header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-04 RNNR 132

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody.

We have no witnesses in person today. We had one cancellation, but we still have three groups of witnesses.

On the screen on our right, we have Brenda Gunn, associate professor, Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba.

On the telephone we have Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh. We thought he was coming from the University of Dublin, but he's not.

You're actually in Australia, right?

Professor Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh (Professor, Griffith University, As an Individual):

I am indeed in Brisbane.

The Chair:

We also have Gunn-Britt Retter, head of the Arctic and environment unit of the Saami Council, by video conference from Norway. Correct?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter (Head, Arctic and Environment Unit, Saami Council):

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you, all of you, for joining us.

We have a number of committee members around the table. Our format is that each of you will be given up to 10 minutes to do a presentation, and then after all three of you complete your presentations, we'll open the table to questions.

I may have to cut you off if we're getting short of time or you're getting close to your time or go over it, so I'll apologize in advance.

Why don't we start with Ms. Retter?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

Thank you for inviting me to speak before the committee. It is a great honour. It is also interesting that Canada is the one looking for international best practices for engaging with indigenous peoples. Usually we look to Canada for good practices for engaging with indigenous peoples.

At the outset, it is worth noting the fundamental difference between indigenous peoples in large parts of Canada, I believe in particular in the Canadian north, who have completed land claim agreements. In Sápmi, the Sami, areas, there are few or close to zero, territories where Sami rights are recognized. The exception is the county of Finnmark in Norway, where the Finnmark Act establishes the Finnmark Estate, which is considered to be co-management of the land, as the Sami Parliament and Finnmark County Council each appoints three members to the board. The Finnmark Act transfers the common land, which the national state claims to own, to the Finnmark Estate. The Finnmark Estate, as the land owner, can be engaged in energy projects as well. So far, to my knowledge there has not been any mechanism in place to engage with indigenous peoples in particular in the one established over Windmill Park, beyond the usual standard national procedures, of course, of conducting environmental impact assessments related to local authority and their spatial planning procedures and applying for licence and the hearing process connected to that applied in national law and for involving stakeholders.

No other considerations are carried out related to Sami peoples. Sami interests are considered part of the Finnmark Estate Board, as I said.

Industry and authorities often call for dialogue. The Sami people often claim that dialogue is needed as well. This is also related to energy projects, as is the question. But we also have gained experiences that tell us that entering a dialogue is a risky business, as the Sami people who are impacted by a project go into a dialogue hoping for understanding of their needs for access to land end up coming out of it without a satisfying outcome, while the project leads go ahead claiming that a dialogue has been conducted, the boxed is ticked and they move on. Without recognition of land rights, it is hard to match the industry that simply follows the national legislation. We end up depending entirely on goodwill.

With no recognition of territory, Sami rights to land are also in the hands of goodwill from the authorities and the legislation they develop. In speeches and jubilees, ministers claim the Sami culture is valuable and important, and enriches Norwegian, Finnish, Swedish or Russian culture, but often some interests have to give way to more important national interests. Now that is the green shift to mitigate climate change.

A recent example in Norway is the permission given to the Nussir copper mine in Fâlesnuorri/Kvalsund. In the name of supporting a green shift and the need for copper to, among other things, produce batteries to replace fossil fuel, both reindeer herding lands and the health of the fjord are put at risk by the mine tailings being deposited on the sea floor. Marine experts have pointed to the environmental risk of this, but through a political decision to support the green shift, the mine has deliberately chosen to take that risk.

There are also several examples of huge windmill plants placed on Sami reindeer herding land, representing a fundamental change in land use in the name of reducing CO2 emissions to promote the green shift. This is a very delicate dilemma.

The Sami people are constantly under pressure to give up land use and fishing grounds for the good of the nation states' interest in the name of mitigating climate change and promoting the green shift.

I am sorry I was not able to provide best practices so far. There is, however, one here in my neighbourhood where the windmill project and reindeer herding entity came to an agreement on the placement the windmill park. I am not aware of the degree to which the company informed the reindeer herders of the fact that the project will produce much more energy than the electricity lines—the grid—to have capacity to send out to the market. Now the company is working hard to get a huge new electricity line established to be able to transfer the energy out to the market.

This is why free, prior and informed consent would be very important when engaging with the indigenous peoples. The information part, as in this example, would have been essential to understanding the full picture through the engagement process.

I would also like to add before I conclude that beyond the Sami region I could mention that, as I'm engaged in the Arctic Council work, there are two forthcoming reports prepared through the Arctic Council. One is on the Arctic environmental impact assessment conducted through the Sustainable Development Working Group, and the other is through the Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment, PAME, Working Group, a project called Meaningful Engagement of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities in Marine Activities. This is an inventory of good practices in the engagement of indigenous peoples, mostly examples from Canada and America actually.

I don't know your deadlines, but these will be published at the beginning of May at the Arctic Council ministerial meeting, so it might be worthwhile for the committee to consider these two reports.

In conclusion, from my perspective, best practice should be to focused on our own consumption patterns to spend and waste less, use energy and resources more efficiently, and reuse resources that are already taken. I would rather do this than occupy more territory for the mitigation efforts.

I hope I kept to the time limit.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

You did. You had time to spare. We're grateful for that, so thank you.

Professor O'Faircheallaigh, why don't you go next.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Thank you.

Just very briefly, good morning from Brisbane and thank you very much for the opportunity to speak to you.

By way of background, my research for the last 25 years has focused on the interrelationship between indigenous people and extractive industries. Over that time I've also worked as a negotiator for aboriginal peoples. I have worked with them to conduct what I refer to as indigenous or aboriginal impact assessments. A number of these have related to large energy projects, particularly to a number of liquefied natural gas projects in the northwest of Western Australia. My experience extends to Canada. I've undertaken fieldwork in Newfoundland and Labrador, in Alberta and in the Northwest Territories.

My comments on international best practice draw on that 25 years of both research and professional engagement.

I want to stress that I am addressing what I consider to be best practice. That, to me, involves two components. It involves the conduct of indigenous or aboriginal impact assessments of major energy projects and, based on those, the negotiation of legally binding agreements between aboriginal peoples, governments and proponents, covering the whole life of energy projects.

The reason for stressing those two points is as follows. Conventional impact assessment has dismally failed indigenous people. That applies in Australia, it applies in Canada, it applies throughout the globe. There are numerous reasons for that. Time means I can't go into them in detail, but I am happy to take follow-up questions.

The major issues are that conventional impact assessment is driven by proponents and the consultants they employ. Their objective is to get approval for projects and, as a result, they tend, for example, to systematically understate problems and issues associated with projects, and to overstate particularly their economic benefits.

Conventional impact assessment tends to deny the validity and knowledge of indigenous knowing, indigenous views of the world. It fails to adopt appropriate methodologies and it tends to be very much project focused. It tends to deal with one project at a time.

The result of that last point is that cumulative impacts tend to be either ignored or very much understated. That, for example, is very evident in the context of oil sands in Alberta.

In response to these fundamental problems, what is happening increasingly is the emergence of indigenous-conducted impact assessment. There are a number of different models that can be applied in developing indigenous-controlled impact assessment. Again, I am happy to elaborate.

Just to mention one, for a proposed liquefied natural gas hub in the northwest of Western Australia, a strategic assessment was conducted by the federal government and the state government in Western Australia. There were a number of terms of reference for the strategic assessment that related to indigenous impacts.

What occurred was that the regional representative aboriginal body, the Kimberley Land Council, and aboriginal traditional owners of the site negotiated with the proponent and the governments that they would simply extract all of the terms of reference that dealt with indigenous issues and would conduct the impact assessment in relation to those terms of reference.

It is extremely instructive to compare the six-volume impact assessment that emerged from that exercise with an impact assessment conducted by the lead proponent, Woodside Energy, in relation to another LNG project in another part of Australia. There is a world of difference. Indigenous impact assessment is much more capable of properly identifying the key issues for indigenous people and, just as importantly, of identifying viable strategies for dealing with those impacts.

The second component of best practice is the negotiation, based on those impact assessments, of legally binding agreements for the whole-of-project life.

(1545)



One fundamental factor is that the political reality—and this isn't just an issue in relation to indigenous peoples—is that once projects get approval, the attention of government moves elsewhere. Given that many of these projects will last for 20, 30, or 40 years, there is a huge issue of making sure that over time there is a continued focus on dealing with the issues identified in impact assessment and in dealing with changes over time. No project is the same after 10, 20, or 30 years. How do we ensure that there is a continued focus?

One way of doing it is to negotiate agreements that cover the whole of project life and provide the resources to make sure that the focus can be maintained, and to provide management mechanisms and decision-making mechanisms that provide for ongoing input from affected indigenous peoples.

It is essential that those agreements extend through the whole of project life, because as we're becoming increasingly aware, as projects developed in the 1960s and 1970s reach the end of their lives, there are very major issues about closure and rehabilitation of projects and about dealing with project impacts that can in fact extend far beyond the operational life of the mines, the gas fields, and the oil fields concerned.

I would stress that I am talking about international best practice that's emerging, but there are very clear examples of such practice having been realized.

The final point I would stress is that the negotiation of agreements for the life of projects must occur in a context in which indigenous peoples have some real bargaining power. If they lack that bargaining power, then the agreements that result are likely to entrench their disadvantage, their lack of power. It is thus critical to have an appropriate legal framework and international legal instruments such as the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, with its emphasis on free, prior and informed consent. It's an example of the sort of framework that can provide that real bargaining power.

Thank you.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Professor Gunn, you are last but not least.

Professor Brenda Gunn (Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba, As an Individual):

[Witness speaks in Northern Michif :]

[English]

Thank you for the invitation to appear today. I'm really excited that this committee is undertaking this important study, so much so that I was willing to take the afternoon away from my three-month-old daughter. My apologies if I'm perhaps not as put together as I might normally be, but I managed to pull together my presentation while she was napping on my lap over the last couple of weeks. I'm really excited to be here, and I look forward to having some time for questions, so I will try to be as succinct as possible.

For your information, I am a professor in the Faculty of Law here at the University of Manitoba. I've been participating in the international indigenous rights movement for the past 15 years. I am also the co-chair of the rights of indigenous peoples interest group for the American Society of International Law, and a member of the International Law Association's implementing the rights of indigenous peoples committee. I've also provided technical assistance to the UN expert mechanism on the rights of indigenous peoples for their study on best practices for implementing the UN declaration.

Today, I want to focus my remarks on the idea of international best practices, but I want to highlight the international legal standards that should guide Canada's engagement with indigenous peoples. I'll make reference to three main rights, which include the right to self-determination, the right to participate in decision-making and the right to free, prior and informed consent.

While many people cite the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in relation to these rights, it's important to know that these rights are grounded in broader human rights treaties that Canada is a party to, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.

My presentation here today is going to draw on four main documents, which I provided to the clerk this morning. There are two studies by the UN expert mechanism on the rights of indigenous peoples: the new World Bank environmental and social standards, as well as the “zero draft” of the convention on business and human rights, which is based on the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

To this end, while I would say that I'm providing a presentation on best practices, I actually think it's much more than simply best practices. I'm trying to provide what, in my expert opinion, are the minimum necessary standards that Canada is required to meet to uphold its international human rights obligations.

What I've done is try to compile some of the key areas that I think Canada must uphold, based on these various documents. As a starting point, I think it's quite clear in international law that indigenous peoples must not just be able to participate in decision-making processes that affect their rights, but must also actually control the outcome of such processes. To this end, the participation must be effective. The processes must uphold indigenous peoples' human rights, including the right to self-determination and the right to use, own, develop and control their lands, territories and resources. This is critical, because, in this regard, FPIC safeguards cultural identity. For indigenous peoples, as we know, cultural identity is inextricably linked to their lands, resources and territories.

When we're speaking about FPIC, we have some guidance on what these different standards are. “Prior” means that the process must occur prior to any other decisions being made that allow the proposal to proceed. The process should begin as early as possible in the formulation of a proposal. The international standard is for indigenous peoples' engagement to begin at the conceptualization and design phases. It must also provide the necessary time for indigenous peoples to absorb, understand and analyze the information provided and to undertake their own decision-making processes.

(1555)



We speak about “informed” consent. International law requires that independent specialists be engaged to assist in the identification of project risks and impacts. Indigenous people should not have to rely solely on the materials put forward by the proponent.

Finally, there is “consent”. I'm sure I'll field more questions on this, so I didn't put too much into the presentation, but I think importantly consent means that indigenous peoples must not be simply required to say yes to a predetermined decision; there has to be the opportunity to engage in a more robust process.

To this end, the process must occur in a climate free from intimidation, coercion, manipulation and harassment. It must promote trust and good faith and not suspicion, accusations, threats, criminalization, violence toward indigenous peoples or the taking of prejudiced views towards them. The process must ensure that indigenous peoples have the freedom to be represented as traditionally required under their own laws, customs and protocols, with attention to gender and representation of other sectors within the community. Indigenous peoples must also be able to determine how and which of their institutions and leaders represent them.

Under international law, indigenous peoples also have the power to determine the course or the actual consultation process. This includes being consulted when devising the process of consultation and having the opportunity to share or use or develop their own protocols in consultation.

Finally, the process must also allow for indigenous peoples to define the methods, the timelines, the locations and evaluation of the consultation process.

One question often raised is when FPIC is required. Generally, it's when a project is likely to have a significant direct impact on indigenous peoples' lives, lands, territories and resources. It's important to note that it's indigenous peoples' perspective on the potential impact that is the standard here. It's not the state's or the proponent's determination of the impact, but indigenous peoples'. Also, this right of FPIC is not limited to lands that Canada recognizes as aboriginal title lands; it includes lands that indigenous peoples have traditionally owned or otherwise occupied and used, including lands, territories and resources that are governed under indigenous peoples' own laws.

It's important during these processes that states engage broadly with all potentially impacted indigenous peoples through their own representative institutions. They must ensure that they are also engaging indigenous women, children, youth and persons with disabilities, bearing in mind that government structures of some indigenous communities may be male-dominated. To this end, consultation should also provide an understanding of the specific impacts on indigenous people. It's not just about having indigenous women, children and youth present, but also specifically turning your mind to how the project may impact indigenous women differently or specifically.

Another area that I think is particularly important in Canada is the importance of ensuring that FPIC processes support consensus building within indigenous peoples' communities and must avoid any process that may cause further division within the community. In relation to processes that might further divide, we want to be aware of any situations of economic duress, such as when communities may be feeling pressure to engage in the process because of economic duress, and trying to ensure that any process, consultation or otherwise is not further dividing the community.

(1600)



As was already mentioned, these consultation processes should occur throughout the project, ensuring that there is constant communication between the parties. Under international law, it's important to note that these consultation processes where indigenous peoples are engaged in decision-making and provide their free, prior and informed consent should not be confused with public hearings for the environment and regulatory regimes.

Sorry, I think I am running short of time. I want to make one or two more points.

International law does recognize that indigenous peoples may withhold their consent in several circumstances, which include following an assessment and conclusion that the proposal is not in their best interest, where there are deficiencies in the process, or to communicate a legitimate distrust in the consultation process or the initiative.

Some might say that the UN declaration is unclear because different articles provide different wording. However, I think the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples has tried to clarify that the terms “consult” and “co-operate” denote a right of indigenous peoples to influence the outcome of the decision-making process, not just to be involved in it. I think the standards and international law are quite clear, and Canada should be taking steps to uphold these obligations.

Finally, to wrap things up, there are some broader objectives that the right to participate in decision-making seeks to achieve that can help us guide these processes. The first is to correct the de jure and de facto exclusion of indigenous peoples from public life, and the second, to revitalize and restore indigenous people's own decision-making processes.

Finally, free, prior and informed consent also has some underlying rationales that should guide our implementation: To restore indigenous people's control over their lands and resources; to restore indigenous people's cultural integrity, pride and self-esteem; and to redress the power imbalance between indigenous peoples and states, with a view to forging new relationships based on rights and mutual respect between the parties.

[Witness speaks in Northern Michif:]

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

Professor Gunn, we do appreciate your taking the time away from your newborn to be here with us and to make the effort to prepare. We're very grateful for that.

Mr. Graham, you're going to start us off.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

First off, Professor O'Faircheallaigh, I checked and I wanted to thank you for getting up at five o'clock in the morning to talk to us. That's very much appreciated by all of us. I'll come back to you in a second.

