'information dont ils estiment avoir besoin. J'encouragerais les organismes à présenter...

M. Matthew Dubé:

Monsieur le ministre, je vais devoir vous interrompre, car mon temps est limité et que c'est probablement le seul tour où je pourrai vous poser des questions.

J'aimerais juste dire que je crois c'est une chose importante à soulever, parce que, au chapitre des dépenses, tous les parlementaires ont un rôle particulier à jouer, au-delà du seul Comité, pour ce qui est de l'autorisation, qui peut concerner davantage les détails opérationnels. L'argent est une affaire complètement différente, comme M. Picard l'a dit dans ses questions concernant le rôle que même nous pouvons jouer en tant que personnes présentes au Comité.

Sur ce, j'aimerais passer à l'ASFC et à la CCETP. Nous savons que le projet de loi C-98 est déposé à la Chambre. Je me demande si vous pourriez clarifier les choses. Au total, 500 000 $ sont destinés à l'ASFC, et 420 000 $ à la CCETP. J'ai deux questions à ce sujet.

D'abord, est-ce là tout l'argent qui découlera du mécanisme associé au projet de loi C-98 ou y a-t-il plus d'argent qui suivra la mise en œuvre de ces mesures? Ensuite, qu'est-ce qui explique cet écart? Si c'est 500 000 $ pour l'ASFC, fait-elle le travail d'examen de surveillance à l'interne, ou ce travail sera-t-il renvoyé à la CCETP une fois que le projet de loi C-98 sera adopté?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Encore une fois, les chiffres qui figurent dans ce Budget des dépenses sont l'aperçu initial, une tranche de un an, du début d'un processus. C'est un processus très important. Alors que, comme vous le savez, la CCETP se concentrait au préalable totalement sur la GRC, nous allons maintenant élargir l'organisme. Il continuera sa fonction d'examen relativement à la GRC, mais il assumera aussi la responsabilité de la fonction d'examen pour l'ASFC.

L'attente est la suivante: pour toute plainte du public concernant le comportement d'un agent ou une situation particulière qui se présente à la frontière ou quelque autre sujet comme la gestion de la détention, par exemple, une plainte pourrait être déposée auprès de cette nouvelle entité élargie, et elle aurait la compétence totale pour enquêter sur cette plainte du public.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Eh bien, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, mieux vaut tard que jamais, et j'espère certainement qu'on l'adoptera avant que le Parlement n'ajourne.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Moi aussi, monsieur Dubé.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ma dernière question concerne le crédit 15, qui porte sur les « menaces pour la sécurité nationale fondées sur l'économie » dans le cadre du mandat du SCRS. Qu'est-ce qu'une menace pour la sécurité nationale fondée sur l'économie dans le contexte de ce que vous êtes autorisé à nous dire ici aujourd'hui?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Eh bien, je pourrais vous donner mon explication en des termes simples.

Monsieur Vigneault, aimeriez-vous fournir la définition officielle?

M. David Vigneault:

Oui. Merci, monsieur le ministre.[Français]

Merci, monsieur Dubé.[Traduction]

Essentiellement, c'est lié aux investissements étrangers globaux dans le pays, lorsque nous examinons les entreprises étatiques différentes d'un pays différent, les diverses entités, qui essaient d'investir dans de nouvelles installations ici, au Canada.

C'est la capacité du service de contribuer aux efforts de la communauté de la sécurité nationale afin d'évaluer si ces transactions présentent une dimension liée à la sécurité nationale. Parfois, c'est en raison de la propriété, et parfois, de la nature de la technologie qui pourrait être acquise. C'est notre capacité globale d'enquêter et de produire la bonne analyse pour soutenir la prise de décisions de Sécurité publique, d'autres organismes et, au bout du compte, du Cabinet, en vertu de la Loi sur Investissement Canada.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Spengemann, s'il vous plaît, pour sept minutes.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Goodale, nous arrivons à la fin de la législature. J'aimerais juste prendre un moment pour vous remercier, ainsi que votre équipe de conseillers, au nom des gens de Mississauga—Lakeshore, la circonscription que je représente, de votre travail, et par votre entremise, les hommes et les femmes, les membres de notre fonction publique, qui font ce travail incroyablement important de sécurité publique et de sécurité nationale, jour après jour.

Il y a quelques jours, j'ai eu l'occasion de rencontrer un groupe d'élèves incroyables de 7e et 8e années à l'école Olive Grove, une école islamique dans ma circonscription. Cette rencontre faisait partie de la Journée du représentant du Canada organisée par CIVIX, qui est une journée pour faire venir des représentants élus en classe.

Il y a eu une excellente discussion. Un des points que nous avons abordés était les crimes violents, et particulièrement la violence par les armes à feu. Je sais que le ministre Blair sera avec nous plus tard. Nous avons sondé les élèves pour savoir quelles questions étaient importantes, et quand il s'agissait de la violence commise par les armes à feu et les crimes violents, presque chaque main s'est levée parmi les élèves de 7e et de 8e  années.

Nous avons un engagement de 2 millions de dollars à l'égard d'un programme visant à protéger les lieux de rassemblement communautaire contre les crimes motivés par la haine, mais aussi le Centre canadien d'engagement communautaire et de prévention de la violence. Que faisons-nous en ce moment pour nous attaquer aux causes profondes des crimes violents et pour nous assurer qu'il y a un degré de sécurité pour les élèves de 7e et 8e années qui appartiennent à une école confessionnelle, pour qu'ils se sentent en sécurité quand ils étudient dans leur collectivité et leur centre d'apprentissage?

(1610)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est une question très importante, monsieur Spengemann, et il y a plusieurs réponses à cette question.

Merci d'avoir souligné le bon travail du Centre d'engagement communautaire du Canada au sein de mon ministère. Son objectif global est de coordonner et de soutenir les activités à l'échelon communautaire partout au pays; certaines sont dirigées par les municipalités, les gouvernements provinciaux ou des organisations universitaires, et d'autres par des services de police qui tendent la main à la collectivité afin de contrer ce processus insidieux de radicalisation menant à la violence.

Une partie de leur travail repose purement sur la recherche; une autre, sur la prestation de programmes; d'autres parties consistent à aider les groupes qui fournissent les messages contraires à des gens qui se dirigent dans une trajectoire négative vers l'extrémisme et la violence. Le centre canadien est opérationnel depuis deux ans et demi, et il a fait un travail très important.

Le programme particulier auquel vous faites référence, je crois, est différent. C'est le Programme de financement des projets d'infrastructure de sécurité qui, quand nous sommes arrivés au pouvoir il y a trois ans et demi, était financé à hauteur d'environ un million de dollars par année, si je ne m'abuse. C'était une bonne initiative, mais sa portée était assez limitée. Nous avons quadruplé les fonds, et ils s'élèvent maintenant à 4 millions de dollars par année. Nous avons élargi les critères par rapport à ce que le programme peut en fait soutenir.

Par exemple, un des récents changements est de permettre qu'une partie du financement du Programme de financement des projets d'infrastructure de sécurité serve à la formation dans des écoles, des lieux de culte ou des centres communautaires, où cette formation peut en fait vous aider à savoir quoi faire en cas d'incident. C'est comme un exercice d'incendie à l'école. Comment réagissez-vous, disons, devant un tireur actif ou un incident de violence?

Dans le cas de la synagogue Tree of Life à Pittsburgh, l'automne dernier, on a découvert qu'une formation préalable avait vraiment servi à changer les choses dans cette situation. Puisqu'ils avaient reçu une formation appropriée, des gens sur les lieux savaient exactement comment réagir devant une situation de tireur actif. Les gens de cette synagogue sont d'avis que la formation a réellement servi à sauver des vies.

Nous avons modifié les conditions du Programme de financement des projets d'infrastructure de sécurité afin de pouvoir payer, en plus de la télévision à circuit fermé, de meilleures portes, des barrières et d'autres mesures de protection qui entrent dans la conception d'un immeuble, et la rénovation de l'immeuble lui-même pour le rendre aussi efficace que possible afin d'assurer la sécurité des gens.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Merci.

Je vais maintenant passer à un autre sujet pour vous amener dans le domaine cybernétique. Je crois que 9,2 millions de dollars servent à la protection des droits et des libertés des Canadiens. Une préoccupation qui est soulevée concerne la cyberintimidation, particulièrement celle dirigée contre les jeunes et les gens LGBTQ2+, mais aussi d'autres communautés vulnérables.

Pouvez-vous dire au Comité ce que fait le ministère au sujet de l'intimidation en ligne, précisément?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est une initiative qui réunit non seulement mon ministère, mais d'autres ministères au sein du gouvernement du Canada. L'objectif global est d'abord de rehausser le degré de sensibilisation par rapport à une partie des activités insidieuses qui ont lieu en ligne. Ce pourrait être de l'intimidation ou de l'exploitation sexuelle des enfants. L'une entraîne souvent l'autre. Ce pourrait être le trafic de personnes ou l'extrémisme violent. Dans un autre cadre, il pourrait s'agir d'attaques contre nos institutions démocratiques. Il y a toute une gamme de préjudices sociaux qui sont perpétrés sur Internet. Notre objectif consiste à élever le degré de sensibilisation publique, de sorte que les gens comprennent et connaissent mieux la littératie numérique, afin qu'ils sachent ce dont ils sont victimes en ligne et puissent établir une distinction entre une activité légitime et une activité illégitime.

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nous avons aussi créé de nouveaux systèmes de cybersécurité — le premier au sein du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, et l'autre à la GRC — ce qui les rend, pour ce qui est de l'unité policière, plus accessibles au public, grâce à un mécanisme de signalement à guichet unique. Les gens savent où ils peuvent signaler des cybercrimes et des incidents sur Internet qui doivent être portés à l'attention des agents publics.

C'est un problème vraiment universel, qui nous occupe littéralement chaque minute. Nous devons mobiliser tous les Canadiens dans cet effort pour comprendre leur vulnérabilité en ligne, puis rendre rapidement accessibles les mécanismes d'intervention à tous les ordres de gouvernement. C'est ce que nous essayons de faire.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Spengemann...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Pour répondre à un dernier petit point, monsieur le président, les systèmes d'infrastructures essentielles auxquels je faisais allusion plus tôt sont les finances, les télécommunications, l'énergie et le transport.

Le président:

Merci.

Je suis sûr que M. Motz est heureux de le savoir.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

En effet. Merci.

Le président: Vous avez cinq minutes, monsieur Motz.

M. Motz: Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, à vous et à votre équipe, d'être ici.

Monsieur le ministre, on a entendu beaucoup de rumeurs récemment par rapport au fait que votre gouvernement songe à interdire certains types d'armes à feu, peut-être pas plus tard que cette semaine. Je vais vous poser une question très simple et claire: envisagez-vous d'adopter un décret pour interdire certaines armes à feu, oui ou non?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le premier ministre...

M. Glen Motz:

Oui ou non.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

... a invité le ministre Blair pour examiner cette question, et il rendra compte de ses recommandations sous peu. Aucune décision finale n'a encore été prise. Il sera en mesure de vous fournir une description exacte de ses délibérations lorsqu'il comparaîtra.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur le ministre, je sais que, généralement, votre parti a tendance à traiter les propriétaires d'armes à feu canadiens respectueux de la loi comme des citoyens de seconde classe...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non, ce n'est pas vrai.

M. Glen Motz:

... mais je veux dire clairement que l'industrie des armes à feu au Canada produit annuellement des centaines de millions de dollars de ventes et qu'elle est responsable de milliers d'emplois. Il y a des conséquences réelles aux tentatives de renforcer votre flanc gauche durant une année électorale, mais avec fort peu de réalisations jusqu'à maintenant dans votre gouvernement.

Encore une fois, oui ou non, prévoyez-vous interdire les armes à feu au pays?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Motz, vous savez très bien que c'est un sujet stratégique précis sur lequel le premier ministre a demandé au ministre Blair de se pencher et de rendre des comptes. Il a mené des consultations élargies, probablement les plus grandes de l'histoire canadienne. Il présentera ses recommandations sous peu.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien. Donc, nous attendons toujours.

Je vais passer à mon autre question. Nous savons que la majorité des homicides liés aux armes à feu dans notre pays ne sont pas commis par les détenteurs de permis d'arme valides. Au cours des 15 dernières années environ, ce pourcentage a été extrêmement faible. Le fait de cibler une population qui respecte la loi dès le départ, avec le projet de loi C-71, plutôt de s'en prendre aux gangs et aux problèmes des armes à feu que nous connaissons au pays... votre gouvernement a affaibli les sanctions prévues pour les gangs et l'affiliation à des gangs et a complexifié les choses pour les actuels propriétaires d'armes à feu respectueux de la loi. Comment conciliez-vous cela?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Eh bien, nous avons investi 327 millions de dollars dans une stratégie qui se consacre directement à la lutte aux armes à feu et aux gangs. De ce total, 214 millions de dollars serviront aux provinces et aux collectivités, afin qu'elles puissent soutenir leurs stratégies locales de lutte contre les gangs. Environ 50 millions de dollars seront destinés à l'ASFC, pour contribuer à l'interception des armes illégales qui arrivent par la frontière, et environ 35 millions de dollars à la GRC, pour appuyer ses efforts de lutte contre le trafic illégal d'armes à feu.

Il y a tout un ensemble de...

