header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under pacp...

  1. 2019-02-21: 2019-02-21 PACP 128

Displaying the most recent stories under pacp...

2019-02-21 PACP 128

Standing Committee on Public Accounts

(0850)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Kevin Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot, CPC)):

Good morning, everyone.

This is meeting number 128 of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts for Thursday, February 21, 2019.

We are once again here in consideration of “Report 1—Connectivity in Rural and Remote Areas” of the 2018 fall reports of the Auditor General of Canada.

We're honoured to have with us this morning, from the Office of the Auditor General, Mr. Jerome Berthelette, the Assistant Auditor General, and Philippe Le Goff, Principal.

From the Department of Industry we have the Deputy Minister, Mr. John Knubley. We also have Lisa Setlakwe, Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategy and Innovation Policy Sector. We also have Michelle Gravelle, Director General, Audit and Evaluation Branch.

From the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission we have Mr. Ian Scott, Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer; Mr. Christopher Seidl, Executive Director of Telecommunications; and Mr. Ian Baggley, Director General, Telecommunications.

For those who may be interested, we are televised today. We had these folks with us before, but we were interrupted by votes in the House. Typically, all they did at that time was their opening statements. We didn't get into very much questioning.

They have complied with our request and are willing to again give us an opening statement. We thank them for that.

We will now turn our time over to Mr. Berthelette.

Mr. Jerome Berthelette (Assistant Auditor General, Performance Audit, Office of the Auditor General):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for this opportunity to discuss our fall 2018 report on connectivity in rural and remote areas. Joining me at the table is Philippe Le Goff, the principal responsible for the audit.

This audit focused on whether Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, according to their respective roles and responsibilities, monitored the state of connectivity and developed and implemented a plan to meet the connectivity needs of Canadians in remote and rural areas.[Translation]

Over the past 12 years, detailed examinations of the state of broadband access in Canada have included recommendations that the federal government lead the creation of a national broadband strategy. However, at the time we finished our audit, the government had still not agreed to take that step.

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada indicated that it was reluctant to establish a strategy with an objective that could not be reached with the available funding. The department had continued to follow an approach that expanded broadband coverage to underserved parts of the country according to when funds were available.

This approach left people in rural and remote parts of the country with less access to important online services, such as education, banking, and health care, and without information about when they could expect to have better access.

On October 26, 2018, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development announced that the federal, provincial, and territorial ministers for innovation and economic development agreed to make broadband a priority and to develop a long-term strategy to improve access to high-speed Internet services for all Canadians.

Ministers committed to a goal of establishing universal access to Internet speeds of 50 megabits per second download and 10 megabits per second upload.

Mr. Chair, with respect to the current state of connectivity in Canada, we found that the department relied on complete and accurate data to inform policy-making aimed at addressing the connectivity gap in rural and remote areas.[English]

In 2016, the government launched its connect to innovate funding program to bring high-speed Internet to 300 rural and remote communities in Canada. We examined whether the department designed and managed this program to maximize the value for taxpayers. We found that the department did not implement the program in a way that ensured the maximum broadband expansion for the public money spent. The program did not include a way to mitigate the risk that government funds might displace private sector funds.

We also found that the department did not provide key information to potential applicants for funding under the program. As a result, some applicants had to invest more effort in preparing their proposals, and all applicants lacked full knowledge of the basis for selecting funding proposals. For example, there were a number of considerations for selecting projects, but the application guide did not specify the relative weight of each criterion used in the project selection process. Also, projects were less likely to be funded if they did not align with provincial and territorial priorities. However, these priorities were not made public. In our view, the department should have made the weights and priorities public.

Many Canadians in rural and remote areas had to rely on fixed wireless broadband solutions. We found that small Internet service providers did not have sufficient access to high-quality spectrum to support broadband deployment in rural and remote areas. For example, the department auctioned spectrum licences for geographic areas that were too large for smaller service providers to bid on. The secondary market for unused spectrum did not function well, partly because licensees had little business incentive to make unused spectrum available for subordinate licensing. In addition, the information on unused spectrum was not readily available to interested Internet providers.[Translation]

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission have agreed with our six recommendations, and we understand that the department has prepared a detailed action plan.

Mr. Chair, this concludes my opening remarks.

We would be pleased to answer any questions the committee may have.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Berthelette.

We'll now turn to our deputy minister, Mr. Knubley, for his comments.

Mr. John Knubley (Deputy Minister, Department of Industry):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Overall, the Government of Canada sees connectivity and broadband as a critical enabler. It really is the way for all Canadians to participate in economic growth, innovation and social inclusion.

Overall, we also agree with the recommendations of the Auditor General. I thought I should, at the outset, acknowledge the contribution of the former Auditor General Ferguson. We had several heated conversations—good conversations—about this topic.

(0855)

The Chair:

Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. John Knubley:

I want to start by thanking the Auditor General and his office for their report. This is an extremely important set of issues. We accept the recommendations and are moving forward to improve rural and remote connectivity.[English]

I have just a few words, then, on the three specific areas of comment in the Auditor General's chapter: first, on strategy; second, on programs; and third, on spectrum.

On strategy, we agree on the need for a connectivity strategy, particularly in light of the CRTC decision in December 2016 declaring broadband a basic service and setting that 50/10 target. I personally believe that this declaration has created a significant inflection point for the delivery of broadband, which has required us to move from an evolutionary, step-by-step approach, addressing gaps, to a more collaborative, integrative approach to broadband.

As a basic service, the department's broadband programs predate this announcement from CRTC. As I said, they were designed to be step by step and to focus on specific gaps in services, coverages and speed. We focused on closing the gaps in speed between urban and rural areas in a way that carefully balances the public interest and private investment. We do want to avoid crowding out private investment in whatever we do.

I would also want to stress to members and to the chair that connectivity is very much a moving target. Technology is constantly changing and improving, and in this context, strategy is important, particularly as we set specific goals. However, it's constantly evolving. Only a few years ago our target was five and one, as opposed to 50 and 10.

As indicated earlier, work was already under way on a strategy this past spring. We established a federal-provincial-territorial connectivity committee. Federal-provincial groups have existed before, but we formalized it.

In June, the department launched a national digital and data strategy consultation, in which connectivity was the foundational component.

On September 25, Minister Bains released the economic strategy tables report, which focused on six sectors. This included the importance of broadband and digital infrastructure for economic growth, innovation and social inclusion.

Finally, on October 26 of last year, the federal-provincial-territorial ministers met. They agreed as a group to make broadband a priority, and to work together to that end. They agreed to a set of connectivity principles and to develop a long-term strategy to improve access for Canadians to high-speed Internet and mobile services. In other words, they accepted the 50/10 goal and the objective of serving Canadians with broadband as a basic service.

They did announce three specific principles: access to ensure reliable, high-quality service; collaboration to leverage all partners, and end fragmentation; and effective instruments, especially targeting market failures, so that government supports this where it is most needed in a real world context and does not crowd out private investment.

I would like to end my comments on the strategy by reminding members that the department has been very active in the digital and connectivity space for many years. It goes back to Minister Manley. There was a national broadband task force in 2001, led by David Johnston. If you look at their principles—I suspect I'll point them out to you later—you will see that they are remarkably similar to ones that are at the heart of our new strategy. The department has been committed for many years to providing programming around education related to digital and broadband activity. I can talk to you about some of those programs.

The second area of focus for the Auditor General was our two programs: Connecting Canadians, a $240-million, five-year program launched in 2014 to install last-mile connection for households; and our more recent program, connect to innovate, a $500-million, five-year program launched in 2016 primarily to support new backbone infrastructure to connect institutions such as schools and hospitals, and to ensure that communities have access to broadband.

(0900)



I do want to stress that the findings of the audit focus solely on the design phase of the connect to innovate program. That's where we were at the time of the work of the Auditor General. I am pleased to report, and I have been asked to do so by Minister Bains, that the program will connect 900 communities across Canada. That's three times the program's original target of 300 communities.

Of the 900 communities, 190 are indigenous communities, some of them in the direst need of better high-speed Internet. I want to stress that above all what was targeted in this program were the areas of highest need for rural broadband, typically where the private sector is not inclined to go and that, overall, our $500 million program leveraged another $500 million, so that $1 billion is dedicated towards improved connectivity.

Let me just turn to the issue of spectrum and the issues raised there by the Auditor General. We certainly agree that the impact on rural and remote areas is a very important consideration when developing spectrum activities or licensing frameworks. We continue to develop policies that encourage service into rural areas to ensure that all Canadians will benefit from high-quality services, coverage and affordable prices. For example, we've just published a consultation on the development of similar geographic service areas for spectrum licence, known as the tier 5 consultation, which was referenced in the Auditor General's report.

What we have been doing is trying to drill down to a smaller geographical service areas so that we have a better understanding and mapping of what can be available to Canadians.

Also the 600 megahertz spectrum auction is scheduled to take place shortly. This spectrum can provide expanded rural coverage, specifically because we set aside 40% of the spectrum for regional service providers.

Let me conclude by just reaffirming that we recognize how important affordable high-speed connectivity and broadband is for rural communities and Canadians and that we all work very hard to ensure that we service and meet the objectives related to that.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Knubley.

Now we'll move to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and Mr. Scott.

Go ahead, please. [Translation]

Mr. Ian Scott (Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission):

Good morning, Mr. Chair.[English]

Members, I'll forgo introducing myself and my colleagues, as the chairman has already done so.

We appreciate the opportunity to appear before this committee to discuss the findings of the Office of the Auditor General and to explain the CRTC's role in increasing connectivity for Canadians living in rural and remote areas of our country.

As the Auditor General's report noted, the commission has a limited but important role to play. Our job as an independent regulator is to ensure that Canadians have access to a world-class communication system that promotes innovation and enriches their lives. We believe that all Canadians, no matter where they live, should have access to broadband Internet services on both fixed and mobile networks. As the Auditor General's report underlines, connectivity is vital in today's world. Broadband is the critical tool we use to communicate with each other, educate and entertain ourselves, find information, apply for jobs and do routine activities from banking to accessing health care and other government services.

So Canadians need access to an unfettered Internet experience. [Translation]

While we don't hold all the levers, there are areas where the CRTC can—and is—helping to advance this goal. A perfect example is the CRTC's December 2016 announcement that broadband Internet is now considered a basic telecommunications service.[English]

At the same time, we established a new universal service objective, as just mentioned by the deputy minister. We call for all Canadians to have access to fixed broadband services at download speeds of at least 50 megabits per second and upload speeds of 10 megabits per second, as well as access to an unlimited data option. The latest wireless technology, currently known as LTE—long-term evolution—should be available not only in Canadian homes and businesses but also on major roads in Canada. By the end of 2021, we expect that 90% of Canadian households will have access to speeds matching the universal service objective. By our current estimates, it will take another decade or so after that for the remaining 10% to join them.

Mr. Chairman, 84% of Canadians have access to the Internet at the new speed targets today. However, many people, particularly those living in rural and remote areas, can only dream of this level of service. While 97% of households in urban areas have access to service that meets the universal service objective, only 37% in rural areas have similar access.

(0905)

[Translation]

As a result, 16% of Canadian households or nearly two million Canadians still don't have access to the universal service objective speeds or unlimited data option. Fast, reliable, high-quality Internet is simply out of reach, whether physically or financially, in many parts of the country.

That message came through loud and clear during the CRTC's public hearing on basic telecommunications services. We heard from more than 50,000 people—individual Canadians, business owners and leaders of indigenous communities. Many of them told us they're being left behind in the digital age.[English]

Coverage gaps, of course, vary by region. Smaller maritime and prairie communities often do not enjoy the high speeds of major urban centres. The worst off and most in need are almost always found in the Canadian north.

Efforts to close these gaps need to be coordinated, as they are a shared responsibility among numerous players. Beyond the CRTC, this of course includes Innovation, Science and Economic Development, as well as the provinces and territories, indigenous governments, the telecommunications industry itself and non-governmental organizations.

For its part, the CRTC has announced a new broadband fund. It will provide up to $750 million over the next five years to help pay for infrastructure to extend Internet and mobile wireless services to underserved areas. Our objective is to ensure that rural residents have comparable service to those in urban areas.

Of that $750 million to be made available, up to 10% of the annual total will be provided to improve services in satellite-dependent communities. These are communities that rely exclusively on satellite transport to receive one or more telecommunication services, such as telephone, fixed and mobile wireless, and Internet services.

Of course, when we launch our first call for applications this year, it will be important for potential applicants to know where the greatest needs are located. We agree with the Auditor General's report on this issue.[Translation]

Last month—it has actually been a few months now—we published maps indicating the areas of the country that do not have access to broadband speeds of 50 megabits for download and 10 megabits for upload. The maps also identify communities without high-capacity transport infrastructure and where homes or major roads do not have access to LTE mobile wireless service. In short, the areas of the country that do not currently meet our universal service objective. We have asked Internet and wireless service providers to verify the accuracy of our maps.

This is consistent with our overall approach regarding broadband data. We make information available to the public in as much detail as possible, while respecting the confidentiality provisions of the Telecommunications Act.

In fact, we will soon publish an update to our annual communications monitoring report that will provide fresh data on broadband availability and other related information.

(0910)

[English]

Moreover, a memorandum of understanding was established a number of years ago between the CRTC and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. This agreement governs our collaboration and the data that is shared between our organizations. We're committed to sharing information on broadband infrastructure to support evidence-based decision-making. We're also committed to working with all levels of government as part of a collaborative effort to provide broadband Internet service to underserved Canadians.

Since announcing the details of our fund late last year, we've met with representatives from provincial and territorial governments, as well as all the relevant federal departments, to explain how the fund will work and to understand their broadband funding plans.

Mr. Chairman and members, extending broadband and mobile coverage to underserved households, businesses and along major roads will require billions of dollars in investment and infrastructure. There is no doubt that this objective is an ambitious one, in part because of our vast geography and shorter construction season in many parts of the country.

The CRTC's broadband fund is obviously just one part of the equation. It is meant to be complementary to but not a replacement for existing and future public funding and private investment.

Having detailed, accurate and up-to-date information at the disposal of the public and policy-makers will ensure that the funds are being directed to the most appropriate projects and communities. There's also no doubt that much work remains to be done. I'm confident, however, that this objective will be met in the same manner that railways and electrical grids were built in the past, by connecting one community at a time.[Translation]

Thank you very much.

We will be happy to answer any questions you may have. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Scott and all, for your presentations.

We'll now move into the first round of questions. The first round is a seven-minute round, and I welcome Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

First of all, Mr. Berthelette, at the outset, condolences for the loss of Michael Ferguson.

Many more communities got service than intended in the program. The program had a target of 300 and, as we just heard from Mr. Knubley, some 900 communities got service, including some 190 indigenous communities. How is this a failure?

The Chair:

Mr. Le Goff.

Mr. Philippe Le Goff (Principal, Office of the Auditor General):

I don't see that as a failure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want to make sure of that.

In my own riding, some $13 million in federal money out of a $47 million project will put 16,000 households across 17 municipalities on fibre optic in a territory three times the size of P.E.I. In what way did we not get value for the money we spent?

The Chair:

Mr. Le Goff.

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

Mr. Chair, I think I cannot comment on a specific case like that. We looked at the design of the program at the time of the audit, simply, and we determined that the approach would not facilitate value for money.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would not facilitate or did not achieve value for money? What we see in the projects that I've seen across the country is quite good value for the money considering that it typically costs $2,000 or $3,000 per household to connect rural to fibre. In a lot of cases, this program came in well below that.

I'm trying to understand the basis on which this didn't get value for money.

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

Mr. Chair, again, I would say that we looked only at the design of the program. It was among the criteria design determined by the department at the time that they would not focus really solely on value for money, but they had other criteria to make decisions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that a bad thing?

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

I would submit, Mr. Chair, that the audit was designed to look at value for money, and it's what we looked at. We concluded on this thing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the opening comments, there was a reference by Mr. Berthelette about displacing private funds. I find it to be a big, red flag when I hear that, because it's based on an assumption that private funds are interested in coming to these communities. What we see is that private funds don't come to the communities; they go into the downtown core of a rural area, if there is a downtown core of a village, and they'll offer service there, but everybody out of range, just forget them; they're not worth funding and not worth investing in. Private companies only come to those areas when the public invests money, and then they say they're going to lose their market share, so now they're going to start investing.

I have a lot of trouble swallowing the concept that this program in any way displaced private funds. If anything, private funds tend to displace public funds when they arrive.

How do you see that assessment?

(0915)

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

Mr. Chair, I would say that our main concern about this was that, in some cases, private funds could have been spent anyway despite the program. Because the program existed, the private funds took advantage of that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On that basis, the 4,000 communities that have not yet received funding should, more or less, all have private investment coming in and we shouldn't need to continue to worry about this.

The Chair:

Mr. Berthelette.

Mr. Jerome Berthelette:

Mr. Chair, I think the philosophy behind the programs of the department is that they're looking to private funds to expand broadband. So when we looked at the program, we were looking at how you maximize private funding. There will be cases where private funds are not going to be made available because of the isolation of the communities, perhaps, and the cost. However, there may be cases where a combination of private funds and public funds is going to be needed, and ideally we will look to the department to make sure that it maximizes private funds and maximizes the benefit that we get from the public funds.

I think what we heard today is that they've managed to get a one-for-one investment from the private funds, and I think that's probably a good thing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the audit, it sounds as if you're not happy with that, but here you're saying you are happy with that. Are we happy with how the program went?

Mr. Jerome Berthelette:

I think that, at the time, we were looking at how the program was designed. We were looking at making recommendations that would help to ensure that the department achieved its goal, which was to try to maximize the private funds. At this point, with the knowledge we have, I'd say they're being fairly successful at achieving that goal. But we haven't audited this, so I think I will hold off on saying whether it is as successful as it could be until we've actually audited what has transpired so far.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. My assessment of what I'm seeing is that, if there's any problem to identify here, it's that there simply wasn't enough money in the program to begin with. But as for the operation of the program, I have trouble finding the problems that have been identified in the audit.

I do have questions for the other witnesses as well, and I'll move on to them. I might come back to you later on.

Mr. Scott, you mentioned that you have a limited but important role. Do you find the CRTC's hands are tied in any way, and is there any way for us to help untie them?

Mr. Ian Scott:

No, I don't believe the commission's hands are tied in any way. We have a very constructive working relationship with ISED in relation to these and the development of broadband maps and ongoing coordination. We too will assist the department in the federal-provincial-territorial discussions. So, no, the commission has a somewhat different role because we are an arm's-length, independent agency, so there are times when we are more insular, for lack of a better term. We must be, to respect our arm's-length relationship.

No, there are no impediments to our working toward fulfilling these broadband objectives.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One of the problems that I keep running into is market position abuse by a large telecom, mainly Bell, in our area. Do you have the tools in your mandate to deal with the problems brought up by vertical integration in telecom and market position abuse, for example, making it very, very difficult to get onto hydro poles to put a new fibre line on for a different company?

Mr. Ian Scott:

There are a number of elements packed into that question. Perhaps I'll—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Feel free to take it apart.

Mr. Ian Scott: —take the last one first.

You're aware, I'm sure, that there is currently a review of both the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act under way. The government established a review panel that will be making its recommendations. We've made a public submission to that panel. One of the issues we have highlighted is the current and future importance of passive infrastructure, in particular as we look toward the deployment of 5G mobile technology. There will be more and more devices to be deployed not only on traditional rights of way, whether they be provincial or municipal, and poles, but also things like municipal-controlled or -owned bus shelters, lamp posts and so on. This will represent a formidable challenge in the future, and we have pointed out that as the legislation is reviewed, it will be very important that parliamentarians pay particular attention to that issue, so that we have a resolution, so that we'll be able to ensure that both broadband and wireless technology in the future is effectively deployed.

(0920)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Scott and Mr. Graham.

I will now move to the opposition and Mr. Dan Albas.

Welcome to the committee. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

I certainly appreciate all of the testimony here today. I look forward to your expertise on this report.

Further to Mr. de Burgh Graham's comments, I heard the member for Pontiac last night bragging about how much money they'd received in a largely rural area. The reality for people in Logan Lake is quite opposite from that of Mr. de Burgh Graham. You'll have a café owner who can't get sufficient download speeds to charge their customers' Interac and they have to give free coffees that day. That's a problem. I certainly appreciate that we're focusing on it, and I appreciate the Auditor General making this one of his audits.

I'll start with the CRTC. Mr. Scott, why did you cut your speed target in half from 50 megabits down to 25 megabits?

Mr. Ian Scott:

I am very pleased to answer that question because the premise is incorrect, with all due respect. We did not cut it. The target is 50 and we look forward to seeing that target fulfilled.

In the decision that we released when we set out all of the details for how one could apply for the fund, we allowed that we'd accept—in certain circumstances—applications for 25 megabit service where it can clearly be scaled up to 50. The reason for that is if we had not made that decision, there would be a lot of communities that would wait until well after 2021 because they simply couldn't get to 50 from where they are today, which might be three, four or five megabits per second.

We were not limiting but expanding the potential number of communities.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Sir, with all due respect, you can say that you did not cut it in half, but the reality is that your proposals for projects mandate a speed of 25 megabits and half of the proposed target. To the Canadians I speak to, that sounds a lot like a cut. If you think that 50 megabits is necessary, why would you only accept projects that seek to deliver half of that?

Mr. Ian Scott:

For the reason I just said. If we insist on accepting applications that can only reach 50 megabits, many of those communities will not be included. It's not to say that they will not get to 50. We will only consider applications at 25 megabit per second that have a clear path to 50. It will result in more communities receiving a higher grade of service sooner than they otherwise would.

