header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under rnnr...

  1. 2019-02-05: 2019-02-05 RNNR 126
  2. 2019-02-07: 2019-02-07 RNNR 127
  3. 2019-02-19: 2019-02-19 RNNR 128
  4. 2019-02-26: 2019-02-26 RNNR 130
  5. 2019-04-02: 2019-04-02 RNNR 131
  6. 2019-04-04: 2019-04-04 RNNR 132
  7. 2019-04-30: 2019-04-30 RNNR 134
  8. 2019-05-07: 2019-05-07 RNNR 135
  9. 2019-05-14: 2019-05-14 RNNR 136
  10. 2019-05-30: 2019-05-30 RNNR 137
  11. 2019-06-20: 2019-06-20 RNNR 140

Displaying the most recent stories under rnnr...

2019-06-20 RNNR 140

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1605)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good afternoon, everybody. I hope everybody is doing well. I know that everybody's quite excited about today's events and the fact that this is our last official act before we can all go home.

Before we get going, Minister, I want to say thank you to a number of people, starting with our clerk and our analysts.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: We all started this journey three years ago. Richard, Shannon, T.J. and I were all original members of this committee and gang. We've come a long way since then.

Speaking for myself, I know that I never would have made it this far if it weren't for the support of everybody on this side of the table. Thank you very much. I honestly can't thank you enough. You've been tremendous. There were lots of times, I will readily admit, when I wasn't sure what I was doing.

A voice: We were going to point that out.

The Chair: Yes, I know. Actually, sometimes you did.

I also want to say thank you to all the committee members. For four years now, we've prided ourselves in having a committee in which we worked incredibly well together. We disagreed at times, but we did so respectfully.

As a result, we've had a committee that other people have looked at with envy, I think, and it's something that we should all be very, very proud of. Thanks to all of you. It's been my pleasure to work with all of you. Honestly, it has. I hope to see all of you again in the fall, and I know you feel the same way too.

Also, there are the other people behind us. They're the ones who really add a lot to this equation as well. Without all of you, none of us could do our jobs, so I want to thank everybody who's on the perimeter of this room.

Voices: Hear, hear!

The Chair: You make it all happen.

An hon. member: Except for the water people.

The Chair: Except for the water people. They want to make sure we get out of here quickly, David.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Minister, I want to thank you. I know you've had a busy schedule for the last couple of days. We've had to move the time for this meeting a number of times, and you've been quite gracious in accommodating us and making yourself available. I believe you're in Calgary right now. We're grateful that you were able to make some time to do this.

You only have an hour, we know, so I'm going to stop talking now and turn the floor over to you. Thank you for joining us, Minister.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi (Minister of Natural Resources):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and good afternoon, everyone.

I first of all want to acknowledge something that is on everyone's mind today, which is the passing of a colleague and a friend to many. On behalf of our government and my family, I want to extend my deepest condolences to the family of Mark Warawa, my colleague, and to our colleagues from the Conservative Party and many others who have lost a friend today.

I would also like to take a moment to recognize that I am speaking to you from Treaty No. 7 territory. Such acknowledgements are important, particularly when we are meeting to talk about doing resource development the right way. Our government's approach to the Trans Mountain expansion project and the start of the construction season is a great example of that—of resource development done right.

Let me also begin by recognizing that I know this expansion project inspires strong opinions on both sides—for and against—and with respect to both sides of the debate, I want to assure everyone that our government took the time required to do the hard work necessary to hear all voices, to consider all evidence and to be able to follow the guidance we received from the Federal Court of Appeal last August.

That included asking the National Energy Board to reconsider its recommendation, taking into account the environmental impact of project-related marine shipping. It also included relaunching phase III consultations with indigenous groups potentially impacted by the project, by doing things differently and engaging in a meaningful two-way dialogue.

On that note, I would like to take a moment to sincerely thank the many indigenous communities that welcomed me into their communities for meetings over the last several months. I appreciate your openness, your honesty and your constructive ideas and sincerity of views.

Honourable members, no matter where you stand on TMX, this decision is a positive step forward for all Canadians. It shows how in 2019, good projects can move forward when we do the hard work necessary to meet our duty to consult indigenous peoples and when we take concrete action to protect the environment for our kids, grandkids and future generations.

When we came into office, we took immediate steps to fix the broken review system the Conservatives left behind. When the risks made it too difficult for the private sector to move forward, we stepped in to save the project. When the Federal Court of Appeal made its decision back in August of 2018, we made the choice to move forward in the right way.

When we finished this process, we were able to come to the right decision to deliver for workers in our energy sector, for Albertans and for all Canadians, a decision to support a project that will create jobs, diversify markets, support clean energy and open up new avenues for indigenous economic prosperity in the process.

Where do we go from here, now that the expansion has been approved? While these are still early days, we have a clear path forward for construction to begin this season and beyond. The Prime Minister laid out a lot of this on Tuesday afternoon as he announced our decision. Minister Morneau expanded on some of these details when he was in Calgary yesterday, talking about the road ahead and about launching exploratory discussions with indigenous groups interested in economic participation and about using TMX's revenues to ensure Canada is a leader in providing more energy choices.

We have also heard from the Trans Mountain Corporation about both its readiness and its ambition to get started on construction. Ian Anderson, the CEO of the Trans Mountain Corporation, made this very clear yesterday.

(1610)



That's also what I heard when I visited with Trans Mountain Corporation workers yesterday in Edmonton. There were a number of contractors there. They are ready to proceed on the expansion of the Edmonton terminal, as well as on many of the pumping stations that are required to be built in this expansion.

The message is clear. We want to get shovels in the ground this season, while continuing to do things differently in the right way.

The NEB will soon issue an amended certificate of public convenience and necessity for the project. It will also ensure that TMC has met the NEB's binding pre-construction conditions. The Trans Mountain Corporation, meanwhile, will continue to advance its applications for municipal, provincial and federal permits. We stand ready to get the federal permits moving.

As all of that is happening, our government continues to consult with indigenous groups, building and expanding our dialogue with indigenous groups as part of phase IV consultations by discussing the potential impacts of the regulatory process on aboriginal and treaty rights and by working with indigenous groups to implement the eight accommodation measures that were co-developed during consultations, including building marine response capacity, restoring fish and fish habitats, enhancing spill prevention, monitoring cumulative effects and conducting further land studies.

We are also moving forward with the NEB's 16 recommendations for enhancing marine safety, protecting species at risk, improving how shipping is managed and boosting emergency response.

What is the bottom line? There is no doubt that there are a lot of moving parts. This is a project that stretches over 1,000 kilometres, but it is moving forward in the right way, as we have already proven with our $1.5-billion oceans protection plan, our $167-million whale initiative, our additional $61.5 million to protect the southern resident killer whale, and our investment of all of the new corporate tax revenues, as well as profits earned from the sale of TMX, in the clean energy projects that will power our homes, businesses and communities for generations to come.

Before making a decision, we needed to be satisfied that we had met our constitutional obligations, including our legal duty to consult with indigenous groups potentially affected by the project, upholding the honour of the Crown and addressing the issues identified by the Federal Court of Appeal last summer.

We have done that. We accomplished this by doing the hard work required by the court, not by invoking sections of the Constitution that don't apply or by launching fruitless appeals, both of which would have taken longer than the process we brought in.

While Conservatives were focused on making up solutions that wouldn't work, we focused on moving this process forward in the right way. We have confirmation of that, including from the Honourable Frank Iacobucci, former Supreme Court justice, who was appointed as a federal representative to provide us with oversight and direction on the revised consultation and accommodation process.

I will close where I began, which is by saying that we have done the hard work necessary to move forward on TMX in the right way, proving that Canada can get good resource projects approved and that we can grow the economy and deliver our natural resources to international markets to support workers, their families and their communities, all while safeguarding the environment, investing in clean growth and advancing reconciliation with indigenous peoples.

Mr. Chair, I think this is a good place to stop and invite questions.

Thank you so much once again for having me here today.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

Mr. Hehr, you're going to start us off, I believe.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Just prior to my asking questions of the minister, I'd like to applaud the chair for his exceptional work and leadership for this committee. You've done excellent work.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Hon. Kent Hehr: Minister, it's a thrill to have you back. I was in Calgary yesterday for Minister Morneau's presentation and his address to the Economic Club of Canada in Calgary. The excitement was present in the air, and there was a hop in the step of people in the room, which was good to see.

I think it's fair to say that last year's Federal Court of Appeal decision came somewhat out of the blue. The court said—and it was clear—that we needed to do our indigenous consultation better and our environmental considerations better.

I was chatting with Hannah Wilson in my office this morning, and I learned that this is happening not only here in Canada but also in the United States. In the case of Keystone XL, Enbridge Line 3 and other energy projects around the United States, the courts have been clear that this is the way things need to be done. Our government is trying to see that through, with indigenous consultation and environmental protections being at the forefront.

What was done differently this time, in consideration of the court decision that we were working with?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

The process we put in place this time was quite different from what was done in past consultations.

First of all, we co-developed the engagement process with input from indigenous communities. We provided proper training to our staff and we doubled the capacity of our consultation teams. They worked tirelessly to engage in a meaningful two-way dialogue.

We also provided participation funding to indigenous communities so they could properly participate in the consultation process. We held more meetings and we met with indigenous communities in their communities. I personally held 45 meetings with indigenous communities and met with more than 65 leaders to listen to and engage with their concerns.

I am very proud of the outcome. We are offering accommodations to indigenous communities to deal with their concerns over fish, fish habitat, protection of cultural sites and burial grounds, as well as issues related to oil spills, the health of the Salish Sea, the southern resident killer whales, underwater noise and many others.

The accommodations we are offering, Mr. Chair, actually go beyond mitigating the impact of this project and will also go a long way toward resolving some of the issues and repairing some of the damage that has been done through industrial development in the Salish Sea. They will respond to many of the outstanding issues that communities have identified, related not only to this project but also to many of the other cumulative effects of the development that communities have experienced.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you for that, Minister.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is important to Calgarians. In fact, it's in the public interest. It not only provides jobs for Albertans but also provides us an opportunity to get fair prices for our oil. None of that is possible without shovels being in the ground, so to speak. What steps must take place before that can happen? Will shovels be in the ground this construction season?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, as I said in my opening remarks, the National Energy Board will issue the certificate in the next couple of days. I was in Edmonton and had a chance to meet with workers and some of the contractors. They're ready to get down to work and they're preparing some of the work that does not require regulatory approval. The company can start mobilizing the contractors and subcontractors. They can start mobilizing their workers. They can start bidding for reconstruction work that is necessary and they can start applying for permits.

As we heard from the Trans Mountain Corporation, they're planning to put shovels in the ground by September. The goal is to complete the construction by mid-2022 so that we can start flowing the oil to markets beyond the United States.

It is very important, Mr. Chair, to understand that 99% of the oil we sell to the outside world goes to one customer, which is the United States. It is a very important customer for us. We need to expand our market with them, but we need to have more customers than one, because we are selling our oil at a discount and losing a lot of money. Over the last number of decades, the situation has remained the same. We want to make sure that this situation changes. That is why getting this project moving forward in the right way and starting construction is very important, not only to Alberta workers but also to all Canadians.

(1620)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Part of the approval of the pipeline was deeply linked to meaningful consultation with indigenous peoples. Are there ways we are ensuring that indigenous peoples meaningfully benefit from Trans Mountain in terms of jobs and other opportunities?

Also, I've heard some exciting things around possible equity stakes. Can you inform us about any of those conversations?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Yes, and a large number of indigenous communities have signed benefit agreements with the company. Those amount to close to $400 million of economic opportunities for indigenous communities. There are other communities that are still in discussions about economic benefits.

As Minister Morneau stated here in Calgary, he is launching a process whereby indigenous communities can explore options to purchase the pipeline or make other financial arrangements. This is something that I have personally heard, Mr. Chair, from a large number of communities that are interested in seeking economic opportunities for their communities to benefit from resource development. We see a lot of potential in that, and Minister Morneau is going to be leading that. Ownership by indigenous communities could be 25% or 50% or even 100%.

We are also providing funding for indigenous communities so that they'll be ready to participate in that process.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Hehr.

Ms. Stubbs is next.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Thank you, Chair. I too want to express that I've really enjoyed working with you and with all the members of this committee over the past four years.

Thank you, Minister, for joining us in committee today in response to my request, through a motion that was supported here, to give some concrete details about the Trans Mountain expansion, which your government has approved formally for the second time now in two and a half years.

I want to start with something you mentioned. The backgrounder indicated, and you have just stated as well, that the government-owned Trans Mountain Corporation is required to seek approvals from the National Energy Board for construction and continued operation. I understand there will be several hearings required by the NEB in relation to the route of the pipeline before construction can start. Can you tell us exactly what the timeline will be for those hearings?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

As many of us will remember, the National Energy Board imposed a number of conditions on this project. Trans Mountain Corporation, like any other private company, would have to comply with those conditions and respond to the NEB, and would need to apply for those permits. As you heard from CEO Ian Anderson, they are putting a process in place to work with the NEB to get those permits issued in an expedited way. The construction is supposed to be starting in mid-September.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Minister. Of course, the Trans Mountain expansion used to be owned by a private company, but now, of course, it's a wholly owned subsidiary of the Government of Canada, which is why I'm asking you. It's also one reason, I assume, that your government delayed by a month your decision, which was supposed to have been made by May 22. I think it would have been reasonable for Canadians to expect all of those authorizations required by the NEB, as well as permits and construction contracts, to be firmed up by the time you gave your second formal approval, after spending billions of dollars and promising that it would be built immediately.

Something else that Ian Anderson said was, as you've indicated, that construction may start in September at the earliest, but that there could still be delays in the construction and completion of the pipeline caused by anti-energy activists and legal challenges. Unfortunately, those are the same risks that were posed to the project when you first approved it in 2016.

Can you tell us specifically what your government's plan is to deal with multiple legal challenges that will be filed by the project's opponents and other levels of government?

(1625)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, first of all, we have done the consultations in a way that reduces the chances of litigation. If somebody does challenge this decision in the Federal Court of Appeal, we are in a very good position to demonstrate that we have discharged our duty to consult by having extensive consultations and by keeping a record of the consultations.

It's also very important, Mr. Chair, to understand that unlike Conservatives, we will not undermine the due process that needs to be followed. We will not cut corners on the regulatory steps that need to be taken by the proponent in this case in relation to the NEB. Conservatives wanted us to cut corners at every step; we refused to do that. That is why we have reached this decision.

We owe it to Alberta workers. We owe it to the energy sector workers to do this.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It is not the case that Conservatives have ever advocated for any steps at the NEB to be skipped. Those steps, of course, were all followed and completed when Kinder Morgan, the private sector proponent, was advancing the Trans Mountain expansion, after which you failed to provide the legal and political certainty for them to go ahead.

Ian Anderson has also indicated that the court injunction remains in place, so what is your government prepared to do if foreign-funded or domestic anti-energy protestors seek to hold up construction?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

As I said earlier, unfortunately energy sector projects such as [Technical difficulty—Editor] controversial because of the steps taken by the Stephen Harper government to polarize Canadians by not respecting Canadians' right to participate and by gutting the environmental protections that were put in place. We will do whatever we can to ensure that this project moves forward in the right way.

In the case of an injunction, I understand that an injunction is in place and we expect anyone who is going to participate in any form of activity to do that within the rule of law. The rule of law will be respected, but I'm not going to speculate on something that has not happened. Our goal is to reduce the tension. Our goal is to reduce the polarization.

I'm confident that the work we have done over the last seven months will allow us to demonstrate to Canadians that we followed due process and are offering accommodations that appropriately deal with the concerns of indigenous communities.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Part of the concern is that literally last year, one week before the Federal Court of Appeal said you failed in your indigenous consultations last time around, you said you believed that your process would hold up. Then the Prime Minister, the finance minister and the natural resources minister all promised legislation to give the legal and political certainty needed for the private sector proponent to proceed. Then you didn't deliver, and then you attacked anyone who suggested the very thing your own Prime Minister promised.

Let's just look at costs quickly, since this is a really important aspect to taxpayers now that you've put them on the hook. The Parliamentary Budget Officer says that if you miss this year's construction season, it will cost taxpayers billions of dollars more and that these increases in construction costs will reduce the sale value of the pipeline and drop the value of the asset.

Can you explain exactly what the cost to taxpayers will be for the construction and completion of the Trans Mountain expansion?

(1630)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

It is very important that we see moving forward on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion as an investment in Alberta's economy, in the Canadian economy, in the workers of Alberta. They deserve that support. We are providing them that support because having not a single pipeline to get our resources to non-U.S. markets has hurt our potential in Canada.

We—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Of course, Minister, the vast majority of—

The Chair:

Your time is up, Ms. Stubbs—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

—product shipped through TMX will go to U.S. refineries, and the only two export pipelines have been cancelled by your government.

The Chair:

Ms. Stubbs, your time is up. Thank you.

Mr. Cannings is next.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you, Minister, for being with us today.

I'm going to pick up on that commentary about first nations consultation and accommodation. It was this aspect that caused the Federal Court of Appeal to rule against the government last year.

After the announcement that you were okaying the permit, I heard an interview with Chief Lee Spahan of the Coldwater band on CBC, and I've read interviews with him in the press since then. He said that “the meaningful dialogue that was supposed to happen never happened”. This is since the court case, and in that court case, the appeal court said that “missing from Canada's consultation was any attempt to explore how Coldwater's concerns could be addressed.”. This was a band that really wanted accommodation and demanded meaningful accommodation, as the courts have said, and they're saying that it hasn't happened.

I talked to Rueben George of the Tsleil-Waututh recently. They're not happy either.

How confident are you that we're not going back to litigation? It seems that the hard work that needed to be done still has not been done.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

First of all, we acknowledge and appreciate the diversity of opinions on this project among indigenous communities, as among other Canadians.

I have met with Chief Lee a number of times. I have met with leadership of the Tsleil-Waututh, with the former chief and with Chief Leah, who is the current chief, to talk about these issues. As far as Coldwater is concerned, our discussions with them are continuing. There are a number of options we are exploring with them to deal with their outstanding issues.

Our consultation doesn't end because the approval of this project has been given. We will continue to work with them.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

They're saying that the questions they asked last February—February of 2018—still haven't been answered.

You've just said, I think twice—both in your introductory remarks and in your responses to Ms. Stubbs—that really the only reason we need to build this pipeline.... We've gone through a heck of a lot in this country to try to get this pipeline built, and apparently the only reason is to get our product to tidewater so that we'll have access to Asia and we'll get better prices.

You know this isn't true. This is just a false narrative. Nobody in the industry is saying that we're going to get better prices in Asia. The best prices for our product are in the United States, and they will be for many, many years to come.

Why are we doing this?

We have these price differentials that happen occasionally. They have nothing to do with the fact that the U.S. is our only customer. It's because there are temporary shutdowns of pipelines to fix leaks or because refineries are getting repairs. That seems to be the reason we have this price differential, which covers only about 20% of our oil exports. Eighty per cent of them get world prices because they're exported by companies that are vertically integrated and have their own upgraders and refineries.

Why are we continuing with his false narrative that we're going to get a better price by getting oil to tidewater when that is simply not true?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I know that this issue has been raised by the NDP before. If you talk to industry folks and to premiers in Alberta who have been advocating this project, from Premier Notley to Premier Kenney, 80% of the capacity of the expansion has already been booked by shippers for up to 20 years. That demonstrates to you that there's a demand. The existing pipeline has been full for the last number of years. There's a capacity that is required, and we believe that building this capacity will allow us to get those resources to the global market.

I'm really disappointed to hear the Conservative members saying that TMX will not get our resources to global markets. I hope that the Conservative members will have discussions with Premier Kenney and will be better engaged on that file. The premier has been advocating for this project because it allows us to get a better price and expand our markets beyond the U.S.

(1635)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I want to get one more question in before my time is up.

Basically, you're admitting that we're not going to get a better price and that the reason we're building this pipeline is that it's an expansion project because the industry wants to expand its operations in the oil sands.

None of the risks that caused Kinder Morgan to walk away from this project have been alleviated. B.C. is still asserting its rights to protect the environment. Many first nations are still steadfastly against it. Vancouver-Burnaby is against it. The Prime Minister has said repeatedly that the government can give the permits, but only communities can give permission. How are you going to convince them that this pipeline is in the national interest?

It's a project that will fuel expansion of the oil sands and increase our carbon emissions when we're desperately trying to reduce them. This isn't about getting a better price for our oil; it's about expanding our oil production.

I think this is an opportune time.... When you were considering this decision, you could have said, “Let's join the rest of the world and move toward a no-carbon future.” Building a pipeline is locking us into a future that just won't be there in 20 or 30 years, so why are we doing this?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

The building of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion does not undermine or hinder our ability to meet our Paris Agreement commitments. We are putting a price on pollution. We are phasing out coal. We are supporting investment in public transit. Every dollar earned from revenue from this project will actually be invested back into a greener and cleaner economy so that we can accelerate our transition to a clean economy.

We all know that as the world transitions, there will still be a demand for oil, and our oil resources are developed in a sustainable way. The intensity of the emissions from the oil sands is continuing to decline, and we are supporting the industry to further reduce that intensity. We want to be the supplier of the energy that the world needs and at the same time use the resources and the revenue to accelerate that transition. It's a win-win situation for our economy: creating jobs at the same time as protecting our environment and dealing with the impacts of climate change.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Whalen is next.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I also wanted to pass along some thanks to the interpreters in the booth, the technical folks and the staff who sit behind us and prepare us for these meetings. This wouldn't be able to happen without you.

Minister, this is a great week for Canada. I'm really excited about the prospect of Trans Mountain. You've been a leader in our party not only on the infrastructure file, but since you've taken over this very delicate but economically vital matter of twinning of the Trans Mountain pipeline. You've been a very steady hand at the wheel.

I just want to get a sense from you of how important it is not only to you personally but also to Albertans to have this significant victory in finally getting an opportunity to triple the capacity of this pipeline.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

This is a very important project for our country. This is a project that is in the public interest. This is a project that will create thousands of jobs in Alberta, in British Columbia and in the Atlantic provinces.

As we all know, the growth of the energy sector in Alberta has provided opportunities for many people throughout this country from the Atlantic provinces through Ontario, Quebec and the prairie provinces. When we were in Fort McMurray the last time with the Prime Minister, we met with workers from British Columbia who were working in Fort McMurray.

This is about prosperity for all Canadians. It's very important for us to recognize and communicate this. This is about expanding our global markets. It's very disappointing that the Conservatives say that we don't need to expand our global markets and that we can continue to rely on the U.S. The U.S. is a very important customer for us, but we did the hard work necessary to get to this stage and we will continue to do the hard work necessary to ensure it gets to completion.

(1640)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much, Minister.

In your opening remarks, you chastised the Conservatives for wanting to do appeals and for taking the legislative route. I must admit that I was also nervous about the path that had been chosen. You and the Minister of Finance convinced me that it was the right way and, of course, I guess now I have to admit that I was wrong on this and you were right, so congratulations on that.

I also have found that some of the opposition rhetoric on this project—including at today's meeting, when the member suggested that somehow we should have begun the process of obtaining permits and entering into construction contracts prior to the completion of the process—demonstrates a fundamental misunderstanding of how this process is meant to work. How irresponsible would it have been to prejudge the outcome or to have rushed this court-required and constitutionally required process?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think it is very important that we make sure to follow the proper processes and procedures put in place for the NEB and our proponents. Whenever you undermine them, whenever you undercut them, you get into trouble and good projects get delayed.

Going back to why the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion got into this situation in the first place, in 2013 and 2014, when the initial review was started, the decision was made by the Stephen Harper government to not do the review to understand the impact of marine shipping on the marine environment and to—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'm sorry, Mr. Minister, but were all those decisions and mistakes that were highlighted in the Federal Court of Appeal decision made when the Conservatives where in power?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

No. I think we need to take some responsibility as well. They made the mistake of not including the marine shipping and its impact on the marine environment, and we did not do a good job on the consultation. I take full responsibility for that. That's why we need to do better. We need to improve our process to ensure that good projects can move forward.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

We've had a lot of difficulty until very recently on clearing exploratory drilling on the east coast, and of course we have the injunction on TMX. Bill C-69 seems to achieve the right balance and seems to push us beyond the mistakes that existed in CEAA 2012 to ensure these types of mistakes don't happen again. Are you confident that's the case?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I am a firm believer that if Bill C-69 had been in place in 2013 when this review was started, the Trans Mountain pipeline would have been completed by now and would have been in operation, delivering our resources to non-U.S. markets. It is very important, because we are fixing a broken system.

As far as the exploratory oil wells in the Atlantic provinces are concerned, having a regional review done actually expedited some of that work.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

We were very excited to see that completed in December to provide an off-ramp from exploratory drilling and massive environmental assessments on a well-by-well basis. That's a great initiative from your and Minister McKenna's departments.

Another concern that's been expressed to me is that we want to make sure the Canadian building trades have access to as much of the work on the Trans Mountain expansion as possible. I know there are different thresholds and limits in other projects. How can we ensure that Canadian workers benefit as much as possible from this megaproject?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

When we creating jobs, we want to make sure that Canadian workers are able to benefit from that job growth. The building trades have been engaging with Minister Morneau's officials to see what role they can play. They have the expertise and the know-how, and they are workers who have been building pipelines for a long time. We want to tap into their expertise, and Minister Morneau is exploring options with them to see what role they can play in the construction of the pipeline.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

As a final very short question, there's been some scuttlebutt at the table here about whether or not a constitutional right is implicated in this process. I'm perhaps not as close to this issue as you are, but do you feel that the section 35 rights of indigenous peoples are implicated by the expansion, and was that something that we were trying to make sure we got right with Bill C-69?

(1645)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

In the work we have done on the consultation of late for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in the thoroughness and the meaningful two-way conversation and engagement that we had, and the assurance from Justice Iacobucci that we have corrected the defects and remedied what the Federal Court of Appeal wanted us to by engaging in meaningful two-way dialogue, I am confident that we have fully discharged our duty to consult with indigenous communities.

I know some people, particularly Conservative politicians, wanted us to make consultation with indigenous communities optional in Bill C-69, which could have been devastating for energy sector projects. Then people would have taken us to court and we would have lost every time we went to court, because you cannot fail to fulfill your duty to consult and to meet the constitutional obligation for meaningful consultation with indigenous communities.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I agree.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. Thank you, Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Schmale, you have five minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

It seems the Liberals want it both ways here. They want to criticize this process, yet they approved the pipeline a few years ago in 2016.

I cannot understand how you want to have it both ways. You talk about indigenous consultation. Kinder Morgan had 51 indigenous groups that had signed benefit agreements. Because of your government's handling of this file, it went down to 42, and now you're expecting us to pat you on the back because it's at 48. I can't figure this one out.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think it is very important, and I will encourage the honourable member to look at the Federal Court of Appeal decision. The appeal was very clear that when the decision was made to not undertake the study of tanker traffic and its impact on the marine environment, it was done completely under the Stephen Harper government.

We were in a good process—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We're talking about consultation. You could have used the transport report as your transportation study. You chose not to. We're talking about consultation here.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

You cannot do that. You have to discharge your duty to consult, which means that you have to engage in a two-way meaningful dialogue. Relying on a transportation report is not a substitute for discharging your section 35 obligations.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Now that the pipeline is owned by the Canadian taxpayer, the finance minister says that your government will sell it only once it has been built. Are Canadians on the hook for any cost overruns? According to the PBO, the cost to build the twinning is around $14 billion.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

As I said earlier, through you, Mr. Chair, this is an investment in Canada. This is an investment in Canadian workers and Canada's energy sector. This is a commercially viable project. We have professionals at the Trans Mountain Corporation who will undertake further analysis and refine cost estimates now that approval has been given. They will refine construction timelines. This is a project that's going to generate close to $70 billion in revenue for Alberta oil producers. This is a project that will generate close to $45 billion of additional revenue for governments. This is a project that will generate half a billion dollars for the federal government, which we will use to transition and accelerate investments in green technologies and green products to make sure that other future generations have clean water, clean air and clean land, and to make sure that we are reducing the impact of climate change.

From every angle you look at it, this is a good investment in Canada and in Canadians.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It didn't have to be an investment in Canadian taxpayer dollars. It could have been private sector dollars that wouldn't cost taxpayers a cent or put them on the hook for these cost overruns that are potentially very real, considering that dozens of permits still need to be given before construction can start.

How much longer will it take to get the permits? How much will it cost?

This week you announced for the first time that Trans Mountain will have to purchase offsets for construction emissions. How much will that cost Canadian taxpayers?

(1650)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

As far as the offsets for the emissions are concerned, that was part of the NEB conditions that were imposed earlier on and part of the commitments the company has made.

As far as permits are concerned, there is a process to get those permits issued. NEB is going to work with the Trans Mountain Corporation to issue those permits.

I think it's very important that we follow due process. I know Conservatives don't respect due process. They don't respect the rule of law and they always encourage us to cut corners, and that's how you get into trouble. We will not cut corners. We want to get the construction going on this project in the right way.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Under the Conservative government, four pipelines were built and three more were in the queue. Now none of those major companies that build pipelines are doing business in Canada. They are now doing business in other countries, but you keep going on with your line of answer.

Going back to federal permits again, you didn't really give me an idea of how many more permits need to be administered and given before construction can be built. Also, will Canadian taxpayers will be on the hook for the overruns, and have you budgeted for that possibility?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, for large projects such as this, there are always municipal, provincial and federal permits required, and there's a process in place to get those—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Since you've had nine months since the court order was given, how come you did not instruct your department to start work on applying for these permits and getting them ready to go so that you could start construction immediately?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

After the NEB recommended approval, it was just two months.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, what the honourable member is saying would have been devastating for this project. The member is suggesting that we should have approved permits prior to having approval—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It's in response to the NEB recommendation.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, your time is up. I'm going to let him finish.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Mr. Chair, it's very important to understand that giving approval to permits prior to the approval of the projects would have undermined administrative justice and would have undermined the due process. It is irresponsible for anyone to suggest that we not respect the process for proper approval of this project, because that is very important and it would have been devastating for energy workers.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's an NEB problem.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Thank you, Mr. Schmale.

Ms. Damoff is next.

Ms. Pam Damoff (Oakville North—Burlington, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to the members of the committee for letting me join you today.

Minister, I'm proud to be part of a government that takes climate change seriously and knows that pollution can no longer be free. We can't just sit back and do nothing, which is what the Conservatives are doing. We know that a price on pollution is recognized globally as the most effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and change behaviours.

Minister, I've heard from constituents in my riding who are expressing concern over the approval of TMX and the fact that the government is building a pipeline at the same time that we declared a climate change emergency. People like Chris, a young man who's passionate about climate change and feels we need to be doing more to transition from a carbon economy, has spoken to me a number of times. I know that he was very upset about the TMX approval. I have constituents in Oakville North—Burlington who are passionate about climate change and the environment. Groups like Halton Environmental Network, the Halton Climate Collective, Citizens' Climate Lobby, Oakvillegreen and BurlingtonGreen work tirelessly in our communities to combat climate change.

Minister, could you explain to these groups and to my constituents like Chris how we can justify TMX while also seriously tackling the climate change emergency that we face in Canada?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

First of all, I'd like to thank the member so much for her leadership on sustainability. We've often discussed how we can provide options for people so that they can make choices that are sustainable.

I want to assure Chris and I want to assure the environmental leaders and people in your constituency that building the Trans Mountain pipeline does not in any way compromise or hinder our ability to meet our Paris commitments. As a matter of fact, it will help us accelerate our investments into a clean economy, into a green economy, and allow us to meet our Paris commitments. The revenue we will generate from this project will be half a billion dollars once the construction is completed. Multiply that over the next 20 or 30 years. On top of the billions of dollars we're already investing into fighting climate change, that will allow us to do more.

At the same time, we also understand that the production that is happening in the oil sector now needs to move. The best way, the safest way and the most cost-effective way to do that is through pipelines, not through railways, as railways cross so many urban centres. As I heard from many of my colleagues, they would prefer oil moving by pipelines, not rail, because rail, even though it's safe, is not as safe as pipelines, so this is a very good investment. It will allow putting a price on pollution, and it's leadership that our government is demonstrating.

Investing in a thousand public transit projects throughout this country, having better fuel standards, investing in new technologies that allow emissions to go down, building RV electrical vehicle charging stations and investing millions of dollars in incentives for people to buy electric vehicles—all of those things are making a real difference and giving people choices so that they can reduce their impact on the environment.

We are committed. I can tell you that I am so excited about what we are doing. With the building of this pipeline and taking action on climate change, we can grow our economy. We can create thousands of jobs for hard-working Canadians and at the same time make a real difference in the protection of the environment.

(1655)

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Thank you, Minister. I have only about a minute left.

When the previous government talked about consultation, it really just meant showing up, telling people what they were doing and then moving ahead anyway. From a number of meaningful conversations I've had with your parliamentary secretary, I know you went into communities, talked to stakeholders and indigenous communities, and took that feedback. How did those consultations result in changes to what we're doing with TMX?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think one of the fundamental differences is how we engaged with the communities, and also how we responded to their concerns. There are more accommodations offered in this than ever was done in the past. We're actually dealing with the cumulative impacts of development. We are engaging in how we better respond to spills; how we prevent spills from happening; how we protect water, fish, fish habitat, southern resident killer whales; how we protect cultural sites and burial grounds and all of those things that have been identified by indigenous communities.

Another thing that we have done differently is that we have engaged at the political level. You know, pipelines are controversial. The northern gateway was controversial. Energy east was controversial. The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion was controversial and is still controversial, but I compare the effort that we have put in and the effort that I have personally put in through the 45 meetings that I have held with indigenous communities. I compare that effort with the few meetings the Conservative ministers held with indigenous communities. For 10 years under Stephen Harper, ministers made no effort to actually meet with indigenous communities and listen to their concerns and then work with them to resolve those concerns. We have put our time in and we are very proud of the work we have done.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. Thank you, Ms. Damoff.

We can go for about 10 more minutes. We're in a five-minute round. What I propose is to go four minutes, four minutes and two minutes. That way Mr. Cannings gets to finish it off. I think that's fair under the circumstances.

Ms. Stubbs, you have four minutes with a hard cap.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thanks, Chair.

Minister, as a person who is part Ojibwa and as a person who represents nine indigenous communities in Lakeland that are all involved in oil and gas and support pipelines, I really hope that this time the indigenous consultation process implemented by your government holds up. I did want to say this: I thought the one that you guys implemented in 2016, before you approved it, would have held up too. I mean that sincerely, and I hope, for the sake of all Canadians and for the execution of the project, that this remains the case. There was of course a missed opportunity in cancelling the northern gateway and losing the opportunity to redo it.

I just want to clarify what we are saying in terms of your government's mismanagement of the timelines around ensuring certainty around the permits, the contracts and the hearings, and why this is a detriment to the project.

What we are talking about is that when the NEB recommendation for approval was made in April—for the second time—your cabinet was supposed to have responded on May 22, and I suggest to you that every Canadian would think it would be utter insanity to think that your cabinet was even considering rejecting the Trans Mountain expansion, given that you spent $4.5 billion on it in tax dollars last year.

What we are talking about is the timeline that elapsed between the NEB's second approval of the Trans Mountain expansion and the announcement your cabinet made on Tuesday. That is when all of the details and all of the specifics should have been firmed up and certain so that the Tuesday announcement was not just literally the same announcement you made in November of 2016, after which literally nothing got done. Construction could have been able to start immediately. You could have been accountable to Canadians and taxpayers by giving the precise start date, end date, completion date, operation and cost.

It's mind-boggling to me that a federally owned project with a federally owned builder, with a federal government decision, failed to secure the federal government authorizations, as well as the provincial and municipal authorizations that surely you would have known were required for construction to start. That is the certainty you must provide Canadians so that they believe you that the Trans Mountain expansion will actually be built.

I think it's very clear that there never has been a concrete plan for construction to start.

(1700)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think that—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I want to tell you I've heard from drillers in my riding that banks are revoking their loans—

The Chair:

Ms. Stubbs, if he does want to answer the question, I suggest you give him an opportunity.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It wasn't a question. I was just clarifying that point.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

With due respect, your understanding is completely wrong. With the utmost respect for you, MP Stubbs, what you were suggesting would have actually gotten us into trouble, because when the Federal Court made the decision in August of 2018, they quashed the decision. There was no project.

We gave new approval on Tuesday to this project. Issuing any permits prior to Tuesday's decision would have been in violation of the procedures under NEB. It would have been taken to court, and we would have lost. We would have done more damage with what you were suggesting.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The reality is that you spent $4.5 billion tax dollars last year and promised Canadians that the expansion would be built immediately.

Here we are today. You have given a second approval and you have not a single concrete detail or specific plan to assure Canadians when it will start being built, when it will be completed, when it will be in operation and what the costs will be.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Stubbs. That's all of your time.

Mr. Graham is next.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister.

Very quickly, Mr. Chair, I just want to add to the comments. This is the fifth standing committee that I have joined in this Parliament, and you have been a very easy-going chair, very easy to get along with. When things get tense, you just go zen. It's a really good skill to have. Don't lose it.

Minister, when Kinder Morgan owned Trans Mountain, where did the profits go?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

They went to their shareholders.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Where will they go now?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Now, as long as government owns it, they will remain with the government, so Canadians will benefit from those profits.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That money will go to the green transition, as we've talked about.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

That is the goal. The half billion dollars that government will earn in additional tax revenue and corporate revenue will go into a green fund to accelerate our investments into a clean and green economy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many conditions are attached to this approval? Can you give us a sense?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

There are 156 conditions by the NEB, and there were 16 recommendations made by the NEB that we have adopted that allow us to deal with the cumulative impact of the project.

If I may say so, I think it's very important, Mr. Chair, to note that what MP Stubbs was suggesting would actually have gotten us into trouble. Issuing permits or even talking about permits prior to the approval would have been a violation of the procedures, and they would have been challenged.

We do have a plan in place to start construction, and the NEB is going to issue a certificate. They're going to put a process in place for the permits to be issued, and the construction is going to start. The preliminary work can start any time and the construction is going to start on this project in September.

(1705)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kind of pressure is not having this expansion in place putting on our rail system, and is it affecting, for example, our grain shipments?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Thank you so much for actually raising that question. It is very important, because if we don't build the pipeline capacity, oil going to be transported and it will be transported by rail. We have at least seen more oil being shipped by rail, putting pressure on other commodities that need to be shipped. There are not only issues around safety, but growth in other natural resource sectors such as forestry and mining is being hindered, and farmers have also identified issues with not being able to ship their products because of the lack of capacity in the rail system.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

We were talking about the green transition earlier. Norway, as an example, managed to put a trillion dollars into their heritage fund, and their debt-to-GDP ratio is negative 90%.

Is investing our revenue and investing in the green transition good for our economy?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

It is, absolutely. Investing in a green economy—in wind, solar, tidal, and geothermal, all of which we are doing—supports and creates green jobs. Those allow us to actually have a better energy mix. Oil and gas will continue to be our energy mix for decades to come, but as we transition, we need to build more renewables. This investment of half a billion dollars ongoing every year will allow us to do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Cannings, you get the last questions and you have only two minutes to do it.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I get the last questions of the Parliament. Okay.

The Chair:

No pressure.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

On Monday we passed a motion here in the House of Commons to declare that we are in a climate crisis, a climate emergency. The IPCC, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, says that we have to act immediately, right now, to tackle climate change.

You talked about spending the profits of this pipeline, $500 million a year, on green initiatives. We've spent $4.5 billion buying this pipeline. That's where the profits of that pipeline went. They went to Texas when we bought that pipeline. Now we're going to spend another $10 billion building it over the next two years. That's about $15 billion we could invest right now in fighting climate change, instead of spending all that money and then waiting two years and then dribbling it out over the next 10, 20 or 30 years. We have to do this now.

I just wonder what sort of economics you are using to try to spin this as a win for climate change. It's just Orwellian.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, we are investing today. We are investing $28 billion in public transit over the next 10 years, and that started in 2016.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

That has nothing to do with the pipeline.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

We are investing $9 billion in green infrastructure, also starting in 2016. We have put a price on pollution that is actually reducing emissions; you have seen that in British Columbia. We are bringing in better fuel standards.

I was in my province supporting a solar farm, where two-cycled capturing of energy is tested. We were in my province a couple of months ago, where we are investing in geothermal energy. If that demonstration is commercialized, it will create 50,000 jobs in Alberta. We are doing all those things. We want to accelerate that by investing this additional revenue.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cannings.

Minister, thank you. You get the last word.

Thank you all again.

Minister, I appreciate your making the effort to accommodate us today. Your schedule has been tight, to say the least. We wish you a safe journey back home.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Alberta is my home, so I am home.

The Chair:

You've always been very gracious in accommodating us and coming to the committee too, so thank you for that.

A voice: And thank you for sparing us for tomorrow morning.

The Chair: Yes, thank you for sparing us for tomorrow morning. There's ending on a high note.

Thank you, everybody. We will see you when we see you. Good luck to all.

Let me just say again that it's been a real honour to do this. Thank you.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: We are adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1605)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bonjour à tous. J'espère que vous vous portez tous bien. Je sais que vous êtes tous très emballés par les événements d'aujourd'hui et par le fait que c'est la dernière loi officielle que nous allons étudier avant de pouvoir rentrer à la maison.

Avant d'amorcer nos délibérations, monsieur le ministre, je tiens à remercier un certain nombre de personnes, en commençant par notre greffière et nos analystes.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Nous avons tous entrepris cette aventure il y a trois ans. M. Canning, Mme Stubbs, M. Harvey et moi étions tous des membres du Comité original et de cette bande. Nous avons fait beaucoup de chemin depuis.

Personnellement, je sais que je n'aurais jamais survécu aussi longtemps sans le soutien de tous les membres de ce côté de la table. Je vous en remercie infiniment. En toute honnêteté, je ne saurais trop vous remercier, car vous avez été formidables. J'admets volontiers que, bon nombre de fois, je n'étais pas sûr de prendre les bonnes mesures.

Une voix: Nous allions le mentionner.

Le président: Oui, je sais. En fait, vous l'avez parfois mentionné.

Je tiens également à remercier tous les membres du Comité. Pendant quatre ans, nous nous sommes enorgueillis de siéger au sein d'un comité dont les membres travaillaient incroyablement bien ensemble. Nous n'étions pas toujours d'accord, mais nous exprimions notre désaccord de façon respectueuse.

Par conséquent, les autres députés regardaient notre comité avec envie et, selon moi, c'est un résultat dont nous devrions tous être très fiers. Je vous en remercie tous. J'ai été heureux de travailler avec chacun de vous. Honnêtement, c'est le cas. J'espère vous revoir tous, cet automne, et je sais que vous ressentez la même chose.

De plus, il y a d'autres personnes qui nous appuient, des personnes qui apportent vraiment une importante contribution. Sans vous tous, aucun de nous ne pourrait faire son travail. Je tiens donc à remercier toutes les personnes qui travaillent dans le périmètre de cette salle.

Des voix: Bravo!

Le président: Vous assurez le succès de toute l'opération.

Un député: Sauf en ce qui concerne les porteurs d'eau.

Le président: Sauf en ce qui concerne les porteurs d'eau. Ils veulent s'assurer que nous quittons la salle rapidement, monsieur de Burg Graham.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur le ministre, je tiens à vous remercier de votre présence. Je sais que votre emploi du temps des deux ou trois derniers jours a été bien rempli. Nous avons été forcés de modifier l'heure de la séance à plusieurs reprises, et vous avez eu la bonne grâce de nous accommoder et de vous rendre disponible. Je crois que vous êtes à Calgary en ce moment. Nous sommes contents que vous ayez été en mesure de prendre le temps de comparaître devant notre comité.

Nous savons que vous disposez d'une heure seulement. Je vais donc cesser de parler et vous céder la parole. Merci de vous être joint à nous, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi (ministre des Ressources naturelles):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Bonjour à tous

Je tiens tout d'abord à reconnaître ce que tout le monde a en tête aujourd'hui, c'est-à-dire le décès d'un collègue et ami d'un grand nombre de personnes. Au nom du gouvernement et de ma famille, je tiens à offrir mes plus sincères condoléances à la famille de mon collègue, Mark Warawa, à mes collègues du Parti conservateur et aux nombreuses autres personnes qui ont perdu un ami aujourd'hui.

Je voudrais aussi prendre un moment pour reconnaître que je vous adresse la parole depuis le territoire du Traité no 7. Cette reconnaissance est importante, en particulier au moment où nous nous réunissons pour parler de l'exploitation adéquate des ressources. L'approche adoptée par notre gouvernement à l'égard du projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain, ainsi que le début de la construction au cours de cette saison, en est un parfait exemple.

Permettez-moi également de commencer par reconnaître que je suis conscient que cet agrandissement suscite des arguments solides des deux côtés — des « pour » et des « contre ». Nous respectons les deux côtés du débat, et je tiens à vous assurer que notre gouvernement a pris le temps nécessaire et n'a ménagé aucun effort pour faire le travail nécessaire, pour entendre toutes les voix, pour examiner tous les éléments probants et pour être en mesure de suivre l'orientation donnée par la Cour d'appel fédérale en août dernier.

Ce travail consistait, entre autres, à demander à l'Office national de l'énergie de réexaminer sa recommandation, en tenant compte des incidences environnementales de la navigation maritime liée au projet. Il s'agissait également de relancer les consultations de la phase III auprès des Autochtones potentiellement touchés par le projet, en faisant les choses différemment et en nouant un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif.

À ce sujet, j'aimerais prendre quelques instants pour remercier sincèrement les nombreuses collectivités autochtones qui m'ont accueilli sur leur territoire pour des rencontres au cours des derniers mois. J'ai aimé votre ouverture, votre honnêteté, vos idées constructives et la sincérité de vos opinions.

Honorables députés, peu importe votre position sur le projet TMX, cette décision est un pas dans la bonne voie pour tous les Canadiens. Elle montre qu'en 2019, les bons projets peuvent aller de l'avant lorsque nous faisons le travail acharné qui est nécessaire pour nous acquitter de notre obligation de consulter les peuples autochtones, et lorsque nous prenons des mesures concrètes pour protéger notre environnement pour nos enfants, nos petits-enfants et les générations futures.

À notre arrivée au pouvoir, nous sommes intervenus immédiatement pour corriger le système d'examen brisé que les conservateurs nous avaient légué. Lorsque les risques ont rendu trop difficiles les démarches du secteur privé, nous sommes intervenus pour sauver le projet. Lorsque la Cour d'appel fédérale a rendu sa décision en août 2018, nous avons fait le choix d'avancer de la bonne façon.

Et lorsque nous avons terminé ce processus, nous avons pu en venir à la bonne décision, c'est-à-dire celle de servir les travailleurs de notre secteur de l'énergie, les Albertains et tous les Canadiens, une décision visant à soutenir un projet qui créera des emplois, diversifiera les marchés, favorisera l'énergie propre et, ce faisant, ouvrira de nouvelles voies à la prospérité économique des Autochtones.

Alors, quelles seront les prochaines étapes maintenant que l'agrandissement a été approuvé? Même si nous n'en sommes qu'au tout début, nous disposons d'un plan à suivre clair pour que la construction commence cette saison. Le premier ministre a décrit une grande partie du travail qui nous attend mardi après-midi, lorsqu'il a annoncé notre décision. Le ministre Morneau a donné de plus amples renseignements à ce sujet à Calgary hier, lorsqu'il a présenté les prochaines étapes du projet, soit le lancement des discussions exploratoires avec des groupes autochtones intéressés par une participation économique au projet d'agrandissement, et l'utilisation des recettes du projet TMX pour garantir que le Canada est un chef de file pour ce qui est d'offrir plus de choix énergétiques.

La Trans Mountain Corporation nous a également parlé de son état de préparation et de sa hâte de commencer la construction. Ian Anderson, le président-directeur général de la Trans Mountain Corporation, l'a exposé très clairement hier.

(1610)



Et c'est aussi ce que j'ai entendu en rendant visite à des travailleurs de la Trans Mountain Corporation hier, à Edmonton. Il y avait un certain nombre d'entrepreneurs là-bas qui étaient prêts à amorcer l'agrandissement du terminal d'Edmonton, ainsi que la construction de nombreuses stations de pompage qui seront requises pour agrandir le réseau.

Le message est clair. Nous voulons que les travaux commencent cette saison, tout en continuant de faire les choses différemment, mais de la bonne façon.

L'ONE délivrera bientôt le certificat de commodité et de nécessité publiques modifié pour le projet. De plus, l'ONE veillera à ce que la Trans Mountain Corporation remplisse les conditions imposées par l'ONE avant la construction. Entretemps, la Trans Mountain Corporation poursuivra ses démarches pour obtenir les autorisations municipales, provinciales et fédérales nécessaires. Nous sommes prêts à démarrer le processus d'obtention des permis fédéraux.

Au cours de ce processus, notre gouvernement poursuit ses consultations avec des groupes autochtones. Nous renforçons et nous élargissons notre dialogue avec des groupes autochtones dans le cadre de la phase IV des consultations, en discutant des incidences potentielles du processus réglementaire sur les Autochtones et les droits issus de traités et en unissant nos efforts avec ceux des Autochtones afin de mettre en œuvre les huit mesures d'accommodement élaborées conjointement au cours des consultations. Ces mesures consistent, entre autres, à renforcer la capacité d'intervention en mer, à rétablir les poissons et leurs habitats, à améliorer la prévention des déversements, à surveiller les effets cumulatifs et à réaliser d'autres études en milieu terrestre.

Nous allons aussi de l'avant avec les 16 recommandations de l'ONE, des recommandations qui visent à améliorer la sécurité maritime, à protéger les espèces en péril, à améliorer la gestion de la navigation et à renforcer les mesures d'intervention en cas d'urgence.

Quel est le bilan? Il ne fait aucun doute que le train des mesures est en marche. Il s'agit d'un projet qui s'étend sur 1 000 kilomètres, et il avance de la bonne façon. Nous l'avons d'ailleurs déjà prouvé avec notre Plan de protection des océans de 1,5 milliard de dollars, avec notre initiative sur les baleines de 167 millions de dollars, avec notre investissement supplémentaire de 61,5 millions de dollars visant à protéger la population des épaulards résidant dans le Sud, et avec notre réinvestissement de tous les nouveaux revenus de l'impôt des sociétés et des produits de la vente du projet TMX dans les projets d'énergie propre qui alimenteront nos résidences, nos entreprises et nos collectivités pendant des générations à venir.

Avant de prendre une décision, nous devrions être convaincus d'avoir respecté nos obligations constitutionnelles, y compris notre obligation juridique de consulter les groupes autochtones potentiellement touchés par le projet, en plus de maintenir l'honneur de la Couronne et d'aborder les problèmes relevés par la Cour d'appel fédérale l'été dernier.

Nous l'avons fait, et nous l'avons accompli en faisant le travail difficile que le tribunal exigeait, non pas en évoquant des articles de la Constitution qui ne s'appliquent pas ou en lançant des appels futiles, ce qui aurait dans les deux cas été plus long que le processus que nous avons établi.

Alors que les conservateurs cherchaient à inventer des solutions qui ne fonctionneraient pas, nous avons cherché à faire avancer ce processus de la bonne façon. Et nous en avons eu la confirmation, y compris par l'ancien juge de la Cour suprême, l'honorable Frank Iacobucci, qui a été nommé représentant fédéral pour superviser notre travail et orienter le processus révisé des consultations et des accommodements.

Je terminerai donc là où j'ai commencé, c'est-à-dire en mentionnant que nous avons fait le travail nécessaire pour avancer de la bonne façon relativement au projet TMX, prouvant ainsi que le Canada peut faire approuver de bons projets de ressources et que nous pouvons développer notre économie et vendre nos ressources naturelles sur les marchés internationaux pour appuyer les travailleurs, leur famille et leur collectivité, tout en préservant l'environnement, en investissant dans la croissance propre et en faisant progresser la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones.

Monsieur le président, je pense que c'est le moment d'arrêter pour que les membres du Comité puissent poser des questions.

J'aimerais vous remercier infiniment une fois de plus de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Hehr, vous allez amorcer les séries de questions, je crois.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Avant de poser des questions au ministre, j'aimerais féliciter le président de son travail exceptionnel et du leadership dont il a fait preuve au sein du Comité. Vous avez fait un excellent travail.

Des députés: Bravo!

L'hon. Kent Hehr: Monsieur le ministre, nous sommes ravis de vous revoir. J'étais à Calgary hier pour assister à l'exposé du ministre Morneau et à son discours devant l'Economic Club of Canada. Il y avait de l'électricité dans l'air, et les gens dans la salle marchaient avec entrain, ce qui était beau à voir.

Je crois qu'il est juste de dire que la décision rendue l'année dernière par la Cour d'appel fédérale a été plutôt inattendue. La cour a indiqué — et c'était clair — que nous devions mener de meilleures consultations auprès des Autochtones et que nous devions mieux évaluer les incidences environnementales.

Pendant que je clavardais avec Hannah Wilson dans mon bureau ce matin, j'ai découvert que le Canada n'était pas le seul pays à faire face à ce genre de situation. Les tribunaux des États-Unis ont indiqué clairement que, dans le cas du pipeline Keystone XL, de la Canalisation 3 d’Enbridge et d'autres projets énergétiques en voie d'élaboration aux États-Unis, c'est ainsi que les choses doivent être faites. Notre gouvernement tente de donner suite à ces exigences en prévoyant dès le début des consultations auprès des Autochtones et la prise de mesures de protection de l'environnement.

Compte tenu de la décision rendue par la cour, qu'avons-nous fait différemment cette fois?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Le processus que nous avons mis en place cette fois-ci était très différent des consultations menées dans le passé.

Premièrement, nous avons élaboré conjointement le processus de participation, en tenant compte des commentaires des collectivités autochtones. Nous avons offert à nos employés une formation adéquate, et nous avons doublé la capacité de nos équipes de consultation. Nos employés ont travaillé sans relâche afin de nouer un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif.

Nous avons également fourni aux collectivités autochtones un financement afin qu'elles puissent participer adéquatement au processus de consultation. Nous avons organisé un plus grand nombre de réunions, et nous avons rencontré les Autochtones dans leur collectivité. J'ai personnellement participé à 45 réunions avec des collectivités autochtones, et j'ai rencontré plus de 65 dirigeants pour écouter leurs préoccupations et nouer un dialogue avec eux.

Je suis très fier du résultat. Nous offrons des accommodements aux collectivités autochtones afin d'apaiser leurs préoccupations relatives aux poissons, à leurs habitats, à la protection des sites culturels et des lieux de sépulture, ainsi qu'aux problèmes liés aux déversements de pétrole, à la santé de la mer des Salish, aux épaulards résidant dans le Sud, au bruit sous-marin et à un grand nombre d'autres enjeux.

Les accommodements que nous offrons, monsieur le président, vont en fait plus loin que l'atténuation des répercussions du projet TMX, et ils contribueront grandement à résoudre certains des problèmes causés par le développement industriel de la mer des Salish et à réparer certains des dommages occasionnés. Les accommodements régleront bon nombre des problèmes en attente que les collectivités ont signalés, qui sont liés non seulement au projet, mais aussi aux nombreux autres effets cumulatifs du développement de ces collectivités.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je vous remercie de votre réponse, monsieur le ministre.

Le pipeline Trans Mountain revêt une grande importance pour les habitants de Calgary. En fait, ce projet est d'intérêt public. Il fournira non seulement des emplois aux Albertains, mais aussi une occasion pour nous d'obtenir des prix équitables pour notre pétrole. Toutefois, rien de cela ne sera possible sans l'amorce du projet de construction, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi. Quelles mesures doivent être prises avant que cela puisse se produire? La construction commencera-t-elle cette saison?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, l'Office national de l'énergie délivrera le certificat d'ici quelques jours. Je suis allé à Edmonton, récemment, où j'ai eu la chance de rencontrer des travailleurs et des entrepreneurs. Ils sont prêts à se mettre au travail et font tout ce qui ne nécessite pas d'approbation réglementaire pour s'y préparer. L'entreprise peut commencer à mobiliser les entrepreneurs et les sous-traitants. Ceux-ci peuvent commencer à mobiliser leurs travailleurs. Ils peuvent commencer à soumissionner pour les travaux de reconstruction nécessaires et à faire des demandes de permis.

Comme nous l'avons entendu de la bouche des dirigeants de la Trans Mountain Corporation, ils prévoient commencer les travaux d'ici septembre. L'objectif est que la construction du réseau soit terminée d'ici la moitié de 2022, pour que nous puissions commencer à acheminer notre pétrole vers d'autres marchés que les États-Unis.

Monsieur le président, il est très important de comprendre que 99 % du pétrole que nous vendons à l'étranger aboutit chez un seul et même client, soit les États-Unis. C'est un client très important pour nous. Nous devons élargir notre marché avec ce client, mais il nous faut aussi plus qu'un client, parce que nous vendons notre pétrole au rabais et perdons beaucoup d'argent. C'est ainsi depuis des dizaines d'années. Nous voulons que les choses changent. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous voulons que ce projet aille de l'avant de la bonne façon et c'est pourquoi il est si important que la construction commence maintenant, non seulement pour les travailleurs de l'Alberta, mais pour l'ensemble des Canadiens.

(1620)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

L'approbation du pipeline dépendait beaucoup de la tenue de consultations véritables auprès des peuples autochtones. Prenons-nous des moyens pour nous assurer que les peuples autochtones tireront véritablement avantage au projet Trans Mountain, par des emplois et autrement?

De même, j'ai entendu des rumeurs emballantes sur de possibles participations en capital. Pouvez-vous nous informer un peu de la teneur des conversations qui ont lieu?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Oui, il y a un grand nombre de communautés autochtones qui ont signé des ententes sur les avantages avec l'entreprise. Celles-ci représentent des débouchés économiques de près de 400 millions de dollars pour ces communautés autochtones. Il y en a d'autres aussi qui sont toujours en pourparlers pour en signer une.

Comme le ministre Morneau le disait ici, à Calgary, il a entrepris une démarche qui permettra aux communautés autochtones d'explorer les options à leur disposition pour acheter le pipeline ou prendre d'autres dispositions financières. C'est ce que j'ai entendu personnellement, monsieur le président, d'un grand nombre de communautés qui souhaitent vivement profiter des retombées économiques de l'exploitation des ressources. Nous y voyons un grand potentiel, et c'est le ministre Morneau qui dirigera le processus en ce sens. Les communautés autochtones pourraient détenir 25, 50 ou même 100 % du pipeline.

Nous leur offrons aussi du financement pour qu'elles soient prêtes à participer au processus.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Hehr.

C'est au tour de Mme Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je souhaite à mon tour souligner que j'ai beaucoup aimé travailler avec vous et tous les membres du Comité au cours des quatre dernières années.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, de vous joindre au Comité aujourd'hui en réponse à ma demande, grâce à une motion qui a reçu l'appui du Comité, pour que vous veniez nous fournir de l'information concrète sur le projet d'expansion du réseau de Trans Mountain, que votre gouvernement a approuvé officiellement pour la deuxième fois en deux ans et demi.

J'aimerais d'abord vous interroger sur une chose que vous avez mentionnée. Il est écrit dans les notes d'information, et vous venez de le dire aussi vous-même, que l'Office national de l'énergie doit approuver la construction et l'exploitation du réseau de Trans Mountain, qui appartient désormais au gouvernement. Je crois comprendre que l'ONE devra tenir plusieurs audiences pour établir le tracé du pipeline avant que sa construction ne puisse commencer. Pouvez-vous nous dire exactement quel sera le calendrier de ces audiences?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous serons nombreux à nous rappeler que l'Office national de l'énergie a imposé un certain nombre de conditions à la réalisation de ce projet. La Trans Mountain Corporation, comme n'importe quelle autre société privée, devra s'y conformer et répondre aux demandes de l'ONE. Elle devra demander des permis. Comme vous avez entendu le PDG Ian Anderson le dire, l'entreprise est en train de mettre un processus en place, en collaboration avec l'ONE, pour que ces permis lui soient délivrés de manière accélérée. La construction devrait commencer à la mi-septembre.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Bien sûr, le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain était le fait d'une société privée, a priori, mais c'est désormais une filiale en propriété exclusive du gouvernement du Canada. C'est la raison pour laquelle je vous pose la question. Je présume que c'est aussi l'une des raisons pour lesquelles votre gouvernement a retardé sa décision d'un mois, alors qu'elle aurait dû être prise au plus tard le 22 mai. Je pense qu'il aurait été raisonnable de la part des Canadiens de s'attendre à ce que toutes les autorisations exigées de l'ONE, de même que les permis et les contrats pour la construction, soient prêts et assurés avant que vous ne donniez votre deuxième approbation officielle au projet, après avoir dépensé des milliards de dollars et nous avoir promis que ce réseau serait construit immédiatement.

Il y a autre chose qu'Ian Anderson a dit. Il est vrai, comme vous l'avez mentionné, que la construction pourrait commencer en septembre, au plus tôt, mais il pourrait quand même y avoir des retards dans la construction et l'achèvement du pipeline à cause des militants anti-énergie et de contestations judiciaires. Malheureusement, ce sont les mêmes risques que ceux que comportait le projet quand vous l'avez approuvé pour la première fois en 2016.

Pouvez-vous nous dire plus exactement ce que votre gouvernement prévoit faire pour réagir aux multiples contestations judiciaires que déposeront les opposants au projet et les autres ordres de gouvernement?

(1625)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, pour commencer, je dois dire que nous avons fait toutes les consultations nécessaires pour réduire les risques de poursuite. Si quiconque conteste cette décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale, nous sommes très bien placés pour faire la preuve que nous nous sommes acquittés de notre devoir de consultation. Nous avons mené de vastes consultations, dont nous avons tenu des comptes rendus.

Il est très important aussi, monsieur le président, de comprendre que contrairement aux conservateurs, nous ne porterons pas entrave à l'application régulière de la loi. Nous ne tournerons pas les coins ronds quant aux mesures réglementaires que le promoteur doit prendre pour répondre aux exigences de l'ONE, comme dans ce cas-ci. Les conservateurs voulaient que nous tournions les coins ronds à chaque étape, ce que nous avons refusé. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons pris cette décision.

Nous le devons aux travailleurs de l'Alberta. Nous le devons aux travailleurs du secteur de l'énergie.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce n'est pas vrai, les conservateurs n'ont jamais réclamé de négliger l'une ou l'autre des mesures à prendre pour répondre aux exigences de l'ONE. Bien entendu, nous avons pris toutes les mesures requises quand Kinder Morgan, le promoteur privé, a voulu agrandir le réseau de Trans Mountain, c'est vous qui n'avez pas voulu lui fournir les assurances juridiques et politiques nécessaires pour que ce projet aille de l'avant ensuite.

Ian Anderson a également rappelé que l'injonction de lacour demeure en vigueur, donc que votre gouvernement est-il prêt à faire si des militants anti-énergie, financés par des sources étrangères ou nationales, cherchent à freiner la construction du pipeline?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Comme je l'ai dit un peu plus tôt, malheureusement, les projets énergétiques comme [difficultés techniques] sont controversés à cause de tous les efforts déployés par le gouvernement de Stephen Harper pour polariser les Canadiens en ne respectant pas leur droit de participer au processus et en vidant de leur substance les protections environnementales mises en place. Nous ferons tout en notre pouvoir pour que ce projet aille de l'avant de la bonne façon.

Pour ce qui est de l'injonction, je sais très bien qu'il y a une injonction en vigueur, et nous nous attendons à ce que quiconque participe à une quelconque forme d'activité le fasse dans le respect de la loi. La primauté du droit sera respectée, mais je ne m'avancerai pas sur des événements fictifs. Notre objectif est de réduire les tensions. Notre objectif est de réduire la polarisation.

J'ai confiance que le travail que nous avons abattu au cours des sept derniers mois nous permettra de montrer aux Canadiens que nous avons pris toutes les mesures nécessaires, en bonne et due forme, et que nous avons offert des mesures d'accommodement appropriées pour répondre aux préoccupations des communautés autochtones.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Une partie du problème, c'est qu'il y a un an, littéralement une semaine avant que la Cour d'appel fédérale affirme que vous n'aviez pas respecté les exigences de consultations des communautés autochtones la dernière fois, vous disiez croire que les mesures que vous aviez prises suffiraient. Ensuite, le premier ministre, le ministre des Finances et le ministre des Ressources naturelles ont tous promis une loi afin de procurer au promoteur privé toute la certitude juridique et politique nécessaire pour aller de l'avant. Vous n'avez pas tenu promesse et ensuite, vous vous êtes mis à attaquer quiconque proposait exactement ce que votre propre premier ministre avait promis.

Examinons brièvement les coûts, comme c'est un élément très important pour les contribuables, maintenant que vous leur refilez la facture. Le directeur parlementaire du budget affirme que si vous ratez la saison de construction de cette année, il leur en coûtera des milliards de dollars de plus, que cela fera bondir les coûts de construction et réduire la valeur marchande du pipeline, ainsi que la valeur de l'actif.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer exactement combien il en coûtera aux contribuables pour la construction et l'achèvement de l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain?

(1630)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Il faut vraiment voir l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain comme un investissement dans l'économie de l'Alberta, dans l'économie canadienne et dans les travailleurs de l'Alberta. Ils en ont besoin. Nous leur fournissons cette aide parce que nous n'avons aucun pipeline pour acheminer nos ressources jusqu'aux marchés en dehors des États-Unis, ce qui limite beaucoup notre potentiel, au Canada.

Nous...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Bien sûr, monsieur le ministre, la grande majorité des...

Le président:

Vous n'avez plus de temps, madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

... des produits expédiés par TMX aboutiront dans les raffineries américaines, et les deux seuls projets de pipeline d'exportation ont été annulés par votre gouvernement.

Le président:

Madame Stubbs, vous n'avez plus de temps. Merci.

Je donne la parole à M. Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Je vous remercie d'être avec nous aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre.

J'aimerais revenir aux commentaires exprimés sur les consultations et les mesures d'accommodement visant les Premières Nations. C'est justement cet élément qui a poussé la Cour d'appel fédérale à trancher en défaveur du gouvernement l'an dernier.

Après l'annonce selon laquelle vous approuviez le permis, j'ai entendu une entrevue avec le chef Lee Spahan de la bande Coldwater, à la CBC, et j'ai lu divers extraits d'entrevues avec lui dans les journaux depuis. Il affirme que le véritable dialogue qui devait avoir lieu n'a jamais eu lieu, et cela, depuis la décision de la Cour qui a statué ce qui suit: « Le Canada n'a pas exploré les façons de répondre aux préoccupations des Coldwater. » Cette bande souhaitait vraiment obtenir des mesures d'accommodement, elle exigeait de véritables mesures d'accommodement, comme la cour l'a souligné, et son chef affirme qu'on ne leur en a pas consenti.

J'ai également parlé à Rueben George de la Première Nation des Tsleil-Waututh récemment, qui n'était pas content non plus.

Comment pouvez-vous être sûr que vous ne serez pas poursuivi de nouveau? Le travail difficile qui était jugé nécessaire ne semble toujours pas avoir été fait.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Premièrement, nous reconnaissons et accueillons la diversité des opinions à l'égard de ce projet parmi les communautés autochtones, et les autres Canadiens aussi.

J'ai rencontré le chef Lee à maintes reprises. J'ai également rencontré les chefs des Tsleil-Waututh, soit l'ancien chef, ainsi que le chef actuel, le chef Leah, pour parler de toutes ces questions. Dans le cas des Coldwater, nos discussions se poursuivent. Il y a un certain nombre d'options que nous sommes en train d'étudier avec eux pour répondre à leurs préoccupations.

Nous n'arrêterons pas de les consulter parce que ce projet a été approuvé. Nous continuerons de travailler avec tous ces groupes.

M. Richard Cannings:

Ils affirment qu'ils n'ont toujours pas de réponses aux questions qu'ils ont posées en février dernier, en février 2018.

Vous venez de dire, à deux reprises même, tant pendant votre exposé qu'en réponse aux questions de Mme Stubbs, que la seule raison pour laquelle nous avions besoin de construire ce pipeline... On fait des pieds et des mains au Canada pour essayer de construire ce pipeline, mais il semble que la seule raison pour laquelle on veut avoir accès à un port en eaux profondes, c'est pour pouvoir accéder au marché de l'Asie et y obtenir de meilleurs prix.

Vous savez pourtant que ce n'est pas vrai. C'est de la fabulation. Il n'y a personne dans l'industrie qui affirme que nous obtiendrons de meilleurs prix en Asie. C'est aux États-Unis que nous pouvons obtenir les meilleurs prix pour nos produits, et il en sera ainsi encore longtemps.

Pourquoi faisons-nous tout cela?

Il y a occasionnellement des écarts de prix, mais ils n'ont rien à voir avec le fait que les États-Unis soient notre seul client. C'est à cause des fermetures temporaires de pipelines pour colmater les fuites ou parce que les raffineries nécessitent des réparations. Cela semble être ce qui explique les écarts de prix, mais cela ne concerne qu'environ 20 % de nos exportations de pétrole. Pour 80 % de nos exportations, nous obtenons le prix mondial, parce que ce sont des entreprises à intégration verticale qui exportent ce pétrole et qu'elles ont leurs propres raffineries et usines de valorisation.

Pourquoi perpétuer ce mensonge que nous obtiendrons de meilleurs prix en exportant notre pétrole depuis un port en eaux profondes, alors que ce n'est pas vrai?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je sais que ce n'est pas la première fois que le NPD soulève cette question. Parlez-en aux gens de l'industrie et aux premiers ministres de l'Alberta qui ont milité pour ce projet, à la première ministre Notley comme au premier ministre Kenney, et vous verrez que 80 % de la capacité supplémentaire du réseau est déjà réservée par les expéditeurs pour une bonne vingtaine d'années. Cela montre qu'il y a de la demande. L'oléoduc existant fonctionne à plein régime depuis des années. Nous avons besoin de cette infrastructure, et nous croyons que la construction de ce réseau nous permettra d'acheminer ces ressources vers le marché mondial.

Je suis très déçu d'entendre des députés conservateurs prétendre que le projet TMX ne nous permettra pas d'acheminer nos ressources vers les marchés mondiaux. J'espère que les députés conservateurs en discuteront avec le premier ministre Kenney et qu'ils sauront s'informer un peu mieux sur ce dossier. Le premier ministre réclame ce projet, parce qu'il nous permettra d'obtenir de meilleurs prix et d'élargir nos marchés au-delà des États-Unis.

(1635)

M. Richard Cannings:

Je veux poser une autre question avant que mon temps soit écoulé.

Pour l'essentiel, vous admettez que nous n'obtiendrons pas un meilleur prix et que si nous construisons ce pipeline, c'est qu'il s'agit d'un projet d'expansion parce que l'industrie veut étendre ses activités dans les sables bitumineux.

Aucun des risques qui ont fait en sorte que Kinder Morgan a abandonné le projet n'a été atténué. La Colombie-Britannique fait toujours valoir ses droits de protéger l'environnement. De nombreuses Premières Nations sont encore fermement contre le projet. Il en est de même pour les gens de Vancouver-Burnaby. Le premier ministre a dit à maintes reprises que le gouvernement peut donner les permis, mais que seules les communautés peuvent donner la permission. Comment allez-vous les convaincre que ce pipeline sert l'intérêt national?

C'est un projet qui renforcera l'expansion des sables bitumineux et qui augmentera nos émissions de carbone alors que nous tentons désespérément de les réduire. Il ne s'agit pas d'obtenir un meilleur prix pour notre pétrole; il s'agit d'accroître notre production de pétrole.

Je pense que c'est un bon moment... Lorsque vous avez envisagé cette décision, vous auriez pu dire « joignons-nous au reste du monde et allons vers un avenir sans carbone ». La construction d'un pipeline nous enferme dans un avenir qui ne sera tout simplement pas là dans 20 ou 30 ans, alors pourquoi faisons-nous cela?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

La réalisation du projet d'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain ne nuit pas à notre capacité de respecter les engagements que nous avons pris dans l'Accord de Paris. Nous mettons un prix sur la pollution. Nous éliminons progressivement le charbon. Nous appuyons les investissements dans le transport en commun. Chaque dollar tiré des recettes du projet sera réinvesti, en fait, dans une économie plus verte et plus propre de sorte que nous puissions accélérer notre transition vers une économie propre.

Nous savons tous que pendant que le monde opère sa transition, il y aura toujours une demande de pétrole, et nos ressources pétrolières sont exploitées de façon durable. L'intensité des émissions produites par les sables bitumineux continue de diminuer, et nous aidons l'industrie à réduire davantage cette intensité. Nous voulons être le fournisseur de l'énergie dont le monde a besoin et, en même temps, utiliser les ressources et les recettes pour accélérer cette transition. C'est une situation avantageuse pour notre économie: créer des emplois tout en protégeant notre environnement et en faisant face aux répercussions des changements climatiques.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cannings.

C'est au tour de M. Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je veux également remercier les interprètes dans les cabines, les techniciens et les membres du personnel qui sont assis derrière nous et qui nous préparent aux réunions. Tout cela ne serait pas possible sans vous.

Monsieur le ministre, c'est une grande semaine pour le Canada. Je suis très emballé par le projet Trans Mountain. Vous êtes un chef de file au sein de notre parti, non seulement dans le dossier de l'infrastructure, mais aussi depuis que vous avez pris en charge cette question très délicate, mais vitale sur le plan économique du doublement du pipeline Trans Mountain. Vous avez tenu la barre d'une main ferme.

J'aimerais que vous me disiez à quel point c'est important non seulement pour vous personnellement, mais également pour les Albertains d'avoir remporté cette victoire, d'avoir enfin la possibilité de tripler la capacité du pipeline.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

C'est un projet très important pour notre pays. C'est un projet d'intérêt public. Il créera des milliers d'emplois en Alberta, en Colombie-Britannique et dans les provinces de l'Atlantique.

Comme nous le savons tous, la croissance du secteur de l'énergie en Alberta a offert des possibilités à bon nombre de personnes au pays, qu'il s'agisse de gens des provinces de l'Atlantique, de l'Ontario, du Québec ou des provinces des Prairies. Lorsque nous étions à Fort McMurray la dernière fois, avec le premier ministre, nous avons rencontré des gens de la Colombie-Britannique qui travaillaient à Fort McMurray.

Il s'agit de prospérité pour tous les Canadiens. Il est très important pour nous de le reconnaître et de le communiquer. Il s'agit d'élargir nos marchés à l'échelle internationale. Il est très décevant que les conservateurs disent que nous n'avons pas besoin d'élargir nos marchés à l'étranger et que nous pouvons continuer à nous fier aux États-Unis. Les États-Unis sont un client très important pour nous, mais nous avons déployé les efforts qu'il faut pour en arriver là et nous continuerons à le faire pour assurer l'achèvement du travail.

(1640)

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez reproché aux conservateurs de vouloir faire appel et emprunter la voie législative. Je dois admettre que la démarche qui avait été choisie me rendait nerveux moi aussi. Le ministre des Finances et vous m'avez convaincu que c'était la bonne façon de procéder et, bien entendu, j'imagine que je dois maintenant admettre que j'avais tort à cet égard et que vous aviez raison, alors je vous en félicite.

J'ai également constaté qu'une partie de la rhétorique de l'opposition sur ce projet — y compris dans la réunion d'aujourd'hui, lorsque la députée a laissé entendre que nous aurions dû, en quelque sorte, commencer les démarches d'obtention des permis et de passation de contrats de construction avant la fin du processus — révèle une mauvaise compréhension de la façon dont les choses sont censées fonctionner. À quel point aurait-il été irresponsable de préjuger de l'issue ou de précipiter le processus exigé par la cour et par la Constitution?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je crois qu'il est très important que nous veillions à suivre les processus établis pour l'Office national de l'énergie et nos promoteurs. Chaque fois qu'on les compromet, on s'attire des ennuis et de bons projets sont retardés.

Pour revenir à la raison pour laquelle on s'est retrouvé dans cette situation en premier lieu concernant l'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain, en 2013 et en 2014, lorsque l'examen initial a commencé, le gouvernement de Stephen Harper a décidé de ne pas faire l'examen pour comprendre les répercussions du transport maritime sur le milieu marin et...

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis désolé, monsieur le ministre, mais est-ce que toutes ces décisions et ces erreurs qui ont été soulevées dans la décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale ont été respectivement prises et commises lorsque les conservateurs étaient au pouvoir?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Non. Je crois que nous devons assumer une part de responsabilité également. Ils ont commis l'erreur de ne pas inclure le transport maritime et ses répercussions sur le milieu marin, et nous n'avons pas fait du bon travail de consultation. J'en assume l'entière responsabilité. C'est pourquoi nous devons faire mieux. Il nous faut améliorer notre processus pour faire en sorte que les bons projets puissent aller de l'avant.

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous avons eu beaucoup de difficultés jusqu'à tout récemment concernant les forages exploratoires sur la côte Est, et bien sûr, il y a l'injonction concernant TMX. Le projet de loi C-69 semble établir un juste équilibre et semble nous permettre de nous pousser au-delà des erreurs qui existaient dans la LCEE 2012 pour que ces erreurs ne se reproduisent plus. En êtes-vous convaincu?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je suis convaincu que si le projet de loi C-69 avait été adopté en 2013, lorsque cet examen a commencé, le pipeline Trans Mountain serait déjà terminé et serait opérationnel, ce qui nous aurait permis d'offrir nos ressources sur des marchés non américains. C'est très important, car nous sommes en train de réparer un système défaillant.

En ce qui concerne les puits de pétrole exploratoires dans les provinces de l'Atlantique, le fait qu'un examen régional ait été effectué a permis d'accélérer une partie des travaux.

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous étions très enthousiastes de voir cela se terminer en décembre pour fournir une sortie concernant les forages exploratoires et de vastes évaluations environnementales, puits par puits. C'est une excellente initiative de votre ministère et de celui de la ministre McKenna.

Une autre préoccupation qui m'a été exprimée, c'est que nous voulons nous assurer que les métiers du bâtiment canadiens aient accès à la plus grande partie possible des travaux d'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain. Je sais qu'il y a différents seuils et différentes limites dans d'autres projets. Comment faire en sorte que les travailleurs canadiens bénéficient le plus possible de ce mégaprojet?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Lorsque nous créons des emplois, nous voulons nous assurer que les travailleurs canadiens peuvent profiter de cette croissance de l'emploi. Les métiers du bâtiment ont collaboré avec les collaborateurs du ministre Morneau pour voir quel rôle ils peuvent jouer. Ils ont l'expertise qu'il faut et ce sont des travailleurs qui construisent des pipelines depuis longtemps. Nous voulons tirer profit de leur expertise et le ministre Morneau explore avec eux des options pour voir quel rôle ils peuvent jouer dans la construction du pipeline.

M. Nick Whalen:

Ma dernière question sera très brève. Il y a eu des discussions à cette table sur la question de savoir si un droit constitutionnel est visé dans ce processus. Je ne suis peut-être pas touché par cette question autant que vous, mais pensez-vous que l'article 35 sur les droits des peuples autochtones est visé par l'élargissement, et était-ce un élément au sujet duquel nous essayions de bien faire les choses dans le cadre du projet de loi C-69?

(1645)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Dans le cadre des consultations que nous avons menées récemment sur l'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain, avec rigueur et dans un véritable dialogue, ainsi qu'avec l'assurance du juge Iacobucci que nous avons corrigé les défauts et les aspects que la Cour d'appel fédérale voulait que nous corrigions en engageant un véritable dialogue, je suis convaincu que nous avons pleinement rempli notre devoir de consulter les collectivités autochtones.

Je sais que certaines personnes, particulièrement des politiciens conservateurs, voulaient que nous rendions facultative la consultation des communautés autochtones dans le projet de loi C-69, ce qui aurait pu être dévastateur pour les projets du secteur énergétique. Les gens nous auraient alors traînés devant les tribunaux et nous aurions perdu chaque fois, parce que nous ne pouvons pas manquer à notre obligation de consulter et de respecter l'obligation constitutionnelle de mener de véritables consultations auprès des collectivités autochtones.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis d'accord avec vous.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Merci, monsieur Whalen.

Monsieur Schmale, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Il semble que les libéraux veulent le beurre et l'argent du beurre ici. Ils veulent critiquer le processus, mais ils ont approuvé le pipeline il y a quelques années, en 2016.

Je ne comprends pas comment vous voulez avoir le beurre et l'argent du beurre. Vous parlez des consultations auprès des Autochtones. Pour Kinder Morgan, 51 groupes autochtones avaient signé des ententes sur les avantages. À cause de la façon dont votre gouvernement a géré ce dossier, ce nombre est tombé à 42, et vous vous attendez maintenant à ce que nous vous félicitions parce qu'il y en a 48. Je n'arrive pas à comprendre.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je pense que c'est très important, et j'encouragerais l'honorable député à examiner la décision de la Cour d’appel fédérale. On y indique très clairement que la décision de ne pas entreprendre l'étude sur le trafic de pétroliers et sur son incidence sur l'environnement marin a été entièrement prise sous le gouvernement de Steven Harper.

Nous étions dans un bon processus…

M. Jamie Schmale:

Nous parlons de consultations. Vous auriez pu utiliser le rapport sur les transports pour votre étude sur les transports. Vous avez choisi de ne pas le faire. Nous parlons de consultations dans ce cas-ci.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Vous ne pouvez pas faire cela. Vous devez remplir votre obligation de consulter, ce qui signifie que vous devez participer à un dialogue bidirectionnel constructif. Vous ne pouvez pas remplacer vos obligations en vertu de l'article 35 par un rapport sur les transports.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Maintenant que le pipeline appartient aux contribuables canadiens, le ministre des Finances affirme que votre gouvernement ne le vendra qu'une fois qu'il aura été construit. Les Canadiens seront-ils responsables des dépassements des coûts? Selon le directeur parlementaire du budget, le coût de construction de l'élargissement est d'environ 14 milliards de dollars.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt par votre entremise, monsieur le président, il s'agit d'un investissement dans le Canada. C'est un investissement dans les travailleurs canadiens et dans le secteur canadien de l'énergie. C'est un projet viable sur le plan commercial. Des professionnels de la société Trans Mountain mèneront une analyse plus approfondie et préciseront les estimations des coûts maintenant que le projet a été approuvé. Ils préciseront également le calendrier des travaux de construction. Ce projet générera près de 70 milliards de dollars en revenus pour les producteurs pétroliers de l'Alberta et près de 45 milliards de dollars en revenus supplémentaires pour les gouvernements. Il générera également un demi-milliard de dollars pour le gouvernement fédéral, et nous utiliserons cet argent pour faciliter la transition vers les technologies et les produits écologiques et pour accélérer les investissements dans ce secteur, afin de veiller à ce que les générations futures aient accès à de l'eau, de l'air et des terres de qualité, et pour veiller à réduire l'impact du changement climatique.

Peu importe l'angle sous lequel on considère la question, c'est un bon investissement pour le Canada et les Canadiens.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Il n'était pas nécessaire d'investir l'argent des contribuables canadiens. On aurait pu utiliser l'argent du secteur privé, ce qui n'aurait rien coûté aux contribuables et ne les aurait pas rendus responsables des dépassements des coûts qui sont potentiellement très réels, étant donné que des douzaines de permis doivent encore être délivrés avant le début des travaux de construction.

Combien de temps faudra-t-il attendre pour obtenir ces permis? Combien cela coûtera-t-il?

Cette semaine, vous avez annoncé pour la première fois que Trans Mountain devra acheter des crédits compensatoires pour les émissions produites par les travaux de construction. Combien cela coûtera-t-il aux contribuables canadiens?

(1650)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Les crédits compensatoires pour les émissions faisaient partie des conditions imposées plus tôt par l'Office national de l'énergie et des engagements pris par l'entreprise.

En ce qui concerne les permis, il faut passer par un processus de délivrance des permis pour les obtenir. L'Office national de l'énergie collaborera avec la société Trans Mountain pour délivrer ces permis.

Je crois qu'il est très important de respecter la procédure établie. Je sais que les conservateurs ne respectent pas la procédure établie. Ils ne respectent pas la primauté du droit et ils nous encouragent toujours à prendre des raccourcis, et c'est ce qui crée des problèmes. Nous ne prendrons pas de raccourcis. Nous voulons suivre le processus approprié pour lancer la construction de ce projet.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Sous le gouvernement conservateur, quatre pipelines ont été construits et trois autres étaient en attente. Maintenant, aucune de ces grandes entreprises qui ont construit des pipelines ne mène ses activités au Canada; elles sont actives dans d'autres pays, mais vous continuez à donner les mêmes réponses.

Pour revenir aux permis fédéraux, vous ne m'avez pas vraiment donné une idée du nombre de permis qui doivent encore être administrés et délivrés avant le début des travaux de construction. De plus, les contribuables canadiens devront-ils payer les dépassements des coûts et avez-vous établi un budget pour cette possibilité?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, dans le cas de grands projets comme celui-ci, des permis municipaux, provinciaux et fédéraux sont toujours exigés, et il faut suivre un processus établi pour les obtenir…

M. Jamie Schmale:

Puisque neuf mois se sont écoulés depuis l'ordonnance du tribunal, pourquoi n'avez-vous pas indiqué à votre ministère de commencer à demander ces permis pour que vous puissiez commencer les travaux de construction immédiatement?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Il s'est écoulé seulement deux mois depuis que l'Office national de l'énergie a recommandé l'approbation du projet.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, ce que dit l'honorable député aurait été catastrophique pour ce projet. En effet, le député laisse entendre que nous aurions dû approuver les permis avant d'obtenir l'approbation…

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est en réponse à la recommandation de l'Office national de l'énergie.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, votre temps est écoulé, mais je vais le laisser terminer.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, il est très important de comprendre que le fait d'approuver les permis avant que le projet soit approuvé aurait nui à la justice administrative et à la procédure établie. Il est irresponsable de suggérer que nous ne respections pas le processus approprié pour l'approbation de ce projet, car il est très important et cela aurait eu des conséquences catastrophiques sur les travailleurs du secteur de l'énergie.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est un problème lié à l'Office national de l'énergie.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Merci, monsieur Schmale.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Damoff.

Mme Pam Damoff (Oakville-Nord—Burlington, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. J'aimerais également remercier les membres du Comité de me permettre de participer à la réunion d'aujourd'hui.

Monsieur le ministre, je suis fière de faire partie d'un gouvernement qui prend le changement climatique au sérieux et qui sait que la pollution ne peut plus être gratuite. Nous ne pouvons plus nous contenter de rester passifs, et c'est ce que font les conservateurs. Nous savons qu'il est reconnu à l'échelle mondiale que l'établissement d'un prix pour la pollution est la façon la plus efficace de réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre et de modifier les comportements.

Monsieur le ministre, des électeurs de ma circonscription m'ont communiqué leurs préoccupations au sujet de l'approbation du projet de TMX et du fait que le gouvernement construit un pipeline en même temps qu'il déclare une situation d'urgence climatique. Des gens comme Chris, un jeune homme qui s'intéresse énormément au changement climatique et qui croit que nous devons favoriser la transition vers une économie zéro carbone, m'a parlé à plusieurs reprises. Je sais qu'il était très mécontent de l'approbation du projet de TMX. Des électeurs de ma circonscription d’Oakville North—Burlington s'intéressent énormément au changement climatique et à l'environnement. Des groupes comme Halton Environmental Network, Halton Climate Collective, Citizens' Climate Lobby, Oakvillegreen et BurlingtonGreen travaillent sans relâche dans nos collectivités pour lutter contre le changement climatique.

Monsieur le ministre, pourriez-vous expliquer à ces groupes et à des électeurs comme Chris comment nous pouvons justifier l'approbation du projet de TMX tout en nous attaquant sérieusement à la situation d'urgence climatique à laquelle nous faisons face au Canada?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

J'aimerais tout d'abord remercier chaleureusement la députée de son leadership en matière de durabilité. Nous discutons souvent des façons d'offrir à la population la possibilité de faire des choix durables.

Je tiens à garantir à Chris, aux chefs de file en matière d'environnement et aux électeurs de votre circonscription que la construction du pipeline de Trans Mountain ne nuira en aucun cas à notre capacité de respecter les engagements que nous avons pris dans le cadre de l'Accord de Paris. En fait, cela nous aidera à accélérer nos investissements dans une économie propre et écologique et à respecter nos engagements liés à l'Accord de Paris. Une fois la construction terminée, nous tirerons des revenus d'un demi-milliard de dollars de ce projet. Vous pouvez multiplier ces revenus au cours des 20 à 30 prochaines années. Cela nous permettra donc d'en faire davantage, en plus des milliards de dollars que nous investissons déjà dans la lutte contre le changement climatique.

En même temps, nous comprenons aussi que la production en cours dans le secteur pétrolier doit maintenant évoluer. La façon la plus efficace, la plus sécuritaire et la plus rentable d'y arriver consiste à utiliser des pipelines, et non le transport ferroviaire, car les chemins de fer traversent de nombreux centres urbains. J'ai entendu un grand nombre de mes collègues affirmer qu'ils préféreraient que le pétrole soit transporté par pipeline plutôt que par chemin de fer, car même si le transport ferroviaire est sécuritaire, il ne l'est pas autant que les pipelines. C'est donc un très bon investissement. Il nous permettra de fixer un prix pour la pollution et le gouvernement fait preuve de leadership à cet égard.

Les investissements dans des milliers de projets de transport en commun au pays, l'amélioration des normes en matière de combustibles, les investissements dans les nouvelles technologies qui permettent de réduire les émissions, la construction de bornes de recharge pour véhicules électriques et les millions de dollars investis pour inciter les gens à acheter des véhicules électriques sont des initiatives qui ont des effets réels et qui offrent des choix aux gens, afin de leur permettre de réduire leur impact sur l'environnement.

Nous avons pris des engagements. Je peux vous assurer que je suis très enthousiaste à l'égard de nos initiatives. Grâce à la construction de ce pipeline et à la prise de mesures contre le changement climatique, nous pouvons favoriser la croissance de notre économie. Nous pouvons aussi créer des milliers d'emplois pour les travailleurs canadiens tout en posant des gestes concrets pour la protection de l'environnement.

(1655)

Mme Pam Damoff:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Il me reste environ une minute.

Lorsque le gouvernement précédent parlait de mener des consultations, cela signifiait seulement qu'il envoyait des représentants dire aux gens ce qu'il avait l'intention de faire et qu'il se mettait ensuite au travail, peu importe le résultat des consultations. Selon plusieurs conversations informatives que j'ai eues avec votre secrétaire parlementaire, je sais que vous êtes allés dans les collectivités pour parler avec les parties intéressées et les communautés autochtones, et que vous avez recueilli leurs commentaires. Quels changements ces consultations ont-elles permis d'apporter au projet de TMX?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je crois que l'une des différences principales, c'est la façon dont nous avons interagi avec les communautés et la façon dont nous avons répondu à leurs préoccupations. Il y a plus de mesures d'adaptation offertes dans le cadre de ce projet que jamais auparavant. Nous nous occupons des répercussions cumulatives du développement. Nous nous efforçons d'améliorer nos interventions en cas de déversement, de déterminer comment prévenir les déversements, de déterminer comment protéger les plans d'eau, les poissons, leur habitat et les épaulards résidents du Sud, de déterminer comment protéger les sites culturels et les cimetières et toutes les choses qui ont été cernées par les communautés autochtones.

Une autre chose que nous avons faite différemment, c'est que nous nous sommes engagés au niveau politique. Comme vous le savez, les pipelines soulèvent la controverse. La porte d'entrée du Nord a également soulevé la controverse, tout comme Énergie Est. Le projet d’agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain a soulevé et soulève toujours la controverse, mais je compare les efforts que nous avons déployés et les efforts que j'ai personnellement investis dans les 45 rencontres avec les communautés autochtones auxquelles j'ai participé au petit nombre de rencontres organisées par les ministres conservateurs avec les communautés autochtones. Au cours des 10 années sous le gouvernement Harper, les ministres n'ont déployé aucun effort pour rencontrer les communautés autochtones et écouter leurs préoccupations et ensuite collaborer avec ces gens pour régler leurs préoccupations. Nous avons consacré le temps nécessaire à ces initiatives et nous sommes très fiers du travail que nous avons accompli.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Madame Damoff, je vous remercie aussi.

Nous pouvons nous donner encore 10 minutes. Comme les interventions sont maintenant de cinq minutes, j'en propose trois, qui dureront respectivement quatre, quatre et deux minutes. Ainsi, M. Cannings pourra conclure. Vu les circonstances, ça me semble équitable.

Madame Stubbs, vous disposez de quatre minutes, pas une seconde de plus.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, mon ascendance est en partie ojibwa et je représente neuf communautés autochtones de ma circonscription de Lakeland, qui participent toutes à l'exploitation pétrolière et gazière et qui appuient les oléoducs. À ce titre, j'espère que, cette fois-ci, la consultation des Autochtones par votre gouvernement ne foirera pas. J'ai cru que celle que vous avez entreprise en 2016, avant votre autorisation, aurait aussi tenu. Je le souhaite sincèrement, pour tous les Canadiens et pour la réalisation du projet. Vous avez bien sûr raté une belle occasion en annulant le projet Northern Gateway et en ratant celle de le relancer.

Je tiens seulement à préciser notre opinion sur la mauvaise gestion des échéanciers par votre gouvernement pour donner de la certitude aux permis, aux contrats et aux audiences, et expliquer pourquoi c'est nuisible au projet.

En effet, quand l'Office national de l'énergie a recommandé l'autorisation du projet, en avril — pour la deuxième fois — votre Cabinet était censé répondre au plus tard le 22 mai, et, je vous le dis, tous les Canadiens considéreraient comme le comble de la démence que votre Cabinet ait même songé à rejeter l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, après y avoir englouti 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables l'année dernière.

Le hic, c'est le délai écoulé entre la deuxième autorisation de l'agrandissement de Trans Mountain par l'Office et l'annonce faite par votre Cabinet, mardi dernier. Tous les détails et toutes les précisions auraient dû alors être confirmés pour éviter de faire de cette annonce la simple copie conforme de celle que vous avez faite en novembre 2016, après quoi absolument rien ne s'est fait. Les travaux auraient dû pouvoir débuter immédiatement. Vous auriez pu vous montrer responsables devant les Canadiens et les contribuables en précisant la date du début et de la fin des travaux, les coûts d'exploitation et les autres coûts.

Je suis frappée de constater qu'un projet décidé par le gouvernement fédéral, dont le maître d'ouvrage et le maître d'œuvre sont fédéraux, n'ait pas réussi à obtenir les autorisations fédérales ni même les autorisations des provinces et des municipalités que vous saviez certainement nécessaires au lancement des travaux. Voilà la certitude à assurer aux Canadiens pour qu'ils croient en la réalité de l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain.