Ms. Retter, in your comments you talked about entering a dialogue as being a risky business. That's something that stuck with me from the moment you said it. You talked about the dangers. I want to get into the dangers and the experience you have with that. You talked about a mine that has tailings in the sea floor as a result of the dialogue, if I understood you correctly. If that's the case, did the dialogue process, as described at length by professor Gunn, follow that kind of process of free, prior, and informed consent, or was there a completely different process involved here? Can you help us with that?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

I think the two other presentations answered many of the things I was addressing. What I was trying to convey was the lack of recognition that the process needs to to fulfill free, prior, and informed consent and the lack of recognition that indigenous peoples have less power and that there is a power imbalance. In the Norwegian system, the engagement has been carried out like the ordinary process of hearing and treated like it is with other stakeholders, without this recognition of the different culture, different needs, different world view and imbalance in power relations.

It was carried out according to other stakeholders' interests. Interests were treated, but indigenous people's rights and needs for conducting our culture were not recognized. That's also why we get a different outcome. If we had an impact assessment conducted by indigenous peoples, like the professor was mentioning, or we addressed the free, prior and informed consent as described, I think we would have had a a different result.

(1605)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Your sense is that the process for a free, prior and informed consent would not allow the entry into dialogue to become a risky business.

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

Yes, that is our hope, until we try that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood. Thank you.

Professor O'Faircheallaigh, you talked about environmental impact assessments and left a loud hint that you'd like to talk about it a bit further. I'd like to give you the opportunity to do that, if you'd like.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Sorry, which specific...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On the topic of environmental impact assessments—

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—you said you didn't have enough time to say everything you wanted to say on that, so here is some time to say what you wanted to say.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

I'm sorry, but I'm getting a bad echo on the line now. Anyway, I'll keep going.

I'd like to begin by perhaps following up on your question about dialogue being a risky business.

I think that one issue with conventional impact assessments is exactly that. When indigenous people don't control it, they're in a dilemma because if they engage with it, it can be taken as an indication of their consent. On the other hand, it very rarely is effective in taking into account the issues they have.

I will fill in on a couple of the points. One is the failure to properly acknowledge the importance of indigenous world views, of indigenous understandings of the universe and indigenous expertise. There tends to be a deeply in-built assumption that western science offers the only valid understanding of environmental processes and outcomes. As a result of that, even if use is made of information provided by indigenous people, for example through land-use studies, it tends to be co-opted and presented in a frame that's very much dominated by western assumptions and western values.

Another point I would mention is the failure to use appropriate methodologies for engaging with indigenous people. The very much standard approach in conventional impact assessment is to use meetings in offices, in buildings, to do that in a one-off form so that you come to a meeting, you provide people with information and you ask for their response. For various reasons, that sort of approach is entirely inappropriate. If you look at the way in indigenous-controlled impact assessment is conducted, you see that it tends to have a much broader variety of forms of engagement. It will involve small group meetings, individual meetings. It will involve perhaps separate meetings with men and women. It will involve meetings “on country”, as we say in Australia, in other words, meetings at the places on the land, in the waters, where these impacts are expected to happen, where indigenous people feel much freer and are much better able to express their understandings.

It is iterative. In other words, there will be a succession of exchanges where initial information is provided, people are given time to think about it and come back and ask questions. Further information is provided. You will have this backwards and forwards process over an extended period of time.

I think there are both fundamental and systemic issues in the way indigenous knowledge is treated, and there are a series of very practical issues of what the appropriate ways of engaging with indigenous people are to make sure that they do in fact have a real impact on what is said in environmental impact statements and on the recommendations that emerge from that.

(1610)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I think my time for consultation is already up.

The Chair:

Sadly, yes it is, Mr. Graham.

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to all the witnesses who have made themselves available to participate in this study.

Let me say, as a member of Parliament in Canada who represents a major oil and gas riding, whose future is completely dependent on the successful construction of major energy infrastructure, I thank you as a person who is of indigenous descent myself, being part Ojibway. I thank you as a person who represents oil and gas workers in northeast Alberta and nine indigenous communities, both first nation and Métis, and whose businesses and livelihoods and futures are dependent on oil and gas development and the construction of major energy projects in Canada. I thank you.

I do, however, regret, Mr. Chair, that I want to move my motion that I tabled on Friday, October 19, 2018.

The Chair:

Which motion is it?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It's the motion I put on notice on Friday, October 19, 2018.

The Chair:

There are others. I've seen a few. I just want to make sure we have the right one in front of us.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Sure, I'll read it: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the Committee request the Minister of Natural Resources appear before the Committee, in the next month, to answer questions related to the Trans Mountain purchase and plans to build the Trans Mountain expansion, and that this meeting be televised.

I trust that the witnesses will understand and probably know that Canada is in a crisis in energy development. It is damaging Canada's reputation as a place that welcomes energy investment, where big projects can be built.

I do hope we'll be able to have you again in the course of this study and certainly invite you to follow up with written submissions, but we as Conservatives are at our wit's end in terms of being able to get our own Minister of Natural of Resources to come to this standing committee to account to Canadians on the outstanding construction of the Trans Mountain expansion—

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, we do have the minister coming on the main estimates within the next month. I am wondering if it would be sufficient for Ms. Stubbs to have the opportunity to question the minister on the broad variety of things one can be questioned on with respect to the main estimates, including money allocated to TMX, at that time, and allow the witnesses who have come from abroad and who have made themselves available for this meeting to continue to be questioned. Or we could devote some time at a future meeting to having a second opportunity for the minister to come and speak to us on TMX in addition to the main estimates, if that would be amenable to her.

The Chair:

Thank you for that. I was going to suggest the same thing. I'll get back to you in a second, Ms. Stubbs, but we do have witnesses who have joined us from around the world, literally. It's been quite difficult to coordinate this, to get all three of them here. Rather than turning them away....

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

What date will the minister be here?

The Chair:

Allow me to finish, please. We have made the request that the minister come, pursuant to the last motion you tabled, actually. He has agreed to do so. I can't remember the date off the top of my head. It's April 30, I've just been reminded. He will be coming—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The problem is that on February 26—

The Chair:

If you would allow me to finish, please—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

—all members of the committee did vote to call the minister—

The Chair:

Or you can interrupt me. It's entirely up to you.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Or you could keep interrupting me.

The Chair:

No, I was actually speaking.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Let me respond to your point.

The Chair:

No, I haven't finished yet.

The minister is coming on April 30.

We have three witnesses here—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

These Liberals really have problems with letting women speak. I'm the only woman member of this committee.

The Chair:

Actually, no, there's another one here. I'd like to acknowledge that.

(1615)

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, there's the permanent member. Sorry.

The Chair:

In any event, we have three witnesses here who have graciously given us their time. We have the minister coming. Mr. Whalen has suggested a very reasonable compromise, although that's entirely up to the committee members. We could set aside some time. We are sitting next week. That way we're not putting further witnesses out, and we can discuss this issue then. Since he is coming anyway, we're not losing any time, or you don't lose anything with respect to the nature of your motion, with all respect. That's my suggestion.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay. Do you feel comfortable that you've concluded, and do I have your consent to speak?

The Chair:

Go ahead. Go ahead.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay. Here's my concern.

On February 26, all members of this committee did move to call the minister to appear here on the supplementary estimates, and I thought that we all had an agreement on that, and so far the minister has failed to appear. He's sitting in the House of Commons today, and he's been here multiple times when this committee has sat. It has been nearly five months since he has appeared here. He has not been accountable on the Trans Mountain purchase. He has not been accountable on the allocations in the estimates. Here we are, trying to get through a study, which, I agree, is extremely important but, I think, confounding, certainly to the indigenous communities that I represent, to the 43 indigenous communities who were counting on the completion of the Trans Mountain expansion...while Liberal legislation, dealing with exactly this issue of full-scale regulatory overhaul and consulting with indigenous communities to ensure the meaningful, the proper, the environmentally responsible and sustainable construction of major energy projects can continue. That legislation is sitting in the Senate right now. It never came through this committee. So here we are, trying to get through this study that—

The Chair:

May I ask you a question?

What do you propose we do with the witnesses today?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think you're trying to make it seem like it is urgent to complete. What is urgent is that the minister should have appeared in front of this committee four and a half months ago.

The Chair:

Okay.

If you intend to continue, and you have the right to do so, should we be good enough to dismiss the witnesses? We have 45 minutes left in the scheduled meeting, and if you're going to do that, I don't think they need to sit here and listen to it, although they're free to do so.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

What I would say is that if you can guarantee and confirm a date and a time when the minister will appear here at the natural resources committee, I absolutely would love to go back to the study. If not, yes, I will continue.

The Chair:

The date will be April 30. The time will be 3:30 in the afternoon.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Great.

The Chair:

So can we move on?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, let's do that.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

We can just leave the motion open but not debate it right now. We'll discuss it next week, because I think Ms. Stubbs might want him twice.

The Chair:

That was my understanding as well, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can adjourn debate on the motion now.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs: Sure.

The Chair:

We can set aside some committee business on Tuesday and deal with it then.

We can move on to witnesses.

Is that acceptable to everybody then?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, NDP):

I just want to make some points here. I've had my hand up.

The Chair:

I saw that. I wasn't ignoring you.

Do you want to speak to something about the motion?

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

I do want to speak to this piece as well as to the motion because of the importance that all of industry.... Regardless of what province or territory we're in, the indigenous people are impacted and want to have full participation, but due to government regulations and industry's understanding, the indigenous communities always end up losing out. I'm very concerned about that.

I want to thank my colleague to my right here. Talking to the minister is very crucial because, as I'm learning and as I've seen across Canada, industry needs to occur, but indigenous communities are required to be involved.

The Chair:

Thank you. You're welcome to come back and join us any time we're meeting.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

I understand that. I don't appreciate the way you said it because I find that condescending, but it's really significant—

The Chair:

What I was saying is that we're going to continue discussing this motion on Tuesday, so I welcome you to come back and participate. That was my point.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

But again, you're just assuming. I want to make sure that my point is made while we have this opportunity, because we're not going to have these witnesses on Tuesday and I really appreciate the witnesses who are here today with us.

The Chair:

All right, thank you.

Are we all in agreement on how we're dealing with this motion then?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

We're all in agreement, and we're also in agreement that if that minister does not get here, this will happen every day, every time we meet.

The Chair:

I'm not sure we agree on that. That's entirely up to you.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay, I'll put you on notice then.

(1620)

The Chair:

Are your questions with respect to the motion? If they're with respect to the motion we're talking about, that's fine. Otherwise I'd like to move on and get to the witnesses.

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

If the minister does not in fact show up on April 30, you have my full support to table the motion again.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Mr. Harvey. We have Albertans in all Canadians.

Mr. Chair, given how important this study is and my gratitude to the witnesses for being here, and the comments of my colleague who doesn't get to participate on a regular basis, if it's okay with you, I would cede my questioning to my NDP colleague to go ahead. Then we'll see if we can get in a follow-up round afterwards.

The Chair:

Absolutely. That's entirely up to you.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

I want to emphasize that I do support the minister's coming here and answering some questions away from the estimates, because when we talk about the budget and the estimates, we rarely get to the kinds of discussions we want to have.

To Ms. Gunn in Manitoba, you speak about indigenous participation and free, prior and informed consent.

I come from Saskatchewan my experience there—and I'm sure it's similar across Canada—is that the federal and provincial governments think “indigenous” means reserves, the Métis locals, or the Métis communities only, but not municipalities where the majority of indigenous people may live.

How can we rectify that? How can we have the discussion to clarify that very point? It's really important that the local residents who live in municipalities look to participate, look to have consent and look for the same information. How can we do that?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Thanks.

I think you're absolutely right with the concern you've raised. The areas for which these consultations are viewed to be necessary tend to be the reserved lands. In Manitoba we have some recognized trapline territories that can sometimes be engaged, at least by provincial governments.

The “how” is perhaps a difficult question, but I think it must start with the recognition that the right under international law to participate in the decision-making and the right to give one's free, prior and informed consent is not limited to aboriginal title or reserve lands; it's traditional lands, territories and resources. Regardless of Canadian governments' recognition of indigenous people's lands, the right exists there.

One starting point would be simply a recognition that all of Canada is indigenous lands, so that when projects are being contemplated, one must think about whose traditional territories are potentially impacted and start engaging the people in that way.

I think you're right. I don't believe I highlighted it in the presentation, but when indigenous peoples reside in an urban environment they also have a right to engage in the processes. The processes may not just be limited to consultations in community; there may need to be ways set up to address and ensure the participation of indigenous peoples in more urban centres. Those are all quite clearly required under international standards right now.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Do we have those discussions occurring across Canada? I'm curious.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

I'm not sure of the extent to which we have them. I think the conversations are perhaps there. Is the legal recognition there that Canada is required to engage in consultation with indigenous people, even when Canadian law has yet to recognize indigenous people's traditional territories? I'm not sure whether it's actually happening. I think you're right to point that out it's not happening effectively.

An example that may speak to this is found in our prairie provinces, where we have the historic treaties and we speak with colleagues who are lawyers in practice. They've told me that different approaches are taken in areas of Canada where there are historic treaties, the numbered treaties, from treaty number 1 through to 11, which Canada still views as indigenous people ceding, surrendering and releasing all rights to the land—indigenous people take a very different perspective on this—compared with the way Canada engages with indigenous people when there is no historic treaty. I think there is a significant difference.

For me, that's some of the problem I was trying to highlight in my presentation—albeit not speaking to it directly—that even if Canada continues to maintain the position that in treaties number 1 through 11 indigenous people ceded, surrendered and released the rights to the land, that is not the perspective of indigenous people. In international law they have a right to engage in processes over their traditional territories, regardless of Canada's interpretation of those treaties.

(1625)

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Thank you.

Do I still have time?

The Chair:

You have used Ms. Stubbs's time, now you have your own time.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

I want to go back to a specific question. The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination said in a letter of December 14, 2018, that proceeding with the site C dam “would infringe indigenous peoples' rights protected under the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.”

How should the governments of Canada and B.C. proceed? That's a really good question and a good discussion to have.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

My apologies. I don't have that report in front of me. I did appear before the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination when Site C was brought up, so I'm aware of this report.

From my recollection, the report, including the initial report that came out.... Sorry, I don't have dates in front of me. I think it was 2016, Canada's last review before CERD and the concluding observations of the committee. The report you refer to is the follow-up.

I think there are some pretty specific directions from the committee on what needs to happen, so I would suggest that's the starting point. I don't have the document in front of me, nor do I have access to the Internet in the little room that I'm currently in, so I can't pull it up.

I think, perhaps, a starting place for our concerns over Site C is to recognize that we just need to take a pause until some of these issues are considered and resolved. My understanding, as I've done some work with Amnesty International, is that Site C is continuing to move forward despite all these concerns that are being raised. I think, perhaps, a starting point for the conversation is for there to at least be a pause on some of the developments so that the broader issues that have been raised by the human rights committee can be addressed.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Am I done?

The Chair:

No, you have five minutes.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is a very sensitive issue for all Canadians across Canada. It is also shown to have split indigenous nations who want to develop the petroleum resources on their lands and get the product to market, and coastal indigenous nations who oppose the project, saying it threatens their economies that are based on utilizing ocean resources.

How can Canada resolve this? Do you have any ideas to recommend, some suggestions and some solutions for moving forward?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Thank you for that question, as well. At least I'm assuming these questions are directed at me.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Yes.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

If any of my co-panellists would like to jump in, I'm happy to hear international perspectives on these matters.

I'm not sure I have an answer, but I appreciate your highlighting the example, because it hits on one of the most challenging issues, namely, the right of indigenous peoples to participate in decision-making and free, prior and informed consent, which is to ensure that these processes do not create further divides amongst indigenous peoples and do not engage in divide-and-conquer types of tactics. I think projects such as Trans Mountain really exemplify the complicated nature of these conversations when projects are so large, crossing so many territories and engaging so many different people.

One of the questions I often get governments and industry asking is who has the right to say yes? Or whose approval do we have to get when there are so many different people? What happens if not everyone agrees? My answer, which may or may not be the one you're hoping for, honourable member, is that I'm curious to know if the communities who have raised concerns regarding Trans Mountain feel as though they've been heard. And I mean truly heard with regard to the concerns they've raised. Has consideration been given to what the impacts are? Can they be mitigated, and has there been space for real conversation? Or have all of the conversations or consultations occurred in a climate of “this project is going forward. Get on board or get out of the way”?

I fear that on large complicated projects such as Trans Mountain, on which there are people with different perspectives, it becomes easier for Canada and industry to work with indigenous peoples or first nations who are willing to work with them, and to then perhaps ignore or sidestep the concerns raised by other people. I think that's fundamentally a problem.