Mr. Dan Albas:

It does sound, sir, like you're saying that there are two-tier communities. While I do recognize there are costs and there are unique situations, one would think that you would come forward with an actual project plan that would deal with that.

Mr. Ian Scott:

We have, sir.

Mr. Dan Albas:

We'll let Canadians decide, sir.

I'd like to move over to Mr. Knubley.

Deputy minister, I asked you a few months ago if your department would ensure that rural fixed wireless customers would not be negatively impacted in the upcoming government clawback of the 3,500 megahertz. At that time, you expressed to me that you would do your darndest to make sure that rural residents weren't negatively impacted. Is that still your position on this critical issue? I'm hearing concerns from rural Canadians that think the opposite.

Mr. John Knubley:

That's still my position. The 3,500 issue has not yet been moved forward, but it will be in due course. As I mentioned in my opening remarks on the 600 side, we did set aside 40% of the spectrum for rural purposes.

(0925)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Sir, I do appreciate that this is a very complex file, but when your department is speaking about clawing back the 3,500 megahertz spectrum and there's no certainty that they're going to keep it, that is cold comfort.

Further in the Auditor General's report there have been many calls for a complete strategy to addressing the deficit in Internet access for rural and remote Canadians. Even in your own comments you talked about very well-known Canadians—David Johnston, former minister Manley—who have worked long on setting out some of the basic principles toward seeing a national standard and to see rural Canadians fully joining the economy.

So far, the government has refused to produce such a strategy as the Auditor General sought. Why the refusal to develop a strategy thus far? What is the status of the strategy spoken of in the report?

When Canadians hear that the principles have been outlined since 2001 and yet they have the Auditor General saying that those principles have not been formulated in a plan, you can see some of the skepticism. Again, I go to places like Logan Lake, Keremeos and Princeton, where they have concerns about their high speed.

Mr. John Knubley:

The strategy since 2001, consistent with the Johnston task force, has been to do with a staged approach to addressing the gaps in the broadband service for Canadians. We have had five programs since 2001, contributing $1 billion overall, from a government perspective, to addressing and fixing these gaps.

In light of the decision that broadband is a basic service and our goal of 50/10 megabits, we are working with provinces and the private sector, recognizing that we have a common objective. We have a time frame of addressing this 10% in 10 to 15 years. Again, we formalized, much more than in the past, our working groups at the federal-provincial level. As I mentioned, the ministers met last fall and committed to meet the goal of 50/10 and to develop an integrated strategy related to this. In that context, officials are working together to develop, province by province and territory by territory, how we will proceed on this basis.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Sir, that does sound oddly like a plan to have a plan. Can you tell us what its status is? When will this plan be forthcoming?

Mr. John Knubley:

We have a plan. We have an objective of 50/10. We know that there is another 5% that will evolve through the private sector in the next five years, and we are working together with all the stakeholders to address this 10% gap.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, well again, an objective is, I think, Mr. Chair, different than a plan.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Albas and Mr. Knubley.

We'll now move to Mr. Christopherson, please, for seven minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, all, for being here again.

I want to start, as I often do, with the focus right at the beginning.

On page 6, it says: This audit focused on whether Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, according to their respective roles and responsibilities, monitored the state of connectivity, and developed and implemented a strategy to meet the connectivity needs of Canadians in rural and remote areas.

The conclusion on page 26 says: We concluded that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, according to their respective roles and responsibilities, monitored the state of connectivity

—so, congratulations— but did not share enough detailed information publicly. We also concluded that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada did not develop and implement a national strategy to improve broadband Internet connectivity to a specific service level in rural and remote areas.

That's going to be the focus of my comment.

However, I do want to start on a positive note and, where I can and where it's deserved, give some credit. Mr. Berthelette, in paragraph 5 of his opening remarks, advised: Mr. Chair, with respect to the state of connectivity in Canada, we found that the Department relied on complete and accurate data to inform policy-making aimed at addressing the connectivity gap in rural and remote areas.

So, by the looks of it, you did a good job on data. Data has been a major priority for us in this term of Parliament, so congratulations on that. That's well done.

Now I want to get to this business of a national strategy because there is a piece missing and I'm not getting it. There are 12 years of studies that say that we need a national broadband strategy. Yet, Mr. Berthelette, you say in the third paragraph of your opening remarks.... To be specific, it states that for 12 years we have needed a national strategy.

It says: However, at the time we finished our audit, the government had still not agreed to take that step.

I know that they have, subsequently, but at the time, no. Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada indicated it was reluctant to establish a strategy with an objective that could not be reached with the available funding.

Mr. Berthelette, would you just expand on that, please? It sounds backwards to me, but again, if you would just reiterate your findings....

(0930)

The Chair:

Mr. Berthelette, or is it Mr. Le Goff?

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

Mr. Chair, at the time of the audit the department was provided with a set amount of money that was, from its perspective—and I think we can share that perspective—not enough to meet the needs of Canadians.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, thank you. That's the way I read it too, and I just wanted to hear it straight up, because it seems to me, in the three and a half decades I've been in public life, that whenever we're faced with a public challenge, the first thing we do is to get a strategy, to get a plan, and then start working at getting the funding. And if we can't get all the funding up front, then there is a phase-in and we can get into the politics of when that money kicks in.

However, the idea that we don't do a strategy because the money is not there up front makes no sense at all to me. I will turn to the deputy.

Help me understand why, when there were repeated recommendations that there needed to be a national strategy, your department didn't do a strategy because you didn't have sufficient funds. I don't get it.

Mr. John Knubley:

I think it is important for members to understand that since 2001 there has been a staged approach, which is a strategy, to closing gaps in broadband. The strategy has been to identify where there are areas of greatest need and to address those.

What has happened as a result of the declaration in December, 2016 that broadband is a basic service and that we agree as a country on moving towards a 50/10 goal—because in the past there have been different views on what the goal should be, and whether it should be 5/1, 30, or 50/10—is that we are now in a position, thanks to the CRTC I would say, to work together in an integrated way to really address the issues together, along with the provinces, private sector, etc.

I would make just one more point about that staged approach. I think that the underlying policy issue at play always, and it continues to be even in this new integrated world we're in, is how to ensure that we get value for money and do not crowd out what private sector input would normally occur.

So there is always a balancing act going on between what is the public interest in closing these gaps and how we work with the private sector, and indeed with provinces and communities, to ensure that there is value for money as we go forward.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I appreciate that. I'm sorry, sir. It was nice and it was somewhat informative, but it didn't answer my question.

My question is, why wasn't a strategy put in place? I hear you. It sounds as though there were bits and pieces of one—

Mr. John Knubley:

There was a strategy of staged implementation and—

Mr. David Christopherson:

But it wasn't a national strategy.

Mr. John Knubley:

—now we've moved to a national strategy.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Now you've moved to a national strategy. My question is, why wasn't there one in the beginning? If it were a health care issue.... It's not as though we don't know these challenges—transportation, health care, community services. It's always difficult in a large country like this, and it's expensive. That's why we have plans and phase-in and that's why there are constant protests coming from the north and far-flung regions about why they're not getting service equal to what we can get in my hometown of Hamilton.

But what I don't understand is why there wasn't a national strategy. It sounds as though there wasn't one because the money wasn't there to do one, which is just not acceptable. If this were a health challenge, we would have recognized that health challenge and we would have put a national strategy in place.

The absence of a national strategy—it looks to me like the politics of this, which is one step beyond you, are that we don't have the money and we don't want to pony up the money, so let's not have a strategy because that will give opponents something to point to in terms of what's not being done. Now it just looks as though they've run out of runway and they have no choice but to do it, and they're dragging their heels at that.

Chair, I know my time has probably run out, but I'll just finish my thought. This may be one of the very few times in the 15 years I've been on this committee that we do need to call a minister in, because it may just be that the answer to the problem has been that the bureaucracy has been told that there is not enough money to do a strategy, so don't even think of starting one. If that's the case, then there has to be a political answer to this, not a bureaucratic one.

(0935)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

We'll now move back to Monsieur Arseneault.[Translation]

Mr. Arseneault, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. René Arseneault (Madawaska—Restigouche, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

My thanks to the witnesses for being here.

I am new to this committee and this is only my second meeting. Therefore, I don't know the full history of the witnesses who appeared or about your previous testimony. I apologize in advance if my questions may seem inappropriate to you.

I come from an extremely rural region: not the far north of Quebec, not an island lost in the Atlantic or Pacific or Sable Island, but Madawaska-Restigouche in northern New Brunswick, a place that is well within Canada.

Across my riding, the lack of broadband service is an irritant that prevents us from developing our full economic potential. I am talking about my region, but the situation is the same in many places in Atlantic Canada or elsewhere in the country, of course. The first casualty therefore is economic development, which leads to the exodus of people from our region who are educated and who could contribute to it, but who look for work elsewhere. Without economic development, there is no growth, and rural areas are being emptied to the benefit of large urban areas. I know you are already familiar with the picture I'm painting for you.

However, in addition to the economic development, there is the whole issue of safety. In my region, the vast majority of economic activity is based on forestry. There are a lot of forestry operations, where workers can get hurt. However, those areas have no access to any cellular signals. Access to ambulance services, hospitals, police and firefighters is a matter of safety.

So we are really lagging behind the Canadian average in terms of safety and economic development.

Mr. Scott, I think you said that basic telecommunications services are now essential, as was the railway to travel across Canada in another era. The construction of the railway was a national project led by the government, not the private sector. Setting up telephone service in New Brunswick was not a private sector project either, which makes me think that perhaps we should study that aspect of the issue. However, that is not what we are talking about today.

I have a question for my friends in the department, either Mr. Knubley or one of his colleagues. To pick up on what Mr. Christopherson was saying, has a study been conducted to establish the strategy and funding necessary to resolve this issue once and for all across Canada? [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Knubley. [Translation]

Mr. John Knubley:

I think the first thing to emphasize is that the federal, provincial and territorial ministers met in October and decided to put a strategy in place. They talked about and agreed on the 50/10 target, a speed of 50 megabits per second for downloads and 10 megabits per second for uploads, which are decent speeds. They then asked officials to take an integrated approach to identify the future needs of the provinces, the federal government and the private sector, so that they can all work together to achieve this target.

I am convinced that, thanks to the CRTC, we are now in a better position to achieve this objective because we have a very specific target and tools for sharing and collaboration. The ministers established three fundamental principles for developing a strategy: access, innovation and collaboration.

Ms. Setlakwe leads a team working on this and perhaps she could add some comments.

(0940)

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe (Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategy and Innovation Policy Sector, Department of Industry):

We are in the process of determining the gaps, province by province and territory by territory, and how much it will cost to connect those places. The areas that are easy to reach have been connected. In rural and more remote areas, the technology to get there is complicated and expensive.

We are in the process of completing this work. We estimate that this will cost about $8 billion, of which $7 billion will be used to connect the main communities in these areas.

You talked about the importance of having access to communications on major roads in forestry sectors such as those in your riding.

Mr. René Arseneault:

They are forestry roads.

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

I'm not sure we're going to make it to all the forestry roads, but we'll make it to the main roads. We estimate that it will cost about $1 billion.

Mr. René Arseneault:

You're saying it will cost $1 billion in addition to the $8 billion?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

It's $8 billion in total: $7 billion for communities and $1 billion for main roads.

We haven't finished the job. We are working with the CRTC, the provinces and territories. We still have work to do. [English]

The Chair:

We'll now move back to Mr. Kelly, please.

Mr. Kelly, we're in the second round now. You have around five minutes.

Mr. Pat Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Again at this committee we have a report from the Auditor General and departments that have said they accept the findings of the Auditor General, yet in the testimony I've heard, in particular in the answers to Mr. Christopherson's question, I sense push-back and defensiveness around the conclusion of the Auditor General.

Mr. Knubley, the Auditor General said that your department did not have a national strategy. Mr. Christopherson asked you why, and if I heard you correctly, I heard not only in response to his questions and to some of the other questions you repeatedly going back to the Johnston report of 18 years ago. It identified a strategy for which the objectives seem largely still unfulfilled 18 years later.

I'm going to repeat the question. Why was there no national strategy in particular after the CRTC declared broadband to be a public necessity? It's easy to declare something a necessity. Those are just words. Once you do that, though, there has to be a strategy and a plan to achieve objectives.

Please, do you accept the Auditor General's assessment that there was no national strategy, and if so, why?

(0945)

Mr. John Knubley:

The nuance I'm trying to bring to this is what the Auditor General raised, which we agree with, is that there was no national integrated strategy with a common, agreed-upon goal. We have now reached 50/10, and we have not had a situation before where all the players, whether the provinces or the federal government or even the private sector, have agreed on that goal and moved ahead.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

So what has happened?

Mr. John Knubley:

I agree there was no national integrated strategy in that sense, and the Auditor General was totally appropriate to point that out. Very shortly after the CRTC identified broadband as a basic service, the government moved ahead very quickly to work on an integrated strategy with provinces, to agree that 50/10 was a goal, to bring together working groups that include the CRTC and the provinces.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Sir, you did not answer my question. You did not answer Mr. Christopherson's question.

Why was there no strategy? If this has been identified and understood for years, the objectives—

Mr. John Knubley:

Because no one could agree on a common technological goal: provinces might have 30 as a goal, for five to one. Technology is always an issue. Various players don't always agree on the extent to which the private sector will go in and solve a situation or where they will invest. As the Auditor General pointed out, in terms of value for money, a big issue is, how do you balance public investment with private sector investment? Even in the case of our 50/10 goal, we have already identified that we're going to move from 84 to 90, really, with private sector investment. Private sector companies invest $12 billion a year to do this.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Okay, thank you.

Mr. John Knubley:

Again, I guess I am saying that it's not straightforward, but complex. The nuance that I'm trying to bring to this is that all governments in the last 15 years, of whatever stripe, have taken the approach of identifying specific gaps. It's a staged approach. What are the specific problems that we're trying to address? Are we trying to do the last mile, where we hardwire two households? Are we trying to do more backbone-type activity, where we take the broadband to a community, to a school? What's the best solution to help the community and to provide the best service to these very remote areas that Canada encounters across the country?

Mr. Pat Kelly:

The reason is just that there wasn't coordination and there couldn't be coordination with provinces. That's why there was no national—

Mr. John Knubley:

There are issues of coordination, technology, and there are issues of money. As you have just heard, the cost of meeting the 50/10 goal, at least as we currently estimate it, is $8 to $9 billion.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Okay, but that—

The Chair:

Would you very quickly summarize your point, and we'll come back to you.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

That's, then, a political question. You can have a strategy, a public strategy, but if a government won't fund your strategy, then that's a political question and one for the voters.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Kelly.

We'll now move to Mr. Sarai.

Mr. Randeep Sarai (Surrey Centre, Lib.):

I'll be sharing my time with Mr. Arseneault.

I have a couple of quick questions, but, first of all, despite what my colleagues on the other side are saying, it seems like this strategy is working and there are 900 communities connected or being connected.

My first question is for the deputy minister.

How are we ensuring that the connectivity infrastructure is designed to grow and expand, i.e., to meet newer and higher speed demands? Are the conduits being made? Is the infrastructure being built so that we can expand to faster speeds, or will it have to be rebuilt every time? Is that being looked at when this infrastructure is being built?

Mr. John Knubley:

Yes, it's being constantly reviewed and assessed. There are several ways we do that. One way would be this mapping activity that's been referenced, which is in fact shared publicly. We basically look at areas of 25 square miles. We look at the number of people, the households, the community needs, and then we put on top of that the actual ISP map, if you like, of current service, and then we try to assess what the gaps are and what the specific needs are in those particular areas. Lisa can elaborate on this, but basically we work with the CRTC, we work with the provinces and with the private sector continually to reassess what we're doing. Specifically right now, because of the 50/10 goal, we're trying to identify where those gaps are across the country and what the priorities are in that regard.

Just very quickly, there's also spectrum, of course, that we auction, and the private sector participates in those auctions. As I mentioned, we typically look at, will there be dominance? Do we need to set aside certain amounts of spectrum for the rural area to promote the participation of smaller ISPs?

(0950)

Mr. Randeep Sarai:

By that same token, how are you making sure there are clusters, certain service providers? If there are only small communities, with very small populations, you don't want to have Telus in one place and Rogers in another. How are we making sure there is enough critical mass for a cluster to keep expanding, making sure that the speed and the type of service is adequate for the technological needs?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

To go back to your first question, one of the things that is assessed under the connect to innovate program, for example, is the technology that's being used and the potential for scalability in the future. Those are things that are definitely considered.

In addition, when we are providing federal funding, there is a requirement for those receiving that federal funding to share their infrastructure under certain terms and conditions. That is a requirement as well. We try to use all the levers that we have to promote competition.

Mr. Randeep Sarai:

As my riding is only 40 square kilometres, I will give it to Mr. Arseneault.

Mr. René Arseneault:

Mine is 12,000.[Translation]

Thank you for your answers. They are very informative, as I am no technician.

There must be territorial, provincial and federal agreements or collaboration. I think Canadians can do that. As for technological complications, the technicians are there to help and support us.

It's all about money. Two years ago, I went around the main suppliers. We know them well. I will not name them, but they are always the same. It was clear that they were reluctant to connect the remote areas.

Let me oversimplify a little. Basically, they told us that they would connect these regions if they were paid for it, but that they were not interested in investing in this connectivity because it was not financially profitable. We live in a capitalist world.

I now turn to Mr. Scott from the CRTC.

The major Internet service providers have an oligopoly; they agree among themselves. We all know how it goes, we are not naive. The licence that the CRTC grants to those providers is a privilege. Within the limits of its jurisdiction, would the CRTC have a way of making them aware that the licence it gives them to expand their services includes an obligation to serve all Canadians, from coast to coast or from forest to forest? If so, could you tell me how this could be done legally?

Mr. Ian Scott:

It is a very complex issue. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Arseneault, again, for sharing your time.

Mr. René Arseneault:

You're rude to me.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

We'll come back to Mr. Albas, please.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In this report, the Auditor General recommended that the government create detailed connectivity maps and have those available. In speaking to stakeholders, I've learned that there also seems to be a complete deficit of information on what infrastructure is truly in the ground.

I'm going to ask a question of both industry and the CRTC. Do either of your organizations have a full and complete map of the telecommunications infrastructure that is installed throughout our country?

(0955)

Mr. John Knubley:

We have what's called the national broadband Internet service availability map. You can go and access it. All Canadians can get into the map itself. It's really a searchable map. As I mentioned, it's a summary of the current services by area. An area is typically defined as a 25 square kilometre area. It shows population and communities, and then it shows ISP footprints.

The challenge with the sharing of information is that some of that actual ISP footprint aspect is commercially sensitive. In that particular area, we have to aggregate some of the data. Also on our maps—we've mentioned the connect to innovate program—is the 2014 program, connecting Canadians. People can go on our map and see where the projects are.

Last, if 50/10 is our goal, the thing we've done with our map more recently—and we've been working with CRTC on this—is to try to show where the gaps are in terms of 50/10 service.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Do you have an inventory somewhere of all the telecommunications infrastructure and where it is? I do realize that there are some sensitivities about releasing that information to the public, but I'd like to know whether or not the government actually has an understanding of it's own inventory. Are you relying on the information that telecommunications companies give you?

Mr. John Knubley:

It's constantly being discussed with the private sector, and then we verify what that service provision is by talking to the communities and the people. We're constantly doing consultations, really, to verify what it is that we know in relation to spectrum, for example.

Mr. Dan Albas:

There is no formal list you have where you've required that. It's just simply “we'd like to know what you have” and then you display some of that information so that Canadians can have that.

The Chair:

Mr. Scott, please.

Mr. Ian Scott:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. If I may add to that just briefly, for the carriers for which the CRTC has regulatory authority, we do obtain detailed information. It's not voluntary. They regularly file information with us. It's that information, along with that collected by the ISED department, that is used to populate the data in the broadband maps.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

ISED has started to consult on smaller geographic areas for spectrum allocation.

To the Auditor General's office, is that move consistent with the recommendations in your report?

To the industry department, is the thinking that smaller geographic areas will be used for all spectrum auctions going forward?

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

Mr. Chair, I think it's a move in the right direction, according to what we heard from ISPs, the small Internet service providers. They raised this issue that they don't have the financial and technical capacity to provide the service or to bid on auctions for large tiers such as tiers two, three and even four. I think it's a step in the right direction to look at the tier 5 kind of size to allow small providers to participate.

Mr. John Knubley:

To clarify, we are consulting on the tier 5, and no decision has yet been made on how we would move to that tier five.

Let me again just give a bit of background. Tier 1 basically is Canada. Tier 2 is basically by province. Tier 3 has 59 regional areas within the higher population cities, if you like, and we use that for mid-range frequency bands. Tier 4 is 172 local areas. We certainly think that we would benefit by going deeper and more granular in terms of our service areas and in that respect agree with what the Auditor General raised, but we haven't made the formal decision on how we will move forward—

Mr. Dan Albas:

What would be the timeline for revealing the outcomes of those consultations?

Mr. John Knubley:

In terms of the consultations, they're ongoing—

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe: Right now.

Mr. John Knubley —right now, so I think we will be reporting on the consultations.... Lisa?

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

Later this year or early next year.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Albas. We'll now move to Ms. Yip, please.

Ms. Yip, you have five minutes.