Il est manifeste qu'il n'y a jamais eu de plan concret pour lancer les travaux.

(1700)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je crois que...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Sachez que des entreprises de forage de ma circonscription m'ont annoncé que les banques annulaient leurs prêts...

Le président:

Madame Stubbs, laissez-le répondre à la question.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce n'était pas une question. Je ne faisais que clarifier la situation.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Sans vouloir vous offenser, vous avez tout faux. Très respectueusement, nous serions dans le pétrin si nous suivions vos conseils, parce que le jugement de la Cour fédérale, en août 2018, a annulé la décision. Il n'y avait pas de projet.

Mardi, nous avons accordé une nouvelle autorisation au projet. L'octroi de permis avant mardi aurait contrevenu aux procédures de l'Office, on nous aurait traînés en justice, et nous aurions perdu. Vos idées auraient été plus dommageables.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

La réalité est que vous avez dépensé, l'année dernière, 4,5 milliards de dollars des contribuables et promis aux Canadiens le début immédiat de l'agrandissement.

Mais aujourd'hui, après une deuxième autorisation, vous êtes incapables de communiquer le moindre détail ou plan pour annoncer aux Canadiens le moment du début des travaux, de leur fin, du début de l'exploitation et les coûts.

Le président:

Merci, madame Stubbs. Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Graham, à vous la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Très rapidement, monsieur le président, voici quelques observations. C'est le cinquième comité dont je fais partie dans la présente législature, et vous avez été un président très facile à vivre, très accommodant. Dans les moments de tension, vous accédez simplement à la zénitude. Ne perdez pas ce beau talent.

Monsieur le ministre, quand Trans Mountain appartenait à Kinder Morgan, où allaient les profits?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Aux actionnaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et désormais, où iront-ils?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Tant que l'État en sera propriétaire, à l'État, pour le bien, donc, des Canadiens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'argent ira à la transition verte, comme nous en avons discuté.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

C'est l'objectif. Le demi-milliard de dollars de revenus fiscaux supplémentaires et de revenus de l'entreprise iront dans un fonds vert pour accélérer nos investissements dans une économie propre et verte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de conditions sont liées à cette autorisation? Pouvez-vous en donner une idée?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

L'Office national de l'énergie a fixé 156 conditions et formulé 16 recommandations que nous avons adoptées et qui nous autorisent à réagir à l'impact cumulatif de la réalisation du projet.

Si je puis me permettre, il importe beaucoup, monsieur le président, de noter que l'idée de Mme Stubbs nous aurait plongés dans le pétrin. Octroyer des permis ou même parler de permis avant l'autorisation du projet aurait contrevenu aux règles, et ces actions auraient été contestées.

Nous avons un plan pour commencer la construction, et l'Office émettra un certificat. Il instituera un processus pour la délivrance des permis, et les travaux commenceront. Le travail préliminaire peut débuter n'importe quand, et la construction débutera en septembre.

(1705)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel genre de pression exerce sur notre réseau ferroviaire le fait de retarder cet agrandissement, et quelles sont les répercussions sur le transport de nos grains, par exemple?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Grand merci de cette question. C'est très important, parce que, faute d'oléoduc, il faudra continuer de transporter le pétrole par wagons. Nous avons au moins constaté qu'il s'en transporte plus par wagons, ce qui soumet à des pressions les autres produits qui ont besoin d'être transportés. Ça ne concerne pas seulement la sécurité, mais ça entrave également la croissance d'autres secteurs de nos richesses naturelles comme la forêt et les mines, et les agriculteurs ont également cerné des problèmes qu'ils éprouvent à écouler leurs produits parce que le réseau ferroviaire ne suffit pas à la tâche.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Nous avons parlé, tout à l'heure, de transition verte. La Norvège, par exemple, est parvenue à placer mille milliards de dollars dans son fonds du patrimoine, et le ratio de sa dette à son PIB est de moins 90 %.

L'investissement de nos revenus dans la transition verte est-il bon pour notre économie?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Oui, absolument. Nos investissements dans l'économie verte — solaire, éolien, géothermique, énergie marémotrice — créent des emplois verts et y subviennent. Ils optimisent notre bouquet énergétique. Le pétrole et le gaz continueront d'en faire partie pendant encore des décennies, mais, dans la transition, nous devons miser davantage sur les énergies renouvelables, ce que permettront ces investissements annuels d'un demi-milliard de dollars.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Cannings, vous êtes le dernier intervenant, mais vous ne disposez que de deux minutes.

M. Richard Cannings:

À moi les dernières questions de la législature. Très bien.

Le président:

Aucune pression.

M. Richard Cannings:

Lundi, la Chambre des communes a adopté une motion pour déclarer que nous traversons une crise, une situation d'urgence climatiques. Le Groupe d'experts intergouvernemental sur l'évolution du climat, le GIEC, nous incite à agir immédiatement, dès maintenant, pour nous attaquer au changement climatique.

Vous avez évoqué l'affectation des profits annuels tirés de cet oléoduc, 500 millions, à des initiatives vertes. L'achat de cet oléoduc nous a coûté 4,5 milliards. Voilà où sont allés ses profits. Envolés au Texas, au moment de l'achat. Nous consacrerons encore 10 milliards à sa construction, dans les deux prochaines années. C'est environ 15 milliards que nous pourrions investir à la place, dès maintenant, contre le changement climatique, au lieu d'attendre deux ans puis de distribuer l'argent au compte-gouttes dans les 10 à 30 prochaines années. Nous devons le faire maintenant.

Je me demande seulement quelles notions économiques vous permettent de le présenter comme un gain pour la lutte contre le changement climatique. C'est simplement orwellien.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, nos investissements ont lieu aujourd'hui même. Depuis 2016, 28 milliards vont et iront pendant encore 10 ans dans les transports en commun.

M. Richard Cannings:

Ça n'a rien à voir avec l'oléoduc.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous investissons, également depuis 2016, 9 milliards dans les infrastructures vertes. Grâce à notre tarification de la pollution, nous réduisons effectivement les émissions; c'est visible en Colombie-Britannique. Nous adoptons de meilleures normes pour les combustibles et les carburants.

Je suis allé dans ma province appuyer une centrale solaire, où on éprouvait la capture de l'énergie en deux cycles. Il y a quelques mois, dans ma province encore, nous investissions dans l'énergie géothermique. Si la démonstration est commercialisée, on créera 50 000 emplois en Alberta. Voilà nos diverses réalisations. Nous voulons les accélérer par l'investissement de revenus supplémentaires.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cannings.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie. Vous avez le dernier mot.

Merci à vous tous, encore une fois.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous suis reconnaissant de votre effort pour satisfaire nos besoins, malgré votre programme très chargé, c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire. Bon retour sans encombre chez vous.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je suis en Alberta, donc chez moi.

Le président:

Vous avez toujours été très affable et très accommodant pour nous et bien disposé à comparaître devant notre comité aussi. Je vous en remercie.

Une voix: Et merci de nous avoir dégagés pour demain matin.

Le président: Oui, merci pour cette faveur. Ça se termine sur une belle note.

Merci à vous tous. Au revoir. Bonne chance à tous.

Permettez-moi de me répéter: Ç'a été un véritable honneur. Merci.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard rnnr 20444 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on June 20, 2019

2019-05-30 RNNR 137

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1530)

[English]

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)):

I would like to bring this meeting to order and recognize Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you, Ms. Stubbs.

In light of your motion, consideration of which was postponed on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, and which I understand you would like to debate now, I move for unanimous consent that David de Burgh Graham be appointed as acting chair of the committee for the duration of the consideration of Ms. Stubbs' motion only.

Do we have unanimous consent?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.)):

On the discussion, Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

I appreciate the opportunity to be able to revisit this motion today. To remind everybody of the subject that we're talking about, I'll read the motion that I moved on April 30: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the Committee immediately invite the Minister of Natural Resources to appear before the committee on June 20, 2019, for no less than a full meeting, to advise the Committee of the government's plan to build the Trans Mountain Expansion; and that this meeting be televised.

I hope that this motion will receive support from all members of this natural resources committee. I want to make the case for why it's important and why I'm confident that we'll have the minister here to explain to Canadians exactly what the next steps will be after the June 18 decision.

Of course, the Trans Mountain expansion was already approved by the independent expert National Energy Board and then by the current Liberal government three years ago, and was recently recommended for approval a second time by the independent expert regulator. However, not a single inch of the Trans Mountain expansion has actually been built to date.

The majority of British Columbians, Albertans, Canadians and also indigenous communities directly impacted by the Trans Mountain expansion support it. However, the issue around the Trans Mountain expansion has become about more than just the pipeline itself, and even more than about the long-term sustainability of Canada's world-class oil and gas sector, which is, of course, the biggest Canadian export and the biggest private-sector investor in the Canadian economy. This is especially given the almost unprecedented flight of capital from the Canadian energy sector in the last three years, and the news again this week that yet another oil and gas operator in Canada has been bought out and will be leaving the country.

It's really about confidence in Canada, about the ability to build big projects and to ensure that major investment can be retained in Canada, and that when big projects are approved in the national interest, they can then go ahead and be built.

I want to make the case to all of my colleagues here that on June 18, Canadians expect, and I'm confident, that the Liberals will again approve the Trans Mountain expansion in the best interests of all of Canada.

However, I think at the same time that the Liberals must also present a concrete plan on how and when the Trans Mountain expansion will be built. I think it's the least that the Liberals owe Canadians, since they've spent $4.5 billion in tax dollars on the existing pipeline and said that would ensure the expansion would be built immediately.

I hope that the natural resources minister will join us to answer outstanding questions, like what will the Liberals do in response to immediate court challenges from anti-energy activists that will be launched as soon as the Trans Mountain expansion is approved again? What will the cost be to taxpayers? How will that litigation take place? How exactly will the Liberals exert federal jurisdiction to prevent construction from being obstructed or delayed by say, weaponizing bylaws and permits by other levels of government or other measures that other levels of government might take? When will construction start? When will it be completed? When will the Trans Mountain expansion be in service? What will be the total cost to taxpayers? What's the plan for ongoing operation and ownership of the Trans Mountain expansion? Will there be a private sector proponent? Will taxpayers be expected to provide a backstop for the costs?

There has been an ongoing discussion, started about a year ago and more recently, about potential split ownership between an investment fund and perhaps an indigenous-owned organization. I think we all know that there are at least four organizations seeking indigenous purchase and ownership of the Trans Mountain expansion right now. I hope that the Liberals will be able to answer how that will work.

If that is a possibility, will there be transparent and regular reporting to Canadians about both the progress of construction and also the total costs incurred? Will there be dividends paid to Canadians if the ownership of the Trans Mountain expansion is transferred and purchased by somebody else, since of course every single Canadian now owns the pipeline because of the Liberal's $4.5-billion expenditure?

I think those are, at the very least, a number of the issues that need to be addressed immediately after June 18, when we all hope and are confident that the Trans Mountain expansion will be approved by the Liberals once again.

(1535)



That's why I hope all members will support the natural resources minister's coming to committee on June 20 to let all Canadians know those answers.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Thank you, Ms. Stubbs.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's good to see you there.

I had quite a bit to say, actually, but I do get the impression that there might be a positive response on the other side, so I will just support what Shannon Stubbs has said. I do agree with everything she has said. Hopefully, we can get some progress on this and, hopefully, the Liberals will support this motion and Canadians will be able to get a view of what the government's plan is to build that Trans Mountain expansion.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

While I, obviously, take some issue with a lot of the axioms that underpin Ms. Stubbs' motion, the motion itself is largely fine.

I do want to reassure her that in a similar context, when investors had pulled out of the Hibernia oil field development back in the eighties and nineties, Canada came in and invested, and it turned out to be one of the best investments, from a return-on-capital perspective, that the Government of Canada ever made. Those investments now are, under the Atlantic Accord, paid back to Newfoundland and Labrador on an ongoing basis for the life of the field. Ultimately, I would like to see, at some point, a situation where British Columbians and Albertans get to benefit from this what I hope will be an excellent investment.

I also take some issue with the concerns about foreign direct investment because, of course, Canada's been a world leader in that now during our tenure in government.

Missing from her statement, of course, was Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. v. Attorney General of Canada et al—the citation for that at the Federal Court of Appeal is 2018 FCA 153—which makes it pretty clear where the problems lie and whose process failed and had the injunction that required Canada to step in to save Albertans and this project.

We would be delighted to have the minister come to speak to all these matters and be able to give Canadians confidence that this was the right decision.

In fact, Ms. Stubbs has said June 20, 2019. I would propose to amend that slightly because it may be possible to do it earlier, and we would actually like to make it clear that it will happen as soon as possible following the announcement on the decision.

If she would accept that friendly amendment that he appear before the committee as soon as possible following the announcement of the decision by the Government of Canada on TMX....

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Stubbs, is that a friendly amendment?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think it would be at little...to just say “on or before” June 20 since the decision is supposed to be rendered on June 18.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Is it on June 18, 19, 20 or 21? I have no idea. I can't tell you what day it's going to be.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The decision by the Liberal cabinet is supposed to be made on June 18.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Even if the decision is made on that date, I don't know what date it's going to be announced, so I wouldn't be prepared to commit to that. What I'm saying is as soon as possible after the announcement. I also want to make sure that it's televised, so if there's some requirement that all the television feeds are not available to us on June 20, we have June 21 so that this can be televised.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The original decision—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

We ran into that issue at the Liaison Committee earlier today where other committees complained about the fact that television broadcasting facilities had been given to other committees. I'm not sure what's going to happen on June 20 in that regard. I do want to make sure that it's televised and that it happens as soon after as possible.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think it is important that we leave June 20 as the outside date since the Liberal cabinet was supposed to make the decision for approval on May 22 after the NEB's second recommendation for approval of the Trans Mountain expansion in the national interest. The Liberal cabinet requested the extension for the decision, delaying it by a month with even more uncertainty. The decision is supposed to be made on June 18, so “as soon as possible” would be after June 18, but before June 20.

(1540)

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Is somebody looking for the floor?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'm happy to have the question called on the amendment, and then we can have it on the motion as well.

Do you need me to read out my amendment again?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Do you have any comments on the amendment, or are you ready to vote on the amendment? Do you want me to read the amendment?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Can you say it again?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Rather than saying “on June 20, 2019”, it would say “as soon as possible following the announcement of the decision on TMX by the Government of Canada”.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I would be more comfortable saying “no later than” somewhere in there.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

We don't know when that is.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

We do know; it's June 18. This is concerning. The decision is supposed to be made on June 18. The Liberal cabinet is supposed to decide whether or not it is accepting the recommendation for approval of the Trans Mountain expansion in the national interest on June 18. You're already a month late.

We also know the approximate end of session. I think it is very reasonable that we've given two days after the decision is supposed to be rendered. I'm sure you guys have your act together. I'm sure there's somebody in there, in the Liberals, who can explain exactly how the Trans Mountain expansion is going to get built, when it's going to start, if shovels will be in the ground before the construction season, how much it's going to cost, and how this pipeline will finally be built.

I don't understand how there can possibly be an argument right now to try to make the language wishy-washy, with weasel words, and not to hold to a date. You're already a month behind, and that's damaging and undermining confidence in Canada.

The decision will be made on June 18, but the minister should be here on June 20 or before.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I appreciate Ms. Stubbs' frustration, but I'm not privy to the information. I know that actually oftentimes the opposition feels that we are privy to things that we aren't, but we really have tried to maintain this deferential view on the work of the committees and the work of the government. If Mr. Hehr has a better view on it, I'm happy to hear it, but I am not privy to it.

This is something that I think is actually even better than what Mrs. Stubbs has asked for, so I was quite surprised that it's causing a problem. Also, it gives us an opportunity to make sure that it's broadcast, which I know is very important for Mrs. Stubbs. Also, it allows us to handle any issues regarding whether if the House rises we can come back and have the meeting.

This is important. We want to debate this. We want to have this come before our committee as soon as possible following the announcement, but I don't want to commit to something when I don't know whether or not it's true. That's not the way I roll.

Thank you.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Benson.

Ms. Sheri Benson (Saskatoon West, NDP):

Just to add to that, if the point is to have a conversation with the minister after a decision has been made, then the amendment makes more sense. I hear what Shannon is saying, and I hear her frustration. I know where the Conservatives are coming from, but if you just take a look at the committee, and you don't change the amendment, whether or not you think it's wishy-washy, or give them more time to do whatever they need to do, then it won't happen. Do you know what I mean?

Let's say in your life it doesn't happen, and they extend it. Then if you don't change the language in this motion, that conversation is never going to happen for you. If you change it to what they are saying, then it will happen, whether it happens on June 21 or July 21 or August 21.

I need to hear that it's important to have the conversation, or is it important just to say they failed; we've asked the minister and he's not coming, and—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think it's extremely important to have the conversation—

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Okay.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

—especially on behalf of the thousands of unemployed oil and gas workers and contractors and the indigenous communities that I represent, who are involved in oil and gas, and on behalf of every Canadian who is waiting on this decision.

I think this is what I would say. Now we're actually in a world and having a conversation about how they might take even longer than June 18 to make the decision.

(1545)

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Yes.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

That would be very alarming and very concerning, I think, to every single Canadian, the vast majority of them, and certainly all those indigenous communities that are counting on the Trans Mountain expansion to be approved for the future of their communities, for their jobs, for their young people and for support for their elders long into the future.

I think this is exactly what Canadians are so frustrated about, that there's this ongoing uncertainty and delay, and I think, in good faith, that I will be surprised if the Liberals are not prepared to come out immediately with a plan for how to get the Trans Mountain expansion built, and if they aren't prepared to stick to the approval date of June 18.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Stubbs, we do have a speakers list, so I can put you back on there.

Mr. Hehr.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I've been listening with great interest. I am supportive of Mr. Whalen's amendment. I believe it achieves not only the spirit but the intent, and it will have the goal of getting the minister here to speak to this august committee. This will allow us to move forward expeditiously after the federal cabinet makes its decision, after it does its announcement, after the minister is able to present what has been decided.

The motion put forward by Mr. Whalen achieves all that Ms. Stubbs wants. Ms. Stubbs wants some clarity around the Trans Mountain. Of course we've said we wanted to move forward on that project in the right way. Since the Federal Court of Appeal decision said we had to go back and do the indigenous consultation better and do our environmental reports off the coast better as a result of the process put in place by the former government, well, that's what we did.

I think the motion put forward by Mr. Whalen will give Canadians confidence that we will be able to achieve many of the goals put forward by Ms. Stubbs, and in this case in particular, have the minister speak to this committee.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you, Chair.

I guess what I need clarification on.... I get the wording, and I get the televised part, but by changing the wording that Ms. Stubbs had, without including a before date—“no later than” whatever—it just leaves it open.

That goes to Ms. Stubbs' point about potential concern regarding the fact that the timeline has been missed already. If we miss it again, or the session ends, that concerns us as the opposition. We do want this conversation to happen. There are points to....

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I can answer your question.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Can I get the floor back?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Yes. It will be Simms method. Remember the Simms method, Jamie?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Okay, great.

It wasn't just televised and making sure that the decision is already made, but also, if the decision is made at such a time that we couldn't have a televised hearing while the House is in session, we would actually be able to come back.

So, the way I've changed this, we will come back as soon as possible to have this meeting after the announcement. There are a lot of reasons why the decision might yet again need to be extended if it's to save us from the same fate that plagued us last September. I want this project to be passed with sufficient accommodation for indigenous people, like everybody else, but I also want this meeting to happen.

What I'm saying, without insider knowledge of any of what's going on, is that the way I've structured the amendment is to make sure we have a meeting with the minister after the decision is made. The way that Mrs. Stubbs proposes it, it could possibly be that the decision has not yet happened, the minister still comes, we have our meeting and it's really not getting us the answers to the questions we want.

I appreciate that, if it doesn't happen on the 20th as Mrs. Stubbs is hoping, or on the 18th, that will give her great fuel to do lots of press. She will still have those opportunities. But, what I want to see happen is a meeting with the minister after the decision has been announced, regardless of when that decision is announced, so that we have an opportunity to discuss things that are on the public record with the minister.

Thank you.

(1550)

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Schmale, you still have the floor.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you. I like the Simms method.

That is the concern that we have right now. I appreciate what you had to say. I totally understand, but the issue we have now is the fact that when the announcement was made—I don't know how long ago—there was no plan. We think that, when the decision was made, the ministry should have had two plans—what to do either way. They didn't have that. They had to go back, and they missed another timeline in May.

I'd be fine with your amendment, but I do not.... That's why I said “no later than”, because if there is a delay, I would like the minister here to explain why there is a delay, and why the decision hasn't been made even though he has said publicly that it will be June 18.

So, leaving it open-ended, I do get your point about the fact that we'll be able to raise issue with this in the media, but I think either way the minister needs to be here before the end of session, for sure—either way.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I would like clarity on whether the passage of this motion is dependent on the friendly amendment. If what our colleagues are saying is that they'll defeat the motion outright and not call on the Minister of Natural Resources to come to committee to answer all the questions that I have outlined and explain to Canadians how and when exactly the Trans Mountain expansion will be built, plus the ongoing operations, ownership and maintenance provisions, plus the overall costs and transparency around reporting and how this is all going to work in the long term, I find it very concerning that it's either this amendment is accepted or the motion is rejected.

To my colleague's point, that's actually exactly why I said that I'm hoping that members of the committee will press the minister on exactly what the Liberals' plans are in terms of dealing with the inevitable court challenges that will be launched against the Trans Mountain expansion, when we do hope the Liberals approve it for a second time.

The reality is, because of the failure to ask for a Supreme Court reference and because of the failure to take the opportunity to get indigenous consultation right on the northern gateway—instead, this Prime Minister of course chose to unilaterally veto it, despite the 31 indigenous equity partnership in the northern gateway—all that lost opportunity and time for the government to properly fulfill consultation with indigenous communities on pipelines....

Here we are and the reality is that now, after last year's court ruling on the Trans Mountain expansion that the Liberals' process of an additional six months of consultation failed, I think every single Canadian is hoping that this time it's been done right and that it will withstand challenges and that will lay the groundwork for the future. If not, Conservatives may have the opportunity to try to get this right six months from now. That is actually one of the issues that the minister must come and explain.

The reality is that whether that process worked will probably be tested and challenged in court, again. Canadians need to know exactly, very clearly, not just the cost, not just when the shovels will be in the ground, the timeline of construction and the in-service date, but also exactly how this time the Liberals will enforce federal jurisdiction, which they failed to do for the previous three years, to ensure that the Trans Mountain expansion will actually get up and get built, especially since he spent $4.5 billion in Canadian tax dollars on the existing pipeline and said that would get the expansion built immediately, which actually was a year ago.

I just need that clarity. Is it an either-or proposition here that the friendly amendment will be accepted or the entire motion will be rejected by the Liberals, therefore blocking the Minister of Natural Resources to have to come here to be accountable to Canadians?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Benson.

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Yes, that's my question.

It's a different motion if you just want the minister to come before the session ends. Then to have the minister come after a decision has been made, which is sort of.... I appreciate the conversation. I haven't sat at the committee a long time, and I certainly hear the passion on either side about getting information.

But these are two different outcomes to me. The conversations will be very different. I'm neither here nor there. If you want to have the minister come before the end of the session, that should be the motion. If you want the minister to come after a decision has been made, to be able to ask different kinds of questions, I'd also be interested to hear how my colleagues will..... If the amendment has to be there for it to pass, it would be good to know that.

Thank you.

(1555)

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

The speakers list is empty. Are we ready for the question on the amendment?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

No, we're not ready. I think we need to hear the answer from our colleagues.

Is it that you'll support the motion only on the condition that the amendment is accepted? Or will you support this motion?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Whalen, did you want to answer?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Do you want to vote on the amendment?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

If you're prepared to vote on the amendment, I am too.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): Do you want to debate the main motion or go straight to a vote?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Let's go straight to a vote.

(Motion as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Do you want to keep chairing?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): Do you want me to?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs: Wouldn't that be against the rules?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'll seek unanimous consent that David de Burgh—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs: It shuts me up more when I'm sitting over there.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Jubilee Jackson):

The unanimous consent motion adopted indicated that Mr. Graham would chair for the duration of the consideration of Ms. Stubbs' motion, which has now come to an end.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

We'll now suspend the meeting briefly in order to go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1530)

[Traduction]

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte, et j'aimerais céder la parole à M. Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Merci, madame Stubbs.

Le mardi 30 avril 2019, l'étude de votre motion a été reportée, et je crois comprendre que vous aimeriez qu'elle fasse maintenant l'objet d'un débat. Je propose donc que, par consentement unanime, nous nommions David de Burgh Graham président suppléant uniquement pendant la durée de l'étude de la motion de Mme Stubbs.

Y a-t-il consentement unanime?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.)):

La parole est à vous, madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous suis reconnaissante de l'occasion qui m'est donnée aujourd'hui de réexaminer cette motion. Pour rappeler à tous le sujet dont nous parlons, je vais lire la motion que j'ai proposée le 30 avril: Que, conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité invite immédiatement le ministre des Ressources naturelles à comparaître devant lui le 20 juin 2019, pendant au moins une réunion complète, afin d'informer le Comité sur le plan du gouvernement pour le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain; et que cette réunion soit télévisée.que cette réunion soit télévisée.

J'espère que ma motion recevra l'appui de tous les membres du Comité des ressources naturelles. Je tiens à faire valoir les raisons pour lesquelles la motion est importante et les raisons pour lesquelles je suis convaincue que le ministre comparaîtra devant nous pour expliquer aux Canadiens en quoi consisteront au juste les prochaines étapes qui suivront la décision du 18 juin.

Bien entendu, il y a trois ans l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain avait déjà été approuvé par l'organisme de réglementation indépendant et expert qu'est l'Office national de l'énergie, puis par le gouvernement libéral actuel. De plus, l'organisme de réglementation a récemment recommandé pour la deuxième fois son approbation. Cependant, pas un seul tronçon du projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain n'a été construit jusqu'à maintenant.

La majorité des Britanno-Colombiens, des Albertains, des Canadiens et des collectivités autochtones touchées directement par l'epxpansion du réseau Trans Mountain appuient le projet. Toutefois, l'enjeu lié à l'expansion de ce réseau dépasse maintenant la construction du pipeline en tant que tel et même la viabilité à long terme du secteur pétrolier et gazier canadien de calibre mondial, qui est, bien entendu, le plus important exportateur canadien et le principal investisseur du secteur privé dans l'économie canadienne. C'est particulièrement le cas compte tenu de la perte de capitaux sans précédent que le secteur énergétique canadien a connue au cours des trois dernières années et de l'annonce de cette semaine concernant l'achat d'une autre société pétrolière et gazière canadienne et son départ du Canada.

Cet enjeu est en réalité lié à la confiance qu'inspire le Canada et à la capacité d'entreprendre de grands projets d'intérêt national approuvés et de maintenir les principaux investissements dans l'économie canadienne.

Je tiens à faire valoir à tous mes collègues ici présents que les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que, le 18 juin, les libéraux approuvent de nouveau l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain dans l'intérêt de tous les Canadiens, et je suis convaincue qu'ils le feront.

Toutefois, j'estime qu'en même temps, les libéraux doivent présenter aussi un plan concret sur la façon dont se déroulera l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain et sur le moment où cette expansion aura lieu. Je pense que c'est le moins que les libéraux puissent faire pour les Canadiens, étant donné qu'ils ont consacré 4,5 milliards de dollars de l'argent des contribuables à l'amélioration du pipeline existant et qu'ils ont affirmé que cela garantirait la mise en œuvre immédiate du projet d'expansion.

J'espère que le ministre des Ressources naturelles se joindra à nous afin de répondre à des questions en suspens comme les suivantes: Quelles mesures les libéraux prendront-ils pour lutter contre les contestations devant les tribunaux que lanceront les militants opposés à l'énergie immédiatement après la nouvelle approbation du projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain? Quels seront les coûts de ces mesures payées par les deniers publics? Comment ces poursuites se dérouleront-elles? Comment les libéraux exerceront-ils leur compétence fédérale pour empêcher que la construction soit bloquée ou retardée par, disons, des arrêtés ou des permis utilisés comme armes par d'autres ordres de gouvernement ou par d'autres mesures prises par ces ordres de gouvernement? Quand la construction commencera-t-elle? Quand prendra-t-elle fin? Quand la nouvelle partie du réseau Trans Mountain sera-t-elle opérationnelle? Quels seront les coûts totaux que les contribuables assumeront dans le cadre de ce projet? Quel est le plan des libéraux en ce qui concerne la propriété et l'exploitation de la nouvelle partie du réseau Trans Mountain? Un promoteur du secteur privé participera-t-il au projet? Les libéraux s'attendent-ils à ce que les contribuables garantissent les coûts de ce projet?

Des discussions ont lieu depuis environ un an à propos de la possibilité d'une propriété partagée entre un fonds d'investissement et une organisation appartenant à des Autochtones. Je pense que nous savons tous qu'il y a au moins quatre organisations autochtones qui cherchent en ce moment à devenir propriétaires de la nouvelle partie du réseau Trans Mountain. J'espère que les libéraux seront en mesure d'expliquer comment cela fonctionnera.

Si cette propriété partagée est une éventualité, des comptes seront-ils rendus aux Canadiens de façon régulière et transparente au sujet des progrès de la construction et des coûts totaux engagés? Si la nouvelle partie du réseau Trans Mountain est achetée par quelqu'un d'autre et que sa propriété lui est transférée, des dividendes seront-ils versés aux Canadiens, étant donné que tous les Canadiens sont maintenant propriétaires du pipeline existant, en raison des 4,5 milliards de dollars que les libéraux ont dépensés pour améliorer son état?

Je crois qu'à tout le moins, ce sont là plusieurs questions qui devront être cernées immédiatement après le 18 juin lorsque, nous l'espérons tous, les libéraux approuveront de nouveau l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain.

(1535)



Voilà pourquoi j'espère que tous les membres du Comité appuieront la comparution du ministre des Ressources naturelles le 20 juin en vue de fournir à tous les Canadiens des réponses à ces questions.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Merci, madame Stubbs.

Monsieur Schmale, la parole est à vous.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. C'est bien de vous voir jouer ce rôle.

En fait, j'avais pas mal de choses à dire, mais j'ai l'impression que l'autre côté accueillera favorablement cette motion. Je vais donc me contenter d'appuyer les paroles de Shannon Stubbs. J'approuve tout ce qu'elle a dit. Avec un peu de chance, nous pourrons obtenir quelques nouvelles à ce sujet et, avec un peu de chance, les libéraux appuieront la motion et les Canadiens seront en mesure de se faire une idée du plan que le gouvernement a élaboré pour agrandir le réseau Trans Mountain.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Whalen, la parole est à vous.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Même si je conteste évidemment bon nombre des postulats qui sous-tendent la motion de Mme Stubbs, la motion elle-même est en grande partie acceptable.

Je tiens à la rassurer en lui expliquant que, dans un contexte semblable, quand des investisseurs se sont retirés du projet d'exploitation du champ pétrolifère Hibernia dans les années 1980 et 1990, le Canada est intervenu et a investi dans le projet. Cela s'est avéré être l'un des meilleurs investissements que le gouvernement du Canada ait jamais faits sur le plan du rendement. Ces investissements sont maintenant assujettis à l'Accord atlantique, qui permet à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador d'être remboursé régulièrement pendant la durée de vie du champ pétrolifère. Au bout du compte, j'aimerais qu'à un moment donné, les Britanno-Colombiens et les Albertains bénéficient de ce qui, je l'espère, sera un excellent investissement.

De plus, je suis en désaccord avec les préoccupations liées aux investissements étrangers directs parce que, bien sûr, le Canada est un chef de file mondial à cet égard maintenant que nous sommes au pouvoir.

Sa déclaration omet aussi de mentionner l'affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. c. Procureur général du Canada et al, dont l'arrêt de la Cour d'appel fédérale est 2018 CAF 153, ce qui indique plutôt clairement à quand les problèmes remontent et qui a entrepris le processus qui a échoué et qui a fait l'objet d'une injonction, une injonction qui a forcé le gouvernement du Canada à intervenir pour sauver ce projet et protéger les intérêts des Albertains.

Nous serions ravis que le ministre vienne parler de toutes ces questions et donne aux Canadiens l'assurance que la bonne décision a été prise.

En fait, bien que Mme Stubbs ait mentionné le 20 juin 2019, je proposerais de modifier légèrement sa motion, car il se peut que cette comparution puisse avoir lieu plus tôt, et nous aimerions indiquer clairement qu'elle aura lieu le plus tôt possible après l'annonce de la décision.

Si elle accepte l'amendement favorable selon lequel le ministre comparaîtra devant le Comité le plus tôt possible après l'annonce de la décision du gouvernement du Canada au sujet du projet TMX...

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Stubbs, est-ce un amendement favorable?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense qu'il serait un peu... de mentionner simplement « le 20 juin ou avant », étant donné que la décision est censée être rendue le 18 juin.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Whalen, la parole est à vous.

M. Nick Whalen:

Est-ce le 18, 19, 20 ou 21 juin? Je n'en ai aucune idée. Je ne peux pas vous dire la date à laquelle la décision sera rendue.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Le Cabinet libéral est censé prendre une décision le 18 juin.

M. Nick Whalen:

Même si la décision est prise à cette date, je ne sais pas quand elle sera annoncée. Je ne serais donc pas disposé à prendre un engagement à cet égard. Je dirais que cela aura lieu le plus tôt possible après l'annonce. Je tiens également à m'assurer que la séance sera télévisée. Donc, si certaines exigences font que toutes les chaînes de télévision ne sont pas disponibles le 20 juin, nous tiendrons la séance le 21 juin, afin qu'elle puisse être télévisée.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

La décision initiale...

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous, les membres du Comité de liaison, avons fait face à ce problème plus tôt aujourd'hui lorsque d'autres comités se sont plaints au cours de notre séance que les installations de télédiffusion avaient été fournies à d'autres comités. J'ignore ce qui se produira à cet égard le 20 juin, mais je tiens à m'assurer que la séance sera télévisée et qu'elle sera organisée le plus tôt possible.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense qu'il importe que nous laissions le 20 juin comme date butoir, étant donné que le Cabinet libéral était censé prendre une décision concernant l'approbation du projet le 22 mai, après que l'ONE a recommandé pour la deuxième fois l'approbation de l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain dans l'intérêt du Canada. Le Cabinet libéral a demandé une prolongation du délai, en reportant d'un mois sa décision, ce qui a créé encore plus d'incertitude. Les libéraux sont censés prendre une décision le 18 juin. Donc, si le ministre comparait « le plus tôt possible », il faudrait que ce soit après le 18 juin, mais avant le 20 juin.

(1540)

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il prendre la parole?

M. Nick Whalen:

Je serais satisfait que mon amendement soit mis aux voix et qu'ensuite, nous mettions aussi aux voix la motion.

Avez-vous besoin que je lise de nouveau mon amendement?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Avez-vous des observations à formuler à propos de l'amendement, ou êtes-vous prêts à voter sur l'amendement? Voulez-vous que je lise l'amendement?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Pouvez-vous mentionner l'amendement de nouveau?

M. Nick Whalen:

Au lieu d'indiquer « le 20 juin 2019 », la motion indiquerait « le plus tôt possible après l'annonce de la décision prise par le gouvernement du Canada au sujet du projet TMX ».

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je serais plus à l'aise si la mention « au plus tard » figurait quelque part dans l'amendement.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Nous ne savons pas quelle sera cette date.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Nous le savons, puisqu'il s'agit du 18 juin. Cette situation est préoccupante. La décision est censée être prise le 18 juin. À cette date, le Cabinet libéral est censé décider s'il accepte la recommandation de l'ONE en ce qui concerne l'approbation de l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain dans l'intérêt du pays. Vous accusez déjà un mois de retard.

Nous connaissons également la date approximative de la fin de la session. Je pense que le délai de deux jours que nous vous avons accordé après la date à laquelle la décision est censée être rendue est un laps de temps très raisonnable. Je suis sûre que vos violons sont accordés et que quelqu'un au sein du parti libéral peut expliquer exactement comment l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain se déroulera, si les travaux commenceront avant la saison de la construction, combien le projet coûtera et comment le pipeline sera finalement construit.

Je ne comprends pas comment vous pouvez avancer un argument en ce moment pour tenter de rendre la formulation vague au moyen de termes ambigus et pour faire en sorte de ne pas avoir à respecter une date. Vous accusez déjà un mois de retard, ce qui est préjudiciable et ce qui mine la confiance des investisseurs à l'égard de l'économie canadienne.

La décision sera prise le 18 juin, mais le ministre devrait comparaître devant nous le 20 juin, ou plus tôt.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Whalen, la parole est à vous.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je comprends la frustration de Mme Stubbs, mais je n'ai pas accès à cette information. Je sais que l'opposition pense souvent que nous avons accès à certains renseignements que nous ne connaissons pas. Toutefois, nous essayons vraiment de maintenir une distance entre les travaux des comités et le travail du gouvernement. Si M. Hehr possède de meilleures connaissances à ce sujet, je serais heureux d'en entendre parler, mais, personnellement, je n'ai pas accès à ces renseignements.

À mon avis, ma proposition est meilleure que celle de Mme Stubbs. J'étais donc très étonné que cela cause un problème. De plus, cela nous donne l'occasion de nous assurer que la séance sera télévisée, un aspect qui compte énormément pour Mme Stubbs. Et, cela nous permet de gérer toutes les situations en ce qui concerne la question de savoir si nous pourrons revenir pour assister à cette réunion si la Chambre ajourne ses travaux.

Cet enjeu est important, et nous souhaitons en débattre. Nous voulons que cette comparution devant le comité se produise le plus tôt possible après l'annonce, mais je ne veux pas prendre un engagement sans savoir si ce que vous dîtes est vrai ou non. Ce n'est pas mon mode de fonctionnement.

Merci.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Benson, la parole est à vous.

Mme Sheri Benson (Saskatoon-Ouest, NPD):

Pour ajouter mon point de vue à cet échange, je préciserais que, si le but est d'avoir une conversation avec le ministre après qu'une décision a été prise, l'amendement est plus logique. Je comprends ce que Mme Stubbs soutient, et j'entends sa frustration. Je sais où les conservateurs veulent en venir, mais, si vous examinez la composition du comité, vous comprendrez que, si vous ne modifiez pas l'amendement, que sa formulation vous semble vague ou non, ou que vous ne leur donnez pas le temps de prendre les mesures qu'ils ont besoin de prendre, cette comparution n'aura pas lieu. Comprenez-vous ce que je veux dire?

Disons que cela ne se produit pas, et qu'ils reportent cette comparution. Si vous ne modifiez pas la formulation de votre motion, vous ne réussirez pas à obtenir cette conversation. Si vous modifiez la motion comme ils le souhaitent, cette conversation aura lieu, que ce soit le 21 juin, le 21 juillet ou le 21 août.

J'ai besoin de vous entendre dire qu'il est important d'avoir cette conversation, ou est-il simplement important de pouvoir dire qu'ils ont échoué? Nous avons demandé que le ministre comparaisse, et il ne le fera pas, et...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense qu'il est extrêmement important que cette conversation ait lieu...

Mme Sheri Benson:

D'accord.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

...en particulier au nom des milliers de chômeurs du secteur pétrolier et gazier, ainsi que des entrepreneurs et des collectivités autochtones que je représente et qui jouent un rôle dans l'industrie pétrolière et gazière, et enfin au nom de tous les Canadiens qui attendent de connaître cette décision.

Voilà, je pense, ce que je dirais. Nous sommes maintenant dans une situation où nous discutons de la possibilité qu'ils prennent la décision plus tard que le 18 juin.

(1545)

Mme Sheri Benson:

Oui.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce serait très préoccupant et alarmant, je crois, pour la grande majorité des Canadiens et certainement pour toutes les collectivités autochtones qui comptent sur l'approbation de l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain pour assurer l'avenir de leurs communautés, pour fournir des emplois et pour appuyer les jeunes et les aînés pendant longtemps.

Selon moi, le fait que cette incertitude persiste et que la décision est retardée constitue exactement ce qui frustre les Canadiens. Et, en toute bonne foi, je crois que je serai étonnée si les libéraux ne sont pas disposés à respecter la date d'approbation du 18 juin et à présenter immédiatement un plan pour la mise en oeuvre du projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Stubbs, nous avons une liste d'intervenants. Je peux donc ajouter de nouveau votre nom à cette liste.

Monsieur Hehr, la parole est à vous.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai écouté les délibérations avec grand intérêt. Je suis favorable à l'amendement de M. Whalen. Je crois qu'il respecte non seulement l'esprit de la motion, mais aussi son intention, et il aura pour objet de faire comparaître le ministre devant nous pendant la séance du mois d'août. Cela nous permettra d'avancer rapidement une fois que le Cabinet fédéral aura pris sa décision et l'aura annoncée, et que le ministre aura été en mesure de présenter cette décision.

La motion présentée par M. Whalen accomplit tout ce que Mme Stubbs désire. Mme Stubbs souhaite obtenir certains éclaircissements à propos du réseau Trans Mountain. Bien entendu, nous avons indiqué que nous souhaitions que ce projet progresse de la bonne façon. Étant donné que, dans sa décision, la Cour d'appel fédérale a indiqué que nous devions faire marche arrière afin de mener de meilleures consultations auprès des peuples autochtones et de rédiger de meilleurs rapports environnementaux au sujet des impacts potentiels au large des côtes, en raison du processus mis en place par l'ancien gouvernement, eh bien, c'est ce que nous avons fait.

Je pense que la motion présentée par M. Whalen donnera aux Canadiens l'assurance que nous serons en mesure d'atteindre bon nombre des objectifs proposés par Mme Stubbs et, en particulier dans le cas présent, de faire comparaître le ministre devant notre comité.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Schmale, la parole est à vous.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'imagine que j'ai besoin d'obtenir des éclaircissements au sujet... Je comprends la formulation et la question de la télédiffusion, mais, en modifiant la formulation de Mme Stubbs sans préciser une date limite — sans mentionner les mots « au plus tard le » ou peu importe —, on laisse simplement la porte ouverte.

Cela reprend l'argument de Mme Stubbs à propos de l'inquiétude potentielle liée au fait que le gouvernement a déjà laissé passer l'échéance. S'il ne respecte pas la nouvelle échéance ou que la session se termine, cela préoccupera les membres de l'opposition. Nous voulons que cette conversation ait lieu. Il y a des questions à...

M. Nick Whalen:

Je peux répondre à votre question.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Puis-je avoir de nouveau la parole?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Oui. Nous allons suivre la méthode Simms. Vous souvenez-vous de la méthode Simms, monsieur Schmale?

M. Nick Whalen:

D'accord. Formidable.

Mes préoccupations ne concernaient pas simplement la télédiffusion et le fait de s'assurer que la décision avait déjà été prise, mais aussi le fait que, si la décision était prise à un moment où il était impossible d'organiser une audience télévisée pendant que la Chambre siégeait, nous serions en fait en mesure de revenir pour organiser une audience.

J'ai donc modifié la motion de manière à ce que nous revenions organiser cette séance le plus tôt possible après l'annonce. Il y a de nombreuses raisons pour lesquelles la décision pourrait être reportée, comme le fait d'éviter de subir le même sort qu'en septembre dernier. Comme tout le monde, je veux que ce projet soit approuvé avec suffisamment de mesures d'adaptation pour satisfaire les peuples autochtones, mais je souhaite aussi que cette séance ait lieu.

Comme je n'ai accès à aucun renseignement privilégié sur ce dossier, j'ai structuré l'amendement de manière à garantir que nous rencontrerons le ministre après que la décision aura été prise. Selon la motion proposée par Mme Stubbs, le ministre pourrait comparaître avant que la décision ait été prise, et nous n'obtiendrions pas les réponses aux questions que nous souhaitons poser.

Je comprends que, si la comparution du ministre ne se déroule pas le 20 juin, comme Mme Stubbs l'espère, cela lui permettra de tenir de nombreuses conférences de presse à ce sujet. Mon amendement lui offrira encore ces possibilités, mais je tiens surtout à ce que la comparution du ministre se déroule après l'annonce de la décision, quelle que soit la date à laquelle la décision est annoncée. Ainsi, nous aurons l'occasion de discuter avec le ministre d'enjeux qui peuvent être rendus publics.

Merci.

(1550)

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Schmale, vous avez toujours la parole.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci. La méthode Simms me plaît.

C'est ce qui nous préoccupe en ce moment. Je vous suis reconnaissant des paroles que vous avez prononcées, et je les comprends parfaitement, mais le problème auquel nous faisons face maintenant, c'est que, lorsque l'annonce a été faite — je ne sais pas à quand cela remonte —, le gouvernement n'avait aucun plan. Nous estimons que, lorsque la décision a été prise, le ministère aurait dû avoir deux plans — indiquant quoi faire dans un cas comme dans l'autre. Les responsables du ministère n'en avaient pas. Il leur a fallu s'informer, et ils ont laissé passer une autre échéance en mai.

Votre amendement ne poserait pas de problème, mais je ne... C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai parlé de la mention « au plus tard le » parce que, si la décision est retardée, j'aimerais que le ministre comparaisse devant nous afin de justifier le retard et d'expliquer la raison pour laquelle la décision n'a pas été prise, même s'il a déclaré publiquement qu'elle le serait le 18 juin.

Il n'est donc pas acceptable de laisser la porte ouverte. Je comprends l'argument que vous faisiez valoir lorsque vous avez dit que nous pourrions soulever la question auprès des médias, mais, d'une manière ou d'une autre, le ministre doit comparaître sans faute devant nous avant la fin de la session.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

J'aimerais confirmer si l'adoption de ma motion dépend de l'adoption de l'amendement favorable. Si mes collègues indiquent qu'ils rejetteront tout simplement la motion et qu'ils ne demanderont pas auministre des Ressources naturelles de comparaître devant notre comité afin de répondre à toutes les questions que j'ai énumérées et d'expliquer aux Canadiens exactement quand et comment le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain sera mis en oeuvre, en plus d'aborder les questions d'opérations permanentes, de dispositions relatives à la propriété et à l'entretien, de l'ensemble des coûts, de la transparence des comptes-rendus et de la façon dont le réseau fonctionnera à long terme, je trouverai très préoccupant le fait que ma motion sera rejetée si l'amendement n'est pas accepté.

Pour reprendre le point de mon collègue, je précise que c'est exactement la raison pour laquelle j'ai dit que j'espérais que les membres du comité exhorteraient leministre à expliquer comment, au juste, les libéraux planifient de gérer les inévitables contestations devant les tribunaux qui seront entreprises pour contrecarrer l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain lorsque, nous l'espérons, les libéraux approuveront le projet pour la deuxième fois.

Le fait est qu'au lieu de demander un renvoi à la Cour suprême et de saisir l'occasion de mener des consultations efficaces avec les Autochtones au sujet de l'oléoduc Northern Gateway, le premier ministre a bien entendu décidé d'exercer unilatéralement son droit de veto pour rejeter le projet, en dépit des 31 partenariats avec participation financière conclus avec des Autochtones dans le cadre de ce projet — toutes ces occasions et ce temps que le gouvernement a gaspillés au lieu de mener des consultations appropriées sur les pipelines auprès des collectivités autochtones...

Voilà où nous en sommes maintenant, et le fait est qu'après que le tribunal a déclaré, l'année dernière, que les six mois de consultation supplémentaires organisés par les libéraux au sujet de l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain avaient échoué, je pense que tous les Canadiens espèrent que les choses ont été faites correctement cette fois, qu'elles résisteront aux contestations et qu'elles prépareront le terrain pour l'avenir. Sinon, il se pourrait que les conservateurs aient l'occasion d'essayer de faire les choses correctement dans six mois. En fait, c'est l'une des questions que le ministre doit venir expliquer.

Que ce processus ait fonctionné ou non, il est probable qu'il sera contesté et éprouvé de nouveau devant les tribunaux. Les Canadiens doivent non seulement connaître exactement les coûts engagés, la date du début des travaux, l'échéancier de construction et la date d'entrée en service, mais ils doivent aussi savoir au juste comment, cette fois, les libéraux exerceront leur compétence fédérale — ce qu'ils n'ont pas réussi à faire au cours des trois dernières années — afin de veiller à ce que le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain soit mis en oeuvre, étant donné en particulier que le premier ministre a consacré 4,5 milliards de dollars de l'argent des contribuables à l'amélioration du pipeline existant en soutenant que cela garantirait la mise en oeuvre immédiate du projet d'expansion. En fait, il a fait cette déclaration il y a un an.

J'ai simplement besoin d'obtenir cet éclaircissement. Est-ce une proposition à prendre ou à laisser, en ce sens que soit l'amendement favorable est accepté, soit la motion en entier est rejetée par les libéraux, ce qui nous empêchera d'exiger que le ministre des Ressources naturelles comparaisse devant le comité afin de rendre des comptes aux Canadiens?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Benson, la parole est à vous.

Mme Sheri Benson:

Oui, c'est la question que je me pose.

Si vous souhaitez seulement que le ministre comparaisse devant le comité avant la fin de la session, cette motion différera de celle dans laquelle on fait comparaître le ministre après l'annonce de la décision, ce qui est en quelque sorte... j'apprécie la conversation. Je ne siège pas au sein du comité depuis longtemps, mais j'ai certainement entendu les deux côtés parler avec passion de l'importance d'obtenir des renseignements.

Toutefois, ces deux résultats me semblent différents. Ces conversations seront très différentes. Personnellement, je ne penche ni d'un côté ni de l'autre. Si vous voulez que le ministre comparaisse devant nous avant la fin de la session, la motion devrait l'indiquer. Si vous voulez que le ministre nous visite après la prise de la décision afin que nous puissions poser différents types de questions, j'aimerais également entendre la façon dont mes collègues... Si l'amendement doit être adopté pour que la motion soit adoptée, ce serait bien de le savoir.

Merci.

(1555)

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

La liste d'intervenants est vide. Sommes-nous prêts à mettre l'amendement aux voix?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Non, nous ne sommes pas prêts. Je pense que nous devons entendre la réponse de nos collègues.

Appuierez-vous la motion seulement si l'amendement est accepté, ou apporterez-vous un appui inconditionnel à la motion?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Whalen, voulez-vous répondre à la question?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Voulez-vous mettre l'amendement aux voix?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Si vous êtes prêts à voter sur l'amendement, je suis également prêt à le mettre aux voix.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): Voulez-vous débattre de la motion principale, ou passer directement au vote?

M. Nick Whalen:

Passons directement au vote.

(La motion modifiée est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Voulez-vous continuer à présider la séance?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): Voulez-vous que je continue à assurer la présidence?

Mme Shannon Stubbs: Cela ne contrevient-il pas au Règlement?

M. Nick Whalen:

Je vais demander le consentement unanime pour que David de Burgh...

Mme Shannon Stubbs: Je suis plus silencieuse lorsque j'occupe le fauteuil là-bas.

La greffière du comité (Mme Jubilee Jackson):

La motion adoptée à l'unanimité indiquait que M. Graham présiderait la séance pendant la durée de l'étude de la motion de Mme Stubbs, une étude qui a maintenant pris fin.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Nous allons maintenant suspendre brièvement la séance afin de passer à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard rnnr 9196 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 30, 2019

2019-05-14 RNNR 136

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Thank you for joining us.

We are going back in time today. Back in 2016, when we first convened this committee, the first thing we did was to study the oil and gas sector, and produced a report entitled “The Future of Canada's Oil and Gas Sector: Innovation, Sustainable Solutions and Economic Opportunities”. The government provided a report in response, and today we're here to discuss an update on those issues and to get a briefing from our friends at NRCan to tell us where things stand as of 2019.

We're grateful to you for taking the time to be here. After your remarks, we will open the floor to questions from members around the table.

Welcome, and thank you.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers (Assistant Deputy Minister, Innovation and Energy Technology Sector, Department of Natural Resources):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's a pleasure to be here and to report on our progress.

I'm accompanied by two colleagues: Dr. Cecile Siewe, director general of the CanmetENERGY laboratory in Devon, Alberta; and Chris Evans, senior director in the petroleum resources branch at Natural Resources Canada.

We shared a copy of a short overview presentation, but I thought perhaps I could touch on it quickly to give you a bit of sense of what has happened since our last encounter on this topic.

With regard to the broad context and sheer importance of the oil and gas sector in the country, it is a major industry, a major driver of jobs, GDP, and exports. You have seen some of those data in the report itself, but it's worth reminding ourselves that it's 276,000 jobs around the country, so it affects a lot of people and their families. It accounts for some $100 billion in exports and 5.6% of GDP. Canada is a very large player in the global scene in the production and export of both oil and natural gas.

As we all know, the industry has faced some pretty challenging times in recent years, in particular thanks to the decline in commodity prices affecting world markets. Our industry and our people working in this industry surely felt it most directly.

Despite the short-term turmoil, the long-term future of the oil and gas industry remains quite strong, as shown in NEB reports, as well as assessments conducted by the International Energy Agency. Despite those challenging times, we've had our share of good news lately with some major project announcements, including the largest project in Canada's history, the LNG Canada project, a $40 billion project in British Columbia. This project will make Canada a prominent player in the LNG space, which as we know is a very important trend globally in energy markets, with our being the cleanest energy producer in the world. This will assist us in servicing our Asian clients, who are trying to move away from coal.

Another key project worth noting is in the offshore of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Hebron project, a $14 billion initiative. There are also major petrochemical projects in Alberta, which were announced in recent months. These are certainly encouraging signs. [Translation]

We're coming back to the elements of the government's response to the report you produced. They are grouped around four main themes.[English]

The first one was around intergovernmental collaboration and co-operation, the second focused on building public trust and transparency, the third was directed at engagement with indigenous people and resource development, and the fourth was on innovation in oil and gas.

I hope to cover some of this in my interim remarks, but because of time considerations, we may have to cover this during the Qs and As.

I'd like to note some of the major initiatives currently in play. There is Bill C-69, which is currently in front of the Senate for deliberation. There is the work around the consultation for the Trans Mountain Pipeline, which is also ongoing. I should also note the sizable investment made by the government in clean technology innovation—some $3 billion has been invested to date, with some key investments in the oil and gas sector, which I will touch on.

Looking at the engagement with citizens was also a key element of our focus this past fall. Our department's Generation Energy Council is engaged with some 380,000 Canadians on what the future of energy should look like. In those discussions, four pathways have emerged. One of these was being a clean oil and gas producer, which remains central to our game plan.

To cut to the chase, the key takeaway from that consultation, which lasted several months, was the desire of our citizens to see us as competitive, to make sure that our oil and gas industry can thrive, and to sustain those jobs and wealth creation. However, it also looked at ways to improve our environmental performance in terms of both GHGs and also our impacts on water and land.

Those two themes were very present throughout our conversation, along with the theme of the innovation required to get to that desired objective.

The industry has gone through a rather challenging environment lately, and this past December the government announced a support package to help the workers and communities affected by the downturn in the price of oil and gas. The total package was worth $1.6 billion.

(1540)



I want to perhaps touch on some of those key components, the first one being $1 billion in commercial financial support coming from Export Development Canada to support the working capital needs of companies as well as their export potential in new markets.

The second envelope was $500 million from the Business Development Bank to help commercial financing to diversify those markets.

The third component was around R and D, with a $50 million investment from the clean growth program at NRCan being set aside. The total value of those projects is $890 million.

The next component was from the strategic innovation fund from ISED, the innovation department. That's a $100 million envelope.

Lastly, there is access to the national trade corridors fund, with a total value of $750 million. A significant amount of commitments have been made in that regard.

To close, in terms of tax measures, in the fiscal updates in the past fall, as colleagues will know, Mr. Chair, there was a significant announcement with regard to accelerated capital cost allowance measures to boost the competitiveness of all industry sectors in the country. The total value of those measures was in the order of $5 billion in terms of foregone tax revenues. Obviously, the oil and gas sector, being such a major player in terms of domestic industry, was one of those that obviously benefited from it, especially in terms of expensing clean energy equipment investments.

That brings me to the innovation team, which I touched on earlier. Obviously I will not be comprehensive here, but again, through our conversations that will follow, we may be able to touch a bit more on that. The government has been working very closely with industry and provincial governments to look at ways to really help drive the industry forward in terms of the future, as the title of your study invites.

While the industry does a terrific job in looking at those incremental improvements, there's a collective sense that we need to look at leapfrogging in terms of environmental performance and cost reductions. This is where renewed efforts with extraction technologies, tailing ponds management, air emissions as well as carbon use have been widely seen as being critical.

I won't go into those in detail, but to give you a bit of a hint, in terms of extraction technologies, there are some promising leads there that we and the industry are pursuing with vigour, to look at both reducing the cost of production but also reducing emissions by the order of 40% to 50%. We have a number of projects in this area, which are very exciting indeed, that we are driving quite actively right now.

It's the same thing in the area of tailings. We hear a lot of concern among our citizens in terms of how we can cope with those and reduce the production of those tailing ponds. There's effort there. It's also looking at using some of those tailing ponds and making sure that we're able to extract the valuable hydrocarbon and heavy metals such as titanium to be able to make better use of it. It's very much in the spirit of a cyclical economy, being able to recycle some of those products.

We have a large-scale project currently under way, which was announced by the Province of Alberta with Titanium Corporation, to do precisely that.

These are, for us, very encouraging signs of what Canada is able to do. Of all sectors, the oil and gas sector in Canada has been known for decades to be extremely innovative and entrepreneurial. I have a lot of confidence that we'll be able to advance those projects successfully.

The the penultimate slide speaks a bit to how we went about doing it. As you know, the pan-Canadian framework was anchored around this notion of working collaboratively with provincial and territorial governments. We felt it was the right thing to do to pay special attention to how we went about doing business.

There I could point out perhaps three elements that were, in our eyes, quite meaningful. The first is the establishment of a clean growth hub, which is essentially a one-stop shop for people to interact with the federal family. Sometimes it's a bit difficult if you're a university researcher, a small firm out there, to figure out whom to talk to. Their wish was to have have a one-stop shop where they could interact with us. We heard that feedback, and we took it to heart and established this hub. It is is a grouping of 16 department and agencies physically co-located in an office here in downtown Ottawa. They are able to interact with clients and direct them, whether they need financing, access to market, regulatory changes or issues around procurement—whatever topic they may have.

(1545)



In our one short year of operation, we've had more than 1,000 clients come our way to look for guidance and support, and it's a very popular feature of our ecosystem nowadays.

The second thing I would note is around the trusted partnership model. We have finite resources both federally and provincially to invest taxpayers' dollars, so we have to try to find ways to use those limited resources smartly. We reach out to provinces and say “How about we try to identify together what the most promising technologies are and look at having an integrated review process?”.

Instead of having researchers in universities go through separate processes both federally and provincially, we essentially recognize each other's process, saving an enormous amount of time for the researchers and innovators to access the federal or provincial funding, and also it speeds up the process considerably. We have eight or nine of those trusted partnership models across the country, which have proven to be quite successful.

The third and last thing I would note is that the government announced, in budget 2019, $100 million in funding for the Clean Resource Innovation Network, or CRIN for short. It brings together innovators in the oil and gas sector, mostly in western Canada, and the grouping has been active now for about a year. The federal government was happy to provide some support for that. They were actually in town just this past week, and it looks to be quite exciting in development. [Translation]

To conclude, I'll talk about the national energy labs.

We have a network of four national labs located in several parts of the country, in Montreal, Ottawa, Hamilton, Ontario, and Alberta. They bring together more than 600 researchers, engineers and technicians in this field.[English]They cover a wide range of technologies: renewable energy, PV, geothermal, bioenergy, marine, energy efficiency, advanced materials. They look at artificial intelligence application in energy as well as fossil energy.

We have the privilege of having Dr. Cecile Siewe here, who is the lab DG from our CanmetENERGY-Devon facility, which is focusing precisely on oil and gas research. As we'll hear during the audience, there's a lot of work there around water research, extraction technologies, partial upgrading, oil spill recovery and a lot of those domains of expertise. Dr. Siewe is a highly renowned scientist in her own right but also the lead of that lab. I thought it could be of interest to the committee members to interact directly with her.

I'll pause here and turn the floor over to you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Whalen, you're going to start us off.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

It's great to hear from you guys on what the government is doing on the innovation side.

I was hoping to maybe get some of your general overall views or just some facts to put on the record about the current opportunities for Canadian petroleum-based energy in the market. Could you guys provide some statistics or some information on what the global market looks like for oil and gas between now and the end of the century, when we hope not to use it anymore, and how much of that oil consumption at that time could or should come from Canada?

Mr. Chris Evans (Senior Director, Pipelines, Gas and LNG, Energy Sector, Petroleum Resources Branch, Department of Natural Resources):

Thank you for the question. It's a good one.

I think we'll have to qualify our answer a little bit in the Canadian context, but certainly at a high level we can say that the International Energy Agency has indicated and highlighted that there is an expectation that, even as the world tries to control its carbon footprint, there is going to be growth in oil. The National Energy Board last year did an energy futures report, which suggested more in the Canadian context a growth of at least 1.7 million barrels of oil out of Canada, out to 2030.

There's a dynamic there where the expectation is that there will be more oil that needs to be consumed by the world and that Canada's production will increase.

(1550)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Do you see potential benefits in the market from the way carbon is being priced around the world that would see lower output pollution costs resulting in benefits for different types of oil that might be produced here, say, at offshore Newfoundland to the detriment of Alberta oil? And how much is that starting to play a role in the marketplace and in global consumers' decisions on where they're sourcing their hydrocarbons from?

Mr. Chris Evans:

I think I'll need to be a little bit cautious about talking too much about carbon pricing, as it sits under a different minister's remit. I think I can say that the government is looking to implement carbon pricing in a way that remains focused on competitiveness. There are several avenues or elements of the carbon approach, including mitigation, adaptation and innovation, which is a very important element. The carbon price does sit within the overall plan.

The current approach has forecasted measurable reductions in carbon pollution out to 2022, just on the plan as it currently exists, but there is still a lot of work being done on the shape of some of the implementation, and I think I wouldn't be able to opine on some of the points you raised.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

That's fair enough.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

If I may supplement this.

It's true in the case of oil. It's also very true in the case of LNG.

In our discussions with super majors and domestic producers as well, we hear a lot about the preoccupation with the carbon footprint, as the member is referencing, and looking at those suppliers who are seen to be clean or the cleanest in the space. It is quite an opportunity for Canada, which is seen as a politically stable jurisdiction, but also potentially as one that is differentiated in the commodity markets in being seen as a clean energy supplier. It is certainly true in the case of our LNG Canada project on the west coast. I think both the domestic constituents care about it and our clients as well, and so do investors.

We're very mindful of that, and it may not be intuitive to many. The fact that we have such an abundant clean electricity supply is one of our advantages, because in order to power those very large pieces of equipment, you need a large amount of power. We're fortunate to have large hydro power and renewable energy, which are able to sharply reduce the carbon footprint of those operations. Whether it's on the west coast or the east coast, we have a chance to differentiate ourselves in a big way.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

When my constituents write to me—and it's more of a political question—they want to know how Canada can continue to participate in the market while living up to its environmental commitments.

I want to get a sense of where we see our markets in the future. Do you see a decline in North Sea production as an opportunity for Newfoundland to pick up some market share? How are we on the greenhouse gas emissions side; how do we compare with the North Sea, the Middle East and with South America, Venezuela in particular?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

It is a good point.

Again, when we look at Canada's production compared not only with that of other oil or gas producers, but also in terms of energy switching, if you're looking at opportunities in the big picture for major emissions reductions, a lot of it is around moving coal to cleaner fuels, either fossil fuel or renewable energy. It's true in the United States, where we've literally seen dozens of coal plants being shut down and moving to either natural gas or clean electricity when possible.

The same is true also in eastern Europe and Asia, where very large domestic production of coal is still used for power production. This is where natural gas can be part of that energy switch from coal to cleaner fuels or cleaner energy.

Fuel switching in the United States has been the largest contributor by far to their improvements in GHG.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

That's good to hear.

It's difficult for Canadians to wrap their head around the sheer volume of oil production in Alberta and what that means and how important it is. When we talk about pipelines and getting the volume of this commodity to market, it's difficult for Canadians to picture how much benefit TMX will have in the mix of the distribution of this oil to markets versus Keystone XL, and difficult for people to understand why energy east is no longer on the table.

If Keystone XL and TMX come online, will that solve the problem Alberta has in getting its current production levels to market? Is there a potential future role for energy east to help Alberta expand its production and get even more resource to market?

(1555)

Mr. Chris Evans:

Canada is a market-driven economy for its energy projects. We rely, of course, on private sector players, by and large, to decide on projects.

In the case of the energy east pipeline, that decision was taken by the company when it looked at all of the factors that were coming to bear.

Strictly in terms of TMX, KXL, and the Line 3 replacement project, if you consider the incremental pipeline capacity that these three projects would contribute to the market, it roughly speaking matches the NEB's forecast of growth in oil production in Canada.

The Chair:

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

With the energy east pipeline, one of the factors that was brought to bear in the proponents' decision was the political intervention in what should have been an unbiased, science-based, evidence-based review, fair to all pipeline considerations.

In fact, because of the stalling and the reappointment of a panel by the Liberals.... Then, for the first time ever, there was the application of downstream emissions criteria as a factor in the assessment of the energy east pipeline, unlike Trans Mountain, which was only assessed on upstream emissions. The energy east pipeline was held to upstream and downstream emissions. That, ultimately, was exactly what the company mentioned one month before, when it asked to stall the process to be able to continue with their application. A month later, it announced it was leaving. This of course is why regulatory certainty is so critical and important.

I have a quick question. I remember that about this time last year—and I don't know what the answer to this is—the government launched a $280,000 study on oil and gas competitiveness. It was led by NRCan, and a firm was commissioned to do it. I think it was completed in June 2018—I don't know. Has that report been made public? Is there a report that has come out of that study?

Mr. Chris Evans:

I really regret that I'll have to look into that. I don't have information about that on hand.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

If you could find out about it and then table it with the committee, that would be great. I remember its being announced, but didn't really ever see the conclusion. Given the dollar amount we knew it would cost taxpayers, it would be great if Canadians would be able to get to see that report.

Speaking about the regulatory review for crucial energy infrastructure in Canada, Bill C-69, as you referenced, will make some major changes. The provinces and three territories have now come out with deep concerns about the impacts of Bill C-69 on future development of oil and gas, given the draft project list that was released last week, all of the kinds of interventions in provincial jurisdiction, as well as the the impact on the ability to build anything in Canada. It's not your job to answer for that; it's the politicians' job.

Because there was a budget allotment relating to the transition between the NEB to whatever ends up coming out of Bill C-69, is your department involved in the plans for that transition? Are you able to shed any light on what the timeline would look like? Can I get some details on that?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

As the committee chair will I'm surely appreciate—given the lively discussions that are currently taking place in the Senate—it would be premature for us to pronounce on how the transition will take shape. Officials are reflecting on all of those considerations, but we need to see how the legislative piece lands before we can firm up all of those plans. We're getting ready for that implementation, should Parliament decide to approve it.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

In our committee study and recommendations, page 5 of the report noted the importance of how society perceives energy development and public confidence. I would argue that the Liberals have campaigned against Canada's world-renowned track record of regulatory reviews of energy projects.

You'll remember that the Liberals campaigned on a loss of confidence in the National Energy Board, even though they never provided a shred of evidence about that. I am confident that you all know that Canada, for decades, when benchmarked substantively against other energy-producing countries in the world, has literally been second to none on all the measures of concern.

Given the comments by the Liberal Minister of Democratic Institutions, who said, “It's time to landlock Alberta's tar sands”, and the Prime Minister's rejection of the Enbridge pipeline, thereby removing the potential for standalone exports to Asia-Pacific, do you have any comments, first of all, on what rhetoric like that by elected representatives does to Canada's reputation as a responsible energy producer? Since you're experts, could you inform everybody, and that Liberal minister in particular, once and for all, if there is actually any tar in the oil sands?

(1600)

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

It's probably not appropriate for me to comment on an exchange from a minister's and MP's perspective, but with regard to making sure that the facts of the full carbon cycle from wells to wheels in terms of our production methods are communicated, I can certainly reassure committee members that the impact we're having and the progress we're making in environmental outcomes are communicated clearly.

That's something we strive to do, not just domestically, but also for investors and key partner countries that, as you can appreciate, we're interacting with daily and who are seeking information and evidence with regard to our work. I would also add that a key element of our plan is making sure that they are included in scientific evidence and facts. We're privileged to have, in our universities and in our national labs, highly respected experts who are able to bring those facts, figures and evidence to the interests of those investors and players so they can make informed decisions.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It would certainly be difficult.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

The same is true for the IEA, for instance, where we're a very active member, to make sure that Canada can present the facts as they are.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

And there is no tar in the oil sands.

Quickly on the Liberal fuel standard, I just wonder if you have you been consulted as a department in the development of the Liberal fuel standard. While the environment department admits they have no modelling for emissions reductions or the cost consequences of the fuel standard, I just wonder if your department has been engaged in the development of it—or maybe you are now, now that they're consulting in the back end, even though they announced it in December—particularly with regard to cost consequences for refiners in Canada.

Mr. Chris Evans:

Certainly our department is working with ECCC in supporting them with analysis and working with our stakeholders as well to take on board their views, conducting analysis and feeding it into the ECCC-led process, yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you all for coming here today; it's been interesting.

I think I'll just pick up on some of the things Mr. Evans said, just to get some clarification. You say there's growth in oil demand around the world. Is that from the IEA projections, which you were talking about, or is it NEB?

Mr. Chris Evans:

I don't have the figures from the International Energy Agency's forecast.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm sorry—

Mr. Chris Evans:

What I was speaking of in terms of the 1.7 million barrels growth out to 2030 was the National Energy Board forecasts.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

That's the production, right, whereas the other one was demand.

Mr. Chris Evans:

It was the forecasted growth in production to meet demand.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I just wanted to make sure I heard the following right. Did you say the world will have more oil than it needs as Canadian production increases?

Mr. Chris Evans:

If those were my words, that was not what I intended to say.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

That's why I wanted to make sure I heard it clearly.

(1605)

Mr. Chris Evans:

I only want to speak in the Canadian context.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Okay.

Mr. Chris Evans:

I prefer not to speak to the International Energy Agency's demand forecasts, because I don't have the numbers before me. Essentially what I was saying was that there is a forecast for growth in oil production in Canada, and that is intended to meet what is understood to be a demand growth globally.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Okay, and so you won't.... I know we had a question about the North Sea, but you can't comment on what the American production might look like over the next few decades.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I think those authoritative sources like the IEA and NEB are probably the most reliable sources for domestic production. We don't have an opinion on what oil this displaces.... It all goes to the world markets, and as we've seen in recent years, there can be a significant shift based on technological developments. It's certainly the case in U.S. oil and gas production, where we've seen a major spike that was not foreseen by anybody. We're continuously tracking both the public and private sector forecasts, and we take them as part of our discussions. However, at the end of the day, it's a market-driven approach in allocation of resources.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I've seen analyses that the American production doesn't show any signs of tailing off in 10 years. It just seems to be staying where it is, if not increasing. I've also seen analyses about the IEA forecasts being consistently, year after year after year, 10% too high.

I'm just a bit wary of some of the statistics I see in some of the forecasts. I know when the National Energy Board was before us for the study we're talking about today, they presented world energy demand curves. When I asked them about that...these were two years out of date, they were before Paris, they were before the tight oil production situation and everything. When they came back a year later, it was very different.

I just wanted to make sure I understood what you said. I guess I misunderstood you, so thank you for that.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

If I may add, Mr. Chair, I'm trained as an economist and we have a good old joke in economic forecasting, which I guess could also apply to weathermen or other domains: Pick a number, pick a date, but never the two of them together.

I think the same challenges apply in the oil and gas markets. It is hard to predict with certainty what's going to happen despite the best minds and the best data. Things are constantly changing in the marketplace.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I heard one of Canada's best resource economists say we're here to make astrologers look good.

I just wanted to get some clarity on that.

Getting back to the study, one of the things we heard—and I remember Professor Monica Gattinger talking about her concerns with respect to the lack of trust in the regulatory system—was that trust would continue to erode until the regulatory system was fixed, or the holes in it were fixed.

Could you comment on what's been done there, what Bill C-69 was meant to address in that regard and where that stands?

Mr. Chris Evans:

In terms of Bill C-69, the overall objectives of the act were to put in place a framework that would give greater transparency to everybody involved in the regulatory process and to restore public trust. This would be in recognition of the fact that efficient, credible and predictable assessments in decision-making processes are critical to attracting investment and maintaining competitiveness.

The overall process would create an impact assessment system with better timelines and greater clarity from the start for all stakeholders, both proponents and Canadians at large, and be built with a lot of engagement with first nations.

Right now, as you know, Bill C-69 is before the Senate Standing Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources, with all of the parliamentary activity that involves. I don't think we're in a great position to comment more on it.

(1610)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I have 30 seconds left and I would like to get one more clarification because I thought I heard you incorrectly. When you were talking about the $1.6 billion and what that was made up of, I thought you said you started off with $1 billion for the EDC. Was that correct?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

That's right.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

That's all I need. Thanks.

The Chair:

Mr. Hehr.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Thanks to our honoured guests for being here.

I have a follow-up question to Mr. Whalen's. You guys were describing our pipeline capacity and how we're going to be moving forward on the Trans Mountain pipeline the right way, and with Enbridge Line 3 and Keystone XL. That roughly equates to oil sands growth in the near term. Is that correct?

Mr. Chris Evans:

If you just take the nameplate capacity of those three pipelines—the incremental new capacity—it would match what the NEB forecasted as growth in Canada's production.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

The timing on some of these is a little unclear. This is like the joke Mr. Des Rosiers made earlier, which could also apply to pipelines. Some of those things are outside of our control, given what's happening in the jurisdiction south of the border, particularly with regard to Keystone and other things.

Are we looking at plans to develop more rail capacity and ability to get more oil by rail? Where are we on that? Have the costs come down on how that process is unfolding?

Mr. Chris Evans:

In the media it was reported that the Province of Alberta was looking at rail procurement for its provincial purposes. The federal government generally takes the view, I believe, that it's the market that determines what's the best supply-and-demand matching.... Although Alberta has made an approach, our department is not looking at anything in particular beyond that.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Okay. Thank you for that answer.

Given that 45 nations and 24 subnational governments have carbon pricing, that seems to be the move towards things being as they are. You mentioned earlier that you guys are working on things that lower the carbon usage or the carbon being emitted to the atmosphere in our oil production, not only in the oil sands but elsewhere. How are those projections going? What are you guys seeing? Are our oil companies and things taking this issue seriously?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Mr. Chair, it's right to note that carbon pricing is seen widely by economists around the world as one of those powerful means to signal to the marketplace how to allocate resources and make investments, whether they're producers, consumers or heavy industries. When you're able to weave that into your everyday budget allocation, it certainly has a very powerful impact. It's not surprising that some of the world's super majors have actually been among the most vocal supporters for having a carbon-pricing regime, and I'm not trying to take a comment from an individual jurisdiction perspective, but just in terms of research and economics, that's a textbook case of using pricing signals to allocate resources.

To the question, most certainly companies are paying close attention. This is not going to be a surprise to committee members: many companies are having so-called shadow prices in terms of their research allocation, i.e., that whether a given jurisdiction has a carbon price or not, they tend to build in a price for the medium- to long-term decisions they're making. As you can appreciate, in the oil and gas sector it's not uncommon to make an investment on a 20-, 30- or 40-year horizon in order to recoup very large capital investments. Companies typically don't reveal those shadow prices, but they have a shadow price for their investment decisions across large jurisdictions or their global operations to take into account what they foresee to be the operating environment in years to come. In effect, many of the large companies that are succeeding are actually doing this already.

(1615)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Fabulous.

You mentioned LNG Canada. Of course, that's a tremendous success story that we're very proud of and that can not only move our economy forward but help with world GHG emissions. In fact, if we do it right and get it to markets overseas, this will help reduce global GHGs and global warming and climate change. Is there capacity in terms of projections for Canada to have more production of LNG here? What would be our potential here to develop that? Do we have an ability to do that?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Most certainly, there's potential to have other projects. These are large-scale projects that require careful consideration by the investors given the sheer scale and the impact in terms of infrastructure, but we do have multiple projects on both the west coast and the east coast that are at different stages of review and consideration.

I think it's fair to say that the LNG Canada investment was a major signal to the marketplace that Canada is a competitive nation when it comes to energy investments. Already we were aware of many projects on both coasts that were under consideration, but that really gave it a significant amount of profile and a boost in terms of Canada's credibility to make those things happen.

We're certainly tracking those discussions, which are confidential and involve many parties, but we're hopeful that in the coming years there will be more of those.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I have a quick question to follow up on Ms. Stubbs' line of questioning. It appears to me right now that what we were operating on before was the 2012 process for developing pipelines that put in place by the Conservatives and, at least from my view, if there has been a “no pipeline bill”, that would essentially be it, as it led to pipelines being in court, not in the ground.

In any event, I know that Bill C-69 has tried to deal with some of that and some of your work around that. Can you talk about early engagement? It seems like that was not as significantly involved in the earlier 2012 process. Is that incorporated in Bill C-69?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I'm not sure I understand the question.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's about the early engagement of indigenous peoples.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

That certainly is a prominent feature in our engagement. We're reminded by the courts, by the Federal Court of Appeal this year, of the importance of doing that, and doing that thoroughly. The government took that most seriously. As you've seen, we've devoted considerable efforts, with the help of former Supreme Court Justice Iacobucci, to making sure that we're doing this in the spirit of what the court was advising us to do. We're going through those motions at this very moment; absolutely.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, you have five minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

I appreciate your coming and speaking with us today.

I'm wondering if you could tell this committee how many pipelines were approved and built under the previous Conservative government in the previous 10 years.

Mr. Chris Evans:

I'm afraid I don't have the data on that. I apologize; we didn't bring that in our briefing book.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

No? Okay: How about the Kinder Morgan Anchor Loop, the Enbridge Line 9 reversal, the Enbridge Alberta Clipper and the TransCanada Keystone pipeline? We can even talk about others as well.

Maybe to go back to Mr. Hehr's question, in the top 10 oil-producing countries in the world, how many of those top 10 have a carbon tax?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I feel I'm being asked to play trivia here.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers: I suspect that the committee member may have the answer.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

The answer is zero.

The Chair:

There's no prize, I might add.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

The answer is absolutely zero.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Oh, there's a big prize: October 21.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's right, October 21.

Now, when my friend Mr. Hehr talked about how it was the Conservatives talking about Bill C-69, calling it the “no more pipelines bill”, it actually wasn't us. We picked it up from industry. They coined that term and we took it from them.

Maybe you can tell us a bit about competitiveness overall in Canada and how we are faring.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I welcome the chance to cover this, because it is a key preoccupation right now across the country and the industry. We hear that loud and clear every time we engage with those players to make sure that Canada is a clean producer but also cost-competitive. I mentioned the extraordinary degree of innovation but also entrepreneurial spirit in the country.

As we've seen in history in so many ways, a crisis will kind of force humans to come up with extraordinary solutions. I think we've seen this happen again and again in Canada's oil and gas sector. Most recently, with the price downturn, we've seen those companies and individuals looking at all sorts of innovative ways to reduce their costs of operation. They're changing some of the technologies they use, looking at their use of the labour force, looking at reducing the input of productions in their activities, and trying to consolidate in some cases the industry players in their domains. All of this has led to very significant cost reductions, driven by those firms. We are in regular discussions with all the major oil and gas producers in Canada. It's truly impressive what they've managed to do to reduce their costs of operation at the firm level.

From a country's perspective, as I mentioned earlier, the government featured this prominently in the 2018 fiscal update. The principal announcement in that update was around competitiveness and bringing about measures in our tax system to accelerate the capital cost allowance of some of the large investments. This was seen also in the context of the competitive landscape, especially in North America, where south of the border some major corporate tax announcements were made and the government came up with fairly sizable corporate tax measures to the tune of $5 billion a year. It was certainly not trivial in terms of changing that landscape.

(1620)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

How aggressive is the United States' oil and gas industry right now? You just talked a bit about it, but can you do a very quick comparison of the two countries and how they are different?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

On both sides of the border, this is an intensely competitive industry, not just Canada-U.S. but also globally. Canada has to constantly make sure that we're able to play at par.

I can certainly comment briefly in terms of our overall tax regime. Looking at the corporate tax rates, in terms of effective tax rates, Canada compares quite advantageously not just with the U.S. but also with global G7 competitors. I think we're in good stead in that regard.

In terms of skilled talent, Canada is doing remarkably well in terms of our engineering and technical talent. Again, as for entrepreneurial flair, our country's workforce is second to none in terms of expertise in that domain. We see this not just in Canada but around the world. Our engineers and our experts are consistently sought after to bring their expertise.

So there are many dimensions to competitiveness. I will not try, in my 30 seconds, to answer it fully. I would just reassure you—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We're seeing billions of dollars—

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

—that this is something we're very—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

—in investment fleeing Canada.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

—seized with, and we're working hard to continue to improve. It's an ongoing effort that every country has to pay attention to.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Since we're on the theme—

The Chair:

You're right on time there.

Mr. Jamie Schmale: Oh. All right.

The Chair: I hate to be the bearer of bad news.

Your colleague to the right can tell you what it's like.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Graham, you have the floor. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Des Rosiers, in your opening remarks, you mentioned 276,000 jobs in the oil and gas sector.

What does this figure include? Does it go so far as to include gas station attendants in the retail sector? Who does it cover? [English]

Mr. Chris Evans:

That figure was for direct employment.[Translation]

I'm sorry, the question was addressed to my colleague.[English]

The same data source that gives us the 276,000 direct jobs would give 900,000 if indirect jobs were counted. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's true.

Slide number 5 talks about new technologies for managing wastewater.

Can you talk more about it? Are we going to get to the point where wastewater could be transformed back into drinking water? If not, what do we do with this water?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

You're referring to the work on retention basins.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

This is a significant issue, which has been raised many times by our citizens and clients. We have all seen the images of these huge basins that could and do pose short-, medium- and long-term problems. In the mining sector, for example, we have seen significant risks of spills in this regard. This explains our attention and that of the industry to develop extraction processes that do not generate large retention basins of this type. In this regard, there are various technologies that are at the demonstration stage before they can be exploited on a commercial scale.

I mentioned another initiative a moment ago. We have been talking about this for several years now, and now we have reached the stage of carrying out these large-scale projects. The aim is to be able to extract hydrocarbon residues from these large ponds that are still commercially attractive, as well as metals, in particular heavy metals such as titanium, and therefore be able to sell them on the global market in order to generate products.

This technology has been under development for several years by Titanium Corporation. It is preparing, with major oil and gas companies, to carry out a project worth $400 million to make this dream a reality. This is a golden opportunity for Canada to reduce or eliminate these types of facilities that are of concern to our citizens.

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With regard to the tailings we already have, is there any way or any upcoming technology that can transform wastewater into drinking water? Will it be recycled later in one way or another?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

The main concern at present[English]—and maybe my colleague, Dr. Siewe, could elaborate on this, as the lab definitely does a lot of water research to reduce the amount of freshwater intake into the process—[Translation]

and therefore to use the current water in several usage cycles. Does the water become potable?[English]

I'll leave that to my colleague, who is more expert than I am.

Mrs. Cecile Siewe (Director General, Innovation and Energy Technology Sector, CanmetENERGY-Devon):

It's not possible to recycle the water yet, but the intention is to reduce the amount of fresh water as much as possible, and then have investigation and R and D into the treatment process, to get it as close as possible to a state that allows you to return it. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Concerning the transformation technology for CO2—we also talk about it on the same page—what solution have you already found? What can we already do with CO2?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Thank you for the question.

This is really a fast-growing sector, where Canada is a world leader in capturing CO2 at the source. There are different carbon capture techniques. It can be captured on industrial sites and even in the air. Carbon Engineering of Squamish, British Columbia, is a world leader in the field and has attracted significant investment from major institutional investors.

The fields of application are numerous. When we think of CO2, we think of negative repercussions, whereas it can be transformed into useful products. Among the Canadian companies that stand out in this regard are CarbonCure Technologies, which reinjects CO2 into concrete or cement to improve its chemical properties and make it more robust and efficient, while reducing production costs. It is very successful not only in Canada, but also in North America, with nearly 100 sites operating commercially throughout the Americas. This company is also the subject of strong interest in other markets around the world. This is an example of a company with great potential. This can also be used to produce plastics or other building materials. There is a strong interest here.

Canada, Canadian and American companies have joined forces with the XPRIZE Foundation, which launches major global competitions and has invested $20 million to gather ideas in the field. The most popular competition in the history of XPRIZE Foundation was the development of new uses for CO2. The good news is that many of the companies selected are Canadian.

At the end of the month, a major ministerial conference will be held in Vancouver, which will bring together the 25 major players in the clean energy sector. Canada will host Clean Energy Ministerial and Mission Innovation-4 to celebrate these types of companies and solutions that are available to the world. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Falk.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you, witnesses, for your presentation here today.

I've got more questions than time. I will start with one question.

Earlier today I was able to meet with the Mining Association of Canada. One of their concerns was a Liberal fuel standard that's being proposed. You mentioned earlier in your presentation that from a tax perspective we are very competitive with our major competition, the United States. They don't have a carbon tax. When you consider the carbon tax and a proposed Liberal fuel standard that could amount to anywhere from $150 to $400 per tonne of carbon, how will that position us competitively?

(1630)

Mr. Chris Evans:

In developing the fuel standard, I think the government recognizes the impacts that climate change is having on Canada and the world and is committed to addressing it. The clean fuel standard is part of that. It's led by Environment and Climate Change Canada. The government has stated an objective through that of reducing carbon pollution by 30 megatonnes by 2030, which is equivalent to taking about seven million cars off the road.

As I mentioned earlier, our department continues to work with ECCC on this file in understanding the impact on stakeholders, in terms of of analysis, and providing that input to them so they can continue their work in refining the shape this may take.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Have you done any modelling on how this might impact our natural gas and oil producers? We already know that over $80 billion in investment in our energy sector has gone south or elsewhere in the last three years.

How would a Liberal fuel standard impact that?

Mr. Chris Evans:

As I said, we continue to work with stakeholders on the analysis. A lot of them are looking at understanding the impacts this standard may have on their industries. I can't give you technical details here on the structure of the analysis that's been happening, but we are continuing to work with these interested parties to make sure that we understand their perspective and that we're looking at what we understand it will mean to the industry. We're making sure that ECCC is aware of that in shaping the final standard.

Mr. Ted Falk:

The mining executives I met today reminded me of how many investment dollars have left our country when it comes to development of more metal mines. Does the department have an analysis on what the prognosis is, going forward?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Our colleagues from the mining sector, which is part of NRCan, are certainly attuned to that. You may have noted that we most recently published a mineral action plan for Canada in conjunction with our provincial stakeholders, which is precisely meant to address that very point about making sure that Canada has an agreed-upon game plan that is accepted and supported by all. I must say that the degree of support around that mineral action plan was extraordinarily high, including from our colleagues from the Mining Association of Canada, along with a large number of stakeholders. It was presented at the PDAC, which as you know is the Prospectors and Developers Association's meeting, gathering tens of thousands of players from Canada and around the world. The work will carry on over the coming months to shape up the various components of that action plan. But we're working very actively on that very point.

Mr. Ted Falk:

If I heard you correctly, you said earlier that we will require additional pipelines to be built to meet up with production. I'd like you to clarify that.

Mr. Chris Evans:

I only commented on the National Energy Board's forecast for production growth and on the nameplate capacity. I am not stating an opinion about public need. That is for another organization. That's part of the National Energy Board's review process, and that will be part of the impending decision of the Governor in Council. It's not appropriate for me to comment on that.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Mr. Ted Falk:

What do you see as the major impediments in fast-tracking the TMX?

Mr. Chris Evans:

That, I think, is sort of a question that would be beyond the scope of what I'm really to opine on.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

The Chair:

Mr. Hehr, we'll go back to you.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I note that you brought up towards the end of your presentation the government's $100 million investment in CRIN and that a group of people came from Calgary to Ottawa to discuss this initiative. You say that the group has been collaborating for the last year. Can you shed a little more light on it and tell us what this group is doing and what outcomes we can expect?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Sure.

Recognizing that this is led by industry and universities out west— I don't speak on their behalf, and I certainly haven't been directly involved in it—I'll perhaps ask my colleague Dr. Cecile Siewe, who is part of the governance of the CRIN, to add to my remarks.

We do have, thanks to this network, both Canada's oil and natural gas producers coming together to really make sure that the ecosystem is efficiently managed. They have established a number of working groups and focus areas, which touch on water technology, which we talked about, novel extraction technology, which we've talked about just earlier. They are looking at novel production and end use, cleaner fuels, methane. There are number of domains that are under consideration, and they want to make sure there is clarity in terms of what is needed from the adopters' perspective. So the oil and gas companies, in this case, are making sure they communicate that clearly to people like Dr. Cecile Siewe in the national lab, to colleagues in universities, to small firms, so that they know exactly what they're looking for.

Is that correct?

(1635)

Mrs. Cecile Siewe:

Absolutely.

One of the rationales for CRIN was really developing that ecosystem in the energy industry to minimize duplication, just increase the level of awareness, build a network of the different parties working in that space—what is going on, who is doing what, what gaps the different parties are trying complete—and create that degree of leveraging of effort so that you can both accelerate the pace of development toward getting commercialized solutions and create synergies between what has already gone on in the different companies in actually addressing some of those gaps.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

This is an exciting project that, hopefully, will wield some excellent results.

Here's a follow-up question to your presentation. You were saying that much work has been done on tailing ponds.

I was actually in the Alberta legislature in 2008 when there was an incident where ducks were migrating and they perished in the tailings ponds. I think at that time it was highlighted, and we faced a lot of pressure from not only Canadian citizens but the international community to try to do better in terms of environmental protection and things of that nature. Could you give me an update on where we are on that and what types of technologies we're using to reduce tailings ponds?

Mrs. Cecile Siewe:

I will take that in three parts.

I will start with generating the ponds. What we're doing and investigating and working on in collaboration with industry is how we can ensure that less of the material goes into the tailing ponds. This is where new technologies, like using a hybrid, which use a lot less water, or you use no water at all in the extraction process, generates a different kind of tailings that doesn't have as much water in it. It consolidates faster. That is one aspect of addressing the tailing ponds issues.

Then with the material that's already been generated, we are looking at things like the geotechnical stability of the tailings ponds. We work in collaboration with our colleagues in the Canadian Forest Service, CFS. We have to get the ponds stable before we can starting talking about reclamation, so we work in collaboration with them on that.

We also look at things like the GHG emissions from the tailings ponds. How can we mitigate or manage them? How can you also ensure the release of water from the tailings ponds? To what extent can you treat the water that is released so that it can be reused or released back into the environment. It's a multi-faceted approach which is still ongoing.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Perhaps you know, Mr. Chair, that the ocean protection plan added a $1.5-billion envelope that committed investment in equipment and scientists—like the one that Dr. Cecile Siewe just described—who are able to have specialized equipment. Specialized staff were able to evaluate the kinds of opportunities that we just talked about.

The Chair:

You can have a quick question.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Is NRCan developing more frameworks and more robust systems to allow geothermal to happen throughout Canada?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Yes, we are. I welcome the question, Mr. Chair, about geothermal energy.

I would say that this is the missing link in Canada. If you travel in Europe, if you travel in the U.S. and many countries, you would see its presence. You might wonder why we don't have any more here. It's not because we don't have opportunities. If you look at the geothermal map that we produce at NRCan, you will see that we actually have plenty of resources in the country—in the east, west, south, and in the north as well where we have fantastic potential to develop this.

Perhaps because we have such abundant energy supply in all forms—renewable energy and fossil—it was somewhat overlooked. We really felt it was missing in our game because it was such an attractive proposition. We were very happy to announce recently a project in Saskatchewan, the project DEEP, which is looking at having an industrial-scale electricity generation capacity using geothermal energy.

We just announced a couple of weeks ago another project, the Eavor-Loop. This one, I want to say, is in Alberta, but I reserve judgment on that. Interestingly, it is looking at oil and gas experts, horizontal drillers. Those same people who do horizontal drilling in the oil and gas sector brought their expertise to do two vertical drills and then make a geothermal plate that is even more stable, efficient and productive. This is a world first. We're really pleased to see it. one. We are curious to see how the demo turns out.

(1640)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Cannings, you have three minutes.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm going to move on. This is something we studied in a different study: the energy data centre, or whatever you would call it. I think in the latest budget there was some money for Statistics Canada to take that up.

Is that where it has landed?

I think a lot of us around this committee and a lot of us across the country would like to have a source of energy data that's open to the public, that's timely, that's transparent and accurate. Then I wouldn't have to ask you all of these questions about things. I'm just wondering if that's where it's landed.

If you know, why wasn't there a separate body created as there is in the United States, where you have something that's truly apart from government that could be seen as unbiased?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Yes, I certainly welcome the questions.

Do you want to take a crack at it?

Mr. Chris Evans:

Certainly. Following the study that you did, I think from April to June last year, you made the point that accurate and reliable information was important to Canada's energy future and to people having a transparent understanding of the market. Through budget 2019, as you observed, there was money given and, in collaboration with provinces and territories, the government has been working to launch a response to what was essentially the first recommendation in your report, namely, for a virtual one-stop shop to bring together and rationalize information, not only from Statistics Canada but from other public institutions and the private sector as well.

Stats Canada, as you know, has world-class expertise in collecting and managing data, so it provides a hard core to this endeavour. It maintains data sharing agreements with provinces, territories and other organizations and positions them to undertake this work well.

The portal, in fact, is expected to be launched relatively soon, recognizing that this energy information co-operation will be a key area for working with provinces and territories. It will be continued through the upcoming energy and mines ministers conference. It's going to happen in July in British Columbia.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I just note that the member of Parliament, Mr. Chair, is not alone in looking for this kind of information. That's something we heard a lot during the Generation Energy discussion. People are curious. They want to have the data, the evidence. They want to forge their own opinions. We think that having this portal and this data available will help inform the public debate.

The Chair:

We have about 15 minutes left. We've gone through two rounds. We could do another round. I propose maybe four minutes per party, if there's an appetite for that, or we could stop now. What's the will of the room?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I have a couple more.

The Chair:

Okay. Why don't we go Conservative, Liberal, NDP, finish? You can have the last word, Richard. How's that?