I don't know enough of the specific concerns that are being raised to say this is the way forward. But I think the right, as contemplated in international law, is about trying to uphold rights and to create space for a real conversation, in which all parties have the opportunity to speak and be heard. I would say that as a starting point for these large projects, we need to make sure all those who are potentially impacted have an opportunity to be heard.

I also think that with projects like Trans Mountain, if I'm correct, there may be a distinction between indigenous communities that are directly impacted by the project, whose traditional territories the pipeline will cross through, and those for whom there may be more indirect impacts. I think that needs to be part of the conversation. I'm not trying to in any way suggest that those who have indirect impacts have lesser rights, but that's just a recognition that there may be different rights at play and so we want to try to get that broader picture.

(1630)

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

It's important to have the minister here so that we can have further discussions.

The Chair:

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I'm happy for this opportunity to bring some of our international guests back into the conversation.

Each of the testimonies we've heard raises issues around the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and you've all emphasized the importance of free, prior and informed consent. Can you advise the committee as to how first Norway and then Australia has acted to ensure that capacity is built among indigenous communities to ensure that consultation is in fact informed? How do you build that technical expertise in Norway and Australia to ensure that people are able to participate in a meaningful way and an informed way in what is often a very technical discussion?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

I have a quick response to the previous question, if I may. I think it's also a question of who has the right to determine future generations' rights to live off the land, just to add to the complication.

Norway has developed, but not Finland and Sweden, a consultation agreement with the Sami Parliament. The Sami Parliament is an elected body of the Sami people. There is one in Norway, another one in Finland and a third in Sweden.

In Norway there is a consultation agreement. An amendment to the act is under discussion now that it should also involve municipalities and provinces, or counties as we call them.

On the question of the technical expertise and capacity, I think the capacity today is what is built in the Sami parliaments, and the employees there have mostly legal backgrounds to do these consultations. But on the technical expertise, which was also raised in one of the previous presentations, we still rely very much on the proponents' reports and findings rather than trusting the indigenous knowledge there.

Of course, in this process with the environmental impact assessments, which Norway, Finland and Sweden conduct, the money is put in by the proponents to carry it out. For example, I don't even know if the Sami have reflected that they could demand to conduct the assessment rather than letting the technical people do it to ensure the holistic and the Sami world view is taken care of. When that has been tried, I don't know of any successful efforts in that regard.

I think we are quite up to date on the legal aspect. We have a lot of legal experts who can take part in this. But when it comes to the more technical part, there is a shortage.

(1635)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Mr. O'Faircheallaigh.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Quickly, there is a precedent with Sami people in Sweden. They have recently conducted their own impact assessment of a proposed copper mine being developed by Falun. I can provide that reference to the committee.

Quickly again, in response to the honourable member's very important questions of only focusing on people on reserve, I think another critical issue about aboriginal control of impact assessment is that aboriginal people decide who is impacted and who should be consulted.

There are cases where I've been involved where—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'm sorry, Mr. O'Faircheallaigh. As you may have heard previously, I only get seven minutes to ask my questions, and I would like you to answer mine.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Okay. Sure.

In terms of capacity and free, prior and informed consent, this is a chicken and egg issue. Where aboriginal people have powerful regional representative organizations, they use their existing capacity to go to proponents and government and negotiate with them about getting the resources to further build that capacity.

For example, in the Kimberley region of northwestern Australia, you have a representative organization called the Kimberley Land Council. It has a powerful political base. It represents all native title groups in the Kimberley, and it is in a position to go to government and proponents and negotiate substantial funding to carry out comprehensive indigenous impact assessments and negotiate agreements.

In parts of Australia, particularly in what we call “settled Australia” in Victoria and New South Wales, you don't have that regional political organization, and, bluntly, you end up with a two-tier system. Aboriginal people in Victoria and New South Wales and South Australia struggle hugely in getting the resources to realize that capacity.

My experience in Canada suggests that you sometimes get the same sort of a two-tier system, possibly for the same sorts of reasons.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Well, let's stay there in Canada, because you said that you've done some work in the oil and gas sector off the east coast. We actually have a process now that's just coming to an end with respect to Equinor and ExxonMobil and consultations for offshore development of the exploratory drilling projects proposed this summer.

Proponent funding was granted to allow the indigenous groups, 41 of them, I believe, that may or may not.... It's quite unknown whether or not their fishing rights in Atlantic salmon would be impacted, but they were all invited to participate. It seems that the ones that were given more funding were the ones that were actually already better able to participate because they were already well funded, and the less well-funded groups were given less money. Do you see this disconnect in Australia—I think you've mentioned it—and how should we try to work around that?

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Yes. First of all, I should clarify that my work was at Voisey's Bay in Labrador, rather than on the offshore—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Okay. Thank you.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

—but I think that reinforces the point, because the Innu and the Inuit were able to negotiate one of the strongest impact benefit agreements in Canada mainly because they already had a strong political organization they were able to mobilize. You certainly see that in Australia.

I think the only solution is to have a federally funded facility that provides all groups affected by major projects with funding capacity. It's possible to do that in a way that is consistent with the parliament's accountability requirements and so on. But in the absence of a national fund, these inequities inevitably emerge. To those who already have will come more.

(1640)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you so much. I have eight more questions, but I only got one in.

The Chair:

Mr. Falk, I believe you're next, for five minutes.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you to all of our presenters here today for their testimony here at committee.

Ms. Retter, I would like to start with you. In your testimony to committee at the beginning of this meeting, you made a comment. I tried to get it all here; I don't know if I captured it all. You said that sometimes rights have to give way to national interests. Can you further expand on that?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

Yes, thank you. I'll try to be brief.

What I was trying to convey is that while Norway, Finland and Sweden recognize that there are indigenous peoples with rights, they don't have the land title as in other parts of the world.

We are often faced with the challenge, for example, in the face of climate change, which is uppermost today. We say, oh yes, but we need to mitigate climate change and we have to find alternatives to fossil fuel, so that is a global and a national interest, and the Sami issues have to wait now that we have these more important issues to solve. Also, we relay expectations to the Sami people that they have to be part of this joint effort to mitigate climate change, and then use that as an argument to put that dilemma on the indigenous peoples or the Sami people that they have the land that is needed to mitigate this or to change to green energy sources and so on. That is a very unfair burden.

First of all, there are already a lot of windmill parks and mines on Sami land, so it's not that we don't contribute, but there's also a lot of other land that you could use that is closer to where the electricity need is. As a Sami, you feel it's yet another argument to continue to change the land use and put pressure on the Sami culture to carry this burden. I'll put it that way.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you.

Ms. Gunn, what is your perspective on national energy projects as far as the rights are concerned of people of first nations or indigenous communities who are directly affected, versus those who are indirectly affected? Should they have the same rights?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Maybe my best response is not just my perspective, but my legal opinion. I believe international law recognizes that there is an obligation on the state to get the free, prior and informed consent of indigenous peoples, whether it's their traditional territory that will be directly impacted, or whether they may have their rights impacted in other ways.

I'm not sure that international law makes the distinction that you're seeking to make here today. Going back to my earlier comment and my opening presentation, what we should be guided by in these processes is seeking to uphold rights. If we're engaging in processes to restore indigenous peoples' control over their lands and resources and restore their integrity and pride and redress power imbalances between indigenous peoples and states, I think this process where we try to divide indigenous peoples and say, “You're directly impacted, and you're indirectly impacted, so your rights aren't as important”, is not done in good faith. It is not upholding the standards, where the consultation process is actually about upholding rights and promoting new partnership.

(1645)

Mr. Ted Falk:

Would it also be in good faith for someone who doesn't have a direct impact or interest in a project to tender their opposition to a project?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Well, I don't think it's fair to speak to that in the abstract. From my experience, when people have raised opposition, they've often done so because of concerns for water quality. They may be downstream from a development. Maybe they're indirectly impacted, but they will experience the impacts.

Again, I think the obligation on Canada is to find out what concerns are being raised, how indigenous peoples can be impacted, and what steps are necessary to ensure that all of their human rights are upheld in the process.

The Chair:

I'm going to have to stop you there, Mr. Falk.

Mr. Ted Falk:

I wasn't done.

The Chair:

Well, I have a difference of opinion with you on that one. You will get another shot if you want.

Mr. Hehr, it's your turn.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

I'd like to thank the guests for coming today. This has been a fascinating discussion. Your knowledge is very deep and you bring a lot to the table for us both to understand our duty to consult and to accommodate our indigenous people here on major energy projects. I come from a city called Calgary, the energy capital of Canada. In Canada, we are also treaty 7 people. We share the land with the indigenous people of that region, and build community with them here today.

Nevertheless, I was listening to the discussion about the Sami people and the mitigation of climate change, wherein you found a successful practice implementing a large-scale windmill and a process that worked all right. Was that because there was early engagement on the file? Were people connected very quickly. What led to a successful outcome in that case?

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

I'm not sure how early they were engaged, but what was fundamental here was the dialogue, the consultations that went on and that they agreed on that. Yes, they understood the need for the windmill, and they had this dialogue on what part of the land was less important for reindeer herding and still useful for a windmill.

What I understand from that process is that both parties were happy. They adjusted the location of the planned windmill park and they agreed.... I'm not sure if there were any direct benefits involved in that, but at the same time, I raised a concern connected to the free, prior and informed consent part of that project. It's the cumulative effect here, which was also mentioned earlier. After they finished the windmill part, they started to talk about the need for electricity lines. I don't know if that was a part of the kind of understanding that was put on the table when they were negotiating or consulting with the reindeer herders. I'm not sure if there was an understanding that this would lead to other construction on the same land that might have a greater impact than the windmill.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

My next question is for Dr. O'Faircheallaigh. Earlier in your testimony, you mentioned that you saw a difference between indigenous environmental impact assessments and “regular” studies in this regard. When these were completed, were the companies and the indigenous people at loggerheads? Was there a mechanism to work out the differences, or was this generally accepted as the best way forward, through dialogue and discourse?

(1650)

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

In the regulatory process, there doesn't have to be a reconciliation because the indigenous impact assessment goes to the decision-maker—in the case I mentioned, to the federal minister and the Western Australian minister—alongside the conventional impact assessment.

What the decision-makers get is an undiluted perspective on the project and its impacts, and mitigation from an indigenous point of view. I think that is the critical thing. That means, for example, that it is up to the indigenous people to decide who will be affected and whether that's “direct” or “indirect”. It's their perspective that goes to the decision-maker and that's key.

However, following on from the impact assessment, there was a negotiation process involving the proponent, the state government and the indigenous parties that resulted in the signing of a series of agreements. Through that negotiation process, you do get a resolution and an agreement on the approach for dealing with the impacts.

I would also note that as a result of the input from the indigenous side, aspects of that are extremely innovative and very important, from the point of view of the national interest, not just the indigenous interest. As I mentioned, one specific example to highlight is that there is a big issue with long-term follow-up. For the life of the project, if it's 40 or 50 years, that agreement provides that there will be an environmental compliance officer present at the site to make sure that all of the agreed environmental protection provisions are put into practice. That's something that goes back to that question about the national interest again.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Hehr.

Mr. Falk, I think you mentioned that you weren't finished. I'll give you the floor back.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, that's very kind of you. Thank you for your last comments, Mr. O'Faircheallaigh. I think those were fairly insightful.

I'd like to go back to Ms. Gunn again and continue questioning her on some of her perspectives. When I look at some of our previous national projects that we've done as a country, for example our railway system, our rail lines would never get built in today's environment. I'm not saying they were done perfectly and that there couldn't have been more consultation at the time. However, when we look at national energy projects today and the amount of consultations we do and are committed to doing and want to do, what do you see as the best path forward to actually completing these projects?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

I'm not sure I quite understand why we think the railway system wouldn't have been built. I think in some ways it's a really good example. We can see that the negotiation of Treaty No. 3 took a little bit longer, but Treaty No. 3 was negotiated and allowed for the railway system to go through. I actually think we have a great historical example there. The time frame was perhaps not initially what the prime minister at the time had hoped. Treaty No. 3 took four years to reach agreement. It required the Queen's negotiators to come back several times and to sit with the Anishinabe, but it did lead to an agreement.

You're right that we do engage in many consultations at this point. I get the sense there's not always a feeling that the discussions with indigenous peoples are effective, with the aim of upholding rights or an attempt to accommodate indigenous peoples' rights. I appreciate honourable member Hehr's point that it's the duty to consult and accommodate. Often in Canada we do an abbreviated duty to consult, and I think that's part of the problem we have. There's a view, and I think my co-panellist spoke to it as well, that there's a “show up, provide information, maybe get some information back” attitude, but then Canada goes off on its own and makes the decision.

I think what is increasingly being required in international law, including under the new World Bank rules—I know Canada is not a borrower from the World Bank, but I think it shows the international trend—is that it has to be a far more robust process whose intention has to be to provide information and hear the concerns that indigenous peoples may raise. We need to sit down and work together to think of ways to address those concerns in the project.

I think a process that better engages indigenous peoples and that seeks to uphold their rights will actually have greater certainty. We will have projects that are good for the environment and good for indigenous peoples and not just be viewed in a narrow economic view. We will be able to reach those decisions faster and with greater certainty and have the process be done in a much more timely fashion.

I think honourable member Stubbs said that we're in crisis, and I agree. We are in crisis, and it's the failure to full-heartedly engage and uphold indigenous peoples' rights that has led to some of the uncertainty.

(1655)

Mr. Ted Falk:

The Prime Minister has stated that indigenous peoples do not have veto rights. Would you agree with that?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

I think international law has reiterated the same point, but it's important to be clear on what we mean by veto. If we're thinking that Canada goes in, presents a plan to indigenous peoples and tells them, you can say yes but can't say no, so say yes and we're going to walk away, that's not what anyone contemplates. Under international law as I indicated, it shouldn't be a pre-determined decision being put forward to indigenous peoples; it should be about engaging them in the decision-making process.

There are circumstances in which indigenous peoples are allowed to say no. I am very clear that while it's not a veto, we still have a right to say no to projects. I can try to find it in my notes to reiterate, but I believe I said in my opening presentation that indigenous peoples have a right to say no under certain circumstances. Yes, my notes say they “may withhold their consent following an assessment and conclusion that the proposal is not in their best interest”—i.e., that it's not going to uphold their rights or that there are deficiencies in the process or to communicate a legitimate distrust of the consultation process.

Yes, it's not a right to veto, but we do have a right to say no.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Whalen, you have five minutes.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Maybe we could use the example that I referred to before about the indigenous consultation that's happening at the same time as the environmental assessment for offshore Newfoundland and Labrador. There are no direct land rights associated with the exploration area, but there are perhaps indirect or ancillary economic rights associated with their local fisheries.

I wonder if each of you can explain or maybe provide your view of your own national law on when consultation in respect to proposed environmental drilling should begin. Should it begin once a proponent decides to go? Should it begin when the state decides to open an area up for licensing? Should it begin the first time someone is interested in doing some seismic testing in the area?

You've talked about early engagement, but then with respect to indirect rights it's unclear to me when you would suggest the best practice would be for indigenous consultation in that type of scenario, in the scenario we see of offshore oil and gas exploration.

Maybe we'll start this time with Canada, then go to Australia, and then to Norway.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

I was hoping I would go last. I was going to try to pull up—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Okay. We can go the other way.

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

Maybe I'll just try to speak really quickly, because I believe our time is almost up.

It should be as early as possible. I know that's not the specific answer you're looking for, but we want to make sure that the engagement is early enough so that indigenous peoples can truly participate in the decision-making and have an impact on the outcome. There's a concern that if we're engaging indigenous peoples too late, it's a fait accompli. You want to make sure that the engagement is early enough.

You are right that I have heard criticisms, mostly coming out of Mexico, in fact, that if the engagement is too early, there's no information that can be provided. My only response at that point is that as early as possible, when the first idea comes up, start building that relationship so there is a relationship of mutual trust and respect that can be built upon for consultations about a specific project.

(1700)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you.

Australia.

Prof. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

The question is when consultation starts. In relation to lands that are under claim or for determined native title, consultation starts when somebody applies for an exploration licence. However, there is a thing called the “expedited procedure”, which means that unless the impact of exploration is expected to be very substantial, that's perfunctory.

If someone applies for a development licence, there is then much more extensive consultation.