Ms. Jean Yip (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

[Technical difficulty—Editor] so how can the groundwork for 5G be started if the most remote communities haven't been serviced? Wouldn't it be better to spend the money to service these communities before paying for the 5G groundwork?

(1000)

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Scott.

Mr. Ian Scott:

Perhaps I can begin. My colleagues may want to add to this.

I think technology in this area is evolving quite quickly. One of the things we're seeing is that fibre is being pushed farther and farther out into the network, not only to provide broadband service but also to support mobile wireless service and, in future, 5G. I think that a few years from now there may not be much of a distinguishing between the two, so all of this infrastructure for higher capacity, higher bandwidth and higher speed is being pushed out to both small and large communities, and that will enable both high-speed broadband and 5G. I'm not sure if that helps as a starting point in response to your question.

Ms. Jean Yip:

I just feel bad, still, for those remote communities that don't have it or don't have—

Mr. John Knubley:

Maybe I would add, though, that one thing we do, which we looked at really in our last two programs, connect to innovate and connecting Canadians, is that we don't always look for the technology that solves the immediate problem. We are looking for projects that have the capacity to grow, if you like, from 4G to 5G and LTE and that sort of thing. Typically, in the projects for the most remote areas—this is why technology is such an important consideration—we look at how well the technology can evolve and allow for the community to have a service not just today but also in the future.

Although it's not directly related to your question, maybe I could add something on satellite service, which we haven't mentioned yet. Of course, there's evolving technology in the satellite service. We recently funded—it was in the last budget—a LEO satellite initiative by Telesat. This does offer a huge opportunity in the north to provide new access to broadband at higher speeds than ever before.

Again, a big consideration, which you're totally right to raise, is about what technology is the right technology for these remote areas. I think we try to be as flexible as possible and try to see as well if the technology we're putting in today can expand in coverage and service and access in the future.

Ms. Jean Yip:

Okay.

How did ISED support small businesses and diverse ISPs in remote and rural regions in accessing CTI funding?

Mr. John Knubley:

I think about a third of the actual companies in the projects are small ISPs. We certainly are always talking to small ISPs and looking for opportunities for them to participate in projects. That's the short answer.

Ms. Jean Yip:

Just to follow up, has the connectivity map been made publicly available?

Mr. John Knubley:

It's on the Canada portal.

Ms. Jean Yip:

As well, has the connect to innovate program website been opened up to allow third party ISPs and stakeholders interested in the backbone services to apply for those projects? Has that been opened up?

Mr. John Knubley:

We don't use the portal for an application. There are issues, in terms of the ISP footprint, around commercial sensitivity. Basically, again, we are trying to promote small ISP participation. Recently, separate from the program, we've been consulting with the small ISPs to understand what the challenges are in their programming and how we can do a better job in incorporating their interests. In our projects, for example, we definitely want to ensure indigenous involvement, ISP involvement, in the actual delivery of the program. I think we were quite successful in getting indigenous companies in the CTI case.

Is the number 190?

(1005)

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

Yes, 190 communities; and a third of the funding is directed to indigenous communities.

Ms. Jean Yip:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Yip.

We'll move to Mr. Christopherson, please.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I've been following the bouncing ball, as well as looking at the paper trail we have, and I'm still not satisfied that we've got to the nub of this lack of a national broadband strategy, which was recommended time after time after time for 12 years.

When the Auditor General went in and asked why there wasn't one, according to what we've heard today, the department was—and I'm quoting—“reluctant to establish a strategy with an objective that could not be reached with the available funding.”

I didn't hear anything about nuance, about all the problems of trying to bring all the people together. In fact, when it's difficult and tough like this, with multiple dimensions to the complexity of it, there is all the more need for a strategy, even if the first thing you say is that we have to get all the provinces, territories, and federal government on the same page in terms of what we agree on: “This is what we need to do. Here's who's responsible. Here's the process. Here's the time frame.”

Instead, what we're hearing, in my opinion, is from governments who have refused...because they didn't want to face the bill. I get the politics of it, but that doesn't make it right in terms of governance. That strategy needed to be in place, and the response at the time that the Auditor General went in was that they hadn't yet done it. Now they're bragging about the fact that they're doing it.

Let's take a look at the time frame. The audit was done about 18 months ago, which is usually when they begin. The deputy mentioned that there was a meeting in June of last year and on October 26, and between those two meetings that's when it was decided that there needed to be a strategy—just in time to get in front of the public hearing on the auditor's report.

If nothing else, I want to claim victory for the auditing system we have in Canada. After 12 years of governments—plural—dragging their heels on doing the right thing in terms of public policy, it took the Auditor General to roll in there and hold them to account. They then come to this committee where, under the glare of public scrutiny, they now acknowledge that they're going to give us a national strategy. I would submit to you, Chair, that if we'd not had an audit, there still would be no plans for a national strategy.

I have to say that I am rejecting the answers I'm hearing from the deputy.

I understand why you're saying it, and I understand it's part of your role, but you also have a responsibility as an accounting officer now. Unlike when I first got here and the rules weren't clear, now they are clear.

The public interest would only have been served if there was a national strategy, and there wasn't one, because no government wanted to be held to account for not spending the money it would take to implement it. That's what it looks like to me.

The important thing right now for me is that the strategy is on track—at least it's there.

I also want to mention, if I can parenthetically, that again, this is one of the issues that most of us don't get too cranked up about, because we have the best service. Most Canadians live in urban centres and everything is fine.

However, when I listen to my colleague, Carol Hughes, talk about what's going on in her riding, and especially when she ties it to the banks that are closing branches in her rural areas, the need for Internet is not only beyond necessity, but is right up there with housing and health and food.

My question, Mr. Berthelette, is on whether you have had a chance to see the strategy at all.

(1010)

Mr. Jerome Berthelette:

No, Mr. Chair.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you have any current plans to go in and examine the strategy?

I only say that in the context that often the AG will signal ahead of time, “Look, for particular reasons we're going back in in short order on this one.”

Sometimes they don't.... Are there any current plans to do that?

Mr. Jerome Berthelette:

At this point, we have no current plans to follow up.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, that's good to know. We can do some follow-up through our report and make sure there are timelines and accountability.

I want to ask one more question if I have time. It sounds like I'm going to get one in.

It's probably affirming the same thing, Mr. Berthelette, but you said something that struck me. You were responding to a question by a colleague, and you were talking about the value for money. At one point you said there were other matters, not just value for dollars, that gave you some concern.

I wonder what exactly you meant by that. It was in response to a member suggesting that things weren't all that bad when you look at what was achieved. You talked about what you went in and examined, and you said that there were other matters, not just value for dollar, that you believed came into play.

I'll give you a chance to comment on that.

The Chair:

Mr. Le Goff.

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

Mr. Chair, one of the concerns we had at the time of the audit was that the priorities made under the connect to innovate program were not made public. The areas that would be considered first were not made public, so we had cases where local groups made some proposals, business cases, but they didn't know that in their province it was almost always determined that another area would get the funding first.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How was that decision being made?

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

You might ask the department to answer that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Deputy?

Mr. John Knubley:

In all respects, what I understand is that we follow a very strong due diligence process. I think the issues at play here are—and they relate to the overall strategy as well—is what are the technologies at play and what are the specific community needs? Again, this links back to technology in part. One of the things is that there's no one solution to putting broadband into any one place: You can do hardwire, you can do mobile, you can do text mobile, you can do satellite. One of the things you need to do from a technological perspective is to try take into account what the appropriate requirements are for any one particular area.

In this case, I do want to stress why the issue of value-for-money gets complex. Given where you come from, you'll understand that these are communities of the remotest type. We're talking about northern Quebec. We're talking about northern Ontario.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Deputy, I'm sorry to interrupt you, sir, but I have very limited time. In fact, I'm probably on borrowed time. I have to say, the theory is that there were decisions made about where money was allocated and because the information wasn't public, we don't really know. The Auditor General is saying that it wasn't necessarily value for money. That's a nice way of saying that it seems like somebody's invisible hand is in there moving stuff around and it's hard to hold people to account because there's no public information.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

We'll now move to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm going to stay on the topic of value for money for a second.

Telecommunications companies invest on the basis of a three-year return on investment. That's the speed they do it. Is that the speed of return you expect of government investment? That's for the Auditor General.

The Chair:

Either Mr. Berthelette or Mr. Le Goff could respond.

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

It was not something that we considered in the audit, Mr. Chair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Do you consider telecommunications to be strictly a business, or is it or should it be a public infrastructure?

Mr. Jerome Berthelette:

Mr. Chair, I think the department has already more or less stated it has both business aspects and public necessity to it.

The Chair:

I think I'm going to interrupt a little bit here. I think we need to recognize that we are sometimes getting into policy here, and we need to remember that the Auditor General's responsibility is not to determine the validity of the policy. It's to determine whether or not there is a way to deliver the listed policy in an effective manner. I think all of us on the committee have to remember that the parameters of the audit as listed were to look and see if there was, I suppose, some value for money, but if it's found in the conclusion that Canada did not develop and implement a national strategy to improve.... That's the focus of the audit.

Sometimes we get into the weeds on everything else and maybe that's a good time to ask the department, but the auditors are not going to give us a broad synopsis of connectivity in Canada. They're going to look at these very tight parameters, and I think that's what we have to drill down on if we're coming to the Auditor General. We can branch off to the different sectors on their way, but we shouldn't really even be going to the policy at all because the government sets the policy, departments deliver, and auditors check to see if departments have delivered.

If I'm a Conservative and I don't like a Liberal policy, that's neither here nor there at this committee. The government sets a policy, the departments deliver on it, and the auditors ask, did they do it in the best way possible?

If we're going to ask about the process, you can ask the auditors about their audit, but everything else should go to the departments.

Mr. Graham.

(1015)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With respect, Mr. Chair, what I'm looking to find out is to understand what the value is in this circumstance.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. John Knubley:

Mr. Chair, maybe I could just add the department's perspective on value for money. I think what we thought mattered in the connect to innovate program was that we leveraged funds. As we mentioned early on, and as the Auditor General people referenced, was the one-to-one. We went from a $500 million investment to $1 billion. In assessing the projects, we also avoided overlap of activity, if you like, so that we ensured that if any one company was doing something, it wasn't covering into another area. Again, we were trying to fix a specific problem.

The issue of scale and technology is part of value for money, and our perspective is that this is a very important consideration. It's not just how you want to fix it today, but whether the companies involved in the projects actually develop investments that will develop the technology over time. It also has to do with the number of communities served as part of the value for money.

From our perspective, at any rate, it's not just dollars and competition of the private sector involved in the projects. It's also these other matters.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one question left for the AG before I go on to the CRTC.

Does the Auditor General's office currently participate, or has it ever participated, in the interchange Canada program?

Mr. Jerome Berthelette:

Yes, we have.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you do this actively?

Mr. Jerome Berthelette:

I don't think we actively do it, but we have participated in it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right, thank you.

I'm going to go back to the CRTC and pick up where I left off earlier.

On the mandate question, if the CRTC mandate were expanded to permit the direct breaking of telecom monopolies and positional abuse, or the power to mandate that a company that services a community must service the entire community, would the CRTC be comfortable applying that?

Mr. Ian Scott:

It's very much a hypothetical question, and perhaps in my response I can also try to answer a question Mr. Arseneault asked earlier.

The commission's overall role is to supervise the industry. It goes to the discussion we just had about the CRTC changing the basic service objective, that the original objective in telecommunications was universal service—getting every household phone service.

The carriers actually have an obligation to serve. That has not been removed. We do have competition in most places, and we rely, to the extent we can, on competition. Where there's a lack of competition, we still engage in more traditional detailed regulatory tools to oversee the services provided. The broadband fund is the vehicle that we hope to use, and will use, as an incentive and a tool to fulfill the broadband service objective in those harder-to-serve regions.

(1020)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When will the broadband fund applications be opened?

Mr. Ian Scott:

The last step in the process, the maps, have been updated recently, which is an important step for applicants. We issued what was called a “decision guide” on Valentine's Day as a present to communities rather than industry.

The application guide, if you will, is a bit of an instruction kit to enable parties to understand exactly what has to be filed and how it has to be filed. We're accepting comments on that to make sure we haven't missed anything, and that the guide is well understood. The comment period's open now. As soon as that closes, then we will be making a determination about our first calls. They will be in the coming months.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Where are we inputting the resale of fibre service?

Mr. Ian Scott:

Pardon me?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right now you can resell DSL, you can resell cable, you cannot sell fibre. Where are you on forcing companies that have fibre infrastructure to resell that service, to offer it to resellers?

Mr. Ian Scott:

At the moment, if you're talking about fibre to the home, then Mr. Seidl can add that it's in Quebec and Ontario.

Chris?

Mr. Christopher Seidl (Executive Director, Telecommunications, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission):

We do have interim tariffs in place for the resale of the fibre, so it's available. We don't have the final rates in place, but we're working on those now, and those will be coming out in a few months. It is in Ontario and Quebec right now, and we're working to extend that across the country.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Seidl and Mr. Graham.

Mr. Kelly.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Mr. Knubley, in response to Mr. de Burgh Graham's question, you spoke about having achieved acceptable value for money in several different ways. The findings of the Auditor General quite clearly say that they found that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada did not implement its connect to innovate program for broadband in a way that ensured the maximum broadband expansion for the public money spent. The program did not include a way of mitigating the risk of government funds displacing private sector investments.

Again, I ask you to square your acceptance of the Auditor General's findings and your earlier remarks.

Mr. John Knubley:

There are always issues of value for money, and we agree with the Auditor General that in doing our work, we should pay attention as a priority to value for money. We are pointing out that in this case, this particular program was being delivered to the remotest areas where there was not a lot of private sector investment interest, and therefore it is important to understand that value for money is not just about competitive private sector investment.

It's also about leveraging funds with the provinces. It's about leveraging funds with the communities, and ensuring that you get the right technology to help the community in a way that will be long-lasting.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

That is understood. There is no private sector investment to displace, because you were in an area remote enough that a private sector operator could never profitably invest in a place. I wouldn't consider that displacing private investment, just because you've spent money there and not had it matched.

Mr. John Knubley:

I'll give you a few cases where the projects took place. One would be in northern Quebec, where we were very partnered with Quebec. In fact, the partnership there is probably a model for how we move forward with an integrated collaborative strategy. We had common applications and common investments. We provided, depending on the area, between 90% and 100% of the funding because there was no investment.

In northern Ontario, five communities are currently served by satellite. Again, no, there's private sector involvement in terms of the satellite, but in terms of moving to a more fibre-to-home operation—

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Fair enough. I understand that, but the Auditor General states in the report that they are concerned that the program was to avoid displacing private sector investment, and they're concerned that is a failure of the department, that the department—

(1025)

Mr. John Knubley:

I would maybe rephrase it, not as a failure but as an agreement with the Auditor General, and note that every time we do a project on broadband in rural and remote areas, the challenges, the balance, the public investment and the private sector investment...we try to do the project in a way that does not crowd out private sector investment that otherwise would have taken place.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

We all agree that's the objective. I understand that.

Mr. John Knubley:

That is why doing broadband is not easy.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

No, I understand that—

Mr. John Knubley:

The other thing I would just emphasize—maybe you should turn to the Auditor General office after I say this—is that they were looking at the design phase of our project. Again, I think we've moved past the design phase, and we're talking now about—

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Fair enough.

Mr. John Knubley:

—what actually was implemented.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

I'll let Ms. Setlakwe speak for the moment I've likely got left.

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

If I could just add, I think that what the Auditor General said in particular was that we didn't specifically ask companies or applicants why public funding was required. In our estimation, we assessed that. We didn't specifically ask them to pronounce on that, but we assessed those things when we were looking at the applications. That was one.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Thank you.

Mr. Le Goff.

Mr. Philippe Le Goff:

Sure. I would add to what has just been said that there was no mechanism in the design of the program to verify whether the project would have been funded by the private sector at a lower cost.

Mr. Pat Kelly:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I don't have any other questions, but I typically explain to our guests that, when we meet like this, we provide a report following it and I do as a result have a couple of questions that have been given to me by the analysts.

Before we get to those questions, I would that although this is a highly technical type of meeting that is televised, many Canadians may be watching it because they watch these types of programs—though their eyes may just glaze over. As Mr. Christopherson suggested, a majority of Canadians live in urban areas and say, “Connectivity problems, what problems? I can game, I can watch a movie, and I can do so many different things.”

However, the Auditor General's report explains the reason for this study, namely, that in 2016 about 96% of urban Canadians had access to broadband Internet speeds of 50 megabytes per second for downloading data and 10 megabytes per second for uploading data, but only 39% of Canadians living in rural and remote areas had access to those speeds.

I represent a riding that is not so much remote as very rural. Within my central Alberta riding, there are what we call the “special areas”, where I know that, when I get into those areas for meetings, I will just have to watch the phone trying to connect. This gap between urban and rural areas is part of why the Auditor General's office did this study, and out of the study, although there has been some improvement over the years, there are some troubling facts.

I should also say—and some of our analysts have worked on indigenous files before—that in paragraph 1.8 of its report, the Auditor General's office noted that “The Commission called broadband a 'transformative enabling technology' and concluded that any Canadian without broadband access is profoundly disadvantaged.” You know this, but I want the viewers watching to understand why this is so significant.

Governments have stated that we want to see improved health care for our indigenous people and those in remote and rural areas. We want to see specialized health, where they have access to specialized health. Part of the universal health care act says that universality, accessibility and reasonable access to common delivery are very important. Those are three of the five principles of the Canada Health Act. Well, specializing in health care in remote areas means that we need broadband, and that it has to be a priority.

I think all of us realize that it's going to be costly. It was costly originally to get a railway out to the far remote parts, but we said we had to do it. Consequently, this is what governments have said.

Health care, education.... If we're going to see indigenous and remote areas of the north, especially the eastern Arctic, improve their lot in life and have more opportunities, it's going to be through education. How do they do it? We do it through broadband, so that's why it's important.

If anyone is going to have a business in those special areas, in rural areas—so many home businesses are now starting up—they completely rely on being able to have the opportunities with this business because of broadband and access. This is part of the reason.

We have 15 minutes left, so pardon the rant.

Then we get into page 13 of the report, and we see, “Lack of transparency in the selection process”. This, to me, is one of the big problems, and we've talked about it today, the lack of transparency in selecting the processes for delivery.

(1030)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Hear, hear!

The Chair:

Here's the problem for most Canadians, if they're watching.

Connect to innovate had $500 million available for allocation to successful applicants. The program received 892 applications, with funding requests for $4.4 billion. In some cases, there were multiple projects covering overlapping areas.

Here's the problem: “We found that the Department used a three-step process to evaluate applications. First, it screened the applications and assessed their merit.” That was the initial screening. “Second, officials from the Department and the Minister's office assessed funding options, each including a different mix for eligible projects.” Finally, in the third step, “the Minister provided conditional support approval on selected projects.” All of these areas—not so much area number one, but the other two areas—can be politicized and could be problematic. I'm not stating that it was a roadblock in any way, but certainly it can be viewed as one.

In paragraph 1.57, the Auditor General's office “found that there were a number of considerations to select projects”. The applications came in and “there were a number of considerations to select projects, but the application guide did not specify the relative weight of each criterion used in the project selection process.” The people applying didn't really understand the weight to each part of it. “Projects were less likely to be funded if they did not align with provincial and territorial priorities. However, these priorities were not made public. In our view, the Department should have made the weights and priorities public.”

Does the department agree with that?

Mr. John Knubley:

First of all, I'd like to just step back. There are three—

The Chair:

No, just answer that one question, for now.

Mr. John Knubley:

The answer is that we did not assign weights, because there are different solutions in different areas. We assess the community needs and the technological requirements, and they vary from place to place. We believe that it is not appropriate to set one specific set of weights.

The Chair:

All right. Thank you.

We go to the conclusion, as Mr. Christopherson and others have done, and we see again that “Canada did not develop and implement a national strategy to improve broadband Internet connectivity to a specific service level in rural and remote areas.”

Again, I represent one of those rural areas and it is problematic.

We have a question from our analyst that we can include in our report. This is regarding its responses to recommendation 1.60, that ISED “should inform stakeholders of the planned availability date, location, capacity, and price of the backbone to which they will have access” in a timely manner. How has the department advised successful project proponents that information on access pricing will be made publicly available in a timely manner as contribution agreements are signed?

Ms. Gravelle.

(1035)

Mrs. Michelle Gravelle (Director General, Science and Research Sector, Department of Industry):

To be eligible for the CTI program, applicants did need to commit to provide open-access infrastructure. There are provisions in all of the contribution agreements. As the contribution agreements are being finalized, there is a requirement to open that up.

The Chair:

Is this any different from what was recommended by the OAG?

Mrs. Michelle Gravelle:

That was the intent at the outset; it was a requirement of the program. It was just at the point that the audit was done. The program was rolling out, so everything couldn't have been opened up.

The Chair:

Did the Auditor General's office make a recommendation?

A voice: That was the recommendation, yes.

The Chair: So it is not different from what the OAG...?

Mr. John Knubley:

There's a timing issue. We ultimately did what they raised, although when they looked at our design, they had questions about it.

The Chair:

All right, so they questioned the design of the delivery.

Mr. John Knubley:

Ultimately when we delivered it, I think we did our best to address that particular issue.

The Chair:

You're saying that in the action plan, although they questioned the design, in the action plan....

Mr. John Knubley:

Yes, the design phase, when we were looking at how to do the program. Then when we actually delivered it, this is how we did it.

The Chair:

All right. Okay.

