header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-04 PROC 147

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

We'll call this meeting to order. [Translation]

Good morning.

Welcome to the 147th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

This morning, we are continuing our study of parallel debating chambers. We are pleased to welcome Charles Robert, the Clerk of the House of Commons, to share his expertise on parallel chambers.

Mr. Clerk, it's a pleasure to have you here. [English]

Just before we start, you may remember that about a year ago the Clerk told us that he was embarking on reorganizing the Standing Orders just to make them clear and easy to access, not making changes to them, and that he would report back to us. He's available on Tuesday, if the committee would be willing, to just update us on the progress of that report and on getting it ready for the next Parliament. By that time it would be ready, I think. If it's okay, he could report to us next meeting.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

If you are looking for consent from the members, I'd be happy to indicate on behalf of the Conservatives that we would very much welcome that.

The Chair:

Okay, so we'll put you on the agenda for Tuesday and you can update us on that project.

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

I look forward to it. [Translation]

The Chair:

You can now have the floor for your presentation.[English]

We look forward to hearing your views on this exciting initiative.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Thank you, Mr. Chair and honourable members of the committee.

I am pleased to be here today to talk about parallel debating chambers. I understand that the former clerk of the United Kingdom House of Commons, my good friend Sir David Natzler, who retired recently, as you know, has also appeared to discuss that legislature's experience with its parallel chamber, Westminster Hall.

I would like to begin by reminding the committee of an updated briefing note that was initially submitted in 2016 during your study of initiatives towards a family-friendly House of Commons. This updated note was sent to you a few weeks ago, and I hope the information it offers will be helpful as you discuss the possibility of establishing a parallel debating chamber. [Translation]

My presentation today is intended as an open discussion on establishing a second debating chamber parallel to the House of Commons, and on the implications for our practices and procedures. I would like to share a few thoughts on the issues being studied by the committee.

The work of the House is governed by practices and rules of procedure that structure each sitting, from government orders and private members' business to routine proceedings. These rules also apply to the House of Commons calendar, voting and many other areas.[English]

Changes in House practices have often been influenced by the needs of members themselves. Major procedural reforms are often the result of a consensus among MPs.

Establishing a second chamber could open up some interesting opportunities for members, and I encourage you to study innovative recommendations and proposed options that, as Mr. Natzler explains so well in his testimony, could be new, unexpected and different from the operations of the House.

It is up to you, as a committee, to determine the scope of your study and the recommendations you wish to make. It will then be the responsibility of the entire House to decide whether to proceed with this reform.

Australia and the United Kingdom offer starting points for a look at how our own House of Commons could introduce a parallel chamber. Some elements could be copied and applied to our legislature. Others may not be as easy to apply since our practices and procedures differ in many respects from those of our counterparts. It is therefore a good idea to analyze how parallel chambers function elsewhere, but still take into account our own rules and way of doing things. [Translation]

And so, if your committee intends to recommend a parallel chamber, you must determine how it will operate. This involves such issues as where the chamber would sit, what limitations would be placed on its activities and what decisions it could take.

There are many, more specific questions to be answered as well. In terms of logistics, where would members want this new chamber to be housed? How would the chamber be laid out? Would members debate face to face as they do in the House of Commons or would the room be arranged in a hemicycle?[English]

The committee might also address some important questions concerning the debates themselves. For example, how would the work of the House, such as bills, the business of supply, and private members' business, be managed? Would the parallel chamber be empowered to make decisions? Similarly, what would be the quorum requirement? Would members be able to move motions and amendments during debates in the parallel chamber? How would the two chambers be allowed to communicate to ensure continuity in proceedings? What rules of debate would apply? Would they be similar to the rules of the House or more like those used in committee? What would be the hours of sitting for the parallel chamber? What would happen if there were a sitting in the second chamber and the bells rang for a vote in the House of Commons, or if it were time for oral questions or other activities that required all MPs to be present in the House?

These are a few of the procedural matters that the committee will want to consider. As you discuss these questions and their answers, you may find that they give rise to other complex issues.[Translation]

And so, while I encourage the committee to pursue your study and report back to the House, I am tempted to recommend, if I may, that you use this report as a springboard and a starting point for the debate on procedure at the beginning of the next parliament. Your report would serve as a benchmark and its recommendations would be food for thought in the debate pursuant to Standing Order 51.

As always, your committee is the master of its own proceedings and is solely responsible for deciding on the next steps to take. If your committee, and subsequently the House, decides to proceed with a parallel chamber, it goes without saying that the administration, my procedural team and I will be pleased to provide our support. We will be ready to act on your recommendations and provide you with all the resources necessary to implement them.

I would be happy to answer any questions you may have.

(1110)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Clerk.[English]

I'd like to welcome Linda Duncan and Scot Davidson to the procedure and House affairs committee. I know everyone wants to be here, so you've drawn the lucky straws today.

While the boss is here, Mr. Clerk, I think the committee would agree that we'd like to thank you for providing us with the best clerk in the House of Commons for our committee.

Mr. Charles Robert: I don't know how long you'll keep him. [Translation]

The Chair:

We'll move to questions.

Mr. Simms, go ahead. [English]

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I am the second Scott—any more Scotts and we'd have a country.

Mr. Robert, first of all, it's a pleasure to have you here, sir. We spoke to the clerk in the U.K. He speaks highly of you.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Does he?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, he does. I guess you've probably already figured that out, but I thought I'd let you know.

I really liked your presentation here, and I'll tell you why. It's not in generalities as to how this could work or may not work or what have you; you've made some specific recommendations here that I like. You end off your report “would serve as a benchmark and its recommendations would be food for thought in the debate pursuant to Standing Order 51.” I'm putting that out there, because I think it should be a part of our report. Again, these are my opinions.

I want to go back to something else that you pointed out. It seems to me that the best advice we can get from you is along the lines of what's feasible and what's not feasible. I have a few opinions about a parallel chamber. I enjoy the makeup and characteristics of what is in Australia. I enjoy the makeup and characteristics of what is in the U.K. They seem to be working in different spheres as to how they operate.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Right.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I have a very specific question.

Given the fact that we don't have programming, although interestingly enough, the Senate seems to be delving into some type of program that I haven't fully read about yet, but they're doing something.... However, when it comes to programming of bills, they tend to go on for some time and then they get guillotined, as the members of Parliament in the U.K. would say. In the absence of that, would a parallel chamber serve as a way of allowing more parliamentarians to debate any particular bill that is in front of us?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, I think it really would depend on what kind of responsibility or role you want the parallel chamber to play. The answer is yes, if that's what you want the parallel chamber to do. There would be no reason why.... My understanding of the programming motions in the United Kingdom, which have been in place since about 1998 or 1999—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Since 1999, yes.

Mr. Charles Robert:

—is that they obviate the need for time allocation or the guillotine, because they basically spell out the time that you will have to debate the bill at this stage or that stage, so it's fairly comprehensive in its intent. It is, properly speaking, as the term suggests, a programming motion.

The suggestion that you are raising, if I understand it correctly, is that you would like to use the parallel chamber as an opportunity to allow for additional debate, presumably within the stage the bill is at.

(1115)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Government business tends to be focused on one or two items per sitting. You could select, by some kind of arrangement with the government and the opposition parties, to allow for a third debate to take place that would create more opportunities for the members to participate and express their views on a bill that has already been initiated in the House and can now be discussed further in the parallel chamber while you're still discussing other government items in the main chamber.

It's not impossible to do. In fact, it might be regarded as a beneficial purpose of having the parallel chamber.

Mr. Scott Simms:

To me, that supplements the legislation that we're currently doing, which is primarily government legislation. Now, if I'm correct, what I take from the U.K. model is that it's more of a supplement of backbenchers and their business in bringing forward other items such as emergency debates and petition debates, which is rather new, but it supplements the members to do their work in other areas, if need be.

Mr. Charles Robert:

That seems to be the way it's modelled, yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It's exclusively focused on that, if I'm not mistaken.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes, but there's no reason why this House has to restrict it to that kind of role.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Ah, see, you're good. You anticipated my question. Can we combine both?

Mr. Charles Robert:

You can do as much as you like.

Mr. Scott Simms:

My goodness. This is all I had. Just kidding.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Another thing might be useful. At Westminster they have the committee of chairs, the liaison committee, the backbench committee and other vehicles that are not yet established here and may never be established here.

Since, for example, you have a subcommittee that deals with private members' business, if you really wanted to be bold, you could take on the responsibility or suggest that you, as the procedure committee, would be prepared to assist in setting the agenda of the parallel chamber.

I'm just throwing that out there for your consideration.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's why you're here, because you're just throwing way too much out there. That's a good thing.

Do you think, if the parallel chamber was to run not in the same calendar days, that would affect the functions of this House? Let's say there's a constituency week and you have—

Mr. Charles Robert:

The sour faces already give me your answer.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh, I'm sorry, did I ruin someone's vacation?

Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NDP):

Vacation in constituency week?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Would that be a possibility? Do other jurisdictions do that, would you know?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I don't think they do, quite frankly. Well, the two models that we have are Australia and Westminster, and I don't think they do.

I think really what you might want to do is to consider hours when the parallel committee could sit that still respect the family-friendly intent of more recent reforms and do not interfere with the general highlight of each sitting day, which is—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Like a Friday.

Mr. Charles Robert:

You could do it earlier in the day. You couldn't do it on a Wednesday because of caucus, but you could either do it earlier in the day or in a sort of, let's call it a slack period, if you identify it as such, in the middle of a sitting day.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see what you mean. Okay.

The Chair:

Sorry.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What? Oh, I feel like I've just begun.

Thank you.

The Chair:

You had, but you've also just finished.

Before we go to Mr. Reid, so the new members know, we have a pile of documents explaining how it works in Australia and Britain.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

I have some.

The Chair:

You have some of those. Okay, great.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

First of all, thank you very much for being here. I always appreciate your very scholarly attitude.

I'd remind you of the promise that I extracted from you some time ago with respect to being an effective clerk: You have to commit yourself to a long period of service.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In order that we can benefit from that experience.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I expect to be known as the old man of the Hill in some years.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's right. You and Ralph Goodale can battle that one out.

I did want to ask this. We keep on mentioning the U.K. and Australia, for obvious reasons. Obviously, Westminster is the most prestigious of all parliamentary systems, the most mature. Australia is a clear parallel to Canada, a mature, bicameral, federalized democracy. To your knowledge, are they the only parliaments that have parallel chambers? Is there anything else out there? I don't know of any but maybe you do.

(1120)

Mr. Charles Robert:

In terms of continental parliaments, I'm not aware of anything similar, either in the National Assembly in Paris or in the Bundestag in Berlin. I was in Rome for a Speakers conference some years ago. It was not raised, so I'm not really sure that there are other places. I think it depends on the kind of legislative format they follow, the range of powers they give to their members and what they expect of them.

I think here in Canada, based on the Westminster model, there is a very strong legislative component to the role of the members. In more recent years, members have identified themselves as advocates for their constituencies. Constituency responsibilities have become far more important than they were 150 years ago, when they virtually didn't exist.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Mr. Charles Robert:

We do see an evolution and a change in the role played by members. Now the question really is: How do you balance the different obligations and responsibilities that you have accepted as part of your role? We know, for example, that legislation is not becoming any simpler. It's becoming more complex. Omnibus bills—or "ominous bills", if you like—are increasingly becoming the model for legislation. That's going to create challenges in terms of how you effectively address them.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My impression, if I might say, on the subject of omnibus bills...I hadn't meant to bring this up, but looking at it.... I have an interest in the issue of administrative law. I'm an editor of the Administrative Law Review out of Washington, D.C. It's clear that administrative law and the need for administrative tribunals arise with the complexity of the regulatory state, which has exploded over the course of the 20th century. As far as I can see, it is unlikely to slow down in the 21st century. I think it is simply in the nature of an increasingly complex society with more interactions.

That being said, I think omnibus bills are a reflection of the practical fact that it's hard to get the larger number of bills we need through our legislative process in the requisite time. This is compared to the situation a century ago, let alone a century and a half, when the Fathers of Confederation were designing it.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Okay, but let's use that as an opportunity to figure out how it can be addressed more effectively. I know that when omnibus bills arrive in the Senate, they adopt a motion after second reading to actually divide the bill to go to separate committees—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Mr. Charles Robert:

—with one committee having mastery of the entire bill. Then they submit bits and pieces to it.

If you had a parallel chamber, you could devise the Standing Orders to allow specific portions of the omnibus bill to be debated in a parallel chamber. This means you could have focused debate, if that's what you feel would be useful.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You could also say that the parallel chamber is the place where bills get sent to serve that parallel Senate purpose of dividing up the bill into its appropriate sections. That would effectively be managed through some kind of House leader and opposition House leader teams within.... Is that a possibility?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Everything is a possibility.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Fair enough.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think it depends really on how the House as a collectivity decides on the best way to manage the increasingly complex business that the House is confronted with.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. In all fairness, though, what we've just described is not parallel. Not that the U.K. or Australia—

Mr. Charles Robert:

No. Well, why can't Canada be an innovator?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We could be. I just want to be clear that we're now talking about an innovation, as opposed to an emulation of an esteemed predecessor.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The other thing that strikes me about the increasing complexity of our society, and the increasing sophistication of the legislators who come here—which may not mean they're more sophisticated people than our predecessors a century ago; it may only mean that we have larger teams working for us, constituency offices, greater ability to access Library of Parliament resources and so on—is that there's more private members' business and it is more meaningful. Even in the 19 years I've been here, I've seen a significant move in that direction. To me, that could potentially serve as a venue for dealing with the multiplicity of issues that are not part of the government agenda or of various opposition party agendas, and yet are of importance, and not always on a local level; they can be issues that have national importance but are very specific.

Having said that, I feel very strongly that one of the problems we have is we are unable to get enough private members' business through the bottleneck. As a reasonable target, I would suggest that we ought to be trying to ensure that every member has a reasonable chance, wherever in the hierarchy or lottery he or she comes out, to present a bill to the House and to expect that it can make its way through the various readings and be sent off to the Senate in time to make it through that body. We can only do this if we increase the amount of time devoted to such bills. Inevitably, that would mean moving that business to a parallel chamber. Alternatively, we could sit all night in the House of Commons to deal with private members' business, but this seems a more humane and practical way of doing it.

(1125)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was going to ask for a comment, but I'm out of time. Maybe you'll work that into your responses to Mr. Graham's or Ms. Duncan's questions.

The Chair:

You can make a comment, if you want.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, I think depending on what you regard as your priorities and what you want to achieve, it can certainly become an aspect of the role you would assign to the parallel chamber.

The Chair:

Ms. Duncan.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Thank you very much.

It's my first time at this committee. I always wondered what PROC gets up to. I have to say, I'm shaking my head at this one. I'm wondering if we can have some of the members of Samara actually follow a member of Parliament one day, and see that we don't have a second in the day to do something additional. A parallel chamber, I'm like....

I have lots of questions about this. You make a good point with omnibus bills, but time after time, the opposition asks for those to be separated, to go to the appropriate places, which are the relevant standing committees, and we don't get that. That would be my preference, rather than going to some nefarious room that isn't taken as seriously.

I think there are many things that could be done to make this place more democratic, and to not only give more opportunities to the elected members, but to the public, scientists and experts to come in and testify, so that we can hear their opinions.

The big question I would raise is that I think a lot of people would think this sounds exciting, because we're actually finally going to have debates. We don't really have debates in this place. One person speaks, and then another person speaks and another person may get to speak. I think that if there were a mechanism, not necessarily another House, but if there were time set aside each year, where we were generally going to have debates, then there could be agreement on the topics of the day.

Say, for example, we have a genuine debate about how we're going to resolve pharmacare. It's not just people giving speeches; you actually have an interesting debate, and maybe panels of experts.

I looked at these other two parallel chambers and in some cases, it seems like those are exactly the things we do in the House. I'm wondering why we need a parallel chamber. My biggest bone of contention is with majority governments. What guarantee is there in this second chamber that it's not all going to be taken up by majority government members? Who's going to decide who gets more time to debate? Big issues like that need to be discussed.

What's the intent of this? Is it to give opportunity for those who aren't getting a fair chance to speak the chance to speak? We have the frustration right now where many can't even table their private member's bill because of procedural actions by the government of the day.

I'm wondering if you've discussed those kinds of issues with these other two jurisdictions about whether they have dealt with some of these issues, and where they think this second chamber helps any of those issues.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I have not discussed with either Westminster or Canberra how they manage their business. I'm a bit familiar with some of the culture.

I would suggest to you that Westminster with its 650 members and a thousand years of history may be bound by certain traditions and behaviours that are expected and that are different from our own.

Australia has a somewhat newer Parliament. Even though it has a close history to Canada's in its development, it is a highly partisan chamber, where party discipline is very strongly enforced. I would see that its behaviour is probably closer to what you have just mentioned.

(1130)

Ms. Linda Duncan:

What happens in the second chamber?

Mr. Charles Robert:

In the second chamber, as you see, they deal basically with what I think Mr. Simms, Mr. Graham and Mr. Reid would admit are somewhat less substantial issues. That's because it's perhaps, in an environment of party discipline, a safer option. Nonetheless, it's releasing a pressure valve that is giving opportunities for members to raise issues that they still feel are important. From that point of view, then, Canberra may be satisfied that this is an effective option to implement to allow members some opportunities to focus on what really is of interest to them.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Other than having to find another chamber, which is already a challenge around here with Centre Block closed—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Just consider it basically another committee.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Our caucus can't even meet over there anymore because there's no room for it, so I don't know how we're going to have another chamber. However, in addition to another chamber, we're going to need clerks and interpreters. There's increasing pressure that we would have indigenous interpreters.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

I think, then, that in any consideration of this, we're going to have to think about the whole ball of wax of what it would cost to deliver this.

Mr. Charles Robert:

All of that, I think, would be factored in. I think there is some flexibility, and it would really depend on the model you choose to propose. If the parallel chamber meets five days a week and a good number of hours, yes, you're probably right. However, if it only meets a few hours—like another committee, let's say—I'm not sure that the impact will be as considerable as you might fear.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

I think the family-friendly aspect is going to be a big issue. I think one of those meets at 4:30 in the afternoon. I don't think there will be a lot of favour for that.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I might tell you that in the good old days—and we are really talking about the good old days—the House of Commons at Westminster would meet at seven o'clock in the morning. The funniest part was that they adjourned when they refused to adopt the motion to bring in the candles.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Well, we don't want any candles in here. We already lost one House of Commons.

I think the key to it, as well—if you would even consider it—would be that we're going to have to completely change who gets to set the agenda and who gets to choose what is being debated that day. Right now in our committees, the majority government members decide all of that. If we really want to provide an additional opportunity for other members to participate, those kinds of things are really going to have to be democratized, I would suspect. I think there have been a lot of proposals to try to better democratize the House proceedings as they are, and my suggestion would be to maybe work on that first before we start inventing another chamber.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Duncan.

Now I am going to more flexible open questioning, so anyone who has questions can ask them.

We'll start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'm going to build a little on some of the things that were said earlier.

There is a certain frustration around here about how some of the PMBs we do are quite weak. We have a day, a week or a month for absolutely everything now, which is cool, but I think PMBs have a lot more potential than that. I see the opportunity of a secondary debating chamber as one that can really empower PMBs to have a purpose again, I think, and make PMBs important again.

So—

Mr. Scott Reid:

We'll just have one for everybody, as opposed to the lottery winners.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right, and it would be nice to change the PMB selection process to, at the very least—and I've put this motion once—survive. It would fix the slightly ridiculous problem of somebody who has been here for five mandates and has never had a PMB and somebody who comes here on the first day and gets a PMB.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Agreed.

An hon. member: Have you ever had one?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm off the list. I'm at about 10 years from now to get mine.

Mr. Scott Simms:

One in 15 years.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

In terms of the structure of a secondary debating team, which I think is a really good idea, you're talking about having to decide the rules. What would be a model to start with from your point of view? Would it be committee of the whole with autopilot-type rules so that the committee would rise the moment bells happen and be suspended like this committee is? Is it somewhere between the House and a committee?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think a committee of the whole would perhaps be a useful model to look at, and then using that as your template, as you drill down into decisions about what you really want the parallel chamber to do, then you can start and say, “Okay, there are rules here.” You can select. There are some jurisdictions that have another way of handling business that you might think would be useful. This is an opportunity for you to be experimental.

I would suggest to you as one possibility that if you didn't allow votes in the parallel chamber because you really wanted to promote debate, the opportunity to be flexible about whether or not you think the government has to have control may be less of a factor.

(1135)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think the purpose of parallel debating chamber is, to use computer lingo, to multithread the environment. When you have a computer that can do two things at once, you call it multithreading, so you're having the things offloaded to another process, or the other House, to deal with a particular problem. The private members' bills would come to the secondary debating chamber and go back to the House for the vote. I think that makes a lot of sense. I don't see any reason to vote in the secondary debating chamber at any time, not even unanimous consent. I don't think that should be permitted there.

I have another question for you. Is there any reason the secondary debating chamber has to be a physical chamber, or could we think of a virtual chamber?

Mr. Charles Robert:

That would be a serious innovation that I think you'd have to consider carefully. The rules right now, for example, require a physical presence.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If it's an autopilot with no quorum and no votes and no UC, then it sort of becomes moot. If somebody wants to use it the way, for example, the late show works, where one person speaks and one person responds, and nobody else has to be there, if that's—

Mr. Charles Robert:

The one factor that might come into play would be if you establish a quorum, and how small you would want it to be or how big. I suspect, and it's one way of looking at it, that if you make it too small, you reduce its importance. It might be convenient in terms of advancing debate, but if you're basically debating into a mirror, I'm not sure how meaningful that is.

An hon. member: He does it all the time.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's arguable that sometimes debates into a mirror do happen, but there happen to be 337 people watching the mirror. I'm not sure that necessarily flows.

Anyhow, I do have another question. I'll come back to that later if I get another chance.

If we have a debating chamber, should it have a name that represents it and what it does?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Sure, I think that would be a great idea.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. For me the ultimate purpose of a secondary debating chamber is to take back control of some aspects of this to the backbench. I'll propose a name for you, and I've told Scott this before—Scott and Scott. I would propose to name it the William Lenthall chamber to recall that the last time the executive tried to interfere, they lost their heads, so it would be the backbench chamber.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's comforting.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Charles Robert:

All right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll put that out there.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Mr. Lenthall never lost his head, by the way. He died an old man in his eighties.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, but he is the one who protected the independence of the House—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—and so I think if there's a name that recalls why we have this chamber, and anybody coming in—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Or you might call it the King Charles I chamber, then.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That would be the result if it fails.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

After you, of course.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid and then Mr. Davidson.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually had a question on the subject.

I personally am not married to the idea of any particular name—I know there's been a lively discussion about this—nor to the specific location it goes in. In the long run, I agree that you'd want to find a suitable location. To some degree the way it evolves would indicate what location is suitable, I would think, so we would learn that. As a practical matter, we are in no position to pick a permanent location now, given the fact that we ourselves are not in a permanent location in the main chamber. I just offer those things. I feel the same with regard to the name. That may, I think, evolve with time.

Having said all of that, the question that arises for me is this. Let us say, for the sake of argument, that we were to do as you've suggested, debate this in the Standing Order 51 debate that would arise 60 to 90 days after the beginning of the 43rd Parliament. Let's imagine, for the sake or argument, that at some point in the life of the 43rd Parliament it comes into existence. These are not guaranteed things, but they're reasonable speculations. Then, let us say, we came to the Clerk and said, “It looks like it's going ahead. What room would you suggest?”

