header image
The world according to David Graham

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. Trump will win in 2020 (and keep an eye on 2024)
  2. January 17th, 2020
  3. January 16th, 2020
  4. January 15th, 2020
  5. January 14th, 2020
  6. January 13th, 2020
  7. January 12th, 2020
  8. January 11th, 2020
  9. January 10th, 2020
  10. January 9th, 2020
  11. January 8th, 2020
  12. January 7th, 2020
  13. January 6th, 2020
  14. January 5th, 2020
  15. January 4th, 2020
  16. January 3rd, 2020
  17. January 2nd, 2020
  18. January 1st, 2020
  19. December 31st, 2019
  20. December 30th, 2019
  21. December 29th, 2019
  22. December 28th, 2019
  23. December 27th, 2019
  24. December 26th, 2019
  25. December 24th, 2019
  26. December 6th, 2019
  27. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  28. Next steps
  29. On what electoral reform reforms
  30. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  31. older entries...

All stories filed under foss...

  1. 2001-01-30: Geek delicacies from around the world: Macaroni and cheese
  2. 2002-07-12: DebConf 2 Summary, Including Notes From Michael Robertson’s Keynote
  3. 2002-09-26: September 26th, 2002 (from Advogato)
  4. 2002-10-27: October 27th, 2002 (from Advogato)
  5. 2002-12-02: OFTC: A study in cooperative open source software politics
  6. 2003-04-25: April 25th, 2003 (from Advogato)
  7. 2003-08-17: Who is David and who is Goliath?
  8. 2003-08-24: Microsoft seeks law to retroactively ban Finnish immigration
  9. 2003-08-31: Linus Torvalds enters race for California Governor
  10. 2003-09-07: Microsoft Way goes nowhere
  11. 2003-10-05: Microsoft makes RMS its friend
  12. 2003-10-10: GPRS and Linux get mobile access on track
  13. 2003-10-17: Environment Canada uses Linux to track hurricanes, predict, and analyse weather
  14. 2004-03-21: Proven: Windows is more secure than Linux out of the box
  15. 2004-04-01: Linus ends free lunch
  16. 2004-04-14: Real World Linux 2004, Day 1: A real world experience
  17. 2004-04-15: Real World Linux 2004, Day 2: Keynotes
  18. 2004-04-16: Real World Linux 2004, Day 3: The conclusion
  19. 2004-05-10: OS conference endures PowerPoint requirement on Day 1
  20. 2004-05-11: Red Hat, Microsoft clash at open source conference
  21. 2004-05-12: Creative Commons highlights final day of OS conference
  22. 2004-07-23: Linux symposium examines technicalities of upcoming Perl 6
  23. 2004-07-24: OLS Day 3: Failed experiments, Linux­Tiny, and the Linux Standard Base
  24. 2004-07-25: Ottawa Linux Symposium day 4: Andrew Morton's keynote address
  25. 2005-04-19: LWCE Toronto: Day 1
  26. 2005-04-20: LWCE Toronto: Day 2
  27. 2005-04-21: LWCE Toronto: Day 3
  28. 2005-07-21: Ottawa Linux Symposium, Day 1
  29. 2005-07-22: Ottawa Linux Symposium, Day 2
  30. 2005-07-23: Ottawa Linux Symposium, Day 3
  31. 2005-07-25: Ottawa Linux Symposium, Day 4
  32. 2005-10-16: Horton AV announces avian flu vaccine for Linux
  33. 2005-10-19: Debian Common Core Alliance loses 'Debian' from its name
  34. 2005-10-19: Ian Murdock responds to Debian­DCC Alliance trademark dispute
  35. 2006-04-25: Security and certification at LinuxWorld Toronto
  36. 2006-04-26: Wikis, gateways, and Garbee at LinuxWorld Toronto
  37. 2006-04-27: Wine, desktops, and standards at LinuxWorld Toronto
  38. 2006-06-29: Patent application jeopardizes IETF syslog standard
  39. 2006-07-10: PostgreSQL Anniversary Summit a success
  40. 2006-07-20: First day at the Ottawa Linux Symposium
  41. 2006-07-21: Day two at OLS: Why userspace sucks, and more
  42. 2006-07-22: Day 3 at OLS: NFS, USB, AppArmor, and the Linux Standard Base
  43. 2006-07-23: OLS Day 4: Kroah­Hartman's Keynote Address
  44. 2007-06-25: DebConf 7 positions Debian for the future
  45. 2007-06-28: Day one at the Ottawa Linux Symposium
  46. 2007-06-29: Kernel and filesystem talks at OLS day two
  47. 2007-06-30: Thin clients and OLPC at OLS day three
  48. 2007-07-02: OLS closes on a keynote
  49. 2007-10-15: Ontario LinuxFest makes an auspicious debut
  50. 2008-07-24: Ottawa Linux Symposium 10, Day 1
  51. 2008-07-25: OLS: Kernel documentation, and submitting kernel patches
  52. 2008-07-28: OLS 2008 wrap-up
  53. 2008-10-28: Ontario LinuxFest 2008
  54. 2016-03-10: 2016-03-10 OGGO 6
  55. 2016-10-27: 2016-10-27 17:55 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  56. 2016-11-15: 2016-11-15 SECU 42
  57. 2016-12-05: 2016-12-05 17:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  58. 2017-05-11: 2017-05-11 18:08 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  59. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 21:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  60. 2018-04-17: 2018-04-17 INDU 101
  61. 2018-05-22: 2018-05-22 17:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  62. 2018-09-24: 2018-09-24 INDU 127
  63. 2018-10-03: 2018-10-03 INDU 130
  64. 2018-10-22: 2018-10-22 INDU 133
  65. 2018-11-21: 2018-11-21 17:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  66. 2018-12-10: 2018-12-10 INDU 143
  67. 2019-02-20: 2019-02-20 19:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  68. 2019-03-18: 2019-03-18 SECU 152
  69. 2019-05-09: 2019-05-09 ETHI 148
  70. 2019-05-13: 2019-05-13 SECU 162
  71. 2019-05-28: 2019-05-28 ETHI 153
  72. 2019-05-29: 2019-05-29 ETHI 155
  73. 2019-09-19: 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  74. 2019-11-18: A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics

Displaying the most recent stories under foss...

A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics

Over the few years I had the responsibility of representing Laurentides--Labelle in Parliament, I spent a great deal of time and effort talking about technology and their related issues within politics.

One of the people I had the opportunity to meet along the way is Professor Michael Geist, Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law, who I had been following for years.

After my defeat, he invited me to his office for a conversation about the experience of being a technologist in national politics, and you can listen to the conversation on his blog:

The LawBytes Podcast, Episode 32: Reflections from the Open Source Member of Parliament -- A Conversation with Ex-MP David Graham.

foss internet legal 132 words - whole entry and permanent link. Posted at 16:21 on November 18, 2019

2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019

From here, for here

Dear Friends,

By choosing to move forward together, we can fight the climate crisis, as we demonstrated in Val-David during the “Planète s’invite au Parlement” march. I have always said that to properly represent you I have to know our community. Over the past four years, I have worked ceaselessly to make the federal government a partner for our region. I have participated in thousands of community events and meetings with residents in every one of the 43 municipalities in Laurentides—Labelle.

Together we have accomplished great things. Our region has benefited from historic investments, both in infrastructure and in social programs. However, I am aware that there is still much work to do so I am simply asking you the question:

Can I count on your support to continue this work for a second term?

I was born in the heart of the Laurentians, and I live on a multigenerational homestead in Sainte-Lucie-desLaurentides. Environmental factors have always been a part of my upbringing and I want to work together with you to deal with the climate crisis. I firmly believe that the Liberal Party has the best and most realistic plan to protect our environment while helping our economy to grow.

I began my career as a journalist specializing in technology. This expertise helps me a lot when dealing with the internet connectivity file. We have brought one of the biggest connectivity projects in Quebec here: within the next two years, fibre optics will be available to more than 18,000 homes in the riding that have been poorly served until now.

In Ottawa, I founded the Liberal National Rural Caucus to ensure that the voice of the regions is listened to and understood. I was a member of four permanent parliamentary committees and worked on hundreds of files to ensure that government decisions had a real and positive impact for the people here.

What I have done, and what I hope to do, is intimately connected to who I am. I am from here, and I work for here! I am offering to continue being your link to the federal government and to continue the partnership to develop Laurentides—Labelle.

Choose forward, together!

- David

D'ici, pour ici

Chers amis,

C'est en choisissant d'avancer, ensemble, qu'on peut lutter contre la crise des changements climatiques, comme on l'a démontré à Val-David lors de la marche “la Planète s'invite au Parlement”. J’ai toujours dit que pour bien vous représenter, je dois bien connaître notre communauté. Au cours des quatre dernières années, j’ai travaillé sans relâche pour que le fédéral soit partenaire de notre région. J’ai participé à des milliers d’activités communautaires et de rencontres avec les citoyens, dans chacune des 43 municipalités de Laurentides—Labelle.

Ensemble, on a réalisé de grandes choses. Notre région a bénéficié d’investissements historiques, autant dans les infrastructures que dans les programmes sociaux. Cependant, conscient qu’il reste beaucoup de travail à faire, je vous pose simplement la question:

Est-ce que je peux compter sur votre appui pour continuer le travail pour un deuxième mandat?

Je suis né au cœur des Laurentides, et je demeure avec ma famille sur une petite ferme multi-générationnelle à Sainte-Lucie-des-Laurentides. Les considérations environnementales ont toujours fait partie de mon éducation, et je veux agir avec vous sur la crise des changements climatiques. Je crois fermement que le Parti Libéral a le meilleur plan, et le plus réaliste, pour protéger notre environnement tout en faisant croître notre économie.

J’ai débuté ma carrière comme journaliste spécialisé en technologies. Cette expertise me sert grandement pour ce qui est de régler les enjeux de branchement à Internet. Nous avons amené ici un des plus gros projets de branchement au Québec: d’ici deux ans, la fibre optique sera offerte à plus de 18 000 foyers qui étaient mal desservis dans la circonscription.

À Ottawa, j'ai fondé le Caucus rural national libéral, pour assurer que la voix des régions soit bien entendue et écoutée. J’ai été membre de quatre comités parlementaires permanents et travaillé sur des centaines de dossiers, pour assurer que les décisions gouvernementales aient un réel impact positif pour les gens ici.

Ce que j’ai fait, et ce que je souhaite faire, est lié à qui je suis. Je suis d’ici, et je travaille pour ici! Je vous offre de continuer à être votre lien avec le fédéral et de poursuivre en partenariat le développement de Laurentides—Labelle.

Choisissons d’avancer, ensemble !

- David

From here...

My son, David, has always been conscious of social justice. He made his first charitable donation in the community when he was just 13, and from a very young age showed a desire to make a difference. Like all parents, we hoped to provide lots of opportunities to our children to prepare them for adult life but had no idea of what route they would follow. We are proud that David became a Member of Parliament, not because of the title but because he has put himself at the service of his fellow citizens and plays a part in the development of his native region, where our family has roots going back nearly a century.

Born in Sainte-Lucie-des-Laurentides in July 1981, David is proud of his Paré roots. His great-great-grandfather, Louis Paré, served as a doctor with the North-West Mounted Police and his great-grandfather, Alphonse Paré, a mining engineer who settled in Val-Morin in 1920, spoke French, English, Ojibwe and Cree. His grandmother, Patricia Paré, who lived in Sainte-Lucie, was the first female ski instructor in Canada and taught until she was 80. His mother Sheila has been involved in politics since her youth and she inspired his interest. He also cites my community involvement, focused on Laurentian history and the saving of the railroad stations and other built heritage, as additional motivation.

He was, and is still, fascinated by trains, as much for their mechanics and workings as because they are an excellent mode of public transport. He loves music, learned to play piano and violin, and has always admired cultural creation. He learned the value of work and respect for the environment from his earliest youth, helping look after our vegetable gardens and chickens, and assisting when we enlarged the house we built with our own hands. His daughter, Ozara, is following in his footsteps, beginning her education at Fleur-des-Neiges, the school he attended.

After high school, David studied information technology and history in Guelph, Ontario. There he dedicated himself to improving the public transit system. There, too, he founded an organization promoting open source software. After working as a journalist, he was hired as a political aide and then made the leap to Parliament Hill where he continued to work for several MPs. It was during that period that he met his partner, Roemishiel. It was also at that stage of his life that David said to himself that in order to contribute more to improving his country, he had to go back to his roots.

David heads out every morning from our multigenerational family home, working to improve life here. We see him devoting himself to his fellowcitizens with respect, diligence, rigour and conviction. We see him in turn passing on the values that are important to him to his daughter Ozara, and recounting the stories and the history of Laurentides—Labelle.

- Joseph Graham

... for here

D'ici...

Mon fils, David, a toujours été sensible aux inégalités sociales. Il a fait son premier don à un organisme à l'âge de 13 ans et a manifesté très jeune le désir de travailler pour faire une différence. Comme tous les parents, nous souhaitions offrir plusieurs opportunités à nos enfants pour les préparer à leur vie d'adulte, mais n'avions aucune idée du chemin qu’ils prendraient. Nous sommes fiers que David soit devenu député, non pas pour le titre, mais bien parce qu'il est au service des gens et contribue au développement de sa région natale, où sa famille est présente depuis près d’un siècle.

Né à Sainte-Lucie-des-Laurentides en juillet 1981, David est fier de ses racines Paré. Son arrière-arrière-grand-père, Louis Paré a servi comme médecin au sein de la police montée du Nord-Ouest et son arrière-grandpère, Alphonse Paré, ingénieur minier établi à Val-Morin en 1920, parlait Français, Anglais, Ojibwe et Cri. Sa grand-mère, Patricia Paré, résidait à Sainte-Lucie, a été la première monitrice de ski au Canada et a enseigné jusqu’à 80 ans. Sa mère Sheila s’implique en politique depuis qu’elle a 16 ans. Mon engagement communautaire, plus axé sur l’histoire des Laurentides et la sauvegarde des gares et du patrimoine bâti, l’a également influencé.

Il était, et est encore, fasciné par les trains, autant pour leur mécanique et leur fonctionnement que parce qu'ils sont un moyen de transport en commun par excellence. Il aime la musique, a appris le piano et le violon et a toujours eu du respect pour la création culturelle. Il a appris dès son enfance la valeur du travail et le respect de l'environnement, alors qu'il a entretenu avec nous les potagers et le poulailler et aidé à agrandir la maison que nous avons bâtie de nos mains. Sa fille Ozara suit les traces de son père, alors qu’elle débute son primaire à l’école Fleur-des-Neiges.

Après son secondaire, David a étudié à Guelph, en Ontario, en technologies informatiques et en histoire. Il s'est grandement dévoué dans cette communauté pour le développement du transport en commun. C'est aussi à partir de là qu'il a fondé un organisme prônant l'accès aux logiciels libres, aujourd'hui connu dans le monde entier. Après avoir travaillé comme journaliste, il a été embauché comme adjoint politique, puis a fait le saut vers la colline parlementaire, où il a continué de travailler auprès de plusieurs députés. C'est durant cette période qu'il a rencontré sa conjointe, Roemishiel. C'est aussi à cette époque de sa vie que David s'est dit que pour contribuer encore plus à améliorer son pays, il devait le faire chez lui.

C'est donc à partir de la maison familiale, qui est maintenant multigénérationnelle, que notre garçon part tous les matins, pour faire avancerles choses, ici. On le voit se dévouer pour ses concitoyens en faisant preuve de respect, de droiture, de rigueur et de convictions. On le voit à son tour transmettre les valeurs qui lui sont chères à sa fille Ozara, et lui raconter l'histoire des Laurentides, notre chez-nous !

- Joseph Graham

... pour ici

View the original publication. Voir la publication originale.

foss history newsletter 1718 words - whole entry and permanent link. Posted at 22:42 on September 19, 2019

2019-05-29 ETHI 155

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

(0835)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)):

I call to order this meeting of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics. This is meeting 155.

This is the last of our international grand committee meetings this week, the International Grand Committee on Big Data, Privacy and Democracy.

With us today from Amazon, we have Mark Ryland, director of security engineering, office of the chief information officer of the Amazon web services.

From Microsoft Canada Inc., we have Marlene Floyd, national director of corporate affairs, and John Weigelt, national technology officer.

From the Mozilla Foundation, we have Alan Davidson, vice-president of global policy, trust and security.

From Apple Inc., we have Erik Neuenschwander. He is manager of user privacy.

We're going to get into your testimony. I wanted to say that the CEOs were invited today, and it's unfortunate that they didn't come. Again, as I've said to many of you just prior to the meeting, this is supposed to be a constructive meeting on how to make it better, and some of the proposals that your companies have right from the top are good ones, and that's why we wanted to hear them today and have the CEOs answer our questions, but we do appreciate that you're here.

We'll start off with Mr. Ryland for 10 minutes.

Mr. Mark Ryland (Director, Security Engineering, Office of the Chief Information Security Officer for Amazon Web Services, Amazon.com):

Thank you very much.

Good morning, Chair Zimmer, members of the committee, and international guests.

My name is Mark Ryland. I serve as the director of security engineering in the office of the chief information security officer at Amazon web services, the cloud computing division of Amazon.

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to speak with you today. I'm pleased to join this important discussion. I'd like to focus my remarks today on how Amazon puts security and customer trust at the centre of everything we do.

Amazon's mission is to be the earth's most customer-centric company. Our corporate philosophy is firmly rooted in working backwards from what customers want and continuously innovating to provide customers better service, more selection and lower prices. We apply this approach across all our areas of business, including those that touch on consumer privacy and cybersecurity.

Amazon has been serving Canadian customers since we first launched amazon.ca in 2002. Amazon now has more than 10,000 full-time employees in Canada. In 2018, we announced plans to create an additional 6,300 jobs.

We also have two tech hubs, one in Toronto and another in Vancouver. These are clusters of offices employing more than 1,000 software engineers and a number of supporting technical workers, building some of our most advanced global systems. We also have offices in Victoria for www.abebooks.com, and our AWS Thinkbox subsidiary in Winnipeg.

We operate seven fulfillment centres in Canada, and four more have been announced. They will all open this year, in 2019.

I would now like to talk about our cloud platform.

Just over 13 years ago, Amazon launched Amazon web services, which is our cloud computing business. Montreal is home to our AWS Canada region, which is made up of a number of distinct data centres. We launched AWS, because after over a decade of building and running amazon.com, we realized we had developed a core competency in operating massively scaled technology infrastructure and data centres. We embarked on a broader mission of serving developers and businesses with information technology services that they can use to run their own businesses.

The term “cloud computing” refers to the on-demand delivery of IT resources over the Internet or over private networks. The AWS cloud spans a network of data centres across 21 geographic regions around the globe. Instead of owning and maintaining their own data centres, our customers can acquire technology such as compute power, storage, and databases in a matter of seconds on an as-needed basis by simply calling an API or clicking a mouse on a graphical console.

We provide IT infrastructure and services in the same way that you just flip a switch to turn on the lights in your home and the power company sends you electricity.

One of this committee's concerns was democracy. Well, we're really democratizing access to IT services, things that only very large organizations could previously do, in terms of the scale involved. Now the smallest organizations can get access to that same type of very sophisticated advanced technology with simply a click of a button and just paying for their consumption.

Today AWS provides IT services to millions of active customers in over 190 countries. Companies that leverage AWS range from large Canadian enterprises such as Porter Airlines, Shaw, the National Bank of Canada, TMX Group, Corus, Capital One, and Blackberry to innovative start-ups like Vidyard and Sequence Bio.

I want to underline that privacy really starts with security. Privacy regulations and expectations cannot be met unless systems are maintaining the confidentiality of data according to their design. At AWS, we say that security is “job zero”, by which we mean it's even more important than a number one priority. We know that if we don't get security right, we don't really have a business.

AWS and Amazon are vigilant about the security and privacy of our costumers and have implemented sophisticated technical and physical measures to prevent unauthorized access to data.

Security is everyone's responsibility. While we have a world-class team of security experts monitoring our systems 24-7 to protect customer data, every AWS employee, regardless of role, is responsible for ensuring that security is an integral component of every facet of our business.

Security and privacy are a shared responsibility between AWS and the customer. What that means is that AWS is responsible for the security and privacy of the cloud itself, and customers are responsible for their security and the privacy of their systems and their applications that run in the cloud. For example, customers should consider the sensitivity of their data and decide if and how to encrypt their data. We provide a wide variety of encryption tools and guidance to help customers meet their cybersecurity objectives.

We sometimes say, “Dance like no one's watching. Encrypt like everyone is.” Encryption is also helpful when it comes to data privacy. In many cases, data can be effectively and permanently erased simply by deleting encryption keys, for example.

(0840)



More and more, organizations are realizing the link between IT modernization offered by the cloud and a better security posture. Security depends on the ability to stay a step ahead of a rapidly and continuously evolving threat landscape, requiring both operational agility and the latest technologies.

The cloud offers many advanced security features that ensure that data is securely stored and handled. In a traditional on-premises environment, organizations spend a lot of time and money managing their own data centres, and worry about defending themselves against a complete range of nimble, continuously evolving threats that are difficult to anticipate. AWS implements baseline protections, such as DDoS protection, or distributed denial of service protection; authentication; access control; and encryption. From there, most organizations supplement these protections with added security measures of their own to bolster cloud data protections and tighten access to sensitive information in the cloud. They also have many tools at their disposal for meeting their data privacy goals.

As the concept of “cloud” is often new to people, I want to emphasize that AWS customers own their own data. Customers choose the geographic location in which to store their data in our highly secure data centres. Their data does not move unless the customer decides to move it. We do not access or use our customers' data without their consent.

Technology is an important part of modern life, and has the potential to offer extraordinary benefits that we are just beginning to realize. Data-driven solutions possess potentially limitless opportunities to improve the lives of people, from making far faster medical diagnoses to making farming far more efficient and sustainable. In addressing emerging technology issues, new regulatory approaches may be required, but they should avoid harming incentives to innovate and avoid constraining important efficiencies like economies of scale and scope.

We believe policy-makers and companies like Amazon have very similar goals—protecting consumer trust and privacy and promoting new technologies. We share the goal of finding common solutions, especially during times of fast-moving innovation. As technology evolves, so too will the opportunities for all of us in this room to work together.

Thank you. I look forward to taking your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Ryland.

Next up is Microsoft. Will it be Ms. Floyd or Mr. Weigelt?

Ms. Marlene Floyd (National Director, Corporate Affairs, Microsoft Canada Inc.):

We will share.

The Chair:

Okay. Go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. John Weigelt (National Technology Officer, Microsoft Canada Inc.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

We're pleased to be here today.[English]

My name is John Weigelt. I'm the national technology officer for Microsoft here in Canada. My colleague Marlene Floyd, national director of corporate affairs for Microsoft Canada, joins me. We appreciate the opportunity to appear before this committee today. The work you've undertaken is important given our increasingly digital world and the impact of technology on jobs, privacy, safety, inclusiveness and fairness.

Since the establishment of Microsoft Canada in 1985, our presence here has grown to include 10 regional offices around the country, employing more than 2,300 people. At our Microsoft Vancouver development centre, over 700 employees are developing products that are being used around the world. Cutting-edge research on artificial intelligence is also being conducted by Ph.D.s and engineers at the Microsoft research lab in Montreal. That's in partnership with the universities there.

Powerful technologies like cloud computing and artificial intelligence are transforming how we live and work, and are presenting solutions to some of the world's most pressing problems. At Microsoft we are optimistic about the benefits of these technologies but also clear-eyed about the challenges that require thinking beyond technology itself to ensure the inclusion of strong ethical principles and appropriate laws. Determining the role that technology should play in society requires those in government, academia, business and civil society to come together to help shape the future.

Over 17 years ago, when Bill Gates asserted that “trustworthy computing” would be the highest priority at Microsoft, he dramatically changed how our company delivers solutions to the marketplace. This commitment was re-emphasized by our CEO, Satya Nadella, in 2016. We believe privacy is a fundamental human right. Our approach to privacy and data protection is grounded in our belief that customers own their own data. Consequently, we protect our customers' privacy and provide them with control over their data.

We have advocated for new privacy laws in a number of jurisdictions, and we were early supporters of the GDPR in Europe. We recognize that for governments, having computer capacity close to their constituents is very important. Microsoft has data centres in more regions than any other cloud provider, with over 100 data centres located in over 50 regions around the world. We're quite proud that two of these data centres are located here in Canada, in Ontario and Quebec.

Protecting our customers and the wider community from cyber-threats is a responsibility we take very seriously. Microsoft continues to invest over $1 billion each year in security research and development, with thousands of global security professionals working with our threat intelligence centre, our digital crimes unit, and our cyber-defence operations centre. We work closely with the Government of Canada's recently announced Canadian Centre for Cyber Security. We have partnered with governments around the world under the government security program, working towards technical information exchanges, threat intelligence sharing and even co-operative botnet takedowns. Further, Microsoft led the Cybersecurity Tech Accord, signed by over 100 global organizations that came together to defend all customers everywhere from malicious cyber-attacks and to do more to keep the Internet safe.

(0845)

Ms. Marlene Floyd:

Microsoft was also proud to be a signatory to the Paris call for trust and security in cyberspace announced in November by French President Emmanuel Macron at the Paris peace summit. With over 500 signatories, it is the largest ever multi-stakeholder commitment to principles for the protection of cyberspace.

Another focus of your committee has been the increasing interference by bad actors in the democratic processes of numerous countries around the world. We fully agree that the tech sector needs to do more to help protect the democratic process. Earlier this week, we were pleased to endorse the Canada declaration on electoral integrity announced by Minister Gould.

Microsoft has taken action to help protect the integrity of our democratic processes and institutions. We have created the Defending Democracy program, which works with stakeholders in democratic countries to promote election integrity, campaign security and disinformation defence.

As part of this program, Microsoft offers a security service called AccountGuard at no cost to Office 365 customers in the political ecosystem. It is currently offered in 26 countries, including Canada, the U.S., the U.K., India, Ireland and most other EU countries. It's currently protecting over 36,000 email accounts. Microsoft AccountGuard identifies and warns individuals and organizations of cyber-threats, including attacks from nation-state actors. Since the launch of the program, it has made hundreds of threat notifications to participants.

We have also been using technology to ensure the resiliency of the voting process. Earlier this month, we announced ElectionGuard, a free, open-source software development kit aimed at making voting more secure by providing end-to-end verification of elections, opening results to third party organizations for secure validation, and allowing individual voters to confirm that their votes were counted correctly.

At Microsoft, we're working hard to ensure that we develop our technologies in ways that are human-centred and that allow for broad and fair access by everyone. The rapid advancement of compute power and the growth of AI solutions will help us be more productive in nearly every field of human endeavour and will lead to greater prosperity, but the challenges need to be addressed with a sense of shared responsibility. In some cases this means moving more slowly in the deployment of a full range of AI solutions while working thoughtfully and deliberately with government officials, academia and civil society.

We know that there is more that we need to do to continue earning trust, and we understand that we will be judged by our actions, not just our words. Microsoft is committed to continuing to work in deliberate and thoughtful partnership with government as we move forward in this digital world.

Thank you, and we're happy to receive your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Floyd.

We'll go next to Mr. Davidson from Mozilla.

Mr. Alan Davidson (Vice-President, Global Policy, Trust and Security, Mozilla Corporation):

Members of the grand committee and the standing committee, thank you.

I'm here today because all is not well with the Internet. For sure the open Internet is the most powerful communications medium we've ever seen. At its best, it creates new chances to learn to solve big problems to build a shared sense of humanity, and yet we've also seen the power of the Internet used to undermine trust, magnify divisiveness and violate privacy. We can do better, and I'm here to share a few ideas about how.

My name is Alan Davidson. I'm the vice-president for policy, trust and security at the Mozilla Corporation. Mozilla is a fairly unusual entity on the Internet. We're entirely owned by a non-profit, the Mozilla Foundation. We're a mission-driven open-source software company. We make the Firefox web browser, Pocket and other services.

At Mozilla we're dedicated to making the Internet healthier. For years we've been champions of openness and privacy online, not just as a slogan but as a central reason for being. We try to show by example how to create products to protect privacy. We build those products not just with our employees but with thousands of community contributors around the world.

At Mozilla we believe the Internet can be better. In my time today, I would like to cover three things: first, how privacy starts with good product design; second, the role of privacy regulation; and third, some of the content issues that you folks have been talking about for the last few days.

First off, we believe our industry can do a much better job of protecting privacy in our products. At Mozilla we're trying to do just that. Let me give you one example from our work on web tracking.

When people visit a news website, they expect to see ads from the publisher of that site, from the owner of that website. When visitors to the top news sites, at least in the U.S., visit, they encounter dozens of third party trackers, trackers from sites other than the one that they're visiting, sometimes as many as 30 or 40. Some of those trackers come from household names and some of them are totally obscure companies that most consumers have never heard of.

Regardless, the data collected by these trackers is creating real harm. It can enable divisive political ads. It can shape health insurance decisions and is being used to drive discrimination in housing and jobs. The next time you see a piece of misinformation online, ask yourself where the data came from that suggested that you would be such an inviting target for that misinformation.

At Mozilla we've set out to try to do something about tracking. We created something we call the Facebook container, which greatly limits what Facebook can collect from you when you're browsing on Firefox. It's now, by the way, one of the most popular extensions that we've ever built. Now we're building something called enhanced tracking protection. It's a major new feature in the Firefox browser that blocks almost all third party trackers. This is going to greatly limit the ability of companies that you don't know to secretly track you as you browse around the web.

We're rolling it out to more people, and our ultimate goal is to turn it on by default for everybody. I emphasize that because what we've learned is that creating products with privacy by default is a very powerful thing for users, along with efforts like our lean data practices, which we use to limit the data that we collect in our own product. It's an approach that we hope others adopt, because we've learned that it's really unrealistic to expect that users are going to sort through all of the privacy policies and all the different options that we can give them to protect themselves. To make privacy real, the burden needs to shift from consumers to companies. Unfortunately, not everybody in our industry believes that.

Let me turn to my second point, which is that we believe that regulation will be an essential part of protecting privacy online. The European Union has been a leader in this space. Many other companies around the world are now following suit and trying to build their own new data protection laws. That's important because the approach we've had for the last two decades in our industry is clearly not working anymore. We've really embraced in the past this notion of notice and choice: If we just tell people what we're going to collect and let them opt out, surely they'll be fine. What we found is that this approach is really not working for people. We've been proponents of these new data protection rules, and we hope you will be too.

We believe that a good privacy law should have three main components. It needs clear rules for companies about what they can collect and use; it should have strong rights for individuals, including granular and revocable consent about specific uses; and it should be implemented within an effective and empowered enforcement agency, which is not always the case. We think that's an important component.

(0850)



Critically, we believe that you can build those laws and you can include those components while still preserving innovation and the beneficial uses of data. That's why we're supporting a new federal privacy law in the U.S. and we're working with regulators in India, Kenya and in other places to promote those laws.

My third point is that given the conversation you have all had for the last few days, I thought it would be useful to touch on at least some of our views on the big issues of content regulation. Of all the issues being examined by the committee, we believe that this is the most difficult.

We've seen that the incentives for many in the industry encourage the spread of misinformation and abuse, yet we also want to be sure that our reactions to those real harms do not themselves undermine the freedom of expression and innovation that have been such a positive force in people's lives on the Internet.

We've taken a couple of different approaches at Mozilla. We're working right now on something we call “accountability processes”. Rather than focusing on individual pieces of content, we should think about the kinds of processes that companies should have to build to attack those issues. We believe that this can be done with a principles-based approach. It's something that's tailored and proportionate to different companies' roles and sizes, so it won't disproportionately impact smaller companies, but it will give more responsibility to larger companies that play a bigger role in the ecosystem.

We've also been really engaged in the issues around disinformation, particularly in the lead-up to the EU parliamentary elections that just happened. We're signatories to the EU Code of Practice on Disinformation, which I think is a very important and useful self-regulatory initiative with commitments and principles to stop the spread of disinformation. For our part, we've tried to build tools in Firefox to help people resist online manipulation and make better choices about and understand better what they're seeing online.

We've also made some efforts to push our fellow code signatories to do more about transparency and political advertising. We think a lot more can be done there. Candidly, we've met with mixed results from some of our colleagues. I think there is much more room to improve the tools, particularly the tools that Facebook has put out there for ad transparency. There is maybe some work that Google could do, too. If we can't do that, the problem is that we'll need stronger action from government. Transparency should be a good starting point for us.

In conclusion, I'd say that none of these issues being examined by the committee are simple. The bad news is that the march of technology—with artificial intelligence, the rise of the Internet of things and augmented reality—is only going to make it harder.

A concluding thought is that we really need to think about how we build our societal capacity to grapple with these problems. For example, at Mozilla we've been part of something called the responsible computer science challenge, which is designed to help train the next generation of technologists to understand the ethical implications of what they're building. We support an effort in the U.S. to bring back the Office of Technology Assessment to build out government's capacity to better understand these issues and work more agilely. We're working to improve the diversity in our own company and our industry, which is essential if we're going to build capacity to address these issues. We publish something every year called the “Internet Health Report”, which just came out a couple of weeks ago. It's part of what we view as the massive project we all have to help educate the public so that they can address these issues.

These are just some of the examples and ideas we have about how to work across many different levels. It's designing better products, improving our public regulations and investing in our capacity to address these challenges in the future.

We really thank you for the opportunity to speak with you today and we look forward to working with you and your colleagues around the world to build a better Internet.

Thanks.

(0855)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Davidson.

Last up, from Apple Inc., we have Erik Neuenschwander, please. You have 10 minutes.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander (Manager of User Privacy, Apple Inc.):

Thank you.

Good morning, members of the committee, and thank you for inviting me to speak with you today about Apple's approach to privacy and data security.

My name is Erik Neuenschwander, and I've been a software engineer at Apple for 12 years. I worked as the first data analysis engineer on the first iPhone. I managed the software performance team on the first iPad, and I founded Apple's privacy engineering team. Today I manage that team responsible for the technical aspects of designing Apple's privacy features. I'm proud to work at a company that puts the customer first and builds great products that improve people's lives.

At Apple we believe that privacy is a fundamental human right, and it is essential to everything we do. That's why we engineer privacy and security into every one of our products and services. These architectural considerations go very deep, down to the very physical silicon of our devices. Every device we ship combines software, hardware and services designed to work together for maximum security and a transparent user experience. Today I look forward to discussing these key design elements with you, and I would also refer the committee to Apple's privacy website, which goes into far more detail about these and other design considerations in our products and services.

The iPhone has become an essential part of our lives. We use it to store an incredible amount of personal information: our conversations, our photos, our notes, our contacts, our calendars, financial information, our health data, even information about where we've been and where we are going. Our philosophy is that data belongs to the user. All that information needs to be protected from hackers and criminals who would steal it or use it without our knowledge or permission.

That is why encryption is essential to device security. Encryption tools have been offered in Apple's products for years, and the encryption technology built into today's iPhone is the best data security available to consumers. We intend to stay on that path, because we're firmly against making our customers' data vulnerable to attack.

By setting up a device passcode, a user automatically protects information on their device with encryption. A user's passcode isn't known to Apple, and in fact isn't stored anywhere on the device or on Apple's servers. Every time, it belongs to the user and the user alone. Every time a user types in their passcode, iPhone pairs that input with the unique identifier that iPhone fuses into its silicon during fabrication. iPhone creates a key from that pairing and attempts to decrypt the user's data with it. If the key works, then the passcode must have been correct. If it doesn't work, then the user must try again. We designed iPhone to protect this process using a specially designed secure enclave, a hardware-based key manager that is isolated from the main processor and provides an additional layer of security.

As we design products, we also challenge ourselves to collect as little customer data as possible. While we want your devices to know everything about you, we don't feel that we should.

For example, we've designed our hardware and software to work together to provide great features by efficiently processing data without that data ever leaving the user's device. When we do collect personal information, we are specific and transparent about how it will be used, because user control is essential to the design of our products. For example, we recently added a privacy icon that appears on Apple devices when personal information is collected. The user can tap on it to learn more about Apple's privacy practices in plain language.

We also use local differential privacy, a technique that enables Apple to learn about the user community without learning about individuals within that community. We have pioneered just-in-time notices, so that when third party apps seek to access certain types of data, a user is given meaningful choice and control over what information is collected and used. This means third party apps cannot access users' data like contacts, calendars, photos, the camera or the microphone without asking for and obtaining explicit user permission.

These and other design features are central to Apple. Customers expect Apple and other technology companies to do everything in our power to protect personal information. At Apple we are deeply committed to that because our customers' trust means everything to us. We spend a lot of time at Apple thinking about how we can provide our customers not only with transformative products, but also with trusted, safe and secure products. By building security and privacy into everything we do, we've proved that great experiences don't have to come at the expense of privacy and security. Instead, they can support them.

I'm honoured to participate in this important hearing. I look forward to answering your questions.

Thank you.

(0900)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Neuenschwander.

We'll start with questions from committee members. My colleague Damian Collins will be here shortly. He regrets he had another thing to attend to.

We'll start with Mr. Erskine-Smith for five minutes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Thanks very much.

Thank you all for your presentations. I know Microsoft supports the GDPR and stronger privacy rules. Obviously, Tim Cook has been public in support of the GDPR. Amazon, do you also support the GDPR?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We support the privacy principles of user control, consent and so forth. We think the actual legislation is new enough and creates some burdens that we don't think directly impact user privacy in a positive way. While we're fully compliant and fully supportive of the principles, we don't necessarily think it's something that should be applied universally at this point.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Support of the principles includes the principle of data minimization.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes, as well as user control. That's really the key principle.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Microsoft, would you agree with the principle of data minimization?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Yes, we would.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Good.

With respect to consumer privacy protection, one way to better protect consumer privacy is to have additional opt-in consents that are explicit for secondary purposes. For example, with Amazon's Echo, California was proposing smart speaker rules that there would have to be opt-in consents for that information to be stored. Do you agree with those rules?

(0905)

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We believe that the user experience should be very smooth and clear, and that people's expectations should be very reasonably met. For example, with the Echo device, you use a mobile application to set up your device, and it makes it very clear what the privacy rules are.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Is there an explicit opt-in consent for recording of those conversations?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

It's not an explicit opt-in consent, but it makes it clear about the recordings and it gives you full control over the recordings. It gives a full list of recordings and the ability to delete any particular one, or all of them. It's a very explicit and clear user interface for that.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

If the GDPR were in effect, there would be a requirement for explicit opt-in consent.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Possibly. There may be legal rulings that we.... That's part of the issue. A lot of specifics are unclear until there are more regulatory or judicial findings about what the exact meaning of some of the general principles is.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Representative from Apple, does Apple engage in web tracking?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

We don't have the kind of destinations around the Internet that do that kind of web tracking. Of course, with our online store, for example, we have a direct first-party relationship with users who visit our sites.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

There's probably a reasonable expectation that when I visit the Apple site, I know that Apple's going to want to communicate with me afterwards, but if I'm visiting other non-related sites around the Internet, Apple wouldn't be tracking me.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

We're not, and in fact our intelligent tracking prevention is on by default in our Safari web browser, so even if Apple were to attempt that, intelligent tracking prevention would seek to prevent it.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Microsoft and Amazon, are you similar to Apple, or do you engage in web tracking on a wide variety of websites across the Internet?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We are involved in the web ecosystem, with the ability to understand where people have come from and where they're going from our site.

Again, our primary business model is selling products to customers, so that's not the way we monetize our business.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Was that a yes to web tracking, fairly broadly?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We participate in the advertising ecosystem, so yes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I think that's a yes.

Microsoft, would you comment?

Mr. John Weigelt:

We have our properties, as do the other communities. We have the Microsoft store and the MSN properties, so we are able to determine where our customers are coming from.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

The reason I ask is that we had an individual yesterday talking about how consent in some cases isn't good enough, and in some cases, I understand that. I'm a reasonably busy person, so I can't be expected to read every agreement about terms and conditions; I can't be expected to read all of them. If secondary consents are in every single app I use and I have to agree to 10 different consents, am I really going to be able to protect my own personal information? I don't think we should expect that of consumers, which is why we have consumer protection law and implied warranties in other contexts.

McNamee yesterday suggested that some things should strictly be off the table. I put it to Google that maybe Google shouldn't be able to read my emails and target me based on ads—that should be off the table. Do you think, Apple, that certain things should just be off the table?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Yes, when we.... Our iCloud service is a place where users can store their photos or documents with Apple, and we are not mining that content to build profiles about our users. We consider it the user's data. We're storing it on our service, but it remains the user's data.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Similarly, Microsoft and Amazon: Do you think certain data collection should simply be off the table completely?

Mr. John Weigelt:

One of the things we feel strongly about is users having visibility into what data they have shared with particular organizations. We've worked very closely—I have personally worked very closely—with information privacy commissioners across Canada to talk about the consent environment and what consent means. As we rolled out tools like Cortana, for example, we worked with the federal Privacy Commissioner's office to understand which of the 12 stages of consent for consumers were particularly important.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

But I'm suggesting that beyond consent, certain things be off the table. For example, my personal pictures on my phone—should those be able to be scanned, and then I get targeted ads?

Mr. John Weigelt:

To be clear, we don't scan that information—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Well, I know you don't—

Mr. John Weigelt:

—however, we do provide—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

—but should certain things be off the table? That is my point.

Mr. John Weigelt:

—visibility to customers so that they understand where their data is being used and give them full control.

Our privacy dashboard, for example, allows you to see what data is resident within the Microsoft environment and then you're able to control that and be able to manage that in a better fashion. It's all about having that user interaction so that they understand the value proposition of being able to share those things.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Amazon, should certain things just be off the table?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I don't think you can say, a priori, that certain things are always inappropriate, because again, the customer experience is key, and if people want to have a better customer experience based on data that they share.... Consent, obviously, and control are critical.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Let's take the case of kids under the age of 18, for example. Maybe we should not be able to collect information about kids under the age of 18, or under 16, or under 13.

Kids, let's say. Should that be off the table?

(0910)

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We're going to comply with all of the laws of the countries where we operate, if that is—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Are you saying you don't have a view on an ethical basis with respect to collecting information from kids?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We certainly have a view that parents should be in charge of children's online experience, and we give parents the full control in our systems for that experience.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

It's so hard to say yes.

The Chair:

We will go to Peter next, for five minutes.

Hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thanks to all of our witnesses for appearing today.

My first question is for Mr. Ryland at Amazon.

In September of last year, your vice-president and associate general counsel for Amazon, Mr. DeVore, testified before a U.S. Senate committee and was very critical, I think it's fair to say, of the California consumer act that was passed.

Among the new consumer rights in that act that he was critical of was the right for users to know all of the business data that is collected about a user and the right to say no to the sale of that business data. It provides, in California, the right to opt out of the sale of that data to third parties. He said the act was enacted too quickly and that the definition of personal information was too broad.

I wonder if you could help us today by giving us Amazon's definition of protectable personal information.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

First of all, let me say that I work in Amazon web services on our security and privacy of our cloud platform. I'm not a deep expert broadly across all of our privacy policies.

However, I will say that certain elements of consumer data are used in the core parts of business. For example, if we sell a product to a customer, we need to track some of that data for tax purposes and for other legal purposes, so it's impossible to say that a consumer has complete control over certain things. There are other legal reasons that data must sometimes be retained, for example.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Have you had any users request or ask about the user data that has been collected about them and whether it has been sold?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes, absolutely.

First of all, we do not sell our customer data. Full stop.

Second, we have a privacy page that shows you all the data we have accumulated about you—your order history, digital orders, book orders, etc. We have a whole privacy page for our Alexa Voice Service. All that gives users control and insight into the data we're utilizing.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Then despite Mr. DeVore's criticism, Amazon is complying with the California act and, I would assume, would comply with any other legislation passed anywhere in the world that was similar.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We will always comply with the laws that apply to us wherever we do business. Absolutely.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

I'd like to ask a question now to Mr. Davidson about Mozilla.

I know that Mozilla, with all of its good practices and its non-profit public benefit mandate, does work with Google and with Bing. I'm just wondering how you establish firewalls for user data accumulation that those two organizations would otherwise collect and monetize.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

It's a great question. It's pretty simple for us. We just don't send data to them beyond what they would normally get from a visitor who visits their website—the IP address, for example, when a visitor comes and visits them.

We make a practice of not collecting any information. If you're using Firefox and you do a search on Bing or on Google, we don't collect anything, we don't retain anything and we don't transmit anything special. That has allowed us to distance ourselves, honestly, and we have no financial incentive to collect that information.

Hon. Peter Kent:

I have a question for Mr. Neuenschwander.

In September of last year, the news broke that the Mac application Adware Doctor, which was supposed to protect Apple users from privacy threats, was in fact recording those users' data and delivering them to a server in China. Apple shut that down, but for how long was that exposure up? Have you determined who exactly was operating that server in China?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I remember that event and the action the App Store team took on it. Off the top of my head, I don't remember exactly the exposure. I'd be happy to go back and look up that information and get back to you with it.

(0915)

Hon. Peter Kent:

You're unaware of how long the exposure—

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

At this time, I don't remember exactly how long that exposure was.

Hon. Peter Kent:

This was, I understand, a very popular Mac application. How thoroughly do you research those applications in the reasonable capitalist rush to monetize new wonders?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

For applications that are free on the store, there's no monetization for Apple in the App Store.

Since we introduced the App Store, we've had both a manual review and, in more recent years, added an automated review of every application that's submitted to the store, and then for every update of the applications on the store. Those applications undergo a review by a dedicated team of experts on the App Store side.

There is a limit that we don't go past, which is that we don't surveil our users' usage of the applications. Once the application is executing on a user's device, for that user's privacy we don't go further and take a look at the network traffic or the data that the user is sending. That would seem creepy to us.

We continue to invest on the App Store side to try to have as strong a review as we can. As applications and their behaviours change, we continue to enhance our review to capture behaviours that don't match our strong privacy policies on the stores.

Hon. Peter Kent:

For Microsoft and Ms. Floyd, in 2013 the European Commission fined Microsoft in the amount of some €561 million for non-compliance with browser choice commitments. There doesn't seem to have been any violation since. Does that sort of substantial fine teach lessons? We're told that even hundreds of millions of dollars or hundreds of millions of euros—even into the billion-dollar mark—don't discourage the large digital companies. I'm wondering about compliance and the encouragement to compliance by substantial financial penalties, which we don't have in Canada at the moment.

Mr. John Weigelt:

As we mentioned, trust is the foundation of our business. Any time there's a negative finding against our organization, we find that the trust is eroded, and it ripples throughout the organization, not only from the consumer side but also on the enterprise side.

That fine was substantive, and we addressed the findings by changing how we deliver our products within the marketplace, providing the choice to have products without that browser in place.

When we look at order-making powers here in Canada or whatnot, we can see that having that negative finding will really impact the business far more broadly than some of those monetary fines.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Would you encourage the Canadian government to stiffen its regulations and penalties for non-compliance with privacy protection?

Mr. John Weigelt:

I would encourage the Canadian government to have the voice you have around how technologies are delivered within the Canadian context. We have people here locally who are there to hear that and change the way we deliver our services.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Angus, for five minutes.

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I was talking to my friend at Apple about how I bought my first Mac Plus in 1984 with a little 350k floppy disk, and I saw it as a revolutionary tool that was going to change the world for the better. I still think it has changed the world for the better, but we are seeing some really negative impacts.

Now that I'm aging myself, back in the eighties, imagine if Bell Telephone listened in on my phone. They would be charged. What if they said, “Hey, we're just listening in on your phone because we want to offer you some really nifty ideas, and we'll have a better way to serve you if we know what you're doing”? What if the post office read my mail before I got it, not because they were doing anything illegal but because there might be some really cool things that I might want to know and they would be able to help me? They would be charged.

Yet in the digital realm, we're now dealing with companies that are giving us all these nifty options. This was where my colleague Mr. Erskine-Smith was trying to get some straight answers.

I think that as legislators, we're really moving beyond this talk about consent. Consent has become meaningless if we are being spied on, if we're being watched and if our phone is tracking us. Consent is becoming a bogus term, because it's about claiming space in our lives that we have not given. If we had old school rules, you would not be able to listen in on our phones and not be able to track us without our rights, yet suddenly it's okay in the digital realm.

Mr. Davidson, I'm really interested in the work that Mozilla does.

Is it possible, do you think, for legislators to put some principled ground rules down about the privacy rights of citizens that will not completely destroy Silicon Valley and they will not all be going on welfare and the business model will still be able to succeed. Is it possible for us to put simple rules down?

(0920)

Mr. Alan Davidson:

Yes.

I can say more.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Say more.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

I think that actually—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I love it when someone agrees with me.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

We were looking for some yeses.

You've heard examples already. We firmly believe that you can build good and profitable businesses and still respect people's privacy. You've heard some examples today. You've heard some examples from us. You can see good examples of laws that are out there, including the GDPR.

There are things that are probably beyond the pale, for which we need to have either clear prohibitions or really strong safeguards. I would say that I wouldn't totally reject consent. What we need is more granular consent, because I think people don't really understand—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Explicit consent.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

—explicit consent.

There are lots of different ways to frame it, but there is a more granular kind of explicit consent. That's because there will be times when some people will want to take advantage of health apps or sharing their location with folks and with their family. They should be able to do that, but they should really understand what they're getting themselves into.

We believe that you can still build businesses that do that.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you.

Some of the concerns we've been looking at are in trying to get our heads around AI. This is the weaponization of digital media. AI could have a very positive role, or it could have a very negative role.

Mr. Ryland, certainly Amazon has really moved heavily in terms of AI. However, Amazon has also been noted as a company with 21st century innovation and 19th century labour practices.

With regard to the allegations that workers were being monitored right down to the level of being fired by AI tracking, is that the policy of Amazon?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Certainly our policy is to respect the dignity of our workforce and to treat everyone in a proper fashion.

I don't know the specifics of that allegation, but I'd be happy to get back to you with more information.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

It was a pretty famous article about Amazon. It said that right down to the seconds, the workers were being monitored by AI, and those who were too slow were being fired.

I may be old school, but I would think that this would be illegal under the labour laws in our country. That is apparently how AI is being used in the fulfillment centres. That, to me, is a very problematic misuse of AI. Are you not aware of that?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I'm not aware of that, and I'm almost certain that there would be human review of any decisions. There's no way we would make a decision like that without at least some kind of human review of machine-learning types of algorithms.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

It was a pretty damning article, and it was covered in many international papers.

Would you be able to get back to our committee and get us a response?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I would be happy to follow up with that.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I don't want to put you on the spot here, but I'd rather get a response on this. I think we would certainly want to get a sense of Amazon's perspective on how it uses AI in terms of the monitoring of the workers within the fulfillment centres. If you could get that to our committee, it would be very helpful.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I will do that.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

We'll go next to our delegation.

We'll start off with Singapore.

Go ahead, for five minutes.

Ms. Sun Xueling (Senior Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Home Affairs and Ministry of National Development, Parliament of Singapore):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have some questions for Mr. Alan Davidson.

I was reading the Mozilla Manifesto with interest. I guess I had some time. I think there are 10 principles in your manifesto. Specifically on principle 9, it reads that “Commercial involvement in the development of the internet brings many benefits; a balance between commercial [benefit] and public benefit is critical.”

That's what principle 9 says.

Would you agree, then, that tech companies, even with the desire for growth and profitability, should not abdicate their responsibility to safeguard against abuse of their platforms?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

We absolutely agree with that. I would say that the manifesto, for those who haven't seen it, is really like our guiding principles. It was written almost 15 years ago. We just updated it with a new set of things we've added on to it to respond to modern times.

We think, yes, that balance is really important, and I think companies need to be thinking about the implications of what they're building. I also think government needs to put guardrails around it, because what we've seen is that not all companies will do that. Some companies need guidance.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Also, I think there was an Internet health report that Mozilla Foundation put out, and I'd like to thank your organization, a non-profit working for the public benefit. I think the Cambridge Analytica scandal was referred to, and your report says that the scandal is a symptom of a much larger systemic issue, that the dominant business model and currency of today's digital world is actually based on gathering and selling data about us.

Would you agree, then, that the Cambridge Analytica scandal somehow demonstrates a mindset whereby the pursuit of profit and the pursuit for company growth had somewhat been prioritized over civic responsibility?

(0925)

Mr. Alan Davidson:

Yes, but our hope is that some of those are isolated instances. I would just say that not every company operates that way. There are, I think, companies that are trying to do the right thing for the user, trying to put their users first, and it's not just for altruistic purposes; I think it's because many of us believe that you build a better business and in the long term should be rewarded in the market if you put your users first.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

We also heard testimony yesterday. I think many of the grand committee members had spoken with businesses who talked about examples around Sri Lanka or Nancy Pelosi. It seemed that it was more about putting information out there, freedom of reach rather than real protection of freedom of speech, because there's no real freedom of speech if it is founded on false information or misleading information.

While we like to think that the Cambridge Analytica scandal is a one-off, I think our concern is that the existing business models of these corporate entities do not seem to give us the confidence that civic responsibility would be seen in the same light as company profits. I think that's where I'm coming from.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

As somebody who has been in this space for a long time, it is really disappointing to see some of those behaviours online. I do think that part of it has been the evolution of these business models, especially the ones that reward engagement as a major overriding metric. Our hope is that companies will do more and do better.

There is a risk in too much government intervention in this space, because we do want to make sure that we respect free expression. When governments are making strong choices about what is true and not true online, there's a lot of risk there. I think there's a serious balance needed there, and I think the starting point is using this bully pulpit to really push companies to do better. That is the right starting point. Hopefully that is effective.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Yes. Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll go next to our Ireland delegation and Ms. Naughton.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton (Chair, Joint Committee on Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Houses of the Oireachtas):

Thank you. Thank you all for coming before us this morning.

My first question is to Amazon. Last November, on Black Friday, I understand there were technical issues. Many of the customers' names and emails appeared on your website. Is that correct?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

No, that's not correct.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

No? Okay. I thought there was some reporting in relation to that. Were there some technical issues last November?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

It doesn't sound familiar to me at all, but I'd be happy to double-check. No, I'm not familiar with that.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

In relation to GDPR and data protection, from what my colleagues asked you earlier, you're saying you would be in favour of some form of GDPR being rolled out globally.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Again, we believe that the principles of consumer trust—putting customers first, giving them control over their data and getting their consent for usage of data—make sense. The specific ways in which that is done and the amount of record-keeping and the bureaucracy involved sometimes seem to outweigh the benefit to consumers, so we really think we need to work together as a community to find a right balance that's not too onerous.

For example, a large company like ours might be able to comply with a very onerous regulation that's very expensive to implement, but a small business might not. We have to find ways in which those principles can be implemented in a way that's efficient and relatively simple and straightforward.

Yes, we definitely support the principles behind GDPR. We think the actual legislation is still a bit of a work in progress, in the sense that we don't know exactly what the meaning of some of the legislation will be once it gets to the regulatory or judicial level—what exactly constitutes reasonable care, for example, on the part of a company.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Okay, so are you open to that, or maybe to a different version of it across the world?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

As you know, in the GDPR as it's currently working, there are those obstacles for some companies, but that has been worked through across the European Union.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

I suppose you're waiting to see how that works out—

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We think there will be a lot of good learnings from that experience. We can do better in the future, whether it's in Europe or in other places, but again, the principles make sense.

(0930)

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Okay.

This is a question for Microsoft: Earlier this year, I understand a hacker compromised the account of a Microsoft support agent. Is that correct?

Mr. John Weigelt:

That's correct. There was a disclosure of credentials.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

I understand at the time Microsoft was saying there was a possibility the hacker accessed and viewed the content of some Outlook users. Did that actually happen? Did they access the content of Microsoft users?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Having that access from the support side gave them the possibility to be able to do so.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

How was it that a hacker was able to, I suppose, compromise your own security or data security features?

Mr. John Weigelt:

That whole environment is an end-to-end trust-type model, so all you have to find is the weakest chain in the link. In this case, it was unfortunate that the administrative worker had a password that the hacker community was able to guess to get into that system.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

What have you done to ensure this doesn't happen again? It seems like kind of a basic breach of data security for your users.

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely. Any time there's an incident within our environment, we bring the Microsoft security response team together with our engineering teams to see how we can do better. We took a look at the environment to see what happened and to make sure we could put in place tools such as multi-factor controls, which would require two things to log in—something you know, something you have. We've been looking at things like two-person controls and tools like that, so that we can ensure we maintain our customers' trust and confidence.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

You're on record for having put these changes in place. Have you had a report? Did you do a report in relation to how many users' information was accessed, or the content?

Mr. John Weigelt:

We'd have to come back to the committee on the report and its findings. I'm not aware of that report. I had not searched it out myself.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Okay.

In relation to the measures taken following that.... Again, this is about the trust of users online and what your company has done. Would it be possible to get feedback about that?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Thank you.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.)):

You have another minute.

Mr. James Lawless (Member, Joint Committee on Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Houses of the Oireachtas):

Thank you, Chair.

To Amazon, first of all, Is Alexa listening? I guess it is. What's it doing with that information?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Alexa is listening for a keyword, the wake word, which alerts the system that you want to interact with it in some fashion. That information is not locally stored. There's nothing stored locally on the device. Once the keyword is recognized, it follows that. There's a light on the device that tells you that the device is now active, and the subsequent sound in the room is then streamed to the cloud.

The first thing the cloud does is to double-check the wake word. The software on the device often isn't sophisticated, so it occasionally makes mistakes. The cloud will then recognize that it wasn't a wake word, and then it will shut off the stream. However, if the cloud confirms that the wake word was used, that stream is then taken through a natural language processing system, which essentially produces a text output of it. From there, the systems take the next action that the user was asking for.

Mr. James Lawless:

Okay.

Is that information used by Amazon for profiling and/or marketing?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

That information becomes part of your account information, just as it would if you were buying books on our website. Therefore, it could influence what we present to you as other things you might be interested in.

Mr. James Lawless:

Okay.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

It's not passed to any third party. It's not used for advertising purposes and so forth.

Mr. James Lawless:

Okay, but if you've asked about the weather in Bermuda and then you go on the Amazon website, you might be pitched a holiday book guide for Bermuda. Is that possible?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

It's theoretically possible, yes. I don't know if that actual algorithm is there.

Mr. James Lawless:

Is it likely?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I don't know. I'd have to get back to you on that.

Mr. James Lawless:

Okay, but it is actually using the queries, which Alexa processes, to be of profit to the user. This could be used to make intelligent marketing pitches on the platform, yes?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

This is because the user directly ties the device to their account and they have full visibility into the utterances. You can see a full list of what you've said and you can delete any one of those. Those will immediately get removed from the database and would not be the basis for a recommendation.

Mr. James Lawless:

Do users consent to that when they sign up? Is that part of the terms and conditions?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I think it's very clear. The consent is part of the experience. To take a colloquial example, I haven't explicitly consented to my voice and video being recorded here today, but I understand from the context that it's probably happening. We believe that simple consumer experiences are best. We think our customers understand that for the service to work the way it's supposed to work, we are accumulating data about them—

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith):

Thanks.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

—and we make it really, really easy to delete and to control that data.

(0935)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith):

Thanks very much, although you may have a better understanding of what's going on today than most users of Alexa.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I'm sorry, Chair, but can I just make a point of order?

I want us to be really clear. When you're speaking before a committee, that's like speaking before a court. It's not about your consent to be recorded or that you think you may be recorded. This is a legal parliamentary process, so of course you're being recorded. To suggest that it's the same as Alexa selling you a thing in Barbados is ridiculous, and it undermines our Parliament.

I would just remind the witnesses that we are here to document for the international legislative community, and this will be on an official record.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith):

Thanks, Charlie.

We'll go to David for five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll start with Microsoft.

The Microsoft ecosystem is quite large, as you know. You have the majority of the world's desktops, with Office 365, LinkedIn, Bing, Skype, MSN, Live.com, Hotmail and so on. You obviously have the ability to collect a tremendous amount of data on a tremendous number of people. Can you assure me that there's no data about individuals interchanged between any of the different platforms?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Do you mean data between, let's say, an Xbox user and your Office 365 type of user? Is that the type of question?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, or LinkedIn and Bing. We heard quite a bit in the first couple of days of this committee about the creation of avatars of users of different companies. Does Microsoft create an avatar of their users? Does it create an impression of who is using their services?

Mr. John Weigelt:

What we see is that if you have a common Microsoft account, that allows you to maintain and manage your data across those properties. The Bing product team would not necessarily go directly from the Xbox team and back and forth for the data that's required. You are in control of your data that's in the centre.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My question was whether there is an interchange of the data between the services. You have your common log-in, but once you've gone past the log-in, you can go to different databases. Do the databases interact?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Again, across all the different platforms, I would have to look at each individual scenario that's done there to say largely that there's no data exchange across....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

You recently bought GitHub, an open-source company, which I thought was pretty interesting. Why?

Mr. John Weigelt:

We recognize that the open-source community is a very vibrant community with a great development model. That open dialogue, that open discussion, has gone beyond simply the software conversation to broader projects. We saw that as an opportunity for us to help engage with that community.

In the past, you've seen that there was almost this animosity between ourselves and the open-source community. We've really embraced the concept of open source and concepts of open data to be able to help bring better innovation to the marketplace.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I come from the open-source community, so I can relate to that comment.

I'd like to speak to Mozilla for a second.

You talked about enhanced tracking protections. Would you describe tracking and anti-tracking as an arms race?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

Unfortunately, yes. I think we are very clear-eyed about the fact that we will build this set of tracking protections. We think they provide real value. I'll give a shout-out to our friends at Apple. They're doing something similar with Safari that's really good.

The trackers will find other ways to get around this, and we'll have to build new tools. I think this is going to be an ongoing thing for some time, which is unfortunate for users, but it is an example of how we can do things to protect users.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

To go to Apple for a second, there was recently the sensor ID hack that was patched in 12.2 of iOS—I'm not familiar with it—that permitted any website anywhere in the world to track any iPhone and most Android devices based on sensory calibration data. You're probably familiar with this.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Yes, it's the fingerprinting issue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, the fingerprinting issue. Can you tell us more about this, how it was used and if it is truly prevented now in iOS 12.2?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

First, I'll step back, I think, to explain a bit of the context. When we're talking about, say, tracking, there can be some technologies that are explicitly for tracking, such as cookies. One of the evolutions we've seen is the development of what we call a synthetic fingerprint. It's just a unique digital number that is synthesized by a third party, probably to attempt to track. It can also be used for anti-fraud and some other reasons, but certainly it is fit for the purposes of tracking.

You're right. Some researchers, by looking at variations in sensor manufacture, identified that there was the ability to try to synthesize one of these unique identifiers. Fingerprinting, much like anti-tracking, is going to be something that will continually evolve and that we're committed to staying in front of. When you ask how it was used, I don't have any data that it was used at all, but I also can't assure you that it was not.

We introduced a number of mitigations in our most recent update, which the researchers have confirmed have blocked their version of the attack, but again, I'd put this in the context of fingerprinting being an evolving area, so I choose my word “mitigations” also carefully. Without actually removing sensors out of the device, there will continue to be a risk there. We're also going to continue to work to mitigate that risk and stay on top of it.

(0940)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have only about 20 seconds left. I have one more question for Apple.

On iOS, when you switch between applications, one application suspends and the next one opens. When you come back to the original application, if it's been more than a few seconds, it will reload the data. Is that not providing ample tracking opportunity to any website you're on, by saying that this is the usage of the device? I find it strange to have to do that, instead of storing the content that you're actually using.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I'll split that into two parts, I guess.

One, when the application gains the foreground and is able to execute, they can reload the content, if they see fit to reload the content. At that point, you've transferred control to that application, and it will be able to execute and reload, if you'd like.

It's our goal, actually, to minimize those reloads as part of the user experience. It's also our goal that the application currently in the foreground should get, within a sandbox, within a set of limitations we have, the maximum execution and other resources of the device. This can mean that the operating system will remove some of the resources of background applications.

In terms of the reloading that you're seeing, iOS, our operating system, could contribute to that, but fundamentally, regardless of what resources are preserved for that background application, when you transition back to an app, it has execution control and it can reload if it sees fit.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

We'll go to my co-chair, Mr. Collins.

Go ahead with your opening comments. It's good to have you back.

Mr. Damian Collins (Chair, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Thank you.

My apologies, since the other U.K. representatives and I were not here for the start of the session, but we're delighted to see all of the witnesses here on the panel.

We had focused yesterday on some of the social media platforms, but I think our interests are much broader, looking at a range of technology companies.

I wonder if I could start with a couple of questions first for Apple.

As I came in, there was a discussion about data collected about voice. Could you tell me a little bit about the sort of data Apple collects in terms of sound captured by its devices? With smart devices, are the devices capturing ambient background sound to gain an understanding of the users—maybe the environment they're in or what they're doing when they're using the device?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

In terms of the information on our devices that support Siri, there is a part of the device that is constantly listening. On some of our devices we've isolated it beyond even iOS, beyond our operating system, into a dedicated coprocessor, basically a specialized piece of hardware, which is not recording or storing that information but is listening only for the wake-up word to trigger our personal assistant, so that information isn't retained on the device.

Further to the point of your question, it isn't being collected into any sort of derived profile to identify something about the users' behaviour or interests. No.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Is it collecting information about the environment they're in at the moment? Let's say, for example, I was commuting to work and I was on the bus. Would it pick up that sort of ambient sound?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

It's not collecting it all. There's what we call a “ring buffer”. There's basically a short period that is transiently recorded to analyze for that wake-up word, and then it's continually overwritten as time progresses. There isn't any collection for more than just the ephemeral milliseconds of being able to listen for that wake-up word.

Mr. Damian Collins:

The only purpose of the listening is for a command to Siri.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

That's correct. Yes.

Mr. Damian Collins:

For product development or training purposes, is any of that information retained by the company?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Again, it's not even retained by the device. As it's transiently listening, it's being continually overwritten. When the user uses a wake-up word, there is some machine learning that happens on the device as it adapts the audio model to the speaker to reduce the number of false positives or false negatives for that wake-up word. Then if the user is using Siri, at the point Siri is woken up and being communicated with, that is the initiation of transmission of data to Apple.

Mr. Damian Collins:

What would the scope of that data be?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

The scope of the data is the utterance until it reaches a termination point and Siri thinks the user has stopped talking, along with information like the device model to tailor the response back to the device and a random device-generated identifier, which is the key to the data that is held by Siri for purposes of your interactions with Siri. This is an identifier that is separate from your Apple ID and not associated with any other account or services at Apple.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Would Apple keep a record of the sort of things I've asked Siri about, the commands I've given?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Yes.

(0945)

Mr. Damian Collins:

Is that used by the company, or is that just used to inform the response to my device?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I guess the second part is a form of use by the company. Yes, we use it for Siri, and for Siri purposes alone.

Mr. Damian Collins:

To get at what the Siri purposes are, are the Siri purposes just actually making Siri more responsive to my voice—

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Yes.

Mr. Damian Collins:

—or is the data kept by the company to understand what sorts of things people ask? Do you have metadata profiles of people based on how they use Siri?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

The only metadata profile that we have is one that is used to tailor your actual interactions with Siri. For example, we are training our voice models to do natural language recognition on the sound profile. This is really just within the Siri business or the Siri experience. If your question is whether it informs some broader profile used by the company to market products and services, the answer is no.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Mark Ryland, does Amazon do that?

I'd be interested to know the difference between how Amazon uses data gathered from voice compared to how Apple does. There was a recent case of a user who actually put in a request for data that Amazon held. That included a series of voice recordings from their home that the company was apparently using for training purposes. I'm interested in how Amazon gathers data from voice and how it uses it.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Similarly, the device listens for a wake-up word. It doesn't store any of that ambient data. Once it's awakened, it will begin to stream data to the cloud to do analysis of what the user is actually requesting. That data is stored; it's explicit in the user's profile, and they can see all the utterances. They can see what Alexa thought they said; they can actually see the text that it was translated into. It also gives them some understanding of where there may be some communication issues, and so forth.

They have the ability to delete that data, either individually or collectively. We use the data just as we would use data with other interactions with that person's account. It's part of their Amazon account. It's part of how they interact with our overall platform.

Mr. Damian Collins:

The representative from Apple has said that the device is constantly listening, but only for the Siri command. It would appear that if you have an Alexa device in your home, that is different. The device is always listening and it is actually retaining in the cloud the things it has heard.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

No. It's very similar. We're retaining the utterances after the wake word. It is just like Siri in that regard.

Mr. Damian Collins:

I know from my own personal experience that Alexa responds to commands other than the wake word. It might be triggered by something it has heard in the room that's not necessarily the wake command.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

That sounds like a malfunction to me. It's not supposed to respond randomly to ambient sounds.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Roger McNamee, who gave evidence to us yesterday, discussed how he put his Alexa in a box after the first day he got it because Alexa starting interacting with an Amazon TV commercial. I think most people who have these devices know that all sorts of things can set them off. It's not just the Alexa command or the wake word.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Well, we're certainly constantly working to refine the technology and make sure the wake word is the way by which people interact with the device.

Mr. Damian Collins:

If you were retaining data from the device that is based on things that it's heard and is then retained in the cloud—which seems to be different from what Apple does—are you saying that it's only sound data that is based on commands that Alexa has been given?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes. It's only the data that is in response to the user's attempt to interact with Alexa, which is based on the wake word.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Would Amazon be in a position to respond to a police request for data or information about a crime that may have been committed in a domestic setting based on sound picked up from Alexa?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We happily obey the laws of all the countries in which we operate. If there is a binding legal order that's reasonable in scope and so forth, then we will respond to that appropriately.

Mr. Damian Collins:

That would suggest you're retaining more data than just simply commands to Alexa.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

No, the only thing we could respond with is the information that I just described, which are the responses that come from the user once they've awakened the device. There's no storage of ambient sound in the environment.

Mr. Damian Collins:

You're saying that when someone gives the wake word to the device, then the command they've given—their dialogue with Alexa, if you like—is retained?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

That is correct.

Mr. Damian Collins:

You're saying that unless the wake word is given, the device isn't triggered and it doesn't collect ambient data.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

That is correct.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Okay.

I'm interested in the data case I referenced earlier. The concern there seemed to be that ambient sound was being kept and recorded and the company was using it for training purposes.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

No. The reference to training is simply that we improve our natural language processing models using the data that the customers give to us through their interaction with the device. It's not at all based on ambient sound.

(0950)

Mr. Damian Collins:

It would seem that all of their commands to Alexa that are triggered by the wake word are being retained by the company in the cloud. Do you think your users are aware of that?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I think so. In my experience with using a mobile device to set up the device at home, I immediately noticed that there is a history icon, essentially, where I can go and see all my interaction with the system.

Mr. Damian Collins:

I don't remember reading that anywhere. Maybe it's in the huge sort of War and Peace-like terms and conditions that are attached to the device.

I think that although it may be the same as using any other kind of search function, the fact is that he was talking to a computer, and I'm not sure users are aware that this information is stored indefinitely. I did not know that was being done. I had no idea how you'd go about identifying that. I'm slightly intrigued as well that you can, in fact, see a transcript of what you've asked Alexa.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes, absolutely. It's in the mobile app, on the website and on the Alexa privacy page that you can see all of your interactions. You can see what the transcription system believed you said, and so forth.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Presumably all of that is merged into a bucket of data that Amazon holds about me in terms of my purchasing habits and other things as well.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

It's part of your account data.

Mr. Damian Collins:

It's a lot of data.

The Chair:

Mr. Davidson wants to respond.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

I wanted to jump in to just say that I think this also highlights the problem we've been talking about with consent.

I'm a loyal Amazon Echo user. They've done a wonderful thing by putting this up. A couple of weeks ago, I went with my family, and we saw the data that was stored, but I have to say it is....

I'm a total privacy nut. I read all this stuff that you get, and I was shocked, honestly, and my family was shocked to see these recordings about us and our young children from years ago that are stored in the cloud. It's not to say that something was done wrongly or unlawfully. I think it's wonderful to see this kind of level of transparency, but users have no idea it's there. I think that many users have just no idea that this data is out there, and they don't know how it's going to be used in the future either.

I think that as an industry, we need to do a much better job of giving people better granular consent about this, or better information about it.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

I don't mean to pick on Amazon; it's a wonderful product.

The Chair:

We'll move on next to Mr. Gourde.

I see a lot of hands going up. There's going to be lots of time for everybody today.

Go ahead, Mr. Gourde, for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My question will focus on a more technical subject.

You, and especially Amazon and other similar organizations, have a lot of information and personal data on your clients.

I'm sure that you're taking every possible measure to secure all the data. However, given the emergence of artificial intelligence, you may have received services to help you predict the market in the future.

It could be useful—especially for Amazon—to be able to predict, let's say for next summer, which item on order could qualify for a discount and be put on sale.

Perhaps some subcontractors or individuals have provided services related to the new algorithm systems. Basically, they sold these services to help you.

Can these subcontractors, if you use them—of course, you don't need to tell us—guarantee that, when they use your company's data to provide this type of service, they won't sell personal information to other people or to larger organizations? These organizations would be very happy to obtain the information, whether they use it to sell advertising or for other purposes.

Do any organizations provide this type of service? [English]

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We do contract with third parties for certain delivery of some services and, under very carefully controlled conditions, we share personal data.

For example, if we're contracting with a delivery service, we share the name and address of the customer where the package has to be delivered, but I think, for all of these core machine-learning cases of the kind you're talking about, that is all internal to our company. We do not contract out access to the core business data that we use for, essentially, running our business. It's only going to be around the peripheral use cases, and in cases where we do share data, we have audit rights and we carefully control, through contract and audit, the usage that our contractors make of any data of our customers that we do share with them for these very limited purposes.

(0955)

[Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Do any other organizations use algorithm strategies to promote your products? [English]

Mr. John Weigelt:

We have a very robust data governance model at Microsoft whereby we recognize and are able to attribute and mark data and appropriately protect it. In areas where we need subcontractors, we use a very limited set.

A lot of adjudication occurs before we select our subcontractors, and they must enter into agreements with us to maintain the privacy of the data they are safeguarding. We have strict rules around the use of that data and the return of that data to us. We have a very robust program of policies, procedures and technical safeguards around subcontractor use to ensure that data isn't misused.

Artificial intelligence is an area of key interest to us, and certainly Satya Nadella, in his book Hit Refresh, has put together principles around the responsible use of AI to empower people. It's really the first principle. We've embraced them within our organization, ensuring that we have a robust governance structure around AI. We have a committee that looks at application of AI both inside and outside the organization to make sure we use it responsibly.

Putting these pieces in place internally helps us better manage and understand how those tools are being used and put them in place in an ethical framework. We're quite pleased that we're working with governments around the world, be they the EU with their AI ethics work or the recent OECD guidelines, or even here in Canada with the CIO Strategy Council's work on an AI ethics framework, so that we can help people and other organizations get a better sense of some of those responsible techniques, processes and governance models that need to be put in place.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I'm not aware of Apple doing the kind of modelling you're talking about. Instead, our machine learning tends to be on device intelligence.