Mr. John Knubley:

Is that reasonably clear?

The Chair:

Yes, well, I think that's an answer.

Regarding your response to recommendation 1.81, that ISED should foster secondary markets for unused spectrum in underserved areas, has the department ever conducted an industry analysis pertaining to the possible effects of mandating secondary market access to unused spectrum? Again, this has been a problem for years and years, where spectrum is purchased and everybody puts it into Calgary right away, but the outlying areas don't get it.

Has the department ever conducted an industry analysis pertaining to the possible effects of mandating secondary market access to unused spectrum?

Mrs. Michelle Gravelle:

I would start by saying that our rules do allow for some licensing, and it's relatively easy, but that being said, the providers don't license very much. We have been reaching out to better understand this issue, so for smaller service providers, we've been trying to figure out what the challenges are that they're experiencing, and for the bigger providers, we're trying to better understand why they're not licensing.

The consultations are under way, the outreach with the stakeholders. We're looking to identify specific obstacles to secondary market transactions.

Mr. John Knubley:

Mr. Chair, I mentioned earlier that we had gone out and consulted small ISP providers. The short story is that these are exactly the issues we're consulting them on and trying to figure out the best way of moving forward.

The Chair:

I know that this consultation has taken place, and on the maps we've just published, I like the way that Mr. Scott said that they'd just published the maps—those maps have been out. I saw those maps in 2013 or 2014, I'm sure. Now we're publishing the maps, showing where there's lack of coverage, and these consultations as to why there's no delivery in those underserved areas outside big urban areas—they've been going on forever.

Is there a cut-off date on the consultation?

Mr. John Knubley:

No. This is an ongoing consultation.

I would just like to shift to another point. With respect to our auctions—and it is relevant—we have deployment conditions. Again, we've been trying—and the Auditor General raises this question in his report—to increase our deployment conditions so we can get these kinds of outcomes that you're talking about, Mr. Chair. While the department doesn't mandate secondary market access to unused spectrum, it's increasingly trying, as it deploys the spectrum, to put conditions on the players to ensure there is this kind of use.

The Chair:

The question that the analysts have given me is what has the department learned from its consultations? But you're saying that these consultations are ongoing. Is it the kind of thing there's an assessment for at some point? I ask because the consultations have been going on for four years. If it's the same consultation, I'm not sure, but are they being assessed regularly, or when? There is no cut-off; it's ongoing.

(1040)

Ms. Lisa Setlakwe:

What I would say, just on the spectrum auctions, is that the 600 megahertz spectrum auction has deployment conditions. We consult on all of these before we go out. Basically, we understand the issue of the spectrum being acquired and not being implemented or used, so we are requiring deployment conditions. We hear the same things, and we are putting measures in place at the opportunities that we have to get past this.

Mr. John Knubley:

Again, trying to be concrete, when we did the 600 megahertz spectrum auction, part of the information that we've received from these consultations leads us to decide to do a 40 megahertz set-aside.

So, it is ongoing, but we actually use the information in the application of our policies to licensing and to spectrum.

The Chair:

All right. Thank you.

Mr. Scott, there was a time when Mr. Christopherson was giving a speech—or, not a speech but—

Mr. David Christopherson:

It probably was.

The Chair:

Yes, it was a speech.

I recognized you and then I went on quickly. I don't know if you even remember what point it was at that time, but I feel you had kind of made a motion to me that you wanted to speak and I missed you.

Mr. Ian Scott:

I don't think so. I think it was when Mr. Arseneault raised the question, and I only began my response. But I think I perhaps gave him an answer in response to another question. If not, I'd be happy to speak to him after the meeting.

The Chair:

It came up afterwards. All right. Thank you for that, and I apologize if I cut you off.

In the course of your leaving here and making your way back to your offices, you might think you didn't get enough time to answer a question broadly enough. Maybe you will think there's more information we could use in this study and that you wish you had disclosed it to us at the time but didn't have time to do. Please submit anything to us as quickly as you can. If you said something you want to enlarge on, please do that. We'll take it on the record and use it as part of our study.

We thank you very much for working on a very difficult file. As I've stated already, when governments want to see improvements in the welfare of many Canadians, and the answer lies on the table that you sit behind, we all hope great success for you. So all the best in delivery.

Thank you for coming.

With that, the meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des comptes publics

(0850)

[Traduction]

Le président (L’hon. Kevin Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot, PCC)):

Bonjour tout le monde.

Bienvenue à la 128e séance du Comité permanent des comptes publics en ce jeudi 21 février 2019.

Nous allons encore une fois nous pencher sur le Rapport 1 — La connectivité des régions rurales et éloignées, qui fait partie des rapports de l'automne 2018 du vérificateur général du Canada.

Ce matin, du Bureau du vérificateur général, nous avons l'honneur d'accueillir M. Jerome Berthelette, vérificateur général adjoint, et Philippe Le Goff, qui est directeur principal.

Du ministère de l'Industrie, nous recevons le sous-ministre, John Knubley, qui est aussi accompagné de Lisa Setlakwe, sous-ministre adjointe principale, Secteur des stratégies et politiques d'innovation, et de Michelle Gravelle, directrice générale, Direction générale de la vérification et de l'évaluation.

Du Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes, nous accueillons M. Ian Scott, président et dirigeant principal; M. Christopher Seidl, directeur exécutif, Télécommunications; et M. Ian Baggley, directeur général, Télécommunications.

Pour ceux qui pourraient être intéressés, la séance d'aujourd'hui est télévisée. Nous avons déjà accueilli ces témoins, mais des votes à la Chambre nous ont interrompus. Habituellement, tout ce qu'ils ont fait à ce stade-ci, ce sont leurs déclarations liminaires. Nous n'avons pas trop posé de questions.

Ils ont accédé à notre demande et ils sont disposés à refaire une déclaration liminaire. Nous les en remercions.

Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à M. Berthelette.

M. Jerome Berthelette (vérificateur général adjoint, Audit de performance, Bureau du vérificateur général):

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de nous donner l'occasion de discuter de notre rapport de l'automne 2018 sur la connectivité des régions rurales et éloignées. Je suis accompagné de M. Philippe Le Goff, le directeur principal chargé de cet audit.

Cet audit visait à déterminer si Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada et le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes avaient, selon leurs responsabilités et rôles respectifs, surveillé l'état de la connectivité ainsi que défini et appliqué une stratégie visant à répondre aux besoins des Canadiens vivant dans les régions rurales et éloignées.[Français]

Au cours des 12 dernières années, des examens approfondis de l'accès à l'Internet à large bande au Canada ont mené à des recommandations pour que le gouvernement fédéral dirige l'élaboration d'une stratégie nationale pour les services à large bande. Toutefois, à la fin de notre audit, le gouvernement n'avait toujours pas approuvé la prise de mesures à cet égard.

Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada a indiqué qu'il hésitait à établir une stratégie dont l'objectif ne pouvait être atteint au moyen des fonds disponibles. Le ministère a donc continué d'appliquer une approche consistant à développer la couverture de services à large bande dans les régions mal desservies du pays à compter du moment où des fonds étaient disponibles.

Cette approche signifiait que les habitants des régions rurales et éloignées avaient moins facilement accès à d'importants services en ligne comme des programmes d'éducation, des services bancaires et des services de soins de santé et qu'ils ne savaient pas quand cet accès pourrait être amélioré.

Le 26 octobre dernier, le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique a annoncé que les ministres fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux de l'Innovation et du Développement économique avaient convenu de faire des services à large bande une priorité et de définir une stratégie à long terme afin d'améliorer l'accès à l'Internet haute vitesse pour tous les Canadiens.

Les ministres se sont engagés à établir un accès universel haute vitesse de 50 mégabits par seconde pour le téléchargement de données et de 10 mégabits par seconde pour le téléversement des données.

Monsieur le président, pour ce qui est de l'état actuel de la connectivité au Canada, nous avons constaté que le ministère s'était fondé sur des données complètes et exactes pour étayer l'élaboration de politiques visant à combler les lacunes en matière de connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées.[Traduction]

En 2016, le ministère a lancé son programme de financement Brancher pour innover afin de connecter à l'Internet haute vitesse 300 collectivités rurales et éloignées du Canada. Nous avons examiné si le ministère avait conçu et géré ce programme pour optimiser les ressources publiques dans l'intérêt des contribuables. Nous avons constaté qu'il n'avait pas appliqué ce programme de façon à assurer une expansion maximale de l'infrastructure avec les deniers publics dépensés. Le programme ne contenait aucune disposition pour atténuer le risque que les fonds publics remplacent les investissements du secteur privé.

Nous avons aussi constaté que le ministère n'avait pas fourni de l'information importante aux éventuels demandeurs de financement en vertu du programme. Certains demandeurs ont donc dû déployer plus d'efforts dans la préparation de leurs propositions, et aucun d'eux ne comprenait complètement les critères de sélection des demandes de financement. Ainsi, le choix des projets était fondé sur un certain nombre de facteurs, mais le guide de préparation des demandes ne précisait pas le poids relatif de chaque critère utilisé dans le processus de sélection. De plus, les projets qui ne correspondaient pas aux priorités des provinces et des territoires étaient moins susceptibles d'être financés, mais ces priorités n'avaient pas été rendues publiques. Selon nous, le ministère aurait dû publier le poids des critères et les priorités.

Beaucoup de Canadiens dans les régions rurales et éloignées dépendaient de solutions sans fil fixes à large bande. Nous avons constaté que les petits fournisseurs de services Internet n'avaient pas eu suffisamment accès aux fréquences du spectre de qualité supérieure pour pouvoir déployer des services à large bande dans les régions rurales et éloignées. Par exemple, le ministère a mis aux enchères des licences de spectre visant des régions géographiques trop vastes pour que les petits fournisseurs de services Internet puissent y participer. Le marché secondaire des portions du spectre non utilisées avait des lacunes, notamment à cause de l'absence d'incitatifs pour les titulaires de licences d'offrir en sous-licences les portions qu'ils n'utilisaient pas. De plus, l'information sur les portions de spectre non utilisées n'était pas facilement accessible aux fournisseurs de services Internet intéressés.[Français]

Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada et le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes ont accepté nos six recommandations. Nous croyons comprendre que le ministère a préparé un plan d'action détaillé.

Monsieur le président, je finis ainsi ma déclaration d'ouverture.

Nous serons heureux de répondre aux questions des membres du Comité.

Je vous remercie.

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Berthelette.

Nous allons maintenant passer à notre sous-ministre, M. Knubley, pour entendre ses commentaires.

M. John Knubley (sous-ministre, ministère de l'Industrie):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Dans l'ensemble, le gouvernement du Canada considère la connectivité et les services à large bande comme des éléments essentiels. C'est vraiment le moyen de faire participer tous les Canadiens à la croissance économique, à l'innovation et à l'inclusion sociale.

De manière générale, nous souscrivons également aux recommandations du vérificateur général. J'ai cru bon de tout d'abord souligner la contribution de l'ancien vérificateur général, M. Ferguson. Nous avons eu plusieurs discussions animées — de bonnes discussions — à ce sujet.

(0855)

Le président:

Merci. [Français]

M. John Knubley:

J'aimerais donc commencer par remercier le vérificateur général et son équipe de leur rapport. Il s'agit d'un ensemble d'enjeux très importants. Nous acceptons les recommandations et travaillons afin d'améliorer la connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées.[Traduction]

Je n'ai alors que quelques mots à dire sur trois aspects précis abordés dans le chapitre du vérificateur général: premièrement, la stratégie; deuxièmement, les programmes; et troisièmement, le spectre.

En ce qui a trait à la stratégie, nous convenons de la nécessité d'élaborer une stratégie de connectivité, particulièrement à la lumière de la décision du CRTC prise en décembre 2016 qui déclare que la large bande est un service de base et qui établit la cible de 50/10. Je crois personnellement que cette déclaration a créé un point d'inflexion pour la prestation de services à large bande, ce qui nous a obligés à passer d'une approche progressive étape par étape pour combler les lacunes à une approche plus collaborative et plus intégrée de la large bande.

Les programmes de large bande du ministère sont antérieurs à cette annonce du CRTC qui en a fait un service de base. Comme je l'ai dit, ils étaient conçus de manière à procéder étape par étape et à mettre l'accent sur des écarts précis dans les services, la couverture et la vitesse. Nos efforts visaient surtout à combler les écarts entre les zones urbaines et rurales en adoptant une approche qui équilibre soigneusement les intérêts du public et les investissements privés. Nous voulons éviter d'empêcher des investissements privés dans tout ce que nous faisons.

Je veux également préciser aux députés et au président que la connectivité est certainement une cible en mouvement. En effet, la technologie change et s'améliore constamment, et dans ce contexte, la stratégie est importante, surtout alors que nous fixons des objectifs précis. Cependant, elle évolue constamment. Il y a seulement quelques années, notre cible était des vitesses de 5/1, par rapport à 50/10.

Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, le travail d'élaboration d'une stratégie avait déjà commencé le printemps dernier. Nous avions établi un comité fédéral-provincial-territorial chargé de la connectivité. Il y a déjà eu des groupes fédéraux-provinciaux, mais nous avons officialisé celui-ci.

En juin, le ministère a lancé des consultations sur une stratégie nationale relative aux données et au numérique, dont l'un des éléments de base est la connectivité.

Le 25 septembre, le ministre Bains a publié le rapport de la Table de stratégie économique, qui met l'accent sur six secteurs, ce qui comprend l'importance des services à large bande et d'une infrastructure numérique pour la croissance économique, l'innovation et l'inclusion sociale.

Enfin, le 26 octobre dernier, les ministres fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux se sont rencontrés. Ils ont convenu en tant que groupe d'accorder la priorité à la large bande, de collaborer à cette fin. Ils se sont entendus sur un ensemble de principes en matière de connectivité et ils ont accepté de mettre sur pied une stratégie à long terme afin d'améliorer l'accès à l'Internet haute vitesse et aux services sans fil pour les Canadiens. Autrement dit, ils ont accepté la cible de 50/10 et l'objectif d'offrir des services de large bande aux Canadiens en tant que service de base.

Ils ont annoncé trois principes: l'accès pour assurer des services fiables et de haute qualité; la collaboration pour mobiliser tous les partenaires et mettre fin à la fragmentation; et le recours à des outils efficaces, en ciblant surtout les défaillances du marché, afin que le gouvernement offre un soutien à cet égard où c'est le plus nécessaire dans un contexte concret sans nuire aux investissements privés.

J'aimerais mettre fin à mes commentaires sur la stratégie en rappelant aux députés que le ministère est très actif dans le domaine du numérique et de la connectivité depuis de nombreuses années. Cela remonte à l'époque du ministre Manley. En 2001, David Johnston a dirigé un groupe de travail national sur les services à large bande. Quand on regarde les principes du groupe — je soupçonne que je vais vous les montrer plus tard —, on voit qu'ils sont remarquablement semblables à ceux qui sont au coeur de notre nouvelle stratégie. Le ministère s'emploie depuis de nombreuses années à offrir des programmes éducatifs liés au numérique et à la large bande. Je peux vous parler de certains de ces programmes.

La deuxième chose sur laquelle le vérificateur général s'est concentré est nos deux programmes: Un Canada branché, un programme quinquennal de 240 millions de dollars lancé en 2014 afin d'installer la connexion du « dernier kilomètre » pour des foyers; et notre programme plus récent, Brancher pour innover, un programme quinquennal de 500 millions de dollars lancé en 2016 surtout pour appuyer une nouvelle infrastructure de base afin de brancher des établissements comme les écoles et les hôpitaux, et pour garantir un accès aux services à large bande aux collectivités.

(0900)



Je tiens à souligner que les constations de l'audit ne portaient que sur l'étape de conception de notre programme Brancher pour innover. C'est là que nous en étions lorsque le vérificateur faisait son travail. Je suis heureux d'annoncer, comme me l'a demandé le ministre Bains, que le programme branchera 900 collectivités d'un bout à l'autre du Canada, soit trois fois plus que la cible initiale du programme, qui était de 300.

De ces 900 collectivités, 190 sont des communautés autochtones, dont certaines ont un urgent besoin d'Internet à plus haute vitesse. Je tiens à souligner que, d'abord et avant tout, le programme ciblait les régions rurales ayant le besoin le plus pressant de services à large bande, habituellement où le secteur privé n'est pas enclin à aller, et que, dans l'ensemble, notre programme de 500 millions de dollars a permis de doubler ce montant, ce qui signifie que 1 milliard de dollars est consacré à l'amélioration de la connectivité.

J'aimerais maintenant parler du spectre et des problèmes soulevés à cet égard par le vérificateur général. Nous convenons sans aucun doute que les répercussions sur les régions rurales et éloignées constituent une considération importante dans le développement des activités connexes et l'élaboration d'un cadre d'octroi de licences. Nous continuons d'élaborer des politiques tenant compte de l'importance des services dans les régions rurales pour veiller à ce que tous les Canadiens puissent tirer parti de services de grande qualité, d'une couverture et de prix raisonnables. Par exemple, nous venons tout juste de publier une consultation sur l'établissement de secteurs géographiques similaires de services pour les licences de spectre. Il s'agit de la consultation de niveau 5 dont il est fait mention dans le rapport du vérificateur général.

Ce que nous faisons, c'est essayer de parvenir à de plus petits secteurs géographiques de services pour que nous ayons de meilleures cartes et une meilleure idée de ce qui peut être offert aux Canadiens.

De plus, les enchères de la bande de 600 mégahertz doivent avoir lieu bientôt. Ce spectre peut permettre d'étendre la zone desservie en région rurale, surtout parce qu'une proportion de 40 % des fréquences de la bande est réservée aux fournisseurs de services régionaux.

Pour terminer, je désire réaffirmer que nous reconnaissons l'importance d'une connectivité haute vitesse et de services à large bande abordables pour les collectivités rurales et les Canadiens et que nous travaillons tous très fort pour offrir ces services et atteindre les objectifs connexes.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Knubley.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Scott du Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes.

Allez-y, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Ian Scott (président et dirigeant principal, Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes):

Bonjour, monsieur le président. [Traduction]

Madame et messieurs les députés, je ne vais pas présenter mes collègues ni moi-même puisque le président l'a déjà fait.

Nous vous remercions de nous donner l’occasion de comparaître devant ce comité pour discuter des conclusions du Bureau du vérificateur général du Canada et pour expliquer le rôle du CRTC dans l'amélioration de la connectivité pour les Canadiens qui vivent dans les régions rurales et éloignées du pays.

Comme l’a fait remarquer le vérificateur général dans son rapport, le CRTC a un rôle limité, mais important à jouer. Notre travail, en tant qu’organisme de réglementation indépendant, est de veiller à ce que les Canadiens aient accès à un système de communication reconnu mondialement qui encourage l’innovation et améliore leur qualité de vie. Le CRTC estime que tous les Canadiens, quel que soit l’endroit où ils vivent, devraient avoir accès à des services Internet à large bande sur des réseaux fixes et mobiles. Comme il est mentionné dans le rapport du vérificateur général, la connectivité est vitale dans le monde d’aujourd’hui. Les services à large bande constituent l’outil essentiel utilisé pour communiquer entre nous, nous renseigner et nous divertir, trouver de l’information, postuler pour des emplois et accomplir des tâches courantes, par exemple effectuer des transactions bancaires ou accéder à des soins de santé ou à d’autres services gouvernementaux.

Les Canadiens doivent donc pouvoir profiter d’une expérience en ligne sans entraves.[Français]

Le CRTC ne tire pas toutes les ficelles, mais dans certains domaines il peut — et doit — contribuer à l'atteinte de cet objectif. L'annonce faite en décembre 2016 par le CRTC selon laquelle les services Internet à large bande sont maintenant considérés comme des services de télécommunications de base en est l'exemple parfait.[Traduction]

En même temps, nous avons établi un nouvel objectif de service universel, comme vient tout juste de le mentionner le sous-ministre. Ainsi, tous les Canadiens doivent avoir accès à des services à large bande fixes à des vitesses de téléchargement d’au moins 50 mégaoctets par seconde et à des vitesses de téléversement d’au moins 10 mégaoctets par seconde, ainsi qu'à un forfait de données illimitées. La plus récente technologie sans fil mobile — actuellement le service mobile évolution à long terme, ou LTE — devrait être disponible non seulement dans les foyers et les entreprises du Canada, mais aussi sur les grandes routes du pays. Nous nous attendons à ce que d’ici 2021, 90 % des ménages canadiens aient accès à des vitesses correspondant à l’objectif du service universel. D’après nos estimations, il faudra une autre décennie pour desservir les 10 % restants.

Monsieur le président, 84 % des Canadiens ont accès aux services Internet aux nouvelles cibles de vitesses. Cependant, beaucoup de gens vivant dans les régions rurales et éloignées ne peuvent que rêver à ce niveau de service. Alors que 97 % des ménages en région urbaine peuvent obtenir des services qui répondent à l’objectif du service universel, seulement 37 % des ménages en région rurale peuvent y avoir accès.

(0905)

[Français]

Par conséquent, 16 % des ménages canadiens, ou près de 2 millions de Canadiens, n'ont pas encore accès à des vitesses respectant l'objectif du service universel ou à une option de données illimitées. Les services Internet rapides, fiables et de grande qualité sont tout simplement hors de portée, physiquement et financièrement, dans beaucoup de régions du pays.