What room would you suggest?

(1140)

Mr. Charles Robert:

I assume that in the discussion about the parallel chamber, there would be some reference to the expected size or the rate of participation by the members, and I think that will help to determine which room would be suitable. If you really go massive and you really want to have something that would be meeting frequently, let's just toss this out—SJAM. If you wanted something smaller—

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's the Sir John A. Macdonald Building across the street.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes, sorry. If you wanted something—

Mr. Scott Reid:

That was for those watching us and listening in, eagerly, on the recorded version.

Mr. Charles Robert:

If you anticipated that it would be something considerably smaller, then one of the larger committee rooms might be fitted out for that purpose.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. In practice, I think it would have to be a dedicated room, so if you're trying to keep it in this building, which you might want to do in order to allow it, for example, when the bells ring, to go a certain number of minutes into the bells ringing, you could have a special order for that.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You can see what I'm getting at.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Then you have an issue with the number of rooms. Using the Sir John A. Macdonald Building resolves that issue of having a dedicated room, but you also need more time. I can see it being interrupted in a way that would throw its business off when we have the bells ringing all the time, as we sometimes do, more than it would throw off a normal committee.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Let's say that becomes the reality. You could put in place that when any vote is called in the chamber, if it coincides with a schedule of the parallel chamber, the division bells would have to ring for, let's say, an extra 10 minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Mr. Charles Robert:

There are ways that you can make adjustments that recognize the reality of creating the second chamber.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right. I agree.

The Chair:

Scott, just to help on that question, the researchers are going to present to us the number of physical seats in the other two chambers plus the average attendance, so we'll know what they use.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's very helpful.

The Chair:

It's quite small, actually.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I believe it.

Thank you.

The Chair:

The quorum is three.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well—

The Chair:

Scot.

Mr. Scot Davidson (York—Simcoe, CPC):

Through you, Mr. Chair, just because I'm the new guy, obviously, I have a couple of questions.

Based on the system they have in Australia and the U.K., and how they've set up their rules, did they have a cost structure they could present to you?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I've not seen anything relating to that.

Mr. Scot Davidson:

I just wondered the cost to the taxpayers.

Also, the current chamber that we're in, couldn't we change, as some members were saying, the current structure of that and have a debate session currently? If someone said, in the new chamber, we'll schedule something at eight o'clock in the morning, people say that they don't have the time for that right now.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's possible. If you schedule the parallel chamber to meet out of times of the primary chamber, it would not be impossible. But that's what you would have to do. It would have to be quite a deliberate process.

Mr. Scot Davidson:

Go ahead.

The Chair:

Linda.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

I think that the House leaders and the whips are important people to include in this discussion about what the possibilities and the implications are. I know they're challenged enough as it is making sure people show up to fill spots in committee, show up to a vote and be in the chamber to support people when they're speaking and so forth. It would probably be good to hear from them about what complications there might be for them or how we could take that into consideration.

I am deeply concerned about any proposal about spending more when we already have commitments, for example, to be coming up with the dollars to provide interpretation for indigenous and we're not doing that. For example, the committee I just came from agreed for the first time to translate their report into four languages. I think that these kinds of things are going to increase in cost. We need to be thinking about the commitments we've already made in the House of Commons and through committees before we start adding on and then ratcheting back.

Those kinds of factors are really important to look at. When we're looking at interpretation, we're now looking at more complications on things like that. I think costing clearly will be a big one that probably various leaders will ask for—certainly the Speaker's office and so forth.

Who is going to decide the agenda and what debates will occur? Is it going to be different from the way it is right now, which is essentially the majority of members at every committee? Different committees operate more convivially than others. Is this chamber going to be different, particularly if David is saying that it should give more opportunity to the backbenchers? There's a heck of a lot more backbenchers in the majority Liberal government right now than there was in the Conservative majority government.

Those kinds of things.... You'll have more enthusiasm in the members of Parliament if they think that is generally going to give them an opportunity to be debating.

This idea is coming, as I understand, from Samara. They did that report on the frustrations former members of Parliament had with democracy and so forth. Part of it, too, is that the public wants to hear more of what the various parties and members of Parliament think. I haven't really heard anybody talk about the role of the great unwashed public in this.

Is that room going to have to allow for substantial audiences? That is another issue because they can come and sit in on our debates in the House. They'll probably want to sit in on some of these debates, particularly if they recommend them.

(1145)

The Chair:

Madam Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for joining us today, Mr. Robert.

You piqued my curiosity earlier. I agree with Ms. Duncan that we don't have two minutes to ourselves. We start here in the morning and we never know when we finish. I was fortunate to sit in the National Assembly of Quebec, and I thought I was working hard there. We sat for three days, from noon to 2 p.m., and then we would stop. We did not eat at a committee table like we are here. We would really stop. Everything was in French. We would finish at 6:30 p.m. and sit for three days.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Very civilized.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I would say that the speeches are not always of higher quality. When I first came here, the first thing that came to mind was whether we were going to eat. I was hungry. No more jokes now. The legislative agenda was still moving forward.

We are talking about Australia and Great Britain. If I understood your comments correctly, countries that do not follow the Commonwealth or British model have not adopted a parallel chambers approach.

You also said that it is time to be innovative and that anything can be proposed.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Absolutely. It depends on the will of this committee. You may decide to establish a parallel chamber, but with certain objectives. It is really up to you to determine what sort of parallel chamber you want. You can determine the hours of work based on the availability of MPs, which, as you said, is very limited.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

At the beginning of your presentation, you mentioned the 2016 briefing note on initiatives toward a family-friendly House of Commons. That's what you mentioned. You said that the way MPs represent their constituents has changed a little.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

There is that, but there is also the fact that the family roles of men and women have changed and evolved since the House of Commons was created. The rules have not been updated and this will need to be addressed.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Of course, we can propose amendments to improve the situation of members of Parliament with respect to their family life. The House has already started working on that.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

We'll have to do more, because our voting marathons are not very healthy, in my opinion.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's better than adjourning after midnight.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The National Assembly of Quebec does not sit later than midnight. They continue the next day.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Normally, the House adjourns at about 8 p.m.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Normally, until—

Mr. Charles Robert:

This decision was made to facilitate family life for all members of Parliament.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

We have no family life if we finish at midnight.

You said you've been here for a long time. I know you were in the Senate before, but how long have you been here?

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's been almost 40 years.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Forty years. You started out young.

Mr. Charles Robert:

If you say so.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

To summarize, we will have to decide what our objectives are.

Thank you.

(1150)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I just want to make a comment and then maybe get a comment from the Clerk.

Ms. Duncan asked what the role of the public would be in this chamber. Previously we had been talking a little bit about petitions. I believe the U.K. parallel chamber deals quite a lot with public petitions and then they're able to debate those issues.

Mr. Charles Robert:

That's correct.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oftentimes the petitions we see, the online petitions through petition.org or the ones that come formally to us, are on the burning issues of the public. If this chamber could accommodate a lot of seating, or if through television the public could see that their issues were being debated, rather than just everyday government or now and then a private member's bill, I think that would really involve and connect the public a little bit more to what we are doing.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I wonder if you have any comments on that or suggestions as to how much of this parallel chamber should be dedicated to something like that, or whether it's really not important.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I believe it really depends on how and whether you as parliamentarians think it's important. The parallel chamber is being designed to accommodate—let's be bolder about it—the frustration you may feel in your life as a parliamentarian and what would help to validate and address the challenges you have as parliamentarians.

If you feel that petitions are important, that they are an expression of a democratic interest in various topics, then allowing some time in a parallel chamber to debate those petitions that meet a certain threshold of support would be useful.

As we mentioned earlier, how you would handle debate on complex legislation, how you could have a parallel debate that would give members a greater opportunity to participate in what they believe to be important legislation when they have a point of view to express—this is also a way the parallel chamber could provide some assistance to alleviate that sense of frustration that members may feel.

We sit 100 or 135 days in a good year. We sit during fixed hours. There is a lot of stuff to be done in a short amount of time. If the legislation is becoming increasingly complex, as it appears to be, then how do you want to manage that?

The government is not going to become smaller. It's not going to become simpler. Legislation is not likely to be as easy as it was a few years ago, or many years ago, when a bill 10 pages long was a big bill. In the 19th century, most of the legislation considered by Parliament was private. It was not government. Government was too small to actually involve itself in a tremendous amount of legislation. That was also one of the reasons that sessions were relatively short. I think in one case we had four sessions in one year, and that means four Speeches from the Throne.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'd like to address something mentioned earlier, the whip situation. I don't think you do this in a vacuum unto itself and exclude the whips. In my humble opinion, I think you create something here that avoids the pitfalls through which a whip can get in trouble, as it were. So the whip has to make sure the votes are there, the people are there for the votes, the legislation is moving through. I'd say whip and government House leader as well, of course.

I don't think the parallel chamber should be something that interferes with their function in any way, shape or form. If we're doing government legislation of the day in the parallel chamber so that other people get to speak, then if I don't get a chance to do it in West Block or in the House of Commons, I will get a chance to speak on this issue in the parallel chamber. But again, that would still be subservient to the House of Commons proceedings.

I champion the cause for backbenchers, but I wouldn't want to take away the essential functions of the whip or the House leader for reasons that are obvious.

By the way, somebody else brought up votes and the marathon votes and that sort of thing. Well, that's something we also have to look at. That's something entirely different. I've told this story before and I'll tell it again. I had three or four members of the European Parliament come over to witness question period. Following question period, there was a vote. This one individual—I forget her name now, but she's been in the European Parliament for almost two decades—said, “It was a fascinating experience. I like your question period, because the questions are limited to 35 seconds.” I told her why and she said, “Well, it's very exciting. You debate like it's the 21st century, but why do you still vote like it's the 19th century?” That's true, because of electronic voting, but that's a whole other issue. I thought I'd just throw that in there.

When it comes to the parallel chamber, though, what about the idea of witnesses? One of the advantages we have here with committees, including committee of the whole, is that we're able.... As a former chair of the fisheries committee, I can talk about what experience fishermen go through on a daily basis, but when I have a witness from Toogood Arm—that exists, by the way; it's a town—who comes in and says, “This is what's actually going on in the ocean right now,” that is a huge advantage. They can come in and give us the most vital experience, such as we're going to see with Samara next. They know what they're talking about.

(1155)

Mr. Charles Robert:

Right.

Mr. Scott Simms:

In these parallel chambers, is there a way we can include witness testimony?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think it becomes really like a committee of the whole.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's true, but do we have to stick to the confines of the committee of the whole?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I don't think you have to stick to anything.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think this is a committee or a parallel chamber that you can design to suit your needs—21st century or 18th century; take your pick.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It can serve to be useful to the work of Parliament. If that's your objective, then however you see that being useful, that can be a model that you can build.

Let's say you want to allow for witnesses. Well, you could establish a parallel chamber and there would be a mechanism that would make it clear that on such and such a day, witnesses will be invited to participate as.... In Britain, there are lay members of committee. Well, okay, let them be lay participants in the parallel chamber.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sorry, but what's a lay member?

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's a non-parliamentarian.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's someone who can be an element of a committee composition in the United Kingdom. I think it's the one on standards. But there is such a thing as a lay member.

Mr. Scott Simms:

All right.

Mr. Charles Robert:

So, if you want to advance a perspective, with respect to the parallel chamber that is truly innovative, then allow lay members.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that something that is a convention, the lay membership, or is that actually written into the Standing Orders of Westminster?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I would have to know how it was designed. I think it was done basically around 2008, when they realized that for purposes of transparency and accountability, having exclusively members involved in looking after codes of conduct and issues of that sort.... Having lay members would give greater credibility to the system.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That is interesting. Maybe we could ask our analysts to take a peek at that and get back to us on that issue.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Scott.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I just have a couple of quick comments in terms of the structure of the place. It occurred to me when we were talking that there's nothing preventing—we're open to anything—the secondary debating chamber from being a joint chamber with the Senate, making it the secondary debating chamber for both Houses together.

That would have its own agenda—

Ms. Linda Duncan:

I'd have to talk to my party about that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Aren't we trying to keep parties out of this? Isn't that what you said?

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Well....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would see it as a place for emergency and take-note debates, PMBs, petitions and privilege debates, which could go as long as they wanted to, with the primary chamber only being government legislation, opposition days and all of the votes. That's the structure I'd see, but having a joint secondary committee.... If PMBs go there, then that whole huge delay of PMBs at the Senate may be fixable as well.

You were the Senate Clerk for a long time.

(1200)

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Perhaps you have some insight into that.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think, again, the opportunity for you to be as inventive as you want is limited only by your imagination.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have an imagination.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Well, set goals that you think are structured in a way that your imagination and those goals harmonize. If you think, for example, that it might be useful to have some sort of association with the Senate, then that's an option.

Dealing with private member's business, let's say that as long as a bill reached a certain stage, either in the House or in the Senate, proving that it had at least a level of acceptability, then you can in those circumstances, rather than allow the bill to go to committee for a study, let it go to the parallel committee composed of members of both Houses, and that can be used as a way to advance the consideration of that bill in whatever second chamber is to be studying the bill after it passes the House.

That record of deliberation could be, in some fashion or another, taken into account when it goes to the second House for deliberation. There's a possibility.

The Chair:

Be quick, because we've almost finished.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I was just going to make one comment.

Maybe that's one of the things we could do. For example, there's the case that you can refer a bill to committee before second reading. That way you could just open up the bill to many more amendments. What you could do is send it to the parallel chamber, if that be the case.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's something you'd have to study to make sure you have all of the mechanics properly spelled out and understood, so that option becomes.... But, as Ms. Duncan points out, the witnesses would be your lay members.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's in the second chamber.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

They're not necessarily appropriate witnesses.

Mr. Charles Robert:

But they're not—

Ms. Linda Duncan:

They would become the—

Mr. Charles Robert:

The lay members would not necessarily be permanent.

The Chair:

Thank you for the fascinating discussion.

We already do have two committees where the Senate's involved. It's not impossible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's not necessarily the best model for what I want to do.

The Chair:

I have one last question, which I assume I know the answer to, but because you said anything's open to our Parliament to decide, as far as you know, anything that's presently done in the U.K. or Australia, in our imagining of another body, we could do legally if we made the appropriate changes to the Standing Orders. Is that right?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think there are political considerations that come into any review of what is possible, and that's what you have to decide, but I believe Mr. Reid mentioned this issue of programming motions. They have existed in the United Kingdom for the last 20 years. They were deeply resisted when they were first introduced, and now they're taken to be part of the daily routine of the life of a member. I would assume that introducing such a measure would be difficult. It would be challenged because it would be seen as a way to further limit the role of MPs. That is a matter of very, very serious negotiation, and it may very well be that a counterpart to that might be something like establishing a parallel chamber.

That might be the quid pro quo, if you like.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for coming, Mr. Clerk.

I'm certain this won't be the last time we have discussions on this. We started this a long time ago. This committee started debate on this when we were on our first family-friendly discussion, as you said. We started this debate, and I don't think it's going to end now, so I'm sure we'll see you again. We appreciate your wise counsel.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Thank you very much for the opportunity to speak to you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have enough clerks to man two chambers?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, I think it depends on the hours. I think that if the parallel chamber is sitting, some committees may not be sitting, so I think we could probably come up with the resources.

The Chair:

Linda. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

How many clerks are on your team?

Mr. Charles Robert:

There are about 90.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay. [English]

The Chair:

Ninety clerks, wow.

That's a good way to end.

We'll suspend for a couple minutes while we change witnesses.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 147th meeting of the committee, as we continue our study on parallel debating chambers.

We are pleased to be joined by representatives of Samara Centre for Democracy. Here today are Michael Morden, research director; and Paul Thomas, senior research associate. Thank you both for being here today.

Members will recall that Samara also submitted a brief to the committee on this subject.

I'll turn over the floor to you, Mr. Morden, for your opening remarks.

Mr. Michael Morden (Research Director, Samara Centre for Democracy):

Thank you very much for the opportunity to address this committee.

My name is Mike Morden. I'm the research director at the Samara Centre for Democracy. Next to me is Dr. Paul E.J. Thomas, our senior research associate.

As you may know, the Samara Centre is an independent, non-partisan charity that is dedicated to strengthening Canadian democracy through research and programming. We want to thank the committee for undertaking this study. Doing so reflects its commitment to stewardship of our Parliament and our democracy by extension. That includes examining issues that are not on any political front burner but deserve consideration because they hold the potential for incremental improvement of our institutions. That's a role we also want to help play.

The Samara Centre supports the creation of a parallel debating chamber. We would also like to encourage the committee to keep the following objectives in mind when designing such a chamber: it advances a clear value proposition by not solely duplicating the business and character of the main chamber; it empowers backbench MPs by providing greater control over the agenda and substance of debates; by doing so, it makes parliamentary debates more relevant and accessible to ordinary Canadians; and it may be used as a platform for experimentation in order to drive improvement to the state of debate in Parliament overall.

As members might have already reviewed the brief that we submitted last month, we would like to save the bulk of our time in order to address questions as best as we are able. I will open just briefly by describing our interest in this proposal. Paul, who is wiser on this subject, and indeed on most things, will then speak about the model of a parallel chamber that we think is best suited to improve the life and work of the Canadian Parliament and to strengthen its ties to citizens.

Since its founding, the Samara Centre has conducted exit interviews with former parliamentarians after they have retired or faced electoral defeat. A central theme of this work is the strong sense among MPs that extensive party control over many facets of parliamentary life hinders their ability to independently advocate on issues and meaningfully influence government policy and legislation. We've always argued that such limitations have important implications for the overall health of our representative democracy.

In our most recent round of interviews, undertaken after the 2015 general election, we were also surprised and troubled to discover just how dismissive former MPs were of parliamentary debates in particular. We took up that theme again last year, when we collaborated with the all-party democracy caucus to survey current MPs. We asked questions of members to assess where they felt more or less empowered to do the work of democratic representation. The strongest finding to us was that debates were the domain of parliamentary work where MPs felt they made the least impact. In fact, two-thirds of MPs who responded were dissatisfied with the state of debate in the House. Just 6% identified debates as an area of parliamentary work where they felt empowered to influence policy or legislation.

We have also observed, as others have, an increase in partisan conflict over time in Parliament, reflected most simply in the recent and sustained spike in the use of time allocation. That conflict reflects the legitimate desire of opposition MPs—and, we would hope, all MPs—to debate and deliberate on government business while also advancing issues independently. It also reflects the legitimate desire of executives of all party stripes to advance government business. That tension will not resolve itself organically, and could conceivably get worse.

Finally, consistent with the views of MPs, our ongoing surveys of ordinary Canadians have repeatedly found the perception that MPs do a better job of reflecting the views of their parties than of their constituents. We want citizens to see themselves more closely reflected in parliamentary debates.

In short, we see four overlapping problems that a parallel chamber could help resolve: one, disempowered MPs who, because of party control, are hampered in their ability to represent their constituents; two, persistent unhappiness with the quality of parliamentary debate, even among MPs; three, a parliamentary time crunch; and four, an enduring disconnect between Canadians and their Parliament.

(1210)

Dr. Paul Thomas (Senior Research Associate, Samara Centre for Democracy):

I will begin, too, by expressing Samara Centre's gratitude for being invited to testify before the committee today. Dr. Morden has already spoken to some of the challenges that we feel are facing the House of Commons, so I will focus my remarks on how a parallel chamber could be designed to help respond to those challenges.

As Deputy Speaker Bruce Stanton described in his remarks to the committee last month, there are two precedents for parallel chambers that could serve as inspiration: the Federation Chamber in the Australian parliament and Westminster Hall at the British Parliament. Both are supplementary chambers, with neither being used for recorded divisions. Both meet only on days when the main chambers are sitting as well.

Australia's Federation Chamber is used for a variety of parliamentary business, such as constituency statements, member statements and debate on uncontentious pieces of legislation. Rather than adding new functions, it serves as what Mr. Stanton called an “adjacent lane” for House business, with most of its functions also occurring to some extent in the parallel chamber. Moreover, decisions regarding what business goes to that chamber are made by the party whips.

In contrast, Westminster Hall proceedings are distinct from those of the main British House of Commons. Westminster Hall is used exclusively for adjournment-style debates, which can be 30, 60 or 90 minutes long, depending on the issue being addressed and the number of members wishing to speak. The debates are selected through four different mechanisms, all of which are driven by backbench members: Individual backbenchers can apply for a debate to the Speaker's office, which holds a ballot of applications once per week. They can apply to the backbench business committee, which is a committee of backbench MPs that schedules a portion of the debating time both in Westminster Hall and in the main chamber itself. The liaison committee, which is made up of the chairs of the various standing committees, can also schedule debates on committee reports. Finally, the petitions committee of the House of Commons can schedule debates on petitions receiving over 100,000 signatures.

However they are chosen, as Sir David Natzler noted when speaking with you, a fundamental characteristic of Westminster Hall debates is that a minister must attend the sessions and respond to the points made. This requirement allows the debates to be much more influential than is possible through member statements.

Importantly, such debates need not be explicitly critical of the government. Indeed, Westminster Hall is regularly used for debates that mark symbolic days, such as Holocaust Memorial Day, World Cancer Day or International Human Rights Day. Such general occasions allow for Parliament to be responsive to the concerns of citizens without being centred on a specific issue at the time.

Although the Federation Chamber has created more opportunities for Australian MPs to raise concerns from their constituents and participate in legislative debates, we believe modelling a new parallel chamber along the lines of Westminster Hall would better respond to the challenges facing the Canadian Parliament.

While it is not possible to exactly duplicate Westminster Hall in the Canadian context, the Samara Centre nevertheless recommends that any Canadian parallel chamber be designed for the benefit of backbench members, with backbench members being able to schedule business independent of party whips; that participation in a parallel chamber similarly be free of control by the party whips, with no lists developed to schedule interventions by members; that much of the debating time in such a chamber be devoted to general debates like those of Westminster Hall, with ministers being required to attend and respond to the points made; that the topics for such debates could be chosen by applications from individual members, the reports of parliamentary committees or petitions from the general public; and finally, that the chamber be a vehicle for further procedural experimentation.

At a time when both citizens and MPs are questioning the value of parliamentary debates, the creation of a parallel chamber devoted to hearing from the diversity of Canadians through their elected representatives could help to empower both Canadians and parliamentarians themselves. It could help make backbench members more central to parliamentary debates, and parliamentary debates more central to political life in Canada.

Thank you very much. We look forward to your questions.

(1215)

The Chair:

Thank you very much for your presentation.

I'll do the same as last time. We'll have one round and then open it up for whoever would like an opportunity.

We'll start with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Dr. Thomas and Mr. Morden, I'm glad you guys are here. Thank you so much. You have done us all a great service in the work you have done, especially in getting to the nub of the issue of what excites us about being here, and at the same time, what frustrates us about being here.

I hate to focus on what frustrates us, but you just have to read my householder to figure out what excites me about being here. Let's talk about what is frustrating.

Here's what you said earlier: Two-thirds of the MPs you surveyed are not satisfied with the debate proceedings as they are now. Is that correct?

Mr. Michael Morden:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's a hell of a number to look at. That's everybody but cabinet, almost, right?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms: That tells us that we're way behind in making this place more accessible, and accessible not only to parliamentarians but the disconnect also between Canadians.... That makes it further worse, this situation that we're in, to try to find a cohesive place, so I'm glad you came here with some actual suggestions, especially when you say the Westminster Hall is preferred. Let me get to that, because we're juxtaposing, for the most part, Westminster Hall and the Federation Chamber, as I think it's called, in Australia.