You have four minutes each.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

So $1.6 billion. Can you elaborate a little bit more on where that money was and who got it?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Sure. I could do it.

On the first tranche, that $1 billion for EDC, we were in touch with those colleagues earlier to take stock of how things are shaping up. Their latest assessment is that they expect to have something in the order of $500 million of that amount be committed by the end of this year—in the coming six to seven months. This money is there to provide for some of the working capital needs of companies that are looking to export, principally, and to find new markets.

The second one is the $500-million inflow from the Business Development Bank. This is geared toward providing some commercial financing, especially to small and medium-sized enterprises in the oil and gas sector. They've committed some $50.8 million in new commercial support thus far. They expect to provide an additional $150 million in support between now and the end of June, within a month or so. They expect to commit another $335 million of ongoing commercial support, so it looks like it's well on track.

(1645)

Mr. Ted Falk:

What is the EDC doing with the $1 billion it has?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I don't know if you want to add to this, Chris, but it's funding to support companies to invest in innovative technologies and for their working capital needs to export to new markets. That's essentially the gist of it.

Do you want to add anything more to that?

Mr. Chris Evans:

No, I think that captures it. The numbers you gave accurately explain how the $500 million that they were planning out of the $1 billion for this year would be rolled out.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

And just to note—

Mr. Ted Falk:

I understand that, but what would that $500 million be used for? I understand it is for support, but what does that look like? What kind of companies are getting it? What are they using it for? Is it an outright grant? Is it a repayable loan?

Mr. Chris Evans:

I can give you, if it would help, examples of the sorts of interventions the BDC has made. We have two nice illustrative examples that will really drive home in concrete terms how small Canadian companies have benefited from receiving that money.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Just know that we cannot share commercially sensitive information, so we're using generic cases, albeit they are real. We cannot reveal a company's name.

Mr. Chris Evans:

For example, one of the companies that received BDC financing was a drilling waste management client that had a challenge, because its primary bank was pulling back on financing options because of the challenges in the reduced oil and gas rig count in Canada and in light of the production curtailment in Alberta. BDC, recognizing the niche environment of waste reduction and its cost-effectiveness, elected to provide financing, which allowed the client to continue a diversification strategy and enhance its product offering, including hiring an environmental engineer to provide a more comprehensive suite of products.

A second example was a client that was facing challenges in the hauling industry due to the economic downturn, in this case in Alberta, again related to the need to adapt to some of the production cuts that can impact the hauling industry. BDC provided working capital as a loan that gave the client the opportunity and time to adjust its business structure to the changing market conditions, allowing it to diversify its services and provide hauling in different industries. This particular company decided to expand into a service called vacuum trucks, which allowed the company, through that loan, to maintain its liquid position and to be successful.

BDC has given out, as of April 30, 392 commercial loans totalling $97 million out of the $500 million envelope.

The Chair:

Thanks for that.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Des Rosiers, if you wish to comment, please go ahead.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I'll be very brief. The $500 million has been fully allocated and those projects have been announced in large part. Others will come in the coming weeks, but they involve a number of projects around the country.

As for the strategic innovation fund, the $100 million has been fully committed. Half of it has been announced for our petrochemical projects—two main projects in western Canada. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would like to come back to this research we were talking about earlier.

We know how much plastic waste causes huge problems all over the world. It's found in enormous quantities in the oceans, in particular. Has research been conducted on the possibility of converting old plastics or plastic waste into usable fuel or gas?

(1650)

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Effectively. The theme of plastics dominated the G7's work, both for the heads of state last June and during the meeting of Canada's Environment, Oceans and Energy Ministers in September.

The Government of Canada continued its efforts in this area in three departments: Environment and Climate Change, Natural Resources, and Fisheries and Oceans. We have challenged ourselves precisely to convert plastics into energy, whether it is thermal energy or liquid fuels. Various technologies are involved. We are very keen to develop this type of process, not only in our labs, but also with outside partners.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll come back to the report that the committee tabled in 2016, before I became a member of the committee. The government then presented its response to this report, in which it discussed collaboration with the United States, particularly in the area of research. Can you tell us about the results of this collaboration?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

This collaboration is generating a lot of interest, both among companies and governments. In particular, we are working with the USDOE national laboratories, the U.S. Department of Energy, to develop approaches that would work for our companies, which do business on both sides of the border. Our collaboration continues, as our American partners are also very keen to see their companies able to do business on both sides of the border.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there other countries we work with so closely or we collaborate well with?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

In this sector, I would say that our closest relationship is with the United States. However, we also collaborate with European and Asian colleagues. Several of them will be present at the meeting in Vancouver, where many of these discussions will continue.

Few people seem to be aware that Canada has a reputation as a major player in the clean energy sector. Indeed, many countries are offering to collaborate with us. However, we have chosen to focus mainly on the United States, Europe and Asia.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the same report, the need to consult and further involve indigenous communities was also mentioned. In fact, as you know, our committee has been working on this specific subject for several months. Can you comment and tell us where these steps stand?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

What are you talking about in relation to indigenous people?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I am talking about consultations on any project, particularly pipeline projects, in which they are involved. In its response to the 2016 report, the government committed to increasing its collaboration with indigenous communities. I want to know where we are on this.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

That's right.

As you know, this applies to the oil and gas sector, particularly for pipeline projects, such as the consultations we are conducting in response to the Court of Appeal's decision. This also applies to all major projects that focus on Canada's energy, mining and forestry resources. We do it rigorously.

We are also exploring another area that is generating great enthusiasm and involvement from our partners in indigenous communities. Specifically, we are looking for ways to reduce their reliance on diesel to produce energy and allow them to migrate to clean energy sources, focus on renewable energy and store energy. Just recently, we launched a $20 million program to train a new generation in this area. We have a large number of projects under way with indigenous communities across the country to help them make this transition to clean energy sources.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Cannings, you're last, but not least.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm trying to think of a way to wrap up here, because I'm still a bit....

We have the IPCC report that tells us that if we're going to meet our targets, not just in Canada but around the world, we are going to have to start cutting back significantly on our oil use around the world. The curve goes down steeply, to basically zero by 2050—30 years from now.

I'm wondering if NRCan ever looks at those scenarios and believes that maybe the world can do this, that maybe we can beat climate change, or do you throw up your hands and say, “I hope those IPCC scientists are wrong. We hope that the other countries of the world won't meet their targets, so that all of this investment won't be for naught.”

Every day, I'm puzzled at that scenario. We are facing this world problem and yet I come here and hear there are plans for increased production—not just here but around the world.

I'm wondering how you deal with that at NRCan.

(1655)

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Mr. Chair, the question by committee members with regard to the IPCC is one that we take extremely seriously. This is why this government has invested such a large amount of effort in the development of a pan-Canadian framework on climate change.

This department, NRCan, is the delivery arm for the majority of those programs, whether it's trying to green the oil and gas sector and looking at transformative technologies to sharply reduce GHG emissions, whether it's looking at transportation where we have a number of efforts trying to electrify the fleet and making this more and more commonplace—and we're starting to see it in our streets—or whether it's working on energy efficiency and looking at net-zero solutions for both residences and commercial buildings. We're pursuing this with vigour.

We are certainly keenly aware of it. Another part of our mandate is looking at the impact on the country of adaptation to climate change. It's not just from reports that we are getting some warning signals, but we actually see it on the ground, affecting our north, our communities. As we've seen in the flooding season again this past spring, there is a very real impact on our population.

Of course, there are reasons to be preoccupied. There are also reasons to be optimistic that Canada will be among the leaders in trying to drive to that low-carbon future. Again, during the ministerial meetings every month, there is an opportunity for all of us to share what we can do in terms of technology, partnerships, and new financing modes, so that we can bring the private sector to help us engineer that transition.

We are pursuing this with vigour, but with humility as well, recognizing that there's a lot more to be done to get to the kind of medium-term target that the IPCC is driving us toward. When thinking of those minus 40%, minus 50% GHG reductions by the year 2050, we'll need to redouble our efforts in the years to come, for sure.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm sure that we'll be needing oil and gas for years to come. I'm not confused about that.

However, here we are saying that we have to use less and less, and we're doing all we can to produce more and more. That's the conundrum that I face, and when I hear this testimony, it doesn't go away.

Thank you.

The Chair:

You have about 20 seconds left. Mr. Whalen tells me he has a very intriguing question to ask.

Ask it very quickly.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Mr. Evans, we talked earlier about the NEB's projections for future production capacity. It seems to me that it's one of those instances where there's a lot of yin and yang between distribution capacity and expected production. There's no strategic petroleum reserve or a place to store large amounts of oil in Alberta to provide that buffer so that people can ramp up their production beyond what's available for distribution beyond the province.

Is there capacity for oil and gas to be expanded beyond the current distribution capacity? Would the NEB be in a position where...? Did the report mention that production could expand beyond the forecasted distribution amounts but that it cannot, because there's nowhere to store the oil?

Mr. Chris Evans:

When the NEB is making those forecasts, it provides more than one case, so we use the reference case as the baseline. It takes into account a lot of factors at a high level, and I'm not privy to everything used in balancing out how it arrives at its forecasts. I can't specifically address the storage issue.

However, we do know that in Alberta, they often speak about how much petroleum product they can store right now. Sometimes, you'll see references in the papers to storage in the 30-million barrel range.

I don't know how the NEB, in particular, would factor storage into its forecasting. I'm sorry.

The Chair:

Thank you.

That takes us to the end of the meeting.

Thank you all very much for joining us today. I appreciate the update. I think everybody will agree that it was very helpful and very informative.

We will see everybody on Thursday at 3:30.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Merci de vous joindre à nous.

Remontons dans le temps. En 2016, année où il a été mis sur pied, le Comité s'est attaqué tout d'abord à l'étude du secteur pétrolier et gazier, et il a produit un rapport, L’avenir des industries pétrolière et gazière au Canada: Innovation, solutions durables et débouchés économiques, auquel le gouvernement a donné une réponse. Aujourd'hui, nous faisons le point sur les mêmes enjeux, et les fonctionnaires du ministère des Ressources naturelles du Canada nous proposent une séance d'information sur l'état des lieux en 2019.

Merci de bien vouloir prendre le temps de comparaître. Après votre exposé, les députés vous adresseront des questions.

Bienvenue et merci.

M. Frank Des Rosiers (sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de l'innovation et de la technologie de l'énergie, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Merci, monsieur le président. C'est un plaisir de comparaître pour faire le point.

Deux collègues m'accompagnent, Cecile Siewe, directrice générale du laboratoire de CanmetÉNERGIE, à Devon, en Alberta, et Chris Evans, directeur principal à la Direction des ressources pétrolières, chez Ressources naturelles Canada.

Nous vous avons remis un bref exposé, mais je me suis dit que je pourrais vous en proposer un survol pour vous donner une idée de ce qui s’est passé depuis notre dernière rencontre consacrée à ce sujet.

Pour ce qui est du contexte général et de l’importance du secteur pétrolier et gazier au Canada, on peut dire qu'il s’agit d’une industrie majeure, qu'elle est la source de beaucoup d'emplois, d'une part importante du PIB et d'exportations considérables. Vous avez vu certaines de ces données dans le rapport même, mais il ne faut pas oublier que le secteur représente 276 000 emplois au Canada, ce qui intéresse beaucoup de travailleurs avec leurs familles, quelque 100 milliards de dollars en exportations et 5,6 % du PIB. Le Canada joue un rôle très important sur la scène mondiale dans la production et l’exportation de pétrole et de gaz naturel.

Comme nous le savons tous, l’industrie a traversé ces dernières années une période assez difficile, en particulier à cause de la baisse des cours mondiaux des produits de base. Ce sont surtout l'industrie et ceux qui y travaillent qui ont souffert le plus directement de ces difficultés.

Malgré les bouleversements à court terme, l’avenir à long terme de l’industrie pétrolière et gazière demeure très solide, comme le montrent les rapports de l’ONE et les évaluations menées par l’Agence internationale de l’énergie. En dépit de ces temps difficiles, nous avons eu notre part de bonnes nouvelles ces derniers temps, notamment l'annonce de quelques grands projets, dont le plus grand projet de l’histoire du Canada, LNG Canada, un projet de 40 milliards de dollars qui se réalisera en Colombie-Britannique. Il fera du Canada un acteur de premier plan dans le domaine du GNL, qui, comme nous le savons, est une tendance très importante sur les marchés de l’énergie à l’échelle mondiale, puisque nous sommes le producteur d’énergie le plus propre au monde. Cela nous aidera à desservir nos clients asiatiques qui essaient de délaisser le charbon.

Le projet Hebron, une initiative de 14 milliards de dollars, au large de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, est un autre projet important qui mérite d’être souligné. Il y a aussi de grands projets pétrochimiques, en Alberta, qui ont été annoncés au cours des derniers mois. Ce sont certainement des signes encourageants. [Français] On revient sur les éléments de la réponse du gouvernement au rapport que vous avez produit. Ils sont regroupés autour de quatre grands thèmes.[Traduction]

Le premier thème portait sur la collaboration et la coopération intergouvernementales, le deuxième sur le renforcement de la confiance du public et la transparence, le troisième sur la mobilisation des peuples autochtones et l’exploitation des ressources, et le quatrième sur l’innovation dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier.

J’espère pouvoir aborder certains de ces sujets dans mon exposé, mais, faute de temps, nous devrons peut-être en parler seulement pendant les questions.

Je voudrais attirer l'attention sur certaines des grandes initiatives en cours. Il y a le projet de loi C-69, dont le Sénat est actuellement saisi. Il y a aussi le travail de consultation sur le pipeline Trans Mountain, également en cours. Je tiens aussi à signaler l’investissement appréciable que le gouvernement a consenti pour l’innovation dans les technologies propres — quelque 3 milliards de dollars ont été injectés à ce jour, dont certains investissements clés dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier. Je vais en dire un mot.

L’étude de la mobilisation des citoyens a été un autre élément clé qui a retenu notre attention l’automne dernier. Le Conseil Génération Énergie de notre ministère consulte quelque 380 000 Canadiens sur l’avenir de l’énergie. De ces discussions, quatre orientations se sont dégagées, dont l'une est celle d'une production de pétrole et de gaz propres, ce qui demeure au cœur de notre plan de match.

Pour aller droit au but, la principale leçon à tirer de cette consultation, qui a duré plusieurs mois, c'est que les Canadiens veulent que nous soyons concurrentiels pour que notre industrie pétrolière et gazière puisse prospérer, et que nous soutenions les emplois et la création de richesse. Toutefois, ils sont aussi à la recherche de moyens d’améliorer la performance environnementale des points de vue tant des GES que des impacts de l'activité sur l’eau et les terres.

Ces deux thèmes ont été très présents tout au long des échanges, tout comme celui de l’innovation nécessaire pour atteindre l'objectif visé.

Ces derniers temps, l’industrie a traversé une période assez difficile. C'est pourquoi, en décembre dernier, le gouvernement a annoncé un programme de soutien totalisant 1,6 milliard de dollars pour aider les travailleurs et les collectivités touchés par la baisse des cours pétroliers et gaziers.

(1540)



Je voudrais dire un mot de certains des éléments clés de ce programme, le premier étant le soutien financier commercial de 1 milliard de dollars d’Exportation et développement Canada pour répondre aux besoins en fonds de roulement des entreprises, qu'il s'agit également d'aider à percer de nouveaux marchés d'exportation.

La deuxième enveloppe, de 500 millions de dollars cette fois, vient de la Banque de développement du Canada. Elle soutient le financement commercial nécessaire à la diversification des marchés.

Le troisième volet concerne la R-D. C'est un apport de 50 millions de dollars au programme de croissance propre de RNCan. La valeur de ces projets totalise 890 millions de dollars.

Le volet suivant provient du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation d’ISDE, le ministère de l’Innovation. Il s'agit d'un montant de 100 millions de dollars.

Enfin, il y a l’accès au Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, d’une valeur totale de 750 millions de dollars. Beaucoup d’engagements ont été pris à cet égard.

Pour terminer, les mesures fiscales. Dans la mise à jour relative à la situation financière, l’automne dernier, monsieur le président, il y a eu, comme mes collègues le savent, une annonce importante au sujet de mesures relatives la déduction pour amortissement accéléré visant à accroître la compétitivité de tous les secteurs industriels au Canada. La valeur totale de ces mesures était de l’ordre de 5 milliards de dollars en recettes fiscales cédées. De toute évidence, le secteur pétrolier et gazier, qui joue un rôle très important dans l’industrie nationale, est l’un de ceux qui en ont manifestement profité, surtout pour ses dépenses liées aux investissements en matériel de production d’énergie propre.

Cela m’amène à parler de l’équipe d’innovation, dont j’ai dit un mot plus tôt. Évidemment, je ne vais pas tout vous dire, mais, encore une fois, grâce aux échanges qui suivront, nous pourrons peut-être étoffer cette information. Le gouvernement central a étroitement collaboré avec l’industrie et les gouvernements provinciaux pour trouver des moyens de vraiment aider l’industrie à progresser à l'avenir, comme le titre de votre étude l’invite à le faire.

Bien que l’industrie fasse un excellent travail dans la recherche d'améliorations progressives, l'impression générale veut que nous devions avancer bien plus rapidement si nous voulons obtenir une meilleure performance environnementale et réduire les coûts. C’est là que des efforts renouvelés en matière de technologies d’extraction, de gestion des bassins de résidus, d’émissions atmosphériques et d’utilisation du carbone ont été largement considérés comme essentiels.

Je n’entrerai pas dans les détails, mais pour vous donner une petite idée, il y a des pistes prometteuses en technologies d’extraction, que nous et l’industrie explorons résolument et qui permettraient une réduction de l’ordre de 40 à 50 % à la fois des coûts de production et des émissions. Nous avons dans ce domaine un certain nombre de projets qui sont très intéressants et que nous menons très activement en ce moment.

C’est la même chose pour les résidus. Nous entendons beaucoup de préoccupations chez nos concitoyens quant à la façon dont nous pouvons affronter ces problèmes et réduire la production de ces bassins de décantation. Des efforts sont déployés à cet égard. Il s’agit également d’utiliser certains de ces bassins de décantation et d’en extraire les hydrocarbures et les métaux lourds précieux comme le titane pour en faire une meilleure utilisation. Le recyclage de certains de ces produits se fait dans l’esprit d’une économie cyclique.

Un projet à grande échelle est en voie de réalisation. Il a été annoncé par la province de l’Alberta avec Titanium Corporation, précisément pour recycler des produits.

Pour nous, ce sont des signes très encourageants qui montrent ce que le Canada peut faire. De tous les secteurs, celui du pétrole et du gaz au Canada est reconnu depuis des décennies comme étant extrêmement novateur et animé par un grand esprit d'entreprise. J’ai bon espoir que nous pourrons faire avancer ces projets avec succès.

L’avant-dernière diapositive explique un peu comment nous avons procédé. Comme vous le savez, le cadre pancanadien était axé sur la collaboration avec les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux. Nous estimions que c’était la bonne chose à faire que de porter une attention particulière à la façon dont nous faisions les choses.

À cet égard, je pourrais peut-être souligner trois éléments qui, à nos yeux, étaient très importants. Le premier est la création d’un Carrefour de la croissance propre, qui est essentiellement un guichet unique qui permet d'interagir avec la famille fédérale. Il est parfois un peu difficile pour un chercheur universitaire ou une petite entreprise de savoir à qui s’adresser. Ils souhaitaient avoir un guichet unique pour communiquer avec nous. Nous avons entendu ces réflexions, nous les avons prises à coeur et nous avons établi cette plaque tournante. Il s’agit d’un regroupement de 16 ministères et organismes qui partagent un bureau au centre-ville d’Ottawa. Ils sont en mesure d’interagir avec les clients et de les orienter, qu’ils aient besoin de fonds, d’un accès au marché, de changements réglementaires ou qu'ils aient des problèmes liés à l’approvisionnement — peu importe le sujet qu’ils abordent.

(1545)



Au cours de notre brève année d’activité, plus d'un millier de clients nous ont demandé des conseils et du soutien, et c’est un élément très populaire de notre écosystème actuel.

La deuxième chose à souligner concerne les modèles de partenariat de confiance. Aux niveaux tant fédéral que provincial, nous avons des ressources limitées à investir, et elles viennent des contribuables. Nous devons donc chercher les moyens d'utiliser intelligemment ces ressources limitées. Nous tendons la main aux provinces et leur disons: « Pourquoi ne pas essayer de voir ensemble quelles sont les technologies les plus prometteuses et envisager d'adopter un processus d’examen intégré? »

Au lieu d’obliger les chercheurs des universités à faire des démarches distinctes aux niveaux fédéral et provincial, nous reconnaissons mutuellement nos processus en place, ce qui permet aux chercheurs et aux innovateurs d’économiser énormément de temps lorsqu'ils tentent d'obtenir des fonds fédéraux ou provinciaux. La démarche s'en trouve considérablement accélérée. Nous avons huit ou neuf de ces modèles de partenariat de confiance partout au Canada, et ils se sont avérés très efficaces.

La troisième et dernière chose que je voudrais souligner, c’est que le gouvernement a annoncé, dans le budget de 2019, des fonds de 100 millions de dollars pour le Réseau d'innovation pour des ressources propres. Il réunit des innovateurs du secteur pétrolier et gazier, surtout dans l’Ouest du Canada, et le groupe est actif depuis environ un an. Le gouvernement fédéral a été heureux de lui apporter un certain soutien. Des représentants du Réseau, qui suscite un grand enthousiasme, étaient à Ottawa la semaine dernière. [Français]

Pour conclure, je vais parler des activités des laboratoires nationaux en matière d'énergie.

Nous avons un réseau de quatre laboratoires nationaux situés dans plusieurs endroits du pays, c'est-à-dire à Montréal, à Ottawa, à Hamilton, en Ontario, et en Alberta. Ils regroupent plus de 600 chercheurs, ingénieurs et techniciens dans ce domaine.[Traduction]Le Réseau s'intéresse à un large éventail de technologies: énergie renouvelable, PV, géothermie, bioénergie, énergie marine, efficacité énergétique, matériaux de pointe, sans oublier l’application de l’intelligence artificielle dans l’énergie et dans les énergies fossiles.

Nous avons l'honneur d’être accompagnés de Mme Cecile Siewe, qui est directrice générale du laboratoire de CanmetÉNERGIE à Devon, installations où les recherches portent précisément sur le pétrole et le gaz. Comme nous l’entendrons au cours de l'audience, il y a beaucoup de travail qui se fait là-bas en recherche sur l’eau, les technologies d’extraction, la valorisation partielle, la récupération des déversements de pétrole et de nombreux champs d’expertise. Mme Siewe est une scientifique de renom, mais elle dirige aussi ce laboratoire. Il m'a semblé intéressant que les membres du Comité puissent discuter directement avec elle.

Je vais m’arrêter ici et vous rendre la parole.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Whalen, vous allez commencer.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

C’est formidable de vous entendre parler de ce que fait le gouvernement en matière d’innovation.

J’espérais peut-être obtenir une vue d'ensemble ou même seulement quelques faits sur les possibilités qui s'offrent actuellement au secteur canadien de l’énergie pétrolière sur le marché. Pourriez-vous nous fournir des statistiques ou des renseignements sur ce que sera le marché mondial du pétrole et du gaz d’ici la fin du siècle, au moment où nous espérons pouvoir nous en passer? Quelle proportion du pétrole consommé à ce moment-là pourrait ou devrait provenir du Canada?

M. Chris Evans (directeur principal, Pipelines, gaz et GNL, Secteur de l’énergie, Direction des ressources pétrolières, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Merci de votre question, qui est excellente.

Il faut sans doute nuancer cette réponse dans le contexte canadien, mais nous pouvons certainement dire que, à un niveau élevé de généralité, l’Agence internationale de l’énergie a souligné qu’on s’attend à ce que, même si le monde tente de limiter son empreinte carbone, il y ait une croissance de la consommation de pétrole. L’an dernier, l’Office national de l’énergie a publié un rapport sur l’avenir énergétique, qui, plutôt dans le contexte canadien, laissait entrevoir une croissance d’au moins 1,7 million de barils de la production canadienne de pétrole d’ici 2030.

Selon la dynamique qui existe sur le terrain, le monde devra consommer plus de pétrole et la production canadienne augmentera.

(1550)

M. Nick Whalen:

Est-il possible que, grâce à la tarification du carbone dans le monde pour faire baisser les coûts de la pollution, des avantages apparaissent sur le marché pour des types particuliers de pétrole produits chez nous, par exemple le pétrole extracôtier de Terre-Neuve, au détriment du pétrole albertain? Et dans quelle mesure cela commence-t-il à jouer un rôle sur le marché et dans les décisions des consommateurs, à l'échelle mondiale, qui ont à choisir leurs fournisseurs d'hydrocarbures?

M. Chris Evans:

Je vais devoir aborder avec prudence la question de la tarification du carbone, car cela relève d’un autre ministre. Je crois pouvoir dire que le gouvernement cherche à mettre en oeuvre la tarification du carbone sans perdre de vue la compétitivité. L'approche à l'égard du carbone réunit un faisceau d'avenues ou d'éléments, dont l'atténuation, l’adaptation et l’innovation, qui est un élément très important. La tarification du carbone trouve place dans cet ensemble.

L’approche actuelle prévoit des réductions mesurables de la pollution par le carbone d’ici 2022, simplement en fonction du plan tel qu’il existe actuellement, mais il y a encore beaucoup de travail qui se fait sur les modalités de la mise en oeuvre, et je ne pense pas pouvoir me prononcer sur certains des points que vous avez soulevés.

M. Nick Whalen:

C’est très bien.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose?

C’est vrai dans le cas du pétrole. C’est aussi très vrai dans le cas du GNL.

Au cours de nos discussions avec les supergrands et les producteurs nationaux, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de l’empreinte carbone, comme le député l’a dit, et de la recherche des fournisseurs perçus comme propres ou comme les plus propres dans le domaine. Il s’agit d’une belle occasion pour le Canada, qui est perçu comme un pays politiquement stable, mais peut-être aussi comme un pays qui se distingue sur les marchés des produits de base comme un fournisseur d’énergie propre. C’est certainement vrai dans le cas du projet LNG Canada, sur la côte Ouest. Les électeurs canadiens, nos clients et les investisseurs se soucient de la question.

Nous sommes très conscients de cela, même si, chez bien des gens, cette idée ne vient pas naturellement. L'électricité propre que nous avons en abondance est un de nos avantages. Pour faire tourner ces imposantes pièces d’équipement, il faut beaucoup d’électricité. Nous avons la chance d’avoir de grandes centrales hydroélectriques et de grandes sources d’énergie renouvelable, ce qui permet de réduire considérablement l’empreinte carbone de ces activités. Que ce soit sur la côte Ouest ou sur la côte Est, nous avons l’occasion de nous démarquer nettement.

M. Nick Whalen:

Lorsque mes électeurs m’écrivent — et c’est davantage une question de nature politique —, ils me demandent comment le Canada peut continuer de participer au marché tout en respectant ses engagements en matière d'environnement.

Je voudrais avoir une idée de l’avenir de nos marchés. Où se situeront-ils? Croyez-vous que le déclin de la production en mer du Nord pourrait permettre à Terre-Neuve d'élargir sa part de marché? Qu’en est-il des émissions de gaz à effet de serre? Comment nous comparons-nous à la mer du Nord, au Moyen-Orient et à l’Amérique du Sud, notamment au Venezuela?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C’est un bon point.

Encore une fois, si non seulement on compare la production canadienne à celle des autres producteurs de pétrole ou de gaz, mais si on tient compte aussi du passage de certaines formes d'énergie à d'autres et si on examine les possibilités de réductions importantes des émissions dans l’ensemble, on constate qu'il s’agit en grande partie de passer du charbon à des combustibles plus propres, comme d'autres combustibles fossiles ou des énergies renouvelables. C’est vrai aux États-Unis, où des dizaines de centrales au charbon ont été fermées et sont passées au gaz naturel ou à l’électricité propre lorsque c’était possible.

Il en va de même en Europe de l’Est et en Asie, où une très grande production intérieure de charbon est toujours utilisée pour produire de l’électricité. C’est là que le gaz naturel peut profiter de ce passage du charbon à des combustibles plus propres ou à une énergie plus propre.

Aux États-Unis, ce remplacement de certaines formes d'énergie est ce qui a le plus contribué à la diminution des émissions de GES de ce pays.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis heureux de l’entendre.

Il est difficile pour les Canadiens de comprendre le volume même de la production pétrolière en Alberta, ce que cela signifie et à quel point c’est important. Lorsque nous parlons des pipelines et de l’acheminement d’un grand volume de ce produit vers les marchés, il est difficile pour les Canadiens de se faire une idée des avantages que le projet Trans Mountain aura quant à la répartition et au transport du pétrole vers les marchés par rapport au projet Keystone XL. Il est aussi difficile pour les gens de comprendre pourquoi le projet Énergie Est n’est plus sur la table.

Si les projets Keystone XL et TMX sont mis en œuvre, cela réglera-t-il le problème que connaît l’Alberta pour ce qui est d’acheminer le pétrole qu’elle produit à l’heure actuelle vers les marchés? Le projet Énergie Est pourrait-il aider l’Alberta à accroître sa production et à acheminer encore plus de ressources vers les marchés?

(1555)

M. Chris Evans:

Le Canada est une économie de marché relativement à ses projets énergétiques. Nous nous fions, bien sûr, aux acteurs du secteur privé, dans l’ensemble, pour décider des projets.

Dans le cas de l’oléoduc Énergie Est, la décision a été prise par la société lorsqu’elle a examiné tous les facteurs à prendre en compte.

En ce qui concerne les projets TMX, KXL et le projet de remplacement de la canalisation 3, si l’on tient compte de l’augmentation de la capacité pipelinière que ces trois projets apporteraient au marché, cela correspond à peu près aux prévisions de l’Office national de l’énergie quant à la croissance de la production pétrolière au Canada.

Le président:

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Dans le cas de l’oléoduc Énergie Est, l’un des facteurs qui a été pris en compte dans la décision des promoteurs était l’intervention politique dans ce qui aurait dû être un examen objectif, scientifique et fondé sur des données probantes, équitable pour tous les facteurs liés aux pipelines.

En fait, en raison de l’obstruction et du renouvellement du mandat d’un groupe d’experts par les libéraux... Puis, pour la toute première fois, des critères d’émissions en aval ont été appliqués comme facteur dans l’évaluation du pipeline Énergie Est, contrairement à Trans Mountain, qui n’a été évalué que pour les émissions en amont. L’oléoduc Énergie Est a été évalué en fonction des émissions en amont et en aval. En fin de compte, c’est exactement ce que l’entreprise a mentionné un mois auparavant, lorsqu’elle a demandé de retarder le processus pour pouvoir continuer de présenter sa demande. Un mois plus tard, elle annonçait son départ. C’est pourquoi la certitude réglementaire est si essentielle et si importante.

J’ai une brève question. Je me souviens qu’à peu près à la même époque l’an dernier — et je ne sais pas quelle est la réponse à cette question — le gouvernement a lancé une étude de 280 000 $ sur la compétitivité du secteur pétrolier et gazier. Elle a été réalisée par une entreprise sous la direction de RNCan. Je crois qu’elle a été complétée en juin 2018 — je ne sais pas. Ce rapport a-t-il été rendu public? Y a-t-il un rapport découlant de cette étude?

M. Chris Evans:

J’ai le regret de vous dire que je devrai faire quelques recherches. Je n’ai pas d’information à ce sujet.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Si vous pouviez vous renseigner à ce sujet et faire part de votre réponse au Comité, ce serait formidable. Je me souviens qu’elle a été annoncée, mais je n’ai jamais vraiment vu de rapport final. Étant donné que nous savions ce que cela coûterait aux contribuables, il serait formidable que les Canadiens puissent voir ce rapport.

En ce qui concerne l’examen réglementaire des infrastructures énergétiques essentielles au Canada, le projet de loi C-69, comme vous l’avez mentionné, apportera des changements majeurs. Les provinces et les trois territoires ont maintenant exprimé de vives préoccupations au sujet des répercussions du projet de loi C-69 sur l’exploitation future du pétrole et du gaz, compte tenu de la liste des projets publiée la semaine dernière, de tous les types d’interventions dans les domaines de compétence provinciale, ainsi que de l’incidence sur la capacité de construire quoique ce soit au Canada. Ce n’est pas à vous de répondre de cela; c’est le travail des politiciens.

Étant donné qu’il y avait une affectation budgétaire liée à la transition entre l’ONE et ce qui découlera du projet de loi C-69, votre ministère participe-t-il à la planification de cette transition? Pouvez-vous nous dire à quoi ressemblerait l’échéancier? Pouvez-vous me donner des détails à ce sujet?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je suis certain que le président du Comité comprendra qu’il serait prématuré pour nous de nous prononcer sur la façon dont la transition se déroulera en raison des discussions animées qui sont en cours au Sénat. Les fonctionnaires réfléchissent à tous ces éléments, mais nous devons attendre la suite des choses quant à cette mesure législative avant de pouvoir préciser tous ces plans. Nous nous préparons à cette mise en œuvre, si le Parlement décide de l’approuver.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Dans l’étude et les recommandations de notre comité, à la page 5 du rapport, nous soulignons l’importance de la façon dont la société perçoit le développement énergétique et la confiance du public. Je dirais que les libéraux ont fait campagne contre le bilan de renommée mondiale du Canada en matière d’examen réglementaire des projets énergétiques.

Vous vous souviendrez que les libéraux ont fait campagne en disant que le public avait perdu confiance à l’égard de l’Office national de l’énergie, même s’ils n’ont jamais fourni la moindre preuve à ce sujet. Je suis convaincue que vous savez tous que le Canada, pendant des décennies, a été littéralement sans égal sur tous les plans lorsqu’il a été comparé de façon substantielle à d’autres pays producteurs d’énergie dans le monde.

Étant donné que la ministre des Institutions démocratiques libérale a dit, « Il est temps d’enclaver les sables bitumineux de l’Alberta », et du rejet par le premier ministre du projet d’oléoduc d’Enbridge, éliminant ainsi la possibilité d’exportations autonomes vers l’Asie-Pacifique, avez-vous des commentaires, tout d’abord, quant à l’incidence de tels propos de la part des élus sur la réputation du Canada en tant que producteur d’énergie responsable? Puisque vous êtes des experts, pourriez-vous dire à tout le monde, et à la ministre libérale en particulier, une fois pour toutes, si les sables bitumineux sont à proprement parler du bitume?

(1600)

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Il n’est probablement pas approprié que je me prononce quant au point de vue d’un ministre et d’un député. Toutefois, pour ce qui est de veiller à ce que les faits relatifs au cycle complet du carbone, des puits aux roues, quant à nos méthodes de production, je peux certainement rassurer les membres du Comité que les répercussions que nous avons et les progrès que nous faisons en matière de résultats environnementaux sont communiqués clairement.

C’est quelque chose que nous nous efforçons de faire, non seulement à l’échelle nationale, mais aussi pour les investisseurs et les pays partenaires clés avec lesquels, comme vous pouvez le comprendre, nous interagissons quotidiennement et qui cherchent de l’information et des données probantes concernant notre travail. J’ajouterais également qu’un élément clé de notre plan consiste à nous assurer qu’ils sont inclus dans les preuves et les faits scientifiques. Nous avons le privilège d’avoir, dans nos universités et nos laboratoires nationaux, des experts très respectés qui sont en mesure de présenter ces faits, ces chiffres et ces preuves à ces investisseurs et intervenants afin qu’ils puissent prendre des décisions éclairées.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce serait certainement difficile.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Il en va de même pour l’AIE, par exemple, dont nous sommes un membre très actif, pour veiller à ce que le Canada puisse présenter les faits tels qu’ils sont.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Et les sables bitumineux ne sont pas du bitume à proprement parler.

Brièvement, en ce qui concerne la norme libérale sur les carburants, je me demande si votre ministère a été consulté dans le cadre de l’élaboration de cette norme. Bien que le ministère de l’Environnement admette qu’il n’a pas de modèle pour la réduction des émissions ou les conséquences financières de la norme sur les carburants, je me demande si votre ministère a participé à l’élaboration de cette norme. Est-ce que vous participez maintenant à ce processus, alors que votre ministère mène des consultations en aval, même si cette norme a été annoncée en décembre? Ma question porte notamment sur les conséquences financières pour les raffineurs au Canada.

M. Chris Evans:

Il est certain que notre ministère travaille avec ECCC pour l’aider à effectuer des analyses et à travailler avec nos intervenants également pour recueillir leurs points de vue, effectuer des analyses et les intégrer au processus dirigé par ECCC, oui.

Le président:

Monsieur Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci à tous d’être venus aujourd’hui; c’était intéressant.

Je pense que je vais simplement reprendre certaines des choses qu’a dites M. Evans, pour avoir des éclaircissements. Vous dites que la demande de pétrole augmente partout dans le monde. S’agit-il des projections de l’AIE, dont vous parliez, ou de l’ONE?

M. Chris Evans:

Je n’ai pas les chiffres des prévisions de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je suis désolé...

M. Chris Evans:

En ce qui concerne la croissance de 1,7 million de barils d’ici 2030, je parlais des prévisions de l’Office national de l’énergie.

M. Richard Cannings:

Cela porte sur la production, n’est-ce pas, alors que l’autre porte sur la demande.

M. Chris Evans:

Il s’agissait de la croissance prévue de la production pour répondre à la demande.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je voulais simplement m’assurer d’avoir bien compris. Avez-vous dit que le monde aura plus de pétrole qu’il n’en aura besoin à mesure que la production canadienne augmentera?

M. Chris Evans:

Si c’est ce que j’ai dit, ce n’est pas ce que je voulais dire.

M. Richard Cannings:

C’est pourquoi je voulais m’assurer d’avoir bien compris.

(1605)

M. Chris Evans:

Je veux seulement parler du contexte canadien.

M. Richard Cannings:

D’accord.

M. Chris Evans:

Je préfère ne pas parler des prévisions de demande de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie, parce que je n’ai pas les chiffres devant moi. Essentiellement, ce que je disais, c’est qu’il y a une prévision de croissance de la production pétrolière au Canada, et cela vise à répondre à ce qui est considéré comme une croissance de la demande mondiale.

M. Richard Cannings:

D’accord, et vous ne... Je sais que nous avions une question au sujet de la mer du Nord, mais vous ne pouvez pas nous dire à quoi pourrait ressembler la production américaine au cours des prochaines décennies.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je pense que les sources qui font autorité, comme l’AIE et l’ONE, sont probablement les plus fiables pour la production nationale. Nous n’avons pas d’opinion sur le pétrole que cela déplace... Tout va vers les marchés mondiaux, et comme nous l’avons vu au cours des dernières années, il peut y avoir un changement important en fonction des progrès technologiques. C’est certainement le cas de la production de pétrole et de gaz aux États-Unis, où nous avons observé une hausse importante que personne n’avait prévue. Nous suivons continuellement les prévisions des secteurs public et privé, et nous en tenons compte dans nos discussions. Toutefois, au bout du compte, c’est une approche axée sur le marché quant à l’affectation des ressources.

M. Richard Cannings:

J’ai vu des analyses selon lesquelles la production américaine ne montrera aucun signe de déclin dans 10 ans. Il semble qu’elle restera stable ou qu’elle augmentera. J’ai aussi vu des analyses selon lesquelles les prévisions de l’AIE sont constamment 10 % trop élevées, année après année.

Je me méfie un peu des statistiques que je vois dans certaines prévisions. Je sais que lorsque les représentants de l’Office national de l’énergie ont comparu devant nous dans le cadre de l’étude dont nous parlons aujourd’hui, ils ont présenté les courbes de la demande mondiale d’énergie. Lorsque je leur ai posé des questions à ce sujet... ces données étaient désuètes depuis deux ans. Elles avaient été calculées avant l’accord de Paris, avant la production de pétrole de réservoirs étanches et tout le reste. Lorsqu’ils sont revenus un an plus tard, c’était très différent.

Je voulais simplement m’assurer d’avoir bien compris ce que vous avez dit. Je suppose que je vous ai mal compris, alors je vous en remercie.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Si vous me permettez d’ajouter quelque chose, monsieur le président, j’ai une formation d’économiste et nous avons une bonne vieille blague en matière de prévisions économiques qui, je suppose, pourrait également s’appliquer à la météorologie ou à d’autres domaines, c’est-à-dire choisissez un chiffre, choisissez une date, mais jamais les deux ensemble.

Je pense que les mêmes défis s’appliquent aux marchés du pétrole et du gaz. Il est difficile de prédire avec certitude ce qui va se passer en dépit des meilleurs cerveaux et des meilleures données. Les choses changent constamment sur le marché.

M. Richard Cannings:

J’ai entendu l’un des meilleurs économistes spécialistes des ressources du Canada dire que nous sommes ici pour faire bien paraître les astrologues.

Je voulais simplement obtenir des précisions à ce sujet.

Pour en revenir à l’étude, l’une des choses que nous avons entendues— et je me souviens que Mme Monica Gattinger a parlé de ses préoccupations concernant le manque de confiance dans le système de réglementation — c’est que la confiance continuerait de s’éroder jusqu’à ce que le système de réglementation soit corrigé ou jusqu’à ce que les lacunes soient comblées.

Pourriez-vous nous parler de ce qui a été fait là-bas, de ce que le projet de loi C-69visait à faire à cet égard et nous dire où en est la situation?

M. Chris Evans:

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-69, les objectifs généraux de la loi étaient de mettre en place un cadre qui assurerait une plus grande transparence pour tous ceux qui participent au processus réglementaire et de rétablir la confiance du public. On reconnaîtrait ainsi le fait que des évaluations efficaces, crédibles et prévisibles des processus décisionnels sont essentielles pour attirer des investissements et maintenir la compétitivité.

Le processus global créerait un système d’évaluation des répercussions assorties de meilleurs échéanciers et d’une plus grande clarté dès le départ pour tous les intervenants, tant les promoteurs que les Canadiens en général, et il serait construit avec une importante participation des Premières Nations.

À l’heure actuelle, comme vous le savez, le projet de loi C-69 est devant le Comité sénatorial permanent de l’énergie, de l’environnement et des ressources naturelles, avec toutes les activités parlementaires que cela implique. Je ne pense pas que nous soyons très bien placés pour en parler davantage.

(1610)

M. Richard Cannings:

Il me reste 30 secondes et j’aimerais obtenir une autre précision parce que je crois vous avoir mal compris. Lorsque vous avez parlé des 1,6 milliard de dollars et de quoi cela consistait, je crois que vous avez dit que vous aviez commencé avec un milliard de dollars de la part d’EDC. Est-ce exact?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C’est exact.

M. Richard Cannings:

C’est tout ce dont j’ai besoin. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Hehr.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Merci à nos distingués invités d’être ici.

J’ai une question complémentaire à celle de M. Whalen. Vous avez décrit notre capacité pipelinière et la façon dont nous allons procéder de la bonne manière quant au pipeline Trans Mountain, à la canalisation 3 d’Enbridge et à Keystone XL. Cela équivaut à la croissance des sables bitumineux à court terme. Est-ce exact?

M. Chris Evans:

Si vous prenez simplement la capacité nominale de ces trois pipelines — la nouvelle capacité supplémentaire — elle correspondrait à la croissance de la production canadienne prévue par l’ONE.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Dans certains cas, le calendrier n’est pas très clair. C’est comme la blague que M. Des Rosiers a faite tout à l’heure, qui pourrait aussi s’appliquer aux pipelines. Certaines de ces choses échappent à notre contrôle, étant donné ce qui se passe au sud de la frontière, particulièrement en ce qui concerne Keystone et d’autres choses.

Envisageons-nous d’élaborer des plans pour accroître la capacité ferroviaire et la capacité de transporter plus de pétrole par rail? Où en sommes-nous à cet égard? Les coûts ont-ils diminué dans le cadre du processus en cours?

M. Chris Evans:

Les médias ont rapporté que l’Alberta se penchait sur l’approvisionnement ferroviaire à des fins provinciales. Le gouvernement fédéral est généralement d’avis, je crois, que c’est le marché qui détermine ce qui correspond le mieux à l’offre et à la demande... Bien que l’Alberta ait adopté une approche, notre ministère n’envisage rien de plus.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

D’accord. Merci de votre réponse.

Étant donné que 45 pays et 24 gouvernements infranationaux ont une tarification du carbone, il semble que ce soit la tendance actuelle. Vous avez dit tout à l’heure que vous travaillez à des choses qui réduisent la consommation de carbone ou le carbone émis dans l’atmosphère par notre production de pétrole, non seulement dans le contexte des sables bitumineux, mais ailleurs. Comment vont ces projections? Qu’est-ce que vous envisagez? Nos compagnies pétrolières prennent-elles cette question au sérieux?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Monsieur le président, il est juste de souligner que la tarification du carbone est largement perçue par les économistes du monde entier comme l’un de ces puissants moyens de montrer au marché comment répartir les ressources et faire des investissements, qu’il s’agisse de producteurs, de consommateurs ou d’industries lourdes. Lorsque vous arrivez à intégrer cela dans votre budget quotidien, cela a certainement un impact très puissant. Il n’est pas surprenant que certaines des grandes entreprises du monde aient en fait été parmi les plus ardents partisans d’un régime de tarification du carbone, et je ne tente pas d’appuyer le point de vue d’une administration en particulier. Toutefois, en matière de recherche et d’économie, c’est un exemple classique d’utilisation de signaux de prix pour allouer des ressources.

Pour répondre à la question, il est certain que les entreprises sont très attentives. Les membres du Comité ne seront pas surpris d’apprendre que de nombreuses entreprises ont des prix fictifs pour ce qui est de leur allocation de recherche, c’est-à-dire que peu importe qu’un pays ait un prix sur le carbone ou non, elles ont tendance à établir un prix pour les décisions qu’elles prennent à moyen et à long terme. Comme vous pouvez le comprendre, dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier, il n’est pas rare de faire un investissement sur une période de 20, 30 ou 40 ans afin de récupérer de très gros investissements en capital. Généralement, les entreprises ne révèlent pas ces prix fictifs, mais elles ont un prix fictif pour leurs décisions d’investissement dans les grandes administrations ou leurs opérations mondiales afin de tenir compte de leurs prévisions relatives au contexte opérationnel dans les années à venir. En fait, bon nombre des grandes entreprises qui réussissent le font déjà.

(1615)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C’est fantastique.

Vous avez mentionné LNG Canada. Bien sûr, c’est une grande réussite dont nous sommes très fiers et qui peut non seulement faire progresser notre économie, mais aussi contribuer à réduire les émissions mondiales de gaz à effet de serre. En fait, si nous faisons bien les choses et que nous transportons nos produits vers des marchés étrangers, cela aidera à réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, le réchauffement de la planète et les changements climatiques. Le Canada a-t-il la capacité, selon les prévisions, d’augmenter sa production de GNL? Quel serait notre potentiel à cet égard? Avons-nous la capacité de le faire?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Bien sûr, d'autres projets sont possibles. Il s'agit de projets de grande envergure qui nécessitent un examen attentif de la part des investisseurs, compte tenu de leur ampleur et de leurs répercussions sur le plan de l'infrastructure. Mais nous avons de nombreux projets sur la côte Ouest et sur la côte Est qui sont à différentes étapes d'examen et de réflexion.

Je pense qu'il est juste de dire que l'investissement de LNG Canada a envoyé un signal important au marché montrant que le Canada est un pays concurrentiel en matière d'investissements dans l'énergie. Nous avions déjà connaissance de nombreux projets à l'étude sur les deux côtes, mais cet investissement nous a vraiment offert une bonne visibilité et a donné un coup de pouce à la crédibilité du Canada quant à sa capacité à concrétiser ce genre de projets.

Nous suivons évidemment ces discussions, qui sont confidentielles et auxquelles participent de nombreuses parties, mais nous espérons qu'il y en aura d'autres au cours des prochaines années.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'ai une brève question qui fait suite à celles de Mme Stubbs. Il me semble qu'auparavant, nous travaillions dans le cadre du processus de 2012 pour la construction de pipelines, mis en place par les conservateurs. À mon avis, s'il y a eu un « projet de loi anti-pipelines », ce serait celui-là, car ce processus a mené les projets de pipelines devant les tribunaux et non pas à leur construction.

Quoi qu'il en soit, je sais que le projet de loi C-69 a tenté de régler une partie de ce problème et de prendre en compte une partie de votre travail à cet égard. Pouvez-vous parler de la participation précoce? Il semble que ce n'était pas tellement important dans le processus de 2012. Est-ce intégré au projet de loi C-69?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre la question.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit de la participation précoce des peuples autochtones.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C'est un élément important de notre politique de participation. Les tribunaux, la Cour d'appel fédérale, nous ont rappelé cette année qu'il est important de le faire et de le faire de façon approfondie. Le gouvernement a pris cela très au sérieux. Comme vous l'avez vu, nous avons déployé des efforts considérables, avec l'aide de l'ancien juge de la Cour suprême Iacobucci, pour nous assurer que nous agissions conformément à l'esprit des recommandations de la cour. Nous examinons ces motions en ce moment même.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je vous remercie d'être venus nous parler aujourd'hui.

Pourriez-vous dire au Comité combien de pipelines ont été approuvés et construits sous le précédent gouvernement conservateur, au cours des 10 dernières années?

M. Chris Evans:

Je crains de ne pas avoir les données à ce sujet. Je m'excuse, cela ne figure pas dans notre cahier d'information.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Non? D'accord: qu'en est-il des projets Alberta Clipper d'Enbridge, Keystone de TransCanada, Anchor Loop de Kinder Morgan et de l'inversion de la canalisation 9B d'Enbridge? On peut même parler des autres aussi.

Pour revenir à la question de M. Hehr, parmi les 10 principaux pays producteurs de pétrole au monde, combien ont une taxe sur le carbone?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

J'ai l'impression qu'on me demande de jouer à des jeux futiles.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Frank Des Rosiers: Je suppose que le membre du Comité a la réponse.

M. Jamie Schmale:

La réponse est aucun.

Le président:

J'ajouterais qu'il n'y a pas non plus de prix. De prix du carbone je veux dire.

M. Jamie Schmale:

La réponse est absolument aucun.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Oh si, il y a un grand prix: c'est le 21 octobre.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est exact, le 21 octobre.

Lorsque mon ami, M. Hehr, a dit que ce sont les conservateurs qui parlaient du projet de loi C-69, en le nommant le « projet de loi anti-pipelines », en réalité ce n'était pas nous. Nous avons emprunté cette formule à l'industrie. Ils ont inventé ce terme et nous l'avons repris.

Peut-être pourriez-vous nous parler un peu de la compétitivité globale au Canada et de nos performances dans ce domaine.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion d'aborder cette question, car c'est une préoccupation majeure à l'heure actuelle dans l'ensemble du pays et dans l'industrie. Nous entendons cela très clairement chaque fois que nous discutons avec ces intervenants pour nous assurer que le Canada est un producteur propre, mais aussi concurrentiel. J'ai mentionné le niveau extraordinaire d'innovation, mais aussi l'esprit d'entreprise qui existent dans notre pays.

Comme nous l'avons souvent vu par le passé, une crise forcera les humains à trouver des solutions extraordinaires. Je pense que cela s'est produit maintes et maintes fois dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier du Canada. Plus récemment, avec la baisse des prix, nous avons vu ces entreprises et ces personnes examiner toutes sortes de façons novatrices de réduire leurs coûts d'exploitation. Elles utilisent d'autres technologies, analysent leur utilisation de la main-d'oeuvre, cherchent à réduire la part des productions dans leurs activités et, dans certains cas, essaient de renforcer les acteurs de l'industrie dans leurs domaines. Tout cela a entraîné des réductions de coûts très importantes, grâce à ces entreprises. Nous discutons régulièrement avec tous les grands producteurs de pétrole et de gaz au Canada. Ce qu'ils ont réussi à faire pour réduire leurs coûts d'exploitation au niveau de l'entreprise est vraiment impressionnant.

Du point de vue du pays, comme je l'ai mentionné tout à l'heure, le gouvernement a mis cela au premier plan dans la mise à jour financière de 2018. La principale annonce faite dans cette mise à jour portait sur la compétitivité et la mise en place de mesures fiscales pour accélérer la déduction pour amortissement de certains gros investissements. On l'a vu aussi dans le contexte concurrentiel, surtout en Amérique du Nord. En effet, au sud de la frontière, de grandes annonces on été faites concernant l'impôt des sociétés et le gouvernement a proposé des mesures fiscales assez importantes pour les sociétés, qui s'élèvent à 5 milliards de dollars par année. Cela a modifié le contexte concurrentiel de façon non négligeable.

(1620)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Dans quelle mesure l'industrie pétrolière et gazière des États-Unis est-elle agressive à l'heure actuelle? Vous venez d'en dire un mot, mais pouvez-vous faire une comparaison très rapide des deux pays et de leurs différences?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

De part et d'autre de la frontière, il s'agit d'une industrie extrêmement concurrentielle, non seulement entre le Canada et les États-Unis, mais aussi à l'échelle mondiale. Le Canada doit constamment s'assurer de pouvoir jouer à égalité.

Je peux parler brièvement de notre régime fiscal global. En ce qui concerne les taux d'imposition réels des sociétés, le Canada se compare avantageusement non seulement aux États-Unis, mais aussi à ses concurrents du G7. Je pense que nous sommes en bonne position à cet égard.

Pour ce qui est des travailleurs qualifiés, le Canada s'en tire remarquablement bien en ce qui concerne les compétences des ingénieurs et des techniciens. Encore une fois, pour ce qui est de la compétence entrepreneuriale, la main-d'œuvre de notre pays est sans égale dans ce domaine. Nous le constatons non seulement au Canada, mais partout dans le monde. Nos ingénieurs et nos experts sont constamment sollicités pour apporter leur expertise.

Il y a donc de nombreuses dimensions à la compétitivité. Je n'essaierai pas de répondre en 30 secondes. Je veux simplement vous rassurer...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Nous voyons des milliards de dollars...

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

... c'est un domaine dans lequel nous sommes très...

M. Jamie Schmale:

... d'investissements qui fuient le Canada.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

... investis, et nous travaillons d'arrache-pied pour continuer à nous améliorer. C'est un effort continu auquel chaque pays doit prêter attention.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Puisque nous parlons de...

Le président:

Vous avez terminé juste à temps.

M. Jamie Schmale: Ah. D'accord.

Le président: Je déteste être porteur de mauvaises nouvelles.

Votre voisin de droite peut vous le dire.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Des Rosiers, dans vos commentaires préliminaires, vous avez parlé de 276 000 emplois dans le secteur du pétrole et du gaz.

Qu'est-ce qui est inclus dans ce chiffre? Cela va-t-il jusqu'à inclure des préposés aux stations-services dans le secteur du détail? Qui cela couvre-t-il? [Traduction]

M. Chris Evans:

Ce chiffre concernait l'emploi direct.[Français]

Excusez-moi, la question était adressée à mon collègue.[Traduction]

La source de données qui nous donne les 276 000 emplois directs en donnerait 900 000 si on comptait les emplois indirects. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est vrai.

Sur la diapositive no 5, on parle des nouvelles technologies pour gérer les eaux résiduelles.

Pouvez-vous en parler davantage? Allons-nous en arriver au point où les eaux résiduelles pourraient être transformées pour redevenir de l'eau potable? Sinon, qu'est-ce qu'on fait de ces eaux?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Vous faites référence aux travaux en matière de bassins de rétention.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C'est un enjeu significatif, qui a été soulevé à maintes reprises par nos citoyens et nos clients. On a tous vu les images de ces immenses bassins qui risquent de poser, et qui posent, des problèmes à court, à moyen et à long terme. On a vu dans le secteur minier, par exemple, des risques significatifs de déversement à cet égard. C'est ce qui explique notre attention et celle de l'industrie pour développer des processus d'extraction qui ne génèrent pas de grands bassins de rétention de ce genre. À ce propos, il y a différentes technologies qui sont à l'étape de la démonstration avant de pouvoir être exploitées à l'échelle commerciale.

J'ai mentionné à l'instant une autre initiative. Cela fait plusieurs années qu'on en parle et là on est rendu à mener ces projets de grande ampleur. Il s'agit de pouvoir extraire de ces grands bassins des résidus d'hydrocarbone qui sont encore commercialement attrayants, ainsi que des métaux, en particulier des métaux lourds, comme le titane, et de pouvoir ainsi les revendre sur le marché mondial afin de générer des produits.

C'est une technologie en développement depuis plusieurs années par la compagnie Titanium Corporation. Elle s'apprête, avec de grandes entreprises pétrolières et gazières, à réaliser un projet de l'ordre de 400 millions de dollars, justement afin de mener à bien ce rêve. C'est là une occasion en or pour le Canada de réduire, voire d'éliminer, ce type d'installations qui préoccupe nos citoyens.

(1625)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En ce qui concerne les résidus qu'on a déjà, est-ce qu'il y a une manière ou une technologie qui s'en vient pour être capable de transformer de l'eau résiduelle en eau potable? Est-ce que cela va être recyclé ultérieurement d'une manière ou d'une autre?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Le principal souci présentement[Traduction]... et peut-être que ma collègue, Mme Siewe, pourrait vous en dire plus à ce sujet, étant donné que le laboratoire fait beaucoup de recherches pour réduire la quantité d'eau douce utilisée dans le processus...[Français]et donc d'utiliser les eaux actuelles dans plusieurs cycles d'utilisation. Est-ce que l'eau devient potable?[Traduction]

Je laisse cela à ma collègue, qui est plus experte que moi.

Mme Cecile Siewe (directrice générale, Secteur de l'innovation et de la technologie de l'énergie, CanmetÉNERGIE-Devon):

Il n'est pas encore possible de recycler l'eau, mais le but recherché est de réduire le plus possible la quantité d'eau douce utilisée, puis de faire des recherches et de la R-D sur le processus de traitement, pour obtenir de l'eau qui se rapproche le plus possible d'un état nous permettant de la restituer. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Concernant la technologie de transformation du CO2— on en parle aussi dans la même page —, quelle solution avez-vous déjà trouvée? Qu'est-ce qu'on peut déjà faire avec le CO2?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

C'est vraiment un secteur en fort développement, où le Canada est un chef de file mondial dans le captage du CO2 à la source. Il y a différentes techniques de captage du carbone. On peut le capter sur les sites industriels et même dans l'air. L'entreprise Carbon Engineering, de Squamish, en Colombie-Britannique, est un chef de file mondial dans le domaine et a attiré des investissements importants de grands investisseurs institutionnels.

Les domaines d'application sont nombreux. Quand on pense au CO2, on pense à des répercussions négatives, alors qu'il peut être transformé en produits utiles. Parmi les entreprises canadiennes qui se démarquent à cet égard, il y a CarbonCure Technologies, qui réinjecte le CO2 dans le béton ou le ciment pour en améliorer les propriétés chimiques et le rendre ainsi plus robuste et performant, tout en réduisant les coûts de production. Elle connaît un grand succès non seulement au Canada, mais aussi en Amérique du Nord, avec près d'une centaine de sites qui sont exploités commercialement partout en Amérique. Cette entreprise fait aussi l'objet d'un vif intérêt d'autres marchés ailleurs dans le monde. C'est un exemple d'entreprise qui présente un grand potentiel. Cela peut être aussi pour produire des plastiques ou d'autres matériaux de construction. Il y a là un fort intérêt.

Le Canada, des compagnies canadiennes et américaines se sont alliées à la fondation XPRIZE. Cette fondation lance de grands concours mondiaux et a investi 20 millions de dollars pour recueillir les idées dans le domaine. Le concours le plus populaire de toute l'histoire de la fondation XPRIZE concernait le développement de nouvelles utilisations du CO2. La bonne nouvelle, c'est que plusieurs entreprises retenues sont canadiennes.

À la fin du mois se tiendra à Vancouver une grande conférence ministérielle, qui accueillera les 25 principaux acteurs du secteur de l'énergie propre. Le Canada sera l'hôte du Clean Energy Ministerial et de Mission Innovation-4, afin justement de célébrer ce type d'entreprises et de solutions qui sont offertes au monde. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Falk, c'est à vous.

M. Ted Falk:

Je remercie les témoins de leur exposé.

J'ai plus de questions que de temps de parole. Voici ma première question.

Aujourd'hui, j'ai pu rencontrer des représentants de l'Association minière du Canada. L'une de leurs inquiétudes concerne la norme sur les carburants proposée par les libéraux. Vous avez dit dans votre exposé que du point de vue fiscal, nous sommes très concurrentiels par rapport à notre principal concurrent, les États-Unis. Il n'y a pas de taxe sur le carbone là-bas. Compte tenu de la norme proposée par les libéraux sur les carburants et de la taxe sur le carbone, qui pourrait se chiffrer entre 150 $ et 400 $ la tonne de carbone, comment cela nous placera-t-il vis-à-vis de nos concurrents?

(1630)

M. Chris Evans:

En élaborant la norme sur les carburants, je crois que le gouvernement reconnaît les répercussions des changements climatiques sur le Canada et sur le reste du monde et qu'il est déterminé à s'y attaquer. La Norme sur les combustibles propres en est un aspect. Elle est dirigée par Environnement et Changement climatique Canada. Le gouvernement s'est fixé comme objectif de réduire la pollution par le carbone de 30 mégatonnes d'ici 2030, ce qui équivaut à retirer environ 7 millions de voitures de la circulation.

Comme je l'ai indiqué, notre ministère continue de travailler avec ECCC sur ce dossier afin d'en comprendre les répercussions sur les intervenants et de leur fournir ces données afin qu'ils puissent poursuivre leur travail d'amélioration de ce projet.

M. Ted Falk:

Avez-vous modélisé l'impact que cela pourrait avoir sur nos producteurs de gaz naturel et de pétrole? Nous savons déjà que plus de 80 milliards de dollars d'investissements dans le secteur énergétique sont partis aux États-Unis ou ailleurs au cours des trois dernières années.

Quelle serait l'incidence de la norme sur le carburant proposée par les libéraux?

M. Chris Evans:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous continuons d'analyser cela avec les intervenants. Beaucoup d'entre eux cherchent à comprendre les répercussions que cette norme pourrait avoir sur leurs industries. Je ne peux pas vous donner de détails techniques sur la structure de l'analyse qui a été faite, mais nous continuons de travailler avec ces parties intéressées pour comprendre leur point de vue et les répercussions que cela aura pour l'industrie. Nous veillons à ce qu'ECCC prenne cela en compte dans l'élaboration de la norme finale.

M. Ted Falk:

Les dirigeants du secteur minier que j'ai rencontrés aujourd'hui m'ont rappelé le montant en dollars d'investissement dans le développement de nouvelles mines de métaux qui avaient quitté notre pays. Le ministère a-t-il un pronostic pour l'avenir?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Nos collègues du secteur minier, qui fait partie de RNCan, sont parfaitement au courant de cela. Vous avez peut-être remarqué que nous avons récemment publié un plan canadien pour les minéraux et les métaux, en collaboration avec nos intervenants provinciaux, qui vise précisément à s'assurer que le Canada a un plan d'action accepté et appuyé par tous. Je dois dire que le soutien à l'égard de ce plan d'action sur les minéraux a été extraordinairement élevé, y compris de la part de nos collègues de l'Association minière du Canada et d'un grand nombre d'intervenants. Il a été présenté à l'ACPE, qui, comme vous le savez, est la réunion de l'Association canadienne des prospecteurs et entrepreneurs, réunissant des dizaines de milliers d'acteurs du Canada et du monde entier. Les travaux se poursuivront au cours des prochains mois pour élaborer les diverses composantes de ce plan d'action. Mais nous travaillons très activement là-dessus.

M. Ted Falk:

Si je vous ai bien compris, vous avez dit tout à l'heure qu'il faudrait construire d'autres pipelines pour répondre à la production. J'aimerais que vous précisiez cela.

M. Chris Evans:

Je n'ai fait que commenter les prévisions de l'Office national de l'énergie concernant la croissance de la production et la capacité nominale. Je ne parle pas de la nécessité publique. Cela concerne une autre organisation. Cela fait partie du processus d'examen de l'Office national de l'énergie et cela fera partie de la décision imminente du gouverneur en conseil. Ce n'est pas à moi de me prononcer là-dessus.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste 20 secondes.

M. Ted Falk:

Selon vous, quels sont les principaux obstacles qui freinent le projet d'oléoduc TMX?

M. Chris Evans:

Je pense que c'est une question qui dépasse la portée de mes attributions.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Le président:

Monsieur Hehr, revenons à vous.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je remarque que vers la fin de votre exposé, vous avez parlé de l'investissement du gouvernement de 100 millions de dollars dans le Réseau d'innovation en ressources propres et vous avez dit qu'un groupe de personnes était venu de Calgary à Ottawa pour discuter de cette initiative. Vous dites que le groupe collabore depuis un an. Pouvez-vous nous éclairer un peu plus à ce sujet et nous dire ce que fait ce groupe et quels résultats nous pouvons attendre?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Bien sûr.

Étant donné que cette initiative est dirigée par l'industrie et les universités de l'Ouest — je ne parle pas en leur nom et je n'y ai absolument pas participé de façon directe —, je vais peut-être demander à ma collègue Cecile Siewe, qui fait partie de la gouvernance du Réseau d'innovation en ressources propres, d'en dire un mot.

Grâce à ce réseau, les producteurs canadiens de pétrole et de gaz naturel unissent leurs efforts pour s'assurer que l'écosystème est géré efficacement. Ils ont mis sur pied un certain nombre de groupes de travail et de secteurs prioritaires, qui portent sur la technologie de l'eau, dont nous avons parlé, les nouvelles technologies d'extraction, dont nous avons parlé tout à l'heure. Ils se penchent sur la production nouvelle et l'utilisation finale, les carburants plus propres, le méthane. Il y a un certain nombre de domaines qui sont à l'étude et ils veulent s'assurer que les besoins sont clairs du point de vue des adopteurs. Donc, les sociétés pétrolières et gazières, dans ce cas-ci, font en sorte de communiquer cela clairement à des gens comme Cecile Siewe, du laboratoire national, à des collègues des universités, à de petites entreprises, pour qu'ils sachent exactement sur quoi porter leurs recherches.

Est-ce exact?

(1635)

Mme Cecile Siewe:

Absolument.

L'une des raisons pour lesquelles le Réseau d'innovation en ressources propres a été créé était de développer cet écosystème dans l'industrie de l'énergie pour réduire au minimum le double emploi, simplement accroître le niveau de sensibilisation, mettre en réseau les différentes parties qui travaillent dans ce domaine — que se passe-t-il, qui fait quoi, quelles sont les lacunes que les différentes parties essaient de combler? Il s'agit aussi de démultiplier les efforts afin de pouvoir à la fois accélérer le rythme de développement vers des solutions commercialisées et créer des synergies entre ce qui se passe déjà dans les différentes entreprises pour combler certaines de ces lacunes.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit d'un projet stimulant qui, nous l'espérons, donnera d'excellents résultats.

Voici une question qui fait suite à votre exposé. Vous disiez que beaucoup de travail a été fait sur les bassins de décantation.

Il se trouve que j'étais à l'Assemblée législative de l'Alberta en 2008 lorsqu'il y a eu cet incident. Des canards en migration ont péri dans les bassins de décantation. Je pense qu'à ce moment-là, cette question s'est trouvée sous le feu des projecteurs et nous avons dû faire face à beaucoup de pressions non seulement de la part des citoyens canadiens, mais aussi de la communauté internationale, pour essayer de mieux protéger l'environnement et ce genre de choses. Pourriez-vous me dire où nous en sommes à cet égard et quels types de technologies nous utilisons pour réduire le recours aux bassins de décantation?

Mme Cecile Siewe:

Ma réponse aura trois parties.

Je vais commencer par la création de bassins. En collaboration avec l'industrie, nous cherchons à faire en sorte qu'une moins grande quantité de matières se retrouve dans les bassins de décantation. C'est là que les nouvelles technologies, comme l'utilisation d'un hybride, qui utilise beaucoup moins d'eau, ou qui permet de ne pas utiliser d'eau du tout dans le processus d'extraction, génèrent un type différent de résidus qui ne contiennent pas autant d'eau. Ils se consolident plus rapidement. C'est une manière de gérer la question des bassins de décantation.

En ce qui concerne les matières déjà produites, nous examinons notamment la stabilité géotechnique des bassins de décantation. Nous travaillons en collaboration avec nos collègues du Service canadien des forêts, le SCF. Nous devons stabiliser les bassins avant de commencer à parler de remise en état, alors nous travaillons en collaboration avec eux dans ce domaine.

Nous examinons aussi les émissions de GES provenant des bassins de décantation. Comment pouvons-nous les atténuer ou les gérer? Comment pouvons-nous gérer les rejets d'eau des bassins de décantation? Dans quelle mesure peut-on traiter l'eau qui est rejetée afin qu'elle puisse être réutilisée ou rejetée dans l'environnement? C'est une approche multidimensionnelle et elle est toujours en cours.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Vous savez peut-être, monsieur le président, que le Plan de protection des océans a permis d'ajouter une enveloppe de 1,5 milliard de dollars d'investissements dans l'équipement. Ainsi, les scientifiques peuvent bénéficier d'équipements spécialisés pour leurs travaux — comme ceux que Mme Cecile Siewe vient de décrire. Le personnel spécialisé a pu évaluer le genre de possibilités dont nous venons de parler.

Le président:

Vous pouvez poser une brève question.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

RNCan élabore-t-il davantage de cadres et de systèmes plus robustes pour permettre le développement de la géothermie dans l'ensemble du Canada?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Oui. Je suis heureux que vous posiez la question, monsieur le président, au sujet de l'énergie géothermique.

Je dirais que c'est le chaînon manquant au Canada. Si vous alliez en Europe, aux États-Unis et dans de nombreux autres pays, vous le constateriez. Vous vous demandez peut-être pourquoi nous n'en avons plus ici. Ce n'est pas parce que nous n'avons pas la possibilité. Si vous consultez la carte géothermique que nous produisons à RNCan, vous verrez que nous avons en fait beaucoup de ressources — à l'est, à l'ouest, au sud et au nord aussi, où nous avons un potentiel fantastique pour la mettre en valeur.

C'est peut-être parce que nous avons un approvisionnement énergétique très abondant sous toutes ses formes — énergies renouvelables et fossiles — qu'elle a été un peu négligée. Nous avions vraiment l'impression qu'elle ne faisait pas partie de nos plans, parce que c'était une proposition tellement intéressante. Nous avons été très heureux d'annoncer récemment un projet en Saskatchewan, le projet de DEEP, qui vise à créer une capacité de production d'électricité à une échelle industrielle à partir de l'énergie géothermique.

Il y a quelques semaines, nous avons annoncé un autre projet, Eavor-Loop. Celui-ci, je tiens à le dire, se trouve en Alberta, mais je réserve mon jugement là-dessus. Ce qui est intéressant, c'est qu'il s'adresse aux experts des domaines de l'exploration pétrolière et gazière et du forage horizontal. Les spécialistes du forage horizontal dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier ont mis à contribution leur expertise pour faire deux forages verticaux, puis une plaque géothermique qui est encore plus stable, efficace et productive. C'est une première mondiale. Nous en sommes vraiment heureux. Nous avons hâte de voir le résultat de la démonstration.

(1640)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Cannings, vous avez trois minutes.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je vais passer à quelque chose que nous avons examiné dans le cadre d'une autre étude: le centre de données sur l'énergie, ou peu importe comment vous l'appelez. Je pense que dans le dernier budget, il y avait de l'argent pour permettre à Statistique Canada de s'en occuper.

Est-ce bien cela?

Je pense qu'un grand nombre d'entre nous ici et dans l'ensemble du pays aimeraient avoir une source de données sur l'énergie qui soit ouverte au public, qui soit opportune, transparente et exacte. Je n'aurais alors pas à vous poser toutes ces questions à ce sujet. Je me demande simplement si c'est là où on en est rendu.

Pourquoi n'a-t-on pas créé un organisme distinct comme c'est le cas aux États-Unis, où vous avez un organisme vraiment indépendant du gouvernement qui pourrait être considéré comme impartial, le savez-vous?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Oui, je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Voulez-vous essayer de répondre?

M. Chris Evans:

Certainement. À la suite de l'étude que vous avez faite, entre avril et juin de l'année dernière, je crois, vous avez fait valoir qu'il était important d'avoir des renseignements exacts et fiables pour l'avenir énergétique du Canada, et qu'il était important que les gens aient une compréhension transparente du marché. Dans le budget de 2019, comme vous l'avez signalé, des fonds ont été accordés et, en collaboration avec les provinces et les territoires, le gouvernement s'apprête à répondre à ce qui était essentiellement la première recommandation de votre rapport, à savoir un guichet unique virtuel pour rassembler et rationaliser l'information, non seulement de Statistique Canada, mais aussi d'autres organismes publics et du secteur privé.

Comme vous le savez, Statistique Canada possède une expertise de calibre mondial en matière de collecte et de gestion de données, ce qui en fait un élément essentiel de cette entreprise. Il maintient des ententes d'échange de données avec les provinces, les territoires et d'autres organisations et les positionne de façon à bien faire ce travail.

En fait, on s'attend à ce que le portail soit lancé relativement bientôt, étant donné que cette coopération en matière d'information sur l'énergie sera un domaine clé de la collaboration avec les provinces et les territoires. Elle se poursuivra jusqu'à la fin de la prochaine conférence des ministres de l'Énergie et des Mines, en juillet en Colombie-Britannique.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Monsieur le président, je fais simplement remarquer que le député n'est pas le seul à chercher ce genre de renseignements. Il en a été beaucoup question pendant la discussion sur Génération Énergie. Les gens sont curieux. Ils veulent avoir les données, les preuves. Ils veulent forger leurs propres opinions. Nous pensons que le fait de disposer de ce portail et de ces données contribuera à éclairer le débat public.

Le président:

Il nous reste environ 15 minutes. Nous avons fait deux tours. Nous pourrions faire un autre tour. Je propose peut-être quatre minutes par parti, si cela vous intéresse, ou nous pourrions nous arrêter maintenant. Qu'en dites-vous?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je poserais bien quelques autres questions.

Le président:

D'accord. L'ordre sera le suivant: Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, NPD. Vous avez le dernier mot, Richard. Qu'en pensez-vous?

Vous avez quatre minutes chacun.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord. Merci, monsieur le président.

Donc, 1,6 milliard de dollars. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur la provenance de cet argent et qui l'a reçu?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Bien sûr.

Pour ce qui est de la première tranche de 1 milliard de dollars pour EDC, nous avons communiqué plus tôt avec ces collègues pour faire le point sur la situation. Selon leur dernière évaluation, ils s'attendent à ce que quelque 500 millions de dollars soient engagés d'ici la fin de l'année — au cours des 6 à 7 prochains mois. Cet argent est là pour assurer le fonds de roulement des entreprises qui cherchent à exporter, principalement, et à trouver de nouveaux marchés.

Le deuxième est l'apport de 500 millions de dollars de la Banque de développement du Canada. Cette somme est destinée au financement commercial, surtout pour les petites et moyennes entreprises du secteur pétrolier et gazier. Jusqu'à maintenant, elle a engagé quelque 50,8 millions de dollars en nouveau soutien commercial. Elle s'attend à fournir un soutien supplémentaire de 150 millions de dollars d'ici à la fin de juin, un mois environ. Elle s'attend à engager 335 millions de dollars de plus en soutien commercial continu, alors il semble bien que ce soit en bonne voie.

(1645)

M. Ted Falk:

Que fait EDC avec le milliard de dollars dont elle dispose?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je ne sais pas si vous voulez ajouter quelque chose, Chris, mais il s'agit de financement pour aider les entreprises à investir dans des technologies novatrices et pour répondre à leurs besoins en fonds de roulement pour exporter vers de nouveaux marchés. C'est essentiellement cela.

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Chris Evans:

Non, je pense que cela résume bien la situation. Les chiffres que vous avez donnés expliquent exactement comment les 500 millions de dollars prévus sur le milliard de dollars de cette année seront dépensés.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Et juste pour noter...

M. Ted Falk:

Je comprends, mais à quoi serviraient ces 500 millions de dollars? Je comprends que c'est pour offrir du soutien, mais comment au juste? Quel genre d'entreprises l'obtiennent? À quoi cet argent sert-il? S'agit-il d'une subvention pure et simple? S'agit-il d'un prêt remboursable?

M. Chris Evans:

Je peux vous donner, si cela peut vous aider, des exemples du genre d'interventions que la BDC a faites. Nous avons deux bons exemples qui montrent concrètement comment les petites entreprises canadiennes ont bénéficié de cet argent.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Sachez simplement que nous ne pouvons pas communiquer des renseignements sensibles sur le plan commercial, alors nous utilisons des cas génériques, quoique réels. On ne peut pas révéler le nom d'une entreprise.

M. Chris Evans:

Par exemple, l'une des entreprises qui a reçu un financement de la BDC était un client oeuvrant dans la gestion des résidus de forage qui avait un problème, parce que sa banque principale se retirait des options de financement en raison des difficultés liées à la réduction du nombre de plateformes de forage au Canada et à la réduction de la production en Alberta. Consciente du créneau de la réduction des déchets et de sa rentabilité, la BDC a décidé de fournir du financement, ce qui a permis au client de poursuivre sa stratégie de diversification et d'améliorer son offre de produits, notamment en embauchant un ingénieur en environnement pour fournir une gamme plus complète de produits.

Mon deuxième exemple est celui d'un client qui faisait face à des problèmes dans l'industrie du transport en raison du ralentissement économique, en l'occurrence en Alberta, encore une fois en raison de la nécessité de s'adapter à certaines des réductions de production qui peuvent avoir une incidence sur l'industrie du transport. BDC a fourni un fonds de roulement sous forme de prêt qui a donné au client la possibilité et le temps d'adapter la structure de son entreprise aux conditions changeantes du marché, ce qui lui a permis de diversifier ses services et d'offrir des services de transport dans différentes industries. L'entreprise en question a décidé de prendre de l'expansion pour offrir un service de camions aspirateurs, ce qui lui a permis, grâce à ce prêt, de maintenir sa position de liquidité et de connaître du succès.

Au 30 avril, la BDC avait accordé 392 prêts commerciaux totalisant 97 millions de dollars sur l'enveloppe de 500 millions de dollars.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Des Rosiers, si vous voulez faire un commentaire, allez-y.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je serai très bref. Les 500 millions de dollars ont été entièrement attribués et ces projets ont été en grande partie annoncés. D'autres viendront au cours des prochaines semaines, mais il s'agit de plusieurs projets partout au pays.

Pour ce qui est du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, les 100 millions de dollars ont été entièrement engagés. La moitié de cette somme a été annoncée pour nos projets pétrochimiques — deux projets principaux dans l'Ouest canadien. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais revenir sur ces recherches dont nous parlions plus tôt.

On sait à quel point les déchets de plastique causent d'immenses problèmes partout sur la planète. On les retrouve en quantité énorme dans les océans, notamment. Des recherches ont-elles été menées sur la possibilité de convertir d'anciennes matières plastiques ou des déchets de plastique en carburant ou en gaz utilisables?

(1650)

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Effectivement. Le thème des plastiques a prédominé dans les travaux du G7, tant pour les chefs d'État en juin dernier que durant la rencontre des ministres canadiens de l'Environnement, des Océans et de l'Énergie qui s'est tenue en septembre.

Le gouvernement du Canada a poursuivi ses efforts dans ce domaine au sein de trois ministères: Environnement et Changement climatique, Ressources naturelles, et Pêches et Océans. Nous avons lancé des défis précisément pour arriver à convertir les matières plastiques en énergie, qu'il s'agisse d'énergie thermique ou de combustibles liquides. Diverses technologies sont en cause. Nous sommes très désireux de développer ce type de procédé, pas uniquement dans nos laboratoires, mais aussi avec des partenaires externes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je reviens au rapport que le Comité a déposé en 2016, avant que je ne devienne membre du comité. Le gouvernement a ensuite présenté sa réponse à ce rapport, dans laquelle il traite de la collaboration avec les États-Unis, particulièrement en matière de recherche. Est-ce que vous pouvez nous parler des résultats de cette collaboration?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Cette collaboration suscite beaucoup d'intérêt, tant au sein des entreprises que des gouvernements. Nous travaillons notamment avec les laboratoires nationaux du USDOE, le département de l'Énergie aux États-Unis, afin de développer des approches qui conviendraient à nos entreprises, lesquelles font des affaires des deux côtés de la frontière. Notre collaboration se poursuit, car nos partenaires américains sont, eux aussi, très désireux de voir leurs entreprises pouvoir traiter des deux côtés de la frontière.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'il y a d'autres pays avec lesquels nous travaillons d'aussi près ou avec lesquels notre collaboration est bonne?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Dans ce secteur, je dirais que nos relations les plus étroites sont avec les États-Unis. Cependant, nous collaborons également avec des collègues européens et asiatiques. Plusieurs d'entre eux seront présents lors de la rencontre à Vancouver, où bon nombre de ces discussions vont se poursuivre.

Peu de gens semblent au courant du fait que le Canada a la réputation d'être l'un des acteurs principaux dans le secteur des énergies propres. En effet, de nombreux pays nous proposent de collaborer. Cependant, nous avons choisi de cibler principalement les États-Unis, l'Europe et l'Asie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce même rapport, il est question de la nécessité de consulter et de davantage impliquer les communautés autochtones. D'ailleurs, comme vous le savez, notre comité se consacre à ce sujet précis depuis plusieurs mois. Pouvez-vous faire des commentaires et nous dire où en sont ces démarches?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

De quel aspect parlez-vous en lien avec les Autochtones?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parle des consultations sur tout projet, notamment de pipeline, dans lesquels ils sont impliqués. Dans sa réponse au rapport de 2016, le gouvernement s'engageait à accroître sa collaboration avec les communautés autochtones. Je veux savoir où nous en sommes rendus à ce sujet.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C'est fort juste.

Comme vous le savez, cela s'applique aux secteurs pétrolier et gazier, notamment pour des projets de pipeline, telles les consultations que nous sommes en train de mener en réponse à la décision de la Cour d'appel. Cela s'applique aussi à tous les projets de grande ampleur qui visent les ressources énergétiques, minières et forestières du Canada. Nous le faisons de façon rigoureuse.

Nous explorons aussi un autre domaine qui suscite un grand enthousiasme et une grande implication de la part de nos partenaires des communautés autochtones. Plus précisément, nous cherchons des façons de réduire leur dépendance au diésel pour produire de l'énergie et de leur permettre de migrer vers des sources d'énergie propre, de privilégier les énergies renouvelables et de stocker l'énergie. Tout récemment, nous avons lancé un programme de 20 millions de dollars pour former une relève en la matière. Nous avons un grand nombre de projets en cours avec les communautés autochtones de partout au pays pour leur permettre d'effectuer cette transition vers des sources d'énergie propre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Cannings, vous êtes le dernier, mais non le moindre.

M. Richard Cannings:

J'essaie de trouver une façon de conclure, parce que je suis encore un peu...

Nous avons le rapport du Groupe d'experts intergouvernemental sur l'évolution du climat, le GIEC, qui nous dit que si nous voulons atteindre nos objectifs, pas seulement au Canada, mais partout dans le monde, il va falloir commencer à réduire considérablement l'utilisation du pétrole dans le monde. La courbe descend rapidement, à zéro d'ici à 2050 — dans 30 ans.

Je me demande si RNCan examine ces scénarios et s'il croit que le monde peut peut-être faire cela, que nous pouvons peut-être vaincre les changements climatiques, ou si vous baissez les bras et dites: « J'espère que ces scientifiques du GIEC ont tort. Nous espérons que les autres pays du monde n'atteindront pas leurs objectifs, afin que tous ces investissements ne soient pas vains. »

Chaque jour, ce scénario me laisse perplexe. Nous sommes confrontés à ce problème mondial et pourtant, je viens ici et j'entends dire qu'il y a des plans pour accroître la production — pas seulement ici, mais partout dans le monde.

Je me demande comment vous composez avec cela à RNCan.

(1655)

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Monsieur le président, nous prenons très au sérieux la question des membres du Comité concernant le GIEC. Voilà pourquoi le gouvernement a investi autant d'efforts dans l'élaboration d'un cadre pancanadien sur les changements climatiques.

Notre ministère, RNCan, est chargé de l'exécution de la majorité de ces programmes, qu'il s'agisse d'écologiser le secteur pétrolier et gazier et d'envisager des technologies transformatrices pour réduire considérablement les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, qu'il s'agisse des transports, où nous déployons des efforts pour électrifier le parc de véhicules et rendre cette pratique de plus en plus courante — et nous commençons à le voir dans nos rues —, ou qu'il s'agisse d'améliorer l'efficacité énergétique et de trouver des solutions de consommation d'énergie nette zéro tant pour les résidences que les immeubles commerciaux. Nous poursuivons ce dossier avec vigueur.

Nous en sommes certainement très conscients. Une autre partie de notre mandat consiste à examiner les répercussions de l'adaptation aux changements climatiques sur le pays. Ce ne sont pas seulement des rapports qui nous envoient des signaux d'alarme, mais nous le voyons sur le terrain, ce qui touche notre Nord, nos collectivités. Comme nous l'avons vu encore une fois au cours de la saison des inondations du printemps dernier, il y a une incidence très réelle sur notre population.

Bien sûr, il y a des raisons de s'inquiéter. Il y a aussi des raisons d'avoir confiance que le Canada sera parmi les chefs de file pour ce qui est d'essayer d'assurer cet avenir sobre en carbone. Encore une fois, lors des réunions ministérielles qui ont lieu tous les mois, nous avons tous l'occasion de faire part de ce que nous pouvons faire en matière de technologie, de partenariats et de nouveaux modes de financement, afin que nous puissions faire appel au secteur privé pour nous aider à réaliser cette transition.

Nous poursuivons ce dossier avec vigueur, mais aussi avec humilité, en reconnaissant qu'il reste beaucoup à faire pour atteindre le genre d'objectif à moyen terme que vise le GIEC. Quand on pense aux réductions de 40 et de 50 % des émissions de gaz à effet de serre d'ici à 2050, il est certain que nous devrons redoubler d'efforts dans les années à venir.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je suis convaincu que nous aurons besoin de pétrole et de gaz pendant des années. Je le sais très bien.

Cependant, nous disons ici que nous devons utiliser de moins en moins, et nous faisons tout ce que nous pouvons pour produire de plus en plus. C'est le dilemme auquel je suis confronté, et lorsque j'entends vos témoignages, il ne s'estompe pas.

Merci.

Le président:

Il vous reste environ 20 secondes. M. Whalen me dit qu'il a une question très intéressante à poser.

Posez-la très rapidement.

M. Nick Whalen:

Monsieur Evans, on a parlé tout à l'heure des projections de l'ONE quant à la capacité de production future. Il me semble que c'est un des cas où il y a beaucoup de yin et de yang entre la capacité de distribution et la production prévue. Il n'y a pas de réserve de pétrole stratégique ni d'endroit où stocker de grandes quantités de pétrole en Alberta de façon à offrir ce tampon afin que les gens puissent augmenter leur production au-delà de ce qui est disponible pour la distribution à l'extérieur de la province.

Dans le cas du pétrole et du gaz, y a-t-il une capacité d'expansion au-delà de la capacité de distribution actuelle? L'ONE serait-il en mesure de... Le rapport mentionnait-il que la production pourrait aller au-delà de la distribution prévue, mais qu'elle ne le peut pas, parce qu'il n'y a aucun endroit où stocker le pétrole?

M. Chris Evans:

Lorsque l'ONE fait ces prévisions, il fournit plus d'un cas, alors nous utilisons le scénario de référence comme base. Il tient compte d'un grand nombre de facteurs à un haut niveau. Je ne suis pas au courant de tout ce qu'il utilise pour arriver à ses prévisions. Je ne peux pas parler précisément de la question du stockage.

Toutefois, nous savons qu'en Alberta, on parle souvent de la quantité de produits pétroliers qu'on peut stocker à l'heure actuelle. Parfois, vous verrez dans les journaux des références à un stockage de l'ordre de 30 millions de barils.

Je ne sais pas comment l'ONE, en particulier, tiendrait compte du stockage dans ses prévisions. Je suis désolé.

Le président:

Merci.

Cela nous amène à la fin de la réunion.

Merci beaucoup à tous de vous être joints à nous aujourd'hui. Je vous remercie d'avoir fait le point. Je pense que tout le monde conviendra que c'était très utile et très instructif.

Nous nous reverrons tous jeudi à 15 h 30.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard rnnr 26198 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 14, 2019

2019-05-07 RNNR 135

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1540)

[English]

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)):

Good afternoon.

Today we will resume the committee's study of international best practices for engaging with indigenous communities regarding major energy projects. It will be our final meeting for this study.

I want to welcome all of the witnesses joining us today. We are again joined by Robert Beamish from Anokasan Capital by video conference, and Raylene Whitford from Canative Energy. Ms. Whitford is joined by her colleague, Chris Karamea Insley. We'll go to each of them for their 10-minute opening round and then follow that with our usual rounds of questions from the parties.

Mr. Beamish, the floor is yours.

Mr. Robert Beamish (Director, Anokasan Capital):

Thank you very much for having me back again.

My name is Robert Beamish, and I am the co-founder and director of Anokasan Capital. I'll keep the introduction brief, as I was introduced previously.

We specialize in securing investment from east Asia for projects in indigenous communities in Canada. I'll be speaking about best practices from an international perspective and the perspective of indigenous communities within Canada.

These best practices are quite similar to the ones I mentioned in my previous presentation, but this time I plan to go into a little more detail on their value and why they are what they are.

I will start with the first one, which is to start with understanding. It is so important in relation to engaging with communities to not only allocate time, but also to budget for the understanding and needs-analysis process. If it's in the budget, it can be tracked and it can be delivered, and...finding out if there's alignment between community members and government for certain project developments. The more alignment you have, the more knowledge you can have of a community, and that will only help as the project develops and the negotiations continue to develop.

In a lot of communities there seems to be a process where people and individuals who go through the communities are very transient, coming for a time to learn or volunteer, and then ending up leaving. Over time, it can be an emotionally extractive process when you share your story, your culture, what things mean to you and your way of life and world view, and then people leave. Then more people come, and it's another process of sharing and leaving. This can also happen from the business perspective. In order to be successful, there needs to be that longer-term commitment from all partners.

Understanding goes to more than just project requirements; it's also understanding what the community's development goals are, what their history is, how they want to develop and where they are in that development process.

The next best practice would be communication alignment, and this relates to providing the platform for concerns to be voiced. If one isn't provided, then one will be created. It's about having regular intervals for communication, not only for dispute resolution, but also for an open floor to provide community members with feedback and details on the development of the project.

As different communication styles need different approaches in order to get all of the information out, you need to have set intervals, whether they be bi-weekly or monthly, to discuss the project's development as it relates not only to community members, but also to project leaders and stakeholders. Having these scheduled interviews allows the time for different people to process that information and perform the different types of analysis that they find valid.

For example, there was a geothermal project that was being worked on. It was in line with the values of the community. It was a renewable energy project, and it had education and employment opportunities included. When the project started to go forward, the machinery that was being brought to the community resembled classic oil rig machinery. When community members saw this, they said, “This isn't in line with what we thought we were getting into.” There wasn't a platform to provide information or dispute resolution, so one was created, and there was a process for this. There ended up being a team that went around to educate community members about what the machinery of a renewable energy project looks like, how it would change and what it would look like in terms of phases. They had to add this as an additional stage in their development process in order to ease the social unrest.

If there had been a platform for that open, free flow of information for community members to ask questions and provide feedback, that could have been avoided.

The next point would be cultural alignment. This one relates to the differences in cultures. Our differences can only bring us together once we understand how they separate us. It's about being proactive in understanding the protocols associated with the land, the land's relationship with that community, and what it means not only in terms of protocols and what should be done while on the land but also what it means in terms of the relationship with the land and why.

As well, a very important practice that we implement is a cultural bias awareness practice where we're self-aware of our own cultural biases. We do this because usually we're working with investors from the Asia-Pacific region, specifically China, but also with indigenous communities. We ourselves have our own cultural biases that we come in with. If we're aware of those, we can understand how our cultural biases are affecting how we're trying to do business, how we're going into this situation, how the cultural biases of the different partners at the table may be affected, and how they're going into doing business.

The next point would be the “four Es”, namely, employment, equity, education and the environment. These four Es affect every community in some way, some on a greater scale than others. We're proactively seeking these out in the “understanding” stage—for example, finding out the employment requirements, the expected equity in projects, the environmental concerns and the education for members, whether that be in training or literacy education. Looking for these and looking for ways to tailor these four Es to communities is an excellent way to proceed as a better partner, but likely these four Es are affecting communities in different ways. Whether they're all at the same time or one is greater than the other, integrating these into projects as opposed to leaving them as concessions is a much better way to start building a relationship.

A segue into the next one is information alignment. What gets measured gets delivered. When these Es can be measured, whether they're by literacy tests prior to a project starting, during the project start, during the training being implemented, or after the project or training has been completed, you are able to mark the improvements in literacy or education or as they relate to skills development. If these items are being measured, then they can also be delivered. Project requirements are measured and delivered upon and timelines are measured, but just as project requirements are measured, these social development requirements should be measured as well. Many communities are lacking in information when it comes to this area. It can be difficult to provide policy and create policy around where the community should go next if this information around literacy rates or around environmental contamination is not available. This information that you can provide to a community is value added to the community in their continued development as well.

I know that this is the last meeting on this topic of best practices, but I think it is very important to heed these best practices. A lot of them are not being implemented. There are challenges to implementing these practices, but the challenge that comes with these practices is also the great reward that comes from implementing them. Understanding these communities and understanding the individuals we'll work with on these projects will change how projects can be developed and how relationships can be developed, and it will affect mutual prosperity going forward. As we know from the different meetings that have been held on this topic, there are so many of these practices. I can only think of the ones that have been mentioned during the two presentations that I'm a part of. They will likely take effort, money and time to implement. They will take understanding and sacrifice in order to develop and be useful going forward, but it will be for the mutual benefit of all the people of this generation and the ones that follow.

(1545)



I do thank you for your time on this. I'm looking forward to your questions.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

Thank you, Mr. Beamish. You're right on time. That's better than most of us in the House of Commons on a daily basis.

Now we will go to our next witness.

Ms. Whitford, together, you and your colleague can split your time.

Ms. Raylene Whitford (Director, Canative Energy):

Thank you, everybody. It's a pleasure to appear in front of you again.

I'm calling in from Rotorua in New Zealand. I'm here with Chris Karamea Insley, who is one of the advisers to Canative Energy.