Ce message, le CRTC l'a entendu clairement pendant son audience publique sur les services de télécommunication de base. Nous l'avons entendu de plus de 50 000 personnes: des particuliers, des propriétaires d'entreprise et des chefs de communautés autochtones. Bon nombre d'entre eux nous ont dit qu'ils avaient l'impression d'être à la traîne en cette ère du numérique.[Traduction]

Bien entendu, les lacunes en matière de couverture varient d’une région à l’autre. Il arrive souvent que les petites collectivités des Maritimes et des Prairies ne bénéficient pas des vitesses élevées des grands centres urbains. Cependant, les collectivités les moins bien desservies et où les besoins sont les plus grands se trouvent pratiquement toutes dans le Nord canadien.

Les efforts pour combler ces lacunes doivent être coordonnés parce qu’ils constituent une responsabilité partagée par de nombreux intervenants. Outre le CRTC, il s’agit entre autres d’Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada, des provinces et des territoires, des gouvernements autochtones, de l’industrie des télécommunications et des organismes non gouvernementaux.

De son côté, le CRTC a annoncé un nouveau régime de financement de la large bande. Il fournit jusqu’à 750 millions de dollars sur une période de cinq ans pour aider à payer l’infrastructure qui permettra d’étendre les services Internet et les services sans fil mobiles aux régions mal desservies. Notre objectif est de faire en sorte que les résidents des régions rurales reçoivent des services comparables à ceux des régions urbaines.

Sur les 750 millions de dollars qui doivent être mis à disposition, jusqu’à 10 % du total annuel servira à améliorer les services dans les collectivités dépendantes des satellites, à savoir les collectivités qui comptent sur le transport par satellite pour recevoir un ou plusieurs services de télécommunication comme la téléphonie, les services sans fil fixes ou mobiles ou les services d’accès Internet.

Évidemment, lorsque nous lancerons notre premier appel de demandes cette année, il sera important que les demandeurs potentiels sachent où sont les plus grands besoins. Nous souscrivons au rapport du vérificateur général sur cette question.[Français]

Le mois dernier — à vrai dire, il y a quelques mois déjà —, nous avons publié des cartes montrant les régions du pays qui n'ont pas accès à des vitesses de large bande de 50 mégabits par seconde pour le téléchargement et de 10 mégabits par seconde pour le téléversement. Les cartes montrent aussi les collectivités sans infrastructure de transport de grande capacité et celles où les ménages et les grandes routes n'ont pas de service sans fil mobile LTE, c'est-à-dire les régions du pays qui ne répondent pas, à l'heure actuelle, à notre objectif du service universel. Nous avons demandé aux fournisseurs de services Internet et de services sans fil de vérifier l'exactitude de nos cartes.

Cela s'inscrit dans notre approche globale concernant les données à large bande. Nous mettons l'information à la disposition du public de la manière la plus détaillée possible, tout en respectant les dispositions en matière de confidentialité de la Loi sur les télécommunications.

En fait, nous avons déjà publié une version à jour de notre rapport annuel de surveillance des communications, qui présente des données récentes sur l'accessibilité de la large bande et d'autres renseignements sur ce sujet.

(0910)

[Traduction]

Qui plus est, il y a un certain nombre d’années, nous avons conclu avec Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada un protocole d’entente qui régit la collaboration et le partage de données entre nos organisations. Nous nous sommes engagés à échanger de l’information sur l’infrastructure à large bande pour améliorer la prise de décision axée sur des données probantes. Nous nous sommes aussi engagés à collaborer avec tous les ordres de gouvernement dans le cadre d’un effort collectif visant à fournir des services Internet à large bande dans les régions mal desservies du Canada.

Depuis l’annonce des détails de notre régime de financement de la large bande plus tôt cet automne, nous avons rencontré des représentants des gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux et de tous les ministères fédéraux concernés pour leur expliquer le fonctionnement du régime et pour comprendre leurs plans de financement de la large bande.

Monsieur le président, chers députés, il faudra investir des milliards dans l’infrastructure pour étendre la couverture à large bande et mobile aux ménages et aux entreprises mal desservis et le long des grandes routes. Il ne fait aucun doute que cet objectif est ambitieux, notamment parce que notre territoire est vaste et que la saison de la construction est brève dans bon nombre de régions du pays.

Le régime de financement de la large bande du CRTC n’est bien sûr qu’une partie de l’équation. Il vise à complémenter et non à remplacer le financement public et l’investissement privé actuels et futurs.

Le fait de mettre de l’information détaillée, exacte et à jour à la disposition du public et des décideurs politiques garantira que les fonds sont orientés vers les projets les plus pertinents et les collectivités qui en ont le plus besoin. Il va sans dire qu’il reste encore beaucoup à faire. Cependant, je suis convaincu que cet objectif sera atteint de la même manière que les réseaux ferroviaires et électriques ont été construits dans le passé: en reliant une collectivité à la fois.[Français]

Je vous remercie.

Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Scott et les autres, de vos exposés.

Nous allons maintenant commencer la première série de questions, qui seront de sept minutes. Je souhaite la bienvenue à M. de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Tout d'abord, monsieur Berthelette, je vous présente d'entrée de jeu mes condoléances à la suite du décès de Michael Ferguson.

Beaucoup plus de collectivités que ce qui était prévu dans le programme ont accès au service. La cible du programme était de 300 et, comme vient tout juste de le dire M. Knubley, quelque 900 collectivités l'ont obtenu, y compris environ 190 collectivités autochtones. En quoi est-ce un échec?

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Le Goff.

M. Philippe Le Goff (directeur principal, Bureau du vérificateur général):

Je ne vois pas cela comme un échec.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux en être certain.

Dans ma propre circonscription, un montant d'environ 13 millions de dollars provenant du gouvernement fédéral dans le cadre d'un projet de 47 millions de dollars permettra de brancher à la fibre optique 16 000 foyers dans 17 municipalités, ce qui représente un territoire ayant trois fois la taille de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard. De quelle façon n'y avons-nous pas trouvé notre compte?

Le président:

Monsieur Le Goff.

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Monsieur le président, je ne pense pas pouvoir parler d'un cas précis comme celui-ci. Dans le cadre de l'audit, nous avons examiné la conception du programme, et nous avons déterminé que l'approche adoptée ne favoriserait pas l'optimisation des ressources.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous dit qu'elle ne favoriserait pas l'optimisation des ressources ou qu'elle ne les a pas optimisées? Ce que nous observons dans les projets que j'ai vus d'un bout à l'autre du pays constitue une très bonne optimisation des ressources étant donné qu'il faut débourser habituellement 2 000 ou 3 000 $ pour brancher un foyer à la fibre optique. Dans bien des cas, le coût était bien moindre dans le cadre du programme.

J'essaie de comprendre les raisons pour lesquelles les ressources n'auraient pas été optimisées.

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Monsieur le président, je répète que nous n'avons examiné que la conception du programme. Cela faisait partie des critères de conception établis à l'époque par le ministère, à savoir qu'il ne fallait pas mettre uniquement l'accent sur l'optimisation des ressources, mais d'autres critères ont servi à prendre des décisions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce une mauvaise chose?

M. Philippe Le Goff:

À mon avis, monsieur le président, l'audit visait à examiner l'optimisation des ressources, et c'est ce que nous avons fait. C'est là-dessus que porte notre conclusion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans les déclarations liminaires, M. Berthelette a parlé du remplacement de fonds privés. Je trouve qu'entendre cela revient à sonner l'alarme haut et fort, car c'est fondé sur l'hypothèse voulant que des investisseurs privés s'intéressent à ces collectivités. Ce n'est pas ce que nous voyons alors qu'ils s'intéressent plutôt aux centres dans les régions rurales, comme le centre d'un village, où ils offrent des services, mais oubliez toutes les personnes hors de portée, car l'investissement n'en vaut pas la peine. Les entreprises privées ne se rendent dans ces régions que lorsque le secteur public y investit de l'argent. Elles disent alors qu'elles perdront leur part de marché et commencent à investir.

J'ai beaucoup de difficulté à gober le concept voulant que ce programme ait remplacé des fonds privés. En fait, c'est plutôt les fonds privés qui ont tendance à remplacer des fonds publics.

Que pensez-vous de cette affirmation?

(0915)

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Monsieur le président, je dirais que notre principale préoccupation à ce sujet était que, dans certains cas, des fonds privés auraient été affectés de toute façon en dépit du programme. Les investisseurs privés ont tiré avantage de l'existence du programme.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans cette optique, les 4 000 collectivités qui n'ont pas encore reçu de financement devraient, plus ou moins, toutes recevoir des fonds privés, et il ne devrait pas être nécessaire de continuer de nous en préoccuper.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Berthelette.

M. Jerome Berthelette:

Monsieur le président, je pense que la philosophie qui sous-tend les programmes du ministère consiste à chercher des fonds privés pour étendre les services à large bande. Quand nous avons examiné le programme, nous nous sommes donc penchés sur la façon dont on optimise le financement privé. Dans certains cas, il n'y aura pas de fonds privés compte tenu de l'isolement des collectivités, peut-être, et du coût. Cependant, dans d'autres cas, il pourrait être nécessaire de combiner des fonds privés et des fonds publics, et idéalement, nous nous tournerons vers le ministère pour nous assurer qu'il optimise les fonds privés et les bienfaits découlant des fonds publics.

Je pense que ce que nous avons entendu aujourd'hui, c'est qu'on a réussi à obtenir un financement privé équivalent, et je pense que c'est probablement une bonne chose.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans l'audit, on dirait que vous êtes insatisfait de cela, mais vous dites le contraire ici. Êtes-vous satisfait de la façon dont le programme a été mis en oeuvre?

M. Jerome Berthelette:

Je pense qu'à l'époque, nous examinions la façon dont le programme était conçu. Nous cherchions à formuler des recommandations qui contribueraient à veiller à ce que le ministère atteigne son but, à savoir d'essayer de maximiser les fonds privés. À ce stade-ci, avec les connaissances que nous avons, je dirais qu'il réussit assez bien à atteindre cet objectif. Mais nous n'avons pas procédé à une vérification, alors je pense que je vais attendre qu'une vérification soit faite avant de dire que le programme est fructueux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. D'après ce que je vois, s'il y a un problème à relever, c'est que les fonds pour le programme étaient tout simplement insuffisants depuis le début. Mais pour ce qui est du fonctionnement du programme, j'ai du mal à trouver les problèmes qui ont été relevés dans la vérification.

J'ai des questions pour les autres témoins également, et je vais les poser maintenant. Je reviendrai peut-être à vous plus tard.

Monsieur Scott, vous avez mentionné que vous avez un rôle limité mais important. Estimez-vous que le CRTC a les mains liées en quelque sorte, et y a-t-il une façon que nous puissions les délier?

M. Ian Scott:

Non, je ne crois pas que la commission a les mains liées. Nous entretenons une relation de travail très constructive avec ISDE pour prendre des mesures à cet égard, élaborer des cartes des services à large bande et assurer une coordination continue. Nous aiderons également le ministère dans le cadre des discussions fédérales-provinciales-territoriales. Donc, non, le ministère a un rôle quelque peu différent à assumer car nous sommes un organisme indépendant, si bien que nous sommes parfois plus isolés, à défaut d'un meilleur terme. Nous devons l'être pour respecter notre relation d'indépendance.

Non, il n'y a pas d'obstacles dans le cadre de nos travaux en vue d'atteindre ces objectifs liés à la large bande.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'un des problèmes auxquels je ne cesse de me heurter, ce sont des abus de pouvoir sur le marché par de grandes entreprises de télécommunications, Bell principalement, dans notre région. Avez-vous les outils dans votre mandat pour régler les problèmes associés à l'intégration verticale dans les entreprises de télécommunications et les abus de pouvoir sur le marché, par exemple, ce qui fait en sorte qu'il est très difficile d'installer une nouvelle ligne de fibre optique sur les poteaux électriques pour une entreprise différente?

M. Ian Scott:

Cette question comporte de nombreux volets. Je vais peut-être...

M. David de Burgh Graham: Sentez-vous à l'aise d'aborder un sujet à la fois.

M. Ian Scott: ... je vais commencer par le dernier point.

Vous savez certainement qu'un examen de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion et de la Loi sur les télécommunications est en cours. Le gouvernement a créé une commission d'examen qui formulera ses recommandations. Nous avons présenté un mémoire public à cette commission. L'un des problèmes que nous avons soulevés est l'importance actuelle et future de l'infrastructure passive, et plus particulièrement étant donné que nous envisageons le déploiement de la génération 5G de technologie mobile. De plus en plus de dispositifs seront déployés pas seulement sur des emprises traditionnelles, qu'elles soient provinciales ou municipales, et des poteaux, mais aussi sur des installations comme des abris d'autobus administrés ou détenus par des municipalités et des lampadaires. Ce sera un défi de taille auquel nous serons confrontés dans le futur, et nous avons signalé que dans le cadre de l'examen de la loi, il sera très important que les parlementaires portent une attention particulière à cette question, de manière à avoir une résolution et à assurer le déploiement efficace de la technologie à large bande et sans fil dans le futur.

(0920)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, messieurs Scott et Graham.

Je vais maintenant passer à l'opposition et céder la parole à M. Dan Albas.

Bienvenue au Comité. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Je suis certainement reconnaissant d'entendre les témoignages d'aujourd'hui. J'ai hâte d'entendre votre opinion d'experts sur ce rapport.

Pour faire suite aux observations de M. de Burgh Graham, j'ai entendu le député de Pontiac hier soir se vanter de l'argent qu'une région essentiellement rurale recevrait. La réalité pour les habitants de Logan Lake est à l'opposé de celle de M. de Burgh Graham. Vous avez un propriétaire de café dont la vitesse de téléchargement n'est pas suffisante pour faire payer ses clients par Interac, si bien qu'ils ont des cafés gratuits ce jour-là. C'est un problème. Je sais que nous nous penchons là-dessus, et je suis reconnaissant au vérificateur général d'effectuer une vérification à ce sujet.

Je vais commencer avec le CRTC. Monsieur Scott, avez-vous réduit de moitié votre cible de vitesse pour la faire passer de 50 à 25 mégabits?

M. Ian Scott:

Je suis ravi de répondre à cette question, car la prémisse est incorrecte, sauf votre respect. Nous n'avons pas réduit la cible. La cible est de 50, et nous avons hâte de l'atteindre.

Dans la décision que nous avons rendue publique lorsque nous avons présenté tous les détails de la façon de faire une demande de fonds, nous avons accepté — dans certaines circonstances — des demandes pour du service de 25 mégabits pouvant être augmenté à 50. Si nous n'avions pas pris cette décision, de nombreuses collectivités attendraient bien après 2021, car elles n'obtiendraient tout simplement pas un service de 50 mégabits dans leur région à l'heure actuelle, où c'est peut-être 3, 4 ou 5 mégabits par seconde.

Nous ne limitons pas mais nous augmentons plutôt le nombre de collectivités éventuelles.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur, sauf votre respect, vous pouvez dire que vous ne l'avez pas réduit de moitié, mais le fait est que vos propositions de projets exigent une vitesse de 25 mégabits et la moitié de la cible proposée. Pour les Canadiens à qui je parle, cela ressemble beaucoup à une réduction. Si vous pensez qu'une vitesse de 50 mégabits est nécessaire, pourquoi acceptez-vous seulement des projets qui cherchent à offrir la moitié de cela?

M. Ian Scott:

C'est pour la raison que je viens d'invoquer. Si nous insistons pour accepter des demandes qui peuvent seulement atteindre 50 mégabits, bon nombre de ces collectivités ne seront pas incluses. On ne dit pas que la cible de 50 mégabits ne sera pas atteinte. On n'examinera que les demandes de 25 mégabits par seconde qui visent clairement à atteindre la cible de 50. Par conséquent, plus de collectivités recevront un niveau de service supérieur plus tôt qu'elles l'auraient obtenu autrement.

M. Dan Albas:

On dirait, monsieur, que vous dites qu'il y a des collectivités à deux vitesses. Même si nous reconnaissons qu'il y a des coûts et des situations uniques, on pourrait penser que vous présenteriez un plan de projet qui réglerait ce problème.

M. Ian Scott:

Nous l'avons fait, monsieur.

M. Dan Albas:

Nous laisserons le soin aux Canadiens d'en décider, monsieur.

J'aimerais passer à M. Knubley.

Monsieur le sous-ministre, j'ai demandé il y a quelques mois si votre ministère s'assurera que les clients de services sans fil fixes dans les régions rurales ne subiront pas les conséquences négatives de la réduction des 3 500 mégahertz à venir. À l'époque, vous m'avez dit que vous mettriez tout en oeuvre pour veiller à ce que les habitants des régions rurales ne soient pas touchés de façon négative. Est-ce toujours votre position sur cette question cruciale? Les Canadiens des régions rurales me font part de préoccupations et craignent que ce soit le contraire.

M. John Knubley:

C'est toujours ma position. La question des 3 500 mégahertz n'a pas encore été mise de l'avant, mais elle le sera en temps et lieu. Comme je l'ai mentionné dans mes remarques liminaires sur la bande de 600 mégahertz, nous avons mis de côté 40 % du spectre pour les régions rurales.

(0925)

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur, je comprends que c'est un dossier très complexe, mais lorsque votre ministère parle de réduire le spectre de 3 500 mégahertz et qu'il n'y a aucune certitude qu'il le gardera, ce n'est pas très réconfortant.

Plus loin dans le rapport du vérificateur général, on réclame à maintes reprises une stratégie exhaustive pour réduire le déficit dans l'accès à Internet pour les Canadiens des régions rurales et éloignées. Même dans vos déclarations, vous avez parlé de Canadiens très connus — David Johnston, l'ancien ministre Manley — qui ont travaillé longuement à établir certains des principes de base pour élaborer une norme nationale et faire en sorte que les Canadiens des régions rurales participent pleinement à l'économie.

Jusqu'à présent, le gouvernement a refusé de produire la stratégie réclamée par le vérificateur général. Pourquoi refuse-t-il d'élaborer une stratégie? Où en sommes-nous avec la stratégie dont il est question dans le rapport?

Lorsque les Canadiens entendent dire que les principes sont énoncés depuis 2001 et que le vérificateur général dit que ces principes n'ont pas été formulés dans un plan, on peut voir un certain scepticisme. Je vais dans des régions comme Logan Lake, Keremeos et Princeton, où les habitants ont des préoccupations concernant leur Internet haute vitesse.

M. John Knubley:

La stratégie depuis 2001, conformément au groupe de travail Johnston, consiste à adopter une approche progressive pour combler les lacunes dans le service à large bande pour les Canadiens. Nous avons eu cinq programmes depuis 2001, pour un total de 1 milliard de dollars, d'un point de vue du gouvernement, pour combler ces lacunes.

À la lumière de la décision selon laquelle le service à large bande est un service de base et de notre objectif de 50/10 mégabits, nous travaillons avec les provinces et le secteur privé, reconnaissant que nous avons un objectif commun. Nous avons une échéance pour régler cette question des 10 % d'ici les 10 à 15 prochaines années. Là encore, nous avons officialisé, beaucoup plus que nous l'avons fait dans le passé, nos groupes de travail au niveau fédéral-provincial. Comme je l'ai mentionné, les ministres se sont rencontrés à l'automne dernier et se sont engagés à atteindre l'objectif de 50/10 et à élaborer une stratégie intégrée connexe. Dans ce contexte, les fonctionnaires travaillent ensemble pour établir, province par province et territoire par territoire, la marche à suivre.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur, on dirait étrangement que c'est un plan en vue d'avoir un plan. Pouvez-vous nous dire où vous en êtes? Quand ce plan sera-t-il présenté?

M. John Knubley:

Nous avons un plan. Nous avons un objectif de 50/10. Nous savons que le secteur privé atteindra une hausse de 5 % au cours des cinq prochaines années, et nous travaillerons avec tous les intervenants pour combler cette lacune de 10 %.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord, mais là encore, je pense qu'un objectif, monsieur le président, c'est différent d'un plan.

Le président:

Merci, messieurs Albas et Knubley.

Nous allons passer à M. Christopherson, s'il vous plaît, pour sept minutes.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci encore une fois à tout le monde d'être ici.

Je veux commencer, comme je le fais souvent, par mettre l'accent d'emblée sur le sujet.

À la page 6, on peut lire ceci: Cet audit visait à déterminer si Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada et le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes avaient, conformément à leurs responsabilités et rôles respectifs, surveillé l’état de la connectivité ainsi qu’élaboré et mis en oeuvre une stratégie visant à répondre aux besoins en la matière des Canadiens qui vivent dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

On peut lire la conclusion suivante à la page 26: Nous avons conclu qu’Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada et le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes avaient, conformément à leurs responsabilités et rôles respectifs, surveillé l’état de la connectivité [...]

Alors félicitations. [...] mais qu’ils n’avaient pas publié suffisamment d’information détaillée à ce sujet. Nous avons aussi conclu qu’Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada n’avait pas défini ni mis en œuvre de stratégie nationale pour améliorer la connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées pour les services Internet à large bande en vue d’atteindre un niveau de service donné dans ces régions.

C'est ce sur quoi je voulais me concentrer.

Cependant, je veux commencer sur une note positive et, quand je peux le faire et quand c'est mérité, reconnaître un certain mérite à quelqu'un. M. Berthelette, au paragraphe 5 de ses remarques liminaires, a fait la déclaration suivante: Pour ce qui est de l'état actuel de la connectivité au Canada, nous avons constaté que le ministère s'était fondé sur des données complètes et exactes pour étayer l'élaboration de politiques visant à combler les lacunes en matière de connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

Vous semblez donc avoir fait du bon travail en ce qui concerne les données. Les données sont une grande priorité pour nous au Parlement, alors félicitations. C'est du beau travail.