For instance, as the keyboard learns about the user, the device itself collects and uses this information to train itself for that user without the information leaving the device. Where we are collecting data to help inform community models, we're using things like local differential privacy, which applies randomization to the data before it leaves the user's device, so we're not able to go back and tie the individual user inputs and their content to a user. It's very much a device focus for us. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Mr. Davidson, do you want to add anything? [English]

Mr. Alan Davidson:

We don't deploy any of those kinds of systems. In some of our research we have been looking at experimenting on devices also. I think that's a very solid approach to trying to protect people's privacy.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Gourde.

Next up, from the U.K., we have Mr. Ian Lucas.

Mr. Ian Lucas (Member, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

If I can pick up on what Mr. Collins was asking, I was intrigued about both the phone for Apple and the Alexa device. Have there been any attempts to hack into the systems you have and access the information you retain?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Apple's systems are under constant attack. I don't know precisely if Siri itself has been a subject of attack or not, but I think a good default position would be to assume it has. However, because the Siri data is not associated with the overall Apple account, while we consider it very sensitive and will strive to protect it, it would also be challenging to gather an individual user's data out of the Siri system, even if it were breached.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Has there ever been a successful hack into the system with respect to a particular individual?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I'm not aware of any, no.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Similarly, we've been protecting customer data very successfully for 20-plus years. This is a new kind of data, obviously a very sensitive kind, but we continue to have a very successful record there, and there's no indication of any kind of compromise of Alexa-related data.

The Chair:

We'll move next to Mr Lawless for five minutes.

Mr. James Lawless:

Thank you.

Going back to security and data privacy and encryption, I think Apple talked about the Key Store on the iPhone and iPad, and Mozilla, I think, also has a Key Store-type feature in the browser.

One of the challenges of security is that our passwords, I think, have become so secure that nobody knows what they are anymore, except for the devices themselves. On the Apple Key Store—I think it's called the Key Store application—you can ask it to generate a password for you, and then you can ask it to remember it for you. You don't know what it is, but the app and the device know what it is, and I guess that's stored in the cloud somewhere. I know you gave an overview at the start.

I suppose Mozilla has a similar feature that allows you to ask the platform to remember the password for you, so you have multiple passwords, and I think probably Microsoft does as well in its browsers. Again, if you log in to Mozilla or Edge or any browser, you find you can autopopulate all your password keys. We end up with this situation like Lord of the Rings, in a “one ring to rule them all” scenario. In our attempts to complicate and derive better security, we've ended up with one link in the chain, and that link is pretty vulnerable.

Maybe I could get some comments on that particular conundrum from all the platforms.

(1000)

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I think the application you're referring to is the Keychain Access application on the Mac and on iOS devices. Within “settings”, “passwords” and “accounts”, you can view the passwords. They are, as you say, auto-generated by the platform. Most users experience that through our Safari web browser, which offers a feature to link into the keychain. It is, as you say, stored in the cloud.

It is stored in the cloud end-to-end encrypted—I want to make that clear—so it's actually encrypted with a key that Apple never possesses. While we put that in the cloud, both to allow you to recover the passwords and to synchronize them among all devices that you've signed in to iCloud, we do that in a way that does not expose the passwords to Apple.

I think that you're right that passwords continue to be an area of challenge in terms of protecting user accounts. You see many companies, certainly Apple among them, moving to what's called two-factor authentication, in which merely the password is not sufficient to gain access to the account. We're very supportive of that. We've taken a number of steps over the years to move our iCloud accounts to that level of security, and we think that it's good industry progress.

The last thing I would say is that absolutely, the password data is extremely sensitive and deserves our highest level of protection. That's why, separate from the Keychain Access application you're talking about on the Mac, on our iOS devices and now on our T2—that's the name of the security chip in some of our latest Macs—we're using the secure enclave hardware technology to protect those passwords and separate them from the actual operating system. We have a smaller attack surface for that, so while it's absolutely a risk that we're highly attentive to, we've taken steps, down in our hardware design, to protect the data around users' passwords.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

It's a great question. I would just add that it seems counterintuitive, right? I think that 10 years ago we would have said, “This is crazy. You're going to put all your passwords in one place?” We offer a similar product—Lockwise—on our browser to help people.

I think that today the security experts will tell you this is a far better solution for most people because the biggest problem that we all have is that we can't remember our passwords, so we end up using the same password everywhere, or we end up using dumb passwords everywhere, and then that's where we get into trouble.

Our own polls of security experts and our own internal experts have said that it is actually far smarter to use a password manager, to use one of these systems. For most of us, the threat of that central vulnerability is actually a lot lower than the threat otherwise. I'd encourage you all to use password managers and think about that.

I've just sent out a note to all of our employees saying that they should do it. We all take that incredibly seriously. Two-factor authentification is an important part of this, and it's an important part of how those managers work. We take the responsibility to guard those things very seriously, but it is actually, as it turns out, a better solution for most consumers today.

Mr. John Weigelt:

Just to chime in, we see that local hardware-based protections based on encryption are important to help support that password protection. Work that together with multifactor authentication, perhaps using something you have, something you own.

I think an interesting counterpoint to this and an interesting add-on is the ability to make very robust decisions about individuals, about their use of a particular system. We use anonymized, pseudonymized data to help organizations recognize that “Hey, John's logging in from here in Ottawa, and there seems to be a log-in coming from Vancouver. He can't travel that fast.” Let's alert somebody to do that on an organizational perspective to intervene and say, “Look, we should perhaps ask John to refresh his password.”

There's another thing that we're able to do, based upon the global scope of our view into the cyber-threat environment. Often malicious users share dictionaries of user names and passwords. We come across those dictionaries, and we are able to inform our toolsets so that if organizations—say, food.com—find out that one of their names is on there, they are able to go back there as well.

For data associated with the use of a particular toolset, anonymization and pseudonymization help to provide greater assurance for privacy and security as well. Let's make sure we recognize that there's a balance we can strike to make sure that we maintain privacy while at the same time helping safeguard those users.

(1005)

Mr. James Lawless:

It's a very interesting area, and it continues to be challenging. There's a usability trade-off versus security.

I remember an IT security manager in a large corporation telling me about a policy he implemented before there were password managers, going back maybe a decade. He implemented a policy of robust passwords so that everybody couldn't use their household pet or their birthplace and so on. Then he found that despite having this enforced policy, everybody was writing their passwords down because there was no way they could otherwise remember them, so it was kind of counterproductive.

I have one final question, and then I'm going to share time with my colleague. I think there's a website called haveyoubeenhacked.com or haveibeenhacked—something like that—which basically records known breaches. If your data and any of your platforms or other third party apps or sites are in the cloud and are compromised, you can do a search for yourself or for your details and pull it back.

Is there any way to remedy that? I ran it recently, and I think there were four different sites that had been compromised that my details were on. If that happens on your platforms, how do you do that? How do you mitigate that? Do you just inform the users? Do you reach out, or do you try to wipe that data set and start again? What happens there?

Mr. John Weigelt:

We have breach notification requirements, obligations, and we notify our users if there's a suspected breach of their environment and recommend that they change their passwords.

For the enterprise set, like that toolset that I mentioned—“Have I been pwned?”, I think it's called—

Mr. James Lawless:

That's the one, yes.

Mr. John Weigelt:

—that site has readily available dictionaries, so we feed those back to enterprise users as well. There's the notification of the individual users, and the we also help enterprises understand what's happening.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

We do the same thing in the sense that we all have data breach obligations and would do those things in such a situation. We've also put together our own version of that “have I been hacked” Firefox monitor. For Firefox account holders who opt into it, we'll actually notify them affirmatively of other attacks that we're notified about, not just any breach on our system but on others as well. I think that's going to be a service that people find valuable.

Mr. James Lawless:

That's good.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

If Apple security teams, in addition to the steps that have been discussed here, become aware that an account has likely been breached, then we can take steps through what's called “automated reset” on the account. We will actually force a password reset and do additional challenges to the user if they have two-factor authentication using their existing trusted devices to re-establish access to that account.

Mr. James Lawless:

Yes, it's very hard to get back in when you're out, because I've had that experience.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

You mentioned balancing usability and security.

Mr. James Lawless:

Yes.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

We try to strike a balance there between whether you are the good guy trying to get back in, so let's not make it hard for you, or let's definitely keep that bad guy out. That's an evolving space.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Can I just come into that, please?

The Chair:

We're actually way over time. The chair is taking the second round, and I already have you as number one on our second round, Hildegarde. Once we get through everybody, we'll start through that next round. It shouldn't be very long.

We'll go to Ms. Vandenbeld now for five minutes.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

I'd like to begin with the lack of utility of the idea of consent anymore. When you want to use a certain app or you want to use something, there are good purposes and bad purposes. Let's say that, for instance, I'm on my iPhone and I'm leaving Parliament and it's 9 p.m. My iPhone tells me exactly which route to take to get to my home. It knows where I live because it has seen that I take that route every day, and if I suddenly start taking a different route to a different place, it will know that as well.

Well, that's great when I want to know whether or not I should take the 417, but for my phone to know exactly where I'm sleeping every night is also something that could be very disturbing for a lot of people.

We don't really have a choice. If we want to use certain services, if we want to be able to access Google Maps or anything like that, we have to say yes, but then there's that alternate use of that data.

By the way, on the comment about this being a public hearing, we have a tickertape right on the side of the wall there that says this is in public. I wish there were a tickertape like that when you're searching on the Internet so that you know whether what you're doing is going to be recorded or made public.

My question, particularly to Apple, is on your collection of data about where I've been. It's not just a matter of where I'm going that day. It's not that I want to get from A to B and I want to know what bus route I should take; it's that it knows exactly the patterns of where I am travelling in terms of location.

How much of that is being stored, and what are the other purposes that this could be used for?

(1010)

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I'd like to be really precise, madam, about the “you” and the “it” in your sentences because I think you used them correctly, but there is a subtle distinction there. “It”—your phone—does know that. Your phone is collecting based on sensor data and behavioural patterns and tries to infer where your home is—and that is your iPhone. “You”, being Apple, does not know this information, or at least not via that process. If you leave a billing address with us for purchases or something, that's different, but the information that your iPhone is becoming intelligent about remains on your phone and is not known by Apple.

When you ask about how much of it is collected, well, it's collected by the phone. It's collected under our “frequent locations” feature. Users can go and browse and remove those inside the device, but the collection is just for the device. It's not actually collected by Apple.

As for the purposes to which it can be put, over our versions of the operating system we try to use that information to provide good local experiences on the device, such as the time-to-leave notifications or notifications of traffic incidents on your route home; but that isn't going to extend to purposes to which Apple, the corporate entity, could put that data, because that data is never in our possession.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I think that goes to what Microsoft started talking about in their opening statement, which is the ability of hackers to access the data. Apple's not using this data, but is it possible, through cyber-threats, that other bad actors might be able to get in and access this data?

I'm actually going to ask Microsoft.

You talked about doing $1 billion a year in security research and development, and there's a term that you threw out, “co-operative botnet takedowns”. I'd like you to explain that a bit, as well as the work that you're doing on cybercrimes.

We know that once the data is out there, it's impossible to put back, and a lot of these Cambridge Analyticas and other data aggregators are using it, so what are you doing to make sure that this data doesn't get out there in the first place?

Mr. John Weigelt:

When we look at the marketplace, we see it's continuously moving, right? What was put in place for security controls 10 years ago is different today, and that's part of the efforts of the community that's out there securing the IT environment.

From our case, we analyze those common techniques. We then try to make sure that those techniques go away. We're not just trying to keep up; we're trying to jump ahead of the malicious user community so that they can't repeat their previous exploits and they will have to figure out new ways to do that.

We look at tools like encryption, tools like hardening up how the operating system works, so that things don't go in the same place every time. Think of it as if you change your route when you go home from Parliament at night, so that if they are waiting for you at the corner of Sparks, then they won't get you because you have changed your route. We do the same thing within the internal system, and it breaks a whole bunch of things that the traditional hacker community does. We also include privacy within that, and accessibility, so our whole work is around trust, security, privacy and accessibility.

At the same time, there is a broader Internet community at large, so it's nothing we can do alone. There are Internet service providers, websites, and even home computers that get taken over by these zombie networks. Hackers have started to create networks of computers that they co-opt to do their bidding. They may have up to a million zombie computers attacking different communities. It really takes the Internet down and bogs it down with traffic and whatnot.

In order to take that down, you need technical sophistication to be able to take it over, but you also need the support of legal entities within regions. One of the things that's unique for us is that our cybercrime centre has worked with government authorities in finding novel legal precedents that allow these networks to be taken down, so in addition to the technology side, we make sure we're on side from the legal side to conduct our operations.

Lastly, what we did for the Zeus and Citadel botnets, which were large zombie networks that had placed themselves into corporate Canada, was work with the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre as well as the corporation to clean up those infections from those machines so they would go quietly, and they could start up again.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Mr. Davidson, would you comment?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

I have two quick points.

First, we work on something that we call “lean data practices”. It's the idea that we should not keep data if we don't need it. The best way to secure data is not to retain it. Sometimes it's needed, but sometimes it's not. The industry could do a better job and consumers could learn more about insisting that data not be kept if it's not needed.

Second, location is a particularly sensitive area. It's probably an area that is ultimately going to need more government attention. Many users probably would feel really comfortable with an Apple or a Microsoft holding this data, because they have great security experts and stuff like that. We worry a lot about some of the smaller companies and third parties that are holding some of this data and maybe not doing it as securely.

(1015)

The Chair:

We will go to Ms. Jo Stevens from the U.K.

Ms. Jo Stevens (Member, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Thank you, Chair.

I would like to turn to a different subject altogether, competitions and markets. I would like to ask Mark and Erik if they think different competition and antitrust rules should apply to tech giants, considering their unprecedented influence and market power.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

When it comes to antitrust regulations, I'm working with an engineering organization, so I can't say I've given a lot of thought to the regulation side. I would be happy to take any questions and refer them back to our legal or government affairs teams.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

As a consumer, do you think that large global tech giants have too much market influence and power?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

My focus, in terms of our platforms, is to put the user in control of data and to leave as much control as possible in the hands of users.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We're a relatively large company, but of course, that is largely the result of the fact that we operate globally. We operate in a lot of different markets. In any given market segment, we typically can be often a very small or middle-size player.

Again, I'm not going to opine in any depth about competition laws. It's not my area of expertise, but we feel the existing competition law as it exists today is adequate to deal with technology companies.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

How about you, John?

Mr. John Weigelt:

We've been around for quite some time, since the 1970s, so we've had some focus on the organization and the way we do our business. I think we've made appropriate adjustments, which we made based on the input and the perspective of governments around the world.

One thing that is important to me as a Canadian working for Microsoft here in Canada is the partner ecosystem and the enabling of Canadian innovation and Canadian business. Over 12,000 partners who make a living off of the toolset have the reach from a consistent platform to be able to sell innovation around the world based upon these toolsets and have a multiplying factor for the revenue that they generate here in the nation.

Sometimes with packaged software it's an eight-to-one multiplier. For cloud computing, it's estimated to be as high as a 20-to-one multiplier for the use of these toolsets, so we see that as a great economic enabler. Having that global reach is an important factor for the partners we work with.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

That quite neatly leads me on to my next question. I think there is quite a strong argument that global tech giants are a bit like a public utility and should be treated as such because of the power you wield.

Bearing in mind what you said just now about innovation, do you think that if that was the case and there was a bigger antitrust emphasis, it would negatively impact innovation? Is that your main reason?

Mr. John Weigelt:

I was making a linkage between those themes. My sense was that, look, we democratize technology. We make it silly simple for emerging nations and emerging companies with great ideas to leverage very advanced technology. When you think about artificial intelligence and the work that's happening in Montreal, Toronto, and even globally, the ability to make use of these tools to provide a new market is critically important.

I see this as a catalyst for the innovation community. We're working across the five Canadian superclusters, which is Canada's innovation engine around agriculture, oceans and advanced manufacturing, to build out new toolsets. Our ability to look across those communities and do cross-platform types of approaches and leverage our experience on a platform provides for activities in the community's best interest.

For example, in the ocean supercluster, working with data and having data about our oceans and having that sharing of a common commodity across the community is something we advocate to help that community grow . Having that platform and easy access to it provides that innovation.

(1020)

Ms. Jo Stevens:

Would either of you like to comment on the innovation point from your company's perspective?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes, I would be happy to.

We face robust competition in all the markets we operate in. Cloud computing is a great example. There are not a large number of players in the cloud market, but competition is very strong, prices are dropping, and it enables, as my colleague was saying, new kinds of business models that were really previously impossible.

I worked for some years in our public sector business at Amazon Web Services. What I saw there was that we had very small companies, 10-, 20- or 30-person companies, competing for large government contracts that would have been impossible for them to compete for prior to the existence of cloud computing. It would have required a very large, dedicated government contractor to compete for these large contracts because they required so much infrastructure and so much capital investment in order to go after a large contract.

With the ability to get onto many IT services from cloud, you now have this great democratization, to reuse that word, of international market access, of mom-and-pop shops with international market access, whether through Amazon sellers on our retail site or through using our cloud platform. I think competition is really strengthened because some of these large-scale players enable people to access a broader set of markets.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

But they have to do it through you, don't they? Where else would they go?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

No, you can do it through us or our competitors.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

But there aren't that many competitors, are there?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

There are not a huge number of competitors, but the competition is fierce.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

It sounds a bit odd to me that you have very few competitors, yet it's fierce. That's not what I'd normally assume to be the case.

How about you, Erik?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

From what little I know about legislation, it appears to be very challenging to write. I would presume that a goal of any legislation would be not to limit innovation, not to put a ceiling on what companies can do, but instead to try to put a floor for good behaviours.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Jo.

We'll go next to Raj Saini for five minutes.

Mr. Raj Saini (Kitchener Centre, Lib.):

Good morning, everybody.

I'm sure you're all aware of the term “data-opoly”. Right now, in front of us, we have Apple, which controls a popular mobile operating software system. We have Amazon, which controls the largest online merchant platform software. We also have Microsoft, which has the ability to acquire a lot of data and use it to gain market advantage.

In talking about competition, I want to go beyond what Ms. Stevens said. When we look at the European Union right now, we see that Apple violated European state aid rules when Ireland granted undue tax benefits of 13 billion euros. In some cases, you paid substantially less tax, which was an advantage.

In the case of Amazon, the European Commission targeted Amazon's anti-competitive most favoured nation clause, and Luxembourg gave Amazon illegal tax benefits worth some 250 million euros.

My point is not in any way to embarrass you, but obviously there is a problem with competition. The problem stems from the fact that there are different competitive regimes or competition laws, whether it be in Europe, whether it be the FTC, or whether it be Canada. In European competition law, a special duty is imposed on dominant market players. That is not the same as the United States, because the same infractions were not charged in the United States. Do you think it's something that should be considered because of your dominant market status?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

As I said, I'm not an expert on competition law. We certainly obey the laws of the countries and regions in which we operate, and we will continue to do so.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Well, the European Commission fined Amazon, so you didn't really follow the law.

My question is about the special duty imposed in European competition law on dominant market players. Do you think that should come to the United States and Canada also?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I really should get back to you on that. I'm not an expert in that area. I'd be happy to follow up with our experts in that area.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Sure.

Apple, would you comment?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I am aware that the state aid story made a great deal of press, I think, but I'm really aware of it as a consumer of the news. I haven't done a lot of reading on European competition law. Similarly, as I'm focused on privacy by design from the engineering side, for questions on that I'll have to get the company to get back to you.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Okay.

Amazon is probably the most dominant bookseller in the market. Do you agree with that?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

No, I don't agree with it.

Mr. Raj Saini:

You don't? Who's bigger than you?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

There's a huge market in book sales from all kinds of retailers, from Walmart to—

(1025)

Mr. Raj Saini:

Who sells more books than you?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I don't know the answer to that, but I'd be happy to look it up for you.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Okay.

One of the approaches you use when you allow books to be sold—I read this somewhere, so correct me if I'm wrong—is that you approach small booksellers and you exact a sizable fee from them to list their books. You don't pay authors per copy when they download the book, but you pay per page. If they don't finish the book, then you pocket the difference. You track online what people read. If people are reading popular authors, you don't provide a discount to them, because you know they will buy the book anyway.

Do you think this is fair, or is what I'm saying wrong?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I don't know the facts surrounding the questions you just raised, so I can't really answer. I would be happy to get back to you on that.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Okay.

This is my final question. Let's suspend animation for a second and look at Amazon as a mall. You own the mall. You grant space to other retailers. You allow them to be on your platform. You control access to customers and you collect data on every site. You're operating the largest mall in the world.

In some cases, whenever small retailers show some success, you tend to use that information to diminish competition. Since you have access to all the third party people who are selling products on your site, do you think that's fair?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We don't use the data we acquire for supporting our third party seller marketplace. We don't use that data for purposes of our own retail business or for purposes of product lines that we launch.

Mr. Raj Saini:

You're sure about that.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes.

Mr. Raj Saini:

You're saying that if anybody lists a product on your website, you do not track the sales of that product to know which product is popular and which product is not popular.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We track the data for supporting that business and the customers of that business. We don't use that data in our retail business.

Mr. Raj Saini:

You won't see which product is selling more or selling less and try to compete with that in any way.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

In terms of the part of our business that supports this vast third party marketplace, which has enabled great success for thousands of companies and mom-and-pop shops around the globe, absolutely that part of our business uses the data to maximize the success of the marketplace. It's not used in our retail business.

Mr. Raj Saini:

One of the complaints in the area of innovation is that a number of market players are dominant because of the access to data they have and because of their ability to retain and use that data. In many cases, smaller companies or smaller players don't have access to the data, don't have access to the market. More importantly, in some cases, when emerging companies are on the rise, the larger companies will buy the technology to kill the technology so it does not compete.

Is that something Amazon or Apple or Microsoft is involved in, in any way?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

If you look at our history of acquisitions, they tend to be very small and very targeted, so in general, the answer would be no.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I believe that's also the answer for Apple.

Mr. Raj Saini:

I mean any emerging technology, any company that's emerging that might be a competitor to any of your platforms. You don't engage in that, or you just...? I don't get what you mean.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

The acquisitions that I'm familiar with have been companies like, say, AuthenTec, which was a firm whose technology we used to build the first version of touch ID into our phones. We look for technological innovations that we can integrate into our products, but I don't really see that as a fingerprint sensor company directly competing with Apple.

Mr. John Weigelt:

We're actively involved with the start-up community around the world. Programs like BizSpark and Microsoft Ventures help our partners and start-ups really get their legs under them so that they can sell their product. We are a commodity software provider—we provide a common platform that helps communities around the world—so there will be areas that are innovated on top of our platform. We saw one such platform here built out of Montreal, Privacy Analytics, which was a start-up here that was doing perfect forward privacy. That was a technology that we didn't have that we thought would help catalyze our business, and as a result we acquired the company with the goal of building that into our products.

We make a decision about whether we build or buy based on the resources that we have, and in some cases there's great innovation out there that we acquire and build into our toolset. That's really how we look at that acquisition strategy.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Saini.

Last up will be Mr. Baylis.

What's going to happen is Mr. Baylis will finish, and then we're going to start the rounds all over again. Delegations will all start from the top again, just to be clear.

Mr. Baylis, go ahead for five minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses. You're both very knowledgeable and very open and willing to answer questions, which was not exactly what we had yesterday, so I'm very grateful for that.

Mr. Davidson, in your opening remarks you mentioned that Google and Facebook have an opportunity to improve their transparency. Could you expand a bit on that, please?

(1030)

Mr. Alan Davidson:

Sure.

We do think that ad transparency is a major tool to think about in how we fight disinformation protection, particularly in the election context. We've been working with some of the other big players as part of this EU code of practice, to try to get better transparency tools out there for consumers to see what ads they're seeing and for researchers and for journalists to understand how these big disinformation campaigns happen. We have a fellow at the Mozilla Foundation working on this. The big frustration, honestly, is that it's very hard to get access to these archives of ads, even though some of our colleagues have pledged to make that access available.

We recently did an analysis. There are five different criteria that experts have identified—for example, is it historical? Is it publicly available? Is it hard to get the information? It's those kinds of things.

We put out a blog post, for example, that Facebook had only met two of the five criteria, the minimum criteria that experts had set for reasonable access to an ad archive. Not to pick on them—we've already picked on them publicly—but I'll say we hope we can do more, because I think without that kind of transparency....

Google did better. It got four out of five on the experts' chart, but without more transparency around ads, we're really stuck in trying to understand what kinds of disinformation campaigns are being built out there.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You mentioned that if they're not willing to self-regulate, you felt that they should be regulated. Did I understand that correctly?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

What I was trying to say is that if we can't get better information....Transparency is the first step here, and it can be a really powerful tool. If we could have transparency and more notice to people about what political advertising they're seeing, that could go a long way toward helping to deal with these disinformation campaigns and this election manipulation. If we don't get that transparency, that's when it will be more reasonable for governments to try to step in and impose more restrictions. We think that's a second-best answer, for sure. That's what I think we were trying to get at.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

My colleague, Charlie, my senior colleague—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Your older brother.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

My older brother Charlie here has made an argument that some things should require consent—you talked about granular consent—while some things should just be prohibited. Do you agree with this line of thought?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

We have said we believe that. We think it's important to recognize that there is a lot of value that people get out of different kinds of tools, even around things like health or financial or location information, so we want to give people that ability. Probably when you get to kids and certain kinds of health information, the bar needs to be very high, if not prohibited.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

My colleague here, my younger brother Nathaniel, has said that certain age things.... For example, we prohibit driving at a certain age and we prohibit drinking at a certain age. Are there any thoughts from the rest of the panel on this concept of just out-and-out prohibiting some data collecting, whether it's age related or some type of data? Do any of you have anything to add to that?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

In my earlier answers I talked about how we seek to leave the data on the user's device and under their control. I'd separate collection by a corporate entity from collection from a device that's under the user's control. Where possible, we want to leave that control in the hands of the users through explicit consent and through retaining the data on their device.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If it's collected, but not used or seen by a corporation such as yours.... If the corporation has collected it and just held it, and then I can delete it or not, you see that as differentiated from collecting it for use elsewhere. Is that what you're saying?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I do see collection from a company compared to being on the user's device as different. I almost wouldn't want to use the word “collection”. Maybe we should say “storage” or something.

Mr. John Weigelt:

I take pause when I try to answer that question, to be thoughtful around potential scenarios. I try to imagine myself as a parent and how these tools would be used. I really think it depends on the context in which that interaction occurs. A medical setting will be dramatically different from an online entertainment setting.

The context of the data is really important in managing the data, in terms of the obligations for safeguarding protections or even for the prohibition of collecting that data.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Do I have time for another question, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You do if you have a very quick, 30-second comment.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Leading into cloud computing, it sounds like a beautiful cloud, but there's no cloud. There's a physical server somewhere. That's what we're talking about. Let's forget the cloud; it's a physical server. The laws that apply to it depend on where that server actually sits.

We talk about Apple, Microsoft or Amazon—and Amazon, this is a big part of your business. If we Canadian legislators make a bunch of laws that protect Canada, but your server happens to be outside of Canada, our laws have zero impact.

Are you doing anything about aligning with government laws by making sure that these servers sit within the confines of the country that's legislating them?

(1035)

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We do have our data centres in multiple countries around the world, including Canada. There is legal control there, but we have to obey the laws of all the countries where we operate. Those laws may have extraterritorial impact as well.

Mr. John Weigelt:

We have delivered data centres in 54 regions around the world and we've put data centres here in Canada, in Toronto and Quebec City. I happen to be accountable for making sure that they're compliant with Canadian laws and regulations, be it the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, the federal government's legislation or provincial privacy legislation. It's critically important to us that we make sure we respect the local legal environment. We treat data that's stored in those data centres like a piece of paper. We want the laws to make sure that they treat that electronic information like the piece of paper.

We have been staunch advocates for the CLOUD Act, which helps to clarify the conflict of laws that are a challenge for multinational companies like ours. We abide by laws around the regions, but sometimes they conflict. The CLOUD Act hopes to set a common platform for understanding around mutual legal assistance treaties, or to follow on from that—because we all understand that mutual legal assistance treaties are somewhat slow and based upon paper—this provides new legal instruments to to provide confidence to governments that their residents' information is protected in the same manner that it would be protected in local data centres.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Thank you, Mr. Baylis.

It hasn't come up yet, so that's why I'm going to ask the question.

We're here because of a scandal called Cambridge Analytica and a social media company called Facebook. We wanted to differentiate between who you are. You're not social media; social media was here yesterday. You're big data, etc.

I have a comment specifically for Apple. This is why we wanted Tim Cook here. He has made some really interesting comments. I'll read exactly what he said: First, the right to have personal data minimized. Companies should challenge themselves to strip identifying information from customer data or avoid collecting it in the first place. Second, the right to knowledge—to know what data is being collected and why. Third, the right to access. Companies should make it easy for you to access, correct and delete your personal data. And fourth, the right to data security, without which trust is impossible.

That's a very strong statement. Apple, from your perspective—and I'm also going to ask Mozilla—how do we or how would you fix Facebook?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I don't know that I would presume to even understand the aspects of Facebook enough to fix it.

What I know we can focus on is primarily two ways. I always put technological solutions first. What we want to do is put the user in control of the data and of access to the data on their device. We've taken it upon ourselves as part of our platform to put the operating system as a barrier between applications and the user's data, and to require that user's consent, as mediated by the operating system, to come in between that app and its data. This is a set of things that we've evolved over time.

You've heard comments today about trying to keep usability front of mind as well, so we're trying to keep things clear and simple for users to use. In doing that, we've built refinements into our technology platform that allow us to expand that set of data that the operating system.... Again, this is separate from Apple, the corporate entity. The operating system can take a step forward and put the user in control of that access.

That's a process that we're going to remain committed to.

The Chair:

To me, changing legislation around this is very difficult, given all the parameters that are around us. It might be simpler for somebody like Tim Cook and an ideology that considers users as paramount. It might be simpler for Apple to do this than for legislators around the world to try to pull this off. However, we're giving it a soldier's try. We're definitely trying.

Mr. Davidson, do you have any comment on how we fix Facebook?

(1040)

Mr. Alan Davidson:

It's very hard from the outside to decide how to fix another company. I think a lot of us are really disappointed in the choices they've made that have created concern among a lot of people and a lot of regulators.

Our hope would be for privacy and more user control. That's a huge starting point.

I guess if I were going to say anything to my colleagues there, it would be to be a little less short term in their thinking about how to address some of these concerns. I think they have a lot of tools at their disposal to give people a lot more control over their information.

There are a lot of tools in the hands of regulators right now to try to make sure we have good guardrails around what companies do and don't do. Unfortunately, it sets a bad standard for other companies in the space when people aren't obeying good privacy practices.

We all can do things on our side too. That's why we built the Facebook container in our tracking tools: to try to give people more control.

The Chair:

Thank you for your answer.

I'm getting signals for questions again. We'll start with my co-chair and we'll go through our normal sequencing. You'll have time. Don't worry.

We'll go to Mr. Collins to start it off.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Thank you.

I will start with Mr. Ryland and Amazon.

Following on from the chair's comments about Facebook, if I connect my Amazon account to Facebook, what data am I sharing between the two platforms?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I'm not familiar with any way in which you do connect your Facebook account to Amazon. I know that Amazon can be used as a log-in service for some other websites, but Facebook is not one of those. I'm not familiar with any other connection model.

Mr. Damian Collins:

You're saying you can't do it. You can't connect your Facebook and Amazon accounts.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

As far as I know, that's true. I'll follow up to make sure that's true.

Mr. Damian Collins:

There was the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee in London, which I chaired with my colleagues here. We published some documents in December of last year that were relevant to the Six4Three case.

At the same time, there was also an investigation by The New York Times that suggested a series of major companies had entered into special data reciprocity agreements with Facebook so that they had access to their users' Facebook data and to their friends' data as well. Amazon was listed as one of those companies.

Could you say what sort of data protocols you have with Facebook and whether that gives you access not just to your customers' data or Facebook account holders, but also their friends as well?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I'll have to get back to you on that. I really don't know the answer to that question.

Mr. Damian Collins:

It was a quite major story in The New York Times last year. I'm amazed that you were not briefed on it.

I'll ask the same question of Microsoft as well.

You can log into Skype with your Facebook account. Again, if you're connecting your Skype and your Facebook accounts, what sort of data are you sharing between them?

Mr. John Weigelt:

As far as I understand, it's a simplified log-in from Facebook into your Skype account. When you connect, there should be a pop-up that provides you with an indication of what Facebook is giving to the Skype environment.

It's a simplified log-in type of environment.

Mr. Damian Collins:

What type of data is shared between the different accounts? For users who do that, what type of data about their Skype usage is shared with Facebook?

Mr. John Weigelt:

It's simply a log-on.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Yes, but all these Facebook log-ins have data reciprocity agreements built into them as well. The question is whether—

Mr. John Weigelt:

It's simply a simplified way to share an identity token, so to speak, so that you can log in to Skype.

Mr. Damian Collins:

I know the way the basic log-in works, but these log-in arrangements with Facebook give reciprocal access to data between the two. There's actual connecting, effectively.

Mr. John Weigelt:

It's nothing that would not have been disclosed in that initial connection, so when you connect, when you actually do that linkage, there is a pop-up that says this is the data that will be interacted or interchanged.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Then it's in the terms and conditions.

Mr. John Weigelt:

It's in the actual pop-up that you have to go through. It's a simplified term, and as I understand it, it's a tiered notice. It provides you notice of what the category of data is, and then as you click through it, you have the ability to dig deeper to see what that is.

Mr. Damian Collins:

In layman's terms, would Facebook know who I was engaging with on Skype?

Mr. John Weigelt:

I don't believe so, but I'd have to get back to you on that. I really don't believe so.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Okay.

I'll just go back to Amazon. I want to quickly get this out.

Under “How do I connect my Facebook account to Amazon?”, Amazon.com says: From Settings, tap My Accounts, and then tap Connect your social networks. Tap Connect Your Facebook Account. Enter your log-in information, and then tap Connect.

That is a pretty simple way of connecting your Facebook account with your Amazon account, so I'll just ask again: If you do that, what type of data are you sharing between the two platforms?

(1045)

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I'll need to get back to you on that. I really don't know the answer to that.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Okay. I think this is pretty basic stuff. My concern is that data is being shared between the two platforms.

Again, in a question asked in The New York Times investigation, it said there were preferential data reciprocity agreements between Amazon, between Microsoft and Facebook, so that they not only had access to the data about the Facebook accounts of their users but the users' friends as well, which was a setting that had been turned off for other apps. However, the major partners of Facebook, in terms of the money they spend together or the value of the data, have preferential access.

Again, I'll ask one more time whether either Amazon or Microsoft can say something about that—the nature of the data, what it includes, and whether you still have those arrangements in place.

Mr. John Weigelt:

I can't comment on—

Mr. Damian Collins:

I don't know whether that means you don't know what to say or you don't know. Either way, if you could write to us, we'd be grateful.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes.

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We'll follow up on that.

The Chair:

We'll go next to Mr. Erskine-Smith for five minutes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

I first want to talk about ethical AI. This committee started a study on this topic, and the Government of Canada now requires algorithmic impact assessments for government departments when they employ an algorithm for the first time, as a risk assessment in the public interest. Do you think that should be a requirement on large public sector, big-data companies such as yourselves?

I'll start with Amazon and go down the table.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We strive very hard to work on good algorithmic fairness, and it's one of our fundamental principles. We have test data sets to make sure that we're constantly meeting the bar on that.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Do you think there should be transparency to the public so that there's proper public accountability with the algorithms that you employ with such large troves of data and personal information?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I think the market is doing a good job of making sure that companies set a good bar on that.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

You see, the frustrating thing is that previously you said you agree with the principles in the GDPR, and algorithmic explainability is a principle in the GDPR.

Apple, what do you think about it?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

In the machine learning that we employ, we do want users to understand that we do it primarily by putting it on the users' devices and training it on their data, as I've said. When we're training generalized models, we're doing that based on public data sets. Primarily, we're not training on personal data.

Where we would be training on personal data, we absolutely want to make sure that it is explainable and understandable by users.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Then you believe in that public transparency.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

We believe in transparency across many things.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Microsoft, would you comment?

Mr. John Weigelt:

We're participating and we're contributing to the work that's happening here in Canada and one of the challenges around definitions. For large-scale unhuman intervention-type systems, there needs to be ability to tell the user what's happening behind the scenes.

It's a big area of controversy, a big area of research around explainability, generalizability, and how we look at outcomes.

The way that documentation is currently written, it almost looks as though if you have website localization—for example, if I am coming from Quebec and I then present a French website because of that—it would require algorithmic risk assessment and notice to the public.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

You're concerned with definition, but in principle you agree with the idea.

Mr. John Weigelt:

In principle, we agree with the idea and applaud the Government of Canada for putting that in place right now, and others should examine similar opportunities.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Including the private sector and Microsoft.

On competition law, I read a quote yesterday from the German regulator, who noted Facebook's superior market power and said, “The only choice the user has is either to accept comprehensive combination of data or to refrain from using the social network. In such a difficult situation the user's choice cannot be referred to as voluntary consent.”

Does the same principle apply to your companies?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We face robust competition in the markets we're in. In the cloud business, for example, our main competition is the old way of doing IT business, and there's a vast array of competitors across that.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I appreciate that. I'll flip it a bit. Should the impact on consumer privacy be a consideration in competition law?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Again, it's an area outside of my expertise. I hate to give that answer.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

It's frustrating, because I did specifically let Amazon know that competition would be a matter we'd be discussing today.

Other companies, do you have a view as to whether the impact on consumer privacy should be a consideration in competition law?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

You imply that there is, at least in some cases, a single, all-or-nothing sort of consent, and we're very cognizant of that. What we do is offer very nuanced and fine-grained consent. It's possible to use an Apple device without signing in to or creating any Apple account, so we try to differentiate and separate those things.

(1050)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I appreciate that.

Does Microsoft have a view?

Mr. John Weigelt:

It's all about the data, and in particular safeguarding the data and how the data is used. I think you need to look more broadly at the data use. Perhaps data sheets for data would help in that regard, because I think privacy is about that data's security and accessibility.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I'm interested in seeing what the associate general counsel says tomorrow at the competition commissioner's data forum.

I'm moving forward with a secondary question on competition law.

In the 1990s, Explorer was free, and yet Microsoft was prevented from monopolizing the browser space. It wasn't protecting consumers on price; it was actually protecting innovation.

I'm going to pick on Amazon a bit. You said before that what I input into Alexa becomes part of my user profile. I assume that also means that what I watch on Prime, purchase from any number of sellers and search for on Amazon or beyond on the Internet all combine into a single profile, presumably to direct targeted ads.

I also wonder if my user profile, combined with everyone's user profile, drives your decisions to create new products. Is that fair?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We certainly look at the trends, purchases and behaviour of our customers, in terms of determining future—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Far apart from that, and in answer to Mr. Saini's questions, you said you're not tracking the information of third party sellers on your websites. If you look at it from the other perspective, you are tracking all of our individual purchase decisions on Amazon and combining all of those decisions in order to compete against those third party sellers in your marketplace. How is that not use of dominance?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I think the fact that the third party marketplace is wildly successful and that there are a huge number of very successful businesses in it is a very clear indicator that this is not a problem.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

You don't think you have an unfair market advantage.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

No.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

The last question I have was raised by—

The Chair:

Please go very quickly, because I know we're trying to squeeze everybody in.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

With respect to the monetization of personal data, I raised the point with experts yesterday that the business model is the problem. That was put forth by a number of folks, and Apple, I think—Tim Cook—made the same point about the industrial data complex.

Microsoft and Amazon, do you think the business model is itself a problem? You just want to collect more and more information about us. What's the value to us in your collecting so much information about us? Is the business model a problem?

Mr. John Weigelt:

To be clear, the information we collect is only there for the products. We're not looking at doing things personalized to you and you only, to target to you.

When we find that people aren't using a feature, grosso modo we anonymize, pseudonymize, and that's a great feature. We try to surface that feature in subsequent releases. That's simply there to help enhance our business. We're a software and services company. That's what we do, and that's our business line.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Our business model is very consistent with consumer privacy, because it's all about meeting customer choice through a traditional purchase-and-sale model of capabilities and products and services.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Angus for five minutes.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you very much.

Diapers.com was an online business selling diapers in this competitive market that Amazon says is out there. Jeff Bezos wanted to buy it. They refused, so Amazon went to predatory pricing. Amazon was losing $100 million on diapers every three months to put a competitor out of business or to force them to sell. They finally agreed, because they were afraid Amazon would drop prices even lower.

We talk about antitrust because of the “kill zone” of innovation that The Economist is talking about, but with Amazon, it's the kill zone of competition—the power that you have through all of your platforms to drive down prices and actually put people out of business. Shaoul Sussman says that the predatory pricing practices of Amazon are antitrust in nature and need legislation.

What do you say?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Again, I have to say that I'm not an expert in competition law and I don't know the history or the details of some of the things you mention.

In the general business that we're in, we see robust competition across all these businesses. There are a lot of new start-ups, and we even have a great number of competitors who use our Amazon Web Services platform. Some of the largest online commerce platforms in, say, Germany and Latin America use AWS and trust us with their businesses, so we think competition is working.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Yes, so you've got all the people to use your cloud services and then you can drive down prices against mom and pop. Lena Kahn, from Open Markets, says that because you are controlling so much market dominance in so many various areas, you can use your profits from the cloud to run predatory pricing and to run down competition. She says that your “structure and conduct pose anticompetitive concerns—yet it has escaped antitrust scrutiny”.

This is an issue that I think legislators need to think about. We see that in Canada one of the great advantages you have is that you're not paying taxes the way our poorest businesses have to. In the U.K., you made 3.35 billion pounds and paid only only 1.8 million pounds in taxable income. I mean, you're like our biggest welfare case on the planet if you're getting that.

In the U.S., it's even better. You made $11 billion in profits and you got a $129-million rebate. You were actually paying a negative 1% tax rate. That seems to me to be an extraordinary advantage. I don't know of any company that wouldn't want to get a rebate rather than pay taxes—or any citizen.

How is it that we have a marketplace where you can undercut any competitor and you can undercut any book publisher and you're not even properly paying taxes? Don't you think that it's at least our job to rein you guys in and make sure that we have some fair rules in the marketplace?

(1055)

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Again, I apologize. I'm not an expert in the competition law area. The panel discussion was on security, consumer protection and privacy, where I do have some expertise, but I'm not able to answer your questions on that area.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Yes, that's unfortunate. I mean, this is why our chair asked that we get people who would be able to answer questions, because these are the questions that as legislators we need to have answered. We're dealing in this new age, and your colleagues at Facebook have put us in this situation. If Facebook had better corporate practices, we might not even be paying attention, but we're having to pay attention. If Amazon was not engaged in such anti-competitive practices, we might think that the free market was great, but it's not great right now, and you can't answer those questions for us.

It puts us in a bind, because as legislators we're asking for answers. What's a fair taxation rate? How do we ensure competition in the marketplace? How do we ensure that we don't have predatory pricing that is deliberately driving down prices and putting businesses—our businesses— out of business because you have such market dominance and you can't answer the question? It leaves us very confused. Should we call Alexa or Siri? Would they help?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I apologize, but I don't have the expertise to answer those questions.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I would like to highlight what Mr. Angus said. This is the reason we asked Mr. Bezos to come. He can answer those kinds of questions before this grand committee. He's exactly the person who could have answered all our questions. We wouldn't have kept anybody off the panel, but certainly we wanted people who could give us comprehensive answers with regard to the whole package.

I will go next to Mr. Lucas from the U.K.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

John, could I return to transfer of data within Microsoft? You mentioned that Microsoft has acquired a number of companies. LinkedIn, which you mentioned, was one of them. Can you just be clear? If I give information to LinkedIn, within the Microsoft organization is it then transferred to other businesses within Microsoft?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely not. LinkedIn remains rather independent from the organization.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

You're saying there is a wall around the information that is collected by LinkedIn and it's not transferred within the Microsoft organization.

Mr. John Weigelt:

Any transfer of.... Excuse me. Let me step back from that. Any connection between your LinkedIn profile and, let's say, your Office toolset is done by the user, and that's a connection that's done explicitly. For example, in your email clients, you may choose to leverage your LinkedIn connection there. That's something that the user intervenes with in their LinkedIn profile. It's their Office—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

I'm interested in the default position. If I join LinkedIn and I don't go through the terms and conditions and I give information to LinkedIn, does it get transferred or is it capable of being transferred to other businesses within the Microsoft family, as you guys like to call it?

Mr. John Weigelt:

LinkedIn doesn't share that information across the business from the back end.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

As a general rule regarding the separate businesses within the Microsoft organization, is the information transferred generally?

Mr. John Weigelt:

As a general rule, each business line is independent.

(1100)

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Is the information transferred between the separate businesses?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Personal information is maintained by each individual business line.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

I just asked a very specific question. Is the policy of the Microsoft organization to allow transfer of personal data between separate businesses owned by Microsoft?

Mr. John Weigelt:

This is a consistent purpose—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Can I have a yes or no?

Mr. John Weigelt:

It's a consistent purpose question, right? So we, as a—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

It's a question to which either yes or no is the answer.

Mr. John Weigelt:

I will have to answer that I cannot affirm or deny that there is.... I don't have that knowledge.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Right, okay. That's not very helpful.

Could you come back to me on that question?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Thank you.

Erik, I have in front of me two very impressive Apple devices, although my techie colleagues tell me that my iPhone is really very old.

The issue I have is that people access, for example, Facebook, very much through Apple, through the hardware that you provide. You have said that a lot of information goes into the Apple phone or the iPad, and it's not transferred elsewhere, and it's not your responsibility to transfer it elsewhere. I don't really buy that argument, because people access other platforms through your hardware.

You are one of the biggest businesses on the planet and you can deal with whom you like. Why should you be allowing businesses that don't agree with your approach to privacy to use your hardware to do business?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I don't know if the businesses agree or disagree with our approach. I think we'd certainly encourage.... We try to demonstrate that people can copy us in our approach to privacy.

What my team seeks to do and what I think the focus is, as I said, is to put the information on the device, but I do think we have a responsibility about where it goes. That's why we've taken steps in our operating system to get in between an application and certain data on the device.

There is some data that we've never exposed on the device, and I don't think we would. For instance, the user's phone number or hardware identifiers that could be used for tracking have never been available on our platform.

We did this with the design of a technology we call sandboxing, which actually separates applications from themselves and from data in the OS.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

My point is that you set out the principles. The chairman set them out, and it's really complex and difficult for us to legislate on these issues, as we're all discovering.

You can do business with Facebook or not. You could disallow access to Facebook through your hardware if you so chose if they did not adhere to the principles. Facebook has done your industry a lot of damage. Why do you continue to do business with them?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I guess if you're talking about their availability on the App Store, I think there are two—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Well, it's a fact that so many people access Facebook through your devices.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Right, so on one hand, under the hypothetical, if the Facebook application wasn't there, Facebook offers a website, and people would still be able to access Facebook through the website, through our browser, or through a competing browser.

If we go further down that route and say that we should actually begin imposing what I would call—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

It's not imposing; it's about agreement. If you believe in your principles and you're an ethical company, then you should deal with people who abide by your principles. That's within your power.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Well, I suppose what's within my power are the technical controls. My approach is to say that underneath any application or any service running on the phone, we should find technical measures to keep the user in control of their data.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

What you could do is not do business with Facebook. You could choose an approach whereby you set out your principles and you apply them in dealing with who you want. Why don't you do that?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

If I take that as the availability of Facebook on our App Store, it would not measurably impact privacy to withdraw that application from the App Store.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

You really don't?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I think that users—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Do you think you'd get a bit of a headline?

(1105)

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

We'd get headline, sure. I don't personally believe that headlines necessarily impact privacy, with respect. I think users would—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Don't you think it would make a substantial impact on the approach that Facebook has been taking?

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

As you point out, Facebook is an extremely popular service. Users would turn to web technologies in other ways to continue to access Facebook. I don't personally see a way that either Apple could or, out of respect for an individual's privacy, that I would be—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

What concerns me is that you're presenting yourselves as the good guys, but you're facilitating the bad guys through the use of your hardware.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

We have taken many steps over the years to continue to constrain and raise the bar higher than any other platform on privacy and user control over the data on our hardware. It's precisely because of our hardware integration that we've been able to take so many positive, proactive steps toward putting users in control of data and finding ways to encourage date minimization.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

But you still want to do business with the bad guys.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Lucas. We have to move on.

Next is Ms. Naughton, from Ireland.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Thank you.

I want to go back to Mr. Ryland and my earlier question in relation to Amazon displaying the names and email addresses of customers. Were you categorical that it did not happen?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I'm certainly not familiar with the incident. I don't believe so, but we'll follow up.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

There were two articles on November 21, 2018, in The Guardian and The Telegraph. Both of them stated that Amazon suffered a major data breach that caused the names and email addresses of customers to be disclosed on its website.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I'd be happy to follow up on that.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Thank you. I just wanted to clarify that. It's very much on the record.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Lawless.

Mr. James Lawless:

I have a question about data portability and the GDPR principle. It struck me as an issue.

In terms of big data, it's where it sits, how it's housed and what form it's kept in, etc. Is that something you embrace? Do you want to hold proprietary data, so that it's exclusive to your corporation, or is it something you're comfortable with using open formats to share? Where are each of you at on data portability at the moment?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

We think access and data portability are extremely important parts of the GDPR and are actually really important pillars of any good privacy rules. Not only that, but they also could have a positive effect in the competition space. We think there's a lot of promising work to be done in not just getting people to be able to see what people have—and we do that when we hold data—but also in making it useful.

It's not just, “I can download my entire Facebook corpus of data”—which I've done and people should do, and it's really interesting—but it's also making it useful, so that I could take it somewhere else if I wanted to.

Mr. John Weigelt:

We're committed to the GDPR and the data portability principles. The big question comes around the interoperability of those profiles or that data, and making sure that you can move them from one place to another in a format that's appropriate. The jury is still out about where people want to move their data and in what formats.

Mr. James Lawless:

Microsoft has advanced on that. I know at one stage there was an alleged issue at Microsoft in terms of proprietary formats, but I know now there's always an option to “save as” in a more open format. Is that where you've gone with that?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely. We've even seen in cloud computing the industry move to take arbitrary activities and move them from one place to another. That's something that we've embraced. We've also looked to the open-source/open data community for advice and guidance.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

In the expectation of GDPR, Apple launched a data and privacy portal. Users can download their personal information, both under access and under portability, in human and machine-readable formats.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Speaking for Amazon web services, where I work, importing and exporting are fundamental capabilities of our platform. We never have an import service that doesn't have an accompanying export service, whether they are virtual machine formats or other kinds of import/export data formats. We have tools always going bidirectionally.

We also work a lot with the open-source community for the portability of application codes and so forth. For example, a lot of our platforms are supporting things like docker formats for containers, Kubernetes for cluster management and so forth. Users can very readily create highly portable systems and data portability across platforms. That's something customers expect, and we want to meet those customer needs.

(1110)

Mr. James Lawless:

You're saying it's the likes of Apache and the open-source foundations and those sorts of guidelines. We're merging open standards, and I suppose they're being embraced to an extent, or maybe they were pre-GDPR-type community concepts, but they're pretty much across the board now. Is that the case?

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely.

Mr. James Lawless:

Yes, okay. That's very good. Thank you.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Next we'll go to Singapore for five minutes.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Mr. Davidson, you mentioned earlier in a reply to Mr. Baylis that with regard to political ads, your first preference was for company action to promote transparency. I'd like to highlight two instances in which it seems that company action has fallen short.

In April 2018, Facebook implemented new rules for political ad transparency. They acknowledged they were slow to pick up foreign interference in the 2016 U.S. elections. They said they were increasing transparency around ads and that this would increase accountability, yet in late October 2018, Vice News published a report showing how easy it was to manipulate the so-called safeguard that Facebook had put in place. The reporters had been required to have their identification verified as having U.S. addresses before they could buy ads, but once verified, the reporters were able to post divisive ads and lie about who paid for them.

That's for Facebook.

Separately, in August 2018, Google said it had invested in robust systems to identify influence operations launched by foreign governments, but shortly after that, a non-profit organization, Campaign for Accountability, detailed how their researchers had posed as an Internet research agency and bought political ads targeting U.S. Internet users. According to CFA, Google made no attempt to verify the identity of the account and they approved the advertisements in less than 48 hours. The adverts ran on a wide range of websites and YouTube channels, generating over 20,000 views, all for less than $100.

Therefore, it does not sound as if the platforms are anywhere close to fulfilling their assurance to safeguard against foreign interference.

Would you agree with that?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

I think we clearly have a long way to go, absolutely, and it's been frustrating for those of us working in this space because we think that ad transparency is an incredibly important tool in being able to do this, and the other tools are not as good.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Yes. It does not seem that it's a technical problem per se, because the researchers flagged that they used the Russian IP address to access Google's Russian advert platforms and supply the details of the Internet research agency, and they went as far as to pay for the adverts using Russian rubles.

That seems to suggest to us that it's more about a desire to sell ads rather than to cut foreign interference.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

I'd caution you a little. The jury is still out. It's still early days. There's a lot more to do, I think. Perhaps the experience in the parliamentary elections in Europe and the elections in India will be informative. That's where people were trying to take much more proactive steps. I think we need to be able to assess that. That's partly why transparency is important.

Platforms need to do more, but as somebody else among your colleagues has pointed out, we should also look at who is perpetrating these acts—

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Definitely, yes.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

—and this is where we as companies need the help of government when nation states are attacking companies.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

You used the term earlier about having guardrails.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

Yes.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

I think that's important to prevent all of us from dropping into the abyss of disinformation.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

Agreed.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Thank you.

Chair, thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go to Anita next. Go ahead.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

To change the topic a little, in your opening remarks, Mr. Davidson, you talked about the fact that your company's workforce is focusing more on diversity. We know and we've heard testimony that algorithms are influenced by the social biases of those who are programming them, so if most of the programmers are young 20-something males, their social bias will be perpetrated through the algorithms.

How important is it that the workforce be diversified? How are you doing that, and what impact is it having?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

We think it's extremely important. It's essential not just because it's the right thing to do—and it is the right thing to do—but also because our argument is we all will build better products if we have a more diverse workforce that reflects the broader base of the communities we serve.

It's been a big struggle in Silicon Valley, in the tech industry generally, and I think we all should acknowledge that. We constantly need to work on it.

We've made it a very big priority in our company. As an example, every executive in our company has goals for the year. We call them objectives and key results. We all set our own, but one is mandatory for everybody: How well did you do in diversity in your hiring? It adds that little extra push to know you're being graded on it.

We need to do more of that, and we will be the first to say we have a way to go. I think we've probably made a lot of progress in gender diversity, particularly within our technical community. We've done less well and still have a long way to go on other kinds of ethnic diversity, and we are really working on it.

(1115)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

Thank you for raising it.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Could I ask the other platforms to each comment on that aspect?

Mr. John Weigelt:

At Microsoft, Satya Nadella has made it a top priority, and we recognize that our decisions and our products are better if our company better reflects the communities we serve.

Here in Canada, we're working to have Microsoft Canada reflect the cultural mosaic that Canada has, which includes not only gender but ethic backgrounds and orientation. Also, for those people who have unique adaptive requirements and unique work styles, such as visual challenges or hearing challenges or perhaps mental attention challenges....

Really, we're creating that community, and we build that into our AI ethics program. We have a governance committee that looks at sensitive uses of AI, but then we convene a very diverse community to do a 360° view of that sensitive use. We want very explicitly to have that cross-sectional perspective from every person in the organization who has a comment and to represent, again, that cultural mosaic. That way, we feel we can address some of those potential unintended consequences up front and be able to provide advice and guidance going forward.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Go ahead.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

Diversity is one of the four corporate values that our CEO Tim Cook has espoused, in addition to privacy. They're both quite important. It goes far beyond AI. Certainly speaking from a privacy dimension, it's very much about the human condition, and having a diversity of viewpoints will help us make good choices.

I don't have the numbers at hand about how our diversity is today. I'm sure we still have a long way to go. We have taken steps not only to improve our hiring and our outreach in terms of bringing diverse people into the workforce, but also in taking a look at churn, or career longevity. It's one thing to get somebody in the door, but you also want to make sure they have a productive and fulfilling career experience to stay and continue contributing.

As I said, we have more work to do on both of those dimensions.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

You'll hear a similar story from Amazon. We place a big focus on diversity. It's a big part of our corporate goals, and hiring managers and executives are given specific goals in that area.

Of course, it's not just a matter of hiring. It's also a matter of career longevity, career management and creating communities of interest within our company that allow people to feel both integrated into the larger organization and to have communities of interest that they feel very much at home in.

We do a lot of work across all those areas to increase the diversity of the business. Again, we think that's best for business. Not only is it the right thing to do, but it will help us to build better products, because the diverse backgrounds of our employees will match the customers we're trying to serve.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Vandenbeld.

I have an explanation of what's going to happen. We have a few more comments, and then we're going to have some final closing comments of the IGC from our vice-chairs, my co-chair and then me. Then we'll be done. It might go a little past 11:30, but it will be very close.

I have Mr. Kent for five minutes.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

If I could come back to the topic of competition, antitrust and monopolies in the new marketplace, there's been a lot of discussion recently, particularly in the United States, about the new digital monopolies and the fact that they may be a lot more durable than monopolies in the past—the railroads, the phone companies and so forth. They can overwhelm competition by either buying it or destroying it.

Yesterday I quoted, to the Facebook representative who was before us, the writings of Chris Hughes, the disillusioned former co-founder of Facebook. I know there's been some suggestion from some of our panellists today that their companies may be willing to accept versions of the European legislation, but one of Mr. Hughes' headlines suggests that Facebook should, in fact, be broken up and be subject to antitrust application. He said, “Facebook isn't afraid of a few more rules. It's afraid of an antitrust case”.

I know the defence against antitrust prosecution is a little more difficult because your big data monopolies use the excuse that your service is free and that there's not a tangible or identifiable dollar cost to what consumers are buying.

Again, this question may be greater than your job descriptions allow, which is why we asked that CEOs be present with us today, but I wonder, particularly in the case of Amazon and Microsoft, if you could discuss your companies' views with regard to countering these growing antitrust discussions and calls for breakup in the interests of greater competition and greater consumer protection.

I'll start with Mr. Ryland.

(1120)

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I'd be happy to say a few words about that.

Again, our business model is very traditional. We're selling goods and services—they have monetary value—both in our retail Amazon.com business and our cloud computing business, and we are facing robust competition across all kinds of different services and platforms that are not limited to online. There's a vast variety of channels and mechanisms that people use to acquire IT services, whether it be for a cloud or other kinds of capabilities. It's just a very different business model from our perspective, and our use of data to enhance the consumer experience is, we believe, very much adding value for consumers, and they really enjoy the experience of using these technologies.

I think it's a very different approach to some of the issues that you raise. Again, that's kind of a high-level statement, and beyond that, in terms of specifics around competition law, I've already disclosed that I'm not an expert.

Again, I think our business model is very traditional in that regard, so I think it's a bit different.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thanks.

I'll go to Microsoft.

Mr. John Weigelt:

I think that as you look at our longevity since the seventies, we've seen ebbs and flows. We used to have a phone. We have a great browser, but it has undergone a number of revisions. The vision of having a PC on every desktop has now changed to a phone in every pocket. We see these ebbs and flows that move through the environment.

As for the consumer data environment, consumers will go to services that are popular to them, and they will have ebbs and flows. Certainly if you speak with millennials today, the millennials are off in different places. For example, my children, who are kind of in that space, although they'll disagree that they're millennials, will say, “Dad, I'm not there, so don't talk to me on that channel—talk to me on this channel.” These things ebb and flow.

The data then lends itself to algorithms. We see an algorithmic age coming, and people using algorithms as a monetization technique. We see a move from algorithms to APIs and people monetizing APIs.

What we have is this continual innovation engine that's moving forward. We need to work together to try to figure out those unintended consequences, the lessons that we are learning along the way when it comes to disinformation, such as, for example, the squishy bag that happens when we push down on one place and then are surprised when it's “Oh, we didn't think about that.” Working together, then we can put in place those instruments to be able to do that.

I've abstracted this out, I know, from your question around anti-competition and antitrust, but I'd like to look at it from the macro level and how these things ebb and flow. How do we then put in place strong protection mechanisms for businesses and for people? That's through partnerships.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Next are Apple and then Mozilla.

Mr. Erik Neuenschwander:

I don't know that I have much to add to the comments of the other panellists. I think that we are very much about both trying to put the diversity of the App Store in front of our users and trying to enable great competition. I think that has been wildly successful for many different companies in that space.

When it comes to personal data, we practice data minimization and are not trying to empower Apple but instead to empower users.

Mr. Alan Davidson:

I would just say that I work at a company that in some ways has its roots in a reaction to a dominant player in the market, which at the time was Internet Explorer. I think we do believe that antitrust law provides some really important guardrails in the market. We want what everybody wants, which is a level playing field of competition.

We think there are a lot of concerns out there about size. With size comes responsibility. We also think that there are a lot of very powerful tools in the hands of antitrust regulators today. We probably need to think about how to give them more information, more tools and a better understanding of things such as APIs and the power of data in their analysis. That's really where the upgrade needs to happen first, even as we think about how to expand the roles. This is a very important area.

(1125)

Hon. Peter Kent:

To contemporize digitally...?

Mr. Alan Davidson:

A contemporized digital antitrust enforcer is what we need out there.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Kent.

Last in the line of questions is David. Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I got everybody else earlier, so I want to go to Mr. Ryland from Amazon for a bit.

Earlier you were talking to Mr. Lucas about whether Alexa has ever been compromised. As I recall, you said that it has not. Is that correct?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

That's right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you not familiar with the Checkmarx hack of only a year ago that did a complete compromise of Alexa and could cause Alexa to stream live audio in an unlimited amount?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I wasn't familiar with that particular.... I'll get back to you on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you not the director of security engineering?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

What's that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you not the director of security engineering?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I am, at Amazon Web Services, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're at Amazon Web Services; so we weren't sent someone from Amazon proper. I just wanted to get that clear.

Amazon has an integrated marketing system. If I go and search for something on Amazon, and then I go onto another computer on another website, I will have ads pop up for me from Amazon saying, “Hey, do you want to buy this thing that you searched for on a different device on a different day at a different time with a different IP address?” How does Amazon know that? What kind of data exchange happens between Amazon and other sites like Facebook and other websites all across...? For example, National Newswatch does that to me.

What is the information exchange there? How do you know who I am on another device?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We do participate in ad exchanges. We have a whole privacy site on our website that allows you to opt out of advertising. Again, that's not personal data. That's anonymized data. It's based on demographic profiling.

Again, it's straightforward to opt out of that on our website, or you can use some of the industry's tools, such as AdChoices, to opt out from participating in ad networks.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's anonymized data, but it knows exactly that one thing that I looked for three hours ago.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I can't speak to the very specific experience you had, but we're not using your personal data for that type of use case.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

At the very beginning of the meeting, you had some interesting perspectives on consent for the use of data. It caused a very good intervention from Mr. Angus. In Amazon's opinion or in your opinion, what is the limit of consent for the sharing of data? Is it explicit? If something is advertised on the box as a “smart” device, is that enough for consent to share data?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

We think context awareness makes sense. The reasonable consumer consuming a certain experience will have some idea of what is involved. If that is not there, then we want that to be more explicit. It's very contextual.

It also depends, obviously, on the type of data. Some data is much more sensitive than other data. As one of the other panellists mentioned, using an online gaming platform is different from using a health care site, so it's being context aware and content aware. Context-based consent makes a lot of sense.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

You mentioned earlier that you're a customer-oriented company. Are you also a worker-oriented company?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes. We very much try to be very worker-oriented.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you not get engaged in anti-union practices?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Again, it's not my area of expertise, but I would say that we treat our workers with respect and dignity. We try to pay a solid wage and give them reasonable working conditions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you engage in any data collection from your own employees?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Like all companies, we collect data around things like web access and an appropriate use of our technology to protect other workers in the workforce.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then at no time did Amazon distribute anti-union marketing materials to newly acquired companies.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I'm not familiar with that particular scenario.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, the next time we have this committee, I hope we have somebody at Amazon who knows the policies of Amazon rather than AWS. You do very good work at web services, but we need to know about Amazon as a whole company.

I think that's all I have for the moment. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, David.

I did neglect Jo from the U.K., and—

Mr. James Lawless:

Chair, before you hand it to Ms. Stevens, I must apologize; we need to catch a flight.

I would just thank the committee for the engagement over the last few days.

The Chair:

All right. Thank you. We will see you again in November of this year.

Mr. James Lawless: Absolutely.

The Chair: Give our best to Ms. Naughton. Thank you for coming.

Mr. James Lawless:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Jo.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

Thank you very much, Chair.

I want to go back to something you said earlier, John, about a board or a group that you have to look at sensitive use of AI. Can you give me an example of what sort of AI deployment you would describe as “sensitive”?

(1130)

Mr. John Weigelt:

One area is the use of artificial intelligence in medical diagnosis. We look at three criteria: Can it approve or deny consequential services? Is there infringement on human rights or human dignity? Are there health and safety issues at hand?

In one case, researchers were training artificial intelligence algorithms on chest X-rays. They then wanted to put that onto the emergency room floor, and they said, “Hey, this might impact patients. We need to understand how this works.” Our committee came together. We reviewed the datasets. We reviewed the validity of that open-source dataset and the number of people there. Then we provided guidance back to the researchers who were putting this in place. The guidance was along the lines of, “Hey, this is not for clinical use”, because software as a medical device is a completely different area. It requires certifications and whatnot.

However, if we're trying to assess whether or not artificial intelligence could potentially have the ability to learn from these scans, then that would be a good use. That's how we would tend to look at that situation.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

That's a really useful example. Thank you.

We do know, and there's plenty of evidence about this, that there is both deliberate and unconscious bias inherent in AI. I think there's quite a strong argument for a regulatory approach to govern AI deployment, much like we have in, say, the pharmaceutical sector. When you look at a product, before you can put it on the market, you have to look at what might be the unintended side effects of a particular medicine.

What do you feel about that? Do you think there is an argument for a regulatory approach, particularly because, as we know, the current deployment of AI does discriminate against women and does discriminate against black and ethnic minority citizens? People are losing jobs and are not gaining access to services like loans and mortgages because of this.

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely. I think your point is well made around the unintended creep of bias into AI decision-making solutions, so we do need to guard against that. It's one of those engineering principles that we're working hard on to come out with guidance and direction to our teams.

There are some areas where we've advocated for very swift and direct action to move more carefully and more deliberately, and one area is facial recognition software. It's to your very point that a lot of these models have been trained on a very homogeneous community and are therefore not looking at the diverse community that they must serve.

We are quite strong advocates for putting in place legislative frameworks around some of the consent regimes, such as whether you have banners on the streets that say that, whether you have measurements, what the difference is between public and private space, and things like that.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

How willing are you to make the work that you've been doing public? I appreciate if you're doing it behind the scenes. That's great, but it would be useful to know what you're doing and what your colleagues are doing.

Mr. John Weigelt:

Absolutely. Clearly, we need to do more about advising and alerting the community about all the great work that's under way. We've published guidance around bots and how to make sure that bots are behaving properly, because we've had our own negative experience around a foul-mouthed, bigoted bot that was trolled for a while. We learned from that. Our CEO stood behind our team, and we did better. Now we've provided guidance, and it's publicly available.

We have what is called the AI Business School, which has a complete set of lectures for business leaders to put in an AI governance model. We're working with that community to help them. We're working to evangelize the work that we're doing internally around our AI ethics overview.

Lastly, I would say that we're working in the 60-plus different regulatory guidance document activities that are happening around the world so that we can start to socialize this from a practical experience perspective. Here in Canada there's the AI impact assessment and the AI ethics guidance standard that are being developed.

Ms. Jo Stevens:

It would be really nice to see a virtual assistant that is not a subservient female in the future. I look forward to seeing something different.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Jo.

Now we'll get into our closing comments from our vice-chairs and then the co-chair.

Nate, would you start with your 60 seconds, please?

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I think if we've learned anything from the last few days, it's that we continue to live in an age of surveillance capitalism that has the potential for serious consequences to our elections, to our privacy and to innovation, frankly.

While it has been frustrating at times, I do think we have made progress. We have had every single platform and big data company now say what they haven't said previously: They are going to embrace stronger privacy and data protection rules.

We had the platforms yesterday note that they need public accountability in their content control decisions and yesterday they acknowledged corporate responsibility for algorithmic impacts, so there is progress, but there is also a lot more work to do with respect to competition and consumer protection, and with respect to moving from an acknowledgement of responsibility for the algorithms that they employ to real accountability and liability when there are negative consequences to those decisions.

I think there's a lot more work to do, and that will depend upon continued global co-operation. I think our Canadian community has worked across party lines effectively. This international committee has now worked effectively across oceans, in some cases, and across countries.

The last thing I will say is that it's not just about addressing these serious global problems with serious global co-operation among parliamentarians; it requires global co-operation from companies. If there is any last takeaway, it is that the companies simply didn't take it seriously enough.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Next we will go to Charlie.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you to our two excellent chairs. Thank you to our witnesses.

I think we have seen something extraordinary. I've been very proud of the Canadian Parliament and our willingness to be part of this process.

There's been some extraordinary testimony in terms of the quality of questions, and I've been very proud to be part of it. Two extraordinary facts are that we have never in my 15 years ever worked across party lines on pretty much anything, and yet we came together. Also, we have never, ever worked across international lines. We can thank a Canadian whistle-blower, Christopher Wylie, who opened the door to the digital Chernobyl that was happening around us.

As politicians, we stay away from complex technical things. They frighten us. We don't have the expertise, so we tend to avoid them, which I think was a great advantage for Silicon Valley for many years.

These things are not all that technical. I think what we've done these last two days with our international colleagues—and what we will continue to do internationally—is to make it as simple and clear as possible to restore the primacy of the person in the realm of big data. Privacy is a fundamental human right that will be protected. Legislators have an obligation and a duty to protect the democratic principles of our country, such as free expression and the right to participate in the digital realm without growing extremism. These are fundamental principles on which our core democracies have been founded. It's no different in the age of the phone than it was in the age of handwritten letters.

I want to thank my colleagues for being part of this. I think we came out of this a lot stronger than we went in, and we will come out even further. We want to work with the tech companies to ensure that the digital realm is a democratic realm in the 21st century.

Thank you all.

The Chair:

Thank you, Charlie.

Go ahead, Damian.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.

I'd just like to start by congratulating you and the members of your committee for the excellent job you've done in hosting and chairing these sessions. I think it's done exactly what we hoped it would do. It has built on the work we started in London. I think it's a model for co-operation between parliamentary committees in different countries that are working on the same issues and benefiting from related experience and insights.

The sessions have been split between what we call social media companies yesterday and other data companies here. Really what we're talking about is that while there are different functions, these are all basically huge data businesses. What we're interested in is how they gather their data, what consent they have for doing so and how they use it.

Across the sessions, time and again we saw companies unwilling to answer direct questions about how they gather data and how they use it. Whether it's asking how Amazon and Facebook share data.... Even though this is widely reported, we don't know. My colleague, Mr. Lucas, asked about LinkedIn and Microsoft data being shared. It's possible to totally integrate your LinkedIn data with your Microsoft tools, and a quick Google search can tell you exactly how to it.

I don't understand why companies are unwilling to talk openly about the tools they put in place. People may consent to use these tools, but do they understand the extent of the data they're sharing when they do? If it's as simple and straightforward as it seems, I'm always surprised that people are unwilling to talk about it. For me, these sessions are important because we get the chance to ask the questions that people won't ask and to continue to push for the answers we need.

Thank you.

The Chair:

I'll speak to the panellists first and then get into some closing comments.

I want to encourage you. You had promised, especially Mr. Ryland, about giving us a lot of the documents that you didn't.... Various commenters didn't have all the information that we were asking for. I would implore you to provide the information we requested to the clerk next to me so we can get a comprehensive answer for the committee. We'll provide it to all the delegates here.

Something that's really going to stick with me is a comment by Roger McNamee about the term "voodoo dolls”.

I watch my kids. I have four children. One is 21, one is 19, one is 17 and one is 15. I watch them becoming more and more addicted to these phones. I see work done by our colleagues in London about the addictive capabilities of these online devices. I wondered where are they going with this. You see that the whole drive from surveillance capitalism, the whole business model, is to keep them glued to that phone, despite the bad health it brings to those children, to our kids. It's all for a buck. We're responsible for doing something about that. We care about our kids, and we don't want to see them turned into voodoo dolls controlled by the almighty dollar and capitalism.

Since we like the devices so much, I think we still have some work to do to make sure we still provide access. We like technology and we've said that before. Technology is not the problem; it's the vehicle. We have to do something about what's causing these addictive practices.

I'll say thanks and offer some last comments.

Thanks to our clerk. We'll give him a round of applause for pulling it off.

He has that look on his face because events like this don't come off without their little issues. We deal with them on a real-time basis, so it's challenging. Again, I want to say a special thanks to Mike for getting it done.

Thanks also to my staff—over to my left, Kera, Cindy, Micah, Kaitlyn—for helping with the backroom stuff too. They're going to be very much de-stressing after this.

I'll give one shout-out before we finally close—oh, I forgot the analysts. Sorry. I'm always forgetting our poor analysts. Please stand.

Thank you for everything.

Thanks to the interpreters as well. There were three languages at the back, so thank you for being with us the whole week.

I'll give a little shout-out to our friend Christopher Wylie, despite being upstaged by sandwiches. I don't know if somebody saw the tweets from Christopher Wylie: “Democracy aside, Zuckerberg also missed out on some serious sandwich action.” He suggested that I mail the leftovers to Facebook HQ. Maybe that's the way we get the summons delivered into the right hands.

I want to thank all the media for giving this the attention we think it deserves. This is our future and our kids' future.

Again, thanks to all the panellists who flew across the globe, especially our U.K. members, who are our brothers and sisters across the water.

Singapore is still here as well. Thank you for coming.

Have a great day.

We'll see you in Ireland in November.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique

(0835)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, PCC)):

La 155e séance du Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique est ouverte.

Il s'agit de la dernière de nos grandes réunions internationales cette semaine, celle du Grand Comité international sur les mégadonnées, la protection des renseignements personnels et la démocratie.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui, de chez Amazon, Mark Ryland, directeur de l'ingénierie de sécurité, au Bureau du dirigeant principal de la sécurité de l'information pour Amazon Web Services.

Marlene Floyd, directrice nationale des Affaires commerciales, et John Weigelt, agent national de technologie, représentent Microsoft Canada inc.

De la Mozilla Foundation, nous recevons Alan Davidson, vice-président, Politique mondiale, confiance et sécurité.

Enfin, de chez Apple Inc., nous accueillons Erik Neuenschwander, gestionnaire pour la vie privée des utilisateurs.

Nous allons passer aux témoignages. Je tiens à signaler que nous avons invité les PDG. Il est regrettable qu'ils ne se soient pas présentés. Comme je l'ai dit à nombre d'entre vous avant la séance, il doit s'agir ici d'une réunion constructive pour chercher les moyens d'apporter des améliorations. Certaines propositions que vos sociétés ont faites d'emblée sont bonnes, et c'est pourquoi nous souhaitions accueillir les PDG, qui auraient pu répondre à nos questions. Nous sommes néanmoins heureux que vous soyez parmi nous.