In Westminster Hall, one of the most popular things for a parallel chamber is the petition aspect. People bring in a petition and it gets a lot of attention from the public. That's one aspect. Is this the type of thing that you see as the best possible route for a parallel chamber?

(1220)

Mr. Michael Morden:

One of the things that struck me in reviewing Sir David Natzler's remarks to committee was his suggestion that something like eight of the 10 most-watched debates in recent years had been debates in Westminster Hall provoked by petitions. It's really kind of astonishing. That's not government business.

I found that actually really encouraging. It's a little bit emboldening as well, because it suggests to me in strong terms that it would still matter to Canadians, in this context, to see their issues debated at Parliament and how that holds value. As the Clerk and others have described, there are a number of different ways to design the parallel chamber, and we do need clarity on what problem we're trying to solve and about—I think reasonable people can disagree—where the balance should be struck.

Ms. Duncan raised in the last session this question of where ordinary citizens come in. We do see something like a petitions mechanism, as well as the opportunity for an ordinary member to approach either the Speaker's office or a backbench business committee to advocate on an issue that they see as holding importance for their constituents. Either a petition or a backbench member, it's either a direct or an indirect mechanism through which citizens can fuel through greater agency what's debated in Parliament. That, to us, strikes us as a particular value proposition for the parallel chamber.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Dr. Thomas.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

If I could add to that, I think one of the major elements of the petition system has been that it's an ongoing relationship with the person who signs. If a debate is selected, they receive a notification of when that debate happens. Signing the petition is not the end of your involvement with the process. You are notified and you're invited to then watch the debate online, which is how they get those viewing numbers. It's a way of having Parliament appear more responsive.

What Sir David told you was actually already inaccurate. The largest petition ever in the Westminster Hall system received six million signatures. It was debated on Monday. In the British practice, it's not a direct relationship between the number of signatures on a petition and then the debate. There's the intermediary body of a committee that can have some editorial control. They grouped one petition against Brexit with another in favour of Brexit and had it be debated in Westminster Hall. They had high traffic.

The other thing I would note is that it allows those members to take part, but the main element is the ministerial response at the end.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Obviously, you can't have hard and fast rules on this. I agree with that, by the way. I wanted to use that as an illustration. To me, that's one that exemplifies what Westminster Hall is about—this petition process—in addition to the other stuff that backbenchers do.

Very quickly then, on the other side of the equation, this is one thing that interests me. With time allocation now being used often here—and more in the last Parliament—if we had a parallel chamber to allow more members to debate government legislation, would that work, in your opinion?

Mr. Michael Morden:

I think it's another route to go. We outlined a few problems we thought a parallel chamber could help to resolve, but the extent to which it's resolved for one problem was coming at the expense of another. We've tried to make the case for at least setting a fair measure of time aside to reflect the practice at Westminster Hall, which isn't resolving the problem of not enough time to debate government business. It's addressing other issues, primarily backbench control, and also this question of how to bring citizens in.

Nevertheless, if the members perceive the greater concern to be not enough time to deliberate on government business, then a parallel chamber could be a mechanism for that as well.

You could also look at other mechanisms like programming motions, which we've never taken a position on but which has been recommended to me by members from all parties as another approach. I believe the Clerk concluded by mentioning that those two could also sort of work in tandem.

(1225)

Mr. Scott Simms:

It could address an issue, but it's not as important as the other aspect of allowing citizens to be more engaged in debate through the Westminster Hall-type system. Is that a safe assumption? Is that what you assume?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

From the research we have, I would say there is a dissatisfaction with the current debates of the House by both MPs and citizens. Having more debates, while perhaps allowing for greater scrutiny, may not necessarily meet the immediate need as compared to having a different type of debate, such as a debate that might more constructively engage with citizens or allow backbenchers more opportunity to raise their concerns.

I think it kind of gets to the question of what Ms. Duncan mentioned, where there was some element of what additional purpose would this serve. Having it be, perhaps, a bit qualitatively different than what goes on would be more of a recommendation at this point.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Simms.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to both our witnesses. Dr. Morden and Dr. Thomas, it's nice to have you here.

I wanted to start by asking about this recent Brexit debate in Westminster Hall. It seems to me that one of the problems arising in the House itself at this point, as the issue is debated and re-debated, is that for reasons that have to do with what's on the agenda and which changing coalition of members—factions, I could almost call them—is in favour of or against different proposals, or the rules on reconsidering an issue that the House has debated before, the debate in the House is being constrained in ways that are perhaps not productive. It would be a very interesting exercise to go through it, from a game theory point of view, as to how the debate has evolved in the Commons.

This raises the issue that there's no longer really a venue in the House itself—or what one might think of as a plenary session—where we're debating the big-picture issue of Brexit itself, as opposed to this or that way out of the current fix the country is in. The fix itself changing on a nearly day-to-day basis. Is that actually what happened in this debate on the e-petitions, that in fact it was possible to go back and reconsider the big-picture issues? That's number one.

Number two is, has this also been a venue for the numerous backbenchers—there are so many of them in the U.K.—who are not in a position to get up and have debates in the Commons itself, to speak and to give those individuals a chance to address Brexit issues?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I must confess that I have not watched the debate in its entirety. My knowledge of it comes largely from the reporting of BBC Radio 4, through the Today in Parliament podcast.

From that report, it did appear to be more of that fundamental discussion of Brexit. It is challenging, I think, at present for the British House of Commons to have fully dispassionate debates on Brexit, given the extent to which the entire political system has been consumed by it, particularly the divisions not just between, but within parties on this issue.

The report concluded by saying that it was refreshing to see it in a different venue, and that the party lines became blurred. That is, in some ways, one of the main benefits of that system. I believe it was noted by David Natzler that the Westminster Hall model is a horseshoe, which helps to reduce partisanship as compared to the more traditional two swords' length seating arrangement.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, although nothing about Brexit is about a clearly defined opposition in government, to put it mildly.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

This is true. In that regard, it was a different place, as compared to the indicative votes, but those issues certainly did bleed into the content of the debate.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do you have any knowledge about how well attended the debate was?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Again, from the report I read, it was quite extensive. One element of British debating style is that members often take interventions from their colleagues, so while the traditional format for a 30-minute Westminster Hall debate is to have one speaker present for 15 minutes, and another reply from the government side, that's usually with three or four interventions each, so the number of members who are in Hansard becomes greater than what might be assumed just by looking at the time.

(1230)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is this on the basis of an actual rule of the committee or is this on the basis of a convention that has sprung up in the committee?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

It's the same practice as in the House. There they also will often be asked in debates to give leave or give way for someone else to interject a question as the speech is being delivered.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's somewhat like the practice in the United States Senate as well.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I am less familiar with that, but perhaps.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You can accept an intervention without losing the floor if you apply the right formula. You have to watch Mr. Smith Goes to Washington; you'll learn everything you need to know.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: Sorry, I don't want to hop in, Dr. Morden. In a sense is this like what we call the Simms rule on this committee? We developed it when we had to find a way of allowing people to convey messages back and forth in the middle of a filibuster where you can't formally give up the floor. My colleague Scott Simms invented this, and it was an extraordinarily effective way to allow the interchange of ideas in a format that otherwise would not have permitted that.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

That's very much so, and that is the idea where it is not ceding the floor, but giving way temporarily. I guess it's one's convention as to how long such interventions would be. I imagine a Speaker may need to get involved if it becomes its own filibuster.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's true. That would have been a breach of protocol.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

In our little system.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I should let my colleague speak.

Mr. Michael Morden:

I have little to add other than the person who is speaking has some prerogative in that you'll hear them say they're going to make some progress in their speech, and then they'll turn it back to them. They have a fair amount of agency in how they distribute their time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

On a different topic, because we've only got a minute or so left, you mentioned that both the Australian and U.K. parallel chambers have sittings only on days when the Commons, or representatives in the case of Australia, are in session. By contrast, ordinary standing committees of the House of Commons, let alone legislative committees, can meet when the Commons is not sitting. The reason that can be done is that only a small number of members have to be present. To have the Commons sit, let us say, through July and August, would involve every single one of the 338 of us saying we'll work instead of being in our constituencies in July and August. That is not true with a committee. In consequence, I've been on a number of committees, like the electoral reform committee that met throughout the months of August and September when the House was not sitting.

Could this not also be true for a parallel chamber, given the low quorum requirements, that it could sit on break weeks and into the summer without creating a situation in which people can't get back into their constituency weeks?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I think this reflects to some extent the tendency of the British Parliament to sit nearly continuously. It sits in July and then has a six-week break and then is back at the end of August. Part of the reality is that they just generally don't have that same extended period when the Commons isn't sitting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We used to sit in July too. Of course, the Meighen government fell in July.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

It has been done provincially as well, particularly following elections, as was seen in Ontario, I think, following the last two elections, but I think that's more why many things just don't happen because their breaks are so much more condensed. The breaks are truly breaks.

In the Canadian context, I don't see why that couldn't be done. The greater challenge is because it's self-selecting; the members who are interested in the subject attend, and those who are not, do not. It becomes more challenging if business was being scheduled at a different time when all members might not be as free to attend. It could potentially shape the debates, but that would be something I think for members...as the Clerk said, that's up to their own imagination. If there might be a designated week in the summer that all members might reserve if interested, then that could certainly be a consideration.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was thinking of private members' business in particular. We're trying to get through a large number of bills, and this problem will only get worse as the number of MPs increases with each redistribution.

We have a very strong interest in our own bills. There would be a number of other people who would be willing to participate in that debate. The actual votes will take place in September or October when the House comes back. It just seems like a simple way. You're not sacrificing that much time out of one summer in your four-year term to come in to deal with your item of business. It would allow for more opportunity.

I've changed from questioning to advocacy, as you can see, on the parallel chamber sitting during the summer months.

(1235)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Madam Duncan.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Here's my perspective, having been here for 11 years.

Rather than going back in deep dark history when we burned the place down, why would we not first of all try to make this place—what we have—more democratic? Basically we have a system where the government, with procedure rules, can simply control the agenda. It varies from committee to committee, but they have the majority and they can decide what they're going to talk about and for how long, and who the witnesses are.

I think that's where a lot of the frustration is. When you're the third party or you don't have party status, you have very little chance to speak in the House. I don't think we're dealing with the democratic actions in the House. I'm not convinced that setting up yet another chamber is going to resolve the frustrations of a lot of members, and that includes backbenchers in majority governments.

I have a couple of questions.

First, what makes you think that party influence and discipline are going to be removed from the second chamber? Are members going to be free all of sudden to express their opinion if it's against the government's position, or even the opposition party's position? How is it going to be set up? Is it going to be first-come, first-served? We have 180-plus backbench Liberals who are probably going to be keen to have a chance to finally stand up and debate something keen to their constituency. How would that be balanced out? Who's really going to decide what the topics are and who gets to speak?

Also, why couldn't petition debates be made part of the House agenda, like maybe once a month? I think that would be fascinating. Instead, they just table them and say that the responses have been issued. Other than sending out the responses to the people who signed the petition, nobody else ever knows what the government response was.

There are a whole lot of things that could be done with the current regime without increasing the amount of work. Is there then going to be pressure on the opposition members and the backbenchers—“Well, why aren't you proposing something in the other chamber”—and adding that to their agenda?

Also, the majority government has all kinds of members that they can send around. The smaller parties are pressured as it is. They have to be in the House. They have to be in committee. Some of them may be travelling with committee. It's a different kind of proposition. If you have a whole lot of members, it's, “Oh yes, we can probably do something in the additional chamber.” I think that needs to be thought through as well.

I would love to also see some good ideas coming forward on how can we make the current chamber more democratic and interesting to the public.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I think the reason we suggested the Westminster Hall model as the inspiration—and particularly to have a space that would be qualitatively different from what goes on in the House in order to have a different type of debate—was precisely for the reasons that you address. It is that if things are oriented along party lines, it becomes challenging to know where to stop—

Ms. Linda Duncan:

How are you going to change that?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

This is the element. It would be having a place where debates are chosen, ideally without the involvement of the party whips, and having a place where speakers would participate without involvement from the party whips.

The goal, ideally, would be to have this as the beginning of an experiment, to see if having a space that was free of party might spread some ideas cross-partisanship into the other place.

I believe there have been complaints about rising partisanship in debate in the Canadian House of Commons for most of the past century. If you read the great text on Parliament, The Parliament of Canada by Ned Franks, written in the late 1980s, the words sound like they could be taken from today.

(1240)

Ms. Linda Duncan:

I don't disagree with what your concern is, and I think that's a challenge, but I question how you are going to, all of a sudden, transform somebody into not caring what their cabinet minister, their whip, the House leader or the caucus has decided is their position. It's a nice idea, but that's the challenge. I would be interested to know if any of that changed in Australia and England.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

What I was trying to say is, if reforming the main chamber hasn't worked, why not try something new?

Mr. Michael Morden:

Moreover, you're right to identify cultural problems, which are pernicious. I don't know how to solve them but to seek procedural change or technical change, which can help engender new behaviour. Behavioural change is really hard in the absence of any kind of alteration to the incentive structure. A parallel chamber is not a panacea. It doesn't resolve the myriad issues you've identified, which are also a concern to us. This is one of any number of things that we're prepared to throw our support behind when it's under contemplation.

I think it's particularly true in Westminster that this is seen as one piece of a broader reform agenda over the course of about 15 years, which has undeniably produced behavioural change and independence. Does the creation of a parallel chamber resolve partisanship or fear of the whip? I don't think so, but I don't know how you would do that in the absence of institutional experimentation.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

That would be an issue that would be worthwhile, talking to the elected members in those two countries: whether they genuinely became freed up from party discipline. That's what you want to have happen, so I think it would be really useful to find out. Did that actually happen in those parallel chambers?

We have media panels every day, and people are still saying the party line. All of a sudden because it's in a different room, I don't know if it'll change, if it is still broadcast. It's a challenge, but it would be interesting to find out in those two countries if in fact there was a transformation and people felt....

If it were more of a discussion as opposed to a debate—you're looking at an issue and everybody is coming up with innovative ideas—how are we going to resolve that? That's a possibility, but if you're debating a bill that has been in the House and those lines have already been drawn, it's interesting.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Could I add something?

This is the main benefit, to be honest. The Westminster Hall model allows members to suggest issues that are relevant to them or their constituencies. This week, for example, there was a debate on pancreatic cancer. The goal was, hopefully, across party lines, to secure better treatment for pancreatic cancer. Members from all places in the U.K. have constituents who might be affected. They came and raised their concerns, and the minister addressed it. It was not necessarily in a partisan fashion but as concerned MPs representing their communities. I believe that in the brief we submitted to the committee, we included a list of the debates that were held. Transportation infrastructure in Essex, for example, hopefully is something that all members could agree on and would not necessarily be committed to the overall partisan success or failure.

To be honest, part of it would be that, hopefully, members would push back against their parties should they find there would not be support. The history of Parliament is littered with innovations that were tried and did not succeed, but that does not necessarily mean not to try, I hope.

Ms. Linda Duncan:

I think on studies in committee that happens sometimes, but not so much on a bill.

The Chair:

We're going to the open round. I have a lot of people on the list, so please keep your remarks brief.

Is it okay with committee members if Mr. Baylis has an intervention?

Okay.

Frank.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Do you want to go first? [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

It's fine, go ahead. [English]

The Chair:

There's a bunch of people after you.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. Sorry.

To your point, I know that when the parallel chambers were brought into both places, they were brought in on a temporary basis. You asked if there was a survey of the MPs, when they were asked to vote on it, and they were overwhelmingly in favour. There was kind of a temporary trial for a year or two. After that, it was resoundingly supported by the MPs because of the reasons that the two gentlemen have expressed, that aspect of a better debate, as you were pointing out.

I have a disagreement with one point here. You mentioned that we have time allocation because many members want to speak. A lot of time members are asked to go and read a speech, which, theoretically, is against our rules. We're not allowed to read a speech, but we do. Do they read the speeches? I understand they don't in the United Kingdom. Do they read them in either the second chamber in the United Kingdom or in Australia, or are they forced to actually give a true speech?

(1245)

Mr. Michael Morden:

I do think that in Westminster Hall some of the remarks are prepared but the exchange is much more dynamic as well. Often when a speaker gives way, the response is less scripted.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

So it's a less scripted environment. Is that the same in Australia?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

On the Australian context, I don't know. I've been to Westminster Hall to observe those debates but I have not had the chance to do that in Australia to the same extent.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I'm also aware that the general public is far more interested in what's debated in the second chamber. But if they were, like me, to listen in to the debates that go on in our hall, I'm bored to tears I'd say 90% of the time. I can't imagine anybody sitting and listening to CPAC, one repetitive, boring speech after another. I find that boring. That's not the case with the parallel chamber at least at Westminster. Is this my understanding, that they have far more people watching that than their main chamber?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

It varies by debate and by the subject. Some of them are hyper-local, about the issues in a particular community. It might be some from that community who are interested. However, especially with the petitions, some of them can be issues of national significance. The main element there is the responsiveness so that it allows for citizens to be brought, and their concerns to be brought, into the chamber in a more direct fashion.

If it's something put forward by a backbench member, particularly if they have constituents who have been campaigning for a particular issue, they can notify them to tune in and be able to see a bit more of a dynamic response as compared to here where you might get an S. O. 31, a member's statement on a particular issue, but you make your statement and there isn't the response in the same fashion.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have just a couple of quick notes. I won't take long.

There is something that hasn't been said and I think it should be said.

If we recall in the 2000 election—I think Scott Reid that's when you came in the first time—there was the promise to have petitions create debates. Rick Mercer made a mockery of it with the Doris Day petition regarding Stockwell Day. It had three million signatures.

It's not always necessarily a good idea to say with petitions take it through the House, with this middle ground of the committee that controls the agenda. Once you have that middle ground that controls the agenda then they can do the agenda clearly for a secondary chamber. I think it's a good approach to doing it.

You were here in the audience for the previous panel. You heard my comments on having a joint chamber with the Senate. Do you have thoughts on that, having a single joint chamber that takes care of PMBs directly and where they're dealt with?

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I would say that's beyond the current scope of our inquiry. It's an interesting idea. As was mentioned, there are precedents for joint House of Commons and Senate committees. In the U.K. they have something called the Joint Committee on Human Rights, which is a joint House of Commons and House of Lords committee that's been quite effective.

On having two chambers try to debate bills simultaneously, however, I'm not sure if I've come across any international examples of that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's not what I'm suggesting. I'm suggesting that instead of PMBs going to the House or the Senate and then we have to pass one House and then do it all again on the other side, because of the nature of it, having one chamber that does all the debating of it as the chamber. Instead of having “S” and “C” bills, you have “J” bills or whatever you want to call them. That would be the idea. This is the chamber where we deal with private members' business whether it comes from the Commons or the Senate as the singular place to do so. The main chamber becomes government business and opposition days as opposed to individuals' business.

Mr. Michael Morden:

This is a fascinating proposal. I can't think of a comparable model, which just means that it might be that much more brilliant and worth exploring. I think at this stage we don't have a substantive stake to plant.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

I think it would require more surgery to the Standing Orders and possibly some constitutional elements, given that, unless deemed in new laws to be legal, you go through both chambers. There would need to be something to make sure that such a body would be considered to have both processes at once.

In terms of the efficiency gains, it certainly would be worth considering.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just as a quick note before I cede the floor, the U.K. Brexit debate was from 4:30 to 7:45 on Monday, April 1. I dug up the link if anybody wants it.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Maybe a partial answer to Mr. Graham's question about what one can do in the constitutional legal concerns, what one can get away with doing, in terms of creating parallel debates of both chambers, is that, ultimately, you have to pass a bill, for it to become an act, in both chambers. The rules about first, second and third reading are, however, as I understand it, entirely internal, and could be stripped away. This was actually tested before the courts in 1919, with reference to the Manitoba referendum legislation, which assumed that if a bill was passed in referendum, it would supplant the various readings in the provincial legislature, and would also be considered to have received royal assent. The courts ruled that royal assent must still take place. It's written down in the Constitution, but the courts ruled that the various internal stages of compressing or telescoping the various readings could be dealt with by means of.... I'm not sure if a statute could do it, or if you require changes to the Standing Orders. At any rate, they dealt with it. There's some reference point to go back to, if one's trying to figure out what is and is not permitted under our Constitution. That all deals with the 1867 Constitution, as opposed to what was added in 1982. It's still relevant law.

I wanted to comment, if I could, on Ms. Duncan's concern about the ubiquitous entry of whips, party considerations and partisanship into committees. That is what happens in most committees, most of the time, including this committee, frequently. My experience is that sometimes it doesn't happen.

There is one example on Parliament Hill of a subcommittee where party and partisan consideration has been kept almost exclusively out. That's the international human rights subcommittee of the foreign affairs committee, which I chaired for eight years. It already had that culture of not being partisan prior to my arrival. It retained it during my period there, and it kept that culture after I left. Whatever the reasons were for its arriving in the first place, I note that we just had to follow certain principles. We agreed that the Standing Orders still applied to everything we did in the procedures, but that we could, by a convention that exists only in the committee, agree to move forward only by consensus.

The world presents a vast smorgasbord of human rights abuses, the result being that we could pick ones where there was no obvious left, right or partisan division. If you debate human rights in Venezuela, the merits of the Maduro regime inevitably come into question, and that's problematic, because we have divisions on that. If you debate an issue about some other country, where there's a Canadian mining interest, say, you're less likely to have that problem. As a result, careful selection criteria, and some other internal rules—

(1250)

Ms. Linda Duncan:

Then you could do that in the second chamber, presumably.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm suggesting something like that. If you had an agreement—

Ms. Linda Duncan:

By consensus is a great concept.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, using a consensus and going in and saying.... It's entirely possible that any one proceeding could disrupt that, but I think only temporarily.

That was a comment I had to make. I just wanted to get that on the record.

Thank you very much.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

We have to ask the witnesses questions, not make a speech.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, there's no rule about that. If the witnesses wish to comment on that, I would welcome that.

Mr. Michael Morden:

I think that points to the importance of getting the process through which such a chamber would be created. If it's an act of consensus in the first place, you can establish norms and conventions that can endure.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

In this regard, as my colleague said, the parallel chamber has been part of a suite of reforms introduced in Westminster over the past 20 years. When it began, the only way of getting debates was through the ballot of application submitted to the Speaker. In 2009, the backbench business committee was created, out of a series of reforms. That is, as its name implies, backbenchers who are elected. The chair is elected by the whole House. Members are elected by their respective caucuses. They sit and decide what will be debated during certain slots.

That speaks, perhaps, to that kind of consensual element, where you could have a different way of managing the business from the broader main chamber.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Madam Lapointe can go before me. I'll take whatever time is left.

The Chair:

Madam Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much.

When witnesses appear before us, I think it's an opportunity to hear what they want to say, what they think and what they've been studying.

Earlier, you mentioned in your briefing that you had studied the cases of people who had lost their jobs or retired in 2015. You say that two-thirds of the people seemed frustrated with the way it worked.

Have you checked whether the figures for 2006, 2008, 2011 or all previous elections were different?

(1255)

[English]

Dr. Paul Thomas:

Samara has done a series of exit interviews with former MPs, beginning with those who left in 2006. The surveys we began with MPs on different subjects started in 2016. Our report on heckling was based on surveys.

The specific issue of how satisfied people were with debates only emerged out of a survey we conducted last year in conjunction with the democracy caucus. The frustration with debates is a long and enduring matter that would date back to the MPs who exited in 2006, 2008, 2011 and so forth. The specific number for the survey of the current MPs, the two-thirds, comes only from 2018. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay. So they were mainly those who did not return in 2015.