(1620)

M. Glen Motz:

En 2017, vous avez promis 500 millions de dollars aux services de police pour lutter contre les gangs et les armes à feu, puis c'était 327 millions de dollars. Je me demande quelle partie de cet argent a réellement été donnée aux provinces pour qu'elles puissent composer avec leurs problèmes de gangs et d'armes.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les accords avec les provinces sont sur le point d'être conclus.

Dans ma province, la Saskatchewan, l'accord est conclu, et le ministre provincial et moi en avons fait l'annonce ensemble. Il y a eu des annonces dans plusieurs provinces et territoires du pays. Les choses avancent.

Notre engagement, c'était d'atteindre le niveau de 100 millions de dollars par année de façon permanente, et nous respecterons cette cible. Les 327 millions de dollars dont j'ai parlé étaient au début de cet engagement, pour aider tous les autres ordres de gouvernement à être aussi efficaces que possible dans leur gestion du problème des armes illégales et des gangs. Vous pouvez probablement ajouter une troisième composante à tout ça, les drogues, parce qu'elles sont habituellement présentes, elles aussi.

Les armes, les gangs et les drogues, c'est ce à quoi l'argent servira, de pair avec des modifications de la loi pour améliorer les vérifications des antécédents, exiger une vérification des permis et normaliser les pratiques exemplaires en matière de tenue de dossiers.

Le président:

Il vous reste un peu moins d'une minute.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

À titre informatif, nous n'allons pas entreprendre un débat sur le projet de loi C-71, parce que ce n'est pas exactement vers ça qu'on s'enligne.

Votre collègue, M. Blair, a dit qu'il n'y a aucune raison pour quiconque d'être propriétaire de ce qui est en réalité un fusil de chasse moderne, parce que ce sont des armes conçues pour blesser les gens. Cette déclaration est non seulement offensante, mais incroyablement erronée et mal avisée. En outre, elle vise délibérément à tromper les Canadiens.

J'aimerais savoir quelle est votre réponse à cette affirmation, monsieur, pour les hommes et les femmes de notre équipe olympique canadienne de tir, par exemple, qui représentent le Canada à Tokyo, lorsqu'ils entendent une telle déclaration formulée par un ministre du gouvernement.

Le président:

Vous allez devoir garder votre réponse pour plus tard.

Votre temps est expiré, monsieur Motz. Je suis sûr que vous aurez l'occasion de demander directement à M. Blair ce qu'il a voulu dire en formulant cette déclaration.

Passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être là aujourd'hui et de l'avoir été toutes les autres fois où vous avez comparu devant le Comité. Vos réponses sont toujours intéressantes.

Vous avez parlé dans votre déclaration du financement futur pour les mesures d'application de la loi touchant les consultants en immigration sans scrupules. Je sais que cela relève non seulement de votre ministère, mais aussi de Citoyenneté et Immigration.

Pouvez-vous nous fournir un peu plus de renseignements sur ce à quoi il faut s'attendre et sur la façon dont les mesures d'application de la loi seront mises en œuvre?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Permettez-moi de demander à M. Ossowski de fournir des renseignements détaillés à ce sujet.

M. John Ossowski:

Merci.

Nous obtenons environ 200 pistes par année, et cela mène à environ 50 enquêtes. Les fonds supplémentaires que nous allons recevoir nous aideront à composer avec certains des cas plus complexes tout en renforçant de façon générale notre capacité de mener de telles enquêtes et, nous l'espérons, de mettre fin au problème.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur les pistes?

Les clients de ces consultants appellent-ils l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, l'ASFC pour les dénoncer?

M. John Ossowski:

Ce peut être une diversité de sources qui nous informent. Parfois, c'est notre propre analyse découlant de notre travail auprès de la Commission de l'immigration et du statut de réfugiés, si les responsables de la Commission estiment que quelque chose est suspect. Il peut y avoir un certain nombre de façons différentes pour nous de découvrir qu'une personne doit faire l'objet d'une enquête.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quel genre de gestes ou de mesures pouvez-vous prendre contre ces personnes?

M. John Ossowski:

Au bout du compte, elles peuvent faire face à des accusations criminelles.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela relèverait de votre compétence, que...

M. John Ossowski:

Si on parle d'une infraction criminelle, alors tout dépend de la question de savoir si nous avons travaillé avec la GRC. Tout dépend de la nature du résultat de l'enquête.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Cette augmentation est-elle une première ou est-ce le montant régulier qui est habituellement attribué?

M. John Ossowski:

Non. C'est une augmentation de 10 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, donc on parle d'environ de 2 millions de dollars, si je me rappelle bien la structure de tout ça. C'est tout simplement, comme je l'ai dit, pour accroître notre capacité, parce que nous commençons à rencontrer un peu plus de ce type de dossiers et, comme je l'ai dit, certains de ces cas sont complexes et font intervenir plusieurs clients, et nous voulons passer en revue toute cette information et mieux concentrer nos efforts.

(1625)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Récemment, monsieur le ministre, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler aux nouvelles des inondations en Ontario, au Québec et au Nouveau-Brunswick. Quelle part de votre budget a été dépensée pour atténuer les répercussions des inondations ou composer avec leurs conséquences?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

En fait, nous pouvons vous fournir un état des paiements liés aux accords d'aide financière en cas de catastrophe, les Accords d'aide financière en cas de catastrophe, les AAFC, des dernières années. C'est vraiment instructif. Je serai heureux de fournir l'information au Comité, parce qu'on peut voir que les pertes couvertes par les AAFC au cours des six dernières années — principalement pour des inondations et des feux de forêt — sont plus élevées que l'ensemble des dépenses du programme au cours des années précédentes, remontant jusqu'en 1970.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Wow.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale : Il est évident qu'il se passe quelque chose du côté climatique et vu l'incidence des feux de forêt et des inondations au cours des dernières années. Le rythme s'accélère de façon marquée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il y en a eu plus au cours des six dernières années que depuis 1970?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les critères ont-ils changé quant aux conditions d'admissibilité au financement gouvernemental ou est-ce principalement en raison des changements climatiques et du fait que de tels événements se produisent plus souvent?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Chaque année, on assiste à un plus grand nombre d'incidents, qui ont tendance à être plus graves et plus dispendieux. Les critères sont essentiellement les mêmes. En fait, il y a quelques années, le gouvernement précédent a rajusté la formule de financement afin que les provinces paient une plus grande part avant que la contribution fédérale entre en jeu, et cela aurait tendance à réduire le montant dépensé par le gouvernement fédéral en raison du léger rajustement de la formule de partage des coûts. Et malgré tout, le montant des paiements fédéraux est plus élevé parce que les pertes sont plus importantes.

Vous n'avez qu'à penser aux événements spectaculaires, comme l'inondation près de High River, en Alberta, il y a quelques années. Je crois qu'il s'est agi de l'inondation la plus onéreuse de l'histoire canadienne. Fort McMurray dans le Nord de l'Alberta a été le théâtre du pire incendie de l'histoire canadienne. Deux années très dispendieuses en Colombie-Britannique ont suivi.

Nous constatons aussi de graves problèmes ce printemps, en raison des inondations survenues il y a quelques semaines au Manitoba, en Ontario, au Québec et au Nouveau-Brunswick, et, maintenant, au cours de la dernière semaine, environ, on est aux prises avec des feux de forêt sur les territoires de la Première Nation de Pikangikum dans le Nord-Ouest de l'Ontario et aussi dans le Nord de l'Alberta. Je crois qu'environ 11 000 personnes ont maintenant été évacuées dans le Nord de l'Alberta, et toute la collectivité de Pikangikum est en train d'être évacuée.

C'est un problème très grave. Les changements climatiques ont des conséquences, et ces conséquences sont de plus en plus graves.

Le président:

Nous devons nous arrêter ici.

Nous approchons de la fin, mais je crois que M. Eglinski peut avoir deux ou trois minutes pour poser une question, s'il le désire.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

J'espère que c'est au sujet de Grande Cache.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Vous n'aurez pas cette chance cette fois-ci...

Merci à tous les témoins et félicitations, monsieur Brennan, de votre récente promotion.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ce sont d'anciens collègues.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Jim Eglinski:

Monsieur le ministre, comme vous le savez, nous avons produit un rapport sur la sécurité publique portant sur la criminalité en région rurale. Mes collègues de l'Alberta et moi avons réalisé un important processus de consultation à l'échelle de la province. Les gens sont très préoccupés, non seulement en Alberta, mais aussi en Saskatchewan. Je crois savoir que certains maires vous ont fait part des pénuries de membres de la GRC. La criminalité a augmenté d'environ 30 % dans les régions rurales du Canada comparativement aux zones urbaines.

Ce qui me trouble beaucoup, c'est que je viens de regarder le plan 2018-2019 de la GRC, qui fait état de la progression de vos effectifs au cours des cinq dernières années, jusqu'à l'exercice 2019-2020. En fait, le programme d'application de la loi demande une réduction du nombre d'agents de police de 1 366 à 1 319. Il s'agit ici uniquement de la main-d'œuvre. Vous augmentez l'effectif général de la force de 1 033 agents, et vous ajoutez 460 membres du personnel administratif. Vos augmentations sont de seulement 0,6 %, 0,1 %, 0,2 % et 0,2 % au cours des prochaines années. Le taux d'attrition sera 10 fois plus élevé que ça.

De quelle façon allez-vous fournir des services de police? De quelle façon vous pouvez dire aux gens des régions rurales du Canada, que ce soit en Saskatchewan, au Manitoba, en Colombie-Britannique ou en Alberta, d'où viendront les services de police? Allez-vous examiner votre contrat afin d'essayer de renforcer ces chiffres? Les chiffres ici révèlent que vous n'avez pas la main-d'œuvre nécessaire.

(1630)

Le président:

Vous avez environ 10 secondes.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vais demander à mon sous-commissaire de répondre à cette question aussi.

Monsieur Eglinski, je tiens tout simplement à souligner que nous avons triplé le nombre de nouvelles recrues qui sortent de l'École de la GRC à la Division Dépôt, à Regina. Il y en a maintenant plus de 1 100, comparativement à un nombre bien moins élevé avant. De plus, si je me souviens bien, l'année passée, environ 135 nouvelles personnes sont allées en Saskatchewan, ce qui constitue une augmentation importante. Cette année, on parle d'environ 90 nouveaux agents qui iront dans cette région précise.

Une partie de la réponse à votre question, c'est que nous renforçons la capacité de formation à Dépôt pour produire des agents de police plus rapidement. Comme vous le savez, nous ne pouvons pas le faire du jour au lendemain. Nous voulons envoyer là-bas des agents qui sont pleinement formés et qualifiés pour faire le travail et protéger les Canadiens. C'est du sérieux, et nous accélérons la formation des recrues.

Les commandants en Alberta et en Saskatchewan ont aussi réalisé des initiatives au cours des deux ou trois dernières années pour déployer des agents en s'appuyant davantage sur le renseignement criminel afin que les agents soient affectés de façon plus stratégique que c'était peut-être le cas avant.

Je souligne que le procureur général de la Saskatchewan et le commandant de l'Alberta ont souligné que, au cours de la dernière année, il semble en fait y avoir eu une amélioration des statistiques liées à la criminalité.

M. Jim Eglinski:

J'aimerais poser une question rapidement, si vous le permettez.

Le président:

Vous pouvez poser une question.

M. Jim Eglinski:

En ce qui a trait aux besoins en matière de recrutement, trouvez-vous de nouvelles recrues?

Le président:

Je suis très heureux de vous avoir donné ces 10 secondes qui, comme le veut la tradition de nos procédures parlementaires, se sont transformées en deux ou trois minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski:

C'est pour ça que je vous aime, mon bon monsieur.

Le président:

M. Eglinski a réussi à glisser une question au tout dernier moment.

Pouvez-vous répondre rapidement, monsieur Brennan?

S.-comm. Brian Brennan:

Nous atteignons les chiffres en matière de recrutement, de façon à nous assurer de former 40 agents par année à Dépôt, et nous continuons d'examiner des façons d'accroître notre capacité de recrutement pour pouvoir le faire pendant une longue période.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

À 40 recrues sur 52 semaines par année, on parle de presque un diplômé par semaine à Dépôt.

Le président:

Vous allez devoir vivre avec cette réponse, monsieur Eglinski.

J'ai pris note de la question de Mme Sahota en ce qui a trait à l'augmentation des fonds d'aide en cas de catastrophe. Je crois que ce serait bien pour nous tous si vous pouviez fournir l'information au Comité.

Cela dit, je tiens à vous remercier à nouveau de votre comparution, ici, monsieur le ministre, et je remercie aussi vos collègues. J'imagine que vous partez, mais que vos collègues resteront. Nous en sommes maintenant au ministre Blair.

Cela dit, nous suspendons nos travaux.

(1630)

(1635)

Le président:

Nous reprenons. Je vois que nous avons encore le quorum.

Bienvenue, monsieur le ministre Blair.

Nous accueillons le ministre Blair, mais nous devons aussi traiter du budget des dépenses en tant que tel. Nous avons une autre motion à adopter relativement au projet de loi C-93, et il y a aussi la question des recommandations que nous aimerions régler.

Je propose qu'on se garde 10 minutes à la fin de...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et qu'en est-il de mes questions?

Le président:

Je ne sais pas. Ce sera peut-être un problème.

J'encourage mes collègues, les ministres et les témoins à poser des questions et à y répondre rapidement, si possible.

Cela dit, je souhaite la bienvenue au ministre Blair devant le Comité à nouveau.