Je veux maintenant aborder la question d'une stratégie nationale, car il y a un élément manquant que je ne comprends pas. Il y a 12 années d'études qui révèlent que nous avons besoin d'une stratégie nationale de service à large bande. Or, monsieur Berthelette, vous dites au troisième paragraphe de vos remarques liminaires... Je tiens à préciser que ce que l'on dit, c'est qu'on a besoin d'une stratégie nationale de service à large bande depuis 12 ans.

Voici ce que l'on a dit: Toutefois, à la fin de notre audit, le gouvernement n'avait toujours pas approuvé la prise de mesures à cet égard.

Je sais qu'il l'a fait subséquemment, mais ce n'était pas le cas à l'époque. Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada a indiqué qu'il hésitait à établir une stratégie dont l'objectif ne pourrait être atteint au moyen des fonds disponibles.

Monsieur Berthelette, pourriez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet, s'il vous plaît? J'ai l'impression qu'on fait les choses à l'envers, mais là encore, si vous pouviez simplement réitérer vos conclusions...

(0930)

Le président:

Monsieur Berthelette, ou est-ce M. Le Goff?

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Monsieur le président, au moment de la vérification, le ministère a reçu une somme d'argent fixe qui, de son point de vue — et je pense que nous partageons ce point de vue —, n'était pas suffisante pour répondre aux besoins des Canadiens.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, merci. C'est ainsi que je l'ai interprété aussi, et je voulais seulement l'entendre, car j'ai l'impression, depuis mes trois décennies et demie dans la fonction publique, que nous sommes confrontés à un défi public. La première étape est d'élaborer une stratégie, un plan, puis nous travaillerons à obtenir le financement. Si nous ne pouvons pas obtenir tout le financement dès le départ, nous pouvons adopter une approche progressive et entrer dans les considérations politiques lorsque nous aurons les fonds.

Cependant, l'idée de ne pas élaborer une stratégie parce que les fonds ne sont pas là d'emblée est illogique à mes yeux. Je vais céder la parole au sous-ministre.

Veuillez m'aider à comprendre pourquoi, lorsque des recommandations répétées sont formulées selon lesquelles il faut une stratégie nationale, votre ministère n'a pas élaboré une stratégie parce qu'il ne disposait pas de fonds suffisants. Je ne comprends pas.

M. John Knubley:

Je pense qu'il est important que les membres comprennent que depuis 2001, il y a une approche progressive, qui est une stratégie, pour combler les lacunes dans le service à large bande. La stratégie vise à cibler les régions où les besoins sont les plus grands et régler les problèmes.

Ce qui est arrivé à la suite de la déclaration en décembre 2016, c'est que le service à large bande est un service de base, et nous convenons en tant que pays que nous devons travailler à l'atteinte de l'objectif de 50/10. Puisqu'il y avait des opinions dans le passé sur ce que cet objectif devrait être, soit 5/1, 30 ou 50/10, nous sommes maintenant en mesure, grâce au CRTC, de travailler ensemble d'une façon intégrée pour résoudre réellement les problèmes ensemble, conjointement avec les provinces, le secteur privé, etc.

J'ajouterais seulement un point concernant cette approche progressive. Je pense que la politique sous-jacente qui est toujours en jeu, et qui continue de l'être même dans ce nouveau monde intégré dans lequel nous sommes, c'est la façon dont nous nous assurons d'optimiser notre argent et de ne pas évincer le secteur privé.

Il faut toujours atteindre un équilibre entre servir l'intérêt public en comblant ces lacunes et la façon dont nous travaillons avec le secteur privé, de même qu'avec les provinces et les collectivités, pour nous assurer d'optimiser les fonds à l'avenir.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, je comprends votre point de vue. Je suis désolé, monsieur. C'était une bonne intervention éclairante, mais vous n'avez pas répondu à ma question.

Ma question est la suivante: pourquoi une stratégie n'a pas été mise en place? Je comprends ce que vous dites. Il semble y avoir eu des éléments disparates de...

M. John Knubley:

Il y a eu une stratégie de mise en oeuvre progressive et...

M. David Christopherson:

Mais ce n'était pas une stratégie nationale.

M. John Knubley:

... nous sommes maintenant passés à une stratégie nationale.

M. David Christopherson:

Maintenant, vous êtes passés à une stratégie nationale. Ce que je veux savoir, c'est pourquoi cette stratégie n'a pas été mise en place dès le début. Si c'était une question de soins de santé... Ce n'est pas comme s'il s'agissait de nouveaux défis — le transport, les soins de santé, les services communautaires. Tout cela est toujours difficile dans un grand pays comme le nôtre, en plus d'être coûteux. C'est pour cette raison qu'il y a des plans et des mises en oeuvre progressives, et aussi que les gens des régions éloignées et du Nord demandent continuellement pourquoi ils n'ont pas accès à la même qualité de service que les habitants de ma ville natale de Hamilton.

Or, ce que je ne comprends pas, c'est pourquoi il n'y a pas eu de stratégie nationale. On dirait qu'il n'y en a pas eu par manque de financement, ce qui est tout simplement inacceptable. S'il s'agissait d'un problème de santé, nous aurions reconnu le problème et nous aurions mis en place une stratégie nationale.

L'absence d'une stratégie nationale... À mes yeux, l'aspect politique de la question, qui vous dépasse d'un échelon, c'est qu'ils n'ont pas l'argent et qu'ils ne veulent pas le dépenser; ils choisissent donc de ne pas élaborer de stratégie parce que cela permettrait aux adversaires de montrer du doigt le travail qui ne serait pas fait. Maintenant, on dirait simplement qu'ils sont arrivés au bout de la piste et qu'ils n'ont donc plus le choix de mettre en place une stratégie, et ils se traînent les pieds.

Je sais que mon temps de parole est probablement écoulé, monsieur le président, mais je vais simplement terminer ma réflexion. Je suis membre du Comité depuis 15 ans, et c'est peut-être une des rares fois où nous devons convoquer un ministre, car la réponse est potentiellement qu'on a dit aux fonctionnaires de ne même pas penser à mettre en place une stratégie parce qu'il n'y avait pas assez d'argent. Si c'est le cas, la réponse est politique et non administrative.

(0935)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Arseneault.[Français]

Monsieur Arseneault, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. René Arseneault (Madawaska—Restigouche, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence.

Je suis nouveau à ce comité et ceci n'est que ma deuxième réunion. Par conséquent, je ne connais pas tout l'historique des témoins qui ont comparu ni de vos témoignages précédents. Je vous prie à l'avance de me pardonner si mes questions peuvent vous sembler inappropriées.

Je viens d'une région extrêmement rurale: pas le Grand Nord québécois, ni une île perdue dans l'Atlantique ou dans le Pacifique ni l'île de Sable, mais plutôt le Madawaska—Restigouche dans le nord du Nouveau-Brunswick, un endroit pourtant bien à l'intérieur du Canada.

Partout dans ma circonscription, le manque de service à large bande est un irritant qui nous empêche de développer notre plein potentiel économique. Je parle de ma région, mais la situation est pareille dans bien des endroits au Canada atlantique ou ailleurs au pays, évidemment. La première victime est donc le développement économique, ce qui entraîne l'exode des gens de chez nous qui sont éduqués et qui pourraient y contribuer, mais qui vont chercher du boulot ailleurs. Sans développement économique, il n'y a pas de croissance, et les régions rurales se vident au bénéfice des grandes agglomérations urbaines. Je vous brosse un tableau que vous connaissez déjà, je le sais.

Cependant, au-delà du développement économique, il y a toute la question de la sécurité. Dans ma région, la grande majorité de l'activité économique est axée sur la forêt. Il y a énormément d'exploitations forestières, où les travailleurs peuvent se blesser. Pourtant, ces zones n'ont accès à aucun signal cellulaire. Or, c'est une question de sécurité que d'avoir accès aux services ambulanciers, aux hôpitaux, aux policiers et aux pompiers.

Nous tirons donc vraiment de l'arrière par rapport à la moyenne du Canada en matière de sécurité et de développement économique.

Je pense que c'est vous, monsieur Scott, qui avez dit que les services de télécommunication de base étaient désormais un service essentiel, comme l'a été à une autre époque le chemin de fer pour aller d'un bout à l'autre du Canada. La construction de ce chemin de fer était un projet national qui a été piloté par le gouvernement et non le secteur privé. L'implantation du service téléphonique au Nouveau-Brunswick n'était pas non plus un projet du secteur privé, ce qui me fait penser que nous devrions peut-être étudier cet aspect de la question, mais ce n'est pas ce dont nous parlons aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais poser une question à mes amis du ministère, soit à M. Knubley ou à l'un de ses collègues. Pour reprendre ce que disait M. Christopherson, a-t-on mené une étude pour établir la stratégie et le financement nécessaires pour régler une fois pour toutes ce dossier, et ce, partout au Canada? [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Knubley. [Français]

M. John Knubley:

Je crois qu'il faut d'abord mettre l'accent sur le fait que les ministres fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux se sont rencontrés en octobre et qu'ils ont décidé de mettre en place une stratégie. Ils ont parlé et convenu de la cible 50/10, soit une vitesse de 50 mégabits par seconde en téléchargement et de 10 mégabits par seconde en téléversement, des vitesses avantageuses. Ils ont ensuite demandé aux fonctionnaires de déterminer de façon intégrée les besoins futurs des provinces, du gouvernement fédéral et du secteur privé, pour que tous collaborent à l'atteinte de cette cible.

Je suis convaincu que, grâce au CRTC, nous sommes maintenant en meilleure posture pour atteindre cet objectif parce que nous avons une cible très précise et des outils de partage et de collaboration. Les ministres ont établi trois principes fondamentaux pour l'élaboration d'une stratégie: l'accès, l'innovation et la collaboration.

Mme Setlakwe dirige une équipe qui travaille là-dessus et elle pourrait peut-être ajouter des commentaires à cet égard.

(0940)

Mme Lisa Setlakwe (sous-ministre adjointe principale, Secteur des stratégies et politiques d'innovation, ministère de l'Industrie):

Nous sommes en train d'établir dans quels endroits il y a des lacunes, province par province et territoire par territoire, et combien cela va coûter pour connecter ces endroits. Les secteurs où il est facile de se rendre ont été connectés. Quant aux secteurs ruraux et plus éloignés encore, la technologie pour s'y rendre est compliquée et cela coûte cher.

Nous sommes en train d'achever ce travail. Nous estimons que cela va coûter environ 8 milliards de dollars, dont 7 milliards serviront à connecter les principales communautés qui demeurent dans ces secteurs.

Vous avez parlé de l'importance d'avoir accès aux communications sur les routes principales dans les secteurs forestiers comme ceux qu'il y a dans votre circonscription.

M. René Arseneault:

Ce sont des routes forestières.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Je ne suis pas sûre que nous allons arriver à nous rendre à toutes les routes forestières, mais nous nous rendrons aux routes principales. Nous estimons que cela va coûter environ 1 milliard de dollars.

M. René Arseneault:

Vous dites que cela coûtera 1 milliard de plus que les 8 milliards de dollars?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

C'est 8 milliards de dollars en tout: 7 milliards pour les communautés et 1 milliard pour les routes principales.

Nous n'avons pas terminé le travail. Nous travaillons avec le CRTC, les provinces et les territoires. Nous avons encore du travail à faire. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Kelly.

Monsieur Kelly, nous sommes rendus à la deuxième série de questions. Vous avez environ cinq minutes.

M. Pat Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Encore une fois, le Comité a devant lui un rapport du vérificateur général et des ministères qui disent avoir accepté les conclusions qu'il contient; pourtant, les témoignages que j'ai entendus, et surtout les réponses à la question de M. Christopherson, me donnent l'impression que les gens sont sur la défensive et que la conclusion du vérificateur général suscite une réaction négative.

Monsieur Knubley, le vérificateur général a déclaré que votre ministère n'avait pas de stratégie nationale. M. Christopherson vous a demandé pourquoi, et si je vous ai bien compris, en réponse à ses questions ainsi qu'à d'autres, vous êtes retourné plusieurs fois au rapport Johnston, qui date d'il y a 18 ans. Ce rapport prévoyait une stratégie dont la majorité des objectifs ne semblent toujours pas avoir été atteints 18 ans plus tard.

Je vais répéter la question: pourquoi n'a-t-on pas mis en place une stratégie nationale, particulièrement après que le CRTC a déclaré que la large bande est une nécessité publique? C'est facile de déclarer que quelque chose est une nécessité. Ce ne sont que des mots. Or, une fois qu'une telle déclaration est faite, il faut élaborer une stratégie et un plan en vue d'atteindre des objectifs.

Acceptez-vous la conclusion du vérificateur général selon laquelle il n'y a pas de stratégie nationale, et dans l'affirmative, pourquoi?

(0945)

M. John Knubley:

La nuance que j'essaie d'apporter, c'est que le vérificateur général a soulevé qu'il n'y avait pas de stratégie nationale intégrée comportant un objectif commun accepté par tous; nous acceptons cette conclusion. Nous avons maintenant fixé l'objectif de 50/10; dans le passé, l'ensemble des intervenants, que ce soit les provinces, le gouvernement fédéral ou même le secteur privé, ne s'est jamais entendu sur un objectif, pour ensuite aller de l'avant.

M. Pat Kelly:

Que s'est-il passé, alors?

M. John Knubley:

C'est vrai que dans ce sens-là, il n'y avait pas de stratégie nationale intégrée, et le vérificateur général avait tout à fait raison de le souligner. Peu après que le CRTC a reconnu que la large bande constitue un service de base, le gouvernement a agi très rapidement pour élaborer une stratégie intégrée en collaboration avec les provinces, pour fixer l'objectif de 50/10, ainsi que pour former des groupes de travail qui incluent le CRTC et les provinces.

M. Pat Kelly:

Vous n'avez pas répondu à ma question, monsieur, comme vous n'avez pas répondu à celle de M. Christopherson.

Pourquoi n'y a-t-il pas eu de stratégie? Si le problème a été cerné et est compris depuis des années, les objectifs...

M. John Knubley:

Parce que personne ne pouvait s'entendre sur un objectif technologique commun; par exemple, l'objectif des provinces était peut-être de 30 ou de 5/1. La technologie suscite toujours un débat. Aussi, les divers intervenants ne s'entendent pas toujours sur la mesure dans laquelle le secteur privé devrait intervenir pour régler un problème ou sur les endroits où il investira. Comme le vérificateur général l'a souligné, une grande question qui concerne la rentabilité, c'est comment équilibrer les investissements du secteur public et ceux du secteur privé? Même dans le cas de notre objectif de 50/10, nous avons déjà déterminé que les investissements du secteur privé nous permettront de passer de 84 à 90. Les entreprises privées investissent 12 milliards de dollars par année pour faire cela.

M. Pat Kelly:

D'accord, merci.

M. John Knubley:

Ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est que la question n'est pas simple, elle est complexe. La nuance que j'essaie d'apporter, c'est que tous les gouvernements des 15 dernières années, toutes allégeances politiques confondues, ont choisi de procéder en ciblant des lacunes précises. Il s'agit d'une approche par étapes. Quels sont les problèmes précis que nous essayons de régler? Tentons-nous de faire la connexion du dernier kilomètre, la connexion filaire de deux ménages? Essayons-nous plutôt de réaliser des activités liées au réseau de base, comme rendre la large bande accessible à une collectivité ou à une école? Quelle est la meilleure façon d'aider les collectivités et de fournir le meilleur service possible aux régions très éloignées partout au Canada?

M. Pat Kelly:

La raison est simplement qu'il n'y avait pas de coordination et qu'on n'arrivait pas à faire de coordination avec les provinces. C'est pour cette raison qu'il n'y a pas de stratégie nationale...

M. John Knubley:

Il y a des difficultés liées à la coordination, à la technologie et aussi à l'argent. Comme vous venez de l'entendre, du moins selon nos estimations actuelles, il faudra verser entre 8 et 9 milliards de dollars pour atteindre l'objectif de 50/10.

M. Pat Kelly:

D'accord, mais...

Le président:

Je vous demanderais de résumer brièvement ce que vous voulez dire; vous aurez un autre tour.

M. Pat Kelly:

C'est donc une question politique. Il peut y avoir une stratégie publique, mais si le gouvernement refuse de la financer, cela devient une question politique qu'il faut soumettre aux électeurs.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Kelly.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Sarai.

M. Randeep Sarai (Surrey-Centre, Lib.):

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Arseneault.

J'ai quelques courtes questions, mais d'abord, j'aimerais dire que malgré ce que mes collègues d'en face avancent, la stratégie semble fonctionner puisque 900 collectivités sont branchées ou sont en voie de l'être.

Ma première question s'adresse au sous-ministre.

Quelles mesures prenons-nous pour faire en sorte que l'infrastructure de connectivité soit conçue de façon à permettre sa croissance et son expansion, c'est-à-dire de répondre à de nouvelles demandes de vitesses encore plus rapides? Fabrique-t-on les conduits? L'infrastructure est-elle construite de manière à ce qu'on puisse la développer pour permettre de plus grandes vitesses ou devra-t-elle être reconstruite chaque fois? Ces questions sont-elles prises en considération lorsque l'infrastructure est construite?

M. John Knubley:

Oui, nous procédons constamment à des examens et des évaluations, et ce, de plusieurs façons. Il y a, par exemple, les activités de cartographie dont on a déjà parlé; ces données sont rendues publiques. Nous nous penchons sur des zones de 25 kilomètres carrés. Nous examinons le nombre de personnes, le nombre de ménages et les besoins de la collectivité, puis nous ajoutons les données concernant la présence de FSI et l'offre actuelle de services. Ensuite, nous tentons de cerner les lacunes et les besoins précis dans les régions données. Lisa peut vous en dire plus à ce sujet, mais grosso modo, nous travaillons avec le CRTC, les provinces et le secteur privé pour réévaluer continuellement ce que nous faisons. Plus précisément, en ce moment, étant donné l'objectif de 50/10, nous tentons de relever les lacunes dans l'ensemble du pays et de fixer les priorités à cet égard.

Très rapidement, il y a aussi le spectre, bien sûr, que nous vendons aux enchères, et le secteur privé participe à ces ventes. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, normalement, nous nous demandons s'il y aura de la dominance et si nous devons réserver une partie du spectre pour les régions rurales afin de favoriser la participation de petits FSI.

(0950)

M. Randeep Sarai:

Dans le même ordre d'idées, comment faites-vous en sorte que certains fournisseurs de services forment des grappes? S'il y a seulement de très petites collectivités avec de très petites populations, vous ne voulez pas que Telus s'installe à un endroit et Rogers à un autre. Comment veillez-vous à ce qu'il y ait une masse critique suffisante pour qu'une grappe continue à prendre de l'expansion, tout en vous assurant que la vitesse et le type de service répondent aux besoins technologiques?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Pour revenir à votre première question, un des éléments qui est évalué dans le cadre du programme Brancher pour innover, par exemple, c'est la technologie qui est utilisée et son potentiel d'extensibilité. Ces facteurs sont certainement pris en considération.

De plus, les groupes auxquels nous accordons du financement fédéral ont l'obligation de partager leurs infrastructures, selon certaines modalités. C'est aussi une exigence. Nous tentons d'utiliser tous les leviers dont nous disposons pour favoriser la concurrence.

M. Randeep Sarai:

Comme la superficie de ma circonscription totalise 40 kilomètres carrés, je vais céder la parole à M. Arseneault.

M. René Arseneault:

La mienne mesure 12 000 kilomètres carrés.[Français]

Je vous remercie de vos réponses. Elles m'éclairent beaucoup, moi qui ne suis pas un technicien.

Il faut avoir des ententes ou une collaboration territoriale, provinciale et fédérale. Je pense que les Canadiens peuvent faire cela. Quant aux complications technologiques, les techniciens sont là pour nous aider et nous appuyer.

Le nerf de la guerre, c'est l'argent. Il y a deux ans, j'ai fait le tour des fournisseurs principaux, que l'on connaît. Je ne les nommerai pas, mais ce sont toujours les mêmes. Il était évident qu'ils avaient une réticence à connecter les régions éloignées.

Je vais caricaturer un peu. En gros, ils nous ont dit qu'ils connecteraient ces régions si on les payait pour cela, mais qu'ils n'étaient pas intéressés à investir dans cette connectivité parce que ce n'était pas rentable financièrement. Nous vivons dans un monde capitaliste.

Je m'adresse maintenant à M. Scott, du CRTC.

Les grands fournisseurs de service Internet ont un oligopole et s'entendent entre eux. On connaît tous la chanson, on n'est pas naïf. La licence que le CRTC accorde à ces fournisseurs est un privilège. Dans les limites de sa compétence, le CRTC aurait-il une façon de les sensibiliser au fait que la licence qu'il leur donne pour étendre leurs services est assortie d'une obligation de servir tous les Canadiens, d'un océan à l'autre ou d'une forêt à l'autre? Si oui, précisez-moi comment on pourrait s'y prendre sur le plan juridique.

M. Ian Scott:

C'est une question très complexe. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci encore une fois, monsieur Arseneault, d'avoir partagé votre temps de parole.

M. René Arseneault:

Vous êtes impoli envers moi.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Je redonne la parole à M. Albas.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Dans son rapport, le vérificateur général a recommandé que le gouvernement dresse et publie des cartes détaillées sur la connectivité. En discutant avec les parties intéressées, j'ai aussi appris qu'il semble y avoir un déficit colossal d'information concernant les infrastructures qui se trouvent réellement sous terre.