In terms of best practice, there is an example of strategic assessment that was conducted in western Australia, which went much earlier. That involved looking at a long stretch of coastline, hundreds of kilometres of coastline, and engaging with people all along that coastline about where a liquefied natural gas hub would be placed. That is much preferable. You then had a two-stage process, once the 11 groups had reached consensus.

I think that also goes back to issues about your pipeline.

Once the 11 groups had reached consensus about the best possible place, there was second level of engagement, much more detailed, with the aboriginal people who had rights in that specific area.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Norway, I know you have only one particular group there, so it might not be as complicated as it is for Canada and Australia, but I would love your perspective.

Ms. Gunn-Britt Retter:

It's not that complicated. However, in line with the last answer as well, your question lays different levels. When government is planning the area where oil and gas exploration is to take place, it would be natural to engage with the Sami Parliament, the representative body of the Sami people in Norway.

There's no offshore oil and gas in Finland and Sweden.

On the seismic testing and other levels, when you get into the local level, actually starting the project, the people representing those who are in or near that area would be the ones to consult at that level. Throughout the process, there are different processes and different levels of Sami participation.

The Chair:

Ms. Jolibois, you have three minutes and then we'll wrap it up.

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Thank you for this very important discussion from all three organizations. Because of the short time frame, I would like to go back to our witness in Manitoba.

Ms. Gunn, I'm still hung up on this consultation with indigenous populations—first nations, Métis and Inuit—where some provinces look after the Métis, while federally it is the first nations and the Inuit.

How can indigenous communities push for the benefits if they want to get into an agreement with the industry? How can provinces and the federal government help with the process?

Prof. Brenda Gunn:

That's a challenging question, and I think this is where energy projects or any natural resource project exists in a context in Canada where there have been a historic pitting of first nations against Métis. I think some of the colonial burden and legacy is what we need to be mindful of when we start engaging in these consultations. We need to be aware of that broader context.

Part of where we're at now, at least with the Supreme Court decision in Daniels, is a recognition that the federal government does have responsibility over Métis people. While the provinces have been engaging with Alberta, for example with the Métis settlements, we do now have clarification, at least from the Supreme Court, that the federal government does have a responsibility to engage with Métis, first nations and Inuit.

I also think the question points to the issue that we're engaging in resource development in Canada in a context where there are several outstanding claims and failure to recognize and uphold treaties. I think that leads to a lot of our tensions and problems, the fact that we're moving forward when we still have other issues that need to be resolved. Related to your question is that the faster Canada moves to resolve outstanding land claims, the easier these consultations may be because we've addressed the fundamental issue. That's where I started my presentation, trying to connect the right to free, prior and informed consent to the broader right to self-determination and the rights over lands, territories and resources.

(1705)

Ms. Georgina Jolibois:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Unfortunately, we're out of time, but thank you very much, all three of you, for taking time from your afternoons, or mornings as the case may be, to join us. It was very helpful and we're very grateful. See everybody on Tuesday.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour tout le monde.

Nous n'avons pas de témoin en personne aujourd'hui. Nous avons eu une annulation, mais nous avons toujours trois groupes de témoins.

Sur l'écran à notre droite, nous avons Brenda Gunn, professeure agrégée à la faculté de droit de l'Université du Manitoba.

Au téléphone, nous avons Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh. Nous pensions qu'il venait de l'Université de Dublin, mais ce n'est pas le cas.

Vous êtes en Australie en fait, n'est-ce pas?

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh (professeur, Griffith University, à titre personnel):

Je suis effectivement à Brisbane.

Le président:

Nous avons également Gunn-Britt Retter, chef de l'Unité de l'Arctique et de l'environnement du Saami Council, par vidéoconférence depuis la Norvège. Est-ce exact?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter (chef, Unité de l'arctique et de l'environnement , Saami Council):

Oui.

Le président:

Merci à vous tous de votre présence.

Nous avons plusieurs membres du Comité autour de la table. Selon notre façon de procéder, chacun de vous disposera de 10 minutes au maximum pour présenter un exposé. À la fin de vos exposés, nous passerons à la période de questions.

Je devrai peut-être vous interrompre si nous manquons de temps, si votre temps achève ou si vous le dépassez. Je m'excuse donc à l'avance.

Pourquoi ne commençons-nous pas par Mme Retter.

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Merci de m'avoir invitée à prendre la parole devant le Comité. C'est un grand honneur. Il est également intéressant de noter que le Canada est celui qui recherche des pratiques exemplaires relativement à la participation de peuples autochtones. Habituellement, nous nous tournons vers lui pour en obtenir.

D'emblée, il convient de souligner qu'il existe une différence fondamentale entre les peuples autochtones des grandes régions du Canada, notamment, je pense, du Nord canadien, qui ont conclu des ententes sur les revendications territoriales. Au Sápmi, la région des Samis, il n'y a pratiquement pas de territoires où les droits des Samis sont reconnus. L'exception est le comté de Finnmark, en Norvège, où la Finnmark Act établit le Domaine du Finnmark, considéré comme une cogestion des terres, car le Parlement sami et le conseil de comté du Finnmark nomment chacun trois membres au sein du conseil. La Finnmark Act cède les terres communes, que l'État national prétend posséder, au Domaine du Finnmark. Le Domaine du Finnmark, en tant que propriétaire foncier, peut participer à des projets énergétiques également. À ma connaissance, il n'existait jusqu'à présent aucun mécanisme permettant la participation des peuples autochtones, en particulier celui établi à Windmill Park, au-delà des procédures nationales habituelles, bien entendu, qui consistent à effectuer des évaluations de l'impact environnemental, relativement aux autorités locales et à leurs procédures en matière d'aménagement du territoire, et à présenter des demandes de permis, et du processus d'audience connexe appliqué dans le droit national... et en ce qui a trait à la participation des intervenants.

Aucun autre examen n'est effectué en ce qui concerne les Samis. On considère que les intérêts de ces derniers font partie du conseil du Domaine du Finnmark, comme je l'ai dit.

L'industrie et les autorités appellent fréquemment au dialogue. Les Samis affirment souvent que le dialogue est également nécessaire. Cela est également lié aux projets énergétiques, comme il en est question. Cependant, d'après nos expériences également, le fait d'entamer un dialogue présente certains risques, car les Samis qui sont touchés par un projet entament un dialogue dans l'espoir que l'on comprenne leurs besoins en matière d'accès aux terres, et ils finissent par se retirer du dialogue sans résultat satisfaisant, tandis que les responsables du projet vont de l'avant en affirmant qu'il y a eu un dialogue; la case est cochée, puis ils passent à autre chose. Sans reconnaissance des droits fonciers, il est difficile de s'opposer à l'industrie, qui suit simplement les dispositions législatives nationales. Nous finissons par dépendre entièrement de la bonne volonté des gens.

En l'absence de reconnaissance des territoires, les droits des Samis aux terres sont également à la merci de la bonne volonté des autorités et des mesures législatives qu'elles élaborent. Lors de discours et de jubilés, les ministres déclarent que la culture samie est précieuse et importante et qu'elle enrichit la culture norvégienne, finlandaise, suédoise ou russe. Or, certains intérêts doivent souvent céder le pas à des intérêts nationaux plus importants. C'est maintenant le virage vert pour atténuer les changements climatiques.

Un exemple récent en Norvège est l'autorisation donnée à la mine de cuivre de Nussir, sur le site de Fâlesnuorri/Kvalsund. Sous prétexte de soutenir un virage vert et de répondre au besoin en cuivre pour, entre autres, la fabrication de piles visant à remplacer le combustible fossile, le dépôt des résidus miniers sur le fond marin met en péril les terres d'élevage de rennes et la santé du fjord. Des experts dans le secteur maritime ont souligné le risque environnemental que pose une telle pratique, mais grâce à la décision politique de soutenir le virage vert, la mine a délibérément choisi de prendre ce risque.

Il existe également plusieurs exemples d'impressionnantes usines d'éoliennes installées sur des terres d'élevages de rennes des Samis, ce qui constitue un changement fondamental dans l'utilisation des terres au nom de la réduction des émissions de CO2 afin de promouvoir le virage vert. C'est un dilemme très délicat.

Les Samis sont sous pression constante pour renoncer à l'utilisation des terres et aux zones de pêche au profit des intérêts des États-nations, au nom de de l'atténuation des changements climatiques et de la promotion du virage vert.

Je suis désolée de ne pas avoir été en mesure de fournir des pratiques exemplaires jusqu'à présent. Cependant, il y en a une ici, dans mon coin où le projet d'éoliennes et l'entité qui garde les rennes en sont venus à une entente sur l'emplacement du parc éolien. Je ne sais pas dans quelle mesure l'entreprise a informé les éleveurs de rennes du fait que le projet produirait beaucoup plus d'énergie que les lignes électriques — le réseau — pour que l'on dispose de la capacité de l'envoyer sur le marché. Maintenant, la société travaille d'arrache-pied afin de mettre en place une nouvelle grande ligne électrique capable de transférer l'énergie sur le marché.

C'est pourquoi un consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause serait très important au moment d'entamer le dialogue avec les peuples autochtones. Le volet information, comme dans le présent exemple, aurait été essentiel afin que l'on puisse avoir une idée complète de la situation tout au long du processus de participation.

Avant de conclure, je voudrais aussi ajouter que, au-delà de la région des Samis... je pourrais mentionner que, dans le cadre des travaux du Conseil de l'Arctique, auquel je participe, deux rapports à venir ont été préparés. L'un porte sur l'évaluation de l'impact environnemental dans l'Arctique, menée par le Groupe de travail sur le développement durable, et l'autre concerne un projet sur la participation significative des peuples autochtones et des collectivités locales aux activités marines, mené par l'entremise du Groupe de travail du Conseil de l'Arctique sur la protection de l'environnement marin. Il s'agit d'un répertoire des pratiques exemplaires associées à la participation de peuples autochtones, principalement des exemples provenant du Canada et des États-Unis.

Je ne connais pas vos délais, mais ces rapports seront publiés au début du mois de mai lors de la réunion ministérielle du Conseil de l'Arctique. Il serait donc peut-être utile que le Comité les examine tous les deux.

En conclusion, selon mon point de vue, les pratiques exemplaires devraient être axées sur nos propres habitudes de consommation; dépenser et gaspiller moins, utiliser plus efficacement l'énergie et les ressources et réutiliser les ressources déjà utilisées. Je préférerais faire cela plutôt que de consacrer davantage de territoire aux efforts d'atténuation.

J'espère que j'ai respecté le temps de parole.

Je vous remercie.

(1540)

Le président:

Vous l'avez respecté. Il vous reste du temps. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants, merci.

Monsieur O'Faircheallaigh, c'est à votre tour.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Merci.

Très brièvement, bonjour de Brisbane et merci beaucoup de me donner l'occasion de vous parler.

À titre d'information, mes recherches au cours des 25 dernières années ont porté sur les relations entre les peuples autochtones et les industries extractives. Pendant cette période, j'ai également travaillé comme négociateur pour les peuples autochtones. J'ai travaillé avec eux afin de réaliser ce que j'appelle des évaluations d'impact sur les peuples autochtones. Un certain nombre d'entre elles ont trait à de grands projets énergétiques, notamment à un certain nombre de projets de gaz naturel liquéfié dans le Nord-Ouest de l'Australie-Occidentale. Mon expérience s'étend au Canada. J'ai entrepris des travaux sur le terrain à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, en Alberta et dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

Mes commentaires sur les pratiques exemplaires internationales s'appuient sur ces 25 années de recherche et d'activités professionnelles.

Je tiens à souligner que j'aborde ce que je considère comme des pratiques exemplaires. À mes yeux, cela comprend deux composantes: la réalisation d'évaluations d'impact des grands projets énergétiques par les peuples autochtones et, à partir de celles-ci, la négociation d'ententes ayant force obligatoire entre les peuples autochtones, le gouvernement et les promoteurs, couvrant la durée de vie des projets énergétiques.

Je souligne ces deux points pour la raison suivante: l'évaluation d'impact classique a lamentablement laissé pour compte les peuples autochtones. Cela est vrai en Australie, au Canada, partout dans le monde. Il y a de nombreuses raisons à cela. Vu le temps alloué, je ne peux pas entrer dans les détails, mais je serai heureux de répondre aux questions.

Les principaux problèmes tiennent au fait que l'évaluation d'impact classique est menée par des promoteurs et les consultants qu'ils emploient. Leur objectif est de faire approuver des projets et, par conséquent, ils ont tendance, par exemple, à sous-estimer systématiquement les problèmes et les enjeux associés aux projets et à surestimer particulièrement leurs avantages économiques.

L'évaluation d'impact classique tend à nier la légitimité et la reconnaissance du savoir des Autochtones, les visions du monde des Autochtones. Elle n'adopte pas les méthodologies appropriées et a tendance à être très axée sur les projets. Elle tend à traiter un projet à la fois.

Compte tenu de ce dernier point, on a tendance à faire fi des répercussions cumulatives ou à beaucoup les sous-estimer. Cela est très évident, par exemple, dans le contexte des sables bitumineux en Alberta.

En réponse à ces problèmes fondamentaux, on constate de plus en plus l'émergence d'une évaluation d'impact réalisée par les Autochtones. Il existe un certain nombre de modèles différents qui peuvent servir à l'élaboration d'une évaluation d'impact contrôlée par les Autochtones. Encore une fois, je suis heureux de vous en dire un peu plus.

Citons, par exemple, un projet de carrefour du gaz naturel liquéfié dans le Nord-Ouest de l'Australie-Occidentale, qui a été soumis à une évaluation stratégique menée par le gouvernement fédéral et le gouvernement de l'État en Australie-Occidentale. L'évaluation stratégique comportait un certain nombre de mandats relatifs aux répercussions sur les populations autochtones.

Voici ce qui s'est produit: le représentant régional de l'organisme autochtone, le Kimberley Land Council, et les propriétaires traditionnels autochtones du site ont négocié avec le promoteur et le gouvernement afin qu'ils retirent simplement tous les mandats traitant des questions autochtones et que ce soit eux qui s'en chargent.

Il est tout à fait instructif de comparer l'évaluation d'impact en six volumes issue de cet exercice à une évaluation d'impact réalisée par le promoteur principal, Woodside Energy, relativement à un autre projet de GNL dans une autre région de l'Australie. Il y a un monde de différence. L'évaluation d'impact réalisée par les Autochtones permet beaucoup mieux de cerner correctement les enjeux clés pour les peuples autochtones et, ce qui est tout aussi important, d'indiquer des stratégies viables pour faire face à ces répercussions.

La deuxième composante d'une pratique exemplaire est la négociation, à partir de ces évaluations d'impact, d'ententes ayant force obligatoire pour la durée de vie du projet.

(1545)



Un facteur fondamental est que la réalité politique — et ce n'est pas seulement un problème pour les peuples autochtones —, une fois les projets approuvés, l'attention du gouvernement se déplace ailleurs. Étant donné que nombre de ces projets dureront 20, 30 ou 40 ans, il est extrêmement difficile de veiller à ce que, au fil du temps, on s'attache de plus en plus à résoudre les problèmes relevés dans l'évaluation d'impact et à composer avec les changements. Aucun projet n'est le même après 10, 20 ou 30 ans. Comment veiller à ce que l'on continue de lui accorder une attention soutenue?

Une façon de le faire est de négocier des ententes qui couvrent la durée de vie du projet et fournissent les ressources nécessaires pour que l'objectif puisse être maintenu, ainsi que de prévoir des mécanismes de gestion et de prise de décisions permettant aux populations autochtones touchées de continuer à apporter leur contribution.

Il est essentiel que ces ententes s'étendent sur la durée de vie du projet, car, à mesure que nous en prenons conscience, à mesure que les projets élaborés dans les années 1960 et 1970 arrivent à la fin de leur vie, la fermeture et la remise en état posent des problèmes très importants, tout comme la prise en considération des effets du projet qui peuvent en réalité aller bien au-delà de la durée de vie opérationnelle des mines ainsi que des gisements de gaz et de pétrole concernés.

Je tiens à souligner que je parle des pratiques exemplaires internationales qui voient le jour, mais il existe des exemples très évidents de la mise en oeuvre de telles pratiques.

Le dernier point sur lequel j'aimerais insister est que la négociation d'ententes pour la durée de vie des projets doit se dérouler selon un cadre dans lequel les peuples autochtones ont un réel pouvoir de négociation. S'il n'ont pas ce pouvoir, les ententes qui en résultent risquent de renforcer leur désavantage, leur manque de pouvoir. Il est donc essentiel de disposer d'un cadre juridique approprié et d'instruments juridiques internationaux comme la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, qui met l'accent sur le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. C'est un exemple du type de cadre pouvant fournir ce réel pouvoir de négociation.