I requested to appear again before the standing committee just because this is a topic that I feel very, very strongly about. This is my life's work, and it has been my career to date so far. I'm an indigenous finance professional. I have worked internationally in the energy sector since I began my career. I spent three years in Ecuador working in social development with Ecuadorian indigenous communities that had been impacted by the energy sector.

As for what I'd like to share with you, I'll just touch base on the three points I raised previously and then bring up another two that I think are very important. It's echoed in what I'm seeing here in New Zealand as well.

The first point I brought up was diversification. It's really important that these communities are not completely dependent on income streams generated from the energy industry.

It's also really important that they have a long-term plan in place. At some point, I saw some Ecuadorian communities that were looking into the future, but some are very nearsighted, and it's very difficult to engage with a major capital project if you are looking only at what is right in front of you.

The third point is building capabilities. Last time, I spoke about the education aspect, the literacy, etc.

I think this next point echoes Robert Beamish's point about energy literacy. What is energy literacy? Basically, it's providing the education and the awareness of what the industry is. What do these capital projects look like? What is the terminology being used? What is the machinery that they're going to see coming through their community? This is really important. It's really difficult to engage with something if you don't know what's going to happen, especially in these communities. They're very tightly knit, so they get a lot of their information from their neighbours and their families. Sometimes the messages change. Sometimes they're coloured a bit by people's ontologies, so it's really important that the government promote energy literacy within these communities so they're able to engage effectively.

The last point is the prioritization of youth voices. What I've seen is the polar opposite of what happens in the energy industry. In the energy industry, it's usually the oldest, loudest voice at the table that's prioritized in the boardroom, whereas in the communities that I've seen operating effectively in their space, they're actually bringing children and youth into the room and asking them for their opinion because they are the leaders of the next generation. They're engaging with these individuals with the expectation of empowering them and engaging them in the conversation to be able to move this forward.

With that, I'll hand it over to Chris. He'll tell you a bit more about what's going on in New Zealand.

(1550)

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley (Advisor, Canative Energy):

Thank you, Raylene.

Good afternoon, Madam Chair, and thank you for the opportunity to speak and share some of the experiences from us, as Maori people down in New Zealand.

My background is that I similarly trained in finance and economics in New Zealand, and also in the U.S. My work experience has been largely concentrated in the natural resources area. I've spent a lot of time working in forestry, including in the U.S. and in Canada—in British Columbia—so I have some experience there. Like Raylene, it's been my life's work in terms of driving Maori and, in turn, indigenous development among the likes of Robert, Raylene and others.

What I want to do is sort of share with you, members of the committee, a little bit about New Zealand, a little bit about Maori, and what makes sense for governments of the world to embrace—the challenges and the opportunities, and the opportunities are big.

As a population, we have around six million people, so we're small in New Zealand. Of that, there are around 600,000 Maori people. If you trace back through time, we as Maori people have shared, if you like, the same challenges that we see among the indigenous first nations people of Canada and elsewhere around the world—like Australia—in terms of high unemployment, all the bad things.

I'm going to echo some of the points that Robert and Raylene have made. It makes sense for governments to try to understand how to work collectively together with indigenous people. From the New Zealand experience, around 30 to 40 years ago, a piece of work was done to measure what the economic size of the Maori economy was within New Zealand. They measured it at around about $30 billion—New Zealand dollars—at that point in time. I might add that interest is concentrated in the natural resources: farming, forestry and fishing, and energy to an extent.

That same piece of work was remeasured, redone, in the last 12 months. The Maori economy today is around $50 billion. If you do the numbers, you'll see that the Maori economy is growing at a compound annual growth rate of around 15% to 20% year-on-year, while the rest of the New Zealand economy is growing at around 2% to 3%. That's triggered a lot of activity and thinking within New Zealand governments that the Maori economy has become a cornerstone of the success of the New Zealand economy in terms of some of the things that Maori are doing. It makes sense; that is the point.

In terms of best practice, again I'm going to echo the points that Raylene and Robert have made. From a government policy point of view, if you understand.... I believe from my assessment in Canada, with the kind of natural resources our first nations folks are involved in, there is enormous potential for that to be grown for first nations and for the economy of Canada, if some of the lessons that we've certainly learned along the way might be transferred.

The first point is that it takes time. I know you're challenged by the short-term electoral cycles, which we have in New Zealand too. It's hard to plan long term when you're up against that challenge, but I make the point that it takes time. I'm echoing, again, other points that Raylene has made. To build capability within communities, to build trust within communities, that all takes time.

Invest in young people. Heavily invest in young people and bring them forward, and that's when you'll really start to see the lessons and the potential start to be realized.

I'm really going to make a pause at this point, but I'd also say that whatever you do, it's worth the effort and don't drop the ball in terms of thinking about long-term plans and policy.

I'll pause there.

(1555)

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

You do have two minutes, if there are any additional comments you want to add.

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

Okay, thank you. I will go on from those best practice points to one other point that I think is really important and that we've certainly come to appreciate. It's a point that has been echoed around the world. That is not only to take a long-term view—and when I say “long-term”, I mean potentially generations, not five to ten years; but 30 to 50 years and beyond—but then also to think about policy that is integrative.

What do I mean by that? It's driven and underpinned by realizing the economics that we've all been trained in. There has to be a return on investment for all of the different parties, including government, the private sector, and the local communities. But absolutely, alongside that—and this is the stuff that we've learned in New Zealand that really starts to resonate with indigenous communities—think about how you grow people and about the social drivers. When you're thinking about getting alongside communities, go to them.

We have in New Zealand this thing that we've termed the “aunty test”. It's often the hardest test to pass, when you're in a meeting in the community, because one of the aunties will stand up and say to you, “Yes, we know all of those NPV numbers and those return on investment numbers, but what are you going to do to grow our people? Where are the jobs for our people? ”

You have, then, to tick the economics; you have to tick driving, and I would argue that the social driver is probably one of the pre-eminent drivers; and then also the environmental drivers. There is a fourth one; that's the cultural drivers. Long=term, you need to integrate all of those different value drivers into your thinking and the way you think about policy.

I'll pause there.

(1600)

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

Again that's perfect timing. Thank you very much for your testimony.

We'll go to our government colleagues with our first seven-minute round of questions, starting with David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'm going to start with Mr. Beamish.

You mentioned an example or a situation in which a project was started and oil rig equipment arrived and the project was not what they were expecting.

Is there a feeling that our projects are being obfuscated or not being explained legitimately in these negotiations with these communities around the world?

Mr. Robert Beamish:

That one could be related to exactly what Raylene was talking about, a case in which information could be derived from your neighbour in a close-knit community and not necessarily from the project's negotiations and what was discussed exclusively in the boardroom. That relates to disseminating information from the boardroom to the community's members at the individual level.

I have colleagues who work in that space, and they literally go knocking on the doors of community members to talk about what these ongoing developments will look like and how the project will affect the community—what the machinery will look like, what the different development stages will look like. That goes to educating the entire community, not just the project leads and the people who will be working on the physical project.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My next question is for all of you

You have been here before. Is there anything in previous testimony over the course of this study that you wanted to rebut or answer or challenge? This is the last day of witnesses, so if a point has been made that you think is utter wrong, now is a good time to point it out, either of you.

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

I'll go first.

I don't think there is anything in any of the evidence I've heard, either in my previous session or in what I've heard through listening online to the other sessions.

What really drove me to connect with the committee is that I feel that sometimes it's difficult to have a purely international view. I know we're meant to be relating to the Canadian context, but it felt, most certainly in our session, that the conversation turned to some legacy issues in Canada and wasn't purely international. I would encourage the committee to keep that international hat on and really look at what's happening around the world.

As well, I really think it's important to acknowledge the youth aspect. What I'm seeing in Ecuador, and what I'm seeing in Canada as well, is the engagement and empowerment of young indigenous people. This is one reason I'm returning to Canada later this year to work. It's really inspiring and it's really great to see this, but it's very risky.

If this generation of youth become disengaged, or disenchanted with the energy industry and the way the government is treating them and operators are engaging with them, they can completely turn the other way and can most definitely stop the projects in their communities. It's really important to understand that their voices are prioritized and respected within these communities and that it not be as hierarchical as what we see in the energy industry.

To me that's one of the polar opposites I see between communities and the way the industry operates: it's the treatment and recognition of the voice of youth.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When we're talking about youth and ensuring the engagement of youth, what resonates with the next generation? What brings them to the table to say, “That's a really good idea; we have to work on this”, as opposed to, “My God, that's a horrible thought”?

What are the lines or explanations that work the best to keep them engaged?

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

What you see at conferences focused on a specific subject—as I've seen in New Zealand—is that the first session is with the youth, who are encouraged to present their ideas and to lead the conference, in a way. I think that's really important.

For example, in one community I saw in Ecuador, there were two individuals who left the community and went to the city to be educated as lawyers. They were very open to activity in the sector. It was in the mining sector, not oil and gas sector, but these mining projects were still major capital projects with long lives. Over the time I spent in Ecuador, I saw them very quickly disengage, just with the way the government was treating them and the way their voices were very quickly pushed aside. The elders of the community were the only ones who were engaging with them.

It's really important to let the youth feel included and involved, and also to listen to their opinions. What you often see, and least with Robert's and my generation, is that we're more open-minded and more international. We have a valid opinion as well, which could be aligned to the sector.

(1605)

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

Could I build on that point, David?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure.

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

From a New Zealand perspective, growing our youth has been, in my view, a cornerstone of the kind of economic growth we've seen achieved in New Zealand. What I mean by that is that a lot of our Maori companies and businesses across all of the different sectors offer scholarships every year to our youth. Over the last 15 to 20 years, we've seen a massive wave of highly educated youth going out through the university systems of New Zealand and the world. The point is really that all of those said youth are highly motivated to return home and contribute the knowledge, skill and expertise they have accumulated both through work and through learning around the world. They have a yearning to make a contribution back into their communities.

That raises another challenge when they come back, because you have to create the opening for them to come back to. That means driving concurrently the economic activity. You cradle a new opportunity and you welcome them back in. That's really what starts to accelerate the development, not just for those communities and those families, but for communities and the nation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I think my time is well past up. I appreciate that.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

Perfect.

For our next seven-minute round, Jamie, you have the floor.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

I appreciate the opportunity to ask our witnesses some questions on this very important study.

To Chris, to continue on that thought, when talking about indigenous youth and engagement and that type of theme, in a lot of cases—and this can even be discussed outside first nation communities—there seems to be a bit of a disconnect between companies requiring certain skills from the newer workers and the younger workers trying to determine whether or not they actually want to get into that trade. Skilled trades come to mind in a lot of cases.

How did New Zealand deal with that? Here in Canada, I think there is an issue.

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

Yes, Jamie, I'll answer that on two levels.

Firstly, in New Zealand, the Maori community has become highly active politically. For example, of our 122 members of parliament in New Zealand, we have 18 Maori members from across the political spectrum. In my view, we've been very sophisticated about how to leverage, as Maori people, that influence within government towards skills training programs for the particular needs of Maori communities. And we have a lot of those unfolding right now in some of these different sectors.

The second part of the answer is that, within our own Maori businesses, we are actively encouraging our youth to go off and get trained at university and in the trades. I think it has to happen at both levels. It's not just a government responsibility; it's a responsibility of government in partnership with business and with the families and communities.

For me, it really comes back to building that trust with those communities. In my view, the success is not through a government-driven, top-down approach only; it has to come from communities to drive that up.

I trust that makes sense.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, it does.

Does anyone want to add anything more before I get on to my next topic?

Mr. Beamish.

(1610)

Mr. Robert Beamish:

I think Chris summarized that well.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay, perfect.

This can be open for anybody.

On indigenous consultation, I'll mention a project that some of you are familiar with, the Eagle Spirit pipeline. I note that so far today we've talked about consultation with regard to projects, but what about the legislation that impacts these projects like the Eagle Spirit pipeline that some of you are familiar with? For example, 35 first nations want to build that indigenous-owned Eagle Spirit pipeline corridor from Fort McMurray, Alberta to the northwest B.C. coast near Prince Rupert. These first nations complained bitterly about the failure of consultation on Bill C-48, which will forever ban the export of crude oil off the northwest coast of B.C.

Now, with respect to Bill C-69, the proposed legislation on impact assessments, we are finding out that many of these Canadian companies, like TransCanada—which recently dropped “Canada” from its name—are focusing investments on other international jurisdictions like the U.S. As investment flees, projects are being cancelled and jobs are being lost, and particularly hard hit are those indigenous jobs.

Indian Oil and Gas Canada, which regulates oil production on first nations lands, has a policy of charging a higher royalty for oil produced on reserve lands than the royalties charged on crown land in B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan.

As investment departs Canada, capital exits indigenous lands first. According to the IOGC itself, new first nations' leases are down 95% over the last four years.

In your opinion, do governments owe a duty to consult on legislation like Bill C-48 and Bill C-69, the no more pipelines bill, that directly affect indigenous interests, or is it only a physical shovels-in-the-ground type of project that requires consultation?

That was a very long preamble.

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

If I may start, first of all, in the spirit of the topic of the committee, I'm going to leave aside the Eagle Spirit pipeline specifics and answer your question directly. Should indigenous peoples be consulted in the creation and development of policy as well as when they put shovels in the ground? Absolutely.

I would encourage the committee to consider indigenous communities as an operator would consider their joint venture partner. Indigenous communities need to have the same rights, the same level of opinion and the same engagement as, for example, Shell would have with BP if they were partnering on an asset in the North Sea. Those two joint venture partners have equal voices when it comes to canvassing the government in developing policy and changing the existing policies. Absolutely. It's only at that point that you will begin to build trust with the indigenous communities.

Thank you.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

How much time do I have left?

The Vice-Chair: One minute.

Mr. Jamie Schmale: Okay, so I might have to skip over a few things.

Speaking of these major projects, when there is opposition, has New Zealand or Australia, whichever, had a divide among indigenous groups? If so, were there any takeaways from the results of that divide, and were accommodations made?

How did that nation-to-nation consultation work, or was it tried, with major infrastructure projects?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

Jamie, let me give a New Zealand sort of response to that.

Part of the context of the answer is that in New Zealand, in 1804, we signed a treaty that was, if you like, an agreement between the indigenous people of New Zealand and the state at that time. That treaty effectively says that in good faith, both parties will talk to each other about really anything that affects the nation of New Zealand.

Personally, I think it's okay and it's good that we have the treaty there, but that shouldn't be the primary driver. If you stepped back from whether or not you should have a discussion about these issues, we have issues going on in New Zealand that are around oil and gas, and there is a divide. It comes down to how both parties have talked to each other about the matter in the preceding period, and that could be years. If you have a good solid foundation for that discussion to take place, it's more than likely you're going to achieve an outcome that's acceptable to both parties.

As I said, we have the treaty there also, which says that in good faith you should respect each other and have a discussion. Start those discussions early—and we have many, many examples of this in New Zealand—and if you do and you build a strong relationship, you will start to achieve the kind of outcomes that I alluded to earlier on. Local communities win, Maori people win, and the nation wins.

(1615)

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

Now, for seven minutes, we go to Richard.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Welcome to you all. Thanks for taking the time to come back to us. I really appreciate it. I'm very jealous, because you're in two of my favourite parts of the world: Medellín and Greater Waikato. I wish I were there—both places at once.

I'm just going to try to pick up on what I think Mr. Schmale was getting at. Mr. Insley, you mentioned in passing the Treaty of Waitangi. I'm just wondering how important those higher level government legal contact relationships are in various countries, or whether you just have to have that relationship and it's all happening down at the community level, the iwi level. You mentioned that that's where the real growth is happening. Are the Waitangi treaty negotiations and implementation an important catalyst for all of that?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

Thank you for the acknowledgement of New Zealand, Richard, and for the question. I think it's a great question. The simple answer to your question is that it's “and, and”. The treaty is a catalyst and is always leaned on now in terms discussion between Maori people and the New Zealand government. We all know that it's there and that it's intended to drive a productive discussion between the parties.

But, at the end of the day, I'm sure you and other members of your committee will understand that it can be a lengthy, drawn-out, highly costly legal process if you choose to go down that path. I would strongly encourage the building of the trust fundamentally with the communities and avoid, if at all possible, going down that much more lengthy, costly process.

Part of the experience in having gone through that process is that it can be very damaging to relationships if you lean on that as the principal mechanism to achieve consensus. It can be damaging and that damage can be long-lasting. My encouragement and urging would be.... We know it's there and that has been helpful—I won't say it hasn't been. A lot of the economic growth that the Maori have achieved has been through that process. But increasingly, what we're seeing is a preference to avoid going down that path. But it is an “and, and”.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Just to clarify that, then, you talked about the dramatic growth in the Maori economy, which I'm understanding from what you're saying is based on an acceptance by the broader New Zealand population that this is how things should be done. There's just that integration of the Maori culture into the New Zealand culture. When I've talked to New Zealanders, to me that acceptance seems to be at a very different stage than what we see in Canada. Is that the reason for this growth in the Maori economy?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

You're exactly right again. There is that growing acceptance. It's taken time. In my view it's taken 10, 20, 30 years to achieve that kind of acceptance. I will use one other example just to illustrate the point. One of the other things that I've been asked to become involved in, along with a number of other Maori business leaders, is to sit alongside our Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade to start to contribute to the development of international trade policy that reflects the particular interests of Maori people, given our size in the New Zealand economy. That acceptance goes further, with what we're now hearing from our government in New Zealand, in that the Maori economy and its culture have become New Zealand's point of difference in trading with other nations, for all of the various products that we will produce from our various parts of the economy.

Again, your point is a very good one. We have reached that point of acceptance by the wider New Zealand community. There is value for all, for the entire nation, by embracing the indigenous community.

(1620)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Do you want to say something to that?

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

I will just add some context for the individuals who haven't had an opportunity to visit New Zealand.

Here the Maori culture is very much integrated into the country. All of the place names are in Maori. There are Maori universities and Maori schools, and this is just a normal thing. This is an accepted thing. Maori is the country's second official language. It's very business as usual, whereas in Canada we're starting to see this resurgence in indigenous pride, renaming of streets, etc., but New Zealand is very much ahead in this respect.

I think that it's not that energy projects need to wait for this to happen; I think it's part and parcel. I think it's going to be a self-propagating entity if you're able to grow the knowledge of the country about and respect for the indigenous culture whilst giving the indigenous communities the opportunity to develop, to go internationally and to participate in these projects. It's going to enable both elements.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'll stay with you, Ms. Whitford, to go to the other end of the spectrum perhaps, with Ecuador, and talk about the legal context there with the concept of Pachamama. I'm suspecting that hasn't had the same impact that the Treaty of Waitangi has had, and that we're at a very different stage of development there.

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

In Ecuador, the indigenous communities have absolutely no rights. They have no mineral rights. They have their settlements and communities, but besides getting government benefit and social insurance, there really is no support for the communities there. It's obviously difficult for them to champion their own development if they don't have the access to these resources and if they don't have the support of the wider government as well.

If you were to place them on a spectrum, I think that Ecuador would be in the very early stages. Canada would be somewhere in the middle, but New Zealand would be 30, 40 or maybe even 50 years ahead of where we are in Canada.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

Now we go to our five-minute round.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Thank you so much to our presenters.

Madam Chair, you're doing an extraordinary job filling in for the regular chair. Thank you so much.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

I made a mistake. You get seven minutes.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I am fascinated by this conversation that we've just seen emerge, in particular with Mr. Insley's reference to the point of difference. Your suggestion is that what sets New Zealand apart is in fact the embracing of the Maori, not only in everyday life but in the economic system as a whole.

Can you tell me how that came about in the last 30 years? Then you can tell me how this is a competitive advantage for you today.

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

It's a very good question. Thank you, Kent.

How did it come about over the last 20 or 30 years?

I really have to hold very firmly to the view that it was through the drive of our leaders and our community, who not only encouraged but also literally forced every one of us to go off and get educated. We were encouraged by our leaders to go off and get educated—not just anywhere but in the best places in the world—and to bring that knowledge back home. It was through that period, that 20 years or so that it took for it to come home.

How is that now creating a competitive advantage? It is—it's creating a competitive advantage for our nation. When our prime minister or any senior delegations from New Zealand travel the world, they take a cultural performing group with them. That group will basically open every major meeting for the leaders of our country. They do that willingly. They see that it adds value, and it's recognized internationally.

Our icon in New Zealand, I guess, is our rugby team, the All Blacks. Our All Blacks stand proudly on the world stage. For those of you who follow rugby, they'll do the haka. The haka really does set us apart, not only on the rugby field but in every arena. All of our children—I have two little grandsons now who are four years old—learn rugby from the time they are born. It's become part of our DNA as a nation. It's in this way that it's promulgated, and it's become part of everything we do.

It's linked back to the point that you make about creating competitive advantage, that we can endure because no one out there has that mix of goods that we have. I think there are real lessons in what we've achieved, and so I think your question is a very good one.

(1625)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you so much.

I think we have to continue to incorporate many of our indigenous cultures here in Canada. I know we're starting to do that with our federal government, by changing our practices and our ways in going about things.

I would also like to address a question to Ms. Whitford.

I come from the province of Alberta, which is tremendously blessed with natural resources. In fact, over the course of time, we have had an excellent resource economy.

The trouble, as you point out, is how do we get the young people involved? How do we not have intergenerational theft? By that, I mean the spending of all the oil wealth in one generation. Do you know what I'm saying? In our home province, we have largely just said, “The future be damned. We're going to spend it all at once” in terms of those types of issues—low taxes, unlimited spending on health care and education—and then the good times are gone.

How do you see that conversation possibly coming back to indigenous communities and consider, for example, how you can look at aspects of sovereign wealth funds, possibly, and how you can get indigenous ownership that recognizes, in their energy literacy, that once you spend the profits from a barrel of oil, that money is gone for good?

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

Thanks, Kent, for your question. I think it's a very valid one.

Again, I'm going to take it out of the province of Alberta and speak with an international voice.

I think we've all seen the power of sovereign wealth funds. If you look at what Norway and a number of countries have done in the energy sector, those funds are most definitely a very astute way of accumulating and growing capital for future generations.

This is something that is quite difficult, I think, for non-indigenous individuals to comprehend. Indigenous communities are inherently long-term. I'm sure the committee has heard of the seven generations a number of times throughout these sessions. Inherently, indigenous communities are looking towards the future, but it's not the near future; it's the long-term future.

I think that providing support, guidance and opportunities for these communities to set up structures whereby they can begin to secure and grow the capital and also opportunities for these future generations will be something they are very interested in.

If you're able to take best practice internationally in the development of these structures, or these funds or trusts, and not give it to them, not parachute it in, but develop it with them, I think that would be a very big win for the federal government.

(1630)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

How do you get more indigenous ownership in these capital projects? Is it building capacity? Is it some other aspect, or is it just education, and continued rigorous hard work building up the community?

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

There are a couple of problems. Most definitely education is important—encouraging the youth to travel internationally and to return. It's also important to give them equity stakes—a valued interest. Giving them a seat at the board table, with an equal voice to those of the other members, is incredibly important. Hopefully, this will shift the conversation from, “Okay, we're going to consult, and tick that box,” to, “We have a very qualified, intelligent, experienced, well-established indigenous person at the table, giving his or her point of view. Everybody around the table is listening and acknowledging that point of view.”

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

Now, for our five-minute round, we'll go to Ted.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you to our witnesses, again, for attending this committee. I appreciate the testimony I've heard.

I'd like one point of clarification. Mr. Insley, you talked about the long legal process not being the preferred route in negotiations. Is that in reference to treaties from the past? What were you referencing with that comment?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

Yes, Ted, it was particularly in relation to the treaty process, not general litigation. The treaty process, from our experience, can be lengthy. That typically means a process that can take tens of years and have a very high cost. In our experience, it can be quite divisive and damaging to relationships. It was particularly in relation to the treaty, but I don't want to undermine the importance of the treaty as a founding document. It is critically important.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you for that clarification. I thought that's what you were saying.

If you don't go down that route in your negotiations, what are the critical components of a negotiation that you do focus on?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

I'm going to just underline the previous points we've all made, namely, the need to start the discussion early and that both parties to that discussion be very honest, sincere and transparent. Certainly in our experience in New Zealand, as many of our people have gone off and become highly trained in all of the various fields, whether it's science, finance and banking or any other fields, we have people who are highly sophisticated and increasingly tuned in to best practices around the world.

In going into those negotiations, indigenous people can get a sense very quickly as to the sincerity of the other parties to engage. If the other parties are not alert to that, it can damage the discussion.

Be in it for the long haul, start the discussion early and be transparent in everything. They are guiding principles, I'd say.

Mr. Ted Falk:

In these negotiations and in your development agreements, are there particular issues that are always in contention, or obstacles to an agreement? Can you give us some guidance on that?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

It's really interesting. Again, I'm thankful for the line of questioning. Often, particularly when you go into a commercial discussion, most of the discussion is around the commercial elements of that negotiation, i.e., the quantum of financial redress. Treaty issues, however, are often not about the amount of financial redress. Often that's actually the last thing that gets discussed. The first thing that gets discussed is a recognition that some issues from the past should be acknowledged. Get those acknowledged first, and then the discussion will shift to addressing a lot of the social issues in the community. Then what happens—and I've been involved in some of these recently—is recognizing within any agreement the need to look after the land and the environment.

Take care of those important drivers, and then you get to the final point, which is agreeing on the financial redress. It's pretty much in that order. It's not the economics first, and all of the other things later.

(1635)

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you for that.

Mr. Beamish, I'd like to ask you a question as well. You've raised capital, you said, from eastern Asian markets.

Mr. Robert Beamish:

Yes, that's right.

Mr. Ted Falk:

What are the things that your investors are looking for?

Mr. Robert Beamish:

We target investors who are looking for a social return as well as a financial return. They are socially conscious investors, so not all investors in this market are our target market. We are looking for investors who want to receive more than an ROI, and who want to have social development included in their investment portfolio, which they are actively tracking. Those are the types of investors that we look for and build relationships with.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you.

I think I'm out of time.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

You are. Thank you.

Everyone's so cooperative.

Now it's back to David for five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Insley, I want to come back to a question from your opening comments. You talked about the rapid and phenomenal growth of the Maori-based economy in New Zealand. I'd like to learn more about the root causes of that. Where is success? What was the turning point? What lessons can we take from that, more widely?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

I think that's a great question.

It's in two parts.

Why is it that the Maori economy is achieving these phenomenal growth rates? First, we have to acknowledge that the treaty settlement process has, if you like, created a pool of development capital available to Maori people that is now being reinvested back into the development of our own businesses, which we own completely. We own fishing companies. We own forestry companies. I was on the board of a highly successful energy company—geothermal energy—and that was stimulated by that initial settlement redress. We've had that pool of development capital made available through that process, but it's not only that.

We have some very talented and smart Maori companies today that are active in a whole range of different fields and have become highly vertically integrated, from the raw material right through to the end product that's being marketed around the world and promoted as being developed by this Maori community.

That all came about through my previous point about growing our young people with the best talent, to bring them back in with all of that talent that they have. It's those two things combined, and there's a third thing I should add, too.

The third thing—actually, there's a fourth thing—is to take a long-term view so that your planning horizon is long. It's not like what we've seen in the past with business per se, where the planning horizon was typically five years. Maori businesses can plan for 100 years. You ride out the ups and downs of prices and all of that kind of volatility.

The last point I'd make that contributes to that phenomenal growth rate is what's inherent within indigenous people, in my view, but certainly within Maori communities, to actually collaborate together and create scale. When you create scale, as you will know, sir, you create leverage. You create leverage in all sorts of ways.

It's a combination of those four factors that are driving these very real, very high, compound annual growth rates.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is the Maori economy leaps and bounds ahead of the non-Maori economy of New Zealand, or is it catching up at a very high rate of speed?

(1640)

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

We're still very far behind in terms of absolute numbers, but the point is the compound annual growth rate, and this is certainly what our governments are paying attention to. There are ministers of our government now who are saying that the Maori economy has become the cornerstone of the New Zealand economy because of its growth rate.

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

I think that growth rate is 20% to 30% versus 2% to 3% nationally here.

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Without the Maori growth, the national economy would not be growing? Is that what I understand?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

That's right. There are really very good reasons, in my view—and certainly it's happening in our country—to pay attention to the interests of the indigenous communities.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could you give a sense of at what point the attitude changed, if it did, to make this happen? Can we identify a moment that this started happening? Was there some change in policy or culture?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

There's no one absolute point. I've been asked that question several times in the last few days and weeks. Was there a critical turning point? It's hard to put a finger on it. It happened some time in the last 20 to 30 years, and it was an accumulation of effort and events, but not a single one of these.

If I were to pin something down, sir, I'd bring it all back to education by Maori people of young people.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My time is up. Thank you very much.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

Now we'll go to Ted for five minutes.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you. I get to ask more questions.

You talked about a redress that you had for Maori people as providing some seed capital and funding that allowed them to initially become entrepreneurs, if you want to use that term. Was there anything else that contributed to the success that they are enjoying today?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

Ted, again, thank you for the question.

I make the point that the development capital that became available through the treaty process was a hugely important catalyst. Beyond that, I think it's education. I don't want to keep belabouring it, but it is education.

You make the point about Maori people becoming entrepreneurial. We actually have that entrepreneurialism; it's really been part of our DNA for many years. Prior to the wars that we've had in New Zealand, we did have a thriving Maori economy—this is over 100 years ago. Different communities had their own currencies. Different communities back then were trading internationally with shipping companies through the last 100 years or so. My point really is that it has been a part of the DNA of the Maori to trade with each other and internationally.

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

If I may just add, it's also in the DNA of North American indigenous people. If you go right back to the fur trade, when we were providing furs to the Hudson's Bay Company, you'll see it is very much in our DNA, as well.

If you could fast-forward a few hundred years, one of the things that's inspiring me to return to Canada is this revival of indigenous entrepreneurship. There are so many people in the country now who.... Ten years ago when I left the country, this wasn't happening, but now you're seeing people creating incredible businesses with new ideas, who are really motivated and really hard-working to do this. It's just about providing them with the tools to be able to do so. I think indigenous people of Canada, New Zealand and Ecuador, whom I have seen, are very willing to put in the hard work, but because we have started a few steps back, it's difficult for us to get ahead.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Raylene, you had mentioned in your comments earlier that in Canada we were probably midway to where the Maori people are in New Zealand as regards the development process in being engaged in natural resource development.

If you were speaking to indigenous communities in Canada today, what advice would you give them in engaging in commerce, in industry and in resource development?

(1645)

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

I would first say the exact same thing that I say to the communities in Ecuador, “It's your decision.” They should do what they like, and they have that freedom of choice that is their own.

I would encourage them to explore the opportunities, to understand the life cycle of the industry from start to finish and to engage in these conversations with an open heart and open mind, but also with the knowledge or support of being able to understand what's being spoken about. The language of the industry, the language of oil and gas, especially the language of drilling, is very different, and sometimes if you pitch that against literacy issues, that in itself is very difficult for indigenous communities, let alone non-indigenous communities. It's taking it slow, it's understanding the issues and it's doing their homework. But at the end of the day, it's their decision.

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

I can offer one really important and related point. You've heard it from Raylene and from me. It is this very close connection that the Maori have with indigenous people of the world, including first nations people. By that I mean that all of the knowledge and everything we have learned, we are putting on the table and sharing with our indigenous family of the world.

All of the lifelong lessons [Technical difficulty—Editor].

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Beamish, while we're waiting for the others to come back, do you have comments on all the things you've been hearing in the last few minutes? I know we've been focusing a lot on them, but I know you have quite a lot to offer.

Mr. Robert Beamish:

I do appreciate that. I also know Chris is an excellent resource. I've sat with him before on panels at conferences. It's not my first time, but it's definitely always [Inaudible—Editor] when I'm on the floor with Chris. I do appreciate that as well, but definitely do recognize the knowledge that he's bringing.

There is one point. The last time I was in committee, toward the end I was asked a question about how we could attract investment to Canada from Asia and internationally and how we could raise that awareness. Time ran out when that question was asked the last time. I took that and I wanted to address how that could be done as it relates to indigenous communities and attracting investment for indigenous communities.

What I've seen from previous work I had with the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and working alongside the Canadian consulate in Hong Kong—which was mainly focused on driving investment from Hong Kong to Canada—was that there was not the awareness of [Technical difficulty—Editor] or training for the trade commissioners that were abroad. Speakers, or their own independently organized trade delegations, would be organized from indigenous communities to attract business to those communities, but there wasn't that partnership that Chris mentioned, when political leaders would travel abroad and have a cultural delegation of Maori people alongside them. Commissioners in consulates or in embassies in the Canadian Chamber of Commerce abroad did not have any kind of awareness or sense of what's happening in the Canadian indigenous community.

It was actually the lack of this that spurred the start of our business, Anokasan Capital, in order to spread that awareness and to educate both East Asians about opportunities in indigenous communities and indigenous communities here in Canada about opportunities in East Asia.

(1650)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for that. I do appreciate the comments. They are helpful.

Chris and Raylene, are you able to hear me again?

Chris, I wanted to build on your answers to Mr. Falk's questions just before you were cut off. The question I wanted to ask is specifically about how you engage with other indigenous communities around the world when you open that door. I'd like to walk through it and learn more about the process that is going on and how that interaction is going to take those best practices the Maori are learning and share them with the rest of the world.

Can you hear me? It doesn't look encouraging.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wanted to build on what Mr. Falk said just before you disappeared. You were talking about sharing your best practices with indigenous communities around the world. I wanted to learn more about what you are up to and how it's working and if you are going through or around governments around the world to get better results. Are the communities working directly together and what kind of results you are seeing?

Mr. Chris Karamea Insley:

It's a really good question again—and it's happening. As I said, it's an “and, and”.

First, we are now repeating our interests in and thoughts about the free trade agreements at the invitation of the New Zealand government. That's intended to be an enduring process and contribution to those formal agreements, so that our interests become embedded in o those free trade agreements right from the outset. The chief economist for our New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs used the terms because he understands the compound annual growth rate numbers, and it's such a no-brainer that governments need to engage and help to get those interests embedded into those free trade agreements.

So we're working through that right now and it continues to be an ongoing process.

Second, there is an enormous amount of business-to-business trading and discussion going on between Maori businesses and first nations. We had another colleague in the room with us today, sharing the numerous numbers from a period of 20 years, backwards and forwards, toing and froing. He talked about some of the discussions he's involved in sitting on a board in the mining energy sector. He's involved in another trade with first nations in the agriculture sector.

So it's an “and, and” answer. I underline again that we, as Maori people, value and are sharing all of the lifelong lessons we've learned with indigenous peoples of the world, including first nations.

Ms. Raylene Whitford:

If I may just quickly add to that.

I was invited by Chris to begin to learn about how the Maori do things: how they have developed. I gave a lecture yesterday at a university, for example, and the Maori in the room were very interested to hear about first nations, the Métis and the Inuit of Canada. So there definitely is this kind of leaning in that you see in international indigenous communities. But at this point, I don't know.... I've never had government support to do this. From what I've seen, it's all direct engagement. So you get an introduction—somebody else introduces you—and that way, you form this relationship. I would like to see more government support of this international liaising, engagement, discussion, communication among indigenous communities, because all the issues we face are the same. All the issues the Ecuadorean indigenous communities face are the same as Canada's and as the Maori's here in New Zealand.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's great.

I'm out of time, but I want to thank you for sharing your tomorrow morning with us.

(1655)

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

And to wrap up for us, Richard, you have for three minutes.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'd like to get around to my questions for Mr. Beamish.

Mr. Insley talked about the various steps that engagement processes take, dealing with historical issues and moving to social issues, and the land, environmental and finally to financial issues. I'm just wondering how that might match up with your four e's. You talked about employment, equity, environment, education. Is there some order to those four e's that you've experienced when you are engaging with indigenous communities? Is that equity part the last, and the education early on and then the environment?

Mr. Robert Beamish:

The order is usually driven by the community and what their priorities are. The environment could come first, depending on the project and the proposed development and the impact this would have; or based on the partnerships they've had in the past, the equity is the first thing that comes up. But that's community driven. We know those four e's are going to be the pillars of the conversation, so we we are transparent that these are areas that we are going to address and let that be driven by our partners in how that conversation develops around those talks.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Just focusing on the education part, we hear a lot about skills training and education at this committee. I'm just wondering how deeply you get into that with your investors and projects. Is the education and skills training component an important part of what your project might provide to communities?

Mr. Robert Beamish:

It is. We don't quite take the same method when we go with investors. When we are talking to investors, we would set aside almost a reserve of what would be dedicated to social needs, and that reserve is discussed with partners in the community and outside partners. We don't claim to be social development experts. My background is in finance. I would love to be a finance and social development expert, but I'm just working on the finance piece right now. We're bringing talent that knows this area, that will work with the community, that will engage. These are other indigenous consultants who work in social development, and we work with them to define what kind of budget would be needed to get to these levels that communities want to reach and what we have available as a reserve from our investors in order to finance that. The investors aren't necessarily there on that level negotiating social development, but we work with outside partners to achieve that goal in a way that works for the community.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Okay. Thank you very much. I appreciate it.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

Thank you, everyone.

That's it for our final meeting on this study. I want to thank the witnesses for joining us and for your patience with our technical challenges with video conferencing.

I'd also like to thank the interpreters, our technical support people for addressing the technical issues, the clerk for keeping me on track and making me look as if I know what I'm doing and my colleagues for making this job easy for me today.

We don't yet know the date and time of our next meeting, so I'm just going to bang this gavel and adjourn this meeting.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1540)

[Traduction]

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC)):

Bonjour.

Aujourd'hui, nous reprenons l'étude du Comité sur les pratiques exemplaires utilisées dans le monde relativement à la participation des communautés autochtones à la réalisation de grands projets énergétiques. Ce sera notre dernière réunion à ce sujet.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à tous les témoins qui se joignent à nous aujourd'hui. Nous accueillons de nouveau M. Robert Beamish, d'Anokasan Capital, cette fois par vidéoconférence, et Mme Raylene Whitford, de Canative Energy. Mme Whitford est accompagnée de son collègue, M. Chris Karamea Insley. Nous allons leur donner la parole à tour de rôle pour qu'ils fassent leur exposé de 10 minutes, après quoi nous passerons aux séries de questions des partis.

Monsieur Beamish, vous avez la parole.

M. Robert Beamish (directeur, Anokasan Capital):

Je vous remercie beaucoup de m'accueillir de nouveau.

Je m'appelle Robert Beamish et je suis cofondateur et directeur d'Anokasan Capital. Mon introduction sera courte, car on m'a déjà présenté lors d'une séance antérieure.

Ma maison de courtage se spécialise dans l'obtention de capitaux de l'Asie orientale pour des projets dans des collectivités autochtones du Canada. Je vais vous parler de pratiques exemplaires d'un point de vue international et sous l'angle des collectivités autochtones au Canada.

Ces pratiques exemplaires sont assez semblables à celles que j'ai mentionnées dans mon exposé antérieur, mais cette fois-ci, j'ai l'intention d'entrer un peu plus dans les détails quant à leur valeur et à leur raison d'être.

La première pratique exemplaire consiste à commencer par comprendre. Il est très important, par rapport à l'engagement auprès des collectivités, non seulement de prévoir du temps, mais aussi de budgéter le processus de bonne intelligence et d'analyse des besoins. Si c'est budgété, on peut en retrouver la trace et l'achever, et déterminer si les membres de la collectivité sont en phase avec le gouvernement pour certains projets de développement. Plus vous êtes en harmonie, plus vous apprenez à connaître une collectivité; cela ne peut qu'être favorable pendant que le projet est en gestation et que les négociations se poursuivent.

Dans beaucoup de collectivités, il semble y avoir une dynamique voulant que les personnes de passage ne restent vraiment pas longtemps, se posant un moment pour apprendre ou faire du bénévolat, puis finissant par partir. À la longue, l'expérience rend insensible, car vous partagez votre histoire, votre culture, le sens des choses, votre mode de vie et votre vision du monde, puis les gens partent. D'autres personnes arrivent et c'est de nouveau le partage et l'abandon. La même chose peut se produire en affaires. Pour réussir, il faut un engagement de longue durée de la part de tous les partenaires.

Comprendre va au-delà des besoins du projet; il faut aussi comprendre quels sont les objectifs de développement de la collectivité, quelle est son histoire, comment elle veut se développer et où elle en est dans ce processus de développement.

La prochaine pratique exemplaire concerne les communications et leur harmonisation, et à cette fin, il faut fournir une tribune où chacun pourra exprimer ses préoccupations. S'il n'y en a pas, il faut en créer une. Il faut aménager une pause pour la communication à intervalles réguliers, non seulement pour régler les conflits, mais aussi pour avoir une tribune permettant de répondre aux questions des membres de la collectivité et de renseigner sur l'avancement du projet.

Étant donné que différents styles de communication nécessitent des approches différentes pour s'assurer que toute l'information est donnée, il faut prévoir des pauses à date fixe, que ce soit aux deux semaines ou une fois par mois, pour discuter du projet, puisqu'il concerne non seulement les membres de la collectivité, mais aussi les chefs de projet et les parties prenantes. Ce calendrier de rencontres donne le temps à chacun de traiter l'information fournie et d'effectuer les différentes analyses qu'il juge valables.

Par exemple, on travaillait à un projet d'énergie géothermique. Il respectait les valeurs de la collectivité. Ce projet d'énergie renouvelable avait une composante éducative et créait des emplois. Lorsque le projet a démarré, la machinerie amenée sur place ressemblait à celle normalement utilisée sur les plateformes de forage. Lorsque les membres de la collectivité ont vu cela, ils ont dit: « Cela ne correspond pas à ce dans quoi nous pensions nous être engagés. » Il n'y avait pas de mécanisme en place pour fournir de l'information ni régler les différends, alors on en a créé un, et il y avait un processus pour cela. En fin de compte, c'est une équipe qui est allée dans la collectivité informer les habitants de ce à quoi ressemble la machinerie utilisée dans les projets d'énergie renouvelable, des changements à venir et de ce qui se passerait en termes de phases. Ils ont dû ajouter cette étape au calendrier de développement pour apaiser l'agitation sociale.

S'il y avait eu une tribune pour assurer la libre circulation de l'information permettant aux membres de la collectivité de poser des questions et d'offrir une rétroaction, cette situation aurait pu être évitée.

Le point suivant est l'harmonisation culturelle. C'est en rapport avec les différences de cultures. Nos différences ne peuvent que nous rapprocher une fois que l'on comprend comment elles nous distinguent les uns des autres. Il faut chercher en amont à comprendre les protocoles touchant le territoire, le lien qui unit le territoire et la collectivité et ce que cela signifie non seulement en termes de protocoles et de comportements pendant qu'on séjourne sur ce territoire, mais aussi en termes de rapport avec le territoire et pourquoi.

En outre, une pratique très importante que nous instaurons consiste à sensibiliser aux préjugés culturels afin qu'on prenne conscience de ses propres préjugés. Nous faisons cela parce que nous travaillons habituellement avec des investisseurs de la région Asie-Pacifique, en particulier de la Chine, mais aussi avec des collectivités autochtones. Nous avons nous-mêmes des préjugés culturels au départ. Si nous en sommes conscients, nous pouvons comprendre de quelle manière ils influent sur notre manière de faire des affaires et d'aborder la situation ainsi que leur incidence sur les préjugés culturels de nos différents partenaires et sur leur façon d'entrer en relation d'affaires.

Le point suivant concerne les quatre « e », c'est-à-dire l'emploi, l'équité, l'éducation et l'environnement. Ces quatre « e » touchent toutes les collectivités d'une façon ou d'une autre, certaines à une plus grande échelle que d'autres. Nous les recherchons en amont, à l'étape de la « compréhension », par exemple, nous nous renseignons sur les besoins dans le domaine de l'emploi, la part attendue dans les projets, les préoccupations environnementales et l'éducation des membres, que ce soit une formation ou l'alphabétisation. Cette recherche et le travail d'adaptation des quatre « e » aux besoins des collectivités concernées sont d'excellents moyens de s'y prendre pour manifester un meilleur partenariat, mais il est probable que ces quatre « e » touchent les collectivités de différentes façons. Que ce soit en même temps ou l'un plus que l'autre, intégrer les éléments définis dans les projets plutôt que de les laisser comme des concessions est une bien meilleure façon de commencer à établir une relation.

Une bonne transition vers la pratique suivante nous mène à l'harmonisation des renseignements. Ce qui est mesuré est livré. Lorsqu'il est possible de mesurer ces « e », que ce soit par des tests de littératie avant le début du projet, au début du projet, pendant la mise en place de la formation, ou à la fin du projet ou de la formation, vous êtes en mesure de noter les améliorations en matière de littératie ou d'éducation ou en lien avec le développement des compétences. Si ces éléments font l'objet d'une évaluation, alors ils peuvent aussi être exécutés. Les exigences du projet sont définies et satisfaites et l'échéancier est établi, mais tout comme les exigences du projet, les besoins en matière de développement social devraient également être évalués. Beaucoup de collectivités n'ont pas l'information à ce sujet. Il peut être difficile de fournir un plan d'action et de définir les orientations que la collectivité devrait prendre si les taux de littératie ou de contamination de l'environnement sont inconnus. Cette information que vous pouvez fournir à la collectivité est une valeur ajoutée à son développement futur.

Je sais que c'est la dernière réunion sur le sujet, mais je pense qu'il est très important de tenir compte de ces pratiques exemplaires. Beaucoup d'entre elles ne sont pas instituées. La mise en œuvre de ces pratiques présente des défis, mais l'effort est largement récompensé. Comprendre ces collectivités ainsi que les personnes avec qui nous travaillerons sur ces projets changera le mode d'élaboration des projets et la façon de tisser des relations, et aura une incidence sur la prospérité mutuelle future. Les différentes rencontres qui ont eu lieu sur le sujet nous ont montré qu'il existe un très grand nombre de pratiques. Je ne peux penser qu'à celles dont on a parlé dans les deux exposés auxquels j'ai participé. Leur application demandera sans doute beaucoup de travail, de temps et d'argent. Il faudra de la compréhension et des sacrifices pour qu'elles se développent et soient utiles à l'avenir, mais ce sera dans l'intérêt mutuel de tous les gens de notre génération et de ceux qui suivront.

(1545)



Je vous remercie d'avoir pris le temps de m'écouter. J'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Je vous remercie, monsieur Beamish. Vous avez respecté le temps alloué. C'est mieux que la plupart des députés à la Chambre des communes.

Nous allons maintenant entendre notre prochain témoin.

Madame Whitford, vous pouvez partager votre temps avec votre collègue.

Mme Raylene Whitford (directrice, Canative Energy):

Je vous remercie. Je suis heureuse de comparaître de nouveau devant vous.

Je vous appelle de Rotorua, en Nouvelle-Zélande. M. Chris Karamea Insley, conseiller de Canative Energy, est à mes côtés.

J'ai demandé à comparaître de nouveau devant le comité permanent parce que le sujet dont il est question me tient à cœur. J'y consacre ma vie et je fais carrière dans ce secteur depuis toujours. Je suis une Autochtone et une professionnelle de la finance. Je travaille dans le secteur énergétique à l'échelon international depuis le début de ma carrière. J'ai consacré trois ans au développement social des collectivités autochtones touchées par le secteur de l'énergie en Équateur.

Pour ce qui est de ce dont j'aimerais vous faire part, après avoir rappelé les trois points soulevés précédemment, j'évoquerai deux autres points qui me semblent très importants. Ce que je constate également en Nouvelle-Zélande leur fait écho.

Le premier point que j'ai soulevé était la diversification. Il est très important que ces collectivités ne dépendent pas totalement des revenus générés par l'industrie énergétique.

Il est également très important de mettre en place un plan à long terme. À un moment donné, j'ai vu des collectivités équatoriennes qui réfléchissaient à leur avenir, mais certaines manquent de vue à long terme, et il est très difficile de s'engager dans un grand projet d'immobilisations si vous ne regardez que ce qui est droit devant vous.

Le troisième point concerne le renforcement des capacités. La dernière fois, j'ai parlé de l'éducation, de l'alphabétisation, etc.

Je pense que le point suivant fait écho à l'argument de Robert Beamish au sujet de la littératie énergétique. Qu'est-ce que la littératie énergétique? Essentiellement, on désigne ainsi la formation et la connaissance en lien avec la nature de l'industrie. À quoi ressemblent ces projets d'immobilisations? Quelle est la terminologie utilisée? Quelle est la machinerie qu'ils vont recevoir dans leur collectivité? C'est vraiment important. Il est vraiment difficile de s'engager dans quelque chose lorsqu'on ne sait pas ce qui va se passer, surtout dans ces collectivités. Elles sont très unies, alors une grande part de l'information vient des voisins et des autres membres de la famille. Parfois, les messages se transforment. Parfois, ils sont teintés par la façon dont les gens s'expliquent les choses entre eux, auquel cas il est vraiment important que le gouvernement favorise la littératie énergétique afin que les collectivités soient en mesure de se lancer effectivement dans le projet.

Le dernier point concerne la priorité accordée à la voix des jeunes. Ce que j'ai vu est tout le contraire de ce qui se passe dans l'industrie énergétique. Dans l'industrie, c'est habituellement l'opinion des plus âgés, ceux qui parlent haut et fort qui ont l'oreille du conseil, alors que dans les collectivités qui opèrent dans leur propre espace de vie, ce sont les enfants et les jeunes qui sont conviés et dont on veut connaître l'opinion parce qu'ils sont les leaders de demain. Ils interagissent avec eux dans l'espoir de leur conférer des responsabilités accrues et de les faire participer à la conversation afin qu'ils soient aptes à faire avancer les choses.

Sur ce, je cède la parole à M. Karamea Insley. Il vous en dira un peu plus sur ce qui se passe en Nouvelle-Zélande.

(1550)

M. Chris Karamea Insley (conseiller, Canative Energy):

Je vous remercie, madame Whitford.

Bonjour, madame la présidente. Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de prendre la parole et de vous faire part de quelques-unes des expériences, vécues par les Maoris de la Nouvelle-Zélande.

J'ai moi aussi étudié en finances et en économie en Nouvelle-Zélande et aussi États-Unis. Mon principal champ d'expérience est dans le domaine des ressources naturelles. J'ai passé beaucoup de temps dans le secteur forestier, notamment aux États-Unis et au Canada — en Colombie-Britannique —, donc j'ai une certaine expérience dans ce domaine. À l'instar de Mme Whitford, j'ai consacré toute ma vie à faire campagne pour le développement des Maoris et ensuite des Autochtones auprès de personnes telles que M. Beamish et Mme Whitford, notamment.

J'aimerais vous parler, mesdames et messieurs, un peu de la Nouvelle-Zélande, un peu des Maoris et de ce qui est avantageux pour les gouvernements du monde de saisir — les défis et les chances à saisir, et les occasions sont énormes.

En Nouvelle-Zélande, la population avoisine les six millions d'habitants; c'est peu. De ce nombre, on compte environ 600 000 Maoris. Si on remonte dans le temps, nous, les Maoris, avons partagé, si vous voulez, le même sort que celui qui est réservé aux peuples autochtones du Canada et d'ailleurs dans le monde, comme l'Australie, en ce qui concerne le taux de chômage élevé, toutes les mauvaises choses.

Je vais reprendre certains des points que M. Beamish et Mme Whitford ont soulevés. Il est logique que les gouvernements essaient de comprendre comment coopérer avec les Autochtones. D'après l'expérience néo-zélandaise, il y a 30 ou 40 ans, un travail a été fait pour mesurer la taille de l'économie maorie en Nouvelle-Zélande. Elle a été évaluée à environ 30 milliards de dollars — en dollars néo-zélandais — à ce moment-là. J'ajouterais que l'intérêt se porte sur les ressources naturelles: l'agriculture, la foresterie, la pêche et, dans une certaine mesure, l'énergie.

Le travail de mesure a été repris, fait de nouveau, au cours des 12 derniers mois. Aujourd'hui, l'économie maorie représente environ 50 milliards de dollars. Si vous faites le calcul, vous verrez que l'économie maorie croît d'année en année à un taux annuel composé d'environ 15 à 20 %, alors que le reste de l'économie néo-zélandaise croît d'environ 2 à 3 %. Ce constat a déclenché beaucoup d'activité et de réflexion au sein des gouvernements néo-zélandais, l'économie maorie étant devenue la pierre angulaire de l'économie néo-zélandaise au regard de ce que font les Maoris. C'est normal: c'est le plan.

Pour ce qui est des pratiques exemplaires, encore une fois, je vais reprendre les points soulevés par Mme Whitford et M. Beamish. Du point de vue de la politique gouvernementale, si vous comprenez... D'après mon évaluation de la situation au Canada, compte tenu des ressources naturelles auxquelles sont associées nos Premières Nations, je crois qu'il y a un énorme potentiel de croissance pour les Premières Nations et pour l'économie du Canada, si certaines des leçons que nous avons apprises en cours de route pouvaient être transférées.

Premièrement, cela prend du temps. Je sais que les cycles électoraux de courte durée, que nous avons aussi en Nouvelle-Zélande, posent un problème. Il est difficile de planifier à long terme face à ce défi, mais je vous fais remarquer que cela prend du temps. Je fais écho, encore une fois, à d'autres points soulevés par Mme Whitford. Renforcer les capacités dans les collectivités, établir la confiance au sein des collectivités, tout cela prend du temps.

Investissez dans les jeunes. Investissez beaucoup dans les jeunes et faites-les connaître, et c'est à ce moment-là que vous commencerez vraiment à tirer les leçons et à voir le potentiel se concrétiser.

Je vais vraiment marquer un temps d'arrêt ici, mais j'ajoute que quoi que vous fassiez, cela en vaut vraiment la peine et ne croyez pas ne pas être à la hauteur quant aux plans à long terme et à la politique.

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

(1555)

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Il vous reste deux minutes, si vous voulez ajouter quelque chose.

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

D'accord, merci. Je vais passer de ces pratiques exemplaires à un autre point qui, à mon avis, est très important et que nous en sommes certainement venus à apprécier. C'est un point qui a été repris partout dans le monde. Il ne s'agit pas seulement d'adopter une perspective à long terme, et quand je dis « à long terme », je veux dire des générations plus tard, pas 5 à 10 ans; mais 30 à 50 ans et au-delà, mais aussi de penser à une politique qui favorise l'intégration.

Qu'est-ce que je veux dire par là? C'est motivé et étayé par la prise en compte des aspects économiques auxquels nous avons tous été formés. Il doit y avoir un rendement du capital investi pour toutes les parties, y compris le gouvernement, le secteur privé et les collectivités locales. Mais impérativement, à côté — et c'est là le truc que nous avons appris en Nouvelle-Zélande et qui commence vraiment à interpeller les collectivités autochtones —, pensez à la façon de faire grandir les gens et aux moteurs sociaux. Lorsque vous songez à côtoyer les collectivités, allez les voir.

En Nouvelle-Zélande, nous avons ce que nous appelons le « test de la tatie ». C'est souvent le test le plus difficile à réussir, lorsque vous assistez à une réunion communautaire, parce qu'une des taties va se lever et vous dire ceci: « Nous sommes au courant des chiffres quant à la valeur actualisée nette et au rendement du capital investi, mais qu'est-ce que vous allez faire pour assurer la croissance de notre population? Où sont les emplois pour nos gens? »

Il faut alors prendre en compte les facteurs économiques; il faut donner un allant, et je dirais que le moteur social est probablement l'une des motivations qui priment; il y a aussi les facteurs environnementaux. Il y en a un quatrième; ce sont les moteurs culturels. À long terme, vous devez intégrer tous ces différents facteurs de valorisation dans votre réflexion et votre façon de concevoir la politique.

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

(1600)

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Encore une fois, le temps de parole a été respecté. Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre témoignage.

Nous passons maintenant à nos collègues du parti gouvernemental pour la première série de questions de sept minutes, en commençant par M. de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je m'adresserai d'abord à M. Beamish.

Vous avez mentionné un exemple ou une situation où un projet avait été lancé et l'équipement de forage pétrolier était arrivé sur place, mais où le projet ne correspondait pas à ce qui était attendu.

A-t-on l'impression que nos projets sont occultés ou qu'ils ne sont pas expliqués avec franchise dans les négociations avec ces communautés dans le monde entier?

M. Robert Beamish:

Il pourrait s'agir exactement de ce dont parlait Mme Whitford, soit un cas où l’information peut avoir été obtenue auprès d’un voisin dans une communauté aux liens serrés, et pas nécessairement au cours des négociations sur le projet et des discussions exclusives du conseil d’administration. Cela souligne le besoin de diffuser l'information depuis la salle de conférence jusqu'aux membres individuels de la communauté.

J'ai des collègues qui travaillent dans ce domaine, et ils vont littéralement frapper aux portes des membres de la communauté pour leur parler de ce à quoi ressembleront les aménagements en cours, des répercussions du projet sur la communauté, de la nature de la machinerie, de la succession des différentes étapes de développement. Il s'agit d'éduquer toute la communauté, pas seulement les responsables du projet et les gens qui travailleront à sa réalisation physique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à vous tous.

Vous avez déjà comparu devant nous. Y a-t-il quelque chose dans les témoignages entendus précédemment au cours de cette étude que vous voudriez réfuter, compléter ou contester? Nous en sommes à la dernière journée de témoignages, et c'est donc le moment pour vous de relever tout point qui aurait été soulevé qui vous paraît tout à fait erroné.

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Je vais commencer, si vous permettez.

Je ne pense pas qu'il y ait quoi que ce soit à redire des témoignages que j'ai entendus, soit à l'occasion de ma dernière comparution, soit au cours des autres séances que j'ai suivies en ligne.

Ce qui m'a surtout incitée à communiquer avec le Comité, c'est que j'ai parfois l'impression qu'il est difficile d'avoir une vision purement internationale. Je sais que nous sommes censés nous reporter au contexte canadien, mais j'ai eu l'impression, très certainement au cours de notre comparution, que la discussion tournait autour de questions environnementales héritées au Canada et qu'elle n'était pas authentiquement internationale. J'encouragerais le Comité à maintenir l'optique internationale et à vraiment regarder ce qui se passe dans le monde.

En outre, je pense qu'il est vraiment nécessaire de reconnaître l'importance de la jeunesse. Ce que je vois en Équateur, de même qu'au Canada, c'est l'engagement et l'autonomisation des jeunes Autochtones. C'est l'une des raisons qui m'amèneront à revenir au Canada plus tard cette année pour travailler. C'est vraiment inspirant et formidable de voir cela, mais il y a aussi un grand risque.

En effet, si les jeunes de cette génération venaient à se désintéresser ou à se sentir déçus de l'industrie de l'énergie, de la façon dont le gouvernement les traite et de leurs interactions avec les exploitants, ils pourraient faire volte-face et très certainement bloquer les projets dans leurs communautés. Il est vraiment important de comprendre que leur voix doit être priorisée et respectée au sein de ces communautés, où les façons de faire ne sont pas aussi hiérarchisées que dans l'industrie de l'énergie.

À mes yeux, le rôle des jeunes et la reconnaissance de leur voix sont l'un des points sur lesquels ces communautés et l'industrie sont à des pôles opposés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque nous parlons des jeunes et d'assurer l'engagement des jeunes, il faut se demander qu'est-ce qui interpelle la nouvelle génération? Qu'est-ce qui les amène à dire: « Voilà une très bonne idée; nous devrions travailler là-dessus », plutôt que « Grands cieux, c'est une idée horrible »?

Quelles sont les voies d'approche ou les explications les plus efficaces pour maintenir leur engagement?

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Ce que nous voyons dans les conférences portant sur un sujet particulier — comme je l'ai vu en Nouvelle-Zélande —, c'est que la première séance est réservée aux jeunes, qui sont encouragés à présenter leurs idées et à prendre, en quelque sorte, la direction de la discussion. Je pense que c'est vraiment important.

Par exemple, dans une communauté que je connais en Équateur, deux jeunes ont quitté leur communauté pour la grande ville afin de faire des études de droit. Ils étaient très ouverts aux activités dans le secteur. Il ne s'agissait pas du secteur pétrolier et gazier, mais du secteur minier, dont les pans prévoyaient quand même de grands projets d'immobilisations ayant un long cycle de vie. Durant mon séjour en Équateur, je les ai vus se désengager très rapidement, simplement à cause de la façon dont le gouvernement les traitait et dont leurs opinions étaient très rapidement écartées. Les aînés de la communauté étaient les seuls à communiquer avec eux.

Il est vraiment important de faire en sorte que les jeunes se sentent inclus et engagés, et aussi d'écouter leurs opinions. Ce que l'on constate souvent, du moins parmi ceux de la génération de M. Beamish et de moi-même, c'est que nous sommes plus ouverts d'esprit et avons une vision plus internationale. Nous avons également une opinion valable, qui pourrait être alignée sur le secteur.

(1605)

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose, monsieur de Burgh Graham?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr.

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Du point de vue de la Nouvelle-Zélande, la progression de nos jeunes a été, à mon avis, la pierre angulaire de la croissance économique que nous avons observée ici. Ce que je veux dire par là, c'est que beaucoup de nos entreprises maories, dans tous les secteurs, offrent des bourses d'études chaque année à nos jeunes. Au cours des 15 ou 20 dernières années, nous avons vu une vague massive de jeunes très instruits sortir des universités néo-zélandaises et étrangères. Ce qu'il faut retenir, c'est que tous ces jeunes sont très motivés à rentrer chez eux et à y apporter les connaissances, les compétences et l'expérience qu'ils ont acquises partout dans le monde tant au cours de leur travail que pendant leurs études. Ils sont désireux de contribuer à leur communauté.

Cela pose un autre défi à leur retour parce qu'il faut qu'ils puissent y trouver des ouvertures. Cela suppose qu'il faut mener concurremment une activité économique. On crée de nouvelles possibilités et on prépare l'accueil de ceux qui reviennent. C'est vraiment ce qui amorce l'accélération du développement, non seulement pour les communautés et les familles concernées, mais aussi pour les autres collectivités et la nation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je pense que mon temps est écoulé depuis longtemps. Je vous remercie de votre indulgence.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

C'est parfait.

M. Schmale est notre prochain intervenant, pour sept minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion, dans le cadre de cette étude très importante, de poser des questions à nos témoins.

Pour poursuivre dans la même veine, monsieur Insley, lorsqu'il est question des jeunes Autochtones, de leur engagement et de sujets en rapport avec ce thème, dans bien des cas — et cela peut même faire l'objet de discussions à l'extérieur des communautés des Premières Nations —, il semble y avoir un certain décalage entre les entreprises en quête de travailleurs ayant certaines compétences et les jeunes travailleurs qui cherchent à décider s'ils veulent ou non exercer tel métier. Ce sont surtout les métiers spécialisés qui viennent à l'esprit.

Comment la Nouvelle-Zélande a-t-elle répondu à cette situation? Ici, au Canada, je pense qu'il existe un problème.

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Votre question, monsieur Schmale, appelle une réponse à deux volets.

En premier lieu, en Nouvelle-Zélande, la communauté maorie est devenue très active sur le plan politique. Par exemple, parmi les 122 députés néo-zélandais, il y a 18 Maoris, qui viennent de tous les horizons politiques. À mon avis, nous avons été très habiles quant à la façon de tirer parti, en tant que Maoris, de l'influence que nous exerçons au sein du gouvernement pour obtenir des programmes de formation professionnelle devant répondre aux besoins particuliers des collectivités maories. Il y en a beaucoup qui sont actuellement mis en application dans différents secteurs.

La deuxième partie de la réponse, c'est que, dans nos propres entreprises maories, nous encourageons activement les jeunes à s'inscrire à l'université et dans les écoles de métiers. Je pense que cet effort doit se faire aux deux niveaux. Il ne s'agit pas d'une responsabilité exclusive du gouvernement; c'est une responsabilité gouvernementale exercée en partenariat avec les entreprises, les familles et les communautés.

Pour moi, cela revient, au fond, à établir ce lien de confiance avec les communautés. À mon avis, le succès ne passe pas seulement par une approche descendante, du gouvernement aux communautés; pour faire avancer les choses, il faut aussi une approche ascendante, venant des communautés.

J'espère que cette explication est compréhensible.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, elle l'est.

Est-ce que quelqu'un voudrait ajouter un mot avant que je passe à mon prochain sujet?

Allez-y, monsieur Beamish.

(1610)

M. Robert Beamish:

Je pense que M. Insley a bien résumé la situation.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord, parfait.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à tous.

Au sujet de la consultation des Autochtones, je vais mentionner un projet que certains d'entre vous connaissent bien, le pipeline Eagle Spirit. Je remarque qu'aujourd'hui nous n'avons parlé jusqu'à présent que de la consultation sur les projets, mais qu'en est-il de la consultation sur une loi qui a une incidence sur des projets comme le pipeline Eagle Spirit? À titre d'exemple, 35 Premières Nations veulent aménager le couloir du pipeline Eagle Spirit, qui appartient à des Autochtones, depuis Fort McMurray, en Alberta, jusqu'à la côte Nord-Ouest de la Colombie-Britannique, à proximité de Prince Rupert. Ces Premières Nations sont amèrement déçues de l'échec des consultations sur le projet de loi C-48, qui interdira à jamais l'exportation de pétrole brut par la côte Nord-Ouest de la Colombie-Britannique.

Maintenant, avec le projet de loi C-69, texte qui porte sur les évaluations d'impact environnemental, nous constatons que beaucoup d'entreprises canadiennes, comme TransCanada — qui a récemment retiré le mot « Canada » de son nom —, concentrent leurs investissements dans d'autres pays, comme les États-Unis. À mesure que les investissements fuient, des projets sont annulés et des emplois sont perdus, tout particulièrement des emplois occupés par des Autochtones.

Pétrole et gaz des Indiens du Canada, qui réglemente la production de pétrole sur les terres des Premières Nations, a pour politique d'exiger des redevances sur le pétrole extrait des terres des réserves plus élevées que celles qui ont cours sur les terres de la Couronne en Colombie-Britannique, en Alberta et en Saskatchewan.

Quand les investissements quittent le Canada, c'est d'abord les terres autochtones qu'ils quittent. Selon PGIC, la valeur des nouveaux baux des Premières Nations a diminué de 95 % au cours des 4 dernières années.

À votre avis, les gouvernements ont-ils l'obligation de tenir des consultations sur des projets de loi qui touchent directement les intérêts des Autochtones, comme les projets de loi C-48 et C-69, le texte législatif qui interdirait les pipelines, ou cette obligation de consulter s'applique-t-elle seulement dans le cas de projets qui comportent des travaux d'aménagement physique sur le terrain?

Excusez-moi ce très long préambule.

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Si vous me permettez de répondre en premier, je dirais tout d'abord, vu l'intention qui préside à de l'étude du Comité, que je ne m'attarderai pas sur les particularités du pipeline Eagle Spirit et que je répondrai directement à votre question. Les peuples autochtones devraient-ils être consultés au cours de l'élaboration et de la formulation des politiques ainsi qu'au moment de la mise en chantier? Tout à fait.

J'encouragerais le Comité à considérer les communautés autochtones comme des exploitants qui envisagent de participer à une coentreprise. Les communautés autochtones doivent avoir les mêmes droits, la même qualité d'avis et le même engagement que, par exemple, Shell aurait avec BP si elle établissait un partenariat pour une activité d'exploitation dans la mer du Nord. Ces deux partenaires en coentreprise ont des voix égales lorsqu'il s'agit de demander au gouvernement d'élaborer de nouvelles politiques ou de modifier celles qui existent. Tout à fait. C'est seulement ainsi que vous commencerez à établir un lien de confiance avec les communautés autochtones.

Merci.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

La vice-présidente: Une minute.

M. Jamie Schmale: D'accord. Je vais peut-être devoir laisser tomber certains points.

Parlant de ces grands projets, lorsqu'ils suscitent de l'opposition, y a-t-il eu en Nouvelle-Zélande ou en Australie, peu importe, une division entre les groupes autochtones? Si oui, y a-t-il eu des leçons à tirer des résultats de ce clivage? Des accommodements ont-ils été faits?

Comment la consultation de nation à nation a-t-elle fonctionné? A-t-elle été tentée dans le cas des grands projets d'infrastructure?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Monsieur Schmale, permettez-moi de vous donner une réponse typiquement néo-zélandaise.

La réponse réside en partie dans le fait qu'en Nouvelle-Zélande nous avons signé, en 1804, un traité qui était, si vous voulez, une entente entre les peuples autochtones de la Nouvelle-Zélande et l'État de l'époque. Ce traité dit en fait que les deux parties se parleront, en toute bonne foi, d'à peu près tout ce qui concerne la nation de la Nouvelle-Zélande.

Personnellement, je pense que c'est correct et que c'est une bonne chose que nous ayons ce traité-là, mais il ne devrait pas être le principal facteur. Mettant en veilleuse pour un moment la nécessité de tenir ou non une discussion sur ces questions, nous avons des problèmes en Nouvelle-Zélande qui concernent le pétrole et le gaz, et il y a un fossé. Cela revient à la façon dont les deux parties ont discuté au cours de la période précédente, ce qui peut vouloir dire des années. S'il existe une base solide pour tenir cette discussion, il est plus que probable qu'on en arrivera à un résultat acceptable pour les deux parties.

Comme je l'ai dit, il y a aussi le traité qui dit qu'il faut, en toute bonne foi, se respecter et discuter. Si ces discussions sont entreprises très tôt — et nous en avons de très nombreux exemples en Nouvelle-Zélande — et si une relation solide a été établie, on commencera à obtenir le genre de résultats auxquels j'ai fait allusion plus tôt. Les communautés locales y gagnent, les Maoris y gagnent et la nation y gagne.

(1615)

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Nous passons maintenant à M. Cannings, pour sept minutes.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Bienvenue à tous. Merci d'avoir pris le temps de revenir nous voir. Je m'en réjouis. Je vous envie beaucoup parce que vous vous trouvez dans deux des régions du monde que je préfère enter toutes: Medellín et le Grand Waikato. J'aimerais bien y être, aux deux endroits en même temps.

Je vais revenir un peu sur ce que disait M. Schmale. Monsieur Insley, vous avez mentionné en passant le Traité de Waitangi. Je me demande simplement quelle est l'importance, dans divers pays, de ces relations d'ordre juridique avec les gouvernements supérieurs, si ce sont des relations de pure forme que vous devez simplement avoir et si tout se passe réellement au niveau communautaire, au niveau iwi. Vous avez mentionné que c'est là que se produit la croissance réelle. Les négociations concernant le Traité de Waitangi et sa mise en œuvre sont-elles un catalyseur important de tout cela?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Cannings, d'avoir vanté quelques régions de la Nouvelle-Zélande, et merci aussi de votre question. Je pense que c'est une excellente question. Pour y répondre simplement, je dirais « oui et oui ». Le traité est un catalyseur et il est toujours invoqué dans les discussions entre les Maoris et le gouvernement de la Nouvelle-Zélande. Nous savons tous qu'il existe et qu'il vise à favoriser une discussion productive entre les parties.

Mais, au bout du compte, je suis sûr que vous et les autres membres du Comité comprendrez qu'il peut être à l'origine d'un processus juridique interminable et très onéreux, pour peu qu'on choisisse de recourir aux tribunaux. J'encouragerais fortement d'établir un lien de confiance avec les communautés autochtones et j'éviterais, si possible, de s'engager dans ce processus beaucoup plus long et onéreux.

L'expérience montre, entre autres choses, que ce processus peut être très dommageable pour les relations, si l'on y a recours comme principal moyen pour parvenir à un consensus. Cela peut être dommageable, et durablement. Mes encouragements et mes exhortations seraient... Nous savons que ce processus existe et qu'il peut être utile; je ne dirais pas qu'il ne l'a pas jamais été. Une bonne partie de la croissance économique des Maoris est attribuable à ce processus. Mais de plus en plus, ce qui se dégage, c'est une volonté d'éviter de s'engager dans cette voie. Mais ma réponse demeure « oui et oui ».

M. Richard Cannings:

À titre de précision, vous avez parlé de la croissance spectaculaire de l'économie maorie, qui, d'après ce que je comprends de ce que vous dites, est fondée sur l'acceptation par l'ensemble de la population néo-zélandaise du fait que c'est ainsi que les choses devraient se faire. Il y a cette intégration de la culture maorie dans la culture néo-zélandaise. Lorsque j'ai parlé à des Néo-Zélandais, il m'a semblé que l'acceptation était à un stade très différent de ce que nous constatons au Canada. Est-ce la raison de cette croissance de l'économie maorie?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Encore une fois, vous avez tout à fait raison. Le niveau d'acceptation est de plus en plus élevé. Cela a pris du temps. À mon avis, il a fallu 10, 20 ou 30 ans pour parvenir à ce niveau d'acceptation. Je vais donner un autre exemple pour illustrer mon propos. On m'a demandé de participer, avec un certain nombre d'autres chefs d'entreprise maoris, à une réunion avec notre ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Commerce afin de préparer notre participation aux travaux d'élaboration d'une politique commerciale internationale qui refléterait les intérêts particuliers des Maoris, compte tenu de notre poids dans l'économie néo-zélandaise. Cette attitude d'acceptation va encore plus loin, puisque nous entendons maintenant de la part du gouvernement de la Nouvelle-Zélande que l'économie maorie et sa culture sont devenues, dans nos échanges commerciaux avec d'autres pays, une marque de distinction qui favorise tous les produits issus des divers secteurs de notre économie.

Encore une fois, vous soulevez un très bon point. Nous avons atteint ce niveau d'acceptation par l'ensemble de la population néo-zélandaise. L'acceptation de la communauté autochtone apporte une valeur à tous, à l'ensemble de la nation.

(1620)

M. Richard Cannings:

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Je vais simplement décrire un peu le contexte à l'intention de ceux qui n'ont pas eu l'occasion de visiter la Nouvelle-Zélande.

Ici, la culture maorie est très bien intégrée au pays. Tous les noms de lieux sont en maori. Il y a des universités maories et des écoles maories, et c'est tout à fait normal. C'est une chose acceptée. Le maori est la deuxième langue officielle du pays. C'est comme si cela allait de soi, alors qu'au Canada, nous commençons tout juste à voir cette résurgence de la fierté autochtone, les changements de nom des rues, etc., mais la Nouvelle-Zélande est très en avance à cet égard.

Ce n'est pas que les projets énergétiques doivent attendre que cela se produise ici. Je pense que ça fait partie d'un tout. Je crois que le phénomène se propagera de lui-même dans la mesure où vous réussirez à faire mieux connaître et respecter la culture autochtone dans le pays, tout en donnant aux communautés autochtones la possibilité de se développer, d'être présentes sur la scène internationale et de participer à ces projets. Les deux vont de pair.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je vais m’en tenir à vous, madame Whitford, pour aller à l’autre extrémité, peut-être, pour parler de l’Équateur et du contexte juridique relatif au concept de Pachamama. Je soupçonne que cela n’a pas eu le même impact que le Traité de Waitangi, et que nous en sommes à une étape très différente du développement là-bas.

Mme Raylene Whitford:

En Équateur, les communautés autochtones n’ont absolument aucun droit. Elles n’ont aucun droit minier. Les Autochtones ont leurs établissements et leurs communautés, mais à part les prestations gouvernementales et l’assurance sociale, il n’y a pas vraiment de soutien pour les communautés. Il est évidemment difficile pour eux de se faire les champions de leur propre développement s’ils n’ont pas accès à ces ressources et s’ils n’ont pas le soutien de l’ensemble du gouvernement.

Si on les plaçait sur un spectre, je pense que les Autochtones de l’Équateur en seraient aux toutes premières étapes. Le Canada se situerait quelque part dans la moyenne, mais la Nouvelle-Zélande aurait 30, 40 ou peut-être même 50 ans d’avance sur le Canada.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Nous passons maintenant à la série de questions de cinq minutes.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup à nos témoins.

Madame la présidente, vous faites un travail extraordinaire comme remplaçante du président. Merci beaucoup.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

J’ai fait une erreur. Vous avez sept minutes.

Des voix : Oh, oh!

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je suis fasciné par la conversation que nous venons d’entendre, en particulier lorsque M. Insley a parlé de la différence. Vous dites que ce qui distingue la Nouvelle-Zélande est la valorisation des Maoris, non seulement dans la vie quotidienne, mais aussi dans le système économique dans son ensemble.

Pouvez-vous me dire comment cela s’est produit au cours des 30 dernières années? Ensuite, vous pourrez me dire en quoi il s’agit d’un avantage concurrentiel pour vous aujourd’hui.

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

C’est une très bonne question. Merci, Kent.

Comment cela s’est-il passé au cours des 20 ou 30 dernières années?

Je suis fermement convaincu que c’est grâce au dynamisme de nos dirigeants et de notre communauté. Non seulement nous ont-ils encouragés, mais ils ont obligé chacun d’entre nous à se faire instruire. Nos dirigeants nous ont encouragés à nous instruire — pas n’importe où, mais dans les meilleurs endroits du monde — et à ramener ces connaissances chez nous. C’est au cours de cette période, de cette vingtaine d’années, que cela s’est produit.

En quoi cela crée-t-il un avantage concurrentiel? En effet, cela crée un avantage concurrentiel pour notre nation. Lorsque notre premier ministre ou toute autre délégation de haut rang de la Nouvelle-Zélande voyage dans le monde, un groupe d’interprètes culturels est de la partie. Ce groupe donne un spectacle au début de presque toutes les grandes réunions auxquelles assistent les dirigeants de notre pays. Les membres du groupe participent de plein gré. Ils voient que cela ajoute de la valeur, et c’est reconnu internationalement.

Notre icône en Nouvelle-Zélande, je suppose, est notre équipe de rugby, les All Blacks. Les membres de cette équipe sont fiers du rang qu’ils occupent sur la scène mondiale. Pour ceux d’entre vous qui suivent le rugby, ils interprètent le haka. Les hakas nous distinguent vraiment, non seulement sur le terrain de rugby, mais dans tous les domaines. Tous nos enfants — j’ai deux petits-fils qui ont maintenant 4 ans — apprennent le rugby dès leur naissance. Cela fait maintenant partie de notre ADN national. C’est ainsi qu’on en fait la promotion, et cela fait partie de toutes nos activités.

Cela nous ramène à ce que vous avez dit au sujet de la création d’un avantage concurrentiel, dont nous pouvons tirer parti parce que nous offrons un éventail de produits uniques. Nos réalisations nous offrent de véritables leçons, et je crois que votre question est très pertinente.

(1625)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci beaucoup.

Je pense que nous devons continuer d’intégrer un grand nombre de nos cultures autochtones ici au Canada. Je sais que notre gouvernement fédéral a commencé à agir, en changeant nos pratiques et nos approches.

J’aimerais aussi poser une question à Mme Whitford.

Je viens de l’Alberta, une province très riche en ressources naturelles. En fait, au fil du temps, nous avons eu une excellente économie fondée sur les ressources.

Le problème, comme vous l’avez souligné, est de savoir comment faire participer les jeunes. Comment pouvons-nous éviter le vol intergénérationnel? J’entends par là le fait de dépenser toute la richesse pétrolière en une génération. Comprenez-vous ce que je veux dire? Un grand nombre d’Albertains ont dit récemment: « Au diable l’avenir. Nous allons tout dépenser d’un seul coup » quant à ce genre d’enjeux — des faibles taux d’imposition, des dépenses illimitées pour les soins de santé et l’éducation — et ensuite l’époque de la prospérité sera révolue.

Comment pourrait-on lancer cette conversation au sein des communautés autochtones pour qu’on tienne compte, par exemple, d’un examen possible de certains aspects des fonds souverains? Comment faire en sorte que les propriétaires autochtones reconnaissent, dans leurs connaissances en matière d’énergie, qu’une fois qu’on a dépensé les bénéfices provenant d’un baril de pétrole, cet argent disparaît à jamais?

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Merci, Kent, de votre question. Je pense qu’elle est très pertinente.

Encore une fois, je vais m’éloigner de l’Alberta et parler de ce qui se passe sur la scène internationale.

Je pense que nous avons tous pu observer le pouvoir des fonds souverains. Si vous regardez ce que la Norvège et un certain nombre de pays ont fait dans le secteur de l’énergie, ces fonds sont assurément une façon très astucieuse d’accumuler et de faire croître le capital pour les générations futures.

Je crois que cela est très difficile à comprendre pour les non-Autochtones. Les communautés autochtones sont foncièrement axées sur le long terme. Je suis sûr que le Comité a entendu parler des sept générations à plusieurs reprises au cours de ses séances. Les communautés autochtones sont essentiellement tournées vers l’avenir, un avenir à long terme et non à court terme.

Je pense que ces communautés aimeraient bien qu’on leur offre du soutien, des conseils, des possibilités et des opportunités pour les générations futures, pour qu’elles mettent en place les structures qui leur permettraient d’obtenir et de faire croître le capital.

À mon avis, ce serait une immense victoire pour le gouvernement fédéral s’il pouvait s’inspirer des pratiques exemplaires internationales pour mettre en place ces structures, ces fonds ou ces fiducies, s’il pouvait les élaborer avec ces communautés et non leur donner ou leur imposer.

(1630)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Comment faire en sorte que les Autochtones soient davantage propriétaires de ces projets d’immobilisations? Serait-ce en renforçant les capacités? S’agit-il d’un autre aspect, ou s’agit-il simplement d’éducation et d’un travail rigoureux et continu pour renforcer la communauté?

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Il existe quelques problèmes. Il ne fait aucun doute que l’éducation est importante, car elle encourage les jeunes à voyager à l’étranger et à revenir. Il est également important de leur accorder des participations en capital — un intérêt important. Il est extrêmement important de leur donner un siège au conseil d’administration, avec une voix égale à celle des autres membres. Il est à espérer que cela changera la perspective où l’on dit « D’accord, nous allons consulter ces gens et cocher cette case » au profit de celle qui affirme que « Nous avons une personne autochtone très qualifiée, intelligente, expérimentée et reconnue à la table, qui donne son point de vue. Tous autour de la table écoutent et respectent ce point de vue. »

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Nous allons maintenant passer à Ted pour un tour de cinq minutes.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Je remercie encore une fois nos témoins de leur participation à cette audience. J’apprécie leurs témoignages.

J’aimerais avoir une précision. Monsieur Insley, vous avez dit que le long processus judiciaire n’était pas la voie à privilégier dans les négociations. Est-ce en rapport avec les traités du passé? À quoi faisiez-vous référence?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Oui, Ted, c’était surtout en rapport avec le processus des traités, et non avec les litiges en général. D’après notre expérience, le processus relatif aux traités peut être long. Cela signifie habituellement qu’une démarche peut prendre des dizaines d’années et coûter très cher. D’après notre expérience, cela peut causer beaucoup de division et de tort aux relations. Cela portait notamment sur les traités, mais je ne veux pas minimiser l’importance des traités en tant que documents fondateurs. Leur importance est capitale.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci de cette précision. Je croyais que c’était ce que vous disiez.

Si vous n’empruntez pas cette voie dans vos négociations, sur quels éléments critiques placez-vous l’accent?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Je soulignerai simplement les points que nous avons tous soulevés précédemment, c’est-à-dire la nécessité d’amorcer la discussion dès que possible et que les deux parties à cette discussion soient très honnêtes, sincères et transparentes. D’après notre expérience en Nouvelle-Zélande, étant donné que bon nombre de nos gens ont reçu une solide formation à l’étranger dans tous les domaines, qu’il s’agisse des sciences, des finances, des banques ou de toute autre discipline, nous avons des gens très qualifiés, qui sont de plus en plus au courant des pratiques exemplaires dans le monde.

En entamant ces négociations, les peuples autochtones peuvent très rapidement se faire une idée de la sincérité et de l’engagement des autres parties. Si les autres parties n’en tiennent pas compte, cela peut nuire aux discussions.

Il faut adopter une perspective à long terme, entamer la discussion dès que possible et être transparents dans toute chose. Ce sont les principes directeurs à mon avis.

M. Ted Falk:

Dans ces négociations et dans vos ententes de développement, y a-t-il des questions particulières qui sont toujours litigieuses ou qui font obstacle à un accord? Pouvez-vous nous éclairer à ce sujet?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

C’est vraiment intéressant. Encore une fois, je vous remercie de vos questions. Souvent, surtout lorsqu’il s’agit d’une discussion commerciale, celle-ci porte surtout sur les aspects commerciaux de cette négociation, c’est-à-dire le montant de la réparation financière. Toutefois, il arrive souvent que les questions relatives aux traités ne portent pas sur le montant du recours financier. C’est souvent la dernière chose dont on discute. Le premier sujet de discussion est la reconnaissance de certains problèmes du passé. On les fait reconnaître dès le début, et la discussion se tournera vers les nombreux problèmes sociaux de la communauté. Par la suite — et j’ai participé à certaines de ces initiatives récemment — on reconnaît que toute entente devra souligner le besoin de s’occuper de la terre et de l’environnement.

On s’occupe de ces facteurs importants avant d’arriver au dernier point, qui est une entente sur le redressement financier. C’est à peu près dans cet ordre. Il ne s’agit pas de discuter d’abord de l’économie et de tout le reste ensuite.

(1635)

M. Ted Falk:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Beamish, j’aimerais également vous poser une question. Vous avez dit que vous avez mobilisé des capitaux sur les marchés de l’Asie de l’Est.

M. Robert Beamish:

Oui, c’est exact.

M. Ted Falk:

Que recherchent vos investisseurs?

M. Robert Beamish:

Nous ciblons les investisseurs qui recherchent un rendement à la fois social et financier. Ce sont des investisseurs animés d’une conscience sociale, alors nous ne ciblons pas tous les investisseurs dans ce marché. Nous sommes à la recherche d’investisseurs qui veulent recevoir plus qu’un RCI et qui veulent que le développement social soit inclus dans leur portefeuille de placements, qu’ils suivent diligemment. Voilà les investisseurs que nous recherchons et avec lesquels nous établissons des relations.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci.

Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Il l’est. Merci.

Tout le monde est très coopératif.

Nous revenons maintenant à David pour cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Insley, j’aimerais revenir à une question que vous avez soulevée dans votre déclaration préliminaire. Vous avez parlé de la croissance rapide et phénoménale de l’économie maorie en Nouvelle-Zélande. J’aimerais en savoir plus sur les causes profondes. Comment expliquer ce succès? Quel était le tournant? Quelles leçons pouvons-nous en tirer, de façon plus générale?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Je pense que c’est une excellente question.

Il y a deux volets.

Pourquoi l’économie maorie atteint-elle ces taux de croissance phénoménaux? Premièrement, nous devons reconnaître que le processus de règlement des traités a, si vous voulez, créé un bassin de capital de développement à la disposition des Maoris qui est maintenant réinvesti dans le développement de nos propres entreprises, qui nous appartiennent entièrement. Nous possédons des entreprises de pêche et d’exploitation forestière. Je siégeais au conseil d’une entreprise d’énergie très prospère — qui produit de l’énergie géothermique — et c’est le premier règlement financier qui lui a donné son essor. Ce processus nous a donné accès à un bassin de capitaux de développement, mais ce n’est pas tout.

Nous avons aujourd’hui des entreprises maories très talentueuses et intelligentes qui sont actives dans toute une gamme de domaines. Elles ont atteint un important niveau d’intégration verticale, manipulant la matière première jusqu’au produit fini qui est ensuite commercialisé partout dans le monde à titre de produit créé par cette communauté maorie.

Tout cela découle de ce que j’ai dit tout à l’heure au sujet de la formation de nos jeunes les plus talentueux, pour les rapatrier avec tous les talents qu’ils ont développés. Ce sont ces deux éléments ensemble, ainsi qu’un troisième élément que je devrais ajouter.

Le troisième élément — en fait, il y en a un quatrième — est qu’il faut planifier pour le long terme. Ce n’est pas ce que nous avons observé par le passé dans le domaine des affaires, où l’horizon de planification était habituellement de cinq ans. Les entreprises maories peuvent planifier pour 100 ans. Cela permet de surmonter les fluctuations des prix et tout ce genre de volatilité.

Le dernier point que j’aimerais soulever et qui contribue à ce taux de croissance phénoménal, lequel est inhérent aux peuples autochtones, à mon avis, et certainement au sein des communautés maories, est la volonté de collaborer et de créer des économies d’échelle. Lorsqu’on crée ces économies d’échelle, comme vous le savez, monsieur, on crée un effet de levier qui se manifeste de toutes sortes de façons.

Une combinaison de ces quatre facteurs explique ces taux de croissance annuels réels, très élevés et composés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L’économie maorie est-elle en avance sur l’économie non maorie de la Nouvelle-Zélande, ou est-elle en train de la rattraper très rapidement?

(1640)

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

En chiffres absolus, nous avons beaucoup de rattrapage à faire, mais il s’agit du taux de croissance annuel composé, et c’est certainement ce qui attire l’attention de nos gouvernements. Certains ministres de notre gouvernement disent maintenant que l’économie maorie est devenue la pierre angulaire de l’économie néo-zélandaise en raison de son taux de croissance.

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Je crois que le taux de croissance est de 20 à 30 % par rapport à 2 ou 3 % à l’échelle nationale.

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sans la croissance maorie, l’économie nationale serait stagnante? Est-ce bien ce que je comprends?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

C’est exact. Il y a vraiment de très bonnes raisons, à mon avis — et c’est certainement ce qui se passe dans notre pays — de prêter attention aux intérêts des communautés autochtones.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourriez-vous nous dire à quel moment les attitudes ont changé, le cas échéant, pour que cela se produise? Pouvons-nous identifier un moment décisif où cela a commencé? Y a-t-il eu un changement de politique ou de culture?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Il n’y a pas de moment précis. On m’a posé cette question à plusieurs reprises au cours des derniers jours et des dernières semaines. Y a-t-il eu un tournant crucial? Il est difficile de mettre le doigt dessus. Cela s’est produit au cours des 20 à 30 dernières années, et il y a eu une accumulation d’efforts et d’événements; il ne s’agit pas d’un seul facteur.

Si je devais identifier une chose, monsieur, je ramènerais tout cela à l’éducation des jeunes Maoris.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé. Merci beaucoup.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Nous passons maintenant à Ted, pour cinq minutes.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci. Je peux poser d’autres questions.

Vous avez parlé d’un redressement que vous avez accordé aux Maoris en leur fournissant des capitaux de démarrage et du financement qui leur ont permis de devenir des entrepreneurs, si je peux m’exprimer ainsi. Y a-t-il autre chose qui a contribué au succès qu’ils connaissent aujourd’hui?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Ted, je vous remercie encore une fois de votre question.

Je souligne que le capital de développement rendu disponible grâce au processus des traités a été un catalyseur extrêmement important. À part cela, je crois que c’est une question d’éducation. Je ne veux pas m’éterniser là-dessus, mais c’est une question d’éducation.

Vous avez dit que les Maoris sont devenus des entrepreneurs. Nous avons cet esprit d’entreprise; cela fait vraiment partie de notre ADN depuis de nombreuses années. Avant les guerres qui ont eu lieu en Nouvelle-Zélande, l’économie maorie était florissante — c’était il y a plus de 100 ans. Différentes communautés avaient leurs propres devises. Au cours des 100 dernières années environ, différentes communautés ont fait du commerce international avec des sociétés de transport maritime. Ce que je veux dire, en fait, c’est que le commerce avec leurs semblables et à l’échelle internationale fait partie de l’ADN des Maoris.

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Si vous me permettez d’ajouter quelque chose, cela est aussi dans l’ADN des peuples autochtones nord-américains. Si on remonte à la traite des fourrures, lorsque nous fournissions des fourrures à la Compagnie de la Baie d’Hudson, on constate que cela fait partie de notre ADN aussi.

Si on pouvait avancer de quelques centaines d’années, l’une des choses qui m’inspirent à revenir au Canada est cette renaissance de l’entrepreneuriat autochtone. Il y a tellement de gens au pays maintenant qui... Il y a 10 ans, lorsque j’ai quitté le pays, ce n’était pas le cas, mais maintenant des gens créent des entreprises incroyables avec de nouvelles idées, des gens vraiment motivés qui travaillent très fort. Il s’agit simplement de leur donner les outils dont ils ont besoin. Je pense que les peuples autochtones du Canada, de la Nouvelle-Zélande et de l’Équateur, que j’ai observés, sont tout à fait prêts à travailler fort; toutefois, il nous est difficile d’aller de l’avant, étant donné que nous accusons un certain retard.

M. Ted Falk:

Raylene, vous avez dit tout à l’heure que le Canada était probablement à mi-chemin des Maoris en Nouvelle-Zélande quant à l’exploitation des ressources naturelles.

Si vous parliez aux communautés autochtones du Canada aujourd’hui, quels conseils leur donneriez-vous pour qu’elles participent au commerce, à l’industrie et à l’exploitation des ressources?

(1645)

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Je dirais d’abord exactement la même chose que j’ai dite aux communautés de l’Équateur: « C’est votre décision ». Elles devraient faire ce qu’elles veulent, et elles ont la liberté de choix qui leur revient.

Je les encouragerais à explorer les possibilités, à comprendre le cycle de vie de l’industrie du début à la fin et à participer à ces conversations avec un cœur et un esprit ouverts. Elles devraient aussi avoir les connaissances ou la capacité de comprendre ce dont on parle. Le langage de l’industrie, le langage du pétrole et du gaz, surtout le langage du forage, est très différent, et parfois, si on tient compte des questions d’alphabétisation, cela est très difficile pour les communautés autochtones, sans parler des communautés non autochtones. Elles doivent prendre leur temps, comprendre les problèmes et faire leurs devoirs. Mais au bout du compte, c’est leur décision.

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Je peux soulever un point très important et connexe. Raylene et moi vous l’avons dit. C’est ce lien très étroit que les Maoris entretiennent avec les peuples autochtones du monde, y compris les Premières Nations. C’est-à-dire, que nous partageons toutes nos connaissances et tout ce que nous avons appris avec notre famille autochtone du monde.

Il s’agit de l’ensemble des leçons qui nous servira tout au long de nos vies [Difficultés techniques].

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Beamish, en attendant que les autres reviennent, comment réagissez-vous aux commentaires que vous avez entendus au cours des dernières minutes? Je sais que nous nous concentrons beaucoup sur eux, mais je crois savoir que vous pouvez apporter une contribution importante.

M. Robert Beamish:

Je comprends cela. Je sais aussi que Chris est une excellente ressource. J’ai déjà siégé avec lui à des groupes de travail lors de conférences. Ce n’est pas la première fois que je le fais, mais c’est toujours [Inaudible] quand je suis avec Chris. Je comprends cela également, mais je reconnais certainement ses connaissances.