We talked to the clerk earlier. We talked about objectives. In the context of a possible parallel chamber, what objectives would you like to achieve?

I would also like to know whether you studied the role of members of Parliament as well. The clerk seemed to say that it had evolved over time. We want to better represent our constituents. That's my second question.

My third point is about the parallel chamber. We talked about it earlier. I would like to know whether, during the evolution of the parallel chambers, the behaviour of members of Parliament seems to have improved. [English]

Dr. Paul Thomas:

The nature of the debates in Westminster Hall in part reflects the different tradition, it would be best to say, of the British House of Commons, where party discipline is much more fluid. They have the three-line whip system, so that the government stakes out aspects of business that are crucial and then allows dissent on a wider range. That has existed previous to the adoption of Westminster Hall. Where the debates were chosen, the culture in that chamber reflected this aspect to some extent. Members were used to having a diversity of opinions.

It also speaks to the broader relationship of the MPs with their whips. There is not the same ability for party leaders to deselect members as the ultimate threat. It's chosen by constituency associations and then on from there.

That said, where it has made a greater difference is in the ability of individual members to hold a debate as part of a broader advocacy on a particular issue. Oftentimes, what you will see is a member raising a particular issue, say, pancreatic cancer, as a first step. Then it might lead to another debate and potentially a bill.

As part of my own research, I looked at the evolution of the law in metal theft. Scrap metal theft is a large issue in the U.K. They have many old buildings. It started with a Westminster Hall debate, then went on to eventually be a private member's bill to regulate scrap metal dealers. That has empowered backbench members to build a broader campaign. It has provided more tools to allow that sort of advocacy.

In terms of the basic relationship between members and their parties, it has always been a bit looser. However, in recent years, and this refers to Ms. Duncan's point, rebellions have increased. There has been more dissent on votes. In part, that reflects the coalition government period and the current hung Parliament.

I hope that responded to your questions. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

First of all, I want to thank you for the work you're doing. It's very insightful. The exit interviews you've done and the polls you've run are fascinating. Through the different ones you have done, I'm assuming that you've sensed frustration with the type of debates we have from people exiting all parties. Is that true?

Mr. Michael Morden:

Yes, and this frustration was shared across party groups. That was a consensus finding.

(1300)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Was there a breakdown at any point of whether that frustration was over debate on government legislation or PMBs?

Mr. Michael Morden:

I think we asked to assess members' satisfaction with the state of thoughtful and substantive debate at a higher level. That was the response we got.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I definitely agree with some of Ms. Duncan's points, but then I disagree with some of them as well.

There is a lot of partisanship, definitely, in this Parliament, but I do think it shifts from time to time. When we are debating PMBs, I notice less partisanship. When it comes to voting, there's a little less partisanship when it comes to PMBs, unless you're the NDP.

In the committee process, we also see a little less partisanship maybe, until there's a vote on some type of issue, but when we're trying to explore topics and discuss ideas, you see that the partisanship starts to shift a little, so I can envision a parallel chamber where perhaps the culture doesn't completely go away but shifts a little bit, and that's a start.

I'm really thankful for the work you've done. In terms of debating government legislation, have you ever had anybody say that they didn't have enough time to debate government legislation, whether they were the government party or opposition?

Mr. Michael Morden:

Inadequate time to deliberate and debate in general was identified in the survey as the number one obstacle to doing the work of democratic representation. What the source of that time crunch is or what members don't have time to do specifically—it may not necessarily be a debate in the main chamber but having time to prepare for committee—I don't know. We didn't have a chance to assess that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It would be interesting to learn a little bit more about that, because just like what was mentioned, what we're seeing in the House right now with the level of debate is that it's not necessarily thrilling to sit there and watch sometimes. Sometimes we're forced into having a certain number of days on different pieces of legislation, but the ideas are not new after a while. We're recycling the same ideas.

Perhaps every member should have the right to get their feelings and statements on the record, but I think the contentment with the level of debate that's happening starts going down after a certain point because you are recycling the same ideas. That has to be brought into balance somehow.

Dr. Paul Thomas:

That was one issue as well. The resources available for members to perhaps bring their own perspectives on legislation was identified as a major issue, where the members' capacity to have staff to conduct research and just sort of independently scrutinize legislation was seen to be challenging.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for coming. We really appreciate this. It will add some more dimensions to a very complex debate, so thank you.

Mr. Michael Morden:

Thank you for having us.

The Chair:

We'll decide, maybe at the end of our next meeting, where we go from here on this.

At the next meeting we'll talk with the Clerk about the reorganization of the Standing Orders.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte. [Français]

Bonjour.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue à la 147e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Ce matin, nous poursuivons notre étude des chambres de débat parallèles. Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir le greffier de la Chambre des communes, M. Charles Robert, pour nous faire part de son expertise au sujet des chambres parallèles.

Monsieur le greffier, c'est un plaisir de vous recevoir.[Traduction]

Avant de commencer, vous vous souviendrez peut-être qu’il y a environ un an, le greffier nous avait annoncé qu’il s’apprêtait à réorganiser le Règlement pour le rendre plus clair et plus accessible, sans le modifier pour autant, et qu’il nous ferait rapport ensuite. Le greffier sera disponible mardi, si le Comité souhaite l'accueillir pour faire le point sur l’état d’avancement de ce rapport et sur sa préparation en vue de la prochaine législature. Je pense qu'il sera prêt avant. Donc, si vous êtes d’accord, le greffier pourrait nous faire rapport à notre prochaine réunion.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Si vous voulez le consentement des membres du Comité, je serais heureux de vous confirmer, au nom des conservateurs, que nous en serions ravis.

Le président:

D’accord, nous allons donc vous inscrire à l’ordre du jour de mardi et vous pourrez faire le point pour nous sur ce projet.

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

J’ai hâte. [Français]

Le président:

Je vous cède maintenant la parole pour faire votre présentation.[Traduction]

Nous avons hâte de connaître votre point de vue sur cette initiative passionnante.

M. Charles Robert:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci aux membres du Comité.

Je suis heureux de me joindre à vous aujourd’hui pour discuter de la question des chambres parallèles. Je crois savoir que le greffier de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni, mon bon ami, sir David Natzler, retraité depuis peu comme vous le savez, s’est fait un plaisir lui aussi de venir vous parler de l’expérience britannique en matière de chambre parallèle, soit Westminster Hall.

Comme point de départ, je rappelle au Comité qu’une version révisée d’une note d’information, que nous avions initialement remise au Comité en 2016 lors de votre étude sur les initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la famille, vous a été envoyée il y a quelques semaines. Nous espérons que l’information qu’elle contient sera utile dans vos délibérations sur la possibilité de créer une chambre de débat parallèle.[Français]

Ma présentation devant vous aujourd'hui se veut une discussion ouverte sur la possibilité de la création d'une seconde chambre de délibérations, parallèle à la Chambre des communes, et sur ses implications pour nos usages et nos procédures. En ce sens, j'aimerais formuler quelques commentaires sur les thèmes à l'étude par le Comité.

Les activités de la Chambre sont régies par des pratiques et des règles de procédure qui encadrent le fonctionnement de chaque séance, allant des ordres émanant du gouvernement aux affaires émanant des députés, et même les affaires courantes. Ces règles régissent aussi le calendrier de la Chambre, la tenue des votes et nombre d'autres travaux.[Traduction]

L'évolution des usages à la Chambre a souvent été influencée par les besoins exprimés par les députés eux-mêmes. Les grandes réformes touchant à la procédure émanent donc bien souvent d’un consensus provenant des députés.

La création d’une seconde chambre pourrait offrir de nouvelles possibilités intéressantes aux députés. Je vous encourage à étudier des recommandations innovatrices et proposer des options qui, comme l’a si bien dit M. Natzler durant son témoignage, pourraient être nouvelles, surprenantes et différentes du fonctionnement de la Chambre.

Il vous revient donc à vous, membres du Comité, de décider de la portée à donner à votre étude ainsi que des recommandations à faire. Il reviendrait ensuite à la Chambre dans son ensemble de décider si elle veut aller de l’avant avec cette réforme.

Les expériences australienne et britannique sont des points de départ à une réflexion sur la façon dont notre propre Chambre des communes pourrait instituer une chambre parallèle. Certains aspects de leur fonctionnement pourraient être copiés et appliqués à notre situation. D’autres éléments ne pourront toutefois pas être si facilement transposés, puisque nos procédures et nos usages sont, à bien des égards, différents de ceux de nos homologues. C’est donc une bonne idée d’analyser comment d'autres chambres parallèles fonctionnent, tout en tenant compte toutefois de nos propres règles et de nos propres façons de faire.[Français]

Si votre comité compte recommander la création d'une telle chambre parallèle, il devra déterminer son fonctionnement. Cela implique notamment de déterminer où cette chambre pourrait siéger, les limites imposées sur ce qu'elle pourrait faire et les décisions qu'elle pourrait prendre.

Particulièrement, plusieurs questions se posent. Sur le plan logistique, dans quel type d'endroit les députés voudraient-ils que cette nouvelle enceinte s'installe? Sous quel format physique les députés seraient-ils amenés à délibérer? Serait-ce selon le face-à-face actuel ou, encore, un hémicycle? [Traduction]

Concernant les délibérations elles-mêmes, d’autres questions importantes pourraient intéresser le Comité. En voici quelques-unes. Comment les différents travaux, dont les projets de loi, les travaux des subsides et les affaires émanant des députés seraient gérés? La chambre parallèle serait-elle habilitée à prendre des décisions? Dans le même ordre d’idée, à combien serait fixé son quorum? Les députés pourraient-ils proposer des motions et des amendements lors de débats dans la chambre parallèle? Comment les deux chambres seraient-elles habilitées à communiquer entre elles afin de garantir une continuité dans les travaux en cours? Quelles règles de débat s’appliqueraient? Seraient-elles semblables à celles de la Chambre ou plutôt à celles des comités? Quelles seraient les heures de séance de la chambre parallèle? Qu’arriverait-il à la séance de la seconde chambre lors des sonneries d’appel et des votes prévus à la Chambre des communes? Ou encore lors du moment prévu pour les Questions orales et d’autres événements où la présence de tous les députés est attendue à la Chambre?

Voilà quelques-unes des questions d’ordre procédural auxquelles le Comité voudra répondre. Lors de vos délibérations, il est possible que ces considérations, et leurs réponses, soient porteuses de certaines conséquences complexes.[Français]

Ainsi, si je peux me permettre, bien que j'encourage le Comité à poursuivre son étude et à en faire rapport à la Chambre, je suis tenté de vous recommander d'utiliser ce rapport comme tremplin et point de départ du débat sur la procédure prévu au début de la prochaine législature. Votre rapport pourrait ainsi servir de référence, et ses recommandations, de pistes de réflexion pour le débat tenu conformément à l'article 51 du Règlement.

Comme toujours, votre comité est maître de ses délibérations, et la décision sur les prochaines étapes lui revient entièrement. En ce sens, si votre comité — et la Chambre, par la suite — décide de créer une chambre parallèle, il va sans dire que ce sera avec plaisir que nous, tant l'Administration que mon équipe procédurale et moi-même, vous offrirons notre appui. Nous serons disposés à donner suite aux recommandations que vous pourriez formuler à cet égard et à mettre à votre disposition toutes les ressources nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de vos recommandations.

C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai maintenant à vos questions.

(1110)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le greffier.[Traduction]

Je souhaite la bienvenue à Linda Duncan et à Scot Davidson à notre Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Comme tout le monde voulait être ici aujourd'hui, c'est que vous avez tiré la courte paille.

Tant que le patron est ici, monsieur le greffier, je suppose que les membres du Comité voudront vous remercier de nous avoir dotés du meilleur greffier de la Chambre des communes.

M. Charles Robert: Je ne sais pas combien de temps vous allez le garder. [Français]

Le président:

Nous passons aux questions.

Monsieur Simms, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Je suis le deuxième Scott... un Scott de plus et nous faisons un pays.

Monsieur Robert, tout d’abord, c’est un plaisir de vous avoir parmi nous. Nous avons parlé au greffier du Royaume-Uni, et il vous tient en haute estime.

M. Charles Robert:

Vraiment?

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, vraiment. Je suppose que vous le saviez déjà, mais j’ai voulu vous le dire.

J’ai beaucoup aimé votre exposé et je vais vous dire pourquoi. Il ne s’agit pas de généralités sur la façon dont les choses pourraient fonctionner ou ne pas fonctionner, ou quoi que ce soit d’autre; vous avez formulé des recommandations précises que j’aime bien. À la fin, vous dites: « Votre rapport pourrait ainsi servir de référence et ses recommandations de pistes de réflexion pour le débat tenu conformément à l’article 51 du Règlement. » Je dis cela parce que j'estime qu'il faudrait reprendre cette phrase dans notre rapport, mais cela n'engage que moi.

J’aimerais revenir sur un autre point que vous avez soulevé. Il me semble que les meilleurs conseils que nous puissions obtenir de vous, concernent ce qui est faisable et ce qui ne l’est pas. J’ai quelques opinions sur la notion de chambre parallèle. J’aime la composition et les caractéristiques du modèle australien. J’aime la composition et les caractéristiques de ce qui se fait au Royaume-Uni. Dans les deux cas, il semble être question de travailler dans des sphères différentes.

M. Charles Robert:

D’accord.

M. Scott Simms:

J’ai une question très précise à poser.

Comme nous ne pratiquons pas encore la programmation des projets de loi, même si — et c’est assez intéressant — le Sénat semble avoir opté pour un modèle à propos duquel je n’ai pas encore tout lu, nous devons faire quelque chose... Toutefois, il faut savoir que les projets de loi programmés peuvent avoir une durée de vie limitée et passer à la guillotine à un moment donné, comme le diraient nos homologues du Royaume-Uni. Si l'on fait exception de cette réalité, une chambre parallèle permettrait-elle à un plus grand nombre de parlementaires de débattre de tel ou tel projet de loi dont nous serions saisis?

M. Charles Robert:

Je dirais que cela dépend vraiment du genre de responsabilité ou de rôle que vous voulez que la chambre parallèle joue. C'est donc oui, si c’est ce que vous voulez que la chambre parallèle fasse. Il n’y a aucune raison pour laquelle... À la manière dont je comprends les motions de programmation au Royaume-Uni, qui sont en place depuis 1998 ou 1999 environ...

M. Scott Simms:

Depuis 1999, oui.

M. Charles Robert:

... il ne serait plus nécessaire de recourir à l’attribution de temps ou à la guillotine, parce que ces motions précisent essentiellement le temps qu’il faudra pour débattre de tel ou tel projet de loi à telle ou telle étape. L’intention visée est assez précise. Comme le terme le laisse entendre, il s’agit d’une motion de programmation.

Si j’ai bien compris, vous dites que vous aimeriez profiter de la chambre parallèle pour permettre un débat supplémentaire, probablement à l’étape où en est le projet de loi.

(1115)

M. Scott Simms:

Oui.

M. Charles Robert:

En général, les affaires émanant du gouvernement portent sur un ou deux points par séance. Vous pourriez décider, aux termes d’une entente quelconque entre le gouvernement et les partis de l’opposition, de permettre la tenue d’un troisième débat qui donnerait davantage la possibilité aux députés de participer et d’exprimer leurs points de vue sur un projet de loi qui a déjà été présenté à la Chambre des communes et qui pourrait maintenant faire l’objet de discussions plus poussées à la chambre parallèle, pendant que vous discuteriez d’autres affaires du gouvernement à la chambre principale.

Ce n’est pas impossible. En fait, on pourrait y voir une retombée positive de la chambre parallèle.

M. Scott Simms:

À mon avis, cela s’inscrit en complément du projet de loi que nous étudions actuellement et qui porte principalement sur les projets de loi du gouvernement. Si je ne me trompe pas sur ce qu'il faut retenir du modèle britannique, il s’agit davantage de permettre à des députés d’arrière-ban de soulever d’autres questions, comme les débats d’urgence et les débats sur les pétitions, ce qui est assez nouveau, mais les députés ont ainsi la possibilité d'étudier d’autres questions, si besoin est.

M. Charles Robert:

Il semble effectivement que ce soit le modèle utilisé.

M. Scott Simms:

Si je ne me trompe pas, c'est exclusivement à cela qu'il sert.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui, mais il n’y a aucune raison pour laquelle la Chambre devrait se limiter à un tel rôle.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous voyez à quel point vous êtes génial? Vous avez anticipé ma question. Pouvons-nous combiner les deux?

M. Charles Robert:

Vous pouvez faire tout ce que vous voulez.

M. Scott Simms:

Mon Dieu! C’est tout ce que j’avais à dire. Non, je plaisante.

M. Charles Robert:

Une autre chose pourrait être utile. À Westminster, il y a le comité des présidents, le comité de liaison, le comité des députés d’arrière-ban et d’autres mécanismes qui ne sont pas encore établis ici et qui ne le seront peut-être jamais.

Puisque vous avez, par exemple, un sous-comité qui s’occupe des affaires émanant des députés, si vous vouliez jouer d'audace, votre comité de la procédure pourrait assumer la responsabilité d'établir le programme de la chambre parallèle, ou du moins suggérer de le faire.

C’est une suggestion que je vous soumets.

M. Scott Simms:

C’est la raison pour laquelle vous êtes ici, parce que vous en faites énormément. C’est une bonne chose.

Selon vous, si la chambre parallèle devait ne pas siéger les mêmes jours civils, cela affecterait-il le fonctionnement de la Chambre des communes? Supposons qu’il y ait une semaine de relâche et que vous ayez...

M. Charles Robert:

Les visages tirés sont votre réponse.

M. Scott Simms:

Oh, je suis désolé, ai-je ruiné les vacances de quelqu’un?

Mme Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NPD):

Des vacances pendant la semaine de relâche?

M. Scott Simms:

Serait-ce possible? Savez-vous si d’autres pays le font?

M. Charles Robert:

Bien franchement, je ne le crois pas. Les deux modèles existants sont ceux de l'Australie et de Westminster, et je ne crois pas que ce soit le cas.

En fait, vous pourriez déterminer les heures pendant lesquelles un comité de la chambre parallèle pourrait siéger tout en respectant l’intention des récentes réformes touchant à la conciliation travail-famille et en ne bouleversant pas le but fixé de chaque journée de séance, c’est-à-dire...

M. Scott Simms:

Comme un vendredi.

M. Charles Robert:

Vous pourriez le faire plus tôt dans la journée. Vous ne pourriez pas le faire un mercredi à cause des caucus, mais vous pourriez le faire plus tôt dans la journée ou, disons, dans une période de ralentissement au milieu d’une journée de séance, si c'est ce que vous constatez.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois ce que vous voulez dire. D’accord.

Le président:

Désolé.

M. Scott Simms:

Déjà? J’ai l’impression que je viens tout juste de commencer.

Merci.

Le président:

Certes, mais vous venez tout juste de terminer.

Je précise à l'intention des nouveaux membres du Comité qu'avant de passer à M. Reid, nous avons une pile de documents qui expliquent comment les choses fonctionnent en Australie et en Grande-Bretagne.

Mme Linda Duncan:

J’en ai quelques-uns.

Le président:

Vous en avez quelques-uns. D’accord, très bien.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Tout d’abord, merci beaucoup d’être ici. J’apprécie toujours votre érudition.

Je vous rappelle la promesse que je vous ai arrachée il y a quelque temps à propos de l’efficacité d'un greffier: il doit s'engager à servir longtemps.

M. Charles Robert:

Vrai.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour que nous puissions profiter de son expérience.

M. Charles Robert:

Je m’attends à être connu comme le vieil homme de la Colline dans quelques années.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est exact. Ralph Goodale et vous pourrez vous battre pour le titre.

J'ai une question pour vous. Nous parlons sans cesse du Royaume-Uni et de l’Australie, pour des raisons évidentes. Évidemment, Westminster est le plus prestigieux de tous les systèmes parlementaires, le plus mûr. L’Australie est un parallèle évident avec le Canada, une démocratie bicamérale et fédéraliste. À votre connaissance, s’agit-il des seuls parlements qui ont des chambres parallèles? Y en aurait-il d'autres? Je ne le sais pas, mais c’est possible.

(1120)

M. Charles Robert:

Pour ce qui est des parlements continentaux, je ne connais rien de semblable, pas plus à l’Assemblée nationale, à Paris, qu'au Bundestag, à Berlin. Il y a quelques années, j’étais à Rome pour une conférence des Présidents d'assemblées. Comme il n'a pas été question de cela, je ne suis pas vraiment sûr qu’il existe des chambres parallèles ailleurs. Je pense que cela dépend du modèle de législature, de l’éventail des pouvoirs accordés aux députés et de ce qu’on attend d’eux.

Je pense qu’ici au Canada, selon le modèle de Westminster, les députés sont appelés à remplir un rôle législatif très fort. Au cours des dernières années, les députés se sont identifiés comme des défenseurs de leurs circonscriptions. Les responsabilités dans les circonscriptions sont devenues beaucoup plus importantes qu’elles ne l’étaient il y a 150 ans, alors qu’elles n’existaient pratiquement pas.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord.

M. Charles Robert:

Nous constatons une évolution et un changement dans le rôle joué par les députés. La question est maintenant de savoir comment concilier les différentes obligations et responsabilités que vous avez acceptées dans le cadre de ce rôle. Nous savons, par exemple, que tout ce qui touche à la législation ne devient pas plus simple, mais au contraire plus complexe. Les projets de loi omnibus — ou « mammouths », si vous voulez — deviennent de plus en plus la norme en matière de législation. On va finir par avoir de la difficulté à les traiter efficacement.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour ce qui est des projets de loi omnibus, j'ai l'impression... Je n’avais pas l’intention d'aborder cette question, mais en y réfléchissant... Je m’intéresse au droit administratif. Je suis rédacteur en chef de la Administrative Law Review de Washington. Il est clair que le droit administratif et la nécessité de disposer de tribunaux administratifs découlent de la complexité qu'il y a à réglementer, complexité qui a explosé au cours du XXe siècle. D’après ce que je peux voir, il est peu probable que les choses s'améliorent au XXIe siècle. Je pense que c’est simplement dû à la nature d’une société de plus en plus complexe où les interactions se multiplient.

Cela étant dit, je pense que les projets de loi omnibus traduisent d'un point de vue pratique le fait qu’il est devenu difficile de faire adopter le grand nombre de projets de loi dont nous avons besoin dans le cadre de notre processus législatif et dans les délais requis. Il faut faire la comparaison avec la situation d’il y a un siècle et même un siècle et demi, quand les Pères de la Confédération ont pensé à cela.

M. Charles Robert:

D’accord, mais profitons-en pour trouver une façon de régler le problème plus efficacement. Je sais que, lorsque les projets de loi omnibus arrivent au Sénat, les sénateurs adoptent une motion après l'étape de la deuxième lecture pour les subdiviser et le renvoyer à des comités distincts...

M. Scott Reid:

Certes.

M. Charles Robert:

... mais un comité demeure le maître d'oeuvre de ces projets de loi omnibus. C'est à lui que sont transmis ensuite les résultats des délibérations qui arrivent par bribes.

Si vous aviez une chambre parallèle, vous pourriez faire en sorte que le Règlement permette que certaines parties d'un projet de loi omnibus soient débattues dans cette chambre. Autrement dit, vous pourriez avoir des débats ciblés, si vous le jugez utile.

M. Scott Reid:

On pourrait aussi décider que les projets de loi sont envoyés à la chambre parallèle pour reproduire le modèle du Sénat qui divise les projets de loi omnibus en autant d'articles qui prennent du sens. Cela serait effectivement géré par une sorte d’équipe de leaders parlementaires du gouvernement et de l’opposition au sein de... Ce serait possible?