Je vous remercie.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci infiniment.

Madame Gunn, vous êtes la dernière, mais non la moindre.

Mme Brenda Gunn (professeure agrégée, Faculté de droit, University of Manitoba, à titre personnel):

[La témoin s'exprime en michif du Nord:]

[Traduction]

Merci de l'invitation à comparaître aujourd'hui. Je suis vraiment ravie que le Comité entreprenne cette importante étude, à tel point que j'étais prête à prendre l'après-midi, loin de ma fille de trois mois. Mes excuses si je ne suis peut-être pas aussi préparée que d'habitude, mais j'ai réussi à mettre au point mon exposé pendant qu'elle faisait la sieste sur mes genoux au cours des deux dernières semaines. Je suis vraiment ravie d'être ici et j'ai hâte d'avoir du temps pour les questions. Je vais donc essayer d'être aussi brève que possible.

Pour votre information, j'enseigne à la Faculté de droit de l'Université du Manitoba. Je participe au mouvement international des droits des peuples autochtones depuis 15 ans. Je suis également coprésidente du groupe de défense des droits des peuples autochtones pour la Société américaine de droit international et membre du comité de mise en oeuvre des droits des peuples autochtones de l'Association de droit international. J'ai également fourni une aide technique au Mécanisme d'experts des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones pour son étude sur les pratiques exemplaires en vue de la mise en oeuvre de la Déclaration des Nations unies.

Aujourd'hui, je veux axer mes remarques sur l'idée des pratiques exemplaires internationales, mais je tiens à souligner les normes juridiques internationales qui devraient guider la collaboration du Canada avec les peuples autochtones. Je ferai référence à trois droits principaux, à savoir le droit à l'autodétermination, le droit de participation à la prise de décisions et le droit au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause.

De nombreuses personnes citent la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones au sujet de ces droits. Il importe cependant de savoir que ces droits sont fondés sur des traités plus généraux relatifs aux droits de la personne auxquels le Canada est partie, notamment le Pacte international relatif aux droits civils et politiques et la Convention internationale sur l'élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination raciale.

Mon exposé aujourd'hui s'appuiera sur quatre documents principaux que j'ai remis à la greffière ce matin. Le Mécanisme d'experts des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones a réalisé deux études: les nouvelles Normes environnementales et sociales de la Banque mondiale ainsi que l'avant-projet de la convention relative aux entreprises et aux droits de l'homme, qui est fondée sur les Principes directeurs relatifs aux entreprises et aux droits de l'homme des Nations unies.

À cette fin, je dirais que je présente un exposé sur les pratiques exemplaires, mais je pense en fait que cela va bien au-delà des pratiques exemplaires. J'essaie de préciser quelles sont, à mon avis, les normes minimales nécessaires que le Canada doit respecter afin de remplir ses obligations internationales en matière de droits de la personne.

J'ai essayé de dresser une liste des principaux domaines que le Canada doit défendre, à partir de ces divers documents. Pour commencer, je pense que le droit international énonce clairement que les peuples autochtones ne doivent pas seulement être en mesure de participer au processus de prise de décisions qui touche leurs droits; ils doivent également en contrôler le résultat. Pour ce faire, la participation doit être réelle. Les processus doivent respecter les droits fondamentaux des peuples autochtones, y compris le droit à l'autodétermination et le droit d'utiliser, de posséder, de mettre en valeur et de contrôler leurs terres, territoires et ressources. Cela est essentiel, car, à cet égard, le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause protège l'identité culturelle. Comme nous le savons, l'identité culturelle des peuples autochtones est inextricablement liée à leurs terres, à leurs ressources et à leurs territoires.

Lorsque nous parlons du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, nous avons quelques indications sur la nature de ces différentes normes. « Préalable » signifie que le processus doit avoir lieu avant que toute autre décision permettant à la proposition d'aller de l'avant ne soit prise. Le processus devrait commencer le plus tôt possible lors de la formulation d'une proposition. Selon la norme internationale, la participation des peuples autochtones commence aux étapes de conceptualisation et d'élaboration. Le processus doit également donner aux peuples autochtones le temps nécessaire pour assimiler, comprendre et analyser les renseignements fournis et pour entreprendre leurs propres processus de prise de décisions.

(1555)



Nous parlons de consentement « en toute connaissance de cause » ou éclairé. Le droit international exige que des spécialistes indépendants soient engagés pour aider à cerner les risques et les répercussions des projets. Les peuples autochtones ne devraient pas être obligés de se fier uniquement aux documents proposés par le promoteur.

Enfin, il y a le mot « consentement ». Je suis sûre que je je vais me faire poser davantage de questions à ce sujet. Je ne me suis donc pas trop attachée à cette question dans mon exposé, mais je pense que le consentement signifie que les peuples autochtones ne doivent pas simplement être tenus de dire oui à une décision prédéterminée; il doit y avoir la possibilité de participer à un processus plus robuste.

À cette fin, le processus doit se dérouler dans un climat exempt d'intimidation, de contrainte, de manipulation et de harcèlement. Il doit promouvoir la confiance et la bonne foi et non pas donner lieu à la suspicion, à des accusations, à des menaces, à la criminalisation, à la violence à l'endroit des peuples autochtones ou à des préjugés à leur égard. Le processus doit faire en sorte que les peuples autochtones aient la liberté d'être représentés comme il est traditionnellement exigé en vertu de leurs propres lois, coutumes et protocoles, compte tenu du sexe et de la représentation des autres secteurs de la collectivité. Les peuples autochtones doivent également être en mesure de déterminer la manière dont ils seront représentés, et, parmi leurs établissements et leurs dirigeants, ceux qui les représenteront.

En vertu du droit international, les peuples autochtones ont aussi le pouvoir de déterminer le déroulement de la consultation ou le processus proprement dit. Cela inclut la consultation lors de la conception du processus de consultation et la possibilité de partager, d'utiliser ou d'élaborer leurs propres protocoles en matière de consultation.

Enfin, le processus doit également permettre aux peuples autochtones de définir les méthodes, les délais, les lieux et l'évaluation du processus de consultation.

Une question souvent posée est celle de savoir à quel moment il faut obtenir le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. En règle générale, c'est lorsqu'un projet est susceptible d'avoir une incidence directe importante sur la vie des peuples autochtones, leurs terres, leurs territoires et leurs ressources. Il est important de souligner que c'est le point de vue des peuples autochtones sur l'incidence potentielle qui constitue la norme ici. Il s'agit de l'incidence déterminée non pas par l'État ou le promoteur, mais par les peuples autochtones. De plus, ce droit au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause ne se limite pas aux terres que le Canada reconnaît comme des terres visées par un titre ancestral; il comprend les terres que les peuples autochtones ont toujours possédées ou occupées et utilisées de manière traditionnelle, y compris les terres, territoires et ressources régis par les lois de ces peuples.

Au cours de ces processus, il importe que les États engagent un dialogue élargi avec tous les peuples autochtones potentiellement concernés par l'entremise de leurs propres institutions représentatives. Ils doivent veiller à faire participer également les femmes, les enfants, les jeunes et les personnes handicapées autochtones, en tenant compte du fait que les structures gouvernementales de certaines collectivités autochtones peuvent être à prédominance masculine. À cette fin, la consultation devrait également permettre de comprendre les répercussions particulières sur les populations autochtones. Il s'agit non pas uniquement de s'assurer de la présence de femmes, d'enfants et de jeunes autochtones: il faut également s'attacher au fait que le projet peut avoir une incidence différente ou particulière sur les femmes autochtones.

Un autre domaine qui, à mon avis, est particulièrement fondamental au Canada est l'importance de veiller à ce que les processus de consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause soutiennent l'établissement d'un consensus au sein des collectivités des peuples autochtones et d'éviter tout processus susceptible d'entraîner une division supplémentaire au sein de la collectivité. En ce qui concerne les processus susceptibles de susciter davantage la division, il faut être conscient de toute situation de contrainte économique, par exemple lorsque les collectivités peuvent se sentir obligées de participer au processus en raison de contraintes économiques, et s'assurer que tout processus, toute consultation ou autre mécanisme ne divise pas davantage la collectivité.

(1600)



Comme cela a déjà été mentionné, ces processus de consultation devraient avoir lieu tout au long du projet, pour garantir une communication constante entre les parties. En vertu du droit international, il importe de souligner que ces processus de consultation où les peuples autochtones participent à la prise de décisions et fournissent leur consentement préalable, librement et en connaissance de cause ne doivent pas être confondus avec des audiences publiques sur l'environnement et les régimes de réglementation.

Désolée, je pense que je manque de temps. Je veux soulever un ou deux autres points.

Le droit international reconnaît que les peuples autochtones peuvent refuser leur consentement dans plusieurs situations, notamment après avoir évalué la proposition et conclu qu'elle n'est pas dans leur intérêt, si le processus comporte des lacunes ou pour faire part d'une méfiance légitime à l'égard du processus de consultation ou de l'initiative.

Certains pourraient dire que la Déclaration des Nations unies n'est pas claire, car différents articles proposent des formulations différentes. Cependant, je pense que le Mécanisme d'experts sur les droits des peuples autochtones a tenté de préciser que les termes « consulter » et « coopérer » dénotent un droit des peuples autochtones d'influencer le résultat du processus de prise de décisions, et pas seulement d'y participer. Je pense que les normes et le droit international sont très clairs et que le Canada devrait prendre des mesures afin de respecter ces obligations.

Enfin, pour conclure, le droit de participer à la prise de décisions vise à atteindre des objectifs plus généraux qui peuvent nous aider à orienter ces processus. Le premier consiste à corriger l'exclusion de droit et de fait des peuples autochtones de la vie publique, et le deuxième, à revitaliser et à rétablir les processus de prise de décisions propres à ces peuples.

En dernier lieu, le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause a également des fondements sous-jacents qui devraient guider notre mise en oeuvre: rétablir le contrôle des peuples autochtones sur leurs terres et leurs ressources; rétablir l'intégrité culturelle, la fierté et l'estime de soi des peuples autochtones; et remédier au déséquilibre des pouvoirs entre les peuples autochtones et les États, en vue de forger de nouvelles relations fondées sur les droits et le respect mutuel entre les parties.

[La témoin s'exprime en michif du Nord :]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à vous tous.

Madame Gunn, nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir pris congé de votre nouveau-né pour être ici avec nous et d'avoir pris la peine de préparer votre exposé. Nous vous en remercions.

Je vais demander à M. Graham de commencer.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Pour commencer, monsieur O'Faircheallaigh, je voulais vous remercier de vous être levé à cinq heures ce matin pour témoigner devant nous. J'ai vérifié. Nous en sommes tous très reconnaissants. Je vais m'adresser à vous dans une seconde.

Madame Retter, vous avez dit dans votre exposé que le fait d'entamer un dialogue présente certains risques. Cela m'est resté en tête depuis que vous l'avez dit. Vous avez parlé des dangers. J'aimerais discuter plus en détail de ce que sont ces dangers et de votre expérience à ce sujet. Vous avez dit que les résidus d'une mine sont déversés dans les fonds marins justement à cause de la consultation qui a été faite, si j'ai bien compris. Si c'est bien le cas, est-ce que le processus de consultation — que Mme Gunn a décrit en détail — a respecté la notion du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, ou a-t-on suivi un processus complètement différent dans cette situation? Pouvez-vous nous éclairer?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Je crois que les deux autres exposés ont répondu à bon nombre de questions qui ont été soulevées dans le mien. Ce que je voulais faire, c'était mettre en relief le fait que le besoin d'obtenir un consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause n'est pas reconnu dans le cadre du processus, pas plus que le fait que les Autochtones sont en position d'infériorité et qu'il y a un rapport d'inégalité. Dans le système norvégien, le processus de consultation est similaire au processus habituel d'audiences. Les choses se font comme avec les autres intervenants, et la différence entre les cultures, les besoins et les perceptions du monde et les rapports d'inégalité ne sont pas reconnus.

Le processus était axé sur les intérêts des autres intervenants. Les intérêts ont été pris en considération, mais les droits et les besoins des peuples autochtones en matière d'autogouvernance n'ont pas été reconnus. Cela explique aussi pourquoi les résultats sont différents. Si les autochtones effectuaient eux-mêmes l'évaluation environnementale, comme M. O'Faircheallaigh le disait, ou si on cherchait à obtenir le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause comme cela est prévu, je crois que les résultats seraient différents.

(1605)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous croyez donc que le processus relatif au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause éliminerait les risques qui pourraient découler de la consultation?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Oui, c'est ce que nous espérons, mais il faudrait l'essayer pour vérifier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai bien compris. Merci.

Monsieur O'Faircheallaigh, lorsque vous avez parlé des évaluations environnementales, vous avez dit plus ou moins subtilement que vous aimeriez en parler davantage. Je vous en donne l'occasion, si vous le souhaitez.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Excusez-moi, mais de quoi, précisément...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est à propos des évaluations environnementales...

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... vous avez dit que vous n'aviez pas suffisamment de temps pour dire tout ce que vous aviez à dire, alors je veux vous laisser un peu de temps pour terminer.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Excusez-moi, mais j'entends beaucoup d'écho présentement. Je peux tout de même poursuivre.

Pour commencer, j'aimerais répondre à votre question sur les risques liés aux consultations.

C'est effectivement un des problèmes avec les évaluations environnementales traditionnelles, selon moi. Les Autochtones sont confrontés à un dilemme: même s'ils ne dirigent pas le processus d'évaluation environnementale, on peut être porté à croire qu'ils donnent leur consentement dès qu'ils y participent. D'un autre côté, les évaluations environnementales prennent très rarement en considération les besoins des Autochtones de façon efficace.

Je vais aussi fournir plus de détails sur deux ou trois sujets. Premièrement, il y a une incapacité à reconnaître en bonne et due forme l'importance de la vision du monde, de la compréhension de l'univers et de l'expertise des Autochtones. Il y a cette idée préconçue bien enracinée selon laquelle seule la science occidentale permet de comprendre correctement les conséquences et les processus environnementaux. Donc, même si on utilise de l'information fournie par des Autochtones — par exemple, des études sur l'utilisation des terres —, les renseignements ont tendance à être dénaturés et présentés dans un cadre où les idées et les valeurs occidentales sont largement dominantes.

Une autre lacune que je veux mentionner est l'incapacité d'utiliser des méthodes appropriées pour consulter les peuples autochtones. L'approche classique, pour une évaluation environnementale traditionnelle, est d'organiser des réunions dans un bureau, dans un immeuble, une seule fois, afin de rencontrer les gens, de leur donner de l'information et d'exiger une réponse. Cette approche est tout à fait inappropriée, pour toutes sortes de raisons. Les évaluations environnementales dirigées par des Autochtones prévoient des méthodes de consultation beaucoup plus diversifiées, avec des réunions en petits groupes ou en personne. Dans certains cas, on peut avoir des réunions avec seulement des hommes ou seulement des femmes. Il y aura des réunions sur le terrain, c'est-à-dire sur la terre et près du plan d'eau, qui seront probablement touchés. C'est dans ce genre d'endroit que les Autochtones se sentent vraiment libres, et ils y sont plus en mesure de communiquer ce qu'ils savent.

C'est une approche itérative. En d'autres mots, c'est un processus de consultation en plusieurs étapes; d'abord, de l'information est fournie, les gens ont du temps pour réfléchir afin de formuler des commentaires ou poser des questions. Ensuite, plus d'information est fournie. Il y a des échanges réciproques sur une longue période.

Je crois qu'il y a des problèmes fondamentaux et systématiques dans la façon dont les connaissances autochtones sont perçues. Il y a des choses très concrètes qu'il faut corriger afin de consulter correctement les Autochtones si on veut qu'ils aient véritablement une voix dans les énoncés des incidences environnementales et les recommandations connexes.

(1610)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je crois que le temps qui m'était accordé pour mon processus de consultation est déjà terminé.

Le président:

Vous avez malheureusement raison, monsieur Graham.

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous les témoins d'avoir pris le temps de participer à notre étude.

D'abord, je dois dire que je représente une circonscription très riche en ressources pétrolières et gazières. L'avenir de ma circonscription dépend entièrement de la construction d'une importante infrastructure énergétique, et je tiens à vous remercier en tant que personne d'origine autochtone. J'ai du sang ojibwé. Je vous remercie aussi en tant que député qui représente des travailleurs du secteur pétrolier et gazier dans le Nord-Est de l'Alberta ainsi que dans neuf collectivités autochtones — des Premières Nations et métisses —, lesquels ont besoin de grands projets énergétiques et d'une infrastructure pétrolière et gazière. Leurs entreprises, leur subsistance et leur avenir en dépendent. Merci.