Ma question s'adresse à la fois aux représentants du ministère de l'Industrie et du CRTC. Un de vos organismes a-t-il une carte complète des infrastructures de télécommunications qui ont été construites partout au pays?

(0955)

M. John Knubley:

Nous avons la Carte nationale des services Internet à large bande. Tous les Canadiens peuvent y accéder et la consulter. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, elle résume les services offerts actuellement dans chaque zone. Normalement, une zone couvre une superficie de 25 kilomètres carrés. La carte montre la population et les collectivités, ainsi que les FSI qui desservent la zone.

La difficulté que pose la communication d'information, c'est que certains renseignements concernant la couverture offerte par les FSI sont des secrets commerciaux. Nous devons donc rassembler certaines données à cet égard. En plus des données du programme Brancher pour innover, nos cartes comprennent celles du programme de 2014, Un Canada branché. Les gens peuvent consulter les cartes pour savoir où sont les projets.

Enfin, comme nous visons des vitesses de 50/10, ce que nous avons fait récemment avec notre carte, en collaboration avec le CRTC, c'est que nous avons tenté de montrer les zones où ces vitesses ne sont toujours pas offertes.

M. Dan Albas:

Avez-vous un inventaire quelque part de l'ensemble des infrastructures de télécommunications et de leur emplacement? Je comprends que certains renseignements secrets ne peuvent pas être rendus publics, mais j'aimerais savoir si le gouvernement connaît son propre inventaire. Vous fiez-vous à l'information que les entreprises de télécommunications vous fournissent?

M. John Knubley:

Nous discutons continuellement avec le secteur privé, et puis nous vérifions les services fournis en parlant avec les collectivités et les personnes. En réalité, nous menons constamment des consultations pour vérifier ce que nous savons relativement au spectre, par exemple.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous n'avez pas de liste officielle répertoriant l'information que vous auriez exigée. Vous dites simplement aux fournisseurs que vous aimeriez savoir ce qu'ils ont et vous rendez une partie de l'information ainsi recueillie accessible à la population canadienne.

Le président:

Monsieur Scott, s'il vous plaît.

M. Ian Scott:

Merci, monsieur le président. J'aimerais ajouter brièvement à cela. Les entreprises qui sont sous l'autorité réglementaire du CRTC nous fournissent de l'information détaillée. Ce n'est pas volontaire. Elles nous soumettent régulièrement de l'information. C'est cette information, en plus de celle recueillie par ISDE, qui est utilisée pour générer les données contenues dans les cartes des services à large bande.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

ISDE a commencé à mener des consultations sur de plus petites zones géographiques pour l'attribution du spectre.

Ma question pour les représentants du Bureau du vérificateur général est la suivante: cette initiative est-elle conforme aux recommandations contenues dans votre rapport?

J'ai aussi une question pour les représentants du ministère de l'Industrie: avez-vous l'intention d'utiliser de plus petites zones géographiques pour toutes les futures ventes aux enchères du spectre?

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Monsieur le président, je pense que c'est un pas dans la bonne direction, selon ce que nous ont dit les petits fournisseurs de services Internet. Ils ont fait valoir qu'ils n'avaient la capacité financière et technique ni de desservir les zones de niveau 2, 3 et même 4, ni de miser sur les grandes zones. À mon avis, c'est une bonne idée de considérer la possibilité de créer de petites zones de niveau 5 pour permettre la participation des petits fournisseurs de services.

M. John Knubley:

Pour préciser, nous menons des consultations sur le niveau 5, et aucune décision n'a encore été prise sur la façon dont nous passerions à ce niveau.

Permettez-moi de présenter quelques renseignements contextuels. En gros, le niveau 1 est le Canada. Le niveau 2 correspond grosso modo aux provinces. Le niveau 3 compte 59 zones régionales comprenant les villes les plus peuplées; nous l'utilisons pour les bandes de fréquences de moyenne portée. Le niveau 4 comprend 172 zones locales. Nous croyons certainement qu'il serait avantageux de créer des zones de service de plus petite taille; sur ce plan, nous sommes d'accord avec le vérificateur général. Toutefois, nous n'avons pas encore pris de décision officielle par rapport à la façon dont nous irons de l'avant...

M. Dan Albas:

Quand prévoit-on publier les résultats des consultations?

M. John Knubley:

Les consultations se poursuivent...

Mme Lisa Setlakwe: Maintenant.

M. John Knubley: ... actuellement, alors je pense que nous ferons rapport des consultations... Lisa?

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Plus tard cette année ou au début de l'an prochain.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Albas. Nous passons maintenant à Mme Yip, s'il vous plaît.

Madame Yip, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Jean Yip (Scarborough—Agincourt, Lib.):

[Note de la rédaction: difficultés techniques] alors comment peut-on jeter les bases du réseau 5G si la plupart des communautés éloignées n'ont pas de services? Ne serait-il pas préférable de dépenser l'argent d'abord pour servir ces communautés plutôt que pour la technologie 5G?

(1000)

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Scott.

M. Ian Scott:

Je pourrais commencer. Mes collègues voudront peut-être ajouter quelque chose.

Je pense que la technologie évolue très rapidement dans ce domaine. On constate que la fibre est de plus en plus étendue, pas seulement pour les services à large bande, mais aussi pour appuyer les services mobiles sans fil et, plus tard, le 5G. Dans quelques années, à mon avis, il n'y aura pas beaucoup de différence entre les deux. Donc, dans les petites et les grandes collectivités, on met en place les infrastructures visant à accroître la capacité, à optimiser la bande passante et à améliorer la vitesse, ce qui favorisera l'accès aux réseaux à large bande à haute vitesse et au 5G. Je ne sais pas si cela répond à votre question.

Mme Jean Yip:

C'est juste que je me sens mal pour les communautés éloignées qui ne l'ont pas ou qui n'ont pas...

M. John Knubley:

Je dirais toutefois que nous ne cherchons pas toujours les technologies qui permettent de régler un problème immédiat, mais des projets qui offrent des possibilités de croissance, du 4G au 5G et à la LTE, etc. C'est ce que nous avons fait dans nos deux derniers programmes, Brancher pour innover et Un Canada branché. Pour les projets des régions les plus éloignées, nous examinons habituellement les possibilités d'évolution de la technologie afin que ces communautés aient accès au service non seulement aujourd'hui, mais aussi à l'avenir, d'où l'importance de bien choisir la technologie.

J'ajouterais aussi un commentaire sur le service satellitaire, dont nous n'avons pas encore parlé, même si ce n'est pas directement lié à votre question. La technologie des services par satellite évolue, évidemment. Récemment — c'était dans le dernier budget —, nous avons financé une initiative de Télésat sur les systèmes de satellite LEO. Il s'agit d'une occasion incroyable d'offrir dans le Nord un accès aux services à large bande à des vitesses beaucoup plus élevées que jamais.

Encore une fois, comme vous l'avez souligné, à juste titre, le choix de la technologie appropriée pour les régions éloignées est un facteur important. Je pense que nous tentons d'avoir la plus grande marge de manoeuvre possible pour voir si la technologie que nous déployons aujourd'hui favorisera l'accroissement de la couverture, du service et de l'accès à l'avenir.

Mme Jean Yip:

Très bien.

Comment ISDE a-t-il aidé les petites entreprises et les FSI des régions rurales et éloignées à avoir accès au financement du programme Brancher pour innover?

M. John Knubley:

Je pense que les petits fournisseurs de services Internet représentent environ le tiers des entreprises qui participent aux projets. Évidemment, nous maintenons le dialogue avec ces petits fournisseurs et nous cherchons des occasions pour qu'ils participent. C'est la réponse courte.

Mme Jean Yip:

Simplement pour faire un suivi, la carte de connectivité est-elle rendue publique?

M. John Knubley:

Elle est publiée sur le portail du gouvernement du Canada.

Mme Jean Yip:

J'aimerais aussi savoir si le site Web du programme Brancher pour innover a été rendu accessible aux fournisseurs Internet et aux intervenants tiers pour qu'ils présentent leur candidature pour des projets liés aux services de base. Est-ce accessible?

M. John Knubley:

Le portail n'est pas utilisé à cette fin en raison des enjeux de sensibilité commerciale liés à l'empreinte des FSI. Je répète que nous essayons de promouvoir la participation des petits FSI. Récemment, hors du cadre du programme, nous avons consulté ces petits fournisseurs pour cerner les enjeux de leur programme et trouver des façons de mieux tenir compte de leurs intérêts. Dans le cadre de nos projets, par exemple, nous tenons absolument à ce que les Autochtones et les FSI contribuent à la mise en oeuvre du programme. Je pense que nous avons obtenu une excellente participation des entreprises autochtones au programme Brancher pour innover.

Il y en a 190, n'est-ce pas?

(1005)

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Oui, 190 communautés; le tiers du financement est destiné aux communautés autochtones.

Mme Jean Yip:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Yip.

Nous passons à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai suivi le dossier et examiné toute la documentation que nous avons, et je ne suis pas encore convaincu que nous sommes allés au coeur du problème de l'absence de stratégie nationale sur le réseau à large bande, qui fait l'objet de multiples recommandations depuis 12 ans.

Lorsque le vérificateur général a demandé pourquoi le ministère n'avait aucune stratégie, le ministère a indiqué, selon ce que nous avons entendu aujourd'hui, qu'il — et je cite — « hésitait à établir une stratégie dont l'objectif ne pourrait être atteint au moyen des fonds disponibles. »

Personne n'a apporté de nuances ni parlé de la difficulté de réunir les gens. En fait, lorsque les choses sont aussi difficiles et ardues, compte tenu de la complexité multidimensionnelle du dossier, une stratégie est d'autant plus nécessaire, même s'il s'agit d'abord d'affirmer que les provinces, les territoires et le gouvernement fédéral doivent tous être sur la même longueur d'onde et convenir d'un objectif en disant: « Voici ce que nous devons faire. Voici les responsables. Voici le processus et voici le calendrier. »

Au lieu de cela, à mon avis, nous entendons les arguments des gouvernements qui ont refusé... parce qu'ils ne voulaient pas payer la facture. Je comprends la joute politique, mais cela ne signifie pas pour autant que c'est acceptable sur le plan de la gouvernance. Cette stratégie devait être mise en place, et la réponse fournie par le ministère lorsque le vérificateur général y est allé était que cela n'avait pas encore été fait. Maintenant, on se targue d'aller de l'avant.

Examinons la chronologie. La vérification a eu lieu il y a environ 18 mois, c'est à ce moment-là qu'ils débutent, habituellement. Le sous-ministre a mentionné que des réunions ont eu lieu en juin de l'an dernier et le 26 octobre, et que c'est entre les deux réunions qu'on a jugé qu'une stratégie était nécessaire, juste à temps pour les audiences publiques sur le rapport du vérificateur général.

À défaut d'autre chose, je veux nous féliciter du système de vérification que nous avons au Canada. Pendant 12 ans, les gouvernements — oui, au pluriel — se sont traîné les pieds et n'ont pas fait ce qu'ils avaient à faire en matière de politiques publiques. Il a fallu que le vérificateur général intervienne et exige des comptes. Ensuite, ces gens viennent au Comité et affirment, sous l'oeil scrutateur du public, qu'ils nous donneront une stratégie nationale. Monsieur le président, je soutiens que sans cette vérification, il n'y aurait toujours pas de plan pour la création d'une stratégie nationale.

Je dois dire que je rejette les réponses fournies par le sous-ministre.

Je comprends pourquoi vous l'affirmez et je comprends que cela fait partie de votre rôle, mais vous avez aussi une responsabilité en tant qu'agent comptable. Lorsque je suis arrivé ici, les règles n'étaient pas claires, mais maintenant elles le sont.

L'établissement d'une stratégie nationale était la seule façon de servir l'intérêt public, et cela n'a pas été fait, parce qu'aucun gouvernement n'a voulu être tenu responsable de ne pas avoir dépensé l'argent nécessaire pour la mettre en oeuvre. C'est l'impression que cela me donne.

Maintenant, pour moi, l'important est que la stratégie progresse. Il y en a une, au moins.

Si vous permettez la parenthèse, j'aimerais aussi répéter que c'est un enjeu qui ne préoccupe pas la plupart des gens, parce que nous avons le meilleur service. La plupart des Canadiens vivent dans les centres urbains, où tout va pour le mieux.

Toutefois, lorsque j'écoute ma collègue Carol Hughes parler de ce qui se passe dans sa circonscription, en particulier lorsqu'elle fait un rapprochement avec les fermetures des succursales bancaires en milieu rural, le service Internet n'est pas seulement nécessaire. C'est une priorité, au même titre que le logement, la santé et la nourriture.

Monsieur Berthelette, ma question est la suivante: avez-vous vu la stratégie?

(1010)

M. Jerome Berthelette:

Non, monsieur le président.

M. David Christopherson:

Avez-vous l'intention de l'étudier?

Je dis cela seulement parce que souvent, le vérificateur général annonce qu'il fera une autre vérification rapidement, pour des raisons précises.

Parfois, ils ne veulent pas... Y a-t-il des plans en ce sens?

M. Jerome Berthelette:

Nous n'avons pas prévu un suivi pour le moment.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. C'est bon à savoir. Dans notre rapport, nous pouvons exiger un suivi et veiller à ce qu'il y ait des délais et une reddition de comptes.

J'aimerais poser une autre question, si j'ai le temps. Cela semble être le cas.

Cela revient probablement au même, monsieur Berthelette, mais vous avez dit quelque chose qui m'a frappé. En réponse à une question d'un collègue, vous avez parlé d'optimisation des ressources et à un moment donné, vous avez indiqué que ce n'était pas le seul critère de la prise de décisions.

Que voulez-vous dire exactement? C'était en réponse au commentaire d'un collègue, selon lequel la situation n'était pas si mauvaise, étant donné tout ce qui a été accompli. Vous avez dit avoir examiné le programme et que l'optimisation des ressources n'était pas le seul critère de la prise de décisions.

Je vous donne l'occasion de commenter.

Le président:

Monsieur Le Goff.

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Monsieur le président, au moment de la vérification, une de nos préoccupations était que les priorités du programme Brancher pour innover n'étaient pas publiques. La liste des régions prioritaires n'a pas été rendue publique. Donc, des groupes locaux ont fait des propositions et présenté des plans d'affaires, mais sans savoir que dans la plupart des cas, la province avait déterminé que le financement irait d'abord à une région précise.

M. David Christopherson:

Comment la décision a-t-elle été prise?

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Vous devriez poser la question au ministère.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le sous-ministre?

M. John Knubley:

Je sais que nous faisons preuve d'une diligence rigoureuse à tous les égards. Dans le cas présent, je pense que les enjeux — qui sont aussi liés à la stratégie générale — consistent à savoir quels sont les technologies et les besoins précis de la communauté. Cela nous ramène encore une fois à la question de la technologie, en partie. Le problème, c'est que le service à large bande peut-être déployé de multiples façons dans une région: services câblés, services mobiles, messagerie texte, satellites. Sur le plan de la technologie, il faut notamment prendre en compte les exigences particulières de chaque région.

Dans ce cas précis, j'aimerais expliquer pourquoi l'optimisation des ressources est si complexe. Vous comprendrez, étant donné la région d'où vous venez, qu'il s'agit des communautés les plus éloignées qui soient. On parle du nord du Québec et du nord de l'Ontario.

M. David Christopherson:

Désolé de vous interrompre, monsieur le sous-ministre, mais j'ai très peu de temps. En fait, mon temps est probablement déjà écoulé. Théoriquement, des décisions sur l'affectation des fonds ont été prises, mais puisque les informations n'ont pas été rendues publiques, nous ne le savons pas vraiment. Selon le vérificateur général, les ressources n'ont pas nécessairement été optimisées. C'est une façon imagée de dire qu'une main invisible s'occupe de tout répartir, et il est difficile d'exiger des comptes, puisque les informations ne sont pas publiques.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Nous passons à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais poursuivre sur la question de l'optimisation des ressources pour quelque temps.

Lorsqu'elles investissent, les entreprises de télécommunications cherchent à rentabiliser leur investissement sur trois ans. C'est le délai qu'elles se donnent. À quelle vitesse le gouvernement doit-il rentabiliser son investissement, selon vous? La question s'adresse au BVG.

Le président:

Messieurs Berthelette et Le Goff, n'importe lequel d'entre vous peut répondre.

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Nous n'avons pas étudié cet aspect pendant la vérification, monsieur le président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Selon vous, les télécommunications sont-elles strictement de nature commerciale, ou devraient-elles être considérées comme des infrastructures publiques?

M. Jerome Berthelette:

Monsieur le président, je pense que le ministère a déjà indiqué, d'une certaine façon, que cela répond à la fois à des impératifs commerciaux et à l'intérêt public.

Le président:

Permettez-moi d'interrompre brièvement la discussion. Je pense qu'il faut reconnaître que nous discutons parfois de politiques, mais il convient de se rappeler que le rôle du vérificateur général n'est pas de juger de la validité des politiques, mais de déterminer s'il est possible ou non d'assurer la prestation efficace d'une politique donnée. Je pense que tous les membres du Comité doivent garder à l'esprit que la vérification visait, selon les paramètres établis, à examiner la politique et à déterminer, je suppose, si les ressources étaient optimisées. Toutefois, si on en venait à la conclusion que le Canada n'a pas réussi à créer et à mettre en oeuvre une stratégie nationale visant à améliorer... Voilà l'objet de la vérification.

Nous nous égarons parfois dans toutes sortes d'autres sujets; c'est peut-être le moment idéal de s'informer auprès du ministère, mais les vérificateurs ne brosseront pas un portrait général de la connectivité au Canada. Ils examinent des questions très précises, et je pense que les questions que nous leur posons doivent être axées là-dessus. Nous pouvons aborder des aspects qu'ils ont peut-être examinés, mais nous ne devrions pas absolument pas traiter des politiques, car les choses fonctionnent ainsi: le gouvernement établit la politique, les ministères en assurent la prestation et les vérificateurs vérifient si les ministères ont fait leur travail.

Si je suis un conservateur et que je n'aime pas une politique libérale, ce comité n'est pas l'endroit pour en discuter. Le gouvernement établit la politique, les ministères en assurent la prestation et les vérificateurs déterminent s'ils l'ont fait de manière optimale.

Si vous avez des questions sur le processus, vos questions aux vérificateurs devraient porter sur la vérification. Pour tout autre sujet, veuillez poser vos questions aux gens des ministères.

Monsieur Graham.

(1015)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Respectueusement, monsieur le président, je cherche à savoir si les ressources ont été optimisées dans ces circonstances.

Le président:

Très bien.

M. John Knubley:

Monsieur le président, je pourrais peut-être donner le point de vue du ministère au sujet de l'optimisation des ressources. À notre avis, ce qui comptait dans le programme Brancher pour innover, c'était la mobilisation des fonds. Comme nous l'avons dit dès le départ, et comme l'ont fait valoir les représentants du Bureau du vérificateur général, il était question d'un pour un. L'investissement est passé de 500 millions de dollars à 1 milliard de dollars. Dans le cadre de l'évaluation des projets, nous avons aussi évité le chevauchement des activités, si vous le voulez, et avons veillé à ce que les activités d'une entreprise n'empiètent pas sur celles d'une autre. Je le répète: nous tentions de régler un problème précis.

La question d'échelle et de technologie est visée par l'optimisation des ressources et à notre avis, il est très important d'en tenir compte. Il n'est pas seulement question de régler le problème aujourd'hui; il est aussi question pour les entreprises qui participent aux projets d'investir pour améliorer la technologie au fil du temps. De plus, il faut tenir compte du nombre de collectivités desservies.

À notre avis, il n'est pas seulement question d'argent et de la concurrence des entreprises du secteur privé qui participent aux projets. Il y a d'autres enjeux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais poser une dernière question aux représentants du Bureau du vérificateur général avant de passer au CRTC.

Est-ce que le Bureau du vérificateur général participe — ou a participé — au programme Échanges Canada?

M. Jerome Berthelette:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y participez-vous activement?

M. Jerome Berthelette:

Pas activement, je crois, mais nous y avons participé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, merci.

Je reviens au CRTC. J'aimerais que nous reprenions là où nous nous étions arrêtés tout à l'heure.

En ce qui a trait au mandat du CRTC, s'il était élargi pour lui permettre de mettre un terme aux monopoles et à l'abus de pouvoir, ou d'obliger certaines entreprises à desservir une collectivité tout entière, est-ce que le CRTC serait à l'aise avec cela?

M. Ian Scott:

C'est une question hypothétique. Je pourrais peut-être aussi tenter de répondre à la question de M. Arseneault.

Le rôle du Conseil est de superviser l'industrie. Cela revient à la conversation que nous venons d'avoir sur la possibilité pour le CRTC de modifier l'objectif associé au service de base, sur l'objectif premier des télécommunications à titre de service universel... offrir les services téléphoniques à tous les ménages.

Les fournisseurs ont l'obligation de servir la population. Nous n'avons pas éliminé cette obligation. La concurrence est présente dans la plupart des régions et nous misons sur cette concurrence dans la mesure du possible. Lorsqu'il n'y en a pas, nous utilisons tout de même des outils de réglementation détaillés plus traditionnels pour surveiller les services offerts. Le Fonds pour un réseau à large bande est le moyen que nous voulons utiliser — et que nous utiliserons — à titre de mesure incitative et d'outil pour atteindre l'objectif en matière de services à large bande dans ces régions plus difficiles à servir.

