header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-08 SECU 161

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1615)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Ladies and gentlemen, I call this meeting to order.

Again, I apologize to our witnesses for the interruptions, but both of you being sophisticated witnesses, you will know exactly what's going on here.

Colleagues, the likelihood is that we'll be interrupted again.

I propose to run the meeting to the next set of bells. Either at that time, or a little later if there's some interest in carrying on past the bells with unanimous consent, or before we all adjourn, I propose that we then move the motion as to whether we refer it back to the finance committee with or without recommendations or amendments.

With that, I think we will start and ask the officials for their opening statements. We'll watch the clock and hopefully get through some of the testimony and questions and answers.

Mr. Koops, are you going first?

Mr. Randall Koops (Director General, Policing Policy, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Sure.

Good afternoon. I'm Randall Koops, the director general of policing and firearms policy at Public Safety Canada.[Translation]

I am accompanied by Jacques Talbot. He is a lawyer and legal counsel for the Department of Justice.[English]

We're happy to appear today to assist the committee in its examination of division 10 of part 4 of Bill C-97. This bill would make amendments to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act to establish in law a new management advisory board to advise the commissioner of the RCMP on the administration and management of the force.[Translation]

The bill sets out the Board's mandate, composition, administration, and other requirements.

In January 2019, the government accepted the recommendations contained in two reports on harassment at the RCMP: one from the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP, or CRCC, and the other from the former Auditor General of Canada, Sheila Fraser.

These reports, as others have before them, identified governance change as a necessary part of stamping out harassment within the ranks of the RCMP.

The government agreed and committed to establishing a management advisory board to guide the RCMP transformation agenda, which proposes major points of intervention for the government to reshape the foundations of the RCMP and orient it towards better long-term outcomes.

The proposed management advisory board would support the Commissioner of the RCMP in accomplishing her mandate commitment to lead the force through a period of transformation, to modernize it, and to reform its culture; in ensuring the sound overall management of the RCMP; in protecting the health and safety of RCMP employees; and in making sure that the RCMP delivers high-quality police services based on appropriate priorities, to keep Canadians safe and protect their civil liberties.[English]

The mandate of the board would be to advise the commissioner of the RCMP on the force's administration and management, including its human resources, management controls, corporate planning and budgets. The composition of the management advisory board would be up to 13 members, including a chairperson and a vice-chairperson appointed by the Governor in Council on a part-time basis for a period of no more than four years.

In selecting these members, the government has indicated that it will consider regional and gender diversity, reconciliation with indigenous peoples, and executive management skills, experiences and competencies, for example, human resources and labour relations, information technology, change management and innovation. The bill would permit the minister to consult provincial and territorial governments that have contracted the services of the RCMP about these appointments. Also, the bill sets out the grounds of ineligibility, most importantly to avoid real, potential or apparent conflicts of interest for board members.[Translation]

Regarding its operations, the management advisory board would be able to set its own priorities, work plans, and procedures. The Deputy Minister of Public Safety Canada and the Commissioner of the RCMP may attend all board meetings as observers, but will not vote.

To make certain that the board is able to advise on anything in its mandate, the RCMP will be obliged to provide the board with information it considers necessary. In addition, the board would be able to share with the minister any advice given to the commissioner. [English]

Most importantly, under this legislation the establishment of the management advisory board would not change the existing roles, responsibilities or accountabilities of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, who will remain accountable to Parliament for the RCMP and retain the authority to direct the commissioner and to establish strategic priorities for the RCMP; of the commissioner of the RCMP, who will retain control and management of the force; nor of the existing RCMP review bodies and existing national security review bodies whose mandates will remain unchanged. Neither will it change the responsibilities of the Treasury Board, which will remain the RCMP's employer.

Bill C-7, which was assented to in 2017, provided for the unionization of RCMP members and reservists. This process is now under way. In C-7, Parliament has reaffirmed the Treasury Board as the force's employer and nothing in these amendments revisits Parliament's decision or disrupts those relationships.

The proposed legislation fully respects a fundamental principle of Canadian policing, which is that police independence underpins the rule of law. The board will not, in any way, impinge upon the independence of RCMP policing operations. It will not be authorized to ask for information that might hinder or compromise an investigation or a prosecution and personal information and cabinet confidences are also out of bounds.

Assuming the bill receives royal assent, the amendments will become effective on a date prescribed by the Governor in Council.

However, if the government creates an interim board in the meantime using its existing authorities under the Public Service Employment Act, then a transitional provision included here in Bill C-97 would continue the tenure of those appointments under the new provisions in the RCMP Act.

In conclusion, the commissioner of the RCMP has said that the creation of a management advisory board is a critical step to help modernize and support a diverse, healthy and effective RCMP. Bill C-97 would make that role permanent to support the current commissioner in her mandate commitment to lead the RCMP through a period of transformation and to support future commissioners in maintaining a force that is trusted by Canadians for its policing excellence.

(1620)



We would be happy to respond to any questions the committee may have.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Koops.

Again, I'm conscious of our time limitations. My suggestion to colleagues would be that we do five minute rounds.

With that, we have Mr. Graham for five minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Koops, would advice from the board be in any way binding on the RCMP?

Mr. Randall Koops:

Not at all. The role of the board would be to support the commissioner by providing her with advice. The commissioner retains command and control of the RCMP under the direction of the minister and nothing in the bill would alter that relationship.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kind of experience is required for a board member to become a board member? What kind of training is provided to them once they're there?

Mr. Randall Koops:

Training would be a question that the RCMP and the board will want to discuss once the board is in place. I think it would be open to the board to have views on what kinds of training would be useful to them, both about police operations and about management. It would also be open to the RCMP to offer that to the board.

On your first question about qualifications, the minister has said that the qualifications that would be considered would include representative qualifications, for example, to reflect the diversity of Canada and geographic representation. Also, the membership that are being sought are folks who have significant experience in leading and guiding transformation in major national institutions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The proposed changes would provide the right for the board to proactively provide advice that is not necessarily solicited, is that correct?

Mr. Randall Koops:

That's correct. The bill would leave the board open to determine its own priorities and determine its own ways of working. We would foresee an arrangement similar to what would exist between many other advisory boards, or boards of management, and a deputy head, which is a healthy dialogue between the two about where advice would be necessary and welcome.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What are some of the most pressing issues the board is looking at, or do you have sense of that? You mentioned harassment. Are there other things as well?

Mr. Randall Koops:

If we look at the government response to the CRCC and Fraser reports that was made public in January 2019, the things that the Minister of Public Safety highlighted included transparent and accountable governance structures, trusted harassment prevention and resolution mechanisms, the leadership development within the RCMP and the RCMP's enterprise-wide commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On harassment, do you think this board will help restore confidence among the rank and file?

Mr. Randall Koops:

The board has a role to play in supporting the commissioner in ensuring that the HR practices that are in place within the RCMP build a healthy workforce and a safe workplace. It would provide the commissioner with guidance on the adequacy of any new arrangements and on adapting them, going forward.

I think, more broadly, the board can provide the commissioner with expertise and guidance on leading the kind of cultural transformation that needs to occur within the RCMP.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that board members would not have access to, for example, cabinet secrets. What level of access will they have?

Mr. Randall Koops:

The bill would provide that the RCMP would provide to the board whatever information the board believes is necessary for it to do its job. There's a positive obligation in the bill on the RCMP to provide that information, subject to a few constraints. Those would include, as we discussed, personal information, cabinet confidences and information related to ongoing law enforcement investigations or prosecutions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I'm going to pass the bit of time I have left to Sven.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Graham.

(1625)

The Chair:

You have a little over a minute.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

In practice, how would the dynamics unfold? I suspect there are a number of different ways to structure that board to create an overall vision of which direction the board should go in.

Should it be a board that has previous policing experience and connections, or should it be a board composed of laypersons who inject a completely fresh perspective, or is that up to the government of the day to decide?

Then, when the board makes recommendations and gives advice is there a reasons requirement? Is there some scrutiny that the RCMP would have to exercise to respond to those recommendations? What obligation is there to take on, at least, the thought process that the committee has developed?