Nous avons hâte d'entendre votre déclaration. Nous poserons des questions après.

L’hon. Bill Blair (ministre de la Sécurité frontalière et de la Réduction du crime organisé):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais essayer de fournir une réponse judicieuse et de respecter votre demande.

Je suis heureux d'avoir de nouveau l'occasion de comparaître devant le Comité pour discuter cette fois-ci du Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020. Ces budgets des dépenses comprennent les autorisations pour les mesures qui, bien sûr, ont été annoncées dans le budget de 2019.

J'aimerais profiter de l'occasion pour m'attarder sur certaines des mesures importantes qui relèvent de mon mandat, soit d'assurer la sécurité de notre frontière et de mener des efforts pour réduire le crime organisé. En ce qui concerne ce dernier point, j'ai déjà mentionné au Comité par le passé que la lutte contre la violence liée aux armes à feu et aux gangs est l'une de nos principales priorités. Au cours des dernières années, la violence liée aux armes à feu était en hausse. Il arrive encore que des armes à feu tombent entre les mains de personnes qui les utilisent pour commettre des crimes. Même si je crois que les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-71 sont exceptionnelles et contribueront beaucoup à renverser cette tendance, je crois aussi que nous pouvons toujours en faire plus.

Nous avons envoyé, plus tôt ce mois-ci, un rapport décrivant ce que nous avons entendu dans le cadre des consultations exhaustives que nous avons menées à l'échelle du pays sur cette question. En attendant, le financement obtenu dans le cadre du budget de 2019 et du Budget principal des dépenses nous permettra de changer des choses immédiatement.

J'ai mentionné par le passé que l'investissement de 327 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, que le gouvernement a annoncé en 2017, commence déjà à aider à soutenir une diversité d'initiatives visant à réduire les armes à feu et les activités liées aux gangs dans les collectivités partout au Canada. Au cours des quelques derniers mois, j'ai eu le plaisir d'aider les provinces, les territoires et les municipalités à tirer profit des fonds attribués à des initiatives précises dans leurs régions.

Le gouvernement du Canada investit 42 millions de dollars de plus dans l'initiative de lutte contre la violence liée aux armes à feu et aux gangs par l'intermédiaire du budget des dépenses de cette année. Il s'agit d'une initiative horizontale qui est dirigée par Sécurité publique Canada, qui, comme toujours, travaille en partenariat avec l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et la Gendarmerie royale du Canada.

En ce qui concerne les services policiers plus précisément, le budget de cet exercice prévoit un financement important, notamment un financement de 508,6 millions de dollars sur cinq ans en vue de soutenir le renforcement des opérations policières de la GRC. De ce montant, 96,2 millions de dollars sont attribués aux activités policières de la GRC à même le budget des dépenses fourni aujourd'hui. Bien sûr, la GRC joue un rôle absolument primordial dans la protection de la sécurité nationale et la réduction de la menace du crime organisé, ainsi que dans le soutien des initiatives de prévention, d'intervention et d'application de la loi à l'échelle canadienne.

L'ASFC soutient la GRC et les autres partenaires de l'application de la loi afin de contrer le crime organisé et l'activité des gangs criminels. Les investissements versés dans le cadre du budget des dépenses et du budget permettront d'obtenir de nouvelles technologies, d'accroître l'équipe de chiens détecteurs, d'obtenir des outils et des cours de formation spécialisés et de renforcer les capacités relatives aux renseignements et à l'évaluation des risques. Tous ces ajouts permettront à l'ASFC de renforcer ses interventions opérationnelles afin qu'elle puisse mieux intercepter les biens illicites à la frontière, comme les armes à feu et les opioïdes. J'ai confiance que les fonds que nous fournissons aideront tous nos partenaires à répondre aux besoins changeants du Canada en matière de sécurité, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les défis liés aux armes à feu et aux gangs.

En ce qui concerne les aspects de mon mandat relatif à la sécurité des frontières, j'ai le plaisir de vous informer que le gouvernement prévoit des investissements importants, tant dans le budget que dans le budget des dépenses, pour mieux gérer la migration irrégulière, la décourager et la prévenir. Le budget de 2019 prévoit un investissement de 1,2 milliard de dollars sur cinq ans à compter de cette année. Ces fonds seront répartis entre Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada, IRCC, la Commmission de l'immigration et du statut de réfugié, la CISR, l'ASFC, la GRC et le SCRS en vue de mettre en œuvre un plan d'action exhaustif pour la réforme de l'asile et la protection des frontières. Même si IRCC est le ministère responsable du plan d'action, le portefeuille de la Sécurité publique joue un rôle vraiment essentiel dans tout ça.

Comme les membres du Comité le savent, l'ASFC est responsable du traitement des demandes d'asile déposées aux points d'entrée officiels et aux bureaux intérieurs. Le financement approuvé dans le cadre du budget de 2019 permettra à l'ASFC de renforcer ses processus à la frontière, en plus de l'aider à renforcer la capacité du régime des demandes d'asile, d'accélérer le traitement des demandes et de faciliter le renvoi des personnes dont on juge qu'elles n'ont pas besoin de protection au Canada, et ce, de façon plus efficiente et plus rapide. La stratégie, grâce à ce financement, encadrera ces efforts.

Avant de conclure, j'aimerais souligner un dernier point. Récemment, les Canadiens entendent souvent parler du blanchiment d'argent, du financement du terrorisme et de l'évasion fiscale, des choses qui se produisent dans notre pays, et tout ça les préoccupe à juste titre. Le blanchiment d'argent est une menace à la sécurité publique et il brime l'intégrité et la stabilité du secteur financier, ainsi que l'économie elle-même, de façon générale. Le gouvernement n'attendra pas avant de passer à l'action pour protéger la sécurité et la qualité de vie des Canadiens. J'ai le plaisir de noter que, dans le budget de 2019, le gouvernement prévoit verser 24 millions de dollars sur cinq ans à Sécurité publique Canada afin de créer une équipe d'action, de coordination et d'exécution de la loi pour la lutte contre le recyclage des produits de la criminalité, l'Équipe ACE. C'est un projet pilote qui renforcera les initiatives interagences contre le blanchiment d'argent et les crimes financiers.

(1640)



De plus, 68,9 millions de dollars de plus seront investis sur cinq ans et attribués à la GRC pour renforcer les capacités de services policiers fédéraux, notamment dans le cadre des efforts de lutte contre le blanchiment d'argent, et tout ça commencera par un investissement de 4,1 millions de dollars durant le présent exercice.

De plus, 28 millions de dollars sur cinq ans sont investis au sein de l'ASFC pour soutenir un nouveau centre d'expertise. Ce centre permettra de cerner les incidents de fraude commerciale et d'entamer des poursuites. Il servira également à cerner les cas de blanchiment d'argent possibles de nature commerciale, afin que la GRC puisse mener une enquête et entamer des poursuites.

Comme toujours, ce ne sont ici que quelques exemples des travaux importants et cruciaux réalisés au sein du portefeuille de la Sécurité publique et, dans ce cas-ci, par les nombreux ministères qui soutiennent mon mandat et qui s'efforcent de protéger les Canadiens.

Encore une fois, je tiens à remercier les membres du Comité de leur examen du présent budget des dépenses et de leurs efforts continus.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je serai heureux de répondre aux questions des membres.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Cela dit, madame Dabrusin, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être là aujourd'hui.

J'ai eu l'occasion de soulever la question déjà. J'aimerais continuer la conversation au sujet des armes à feu et des gangs. Vous en avez parlé dans votre déclaration préliminaire, et j'ai consulté le Budget principal des dépenses pour connaître les travaux qui sont aussi réalisés du côté de la frontière.

Ma première question est la suivante: lorsqu'on se penche sur les problèmes liés aux armes à feu, toutes les conversations que j'ai eues parlaient vraiment de l'offre et de la demande, les deux aspects. Si on commence par réfléchir à l'offre — vous l'avez mentionné rapidement —, mais pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur ce que fait l'ASFC pour prévenir la contrebande d'armes?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Oui, merci beaucoup, madame Dabrusin.

Les armes qui se retrouvent au bout du compte entre les mains des criminels et sont utilisées pour commettre des crimes violents dans nos collectivités viennent de différentes sources. Il y a diverses estimations accessibles auprès des multiples services de police et organismes de partout au pays qui cernent la provenance de ces armes illicites. Il est très clair qu'une part importante des armes à feu utilisées par les gangs pour commettre des infractions criminelles dans nos collectivités partout au Canada sont importées illicitement au Canada et traversent les frontières. L'ASFC, bien sûr, a un rôle très important à jouer pour intercepter cet approvisionnement.

J'ai eu l'occasion durant la fin de semaine de me rendre à l'installation de l'ASFC de Point Edward et de la visiter et j'ai aussi eu l'occasion de parler de certaines des choses que les gens font là-bas, grâce aux nouvelles technologies, aux équipes canines et, franchement, au travail de personnes vraiment extraordinaires et dévouées...

(1645)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Si vous me permettez de vous interrompre, lorsque vous parlez des équipes canines, vous parlez des chiens?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Oui, de vrais chiens. J'ai rencontré le chien. Il s'appelle Bones.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

L'hon. Bill Blair: Les gens m'ont montré de quelle façon il avait fouillé un véhicule. C'est vraiment un processus remarquable. Ce n'est pas de la haute technologie, mais ça fonctionne; ça fonctionne très bien même.

Les gens ont aussi pu me parler de certaines des grandes réussites qu'ils ont obtenues, y compris, par exemple, la saisie d'une arme d'assaut très puissante durant la fin de semaine du 24 mai en plus d'un certain nombre de chargeurs à grande capacité et de munitions. Il se fait de l'excellent travail le long de nos frontières.

Je peux aussi vous dire que les membres de l'ASFC et du milieu de l'application de la loi reconnaissent que, pour éliminer l'approvisionnement d'armes qui traversent la frontière des États-Unis... Les États-Unis sont essentiellement le plus important arsenal d'armes de poing du monde. Il y a beaucoup d'armes à feu là-bas. Les criminels savent que, s'ils peuvent faire passer ces armes à la frontière, ils peuvent les vendre beaucoup plus cher qu'aux États-Unis, parce qu'ils ne sont pas faciles d'accès au Canada. C'est un crime motivé par le profit.

Les services de police et l'ASFC comprennent qu'on ne peut pas tout simplement intercepter l'approvisionnement à la frontière, alors on déploie des efforts extraordinaires. Nous investissons dans la GRC et dans les services de police municipaux et provinciaux partout au Canada afin qu'ils travaillent de façon intégrée avec les équipes d'application de la loi à la frontière et qu'ils réalisent des enquêtes sur le crime organisé afin de cerner les personnes et les organisations criminelles qui sont responsables de l'achat de ces armes aux États-Unis, qui les font entrer clandestinement au Canada par la frontière et qui les vendent ensuite à des criminels au pays.

Nous avons vu des réussites extraordinaires découlant de tels partenariats aussi, mais le travail se poursuit et est en cours. Nous faisons de grands investissements dans le présent budget pour renforcer la capacité de l'ASFC et des organisations d'application de la loi de mener de telles enquêtes pour améliorer la qualité des renseignements recueillis et la façon dont les données permettent de mener des enquêtes réussies et de poursuivre avec succès les personnes responsables.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.

Toujours au sujet de l'approvisionnement — j'espère que nous aurons quelques minutes pour parler de la demande — vous avez eu une étude. Cela faisait partie de votre lettre de mandat. On vous a demandé d'étudier une possible interdiction des armes de poing et des armes d'assaut. Si je ne m'abuse, vous avez produit un « rapport sur ce que vous avez entendu ». Pouvez-vous nous dire quelles seront les prochaines étapes?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Nous avons cerné un certain nombre de façons dont les armes se retrouvent entre les mains des criminels. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, une portion de ces armes — certains estiment que c'est 50 %, et d'autres, jusqu'à 70 % — sont en fait passées en contrebande à la frontière. Nous savons aussi qu'un certain nombre de ces armes à feu qui seront par la suite utilisées pour commettre des infractions criminelles au Canada ont été achetées ici même.

Essentiellement, cela se produit d'un certain nombre de façons assez bien connues. En ce qui a trait à la première façon, il y a eu un grand nombre de vols importants d'armes à feu chez des détaillants d'armes à feu ou des Canadiens qui possèdent des armes à feu. Ces armes sont par la suite vendues dans la rue à des organisations criminelles et utilisées pour commettre des actes criminels partout au pays. L'une des choses que j'ai entendues, et nous en avons beaucoup discuté, c'était la façon dont on pourrait renforcer l'entreposage sécuritaire des armes à feu pour prévenir de tels vols, pour faire en sorte qu'il soit plus difficile pour les criminels de voler ces armes à feu et, qu'elles se retrouvent par la suite dans la rue.

Il y a aussi un certain nombre de cas où on a constaté que des armes à feu avaient été achetées légalement au pays, mais qui ont ensuite été détournées vers le marché criminel par des personnes qui avaient l'intention de profiter de la revente des armes en question. C'est un processus qu'on appelle parfois l'achat par personnes interposées. Essentiellement, il s'agit d'une personne qui a le droit juridique d'acheter une arme à feu, qui essaie d'éliminer toute trace de son origine en retirant le numéro de série, puis qui revend l'arme à quelqu'un, dans la rue, à prix fort.