M. Charles Robert:

Tout est possible.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense que cela dépendra en fait de la façon dont la Chambre, considérée collectivement, décidera de la meilleure façon de gérer les affaires de plus en plus complexes auxquelles la Chambre des communes est confrontée.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord. En toute justice, cependant, ce que nous venons de décrire ne correspond pas à une chambre parallèle. Ce n'est pas que le Royaume-Uni ou l’Australie...

M. Charles Robert:

Exact. Alors, pourquoi le Canada n'innoverait-il pas?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous le pourrions. Je tiens simplement à dire que nous parlons maintenant d’innover plutôt que d'imiter un prédécesseur estimé.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

À propos de la complexité de notre société et des compétences toujours plus étonnantes des législateurs que nous rencontrons ici — et je ne suggère pas que nous sommes plus compétents que nos prédécesseurs du siècle dernier, mais que nos équipes de soutien sont plus complexes, que nous avons des bureaux de circonscription, que nous jouissons d'un meilleur accès à la Bibliothèque du Parlement, etc. —, je suis vraiment frappé par l'augmentation du nombre et de l'importance des affaires émanant des députés. Tout au long de mes 19 ans au Parlement, j'ai remarqué une tendance marquée dans cette direction. Il me semble que nous pourrions nous en servir pour traiter les multiples enjeux qui ne s'insèrent pas dans le programme du gouvernement ou des partis d'opposition, mais qui ont de l'importance. Ces enjeux ne sont pas toujours locaux; certains touchent tout le pays, mais ils sont quelque peu particuliers.

Cela dit, je trouve que nous ne réussissons pas à traiter les projets de loi émanant de députés de manière à éviter qu'ils se coincent dans un goulot d'étranglement. Nous devrions veiller à ce que chaque député, quelle que soit sa place dans la hiérarchie ou son numéro de loterie, puisse déposer un projet de loi à la Chambre en sachant qu'il franchira les diverses étapes de lecture et qu'il arrivera au Sénat à temps pour y être adopté. Nous n'y parviendrons qu'en consacrant le temps nécessaire à l'examen de ces projets de loi. Il faudrait inévitablement le faire dans une chambre parallèle. Autrement, nous devrons siéger des nuits entières à la Chambre des communes pour traiter les affaires émanant de députés. La chambre parallèle semble offrir un moyen plus humain et pratique de le faire.

(1125)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'allais demander l'avis du témoin à ce sujet, mais mon temps est écoulé. Vous pourrez peut-être vous arranger pour dire ce que vous en pensez en répondant aux questions de M. Graham ou de Mme Duncan.

Le président:

Vous pouvez nous donner votre avis, si vous le désirez.

M. Charles Robert:

Je le répète, vous pourrez certainement ajouter cela au rôle que vous choisirez pour la chambre parallèle en fonction de vos priorités et de vos objectifs.

Le président:

Madame Duncan.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Merci beaucoup.

Je siège pour la première fois à ce comité. Je me suis toujours demandé de quoi les membres du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pouvaient bien débattre. Je n'en reviens pas d'entendre ce que vous dites. Nous pourrions peut-être charger un membre du Centre Samara de suivre un député pendant une journée. Il verrait que nous n'avons pas une seconde de libre pour accomplir un iota de travail de plus. Une chambre parallèle, je...

J'ai beaucoup de questions à poser à ce sujet. Ce que vous dites sur les projets de loi omnibus est très vrai, mais l'opposition ne cesse de demander qu'on les sépare, qu'on en débatte dans les comités permanents concernés, mais on n'accorde jamais ces demandes. Je préférerais cela au lieu d'être reléguée dans une horrible chambre que personne ne prendra au sérieux.

Nous avons bien des possibilités d'améliorer l'aspect démocratique du Parlement et d'inviter non seulement les élus, mais des membres du public, des scientifiques et des experts à venir témoigner afin que nous puissions entendre leurs opinions.

Bien des gens trouveront cette initiative passionnante, parce que nous pourrons enfin participer à des débats. Nous ne le faisons pas vraiment ici. Une personne parle, puis une autre occupe le micro, et une autre encore aura éventuellement le temps de faire une allocution. Alors ma grande question est la suivante. S'il y avait un mécanisme, pas nécessairement une autre chambre, mais si chaque année, nous réservions du temps pour organiser de vrais débats, ne pourrions-nous pas alors enfin nous entendre sur les enjeux d'actualité?

Disons par exemple que nous débattions réellement pour résoudre le problème de l'assurance-médicaments. Nous ne nous contenterions pas d'écouter des discours, mais nous animerions un débat intéressant, orienté peut-être par un groupe d'experts.

J'ai regardé un peu en quoi consistent ces deux autres chambres parallèles, et il me semble qu'on y procède exactement comme nous le faisons ici à la Chambre. Alors je me demande pourquoi il nous faudrait une chambre parallèle. Les gouvernements majoritaires me tracassent beaucoup. Comment éviterions-nous, dans cette deuxième chambre, que les députés du gouvernement majoritaire contrôlent entièrement les débats? Qui accordera plus de temps à certains intervenants pendant ces débats? Il faudra discuter de ces questions cruciales.

Quel est l'objectif de cette initiative? Vise-t-elle à offrir un temps de parole équitable à ceux qui n'ont pas l'occasion d'exprimer leurs opinions? À l'heure actuelle, de nombreux députés sont frustrés de ne pas pouvoir déposer leurs projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire à cause des mesures procédurales qu'impose le gouvernement au pouvoir.

Je voudrais savoir si vous avez discuté de ce genre de problèmes avec les deux autres gouvernements pour savoir s'ils ont réglé certaines de ces questions et comment, selon eux, cette seconde chambre les aide.

M. Charles Robert:

Je n'ai pas demandé à Westminster et à Canberra comment ils gèrent leurs affaires parlementaires. Je connais un peu leurs cultures.

Je pense que Westminster, avec ses 650 députés et ses mille ans d'histoire, est lié à des traditions et à des comportements qui sont différents des nôtres.

Le Parlement australien n'est pas aussi ancien. Bien qu'il ait évolué de façon assez similaire à celui du Canada, la chambre y est très partisane, et la discipline de parti est très fortement appliquée. Je dirais qu'on s'y comporte de façon très similaire à ce que vous venez de suggérer.

(1130)

Mme Linda Duncan:

Que fait-on dans la deuxième chambre?

M. Charles Robert:

Comme vous le voyez, dans la deuxième chambre on traite d'enjeux que, je crois, M. Simms, M. Graham et M. Reid considéreraient comme étant secondaires. Vu la discipline à laquelle les partis sont assujettis, c'est peut-être une option plus sûre. Cela soulage un peu la pression, et les députés peuvent soulever des questions qu'ils jugent importantes. Cette option convient à Canberra, parce qu'elle permet aux députés de se concentrer sur des enjeux qui les intéressent profondément.

Mme Linda Duncan:

À part la difficulté de trouver une nouvelle salle, alors que l'édifice du Centre est fermé...

M. Charles Robert:

Considérez cette chambre comme un nouveau comité.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Notre caucus ne peut plus se réunir là-bas, parce qu'il n'y a pas assez de place, alors je ne vois pas où nous caserions une autre chambre. Il faudra aussi de la place pour les greffiers et les interprètes. De plus, les pressions sont fortes pour que nous ayons des interprètes autochtones.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Nous allons aussi devoir penser à combien coûtera l’application de ce train de mesures.

M. Charles Robert:

On tiendra compte de tous ces facteurs. Nous aurons une certaine marge de manoeuvre. Tout dépendra du modèle que vous proposerez. Si la chambre parallèle se réunit cinq jours par semaine pendant de longues heures, alors oui, vous avez probablement raison. Mais si elle ne se réunit que pendant quelques heures — comme les comités, disons —, je n'ai pas l'impression que l'impact sera aussi considérable que vous l'imaginez.

Mme Linda Duncan:

À mon avis, l'aspect du respect de la vie de famille causera de gros obstacles. Je crois que l'une de ces chambres se réunit à 16 h 30. Je ne pense pas que nos députés accepteront cela.

M. Charles Robert:

Je peux vous dire que dans le bon vieux temps — et je vous parle vraiment du bon vieux temps —, la Chambre des communes à Westminster commençait à siéger à 7 heures le matin. Le plus drôle, c'est qu'on a levé la séance quand la motion d'apporter des bougies a été rejetée.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Eh bien, nous ne voulons pas de bougies ici. Nous avons déjà perdu une Chambre des communes.

À mon avis, l'élément clé, si vous acceptez de l'envisager, sera de décider qui d'autre établira le programme et qui choisira les thèmes à débattre ce jour-là. À l'heure actuelle, dans nos comités, le gouvernement majoritaire prend toutes ces décisions. Je suppose que si nous voulons vraiment permettre à d'autres députés de participer, nous devrons démocratiser ce genre de prise de décisions. Il me semble qu'on a déjà proposé de nombreuses façons de démocratiser les délibérations actuelles de la Chambre. Je suggère fortement que nous nous attaquions à cela avant de commencer à inventer une autre chambre.

Le président:

Merci, madame Duncan.

Je vais maintenant assouplir la ronde de questions en permettant à quiconque a des questions de les poser.

Nous commencerons par M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vais m'étendre un peu sur certains des sujets mentionnés tout à l'heure.

La faiblesse de certains projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire cause de la frustration autour de nous. Nous avons une journée, une semaine et un mois pour absolument tout, ce qui est bien, mais je pense que les projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire ont beaucoup plus de potentiel que cela. À mon avis, une chambre de débat secondaire leur redonnerait une raison d'être, une certaine importance.

Alors...

M. Scott Reid:

Nous en établirons une pour tout le monde et pas uniquement pour les gagnants à la loterie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est vrai, et il serait bon de modifier le processus de sélection de ces projets de loi pour qu'ils puissent au moins survivre. J'ai déjà déposé une motion là-dessus il y a un certain temps. Nous réglerions ainsi le problème ridicule du député qui, pendant ses cinq mandats, n'a jamais pu déposer un projet de loi alors que le projet d'un petit gars nouvellement élu passe tout de suite.

M. Scott Simms:

Tout à fait d'accord.

Un député: Vous en avez déjà déposé un?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n'est plus dans la liste. Il me faudra à peu près 10 ans pour le faire passer.

M. Scott Simms:

Un projet de loi en 15 ans.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Pour en revenir à la structure d'une équipe de débat secondaire, ce qui à mon avis est une bonne idée, vous nous avez dit qu'il faudra établir des règles. Quel modèle nous suggéreriez-vous de suivre pour commencer? S'agirait-il d'un comité plénier avec des règles qui s'appliqueraient en pilote automatique afin que les membres se lèvent et suspendent leur réunion dès qu'ils entendent la sonnerie? La structure se situerait-elle entre celle de la Chambre et celle d'un comité?

M. Charles Robert:

Vous pourriez commencer par suivre le modèle de comité plénier, et une fois que vous aurez déterminé les objectifs de la chambre parallèle, alors vous pourriez établir les règles. À vous de choisir. D'autres gouvernements traitent leurs affaires d'une façon différente, et cela pourrait vous inspirer. Vous avez là une occasion d'expérimenter.

Je suppose que si vous décidiez de ne pas voter dans la chambre parallèle afin de favoriser le débat, il serait moins important de déterminer le degré de contrôle qu'aurait le gouvernement au pouvoir.

(1135)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois qu'une chambre de débat parallèle sert, pour parler en jargon informatique, à effectuer un traitement multifilière. Un ordinateur qui effectue un traitement multitransactionnel, ou multifilière comme on l'appelle, télécharge des éléments vers un autre processus, ou vers l'autre chambre, pour se pencher sur un problème particulier. Le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire serait renvoyé à la chambre de débat secondaire, puis retournerait à la Chambre pour le vote. Je trouve cela tout à fait logique. Je ne vois aucune raison de voter dans la chambre secondaire, même pour obtenir un consensus unanime. À mon avis, on ne devrait pas permettre le vote dans cette chambre.

J'ai une autre question à vous poser. Y a-t-il une raison particulière pour que la chambre de débat secondaire soit une chambre physique? Pourrions-nous établir une chambre virtuelle?

M. Charles Robert:

C'est une idée très novatrice, et je crois que vous devriez l'examiner avec beaucoup de soin. Par exemple, les règles actuelles exigent une présence physique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si la procédure se déroule sur pilote automatique, sans quorum, sans vote et sans consensus unanimes, elle devient fictive. Si quelqu'un veut s'en servir de la même manière, par exemple, que le débat d'ajournement où une personne parle, une autre personne répond et personne d'autre n'est tenu d'y assister, si c'est...

M. Charles Robert:

Cela se produirait si vous fixiez un quorum et que vous décidiez de sa taille. Si le quorum est trop petit, il perd de son importance. Il animera peut-être le débat, mais si vous débattez avec vous-même devant un miroir, je n'en vois pas l'utilité.

Un député: Il le fait tout le temps.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il arrive parfois que des gens mènent le débat devant un miroir, mais que 337 personnes regardent le miroir. Je ne suis pas sûr que cet exemple s'applique bien.

Quoi qu'il en soit, j'ai une autre question à vous poser. Je reviendrai à cela plus tard si j'en ai l'occasion.

Si nous créons une chambre de débat, devrions-nous lui donner un nom qui indique sa raison d'être?

M. Charles Robert:

Bien sûr, ce serait une bonne idée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bon. Selon moi, l'objectif ultime d'une chambre de débat secondaire est de renvoyer certains aspects de ces choses aux députés d'arrière-ban. J'ai un nom à vous proposer. J'en ai déjà parlé à Scott, et c'est Scott et Scott. Je proposerais de l'appeler la chambre William Lenthall pour qu'on n'oublie pas que la dernière fois que les membres du pouvoir exécutif ont essayé de s'ingérer, ils ont perdu la tête, alors je l'appellerais la chambre de l'arrière-ban.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

C'est réconfortant.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Charles Robert:

Bien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je proposerai cette motion.

M. Charles Robert:

M. Lenthall n'a jamais perdu la tête, soit dit en passant. Il est décédé à un âge avancé; il avait plus de quatre-vingts ans.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, mais c'est lui qui a protégé l'indépendance de la Chambre...

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... et à mon avis, ce nom souligne les raisons pour lesquelles nous créons cette chambre, et tous ceux qui viennent...

M. Charles Robert:

Dans ce cas, vous pourriez aussi l'appeler la chambre du roi Charles I.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voilà ce qui arriverait en cas d'échec.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

Après vous, bien sûr.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

M. Reid, puis M. Davidson.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, j'avais une question à poser à ce sujet.

Je ne tiens pas à un nom particulier — je sais qu'on en a discuté vivement — ni à un endroit où créer cette chambre. Évidemment, à la longue, il faudra trouver un endroit convenable. En fait, ce choix se fera en fonction de l'évolution de la chambre. Nous ne pouvons pas choisir maintenant un endroit permanent, puisque la Chambre des communes ne siège pas dans une salle permanente. Je ne fais que penser à haute voix. Il en sera de même pour le choix du nom, qui évoluera avec le temps, il me semble.

Tout cela étant dit, voici la question qui me vient à l'esprit. Disons que, comme vous l'avez suggéré, nous discutions de cela dans le cadre de notre débat tenu conformément à l'article 51 du Règlement dans la période de 60 à 90 jours qui suivront le début de la 43e législature. Imaginons même que cette chambre soit créée pendant cette législature. Ce n'est pas garanti, mais c'est très possible. Ensuite, nous venons demander au greffier dans quelle salle il nous suggère d'installer cette chambre.

Quelle salle nous suggéreriez-vous?

(1140)

M. Charles Robert:

Je suppose qu'au cours des discussions sur cette chambre parallèle, nous mentionnerions la taille et le taux de participation des députés auxquels nous nous attendrions. Cela nous aiderait à choisir la salle qui conviendrait. Si vous décidez de créer une chambre énorme qui se réunit fréquemment — n'écartons pas cette possibilité —, alors je suggère l'édifice SJAM. Si vous voulez créer une plus petite chambre...

M. Scott Reid:

C'est l'édifice Sir-John-A.-Macdonald, de l'autre côté de la rue.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui, désolé. Si vous voulez créer quelque chose...

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai précisé cela pour les gens qui nous regardent et qui suivent avec passion l'enregistrement de cette réunion.

M. Charles Robert:

Si vous désirez créer une chambre beaucoup plus petite, alors nous pourrions aménager l'une des plus grandes salles de comité à cet effet.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est vrai. En pratique, je crois que nous devrions consacrer une salle particulière pour cette chambre. Il serait utile qu'elle se trouve dans cet édifice parce que, par exemple quand la sonnerie retentit, les députés pourraient poursuivre leur débat pendant une période donnée. On pourrait fixer une règle à ce sujet.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous voyez où je veux en venir.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Ensuite, il y a le problème du nombre de salles. L’utilisation de l’édifice Sir-John-A.-Macdonald résout le problème d’avoir une salle réservée, mais il faut aussi plus de temps. Je peux imaginer qu’on interrompe les travaux alors que la sonnerie d’appel se fait entendre tout le temps, comme c’est parfois le cas, plus que pour un comité normal.

M. Charles Robert:

Disons que cela devient la réalité. On pourrait prévoir que lorsqu’un vote est demandé à la chambre, s’il coïncide avec l’horaire de la chambre parallèle, la sonnerie d’appel devra retentir pendant, disons, 10 minutes de plus.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord.

M. Charles Robert:

Il y a des façons d’apporter des ajustements qui tiennent compte de la réalité de la création de la seconde chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien. Je suis d’accord.

Le président:

Scott, simplement pour répondre à cette question, les attachés de recherche vont nous présenter le nombre de sièges dans les deux autres chambres, plus la fréquentation moyenne, pour que nous sachions sur quoi ils se basent.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce sera très utile.

Le président:

En fait, c’est très petit.

M. Scott Reid:

Je le crois.

Merci.

Le président:

Le quorum est de trois.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien...

Le président:

Scot.

M. Scot Davidson (York—Simcoe, PCC):

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, comme je suis le nouveau venu, j’ai évidemment quelques questions à poser.

Compte tenu du système qui existe en Australie et au Royaume-Uni, et de la façon dont ces pays ont établi leurs règles, vous ont-ils présenté une structure de coûts?

M. Charles Robert:

Je n’ai rien vu de cela.

M. Scot Davidson:

Je me posais simplement la question du coût pour les contribuables.

De plus, à propos de la chambre dans laquelle nous siégeons actuellement, ne pourrions-nous pas, comme certains députés l’ont dit, changer la structure actuelle et tenir une séance de débat? Si quelqu’un disait, dans la nouvelle chambre, nous allons prévoir quelque chose à 8 heures du matin, les gens disent qu’ils n’ont pas le temps pour cela à l'heure actuelle.

M. Charles Robert:

C’est possible. Si vous prévoyez que la chambre parallèle se réunira à l’extérieur des heures de la chambre principale, ce ne sera pas impossible. Mais c’est ce qu’il faudrait faire. Il faudrait que ce soit un processus tout à fait délibéré.

M. Scot Davidson:

Allez-y.

Le président:

Linda.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Je pense que les leaders à la Chambre et les whips sont des gens importants à inclure dans cette discussion sur les possibilités et les répercussions. Je sais qu’ils sont suffisamment occupés à s’assurer que les gens se présentent pour combler des postes aux comités, se présentent à un vote et se trouvent à la chambre pour appuyer les gens qui prennent la parole, et ainsi de suite. Il serait probablement bon de les entendre parler des complications que cela pourrait entraîner pour eux ou de la façon dont nous pourrions en tenir compte.

Je suis très préoccupée par toute proposition visant à dépenser davantage alors que nous avons déjà pris l'engagement, par exemple, de trouver les fonds nécessaires pour fournir des services d’interprétation aux Autochtones, et ce n’est pas ce que nous faisons. Par exemple, le comité dont je ressors a accepté pour la première fois de traduire son rapport dans quatre langues. Je pense que les coûts de ce genre de choses vont augmenter. Nous devons réfléchir aux engagements que nous avons déjà pris à la Chambre des communes et par l’entremise des comités avant de commencer à ajouter des dépenses pour ensuite faire marche arrière.

Il est très important d’examiner ce genre de facteurs. En ce qui concerne l’interprétation, il y a maintenant plus de complications. Je pense que l’établissement des coûts sera certainement un élément important que divers leaders demanderont probablement — ce sera certainement le cas du bureau du Président et ainsi de suite.

Qui décidera de l’ordre du jour et des débats? Des personnes différentes par rapport à l'heure actuelle, c’est-à-dire la majorité des membres de chaque comité? Différents comités fonctionnent de façon plus conviviale que d’autres. Cette chambre sera-t-elle différente, surtout si David dit qu’elle devra accorder une plus grande importance aux députés d’arrière-ban? Il y a beaucoup plus de députés d’arrière-ban, dans le gouvernement libéral majoritaire à l’heure actuelle, qu’il n’y en avait dans le gouvernement conservateur majoritaire précédent.

Ce genre de choses... Les députés seront plus enthousiastes s’ils pensent qu'ils auront en général davantage d’occasions de débattre.

Si j’ai bien compris, cette idée vient du Centre Samara. Ils ont rédigé un rapport sur les frustrations exprimées par d'ex-députés à l’égard de la démocratie et ainsi de suite. Il y a aussi le fait que le public veut entendre davantage ce que pensent les différents partis et les députés. Je n’ai vraiment entendu personne parler du rôle du grand public dans ce dossier.

Cette salle devra-t-elle accueillir des auditoires importants? C’est une autre question, car le public pourrait venir assister à nos débats à la Chambre. Ils voudront probablement participer à certains de ces débats, surtout s’ils les recommandent.

(1145)

Le président:

Madame Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être avec nous aujourd'hui, monsieur Robert.

Vous avez piqué ma curiosité tantôt. Je suis d'accord avec Mme Duncan pour dire que nous n'avons pas deux minutes à nous. Nous commençons ici le matin et nous ne savons jamais à quelle heure nous allons terminer. J'ai eu la chance de siéger à l'Assemblée nationale du Québec, et je pensais travailler fort là-bas. Nous siégions trois jours, de midi à 14 heures, puis nous arrêtions. Nous n'étions pas en train de manger sur une table de comité comme nous le faisons ici. Nous arrêtions vraiment. C'était tout en français. Nous finissions à 18 h 30 et nous siégions trois jours.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est très civilisé.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je vous dirais que les discours n'y sont pas nécessairement plus élevés. Quand je suis arrivée ici, la première chose qui me soit venue à l'esprit, c'était si nous allions manger. J'avais faim! Trêve de plaisanterie maintenant. Le programme législatif avançait quand même.

On parle de l'Australie et de la Grande-Bretagne. Si j'ai bien compris vos propos, les pays qui ne suivent pas le modèle du Commonwealth ou de la Grande-Bretagne n'ont pas adopté de chambre parallèle.

Vous avez aussi dit que c'est le temps d'être innovateur et que tout peut être proposé.