Mr. Randall Koops:

On the first point, the government of the day would be open to selecting board members that it felt responded to the current needs of the board, given the kind of experience that was necessary to help the commissioner.

For your example of police experience, I think the minister has said that the government would look for some measure of police experience on the board, but it should probably be broader than just former police officers.

You will note that in the bill there is a provision that current members of the RCMP are ineligible, as are employees of provincial or municipal governments, so it will not be a board of serving police officers.

The board is free to provide advice to the commissioner in the form that it best sees fit. How they do that would be open to discussion between the board and the commissioner.

The deputy minister of public safety will serve as an ex officio member of the board and, in that sense, the minister is represented at the board, even when the minister is not present at the board.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you for being here today.

We know that there's a lot of oversight already with the RCMP, a lot of committees that they're involved in—the oversight committee, the review committee, their management committee, their committees related to security.

The challenges they face, as we know, are significant. It's unclear to me, and maybe to Canadians as well, how this new management committee is going to address those issues that face the RCMP.

One of the issues that I get in my riding is about being understaffed. I don't understand this—and I'm sure Canadians are going to be asking. How can the solution to the issues—severely understaffed rural detachments, poor communication, the lack of equipment, the internal harassment complaints that we continue to see repeatedly and the cultural challenges that they continue to face—be addressed by developing an advisory committee?

How do we see those issues being resolved with this new advisory committee?

Mr. Randall Koops:

I think what the government is doing in response to a long series of recommendations going back many years about the need to fix cultural problems in the RCMP, in part, is by changing the governance of the RCMP.

In this instance, what the government has proposed is a board that can give the commissioner advice about leading enterprise-wide change in that organization. That will result, over time, in better management decisions and a healthier workforce, all of which contribute, in the long run, to fixing the kinds of issues that you've identified as things that need—

Mr. Glen Motz:

You said, in response to my colleague's question, that the commissioner of the RCMP is not obligated to take any of the advice given by the advisory committee and implement it. Is that correct?

Mr. Randall Koops:

That's correct.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Are there repercussions if she doesn't?

Mr. Randall Koops:

That is a discussion between the commissioner and the board and the commissioner and the minister. What the government has proposed is that rather than create a board that has decision-making or directive power over the commissioner—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Straight advisory.

Mr. Randall Koops:

—it has given the commissioner of the RCMP, in her mandate letter, a very clear mandate to lead transformation of the RCMP—

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, that's true, and I—

Mr. Randall Koops:

—and then to equip her with the tools to support her in doing that.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Right, but having said that, what I find interesting is that this management advisory board has been asked to deal with these cultural issues, with the harassment. Internal harassment is one of those cultural issues that continue to be facing the RCMP. But as I hear what you say, and I see the legislation, the board doesn't have a direct mandate to deal with that issue specifically. I'm curious to know why that was silent.

(1630)

Mr. Randall Koops:

The board's mandate is not to fix those issues. The board's mandate is to give expert advice to the commissioner in her mandate to fix those issues.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, so I chose the wrong words when I talked about fixing those problems. Still, if the mandate of the advisory committee is that we would like you to look at this specific issue, because it's a cultural issue that's occurred for decades within the organization and that it's something to focus on, I find it intriguing that this legislation is silent on that.

Mr. Randall Koops:

That's the choice the government of the day has made, to give that mandate very clearly to the commissioner and then to support her with tools to deliver on the mandate, rather than at this point upset or alter the existing relationships—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Fair enough.

Mr. Randall Koops:

—in relation to who is the employer and who has financial authorities, etc.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Obviously, you believe there are benefits to the development of creating this management board. Obviously, there are probably some disadvantages as well. Do you believe the work of the management advisory board will lead to improved governance, and if so, how?

Mr. Randall Koops:

As we said, the benefit comes to the commissioner in having a broader set of experts who can help her with very complex issues about a very complex national organization.

Mr. Glen Motz:

But that goes back to Mr. Graham's question about what the composition is of this advisory board. If you don't have a broad section of experts to do that...and “broad” means not just policing, but you need to have a policing context to fall back on.

Mr. Randall Koops:

Of course you do.

Mr. Glen Motz:

You need a legal framework. You need HR expertise. You need corporate experience for the management of such a big organization with that mandate. Is that the goal, that we will have that breadth of experience on this committee?

Mr. Randall Koops:

Very much so. Mr. Goodale has spoken publicly about the process under way to find the composition of a board that does those very things.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Non-partisan, I hope.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Dubé, you have five minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, sir, for being here today.

You answered in the negative when you were asked if the RCMP had to implement the advice they receive or to respond to it.

As indicated in the bill, the board's mission is to act “on its own or following a request of the latter”, the latter being the commissioner. In theory, the RCMP is not obliged to consult the board, unless they decide to share information or unless the RCMP decides to proactively ask for any information, but not as a legal obligation. Is that correct? [English]

Mr. Randall Koops:

Or, in the third scenario, the Minister of Public Safety requests or directs the commissioner of the RCMP to seek the view of the management advisory committee. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

At the end of the day, neither side has a legal obligation to consult the board. [English]

Mr. Randall Koops:

Correct. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

I have another question for you. Maybe this is in your document and I did not see it. If that is the case, please forgive me.

Is there an obligation or a reporting mechanism, a public report that the minister or some other authority has to table, which would make the public and RCMP members aware of the advice that was given and the interactions that took place?

Mr. Randall Koops:

The answer is no, because the board's goal is to make recommendations to the commissioner, not to have a public role.[English]

It's not involved in the administration of a statute. It is not a review body. Parliament is not delegating to it the responsibility to administer a statute or carry out another role. Those are generally the things that attract the responsibility to make a public report. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

If RCMP members wished to lodge a human resources complaint based on the points in the board's mission that deal with human resources, they could do so by going through the union, as the situation evolved. Otherwise, they could go through the CRCC's other oversight mechanism. RCMP members have access to those mechanisms if ever they want to register a complaint.

Mr. Randall Koops:

That's right.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay.

Here are my last two questions. The management advisory board's mission is stated in paragraph 45.18(2) of the amended act. In paragraph 45.18(2)(a), you will find the implementation of transformation and modernization plans. In paragraph 45.18(2)(b), the effective and efficient use of resources; and in paragraph 45.18(2)(e), the development and the implementation of corporate and strategic plans.

Why were these terms chosen? This is all well and good for the current government, but it could also lead to workforce cuts or reductions that would have a harmful impact on the very employees that the board is apparently supposed to be championing.

(1635)

Mr. Jacques Talbot (Counsel, Department of Justice):

What is described here are the normal activities for any organization. The terminology is neutral and it applies to all organizations, be they departments, agencies or, in this case, the RCMP.

These are things that the RCMP is currently doing and will have to continue to do in 10 years and in 100 years.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

So I understand that the board's mission will be set based on the objectives of the government in office, with the resources...

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

The board's mission will not change with time. It will have to notify and advise the commissioner based on the reality the commissioner will have to face.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

It could be a financial or political reality, or some other kind.

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

That will depend on the government in place at that time.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Here is my last question.

We haven't yet had the opportunity to study Bill C-98 in depth, because it was tabled yesterday. Will it affect the section of the omnibus bill that we are currently studying? [English]

Mr. Randall Koops:

No. Nothing here would change the role of what's proposed in the following bill, or vice versa. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Picard, please, for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you, gentlemen, for taking part in this exercise.

Is it common practice for a government institution or agency to use advisory boards like this one?

Mr. Randall Koops:

Could I ask you to repeat the question, please?

Mr. Michel Picard:

Is it common practice for government institutions and independent agencies to use advisory boards as part of their management?

Mr. Randall Koops:

What is being proposed for the RCMP is indeed new. However, there are many advisory boards within the federal government.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do any of the advisory boards include the minister or a minister's representative among their members?

Mr. Randall Koops:

No ministers, but there is often a representative, usually the deputy minister.

Mr. Michel Picard:

So we can conclude that, among the members selected, there will be a member of cabinet, either the deputy minister or a person representing the minister. Is that correct?

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

I want to point out that, in this case, it's a member who will not have the right to vote, so more of an observer than a member.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Does the presence of the minister, through a delegate, not add to the balance of power within the advisory board simply because of the minister's presence, given that the RCMP is still trying to have independent management?