Dans le cadre de conversations partout au pays — particulièrement auprès des responsables de l'application de la loi —, nous avons constaté l'importance d'améliorer la traçabilité des armes à feu qui sont utilisées dans le cadre des infractions criminelles afin que nous puissions cerner l'origine de la vente et mieux connaître et tenir responsables — et, par le fait même, dissuader davantage — les personnes qui s'adonnent à une telle activité criminelle. Il y a un certain nombre d'autres mesures dont nous avons aussi entendu parler au sujet de l'interception de l'approvisionnement.

J'ai aussi entendu un certain nombre de personnes qui se disaient préoccupées par le fait que divers types d'armes, franchement, constituent un risque important, et des mesures supplémentaires devraient être envisagées afin que de telles armes soient moins accessibles aux personnes pouvant les utiliser pour causer des préjudices à autrui.

(1650)

Le président:

Vous n'avez pas encore terminé, mais je suis sûr que M. Graham vous remerciera si nous finissons avant sept minutes.

Il vous reste 40 secondes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Oui. Je vous remercie.

En ce qui concerne la demande, rapidement, nous avons assisté à une annonce à Toronto en décembre concernant notamment la façon dont nous aidons les jeunes et les collectivités touchées.

Pouvez-vous m'en parler un peu, s'il vous plaît?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Madame Dabrusin, mes remarques précédentes portaient en grande partie sur l'interdiction de la fourniture d'armes à feu qui se retrouvent dans les mains de criminels. Cependant, notre gouvernement reconnaît qu'il faut également réduire la demande pour ces armes à feu. Nous investissons donc beaucoup dans les collectivités et les enfants. Nous travaillons particulièrement avec les municipalités, mais je me suis rendu dans chaque province, et nous fournissons des ressources à chaque province et territoire afin de lui permettre d'investir dans ses collectivités et les organismes communautaires qui font un travail extraordinaire auprès des jeunes pour les aider à faire de meilleurs choix, des choix plus sûrs et plus responsables socialement, pour éviter qu'ils s'associent à des gangs.

Nous soutenons également un certain nombre d'initiatives, où l'on travaille auprès de jeunes qui ont déjà fait partie de gangs en vue de les aider à quitter le style de vie des gangs et à éviter de se livrer à des activités criminelles violentes qui causent tellement de traumatismes dans nos collectivités d'un bout à l'autre du pays.

Il n'y a pas une seule réponse. Franchement, cela nécessite des investissements très importants et une approche plus large...

Le président:

Je pense que nous allons devoir laisser tomber la réponse.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

J'aurai peut-être l'occasion de revenir sur certaines des choses que nous faisons qui ont des effets réels.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Le talent pour étirer les secondes en minutes est tout à fait extraordinaire aujourd'hui.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je veux parler des passages illégaux à la frontière.

Le vérificateur général a présenté un rapport très accablant sur les demandes d'asile. Vous avez dit que le système était très efficace, mais on a confirmé qu'il était très surchargé. La collaboration entre les principales agences pose des difficultés et il faudra de quatre à cinq ans uniquement pour revenir à la normale.

Regrettez-vous de nous avoir dit en comité que tout allait bien et que c'était extraordinaire? Regrettez-vous d'avoir donné des informations inexactes? [Traduction]

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Bien sûr, je vous dis la vérité, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Je tenais à souligner le travail exceptionnel de l'ASFC et de la GRC, de la police, des provinces et des municipalités, partout au pays. Compte tenu des ressources et du soutien dont elles disposent, je pense qu'elles font un travail extraordinaire.

Nous reconnaissons qu'il reste encore beaucoup à faire. C'est précisément la raison pour laquelle nous effectuons de nouveaux investissements importants et renforçons leur capacité de mener ces enquêtes très complexes. À titre d'exemple, nous reconnaissons qu'il est important que tous les organismes et ministères chargés de l'application de la loi collaborent davantage. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous créons l'équipe d'action, de coordination et d'exécution de la loi pour la lutte contre le recyclage des produits de la criminalité. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

À l'époque, vous nous avez dit que tout allait bien, mais le vérificateur général nous avait dit que c'était faux. Au fond, vous confirmez que l'information que vous avez donnée à ce moment-là était mauvaise. [Traduction]

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Pouvez-vous préciser à quel rapport du vérificateur général vous faites référence, monsieur? [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je parle plutôt du rapport du directeur parlementaire du budget, qui confirmait qu'il y avait des problèmes associés aux coûts de 1,1 milliard de dollars pour la gestion des demandeurs d'asile. Ce rapport a été publié il y a quelques mois. Savez-vous de quoi je parle? [Traduction]

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je suis désolé, je parlais des armes à feu et du recyclage des produits de la criminalité. Si vous parlez de demandeurs d'asile, l'une des choses relevées, je crois, dans ce rapport est le travail effectué dans le cadre de la vérification de sécurité par l'ASFC.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Ma question, monsieur, est assez simple.

Lors de votre comparution devant le Comité, il y a quelques mois, nous avons posé une question à ce sujet, et vous avez dit que tout allait bien. Or, le vérificateur général a dit que cela posait de nombreux problèmes. Je voulais simplement savoir si vous êtes prêt à présenter des excuses au Comité, car vous avez dit quelque chose qui était erroné à ce moment-là.

C'était ma question, mais j'ai perdu trop de temps à cet égard. Je vais donc passer à ma prochaine question, monsieur.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Voulez-vous une réponse à cette question?

Monsieur, je serai heureux de tenter d'y répondre.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

J'ai perdu assez de temps, monsieur. Je vais poser une autre question, d'accord?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

S'il y a d'autres questions pour lesquelles vous ne voulez pas de réponse, dites-le-moi.

(1655)

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Ça va parce que vous comprenez ma question.

Vos notes d'allocution y font référence. Dans le budget, vous parlez d'un investissement de 1,2 milliard de dollars sur cinq ans, mais s'agit-il du même montant que celui mentionné par le vérificateur général, soit 1,1 milliard de dollars sur trois ans?

S'agit-il du même argent?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je pense que le vérificateur général a conclu son rapport et ses prévisions sur ce qui était requis au printemps dernier, en 2018, et depuis lors, notre gouvernement... Tout d'abord, le budget de 2018 a consenti de nouveaux investissements importants dans la CISR et l'ASFC, et bien sûr, dans le budget que nous venons de vous présenter aujourd'hui, soit 1,18 milliard de dollars...

À titre d'exemple, nous augmentons la capacité de la CISR par rapport à l'époque où le vérificateur général a présenté son rapport. La Commission avait alors la capacité de tenir environ 26 000 audiences par année. Avec ces nouveaux investissements, ce nombre atteindra environ 50 000 d'ici la fin de l'année prochaine, ce qui répond tout à fait à l'insuffisance constatée en raison d'un sous-effectif et d'un sous-financement antérieurs. Nous avons effectué ces investissements dans les budgets de 2018 et 2019.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord, vous faites beaucoup de détours.

Votre titre est ministre de la Sécurité frontalière et de la Réduction du crime organisé.

À propos de la réduction du crime organisé, vous êtes censé parler des cartels mexicains, mais aussi des cartels de la drogue. Or, pourquoi le cabinet du ministre Goodale répond-il toujours aux questions des médias et non pas votre cabinet?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Tout d'abord, il est ministre de la Sécurité publique et...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Mais vous êtes le ministre de la Sécurité frontalière et de la Réduction du crime organisé. Est-ce exact?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

J'ai écouté très attentivement la réponse du ministre Goodale et même sa réponse un peu plus tôt aujourd'hui, et j'ai exactement les mêmes renseignements que ceux qu'il a fournis au Comité.

C'est un résultat direct de l'information fournie par nos organismes. Je crois qu'il a confirmé que l'ASFC avait déterminé que le nombre de cas d'interdiction de territoire était de 238 pour la période en question et il a également mentionné que nous n'avons pas été en mesure d'établir de données probantes selon lesquelles...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je ne veux pas sa réponse, monsieur le ministre, je veux votre...

L’hon. Bill Blair:

... en ce qui concerne le nombre que vous avez mentionné à la Chambre, 400 ressortissants au Canada, nous n'avons pas été en mesure de trouver des données probantes pour appuyer la véracité de cette affirmation.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je vais passer à ma prochaine question.

La semaine dernière, le vice-président américain Pence est venu rencontrer le premier ministre. Pensez-vous qu'ils ont soulevé la question de l'Entente sur les tiers pays sûrs? L'ont-ils soulevée?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je crois que le sujet a été abordé...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Avez-vous une réponse à nous donner ou pensez-vous que nous allons changer l'Entente sur les tiers pays sûrs?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Il y a des discussions. J'ai participé à des discussions avec des responsables américains ainsi qu'avec nos fonctionnaires d'IRCC et de l'ASFC. Je sais que le sujet a été abordé à différents niveaux de discussion et je pense que l'on admet ou que l'on reconnaît qu'il s'agit d'une entente qui peut être modernisée et améliorée dans l'intérêt des deux pays, et ces discussions se poursuivent.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Par « modernisée », voulez-vous dire comme nous l'avions suggéré l'année dernière?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Si je me souviens bien, vous avez suggéré de modifier unilatéralement une entente bilatérale, et ce n'est pas la façon de faire. Nous avions commencé à discuter avec nos partenaires de traité, les États-Unis, de nombreux aspects de cette entente, car nous croyons qu'il est possible de l'améliorer et de l'élargir. Ces discussions sont en cours.

Il n'est ni possible ni opportun de modifier unilatéralement une entente bilatérale.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Nous n'avons pas dit cela. Je sais que nous ne dirons jamais cela. Nous avons dit que nous devions...

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Pour que tout soit bien clair, vous avez dit que vous alliez la changer, et nous avons dit non, que nous engagerions des discussions avec notre partenaire sur la manière de l'améliorer.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Bien sûr que nous avons...

Je n'ai plus de questions.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

Je vais vous poser une question sur vos responsabilités concernant la frontière et la question des migrants. Il y a eu de longues réponses. Je vais me permettre de faire un long préambule et revenir sur le passé, pour que vous compreniez le contexte de ma question. Si mes collègues n'ont pas vu le reportage de Radio-Canada, je les inviterais à le regarder.

En 2011, si je ne m'abuse, un programme a été mis en place par le gouvernement précédent à la suite de deux incidents où des bateaux étaient arrivés au Canada avec à leur bord des demandeurs d'asile tamouls. Ce programme existe toujours et les dépenses qu'on y consacre ont augmenté. Plus de 18 millions de dollars sont consacrés à ce programme. Des gens du SCRS, de la GRC et même du CST interagissent à l'étranger avec des personnages peu reluisants, dans des pays où il pourrait y avoir du trafic de migrants vers le Canada. On conviendra que ce sont des endroits où les droits de la personne posent problème.

Voici ce que j'aimerais savoir. Comment pouvez-vous réconcilier l'approche du gouvernement, qui consiste à faire preuve de compassion à l'égard de personnes dans cette situation, et le fait que des agences agissent à l'étranger pour de l'interdiction? Des gens sont détenus dans des pays où il risque d'y avoir des violations des droits de la personne.

Si vous n'êtes pas en mesure de répondre, je sais que les personnes qui vous accompagnent aujourd'hui pourraient le faire. Dans le reportage de Radio-Canada, ni la GRC ni le SCRS n’était en mesure ou n'avait la volonté de répondre.

Je vous laisse le soin de répondre à ma question. Je suis désolé pour la longue mise en contexte, mais c'était important pour mes collègues.

(1700)

[Traduction]

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Dubé.

Si je comprends bien votre question — et j'inviterai naturellement les fonctionnaires à ajouter toute l'information qui pourrait vous aider —, d'après mon expérience, il y a malheureusement des personnes... Celles qui cherchent un refuge et celles qui fuient la guerre et la persécution sont dans une situation très vulnérable. Bien souvent, ces personnes sont soumises à l'exploitation de ceux qui voudraient en tirer profit. Nous avons donc également la responsabilité de veiller à maintenir l'intégrité de notre système d'octroi de l'asile et de nos frontières. L'ASFC, la GRC et d'autres personnes qui travaillent ensemble ont une responsabilité, et nous travaillons à l'échelle internationale... Franchement, nous sommes très préoccupés, et nous avons pris un certain nombre de mesures afin de nous occuper de ceux qui exploiteraient les personnes vulnérables.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Certes, je ne suis pas en désaccord avec cette description des gens qui veulent profiter des personnes en situation de vulnérabilité. Le problème dans ce reportage, que je soulève ici, c'est que le gouvernement du Canada a un programme et investit des millions de dollars — 1 million de dollars pour le SCRS et 9 millions de dollars pour la GRC, si je me souviens bien, mais je pourrais me tromper — afin que ces organismes exercent leurs activités à l'étranger pour s'occuper de ces individus sans scrupules dans des régions où vous traitez avec des régimes tout aussi peu scrupuleux, voire plus dénués de tout scrupule, dans ces pays.

Une personne du Cabinet du premier ministre, ou du moins qui conseille le premier ministre sur ce programme, s'est rendue dans ces endroits pour remercier ces régimes au nom du Canada.