Il y a un point. Lors de mon dernier témoignage devant le Comité, vers la fin de mon intervention, on m’a posé une question sur la façon dont nous pourrions attirer au Canada des investissements de l’Asie et de l’étranger et sur la façon dont nous pourrions sensibiliser la population à ce sujet. Nous avons manqué de temps à cette occasion. J’en ai tenu compte et je voulais parler de la façon dont on pourrait attirer des investissements vers les communautés autochtones.

Dans le cadre de mes collaborations antérieures avec la Chambre de commerce du Canada à Hong Kong et le consulat canadien à Hong Kong — qui visaient principalement à attirer des investissements de Hong Kong au Canada — j’ai constaté que les délégués commerciaux qui étaient à l’étranger ne recevaient aucune formation pour les sensibiliser aux enjeux [Difficultés techniques]. Les communautés autochtones organisaient les conférenciers et les délégations commerciales indépendantes pour attirer des entreprises. Toutefois, il n’y avait pas ce partenariat dont Chris a parlé, lorsque les dirigeants politiques voyageaient à l’étranger en compagnie d’une délégation culturelle de Maoris. Les délégués commerciaux des consulats, des ambassades ou de la Chambre de commerce du Canada à l’étranger n’avaient aucune idée de ce qui se passe dans la communauté autochtone canadienne.

En fait, c’est cette lacune qui a inspiré le démarrage de notre entreprise, Anokasan Capital, dont le but est de sensibiliser les gens et les Asiatiques de l’Est aux possibilités qui existent dans les communautés autochtones du Canada et en Asie de l’Est.

(1650)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous en remercie. Je vous remercie de vos commentaires. Ils sont utiles.

Chris et Raylene, pouvez-vous m’entendre de nouveau?

Chris, j’aimerais revenir sur les réponses que vous avez données aux questions de M. Falk juste avant qu’on vous coupe la parole. La question que je voulais poser porte précisément sur la façon dont vous composez avec les autres communautés autochtones du monde lorsque vous ouvrez cette porte. J’aimerais qu’on en discute pour en apprendre davantage sur le processus en cours et sur la façon dont ces liens permettront de partager avec le reste du monde les pratiques exemplaires que les Maoris auront apprises.

M’entendez-vous? Cela n’a pas l’air encourageant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je voulais revenir sur ce que M. Falk a dit juste avant l’interruption de la communication. Vous avez dit que vous partagiez vos pratiques exemplaires avec les communautés autochtones du monde entier. Je voulais en savoir davantage sur ce processus. Comment cela fonctionne-t-il; coopérez-vous avec les gouvernements du monde entier pour obtenir de meilleurs résultats? Les communautés collaborent-elles directement et quels résultats avez-vous observés?

M. Chris Karamea Insley:

Encore une fois, c’est une très bonne question — et c’est ce qui se passe. Comme je l’ai dit, c’est une succession de choses.

Premièrement, nous réitérons actuellement l’intérêt que nous portons pour les accords de libre-échange et notre réflexion à cet égard, à l’invitation du gouvernement de la Nouvelle-Zélande. Nous nous attendons à ce que ce processus soit durable et que ces accords officiels tiennent compte de nos intérêts dès le départ. L’économiste en chef du ministère des Affaires étrangères de la Nouvelle-Zélande a utilisé ces termes parce qu’il comprend les taux de croissance annuels composés, et il est tellement évident que les gouvernements doivent agir et veiller à ce que ces accords de libre-échange tiennent compte de nos intérêts.

C’est donc ce que nous faisons actuellement et il s’agit d’un processus continu.

Deuxièmement, il y a énormément d’échanges commerciaux entre les entreprises maories et les Premières Nations. Aujourd’hui, nous avons accueilli dans cette salle un autre collègue qui nous a fait part de nombreux chiffres qui couvraient une période de 20 ans. Il a fait le survol de ses chiffres rétrospectifs et de ses prévisions. Il a parlé de certaines des discussions auxquelles il a participé à titre de directeur d’un conseil d’administration dans le secteur de l’énergie minière. Il s’occupe d’un autre commerce avec les Premières Nations dans le secteur agricole.

C’est donc une réponse à plusieurs volets. Je souligne encore une fois que nous, les Maoris, valorisons et partageons toutes les leçons que nous avons apprises tout au long de notre vie avec les peuples autochtones du monde, y compris les Premières Nations.

Mme Raylene Whitford:

Si vous me le permettez, j’aimerais ajouter quelque chose.

Chris m’a invitée à apprendre comment les Maoris font les choses: comment ils se sont développés. Hier, j’ai donné une conférence dans une université, par exemple, et les Maoris dans la salle étaient très intéressés d’entendre parler des Premières Nations, des Métis et des Inuits du Canada. Il y a donc certainement une telle tendance dans les communautés autochtones internationales. Mais pour l’instant, je ne sais pas... Je n’ai jamais eu le soutien du gouvernement pour faire cela. D’après ce que j’ai vu, il s’agit d’engagements directs dans tous les cas. Il y a donc les présentations — quelqu’un vous présente— et vous formez ainsi une relation. J’aimerais que le gouvernement appuie davantage cette liaison internationale, cette mobilisation, cette discussion, cette communication entre les communautés autochtones, parce que tous les enjeux auxquels nous sommes confrontés sont les mêmes, que nous soyons autochtones équatoriens, canadiens ou maoris de Nouvelle-Zélande.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est formidable.

Mon temps est écoulé, mais je tiens à vous remercier d’avoir partagé votre lendemain matin avec nous.

(1655)

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Et pour conclure, Richard, vous avez trois minutes.

M. Richard Cannings:

J’aimerais poser mes questions à M. Beamish.

M. Insley a parlé des diverses étapes du processus de mobilisation relativement aux questions historiques, sociales, territoriales, environnementales et, enfin, financières. Je me demande simplement comment cela pourrait correspondre à vos quatre "e". Vous avez parlé d’emploi, d’équité, d’environnement, d’éducation. Dans le cadre de vos échanges avec les communautés autochtones, avez-vous observé si on accordait un ordre d’importance à ces quatre "e"? Est-ce qu’on aborde l’équité en dernier; l’éducation passe-t-elle en premier, suivie de l’environnement?

M. Robert Beamish:

L’ordre est habituellement dicté par la communauté et ses priorités. L’environnement pourrait passer en premier, selon le projet et le développement proposés et l’impact qu’ils auraient. Par contre, les partenariats du passé démontrent que l’équité est le premier sujet abordé. Mais c’est une initiative communautaire. Nous savons que ces quatre "e" seront les piliers de la conversation, alors nous sommes transparents quant au fait qu’il s’agit de domaines que nous allons aborder et nous laissons nos partenaires orienter ces discussions.

M. Richard Cannings:

En ce qui concerne l’éducation, ce comité entend beaucoup parler de la formation professionnelle et de l’éducation. Je me demande simplement dans quelle mesure vous abordez cette question avec vos investisseurs et dans vos projets. Le volet éducation et formation professionnelle est-il un élément important de ce que votre projet pourrait offrir aux communautés?

M. Robert Beamish:

C’est le cas. Nous n’utilisons pas tout à fait la même méthode lorsque nous nous adressons aux investisseurs. Lorsque nous parlons à des investisseurs, nous mettons passablement de côté la question des fonds qui pourraient être mis en réserve et consacrés aux besoins sociaux. Cette réserve de fonds fait l’objet de discussions avec des partenaires communautaires et externes. Nous ne prétendons pas être des experts en développement social. Je viens du milieu des finances. J’aimerais beaucoup être un expert en finance et en développement social, mais je travaille actuellement sur le volet financier. Nous consultons des experts dans ce domaine, qui travailleront avec la communauté et qui s’engageront auprès d’elle. Il s’agit d’autres consultants autochtones qui travaillent dans le domaine du développement social. Nous collaborons avec eux pour identifier les budgets dont les communautés auront besoin pour atteindre leurs objectifs et les fonds que nos investisseurs ont réservés à cette fin. Les investisseurs ne négocient pas nécessairement en fonction du développement social, mais nous travaillons avec des partenaires de l’extérieur pour atteindre cet objectif d’une façon qui fonctionne pour la communauté.

M. Richard Cannings:

D’accord. Merci beaucoup. Je l’apprécie.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Merci à tous.

C’est tout pour notre dernière réunion sur cette étude. Je remercie les témoins de s’être joints à nous et de la patience dont ils ont fait preuve à l’égard des défis techniques liés aux vidéoconférences.

J’aimerais également remercier les interprètes, nos employés de soutien technique qui ont réglé les problèmes techniques, le greffier qui m’a gardée sur la bonne voie et créé l’impression que je sais ce que je fais. Je remercie aussi mes collègues qui m’ont facilité la tâche aujourd’hui.

Nous ne connaissons pas encore la date et l’heure de notre prochaine réunion, alors je vais simplement lever la séance.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard rnnr 21915 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 07, 2019

2019-04-30 RNNR 134

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Thank you for joining us. Our apologies for the last-minute room change. Apparently there are some technical difficulties upstairs which necessitated the move, but we're all here now. It all worked out thanks to our clerk and everybody else who made the change work out so quickly.

This afternoon, pursuant to Standing Order 81(4), we're considering the main estimates for 2019-20: vote 1 under Atomic Energy of Canada Limited; vote 1 under Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission; votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 under Department of Natural Resources; votes 1 and 5 under National Energy Board; and, vote 1 under Northern Pipeline Agency. These were referred to the committee on Thursday, April 11, 2019.

Minister, I want to start by thanking you for taking the time to join us today. We all know how incredibly busy you are. We're always grateful to you for making time in your schedule to be here with us. I'd like to also welcome your colleagues who are joining us as well.

You all know the process, so I don't need to give any explanation. I will turn the floor over to you. Following that, we will be going to a period of questions and answers.

Minister, the floor is yours. Thank you.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi (Minister of Natural Resources):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, everyone.

It's great to be here again to talk about what important investments our government has made in forestry, mining and the energy sector since October 2015, and how we can continue to invest in the future of Canada's natural resource sectors. This is a critically important time for our resource sectors and, more importantly, for Canadian workers.

As we all know, the world's energy needs are changing. Countries are increasingly looking to import sustainably sourced products. There is a growing consensus on the need to take immediate and sustained action on climate change. Some may choose to ignore these changes, keep their heads in the sand and hope for the best, but that is not the Canadian way. We are innovators.

Let's not forget that it was Canadians who first discovered how to get oil out of the oil sands. It was Canadians who created the first all-electric, battery-powered gold mine. It was Canadians who first built the largest North American passive house.

So how do we prepare for the future while also responding to the needs of today?

It starts with listening. In 2015, Canadians made it clear that protecting the environment and growing the economy could no longer be treated by the government as opposing goals.

Through Generation Energy, over 380,000 workers and leaders from renewable energy and clean tech, from oil and gas, from municipalities, indigenous leaders and Canadians helped build the idea of what our energy future could look like and how we can get there. We listened, and we have taken action to deliver for middle-class Canadians and those working hard to join the middle class.

We have done this by attracting new investment, extending the mineral exploration tax credit for five years, which is the first ever multi-year extension, and unveiling a plan that will position Canada as the world's undisputed mining leader. It is creating tens of thousands of jobs by supplying the minerals that will drive the clean growth economy.

We are reimagining the forest sector so our vast forests continue to play an essential role in our economy, not just here in Canada but around the world.

Through our investment of over $1 billion in energy efficiency, we are helping Canadians save money on their energy bills while fighting climate change.

We are building our energy future with a clear focus on expanding our renewable sources of energy, gaining access to global markets and making our traditional resources, such as oil and gas, more sustainable than ever.

Continuing this work and building on our progress to date is the big picture behind our main estimates. It mirrors a lot of what you have studied in your work as a parliamentary committee and the valuable recommendations you have provided to our government. I want to thank you for your work on behalf of Canadians.

The funding contained in this year's main estimates would support our department as we address the challenges in front of us, but also the opportunities ahead. This funding includes: advancing the use of new, clean technologies in the resource sector; helping remote, northern indigenous communities reduce their reliance on diesel; combatting the spruce budworm outbreak through early intervention; and extending our support to the many communities impacted by the unjustified tariffs on softwood lumber.

It will also give us the funds needed to implement key pillars of budget 2019. This includes new investments to encourage more Canadians to buy zero-emission vehicles; engage indigenous communities in major resource projects; improve our energy data, a key study from your committee; and enhance our ability to prepare for and respond to disasters that increasingly require federal action.

(1540)



As I noted at the beginning of my remarks, this is a pivotal moment in our country's history and it is not without its challenges, whether they are building pipeline capacity in the west, fending off protectionist measures to our south or changes across our economy in all regions of our country.

Canada's unemployment rate may be at a 40-year low, but we need to be mindful of Canadians who are anxious about their future. ln my home province of Alberta, we have seen ongoing challenges for many workers because of fluctuating commodity prices. Our government sees all of these challenges, and we are taking them head-on.

That is why we announced a $1.6-billion action plan to support workers and enhance competitiveness in our oil and gas sector. That is why our government is providing up to $2 billion to respond to the U.S. tariffs that are threatening Canadian workers in our steel and aluminum sectors. lt is why we built on the $867 million through our softwood lumber action plan with continued support to the forest sector in budget 2019.

lt is why we are providing $150 million to ensure a just transition for workers and communities affected by the phasing out of coal-powered electricity. lt is why we are improving the way we make decisions on major projects, so that all Canadians have trust in their reviews, ensuring that we can advance nation-building projects that will grow our economy without putting our health, environment or communities in harm's way.

It is also why we have been doing the hard work necessary to follow the path set out in the Federal Court of Appeal's decision on the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. While that decision was a disappointment to many, it provided clear guidance on how the process could move forward in the right way, in a specific and focused way.

Some argue we should ignore that guidance, disregard the court and respond with lengthy appeals designed to avoid our obligations to the environment and to indigenous peoples. Our government took the responsible and more efficient path. We directed the National Energy Board to conduct a review of marine shipping and committed to getting phase three consultations right.

That important work is well under way. The NEB report was delivered on time on February 22. ln parallel, our consultation teams have been hard at work on phase three consultations. These teams, nearly double their original size, have been engaging in meaningful, two-way dialogue to discuss and understand priorities of indigenous communities and to offer responsive accommodations where appropriate. I have also personally met with many indigenous communities to help build a relationship based on trust.

Our work to date has put us in the strong position we are in today to deliver this process for all Canadians. Our work on TMX, our historic investments in solar, wind, geothermal and other forms of energy and our commitment to innovation and the development of new technologies are laying the foundation for a strong Canada both for today and for tomorrow.

Mr. Chair, our government sees our resource industries playing a key role in driving Canada's clean growth economy. We value the expertise and experience at Natural Resources and the drive of all Canadians to help make it happen.

These main estimates are a down payment on Canada's future, a future that our children will inherit with pride and build upon with confidence, a future that will continue to create well-paying, middle-class jobs for Canadians and future generations.

With that, I would be happy to take your questions.

Thank you for having us here.

(1545)

The Chair:

Minister, thank you for your remarks.

The honourable Kent Hehr is going to start us off.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Minister, thank you so much for coming. You have explained how Albertans figured out the oil sands. It was 1975 when Premier Peter Lougheed, Premier Bill Davis and our Liberal government invested in the modern oil sands. In 1997 it was Premier Klein and then prime minister Chrétien investing in the oil sands and expanding them once again.

You rightfully point out the purchase and the going ahead with Trans Mountain pipeline in the right way, but in my riding of Calgary Centre there are many oil companies and in fact energy workers from whom I continue to hear questions about the industry's competitiveness. They are concerned about a potential layering effect from the various environmental regulations and how they might make our oil and gas industry less competitive. We want to ensure that Canada is the supplier of choice for oil and gas around the world. How do we make sure that we are protecting our environment and yet ensuring that we remain competitive globally?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, I thank the member so much for that question.

As you know, we were in Calgary last week announcing funding support for a very promising new technology that is investing in testing a prototype for geothermal. When you talk to companies like that, they know that if they are successful in commercializing that technology, it can create 40,000 jobs in western Canada, mainly for people who are currently working in the oil sector, people who are drilling and doing that work. We're investing in new technology and investing in our traditional oil and gas sector to make it more clean and green, with the provisions of the accelerated capital allowance announced in last Year's fall economic statement as well as the $100 million allocated in budget 2019 to foster collaboration and innovation amongst the oil and gas sector.

I can give you a number of examples that make our energy sector competitive. We will continue to keep an eye on it so that we remain competitive. We want to make sure our oil and gas sector, our renewable sector, remains a source of well-paying middle-class jobs for Canadians for decades to come. We will continue to make sure our support is there.

(1550)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's my understanding that the Trans Mountain pipeline consultations and review are continuing. I saw the announcement that there will be a further extension in consultations. I'm wondering if you can give us an update on where we are in this process.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

We have eight teams consisting of 60 individuals, professionals who have been engaging in meaningful two-way dialogue with indigenous communities over the last number of months. During that consultation, indigenous communities requested an extension to the timelines. In order to accommodate that reasonable request, we extended the timeline by three weeks. This week we sent out a draft copy of the Crown's consultation and accommodation report to all the communities who engaged with us. Now they're able to comment on that draft report. We want to make sure they have enough time to actually read it and go through it and analyze it and give us good input.

Our goal is to make a decision on this project by June 18. The way things are going, I think we're in a good position to achieve that.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Market access is the key, Minister. I think with moving forward on Trans Mountain the right way, obviously with Enbridge Line 3 and hopefully with Keystone XL, are you confident that this will be enough to allow us to have our supply from Alberta oil taken care of in the short and medium terms?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Well, we all know—members of this committee have raised this issue a number of times—and Albertans, people in the energy sector and workers in that sector understand that the lack of pipeline capacity is costing our economy jobs. It is costing potential growth in the sector. That's why from day one when we got into office we focused on expanding that pipeline capacity.

We are the government that gave approval to the Nova gas pipeline, which is built in Alberta. We are the government that gave approval to Enbridge Line 3, and the construction of that project in Canada is almost complete. We are working with the U.S. government in alleviating some of the challenges that are being faced in that country. I was in Houston meeting with Secretary Perry to advocate building of the Keystone XL pipeline.

We will continue to work with the private sector to advance their shared goal of moving forward on that project, and taking the right approach to get the process right on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project is a strong commitment. We are the government that invested $4.5 billion when that project could have possibly fallen apart because of the uncertainty that existed at that time.

(1555)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

In your conversations with oil companies, I know that Suncor, Synova, CNRL and companies like that were very supportive of putting a price on pollution. They understood that climate change is real and we need to be part of that solution.

Is that still your conversation with oil executives? Do they understand the need to move forward in this way?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

In the conversations we have with our energy sector partners, they absolutely understand that choosing between the economy and the environment is a false choice and that we can do both. We can protect our environment and we can continue to grow our economy in a way which at the same time makes sure that indigenous communities are partners, that they are able to participate in the process, and at the same time also participate in the economic opportunities that these projects provide.

The Chair:

Minister, I have to ask you to wrap it up, please. Thank you.

Mr. Schmale, I understand you're going to go first, but you're splitting your time with Ms. Stubbs. Is that right?

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

That's correct.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you, Minister, for being here. I appreciate your testimony. I have a lot of questions to get through, as you can imagine, so I'm going to try to keep them brief. Maybe you can be equally tight with your answers, and we'll try to get through as many as possible.

The first is with regard to TMX. The Federal Court of Appeal said, “The concerns of the Indigenous applicants, communicated to Canada, are specific and focussed. This means that the dialogue Canada must engage in can also be...brief and efficient...”.

Between October and February, the National Energy Board conducted extensive consultations with indigenous communities, including hearing oral testimony in multiple cities in both Alberta and British Columbia. The courts never questioned the consultation process of the NEB.

You say June 18 is your goal. What assurances can Canadians have, given that so far, every deadline set has been missed?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

First of all, through you, Mr. Chair, there were two issues the Federal Court identified in the ruling of August 30, 2018. One was the issue of not conducting the review of marine safety related to marine tanker traffic. That was the process which the NEB had undertaken, and they have made a decision and a recommendation to approve this project.

The other issue is the indigenous consultation that my department has been undertaking. We have been clear from day one that our goal is to get the process right, so we never set a deadline on the conclusion of those consultations. We've always said that we will make a decision when we feel that we have adequately discharged our constitutional obligation for meaningful consultation with the indigenous communities. Now we feel with the work that has been done that our goal is to make that decision by June 18.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Minister, thank you.

By pushing off the decision date to June 18.... The Prime Minister confirmed to Premier Kenney on April 18 that, quote, he just needed two more weeks to complete consultations with indigenous communities. Obviously, it's been longer than two weeks. Can you confirm that shovels will be in the ground this summer?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

We extended the consultation process by three weeks at the request of the indigenous communities. I think it is a reasonable request coming from our partners who we are engaging. Cabinet would have to make a decision on this project, and I cannot predetermine the decision of cabinet. Once that decision is made, the next part of the process will unfold.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay. I have more, but I have to cede my time to Ms. Stubbs.

Thank you, Minister.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Minister, I think what's concerning is the judge in the court ruling specifically said that the renewed consultations with indigenous communities can be brief and efficient. Instead of that happening, you were threatening very recently that you will not meet the June 18 deadline for the final cabinet decision. That's why we're asking these questions.

The National Energy Board, even with the expanded scope of course, has said twice that the project is in the national interests, with two exhaustive, independent, scientific assessments of the expansion.

You said last year that not building Trans Mountain is not an option. The Prime Minister said 11 months ago that we're going to get that pipeline built. Your predecessor said you were buying the pipeline to get the expansion built right away. The finance minister said you were doing that to build it immediately. Your Liberal cabinet had already approved the pipeline previously.

Given what I'm sure is our shared value of the evidence-based, science-based, expert-based and independent regulator's recommendation, can you commit that the cabinet will approve the TMX on June 18 and indicate when shovels will be in the ground?

(1600)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think it is important to understand that, when we undertook the analysis of the court ruling, we also engaged former Supreme Court justice Iacobucci to give us the advice to ensure that we are properly understanding the direction of the court, but also whatever decision is made in the future, that the process can withstand the challenges of the commitments that we have made under the constitutional obligations the Crown has to indigenous communities.

My goal is to ensure that the process is properly followed, that we do not cut corners on that process.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Minister. You confirm that the cabinet will approve the TMX again. That's fine.

On a different topic, last week you publicly threatened to include in situ oil sands projects under Bill C-69's project lists, in a political response to the election in Alberta. Of course, I'm sure you know and feel just as strongly as I do, as an Albertan, that oil extraction and upstream resource development is provincial jurisdiction, and of course a threat is only a threat if there's a negative consequence.

Now that you've finally admitted what industry, economists, first nations, premiers and other groups have been saying for a year, that Bill C-69 is meant to harm oil and gas development, will you commit to repealing Bill C-69 before it's too late and ensure that in situ oil sands projects will not face federal review?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, when the draft discussion paper was launched regarding what goes on the project list, it was mentioned in the draft discussion that in situ projects will be exempt from Bill C-69 federal review as long as there is a cap on emissions in the jurisdiction where they are being proposed. We have been clear, as part of the pan-Canadian framework on climate change and clean growth, we want to ensure that our oil and gas sector continues to grow in a sustainable way and that they're able to continue to innovate. We will continue to support them investing in new clean technologies. The sector can continue to grow, and at the same time we want to make sure that emissions are controlled as well.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

You will risk provincial jurisdiction being intervened and in situ oil sands development in Alberta potentially being exposed to a federal review.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

We look forward to—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

That's seven minutes, Chair.

Yes, it is. That was my concluding comment.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

—working with the new government.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you, Minister, for being here today.

I'm just going to start with some follow-up questions. The last time you were here, I gave you three suggestions that you might want to consider in the budget. Having now seen the budget, I just wanted to follow up with those.

One is about home retrofits. We all know that energy efficiency is one of the best ways to reduce our greenhouse gas footprints in Canada. We had a very successful program here started by the Conservative government in the previous parliaments, the eco-energy retrofit program. Its last iteration had $400 million in the 2011 budget. Unfortunately it was cancelled and hasn't been brought up again by this Liberal government. First, it seemed that retrofits were kicked over to the provinces in the pan-Canadian framework, and in this budget, there's an item for $300 million that is being put down under the municipalities through the FCM.

I'm rather confused and concerned that the federal government hasn't taken it upon itself to actually do this itself. This is leadership that I think Canadians expect from the federal government. With something as serious as climate action, we really need to do things quickly and boldly. It seems that this is just another example of putting things down onto the municipalities.

I'm confused. For one thing, in the book here, it says in one place that this is to be spent in the 2018-19 fiscal year. In another place it says it's to be spent in the 2019-20 year. That's not what I'm concerned about here. It's just one more confusion.

I guess now that this money has been transferred, I assume to FCM, how long will they have to spend this? Is this a one-year pot, like the $400-million pot that the Conservatives put up? Will municipalities have to sign on individually? I don't live in a municipality. How do I access this program? If we had done it nationally, those questions would not have to be asked.

(1605)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, thank you so much for that question because we believe that energy efficiency is one of the ways that we can reduce the impact of climate change and make our communities more resilient and reduce emissions.

The funding that you are referring to, the $1 billion that is being transferred—

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Well, it's $300 million for retrofits.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

A portion of that is going to the FCM. Then there's a gas tax transfer to municipalities as well that directly goes to municipalities. Funding is also available for energy efficiency through, as you mentioned, the bilateral agreements that we signed with the provinces, plus $300 million is to be managed by the FCM.

We're trying to supplement and not duplicate. We are trying to ensure that programs are already effectively working. FCM has managed a green municipal fund for the last decade or maybe longer, so we are just supplementing the good work the FCM is doing.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm thinking about my riding. It's mainly tiny communities of 500 people, 1,000 people. These are not communities that have the resources, the people resources, the administration resources, to manage these programs on their own. Why are you putting it on them or the FCM rather than doing it through the federal government?

I'll move on now because I have a few more questions.

The last time I asked, I was looking for ways the federal government could support the forest industry. As you know, it's having hard times. We still have softwood lumber tariffs hanging over it. There are mills in my riding that are closing for periods of time this spring to save money because they've been hit as lumber prices have fallen.

The last time you were here, I suggested that the federal government could put up bold funding to help these communities and this industry and also keep them protected. We've had two years of forest fires in British Columbia alone that cost $1 billion a year just to fight the fires, and perhaps $10 billion in costs to deal with the aftermath.

The forest experts I've talked to suggest that we should be spending $1 billion each year in British Columbia to mitigate those actions. I see small, various programs to help the forest industry in this budget, but I don't see anything significant that will go after the safety of communities in forest environments. With most of the communities in British Columbia, for instance, and many communities across Canada, where the federal government could provide funding that would help the provinces and municipalities thin the forests in the interface areas, it would provide fibre for local mills, provide work and keep people safe.

I met with a community group in my riding a couple of weeks ago. They're one of Canada's top fire safe communities. They are desperate for any government help they can find. Right now, they get $500 a year. If they got $1,000 a year, they'd be happy. They're just a tiny community. I'm wondering why I don't see anything in this budget that is a significant help in terms of fire smarting these forest communities.

The Filmon report suggested an amount for British Columbia, an amount that has not even.... Only 15% has been sent. We're talking about billions of dollars here.

I'm wondering if there's any hope for the future that this federal government will step up and make some really meaningful contribution in this regard.

(1610)

The Chair:

Minister, he didn't leave you very much time to answer that question, so if you could be very brief, I'd be grateful.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Yes. I look forward to engaging more on specific communities and projects, or ideas that you may have in mind.

I spoke with my counterparts, all the forestry ministers, a few months ago about having a joint working group to develop some proposals on how we can work together on those issues.

I can definitely follow up with you on that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

You're out of time.

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thanks for coming, Minister.

In Mr. Cannings' remarks, he got almost to the point of asking you a question on how the Government of Canada is helping rural and remote communities in this budget.

I am looking at table A.2, Natural Resources Canada's 2019-20 transfer payments. It says that we're increasing those amounts from last year to this year from $14.2 million to $21.4 million.

Can you or your officials provide us with some colour as to how this money is going to help rural and remote communities access clear energy programs, and what type of administrative support might be available for smaller communities that don't have the in-house capacity to necessarily think through all the options themselves?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, there are a number of programs available for rural, isolated and northern communities, whether they are in the area of getting those communities off diesel to new renewable sources of energy, or using waste wood to turn that into biofuels, or investments in indigenous communities to encourage indigenous economic development.

I'll ask my officials to elaborate a little more on that particular program.

Ms. Cheri Crosby (Assistant Deputy Minister and Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Management and Services Sector, Department of Natural Resources):

I'm happy to do that.

Through you, Chair, the particular thing you're referring to is the clean energy for rural and remote communities program, which is increasing by $7 million from last year. It was launched in budget 2017, the year before, so we've been ramping it up.

In terms of some of the details, we have committed to supporting the deployment of renewable electricity technologies for $89 million.

We're going to be getting into demonstrating renewable technologies in electricity and heating, deploying bioheat technologies in rural and remote communities, supporting capacity building as well, and just encouraging energy efficiency through a variety of ways.

I'll leave it there, unless you want more detail.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

For the record, I think that probably responds to Mr. Cannings' earlier statement.

In terms of the extension of time in order to fully complete the consultation process with indigenous groups for the Trans Mountain expansion, you indicated that you've engaged former justice Iacobucci on this. My own province was obviously quite anxious about our own indigenous consultations with respect to offshore exploratory drilling, which have come to what we understand to be a successful conclusion.

Maybe you can provide us with some context on why it's important to provide this extension and what confidence you can give us, based on the experience of the government thus far, that our new processes in this regard are working, are compliant and will survive a court challenge.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, we are very serious about how we engage with indigenous communities. We learn new things and look for new opportunities to engage in a meaningful way.

In this particular case, those drilling projects had a number of conditions that were imposed, and rightfully so. I think we have a lot of expertise in our offshore authorities and the bodies that do the consultations. We've continued to learn how to engage, and in some cases, some processes are better than others, so we will continue to explore and learn.

(1615)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Is there anything in particular you'd like to elaborate on in terms of the three-week extension that might be able to give us some comfort that this is the right thing to do?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I would say one of the ways of being open and responsive is to listen to your partners in a sincere way. They made a sincere request to us for an extension and we responded. I think our responding to the request that indigenous communities made to us shows our commitment.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

In terms of making Canada a global leader in mining, at a conference in Toronto just a couple of months ago I heard from mining leaders that they want to make sure that when they engage in scientific discussions with the government, they and the government are learning from past practice, moving forward and not reinventing the wheel.

Can you provide us some clarity on how your department is ensuring we're learning from past practice and continually improving our environmental regulatory process?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, we were very happy to launch the Canadian mineral and metals plan. I'm pretty sure some of you have seen it. If you haven't, I would encourage you to look at it. We can provide copies. This work is a collaboration with industry and many stakeholders.

In an economy where more investments are being put into solar, wind and electric vehicles, the minerals and metals we have as Canadians have a huge potential for us to create thousands and thousands of well-paying jobs throughout the country and will help transition to a more clean and green economy.

This helps deal with climate change. It allows us to move forward on creating jobs as well as investments in new technologies, for example, in the extraction area. The first-ever all-electric gold mine, the Borden gold mine, is a good example of how we can work with industry to support that.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, I understand you're splitting your time again. You have five minutes this time.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you very much.

Thank you, Minister. I will be very quick.

Minister, I want to talk about your subsidies for zero-emission vehicles. As I'm sure you know, we have seen that none of the total electric vehicles are made in Canada. The only hybrid made in Canada is the Chrysler Pacifica.

Having said that, I went on the Nissan Canada website and I built myself the most basic Nissan Leaf, one of the best-selling electric vehicles on the planet, with no toys, nothing. It costs $817.74 a month.

Given that this is a mortgage payment for some, can you please explain this to me? I don't understand why we're subsidizing the very rich to purchase these vehicles that aren't even made in Canada.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, there's a cap on the price for the vehicles that can be purchased through this incentive, and that price is to ensure that middle-class Canadians are able to access this incentive and that the wealthy Canadians, who can probably afford to buy—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, but that $817 includes the discount.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

The other goal is to spur more innovation and investment in zero-emission vehicles as part of our overall climate change plan. That's the reason this incentive is provided.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Minister.

By how many cents will your government's new fuel standard increase the cost of a litre of diesel, a litre of gasoline and a cubic metre of natural gas?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

The discussion around fuel standards is being led by Minister McKenna at ECCC. They are in discussions with industry stakeholders. We will make sure that we always keep our competitiveness in mind when we launch any policy, making sure that middle-class Canadians who work hard every day to be part of the middle class, that their living remains affordable. That's why—

(1620)

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The policy has been posted on your department's website for months, and I just find it incredible that after two years of developing the policy, Liberal ministers don't seem to be able to answer how much it would cost Canadians.

The Chemistry Industry Association of Canada says the fuel standard will be the equivalent of a $200 a tonne carbon tax. Industry is saying anywhere between $150 to $280 a tonne carbon tax, and your government provided a 95% exemption from the carbon tax for large emitters, as the environment minister said, “to stay competitive and keep good jobs in Canada”.

If those companies, according to that analysis, will do what Conservatives have been warning about for years, shut down their businesses and kill jobs in Canada if they pay more than 5% of your carbon tax, how can you rationalize imposing these dramatic costs on those same businesses in the new fuel standard?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I look forward to meeting with the association tomorrow. We have been working very closely with the petrochemical industry as well. I was back home in Alberta last week announcing $49 million that is going to generate $4.5 billion of new investment in Alberta's economy.

It is in the best interest of all that our industry remain competitive.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

To that end, I hope you will advocate very aggressively that the government know what it's doing before it imposes this policy since the cost-benefit analysis says there are no models to determine emissions reductions credit supply or the economic impacts of the fuel standard.

Mr. Chair, I would like to move a motion: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the Committee immediately invite the Minister of Natural Resources to appear before the Committee on Thursday, June 20, 2019, for no less than a full meeting, to advise the Committee of the government’s plan to build the Trans Mountain Expansion; and that this meeting be televised.

The Chair:

I would propose we set aside some time for committee business this Thursday because we have time in our schedule. We can deal with the motion then and that doesn't eat into our time here.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, I look forward to that. I'm sure the minister will be more than willing to come to tell Canadians about the start date of construction, the timeline for construction, the in-service date of the Trans Mountain expansion, how much it will cost taxpayers, and also the plans on whether or not the Trans Mountain expansion will be built and then operated in the long term by the private sector.

The Chair:

Thank you. We'll discuss that on Thursday, then.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Great.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, the floor is yours to finish it off.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I have a couple of quick questions before I get into the forestry industry, which is obviously important to my riding.

This is just a quick question. Eight years ago the Conservatives sold AECL, or a chunk of it, for $15 million. I'm wondering how we did on our investment. We sold it for $15 million, but we still have to put quite a lot of money into AECL. Was it a good idea to sell it eight years ago, or sell a chunk of it?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I would have to get back to you on that question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think my point is made.

I want to build on Mr. Cannings' question earlier. As you know, forestry is a very important industry in my large rural riding not far from here. I want to thank you first of all for the helpful announcement to Uniboard two weeks ago, which will be an enormous help in greening the factory we have in a very défavorisée part of the riding that has a lot of economic issues. It will help save a lot of jobs in this area. It's one of the biggest players I have in my riding.

The forestry industry has faced a lot of challenges in the last few years. In 1987 in my riding we lost the railways. They were ripped out and they were sold for scrap. In 1990 we lost the ability to log drive. Also, we've had a lot of problems with the American trade sanctions on forest products that have caused untold trouble. We have only one road in and out of the riding that can be used for logging, and we have now a worker shortage, which is impacting the ability to keep the businesses running.

What can you tell us about what we can do for the forestry sector, short term and long term, and also in terms of expanding second and third transformation, which we do very little of in my area?

(1625)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, I can highlight a number of things. Some are related to my ministry, and some are not.

For example, there is the $2-billion rural infrastructure fund that allows roads to be constructed in the rural communities, or the $2-billion trades corridor fund that communities can access. An investment of $250 million was allocated in budget 2019 to foster more innovation and diversify the sector and help it grow. The forestry sector is a very important sector for Canada, and yes, it is facing challenges as far as relations with the U.S. are concerned. The three trade agreements that our government has signed absolutely open up so much potential for our products to be imported because we have the best product. We have the way we harvest and environmental sustainability in the practices. I think that absolutely those are some of the things we have been doing.

I don't know, DM, if you want to elaborate on some of the other support systems that we have in place in the forestry sector.

Ms. Christyne Tremblay (Deputy Minister, Department of Natural Resources):

Thank you, Chair. We're recognizing the importance of the forest sector and we're working on many fronts. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can answer in French if you want.

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Okay.

We are working on several fronts, the first of which is the competitiveness of the sector. Together with all provinces and territories, we have developed a forest bioeconomy framework, which will allow us to diversify forest products and add to their value. The framework is actually the first item on the agenda for the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers meeting, which starts this evening.

Second, we are making huge investments in innovation. The most recent budget devoted the major sum of $100 million to the area. The money comes from strategic investment funds for promising projects, such as biofuels and high value-added wood products.

Third, we are making substantial investments in market diversification so that Canadian wood can be used overseas. Major projects are underway in China, including Tianjin, where we are demonstrating ways to include wood in construction and how that contributes to our efforts to fight climate change.

Fourth, as the minister mentioned, the government is providing significant assistance to the softwood lumber industry. His plan was not only to help the workers and the companies targeted by the countervailing duties, but also to encourage market and product diversification. The plan has worked very well. Also today, the minister will chair a working group, made up of all ministers with responsibility for forests, that is monitoring the health of our forestry sector and ensuring that measures are in place to assist local communities, workers and the industry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My time is up.

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Minister, thank you very much. That's all the time we have in the first hour. It goes by very quickly. We're very grateful to you for taking the time and making yourself available to join us today, as always.

We're going to suspend for just two minutes, and then Ms. Tremblay and Ms. Crosby are going to stay, and some other officials will be joining us for the second hour.

Thank you, Minister.

(1625)

(1630)

The Chair:

Welcome back, everybody. Thank you for being so good with the time. We are continuing now.

We have six departmental officials with us.

Thank you for staying and being with us here today. We have the deputy minister and five assistant deputy ministers. I would think that would be a pretty hard panel to stump when we're talking about this, not to set the bar too high, of course.

We're going to jump right into questions and having put that out there, Mr. Hehr, it's your job to try to stump them first.

(1635)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I doubt I will be able to do that.

I know that with increased climate change we're seeing the ravages of flooding and environmental impacts throughout the country. We see an increase in those in ever-increasing numbers. I think it was stated that a rise in contributions from the federal purse is going out to cover these damages each and every day.

In any event, I know that in the estimates NRCan is seeking $11.1 million to ensure better disaster management preparation, response and improved emergency management in Canada.

Can you describe what these will go towards funding? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you.

I am very pleased that you raised that question, which unfortunately is very much in the news, given the flooding we are seeing in Quebec and Ontario. They cause major costs in economic terms, but also in human terms that must be considered. Often these natural disasters threaten the safety and resilience of people as well as the protection of their possessions. This is important. We have to be very responsible in the way we deal with these disasters.

We are increasingly realizing that we have to build communities that are much more resilient in the face of disasters such as floods or forest fires. In the last budget, the Department of Natural Resources received $88 million over five years so that we can work with the provinces and territories on measures to increase the resilience of communities. A major part of that funding will go to forest fire prevention.

I am pleased that I have been asked a number of questions on the forests today. In the last year, all provinces and territories have focused on ways to fight forest fires and to ensure that communities are better prepared to face those disasters. A Canada-wide plan on forest fires has just been developed. All provinces and territories support it, but there are also initiatives that have to be considered.

Some people may not be able to hear me. Do you want me to stop, Mr. Chair? [English]

The Chair:

Yes, for Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings: It's okay now.

The Chair: All right. All systems are working now. [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

I am happy to answer your question about natural disasters, Mr. Cannings. My department is actually going to receive $88 million to ensure that communities are resilient to natural disasters. A large part of that amount will be used in fighting forest fires. As you know, British Columbia saw major forest fires last year. The money will also be used to increase our forecasting and mapping abilities. The goal is for us to be more proactive and better prepared, so that we are able to see the disasters coming. [English]

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you for that answer.

We heard some questioning by Mr. Schmale around our new incentive program to encourage people to look at electric vehicles. I'm hoping that you can tell me a bit more about that program.

As well, Hannah Wilson from my office stated that about 80% of cars in that marketplace would be available for that price point. Are there cars available at the $45,000 cap? Would those be available? How does the program work?

(1640)

[Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you for the question.

Increasing sales of zero-emission vehicles is a major objective for the government. As you mentioned, a new incentive program is designed to encourage consumers to choose those vehicles. Transport Canada, not Natural Resources Canada, is responsible for the program. However, we have to make sure that the cars can be driven and recharged. So we have to make sure that the infrastructures are in place.

We are already working to establish a network of more than 1,000 charging stations across Canada. In some cases, these will be electric charging stations and in others the stations will work on hydrogen or natural gas. In the most recent budget, we received funds to add 20,000 charging stations. This time, they will be installed near where Canadians live. In other words, stations will be in their homes, and near where they work and play, even in the parking lots they use. For us, therefore, this is a major investment.

In addition, we are continuing to work very hard for the stations to be more effective. If I may, I will give the floor to Frank Des Rosiers, our assistant deputy minister responsible for everything related to clean technologies in our department. He works specifically with certain technologies in order to ensure that Canadians who own vehicles of that kind are able to drive them.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers (Assistant Deputy Minister, Innovation and Energy Technology Sector, Department of Natural Resources):

Exactly.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Perhaps to add to the deputy's remark, this is actually one of those areas that is important for Canada. We've seen all those cars on the road. They account for roughly a quarter of our GHG emissions in the country. Making a dent in this actually matters a great deal.

We have not only an opportunity to deploy existing technology, but also to develop new ones. We have a number of innovators in the country. I'm thinking about AddÉnergie, for instance, based in Shawinigan, Quebec. They are in the process of developing, thanks to our support and the support of the provincial government as well, new infrastructure, for instance, to have a solution for those residing in condos and multi-residential units. Right now there aren't a lot of solutions being offered in the marketplace, and we're looking for those kinds of solutions.

Another angle that we've been exploring is what the impact is of having thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of vehicles on the grid. Picture if you are running a utility and a sizable electrical grid, and you suddenly have this large amount of demand out there. How do you manage this? What's the cybersecurity consideration around having such a large amount of new demand in the marketplace?

These are the kinds of solutions and issues we've been striving to resolve.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Falk.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to department officials for attending.

I have a whole bunch of questions. I'll try to fire through them and we'll see how it goes. I don't care who answers.

We've bought a pipeline. Have we paid for it? That is the question. Have we paid for the pipeline?

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Labonté will answer.

Mr. Jeff Labonté (Assistant Deputy Minister, Major Projects Management Office, Department of Natural Resources):

Have we paid for the pipeline, meaning has the transaction been closed?

Mr. Ted Falk:

Correct.

Mr. Jeff Labonté:

I believe the transaction has been closed, but I think the Minister of Finance is responsible for the execution through CDIC, the Crown agency that's responsible for delivering and operating the pipeline.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

Would the Crown agency also incur all the costs associated with it now in order to proceed towards the expansion, or would that be a departmental cost?

Mr. Jeff Labonté:

The Crown agency is run through its own separate board of directors, but I'm getting to the margins of my knowledge base here, given that it's the Minister of Finance's officials and whatnot. It's run through, as I understand it, a separate board of directors. It has its own, if you will, financial regime under which it operates.

Of course at this point there's no certificate for an expansion to occur, so it's operating the pipeline that exists today and waiting for the decision that will come—should it come—related to the project decision on the expansion part.

(1645)

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay. Very good.

The carbon tax was implemented in my province recently. I saw just over a 4.5¢ per litre increase on the price of gas, and just over 5¢ per litre on the price of diesel fuel. Do you have projected revenues on what that will bring in? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

That is a question for Environment and Climate Change Canada. [English]

Mr. Ted Falk:

So your department hasn't been tasked at all with calculating the amount of fuel that's going to be burned. You have not been involved in that at all. [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

There has certainly been collaboration between the departments, but the question should go to another department. [English]

The Chair:

There's your answer.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay. Can you give me the volumes, then, of fuel that you expect to be taxed with this carbon tax, either gasoline or diesel? Have you done that calculation? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

As I have already said, the question should be addressed to Environment and Climate Change Canada, which is responsible for the carbon tax, or to the Department of Finance Canada, which is responsible for calculating the revenue from that tax. [English]

Mr. Ted Falk:

Mr. Chair, I'm not looking anymore for the dollar amounts; I can do the math myself. I'm looking for volume. That, I think, would be something that would fall under this department's jurisdiction.

The Chair:

I understood the question, and I think they did too, but the answer's the answer, Mr. Falk.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

Getting back to my colleague's question on the Canadian fuel standard, have there been any calculations done by the department on the effect of that? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Department of Natural Resources is collaborating with the industry on the work being done on the clean fuel standard. A consultation is under way. Our department is working with various companies, the industry, as well as Environment and Climate Change Canada to analyze the effects of the scenarios that come up and that are of concern to the industry and to companies on an individual basis. When the regulations are published, the stakeholders will provide cost estimates, as always. [English]

Mr. Ted Falk:

On the large emitters of carbon that are being exempted with the 95% rule, you've obviously done some calculations. Can you tell me how many tonnes of emissions have been exempted? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

The same answer goes for that question as well. [English]

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay, I'll go to something easy here.

Let's talk about the spruce budworm. What are the objectives and expected results of phase one of the spruce budworm early intervention strategy? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

I am very pleased that that question has been asked, Mr. Chair. With your permission, I will yield the floor to Beth MacNeil, our assistant deputy minister for the Canadian Forest Service. [English]

Ms. Beth MacNeil (Assistant Deputy Minister, Canadian Forest Service, Department of Natural Resources):

I'm not sure whether the question was about phase one or phase two, because the early intervention strategy is actually phase two. Could I get some clarity on that?

Mr. Ted Falk:

Yes, sorry, I meant phase two.

Ms. Beth MacNeil:

The Government of Canada allocated approximately $74.5 million for phase two. We are just beginning year two.

I'm very happy to report that early signs show that this is very successful. Many of the resources are going to spraying operations to attack hot spots as well as to monitoring. Since 2014 we've seen a reduction of 90% of the spruce budworm populations in New Brunswick. We believe if we're successful there, it will not spread into Nova Scotia, P.E.I. or Newfoundland and Labrador.

(1650)

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Yes, I have questions; I just might get an answer sometime.

The Chair:

Okay, that will take us to Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to all of you for being here.

I'm going to start with a question that I meant to ask the minister, but I ran out of time because I rambled on too much, I guess.

A few weeks ago, I was here in this room, or a room very like it, listening to the commissioner on the environment and sustainability give her final report of her tenure here. In that report she said, “For decades, successive federal governments have failed to reach their targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the government is not ready to adapt to a changing climate. This must change.”

Part of the report that she was presenting at that meeting was about fossil fuel subsidies. I don't have the quote right in front of me, but one of the breakout headlines of that report was to the effect that this government, after four years, couldn't even define what an inefficient fossil fuel subsidy was, yet it went on in the next breath to say that we don't have any.

I remember being in Argentina with the former minister when the big topic at the G20 meeting was about whether this government would commit to removing all subsidies for fossil fuels and instead put in significant incentives for renewable energy.

I'm just wondering if Mr. Khosla or somebody could.... [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

A clean environment and a strong economy go hand in hand. There is a lot of work that is being done on inefficient fossil fuel subsidies, and I think it's very key to understand and highlight inefficient fossil fuel subsidies. We believe that what we're doing in Canada doesn't fall under this, but we agreed to conduct a peer review with Argentina. The Minister of Finance is responsible for that.

Recently, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change launched a consultation. She appointed a commissioner who is going to consult Canadians about fossil fuel subsidies. There are some definitions that exist that can be used and are referred to in the discussion paper that's being published at the same time as we launch this consultation.

If you want to speak more about this definition, I would turn to Mr. Des Rosiers, who is in charge of this file.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Maybe I'll just add that the purpose of that consultation is precisely to see the views of Canadians and parliamentarians, should they have views in terms of what should be involved or not. There are lots of definitions out there.

In Europe, they have adopted some model within the European Commission. The commissioner actually referenced the multiplicity of definitions present and captured it in that consultation paper, which is fairly thorough.

The government wants to have that open dialogue with Canadians to seek their views on it.

Michael Horgan, former deputy minister of finance is involved in this consultation. He's a very respected senior official. Their work has just been kicked off recently. We look forward to hearing Canadians' views.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Moving on then, there was a brief discussion of electric vehicles. Mr. Schmale tried to make the point about how expensive they are for the average Canadian. From the studies I've seen, if you take into account the very little money you spend maintaining them and fuelling them, it works out to be about the same.

My first question is, because I have the figure of $10 million written down here and I fear it might be low, how much money is in the budget for building charging infrastructure across the country? Is it $10 million or $100 million?

(1655)

Ms. Cheri Crosby:

According to the budget 2019 announcement, there was an additional $435 million, of which $130 million comes to NRCan over five years, with $10 million this year.

Our package in terms of building the infrastructure will be closer to $130 million over the five years, but in the main estimates this year, it will show up as $10 million.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Getting back to my point, we have to be bold with this. By my calculations, $10 million will build about 100 charging stations if they're the fast-charging stations that people would want. We're already getting reports in cities like Vancouver of people waiting a long time because there are.... If you can imagine, 100 gas pumps across Canada wouldn't fuel too many cars.

I would urge the government to put more effort into that department. That said, I'm glad there are charging stations out there now. If I did buy an electric car now, I think I could get around my riding with that.

Coming back to the retrofits, I wanted to try to get some more clarity on that about this new program. FCM, Federation of Canadian Municipalities, has now been given $300 million for home retrofits for private homes.

How can Canadians get involved in that? Do they have to contact FCM? Do their own municipalities have to get involved? If they're not in a municipality, how can they access that? Is it this year, or is it last year? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

If I may, Mr. Chair, I will give a partial answer before I hand over to Mr. Khosla.

Your first concern is correct, Mr. Cannings. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities, or FCM, is a national voice and has been our partner since 1901. So we are used to working with that partner. It is established in large cities, but also in small municipalities and rural communities. We are going to be working with 19 provincial and territorial associations responsible for reaching out not only to the major centres, but also to small towns and rural municipalities.

The envelope even includes an amount for community action and for work with not-for-profit organizations in small communities so that investments can be made in public buildings. The FCM and its affiliates therefore allow us to ensure that the program will not simply be deployed only in major urban centres.

I will now give Mr. Khosla the floor so that he can explain the program itself. [English]

The Chair:

Very, very quickly.

Mr. Jay Khosla (Assistant Deputy Minister, Energy Sector, Department of Natural Resources):

Okay.

I don't have a whole lot more to add, but to come to the question of retrofits and whether there are residential retrofits contained within...first of all, there's $1 billion that's going to the FCM.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Oh, I know. There's $300 million for residential retrofits.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

I would say it's closer to $600 million.

We can come back on the figure, but there is retrofit money in there and it's going directly to housing.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm more concerned with how that rolls out to people who don't live in Montreal or Vancouver.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

I understand—

The Chair:

I'm going to have to interrupt.

I gave you some of that three minutes you got last time but didn't think you did.

Mr. Graham, it's over to you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you'd cut me off with three minutes left to hand it over to Mr. Whalen, I'd appreciate it.

The Chair:

Okay, no problem. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question for you, Ms. Tremblay.

Vote 35 is to “support a new critical cyber systems framework to protect Canada's critical infrastructure against cyber threats, including in the finance, telecommunications, energy and transport sectors”. Could you tell us a little more about what you are doing? What is Natural Resources Canada's cyber security plan?

I will let you choose who will answer.

(1700)

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Your question is about cyber security, correct?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. A little more than $800,000 is identified for that and I would like to know what the plans are.

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

You ask an excellent question.

Cyber security is more and more of a concern. Being responsible for a country's energy infrastructure means that it is very important to be on the cutting-edge of cyber security. This is a major concern in our relations, not only with the United States, because a huge amount of infrastructure crosses our border, but also with our partner in Mexico.

We are working with our partners in the private sector, meaning the major public utilities, electricity associations, and oil and gas companies, because pipelines are now the target of attacks. We were recently in discussion with mining sector representatives, who told us that their strategic data had been attacked. Such attacks may well become more common as our economy becomes more and more digitally based.

Canada has minerals, rare ores and metals like lithium that generate a lot of interest. So this is a natural resources sector that we have to protect.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I do not have a lot of time left.

Can I ask you which form this is taking? Are we talking about developers or our own cyber security experts? Are we subsidizing companies that want to work on cyber security?

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

I will start before I give the floor to my colleague, Mr. Khosla.

These are principally investments in critical infrastructures in order to strengthen their resilience. We are also working with our partners, industry and associations, to ensure that we can respond to this concern. Finally, specific amounts are set aside for our work with our American partner.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

I would just like to add that the government wishes to introduce a bill to oversee, and tighten its collaboration with, the industry. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there time left for Mr. Whalen?

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds left until the three-minute mark.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take it back later.

The Chair:

All right.

Mr. Whalen, are you going to use the rest of the time?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Yes. Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

On the notion of spending $130 million on charging stations over five years, I was at a local hockey rink on the weekend in Paradise, in part of my riding of St. John's East in Newfoundland. It's a neighbouring community. They had a couple of charging stations out front that are fairly new, but they're already deteriorating from weather and salt in the parking lots.

When I was knocking on doors on the weekend, I met a constituent who was concerned. He wanted to buy an electric vehicle, but they live in a multi-unit dwelling and his parking spot is in a parking lot next to the building. He's concerned that even if he spends the money to have his own charging station installed next to his spot, the plow would knock it or it would get damaged.

What type of money within this envelope is there for operation, maintenance and repair of these assets? Who owns the assets? Is there going to be any sort of comparative analysis done across multiple vendors of these? Are you going to sole-source to a single vendor, or are you going to take this opportunity to do a consumer advocacy piece where you could test and measure hundreds of different suppliers against each other to see whose units last longer and whose are more resilient? What type of work is this and how does this relate to other departments in terms of national building code development around the residential installation of these units? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

That is an excellent question.

An amount of $76 million over six years has been devoted to demonstration projects of the next-generation recharging stations, to make sure that they are resilient and stand up to our Canadian climate.

Mr. Des Rosiers can tell you more about some of those projects.

(1705)

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I mentioned some of the technologies that have been developed.[English]

You're referring to some of the multi-residential units. This was actually one of the market-based focus areas that we heard about. There was not actually a solution that was robust enough to meet our needs.

You mentioned the issues around weather, but there are also challenges around high voltage. As you know, the tendency among users and manufacturers is to go with fast-charging units, which can have an impact in terms of not only the battery system but also the electrical systems, affecting both homes and commercial entities or larger operators. This was also a clear area of focus.

In terms of the details of the implementation of the program, which is the second element of your question, I don't know if the deputy or Jay may wish to elaborate on that.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

Yes, I'm happy to. That is a great question.

As you know, we have already had previous experience with this. In 2016-17, we received about $180 million to administer the first stage. We're into the second stage now. Through that, we've actually deployed 532 fast chargers around the country. We have about 1,000 that need to go to that, and then the second stage, as the deputy mentioned, is more residential, municipal and local.

As a result of that, we know what's out there in terms of technology. We know the kinds of firms that are out there. It's a competitive process that we enter into to do all of this. We will continue to do that, but we've gained a very good understanding of what some of the best firms are within the industry and continue to pursue that.

I would say that's pretty good for the Government of Canada to roll out with that many charging stations so quickly. I'm sorry to toot our own horn, but I'm really proud of the fact that we're moving so quickly in this space.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Who maintains these systems now that they're deployed? How much of this money is directed to O and M? Are consumers going to be given this information? You've done all this research. It would be great if it were made available to the purchasing public.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

Very rapidly, it is a private sector exercise. We do go to the best firms that we possibly can, but it's a competitive thing. It's not up to the government to maintain. We're working with the private sector on that. I think that makes sense.

Yes, we can make the information available. We do have good websites that are up and running, and people can access some of our information. I'm happy to provide other information to the committee as they need it.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Chair.

Thanks to all the officials for being available for us today.

I have a question about the transition as a result of Bill C-69.

The 2019-20 estimates show an allocation of $3.7 million under vote 5 for the purpose of disbanding Canada's world-leading and historically renowned National Energy Board and replacing it with the new Canadian energy regulator. Since the allotment for that transition is already here even before the bill has become law, I'm hoping that, if possible, you can tell us exactly how long it will take to completely establish the proposed Canadian energy regulator and what year that will be complete, given, of course, the certainty that will be required for investors or proponents of major resource projects. What is the timeline of that transition?

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Chair, it's a good question, and, as I already mentioned in front of the Senate committee, I believe the implementation will be very crucial if we want to meet the expectations of the industry, so we are already preparing for the transition. It's difficult to have a specific game plan since the bill is not passed yet and is still under discussion, but I can assure you that the agency, the NEB, and all the departments are preparing for the transition. In our case, we received some money to develop a platform and offered to share the science for the impact assessment. There is an emerging concern above all about the cumulative effects, and we are in charge of developing the platform that's going to address this.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay. That's interesting. Canada, of course, for decades has been noted as a world leader in terms of measuring the cumulative effects of responsible ownership. That's good.

(1710)

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

If in the coming days or weeks you do end up having any details regarding my specific question, it would be great if you could provide those to all of us.

The 2018 fall fiscal update said the now taxpayer-owned Trans Mountain expansion is on track to earn $200 million annually, but internal documents, as you probably know, indicate that annual interest payments for the $1-billion loans the government took out to pay for it could be costing $255 million per year. That's a $55-million difference. I wonder if you're able to confirm the size of the loans the Government of Canada is liable for related to the Trans Mountain expansion and what the monthly cost to carry those loans is.

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Chair, it's the finance department that is in charge of this.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay.

As you know, on February 22, 2019, the National Energy Board recommended again the approval of the Trans Mountain expansion in the national interest of Canada. The supplementary estimates (B) for 2018-19 show $6 million allocated for the NEB's 22-week reconsideration. Of course, an option for the government at that time, which Conservatives suggested, was emergency retroactive legislation to affirm that the Transport Canada assessment of tanker traffic as a result of the Trans Mountain expansion was sufficient, and the government could have done that, which did feed into the original recommendation by the NEB of approval of the Trans Mountain expansion. Of course, in the 22-week-long redundant duplicative reconsideration of the NEB, they had to appoint two experts from Transport Canada to do that part since Transport Canada is the jurisdiction responsible for that area. Of course, exactly the same information was reviewed; exactly the same mitigation measures were reviewed, and exactly the same recommendation for approval was made from the NEB reconsideration.

Can you tell me if there ever was a cost-benefit analysis done internally to determine the best option for Canadians between emergency retroactive legislation to affirm Transport Canada's original analysis and this 22-week-long NEB reconsideration?

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Chair, the government made a decision to follow the advice of the Federal Court of Appeal and to ask the NEB to do the review of the marine and to redo the phase three consultations.

The Chair:

Thank you. We're out of time.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay, if you find out if there was a cost assessment, that would be great, too.

The Chair:

Mr. Tan, you're last up.

Mr. Geng Tan (Don Valley North, Lib.):

Thank you. It's five minutes, right?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Geng Tan:

I have only one question, so if there is time left, I am willing to share with my colleagues.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'm right over here.

Mr. Geng Tan:

In the main estimates there is funding to AECL to be used as support to nuclear R and D and waste management in Canada.

Having worked in nuclear myself for almost 10 years, I have deep respect for Canada's nuclear talents and our nuclear legacy. Our CANDU R and D has been at the leading edge, for sure, of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in the world. We have nuclear reactors generating electricity to meet the needs of Canadians in Ontario, in New Brunswick and formerly in Quebec.

Right now, the reactor in Quebec has been closed, and the Pickering station will be decommissioned quickly. The chance that they'll have a new build with the CANDU design in the foreseeable future is very low, if I am correct. There is a strong probability that our Canadian nuclear capacity in the future will be significantly impacted.

I use one example. The United Kingdom's experience shows how, in a very similar situation, it lost its ability to design and supply reactors and is now dependent only on importing the design and the equipment.

I wonder what your vision is for the future of nuclear research and the nuclear industry in Canada. Do you see it moving in a positive direction or not?

Thank you.

(1715)

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Chairman, I am very pleased that the member is raising a question on this sector.

For sure, now the nuclear sector is part of the energy mix of this country. He raised that we have expertise. We have a lot of energy coming from that source. The government is investing this year in AECL. Just in this budget it's $1.2 billion.

As a country and as a department, we have a full unit working on that sector in particular. We did a lot of work in the last year on new technology, for example, SMRs that can be used for remote communities, where Canada can have a leading edge, a competitive advantage.

Perhaps I can pass to my colleague, Mr. Khosla, who is in charge of this sector, who can give you some of the progress we've made and maybe address your question about decommissioning and waste management.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

Yes, there are a lot of questions embedded within that primary question of whether there is a future for nuclear.

I could spend a bit of time, but we're very cognizant, as the deputy said, of the fact that Canada is a tier one nuclear nation, and that is really important for the country of Canada.

We're also mindful of the CANDU technology that we have developed here, homegrown, just as we are with every other form of energy that we've developed here. We have been working very hard around the world internationally with the vendors to try to find whether there is uptake in various other countries.

We know that China is growing massively in this area, as is India. We continue to do that. We partner with some other countries, for example, to try to find other markets in Argentina and so on and so forth.

That is a quick answer on CANDU.

The $1.2 billion in the labs is exactly right. That is a huge investment for this government to make sure that the R and D is protected, that the IP is protected and that we're moving forward. I can say lots more on that. I won't at this moment, recognizing the time.

I would say that in terms of SMRs, if you want to talk about the future, really we're seeing a lot of activity in this space right now, and it is in some ways not surprising but in many ways refreshing to see that the world is coming to Canada for a potential play on SMRs, small modular reactors.

That primarily could help the north, we think. We're looking at that. We did a road map, a year-long exercise. We consulted Canadians, and in that road map we found that Canada is one of the best places to do it. We have one project before the regulator, the CNSC, that is going through right now. We have nine proposals.

New York came calling the other day. We went to New York to talk to Bloomberg because they're interested in investing, so I would encourage this committee to continue to look at that element.

The last thing I would say—and there is lots more, as I said—is let's not forget that we have uranium supplies here, too. When it comes to a one-stop shop for nuclear, we have some good things to say, but waste and cost are big issues and we have to get our heads around them in this country, and so does the world. We're working hard toward that end as well.

I hope that's a helpful answer.

The Chair:

It's a good thing you didn't have two questions. That's all your time.

He is out of time. I don't like to be difficult, but I think we need to move on. I think that's all the time we have for witnesses.

We do have some voting to do on the estimates, which will take anywhere from two to 10 minutes depending on the level and spirit of co-operation around the table. I wasn't looking in any particular direction when I said that, Mr. Schmale, just so we're clear.

Thank you very much for taking the time to be here today and answering all our questions. Nobody stumped you on areas of expertise.

We'll suspend briefly.

(1715)

(1720)

The Chair:

We are back on the record.

For the record, Mr. Schmale was sitting in his seat first, to my left. To my right, nobody left their seat.

We now have to vote on the estimates. We have two choices. We can vote on them collectively if we get unanimous consent, or we can vote on them individually if we don't.

Now I am looking to my left, Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Ted Falk:

It's on division for everything.

The Chair:

Okay. I anticipated that. ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA LIMITED ç Vote 1—Payments to the corporation for operating and capital expenditures..........$1,197,282,026

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) CANADIAN NUCLEAR SAFETY COMMISSION ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$39,136,248

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$563,825,825 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$13,996,000 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$471,008,564 ç Vote 15—Encouraging Canadians to Use Zero Emission Vehicles..........$10,034,967 ç Vote 20—Engaging Indigenous Communities in Major Resource Projects..........$12,801,946 ç Vote 25—Ensuring Better Disaster Management Preparation and Response..........$11,090,650 ç Vote 30—Improving Canadian Energy Information..........$1,674,737 ç Vote 35—Protecting Canada's Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Threats..........$808,900 ç Vote 40—Strong Arctic and Northern Communities..........$6,225,524

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 agreed to on division) NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$82,536,499 ç Vote 5—Canadian Energy Regulator Transition Costs..........$3,670,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division) NORTHERN PIPELINE AGENCY ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$1,055,000

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report vote 1 under Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, vote 1 under Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 under Natural Resources, votes 1 and 5 under National Energy Board and vote 1 under Northern Pipeline Agency to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: That is all of our business for today.

Thursday we have the delegation of German parliamentarians coming in. We have no formal meeting, but we're meeting with them in conjunction with the trade committee. I understand that most of you have already agreed to attend. Let's hope everybody can make it. We don't have the room assignment yet.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Jubilee Jackson):

It's room 025B, next door.

The Chair:

Room 025B, next door, at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday.

Mr. Whalen has a question.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Ms. Stubbs raised an issue about scheduling the June 20 meeting to receive....

We might be able to deal with that right now.

The Chair:

I was going to suggest we deal with it on Tuesday, actually. Tuesday is the last scheduled day for this current study. I think it's only for an hour. We could deal with it then.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, I like Tuesday better.

The Chair:

Tuesday is better. That gets us out of here.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It gives them more time to know what's happening.

The Chair:

It gives people some time to think about it, and it gets us out of here right now, too.

On that note, thank you everybody.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Je vous remercie de vous joindre à nous. Je suis désolé pour ce changement de salle de dernière minute. Il y a semble-t-il des problèmes techniques dans l'autre salle qui ont fait en sorte que nous avons dû nous déplacer, mais nous sommes tous ici maintenant. Tout s'est bien réglé grâce à notre greffière et à tous ceux qui ont fait en sorte que ce changement se fasse rapidement.

Cet après-midi, conformément au paragraphe 81(4) du Règlement, nous examinons le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020: crédit 1 sous la rubrique Énergie atomique du Canada limitée; crédit 1 sous la rubrique Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire; crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 et 40 sous la rubrique Ressources naturelles; crédits 1 et 5 sous la rubrique Office national de l'énergie et crédit 1 sous la rubrique Administration du pipeline du Nord. Tout cela a été renvoyé au Comité le jeudi 11 avril 2019.

Monsieur le ministre, je veux d'abord vous remercier de prendre le temps de comparaître devant nous aujourd'hui. Nous savons tous que vous êtes extrêmement occupé. Nous vous sommes toujours reconnaissants de prévoir dans votre horaire du temps pour témoigner devant le Comité. Je tiens aussi à souhaiter la bienvenue à vos collègues.

Vous savez tous comment nous fonctionnons, alors je n'ai pas besoin de vous l'expliquer. Je vais donc vous céder la parole. Après votre exposé, nous allons passer aux questions.

Monsieur le ministre, la parole est à vous. Je vous remercie.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi (ministre des Ressources naturelles):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour à tous.

Je suis très heureux d'être de nouveau ici. Je parlerai des investissements importants faits par notre gouvernement dans les domaines de la foresterie, de l'exploitation minière et de l'énergie depuis octobre 2015, ainsi que de la façon dont nous pouvons continuer d'investir dans l'avenir des secteurs des ressources naturelles du Canada. C'est un moment très important pour les secteurs des ressources naturelles et, surtout, pour les travailleurs canadiens.

Comme nous le savons tous, les besoins énergétiques de la planète sont en train de changer. Les pays cherchent de plus en plus à importer des produits provenant de sources durables. Il y a un consensus croissant sur la nécessité de prendre des mesures immédiates et durables relativement aux changements climatiques. Certains peuvent choisir de ne pas tenir compte de ces changements, de garder la tête dans le sable et d'espérer pour le mieux, mais ce n'est pas la façon de faire du Canada. Nous sommes des innovateurs.

N'oublions pas que ce sont les Canadiens qui ont découvert la façon d'obtenir du pétrole des sables bitumineux. Ce sont les Canadiens qui ont créé la première mine d'or entièrement alimentée en électricité par batterie. De plus, ce sont les Canadiens, qui, les premiers, ont construit la plus grande maison passive en Amérique du Nord.

Alors, comment allons-nous nous préparer pour l'avenir tout en répondant aux besoins d'aujourd'hui?

Cela commence par l'écoute. En 2015, les Canadiens ont clairement indiqué que la protection de l'environnement et la croissance de l'économie ne pouvaient plus être considérées par le gouvernement comme étant des objectifs opposés.

Dans le cadre de Génération Énergie, plus de 380 000 travailleurs et chefs de file des domaines de l'énergie renouvelable, des technologies propres et du pétrole et du gaz, des municipalités, des dirigeants autochtones et des Canadiens ont aidé à élaborer l'idée de ce à quoi notre avenir énergétique pourrait ressembler et de la façon d'y arriver. Nous avons écouté et nous avons pris des mesures pour obtenir des résultats pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne et ceux qui travaillent dur pour rejoindre la classe moyenne.

Nous avons attiré de nouveaux investissements, prolongé le crédit d'impôt pour l'exploration minière de cinq ans, la première prolongation pluriannuelle, et dévoilé un plan qui fait du Canada un chef de file mondial incontesté du secteur minier. Nous avons créé des dizaines de milliers d'emplois en fournissant les minéraux qui stimuleront l'économie à croissance propre.

Nous réimaginons le secteur forestier afin que nos vastes forêts continuent de jouer un rôle essentiel dans notre économie, non seulement ici, au Canada, mais partout dans le monde.

Grâce à notre investissement de plus de 1 milliard de dollars dans l'efficacité énergétique, nous aidons les Canadiens à économiser de l'argent sur leur facture d'énergie tout en combattant les changements climatiques.

Nous bâtissons notre avenir énergétique en nous concentrant sur l'expansion de nos sources d'énergies renouvelables, en obtenant l'accès aux marchés mondiaux et en rendant nos ressources traditionnelles, comme le pétrole et le gaz, plus durables que jamais.

La poursuite de ce travail et le fait de s'appuyer sur nos progrès à ce jour constituent le tableau d'ensemble de notre Budget principal des dépenses. Cela reflète une grande partie de ce que vous avez étudié dans le cadre de votre travail en tant que comité parlementaire et les recommandations précieuses que vous avez fournies à notre gouvernement. Je tiens à vous remercier pour votre travail au nom des Canadiens.

Le financement contenu dans le Budget principal des dépenses de cette année appuiera notre ministère alors que nous relevons les défis qui se trouvent devant nous, mais aussi alors que nous voulons saisir les possibilités à venir. Le financement vise ceci: faire progresser l'utilisation de nouvelles technologies propres dans le secteur des ressources; aider les collectivités autochtones éloignées du Nord à réduire leur dépendance à l'égard du diesel; combattre l'épidémie de tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette au moyen d'une intervention précoce et étendre notre appui aux nombreuses collectivités touchées par les droits de douane injustifiés visant l'industrie du bois d'œuvre.

Ce financement nous donnera également les fonds nécessaires pour mettre en œuvre les principaux piliers du budget de 2019. Cela comprend de nouveaux investissements pour encourager un plus grand nombre de Canadiens à acheter des véhicules à émission zéro; faire participer les collectivités autochtones dans de grands projets de ressources naturelles; améliorer nos données sur l'énergie, une étude clé de votre comité, et améliorer notre capacité de nous préparer et de réagir aux catastrophes, qui exigent de plus en plus des mesures fédérales.

(1540)



Comme je l'ai fait remarquer au début de mon exposé, c'est un moment charnière dans l'histoire de notre pays, qui comporte son lot de difficultés, qu'il s'agisse de l'augmentation de la capacité des pipelines dans l'Ouest, du fait de se défendre contre les mesures protectionnistes de notre voisin du Sud ou des changements dans l'ensemble de notre économie et dans toutes les régions de notre pays.

Le taux de chômage au Canada est à son plus bas depuis 40 ans, mais nous devons garder à l'esprit les Canadiens qui sont inquiets au sujet de leur avenir. Dans ma province, l'Alberta, nous avons constaté des défis constants pour de nombreux travailleurs en raison de la fluctuation des prix des produits de base. Notre gouvernement voit tous ces défis et nous les affrontons directement.

C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons annoncé un plan d'action de 1,6 milliard de dollars pour appuyer les travailleurs et accroître la compétitivité de nos secteurs pétrolier et gazier. C'est la raison pour laquelle également notre gouvernement fournit jusqu'à 2 milliards de dollars pour répondre aux tarifs américains qui menacent les Canadiens qui travaillent dans les secteurs de l'acier et de l'aluminium. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous servons des 867 millions de dollars obtenus par l'entremise de notre plan d'action du bois d'œuvre pour continuer d'appuyer le secteur forestier dans le budget de 2019.

C'est la raison pour laquelle aussi nous fournissons 150 millions de dollars pour assurer une transition équitable pour les travailleurs et les collectivités touchés par l'élimination progressive de l'électricité produite par les centrales au charbon. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous améliorons la façon dont nous prenons les décisions sur de grands projets, de sorte que tous les Canadiens aient confiance dans les examens qui sont effectués. Nous veillons à pouvoir faire progresser les projets d'édification de la nation qui contribueront à la croissance de notre économie, sans mettre en péril notre santé, notre environnement ou les collectivités.

De plus, c'est également la raison pour laquelle nous avons fait le travail nécessaire pour respecter la décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale sur le projet proposé d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain. Même si cette décision a été une déception pour beaucoup de personnes, elle a fourni des directives claires sur la façon dont le processus pourrait aller de l'avant de la bonne façon et dans un contexte précis et ciblé.

Même si certaines personnes ont fait valoir que nous devrions faire fi de ces directives, ne pas tenir compte de la cour et répondre à l'aide de longs appels conçus de façon à éviter nos obligations envers l'environnement et les peuples autochtones, notre gouvernement a choisi la voie responsable et plus efficace. Nous avons ordonné à l'Office national de l'énergie d'effectuer un examen du transport maritime et nous nous engageons à effectuer la phase trois des consultations de la bonne façon.

Ce travail important est en cours. Le rapport de l'Office national de l'énergie a été livré à temps, le 22 février. Parallèlement, nos équipes de consultation ont travaillé avec acharnement sur la phase trois des consultations. Ces équipes, qui ont presque doublé par rapport à leur taille originale, ont participé à un dialogue bilatéral significatif visant à discuter des priorités des collectivités autochtones et à les comprendre ainsi qu'à offrir des mesures d'adaptation adaptées, le cas échéant. J'ai aussi personnellement rencontré de nombreuses collectivités autochtones pour les aider à établir des relations fondées sur la confiance.

Notre travail à ce jour nous a placés dans la solide position que nous occupons aujourd'hui pour effectuer ce processus pour tous les Canadiens. Notre travail sur le projet Trans Mountain, nos investissements historiques dans l'énergie solaire, l'énergie éolienne, l'énergie géothermique et d'autres formes d'énergie, ainsi que notre engagement à l'égard de l'innovation et de l'élaboration de nouvelles technologies jettent les fondements pour un Canada fort, tant aujourd'hui que demain.

Monsieur le président, notre gouvernement voit que nos industries des ressources naturelles jouent un rôle clé dans la stimulation de la croissance d'une économie propre au Canada. De plus, nous apprécions l'expertise et l'expérience du ministère des Ressources naturelles et la volonté de tous les Canadiens de nous aider à y arriver.

Le Budget principal des dépenses est un versement initial sur l'avenir du Canada, un avenir dont nos enfants hériteront avec fierté et qu'ils mettront à profit avec confiance, un avenir qui continuera de créer de bons emplois bien rémunérés pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne ainsi que pour les générations à venir.

Maintenant, je répondrai volontiers à vos questions.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre, pour votre exposé.

La parole est d'abord à l'honorable Kent Hehr.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie beaucoup pour votre présence. Vous avez expliqué que les Albertains ont découvert la façon d'obtenir du pétrole des sables bitumineux. C'est en 1975 que le premier ministre Peter Lougheed, le premier ministre Bill Davis et notre gouvernement libéral ont investi dans l'exploitation des sables bitumineux. En 1997, le premier ministre Klein et ensuite le premier ministre Chrétien ont investi dans les sables bitumineux afin d'accroître leur exploitation.

Vous avez mentionné à juste titre l'achat du pipeline Trans Mountain, mais dans ma circonscription, celle de Calgary-Centre, de nombreuses sociétés pétrolières et des travailleurs du secteur de l'énergie ne cessent de me poser des questions à propos de la compétitivité de l'industrie. Ils craignent un possible effet de stratification des divers règlements environnementaux, qui risquent de rendre notre industrie pétrolière et gazière moins compétitive. Nous voulons nous assurer que le Canada soit le fournisseur de choix pour le pétrole et le gaz dans le monde. Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer de protéger notre environnement tout en demeurant compétitifs à l'échelle mondiale?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je remercie beaucoup le député pour sa question.

Comme vous le savez, nous avons annoncé à Calgary la semaine dernière du financement pour une nouvelle technologie très prometteuse utilisée pour tester un prototype de système de production d'énergie géothermique. Lorsqu'on discute avec des entreprises de la sorte, on constate qu'elles savent que si elles parviennent à commercialiser cette technologie, on pourra créer 40 000 emplois dans l'Ouest canadien, principalement pour des personnes qui travaillent actuellement dans le secteur pétrolier, notamment dans le forage. Nous investissons dans de nouvelles technologies et dans le secteur traditionnel du pétrole et du gaz afin de le rendre plus propre et plus écologique grâce aux dispositions visant la déduction pour amortissement accéléré, que nous avons annoncées dans l'énoncé économique de l'automne dernier ainsi qu'aux 100 millions de dollars prévus dans le budget de 2019 pour favoriser la collaboration et l'innovation au sein du secteur pétrolier et gazier.

Je peux vous citer un certain nombre de mesures qui visent à rendre notre secteur de l'énergie compétitif. Nous allons continuer de surveiller ce secteur pour nous assurer qu'il demeure compétitif. Nous voulons faire en sorte que notre secteur pétrolier et gazier et notre secteur des énergies renouvelables demeurent une source d'emplois bien rémunérés pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne au cours des prochaines décennies. Nous allons veiller à continuer d'offrir du soutien.

(1550)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je crois savoir que les consultations et l'examen relatifs au projet Trans Mountain se poursuivent. J'ai vu qu'on a annoncé que la période des consultations sera à nouveau prolongée. Pourriez-vous faire le point à ce sujet?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous avons huit équipes composées de 60 personnes, des professionnels qui ont procédé à un dialogue significatif avec des collectivités autochtones au cours des derniers mois. Durant ces consultations, des collectivités autochtones ont demandé que la période prévue pour les consultations soit prolongée. Pour accéder à cette demande raisonnable, nous avons prolongé de trois semaines la période des consultations. Cette semaine, nous avons fait parvenir à toutes les collectivités avec lesquelles nous avons discuté une copie du rapport provisoire sur la consultation et l'accommodement de la Couronne. Les collectivités sont maintenant en mesure de formuler des commentaires au sujet de ce rapport provisoire. Nous voulons nous assurer qu'elles disposent de suffisamment de temps pour le lire et l'analyser, afin de nous donner de bons commentaires.

Notre objectif est de prendre une décision au sujet du projet d'ici le 18 juin. Vu le bon déroulement des choses, je pense que nous serons en mesure d'atteindre cet objectif.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

L'accès aux marchés est la clé, monsieur le ministre. Si nous allons de l'avant correctement avec le projet Trans Mountain, et bien entendu avec la canalisation 3 d'Enbridge et, je l'espère, avec Keystone XL, pensez-vous que ce sera suffisant pour acheminer le pétrole de l'Alberta à court et à moyen termes?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Eh bien, nous savons tous — des membres du Comité l'ont souligné à de nombreuses reprises —, ainsi que les Albertains, que les gens qui travaillent dans le secteur de l'énergie comprennent bien que la capacité insuffisante des pipelines coûte des emplois à l'économie. Cela prive le secteur d'une croissance potentielle. C'est pourquoi, dès que nous avons pris le pouvoir, nous nous sommes concentrés sur l'accroissement de la capacité des pipelines.

C'est notre gouvernement qui a approuvé le gazoduc de Nova Gas, qui est construit en Alberta. C'est notre gouvernement qui a approuvé la canalisation 3 d'Enbridge, dont la construction au Canada est presque terminée. Nous travaillons avec le gouvernement américain pour aplanir certaines des difficultés qui existent aux États-Unis. Je me suis rendu à Houston pour faire valoir auprès du secrétaire Perry la construction du pipeline Keystone XL.

Nous allons continuer de travailler avec le secteur privé afin d'atteindre notre but commun, qui consiste à aller de l'avant avec ce projet, et nous nous sommes fermement engagés à adopter la bonne approche pour que le processus relatif au projet d'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain se déroule bien. C'est notre gouvernement qui a investi 4,5 milliards de dollars au moment où ce projet aurait pu être abandonné en raison de l'incertitude qui existait à ce moment-là.

(1555)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Vous avez discuté avec des sociétés pétrolières, et je sais que Suncor, Synova, CNRL et d'autres sociétés comme celles-là appuyaient fortement l'idée de la tarification de la pollution. Elles comprenaient bien que les changements climatiques sont une réalité et que nous devons faire partie de la solution.

Lorsque vous discutez avec les sociétés pétrolières, est-ce qu'elles tiennent toujours le même discours? Est-ce qu'elles comprennent qu'il est nécessaire d'aller de l'avant avec cette mesure?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Lorsque nous discutons avec nos partenaires du secteur de l'énergie, ils nous disent qu'ils comprennent tout à fait qu'il n'y a pas lieu de choisir entre l'économie et l'environnement, car nous pouvons choisir les deux. Nous pouvons protéger l'environnement et nous pouvons continuer à faire croître l'économie tout en veillant à inclure les collectivités autochtones parmi nos partenaires, afin qu'elles puissent participer au processus et profiter en même temps des débouchés économiques qu'offrent ces projets.

Le président:

Monsieur le ministre, vous allez devoir vous arrêter là. Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Schmale, je crois savoir que vous allez partager votre temps de parole avec Mme Stubbs, est-ce exact?

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

C'est exact.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, pour votre présence. Je vous suis reconnaissant de témoigner devant le Comité. J'ai beaucoup de questions à poser, comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, alors je vais essayer d'être bref. Si vous pouviez répondre brièvement à mes questions, je pourrai en poser le plus grand nombre possible.

Ma première question concerne le pipeline Trans Mountain. La Cour d'appel fédérale a dit ceci: « Les préoccupations des demandeurs autochtones communiquées au Canada sont précises et circonscrites, et le dialogue auquel le Canada est tenu peut être [...] bref et efficace... ».

Entre les mois d'octobre et février, l'Office national de l'énergie a tenu de vastes consultations auprès de collectivités autochtones, dans le cadre desquelles il a notamment entendu des témoignages de vive voix dans de nombreuses villes en Alberta et en Colombie-Britannique. Les tribunaux n'ont jamais remis en question le processus de consultation de l'Office.

Vous avez dit que vous visez le 18 juin. Comment les Canadiens peuvent-ils avoir confiance que ce délai sera respecté, étant donné que jusqu'à maintenant aucun des délais fixés n'a été respecté?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Premièrement, par votre entremise, monsieur le président, j'aimerais répondre que la Cour fédérale a souligné deux problèmes dans le jugement qu'elle a rendu le 30 août 2018. Le premier est le fait de ne pas avoir mené un examen de la sécurité maritime liée à la circulation des pétroliers. C'est un processus que l'Office national de l'énergie avait entrepris, au terme duquel il a décidé de recommander d'approuver le projet.

L'autre problème concerne les consultations avec les Autochtones menées par mon ministère. Dès le début, nous avons dit clairement que notre objectif était de bien faire les choses à cet égard, alors nous n'avons jamais fixé un délai pour la fin des consultations. Nous avons toujours dit que nous allons prendre une décision lorsque nous estimerons que nous nous serons adéquatement acquittés de notre obligation constitutionnelle de tenir des consultations en bonne et due forme avec les collectivités autochtones. Compte tenu du travail qui a été fait, nous nous sommes donné comme objectif de prendre une décision d'ici le 18 juin.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

En repoussant la décision au 18 juin... Le premier ministre a fait savoir au premier ministre Kenney, le 18 avril, qu'il avait besoin seulement de deux autres semaines pour terminer les consultations avec les communautés autochtones. Bien entendu, il faudra plus de deux semaines. Pouvez-vous confirmer que les travaux commenceront cet été?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous avons prolongé de trois semaines la période des consultations à la demande des collectivités autochtones. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une demande raisonnable de la part de nos partenaires. C'est le cabinet qui devra prendre une décision, et je ne peux pas déterminer à l'avance quelle sera cette décision. Une fois que la décision aura été prise, la prochaine étape s'enclenchera.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord. J'ai d'autres questions à poser, mais je dois céder la parole à Mme Stubbs.

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Monsieur le ministre, ce qui est préoccupant à mon avis, c'est que le juge, dans la décision, a dit précisément que le processus de consultation corrigé peut être bref et efficace. Ce ne sera pas le cas, car vous avez prévenu très récemment que le délai du 18 juin pour la décision finale du cabinet ne sera pas respecté. C'est pourquoi nous posons ces questions.

L'Office national de l'énergie a affirmé à deux reprises qu'il est dans l'intérêt national d'aller de l'avant avec ce projet, s'appuyant sur deux évaluations scientifiques exhaustives et indépendantes de l'expansion du pipeline.

Vous avez déclaré l'année dernière que de ne pas aller de l'avant avec le projet Trans Mountain n'était pas une option. Le premier ministre a affirmé il y a 11 mois que le pipeline serait construit. Votre prédécesseur a expliqué que le gouvernement achetait le pipeline pour qu'on procède immédiatement à l'expansion. Le ministre des Finances a dit que le but était de le construire immédiatement. Le cabinet avait déjà approuvé le projet d'expansion.

Étant donné que nous accordons tous de la valeur à la recommandation formulée par cet organisme de réglementation indépendant, fondée sur l'avis d'experts ainsi que sur des données probantes et des données scientifiques, pouvez-vous confirmer que le cabinet approuvera le 18 juin le projet Trans Mountain et nous dire quand les travaux commenceront?

(1600)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je pense qu'il est important de savoir que, lorsque nous avons entrepris l'analyse du jugement de la cour, nous avons également demandé au juge Iacobucci, un ancien juge de la Cour suprême, de nous donner ses conseils afin de nous assurer de bien comprendre la directive de la cour, mais aussi toute décision qui sera prise dans l'avenir, et nous assurer que le processus puisse résister à une contestation fondée sur les engagements que nous avons pris en vertu des obligations constitutionnelles de la Couronne à l'égard des collectivités autochtones.

Mon objectif est de faire en sorte que le processus se déroule correctement et qu'on évite de tourner les coins ronds.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Vous confirmez que le Cabinet approuvera de nouveau le projet TMX. Bien.

Passons à un autre sujet. La semaine dernière, vous avez publiquement menacé d'inclure les projets de sables bitumineux in situ dans les listes de projets du projet de loi C-69. Il s'agissait d'une réaction politique à l'élection en Alberta. Bien entendu, je suis certaine que vous savez et sentez, aussi fortement que moi, à titre d'Albertain, que l'extraction du pétrole et l'exploitation des ressources en amont relèvent des compétences provinciales et que, bien entendu, une menace n'est efficace que si elle a une conséquence négative.

Maintenant que vous avez enfin admis ce que l'industrie, des économistes, des Premières Nations, des premiers ministres et d'autres groupes affirment depuis un an, c'est-à-dire que le projet de loi C-69 vise à nuire à l'exploitation pétrolière et gazière, vous engagerez-vous à rejeter cette mesure législative avant qu'il ne soit trop tard et à veiller à ce que les projets de sables bitumineux in situ ne soient pas soumis à l'examen du gouvernement fédéral?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, lors de la publication de l'ébauche de document de discussion relatif à la liste de projets, le gouvernement a précisé que les projets in situ seraient exclus de l'examen fédéral réalisé en vertu du projet de loi C-69 à condition que les émissions soient plafonnées dans la province où le projet est proposé. Nous avons clairement indiqué qu'au titre du cadre pancanadien sur la croissance propre et les changements climatiques, nous voulons être certains que le secteur pétrolier et gazier continue de croître de manière durable tout en pouvant continuer d'innover. Nous continuerons d'aider ce secteur à investir dans les nouvelles technologies propres. Il peut poursuivre sa croissance, mais en même temps, nous voulons nous assurer que les émissions sont contrôlées.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Vous risquez d'empiéter dans la sphère de compétences provinciale et de soumettre des projets de sables bitumineux de l'Alberta à un examen fédéral.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous souhaitons...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Cela fait sept minutes, monsieur le président.

Oui, mon temps est écoulé. C'était mon dernier commentaire.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

... collaborer avec le nouveau gouvernement.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Cannings, vous avez la parole.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci de témoigner aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre.

Je commencerai avec quelques questions de suivi. Lors de votre dernière comparution, je vous ai fait trois suggestions pour que vous envisagiez de les inclure dans le budget. Maintenant que j'ai vu le budget, je voulais faire le suivi à ce sujet.

L'une de ces questions concerne les rénovations domiciliaires. Nous savons tous que l'efficacité énergétique constitue un des meilleurs moyens de réduire l'empreinte des gaz à effet de serre au Canada. Au cours des législatures précédentes, le gouvernement conservateur a lancé un programme qui a connu un succès retentissant, soit celui d'écoÉnergie Rénovation, dont la dernière version a reçu 400 millions de dollars dans le budget de 2011. Ce programme a malheureusement été éliminé et n'a pas été rétabli par le présent gouvernement libéral. Premièrement, dans le cadre pancanadien, il semble que les rénovations aient été pelletées dans la cour des provinces. En outre, dans le présent budget, une somme de 300 millions de dollars est accordée aux municipalités par l'entremise de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités.

Je suis plutôt mêlé, et je trouve préoccupant que le gouvernement fédéral n'ait pas cru bon d'intervenir lui-même en faisant preuve du leadership que la population canadienne attend de lui. Avec quelque chose d'aussi sérieux que l'action pour le climat, il faut vraiment agir rapidement et oser. Il semble que nous ayons là un autre exemple de dossier que le gouvernement renvoie aux municipalités.

Me voilà mêlé. Dans le livre, ici, il est indiqué quelque part que les fonds doivent être dépensés au cours de l'exercice 2018-2019, alors qu'ailleurs, il faut le dépenser en 2019-2020. Ce n'est pas ce qui me préoccupe ici, mais cela ne fait qu'ajouter à la confusion.

Maintenant que les fonds ont été transférés — à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, je présume —, de combien de temps les municipalités disposeront-elles pour les dépenser? S'agit-il d'un financement annuel, comme la somme de 400 millions de dollars que les conservateurs avaient accordée? Les municipalités devront-elles signer une entente individuelle? Je ne vis pas dans une municipalité. Comment puis-je accéder à ce programme? Si nous avions agi à l'échelle nationale, ces questions n'auraient pas lieu d'être.

(1605)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je vous remercie de cette question, car nous pensons que l'efficacité énergétique est un moyen grâce auquel nous pouvons réduire l'impact des changements climatiques, rendre nos communautés plus résilientes et réduire les émissions.

Le transfert de 1 milliard de dollars auquel vous faites référence...

M. Richard Cannings:

Eh bien, c'est un montant de 300 millions de dollars destiné aux rénovations.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Une partie de ce financement va à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités. Il y a aussi un transfert de taxe sur l'essence que reçoivent directement les municipalités. Des fonds sont également disponibles pour l'efficacité énergétique, comme vous l'avez souligné, au titre des ententes bilatérales que nous avons conclues avec les provinces. À ce montant s'ajoutent 300 millions de dollars qui seront gérés par la Fédération canadienne des municipalités.

Nous tentons d'étoffer les mesures et non d'y faire double emploi. Nous essayons de veiller à ce que les programmes fonctionnent déjà efficacement. La Fédération canadienne des municipalités gère un fonds municipal vert depuis une décennie, voire plus longtemps. Nous ne faisons qu'appuyer le bon travail qu'elle accomplit.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je pense à ma circonscription, laquelle est principalement composée de petites communautés de 500 à 1 000 habitants qui ne disposent pas des ressources humaines et administratives pour gérer ces programmes toutes seules. Pourquoi transférez-vous ces responsabilités à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités au lieu de laisser le gouvernement fédéral les assumer?

Je dois maintenant continuer, car j'ai d'autres questions.

La dernière fois que j'ai posé cette question, je cherchais des manières dont le gouvernement fédéral pourrait appuyer l'industrie forestière, qui est en difficulté, comme vous le savez. Elle est toujours visée par les tarifs sur le bois d'oeuvre. Certaines usines de ma circonscription ont fermé leurs portes pendant certaines périodes ce printemps par souci d'économie, car elles subissent les contrecoups de la baisse des prix du bois d'oeuvre.

Lors de votre dernière comparution, j'ai proposé que le gouvernement fédéral accorde un financement audacieux afin d'aider et de protéger ces communautés et cette industrie. En Colombie-Britannique seulement, les incendies de forêt des deux dernières années ont coûté 1 milliard de dollars par année juste pour combattre les flammes, et peut-être 10 milliards de dollars pour composer avec les conséquences.

Les experts en forêt auxquels j'ai parlé ont proposé de dépenser 1 milliard de dollars par année en Colombie-Britannique afin d'atténuer ces effets. Le budget comprend divers petits programmes visant à aider l'industrie forestière, mais je n'y vois aucune initiative d'envergure qui permettrait d'assurer la sécurité des communautés situées en milieu forestier. Dans la plupart des communautés de la Colombie-Britannique, par exemple, et dans bien des communautés du pays où le gouvernement fédéral pourrait fournir du financement pour aider les provinces et les municipalités à élaguer la forêt dans les régions limitrophes, ces mesures pourraient alimenter les usines locales en fibres, fournir du travail et garder la population en sécurité.

Il y a quelques semaines, j'ai rencontré un groupe communautaire de ma circonscription, qui venait d'une des communautés les mieux protégées contre les incendies au Canada. Ces gens souhaitent désespérément obtenir toute l'aide possible du gouvernement. À l'heure actuelle, la communauté reçoit 500 $ par année. Si elle recevait 1 000 $ par an, les habitants seraient bien contents. C'est une toute petite communauté. Je me demande pourquoi je ne vois rien dans le budget qui pourrait aider de manière substantielle les communautés forestières à se protéger contre les incendies.

Le rapport Filmon proposait un montant pour la Colombie-Britannique, mais seulement 15 % ont été envoyés, alors que nous parlons de milliards de dollars ici.

Je me demande si nous pouvons espérer que dans l'avenir, le gouvernement fédéral interviendra et fera une contribution vraiment substantielle à cet égard.