Nous entendrons d'abord M. Ryland, qui aura 10 minutes.

M. Mark Ryland (directeur, Ingénierie de sécurité, Bureau du dirigeant principal de la sécurité de l'information pour Amazon Web Services, Amazon.com):

Merci beaucoup.

Bonjour, monsieur le président Zimmer, et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je salue également les invités venus de l'étranger.

Je m'appelle Mark Ryland, et je suis directeur de l'ingénierie de sécurité au Bureau du dirigeant principal de la sécurité de l'information pour Amazon Web Services, la division de l'infonuagique chez Amazon.

Merci de m'avoir invité à m'entretenir avec vous. C'est un plaisir de me joindre à cette importante discussion. Je chercherai surtout à expliquer comment Amazon place la sécurité et la confiance des consommateurs au centre de toutes ses activités.

La mission d'Amazon est d'être l'entreprise la plus axée sur la clientèle au monde. Sa philosophie d'entreprise est profondément ancrée dans une démarche qui consiste à faire le cheminement inverse, à partir des besoins du client, et à innover constamment pour lui offrir ensuite un meilleur service, un choix plus vaste et des prix plus bas. Cette approche s'applique à tous ses secteurs d'activité, y compris ceux qui concernent la protection des renseignements des consommateurs et la cybersécurité.

Amazon est au service des clients canadiens depuis le lancement d'amazon.ca, en 2002. L'entreprise compte plus de 10 000 employés à temps plein au Canada et elle a annoncé en 2018 qu'elle comptait créer 6 300 emplois de plus.

Amazon a également deux carrefours technologiques, l'un à Toronto et l'autre à Vancouver. Ces regroupements de bureaux emploient plus d'un millier d'ingénieurs en logiciels et un certain nombre de techniciens de soutien. Ils élaborent certains de nos systèmes mondiaux les plus avancés. Il y a également des bureaux à Victoria pour www.abebooks.com et la filiale AWS Thinkbox, à Winnipeg.

L'entreprise exploite sept centres de traitement au Canada, et quatre autres ont été annoncés. Ils ouvriront tous leurs portes cette année, en 2019.

Un mot maintenant au sujet de notre plateforme infonuagique.

Il y a un peu plus de 13 ans, Amazon a lancé Amazon Web Services, son entreprise d'infonuagique. C'est à Montréal que se trouve le siège d'AWS au Canada, où AWS compte un certain nombre de centres de données distincts. Nous avons lancé AWS parce qu'après plus d'une décennie passée à construire et à exploiter Amazon.com, nous nous sommes aperçus que nous avions acquis une compétence fondamentale dans l'exploitation d'une infrastructure technologique et de centres de données à très grande échelle. Nous nous sommes engagés dans une mission plus vaste, celle de servir les développeurs et les entreprises en leur offrant des services de technologie de l'information qu'ils peuvent utiliser pour gérer leurs propres entreprises.

Le terme « infonuagique » désigne la prestation sur demande de ressources de TI sur Internet ou sur des réseaux privés. Le nuage d'AWS s'étend sur un réseau de centres de données répartis dans 21 régions géographiques dans le monde entier. Au lieu de posséder et d'entretenir leurs propres centres de données, nos clients peuvent acquérir des technologies telles que la puissance de calcul, le stockage et les bases de données en quelques secondes, au gré des besoins, en appelant simplement une API ou en cliquant sur une console graphique.

Nous fournissons l'infrastructure et les services de TI de la même façon que le consommateur qui appuie sur l'interrupteur d'une lampe chez lui reçoit l'électricité d'un fournisseur.

L'une des préoccupations du Comité est la démocratie. Eh bien, nous démocratisons vraiment l'accès à des services de TI que seulement de très grandes organisations pouvaient s'offrir auparavant, vu l'importance du dispositif nécessaire. Maintenant, les plus petites organisations peuvent avoir accès à ce même type de technologie de pointe très perfectionnée en cliquant simplement sur un bouton et en payant uniquement leur consommation.

Aujourd'hui, AWS fournit des services informatiques à des millions de clients actifs dans plus de 190 pays. Les entreprises qui se prévalent des services d'AWS vont de grandes entreprises canadiennes comme Porter Airlines, Shaw, la Banque Nationale du Canada, TMX Group, Corus, Capital One et Blackberry jusqu'à de jeunes entreprises novatrices comme Vidyard et Sequence Bio.

Je tiens à souligner que la protection de la vie privée commence au fond par la sécurité. Il n'est possible de se conformer aux règlements et aux attentes en matière de protection des renseignements personnels que si la confidentialité des données est prise en compte dès la conception même des systèmes. Chez AWS, nous disons que la sécurité est la fonction primordiale: elle est encore plus importante que la toute première priorité. Nous savons que, si la sécurité n'est pas assurée, notre entreprise ne peut pas exister.

AWS et Amazon veillent jalousement à la sécurité et à la protection des renseignements des consommateurs et ont mis en œuvre des mesures techniques et physiques perfectionnées pour bloquer tout accès non autorisé aux données.

La sécurité est la responsabilité de tous. Bien que nous ayons une équipe d'experts en sécurité de calibre mondial qui surveille nos systèmes 24 heures sur 24 et 7 jours sur 7, afin de protéger les données des clients, chaque employé d'AWS, peu importe son rôle, est responsable de veiller à ce que la sécurité fasse partie intégrante de toutes les facettes de notre entreprise.

La sécurité et la protection des renseignements personnels sont une responsabilité partagée d'AWS et du client. Cela signifie qu'AWS est responsable de la sécurité et de la protection des renseignements personnels dans le nuage même, et que les clients sont responsables de la sécurité et de la confidentialité dans leurs systèmes et leurs applications qui fonctionnent dans le nuage. Par exemple, les clients doivent tenir compte de la sensibilité de leurs données et décider s'il faut les crypter et comment. Nous offrons une grande variété d'outils de cryptage et des conseils pour aider les clients à atteindre leurs objectifs en matière de cybersécurité.

Nous disons parfois: « Dansez comme si personne ne vous regardait. Cryptez comme si tout le monde était aux aguets. » Le cryptage est également utile pour garantir la confidentialité des données. Dans de nombreux cas, les données peuvent être effacées de façon efficace et permanente simplement en supprimant les clés de cryptage.

(0840)



De plus en plus, les organisations prennent conscience du lien entre la modernisation de la TI offerte par le nuage et une meilleure posture en matière de sécurité. La sécurité dépend de la capacité de garder une longueur d'avance dans un contexte de menaces qui évolue rapidement et continuellement, ce qui exige à la fois agilité opérationnelle et technologies de pointe.

Le nuage offre de nombreuses caractéristiques avancées qui garantissent que les données sont stockées et manipulées en toute sécurité. Dans un environnement classique, sur place, les organisations consacrent beaucoup de temps et d'argent à la gestion de leurs propres centres de données et se préoccupent de se défendre contre une gamme complète de menaces très variables et en constante évolution qu'il est difficile de prévoir. AWS met en œuvre des mesures de protection de base, comme la protection contre les DDoS ou la protection contre les dénis de service distribués; l'authentification, le contrôle d'accès et le cryptage. À partir de là, la plupart des organisations complètent ces protections en ajoutant leurs propres mesures de sécurité pour renforcer la protection des données de l'infonuagique et resserrer l'accès à l'information délicate dans le nuage. Elles disposent également de nombreux outils pour atteindre leurs objectifs en matière de protection des données.

Comme la notion de « nuage » est une nouveauté pour bien des gens, je tiens à souligner que les clients d'AWS sont les propriétaires de leurs propres données. Ils choisissent l'emplacement géographique où ils entreposent leurs données dans nos centres hautement sécurisés. Leurs données ne bougent pas à moins qu'ils ne décident de les déplacer. Nous n'accédons pas aux données de nos clients et nous ne les utilisons pas sans leur consentement.

La technologie est un élément important de la vie moderne et elle a le potentiel d'offrir des avantages extraordinaires dont nous commençons à peine à prendre conscience. Les solutions basées sur les données offrent des possibilités illimitées d'améliorer la vie des gens, qu'il s'agisse de poser des diagnostics médicaux beaucoup plus rapides ou de rendre l'agriculture beaucoup plus efficace et durable. Face à de nouveaux enjeux liés à la technologie, il se peut qu'il faille de nouvelles approches réglementaires, mais elles devraient éviter de nuire aux incitatifs à l'innovation et de limiter les gains d'efficience importants comme les économies d'échelle et la portée des technologies.

Nous croyons que les décideurs et les entreprises comme Amazon ont des objectifs très semblables: protéger la confiance des consommateurs et les renseignements personnels et promouvoir les nouvelles technologies. Nous partageons l'objectif de trouver des solutions communes, surtout en période d'innovation rapide. À mesure que la technologie évoluera, nous aurons tous la possibilité de travailler ensemble.

Merci. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Ryland.

Nous passons maintenant à Microsoft. Entendrons-nous Mme Floyd ou M. Weigelt?

Mme Marlene Floyd (directeur national, Affaires commerciales, Microsoft Canada inc.):

Nous allons nous partager le temps de parole.

Le président:

D'accord. À vous. [Français]

M. John Weigelt (agent national de technologie, Microsoft Canada inc.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous sommes heureux d'être ici avec vous aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Je m'appelle John Weigelt. Je suis l'agent national de technologie pour Microsoft au Canada. Ma collègue, Marlene Floyd, directrice nationale des affaires commerciales chez Microsoft Canada, m'accompagne. Nous sommes heureux d'avoir l'occasion de comparaître devant le Comité. Le travail que vous avez entrepris est important, compte tenu de la place de plus en plus grande du numérique et de l'incidence de la technologie sur les emplois, la protection des renseignements personnels, la sécurité, la participation de tous et l'équité.

Depuis la création de Microsoft Canada, en 1985, notre présence ici s'affirme de plus en plus, au point que nous avons désormais 10 bureaux régionaux aux quatre coins du pays, et ils emploient plus de 2 300 personnes. Au centre de développement de Microsoft à Vancouver, plus de 700 employés mettent au point des produits qui sont utilisés dans le monde entier. Des recherches de pointe sur l'intelligence artificielle sont également menées par des docteurs et des ingénieurs au laboratoire de recherche de Microsoft à Montréal. Ils travaillent en partenariat avec les universités de cette ville.

Des technologies puissantes comme l'infonuagique et l'intelligence artificielle transforment notre façon de vivre et de travailler et apportent des solutions à certains des problèmes les plus urgents du monde. Chez Microsoft, nous considérons avec optimisme les avantages de ces technologies, mais nous sommes aussi lucides devant les défis qui exigent une réflexion qui va au-delà de la technologie pour garantir l'application de principes éthiques forts et de lois adaptées. Quel rôle la technologie devrait-elle jouer dans la société? Pour répondre, il faut que des représentants de l'État, du milieu universitaire, du monde des affaires et de la société civile conjuguent leurs efforts pour modeler l'avenir.

Il y a plus de 17 ans, lorsqu'il a affirmé que « l'informatique fiable » était au premier rang des priorités chez Microsoft, Bill Gates a changé radicalement la façon dont cette société offre des solutions sur le marché. Cet engagement a été réitéré par l'actuelle PDG, Satya Nadella, en 2016. Nous croyons que la vie privée est un droit fondamental. Notre approche à l'égard de la protection de la vie privée et des données personnelles repose sur notre conviction que les clients sont propriétaires de leurs propres données. Par conséquent, nous protégeons la vie privée de nos clients et leur donnons le contrôle de leurs données.

Nous avons préconisé l'adoption de nouvelles lois sur la protection de la vie privée dans un certain nombre de pays, et nous avons été parmi les premiers à appuyer le RGPD en Europe. Nous reconnaissons que, pour les gouvernements, il est très important d'avoir une capacité informatique située près de leurs administrés. Microsoft a des centres de données dans plus de régions que tout autre fournisseur de services infonuagiques, avec plus d'une centaine de centres de données répartis dans plus de 50 régions du monde. Nous sommes très fiers que deux de ces centres de données soient situés ici, au Canada, soit en Ontario et au Québec.

La protection de nos clients et de la collectivité en général contre les cybermenaces est une responsabilité que nous prenons très au sérieux. Microsoft continue d'investir plus de 1 milliard de dollars par année dans la recherche et le développement en matière de sécurité, et des milliers de professionnels de la sécurité mondiale travaillent avec notre centre de renseignement sur les menaces, notre unité de la criminalité numérique et notre centre des opérations de cyberdéfense. Nous entretenons une étroite collaboration avec le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité annoncé récemment par le gouvernement du Canada. Nous avons établi des partenariats avec des gouvernements du monde entier dans le cadre du Government Security Program, cherchant à échanger de l'information technique et des renseignements sur les menaces et même à coopérer pour démanteler des réseaux de zombies. En outre, Microsoft a pris la tête du Cybersecurity Tech Accord, signé par plus d'une centaine d'organisations mondiales qui se sont rassemblées pour défendre tous les clients de partout contre les cyberattaques malveillantes et rendre Internet plus sûr.

(0845)

Mme Marlene Floyd:

Microsoft a également été fière de signer l'Appel de Paris pour la confiance et la sécurité dans le cyberespace lancé en novembre par le président français, Emmanuel Macron, lors du Forum de Paris sur la paix. Avec plus de 500 signataires, il s'agit du plus important engagement multipartite à l'égard des principes de protection du cyberespace.

Le Comité a également mis l'accent sur l'ingérence croissante d'acteurs malveillants dans les processus démocratiques de nombreux pays. Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord pour dire que le secteur de la technologie doit faire davantage pour aider à protéger le processus démocratique. Plus tôt cette semaine, nous avons eu le plaisir d'appuyer la Déclaration du Canada sur l’intégrité électorale en ligne annoncée par la ministre Gould.

Microsoft a pris des mesures pour aider à protéger l'intégrité de nos processus et institutions démocratiques. Il a créé le Programme de défense de la démocratie, qui travaille avec les intervenants des pays démocratiques pour promouvoir l'intégrité des élections, la sécurité des campagnes électorales et la défense contre la désinformation.

Dans le cadre de ce programme, Microsoft offre sans frais un service de sécurité appelé AccountGuard aux clients d'Office 365 dans l'écosystème politique. Il est actuellement proposé dans 26 pays, dont le Canada, les États-Unis, le Royaume-Uni, l'Inde, l'Irlande et la plupart des autres pays de l'Union européenne. Il protège actuellement plus de 36 000 comptes de courriel. AccountGuard identifie les cybermenaces, y compris les attaques d'États-nations, et met en garde les particuliers et les organisations. Depuis le lancement du programme, des centaines d'avis de menaces ont été envoyés aux participants.

Nous avons également utilisé la technologie pour assurer la résilience du processus électoral. Plus tôt ce mois-ci, nous avons annoncé ElectionGuard, une trousse de développement de logiciels libres et gratuits visant à rendre le vote plus sûr en fournissant une vérification de bout en bout des élections, en ouvrant les résultats à des organismes tiers pour permettre une validation sécurisée, et en donnant à chaque électeur la possibilité de confirmer que son vote a été compté correctement.

Chez Microsoft, nous travaillons fort pour nous assurer de développer les technologies de manière qu'elles soient centrées sur l'être humain et qu'elles permettent un accès large et équitable pour tous. L'évolution rapide de la puissance informatique et la croissance des solutions d'IA nous aideront à être plus productifs dans presque tous les domaines de l'activité humaine et conduiront à une plus grande prospérité, mais il faut relever les défis avec un sens de la responsabilité commune. Dans certains cas, cela signifie qu'il faut avancer plus lentement dans le déploiement d'une gamme complète de solutions d'IA tout en travaillant de façon réfléchie et délibérée avec les responsables gouvernementaux, le milieu universitaire et la société civile.

Nous savons que nous devons en faire plus pour continuer à gagner la confiance, et nous comprenons que nous serons jugés à nos actes, et pas seulement d'après nos paroles. Microsoft est déterminée à continuer de travailler dans le cadre d'un partenariat délibéré et réfléchi avec le gouvernement au fur et à mesure que nous progressons dans le monde du numérique.

Merci. Ce sera un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci, madame Floyd.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Davidson, de Mozilla.

M. Alan Davidson (vice-président, Politique mondiale, confiance et sécurité, Mozilla Corporation):

Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Grand Comité et du Comité permanent, merci.

Si je témoigne aujourd'hui, c'est parce que tout ne va pas bien dans le monde d'Internet. Il est certain que l'Internet ouvert est le moyen de communication le plus puissant que nous ayons jamais connu. À son mieux, il fait apparaître de nouvelles occasions d'apprendre à résoudre de grands problèmes pour bâtir un sens commun de l'humanité, et pourtant, nous avons aussi vu le pouvoir d'Internet utilisé pour miner la confiance, accentuer les dissensions et violer la vie privée. Nous pouvons faire mieux, et je suis ici pour vous faire part de quelques idées sur la façon de s'y prendre.

Je m'appelle Alan Davidson. Je suis vice-président chargé de la politique, de la confiance et de la sécurité à la Mozilla Corporation. Mozilla est une entité assez inhabituelle sur Internet. Nous appartenons entièrement à un organisme sans but lucratif, la Mozilla Foundation. Nous sommes une entreprise de logiciels libres axée sur une mission. Nous produisons le navigateur Web Firefox, Pocket et d'autres services.

Chez Mozilla, nous sommes déterminés à rendre Internet plus sain. Depuis des années, nous nous faisons les champions de l'ouverture et de la protection de la vie privée en ligne. Ce n'est pas qu'un slogan; c'est notre principale raison d'être. Nous essayons de montrer par l'exemple comment créer des produits pour protéger les renseignements personnels. Nous fabriquons ces produits avec le concours non seulement de nos employés, mais aussi de milliers d'intervenants de la base, partout dans le monde.

Chez Mozilla, nous croyons qu'Internet peut être meilleur. Pendant la période qui m'est accordée, je voudrais aborder trois sujets: premièrement, le fait que la protection de la vie privée commence par une bonne conception des produits; deuxièmement, le rôle de la réglementation en matière de protection de la vie privée; et troisièmement, certaines des questions de contenu dont vous avez parlé ces derniers jours.

Tout d'abord, nous croyons que notre industrie est en mesure de beaucoup mieux protéger la vie privée grâce à nos produits. C'est exactement ce que nous essayons de faire chez Mozilla. Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple tiré de notre travail sur le pistage en ligne.

Lorsque les utilisateurs se rendent sur un site Web d'information, ils s'attendent à y voir des annonces de l'éditeur, du propriétaire de ce site. Or, les visiteurs des principaux sites d'information, du moins aux États-Unis, y trouvent des dizaines de dispositifs de pistage provenant de sites autres que celui qu'ils visitent, parfois même une trentaine ou une quarantaine. Certains de ces dispositifs de pistage sont rattachés à des entreprises fort bien connues, mais d'autres sont ceux d'entreprises totalement obscures dont la plupart des consommateurs n'ont jamais entendu parler.

Quoi qu'il en soit, les données recueillies par ces dispositifs causent des préjudices réels. Ils permettent de lancer des publicités politiques clivantes, d'influencer les décisions en matière d'assurance-maladie, d'encourager la discrimination dans le domaine du logement et de l'emploi. La prochaine fois que vous verrez un élément de désinformation en ligne, demandez-vous d'où viennent les données qui ont permis de croire que vous seriez une cible attrayante pour cette désinformation.

Chez Mozilla, nous avons décidé d'essayer de lutter contre le pistage en ligne. Nous avons créé ce que nous appelons le Facebook Container, qui limite grandement les données que Facebook peut recueillir sur l'utilisateur qui navigue sur Firefox. En passant, c'est maintenant l'une des extensions les plus populaires que nous ayons jamais produites. Nous sommes en train de mettre en place ce qu'on appelle la protection améliorée contre le pistage. Il s'agit d'une nouvelle fonction majeure du navigateur Firefox qui bloque presque tout le pistage effectué par des tiers. Cela va grandement limiter la capacité d'entreprises que vous ne connaissez pas de vous suivre secrètement pendant que vous naviguez sur le Web.

Nous l'offrons à un plus grand nombre de personnes, et notre but ultime est de l'appliquer par défaut à tout le monde. J'insiste là-dessus, parce que nous avons appris que la création de produits avec protection de la vie privée par défaut est un moyen très puissant pour les utilisateurs. Et il ne faut pas oublier des efforts comme nos pratiques de gestion allégée des données, que nous utilisons pour limiter les données que nous recueillons dans notre propre produit. C'est une approche que d'autres adopteront, nous l'espérons, parce que nous avons appris qu'il est vraiment irréaliste de s'attendre à ce que les utilisateurs s'y retrouvent dans toutes les politiques sur la protection des renseignements personnels et toutes les options que nous pouvons leur offrir pour qu'ils se protègent. Si nous voulons que la protection de la vie privée devienne réalité, le fardeau doit passer des consommateurs aux entreprises. Malheureusement, ce n'est pas une conviction partagée par tout le monde dans notre industrie.

Je passe maintenant à mon deuxième point: nous croyons que la réglementation sera un élément essentiel de la protection de la vie privée en ligne. L'Union européenne a été un chef de file dans ce domaine. Beaucoup d'autres entreprises dans le monde emboîtent le pas et essaient maintenant d'élaborer leurs propres lois sur la protection des données. C'est important, car l'approche que nous avons adoptée au cours des deux dernières décennies dans notre industrie ne fonctionne manifestement plus. Par le passé, nous avons vraiment adopté la notion de notification et de choix, c'est-à-dire que si nous disons simplement aux navigateurs ce que nous allons recueillir comme données et en leur permettant de s'exclure, tout ira bien. Nous avons constaté que cette approche ne fonctionne vraiment pas pour eux. Nous avons été les promoteurs de ces nouvelles règles de protection des données, et nous espérons que vous le serez aussi.

Nous croyons qu'une bonne loi sur la protection de la vie privée devrait comporter trois éléments principaux. Il faut pour les entreprises des règles claires sur ce qu'elles peuvent recueillir et utiliser; il devrait y avoir des droits solides pour les personnes, y compris le consentement granulaire et révocable au sujet d'utilisations précises; et la loi devrait être appliquée par un organisme efficace et doté de pouvoirs, ce qui n'est pas toujours le cas. C'est là un élément important, à notre avis.

(0850)



Nous croyons qu'il est essentiel d'élaborer ces lois et d'y inclure ces éléments tout en préservant l'innovation et les utilisations bénéfiques des données. C'est pourquoi nous appuyons une nouvelle loi fédérale sur la protection des renseignements personnels aux États-Unis et nous travaillons avec les organismes de réglementation en Inde, au Kenya et ailleurs pour promouvoir des lois de cette nature.

Troisièmement, étant donné les échanges que vous avez tous eus ces derniers jours, il serait utile de dire au moins un mot de certaines de nos opinions sur les grandes questions de réglementation du contenu. De toutes les questions étudiées par le Comité, c'est la plus ardue, selon nous.

Nous avons constaté que de nombreux éléments, dans l'industrie, sont incités à encourager la propagation de la désinformation et des abus, mais nous voulons aussi nous assurer que nos réactions à ces préjudices réels ne minent pas elles-mêmes la liberté d'expression et l'innovation qui ont été une force constructive dans la vie des utilisateurs d'Internet.

Chez Mozilla, nous avons adopté quelques approches différentes. Nous travaillons actuellement à ce que nous appelons des « processus de responsabilisation ». Plutôt que de nous concentrer sur des éléments de contenu individuels, nous devrions réfléchir au genre de processus que les entreprises devraient mettre en place pour s'attaquer à ces problèmes. Cela peut se faire au moyen d'une approche fondée sur des principes. Elle doit être adaptée au rôle et proportionnelle à la taille des différentes entreprises, de sorte qu'elle n'ait pas d'incidence disproportionnée sur les petites entreprises, mais donne plus de responsabilités aux grandes entreprises qui jouent un rôle plus important dans l'écosystème.

Nous nous sommes également beaucoup occupés des problèmes de désinformation, surtout en prévision des élections législatives européennes qui viennent de se tenir. Nous sommes signataires du Code de bonnes pratiques de l'Union européenne sur la désinformation, qui est, à mon avis, une initiative d'autoréglementation très importante et utile, assortie d'engagements et de principes visant à stopper la propagation de la désinformation. Pour notre part, nous avons créé des outils dans Firefox pour aider les navigateurs à résister à la manipulation en ligne, à mieux choisir et comprendre ce qu'ils regardent en ligne.

Nous avons également déployé des efforts pour inciter les autres signataires du Code à en faire davantage en matière de transparence et de publicité politique. Il nous semble possible d'en faire beaucoup plus à cet égard. Honnêtement, il y a eu des résultats discutables chez certains de nos collègues. Il y a encore beaucoup de place pour améliorer les outils, en particulier ceux que Facebook a mis en place pour assurer la transparence de la publicité. Il y a peut-être aussi du travail à faire chez Google. Si nous n'arrivons pas à faire ce qu'il faut, nous aurons besoin de mesures plus énergiques de la part des gouvernements. La transparence devrait être un bon point de départ pour nous.

En conclusion, je dirai qu'aucune des questions examinées par le Comité n'est simple. La mauvaise nouvelle, c'est que la progression de la technologie — avec l'intelligence artificielle, la montée de l'Internet des objets et la réalité augmentée — ne fera que rendre la tâche plus difficile.

Une dernière réflexion: nous devons vraiment songer aux moyens de bâtir la capacité de la société d'affronter ces problèmes. Par exemple, chez Mozilla, nous avons participé à ce qu'on a appelé le défi de l'informatique responsable. Il s'agit d'aider à former la prochaine génération de technologues pour qu'ils comprennent les implications éthiques de ce qu'ils élaborent. Nous appuyons les efforts déployés aux États-Unis pour rétablir l'Office of Technology Assessment afin de renforcer la capacité de l'État de comprendre ces questions et de travailler avec plus de dextérité. Nous travaillons à améliorer la diversité dans notre propre entreprise et notre industrie, ce qui est essentiel si nous voulons renforcer la capacité de régler ces problèmes. Nous publions chaque année un rapport, Bulletin de santé d'Internet, qui a paru il y a quelques semaines. Cela fait partie de ce que nous considérons comme l'énorme projet que nous voulons tous réaliser pour sensibiliser le public afin qu'il puisse affronter ces problèmes.

Ce ne sont là que quelques exemples et quelques idées sur la façon de travailler à de nombreux niveaux. Il s'agit de concevoir de meilleurs produits, d'améliorer notre réglementation publique et d'investir dans notre capacité de relever ces défis à l'avenir.

Nous vous remercions sincèrement de nous avoir donné l'occasion de vous parler aujourd'hui et nous avons hâte de travailler avec vous et vos collègues du monde entier pour bâtir un Internet meilleur.

Merci.

(0855)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Davidson.

Enfin, nous accueillons Erik Neuenschwander, d'Apple Inc. Je vous en prie. Vous avez 10 minutes.

M. Erik Neuenschwander (gestionnaire pour la vie privée des utilisateurs, Apple Inc.):

Merci.

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, et merci de m'avoir invité à vous parler aujourd'hui de l'approche d'Apple en matière de protection des renseignements personnels et de sécurité des données.

Je m'appelle Erik Neuenschwander et je suis ingénieur en logiciels chez Apple depuis 12 ans. J'ai été l'ingénieur principal en analyse de données sur le premier iPhone. J'ai géré l'équipe de performance du logiciel du premier iPad, et j'ai fondé l'équipe d'ingénierie de la protection de la vie privée d'Apple. Aujourd'hui, je gère l'équipe chargée des aspects techniques de la conception des caractéristiques de confidentialité d'Apple. Je suis fier de travailler dans une entreprise qui accorde la priorité au client et fabrique d'excellents produits qui améliorent la vie des utilisateurs.

Chez Apple, nous croyons que la vie privée est un droit fondamental et qu'elle est essentielle à tout ce que nous faisons. C'est pourquoi nous intégrons la protection de la vie privée et la sécurité à chacun de nos produits et services. Ces considérations architecturales vont très loin, jusqu'au silicium très physique de nos appareils. Chaque appareil que nous expédions combine des logiciels, du matériel et des services conçus pour fonctionner ensemble pour une sécurité maximale et une expérience utilisateur transparente. Aujourd'hui, j'ai hâte de discuter avec vous de ces éléments clés de conception, et je renvoie également le Comité au site Web d'Apple sur la protection des renseignements personnels, qui donne beaucoup plus de détails sur ces éléments et d'autres facteurs dont il est tenu compte dans la conception dans nos produits et services.

L'iPhone est devenu une partie essentielle de nos vies. Nous l'utilisons pour stocker une quantité incroyable de renseignements personnels, comme nos conversations, nos photos, nos notes, nos contacts, nos calendriers, nos renseignements financiers, nos données sur la santé, et même de l'information sur nos allées et venues. Notre principe, c'est que les données appartiennent à l'utilisateur. Tous ces renseignements doivent être protégés contre les pirates informatiques et les criminels qui voudraient les voler ou les utiliser à notre insu ou sans notre permission.

C'est pourquoi le cryptage est essentiel à la sécurité des dispositifs. Les outils de cryptage sont offerts dans les produits d'Apple depuis des années, et la technologie de cryptage intégrée à l'iPhone d'aujourd'hui est la meilleure sécurité de données qui soit à la disposition des consommateurs. Nous avons l'intention de poursuivre dans cette voie, parce que nous sommes fermement opposés à ce que les données de nos clients soient vulnérables aux attaques.

En établissant un code d'accès, l'utilisateur protège automatiquement l'information de son appareil au moyen d'un cryptage. Apple ne connaît pas le code d'accès de l'utilisateur. En fait, ce code n'est stocké nulle part sur l'appareil ou sur les serveurs d'Apple. Chaque fois, il appartient à l'utilisateur et à lui seul. Chaque fois qu'un utilisateur saisit son mot de passe, l'iPhone est jumelé à l'identificateur unique que l'iPhone fusionne dans son silicium au moment de la fabrication. L'iPhone crée une clé à partir de ce jumelage et tente de décrypter les données de l'utilisateur. Si la clé fonctionne, alors le mot de passe doit avoir été correct. Si cela ne fonctionne pas, l'utilisateur doit réessayer. Nous avons conçu l'iPhone pour protéger ce processus à l'aide d'une enclave sécurisée spécialement conçue, un gestionnaire de clés qui fait partie du matériel, isolé du processeur principal et offrant une couche de sécurité supplémentaire.

En concevant des produits, nous nous efforçons également de recueillir le moins de données possible sur les clients. Nous voulons que vos appareils sachent tout sur eux, mais nous ne pensons pas que nous devions tout savoir.

Par exemple, nous avons conçu notre matériel et nos logiciels de manière qu'ils fonctionnent ensemble pour offrir d'excellentes fonctions en traitant efficacement les données sans que celles-ci ne quittent jamais l'appareil de l'utilisateur. Lorsque nous recueillons des renseignements personnels, nous disons avec précision et transparence à quoi ils serviront, car le contrôle par l'utilisateur est essentiel à la conception de nos produits. Ainsi, nous avons récemment ajouté une icône de confidentialité qui apparaît sur les appareils Apple lorsque des renseignements personnels sont recueillis. L'utilisateur peut s'en servir pour en apprendre davantage sur les pratiques d'Apple en matière de protection des renseignements personnels, le tout étant expliqué en langage simple.

Nous utilisons également la « confidentialité différentielle locale », une technique qui permet à Apple d'en apprendre davantage sur un groupe d'utilisateurs sans en savoir plus sur les membres du groupe. Nous avons fait œuvre de pionnier en ce qui concerne les avis « juste-à-temps », de sorte que, lorsque des applications tierces cherchent à accéder à certains types de données, l'utilisateur a un choix et un contrôle sérieux sur les renseignements recueillis et utilisés. Cela signifie que les applications tierces ne peuvent pas accéder aux données des utilisateurs comme les contacts, les calendriers, les photos, la caméra ou le microphone sans demander et obtenir l'autorisation explicite de l'utilisateur.

Ces caractéristiques de conception, parmi d'autres, sont au cœur d'Apple. Les clients s'attendent à ce qu'Apple et d'autres entreprises de technologie fassent tout en leur pouvoir pour protéger les renseignements personnels. Chez Apple, nous sommes profondément engagés à cet égard parce que la confiance de nos clients signifie tout pour nous. Nous passons beaucoup de temps à réfléchir à la façon dont nous pouvons offrir à nos clients non seulement des produits qui transforment l'existence, mais aussi des produits fiables, sûrs et sécuritaires. En intégrant la sécurité et la protection de la vie privée à tout ce que nous faisons, nous avons prouvé que les expériences formidables n'ont pas à se faire aux dépens de la vie privée et de la sécurité. Ils peuvent plutôt les appuyer.

Je suis honoré de participer à cette importante séance. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Merci.

(0900)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Neuenschwander.

Nous allons passer aux questions des membres du Comité. Mon collègue Damian Collins sera ici sous peu. Il regrette d'être retenu par autre chose.

Nous allons commencer par M. Erskine-Smith, qui aura cinq minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à tous de vos exposés. Je sais que Microsoft appuie le RGPD et des règles plus strictes en matière de protection de la vie privée. De toute évidence, Tim Cook a publiquement appuyé le RGPD. Chez Amazon, appuyez-vous également ce règlement?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous appuyons les principes de protection de la vie privée que sont le contrôle par l'utilisateur, le consentement et ainsi de suite. La loi actuelle est plutôt récente et elle entraîne un fardeau qui, à notre avis, ne favorise pas directement une meilleure protection de la vie privée des utilisateurs. Bien que nous nous conformions tout à fait aux principes et que nous les appuyions pleinement, nous ne pensons pas nécessairement que c'est un dispositif qui devrait être appliqué universellement pour l'instant.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Le soutien des principes s'étend au principe de la minimisation des données.

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui, ainsi qu'au contrôle par l'utilisateur. C'est vraiment le principe fondamental.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Chez Microsoft, approuvez-vous le principe de la minimisation des données?

M. John Weigelt:

Oui, nous sommes d'accord

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Bien.

En ce qui concerne la protection des renseignements des consommateurs, une façon de s'y prendre consiste à obtenir des consentements positifs supplémentaires qui sont explicites pour des fins secondaires. Par exemple, dans le cas d'Echo d'Amazon, la Californie proposait des règles sur les haut-parleurs intelligents selon lesquelles il faudrait obtenir le consentement pour que l'information soit stockée. Êtes-vous d'accord sur ces règles?

(0905)

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous croyons que l'expérience des utilisateurs devrait être très fluide et claire, et que les attentes des gens devraient être très raisonnablement satisfaites. Par exemple, dans le cas du dispositif Echo, on utilise une application mobile pour configurer son appareil, et les règles de confidentialité sont très claires.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Y a-t-il consentement explicite pour enregistrer ces conversations?

M. Mark Ryland:

Il ne s'agit pas d'un consentement explicite, mais il indique clairement les enregistrements et vous en donne le plein contrôle. Il donne une liste complète des enregistrements et la capacité de supprimer un enregistrement en particulier, ou tous les enregistrements. Il s'agit d'une interface utilisateur très explicite et claire.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Si le RGPD était en vigueur, il faudrait un consentement explicite.

M. Mark Ryland:

Peut-être. Il peut y avoir des décisions juridiques que nous... Cela fait partie du problème. Beaucoup de détails ne seront pas clairs tant qu'il n'y aura pas plus de décisions des pouvoirs réglementaires ou des tribunaux sur la signification exacte de certains des principes généraux.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Le représentant d'Apple pourrait-il dire si sa société pratique le pistage en ligne?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Nous n'avons pas le genre de destinations sur Internet où se fait ce genre de pistage. Bien sûr, notre magasin en ligne, par exemple, entretient une relation directe de première partie avec les utilisateurs qui le visitent.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Il est probablement raisonnable de s'attendre à ce que, lorsque je me rends sur le site d'Apple, cette société veuille communiquer avec moi par la suite, mais si je me rends sur d'autres sites non connexes sur Internet, Apple ne pratiquerait aucun pistage.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Non, Apple ne le fait pas. En réalité, notre système intelligent de prévention du pistage est activé par défaut dans notre navigateur Web Safari. Si Apple essayait de faire du pistage, le système de prévention chercherait à l'en empêcher.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je m'adresse à Microsoft et à Amazon. Faites-vous comme Apple ou faites-vous du pistage en ligne sur de nombreux sites Internet?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous sommes engagés dans l'écosystème du Web et nous avons la capacité de comprendre d'où viennent les utilisateurs et où ils vont lorsqu'ils quittent notre site.

Encore une fois, notre principal modèle d'affaires consiste à vendre des produits à des clients. Le pistage n'est pas pour nous un moyen de recueillir de l'argent pour l'entreprise.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Était-ce un oui au pistage en ligne, de façon assez générale?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous participons à l'écosystème de la publicité. Alors c'est oui.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

C'est ainsi que j'interprète votre réponse.

Les représentants de Microsoft ont-ils quelque chose à dire?

M. John Weigelt:

Nous avons nos propriétés particulières, comme les autres groupes. Nous avons le magasin Microsoft et les propriétés de MSN. Nous sommes donc en mesure de trouver l'origine de nos clients.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Si je pose la question, c'est qu'hier, un témoin nous a dit que le consentement, parfois, n'était pas suffisant, et je comprends que, dans certains cas, ce soit vrai. Comme je suis raisonnablement occupé, on ne peut pas s'attendre à ce que je lise chaque entente sur les modalités. On ne peut pas s'attendre à ce que je lise tout. S'il y a des consentements secondaires dans chaque application que j'utilise et que je dois donner 10 consentements différents, vais-je vraiment pouvoir protéger mes renseignements personnels? Nous ne devrions pas nous attendre à cela des consommateurs, et c'est pourquoi nous avons une loi sur la protection des consommateurs et des garanties implicites dans d'autres contextes.

Hier, Roger McNamee a laissé entendre que certaines choses devraient être strictement exclues. J'ai dit à Google qu'il ne devrait peut-être pas être en mesure de lire mes courriels et de me cibler en fonction de publicités — cela devrait être exclu. Pensez-vous, chez Apple, que certaines choses devraient tout simplement être exclues?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Oui, lorsque nous... Notre service iCloud est un lieu où les utilisateurs peuvent stocker leurs photos ou leurs documents chez Apple, et nous n'exploitons pas ce contenu pour créer des profils de nos utilisateurs. Nous considérons qu'il s'agit des données de l'utilisateur. Nous les stockons grâce à notre service, mais elles demeurent la propriété de l'utilisateur.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Même question pour Microsoft et Amazon: pensez-vous que la collecte de certaines données devrait être complètement exclue?

M. John Weigelt:

L'une des choses qui nous tiennent à coeur, c'est que les utilisateurs puissent savoir quelles données ils ont communiquées à certaines organisations. Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration — je l'ai fait personnellement — avec les commissaires à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée de tout le Canada. Nous avons discuté du consentement et du sens à donner à ce terme. Lorsque nous avons mis en place des outils comme Cortana, par exemple, nous avons travaillé avec le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada pour arriver à comprendre laquelle des 12 étapes du consentement pour les consommateurs était particulièrement importante.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mais je propose que, au-delà de la question du consentement, certains éléments soient exclus d'emblée. Par exemple, mes photos personnelles sur mon téléphone. Devrait-on pouvoir les numériser, après quoi je recevrais des annonces ciblées?

M. John Weigelt:

Soyons clairs: nous ne numérisons pas cette information...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Eh bien, je sais que vous ne le faites pas...

M. John Weigelt:

... mais nous fournissons...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

... mais certaines choses devraient-elles être exclues? Voilà où je veux en venir.

M. John Weigelt:

... une certaine visibilité pour les clients afin qu'ils comprennent où leurs données sont utilisées et qu'ils en aient le plein contrôle.

Notre tableau de bord sur la protection des renseignements personnels, par exemple, permet de voir quelles données se trouvent dans l'environnement Microsoft, puis l'utilisateur peut contrôler ces données et être en mesure de mieux gérer la situation. Il s'agit d'avoir cette interaction avec les utilisateurs pour qu'ils comprennent la proposition de valeur de cette capacité de communiquer des données.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Les représentants d'Amazon sont-ils d'avis qu'il faudrait exclure certaines choses?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne pense pas qu'on puisse dire, a priori, que certaines choses sont toujours inacceptables, parce que, encore une fois, l'expérience client est essentielle, et si les gens veulent une meilleure expérience client fondée sur les données qu'ils communiquent... Le consentement, évidemment, et le contrôle sont essentiels.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Prenons le cas des enfants de moins de 18 ans, par exemple. Nous ne devrions peut-être pas être en mesure de recueillir des renseignements sur les jeunes de moins de 18 ans, de moins de 16 ans ou de moins de 13 ans.

Les enfants, disons. Faudrait-il exclure les données qui les concernent?

(0910)

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous allons nous conformer à toutes les lois des pays où nous menons nos activités, si...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Êtes-vous en train de dire que vous n'avez pas d'opinion éthique sur la collecte de renseignements auprès des enfants?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous sommes certainement d'avis que les parents devraient être responsables de l'expérience en ligne des enfants, et nous donnons aux parents le plein contrôle de cette expérience dans nos systèmes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Il est tellement difficile de dire oui.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Kent, qui aura cinq minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous nos témoins qui comparaissent aujourd'hui.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Ryland, d'Amazon.

En septembre dernier, le vice-président et avocat général associé d'Amazon, M. DeVore, témoignant devant un comité du Sénat américain, a critiqué vivement, je crois que le mot est juste, la loi sur la protection des consommateurs qui avait été adoptée en Californie.

Parmi les nouveaux droits reconnus aux consommateurs dans cette loi auxquels il s'est opposé, il y avait le droit des utilisateurs de connaître toutes les données commerciales recueillies à leur sujet et le droit de s'opposer à la vente de ces données. La loi institue, en Californie, le droit d'interdire la vente de ces données à des tiers. Il a dit que la loi avait été adoptée trop rapidement et que la définition de renseignements personnels était trop large.

Je me demande si vous pourriez nous aider aujourd'hui en nous disant comment Amazon définit les renseignements personnels à protéger.

M. Mark Ryland:

Tout d'abord, permettez-moi de dire que je travaille aux services Web d'Amazon dans le domaine de la sécurité et de la protection des données sur notre plateforme infonuagique. Je ne connais pas à fond l'ensemble de nos politiques de protection des renseignements personnels.

Toutefois, je dirai que certains éléments des données sur les consommateurs sont utilisés dans les secteurs de base de l'entreprise. Par exemple, si nous vendons un produit à un client, nous devons en faire un certain suivi à des fins fiscales et juridiques, de sorte qu'il est impossible de dire qu'un consommateur a un contrôle total sur certaines choses. Il y a d'autres raisons juridiques, par exemple, pour lesquelles les données doivent parfois être conservées.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Des utilisateurs vous ont-ils demandé de l'information sur les données qui ont été recueillies à leur sujet et si elles avaient été vendues?

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui, assurément.

Tout d'abord, je tiens à dire qu'Amazon ne vend pas de données sur ses clients. Point à la ligne.

Deuxièmement, nous avons une page de renseignements personnels protégés où l'utilisateur peut voir toutes les données le concernant que nous avons accumulées: l'historique de ses commandes, ses commandes numériques, ses commandes de livres, etc. Nous avons une page similaire pour notre service Alexa Voice. Tout cela permet aux utilisateurs de contrôler et de comprendre les données que nous utilisons.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Ainsi, malgré les critiques de M. DeVore, Amazon se conforme à la loi californienne, et je suppose qu'elle se conformerait à toute autre loi semblable adoptée ailleurs dans le monde.

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous nous conformerons toujours aux lois qui s'appliquent à nous partout où nous faisons des affaires. Certainement.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

J'aimerais maintenant poser une question à M. Davidson au sujet de Mozilla.

Je sais que Mozilla, avec toutes ses bonnes pratiques et son mandat d'intérêt public sans but lucratif, travaille avec Google et avec Bing. Je me demande simplement quels genres de pare-feu vous établissez pour empêcher l'accumulation de données sur les utilisateurs par ces deux entreprises qui, autrement, les recueilleraient et les monétiseraient.

M. Alan Davidson:

Voilà une excellente question. Chez nous, c'est assez simple. Nous ne leur envoyons tout simplement pas de données au-delà de ce qu'ils obtiendraient normalement d'un visiteur qui se rend sur leur site Web, l'adresse IP, par exemple.

Nous avons pour pratique de ne pas recueillir de renseignements. Si, à partir de Firefox, vous faites une recherche sur Bing ou Google, nous n'en gardons aucune trace, nous ne conservons rien et nous ne transmettons rien de spécial. Cela nous a permis de nous distancer, honnêtement, et nous n'avons aucun incitatif financier à recueillir cette information.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

J'ai une question pour M. Neuenschwander.

En septembre dernier, on a appris que l'application Mac Adware Doctor, qui était censée protéger les utilisateurs d'Apple contre les menaces à la protection de la vie privée, enregistrait en fait les données de ces utilisateurs et les transmettait à un serveur en Chine. Apple y a mis fin depuis, mais je voudrais savoir combien de temps a duré cette exposition. Avez-vous déterminé qui exactement exploitait ce serveur en Chine?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je me souviens de cet événement et des mesures prises par l'équipe de l'App Store. Je ne peux pas, de mémoire, vous dire exactement quelle a été la durée de l'exposition. Je me ferai un devoir de vérifier cette information et de vous revenir là-dessus.

(0915)

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Vous ne connaissez pas la durée de l'exposition…

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Sur le moment, je ne pourrais pas le dire exactement.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je crois savoir que c'était une application Mac très populaire. Dans quelle mesure examinez-vous rigoureusement ces applications, dans la ruée capitaliste, bien compréhensible, pour monétiser ces nouvelles merveilles?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Pour les applications gratuites en magasin, il n'y a pas de monétisation pour Apple dans l'App Store.

Depuis que nous avons lancé l'App Store, nous effectuons un examen manuel et, ces dernières années, un examen automatisé de chaque application proposée au magasin, puis de chaque mise à jour de ces applications. Elles sont soumises à l'examen d'une équipe d'experts spécialisés de l'App Store.

Il y a une limite que nous ne dépassons pas. Nous ne surveillons pas l'utilisation des applications par nos utilisateurs. Une fois l'application installée sur l'appareil d'un utilisateur, nous nous interdisons, par respect pour la vie privée de l'utilisateur, de surveiller le trafic réseau ou les données qu'il envoie. Cela nous semblerait inconvenant.

Nous continuons d'investir du côté de l'App Store pour tâcher d'avoir un examen aussi rigoureux que possible. À mesure que les applications et leurs fonctionnalités changent, nous continuons de renforcer notre examen pour saisir les fonctionnalités qui ne répondent pas à nos politiques de confidentialité dans les magasins.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

J'ai une question pour les représentants de Microsoft, Mme Floyd en particulier. En 2013, la Commission européenne a imposé à Microsoft une amende d'environ 561 millions d'euros pour non-respect des engagements relatifs au choix de navigateur. Il ne semble pas y avoir eu de violation depuis. Tire-t-on des leçons d'amendes aussi lourdes? On nous dit que les amendes, même s'élevant à des centaines de millions de dollars ou d'euros — même celles dépassant le milliard de dollars —, ne découragent pas les grandes entreprises numériques. Je m'interroge sur l'utilité de fortes sanctions pécuniaires, qui n'existent pas actuellement au Canada, comme moyen pour assurer la conformité, ou pour inciter à la conformité.

M. John Weigelt:

Comme nous l'avons dit, la confiance est le fondement de notre entreprise. Chaque fois qu'il y a un jugement prononcé contre notre entreprise, nous constatons que la confiance s'érode, et cela se répercute sur toute l'organisation, non seulement du côté des consommateurs, mais aussi au sein de l'entreprise.

Cette amende était lourde. Nous avons donné suite à ce jugement en modifiant la façon dont nous offrons nos produits sur le marché, en donnant aux consommateurs le choix d'acheter des produits sans navigateur intégré.

Lorsque nous examinons le pouvoir de rendre des ordonnances, ici au Canada ou ailleurs, nous devons conclure qu'un jugement défavorable aura une incidence beaucoup plus grande sur l'entreprise que certaines de ces sanctions pécuniaires.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Pensez-vous que le gouvernement canadien devrait renforcer ses règlements et ses sanctions en cas de non-respect des règles de protection de la vie privée?

M. John Weigelt:

J'encouragerais le gouvernement canadien à se faire entendre sur la façon dont les technologies sont mises en place dans le contexte canadien. Nous avons des gens sur place qui sont là pour l'entendre et modifier en conséquence la façon dont nous offrons nos services.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Angus. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Charlie Angus (Timmins—Baie James, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je parlais à un ami chez Apple de l'achat, en 1984, de mon premier Mac Plus, muni d'une disquette de 350 kilobits, que je voyais comme un outil révolutionnaire qui allait changer le monde pour le mieux. Je continue de croire que le monde a changé pour le mieux, mais nous constatons aussi des dérapages vraiment regrettables.

Maintenant que j'ai moi-même pris de l'âge, je peux prendre du recul et m'imaginer ce qui se serait passé si, dans les années 1980, Bell avait écouté mes conversations téléphoniques. Des accusations auraient été portées, même si Bell se justifiait en disant: « Nous écoutons vos conversations simplement parce que nous voulons vous offrir des trucs vraiment astucieux et nous pourrons mieux vous servir si nous savons ce que vous faites. » Que se passerait-il si le bureau de poste lisait mon courrier avant de me le livrer, non dans un but illicite, mais pour me mettre au courant de choses très intéressantes que je devrais connaître et pour me proposer son aide? Des accusations seraient certainement portées.

Pourtant, dans le monde numérique, nous avons maintenant affaire à des entreprises qui nous offrent toutes sortes de possibilités alléchantes. C'est sur ce point que mon collègue, M. Erskine-Smith, essayait d'obtenir des réponses claires.

Je pense que, en tant que parlementaires, nous allons vraiment au-delà de cette discussion sur le consentement. Le consentement n'a plus aucun sens si on nous espionne, si on nous surveille et si notre téléphone sert à nous pister. Le consentement est en train de devenir un terme trompeur parce qu'il s'agit de récupérer un espace dans nos vies que nous n'avons pas cédé. Si nous suivions les anciennes règles, il ne serait pas possible d'écouter nos conversations téléphoniques et de nous pister en ligne au mépris de nos droits, mais c'est tout à coup devenu acceptable dans le monde numérique.

Monsieur Davidson, je m'intéresse beaucoup au travail que fait Mozilla.

Pensez-vous qu'il soit possible pour les parlementaires d'établir des règles de base raisonnées pour protéger le droit à la vie privée des citoyens, des règles qui n'entraîneront pas la ruine complète des gens de Silicon Valley, n'en feront pas tous des assistés sociaux, et qui permettront au modèle d'affaires de réussir? Est-il possible d'établir des règles simples?

(0920)

M. Alan Davidson:

Oui.

Je peux en dire plus.

M. Charlie Angus:

Allez-y.

M. Alan Davidson:

Je pense que c'est effectivement…

M. Charlie Angus:

J'adore ça quand on est d'accord avec moi.

M. Alan Davidson:

Nous cherchions des feux verts.

Vous connaissez déjà certains exemples. Nous croyons fermement qu'il est possible d'établir de bonnes entreprises rentables tout en respectant la vie privée des gens. Vous avez pris connaissance de quelques exemples aujourd'hui, dont certains de notre part. Il existe des exemples de bonnes lois, y compris le RGPD.

Il y a des choses qui dépassent probablement toutes les bornes, pour lesquelles nous avons besoin d'interdictions claires ou de mesures de sécurité très rigoureuses. À mon avis, il ne faut pas rejeter complètement l'idée du consentement. Ce qu'il nous faut, c'est un consentement plus précis parce que je pense que les gens ne comprennent pas vraiment…

M. Charlie Angus:

Le consentement explicite.

M. Alan Davidson:

... le consentement explicite.

Il y a toutes sortes de façons de l'encadrer, mais il y a une forme plus parcellaire de consentement explicite. C'est qu'il y aura des moments où des gens voudront profiter d'applications sur la santé ou faire connaître à des proches et à leur famille où ils se trouvent. Ils devraient pouvoir le faire, mais ils devraient vraiment comprendre ce que cela implique.

Nous croyons qu'il demeure possible de créer des entreprises qui le permettraient.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci.

Certaines des préoccupations sur lesquelles nous nous sommes penchés concernent l'intelligence artificielle. Il s'agit de l'arsenalisation des médias numériques. L'intelligence artificielle pourrait jouer un rôle très positif ou très négatif.

Monsieur Ryland, Amazon a certainement fait beaucoup de progrès en matière d'intelligence artificielle. Cependant, elle a également été qualifiée d'entreprise novatrice du XXIe siècle, mais dont les pratiques de travail appartiennent au XIXe siècle.

Au sujet des allégations selon lesquelles les travailleurs faisaient l'objet d'une surveillance, pouvant mener jusqu'à leur congédiement, au moyen d'un pistage par intelligence artificielle, est-ce bien la politique d'Amazon?

M. Mark Ryland:

Notre politique est certainement de respecter la dignité de notre main-d’œuvre et de traiter tout le monde comme il se doit.

Je ne connais pas les détails de cette allégation, mais je me ferai un devoir de vous fournir de plus amples renseignements.

M. Charlie Angus:

C'était dans un article retentissant sur Amazon. On y lisait que les travailleurs étaient surveillés, jusqu'à la seconde près, par des moyens d'intelligence artificielle et que ceux qui étaient trop lents étaient congédiés.

Je suis peut-être de la vieille école, mais je pense que ce serait illégal en vertu des lois du travail de notre pays. C'est apparemment la façon dont l'intelligence artificielle est utilisée dans les centres de traitement. À mon avis, c'est une utilisation très problématique de l'intelligence artificielle. N'êtes-vous pas au courant de cela?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne suis pas au courant, et je suis presque certain qu'il y aurait un examen humain de toute décision de congédiement. Il est impossible de prendre une telle décision sans au moins un examen humain des types d'algorithmes d'apprentissage machine.

M. Charlie Angus:

C'était un article assez accablant, et le sujet a été repris par de nombreux journaux étrangers.

Pourriez-vous faire un suivi de cette question et transmettre une réponse au Comité?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je me ferai un plaisir d'y donner suite.

M. Charlie Angus:

Je ne cherche pas à vous mettre sur la sellette, mais je voudrais avoir une réponse à ce sujet. Je pense que nous aimerions certainement pouvoir nous faire une idée de l'optique dans laquelle Amazon utilise l'intelligence artificielle pour faire la surveillance des travailleurs dans les centres de traitement. Si vous pouviez faire parvenir cela au Comité, ce serait très utile.

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne manquerai pas de le faire.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus.

Nous passons maintenant à nos délégations.

Nous allons commencer par celle de Singapour.

Allez-y, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Sun Xueling (secrétaire parlementaire principale, Ministère des affaires intérieures et Ministère du développement national, Parlement de Singapour):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai quelques questions à poser à M. Davidson.

J'ai lu avec intérêt le Manifeste Mozilla. Je suppose que j'avais un peu de temps libre. Je pense qu'il y a 10 principes dans votre manifeste. Je m'arrête en particulier sur le principe 9, qui est formulé comme suit: « L'investissement commercial dans le développement d'Internet apporte de nombreux bénéfices; un équilibre entre les bénéfices commerciaux et l'intérêt public est crucial. »

C'est textuellement ce que dit le principe 9.

Seriez-vous d'accord, alors, pour dire que les entreprises de technologie, même si elles ont un objectif de croissance et de rentabilité, ne devraient pas abdiquer leur responsabilité d'empêcher l'utilisation abusive de leurs plateformes?

M. Alan Davidson:

Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord avec cela. Je dirais que le manifeste, pour ceux qui ne l'ont pas lu, constitue en quelque sorte nos principes directeurs. Il a été rédigé il y a une quinzaine d'années. Nous venons tout juste de le mettre à jour en y apportant un ensemble d'ajouts pour répondre à la situation d'aujourd'hui.

Nous croyons effectivement que cet équilibre est vraiment important. Pour ma part, je pense que les entreprises doivent réfléchir aux conséquences de ce qu'elles construisent. Je pense aussi que le gouvernement doit baliser tout cela parce que, nous l'avons vu, ce ne sont pas toutes les entreprises qui vont le faire. Certaines ont besoin d'être guidées.

Mme Sun Xueling:

De plus, il me semble que le Bulletin de santé d'Internet a été publié par la Fondation Mozilla, et j'aimerais remercier votre organisme, qui est sans but lucratif et qui travaille dans l'intérêt public. Je pense que votre bulletin a traité du scandale impliquant Cambridge Analytica et a fait remarquer qu'il était un symptôme d'un problème systémique beaucoup plus vaste, que, de nos jours, le modèle d'affaires dominant et les activités courantes du monde numérique sont, en fait, fondés sur la collecte et la vente de données au sujet des utilisateurs.

Seriez-vous alors d'accord pour dire que le scandale impliquant Cambridge Analytica illustre en quelque sorte une attitude mentale qui priorise la quête du gain et de la croissance de l'entreprise au détriment de sa responsabilité civique?

(0925)

M. Alan Davidson:

Oui, mais nous gardons espoir qu'il s'agit de cas isolés. Je dirais simplement que ce ne sont pas toutes les entreprises qui fonctionnent de cette façon. Il y a, je crois, des entreprises qui tâchent de faire ce qu'il faut pour servir l'utilisateur, qui tentent de faire passer leurs utilisateurs en premier, et non uniquement à des fins altruistes. Je pense que c'est plutôt parce que nous sommes nombreux à croire que c'est dans l'intérêt de l'entreprise et que, sur le long terme, le marché récompensera les entreprises qui accordent la priorité aux utilisateurs.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Nous avons entendu des témoignages hier également. Je pense que bon nombre des membres du grand comité ont parlé avec des entreprises qui avaient fait état d'exemples concernant le Sri Lanka ou Nancy Pelosi. Il m'a semblé qu'il s'agissait davantage de diffuser de l'information, d'assurer la liberté d'extension de l'information, plutôt que de protéger réellement la liberté d'expression, puisqu'il qu'il n'y a pas de véritable liberté d'expression si elle est fondée sur une information fausse ou trompeuse.

Même si nous aimons croire que le scandale impliquant Cambridge Analytica est un cas unique, ce qui nous préoccupe, je pense, c'est que les modèles d'affaires existants de ces entreprises ne semblent pas devoir nous assurer que la responsabilité civique est perçue sous le même jour que la marge bénéficiaire des entreprises. Je pense que c'est à cela que je voulais en venir.

M. Alan Davidson:

Étant dans ce domaine depuis longtemps, je peux dire qu'il est vraiment désolant de voir certains de ces comportements en ligne. Je pense que c'est en partie à cause de l'évolution des modèles d'affaires, surtout ceux qui font de l'engagement la mesure prépondérante. Nous espérons que les entreprises feront plus et mieux.

Il y a un risque à une trop grande intervention gouvernementale dans ce domaine, du fait que nous tenons à respecter la liberté d'expression. Lorsque les gouvernements font des choix tranchés sur ce qui est vrai et ce qui est faux dans l'information diffusée en ligne, il y a beaucoup de risques. Je pense qu'il faut trouver un juste équilibre. Pour commencer, il me semble qu'il faudrait utiliser notre tribune exceptionnelle pour vraiment pousser les entreprises à faire mieux. C'est le bon point de départ. Espérons qu'il aura des suites utiles.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Oui. Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à la délégation irlandaise et à Mme Naughton.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton (présidente, Comité mixte sur les communications, l'action sur le climat et l'environnement, Parlement de la République d'Irlande):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Merci à tous d'être venus ce matin.

Ma première question s'adresse au porte-parole d'Amazon. En novembre dernier, le vendredi noir, je crois savoir qu'il y a eu des problèmes techniques. Beaucoup de noms et de courriels de clients ont paru sur votre site Web. Est-ce exact?

M. Mark Ryland:

Non, ce n'est pas exact.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Non? D'accord. Je croyais qu'il y avait eu des reportages à ce sujet. Y a-t-il eu des problèmes techniques en novembre dernier?

M. Mark Ryland:

Cela ne me dit rien du tout, mais je me ferai un plaisir de vérifier. Non, je ne suis pas au courant.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

En ce qui concerne le RGPD et la protection des données, d'après ce que mes collègues vous ont demandé tout à l'heure, vous dites que vous seriez en faveur d'une forme quelconque de RGPD à l'échelle mondiale.

M. Mark Ryland:

Encore une fois, nous croyons que les principes de la confiance des consommateurs — accorder la priorité aux clients, leur donner le contrôle de leurs données, obtenir leur consentement à l'utilisation des données — ont du sens. Les moyens précis de le faire, la tenue de dossiers et la charge administrative que cela suppose semblent parfois l'emporter sur les avantages pour les consommateurs, alors nous pensons vraiment que nous devons travailler en collectivité pour trouver un juste équilibre qui ne soit pas trop onéreux.

Par exemple, une grande entreprise comme la nôtre serait capable de se conformer à un règlement très coûteux à appliquer, mais pas nécessairement une petite entreprise. Nous devons trouver des moyens d'appliquer ces principes de façon efficace, relativement simple et directe.

Bien sûr, nous appuyons les principes qui sous-tendent le RGPD. Nous pensons que la loi comme telle n'est pas encore tout à fait au point, en ce sens que nous ne savons pas exactement comment certaines dispositions seront interprétées une fois rendues au niveau réglementaire ou judiciaire — ce qu'on entend au juste par diligence raisonnable, par exemple, de la part d'une entreprise.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

D'accord, alors êtes-vous ouvert à cela, ou peut-être à une version différente à travers le monde?

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Comme vous le savez, dans le RGPD tel qu'il s'applique actuellement, il y a de ces obstacles pour certaines entreprises, mais on les a aplanis dans l'ensemble de l'Union européenne.

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Je suppose que vous attendez de voir la suite des choses...

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous pensons qu'il y aura beaucoup de bonnes leçons à tirer de cette expérience. Nous pourrons faire mieux à l'avenir, que ce soit en Europe ou ailleurs, mais encore une fois, les principes ont du sens.

(0930)

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

D'accord.

Ma question s'adresse à Microsoft. Plus tôt cette année, je crois savoir qu'un pirate a compromis le compte d'un agent de soutien de Microsoft. Est-ce exact?

M. John Weigelt:

C'est exact. Il y a eu divulgation de justificatifs d'identité.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Microsoft disait alors qu'il se pouvait que le pirate ait eu accès au contenu de certains utilisateurs d'Outlook. Est-ce que cela est vraiment arrivé? A-t-il pu accéder au contenu d'utilisateurs de Microsoft?

M. John Weigelt:

Cet accès du côté du soutien leur en donnait la possibilité, oui.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Comment un pirate a-t-il pu, je suppose, déjouer votre propre sécurité ou votre dispositif de sécurité des données?

M. John Weigelt:

Tout cet environnement repose sur un modèle de confiance de bout en bout, alors il suffit de trouver le maillon le plus faible dans la chaîne. Dans ce cas-ci, malheureusement, l'employé de soutien avait un mot de passe que les pirates pouvaient deviner pour entrer dans ce système.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Qu'avez-vous fait pour que cela ne se reproduise plus? Cela me paraît être une atteinte fondamentale à la sécurité des données de vos utilisateurs.

M. John Weigelt:

Tout à fait. Chaque fois qu'il se produit un incident dans notre environnement, nous réunissons notre équipe d'intervention de sécurité avec nos techniciens pour voir comment nous améliorer. Nous avons examiné ce qui s'était passé et nous nous sommes assurés de pouvoir mettre en place des protections comme le contrôle multifactoriel, qui exige deux choses pour se connecter: quelque chose que vous savez, quelque chose que vous avez. Nous avons envisagé des choses comme le contrôle à deux personnes et des outils de ce genre, afin de nous assurer de préserver la confiance de nos clients.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Nous savons que vous avez apporté ces changements. Avez-vous eu un rapport? Avez-vous fait un rapport sur le nombre d'utilisateurs dont les renseignements ou le contenu ont été compromis?

M. John Weigelt:

Il faudrait que nous revenions devant le Comité pour en discuter. Je ne suis pas au courant de ce rapport. Je n'avais pas moi-même cherché à savoir.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

D'accord.

En ce qui concerne les mesures prises par la suite... Là encore, il s'agit de la confiance des utilisateurs en ligne et de ce que votre entreprise a fait. Pourriez-vous nous revenir à ce sujet?

M. John Weigelt:

Absolument.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Merci.

Le vice-président (M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.)):

Il vous reste une minute.

M. James Lawless (membre, Comité mixte sur les communications, l'action sur le climat et l'environnement, Parlement de la République d'Irlande):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je m'adresse d'abord à Amazon. Est-ce qu'Alexa nous écoute? Je suppose que oui. Que fait-elle de cette information?

M. Mark Ryland:

Alexa est à l'affût d'un mot-clé, le mot qui l'active, qui avertit le système que vous voulez interagir avec lui d'une façon ou d'une autre. Cette information n'est pas stockée localement. Rien n'est stocké localement sur l'appareil. Une fois que le mot-clé est reconnu, il suit le flux de données. Un témoin lumineux vous indique que l'appareil est maintenant actif, et le son suivant qui se produit dans la pièce est alors envoyé dans le nuage.

La première chose que fait le nuage, c'est de revérifier le mot-clé. Souvent, le logiciel de l'appareil n'est pas évolué, alors il fait parfois des erreurs. Si le nuage reconnaît que ce n'était pas un mot-clé, il interrompt le flux. Par contre, si le nuage confirme que le mot-clé a été prononcé, le flux est ensuite acheminé par un système de traitement du langage naturel, qui produit essentiellement un texte. À partir de là, les systèmes prennent le relais pour répondre à la demande de l'utilisateur.

M. James Lawless:

D'accord.

Est-ce qu'Amazon se sert de cette information à des fins de profilage ou de marketing?

M. Mark Ryland:

L'information est versée dans les renseignements sur votre compte, tout comme si vous achetiez des livres sur notre site Web. Elle pourrait donc influencer ce que nous vous présentons comme autres choses susceptibles de vous intéresser.

M. James Lawless:

D'accord.

M. Mark Ryland:

Elle n'est transmise à aucun tiers. Elle ne sert pas à des fins publicitaires et ainsi de suite.

M. James Lawless:

D'accord, mais si vous avez demandé le temps qu'il fait aux Bermudes et que vous allez ensuite sur le site Web d'Amazon, vous pourriez tomber sur un guide de vacances aux Bermudes, n'est-ce pas?

M. Mark Ryland:

C'est théoriquement possible, oui. Je ne sais pas si cet algorithme existe.

M. James Lawless:

Est-ce probable?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne sais pas. Il faudrait que je vous revienne là-dessus.

M. James Lawless:

D'accord, mais on utilise tout de même les questions posées, qui sont traitées par Alexa, pour offrir quelque chose à l'utilisateur. On pourrait s'en servir pour lui faire une présentation de marketing intelligent sur la plateforme, non?

M. Mark Ryland:

C'est parce que l'utilisateur lie directement l'appareil à son compte et que tous ses énoncés deviennent visibles. Vous pouvez voir une liste complète de ce que vous avez dit et vous pouvez supprimer n'importe quel énoncé. Il sera aussitôt retiré de la base de données et ne pourra plus servir à vous faire une recommandation.

M. James Lawless:

Est-ce que l'utilisateur consent à cela lorsqu'il s'inscrit? Est-ce que cela fait partie des modalités?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je pense que c'est très clair. Le consentement fait partie de l'expérience. Pour prendre un exemple familier, je n'ai pas explicitement consenti à ce que ma voix et mon image soient enregistrées ici aujourd'hui, mais le contexte me dit que c'est probablement ce qui se passe. Nous croyons que les expériences simples pour le consommateur sont les meilleures. Nous pensons que nos clients comprennent que, si nous accumulons des données à leur sujet, c'est justement pour que le service fonctionne comme il est censé fonctionner...

Le vice-président (M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith):

Merci.

M. Mark Ryland:

... et nous facilitons vraiment, vraiment, la suppression et le contrôle de ces données.

(0935)

Le vice-président (M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith):

Merci beaucoup, même si vous comprenez peut-être mieux ce qui se passe aujourd'hui que la plupart des utilisateurs d'Alexa.

M. Charlie Angus:

Excusez-moi, monsieur le président, mais puis-je invoquer le Règlement?

Je veux que ce soit bien clair. Quand on s'adresse à un comité, c'est comme s'adresser à un tribunal. Il ne s'agit pas de savoir si vous consentez à être enregistré ou si vous pensez que vous l'êtes. Il s'agit d'un processus parlementaire prévu par la loi, alors, bien sûr, vous êtes enregistré. Il est ridicule de comparer cela avec Alexa qui vous vend quelque chose à la Barbade, cela mine les fondements de notre Parlement.

Je rappellerais simplement aux témoins que nous sommes ici pour recueillir de l'information au profit de la communauté internationale des législateurs, et que tout est consigné officiellement.

Le vice-président (M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith):

Merci, monsieur Angus.

Monsieur de Burgh Graham, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci. Je vais commencer par Microsoft.

L'écosystème de Microsoft est assez vaste, comme vous le savez. Vous avez la majorité des ordinateurs de bureau du monde, avec Office 365, LinkedIn, Bing, Skype, MSN, Live.com, Hotmail, etc. De toute évidence, vous avez la capacité de recueillir une énorme quantité de données sur un nombre immense de personnes. Pouvez-vous m'assurer qu'il n'y a pas de données personnelles échangées entre ces différentes plateformes?

M. John Weigelt:

Parlez-vous de données échangées entre, disons, un utilisateur de Xbox et un utilisateur d'Office 365? Est-ce là votre question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, ou entre LinkedIn et Bing. Pendant nos premiers jours de séance sur cette question, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de la création d'avatars des utilisateurs de différentes entreprises. Est-ce que Microsoft crée un avatar de ses utilisateurs? Est-ce qu'elle crée une image de qui utilise ses services?

M. John Weigelt:

Si vous avez un compte Microsoft commun, vous pouvez conserver et gérer vos données de l'une à l'autre de ces plateformes. L'équipe de produits de Bing ne ferait pas nécessairement l'aller-retour entre elle et l'équipe de Xbox pour obtenir les données requises. C'est vous qui contrôlez les données qui se trouvent au centre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je voulais savoir s'il y avait un échange de données entre les services. Vous avez votre connexion commune, mais une fois que vous l'avez passée, vous pouvez aller dans différentes bases de données. Les bases de données interagissent-elles?

M. John Weigelt:

Là encore, à travers toutes les différentes plateformes, il faudrait que j'examine chaque scénario particulier pour dire généralement qu'il n'y a pas d'échange de données entre...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Vous avez récemment acheté GitHub, une entreprise à code source ouvert, ce que j'ai trouvé très intéressant. Pourquoi?

M. John Weigelt:

Nous trouvons que la communauté des partisans du code source ouvert est très dynamique et qu'elle offre un excellent modèle de développement. Ce libre dialogue entre eux, cette discussion libre, va au-delà de la simple conversation sur les logiciels pour englober des projets plus vastes. Nous y avons vu une occasion de collaboration.

Par le passé, vous savez qu'il y avait presque de l'animosité entre nous et les partisans du code source ouvert. Nous avons vraiment adhéré aux concepts du logiciel libre et des données ouvertes pour être en mesure de mieux innover dans le marché.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je viens moi-même de cette communauté, alors je peux comprendre ce que vous dites.

J'aimerais m'adresser un instant à Mozilla.

Vous avez parlé de meilleures protections contre le pistage en ligne. Diriez-vous qu'il y a une sorte de course aux armements entre pisteurs et contre-pisteurs?

M. Alan Davidson:

Malheureusement, oui. Nous sommes très lucides en nous apprêtant à construire cet ensemble de protections contre le pistage en ligne. Nous pensons qu'elles offrent une réelle valeur. Et je lève mon chapeau à nos amis d'Apple. Ils font quelque chose de semblable avec Safari qui est vraiment bon.

Les pisteurs vont trouver d'autres façons de déjouer nos protections, et nous allons devoir en construire de nouvelles. Je pense que cela va durer un certain temps, ce qui est malheureux pour les utilisateurs, mais c'est un exemple de ce que nous pouvons faire pour les protéger.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Compris.

Pour passer à Apple un instant, il y a eu récemment le piratage d'identifiant de capteur qui a été corrigé dans la version 12.2 d'iOS — je ne la connais pas —, qui permettait à n'importe quel site Web dans le monde de suivre n'importe quel iPhone et la plupart des appareils Android en se servant des données de calibrage sensoriel. Vous êtes probablement au courant de cela.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Oui, c'est l'affaire du pistage par empreinte numérique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, le pistage par empreinte numérique. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage à ce sujet, nous dire comment il a été utilisé et si c'est vraiment corrigé maintenant dans iOS 12.2?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je vais commencer par expliquer un peu le contexte. Lorsque nous parlons, disons, de pistage en ligne, il peut y avoir des technologies qui servent expressément à cela, comme les témoins communément appelés cookies. Une des évolutions que nous avons observées est la mise au point de ce que nous appelons une empreinte synthétique. Il s'agit simplement d'un numéro unique qui est synthétisé par un tiers, probablement pour essayer de faire du pistage. On s'en sert aussi dans la lutte anti-fraude et pour d'autres usages, mais chose certaine, cela se prête très bien au pistage en ligne.

Vous avez raison. Certains chercheurs, en examinant les variations dans la fabrication des capteurs, ont déterminé qu'il était possible de synthétiser un de ces identifiants uniques. Le pistage par empreinte numérique, tout comme le contre-pistage, va évoluer continuellement et nous sommes déterminés à rester à l'avant-garde. Quant à savoir comment il a été utilisé, je n'ai aucune donnée indiquant qu'il ait même été utilisé, mais je ne peux pas non plus vous assurer qu'il ne l'a pas été.

Nous avons mis en place des mesures d'atténuation dans notre dernière mise à jour, et les chercheurs ont confirmé qu'elles ont bloqué leur version de l'attaque en ligne, mais je répète que c'est une technique qui continue d'évoluer, alors je pèse soigneusement mes mots « mesures d'atténuation ». À moins de retirer les capteurs de l'appareil, il y aura toujours un risque. Nous allons aussi continuer de travailler pour réduire ce risque et garder le dessus.

(0940)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me reste environ 20 secondes. J'ai une autre question pour Apple.

Sur iOS, lorsque vous passez d'une application à l'autre, une application se met en suspens et l'autre s'ouvre. Lorsque vous revenez à l'application originale, si cela fait plus de quelques secondes, elle recharge les données. Est-ce que cela ne donne pas amplement l'occasion de pister vers n'importe quel site Web que vous consultez, en disant que c'est l'usage de l'appareil? Je trouve curieux de faire cela, au lieu de stocker le contenu que vous utilisez.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je vais diviser cela en deux parties, je crois bien.

Premièrement, lorsque l'application passe à l'avant-plan et qu'elle peut s'exécuter, elle peut recharger le contenu, si elle juge bon de le faire. À ce moment-là, vous lui avez remis les commandes et elle peut s'exécuter et recharger, si vous voulez.