Mr. Jacques Talbot:

In fact, observers will be available to board members to answer their questions, provide assistance and explain certain points or issues on which members are called upon to provide advice to the commissioner.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Okay.[English]

I'm done, Chair.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

As colleagues know, the bells are ringing. I propose that we go for another 15 minutes, if that's all right with people. They are half-hour bells.

Up until about three seconds ago, I had thought that there were going to be no amendments or recommendations. Ms. Sahota has some recommendations, and I would like to give the committee some chance to at least absorb those recommendations and think about them, so we can continue with questioning and come back another day and do that, or we can look at these amendments.

I've been working on the assumption that the opposition doesn't have any amendments or recommendations.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I have one.

The Chair:

You have one?

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

I'd rather deal with the questioning and come back to deal with the amendments on another day. Otherwise, we are being loaded down with everything again in a short period of time.

The Chair:

We don't have to report until May 17, so we do have time. It may require a special meeting, because we are chockablock for the next two meetings.

We'll go to the next round, and then we'll deal with amendments at some future date.

Is that good?

Are you fine with that, Mr. Dubé?

(1640)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I'm just wondering how many questions colleagues have left, or if we could use that time to get to the amendments.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Eglinski certainly wants....

Do you want to go, Ms. Sahota?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I wanted to speak to my suggestions in the motion.

After hearing from the witnesses, I think I have a fourth one to add from the floor, but we might be in agreement about what that fourth one is, because I'm actually picking it off of some of your questions, Mr. Motz.

The Chair:

Let's go with Mr. Eglinski, and we'll see whether anybody else has any other questions.

After Mr. Eglinski, we'll start discussing these and then we'll go from there.

Is that fine?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you, and my thanks to both the witnesses.

In my past experience as an RCMP officer for 35 years, I think the majority of the membership would appreciate this committee, but I do have some concerns. The mandate of the board would be to advise the commissioner of the RCMP on the force's administration and management, including resources, management controls, corporate planning and budgets. What power would this committee have to advise the appropriate ministries within the government on funding for the RCMP?

They can make all the recommendations they want to the RCMP, but without the support of Treasury Board or the public safety minister's office to respect what they are saying to the commissioner and supporting the board on those recommendations.... I don't see anything in here saying that they have the authority to go back to the two ministries who are going to be responsible overall.

Mr. Randall Koops:

Ultimately, the board would give its advice to the commissioner. As foreseen, the commissioner, in turn, supported by that advice, can help make better decisions and present better business cases. If we take the example in (f),“the development and implementation of operating and capital budgets”, she has expertise available to her to present—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

But the expertise is only as good as the support that that expertise gets if they pass the information on. I remember that when I was in a force, we were always within the top three salary-wise in Canada. Things drastically changed over the years, and now we're somewhere around 50—I don't know, I can't count that far, as I don't have enough fingers and toes—but we need the two relevant ministries to support the committee they want to form, and yet you have nothing in here saying that they're going to give that support to the committee.

They're going to make recommendations and then the commissioner is going to have to come back and fight with the public safety minister and the Treasury Board to get the funding.

Mr. Randall Koops:

The bill includes a provision that the management advisory board may also provide the minister with a copy of any advice that it is giving the commissioner. On those types of issues where there are large, difficult decisions being made—you used an example about capital budgeting and those kinds of things—the board may well see fit to share that advice with the minister to ensure that they also know the advice it has given the commissioner.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

That's my main concern. I just wanted to hear it from you. I guess we have to wait to see what takes place.

Mr. Randall Koops:

The other provisions are, as we mentioned in response to a question from the other side, that the deputy minister is also present in the meetings of the board and therefore is aware and informed by the discussions and deliberations of the board.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I want to mention here on the record that one of the biggest problems facing the RCMP over the last 20 years has been funding and keeping up the resources to the level that they think they should be. They can't do that, though, because they don't have that funding. It all comes down to budgeting and putting the money where the best resources are.

Thank you, that's all I have for questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Eglinski.

Does anyone on the government side have questions?

Mr. Motz, you can ask one or two questions. You have a couple of minutes, and that's it.

(1645)

Mr. Glen Motz:

Am I to assume that the members of this advisory board, certainly the chair and vice-chair, would be covered under the Government Employees Compensation Act, which would mean they would be paid?

Mr. Randall Koops:

All the members will be paid. They will be paid a per diem. That rate is fixed as part of the appointment process when the Governor in Council makes the appointment.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That includes the chair and the vice-chair. They're not getting a salary; they're just getting a per diem.

Mr. Randall Koops:

Correct. It's a part-time appointment, so they will be paid by the day, plus their travel expenses. In these types of arrangements, normally some degree of preparatory time or reading time will be paid.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Has the department determined approximately what this committee would cost annually?

Mr. Randall Koops:

The department has determined the cost of the committee at about, I believe, $1.6 million per year, $7 million over 5 years, and $1.6 million ongoing to be funded from within the existing reference levels of the RCMP.

Mr. Glen Motz:

So I guess our real crime issues, with being understaffed, are not going to be addressed that way. Anyway, redeploying some cash that could go elsewhere....

How long do you think it will take for this committee to be operational?

Mr. Randall Koops:

The minister said that he hopes to see the committee operational soon. In January the government announced its intent to proceed with the establishment of an interim arrangement to get the board up and running. I believe the minister said in a scrum yesterday that he expected it would be very soon.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Finally, do you think that a management advisory board will speed up the internal review process, the internal processes for resolving some of the matters when members have issues that need to be dealt with? Do you think that will speed up that whole process?

Mr. Randall Koops:

When members have complaints, the board does not sit to receive members' complaints.

The Chair:

We have to leave it there.

Mr. Randall Koops:

I didn't mean that they investigate complaints; I know they don't investigate complaints. I'm talking about fixing the systemic issues. The goal is to help the minister do that.

The Chair:

Mr. Spengemann now has one or two minutes.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

A minute....

The Chair:

A minute is all you need. Okay.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

This board has some size—up to 13 members—and presumably some diversity of views. Is it your expectation that the board will, or may, split on some key issues, and if so, how would they express dissenting views on those issues?

Mr. Randall Koops:

That would be very much up to the board to decide. The board will be free, under the proposed provisions, to determine its own procedures and its own method of working.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota has three or four suggested amendments, since we're not amending a bill as such.

We have 19 minutes. I propose that we run this for five minutes, because the whip will have a heart attack if we don't leave within 15 minutes. Lock him up and we don't have a problem.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: We'll run until 4:55.

Ms. Sahota has presented these amendments, but they're not in both official languages, so I can't distribute them. I'm going to have to have you read them into the record and make your arguments as to why you think these should be considered as suggested amendments.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This piece of legislation is really appreciated. The spirit of it is exactly what is appropriate. I just think it's a little vague.

I understand that perhaps that's been done so that the board will have the ability and flexibility to act differently when addressing different issues. However, I think some of the core things, which you mentioned in your opening remarks....

I'll just read out my proposals and then I'll explain them: The Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security recommends that the Standing Committee on Finance consider amending Division 10 on the Budget Implementation Act to: 1. Require full reports prepared by the Management Advisory Board, per 45.18 (3), to be automatically provided to the Minister;

In the legislation, it says that they “may” provide them, so this is more of a “shall”. I know that the minister receives a lot of reports, but I think it's important, especially if it's an official report, for him or her to be seized of the issue moving forward. That's been recommended. I further propose: 2. encourage diverse representation on future iterations of the Management Advisory Board, including but not limited to women, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, members of the LGBTQ+ community and members of visible minorities; and 3. require that Gender-Based Analysis+, or any future program that may reasonably be viewed as its successor, be incorporated into the Management Advisory Board's work.

Number four is on the fly. After our discussion today, I'm thinking that the mandate of the advisory board lacks any specific mention of harassment and cultural change. I think that should be encompassed in proposed paragraph 45.18(2)(a) of the mandate, but it's very vague. I would recommend that the finance committee figure out what language they want to use, but specifically mention that is the transformation or a part of the modernization plans.