Monsieur le président, je le regrette, mais je veux présenter la motion que j'ai déposée le vendredi 19 octobre 2018.

Le président:

De quelle motion s'agit-il?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

La motion pour laquelle j'ai présenté un avis le vendredi 19 octobre 2018.

Le président:

Il y en a plus d'une, au moins quelques-unes. Je veux être sûr d'avoir la bonne sous les yeux.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord. Je vais la lire. Je propose: Que, conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité demande au ministre des Ressources naturelles de comparaître devant lui au cours du prochain mois afin de répondre à des questions sur l’achat de Trans Mountain et les plans d’agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain, et que cette réunion soit télévisée.

Je crois que les témoins comprennent et savent probablement déjà que le Canada traverse une crise liée à l'aménagement énergétique. Cela ternit la réputation du Canada comme pays propice aux investissements énergétiques et où de grands projets peuvent être entrepris.

J'espère que vous serez en mesure de revenir témoigner dans le cadre de cette étude, et je vous invite bien évidemment à nous présenter des observations par écrit. Malheureusement, nous, les conservateurs, sommes au bout du rouleau, puisque nous n'arrivons pas à faire en sorte que notre propre ministre des Ressources naturelles vienne témoigner devant notre comité pour rendre des comptes aux Canadiens relativement aux plans d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain qui sont en suspens...

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Il est prévu que leministre des Ressources naturelles vienne témoigner à propos du Budget principal des dépenses au cours du prochain mois. Peut-être que Mme Stubbs pourrait tirer parti de cette occasion pour interroger le ministre à propos de tout ce qu'elle veut savoir par rapport au Budget principal des dépenses, y compris l'argent affecté au projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain. De cette façon, nous pourrons poursuivre la période de questions avec les témoins à l'étranger qui ont pris le temps de participer à la séance du Comité. Une autre solution serait de prendre un peu de temps lors d'une séance future afin que le ministre vienne témoigner à nouveau à propos du projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain en plus du Budget principal de dépenses, si cela convient à Mme Stubbs.

Le président:

Merci. J'allais justement le proposer. Je vais revenir à vous dans un instant, madame Stubbs, mais il y a effectivement avec nous des témoins qui sont à l'autre bout du monde, littéralement. Cela n'a vraiment pas été facile de coordonner l'apparition des trois témoins, alors si on pouvait éviter de les renvoyer...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Quand le ministre est-il censé venir?

Le président:

Laissez-moi terminer, je vous prie. Conformément à la dernière motion que vous avez déposée, nous avons présenté une demande afin que le ministre vienne témoigner, et il a accepté. Je ne me souviens pas exactement de la date. On me dit que c'est le 30 avril. Il va venir...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Le problème, c'est que le 26 février...

Le président:

Laissez-moi terminer, s'il vous plaît...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

... le Comité a voté à l'unanimité afin de convoquer le ministre...

Le président:

Ou continuez de m'interrompre. Libre à vous.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Vous m'interrompez.

Le président:

Non, j'avais la parole, à dire vrai.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Laissez-moi répondre.

Le président:

Non, je n'ai pas encore terminé.

Le ministre vient témoigner le 30 avril.

Nous avons trois témoins...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Les libéraux ont vraiment de la difficulté à laisser les femmes parler. Je suis la seule femme qui siège au Comité.

Le président:

Il y en a une autre, à dire vrai. J'aimerais le souligner.

(1615)

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, un membre permanent. Je suis désolée.

Le président:

Quoi qu'il en soit, les trois témoins d'aujourd'hui nous ont gracieusement offert leur temps. Il est déjà prévu que le ministre vienne témoigner. M. Whalen a proposé un compromis tout à fait raisonnable, encore qu'il appartient entièrement aux membres du Comité d'en décider. Nous pourrons prendre un peu de temps plus tard pour en discuter. Nous siégeons la semaine prochaine. De cette façon, nous n'empiéterons pas sur le temps des autres témoins pour en discuter. Donc, puisque le ministre vient témoigner de toute façon, nous n'allons pas perdre de temps, et vous ne perdez rien de ce que vous proposez dans votre motion, avec tout le respect que je vous dois. Voilà ce que je propose.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord. Êtes-vous sûr d'avoir terminé? Ai-je votre autorisation pour prendre la parole?

Le président:

Allez-y, allez-y.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord. Voici ce qui me préoccupe.

Le 26 février, le Comité a voté à l'unanimité afin de convoquer le ministre pour qu'il vienne témoigner à propos du Budget supplémentaire de dépenses. Je croyais que nous nous étions tous entendus à ce sujet, mais le ministre n'est toujours pas venu témoigner. Il est à la Chambre des communes aujourd'hui, et il a été au Parlement de nombreuses fois pendant que le Comité siégeait. Cela fait près de cinq mois qu'il ne s'est pas présenté devant notre comité. Il n'a pas rendu de comptes au sujet de l'achat de Trans Mountain. Il n'a pas non plus rendu de comptes au sujet des affectations dans le budget des dépenses. Nous voici donc, au milieu d'une étude qui, j'en conviens, est extrêmement importante, mais qui, en revanche, est certainement déconcertante pour les collectivités autochtones que je représente, les 43 collectivités autochtones qui comptent sur l'achèvement du projet d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain... Il y a un projet de loi libéral qui est à l'étude au Sénat présentement, une loi qui concerne exactement ces modifications réglementaires à grande échelle sur la consultation auprès des collectivités autochtones afin de veiller à ce que la construction de projets énergétiques de grande envergure se poursuive de façon concrète, adéquate, respectueuse de l'environnement et durable. Notre comité n'a jamais pu examiner cette loi. Nous sommes donc ici, au milieu de cette étude, et...

Le président:

Puis-je vous poser une question?

Que proposez-vous que nous fassions des témoins d'aujourd'hui?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense que vous tentez de donner l'impression que c'est urgent à terminer. Ce qui est urgent, c'est que le ministre aurait dû comparaître devant le Comité il y a quatre mois et demi.

Le président:

D'accord.

Si vous avez l'intention de continuer — et vous avez le droit de le faire —, devrions-nous laisser les témoins partir? Il nous reste 45 minutes de la période prévue pour la séance, et, si vous continuez, je ne pense pas qu'ils ont besoin de rester assis là à vous écouter, quoiqu'ils sont libres de le faire.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce que je dirais, c'est que, si vous pouvez garantir et confirmer une date et une heure où le ministre comparaîtra ici, devant le Comité des ressources naturelles, je serais tout à fait ravie de revenir à l'étude. Sinon, oui, je vais continuer.

Le président:

La date sera le 30 avril. L'heure sera 15 h 30.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Excellent.

Le président:

Alors, pouvons-nous passer à autre chose?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, allons-y.

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous pouvons simplement laisser la motion ouverte, mais ne pas en débattre maintenant. Nous en discuterons la semaine prochaine, car je pense que Mme Stubbs voudra peut-être qu'il comparaisse deux fois.

Le président:

C'est aussi ce que j'avais cru comprendre, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons ajourner le débat sur la motion maintenant.

Mme Shannon Stubbs: Bien sûr.

Le président:

Nous pourrons mettre de côté certains travaux du Comité prévus mardi, et régler la question à ce moment-là.

Nous pouvons passer aux témoins.

Alors, est-ce acceptable pour tout le monde?

Mme Georgina Jolibois (Desnethé—Missinippi—Rivière Churchill, NPD):

Je veux simplement formuler certains commentaires. J'ai la main levée depuis tout à l'heure.

Le président:

J'ai bien vu. Je ne vous ignorais pas.

Voulez-vous dire quelque chose au sujet de la motion?

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je veux parler de la question à l'étude ainsi que de la motion, en raison de l'importance que toute l'industrie... Peu importe la province ou le territoire où on se trouve, les peuples autochtones sont touchés et veulent avoir une pleine participation, mais, en raison de la réglementation du gouvernement et de ce que l'industrie en comprend, les collectivités autochtones finissent toujours perdantes. Je suis très préoccupée à ce sujet.

Je veux remercier ma collègue, à ma droite. Il est très crucial que nous parlions au ministre parce que, selon ce que j'apprends et ce que j'ai vu partout au Canada, des projets industriels doivent être entrepris, mais il faut que les collectivités autochtones participent.

Le président:

Merci. Vous pouvez revenir vous joindre à nous à l'occasion de n'importe laquelle de nos séances; vous serez la bienvenue.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je comprends. Je n'apprécie pas la façon dont vous l'avez dit parce que je trouve cela condescendant, mais il est vraiment important...

Le président:

Ce que je disais, c'est que nous allons continuer à discuter de cette motion mardi, alors je vous invite à revenir et à participer. C'est là que je voulais en venir.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Mais, encore une fois, vous ne faites que présumer. Je veux m'assurer que mon commentaire est formulé pendant que nous avons cette possibilité, parce que ces témoins ne seront pas présents mardi, et j'apprécie réellement les témoins qui sont des nôtres aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Très bien, merci.

Nous entendons-nous tous sur la façon dont nous traitons cette motion, dans ce cas?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Nous sommes tous d'accord, et nous convenons également du fait que si le ministre ne se présente pas, cette discussion aura lieu tous les jours, chaque fois que nous nous réunirons.

Le président:

Je ne suis pas certain que nous nous entendions tous là-dessus. Libre à vous de le faire.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord, mais je vous avertirai, dans ce cas.

(1620)

Le président:

Vos questions concernent-elles la motion? Si elles portent sur la motion dont il est question, c'est acceptable. Autrement, je voudrais passer à autre chose et en venir aux témoins.

M. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

Si, de fait, le ministre ne se présente pas le 30 avril, vous aurez tout mon appui pour présenter la motion à nouveau.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur Harvey. Un Albertain sommeille dans chaque Canadien.

Monsieur le président, compte tenu de l'importance de cette étude et de ma gratitude envers les témoins ici présents, de même que des commentaires formulés par ma collègue qui ne participe pas régulièrement à nos séances, si cela vous va, je céderais ma période de questions à ma collègue du NPD pour qu'elle prenne la parole. Ensuite, nous verrons si nous pouvons intervenir dans le cadre d'une série de questions de suivi, après.

Le président:

Tout à fait. Vous êtes libre de le faire.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je veux insister sur le fait que je suis favorable à la comparution du ministre ici afin qu'il réponde à certaines questions qui ne sont pas liées au budget des dépenses, parce que, quand nous parlons du budget et du budget des dépenses, nous en arrivons rarement au genre de discussions que nous voulons tenir.

Je m'adresse à Mme Gunn, au Manitoba: vous parlez de la participation des Autochtones et du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause.

Je viens de la Saskatchewan, et selon mon expérience là-bas — je suis certaine que c'est semblable partout au Canada —, les gouvernements fédéral et provincial pensent que le terme « Autochtone » ne sert qu'à désigner les réserves, les associations locales des Métis ou les collectivités métisses, mais pas les municipalités où la majorité des Autochtones pourraient vivre.

Comment pouvons-nous rectifier cette situation? Comment pouvons-nous tenir la discussion nécessaire pour clarifier cette question? Il est très important que les résidants locaux qui vivent dans les municipalités envisagent de participer, de donner leur consentement et de chercher les mêmes informations. Comment pouvons-nous faire cela?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Merci.

Je pense que vous avez tout à fait raison d'exprimer cette préoccupation. Les régions pour lesquelles ces consultations sont considérées comme étant nécessaires tendent à être des territoires de réserve. Au Manitoba, nous avons certains territoires de piégeage reconnus dont les habitants peuvent parfois être mobilisés, du moins par les gouvernements provinciaux.

Il est peut-être difficile de savoir comment faire, mais je pense qu'il faut commencer par reconnaître que le droit de participer au processus décisionnel et celui de donner son consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, qui sont prévus au titre du droit international, ne sont pas limités aux titres ancestraux ou aux territoires de réserve; ce sont les terres, les territoires et les ressources traditionnels. Sans égard à la reconnaissance par le gouvernement canadien des terres des peuples autochtones, le droit existe.

Le simple fait de reconnaître que l'ensemble du Canada est constitué de terres autochtones serait un point de départ, de sorte que, lorsque des projets sont envisagés, on devra se demander quels sont les peuples dont le territoire traditionnel est peut-être touché et commencer à les mobiliser de cette manière.

Je pense que vous avez raison. Je ne crois pas l'avoir souligné dans mon exposé, mais, quand les peuples autochtones résident dans un environnement urbain, ils ont également le droit de participer aux processus, qui ne se limitent peut-être pas simplement à des consultations dans la collectivité; il pourrait y avoir des moyens organisés pour assurer la participation des peuples autochtones dans les centres urbains et aborder cette question. Tous ces éléments sont actuellement requis au titre des normes internationales.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Tenons-nous ces discussions partout au Canada? Je suis curieuse.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je ne suis pas certaine de leur ampleur. Je pense que ces conversations sont peut-être en cours. Est-il reconnu sur le plan juridique que le Canada est tenu de procéder à des consultations auprès des peuples autochtones, même si ses lois ne reconnaissent pas encore leurs territoires traditionnels? Je ne suis pas certaine que ce soit ce qui se passe. Je pense que vous avez raison de souligner que ces discussions n'ont effectivement pas lieu.

Nos provinces des Prairies, où nos traités historiques sont en vigueur et où nous parlons avec des collègues qui sont des avocats pratiquant le droit, sont un exemple qui pourrait être éloquent à cet égard. On m'a dit que diverses approches sont adoptées dans des régions du Canada où des traités historiques ont été ratifiés — les traités numérotés, du numéro 1 au numéro 11 —, lesquels sont encore vus par le Canada comme une cession de tout droit aux terres de la part des peuples autochtones — les Autochtones ont un point de vue très différent sur ces traités —, et que la façon dont le Canada interagit avec les peuples autochtones diffère lorsqu'il n'y a aucun traité historique. Je pense que la différence est considérable.

À mes yeux, une partie du problème que je tentais de faire ressortir dans mon exposé — quoique je n'en ai pas parlé directement — tient au fait que, même si le Canada continue de maintenir la position selon laquelle la ratification des traités numéro 1 à 11 constitue une cession de tout droit aux terres de la part des peuples autochtones, ce n'est pas le point de vue des peuples autochtones. Au titre du droit international, ils ont le droit de participer aux processus concernant leurs territoires traditionnels, quelle que soit l'interprétation que fait le Canada de ces traités.

(1625)

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Merci.

Me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Vous avez utilisé le temps de parole de Mme Stubbs; maintenant, vous avez votre propre temps de parole.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je veux revenir sur une question précise. Le Comité des Nations unies pour l'élimination de la discrimination raciale a affirmé dans une lettre du 14 décembre 2018 que la mise en oeuvre du projet de barrage du Site C « enfreindrait les droits des peuples autochtones protégés au titre de la Convention internationale sur l'élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination raciale ».

Comment les gouvernements du Canada et de la Colombie-Britannique devraient-ils procéder? C'est vraiment une bonne question à poser et une bonne discussion à tenir.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Mes excuses. Je n'ai pas ce rapport sous les yeux. J'ai comparu devant le Comité pour l'élimination de la discrimination raciale quand la question du Site C a été soulevée, alors je suis au courant de l'existence de ce rapport.

Si je me souviens bien, le rapport, y compris la version initiale qui a été publiée... Désolée, je n'ai pas les dates sous les yeux. Je pense que c'était en 2016, au moment où le Canada a mené son dernier examen devant le Comité pour l'élimination de la discrimination raciale et où le comité a présenté ses dernières observations. Le rapport que vous mentionnez est celui de suivi.

Je pense que le comité a donné des directives très précises quant à ce qui doit se passer, alors j'affirmerais qu'il s'agit du point de départ. Je n'ai pas le document sous les yeux, et je n'ai pas non plus accès à Internet dans la petite salle où je me trouve actuellement, alors je ne peux pas le consulter.

Je pense que la reconnaissance du fait que nous devons simplement faire une pause jusqu'à ce que certains de ces problèmes soient pris en considération et réglés serait peut-être un point de départ en ce qui a trait à nos préoccupations concernant le Site C. Je crois comprendre, car j'ai effectué certains travaux avec Amnistie internationale, que le projet du Site C continue d'aller de l'avant malgré toutes les préoccupations qui sont soulevées. Je pense que si on interrompait certains des projets de mise en valeur afin que les vastes enjeux qui ont été soulevés par le comité des droits de la personne puissent être abordés, ce serait peut-être un point de départ pour la conversation.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Ai-je terminé?