À quel coût assurons-nous l'intégrité de la frontière? En d'autres termes, nous avons non seulement la responsabilité de préserver l'intégrité de la frontière et de combattre ces individus sans scrupules, mais aussi de veiller, pardonnez l'expression, à ne pas nous acoquiner avec des individus passablement problématiques à l'étranger, si je puis dire en toute diplomatie, comme l'indique le rapport, que j'inviterais encore une fois mes collègues à lire et que je serais ravi de fournir aux membres du Comité qui ne l'ont pas vu.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Oui, monsieur. Je me contenterai de reconnaître, car je ne suis pas au courant... et, chers collègues, si l'un de vous a l'information, je souhaiterais qu'il intervienne... Nous traitons du crime organisé transnational, y compris l'exploitation de personnes vulnérables, dans la traite de personnes, et avec ceux qui seraient impliqués dans l'exploitation des personnes qui fuient la persécution. Nos fonctionnaires fédéraux et nos organismes de sécurité doivent étendre leur travail au-delà de nos frontières afin... Le travail le plus efficace pour prévenir les problèmes et les crimes au Canada consiste notamment à les empêcher d'arriver à nos frontières en premier lieu. Ils sont à l'œuvre dans des endroits très difficiles du monde, mais nous nous attendons à ce qu'ils continuent à faire respecter les lois et les normes canadiennes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il me reste peu de temps.

Messieurs Vigneault ou Brennan, voulez-vous parler de la perspective de votre organisme?

M. David Vigneault:

Oui. Merci, monsieur Dubé.[Traduction]

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

J'ajouterai simplement, monsieur Dubé, que le programme dont vous avez parlé est en place depuis plusieurs années maintenant, comme l'a mentionné le ministre et comme vous y avez fait référence dans votre préambule, afin d'empêcher les trafiquants de faire entrer des personnes au Canada de façon irrégulière. La raison de notre engagement est de protéger l'intégrité du système au Canada et de veiller à ce que les criminels... à prendre en considération les préoccupations relatives à la sécurité nationale ou à nous assurer que les personnes ne soient pas victimes de ces processus.

Notre travail à l'étranger est régi par notre loi et par des directives ministérielles. Je ne peux pas entrer dans tous les détails opérationnels, mais je peux dire que, lorsque nous échangeons de l'information avec des entités étrangères, nous obéissons à des directives ministérielles afin de nous assurer que ces renseignements ne mènent pas à une violation des droits de la personne ou à de mauvais traitements. Je sais ce que les médias ont déclaré à ce sujet, mais je peux dire que ces programmes font l'objet d'un examen et que tous les organismes concernés sont couverts par cette directive ministérielle. Il y a donc une autre perspective à cette histoire.

(1705)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Madame Sahota, vous disposez de sept minutes; allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Monsieur Blair, merci d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Je veux commencer par les accords dont vous parliez plus tôt avec les différentes provinces concernant le financement au titre des gangs et des armes à feu. Pouvez-vous m'expliquer un peu à combien s'élève le financement consenti par le gouvernement fédéral, en particulier au gouvernement Doug Ford en Ontario?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Environ 214 millions de dollars ont été réservés par rapport aux armes à feu et aux gangs pour l'ensemble du pays. Cela s'ajoute aux 89 millions de dollars alloués à l'ASFC et à la GRC. Sur les 214 millions de dollars, 65 millions sont alloués à la province de l'Ontario. Des discussions sont en cours avec la province de l'Ontario sur la façon dont cet argent lui sera versé et sur ce qu'elle en fera. J'ai récemment annoncé conjointement avec la ministre de la Sécurité communautaire et la procureure générale de l'Ontario que la province a accepté 11 millions de dollars au cours des deux premières années de ce programme. Je ne sais pas encore si la province a annoncé comment elle prévoit affecter cette somme, mais il s'agit d'une allocation de fonds totalisant 65 millions de dollars sur cinq ans. Jusqu'à présent, la province de l'Ontario a reçu 11 millions de dollars à ce titre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pourquoi ne s'agit-il que de 11 millions de dollars à ce moment-ci? Qui a fait ce choix, et comment cette décision a-t-elle été prise?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Cela fait partie des discussions en cours entre nous. C'est le montant pour lequel la province était prête à désigner diverses initiatives. L'argent reste disponible pour être alloué à la province de l'Ontario lorsqu'elle sera prête à l'utiliser. Jusqu'ici, au cours des deux premières années du programme, la province a indiqué être prête à entreprendre des initiatives pour un montant de 11 millions de dollars.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Êtes-vous en train de me dire que 65 millions de dollars sont disponibles pour l'Ontario? Je sais que mes homologues de la Ville de Brampton manifestent un vif intérêt pour la réduction de la criminalité dans la ville. Cependant, les responsables n'ont accepté que 11 millions de dollars sur les 65 millions de dollars offerts.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Pour être juste, ce sont des discussions en cours entre notre gouvernement et toutes les provinces. Nous avons calculé des allocations de fonds pour chacune des provinces, et c'est ce qui a été établi jusqu'à présent. Cet argent est destiné aux services de police municipaux et autochtones des provinces et des territoires, mais il est alloué de manière appropriée et nécessaire par l'entremise des gouvernements provinciaux. J'encouragerais simplement toutes les municipalités à discuter avec leur gouvernement provincial respectif quant à la façon dont elles pourraient avoir accès aux fonds provenant du gouvernement fédéral par l'intermédiaire des gouvernements provinciaux.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Y a-t-il un moyen de verser l'argent directement aux administrations municipales? Je sais que ma ville, Brampton, a très hâte de pouvoir accéder à une partie de ces fonds afin de pouvoir résoudre certains des problèmes auxquels elle est confrontée. Est-ce que le seul moyen d'avoir accès à cet argent est de passer par la province?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je pense qu'il nous incombe de faire de notre mieux pour collaborer avec nos partenaires provinciaux dans l'ensemble du pays. Je vous dirai que, selon mon expérience dans d'autres administrations, l'expérience a été très positive. Je demeure optimiste quant à ces allocations en Ontario. J'ai moi-même un intérêt marqué pour cet endroit. Je connais les municipalités et les services de police concernés. Encore une fois, avec ces décisions, je pense que la manière appropriée...

Les services de police sont administrés et supervisés par les gouvernements provinciaux du Canada. Nous travaillons avec les ministres de la Sécurité communautaire, les ministres de la Sécurité publique et les procureurs généraux partout au pays, dans chacune des provinces et chacun des territoires. Nous avons certainement fait de notre mieux. Il existe d'autres possibilités de financement disponible directement, en particulier pour les organismes communautaires. Outre les fonds que j'ai déjà mentionnés, plusieurs annonces importantes ont été faites en Ontario, dans le cadre desquelles nous soutenons des organismes communautaires, diverses initiatives de prévention du crime et d'autres types d'investissements dans les collectivités.

(1710)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Lorsque vous comparez l'offre de 65 millions de dollars aux montants alloués précédemment, est-ce plus ou moins que ce que le gouvernement du Canada a fourni aux provinces ou à l'Ontario en particulier?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je ne suis pas au courant d'un financement de cette ampleur qui aurait été octroyé auparavant. J'ai participé, à différents titres, au traitement des questions liées aux armes à feu et aux gangs. En règle générale, nos relations étaient uniquement avec le gouvernement provincial. En fait, des fonds ont été dégagés en 2008 pour ce que l'on appelle le Fonds de recrutement de policiers, mais ce fonds a été supprimé en 2013.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ce type de financement est-il le premier du genre que le gouvernement fédéral verse aux provinces?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

L'année dernière, le ministre de la Sécurité publique et notre gouvernement ont consenti un investissement important dans les initiatives relatives aux armes à feu et aux gangs. De plus, après discussion avec les provinces et les services de police municipaux et autochtones, on a également reconnu et admis qu'il y avait un travail important à accomplir. Lorsque nous avons commencé à investir, nous nous sommes assurés que de l'argent serait acheminé par l'entremise des provinces à ces services de police municipaux et autochtones, ainsi qu'à nos autorités fédérales à la GRC, à l'ASFC et à d'autres organismes, parce que la question des armes à feu et des gangs est une véritable préoccupation partout au pays. Nous avons constaté une augmentation significative de la violence liée aux armes à feu et des meurtres commis avec une arme à feu au pays. La situation est en grande partie directement liée à la drogue et aux activités de gangs; nous faisons donc des investissements importants afin de soutenir ces efforts.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'après mon expérience ces dernières années, en portant attention et en suivant la situation — parce que les problèmes ont désormais tendance à venir aux oreilles des députés —, j'ai constaté que, avec les conditions météorologiques qui s'améliorent et l'arrivée de l'été, il y a généralement une augmentation des activités criminelles à Brampton.

Existe-t-il une approche différente... ou des allocations de fonds différentes sont-elles inscrites au budget pour certains mois? Pouvez-vous parler de votre expérience passée pour expliquer ce qu'il en est?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Ces décisions opérationnelles concernant la répartition des ressources et l'utilisation de ces nouvelles ressources relèvent en réalité de la responsabilité des services de police et de leurs dirigeants, sous la direction de leur conseil et de leur municipalité. Elles sont prises en grande partie en collaboration avec les autorités provinciales.

Il existe également des partenariats très importants dans l'ensemble du pays parmi les organismes d'application de la loi. Par exemple, la GRC mène plusieurs initiatives importantes dans le cadre de ce que nous appelons l'équipe intégrée multidisciplinaire. À titre d'exemple, nous avons les équipes intégrées de la sécurité nationale et d'autres équipes auxquelles participent tous les services de police. Je devrais mentionner, parce qu'elles sont tout à fait pertinentes dans mon mandat, les équipes intégrées de la police des frontières, qui sont généralement dirigées par un organisme fédéral, mais auxquelles participent également d'autres services de police. Ces types d'initiatives sont soutenues grâce au financement que nous versons.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins d'être ici.

Monsieur le ministre, la semaine dernière, vous avez dit que les fusils d'assaut étaient des armes militaires « conçues pour chasser les gens ». Je ne sais pas ce que vous appelez un fusil d'assaut, mais je suppose que vous parlez de fusils automatiques, d'armes à feu automatiques, et vous savez que ces armes à feu sont interdites au pays depuis 1976. Pourriez-vous nous dire exactement de quelles armes à feu vous parlez dans cette déclaration?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Nous avons eu plusieurs discussions. Comme je l'ai dit, j'ai parcouru le pays, monsieur Motz.

M. Glen Motz:

À quelles armes à feu faites-vous allusion précisément dans cette déclaration?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Ce sont des armes à feu conçues à des fins militaires, des armes à feu qui...

M. Glen Motz:

Je ne sais pas ce que cela signifie. Avec cette déclaration, vous faites allusion, en réalité, aux fusils de chasse modernes, aux fusils de sport modernes. Le fait même que vous ayez fait cette déclaration... Je trouve cela extrêmement choquant. Je trouve votre déclaration malencontreuse. J'estime que c'est être mal informé, et vous induisez la population canadienne en erreur. Encore une fois, de quelles armes à feu parlez-vous spécifiquement?

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, laissez M. Blair répondre.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je suis désolé que vous ayez été offensé, mais je pensais à...

M. Glen Motz:

Les propriétaires d'armes à feu titulaires d'un permis canadien sont choqués par cette déclaration.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, laissez M. Blair répondre à la question.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je pensais à l'arme à feu utilisée pour tuer trois membres de la GRC à Moncton. C'était une arme à feu conçue pour un usage militaire. Elle a été créée et utilisée par l'armée. Il s'agissait d'une arme utilisée par cet individu pour chasser trois policiers.

M. Glen Motz:

Qu'est-ce que c'était? Quel était le fusil? Quelle était l'arme à feu?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je crois que c'était un M14. Je pensais aussi aux armes utilisées pour tuer les deux agents à Fredericton et deux simples citoyens. Je pensais aussi à l'arme utilisée pour tuer 14 femmes à l'École Polytechnique...

M. Glen Motz:

Vous avez parlé de l'AR-15...

L’hon. Bill Blair:

... et l'arme utilisée pour tuer des fidèles dans la mosquée de Québec.

C'étaient toutes des armes qui n'étaient pas conçues comme des armes de chasse. Elles ont été conçues pour des soldats, des soldats qui...

(1715)

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez expressément nommé l'AR-15. Vous l'avez nommé. Savez-vous si l'AR-15 a déjà été utilisé dans un crime commis au Canada?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

L'AR-15... Encore une fois, j'ai mentionné certaines des autres... L'AR-15 est l'arme numéro un utilisée...

M. Glen Motz:

... une fusillade au volant en 2004, et personne n'a été blessé.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Nous n'obtenons tout simplement pas les réponses à ces questions.

M. Glen Motz:

Il doit répondre à la question. Il n'a pas à tourner autour du pot.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

L'AR-15 est l'arme qui a été utilisée pour tuer tout un groupe de jeunes enfants à Sandy Hook. Elle a également été utilisée pour assassiner 50 personnes à Christchurch...

M. Glen Motz:

Nous parlons du Canada, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, si vous voulez poser votre question, posez-la, puis laissez le ministre terminer sa réponse. Ensuite, vous pouvez poser une autre question.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur le ministre, pouvez-vous décrire la différence entre un AR-15, actuellement restreint au pays, et le WK180-C?

Le président:

D'accord, il y a une question précise. Donnez une réponse précise, si vous le pouvez, je vous prie.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Franchement, je ne me considère pas comme un expert dans la classification de ces armes à feu, même si je connais les deux. Je ne sais pas si l'un des autres témoins a l'expertise pour les définir. Comme vous le savez, le classement est maintenant déterminé par la GRC.

Le président:

D'accord, nous avons maintenant une réponse précise à une question précise.