(1610)

Le président:

Monsieur le ministre, il ne vous a pas laissé beaucoup de temps pour répondre à la question; je vous serais donc reconnaissant d'être très bref.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Oui. J'aurai plaisir à examiner les diverses communautés et les projets ou les idées que vous avez en tête.

Il y a quelques mois, j'ai parlé à tous mes homologues ministres des Forêts afin de constituer un groupe de travail mixte pour élaborer des propositions sur la manière dont nous pouvons nous attaquer ensemble à ces problèmes.

Je peux certainement assurer le suivi avec vous à ce sujet.

Le président:

Merci.

Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de témoigner, monsieur le ministre.

Lors de son intervention, M. Cannings en est presque venu à vous demander comment le gouvernement fédéral aide les communautés rurales et éloignées dans le présent budget.

J'examine le tableau A.2, qui concerne les paiements de transfert à Ressources naturelles Canada en 2019-2020. Il est indiqué que le montant passe de 14,2 à 21,4 millions de dollars entre l'an dernier et cette année.

Vos fonctionnaires peuvent-ils nous expliquer comment cet argent aidera les communautés rurales et éloignées à accéder aux programmes énergétiques, et quel genre de soutien administratif pourraient obtenir les petites communautés qui ne possèdent pas nécessairement la capacité interne d'analyser toutes les options elles-mêmes?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, un certain nombre de programmes s'offrent aux communautés rurales, isolées et du Nord, qu'ils visent à les aider à abandonner le diesel au profit de sources d'énergie renouvelables ou à utiliser les rebuts ligneux comme biocarburants, ou à investir afin d'encourager le développement économique des communautés autochtones.

Je demanderai à mon personnel de vous en dire un peu plus au sujet de ce programme.

Mme Cheri Crosby (sous-ministre adjointe et dirigeante principale des finances, Secteur de la gestion et des services intégrés, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Je le ferai volontiers.

Monsieur le président, l'initiative dont il est question ici est le programme d'énergie propre pour les collectivités rurales et éloignées, dont le financement augmente de 7 millions de dollars cette année. Nous renforçons donc ce programme lancé l'année dernière, dans le budget de 2017.

Pour ce qui est des détails, nous nous sommes engagés à soutenir le déploiement des technologies électriques renouvelables à hauteur de 89 millions de dollars.

Nous nous emploierons à faire la démonstration de technologies renouvelables dans les domaines de l'électricité et du chauffage, à déployer des technologies de biothermie dans les communautés rurales et éloignées, à appuyer le renforcement de la capacité et à simplement encourager l'efficacité énergétique de diverses manières.

Je m'en tiendrai là, à moins que vous ne vouliez obtenir plus de détails.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je dirai, aux fins du compte rendu, que je pense que cela répond probablement à la question précédente de M. Canning.

Pour ce qui est de la prolongation du délai afin d'achever le processus de consultation auprès des groupes autochtones au sujet de l'expansion du projet Trans Mountain, vous avez indiqué que vous faisiez appel à l'ancien juge Iacobucci à ce sujet. De toute évidence, ma propre province s'inquiétait considérablement des consultations menées auprès des Autochtones sur les forages exploratoires extracôtiers. Selon ce que nous comprenons, ces démarches en sont arrivées à une conclusion favorable.

Peut-être pouvez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi il importe de prolonger le délai. En vous fondant sur l'expérience du gouvernement jusqu'à maintenant, quelles garanties pouvez-vous nous offrir que les nouveaux processus fonctionnent, sont conformes et résisteront à une contestation judiciaire?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, nous sommes très sérieux quant à la manière dont nous consultons les communautés autochtones. Nous apprenons de nouvelles choses et nous sommes à l'affût de nouvelles occasions de faire participer les parties prenantes de manière constructive.

Dans ce cas précis, les projets de forage étaient assujettis à un certain nombre de conditions, et avec raison. Je pense que les autorités extracôtières et les organes qui mènent les consultations possèdent une expertise considérable. Nous continuons d'apprendre comment faire participer les parties prenantes et, dans certains cas, certains processus sont meilleurs que d'autres. Nous allons donc continuer d'explorer et d'apprendre.

(1615)

M. Nick Whalen:

Voudriez-vous ajouter quelque chose de particulier au sujet de la prolongation de trois semaines afin de peut-être nous assurer que nous faisons la bonne chose?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je dirais qu'une des manières d'être ouvert et souple consiste à écouter ses partenaires avec sincérité. Les communautés autochtones nous ont sincèrement demandé une prolongation, que nous leur avons accordée. Je pense qu'en agréant leur demande, nous avons fait la preuve de notre engagement.

M. Nick Whalen:

Pour ce qui est de faire du Canada un chef de file mondial du domaine minier, j'ai entendu, il y a quelques mois à l'occasion d'une conférence tenue à Toronto, des dirigeants de ce secteur déclarer qu'ils veulent s'assurer que lorsqu'ils entreprennent des discussions scientifiques avec le gouvernement, les deux parties s'inspirent des pratiques exemplaires, vont de l'avant et ne réinventent pas la roue.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment votre ministère fait en sorte que nous nous inspirons toujours des pratiques exemplaires et que nous améliorons continuellement notre processus de réglementation de l'environnement?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, sachez que nous avons eu le grand plaisir de lancer le Plan canadien pour les minéraux et les métaux, que certains d'entre vous auront vu, j'en suis assez certain. Si vous ne l'avez pas vu, je vous encourage à le consulter. Nous pouvons vous en fournir des exemplaires. Ce plan est le fruit d'une collaboration entre l'industrie et de nombreuses parties prenantes.

Dans une économie où on investit davantage dans l'énergie solaire et éolienne et les véhicules électriques, les minéraux et les métaux que recèle le Canada nous offrent le potentiel colossal de créer des milliers d'emplois bien rémunérés au pays et de faciliter la transition vers une économie plus propre et plus verte.

Cela nous aide à lutter contre les changements climatiques, à créer des emplois et à investir dans les nouvelles technologies, dans le domaine de l'extraction, par exemple. La mine aurifère Borden, la toute première mine entièrement alimentée à l'électricité, constitue un bon exemple de la manière dont nous pouvons collaborer avec l'industrie afin d'appuyer ces efforts.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, je crois comprendre que vous partagerez votre temps une fois encore. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre. Je serai très bref.

Monsieur le ministre, je veux parler de vos subventions pour les véhicules sans émissions. Comme vous le savez certainement, nous avons constaté qu'il ne se construit aucun véhicule entièrement électrique au Canada. Le seul véhicule hybride qui y est construit est le modèle Pacifica de Chrysler.

Cela étant dit, j'ai visité le site Web de Nissan Canada et me suis constitué une Leaf de base, un des véhicules électriques qui se vendent le mieux dans le monde. Mon modèle ne comprend aucun joujou, rien, et il coûte 817,74 $ par mois.

Comme ce montant correspond pour certains à un versement hypothécaire, auriez-vous l'obligeance de m'expliquer pourquoi nous subventionnons les nantis pour qu'ils achètent des véhicules qui ne sont même pas construits au Canada?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, le prix des véhicules qui peuvent être achetés grâce à cette mesure incitative est plafonné, et ce, afin de veiller à ce que les Canadiens de la classe moyenne puissent se prévaloir de cet incitatif et que les Canadiens riches, qui ont probablement les moyens d'acheter...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, mais le rabais est inclus dans le prix de 817 $.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

L'autre objectif consiste à encourager l'innovation et l'investissement dans les véhicules sans émissions dans le cadre de notre plan global de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Voilà pourquoi nous offrons cet incitatif.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

De combien de cents la nouvelle norme en matière de carburants de votre gouvernement augmentera-t-elle le coût d'un litre de diesel, d'un litre d'essence et d'un mètre cube de gaz naturel?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

C'est la ministre McKenna, d'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, qui dirige la discussion sur les normes relatives aux carburants. Le ministère discute avec les parties prenantes de l'industrie. Nous veillerons à toujours garder notre compétitivité à l'esprit quand nous instaurerons des politiques afin de permettre aux Canadiens de la classe moyenne qui travaillent dur chaque jour pour demeurer dans cette classe de maintenir un niveau de vie abordable. Voilà pourquoi...

(1620)

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je trouve tout simplement incroyable qu'au bout de deux années consacrées à l'élaboration de cette politique qui a été affichée sur le site Web de votre ministère pendant des mois, les ministres libéraux ne semblent pas capables de nous dire combien tout cela va coûter aux Canadiens.

Selon l'Association canadienne de l'industrie de la chimie, la norme sur les combustibles propres correspondra à l'équivalent d'une taxe sur le carbone de 200 $ la tonne. L'industrie situe ce montant entre 150 et 280 $ la tonne, et votre gouvernement exempte les grands émetteurs de la tarification du carbone à hauteur de 95 % pour les inciter, comme l'indiquait la ministre de l'Environnement, à demeurer concurrentiels et à préserver de bons emplois au Canada.

Si l'on estime, à la lumière de cette analyse, que ces entreprises feraient ce que les conservateurs craignent depuis des années en fermant leurs portes et en supprimant des emplois au Canada si on leur demandait de payer une proportion supérieure à 5 % de la taxe sur le carbone, comment justifiez-vous que l'on puisse leur imposer des coûts aussi considérables en application de la nouvelle norme sur les combustibles propres?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

J'aurai l'occasion de rencontrer les représentants de cette association dès demain. Nous travaillons aussi en très étroite collaboration avec l'industrie pétrochimique. J'étais la semaine dernière chez moi en Alberta pour annoncer un financement de 49 millions de dollars qui va générer 4,5 milliards de dollars en nouveaux investissements dans l'économie de ma province.

Il est dans l'intérêt de tous que notre industrie demeure concurrentielle.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

J'ose espérer que vous pourrez nous indiquer de façon très convaincante que le gouvernement sait ce qu'il fait en imposant cette politique, car l'analyse coûts-avantages du ministère indique qu'il n'existe aucun modèle permettant de quantifier les réductions d'émissions, l'offre de crédits ou les répercussions économiques de la norme sur les combustibles propres.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais présenter la motion suivante: Que, conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité invite immédiatement le ministre des Ressources naturelles à comparaître devant lui le jeudi 20 juin 2019, pendant au moins une réunion complète, afin d'informer le Comité sur le plan du gouvernement pour le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain; et que cette réunion soit télévisée.

Le président:

Je proposerais que nous prévoyions un peu de temps lors de notre séance de jeudi pour discuter des travaux du Comité, car notre horaire nous le permettra. Nous pourrons alors débattre de cette motion sans empiéter sur le temps à notre disposition aujourd'hui.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, je me réjouis à la perspective de pouvoir en débattre. Je suis persuadée que le ministre sera tout à fait disposé à venir annoncer aux Canadiens la date du début des travaux de construction, l'échéancier de ces travaux, la date d'entrée en service du nouveau tronçon de Trans Mountain, les coûts qui en découleront pour les contribuables ainsi que les plans du gouvernement quant à savoir si cette expansion ira bel et bien de l'avant et si son exploitation sera éventuellement confiée au secteur privé.

Le président:

Merci. Nous en discuterons donc jeudi.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Formidable.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, c'est vous qui avez la parole pour conclure.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'ai quelques brèves questions avant de m'intéresser de plus près à l'industrie forestière, laquelle occupe bien évidemment une place importante dans ma circonscription.

Il y a huit ans, les conservateurs ont vendu EACL, ou tout au moins une portion de cette entreprise, au montant de 15 millions de dollars. Je me demandais comment on pouvait évaluer cette transaction. Nous l'avons vendue pour 15 millions de dollars, mais nous devons encore investir des sommes considérables dans EACL. Était-ce une bonne idée de vendre cette entreprise, en tout ou en partie, il y a huit ans?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je vais devoir faire quelques vérifications avant de pouvoir vous répondre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que nous savons à quoi nous en tenir.

Je veux poursuivre dans le sens de la question posée par M. Cannings tout à l'heure. Comme vous le savez, la foresterie est une industrie très importante dans ma grande circonscription rurale située pas très loin d'ici. Je tiens d'abord à vous remercier pour l'aide financière à Uniboard qui a été annoncée il y a deux semaines. Ce soutien facilitera grandement les choses à l'entreprise pour l'écologisation de son usine installée dans une portion très défavorisée de ma circonscription où les problèmes économiques sont légion. De nombreux emplois seront ainsi préservés dans la région. C'est l'une des plus grandes entreprises de ma circonscription.

L'industrie forestière a vécu sa large part de difficultés au cours des dernières années. Ma circonscription a perdu en 1987 ses voies ferrées qui ont été démantelées et vendues à la ferraille. Depuis 1990, la drave n'est plus autorisée. Nous avons également de nombreux problèmes découlant des sanctions commerciales américaines sur les produits forestiers. Il y a seulement une route entrant et sortant de la circonscription qui peut servir pour l'exploitation forestière, et nous nous retrouvons maintenant aux prises avec une pénurie de main-d’œuvre telle qu'il est difficile pour certaines entreprises de poursuivre leurs activités.

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il nous est possible de faire pour aider le secteur forestier à court et à long terme ainsi que pour développer davantage les activités de deuxième et troisième transformations qui sont très rares dans ma région?

(1625)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je pourrais vous parler de différentes mesures. Certaines relèvent de mon ministère et d'autres non.

On peut penser par exemple au Fonds sur l'infrastructure municipale rurale qui prévoit 2 milliards de dollars pour la construction de routes dans les collectivités rurales, ou encore au Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, une autre enveloppe de 2 milliards de dollars à laquelle les municipalités ont accès. Le budget de 2019 prévoyait par ailleurs un investissement de 250 millions de dollars pour favoriser davantage l'innovation dans le secteur forestier et faciliter sa diversification et sa croissance. C'est un secteur qui revêt une importance capitale au Canada et qui connaît effectivement des difficultés dans le contexte de nos relations avec les États-Unis. Les trois ententes commerciales que notre gouvernement a conclues ouvrent de nouveaux débouchés très prometteurs pour nos produits qui se distinguent nettement en raison de nos méthodes d'exploitation assurant notamment la viabilité de l'environnement. C'était donc un échantillon des mesures que nous prenons pour appuyer ce secteur.

Je ne sais pas si ma sous-ministre pourrait vous en dire davantage au sujet de quelques-uns des autres mécanismes de soutien que nous avons mis en place pour l'industrie forestière.

Mme Christyne Tremblay (sous-ministre, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Merci, monsieur le président. Nous reconnaissons l'importance de l'industrie forestière et nous nous efforçons de l'appuyer de différentes manières. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pouvez répondre en français, si vous le voulez.

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

D'accord.

Nous travaillons sur plusieurs fronts, dont le premier est la compétitivité du secteur. Avec l'ensemble des provinces et des territoires, nous avons élaboré un cadre de la bioéconomie forestière, qui va faire nous permettre d'en diversifier les produits et d'augmenter leur valeur ajoutée. Ce cadre est d'ailleurs le premier élément à l'ordre du jour de la rencontre des sous-ministres du Conseil canadien des ministres des forêts qui débute ce soir.

Deuxièmement, nous investissons énormément dans l'innovation. Le dernier budget a consacré un important montant de 100 millions de dollars à ce secteur, provenant de fonds stratégiques d'investissement dans des projets prometteurs, comme le biocarburant ou les produits du bois à haute valeur ajoutée.

En troisième lieu, nous investissons de façon substantielle dans la diversification des marchés dans le but que le bois canadien soit utilisé à l'étranger. D'importants projets sont en cours en Chine, notamment à Tianjin, où l'on démontre les façons d'intégrer le bois dans la construction et en quoi cela contribue à nos efforts de lutte contre les changements climatiques.

Quatrièmement, comme M. le ministre l'a mentionné, le gouvernement a versé des sommes importantes pour soutenir l'industrie du bois d'oeuvre. Son plan était non seulement d'aider tant les travailleurs que les entreprises visées par les droits compensateurs, mais aussi de favoriser la diversification des marchés et des produits. Ce plan a très bien fonctionné. Encore aujourd'hui, M. le ministre préside un groupe de travail comprenant l'ensemble des ministres responsables des forêts pour suivre la santé de notre secteur forestier et s'assurer d'avoir en place des mesures permettant de venir en aide aux communautés locales, aux travailleurs et à l'industrie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps de parole est écoulé.

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre. Nous en sommes arrivés à la fin de la première heure de notre séance. Le temps passe tellement vite. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants pour le temps que vous nous avez consacré et la disponibilité dont vous nous faites toujours bénéficier.

Nous allons interrompre nos travaux deux minutes à peine, le temps que d'autres fonctionnaires se joignent à Mmes Tremblay et Crosby pour la seconde heure de notre réunion.

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

(1625)

(1630)

Le président:

Nous sommes de retour. Merci d'avoir été aussi rapides. Nous reprenons nos travaux.

Pas moins de six représentants du ministère sont des nôtres.

Merci de votre présence aujourd'hui. Nous accueillons la sous-ministre qui est accompagnée de cinq sous-ministres adjoints. Je pense qu'il risque d'être un peu difficile de prendre ces gens-là au dépourvu, sans vouloir bien sûr leur mettre trop de pression.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions des membres du Comité. Monsieur Hehr, c'est à vous d'essayer de les piéger en premier.

(1635)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci, monsieur le président. J'ai bien peur de ne pas être capable de les coincer.

Avec l'intensification des changements climatiques, nous sommes tous témoins des ravages que peuvent causer les inondations et des impacts environnementaux qui se font ressentir partout au pays. La situation ne cesse de se détériorer. Je crois que quelqu'un a d'ailleurs indiqué que les indemnisations versées par le gouvernement fédéral au titre des dommages ainsi causés augmentent chaque jour.

Quoi qu'il en soit, Ressources naturelles Canada demande dans le Budget principal des dépenses un montant de 11,1 millions de dollars pour améliorer la préparation et les interventions pour la gestion des catastrophes au Canada.

Pouvez-vous nous indiquer à quoi vont servir ces fonds? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je vous remercie.

Je suis très contente que vous ayez soulevé cette question, qui est malheureusement d'actualité, vu les inondations que nous connaissons au Québec et en Ontario. Elles engendrent des coûts importants sur le plan économique, mais également des coûts humains dont il faut tenir compte. Souvent, ces catastrophes naturelles menacent la sécurité et l'intégrité des personnes de même que leurs biens. C'est important. Il faut être très responsable quant à la façon dont on aborde ces catastrophes.

De plus en plus, nous réalisons qu'il faut bâtir des communautés beaucoup plus résilientes face à la récurrence de ces catastrophes naturelles, qu'il s'agisse d'inondations ou de feux de forêt. Lors du dernier budget, le ministère des Ressources naturelles a reçu 88 millions de dollars sur cinq ans pour travailler avec les provinces et les territoires à des mesures destinées à augmenter la résilience des communautés. Une grande partie de ces fonds ira à la prévention des feux de forêt.

Je suis contente qu'on m'ait posé plusieurs questions reliées à la forêt aujourd'hui. Au cours de la dernière année, toutes les provinces et les territoires se sont penchés sur les façons de combattre les feux de forêt et de s'assurer que les communautés sont mieux préparées à faire face à ces désastres. Un plan pancanadien sur les feux de forêt vient d'être élaboré. L'ensemble des provinces et des territoires y souscrivent, mais il y a également des initiatives dont il faut tenir compte.

Il y a peut-être des gens qui ne m'entendent pas. Voulez-vous que j'arrête de parler, monsieur le président? [Traduction]

Le président:

Oui, pour M. Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings: Tout va bien maintenant.

Le président: Très bien. Tout fonctionne pour le mieux. [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur Cannings, je suis heureuse de répondre à cette question sur les désastres naturels. En effet, mon ministère va recevoir 88 millions de dollars afin d'assurer la résilience des communautés face aux catastrophes naturelles. Une grande partie de cette somme servira à combattre les feux de forêt. On sait qu'en Colombie-Britannique il y a eu des feux très importants l'année dernière. Cette somme servira également à rehausser notre capacité en matière de prévisions et à l'égard de tout ce qui concerne le repérage géospatial, ou mapping. Le but est que nous soyons plus proactifs, mieux préparés et en mesure de voir venir ces catastrophes. [Traduction]

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci pour cette réponse.

M. Schmale vous a posé des questions au sujet de votre nouveau programme d'incitatifs pour l'achat de véhicules électriques. J'espère que vous pouvez m'en dire davantage au sujet de ce programme.

À mon bureau, Hannah Wilson m'indiquait qu'environ 80 % des véhicules sur le marché seraient vendus à un prix inférieur au seuil établi. Y a-t-il des voitures électriques que l'on peut acheter pour moins de 45 000 $? Est-ce que ces véhicules seraient admissibles? Comment fonctionne le programme?

(1640)

[Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Augmenter la vente de véhicules à zéro émission est un objectif important pour le gouvernement. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, il y a un nouveau programme d'incitatifs destiné à encourager les consommateurs à opter pour ces véhicules. Cependant, c'est Transports Canada, et non Ressources naturelles Canada, qui est responsable de ce programme. Cela dit, nous devons pour notre part nous assurer que ces voitures roulent et qu'elles peuvent être rechargées. Nous devons donc nous assurer que les infrastructures sont en place.

Nous nous employons déjà à mettre en place un réseau de plus de 1 000 bornes de recharge, partout au Canada. Il s'agira dans certains cas de bornes de recharge électriques et dans d'autres cas de bornes fonctionnant à l'hydrogène ou au gaz naturel. Lors du dernier budget, nous avons reçu des fonds pour ajouter 20 000 bornes de recharge. Or cette fois-ci, elles seront installées à proximité des lieux où vivent les Canadiens. Autrement dit, il y aura des bornes à leurs résidences, près de leurs lieux de travail ou de loisir ou encore dans les stationnements auxquels ils ont accès. Il s'agit donc pour nous d'un important investissement.

En outre, nous continuons à faire des efforts importants pour que ces bornes soient plus efficaces. Si vous le permettez, je vais passer la parole à notre sous-ministre adjoint M. Frank Des Rosiers, qui est responsable de tout ce qui est lié aux technologies propres dans notre ministère. Il travaille plus particulièrement à certaines technologies pouvant assurer aux Canadiens propriétaires de tels véhicules de pouvoir rouler.

M. Frank Des Rosiers (sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de l'innovation et de la technologie de l'énergie, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Tout à fait.

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Pour ajouter à ce que disait notre sous-ministre, il faut avouer que c'est un secteur d'intervention qui est important dans le contexte actuel où l'on voit tous ces véhicules sur nos routes qui sont responsables du quart des émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada. Si l'on parvenait à réduire un tant soit peu les émissions provenant de cette source, ce serait un grand pas en avant.

Non seulement avons-nous l'occasion de mettre en service des technologies déjà existantes, mais nous pouvons également en développer de nouvelles. Ce n'est pas la capacité novatrice qui manque au Canada. Je pense par exemple à AddÉnergie, une entreprise installée à Shawinigan, au Québec. Grâce à notre soutien financier et à celui du gouvernement provincial, on est en train d'y concevoir une nouvelle infrastructure de recharge pour les condominiums et les immeubles multilogements, un secteur pour lequel très peu de solutions sont actuellement offertes sur le marché. C'est justement le genre d'innovation que nous recherchons.

Nous essayons par ailleurs de déterminer quel pourrait être l'impact du branchement de milliers, voire de dizaines de milliers ou de centaines de milliers de véhicules sur le réseau. Mettez-vous à la place d'un service public responsable d'un réseau électrique assez important qui doit composer avec un tel accroissement soudain de la demande. Comment gérer le tout? Est-ce que ce nouvel afflux de demande sur le marché peut avoir des conséquences en matière de cybersécurité?

Voilà le genre de questions auxquelles nous cherchons à répondre.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Falk.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci aux représentants du ministère de leur présence aujourd'hui.

J'ai toute une série de questions que je vais essayer de vous poser et nous verrons ce qu'il en ressortira. Vous pouvez tous répondre.

Nous avons acheté un pipeline. L'avons-nous payé? C'est ma question. Avons-nous payé ce pipeline?

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

M. Labonté va vous répondre.

M. Jeff Labonté (sous-ministre adjoint, Bureau de gestion des grands projets, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Vous voulez savoir si nous avons payé le pipeline, c'est-à-dire si le dossier de cette transaction est réglé?

M. Ted Falk:

Exactement.

M. Jeff Labonté:

Je crois que le dossier est réglé, mais il relève en fait du ministère des Finances par l'entremise de la Corporation de développement des investissements du Canada (CDIC), la société d'État responsable de la construction et de la mise en service du pipeline.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Est-ce que cette société d'État va aussi éponger tous les coûts associés à l'expansion de ce pipeline, ou est-ce que c'est le ministère qui devra s'en charger?

M. Jeff Labonté:

Je ne suis peut-être pas le mieux placé pour vous parler de ces questions, car cela relève du ministre des Finances, mais je peux vous dire que la société d'État est dirigée par un conseil d'administration distinct. Elle fonctionne donc à l'intérieur d'un cadre financier qui lui est propre.

Comme aucune autorisation n'a encore été donnée pour une éventuelle expansion, on gère pour l'instant le pipeline dans sa forme actuelle dans l'attente d'une décision dans un sens ou dans l'autre.

(1645)

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord. C'est très bien.

Ma province vient de mettre en place une tarification sur le carbone. Le prix de l'essence a alors augmenté d'un peu plus de 4,5 ¢ le litre pendant que la hausse dépassait de peu les 5 ¢ pour le diesel. Avez-vous établi des projections quant aux revenus qui seront tirés de cette tarification supplémentaire? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

C'est une question qui relève d'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada. [Traduction]

M. Ted Falk:

Vous nous dites donc que votre ministère n'a pas le mandat de calculer la quantité de carburant consommé. Vous n'avez aucun rôle à jouer à cet égard. [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je dirais qu'il y a une collaboration entre les ministères, mais que la question relève d'un autre ministère. [Traduction]

Le président:

Vous avez votre réponse.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord. Pouvez-vous alors m'indiquer la quantité de carburant qui devrait selon vous être assujettie à cette tarification du carbone, qu'il s'agisse d'essence ou de diesel? Avez-vous effectué ce calcul? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Comme je l'ai dit déjà, la question devrait être adressée à Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, qui est responsable de la taxe sur le carbone, ou au ministère des Finances Canada, qui est chargé de calculer les revenus de cette taxe. [Traduction]

M. Ted Falk:

Monsieur le président, je n'essaie plus de connaître les sommes en cause; je peux faire moi-même le calcul. Je veux savoir quelles sont les quantités. Selon moi, cela devrait relever de la compétence de ce ministère.

Le président:

J'ai compris la question, et je crois que nos témoins l'ont comprise également, mais j'ai bien peur que vous alliez devoir vous contenter de cette réponse, monsieur Falk.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Si l'on revient à la question de mon collègue concernant la norme sur les combustibles propres, pouvez-vous me dire si votre ministère a effectué des calculs à ce sujet? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le ministère des Ressources naturelles collabore avec l'industrie pour ce qui est des travaux réalisés dans le cadre de la Norme sur les combustibles propres. Une consultation est en cours. Notre ministère travaille avec diverses compagnies, l'industrie, ainsi qu'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada pour analyser les effets des scénarios qui sont présentés et qui concernent l'industrie et diverses compagnies, de façon individuelle. Lorsque la réglementation sera publiée, il y aura comme toujours une évaluation des coûts par les parties prenantes. [Traduction]

M. Ted Falk:

Vous avez assurément fait certains calculs dans le cas des grands émetteurs de gaz carbonique qui sont exemptés dans une proportion de 95 %. Pouvez-vous me dire combien de tonnes d'émissions ont ainsi été exemptées? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je vais réitérer ma réponse pour cette question également. [Traduction]

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord, essayons avec une question plus facile.

Parlons de la tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette. Quels sont les objectifs et les résultats attendus de la deuxième étape de la Stratégie d'intervention en amont contre la tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, je suis très contente que cette question soit posée. Avec votre permission, je vais céder la parole à notre sous-ministre adjointe du Service canadien des forêts, Mme Beth MacNeil. [Traduction]

Mme Beth MacNeil (sous-ministre adjointe, Service canadien des forêts, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Je ne suis pas certaine si la question portait sur la première ou la deuxième étape, car la Stratégie d'intervention en amont correspond en fait à l'étape deux. Pourriez-vous me dire ce qu'il en est exactement?

M. Ted Falk:

Oui, je suis désolé, je voulais parler de la deuxième étape.

Mme Beth MacNeil:

Le gouvernement du Canada a alloué environ 74,5 millions de dollars pour la deuxième étape. Nous amorçons à peine la deuxième année de cette stratégie.

Je suis ravie de pouvoir vous dire que les premiers résultats semblent indiquer que la stratégie fonctionne très bien. Une grande partie des ressources servent à des opérations d'épandage dans les secteurs les plus touchés de même qu'au suivi nécessaire. Depuis 2014, nous avons noté une diminution de 90 % des populations de tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette au Nouveau-Brunswick. Nous croyons que si nous parvenons à enrayer l'épidémie dans cette province, elle ne s'étendra pas à la Nouvelle-Écosse, à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard et à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador.

(1650)

Le président:

Il vous reste 20 secondes.

M. Ted Falk:

J'ai effectivement bien des questions; j'aimerais seulement avoir des réponses de temps à autre.

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons passer à M. Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Je vais débuter avec une question que je souhaitais poser au ministre. J'ai toutefois manqué de temps, sans doute parce que j'ai parlé trop longtemps.

Il y a quelques semaines, j'étais dans cette salle, ou dans une autre en tout point semblable, à écouter la commissaire à l'environnement et au développement durable nous présenter son rapport final à l'expiration de son mandat. Voici ce que l'on peut notamment lire dans ce rapport : « Pendant des décennies, les gouvernements fédéraux ont invariablement échoué dans leurs efforts pour atteindre les cibles de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, et le gouvernement n'est pas prêt à s'adapter à un climat changeant. Tout ceci doit changer. »

Une partie du rapport qu'elle nous a alors présenté portait sur les subventions aux combustibles fossiles. Je n'ai pas le texte sous les yeux, mais l'une des grandes constatations du rapport était que le gouvernement actuel ne pouvait même pas, après quatre ans, définir avec précision ce qu'on entend par une subvention inefficace aux combustibles fossiles, mais n'hésitait pas malgré tout à affirmer du même souffle que nous ne versions pas de subventions semblables.

Lorsque j'ai accompagné l'ancien ministre en Argentine pour la réunion du G20, on voulait d'abord et avant tout savoir si notre gouvernement allait s'engager à éliminer toutes les subventions aux combustibles fossiles pour les remplacer par de véritables incitatifs pour le recours à l'énergie renouvelable.

Je ne sais pas si M. Khosla ou quelqu'un d'autre pourrait... [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Un environnement sain et une économie forte vont de pair. De nombreuses mesures sont prises dans le dossier des subventions inefficaces aux combustibles fossiles, et j'insiste sur le fait que l'on parle de subventions inefficaces. Nous croyons que les subventions versées au Canada n'entrent pas dans cette catégorie, mais nous avons tout de même accepté de mener un examen par les pairs conjointement avec l'Argentine. C'est le ministre des Finances qui est responsable de cet exercice.

La ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique vient pour sa part de lancer une consultation à ce sujet. Elle a nommé un commissaire qui consultera les Canadiens au sujet des subventions aux combustibles fossiles. Le document de discussion rendu public au moment où cette consultation a été lancée propose certaines définitions déjà existantes qui pourront servir de référence.

Si vous voulez traiter plus à fond de la définition à proprement parler, je vais laisser la parole à M. Des Rosiers qui est responsable de ce dossier.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

J'ajouterais seulement que cette consultation a pour but de connaître les points de vue des Canadiens et des parlementaires qui souhaiteraient se prononcer quant à ce qui devrait être visé ou non par cette définition, car il en existe effectivement de nombreuses versions.

Il y a un modèle qui a été adopté par la Commission européenne. Le commissaire a recensé les différentes définitions utilisées et les présente de façon assez exhaustive dans le document de consultation.

Le gouvernement tient à discuter ouvertement de ces questions avec les Canadiens pour connaître leurs points de vue à ce sujet.

Michael Horgan, ancien sous-ministre des Finances, est responsable de cette consultation. C'est un haut fonctionnaire qui jouit d'une excellente réputation. Le travail vient tout juste de s'amorcer. Nous avons grand-hâte de connaître les opinions des Canadiens.

M. Richard Cannings:

Nous avons eu par ailleurs un bref échange au sujet des véhicules électriques. M. Schmale a essayé de faire valoir que ces véhicules pouvaient être fort dispendieux pour le Canadien moyen. D'après les études dont j'ai pris connaissance, si l'on tient compte des économies réalisées pour l'entretien et le carburant, on arrive en fin de compte à peu près au même résultat.

J'ai noté ici un montant de 10 millions de dollars et je crains fort que ce soit peut-être un peu bas. Alors, pourriez-vous m'indiquer quel montant est prévu dans le budget pour la construction d'infrastructures de recharge partout au pays? S'agit-il de 10 millions de dollars ou de 100 millions de dollars?

(1655)

Mme Cheri Crosby:

Selon ce qui a été annoncé dans le budget de 2019, c'est un montant additionnel de 435 millions de dollars, dont 130 millions de dollars iront à Ressources naturelles Canada au cours des cinq prochaines années, y compris 10 millions de dollars cette année.

Le financement global dont nous bénéficierons pour la construction de ces infrastructures se rapprochera de 130 millions de dollars sur une période de cinq ans, mais le Budget principal des dépenses de cette année indique bel et bien une somme de 10 millions de dollars.

M. Richard Cannings:

Pour revenir à ce que je disais, nous devons être audacieux. Selon mes calculs, avec 10 millions de dollars, nous construirons environ une centaine de stations de recharge rapides comme celles que les gens veulent. On entend déjà dire que dans des villes comme Vancouver, les gens attendent longtemps parce qu'il y a... Imaginez-vous une centaine de stations d'essence au Canada: elles ne pourraient pas ravitailler tellement de voitures.

J'exhorte le gouvernement à redoubler d'efforts sur ce plan. Cela dit, je suis content qu'il y ait des stations de recharge maintenant. Si j'achetais une voiture électrique aujourd'hui, je pense que je pourrais m'en servir pour faire le tour de ma circonscription.

Pour ce qui est des rénovations, j'aimerais avoir quelques précisions sur le nouveau programme. La FCM, la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, recevra 300 millions de dollars pour la rénovation résidentielle.

Comment les Canadiens peuvent-ils en profiter? Doivent-ils communiquer avec la FCM? Est-ce que ce sont leurs municipalités qui doivent en faire la demande? S'ils ne vivent pas dans une municipalité, comment peuvent-ils avoir accès à ces fonds? Sont-ils pour cette année ou l'année dernière? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président, je vais répondre en partie avant de passer la parole à M. Khosla.

Votre première préoccupation est bonne, monsieur Cannings. La Fédération canadienne des municipalités, ou FCM, est une voix nationale et notre partenaire depuis 1901. Nous avons l'habitude de travailler avec cette partenaire qui est établie dans les grandes villes, mais aussi dans les petites municipalités et dans les communautés rurales. Nous allons travailler avec 19 associations provinciales et territoriales responsables de rejoindre non seulement les grands centres, mais aussi les petites villes et les municipalités rurales.

Cette enveloppe comprend même un montant pour l'action communautaire et pour travailler avec les organismes à but non lucratif établis dans les petites communautés afin que des investissements soient faits dans les édifices publics. La FCM et ses ramifications nous permettent donc de nous assurer que le déploiement ne sera pas cantonné aux grands centres urbains.

Je passe la parole à M. Khosla pour qu'il vous explique le programme lui-même. [Traduction]

Le président:

Très, très brièvement.

M. Jay Khosla (sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de l'énergie, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

D'accord.

Je n'ai pas grand-chose à ajouter, mais sur la question des rénovations de nature résidentielle prévues dans le... Premièrement, c'est plutôt 1 milliard de dollars que la FCM recevra.

M. Richard Cannings:

Oui, je le sais. Elle recevra 300 millions de dollars pour les rénovations résidentielles.

M. Jay Khosla:

Je dirais que c'est plus près de 600 millions de dollars.

Nous pourrons revenir au montant exact, mais il y a de l'argent pour les rénovations et il ira directement au logement.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je me demande surtout comment pourront en profiter les personnes qui ne vivent pas à Montréal ni à Vancouver.

M. Jay Khosla:

Je comprends...

Le président:

Je vais devoir vous interrompre.

Je vous ai donné une partie des trois minutes que vous aviez eues la dernière fois, mais que vous ne pensiez pas avoir eues.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous pouvez m'arrêter quand il me restera trois minutes pour les laisser à M. Whalen, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

Le président:

Sans problème. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question pour vous, madame Tremblay.

Le crédit 35 vise à « protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces: afin de soutenir un nouveau cadre de cybersystèmes essentiels pour protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada, notamment dans les secteurs des finances, de l'énergie, des télécommunications et du transport. » Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur ce que vous faites? Quel est le plan de cybersécurité du côté de Ressources naturelles Canada?

Je vous laisse choisir qui va répondre.

(1700)

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Votre question porte bien sur la cybersécurité, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Un peu plus de 800 000 $ sont prévus pour cela et j'aimerais savoir quels sont les plans.

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Vous posez une excellente question.

La cybersécurité est de plus en plus à l'ordre du jour. Quand on est responsable des infrastructures énergétiques d'un pays, il est très important d'être à la fine pointe de la cybersécurité. Il s'agit d'une préoccupation majeure dans nos relations avec non seulement les États-Unis, puisqu'il y a énormément d'infrastructures qui traversent notre frontière, mais aussi avec notre partenaire mexicain.

Nous travaillons avec nos partenaires du secteur privé, c'est-à-dire les grands services publics, les associations du secteur de l'électricité, ainsi que les entreprises pétrolières et gazières, puisque les pipelines sont maintenant la cible d'attaques. Nous discutions récemment avec des représentants du secteur minier, qui nous disaient subir des attaques sur leurs données stratégiques. Pareilles attaques risquent de devenir plus nombreuses alors que notre économie repose de plus en plus sur le numérique.

Le Canada possède des minéraux, des minerais rares et des métaux comme le lithium, lesquels suscitent beaucoup d'intérêt. Il s'agit donc d'un secteur des ressources naturelles qu'il faut protéger.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste pas beaucoup de temps.

Puis-je vous demander quelle forme cela prend? S'agit-il de promoteurs ou d'experts en cybersécurité de chez nous? Est-ce qu'on subventionne les entreprises ou les compagnies qui veulent faire de la cybersécurité?

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je vais commencer avant de passer la parole à mon collègue M. Khosla.

Il s'agit principalement d'investissements dans les infrastructures critiques pour renforcer la résilience. Nous travaillons aussi avec nos partenaires, l'industrie et les associations pour nous assurer de répondre à cette préoccupation. Enfin, des montants précis sont consacrés à notre travail avec notre partenaire américain.

M. Jay Khosla:

Je voudrais simplement ajouter que le gouvernement souhaite déposer un projet de loi pour surveiller l'industrie et resserrer sa collaboration avec elle. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Reste-t-il du temps pour M. Whalen?

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes avant d'atteindre la barre des trois minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je les prendrai plus tard.

Le président:

Très bien.

Monsieur Whalen, utiliserez-vous le reste de ce temps?

M. Nick Whalen:

Oui, merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Concernant l'idée de dépenser 130 millions de dollars dans les stations de recharge au cours des cinq prochaines années, je suis allé dans un aréna local la fin de semaine dernière, à Paradise, dans ma circonscription de St. John's-Est, à Terre-Neuve, près de chez moi. Il y avait quelques stations de recharge assez récentes devant le bâtiment, mais elles ont déjà commencé à se détériorer à cause des intempéries et du sel épandu dans le stationnement.

Quand je suis allé frapper aux portes, pendant la fin de semaine, j'ai rencontré un électeur frustré. Il aimerait acheter un véhicule électrique, mais il habite dans une habitation multifamiliale, et son stationnement se trouve à côté de l'édifice. Il a peur que même s'il dépense de l'argent pour faire installer sa propre borne de recharge près de son espace de stationnement, elle sera abîmée ou détruite par les déneigeurs.

Quelle part de l'argent prévu dans cette enveloppe servira à l'exploitation, à l'entretien et à la réparation de l'infrastructure? À qui appartient-elle? Y aura-t-il une quelconque analyse comparative des produits offerts par les divers fournisseurs? Aurez-vous recours à un fournisseur unique ou saisirez-vous l'occasion pour évaluer l'offre aux consommateurs, puis tester et comparer les produits des centaines de fournisseurs différents pour déterminer quelles unités durent le plus longtemps et lesquelles sont les plus résilientes? Quel genre de travail effectuerez-vous et comment ferez-vous le lien avec les autres ministères pour ajouter au Code national du bâtiment des dispositions sur l'installation résidentielle de telles unités? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est une excellente question.

Un montant de 76 millions de dollars sur six ans a été consacré à des projets de démonstration de la prochaine génération de bornes de recharge, afin de s'assurer qu'elles sont résilientes et qu'elles résistent au climat canadien.

M. Des Rosiers peut vous en dire davantage sur certains de ces projets.

(1705)

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

J'ai mentionné certaines des technologies qui ont été développées.[Traduction]

Vous parlez des habitations multifamiliales. C'est justement un des problèmes du marché qui nous a été mentionné. Il n'y a pas de solution assez robuste pour répondre à nos besoins.

Vous avez mentionné les problèmes de résistance au climat, mais il y a aussi les difficultés liées aux systèmes à haute tension. Comme vous le savez, les utilisateurs et les fabricants ont tendance à préférer les unités de recharge rapide, ce qui peut avoir une incidence non seulement sur le type de pile privilégié, mais aussi sur les systèmes électriques, et c'est un problème qui touche à la fois les entités résidentielles, commerciales et les grands exploitants. C'est un autre problème qui est ressorti clairement.

Pour ce qui est des détails de la mise en oeuvre du programme, pour répondre à la deuxième partie de votre question, la sous-ministre ou Jay pourrait peut-être vous en parler plus en détail.

M. Jay Khosla:

Je me ferai un plaisir de le faire. C'est une excellente question.

Comme vous le savez, nous avons de l'expérience. En 2016-2017, nous avons reçu environ 180 millions de dollars pour administrer la première étape du programme. Nous en sommes maintenant à la deuxième. À la première étape, nous avons installé 532 bornes de recharge rapide au pays. Il y en a environ 1 000 qui doivent s'y ajouter, et à la deuxième étape, comme la sous-ministre le mentionnait, nous nous concentrerons davantage sur les besoins résidentiels, municipaux et locaux.

Nous connaissons donc les technologies qui existent. Nous connaissons les entreprises qui existent. Nous utilisons un processus concurrentiel. Nous continuerons de le faire, mais nous avons déjà une très bonne idée des meilleures entreprises qui existent dans l'industrie, et nous continuerons sur notre lancée.

Je dirais que c'est très bien que le gouvernement du Canada fasse installer autant de stations de recharge si vite. Je ne veux pas me vanter, mais je suis très fier que nous ayons réussi à agir si vite dans ce domaine.

M. Nick Whalen:

Qui s'occupe de l'entretien des unités une fois qu'elles sont installées? Quelle partie des sommes allouées servira à l'exploitation et à l'entretien? Les consommateurs en seront-ils informés? Vous faites beaucoup de recherches. Ce serait fantastique si vous en diffusiez les résultats au public, aux consommateurs.

M. Jay Khosla:

Très rapidement, tout cela se joue dans le secteur privé. Nous retenons les services des meilleures entreprises possible, mais c'est une question de concurrence. Ce n'est pas au gouvernement d'en effectuer l'entretien. Nous travaillons avec le secteur privé pour cela. Je pense que cela tombe sous le sens.

Oui, nous pouvons diffuser l'information. Nous avons de bons sites Web déjà accessibles où l'on peut trouver beaucoup d'information. Je pourrai faire parvenir d'autres renseignements au Comité s'il le souhaite.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les fonctionnaires d'être ici pour nous aujourd'hui.

J'ai une question à vous poser sur la transition qui suivra l'adoption du projet de loi C-69.

On voit dans le budget de 2019-2020 une attribution de 3,7 millions de dollars au crédit 5 pour le démantèlement de l'Office national de l'énergie, une organisation canadienne reconnue dans le monde depuis longtemps, et son remplacement par la nouvelle Régie canadienne de l'énergie. Comme des fonds sont déjà prévus pour cette transition avant même que le projet de loi n'ait acquis force de loi, j'espère que vous pourrez nous dire, si possible, exactement combien de temps il faudra pour établir complètement la Régie canadienne de l'énergie et en quelle année elle sera pleinement fonctionnelle compte tenu, bien sûr, de la certitude dont les investisseurs et les promoteurs auront besoin pour réaliser leurs grands projets d'exploitation des ressources. Quel est l'échéancier prévu pour cette transition?

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, c'est une bonne question. Et comme je l'ai déjà mentionné devant le comité sénatorial, je pense que la mise en oeuvre sera déterminante si nous voulons répondre aux attentes de l'industrie, donc nous nous préparons déjà en vue de la transition. Il est difficile d'avoir un plan de match précis, puisque le projet de loi n'a pas encore été adopté et qu'il y a encore beaucoup de discussions en cours, mais je peux vous assurer que la Régie, l'ONE et tous les ministères se préparent pour la transition. Dans notre cas, nous avons reçu de l'argent pour concevoir une plateforme et avons offert notre expertise scientifique pour l'évaluation d'impact. On s'inquiète de plus en plus des effets cumulatifs, et nous avons la responsabilité de concevoir une plateforme à ce sujet.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord. C'est intéressant. Bien sûr, depuis des dizaines d'années, le Canada est cité en exemple dans le monde pour sa façon de mesurer les effets cumulatifs d'une propriété responsable. C'est bien.

(1710)

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Merci.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Si vous avez plus d'informations au cours des prochains jours ou des prochaines semaines pour répondre à ma question, vous seriez très aimable de nous les faire parvenir.

Selon la mise à jour économique de l'automne 2018, l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, qui appartient désormais aux contribuables, devrait nous rapporter 200 millions de dollars par année, mais selon des documents internes, comme vous le savez probablement, il en coûterait 255 millions de dollars par année au gouvernement en intérêts sur le prêt de 1 milliard de dollars qui l'a contracté. C'est une différence de 55 millions de dollars. Je me demande si vous pouvez confirmer l'ampleur du prêt qu'a contracté le gouvernement du Canada pour le projet d'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain et ce qu'il lui en coûtera chaque mois en intérêts.

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, c'est le ministère des Finances qui est responsable de cet aspect.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord.

Comme vous le savez, le 22 février 2019, l'Office national de l'énergie a recommandé de nouveau l'approbation de l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain dans l'intérêt national du Canada. Dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de 2018-2019, 6 millions de dollars ont été alloués à l'ONE pour un réexamen de 22 semaines. Bien sûr, l'une des options à la disposition du gouvernement, à l'époque, que les conservateurs recommandaient, aurait été d'adopter un projet de loi d'urgence rétroactif afin d'affirmer que l'évaluation du trafic de pétroliers réalisée par Transports Canada en vue du projet d'agrandissement de Trans Mountain était suffisant, et le gouvernement aurait pu le faire, puisque l'ONE s'est appuyé sur cette évaluation dans sa recommandation d'origine pour approuver le projet Trans Mountain. Bien sûr, pour ce réexamen redondant de 22 semaines, il a fallu nommer deux experts de Transports Canada, puisque c'est le ministère responsable en la matière. Bien sûr, ce sont exactement les mêmes informations qui ont été examinées de nouveau, exactement les mêmes mesures d'atténuation, et l'ONE a fait exactement la même recommandation d'approbation à l'issue de son réexamen.

Pouvez-vous me dire s'il y a une analyse des coûts-avantages qui a été faite à l'interne pour déterminer ce qui serait le mieux pour les Canadiens, entre l'adoption d'un projet de loi d'urgence rétroactif pour affirmer la validité de l'analyse originale de Transports Canada et ce réexamen de 22 semaines par l'ONE?

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, le gouvernement a décidé de suivre les conseils de la Cour d'appel fédérale puis de demander à l'ONE de réexaminer la question maritime et de recommencer les consultations de la phase trois.

Le président:

Merci. Nous n'avons plus de temps.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Très bien, si vous découvrez qu'il y a eu une évaluation des coûts, j'aimerais bien l'obtenir aussi.

Le président:

Monsieur Tan, vous serez le dernier intervenant.

M. Geng Tan (Don Valley-Nord, Lib.):

Merci. J'ai cinq minutes, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Geng Tan:

Je n'ai qu'une question à poser, donc s'il reste du temps après, je suis prêt à le laisser à mes collègues.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis là.

M. Geng Tan:

Le Budget principal des dépenses octroie un financement à EACL pour la R-D sur les questions nucléaires et la gestion des déchets au Canada.

Ayant travaillé moi-même presque 10 ans dans le domaine nucléaire, j'ai beaucoup de respect pour les spécialistes canadiens et nos compétences en matière nucléaire. Notre CANDU est à n'en pas douter un chef de file de la R-D sur les applications pacifiques des technologies nucléaires dans le monde. Nous avons des réacteurs nucléaires qui génèrent de l'électricité pour répondre aux besoins des Canadiens en Ontario, au Nouveau-Brunswick, et nous en avons eu longtemps au Québec.

Le réacteur du Québec est désormais fermé, et la station de Pickering sera bientôt déclassée. Les chances qu'un nouveau réacteur soit construit selon les plans du CANDU dans un avenir rapproché sont très faibles, si je ne me trompe pas. Il y a une forte probabilité que les capacités nucléaires du Canada en souffrent beaucoup à terme.

Je vais vous donner un exemple. L'expérience du Royaume-Uni nous montre que dans des circonstances très semblables, le pays a perdu son aptitude à concevoir et à fabriquer des réacteurs, et qu'il dépend désormais de l'importation pour la conception de plans et l'achat d'équipement.

Je me demande comment vous entrevoyez l'avenir de la recherche nucléaire et de l'industrie nucléaire au Canada. Considérez-vous qu'elles évoluent dans la bonne direction ou non?

Merci.

(1715)

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, je suis très heureuse que le député pose une question sur ce secteur.

Le secteur nucléaire fait évidemment partie du paysage énergétique du Canada. Il mentionnait nos compétences. Nous tirons beaucoup d'énergie de cette source. Le gouvernement investit dans l'EACL cette année et lui octroie 1,2 milliard de dollars dans ce budget seulement.

Notre pays et notre ministère ont une unité complète qui se consacre à ce secteur. Nous avons fait beaucoup de travail au cours de la dernière année sur les nouvelles technologies, notamment sur les PRM, qui pourraient servir dans les communautés éloignées, où le Canada pourrait jouir d'un avantage concurrentiel en étant à la fine pointe de la technologie.

Je peux peut-être céder la parole à mon collègue, M. Khosla, qui est responsable de ce secteur et qui pourra vous parler un peu des progrès que nous avons réalisés, puis peut-être répondre à votre question sur le déclassement et la gestion des déchets.

M. Jay Khosla:

Oui, il y a beaucoup de questions sous-jacentes à votre question principale sur l'avenir du nucléaire.

Je pourrais en parler longtemps, mais nous savons très bien, comme la sous-ministre l'a dit, que le Canada est un pays nucléaire de premier plan et que c'est très important pour lui.

Nous savons aussi que les technologies conçues ici par le CANDU sont tout aussi importantes que toutes les autres formes de technologies énergétiques conçues ici. Nous déployons beaucoup d'efforts auprès des fournisseurs du monde entier pour sonder l'intérêt de divers autres pays pour ces technologies.

Nous savons que c'est un domaine qui connaît une croissance exponentielle en Chine, comme en Inde. Nous continuons notre travail. Nous travaillons en partenariat avec d'autres pays pour essayer de trouver d'autres marchés, comme en Argentine.

C'est la réponse que je peux donner rapidement sur le CANDU.

Vous avez tout à fait raison, le budget alloue 1,2 milliard de dollars aux laboratoires. C'est un énorme investissement de la part de ce gouvernement, pour protéger la R-D, ainsi que la propriété intellectuelle, et que nous restions tournés vers l'avenir. Je pourrais en dire beaucoup plus à ce sujet, mais je ne le ferai pas pour l'instant, puisque je suis sais qu'il reste peu de temps.

Concernant les PRM, si vous voulez parler de l'avenir, il y a beaucoup de choses qui se passent dans ce domaine, et d'une certaine façon, ce n'est pas surprenant, mais c'est aussi très rafraîchissant de voir que le monde se tourne vers le Canada pour le rôle qu'il pourrait jouer dans le domaine des PRM, soit des petits réacteurs modulaires.

Ceux-ci pourraient surtout être utiles dans le Nord, à notre avis. Nous étudions la question. Nous avons établi une feuille de route, un exercice qui nous a pris un an. Nous avons consulté les Canadiens, et nous avons constaté que le Canada est l'un des meilleurs endroits où mettre cette technologie en pratique. Nous avons soumis un projet à l'organisme de réglementation, la CCSN, qui est en train de l'examiner. Nous avons neuf propositions à l'étude.

Nous avons reçu un appel de New York l'autre jour. Nous nous y sommes rendus pour aller parler à Bloomberg, qui serait intéressée à investir dans ce domaine, donc j'encourage le Comité à continuer d'étudier la chose.

Pour terminer, je vous dirais — et comme je le disais, je pourrais vous en parler bien plus longuement —, qu'il ne faut pas oublier que nous avons aussi de l'uranium. Pour tout trouver au même endroit dans le domaine nucléaire, nous avons de bonnes choses à dire, mais les coûts et la gestion des déchets sont de grands défis, auxquels nous devons trouver des solutions au Canada, comme ailleurs dans le monde. Nous travaillons fort en ce sens.

J'espère que ma réponse vous aide.

Le président:

C'est une bonne chose que vous n'aviez pas deux questions à poser. C'est tout le temps que vous aviez.

Il n'a plus de temps. Je n'aime pas être sévère, mais je pense que nous devons poursuivre. C'est tout le temps que nous avions pour les témoins.

Nous devons voter sur le budget, ce qui devrait nous prendre entre 2 et 10 minutes, selon l'esprit de coopération dont nous saurons faire preuve. Je ne regardais ni dans une direction ni dans l'autre quand je l'ai dit, monsieur Schmale, que ce soit bien clair.

Je vous remercie beaucoup d'avoir pris le temps d'être avec nous aujourd'hui et d'avoir répondu à toutes nos questions. Personne n'a su vous piéger dans vos domaines d'expertise.

Nous allons suspendre la séance brièvement.

(1715)

(1720)

Le président:

Reprenons la séance.

Pour le compte rendu, je tiens à dire que M. Schmale a été le premier assis, à ma gauche. À ma droite, personne n'a quitté son siège.

Nous devons maintenant voter sur le Budget principal des dépenses. Nous avons deux choix. Nous pouvons voter sur tous les éléments en bloc, si nous avons le consentement unanime du Comité, ou nous pouvons voter sur chacun individuellement.

Je regarde maintenant vers la gauche, monsieur Schmale.

M. Ted Falk:

Tous les crédits seront adoptés avec dissidence.

Le président:

Très bien. Je m'y attendais. ÉNERGIE ATOMIQUE DU CANADA, LIMITÉE ç Crédit 1—Paiements à la société pour les dépenses de fonctionnement et les dépenses en capital..........1 197 282 026 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) COMMISSION CANADIENNE DE SÛRETÉ NUCLÉAIRE ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........39 136 248 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DES RESSOURCES NATURELLES ç Crédit 1—Dépenses de fonctionnement..........563 825 825 $ ç Crédit 5—Dépenses en capital..........13 996 000 $ ç Crédit 10—Subventions et contributions..........471 008 564 $ ç Crédit 15—Encourager les Canadiens à utiliser des véhicules à émission zéro..........10 034 967 $ ç Crédit 20—Mobiliser les communautés autochtones dans le cadre de grands projets de ressources..........12 801 946 $ ç Crédit 25—Veiller à une meilleure préparation et intervention pour la gestion des catastrophes..........11 090 650 $ ç Crédit 30—Améliorer l'information sur l'énergie canadienne..........1 674 737 $ ç Crédit 35—Protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces..........808 900 $ ç Crédit 40—Des collectivités arctiques et nordiques dynamiques..........6 225 524 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 et 40 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) OFFICE NATIONAL DE L'ÉNERGIE ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........82 536 499 $ ç Crédit 5—Coûts de transition pour la Régie canadienne de l'énergie..........3 670 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) ADMINISTRATION DU PIPE-LINE DU NORD ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........1 055 000 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Puis-je faire rapport à la Chambre du crédit 1 sous la rubrique Énergie atomique du Canada limitée, du crédit 1 sous la rubrique Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire, des crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 et 40 sous la rubrique Ressources naturelles, des crédits 1 et 5 sous la rubrique Office national de l'énergie et du crédit 1 sous la rubrique Administration du pipe-line du Nord?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: C'est tout ce que nous avions à l'ordre du jour d'aujourd'hui.

Jeudi prochain, nous recevrons une délégation de parlementaires allemands. Nous n'avons pas prévu de séance officielle, mais nous les rencontrerons avec le comité du commerce. Je pense que la plupart d'entre vous avez déjà accepté d'être présents. Espérons que tout le monde pourra y être. Nous ne savons pas encore dans quelle salle cette rencontre se tiendra.

La greffière du Comité (Mme Jubilee Jackson):

Ce sera dans la pièce 025B, juste à côté.

Le président:

Ce sera dans la pièce 025B, juste à côté, à 15 h 30, jeudi.

M. Whalen a une question.

M. Nick Whalen:

Mme Stubbs avait évoqué la possibilité de changer la date de la réunion du 20 juin pour recevoir...

Nous pourrions peut-être en parler maintenant.

Le président:

J'allais en fait vous proposer que nous en discutions mardi. Nous tiendrons mardi notre dernière séance prévue dans le cadre de cette étude. Elle ne devrait pas dépasser une heure. Nous pourrions en parler à ce moment-là.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, je préfère que nous parlions mardi.

Le président:

C'est mieux mardi. Ce serait donc tout pour aujourd'hui.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Cela leur laissera plus de temps pour comprendre ce qui se passe.

Le président:

Cela laissera plus de temps à tous pour y réfléchir, et ce sera aussi tout pour aujourd'hui maintenant.

Sur ce, je vous remercie toutes et tous.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard rnnr 28664 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on April 30, 2019

2019-04-04 RNNR 132

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody.

We have no witnesses in person today. We had one cancellation, but we still have three groups of witnesses.

On the screen on our right, we have Brenda Gunn, associate professor, Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba.

On the telephone we have Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh. We thought he was coming from the University of Dublin, but he's not.

You're actually in Australia, right?

Professor Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh (Professor, Griffith University, As an Individual):

I am indeed in Brisbane.

The Chair:

We also have Gunn-Britt Retter, head of the Arctic and environment unit of the Saami Council, by video conference from Norway. Correct?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter (Head, Arctic and Environment Unit, Saami Council):

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you, all of you, for joining us.

We have a number of committee members around the table. Our format is that each of you will be given up to 10 minutes to do a presentation, and then after all three of you complete your presentations, we'll open the table to questions.

I may have to cut you off if we're getting short of time or you're getting close to your time or go over it, so I'll apologize in advance.

Why don't we start with Ms. Retter?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

Thank you for inviting me to speak before the committee. It is a great honour. It is also interesting that Canada is the one looking for international best practices for engaging with indigenous peoples. Usually we look to Canada for good practices for engaging with indigenous peoples.

At the outset, it is worth noting the fundamental difference between indigenous peoples in large parts of Canada, I believe in particular in the Canadian north, who have completed land claim agreements. In Sápmi, the Sami, areas, there are few or close to zero, territories where Sami rights are recognized. The exception is the county of Finnmark in Norway, where the Finnmark Act establishes the Finnmark Estate, which is considered to be co-management of the land, as the Sami Parliament and Finnmark County Council each appoints three members to the board. The Finnmark Act transfers the common land, which the national state claims to own, to the Finnmark Estate. The Finnmark Estate, as the land owner, can be engaged in energy projects as well. So far, to my knowledge there has not been any mechanism in place to engage with indigenous peoples in particular in the one established over Windmill Park, beyond the usual standard national procedures, of course, of conducting environmental impact assessments related to local authority and their spatial planning procedures and applying for licence and the hearing process connected to that applied in national law and for involving stakeholders.

No other considerations are carried out related to Sami peoples. Sami interests are considered part of the Finnmark Estate Board, as I said.

Industry and authorities often call for dialogue. The Sami people often claim that dialogue is needed as well. This is also related to energy projects, as is the question. But we also have gained experiences that tell us that entering a dialogue is a risky business, as the Sami people who are impacted by a project go into a dialogue hoping for understanding of their needs for access to land end up coming out of it without a satisfying outcome, while the project leads go ahead claiming that a dialogue has been conducted, the boxed is ticked and they move on. Without recognition of land rights, it is hard to match the industry that simply follows the national legislation. We end up depending entirely on goodwill.

With no recognition of territory, Sami rights to land are also in the hands of goodwill from the authorities and the legislation they develop. In speeches and jubilees, ministers claim the Sami culture is valuable and important, and enriches Norwegian, Finnish, Swedish or Russian culture, but often some interests have to give way to more important national interests. Now that is the green shift to mitigate climate change.

A recent example in Norway is the permission given to the Nussir copper mine in Fâlesnuorri/Kvalsund. In the name of supporting a green shift and the need for copper to, among other things, produce batteries to replace fossil fuel, both reindeer herding lands and the health of the fjord are put at risk by the mine tailings being deposited on the sea floor. Marine experts have pointed to the environmental risk of this, but through a political decision to support the green shift, the mine has deliberately chosen to take that risk.

There are also several examples of huge windmill plants placed on Sami reindeer herding land, representing a fundamental change in land use in the name of reducing CO2 emissions to promote the green shift. This is a very delicate dilemma.

The Sami people are constantly under pressure to give up land use and fishing grounds for the good of the nation states' interest in the name of mitigating climate change and promoting the green shift.

I am sorry I was not able to provide best practices so far. There is, however, one here in my neighbourhood where the windmill project and reindeer herding entity came to an agreement on the placement the windmill park. I am not aware of the degree to which the company informed the reindeer herders of the fact that the project will produce much more energy than the electricity lines—the grid—to have capacity to send out to the market. Now the company is working hard to get a huge new electricity line established to be able to transfer the energy out to the market.

This is why free, prior and informed consent would be very important when engaging with the indigenous peoples. The information part, as in this example, would have been essential to understanding the full picture through the engagement process.

I would also like to add before I conclude that beyond the Sami region I could mention that, as I'm engaged in the Arctic Council work, there are two forthcoming reports prepared through the Arctic Council. One is on the Arctic environmental impact assessment conducted through the Sustainable Development Working Group, and the other is through the Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment, PAME, Working Group, a project called Meaningful Engagement of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities in Marine Activities. This is an inventory of good practices in the engagement of indigenous peoples, mostly examples from Canada and America actually.

I don't know your deadlines, but these will be published at the beginning of May at the Arctic Council ministerial meeting, so it might be worthwhile for the committee to consider these two reports.

In conclusion, from my perspective, best practice should be to focused on our own consumption patterns to spend and waste less, use energy and resources more efficiently, and reuse resources that are already taken. I would rather do this than occupy more territory for the mitigation efforts.

I hope I kept to the time limit.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

You did. You had time to spare. We're grateful for that, so thank you.

Professor O'Faircheallaigh, why don't you go next.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Thank you.

Just very briefly, good morning from Brisbane and thank you very much for the opportunity to speak to you.

By way of background, my research for the last 25 years has focused on the interrelationship between indigenous people and extractive industries. Over that time I've also worked as a negotiator for aboriginal peoples. I have worked with them to conduct what I refer to as indigenous or aboriginal impact assessments. A number of these have related to large energy projects, particularly to a number of liquefied natural gas projects in the northwest of Western Australia. My experience extends to Canada. I've undertaken fieldwork in Newfoundland and Labrador, in Alberta and in the Northwest Territories.

My comments on international best practice draw on that 25 years of both research and professional engagement.

I want to stress that I am addressing what I consider to be best practice. That, to me, involves two components. It involves the conduct of indigenous or aboriginal impact assessments of major energy projects and, based on those, the negotiation of legally binding agreements between aboriginal peoples, governments and proponents, covering the whole life of energy projects.

The reason for stressing those two points is as follows. Conventional impact assessment has dismally failed indigenous people. That applies in Australia, it applies in Canada, it applies throughout the globe. There are numerous reasons for that. Time means I can't go into them in detail, but I am happy to take follow-up questions.

The major issues are that conventional impact assessment is driven by proponents and the consultants they employ. Their objective is to get approval for projects and, as a result, they tend, for example, to systematically understate problems and issues associated with projects, and to overstate particularly their economic benefits.

Conventional impact assessment tends to deny the validity and knowledge of indigenous knowing, indigenous views of the world. It fails to adopt appropriate methodologies and it tends to be very much project focused. It tends to deal with one project at a time.

The result of that last point is that cumulative impacts tend to be either ignored or very much understated. That, for example, is very evident in the context of oil sands in Alberta.

In response to these fundamental problems, what is happening increasingly is the emergence of indigenous-conducted impact assessment. There are a number of different models that can be applied in developing indigenous-controlled impact assessment. Again, I am happy to elaborate.

Just to mention one, for a proposed liquefied natural gas hub in the northwest of Western Australia, a strategic assessment was conducted by the federal government and the state government in Western Australia. There were a number of terms of reference for the strategic assessment that related to indigenous impacts.

What occurred was that the regional representative aboriginal body, the Kimberley Land Council, and aboriginal traditional owners of the site negotiated with the proponent and the governments that they would simply extract all of the terms of reference that dealt with indigenous issues and would conduct the impact assessment in relation to those terms of reference.

It is extremely instructive to compare the six-volume impact assessment that emerged from that exercise with an impact assessment conducted by the lead proponent, Woodside Energy, in relation to another LNG project in another part of Australia. There is a world of difference. Indigenous impact assessment is much more capable of properly identifying the key issues for indigenous people and, just as importantly, of identifying viable strategies for dealing with those impacts.

The second component of best practice is the negotiation, based on those impact assessments, of legally binding agreements for the whole-of-project life.

(1545)



One fundamental factor is that the political reality—and this isn't just an issue in relation to indigenous peoples—is that once projects get approval, the attention of government moves elsewhere. Given that many of these projects will last for 20, 30, or 40 years, there is a huge issue of making sure that over time there is a continued focus on dealing with the issues identified in impact assessment and in dealing with changes over time. No project is the same after 10, 20, or 30 years. How do we ensure that there is a continued focus?

One way of doing it is to negotiate agreements that cover the whole of project life and provide the resources to make sure that the focus can be maintained, and to provide management mechanisms and decision-making mechanisms that provide for ongoing input from affected indigenous peoples.

It is essential that those agreements extend through the whole of project life, because as we're becoming increasingly aware, as projects developed in the 1960s and 1970s reach the end of their lives, there are very major issues about closure and rehabilitation of projects and about dealing with project impacts that can in fact extend far beyond the operational life of the mines, the gas fields, and the oil fields concerned.

I would stress that I am talking about international best practice that's emerging, but there are very clear examples of such practice having been realized.

The final point I would stress is that the negotiation of agreements for the life of projects must occur in a context in which indigenous peoples have some real bargaining power. If they lack that bargaining power, then the agreements that result are likely to entrench their disadvantage, their lack of power. It is thus critical to have an appropriate legal framework and international legal instruments such as the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, with its emphasis on free, prior and informed consent. It's an example of the sort of framework that can provide that real bargaining power.

Thank you.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Professor Gunn, you are last but not least.

Professor Brenda Gunn (Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba, As an Individual):

[Witness speaks in Northern Michif :]

[English]

Thank you for the invitation to appear today. I'm really excited that this committee is undertaking this important study, so much so that I was willing to take the afternoon away from my three-month-old daughter. My apologies if I'm perhaps not as put together as I might normally be, but I managed to pull together my presentation while she was napping on my lap over the last couple of weeks. I'm really excited to be here, and I look forward to having some time for questions, so I will try to be as succinct as possible.

For your information, I am a professor in the Faculty of Law here at the University of Manitoba. I've been participating in the international indigenous rights movement for the past 15 years. I am also the co-chair of the rights of indigenous peoples interest group for the American Society of International Law, and a member of the International Law Association's implementing the rights of indigenous peoples committee. I've also provided technical assistance to the UN expert mechanism on the rights of indigenous peoples for their study on best practices for implementing the UN declaration.

Today, I want to focus my remarks on the idea of international best practices, but I want to highlight the international legal standards that should guide Canada's engagement with indigenous peoples. I'll make reference to three main rights, which include the right to self-determination, the right to participate in decision-making and the right to free, prior and informed consent.

While many people cite the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in relation to these rights, it's important to know that these rights are grounded in broader human rights treaties that Canada is a party to, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.

My presentation here today is going to draw on four main documents, which I provided to the clerk this morning. There are two studies by the UN expert mechanism on the rights of indigenous peoples: the new World Bank environmental and social standards, as well as the “zero draft” of the convention on business and human rights, which is based on the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

To this end, while I would say that I'm providing a presentation on best practices, I actually think it's much more than simply best practices. I'm trying to provide what, in my expert opinion, are the minimum necessary standards that Canada is required to meet to uphold its international human rights obligations.

What I've done is try to compile some of the key areas that I think Canada must uphold, based on these various documents. As a starting point, I think it's quite clear in international law that indigenous peoples must not just be able to participate in decision-making processes that affect their rights, but must also actually control the outcome of such processes. To this end, the participation must be effective. The processes must uphold indigenous peoples' human rights, including the right to self-determination and the right to use, own, develop and control their lands, territories and resources. This is critical, because, in this regard, FPIC safeguards cultural identity. For indigenous peoples, as we know, cultural identity is inextricably linked to their lands, resources and territories.

When we're speaking about FPIC, we have some guidance on what these different standards are. “Prior” means that the process must occur prior to any other decisions being made that allow the proposal to proceed. The process should begin as early as possible in the formulation of a proposal. The international standard is for indigenous peoples' engagement to begin at the conceptualization and design phases. It must also provide the necessary time for indigenous peoples to absorb, understand and analyze the information provided and to undertake their own decision-making processes.

(1555)



We speak about “informed” consent. International law requires that independent specialists be engaged to assist in the identification of project risks and impacts. Indigenous people should not have to rely solely on the materials put forward by the proponent.

Finally, there is “consent”. I'm sure I'll field more questions on this, so I didn't put too much into the presentation, but I think importantly consent means that indigenous peoples must not be simply required to say yes to a predetermined decision; there has to be the opportunity to engage in a more robust process.

To this end, the process must occur in a climate free from intimidation, coercion, manipulation and harassment. It must promote trust and good faith and not suspicion, accusations, threats, criminalization, violence toward indigenous peoples or the taking of prejudiced views towards them. The process must ensure that indigenous peoples have the freedom to be represented as traditionally required under their own laws, customs and protocols, with attention to gender and representation of other sectors within the community. Indigenous peoples must also be able to determine how and which of their institutions and leaders represent them.

Under international law, indigenous peoples also have the power to determine the course or the actual consultation process. This includes being consulted when devising the process of consultation and having the opportunity to share or use or develop their own protocols in consultation.

Finally, the process must also allow for indigenous peoples to define the methods, the timelines, the locations and evaluation of the consultation process.

One question often raised is when FPIC is required. Generally, it's when a project is likely to have a significant direct impact on indigenous peoples' lives, lands, territories and resources. It's important to note that it's indigenous peoples' perspective on the potential impact that is the standard here. It's not the state's or the proponent's determination of the impact, but indigenous peoples'. Also, this right of FPIC is not limited to lands that Canada recognizes as aboriginal title lands; it includes lands that indigenous peoples have traditionally owned or otherwise occupied and used, including lands, territories and resources that are governed under indigenous peoples' own laws.

It's important during these processes that states engage broadly with all potentially impacted indigenous peoples through their own representative institutions. They must ensure that they are also engaging indigenous women, children, youth and persons with disabilities, bearing in mind that government structures of some indigenous communities may be male-dominated. To this end, consultation should also provide an understanding of the specific impacts on indigenous people. It's not just about having indigenous women, children and youth present, but also specifically turning your mind to how the project may impact indigenous women differently or specifically.

Another area that I think is particularly important in Canada is the importance of ensuring that FPIC processes support consensus building within indigenous peoples' communities and must avoid any process that may cause further division within the community. In relation to processes that might further divide, we want to be aware of any situations of economic duress, such as when communities may be feeling pressure to engage in the process because of economic duress, and trying to ensure that any process, consultation or otherwise is not further dividing the community.

(1600)



As was already mentioned, these consultation processes should occur throughout the project, ensuring that there is constant communication between the parties. Under international law, it's important to note that these consultation processes where indigenous peoples are engaged in decision-making and provide their free, prior and informed consent should not be confused with public hearings for the environment and regulatory regimes.

Sorry, I think I am running short of time. I want to make one or two more points.

International law does recognize that indigenous peoples may withhold their consent in several circumstances, which include following an assessment and conclusion that the proposal is not in their best interest, where there are deficiencies in the process, or to communicate a legitimate distrust in the consultation process or the initiative.

Some might say that the UN declaration is unclear because different articles provide different wording. However, I think the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples has tried to clarify that the terms “consult” and “co-operate” denote a right of indigenous peoples to influence the outcome of the decision-making process, not just to be involved in it. I think the standards and international law are quite clear, and Canada should be taking steps to uphold these obligations.

Finally, to wrap things up, there are some broader objectives that the right to participate in decision-making seeks to achieve that can help us guide these processes. The first is to correct the de jure and de facto exclusion of indigenous peoples from public life, and the second, to revitalize and restore indigenous people's own decision-making processes.

Finally, free, prior and informed consent also has some underlying rationales that should guide our implementation: To restore indigenous people's control over their lands and resources; to restore indigenous people's cultural integrity, pride and self-esteem; and to redress the power imbalance between indigenous peoples and states, with a view to forging new relationships based on rights and mutual respect between the parties.

[Witness speaks in Northern Michif:]

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

Professor Gunn, we do appreciate your taking the time away from your newborn to be here with us and to make the effort to prepare. We're very grateful for that.

Mr. Graham, you're going to start us off.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

First off, Professor O'Faircheallaigh, I checked and I wanted to thank you for getting up at five o'clock in the morning to talk to us. That's very much appreciated by all of us. I'll come back to you in a second.

Ms. Retter, in your comments you talked about entering a dialogue as being a risky business. That's something that stuck with me from the moment you said it. You talked about the dangers. I want to get into the dangers and the experience you have with that. You talked about a mine that has tailings in the sea floor as a result of the dialogue, if I understood you correctly. If that's the case, did the dialogue process, as described at length by professor Gunn, follow that kind of process of free, prior, and informed consent, or was there a completely different process involved here? Can you help us with that?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

I think the two other presentations answered many of the things I was addressing. What I was trying to convey was the lack of recognition that the process needs to to fulfill free, prior, and informed consent and the lack of recognition that indigenous peoples have less power and that there is a power imbalance. In the Norwegian system, the engagement has been carried out like the ordinary process of hearing and treated like it is with other stakeholders, without this recognition of the different culture, different needs, different world view and imbalance in power relations.

It was carried out according to other stakeholders' interests. Interests were treated, but indigenous people's rights and needs for conducting our culture were not recognized. That's also why we get a different outcome. If we had an impact assessment conducted by indigenous peoples, like the professor was mentioning, or we addressed the free, prior and informed consent as described, I think we would have had a a different result.

(1605)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Your sense is that the process for a free, prior and informed consent would not allow the entry into dialogue to become a risky business.

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

Yes, that is our hope, until we try that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood. Thank you.

Professor O'Faircheallaigh, you talked about environmental impact assessments and left a loud hint that you'd like to talk about it a bit further. I'd like to give you the opportunity to do that, if you'd like.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Sorry, which specific...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On the topic of environmental impact assessments—

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—you said you didn't have enough time to say everything you wanted to say on that, so here is some time to say what you wanted to say.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

I'm sorry, but I'm getting a bad echo on the line now. Anyway, I'll keep going.

I'd like to begin by perhaps following up on your question about dialogue being a risky business.

I think that one issue with conventional impact assessments is exactly that. When indigenous people don't control it, they're in a dilemma because if they engage with it, it can be taken as an indication of their consent. On the other hand, it very rarely is effective in taking into account the issues they have.

I will fill in on a couple of the points. One is the failure to properly acknowledge the importance of indigenous world views, of indigenous understandings of the universe and indigenous expertise. There tends to be a deeply in-built assumption that western science offers the only valid understanding of environmental processes and outcomes. As a result of that, even if use is made of information provided by indigenous people, for example through land-use studies, it tends to be co-opted and presented in a frame that's very much dominated by western assumptions and western values.

Another point I would mention is the failure to use appropriate methodologies for engaging with indigenous people. The very much standard approach in conventional impact assessment is to use meetings in offices, in buildings, to do that in a one-off form so that you come to a meeting, you provide people with information and you ask for their response. For various reasons, that sort of approach is entirely inappropriate. If you look at the way in indigenous-controlled impact assessment is conducted, you see that it tends to have a much broader variety of forms of engagement. It will involve small group meetings, individual meetings. It will involve perhaps separate meetings with men and women. It will involve meetings “on country”, as we say in Australia, in other words, meetings at the places on the land, in the waters, where these impacts are expected to happen, where indigenous people feel much freer and are much better able to express their understandings.

It is iterative. In other words, there will be a succession of exchanges where initial information is provided, people are given time to think about it and come back and ask questions. Further information is provided. You will have this backwards and forwards process over an extended period of time.

I think there are both fundamental and systemic issues in the way indigenous knowledge is treated, and there are a series of very practical issues of what the appropriate ways of engaging with indigenous people are to make sure that they do in fact have a real impact on what is said in environmental impact statements and on the recommendations that emerge from that.

(1610)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I think my time for consultation is already up.

The Chair:

Sadly, yes it is, Mr. Graham.

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to all the witnesses who have made themselves available to participate in this study.

Let me say, as a member of Parliament in Canada who represents a major oil and gas riding, whose future is completely dependent on the successful construction of major energy infrastructure, I thank you as a person who is of indigenous descent myself, being part Ojibway. I thank you as a person who represents oil and gas workers in northeast Alberta and nine indigenous communities, both first nation and Métis, and whose businesses and livelihoods and futures are dependent on oil and gas development and the construction of major energy projects in Canada. I thank you.

I do, however, regret, Mr. Chair, that I want to move my motion that I tabled on Friday, October 19, 2018.

The Chair:

Which motion is it?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It's the motion I put on notice on Friday, October 19, 2018.

The Chair:

There are others. I've seen a few. I just want to make sure we have the right one in front of us.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Sure, I'll read it: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the Committee request the Minister of Natural Resources appear before the Committee, in the next month, to answer questions related to the Trans Mountain purchase and plans to build the Trans Mountain expansion, and that this meeting be televised.

I trust that the witnesses will understand and probably know that Canada is in a crisis in energy development. It is damaging Canada's reputation as a place that welcomes energy investment, where big projects can be built.

I do hope we'll be able to have you again in the course of this study and certainly invite you to follow up with written submissions, but we as Conservatives are at our wit's end in terms of being able to get our own Minister of Natural of Resources to come to this standing committee to account to Canadians on the outstanding construction of the Trans Mountain expansion—

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, we do have the minister coming on the main estimates within the next month. I am wondering if it would be sufficient for Ms. Stubbs to have the opportunity to question the minister on the broad variety of things one can be questioned on with respect to the main estimates, including money allocated to TMX, at that time, and allow the witnesses who have come from abroad and who have made themselves available for this meeting to continue to be questioned. Or we could devote some time at a future meeting to having a second opportunity for the minister to come and speak to us on TMX in addition to the main estimates, if that would be amenable to her.

The Chair:

Thank you for that. I was going to suggest the same thing. I'll get back to you in a second, Ms. Stubbs, but we do have witnesses who have joined us from around the world, literally. It's been quite difficult to coordinate this, to get all three of them here. Rather than turning them away....

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

What date will the minister be here?

The Chair:

Allow me to finish, please. We have made the request that the minister come, pursuant to the last motion you tabled, actually. He has agreed to do so. I can't remember the date off the top of my head. It's April 30, I've just been reminded. He will be coming—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The problem is that on February 26—

The Chair:

If you would allow me to finish, please—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

—all members of the committee did vote to call the minister—

The Chair:

Or you can interrupt me. It's entirely up to you.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Or you could keep interrupting me.

The Chair:

No, I was actually speaking.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Let me respond to your point.

The Chair:

No, I haven't finished yet.

The minister is coming on April 30.

We have three witnesses here—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

These Liberals really have problems with letting women speak. I'm the only woman member of this committee.

The Chair:

Actually, no, there's another one here. I'd like to acknowledge that.

(1615)

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, there's the permanent member. Sorry.

The Chair:

In any event, we have three witnesses here who have graciously given us their time. We have the minister coming. Mr. Whalen has suggested a very reasonable compromise, although that's entirely up to the committee members. We could set aside some time. We are sitting next week. That way we're not putting further witnesses out, and we can discuss this issue then. Since he is coming anyway, we're not losing any time, or you don't lose anything with respect to the nature of your motion, with all respect. That's my suggestion.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay. Do you feel comfortable that you've concluded, and do I have your consent to speak?

The Chair:

Go ahead. Go ahead.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay. Here's my concern.

On February 26, all members of this committee did move to call the minister to appear here on the supplementary estimates, and I thought that we all had an agreement on that, and so far the minister has failed to appear. He's sitting in the House of Commons today, and he's been here multiple times when this committee has sat. It has been nearly five months since he has appeared here. He has not been accountable on the Trans Mountain purchase. He has not been accountable on the allocations in the estimates. Here we are, trying to get through a study, which, I agree, is extremely important but, I think, confounding, certainly to the indigenous communities that I represent, to the 43 indigenous communities who were counting on the completion of the Trans Mountain expansion...while Liberal legislation, dealing with exactly this issue of full-scale regulatory overhaul and consulting with indigenous communities to ensure the meaningful, the proper, the environmentally responsible and sustainable construction of major energy projects can continue. That legislation is sitting in the Senate right now. It never came through this committee. So here we are, trying to get through this study that—

The Chair:

May I ask you a question?

What do you propose we do with the witnesses today?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think you're trying to make it seem like it is urgent to complete. What is urgent is that the minister should have appeared in front of this committee four and a half months ago.

The Chair:

Okay.

If you intend to continue, and you have the right to do so, should we be good enough to dismiss the witnesses? We have 45 minutes left in the scheduled meeting, and if you're going to do that, I don't think they need to sit here and listen to it, although they're free to do so.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

What I would say is that if you can guarantee and confirm a date and a time when the minister will appear here at the natural resources committee, I absolutely would love to go back to the study. If not, yes, I will continue.

The Chair:

The date will be April 30. The time will be 3:30 in the afternoon.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Great.

The Chair:

So can we move on?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, let's do that.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

We can just leave the motion open but not debate it right now. We'll discuss it next week, because I think Ms. Stubbs might want him twice.

The Chair:

That was my understanding as well, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can adjourn debate on the motion now.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs: Sure.

The Chair:

We can set aside some committee business on Tuesday and deal with it then.

We can move on to witnesses.

Is that acceptable to everybody then?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, NDP):

I just want to make some points here. I've had my hand up.

The Chair:

I saw that. I wasn't ignoring you.

Do you want to speak to something about the motion?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

I do want to speak to this piece as well as to the motion because of the importance that all of industry.... Regardless of what province or territory we're in, the indigenous people are impacted and want to have full participation, but due to government regulations and industry's understanding, the indigenous communities always end up losing out. I'm very concerned about that.

I want to thank my colleague to my right here. Talking to the minister is very crucial because, as I'm learning and as I've seen across Canada, industry needs to occur, but indigenous communities are required to be involved.

The Chair:

Thank you. You're welcome to come back and join us any time we're meeting.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

I understand that. I don't appreciate the way you said it because I find that condescending, but it's really significant—

The Chair:

What I was saying is that we're going to continue discussing this motion on Tuesday, so I welcome you to come back and participate. That was my point.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

But again, you're just assuming. I want to make sure that my point is made while we have this opportunity, because we're not going to have these witnesses on Tuesday and I really appreciate the witnesses who are here today with us.

The Chair:

All right, thank you.

Are we all in agreement on how we're dealing with this motion then?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

We're all in agreement, and we're also in agreement that if that minister does not get here, this will happen every day, every time we meet.

The Chair:

I'm not sure we agree on that. That's entirely up to you.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay, I'll put you on notice then.

(1620)

The Chair:

Are your questions with respect to the motion? If they're with respect to the motion we're talking about, that's fine. Otherwise I'd like to move on and get to the witnesses.

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

If the minister does not in fact show up on April 30, you have my full support to table the motion again.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Mr. Harvey. We have Albertans in all Canadians.

Mr. Chair, given how important this study is and my gratitude to the witnesses for being here, and the comments of my colleague who doesn't get to participate on a regular basis, if it's okay with you, I would cede my questioning to my NDP colleague to go ahead. Then we'll see if we can get in a follow-up round afterwards.

The Chair:

Absolutely. That's entirely up to you.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

I want to emphasize that I do support the minister's coming here and answering some questions away from the estimates, because when we talk about the budget and the estimates, we rarely get to the kinds of discussions we want to have.

To Ms. Gunn in Manitoba, you speak about indigenous participation and free, prior and informed consent.

I come from Saskatchewan my experience there—and I'm sure it's similar across Canada—is that the federal and provincial governments think “indigenous” means reserves, the Métis locals, or the Métis communities only, but not municipalities where the majority of indigenous people may live.

How can we rectify that? How can we have the discussion to clarify that very point? It's really important that the local residents who live in municipalities look to participate, look to have consent and look for the same information. How can we do that?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Thanks.

I think you're absolutely right with the concern you've raised. The areas for which these consultations are viewed to be necessary tend to be the reserved lands. In Manitoba we have some recognized trapline territories that can sometimes be engaged, at least by provincial governments.

The “how” is perhaps a difficult question, but I think it must start with the recognition that the right under international law to participate in the decision-making and the right to give one's free, prior and informed consent is not limited to aboriginal title or reserve lands; it's traditional lands, territories and resources. Regardless of Canadian governments' recognition of indigenous people's lands, the right exists there.

One starting point would be simply a recognition that all of Canada is indigenous lands, so that when projects are being contemplated, one must think about whose traditional territories are potentially impacted and start engaging the people in that way.

I think you're right. I don't believe I highlighted it in the presentation, but when indigenous peoples reside in an urban environment they also have a right to engage in the processes. The processes may not just be limited to consultations in community; there may need to be ways set up to address and ensure the participation of indigenous peoples in more urban centres. Those are all quite clearly required under international standards right now.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Do we have those discussions occurring across Canada? I'm curious.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

I'm not sure of the extent to which we have them. I think the conversations are perhaps there. Is the legal recognition there that Canada is required to engage in consultation with indigenous people, even when Canadian law has yet to recognize indigenous people's traditional territories? I'm not sure whether it's actually happening. I think you're right to point that out it's not happening effectively.

An example that may speak to this is found in our prairie provinces, where we have the historic treaties and we speak with colleagues who are lawyers in practice. They've told me that different approaches are taken in areas of Canada where there are historic treaties, the numbered treaties, from treaty number 1 through to 11, which Canada still views as indigenous people ceding, surrendering and releasing all rights to the land—indigenous people take a very different perspective on this—compared with the way Canada engages with indigenous people when there is no historic treaty. I think there is a significant difference.

For me, that's some of the problem I was trying to highlight in my presentation—albeit not speaking to it directly—that even if Canada continues to maintain the position that in treaties number 1 through 11 indigenous people ceded, surrendered and released the rights to the land, that is not the perspective of indigenous people. In international law they have a right to engage in processes over their traditional territories, regardless of Canada's interpretation of those treaties.

(1625)

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Thank you.

Do I still have time?

The Chair:

You have used Ms. Stubbs's time, now you have your own time.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

I want to go back to a specific question. The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination said in a letter of December 14, 2018, that proceeding with the site C dam “would infringe indigenous peoples' rights protected under the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.”

How should the governments of Canada and B.C. proceed? That's a really good question and a good discussion to have.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

My apologies. I don't have that report in front of me. I did appear before the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination when Site C was brought up, so I'm aware of this report.

From my recollection, the report, including the initial report that came out.... Sorry, I don't have dates in front of me. I think it was 2016, Canada's last review before CERD and the concluding observations of the committee. The report you refer to is the follow-up.

I think there are some pretty specific directions from the committee on what needs to happen, so I would suggest that's the starting point. I don't have the document in front of me, nor do I have access to the Internet in the little room that I'm currently in, so I can't pull it up.

I think, perhaps, a starting place for our concerns over Site C is to recognize that we just need to take a pause until some of these issues are considered and resolved. My understanding, as I've done some work with Amnesty International, is that Site C is continuing to move forward despite all these concerns that are being raised. I think, perhaps, a starting point for the conversation is for there to at least be a pause on some of the developments so that the broader issues that have been raised by the human rights committee can be addressed.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Am I done?

The Chair:

No, you have five minutes.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is a very sensitive issue for all Canadians across Canada. It is also shown to have split indigenous nations who want to develop the petroleum resources on their lands and get the product to market, and coastal indigenous nations who oppose the project, saying it threatens their economies that are based on utilizing ocean resources.

How can Canada resolve this? Do you have any ideas to recommend, some suggestions and some solutions for moving forward?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Thank you for that question, as well. At least I'm assuming these questions are directed at me.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Yes.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

If any of my co-panellists would like to jump in, I'm happy to hear international perspectives on these matters.

I'm not sure I have an answer, but I appreciate your highlighting the example, because it hits on one of the most challenging issues, namely, the right of indigenous peoples to participate in decision-making and free, prior and informed consent, which is to ensure that these processes do not create further divides amongst indigenous peoples and do not engage in divide-and-conquer types of tactics. I think projects such as Trans Mountain really exemplify the complicated nature of these conversations when projects are so large, crossing so many territories and engaging so many different people.

One of the questions I often get governments and industry asking is who has the right to say yes? Or whose approval do we have to get when there are so many different people? What happens if not everyone agrees? My answer, which may or may not be the one you're hoping for, honourable member, is that I'm curious to know if the communities who have raised concerns regarding Trans Mountain feel as though they've been heard. And I mean truly heard with regard to the concerns they've raised. Has consideration been given to what the impacts are? Can they be mitigated, and has there been space for real conversation? Or have all of the conversations or consultations occurred in a climate of “this project is going forward. Get on board or get out of the way”?

I fear that on large complicated projects such as Trans Mountain, on which there are people with different perspectives, it becomes easier for Canada and industry to work with indigenous peoples or first nations who are willing to work with them, and to then perhaps ignore or sidestep the concerns raised by other people. I think that's fundamentally a problem.

I don't know enough of the specific concerns that are being raised to say this is the way forward. But I think the right, as contemplated in international law, is about trying to uphold rights and to create space for a real conversation, in which all parties have the opportunity to speak and be heard. I would say that as a starting point for these large projects, we need to make sure all those who are potentially impacted have an opportunity to be heard.

I also think that with projects like Trans Mountain, if I'm correct, there may be a distinction between indigenous communities that are directly impacted by the project, whose traditional territories the pipeline will cross through, and those for whom there may be more indirect impacts. I think that needs to be part of the conversation. I'm not trying to in any way suggest that those who have indirect impacts have lesser rights, but that's just a recognition that there may be different rights at play and so we want to try to get that broader picture.

(1630)

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

It's important to have the minister here so that we can have further discussions.

The Chair:

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I'm happy for this opportunity to bring some of our international guests back into the conversation.

Each of the testimonies we've heard raises issues around the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and you've all emphasized the importance of free, prior and informed consent. Can you advise the committee as to how first Norway and then Australia has acted to ensure that capacity is built among indigenous communities to ensure that consultation is in fact informed? How do you build that technical expertise in Norway and Australia to ensure that people are able to participate in a meaningful way and an informed way in what is often a very technical discussion?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

I have a quick response to the previous question, if I may. I think it's also a question of who has the right to determine future generations' rights to live off the land, just to add to the complication.

Norway has developed, but not Finland and Sweden, a consultation agreement with the Sami Parliament. The Sami Parliament is an elected body of the Sami people. There is one in Norway, another one in Finland and a third in Sweden.

In Norway there is a consultation agreement. An amendment to the act is under discussion now that it should also involve municipalities and provinces, or counties as we call them.

On the question of the technical expertise and capacity, I think the capacity today is what is built in the Sami parliaments, and the employees there have mostly legal backgrounds to do these consultations. But on the technical expertise, which was also raised in one of the previous presentations, we still rely very much on the proponents' reports and findings rather than trusting the indigenous knowledge there.

Of course, in this process with the environmental impact assessments, which Norway, Finland and Sweden conduct, the money is put in by the proponents to carry it out. For example, I don't even know if the Sami have reflected that they could demand to conduct the assessment rather than letting the technical people do it to ensure the holistic and the Sami world view is taken care of. When that has been tried, I don't know of any successful efforts in that regard.

I think we are quite up to date on the legal aspect. We have a lot of legal experts who can take part in this. But when it comes to the more technical part, there is a shortage.

(1635)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Mr. O'Faircheallaigh.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Quickly, there is a precedent with Sami people in Sweden. They have recently conducted their own impact assessment of a proposed copper mine being developed by Falun. I can provide that reference to the committee.

Quickly again, in response to the honourable member's very important questions of only focusing on people on reserve, I think another critical issue about aboriginal control of impact assessment is that aboriginal people decide who is impacted and who should be consulted.

There are cases where I've been involved where—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'm sorry, Mr. O'Faircheallaigh. As you may have heard previously, I only get seven minutes to ask my questions, and I would like you to answer mine.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Okay. Sure.

In terms of capacity and free, prior and informed consent, this is a chicken and egg issue. Where aboriginal people have powerful regional representative organizations, they use their existing capacity to go to proponents and government and negotiate with them about getting the resources to further build that capacity.

For example, in the Kimberley region of northwestern Australia, you have a representative organization called the Kimberley Land Council. It has a powerful political base. It represents all native title groups in the Kimberley, and it is in a position to go to government and proponents and negotiate substantial funding to carry out comprehensive indigenous impact assessments and negotiate agreements.

In parts of Australia, particularly in what we call “settled Australia” in Victoria and New South Wales, you don't have that regional political organization, and, bluntly, you end up with a two-tier system. Aboriginal people in Victoria and New South Wales and South Australia struggle hugely in getting the resources to realize that capacity.