Although you've mentioned in your introductory remarks that they are trying to achieve regional diversity—all of those different things—it's not actually stated in the legislation. This government may intend to make appointments based on that—or the council—but that might not be the case in the future. I think putting that language in would make the person who needs to make appointments aware that he or she must make sure that the board comprises all of those factors.

I haven't listed if there needs to any kind of mandated specific.... What's the word I'm looking for?

(1650)

Mr. Glen Motz:

Quota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Quotas or anything like that. They should be viewing it from that perspective, that there should be as much diversity as possible, so that the recommendations that are made are good, right? The work that's done by a more diverse board would be good.

Those are my recommendations to the finance committee.

Is there any discussion by any members?

The Chair:

In the two or three minutes that we have left, is there any commentary, either from the officials or from members of the opposition parties?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I would think that the composition of any board, any management committee, any commission, would be on merit, based on the competency skills you're looking for to do the job of whatever they're asked to do. That should be the number one requisite.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's not mentioned here either. I would think that anyone they select would be merit-based, of course. That's a given.

The Chair:

Do you want to move that as an amendment, Mr. Motz?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Sure, so moved.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sure.

The Chair:

You didn't mention anything about religious communities.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No.

Basically, number 2 is saying that I encourage diverse representation on future management advisory boards: “including but not limited to”. It's just throwing out some ideas basically, of gender, of minorities, those with disabilities. It's not limited.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Why do you have to break it down? Why can't it just be “diverse”?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think that word could be taken in different ways. It could mean diversity of opinions. I think giving a few examples sets the readers'.... The finance committee would know better what I'm speaking of.

The Chair:

Unfortunately, I have to bring this to a conclusion, since we're under 15 minutes, and we are always concerned about the health and welfare of our whip.

We're going to have to bring this up again, because I'm assuming—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we coming back after the vote?

The Chair:

I'm assuming there's still wish to discuss this further before we write the letter.

With that, I think we are going to have to adjourn. We'll have to figure out a time to bring it back. Thank you very much.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1615)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Mesdames et messieurs, je déclare la séance ouverte.

Encore une fois, je fais mes excuses aux témoins pour les interruptions, mais comme vous êtes tous deux des témoins bien informés, vous savez nettement de quoi il retourne, ici.

Chers collègues, il est très probable que nous soyons à nouveau interrompus.

Je propose de poursuivre la réunion jusqu'au prochain appel à voter. À ce moment-là, ou peut-être un peu après si vous voulez poursuivre, avec le consentement unanime des membres du Comité, ou avant la levée de la séance, je propose qu'une motion soit présentée pour le renvoi au comité des finances, avec ou sans recommandations ou amendements.

Là-dessus, nous allons commencer en invitant les témoins à faire leurs déclarations liminaires. Nous surveillons l'heure et espérons avoir le temps d'entendre les témoignages et de poser quelques questions.

Monsieur Koops, voulez-vous être le premier?

M. Randall Koops (directeur général, Politiques en matière de police, ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Certainement.

Bonjour. Je suis Randall Koops, directeur général, Politiques en matière de police et d'armes à feu, au ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile.[Français]Je suis accompagné de M. Jacques Talbot, avocat et conseiller juridique du ministère de la Justice.[Traduction]

Nous sommes heureux d'être parmi vous aujourd'hui pour aider le Comité dans son examen de la section 10 de la partie 4 du projet de loi C-97. Ce projet de loi modifierait la Loi sur la Gendarmerie royale du Canada afin d'établir en droit un nouveau conseil consultatif de gestion qui guiderait le commissaire de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada relativement à l'administration et à la gestion de la gendarmerie.[Français]

Le projet de loi présente le mandat, la composition, l'administration et d'autres exigences du Comité.

En janvier 2019, le gouvernement a accepté les recommandations présentées dans deux rapports sur le harcèlement à la GRC: celui de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC, ou CCETP, et celui de l'ancienne vérificatrice générale du Canada, Mme Sheila Fraser.

Ces rapports, tout comme d'autres présentés avant eux, ont mis en évidence qu'un changement de gouvernance était nécessaire pour éradiquer le harcèlement dans les rangs de la GRC.

Le gouvernement s'est dit d'accord et s'est engagé à mettre en place un conseil consultatif de gestion afin d'orienter le programme de transformation de la GRC proposant d'importants points d'intervention qui permettront au gouvernement de restructurer les fondements de la GRC et de l'orienter vers l'atteinte de meilleurs résultats à long terme.

Le conseil consultatif de gestion proposé aiderait la commissaire de la GRC: à accomplir l'engagement de son mandat à diriger la Gendarmerie pendant sa transformation, à la moderniser et à réformer sa culture; à assurer une saine gestion globale de la GRC; à protéger la santé et la sécurité des employés de la GRC; et à s'assurer que la GRC fournit des services de police de haute qualité, fondés sur les bonnes priorités, tout en assurant la sécurité des Canadiens et en protégeant leurs libertés civiles.[Traduction]

Le mandat du Conseil serait de conseiller le commissaire de la GRC relativement à l'administration et à la gestion de la gendarmerie, y compris ses ressources humaines, ses contrôles de gestion, sa planification organisationnelle et ses budgets. Le Conseil consultatif de gestion se composerait d'un nombre maximal de 13 membres, y compris un président et un vice-président, nommés par le gouverneur en conseil à temps partiel pour une période d'au plus quatre ans.

Le gouvernement a indiqué que la sélection de ces membres reposerait notamment sur la diversité régionale et de genre, la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones, les habiletés, l'expérience et les compétences en gestion du niveau de la haute direction, par exemple, les ressources humaines et les relations de travail, la technologie de l'information, la gestion du changement et l'innovation. Le projet de loi permettrait au ministre de consulter les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux qui ont fait appel aux services de la GRC relativement aux nominations. Le projet de loi énonce également les qualités requises des membres, surtout pour éviter des conflits d'intérêts réels, possibles ou apparents pour les membres.[Français]

En ce qui a trait à ses opérations, le conseil consultatif de gestion établirait ses propres priorités, plans de travail et procédures. Le sous-ministre de Sécurité publique Canada et le commissaire de la GRC peuvent assister à toutes les réunions du conseil à titre d'observateurs, mais ils n'ont pas de droit de vote.

Afin que le conseil soit en mesure de fournir des conseils sur tous les éléments qui touchent à son mandat, la GRC fournira au conseil les informations que ce dernier estime nécessaires. De plus, le conseil pourrait communiquer au ministre les conseils fournis à la commissaire.[Traduction]

Il importe de noter que, au titre de cette loi, la constitution du Conseil consultatif de gestion ne changerait pas les rôles, responsabilités ou obligations de rendre compte actuels du ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile, qui demeure responsable de la GRC devant le Parlement et conservera le pouvoir de diriger le commissaire et d'établir les priorités stratégiques pour la GRC; du commissaire de la GRC qui conservera le contrôle et la gestion de la gendarmerie; des organismes existants d'examen de la GRC et des organismes existants d'examen des activités de sécurité nationale, dont les mandats resteront les mêmes; et du Conseil du Trésor qui demeurera l'employeur de la GRC.

Le projet de loi C-7, qui a reçu la sanction royale en 2017, prévoyait la syndicalisation des membres et des réservistes de la GRC, processus actuellement en cours. Dans le projet de loi C-7, le Parlement a réaffirmé que le Conseil du Trésor était l'employeur de la gendarmerie. Les modifications proposées ne reviennent pas sur la décision du Parlement ou ne perturbent pas ces relations.

La loi proposée respecte entièrement un principe fondamental des services de la police du Canada — l'indépendance de la police est à la base de la primauté du droit. Le conseil ne portera atteinte d'aucune façon à l'indépendance des opérations policières de la GRC. Il ne sera pas autorisé à demander des informations qui pourraient entraver ou compromettre une enquête ou une poursuite. Il n'a pas non plus accès aux renseignements personnels et aux documents confidentiels du Cabinet.

Si le projet de loi reçoit la sanction royale, les modifications entreront en vigueur à la date prévue par le gouverneur en conseil.