La deuxième question spécifique.

M. Glen Motz:

Permettez-moi de répondre à la question pour vous. Il s'agit pratiquement de la même arme à feu. Les deux armes tirent des balles de calibre .223. Elles ont les mêmes mécanismes opérationnels. La seule différence est... et je suis heureux que vous ayez mentionné l'idée des classifications. Le public canadien veut que les armes à feu soient classées en fonction de ce qu'elles peuvent faire, et non de ce à quoi elles ressemblent, et ce défi est permanent. Le projet de loi C-71 en est un excellent exemple. Nous avons besoin de faits pour guider ces décisions, non pas d'information superficielle, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

C'est un commentaire, pas une question.

M. Glen Motz:

C'est le cas.

Alors, est-il vrai...

Le président:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Motz.

Le ministre souhaite-t-il réagir au commentaire de M. Motz?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Non.

Le président:

Non.

Monsieur Motz, posez votre question.

M. Glen Motz:

Certaines rumeurs circulent ces derniers temps selon lesquelles votre gouvernement prévoit interdire les armes à feu, allant de l'interdiction d'armes à feu spécifiques à l'interdiction des armes à feu semi-automatiques, en passant par les armes de poing.

Répondez simplement par oui ou par non: un décret en conseil interdira-t-il certaines catégories d'armes à feu?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Monsieur Motz, je ne réagis normalement pas aux rumeurs. Ce que nous sommes...

M. Glen Motz:

Ce n'est pas une rumeur. Je pose une question directe.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Si je peux me permettre...

M. Glen Motz:

Un décret est-il...

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous avez posé une question précise. Cela vous a pris une demi-minute pour le faire. Je devrais allouer un temps similaire au ministre Blair pour qu'il réponde à votre question.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Nous examinons toutes les mesures qui, à notre avis, pourraient contribuer à assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, et nous examinons la bonne façon d'appliquer ces mesures.

M. Glen Motz:

Aucun décret n'est donc prévu. Avez-vous un plan différent pour interdire les armes à feu, comme vous l'avez indiqué?

Le président:

D'accord, c'est la fin de cette question.

Répondez brièvement à M. Motz, qui aura épuisé ses cinq minutes.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

J'ai un plan pour examiner tous les moyens par lesquels nous pouvons assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.

M. Glen Motz:

Vous continuez à éluder la question.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, comme vous le savez, je suis un Canadien du milieu rural qui possède des armes à feu dans la maison et qui les utilise de temps en temps. La dernière fois que j'ai utilisé un AR-15, c'était il y a à peine un mois; je tiens donc à mettre les choses en perspective.

Que faites-vous pour protéger les utilisateurs légitimes d'armes à feu à l'avenir?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je veux aussi être très clair. Le gouvernement m'a confié le mandat d'examiner toutes les mesures susceptibles d'assurer la sécurité des personnes avec une mise en garde spécifique très importante. Il s'agissait d'une reconnaissance et d'une admission du fait que la très grande majorité des propriétaires d'arme à feu du pays sont respectueux des lois et responsables en cette matière. Ils achètent leurs armes à feu légalement. Ils les entreposent en toute sécurité. Ils les utilisent de manière responsable et en disposent conformément à la loi.

La possession d'arme à feu au pays est un privilège qui repose sur la volonté des gens et l'acceptation de nos lois et règlements en ce qui concerne les armes à feu. D'après mon expérience, les Canadiens, en très grande majorité, sont exceptionnellement responsables et respectueux des lois en ce qui concerne leurs armes à feu, et je pense qu'il est extrêmement important que nous respections toujours cela. Ce ne sont pas des gens dangereux, et en particulier les chasseurs, les agriculteurs et les tireurs sportifs font très attention à leurs armes.

Parallèlement, nous avons la responsabilité de veiller à ce que ces armes ne se retrouvent pas entre les mains de personnes qui s'en serviraient pour commettre des crimes violents. D'après mon expérience et mes discussions d'un bout à l'autre du pays, je crois que les propriétaires d'arme à feu responsables se préoccupent également de la sécurité publique et veillent à ce que leurs armes à feu ne se retrouvent pas entre les mains de criminels.

(1720)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Me reste-t-il du temps, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous disposez de cinq minutes complètes, en partie grâce à l'efficacité de...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pensais que vous vouliez qu'il reste 10 minutes à la fin.

J'apprécie vos réponses.

Je voulais poser à M. Tousignant — je crois que vous êtes du SCC — une très brève question avant de revenir à M. Blair.

J'aurais posé cette question au groupe précédent, mais je n'ai eu aucune occasion de le faire. Dans ma circonscription, il y a l'Établissement de La Macaza, qui compte 28 silos à missiles Bomarc. J'aimerais savoir si le SCC peut nous aider à empêcher que ceux-ci soient démolis.

M. Alain Tousignant (sous-commissaire principal, Service correctionnel du Canada):

Il faudrait que je me renseigne avant de vous répondre à ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils se trouvent sur le terrain de l'Établissement de La Macaza. C'est pourquoi je vous le demande.

M. Alain Tousignant:

Oui.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je n'ai pas de réponse à cela non plus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je tiens simplement à ce que cela soit consigné au compte rendu, car ces silos font partie de notre patrimoine. Je ne veux pas perdre ce patrimoine. Ces silos sont utilisés comme unités de stockage et contiennent de l'amiante; on veut les supprimer. On veut enlever ces silos. Je ne veux pas que cela se produise.

Le président:

Nous voulons donc préserver...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Préserver les silos à missiles Bomarc. Sauver les silos à missiles.

Le président:

... les silos à missiles. D'accord.

C'est différent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Blair, je ne sais pas si c'est votre ministère, celui de la Santé ou les deux... mais j'aimerais parler un peu des lois sur la marijuana.

Comme vous le savez, c'est une grande circonscription rurale. De nombreuses exploitations de marijuana à des fins médicales sont en cours de création. Beaucoup de villes se plaignent de ne pas en savoir davantage à leur sujet. J'aimerais savoir quelle est la responsabilité d'un demandeur de licence d'informer la police, les pompiers et les municipalités. Pourriez-vous m'aider à ce sujet?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Ce sont des règlements qui ne relèvent pas de la Loi sur le cannabis, où quelqu'un obtient une autorisation de cultiver du cannabis, mais doit tout d'abord respecter les règlements de Santé Canada concernant ces installations; il est également assujetti aux règlements municipaux et de zonage, s'ils existent. Je le dis parce que tous les endroits n'ont pas de tels règlements.

Un certain nombre de ces incidents ont entraîné des problèmes liés aux odeurs, à la pollution lumineuse, au bruit et à d'autres complications. Dans ces situations, Santé Canada a un rôle à jouer, et certains règlements s'appliquent spécifiquement aux producteurs autorisés de marijuana à des fins médicales, qui ne sont pas les producteurs autorisés en vertu de la Loi sur le cannabis. Les autorités de réglementation locales ont également un rôle important à jouer, notamment en ce qui concerne l'application des règlements en vue de régler ce genre de problèmes.

Si vous avez dans votre circonscription de telles installations qui posent problème à votre collectivité, je vous encourage à communiquer avec nous, et nous veillerons à ce que Santé Canada, dans la mesure de ses moyens, aide à régler ces problèmes grâce à ses règlements. Dans de nombreux cas, nous pouvons collaborer avec les autorités municipales locales ou régionales afin de donner suite à ces préoccupations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Sur ce, je vais mettre fin aux questions.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Attendez, j'ai une très bonne question.

Le président:

Ce serait la première fois depuis longtemps que vous poseriez une bonne question.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

J'aimerais beaucoup répondre à votre bonne question.

Le président:

Vous pouvez poser votre belle question après la séance. Nous devons adopter le budget des dépenses, ce qui est l'objectif de notre réunion aujourd'hui.

Au nom du Comité, je tiens à vous remercier, monsieur le ministre Blair, ainsi que tous vos collaborateurs d'être venus pendant que nous examinons le budget.

Sur ce, je vais suggérer... et c'est aux collègues de décider si nous voulons adopter plus ou moins 30 crédits en même temps, qui seront probablement tous adoptés avec dissidence. Est-ce une façon préférable de procéder ou souhaitez-vous diviser les crédits?

Nous sommes d'accord pour que tout soit fait en même temps. AGENCE DES SERVICES FRONTALIERS DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement... 1 550 213 856 $ ç Crédit 5 — Dépenses en capital... 124 728 621 $ ç Crédit 10 — Répondre aux défis de la peste porcine africaine... 5 558 788 $ ç Crédit 15 — Renforcer la reddition de comptes et la surveillance de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada... 500 000 $ ç Crédit 20 — Accroître l'intégrité des frontières et du système d'octroi de l'asile du Canada... 106 290 000 $ ç Crédit 25 — Aider les voyageurs à visiter le Canada... 12 935 000 $ ç Crédit 30 — Modernisation des opérations frontalières du Canada... 135 000 000 $ ç Crédit 35 — Protéger les personnes contre les consultants en immigration sans scrupules... 1 550 000 $

(Crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 et 35 adoptés avec dissidence) SERVICE CANADIEN DU RENSEIGNEMENT DE SÉCURITÉ ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 535 592 804 $ ç Crédit 5 — Accroître l'intégrité des frontières et du système d'octroi de l'asile du Canada... 2 020 000 $ ç Crédit 10 — Aider les voyageurs à visiter le Canada... 890 000 $ ç Crédit 15 — Protéger la sécurité nationale du Canada... 3 236 746 $ ç Crédit 20 — Protection des droits et des libertés des Canadiens... 9 200 000 $ ç Crédit 25 — Renouveler la Stratégie du Canada au Moyen-Orient... 8 300 000 $

(Crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 et 25 adoptés avec dissidence) COMMISSION CIVILE D'EXAMEN ET DE TRAITEMENT DES PLAINTES RELATIVES À LA GENDARMERIE ROYALE DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 9 700 400 $ ç Crédit 5 — Renforcer la reddition de comptes et la surveillance de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada... 420 000 $

(Crédits 1 et 5 adoptés avec dissidence) SERVICE CORRECTIONNEL DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement, subventions et contributions... 2 062 950 977 $ ç Crédit 5 — Dépenses en capital... 187 808 684 $ ç Crédit 10 — Soutien au Service correctionnel du Canada

(Crédits 1, 5 et 10 adoptés avec dissidence) MINISTÈRE DE LA SÉCURITÉ PUBLIQUE ET DE LA PROTECTION CIVILE ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement... 130 135 974 $ ç Crédit 5 — Subventions et contributions... 597 655 353 $ ç Crédit 10 — Veiller à une meilleure préparation et intervention pour la gestion des catastrophes... 158 465 000 $ ç Crédit 15 — Protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces... 1 773 000 $ ç Crédit 20 — Protéger la sécurité nationale du Canada... 1 993 464 $ ç Crédit 25 — Protéger les enfants contre l'exploitation sexuelle en ligne... 4 443 100 $ ç Crédit 30 — Protéger les lieux de rassemblement communautaires contre les crimes motivés par la haine... 2 000 000 $ ç Crédit 35 — Renforcer le régime canadien de lutte contre le recyclage des produits de la criminalité et le financement des activités terroristes... 3 282 450 $

(Crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 et 35 adoptés avec dissidence) BUREAU DE L'ENQUÊTEUR CORRECTIONNEL DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 4 735 703 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence) COMMISSION DES LIBÉRATIONS CONDITIONNELLES DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 41 777 398 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence) GENDARMERIE ROYALE DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement... 2 436 011 187 $ ç Crédit 5 — Dépenses en capital... 248 693 417 $ ç Crédit 10 — Subventions et contributions... 286 473 483 $ ç Crédit 15 — Offrir un meilleur service aux passagers du transport aérien... 3 300 000 $ ç Crédit 20 — Accroître l'intégrité des frontières et du système d'octroi de l'asile du Canada... 18 440 000 $ ç Crédit 25 — Protéger la sécurité nationale du Canada... 992 280 $ ç Crédit 30 — Renforcer le régime canadien de lutte contre le recyclage de produits de la criminalité et le financement des activités terroristes... 4 100 000 $ ç Crédit 35 — Soutien pour la Gendarmerie royale du Canada... 96 192 357 $

(Crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 et 35 adoptés avec dissidence) COMITÉ EXTERNE D'EXAMEN DE LA GENDARMERIE ROYALE DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 3 076 946 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence) SECRÉTARIAT DU COMITÉ DES PARLEMENTAIRES SUR LA SÉCURITÉ NATIONALE ET LE RENSEIGNEMENT ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 3 271 323 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence) COMITÉ DE SURVEILLANCE DES ACTIVITÉS DU RENSEIGNEMENT DE SÉCURITÉ ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 4 629 028 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence)

Le président: Est-ce que le président doit faire rapport des crédits du Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020, moins les montants approuvés dans les prévisions, à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard secu 34724 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on June 03, 2019

2019-05-29 SECU 165

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1615)

[Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP)):

Good afternoon, everyone. We will begin the meeting, now that we finally have enough government and opposition members here.

Before I give the floor to our witness, who will be joining us by videoconference, I would like to take a moment to discuss today's proceedings.