M. Charles Robert:

Tout à fait. Cela dépend de la volonté de ce comité. Vous pouvez décider d'établir une chambre parallèle, mais avec certains objectifs. C'est vraiment à vous de déterminer quelle chambre parallèle vous voulez. Vous pouvez déterminer les heures de travail qui correspondent à la disponibilité des députés, qui, comme vous l'avez dit, est très réduite.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Au début de votre présentation, vous avez parlé de la note d'information de 2016 au sujet des initiatives visant à favoriser une Chambre des communes propice à la famille. Vous avez parlé de cela. Vous avez dit que la façon des députés de représenter leurs concitoyens avait un peu changé.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il y a cela, mais il y a aussi que le rôle familial des hommes et des femmes a changé et évolué depuis que la Chambre des communes existe. Les règles n'ont pas été mises à jour et c'est un sujet qu'il faudra aborder.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est sûr qu'on peut proposer des modifications pour améliorer la situation des députés relativement à leur vie familiale. La Chambre a déjà commencé à faire des efforts en ce sens.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il faudra en faire encore, parce que les marathons de votes que nous faisons ne sont pas très bons pour la santé, à mon sens.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est mieux que d'ajourner après minuit.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

L'Assemblée nationale du Québec ne siège pas plus tard que minuit. Cela continue le lendemain.

M. Charles Robert:

Normalement, la Chambre ajourne vers 20 heures.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Normalement, jusqu'à ce que...

M. Charles Robert:

Cette décision a été prise pour faciliter la vie familiale de tous les députés.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

En finissant à minuit, nous n'avons pas de vie familiale.

Vous avez dit être ici depuis longtemps. Je sais que vous étiez au Sénat avant, mais depuis combien de temps êtes-vous ici?

M. Charles Robert:

Cela fait presque 40 ans.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Quarante ans! Vous avez commencé jeune.

M. Charles Robert:

D'accord.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Pour résumer, c'est nous qui devrons décider quels sont nos objectifs.

Merci.

(1150)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J’aimerais simplement faire un commentaire, et entendre ensuite le greffier.

Mme Duncan a demandé quel serait le rôle du public dans cette chambre. Nous avons déjà parlé un peu des pétitions. Je crois que la chambre parallèle du Royaume-Uni traite beaucoup de pétitions du public et qu’elle peut ensuite débattre des questions à l'enjeu.

M. Charles Robert:

C’est exact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Souvent, les pétitions en ligne soumises par l’intermédiaire de petition.org ou celles que nous recevons officiellement, portent sur des questions brûlantes pour le public. Si cette chambre pouvait accueillir un grand nombre de parlementaires, ou si les personnes du public pouvaient voir à la télévision que leurs questions font l’objet de débats, plutôt que d'assister seulement aux affaires courantes ou aux projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire de temps à autre, je pense que cela ferait vraiment participer le public et le rapprocherait un peu plus de ce que nous faisons.

M. Charles Robert:

Je suis d'accord.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous des commentaires à faire à ce sujet ou des suggestions à faire quant à la mesure dans laquelle cette chambre parallèle devrait être consacrée à des activités de ce genre, ou si ce n’est vraiment pas important pour vous?

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois que cela dépend vraiment de l'importance que vous, les parlementaires, y accordez. La chambre parallèle est conçue pour tenir compte — soyons plus audacieux — de la frustration que vous pouvez ressentir dans votre vie de parlementaire et de ce qui pourrait aider à valider et à relever les défis auxquels vous êtes confrontés comme parlementaires.

Si vous estimez que les pétitions sont importantes, qu’elles expriment un intérêt démocratique pour divers sujets, il serait utile de prévoir du temps dans une chambre parallèle pour débattre les pétitions qui atteignent un certain seuil de soutien.

Comme nous l’avons demandé plus tôt, comment gérer un débat sur un projet de loi complexe, comment tenir un débat parallèle qui donnerait aux députés une meilleure occasion de participer à ce qu’ils estiment être un projet de loi important lorsqu’ils ont un point de vue à exprimer — c’est aussi une façon pour la chambre parallèle d’aider à atténuer le sentiment de frustration que peuvent ressentir les députés.

Nous siégeons 100 ou 135 jours dans une bonne année. Nous siégeons à heures fixes. Il y a beaucoup de choses à faire en bien peu de temps. Si la loi devient de plus en plus complexe, comme cela semble être le cas, comment peut-on gérer cela?

Le gouvernement ne risque pas de rapetisser, ni de devenir plus simple. Il est peu probable que les mesures législatives soient aussi faciles qu’il y a quelques années, ou il y a de nombreuses années, lorsqu’un projet de loi de 10 pages était considéré comme un gros projet de loi. Au XIXe siècle, la plupart des lois étudiées par le Parlement étaient privées. Elles n'émanaient pas du gouvernement. Le gouvernement était trop petit pour se mêler d’un grand nombre de mesures législatives. C’est aussi l’une des raisons pour lesquelles les séances étaient relativement courtes. Je crois que dans un cas, nous avons eu jusqu'à quatre sessions en un an, ce qui signifie quatre discours du Trône.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

J’aimerais parler d’une chose qui a été mentionnée plus tôt, la situation des whips. Je ne pense pas qu'il soit possible de travailler en vase clos et d'exclure les whips. À mon humble avis, je pense qu'il faut créer ici quelque chose qui permet de contourner les pièges dans lesquels un whip peut tomber, pour ainsi dire. Le whip doit donc s’assurer que les votes ont lieu, que les parlementaires se présentent aux votes, et que l'étude du projet de loi progresse. Je parle évidemment du whip et du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre.

Je ne pense pas que la chambre parallèle doive interférer de quelque façon que ce soit avec leur fonction. Si nous étudions les projets de loi d’initiative ministérielle du jour dans la chambre parallèle afin que d’autres personnes puissent prendre la parole, et si je n’ai pas la chance de m'exprimer dans l’édifice de l’Ouest ou à la Chambre des communes, j’aurai l’occasion de m'exprimer dans la chambre parallèle. Mais, encore une fois, cela dépendrait des délibérations à la Chambre des communes.

Je défends la cause des députés d’arrière-ban, mais je ne voudrais pas abolir les fonctions essentielles du whip ou du leader à la Chambre, pour des raisons évidentes.

Soit dit en passant, quelqu’un d’autre a parlé des votes, des marathons de vote et de ce genre de choses. Eh bien, c’est un aspect sur lequel nous devrons également nous pencher. C’est complètement différent. J’ai déjà raconté cette histoire et je vais la répéter. Trois ou quatre députés du Parlement européen sont venus assister à la période des questions. Après la période des questions, il y a eu un vote. Cette personne — j’oublie son nom, mais elle siège au Parlement européen depuis près de deux décennies — a dit: « C’était une expérience fascinante. J’aime votre période de questions, parce que les questions sont limitées à 35 secondes. » Je lui ai demandé pourquoi et elle m’a dit: « Eh bien, c’est passionnant. Vous débattez à l'heure du XXIe siècle, mais pourquoi votez-vous encore comme au XIXe siècle? » C’est vrai, en raison du vote électronique, mais c’est une tout autre question. Je voulais simplement ajouter cela.

Mais en ce qui concerne la chambre parallèle, qu’en est-il des témoins? L’un des avantages que nous avons ici avec les comités, y compris le Comité plénier, c’est que nous pouvons... À titre d’ex-président du Comité des pêches, je peux parler de l’expérience que vivent quotidiennement les pêcheurs, mais quand un témoin de Toogood Arm — cela existe, soit dit en passant; c’est le nom d'un village — arrive et dit: « Voici ce qui se passe dans l’océan en ce moment », c’est un énorme avantage. Les intéressés peuvent venir nous faire part de l’expérience la plus vitale, comme nous le verrons ensuite avec Samara. Ils savent de quoi ils parlent.

(1155)

M. Charles Robert:

Exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Dans ces chambres parallèles, y a-t-il moyen d’inclure des témoignages?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense que cela devient vraiment un comité plénier.

M. Scott Simms:

C’est vrai, mais devons-nous nous en tenir aux limites du comité plénier?

M. Charles Robert:

Je ne pense pas qu’il faille s’en tenir à quoi que ce soit.

M. Scott Simms:

D’accord.

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense qu’il s’agit d’un comité ou d’une chambre parallèle que vous pouvez concevoir en fonction de vos besoins — du XXIe ou du XVIIIe siècle; à vous de choisir.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui.

M. Charles Robert:

Cette chambre peut être utile aux travaux du Parlement. Si c’est votre objectif, alors, peu importe ce que vous considérez utile, cela peut être un modèle que vous pouvez construire.

Disons que vous voulez entendre des témoins. Eh bien, vous pourriez établir une chambre parallèle et un mécanisme indiquerait clairement que tel jour ou tel autre, des témoins seront invités à participer comme... En Grande-Bretagne, il y a des membres profanes au sein des comités. On leur permet de participer aux travaux de la chambre parallèle.

M. Scott Simms:

Excusez-moi, mais qui sont ces membres profanes?

M. Charles Robert:

Ce ne sont pas des parlementaires.

M. Scott Simms:

D’accord.

M. Charles Robert:

Ces personnes peuvent faire partie de la composition d’un comité au Royaume-Uni. Je pense que c’est celui sur les normes. Mais il existe une disposition prévoyant la participation de membres profanes.

M. Scott Simms:

D’accord.

M. Charles Robert:

Donc, si l'on veut présenter des points de vue vraiment innovateurs à la chambre parallèle, il faut permettre aux profanes de participer.

M. Scott Reid:

S’agit-il d’une convention, d'accepter des membres profanes, ou est-ce inscrit dans le Règlement de Westminster?

M. Charles Robert:

Il faudrait que je sache comment la disposition a été conçue. Je pense qu'elle a été instaurée vers 2008, lorsqu’ils se sont rendu compte que pour des raisons de transparence et de reddition de comptes, le fait que seuls les membres participent à l’examen des codes de conduite et des questions de ce genre... Le fait d’avoir des membres profanes permettait de donner une plus grande crédibilité au système.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est intéressant. Peut-être pourrions-nous demander à nos analystes de jeter un coup d’oeil là-dessus et de nous revenir à ce sujet.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, Scott.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai quelques brèves observations à faire au sujet de la structure de l’endroit. Lorsque nous discutions, je me suis dit qu’il n’y avait rien qui empêchait — nous sommes ouverts à tout — la chambre secondaire de débat d’être une chambre mixte avec le Sénat, ce qui en ferait la chambre secondaire de débat pour les deux chambres à la fois.

Elle aurait son propre ordre du jour...

Mme Linda Duncan:

Il faudrait que j’en parle à mon parti.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N’essayons-nous pas de garder les partis à l'extérieur de nos travaux? N’est-ce pas ce que vous avez dit?

Mme Linda Duncan:

Eh bien...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’y verrais un lieu pour tenir des débats d’urgence et des débats exploratoires, étudier des projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire, des pétitions et des débats sur les privilèges, qui pourraient durer aussi longtemps que nous le voudrions, la chambre principale étant uniquement réservée aux projets de loi du gouvernement, aux journées de l’opposition et à tous les votes. C’est la structure que je verrais, mais le fait d’avoir un comité mixte secondaire... Si les projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire y sont renvoyés, il sera peut-être possible de remédier au problème des retards accumulés par ces projets de loi au Sénat.

Vous avez été greffier du Sénat pendant longtemps.

(1200)

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez peut-être une idée à ce sujet?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense, encore une fois, que les seules limites à notre inventivité sont celles de notre imagination.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai de l’imagination.

M. Charles Robert:

Eh bien, fixez des objectifs qui, selon vous, sont structurés de manière à ce que votre imagination et ces objectifs s’harmonisent. Si vous pensez, par exemple, qu’il pourrait être utile d’avoir une sorte d’association avec le Sénat, alors c’est une option à envisager.

Pour ce qui est des affaires émanant des députés, disons que, dans la mesure où un projet de loi atteint une certaine étape, soit à la Chambre ou au Sénat, ce qui prouve qu’il a un certain niveau d'acceptabilité, il est possible, dans ces circonstances, au lieu de le renvoyer à l’étape de l’étude en comité, de le renvoyer au comité parallèle composé de membres des deux chambres, et cela pourrait servir à faire avancer l’étude de ce projet de loi à la deuxième chambre, quelle qu’elle soit, une fois qu’il a été adopté par la Chambre.

Ce compte rendu des délibérations pourrait, d’une façon ou d’une autre, être pris en compte lorsque les travaux avancent à la deuxième chambre pour fins de délibération. C'est une possibilité.

Le président:

Soyez bref, car nous n'avons presque plus de temps.

M. Scott Simms:

Je voulais simplement faire un commentaire.

C’est peut-être une des choses que nous pourrions faire. Par exemple, on peut renvoyer un projet de loi au comité avant la deuxième lecture. De cette façon, on pourrait simplement ouvrir le projet de loi à beaucoup d’autres amendements. Ce qu'il serait alors possible de faire, c’est l’envoyer à la chambre parallèle, si c’est le cas.

M. Charles Robert:

C’est une possibilité qu’il faudrait étudier pour s’assurer que tous les mécanismes sont bien définis et compris, alors cette option devient... Mais, comme Mme Duncan l’a souligné, les témoins seraient les membres profanes.

M. Scott Simms:

Dans la seconde chambre.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Ce ne sont pas nécessairement des témoins appropriés.

M. Charles Robert:

Mais ils ne sont pas...

Mme Linda Duncan:

Ils deviendraient les...

M. Charles Robert:

Les membres profanes ne seraient pas nécessairement permanents.

Le président:

Merci de cette discussion fascinante.

Il y a déjà deux comités auxquels participe le Sénat. Ce n’est pas impossible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n’est pas nécessairement le meilleur modèle pour ce que je veux accomplir.

Le président:

J’ai une dernière question, et je suppose que je connais la réponse, mais comme vous l'avez dit, notre Parlement est ouvert à tout et libre de décider, mais à votre connaissance, de tout ce qui se fait actuellement au Royaume-Uni ou en Australie, dans notre conception d’un autre organisme, nous pourrions le faire légalement si nous apportions les changements qui s'imposent au Règlement. Est-ce bien exact?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense qu’il y a des considérations politiques qui entrent en ligne de compte dans tout examen de ce qui est possible, et c’est ce que vous devez décider, mais je crois que M. Reid a mentionné la question des motions de programmation. Elles existent au Royaume-Uni depuis 20 ans. Il y a eu beaucoup de réticence lorsqu’elles ont été présentées pour la première fois, mais elles sont maintenant considérées comme faisant partie des travaux courants pour un parlementaire. Je suppose qu’il serait difficile d’introduire une telle mesure. Elle serait contestée parce qu’elle serait perçue comme une façon de limiter davantage le rôle des députés. C’est un très sérieux enjeu de négociation, et il se peut fort bien qu’une chambre parallèle soit établie en contrepartie.

C’est peut-être la contrepartie, si vous voulez.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup d’être venu, monsieur le greffier.

Je suis certain que ce ne sera pas la dernière fois que nous discutons de ce sujet. Nous avons commencé il y a longtemps. Le Comité a amorcé le débat sur cette question lorsque nous avons entamé notre première discussion familiale, comme vous l'avez dit. Nous avons commencé ce débat, et comme je ne pense pas qu’il prendra fin de sitôt, je suis sûr que nous allons vous revoir. Nous apprécions vos sages conseils.

M. Charles Robert:

Merci beaucoup de m’avoir écouté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous suffisamment de greffiers pour deux chambres?

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, je pense que cela dépend des heures. Si la chambre parallèle siège, certains comités pourraient ne pas siéger, si bien que nous pourrions probablement trouver les ressources nécessaires.

Le président:

Linda. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Combien de greffiers y a-t-il dans votre équipe de greffiers?

M. Charles Robert:

Ils sont à peu près 90.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord. [Traduction]

Le président:

Quatre-vingt-dix greffiers, c'est impressionnant.

C’est une bonne façon de terminer.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes, le temps de laisser s'installer d'autres témoins.

(1200)

(1205)

Le président:

Bienvenue à la 147e séance du Comité, alors que nous poursuivons notre étude sur les chambres de débat parallèles.

Nous sommes heureux d’accueillir des représentants du Centre Samara pour la démocratie. Nous accueillons aujourd’hui Michael Morden, directeur de recherche, et Paul Thomas, associé de recherche principal. Merci à vous deux d’être ici aujourd’hui.

Les députés se souviendront que Samara a également présenté un mémoire au Comité sur le sujet.

Je vous cède la parole, monsieur Morden, pour votre déclaration préliminaire.

M. Michael Morden (directeur de recherche, Centre Samara pour la démocratie):

Merci beaucoup de m’avoir invité.

Je m’appelle Mike Morden. Je suis directeur de recherche au Centre Samara pour la démocratie. À mes côtés se trouve M. Paul E.J. Thomas, associé de recherche principal.

Comme vous le savez peut-être, le Centre Samara est un organisme de bienfaisance indépendant et non partisan qui se consacre au renforcement de la démocratie canadienne au moyen de la recherche et de divers programmes. Nous tenons à remercier le Comité d’avoir entrepris cette étude. Cela témoigne de son engagement à l’égard de la gestion de notre Parlement et de notre démocratie. Cela comprend l’examen de questions qui ne sont pas à l’avant-plan politique, mais qui méritent d’être examinées parce qu’elles présentent un potentiel d’amélioration progressive de nos institutions. C’est un rôle auquel nous voulons également contribuer.

Le Centre Samara appuie la création d’une chambre de débat parallèle. Nous encourageons également le Comité à garder à l’esprit les objectifs suivants lorsqu’il conçoit une telle chambre, c’est-à-dire qu’elle présente une proposition de valeur claire en ne faisant pas que reproduire les travaux et les caractéristiques de la chambre principale; qu'elle habilite les députés d’arrière-ban en leur donnant un plus grand contrôle sur l'ordre du jour et la teneur des débats; ce faisant, elle rendra les débats parlementaires plus pertinents et plus accessibles au Canadien moyen; et elle pourra être utilisée comme plateforme d’expérimentation afin d’améliorer l’état des débats au Parlement dans son ensemble.

Comme les membres du Comité ont peut-être déjà pris connaissance du mémoire que nous avons présenté le mois dernier, nous aimerions gagner le plus de temps possible afin de pouvoir répondre aux questions du mieux que nous le pouvons. Je vais commencer par décrire brièvement notre intérêt pour cette proposition. Paul, qui est plus éclairé à ce sujet et, en fait, sur la plupart des sujets, parlera ensuite d'un modèle de chambre parallèle qui, selon nous, est le mieux placé pour améliorer la vie et le travail du Parlement canadien et pour renforcer ses liens avec les citoyens.

Depuis sa création, le Centre Samara a mené des entrevues de départ auprès d’ex-parlementaires après leur départ à la retraite ou leur défaite électorale. Un thème central qui ressort de ce travail est la forte impression qu’ont les députés qu’un contrôle étendu des partis sur de nombreuses facettes de la vie parlementaire nuit à leur capacité de débattre de façon indépendante les enjeux et d’exercer une influence significative sur les politiques et les lois du gouvernement. Nous avons toujours soutenu que de telles limites ont d’importantes répercussions sur la santé générale de notre démocratie représentative.

Lors de notre dernière série d’entrevues, qui a eu lieu après l’élection générale de 2015, nous avons également été surpris et troublés de découvrir à quel point les ex-députés étaient particulièrement critiques au sujet des débats parlementaires. Nous avons repris ce thème l’année dernière, lorsque nous avons collaboré avec le caucus multipartite pour la démocratie afin de sonder les députés actuels. Nous avons posé des questions aux députés pour déterminer s’ils se sentaient plus ou moins habilités à faire le travail de représentation démocratique. La constatation la plus importante pour nous a été que les débats constituaient l'aspect du travail parlementaire où les députés estimaient avoir le moins d’impact. En fait, les deux tiers des députés qui ont répondu étaient insatisfaits de l’état des débats à la Chambre. Seulement 6 % ont indiqué que les débats représentaient un aspect du travail parlementaire où ils se sentaient habilités à influer sur les politiques ou les lois.

Nous avons également observé, comme d’autres l’ont fait, une augmentation des conflits partisans au fil du temps au Parlement, ce qui se reflète le plus simplement dans la montée récente et soutenue du recours à l’attribution de temps. Ces conflits reflètent le désir légitime des députés de l’opposition — et, nous l’espérons, de tous les députés — de débattre et de délibérer sur les affaires du gouvernement tout en faisant avancer les dossiers de façon indépendante. Ils reflètent également le désir légitime des dirigeants de tous les partis de faire progresser les affaires du gouvernement. Cette tension ne se résoudra pas de façon organique et pourrait même empirer.

Enfin, conformément au point de vue des députés, nos sondages continus auprès des Canadiens moyens ont révélé à maintes reprises que les députés sont plus aptes à refléter le point de vue de leur parti que celui de leurs électeurs. Nous voulons que les points de vue des citoyens soient davantage reflétés dans les débats parlementaires.

Bref, nous voyons quatre problèmes qui se chevauchent et qu’une chambre parallèle pourrait contribuer à résoudre. Premièrement, il y a les députés privés de pouvoir qui, en raison du contrôle du parti, sont entravés dans leur capacité de représenter leurs électeurs; deuxièmement, le mécontentement persistant à l’égard de la qualité des débats parlementaires, même parmi les députés; troisièmement, un manque de temps parlementaire; et quatrièmement, un décalage persistant entre les Canadiens et leur Parlement.

(1210)

M. Paul Thomas (associé de recherche principal, Centre Samara pour la démocratie):

Je commencerai également par exprimer la gratitude du Centre Samara d’avoir été invité à témoigner devant le Comité aujourd’hui. M. Morden a déjà parlé de certains des défis que nous estimons devoir relever à la Chambre des communes. Je vais donc me concentrer sur la façon dont une chambre parallèle pourrait être conçue pour contribuer à relever ces défis.

Comme le vice-président Bruce Stanton l’a expliqué dans ses observations au Comité le mois dernier, il existe deux précédents de chambres parallèles qui pourraient servir d’inspiration, soit la Chambre de la fédération au Parlement australien et Westminster Hall au Parlement britannique. Il s’agit dans les deux cas de chambres supplémentaires, et ni l’une ni l’autre n’est utilisée pour les votes par appel nominal. Les deux ne se réunissent que les jours où les chambres principales siègent également.

La Chambre de la fédération australienne est utilisée pour diverses affaires parlementaires, comme les déclarations de circonscription, les déclarations de députés et les débats sur des mesures législatives non litigieuses. Plutôt que d’ajouter de nouvelles fonctions, il s’agit de ce que M. Stanton a appelé une « voie adjacente » pour les travaux de la Chambre, la plupart de ses fonctions se déroulant dans une certaine mesure dans la chambre parallèle. De plus, ce sont les whips des partis qui prennent les décisions concernant les travaux dirigés vers cette chambre.

En revanche, les délibérations à Westminster Hall sont distinctes de celles de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni. Westminster Hall est utilisé exclusivement pour les débats de type ajournement, qui peuvent durer 30, 60 ou 90 minutes, selon la question à l’étude et le nombre de députés qui souhaitent prendre la parole. Les débats sont choisis au moyen de quatre mécanismes différents, qui sont tous dirigés par des députés d’arrière-ban, c’est-à-dire que les députés d’arrière-ban peuvent présenter une demande de débat au bureau du Président, qui tient un scrutin de candidatures une fois par semaine. Ils peuvent présenter une demande au comité des affaires des députés d’arrière-ban, qui est un comité de députés d’arrière-ban qui prévoit une partie du temps de débat à Westminster Hall et à la Chambre principale. Le comité de liaison, qui est composé des présidents des divers comités permanents, peut également planifier les débats sur les rapports des comités. Enfin, le comité des pétitions de la Chambre des communes peut programmer des débats sur les pétitions constituées de plus de 100 000 signatures.