Le président:

Non, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

L'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain est une question très sensible pour tous les Canadiens de partout au pays. On a aussi vu qu'elle a divisé les nations autochtones qui veulent mettre en valeur les ressources pétrolières sur leurs terres et mettre le produit sur le marché et les nations autochtones côtières qui s'opposent au projet en affirmant qu'il menace leur économie fondée sur l'utilisation des ressources marines.

Comment le Canada peut-il régler ce problème? Avez-vous des idées de recommandations, des suggestions et des solutions qui permettraient d'aller de l'avant?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je vous remercie de poser cette question également. Du moins, je présume que ces questions me sont adressées.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Oui.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

S'il y en a parmi les autres témoins qui voudraient intervenir, je serai heureuse d'entendre le point de vue de personnes d'autres pays sur ces questions.

Je ne suis pas certaine d'avoir une réponse à donner, mais je vous suis reconnaissante de souligner l'exemple, car il touche l'un des problèmes les plus difficiles, c'est-à-dire le droit des peuples autochtones à la participation au processus décisionnel et au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, ainsi que le fait de s'assurer que ces processus n'entraînent pas de nouvelles divisions au sein des peuples autochtones et ne favorisent pas le recours à des tactiques de type diviser pour mieux régner. Je pense qu'un projet comme Trans Mountain montre vraiment la nature complexe de ces conversations lorsqu'il est question de projets de très grande envergure, qui traversent un très grand nombre de territoires et qui mobilisent un très grand nombre de personnes différentes.

Les gouvernements et l'industrie me demandent souvent: Qui a le droit de dire oui? Ou bien, l'approbation de qui devons-nous obtenir lorsqu'il y a un si grand nombre de personnes différentes? Qu'arrivera-t-il si tout le monde ne s'entend pas? Ma réponse — qui est peut-être ou peut-être pas celle que vous espérez, honorables députés —, c'est que je suis curieuse de savoir si les collectivités qui ont soulevé des préoccupations concernant Trans Mountain ont l'impression d'avoir été entendues. Et je parle d'un vrai sentiment que leurs opinions ont été entendues. La nature des conséquences a-t-elle été prise en considération? Peuvent-elles être atténuées? Y a-t-il eu de réels efforts pour qu'une conversation soit tenue, ou bien les conversations ou consultations ont-elles toutes eu lieu dans un climat de « ce projet ira de l'avant. Participez ou dégagez le passage »?

Je crains qu'en ce qui concerne les grands projets complexes comme Trans Mountain, sur lesquels les gens ont divers points de vue, il devienne plus facile pour le Canada et l'industrie de travailler avec les peuples autochtones ou les Premières Nations qui sont disposés à travailler avec eux, puis peut-être de faire fi des préoccupations soulevées par d'autres personnes ou de les esquiver. Je pense que c'est fondamentalement problématique.

Je n'en sais pas assez sur les préoccupations particulières qui sont soulevées pour affirmer qu'il s'agit de la voie à emprunter. Toutefois, je pense que le droit international prévoit l'obligation de tenter de respecter les droits et de créer un espace pour une réelle conversation, dans le cadre de laquelle toutes les parties ont la possibilité de prendre la parole et d'être entendues. J'affirmerais qu'en guise de point de départ pour ces grands projets, nous devons nous assurer que toutes les personnes qui pourraient être touchées ont la possibilité d'être entendues.

Je pense également que, dans le cas de projets comme Trans Mountain, si je ne me trompe pas, il pourrait y avoir une distinction entre les collectivités autochtones qui sont directement touchées par le projet, les territoires traditionnels que traversera le pipeline, et celles pour qui les conséquences pourraient être indirectes. Je pense que cela doit faire partie de la conversation. Je n'essaie en aucune manière de laisser entendre que les personnes qui subiront des conséquences indirectes ont moins de droits, mais ce n'est qu'une reconnaissance du fait qu'il pourrait y avoir des droits différents en jeu et que nous devons donc tenter de nous faire une idée d'ensemble.

(1630)

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Il est important de faire comparaître le ministre ici afin que nous puissions tenir d'autres discussions.

Le président:

Monsieur Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux de cette occasion de ramener certains de nos invités étrangers dans la conversation.

Chacun des témoignages que nous avons entendus soulève des questions relativement à la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, et vous avez tous souligné l'importance du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. Pouvez-vous donner des conseils au Comité quant à la façon dont, d'abord, la Norvège, puis l'Australie, ont agi pour s'assurer que les capacités sont renforcées au sein des collectivités autochtones, de sorte que les consultations soient réellement éclairées? Comment établissez-vous cette expertise technique, en Norvège et en Australie, afin de vous assurer que les gens sont capables de participer d'une manière significative et éclairée à ce qui est souvent une discussion très technique?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

J'ai une réponse rapide à la question précédente, si je puis me permettre. Je pense qu'il s'agit aussi de savoir qui a le droit de déterminer les droits des générations à venir de vivre des produits de la terre, simplement pour ajouter à la complexité.

La Norvège a élaboré — mais pas la Finlande, ni la Suède — un accord de consultation avec le Parlement sami. Ce parlement est un organisme composé de Samis élus. Il y en a un en Norvège, un autre en Finlande et un troisième en Suède.

En Norvège, un accord de consultation est en vigueur. On tient actuellement des discussions concernant une modification de la loi parce qu'elle devrait également faire participer les municipalités et les provinces, ou comtés, comme nous les appelons.

Concernant la question de l'expertise technique et des capacités, je pense qu'aujourd'hui, on renforce les capacités au sein des Parlements samis et que la plupart des employés possèdent l'expérience juridique nécessaire pour participer à ces consultations. Toutefois, concernant l'expertise technique, qui a également été soulevée dans l'un des exposés précédents, nous dépendons encore beaucoup des rapports et des conclusions des promoteurs au lieu de nous fier au savoir des Autochtones.

Bien entendu, dans le cadre de ce processus assorti d'études environnementales, que mènent la Norvège, la Finlande et la Suède, ce sont les promoteurs qui injectent l'argent nécessaire. Par exemple, je ne sais même pas si les Samis ont réfléchi au fait qu'ils pourraient exiger de mener les études au lieu de laisser les experts techniques s'en charger afin de s'assurer que le point de vue holistique et la vision du monde des Samis sont pris en considération. S'ils ont tenté de le faire, je ne suis au courant d'aucun effort fructueux à cet égard.

Je pense que nous sommes pas mal à jour en ce qui concerne l'aspect juridique. Nous disposons de beaucoup de juristes qui peuvent prendre part à ce processus. Toutefois, pour ce qui est du volet technique, on manque de ressources.

(1635)

M. Nick Whalen:

Monsieur O'Faircheallaigh.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Rapidement, il y a un précédent chez les Samis de la Suède. Ils ont récemment mené leur propre évaluation environnementale d'une mine de cuivre que Falun proposait d'exploiter. Je peux fournir cette référence au Comité.

Encore rapidement, en réponse aux questions très importantes posées par l'honorable députée concernant le fait qu'on ne se concentre que sur les gens vivant dans les réserves, je pense qu'un autre enjeu crucial au sujet du contrôle par les Autochtones des évaluations environnementales, c'est que cela permet aux peuples autochtones de décider qui est touché et qui devrait être consulté.

Il y a des cas où je suis intervenu...

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis désolé, monsieur O'Faircheallaigh. Comme vous l'avez peut-être déjà entendu dire, je ne dispose que de sept minutes pour poser mes questions, et je voudrais que vous répondiez à la mienne.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

D'accord. Bien sûr.

En ce qui concerne les capacités et le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, c'est la question de l'oeuf ou la poule. Là où les Autochtones ont de plus amples organisations représentatives régionales, ils utilisent leurs capacités actuelles pour s'adresser aux promoteurs et au gouvernement et négocier avec eux au sujet de l'obtention des ressources nécessaires au renforcement de ces capacités.

Par exemple, dans la région de Kimberley du Nord-Ouest de l'Australie, il y a une organisation représentative appelée le Kimberley Land Council. Son assise politique est puissante. Elle représente tous les groupes autochtones de la région, et elle est en position d'intervenir auprès du gouvernement et des promoteurs et de négocier un financement important pour l'exécution d'évaluations environnementales autochtones complètes et la négociation d'ententes.

Dans des régions de l'Australie, surtout dans les zones dites colonisées de Victoria et de la Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, il n'existe pas de telles organisations politiques régionales, et on se retrouve carrément avec un système à deux vitesses. Les Autochtones de Victoria, de la Nouvelle-Galles du Sud et de l'Australie-Méridionale ont énormément de difficulté à obtenir les ressources nécessaires pour réaliser ces capacités.

Mon expérience au Canada me donne à penser que vous obtenez parfois le même genre de système à deux vitesses, peut-être pour le même genre de raisons.

M. Nick Whalen:

Eh bien, restons ici, au Canada, parce que vous avez affirmé avoir effectué certains travaux dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier au large de la côte Est. Un de nos processus vient tout juste de prendre fin en ce qui concerne Equinor et ExxonMobil, ainsi que les consultations relatives à la réalisation des projets de forage exploratoires extracôtier proposés cet été.

Le promoteur a octroyé aux groupes autochtones — 41 d'entre eux, je crois — un financement qui pourrait ou non... On ne sait pas vraiment si leurs droits de pêche du saumon de l'Atlantique seront touchés ou pas, mais ils ont tous été invités à participer. Il semble que ceux qui ont reçu plus de financement étaient déjà mieux en mesure de participer parce qu'ils étaient déjà bien financés et que les groupes moins bien financés ont reçu moins d'argent. Observez-vous ce décalage en Australie — je pense que vous l'avez mentionné —, et comment devrions-nous tenter de contourner ce problème?

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Oui. Tout d'abord, je préciserais que mon travail était à Voisey's Bay, au Labrador, et non au large...

M. Nick Whalen:

D'accord. Merci.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

... mais je pense que cela renforce l'idée, car les Innus et les Inuits ont été en mesure de négocier l'une des plus solides ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages au Canada, principalement parce qu'ils disposaient déjà d'une forte organisation politique qu'ils ont été en mesure de mobiliser. On observe certainement ce phénomène en Australie.

Je pense que la seule solution est l'établissement d'une installation financée à l'échelon fédéral, qui fournit à tous les groupes touchés par de grands projets une capacité de financement. Il est possible de le faire d'une manière qui est conforme aux exigences en matière de reddition de comptes du Parlement, et ainsi de suite. Toutefois, s'il n'y a pas de fonds national, ces iniquités se produisent inévitablement. Ceux qui ont déjà de l'argent en recevront davantage.

(1640)

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci infiniment. J'ai huit autres questions à poser, mais je n'en ai posé qu'une.

Le président:

Monsieur Falk, je crois que vous êtes le prochain intervenant; vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Merci à tous nos invités ici présents aujourd'hui du témoignage qu'ils ont fourni au Comité.

Madame Retter, je voudrais commencer par vous. Dans le témoignage que vous avez présenté au Comité au début de la séance, vous avez formulé un commentaire. J'ai tenté de le consigner au complet; je ne sais pas si j'ai bien réussi. Vous avez affirmé que, parfois, les droits doivent céder la place aux intérêts nationaux. Pourriez-vous nous donner plus de détails à ce sujet?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Oui, merci. Je tenterai d'être brève.

Ce que je tentais d'expliquer, c'est que, même si la Norvège, la Finlande et la Suède reconnaissent l'existence de peuples autochtones ayant des droits, ces peuples ne possèdent pas de titres fonciers comme dans d'autres régions du monde.

Nous faisons souvent face au problème, par exemple en ce qui concerne le changement climatique, qui est actuellement au sommet des préoccupations. Nous disons, oh oui, mais nous devons atténuer les changements climatiques et trouver des solutions de rechange aux combustibles fossiles, alors il s'agit d'un intérêt mondial et national, et les problèmes des Samis doivent maintenant attendre parce que nous avons ces problèmes plus importants à régler. En outre, nous faisons part aux Samis du fait que nous attendons d'eux qu'ils prennent part à cet effort concerté visant à atténuer les changements climatiques, puis utilisons cela comme argument pour imposer ce dilemme aux Autochtones ou aux Samis, c'est-à-dire qu'ils possèdent les terres dont on a besoin pour atténuer ces changements ou pour passer à des sources d'énergie écologique, et ainsi de suite. C'est un fardeau très injuste.

Tout d'abord, il y a déjà beaucoup de parcs éoliens et de mines sur les terres samies, alors ce n'est pas que nous ne contribuons pas, mais il y a aussi d'autres terres qu'on pourrait utiliser et qui sont plus près de l'endroit où on a besoin d'électricité. En tant que Sami, on a l'impression qu'il s'agit encore d'un autre argument visant à continuer à changer l'utilisation des terres et à exercer des pressions sur la culture samie afin qu'elle porte ce fardeau. Voilà mon explication.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci.

Madame Gunn, quel est votre point de vue sur les projets énergétiques nationaux en ce qui concerne les droits des peuples des Premières Nations ou des collectivités autochtones qui sont directement touchés, par rapport aux droits de ceux qui sont indirectement touchés? Devraient-ils avoir les mêmes droits?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

La meilleure façon dont je peux répondre, c'est peut-être en donnant, non pas uniquement mon point de vue, mais aussi mon avis juridique. Je pense que le droit international reconnaît que l'État a l'obligation d'obtenir le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause des peuples autochtones, si leur territoire traditionnel sera directement touché, ou si leurs droits seraient touchés d'une autre façon.

Je ne suis pas certaine que le droit international fasse la distinction que vous cherchez à faire ici aujourd'hui. Pour revenir à mon commentaire précédent et à ma déclaration préliminaire, ce qui devrait nous guider dans ces processus, c'est de chercher à faire respecter les droits. Si nous prenons des mesures pour redonner aux peuples autochtones le contrôle sur leurs terres et sur leurs ressources, rétablir leur intégrité et leur fierté et corriger les déséquilibres de pouvoir entre les peuples autochtones et l'État, je pense que ce processus visant à diviser les peuples autochtones en disant « vous êtes directement touchés, mais pas vous, vos droits ne sont alors pas aussi importants » ne dénote pas de la bonne foi. On ne respecte pas les normes, alors que le processus de consultation vise en réalité à faire respecter les droits et à promouvoir de nouveaux partenariats.

(1645)

M. Ted Falk:

Si une personne qui n'est pas directement touchée par un projet ou qui n'a pas d'intérêt dans un projet pourrait-elle manifester son opposition?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je ne pense pas que ce soit juste d'en parler dans l'abstrait. D'après mon expérience, quand les gens se sont opposés, ils l'ont souvent fait parce qu'ils avaient des préoccupations au sujet de la qualité de l'eau. Ils peuvent se trouver en aval d'un projet de développement. Ils sont peut-être indirectement touchés, mais ils subiront les conséquences.

Encore une fois, je pense que le Canada a l'obligation de savoir quelles sont les préoccupations qui sont soulevées, comment les peuples autochtones peuvent être touchés, et quelles sont les mesures nécessaires pour s'assurer que tous leurs droits fondamentaux sont respectés tout le long du processus.

Le président:

Je vais devoir vous interrompre, monsieur Falk.

M. Ted Falk:

Je n'ai pas fini.

Le président:

Eh bien, je ne suis pas d'accord avec vous sur ce point. Vous aurez une autre occasion d'intervenir, si vous voulez.

Monsieur Hehr, c'est à vous.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

J'aimerais remercier les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui. Cette discussion est fascinante. Vos connaissances sont très approfondies, et vous nous apprenez beaucoup de choses, pour nous permettre de bien comprendre notre obligation de consulter et d'accommoder les peuples autochtones dans le cadre des grands projets énergétiques. Je viens de Calgary, la capitale de l'énergie du Canada. Au Canada, nous sommes également signataires du Traité no 7. Nous partageons les terres avec les peuples autochtones de cette région, et nous bâtissons une collectivité avec eux, ici, aujourd'hui.

Néanmoins, j'écoutais la discussion sur le peuple sami et sur l'atténuation du changement climatique, où vous disiez avoir trouvé une façon de mettre en oeuvre avec succès un projet éolien à grande échelle et avoir établi un processus qui a bien fonctionné. Est-ce parce qu'il y a eu une mobilisation précoce dans ce dossier? Une relation a-t-elle été très rapidement établie? Qu'est-ce qui a mené à une issue favorable dans ce cas?