Given the time we have already lost, and the uncertainty about this afternoon's schedule due, in part, to the possibility of further votes following the procedural manoeuvres in the House, I would like to make a suggestion.[English]

What I would suggest is, given the fact that we still do have time in the remaining meetings to accommodate Mr. Amos, and given the uncertainty.... He is a member of Parliament, and he is around these parts more often than not, so it's easier to reaccommodate him. We would hear from the witness, do questioning and then, depending on how time is going, move on from there, and put Mr. Amos' testimony to another day.[Translation]

I would like to hear what committee members think.

Let us start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Amos plans to attend the meeting in any case. He has arranged to be replaced in his duties in order to be here.

I suggest that we do all the work we can until there are no further questions. If there is no vote in the House, the PayPal representative could appear for 45 to 60 minutes, depending on the number of questions. Then Mr. Amos could have the time to give his presentation at the end.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

It is a possibility, but the problem—and this is what concerns me—is that Mr. Amos is sponsoring the motion. We may not have an opportunity to question him if it is nearly 5:30 p.m. or if the bells call us to vote.

The clerk informs me that this would have little effect on our schedule in the next weeks before the end of the session.

That is my personal, very sincere opinion. I am replacing Mr. McKay, but I do not want to impose my point of view. Even so, because of the number of days we have left, we may well not be able to move forward the study that Mr. Amos is asking for in a meaningful way.

I am still open to your suggestion, Mr. Graham.

What do you think, Mr. Paul-Hus?

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

I agree with you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Johnson from PayPal has been waiting for an hour. Let us hear his presentation and take the time to ask our questions properly. Then we can adjourn.

Mr. Amos can appear at another time.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Does anyone object to proceeding in that way?

It seems unnecessary to do otherwise.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It depends when we will be able to come back.

A motion has been unanimously adopted by the House recommending that we undertake this study. I want to ensure that we come to grips with it as quickly as possible. This must not drag on for another month. We have already lost our time today.

That is why I suggest that Mr. Amos introduce his motion. That way, we can move on with the study.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Once again, the clerk has informed me that there is no problem with the schedule. I have checked the information. Mr. Graham, that may reassure you about our ability to hear from Mr. Amos at another time. As Mr. Paul-Hus said, we have already kept our witness waiting.

We have an hour and a quarter, but, even if this witness's testimony takes only 45 minutes and Mr. Amos then appears, we still may run out of time or be called to vote. So I prefer to avoid that uncertainty, especially considering the ease with which we can invite an MP to another meeting. With most witnesses, we can rarely do that.

So let us continue the meeting.

(1620)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Let us begin; let us not waste any more time. [English]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Thank you, colleagues.

I will now move to our witness. I want to thank Mr. Johnson for his patience. The procedural wrangling that goes on in this place does have that impact sometimes. Joining us by video conference, we have Brian Johnson, who is Senior Director for Information Security at PayPal.

You have 10 minutes, Mr. Johnson, for your opening statement. We'll take questions from the members, and we thank you for taking the time this afternoon.

Mr. Brian Johnson (Senior Director, Information Security, PayPal, Inc.):

Thank you very much. Good afternoon, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee.

Again, my name is Brian Johnson and I do serve as the Senior Director of Information Security at PayPal. I appreciate your giving us the opportunity to speak with you today and for making the time in your busy schedule.

I suspect you all know a bit about PayPal generally speaking, but allow me to add a bit of detail.

Founded in 1998, PayPal is a leading technology platform company that enables digital and mobile payments on behalf of more than 277 million consumers and merchants in more than 200 markets worldwide. We offer online and mobile merchant acquiring and money transfer services. PayPal is the most popular digital wallet in Canada.

We are based in San Jose, California, and our Canadian headquarters is in Toronto with offices in Vancouver. PayPal Canada was incorporated in 2006. We have more that 7.1 million customers including more than 250,000 small business customers in Canada.

Fuelled by a fundamental belief that having access to financial services creates opportunity, PayPal is committed to democratizing financial services and empowering people and businesses to join and thrive in the global economy. Our open digital payments platform gives PayPal's 277 million active account holders the confidence to connect and transact in new and powerful ways, whether they are online or on a mobile device. Through a combination of technological innovation and strategic partnerships, PayPal creates better ways to manage and move money, and offers choice and flexibility when sending payments, paying or getting paid.

We believe now is the time to reimagine money and to democratize financial services so that managing and moving money is a right for all citizens, not just the affluent. We believe that every person has a right to participate fully in the global economy. We have an obligation to empower people to exercise this right and improve their financial health. As a fintech pioneer and an established leader, we believe in providing simple, affordable, secure and reliable financial services and digital payments that enable the hopes, dreams and ambitions of millions of people around the world. We have a fundamental commitment to put our customers at the centre of everything we do.

Securing our customers and their data is central to our mission. For financial companies, data security is the main pillar. Through strong partnerships, strategic investments and a tireless commitment to protecting consumers, PayPal has resolved to be an industry leader in cybersecurity capabilities and to help make the Internet safer.

We have in our favour more than 20 years of experience in processing electronic transactions safely. PayPal has one of the most sophisticated fraud prevention engines in the world, which gets smarter with every transaction that goes through our system. With our advanced fraud monitoring technology, we detect and prevent attacks before they happen.

Security is in our DNA, and it's at the epicentre of all that we do at PayPal. We are the number one trusted brand of e-commerce and mobile commerce around the world. People trust PayPal because they know that we don't share customers' financial information with merchants, retailers or online sellers. Our robust security standards ensure that every part of a transaction is safe and secure.

At PayPal we believe we have a responsibility to help protect our users against harm. Privacy has always been one of our main concerns. Our customers trust us with their data. We take that trust very seriously. We collect only the data that's necessary to fulfill services that a customer requests, to improve product experiences and deliver relevant PayPal advertisements and to prevent fraud. We never sell or rent customer information.

It's commonly held among global law enforcement agencies that cybercrime and online methods of fraud are now more common than crimes committed in the offline and physical world. As the committee is certainly aware, over the last five years, the RCMP alone has observed an almost 50% increase in cybercrime reports from Canadians. I applaud the committee for aggressive action and for its support of Canada's national security strategy, by including significant funding for investments in cybersecurity as part of your commitment to safety and security. Building an innovative and adaptive cyber-ecosystem is a crucial step to being able to quickly scale and combat emerging threats to critical infrastructure, government, business and individuals' digital information.

To conclude, I would like to emphasize PayPal's commitment to cybersecurity and our willingness to work together with the Canadian government and industry.

Thank you again for the invitation to discuss these very relevant topics and to represent PayPay's strong position in support of consumer data protection and privacy.

(1625)



I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Great. Thank you so much, Mr. Johnson.

We will proceed to our question period. We will begin with Ms. Sahota, please, for seven minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Johnson, for being here today.

Are there any differences in how you operate in Canada versus the U.S., or are you mainly based out of the U.S. and that's where all the information ends up when Canadians are using your service?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

[Inaudible—Editor] by PayPal customers are stored within U.S. data centres and localized data housing, so localization of data of Canadian customers is also contained within the U.S.-hosted facilities.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

To clarify, there's no difference in how you operate when it comes to Canadian customers versus the American customers, right?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Other than localization for currency or for other preferences that are localized, the data and information is stored the same as that of U.S.-based customers.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm very glad to hear that, because I would figure after operating for two decades—longer than other competitors in this realm have existed—you must have a lot of data stored up. It is good to hear that you don't sell the data that you have received. Thank you for providing us with that information.

However, I have seen that there have been several articles in just this recent month about PayPal. One is about paying hackers—I would assume they are white hat hackers—to try to protect the security of your system. Could I hear a little more about that, and how that's been working? Have you been doing that for a long period? Is this a recent trend, that you're paying hackers to hack your system? What advantages are you getting out of that?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

That's an excellent question, Ms. Sahota.

Our program is called bug bounty, and it's an industry-wide accepted method of using contracted support, basically using the industry of white hat hackers through a managed program. They're vetted so they're not allowed to just go rogue or attack systems without request and without knowledge. They're considered professional security researchers across industry, and many of them are professionals in other areas and use freelance time or side jobs at times to provide what's called bug bounty ethical hacking. It helps us to expose any concerns or vulnerabilities in systems that are not caught with internal tools and to instead catch those through bug bounty programs, which again are commonly used by many companies for the security researcher community to collaborate with us on those vulnerabilities.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you have contracts with these hackers?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We contract with a group called Hackerone that provides the vetting process with them, and then through responsible disclosures, those vulnerabilities are reported to us to fix them before they're disclosed publicly, so we can resolve any of those vulnerabilities that they find.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

If an issue was to occur where somebody was to breach the system or someone's privacy, where would the liability lie? Would it lie with PayPal?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

If there's a system breach, that's an unauthorized activity and it would be treated as malicious and illegitimate access as with any mal-intended attacker. We don't have bug bounty researchers perform attacks or breaches, and as part of the program policy, they're not allowed to access customer data nor to make any manipulation or changes of information. They're allowed to disclose vulnerabilities that are detected in the system and report those to us through the responsible disclosure program.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

PayPal also uses an app for convenience for customers, correct?

(1630)

Mr. Brian Johnson:

An app for convenience? We do have a mobile app.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

A mobile app, that's right.

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Correct, we do have mobile apps.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have seen articles also just recently this month of actual accounts of people being defrauded, with up to $9,000 or so being taken out of their bank account, and it has been done because the app can be hacked. As a result, the vulnerability of the app is allowing access into people's bank accounts directly.

We heard from credit card companies that the information is never shared directly. People's bank information does not directly go to the credit card company, but it seems in this case, the bank information is being directly shared with PayPal and then if there's a vulnerability there, the hacker can access all the information.

How are you protecting against that?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Media reports are not always accurate. To be technically accurate, the access of information within the PayPal account would only be through an authorized account holder or through their loss of credentials and device. If there's a loss of credentials by a consumer—let's say they have malware on their computer and their log-in credentials are stolen or lost through that—the access of their account through a malicious attempt would be caught by our fraud platform or risk systems to detect that. If it's not caught by some vulnerability, the only access into the PayPal account would be to PayPal balance, but not directly into the consumer's bank information. The bank information is stored in our system and not made visible, even after entered into the system by the consumer.

The only method they would have is of trying to extract data by using the PayPal system to process transactions. They might try to attempt fraud, but they wouldn't be able to get their bank account information through the platform.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's interesting. The article warns people to check their bank accounts regularly and look for PayPal transactions that may not have been authorized.

When this occurs, how does the person recover? Do they recover from their bank? Are they able to recover from PayPal?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We have buyer protection so if there are malicious or unintended transactions on a consumer account, we provide buyer liability and buyer protection for those fraudulent transactions and protect the consumer in that case.

I want to reiterate though that a malicious account access into a PayPal account is unlike a malicious access into any account. If online fraud occurs, we cover liability for the buyer, for the consumer, in that case. Our seller protection has other coverages to sell our merchants. The access to the PayPal account does not mean that the malicious actor necessarily has access to the bank account directly. They don't have access to credentials, nor to the bank account information, but only the linkage that we provide for the bank account as a funding instrument into the PayPal account.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

I used PayPal many years ago, but I stopped using after a while when I continued to get fraudulent emails telling me about certain transactions that were made. I have a final comment; it can lead to being very confusing for the user and, therefore, I steered away from it because I found I was receiving too many fake emails from PayPal.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Unfortunately, we're going to have to leave it there.[Translation]

I now give the floor to Mr. Paul-Hus for seven minutes.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Here is my first question.

Mr. Johnson, you mentioned that PayPal has existed since 1998. You have therefore been in existence since the beginnings of the Internet.

We know that cybersecurity issues have evolved in parallel with the Internet. Is PayPal able to follow that evolution and counter those threats? [English]

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Many of our staff in our information security organization are members of industry alliances that are helping to make the Internet more secure. We are absolutely in the research and development stages of many investments. Email phishing and anti-phishing working groups are other areas as well, as Ms. Sahota mentioned. The investments we make in email security, Internet security and browser security are at the forefront of our investments.

(1635)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

You also mentioned that people trust PayPal.

What measures have you undertaken to ensure that those who do business with PayPal do so with complete trust? [English]

Mr. Brian Johnson:

As I mentioned, our buyer protection programs provide liability coverage for any fraudulent activities that might happen on a consumer account. We also invest heavily into cybersecurity initiatives and our fraud-risk platforms. We have industry-leading metrics on how low our fraud numbers are in the sense that we protect and prevent a significant amount of fraud, and protect merchants and consumers on our platform at an excellent rate that we're very proud of. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Excellent.

Among the witnesses who have appeared before our committee for this study, we have had representatives from a number of banks, including the Toronto-Dominion Bank. One of its representatives informed us that cyber attacks against the bank come from a number of different countries.

Can you name the countries attacking PayPal's system? [English]

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Interestingly, foreign countries—you mention nation-state, and it's not information I'm at liberty to share, but related to private attackers or individuals who are online fraudsters who would attempt to attack websites happens on a regular basis. They're not centralized to any particular geographic region. There is, of course, a high distribution of cyber-attacks where their origin or their attribution to the country of origin is often difficult to trace, because a lot of countries participating in their infrastructure are allowing it to be hacked. As an example, attackers may originate from one country and use Internet services from another country to direct their attacks. Criminals use a multi-layered economy, and multiple parties are usually involved from different regions of each attack. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I understand the difference between an individual's country of origin and the country from which an attack comes, but my question was more about the countries than the individuals. Has PayPal been subject to attacks from states? [English]

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Not in particular. We have no singular concentration of countries that attack us as a company uniquely. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay, perfect.