Si, entre-temps, le gouvernement crée un conseil intérimaire grâce au pouvoir conféré par la Loi sur l'emploi dans la fonction publique, une disposition transitoire dans le projet de loi C-97 maintiendrait le mandat de ces nominations au titre des nouvelles dispositions de la Loi sur la GRC.

En conclusion, la commissaire de la GRC a indiqué que la création d'un conseil consultatif de gestion est une étape essentielle pour la modernisation et le soutien d'une GRC diversifiée, saine et efficace. Le projet de loi C-97 rendrait ce rôle permanent afin de soutenir la commissaire actuelle dans son engagement à diriger la GRC pendant une période de transformation et afin d'aider les prochains commissaires à maintenir une gendarmerie en laquelle les Canadiens ont confiance pour l'excellence de ses services de police.

(1620)



Nous serons heureux de répondre aux questions du Comité.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Koops.

Encore une fois, je suis conscient de nos limites de temps. Je suggère à mes collègues que nous fassions des séries de questions de cinq minutes.

Sur ce, monsieur Graham, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Koops, les conseils du conseil consultatif lieraient-ils de quelque façon la GRC?

M. Randall Koops:

Non. Pas du tout. Le rôle du conseil serait d'appuyer la commissaire en lui fournissant des conseils. La commissaire conserve le commandement et le contrôle de la GRC sous la direction du ministre et rien dans ce projet de loi ne changerait cette relation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel genre d'expérience est requis pour qu'un membre du conseil devienne membre du conseil? Quel genre de formation leur est offert une fois qu'ils sont en poste?

M. Randall Koops:

La GRC et le conseil voudront discuter de la question de la formation une fois que le conseil sera mis sur pied. Je pense qu'il serait libre au conseil d'obtenir des points de vue sur les types de formation qui pourraient leur être utiles, tant en ce qui concerne les opérations policières que la gestion. La GRC pourrait également en offrir au conseil.

En ce qui concerne votre première question au sujet des qualifications, le ministre a dit que les qualifications qui devraient être prises en considération comprendraient des qualifications représentatives, pour, par exemple, refléter la diversité du Canada et la représentation géographique. De plus, les membres recherchés sont des gens qui ont une expérience significative de la direction et de l'orientation des projets de transformation dans de grandes institutions nationales.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les modifications proposées donneraient au conseil le droit de fournir de façon proactive des conseils qui ne sont pas nécessairement sollicités, n'est-ce pas?

M. Randall Koops:

C'est exact. Le projet de loi permettrait au conseil consultatif de déterminer ses propres priorités et ses propres méthodes de travail. Nous prévoyons une entente semblable à celle qui existe entre nombre d'autres conseils consultatifs ou de gestion et un administrateur général, c'est-à-dire un dialogue sain entre les deux au cas où des conseils seraient nécessaires et bienvenus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous une idée des enjeux les plus urgents sur lesquels le conseil consultatif doit se pencher? Vous avez parlé, entre autres, de harcèlement. Y a-t-il d'autres enjeux?

M. Randall Koops:

En examinant la réponse du gouvernement aux rapports de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC et au rapport Fraser rendus publics en janvier 2019, nous voyons que le ministre de la Sécurité publique a souligné les éléments suivants: des structures de gouvernance transparentes et responsables, des mécanismes fiables de prévention et de règlement du harcèlement, le perfectionnement du leadership au sein de la GRC et l'engagement de la GRC envers la diversité et l'inclusion à l'échelle organisationnelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En ce qui concerne le harcèlement, pensez-vous que ce conseil consultatif aidera à rétablir la confiance des membres ordinaires?

M. Randall Koops:

Le conseil doit aider la commissaire à s'assurer que les pratiques de ressources humaines en place à la GRC favorisent un effectif en santé et un milieu de travail sécuritaire. Il fournirait des conseils à la commissaire sur la pertinence de tout nouvel arrangement et sur la façon de les adapter à l'avenir.

De façon plus générale, je crois que le conseil peut fournir à la commissaire l'expertise et les conseils dont elle a besoin pour mener le genre de transformation culturelle qui doit avoir lieu au sein de la GRC.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit que les membres du conseil consultatif n'auraient pas accès aux secrets du Cabinet, par exemple. Quel niveau d'accès auront-ils?

M. Randall Koops:

Le projet de loi prévoit que la GRC fournirait au conseil les renseignements qu'il estime nécessaires pour exercer son mandat. Le projet de loi oblige la GRC à fournir ces renseignements, sous réserve de certaines limites. Comme nous l'avons mentionné, cela comprendrait les renseignements personnels, les documents confidentiels du Cabinet et les renseignements liés aux enquêtes ou aux poursuites en cours des forces de l'ordre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je vais partager le reste de mon temps de parole avec Sven.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Graham.

(1625)

Le président:

Vous disposez d'un peu plus d'une minute.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Quelle serait la dynamique concrètement? Je présume qu'il existe un certain nombre de façons différentes de structurer ce conseil, afin de créer une vision d'ensemble de l'orientation qu'il devrait prendre.

Devrait-il s'agir d'un conseil qui a de l'expérience et des liens avec les forces de l'ordre, ou alors d'un conseil composé de profanes qui apporteraient un point de vue tout à fait nouveau? Cette décision relève-t-elle du gouvernement en place?

De plus, lorsque le conseil fait des recommandations et donne des conseils, doit-il s'expliquer? La GRC devra-t-elle exercer un examen minutieux pour donner suite à ces recommandations? Quelle est l'obligation de suivre à tout le moins le processus de réflexion qui a été élaboré par le comité?

M. Randall Koops:

En ce qui concerne le premier point, le gouvernement en place serait disposé à choisir les membres du conseil qui, à son avis, répondraient aux besoins actuels, compte tenu de l'expérience nécessaire pour aider la commissaire.

Au sujet de l'expérience policière, je pense que le ministre a mentionné que le gouvernement aimerait que le conseil puisse compter sur une certaine expérience policière, mais pas seulement celle d'anciens policiers.

Vous remarquerez que le projet de loi contient une disposition selon laquelle les membres actuels de la GRC ne sont pas admissibles, tout comme les employés des gouvernements provinciaux ou municipaux, de sorte que le conseil ne devienne pas un conseil de policiers en service.

Le conseil est libre de donner des conseils à la commissaire de la manière qu'il juge la plus appropriée. La prestation de conseils pourrait faire l'objet d'une discussion entre le conseil et la commissaire.

Le sous-ministre de la Sécurité publique sera membre d'office du conseil et, en ce sens, le ministre sera représenté au conseil même lorsqu'il est absent.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci de votre présence.

Nous savons qu'il y a déjà beaucoup de surveillance à la GRC, beaucoup de comités auxquels elle participe, notamment le comité de surveillance, le comité d'examen, le comité de gestion et les comités sur la sécurité.

Comme nous le savons, les défis qu'elle doit relever sont importants. J'ai du mal à comprendre, et peut-être que les Canadiens sont dans la même impasse que moi, comment ce nouveau comité de gestion va s'attaquer aux problèmes auxquels fait face la GRC.

L'un des problèmes qui se posent dans ma circonscription, c'est le manque de personnel. Je ne comprends pas cela, et je suis certain que les Canadiens vont poser la question. Comment la solution aux problèmes, soit le manque de personnel criant dans les détachements ruraux, le manque de communication, le manque d'équipement, les plaintes de harcèlement interne que nous continuons de voir encore et encore et les problèmes culturels auxquels on continue de se heurter, peut-elle se limiter à la création d'un comité consultatif?

Comment ce nouveau comité consultatif va-t-il régler ces problèmes?

M. Randall Koops:

Après une longue série de recommandations qui remontent à de nombreuses années au sujet de la nécessité de régler les problèmes culturels à la GRC, je pense que le gouvernement réagit notamment en modifiant la gouvernance de la GRC.

En l'occurrence, le gouvernement a proposé la création d'un conseil qui pourrait conseiller actuellement la commissaire sur la façon de diriger le changement à l'échelle de l'organisation. Il en résultera, avec le temps, de meilleures décisions de gestion et un personnel en meilleure santé, ce qui contribuera, à long terme, à régler les types de problèmes que vous avez mentionnés comme ayant besoin de...