(1020)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand pourra-t-on présenter une demande par l'entremise du Fonds pour un réseau à large bande?

M. Ian Scott:

Les cartes, qui représentent la dernière étape du processus, ont été mises à jour récemment; c'est une étape importante pour les demandeurs. Nous avons publié ce qu'on appelle un guide de décision à la Saint-Valentin à titre de cadeau pour les collectivités plutôt que pour l'industrie.

Le guide du demandeur, si l'on veut, est une trousse d'instructions qui permet aux parties de comprendre exactement ce qu'ils doivent présenter et comment le faire. Nous acceptons les commentaires à ce sujet afin de veiller à ne rien oublier et à ce que le guide soit bien compris. La période de consultation est en cours. Dès qu'elle sera terminée, nous prendrons des décisions au sujet des premiers appels de propositions, qui seront lancés au cours des prochains mois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Où en sommes-nous avec la revente des services par fibre?

M. Ian Scott:

Pardon?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À l'heure actuelle, on peut revendre la DSL et le câble, mais pas la fibre. Quand allez-vous obliger les entreprises dotées d'infrastructures de fibre optique à revendre le service, à l'offrir aux revendeurs?

M. Ian Scott:

Si vous parlez de la fibre à la maison, M. Seidl pourra vous parler de ce qui se passe actuellement au Québec et en Ontario.

Chris?

M. Christopher Seidl (directeur exécutif, Télécommunications, Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes):

Nous avons en place des tarifs provisoires pour la revente de la fibre; elle est donc possible. Nous n'avons pas établi de tarifs définitifs, mais nous y travaillons et ils seront communiqués dans quelques mois. La revente est possible en Ontario et au Québec à l'heure actuelle, et nous travaillons à l'offrir dans l'ensemble du pays.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Seidl et monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Kelly, vous avez la parole.

M. Pat Kelly:

Monsieur Knubley, en réponse à la question de M. de Burgh Graham, vous avez parlé de plusieurs façons d'optimiser les ressources. Le rapport du vérificateur général énonce clairement qu'Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada n'avait pas mis en oeuvre son programme Brancher pour innover de manière à garantir l'expansion de la large bande avec les fonds publics investis. Le programme ne prévoyait pas de mesures pour atténuer le risque que le financement du gouvernement entraîne un déplacement des investissements du secteur privé.

Je vous demanderais de réitérer votre acceptation des constatations du vérificateur général et vos remarques précédentes.

M. John Knubley:

L'optimisation des ressources est toujours un enjeu et nous sommes d'accord avec le vérificateur général: dans le cadre de notre travail, nous devons y accorder une attention particulière; elle doit être une priorité. Nous avons fait valoir que, dans ce cas précis, le programme était offert dans les régions les plus éloignées du pays où le secteur privé n'avait pas grand intérêt à investir. Il est donc important de comprendre que l'optimisation des ressources ne vise pas uniquement l'investissement concurrentiel du secteur privé.

Elle vise aussi à débloquer des fonds dans les provinces et les collectivités, et à veiller à ce que la technologie puisse aider ces collectivités à long terme.

M. Pat Kelly:

Je comprends. Il n'y a pas d'investissement du secteur privé à déplacer, parce qu'il n'est pas rentable pour les fournisseurs du secteur privé d'investir dans ces régions éloignées. Je ne dirais pas qu'il y a eu déplacement des fonds privés parce que vous avez engagé des fonds qui n'ont pas été égalés.

M. John Knubley:

Je vais vous donner quelques exemples de projets. L'un d'entre eux a été réalisé dans le Nord du Québec, en collaboration avec le gouvernement de la province. En fait, ce partenariat pourrait servir de modèle en vue d'une stratégie de collaboration intégrée. Nous avions des demandes communes et des investissements communs. Nous avons octroyé de 90 à 100 % des fonds, selon les régions, parce que personne d'autre ne voulait investir.

Au Nord de l'Ontario, cinq collectivités sont desservies par satellite. Encore là, le secteur privé investit dans la technologie, mais pour ce qui est de passer à la fibre optique...

M. Pat Kelly:

Très bien. Je comprends cela, mais dans son rapport, le vérificateur général fait valoir que le programme visait à éviter le déplacement des investissements du secteur privé, et se demande si le ministère n'a pas failli à son devoir; si le ministère...

(1025)

M. John Knubley:

Je reformulerais peut-être la phrase et je dirais non pas que nous avons failli à notre devoir, mais que nous sommes d'accord avec le vérificateur général, et je soulignerais que pour chaque projet associé à la large bande dans les régions rurales et éloignées, les défis, l'équilibre, l'investissement public et l'investissement du secteur privé... nous tentons de réaliser le projet de manière à ne pas chasser les investisseurs qui auraient autrement investi dans la région.

M. Pat Kelly:

C'est le but, nous sommes tous d'accord là-dessus. Je comprends cela.

M. John Knubley:

C'est pourquoi il est difficile d'offrir le service à large bande.

M. Pat Kelly:

Je comprends...

M. John Knubley:

Je dirais aussi — et vous pourrez vous adresser aux représentants du Bureau du vérificateur général par la suite — que le vérificateur général s'est concentré sur l'étape de conception de notre projet. Nous avons franchi cette étape et nous parlons maintenant...

M. Pat Kelly:

Très bien.

M. John Knubley:

... de ce qui a été mis en oeuvre.

M. Pat Kelly:

Je vais donner la parole à Mme Setlakwe pour le temps qu'il me reste.

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

Je crois que ce que dit le vérificateur général, c'est que nous n'avons pas demandé aux entreprises ou aux demandeurs pourquoi un investissement public était nécessaire. Nous croyons avoir évalué ce point. Nous ne leur avons pas demandé de se prononcer là-dessus de façon précise, mais nous en avons tenu compte dans notre évaluation des demandes. C'est une chose.

M. Pat Kelly:

Merci.

Monsieur Le Goff.

M. Philippe Le Goff:

Oui. J'ajouterais qu'il n'y avait aucun mécanisme en place pour vérifier si le projet aurait été financé par le secteur privé à un coût moins élevé.

M. Pat Kelly:

Merci.

Le président:

Je n'ai pas d'autres questions, mais habituellement, j'explique à nos invités que lorsque nous nous réunissons de la sorte, nous préparons ensuite un rapport. Ainsi, les analystes m'ont transmis quelques questions à cette fin.

Avant d'y arriver, je dirais que bien qu'il s'agisse d'un sujet très technique, la réunion est télévisée et bon nombre de Canadiens peuvent la regarder, parce que c'est un sujet qui les intéresse... Il se peut aussi qu'ils la regardent distraitement. Comme l'a fait valoir M. Christopherson, la majorité des Canadiens vivent dans des régions urbaines et se disent peut-être: « Des problèmes de connectivité? Quels problèmes? Je peux jouer en ligne, regarder un film et faire tout plein de choses. »

Toutefois, le rapport du vérificateur général explique les raisons qui ont motivé cette étude, notamment le fait qu'en 2016, environ 96 % des Canadiens vivant dans les régions urbaines avaient accès à une connexion Internet à large bande de 50 mégabits par seconde pour le téléchargement en aval et de 10 mégabits par seconde pour le téléchargement en amont, mais que seulement 39 % des Canadiens vivant dans les régions rurales et éloignées avaient accès à de telles vitesses.

Je représente une circonscription qui n'est pas tellement éloignée, mais très rurale. Dans cette circonscription du centre de l'Alberta, il y a ce qu'on appelle les « zones particulières ». Lorsque je me rends dans ces zones pour une réunion, je sais que je devrai me résigner à regarder mon téléphone tenter de se connecter au réseau. Cet écart entre les régions urbaines et les régions rurales est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles le Bureau du vérificateur général a décidé d'entreprendre cette étude, qui révèle certains faits troublants, même si la situation s'est améliorée au cours des dernières années.

Je tiens aussi à dire — et certains de nos analystes ont travaillé aux dossiers autochtones par le passé — qu'au paragraphe 1.8 de son rapport, le Bureau du vérificateur général souligne que le Conseil avait indiqué que la technologie à large bande était une « technologie habilitante et transformatrice », et qu'il avait conclu que tout Canadien n'y ayant pas accès était très désavantagé. Vous le savez, mais je voulais que les gens qui nous regardent comprennent pourquoi cet enjeu est si important.

Les gouvernements ont dit vouloir que les soins de santé offerts aux Autochtones et aux personnes qui habitent dans les régions éloignées et rurales soient améliorés. Nous voulons qu'ils aient accès aux soins de santé spécialisés. En vertu de la loi sur les soins de santé universels, l'universalité, l'accessibilité et l'accès raisonnable à la prestation de services communs sont des éléments très importants. Ce sont trois des cinq principes de la Loi canadienne sur la santé. Pour offrir des soins de santé spécialisés dans les régions éloignées, nous avons besoin de la large bande; il faut que ce soit une priorité.

Je crois que nous comprenons tous que cela coûtera cher. La construction de chemins de fer pour desservir les régions éloignées a aussi coûté cher, mais nous avons convenu qu'elle était nécessaire. C'est ce que disent les gouvernements.

Les soins de santé, l'éducation... Si nous voulons que la situation dans les zones autochtones et les régions éloignées du Nord — surtout dans la région est de l'Arctique — s'améliore et qu'elles aient plus de possibilités, il faut une meilleure éducation. Comment pouvons-nous y arriver? Par l'entremise de la large bande. Voilà pourquoi elle est si importante.

Les personnes qui veulent faire des affaires dans ces régions particulières, dans les régions rurales — les nouvelles entreprises à domicile sont nombreuses —, misent entièrement sur l'accès à la large bande. Voilà une autre raison.

Il nous reste 15 minutes, alors vous m'excuserez pour cette lancée.

Ensuite, à la page 19 du rapport, on parle du manque de transparence du processus de sélection. À mon avis, c'est un grave problème, et nous en avons parlé aujourd'hui.

(1030)

M. David Christopherson:

Bravo!

Le président:

Voilà où se trouve le problème, pour la plupart des Canadiens qui nous regardent.

Le programme Brancher pour innover était associé à un financement de 500 millions de dollars destiné aux candidats retenus. Il a reçu 892 demandes, totalisant 4,4 milliards de dollars. Dans certains cas, des projets multiples se chevauchaient dans les régions.

Voici le problème: « Nous avons constaté que le Ministère avait utilisé un processus en trois étapes pour évaluer les demandes. D’abord, il a étudié toutes les demandes et évalué leur bien-fondé. » C'était la présélection initiale. « Ensuite, des représentants du Ministère et du cabinet du Ministre ont évalué les options de financement, chacune comprenant une combinaison différente de projets admissibles. » Enfin, à la troisième étape, « le Ministre accordait une approbation conditionnelle à l’égard des projets retenus. » Toutes ces étapes — peut-être pas la première, mais les deux autres — peuvent être politisées et peuvent être problématiques. Je ne dis pas qu'il s'agissait d'un obstacle, mais qu'on pourrait le percevoir ainsi.

Au paragraphe 1.57, le Bureau du vérificateur général a « constaté que le choix des projets était fondé sur un certain nombre de facteurs, mais que le guide de préparation des demandes ne précisait pas le poids relatif de chaque critère utilisé dans le processus de sélection. » Les gens qui présentaient une demande ne savaient pas quelle importance on accordait à chacun des critères. « Les projets qui ne correspondaient pas aux priorités des provinces et des territoires étaient moins susceptibles d’être financés. Or, ces priorités n’ont pas été rendues publiques. Nous sommes d’avis que le Ministère aurait dû publier le poids relatif des critères et les priorités. »

Le ministère est-il d'accord avec cela?

M. John Knubley:

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais revenir en arrière. Il y a trois...

Le président:

Non, répondez simplement à cette question pour le moment.

M. John Knubley:

La réponse, c'est que nous n'avons pas attribué de poids parce qu'il y a différentes solutions dans différentes régions. Nous évaluons les besoins communautaires et les exigences technologiques, ce qui varie d'un endroit à l'autre. Selon nous, il ne convient pas d'établir un ensemble précis de poids.

Le président:

Très bien. Merci.

Passons à la conclusion, que M. Christopherson et d'autres ont déjà évoquée, et, là encore, nous pouvons voir que « [le] Canada n’avait pas défini ni mis en œuvre de stratégie nationale pour améliorer la connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées pour les services Internet à large bande en vue d’atteindre un niveau de service donné dans ces régions. »

Comme je l'ai dit, je représente une de ces régions rurales, et cette situation pose problème.

Notre analyste nous a suggéré une question que nous pourrons inclure dans notre rapport. Cela concerne les réponses à la recommandation 1.60, à savoir qu'ISDE « devrait informer les parties prenantes de la date de disponibilité, de l'emplacement, de la capacité et du prix prévus de l'infrastructure de base à laquelle ils auront accès », et ce, en temps opportun. Comment le ministère a-t-il informé les promoteurs de projets retenus que l'information sur le prix de l'accès sera rendue publique en temps opportun au fur et à mesure que les accords de contribution seront signés?

Madame Gravelle.

(1035)

Mme Michelle Gravelle (directrice générale, Secteur des sciences et de la recherche, ministère de l'Industrie):

Pour être admissibles au programme Brancher pour innover, les demandeurs devaient s'engager à accorder un accès ouvert à l'infrastructure. Tous les accords de contribution contiennent des dispositions à cet égard. À mesure que les accords de contribution sont finalisés, une des exigences est d'assurer un accès ouvert.

Le président:

En quoi, le cas échéant, est-ce différent de ce qui a été recommandé par le Bureau du vérificateur général?

Mme Michelle Gravelle:

C'était l'intention dès le départ; cela figurait parmi les exigences du programme. Ce travail venait de commencer au moment de l'audit. Puisque le programme n'était pas encore entièrement mis en oeuvre, il était impossible que tout soit prêt sur le plan de l'accès ouvert.

Le président:

Le Bureau du vérificateur général a-t-il fait une recommandation?

Une voix: C'était la recommandation, oui.

Le président: Ce n'est donc pas différent de ce que le Bureau du vérificateur général...?

M. John Knubley:

Le facteur temps y est pour quelque chose. Au bout du compte, nous avons donné suite aux recommandations du Bureau du vérificateur général, mais les questions soulevées dans le cadre de son examen portaient sur la conception du programme.

Le président:

Très bien. Donc, le Bureau du vérificateur général a remis en question la conception du modèle d'exécution.

M. John Knubley:

Au final, lorsque nous avons mis en place le programme, je crois que nous avons fait de notre mieux pour régler ce problème précis.

Le président:

Vous dites que, dans le plan d'action, même si le Bureau du vérificateur général a remis en question la conception...

M. John Knubley:

Oui, c'était à l'étape de la conception, lorsque nous cherchions à déterminer comment exécuter le programme. Ensuite, lorsque nous l'avons offert concrètement, nous avons suivi la démarche recommandée.

Le président:

Très bien. D'accord.

M. John Knubley:

Est-ce assez clair?

Le président:

Oui, eh bien, je crois que c'est une piste de réponse.

Au sujet de votre réponse à la recommandation 1.81, à savoir qu'ISDE devrait favoriser l'établissement de marchés secondaires pour les portions de spectre non utilisées dans les régions mal desservies, le ministère a-t-il déjà effectué une analyse sectorielle afin de déterminer quelles seraient les conséquences si l'on imposait l'accès, par un marché secondaire, au spectre inutilisé? Là encore, c'est un problème qui existe depuis bien des années: après chaque achat de spectre, tout le monde s'empresse de le déployer à Calgary, mais les régions éloignées sont laissées pour compte.

Le ministère a-t-il déjà effectué une analyse sectorielle afin de déterminer quelles seraient les conséquences si l'on imposait l'accès, par un marché secondaire, au spectre inutilisé?

Mme Michelle Gravelle:

Je commencerai par dire que nos règles permettent certaines activités de délivrance de licences, et c'est relativement facile, mais cela dit, les fournisseurs n'accordent pas beaucoup de licences. Nous avons fait des démarches pour mieux comprendre ce problème; dans le cas des petits fournisseurs de services, nous essayons de voir quels sont les défis auxquels ils font face et, pour ce qui est des grands fournisseurs, nous tâchons de mieux comprendre pourquoi ils n'octroient pas de licences.

Les consultations sont en cours auprès des parties prenantes. Nous cherchons à déterminer quels sont les obstacles précis aux transactions sur le marché secondaire.

M. John Knubley:

Monsieur le président, j'ai mentionné tout à l'heure que nous avons consulté les petits fournisseurs de services Internet. En somme, nous les consultons sur ces mêmes questions et nous essayons de trouver la meilleure façon de procéder.

Le président:

Je sais que cette consultation a eu lieu, et je me réjouis d'entendre M. Scott dire que le ministère vient de publier les cartes. J'en avais pris connaissance en 2013 ou 2014, j'en suis sûr. Nous publions maintenant les cartes pour montrer les régions où l'accès aux services à large bande fait défaut, mais nous menons des consultations à n'en plus finir pour savoir pourquoi il n'y a pas de services dans les régions mal desservies qui se trouvent à l'extérieur des grands centres urbains.

Y a-t-il une date butoir pour les consultations?

M. John Knubley:

Non. Il s'agit de consultations permanentes.

J'aimerais simplement passer à un autre point. En ce qui concerne nos ventes aux enchères — et c'est pertinent —, nous imposons des conditions de déploiement. Je le répète, nous avons essayé — et le vérificateur général a soulevé cette question dans son rapport — d'élargir nos conditions de déploiement afin que nous puissions obtenir le genre de résultats dont vous parlez, monsieur le président. Même si le ministère n'impose pas l'accès, par un marché secondaire, au spectre inutilisé, il essaie de plus en plus, dans le cadre de ses efforts de déploiement du spectre, d'imposer des conditions aux intervenants pour veiller à ce qu'il y ait ce genre d'utilisation.

Le président:

La question que les analystes m'ont transmise est la suivante: qu'est-ce que le ministère a appris des consultations qu'il a menées? Or, vous dites que ces consultations se poursuivent en permanence. Est-ce le genre de chose qui fera l'objet d'une évaluation à un moment donné? Je pose la question parce que les consultations durent depuis quatre ans. S'il s'agit des mêmes consultations, je n'en suis pas sûr, mais est-ce qu'elles sont évaluées régulièrement ou, sinon, quand le seront-elles? Il n'y a pas de date butoir; c'est une pratique permanente.

(1040)

Mme Lisa Setlakwe:

En ce qui concerne la vente aux enchères du spectre, je me contenterai de dire que les enchères de la bande de 600 mégahertz sont assorties de conditions de déploiement. Nous menons des consultations sur toutes ces questions avant de faire une annonce. En fait, nous comprenons le problème que présente l'acquisition du spectre qui n'est ensuite pas déployé ou utilisé; c'est pourquoi nous exigeons des conditions de déploiement. Nous entendons les mêmes préoccupations, et nous prenons des mesures chaque fois que nous avons l'occasion de remédier à la situation.

M. John Knubley:

Encore une fois, pour vous donner un exemple concret, lorsque nous avons lancé les enchères de la bande de 600 mégahertz, une partie de l'information que nous avons recueillie au cours de ces consultations nous a amenés à décider de réserver 40 mégahertz.

Bref, c'est un processus continu, mais nous utilisons l'information dans l'application de nos politiques à la délivrance de licences et au spectre.

Le président:

Très bien. Merci.

Monsieur Scott, tout à l'heure, M. Christopherson était en train de prononcer un discours — ou ce n'était pas un discours, mais...

M. David Christopherson:

Ce l'était probablement.

Le président:

Oui, c'était donc un discours.

Je vous ai donné la parole, mais j'ai été trop vite. Je ne sais pas si vous vous rappelez de quoi il était question à ce moment-là, mais j'ai l'impression que vous m'avez fait signe que vous vouliez intervenir, mais je vous ai oublié.

M. Ian Scott:

Je ne pense pas. Je crois que c'était quand M. Arseneault a soulevé la question, et je n'en étais qu'au début de ma réponse. Tout compte fait, je crois lui avoir peut-être répondu dans le cadre d'une autre intervention. Si ce n'est pas le cas, je serai heureux de m'entretenir avec lui après la réunion.

Le président:

Vous y êtes donc revenu. Très bien. Je vous en remercie, et je suis désolé de vous avoir coupé la parole.

Chers témoins, sur votre chemin de retour vers vos bureaux respectifs, vous vous direz peut-être que vous n'avez pas eu assez de temps pour répondre à une question de façon suffisamment détaillée. Vous songerez peut-être à d'autres renseignements que nous pourrions utiliser dans notre étude et que vous auriez aimé nous fournir sur le coup, mais vous n'en avez pas eu le temps. Je vous invite donc à nous faire parvenir tout supplément d'information le plus rapidement possible. Si vous voulez approfondir un des points que vous avez soulevés, n'hésitez pas à le faire. Nous en tiendrons compte officiellement dans le cadre de notre étude.

Nous vous remercions infiniment du travail que vous accomplissez dans un dossier très difficile. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, lorsque les gouvernements veulent apporter des améliorations qui touchent le bien-être de nombreux Canadiens, la solution consiste à s'asseoir autour de la table, et nous espérons tous que vos efforts seront couronnés de succès. Alors, bonne continuation.

Merci d'avoir été des nôtres.

Sur ce, la séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard pacp 33322 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on February 21, 2019

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.