Notre objectif, en fait, est de réduire au minimum ces recharges dans le cadre de l'expérience utilisateur. Nous voulons aussi que l'application qui se trouve à l'avant-plan obtienne, dans un bac à sable, dans un ensemble de limites que nous avons, le maximum des moyens d'exécution et des autres ressources de l'appareil. Cela peut vouloir dire que le système d'exploitation enlève des ressources aux applications qui se trouvent en arrière-plan.

Pour ce qui est du rechargement que vous voyez, iOS, notre système d'exploitation, pourrait y contribuer, mais au fond, peu importe les ressources qu'on préserve pour celle qui se trouve en arrière-plan, lorsque vous retournez à une application, elle a le contrôle de l'exécution et elle peut recharger si elle le juge bon.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Nous passons maintenant à mon coprésident, M. Collins.

Allez-y de vos remarques préliminaires. C'est bon de vous revoir.

M. Damian Collins (président, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Merci.

Mes excuses, puisque les autres représentants du Royaume-Uni et moi-même n'étions pas ici au début de la séance, mais nous sommes ravis de voir tous les témoins ici présents.

Hier, nous nous sommes concentrés sur certaines plateformes de médias sociaux, mais je pense que notre champ d'intérêt est beaucoup plus vaste et qu'il englobe tout un éventail d'entreprises de technologie.

J'aurais d'abord quelques questions pour Apple.

Lorsque je suis entré, il était question des données recueillies sur la voix. Pourriez-vous me parler un peu du genre de données qu'Apple recueille en ce qui concerne le son capté par ses appareils? Dans le cas des appareils intelligents, est-ce qu'ils captent le son ambiant pour se faire une idée des utilisateurs — peut-être le milieu dans lequel ils se trouvent ou ce qu'ils sont en train de faire lorsqu'ils utilisent l'appareil?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Pour ce qui est de l'information sur nos appareils qui supportent Siri, il y a une partie de l'appareil qui est toujours à l'écoute. Sur certains de nos appareils, nous l'avons isolée même d'iOS, même de notre système d'exploitation, dans un coprocesseur dédié, essentiellement une pièce de matériel spécialisée, qui n'enregistre ni ne stocke l'information, mais qui est seulement à l'écoute du mot-clé pour activer notre assistant personnel, alors l'information n'est pas conservée dans l'appareil.

Toujours en réponse à votre question, elle n'est pas non plus versée dans un quelconque profil dérivé pour identifier quelque chose en rapport avec le comportement ou les centres d'intérêt de l'utilisateur. Non.

M. Damian Collins:

Est-ce que l'appareil recueille de l'information sur l'environnement où on se trouve en ce moment? Disons, par exemple, que je suis dans l'autobus pour me rendre au travail. Est-ce qu'il capterait ce genre de bruit ambiant?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Elle n'enregistre pas tout. Il y a ce que nous appelons une « période tampon ». Il s'agit essentiellement d'une courte période qui est enregistrée de façon transitoire pour analyser le mot-clé, et qui est ensuite continuellement effacée à mesure que le temps avance. Rien n'est enregistré, sauf les quelques millisecondes éphémères qui permettent d'entendre ce mot-clé.

M. Damian Collins:

L’écoute ne sert qu'à passer une commande à Siri.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

C’est exact.

M. Damian Collins:

À des fins de développement de produits ou de formation, l’entreprise conserve-t-elle certains de ces renseignements?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Encore une fois, l'appareil ne conserve même pas ces renseignements. Comme il écoute de façon passagère, ces renseignements sont continuellement effacés. Lorsque l’utilisateur utilise un mot-clé, un apprentissage automatique se fait sur l'appareil en adaptant le modèle audio à l'interlocuteur pour réduire le nombre de faux positifs ou de faux négatifs de ce mot-clé. Ensuite, si l’utilisateur fait appel à Siri, au moment où Siri est interrogée et où l'on communique avec elle débute l'envoi de données à Apple.

M. Damian Collins:

Quelle est la portée des données ainsi envoyées?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

La portée des données n'englobe que l’énoncé jusqu’à ce qu’il atteigne un point de terminaison et que Siri estime que l’utilisateur a cessé de parler, ainsi que des renseignements comme le modèle de l'appareil, pour adapter la réponse à l’appareil et un identificateur aléatoire généré par l’appareil, qui est la clé des données détenues par Siri aux fins de vos interactions avec elle. Il s’agit d’un identificateur qui est distinct de votre identificateur Apple et qui n’est associé à aucun autre compte ou service chez Apple.

M. Damian Collins:

Est-ce qu’Apple tient un registre de mes demandes à Siri, de mes commandes?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Oui.

(0945)

M. Damian Collins:

Est-ce que l’entreprise utilise ce registre ou est-il seulement utilisé pour faciliter la réponse à mon appareil?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je suppose, en réponse à la deuxième partie de votre question, que cela donne lieu à une certaine forme d'utilisation par l’entreprise. Oui, nous utilisons ces données pour Siri, mais pour Siri seulement.

M. Damian Collins:

Pour comprendre ce que sont les objectifs de Siri, ne s'agit-il que de rendre Siri plus sensible à ma voix...

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Oui.

M. Damian Collins:

... ou les données sont-elles conservées par l’entreprise pour établir un profil des demandes des utilisateurs? Conservez-vous des profils de métadonnées des gens selon l'utilisation qu'ils font de Siri?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Le seul profil de métadonnées que nous avons est celui qui est utilisé pour adapter vos interactions réelles avec Siri. Par exemple, nous formons nos modèles de voix pour qu'ils puissent reconnaître le langage naturel sur le profil sonore. Cela ne sert que pour le volet ou l’expérience Siri. Si vous demandez si les renseignements recueillis permettent d'établir un profil plus large utilisé par l’entreprise pour commercialiser des produits et des services, la réponse est non.

M. Damian Collins:

Monsieur Ryland, est-ce qu’Amazon fait cela?

J’aimerais savoir quelle est la différence entre la façon dont Amazon utilise les données recueillies à partir de la voix et la façon dont Apple les utilise. Récemment, un utilisateur a présenté une demande de données qu’Amazon détenait. Cela comprenait une série d’enregistrements de la parole à domicile que l’entreprise utilisait apparemment à des fins de formation. J’aimerais savoir comment Amazon recueille les données vocales et comment elle les utilise.

M. Mark Ryland:

L’appareil attend aussi un mot-clé. Il ne stocke aucune donnée ambiante. Une fois interpellé, il commence à acheminer des données vers le nuage pour analyser ce que l’utilisateur demande réellement. Ces données sont stockées; tout cela est expliqué dans le profil de l’utilisateur, qui peut voir tous les énoncés. Il peut voir ce qu’Alexa a cru entendre, le texte de l'interprétation qu'en a fait Alexa. Cela lui permet également de comprendre l'origine des problèmes de communication, et ainsi de suite.

L'utilisateur peut supprimer ces données, individuellement ou collectivement. Nous utilisons les données tout comme nous utilisons les données d’autres interactions concernant le compte de l'utilisateur. Cela fait partie du compte de l'utilisateur Amazon. Cela fait partie de la façon dont il interagit avec notre plateforme globale.

M. Damian Collins:

Le représentant d’Apple a dit que l’appareil écoute constamment, mais attend seulement la commande Siri. Il semble que ce soit différent avec Alexa. L’appareil est toujours à l’écoute et il conserve dans le nuage ce qu’il a entendu.

M. Mark Ryland:

Non, c’est plutôt très semblable. Nous conservons les énoncés entendus après le mot-clé, tout comme Siri.

M. Damian Collins:

Je sais d’expérience qu’Alexa répond à des commandes autres que le mot-clé. Il pourrait être déclenché par quelque chose qu’il a entendu dans la salle et qui n’est pas nécessairement le mot-clé.

M. Mark Ryland:

Cela me semble être une défaillance. Alexa n’est pas censée réagir de façon aléatoire aux sons ambiants.

M. Damian Collins:

Roger McNamee, qui est venu témoigner devant nous hier, nous a expliqué comment il avait placé Alexa dans une boîte dès le premier jour parce qu’Alexa avait commencé à interagir avec une publicité d’Amazon qui passait à la télévision. Je pense que la plupart des gens qui ont ces appareils savent que toutes sortes de choses peuvent les déclencher, et pas seulement la commande ou le mot-clé d’Alexa.

M. Mark Ryland:

Eh bien, nous travaillons sans cesse à raffiner la technologie et à nous assurer que le mot-clé constitue la seule façon dont les gens peuvent interagir avec l’appareil.

M. Damian Collins:

Si vous conserviez dans l'appareil les données qu'il entend et les gardiez ensuite dans le nuage — ce qui semble être différent de ce que fait Apple —, vous nous dites que ce ne sont que des données sonores qui sont fondées sur les commandes reçues par Alexa?

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui. Ce ne sont que les données créées en réponse à la tentative de l’utilisateur d’interagir avec Alexa, qui est déclenchée par le mot-clé.

M. Damian Collins:

Est-ce qu’Amazon serait en mesure de répondre à une demande de données ou de renseignements de la police au sujet d’un crime qui a peut-être été commis à l’intérieur du pays en fonction de paroles captées par Alexa?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous observons évidemment les lois de tous les pays dans lesquels nous opérons. S’il y a une ordonnance exécutoire d’une portée raisonnable et ainsi de suite, nous y donnerons suite comme il se doit.

M. Damian Collins:

Cela donne à penser que vous conservez plus de données que de simples commandes à Alexa.

M. Mark Ryland:

Non, la seule chose à laquelle nous pourrions répondre, c’est l’information que je viens de décrire, c’est-à-dire les réponses qui viennent de l’utilisateur une fois qu’il a interpellé l’appareil. Il n’y a pas de stockage des données ambiantes.

M. Damian Collins:

Vous dites que lorsque quelqu’un interpelle l’appareil, la commande reçue — son dialogue avec Alexa, si vous voulez — est conservée?

M. Mark Ryland:

C’est exact.

M. Damian Collins:

Vous dites qu’à moins que le mot-clé ne soit prononcé, l’appareil n’est pas déclenché et il ne recueille pas de données ambiantes.

M. Mark Ryland:

C’est exact.

M. Damian Collins:

D’accord.

Je m’intéresse au cas des données dont j’ai parlé plus tôt. On semblait craindre que le son ambiant soit conservé et enregistré et que l'entreprise l’utilise à des fins de formation.

M. Mark Ryland:

Non. Quand j'ai parlé de formation, c’est simplement que nous améliorons nos modèles de traitement du langage naturel en utilisant les données que les clients nous donnent dans le cadre de leur interaction avec l’appareil. Ce n’est pas du tout basé sur le son ambiant.

(0950)

M. Damian Collins:

Tous les commandements d’Alexa qui sont déclenchés par le mot-clé sont donc conservés par l’entreprise dans le nuage. Pensez-vous que vos utilisateurs le savent?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je pense que oui. D'après mon expérience de l’utilisation d’un appareil mobile pour configurer l’appareil à la maison, j’ai immédiatement remarqué qu’il y a une icône d’historique, où je peux essentiellement aller prendre connaissance de toutes mes interactions avec le système.

M. Damian Collins:

Je ne me souviens pas d’avoir lu cela nulle part. C’est peut-être en raison du feuillet de l'épaisseur de Guerre et paix, des instructions qui sont rattachées à l’appareil.

Je pense que même si c’est peut-être la même chose que d’utiliser n’importe quelle autre fonction de recherche, le fait est qu’il parlait à un ordinateur, et je ne suis pas sûr que les utilisateurs savent que cette information est stockée indéfiniment. Je ne savais pas que cela se faisait. Je n’avais aucune idée de la façon dont on s’y prendrait pour le savoir. Je suis également un peu intrigué par le fait qu'il est possible, en fait, de voir la transcription de ce que vous avez demandé à Alexa.

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui, c'est exact. C’est dans l’application mobile, sur le site Web et sur la page de confidentialité d’Alexa que vous pouvez voir toutes vos interactions. Vous pouvez voir ce que le système de transcription a cru entendre, et ainsi de suite.

M. Damian Collins:

Je présume que tout cela est regroupé dans un ensemble de données qu’Amazon détient à mon sujet en ce qui concerne mes habitudes d’achat et d’autres choses également.

M. Mark Ryland:

Cela fait partie des données de votre compte.

M. Damian Collins:

Cela représente beaucoup de données.

Le président:

M. Davidson veut répondre.

M. Alan Davidson:

Je voulais simplement dire que je pense que cela met également en évidence le problème dont nous avons parlé au sujet du consentement.

Je suis un fidèle utilisateur d’Amazon Echo. L'entreprise a conçu un outil formidable. Il y a quelques semaines, je suis allé avec ma famille et nous avons vu les données qui étaient stockées, mais je dois dire que c’est...

La protection de la vie privée est un sujet qui me passionne. J’ai lu tout ce que vous recevez, et j’ai été stupéfait, honnêtement, et ma famille a été étonnée de voir ces données enregistrées de nous et de nos jeunes enfants qui remontent à plusieurs années et qui sont stockées dans le nuage. Cela ne veut pas dire que cela a été fait à tort ou illégalement. Je pense que c’est merveilleux de voir ce genre de transparence, mais les utilisateurs n’en ont aucune idée. Je pense que beaucoup d’utilisateurs ne savent tout simplement pas que ces données existent et ne savent pas non plus comment elles seront utilisées à l’avenir.

Comme industrie, nous devons faire un bien meilleur travail pour ce qui est de demander aux gens un consentement plus précis, ou fournir une meilleure information à ce sujet.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Alan Davidson:

Je ne veux pas m’en prendre à Amazon; c’est un produit merveilleux.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Gourde.

Je vois beaucoup de mains se lever. Tout le monde aura beaucoup de temps aujourd’hui.

Monsieur Gourde, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question va toucher un sujet d'ordre un peu plus technique.

Vous possédez, surtout Amazon et les autres organisations semblables, beaucoup de renseignements et de données personnelles concernant vos clients.

Je suis convaincu que vous faites l'impossible pour sécuriser toutes ces données. Par contre, compte tenu de l'avènement de l'intelligence artificielle, vous avez peut-être eu des offres de service afin de vous aider à prévoir le marché dans l'avenir.

Cela pourrait être très utile — surtout pour Amazon — d'être capable de prévoir, supposons pour l'été prochain, quel article parmi ceux qui ont été commandés pourrait faire l'objet d'un rabais, être mis en solde.

Il y a peut-être des sous-traitants ou des personnes qui vous ont offert des services en ce qui a trait aux nouveaux systèmes d'algorithmes. Au fond, ils vous auraient vendu cela pour vous aider.

Est-ce que ces sous-traitants, si vous y faites appel — bien sûr, vous n'êtes pas obligé de nous le dire —, peuvent garantir que, en utilisant les données détenues par votre entreprise pour offrir ce genre de service, ils ne vont pas vendre ces renseignements personnels à d'autres personnes ou à des organisations plus importantes? Ces dernières seraient très heureuses d'obtenir ces informations, que ce soit pour vendre de la publicité ou à d'autres fins.

Y a-t-il des organisations qui vous offrent ce genre de service? [Traduction]

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous concluons des marchés avec des tiers pour la prestation de certains services et, dans des conditions très prudemment contrôlées, nous partageons des données personnelles.

Par exemple, si nous concluons un marché avec un service de livraison, nous communiquons le nom et l’adresse du client où le colis doit être livré, mais je pense que pour tous ces cas d’apprentissage automatique de base du genre dont vous parlez, tout cela ne concerne que notre entreprise. Nous ne vendons pas l’accès aux données de base aux entreprises avec lesquelles nous traitons aux fins des services que nous offrons. Ce partage de données ne se fait que dans des cas d’utilisation périphérique, et même dans ces cas, nous conservons des droits de vérification et nous contrôlons soigneusement, par l’entremise de contrats et de vérifications, l’utilisation que font nos sous-traitants des données de nos clients que nous partageons avec eux à ces fins très limitées.

(0955)

[Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Y a-t-il d'autres organisations qui utilisent des stratégies d'algorithmes pour mousser vos produits? [Traduction]

M. John Weigelt:

Nous appliquons chez Microsoft un très solide modèle de gouvernance des données qui nous permet de reconnaître et de marquer les données et de les protéger comme il se doit. Dans les secteurs où nous avons besoin de sous-traitants, leur nombre demeure très limité.

Il y a beaucoup de décisions à prendre avant que nous choisissions nos sous-traitants, et ils doivent conclure des ententes avec nous pour assurer la confidentialité des données qu’ils sauvegardent. Nous avons des règles strictes concernant la façon dont ils utilisent ces données et les conditions dans lesquelles ils doivent nous les renvoyer. Nous avons un programme très solide de politiques, de procédures et de mesures de sécurité techniques concernant l’utilisation des données par les sous-traitants pour veiller à ce qu’elles ne soient pas utilisées à mauvais escient.

L’intelligence artificielle est un domaine qui nous intéresse au plus haut point, et Satya Nadella, dans son livre intitulé Hit Refresh, a certes établi des principes d’utilisation judicieuse de l’intelligence artificielle afin de responsabiliser les gens. C’est vraiment le premier principe. Nous avons adopté ces principes au sein de notre organisation, en veillant à établir une structure de gouvernance robuste en matière d’intelligence artificielle. Nous avons mis sur pied un comité qui examine l’application de l’IA à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de l’organisation pour s’assurer que nous l’utilisons de façon responsable.

La mise en place de ces éléments dans l'organisation nous aide à mieux gérer et comprendre la façon dont ces outils sont utilisés et à les mettre en place dans un cadre conforme à l'éthique. Nous sommes très heureux de collaborer avec des gouvernements partout dans le monde, que ce soit l’Union européenne avec ses travaux dans le domaine de l’éthique de l’intelligence artificielle ou les récentes lignes directrices de l’OCDE, ou même ici au Canada avec les travaux du Conseil stratégique des DPI, le CSDPI, sur un cadre déontologique de l’intelligence artificielle, afin que nous puissions aider les gens et d’autres organisations à mieux comprendre certaines de ces techniques, des processus et des modèles de gouvernance responsables qui doivent être mis en place.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je ne sais pas si Apple fait le genre de modélisation dont vous parlez. Au lieu de cela, notre apprentissage automatique a tendance à être basé sur l’intelligence des appareils.

Par exemple, à mesure que le clavier apprend à connaître l’utilisateur, l’appareil lui-même recueille et utilise cette information pour s’entraîner à reconnaître cet utilisateur sans que l’information ne quitte l’appareil. Lorsque nous recueillons des données pour aider à éclairer les modèles communautaires, nous appliquons des critères comme la protection de la vie privée différentielle locale, qui applique la randomisation aux données avant qu’elles quittent l’appareil de l’utilisateur, de sorte que nous ne sommes pas en mesure de revenir en arrière et de relier les données de l’utilisateur et leur contenu à un utilisateur. Pour nous, tout est centré sur l'appareil. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Monsieur Davidson, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose? [Traduction]

M. Alan Davidson:

Nous ne déployons aucun de ces systèmes. Dans le cadre de certaines de nos recherches, nous avons également examiné la possibilité de faire des expériences sur des appareils. Je pense que c’est une approche très solide pour protéger la vie privée des gens.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Gourde.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Ian Lucas, du Royaume-Uni.

M. Ian Lucas (membre, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Si je peux revenir à la question de M. Collins, j’ai été intrigué par le téléphone Apple et l’appareil Alexa. Y a-t-il eu des tentatives de piratage de vos systèmes et d’accès à l’information que vous conservez?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Les systèmes d’Apple sont constamment attaqués. Je ne sais pas exactement si l'application Siri en soi a été l’objet d’attaques ou non, mais on peut supposer qu'elle l'a été. Cependant, étant donné que les données de Siri ne sont pas associées à l’ensemble du compte Apple, même si nous les considérons comme très sensibles et que nous nous efforçons de les protéger, il serait très difficile pour une personne mal intentionnée de recueillir les données d’un utilisateur individuel à partir du système Siri.

M. Ian Lucas:

A-t-on déjà réussi à pirater le système en ce qui concerne une personne en particulier?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Pas à ma connaissance, non.

M. Mark Ryland:

De même, nous protégeons les données des clients avec beaucoup de succès depuis plus de 20 ans. Il s’agit d’un nouveau type de données, de toute évidence d’un type très sensible, mais nous conservons un dossier très positif à cet égard, et rien n’indique qu’il y ait eu quelque violation que ce soit à l’égard des données liées à Alexa.

Le président:

Nous cédons maintenant la parole à M. Lawless, pour cinq minutes.

M. James Lawless:

Merci.

Pour revenir à la sécurité, à la confidentialité des données et au cryptage, je crois qu’Apple a parlé du Key Store sur l’iPhone et l’iPad, et Mozilla, je crois, offre aussi une fonction de type Key Store dans son navigateur.

L’une des difficultés en matière de sécurité, c’est que nos mots de passe, selon moi, sont devenus tellement sûrs que personne ne les retient, sauf les appareils eux-mêmes. Sur le Key Store d'Apple — je crois qu’on l'appelle l’application Key Store —, vous pouvez demander à l'application de générer un mot de passe pour vous, puis lui demander de s’en souvenir pour vous. Vous ne savez pas ce que c’est, mais l’application et l’appareil le savent, et je suppose que cette information est stockée dans le nuage quelque part. Je sais que vous en avez présenté un aperçu au début.

Je suppose que Mozilla a une fonction semblable qui permet de demander à la plateforme de se souvenir du mot de passe pour vous, donc vous avez plusieurs mots de passe, et je pense que Microsoft offre aussi probablement cette fonction dans ses navigateurs. Encore une fois, si vous ouvrez une session dans Mozilla, Edge ou n’importe quel navigateur, vous pouvez remplir automatiquement tous vos champs de mot de passe. Nous nous retrouvons dans une situation comme celle du Seigneur des anneaux, où il n'existe qu'« un anneau pour tous ». Dans nos tentatives pour améliorer la sécurité, nous nous sommes retrouvés avec un seul maillon dans la chaîne, et ce maillon est assez vulnérable.

Peut-être, pourrais-je obtenir des commentaires sur ce problème particulier de toutes les plateformes.

(1000)

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je crois que l’application dont vous parlez est l’application Keychain Access sur les appareils Mac et iOS. Dans les « réglages », « mots de passe » et « comptes », vous pouvez voir les mots de passe. Comme vous le dites, ils sont générés automatiquement par la plateforme. La plupart des utilisateurs en font l’expérience grâce à notre navigateur Safari, qui offre une fonction de connexion à Keychain. Comme vous le dites, l'information est stockée dans le nuage.

Elle est sauvegardée dans le nuage et cryptée de bout en bout — je tiens à le préciser — au moyen d'une clé qu’Apple n’a jamais en sa possession. Même si nous plaçons cette information dans le nuage, à la fois pour vous permettre de récupérer les mots de passe et de les synchroniser entre tous les appareils que vous avez connectés à iCloud, nous le faisons d’une manière qui n’expose pas vos mots de passe à Apple.

Vous avez raison de dire que les mots de passe continuent de poser un défi en ce qui concerne la protection des comptes d’utilisateur. On voit beaucoup d’entreprises, notamment Apple, passer à ce qu’on appelle l’authentification à deux facteurs, où le simple mot de passe n’est pas suffisant pour accéder au compte. Nous sommes très favorables à cela. Nous avons pris un certain nombre de mesures au fil des ans pour faire passer nos comptes iCloud à ce niveau de sécurité, et nous estimons que c’est un bon progrès pour l’industrie.

La dernière chose que j'aimerais préciser, c’est que les données des mots de passe sont extrêmement délicates et méritent notre plus haut niveau de protection. C’est pourquoi, à part l’application Keychain Access dont vous parlez sur le Mac, sur nos dispositifs iOS et maintenant sur notre T2 — c’est le nom de la puce de sécurité dans certains de nos plus récents appareils Mac —, nous utilisons la technologie de l’enclave sécurisée pour protéger ces mots de passe et les séparer du système d’exploitation. Comme la surface d’attaque est plus petite, même si c’est un risque auquel nous sommes très attentifs, nous avons pris des mesures, à l'étape de la conception matérielle, pour protéger les données entourant les mots de passe des utilisateurs.

M. Alan Davidson:

C’est une excellente question. J’ajouterais simplement que cela semble contre-intuitif, n’est-ce pas? Il y a à peine 10 ans, nous aurions dit: « C’est fou. Vous allez mettre tous vos mots de passe au même endroit? » Nous offrons un produit semblable — Lockwise — sur notre navigateur.

Aujourd’hui, les experts en sécurité vous diront que c’est une bien meilleure solution pour la plupart des gens parce que le plus gros problème que nous avons tous est que nous ne pouvons pas nous souvenir de nos mots de passe, alors nous finissons par utiliser le même mot de passe partout, ou nous finissons par utiliser des mots de passe idiots partout, et c’est là que débutent nos problèmes.

Nos propres sondages d’experts en sécurité et nos propres experts internes ont dit qu’il est en fait beaucoup plus intelligent d’utiliser un gestionnaire de mots de passe. Pour la plupart d’entre nous, cela réduit sensiblement la menace de cette vulnérabilité centrale. Je vous encourage donc tous à utiliser des gestionnaires de mots de passe.

Je viens d’envoyer une note à tous nos employés pour leur dire qu’ils devraient le faire. Nous prenons tous cela très au sérieux. L’authentification à deux facteurs est un élément important, et c’est un élément important du fonctionnement de ces gestionnaires. Nous prenons très au sérieux la responsabilité de protéger nos informations, mais il s’avère qu’il s’agit d’une bien meilleure solution pour la plupart des consommateurs aujourd’hui.

M. John Weigelt:

J’aimerais ajouter que nous constatons que les protections matérielles locales fondées sur le cryptage sont importantes pour appuyer la protection des mots de passe. Jumelez ces protections à l’authentification multifactorielle, en utilisant peut-être quelque chose que vous possédez déjà.

Je pense qu’un contrepoint intéressant à cela et un ajout intéressant est la capacité de prendre des décisions très solides au sujet des personnes, au sujet de leur utilisation d’un système en particulier. Nous utilisons des données anonymes et pseudonymes pour aider les organisations à reconnaître que « Jean-Pierre se connecte à partir d’Ottawa, et il semble y avoir au même moment une ouverture de session à partir de Vancouver. Il ne peut pas voyager aussi vite. Avertissons Jean-Pierre qu'il est peut-être temps de rafraîchir son mot de passe. »

Il y a une autre chose que nous pouvons faire, compte tenu de la portée mondiale de notre vision de l’environnement des cybermenaces. Souvent, les utilisateurs malveillants partagent des dictionnaires de noms d’utilisateur et de mots de passe. Nous consultons ces dictionnaires, et nous sommes en mesure d’éclairer nos outils de sorte que si les organisations — par exemple, food.com — découvrent qu’un de leurs noms d'utilisateurs y figure, elles peuvent aussi s'en occuper.

Dans le cas des données associées à l’utilisation d’un ensemble d’outils particulier, l’anonymat et le pseudonymat fournissent une plus grande assurance de protection de la vie privée et de sécurité également. Assurons-nous de reconnaître qu’il y a un équilibre à trouver pour nous assurer de préserver la vie privée tout en protégeant ces utilisateurs.

(1005)

M. James Lawless:

C’est un domaine très intéressant, et les défis y demeurent nombreux. Il y a un compromis à faire entre la convivialité et la sécurité.

Je me souviens qu’un gestionnaire de la sécurité des TI d’une grande société m’a parlé d’une politique qu’il avait mise en œuvre avant l'avènement des gestionnaires de mots de passe, il y a peut-être une décennie. Il avait mis en place une politique de mots de passe robustes afin que tout le monde ne puisse pas utiliser son animal domestique ou son lieu de naissance, et ainsi de suite. Il a ensuite constaté que, même si cette politique était appliquée, tout le monde écrivait ses mots de passe sur papier parce qu’il n’y avait aucun moyen de s’en souvenir, ce qui était contre-productif.

J’ai une dernière question, puis je vais ensuite partager mon temps avec ma collègue. Je pense qu’il y a un site Web appelé haveyoubeenhacked.com ou haveibeenhacked — quelque chose du genre — qui enregistre essentiellement les atteintes connues. Si vos données, vos plateformes ou d’autres applications ou sites de tiers se trouvent dans le nuage et sont compromis, vous pouvez faire une recherche pour vous-même ou pour obtenir vos détails et les retirer.

Y a-t-il moyen de remédier à cela? J’ai fait le test récemment, et je crois qu’il y avait quatre sites différents sur lesquels mes détails avaient été divulgués. Si cela se produit sur vos plateformes, comment allez-vous procéder? Comment pouvez-vous atténuer cela? Vous contentez-vous simplement d'informer les utilisateurs? Faites-vous de la sensibilisation ou essayez-vous d’effacer cet ensemble de données et de recommencer? Que se passe-t-il dans un tel cas?

M. John Weigelt:

Nous avons des exigences et des obligations en matière de notification des atteintes, et nous avisons nos utilisateurs s’il y a un soupçon d'atteinte à leur information et nous leur recommandons de changer leur mot de passe.

Pour ce qui est de l’ensemble organisationnel, comme la trousse d’outils dont j'ai parlé — je pense que c’est « Have I been pwned »...

M. James Lawless:

C’est bien cela.

M. John Weigelt:

... ce site a des dictionnaires facilement accessibles, alors nous les transmettons également aux utilisateurs organisationnels. Il y a la notification des utilisateurs individuels, et nous aidons également les entreprises à comprendre ce qui se passe.

M. Alan Davidson:

Nous faisons la même chose en ce sens que nous avons tous des obligations en matière d’atteinte à la protection des données et nous nous en acquittons dans de tels cas. Nous avons également mis au point notre propre version Firefox de ce surveillant « Have I been hacked ». Les titulaires de compte Firefox qui choisissent d’y adhérer seront avisés des autres attaques dont nous sommes informés, pas seulement de n’importe quelle atteinte à notre système, mais à d’autres également. Ce sera un service que les gens trouveront fort utile.

M. James Lawless:

C’est bien.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Si les équipes de sécurité d’Apple, en plus des étapes dont il a été question ici, apprennent qu’il y a probablement eu violation d’un compte, alors nous pouvons prendre une mesure qu’on appelle la « réinitialisation automatisée » du compte. Nous obligerons en fait l’utilisateur à réinitialiser son mot de passe et lui poserons des défis supplémentaires s’il a une authentification à deux facteurs à l’aide de ses dispositifs de confiance existants pour rétablir l’accès à ce compte.

M. James Lawless:

Oui, il est très difficile de revenir à notre compte une fois qu'on en est évincé, et je le sais pour l'avoir vécu.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Vous avez parlé d’équilibre entre la convivialité et la sécurité.

M. James Lawless:

Oui.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Nous essayons de trouver un équilibre entre la possibilité que vous soyez la bonne personne qui essaie de récupérer son compte, auquel cas il ne faut pas exagérément vous compliquer la vie, ou nous essayons de garder un utilisateur malveillant définitivement à l’écart. C’est un domaine en évolution.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Puis-je intervenir, s’il vous plaît?

Le président:

Nous avons en fait largement dépassé le temps prévu. Le président passera au deuxième tour, et vous êtes déjà inscrite en premier au deuxième tour, Hildegarde. Lorsque tout le monde aura pris la parole, nous passerons à la prochaine série de questions. Cela ne devrait pas être très long.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Vandenbeld, pour cinq minutes.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

J’aimerais d'abord parler de la désuétude du consentement. Quand on veut utiliser une application ou autre chose, il y a de bonnes et de mauvaises fins. Disons, par exemple, que j'utilise mon iPhone et que je quitte le Parlement à 9 h. Mon iPhone me dit exactement quelle route prendre pour me rendre à la maison. Il sait où je vis parce qu’il a vu que j’emprunte cette voie tous les jours, et si je commence soudainement à emprunter une voie différente pour me rendre à un autre endroit, il le saura aussi.

Bien, c’est parfait quand je veux savoir si je devrais ou non prendre l'autoroute 417, mais le fait que mon téléphone sache exactement où je dors tous les soirs pourrait aussi être très troublant pour beaucoup de gens.

Nous n’avons pas vraiment le choix. Si nous voulons utiliser certains services, si nous voulons avoir accès à Google Maps ou à autre chose du genre, nous devons accepter, mais il y a alors d'autres utilisations de ces données.

Soit dit en passant, en ce qui concerne le fait qu’il s’agit d’une audience publique, il y a une enseigne sur le mur qui le précise. J’aimerais bien qu’il y ait une telle enseigne lorsqu’on effectue des recherches sur Internet pour savoir si ce qu’on fait sera enregistré ou rendu public.

Ma question, qui s’adresse particulièrement à Apple, porte sur les données que vous recueillez sur mes allées et venues. Il ne s’agit pas seulement de savoir où je vais ce jour-là. Le problème ne réside pas dans le fait de savoir si je veux aller du point A au point B et de savoir quel autobus je dois prendre; le problème, c'est que mon appareil sait exactement où je me trouve sur le plan géographique.

Lesquelles de ces données sont sauvegardées et à quelles autres fins pourraient-elles être utilisées?

(1010)

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

J’aimerais avoir plus de précisions, madame, à savoir de qui et de quoi vous parlez, parce qu'il y a des nuances à faire ici. « L'appareil » — votre téléphone — sait effectivement tout cela. Votre téléphone recueille des données de capteurs et des tendances comportementales et il essaie de déterminer où se trouve votre maison — et c’est votre iPhone. Quand vous dites « vous » en parlant d'Apple, sachez que nous n'avons pas cette information, ou du moins pas par ce processus. Si vous nous laissez une adresse de facturation pour des achats ou autre chose du genre, c’est différent, mais l’information qui améliore l'intelligence de votre iPhone demeure sur votre téléphone et Apple ne la connaît pas.

Lorsque vous demandez dans quelle mesure ces données sont recueillies, sachez qu'elles sont recueillies par le téléphone. Elles sont recueillies sous la fonction « lieux importants ». Les utilisateurs peuvent aller les chercher et les supprimer, mais la collecte ne concerne que l’appareil. Ce n’est pas Apple qui recueille cette information.

Pour ce qui est des fins auxquelles elle peut être utilisée, d'une version à l'autre du système d’exploitation, nous essayons d’utiliser cette information pour fournir de bonnes expériences locales sur l’appareil, comme les avis de moment du départ ou les avis d’accidents de la circulation sur votre trajet vers le domicile, mais cela ne va pas s’étendre à des fins auxquelles Apple, l’entreprise, pourrait utiliser ces données, parce que ces données ne sont jamais en notre possession.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je pense que cela revient à ce que Microsoft a commencé à dire dans sa déclaration préliminaire, c’est-à-dire la capacité des pirates informatiques d’accéder aux données. Apple n’utilise pas ces données, mais est-il possible, grâce aux cybermenaces, que d’autres utilisateurs malveillants puissent accéder à ces données?

Je vais en fait poser la question à Microsoft.

Vous avez parlé d’investir 1 milliard de dollars par année dans la recherche et le développement en matière de sécurité, et vous avez utilisé l'expression « démantèlements coopératifs de réseaux de zombies ». Pouvez-vous m'en dire plus à ce sujet, et aussi parler de votre travail en matière de cybercriminalité?

Nous savons qu’une fois que les données sont divulguées, il est impossible de revenir en arrière, et puisque bon nombre de ces Cambridge Analytica et autres agrégateurs de données les utilisent, que faites-vous pour vous assurer que ces données ne sont pas diffusées au départ?

M. John Weigelt:

Lorsque nous examinons le marché, nous constatons qu’il évolue continuellement, n’est-ce pas? Ce qui a été mis en place pour les contrôles de sécurité il y a 10 ans est différent aujourd’hui, et cela fait partie des efforts déployés par la collectivité pour protéger l’environnement des TI.

Dans notre cas, nous analysons ces techniques courantes. Nous essayons ensuite de nous assurer que ces techniques disparaissent. Nous n’essayons pas seulement de suivre; nous essayons de devancer les utilisateurs malveillants afin qu’ils ne puissent pas répéter leurs exploits antérieurs et qu’ils doivent trouver de nouvelles façons de faire.

Nous examinons des outils comme le cryptage, le renforcement du fonctionnement du système d’exploitation, pour que les choses ne se passent pas toujours au même endroit. C'est un peu comme si vous changiez d'itinéraire lorsque vous rentrez chez vous du Parlement le soir, de sorte que si des malfaiteurs vous attendent à l'angle de Sparks et Bank, ils ne vous auront pas parce que vous avez changé d'itinéraire. Nous faisons la même chose au sein du système interne, et cela rompt avec tout un tas de choses que fait la communauté des pirates traditionnels. Comme nous incluons également la protection de la vie privée et l’accessibilité, notre travail porte sur la confiance, la sécurité, la protection des renseignements personnels et l’accessibilité.

Parallèlement, comme il existe une plus vaste communauté Internet dans son ensemble, ce n’est pas quelque chose que nous pouvons faire seuls. Il y a des fournisseurs de services Internet, des sites Web et même des ordinateurs à domicile qui sont contrôlés par ces réseaux de zombies. Les pirates informatiques ont commencé à créer des réseaux d’ordinateurs qu’ils partagent pour commettre leurs méfaits. Ils peuvent avoir jusqu’à un million d’ordinateurs zombies qui attaquent différentes communautés. Cela ralentit vraiment l’Internet, embourbe le trafic sur la Toile et ainsi de suite.

Pour démanteler ces réseaux, il faut un savoir-faire technique pour en prendre le contrôle, mais il faut aussi l’appui des entités juridiques dans les régions. Ce qui est unique pour nous, c’est que notre centre de cybercriminalité a collaboré avec les autorités gouvernementales pour trouver de nouveaux précédents juridiques qui permettent de supprimer ces réseaux. Ainsi, en plus de l’aspect technologique, nous nous assurons d’être en règle sur le plan juridique pour mener nos activités.

Enfin, ce que nous avons fait pour les réseaux Zeus et Citadel, d'importants réseaux de zombies qui s’étaient installés dans les systèmes d'entreprises canadiennes, c’est collaborer avec le Centre canadien de réponse aux incidents cybernétiques ainsi qu’avec les entreprises pour désinfecter ces appareils afin qu’ils puissent redémarrer sans problème.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Monsieur Davidson, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

M. Alan Davidson:

J’ai deux points à soulever rapidement.

Premièrement, nous travaillons à ce que nous appelons l'« allègement des données ». Cette idée part du principe que nous ne devrions pas conserver les données dont nous n’avons pas besoin. La meilleure façon de protéger les données est de ne pas les conserver. Parfois, c’est nécessaire, mais parfois ce ne l’est pas. L’industrie pourrait faire un meilleur travail et les consommateurs pourraient en apprendre davantage sur l’importance d’insister pour que les données ne soient pas conservées si elles ne sont pas nécessaires.

Deuxièmement, l’emplacement est un aspect particulièrement délicat. C’est probablement un aspect qui, au bout du compte, exigera davantage d’attention de la part du gouvernement. De nombreux utilisateurs se sentiraient probablement très à l’aise qu'une société comme Apple ou Microsoft détienne ces données, parce qu’ils ont d’excellents experts en sécurité et ce genre de choses. Nous nous inquiétons beaucoup des petites entreprises et des tierces parties qui détiennent certaines de ces données et qui ne travaillent peut-être pas de façon aussi sûre.

(1015)

Le président:

Nous allons passer à Mme Jo Stevens, du Royaume-Uni.

Mme Jo Stevens (membre, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais aborder un sujet tout à fait différent, celui de la concurrence et des marchés. J’aimerais demander à messieurs Ryland et Neuenschwander s’ils pensent que des règles en matière de concurrence et des règles antitrust différentes devraient s’appliquer aux géants de la technologie, compte tenu de leur influence et de leur pouvoir sans précédent sur le marché.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

En ce qui concerne les règlements antitrust, comme je travaille au sein d'une organisation d’ingénierie, je ne peux pas dire que j’ai beaucoup réfléchi à cette question. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions et de les soumettre à nos équipes des affaires juridiques ou gouvernementales.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Comme consommateur, pensez-vous que les grands géants technologiques mondiaux ont trop d’influence et de pouvoir sur le marché?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Mon objectif, en ce qui concerne nos plateformes, est de permettre à l’utilisateur de contrôler les données et de laisser le plus de contrôle possible aux utilisateurs.

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous sommes une entreprise relativement importante, mais bien sûr, c’est en grande partie le résultat de nos activités à l’échelle mondiale. Nous évoluons dans beaucoup de marchés différents. Dans un segment de marché donné, nous pouvons souvent être un très petit joueur ou un joueur de taille moyenne.

Encore une fois, je ne vais pas me prononcer en profondeur au sujet des lois sur la concurrence. Ce n’est pas mon domaine d’expertise, mais nous estimons que la loi actuelle sur la concurrence est suffisante en ce qui a trait aux sociétés de technologie.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Monsieur Weigelt, qu'en pensez-vous?

M. John Weigelt:

Nous sommes sur le marché depuis pas mal de temps, depuis les années 1970, en fait, nous avons donc eu le temps de réfléchir à l'organisation et la manière dont nous exerçons nos activités. Je pense que nous avons apporté les correctifs nécessaires, en nous appuyant sur les commentaires et les points de vue des gouvernements étrangers.

Une chose qui me semble importante à signaler, en tant que Canadien travaillant pour Microsoft ici au Canada, c'est cet écosystème de partenaires qui stimule l'innovation canadienne et les entreprises canadiennes. Plus de 12 000 partenaires tirent leurs revenus grâce à l'ensemble d'outils à leur disposition et ont accès à une plateforme cohérente, ce qui leur permet de vendre leurs innovations dans le monde entier grâce à ces outils et de multiplier les revenus qu'ils génèrent ici au pays.

Les progiciels permettent parfois de multiplier les revenus par huit. Pour l'infonuagique, le facteur de multiplication peut être aussi élevé que 20 pour l'utilisation de ces ensembles d'outils. Il s'agit donc d'un moteur économique fantastique. Cet accès au marché mondial est un atout important pour nos partenaires.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Cela m'amène à ma prochaine question. Je pense que c'est une idée largement répandue que les géants mondiaux de la technologie sont un peu comme un service public et qu'ils devraient être traités à ce titre en raison du pouvoir qu'ils détiennent.

Compte tenu de ce que vous venez de dire au sujet de l'innovation, croyez-vous que, si c'était le cas et si la pression antitrust était plus forte, cela pourrait nuire à l'innovation? Est-ce la principale raison que vous invoquez?

M. John Weigelt:

Je faisais un lien entre ces deux sujets. Ce que je voulais dire, c'est que nous démocratisons la technologie. Nous la simplifions grandement pour les pays émergents et les entreprises émergentes et nous leur donnons des idées fantastiques pour tirer parti d'une technologie très avancée. Quand on pense à l'intelligence artificielle et au travail qui se fait à Montréal, à Toronto et ailleurs dans le monde, il est essentiel que nous puissions utiliser ces outils pour créer un nouveau marché.

Je vois cela comme un catalyseur pour le milieu de l'innovation. Nous collaborons avec cinq supergrappes canadiennes, qui sont le moteur de l'innovation du Canada dans les domaines de l'agriculture, des océans, de la fabrication de pointe, pour créer de nouveaux ensembles d'outils. Notre capacité d'interagir avec ces différents secteurs, d'adopter des approches multiplateformes et d'optimiser notre expérience sur une plateforme leur permet de s'engager dans des activités qui sont dans le meilleur intérêt du milieu.

Par exemple, dans la supergrappe de l'économie océanique, utiliser et obtenir des données sur nos océans et partager ce produit commun avec l'ensemble du secteur, c'est une pratique que nous encourageons afin de stimuler la croissance du secteur. Faciliter l'accès à cette plateforme est un moyen de stimuler l'innovation.

(1020)

Mme Jo Stevens:

Pourriez-vous nous parler de l'innovation du point de vue de votre entreprise? Ma question s'adresse à vous deux.

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui, avec plaisir.

La concurrence est très forte sur tous les marchés où nous sommes présents. L'infonuagique est un excellent exemple. Les joueurs ne sont pas très nombreux sur ce marché, mais la concurrence est très forte et les prix sont en baisse, ce qui facilite, comme l'a dit mon collègue, l'émergence de nouveaux modèles d'affaires qui étaient auparavant impensables.

J'ai travaillé quelques années à la division des organismes du secteur public chez Amazon Web Services. Ce que j'y ai constaté, c'est que de très petites entreprises, disons de 10, 20 ou 30 employés, étaient en concurrence pour l'obtention de gros contrats gouvernementaux, ce qui aurait été impensable pour elles avant l'existence de l'infonuagique. Seule une très grande entreprise spécialisée dans les contrats gouvernementaux aurait pu soumissionner pour ces gros contrats, parce qu'il fallait qu'elle soit dotée d'une solide infrastructure et qu'elle soit en mesure de faire d'importants investissements en capital.

Comme il est maintenant possible d'obtenir de nombreux services de TI à partir du nuage, nous assistons à une fantastique démocratisation, pour reprendre ce mot, de l'accès au marché international, de l'accès des petits commerces au marché international, que ce soit en vendant sur le site de vente au détail d'Amazon ou au moyen de notre plateforme infonuagique. Je pense que la concurrence est vraiment renforcée parce que certains de ces joueurs de grande envergure permettent aux consommateurs d'avoir accès à une gamme plus vaste de marchés.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Mais ils doivent passer par vous, n'est-ce pas? Autrement, comment feraient-ils?

M. Mark Ryland:

Non, ils peuvent y accéder par notre entremise ou celle de nos concurrents.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Mais les concurrents ne sont pas si nombreux, n'est-ce pas?

M. Mark Ryland:

Ils ne sont pas nombreux, mais la concurrence est féroce.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Il me semble un peu bizarre que vous ayez si peu de concurrents, même si la concurrence est féroce. Ce n'est pas ce que j'aurais normalement imaginé.

Et vous, monsieur Neuenschwander?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je ne m'y connais pas beaucoup en matière de législation, mais il semble très difficile de légiférer dans ce domaine. Je suppose que l'objectif d'une loi n'est pas de freiner l'innovation ni d'imposer une limite à ce que les entreprises peuvent faire, mais plutôt d'encourager les bons comportements.

Mme Jo Stevens:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Stevens.

Monsieur Saini, c'est maintenant à vous. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Raj Saini (Kitchener-Centre, Lib.):

Bonjour à tous.

Vous connaissez tous, j'en suis certain, l'expression « monopole de données ». Nous avons devant nous Apple, qui contrôle un logiciel populaire d'exploitation mobile. Nous avons Amazon, qui contrôle la plus importante plateforme commerciale en ligne. Nous avons également Microsoft, qui a la capacité d'acquérir une foule de données et de les utiliser pour s'imposer sur les marchés.

Au sujet de la concurrence, je veux aller plus loin que Mme Stevens. Si nous regardons du côté de l'Union européenne, nous voyons qu'Apple a violé les règles de l'UE relatives aux aides d'État lorsque l'Irlande lui a accordé des avantages fiscaux indus de 13 milliards d'euros. Dans certains cas, vous avez payé beaucoup moins d'impôts, ce qui vous donnait un avantage.

Dans le cas d'Amazon, la Commission européenne a jugé anti-concurrentielle la clause de la nation la plus favorisée des contrats d'Amazon et le Luxembourg a accordé à Amazon des avantages fiscaux illégaux d'une valeur d'environ 250 000 millions d'euros.

Mon intention n'est pas de vous mettre dans l'embarras, mais il y a manifestement un problème de concurrence. Ce problème est attribuable à l'existence d'une diversité de régimes ou de lois en matière de concurrence, que ce soit en Europe, à la FTC des États-Unis, ou au Canada. La loi européenne sur la concurrence prévoit l'imposition d'un droit spécial aux acteurs dominants du marché. La situation est différente aux États-Unis parce que les mêmes infractions n'ont pas été sanctionnées. Selon vous, est-ce une mesure qui devrait être envisagée, étant donné que vous êtes en position dominante sur le marché?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je le répète, je ne suis pas un expert en droit de la concurrence, mais je vous assure que nous nous conformons aux lois des pays et des régions où nous exerçons nos activités et que nous continuerons à le faire.

M. Raj Saini:

Si la Commission européenne a imposé une amende à Amazon, c'est donc que vous n'avez pas vraiment respecté la loi.

Ma question porte sur le droit spécial imposé en vertu de la loi européenne sur la concurrence aux entreprises en position dominante sur le marché. Selon vous, les États-Unis et le Canada devraient-ils faire la même chose?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je vais devoir vous revenir sur ce point. Je ne suis pas un expert en la matière. Je serai heureux de faire le suivi avec nos experts dans ce domaine.

M. Raj Saini:

Parfait.

Des commentaires du côté d'Apple?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je sais que l'affaire des aides publiques a fait beaucoup de bruit dans la presse, mais tout ce que je sais de cette affaire, je l'ai appris par les nouvelles. Je n'ai pas beaucoup lu sur le droit européen de la concurrence. Comme mon travail porte essentiellement sur la protection intégrée de la vie privée du point de vue technologique, je vais devoir demander à nos spécialistes de répondre à vos questions.

M. Raj Saini:

D'accord.

Amazon est probablement la librairie dominante sur le marché. Êtes-vous d'accord?

M. Mark Ryland:

Non, je ne suis pas d'accord.

M. Raj Saini:

Ah non? Qui occupe une place plus importante que vous?

M. Mark Ryland:

Le marché du livre est énorme et de nombreux acteurs vendent des livres, de Walmart à...

(1025)

M. Raj Saini:

Qui vend plus de livres que vous?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne connais pas la réponse, mais je serai heureux de faire une recherche pour vous.

M. Raj Saini:

D'accord.

L'une des méthodes que vous utilisez lorsque vous mettez des livres en vente — j'ai lu cela quelque part, corrigez-moi si je fais erreur —, c'est que vous approchez de petites librairies et leur imposez un droit appréciable pour inscrire leurs livres sur votre site. Vous ne payez pas les auteurs en fonction du nombre de copies numériques vendues, mais vous les payez en fonction du nombre de pages lues. Si le lecteur ne le lit pas le livre jusqu'au bout, vous empochez la différence. Vous enregistrez les préférences des lecteurs. S'ils lisent des auteurs populaires, vous n'offrez pas de rabais sur ces livres, parce que vous savez qu'ils les achèteront de toute façon.

Pensez-vous que cette pratique est équitable, ou est-ce que j'ai tout faux?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne connais pas les faits que vous évoquez, je ne peux donc pas répondre. Je serai heureux de vous revenir là-dessus.

M. Raj Saini:

D'accord.

Une dernière question. Laissons de côté l'animation un instant et imaginons qu'Amazon est un grand centre commercial. Vous en êtes le propriétaire. Vous louez des espaces aux détaillants. Vous leur donnez accès à votre plateforme. Vous contrôlez l'accès aux consommateurs et vous recueillez des données sur chaque site. Vous exploitez le plus grand centre commercial au monde.

Lorsque de petits commerçants connaissent un certain succès, vous avez tendance à utiliser cette information pour réduire la concurrence. Comme vous avez accès à toutes les tierces parties qui vendent des produits sur votre site, croyez-vous que ce soit une pratique équitable?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous n'utilisons pas les données que nous recueillons pour soutenir le marché de nos fournisseurs tiers. Nous n'utilisons pas ces données pour promouvoir nos propres ventes ou les produits que nous lançons en ligne.

M. Raj Saini:

Vous en êtes certain?

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui.

M. Raj Saini:

Vous dites que si quelqu'un annonce un produit sur votre site Web, vous ne faites pas le suivi des ventes de ce produit pour savoir s'il est populaire ou non.

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous recueillons les données pour soutenir l'entreprise et ses clients. Nous ne les utilisons pas pour nos propres activités de vente au détail.

M. Raj Saini:

Vous ne cherchez pas à savoir quel produit se vend bien ou lequel se vend moins bien et vous n'essayez pas de concurrencer l'entreprise d'aucune manière.

M. Mark Ryland:

Le volet de notre entreprise qui soutient ce vaste marché de fournisseurs tiers et qui a contribué au succès de milliers d'entreprises et de petits commerces dans le monde entier utilise certainement les données pour maximiser leur succès sur le marché. Nous ne les utilisons pas pour nos activités commerciales.

M. Raj Saini:

L'une des plaintes que nous entendons dans le domaine de l'innovation, c'est que certains acteurs dominent le marché parce qu'ils ont accès à des données et parce qu'ils peuvent les conserver et les utiliser. Dans bien des cas, les petites entreprises ou les joueurs de moindre importance n'ont pas accès aux données ni au marché. De surcroît, il arrive parfois, lorsque des entreprises émergentes ont le vent dans les voiles, que les grandes compagnies leur achètent leur technologie pour la détruire et empêcher ainsi l'entreprise de leur faire concurrence.

Est-ce là une pratique utilisée par Amazon, Apple ou Microsoft?

M. Mark Ryland:

Si vous regardez l'historique de nos acquisitions, vous constaterez que nous avons tendance à acquérir de très petites entreprises très ciblées. En gros, la réponse serait donc non.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

C'est la même réponse du côté d'Apple.

M. Raj Saini:

Je parle de toute technologie émergente, de toute entreprise émergente susceptible de faire concurrence à n'importe laquelle de vos plateformes. Vous ne faites pas cela, ou seulement...? Je ne comprends pas ce que vous voulez dire.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Les acquisitions dont je suis au courant visaient des entreprises comme AuthenTec, dont nous avons utilisé la technologie pour créer la première version de notre système Touch ID dans nos téléphones. Nous recherchons des innovations technologiques que nous pouvons intégrer à nos produits. Je ne pense pas que la technologie de lecture d'empreintes numériques de cette entreprise en faisait une concurrente directe d'Apple.

M. John Weigelt:

Nous travaillons activement avec les jeunes entreprises du monde entier. Des programmes comme BizSpark et Microsoft Ventures aident nos partenaires et les entreprises en démarrage à progresser et à vendre leur produit. Nous sommes un fournisseur de logiciels génériques; nous offrons une plateforme commune à partir de laquelle les entreprises du monde entier créent leurs innovations. Une plateforme de ce genre a été construite à Montréal, Privacy Analytics, c'est une jeune entreprise qui se spécialisait dans la technologie de confidentialité persistante appelée Perfect Forward Privacy. Nous n'avions pas cette technologie et nous avons pensé qu'elle pourrait servir de catalyseur pour nos activités. Nous avons donc fait l'acquisition de cette entreprise dans le but d'intégrer sa technologie à nos produits.

Nos décisions en matière de création ou d'acquisition s'appuient sur les ressources dont nous disposons; dans certains cas, nous avons fait l'acquisition d'innovations fantastiques que nous avons intégrées à nos produits. Voilà en quoi consiste notre stratégie d'acquisition.

M. Raj Saini:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Monsieur Saini, je vous remercie.

Le dernier intervenant sera M. Baylis.

Quand M. Baylis aura terminé, nous procéderons à une autre série de questions. Pour que les choses soient claires, nous recommencerons à poser des questions aux délégations en suivant l'ordre de la liste.

Monsieur Baylis, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie également nos témoins. Vous êtes tous deux très bien informés et disposés à répondre à nos questions, ce qui n'a pas été le cas hier. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Monsieur Davidson, dans vos observations préliminaires, vous avez dit que Google et Facebook doivent saisir l'occasion d'accroître leur transparence. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet?

(1030)

M. Alan Davidson:

Bien sûr.

Nous pensons que la transparence publicitaire est un précieux outil à envisager pour lutter contre la désinformation, surtout dans un contexte électoral. Nous avons collaboré avec certains autres acteurs de premier plan à l'élaboration du Code de bonnes pratiques contre la désinformation de l'UE, afin d'améliorer les outils de transparence qui permettront aux consommateurs d'avoir plus de discernement face aux annonces qu'ils voient, tout en aidant les chercheurs et les journalistes à comprendre comment se produisent des vastes campagnes de désinformation. À la Fondation Mozilla, nous avons quelqu'un qui travaille là-dessus. Notre grande source de frustration, pour être honnête, c'est qu'il est très difficile d'avoir accès aux archives publicitaires, même si certains de nos collègues se sont engagés à en faciliter l'accès.

Nous avons récemment fait une analyse. Les experts ont établi cinq critères distincts — par exemple, est-ce une donnée historique? Est-elle publique? Est-ce une information difficile à obtenir? Ce genre de choses.

Sur notre blogue, nous publions des billets indiquant, par exemple, que Facebook n'a respecté que deux des cinq critères, soit le nombre minimal établi par les experts pour garantir un accès raisonnable à une publicité archivée. Sans vouloir critiquer ces entreprises — nous l'avons déjà fait publiquement —, je dirais que nous espérons aller plus loin, parce que si la transparence n'est pas au rendez-vous, je pense que...

Google a obtenu une meilleure note. Elle a obtenu quatre sur cinq sur la fiche des experts, sans toutefois être plus transparente concernant les annonces publicitaires. Nous n'arrivons toujours pas à comprendre comment sont orchestrées les campagnes de désinformation.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez dit que ces entreprises ne sont pas disposées à s'autoréglementer et que, à votre avis, elles devraient être réglementées. Vous ai-je bien compris?

M. Alan Davidson:

Je voulais dire que si nous ne pouvons obtenir de meilleurs renseignements... La transparence est la première étape et elle peut être un outil vraiment puissant. Si nous arrivions à assurer la transparence et à mieux informer les gens sur la publicité partisane qu'ils voient, cela pourrait contribuer grandement à contrer ces campagnes de désinformation et la manipulation des élections. Si cette transparence n'est pas assurée, il serait alors plus raisonnable que les gouvernements interviennent et imposent plus de restrictions. Selon nous, c'est la deuxième meilleure solution, c'est certain. C'est ce que nous essayons de faire.

M. Frank Baylis:

Mon collègue M. Angus ou, si vous le permettez, Charlie, mon collègue aîné...

M. Charlie Angus:

Votre frère aîné.

M. Frank Baylis:

Mon grand frère Charlie a soutenu que certaines activités devraient nécessiter le consentement — vous avez parlé de consentement granulaire ou distinct — et que d'autres devraient être carrément interdites. Êtes-vous d'accord avec cette ligne de pensée?

M. Alan Davidson:

Nous avons dit que nous l'étions. Nous pensons qu'il est important de reconnaître que ces différents outils apportent de grands avantages aux utilisateurs, même dans des domaines comme la santé, les finances ou la localisation, nous voulons donc leur donner ces moyens. Si on parle des enfants ou de certaines informations du domaine de la santé, il faut probablement placer la barre très haut, voire interdire cette pratique.

M. Frank Baylis:

Mon jeune collègue, M. Erskine-Smith, a dit que certaines pratiques fondées sur l'âge... Par exemple, nous interdisons aux personnes d'un certain âge de conduire et nous interdisons la consommation d'alcool sous un certain âge. Les témoins ont-ils des idées sur cette possibilité d'interdire carrément la collecte de certaines données, qu'elles soient ou non liées à l'âge, ou d'autres types de données? Avez-vous des commentaires à faire à ce sujet?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Dans mes réponses précédentes, j'ai expliqué que nous cherchions à laisser les données sur l'appareil de l'utilisateur et sous son contrôle. Je ferais une distinction entre les données recueillies par une entreprise et celles recueillies par un appareil sous le contrôle de l'utilisateur. Dans la mesure du possible, nous voulons laisser les utilisateurs contrôler leurs données, par consentement explicite, et les laisser dans leur appareil.

M. Frank Baylis:

Si l'information est recueillie, mais qu'elle n'est pas utilisée ou vue par une entreprise comme la vôtre... Si l'entreprise l’a recueillie et simplement conservée et que j'ai ensuite le choix de la supprimer ou non, vous estimez que c'est différent d'une collecte destinée à une utilisation ailleurs. C'est bien ce que vous dites?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je crois effectivement que la collecte effectuée par une entreprise est différente de la collecte effectuée sur l’appareil de l’utilisateur. À la limite, je n'emploierais pas le mot « collecte ». On devrait peut-être dire « stockage » ou quelque chose de ce genre.

M. John Weigelt:

Je prends mon temps pour répondre à cette question parce que je réfléchis aux différentes situations possibles. J’essaie de me mettre à la place d'un parent et je me demande comment j'utiliserais ces outils. Je suis convaincu que cela dépend du contexte dans lequel s'inscrit cette interaction. Un environnement médical sera radicalement différent d’un environnement de divertissement en ligne.

La gestion des données dépend énormément du contexte, qu'il s'agisse des garanties de protection ou même de l’interdiction de recueillir ces données.

M. Frank Baylis:

Est-ce que j'ai le temps de poser une autre question, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Si vous faites vite, oui; vous avez 30 secondes.

M. Frank Baylis:

Parlons de l'infonuagique. On dirait un beau nuage, mais ce n'est pas là que cela se passe. Il y a un serveur physique quelque part. C’est de cela qu'il est question. Oublions le nuage; c’est un serveur physique. Les lois applicables dépendent de l’endroit où se trouve le serveur.

On parle d’Apple, de Microsoft ou d’Amazon — et Amazon, c’est une grande partie de vos activités. Si nous, législateurs canadiens, adoptons une série de lois protégeant le Canada, mais que le serveur se trouve à l’étranger, nos lois n’auront aucun effet.

Est-ce que vous prenez des mesures pour vous aligner sur les lois gouvernementales en veillant à ce que ces serveurs se trouvent dans les limites territoriales du pays qui les réglemente?

(1035)

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous avons des centres de données dans de nombreux pays, y compris au Canada. Il y a un contrôle juridique, mais nous devons respecter les lois de tous les pays où nous fonctionnons. Ces lois peuvent aussi avoir une incidence extraterritoriale.

M. John Weigelt:

Nous avons créé des centres de données dans 54 régions du monde et nous en avons installé ici au Canada, à Toronto et à Québec. Il se trouve que j’ai la responsabilité de veiller à ce qu’ils respectent les lois et règlements canadiens, qu’il s’agisse des normes du Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières ou des lois fédérales ou provinciales sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Nous accordons la plus grande importance au respect du cadre juridique local. Nous traitons les données stockées dans ces centres de données comme des documents imprimés. Nous voulons que les lois fassent en sorte que ces renseignements électroniques soient traités comme des documents imprimés.

Nous sommes d’ardents défenseurs de la CLOUD Act, qui permet de clarifier les conflits de lois qui posent des problèmes aux entreprises multinationales comme la nôtre. Nous respectons les lois régionales, mais elles sont parfois contradictoires. Avec la CLOUD Act, on espère créer une plateforme commune pour comprendre les traités d’entraide juridique ou pour y donner suite — car nous savons tous que l'application des traités d’entraide juridique est plutôt lente et que ces traités s'appuient sur des documents imprimés —, qui fournira de nouveaux instruments juridiques pour donner aux gouvernements la garantie que les renseignements de leurs résidants sont protégés de la même façon qu’ils le seraient dans des centres de données locaux.

Le président:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur Baylis.

On n'en a pas encore parlé, et c’est pourquoi je vais poser la question.

Nous sommes ici à cause d’un scandale appelé Cambridge Analytica et d’une entreprise de médias sociaux appelée Facebook. Nous voulions vous différencier. Vous n’êtes pas dans les médias sociaux; les médias sociaux étaient représentés ici hier. Vous vous occupez de mégadonnées, etc.

J’ai un commentaire qui concerne plus précisément Apple. C’est pourquoi nous voulions que Tim Cook soit ici. Il a fait des observations très intéressantes. Je vais lire exactement ce qu’il a dit: Il y a d'abord le droit d'avoir des données personnelles réduites au minimum. Les entreprises devraient se faire un devoir de supprimer les renseignements signalétiques dans les données sur les clients ou d’éviter de les recueillir. Il y a ensuite le droit de savoir — c'est-à-dire de savoir quelles données sont recueillies et pourquoi. En troisième lieu, il y a le droit d’accès. Les entreprises devraient faire en sorte qu'il soit facile pour vous de consulter, de corriger et de supprimer vos données personnelles. Enfin, il y a le droit à la protection des données, sans quoi la confiance est impossible.

C’est une déclaration très forte. Dans la perspective d'Apple — et je poserai aussi la question à Mozilla —, que feriez-vous pour régler le problème de Facebook?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je ne suis même pas sûr de comprendre suffisamment tous les aspects du problème de Facebook pour pouvoir le régler.

Mais je sais qu'on peut se concentrer sur deux moyens. J’accorde toujours la priorité aux solutions technologiques. Ce que nous voulons, c’est placer l’utilisateur au contrôle des données et de l’accès aux données sur son appareil. Nous avons pris l’initiative, dans le cadre de notre plateforme, de dresser la barrière du système d’exploitation entre les applications et les données de l’utilisateur et d’exiger le consentement de l’utilisateur, par la médiation du système d’exploitation, entre ces applications et ses données. C’est un ensemble de mesures que nous avons fait évoluer au fil du temps.

On vous a dit aussi aujourd’hui qu'il fallait également songer à la convivialité, et c'est pourquoi nous essayons de garder les choses claires et simples pour les utilisateurs. Ce faisant, nous avons apporté à notre plateforme technologique des améliorations qui nous permettent d’élargir cet ensemble de données que le système d’exploitation... Je rappelle que c’est distinct d’Apple, distinct de l'entreprise. Le système d’exploitation peut prendre de l'avance et permettre à l’utilisateur de contrôler cet accès.

C’est un processus auquel nous resterons fidèles.

Le président:

À mon avis, il est très difficile de modifier la loi à cet égard, étant donné tous les paramètres qui entrent en ligne compte. Ce serait peut-être plus simple pour quelqu’un comme Tim Cook et dans le cadre d'une idéologie qui considère que les utilisateurs sont primordiaux. Il serait peut-être plus simple pour Apple de s'en charger que pour les législateurs du monde entier d’essayer de régler cette question. Nous faisons cependant tout notre possible. Nous essayons vraiment.

Monsieur Davidson, est-ce que vous avez quelque chose à dire sur la façon de régler le problème de Facebook?

(1040)

M. Alan Davidson:

Vu de l'extérieur, il est très difficile d'imaginer comment régler le problème d'une autre entreprise. À mon avis, nous sommes nombreux à être déçus des choix qu’elle a faits et qui ont suscité l’inquiétude de beaucoup de gens et de nombreux organismes de réglementation.

Notre espoir est qu'elle garantisse la protection de la vie privée et permette aux utilisateurs d'exercer plus de contrôle. C’est un point de départ extrêmement important.

Si je devais dire quelque chose à mes collègues, je les inviterais à réfléchir un peu moins à court terme au sujet des moyens de répondre à certaines de ces préoccupations. Je pense qu’ils ont beaucoup d’outils à leur disposition pour donner aux gens beaucoup plus de contrôle sur leurs renseignements personnels.

À l’heure actuelle, les organismes de réglementation disposent de nombreux outils pour bien encadrer ce que les entreprises peuvent se permettre ou non. Malheureusement, quand les gens ne respectent pas de bonnes pratiques en matière de protection de la vie privée, ils donnent le mauvais exemple.

Nous pouvons tous faire quelque chose. C’est pourquoi nous avons intégré l'extension Facebook Container dans nos outils de suivi: pour essayer de donner plus de contrôle aux gens.

Le président:

Merci de votre réponse.

Il y a encore des questions. Nous allons commencer par mon coprésident, puis nous suivrons l'ordre habituel. Vous aurez du temps. Ne vous inquiétez pas.

Commençons par M. Collins.

M. Damian Collins:

Merci.

Je vais m'adresser d'abord à M. Ryland et à Amazon.

Pour faire suite aux commentaires du président au sujet de Facebook, si je relie mon compte Amazon à Facebook, quelles sont les données qui sont partagées entre les deux plateformes?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne sais pas comment on relie un compte Facebook à Amazon. Je sais qu’Amazon peut servir de service de connexion vers d’autres sites Web, mais Facebook n’en fait pas partie. Je ne connais aucun autre modèle de connexion.

M. Damian Collins:

Vous dites qu'on ne peut pas le faire. On ne peut pas connecter un compte Facebook et un compte Amazon.

M. Mark Ryland:

Pas à ma connaissance. Je ferai un suivi pour m’en assurer.

M. Damian Collins:

Il y a eu le Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee à Londres, que j’ai présidé avec mes collègues ici présents. En décembre dernier, nous avons publié des documents concernant l’affaire Six4Three.

Au même moment, une enquête du New York Times donnait à penser qu’un certain nombre de grandes entreprises avaient conclu avec Facebook des accords spéciaux de réciprocité leur permettant d'avoir accès aux données de leurs utilisateurs sur Facebook et à celles de leurs amis. Amazon figurait parmi ces entreprises.

Pourriez-vous nous dire quel genre de protocoles d'entente vous avez avec Facebook et si cela vous donne accès non seulement aux données de vos clients ou des titulaires de comptes Facebook, mais aussi à celles de leurs amis?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je vais devoir vous revenir à ce sujet. Je ne sais pas du tout.

M. Damian Collins:

Cet article du New York Times a fait des vagues l’année dernière. Je suis étonné qu’on ne vous en ait pas parlé.

Je vais poser la même question à Microsoft également.

On peut se connecter à Skype à partir de son compte Facebook. Je vous le demande également: si on relie son compte Skype et son compte Facebook, quelles sont les données qui sont partagées entre les deux?

M. John Weigelt:

Si je comprends bien, il s’agit d’une connexion simplifiée à votre compte Skype à partir de Facebook. Quand on se connecte, une fenêtre contextuelle devrait s'ouvrir pour donner une idée de ce que Facebook fournit à l’environnement Skype.

C’est un modèle de connexion simplifié.

M. Damian Collins:

Quelles sont les données qui sont partagées entre les comptes? Pour les utilisateurs qui utilisent ce moyen, quelles sont les données d'utilisation de Skype qui sont communiquées à Facebook?

M. John Weigelt:

C’est simplement une connexion.

M. Damian Collins:

Oui, mais toutes ces connexions sur Facebook comportent également des accords de réciprocité. La question est de savoir si...

M. John Weigelt:

C’est seulement une façon simplifiée de partager une preuve d’identité, si on veut, et c'est ce qui vous permet de vous connecter à Skype.

M. Damian Collins:

Je sais comment fonctionne la connexion de base, mais ces dispositions de connexion à partir de Facebook donnent un accès réciproque aux données des deux. C'est effectivement une connexion.

M. John Weigelt:

Ce n’est rien qui n’aurait pas été divulgué dans le cadre de la connexion initiale; donc, quand vous vous connectez, quand vous utilisez cette passerelle, une fenêtre contextuelle indique les données qui interagissent ou sont échangées.

M. Damian Collins:

Et puis c'est dans les conditions et modalités.

M. John Weigelt:

C’est dans la fenêtre contextuelle par laquelle vous devez passer. C’est une modalité simplifiée et, si j’ai bien compris; c’est un avis à plusieurs niveaux. On vous donne un aperçu de la catégorie de données; puis, en cliquant dessus, vous pouvez aller plus loin pour voir de quoi il s’agit.

M. Damian Collins:

En termes simples, est-ce que Facebook saurait avec qui j’ai communiqué sur Skype?

M. John Weigelt:

Je ne crois pas, mais je vais devoir vous revenir à ce sujet. Mais, vraiment, je ne crois pas.

M. Damian Collins:

D’accord.

Je voudrais revenir à Amazon. Rapidement.

Voici comment Amazon.com prévoit la connexion entre un compte Facebook et un compte Amazon: Aller dans réglages, sélectionner son compte, puis choisir la fonction de connexion aux réseaux sociaux. Sélectionner ensuite son compte Facebook. Fournir ses données de connexion et cliquer sur Se connecter.

C’est une façon très simple de connecter son compte Facebook à son compte Amazon. Je vais donc vous reposer la question: quand on fait cela, quelles sont les données qui sont partagées entre les deux plateformes?

(1045)

M. Mark Ryland:

Je vais devoir vous revenir à ce sujet. Je ne sais pas du tout.

M. Damian Collins:

Je vois. C'est pourtant assez élémentaire. Ce qui m’inquiète, c’est que des données soient partagées entre les deux plateformes.

Je rappelle que l’enquête du New York Times a révélé l'existence d'accords de réciprocité préférentiels entre Amazon et Facebook, entre Microsoft et Facebook, pour que ces entreprises aient accès non seulement aux données de leurs utilisateurs sur Facebook, mais aussi à celles de leurs amis, alors que ce réglage avait été éliminé d’autres applications. Il reste que les principaux partenaires de Facebook ont un accès préférentiel compte tenu de l’argent qu’ils dépensent ensemble ou de la valeur des données.

Je voudrais savoir, encore une fois, si Amazon ou Microsoft peut nous parler de la nature des données, de ce qu’elles englobent, et si ces arrangements sont toujours en vigueur.

M. John Weigelt:

Je ne peux rien dire de...

M. Damian Collins:

Je ne sais pas si cela veut dire que vous ne savez pas ou que vous ne savez pas quoi dire. Quoi qu’il en soit, si vous pouviez nous écrire, nous vous en serions reconnaissants.

M. Mark Ryland:

D'accord.

M. John Weigelt:

Sans faute.

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous ferons un suivi.

Le président:

Passons à M. Erskine-Smith. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Je voudrais d’abord parler d'éthique et d’intelligence artificielle. Le Comité a entrepris une étude à ce sujet, et le gouvernement du Canada exige désormais des évaluations algorithmiques d'impact sur les ministères quand ceux-ci emploient un algorithme pour la première fois, à titre d'évaluation du risque dans l’intérêt public. D'après vous, est-ce qu'on devrait l'exiger des grandes entreprises de mégadonnées du secteur public comme la vôtre?

Je vais commencer par Amazon, puis je ferai le tour de la table.

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous faisons le maximum pour garantir l'impartialité des algorithmes, et c’est l’un de nos principes fondamentaux. Nous avons des ensembles de données d’essai pour veiller à toujours respecter la norme à cet égard.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Selon vous, est-ce qu'il devrait y avoir transparence pour le public afin de garantir une reddition des comptes suffisante concernant les algorithmes que vous appliquez à ces trésors considérables de données et de renseignements personnels?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je pense que le marché arrive très bien à faire en sorte que les entreprises se dotent de bonnes normes à cet égard.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Voyez-vous, ce qui est frustrant, c’est que vous avez dit être d’accord avec les principes du RGPD, et le droit à l'explication des algorithmes est justement un principe du RGPD.

Apple, qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Dans le modèle d’apprentissage machine que nous employons, nous voulons effectivement que les utilisateurs comprennent que nous le faisons principalement en le plaçant sur leurs appareils et en le développant à partir de leurs données. Quand nous développons des modèles généralisés, nous nous appuyons sur des ensembles de données publiques. Nous ne le faisons surtout pas à partir de données personnelles.

Si l'apprentissage machine se fait à partir de données personnelles, nous tenons absolument à ce que le processus puisse être expliqué aux utilisateurs et que ceux-ci puissent le comprendre.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous croyez donc à cette transparence publique.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Nous croyons en la transparence à bien des égards.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Microsoft, quel est votre avis?

M. John Weigelt:

Nous participons et nous contribuons au travail qui se fait ici, au Canada, et notamment au règlement des difficultés liées aux définitions. Dans le cas des systèmes d’intervention artificielle à grande échelle, il faut pouvoir expliquer à l’utilisateur ce qui se passe dans les coulisses.