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Je ne sais pas à quel point la mobilisation a été précoce, mais ce qui a été fondamental ici, c'était le dialogue, les consultations et le fait qu'on soit parvenu à un accord. Oui, les gens de la région ont compris la nécessité du projet, et ils ont eu une discussion afin de désigner quelle partie des terres avait le moins d'importance pour l'élevage de rennes, tout en étant propice à l'installation d'une éolienne.

Ce que je comprends de ce processus, c'est que les deux parties étaient satisfaites. Elles ont réglé l'emplacement du parc éolien prévu et se sont mises d'accord. Je ne suis pas certaine des avantages directs liés à cela, mais en même temps, j'ai soulevé une préoccupation relative au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause à l'égard de ce projet. Il s'agit ici de l'effet cumulatif, qui a également été mentionné tout à l'heure. Une fois qu'on a fini de construire l'éolienne, on a commencé à discuter de la nécessité d'avoir des lignes électriques. Je ne sais pas si cela faisait partie du genre d'entente qui avait été discutée lors des négociations ou des consultations au sujet des élevages de rennes. Je ne suis pas certaine s'il y a eu une entente sur le fait que cela mènerait à d'autres constructions sur les mêmes terres qui pourraient avoir une plus grande incidence que l'éolienne.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à M. O'Faircheallaigh. Dans votre témoignage de tout à l'heure, vous avez mentionné avoir remarqué une différence entre les évaluations environnementales des Autochtones et les études « habituelles » réalisées à cet égard. Une fois ces études réalisées, les entreprises et les Autochtones étaient-ils en désaccord? Existait-il un mécanisme pour régler les différends, ou cela a-t-il généralement été accepté en tant que meilleure marche à suivre, grâce au dialogue et au débat?

(1650)

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

Dans le processus réglementaire, il n'est pas nécessaire d'avoir une réconciliation, car l'évaluation environnementale des Autochtones est transmise au décideur — dans le cas que j'ai mentionné, c'était au ministre fédéral et au ministre d'Australie-Occidentale — en plus de l'évaluation environnementale classique.

Les décideurs obtiennent une représentation fidèle du projet et de ses impacts, ainsi que des mesures d'atténuation, du point de vue autochtone. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un élément essentiel. Cela veut dire que, par exemple, c'est aux peuples autochtones de décider qui sera touché et si ce sera de manière « directe » ou « indirecte ». C'est leur point de vue qui est soumis au décideur, et c'est la clé.

Toutefois, à la suite de l'évaluation environnementale, il y a eu un processus de négociation entre le promoteur, le gouvernement de l'État et les parties autochtones, qui a donné lieu à la signature d'une série d'accords. Au moyen de ce processus de négociation, vous obtenez une résolution et un accord sur l'approche à adopter pour mieux gérer les impacts.

J'aimerais également souligner que, grâce à la contribution des Autochtones, certains aspects sont extrêmement novateurs et très importants, du point de vue de l'intérêt national, et pas seulement du point de vue de l'intérêt des Autochtones. Comme je l'ai mentionné, l'exemple précis que je donne pour souligner cela est lié au grand problème qui existe au chapitre du suivi à long terme. En ce qui concerne la durée de vie du projet, si elle est de 40 ou 50 ans, cet accord prévoit qu'il y aura un agent de conformité environnementale qui sera présent sur le site pour s'assurer que toutes les dispositions relatives à la protection de l'environnement convenues sont mises en pratique. C'est une chose qui revient, une fois de plus, à la question sur l'intérêt national.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Hehr.

Monsieur Falk, je crois que vous avez mentionné que vous n'aviez pas fini. Je vous redonne la parole.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci, monsieur le président, c'est très aimable de votre part. Je vous remercie de vos dernières observations, monsieur O'Faircheallaigh. Je pense qu'elles étaient très intéressantes.

Je souhaiterais de nouveau revenir à Mme Gunn et continuer à l'interroger sur certains de ses points de vue. Si on pense à certains des précédents projets nationaux que nous avons réalisés en tant que pays, par exemple la construction de notre système ferroviaire, nos voies ferrées, n'auraient jamais été construites dans le contexte actuel. Je ne dis pas que ces projets ont été parfaitement réalisés et qu'il n'y aurait pas pu y avoir plus de consultations à l'époque. Toutefois, quand on examine aujourd'hui les projets nationaux en matière d'énergie et le nombre de consultations que nous faisons, que nous nous sommes engagés à faire et que nous voulons faire, quelle est la meilleure voie à suivre, selon vous, pour achever ces projets?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je ne suis pas certaine de bien comprendre pourquoi nous pensons que le système ferroviaire n'aurait pas été construit. Je pense que, d'une certaine façon, c'est un très bon exemple. Nous pouvons voir que la négociation du Traité no 3 a pris un peu plus de temps, mais il a été négocié et a permis la construction du système ferroviaire. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'un excellent exemple historique. L'échéancier n'était peut-être pas initialement ce que le premier ministre de l'époque avait espéré. Dans le cadre du Traité no 3, il a fallu quatre années pour aboutir à un accord. Les négociateurs de la Reine ont dû discuter à plusieurs reprises avec les Anichinabés, mais cela a permis de conclure un accord.

Vous avez raison de dire que nous participons à beaucoup de consultations en ce moment. J'ai l'impression qu'on n'a pas toujours le sentiment que les discussions avec les peuples autochtones sont efficaces, en ce qui concerne le fait d'assurer le respect de leurs droits ou d'essayer de les accommoder. Je comprends le point de vue de M. Hehr concernant l'obligation de consulter et de proposer des accommodements. Au Canada, nous avons souvent un processus de consultation abrégé, et je pense que c'est une partie du problème. Certains sont d'avis — et je pense que l'autre témoin en a également parlé — que le Canada a une attitude qui consiste à « se présenter, fournir de l'information, et peut-être en obtenir en retour », mais qu'ensuite, il fait cavalier seul et prend des décisions.

Je pense que ce qui est de plus en plus exigé dans le droit international, y compris aux termes des nouvelles règles de la Banque mondiale — je sais que le Canada n'emprunte pas de la Banque mondiale, mais je pense que cela indique la tendance internationale —, c'est un processus beaucoup plus rigoureux qui vise à fournir de l'information et à entendre les préoccupations que soulèveraient les peuples autochtones. Nous devons nous réunir et travailler ensemble pour réfléchir aux moyens de répondre à ces préoccupations dans le cadre du projet.

Je pense qu'un processus qui fait davantage participer les peuples autochtones et qui vise à faire respecter leurs droits permettra en fait d'avoir une plus grande certitude. Nous aurons des projets qui seront bons pour l'environnement et pour les peuples autochtones et pas seulement d'un point de vue économique étroit. Nous pourrons prendre ces décisions plus rapidement et avec une meilleure certitude et ainsi avoir un processus beaucoup plus rapide.

Je crois que M. Stubbs a dit que nous sommes en crise, et je suis d'accord. Nous sommes en crise, et c'est l'incapacité d'assurer pleinement la participation des peuples autochtones et le respect de leurs droits qui a mené à une partie de cette incertitude.

(1655)

M. Ted Falk:

Le premier ministre a affirmé que les peuples autochtones n'avaient pas le droit de veto. Souscrivez-vous à cette déclaration?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je crois que le droit international a insisté sur ce point, mais il est très important d'être clairs sur ce que nous entendons par veto. Si le Canada arrive, présente un plan aux peuples autochtones et leur dit, « vous pouvez dire oui, mais vous ne pouvez pas dire non », personne ne veut cela. Comme je l'ai indiqué, conformément au droit international, il ne s'agit pas de présenter une décision prise à l'avance aux peuples autochtones; il s'agit plutôt de les faire participer au processus décisionnel.

Il existe certaines circonstances dans lesquelles les peuples autochtones peuvent dire non. J'affirme sans équivoque que, même s'il ne s'agit pas d'un veto, nous avons encore le droit de dire non à des projets. Je peux essayer de retrouver ce passage dans mes notes pour le répéter, mais je crois avoir dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire que les peuples autochtones ont le droit de dire non dans certaines circonstances. Oui, mes notes indiquent qu'ils « peuvent refuser leur consentement dans plusieurs situations, notamment après avoir évalué la proposition et conclu qu'elle n'est pas dans leur intérêt », c'est-à-dire que leurs droits ne seront pas respectés, ou qu'il existe des lacunes dans le processus ou une méfiance légitime dans à l'égard du processus de consultation.

Oui, il ne s'agit pas d'un droit de veto, mais nous avons le droit de dire non.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Whalen, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous pourrions peut-être utiliser l'exemple que j'ai mentionné précédemment à propos des consultations menées auprès des Autochtones qui se déroulent en même temps que l'évaluation environnementale relative au forage en haute mer à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador. Il n'y a pas de droits territoriaux qui touchent directement la zone d'exploration, mais il existe peut-être des droits économiques indirects ou auxiliaires liés aux pêcheries locales.

Je me demande si chacun d'entre vous peut expliquer ou peut-être donner son point de vue sur sa propre législation nationale quant au moment où les consultations relatives aux travaux de forage environnemental proposés devraient commencer. Devraient-elles commencer quand un promoteur décide de lancer un projet? Devraient-elles commencer quand l'État décide d'offrir des permis dans une zone? Devraient-elles plutôt commencer dès que quelqu'un manifeste un intérêt pour la prise de mesures sismiques dans la zone?

Vous avez parlé d'une mobilisation précoce, mais, en ce qui concerne les droits indirects, je ne suis pas certain du moment que vous proposez à titre de pratique exemplaire pour la tenue de consultations auprès des Autochtones dans ce genre de scénario, c'est-à-dire dans le cas de l'exploration pétrolière et gazière extracôtière.

Cette fois-ci, commençons par le témoin du Canada et nous entendrons ensuite celui de l'Australie et celui de la Norvège.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

J'espérais que mon tour viendrait en dernier. Je voulais essayer de trouver...

M. Nick Whalen:

D'accord. Nous pouvons inverser l'ordre.

Mme Brenda Gunn:

Je peux peut-être essayer de parler très rapidement, parce que je crois qu'il ne reste presque plus de temps.

Ce devrait être le plus tôt possible. Je sais que cette réponse ne vous donne pas la précision que vous cherchez, mais ce que nous souhaitons, c'est de faire en sorte que la mobilisation se fasse assez tôt pour que les Autochtones puissent véritablement participer au processus décisionnel et influencer le résultat. Notre préoccupation tient au fait que si nous sollicitons la participation des Autochtones trop tard, ce sera un fait accompli. Il faut s'assurer que la participation se fait assez tôt.

Vous avez raison, j'ai entendu des critiques, surtout venant du Mexique, selon lesquelles, si la participation est sollicitée trop tôt, il n'y a pas de renseignements à communiquer. La seule réponse que je peux fournir en ce moment, c'est que cela doit se faire le plus tôt possible. Lorsque l'idée est manifestée pour la première fois, il faut commencer à établir la relation pour tisser des liens de confiance et de respect mutuel pouvant servir de fondement aux consultations portant sur un projet précis.

(1700)

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci.

Pour l'Australie.

M. Ciaran O'Faircheallaigh:

La question est de savoir quand commencer la consultation. En ce qui concerne les terres qui font l'objet d'une revendication ou dans le cas où il existe des titres de propriété autochtones, la consultation commence quand quelqu'un demande un permis d'exploration. Toutefois, il existe un processus appelé la « procédure accélérée », ce qui signifie que, à moins que l'on prévoie que les incidences de l'exploration seront très importantes, il s'agit d'un processus de routine.

Si une entité soumet une demande de permis d'exploitation, alors on tient une consultation beaucoup plus exhaustive.

En ce qui concerne les pratiques exemplaires, il existe un exemple d'évaluation stratégique qui a été menée en Australie-Occidentale et qui s'est déroulée beaucoup plus tôt. Ce processus comprenait l'examen d'une grande partie de la côte, des centaines de kilomètres de côte, et la consultation des habitants tout le long de la côte à propos de l'emplacement d'un carrefour de gaz naturel liquéfié. Cette approche est de loin préférable. Un processus à deux étapes a suivi, après que les 11 groupes ont trouvé un consensus.

Je crois que cela rejoint aussi les problèmes qui touchent votre pipeline.

Après que les 11 groupes ont trouvé un consensus à propos du meilleur emplacement, on a mené une deuxième étape de consultations, beaucoup plus détaillées, auprès des Autochtones qui détenaient des titres de propriété dans la zone en question.

M. Nick Whalen:

Dans le cas de la Norvège, je sais qu'il n'y a qu'un seul groupe là-bas, donc les choses ne sont peut-être pas aussi compliquées qu'elles le sont au Canada et en Australie, mais j'aimerais connaître votre point de vue.

Mme Gunn-Britt Retter:

Ce n'est pas très compliqué. Toutefois, comme il a été mentionné dans la dernière réponse, votre question touche différents volets. Quand le gouvernement effectue la planification concernant la zone d'exploration pétrolière et gazière, il doit automatiquement consulter le Parlement sami, soit l'entité qui représente les membres du peuple sami en Norvège.

Il n'y a pas d'exploration pétrolière et gazière extracôtière en Finlande et en Suède.

Pour ce qui est de la prise de mesures sismiques et d'autres étapes, quand on arrive à l'échelon local, c'est-à-dire le véritable début du projet, les représentants des personnes qui habitent dans la zone, ou en périphérie de celle-ci, sont ceux qui doivent être consultés à cette étape. Tout au long du processus global, il y a différents processus et différentes étapes liés à la participation du peuple sami.

Le président:

Madame Jolibois, vous disposez de trois minutes, ensuite nous allons terminer la réunion.

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Je remercie les représentantes des trois organisations de cette importante discussion. Vu le peu de temps qu'il reste, je souhaite revenir à notre témoin du Manitoba.

Madame Gunn, je suis encore accrochée à la consultation avec les Autochtones — les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits — vu que certaines provinces ont des responsabilités à l'égard des Métis, alors qu'au palier fédéral, ce n'est qu'à l'égard des Premières Nations et des Inuits.

De quelle façon les collectivités autochtones peuvent-elles réclamer les avantages qu'elles convoitent si elles souhaitent conclure un accord avec les acteurs de l'industrie? Comment les gouvernements des provinces et du fédéral peuvent-ils aider en ce qui concerne le processus?

Mme Brenda Gunn:

C'est une question difficile, et je crois que c'est ce qui explique que les projets dans le domaine de l'énergie ou des ressources naturelles se déroulent au Canada dans un contexte où, de façon historique, on oppose les Premières Nations aux Métis. Je suis d'avis qu'il faut garder à l'esprit le fardeau et l'héritage coloniaux au moment de s'engager dans ces consultations. Nous devons tenir compte de ce contexte plus large.

Ce qui explique en partie la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons, du moins en ce qui concerne l'arrêt Daniels de la Cour suprême, c'est la reconnaissance du fait que le gouvernement fédéral est responsable du peuple métis. Même si les provinces ont tenu des consultations, comme en Alberta, avec les collectivités métisses, il a maintenant été précisé, du moins par la Cour suprême, que le gouvernement fédéral a l'obligation de consulter les Métis, les Premières Nations et les Inuits.

Je crois aussi que la question touche au fait que nous effectuons de l'exploitation des ressources au Canada dans un contexte où il y a plusieurs revendications territoriales non réglées et un manque de reconnaissance et de respect des traités. Selon moi, cela a engendré une bonne partie des tensions et des problèmes que nous connaissons, c'est-à-dire le fait que nous procédons quand même, en dépit du fait qu'il y a des problèmes qui restent à régler. En outre, plus le Canada agit pour régler les revendications territoriales qui sont en instance, plus ces consultations deviennent faciles, parce que nous réglons des questions fondamentales. J'ai commencé mon exposé en soulevant ce point, et en tentant d'établir un lien entre le droit au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause et le droit plus large à l'autodétermination et les droits touchant les terres, les territoires et les ressources.

(1705)

Mme Georgina Jolibois:

Merci.

Le président:

Malheureusement, le temps dont nous disposions est écoulé. Je vous remercie beaucoup, tous les trois, d'avoir pris du temps durant votre après-midi, ou votre matinée, selon le cas, pour vous joindre à nous. Cela a été très utile et nous sommes très reconnaissants. Nous nous reverrons mardi.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 04, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.