M. Glen Motz:

Vous avez dit, en réponse à la question de mon collègue, que la commissaire de la GRC n'était pas obligée de suivre les conseils donnés par le conseil consultatif et de les appliquer. Est-ce que c'est exact?

M. Randall Koops:

C'est exact.

M. Glen Motz:

Y aura-t-il des répercussions si elle ne le fait?

M. Randall Koops:

Il s'agit d'une discussion entre la commissaire et le conseil et entre la commissaire et le ministre. Ce que le gouvernement a proposé, c'est qu'au lieu de créer un conseil qui aurait un pouvoir décisionnel ou directif sur la commissaire...

M. Glen Motz:

Il ne s'agirait que de conseils.

M. Randall Koops:

... on a donné à la commissaire de la GRC, dans sa lettre de mandat, un mandat très clair pour diriger la transformation de la GRC...

M. Glen Motz:

Non, c'est vrai, et je...

M. Randall Koops:

... et de lui donner les outils nécessaires pour l'aider à le faire.

M. Glen Motz:

C'est vrai, mais cela dit, ce que je trouve intéressant, c'est qu'on a demandé à ce conseil consultatif de s'occuper de questions culturelles, du harcèlement. Le harcèlement à l'interne est un des problèmes culturels auquel la GRC continue de faire face. Mais d'après ce que vous dites, et je vois le contenu du projet de loi, le conseil n'a pas le mandat direct de s'occuper de cette question en particulier. Je serais curieux de savoir pourquoi cela n'a pas été abordé.

(1630)

M. Randall Koops:

Le conseil n'a pas le mandat de régler ces problèmes, mais plutôt de donner des conseils d'experts à la commissaire qui est chargée de régler ces problèmes.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord, j'ai mal choisi mes mots en parlant des solutions à apporter. Il n'en demeure pas moins que le comité consultatif doit examiner cet enjeu culturel précis qui sévit depuis des dizaines d'années au sein de l'organisation. Je trouve intrigant que le projet de loi n'en fasse aucune mention.

M. Randall Koops:

Le gouvernement a choisi de confier très clairement ce mandat à la commissaire et de lui donner ensuite les ressources nécessaires pour l'accomplir, au lieu de perturber ou de modifier les relations actuelles...

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord, je comprends.

M. Randall Koops:

... entre l'employeur et qui détient les pouvoirs financiers, etc.

M. Glen Motz:

Vous croyez évidemment que la mise sur pied de ce conseil de gestion entraîne des avantages. Mais cela doit fort probablement présenter des désavantages aussi. Le cas échéant, quels seraient les avantages qu'apporterait le travail du conseil consultatif de gestion en matière de gouvernance?

M. Randall Koops:

Comme nous l'avons dit, l'avantage vient du groupe plus vaste d'experts sur lequel la commissaire peut compter afin de régler des problèmes très complexes au sein d'une organisation nationale très complexe.

M. Glen Motz:

Mais on en revient à la question de M. Graham sur la composition du conseil. Si le conseil ne jouit pas d'un vaste groupe d'experts pour réaliser son travail... et en parlant de « vaste » groupe, il n'est pas question que d'experts en service policier, mais le conseil doit pouvoir compter sur une expertise dans ce domaine.

M. Randall Koops:

Bien sûr.

M. Glen Motz:

Vous avez besoin d'un cadre juridique. Vous avez besoin d'expertise en ressources humaines. Vous avez besoin d'expérience organisationnelle pour la gestion d'une aussi grande organisation ayant ce mandat. Le but est-il qu'une telle diversité d'expérience soit représentée dans ce comité?

M. Randall Koops:

Tout à fait. M. Goodale a parlé publiquement du processus en cours visant à établir la composition d'un conseil qui englobe tout cela.

M. Glen Motz:

J'espère que ce sera non partisan.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur, je vous remercie d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Vous avez répondu par la négative quand on vous a demandé si la GRC allait avoir l'obligation de mettre en oeuvre les conseils donnés ou d'y répondre.

Le projet de loi dit que la mission du conseil est d'agir « de sa propre initiative ou à la demande de ce dernier », ce dernier étant la commissaire. En principe, la GRC n'a donc pas l'obligation de consulter le conseil, à moins que le celui-ci décide de fournir des informations ou que la GRC décide de façon proactive, et non en vertu d'une obligation légale, d'en demander. Est-ce exact? [Traduction]

M. Randall Koops:

Ou, dans un troisième scénario, le ministre de la Sécurité publique demande ou ordonne à la commissaire de la GRC d'obtenir le point de vue du comité consultatif de gestion. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Au bout du compte, il n'y a aucune obligation légale de consulter le conseil, d'un côté comme de l'autre. [Traduction]

M. Randall Koops:

C'est exact. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

J'ai une autre question à vous poser. Il se peut que ce soit dans votre document et que je ne l'aie pas vu. Si c'est le cas, j'espère que vous me pardonnerez.

Existe-t-il une obligation ou un mécanisme de rapport, donc un rapport public, qui serait déposé par la ministre ou par une autre instance, qui permettrait au public et aux membres de la GRC d'être au courant des conseils qui ont été donnés et des interactions?

M. Randall Koops:

La réponse est non, parce que le but du conseil est de fournir des recommandations à la commissaire, et non d'avoir un rôle public.[Traduction]

Il ne participe pas à l'administration d'une loi. Il ne s'agit pas d'un organisme de surveillance. Le Parlement ne lui délègue pas la responsabilité d'appliquer une loi ou de jouer un autre rôle. Voilà généralement des éléments qui mènent à la responsabilité de déposer un rapport public. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Si un membre de la GRC avait une plainte à déposer quant aux éléments énumérés dans la mission du conseil qui concernent les ressources humaines, il pourrait donc le faire en passant par le syndicat selon l'évolution de la situation, sinon, il pourrait le faire en passant par l'autre mécanisme de surveillance à la CCETP. Ce sont les mécanismes qu'un membre de la GRC pourrait utiliser advenant le cas où il voudrait formuler une plainte.

M. Randall Koops:

C'est bien cela.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord.

Voici mes deux dernières questions. La mission du conseil consultatif de gestion se trouve au paragraphe 45.18(2) de la loi modifiée. À l'alinéa 45.18(2)a), on retrouve la mise en œuvre de plans de modernisation et de transformation; à l'alinéa 45.18(2)b), l'utilisation efficace et efficiente des ressources; et à l'alinéa 45.18(2)e), l'élaboration et de la mise en œuvre de plans organisationnels et stratégiques.

Pourquoi a-t-on choisi ces termes? C'est bien beau dans le cas du gouvernement actuel, mais cela pourrait aussi signifier l'implantation de compressions ou de réductions d'effectifs qui auraient un impact néfaste pour les mêmes employés que le conseil est censé défendre en principe.

(1635)

M. Jacques Talbot (conseiller juridique, ministère de la Justice):

Ce que l'on décrit ici, ce sont les activités normales de toute organisation. C'est une terminologie qui est neutre et qui s'applique à toute organisation, qu'il s'agisse d'un ministère ou d'une agence, la GRC dans ce cas-ci.

Ce sont des choses que la GRC fait actuellement et qu'elle devra faire dans 10 ans et dans une centaine d'années.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je comprends donc que la mission du conseil s'établira en fonction des objectifs du gouvernement du jour, avec les ressources...

M. Jacques Talbot:

La mission du conseil ne changera pas avec les années. Il devra toujours aviser et conseiller le commissaire en fonction de la réalité à laquelle le commissaire devra faire face.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ce pourrait être une réalité politique financière ou autre.

M. Jacques Talbot:

Ce sera en fonction du gouvernement qui sera en place à ce moment-là.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Voici ma dernière question.

Le projet de loi C-98, que nous n'avons pas eu encore la chance d'examiner en profondeur parce qu'il a été déposé hier, aura-t-il une incidence sur cette section du projet de loi omnibus que nous étudions actuellement? [Traduction]

M. Randall Koops:

Non. Rien dans ce projet de loi ne change le rôle de ce qui est proposé dans le projet de loi à l'étude, ou vice versa. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Picard, vous avec cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, messieurs, de vous prêter à cet exercice.