C’est un sujet très controversé, un large domaine de recherche sur le droit à l’explication, sur la généralisabilité et sur la façon dont nous examinons les résultats.

D'après la documentation actuelle, tout se passe pour ainsi dire comme si l'évaluation des risques algorithmiques et un avis au public étaient obligatoires à partir du moment où on a la localisation du site Web — par exemple, si je viens du Québec et que je présente un site Web en français pour cette raison.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous vous inquiétez de la définition, mais vous êtes d'accord sur le principe.

M. John Weigelt:

Nous sommes d’accord sur le principe et nous félicitons le gouvernement du Canada d’avoir mis cela en place dès maintenant; d’autres devraient envisager des possibilités semblables.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Notamment le secteur privé et Microsoft.

Concernant la réglementation de la concurrence, j’ai lu hier une citation de l’organisme de réglementation allemand, qui souligne la position dominante de Facebook sur le marché et estime que « le seul choix donné à l’utilisateur est d’accepter de fournir une combinaison complète de données ou de s’abstenir d’utiliser le réseau social. En tout état de cause, on ne peut pas parler de consentement volontaire ».

Est-ce que le même principe s’applique à vos entreprises?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous faisons face à une concurrence féroce sur les marchés où nous exploitons. Dans le domaine de l’infonuagique, par exemple, notre principal concurrent est l’ancien modèle d'exploitation des entreprises informatiques, et il y a un vaste éventail de concurrents.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je vois. Changeons un peu de sujet. Est-ce qu'on devrait tenir compte de l’incidence sur la vie privée des consommateurs dans la réglementation de la concurrence?

M. Mark Ryland:

C’est un domaine qui n’est pas non plus de mon ressort. Je déteste donner cette réponse.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Dommage, parce que j’avais précisé à Amazon que nous discuterions justement de concurrence aujourd’hui.

Je pose la question aux autres entreprises: pensez-vous qu'on devrait tenir compte de l’incidence sur la vie privée des consommateurs dans la réglementation de la concurrence?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Vous laissez entendre qu’on exige, du moins dans certains cas, un consentement unique, du genre tout ou rien, et nous le savons très bien. Nous proposons, en fait, un consentement très nuancé et détaillé. Il est possible d’utiliser un appareil Apple sans s'inscrire ni créer de compte Apple. Nous essayons donc de différencier et de séparer ces choses.

(1050)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je vois.

Est-ce que Microsoft a un point de vue sur cette question?

M. John Weigelt:

C'est une question de données et plus particulièrement de protection et d'utilisation des données. Je crois que nous devons examiner l'utilisation des données de façon plus générale. À ce chapitre, des fiches de données pourraient être utiles puisque, selon moi, la protection des renseignements personnels est une question de sécurité et d'accessibilité des données.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

J'ai hâte de savoir ce que l'avocat général associé aura à dire demain au forum des données du commissaire à la concurrence.

J'ai une autre question au sujet du droit de la concurrence.

Dans les années 1990, Explorer était gratuit, et pourtant, on a empêché Microsoft d'être en situation de monopole avec son navigateur. Il ne s'agissait pas de protéger les consommateurs contre une hausse des prix. Il s'agissait de protéger l'innovation.

Je vais lancer quelques flèches en direction d'Amazon. Tout à l'heure, vous avez dit que les renseignements que je verse dans Alexa font partie de mon profil d'utilisateur. J'en déduis que ce que je regarde sur Prime, ce que j'achète de n'importe quel vendeur et ce que je recherche sur Amazon ou ailleurs sur Internet, tout cela est agrégé en un profil unique aux fins des publicités ciblées, je présume.

J'aimerais aussi savoir si mon profil d'utilisateur, combiné au profil des autres utilisateurs, oriente vos décisions en matière de nouveaux produits. Est-ce une question légitime?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous examinons les tendances, les achats et le comportement de nos clients pour déterminer quels seront les prochains...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Au contraire, en réponse aux questions de M. Saini, vous avez dit ne pas faire le pistage en ligne des renseignements des vendeurs tiers sur vos sites Web. Si l'on regarde les choses sous un autre angle, on constate que vous faites le pistage de toutes les décisions d'achat individuelles sur Amazon et que vous combinez ces données pour faire concurrence aux vendeurs tiers sur votre plateforme de commerce. N'exploitez-vous pas ainsi votre position hégémonique?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je pense que le fait que le marché des vendeurs tiers est si prospère — on y retrouve un très grand nombre d'entreprises prospères — montre très clairement que ce n'est pas un problème.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous n'estimez pas détenir un avantage indu sur le marché.

M. Mark Ryland:

Non.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Ma dernière question a été soulevée par...

Le président:

Faites vite, je vous prie. Nous essayons de donner la parole à tout le monde.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

En ce qui concerne la monétisation des données personnelles, comme je l'ai dit hier aux experts, le problème tient au modèle d'affaires. Cette proposition a été formulée par un certain nombre de personnes. Je crois que Tim Cook d'Apple a fait valoir le même argument en ce qui a trait au complexe industriel de données.

J'aimerais que les témoins de Microsoft et d'Amazon me disent s'ils pensent que le modèle d'affaires est problématique en soi. Vous voulez recueillir de plus en plus de renseignements à notre sujet. Quelle est l'utilité, pour nous, de cette collecte massive de renseignements à notre sujet? Le modèle d'affaires pose-t-il problème?

M. John Weigelt:

Je tiens à préciser que les renseignements que nous recueillons ne concernent que les produits. Nous ne cherchons pas à personnaliser les choses pour cibler une personne en particulier.

Lorsque nous nous rendons compte que les gens n'utilisent pas une fonctionnalité, grosso modo, nous faisons usage de l'anonymat et du pseudonymat; c'est une excellente fonctionnalité. Nous essayons de faire ressortir cette fonctionnalité dans les versions subséquentes. C'est simplement pour nous aider à améliorer notre entreprise. Nous sommes une société de logiciels et de services. C'est notre secteur d'activité.

M. Mark Ryland:

Notre modèle d'affaires est tout à fait conforme à la protection de la vie privée des consommateurs, car il s'agit de respecter les choix de ceux-ci grâce à un modèle traditionnel d'achat et de vente de ressources et de produits et de services.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Angus. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci beaucoup.

Diapers.com était une entreprise en ligne qui vendait des couches dans ce « marché concurrentiel » dont parle Amazon. Jeff Bezos voulait l'acheter. L'entreprise a refusé l'offre, alors Amazon a fixé des prix d'éviction. Amazon perdait 100 millions de dollars en couches tous les trois mois, et ce, afin de pousser un concurrent à la vente ou à la faillite. Finalement, Diapers.com a accepté l'offre. On craignait qu'Amazon ne baisse les prix encore plus.

Nous parlons d'antitrust en raison de ce qu'on appelle, dans The Economist, la « zone de destruction » de l'innovation. Or, dans le cas d'Amazon, il s'agit d'une zone de destruction de la concurrence fondée sur le pouvoir que vous avez, sur toutes vos plateformes, de baisser les prix et de pousser les gens à la faillite. Selon Shaoul Sussman, les pratiques de prix d'éviction d'Amazon relèvent de l'antitrust et réclament une mesure législative.

Que répondez-vous à cela?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je me dois de répéter que je ne suis pas un expert en droit de la concurrence et que je ne connais pas l'historique ou les détails de certains éléments dont vous faites mention.

Dans notre secteur d'activité en général, nous constatons une forte concurrence entre toutes ces entreprises. Il y a beaucoup d'entreprises en démarrage et un grand nombre de concurrents qui utilisent notre plateforme Amazon Web Services — soit AWS. Certaines des plus grandes plateformes de commerce en ligne en Allemagne et en Amérique latine, par exemple, nous font confiance et utilisent AWS. Nous pensons donc que la concurrence fonctionne bien.

M. Charlie Angus:

Oui, vous avez tous ces gens qui utilisent vos services infonuagiques, puis vous pouvez baisser les prix dans une attaque contre les petites entreprises familiales. Lena Kahn, de Open Markets, dit que, étant donné que vous dominez le marché dans un si grand nombre de secteurs, vous pouvez utiliser les profits que vous tirez des services infonuagiques pour imposer des prix d'éviction et réduire la concurrence. Elle dit que la « structure et la conduite [de votre entreprise] soulèvent des préoccupations d'ordre anticoncurrentiel, et pourtant, [la société] échappe au contrôle antitrust ».

Les législateurs doivent se pencher sur cette question, selon moi. Nous constatons que, au Canada, vous jouissez de l'avantage de ne pas payer des impôts au même titre que nos entreprises les plus pauvres. Au Royaume-Uni, vous avez gagné 3,35 milliards de livres et vous n'avez payé que 1,8 million de livres sur des revenus imposables. Si vous obtenez ce genre de traitement, on peut dire que vous êtes le plus grand assisté social de la terre entière.

Aux États-Unis, les choses vont encore plus rondement. Vous avez réalisé des profits de 11 milliards de dollars et vous avez obtenu un remboursement de 129 millions de dollars. De fait, vous avez eu droit à un taux d'imposition négatif de 1 %. Voilà un avantage extraordinaire. Quelle entreprise ou quel particulier ne voudrait obtenir un remboursement au lieu de payer des impôts?

Comment justifier l'existence d'un marché où Amazon peut couper l'herbe sous le pied de n'importe quel concurrent ou éditeur de livres sans même payer sa juste part d'impôts? Ne croyez-vous pas qu'il nous incombe de vous rappeler à l'ordre et de veiller à ce que le marché soit gouverné par des règles équitables?

(1055)

M. Mark Ryland:

Mes excuses. Comme je vous l'ai déjà dit, je ne suis pas un expert en droit de la concurrence. La discussion devait porter sur la sécurité, la protection des consommateurs et la protection de la vie privée, un domaine dans lequel j'ai une certaine expertise. Je ne suis pas en mesure de répondre à vos questions sur les sujets dont vous parlez.

M. Charlie Angus:

Oui, c'est malheureux. C'est pourquoi le président du Comité a demandé que nous invitions des gens qui soient à même de répondre aux questions, parce que ce sont là les questions qui, pour nous, les législateurs, exigent des réponses. Nous sommes dans une nouvelle ère et en raison de Facebook, nous nous trouvons dans la situation actuelle. Si les pratiques d'entreprise de Facebook étaient meilleures, nous ne serions peut-être pas tenus de nous pencher là-dessus. Or, nous y sommes tenus. Si Amazon ne se livrait pas à de telles pratiques anticoncurrentielles, nous pourrions penser que le libre marché fonctionne parfaitement, mais ce n'est pas le cas actuellement, et vous n'arrivez pas à nous donner des réponses.

Voilà qui nous place dans une situation difficile. À titre de législateurs, nous demandons des réponses. Qu'est-ce qu'un taux d'imposition équitable? Comment assurer la concurrence sur le marché? Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer qu'il n'y a pas de pratique de prix d'éviction acculant les entreprises — nos entreprises — à la faillite en raison de votre hégémonie sur le marché? Pourtant, vous n'arrivez pas à répondre à nos questions. Tout cela nous laisse très perplexes. Devrions-nous demander l'aide d'Alexa ou de Siri?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Mark Ryland:

Je m'excuse, mais je n'ai pas l'expertise nécessaire pour répondre à ces questions.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci.

Le président:

J'aimerais revenir sur ce qu'a dit M. Angus. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons demandé à M. Bezos de venir. Il peut répondre à ce genre de questions devant notre grand Comité. C'est lui qui aurait été à même de répondre à toutes nos questions. Nous n'aurions exclu aucun témoin du Comité, mais nous voulions entendre des gens capables de nous donner des réponses complètes au sujet de l'ensemble du dossier.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Lucas, du Royaume-Uni.

M. Ian Lucas:

Monsieur Weigelt, puis-je revenir à la question du transfert de données au sein de Microsoft? Vous avez dit que Microsoft avait acquis un certain nombre d'entreprises, dont LinkedIn. Pouvez-vous apporter des éclaircissements? Si je confie des renseignements à LinkedIn, ceux-ci sont-ils ensuite communiqués à d'autres entreprises au sein de Microsoft?

M. John Weigelt:

Pas du tout. LinkedIn conserve une certaine indépendance par rapport à la société Microsoft.

M. Ian Lucas:

Vous dites donc que l'information recueillie par LinkedIn est isolée et qu'elle n'est pas communiquée au sein de la société Microsoft.

M. John Weigelt:

Tout transfert de... Excusez-moi. Permettez-moi de revenir en arrière. Toute connexion entre votre profil LinkedIn et, par exemple, votre suite Office est effectuée par vous-même, l'utilisateur. C'est une connexion qui est établie sciemment. Par exemple, vous pouvez choisir de tirer parti d'une connexion à LinkedIn dans vos clients de messagerie. Alors, l'utilisateur accomplit une action dans son profil LinkedIn. C'est sa suite Office...

M. Ian Lucas:

Ce qui m'intéresse, c'est le fonctionnement par défaut. Si je m'inscris à LinkedIn, j'omets de lire les modalités d'utilisation et je donne des renseignements, est-il possible que ceux-ci soient transférés vers d'autres entreprises de la famille Microsoft, pour reprendre votre appellation?

M. John Weigelt:

LinkedIn ne partage pas de tels renseignements à l'échelle de l'entreprise à partir du système informatique dorsal.

M. Ian Lucas:

En règle générale, les renseignements sont-ils transférés à travers les différentes entreprises faisant partie de la société Microsoft?

M. John Weigelt:

En règle générale, chaque secteur d'activité est indépendant.

(1100)

M. Ian Lucas:

Y a-t-il un transfert d'informations entre les différentes entreprises?

M. John Weigelt:

Les renseignements personnels sont conservés dans chaque secteur d'activité.

M. Ian Lucas:

Je viens de poser une question très précise. La politique de la société Microsoft permet-elle le transfert de données personnelles entre les différentes entreprises appartenant à Microsoft?

M. John Weigelt:

C'est une question d'usage compatible...

M. Ian Lucas:

Pouvez-vous répondre par un oui ou par un non?

M. John Weigelt:

C'est une question d'usage compatible, n'est-ce pas? Donc, nous, à titre de...

M. Ian Lucas:

La réponse à cette question est soit oui, soit non.

M. John Weigelt:

Je dois répondre que je ne peux ni affirmer ni nier qu'il y ait... Je ne suis pas au courant.

M. Ian Lucas:

Bon, d'accord. Voilà qui ne nous avance pas beaucoup.

Pourriez-vous me revenir là-dessus?

M. John Weigelt:

Certainement.

M. Ian Lucas:

Merci.

Monsieur Neuenschwander, j'ai devant moi deux appareils Apple très impressionnants, quoique mes collègues technophiles me disent que mon iPhone est complètement dépassé.

Le problème, c'est que bien souvent, les gens accèdent à Facebook, par exemple, au moyen d'un appareil Apple. Vous avez dit qu'une grande quantité de renseignements se retrouvent dans le téléphone ou dans l'iPad d'Apple. Vous avez aussi dit que ces renseignements ne sont pas transférés ailleurs et qu'il ne vous appartient pas de les transférer. Je n'accepte pas vraiment cet argument, parce que les gens ont accès à d'autres plateformes au moyen de vos appareils.

Votre entreprise est l'une des plus grandes sociétés du monde. Vous pouvez choisir avez qui vous faites affaire. Pourquoi permettre aux entreprises qui ne partagent pas votre approche en matière de protection de la vie privée d'utiliser votre matériel pour faire des affaires?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je ne sais pas si les entreprises sont d'accord ou non avec notre approche. Je pense que nous encouragerions... Nous essayons de donner l'exemple dans notre approche en matière de protection de la vie privée.

Comme je l'ai dit, l'objectif de mon équipe est, je crois, de mettre les renseignements sur l'appareil, mais je pense que nous avons une responsabilité à l'égard du déplacement de ces renseignements. C'est pourquoi nous avons pris des mesures pour que notre système d'exploitation s'interpose entre les applications et certaines données présentes sur l'appareil.

Il y a des données présentes sur l'appareil que nous n'avons jamais rendues accessibles. Il en restera ainsi, je crois. Par exemple, le numéro de téléphone de l'utilisateur ou les identificateurs du matériel qui pourraient être utilisés pour le pistage n'ont jamais été rendus accessibles sur notre plateforme.

Il s'agit d'un concept technologique du type « vase clos », selon lequel chaque application est séparée à la fois des autres applications et des données présentes dans le système d'exploitation.

M. Ian Lucas:

Là où je veux en venir, c'est que vous établissez les principes. Le président les a énoncés. C'est vraiment complexe et difficile pour nous de légiférer sur ces questions. Nous nous en rendons tous compte.

Vous pouvez décider si vous faites affaire avec Facebook. Si vous le vouliez, vous pourriez refuser à Facebook l'accès à votre matériel en cas de non-respect des principes. Facebook a causé beaucoup de tort à votre secteur. Pourquoi continuez-vous de faire affaire avec cette entreprise?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Si vous parlez de la disponibilité de l'application sur l'App Store, je crois qu'il y a deux...

M. Ian Lucas:

On ne peut nier qu'énormément de gens accèdent à Facebook au moyen de vos appareils.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

D'accord. D'un côté, supposons que l'application Facebook ne soit pas offerte. Facebook a un site Web auquel les gens pourraient toujours avoir accès au moyen de notre navigateur ou d'un navigateur concurrent.

Si nous allons plus loin et disons que nous devrions commencer à imposer ce que j'appellerais...

M. Ian Lucas:

Il ne s'agit pas d'imposer quelque chose. C'est une question d'accord. Si vous croyez en vos principes et si vous êtes une entreprise éthique, vous devriez faire affaire avec des gens qui respectent vos principes. Vous avez le pouvoir de faire cela.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Ce qui est en mon pouvoir, je suppose, ce sont les mesures techniques. Mon approche consiste à dire que toute application ou tout service passant par le téléphone devrait comprendre des mesures techniques permettant à l'utilisateur de garder la maîtrise de ses données.

M. Ian Lucas:

Vous pourriez décider de ne pas faire affaire avec Facebook. Vous pourriez établir vos propres principes et les appliquer en choisissant avec qui vous faites affaire. Pourquoi ne faites-vous pas cela?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Si vous parlez de la disponibilité de Facebook sur l'App Store, le retrait de cette application n'aurait pas une incidence mesurable sur la protection de la vie privée.

M. Ian Lucas:

Vraiment?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je pense que les utilisateurs...

M. Ian Lucas:

Vous feriez les manchettes, ne croyez-vous pas?

(1105)

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Bien sûr, nous ferions les manchettes. Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je ne crois pas que les manchettes aient nécessairement une incidence sur la protection de la vie privée. Je pense que les utilisateurs...

M. Ian Lucas:

Ne pensez-vous pas que cela aurait une incidence importante sur l'approche adoptée par Facebook?

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Comme vous l'avez souligné, Facebook est un service extrêmement populaire. Les utilisateurs se tourneraient vers les technologies Web pour trouver d'autres façons de continuer à accéder à Facebook. Personnellement, je ne vois pas comment Apple pourrait... ou comment je pourrais, par respect pour la vie privée d'une personne...

M. Ian Lucas:

Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que vous vous présentez comme les bons tout en facilitant les choses pour les méchants par l'entremise de votre matériel.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Au fil des ans, nous avons adopté de nombreuses mesures pour établir des limitations et pour en faire plus que toute autre plateforme en matière de protection de la vie privée et de maîtrise des utilisateurs sur les données présentes sur nos appareils. C'est précisément grâce à l'intégration de notre matériel informatique que nous avons pu prendre tant de mesures positives et proactives pour encourager la minimisation des données et pour permettre aux utilisateurs d'avoir une maîtrise sur leurs données.

M. Ian Lucas:

Cependant, vous voulez tout de même faire affaire avec les méchants.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Lucas. Nous devons poursuivre.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Naughton, de l'Irlande.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Merci.

J'aimerais revenir à M. Ryland et à la question que j'ai posée plus tôt au sujet de l'affichage des noms et des adresses électroniques des clients par Amazon. Êtes-vous absolument certain que cela ne s'est pas produit?

M. Mark Ryland:

Chose certaine, je ne suis pas au courant de l'incident. Je ne crois pas que cela se soit produit, mais nous vous reviendrons là-dessus.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Le 21 novembre 2018, deux articles ont paru dans The Guardian et dans The Telegraph. Dans les deux cas, on faisait état d'une importante atteinte à la protection des données chez Amazon, si bien que les noms et adresses électroniques des clients avaient été divulgués sur le site Web de l'entreprise.

M. Mark Ryland:

Je me ferai un plaisir de vous revenir là-dessus.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Merci. Je voulais simplement tirer cela au clair. C'est consigné au compte rendu.

Le président:

Monsieur Lawless, vous avez la parole.

M. James Lawless:

J'ai une question au sujet de la transférabilité des données et du principe du RGPD. Cela m'a semblé poser problème.

Pour ce qui est des mégadonnées, il s'agit de savoir où elles se trouvent, comment elles sont stockées, sous quelle forme elles sont conservées, etc. Acceptez-vous cela? Souhaitez-vous conserver des données qui soient exclusives à votre société ou êtes-vous à l'aise avec l'utilisation de formats ouverts qui permettent le partage? J'aimerais savoir quelle est la position actuelle de chacun d'entre vous au sujet de la transférabilité des données.

M. Alan Davidson:

Nous pensons que l'accès et la transférabilité des données sont des éléments extrêmement importants du RGPD. En fait, ce sont des piliers de toute bonne réglementation en matière de protection de la vie privée. C'est sans parler de l'effet positif que cela pourrait avoir sur la concurrence. Nous pensons qu'il y a beaucoup de travail prometteur à accomplir pour faire en sorte que les gens sachent ce qui se trouve à tel endroit et pour que cette information — laquelle nous fournissons, d'ailleurs, lorsque nous détenons des données — soit utilisable.

Il ne s'agit pas seulement de savoir que l'on peut télécharger tout son corpus de données Facebook — je l'ai fait et j'encourage les gens à le faire, c'est très intéressant. Il s'agit aussi de rendre ces données utilisables, de telle sorte que l'utilisateur puisse les transporter ailleurs s'il le souhaite.

M. John Weigelt:

Nous nous sommes engagés à respecter le RGPD et les principes de la transférabilité des données. La grande question porte sur l'interopérabilité des profils ou des données et sur la possibilité de les déplacer dans un format approprié. Pour l'heure, on ignore encore où les gens veulent transférer leurs données et dans quels formats ils veulent le faire.

M. James Lawless:

Microsoft a fait des progrès à ce chapitre. Je sais que, par le passé, on alléguait qu'il y avait chez Microsoft un problème qui tenait aux formats exclusifs, mais aujourd'hui, on offre toujours l'option de « sauvegarder sous » un format plus ouvert. Est-ce là ce que vous avez fait?

M. John Weigelt:

Tout à fait. Même que dans le secteur, dans le domaine de l'infonuagique, des activités arbitraires ont été déplacées d'un endroit à l'autre. Nous avons adopté cette approche. De plus, nous nous sommes tournés vers la communauté des codes sources ouverts et des données ouvertes pour obtenir des conseils.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Anticipant le RGPD, Apple a lancé un portail de données et de renseignements personnels. Les utilisateurs peuvent télécharger leurs renseignements personnels, au titre de l'accès à l'information comme au titre de la transférabilité, en formats lisibles par des humains et par des machines.

M. Mark Ryland:

Au nom d'Amazon Web Services, où je travaille, je dirai que l'importation et l'exportation sont des fonctionnalités fondamentales de notre plateforme. Chez nous, toute fonction d'importation se double d'une fonction d'exportation dans des formats lisibles par des machines virtuelles ou dans d'autres types de formats de données d'importation ou d'exportation. Nos outils sont toujours bidirectionnels.

Nous collaborons aussi beaucoup avec la communauté des codes sources ouverts en vue de la transférabilité des codes des applications, entre autres. Par exemple, bon nombre de nos plateformes sont compatibles avec les formats pour le débardage des conteneurs, tel Kubernetes pour la gestion de grappes de serveurs. Les utilisateurs peuvent très facilement créer des systèmes caractérisés par une très grande transférabilité des données entre les plateformes. Telles sont les attentes de nos clients, attentes auxquelles nous souhaitons répondre.

(1110)

M. James Lawless:

Vous dites que c'est comme Apache, suivant les lignes directrices des fondations du code source ouvert. Les normes du code source ouvert sont en train d'être consolidées et acceptées, je suppose, dans une certaine mesure. Peut-être s'agissait-il de concepts communautaires antérieurs au RGPD, mais ces concepts sont maintenant assez généralisés, n'est-ce pas?

M. John Weigelt:

Tout à fait.

M. James Lawless:

Oui, d'accord. C'est très bien. Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Xueling, de Singapour. Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Monsieur Davidson, vous avez dit tout à l'heure, en réponse à une question de M. Baylis, qu'en ce qui concerne les publicités politiques, vous aimeriez voir les entreprises adopter des mesures pour promouvoir la transparence. J'aimerais donner deux exemples dans lesquels les mesures prises par les entreprises n'ont pas été suffisantes.

En avril 2018, Facebook a mis en œuvre de nouvelles règles pour la transparence en matière de publicité politique. Chez Facebook, on a admis avoir pris beaucoup de temps pour déceler l'ingérence étrangère dans les élections américaines de 2016. On a dit avoir amélioré la transparence en matière de publicité et on a argué que, par conséquent, il y aurait une meilleure reddition de comptes. Pourtant, à la fin d'octobre 2018, Vice News a publié un rapport montrant à quel point il était facile de contourner les barrières que Facebook avait prétendu avoir mises en place. Les journalistes ont dû se soumettre à une vérification d'identité avant de pouvoir acheter des annonces publicitaires, mais une fois cette étape franchie, ils ont été capables de publier des annonces semant la discorde et de mentir au sujet de ceux qui les avaient payées.

Voilà pour Facebook.

Par ailleurs, en août 2018, Google a déclaré avoir investi dans des systèmes robustes visant à identifier les opérations d'influence lancées par des gouvernements étrangers. Cependant, peu de temps après, un organisme sans but lucratif nommé Campaign for Accountability a mené une expérience qui a été décrite en détail: des chercheurs de l'organisme ont prétendu travailler pour un organisme de recherche Internet, puis ils ont acheté des publicités politiques ciblant les internautes américains. Selon Campaign for Accountability, chez Google, on n'a pas tenté de vérifier l'identité du compte et on a approuvé les annonces en moins de 48 heures. Les publicités ont été diffusées sur un large éventail de sites Web et de chaînes YouTube, générant plus de 20 000 visionnements, et ce, pour un coût inférieur à 100 $.

Ainsi, il ne semble pas que les plateformes soient sur le point de remplir leur promesse de protection contre l'ingérence étrangère.

Êtes-vous d'accord avec ce que je viens de dire?

M. Alan Davidson:

Manifestement, il nous reste beaucoup de travail à faire. Tout à fait. Nous qui travaillons dans ce domaine avons ressenti une frustration, car nous pensons que la transparence de la publicité est un outil extrêmement important pour accomplir cela. Les autres outils ne sont pas aussi efficaces.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Oui. Il ne semble pas qu'il s'agisse d'un problème technique à proprement parler, puisque les chercheurs ont indiqué avoir utilisé l'adresse IP russe pour accéder aux plateformes de publicité russe de Google et fournir les détails de l'organisme de recherche Internet. Ils sont allés jusqu'à payer les publicités en roubles.

Voilà qui semble indiquer que le désir de vendre des publicités est plus fort que l'intention de réduire l'ingérence étrangère.

M. Alan Davidson:

Je mettrais un bémol. Il est encore trop tôt pour dire ce qu'il en est. Il reste beaucoup à faire, à mon avis. L'expérience des élections en Inde et au Parlement européen sera peut-être instructive. Là-bas, les gens ont tenté d'adopter des mesures de manière beaucoup plus proactive. Nous devons être à même d'évaluer cela, je crois. C'est pourquoi, entre autres raisons, la transparence est importante.

Les plateformes doivent en faire plus, mais comme l'un de vos collègues l'a souligné, nous devrions aussi nous pencher sur les auteurs de ces actes...

Mme Sun Xueling:

Tout à fait, oui.

M. Alan Davidson:

... et lorsque des États-nations s'en prennent à nos entreprises, nous avons besoin de l'aide du gouvernement.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Plus tôt, vous avez parlé de garde-fous.

M. Alan Davidson:

Oui.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Je crois que c'est important pour que nous évitions de plonger dans l'abîme de la désinformation.

M. Alan Davidson:

Je suis d'accord.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Vandenbeld. C'est à vous.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je vais changer un peu le sujet de la conversation. Monsieur Davidson, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez mentionné le fait que votre entreprise met davantage l'accent sur la diversité de la main-d'œuvre. Nous savons — des témoins entendus ici l'ont aussi dit — que les algorithmes sont influencés par les préjugés sociaux de ceux qui en écrivent le code, de sorte que si la plupart des programmeurs sont des hommes dans la vingtaine, leurs préjugés sociaux seront reconduits par les algorithmes.

Dans quelle mesure est-il important de diversifier la main-d'œuvre? Comment vous y prenez-vous? Quelles sont les répercussions?

M. Alan Davidson:

Selon nous, c'est extrêmement important. Non seulement est-ce la bonne chose à faire, mais nous soutenons aussi que les produits que nous créerons seront meilleurs si nous disposons d'une main-d'œuvre plus diversifiée qui reflète l'ensemble des communautés que nous desservons.

C'est un grand problème dans la Silicon Valley et dans le secteur de la technologie en général. Je pense que nous devrions tous l'admettre. Nous devons travailler là-dessus sans relâche.

Dans notre entreprise, nous en avons fait une très grande priorité. Par exemple, chaque année, tous les cadres de notre entreprise ont des objectifs. Nous parlons d'objectifs et de résultats clés. Chacun établit ses propres critères, mais il y a un critère qui est obligatoire pour tout le monde. La question se pose comme suit: dans quelle mesure avez-vous réussi à assurer la diversité dans votre processus d'embauche? Lorsque l'on se sait évalué, on a tendance à fournir un effort quelque peu accru.

Nous devons en faire plus à ce chapitre. Nous sommes les premiers à reconnaître qu'il nous reste du chemin à faire. Je pense que nous avons fait beaucoup de progrès en matière de diversité des genres, surtout parmi les membres de la communauté du domaine technique. Dans d'autres aspects de la diversité ethnique, nos résultats sont moins bons, il nous reste beaucoup à faire. Nous y travaillons vraiment.

(1115)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

M. Alan Davidson:

Merci d'avoir soulevé la question.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Pourrais-je demander à chacun des autres témoins de s'exprimer à ce sujet?

M. John Weigelt:

Chez Microsoft, Satya Nadella en a fait une priorité absolue. Nous reconnaissons que nos décisions et nos produits sont meilleurs si notre entreprise reflète mieux les communautés que nous desservons.

Ici, au Canada, nous travaillons à faire en sorte que Microsoft Canada reflète la mosaïque culturelle du Canada, ce qui comprend non seulement le sexe, mais aussi les origines ethniques et l'orientation. De plus, pour les personnes qui ont des exigences d'adaptation et des méthodes de travail uniques, comme des problèmes de vision, d'ouïe ou d'attention...

Nous travaillons vraiment à forger une telle communauté en intégrant cet effort au sein de notre programme d'éthique de l'IA. Nous avons un comité de gouvernance qui se penche sur les utilisations délicates de l'IA. Ensuite, nous réunissons un groupe de personnes très diversifié pour examiner toutes les facettes de cette utilisation délicate. Nous voulons expressément obtenir le point de vue intersectionnel de toute personne de l'entreprise souhaitant émettre un commentaire afin de refléter cette mosaïque culturelle dont j'ai parlé. De cette façon, nous pensons être à même de tuer dans l'œuf certains effets imprévus potentiels, de manière à pouvoir donner des conseils et une orientation à l'avenir.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Allez-y.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

En plus de la protection des renseignements personnels, la diversité constitue l'une des quatre valeurs d'entreprise de notre PDG Tim Cook. Les deux valeurs sont très importantes. Cela va bien au-delà de l'IA. La protection de la vie privée relève surtout de la condition humaine. Pour ce qui est de la diversité des points de vue, elle nous aidera à faire de bons choix.

En matière de diversité dans notre entreprise, je n'ai pas les chiffres sous la main. Je suis sûr qu'il nous reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire. Nous avons adopté des mesures d'amélioration non seulement en matière de recrutement et de rayonnement visant à attirer des personnes de la diversité, mais aussi en matière de roulement ou de longévité de la carrière. Faire entrer une personne dans l'entreprise est une chose, s'assurer qu'elle a une expérience de carrière productive et enrichissante pour qu'elle reste dans l'entreprise et continue d'y contribuer en est une autre.

Comme je l'ai dit, nous avons encore du travail à faire sur ces deux aspects.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

M. Mark Ryland:

La situation est similaire chez Amazon. Nous mettons beaucoup l'accent sur la diversité. Parmi nos objectifs d'entreprise, cet enjeu occupe une grande place. Les gestionnaires d'embauche et les cadres supérieurs sont tenus d'atteindre des objectifs précis à cet égard.

Bien entendu, ce n'est pas seulement une question d'embauche. C'est aussi une question de longévité de carrière, de gestion de carrière et de création de communautés d'intérêts au sein de notre entreprise. Ainsi, les gens sentent qu'ils font partie à la fois de l'entreprise dans son ensemble et de communautés d'intérêts qui leur ressemblent vraiment.

Nous travaillons très fort dans tous ces domaines pour accroître la diversité de l'entreprise. Encore une fois, nous pensons que c'est ce qu'il y a de mieux pour les affaires. Non seulement est-ce la bonne chose à faire, mais c'est aussi ce qui nous aidera à créer de meilleurs produits, parce que les origines diverses de nos employés correspondent aux clients que nous essayons de rejoindre.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Vandenbeld.

J'aimerais expliquer le déroulement des choses. Nous aurons encore quelques interventions, puis nous entendrons les derniers commentaires des vice-présidents, du coprésident et de moi-même. Ensuite, ce sera terminé. Si nous dépassons les 11 h 30, ce sera de peu.

Monsieur Kent, vous avez cinq minutes.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir à la question de la concurrence, de l'antitrust et des monopoles dans le nouveau marché. On a beaucoup parlé récemment, particulièrement aux États-Unis, des nouveaux monopoles numériques et du fait qu'ils sont peut-être beaucoup plus durables que les monopoles du passé — les chemins de fer, les compagnies de téléphone, etc. Ces monopoles peuvent vaincre leurs concurrents en les achetant ou en les détruisant.

Hier, j'ai cité, à l'intention du représentant de Facebook qui comparaissait au Comité, les écrits de Chris Hughes, le cofondateur de Facebook, désormais désillusionné. Certains de nos témoins d'aujourd'hui ont laissé entendre que leurs entreprises seraient peut-être prêtes à accepter des déclinaisons de la loi européenne. Toutefois, M. Hughes a fait les manchettes en laissant entendre que Facebook devrait être démantelée et faire l'objet d'une démarche antitrust. Il a dit ceci: « Ce qui effraie chez Facebook, ce n'est pas quelques règles de plus. C'est une poursuite antitrust ».

Je sais que la défense contre les poursuites antitrust peut poser problème. En situation de monopole en matière de mégadonnées, vous invoquez l'excuse suivante: votre service est gratuit, il n'y a pas de coûts tangibles associés aux achats des consommateurs.

C'est peut-être une question trop vaste pour le poste que vous détenez, comme on l'a déjà dit. C'est pourquoi nous avions demandé que les PDG soient présents aujourd'hui. Je me demande tout de même, particulièrement dans le cas d'Amazon et de Microsoft, si vous pourriez nous parler du point de vue de vos entreprises visant à contrer ces discussions antitrust et les appels au démantèlement dans l'intérêt d'une plus grande concurrence et d'une plus grande protection des consommateurs.

Je pose d'abord la question à M. Ryland.

(1120)

M. Mark Ryland:

Je dirai volontiers quelques mots à ce sujet.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, notre modèle d'affaires est très traditionnel. Nous vendons des biens et des services — lesquels ont une valeur pécuniaire — tant dans notre commerce de détail Amazon.com que dans notre entreprise d'infonuagique, et nous faisons face à une concurrence féroce pour toutes sortes de services et de plateformes qui ne se limitent pas à l'Internet. Les gens utilisent une grande variété de canaux et de mécanismes pour acquérir des services de TI, que ce soit pour l'infonuagique ou pour d'autres types de ressources. De notre point de vue, il s'agit tout simplement d'un modèle d'affaires très différent, et notre utilisation des données pour améliorer l'expérience des consommateurs est, à notre avis, très avantageuse pour les consommateurs. Ceux-ci apprécient vraiment l'expérience d'utilisation de ces technologies.

À mon avis, c'est une approche qui diffère beaucoup de certains enjeux que vous soulevez. Je m'en tiens à cette affirmation plutôt générale. En ce qui concerne les détails du droit de la concurrence, comme je l'ai déjà dit, je ne suis pas un expert.

Je pense vraiment que notre modèle d'affaires est très traditionnel à cet égard. C'est un peu différent, à mon avis.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Je vais passer au témoin de Microsoft.

M. John Weigelt:

Au vu de la longévité de notre entreprise, qui existe depuis les années 1970, nous avons connu des fluctuations. Nous avons eu un téléphone par le passé. Nous avons un excellent navigateur, mais celui-ci a subi un certain nombre de modifications. Auparavant, on disait: un ordinateur sur chaque bureau. Aujourd'hui, on dit plutôt: un téléphone dans chaque poche. Ces fluctuations traversent le milieu qui est le nôtre.

Pour ce qui est de l'environnement des données, les consommateurs se tourneront vers les services qui leur plaisent. Il y aura des fluctuations. Si vous parlez aux milléniaux, ils vous diront qu'ils utilisent différents services. Par exemple, mes enfants — qui, s'ils ne se considèrent pas comme des milléniaux, occupent le même espace —, diront ceci: « Papa, ne me parle pas sur cette plateforme, je ne suis pas là. Parle-moi sur cette autre plateforme ». Ces choses-là fluctuent.

Des données, on passe ensuite aux algorithmes. Nous entrevoyons une ère algorithmique et une monétisation des algorithmes. Nous assistons à une transition des algorithmes aux API, les gens tirant un profit pécuniaire de ces API.

Nous voyons ce moteur d'innovation en marche, qui va continuellement de l'avant. Nous devons travailler ensemble pour essayer d'anticiper les conséquences imprévues et d'apprendre en cours de route des leçons en matière de désinformation. C'est comme le jeu de la taupe: on n'a pas plus tôt frappé une taupe qu'une autre resurgit à un endroit imprévu. On s'exclame alors: « Oh, nous n'avions pas pensé à cela. » En travaillant ensemble, nous pouvons mettre en place les instruments pour y arriver.

J'ai donné une réponse abstraite à votre question au sujet de l'anticoncurrence et de l'antitrust, je sais, mais j'aimerais aborder la question sous l'angle général et sur le plan des fluctuations. Comment pouvons-nous mettre en place des mécanismes de protection solides pour les entreprises et les particuliers? Grâce à des partenariats.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

C'est au tour des témoins d'Apple et de Mozilla.

M. Erik Neuenschwander:

Je ne crois pas avoir grand-chose à ajouter aux observations des autres témoins. Je pense que nous essayons à la fois d'offrir la diversité de l'App Store à nos utilisateurs et de favoriser une grande concurrence. De nombreuses entreprises ont connu une grande réussite dans cet espace.

En ce qui concerne les données personnelles, nous pratiquons la minimisation des données et nous essayons de donner le pouvoir non pas à Apple, mais bien aux utilisateurs.

M. Alan Davidson:

Je dirai simplement que je travaille pour une entreprise qui, d'une certaine façon, a pris naissance en réaction à Internet Explorer, qui était un joueur dominant dans le marché à l'époque. Nous croyons que la loi antitrust constitue un garde-fou très important pour le marché. Comme tout le monde, nous voulons qu'il y ait des règles du jeu équitables sur le plan de la concurrence.

À notre avis, il y a beaucoup de préoccupations au sujet de la taille des entreprises. Plus grande est la taille, plus grande est la responsabilité. Nous pensons aussi que les organismes de réglementation antitrust disposent de beaucoup d'outils très puissants à l'heure actuelle. Nous devons, je crois, réfléchir à la façon de donner à ces organismes plus d'information, plus d'outils et une meilleure compréhension des API et de la puissance des données dans leur analyse, notamment. C'est d'abord là que nous devons effectuer une mise à niveau, tandis que nous réfléchissons à la façon d'élargir les rôles. C'est un domaine très important.

(1125)

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Pour moderniser numériquement...?

M. Alan Davidson:

Nous avons besoin d'une application contemporaine et numérique de la loi antitrust.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Kent.

Le dernier intervenant est M. Graham. C'est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'ai posé des questions à tout le monde un peu plus tôt. J'aimerais donc discuter un peu avec M. Ryland d'Amazon.

Plus tôt, vous avez discuté avec M. Lucas de la question de savoir si la sécurité d'Alexa avait déjà été compromise. Si je me souviens bien, vous avez dit que non. Est-ce exact?

M. Mark Ryland:

C'est exact.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous n'êtes pas au courant du piratage de Checkmarx d'il y a à peine un an, qui a complètement compromis Alexa et qui pourrait causer la diffusion en direct d'innombrables enregistrements audio?

M. Mark Ryland:

Je n'étais pas au courant de ce... Je vais vous revenir là-dessus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N'êtes-vous pas le directeur de l'ingénierie de sécurité?

M. Mark Ryland:

Qu'est-ce que c'est?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N'êtes-vous pas le directeur de l'ingénierie de sécurité?

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui, chez Amazon Web Services.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous travaillez pour Amazon Web Services; on ne nous a donc pas envoyé quelqu'un de Amazon. Je voulais simplement que ce soit clair.

Amazon a un système de marketing intégré. Si je cherche une information sur Amazon et je vais ensuite sur un autre ordinateur et un autre site Web, il y aura des annonces de Amazon me demandant si je veux acheter l'article que j'avais cherché antérieurement sur un autre appareil et avec une adresse IP différente. Que fait Amazon pour savoir cela? Quel genre d'échange de données y a-t-il entre Amazon et des sites comme Facebook et autres? Par exemple, National Newswatch me fait le coup.

Comment se fait cet échange d'information? Comment savez-vous qui je suis quand j'utilise un autre appareil?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous faisons des échanges publicitaires. Nous avons tout un site consacré à la vie privée, qui vous permet de désactiver la publicité. Cela dit, il ne s'agit pas de renseignements personnels. Les données sont anonymisées. Le système se fonde sur un profilage démographique.

Je répète qu'il est très simple de désactiver la publicité sur notre site Web. On peut également se valoir d'outils commerciaux, comme AdChoices, pour éviter de participer aux réseaux publicitaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sont des données soi-disant anonymes, mais le système sait exactement ce que j'ai cherché il y a trois heures.

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne sais quoi vous dire dans votre cas précis, mais nous n'utilisons pas vos renseignements personnels à de telles fins.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Au tout début de la réunion, vous avez présenté des points de vue intéressants sur le consentement à l'utilisation des données, ce qui a suscité une excellente intervention de M. Angus. Selon Amazon ou selon vous, quelle est la limite de consentement pour la divulgation de données? Est-ce explicite? Suffit-il que la boîte précise qu'il s'agit d'un appareil « intelligent » pour que le consentement à divulguer des données soit sous-entendu?

M. Mark Ryland:

Nous pensons que le plus logique, c'est d'être sensible au contexte. Le consommateur averti aura sûrement une idée de ce qui est en jeu. Si ce n'est pas le cas, il faudra nous arranger pour que ce soit plus explicite. C'est très contextuel.

Cela dépend aussi, bien entendu, du type de données. Certaines sont beaucoup plus délicates que d'autres. Comme l'un des panélistes l'a mentionné, utiliser une plateforme de jeux en ligne et consulter un site sur les soins de santé sont deux choses entièrement différentes; il faut donc connaître le contexte et le contenu. Le consentement fondé sur le contexte est tout à fait logique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit plus tôt que votre entreprise est axée sur la clientèle. Accordez-vous autant d'importance à vos travailleurs?

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui. Nous nous efforçons de le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous ne suivez pas des pratiques antisyndicales?

M. Mark Ryland:

Ce n'est pas mon champ d'expertise, mais je dirais que nous traitons nos travailleurs avec respect et dignité. Nous nous efforçons de leur offrir de bons salaires et des conditions de travail raisonnables.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Obtenez-vous des données de vos propres employés?

M. Mark Ryland:

Comme toutes les entreprises, nous recueillons des données sur des aspects comme l'accès à Internet et l'utilisation responsable de notre technologie pour protéger les autres travailleurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors Amazon n'aurait jamais distribué de matériel promotionnel antisyndical à des entreprises nouvellement acquises.

M. Mark Ryland:

Je ne suis pas au courant de ce genre de scénario.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, j'espère que lors de notre prochaine réunion, nous pourrons compter sur un représentant de Amazon qui en sache plus long sur les politiques de l'entreprise. Vous maîtrisez sans doute les services sans fil évolués, mais ce qu'il nous faut, c'est nous faire une idée globale du fonctionnement de Amazon.

Je pense que c'est tout pour l'instant. Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur de Burgh Graham.

Il semble que j'ai oublié Mme Stevens du Royaume-Uni, et...

M. James Lawless:

Monsieur le président, avant que vous ne donniez la parole à Mme Stevens, je dois m'excuser, car nous devons prendre l'avion.

Je voudrais simplement remercier les membres de tout le travail qui a été fait ces derniers jours.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci. Nous vous reverrons en novembre prochain.

M. James Lawless: Absolument.

Le président: Toutes nos salutations à Mme Naughton. Merci d'être venus.

M. James Lawless:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Allez-y, madame Stevens.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir à quelque chose que vous avez dit tout à l'heure, monsieur Weigelt, au sujet d'un conseil ou d'un groupe qui doit se pencher sur l'utilisation judicieuse de l'intelligence artificielle. Pouvez-vous me donner un exemple du genre de déploiement qui serait « judicieux » d'après vous?

(1130)

M. John Weigelt:

Il y a d'abord l'utilisation de l'intelligence artificielle dans le diagnostic médical. Il y a trois critères à examiner: le système peut-il approuver ou refuser des services corrélatifs? Y a-t-il atteinte aux droits de la personne ou à la dignité humaine? Y a-t-il des problèmes de santé et de sécurité?

Dans un cas, des chercheurs ont établi des algorithmes d'intelligence artificielle sur les radiographies pulmonaires. Ils ont ensuite voulu les incorporer à la salle d'urgence, pour en constater le fonctionnement et les effets sur les patients. Notre comité s'est réuni. Nous avons examiné les ensembles de données. Nous avons étudié la validité de cet ensemble de données ouvertes et le nombre de personnes visées. Nous avons ensuite déconseillé leur usage clinique aux chercheurs en cause en leur précisant que tout logiciel utilisé comme instrument médical est un domaine complètement différent. Il faut des certifications et tout le reste.

Un usage judicieux serait d'évaluer si l'intelligence artificielle peut oui ou non tirer des leçons de ces examens. C'est l'optique que nous avons tendance à adopter en la matière.

Mme Jo Stevens:

C'est un exemple très utile. Merci.

Nous savons, et ce ne sont pas les preuves qui manquent, qu'il y a des préjugés délibérés et inconscients inhérents à l'intelligence artificielle. Je pense qu'il y a un argument assez solide en faveur d'une approche réglementaire pour régir son déploiement, un peu comme ce que nous avons dans, disons, le secteur pharmaceutique. Avant de mettre un médicament sur le marché, il faut en examiner les effets secondaires indésirables.

Qu'en pensez-vous? Pensez-vous qu'il y a un argument en faveur d'une approche réglementaire, particulièrement parce que, comme nous le savons, le déploiement actuel de l'intelligence artificielle est discriminatoire envers les femmes, les Noirs et les minorités ethniques? Des gens perdent leur emploi et n'ont pas accès à des services comme des prêts et des hypothèques à cause de cela.

M. John Weigelt:

Absolument. Je pense que vous avez raison de parler du parti pris involontaire en ce qui a trait aux décisions en matière d'intelligence artificielle; il s'agit donc de nous protéger contre cela. C'est l'un des principes techniques sur lesquels nous travaillons fort pour donner des conseils et des directives à nos équipes.

Il y a certains domaines où nous avons préconisé une action très rapide et directe pour agir plus prudemment et plus délibérément, comme dans le cas du logiciel de reconnaissance faciale. Pour revenir à ce que vous disiez, bon nombre de ces modèles ont été formés en fonction d'une communauté très homogène et ne tiennent donc pas compte de la diversité des gens qu'ils doivent servir.

Nous sommes d'ardents défenseurs de la mise en place de cadres législatifs pour certains régimes de consentement, par exemple s'il faut des bannières dans les rues, s'il faut des paramètres, s'il faut définir la différence entre l'espace public et l'espace privé, et ainsi de suite.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous prêt à rendre public le travail que vous avez fait? Je vous en sais gré si vous le faites officieusement. C'est très bien, mais il serait utile de savoir ce que vous faites et ce que font vos collègues.

M. John Weigelt:

Absolument. Il est clair que nous devons mieux renseigner la collectivité de l'excellent travail qui est en cours. Nous avons publié des lignes directrices sur les robots et sur la façon de s'assurer qu'ils se comportent correctement, car figurez-vous que nous avons eu nos propres ennuis avec un robot sectaire qui a semé la discorde pendant un certain temps. Nous en avons tiré des leçons. Notre PDG a appuyé notre équipe et nous avons progressé. Nous avons fourni des conseils, et ils sont accessibles au public.

Nous avons ce qu'on appelle la AI Business School, qui propose toute une série de cours à l'intention des chefs d'entreprise pour mettre en place un modèle de gouvernance de l'intelligence artificielle. Nous travaillons avec ce milieu pour l'aider. Nous nous efforçons de diffuser le travail que nous faisons à l'interne dans le cadre de notre examen de l'éthique de l'intelligence artificielle.

Enfin, je dirais que nous travaillons dans le cadre d'une soixantaine d'activités d'orientation en matière de réglementation qui se déroulent partout dans le monde afin de commencer à socialiser cet aspect du point de vue de l'expérience pratique. Ici, au Canada, on s'occupe de mettre au point les critères d'évaluation de l'impact de l'intelligence artificielle et la norme d'éthique correspondante.

Mme Jo Stevens:

Ce serait vraiment bien de voir un assistant virtuel coupé sur un patron tout autre que celui d'une femme servile. J'ai hâte de voir quelque chose de différent.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Stevens.

Nous allons maintenant entendre les observations finales de nos vice-présidents, puis du coprésident.

Monsieur Erskine-Smith, voulez-vous commencer par vos 60 secondes, s'il vous plaît?

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je pense que si nous avons tiré des leçons des derniers jours, c'est que nous continuons de vivre dans une ère de capitalisme de surveillance qui pourrait avoir de graves conséquences sur nos élections, sur notre vie privée, voire sur notre envie d'innover.

Malgré certaines frustrations, je crois que nous avons fait des progrès. Toutes les plateformes et toutes les entreprises de mégadonnées nous ont dit ce qu'elles n'avaient pas dit auparavant, à savoir qu'elles allaient adopter des règles plus rigoureuses en matière de protection de la vie privée et des données.

Hier, les responsables des plateformes ont fait remarquer qu'ils doivent rendre des comptes au public lorsqu'ils prennent des décisions sur le contrôle du contenu, et ils ont reconnu la responsabilité des entreprises à l'égard des répercussions algorithmiques. Il y a donc des progrès, mais il reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire en ce qui concerne la concurrence et la protection des consommateurs, et la reconnaissance de la responsabilité des algorithmes qu'ils utilisent, pour passer à une responsabilisation et responsabilité réelles lorsque les décisions ont des conséquences négatives.

Je pense qu'il y a encore beaucoup de travail à faire, et cela dépendra d'une coopération mondiale suivie. Je pense que notre communauté canadienne a su transcender les lignes de parti. Ce comité international travaille maintenant efficacement dans plusieurs pays.

La dernière chose que je dirai, c'est qu'il ne s'agit pas seulement de s'attaquer à ces graves problèmes mondiaux au moyen d'une coopération mondiale sérieuse entre les parlementaires; il faut une coopération mondiale de la part des entreprises. S'il y a une dernière chose à retenir, c'est que les entreprises ne l'ont tout simplement pas pris assez au sérieux.

(1135)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Erskine-Smith.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Angus.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci à nos deux excellents présidents. Merci à nos témoins.

Je pense que nous avons vu quelque chose d'extraordinaire. Je suis très fier du Parlement canadien et de notre volonté de participer à ce processus.

Il y a eu des témoignages extraordinaires en ce qui a trait à la qualité des questions, et j'ai été très fier d'en faire partie. Deux faits extraordinaires, c'est que, au cours de mes 15 années en fonction, nous n'avons jamais réussi à transcender les lignes de parti sur ainsi dire quoi que ce soit, et pourtant, nous voilà réunis. De plus, nous n'avons jamais travaillé au-delà des frontières internationales. Nous pouvons remercier un dénonciateur canadien, Christopher Wylie, qui a lancé l'alerte sur le Tchernobyl numérique qui sévissait autour de nous.

Les politiciens, nous ne nous occupons pas des aspects techniques complexes. Ils nous effraient. Nous n'avons pas l'expertise nécessaire, alors nous avons tendance à les éviter, ce qui a été un grand avantage pour la Silicon Valley pendant des années.

Ces choses ne sont pas tellement techniques. Je pense que ce que nous avons fait ces deux derniers jours avec nos collègues d'autres pays — et ce que nous continuerons de faire à l'échelle internationale — c'est de rendre les choses aussi simples et claires que possible pour rétablir la primauté de la personne humaine dans le domaine des mégadonnées. La vie privée est un droit fondamental qui sera protégé. Les législateurs ont l'obligation et le devoir de protéger les principes démocratiques de notre pays, comme la liberté d'expression et le droit de participer à l'univers numérique sans faire proliférer l'extrémisme. Ce sont là des principes fondamentaux sur lesquels reposent nos démocraties. Ce qui était vrai à l'ère des lettres manuscrites est tout aussi vrai à l'ère de la téléphonie.

Je tiens à remercier mes collègues de leur participation. Je pense que nous sortons de nos réunions beaucoup plus forts qu'avant et nous prendrons encore plus de force à l'avenir. Nous voulons travailler avec les entreprises de technologie pour faire en sorte que le monde numérique soit un monde démocratique au XXIe siècle.

Merci à tous.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus.

C'est votre tour, monsieur Colllins.

M. Damian Collins:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais commencer par vous féliciter, vous et les membres de votre comité, de l'excellent travail que vous avez fait en organisant et présidant ces séances. Je pense que cette rencontre a réussi à faire exactement ce que nous espérions. Elle s'appuie sur les travaux que nous avions entrepris à Londres. Je pense que c'est un modèle de coopération entre les comités parlementaires de différents pays qui travaillent sur les mêmes questions et profitent mutuellement de leurs expériences et connaissances connexes.

Les séances ont été divisées entre ce que nous appelons les entreprises de médias sociaux hier et d'autres entreprises de données ici. En réalité, ce dont nous parlons, c'est que même s'il y a différentes fonctions, ce sont toutes des entreprises de données énormes. Ce qui nous intéresse, c'est la façon dont elles recueillent leurs données, si elles ont le consentement des intéressés, et ce qu'elles font de ces données.

Au cours des séances, nous avons vu à maintes reprises des entreprises refuser de répondre à des questions directes sur la façon dont elles obtiennent des données et dont elles les utilisent. Qu'il s'agisse de savoir comment Amazon et Facebook échangent les données... Même si c'est amplement diffusé, il demeure que nous ne le savons pas. Mon collègue, M. Lucas, a posé une question au sujet de l'échange des données de LinkedIn et de Microsoft. Il est possible d'intégrer totalement vos données LinkedIn à vos outils Microsoft, et une recherche rapide sur Google vous dira exactement comment faire.

Je ne comprends pas pourquoi les entreprises ne veulent pas parler ouvertement des outils qu'elles mettent en place. Les gens peuvent consentir à utiliser ces outils, mais comprennent-ils la portée des données qu'ils divulguent ce faisant? Si c'est aussi simple et direct qu'il semble, je suis toujours surpris que les gens ne veuillent pas en parler. Pour moi, ces séances sont importantes parce que nous avons l'occasion de poser les questions que les gens ne poseront pas et de continuer à insister pour obtenir les réponses dont nous avons besoin.

Merci.

Le président:

Je vais d'abord m'adresser aux panélistes, puis je ferai quelques observations finales.

Je tiens à vous encourager. Vous aviez promis, surtout M. Ryland, de nous donner beaucoup de documents que vous n'avez pas... Divers commentateurs n'avaient pas toute l'information que nous demandions. Je vous implore de fournir les renseignements que nous avons demandés au greffier à mes côtés afin que nous puissions obtenir une réponse complète pour le Comité. Nous la distribuerons ensuite à tous les délégués ici présents.

Ce que je ne risque pas d'oublier de sitôt, c'est le commentaire de Roger McNamee au sujet de l'expression « poupées vaudou ».

Je regarde mes enfants. J'en ai quatre, âgés de 21, 19, 17 et 15 ans, respectivement. Je les vois devenir de plus en plus dépendants de ces appareils téléphoniques. Je vois le travail effectué par nos collègues à Londres au sujet de la dépendance que ces appareils peuvent créer. Je me demandais où on voulait en venir. On voit clairement que le capitalisme de surveillance, tout le modèle des affaires, ne demandent qu'une chose: garder ces enfants, nos enfants, collés au téléphone, même si c'est au prix de leur santé. C'est une question d'argent, tout simplement. Nous avons la responsabilité de faire quelque chose à ce sujet. Nous nous soucions de nos enfants, et nous ne voulons pas qu'ils soient transformés en poupées vaudou contrôlées par le tout-puissant dollar et le capitalisme.

Comme nous aimons tellement les appareils, je pense qu'il nous reste du travail à faire pour nous assurer que nous continuons d'offrir l'accès. Nous aimons la technologie et nous l'avons déjà dit. La technologie n'est pas le problème; c'est le véhicule. Nous devons nous attaquer aux causes de ces pratiques qui créent une dépendance.

Je vais dire merci et faire quelques derniers commentaires.

Merci à notre greffier. Nous allons l'applaudir pour s'être si bien tiré d'affaire.

Il a ce regard sur son visage parce que des événements comme celui-ci ne se déroulent pas sans ses petits problèmes. Nous nous en occupons au fur et à mesure, alors c'est difficile. Encore une fois, un gros merci à Mike MacPherson, pour avoir tout si bien résolu.

Je remercie également mon équipe — à ma gauche, Kera, Cindy, Micah, Kaitlyn — de m'avoir aidé à régler les questions administratives. Je pense qu'ils ont hâte de décompresser.

Avant de terminer, je vais encore évoquer... Oh, j'ai oublié les analystes. Désolé. J'oublie toujours nos pauvres analystes. Veuillez vous lever.

Merci pour tout.

Merci également aux interprètes. Il y avait trois langues à traduire, alors je vous remercie de nous avoir accompagnés toute la semaine.

Je salue notre ami Christopher Wylie, même si les sandwichs ont fini par avoir la vedette. Je ne sais pas si quelqu'un a vu ses gazouillis, « En plus d'une occasion ratée de faire preuve de démocratie, Zuckerberg a manqué toute l'action autour des sandwichs. » Notre ami m'a suggéré d'envoyer les restes par la poste au siège social de Facebook. C'est peut-être ainsi que nous réussirons à remettre la convocation en bonnes mains.

Je tiens à remercier tous les médias d'avoir accordé à cette question l'attention qu'elle mérite. C'est notre avenir et celui de nos enfants qui sont en jeu.

Encore une fois, merci à tous les panélistes qui sont venus de si loin, en particulier nos membres du Royaume-Uni, qui sont nos frères et sœurs de l'autre côté de l'océan.

Singapour est toujours là aussi. Merci d'être venus.

Passez une bonne journée.

Nous nous reverrons en Irlande au mois de novembre.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee ethi foss hansard 68302 words - whole entry and permanent link. Posted at 22:44 on May 29, 2019

2019-05-28 ETHI 153

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

(1040)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)):

We'll bring to order meeting 153 of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics and by extension the international grand committee on big data, privacy and democracy. We will have countries' representatives speak as well. We'll start off with my co-chair, Mr. Damian Collins from the U.K.

The way it will work structurally is that we'll go through the delegations, one representative per country initially and then the second representative. You each should have your own five-minute time slot exclusive to yourself.

Before we begin, Mr. Angus has a comment.

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP):

Mr. Chair, just as a point of order for our committee, we are very surprised, I think, that Mr. Zuckerberg decided—and Ms. Sandberg—to ignore the summons of a parliamentary committee, particularly as we have international representatives here. As far as I know, we were not even informed that he wasn't showing up. I have never seen a situation where a corporate head ignores a legal summons.

In light of that, I would like to bring notice of a motion to vote on: That the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, on account of the refusal of Mr. Mark Zuckerberg and Ms. Sheryl Sandberg to appear before it on May 28th, direct the Chair to serve either or both with a formal summons should they arrive in Canada for any purpose to appear before the Committee at the date of the next meeting from the date of their summons, and should they be served with a summons when the House is not sitting, that the Chair reconvene the Committee for a special meeting as soon as practicable for the purpose of obtaining evidence from them.

Mr. Chair, I don't know if we've ever used an open summons in Parliament—we've checked and we haven't found one—but I believe you'll find that this is in order. If Mr. Zuckerberg or Ms. Sandberg decide to come here for a tech conference or to go fishing, Parliament will be able serve that summons and have them brought here.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

For the ex officio members of the committee, we have a motion before our committee that we will have to vote on, so there will be some discussion.

Is there any discussion from any other members about the motion?

Mr. Kent.

Hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Yes, the official opposition, the Conservative Party, is fully willing to support Mr. Angus's motion. As we heard in some of the previous testimony, Facebook, among others of the large platforms, has shown extreme disrespect and disregard for sovereign governments and for committees representing sovereign governments, with regard to their concerns and the search for explanations as to why meaningful action has not been taken to date and for a clear and explicit explanation of their response to the concerns from around the world and certainly within democracies and the members of this international grand committee.

We will support this motion. Thank you.

The Chair:

There was a discussion previously about no substantive motions being brought before the committee. That said, with all agreement at the table here, I think we can agree to have that heard—and we are hearing it today—and voted on.

Do we have...? I see all in favour of having that motion moved before us.

Are there any other comments about the motion?

Mr. Lucas.

Mr. Ian Lucas (Member, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

This is a case of recidivism by Mr. Zuckerberg. This has happened previously, and it is a matter of deep concern. It's particularly of great concern to me, because unfortunately governments are continuing to meet with Mr. Zuckerberg, and I think it important that we should communicate, as parliamentarians, our concern about the disrespect that Mr. Zuckerberg is showing to parliamentarians from across the world. They should consider the access they give Mr. Zuckerberg, access to governments and to ministers, operated in private, without respect to us as parliamentarians and without respect to our constituents, who are excluded from the confidential discussions that are happening on these crucial matters.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Lucas.

Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

I would just note that it's funny that less than two months ago, on March 30, Mark Zuckerberg wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal. He wrote that he believes Facebook has a responsibility to address harmful content, protecting elections, privacy and data protection and data portability—the very issues we're discussing today—and that he was looking forward to discussing them with lawmakers around the world. Those were his words less than two months ago. If he were an honest individual in writing those words, he'd be sitting in that chair today.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Are there any further comments on the motion?

Frankly, to answer your question, being the chair of this committee on both levels, the international and our ethics committee, it's abhorrent that he's not here today and that Ms. Sandberg is not here today. It was very clearly communicated to them that they were to appear today before us. A summons was issued, which is already an unusual act for a committee. I think it's only fitting that there be an ongoing summons. As soon as either Mr. Zuckerberg or Ms. Sandberg step foot into our country, they will be served and expected to appear before our committee. If they choose not to, then the next step will be to hold them in contempt.

I think the words are strong, Mr. Angus, and I applaud you for your motion.

If there is not any further discussion on the motion, we'll go to the vote.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Thank you, Mr. Angus.

Next, we'll go to the platforms. We'll start with Facebook, go to Google, and then....

I'll mention the names. With Facebook Inc., we have Kevin Chan, Global Policy Director for Canada, and Neil Potts, Global Policy Director. With Google LLC, we have Derek Slater, Global Director of Information Policy; and with Google Canada, Colin McKay, Head, Government Affairs and Public Policy. From Twitter Inc., we have Carlos Monje, Director of Public Policy, and Michele Austin, Head, Government and Public Policy, Twitter Canada.

I would like to say that it wasn't just the CEOs of Facebook who were invited today. The CEOs of Google were invited. The CEO of Twitter was invited. We are more than disappointed that they as well chose not to show up.

We'll start off with Mr. Chan, for seven minutes.

Thank you.

(1045)

Mr. Kevin Chan (Global Policy Director, Facebook Inc.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

My name is Kevin Chan, and I am here today with my colleague Neil Potts. We are both global policy directors at Facebook.

The Internet has transformed how billions of people live, work and connect with each other. Companies such as Facebook have immense responsibilities to keep people safe on their services. Every day we are tasked with the challenge of making decisions about what speech is harmful, what constitutes political advertising and how to prevent sophisticated cyber-attacks. This is vital work to keeping our community safe, and we recognize this work is not something that companies like ours should do alone.[Translation]

New rules for the Internet should preserve what is best about the Internet and the digital economy—fostering innovation, supporting growth for small businesses, and enabling freedom of expression—while simultaneously protecting society from broader harms. These are incredibly complex issues to get right, and we want to work with governments, academics and civil society around the world to ensure new regulations are effective.[English]

We are pleased to share with you today some of our emerging thinking in four areas of possible regulatory action: harmful content, privacy, data portability and election integrity.

With that, I will turn it over to my colleague Neil, who would love to engage with you about harmful content.

Mr. Neil Potts (Global Policy Director, Facebook Inc.):

Chair, members of the committee, thank you for the opportunity to be here today.

I'm Neil Potts. I'm a Director with oversight of the development and implementation of Facebook's community standards. Those are our guidelines for what types of content are allowed on our platform.

Before I continue, though, I'd just like to point out that Kevin and I are global directors, subject matter area experts, ready to engage with you on these issues. Mark and Sheryl, our CEO and COO, are committed to working with government in a responsible manner. They feel that we have their mandate to be here today before you to engage on these topics, and we are happy to do so.

As you know, Facebook's mission is to give people the power to build community and to bring the world closer together. More than two billion people come to our platform every month to connect with family and friends, to find out what's going on in the world, to build their businesses and to help those in need.

As we give people a voice, we want to make sure that they're not using that voice to hurt others. Facebook embraces the responsibility of making sure that the tools we build are used for good and that we keep people safe. We take those responsibilities very seriously.

Early this month, Facebook signed the Christchurch Call to Eliminate Terrorist and Violent Extremist Content Online, and we have taken immediate action on live streaming. Specifically, people who have broken certain rules on Facebook, which include our “dangerous organizations and individuals” policy, will be restricted from using Facebook Live.

We are also investing $7.5 million in new research partnerships with leading academics to address the adversarial media manipulation that we saw after Christchurch—for example, when some people modified the video to avoid detection in order to repost it after it had already been taken down.

As the number of users on Facebook has grown, and as the challenge of balancing freedom of expression and safety has increased, we have come to realize that Facebook should not be making so many of these difficult decisions alone. That's why we will create an external oversight board to help govern speech on Facebook by the end of 2019. The oversight board will be independent from Facebook, and it will be a final level of appeal for what stays up and what comes down on our platform.

Even with the oversight board in place, we know that people will use many different online platforms and services to communicate, and we'd all be better off if there were clear baseline standards for all platforms. This is why we would like to work with governments to establish clear frameworks related to harmful online content.

We have been working with President Macron of France on exactly this kind of project, and we welcome the opportunity to engage with more countries going forward.

Kevin.

(1050)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

In terms of privacy we very clearly understand our important responsibility as custodians of people's data and the need for us to do better. That is why, since 2014, we have taken significant measures to drastically reduce the amount of data that third party applications can access on Facebook and why we're putting together a much bigger and muscular privacy function within the company. We've also made significant advancements to give people more transparency and control over their data.

We recognize that, while we're doing much more on privacy, we're all better off when there are overarching frameworks to govern the collection and use of data. Such frameworks should protect your right to choose how your information is used, while enabling innovation. They should hold companies such as Facebook accountable by imposing penalties when we make mistakes and should clarify new areas of inquiry, including when data can be used for the public good and how this should be applied to artificial intelligence.

There are already some good models to emulate, including the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation and Canada's Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act. Achieving some degree of harmonization around the world would be desirable and would facilitate economic growth.

We also believe that the principle of data portability is hugely important for consumer choice and for ensuring a dynamic and competitive marketplace for digital services. People should be able to take the data they have put on one service and move it to another service. The question becomes how data portability can be done in a way that is secure and privacy-protective. Data portability can only be meaningful if there are common standards in place, which is why we support a standard data transfer format and the open source data transfer project.

Finally, Facebook is doing its utmost to protect elections on our platform around the world by investing significantly in people, technology and partnerships. We have tripled the number of people working on security matters worldwide from 10,000 to 30,000 people. We have developed cutting-edge AI technology that allows us to detect and remove fake accounts en masse.

Of course, we cannot achieve success working only on our own, so we've partnered with a wide range of organizations. In Canada we are proud to be working with Agence France-Presse on third party fact checking, MediaSmarts on digital literacy and Equal Voice to keep candidates, in particular women candidates, safe online.

Facebook is a strong supporter of regulations promoting the transparency of online political advertising. We think it is important that citizens should be able to see all the political ads that are running online, especially those that are not targeted at them. That is why we support and will comply with Bill C-76, Canada's Elections Modernization Act, which this Parliament passed, and will be engaging in the weeks ahead with Canadian political advertisers, including the federal political parties represented here today, on important changes for political advertising that will come to the platform by the end of June.

Finally, Mr. Chair, if I may, as you will know, Facebook is part of the Canada declaration on electoral integrity online, which sets out 12 commitments that the Government of Canada and certain online platforms agree to undertake together in the lead up to the October federal election. This is a strong expression of the degree to which we are taking our responsibilities seriously in Canada, and we look forward to working in lockstep with officials to guard against foreign interference.

Thank you for the opportunity.[Translation]

We look forward to taking your questions. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Chan.

Next up, we'll go to Mr. Slater, with Google.

Mr. Derek Slater (Global Director, Information Policy, Google LLC):

Thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today.

My name is Derek Slater, and at Google I help shape the company's approach to information policy and content regulation. I'm joined here by my colleague Colin McKay, who's the head of public policy for Google in Canada.

We appreciate your leadership and welcome the opportunity to discuss Google's approach to addressing our many shared issues.

For nearly two decades, we have built tools that help users access, create and share information like never before, giving them more choice, opportunity and exposure to a diversity of resources and opinions. We know, though, that the very platforms that have enabled these societal benefits may also be abused, and this abuse ranges from spam to violent extremism and beyond. The scrutiny of lawmakers and our users informs and improves our products as well as the policies that govern them.

We have not waited for government regulation to address today's challenges. Addressing illegal and problematic content online is a shared responsibility that requires collaboration across government, civil society and industry, and we are doing and will continue to do our part.

I will highlight a few of the things we're doing today. On YouTube, we use a combination of automated and human review to identify and remove violative content. Over time we have improved, removing more of this content faster and before it's even viewed. Between January and March 2019, YouTube removed nearly 8.3 million videos for violating its community guidelines, and 76% of these were first flagged by machines rather than people. Of those detected by machines, over 75% had never received a single view.

When it comes to combatting disinformation, we have invested in our ranking systems to make quality count in developing policies, threat monitoring and enforcement mechanisms to tackle malicious behaviours and in features that provide users with more context, such as fact check or information panels on Google Search and YouTube.

Relatedly, in the context of election integrity, we've been building products for over a decade that provide timely and authoritative information about elections around the world. In addition, we have devoted significant resources to help campaigns, candidates and election officials improve their cybersecurity posture in light of existing and emerging threats. Our Protect Your Election website offers free resources like advanced protection, which provides Google's strongest account security, and Project Shield, a free service designed to mitigate the risk of distributed denial of service attacks that inundate sites with traffic in an effort to shut them down.

While industry needs to do its part, policy-makers, of course, have a fundamental role to play in ensuring everyone reaps the personal and economic benefits of modern technologies while addressing social costs and respecting fundamental rights. The governments and legislatures of the nearly 200 countries and territories in which we operate have come to different conclusions about how to deal with issues such as data protection, defamation and hate speech. Today's legal and regulatory frameworks are the product of deliberative processes, and as technology and society's expectations evolve, we need to stay attuned to how best to improve those rules.

In some cases, laws do need updates, for instance, in the case of data protection and law enforcement access to data. In other cases, new collaboration among industry, government and civil society may lead to complementary institutions and tools. The recent Christchurch call to action on violent extremism is just one example of this sort of pragmatic, effective collaboration.

Similarly, we have worked with the European Union on its hate speech code of conduct, which includes an audit process to monitor how platforms are meeting their commitments, and on the recent EU Code of Practice on Disinformation. We agreed to help researchers study this topic and to provide a regular audit of our next steps in this fight.

New approaches like these need to recognize relevant differences between services of different purpose and function. Oversight of content policies should naturally focus on content sharing platforms. Social media, video sharing sites and other services that have the principle purpose of helping people to create content and share it with a broad audience should be distinguished from other types of services like search, enterprise services, file storage and email, which require different sets of rules.

With that in mind, we want to highlight today four key elements to consider as part of evolving oversight and discussion around content sharing platforms.

First is to set clear definitions.

While platforms have a responsibility to set clear rules of the road for what is or is not permissible, so too, do governments have a responsibility to set out the rules around what they consider to be unlawful speech. Restrictions should be necessary and proportionate, based on clear definitions and evidence-based risks and developed in consultation with relevant stakeholders. These clear definitions, combined with clear notices about specific pieces of content, are essential for platforms to take action.

(1055)



Second, develop standards for transparency and best practice.

Transparency is the basis for an informed discussion and helps build effective practices across the industry. Governments should take a flexible approach that fosters research and supports responsible innovation. Overly restrictive requirements like one-size-fits-all removal times, mandated use of specific technologies or disproportionate penalties will ultimately reduce the public's access to legitimate information.

Third, focus on systemic recurring failures rather than one-offs.

Identifying and responding to problematic content is similar, in a way, to having information security. There will always be bad actors and bugs and mistakes. Improvement depends on collaboration across many players using data-driven approaches to understand whether particular cases are outliers or representative of a more significant recurring systemic problem.

Fourth and finally, foster international co-operation.

As today's meeting demonstrates, these concerns and issues are global. Countries should share best practices with one another and avoid conflicting approaches that impose undue compliance burdens and create confusion for customers. That said, individual countries will make different choices about permissible speech based on their legal traditions, history and values consistent with international human rights obligations. Content that is unlawful in one country may be lawful in another.

These principles are meant to contribute to a conversation today about how legislators and governments address the issues we are likely to discuss, including hate speech, disinformation and election integrity.