My experience in Canada suggests that you sometimes get the same sort of a two-tier system, possibly for the same sorts of reasons.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Well, let's stay there in Canada, because you said that you've done some work in the oil and gas sector off the east coast. We actually have a process now that's just coming to an end with respect to Equinor and ExxonMobil and consultations for offshore development of the exploratory drilling projects proposed this summer.

Proponent funding was granted to allow the indigenous groups, 41 of them, I believe, that may or may not.... It's quite unknown whether or not their fishing rights in Atlantic salmon would be impacted, but they were all invited to participate. It seems that the ones that were given more funding were the ones that were actually already better able to participate because they were already well funded, and the less well-funded groups were given less money. Do you see this disconnect in Australia—I think you've mentioned it—and how should we try to work around that?

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Yes. First of all, I should clarify that my work was at Voisey's Bay in Labrador, rather than on the offshore—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Okay. Thank you.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

—but I think that reinforces the point, because the Innu and the Inuit were able to negotiate one of the strongest impact benefit agreements in Canada mainly because they already had a strong political organization they were able to mobilize. You certainly see that in Australia.

I think the only solution is to have a federally funded facility that provides all groups affected by major projects with funding capacity. It's possible to do that in a way that is consistent with the parliament's accountability requirements and so on. But in the absence of a national fund, these inequities inevitably emerge. To those who already have will come more.

(1640)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you so much. I have eight more questions, but I only got one in.

The Chair:

Mr. Falk, I believe you're next, for five minutes.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you to all of our presenters here today for their testimony here at committee.

Ms. Retter, I would like to start with you. In your testimony to committee at the beginning of this meeting, you made a comment. I tried to get it all here; I don't know if I captured it all. You said that sometimes rights have to give way to national interests. Can you further expand on that?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

Yes, thank you. I'll try to be brief.

What I was trying to convey is that while Norway, Finland and Sweden recognize that there are indigenous peoples with rights, they don't have the land title as in other parts of the world.

We are often faced with the challenge, for example, in the face of climate change, which is uppermost today. We say, oh yes, but we need to mitigate climate change and we have to find alternatives to fossil fuel, so that is a global and a national interest, and the Sami issues have to wait now that we have these more important issues to solve. Also, we relay expectations to the Sami people that they have to be part of this joint effort to mitigate climate change, and then use that as an argument to put that dilemma on the indigenous peoples or the Sami people that they have the land that is needed to mitigate this or to change to green energy sources and so on. That is a very unfair burden.

First of all, there are already a lot of windmill parks and mines on Sami land, so it's not that we don't contribute, but there's also a lot of other land that you could use that is closer to where the electricity need is. As a Sami, you feel it's yet another argument to continue to change the land use and put pressure on the Sami culture to carry this burden. I'll put it that way.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you.

Ms. Gunn, what is your perspective on national energy projects as far as the rights are concerned of people of first nations or indigenous communities who are directly affected, versus those who are indirectly affected? Should they have the same rights?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Maybe my best response is not just my perspective, but my legal opinion. I believe international law recognizes that there is an obligation on the state to get the free, prior and informed consent of indigenous peoples, whether it's their traditional territory that will be directly impacted, or whether they may have their rights impacted in other ways.

I'm not sure that international law makes the distinction that you're seeking to make here today. Going back to my earlier comment and my opening presentation, what we should be guided by in these processes is seeking to uphold rights. If we're engaging in processes to restore indigenous peoples' control over their lands and resources and restore their integrity and pride and redress power imbalances between indigenous peoples and states, I think this process where we try to divide indigenous peoples and say, “You're directly impacted, and you're indirectly impacted, so your rights aren't as important”, is not done in good faith. It is not upholding the standards, where the consultation process is actually about upholding rights and promoting new partnership.

(1645)

Mr. Ted Falk:

Would it also be in good faith for someone who doesn't have a direct impact or interest in a project to tender their opposition to a project?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Well, I don't think it's fair to speak to that in the abstract. From my experience, when people have raised opposition, they've often done so because of concerns for water quality. They may be downstream from a development. Maybe they're indirectly impacted, but they will experience the impacts.

Again, I think the obligation on Canada is to find out what concerns are being raised, how indigenous peoples can be impacted, and what steps are necessary to ensure that all of their human rights are upheld in the process.

The Chair:

I'm going to have to stop you there, Mr. Falk.

Mr. Ted Falk:

I wasn't done.

The Chair:

Well, I have a difference of opinion with you on that one. You will get another shot if you want.

Mr. Hehr, it's your turn.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

I'd like to thank the guests for coming today. This has been a fascinating discussion. Your knowledge is very deep and you bring a lot to the table for us both to understand our duty to consult and to accommodate our indigenous people here on major energy projects. I come from a city called Calgary, the energy capital of Canada. In Canada, we are also treaty 7 people. We share the land with the indigenous people of that region, and build community with them here today.

Nevertheless, I was listening to the discussion about the Sami people and the mitigation of climate change, wherein you found a successful practice implementing a large-scale windmill and a process that worked all right. Was that because there was early engagement on the file? Were people connected very quickly. What led to a successful outcome in that case?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

I'm not sure how early they were engaged, but what was fundamental here was the dialogue, the consultations that went on and that they agreed on that. Yes, they understood the need for the windmill, and they had this dialogue on what part of the land was less important for reindeer herding and still useful for a windmill.

What I understand from that process is that both parties were happy. They adjusted the location of the planned windmill park and they agreed.... I'm not sure if there were any direct benefits involved in that, but at the same time, I raised a concern connected to the free, prior and informed consent part of that project. It's the cumulative effect here, which was also mentioned earlier. After they finished the windmill part, they started to talk about the need for electricity lines. I don't know if that was a part of the kind of understanding that was put on the table when they were negotiating or consulting with the reindeer herders. I'm not sure if there was an understanding that this would lead to other construction on the same land that might have a greater impact than the windmill.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

My next question is for Dr. O'Faircheallaigh. Earlier in your testimony, you mentioned that you saw a difference between indigenous environmental impact assessments and “regular” studies in this regard. When these were completed, were the companies and the indigenous people at loggerheads? Was there a mechanism to work out the differences, or was this generally accepted as the best way forward, through dialogue and discourse?

(1650)

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

In the regulatory process, there doesn't have to be a reconciliation because the indigenous impact assessment goes to the decision-maker—in the case I mentioned, to the federal minister and the Western Australian minister—alongside the conventional impact assessment.

What the decision-makers get is an undiluted perspective on the project and its impacts, and mitigation from an indigenous point of view. I think that is the critical thing. That means, for example, that it is up to the indigenous people to decide who will be affected and whether that's “direct” or “indirect”. It's their perspective that goes to the decision-maker and that's key.

However, following on from the impact assessment, there was a negotiation process involving the proponent, the state government and the indigenous parties that resulted in the signing of a series of agreements. Through that negotiation process, you do get a resolution and an agreement on the approach for dealing with the impacts.

I would also note that as a result of the input from the indigenous side, aspects of that are extremely innovative and very important, from the point of view of the national interest, not just the indigenous interest. As I mentioned, one specific example to highlight is that there is a big issue with long-term follow-up. For the life of the project, if it's 40 or 50 years, that agreement provides that there will be an environmental compliance officer present at the site to make sure that all of the agreed environmental protection provisions are put into practice. That's something that goes back to that question about the national interest again.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Hehr.

Mr. Falk, I think you mentioned that you weren't finished. I'll give you the floor back.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, that's very kind of you. Thank you for your last comments, Mr. O'Faircheallaigh. I think those were fairly insightful.

I'd like to go back to Ms. Gunn again and continue questioning her on some of her perspectives. When I look at some of our previous national projects that we've done as a country, for example our railway system, our rail lines would never get built in today's environment. I'm not saying they were done perfectly and that there couldn't have been more consultation at the time. However, when we look at national energy projects today and the amount of consultations we do and are committed to doing and want to do, what do you see as the best path forward to actually completing these projects?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

I'm not sure I quite understand why we think the railway system wouldn't have been built. I think in some ways it's a really good example. We can see that the negotiation of Treaty No. 3 took a little bit longer, but Treaty No. 3 was negotiated and allowed for the railway system to go through. I actually think we have a great historical example there. The time frame was perhaps not initially what the prime minister at the time had hoped. Treaty No. 3 took four years to reach agreement. It required the Queen's negotiators to come back several times and to sit with the Anishinabe, but it did lead to an agreement.

You're right that we do engage in many consultations at this point. I get the sense there's not always a feeling that the discussions with indigenous peoples are effective, with the aim of upholding rights or an attempt to accommodate indigenous peoples' rights. I appreciate honourable member Hehr's point that it's the duty to consult and accommodate. Often in Canada we do an abbreviated duty to consult, and I think that's part of the problem we have. There's a view, and I think my co-panellist spoke to it as well, that there's a “show up, provide information, maybe get some information back” attitude, but then Canada goes off on its own and makes the decision.

I think what is increasingly being required in international law, including under the new World Bank rules—I know Canada is not a borrower from the World Bank, but I think it shows the international trend—is that it has to be a far more robust process whose intention has to be to provide information and hear the concerns that indigenous peoples may raise. We need to sit down and work together to think of ways to address those concerns in the project.

I think a process that better engages indigenous peoples and that seeks to uphold their rights will actually have greater certainty. We will have projects that are good for the environment and good for indigenous peoples and not just be viewed in a narrow economic view. We will be able to reach those decisions faster and with greater certainty and have the process be done in a much more timely fashion.

I think honourable member Stubbs said that we're in crisis, and I agree. We are in crisis, and it's the failure to full-heartedly engage and uphold indigenous peoples' rights that has led to some of the uncertainty.

(1655)

Mr. Ted Falk:

The Prime Minister has stated that indigenous peoples do not have veto rights. Would you agree with that?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

I think international law has reiterated the same point, but it's important to be clear on what we mean by veto. If we're thinking that Canada goes in, presents a plan to indigenous peoples and tells them, you can say yes but can't say no, so say yes and we're going to walk away, that's not what anyone contemplates. Under international law as I indicated, it shouldn't be a pre-determined decision being put forward to indigenous peoples; it should be about engaging them in the decision-making process.

There are circumstances in which indigenous peoples are allowed to say no. I am very clear that while it's not a veto, we still have a right to say no to projects. I can try to find it in my notes to reiterate, but I believe I said in my opening presentation that indigenous peoples have a right to say no under certain circumstances. Yes, my notes say they “may withhold their consent following an assessment and conclusion that the proposal is not in their best interest”—i.e., that it's not going to uphold their rights or that there are deficiencies in the process or to communicate a legitimate distrust of the consultation process.

Yes, it's not a right to veto, but we do have a right to say no.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Whalen, you have five minutes.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Maybe we could use the example that I referred to before about the indigenous consultation that's happening at the same time as the environmental assessment for offshore Newfoundland and Labrador. There are no direct land rights associated with the exploration area, but there are perhaps indirect or ancillary economic rights associated with their local fisheries.

I wonder if each of you can explain or maybe provide your view of your own national law on when consultation in respect to proposed environmental drilling should begin. Should it begin once a proponent decides to go? Should it begin when the state decides to open an area up for licensing? Should it begin the first time someone is interested in doing some seismic testing in the area?

You've talked about early engagement, but then with respect to indirect rights it's unclear to me when you would suggest the best practice would be for indigenous consultation in that type of scenario, in the scenario we see of offshore oil and gas exploration.

Maybe we'll start this time with Canada, then go to Australia, and then to Norway.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

I was hoping I would go last. I was going to try to pull up—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Okay. We can go the other way.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Maybe I'll just try to speak really quickly, because I believe our time is almost up.

It should be as early as possible. I know that's not the specific answer you're looking for, but we want to make sure that the engagement is early enough so that indigenous peoples can truly participate in the decision-making and have an impact on the outcome. There's a concern that if we're engaging indigenous peoples too late, it's a fait accompli. You want to make sure that the engagement is early enough.

You are right that I have heard criticisms, mostly coming out of Mexico, in fact, that if the engagement is too early, there's no information that can be provided. My only response at that point is that as early as possible, when the first idea comes up, start building that relationship so there is a relationship of mutual trust and respect that can be built upon for consultations about a specific project.

(1700)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you.

Australia.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

The question is when consultation starts. In relation to lands that are under claim or for determined native title, consultation starts when somebody applies for an exploration licence. However, there is a thing called the “expedited procedure”, which means that unless the impact of exploration is expected to be very substantial, that's perfunctory.

If someone applies for a development licence, there is then much more extensive consultation.

In terms of best practice, there is an example of strategic assessment that was conducted in western Australia, which went much earlier. That involved looking at a long stretch of coastline, hundreds of kilometres of coastline, and engaging with people all along that coastline about where a liquefied natural gas hub would be placed. That is much preferable. You then had a two-stage process, once the 11 groups had reached consensus.

I think that also goes back to issues about your pipeline.

Once the 11 groups had reached consensus about the best possible place, there was second level of engagement, much more detailed, with the aboriginal people who had rights in that specific area.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Norway, I know you have only one particular group there, so it might not be as complicated as it is for Canada and Australia, but I would love your perspective.

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

It's not that complicated. However, in line with the last answer as well, your question lays different levels. When government is planning the area where oil and gas exploration is to take place, it would be natural to engage with the Sami Parliament, the representative body of the Sami people in Norway.

There's no offshore oil and gas in Finland and Sweden.

On the seismic testing and other levels, when you get into the local level, actually starting the project, the people representing those who are in or near that area would be the ones to consult at that level. Throughout the process, there are different processes and different levels of Sami participation.

The Chair:

Ms. Jolibois, you have three minutes and then we'll wrap it up.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Thank you for this very important discussion from all three organizations. Because of the short time frame, I would like to go back to our witness in Manitoba.

Ms. Gunn, I'm still hung up on this consultation with indigenous populations—first nations, Métis and Inuit—where some provinces look after the Métis, while federally it is the first nations and the Inuit.

How can indigenous communities push for the benefits if they want to get into an agreement with the industry? How can provinces and the federal government help with the process?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

That's a challenging question, and I think this is where energy projects or any natural resource project exists in a context in Canada where there have been a historic pitting of first nations against Métis. I think some of the colonial burden and legacy is what we need to be mindful of when we start engaging in these consultations. We need to be aware of that broader context.

Part of where we're at now, at least with the Supreme Court decision in Daniels, is a recognition that the federal government does have responsibility over Métis people. While the provinces have been engaging with Alberta, for example with the Métis settlements, we do now have clarification, at least from the Supreme Court, that the federal government does have a responsibility to engage with Métis, first nations and Inuit.

I also think the question points to the issue that we're engaging in resource development in Canada in a context where there are several outstanding claims and failure to recognize and uphold treaties. I think that leads to a lot of our tensions and problems, the fact that we're moving forward when we still have other issues that need to be resolved. Related to your question is that the faster Canada moves to resolve outstanding land claims, the easier these consultations may be because we've addressed the fundamental issue. That's where I started my presentation, trying to connect the right to free, prior and informed consent to the broader right to self-determination and the rights over lands, territories and resources.

(1705)

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Unfortunately, we're out of time, but thank you very much, all three of you, for taking time from your afternoons, or mornings as the case may be, to join us. It was very helpful and we're very grateful. See everybody on Tuesday.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour tout le monde.

Nous n'avons pas de témoin en personne aujourd'hui. Nous avons eu une annulation, mais nous avons toujours trois groupes de témoins.

Sur l'écran à notre droite, nous avons Brenda Gunn, professeure agrégée à la faculté de droit de l'Université du Manitoba.

Au téléphone, nous avons Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh. Nous pensions qu'il venait de l'Université de Dublin, mais ce n'est pas le cas.

Vous êtes en Australie en fait, n'est-ce pas?

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh (professeur, Griffith University, à titre personnel):

Je suis effectivement à Brisbane.

Le président:

Nous avons également Gunn-Britt Retter, chef de l'Unité de l'Arctique et de l'environnement du Saami Council, par vidéoconférence depuis la Norvège. Est-ce exact?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter (chef, Unité de l'arctique et de l'environnement , Saami Council):

Oui.

Le président:

Merci à vous tous de votre présence.

Nous avons plusieurs membres du Comité autour de la table. Selon notre façon de procéder, chacun de vous disposera de 10 minutes au maximum pour présenter un exposé. À la fin de vos exposés, nous passerons à la période de questions.

Je devrai peut-être vous interrompre si nous manquons de temps, si votre temps achève ou si vous le dépassez. Je m'excuse donc à l'avance.

Pourquoi ne commençons-nous pas par Mme Retter.

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Merci de m'avoir invitée à prendre la parole devant le Comité. C'est un grand honneur. Il est également intéressant de noter que le Canada est celui qui recherche des pratiques exemplaires relativement à la participation de peuples autochtones. Habituellement, nous nous tournons vers lui pour en obtenir.

D'emblée, il convient de souligner qu'il existe une différence fondamentale entre les peuples autochtones des grandes régions du Canada, notamment, je pense, du Nord canadien, qui ont conclu des ententes sur les revendications territoriales. Au Sápmi, la région des Samis, il n'y a pratiquement pas de territoires où les droits des Samis sont reconnus. L'exception est le comté de Finnmark, en Norvège, où la Finnmark Act établit le Domaine du Finnmark, considéré comme une cogestion des terres, car le Parlement sami et le conseil de comté du Finnmark nomment chacun trois membres au sein du conseil. La Finnmark Act cède les terres communes, que l'État national prétend posséder, au Domaine du Finnmark. Le Domaine du Finnmark, en tant que propriétaire foncier, peut participer à des projets énergétiques également. À ma connaissance, il n'existait jusqu'à présent aucun mécanisme permettant la participation des peuples autochtones, en particulier celui établi à Windmill Park, au-delà des procédures nationales habituelles, bien entendu, qui consistent à effectuer des évaluations de l'impact environnemental, relativement aux autorités locales et à leurs procédures en matière d'aménagement du territoire, et à présenter des demandes de permis, et du processus d'audience connexe appliqué dans le droit national... et en ce qui a trait à la participation des intervenants.

Aucun autre examen n'est effectué en ce qui concerne les Samis. On considère que les intérêts de ces derniers font partie du conseil du Domaine du Finnmark, comme je l'ai dit.

L'industrie et les autorités appellent fréquemment au dialogue. Les Samis affirment souvent que le dialogue est également nécessaire. Cela est également lié aux projets énergétiques, comme il en est question. Cependant, d'après nos expériences également, le fait d'entamer un dialogue présente certains risques, car les Samis qui sont touchés par un projet entament un dialogue dans l'espoir que l'on comprenne leurs besoins en matière d'accès aux terres, et ils finissent par se retirer du dialogue sans résultat satisfaisant, tandis que les responsables du projet vont de l'avant en affirmant qu'il y a eu un dialogue; la case est cochée, puis ils passent à autre chose. Sans reconnaissance des droits fonciers, il est difficile de s'opposer à l'industrie, qui suit simplement les dispositions législatives nationales. Nous finissons par dépendre entièrement de la bonne volonté des gens.

En l'absence de reconnaissance des territoires, les droits des Samis aux terres sont également à la merci de la bonne volonté des autorités et des mesures législatives qu'elles élaborent. Lors de discours et de jubilés, les ministres déclarent que la culture samie est précieuse et importante et qu'elle enrichit la culture norvégienne, finlandaise, suédoise ou russe. Or, certains intérêts doivent souvent céder le pas à des intérêts nationaux plus importants. C'est maintenant le virage vert pour atténuer les changements climatiques.

Un exemple récent en Norvège est l'autorisation donnée à la mine de cuivre de Nussir, sur le site de Fâlesnuorri/Kvalsund. Sous prétexte de soutenir un virage vert et de répondre au besoin en cuivre pour, entre autres, la fabrication de piles visant à remplacer le combustible fossile, le dépôt des résidus miniers sur le fond marin met en péril les terres d'élevage de rennes et la santé du fjord. Des experts dans le secteur maritime ont souligné le risque environnemental que pose une telle pratique, mais grâce à la décision politique de soutenir le virage vert, la mine a délibérément choisi de prendre ce risque.

Il existe également plusieurs exemples d'impressionnantes usines d'éoliennes installées sur des terres d'élevages de rennes des Samis, ce qui constitue un changement fondamental dans l'utilisation des terres au nom de la réduction des émissions de CO2 afin de promouvoir le virage vert. C'est un dilemme très délicat.

Les Samis sont sous pression constante pour renoncer à l'utilisation des terres et aux zones de pêche au profit des intérêts des États-nations, au nom de de l'atténuation des changements climatiques et de la promotion du virage vert.

Je suis désolée de ne pas avoir été en mesure de fournir des pratiques exemplaires jusqu'à présent. Cependant, il y en a une ici, dans mon coin où le projet d'éoliennes et l'entité qui garde les rennes en sont venus à une entente sur l'emplacement du parc éolien. Je ne sais pas dans quelle mesure l'entreprise a informé les éleveurs de rennes du fait que le projet produirait beaucoup plus d'énergie que les lignes électriques — le réseau — pour que l'on dispose de la capacité de l'envoyer sur le marché. Maintenant, la société travaille d'arrache-pied afin de mettre en place une nouvelle grande ligne électrique capable de transférer l'énergie sur le marché.

C'est pourquoi un consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause serait très important au moment d'entamer le dialogue avec les peuples autochtones. Le volet information, comme dans le présent exemple, aurait été essentiel afin que l'on puisse avoir une idée complète de la situation tout au long du processus de participation.

Avant de conclure, je voudrais aussi ajouter que, au-delà de la région des Samis... je pourrais mentionner que, dans le cadre des travaux du Conseil de l'Arctique, auquel je participe, deux rapports à venir ont été préparés. L'un porte sur l'évaluation de l'impact environnemental dans l'Arctique, menée par le Groupe de travail sur le développement durable, et l'autre concerne un projet sur la participation significative des peuples autochtones et des collectivités locales aux activités marines, mené par l'entremise du Groupe de travail du Conseil de l'Arctique sur la protection de l'environnement marin. Il s'agit d'un répertoire des pratiques exemplaires associées à la participation de peuples autochtones, principalement des exemples provenant du Canada et des États-Unis.

Je ne connais pas vos délais, mais ces rapports seront publiés au début du mois de mai lors de la réunion ministérielle du Conseil de l'Arctique. Il serait donc peut-être utile que le Comité les examine tous les deux.

En conclusion, selon mon point de vue, les pratiques exemplaires devraient être axées sur nos propres habitudes de consommation; dépenser et gaspiller moins, utiliser plus efficacement l'énergie et les ressources et réutiliser les ressources déjà utilisées. Je préférerais faire cela plutôt que de consacrer davantage de territoire aux efforts d'atténuation.

J'espère que j'ai respecté le temps de parole.

Je vous remercie.

(1540)

Le président:

Vous l'avez respecté. Il vous reste du temps. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants, merci.

Monsieur O'Faircheallaigh, c'est à votre tour.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Merci.

Très brièvement, bonjour de Brisbane et merci beaucoup de me donner l'occasion de vous parler.

À titre d'information, mes recherches au cours des 25 dernières années ont porté sur les relations entre les peuples autochtones et les industries extractives. Pendant cette période, j'ai également travaillé comme négociateur pour les peuples autochtones. J'ai travaillé avec eux afin de réaliser ce que j'appelle des évaluations d'impact sur les peuples autochtones. Un certain nombre d'entre elles ont trait à de grands projets énergétiques, notamment à un certain nombre de projets de gaz naturel liquéfié dans le Nord-Ouest de l'Australie-Occidentale. Mon expérience s'étend au Canada. J'ai entrepris des travaux sur le terrain à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, en Alberta et dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

Mes commentaires sur les pratiques exemplaires internationales s'appuient sur ces 25 années de recherche et d'activités professionnelles.

Je tiens à souligner que j'aborde ce que je considère comme des pratiques exemplaires. À mes yeux, cela comprend deux composantes: la réalisation d'évaluations d'impact des grands projets énergétiques par les peuples autochtones et, à partir de celles-ci, la négociation d'ententes ayant force obligatoire entre les peuples autochtones, le gouvernement et les promoteurs, couvrant la durée de vie des projets énergétiques.

Je souligne ces deux points pour la raison suivante: l'évaluation d'impact classique a lamentablement laissé pour compte les peuples autochtones. Cela est vrai en Australie, au Canada, partout dans le monde. Il y a de nombreuses raisons à cela. Vu le temps alloué, je ne peux pas entrer dans les détails, mais je serai heureux de répondre aux questions.

Les principaux problèmes tiennent au fait que l'évaluation d'impact classique est menée par des promoteurs et les consultants qu'ils emploient. Leur objectif est de faire approuver des projets et, par conséquent, ils ont tendance, par exemple, à sous-estimer systématiquement les problèmes et les enjeux associés aux projets et à surestimer particulièrement leurs avantages économiques.

L'évaluation d'impact classique tend à nier la légitimité et la reconnaissance du savoir des Autochtones, les visions du monde des Autochtones. Elle n'adopte pas les méthodologies appropriées et a tendance à être très axée sur les projets. Elle tend à traiter un projet à la fois.

Compte tenu de ce dernier point, on a tendance à faire fi des répercussions cumulatives ou à beaucoup les sous-estimer. Cela est très évident, par exemple, dans le contexte des sables bitumineux en Alberta.

En réponse à ces problèmes fondamentaux, on constate de plus en plus l'émergence d'une évaluation d'impact réalisée par les Autochtones. Il existe un certain nombre de modèles différents qui peuvent servir à l'élaboration d'une évaluation d'impact contrôlée par les Autochtones. Encore une fois, je suis heureux de vous en dire un peu plus.

Citons, par exemple, un projet de carrefour du gaz naturel liquéfié dans le Nord-Ouest de l'Australie-Occidentale, qui a été soumis à une évaluation stratégique menée par le gouvernement fédéral et le gouvernement de l'État en Australie-Occidentale. L'évaluation stratégique comportait un certain nombre de mandats relatifs aux répercussions sur les populations autochtones.

Voici ce qui s'est produit: le représentant régional de l'organisme autochtone, le Kimberley Land Council, et les propriétaires traditionnels autochtones du site ont négocié avec le promoteur et le gouvernement afin qu'ils retirent simplement tous les mandats traitant des questions autochtones et que ce soit eux qui s'en chargent.

Il est tout à fait instructif de comparer l'évaluation d'impact en six volumes issue de cet exercice à une évaluation d'impact réalisée par le promoteur principal, Woodside Energy, relativement à un autre projet de GNL dans une autre région de l'Australie. Il y a un monde de différence. L'évaluation d'impact réalisée par les Autochtones permet beaucoup mieux de cerner correctement les enjeux clés pour les peuples autochtones et, ce qui est tout aussi important, d'indiquer des stratégies viables pour faire face à ces répercussions.

La deuxième composante d'une pratique exemplaire est la négociation, à partir de ces évaluations d'impact, d'ententes ayant force obligatoire pour la durée de vie du projet.

(1545)



Un facteur fondamental est que la réalité politique — et ce n'est pas seulement un problème pour les peuples autochtones —, une fois les projets approuvés, l'attention du gouvernement se déplace ailleurs. Étant donné que nombre de ces projets dureront 20, 30 ou 40 ans, il est extrêmement difficile de veiller à ce que, au fil du temps, on s'attache de plus en plus à résoudre les problèmes relevés dans l'évaluation d'impact et à composer avec les changements. Aucun projet n'est le même après 10, 20 ou 30 ans. Comment veiller à ce que l'on continue de lui accorder une attention soutenue?

Une façon de le faire est de négocier des ententes qui couvrent la durée de vie du projet et fournissent les ressources nécessaires pour que l'objectif puisse être maintenu, ainsi que de prévoir des mécanismes de gestion et de prise de décisions permettant aux populations autochtones touchées de continuer à apporter leur contribution.

Il est essentiel que ces ententes s'étendent sur la durée de vie du projet, car, à mesure que nous en prenons conscience, à mesure que les projets élaborés dans les années 1960 et 1970 arrivent à la fin de leur vie, la fermeture et la remise en état posent des problèmes très importants, tout comme la prise en considération des effets du projet qui peuvent en réalité aller bien au-delà de la durée de vie opérationnelle des mines ainsi que des gisements de gaz et de pétrole concernés.

Je tiens à souligner que je parle des pratiques exemplaires internationales qui voient le jour, mais il existe des exemples très évidents de la mise en oeuvre de telles pratiques.

Le dernier point sur lequel j'aimerais insister est que la négociation d'ententes pour la durée de vie des projets doit se dérouler selon un cadre dans lequel les peuples autochtones ont un réel pouvoir de négociation. S'il n'ont pas ce pouvoir, les ententes qui en résultent risquent de renforcer leur désavantage, leur manque de pouvoir. Il est donc essentiel de disposer d'un cadre juridique approprié et d'instruments juridiques internationaux comme la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, qui met l'accent sur le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. C'est un exemple du type de cadre pouvant fournir ce réel pouvoir de négociation.

Je vous remercie.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci infiniment.

Madame Gunn, vous êtes la dernière, mais non la moindre.

Mme Brenda Gunn (professeure agrégée, Faculté de droit, University of Manitoba, à titre personnel):

[La témoin s'exprime en michif du Nord:]

[Traduction]

Merci de l'invitation à comparaître aujourd'hui. Je suis vraiment ravie que le Comité entreprenne cette importante étude, à tel point que j'étais prête à prendre l'après-midi, loin de ma fille de trois mois. Mes excuses si je ne suis peut-être pas aussi préparée que d'habitude, mais j'ai réussi à mettre au point mon exposé pendant qu'elle faisait la sieste sur mes genoux au cours des deux dernières semaines. Je suis vraiment ravie d'être ici et j'ai hâte d'avoir du temps pour les questions. Je vais donc essayer d'être aussi brève que possible.

Pour votre information, j'enseigne à la Faculté de droit de l'Université du Manitoba. Je participe au mouvement international des droits des peuples autochtones depuis 15 ans. Je suis également coprésidente du groupe de défense des droits des peuples autochtones pour la Société américaine de droit international et membre du comité de mise en oeuvre des droits des peuples autochtones de l'Association de droit international. J'ai également fourni une aide technique au Mécanisme d'experts des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones pour son étude sur les pratiques exemplaires en vue de la mise en oeuvre de la Déclaration des Nations unies.

Aujourd'hui, je veux axer mes remarques sur l'idée des pratiques exemplaires internationales, mais je tiens à souligner les normes juridiques internationales qui devraient guider la collaboration du Canada avec les peuples autochtones. Je ferai référence à trois droits principaux, à savoir le droit à l'autodétermination, le droit de participation à la prise de décisions et le droit au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause.

De nombreuses personnes citent la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones au sujet de ces droits. Il importe cependant de savoir que ces droits sont fondés sur des traités plus généraux relatifs aux droits de la personne auxquels le Canada est partie, notamment le Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques et la Convention internationale sur l'élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination raciale.

Mon exposé aujourd'hui s'appuiera sur quatre documents principaux que j'ai remis à la greffière ce matin. Le Mécanisme d'experts des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones a réalisé deux études: les nouvelles Normes environnementales et sociales de la Banque mondiale ainsi que l'avant-projet de la convention relative aux entreprises et aux droits de l'homme, qui est fondée sur les Principes directeurs relatifs aux entreprises et aux droits de l'homme des Nations unies.

À cette fin, je dirais que je présente un exposé sur les pratiques exemplaires, mais je pense en fait que cela va bien au-delà des pratiques exemplaires. J'essaie de préciser quelles sont, à mon avis, les normes minimales nécessaires que le Canada doit respecter afin de remplir ses obligations internationales en matière de droits de la personne.

J'ai essayé de dresser une liste des principaux domaines que le Canada doit défendre, à partir de ces divers documents. Pour commencer, je pense que le droit international énonce clairement que les peuples autochtones ne doivent pas seulement être en mesure de participer au processus de prise de décisions qui touche leurs droits; ils doivent également en contrôler le résultat. Pour ce faire, la participation doit être réelle. Les processus doivent respecter les droits fondamentaux des peuples autochtones, y compris le droit à l'autodétermination et le droit d'utiliser, de posséder, de mettre en valeur et de contrôler leurs terres, territoires et ressources. Cela est essentiel, car, à cet égard, le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause protège l'identité culturelle. Comme nous le savons, l'identité culturelle des peuples autochtones est inextricablement liée à leurs terres, à leurs ressources et à leurs territoires.

Lorsque nous parlons du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, nous avons quelques indications sur la nature de ces différentes normes. « Préalable » signifie que le processus doit avoir lieu avant que toute autre décision permettant à la proposition d'aller de l'avant ne soit prise. Le processus devrait commencer le plus tôt possible lors de la formulation d'une proposition. Selon la norme internationale, la participation des peuples autochtones commence aux étapes de conceptualisation et d'élaboration. Le processus doit également donner aux peuples autochtones le temps nécessaire pour assimiler, comprendre et analyser les renseignements fournis et pour entreprendre leurs propres processus de prise de décisions.

(1555)



Nous parlons de consentement « en toute connaissance de cause » ou éclairé. Le droit international exige que des spécialistes indépendants soient engagés pour aider à cerner les risques et les répercussions des projets. Les peuples autochtones ne devraient pas être obligés de se fier uniquement aux documents proposés par le promoteur.

Enfin, il y a le mot « consentement ». Je suis sûre que je je vais me faire poser davantage de questions à ce sujet. Je ne me suis donc pas trop attachée à cette question dans mon exposé, mais je pense que le consentement signifie que les peuples autochtones ne doivent pas simplement être tenus de dire oui à une décision prédéterminée; il doit y avoir la possibilité de participer à un processus plus robuste.

À cette fin, le processus doit se dérouler dans un climat exempt d'intimidation, de contrainte, de manipulation et de harcèlement. Il doit promouvoir la confiance et la bonne foi et non pas donner lieu à la suspicion, à des accusations, à des menaces, à la criminalisation, à la violence à l'endroit des peuples autochtones ou à des préjugés à leur égard. Le processus doit faire en sorte que les peuples autochtones aient la liberté d'être représentés comme il est traditionnellement exigé en vertu de leurs propres lois, coutumes et protocoles, compte tenu du sexe et de la représentation des autres secteurs de la collectivité. Les peuples autochtones doivent également être en mesure de déterminer la manière dont ils seront représentés, et, parmi leurs établissements et leurs dirigeants, ceux qui les représenteront.

En vertu du droit international, les peuples autochtones ont aussi le pouvoir de déterminer le déroulement de la consultation ou le processus proprement dit. Cela inclut la consultation lors de la conception du processus de consultation et la possibilité de partager, d'utiliser ou d'élaborer leurs propres protocoles en matière de consultation.

Enfin, le processus doit également permettre aux peuples autochtones de définir les méthodes, les délais, les lieux et l'évaluation du processus de consultation.

Une question souvent posée est celle de savoir à quel moment il faut obtenir le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. En règle générale, c'est lorsqu'un projet est susceptible d'avoir une incidence directe importante sur la vie des peuples autochtones, leurs terres, leurs territoires et leurs ressources. Il est important de souligner que c'est le point de vue des peuples autochtones sur l'incidence potentielle qui constitue la norme ici. Il s'agit de l'incidence déterminée non pas par l'État ou le promoteur, mais par les peuples autochtones. De plus, ce droit au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause ne se limite pas aux terres que le Canada reconnaît comme des terres visées par un titre ancestral; il comprend les terres que les peuples autochtones ont toujours possédées ou occupées et utilisées de manière traditionnelle, y compris les terres, territoires et ressources régis par les lois de ces peuples.

Au cours de ces processus, il importe que les États engagent un dialogue élargi avec tous les peuples autochtones potentiellement concernés par l'entremise de leurs propres institutions représentatives. Ils doivent veiller à faire participer également les femmes, les enfants, les jeunes et les personnes handicapées autochtones, en tenant compte du fait que les structures gouvernementales de certaines collectivités autochtones peuvent être à prédominance masculine. À cette fin, la consultation devrait également permettre de comprendre les répercussions particulières sur les populations autochtones. Il s'agit non pas uniquement de s'assurer de la présence de femmes, d'enfants et de jeunes autochtones: il faut également s'attacher au fait que le projet peut avoir une incidence différente ou particulière sur les femmes autochtones.

Un autre domaine qui, à mon avis, est particulièrement fondamental au Canada est l'importance de veiller à ce que les processus de consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause soutiennent l'établissement d'un consensus au sein des collectivités des peuples autochtones et d'éviter tout processus susceptible d'entraîner une division supplémentaire au sein de la collectivité. En ce qui concerne les processus susceptibles de susciter davantage la division, il faut être conscient de toute situation de contrainte économique, par exemple lorsque les collectivités peuvent se sentir obligées de participer au processus en raison de contraintes économiques, et s'assurer que tout processus, toute consultation ou autre mécanisme ne divise pas davantage la collectivité.

(1600)



Comme cela a déjà été mentionné, ces processus de consultation devraient avoir lieu tout au long du projet, pour garantir une communication constante entre les parties. En vertu du droit international, il importe de souligner que ces processus de consultation où les peuples autochtones participent à la prise de décisions et fournissent leur consentement préalable, librement et en connaissance de cause ne doivent pas être confondus avec des audiences publiques sur l'environnement et les régimes de réglementation.

Désolée, je pense que je manque de temps. Je veux soulever un ou deux autres points.

Le droit international reconnaît que les peuples autochtones peuvent refuser leur consentement dans plusieurs situations, notamment après avoir évalué la proposition et conclu qu'elle n'est pas dans leur intérêt, si le processus comporte des lacunes ou pour faire part d'une méfiance légitime à l'égard du processus de consultation ou de l'initiative.

Certains pourraient dire que la Déclaration des Nations unies n'est pas claire, car différents articles proposent des formulations différentes. Cependant, je pense que le Mécanisme d'experts sur les droits des peuples autochtones a tenté de préciser que les termes « consulter » et « coopérer » dénotent un droit des peuples autochtones d'influencer le résultat du processus de prise de décisions, et pas seulement d'y participer. Je pense que les normes et le droit international sont très clairs et que le Canada devrait prendre des mesures afin de respecter ces obligations.

Enfin, pour conclure, le droit de participer à la prise de décisions vise à atteindre des objectifs plus généraux qui peuvent nous aider à orienter ces processus. Le premier consiste à corriger l'exclusion de droit et de fait des peuples autochtones de la vie publique, et le deuxième, à revitaliser et à rétablir les processus de prise de décisions propres à ces peuples.

En dernier lieu, le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause a également des fondements sous-jacents qui devraient guider notre mise en oeuvre: rétablir le contrôle des peuples autochtones sur leurs terres et leurs ressources; rétablir l'intégrité culturelle, la fierté et l'estime de soi des peuples autochtones; et remédier au déséquilibre des pouvoirs entre les peuples autochtones et les États, en vue de forger de nouvelles relations fondées sur les droits et le respect mutuel entre les parties.

[La témoin s'exprime en michif du Nord :]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à vous tous.

Madame Gunn, nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir pris congé de votre nouveau-né pour être ici avec nous et d'avoir pris la peine de préparer votre exposé. Nous vous en remercions.

Je vais demander à M. Graham de commencer.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Pour commencer, monsieur O'Faircheallaigh, je voulais vous remercier de vous être levé à cinq heures ce matin pour témoigner devant nous. J'ai vérifié. Nous en sommes tous très reconnaissants. Je vais m'adresser à vous dans une seconde.

Madame Retter, vous avez dit dans votre exposé que le fait d'entamer un dialogue présente certains risques. Cela m'est resté en tête depuis que vous l'avez dit. Vous avez parlé des dangers. J'aimerais discuter plus en détail de ce que sont ces dangers et de votre expérience à ce sujet. Vous avez dit que les résidus d'une mine sont déversés dans les fonds marins justement à cause de la consultation qui a été faite, si j'ai bien compris. Si c'est bien le cas, est-ce que le processus de consultation — que Mme Gunn a décrit en détail — a respecté la notion du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, ou a-t-on suivi un processus complètement différent dans cette situation? Pouvez-vous nous éclairer?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Je crois que les deux autres exposés ont répondu à bon nombre de questions qui ont été soulevées dans le mien. Ce que je voulais faire, c'était mettre en relief le fait que le besoin d'obtenir un consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause n'est pas reconnu dans le cadre du processus, pas plus que le fait que les Autochtones sont en position d'infériorité et qu'il y a un rapport d'inégalité. Dans le système norvégien, le processus de consultation est similaire au processus habituel d'audiences. Les choses se font comme avec les autres intervenants, et la différence entre les cultures, les besoins et les perceptions du monde et les rapports d'inégalité ne sont pas reconnus.

Le processus était axé sur les intérêts des autres intervenants. Les intérêts ont été pris en considération, mais les droits et les besoins des peuples autochtones en matière d'autogouvernance n'ont pas été reconnus. Cela explique aussi pourquoi les résultats sont différents. Si les autochtones effectuaient eux-mêmes l'évaluation environnementale, comme M. O'Faircheallaigh le disait, ou si on cherchait à obtenir le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause comme cela est prévu, je crois que les résultats seraient différents.

(1605)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous croyez donc que le processus relatif au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause éliminerait les risques qui pourraient découler de la consultation?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Oui, c'est ce que nous espérons, mais il faudrait l'essayer pour vérifier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai bien compris. Merci.

Monsieur O'Faircheallaigh, lorsque vous avez parlé des évaluations environnementales, vous avez dit plus ou moins subtilement que vous aimeriez en parler davantage. Je vous en donne l'occasion, si vous le souhaitez.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Excusez-moi, mais de quoi, précisément...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est à propos des évaluations environnementales...

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... vous avez dit que vous n'aviez pas suffisamment de temps pour dire tout ce que vous aviez à dire, alors je veux vous laisser un peu de temps pour terminer.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Excusez-moi, mais j'entends beaucoup d'écho présentement. Je peux tout de même poursuivre.

Pour commencer, j'aimerais répondre à votre question sur les risques liés aux consultations.

C'est effectivement un des problèmes avec les évaluations environnementales traditionnelles, selon moi. Les Autochtones sont confrontés à un dilemme: même s'ils ne dirigent pas le processus d'évaluation environnementale, on peut être porté à croire qu'ils donnent leur consentement dès qu'ils y participent. D'un autre côté, les évaluations environnementales prennent très rarement en considération les besoins des Autochtones de façon efficace.

Je vais aussi fournir plus de détails sur deux ou trois sujets. Premièrement, il y a une incapacité à reconnaître en bonne et due forme l'importance de la vision du monde, de la compréhension de l'univers et de l'expertise des Autochtones. Il y a cette idée préconçue bien enracinée selon laquelle seule la science occidentale permet de comprendre correctement les conséquences et les processus environnementaux. Donc, même si on utilise de l'information fournie par des Autochtones — par exemple, des études sur l'utilisation des terres —, les renseignements ont tendance à être dénaturés et présentés dans un cadre où les idées et les valeurs occidentales sont largement dominantes.

Une autre lacune que je veux mentionner est l'incapacité d'utiliser des méthodes appropriées pour consulter les peuples autochtones. L'approche classique, pour une évaluation environnementale traditionnelle, est d'organiser des réunions dans un bureau, dans un immeuble, une seule fois, afin de rencontrer les gens, de leur donner de l'information et d'exiger une réponse. Cette approche est tout à fait inappropriée, pour toutes sortes de raisons. Les évaluations environnementales dirigées par des Autochtones prévoient des méthodes de consultation beaucoup plus diversifiées, avec des réunions en petits groupes ou en personne. Dans certains cas, on peut avoir des réunions avec seulement des hommes ou seulement des femmes. Il y aura des réunions sur le terrain, c'est-à-dire sur la terre et près du plan d'eau, qui seront probablement touchés. C'est dans ce genre d'endroit que les Autochtones se sentent vraiment libres, et ils y sont plus en mesure de communiquer ce qu'ils savent.

C'est une approche itérative. En d'autres mots, c'est un processus de consultation en plusieurs étapes; d'abord, de l'information est fournie, les gens ont du temps pour réfléchir afin de formuler des commentaires ou poser des questions. Ensuite, plus d'information est fournie. Il y a des échanges réciproques sur une longue période.

Je crois qu'il y a des problèmes fondamentaux et systématiques dans la façon dont les connaissances autochtones sont perçues. Il y a des choses très concrètes qu'il faut corriger afin de consulter correctement les Autochtones si on veut qu'ils aient véritablement une voix dans les énoncés des incidences environnementales et les recommandations connexes.

(1610)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je crois que le temps qui m'était accordé pour mon processus de consultation est déjà terminé.

Le président:

Vous avez malheureusement raison, monsieur Graham.

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous les témoins d'avoir pris le temps de participer à notre étude.

D'abord, je dois dire que je représente une circonscription très riche en ressources pétrolières et gazières. L'avenir de ma circonscription dépend entièrement de la construction d'une importante infrastructure énergétique, et je tiens à vous remercier en tant que personne d'origine autochtone. J'ai du sang ojibwé. Je vous remercie aussi en tant que député qui représente des travailleurs du secteur pétrolier et gazier dans le Nord-Est de l'Alberta ainsi que dans neuf collectivités autochtones — des Premières Nations et métisses —, lesquels ont besoin de grands projets énergétiques et d'une infrastructure pétrolière et gazière. Leurs entreprises, leur subsistance et leur avenir en dépendent. Merci.

Monsieur le président, je le regrette, mais je veux présenter la motion que j'ai déposée le vendredi 19 octobre 2018.

Le président:

De quelle motion s'agit-il?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

La motion pour laquelle j'ai présenté un avis le vendredi 19 octobre 2018.

Le président:

Il y en a plus d'une, au moins quelques-unes. Je veux être sûr d'avoir la bonne sous les yeux.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord. Je vais la lire. Je propose: Que, conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité demande au ministre des Ressources naturelles de comparaître devant lui au cours du prochain mois afin de répondre à des questions sur l’achat de Trans Mountain et les plans d’agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain, et que cette réunion soit télévisée.

Je crois que les témoins comprennent et savent probablement déjà que le Canada traverse une crise liée à l'aménagement énergétique. Cela ternit la réputation du Canada comme pays propice aux investissements énergétiques et où de grands projets peuvent être entrepris.

J'espère que vous serez en mesure de revenir témoigner dans le cadre de cette étude, et je vous invite bien évidemment à nous présenter des observations par écrit. Malheureusement, nous, les conservateurs, sommes au bout du rouleau, puisque nous n'arrivons pas à faire en sorte que notre propre ministre des Ressources naturelles vienne témoigner devant notre comité pour rendre des comptes aux Canadiens relativement aux plans d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain qui sont en suspens...

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Il est prévu que leministre des Ressources naturelles vienne témoigner à propos du Budget principal des dépenses au cours du prochain mois. Peut-être que Mme Stubbs pourrait tirer parti de cette occasion pour interroger le ministre à propos de tout ce qu'elle veut savoir par rapport au Budget principal des dépenses, y compris l'argent affecté au projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain. De cette façon, nous pourrons poursuivre la période de questions avec les témoins à l'étranger qui ont pris le temps de participer à la séance du Comité. Une autre solution serait de prendre un peu de temps lors d'une séance future afin que le ministre vienne témoigner à nouveau à propos du projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain en plus du Budget principal de dépenses, si cela convient à Mme Stubbs.

Le président:

Merci. J'allais justement le proposer. Je vais revenir à vous dans un instant, madame Stubbs, mais il y a effectivement avec nous des témoins qui sont à l'autre bout du monde, littéralement. Cela n'a vraiment pas été facile de coordonner l'apparition des trois témoins, alors si on pouvait éviter de les renvoyer...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Quand le ministre est-il censé venir?

Le président:

Laissez-moi terminer, je vous prie. Conformément à la dernière motion que vous avez déposée, nous avons présenté une demande afin que le ministre vienne témoigner, et il a accepté. Je ne me souviens pas exactement de la date. On me dit que c'est le 30 avril. Il va venir...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Le problème, c'est que le 26 février...

Le président:

Laissez-moi terminer, s'il vous plaît...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

... le Comité a voté à l'unanimité afin de convoquer le ministre...

Le président:

Ou continuez de m'interrompre. Libre à vous.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Vous m'interrompez.

Le président:

Non, j'avais la parole, à dire vrai.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Laissez-moi répondre.

Le président:

Non, je n'ai pas encore terminé.

Le ministre vient témoigner le 30 avril.

Nous avons trois témoins...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Les libéraux ont vraiment de la difficulté à laisser les femmes parler. Je suis la seule femme qui siège au Comité.

Le président:

Il y en a une autre, à dire vrai. J'aimerais le souligner.

(1615)

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, un membre permanent. Je suis désolée.

Le président:

Quoi qu'il en soit, les trois témoins d'aujourd'hui nous ont gracieusement offert leur temps. Il est déjà prévu que le ministre vienne témoigner. M. Whalen a proposé un compromis tout à fait raisonnable, encore qu'il appartient entièrement aux membres du Comité d'en décider. Nous pourrons prendre un peu de temps plus tard pour en discuter. Nous siégeons la semaine prochaine. De cette façon, nous n'empiéterons pas sur le temps des autres témoins pour en discuter. Donc, puisque le ministre vient témoigner de toute façon, nous n'allons pas perdre de temps, et vous ne perdez rien de ce que vous proposez dans votre motion, avec tout le respect que je vous dois. Voilà ce que je propose.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord. Êtes-vous sûr d'avoir terminé? Ai-je votre autorisation pour prendre la parole?

Le président:

Allez-y, allez-y.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord. Voici ce qui me préoccupe.

Le 26 février, le Comité a voté à l'unanimité afin de convoquer le ministre pour qu'il vienne témoigner à propos du Budget supplémentaire de dépenses. Je croyais que nous nous étions tous entendus à ce sujet, mais le ministre n'est toujours pas venu témoigner. Il est à la Chambre des communes aujourd'hui, et il a été au Parlement de nombreuses fois pendant que le Comité siégeait. Cela fait près de cinq mois qu'il ne s'est pas présenté devant notre comité. Il n'a pas rendu de comptes au sujet de l'achat de Trans Mountain. Il n'a pas non plus rendu de comptes au sujet des affectations dans le budget des dépenses. Nous voici donc, au milieu d'une étude qui, j'en conviens, est extrêmement importante, mais qui, en revanche, est certainement déconcertante pour les collectivités autochtones que je représente, les 43 collectivités autochtones qui comptent sur l'achèvement du projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain... Il y a un projet de loi libéral qui est à l'étude au Sénat présentement, une loi qui concerne exactement ces modifications réglementaires à grande échelle sur la consultation auprès des collectivités autochtones afin de veiller à ce que la construction de projets énergétiques de grande envergure se poursuive de façon concrète, adéquate, respectueuse de l'environnement et durable. Notre comité n'a jamais pu examiner cette loi. Nous sommes donc ici, au milieu de cette étude, et...

Le président:

Puis-je vous poser une question?

Que proposez-vous que nous fassions des témoins d'aujourd'hui?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense que vous tentez de donner l'impression que c'est urgent à terminer. Ce qui est urgent, c'est que le ministre aurait dû comparaître devant le Comité il y a quatre mois et demi.

Le président:

D'accord.

Si vous avez l'intention de continuer — et vous avez le droit de le faire —, devrions-nous laisser les témoins partir? Il nous reste 45 minutes de la période prévue pour la séance, et, si vous continuez, je ne pense pas qu'ils ont besoin de rester assis là à vous écouter, quoiqu'ils sont libres de le faire.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce que je dirais, c'est que, si vous pouvez garantir et confirmer une date et une heure où le ministre comparaîtra ici, devant le Comité des ressources naturelles, je serais tout à fait ravie de revenir à l'étude. Sinon, oui, je vais continuer.

Le président:

La date sera le 30 avril. L'heure sera 15 h 30.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Excellent.

Le président:

Alors, pouvons-nous passer à autre chose?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, allons-y.

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous pouvons simplement laisser la motion ouverte, mais ne pas en débattre maintenant. Nous en discuterons la semaine prochaine, car je pense que Mme Stubbs voudra peut-être qu'il comparaisse deux fois.

Le président:

C'est aussi ce que j'avais cru comprendre, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons ajourner le débat sur la motion maintenant.

Mme Shannon Stubbs: Bien sûr.

Le président:

Nous pourrons mettre de côté certains travaux du Comité prévus mardi, et régler la question à ce moment-là.

Nous pouvons passer aux témoins.

Alors, est-ce acceptable pour tout le monde?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill, NPD):

Je veux simplement formuler certains commentaires. J'ai la main levée depuis tout à l'heure.

Le président:

J'ai bien vu. Je ne vous ignorais pas.

Voulez-vous dire quelque chose au sujet de la motion?

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je veux parler de la question à l'étude ainsi que de la motion, en raison de l'importance que toute l'industrie... Peu importe la province ou le territoire où on se trouve, les peuples autochtones sont touchés et veulent avoir une pleine participation, mais, en raison de la réglementation du gouvernement et de ce que l'industrie en comprend, les collectivités autochtones finissent toujours perdantes. Je suis très préoccupée à ce sujet.

Je veux remercier ma collègue, à ma droite. Il est très crucial que nous parlions au ministre parce que, selon ce que j'apprends et ce que j'ai vu partout au Canada, des projets industriels doivent être entrepris, mais il faut que les collectivités autochtones participent.

Le président:

Merci. Vous pouvez revenir vous joindre à nous à l'occasion de n'importe laquelle de nos séances; vous serez la bienvenue.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je comprends. Je n'apprécie pas la façon dont vous l'avez dit parce que je trouve cela condescendant, mais il est vraiment important...

Le président:

Ce que je disais, c'est que nous allons continuer à discuter de cette motion mardi, alors je vous invite à revenir et à participer. C'est là que je voulais en venir.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Mais, encore une fois, vous ne faites que présumer. Je veux m'assurer que mon commentaire est formulé pendant que nous avons cette possibilité, parce que ces témoins ne seront pas présents mardi, et j'apprécie réellement les témoins qui sont des nôtres aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Très bien, merci.

Nous entendons-nous tous sur la façon dont nous traitons cette motion, dans ce cas?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Nous sommes tous d'accord, et nous convenons également du fait que si le ministre ne se présente pas, cette discussion aura lieu tous les jours, chaque fois que nous nous réunirons.

Le président:

Je ne suis pas certain que nous nous entendions tous là-dessus. Libre à vous de le faire.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord, mais je vous avertirai, dans ce cas.

(1620)

Le président:

Vos questions concernent-elles la motion? Si elles portent sur la motion dont il est question, c'est acceptable. Autrement, je voudrais passer à autre chose et en venir aux témoins.

M. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

Si, de fait, le ministre ne se présente pas le 30 avril, vous aurez tout mon appui pour présenter la motion à nouveau.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur Harvey. Un Albertain sommeille dans chaque Canadien.

Monsieur le président, compte tenu de l'importance de cette étude et de ma gratitude envers les témoins ici présents, de même que des commentaires formulés par ma collègue qui ne participe pas régulièrement à nos séances, si cela vous va, je céderais ma période de questions à ma collègue du NPD pour qu'elle prenne la parole. Ensuite, nous verrons si nous pouvons intervenir dans le cadre d'une série de questions de suivi, après.

Le président:

Tout à fait. Vous êtes libre de le faire.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je veux insister sur le fait que je suis favorable à la comparution du ministre ici afin qu'il réponde à certaines questions qui ne sont pas liées au budget des dépenses, parce que, quand nous parlons du budget et du budget des dépenses, nous en arrivons rarement au genre de discussions que nous voulons tenir.

Je m'adresse à Mme Gunn, au Manitoba: vous parlez de la participation des Autochtones et du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause.

Je viens de la Saskatchewan, et selon mon expérience là-bas — je suis certaine que c'est semblable partout au Canada —, les gouvernements fédéral et provincial pensent que le terme « Autochtone » ne sert qu'à désigner les réserves, les associations locales des Métis ou les collectivités métisses, mais pas les municipalités où la majorité des Autochtones pourraient vivre.

Comment pouvons-nous rectifier cette situation? Comment pouvons-nous tenir la discussion nécessaire pour clarifier cette question? Il est très important que les résidants locaux qui vivent dans les municipalités envisagent de participer, de donner leur consentement et de chercher les mêmes informations. Comment pouvons-nous faire cela?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Merci.

Je pense que vous avez tout à fait raison d'exprimer cette préoccupation. Les régions pour lesquelles ces consultations sont considérées comme étant nécessaires tendent à être des territoires de réserve. Au Manitoba, nous avons certains territoires de piégeage reconnus dont les habitants peuvent parfois être mobilisés, du moins par les gouvernements provinciaux.

Il est peut-être difficile de savoir comment faire, mais je pense qu'il faut commencer par reconnaître que le droit de participer au processus décisionnel et celui de donner son consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, qui sont prévus au titre du droit international, ne sont pas limités aux titres ancestraux ou aux territoires de réserve; ce sont les terres, les territoires et les ressources traditionnels. Sans égard à la reconnaissance par le gouvernement canadien des terres des peuples autochtones, le droit existe.

Le simple fait de reconnaître que l'ensemble du Canada est constitué de terres autochtones serait un point de départ, de sorte que, lorsque des projets sont envisagés, on devra se demander quels sont les peuples dont le territoire traditionnel est peut-être touché et commencer à les mobiliser de cette manière.

Je pense que vous avez raison. Je ne crois pas l'avoir souligné dans mon exposé, mais, quand les peuples autochtones résident dans un environnement urbain, ils ont également le droit de participer aux processus, qui ne se limitent peut-être pas simplement à des consultations dans la collectivité; il pourrait y avoir des moyens organisés pour assurer la participation des peuples autochtones dans les centres urbains et aborder cette question. Tous ces éléments sont actuellement requis au titre des normes internationales.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Tenons-nous ces discussions partout au Canada? Je suis curieuse.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je ne suis pas certaine de leur ampleur. Je pense que ces conversations sont peut-être en cours. Est-il reconnu sur le plan juridique que le Canada est tenu de procéder à des consultations auprès des peuples autochtones, même si ses lois ne reconnaissent pas encore leurs territoires traditionnels? Je ne suis pas certaine que ce soit ce qui se passe. Je pense que vous avez raison de souligner que ces discussions n'ont effectivement pas lieu.

Nos provinces des Prairies, où nos traités historiques sont en vigueur et où nous parlons avec des collègues qui sont des avocats pratiquant le droit, sont un exemple qui pourrait être éloquent à cet égard. On m'a dit que diverses approches sont adoptées dans des régions du Canada où des traités historiques ont été ratifiés — les traités numérotés, du numéro 1 au numéro 11 —, lesquels sont encore vus par le Canada comme une cession de tout droit aux terres de la part des peuples autochtones — les Autochtones ont un point de vue très différent sur ces traités —, et que la façon dont le Canada interagit avec les peuples autochtones diffère lorsqu'il n'y a aucun traité historique. Je pense que la différence est considérable.

À mes yeux, une partie du problème que je tentais de faire ressortir dans mon exposé — quoique je n'en ai pas parlé directement — tient au fait que, même si le Canada continue de maintenir la position selon laquelle la ratification des traités numéro 1 à 11 constitue une cession de tout droit aux terres de la part des peuples autochtones, ce n'est pas le point de vue des peuples autochtones. Au titre du droit international, ils ont le droit de participer aux processus concernant leurs territoires traditionnels, quelle que soit l'interprétation que fait le Canada de ces traités.

(1625)

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Merci.

Me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Vous avez utilisé le temps de parole de Mme Stubbs; maintenant, vous avez votre propre temps de parole.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je veux revenir sur une question précise. Le Comité des Nations unies pour l'élimination de la discrimination raciale a affirmé dans une lettre du 14 décembre 2018 que la mise en oeuvre du projet de barrage du Site C « enfreindrait les droits des peuples autochtones protégés au titre de la Convention internationale sur l'élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination raciale ».

Comment les gouvernements du Canada et de la Colombie-Britannique devraient-ils procéder? C'est vraiment une bonne question à poser et une bonne discussion à tenir.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Mes excuses. Je n'ai pas ce rapport sous les yeux. J'ai comparu devant le Comité pour l'élimination de la discrimination raciale quand la question du Site C a été soulevée, alors je suis au courant de l'existence de ce rapport.

Si je me souviens bien, le rapport, y compris la version initiale qui a été publiée... Désolée, je n'ai pas les dates sous les yeux. Je pense que c'était en 2016, au moment où le Canada a mené son dernier examen devant le Comité pour l'élimination de la discrimination raciale et où le comité a présenté ses dernières observations. Le rapport que vous mentionnez est celui de suivi.

Je pense que le comité a donné des directives très précises quant à ce qui doit se passer, alors j'affirmerais qu'il s'agit du point de départ. Je n'ai pas le document sous les yeux, et je n'ai pas non plus accès à Internet dans la petite salle où je me trouve actuellement, alors je ne peux pas le consulter.

Je pense que la reconnaissance du fait que nous devons simplement faire une pause jusqu'à ce que certains de ces problèmes soient pris en considération et réglés serait peut-être un point de départ en ce qui a trait à nos préoccupations concernant le Site C. Je crois comprendre, car j'ai effectué certains travaux avec Amnistie internationale, que le projet du Site C continue d'aller de l'avant malgré toutes les préoccupations qui sont soulevées. Je pense que si on interrompait certains des projets de mise en valeur afin que les vastes enjeux qui ont été soulevés par le comité des droits de la personne puissent être abordés, ce serait peut-être un point de départ pour la conversation.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Ai-je terminé?

Le président:

Non, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

L'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain est une question très sensible pour tous les Canadiens de partout au pays. On a aussi vu qu'elle a divisé les nations autochtones qui veulent mettre en valeur les ressources pétrolières sur leurs terres et mettre le produit sur le marché et les nations autochtones côtières qui s'opposent au projet en affirmant qu'il menace leur économie fondée sur l'utilisation des ressources marines.

Comment le Canada peut-il régler ce problème? Avez-vous des idées de recommandations, des suggestions et des solutions qui permettraient d'aller de l'avant?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je vous remercie de poser cette question également. Du moins, je présume que ces questions me sont adressées.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Oui.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

S'il y en a parmi les autres témoins qui voudraient intervenir, je serai heureuse d'entendre le point de vue de personnes d'autres pays sur ces questions.

Je ne suis pas certaine d'avoir une réponse à donner, mais je vous suis reconnaissante de souligner l'exemple, car il touche l'un des problèmes les plus difficiles, c'est-à-dire le droit des peuples autochtones à la participation au processus décisionnel et au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, ainsi que le fait de s'assurer que ces processus n'entraînent pas de nouvelles divisions au sein des peuples autochtones et ne favorisent pas le recours à des tactiques de type diviser pour mieux régner. Je pense qu'un projet comme Trans Mountain montre vraiment la nature complexe de ces conversations lorsqu'il est question de projets de très grande envergure, qui traversent un très grand nombre de territoires et qui mobilisent un très grand nombre de personnes différentes.

Les gouvernements et l'industrie me demandent souvent: Qui a le droit de dire oui? Ou bien, l'approbation de qui devons-nous obtenir lorsqu'il y a un si grand nombre de personnes différentes? Qu'arrivera-t-il si tout le monde ne s'entend pas? Ma réponse — qui est peut-être ou peut-être pas celle que vous espérez, honorables députés —, c'est que je suis curieuse de savoir si les collectivités qui ont soulevé des préoccupations concernant Trans Mountain ont l'impression d'avoir été entendues. Et je parle d'un vrai sentiment que leurs opinions ont été entendues. La nature des conséquences a-t-elle été prise en considération? Peuvent-elles être atténuées? Y a-t-il eu de réels efforts pour qu'une conversation soit tenue, ou bien les conversations ou consultations ont-elles toutes eu lieu dans un climat de « ce projet ira de l'avant. Participez ou dégagez le passage »?

Je crains qu'en ce qui concerne les grands projets complexes comme Trans Mountain, sur lesquels les gens ont divers points de vue, il devienne plus facile pour le Canada et l'industrie de travailler avec les peuples autochtones ou les Premières Nations qui sont disposés à travailler avec eux, puis peut-être de faire fi des préoccupations soulevées par d'autres personnes ou de les esquiver. Je pense que c'est fondamentalement problématique.

Je n'en sais pas assez sur les préoccupations particulières qui sont soulevées pour affirmer qu'il s'agit de la voie à emprunter. Toutefois, je pense que le droit international prévoit l'obligation de tenter de respecter les droits et de créer un espace pour une réelle conversation, dans le cadre de laquelle toutes les parties ont la possibilité de prendre la parole et d'être entendues. J'affirmerais qu'en guise de point de départ pour ces grands projets, nous devons nous assurer que toutes les personnes qui pourraient être touchées ont la possibilité d'être entendues.

Je pense également que, dans le cas de projets comme Trans Mountain, si je ne me trompe pas, il pourrait y avoir une distinction entre les collectivités autochtones qui sont directement touchées par le projet, les territoires traditionnels que traversera le pipeline, et celles pour qui les conséquences pourraient être indirectes. Je pense que cela doit faire partie de la conversation. Je n'essaie en aucune manière de laisser entendre que les personnes qui subiront des conséquences indirectes ont moins de droits, mais ce n'est qu'une reconnaissance du fait qu'il pourrait y avoir des droits différents en jeu et que nous devons donc tenter de nous faire une idée d'ensemble.

(1630)

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Il est important de faire comparaître le ministre ici afin que nous puissions tenir d'autres discussions.

Le président:

Monsieur Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux de cette occasion de ramener certains de nos invités étrangers dans la conversation.

Chacun des témoignages que nous avons entendus soulève des questions relativement à la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, et vous avez tous souligné l'importance du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. Pouvez-vous donner des conseils au Comité quant à la façon dont, d'abord, la Norvège, puis l'Australie, ont agi pour s'assurer que les capacités sont renforcées au sein des collectivités autochtones, de sorte que les consultations soient réellement éclairées? Comment établissez-vous cette expertise technique, en Norvège et en Australie, afin de vous assurer que les gens sont capables de participer d'une manière significative et éclairée à ce qui est souvent une discussion très technique?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

J'ai une réponse rapide à la question précédente, si je puis me permettre. Je pense qu'il s'agit aussi de savoir qui a le droit de déterminer les droits des générations à venir de vivre des produits de la terre, simplement pour ajouter à la complexité.

La Norvège a élaboré — mais pas la Finlande, ni la Suède — un accord de consultation avec le Parlement sami. Ce parlement est un organisme composé de Samis élus. Il y en a un en Norvège, un autre en Finlande et un troisième en Suède.

En Norvège, un accord de consultation est en vigueur. On tient actuellement des discussions concernant une modification de la loi parce qu'elle devrait également faire participer les municipalités et les provinces, ou comtés, comme nous les appelons.

Concernant la question de l'expertise technique et des capacités, je pense qu'aujourd'hui, on renforce les capacités au sein des Parlements samis et que la plupart des employés possèdent l'expérience juridique nécessaire pour participer à ces consultations. Toutefois, concernant l'expertise technique, qui a également été soulevée dans l'un des exposés précédents, nous dépendons encore beaucoup des rapports et des conclusions des promoteurs au lieu de nous fier au savoir des Autochtones.

Bien entendu, dans le cadre de ce processus assorti d'études environnementales, que mènent la Norvège, la Finlande et la Suède, ce sont les promoteurs qui injectent l'argent nécessaire. Par exemple, je ne sais même pas si les Samis ont réfléchi au fait qu'ils pourraient exiger de mener les études au lieu de laisser les experts techniques s'en charger afin de s'assurer que le point de vue holistique et la vision du monde des Samis sont pris en considération. S'ils ont tenté de le faire, je ne suis au courant d'aucun effort fructueux à cet égard.

Je pense que nous sommes pas mal à jour en ce qui concerne l'aspect juridique. Nous disposons de beaucoup de juristes qui peuvent prendre part à ce processus. Toutefois, pour ce qui est du volet technique, on manque de ressources.

(1635)

M. Nick Whalen:

Monsieur O'Faircheallaigh.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Rapidement, il y a un précédent chez les Samis de la Suède. Ils ont récemment mené leur propre évaluation environnementale d'une mine de cuivre que Falun proposait d'exploiter. Je peux fournir cette référence au Comité.

Encore rapidement, en réponse aux questions très importantes posées par l'honorable députée concernant le fait qu'on ne se concentre que sur les gens vivant dans les réserves, je pense qu'un autre enjeu crucial au sujet du contrôle par les Autochtones des évaluations environnementales, c'est que cela permet aux peuples autochtones de décider qui est touché et qui devrait être consulté.

Il y a des cas où je suis intervenu...

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis désolé, monsieur O'Faircheallaigh. Comme vous l'avez peut-être déjà entendu dire, je ne dispose que de sept minutes pour poser mes questions, et je voudrais que vous répondiez à la mienne.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

D'accord. Bien sûr.

En ce qui concerne les capacités et le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, c'est la question de l'oeuf ou la poule. Là où les Autochtones ont de plus amples organisations représentatives régionales, ils utilisent leurs capacités actuelles pour s'adresser aux promoteurs et au gouvernement et négocier avec eux au sujet de l'obtention des ressources nécessaires au renforcement de ces capacités.

Par exemple, dans la région de Kimberley du Nord-Ouest de l'Australie, il y a une organisation représentative appelée le Kimberley Land Council. Son assise politique est puissante. Elle représente tous les groupes autochtones de la région, et elle est en position d'intervenir auprès du gouvernement et des promoteurs et de négocier un financement important pour l'exécution d'évaluations environnementales autochtones complètes et la négociation d'ententes.

Dans des régions de l'Australie, surtout dans les zones dites colonisées de Victoria et de la Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, il n'existe pas de telles organisations politiques régionales, et on se retrouve carrément avec un système à deux vitesses. Les Autochtones de Victoria, de la Nouvelle-Galles du Sud et de l'Australie-Méridionale ont énormément de difficulté à obtenir les ressources nécessaires pour réaliser ces capacités.

Mon expérience au Canada me donne à penser que vous obtenez parfois le même genre de système à deux vitesses, peut-être pour le même genre de raisons.

M. Nick Whalen:

Eh bien, restons ici, au Canada, parce que vous avez affirmé avoir effectué certains travaux dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier au large de la côte Est. Un de nos processus vient tout juste de prendre fin en ce qui concerne Equinor et ExxonMobil, ainsi que les consultations relatives à la réalisation des projets de forage exploratoires extracôtier proposés cet été.

Le promoteur a octroyé aux groupes autochtones — 41 d'entre eux, je crois — un financement qui pourrait ou non... On ne sait pas vraiment si leurs droits de pêche du saumon de l'Atlantique seront touchés ou pas, mais ils ont tous été invités à participer. Il semble que ceux qui ont reçu plus de financement étaient déjà mieux en mesure de participer parce qu'ils étaient déjà bien financés et que les groupes moins bien financés ont reçu moins d'argent. Observez-vous ce décalage en Australie — je pense que vous l'avez mentionné —, et comment devrions-nous tenter de contourner ce problème?

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Oui. Tout d'abord, je préciserais que mon travail était à Voisey's Bay, au Labrador, et non au large...

M. Nick Whalen:

D'accord. Merci.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

... mais je pense que cela renforce l'idée, car les Innus et les Inuits ont été en mesure de négocier l'une des plus solides ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages au Canada, principalement parce qu'ils disposaient déjà d'une forte organisation politique qu'ils ont été en mesure de mobiliser. On observe certainement ce phénomène en Australie.

Je pense que la seule solution est l'établissement d'une installation financée à l'échelon fédéral, qui fournit à tous les groupes touchés par de grands projets une capacité de financement. Il est possible de le faire d'une manière qui est conforme aux exigences en matière de reddition de comptes du Parlement, et ainsi de suite. Toutefois, s'il n'y a pas de fonds national, ces iniquités se produisent inévitablement. Ceux qui ont déjà de l'argent en recevront davantage.

(1640)

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci infiniment. J'ai huit autres questions à poser, mais je n'en ai posé qu'une.

Le président:

Monsieur Falk, je crois que vous êtes le prochain intervenant; vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Merci à tous nos invités ici présents aujourd'hui du témoignage qu'ils ont fourni au Comité.

Madame Retter, je voudrais commencer par vous. Dans le témoignage que vous avez présenté au Comité au début de la séance, vous avez formulé un commentaire. J'ai tenté de le consigner au complet; je ne sais pas si j'ai bien réussi. Vous avez affirmé que, parfois, les droits doivent céder la place aux intérêts nationaux. Pourriez-vous nous donner plus de détails à ce sujet?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Oui, merci. Je tenterai d'être brève.

Ce que je tentais d'expliquer, c'est que, même si la Norvège, la Finlande et la Suède reconnaissent l'existence de peuples autochtones ayant des droits, ces peuples ne possèdent pas de titres fonciers comme dans d'autres régions du monde.

Nous faisons souvent face au problème, par exemple en ce qui concerne le changement climatique, qui est actuellement au sommet des préoccupations. Nous disons, oh oui, mais nous devons atténuer les changements climatiques et trouver des solutions de rechange aux combustibles fossiles, alors il s'agit d'un intérêt mondial et national, et les problèmes des Samis doivent maintenant attendre parce que nous avons ces problèmes plus importants à régler. En outre, nous faisons part aux Samis du fait que nous attendons d'eux qu'ils prennent part à cet effort concerté visant à atténuer les changements climatiques, puis utilisons cela comme argument pour imposer ce dilemme aux Autochtones ou aux Samis, c'est-à-dire qu'ils possèdent les terres dont on a besoin pour atténuer ces changements ou pour passer à des sources d'énergie écologique, et ainsi de suite. C'est un fardeau très injuste.

Tout d'abord, il y a déjà beaucoup de parcs éoliens et de mines sur les terres samies, alors ce n'est pas que nous ne contribuons pas, mais il y a aussi d'autres terres qu'on pourrait utiliser et qui sont plus près de l'endroit où on a besoin d'électricité. En tant que Sami, on a l'impression qu'il s'agit encore d'un autre argument visant à continuer à changer l'utilisation des terres et à exercer des pressions sur la culture samie afin qu'elle porte ce fardeau. Voilà mon explication.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci.

Madame Gunn, quel est votre point de vue sur les projets énergétiques nationaux en ce qui concerne les droits des peuples des Premières Nations ou des collectivités autochtones qui sont directement touchés, par rapport aux droits de ceux qui sont indirectement touchés? Devraient-ils avoir les mêmes droits?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

La meilleure façon dont je peux répondre, c'est peut-être en donnant, non pas uniquement mon point de vue, mais aussi mon avis juridique. Je pense que le droit international reconnaît que l'État a l'obligation d'obtenir le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause des peuples autochtones, si leur territoire traditionnel sera directement touché, ou si leurs droits seraient touchés d'une autre façon.

Je ne suis pas certaine que le droit international fasse la distinction que vous cherchez à faire ici aujourd'hui. Pour revenir à mon commentaire précédent et à ma déclaration préliminaire, ce qui devrait nous guider dans ces processus, c'est de chercher à faire respecter les droits. Si nous prenons des mesures pour redonner aux peuples autochtones le contrôle sur leurs terres et sur leurs ressources, rétablir leur intégrité et leur fierté et corriger les déséquilibres de pouvoir entre les peuples autochtones et l'État, je pense que ce processus visant à diviser les peuples autochtones en disant « vous êtes directement touchés, mais pas vous, vos droits ne sont alors pas aussi importants » ne dénote pas de la bonne foi. On ne respecte pas les normes, alors que le processus de consultation vise en réalité à faire respecter les droits et à promouvoir de nouveaux partenariats.

(1645)

M. Ted Falk:

Si une personne qui n'est pas directement touchée par un projet ou qui n'a pas d'intérêt dans un projet pourrait-elle manifester son opposition?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je ne pense pas que ce soit juste d'en parler dans l'abstrait. D'après mon expérience, quand les gens se sont opposés, ils l'ont souvent fait parce qu'ils avaient des préoccupations au sujet de la qualité de l'eau. Ils peuvent se trouver en aval d'un projet de développement. Ils sont peut-être indirectement touchés, mais ils subiront les conséquences.

Encore une fois, je pense que le Canada a l'obligation de savoir quelles sont les préoccupations qui sont soulevées, comment les peuples autochtones peuvent être touchés, et quelles sont les mesures nécessaires pour s'assurer que tous leurs droits fondamentaux sont respectés tout le long du processus.

Le président:

Je vais devoir vous interrompre, monsieur Falk.

M. Ted Falk:

Je n'ai pas fini.

Le président:

Eh bien, je ne suis pas d'accord avec vous sur ce point. Vous aurez une autre occasion d'intervenir, si vous voulez.

Monsieur Hehr, c'est à vous.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

J'aimerais remercier les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui. Cette discussion est fascinante. Vos connaissances sont très approfondies, et vous nous apprenez beaucoup de choses, pour nous permettre de bien comprendre notre obligation de consulter et d'accommoder les peuples autochtones dans le cadre des grands projets énergétiques. Je viens de Calgary, la capitale de l'énergie du Canada. Au Canada, nous sommes également signataires du Traité no 7. Nous partageons les terres avec les peuples autochtones de cette région, et nous bâtissons une collectivité avec eux, ici, aujourd'hui.

Néanmoins, j'écoutais la discussion sur le peuple sami et sur l'atténuation du changement climatique, où vous disiez avoir trouvé une façon de mettre en oeuvre avec succès un projet éolien à grande échelle et avoir établi un processus qui a bien fonctionné. Est-ce parce qu'il y a eu une mobilisation précoce dans ce dossier? Une relation a-t-elle été très rapidement établie? Qu'est-ce qui a mené à une issue favorable dans ce cas?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Je ne sais pas à quel point la mobilisation a été précoce, mais ce qui a été fondamental ici, c'était le dialogue, les consultations et le fait qu'on soit parvenu à un accord. Oui, les gens de la région ont compris la nécessité du projet, et ils ont eu une discussion afin de désigner quelle partie des terres avait le moins d'importance pour l'élevage de rennes, tout en étant propice à l'installation d'une éolienne.

Ce que je comprends de ce processus, c'est que les deux parties étaient satisfaites. Elles ont réglé l'emplacement du parc éolien prévu et se sont mises d'accord. Je ne suis pas certaine des avantages directs liés à cela, mais en même temps, j'ai soulevé une préoccupation relative au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause à l'égard de ce projet. Il s'agit ici de l'effet cumulatif, qui a également été mentionné tout à l'heure. Une fois qu'on a fini de construire l'éolienne, on a commencé à discuter de la nécessité d'avoir des lignes électriques. Je ne sais pas si cela faisait partie du genre d'entente qui avait été discutée lors des négociations ou des consultations au sujet des élevages de rennes. Je ne suis pas certaine s'il y a eu une entente sur le fait que cela mènerait à d'autres constructions sur les mêmes terres qui pourraient avoir une plus grande incidence que l'éolienne.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à M. O'Faircheallaigh. Dans votre témoignage de tout à l'heure, vous avez mentionné avoir remarqué une différence entre les évaluations environnementales des Autochtones et les études « habituelles » réalisées à cet égard. Une fois ces études réalisées, les entreprises et les Autochtones étaient-ils en désaccord? Existait-il un mécanisme pour régler les différends, ou cela a-t-il généralement été accepté en tant que meilleure marche à suivre, grâce au dialogue et au débat?

(1650)

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Dans le processus réglementaire, il n'est pas nécessaire d'avoir une réconciliation, car l'évaluation environnementale des Autochtones est transmise au décideur — dans le cas que j'ai mentionné, c'était au ministre fédéral et au ministre d'Australie-Occidentale — en plus de l'évaluation environnementale classique.

Les décideurs obtiennent une représentation fidèle du projet et de ses impacts, ainsi que des mesures d'atténuation, du point de vue autochtone. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un élément essentiel. Cela veut dire que, par exemple, c'est aux peuples autochtones de décider qui sera touché et si ce sera de manière « directe » ou « indirecte ». C'est leur point de vue qui est soumis au décideur, et c'est la clé.

Toutefois, à la suite de l'évaluation environnementale, il y a eu un processus de négociation entre le promoteur, le gouvernement de l'État et les parties autochtones, qui a donné lieu à la signature d'une série d'accords. Au moyen de ce processus de négociation, vous obtenez une résolution et un accord sur l'approche à adopter pour mieux gérer les impacts.

J'aimerais également souligner que, grâce à la contribution des Autochtones, certains aspects sont extrêmement novateurs et très importants, du point de vue de l'intérêt national, et pas seulement du point de vue de l'intérêt des Autochtones. Comme je l'ai mentionné, l'exemple précis que je donne pour souligner cela est lié au grand problème qui existe au chapitre du suivi à long terme. En ce qui concerne la durée de vie du projet, si elle est de 40 ou 50 ans, cet accord prévoit qu'il y aura un agent de conformité environnementale qui sera présent sur le site pour s'assurer que toutes les dispositions relatives à la protection de l'environnement convenues sont mises en pratique. C'est une chose qui revient, une fois de plus, à la question sur l'intérêt national.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Hehr.

Monsieur Falk, je crois que vous avez mentionné que vous n'aviez pas fini. Je vous redonne la parole.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci, monsieur le président, c'est très aimable de votre part. Je vous remercie de vos dernières observations, monsieur O'Faircheallaigh. Je pense qu'elles étaient très intéressantes.

Je souhaiterais de nouveau revenir à Mme Gunn et continuer à l'interroger sur certains de ses points de vue. Si on pense à certains des précédents projets nationaux que nous avons réalisés en tant que pays, par exemple la construction de notre système ferroviaire, nos voies ferrées, n'auraient jamais été construites dans le contexte actuel. Je ne dis pas que ces projets ont été parfaitement réalisés et qu'il n'y aurait pas pu y avoir plus de consultations à l'époque. Toutefois, quand on examine aujourd'hui les projets nationaux en matière d'énergie et le nombre de consultations que nous faisons, que nous nous sommes engagés à faire et que nous voulons faire, quelle est la meilleure voie à suivre, selon vous, pour achever ces projets?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je ne suis pas certaine de bien comprendre pourquoi nous pensons que le système ferroviaire n'aurait pas été construit. Je pense que, d'une certaine façon, c'est un très bon exemple. Nous pouvons voir que la négociation du Traité no 3 a pris un peu plus de temps, mais il a été négocié et a permis la construction du système ferroviaire. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'un excellent exemple historique. L'échéancier n'était peut-être pas initialement ce que le premier ministre de l'époque avait espéré. Dans le cadre du Traité no 3, il a fallu quatre années pour aboutir à un accord. Les négociateurs de la Reine ont dû discuter à plusieurs reprises avec les Anichinabés, mais cela a permis de conclure un accord.

Vous avez raison de dire que nous participons à beaucoup de consultations en ce moment. J'ai l'impression qu'on n'a pas toujours le sentiment que les discussions avec les peuples autochtones sont efficaces, en ce qui concerne le fait d'assurer le respect de leurs droits ou d'essayer de les accommoder. Je comprends le point de vue de M. Hehr concernant l'obligation de consulter et de proposer des accommodements. Au Canada, nous avons souvent un processus de consultation abrégé, et je pense que c'est une partie du problème. Certains sont d'avis — et je pense que l'autre témoin en a également parlé — que le Canada a une attitude qui consiste à « se présenter, fournir de l'information, et peut-être en obtenir en retour », mais qu'ensuite, il fait cavalier seul et prend des décisions.

Je pense que ce qui est de plus en plus exigé dans le droit international, y compris aux termes des nouvelles règles de la Banque mondiale — je sais que le Canada n'emprunte pas de la Banque mondiale, mais je pense que cela indique la tendance internationale —, c'est un processus beaucoup plus rigoureux qui vise à fournir de l'information et à entendre les préoccupations que soulèveraient les peuples autochtones. Nous devons nous réunir et travailler ensemble pour réfléchir aux moyens de répondre à ces préoccupations dans le cadre du projet.

Je pense qu'un processus qui fait davantage participer les peuples autochtones et qui vise à faire respecter leurs droits permettra en fait d'avoir une plus grande certitude. Nous aurons des projets qui seront bons pour l'environnement et pour les peuples autochtones et pas seulement d'un point de vue économique étroit. Nous pourrons prendre ces décisions plus rapidement et avec une meilleure certitude et ainsi avoir un processus beaucoup plus rapide.

Je crois que M. Stubbs a dit que nous sommes en crise, et je suis d'accord. Nous sommes en crise, et c'est l'incapacité d'assurer pleinement la participation des peuples autochtones et le respect de leurs droits qui a mené à une partie de cette incertitude.

(1655)

M. Ted Falk:

Le premier ministre a affirmé que les peuples autochtones n'avaient pas le droit de veto. Souscrivez-vous à cette déclaration?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je crois que le droit international a insisté sur ce point, mais il est très important d'être clairs sur ce que nous entendons par veto. Si le Canada arrive, présente un plan aux peuples autochtones et leur dit, « vous pouvez dire oui, mais vous ne pouvez pas dire non », personne ne veut cela. Comme je l'ai indiqué, conformément au droit international, il ne s'agit pas de présenter une décision prise à l'avance aux peuples autochtones; il s'agit plutôt de les faire participer au processus décisionnel.

Il existe certaines circonstances dans lesquelles les peuples autochtones peuvent dire non. J'affirme sans équivoque que, même s'il ne s'agit pas d'un veto, nous avons encore le droit de dire non à des projets. Je peux essayer de retrouver ce passage dans mes notes pour le répéter, mais je crois avoir dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire que les peuples autochtones ont le droit de dire non dans certaines circonstances. Oui, mes notes indiquent qu'ils « peuvent refuser leur consentement dans plusieurs situations, notamment après avoir évalué la proposition et conclu qu'elle n'est pas dans leur intérêt », c'est-à-dire que leurs droits ne seront pas respectés, ou qu'il existe des lacunes dans le processus ou une méfiance légitime dans à l'égard du processus de consultation.

Oui, il ne s'agit pas d'un droit de veto, mais nous avons le droit de dire non.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Whalen, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous pourrions peut-être utiliser l'exemple que j'ai mentionné précédemment à propos des consultations menées auprès des Autochtones qui se déroulent en même temps que l'évaluation environnementale relative au forage en haute mer à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador. Il n'y a pas de droits territoriaux qui touchent directement la zone d'exploration, mais il existe peut-être des droits économiques indirects ou auxiliaires liés aux pêcheries locales.

Je me demande si chacun d'entre vous peut expliquer ou peut-être donner son point de vue sur sa propre législation nationale quant au moment où les consultations relatives aux travaux de forage environnemental proposés devraient commencer. Devraient-elles commencer quand un promoteur décide de lancer un projet? Devraient-elles commencer quand l'État décide d'offrir des permis dans une zone? Devraient-elles plutôt commencer dès que quelqu'un manifeste un intérêt pour la prise de mesures sismiques dans la zone?

Vous avez parlé d'une mobilisation précoce, mais, en ce qui concerne les droits indirects, je ne suis pas certain du moment que vous proposez à titre de pratique exemplaire pour la tenue de consultations auprès des Autochtones dans ce genre de scénario, c'est-à-dire dans le cas de l'exploration pétrolière et gazière extracôtière.

Cette fois-ci, commençons par le témoin du Canada et nous entendrons ensuite celui de l'Australie et celui de la Norvège.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

J'espérais que mon tour viendrait en dernier. Je voulais essayer de trouver...

M. Nick Whalen:

D'accord. Nous pouvons inverser l'ordre.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je peux peut-être essayer de parler très rapidement, parce que je crois qu'il ne reste presque plus de temps.

Ce devrait être le plus tôt possible. Je sais que cette réponse ne vous donne pas la précision que vous cherchez, mais ce que nous souhaitons, c'est de faire en sorte que la mobilisation se fasse assez tôt pour que les Autochtones puissent véritablement participer au processus décisionnel et influencer le résultat. Notre préoccupation tient au fait que si nous sollicitons la participation des Autochtones trop tard, ce sera un fait accompli. Il faut s'assurer que la participation se fait assez tôt.

Vous avez raison, j'ai entendu des critiques, surtout venant du Mexique, selon lesquelles, si la participation est sollicitée trop tôt, il n'y a pas de renseignements à communiquer. La seule réponse que je peux fournir en ce moment, c'est que cela doit se faire le plus tôt possible. Lorsque l'idée est manifestée pour la première fois, il faut commencer à établir la relation pour tisser des liens de confiance et de respect mutuel pouvant servir de fondement aux consultations portant sur un projet précis.

(1700)

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci.

Pour l'Australie.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

La question est de savoir quand commencer la consultation. En ce qui concerne les terres qui font l'objet d'une revendication ou dans le cas où il existe des titres de propriété autochtones, la consultation commence quand quelqu'un demande un permis d'exploration. Toutefois, il existe un processus appelé la « procédure accélérée », ce qui signifie que, à moins que l'on prévoie que les incidences de l'exploration seront très importantes, il s'agit d'un processus de routine.

Si une entité soumet une demande de permis d'exploitation, alors on tient une consultation beaucoup plus exhaustive.

En ce qui concerne les pratiques exemplaires, il existe un exemple d'évaluation stratégique qui a été menée en Australie-Occidentale et qui s'est déroulée beaucoup plus tôt. Ce processus comprenait l'examen d'une grande partie de la côte, des centaines de kilomètres de côte, et la consultation des habitants tout le long de la côte à propos de l'emplacement d'un carrefour de gaz naturel liquéfié. Cette approche est de loin préférable. Un processus à deux étapes a suivi, après que les 11 groupes ont trouvé un consensus.

Je crois que cela rejoint aussi les problèmes qui touchent votre pipeline.

Après que les 11 groupes ont trouvé un consensus à propos du meilleur emplacement, on a mené une deuxième étape de consultations, beaucoup plus détaillées, auprès des Autochtones qui détenaient des titres de propriété dans la zone en question.

M. Nick Whalen:

Dans le cas de la Norvège, je sais qu'il n'y a qu'un seul groupe là-bas, donc les choses ne sont peut-être pas aussi compliquées qu'elles le sont au Canada et en Australie, mais j'aimerais connaître votre point de vue.

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Ce n'est pas très compliqué. Toutefois, comme il a été mentionné dans la dernière réponse, votre question touche différents volets. Quand le gouvernement effectue la planification concernant la zone d'exploration pétrolière et gazière, il doit automatiquement consulter le Parlement sami, soit l'entité qui représente les membres du peuple sami en Norvège.

Il n'y a pas d'exploration pétrolière et gazière extracôtière en Finlande et en Suède.

Pour ce qui est de la prise de mesures sismiques et d'autres étapes, quand on arrive à l'échelon local, c'est-à-dire le véritable début du projet, les représentants des personnes qui habitent dans la zone, ou en périphérie de celle-ci, sont ceux qui doivent être consultés à cette étape. Tout au long du processus global, il y a différents processus et différentes étapes liés à la participation du peuple sami.

Le président:

Madame Jolibois, vous disposez de trois minutes, ensuite nous allons terminer la réunion.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je remercie les représentantes des trois organisations de cette importante discussion. Vu le peu de temps qu'il reste, je souhaite revenir à notre témoin du Manitoba.

Madame Gunn, je suis encore accrochée à la consultation avec les Autochtones — les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits — vu que certaines provinces ont des responsabilités à l'égard des Métis, alors qu'au palier fédéral, ce n'est qu'à l'égard des Premières Nations et des Inuits.

De quelle façon les collectivités autochtones peuvent-elles réclamer les avantages qu'elles convoitent si elles souhaitent conclure un accord avec les acteurs de l'industrie? Comment les gouvernements des provinces et du fédéral peuvent-ils aider en ce qui concerne le processus?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

C'est une question difficile, et je crois que c'est ce qui explique que les projets dans le domaine de l'énergie ou des ressources naturelles se déroulent au Canada dans un contexte où, de façon historique, on oppose les Premières Nations aux Métis. Je suis d'avis qu'il faut garder à l'esprit le fardeau et l'héritage coloniaux au moment de s'engager dans ces consultations. Nous devons tenir compte de ce contexte plus large.

Ce qui explique en partie la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons, du moins en ce qui concerne l'arrêt Daniels de la Cour suprême, c'est la reconnaissance du fait que le gouvernement fédéral est responsable du peuple métis. Même si les provinces ont tenu des consultations, comme en Alberta, avec les collectivités métisses, il a maintenant été précisé, du moins par la Cour suprême, que le gouvernement fédéral a l'obligation de consulter les Métis, les Premières Nations et les Inuits.

Je crois aussi que la question touche au fait que nous effectuons de l'exploitation des ressources au Canada dans un contexte où il y a plusieurs revendications territoriales non réglées et un manque de reconnaissance et de respect des traités. Selon moi, cela a engendré une bonne partie des tensions et des problèmes que nous connaissons, c'est-à-dire le fait que nous procédons quand même, en dépit du fait qu'il y a des problèmes qui restent à régler. En outre, plus le Canada agit pour régler les revendications territoriales qui sont en instance, plus ces consultations deviennent faciles, parce que nous réglons des questions fondamentales. J'ai commencé mon exposé en soulevant ce point, et en tentant d'établir un lien entre le droit au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause et le droit plus large à l'autodétermination et les droits touchant les terres, les territoires et les ressources.

(1705)

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Merci.

Le président:

Malheureusement, le temps dont nous disposions est écoulé. Je vous remercie beaucoup, tous les trois, d'avoir pris du temps durant votre après-midi, ou votre matinée, selon le cas, pour vous joindre à nous. Cela a été très utile et nous sommes très reconnaissants. Nous nous reverrons mardi.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard rnnr 26238 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on April 04, 2019

2019-04-02 RNNR 131

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1540)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Thank you all for joining us today. It's been a while since we've been together. I can tell just by everybody's demeanour just how much they miss being here. We're glad to be back together. I'd like to thank our two witnesses in the first hour.

From Woodland Cree First Nation, we have Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom.

From Amnesty International, we have Craig Benjamin.

Thank you both for joining us today. The format is that each of you will be given up to 10 minutes to deliver your opening remarks, and then we'll open the table to questions from around the table.

I will open the floor to either one of you, whoever wants to go first.

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom (Chief, Woodland Cree First Nation):

Tansi. Kinana'skomitina'wa'w.

It's a pleasure and an honour to be here. My name is Chief Isaac Ausinis Laboucan-Avirom. I'm from the Woodland Cree First Nation. I was grand chief of the Treaty No. 8 territory not too long ago, grand chief of my tribal council, but today I'm here just as chief of my first nation. I'd like to say that I know that this is a good effort to do, but this is not in consultation with other first nations. I don't want to be accountable....