Est-il de pratique courante qu'une institution gouvernementale ou une agence ait recours à des conseils consultatifs comme celui-là?

M. Randall Koops:

Puis-je vous demander de répéter votre question, s'il vous plaît?

M. Michel Picard:

Est-il de pratique courante que les institutions gouvernementales et les agences indépendantes aient recours à des conseils consultatifs dans le cadre de leur gestion?

M. Randall Koops:

Ce que l'on propose pour la GRC est effectivement nouveau. Cependant, il existe beaucoup de conseils consultatifs au sein du fédéral.

M. Michel Picard:

Est-ce que les conseils consultatifs, quels qu'ils soient, comptent le ministre ou un de ses représentants parmi leurs membres?

M. Randall Koops:

Il n'y a pas de ministre, mais il y a souvent un de ses représentants; normalement, c'est le sous-ministre.

M. Michel Picard:

On peut donc conclure que, dans ce conseil consultatif, parmi les membres qui seront choisis, on retrouvera un membre du cabinet, soit le sous-ministre ou une personne représentant le ministre. Est-ce bien cela?

M. Jacques Talbot:

Je veux attirer votre attention sur le fait que, dans ce cas, il s'agit d'un membre qui n'aura pas de droit de vote. C'est plutôt un observateur qu'un membre.

M. Michel Picard:

La présence du ministre, par l'intermédiaire d'un délégué, ne vient-elle pas ajouter au rapport de force qui se joue à l'intérieur du conseil consultatif du simple fait de sa présence, étant donné que la GRC essaie quand même d'avoir une gestion indépendante?

M. Jacques Talbot:

En fait, les observateurs seront à la disposition des membres du conseil pour répondre à leurs questions, pour fournir une assistance et pour expliquer certains points ou certaines questions sur lesquels les membres sont appelés à fournir des avis au commissaire.

M. Michel Picard:

D'accord.[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, j'ai terminé.[Français]

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Comme mes collègues le savent, la sonnerie retentit. Je propose qu'on poursuive pendant encore 15 minutes si cela vous va. Il s'agit d'une sonnerie d'appel d'une demi-heure.

Jusqu'à il y a quelques instants, je ne croyais pas que des amendements ou des recommandations seraient présentés. Mme Sahota a quelques recommandations à formuler, et j'aimerais donner au comité l'occasion de prendre connaissance de ces recommandations et d'y penser afin qu'on puisse poursuivre avec les questions et y revenir un autre jour, ou on peut étudier les amendements.

Je suppose que l'opposition n'a pas d'amendements ou de recommandations à présenter.

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'en ai un.

Le président:

Vous en avez un?

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

J’aimerais mieux que nous terminions les questions et que nous nous occupions des amendements un autre jour. Sinon, nous allons encore essayer de tout faire en peu de temps.

Le président:

Nous avons jusqu'au 17 mai pour produire le rapport, donc nous avons du temps. Il faudra peut-être tenir une réunion spéciale, parce que notre horaire est totalement plein pour les deux prochaines réunions.

Nous allons passer aux prochaines questions, et nous nous occuperons des amendements un autre jour.

Êtes-vous d'accord?

Ça vous va, monsieur Dubé?

(1640)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je me demandais combien de questions ont encore les collègues, ou si on pouvait utiliser ce temps pour examiner les amendements.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Oui.

Le président:

M. Eglinski veut certainement...

Voulez-vous prendre la parole, madame Sahota?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je voulais parler de mes suggestions dans la motion.

Après avoir entendu les témoins, je pense avoir une quatrième recommandation, mais nous allons peut-être nous entendre sur celle-ci, puisqu'elle découle de certaines de vos questions, monsieur Motz.

Le président:

Passons à M. Eglinski, et puis on verra s'il y a d'autres questions.

Après M. Eglinski, nous allons discuter des amendements et on verra ensuite.

Est-ce que ça vous va?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui.

Le président:

Monsieur Eglinski.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je vous remercie, et je remercie également nos deux témoins.

D'après mes 35 ans d'expérience dans la GRC, je pense que la majorité de ses membres seraient heureux de la création de ce comité, mais j'ai néanmoins quelques préoccupations. Le mandat du conseil serait de conseiller la commissaire de la GRC relativement à l'administration et à la gestion de la gendarmerie, y compris ses ressources, ses contrôles de gestion, sa planification et ses budgets. En quoi ce comité pourrait-il conseiller les ministères pertinents, au sein du gouvernement, en ce qui concerne le financement de la GRC?

Ils peuvent bien faire toutes les recommandations qu'ils veulent à la GRC, mais sans le soutien du Conseil du Trésor ou du ministère de la Sécurité publique, pour faire respecter les conseils qu'ils donnent à la commissaire et soutenir le conseil en ce qui a trait à ces recommandations... Je ne vois rien ici qui dit qu'il a le pouvoir de se tourner vers les deux ministères qui auront l'ensemble des responsabilités.

M. Randall Koops:

Au bout du compte, le conseil conseillerait la commissaire. Ce qui est prévu, c'est que la commissaire, à son tour, sur la foi de ces conseils, peut prendre de meilleures décisions et présenter de meilleurs dossiers d'analyse. Si on prend l'exemple (f), « l'élaboration et la mise en oeuvre de budgets de fonctionnement et d'investissement », elle dispose de l'expertise nécessaire pour présenter...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Mais cette expertise n'est vraiment valable que si l'information est transmise. Je me souviens, quand j'étais dans la GRC, que nous figurions toujours dans les trois premiers rangs sur le plan salarial au Canada. Les choses ont radicalement changé avec les années, et nous sommes maintenant aux alentours du 50e rang — je ne sais pas, je ne sais pas compter si loin, je n'ai pas assez de doigts et d'orteils — mais il faudrait que les deux ministères pertinents appuient le comité qu'ils veulent former, et pourtant, rien ici ne nous dit qu'ils vont offrir ce soutien au comité.

Ils vont faire des recommandations, puis la commissaire devra affronter le ministère de la Sécurité publique et le Conseil du Trésor pour obtenir le financement.

M. Randall Koops:

Le projet de loi comprend une disposition indiquant que le Comité consultatif de gestion peut également fournir au ministre une copie des conseils prodigués à la commissaire. Or, il faut prendre des décisions difficiles et d'envergure dans certains dossiers; vous avez donné l'exemple du budget des investissements, entre autres, et il se peut que le comité veuille transmettre les conseils fournis au ministre afin de s'assurer que le ministre a les mêmes conseils que la commissaire.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Voilà ma grande préoccupation. Je voulais vous entendre le dire. Il va falloir voir comment les choses évoluent.

M. Randall Koops:

Les autres dispositions, comme nous l'avons dit à votre collègue d'en face, précisent que le sous-ministre est également présent lors des réunions du comité et est donc au courant des discussions et des délibérations.

M. Jim Eglinski:

J'aimerais affirmer que l'un des plus grands problèmes rencontrés par la GRC au cours des 20 dernières années, c'est la question du budget et du caractère suffisant des ressources. La GRC n'y arrive pas parce qu'elle n'a pas les fonds nécessaires. Il faut disposer d'un budget suffisant et affecter les fonds pour se procurer les meilleures ressources.

Merci, je n'ai plus de questions.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Eglinski.

Y a-t-il d'autres questions du côté du parti ministériel?

Monsieur Motz, vous pouvez poser une ou deux questions. Vous avez seulement quelques minutes.

(1645)

M. Glen Motz:

Devrais-je comprendre que les membres du comité consultatif, et sans doute le président et le vice-président, seraient assujettis à la Loi sur l'indemnisation des agents de l'État, ce qui veut dire qu'ils seraient rémunérés?

M. Randall Koops:

Tous les membres seront payés. Ils recevront une indemnité quotidienne. Le taux est établi dans le cadre du processus de nomination par le gouverneur en conseil.

M. Glen Motz:

Y compris le président et le vice-président. Ils ne toucheront pas un salaire, mais recevront plutôt une indemnité quotidienne.

M. Randall Koops:

Exactement. Il s'agit d'une nomination à temps partiel et donc ils seront rémunérés sur une base journalière, plus les frais de déplacement. Pour ce type d'arrangements, d'habitude, il y a un certain dédommagement pour le temps de préparation ou de lecture.