In closing, I will say that the Internet poses challenges to the traditional institutions that help society organize, curate and share information. For our part, we are committed to minimizing that content that detracts from the meaningful things our platforms have to offer. We look forward to working with the members of this committee and governments around the world to address these challenges as we continue to provide services that promote and deliver trusted and useful information.

Thank you.

(1100)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next up we'll go to Twitter. I believe Mr. Monje is going to be speaking.

Go ahead.

Mr. Carlos Monje (Director, Public Policy, Twitter Inc.):

Thank you very much.

Chairman Zimmer, Chairman Collins and members of the committee, my name is Carlos Monje. I'm Director of Public Policy for Twitter. I'm joined by Michele Austin, who's our Head of Public Policy for Canada.

On behalf of Twitter, I would like to acknowledge the hard work of all the committee members on the issues before you. We appreciate your dedication and willingness to work with us.

Twitter's purpose is to serve the public conversation. Any attempts to undermine the integrity of our service erodes the core tenets of freedom of expression online. This is the value upon which our company is based.

The issues before this committee are ones that we care about deeply as individuals. We want people to feel safe on Twitter and to understand our approach to health and safety of the service. There will always be more to do, but we've made meaningful progress.

I would like to briefly touch upon our approach to privacy and disinformation and I look forward to your questions.

Twitter strives to protect the privacy of the people who use our service. We believe that privacy is a fundamental human right. Twitter is public by default. This differentiates our service from other Internet sites. When an individual creates a Twitter account and begins tweeting, their tweets are immediately viewable and searchable by anyone around the world. People understand the default public nature of Twitter and they come to Twitter expecting to see and join in a public conversation. They alone control the content that they share on Twitter, including how personal or private that content might be.

We believe that when people trust us with their data, we should be transparent about how we provide meaningful control over what data is being collected, how it is used and when it is shared. These settings are easily accessible and built with user friendliness front of mind. Our most significant personalization in data settings are located on a single page.

Twitter also makes available the “your Twitter data” toolset. Your Twitter data provides individuals with insight on the types of data stored by us, such as username, email address, phone numbers associated with the account, account creation details and information about the inferences we may have drawn. From this toolset, people can do things like edit their inferred interests, download their information and understand what we have.

Twitter is also working proactively to address spam, malicious automation, disinformation and platform manipulation by improving policies and expanding enforcement measures, providing more context for users, strengthening partnerships with governments and experts, and providing greater transparency. All of this is designed to foster the health of the service and protect the people who use Twitter.

We continue to promote the health of the public conversation by countering all forms of platform manipulation. We define platform manipulation as using Twitter to disrupt the conversation by engaging in bulk aggressive or deceptive activity. We've made significant progress. In fact, in 2018, we identified and challenged more than 425 million accounts suspected of engaging in platform manipulation. Of these, approximately 75% were ultimately suspended. We are increasingly using automated and proactive detection methods to find abuse and manipulation on our service before they impact anyone's experience. More than half the accounts we suspend are removed within one week of registration—many within hours.

We will continue to improve our ability to fight manipulative content before it affects the experience of people who use Twitter. Twitter cares greatly about disinformation in all contexts, but improving the health of the conversation around elections is of utmost importance. A key piece of our election strategy is expanding partnerships with civil society to increase our ability to understand, identify and stop disinformation efforts.

Here in Canada, we're working with Elections Canada, the commissioner of Canada Elections, the Canadian centre for cybersecurity, the Privy Council Office, democratic institutions and civil society partners such as the Samara Centre for Democracy and The Democracy Project.

In addition to our efforts to safeguard the service, we believe that transparency is a proven and powerful tool in the fight against misinformation. We have taken a number of actions to disrupt foreign operations and limit voter suppression and have significantly increased transparency around these actions. We released to the public and to researchers the world's largest archive of information operations. We've pervaded data and information on more than 9,600 accounts including accounts originating in Russia, Iran and Venezuela, totalling more than 25 million tweets.

It is our fundamental belief that these accounts and their content should be available and searchable, so that members of the public, governments and researchers can investigate, learn and build media literacy capabilities for the future. They also help us be better.

(1105)



I want to highlight one specific example of our efforts to combat disinformation here in Canada.

Earlier this spring we launched a new tool to direct individuals to credible public health resources when they searched Twitter for key words associated with vaccines. Here we partnered with the Public Health Agency of Canada. This new investment builds on our existing work to guard against the artificial amplification of non-credible content about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines. Moreover, we already ensure that advertising content does not contain misleading claims about the cure, treatment, diagnosis or prevention of any disease, including vaccines.

In closing, Twitter will continue to work on developing new ways to maintain our commitment to privacy, to fight disinformation on our service and to remain accountable and transparent to people across the globe. We have made strong and consistent progress, but our work will never be done.

Once again, thank you for the opportunity to be here. We look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

First of all, we will go to my co-chair, Damian Collins, and then the sequence will follow.

You each have five minutes. Try to keep it as crisp as you possibly can.

Mr. Collins.

Mr. Damian Collins (Chair, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I'm going to direct my first question to the Facebook representatives. I'm sure you're aware that one of the principal concerns of members of this committee has been that deceptive information, deliberately and maliciously spread through the tools created by social media companies, are a harm to democracy, and this disinformation is used to undermine senior politicians and public figures, public institutions and the political process.

With that in mind, could Facebook explain why it has decided not to remove the video of Nancy Pelosi that presents a distorted impression of her to undermine her public reputation? The reason I think this is so important is that we're all aware that new technology is going to make the creation of these sorts of fake or manipulated films much easier. Perhaps you could explain why Facebook is not going to take this film down.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Thank you, Mr. Collins.

I'm happy to explain our approach to misinformation a bit more clearly for this committee.

First, I want to be clear that we are taking action against that video—

Mr. Damian Collins:

I'm sorry, Mr. Potts, we haven't got much time. I'd like you to answer the question you've been asked, not give a statement about Facebook's policies on misinformation or what else you might have done. I want you to answer the question as to why you, unlike YouTube, are not taking this film down?

Mr. Neil Potts:

We are aggressively down ranking that—

Mr. Damian Collins:

I know you're down ranking it. Why aren't you taking the film down?

Mr. Neil Potts:

It is our policy to inform people when we have information on the platform that may be false, so they can make their own decisions about that content.

Mr. Damian Collins:

But this is content that I think is widely accepted as being fake. YouTube has taken it down. The fact-checkers that work with Facebook are saying it's fake, yet the video is allowed to remain and that video being there is far more powerful than any legal disclaimer that may be written under or over it.

Why won't you say that films that are clearly fake and are independently verified as being fake, that are there to deceive people about some of the most senior politicians in your country, will be taken down?

Mr. Neil Potts:

We are conducting research on our inform treatments. That is the treatment that shows that something is fake. For example, if someone wanted to share this video with their friends or if they have already shared it or when they see it in a newsfeed, they receive a message that says it's false.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Facebook accepts that this film is a distortion, doesn't it?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Neil, you're closer to this, but my understanding is that the video in question has been slowed down. Is that what this is?

Mr. Neil Potts:

That's correct. I think this is manipulated—

Mr. Damian Collins:

It's manipulated film to create the distorted impression that Nancy Pelosi was somehow impaired when she was speaking. That's what has happened and that's why YouTube has taken the film down and that's why there has been a general recognition, including by independent fact-checkers who work for Facebook, that this film is distorted and creates a distorted impression of the third most senior politician in America.

(1110)

Mr. Neil Potts:

As you mentioned the fact-checkers, we work with over 50 fact-checkers internationally that are—

Mr. Damian Collins:

This is not in question. The fact-checkers recognize it's fake. You're saying it can stay there. Do you not see that what Facebook is doing is giving a green light to anyone in the world who wants to make a distorted or fake film about a senior politician, or maybe in the future use deepfake technologies to do it, and know that whatever happens Facebook won't remove the film?

Mr. Neil Potts:

I think you're asking a philosophical question, sir. Should we remove or should we inform people that it is fake? We have taken the approach to inform people that it's fake, so they can understand why that video is on the platform and what other independent parties have considered this to be. They have considered it to be false and now they see this on our platform if they go to share it. All these questions, I think are very thorough questions, but it allows people to make their own decision and it allows them to tell others it is false.

You mentioned that the video is slowed down, which by all accounts and the fact-checkers have said it is, but I think there are many different cases where videos are slowed down and that would perhaps not be a warrant for this committee.

Mr. Damian Collins:

The issue here is to say that if someone is making a film, or slowing down a film or manipulating a film, to try to create the false impression that a senior public figure is not fit for office, then that is an attempt to undermine them and the office they hold.

This is not a question of opinion. This is not a question of free speech. This is a question of people manipulating content in order to undermine public figures, and my concern is that to leave that sort of content up there, when it is indisputably fake, indisputably false and distorted, and to allow permission for this content to be shared with and promoted by other users is irresponsible.

YouTube has removed this content. I don't understand why Facebook doesn't do the same.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Sir, I understand your concerns, but I think your questions are the right ones and that they show the complexity of this issue and also show perhaps that the approach we are taking is working. You don't hear people—

Mr. Damian Collins:

Sorry, but with all respect, what it shows is the simplicity of these issues, the simplicity that another company has taken, recognizing the same issues, the simple action to say that this is clearly fake, it's clearly distorted, it's there to undermine senior public figures and it actually shouldn't have a place on the platform. It shouldn't be part of your community.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Your opinion is right, and I obviously respect the opinion of YouTube as an independent company, but we're not hearing people talk about this video as if it were real. We're hearing people discuss the fact that it is fake and that it is on the platform, so on the question of whether we have informed people that this is a fake video, yes, we have. I think that is the predominant speech right now. Whether it's the conversation we're having right now, whether it's on the news or others, people understand that this video is fake and they can make further decisions from there.

Mr. Damian Collins:

My concern about this is that it sets a very dangerous precedent. Your colleague Monika Bickert said last week to CNN that basically Facebook's policy is that any political content, any disinformation content in relation to politics will not be taken down, that there would be notes put up for users so they could see that the facts are disputed, but it will never be removed.

If you're going to allow your platform to be abused in this way by people producing disinformation films targeted at users to try to interfere with democracy and the best you're going to do is just put a flag on it to say some people dispute this film, I think that is a very dangerous precedent.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Collins.

We'll go next to Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Go ahead, for five minutes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

You speak to Mr. Zuckerberg often enough, because you're here on his behalf. Remind me why he isn't here today.

Mr. Neil Potts:

I'm sorry, sir. I can't see your name.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

It is Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Mr. Erskine-Smith, Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg have entrusted us to represent the company here today. We are subject matter experts in these areas, and we're more than happy for the opportunity to be here, but I do want to make—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

He said, “I'm looking forward to discussing these issues with lawmakers around the world” less than two months ago. He just didn't mean these lawmakers. He meant other lawmakers, I'm sure.

I'm going to talk about privacy. In his most recent report, our Privacy Commissioner has said that Facebook's privacy protection framework was “empty”. Then on May 7 before this committee, our Privacy Commissioner said that finding still applies, that it is empty. If Facebook takes privacy seriously, and I heard Mr. Chan say that it does—these aren't my words; these are the Privacy Commissioner's words—why had it “outright rejected, or refused to implement” the Privacy Commissioner's recommendations?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Given that the commissioner has indicated that he will be taking this to Federal Court, we're somewhat limited in what we can say, but what I can share with you is that—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

You're not limited in what you can say at all, Mr. Chan.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I'm going to continue with what I can share with you, which is that we actually have been working quite hard in the last few months to arrive at a resolution and a path forward with the Privacy Commissioner of Canada—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

So you didn't outright reject or refuse to implement the recommendations.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I think we were in a conversation about how we could get to the objectives that we all seek.

(1115)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

When the Privacy Commissioner wrote those specific words in his specific report, he was incorrect, in your view.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I don't.... If I may, I just want to share a bit more, because I am limited in what I can say—

The Chair:

Actually, Mr. Chan....

Mr. Chan, the priority goes to members of the committee, so if you wish to keep speaking, you need to hear.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mark Zuckerberg has also said the future is private. Interestingly, of course though, it used to be Facebook privacy policy in 2004 that it did not and would not use cookies to collect private information from any user. That changed in 2007. Initially Facebook gave users the ability to prohibit the collection of their personal information from third parties, and that was again changed.

When Mr. Zuckerberg says the future is private, does he mean the future is going back to our past, when we cared about privacy before profits?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I think we are undertaking a significant effort to reimagine what communications services will look like online. I think there have been a lot of interesting things written, not just by folks at the company but around the world. We do see a trend line such that people are increasingly focused on one-to-one communications. Those are, by definition, private, but what it does raise, sir, in terms of public policy questions is a very interesting balance between privacy and lawful access to information and questions of encryption. These are tight tensions. I think they've been raised previously, including in previous parliaments of Canada, and we look forward to engaging on those questions.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

With regard to engaging on those questions, GDPR has been adopted by the EU. We've recommended, at this committee, that Canada go further initially.

Facebook made $22 billion last year. Alphabet made $30 billion last year. Previously, you've used millions of those dollars to lobby against GDPR. Now you agree that's a standard that ought to be in place or that similar standards ought to be in place.

I'd like a simple yes-or-no answer, Mr. Chan and Mr. Slater.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Yes, we fully support GDPR.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mr. Slater.

Mr. Colin McKay (Head, Government Affairs and Public Policy, Google Canada):

If you don't mind, Mr. Erskine-Smith, I'll respond as the privacy expert.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Sure.

Mr. Colin McKay:

Yes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mr. McNamee was here and he suggested that perhaps consent shouldn't be the only rule in play and that in certain instances we should simply ban certain practices. He used web tracking.

When was the last time that Google read my emails to target me with ads? How many years ago was it?

Mr. Colin McKay:

We stopped using your Gmail content for advertising in 2017. That was specific to you. That information was never shared externally.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Is that something that we could consider banning so that individuals could never consent to having their emails read to be targeted for advertising? Would you be comfortable with that?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

It's certainly the practice that we have now. I hesitate at the word “ban” because there's a broad range of services that might be used in that specific context that make sense.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

The German competition authority, in February of this year, said: In view of Facebook’s superior market power, an obligatory tick on the box to agree to the company’s terms of use is not an adequate basis for such intensive data processing. The only choice the user has is...to accept the comprehensive combination of data or to refrain from using the social network. In such a difficult situation the user’s choice cannot be referred to as voluntary consent.

Mr. Chan and Mr. Slater, do you think that privacy is a key consideration in competition and merger decisions, and should competition authorities around the world take privacy issues into account?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I'm sorry. Could you repeat the question just to make sure I understand?

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Do you agree that competition authorities around the world should be looking at privacy—just as they currently look at price—and data collection of our personal information as a key consideration in competition law and when looking at mergers and acquisitions?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

That's a very interesting question of public policy. I think, presumably, certain—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

It could just be a yes or no.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

These are complex issues, sir, as you can appreciate, and if you would allow me, I would just like to say a few more words with regard to this because it is complicated.

I think it's clear that competition policies and privacy policies are quite different. I suspect that data protection authorities around the world would have very different views about whether or not it is appropriate to pour concepts from other realms into data protection law.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I'm not suggesting that. I'm suggesting that since we currently protect consumers on price, shouldn't we protect consumers on privacy? We have a German competition authority suggesting that we should do so.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I see. I'm sorry. I understand more clearly what you're saying.

(1120)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I did read a quote directly from the German competition authority.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

You're absolutely right that data protection...that we should treat privacy as a foundational cornerstone of the digital economy.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Of competition law....

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I believe that these are two very distinct and separate things. It wouldn't just be me. I think that if you talk to competition authorities and data protection authorities, they might very much arrive at similar views.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

That's not the one that I read to you.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We are aware of this. I have spoken to some of my colleagues in Germany with respect to this. Our understanding is that the GDPR needs to, obviously, be enforced and interpreted by data protection authorities in Europe.

The Chair:

Thanks.

We need to move on.

We will go next to Monsieur Gourde for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Over the years, the digital platforms you represent have developed very powerful, even overly powerful, tools. You are in the midst of a frantic race for performance. However, it isn't necessarily for the well-being of humanity, but rather for the personal interests of your companies.

Let me make an analogy. You have designed cars that can travel up to 250 kilometres an hour, but you rent them to drivers who travel at that speed in school zones. You have developed tools that have become dangerous, that have become weapons.

As a legislator, I do not accept that you rejected out of hand your responsibility in this regard. These tools belong to you, you have equipped them with functions, but you don't necessarily choose the users. So you rent your tools commercially to people who misuse them.

In the election we'll have in Canada in a few months, will you have the technical ability to immediately stop any fake news, any form of hate advertising or any form of advertising that would undermine our democracy? Will you be able to act very quickly? At the very least, can you stop all advertising during elections in Canada and other countries, if you cannot guarantee us absolute control over the ads that can be placed on your platforms?

We'll start with the representatives from Facebook, then I'd like to hear from Google and Twitter.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you very much, Mr. Gourde.

I'll start by saying that we'll do everything we can to protect the election in October 2019.

As you know, we are working closely with the Conservative Party, the New Democratic Party and the Liberal Party. The other parties should be mentioned, including the Green Party, the People's Party, the Bloc Québécois—

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Excuse me, Mr. Chan, but it isn't about parties. It's about people who will have to make a choice based on the information we will provide to them, not on fake information.

Do you have the ability to quickly stop the spread of fake information or even to stop altogether any advertising that can be placed on your platforms, if you don't have control over it?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you for the question.

Here, in Canada, we have a team that works on each election. We have done this in Ontario, British Columbia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick—

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Please don't list all the provinces.

I want to know if you have the ability to stop the spread of any hate advertising or any fake information at any time during the next election.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

For the time being, in all the other elections, there have been no problems that we haven't been able to resolve quickly.

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Thank you.

I have the same question for the representatives from Google. [English]

Mr. Derek Slater:

Getting this right is absolutely essential. We do invest heavily in efforts to both anticipate and prevent efforts that would interfere with election integrity. That's by making useful information available in search or dealing with actors who might deceive or misrepresent themselves in ads.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

Twitter has spent a significant amount of time improving our internal ability to spot this type of disinformation. We've learned from elections around the globe. We've actively engaged with civil society here, most recently in the Alberta elections, and we believe we are very prepared. However, we cannot take our eye off the prize. It's going to be the people who want to manipulate the conversation who will continue to innovate and we will continue to innovate to stay ahead of them.

(1125)

[Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Based on your answers, I remain doubtful and concerned.

You cars can drive 250 kilometres and hour, but the speed limit on the highway is 100 kilometres an hour. Are you able to reduce the capacity of your tools so that it is fair and equitable for everyone?

What is the point of having such powerful tools if it is to do evil, when a lesser performance could serve the good of humanity?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

If I may, I will speak in English to be clearer, since it's my mother tongue.[English]

I just want to say, Mr. Gourde, that's exactly what we're going to do. Next month, as your party and other parties in Canada are aware, we're introducing a very friction-intensive process for anybody who wants to run political ads. We are going to require them to authorize, to demonstrate that they're Canadian. We will need to independently validate the fact that they're Canadian, and then we're going to have to give them a code—or a key, if you will—where they're going to authenticate before they can run an ad.

This is not going to be a thing that happens in an hour. It's not going to be a thing that happens in a day. It's going to be a multi-day process. You have my assurance that we'll be reaching out and working in strict collaboration with all political parties in Canada to take them through this process. Precisely to your point about speed bumps or brakes, I would say this is going to be significant friction in the system, but we think this is the right thing to do in order to get ad transparency right, it's the right thing to do to get regulated political advertising right and it's an important thing to do to guard against foreign interference.

The Chair:

Thank you, Monsieur Gourde.

Next up is Mr. Angus.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you so much for these presentations. They're very helpful.

Mr. Chan, we know that Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg are very important people. Are they busy today?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I am not aware of their schedules today, but I think that's right. They unfortunately had to send their regrets.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Okay.

I'm trying to get a sense of corporate governance with Facebook. You come from Canadian politics. You worked for the Liberal Party. We're kind of meek and mild here in Canada. I don't ever remember a summons being issued against the head of a corporation. I don't know of anybody who has ever decided to ignore a summons.

Surely to God they have something really pressing to keep them busy. When Mr. Zuckerberg recently spoke, as my colleague pointed out, about his willingness, his desire to talk with legislators. Was that a joke?

This is for Mr. Chan. I'm interested in Mr. Chan because he represents us in Canada.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Well, sir, I have to say that we do desire very much to collaborate with the Parliament of Canada and the Government of Canada. The election that's before us is going to be an important one, and an important one for us to get right at Facebook. We want to ensure a free and fair election. That's why we have done all the things that we have done.

We're complying with Bill C-76. To my knowledge, we may be the only company represented on this panel that is moving forward with an architectured system to do this. We have moved quickly on hate figures and hate organizations in Canada, and we have signed on to the Canada declaration on electoral integrity. I would—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Yes, thank you for that. Sorry, I only have a few minutes.

I appreciate that work. I'm a big fan of Facebook.

Mr. Kevin Chan: Thank you, sir.

Mr. Charlie Angus: I've spoken greatly about the powerful tools it has in the indigenous communities I represent.

My concern is this idea of opt-in, opt-out that Facebook has when it comes to national law. First of all, you ignored a summons by Parliament because Mr. Zuckerberg may be busy. It may be his day off. I don't know.

You were recently found guilty by our regulator in the Cambridge Analytica breach. Our regulator, Mr. Therrien, said: Canadians using Facebook are at high risk that their personal information will be used in ways they may not be aware of, for purposes that they did not agree to and which may be contrary to their interests and expectations. This could result in real harms, including political...surveillance.

What was striking was that Facebook didn't concede that we have jurisdiction over our own citizens. If you're saying you're willing to work with parliamentarians, I don't get this opt-in when it works for Facebook and opt-out when....

Can you give me an example of any company saying that they just don't recognize whether or not we have jurisdiction over our citizens?

(1130)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, my eyebrows were also raised when I saw those reports, so I did read it carefully and I did talk to legal counsel about it.

My understanding is that this was in reference to the fact that, to our knowledge, based on the available evidence around the world and based on documented evidence, not only in terms of contracts and things like that, but also witnesses who have first-hand accounts, there was no Canadian, or indeed, no non-U.S. user data that was ever transferred to Cambridge Analytica. I believe, if I may—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Okay, but on that point—I only have a short period of time—622,000 Canadians had their data taken. Facebook became aware of it in 2015, and Facebook said nothing until it was exposed internationally because of the Cambridge Analytica breach. That is a breach of Canadian law under PIPEDA.

You know that law, yet to tell Canadian legislators that we had to prove individual harm before Facebook would concede jurisdiction, that to me would be like an international auto company saying, “Yes, there were mass deaths in Brazil; yes, there were mass deaths in the United States; yes, there were mass deaths all over Europe; but since nobody died in a car accident in Canada, we are not going to comply with Canadian law.”

How do you get to decide what laws you respect and what laws you figure don't apply to you? Why do you think that?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Mr. Angus, with all due respect, we actually go over and above the law—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

No you don't. You don't recognize that we have jurisdiction.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

—as the Parliament of Canada knows.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

How can you say that to us with a straight face, Mr. Chan? How can you?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Because it is the truth, sir.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

So we have to take you to court to get you to recognize that we have jurisdiction to protect our citizens, after you sat on a breach that you knew about for three years and did nothing to tell us about because you didn't want to up-end your business model.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

With respect to election integrity, we are going over and above the law—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

I'm talking about the privacy rights of Canadians and the breach of our law that you were found guilty of. That's the question.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We can talk about that as well, sir, in the time remaining, if you will permit me.

As I said, we wanted to get to a resolution with the commissioner. He has decided to take us to court, which is of course the framework that's prescribed for him—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

He had to take you to court, because you wouldn't concede that we as legislators even have jurisdiction over our own citizens. That's not coming to a resolution. That's like, “Hey, Facebook, is it okay if we come and see, and if it's okay, we'll all work things out?” That is not how law works. Maybe that's how it works for Mr. Zuckerberg, but that's not how it works internationally, which is why we are here. It's because we have international legislators who are frustrated—

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We have nothing but the utmost respect for—

Mr. Charlie Angus:

—by the lack of respect for international law.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We have the utmost respect for the law in Canada and for legal authority around the world.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go on next to Mr. Tong from Singapore.

Mr. Edwin Tong (Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Law and Ministry of Health, Parliament of Singapore):

I have limited time, so I would appreciate it if you just focus on my questions and give the answers directly.

We've heard a lot about what you wish to do, who you are engaged with, who you wish to see and how you're going to work on your policies, but let's just see what actually appears and continues to appear on your platforms.

To do that and to save some time, I have put together a little handout that summarizes several cases, which I have no doubt you're familiar with. Just thumb through them quickly. These are all cases that were sensational. They all went viral quickly. They were probably amplified by trolls and bots—fake accounts. They incite fear, they cause disaffection and tensions, and they prey on divisive social fault lines: race, religion, immigration.

One key fact is that they're all false information as well, and all resulted in real world harm: physical injuries, deaths, riots, accentuating divisions and fault lines between religions and races, causing fear.

Just go to the very last page of the handout and look at Sri Lanka, April 2019. The leader of the Easter terrorist bombings in Sri Lanka had posted videos that were on your platforms—Facebook and YouTube—for at least six months prior to the bombing itself. In the videos, he says, “Non-Muslims and people who don't accept Muslims can be killed, along with women and children.” Separately, he says, “We can kill women and children with bombs. It is right.”

This is clear hate speech, is it not?

Mr. Neil Potts:

It is hate speech.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

And it's a breach of your own policies, isn't that correct?

Mr. Neil Potts:

That would be a breach of our policies. That is correct, sir.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

These passages, posted months prior to the Easter bombings, portend what was to come, and it happened, horrifically, in April, in the same fashion as this alleged priest, Mr. Zahran Hashim, said it would—by bombs, killing women and children—on your platforms.

Why? Why was it not removed?

Mr. Neil Potts:

Thank you, Mr. Tong.

Just to quickly—

(1135)

Mr. Edwin Tong:

No. Please answer my question. Why was it not removed? You say it's a breach of your own policies. Why was it not removed in September 2018?

Mr. Neil Potts:

When we're made aware of that content, we do remove it. If it is not reported or if we have not proactively identified it, then we would not remove it, because honestly we would not know that it exists.

I want to say that our hearts go out to those people in Sri Lanka and everywhere that you've mentioned here in your handout. Intercommunal ethnic violence is a horrific thing. We don't want our platform to be co-opted and used for these activities. In fact, we have taken aggressive action to combat this. We now have more than 30,000 people working in safety and security—

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Mr. Potts, I don't need a speech on what you will be doing.

Mr. Neil Potts:

I apologize.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

How difficult is it to work out that the phrase, “We can kill women and children with bombs. It is right”, is hate speech? How difficult is it?

Mr. Neil Potts:

That question is not hard, Mr. Tong. The question would be one of identifying the content. If we are not made aware that the content exists, either through a user report or our own proactive measures, then we would not know that this content is on the platform.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

So none of the AI, or the technology, or the fact-checkers or the army of people you have scrutinizing your platforms picked this up eight months prior to the event, and you are asking us to trust the processes that you intend to put in place, trust that the AI that you now have will do so in the future.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Artificial intelligence is a great lever to help us identify this. It is not perfect. It is not salient where it will get 100% of the activity right, just as humans we will not get 100% of the activity right. I would have to check on this video specifically, but if we were made aware of this video, we would remove it. This is a very straightforward call.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Mr. Potts, if you do some homework and check, local Muslim leaders flagged it to Facebook, and Facebook did not take it down despite being aware of it, despite it being, as you say, a clear breach of your own policies. I'd like to know why.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Sir, I would have to see how the content was shared. The way that you have—

Mr. Edwin Tong:

You said, Mr. Potts and Mr. Chan, that both of you are content specialists. You are domain specialists. You're here in place of Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg, and you should know. This happened a few months ago, so why was it not taken down despite Facebook being aware of it? Can you explain?

Mr. Neil Potts:

I'm trying to explain that I don't know that premise. I'd have to check to make sure that we were actually aware. I do not believe that we were aware of that video at the time.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Let me suggest to you that you didn't remove it because such content is sensational. It incites fear, violence, hatred and conspiracy theories. As Mr. McNamee explained to us earlier, that is what drives eyeballs to your platforms. It's what drives users to your platforms and that is the engine room of your profit mechanism.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Mr. Tong, I reject the premise. I reject that wholeheartedly. If we know that something is hate speech, if we know that it is causing violence, we actually move more swiftly.

We had a discussion earlier about misinformation. If we know that misinformation is actually leading to physical harm and violence, we work with trusted partners on the ground, civil society and others, to flag that for us—law enforcement even—and then we will actually remove that content.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Mr. Potts, Facebook was told about this. You can check. Facebook was also told about the problems in Sri Lanka on March 2018 by the Sri Lankan government. It refused to take it down on the basis that it didn't infringe on your own policies. Mr. McNamee says that as a result, governments in Sri Lanka, in Indonesia and in India have had to take proactive action to shut down social media such as Facebook and WhatsApp. Is that how you want this play out?

Can we trust the policies you have in place? Can we trust that what you do and put in place, checks to seek out and remove such content, will actually work?

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Tong. We'll have to go on to the next question.

We'd like to welcome our delegation from Ireland. They just landed this morning.

Welcome to our committee.

We'll start off our first five minutes with Hildegarde Naughton.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton (Chair, Joint Committee on Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Houses of the Oireachtas):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. We're delighted to be here this afternoon.

I'll start by listing out my questions for you, and the social media companies can answer afterwards. I have about three questions here. The first is in relation to data protection.

It's very clear that you're all scrambling to figure out how to make privacy rules clear and how to protect users' data. The inception of GDPR has been a sea change in European data protection. The Irish data protection commissioner now has the job of effectively regulating Europe, given the number of social media companies who have their headquarters based in Ireland.

In the 11 months since GDPR came into force, the commissioner has received almost 6,000 complaints. She has said that her concentration on Facebook is because she didn't think that there would be so many significant data breaches by one company, and at one point, there were breaches notified to her under GDPR every fortnight, so she opened a consolidated investigation to look at that. I want to ask Facebook if you can comment on her remarks and why you're having such difficulty protecting users' data.

Also, for this next question, I might ask Google and Facebook to comment. I and my colleague James Lawless and deputy Eamon Ryan met earlier this year with Mark Zuckerberg in Ireland, and he said that he would like to see GDPR rolled out globally. Some of Facebook's biggest markets are in the developing world, such as in Asia and Africa, and out of the top 10 countries, there are only two in the developed world, the United States and the United Kingdom. Some experts are saying that a one-size-fits-all approach won't work with GDPR, because some regions have different interpretations of the importance of data privacy.

I would like to get Google's viewpoint on that—What is your view is in relation to the rollout of GDPR globally? How would that work? Should it be in place globally?—and in relation to the concerns around the different interpretations of data privacy.

Finally, due to the work of our communications committee in the Oireachtas—the Irish parliament—the Irish government is now going to introduce a digital safety commissioner who will have legal takedown powers in relation to harmful communication online. Given that Ireland is the international and European headquarters for many social media companies, do you think that this legislation will effectively see Ireland regulating content for Europe and possibly beyond?

Whoever would like to come in first, please comment on that if you could.

(1140)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you, ma'am. I want to indicate that Neil and I spent some time with our Irish counterparts, and they have nothing but complimentary things to say about you, so it's nice to meet you.

With respect to the question of breaches that you mention, obviously we are not aware of the specifics that would have been sent to the Irish data protection authority, so I wouldn't be able to comment specifically on that, but I would say our general posture is to be as transparent as we can.

You—and various members at this committee—will probably know that we are quite forward-leaning in terms of publicly revealing where there have been bugs, where there has been some information we have found where we need to pursue investigations, where we're made aware of certain things. That's our commitment to you but also to users around the world, and I think you will continue to hear about these things as we discover them. That is an important posture for us to take, because we do want to do what is right, which is to inform our users but also to inform the public and legislators as much as possible whenever we are made aware of some of these instances.

We want to be very transparent, which is why you will hear more from us. Again, unfortunately, I cannot speak to the specifics that the DPA was referring to.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Google, can I have your comments, please?

Mr. Colin McKay:

As we outlined in our opening remarks, we look for international standards that are applicable across a variety of social, cultural and economic frameworks. We look for principle-driven frameworks, particularly in data protection. That has been the history with GDPR as well as the previous OECD principles.

The extension of GDPR beyond its current boundaries is something that is preferable. The question is, how does it adapt to the particular jurisdictions within which it has to operate, considering that the European environment and the history of data protection in Europe is very different from elsewhere in the world, especially the portions of the world, whether Africa or Asia, that you identified?

We're in agreement there. We have been applying the protections that are given to Europeans on a global basis. The question is, what does that look like within a domestic jurisdiction?

On your second question around a digital safety commissioner, I'll turn it over to my colleague Derek.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Naughton. We are actually at time, so we have to move on to the next delegate. My apologies. Time is short.

For the next question, we go to the Republic of Germany.

Mr. Jens Zimmermann (Social Democratic Party, Parliament of the Federal Republic of Germany):

Thank you very much.

I will also focus first on Facebook. It's great to get to know the Canadian public policy team. I know the German public policy team.

First, I would like to comment on what my colleague from Singapore asked. From my experience in Germany, I have a relatively simple answer. It is simply that many companies, also present today, do not have enough staff to work on all these issues and all these complaints. As has already been mentioned, AI is not always sufficient to work on this. What we've learned in Germany, after the introduction of the NetzDG, is that a massive increase in staff, which is needed to handle complaints, also increases the number of complaints that are handled. I don't know the situation in other countries, but this is definitely an important aspect.

I want to ask about the antitrust ruling in Germany on the question of whether the data from Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram should be combined without the consent of the users. You are working against that ruling in Germany, so obviously you don't agree, but maybe you can be a bit clearer on your position.

(1145)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you very much, sir. I understand from one of my colleagues in Canada that she spent some time with you yesterday at a round table. Thank you very much for the invitation.

With respect to the various platforms, our terms of service and our user data policy does underline the fact that we will share data infrastructure between various services, as you know. A big part of it, to be quite frank, is to ensure that we are able to provide some degree of security measures across platforms.

Facebook is a platform where you have your authentic identity. We want to make sure people are who they say they are, but there are lots of good reasons why you will want to have similar kinds of measures on the Instagram platform, for example. There are many instances where—and you would have heard of these in terms of even some of our coordinated inauthentic behaviour takedowns—to be able to do adequate investigations across the system, we actually have to have some ability to understand the provenance of certain content and certain accounts. Having a common infrastructure allows us to very effectively deal with those sorts of challenges.

Mr. Jens Zimmermann:

Yes, and it allows you to very effectively aggregate the data, increase the knowledge of the user and also increase the profit. Isn't that the reason behind it?

It would be possible to, again, give all the users the ability to decide on that. That would be very easy, but I think it would also be very costly for you.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I think, sir, what you're touching on in terms of the broader arc of where we're going is correct. We do want to give people more control. We want people to be able to—

Mr. Jens Zimmermann:

Okay, but why then are you working against that ruling in Germany?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I think the nub of this is again the question that Mr. Erskine-Smith raised: Where do the limits of competition policy start and end versus the limits of privacy?

Mr. Jens Zimmermann:

Okay. Thank you.

I also want to go to Google. You mentioned that you need clear definitions of unlawful speech. I looked into Germany's transparency report and it turns out that of 167,000 complaints in Germany, it was only in 145 cases that your colleagues needed to turn to specialists to determine whether or not this was unlawful speech. Why, then, do you think this is really a problem? Is it really a problem of definition or is it really a problem of handling the number of complaints and the massive amount of hate speech online?

Mr. Derek Slater:

That's a very important question. The NetzDG is a complex law, but one of the pieces that is relevant here is that it calls out, I believe, 22 specific statutes that it governs.

Mr. Jens Zimmermann:

Actually, the NetzDG basically says that in Germany, you need to comply with German law—full stop.

Mr. Derek Slater:

I understand that, and it says, with respect to these 22 statutes, “Here is your turnaround time and your transparency reporting requirements, leading to the data you had.” I think part of what is important there is that it refers specifically to clear statutory definitions. These definitions allow us to then act on clear notices in an expeditious manner as set within the framework of the law.

(1150)

The Chair:

Next we will go to the Republic of Estonia.

Go ahead, for five minutes.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus (Vice-Chairwoman, Reform Party, Parliament of the Republic of Estonia (Riigikogu)):

Thank you.

I come from Europe, from Estonia. It is true that, two days after the European election, one can say that you actually have made progress in removing the fake accounts, but it is also true that those fake accounts should not have been there in the first place.

My first question is the following: What kinds of changes are you planning to use to identify your users in the beginning?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you for that. I think we are cautiously pleased with the results in terms of the way the platform has performed in Europe. However, with respect to fake accounts, I would say—and I think my colleague Neil has mentioned—that this is a bit of an arms race with our adversaries, with bad actors trying to put inauthentic accounts and content onto the platform.

I think we want to constantly get better and to constantly evolve—

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

How do you improve the identification process in the first place?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

One of the things I can share with you, again in terms of the political advertising piece that we are trying to do, is that we are trying to get a very good certainty as to the identity of the individuals when they run an ad.

In Canada, as I mentioned earlier, we will do this and it will be not without pain. For political advertisers in Canada, it's very much that we will need to get some kind of ID from you. We will need to independently verify that ID, and then we're going to send you some kind of key—a digital key if you will—that you're going to have to use to authenticate yourself before you can even run a political ad.

This is a very costly and significant investment. It is also not without friction. I personally worry that there will be instances where people want to run an ad, don't know about this requirement and then find it's going to take many days to do.

I also worry that there may be false positives, but I think this is the right thing to do to protect elections around the world and here in Canada in October. We're prepared to put in the time, the investment and potentially some of the friction to get it right.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

All right. Thank you.

My second question will be about fake news or fake videos. What is your policy towards fake news, for example, deepfake? Will they be removed or will they just be marked as deepfake videos?

Mr. Derek Slater:

The issue of deepfakes.... Thanks for that question. It's a really important emerging issue. We have clear guidelines today about what content should be removed. If a deepfake were to fall under those guidelines, we would certainly remove it.

We also understand this needs further research. We've been working actively with civil society and academics on that.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

What about Facebook?

Mr. Neil Potts:

Thank you.

We are also investigating and doing research on this policy, to make sure we are in the right place. Currently, we would identify it as being fake and then inform our users, but we constantly—

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

The deepfake will stay on.

Mr. Neil Potts:

We constantly iterate our policies, and we may update those policies in the future, as they evolve. We are working with research agencies and people on the ground to understand how these videos could manifest. As I mentioned before, if these videos, or any type of misinformation, led to real world harm—or off-line harm, I should say—we would remove that content.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

What about Twitter?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

We also share concerns about deepfakes. If we see the use of deepfakes to spread misinformation in a way that violates our rules, we'll take down that content.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

My last question will come back to what Mr. Collins asked in the beginning, about the fake video of Nancy Pelosi. Let's say a similar video were to appear, only the person there was Mr. Zuckerberg. Would that video be taken down, or just marked as a fake one?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Neil Potts:

I'm sorry, the laughter.... I didn't hear the name?

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Sorry for the loud laughter. If a video similar to what has been airing, picturing Nancy Pelosi, appeared with Mark Zuckerberg, would you remove that fake video, or would you just mark it as fake news?

Mr. Neil Potts:

If it was the same video, inserting Mr. Zuckerberg for Speaker Pelosi, it would get the same treatment.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I want to give a brief explanation of what's going on behind me. Your chairs have elected to have a working lunch. Feel free to come up and grab something to eat, and we'll continue with testimony all the way through our lunch.

Next up, we have Mexico. Go ahead for five minutes.

(1155)

Hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre (Senator):

[Delegate spoke in Spanish, interpreted as follows:]

Thank you. I'm going to speak in Spanish.

I have several questions. In the case of Google, what do you do to protect people's privacy? I know many cases of sexting videos that are still there in the world, and when the victims of those videos go specifically to your office in Mexico—and I have known about several cases—the Google office tells them to go to the United States to complain. These are videos that are violently attacking somebody and cannot be downloaded. What do you do in those cases?

Mr. Derek Slater:

I'm not familiar with the particular cases you're talking about, but we do have strict guidelines about things like incitement to violence, or invasion of privacy and the like. If notified, and if we become aware of it, we would take action, if it's in violation of those guidelines. I'm not familiar with the specific cases, but would be happy to inquire further.

Hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[Delegate spoke in Spanish, interpreted as follows:]

I have information about very specific cases, but we don't know who to turn to in Mexico because they reject people. We hope you will take over this case, because the people have to wait for years to withdraw those things.

I'd like to ask Twitter about the creation of trends with robots. It's very common in Mexico. Every day, we have trends created with robots—the so-called bot farms. I don't know what the policy is at Twitter, because you seem to allow the artificial trends, or hashtags, when they are harming somebody. Why don't you allow trends to happen organically? I agree with having trends, things becoming viral and respecting freedom of expression, but why are robots allowed? If anybody can detect them, why is it Twitter cannot?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

Trends measure the conversation in real time and try to distinguish conversations that are always having a high level of engagement, English Premier League or the Mexican election writ large. What trends are trying to identify is acceleration above the normal. When that happens organically, like you mentioned, it has a different pattern from when it happens augmented by bots.

Since 2014, which for us is a lifetime, we've had the ability to protect trends from that kind of inorganic automated activity. Kevin mentioned an arms race. I think that's a good term for the battle against malicious automation. Right now we're challenging 450 million accounts a year for being inauthentic, and our tools are very subtle, very creative. They look at signals like instant retweets or activity that's so fast that it's impossible to be human.

Despite that, 75% is what ultimately gets kicked off the service, so 25% of the people who we thought were acting in an inauthentic way were able to pass the challenge. We are over-indexing to try to stop this inauthentic activity. This is a place where there is no delta between the societal values of trusting online activity and our imperatives as a company, which is that we want people when they come to Twitter to believe in what they see, to know that they are not getting messed about with Russian bots or whatever, so we work very hard to get this right and we're continuing to make improvements on a weekly basis.

Hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[Delegate spoke in Spanish, interpreted as follows:] But this happens normally every day, not during elections. It's happening every time that a trend is inflated with bots. There's been no adequate response to this. There are things that are aggressive.

This is for Twitter and for Facebook. When a user reports something that has been published, very commonly they report that they are not breaching their policy but they are aggressive against the person. They tell us that it's not breaching the policy, but it's somebody who is lying, who is attacking, and the person feels vulnerable. Many a time nothing happens because it's not breaching your policies.

Also, with this thing about the authentication, when the accounts are authenticated with blue arrows, even the other accounts can be blocked. Some people say identify yourself and they block all the accounts. Meanwhile, there are thousands of fake accounts and nothing happens, even if they are reported. There are users who are constantly reporting these fake accounts. Why do you have a different policy?

(1200)

The Chair:

Give a short answer, please.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

We are working to adjust our policies. We have things that are against our rules and we have things that aren't against our rules but that people don't like. We call it, internally, the gap. What we've been doing and what our teams have been doing is trying to break those issues down, portion by portion, and understand where the expectations of our users don't match the experience they're getting.

Our approach is, again, very consistent. We want people to feel comfortable, to feel safe to come online. We also don't want to squelch public expression, and these are issues that we care about deeply and take very personally.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next up, we'll go to the Kingdom of Morocco for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Mohammed Ouzzine (Deputy Speaker, Committee of Education and Culture and Communication, House of Representatives of the Kingdom of Morocco):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would also like to thank the kind team doing us the honour of being here today: Kevin Chan, Derek Slater, Neil Potts, Carlos Moje and Michele Austin. We would have liked Mark Zuckerberg to be with us, but he let us down. We hope he will return some other time.

I have been very attentive to two proposals from Mr. Chan. I would like to make a linguistic clarification for interpreters: when I use the word “proposition”, in English, it refers to the term “proposition”, and not “proposal”.

In presenting the issues raised by his company, Mr. Chan said that it was not just Facebook's responsibility to resolve them. We fully agree on this point.

And then, again on these issues, he added that society must be protected from the consequences. Of course, these platforms have social advantages. However, today we are talking about the social unrest they cause; this is what challenges us more than ever.

Facebook, Twitter and YouTube were initially intended to be a digital evolution, but it has turned into a digital revolution. Indeed, it has led to a revolution in systems, a revolution against systems, a revolution in behaviour, and even a revolution in our perception of the world.

It is true that today, artificial intelligence depends on the massive accumulation of personal data. However, this accumulation puts other fundamental rights at risk, as it is based on data that can be distorted.

Beyond the commercial and profit aspect, wouldn't it be opportune for you today to try a moral leap, or even a moral revolution? After allowing this dazzling success, why not now focus much more on people than on the algorithm, provided that you impose strict restrictions beforehand, in order to promote accountability and transparency?

We sometimes wonders if you are as interested when misinformation or hate speech occurs in countries other than China or in places other than Europe or North America, among others.

It isn't always easy to explain why young people, or even children, can upload staged videos that contain obscene scenes, insulting comments or swear words. We find this unacceptable. Sometimes, this is found to deviate from the purpose of these tools, the common rule and the accepted social norm.

We aren't here to judge you or to conduct your trial, but much more to implore you to take our remarks into consideration.

Thank you.

(1205)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you very much, Mr. Ouzzine.

Again, please allow me to answer in English. It isn't because I can't answer your question in French, but I think I'll be clearer in English.[English]

I'm happy to take the first question with respect to what you were talking about—humans versus machines or humans versus algorithms. I think the honest truth on that is that we need both, because we have a huge amount of scale, obviously. There are over two billion people on the platform, so in order to get at some of the concerns that members here have raised, we do need to have automated systems that can proactively find some of these things.

I think to go back to Mr. Collins's first question, it is also equally important that we have humans that are part of this, because context is ultimately going to help inform whether or not this is malicious, so context is super important.

If I may say so, sir, on the human questions, I do think you are hitting on something very important, and I had mentioned it a bit earlier. There is this need, I think, for companies such as Facebook not to make all of these kinds of decisions. We understand that. I think people want more transparency and they want to have a degree of understanding as to why decisions were arrived at in the way they were in terms of what stays up and what goes down.

I can tell you that in the last few months, including in Canada, we have embarked on global consultation with experts around the world to get input on how to create an external appeals board at Facebook, which would be independent of Facebook and would make decisions on these very difficult content questions. We think there is—at least as our current thinking in terms of what we put out there—this question of whether they should be publicly binding on Facebook. That is sort of the way we have imagined it and we are receiving input and we will continue to consult with experts. Our commitment is to get this done by 2019.

Certainly, on our platform, we understand that this is challenging. We want a combination of humans and algorithms, if you will, but we also understand that people will have better confidence in the decisions if there is a final board of appeal, and we're going to build that by 2019.

Of course, we're all here today to discuss the broader question of regulatory frameworks that should apply to all services online. There, once again obviously, the human piece of it will be incredibly important. So thank you, sir, for raising that, because that's the nub, I think, of what we're trying to get at—the right balance and the right framework per platform but also across all services online.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Chan.

Next up, we will go to Ecuador for five minutes.

Ms. Elizabeth Cabezas (President, National Assembly of the Republic of Ecuador):

[Delegate spoke in Spanish, interpreted as follows:]

Thank you very much.

I want to talk about some of the concerns that have already been mentioned at this meeting, and also express great concern regarding tweets and Twitter, on which there is a proliferation in the creation of false accounts that are not detected. They definitely remain active for a very long time on social networks and generate, in most cases, messages and trends that are negative and against different groups, both political and those that are linked to businesses or unions in many different areas.

I don't know what mechanisms you have decided to choose to verify the creation of these, because these are accounts that have to do with troll centres or troll farms, which in the case of Ecuador have really cropped up very frequently and which continue to. They have been spreading messages on a massive scale, malicious messages that counteract real information and true information and really twist the points of view.

More than continuing to mention the issues that have already been mentioned, I would urge you to think about fact-checking mechanisms that can detect these accounts in a timely manner, because definitely you do not do it quickly enough or as quickly as is necessary. This allows damaging messages to proliferate and generate different thoughts, and they distort the truth about a lot of subjects.

I don't know what the options are, in practice, or what you're going to be doing in practice to avoid this or prevent this, and to prevent the existence of these troll centres and the creation of accounts that are false, of which there are many.

(1210)

Mr. Carlos Monje:

Thank you. That is exactly the right question to ask, and one that we work on every day.

I'll just note that our ability to identify, disrupt and stop malicious automation improves every day. We are now catching—I misspoke earlier—425 million accounts, which we challenged in 2018.

Number one is stopping the coordinated bad activity that we see on the platform. Number two is working to raise credible voices—journalists, politicians, experts and civil society. Across Latin America we work with civil society, especially in the context of elections, to understand when major events are happening, to be able to focus our enforcement efforts on those events, and to be able to give people more context about people they don't understand.

I'll give you one example because I know time is short. If you go onto Twitter now, you can see the source of the tweet, meaning, whether it is coming from an iPhone, an Android device, or from TweetDeck or Hootsuite, or the other ways that people coordinate their Twitter activities.

The last piece of information or the way to think about this is transparency. We believe our approach is to quietly do our work to keep the health of the platform strong. When we find particularly state-sponsored information operations, we capture that information and put it out into the public domain. We have an extremely transparent public API that anybody can reach. We learn and get better because of the work that researchers have undertaken and that governments have undertaken to delve into that dataset.

It is an incredibly challenging issue, I think. One of the things you mentioned is that it's easy for us to identify instantaneous retweets and things that are automated like that. It is harder to understand when people are paid to tweet, or what we saw in the Venezuelan context with troll prompts, those kinds of things.

We will continue to invest in research and invest in our trolling to get better.

The Chair:

We'll move on to the last on our list and then we'll start the sequence all over again.

To Saint Lucia, please go ahead for five minutes.

Mr. Andy Daniel (Speaker, House of Assembly of Saint Lucia):

Thank you, Mr. Co-chair.

My questions are to Neil Potts, Global Policy Director. I have two questions.

The first one is that I would like to understand and to know from him and from Facebook, generally, whether or not they understand the principle of “equal arms of government”. It would appear, based on what he said earlier in his opening remarks, that he is prepared and he is willing to speak to us here, and Mr. Zuckerberg will speak to the governments. It shows a.... I do not understand...not realizing the very significant role that we play as parliamentarians in this situation.

My next question is with reference to Speaker Nancy Pelosi's video, as well as to statements made by him with reference to Sri Lanka. He said that the videos would only be taken down if there were physical violence.

Let me just make a statement here. The Prime Minister of Saint Lucia's Facebook accounts have been, whether you want to say “hacked” or “replicated”, and he is now struggling out there to try to inform persons that this is a fake video or a fake account. Why should this be? If it is highlighted as fake, it is fake and it should not be....

Let me read something out of the fake...and here is what it is saying, referring to a grant. I quote: It's a United Nation grant money for those who need assistance with paying for bills, starting a new project, building homes, school sponsorship, starting a new business and completing an existing ones. the United nation democratic funds and human service are helping the youth, old, retired and also the disable in the society....

When you put a statement out there like this, this is violence against a certain vulnerable section of our society. It must be taken down. You can't wait until there is physical violence. It's not only physical violence that's violence. If that is the case, then there is no need for abuse when it is gender relations, or otherwise. Violence is violence, whether it is mental or physical.

That is my question to you, sir. Shouldn't these videos, these pages, be taken down right away once it is flagged as fake?

(1215)

Mr. Neil Potts:

If it is the case that someone is misrepresenting a member of government, we would remove that if it is flagged. I will follow up with you after this hearing and make sure that we have that information and get it back to the team so that we can act swiftly.

Maybe perhaps to address a few of the other conversations here, there's been this kind of running theme that Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg are not here because they are eschewing their duty in some way. They have mandated and authorized Mr. Chan and me to appear before this committee to work with you all. We want to do that in a very co-operative way. They understand their responsibility. They understand the idea of coequal branches of government, whether that's the legislative branch, the executive branch or the judicial branch. They understand those concepts and they are willing to work. We happen to be here now to work on—

The Chair:

With respect, Mr. Potts, I'm going to step in here.

With respect, it is not your decision to select whether you're going to come or not. The committee has asked Mr. Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg to come, plain and simple, to appear before our international grand committee. We represent 400 million people, so when we ask those two individuals to come, that's exactly what we expect. It shows a little bit of distain from Mark Zuckerberg and Ms. Sandberg to simply choose not to come. It just shows there's a lack of an understanding about what we do, as legislators, as the member from Saint Lucia mentioned. The term “blowing us off”, I think, can be brought up again, but it needs to be stated that they were invited to appear and they were expected to appear and they're choosing not to. To use you two individuals in their stead is simply not acceptable.

I'll go back to Mr. Daniel from Saint Lucia.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Thank you, Mr. Zimmer. I want to be clear. I'm not familiar with the procedures of Canadian Parliament and what requires appearance. I respect that, but I do want to get on record that they are committed to working with government, as well as being responsible toward these issues.

Additionally—

The Chair:

I would argue, Mr. Potts, if that were the case, they would be seated in those two chairs right there.

Continue on.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Additionally, just to address another question that I think is permeating, about how we go about removing content and identifying it, we do remove content for a number of various abuse types. It's not just violence. In that specific case, where we're talking about misinformation, the appearance of some of these tropes that appeared in Sri Lanka and other countries, we removed that on the cause that it would lead to violence. But we have policies that cover things like hate speech, where violence may not be imminent. We have things like personal identifiable information, bullying, which we take very seriously, that may not lead directly to violence but we do enforce those policies directly and we try to enforce them as swiftly as possible.

We now have 30,000 people globally working on these issues. There was a comment earlier about having people with the right amount of context to really weigh in. For all the countries that are represented here, I just want to say that, within that 30,000 people, we have 15,000 content moderators who speak more than 50 languages. They work 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Some of them are located in countries that are here before us today. We take that very seriously.

Additionally, we do have a commitment to working with our partners—government, civil society and academics—so that we are arriving at the answers that we think are correct on these issues. I think we all recognize that these are very complex issues to get right. Everyone here, I think, shares the idea of ensuring the safety of our community, all of whom are your constituents. I think we share those same goals. It's just making sure that we are transparent in our discussion and that we come to a place where we can agree on the best steps forward. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

It was just brought to my attention, too, the inconsistency in your testimony, Mr. Potts.

On one hand, Mr. Collins had asked you about the Pelosi video, which you're not going to pull down. Then within 30 minutes or within an hour you just answered the member from Saint Lucia that it would come down immediately. I just would like you to be completely aware that it's expected that you completely tell the truth to this committee at this time and not to be inconsistent in your testimony.

(1220)

Mr. Neil Potts:

Mr. Zimmer, if I was inconsistent, I apologize, but I don't believe that I answered the question differently. If I had a transcript, obviously I would flag where my discrepancy was and correct it immediately.

Again, on misinformation that is not leading to immediate harm, we take an approach to reduce that information, inform users that it is perhaps false, as well as remove inauthentic accounts. If someone is being inauthentic, representing that they are someone else, we would remove that. Authenticity is core to our principles, authentic individuals on our platform. That's why we require real names.

The question that I believe Mr. Collins was asking was about the video, the video itself. It's not that the user was inauthentic in his sharing of the video. The user is a real person or there's a real person behind the page. It's not a troll account or a bot or something like that. We would remove that.

If I misspoke, I apologize, but I want to be clear that I don't think my—

The Chair:

I don't think it's any clearer to any of us in the room, but I'll move on to the next person.

We'll go to Mr. Baylis, for five minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll start off with Mr. Slater.

A couple of weeks ago, we had another one of your gentlemen in, telling us that Google would not comply with Bill C-76, our new election campaign law. I asked, “Why not?” He said, “Well, we can't get the programming done in six months' time.”

I pointed out that Facebook can, and he said, “Well, our systems are more difficult and it's more complicated.”

He said, “We can't do it in six months”, so I asked him, “Okay, how much time do you need? When can you get it done?” He said he didn't know.

Can you explain that?

Mr. Derek Slater:

They've given you extensive information on this front, but just to add a bit, yes, we are a different service, and while we knew regrettably that we would not be in a position to offer election advertising in this time, we would look to it in the future.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If you can say you can't do it in six months' time but you don't know how long it will take, how do you know you can't do it in six months, when Facebook can do it in six months?

Mr. Derek Slater:

We are very different services with different features of various types.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

How do you not know how long it will take?

Mr. Derek Slater:

In part, it's because things continue to change over time. It's a rapidly evolving space, both legally and in terms of our services. Therefore, in terms of exactly when it will be ready, we wouldn't want to put—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You know you can't do it in six months.

Mr. Derek Slater:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

However, you don't know how long it would take.

Mr. Derek Slater:

Correct.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I was worried about that, so I asked, “What happens, then, if someone puts up an ad that they're not allowed to?” He said not to worry about that, and do you know why? He said they'll find it instantaneously; they can pick it off.

I asked, “How do you do that?” and he said they have this artificial intelligence and they have a team of people.

Now it says you can find the ad instantaneously, but our law says once you have the ad, you have to put it up. You have 24 hours to put it in a database. That, you can't do.

Can you explain that to me? How is it possible that you have all this technology, you can identify any ad from any platform instantaneously, but you can't have your programmers put it up in 24 hours on a database, and it will take more than six months to do so?

Mr. Derek Slater:

If I understand the question correctly, it is simpler to take a more conservative approach, an approach that is more broadly restrictive than one that says, yes, we're going to validate that this is an election ad operating under the law, and so on and so forth.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You're already making a decision. You're validating it because you're blocking it. He told me that. You're doing that.

Mr. Derek Slater:

Yes, we may be blocking it for a variety of reasons if it violates our policies.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

No, not your policies; he said “political ads”. My question was very specific.

You can stop it, but you can't put it on a database. I want to understand the difference.

Mr. Derek Slater:

There is a big difference between saying we're going to take, in general, a conservative approach here and saying, on the other hand, “I'm going to say clearly this is a legitimate election ad”, taking that further step.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Once you see that it's an ad, you're not letting it go up. You're blocking it. You can instantaneously decide it's an ad, but once you've decided it's an ad, it's too much work to program it to put it in a database. That's what our law asks: Just put it in a database.

You're saying, “That, we can't do.”

Mr. Derek Slater:

The needs of implementing the law in the specific way it was written were prohibitive for us in this period of time to get it right, and if we're going to have election ads in the country, we absolutely need to and want to get it right.

That was the decision we had to make here, regrettably, but we look forward to working on it in the future.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You could decide that you couldn't do it in six months' time, even though someone else could do it, and you decided you can instantaneously capture any ad from anywhere at any time, but you don't have the technological capability at Google to put it in a database within 24 hours. You just don't have that capability to program that in six months.

Mr. Derek Slater:

We do not have the capability at this time to comply in fullness with that law.

(1225)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You don't have the capability. Are you serious when you say that?

Are you serious when you say that you can identify any ad from any platform anywhere, but you can't get your programmers to put it in a database? It will take too long for you to program moving it from being identified to just putting it in a database.

Mr. Derek Slater:

I can't speak to everybody's services everywhere. To be clear, we use machines and people to monitor ads that are submitted through our systems to make sure they are in compliance with our rules.

In terms of the additional obligations, no, we were not able to meet them in this case.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. I have another question for Google and Facebook, a simple question.

I don't like your terms of use. What can I do about it?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, if you could explain to me, perhaps give me a bit more colour about what you don't like about it....

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I don't like being spied on.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Oh, well, we don't do that, sir.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You collect data on me that I don't want you to collect.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

As you know, I do spend a lot of time on digital literacy space. What is appropriate is for people to not put as much as they do not wish to put on the service.

Sir, if I may, to get to a different point on this, we are, as you know I think, going to be releasing a very different type of product experience in the next little while, where you're going to be able to remove not only information we have that you've put onto the service, but you're going to be able to remove also information that would have been on the service because of integrations with other services across the Internet. We are going to give you that functionality, so again, to the extent that is not desirable for you, we do want to give you that control.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Baylis. Unfortunately, we have to move on.

Next up for five minutes is Mr. Kent.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you, Chair.

This is a question for Mr. Chan.

If a Canadian employer came to Facebook and wanted to place an employment ad microtargeting by age and sex and excluding other demographic groups, would Facebook accept that ad?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, thank you for the question. Again, I want to also thank you for extending an invitation to us to be part of your recent round table in Oshawa. It was greatly appreciated.

That would be a violation of our policies, so it would not be accepted.

We have a couple of things and I think I understand what you're getting at—

Hon. Peter Kent:

If I can, because time is short.... Would it shock you to learn that we in the official opposition of Parliament have received an answer to an Order Paper question today that says that several Government of Canada departments have placed ads with exactly those microtargeted conditions and that your company is named a number of times.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, that is, as you know, through the incredibly thorough reporting of Elizabeth Thompson from the CBC, also out in the public domain, because I read it there first.

You should know that this is a violation of our policy, sir. We have actually moved quite aggressively in the last little while to remove a whole bunch of different targeting abilities for these types of ads. We have also—for housing, employment and credit ads, to be clear—required all advertisers on a go-forward basis to certify that they are not running housing and credit and employment ads.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Have you informed the Government of Canada that this sort of microtargeting practice by the Liberal Government of Canada will no longer be accepted? Just give a yes or no.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We have sent out emails to all admins telling them that they cannot do this.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Coming back to Mr. Collins' original question about the manipulated, sexist, politically hostile video that has been allowed to stay on your Facebook platform, I understand that after The Washington Post contacted Facebook, a statement was issued saying, “We don't have a policy...that the info you post on Facebook must be true”.

From your earlier answers, it would seem that Facebook is refusing to remove this politically hostile video, claiming a sort of perverted defence claim of free speech, and that in the 24 hours after The Washington Post made that notification to you, they report that there was a viewership, on a single Facebook page, of more than 2.5 million views and that it was multiplied many times on other Facebook pages.

If that were to happen in the Canadian election—a similar video of a Canadian politician, perhaps the leader of one or another of the parties were to be posted and manipulated in the same way to give the impression of mental incapacity or intoxication—would Facebook remove that video, or would you do what you maintained in your answers to Mr. Collins, simply say that it's not true, despite those who would continue to exploit the falseness of the video?

(1230)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, just leaving aside the specific video in question that is originating from the United States, we have been at this and I have been at this personally for the last two-plus years, trying to find ways to better secure the platform for the upcoming election.

I can tell you that when we receive requests from various sectors and people and parties, 99% of the time when we find something that has been reported to us, we actually go beyond what the content is. We're not looking for the content. We're looking for the behaviour.

Hon. Peter Kent:

But would you take it down?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

If it originates from a fake account or if it's deemed to be spam, or if it is a violation otherwise of a community's standards, absolutely we would.

I can assure you that in almost every instance that I—

Hon. Peter Kent:

But it is false. It's not the truth. Does Facebook still defend the concept that it doesn't have to be truthful to be on your platform?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, I understand what you're getting at. I think that, if you'll permit me, the way I would like to maybe talk about it a bit is—

Hon. Peter Kent:

Yes or no would work.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

That's why we're here. We would welcome basic—

Hon. Peter Kent:

So is this a learning experience for you?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Mr. Kent....

Hon. Peter Kent:

I ask that with respect and civility.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We would welcome basic standards that lawmakers can impose on the platform about what should go up and what should come down. If lawmakers, in their wisdom, want to draw the line somewhere north or south of censorship, we would, obviously, oblige the local law.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Perhaps I will close by commenting.

Chris Hughes, a disillusioned co-founder of Facebook who has become something of a whistle-blower again for some, says that “Facebook isn’t afraid of a few more rules. [Facebook is] afraid of an antitrust case”.

Are you aware that, in democracies around the world, you are coming closer and closer to facing antitrust action?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I am aware of multiple questions with respect to regulation around the world, yes, sir.

Hon. Peter Kent:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Kent.

Just so that you're aware, I want to remind you all about the sequence of questioning. We're going one question per delegation first, through the countries. You can see how the pattern has been established. Then there are going to be different rounds until all the members have had a chance to ask a question. For example, the next member in the delegation would ask the next question, etc.

Right now we have the second member of the delegation for the U.K., Mr. Lucas. He will be asking the next five-minute question, or maybe Jo Stevens.

Prepare yourself for that. I might look to different countries. If you have a second delegate, he or she will be given the opportunity to ask a question as well.

Go ahead, Ms. Stevens, for five minutes.

Ms. Jo Stevens (Member, Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Potts and Mr. Chan, I want to say thank you for coming today, but my colleagues and I from the U.K. Parliament wanted to ask Mark Zuckerberg our questions. He wouldn't come to answer our questions in London at our Parliament, so we have come across the Atlantic to make it easier for him. We can only conclude that he's frightened of scrutiny. For the avoidance of doubt, I am sick to death of sitting through hours of platitudes from Facebook and avoidance tactics with regard to answering questions. I want the boss here to take responsibility, so please take that message back to Mr. Zuckerberg.

I'd like to ask the Google representatives a question.

In any other sector, your company's monopolistic position would have been dismantled by now. What are you doing at the moment to prepare yourselves for that eventuality?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I think we're working very hard to demonstrate to our users and to regulators that we bring value to the marketplace and to our users. They have a clear understanding—whether they're using our maps in signed-in or incognito mode, whether they're using Gmail, or whether they're using our infrastructure services—that there is a value for them and that we're playing a positive role in the marketplace not only by providing value for them in terms of computing services, but also by providing products and services that help businesses grow around the world.

We think regulators have a right and, certainly, a duty to scrutinize our business and to examine it within the framework that they have that's been set up through their local jurisdictions. We will participate in that process and try to explain how we think we're providing that value when we're meeting the obligations of the regulations as they have interpreted them.

(1235)

Ms. Jo Stevens:

However, you're not taking any steps at the moment to prepare yourself for cases.

Mr. Colin McKay:

At the moment, we're focusing on providing services that both fulfill and anticipate the needs of our users.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Perhaps I could ask about a specific hearing that Facebook gave evidence at in February 2018. When we asked Facebook about Cambridge Analytica in Washington, we were not informed of the data incident involving Cambridge Analytica and Aleksandr Kogan.

Mr. Potts, with regard to transparency, which you raised, why were we not informed about the Cambridge Analytica incident, which we specifically raised on that day?

Mr. Neil Potts:

Thank you, Mr. Lucas.

I'm sorry, but I'm not quite clear on what happened during that hearing. I can try to find out exactly what was presented and what evidence was given, but I, unfortunately, don't recall what was given.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

It's a matter of public record. The reason we want Mark Zuckerberg here is that we want clear evidence from Facebook executives about specific questions that we've asked.

Mr. Chan, can you answer the question for me?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, I'm afraid that I don't want to speak out of turn, but we're not familiar with the transcript of what happened in, I think you said, February 2018. Certainly we would undertake to find out.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

I can tell you exactly what happened. I could read the position. We raised the issue of Cambridge Analytica, the data incident and the issue related to Cambridge Analytica. We were not told that there had been a data incident involving Aleksandr Kogan, which came out subsequently in the newspapers within two months. You're aware of that incident, I assume.

Mr. Neil Potts:

We are aware of Cambridge Analytica. Again, we don't know, I guess, what attestations were made.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Did you regard that incident as a serious matter, the Cambridge Analytica incident?

Mr. Neil Potts:

Yes, Mr. Lucas.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Do you know what steps were taken within Facebook when the Cambridge Analytica incident involving Aleksandr Kogan...? What steps were taken? Do you know?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

If I understand your question, since 2014 we have significantly reduced—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

I asked you a specific question. What steps were taken within Facebook when you became aware of the Cambridge Analytica incident? I'm choosing my words very carefully, more sympathetically than most would. Some people would call this a data breach, but on the incident involving Aleksandr Kogan, what steps were taken by Facebook?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Specifically with Aleksandr Kogan's app, that app is banned from the platform, sir.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Who made that decision?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

The company.... I couldn't tell you. If you were looking for a specific individual, I really couldn't tell you, but the company—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

The specific individual I'd like to be asking this question of is Mark Zuckerberg because I want to know if he knew about this incident then. Did he know?

I've asked Mike Schroepfer this question and he told me he'd get back to me. That was last summer. Did Mark Zuckerberg know about that breach in 2015?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, we are very happy to get you an answer to that. To the extent that you haven't had it, which seems to be what you are saying, we apologize. We obviously want to always co-operate with questioning—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Can I just stop you there?

You said, Mr. Potts, that the incident was serious. Can you give me an example of a business or an individual who has been taken off the Facebook platform for the type of incident or breach that happened involving Aleksandr Kogan, the sharing of information?

Mr. Neil Potts:

I think that you just named one. Mr. Lucas, I don't work on those issues directly, the privacy issues. Those go through a separate team.

I do want to say that we are committed, as Mr. Chan said, to getting back to you. I've had the pleasure of giving testimony in evidence before a committee recently and—

(1240)

Mr. Ian Lucas:

I'm sorry, Mr. Potts. We want basic honesty, which is a universal value, and you have people from around the world at this table. We all understand honesty. We've got different legal systems—

Mr. Neil Potts:

I fully—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

—and I want straight answers. I've heard from you four times in evidence.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Mr. Lucas, I fully agree with you about honesty and—

The Chair:

I'm sorry Mr. Potts—

Mr. Neil Potts:

—and to impugn somebody's integrity, it is a strong action.

The Chair:

Mr. Potts, the priority is given to members of the committee, and Mr. Lucas has the floor.

Go ahead, Mr. Lucas.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

I have not had a straight answer from your company. You've been sent here by Mr. Zuckerberg to speak on behalf of Facebook. He's had plenty of notice of these questions.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I'm sorry, sir, let me just.... If I understand correctly, your question was: Are there other apps that have been banned from the platform for inappropriate use or abuse of the platform? The answer is yes.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

For transferring data....

The Chair:

We're at time, so I have to move on to the next questioner, who is Mr. Lawless from Ireland.

Mr. James Lawless (Member, Joint Committee on Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Houses of the Oireachtas):

Mr. Chair, thanks for including us here today. I'm glad to be here.

We've had engagement, obviously, at our Irish committee with the companies and we met Mr. Zuckerberg in Dublin recently.

I have to say that I welcome the engagement of the representatives from the tech companies that are here, but I do find extraordinary some of the statements that have been made, such as the statement made by Mr. Potts a few minutes ago that he wasn't familiar with the parliamentary procedure, and that was maybe to explain some gap in the evidence.

I also find it extraordinary that some of the witnesses are unfamiliar with previous hearings and previous discourse on these matters in all of our parliaments. I would have thought that was a basic prerequisite before you entered the room, if you were qualified to do the job. I caveat my questions with that. It is disappointing. I want to put that on record.

Moving on to the specifics, we've heard a lot of words, some positive words, some words that are quite encouraging if we were to believe them, both today and previously, from the executive down. However, I suppose actions speak louder than words—that's my philosophy. We heard a lot today already about the Cambridge Analytica-Kogan scandal. It's worth, again, putting on record that the Irish data protection commissioner actually identified that in 2014 and put Facebook on notice. However, I understand that it wasn't actually followed up. I think it was some two or three years, certainly, before anything was actually done. All that unfolded since could have been avoided, potentially, had that actually been taken and followed up on at the time.

I'm following that again to just, I suppose, test the mettle of actions rather than words. These first few questions are targeted to Facebook.

We heard Mr. Zuckerberg say in public, and we heard again from witnesses here today, that the GDPR is a potential gold standard, that the GDPR would be a good model data management framework and could potentially be rolled out worldwide. I think that makes a lot of sense. I agree. I was on the committee that implemented that in Irish law, and I can see the benefits.

If that is so, why is it that Facebook repatriated 1.5 billion datasets out of the Irish data servers the night before the GDPR went live? Effectively, we have a situation where a huge tranche of Facebook's data worldwide was housed within the Irish jurisdiction because that's the EU jurisdiction, and on the eve of the enactment of GDPR—when, of course, GDPR would have become applicable—1.5 billion datasets were taken out of that loop and repatriated back to the States. It doesn't seem to be a gesture of good faith.

Perhaps we'll start with that question, and then we'll move on if we have time.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Thank you very much, sir.

I very much agree with you that actions speak louder than words. I think that, to the degree that we need to demonstrate that, we will be working in the coming months and in the coming years through our actions to demonstrate that we intend to keep our service secure and the privacy of individuals safe, and that we intend to do the right thing.

In terms of what you mentioned with respect to the transfer.... Again—full declaration—I am not a lawyer, but I understand that's consistent with our terms of service.

Mr. James Lawless:

It's consistent, but it's also incredibly convenient that it was on the night before the GDPR became effective.

I'll ask another question in the same vein. My understanding is that Facebook is continuing to appeal a number of decisions. The U.K. information commissioner had a negative finding against Facebook recently, which Facebook is appealing. My colleague, Hildegarde Naughton, has talked about the Irish data protection commissioner's findings.

If you're putting your hands up and saying, “We got some things wrong”, and demonstrating good faith, which I would welcome if that were the case, why are you continuing to appeal many of these decisions?

(1245)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

There are instances.... Because they are subject to court processes, there are limits to what I think we can say today. As you are probably aware, we are trying very hard to arrive at resolutions on other open matters. I think that I would urge you to observe our actions as we can make them public through these processes and make a determination at that time.

Mr. James Lawless:

I just have a very quick question for Google.

I understand that Google's approach has been to not run political advertising at all, certainly in the Canadian context. We saw a similar decision in Ireland during the abortion referendum a year ago. I have concerns about that decision because I think that it allows malevolent actors to take the stage in terms of misinformation that's not targeted. I think that perhaps it's actually more bona fide to have political actors be transparent and run ads in a legitimate, verified context.

I'm just concerned about that, and I hope that's not going to be long term. Maybe that's an interim move.

Mr. Colin McKay:

With the few seconds we have left, I have an observation. Both in Ireland and in Canada, we found ourselves in a position where we were seeing uncertainty in what we could guarantee to the electorate. We wanted to make sure we had a strict framework around how we were serving advertising and recognizing our responsibilities. As my colleague mentioned earlier, a goal of ours moving forward is that we have the tools in place so that, whether it's a question of ambiguity or malevolent actors, there is transparency for users and it's done in a clear and consistent way across all our products.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Lawless.

We'll go into our next round now.

Go ahead, Singapore.

Ms. Sun Xueling (Senior Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Home Affairs and Ministry of National Development, Parliament of Singapore):

I would like to come back to the example of Sri Lanka, with Mr. Neil Potts.

Mr. Potts said earlier that he was not aware that the incendiary videos had been sent up to Facebook. I would like to highlight that in an article in The Wall Street Journal, Mr. Hilmy Ahamed, Vice-President of the Muslim Council of Sri Lanka, said that Muslim leaders had flagged Hashim's inflammatory videos to Facebook and YouTube using the services that were built into your reporting system.

Can I just confirm with Mr. Potts that if you were aware of these videos, Facebook would have removed them?

Mr. Neil Potts:

Yes, ma'am. That's correct. If we are aware, we would remove the videos. With this specific case, I don't have the data in front of me to ensure we were put on notice, but if we were aware, these videos would have been removed.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Thank you.

Similarly, can I then confirm in the same spirit that if Facebook were aware of a video being falsified—and we discussed the case of Nancy Pelosi earlier—Facebook would then carry a clarification that they are aware the video is falsified?