Toutefois, comme sir David Natzler vous l’a fait remarquer, l’une des caractéristiques fondamentales des débats à Westminster Hall, c’est qu’un ministre doit assister aux séances et répondre aux points soulevés. Cette exigence permet aux débats d’avoir beaucoup plus d’importance que ne le permettent les déclarations de députés.

Fait important, il n’est pas nécessaire que de tels débats soient de nature explicitement critique envers le gouvernement. En effet, Westminster Hall est régulièrement utilisé pour des débats qui soulignent des journées symboliques, comme la Journée commémorative de l’Holocauste, la Journée mondiale du cancer ou la Journée internationale des droits de l’homme. De telles occasions permettent au Parlement de donner suite aux préoccupations des citoyens sans mettre l'accent sur une question précise à ce moment-là.

Même si la Chambre de la fédération a permis aux députés australiens de soulever les préoccupations de leurs électeurs et de participer aux débats législatifs, nous croyons que la création d’une nouvelle chambre parallèle semblable à Westminster Hall permettrait de mieux relever les défis auxquels fait face le Parlement canadien.

Même s'il n'est pas possible de reproduire exactement Westminster Hall dans le contexte canadien, le Centre Samara recommande néanmoins qu'une chambre parallèle canadienne soit conçue pour le bénéfice des députés d’arrière-ban, qui pourraient planifier leurs travaux indépendamment des whips des partis; que la participation à une chambre parallèle soit également libre de tout contrôle de la part des whips des partis, sans qu’aucune liste ne soit dressée pour prévoir les interventions des députés; qu’une bonne partie du temps de débat dans une telle chambre soit consacrée à des débats généraux comme ceux qui sont tenus à Westminster Hall, les ministres étant tenus d’y assister et de répondre aux points soulevés; que les sujets de ces débats puissent être choisis au moyen de demandes présentées par des députés, de rapports de comités parlementaires ou de pétitions provenant du grand public; et enfin, que la chambre soit un véhicule pour d’autres expériences procédurales.

À une époque où les citoyens comme les députés remettent en question la valeur des débats parlementaires, la création d’une chambre parallèle consacrée à faire entendre la diversité des Canadiens par l’entremise de leurs représentants élus pourrait contribuer à donner plus de pouvoir aux Canadiens et aux parlementaires eux-mêmes. Elle pourrait contribuer à rendre les députés d’arrière-ban plus au centre des débats parlementaires, et les débats parlementaires plus au centre de la vie politique au Canada.

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes prêts à répondre à vos questions.

(1215)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de votre exposé.

Je vais faire la même chose que la dernière fois. Nous aurons une série de questions, puis nous donnerons la parole à quiconque souhaite intervenir.

Nous allons commencer par M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Messieurs Thomas et Morden, je suis heureux que vous soyez ici. Merci beaucoup. Vous nous avez tous rendu un grand service avec tout le travail que vous avez accompli, surtout en ce qui concerne ce qui nous passionne ici et, en même temps, ce qui nous frustre ici.

Je déteste me concentrer sur ce qui nous frustre, mais vous n’avez qu’à lire mon bulletin parlementaire pour comprendre ce qui me passionne ici. Parlons donc de ce qui est frustrant.

Vous avez dit plus tôt que les deux tiers des députés que vous avez sondés ne sont pas satisfaits des débats tels qu’ils sont maintenant. Est-ce exact?

M. Michael Morden:

C’est exact.

M. Scott Simms:

C’est tout un chiffre à prendre en considération. C’est donc tout le monde sauf les membres du Cabinet, n’est-ce pas?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms: Cela nous montre que nous sommes très en retard pour ce qui est de rendre cet endroit plus accessible, non seulement aux parlementaires, mais aussi aux Canadiens... C’est encore pire, la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons, pour essayer de trouver un endroit cohésif, et c'est pourquoi je suis heureux que vous soyez venu ici avec des suggestions concrètes, surtout lorsque vous dites que le modèle Westminster Hall est à privilégier. J’y arrive, parce que nous juxtaposons, en grande partie, Westminster Hall et la Chambre de la fédération, comme on l’appelle, je crois, en Australie.

À Westminster Hall, l’un des aspects les plus populaires d’une chambre parallèle est celui des pétitions. Les gens présentent une pétition qui attire beaucoup l’attention du public. C’est un aspect. Est-ce le genre de chose que vous considérez comme la meilleure voie possible pour une chambre parallèle?

(1220)

M. Michael Morden:

L’une des choses qui m’a frappé en examinant les observations de sir David Natzler au Comité, c’est qu’il a laissé entendre qu’environ huit des dix débats les plus suivis à Westminster Hall au cours des dernières années avaient été des débats provoqués par des pétitions. C’est vraiment étonnant. Cela ne concernait pas les affaires émanant du gouvernement.

J’ai trouvé cela vraiment encourageant. Cela m'enhardit aussi un peu, parce que cela me donne à penser que, dans ce contexte, il serait encore important pour les Canadiens de voir leurs questions débattues au Parlement et d'être témoins de la valeur d'un tel débat. Comme le greffier et d’autres l’ont expliqué, il y a différentes façons de concevoir la chambre parallèle, et nous avons besoin de précisions sur le problème que nous essayons de résoudre et sur les aspects — je pense que des gens raisonnables peuvent ne pas être d’accord — où il faut trouver un équilibre.

Au cours de la dernière session, Mme Duncan a soulevé la question de l’intervention du citoyen moyen. Nous voyons un mécanisme comme les pétitions, ainsi que la possibilité pour un simple député de s’adresser au bureau du Président ou à un comité des affaires des députés d’arrière-ban pour défendre une question qu’il juge importante pour ses électeurs. Qu’il s’agisse d’une pétition ou d’un député d’arrière-ban, il s’agit d’un mécanisme direct ou indirect par lequel les citoyens peuvent déterminer, par l’entremise d’un plus grand organisme, ce qui est débattu au Parlement. Pour nous, cela constitue une proposition de valeur particulière pour la chambre parallèle.

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Thomas.

M. Paul Thomas:

Si vous me permettez d’ajouter quelque chose, je pense que l’un des principaux éléments du système de pétitions est qu’il s’agit d’une relation continue avec les signataires. Si un débat est choisi, ils en sont informés. La signature de la pétition ne constitue pas la fin de la participation au processus. On vous avise et vous êtes invité à suivre le débat en ligne, ce qui permet d’obtenir ce nombre de spectateurs. C’est une façon de faire en sorte que le Parlement semble plus réceptif.

Ce que sir David vous a dit était déjà inexact. La plus importante pétition jamais présentée dans le système de Westminster Hall a reçu six millions de signatures. Elle a été débattue lundi. Dans la pratique britannique, il n’y a pas de lien direct entre le nombre de signatures sur une pétition et le débat. Il y a l’organe intermédiaire d’un comité qui peut exercer un certain contrôle éditorial. Ils ont regroupé une pétition contre le Brexit avec une autre en faveur du Brexit et ils ont demandé qu’elles soient débattues à Westminster Hall. L'exercice a été très suivi.

L’autre chose que j’aimerais souligner, c’est que cela permet à ces députés de participer, mais l’élément principal est la réaction ministérielle à la fin.

M. Scott Simms:

De toute évidence, on ne peut pas imposer des règles strictes à cet égard. Soit dit en passant, je suis d’accord avec cela. Je voulais utiliser cela comme exemple. Pour moi, c’est un exemple de ce qu’est Westminster Hall — ce processus de pétition — en plus des autres choses que font les députés d’arrière-ban.

Très rapidement alors, de l’autre côté de l’équation, c’est une chose qui m’intéresse. Étant donné que l’attribution de temps est maintenant souvent utilisée ici — et encore plus souvent au cours de la dernière législature —, si nous avions une chambre parallèle pour permettre à plus de députés de débattre des projets de loi du gouvernement, est-ce que cela fonctionnerait, à votre avis?

M. Michael Morden:

Je pense que c’est une autre voie à suivre. Nous avons décrit quelques problèmes que nous pensions qu’une chambre parallèle pourrait aider à résoudre, mais la mesure dans laquelle cela se règle pour un problème se faisait au détriment d’un autre. Nous avons essayé de faire valoir qu’il fallait à tout le moins réserver une période de temps équitable pour refléter la pratique de Westminster Hall, qui ne règle pas le problème du manque de temps pour débattre des affaires du gouvernement. Il s’agit de régler d’autres problèmes, principalement le contrôle exercé par les députés d’arrière-ban, et aussi la question de savoir comment faire venir des citoyens.

Quoi qu’il en soit, si les députés perçoivent que la préoccupation la plus importante est de ne pas avoir assez de temps pour délibérer au sujet des affaires du gouvernement, alors une chambre parallèle pourrait être un mécanisme adopté pour régler cela également.

Vous pourriez aussi examiner d’autres mécanismes comme les motions de programmation, sur lesquelles nous n’avons jamais pris position, mais qui m’ont été recommandées par des députés de tous les partis comme autre approche. Je crois que le greffier a conclu en mentionnant que ces deux mesures pourraient également être mises en oeuvre en parallèle.

(1225)

M. Scott Simms:

Cela pourrait régler un problème, mais ce n’est pas aussi important que l’autre aspect qui consiste à permettre aux citoyens de participer davantage au débat dans le cadre d'un système comme celui de Westminster Hall. Est-ce une hypothèse raisonnable? Est-ce ce que vous supposez?

M. Paul Thomas:

D’après nos recherches, je dirais que les députés et les citoyens sont insatisfaits des débats en cours à la Chambre. Le fait de tenir plus de débats, tout en permettant peut-être un examen plus approfondi, ne répond pas nécessairement à un besoin immédiat, par rapport à la tenue d’un autre type de débat, comme un débat qui pourrait faire participer de manière plus constructive les citoyens ou permettre aux députés d’arrière-ban de soulever leurs préoccupations.

Je pense que cela nous ramène à ce que Mme Duncan a dit, à savoir qu’il faut aussi déterminer une raison d'être supplémentaire. Le fait que ce soit peut-être un peu différent de ce qui se passe sur le plan qualitatif serait davantage une recommandation à ce stade-ci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Simms.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie nos deux témoins. Monsieur Morden, monsieur Thomas, nous sommes heureux de vous avoir parmi nous.

Je voudrais d'entrée de jeu poser une question au sujet du récent débat sur le Brexit à Westminster Hall. Il me semble que l'un des problèmes qui se pose aux Communes à ce stade-ci, vu que le dossier du Brexit a été débattu, et plus d'une fois, c'est que, pour des raisons qui tiennent au contenu du programme législatif et à la nature changeante de la coalition de députés — je pourrais presque parler de factions — en faveur ou contre les différentes propositions, ou aux règles sur le réexamen d'une question déjà débattue aux Communes, des contraintes limitent le débat dans des voies qui ne sont pas forcément productives. Il serait très intéressant d'appliquer la théorie des jeux pour dégager les étapes de l'évolution de ce débat à la Chambre des communes.

Cela soulève le problème de la pertinence de la Chambre elle-même — ou de ce qu'on pourrait considérer comme une assemblée plénière — en tant que lieu où débattre la question globale du Brexit lui-même, par opposition à telle ou telle solution pour sortir le pays de l'impasse où il se trouve. La nature de l'impasse elle-même change presque de jour en jour. Est-ce vraiment ce qui s'est produit dans ce débat sur les pétitions électroniques, qui, en fait, a permis de revenir en arrière et de réexaminer les grands enjeux? C'est là mon premier point.

En deuxième lieu, ce débat n'a-t-il pas aussi offert une tribune à beaucoup de simples députés, très nombreux au Royaume-Uni, qui ne sont pas ordinairement en mesure de prendre la parole à la Chambre des communes, leur donnant l'occasion de s'exprimer et de débattre les enjeux du Brexit?

M. Paul Thomas:

Je dois avouer que je n'ai pas suivi le débat dans son ensemble. Ce que j'en sais me vient pour l'essentiel du compte rendu de la chaîne Radio 4 de la BBC, grâce au balado Today in Parliament.

Si je me fie à ce compte rendu, il semble qu'il s'agit davantage d'une discussion de fond sur le Brexit. À l'heure actuelle, je pense qu'il est difficile pour la Chambre des communes britannique de débattre tout à fait calmement le dossier du Brexit, vu l'attention accaparante qu'il suscite dans toute la classe politique et, en particulier, les divisions qu'il provoque non seulement entre les partis, mais encore au sein des partis.

Le compte rendu faisait valoir, en conclusion, qu'il était rafraîchissant de voir le débat se dérouler différemment et les lignes de parti s'estomper. À certains égards, c'est l'un des principaux avantages de ce système. Je crois que c'est David Natzler qui a fait remarquer que les sièges à Westminster Hall étaient disposés en fer à cheval, disposition qui invite moins aux interruptions partisanes que l'alignement traditionnel de rangées se faisant face.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, même si le Brexit n'a rien à voir, c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire, avec une opposition clairement définie au gouvernement.

M. Paul Thomas:

C'est vrai. À cet égard, l'ambiance dans l'enceinte était différente de celle qui a cours pendant les votes indicatifs, mais ces enjeux ont certainement influé sur la teneur du débat.

M. Scott Reid:

Savez-vous quel a été le niveau de participation au débat?

M. Paul Thomas:

Encore une fois, d'après le compte rendu que j'ai lu, la participation était à peu près générale. L'une des particularités des débats parlementaires au Royaume-Uni, c'est que les députés acceptent souvent les interventions de leurs collègues. Ainsi, bien que la forme traditionnelle d'un débat de 30 minutes à Westminster Hall veuille qu'un orateur parle pendant 15 minutes, suivi pour la même durée d'un représentant du parti ministériel, il est habituel que l'un et l'autre soient interrompus trois ou quatre fois, si bien que le nombre de députés qui figurent dans le hansard est supérieur à ce qu'on pourrait supposer en se fiant simplement au temps alloué au débat.

(1230)

M. Scott Reid:

S'agit-il d'une règle du comité ou d'une convention qui a été adoptée par le comité?

M. Paul Thomas:

La même pratique a cours à la Chambre des communes. Là aussi, pendant un débat, il est souvent demandé à un orateur d'accepter qu'un autre député intervienne pour poser une question.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est un peu la même chose au Sénat des États-Unis.

M. Paul Thomas:

Peut-être, mais je le connais moins.

M. Scott Reid:

Un orateur peut accepter une intervention sans perdre la parole s'il a recours à la formule voulue. Regardez Mr. Smith Goes to Washington; vous apprendrez tout ce que vous devez savoir.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Désolé, je ne veux pas vous couper la parole, monsieur Morden. Dans un sens, est-ce que cela ne ressemble pas à ce que nous appelons la règle Simms dans notre comité? Nous l'avons adoptée afin de permettre aux gens d'échanger des messages en plein milieu d'une obstruction systématique, où l'on ne peut pas officiellement céder la parole. C'est mon collègue Scott Simms qui a formulé cette règle, qui s'est avérée un moyen des plus efficaces efficace pour permettre l'échange d'idées dans un contexte qui autrement ne l'aurait pas permis.

M. Paul Thomas:

C'est tout à fait juste. L'idée, c'est que l'orateur ne perd pas son droit de parole, mais le cède temporairement. Je suppose que la durée de ces interventions est une affaire de convention. J'imagine que le président d'un comité pourrait avoir à intervenir si cette pratique tournait à l'obstruction systématique.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid:

C'est vrai. Ce serait une atteinte au protocole.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

Dans notre petit système.

M. Paul Thomas:

Je devrais laisser la parole à mon collègue.

M. Michael Morden:

Je n'ai pas grand-chose à ajouter, à part le fait que la personne qui a la parole jouit d'une certaine prérogative, en ceci qu'on l'entendra dire qu'elle veut avancer dans son discours et qu'ensuite elle cédera la parole. Ils disposent d'un assez grand nombre de moyens pour répartir leur temps.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, puisqu'il ne nous reste qu'une minute environ, vous avez mentionné que les chambres parallèles en Australie et au Royaume-Uni ne tiennent des séances que les jours où les Communes, ou les représentants dans le cas de l'Australie, siègent. Ici en revanche, les comités permanents ordinaires de la Chambre des communes, sans parler des comités législatifs, peuvent se réunir lorsque la Chambre ne siège pas. Cela s'explique par le fait qu'il n'y a qu'un petit nombre de députés qui doivent être présents. Pour que la Chambre des communes siège, disons, jusqu'en juillet et en août, il faudrait que chacun des 338 députés accepte de siéger, au lieu de rester dans sa circonscription pendant ces mois. Ce n'est pas le cas pour un comité. C'est ainsi que j'ai participé aux travaux de plusieurs comités, notamment celui de la réforme électorale, qui s'est réuni tout au long des mois d'août et de septembre, alors que la Chambre, elle, ne siégeait pas.

Cela ne pourrait-il pas également être le cas d'une chambre parallèle, vu les exigences faibles quant au quorum, qui pourrait siéger pendant les semaines de relâche et pendant l'été sans créer une situation qui empêcherait les gens de retourner dans leur circonscription?

M. Paul Thomas:

Je pense que cela reflète dans une certaine mesure la tendance du parlement britannique à siéger presque continuellement. Il siège en juillet, puis il fait une pause de six semaines avant de reprendre ses travaux à la fin d'août. Concrètement, le fait demeure que les députés britanniques ne bénéficient pas, en général, de la même période prolongée pendant laquelle la Chambre des Communes ne siège pas.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans le passé, nous avons aussi siégé en juillet. Bien sûr, c'est en juillet que le gouvernement Meighen est tombé.

M. Paul Thomas:

Cela se fait aussi au niveau provincial, particulièrement à la suite d'une élection, comme on l'a vu en Ontario, je crois, après les deux dernières élections. Mais je pense que cela explique mieux pourquoi beaucoup de choses ne se produisent tout simplement pas, parce que leurs congés sont beaucoup plus condensés. Les congés sont vraiment des congés.

Dans le contexte canadien, je ne vois pas pourquoi on ne pourrait pas le faire. Le plus grand défi, c'est qu'il s'agit d'un choix volontaire; les députés qui s'intéressent à un dossier seront présents et ceux qui ne s'y intéressent pas s'abstiendront. Cela deviendrait plus difficile si les travaux étaient prévus à un autre moment, où tous les membres ne seraient peut-être pas aussi disponibles. Une telle pratique pourrait éventuellement façonner les débats, mais je pense que ce serait quelque chose pour les députés... comme le greffier l'a dit, c'est laissé à leur imagination. S'il y avait une semaine désignée pendant l'été que tous les députés intéressés pourraient réserver, ce serait alors certainement une option à prendre en considération.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pensais en particulier aux initiatives parlementaires. Nous tentons de faire adopter un grand nombre de ces projets de loi, et le problème ne fera qu'empirer avec l'augmentation du nombre de députés à chaque redécoupage.

Chacun s'intéresse beaucoup au projet de loi dont il a l'initiative. Un certain nombre d'autres députés seraient prêts à participer au débat. Les votes proprement dits auraient lieu en septembre ou en octobre, lorsque la Chambre reprend ses travaux. Cela me semble être une solution simple. Les députés n'auraient pas à consacrer autant de temps un été pendant leur mandat de quatre ans pour s'occuper de leur dossier particulier. Cette pratique offrirait plus de possibilités.

Comme vous pouvez le voir, je suis passé du rôle de celui qui pose des questions à celui de promoteur d'une chambre parallèle qui siégerait pendant les mois d'été.

(1235)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Duncan, c'est à vous.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Voici mon point de vue, fondé sur mes 11 années d'expérience ici.

Plutôt que de revenir à l'époque sombre où nous mettions le feu à la baraque, pourquoi ne pas essayer tout d'abord de rendre ce lieu — qui est le nôtre — plus démocratique? Au fond, nous avons un système où le gouvernement, appliquant les règles de procédure, peut contrôler à son gré le programme législatif. Son influence varie d'un comité à l'autre, mais comme il est partout majoritaire, il peut décider des questions à discuter, du temps à y consacrer et des témoins à convoquer.

Je pense que c'est là une source de grande frustration. Les députés d'un tiers parti ou ceux qui n'ont pas le statut de parti, ont très peu de chances de prendre la parole à la Chambre. À mon avis, nous ne sommes pas en train de discuter de mesures susceptibles de démocratiser la Chambre. Je ne suis pas convaincue que la création d'une autre chambre atténuerait les sentiments de frustration qu'éprouvent beaucoup de députés, y compris les simples députés du parti majoritaire.

J'ai quelques questions à poser.

Premièrement, qu'est-ce qui vous fait croire que l'influence et la discipline de parti ne s'exerceront pas dans la deuxième chambre? Les députés seront-ils tout à coup libres d'exprimer leur opinion si elle va à l'encontre de la position gouvernementale ou même de celle du parti de l'opposition? Comment est-ce que cela se fera? Est-ce que ce sera la règle du premier arrivé, premier servi? Il y a plus de 180 simples députés libéraux qui vont sans doute vouloir prendre enfin la parole et débattre de questions intéressant leurs électeurs. Comment établira-t-on un équilibre? Qui va vraiment décider quels sujets seront débattus et à qui accorder le droit de parole?

De plus, pourquoi les débats sur les pétitions ne pourraient-ils pas être inscrits au programme de la Chambre, disons une fois par mois? Je pense que ce serait fascinant. Au lieu de procéder ainsi, le gouvernement se contente de les déposer et de dire qu'une réponse a été donnée. Mis à part les signataires de la pétition à qui la réponse a été envoyée, personne ne sait quelle a été la réponse du gouvernement.

Il y a beaucoup de choses qu'on pourrait faire dans le régime actuel sans augmenter la charge de travail. Va-t-on exercer des pressions sur les députés de l'opposition et les simples députés de la majorité pour les inciter à présenter leurs propositions à l'autre chambre et à demander de les inscrire à son programme?

De plus, le gouvernement majoritaire a une pléthore de députés qu'il peut envoyer où il le juge bon. Les petits partis subissent déjà des pressions. Ils doivent être à la Chambre. Ils doivent siéger en comité. Certains d'entre eux sont peut-être en déplacement pour les audiences d'un comité. Leur situation est toute différente. Pour le parti qui dispose de beaucoup de députés, il sera facile de dire qu'il peut probablement arranger les choses dans l'autre chambre. Je pense qu'il faut réfléchir également à cette éventualité.

J'aimerais bien aussi qu'on me présente de bonnes idées sur les moyens de rendre la Chambre des communes plus démocratique et plus intéressante pour le public.

M. Paul Thomas:

Je pense que la raison pour laquelle nous vous avons suggéré de vous inspirer du modèle de Westminster, et surtout de créer un lieu qui serait qualitativement différent de la Chambre afin d'y tenir des débats d'un autre genre, coïncide justement avec celles que vous avez mentionnées. Il faut comprendre que lorsque les choses sont axées sur les lignes de parti, il devient difficile de savoir où s'arrêter…

Mme Linda Duncan:

Comment changer cela?

M. Paul Thomas:

Voici l'élément clé. Il s'agirait de créer un espace où les débats sont choisis et où les intervenants peuvent s'exprimer, en principe sans la participation des whips de parti.

L'objectif consisterait, idéalement, à créer un tel espace comme banc d'essai, pour voir si l'existence d'un espace exempt de partisanerie pourrait aider à propager des idées de changement chez les divers partis dans l'autre enceinte, la Chambre.

La montée de la partisanerie dans les débats à la Chambre des communes a suscité, il me semble, bien des critiques à peu près tout au long du siècle dernier. Si vous lisez le grand ouvrage de Ned Franks, intitulé The Parliament of Canada, paru à la fin des années 1980, vous constaterez que beaucoup de ses propos demeurent d'actualité.