M. Glen Motz:

Est-ce que le ministère a estimé les coûts annuels de ce comité?

M. Randall Koops:

Le ministère a évalué que les coûts du comité s'élèveraient à 1,6 million de dollars par année, donc 7 millions sur cinq ans, si je ne m'abuse. Il y aurait 1,6 million de dollars en financement continu provenant de niveaux de référence existants de la GRC.

M. Glen Motz:

Alors, puisque nous manquons d'effectifs, des enjeux de criminalité ne pourront pas être résolus de la sorte. De toute façon, réaffecter des fonds ailleurs...

Quand le comité pourra-t-il commencer ses activités?

M. Randall Koops:

Le ministre espère que le comité commencera d'ici peu. En janvier, le gouvernement a annoncé son intention d'établir une entente intérimaire afin de mettre en place le conseil. Je crois que le ministre a dit lors d'un point de presse hier qu'il s'attendait à ce que le tout se fasse très bientôt.

M. Glen Motz:

Finalement, est-ce que vous croyez qu'un conseil consultatif de gestion accélérera le processus d'examen interne, soit le processus de résolution des différends soulevés par les membres? Pensez-vous que cela permettra d'accélérer tout ce processus?

M. Randall Koops:

Lorsque les membres ont des plaintes à formuler, le conseil ne siège pas pour les recevoir.

Le président:

Nous devons nous arrêter là.

M. Randall Koops:

Je ne voulais pas dire qu'ils enquêtent sur les plaintes; je sais qu'ils n'enquêtent pas sur les plaintes. Je parle de régler les problèmes systémiques. L'objectif est d'aider le ministre à le faire.

Le président:

M. Spengemann dispose maintenant d'une ou deux minutes.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Une minute...

Le président:

Une minute, c'est tout ce qu'il vous faut. D'accord.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Ce conseil est assez large — jusqu'à 13 membres — et il représente probablement une certaine diversité d'opinions. Vous attendez-vous à ce que le conseil soit divisé ou puisse être divisé sur certaines questions clés et, le cas échéant, comment exprimera-t-il ses opinions dissidentes sur ces questions?

M. Randall Koops:

Ce serait au conseil d'en décider. Le conseil sera libre, en vertu des dispositions proposées, de déterminer ses propres procédures et sa propre méthode de travail.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Mme Sahota a proposé trois ou quatre amendements, puisque nous ne modifions pas un projet de loi en tant que tel.

Nous avons 19 minutes. Je propose que nous continuions pendant cinq minutes, parce que le whip aura une crise cardiaque si nous ne partons pas d'ici d'ici 15 minutes. Si on l'enferme, on règle le problème.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Nous allons continuer jusqu'à 16 h 55.

Mme Sahota a présenté ses amendements, mais ils ne sont pas dans les deux langues officielles, alors je ne peux les distribuer. Je vais vous demander de les lire et d'expliquer pourquoi vous pensez qu'ils doivent être considérés comme des amendements proposés.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ce projet de loi est véritablement apprécié, son objet est des plus pertinents. Je pense seulement qu'il est un peu vague.

À ce que je comprends, peut-être cela a-t-il été fait, afin que le conseil ait la capacité et la souplesse nécessaires pour adapter les mesures qu'il prend, en fonction des enjeux différents. Je pense toutefois que nos éléments fondamentaux, dont vous avez traité dans vos observations liminaires...

Je vais lire ce que je propose, et je m'expliquerai ensuite: Que le Comité recommande au Comité permanent des finances d’amender la section 10 du projet de loi C-97, Loi portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 19 mars 2019 et mettant en oeuvre d'autres mesures, pour: 1. Exiger que les rapports complets préparés par le Conseil constitutif de gestion, visés au paragraphe 45.18 (3), soient automatiquement fournis au ministre;

Dans la loi, on prévoit que le conseil de gestion « peut » fournir ces rapports, alors ici on parle d'« exiger ». Je sais que le ministre reçoit beaucoup de rapports, mais je crois que c'est important, surtout s'il s'agit d'un rapport officiel, qu'il puisse désormais être saisi des enjeux. C'est ce qui a été recommandé. Je propose en outre: 2. encourager la composition diversifiée du futur Conseil constitutif de gestion, notamment en faisant appel à des femmes, à des Autochtones, à des personnes handicapées, à des membres de la communauté LGBTQ+ et à des membres de minorités visibles; 3. exiger qu’une analyse comparative entre les sexes +, ou tout autre programme futur qui pourrait raisonnablement être perçu comme son successeur, soit intégrée aux travaux du Conseil constitutif de gestion.

Pour ce qui est de la quatrième recommandation, je l'improvise. Après notre discussion d'aujourd'hui, je pense qu'il manque dans le mandat du conseil consultatif une mention particulière concernant le harcèlement et le changement culturel. Il me semble que cela devrait être englobé dans l'alinéa 45.18(2)a) du mandat, mais c'est très vague. Je recommanderais donc que le comité des finances trouve pour cela le libellé qu'il juge approprié, mais qu'il mentionne précisément que cela doit faire partie intégrante des plans de transformation ou de modernisation.

Je sais que vous avez dit dans vos observations liminaires qu'ils essaient d'assurer une représentation de la diversité régionale — et toutes ces diverses choses — ce n'est pas véritablement exprimé dans la loi. Le gouvernement — ou le conseil — peut bien vouloir procéder à des nominations dans cet esprit, mais ce pourrait ne pas toujours être le cas. Je pense que si c'est clairement exprimé dans la loi, la personne qui doit faire ces nominations saura ainsi qu'elle doit s'assurer que le conseil soit composé en tenant compte de tous ces facteurs.

Je n'ai pas mis dans cette liste la nécessité d'un nombre précis obligatoire... Quel terme encore utilise-t-on?

(1650)

M. Glen Motz:

Des quotas.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Des quotas ou quelque chose de semblable. Ils devraient voir la chose sous cet angle, de manière à avoir le plus de diversité possible, pour que les recommandations qui sont faites soient bonnes, n'est-ce pas? Si le travail était fait par un conseil plus diversifié, ce serait bien.

Voilà donc mes recommandations au comité des finances.

Les membres du Comité désirent-ils en discuter?

Le président:

Pendant les deux ou trois minutes qui nous restent, les fonctionnaires ou les membres des partis de l'opposition ont-ils des commentaires à faire?

M. Glen Motz:

J'estime que la composition de n'importe quel conseil, comité de gestion ou commission devrait être basée sur le mérite, sur les compétences et les aptitudes que l'on recherche pour faire le travail requis. Cela devrait être la priorité numéro un.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il n'en est fait aucune mention ici. J'estime que toute nomination serait basée sur le mérite, bien entendu. Cela va de soi.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, voulez-vous le proposer sous la forme d'un amendement?

M. Glen Motz:

Oui, allons-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Le président:

Vous n'avez rien dit au sujet des minorités religieuses.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non.

En fait, le point numéro deux dit que j'encourage la représentation diverse au sein de tout prochain conseil consultatif de gestion: « y compris, sans s'y limiter ». Cela ne fait que proposer des idées: diversité de genre, diversité de minorité, diversité de personnes handicapées. Mais cela n'est pas prescriptif.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Pourquoi vouloir préciser les choses? Pourquoi ne pas seulement dire « diverses »?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que ce mot peut être interprété de différentes façons. Cela pourrait vouloir dire la diversité d'opinions. Je crois que le fait de citer quelques exemples permet aux lecteurs... Le comité des finances ainsi saurait mieux ce que j'ai en tête.

Le président:

Malheureusement, je dois mettre fin à la discussion, puisque nous avons moins de 15 minutes avant le vote et parce que nous sommes toujours très soucieux de la santé et du bien-être de notre whip.

Nous devrons revenir là-dessus, car j'imagine...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Revenons-nous après le vote?

Le président:

J'imagine que les membres voudront en discuter davantage avant de rédiger la lettre.

Sur ce, nous allons devoir lever la séance. Nous devrons décider d'une heure pour y revenir. Merci beaucoup.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 08, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.