Mr. Neil Potts:

When one of our third party, fact-checking partners.... We have over 50 now who are international, global and that adhere to the Poynter principles. They would rate that as being false. We would then put up the disclaimer. We would also aggressively reduce that type of information and also signal to users who are not only engaging with it but trying to share, or have shared, that it has been rated false.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Your disclaimer would actually say that you understand that the information contained is false.

Mr. Neil Potts:

It would have a link or a header to the article from one of the fact-checkers that disputes and claims it is false.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

This would be circulated to all who would have seen the original video.

Mr. Neil Potts:

If you are engaging with it currently, you would see it, whether at the bottom in your newsfeed or perhaps on the side if you are on desktop. If you have shared it, you would be informed that there has been an action disputing the validity of the content.

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Mr. Chan, previously you had talked about Facebook putting friction into the system. Can I then confirm with you that Facebook is committed to cutting out foreign interference in political activities and elections, and that you would actively put friction into the system to ensure that such foreign interference is weeded out?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I suspect you're asking about potential legislation in Singapore. You would be well served to look at the Elections Modernization Act that Canada put in place—

Ms. Sun Xueling:

My question was quite specific. I wanted you to confirm what you said earlier, that you are putting “friction” into the system. You specifically used that term.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Parliament has given us great guidance and we have decided to put friction into the system. We would recommend that the Canadian model be something that you consider as you develop legislation elsewhere.

(1250)

Ms. Sun Xueling:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We've gone through just about all the delegates. We're going to go back to the U.K. for another kick. You didn't have to share your time, so we're going to give you some more time.

We're going to go to Mr. Erskine-Smith, and I think Mr. Angus has another question. Ms. Stevens...again, and then I think we've completed everybody.

As chair, I'm going to try to give everybody a five-minute turn. Once we have gone through everybody, we have David to follow the sequence. Then we'll look at second questions in second five-minute times, so if you wish to ask another question, please let the chair know, and I'll try to put them in priority.

Next up, we have Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thank you very much.

I just want to pick up where I left off with Google. Would you support a competition framework that includes privacy in the competition commissioner's purview?

Mr. Colin McKay:

We have two regulatory mechanisms in Canada, one for competition and one for data protection. This was highlighted in the government's recent digital charter. They've both been identified for review over the next year and that's a process where I think we can discuss that balance.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

So Google doesn't have a view right now. Okay.

To Twitter...and I ask this partly because our competition commissioner, unbeknownst to Facebook in particular, on Thursday is engaged in this very conversation. It's not just the German regulator. They're holding a data forum at the National Arts Centre.

Does Twitter have a view of competition policy and privacy?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

Thank you for the question, and thank you also for distinguishing the platforms that are on here. Twitter has a single-digit share of the advertising market. We have 130-odd million daily users. We treasure them all. We work to keep their trust and to keep them engaged, and are closely watching these antitrust and competition—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Do you agree that privacy should play a central role in competition law?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

I'd have to examine that a little bit more closely.

Ms. Michele Austin (Head, Government and Public Policy, Twitter Canada, Twitter Inc.):

We would echo the same comments said by Google. We would look forward—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

So you have no view right now.

Ms. Michele Austin:

—to working on the marketplace framework, which is the basis of competition law.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Right. Okay, so none of you have a view on a really important issue of our day.

In terms of algorithmic accountability, the Government of Canada now has algorithmic impact assessments. Have any of your companies conducted algorithmic impact assessments? Facebook for News Feed, Google for the recommendation function on YouTube, and Twitter, have you conducted internal algorithmic impact assessments, yes or no?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I think broadly, yes. I don't know exactly what you mean, but if you're asking if we have a work stream to understand the implications of algorithms—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

To understand a risk assessment of positive and negative outcomes of the algorithms that you're currently employing on millions of people....

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, not only do we have a team on it internally. We also have an international working group of experts on algorithmic bias that we convene on a regular basis to discuss these matters.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Your company has never had analysts look at the News Feed, and the algorithms that are employed on that News Feed, and said here are the positive and negative outcomes that we should be considering.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I thought I just answered in the positive.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

So you have. Okay.

Google, with respect to the YouTube recommendation function...?

Mr. Derek Slater:

Similarly, we're constantly assessing and looking to improve.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

You have internal documentation that says these are the positive outcomes, these are the negative outcomes, and this is the risk assessment with respect to the algorithms we employ. Is it fair to say you have that?

Mr. Derek Slater:

We constantly do that sort of assessment, yes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Great.

And Twitter, is it the same?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

We are assessing it. I'd also note that Twitter's use of algorithms is substantially different. People can turn it off at any point.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Would you provide the internal risk assessments to this committee?

Mr. Derek Slater:

Speaking for ourselves and the YouTube recommendation algorithm, we continue to try to improve the transparency that we have.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Would you provide those internal risk assessments? They ought to be public, frankly, as far as I'm concerned, in the same way the Government of Canada has an algorithmic impact assessment and any departmental agency that wants to employ an algorithm has to be transparent about it. None of you billion-dollar companies have to be, and I think you should be.

Would you provide to this committee the algorithmic impact assessments, which you've said you have done, and engage in some transparency?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I thank you for that. I think we're going to go further than that. We are in the process, as I've mentioned, of providing more transparency on a number of things that you will see on the platform. We have actually introduced in some markets already, as a test, something called WAIST, which is “Why Am I Seeing This?” That gives you a very good sense of how things are being ranked and sorted by News Feed.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Because you're going to go further, I assume that it's, yes, you will provide that internal documentation to this committee.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I think we're going to do better. We're going to speak by our actions, as we talked about earlier, sir.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I can't tell if it's a yes or a no.

Google...?

Mr. Derek Slater:

We will continue to communicate on how we're doing.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I take that as a no.

Twitter...?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

We believe transparency is key. I think there are a couple of points to consider. One is that each of these algorithms is proprietary. It's important to think about those things.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith: I understand, yes.

Mr. Carlos Monje: The other is understandable. We often talk very different languages. Bad actors, and their understanding of how we do our things...and also to judge us on the outcomes and not necessarily the inputs.

(1255)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay.

I'm running out of time, so I want to talk about liability and the responsibility for content on your platforms. I understand that for very harmful content...and we can talk about the nature of the content itself. If it's very harmful, if it's child porn or terrorism, you will take it down. If it's clearly criminal hate speech, you take it down, because these are harmful just by the nature of the content. There would be liability in Germany, certainly, and we've recommended at this committee that there be liability. If it's obviously hateful content, if it's obviously illegal content, there should be liability on social media platforms if they don't take it down in a timely way. That makes sense to me.

The second question, though, is not about the nature of the content. It's about your active participation in increasing the audience for that content. Where an algorithm is employed by your companies and used to increase views or impressions of that content, do you acknowledge responsibility for the content? I'm looking for a simple yes or no.

Let's go around, starting with Google.

Mr. Derek Slater:

We have a responsibility for what we recommend, yes.

A voice: For sure.

A voice: Yes.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

Yes, we take that responsibility extremely seriously.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

The Chair:

We'll go back to the U.K. delegation for another five-minute slot.

Just so it's clear, Estonia has asked for a second question. Germany, Mexico and members of our committee have as well. There's Singapore, whose hand I've seen just now, Charlie Angus, Damian Collins and then I'll finish.

Mr. Lucas or Ms. Stevens, go ahead.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

To all the platforms, do you have a satisfactory age verification process in place for your platform?

Mr. Monje.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

We do. We implement the GDPR age gating procedures and are trying to figure out ways to do that in a way that protects the privacy of our users. Often you have to collect more information from minors in order to verify they are who they say they are.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Facebook, do you have a satisfactory age verification process in place?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I thought Carlos's answer was quite good. That's exactly the tension we're looking at.

Having said that, I understand the spirit of your question. We can always get better. I have to tell you—and I think you've heard it from colleagues of mine who recently appeared in the U.K.—

Mr. Ian Lucas:

You do read transcripts of evidence, then.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Actually, I didn't. I spent time with a colleague, Karina Newton, whom members may know. She's a lovely lady and she spent some of her time briefing me on how she thought it went. She thought it went really well. There were really deep and piercing questions, sir, with respect to age verification.

Unfortunately, though, the technology is not quite there yet.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Google...?

Mr. Derek Slater:

Yes, we have requirements in place and broadly agree with what was said.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

You may have requirements in place, but I've actually been able to join Instagram as a 10-year-old, I think, during the course of a committee meeting. It seems to me, from the evidence I've heard and from what I hear from my constituents in the U.K., people are extremely concerned and don't believe there are satisfactory age verification processes in place. Indeed, the evidence I received was that the platforms themselves in the U.K. seemed to be suggesting there weren't satisfactory age verification procedures in place.

Do you disagree with that? Do you think the position is okay? That is basically what most of us have been asking.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, what I said earlier was that we can always do better. The technology is not where we'd like it to be.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Okay.

For Facebook, I'm a little confused about the relationship you have with WhatsApp and Instagram, and the transfer of data. If I give information to Facebook, is it freely transferable to Instagram and to WhatsApp?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

As you know—I believe, because Karina mentioned that you had an exchange on this in the U.K.—Facebook and Instagram are governed by one set of terms of service, and WhatsApp is governed by another.

(1300)

Mr. Ian Lucas:

That means information is shared between Instagram and Facebook.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Correct. As we discussed earlier, it is important for us to be able to leverage infrastructure in order to do a lot of the things we do to try to keep people safe. Karina kind of mentioned this, although she said she didn't know if it was completely clear. Having real world identities on Facebook actually allows us to do some of the things we wouldn't be able to do with Instagram on its own to ensure we're able to get greater certainty on these questions of age, real world identity and so on. Facebook enables us to leverage some of the security systems and apply them to Instagram, because Instagram, as you obviously know, functions quite differently and has a very different set of practices in terms of how people use the service.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

Finally, to all the platforms, if you were legally responsible for the content of your platforms, would you be able to function as businesses?

Mr. Derek Slater:

There are existing legal frameworks with respect to our responsibility for illegal content, which we abide by.

Mr. Ian Lucas:

If it were possible to conduct legal actions against the separate platforms because of information that you circulated, which we knew could cause harm in the future, do you think you would be able to continue to trade or do you think that would put you out of business?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

I'm most familiar with the American context where we do have a degree of immunity. It was under the Communications Decency Act, and it was designed to give us the flexibility to implement our terms of service so that we wouldn't get sued. America is a very litigious society, as you know, and that protection has enabled us to create and maintain a much safer platform than it otherwise would be.

What you've seen across this table and across the world are many different regimes trying different mechanisms to do that. There has been independent research about the implications of that, including places where accusations were that the platforms overcorrect and squelch good speech. In the U.S. we don't often get criticisms from government to take things down because it is a violation of our hate speech or hateful conduct policy, but rather because it is a violation of copyright law, because the copyright rules in the United States are very strict, and we have to take it down within a certain period of time.

Rather than taking somebody who is critical of the government and asking them to take it down because of other terms of service, they go to the strictest regime, and that has a very negative impact on free expression.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have to move on. I want to highlight what's going to happen in the next 30 minutes. We have two members of the Canadian committee who haven't spoken yet. We're going to give them five minutes each. That gives us, with the people who have asked for second questions, about 20 minutes, approximately three minutes per individual.

Again, we'll go to Mr. Graham first and Mr. Saini, and then we'll go by country.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

I want to get straight into this. I'm going to focus on Google and Facebook for a minute.

Do you accept the term “surveillance capitalism”, Google?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I think it's an exaggeration of the situation, but it reflects social pressures and a recognition that there is an increasing worry about the data that's collected about individuals.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Facebook...?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I cringed, I think, when I read it the first time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You track individuals on the Internet in any way, shape or form without their knowledge or explicit consent at any time for any reason, and you do so for profit.

Mr. Colin McKay:

We have a pretty clear relationship with our users about what information we collect and what we use it for. We secure consent for the information that we use.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But you don't only track information on users. You track information on anybody on the Internet. If you look at Google Analytics and any of these other services that track anybody passing through another website that has nothing to do with Google, you're collecting vastly more data than what is provided voluntarily by users. My question is, again, are you collecting data on people for profit and, if so, is that not surveillance capitalism?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I think in the broad circumstance you just described around people using the Internet, we're not collecting information about people. We're measuring behaviour and we're measuring.... Sorry, that's the wrong term. I can hear the chuckle.

We're measuring how people act on the Internet and providing data around that, but it's not around an individual. It's around an actor.

(1305)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Or it's around a type of individual, an IP address or this type of information. You are collecting data that can be annexed to people. My point, and I want to take it further than that, is that governments have a tremendous surveillance capacity, as we all know. At least in this country and a lot of other countries around this table, we now have a committee of parliamentarians to oversee our security apparatus, and they go in a classified setting. They dive deeply into the intelligence agencies, what they do, how they do it and why, and they report it back.

If these committees were either created to just focus on social media companies or this committee was applied to it, what surprises would they find?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, as I've indicated, we want to do more than that by our actions. We're going to make all of that available and then people can...including things that are off platform. If there's a site that uses, let's say, a plug-in or something like that from Facebook, you have available all that information and you can do whatever it is you want with it. You can remove things. You can delete things. You can transfer it. You can download it. That is our commitment and we will be moving fast to get it done.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that, but if you go into Facebook and ask it to download your data, the data that it gives you is not a comprehensive collection of what Facebook has on you as a user.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Right. I think you're referring to when you download your information you get things like the photos and the videos.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You get a handful of your pictures, a handful of your updates and have a nice day.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

That's right. What we want to do is build...and it takes a bit of time. If you can bear with me, it takes a little bit more time to build something that's much more ambitious, which is to then give you actual control over not just the things that you put on Facebook but all the activity that you may have done with social plugs-ins elsewhere, where we can give you the ability to control and remove stuff if you so choose.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If Mark Zuckerberg were to run for president of the United States, for example, what limits his ability to use Facebook's data, machines, algorithms and collection to feed his campaign?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, if I may, that is a very good question, and that's precisely why we have the policies that we have in place and why we hold so steadfastly to them. It's not...and I think the question kind of came about in a different way. It was, “What if there was a photo of Mark Zuckerberg or a video of Mark Zuckerberg?” The treatment would be the same. That's because these policies have to hold regardless of the direction the wind blows.

As I said before, we understand that people may not be comfortable with the degree of transparency and the degree to which Facebook is able to make these decisions about what happens on our service, which is why we're building this external oversight board, so that these decisions, so that many of these hard precedential decisions, will not be made by Facebook alone. There will be an ability to appeal to an independent body that can make these decisions that would govern the speech on a platform.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I only have seconds, and I want to come back to the independent body in a second.

My point is, if Neil Potts runs for president of the United States and Mark Zuckerberg runs for president of the United States, I suspect that the support from Facebook and the data usage from Facebook would not be the same. On that basis, it would be very hard to say that having Mark Zuckerberg and Neil Potts here is equivalent.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Again, our policies are for everyone. We would not make any exceptions for anybody, which is in fact why we have these kinds of robust conversations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does Mr. Zuckerberg have a—

The Chair:

We're actually out of time. Sorry, Mr. Graham.

We'll go to Mr. Saini for five minutes.

Mr. Raj Saini (Kitchener Centre, Lib.):

Good afternoon.

One of the things we've heard from many experts is that a lot of the issues that have happened with data were when the machine learning really came into force. There was an inflection point. Many experts agree that self-regulation is not viable anymore. Rules have to be in place. The business model just can't regulate itself, and it doesn't align with the public interest.

I have two points. My concern is that right now, we're a mature democracy. A lot of the countries represented around this table are mature democracies. My worry is for nascent democracies that are trying to elevate themselves but don't have the proper structure, regulation, education and efficiency in place, or a free or advanced press. There has been some suggestion that maybe this self-regulation should be internationalized, as with other products. Even though some countries may not have the ability to effectively regulate certain industries, the mature democracies could set a standard worldwide.

Would that be something that would be accepted, either through a WTO mechanism or some other international institution that's maybe set apart? Part of the conversation has been around the GDPR, but the GDPR is only for Europe. There are the American rules, the Canadian rules, the South Asian rules.... If there were one institution that governed everybody, there would be no confusion, wherever the platforms were doing business, because they would accede to one standard worldwide.

(1310)

Mr. Kevin Chan:

You are correct. Where we can have harmonization of standards across the world, that's helpful. We've called for that in multiple realms, including in the privacy realm.

I would say that's actually one of the key challenges. It's a vigorous debate that we have when we talk about the oversight board. In the consultations we've had around the world, including in Canada, the big question that's come up is, “How can you have a global board make decisions that have local impact?” It's come up, and I can say we've had some interesting conversations with the Assembly of First Nations. Obviously they have some unique questions about what the right governing framework is for content online and how we marry the international with the local.

I absolutely agree with you, sir. That's a very good and astute question, and one that we wrestle with.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Google...?

Mr. Colin McKay:

This is a challenge we've recognized since the early days of implementing machine learning in our products, and it's one of the reasons we came out over a year ago with a very clear set of principles around how we will use artificial intelligence in our products.

We certainly underline that there needs to be an active conversation between industry and governments around the world. In the past, this sort of principles-based development of regulation that was led by the OECD around data protection has served us well for developments according to region and in levels of sophistication.

I agree with you that this sort of principles-based global collaboration, especially in concert with the companies that will have to execute on it, will result in a fairer regulatory system that's as broadly applicable as possible, whether in this room or globally.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Thank you for that. Obviously you're going to take in the local effect of any country you work in, but there are some basic principles that I think can be agreed upon worldwide.

My final question is a bit philosophical but also a bit practical. In certain countries in which you operate, you know there are no standards and no regulation. The rule of law is lacking, a free press is lacking and the government structure is not that advanced. The content could be exploited in a much more heinous or worse way in those countries than in other parts of the world.

Is there no moral incumbency on the platforms to make sure that when they go into those jurisdictions they are helping to elevate the governance structure, so that when they're doing business in those countries, it's done in a more equitable manner?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I have a twofold response to that.

First, as my colleague, Mr. Slater, mentioned, we work very hard to make sure the policies and guidelines around all of our products apply to circumstances in those countries as well as what we might describe as more developed or more stable countries.

However, that's also why people like me work at the company. We work on teams that focus on AI and on privacy and data protection. We have those engagements, whether in the country itself or at international organization meetings, so that we can have an ongoing conversation and share information about how we're seeing these policies and technologies develop internationally. We can provide a comparison with how they're seeing that develop within their own jurisdiction.

It's an honest and forthright exchange, recognizing that we're on the forefront of a technology that is having a significant impact on our products and a significant benefit for our users.

Mr. Raj Saini:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Saini.

Now, we'll go into the countries again. We're at about two minutes each. If it can be quick that would be great. We have Estonia, Germany, Mexico, Singapore, Ireland and then we have some closing statements from us.

Go ahead, Estonia.

Ms. Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Thank you.

It has been pointed out that the disinformation phenomenon is becoming more complex and cross-channel or cross-platforms, meaning that the different phases or different stages of the disinformation campaigns happen often on different channels.

How do you co-operate? How do you see what could be the model for co-operation between the different platforms in order to fight the disinformation problem?

Mr. Derek Slater:

We do our own threat assessments to prevent and anticipate new trends, and then we work collaboratively among the industry, and where appropriate with law enforcement and others, to make sure information and indicators are shared. We actively want to be a participant in that sort of process.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

I'll just say that the companies do work together on these issues and work closely with governments. In Mr. Saini's comments, I was thinking about the role of government and how forward-leaning Estonia has been, under the thumb of Russian disinformation for a long time, in working to improve media literacy and working with the platforms in a way that it makes our jobs easier.

Everyone has a role and the companies do work together to try to address common threats.

(1315)

Mr. Neil Potts:

A good place to perhaps look is the work that we do as the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism. All of our companies are members of that forum, where we have shared responsibilities of information sharing, technological co-operation and then support for research.

The Chair:

Next up is Germany.

Go ahead.

Mr. Jens Zimmermann:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I would like to ask a few questions of Twitter.

During the recent European elections you introduced several measures, especially concerning fake news about the electoral process as such. That sounded like a good idea in the first place, but we ended up having elected officials in Germany being blocked for tweets that obviously didn't have any failed information in them.

Obviously, the complaint mechanism from Twitter was used by right-wing activists to flag completely legal posts by members of Parliament, for example. It was really the problem that you did it that way, and it took quite some time until everything was solved.

Have you monitored these developments? What are your lessons learned, and how will that evolve during upcoming elections?

Mr. Carlos Monje:

Thank you for that question.

I followed that as well from the U.S., the disinformation reporting flow that we launched in the EU and in India. I think this is one of the challenges and blessings of being a global platform—every time you turn around there's another election. We have Argentina coming up. We have the U.S. 2020 elections to follow, and Canada, of course, in October.

What we learned is that, as always, when you create a rule and create a system to implement that rule, people try to game the system. What we saw in Germany was a question of how and whether you sign a ballot. That was one of the issues that arose. We are going to learn from that and try to get better at it.

What we found—and Neil mentioned the GIFCT—was that our contribution to the effort, or what Twitter does, is to look at behavioural items first, which is not looking at the content but how are different accounts reacting to one another. That way we don't have to read the variety of contexts that make those decisions more complicated.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll go to Singapore for two minutes.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Mr. Potts, earlier you had said in answer to my colleague's question that you were not aware of being told prior to or after the bombings in Sri Lanka that it, in fact, had been flagged to Facebook prior to that. Do you recall that?

Mr. Neil Potts:

Yes, sir.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

This was a serious and horrific massacre where videos were carried on Facebook for some time and, as you said, it's hate speech in clear breach of your policies. The alleged bomber himself, in fact, had a Facebook account, which I'm sure you know. I'm surprised that you didn't check, because that's something that I would have thought Facebook would want to know.

They would have wanted to know how it is that, with videos having been spread on Facebook, this was something that Facebook had missed, if at all you had missed it. I'm surprised you are not aware today as to whether or not this was something flagged to Facebook. Can you confirm that?

Mr. Neil Potts:

For the specific video, sir, I'm happy to follow up after this hearing, and to come back to show you exactly that timeline. When we were made aware of the attack of the individual, we quickly removed—

Mr. Edwin Tong:

I know. That's not my focus. Why it is that today, about two months after the event, you still don't know if, prior to the attack, Facebook had been made aware of the existence of the videos? I would have thought that, if you were to have us believe that the policies you now have in place—AIs and other mechanisms for the future.... If I were Facebook, I would have wanted to know how this was missed. I'm surprised that you don't know, even today.

Mr. Neil Potts:

That is correct. We do a formal after-action process where we review these incidents to make sure that our policies—

(1320)

Mr. Edwin Tong:

It didn't come up.

Mr. Neil Potts:

I would just have to get the information back for you. I don't want to speak out of turn.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

You, yourself, Mr. Potts, just last month, gave evidence to the U.K. Parliament, where this issue came up in that session. Was that not correct?

Mr. Neil Potts:

I believe the attack happened on Easter Sunday. We gave evidence, I believe, on that Tuesday. It was very much in the nascent stages when we gave evidence.

Mr. Edwin Tong:

Fair enough, but I would like to say that I'm surprised Facebook didn't see fit to check whether something had been missed.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

If I may say, sir, there is one thing I want to assure—

Mr. Edwin Tong:

If it's an answer to my question, then, yes, please explain, but otherwise—

Mr. Kevin Chan:

It's about our security posture, sir.

The Chair:

I'm sorry. If it's not an answer directly to Mr. Tong, we don't have the time.

I'm sorry, Mr. Tong. We're out of time.

We have to move on to Ireland for two minutes, and then we will make some closing remarks.

I apologize. I wish we had more time. We just don't.

Go ahead.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I didn't have a chance to get the answer to my first question in relation to Google's viewpoint on the GDPR. Many of the social media companies are based in Ireland. Effectively, our data protection commissioner is regulating for Europe, and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg has called on a GDPR-type approach to be rolled out globally.

What is your view on that? Will it work?

Mr. Colin McKay:

We think the GDPR provides a strong framework for a conversation around the world on what extended privacy protections would look like. The question is how it adapts to local jurisdictions, and also reflects the political and social background of each of those jurisdictions.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

You can't be definitive about whether it would work.

Are you in agreement with Mr. Zuckerberg in relation to the rollout of GDPR globally?

Mr. Colin McKay:

We've already made a broad and detailed statement about the need for increased work on privacy regulation. It was last fall. It builds on a lot of the work around the development of GDPR.

I'm just being careful, because I recognize that, around the table, there are many different types of data protection regulations in place right now.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

In different countries....

In relation to Ireland yet again, because it's the base of a lot of the social media companies.... You're all based, your European international headquarters are based in Ireland. We're working on digital safety commissioner legislation, which will effectively mean that Ireland will be legislating in relation to takedown online content moderation for Europe, and potentially beyond that.

Is that how you would see it? What is your viewpoint on that, very briefly?

Mr. Derek Slater:

Consistent with what we said at the outset, clear definitions by government of what's illegal, combined with clear notices, are critical to platforms acting expeditiously. We welcome that sort of collaboration in the context of illegal content.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Can you see that being rolled out, maybe beyond Europe, because of the legislation in Ireland.

Mr. Derek Slater:

Whether or not it's that specific law, I think the basics of notice and take down of illegal content, speaking broadly, is something there is increasing consensus around.

Ms. Hildegarde Naughton:

Facebook, do you want to come in on this?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I think what Mr. Slater said is absolutely right. We do want to work with you. I understand our team is, in fact, working with the Irish public authorities on this.

We are also working with President Macron and the Government of France on what he's calling smart regulation. We would welcome, I think, the opportunity to discuss with you and others in Ireland how that is evolving. I think it's worth having additional conversations on it.

Mr. Carlos Monje:

In addition to the importance of having precise terminology, I think accountability is important, beyond the regulatory agency to the Parliament and the people who can be held accountable by their constituents.

I would also note that it's important, especially on these issues of content moderation, which we take extremely seriously, to recognize how those tools can be used in the hands of autocratic regimes. I was listening to the testimony yesterday about pre-Nazi Germany. The tools used there to protect democracy in one case were then used to squelch it on the back end. I think they are difficult questions and I'm glad that this committee is taking it so seriously.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Naughton.

We appreciate all the testimony today.

We have some closing statements, starting with Mr. Angus....

My apologies to Mexico, you did put up your hand, so we'll give you a quick two minutes. Go ahead.

Hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[Delegate spoke in Spanish, interpreted as follows:]

I just briefly would like to ask you, what is the path that a victim must follow when the controls fail that are going against [Technical difficulty—Editor] and Google in particular.

Mr. Derek Slater:

If I understand correctly, before you were asking about content that violates our community guidelines on YouTube. We have flagging systems where a user can click and say, “This violates your guidelines in this particular way.” That notice is then sent and put into a queue for review. They can do that right under the video there.

(1325)

Hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[Delegate spoke in Spanish, interpreted as follows:]

What happens when they are told that there is no breach in the policies, and there is a video with a person who is naked and everybody can see that?

Mr. Derek Slater:

From the context, if it violates our guidelines, we would remove it. If we don't, there are appeal mechanisms, and so on and so forth.

Hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[Delegate spoke in Spanish, interpreted as follows:]

I know of cases, many cases, that have followed all the routes online and always the answer has been, “This is not against our policies,” on the three platforms. What does the victim do? How do they appeal to anybody?

As I told you, in a particular case, when they went to the Google office in Mexico, they were told to go to Google in the United States. Therefore, what does a victim do when the images against that person still appear? They are up there.

Mr. Derek Slater:

I'm not familiar with the particular cases you're talking about, but we'd be happy to follow up.

Hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[Delegate spoke in Spanish, interpreted as follows:]

In any case, what's next?

Mr. Derek Slater:

In general, if something were to violate someone's privacy or be defamatory or incite violence, and so on and so forth, against our guidelines, we would take it down. The case you're describing is something I'm not familiar with, but we'd be happy to receive more information and take it back to our teams.

The Chair:

We'd better move on.

We'll go to Mr. Angus for just a couple of minutes, and then Mr. Collins and me.

Go ahead, Mr. Angus.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to make a confession. I'm a recovering digital utopian. I came here as a young democratic socialist and I fought hard against regulation. Imagine that, because we saw all the start-ups and we saw a great digital future. That was 2006. Now in 2019, I have conservative chairs here who are pushing for government regulation. That's the world we're in with you folks.

It's because we're talking about democratic rights of citizens, re-establishing the rights of citizens within the realm that you control. We're talking about the power of these platforms to up-end our democratic systems around the world, which is unprecedented. We're talking about the power of these platforms to self-radicalize people in every one of our constituencies, which has led to mass murder around the world. These are serious issues. We are just beginning to confront the issues of AI and facial recognition technologies and what that will mean for our citizens.

It's what our Privacy Commissioner has called the right of citizens to live free of surveillance, which goes to the heart of the business model, particularly of Facebook and Google, and it came up yesterday and today from some of the best experts in the world that the front line of this fight over the public spaces and the private lives of citizens will be fought in the city of Toronto with the Google project.

Mr. McKay, we asked you questions on Sidewalk Labs before, but you said you didn't speak for Sidewalk Labs, that it was somehow a different company.

Mr. Slater, we had experts say this is a threat to the rights of our citizens. Mr. McNamee said he wouldn't let Google within 100 miles of Toronto.

How is it that the citizens of our country should trust this business model to decide the development of some of the best urban lands in our biggest city?

Mr. Derek Slater:

I, too, do not work for Sidewalk Labs. You're right. We want your trust, but we have to earn your trust, through transparency, through development of best practices with you and accountability. I think then different sites will make different choices. That is in general the case, but I can't speak to that specific company because I'm not a part of it.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Angus.

Mr. Collins.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Thank you.

I would just like to pick up on a couple of things that were touched on in this session.

Mr. Potts, you mentioned briefly the changes to the Facebook Live policy as a result of the Christchurch attack. I understand that as a restriction on people who have broadcast the most serious footage through Facebook Live, and who would then have their accounts automatically suspended. Is that correct?

Mr. Neil Potts:

That part is correct, but also, I think, more broadly, if you have a community standards violation for specific types of actions, you would lose your access for a period of time—30 days, 60 days, 90 days—to enable yourself to go on the live product.

(1330)

Mr. Damian Collins:

You wouldn't be able to use the live product.

Mr. Neil Potts:

Correct.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Would that be at a maximum of 90 days suspension?

Mr. Neil Potts:

I think for egregious violations of our community standards, we also reserve the right to disable your account.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Okay.

What about people who have shared serious content that has been broadcast through Facebook Live? They're not the broadcaster themselves, but they've shared that footage with others on the platform. Is there any action taken against them?

Mr. Neil Potts:

We try to look at the intent of the sharer. I think that in the Christchurch example, we had many people just sharing for awareness purposes. We had some, definitely, who were sharing for malicious purposes, to subvert our policies, to subvert our AI. Those would be actioned against. If we knew that you were sharing—even media companies shared the video—we would try to read in some context and try to understand the intent of why you were sharing.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Did people who you believe maliciously shared the footage have their accounts cancelled?

Mr. Neil Potts:

In some cases there have been individuals who had their accounts disabled. In other cases they received penalties.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Would you be able to write to us to tell us how many accounts have been disabled as a consequence of this?

Mr. Neil Potts:

I'd be happy to follow up after the hearing.

Mr. Damian Collins:

These changes obviously take retrospective action against people who have done it. Is there anything Facebook has done to stop something like Christchurch from happening again, in terms of the way it is broadcast and shared through your systems?

Mr. Neil Potts:

We are continuing to invest in the AI.

In the Christchurch case, the use of the first-person video from the GoPro is very difficult for AI to recognize. We're continuing to invest to try to get better, to try to give training data to the machine learning so that we can identify and prevent. We have introduced new protocols for routing those types of videos to human reviewers in the moment, but it's important to note that the actual video was never reported while it was live.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Okay. I'm not sure I'm clear on that, but there are a couple of more things.

You've said quite a lot about the deletion of inauthentic accounts. Facebook, I believe, said that there were 3.3 billion inauthentic accounts deleted over the previous six months. That is considerably greater than the active user base of the company. Based on that, how confident can you be that there are only about 5% of accounts at any one time that are inauthentic?

Mr. Neil Potts:

We have data science teams that study this closely, so I defer to their expertise and analysis on that.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Monika Bickert said that the inauthentic accounts are far more likely to be sharing disinformation, so of those 3.3 billion accounts, how many of those were actively sharing disinformation?

Mr. Neil Potts:

I do not have that figure. I believe she said that they are more likely to...a combination of abusive behaviour, so not only disinformation but hate speech. Your point is taken and I can follow up.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Would Facebook be able to write to the committee with the answer to that question?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Well, sir, I should clarify. I think it is the case, if you look at the transparency report—

Mr. Damian Collins:

So sorry, sir, we're running out of time.

I just want to say, if you don't have the answer to that question now—

Mr. Kevin Chan:

We do have the answer, sir.

Mr. Damian Collins:

—the company can write to us with it.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

The vast majority of accounts are actually disabled before a human can even interact with them.

Mr. Damian Collins:

Okay.

Could Facebook commit to the write to the committee to say—

Mr. Neil Potts:

We will write.

Mr. Damian Collins:

—how many of those accounts that were deleted, those 3.3 billion, were sharing disinformation? The company is saying that they're more likely to be sharing disinformation than other sorts of accounts.

Mr. Neil Potts:

If we have [Inaudible—Editor].

Mr. Damian Collins:

Finally, in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal last year, Facebook announced that there would be a new feature for users to be able to clear their browser history. I understand that Facebook announced that this will launch later this year. This does seem to be a long period of time. If this were a product launch that Facebook would be making money out of, one sort of feels it would have come on quicker. This doesn't seem to be a case of moving fast and breaking things, but of moving slowly.

Is Facebook able to commit to a date when the “clear browser history” function will be live?

Mr. Kevin Chan:

Sir, I think I've mentioned it a few times, including, I think, with various members about this new feature. It would probably be inadvisable for me to commit to a date, obviously, at this time. I don't want to get out ahead of my skis, but I could just say that even with the transparency measures we're putting in place in Canada, we are working down to the wire to get this right. We're going to try to roll this other product out globally. That will take—

Mr. Damian Collins:

I would just say, these sorts of functions are pretty widespread across the web. I think the fact that it's now been over a year since this was announced and that you can't even give a date this year when it will come into force is really poor.

Mr. Kevin Chan:

I appreciate that.

The Chair:

I want to thank everybody for your testimony today.

I applaud Mr. Chan on some of the changes that you say are coming. We've heard this story many times, so I guess we will wait to see what we get at the end of the day.

It goes to what we were asking for in the first place. In good faith we asked your CEO and your COO to come before us today to work together for a solution to what these problems are that a whole bunch of countries and a whole bunch of people around the globe see as common issues. To me, it's shameful that they are not here today to answer those specific questions that you could not fully answer.

That's what's troubling. We're trying to work with you, and you're saying you are trying to work with us. We just had a message today that was forwarded to me by my vice-chair. It says, “Facebook will be testifying at the International Grand Committee this morning. Neil Potts and Kevin Chan will be testifying. Neither of whom are listed in this leadership chart of the policy team's 35 most senior officials”.

Then we're told you're not even in the top 100. No offence to you individuals, you're taking it for the team for Facebook, so I appreciate your appearance here today, but my last words to say before the committee is shame on Mark Zuckerberg and shame on Sheryl Sandberg for not showing up today.

That said, we have media availability immediately following this meeting to answer questions. We're going to be signing the Ottawa declaration just over here so we're going to have a member from each delegation sitting here as representatives.

After that, all the members of Parliament visiting from around the world are invited to attend our question period today. I'm going to point out my chief of staff, Cindy Bourbonnais. She will help you get the passes you need to sit in the House if you wish to come to QP today.

Thank you again for coming as witnesses. We will move right into the Ottawa declaration.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique

(1040)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, PCC)):

Je déclare ouverte la 153e séance du Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique, et, par conséquent, le Grand Comité international sur les mégadonnées, la protection des renseignements personnels et la démocratie. Des représentants des pays prendront aussi la parole. Nous allons commencer par mon coprésident, M. Damian Collins, du Royaume-Uni.

Voici le fonctionnement structurel: nous ferons passer les délégations, à commencer par un représentant par pays, suivi du deuxième représentant. Vous devriez tous avoir votre propre période de cinq minutes.

Avant de commencer, M. Angus veut dire quelque chose.

M. Charlie Angus (Timmins—Baie James, NPD):

Monsieur le président, permettez-moi d'invoquer le Règlement à l'intention de notre comité; nous sommes très surpris, je crois, que M. Zuckerberg ait décidé — ainsi que Mme Sandberg — de faire fi de l'assignation d'un comité parlementaire, particulièrement à la lumière du fait que nous avons ici des représentants internationaux. À ma connaissance, nous n'avons même pas été informés de son absence. Je n'ai jamais vu de situation où un dirigeant d'entreprise fait fi d'une assignation légale.

À la lumière de ce fait, j'aimerais donner un avis de motion à mettre aux voix: Que le Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique, en raison du refus de M. Mark Zuckerberg et de Mme Sheryl Sandberg d'y comparaître le 28 mai, dirige le président à livrer une assignation s'ils arrivent au Canada pour quelconque raison pour comparaître devant le Comité à la prochaine réunion après la date de l'assignation, et s'ils sont convoqués pendant que la Chambre ne siège pas, que le Comité dirige le président de convenir une réunion extraordinaire aussi tôt que possible en raison d'obtenir leur témoignage.

Monsieur le président, j'ignore si nous avons déjà utilisé une assignation ouverte au Parlement — nous avons vérifié et n'en avons pas trouvé —, mais je crois que vous jugerez que c'est en règle. Si M. Zuckerberg ou Mme Sandberg décidaient de venir ici pour une conférence sur les technologies ou pour aller pêcher, le Parlement pourrait signifier cette assignation et les faire venir ici.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Angus.

Pour les membres d'office du Comité, nous sommes saisis d'une motion sur laquelle nous devrons voter, et il y aura donc un certain débat.

D'autres membres souhaitent-ils débattre de la motion?

Monsieur Kent, allez-y.

L'hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Oui, l'opposition officielle, le Parti conservateur, est tout à fait disposée à appuyer la motion de M. Angus. Comme nous l'avons entendu dans certains des témoignages précédents, Facebook, parmi d'autres grandes plateformes, a manifesté un manque de respect et un mépris extrêmes devant les gouvernements étrangers et les comités qui les représentent, à l'égard de leurs préoccupations et de leur recherche d'explications quant à la raison pour laquelle des mesures utiles n'ont pas été prises à ce jour et n'a pas fourni d'explication claire et explicite concernant sa réponse aux préoccupations du monde entier, et certainement des démocraties et des membres du grand comité international.

Nous appuierons cette motion. Merci.

Le président:

Nous avons déjà discuté du fait qu'aucune motion de fond n'avait été présentée au Comité. Cela dit, avec l'assentiment de tout le monde ici, je crois que nous pourrions convenir de l'entendre — et nous l'entendons aujourd'hui — et de voter sur celle-ci.

Avons-nous...? Je vois que tout le monde est en faveur du dépôt de la motion dont nous sommes saisis.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires au sujet de la motion?

Monsieur Lucas, allez-y.

M. Ian Lucas (membre, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

C'est un cas de récidive de la part de M. Zuckerberg. C'est une situation qui s'est déjà produite et qui nous préoccupe vivement. C'est une préoccupation particulièrement grande pour moi, car malheureusement, les gouvernements continuent de rencontrer M. Zuckerberg, et je crois qu'il est important que nous témoignions, en tant que parlementaires, de notre préoccupation au sujet du manque de respect dont fait preuve M. Zuckerberg à l'égard des parlementaires du monde entier. Ils devraient examiner l'accès qu'ils donnent à M. Zuckerberg, l'accès aux gouvernements et aux ministres, en privé, sans nous respecter nous, en tant que parlementaires, et sans respecter nos électeurs, qui sont exclus des discussions confidentielles qui ont lieu sur ces affaires cruciales.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Lucas.

Monsieur Erskine-Smith, vous avez la parole.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

J'aimerais juste dire que je trouve comique que le 30 mars, soit il y a moins de deux mois, Mark Zuckerberg ait écrit un article dans le Wall Street Journal. Il a écrit qu'il croit que Facebook a une responsabilité pour réagir au contenu préjudiciable, protéger les élections, protéger les renseignements personnels et les données ainsi que la portabilité des données — les questions mêmes dont nous discutons aujourd'hui — et qu'il était impatient d'en parler avec les législateurs du monde entier. C'était ses mots il y a moins de deux mois. S'il avait été honnête en les écrivant, il serait assis dans ce fauteuil aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Erskine-Smith.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires sur la motion?

Bien franchement, pour répondre à votre question, en tant que président des deux comités, le comité international et notre comité de l'éthique, je trouve odieux qu'il ne soit pas ici aujourd'hui et que Mme Sandberg ne soit pas là non plus. On leur a fait savoir très clairement qu'ils devaient comparaître devant nous aujourd'hui. Une assignation a été délivrée, ce qui est déjà un geste inhabituel pour un comité. Je crois qu'il est donc tout naturel que l'on prépare un mandat de comparution. Dès que M. Zuckerberg ou Mme Sandberg mettront les pieds dans notre pays, ils se verront signifier une assignation et devront comparaître devant notre comité. S'ils décident de ne pas le faire, la prochaine étape consistera à les reconnaître coupables d'outrage.

Je crois que les mots sont forts, monsieur Angus, et je vous félicite de votre motion.

S'il n'y a pas d'autres interventions relativement à la motion, nous passerons au vote.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Merci, monsieur Angus.

Nous passons maintenant aux plateformes, en commençant par Facebook, puis Google, puis...

Je vais mentionner les noms. Nous recevons Kevin Chan, directeur des politiques mondiales pour le Canada, et Neil Potts, directeur des politiques mondiales, de Facebook Inc. Nous accueillons Derek Slater, directeur mondial, Politique de l'information, de Google LLC; et Colin McKay, chef, Relations gouvernementales et politiques publiques, de Google Canada. Nous recevons Carlos Monje, directeur, Politique publique, et Michele Austin, chef, gouvernement, Politique publique, Twitter Canada, de Twitter Inc.

Je tiens à dire que ce ne sont pas juste les PDG de Facebook qui ont été invités aujourd'hui. Les PDG de Google ont été invités, tout comme le PDG de Twitter. Nous sommes plus que déçus qu'ils aient décidé eux aussi de ne pas se présenter.

Nous allons commencer par M. Chan, pour sept minutes.

Merci.

(1045)

M. Kevin Chan (directeur des politiques mondiales, Facebook Inc.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je m'appelle Kevin Chan, et je suis accompagné aujourd'hui de mon collègue Neil Potts. Nous sommes tous les deux directeurs des politiques mondiales chez Facebook.

Internet a transformé la façon dont des milliards de personnes vivent, travaillent et communiquent ensemble. Des entreprises comme Facebook ont d'immenses responsabilités pour assurer la sécurité des personnes sur leurs services. Chaque jour, nous avons comme défi de prendre des décisions pour savoir quels discours sont préjudiciables, ce qui constitue des publicités politiques et comment prévenir des cyberattaques élaborées. Il s'agit d'un travail essentiel pour assurer la sécurité de nos collectivités, et nous reconnaissons que ce travail n'est pas quelque chose que des entreprises comme la nôtre devraient faire seules. [Français]

De nouvelles règles pour Internet devraient permettre de préserver ce qu'il y a de mieux en matière d'économie numérique et d'Internet, encourager l'innovation, soutenir la croissance des petites entreprises et permettre la liberté d'expression, tout en protégeant la société contre des dommages plus graves. Ce sont des enjeux très complexes à résoudre, et nous souhaitons travailler avec les gouvernements, les universitaires et la société civile pour garantir l'efficacité de la nouvelle réglementation.[Traduction]

Nous sommes ravis de vous faire part aujourd'hui de certaines de nos nouvelles réflexions dans quatre domaines d'action réglementaire possibles: le contenu préjudiciable, la protection de la vie privée, la portabilité des données et l'intégrité électorale.

Cela dit, je vais céder la parole à mon collègue Neil, qui aimerait échanger avec vous au sujet du contenu préjudiciable.

M. Neil Potts (directeur des politiques mondiales, Facebook Inc.):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, merci de me fournir l'occasion d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je m'appelle Neil Potts, et je suis le directeur chargé de la surveillance de l'élaboration et de la mise en œuvre des normes communautaires de Facebook. Voici nos lignes directrices concernant les types de contenus qui sont autorisés sur notre plateforme.

Toutefois, avant de continuer, j'aimerais juste signaler que M. Chan et moi sommes des directeurs des politiques mondiales, des experts en la matière, qui sommes prêts à échanger avec vous sur ces questions. M. Zuckerberg et Mme Sandberg, notre PDG et notre directrice des opérations, sont déterminés à travailler avec le gouvernement de façon responsable. Ils estiment qu'ils nous ont mandatés pour comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui afin de discuter de ces sujets, et nous sommes heureux de le faire.

Comme vous le savez, la mission de Facebook est de donner aux gens le pouvoir de bâtir une communauté et de rapprocher le monde. Plus de deux milliards de personnes utilisent notre plateforme chaque mois pour communiquer avec des membres de la famille et des amis, découvrir ce qui se passe dans le monde, créer leur entreprise et aider ceux dans le besoin.

Quand nous donnons une voix aux gens, nous voulons nous assurer qu'ils ne l'utilisent pas pour blesser d'autres personnes. Facebook assume pleinement la responsabilité de s'assurer que les outils que nous créons sont utilisés pour faire le bien et que nous assurons la sécurité des gens. Nous prenons ces responsabilités très au sérieux.

Plus tôt ce mois-ci, Facebook a signé l'Appel à l'action de Christchurch visant à éliminer les contenus terroristes et extrémistes violents en ligne, et nous avons pris des mesures immédiates touchant la diffusion en direct. Concrètement, les gens qui ont enfreint certaines règles sur Facebook, ce qui comprend notre politique « Individus et organismes dangereux », se verront interdire l'utilisation de Facebook Live.

Nous investissons aussi 7,5 millions de dollars dans de nouveaux partenariats de recherche avec d'éminents universitaires pour composer avec la manipulation médiatique contradictoire que nous avons vue après l'événement de Christchurch — par exemple, quand certaines personnes ont modifié la vidéo pour éviter d'être repérées afin de pouvoir la republier après son retrait.

Puisque le nombre d'utilisateurs de Facebook a augmenté et que la difficulté liée au fait de trouver le juste milieu entre la liberté d'expression et la sécurité s'est accrue, nous sommes parvenus à la conclusion que Facebook ne devrait pas prendre seule un si grand nombre de ces décisions difficiles. C'est pourquoi nous allons créer un comité de surveillance externe pour aider à régir les discours sur Facebook d'ici la fin de 2019. Le comité de surveillance sera indépendant de Facebook, et il s'agira d'un dernier niveau d'appel pour le contenu qui reste sur notre plateforme et celui qui est retiré.

Malgré la mis en place du comité de surveillance, nous savons que des gens utiliseront une panoplie de plateformes et de services en ligne différents pour communiquer, et nous nous en porterions tous mieux s'il existait des normes de base claires pour toutes les plateformes. C'est pourquoi nous aimerions travailler avec les gouvernements à établir des cadres clairs liés au contenu préjudiciable en ligne.

Nous avons collaboré avec le président Macron de la France sur exactement ce type de projet et nous sommes ouverts à la possibilité de dialoguer avec un plus grand nombre de pays dans l'avenir.

Monsieur Chan, voulez-vous prendre le relais?

(1050)

M. Kevin Chan:

Pour ce qui est de la protection de la vie privée, nous comprenons très clairement notre responsabilité importante en tant que gardiens des données des gens et de la nécessité pour nous de faire mieux. C'est pourquoi, depuis 2014, nous avons pris des mesures importantes pour réduire de façon radicale la quantité de données auxquelles des applications tierces peuvent accéder sur Facebook et ce pourquoi nous mettons sur pied une fonction en matière de protection de la vie privée beaucoup plus importante et vigoureuse au sein de l'entreprise. Nous avons aussi réalisé des progrès considérables afin de donner aux gens plus de transparence et de contrôle sur leurs données.

Nous reconnaissons que, même si nous menons beaucoup plus d'activités sur la protection de la vie privée, nous nous portons tous mieux lorsque des cadres généraux régissent la collecte et l'utilisation des données. De tels cadres devraient protéger votre droit de choisir la façon dont votre information est utilisée, tout en permettant l'innovation. On devrait tenir des entreprises comme Facebook responsables en imposant des sanctions lorsque nous commettons des erreurs et l'on devrait clarifier les nouveaux sujets d'étude, y compris le moment où les données peuvent être utilisées pour le bien public et la façon dont cela devrait s'appliquer à l'intelligence artificielle.

Il existe déjà certains bons modèles que l'on peut reproduire, y compris le Règlement général sur la protection des données de l'Union européenne et la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques du Canada. L'atteinte d'un certain degré d'harmonisation autour du monde serait souhaitable et faciliterait la croissance économique.

Nous croyons aussi que le principe de la portabilité des données est suprêmement important pour le choix des consommateurs et pour assurer un marché dynamique et compétitif en matière de services numériques. Les gens devraient être en mesure de prendre les données qu'ils ont mises sur un service et de les déplacer vers un autre service. On doit ensuite se demander comment la portabilité des données peut se faire d'une façon sécuritaire qui protège la vie privée. La portabilité des données n'est utile que s'il y a en place des normes communes, et c'est pourquoi nous soutenons un format standard pour le transfert des données et le projet de transfert des données ouvertes.

Enfin, Facebook fait tout son possible pour protéger les élections sur sa plateforme dans le monde entier en investissant considérablement dans les gens, la technologie et les partenariats. Nous avons triplé le nombre de personnes qui travaillent sur des questions de sécurité dans le monde, le faisant passer de 10 000 à 30 000 personnes. Nous avons mis au point une technologie d'intelligence artificielle de pointe qui nous permet de déceler et de retirer de faux comptes en masse.

Bien sûr, nous ne pouvons pas réussir si nous faisons cavalier seul, et nous nous sommes donc associés à un vaste éventail d'organisations. Au Canada, nous sommes fiers de travailler avec l'Agence France-Presse sur la vérification de faits par des tiers, HabiloMédias sur la littéracie numérique et l'organisme À voix égales pour assurer la sécurité des candidats, plus particulièrement des candidates, en ligne.

Facebook est une ardente défenseure des règlements qui font la promotion de la transparence des publicités politiques en ligne. Nous croyons qu'il est important que les citoyens puissent voir toutes les publicités politiques qui sont offertes en ligne, particulièrement celles qui ne leur sont pas destinées. C'est pourquoi nous appuyons et respecterons le projet de loi C-76, la Loi sur la modernisation des élections du Canada, que le Parlement a adoptée, et nous dialoguerons au cours des prochaines semaines avec des publicitaires politiques canadiens, y compris les partis politiques fédéraux représentés ici aujourd'hui, sur des changements importants au chapitre des publicités politiques qui seront apportés sur la plateforme d'ici la fin juin.

Enfin, monsieur le président, comme vous le savez, Facebook est partie à la Déclaration du Canada sur l'intégrité électorale en ligne, qui énonce 12 engagements que le gouvernement du Canada et certaines plateformes en ligne acceptent d'entreprendre ensemble en prévision des élections fédérales d'octobre. Il s'agit d'une expression forte de la mesure dans laquelle nous prenons au sérieux nos responsabilités au Canada, et nous sommes impatients de travailler de pair avec des représentants pour nous prémunir contre l'ingérence étrangère.

Merci de m'avoir donné l'occasion d'être ici. [Français]

Nous avons hâte de répondre à vos questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Chan.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Slater, de Google.

M. Derek Slater (directeur mondial, Politique de l'information, Google LLC):

Merci de me donner l'occasion de comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui.

Je m'appelle Derek Slater, et mon rôle chez Google est d'aider à façonner l'approche de l'entreprise à l'égard des politiques d'information et de la réglementation du contenu. Je suis accompagné de mon collègue Colin McKay, chef des politiques publiques pour Google au Canada.

Nous reconnaissons votre leadership et sommes heureux d'avoir l'occasion de discuter de l'approche de Google afin d'examiner nos nombreux enjeux en commun.

Pendant près de 20 ans, nous avons conçu des outils pour aider les utilisateurs à accéder à de l'information, à en créer et à en partager comme jamais auparavant, en leur donnant plus de choix, de possibilités et d'exposition à une diversité de ressources et d'opinions. Toutefois, nous savons que les plateformes mêmes qui ont procuré ces avantages sociétaux peuvent aussi faire l'objet d'abus, et cela va du hameçonnage à l'extrémisme violent et plus encore. L'examen attentif des législateurs et de nos utilisateurs guide et améliore nos produits ainsi que les politiques qui les régissent.

Nous n'avons pas attendu la réglementation du gouvernement pour nous attaquer aux défis d'aujourd'hui. Le fait de réagir au contenu illégal et problématique en ligne est une responsabilité partagée qui nécessite la collaboration entre les gouvernements, la société civile et l'industrie, et nous faisons notre part et continuerons de la faire.

Je vais faire ressortir certaines de nos activités en ce moment. Sur YouTube, nous combinons des examens automatisés et humains pour repérer et retirer le contenu qui contrevient aux règlements. Nous nous sommes améliorés au fil du temps et avons éliminé plus rapidement une partie de ce contenu, et ce, même avant qu'il soit consulté. Entre janvier et mars 2019, YouTube a retiré près de 8,3 millions de vidéos qui violaient ses lignes directrices communautaires, et 76 % de celles-ci ont été signalées par des machines plutôt que par des gens. Parmi les vidéos repérées par des machines, plus de 75 % n'avaient jamais été visionnées une seule fois.

Lorsqu'il s'agit de lutter contre la désinformation, nous avons investi dans nos systèmes de classement pour nous assurer que la qualité compte dans l'élaboration de politiques, la surveillance de menaces et les mécanismes d'application de la loi afin de nous attaquer à des comportements malveillants, de même que dans des outils qui fournissent aux utilisateurs plus de contexte, comme la vérification des faits ou les panneaux d'information sur la recherche Google et YouTube.

De plus, dans le contexte de l'intégrité électorale, nous concevons depuis plus de 10 ans des produits qui fournissent des renseignements en temps opportun et faisant autorité au sujet des élections du monde entier. En outre, nous avons consacré des ressources importantes pour aider les campagnes, les candidats et les représentants électoraux à améliorer leur posture en matière de cybersécurité à la lumière des menaces existantes et émergentes. Notre site Web Protection Élections offre des ressources gratuites comme la protection avancée, qui offre le compte de sécurité optimal de Google, et Project Shield, un service gratuit conçu pour atténuer le risque d'attaques de déni de service distribué qui inondent les sites de trafic dans le but de les fermer.

Même si l'industrie doit faire sa part, les décideurs, bien sûr, ont un rôle fondamental à jouer pour faire en sorte que tout le monde récolte les avantages personnels et économiques des technologies modernes tout en tenant compte des coûts sociaux et en respectant les droits fondamentaux. Les gouvernements et les assemblées législatives de près de 200 pays et territoires dans lesquels nous exerçons des activités sont parvenus à des conclusions différentes quant à la façon de régler des problèmes comme la protection des données, la diffamation et les discours haineux. Les cadres juridiques et réglementaires d'aujourd'hui sont le produit de processus délibératifs, et à mesure que la technologie et les attentes de la société évoluent, nous devons rester attentifs à la façon de mieux améliorer ces règles.

Dans certains cas, les lois doivent être modernisées, par exemple, dans le cas de la protection des données et de l'accès des organismes d'application de la loi aux données. Dans d'autres cas, une nouvelle collaboration entre l'industrie, le gouvernement et la société civile peut se traduire par des institutions et des outils complémentaires. Le récent Appel à l'action de Christchurch sur l'extrémisme violent n'est qu'un exemple de ce type de collaboration pragmatique et efficace.

De même, nous avons travaillé avec l'Union européenne sur le récent code de conduite contre les discours haineux, ce qui renferme un processus de vérification pour surveiller la façon dont les plateformes respectent leurs engagements, et sur le récent code de bonnes pratiques de l'Union européenne contre la désinformation. Nous avons convenu d'aider des chercheurs à étudier ce sujet et d'assurer la vérification régulière de nos prochaines étapes associées à cette lutte.

De nouvelles approches comme celles-là doivent reconnaître les différences pertinentes entre des services aux fonctions et aux fins différentes. La surveillance des politiques sur le contenu devrait naturellement se focaliser sur les plateformes de partage de contenu. Les médias sociaux, les sites d'échange de vidéos et d'autres services dont le but principal est d'aider des gens à créer du contenu et à le communiquer à un vaste public devraient être différenciés d'autres types de services comme des services de recherche, des services d'entreprise, et des services de stockage de dossiers et de courriels, qui nécessitent des ensembles de règles différents.

Cela dit, nous voulons faire ressortir aujourd'hui quatre éléments clés à prendre en considération dans le cadre de l'évolution de la surveillance et de la discussion concernant les plateformes de partage de contenu.

Premièrement, il fait établir des définitions claires.

Les plateformes sont responsables d'établir des règles du jeu claires pour ce qui est ou non permissible, et les gouvernements ont aussi la responsabilité d'établir les règles par rapport à ce qu'ils estiment être des discours illégaux. Les restrictions devraient être nécessaires et proportionnelles, établies à partir de définitions claires et de risques fondés sur les données probantes et élaborées en consultation avec les parties prenantes pertinentes. Ces définitions claires, combinées à des avis clairs au sujet d'éléments de contenu particuliers, sont essentielles pour que les plateformes puissent agir.

(1055)



Deuxièmement, on doit élaborer des normes concernant la transparence et les pratiques exemplaires.

La transparence est le fondement d'une discussion éclairée et elle aide à établir les pratiques efficaces dans l'ensemble de l'industrie. Les gouvernements devraient adopter une approche souple qui renforce la recherche et soutient l'innovation responsable. Des exigences trop restrictives comme des délais de retrait universels, l'utilisation obligatoire de technologies particulières ou des sanctions disproportionnées réduiront au bout du compte l'accès du public à de l'information légitime.

Troisièmement, on doit miser sur des défaillances systémiques récurrentes plutôt que sur des cas isolés.

La détermination du contenu problématique et la réaction par rapport à celui-ci est semblable, d'une certaine façon, à la sécurité de l'information. Il y aura toujours de mauvais acteurs, des bogues et des erreurs. L'amélioration dépend de la collaboration entre de nombreux joueurs qui utilisent des approches axées sur les données pour comprendre si des cas particuliers sont exceptionnels ou représentatifs de problèmes systémiques récurrents plus importants.

Quatrièmement et finalement, on doit renforcer la coopération internationale.

Comme le démontre la réunion d'aujourd'hui, ces préoccupations et ces enjeux sont mondiaux. Les pays devraient s'échanger leurs pratiques exemplaires et éviter des approches conflictuelles qui imposent des fardeaux de conformité indus et créent de la confusion pour les clients. Cela dit, des pays individuels feront des choix différents au sujet des discours permissibles en fonction de leurs traditions juridiques, de leur histoire et de leurs valeurs, conformément aux obligations internationales en matière de droits de la personne. Un contenu illégal dans un pays pourrait être légal dans un autre.

Ces principes ont pour but de contribuer à une conversation aujourd'hui sur la façon dont les législateurs et les gouvernements devraient s'attaquer aux enjeux que nous sommes susceptibles d'aborder, y compris les discours haineux, la désinformation et l'intégrité électorale.

Pour terminer, je dirai qu'Internet présente des défis pour les institutions traditionnelles qui aident la société à organiser, à conserver et à communiquer de l'information. Quant à nous, nous sommes déterminés à réduire au minimum le contenu qui s'éloigne des éléments utiles que nos plateformes ont à offrir. Nous espérons travailler avec les membres du Comité et des gouvernements du monde entier pour surmonter ces difficultés à mesure que nous continuons d'offrir des services qui préconisent et diffusent des renseignements fiables et utiles.

Merci.

(1100)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Twitter. Je crois que M. Monje prendra la parole.

Allez-y.

M. Carlos Monje (directeur, Politique publique, Twitter inc.):

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur le président Zimmer, monsieur le président Collins et chers membres du Comité, je m'appelle Carlos Monje, et je suis directeur des politiques publiques pour Twitter. Je suis accompagné de Michele Austin, qui est notre chef des politiques publiques pour le Canada.

Au nom de Twitter, j'aimerais reconnaître le travail acharné de tous les membres du Comité par rapport aux questions qui vous sont présentées. Nous vous remercions de votre dévouement et de votre volonté de travailler avec nous.

Twitter a pour objectif de servir la conversation publique. Toute tentative pour miner l'intégrité de notre service érode les principes mêmes de la liberté d'expression en ligne. C'est la valeur sur laquelle repose notre entreprise.

Les questions soulevées au Comité nous préoccupent profondément en tant que personnes. Nous voulons que les gens se sentent en sécurité sur Twitter et qu'ils comprennent notre approche à l'égard de la santé et de la sécurité du service. Il y aura toujours plus de choses à faire, mais nous avons réalisé des progrès considérables.

J'aimerais aborder brièvement notre approche à l'égard de la protection de la vie privée des gens, et j'ai hâte d'entendre vos questions.

Twitter s'efforce de protéger la vie privée des gens qui utilisent notre service. Nous croyons que la protection de la vie privée est un droit de la personne fondamental. Twitter est publique par défaut. Cela distingue notre service d'autres sites Internet. Quand un particulier crée un compte Twitter et commence à envoyer des gazouillis, ceux-ci sont immédiatement visibles et consultables par n'importe qui dans le monde. Les gens comprennent la nature publique par défaut de Twitter et ils vont sur le site en s'attendant à voir une conversation publique et à s'y joindre. Eux seuls contrôlent le contenu qu'ils partagent sur Twitter, y compris la mesure dans laquelle ce contenu peut être personnel ou privé.

Nous croyons que lorsque des gens nous confient leurs données, nous devrions nous montrer transparents dans notre façon de fournir un contrôle utile quant aux données qui sont recueillies, à la façon dont elles sont utilisées et au moment où elles sont communiquées. Ces paramètres sont facilement accessibles et conçus dans un esprit de convivialité. Nos paramètres de données qui permettent la plus grande personnalisation sont situés sur une seule page.

Twitter rend aussi accessible la trousse à outils « Vos données Twitter », qui offre aux personnes un instantané des types de données stockées par nous, comme le nom d'utilisateur, l'adresse de courriel, le numéro de téléphone associés au compte, des détails sur la création du compte et de l'information au sujet des inférences que nous pourrions avoir tirées. À partir de cet ensemble d'outils, les gens peuvent faire des choses comme modifier les intérêts présumés, télécharger leurs renseignements et comprendre ce que nous offrons.

Twitter cherche aussi de manière proactive à contrer les pourriels, l'automatisation malveillante, la désinformation et la manipulation des plateformes en améliorant les politiques et en élargissant les mesures d'application de la loi, en fournissant un plus grand contexte aux utilisateurs, en renforçant les partenariats avec les gouvernements et les experts et en assurant une plus grande transparence. Tout cela vise à renforcer la santé du service et à protéger les gens qui utilisent Twitter.

Nous continuons de promouvoir la santé de la conversation publique en contrant toutes les formes de manipulation des plateformes. Nous définissons la manipulation des plateformes comme l'utilisation de Twitter pour perturber la conversation en participant à une activité agressive ou trompeuse en bloc. Nous avons réalisé des progrès considérables. De fait, en 2018, nous avons repéré et remis en question plus de 425 millions de comptes que l'on a soupçonné avoir participé à la manipulation des plateformes. De ceux-là, environ 75 % ont fini par être suspendus. De plus en plus, nous utilisons des méthodes de détection automatisées et proactives pour trouver les abus et les manipulations sur notre service avant qu'ils n'aient une incidence sur l'expérience de qui que ce soit. Plus de la moitié des comptes que nous suspendons sont retirés dans la semaine suivant leur enregistrement — et bon nombre, au bout de quelques heures à peine.

Nous continuerons d'améliorer notre capacité de lutter contre le contenu manipulatif avant qu'il n'influence l'expérience des gens qui utilisent Twitter. Twitter se préoccupe beaucoup de la désinformation dans tous les contextes, mais l'amélioration de la santé de la conversation au sujet des élections revêt la plus grande importance. Un aspect clé de notre stratégie électorale est l'élargissement des partenariats avec la société civile pour accroître notre capacité de comprendre, de repérer et de faire cesser les tentatives de désinformation.

Ici, au Canada, nous travaillons avec Élections Canada, le commissaire aux élections fédérales, le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité, le Bureau du Conseil privé, des institutions démocratiques et des partenaires de la société civile, comme le Centre Samara pour la démocratie et le Projet Démocratie.

En plus de déployer des efforts pour protéger le service, nous estimons que la transparence est un outil éprouvé et puissant dans la lutte contre la désinformation. Nous avons pris un certain nombre de mesures pour perturber les activités étrangères et limiter la suppression d'électeurs et avons augmenté de manière considérable la transparence au sujet de ces mesures. Nous avons mis à la disposition du public et des chercheurs les plus grandes archives sur les activités d'information au monde. Nous avons parcouru des données et des renseignements sur plus de 9 600 comptes, y compris des comptes en provenance de la Russie, de l'Iran et du Venezuela, pour un total de plus de 25 millions de gazouillis.

Nous croyons fondamentalement que ces comptes et leur contenu devraient être accessibles et consultables, de sorte que les membres du public, les gouvernements et les chercheurs puissent mener des enquêtes, tirer des apprentissages et acquérir des capacités en matière de littératie médiatique pour l'avenir. Ils nous aident aussi à nous améliorer.

(1105)



J'aimerais souligner un exemple particulier dans le cadre de nos efforts pour lutter contre la désinformation ici, au Canada.

Plus tôt ce printemps, nous avons lancé un nouvel outil pour diriger les personnes vers des ressources de santé publique crédibles lorsqu'elles cherchaient des mots clés associés aux vaccins sur Twitter. Dans ce cas-ci, nous nous sommes associés à l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada. Ce nouvel investissement s'appuie sur notre travail existant pour nous protéger contre l'amplification artificielle de contenu non crédible au sujet de la sécurité et de l'efficacité des vaccins. De plus, nous nous assurons déjà que le contenu publicitaire ne contient pas d'affirmations trompeuses au sujet du remède, du traitement, du diagnostic ou de la prévention de toute maladie, y compris des vaccins.

Pour terminer, Twitter continuera d'imaginer de nouveaux moyens de maintenir son engagement à l'égard de la protection de la vie privée, de lutter contre la désinformation sur son service et de demeurer responsable et transparente à l'égard des gens du monde entier. Nous avons réalisé des progrès notables et constants, mais notre travail ne sera jamais terminé.

Encore une fois, merci de nous avoir donné l'occasion d'être ici. Nous sommes impatients de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Tout d'abord, nous allons nous tourner vers mon coprésident, Damian Collins, puis nous observerons la séquence.

Vous aurez chacun cinq minutes. Essayez d'être aussi succincts que vous le pouvez.

Monsieur Collins, c'est à vous.

M. Damian Collins (président, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais adresser ma première question aux représentants de Facebook. Je suis sûr que vous savez que l'une des principales préoccupations des membres du Comité a été que des renseignements trompeurs, communiqués de manière délibérée et malveillante par l'intermédiaire des outils créés par les entreprises de médias sociaux, portent préjudice à la démocratie, et cette désinformation est utilisée pour nuire à des politiciens chevronnés et à des personnalités publiques, à des institutions publiques et au processus politique.

Cela dit, Facebook pourrait-elle expliquer pourquoi elle a choisi de ne pas retirer la vidéo de Nancy Pelosi qui donne une fausse impression d'elle pour miner sa réputation publique? La raison pour laquelle je crois que c'est très important, c'est que nous savons tous très bien que la nouvelle technologie va faciliter la création de ces sortes de documents faux ou manipulés. Vous pourriez peut-être expliquer pourquoi Facebook ne va pas retirer ce film.

M. Neil Potts:

Merci, monsieur Collins.

Je suis heureux d'expliquer de façon un peu plus claire notre approche à l'égard de la désinformation pour le Comité.

D'abord, je tiens à exprimer clairement que nous prenons des mesures contre cette vidéo...

M. Damian Collins:

Je suis désolé, monsieur Potts, mais nous n'avons pas beaucoup de temps. J'aimerais que vous répondiez à la question qui vous a été posée, plutôt que de faire une déclaration au sujet des politiques de Facebook sur la désinformation ou ce que vous auriez pu faire d'autre. J'aimerais que vous répondiez à la question: pourquoi vous, contrairement à YouTube, ne retirez pas ce film?

M. Neil Potts:

Nous prenons des mesures dynamiques pour déclasser ce...

M. Damian Collins:

Je sais que vous êtes en train de le déclasser. Pourquoi ne retirez-vous pas le film?

M. Neil Potts:

Nous avons pour politique d'informer les gens lorsque nous détenons des renseignements sur la plateforme qui pourraient être faux, pour qu'ils puissent prendre leurs propres décisions au sujet de ce contenu.

M. Damian Collins:

Mais il s'agit de contenu qui est largement considéré, à mon avis, comme étant faux. YouTube l'a retiré. Les vérificateurs des faits qui travaillent auprès de Facebook disent que c'est un faux; pourtant, on permet que la vidéo reste en ligne, et sa présence est beaucoup plus puissante que toute clause de non-responsabilité qui pourrait être écrite en dessous ou au-dessus.

Pourquoi ne dites-vous pas que les films qui sont clairement faux et sont désignés de façon indépendante comme étant faux, qui sont là pour tromper les gens par rapport à certains des politiciens les plus chevronnés de notre pays, seront retirés?

M. Neil Potts:

Nous effectuons des recherches sur nos traitements de l'information. C'est le traitement qui révèle que quelque chose est faux. Par exemple, si quelqu'un souhaitait partager cette vidéo avec ses amis ou qu'il l'avait déjà partagée ou la voyait dans un fil de nouvelles, il recevrait un message disant que c'est faux.

M. Damian Collins:

Facebook accepte que ce film soit une déformation des faits, n'est-ce pas?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur Potts, vous êtes plus près de cela, mais je crois comprendre que la vidéo en question a été ralentie. Est-ce bien le cas?

M. Neil Potts:

C'est exact. Je crois que c'est manipulé...

M. Damian Collins:

C'est un film qui a été manipulé pour créer l'impression déformée que Nancy Pelosi était en quelque sorte en état d'ébriété lorsqu'elle parlait. C'est ce qui s'est produit et c'est pourquoi YouTube a retiré le film et pourquoi il y a eu une reconnaissance générale, y compris par les vérificateurs des faits indépendants qui travaillent pour Facebook, que ce film est déformé et qu'il crée une impression déformée de la personne qui vient au troisième rang des politiciens les plus expérimentés aux États-Unis.

(1110)

M. Neil Potts:

Puisque vous avez mentionné les vérificateurs des faits, nous travaillons avec plus de 50 vérificateurs des faits à l'échelle internationale qui sont...

M. Damian Collins:

Ce n'est pas remis en question. Les vérificateurs des faits reconnaissent que c'est faux. Vous dites que la vidéo peut rester là. Ne voyez-vous pas que ce que Facebook fait donne le feu vert à quiconque dans le monde veut faire un film déformé ou un faux documentaire au sujet d'un politicien d'expérience, ou peut-être utiliser dans l'avenir la technologie des hypertrucages pour le faire, en sachant que, peu importe ce qui se passe, Facebook ne va pas retirer le film?

M. Neil Potts:

Je crois que vous posez une question philosophique, monsieur. Devrions-nous retirer le film ou aviser les gens qu'il est faux? Nous avons choisi d'aviser les gens que c'est faux, de manière à ce qu'ils comprennent pourquoi la vidéo se trouve sur la plateforme et quelles autres parties indépendantes ont jugé qu'elles l'étaient. Elles ont considéré qu'elle était fausse et elles voient maintenant cela sur notre plateforme si elles y vont pour la partager. À mon avis, toutes ces questions sont très complexes, mais cela permet aux gens de prendre leurs propres décisions et de dire aux autres qu'elle est fausse.

Vous avez mentionné que la vidéo est ralentie, ce que tout le monde et les vérificateurs des faits ont dit, mais je crois qu'il existe de nombreux cas différents où les vidéos sont ralenties et ne seraient peut-être pas une justification pour le Comité...

M. Damian Collins:

La question ici, c'est de dire que si quelqu'un fait un film, ralentit un film ou le manipule, il essaie de créer la fausse impression qu'une personnalité publique d'expérience n'est pas apte à assumer ses fonctions, c'est donc une tentative de lui nuire, ainsi que nuire à sa charge publique.

Ce n'est pas une question d'opinion ni de liberté de parole. C'est une question de gens qui manipulent du contenu pour nuire à des personnalités publiques, et ma préoccupation, c'est que le fait de laisser ce type de contenu en ligne, que l'on sait faux et déformé de manière indiscutable, et de permettre le partage de ce contenu et la promotion par d'autres utilisateurs est irresponsable.

YouTube a retiré ce contenu. Je ne comprends pas pourquoi Facebook ne fait pas la même chose.

M. Neil Potts:

Monsieur, je comprends vos préoccupations, mais je crois que vos questions sont les bonnes et qu'elles révèlent la complexité de cet enjeu et aussi peut-être le fait que l'approche que nous adoptons fonctionne. Vous n'entendez pas les gens...

M. Damian Collins:

Désolé, mais avec tout le respect que je vous dois, ce que cela montre, c'est la simplicité de ces enjeux, la solution de simplicité qu'a choisie une autre entreprise, reconnaissant les mêmes enjeux. Il s'agit simplement de dire que c'est clairement faux et déformé, que c'est fait pour nuire à des personnalités publiques d'expérience et que cela ne devrait en fait pas avoir sa place sur la plateforme ni faire partie de votre communauté.

M. Neil Potts:

Vous avez raison, et je respecte évidemment l'opinion de YouTube comme entreprise indépendante, mais nous n'entendons pas des gens parler de cette vidéo comme si elle était réelle. Nous les entendons plutôt discuter du fait qu'elle est fausse et qu'elle se trouve sur la plateforme; donc, par rapport à la question de savoir si nous avons informé les gens du fait que la vidéo était fausse, oui, nous l'avons fait. Je crois que c'est le discours prédominant en ce moment. Que ce soit dans la conversation que nous tenons en ce moment, que ce soit dans les nouvelles ou ailleurs, les gens comprennent que cette vidéo est fausse, et ils peuvent prendre d'autres décisions à partir de là.

M. Damian Collins:

Mon inquiétude à ce sujet, c'est que cela établit un précédent très dangereux. Votre collègue Monika Bickert a dit la semaine dernière à CNN que, essentiellement, Facebook a pour politique de ne pas retirer tout contenu politique, tout contenu de désinformation lié aux politiques: on mettrait des notes pour les utilisateurs afin qu'ils voient que les faits sont contestés, mais le contenu ne sera jamais retiré.

Si vous acceptez que des gens qui produisent des films de désinformation ciblant des utilisateurs dans le but de miner la démocratie abusent ainsi de votre plateforme, et que la meilleure solution, que vous ayez trouvée, c'est simplement de les signaler pour dire que certaines personnes contestent ce film, je crois que vous créez un précédent très dangereux.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Collins.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Erskine-Smith.