Your company is based in the United States and deals with many different countries, all of which have different regulations. Given that we are studying this from a Canadian perspective, do Canadian laws and regulations have an effect on PayPal's activities? For example, are our privacy laws too restrictive or not restrictive enough? [English]

Mr. Brian Johnson:

It's an excellent question. The data protection and data privacy implications that Canada is proposing and has outlined as a framework are an excellent support for industry and businesses globally.

To answer the first part of your question about operating globally, we do have staff in many of our regions that have increased regulations. We gave a local presence in many countries, including Europe, with support for GDPR, and in regions in Singapore where we have support for our business in the APAC region. We do have localized staff and support for each of those regions, as well as in other areas in the world that support local regulations. We have a global workforce that encourages participation with local legislators and regulators. We work closely with examiners and regulators when there are data protection and data privacy laws to ensure that we not only support and accommodate those, but help to align with regulations that are evolving and help inform practical applications to those in a context that's suitable for a global economy. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

In your opinion, are there aspects that Canada should improve? You have said that our country has strong laws, but do you still have recommendations for us on the legislative level?

(1640)

[English]

Mr. Brian Johnson:

By the way, on the announcement of the new digital charter, PayPal applauds Minister Bains and the Government of Canada for taking leadership on that important topic of data protection. We believe that this responsibility does help us to protect users against harm and support privacy laws. It's a great first step. It derives some principles. I believe the 10th principle, or the last one on that was to provide accountability and enforcement. More detail around that would be helpful.

Certainly, as Canada has not been the first mover of data privacy law, I think that's actually worked to your advantage because you've been able to learn from other regions and regulators about the right balance of privacy law. But in being specific with companies with respect to the digital privacy and regulations that you're encouraging, there will be a tough balance between the framework that you've provided and those guiding principles that help direct good behaviour and strong accountability. As well, the work with industry and private partnerships will help to build strong legislation that you can support in years to come. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Thank you very much.

We will now give the floor to Mr. Picard for seven minutes.

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, usually, you would also have the right to speak for seven minutes.

Under the circumstances, I propose allowing the Chair seven minutes so that he can ask questions on behalf of his party.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

You are very generous, thank you. [English]

Mr. Michel Picard:

I won't do that again.

Sir, I would like to look at your operation from a money-laundering standpoint. When I buy credit or I put money in my account, my first naive question is where does my money go?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Where does your money go in a PayPal balance stream?

Mr. Michel Picard:

Yes.

Mr. Brian Johnson:

PayPal balances are backed by a number of U.S. banks, so we support depositing and safe investment and deposit of the account money. The first item was if you use credit. Was that a supporting comment, or what was the line there, before I answer?

Mr. Michel Picard:

When I buy a number of credit...and I put some money in my account for further purchases, my money then ends up in a bank supporting your transaction. Let's say I have $100 of whatever unit, or it might be just dollars, to buy stuff. Do you trace the origin of this transaction and where it comes from, whether credit card, bank account or stuff like that?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Yes, I'm sorry. I understand your question now, Mr. Picard.

Yes. The origin of the money.... From an anti-money laundering, AML, perspective, we have an anti-money laundering department and a strong division and investment in detecting money-laundering activities. We treat those activities very seriously by tracing the money trail from the point of origin, funding source and the original deposit method, and we support law enforcement efforts in fighting any money-laundering operations or fraud schemes that are detected or reported on the platform.

Mr. Michel Picard:

You are supporting efforts during the investigation, but when you get the money from any credit card, at your level, I guess you accept the transaction as long as there is enough money at the point of origin. That means that if I have, for example, a prepaid credit card, and I want to put money in my balance, I put in mu credit card, you verify the balance, the money is there, you take it, and there's no more investigation, regardless of the origin. Whether this origin is criminal or not, you cannot verify that.

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We actually do validation of the data source or the money source at its origin, and in certain circumstances, prepaid has limits supplied on how much money we will allow to be deposited and what money can be withdrawn within a period of time or spent within certain websites. Our risk and fraud platforms do have very granular rules that detect certain financial instruments that are used based on the risk level. If there is an AML or a money-laundering method that we've written into our fraud patterns for that use case, like prepaid, as an example, we place limits and certain criteria to restrict losses and to minimize risk in that case.

(1645)

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do you have pattern analysis in terms of types of transactions?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We do. We perform behavioural analysis, and we have some artificial intelligence methods running in our risk platforms that are learning and baselining behaviours and payment patterns across the platform.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Usually when money is in my balance, I cannot withdraw money as is. I have to buy something. Is that the case, or do I have exceptions where I can withdraw some money from my balance?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We do provide methods of withdrawing money in certain regions of the world, depending on where the money was sourced, of course. It can be withdrawn through different methods. We have a partnership, as an example, with Walmart that allows for cash withdrawals. With Walgreens and with local retailers, we've opened partnerships that allow for deposit and withdrawal of cash in local currency. Through our integration with the Zoom platform, we also allow for global remittance or transfer across borders of different transactions and withdrawal of money through different methods at retailers as well. The money can also be deposited or withdrawn in cash by certain methods.

Mr. Michel Picard:

What is the maximum amount of money I can put in my balance in one transaction?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

I believe it depends on the risk rules. That's not my area of expertise, so I don't know the specifics, but there are limits depending on the age of the account, whether your account has been verified with identification and whether we've verified the account holder's history. There are other methods of raising that limit based on knowledge and know-your-customer indicators on trusting the account holder.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do you have the obligation to declare to FINTRAC in Canada if there are patterns of transactions or deposits of more than $10,000?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

I'm not certain about that. I'm not in the fraud or AML department, but I know that we do report through FinCEN and other networks in the U.S. that I'm familiar with with respect to certain criteria. I'm not familiar with our reporting through the fraud pattern notification with Canada, though. We can certainly find out.

Mr. Michel Picard:

If I put money in my own account so I can, myself, withdraw my own money without your knowing whether I'm the same person doing the two transactions.... Let's say I take a prepaid card, or my money is in an account in a bank that is the same, under suspicion, because we do have some banks that are under suspicion.

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Sure.

Mr. Michel Picard:

I put money in my PayPal account. Two or three days after that, I withdraw my money. The only information you need to know to do this transaction is whether the account has the right log-in and password to get in, and the same thing to get the money out. There's no possibility to verify whether it's the same person. My colleague and I may work on the same account.

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We do verify device telemetry. We look for information about the device, the computer you're using, based on geolocation, on some other fraud detection patterns, to try to verify the authenticity of the user on the account. The account holder, of course, has to have the credentials to perform that payment or that transaction.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Another area—I don't have much time—is the nature of the attacks where you've been targeted.

What kind of evolution have you seen throughout the years, the level of sophistication of those attacks? What can you say about that?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Generally speaking, the cyber-attack footprint has become much more complex and advanced. Cybercriminals have become much more of an economy unto themselves, and have layered their tools, their data, their methods of attack in a very sophisticated way, and in a very coordinated way in many cases.

Criminals are creating tools, and both executing and renting access to those tools. Distributed denial-of-service attacks, or DDoS attacks, have become much more significant and advanced over the years. The cyber-landscape in threats and emerging trends in that area have definitely become more complex, and have increased in scale dramatically in recent years.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Colleagues, as you can see, we have bells. We require unanimous consent to continue. If we choose to do so, we must also decide for how much longer we will continue. I'm looking for guidance, based on the number of questions you may or may not have.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I say we go until the bells flash three times, which should give us five minutes to get upstairs.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

You're proposing that we go for 20 minutes?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Twenty-two more minutes, yes.

An hon. member: Is that enough time?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: It's five minutes to go up two floors in this building.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Can we agree on two final five-minute rounds for each of the parties at the table right now? Is that okay?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

An hon. member: Do you want [Inaudible—Editor], Mr. Chair ?

The Chair: I'm good on my end, but I appreciate the generosity with the speaking time from your side.

Mr. Eglinski, please, for five minutes.

(1650)

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

I'd like to thank the witness for being here.

Brian, I want to follow through with what Mr. Picard was stating.

You stated earlier in your evidence that the money put into the PayPal accounts goes into the United States. Is that true for all countries where you do transactions?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

I'm not certain on that, Mr. Eglinski.

I'd have to verify with our product team on where the money is deposited in back-end sources based on locale.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Let's deal with the Canadian customers.

Do all the funds from which we do transactions with you go into the United States, or is some of it done here in Canada?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

I'm sorry. I'm not sure which products have storage of data and balances in which accounts, so I can't answer that with clarity.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

All right.

Is there a regulatory body in the United States that requires you to report breaches in your program? As you mentioned to Mr. Picard earlier, you have a program that will kick out if a transaction is made and a second transaction is withdrawn from a different locale.

Is that requirement for you? Do you report those to certain security agencies within the United States or Canada?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We have a number of obligations to notify and notification obligations based on regulators across the globe. Again, those are regionally managed at the state level within the U.S., and at the regional level within each of the regulators.

We're governed by the CSSF in Europe, which is overseeing our European banking licence, and the MAS, which is the Monetary Authority of Singapore. We're governed in a number of other jurisdictions where we operate money remitter and payment service provider licences that we do in the United States and Canada.

Those obligations to notify vary based on the condition, but we do notify regulators of occurrences on whether they cross the threshold of notification for any data breach situation, or for any money-laundering operation or fraud scheme that we may detect on the platform. Those are notified through regulators as required.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Are you a member of the Canadian Cyber Threat Exchange?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

No, sir, we're not. We've discussed with the group, and our threat intelligence team has met with them before, but we're not currently members of the group.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Is there a reason for that?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

I believe there were other channels that superceded that—threat exchange platforms that are not specifically regional. The CCTX actually subscribes to some of the threat feeds that we're already members of. There are a number of threat exchanges that I believe they already exchange data through. We're not opposed to it, there just wasn't a need, as we've discussed with them, for any unique data exchange.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay, thank you.

I've been a member of PayPal, I think since about 2000, and have used it quite often over the years.

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Thank you for your business.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

How much of my personal information, or other users', goes through your service? Where is that information stored? Is it all stored in the United States, or is it stored in individual countries?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

It's all stored in the United States. Personal information is all encrypted. We have extremely high-level encryption technologies at all levels of our infrastructure and technology stack. Personally identifiable information is not shared. Again, we don't sell or rent that data out to anyone, for marketing or any other purpose. It is housed and stays on PayPal's systems in the United States, in our data centres.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Have you been hacked?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Have we been hacked? The direct answer is that we have not been breached. If you're asking if we've been breached in the sense of a customer-notifiable data breach event from PayPal, no. Properties, as you may be aware, of other adjacent companies that we've acquired over the years have reported cyber-incidents. We've had some vulnerabilities, and what would be classified as “hacks” noted in different products as an interface, but none of those have led to a massive breach, or a data loss at the extreme level that would require any notification.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You mentioned that all the data is stored in the United States. Is it stored in only one facility, or do you have a backup-type system?

(1655)

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We have multiple backups, yes. We're geographically distributed across high-availability data centre zones, so that we maintain resilience and disaster recovery capabilities across the platform.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay. Thank you. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Matthew Dubé):

Thank you, Mr. Eglinski.

We will now give the floor to Mr. Graham for the last five minutes. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a more lighthearted question to start with.

Do you know that at the bottom of the screen, it says, “SCF Superman”?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Yes, it does. That's my conference room.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. I'm just wondering, because that's televised, so everyone is going to see that.

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Yes. That's a joke, so you're just fine.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that you don't trade data. Is there no interaction of any data, besides transaction data, between PayPal and any other company, for any reason? Would that be correct?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

We don't sell or rent data. There are certain fraud detection and other methods that we use. There are certainly integrations with merchants where we require certain data types. We don't sell or rent our customer data. The customer data footprint is not exchanged with third parties for marketing purposes, unless it's opted in on the PayPal platform by our customers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What data, besides transaction history data, does PayPal collect from its own customers, for some marketing purposes?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

I'm sorry, Mr. Graham, I'm not in the marketing department, so I'm not sure which data elements the marketing department uses. Again, we don't rent or sell that data outside of the platform. I'm not sure what we use onside of the platform, and into our platform, from a marketing perspective. Do you mean if they source other data, in other words, or data that's collected from PayPal customers?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm just trying to get to the bottom of it. Mr. Picard and I just came out of three days of the grand committee on privacy, and we've discussed the avatars companies create, and this type of thing, so it's obviously top of mind for us and I'm trying to understand the level of information PayPal has on its users. Is it just: This person has sent this much money, and that's all we know about him, or is there a great deal more information retained by PayPal about their users?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

Certainly from a financial perspective, and in regard to some of the prior questions around any money-laundering detection and fraud prevention, we need to collect more data around transaction details, usage of the platform and device information, to comply with local law enforcement and regulators that require us to maintain knowledge of customers.

From a know-your-customer, KYC, perspective, the transaction history and the usage of certain customer computers and devices are bits of information we use to detect fraud. Those are, again, not used for marketing purposes. We wouldn't market you because you have connected a certain device type to us, if, for example, we use that for fraud prevention. Again, to my knowledge, that's not information we would have in our marketing team's purview, to expand on or share outside of that function.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A couple of years ago, there was a lot of ink spilled over a class action lawsuit against PayPal for accepting donations to charities that weren't members of PayPal, and it was eventually referred to binding arbitration. By any chance, do you know the status of that suit?

Mr. Brian Johnson:

I don't. I recall readin