(1240)

Mme Linda Duncan:

Je ne nie pas le bien-fondé de votre position et je reconnais que c'est un défi intéressant, mais je me demande comment vous pensez pouvoir, d'un coup, transformer quelqu'un au point qu'il cesserait de se soucier de ce que son ministre, son whip, son leader à la Chambre ou son caucus a décidé. C'est une bonne idée, mais c'est tout un défi. J'aimerais savoir si les choses ont changé en Australie et en Angleterre.

M. Paul Thomas:

Ce que je tente de dire, c'est que, puisque la réforme de la Chambre n'a pas réussi, pourquoi ne pas essayer quelque chose de nouveau?

M. Michael Morden:

De plus, vous avez raison de signaler les problèmes de culture, qui sont pernicieux. Je ne sais pas comment les résoudre, mais je cherche à obtenir des changements de procédure ou des changements techniques, ce qui peut aider à faire naître des comportements nouveaux. Le changement de comportement est vraiment difficile en l'absence de toute modification de la structure incitative. Une chambre parallèle n'est pas une panacée. Elle ne résout pas la myriade de problèmes que vous avez soulevés et qui nous préoccupent également. Elle est l'une des nombreuses innovations que nous sommes disposés à appuyer lorsqu'elle sera envisagée.

Je pense qu'il est vrai, particulièrement à Westminster, que cette innovation est vue comme l'un des éléments d'un programme de réforme plus vaste échelonné sur une quinzaine d'années, qui jusqu'ici s'est traduit, indéniablement, par un changement de comportement et un gain d'indépendance des députés. La création d'une chambre parallèle met-elle fin à la partisanerie ou à l'autorité du whip? Je ne le pense pas, mais je ne sais pas comment on pourrait y arriver sans expérimentation sur le plan institutionnel.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Cela vaudrait la peine de demander aux élus de ces deux pays s'ils se sont réellement libérés de la discipline de parti. C'est ce que vous préconisez, et je pense donc qu'il serait vraiment utile de le savoir. Une telle transformation s'est-elle vraiment produite dans les chambres parallèles?

Nous avons des rencontres avec les médias tous les jours, et les gens s'en tiennent toujours à la ligne de parti. Je ne sais pas si, tout à coup, cela va changer du fait que ces rencontres se feront dans une autre salle, pour peu que les médias continuent à les diffuser. C'est un défi, mais il serait intéressant de savoir si, dans ces deux pays, il y a eu une transformation et si les gens ont l'impression...

S'il s'agissait davantage d'une discussion que d'un débat — les gens examinent une question et tout le monde propose des idées novatrices —, comment allons-nous résoudre ce problème? C‘est une possibilité, mais si le débat porte sur un projet de loi qui a été présenté à la Chambre et que les lignes de parti ont déjà été tracées, ce sera chose intéressante à voir.

M. Paul Thomas:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose?

Je vous dirais franchement que c'est le principal avantage. Le modèle de Westminster permet aux députés de soulever des questions qui sont pertinentes pour eux ou pour leurs circonscriptions. Cette semaine, par exemple, il y a eu un débat sur le cancer du pancréas. L'objectif souhaité était d'en arriver, sans égard aux allégeances politiques, à améliorer le traitement pour les gens atteints du cancer du pancréas. Des députés de partout au Royaume-Uni ont des électeurs qui pourraient être touchés. Ils sont venus exprimer leurs préoccupations et le ministre y a donné suite. Les députés ont agi non pas en fonction de leur appartenance politique, mais bien en tant que représentants de leur collectivité. Je crois que dans le mémoire que nous avons présenté au Comité, nous avons inclus la liste des débats qui ont eu lieu. L'infrastructure des transports à Essex, par exemple, est une question sur laquelle tous les députés pourraient s'entendre et dont l'aboutissement, heureux ou non, ne devrait pas dépendre des allégeances partisanes.

Bien franchement, j'espère que les députés résisteront à leur parti lorsqu'ils constatent qu'une mesure proposée ne jouit pas de l'appui nécessaire. L'histoire parlementaire est truffée d'exemples d'innovations qui ont été essayées et qui ont échoué, mais cela ne veut pas forcément dire qu'il faut s'abstenir d'essayer.

Mme Linda Duncan:

Je pense que c'est parfois le cas pour les études en comité, mais pas tellement pour un projet de loi.

Le président:

Nous entamons un tour de questions ouvertes. J'ai beaucoup de noms sur ma liste, et je vous demanderai donc d'être succincts.

Les membres du Comité sont-ils d'accord pour que M. Baylis intervienne?

D'accord.

Frank, c'est à vous.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Voulez-vous commencer? [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est correct, allez-y. [Traduction]

Le président:

Il y a beaucoup de gens après vous.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord. Désolé.

À ce sujet, je sais que lorsque les chambres parallèles ont été introduites aux deux endroits, elles l’ont été temporairement. Vous avez demandé s’il y avait eu une enquête auprès des députés lorsque la proposition a été mise aux voix, et ils ont été massivement en faveur. Il y a eu un genre de mise à l'essai pendant un an ou deux. Par la suite, la mesure a reçu un appui total de la part des députés pour les raisons que les deux messieurs ont exprimées, cet aspect d’un meilleur débat, comme vous l’avez souligné.

Je ne suis pas d’accord sur un point. Vous avez dit que nous avons l’attribution d'une période de temps parce que de nombreux députés veulent prendre la parole. On demande souvent aux députés d’aller lire un texte, ce qui, en théorie, est contraire à nos règles. Nous ne sommes pas autorisés à lire un texte, mais nous le faisons. Lisent-ils les textes? Je crois savoir que ce n’est pas le cas au Royaume-Uni. Est-ce qu’ils les lisent dans la deuxième chambre au Royaume-Uni ou en Australie, ou sont-ils forcés de vraiment prononcer un discours?

(1245)

M. Michael Morden:

Je pense qu’à Westminster Hall, certaines des observations sont préparées d'avance, mais la conversation est beaucoup plus libre. Souvent, lorsqu’un orateur se laisse aller, la réaction est moins scénarisée.

M. Frank Baylis:

C’est donc un environnement moins réglé comme du papier à musique. Est-ce la même chose en Australie?

M. Paul Thomas:

Pour le contexte australien, je ne sais pas. Je suis allé à Westminster Hall pour observer ces débats, mais je n’ai pas eu l’occasion de faire cela autant en Australie.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je sais aussi que le grand public est beaucoup plus intéressé par ce qui est débattu à la seconde chambre. Mais s’il devait comme moi écouter les débats qui se déroulent dans notre galerie, je m’ennuie à mourir, je dirais 90 % du temps. Je ne peux pas imaginer que quelqu’un s'arrête pour écouter CPAC, où les discours répétitifs et ennuyeux se succèdent. Je trouve cela ennuyant. Ce n’est pas le cas à la chambre parallèle, du moins à Westminster. Si j’ai bien compris, il y a beaucoup plus de téléspectateurs de ces débats que de ceux à la chambre principale?

M. Paul Thomas:

Cela dépend du débat et du sujet. Certains sont hyperlocaux et portent sur les problèmes d’une collectivité en particulier. Il y a peut-être des membres de cette collectivité qui sont intéressés. Toutefois, surtout dans le cas des pétitions, certains sujets ont une résonance à l'échelle nationale. L’élément principal, c’est la réceptivité qui permet aux citoyens et à leurs préoccupations d’être pris en compte à la chambre de manière plus directe.

S'il s'agit d'une proposition d'un député d’arrière-ban, surtout si ce dernier a des électeurs qui mènent une campagne pour un enjeu en particulier, il peut les prévenir d'écouter pour être témoins d'une réponse un peu plus spontanée, comparativement à ce qui se passe ici, où on évoquera l'article 31 du Règlement, une déclaration de député sur une question particulière, mais où vous faites votre déclaration sans que la réponse soit du même ordre.

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, c'est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n’ai qu'une ou deux remarques générales. Je ne prendrai pas beaucoup de temps.

Il y a quelque chose qui n’a pas été dit et qui devrait l’être.

Lors de la campagne électorale de l'an 2000 — je crois, Scott Reid, que c’est là que vous avez été élu pour la première fois —on avait promis que les pétitions appelleraient à débattre. Rick Mercer s’en est moqué en adressant une pétition de Doris Day concernant Stockwell Day. Elle réunissait trois millions de signatures.

Ce n’est pas toujours une bonne idée de pétitionner la Chambre, avec, au milieu, le comité qui est maître de l’ordre du jour. Une fois que la position intermédiaire qui contrôle l’ordre du jour est acquise, un ordre du jour clair peut être établi pour une seconde chambre. Je pense que c’est une bonne approche.

Vous avez entendu le groupe de témoins précédent. Vous avez entendu mes commentaires sur la création d’une chambre mixte avec le Sénat. Que pensez-vous de l'idée d’une seule chambre mixte qui s’occuperait directement des projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire et qui déciderait de leur sort?

M. Paul Thomas:

Je dirais que cela dépasse la portée actuelle de notre enquête. C’est une idée intéressante. Comme on l’a mentionné, il existe des précédents en ce qui concerne les comités mixtes de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat. Au Royaume-Uni, il y a ce qu’on appelle le comité mixte des droits de la personne, qui est un comité mixte de la Chambre des communes et de la Chambre des lords, qui fonctionne plutôt bien.

Pour ce qui est d’avoir deux chambres qui essaient de débattre des projets de loi simultanément, cependant, je ne suis pas certain qu’il y ait de tels exemples à l'échelle internationale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n’est pas ce que je propose. Ce que je propose, c’est qu’au lieu de déposer les projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire sur le bureau de la Chambre ou du Sénat pour qu'ils soient ensuite adoptés par une chambre, et de tout recommencer avec l’autre, qu'en raison de la nature du projet de loi, il n'y ait qu’une seule chambre qui en débatte. Au lieu d’avoir des projets de loi du Sénat ou de la Chambre, on aurait des projets de loi « mixtes » ou peu importe comment vous voulez les appeler. C'est l’idée. Ce serait dans cette enceinte que nous traiterions des mesures d'initiative parlementaire, qu’elles viennent de la Chambre des communes ou du Sénat. La chambre principale s'occupe des affaires du gouvernement et des journées de l’opposition plutôt que des affaires émanant des députés.

M. Michael Morden:

C’est une proposition intéressante. Aucun modèle comparable ne me vient à l'esprit, ce qui signifie simplement qu’elle pourrait être d'autant plus brillante et digne d'être étudiée. Je pense qu’à ce stade-ci, nous n’avons pas d'argument de fond à planter.

M. Paul Thomas:

Je pense qu’il faudrait modifier davantage le Règlement et peut-être certains éléments constitutionnels, étant donné qu'à moins que de nouvelles lois ne le rendent légal, il faut passer par les deux chambres. Il faudrait s’assurer qu’un tel organe soit considéré comme offrant les deux procédures en même temps.

Pour ce qui est des gains en efficience, il vaudrait certainement la peine de l'envisager.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avant de céder la parole, j’aimerais signaler que le débat sur le Brexit au Royaume-Uni a eu lieu de 16 h 30 à 19 h 45 le lundi 1er avril. J’ai déniché le lien, si quelqu’un le veut.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Une réponse partielle à la question de M. Graham sur ce qu’on peut faire du côté constitutionnel, ce qu’on peut arriver à faire, pour instituer une seconde chambre de délibérations, en bout de ligne, il faut présenter un projet de loi dans les deux chambres. Cependant, les règles concernant la première, la deuxième et la troisième lecture sont, si je comprends bien, de régie interne et pourraient donc être supprimées. De fait, on en a saisi le tribunal en 1919, suite à la loi référendaire du Manitoba, laquelle présumait qu'un projet de loi adopté par référendum supplante les étapes de lecture à l’assemblée législative et équivaut à la sanction royale. Le tribunal a déclaré que la sanction royale devait intervenir. La Constitution le prévoit, mais les tribunaux ont décidé que les diverses étapes internes de compression ou de télescopage des diverses lectures pouvaient être traitées au moyen de... Je ne sais pas si une loi pourrait le faire ou si vous avez besoin de modifier le Règlement. Quoi qu’il en soit, ils ont réglé le problème. Il y a des références qu'on peut consulter, si on essaie de déterminer ce qui est permis et ce qui ne l’est pas en vertu de notre Constitution. Tout cela concerne la Constitution de 1867, par opposition à ce qui a été ajouté en 1982. Elle demeure applicable.

Je voudrais faire un commentaire sur la préoccupation de Mme Duncan concernant l’apparition généralisée de whips, d'éléments d'appréciation partisans et de sectarisme politique dans les comités. C’est ce qui se produit dans la plupart des comités, la plupart du temps, y compris dans celui-ci. D’après mon expérience, parfois ce n’est pas le cas.

Il y a un exemple, sur la Colline du Parlement, d'un sous-comité qui a su décourager pratiquement tous les jeux politiques et l'esprit partisan. Il s’agit du Sous-comité des droits internationaux de la personne du Comité des affaires étrangères, que j’ai présidé pendant huit ans. Il possédait déjà cette culture non politicienne avant mon arrivée. Elle a été florissante sous ma gouverne et elle est toujours vivante. Peu importe ce qui a motivé son apparition, je remarque qu’il suffisait de respecter certains principes. Nous avons convenu que le Règlement continuait de s’appliquer à tout ce qui concernait la marche à suivre, mais que nous pouvions, par convention unique à ce comité, nous entendre pour nous attaquer à un dossier seulement s'il y avait consensus.

Partout dans le monde, on assiste à un cocktail de violations des droits de la personne, ce qui nous permettait de choisir les causes où il n’y avait pas de clivage évident entre la gauche, la droite ou le parti. Si le débat porte sur les droits de la personne au Venezuela, le régime Maduro est inévitablement remis en question, ce qui fait problème parce que les avis sont partagés à ce sujet. Si le débat porte sur un problème vécu dans un autre pays où il y a des intérêts miniers canadiens, par exemple, vous risquez moins d’avoir ce problème. Par conséquent, des critères de sélection rigoureux et d’autres règles internes...

(1250)

Mme Linda Duncan:

On pourrait alors en débattre dans la seconde chambre, je suppose.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est ce que je propose. Si vous aviez un accord...

Mme Linda Duncan:

Le consensus est un excellent concept.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, en appelant au consensus et en fonçant... Il est tout à fait possible qu’une procédure quelconque puisse perturber cela, mais je pense que ce serait seulement temporaire.

C’était une observation que je voulais formuler. Je voulais simplement que cela figure au compte rendu.

Merci beaucoup.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Nous devons poser des questions aux témoins, et non faire un discours.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, il n’y a pas de règle à ce sujet. Si les témoins veulent faire des commentaires à ce sujet, je les invite à le faire.

M. Michael Morden:

Je pense que cela souligne l’importance d'établir le processus par lequel une telle chambre serait instituée. Si le geste est consensuel au départ, on peut établir des normes et des conventions qui peuvent perdurer.

M. Paul Thomas:

À cet égard, comme mon collègue l’a dit, la chambre parallèle fait partie d’une série de réformes instaurées à Westminster au cours des 20 dernières années. Au début, la seule façon d’obtenir qu'on débatte d'une question passait par une demande au Président de la Chambre. En 2009, le Comité des affaires des députés d’arrière-ban a été créé à la suite d’une série de réformes. Comme son nom l’indique, ce sont des députés d’arrière-ban qui sont élus. Le président est élu par l’ensemble de la Chambre. Les membres sont élus par leurs caucus respectifs. Ils siègent et décident de ce qui sera débattu pendant certaines périodes.

Cela témoigne peut-être de ce genre d’élément consensuel où l’on pouvait gérer les affaires d'une façon différente par rapport à la chambre principale.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mme Lapointe peut prendre la parole avant moi. Je prendrai le temps qui restera.

Le président:

Madame Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup.

Quand nous recevons des témoins, je pense que c'est l'occasion d'entendre ce qu'ils veulent faire valoir, ce qu'ils pensent et ce qu'ils ont étudié.

Vous avez dit plus tôt, dans votre breffage, que vous aviez étudié le cas de gens qui avaient perdu leur emploi ou pris leur retraite en 2015. Vous dites que les deux tiers des personnes semblaient frustrées par la façon dont cela fonctionnait.

Avez-vous vérifié si, pour 2006, 2008, 2011 ou toutes les élections précédentes, les chiffres étaient différents?

(1255)

[Traduction]

M. Paul Thomas:

Samara a mené une série d’entrevues de départ avec d’anciens députés, à commencer par ceux qui sont partis en 2006. Les enquêtes sur différents sujets ont commencé en 2016. On s'est basé sur ces entrevues pour rédiger notre rapport sur le chahut.

Le degré de satisfaction relativement aux débats est un problème qui est apparu seulement l’an dernier lors d'une enquête réalisée en collaboration avec le caucus pour la démocratie. La frustration éprouvée à cet égard dure depuis longtemps et remonterait aux députés qui ont quitté en 2006, 2008, 2011 et ainsi de suite. Le chiffre précis dans le sondage auprès des députés actuels, les deux tiers, ne concerne que 2018. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord. Il s'agissait donc principalement de ceux qui n'étaient pas revenus en 2015.

On a parlé plus tôt au greffier. Il a été question des objectifs. Dans le cadre d'une éventuelle chambre parallèle, quels objectifs souhaiterait-on réaliser?

J'aimerais également savoir si vous avez aussi étudié le rôle des députés. Le greffier semblait dire qu'il avait évolué dans le temps. Nous voulons mieux représenter nos citoyens. C'est ma deuxième question.

Ma troisième porte sur la chambre parallèle. On en a parlé tout à l'heure. J'aimerais savoir si, au cours de l'évolution des chambres parallèles, le comportement des députés semble s'être amélioré. [Traduction]

M. Paul Thomas:

La nature des débats à Westminster Hall reflète en partie une tradition différente, devrait-on dire, de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni, où la discipline de parti est beaucoup plus lâche. Le vote de troisième catégorie existe dans cette enceinte, donc le gouvernement se réserve les aspects cruciaux et permet la dissidence sur un plan plus général. Cette pratique existait avant même la mise en place du Westminster Hall. La culture de la chambre qui choisissait le sujet à débattre influait sur cet aspect dans une certaine mesure. Les députés avaient l’habitude d’avoir des opinions divergentes.

Cela témoigne également de la relation plus détendue des députés avec leur whip. Les chefs de parti n’ont pas la même capacité de menacer de ne pas sélectionner de nouveau un député. Les candidats sont choisis par les associations de circonscription.

Cela dit, là où cela a fait la plus grande différence, c’est dans la capacité des députés de tenir un débat dans le cadre d’une action de défense plus large sur une question particulière. Souvent, un député va soulever un problème en particulier, disons le cancer du pancréas, comme première étape. Ensuite, cela peut susciter un autre débat et peut-être un projet de loi.

Dans le cadre de mes propres recherches, j’ai examiné l’évolution de la loi en matière de vol de ferraille. Le vol de ferraille est un gros problème au Royaume-Uni. Le pays compte beaucoup de vieux immeubles. La question a d'abord été l'objet d'un débat à Westminster Hall, puis d'un projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire visant à réglementer les marchands de ferraille. Cela a permis aux députés d’arrière-ban de mener une campagne plus vaste. Plus d’outils sont ainsi offerts pour ce genre de défense des droits.

Pour ce qui est de la relation fondamentale entre les députés et leur parti, elle a toujours été un peu plus informelle. Toutefois, ces dernières années, et cela rejoint le point soulevé par Mme Duncan, les rébellions ont été plus fréquentes. Il y a eu plus de différences d'opinion. Cela s'explique en partie du fait que c'est un gouvernement de coalition et que le Parlement est sans majorité.

J’espère avoir répondu à vos questions. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Madame Sahota, c'est à vous.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Tout d’abord, je tiens à vous remercier du travail que vous faites. C’est très révélateur. Les résultats des entrevues de départ réalisées et des sondages effectués sont très intéressants. Je suppose que vous avez senti cette frustration des gens qui quittent les partis relativement au genre de débats que nous avons. Est-ce vrai?

M. Michael Morden:

Oui, et cette frustration a été partagée par tous les membres des partis. C’était un consensus.

(1300)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Y a-t-il eu une distinction faite à un moment ou à un autre entre la frustration due aux débats sur les projets de loi du gouvernement et celle liée aux projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire?

M. Michael Morden:

Je pense que nous avons demandé d’évaluer la satisfaction des députés en fonction du caractère sérieux et concret des débats à un niveau supérieur. C’est la réponse que nous avons obtenue.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je suis tout à fait d’accord avec Mme Duncan sur certains points qu'elle a soulevés, mais je suis en désaccord avec elle sur d’autres.

Il y a certainement beaucoup d'esprit de parti dans l'actuel Parlement, mais je crois que cela change de temps à autre. Lorsque nous débattons des projets de loi d’initiative parlementaire, je remarque qu’il y a moins de sectarisme politique. À l'étape de la mise aux voix de ces projets de loi, le sectarisme diminue un peu, sauf au NPD.

Dans les comités, nous voyons aussi un peu moins d'esprit de parti, jusqu’à ce qu’il y ait un vote sur une question quelconque, mais lorsque nous essayons d’explorer des sujets et de brasser des idées, cet esprit disparaît un peu, par conséquent, je peux imaginer une chambre parallèle où la culture ne disparaît pas complètement, mais change un peu, et c’est un début.

Je vous suis vraiment reconnaissante du travail que vous avez accompli. En ce qui concerne les débats sur les projets de loi du gouvernement, quelqu’un vous a-t-il déjà dit qu’il n’y avait pas assez de temps prévu, que cette personne ait été députée du parti ministériel ou de l’opposition?

M. Michael Morden:

Le temps insuffisant pour délibérer et débattre en général a été désigné dans le sondage comme étant le principal obstacle au travail de la représentation démocratique. Je ne sais pas quelle est la source de ce manque de temps ou ce que les députés n’ont pas le temps de faire précisément — ce n’est peut-être pas nécessairement un débat à la chambre principale, mais le fait d’avoir le temps de se préparer pour le comité. Nous n’avons pas eu l’occasion d’évaluer cela.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il serait intéressant d’en apprendre un peu plus à ce sujet, parce que, tout comme on l'a mentionné, ce à quoi nous assistons à la Chambre en ce moment, compte tenu du niveau du débat, ce n'est pas ce qu'il y a de plus excitant d’être assis là et de voir ce spectacle. Il arrive que nous soyons obligés de consacrer un certain nombre de jours à l'étude de différentes mesures législatives, mais, après un certain temps, les idées n'ont rien de nouveau à offrir. Nous nous répétons.

Peut-être que tous les députés devraient avoir le droit de consigner leurs sentiments et leurs déclarations au procès-verbal, mais je pense que le degré de satisfaction quant au niveau du débat commence à diminuer après un certain temps parce que ce sont les mêmes idées qui reviennent sans cesse. Il faut trouver un équilibre.

M. Paul Thomas:

Voilà un autre problème. Les ressources dont disposent les députés pour apporter leur point de vue personnel sur les projets de loi constituent un problème majeur; la possibilité d’avoir du personnel qui s'occupe de la recherche et d'une sorte d’examen indépendant des projets de loi a été jugée difficile.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup d’être venus. Nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants. Cela ajoutera d’autres dimensions à un débat très complexe, alors je vous remercie.

M. Michael Morden:

Merci de nous avoir accueillis.

Le président:

Nous déciderons, peut-être après la prochaine réunion, de ce que nous allons faire à partir de là.

À la prochaine réunion, nous discuterons avec le greffier de la réorganisation du Règlement.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 04, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.