As for Woodland Cree, we are surrounded by natural resource activity, from oil and gas development to forestry to green energy projects like Site C. There are always negative and positive impacts when doing resource development, but we're in a day and age in which there has to be more accountability to first nations communities and to the environment. We have to make sure we're making good decisions so that we can have sustainability and so that generations of our children can grow in a country that is not fully polluted and that still has healthy jobs for people to get to.

You have to forgive me; I'm supposed to be on spring break, and my executive assistant is on spring break, so I'll be jumping back and forth in some of my notes here.

Companies should be encouraged to develop some understanding of the legal and constitutional rights of first nations. In Canada, first nations were not defeated in war. We have treaties. These treaty rights are constitutionally protected. Many international companies do not understand this, and they come from different perspectives. From my understanding of this, sometimes it gets very difficult when we are dealing with this mindset. We have to re-educate them and tell them who we are and why we have our rights. A best practice would include an educational component for international companies to understand the landscape in Canada so that first nations don't have to consistently recreate this work.

You know, one of the biggest struggles for first nations is that we are always looking for better and better human capacity. As I look around this room, I know that some of the best mindsets in Canada are here. As a first nations chief, sometimes I'm obligated to work with some of the best on the other side of the table, where I'm going against people such.... They used to be Shell, CNRL...where they have some of the best minds money can buy.

In order to have meaningful consultation, first nations need to have the capacity to understand the technical aspects of the projects, communicate information to community members, and gather information from community members and knowledge-keepers. This takes much more funding than is currently offered by Canada. The nation spends a lot of time and energy building the case for capacity funding and negotiating capacity funding, etc. The time and energy would be better spent actually engaging in the consultation and the search for accommodation measures. Best practices should include a requirement to provide adequate funding, which could be expressed as a percentage of the amount the company expects to spend on environmental, geotechnical and other types of studies.

I have the example of Site C. I'll be jumping back and forth between oil and gas and other resource departments. I had lawyers come to my nation one time, saying that they wanted to build Site C. My nation does not have monies to spend on lawyers. We'd rather build houses and put money into education and the elders. One of the questions I asked the Site C legal team was around what environmental impacts would be caused. They said, oh, there won't be much. Well, they'd be extinguishing two species of fish in the reservoir, the Arctic grayling and the goldeye. It doesn't take a university individual to understand that this has a direct impact on other ecological systems. Those are feeder fish for bigger fish, etc. Woodland Cree at that time did not have a million dollars to spend in the courts, so it's something.... And then also through the consultation process, that the borders between Alberta and B.C....said that the consultation process was basically a no-go zone.

(1545)



Indigenous knowledge and input from the community should be incorporated into all aspects of the environment and social investigations into the projects. A best practice would include encouraging companies to look at the inclusion of indigenous communities through project development, design and implementation. Ultimately, the goal of any best practice would be to actually arrive at a meaningful mitigation or accommodation of impacts. When I think of meaningful consultation, that means I know exactly what the other side of the table, the proponent producer, is talking about.

When I look at these bills such as Bill C-69, I see this is just an example of where, at one of my chiefs meetings in Alberta, we condoned it, and then just last week we rescinded it. That's a good example of how it was so complex and misunderstood, and then now we're sitting here today where it's already gone so far in the process. I don't believe there was proper and meaningful consultation on Bill C-48 and Bill C-69, and we're at a place where we shouldn't be at.

In most cases today, the parties have become much better at exchanging information, but there is still a resistance to making meaningful changes to the projects to lessen impacts on traditional land uses and resistance to involving indigenous communities in long-term economic development benefits.

Woodland is one nation that has been working hard to make strong and meaningful partnerships with business to develop business capacities, local employment, etc., but these have to be long-term opportunities not just brush-clearing and construction.

Woodland Cree needs to get into the business of developing and eventually owning resources such as the Eagle Spirit pipeline. I am on the chiefs' committee of that group. I can only talk so much to companies. Yes, they will nod their head and they will say yes, we tried, but if we were actually owners and operators of those companies, then our corporate values would follow that company.

For example, if I'm an owner of a company, I want to say I want to be the best in the world. I want to make that pipeline as indestructible as we can. I know there's technology and the abilities to do that. We're at this meeting today to be the best in the world, and I know we can do that.

It also goes into trading aspects of it. If we had ownership of these pipelines, then we could tell our customers that they need a better environmental standard on the products they develop from our resources.

Best practices would include encouraging companies to dig into business development with indigenous communities to share with them what types of businesses should also be pursued in order to support the project. Companies should also be willing to learn about capacities that different first nations have to offer. If both parties come to the table with a willingness to share information and work together to build first nations' capacity, then we will achieve meaningful accommodation.

Sometimes the feds are typically avoiding absolutely any language in the question that alludes to free, prior and informed consent. There are also quite a few articles written specifically about this within UNDRIP. We know this, especially if we're looking internationally.

There is no perfect international example of projects. However, projects in Bolivia entrenched the rights of nature—they actually used “mother earth” in Spanish—using indigenous law. New Zealand protected the rivers using Maori law. The Sami have a parliament and can pass laws in their territory. If a corporation has personhood, so then should the same things that make first nations....

Project approval currently only represents one culture's law and relations with the land. In order for a project to be truly collaborative and successful from a first nations' viewpoint, it should also respect our culture and our laws too.

(1550)



That can seem almost impossible when our laws in Canada aren't respected or admitted into courts of regulatory.... If we want projects to go through, then consent is the only way.

The Chair:

I'm going to have to ask you to wrap up in about 30 seconds.

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Basically I'm here to find a solution and to be part of the solution. There are a lot of misconceptions in the media all the time. As a first nations individual, I think our land, our water, the air and the animals are important to all of us. They are sustainability for future generations to come.

It frustrates me, as a first nations individual, when I have to almost beg for monies when we're living in one of the most resource-rich countries in the world. Why should our people be living in third-class or second-class communities when we are surrounded by natural resources that go into paving our roads, putting in rec centres, and so on?

I have children and I want my children to have the same abilities your children have. I know that a treaty is a nation-to-nation relationship. We need to encourage that to keep going on, and to understand and be more respectful to each other.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Benjamin.

Mr. Craig Benjamin (Campaigner, Indigenous Rights, Amnesty International Canada):

Thank you.

I'd like to begin by acknowledging the Algonquin people on whose territory we have the privilege of meeting today.

I would like to thank the members of the committee for this opportunity to come to speak to you. I would also like to express my appreciation for the opportunity to share the table with Chief Laboucan-Avirom.

The subject of this study is one of great interest to Amnesty International, and to me personally. There are a lot of things I could talk about, but what I'd like to do is focus on one specific example of international guidelines for engagement with indigenous peoples, which is the International Finance Corporation's performance standards on indigenous peoples.

Members of the committee will know that the International Finance Corporation, IFC, is the institution within the World Bank group that focuses exclusively on support to the private sector in development activities.

After the UN General Assembly adopted the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007, the IFC undertook a review of its social and environmental performance standards. In 2012 it adopted a dramatically revised requirement for projects potentially affecting indigenous peoples.

These performance standards take a precautionary approach, setting out measures needed to reduce the risk of significant harm to indigenous peoples, regardless of the recognition or lack of recognition of indigenous people's rights in national law. The performance standards do not directly address indigenous people's right to self-determination, nor do the standards address indigenous people's continued right to exercise jurisdiction over their traditional lands. These are matters at the very heart of the UN declaration, but the performance standards leave them to national governments to resolve.

Strikingly, however, even in the absence of explicit requirements to respect and uphold traditional land title and to engage with indigenous peoples as an order of government exercising jurisdiction within their territories, the standards that were adopted by the IFC are still, in many ways, considerably more stringent than Canada's current domestic laws and regulations around resource extraction.

In particular, I would like to draw the committee's attention to the IFC's provisions on free, prior and informed consent, FPIC. The IFC states that FPIC is both a process and an outcome. In other words, it doesn't just call on the private sector to seek consent; it makes consent a formal requirement for its support.

The performance standard specifically requires FPIC in four broad areas: where there is potential for significant impacts on indigenous peoples's identities or the cultural, ceremonial or spiritual aspects of their lives; where there are impacts on lands and natural resources subject to traditional ownership or under customary use; where a project might lead to displacement from lands and resources; or where a project proposes to exploit indigenous people's cultural heritage.

The IFC explicitly states that the process by which indigenous peoples grant or withhold their consent must be a process that is acceptable to them. The performance standard further states that the process must be culturally appropriate and it must engage with the existing customary institutions and decision-making processes of the affected peoples.

This process must begin at the earliest stages of project design and continue through the development and implementation of the project. The performance standard requires that the process and any agreements that are reached be documented. Furthermore, the performance standard requires that a mutually acceptable grievance process be established to address any disputes that could arise over the agreements.

I've mentioned that one of the IFC's tests for whether FPIC is required is the potential for significant impacts. In determining whether impacts are significant, the performance standard calls for consideration of the strength of available legal protections for indigenous rights, indigenous people's past and current relationship to the state and to other groups in society, their current economic situation, and the importance of land and resources to their lives, economy and society.

Significantly, this determination of whether or not the potential harm is significant, and therefore requiring consent, is to be undertaken in direct collaboration with the affected peoples themselves, as opposed to arbitrarily or unilaterally determined by the state or by the IFC.

I also wanted to note, in the context of the current debates around the federal government's proposed new impact assessment regime, that the IFC's performance standard on indigenous peoples and other performance standards adopted by this institution explicitly require the involvement of women in the determination of impacts as well as specific consideration of how the impacts can be different for men than for women.

(1555)



Canada is one of the founding members of the IFC. Like other member countries, Canada appoints a representative to the board of governors. Additionally, Canada holds one of 24 seats on the board of executive directors, and Canada's Minister of Finance reports regularly to Parliament on the operations of the IFC and other World Bank institutions.

In responding to this committee's 2017 report on the future of Canada's mining sector and your recommendation that Canada promote and improve responsible mining practices in Canada and abroad, Natural Resources Canada responded that it does in fact encourage companies to “adopt best practices domestically and internationally by implementing principles and guidelines into their day-to-day operations” from sources such as the IFC's performance standards.

All of this underlines the main point I want to make, namely, that an institution that Canada helps to govern, and which Canada refers to as a source of best practices, actually sets out a significantly higher standard for engagement with indigenous peoples than the federal government generally requires of itself or of corporations operating in Canada.

Numerous critiques have been made about the insufficiency of the IFC's own enforcement of its standards. This doesn't change the fact that the standards that it adopted and instituted more than five years ago are in many ways more stringent than those in effect in Canada, and that there is a gap in the requirements of corporate engagement with indigenous peoples between what is required of corporations acting in Canada versus those acting abroad. In this case, it is Canada, Canada's laws and Canada's regulations and practices that are falling short of this international standard.

I would be happy to talk about this with you further. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hehr, you're up first.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Chief and Mr. Benjamin, for coming here to share your stories and information with our committee.

I would first like to say to the chief that I'm from Treaty No. 7, where we share the land with our indigenous brothers and sisters. I know that Métis region number 3 is also very present here. Are you from Treaty No. 6?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Treaty No. 8. My wife is from Treaty No. 6.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Well, I was never much good at numbers, Mr. Chair, but I'm trying.

You bring up the fact—and I thought very eloquently—about how we have to move to a nation-to-nation relationship and how you just want to see your kids have the same opportunities on your land that we do in other parts of the country. I think that's a fair assessment.

You were bringing up the fact that you're negotiating with Shell, with Cenovus and with other levels of government. Do you feel that you have the capacity or the ability to do that? Or do we need to invest more in that capacity so that you have the tools to shape your own destiny?

(1600)

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

I'd like to say absolutely. We could definitely do a better job in that area, meaning that if I had the tools and the funding to do that, I think we absolutely could provide a better outcome.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Should that be negotiated in a mutual benefit agreement? How do you see that framework evolving?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

I think mutual benefit agreements are good, but again, if I had the proper capacity behind me, I'd be able to say that more eloquently.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I get that it's a chicken-and-egg sort of proposition, and I appreciate that.

Recently in your area, the Alberta government announced a new park out there, the Kitaskino Nuwenëné Wildland Provincial Park. It's created out of the oil sands leases from proponents that have been up there. Has that process worked for you? Has that ability to go back onto the land been something that you felt committed to, connected to and consulted on?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

I'd have to say no, because that isn't a direct area that I've worked in. That might have been in the more eastern area, into the Fort McMurray area, I'm assuming. I just don't have much information in that specific area.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I have a question for you, Mr. Benjamin. In your brief time, you went through some very detailed points on free, prior and informed consent and how it relates to indigenous peoples in the development of oil and gas projects, I guess, but resource projects more generally.

One of the things we've been discussing is early engagement: getting in early and discussing what the issues are, what the cultural reference points are that we need to be sensitive to, and what the ecological things are that we need to work with. Is that something that works in international best practices? Is that something that has to be driven home time and time again?

Mr. Craig Benjamin:

As Chief Laboucan-Avirom said, we lack perfect international practices. The practice is more often a negative one than a positive one. But I think you're absolutely right. The earlier the engagement, the better, on all kinds of levels. For one thing, the earlier the engagement can occur, the more likely it's possible to negotiate the kinds of arrangements that were talked about, negotiations where there is genuine mutual benefit, where there is the possibility to walk that line that ensures access to the benefits of development without sacrificing the cultural values, the practices and the traditions. The further down the line the process comes, obviously, the harder it is to adjust to fundamental needs and concerns.

The problem we see all too often is that, in fact, the decisions are set in stone before engagement with indigenous peoples begins. There's the intention already to go ahead with a particular project on a particular piece of land, and what we hear quite often from first nations we work with in Canada—and we hear this from indigenous peoples around the world—is that it's often not necessarily the case that they would be opposed to oil and gas development or a mine somewhere else in their territory, but that choice isn't being given to them. That choice of saying what they can live with, where, and what they would like, where—that very fundamental question of what the priorities are for different areas of land—gets taken away by the fact that they are only approached after those initial decisions are already made.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

You're a proponent, though, of early engagement.

Mr. Craig Benjamin:

Very much so.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Let me ask you this. How do you balance FPIC with an abundance of first nations throughout this great country of ours and being able to get consensus on moving projects forward? How do you find that balance? I'll just throw that open to both of you.

(1605)

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Okay. The question is with free.... Can you say that again?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's about free, prior and informed consent. When we've identified a big project that's going through, when the discussions happen, when you've wrestled and grappled with the area, how do you come to a consensus that this project is going to go through or this one isn't? How do you share the balance on those things?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

In Canada, in Alberta, even in the western provinces, it's a big demographic situation. When you talk specifically, let's say you use that on the oil and gas sector. In my area, it's a lot of in situ steam under the ground and it's not as big a footprint as in the Fort McMurray area. In my area with the free, informed consent, it will be a very different outlook or implications from those in the Fort McMurray area.

I think the broadness of it is the resource that is used in both of those aspects and in many aspects, water. Whether it's topical water or underground water, it should have way more value than oil.

The Chair:

I have to stop you there, unfortunately.

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thanks to both of our witnesses for being here.

I'm from the Treaty 6 area. I'm very proud to represent a total of nine indigenous and Métis communities. Almost all of them are actively involved in resource development, responsible oil and gas development, and supporting pipelines.

Chief Isaac, I know you've worked with a number of the chiefs from my area, such as leaders of the Frog Lake Energy Resources Corporation and others, who talk about the importance of resource development to indigenous communities and to future generations of indigenous communities, and also about the importance of ownership and direct involvement in resource development.

I do find it curious that we, at this committee, are doing a study on the best practices of indigenous communities when a bill that very much impacts that issue is in the Senate right now. Chief Isaac, I wonder if you have any comments about the scenario in which we find ourselves, which is that Bill C-69 is in its final stages of becoming law—unless it is stopped by the Senate—and this committee did not have an opportunity to review that piece of legislation.

You remarked originally on the association of chiefs that initially supported the legislation, but now yesterday or last week, I think, have come out opposing it. We can get into a little bit more of the details if you like, but I wonder if you do consider it to be a best practice that legislation like this could be on its way to completion right now without any of the committees having done a study on indigenous engagement. Do you have any comments on the degree to which you or other indigenous communities were consulted in the development of the legislation?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Like I said, my interpretation or definition of consultation—the ruling of consultation—is meaningful consultation, where I know exactly what the other side of the table is talking about. You could spin it around, shake it upside down and turn it all around, but I know exactly what they're about.

I'd say absolutely not, just on that example of how the chiefs at one meeting supported it, not fully understanding the consequences of it and now rescinding after having looked at it in more depth, understanding and saying that this has detrimental effects not only to them, to their provinces, to their territories, but also to the country.

Then, it's in the Senate right now. How did it get that far? How many people have been saying “stop”, “no”, and “don't”? I guess that's a good example of free, informed consent. If we had that mechanism and if it was actually working a hundred percent, it would not have gotten this far. That's my opinion.

Does that help? Is that a good example?

(1610)

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, it does. In fact, there has been a broad base of legal consensus that Bill C-69 won't expand either the duty of the Crown to indigenous people or change the rights of indigenous communities and people in the consultation related to major resource projects in federal jurisdiction.

We, of course, agree and have heard the concerns about capacity and resourcing for capacity loud and clear, and we share those concerns. Overall Bill C-69 doesn't meet that need. In fact, the national chiefs council, the Indian Resource Council, the Eagle Spirit Chiefs Council and the majority of Treaty 7 first nations all oppose Bill C-69.

Chief Roy Fox said, “I don't have any confidence in Bill C-69. I am fearful, and I am confident, that it will keep my people in poverty.”

I just wonder if you agree with that statement.

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

I'll support all my chiefs' statements.

Yes, it's worrisome. To me, it feels like the consultation process has just been a checkmark chore, where the actual consultation has not been either adequate or designed for the intent of it.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

In the international context, not only would Bill C-69 obviously put Canada at a disadvantage, but another bill—Bill C-48, which is the shipping ban on oil off B.C.'s north coast—is another example, in the context of discussing best practices for this study, where I understand there was a limited or complete lack of consultation on the bill with indigenous communities.

I know that you yourself have said, “This tanker ban is not just going to hurt us at the moment, which it's doing, but it's going to hurt future generations.”

I wonder if there is anything that you wanted to share about the process in that consultation on Bill C-48. Also, do you consider it to be a best practice of a government imposing anti-energy legislation on indigenous communities and all Canadians without consulting?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Absolutely, it's not a best practice.

How I got involved in that situation is that the first nations from the coast, even from Haida Gwaii, got together. They were saying that they could see tankers going by their territories on a daily basis. This is from them; I'm just kind of restating what they stated. They said there was no actual consultation even with the Great Bear Rainforest. I know there might have been good intentions but those are ideological mindsets. The fishing is going away and they could literally see from their own houses all the benefits going into the States and into the Alaskan ports. Basically, they said, this is where we are in this day and age. The fishing industry is hurting. They just want to make a living. They want to create jobs. They want some income and prosperity to come from these opportunities, and Bill C-48 kind of limits that. That is not to say that we do not care. We absolutely care 110% about any waters—ocean waters, lake waters and river waters. We want to see those things survive and to protect them through our mechanisms.

I'm going to segue back into Alberta—

The Chair:

I'm going to have to stop you there.

Unfortunately, we're out of time.

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you both for being here today.

I'm going to start with you, Mr. Benjamin. You mentioned the IFC and its guidelines. As far as I understand it, you said they are more stringent than our legislation here in Canada. How is that reflected in reality? Are those guidelines acted upon internationally, and what would need to change if you were advising the Government of Canada and wanted to reflect those guidelines in our legislation?

(1615)

Mr. Craig Benjamin:

There is definitely a significant gap in the enforcement of these guidelines. This is one of the problems we see around the world. We often have good laws but weak institutions for upholding those laws. The problem is multiplied when you have indigenous peoples who are the subject of so much racism and discrimination who are at such a great disadvantage in accessing legal mechanisms as this problem plays out over and over again.

There are interesting examples within the IFC system. IFC has published reports on how they've examined and made decisions about funding to particular projects. Chief Laboucan-Avirom talked about the issue of the provincial border being the cut-off point for consultation. Prior to the current guidelines, under their earlier, weaker guidelines, there's actually a case where the IFC looked at the fact that who was being consulted about the downstream impacts of the mining project was arbitrarily limited. They actually stepped in and withheld funding for that very fundamental reason. We do see some examples of enforcement around some basic principles.

My basic advice to the Government of Canada specifically about these performance standards is that there's a fundamental contradiction in being part of advocating for and holding Canadian corporations abroad to this standard through an institution that we helped govern and not having comparable standards in Canada. I think the goal of harmonization and consistency across borders is a good one, but we should seek to harmonize upward rather than downward. This standard is not an ideal standard, but we certainly shouldn't be falling below it domestically. A key piece is simply that recognition of consent, not only as a process but as an actual legislative requirement, to say that as a piece of approval there should be documented evidence that consent has in fact been obtained when there is a risk of serious harm. I think this is something perfectly possible to proceed with in Canada. We have a history in Canada of exactly such negotiations with first nations. You can look on Natural Resources Canada's website and it has a list of the vast numbers of impact benefit agreements that have been reached. We have the evidence that agreements can be reached. The difference that's being proposed is to make such an agreement a requirement so it strengthens the hand of indigenous peoples when they are at the table knowing that the other party can't simply walk away.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Chief, would you like to comment on that?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

I just want to interpret what Mr. Benjamin said, that Canada operates on a “do as I say, not as I do” process. That's just what I interpreted there. That does have to change.

I like how he brought up the provincial barriers. When the treaty was signed, we were signed before the provincial boundaries were made. Now there's either—don't take this the wrong way, but—a colonialism tactic or our way of safeguarding our own traditional lands.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I will just follow up, Chief, with another question. We're talking about downstream effects on dams, whatever, on the Peace River. We have linear issues, especially in the oil and gas industry where we have oil and gas being produced in northern B.C. and Alberta and shipped to the coast. We have different first nations along those routes that might be impacted differently. We have nations like yours that may benefit from those resource developments whereas you might have a first nation on the coast that is concerned about the impacts of marine transport, for instance. I've talked to first nations people in northeastern B.C. who have concerns about fracking and the use of water in gas, whereas the first nations on the coast are very much in favour of those projects that ship it out. It seems it can go both ways.

I'm wondering how you would see resolving those issues, when you have different first nations with differing concerns and opinions about whether resource projects should go through. How can we resolve that?

(1620)

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

That's a very big question. I can't answer that one in 10 minutes, but I know exactly what you mean: I live in the Peace River area. In the Grande Prairie area, which is three hours from where I live, they do a lot of fracking for the gas.

I'd like to say we've got to somehow invest and learn more in innovation. I've worked in the oil and gas sector and I know there have been different innovative things designed every year.

At the end, where the ports are and where the nations are on the coast, I understand why they see it as a good benefit.

One of the ways I look at it is that in some situations—excuse me for my language—we're damned if we do and we're damned if we don't. What is the greater good between the two evils, so to speak? That takes us back to thinking about international best practices. Internationally we are dealing with climate change. Politicians and industry might not like to use those words, “climate change”, but if we were to stop all of the automobiles, all of the carbon footprints right now, we would not necessarily slow down climate change. We have to be innovative.

I know if that gas gets to China and India, it will actually lower global emissions. I think that education needs to be out there. I would like to say that you don't need to use as much water in the fracking. As I said earlier, water is way more valuable than oil. I think if we have that mindset, our scientists and our technical people might be able to find a way.

The Chair:

I'm going to have to stop you there, Chief.

Mr. Tan.

Mr. Geng Tan (Don Valley North, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Chief Isaac, you mentioned in your presentation that there are some interactions or collaborations between the government and your first nation. In your opinion, in what areas do we collaborate well and in what areas do we still have to work hard to overcome some challenges?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

I do know that there's been a willingness to work together more. If there's a measuring stick for the last 20 years, we are doing better today than we have in the last 20 years.

When I think about forestry, there has been more scientific evidence and areas where we are trying to do a lot better, not just clear-cut, for example, but create some sort of sanctuary for animals, safeguard the creeks, etc.

When we do forest harvesting in our territory, because we do the cutting, we are able to more easily tell the companies not to cut the birch tree if they are going after the spruce tree, even if they need firewood, etc.

For the oil and gas sector, my territory had one of the largest oil spills in Alberta in 2011. What I have been saying ever since then is that we have to improve standards. As a treaty standard, I need to be able to drink that water, eat that moose and harvest those herbs. The way the standards are right now, if you spill four million litres of oil and you only clean up two million litres, then the energy board says that, yes, it's cleaned up. That has to be improved. If you spill four million litres of oil, then you clean up four million litres.

Mr. Geng Tan:

As a chief in your first nations community, do you interact directly with the government, entities or other companies that are seeking to develop the natural resource projects in your region, and are your community members also getting involved or engaged, or do you think you could speak on their behalf?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Absolutely, a little bit of both.

As an elected chief I'm an elected official, so they give me the ability to speak on their behalf. It is in the best interests of my community and I am obligated to be the best that I can be for them. I do invite my elders when I can, and we're even starting to invite youth. In big projects, for example, I will have an elders' meeting and then I will also hold a community meeting.

(1625)

Mr. Geng Tan:

I have a technical question. You mentioned in your presentation that your community is surrounded by very rich natural resources. I assume that means natural resource projects around your community. When a company starts a project, it always sends in a whole bunch of technical experts to be there on the site. They could be engineers or environmental professionals. They are technical experts, but not necessarily...they are called community engagement experts. Quite often, they are the first people that a local community sees, so they represent the face of the company, or you could say this is how the local community gets its first impression of those companies.

Do you think this is a best practice, and if not, how can we correct this?

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

I think there definitely has to be more time for engagement and more time to build that relationship through the consultation process. All companies are different. Some companies meet minimum requirements, and I think we have to upgrade those minimum requirements to an international best standards requirement.

Yes. Basically, we have the paper coming in and sometimes we have those individuals come in. I let them deal with our lands management staff, and as the project works its way up, then I will start meeting with their corporate leadership.

Mr. Geng Tan:

I guess you have a team to deal with the company—

Chief Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

No. My team is not that big and my team is not growing, meaning that I try to get my community members.... I have to educate my community members because they're going to be the ones who are sustainable. Before, I'd have to use money and hire a high-priced consultant and put a lot of money basically out the door. What I want to do is retain that information and those practices within the community.

Mr. Geng Tan:

Mr. Benjamin, the government wants a system that respects indigenous rights, recognizes the national interest and also reflects the commercial realities faced by companies. In your opinion, how can Canada create a fair, reasonable and collectively beneficial approach?

Mr. Craig Benjamin:

I think there is a lot of guidance to be drawn from international standards, such as the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the interpretations that exist out there through bodies like the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the expert mechanism on the rights of indigenous peoples.

To go back to first principles, I think there are a few key things to be mindful of. One is the fact that we have all inherited a situation where indigenous peoples' inherent rights to self-government over their lands and territories were historically denied. Our laws and practices are built on that foundation. We have to come to terms with that. To ignore that in the process of engagement inevitably perpetuates not only an injustice, but also conflict.

Unfortunately, our current practice is to put the onus on indigenous peoples to launch long and expensive court cases, and to put all these issues in the most adversarial, expensive and time-consuming process possible, where people have to prove their rights exist.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, both of you, for being here. That's all the time we have for this part of the panel.

We will suspend for two minutes while we get the next people in.

(1625)

(1635)

The Chair:

All right. Welcome back, everybody.

Professor Hemming, thank you for joining us. I understand you're in Australia, and it's tomorrow, so you can tell us what the future holds.

Ms. Leach, thank you for joining us. I understand you can tell us who holds the record for the most goals scored in one playoff season in the NHL.

For those of you who don't know, his name is Reggie Leach, and it was 1976.

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach (Vice-Chair, National Indigenous Economic Development Board):

That's my husband.

The Chair:

I remember it.

Thanks very much to both of you for joining us, and to you, Professor, thank you for getting up so early in the morning.

The process is that each of you will have up to 10 minutes to deliver your opening remarks, and then we'll open the floor to questions. I may interrupt you if we get close to the time threshold. I will be doing the same to people asking you questions as well.

With no further ado, Ms. Leach, since you are here, why don't we start with you.

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

Good afternoon, and thank you for the invitation to speak with you today.

I'd like to take a moment to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional territory of the Algonquin Anishinabe peoples.

I speak to you today as the vice-chair of the National Indigenous Economic Development Board. Our board is made up of first nations, Inuit and Métis business and community leaders from across Canada, whose mandate is to advise the whole of the federal government on indigenous economic development.

The board believes that reconciliation should begin with economic empowerment. In fact, we published a report entitled “Reconciliation: Growing Canada's Economy by $27.7 Billion”. This report found that closing the gaps in economic outcomes between indigenous people and the non-indigenous population would result in an estimated increase of about $27.7 billion annually in Canada's GDP. You can find that report on our website. We would be able to achieve that if our people were employed at the same level as mainstream Canadians. An important element of this economic empowerment includes being meaningfully involved with the active engagement of indigenous communities concerning natural resource developments on our traditional territories.

On behalf of the board, I would like to offer information that may assist you in your study on international best practices for engaging with indigenous communities. The work of your committee is timely as the international Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD, is currently undertaking its own global study of how indigenous communities can be linked to economic development opportunities in their traditional territories and regions.

The OECD launched its first-ever indigenous-specific study in late 2017. The study looks at leading practices worldwide on engaging with indigenous peoples and linking them to regional economic development. The report will be published later this year. This initiative is being undertaken in partnership with several countries that are members of, or seeking membership with, this international organization. On behalf of our national board, I have been the champion of this initiative with OECD as a means to gather critical data that can help shape and inform Canadian policy in establishing the meaningful engagement of indigenous people in Canada.

I was asked to be one of the Canadian peer reviewers of the Australian case study mission, so I'm really pleased to be on this panel with my counterpart there. My involvement in the study mission started in Canberra, the Australian capital, and then took me to Western Australia and the Northern Territory regions of the country.

One of the leading practices I found there was the success of the aboriginal procurement policy, which has produced significant results in terms of contracting indigenous businesses through more than $1 billion in contracts to more than 1,200 indigenous businesses there.

Another example of the success due to the procurement strategy is in Australian mining companies. For example, Fortescue Metals Group Ltd procures services through Supply Nation, Australia's leading database of verified indigenous businesses. They recently reached the $2-billion level in procurement services from indigenous businesses. Canada needs a better indigenous procurement policy and an indigenous-led entity to provide a verified database of indigenous suppliers.

Another good example in Australia that I was able to see first-hand is the work of the Gunyangara people of the East Arnhem Region in the Northern Territory. This is the only indigenous community in Australia, and possibly in the whole world, that has 100% ownership of their own mine. Their arrangement with Rio Tinto, which is the purchaser of the bauxite produced by the community-owned Gumatj Corporation Ltd, is a model for many mineral resource initiatives going forward.

The community is a great example of sustainable development. As they reclaim the land where they remove the bauxite, they have planted a nursery and built forestry operations. They produce a hardwood tree that they use in the sawmill they've started, and they also manufacture furniture with that wood.

(1640)



However, indigenous people are not sufficiently and meaningfully engaged in regional development. Engaging indigenous people would mean they could potentially benefit from regional development or they would designate large regions of lands and resources as protected from exploitation. I suspect there is a fear that this would result in fewer revenues for the financial coffers of government and industry.

Indigenous people recognize the need for important minerals that support important global needs. We recognize that it's in all elements of cellphones and cars and the technology that we use. As such, many are interested in business partnerships to not only reap a fair share of economic benefits but to help ensure that resource development is done sustainably through investing in the latest technology and innovative processes with proper oversight in place.

One of the main initial findings of the OECD across the case studies is that governments should ensure participation of indigenous people in decisions about projects that affect their traditional territories through three main actions.

First is supporting and encouraging project proponents to engage in dialogue and meetings with indigenous people prior to submitting projects for approval and agreeing up front on the terms and procedures for engagement.

Second is increasing the scope of environmental impact assessments to include traditional knowledge and socio-cultural issues and to assess the cumulative and wider impacts of projects on indigenous people's cultural values and traditional activities.

Third is developing a national framework for consultation with indigenous groups about project development that seeks alignment with UN international standards of free, prior and informed consent. This must include reduced or no costs to indigenous parties, broad and early consultation with indigenous lands rights holders and clear and informed processes and opportunities to present and partner on fair alternatives.

I had the opportunity to share my own experience at an OECD meeting in Darwin, Australia, last November. I believe that a lot of what I shared with that audience in regard to the involvement of indigenous people in mining projects is applicable to the discussions here today regarding the involvement of indigenous people in energy projects.

As I am from northeast Ontario, a hub of mining activity, I believe it is important to help all parties make informed decisions, including indigenous communities, mining companies and government.

I served on my first nation council, and when we were approached by mining and resource development companies, we would receive reams and binders of technical data and we had nowhere to turn for help. That's why, in 2015, the Waubetek Business Development Corporation developed a new mining strategy to help stakeholders navigate the intricacies involved with resource development.

This aboriginal mining strategy for northeast Ontario outlines priorities in four strategic areas: first, building indigenous knowledge and capacity with respect to the mining industry; second, building mining industry relationships; third, engaging a skilled indigenous workforce; and, four, promoting indigenous business and partnerships.

A key component of this strategy includes the setting up of a centre of excellence on indigenous minerals development, which is a clearing house of technical information for first nations, indigenous businesses, mining companies and government. The centre would provide tools, templates, leading practices, case studies and referrals for legal, financial and environmental expertise.

Companies might go there to find contact information on which communities to engage with for a particular area that they're looking at, while a first nation might go to find out what is involved in mining exploration or the whole value chain or to get referrals for proper legal expertise. The centre will be a first of its kind, not only in Ontario or Canada but in the world.

Overall, I'd like to underline the importance of having indigenous communities included in these natural resource development projects so that our people's knowledge and voice is recognized as vital to this country's development, that all parties involved understand that natural resource projects need to be done in a sustainable way, and for industry to accept that sometimes there will be areas where no development can occur because the area is significant to the indigenous people.

(1645)



Those are the main messages I want to share with you today. I thank you for your time.

I just want to add one other thing. I'm anxious for Bill C-69 to pass in the Senate.

Thank you very much.

Meegwetch.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Professor Hemming, just before I give the floor to you, I understand you may have some speaking notes. Do you intend to distribute them or refer to them in a presentation? If you do, I need to get consent of the table to proceed because they are in English only. If they are just for your own reference, then that's a different story.

Dr. Steve Hemming (Associate Professor, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Flinders University, As an Individual):

I sent them through, and they are to share with people. There is some background material, just to give people an understanding, and some speaking notes.

The Chair:

The professor will be referring to some academic articles, I understand, that have been sent to translation. We just received them. Does anyone object to...?

Some hon. members: No.

The Chair: No? All right, thanks.

Go ahead, Professor.

Dr. Steve Hemming:

I'd like to thank the House of Commons Standing Committee on Natural Resources for the invitation to present on the topic of indigenous engagement, and recognize the presentation that was just given for its focus on Australia. I'd also like to acknowledge the courage and resilience of sovereign first nations in the settler nations of Canada and Australia. In particular, I'd like to acknowledge the Algonquin Anishinabe people, the Kaurna nation on whose lands and waters I'm speaking today in Adelaide, and the Ngarrindjeri nation, the indigenous nation I will be talking about today.

I am a non-indigenous academic, but I've worked with the Ngarrindjeri nation for about 40 years on various programs and projects.

The Ngarrindjeri nation is in south Australia. It's at the bottom end of the longest river in Australia, in the Murray-Darling Basin region. Ngarrindjeri are water people on the coast, on the river and in the estuarine space. Ngarrindjeri draw on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and a set of promises that were made in 1836 by King William IV in the Letters Patent that proclaim the establishment of the colony of South Australia when negotiating with the Australian state.

In South Australia, there's no treaty. There has been some discussion about the possibilities of treaties in recent times, but that's been taken off the table. In general in Australia, no treaties are being negotiated at this time. Indigenous peoples rely on a weaker form of aboriginal title recognition called native title, which establishes a legal process and protection under aboriginal heritage. In some parts of Australia, there are land rights acts that also provide people with some protection, and veto rights in relation to mining.

Today I'm going to be talking about an example of an indigenous-led initiative in the Murray-Darling Basin region, which is the river basin that provides a huge number of resources to Australia in water and irrigation and food resources. It's in the midst of a drought at the moment, which has been ongoing, and a problem of overuse and over-allocation, so there's a crisis in that space, and a focus on trying to resolve issues about how to manage that water resource. The focus is going to be on water resource management, and natural resource management in general, and some of the innovations that led to the Ngarrindjeri nation winning the 2015 river prize for best practice in river management in Australia, the first time an indigenous-led program won that particular award.

“Ngarrindjeri” means belonging to the lands and waters. Ngarrindjeri understand the connection to country; Ngarrindjeri speak as the lands and waters, and not separate from lands and waters. One of the major things that Ngarrindjeri have been involved in over the last 20 or 30 years is trying to educate the border community on their relationship to country, have that wide impact on engagement with government and with industry around the development of resources in Ngarrindjeri country. When there's interest in developing water or mining exploration interests, one of the first steps is to try to educate those people who are interested in the way the Ngarrindjeri identify as country and how that impacts on people.

The Ngarrindjeri in 1995 tried to protect the mouth of the River Murray area, the estuarine area called the meeting of the waters site, in the face of development in that space. That led to a major controversy in Australia called the Hindmarsh Island case, which also resulted in a royal commission into the beliefs and interests of Ngarrindjeri people. Ninety-five Ngarrindjeri people were accused of being liars and fabricators of their own traditions in relation to the lands and waters, and were seen as almost a pariah nation in Australia, so it was very much a low point for Ngarrindjeri people. That particular case affected land rights and native title rights of aboriginal people across Australia.

In 2015, working with government, Ngarrindjeri won the Australian river prize for best practice in management, so there was quite a steep learning curve in indigenous engagement during that period.

(1650)



Ngarrindjeri leaders decided to work on a campaign of education and negotiation, rather than using legislation and law to establish their speaking position.

In 2000 and 2001, Ngarrindjeri negotiated a new form of agreement with the local council in their region called the Kungun Ngarrindjeri Yunnan agreement. That means, “Listen to what Ngarrindjeri people are talking about.” It's a contract law agreement that recognizes the Ngarrindjeri people as the traditional owners of the lands and waters, and it was groundbreaking in that it was the first time that Ngarrindjeri were recognized as traditional owners of their lands and waters.

In 2009, Ngarrindjeri moved to a whole-of-government agreement with the state of South Australia, a contract law agreement that recognized Ngarrindjeri as the traditional owners. It's like a treaty, in a sense, but it's an agreement that establishes a new relationship and a new set of terms of how to work together. It doesn't dictate what emerges from that agreement, but it sets out a new way of working together.

That agreement allowed Ngarrindjeri to come together with industry groups, government departments and others and start to work on a new regional way of doing business in relation to Ngarrindjeri lands and waters.

In 2009, it was in the middle of the real part of what was called the “millennium drought”. There were lots of proposals to conduct engineering projects and do major works in Ngarrindjeri country, so there was a need to establish a complex way of engagement.

The Kungun Ngarrindjeri Yunnan agreement enabled Ngarrindjeri to meet regularly with the government ministers and the premier in a context of leaders to leaders. In Australia, it was revolutionary for indigenous leaders to meet directly with government and be recognized as leaders of their particular nation.

That led to the establishment of a task force that met every month and brought together government departments and industry groups to present projects and programs to be considered at an early stage by the Ngarrindjeri nation. Resources were provided for the establishment of a program to assess proposals, and then there was a strategic plan developed with the state of South Australia to move forward on managing issues in Ngarrindjeri country.

In a way, that was both a negotiation mechanism and an educational mechanism. Over 17 meetings every month were conducted for several years with government agencies from right across the spectrum. That allowed people to talk together and to start to understand each other and where they were coming from. It was co-chaired by Ngarrindjeri leaders and government, and it provided a great opportunity to start to understand the differences and the similarities between the government, industry and Ngarrindjeri. Ngarrindjeri leaders have seen that as a major success.

Out of that particular agreement there was also a cultural knowledge agreement negotiated with the state of South Australia. Ngarrindjeri negotiated an agreement whereby the state recognized that Ngarrindjeri own their cultural knowledge in any planning and negotiation contexts so that there is security for elders and others to share knowledge in projects where that knowledge is needed to make decisions about whether developments would occur, or whether particular issues would be considered. That provided some certainty for people in their sharing of knowledge. Remember, there is no treaty process in this context. Ngarrindjeri started from a position of wanting a new relationship with the state, a new appraisal of the major issues surrounding that relationship, a fresh consideration of the ways of addressing those issues, and a recognition of the need for Ngarrindjeri and the state of South Australia to sit down and talk differently to each other.

The government supported Ngarrindjeri in that over time. It was a major shift in relations that led to a policy of establishing regional authorities across South Australia and starting some discussions around treaties.

In recent times, we have been working on a process across the Murray-Darling Basin where indigenous interests are being taken into account in planning how water is allocated across the region. What Ngarrindjeri have developed, in that context, is a particular kind of risk assessment and risk management strategy where indigenous interests are factored into the state's risk management processes at the very earliest opportunity.

(1655)



What we discovered, I guess, was that a lot of the planning that occurs around natural resources, in natural resource management and in other sectors, is governed by international standards around risk management. If those standards don't take into account indigenous nations' aspirations, values and knowledge and the consequences of acts on their country and people, then there's a part of the chain of planning that's missed out right from the beginning.

At the moment, we're trying to work on a way of adapting Ngarrindjeri risk management strategies to develop a new set of strategies in the state, where the state actually conducts risk management from the beginning that takes into account the effects that any particular decision might have on Ngarrindjeri lands and waters and on Ngarrindjeri people. That's considered as a holistic process.

In a way it's an assessment of the impacts of colonization.

The Chair:

I think I'm going to have to stop you there, Professor. We're a little bit over time.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Professor, if you wanted to wrap up for a couple of seconds, I would be happy to let you do that.

Dr. Steve Hemming:

I was just finishing on that note about risk assessment. I think one of the things that is really important to take into account is that in the forward planning for incorporating indigenous nations' aspirations and values into a co-operative plan for a state like Canada or for Australia, there has to be an engagement with indigenous values in risk management at all levels. Otherwise, people are left out of the early stages of planning, and there's always a process of catch-up.

That becomes an assessment of colonization. So, in any given example—education or natural resource management—if an indigenous nation has a process of risk management or risk assessment of that action, then there's a way forward for identifying what needs to take place in a strategic way.

(1700)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

You talked about what the Hindmarsh Island case. What was actually involved and what happened in that case?

Dr. Steve Hemming:

The Ngarrindjeri people, particularly senior women and men, tried to stop the development of a bridge and other developments at the bottom end of the River Murray in South Australia in 1994 using heritage legislation. They made the case that it was a sacred area particularly in relation to women's knowledge.

In southern Australia, there is basically an understanding that aboriginal people have lost their traditions and their law, and in particular, too, that indigenous women didn't really hold strong law and play a major role. It was quite a challenge for the Ngarrindjeri, then, to actually make their case that, no, in fact, knowledge and traditions had been passed down, that they were very significant and that women held knowledge separate from men.

That became a major series of court cases. It ended up in a royal commission called by the state of South Australia, which found that the women and men who were advocating these traditions were making them up, effectively. That was something that the Ngarrindjeri leadership didn't accept and continued to challenge up until 2001 in a federal court case on the same issue. It was found that the women and men who were passing on and talking about those traditions were truthful and that there was evidence that could sustain those positions.

The area was eventually registered under aboriginal heritage, and the “meeting of the waters” is now seen as a significant area on the River Murray. I don't know the stories and I'm not privy to that female knowledge, but effectively it's a reproductive area that needs to be looked after. If that area is healthy, then the whole of the River Murray-Darling Basin is healthy, as are all of the people. It's a litmus test for health of the river, and as people know across the world, those areas are important.

I guess that was a case where indigenous traditions were tested with the worst possible outcomes, but people didn't give up on that issue. The state of South Australia and the local council have come to agreement and work together with the Ngarrindjeri now, and there's a respectful relationship.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

We know a lot about the impacts of climate change now. We've seen what you refer to as the millennium drought in Australia. We've been hearing about massive heat waves across Australia in the last few months. Does that have impacts on the relationships with the indigenous peoples, for better or for worse?

Dr. Steve Hemming:

I guess what indigenous peoples are trying to do is actually be heavily involved in the planning and the research to try to provide solutions. Indigenous peoples know their countries really well, know when climate change is having an impact and have been arguing for those issues.

The Ngarrindjeri formally recognized the Kyoto protocol back in 2006 and understand the importance of their country to other parts of the world, so that issue about connection, relationship and climate change is very important to indigenous peoples.

There is a lot of work going on between indigenous nations in Australia and scientists and governments to try to address those issues. However, at the moment there's an impasse in the Murray-Darling Basin region and the river is a very sick space, with a lot of fish kills and flows that are really impeded. There's a need to negotiate a better outcome at a federal level.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I'm going to go to Ms. Leach for a few minutes. You talked about the Australian aboriginal procurement policy, which I thought was really interesting. Does it survive international obligations, and is it a “buy indigenous first” policy? Does it cause any problems with international relations, or does that country have very little problem pursuing this option?

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

With the Australian procurement policy, they have higher levels of set-asides. I think the fact that they have a source for accessing business information through that entity called Supply Nation really helps with the procurement policy there.

I have had a look. I brought copies of it to my counterparts here in Canada looking at procurement. I think the process for registration is a bit easier, but there are some limitations in Canada's procurement policy in many ways in that the set-asides are only for areas that have a significant indigenous population; but there are indigenous people right across Canada located in urban centres as well who could benefit from accessing the set-asides that may be available for them. As for that $27.7-billion report that I mentioned earlier, if we could build more business opportunities, that would help to make that report a reality.

(1705)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm thinking of business opportunities. You had mentioned the verified indigenous business database in Australia. How long has this been going? Are there a lot of businesses that are not registered? Is that very comprehensive? Is there a way of knowing?

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

I'm not too sure exactly when Supply Nation started. I don't think their procurement policy is as old as Canada's indigenous procurement policy. I think it's much newer. I believe that organization has been around for I would guess around eight or 10 years, something like that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Professor Hemming.

Dr. Steve Hemming:

That's about right. We work with Supply Nation. One of the things that indigenous nations also negotiate is to have clauses in procurement policies in their region that actually specify that the first businesses that should have an opportunity should be the businesses associated with that particular nation in relation to those lands and waters. Supply Nation doesn't necessarily specify that aboriginal companies need to come from those particular spaces as far as I'm aware, particularly in South Australia.

There has been negotiation around those issues, but the shifts in procurement policy have been a major innovation at a federal level and at the states levels so that [Technical difficulty—Editor]. They have been very active in negotiating procurement and also trying to change the system to suit local and regional opportunities.

Having the capacity to actually take up those opportunities is always the difficulty. In South Australia there's a policy that says that projects up to, I think, $200,000 are first provided to indigenous businesses in that particular region—that would be privilege. So there are particular caps on amounts as well.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to our witnesses for appearing today. I appreciate that.

I will start with Ms. Leach. In 2016, the National Indigenous Economic Development Board said—this was your statement—that economic reconciliation is not only fair but the right thing to do, and there's a strong business case for it as well, which I tend to agree with.

It also states that Canada's economy would grow by $27.7 billion “if barriers preventing Indigenous Canadians from participating in the Canadian economy were removed.”

Can you give us a picture of what this would look like? In particular, when you mentioned your support for Bill C-69, was that in the mining perspective only, or oil and gas as well?

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

First of all, with regard to the barriers, it's pretty clear that indigenous people in Canada are the most marginalized. Some of the barriers are around things like access to capital. With the lower incomes, we struggle with getting together equity to start a business. The education levels are also barriers. We have growing education rates and more and more post-secondary education where people are graduating from post-secondary education, but it's still not at the level that it should be and it doesn't match the Canadian standard.

As a matter of fact, in June our board will be launching our second national aboriginal economic progress report. You could find the first benchmark report and our second progress report on our website.

Those will show you that we have a lot of disadvantages when it comes to getting into business and seeking the employment that we need. I always try to remind people to put it in perspective. For example, if we're looking at employment levels in Atlantic Canada, all we need is about 4,900 jobs for indigenous people in all of Atlantic Canada to be at the same employment levels of all other people in Atlantic Canada. That might sound like a lot, but if you break it down by institution, education, services or universities, colleges, health services, businesses, small businesses, large corporations, government agencies, if all of these agencies took a few numbers, they could easily achieve that.

In Ontario, with the largest population, all we need is about 19,000 jobs for aboriginal people in Ontario to be at the same employment levels. That would mean more people working, fewer people on social services. That means more people paying into the services that are provided and all the economic leakage that goes to surrounding regions. This is something that's really possible, and it could happen right away if there was a concerted effort. That's what we talk about, economic empowerment. If people knew that and people took ownership of creating some of those jobs, I think that would help. We're not just relying on government, but like I said, institutional jobs and industry and all that to step up.

I spoke about the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. I am so excited about the possibility of Canada being the first one to incorporate that declaration into the law of this land. It's so critical for us to be leaders in the world to be able to do that. There are so many basic elements to that declaration that could really make a difference in the lives of indigenous people. I think it's so important that we can do things like that.

Through that OECD study I spoke about earlier, I've been learning so much from other indigenous people from around the world. There are so many great things going on. We can look at how the Maori people are involved in New Zealand leadership and government and how the Sami people in Sweden have their own Sami parliament. Everything works well. People are afraid of some of these changes, but there's so much that we could share with each other from other countries, which is why I feel privileged today to be sharing this panel with a friend from Australia. I think there's so much that we can share with each other and learn from each other.

To me, having this bill passed in the Senate would make Canada a real leader in indigenous issues around the world.

(1710)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

When you're talking about creating those opportunities for indigenous communities, especially in Northern Ontario, a lot of the barriers seem to be.... If you're going to set up a mine—for example, the Ring of Fire—there's obtaining access and getting the ability to start that mine, and we know it is a process. But there's also the fact that once the mine is up and running, then the jobs and opportunities come along to it.

Would you say that also we need a process? We talked about the consultation and ensuring that it gets done in a manner that's respectful and what have you, but one of the barriers I would say to this development would also be government itself.

(1715)

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

I think that there are a lot of barriers. One of the barriers is having indigenous people develop the capacity to be able to make informed decisions in that development, because, as you know, there have been different initiatives and efforts.

Some were top-down, but now I'm really proud of this new committee approach that has also looked at social issues in the Ring of Fire. At first, they were just focused on the economic issues and the formal consultation on the mining itself, not looking at the overall social issues that were being experienced by the people there.

Now this committee is working on addressing those social issues, including housing, access to clean water and other basic needs of the community. It's hard for them to start negotiating a mining project when they don't have clean drinking water in their community.

The Chair:

I'm going to have to stop you there because we're already over time.

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you both for being here today. It's been very interesting.

I'm going to start with Dr. Hemming in Australia. Some of the other witnesses we've heard today have mentioned concepts such as giving nature and rivers rights that normally people would have. We have the Pachamama, or mother nature, concept in Bolivia; the Whanganui River in New Zealand; and I think there are some examples in the rivers of Victoria.

I'm just wondering if you would comment on that and as to whether that's a useful concept, whether it is practical and whether it's something that maybe Canada should consider, maybe not in exactly those terms, but in terms of guaranteeing the rights to a clean environment.

Dr. Steve Hemming:

I've had a bit of a look at that issue, obviously, working on a river system. I think there's a lot of value in providing some rights to parts of the lands and waters that are so important. The key issue, I think, from working with Ngarrindjeri people from indigenous perspectives in Australia—now and then in Victoria there are similar kinds of rights being assigned to a river in that space—is to ensure that the relationship of the indigenous peoples isn't affected by that particular assignation of identity.

For Ngarrindjeri people, the river, the lands and waters are a living body that they are part of, so the idea of providing rights that might separate indigenous people from that living body is something that needs to be guarded against, but that depends on the way of living, the philosophies of the indigenous nations in a particular context and how they identify with their lands and waters. From the Ngarrindjeri perspective, there have been some discussions around those issues with the opposition federal government in Australia, with Ngarrindjeri leadership.

There's certainly an interest in providing some support to providing rights to rivers, but not as separate to the indigenous nations themselves. For Ngarrindjeri, there's an agreement called the “speaking as country”, where the state of South Australia recognizes that Ngarrindjeri people speak as the lands and waters and that it's a particular set of responsibilities and a relationship that is separate from the non-indigenous relationship to country. It needs to be respected, recognized, understood and not interfered with through particular laws.

I think it's a complicated issue, but there are certainly benefits in that space. I know in New Zealand there's a recognition of indigenous peoples' relationships that's very complex in their assignation of rights to rivers.

(1720)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Just to follow up, it's interesting that we're talking about water. One of the previous witnesses just reminded us that, although we value oil and gas, water is perhaps more valuable than that. You mentioned the Murray-Darling system and the troubles it's having.

I'm just wondering how the aboriginal people in South Australia or Victoria or wherever assert their rights over parts of a river when you have a linear system like that. You are growing cotton, but the headwaters and all that water is being used up, and you have nothing left by the time it gets to the sea. How are those rights dealt with in Australia?

Dr. Steve Hemming:

At the moment, there are two peak indigenous collections of nations in the Murray-Darling Basin: the northern basin group and the Murray Lower Darling indigenous nations. They're the nations along the river, and they're advocating for improved policies, in relation to indigenous rights to the rivers, at the federal level. They're supported by the Murray Basin Authority. There are a couple of nations along the whole of the system that have won native title rights fairly recently. The Ngarrindjeri have native title rights that were confirmed only just recently.

Native title is only a very partial and weak right, in a lot of ways, in Australia. There's also a nation in New South Wales that's won rights on the river. It's very early days in relation to that negotiation, but there's certainly an opportunity for Ngarrindjeri, as a nation on the river with rights to water, and also cultural heritage rights to water, to start to negotiate, in relation to flows that come down the river.

What happens upriver affects downriver, most certainly, but that hasn't been taken into account in policy yet in Australia. It's early days in that conversation, from an indigenous perspective. The Ngarrindjeri “speaking as country” agreement that I named is an agreement in which the Ngarrindjeri have agreed to work with the state of South Australia to secure water. In a sense, it's a collaboration between the indigenous nations' understandings of the river, and South Australians' need for water coming down the river, to negotiate with upstream states.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you.

Dawn, you have one minute. I was going to ask you a question, but go right ahead.

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

I was just going to mention how the Baniyala people in the East Arnhem region won title to land and sea. They're using the title to sea, and working on a plan for commercial fisheries and aquaculture. I think that's how they're implementing it, and also making sure that it's done in a sustainable way.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm glad you mentioned the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and Romeo Saganash's bill that's in the Senate right now. I'm just wondering how you see the Government of Canada and its legislation in this Parliament. Has there been any improvement in implementing those concepts in that legislation?

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

Not yet, but I'm hoping that's the plan. I don't know if there's still a committee working on looking at what legislation would need to change to respect the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. I hope that work is ongoing. Of course, I think this bill needs to pass first, and then everything else will flow from there.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Dr. Hemming, can you help us contextualize the legal status of the Ngarrindjeri people in Australia, just so we can understand, in a Canadian context, what some differences might be? How does someone become a member? Do they have any special legal rights? I know you've talked about some, in terms of connection with land, and as protectors of the land and rivers, property rights and whatnot.

Dr. Steve Hemming:

That's a complex question. Ngarrindjeri are a community of people who identify as Ngarrindjeri, and share similar laws, histories, backgrounds, language and particular connections to the country. In a way, Ngarrindjeri is a bit like a federation. It's a collection of what used to be groups that share similar kinds of histories, traditions and values.

In the Australian context, up until the first Kungun Ngarrindjeri Yunnan agreement in 2000-01, Ngarrindjeri were not formally recognized by the state or by the overall nation. Native title had come in 1992 as a possibility, so first nations or communities, or what are sometimes called tribes, could apply for recognition under Australian legislation, but their native title had survived colonization and the impacts of other titles. When someone wins a native title, that's really just a recognition that you've survived colonization, and you still have a society intact, and some of your rights and interest to country on some titles in your country.

For Ngarrindjeri, the effect of native title is really only on some parcels of land where native title hasn't been extinguished, and on the waters, riverbed and some other areas, but that's very early stages in working out what that really means.

There's also heritage legislation, which recognizes that aboriginal people have special interests in pieces of country, or water, relating to their cultural heritage. That also draws in issues, but it's very different from the Canadian situation and the U.S., in terms of rights. In other parts of Australia, there is land rights legislation where people are able to apply for land rights—

(1725)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Sure.

In terms of governance, are there multiple councils that help reflect the views of the group? How do they do self-governance?

Dr. Steve Hemming:

In 2007, the Ngarrindjeri, established a formal peak body called the Ngarrindjeri Regional Authority, which was a reflection of the traditional governance of Ngarrindjeri.

Ngarrindjeri have always had a system of peak governance. Different groups within the community have leaders who speak authoritatively. Those elders and leaders come together to make decisions in relation to cultural issues.

The decision-making that had been occurring since colonization was basically very limited in relation to interaction with government, right up until the 1960s. There was a referendum, which led to more rights for indigenous peoples. So really, it's only very recent.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I am trying to lead a thread to get Ms. Leach back in.

In terms of economic development, do the the Ngarrindjeri own businesses and corporations? Do those corporations pay tax like regular Australian corporations do, or do they have a separate tax regime?

Dr. Steve Hemming:

It's the same tax regime.

When they set up the peak body in 2007, there were two priorities: looking after lands, waters and people; and economic development. There has been a real push around economic development.

There are several key Ngarrindjeri businesses and smaller businesses on Ngarrindjeri country. Those businesses have been expanding since the mid-2000s. There's a big stake in the cockle industry, which is a fishing industry in the region. There's a wildflowers business that's taking off, which actually supplies to supermarkets and internationally. There's a focus on the possibilities around water. There are revegetation programs. It's a lively business.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much. This is great.

I want to shift a little bit now.

Maybe, Ms. Leach, you could answer this first question.

In the previous panel, we heard from Chief Laboucan-Avirom that capital and ownership of resources, and companies that can develop the resources, are important for the economic development of first nations.

How are you recommending...or maybe, as you've looked around the world and through the OECD, how are indigenous groups accessing the capital they need to participate in the ownership structures for the development of their own resources?

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

I have to tell you that through the OECD studies, it was found that Canada has a pretty good system of aboriginal-owned financial institutions. We have a network of about 58 aboriginal financial institutions across Canada that service the whole country. We also have two indigenous-owned banks in Canada. Other countries are pretty envious of the fact that we do have those entities. That does help, along with the fact that there are, I believe, more than 56,000 indigenous businesses in Canada.

I think having those models of finance available, which are indigenous-owned financial institutions—

(1730)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Ms. Leach, excuse me for my ignorance on this. Is there any special tax status for those indigenous-owned banks or do they operate the same as chartered banks in Canada?

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

They operate the same as chartered banks.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Wonderful.

I have a final question for both of you: When it comes to the other aspect of resource development, environmental management of the resource, what are some of the best practices you've seen in your research on co-management or joint management of resources?

After Ms. Leach has answered, maybe you, Dr. Hemming, can let us know to what extent the Ngarrindjeri jointly manage any of the fishing resources you've spoken about.

Ms. Leach.

Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach:

In my own region near Sudbury, we have the Wahnapitae First Nation. It owns its own environmental company, which does all the environmental testing of the waterways and the lakes around the Sudbury region through contracts with the many mining companies in the area. This is a company that's owned by the community. It employs young indigenous people who have studied the environment and biology and have the expertise to do all the testing. I think that's one element. They report back to the community on all their findings. I think that's one example.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thanks, Ms. Leach.

I'll give Dr. Hemming the last word on joint management of resources in Australia.

Dr. Steve Hemming:

There's a program called indigenous protected areas in Australia. It is a pretty successful program. It's a mechanism for identifying an area and bringing multiple groups together to start to manage it as a natural resource management space and a protected space. A number of those have been declared in Australia, and they're very effective.

I think the mining industry has moved and shifted to develop some significant innovations working with indigenous nations across Australia. In the Ngarrindjeri context, they have basically built up a co-management relationship with the state that isn't fully recognized at this point. A hand-back of national parks occurs in some places and then there's co-management, but it's different across Australia, and it's different depending on the histories of indigenous opportunities under land rights, mining and other spaces. I think it's behind in relation to other settled societies such as the U.S., Canada and New Zealand in some contexts.

Indigenous leaders have really led the way. There's been a huge amount of work from indigenous nations to try to change the situation. There are some really interesting innovations that have been developed out of virtually nothing. It's an interesting example in Australia. When you don't have treaty rights, you don't have many rights at all, so what kinds of things can you negotiate? I think it's worth looking at Australia for that reason.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

As always, Mr. Chair, we don't have enough time to get to interesting points such as capacity development, but maybe we can in the next meeting.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Whalen.

Both of you, thank you very much. I know your contributions will prove to be very significant.

I'm very grateful for your taking the time to be here, Ms. Leach.

Professor, you're just starting your day, so good day. I hope you enjoy it. Thank you for joining us.

What time is it there, just out of curiosity?

Dr. Steve Hemming:

It's 8:03 in the morning.

The Chair:

Okay, so it's not that bad.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1540)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Merci à tous de vous être joints à nous aujourd’hui. Il y a longtemps que nous n’avons pas été réunis. Le comportement de chacun montre à quel point cela vous manquait d’être ici. Nous sommes heureux d’être à nouveau ensemble. J’aimerais remercier nos deux témoins de cette première heure.

Nous accueillons le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom, de la Première Nation crie de Woodland.

Nous accueillons Craig Benjamin, d’Amnistie internationale.

Je vous remercie tous les deux d’être parmi nous aujourd’hui. Vous disposerez chacun de 10 minutes pour faire votre déclaration préliminaire, après quoi nous passerons aux questions des membres du Comité.

Je vais donner la parole à l’un ou l’autre, à celui qui veut commencer.

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom (chef, Woodland Cree First Nation):

Tansi. Kinan’skomitina’wa’w.

C’est un plaisir et un honneur d’être ici. Je suis le chef Isaac Ausinis Laboucan-Avirom. Je viens de la Première Nation crie de Woodland. J’ai été récemment grand chef du territoire visé par le Traité no 8 ainsi que grand chef de mon conseil tribal, mais je suis ici aujourd’hui en qualité de chef de ma Première Nation. J’aimerais dire que je suis convaincu qu'il s'agit d'un effort louable, mais ce n’est pas en consultation avec d’autres Premières Nations. Je ne veux pas être responsable...

Pour ce qui est des Cris des régions boisées, nous sommes entourés d’activités liées aux ressources naturelles, qu’il s’agisse de l’exploitation pétrolière et gazière, de l’exploitation forestière ou de projets d’énergie verte comme le site C. L’exploitation des ressources a toujours des répercussions négatives et positives, mais nous sommes à une époque où il faut rendre davantage de comptes aux collectivités des Premières Nations, ainsi qu'en matière d'environnement. Nous devons prendre les bonnes décisions afin d’assurer la durabilité et de faire en sorte que nos enfants puissent grandir dans un pays qui n’est pas entièrement pollué et qui offre encore des emplois sains.

Pardonnez-moi, je suis censé être en congé et mon adjoint exécutif est en congé, alors je vais faire un va-et-vient dans mes notes.

Les entreprises devraient être encouragées à acquérir une certaine compréhension des droits juridiques et constitutionnels des Premières Nations. Au Canada, les Premières Nations n’ont pas été vaincues en temps de guerre. Nous avons des traités. Ces droits issus de traités sont protégés par la Constitution. Beaucoup d’entreprises internationales ne comprennent pas cela et elles ont des points de vue différents. D’après ce que je comprends, il est parfois très difficile de composer avec cette attitude. Nous devons les rééduquer et leur dire qui nous sommes et pourquoi nous avons nos droits. Une pratique exemplaire comporterait un volet éducatif pour que les entreprises internationales comprennent le contexte au Canada afin que les Premières Nations n’aient pas à constamment refaire ce travail.

Vous savez, l’une des plus grandes difficultés pour les Premières Nations, c’est que nous cherchons toujours les meilleures ressources humaines. En regardant autour de moi, je sais que se trouvent ici certaines des personnes ayant la meilleure attitude au pays. En tant que chef d’une Première Nation, je suis parfois contraint de travailler dans des circonstances où certains des meilleurs sont de l’autre côté de la table, où je m’oppose à des gens comme... Il s’agissait de Shell, de CNRL, où se trouvent quelques-uns des meilleurs cerveaux du marché.

Pour mener des consultations sérieuses, les Premières Nations doivent avoir la capacité de comprendre les aspects techniques des projets, de transmettre des informations aux membres de la collectivité et de recueillir des informations auprès des membres de la collectivité et des gardiens du savoir. Cela exige beaucoup plus de financement que ce qu’offre actuellement le Canada. La nation consacre beaucoup de temps et d’énergie à défendre le financement du développement des capacités et à négocier ce financement, etc. Il vaudrait mieux consacrer ce temps et cette énergie à la consultation et à la recherche de mesures d’adaptation. Les pratiques exemplaires devraient inclure l’obligation de fournir un financement adéquat, qui pourrait être exprimé en pourcentage du montant que l’entreprise prévoit consacrer à des études environnementales, géotechniques et autres.

Je prendrai l’exemple du site C. Je vais passer du pétrole au du gaz et aux autres ministères chargés des ressources. Une fois, des avocats sont venus dans ma nation pour dire qu’ils voulaient construire le site C. Ma nation n’a pas d’argent à dépenser pour des avocats. Nous préférons construire des maisons et investir dans l’éducation et les aînés. L’une des questions que j’ai posées à l’équipe juridique du site C portait sur les répercussions environnementales. Ils ont dit, oh, il n’y aura pas grand-chose. Eh bien, ils allaient éliminer deux espèces de poissons dans le réservoir, l’ombre de l’Arctique et la laquaiche aux yeux d'or. Inutile d'être universitaire pour comprendre que cela a un impact direct sur d’autres systèmes écologiques. Ces poissons nourrissent de plus gros poissons, etc. À l’époque, les Cris des régions boisées n’avaient pas un million de dollars à dépenser devant les tribunaux, alors c’est quelque chose... Et aussi, dans le cadre du processus de consultation, que les frontières entre l’Alberta et la Colombie-Britannique — il a été dit que le processus de consultation était en gros une zone interdite.

(1545)



Les connaissances autochtones et les commentaires de la collectivité devraient être intégrés à tous les aspects des enquêtes environnementales et sociales des projets. Une pratique exemplaire consisterait à encourager les entreprises à envisager l’inclusion des collectivités autochtones tout au long de l’élaboration, de la conception et de la mise en oeuvre de projets. En fin de compte, l’objectif de toute pratique exemplaire serait d’arriver à une atténuation significative des impacts ou à une adaptation valable. Lorsque j'évoque des consultations sérieuses, cela signifie que je sais exactement de quoi parle le promoteur de l’autre côté de la table.

Lorsque j’examine ces projets de loi, comme le projet de loi C-69, je vois un exemple de situation dans laquelle, lors d'une réunion des chefs en Alberta, nous avons approuvé le projet de loi pour ensuite l'annuler la semaine dernière. C’est une bonne illustration de sa complexité et de l’incompréhension qu'il suscite et nous voici ici aujourd’hui, avec un processus déjà très avancé. Je ne crois pas qu’il y ait eu de consultations appropriées et sérieuses sur les projets de loi C-48 et C-69 et nous ne devrions pas déjà nous trouver à cette étape.

Dans la plupart des cas aujourd’hui, les parties ont nettement amélioré leurs échanges d'information, mais il y a encore des résistances lorsqu'il s'agit d'apporter des changements importants aux projets afin de réduire les répercussions sur l’utilisation traditionnelle des terres, mais aussi des résistances à la participation des collectivités autochtones aux avantages du développement économique à long terme.

La Première Nation crie de Woodland a travaillé dur pour établir des partenariats solides et significatifs avec les entreprises afin de développer des capacités d’affaires, des emplois locaux, etc., mais il doit s’agir de possibilités à long terme, pas seulement de travaux de débroussaillage et de construction.

Les Cris des régions boisées doivent se lancer dans l’exploitation et à terme, la possession des ressources comme le pipeline Eagle Spirit. Je fais partie du comité des chefs de ce groupe. Il y a des limites à mes échanges avec les représentants des entreprises. Ils hochent la tête et disent oui. Nous avons essayé, mais si nous étions vraiment propriétaires et exploitants de ces entreprises, alors nos valeurs d’entreprise suivraient.

Par exemple, si je suis propriétaire d’une entreprise, je veux être le meilleur au monde. Je veux rendre ce pipeline aussi indestructible que possible. Je sais qu’il y a la technologie et les capacités pour le faire. Nous sommes ici aujourd’hui pour être les meilleurs au monde et je sais que nous pouvons y parvenir.

Cela touche aussi les aspects commerciaux. Si nous étions propriétaires de ces pipelines, nous pourrions dire à nos clients qu’il leur faut une meilleure norme environnementale pour les produits qu’ils développent à partir de nos ressources.

Les pratiques exemplaires consisteraient notamment à encourager les entreprises à explorer le développement des affaires avec les collectivités autochtones afin de leur faire connaître les types d’affaires qui devraient également être exploitées pour appuyer le projet. Les entreprises devraient aussi être disposées à se renseigner sur les capacités que les différentes Premières Nations ont à offrir. Si les deux parties se présentent à la table avec la volonté d’échanger des informations et de travailler ensemble pour renforcer les capacités des Premières Nations, nous parviendrons à des compromis valables.

Il arrive parfois que le gouvernement fédéral évite de parler de consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. Il y a aussi un certain nombre d’articles qui portent précisément là-dessus dans la DNUDPA. Nous le savons, surtout à l’échelle internationale.

Il n’y a pas d’exemple parfait de projets internationaux. Cependant, des projets en Bolivie ont inscrit les droits de la nature — en utilisant l'expression « Terre mère » en espagnol — par le biais du droit autochtone. La Nouvelle-Zélande a protégé les rivières en invoquant la loi maorie. Les Samis ont un parlement et peuvent adopter des lois sur leur territoire. Si une société a une personnalité morale, alors les mêmes choses qui font que les Premières Nations...

À l’heure actuelle, l’approbation de projets ne représente la loi et les relations à la terre que d'une seule culture. Pour qu’un projet soit vraiment collaboratif et fructueux du point de vue des Premières Nations, il doit aussi respecter notre culture et nos lois.

(1550)



Cela peut sembler presque impossible lorsque nos lois au Canada ne sont pas respectées ou admises devant les tribunaux... Si nous voulons que les projets aillent de l’avant, le consentement est la seule voie.

Le président:

Je vais devoir vous demander de conclure dans environ 30 secondes.

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Je suis ici essentiellement pour trouver une solution et faire partie de cette solution. Beaucoup d’idées fausses sont véhiculées par les médias. Comme membre des Premières Nations, je pense que notre territoire, notre eau, l’air et les animaux sont importants pour nous tous. Ce sont les garants de l'avenir des générations futures.

Cela me frustre, en qualité de membre d’une Première Nation, de devoir pratiquement quémander de l’argent alors que nous vivons dans l’un des pays les plus riches en ressources du monde. Pourquoi nos gens devraient-ils vivre dans des collectivités de troisième ou de deuxième classe alors que nous sommes entourés de ressources naturelles qui servent à asphalter nos routes, à construire des centres récréatifs et ainsi de suite?

J’ai des enfants et je veux que mes enfants aient les mêmes possibilités que les vôtres. Je sais qu’un traité est une relation de nation à nation. Nous devons faire en sorte de poursuivre dans cette voie, de nous comprendre et d'être plus respectueux les uns envers les autres.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Benjamin.

M. Craig Benjamin (militant, Droits autochtones, Amnistie internationale Canada):

Merci.

J’aimerais commencer par saluer le peuple algonquin sur le territoire duquel nous avons le privilège de nous réunir aujourd’hui.

Je remercie les membres du Comité de me donner l’occasion de m’adresser à eux. Je tiens également à vous remercier de me donner l’occasion de partager la parole avec le chef Laboucan-Avirom.

Le sujet de cette étude est d’un grand intérêt pour Amnistie internationale et pour moi personnellement. Il y a beaucoup de choses dont je pourrais parler, mais j’aimerais me concentrer sur un exemple précis de lignes directrices internationales pour la mobilisation des peuples autochtones, il s'agit des normes de rendement de la Société financière internationale à l’égard des peuples autochtones.

Les membres du Comité savent que la Société financière internationale, la SFI, est l’institution du Groupe de la Banque mondiale qui se concentre exclusivement sur le soutien au secteur privé dans les activités de développement.

Après que l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies eut adopté la Déclaration de l'ONU sur les droits des peuples autochtones en 2007, la SFI a entrepris un examen de ses normes de rendement social et environnemental. En 2012, elle a adopté des exigences fortement révisées pour les projets susceptibles de toucher les peuples autochtones.

Ces normes de rendement adoptent une approche de précaution, établissant les mesures nécessaires pour réduire le risque de préjudice important pour les peuples autochtones, indépendamment de la reconnaissance ou de l’absence de reconnaissance des droits des peuples autochtones dans le droit national. Les normes de rendement ne portent pas directement sur le droit des peuples autochtones à l’autodétermination ni sur le droit continu des peuples autochtones d’exercer leur autorité sur leurs terres traditionnelles. Ces questions sont au coeur même de la déclaration des Nations unies, mais les normes de rendement laissent aux gouvernements nationaux le soin de les résoudre.

Toutefois, il est frappant de constater que, même en l’absence d’exigences explicites pour le respect et le maintien des titres fonciers traditionnels et la participation des peuples autochtones en tant qu’ordre de gouvernement exerçant sa compétence sur ses territoires, les normes qui ont été adoptées par la SFI demeurent, à bien des égards, beaucoup plus strictes que les lois et les règlements nationaux actuels du Canada en matière d’extraction des ressources.

J’aimerais en particulier attirer l’attention du Comité sur les dispositions de la SFI concernant le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, le CPLCC. La SFI affirme que le CPLCC est à la fois un processus et un résultat. Autrement dit, elle ne se limite pas simplement à demander le consentement du secteur privé; elle fait du consentement une exigence formelle pour son appui.

La norme de rendement exige expressément le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause dans quatre grands domaines: lorsqu’il y a possibilité de répercussions importantes sur l’identité des peuples autochtones ou sur les aspects culturels, cérémoniels ou spirituels de leur vie; lorsqu’il y a des répercussions sur les terres et les ressources naturelles qui sont de propriété traditionnelle ou qui sont utilisées selon la coutume; lorsqu'un projet pourrait entraîner un déplacement des personnes loin des terres et des ressources; ou lorsqu’un projet propose d’exploiter le patrimoine culturel des peuples autochtones.

La SFI déclare explicitement que le processus par lequel les peuples autochtones accordent ou refusent leur consentement doit être acceptable pour eux. La norme de rendement stipule en outre que le processus doit être adapté à la culture et qu’il doit s’associer aux institutions coutumières existantes et aux processus décisionnels des peuples concernés.

Ce processus doit commencer dès les premières étapes de la conception du projet et se poursuivre tout au long de l’élaboration et de la mise en œuvre de celui-ci. La norme de rendement exige que le processus et toute entente conclue soient documentés. De plus, la norme de rendement exige qu’un processus de règlement des griefs mutuellement acceptable soit établi pour régler tout différend qui pourrait survenir au sujet des ententes.

J’ai dit que la possibilité d’impacts importants était l’un des critères retenus par la SFI pour déterminer si le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause était nécessaire. Pour déterminer si les répercussions sont importantes, la norme de rendement exige que l’on tienne compte de la solidité des protections juridiques disponibles pour les droits des Autochtones, de la relation passée et actuelle des peuples autochtones avec l’État et d’autres groupes de la société, de leur situation économique actuelle et de l’importance des terres et des ressources pour leur vie, leur économie et leur société.

Il est important de souligner que cette détermination de l’importance du préjudice potentiel et donc de l’obligation d’obtenir le consentement doit être entreprise en collaboration directe avec les populations touchées elles-mêmes, plutôt qu’en fonction d’une décision arbitraire ou unilatérale de l’État ou de la SFI.

Je tiens également à souligner, dans le contexte des débats actuels sur le nouveau régime d’évaluation des impacts proposé par le gouvernement fédéral, que la norme de rendement de la SFI sur les peuples autochtones et d’autres normes de rendement adoptées par cette institution exigent explicitement la participation des femmes à la détermination des impacts, ainsi qu’une réflexion particulière sur la façon dont les impacts peuvent être différents pour les hommes et pour les femmes.

(1555)



Le Canada est l’un des membres fondateurs de la SFI. Comme d’autres pays membres, le Canada nomme un représentant au conseil d’administration. De plus, le Canada détient l’un des 24 sièges au conseil d’administration et le ministre des Finances du Canada rend régulièrement compte au Parlement des opérations de la SFI et d’autres institutions de la Banque mondiale.

En réponse au rapport de 2017 du Comité sur l’avenir du secteur minier au Canada et à votre recommandation voulant que le Canada favorise et améliore les pratiques minières responsables au Canada et à l’étranger, le ministère des Ressources naturelles a répondu qu’il encourage effectivement les entreprises à « adopter les meilleures pratiques au pays et à l’étranger en mettant en oeuvre des principes et des lignes directrices dans leurs activités quotidiennes » à partir de sources comme les normes de rendement de la SFI.

Tout cela fait ressortir le point principal que je veux faire valoir, à savoir qu’une institution que le Canada aide à gouverner, et que le Canada qualifie de source de pratiques exemplaires, établit en fait des normes beaucoup plus élevées en matière de relations avec les peuples autochtones que ce que le gouvernement fédéral exige généralement de lui-même ou des sociétés qui exercent leurs activités au Canada.

De nombreuses critiques ont été formulées au sujet de l’insuffisance de l’application par la SFI de ses propres normes. Cela ne change rien au fait que les normes qu’elle a adoptées et instituées il y a plus de cinq ans sont à bien des égards plus strictes que celles en vigueur au Canada et qu’en matière d'exigences d’engagement des entreprises auprès des peuples autochtones, il y a un écart entre ce qui est exigé des sociétés agissant au Canada et ce qui est exigé des entreprises agissant à l’étranger. Dans ce cas-ci, ce sont le Canada, les lois du Canada et les règlements et pratiques du Canada qui ne respectent pas cette norme internationale.

Je serais heureux d’en parler davantage avec vous. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hehr, vous êtes le premier.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président et merci à vous, chef, et merci, monsieur Benjamin, d’être venus nous faire part de vos récits et de vos renseignements.

J’aimerais d’abord dire au chef que je viens du territoire visé par le Traité no 7, où nous partageons le territoire avec nos frères et soeurs autochtones. Je sais que la région métisse numéro 3 est également très présente ici. Êtes-vous du Traité no 6?

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Traité no 8. Ma femme vient du territoire visé par le Traité no 6.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Eh bien, je n’ai jamais été très bon en matière de chiffres, monsieur le président, mais j’essaie.

Vous soulevez le fait — de façon très éloquente, je dois dire — que nous devons passer à une relation de nation à nation et que vous voulez simplement que vos enfants aient les mêmes possibilités sur votre territoire que ce qui existe dans d’autres régions du pays. Je pense que c’est une évaluation juste.

Vous avez dit que vous étiez en train de négocier avec Shell, avec Cenovus et avec d’autres ordres de gouvernement. Estimez-vous avoir la capacité, les compétences de le faire? Ou devons-nous investir davantage dans cette capacité afin que vous ayez les outils pour façonner votre propre destin?

(1600)

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Absolument. Nous pourrions certainement faire un meilleur travail dans ce domaine, c’est-à-dire que, si j’avais les outils et le financement pour le faire, je pense que nous pourrions certainement obtenir de meilleurs résultats.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Cela devrait-il être négocié dans le cadre d’une entente sur les avantages mutuels? Selon vous, comment ce cadre évoluera-t-il?

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Je pense que les ententes sur les avantages mutuels sont une bonne chose, mais encore une fois, si j’avais ce qu'il faut, je pourrais le dire avec plus d’éloquence.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je comprends que c’est un peu comme la poule et l’oeuf.

Récemment, dans votre région, le gouvernement de l’Alberta a annoncé la création d’un nouveau parc, le Kitaskino Nuwenëné Wildland Provincial Park. Il a été créé à partir des concessions de sables bitumineux par des promoteurs qui ont travaillé là-bas. Ce processus a-t-il fonctionné selon vous? Vous êtes-vous senti partie prenante dans cette possibilité de retourner sur vos terres, avez-vous participé au projet et avez-vous été consulté?

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Non, parce que ce n’est pas un domaine dans lequel j’ai travaillé directement. C’était peut-être dans la région plus à l’est, dans la région de Fort McMurray, je suppose. Je n’ai tout simplement pas beaucoup d’information à ce sujet.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J’ai une question pour vous, monsieur Benjamin. Dans le peu de temps dont vous disposiez, vous avez abordé des aspects très détaillés du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, et la façon dont il est lié aux peuples autochtones dans le cadre de la mise en oeuvre de projets pétroliers et gaziers, je suppose, mais plus généralement de projets d’exploitation des ressources.

Nous avons notamment discuté de la participation précoce, c’est-à-dire intervenir tôt et discuter des enjeux, des points de référence culturels auxquels nous devons être sensibles et des aspects écologiques avec lesquels nous devons travailler. Cela fonctionne-t-il dans les pratiques exemplaires internationales? Est-ce quelque chose qu’il faut constamment rappeler?

M. Craig Benjamin:

Comme l’a dit le chef Laboucan-Avirom, nous n’avons pas de pratiques internationales parfaites. La pratique est plus souvent négative que positive. Mais je pense que vous avez tout à fait raison. Plus la participation est précoce, mieux c’est, à tous les niveaux. Plus la participation peut se faire tôt, plus il est possible de négocier le genre d’arrangements dont il a été question, des négociations dans lesquelles il y a un véritable avantage mutuel, où l'on trouve cet équilibre en assurant l’accès aux avantages du développement sans sacrifier les valeurs culturelles, les pratiques et les traditions. Bien entendu plus le processus avance, plus il devient difficile de s’adapter aux préoccupations et aux besoins fondamentaux.

Nous constatons trop souvent qu'en réalité les décisions sont gravées dans le marbre avant que le dialogue avec les peuples autochtones ne commence. L’intention existe d’aller de l’avant avec un projet particulier dans un secteur précis et, souvent, les Premières Nations avec lesquelles nous travaillons au Canada — et nous entendons cela de la part des peuples autochtones du monde entier —, nous disent qu'elles ne s'opposent pas nécessairement à l’exploitation pétrolière et gazière ou à une mine sur leur territoire, mais qu'on ne leur donne pas le choix. Le choix de dire ce qu'elles peuvent accepter et ce qu’ils aimeraient, où — cette question fondamentale de savoir quelles sont les priorités pour les différentes régions de leur territoire —, leur est retiré par le fait qu’elles ne sont consultées qu’après que les décisions initiales ont été prises.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Toutefois, vous êtes un partisan de la participation précoce.

M. Craig Benjamin:

Tout à fait.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Permettez-moi de vous poser la question suivante. Comment établir un équilibre entre le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause d'une part, le grand nombre de Premières Nations dans notre grand pays et la possibilité d’obtenir un consensus sur la façon de faire avancer les projets d'autre part? Comment trouver cet équilibre? Je vous pose la question à tous les deux.

(1605)

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

D’accord. La question est de savoir si... Pouvez-vous répéter votre question?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. Une fois que nous avons identifié un grand projet en cours, lorsque les discussions ont lieu et que vous vous êtes débattus avec la région, comment arrivez-vous à un consensus pour dire que ce projet va être adopté ou non? Comment arrivez-vous à l’équilibre à cet égard?

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Au Canada, en Alberta et même dans les provinces de l’Ouest, la situation démographique est importante. Si l'on veut être précis, disons que vous utilisez cela pour le secteur pétrolier et gazier. Dans ma région, il s'agit beaucoup de vapeur in situ sous terre et l’empreinte écologique n’est pas aussi grande que dans la région de Fort McMurray. Dans ma région, avec le consentement libre et éclairé, les perspectives et les répercussions seront très différentes de ce qu'elles sont dans la région de Fort McMurray.

À mon avis, l'essentiel c’est la ressource qui est utilisée dans ces deux cas et à bien des égards: l’eau. Qu’il s’agisse d’eau locale ou d'eau souterraine, elle devrait avoir beaucoup plus de valeur que le pétrole.

Le président:

Je dois malheureusement vous interrompre.

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos deux témoins d’être ici.

Je viens de la région visée par le Traité no 6. Je suis très fière de représenter un total de neuf collectivités autochtones et métisses. Presque toutes participent activement à l’exploitation des ressources, à l’exploitation responsable du pétrole et du gaz et à l'appui des pipelines.

Chef Isaac, je sais que vous avez travaillé avec un certain nombre de chefs de ma région, comme les dirigeants de la Frog Lake Energy Resources Corporation et d’autres, qui parlent de l’importance de l’exploitation des ressources pour les collectivités autochtones et les générations futures de collectivités autochtones, ainsi que de l’importance de la propriété et de la participation directe à l’exploitation des ressources.

Je trouve curieux que le Comité étudie les pratiques exemplaires des collectivités autochtones alors qu’un projet de loi qui a une grande incidence sur cette question est actuellement au Sénat. Chef Isaac, je me demande si vous avez des commentaires à faire au sujet du scénario dans lequel nous nous trouvons, c’est-à-dire que le projet de loi C-69 en est aux dernières étapes de son adoption — à moins qu’il ne soit bloqué par le Sénat — et que le Comité n’a pas eu l’occasion d’examiner cette mesure législative.

Au départ, vous avez parlé de l’association des chefs qui appuyait le projet de loi, mais je crois qu’hier ou la semaine dernière, elle s’y est opposée. Nous pouvons entrer un peu plus dans les détails si vous le voulez, mais je me demande si vous considérez comme une pratique exemplaire le fait qu'un projet de loi comme celui-ci puisse être sur le point d’être terminé sans qu’aucun des comités n’ait fait d’étude sur la participation des Autochtones. Dans quelle mesure vous-même ou d’autres collectivités autochtones avez été consultés dans l’élaboration de ce projet de loi?

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Comme je l’ai dit, mon interprétation ou ma définition de la consultation — la décision concernant la consultation — est une consultation sérieuse, dans laquelle je sais exactement de quoi parlent ceux qui se trouvent de l’autre côté de la table. On pourrait la tourner, la secouer à l’envers et tout renverser, mais je sais exactement de quoi il s’agit.

Absolument pas, je prendrais simplement l’exemple des chefs qui, lors d’une réunion, l’ont appuyé, en ne comprenant pas pleinement les conséquences et qui font maintenant machine arrière après l’avoir examiné plus en profondeur, ils comprennent et disent que cela a des effets néfastes non seulement pour eux, leurs provinces, leurs territoires, mais aussi pour le pays.

Désormais, il est au Sénat. Comment en est-on arrivé là? Combien de personnes ont dit « arrêtez », « non » et « ne faites pas cela »? Je suppose que c’est un bon exemple de consentement libre et éclairé. Si nous avions eu ce mécanisme, et s’il fonctionnait à 100 %, le projet de loi ne serait pas allé aussi loin. Voilà mon avis.

Est-ce que cela vous aide? Est-ce un bon exemple?

(1610)

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui. En fait, il y a eu un large consensus juridique selon lequel le projet de loi C-69 n’élargira ni les obligations de la Couronne envers les peuples autochtones ni ne modifiera les droits des collectivités et des peuples autochtones dans la consultation relative aux grands projets d’exploitation des ressources relevant de la compétence fédérale.

Bien sûr, nous sommes tout à fait d’accord et nous avons entendu les préoccupations au sujet de la capacité et des ressources en la matière et nous les partageons. Dans l’ensemble, le projet de loi C-69 ne répond pas à ce besoin. En fait, le conseil des chefs national, le Conseil des ressources indiennes, le conseil des chefs du projet Eagle Spirit et la majorité des Premières Nations signataires du Traité no 7 s’opposent tous au projet de loi C-69.

Le chef Roy Fox a dit: « Je n’ai aucune confiance dans le projet de loi C-69. Je crains et j’ai la certitude, que cela maintiendra mon peuple dans la pauvreté. »

Je me demande si vous êtes d’accord avec cette affirmation.

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

J’appuie toutes les déclarations de mes chefs.

Oui, c’est inquiétant. J’ai l’impression que le processus de consultation n’a été qu’une liste de contrôle à cocher lors de laquelle la consultation n’a pas été adéquate ou n’a pas été conçue conformément à l’intention.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Dans le contexte international, non seulement le projet de loi C-69 désavantagerait manifestement le Canada, mais un autre projet de loi — le projet de loi C-48, qui interdit le transport du pétrole au large de la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique — est aussi un exemple, dans le cadre de la discussion sur les pratiques exemplaires pour cette étude, pour lequel je crois comprendre que les consultations au sujet du projet de loi auprès des collectivités autochtones ont été limitées, voire inexistantes.

Je sais que vous avez vous-même dit: « Cette interdiction des pétroliers ne va pas seulement nous nuire aujourd'hui, ce qui est le cas, mais elle va aussi nuire aux générations futures. »

Je me demande si vous avez quelque chose à dire au sujet du processus de consultation sur le projet de loi C-48. De plus, considérez-vous qu’il s’agit d’une pratique exemplaire lorsqu'un gouvernement impose une loi anti-énergie aux collectivités autochtones et à tous les Canadiens sans les consulter?

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Absolument pas, ce n’est pas une pratique exemplaire.

Ce qui m’a amené à intervenir dans cette affaire, c’est que les Premières Nations de la côte, même de Haida Gwaii, se sont réunies. Elles disaient voir des pétroliers longer leur territoire tous les jours. C’est ce qu’elles ont dit; je ne fais que répéter leurs propos. Elles ont dit qu’il n’y avait pas eu de véritable consultation, même pour la forêt pluviale de Great Bear. Je sais qu’il y avait peut-être de bonnes intentions, mais ce sont des attitudes idéologiques. La pêche est en train de disparaître et les gens pouvaient littéralement voir depuis leurs propres maisons tous les bénéfices partir aux États-Unis et dans les ports de l’Alaska. En gros, leur message était, voici où nous en sommes aujourd’hui. L’industrie de la pêche souffre. Ils veulent simplement gagner leur vie. Ils veulent créer des emplois. Ils veulent une part des revenus et de la prospérité que génèrent ces possibilités, et le projet de loi C-48 limite cela. Cela ne veut pas dire que nous nous en fichons. Nous nous soucions à 110 % des eaux — les eaux océaniques, les eaux lacustres et les eaux fluviales. Nous voulons les voir survivre et nous voulons les protéger grâce à nos mécanismes.

Je vais revenir à l’Alberta...

Le président:

Je vais devoir vous interrompre.

Malheureusement, le temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci à vous deux d’être ici aujourd’hui.

Je vais commencer par vous, monsieur Benjamin. Vous avez mentionné la SFI et ses lignes directrices. D’après ce que je comprends, vous avez dit qu’elles sont plus strictes que nos lois ici au Canada. Comment cela se reflète-t-il dans la réalité? Ces lignes directrices sont-elles appliquées à l’échelle internationale et qu’est-ce qui devrait changer si vous conseilliez le gouvernement du Canada et que vous vouliez les intégrer à notre législation?

(1615)

M. Craig Benjamin:

Il y a certainement une lacune importante dans l’application de ces lignes directrices. C’est l’un des problèmes que nous voyons partout dans le monde. Nous avons souvent de bonnes lois, mais des institutions faibles pour les faire respecter. Le problème se multiplie lorsqu’il y a des peuples autochtones qui font l’objet d'un fort racisme et de discrimination et qui sont très désavantagés dans l’accès aux mécanismes juridiques tandis que ce phénomène se reproduit sans cesse.

Il y a des exemples intéressants dans le système de la SFI. La SFI a publié des rapports sur la façon dont elle a examiné le financement de projets particuliers et pris des décisions à leur sujet. Le chef Laboucan-Avirom a dit que la frontière provinciale était le point critique des consultations. Avant l’adoption des lignes directrices actuelles, en vertu de leurs lignes directrices antérieures plus faibles, il existe un cas où la SFI a examiné le fait qu'il y avait une limitation arbitraire des personnes consultées au sujet des répercussions en aval du projet minier. Elle est intervenue et a suspendu son financement pour cette raison fondamentale. Nous voyons des exemples d’application fondés sur certains principes de base.

Le conseil fondamental que je donne au gouvernement du Canada au sujet de ces normes de rendement, c’est qu’il y a une contradiction fondamentale à militer et à faire en sorte que les sociétés canadiennes à l’étranger respectent cette norme par l’entremise d’une institution que nous avons aidée à gouverner sans avoir de normes comparables au Canada. Je pense que l’objectif de l’harmonisation et de la cohérence transfrontalière est bon, mais nous devrions chercher à l’harmoniser à la hausse plutôt qu’à la baisse. Cette norme n’est pas idéale, mais nous ne devrions certainement pas tomber en deçà sur le plan national. Un élément clé est simplement la reconnaissance du consentement, non seulement comme un processus, mais comme une exigence législative réelle, pour dire que, comme élément d’approbation, il devrait y avoir une preuve documentée que le consentement a bel et bien été obtenu lorsqu’il y a un risque de préjudice grave. Je pense que c’est quelque chose de tout à fait réalisable au Canada. C’est exactement ce qui s’est passé au Canada dans le cadre des négociations avec les Premières Nations. Vous pouvez consulter le site Web de Ressources naturelles Canada et y trouver une liste des nombreuses ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages qui ont été conclues. Nous avons la preuve qu’il est possible de conclure des ententes. La différence dans ce qui est proposé est qu'il s'agit de faire d’un tel accord une exigence pour renforcer la position des peuples autochtones lorsqu’ils sont à la table en sachant que l’autre partie ne peut tout simplement pas se retirer.

M. Richard Cannings:

Chef, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

Le chef Isaac Laboucan-Avirom:

Je veux simplement interpréter ce qu’a dit M. Benjamin, à savoir que le Canada fonctionne selon un processus qui consiste à dire « Faites ce que je dis et non ce que je fais. » C’est ce que j’ai compris. Il faut que cela change.

J’apprécie la façon dont il a parlé des obstacles provinciaux. Lorsque le traité a été signé, les frontières provinciales n'étaient pas encore établies. Maintenant, il y a soit — ne vous méprenez pas, mais — une tactique colonialiste soit notre façon de protéger nos propres terres traditionnelles.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je vais simplement enchaîner, chef, avec une autre question. Nous parlons des effets en aval sur les barrages, peu imp