Allez-y, pour cinq minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Vous parlez assez souvent à M. Zuckerberg, parce que vous êtes ici en son nom. Rappelez-moi pourquoi il n'est pas ici aujourd'hui.

M. Neil Potts:

Je suis désolé, monsieur. Je n'arrive pas à voir votre nom.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

C'est M. Erskine-Smith.

M. Neil Potts:

Monsieur Erskine-Smith, M. Zuckerberg et Mme Sandberg nous ont chargés de représenter l'entreprise ici aujourd'hui. Nous sommes des experts en la matière dans ces domaines et sommes plus qu'heureux d'avoir l'occasion d'être ici, mais je veux...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Il a dit: « J'ai hâte de discuter de ces problèmes avec les législateurs du monde entier » il y a moins de deux mois. Il ne voulait pas juste dire ces législateurs-là, mais aussi d'autres législateurs, j'en suis sûr.

Je vais parler de la protection de la vie privée. Dans son plus récent rapport, notre commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a dit que le cadre de protection de la vie privée de Facebook était « une coquille vide ». Puis, le 7 mai, devant le Comité, notre commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a dit que les conclusions s'appliquent toujours, soit que c'est une coquille vide. Si Facebook prend au sérieux la protection de la vie privée, et j'entends M. Chan dire qu'il le fait — ce ne sont pas mes mots; ce sont ceux du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée — pourquoi avait-il « rejeté d'emblée ou refusé de mettre en œuvre » les recommandations du commissaire à la protection de la vie privée?

M. Kevin Chan:

Vu que le commissaire a annoncé qu'il allait porter l'affaire devant la Cour fédérale, nous sommes en quelque sorte limités dans ce que nous pouvons dire, mais ce que je peux vous raconter, c'est que...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous n'êtes pas du tout limité dans ce que vous pouvez dire, monsieur Chan.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je vais continuer avec ce que je peux vous raconter, c'est-à-dire que nous avons en fait travaillé très dur au cours des derniers mois pour parvenir à une résolution et à une marche à suivre avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée du Canada...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Donc vous n'avez pas rejeté d'emblée ou refusé de mettre en œuvre les recommandations.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je crois que nous avons entamé une conversation sur la façon dont nous pourrions atteindre les objectifs que nous recherchons tous.

(1115)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Lorsque le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a écrit ces mots précis dans son rapport particulier, il avait tort, à votre avis.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je ne... Si je peux me permettre, j'aimerais juste expliquer un peu plus, parce que je suis limité dans ce que je peux dire...

Le président:

En fait, monsieur Chan...

Monsieur Chan, la priorité est donnée aux membres du Comité, donc si vous voulez continuer de parler, vous devez entendre.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mark Zuckerberg a aussi dit que l'avenir est privé. Fait intéressant, cependant, selon la politique sur la protection de la vie privée de Facebook en 2004, l'entreprise n'avait pas et n'utiliserait pas de témoins pour recueillir des renseignements privés auprès de tout utilisateur. Cela a changé en 2007. Au départ, Facebook a donné aux utilisateurs la capacité d'empêcher la collecte de leurs renseignements personnels par des tiers, et cela a aussi été changé.

Quand M. Zuckerberg a dit que l'avenir est privé, veut-il dire que l'avenir retourne à notre passé, lorsqu'on se souciait davantage de la protection de la vie privée que des profits?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je crois que nous faisons des pieds et des mains pour repenser ce à quoi les services de communications en ligne vont ressembler. Je pense que beaucoup de choses intéressantes ont été écrites, pas juste par des gens de l'entreprise, mais dans le monde entier. Nous voyons une ligne de tendance où les gens se concentrent de plus en plus sur les communications individuelles. Elles sont privées, par définition, mais ce que cela soulève, monsieur, en matière de questions de politiques publiques, c'est un équilibre très intéressant entre la protection de la vie privée et l'accès légitime à de l'information ainsi que des questions d'encryptage. Ce sont de fortes tensions. Je crois qu'elles ont été soulevées plus tôt, y compris dans des législatures précédentes au Canada, mais nous espérons dialoguer sur ces questions.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Pour ce qui est de dialoguer sur ces questions, le RGPD a été adopté par l'Union européenne. Nous avons déjà recommandé, au Comité, que le Canada aille plus loin.

L'an dernier, Facebook a fait 22 milliards de dollars, et Alphabet, 30 milliards de dollars. Dans le passé, vous avez utilisé des millions de ces dollars pour des activités de lobbyisme contre le RGPD. Maintenant, vous convenez que c'est une norme qui devrait être en place ou que des normes semblables devraient être en place.

J'aimerais une réponse simple par oui ou non, monsieur Chan et monsieur Slater.

M. Kevin Chan:

Oui, nous appuyons pleinement le RGPD.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Et vous, monsieur Slater?

M. Colin McKay (chef, Relations gouvernementales et politiques publiques, Google Canada):

Si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, monsieur Erskine-Smith, je vais répondre en tant qu'expert en matière de protection de la vie privée.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Bien sûr.

M. Colin McKay:

Oui.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

M. McNamee était ici et il a dit que le consentement ne devrait peut-être pas être la seule règle en jeu et que, dans certains cas, nous devrions simplement interdire certaines pratiques. Il a utilisé le suivi sur le Web.

À quand remonte la dernière fois que Google a lu mes courriels pour me cibler au moyen de publicités? C'était il y a combien d'années?

M. Colin McKay:

Nous avons cessé d'utiliser votre contenu Gmail pour faire de la publicité en 2017. Ce contenu était propre à vous. Cette information n'a jamais été communiquée à l'externe.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Est-ce quelque chose que nous devrions songer à interdire, de sorte que les personnes ne pourraient jamais consentir à ce que leurs courriels soient lus afin qu'on puisse les cibler au moyen de publicités? Seriez-vous à l'aise avec cette idée?

M. Kevin Chan:

C'est certainement la pratique en ce moment. J'hésite à utiliser le mot « interdiction », parce qu'un vaste éventail de services qui pourraient être utilisés dans ce contexte particulier sont raisonnables.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

L'autorité de la concurrence allemande a dit ceci en février dernier: En raison de la position de l’entreprise sur le marché, une acceptation obligatoire des conditions générales d’utilisation n’est pas une base suffisante pour un traitement des données aussi intensif. Le seul choix qui s'offre à l'utilisateur est d'accepter la combinaison complète des données ou de s'abstenir d'utiliser le réseau social. Dans une situation aussi difficile, le choix de l'utilisateur ne peut être considéré comme un consentement volontaire.

Messieurs Chan et Slater, croyez-vous que la protection de la vie privée est une considération clé dans les décisions relatives à la concurrence et aux fusions, et les autorités de la concurrence du monde entier devraient-elles tenir compte des questions sur la protection de la vie privée?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je suis désolé. Pourriez-vous répéter la question, juste pour que je m'assure que je la comprends?

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Êtes-vous d'accord pour dire que les autorités de la concurrence du monde entier devraient examiner la protection de la vie privée — tout comme elles examinent actuellement les prix — et la collecte de données de nos renseignements personnels comme considération clé dans le droit de la concurrence et au moment d'examiner des fusions et des acquisitions?

M. Kevin Chan:

C'est une question de politiques publiques très intéressante. On peut supposer que certains...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous pouvez juste répondre par oui ou non.

M. Kevin Chan:

Ce sont des questions complexes, monsieur, comme vous pouvez le comprendre, et si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais juste dire quelques mots de plus par rapport à cette question, car je crois que c'est compliqué.

Je crois qu'il est clair que les politiques en matière de concurrence et celles sur la protection de la vie privée sont assez différentes. Je soupçonne que les autorités responsables de la protection des données dans le monde entier auraient des points de vue très différents par rapport au fait de savoir si c'est ou non approprié de déverser des concepts propres à d'autres domaines dans la loi sur la protection des données.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Ce n'est pas ce que je dis. Je demande si, puisque nous protégeons actuellement les consommateurs par rapport au prix, nous ne devrions pas les protéger par rapport à la vie privée? Nous avons une autorité de la concurrence allemande qui laisse entendre que nous devrions le faire.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je vois, je suis désolé. Je comprends mieux ce que vous dites.

(1120)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

J'ai lu directement une citation de l'autorité de la concurrence allemande.

M. Kevin Chan:

Vous avez tout à fait raison de dire que la protection des données... que nous devrions traiter la protection de la vie privée comme le pilier fondamental de l'économie numérique.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Du droit de la concurrence.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je crois que ce sont deux choses très distinctes. Je ne suis pas le seul à le croire. Je pense que si vous parlez aux autorités de la concurrence et aux autorités de la protection des données, elles pourraient très bien arriver à des points de vue semblables.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Ce n'est pas l'extrait que je vous ai lu.

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous sommes bien au courant de cela. J'ai parlé de cette question avec certains de mes collègues en Allemagne. Selon notre compréhension, le RGPD doit évidemment être appliqué et interprété par les autorités responsables de la protection des données en Europe.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons continuer.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Gourde, pour cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Les plateformes numériques que vous représentez ont mis au point, au fil des années, des outils très performants, même excessivement performants. Vous êtes en train de mener une course effrénée à la performance. Or, ce n'est pas nécessairement pour le bien-être de l'humanité, mais plutôt pour les intérêts personnels de vos compagnies.

Je vais faire une analogie. Vous avez conçu des automobiles qui peuvent rouler jusqu'à 250 kilomètres à l'heure, mais vous les louez à des utilisateurs qui roulent à cette vitesse dans des zones scolaires. Vous avez mis au point des outils qui sont devenus dangereux, qui sont devenus des armes.

En tant que législateur, je n'accepte pas que vous rejetiez du revers de la main la responsabilité que vous avez à cet égard. Ces outils vous appartiennent, vous les avez dotés de fonctions, mais vous ne choisissez pas nécessairement les utilisateurs. Vous louez donc vos outils de façon commerciale à des gens qui les utilisent à mauvais escient.

Au cours de l'élection que nous allons vivre dans quelques mois au Canada, aurez-vous la capacité technique d'arrêter immédiatement toute fausse nouvelle, toute forme de publicité haineuse ou toute forme de publicité qui porterait atteinte à notre démocratie? Pourrez-vous agir de façon très rapide? À la rigueur, pourrez-vous enrayer toute publicité pendant les élections au Canada et dans les autres pays, si vous ne pouvez pas nous garantir le contrôle absolu des publicités qui peuvent être placées sur vos plateformes?

Nous allons commencer par les représentants de Facebook, puis j'aimerais entendre ceux de Google et de Twitter.

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Gourde.

Je vais commencer par dire que c'est sûr que nous voulons faire tout ce que nous pouvons pour protéger l'élection d'octobre 2019.

Comme vous le savez, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le Parti conservateur, le Nouveau Parti démocratique et le Parti libéral. Il faut mentionner aussi les autres partis, comme le Parti vert, le Parti populaire, le Bloc québécois...

M. Jacques Gourde:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Chan, mais ce n'est pas une question de partis. Il est question de la population qui devra faire un choix en s'appuyant sur des informations que nous allons lui communiquer, et non pas sur de fausses informations.

Avez-vous la capacité d'arrêter rapidement la diffusion de fausses informations ou même d'enrayer carrément toute publicité qui peut être mise sur vos plateformes, si vous n'en avez pas le contrôle?

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci de la question.

Ici, au Canada, nous avons une équipe qui travaille sur chaque élection. Nous avons fait cela en Ontario, au Québec, en Colombie-Britannique, à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, au Nouveau-Brunswick...

M. Jacques Gourde:

Ne me nommez pas toutes les provinces.

Je veux savoir si vous avez la capacité d'enrayer en tout temps toute publicité haineuse ou toute fausse information durant la prochaine élection.

M. Kevin Chan:

Pour le moment, au cours de toutes les autres élections, il n'y a pas eu de problèmes que nous n'ayons pu résoudre rapidement.

M. Jacques Gourde:

Merci.

Je pose la même question aux représentants de Google. [Traduction]

M. Derek Slater:

Il est absolument essentiel de bien faire les choses. Nous investissons fortement dans des activités visant à prévoir et à prévenir les tentatives de miner l'intégrité électorale. Pour ce faire, nous rendons des renseignements utiles accessibles dans des recherches ou nous traitons avec les acteurs qui pourraient faire des déclarations trompeuses ou donner d'eux-mêmes une image inexacte dans des publicités.

M. Carlos Monje:

Twitter a consacré beaucoup de temps à l'amélioration de notre capacité interne de repérer ce type de désinformation. Nous avons tiré des apprentissages des élections dans le monde entier. Nous avons activement dialogué avec la société civile ici, et récemment durant les élections en Alberta, et nous estimons être très bien préparés. Toutefois, nous ne pouvons pas perdre de vue le prix. Ce sont les gens qui veulent manipuler la conversation qui continueront d'innover, et nous continuerons d'innover afin d'avoir une longueur d'avance sur eux.

(1125)

[Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

À la suite de vos réponses, je reste dans le doute et dans l'inquiétude.

Vos véhicules peuvent rouler à 250 kilomètres à l'heure, mais la limite sur l'autoroute est de 100 kilomètres à l'heure. Êtes-vous capables de réduire la capacité de vos outils, pour que ce soit juste et équitable envers tout le monde?

Qu'est-ce que cela donne d'avoir des outils si performants, si c'est pour faire le mal, alors qu'une moins grande performance pourrait servir le bien de l'humanité?

M. Kevin Chan:

Si vous me le permettez, je vais m'exprimer en anglais pour être plus clair, puisque c'est ma langue maternelle.[Traduction]

J'aimerais juste dire, monsieur Gourde, que c'est exactement ce que nous allons faire. Le mois prochain, comme votre parti et d'autres partis au Canada le savent, nous présenterons un processus très intensif pour quiconque veut publier des publicités politiques. Nous obligerons ces gens à obtenir une autorisation ou à démontrer qu'ils sont Canadiens. Nous devrons valider indépendamment le fait qu'ils sont Canadiens, puis nous leur donnerons un code — ou une clé, si vous le voulez — avec quoi ils devront s'authentifier avant de pouvoir diffuser une publicité.

Ce processus ne se fera pas dans une heure ou une journée, mais sur plusieurs jours. Je vous garantis que nous dialoguerons et travaillerons en étroite collaboration avec tous les partis politiques du Canada pour les guider dans le cadre de ce processus. Concernant les ralentisseurs ou les freins, je dirais que ce sera un mécanisme de ralentissement important dans le système, mais je crois que c'est ce qu'il faut faire pour assurer la transparence des publicités, pour réglementer le droit de faire des publicités politiques et pour se prémunir contre l'ingérence étrangère.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Gourde.

Le prochain est M. Angus.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup de ces exposés. Ils sont très utiles.

Monsieur Chan, nous savons que M. Zuckerberg et Mme Sandberg sont des personnes très importantes. Sont-elles occupées aujourd'hui?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je ne suis pas au courant de leur horaire aujourd'hui, mais je crois que c'est exact. Elles ont malheureusement dû transmettre leurs excuses.

M. Charlie Angus:

D'accord.

Je vais essayer de comprendre la gouvernance d'entreprise de Facebook. Vous venez du milieu politique canadien. Vous avez travaillé pour le Parti libéral. Nous sommes en quelque sorte doux et dociles ici, au Canada. Je n'ai même pas souvenir qu'on ait délivré une assignation au chef d'une société. Je ne connais personne qui ait déjà décidé de faire fi d'une assignation.

J'ose croire qu'ils ont quelque chose de vraiment pressant qui les garde occupés. Quand M. Zuckerberg a parlé récemment, comme mon collègue l'a souligné, au sujet de sa volonté, de son désir de parler avec les législateurs, est-ce que c'était une blague?

Ma question s'adresse à M. Chan. J'aimerais savoir ce qu'il en pense, parce qu'il nous représente au Canada.

M. Kevin Chan:

Eh bien, monsieur, je dois dire que nous souhaitons beaucoup collaborer avec le Parlement et le gouvernement du Canada. L'élection qui s'en vient sera importante, et elle sera importante pour nous afin que nous fassions bien les choses à Facebook. Nous voulons assurer une élection libre et juste. C'est pourquoi nous avons fait tout ce que nous avons fait.

Nous nous conformons au projet de loi C-76. À ma connaissance, nous pourrions être la seule entreprise représentée ici qui va de l'avant avec un système d'architecture pour le faire. Nous avons réagi rapidement aux promoteurs de haine au Canada, autant les organisations que les particuliers, et nous avons signé la Déclaration du Canada sur l'intégrité électorale. J'aimerais...

M. Charlie Angus:

Oui, et je vous en remercie. Désolé, je n'ai que quelques minutes.

Je reconnais ce travail. Je suis un grand admirateur de Facebook.

M. Kevin Chan: Merci, monsieur.

M. Charlie Angus: J'ai beaucoup parlé des outils puissants qu'il offre dans les collectivités autochtones que je représente.

Mon inquiétude a trait à cette idée d'adhésion et de retrait de Facebook quand il s'agit de la législation nationale. Tout d'abord, vous avez fait fi d'une assignation du Parlement, parce que M. Zuckerberg pourrait être occupé. C'est peut-être son jour de congé. Je ne sais pas.

Vous avez récemment été reconnu coupable par notre organisme de réglementation de la violation par Cambridge Analytica. M. Therrien a dit ceci: Le risque est élevé pour les Canadiens qui utilisent Facebook de voir leurs renseignements personnels utilisés à des fins qui leur sont inconnues pour lesquelles ils n'ont pas consenti et qui peuvent être contraires à leurs intérêts ou à leurs attentes. Les préjudices peuvent être très réels, notamment le [...] politique et la surveillance.

Ce qui était frappant, c'est que Facebook n'a pas reconnu que nous avons compétence sur nos propres citoyens. Si vous dites que vous êtes prêts à travailler avec les parlementaires, je ne comprends pas cette adhésion quand cela fonctionne pour Facebook et ce retrait quand...

Pourriez-vous me donner un exemple d'une entreprise qui dit qu'elle ne reconnaît juste pas si oui ou non nous avons compétence sur nos citoyens?

(1130)

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, j'ai aussi été surpris quand j'ai vu ces rapports, et j'ai donc lu l'affaire avec attention et j'en ai parlé à un conseiller juridique.

Ce que je comprends, c'est que cela faisait allusion au fait que, à notre connaissance, selon les données probantes disponibles dans le monde et les preuves documentées, pas seulement en ce qui concerne des contrats et des choses du genre, mais aussi selon des témoins qui ont des récits de première main, aucune donnée de Canadiens ou, en fait, d'utilisateurs non américains n'a jamais été transférée à Cambridge Analytica. Je crois, si je peux...

M. Charlie Angus:

D'accord, mais sur ce point — je n'ai que peu de temps — 622 000 Canadiens se sont vu prendre leurs données. Facebook en a eu connaissance en 2015, et l'entreprise n'a rien dit jusqu'à ce qu'elle ait été exposée à l'échelle internationale, en raison de la violation dont s'est rendue coupable Cambridge Analytica. Il s'agissait d'une violation du droit canadien en contravention de la LPRPDE.

Vous connaissez cette loi; pourtant, le fait de dire aux législateurs canadiens que nous devions prouver les préjudices individuels avant que Facebook puisse reconnaître la compétence, pour moi, ce serait la même chose qu'une entreprise automobile internationale qui dit: « Oui, il y a eu de nombreux décès au Brésil; oui, il y a eu des morts en masse aux États-Unis; oui, il y a eu des morts en masse dans toute l'Europe; mais puisque personne n'est mort dans un accident automobile au Canada, nous n'allons pas nous conformer à la loi canadienne ».

Comment décidez-vous quelles lois vous respectez et quelles lois ne s'appliquent pas à vous? Pourquoi pensez-vous cela?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur Angus, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, nous respectons entièrement la loi...

M. Charlie Angus:

Non, vous ne le faites pas. Vous ne reconnaissez pas notre compétence.

M. Kevin Chan:

... comme le sait le Parlement du Canada.

M. Charlie Angus:

Comment pouvez-vous nous dire cela sans broncher, monsieur Chan? Comment est-ce possible?

M. Kevin Chan:

Parce que c'est la vérité, monsieur.

M. Charlie Angus:

Donc nous devons vous traduire devant les tribunaux pour que vous reconnaissiez que nous avons la compétence de protéger nos citoyens, après que vous avez caché une violation dont vous étiez au courant depuis trois ans et n'avez rien fait pour nous le dire, car vous ne vouliez pas mettre fin à votre modèle opérationnel.

M. Kevin Chan:

Pour ce qui est de l'intégrité des élections, nous respectons la loi...

M. Charlie Angus:

Je parle du droit à la vie privée des Canadiens et de la violation de notre loi dont vous avez été reconnu coupable. C'est la question.

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous pouvons aussi en parler, monsieur, dans le temps qu'il nous reste, si vous me le permettez.

Comme je l'ai dit, nous voulions parvenir à une résolution avec le commissaire. Il a décidé de nous amener devant les tribunaux, ce qui est bien sûr le cadre qui est prescrit pour lui...

M. Charlie Angus:

Il devait vous traduire en justice, parce que vous ne vouliez pas reconnaître que nous, en tant que législateurs, avions même compétence sur nos propres citoyens. Il ne s'agit pas de parvenir à une résolution. C'est comme dire: « Hé, Facebook, est-ce que cela vous va si nous venons jeter un coup d'œil et que nous arrangeons les choses? » Ce n'est pas ainsi que la loi fonctionne. Peut-être que c'est ainsi que cela fonctionne pour M. Zuckerberg, mais sur la scène internationale, ce n'est pas comme ça, et c'est pourquoi nous sommes ici. C'est parce que nous avons des législateurs internationaux qui sont frustrés...

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous avons le plus grand respect pour...

M. Charlie Angus:

... par le manque de respect du droit international.

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous avons le plus grand respect pour le droit au Canada et pour l'autorité juridique dans le monde.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Tong, de Singapour.

M. Edwin Tong (ministre d'État principal, Ministère de la justice et Ministère de la santé, Parlement de Singapour):

Mon temps est limité, donc je vous serais reconnaissant si vous vous en teniez à mes questions et donniez directement les réponses.

Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de ce que vous souhaitez faire, des gens avec qui vous avez noué un dialogue, des gens que vous souhaitez voir et de la façon dont vous allez travailler sur vos politiques, mais voyons juste ce qui se passe dans la réalité et ce qui continue d'apparaître sur vos plateformes.

Pour ce faire et pour gagner du temps, j'ai préparé un petit document qui résume plusieurs cas, et je suis certain que vous les connaissez. Veuillez juste les parcourir rapidement. Ce sont tous des cas qui ont été sensationnels. Ils sont tous devenus viraux rapidement. Ils ont probablement été amplifiés par des trolls et des bots — de faux comptes. Ils incitent à la peur, ils causent une désaffection et des tensions et ils s'attaquent à des lignes de faille sociales qui divisent: la race, la religion et l'immigration.

Un fait essentiel, c'est que ce sont tous de faux renseignements également, et tout cela a entraîné des préjudices dans le monde réel: des blessures physiques, des décès, des soulèvements, l'accentuation des divisions et des lignes de faille entre les religions et les races, qui ont causé de la peur.

Si vous pouvez juste aller à la dernière page du document et regarder le Sri Lanka, en avril 2019. Le chef des terroristes ayant fait exploser des bombes à Pâques au Sri Lanka avait publié des vidéos qui se trouvaient sur vos plateformes — Facebook et YouTube — pendant au moins six mois avant les attentats à la bombe proprement dits. Dans les vidéos, il dit: « les non-musulmans et les gens qui n'acceptent pas les musulmans peuvent être tués, en plus des femmes et des enfants ». Ailleurs, il dit: « Nous pouvons tuer des femmes et des enfants avec des bombes. C'est juste. »

Il s'agit clairement d'un discours haineux, n'est-ce pas?

M. Neil Potts:

C'est un discours haineux.

M. Edwin Tong:

Et c'est une violation de vos propres politiques, est-ce exact?

M. Neil Potts:

Ce serait une violation de nos politiques. C'est exact, monsieur.

M. Edwin Tong:

Ces passages, publiés des mois avant les attentats de Pâques, prédisent ce qu'il va se passer, et c'est arrivé, horriblement, en avril, de la même manière que ce prêtre allégué, M. Zahran Hashim, a dit que cela arriverait — des bombes ont tué des femmes et des enfants — sur vos plateformes.

Pourquoi? Pourquoi est-ce que cela n'a pas été retiré?

M. Neil Potts:

Merci, monsieur Tong.

Rapidement, juste pour...

(1135)

M. Edwin Tong:

Non, veuillez répondre à ma question. Pourquoi cela n'a-t-il pas été retiré? Vous dites que c'est une violation de vos propres politiques. Pourquoi la vidéo n'a-t-elle pas été retirée en septembre 2018?

M. Neil Potts:

Quand nous prenons connaissance de ce contenu, nous le retirons. Si ce n'est pas signalé ou si nous ne l'avons pas repéré de manière proactive, alors nous ne le retirons pas, car honnêtement, nous ne savons pas que ça existe.

J'aimerais dire que nos pensées vont aux gens du Sri Lanka et d'ailleurs que vous avez mentionnés ici, dans votre document. La violence ethnique intercommunautaire est une chose horrible. Nous ne voulons pas que nos plateformes soient entraînées dans ces activités et utilisées à ces fins. En fait, nous avons pris des mesures vigoureuses pour nous y attaquer. Nous avons maintenant plus de 30 000 personnes qui travaillent à la sécurité...

M. Edwin Tong:

Monsieur Potts, je n'ai pas besoin de discours sur ce que vous allez faire.

M. Neil Potts:

Je m'excuse.

M. Edwin Tong:

Quelle est la difficulté de comprendre que les phrases: « Nous pouvons tuer des femmes et des enfants avec des bombes. C'est juste » est un discours haineux? Quelle est la difficulté là-dedans?

M. Neil Potts:

La question n'est pas difficile, monsieur Tong. Il s'agit plutôt de repérer le contenu. Si nous ne sommes pas mis au courant de l'existence du contenu, que ce soit au moyen d'un rapport d'utilisateur ou de nos propres mesures proactives, alors nous ne savons pas que ce contenu se trouve sur la plateforme.

M. Edwin Tong:

Donc rien, ni l'intelligence artificielle ou la technologie, ni les vérificateurs des faits ou l'armée de gens qui ont scruté vos plateformes n'a repéré cela huit mois avant l'événement, et vous nous demandez de faire confiance aux processus que vous avez l'intention de mettre en place, d'avoir confiance, car l'intelligence artificielle que vous détenez maintenant le fera dans l'avenir.

M. Neil Potts:

L'intelligence artificielle est un excellent levier pour nous aider à repérer cela. Ce n'est pas parfait. Il n'est pas évident qu'elle permettra de découvrir 100 % des activités, tout comme les humains ne découvriront pas 100 % des activités. Il me faudrait vérifier précisément cette vidéo, mais si nous en avions eu connaissance, nous l'aurions retirée. C'est une décision très directe.

M. Edwin Tong:

Monsieur Potts, si vous faites vos devoirs et vos vérifications, les dirigeants musulmans locaux l'ont signalée sur Facebook, et Facebook ne l'a pas retirée même si l'entreprise était au courant, même s'il s'agissait, comme vous le dites, d'une violation claire de vos propres politiques. J'aimerais savoir pourquoi.

M. Neil Potts:

Monsieur, il me faudrait voir comment le contenu a été partagé. La façon dont vous avez...

M. Edwin Tong:

Vous avez dit, messieurs Potts et Chan, que vous êtes tous deux des spécialistes du contenu. Vous êtes des spécialistes du domaine. Vous êtes ici pour remplacer M. Zuckerberg et Mme Sandberg, et vous devriez le savoir. Cela s'est produit il y a quelques mois, donc pourquoi la vidéo n'a-t-elle pas été retirée, même si Facebook était au courant? Pourriez-vous expliquer pourquoi?

M. Neil Potts:

J'essaie d'expliquer que je ne connais pas la situation. Il faudrait que je vérifie pour m'assurer que nous le savions. Je ne crois pas que nous étions au fait de cette vidéo à ce moment-là.

M. Edwin Tong:

Je dirais que vous n'avez pas retiré la vidéo parce que son contenu était sensationnel, à même de susciter la peur, la violence, la haine et les théories du complot. Comme M. McNamee nous l'a expliqué précédemment, c'est ce qui attire les gens sur vos plateformes. C'est ce qui attire les utilisateurs vers vos plateformes et c'est ainsi que vous générez des profits.

M. Neil Potts:

Monsieur Tong, je rejette cette affirmation. Je la rejette sans réserve. Si nous sommes au fait d'un cas de discours haineux, si nous savons que cela suscite la violence, nous agissons plus rapidement.

Nous avons eu une discussion précédemment sur la mésinformation. Si nous savons qu'un cas de mésinformation peut mener à des préjudices physiques et à de la violence, nous travaillons avec des partenaires dignes de confiance sur le terrain, la société civile et d'autres intervenants, pour qu'ils nous le disent — et même les représentants de l'application de la loi —, puis, en fait, nous retirons le contenu en question.

M. Edwin Tong:

Monsieur Potts, Facebook a été informée de tout cela. Vous pouvez vérifier. Facebook a aussi été informée des problèmes au Sri Lanka en 2018 par le gouvernement sri lankais. L'entreprise a refusé de retirer le contenu parce qu'il ne violait pas ses propres politiques. M. McNamee affirme que, en conséquence, les gouvernements au Sri Lanka, en Indonésie et en Inde ont pris des mesures proactives pour interdire l'accès aux médias sociaux comme Facebook et WhatsApp. Est-ce ainsi que vous voulez que les choses se passent?

Pouvons-nous faire confiance aux politiques que vous mettez en place? Pouvons-nous être sûrs que ce que vous faites et ce que vous mettez en place — les vérifications pour trouver et retirer de tels éléments de contenu — fonctionneront?

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Tong. Il faut passer au prochain intervenant.

Nous tenons à souhaiter la bienvenue à la délégation d'Irlande. Les représentants viennent d'arriver ce matin par avion.

Bienvenue.

Nous allons donner les cinq premières minutes à Hildegarde Naughton.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton (présidente, Comité mixte sur les communications, l'action sur le climat et l'environnement, Parlement de la République d'Irlande):

Merci, monsieur le président. Nous sommes heureux d'être ici cet après-midi.

Je vais commencer par formuler mes questions, puis les entreprises des médias sociaux pourront répondre. J'ai environ trois questions. La première est liée à la protection des données.

Il est évident que vous vous efforcez tous de trouver une façon de rendre les règles claires en matière de protection de la vie privée et de protéger les données des utilisateurs. La mise en place du RGPD a changé complètement la donne en ce qui a trait à la protection des données en Europe. En fait, la commissaire irlandaise à la protection des données a maintenant la tâche de réglementer l'Europe, vu le nombre d'entreprises des médias sociaux dont les sièges sociaux sont situés en Irlande.

Dans les 11 mois qui ont suivi l'entrée en vigueur du RGPD, la commissaire a reçu près de 6 000 plaintes. Elle a dit s'être concentrée sur Facebook parce qu'elle ne pensait pas qu'il pouvait y avoir autant de violations importantes touchant les données associées à une seule entreprise. En outre, à un moment donné, elle était informée de manquements en vertu du RGPD aux deux semaines, alors elle a mis en place une enquête conjointe pour se pencher sur la situation. J'aimerais demander à Facebook de formuler des commentaires sur ses remarques et d'expliquer pourquoi l'entreprise a tellement de difficultés à protéger les données des utilisateurs.

Pour ce qui est de la prochaine question, je vais peut-être demander à Google et Facebook de répondre. Mon collègue James Lawless, le sous-ministre Eamon Ryan et moi avons rencontré plus tôt cette année Mark Zuckerberg, en Irlande, et il a dit qu'il aimerait que le RGPD soit adopté à l'échelle internationale. Certains des plus gros marchés de Facebook se trouvent dans des pays en développement, comme l'Asie et l'Afrique et, parmi les 10 principaux pays, il y en a seulement deux du monde industrialisé, soit les États-Unis et le Royaume-Uni. Certains experts affirment qu'une approche universelle ne fonctionnera pas en ce qui a trait au RGPD, parce que certaines régions ont des interprétations différentes de l'importance de la protection des renseignements personnels.

J'aimerais obtenir le point de vue de Google là-dessus: que pensez-vous de la mise en place d'un RGPD à l'échelle internationale? De quelle façon cela fonctionnerait-il? Devrait-on mettre un tel règlement en place à l'échelle internationale? Et j'aimerais aussi connaître vos préoccupations quant aux différentes interprétations faites de la protection des renseignements personnels.

Et pour terminer, en raison du travail de notre comité responsable des communications dans l'Oireachtas — le Parlement irlandais — le gouvernement irlandais est sur le point de créer un commissaire à la sécurité numérique qui aura le pouvoir juridique de demander le retrait de communications néfastes en ligne. Vu que l'Irlande accueille les sièges sociaux internationaux et européens de nombreuses entreprises des médias sociaux, croyez-vous qu'une telle loi permettra réellement à l'Irlande de réglementer le contenu en Europe et, possiblement, au-delà des frontières européennes?

Quiconque le désire peut répondre en premier.

(1140)

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci, madame. Je tiens à souligner que Neil et moi avons passé du temps avec nos homologues irlandais et qu'ils n'ont que de bonnes choses à dire à votre sujet, alors je suis heureux de vous rencontrer.

En ce qui concerne la question des violations que vous avez mentionnées, évidemment, nous ne sommes pas au courant des renseignements précis qui auraient été envoyés à l'autorité irlandaise responsable de la protection des données, alors je ne peux pas vous parler précisément de cela, mais je peux dire que notre position générale, c'est d'être le plus transparents possible.

Vous — et divers membres du Comité — savez probablement que nous sommes assez francs en ce qui a trait à la communication publique de nos failles, des situations où nous avons trouvé des renseignements justifiant des enquêtes, des situations où nous avons été mis au fait de certaines choses. C'est notre engagement à votre égard, mais aussi à l'égard des utilisateurs partout dans le monde, et je crois que vous continuerez d'entendre parler de ces choses à mesure que nous les découvrons. C'est une position importante pour nous, parce que nous voulons faire la bonne chose, soit informer nos utilisateurs, mais aussi informer le public et les législateurs le plus possible lorsque nous découvrons de telles situations.

Nous voulons être très transparents, et c'est la raison pour laquelle vous entendrez de plus en plus parler de nous. Encore une fois, malheureusement, je ne peux pas vous parler précisément de ce à quoi faisait référence l'autorité responsable de la protection des données.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Google, puis-je, s'il vous plaît, connaître vos points de vue à ce sujet?

M. Colin McKay:

Comme nous l'avons décrit dans notre déclaration préliminaire, nous cherchons des normes internationales applicables à une diversité de cadres sociaux, culturels et économiques. Nous misons sur des cadres fondés sur les principes, particulièrement lorsqu'il est question de protection des données. C'est ce qu'on a pu voir relativement au RGPD et aussi au sujet des principes antérieurs de l'OCDE.

Le fait d'élargir la portée du RGPD au-delà des frontières actuelles est quelque chose que nous jugeons souhaitable. La question est la suivante: de quelle façon peut-on l'adapter dans des administrations précises où il faudra l'appliquer, vu que l'environnement européen et l'histoire européenne en matière de protection des données sont très différents de ce qu'on retrouve ailleurs dans le monde, surtout dans certaines régions du globe, qu'on parle de l'Afrique, ou de l'Asie, que vous avez mentionnées?

Nous sommes d'accord là-dessus. Nous avons même appliqué les mesures de protection accordées aux Européens à l'échelle internationale, mais il faut se demander à quoi cela peut ressembler au sein d'un pays.

Pour ce qui est de votre deuxième question sur le commissaire responsable de la sécurité numérique, je vais céder la parole à M. Slater.

Le président:

Merci, madame Naughton. En fait, le temps est écoulé, alors nous devons passer au prochain délégué. Toutes mes excuses. Nous avons peu de temps.

Pour la prochaine question, nous nous tournons vers la République d'Allemagne.

M. Jens Zimmermann (Parti social-démocrate, Parlement de la République fédérale d'Allemagne):

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais aussi commencer par Facebook. Je suis heureux de rencontrer l'équipe canadienne responsable des politiques publiques. Je connais l'équipe allemande.

Pour commencer, j'aimerais revenir sur ce que mon collègue de Singapour a demandé. À la lumière de l'expérience en Allemagne, j'ai une réponse relativement simple. C'est tout simplement que de nombreuses entreprises — aussi présentes aujourd'hui — n'ont pas assez d'employés pour s'occuper de tous ces problèmes et traiter toutes ces plaintes. Comme cela a déjà été mentionné, l'intelligence artificielle n'est pas toujours suffisante pour faire ce travail. Après l'adoption de la NetzDG en Allemagne, nous avons constaté qu'une augmentation massive du nombre d'employés était nécessaire pour gérer toutes les plaintes et qu'elle permettait aussi d'accroître le nombre de plaintes traitées. Je ne connais pas la situation dans d'autres pays, mais c'est assurément un aspect important.

Je veux poser une question sur une décision antitrust en Allemagne concernant le fait de savoir si les données de Facebook, WhatsApp et Instagram devraient être combinées sans le consentement des utilisateurs. Vous allez à l'encontre de la décision allemande, alors, évidemment, vous n'êtes pas d'accord, mais vous pourriez peut-être décrire un peu plus clairement votre position.

(1145)

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur. Une de mes collègues au Canada m'a dit avoir passé du temps avec vous, hier, dans le cadre d'une table ronde. Merci beaucoup de l'invitation.

En ce qui a trait aux diverses plateformes, comme vous le savez, nos conditions de service et notre politique sur les données des utilisateurs soulignent le fait que nous allons communiquer l'infrastructure de données entre les divers services. C'est en grande partie, franchement, pour nous assurer de pouvoir offrir un certain niveau de sécurité d'une plateforme à l'autre.

Facebook est une plateforme qui exige la vraie identité des utilisateurs. Nous voulons nous assurer que les gens sont bien qui ils disent être, mais il y a beaucoup de bonnes raisons pour lesquelles on voudra mettre ce même genre de mesures en place sur la plateforme Instagram, par exemple. Il y a de nombreuses situations où — et vous avez entendu parler de tout ce qui concernait même notre lutte coordonnée contre les comportements inauthentiques — pour pouvoir réaliser des enquêtes adéquates à l'échelle du système, nous devons avoir une certaine capacité de comprendre la provenance de certains éléments de contenu et de certains comptes. Le fait d'avoir une infrastructure commune nous permet de relever ce genre de défi de façon très efficace.

M. Jens Zimmermann:

Oui, et cela vous permet aussi de regrouper très efficacement des données et d'accroître votre connaissance des utilisateurs et vos profits. N'est-ce pas là la raison sous-jacente?

Il serait possible, encore une fois, de donner à tous les utilisateurs la capacité de prendre ces décisions. Ce serait très facile, mais je crois que ce serait aussi très coûteux pour vous.

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, je crois que, lorsque vous parlez de notre objectif plus général et de la situation vers laquelle nous nous dirigeons, c'est exact. Nous voulons donner aux gens plus de contrôle. Nous voulons que les gens puissent...

M. Jens Zimmermann:

D'accord, mais alors pourquoi allez-vous à l'encontre de la décision rendue en Allemagne?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je crois que le nœud du problème, encore une fois, tient à la question posée par M. Erskine-Smith: où commence et où se termine la politique sur la concurrence relativement aux limites du droit à la vie privée?

M. Jens Zimmermann:

D'accord. Merci.

Je veux aussi m'adresser à Google. Vous avez mentionné avoir besoin de définitions claires de la notion de « discours illicites ». Je me suis penché sur le rapport allemand sur la transparence, et il s'avère que, des 167 000 plaintes en Allemagne, seulement 145 cas ont exigé que vos collègues se tournent vers des spécialistes pour déterminer si, oui ou non, il était question de discours illicites. Pourquoi, alors, croyez-vous que c'est vraiment problématique? Est-ce vraiment un problème de définition ou est-ce plutôt un problème lié à la gestion du nombre de plaintes et à l'immense quantité de discours haineux en ligne?

M. Derek Slater:

C'est une question très importante. La NetzDG est une loi complexe, mais l'une des composantes pertinentes, ici, c'est qu'elle cerne, si je ne m'abuse, 22 lois précises qu'elle régit.

M. Jens Zimmermann:

En fait, la NetzDG dit essentiellement que, en Allemagne, il faut respecter les lois allemandes, un point c'est tout.

M. Derek Slater:

Je comprends, et ce qui a été dit au sujet de ces 22 lois, c'est: « Voici les exigences en matière de délai de traitement et de rapport sur la transparence ayant mené aux données que vous aviez. » Selon moi, une des choses importantes dans ce cas-ci, c'est qu'on parle précisément de définitions législatives claires. Ces définitions nous permettent ensuite d'agir en fonction d'avis clairs de façon rapide et conformément au cadre législatif.

(1150)

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à la République d'Estonie.

Allez-y, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus (vice-présidente, Parti réformateur, Parlement de la République d'Estonie (Riigikogu)):

Merci.

Je viens d'Europe, de l'Estonie. C'est vrai que, deux jours après les élections européennes, on pourrait dire que vous avez fait des progrès en ce qui a trait au retrait de faux comptes, mais c'est aussi vrai que ces faux comptes n'auraient jamais dû exister d'entrée de jeu.

Ma première question est la suivante: quel genre de changements prévoyez-vous mettre en place pour identifier vos utilisateurs dès le départ?

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci de la question. Je crois que nous sommes prudents, mais heureux des résultats en ce qui a trait au rendement de la plateforme en Europe. Cependant, pour ce qui est des faux comptes, je dirais — et je crois que mon collègue M. Potts l'a mentionné — qu'il y a un genre de course à l'armement entre nous et nos adversaires, les délinquants qui essaient de créer des comptes et du contenu inauthentiques sur la plateforme.

Je crois que nous devons constamment nous améliorer et évoluer...

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

De quelle façon pouvez-vous améliorer le processus d'identification initial?

M. Kevin Chan:

L'une des choses que je peux vous dire — et encore là il est question de la publicité politique que nous tentons de gérer —, c'est que nous voulons être assez sûrs de l'identité des personnes qui font de la publicité.

Au Canada, comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, nous le ferons, et ce ne sera pas facile. Les annonceurs politiques au Canada devront obtenir une preuve d'identité quelconque. Il faudra vérifier de façon indépendante cette preuve d'identité, puis nous enverrons à la personne une clé quelconque — une clé numérique, si vous voulez — qu'elle utilisera pour s'authentifier avant de pouvoir faire de la publicité politique.

C'est très coûteux, et il s'agit d'un investissement important. Ce n'est pas non plus quelque chose qui se fera sans créer certaines frictions. Personnellement, je crains qu'il y ait des situations où les gens voudront publier une publicité sans connaître l'exigence, pour ensuite constater qu'il leur faudra plusieurs jours avant de pouvoir le faire.

Je crains aussi qu'il y ait de faux positifs, mais je crois que c'est la bonne chose à faire pour protéger les élections partout dans le monde et ici même, au Canada, en octobre. Nous sommes prêts à y consacrer le temps et l'argent et, possiblement, à composer avec certaines des frictions pour bien faire les choses.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

D'accord. Merci.

Ma deuxième question concerne les fausses nouvelles et les fausses vidéos. Quelle est votre politique en matière de fausses nouvelles, par exemple, les vidéos truquées? Seront-elles retirées ou indiquera-t-on tout simplement qu'il s'agit de vidéos truquées?

M. Derek Slater:

La question des vidéos truquées... Merci de la question. C'est un nouvel enjeu très important. Nous avons des lignes directrices claires aujourd'hui au sujet du contenu qu'il faut retirer. Si une vidéo truquée est visée par nos lignes directrices, nous la retirerons.

Nous comprenons aussi qu'il faut faire plus de recherches. Nous avons travaillé activement avec la société civile et le milieu universitaire à cet égard.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Et qu'en est-il de Facebook?

M. Neil Potts:

Merci.

Nous menons aussi des enquêtes et réalisons des recherches sur cette politique pour nous assurer de faire la bonne chose. Actuellement, nous indiquerions que c'est un faux, nous informerions les utilisateurs, mais nous tentons constamment...

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Les vidéos truquées ne seront pas retirées.

M. Neil Potts:

Nous mettons constamment à jour nos politiques, et nous pourrons les mettre à jour à l'avenir, à mesure que les choses évoluent. Nous travaillons avec des organismes de recherche et des gens sur le terrain pour comprendre de quelle façon ces vidéos pourraient se manifester. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, si ces vidéos — ou tout type de mésinformation — peuvent mener à des préjudices dans le vrai monde — à des préjudices hors ligne, en fait — nous retirerons le contenu.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Et du côté de Twitter?

M. Carlos Monje:

Nous partageons la même préoccupation au sujet des vidéos truquées. Si nous constatons que des vidéos truquées sont utilisées pour transmettre de faux renseignements en contravention de nos règles, nous retirerons le contenu.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Ma dernière question sera à nouveau adressée à M. Collins. C'est la question qui a été posée au début, au sujet de la fausse vidéo de Nancy Pelosi. Disons qu'une vidéo similaire devait être produite, mais qu'elle mettait en scène M. Zuckerberg, serait-elle retirée ou indiqueriez-vous seulement que c'est une fausse vidéo?

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Neil Potts:

Je suis désolé, à cause des rires... Je n'ai pas entendu le nom.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Désolée pour les éclats de rire. Si une vidéo similaire à ce qui a été présenté — la vidéo de Nancy Pelosi — était affichée, mais qu'elle mettait en vedette Mark Zuckerberg, la retireriez-vous ou indiqueriez-vous simplement qu'il s'agit d'une fausse nouvelle?

M. Neil Potts:

Si c'était la même vidéo, mais qu'il s'agissait de M. Zuckerberg plutôt que de la présidente Pelosi, le traitement serait le même.

Le président:

Merci.

Je veux expliquer rapidement ce qui se passe derrière moi. Vos présidents ont décidé de continuer de travailler durant le dîner, alors n'hésitez pas à aller chercher quelque chose. Nous continuerons les témoignages durant le dîner.

Nous passons maintenant au Mexique. Allez-y. Vous avez cinq minutes.

(1155)

L’hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre (sénatrice):

[Le témoin s'exprime en espagnol et l'interprétation en anglais de ses propos est traduite ainsi:]

Merci. Je vais parler dans ma langue.

J'ai plusieurs questions. Dans le cas de Google, que faites-vous pour protéger les renseignements personnels des gens? Je sais qu'il y a beaucoup de cas de vidéos liés à du sextage qui sont encore accessibles, et quand les victimes de ces vidéos se tournent vers vos bureaux à Mexico — et je suis au fait de plusieurs cas — Google leur dit de présenter la plainte aux États-Unis. On parle de vidéos qui constituent une attaque violente contre une personne et ne peuvent pas être téléchargées. Que faites-vous dans de tels cas?

M. Derek Slater:

Je ne connais pas les cas précis dont vous parlez, mais nous avons des lignes directrices strictes lorsqu'on parle de choses qui peuvent inciter à la violence ou qui constituent des violations de la vie privée, par exemple. Si nous sommes informés et que nous sommes mis au fait de quelque chose du genre, nous passons à l'action, s'il s'agit d'une violation des lignes directrices en question. Je ne suis pas au fait des cas précis, mais je serais heureux de faire un suivi.

L’hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[Le témoin s'exprime en espagnol et l'interprétation en anglais de ses propos est traduite ainsi:]

J'ai des renseignements sur des cas très précis, mais nous ne savons pas vers qui nous tourner au Mexique, parce que les représentants ne font rien. Nous espérons que vous vous occuperez de ce dossier, parce que les gens doivent attendre des années avant que ces choses soient retirées.

J'aimerais poser une question à Twitter sur la création de tendances au moyen de robots. C'est très courant au Mexique. Chaque jour, il y a des tendances créées par des robots, ce qu'on appelle les fermes de robots. Je ne sais pas quelle est la politique de Twitter, parce que vous semblez permettre les tendances artificielles — ou les mots-clics — lorsqu'ils sont préjudiciables pour quelqu'un. Pourquoi ne laissez-vous pas les tendances se produire de façon organique? Je suis d'accord avec les tendances, des choses deviennent virales et il faut respecter la liberté d'expression, mais pourquoi permettre l'utilisation de robots? Si tout le monde peut détecter ces choses, pourquoi Twitter n'y arrive-t-elle pas?

M. Carlos Monje:

Les tendances mesurent la conversation en temps réel et essaient de distinguer les conversations qui suscitent toujours un haut niveau d'engagement, le Championnat d'Angleterre de football, par exemple, ou les élections mexicaines. Ce que les tendances tentent de cerner, c'est une accélération au-dessus de la moyenne. Lorsque cela se produit de façon organique, comme vous l'avez mentionné, la tendance est différente de ce que l'on constate lorsque le processus est accéléré par des robots.

Depuis 2014, ce qui est il y a très longtemps pour nous, nous avons la capacité de protéger les tendances de ce genre d'activités automatisées non organiques. M. Chan a mentionné une course à l'armement. Je crois que c'est une bonne expression pour exprimer la lutte contre l'automatisation à des fins malicieuses. Actuellement, nous vérifions 450 millions de comptes par année que nous croyons être inauthentiques, et nos outils sont très subtils, très créatifs. On regarde des choses comme les gazouillis partagés ou les activités qui se passent si vite que c'est impossible que ce soit le fait d'un humain.

Et malgré cela, on en a éliminé 75 %, et il y a donc 25 % des comptes que nous estimions être inauthentiques qui ont subi le test avec succès. Nous ratissons plus large que nécessaire pour essayer de mettre fin à ces activités inauthentiques. C'est un contexte où il n'y a pas d'écart entre les valeurs sociétales de confiance à l'égard des activités en ligne et nos impératifs en tant qu'entreprise, soit le fait que nous voulons que les gens se tournent vers Twitter pour croire ce qu'ils voient, en sachant que les robots russes ou peu importe ne leur jouent pas des tours, alors nous travaillons très dur pour bien faire les choses et nous continuons d'apporter des améliorations chaque semaine.

L’hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[Le témoin s'exprime en espagnol et l'interprétation en anglais de ses propos est traduite ainsi:] Mais c'est quelque chose qui se passe normalement chaque jour, pas seulement durant les élections. C'est quelque chose qui se passe chaque fois qu'une tendance est gonflée par des robots. La réaction à tout cela a été inadéquate. Il y a des choses qui sont agressives.

J'ai une question pour Twitter et Facebook. Lorsqu'un utilisateur signale une publication, très souvent, on précise que la chose reprochée n'enfreint pas la politique, mais c'est tout de même quelque chose d'agressif aux yeux de l'utilisateur. On nous dit que la publication n'enfreint pas la politique, mais c'est tout de même quelqu'un qui ment, qui attaque, et la personne visée se sent vulnérable. Très souvent, il ne se passe rien parce que vos politiques ne sont pas enfreintes.

De plus, pour ce qui est de toute la question de l'authentification, lorsque les comptes sont authentifiés grâce à des crochets bleus, même les autres comptes peuvent être bloqués. Certaines personnes disent « identifiez-vous » et bloquent tous les comptes. Parallèlement, il y a des milliers de faux comptes, et rien ne se fait, même si on les signale. Il y a des utilisateurs qui signalent constamment ces faux comptes. Pourquoi avez-vous une politique différente?

(1200)

Le président:

Donnez une réponse brève, s'il vous plaît.

M. Carlos Monje:

Nous nous efforçons de rajuster nos politiques. Il y a des choses qui vont à l'encontre de nos règles, et d'autres qui ne constituent pas des infractions, même si les gens ne les aiment pas. C'est ce que nous appelons, à l'interne, l'écart. Ce que nous avons fait et ce que nos équipes font, c'est essayer d'éliminer ces problèmes, morceau par morceau, et de comprendre quelles sont les attentes de nos utilisateurs qui ne correspondent pas à leur expérience.

Notre approche est, encore une fois, très cohérente. Nous voulons que les gens se sentent à l'aise et en sécurité en ligne. Nous ne voulons pas miner l'expression publique, et ce sont des enjeux que nous avons beaucoup à cœur et relativement auxquels nous nous sentons visés personnellement.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer au Royaume du Maroc pour cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Mohammed Ouzzine (vice-président, Commission de l'enseignement, de la culture et de la communication, Chambre des représentants du Royaume du Maroc):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie également l'équipe sympathique qui nous fait l'honneur d'être ici aujourd'hui: Kevin Chan, Derek Slater, Neil Potts, Carlos Monje et Michele Austin. Nous aurions souhaité que M. Mark Zuckerberg soit des nôtres, mais il nous a fait faux bond. Nous espérons le revoir à une autre occasion.

J'ai été très attentif à deux propositions de M. Chan. Je tiens ici à faire une précision de nature linguistique, à l'intention des interprètes: quand j'utilise le terme « proposition », en anglais, cela renvoie au terme « proposition », et non « proposal ».

En présentant les enjeux que soulève sa compagnie, M. Chan disait qu'il n'appartenait pas qu'à Facebook de les résoudre. Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord sur ce point.

Ensuite, toujours au sujet de ces enjeux, il a ajouté qu'il fallait protéger la société des conséquences. Bien sûr, ces plateformes présentent des avantages sur le plan social. Cependant, nous parlons aujourd'hui des troubles sociaux qu'elles engendrent; c'est ce qui nous interpelle plus que jamais.

Facebook, Twitter et YouTube se voulaient, dans un premier temps, une évolution numérique, mais cela s'est transformé en révolution numérique. En effet, cela a mené à une révolution des systèmes, à une révolution contre les systèmes, à une révolution du comportement, et même à une révolution de notre perception du monde.

Il est vrai qu'aujourd'hui, l'intelligence artificielle dépend de l'accumulation massive de données personnelles. Cela étant, cette accumulation met à risque d'autres droits fondamentaux, car cela repose sur des données qui peuvent être faussées.

Au-delà de l'aspect commercial et du profit, ne serait-il pas opportun pour vous aujourd'hui de tenter un sursaut moral, voire une révolution morale? Après avoir permis ce succès fulgurant, pourquoi ne pas désormais mettre l'accent beaucoup plus sur l'homme que sur l'algorithme, moyennant que vous imposiez au préalable des restrictions strictes, dans un souci de promouvoir la responsabilité et la transparence?

On se demande parfois si vous manifestez autant d'intérêt quand la désinformation ou les discours haineux surviennent dans des pays autres que la Chine ou situés ailleurs qu'en Europe ou en Amérique du Nord, entre autres.

On ne s'explique pas toujours que des jeunes, voire des enfants, puissent mettre en ligne des vidéos montées de toutes pièces qui contiennent des scènes obscènes, des commentaires insultants ou des gros mots. On trouve cela inacceptable. Parfois, on trouve que cela s'écarte de la finalité de ces outils, de la règle commune et de la norme sociale admise.

Nous ne sommes pas là pour vous juger ni pour faire votre procès, mais beaucoup plus pour vous implorer de prendre nos remarques en considération.

Merci.

(1205)

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Ouzzine.

Encore une fois, permettez-moi de vous répondre en anglais. Ce n'est pas parce que je ne veux pas vous répondre en français, mais je pense que je serai plus clair en anglais.[Traduction]

Je serai heureux de répondre à la première question liée à ce dont vous parlez, les humains contre les machines ou les humains contre les algorithmes. Honnêtement, je crois qu'on a besoin des deux, parce que, évidemment, on parle de quantités astronomiques. Il y a plus de 2 milliards de personnes sur la plateforme. Par conséquent, pour dissiper certaines des préoccupations soulevées ici par les membres, nous avons besoin de systèmes automatisés qui peuvent cerner de façon proactive certains des problèmes.

Pour revenir à la première question de M. Collins, je crois qu'il est tout aussi important d'inclure des humains dans tout ça, parce que, au bout du compte, le contexte aidera à déterminer si, oui ou non, quelque chose est malveillant. Le contexte est donc extrêmement important.

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur, en ce qui concerne les enjeux humains, je crois que vous mettez le doigt sur quelque chose de très important. C'est quelque chose que j'avais déjà mentionné. Selon moi, il ne faut pas que les entreprises comme Facebook prennent toutes les décisions de ce genre. Nous le comprenons. Je crois que les gens veulent plus de transparence et qu'ils veulent mieux comprendre de quelle façon nous prenons nos décisions en ce qui concerne les choses qui restent, et celles qu'on retire.

Je peux vous dire que, au cours des derniers mois, y compris au Canada, nous avons entrepris un processus de consultation international auprès d'experts de partout dans le monde pour obtenir des commentaires sur la façon de créer un comité d'appel externe de Facebook, une entité qui serait indépendante de Facebook et qui prendrait des décisions sur les questions très difficiles liées au contenu. Selon nous, il y a une question qui se pose — du moins là où nous en sommes dans notre réflexion quant à ce que nous proposerons —, et c'est celle de savoir si les décisions d'un tel comité seraient publiques et contraignantes pour Facebook. C'est un peu ainsi que nous avons imaginé tout ça. En outre, nous recevons des commentaires et nous continuerons de consulter les experts. Notre engagement, c'est que ça soit prêt d'ici la fin de 2019.

Assurément, nous comprenons que c'est difficile sur notre plateforme. Nous voulons miser à la fois sur des humains et sur des algorithmes, si vous voulez, mais nous comprenons aussi que les gens feront plus confiance aux décisions s'il y a un comité d'appel, au bout du compte, et c'est ce que nous mettrons en place d'ici la fin de 2019.

Bien sûr, nous sommes ici aujourd'hui pour discuter de la question plus générale des cadres réglementaires qui devraient s'appliquer à tous les services en ligne. De ce côté-là, encore une fois, évidemment, l'aspect humain sera incroyablement important. Je vous remercie donc, monsieur, d'avoir soulevé cet enjeu, parce que c'est exactement ce que, selon moi, nous tentons de faire, soit de trouver le juste équilibre et de mettre en place le bon cadre pour la plateforme, mais aussi à l'échelle de tous les services en ligne.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Chan.

Nous allons maintenant passer à l'Équateur pour cinq minutes.

Mme Elizabeth Cabezas (présidente, Assemblée nationale de la République de l'Équateur):

[La déléguée s'exprime en espagnol. Traduction de l'interprétation.]

Merci beaucoup.

Je veux revenir sur certaines des préoccupations qui ont déjà été soulevées durant la réunion et aussi exprimer une grande préoccupation au sujet des gazouillis et de Twitter et de la prolifération de faux comptes non détectés. Ces comptes restent de toute évidence actifs très longtemps sur les médias sociaux et génèrent, dans la plupart des cas, des messages et des tendances de nature négative contre différents groupes, tant des groupes politiques que des entreprises et des syndicats de différents secteurs.

Je ne sais pas quels mécanismes vous avez décidé d'adopter pour authentifier ces comptes, parce que ce sont des comptes qui sont liés à des centres de trolls ou des usines à trolls, qui, en Équateur, apparaissent vraiment souvent, et la tendance se maintient. Ces centres disséminent des messages à grande échelle, des messages malveillants qui vont à l'encontre de l'information réelle et véridique et qui déforment vraiment les points de vue.

Plutôt que de continuer à souligner les problèmes qui ont déjà été mentionnés, je vous prie de réfléchir à des mécanismes de vérification des faits pouvant détecter ces comptes rapidement, parce qu'il est évident que vous ne le faites pas aussi rapidement qu'il le faut, ce qui permet à des messages nuisibles de proliférer et de générer différentes pensées en plus de déformer la vérité sur beaucoup de sujets.

Je ne sais pas quelles sont les options, en pratique, ni ce que vous faites concrètement pour éviter ou prévenir ce genre de choses et pour prévenir l'existence de ces centres de trolls et la création de faux comptes, qui sont extrêmement nombreux.

(1210)

M. Carlos Monje:

Merci. C'est exactement la bonne question à poser, et c'est un sujet sur lequel nous travaillons chaque jour.

Je tiens à souligner que notre capacité de cerner, de perturber et d'éliminer les activités d'automatisation malveillantes s'améliore chaque jour. Nous cernons — je me suis trompé précédemment — 425 millions de comptes, c'est le nombre de comptes que nous avons contestés en 2018.

Premièrement, il faut mettre fin aux mauvaises activités coordonnées constatées sur la plateforme. Deuxièmement, nous devons travailler pour soutenir des personnes dont les messages sont crédibles, comme les journalistes, les politiciens, les experts et la société civile. Partout en Amérique latine, nous travaillons avec la société civile — surtout dans le contexte des élections —, pour comprendre quand les principaux événements se produisent, afin de pouvoir cibler nos efforts d'application de la loi en conséquence et de donner plus de renseignements contextuels aux gens sur les personnes qu'ils ne comprennent pas.

Je vais vous donner un exemple, parce qu'on a peu de temps. Si vous allez sur Twitter actuellement, vous pouvez voir la source du gazouillis, ce qui signifie que vous pouvez savoir si le message vient d'un iPhone, d'un appareil Android, de TweetDeck ou de Hootsuite ou d'une des autres façons utilisées par les gens pour coordonner leurs activités sur Twitter.

Le dernier élément d'information — ou la façon de penser à tout ça — concerne la transparence. Selon nous, notre approche doit consister à faire silencieusement notre travail pour nous assurer que la plateforme reste saine et solide. Lorsque nous cernons des activités d'information précises parrainées par un État, nous communiquons publiquement notre découverte. Nous avons une interface de programmation d'applications publiques très transparente que tout le monde peut consulter. Nous apprenons et nous nous améliorons en raison des travaux que des chercheurs ont réalisés — tout comme les gouvernements — dans cet ensemble de données.

Selon moi, c'est un enjeu extrêmement complexe. L'une des choses que vous avez mentionnées, c'est qu'il est facile pour nous d'identifier les gazouillis partagés instantanés et les choses automatisées du genre. C'est plus difficile de le faire lorsque les gens sont payés pour gazouiller, ou, comme on l'a vu dans le contexte vénézuélien, s'il est question de messages de trolls et de ce genre de choses.

Nous allons continuer d'investir dans la recherche et dans la lutte contre les trolls afin de nous améliorer.

Le président:

Nous allons passer au dernier intervenant sur notre liste, puis nous recommencerons la séquence au début.

Nous passons à Sainte-Lucie. Vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Andy Daniel (président, Assemblée de Sainte-Lucie):

Merci, monsieur le coprésident.

Mes questions sont destinées à Neil Potts, directeur des politiques mondiales. J'ai deux questions.

La première est la suivante: j'aimerais que lui et Facebook m'aident à comprendre et à savoir, de façon générale, s'ils comprennent le principe des « branches égales de gouvernement ». Il semble, à la lumière de ce qu'il a dit précédemment dans sa déclaration préliminaire qu'il est prêt à nous parler, ici, et qu'il accepte de le faire et que M. Zuckerberg parlera aux gouvernements. Cela montre un... Je ne comprends pas... Il ne se rend pas compte du rôle très important que nous jouons en tant que parlementaires dans cette situation.

Ma question suivante concerne la référence à la vidéo de Nancy Pelosi et à la déclaration qu'il a faite relativement au Sri Lanka. Il a dit que les vidéos seraient seulement retirées en cas de violence physique.

Permettez-moi de formuler une déclaration, ici. Les comptes Facebook du premier ministre de Sainte-Lucie ont été « piratés » ou « répliqués » — peu importe comment vous voulez le dire — et il s'efforce maintenant d'informer les gens qu'il s'agit d'une fausse vidéo ou d'un faux compte. Pourquoi est-ce que cela se produit? Si on mentionne que c'est un faux, c'est un faux et ça ne devrait pas...

Permettez-moi de lire un extrait du faux... Voici ce qui est dit au sujet d'une subvention. Je cite: C'est une subvention des Nations unies pour les gens qui ont besoin d'aide pour payer leurs factures, commencer un nouveau projet, bâtir des maisons, parrainer des écoles, lancer une nouvelle entreprise ou soutenir une entreprise qui existe déjà. Les fonds démocratiques et les services humains des Nations unies aident les jeunes, les personnes âgées, les retraités ainsi que les personnes handicapées de la société...

Lorsqu'on publie une telle déclaration, c'est un acte de violence contre certaines populations vulnérables de notre société. Il faut retirer le message. On ne peut pas attendre qu'il y ait de la violence physique. Ce n'est pas seulement la violence physique qui est de la violence. Si c'est le cas, il n'est pas nécessaire qu'il y ait de la violence lorsqu'on parle de relations entre les sexes ou peu importe. De la violence, c'est de la violence, qu'elle soit psychologique ou physique.

C'est la question que je vous pose, monsieur. Ne faudrait-il pas que ces vidéos, ces pages, soient retirées immédiatement une fois qu'elles sont identifiées comme étant fausses?

(1215)

M. Neil Potts:

Si quelqu'un se fait passer pour un membre du gouvernement, nous allons retirer tout ça si nous en sommes informés. Je ferai un suivi auprès de vous après l'audience pour m'assurer que nous avons l'information nécessaire et que nous pourrons la transmettre à notre équipe afin d'agir rapidement.

Si vous me permettez, peut-être, de revenir sur quelques-unes des autres conversations que nous avons ici, un thème qui semble revenir, c'est l'idée que M. Zuckerberg et Mme Sandberg ne sont pas ici parce qu'ils fuient leurs obligations d'une façon ou d'une autre. Ils ont demandé à M. Chan et à moi-même — et ils nous ont autorisés — de comparaître devant le Comité pour travailler avec vous tous. Nous voulons le faire en misant vraiment sur la coopération. Ils comprennent leurs responsabilités. Ils comprennent l'idée des branches égales du gouvernement, qu'il s'agisse de la branche législative, de la branche exécutive ou de la branche judiciaire. Ils comprennent ces notions et sont prêts à travailler. Nous sommes ici maintenant pour travailler sur...

Le président:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, monsieur Potts, permettez-moi de vous interrompre un instant.

À cet égard, ce n'est pas votre décision de déterminer si vous allez venir ou non. Le Comité a demandé à M. Zuckerberg et Mme Sandberg de venir, c'est très simple, pour comparaître devant notre Grand Comité international. Nous représentons 400 millions de personnes, alors quand nous demandons à ces deux personnes de venir, c'est exactement ce à quoi nous nous attendons. C'est un peu un manque de respect de Mark Zuckerberg et de Mme Sandberg de tout simplement choisir de ne pas venir. Cela montre tout simplement qu'ils ne comprennent pas bien ce que nous faisons, en tant que législateurs, comme le représentant de Sainte-Lucie l'a souligné. L'expression « nous faire faux bond », eh bien je crois qu'on peut la répéter, mais il faut souligner qu'ils ont été invités à comparaître et qu'on s'attendait à ce qu'ils comparaissent et qu'ils ont choisi de ne pas le faire. Vous envoyer vous deux en tant que remplaçants n'est tout simplement pas acceptable.

Je vais revenir à M. Daniel, de Sainte-Lucie.

M. Neil Potts:

Merci, monsieur Zimmer. Je veux que ce soit clair. Je ne connais pas les procédures du Parlement canadien et les exigences en matière de comparution. Je respecte tout ça, mais je tiens à dire à nouveau pour le compte rendu que nous sommes déterminés à travailler avec le gouvernement et à être responsables relativement à ces enjeux.

De plus...

Le président:

Je dirais, monsieur Potts, que si c'était le cas, les personnes demandées seraient assises à votre place actuellement.

Poursuivez.

M. Neil Potts:

De plus, pour répondre à une autre question qui, selon moi, revient souvent et qui concerne la façon dont nous identifions et retirons certains éléments de contenu, nous pouvons retirer du contenu pour une diversité de types d'abus. Ce n'est pas seulement en cas de violence. Dans ce cas précis, lorsqu'on parle de mésinformation, la diffusion de certaines images, comme on l'a vu au Sri Lanka et dans d'autres pays, nous avons retiré les images parce qu'elles pouvaient mener à de la violence. Cependant, nous avons des politiques qui concernent des choses comme le discours haineux, où la violence n'est pas nécessairement imminente. Il peut y avoir des choses comme des renseignements personnels qui permettent d'identifier les gens, l'intimidation — que nous prenons très au sérieux — et d'autres choses qui ne mènent pas nécessairement à la violence, mais nous appliquons quand même ces politiques directement et nous essayons de le faire le plus rapidement possible.

Nous avons maintenant 30 000 personnes à l'échelle internationale qui s'en occupent. Quelqu'un a dit précédemment qu'il fallait compter sur des gens qui ont les renseignements contextuels nécessaires pour faire le travail. Dans le cas de tous les pays qui sont représentés ici, je tiens à dire que, parmi ces 30 000 personnes, il y a 15 000 modérateurs de contenu qui parlent plus de 50 langues. Ils travaillent 24 heures sur 24 et 7 jours sur 7. Certains travaillent dans les pays qui sont représentés ici aujourd'hui. Nous prenons ces choses très au sérieux.

De plus, nous sommes déterminés à travailler avec nos partenaires — les gouvernements, la société civile et les universités — afin de trouver des réponses qui, selon nous, sont adaptées à de tels enjeux. Je crois que nous reconnaissons tous que ce sont des enjeux très complexes et qu'il faut faire la bonne chose. Tout le monde ici, selon moi, veut assurer la sécurité des membres de notre communauté, qui comptent tous parmi vos électeurs. Selon moi, nous partageons les mêmes objectifs. Il faut tout simplement s'assurer de le faire de façon transparente dans le cadre de nos discussions et d'en venir à une situation où nous pouvons nous entendre sur la meilleure marche à suivre. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

On vient de porter à mon attention une incohérence dans votre témoignage, monsieur Potts.

D'un côté, M. Collins a posé une question au sujet de la vidéo de Mme Pelosi, et vous avez dit que vous n'alliez pas la retirer. Puis, 30 minutes ou une heure plus tard, vous venez de répondre au représentant de Sainte-Lucie et affirmer que vous la retireriez immédiatement. Je tiens à ce que vous compreniez très bien qu'on s'attend de vous que vous disiez toute la vérité au Comité en ce moment, et ce, sans incohérence dans votre témoignage.

(1220)

M. Neil Potts:

Monsieur Zimmer, si j'ai été incohérent, je m'en excuse, mais je ne crois pas avoir répondu à cette question différemment. Si j'avais la transcription, évidemment, je pourrais vous dire où j'ai fait une erreur et je pourrais corriger le tir immédiatement.

Encore une fois, lorsqu'il est question de mésinformation qui ne mène pas immédiatement à des préjudices, notre approche consiste à atténuer la portée de l'information, à informer les utilisateurs de la fausseté de l'information et à éliminer les comptes inauthentiques. Si quelqu'un agit de façon inauthentique et fait semblant d'être quelqu'un d'autre, ce sera retiré. L'authenticité est au centre de nos principes; nous voulons des personnes authentiques sur notre plateforme. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous exigeons les vrais noms des gens.

La question que, selon moi, M. Collins posait concernait la vidéo en tant que telle. L'utilisateur ne communiquait pas la vidéo de façon inauthentique. Il s'agissait d'une vraie personne, et il y avait une vraie personne derrière la page. Ce n'est pas un compte de troll ou un robot ou quelque chose du genre. Ce genre de choses, nous les éliminerions.

Si je me suis mal exprimé, je m'en excuse, mais je veux que ce soit clair que je ne crois pas que mon...

Le président:

Je ne crois pas que ce soit plus clair pour quiconque dans la salle, mais je vais passer au prochain intervenant.

Nous allons passer à M. Baylis, pour cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci. Je vais commencer par M. Slater.

Il y a deux ou trois semaines, nous avons accueilli un de vos collègues qui nous a dit que Google n'allait pas se conformer au projet de loi C-76, notre nouvelle loi sur la campagne électorale. Je lui ai demandé pourquoi, et il a répondu: « Eh bien, nous ne pouvons pas faire le travail de programmation en six mois ».

Je lui ai souligné que Facebook pouvait le faire, et il a dit: « Eh bien, nos systèmes sont plus difficiles et plus complexes ».

Il a dit: « Nous ne pouvons pas le faire en six mois », alors je lui ait demandé: « D'accord, de combien de temps aurez-vous besoin? Quand cela pourra-t-il être fait? » Il m'a répondu ne pas le savoir.

Pouvez-vous m'expliquer tout ça?

M. Derek Slater:

Les représentants vous ont donné beaucoup de renseignements à cet égard, mais, si je peux ajouter mon grain de sel, oui, nous sommes un service différent, et même si nous savons que, malheureusement, nous ne pouvons pas permettre de la publicité électorale à ce moment-ci, nous aimerions pouvoir le faire à l'avenir.

M. Frank Baylis:

Si vous pouvez dire que vous ne pouvez pas le faire en six mois, sans pour autant savoir de combien de temps vous auriez besoin, comment pouvez-vous être vraiment sûr de ne pas pouvoir le faire en six mois alors que Facebook peut y arriver?

M. Derek Slater:

Nos services sont très différents et sont assortis de caractéristiques différentes à plusieurs égards.

M. Frank Baylis:

Comment pouvez-vous ne pas savoir combien de temps sera nécessaire?

M. Derek Slater:

C'est en partie parce que les choses continuent d'évoluer au fil du temps. C'est un espace qui évolue rapidement, tant du point de vue juridique que du point de vue de nos services. Par conséquent, pour ce qui est de savoir exactement quand cela pourrait être prêt, nous ne voulons pas mettre...

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous savez que vous ne pouvez pas le faire en six mois.

M. Derek Slater:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cependant, vous ne savez pas combien de temps cela peut prendre.

M. Derek Slater:

C'est exact.

M. Frank Baylis:

La situation m'inquiétait, alors j'ai demandé: « Qu'arrivera-t-il, alors, si quelqu'un fait paraître une annonce sans avoir le droit de le faire? » Il a dit que je n'avais pas à m'en inquiéter, et vous savez pourquoi? Il a dit que l'entreprise allait trouver la publicité instantanément et la retirer.

J'ai demandé: « Comment pouvez-vous faire ça? » Et il m'a répondu que l'entreprise mise sur l'intelligence artificielle et qu'une équipe est là pour s'en occuper.

Donc, vous dites pouvoir identifier la publicité instantanément, et notre loi dit que, une fois la publicité trouvée, il faut le déclarer. Vous avez 24 heures pour la mettre dans une base de données, mais ça, vous ne pouvez pas le faire.

Pouvez-vous m'expliquer la situation? Comment pouvez-vous avoir toute cette technologie qui vous permet d'identifier n'importe quelle publicité sur n'importe quelle plateforme instantanément, mais ne pas pouvoir demander à vos développeurs de la transférer dans les 24 heures dans une base de données? En outre, vous dites qu'il vous faudra plus de six mois pour y arriver.

M. Derek Slater:

Si j'ai bien compris la question, il est plus simple d'adopter une approche plus conservatrice, une approche générale qui est plus restrictive qu'une approche selon laquelle nous allons valider qu'il s'agit d'une publicité électorale qui respecte la loi et ainsi de suite.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez déjà pris une décision. Vous avez procédé à la validation, parce que vous la bloquez. C'est ce qu'il m'a dit. Vous le faites déjà.

M. Derek Slater:

Oui. Nous pouvons bloquer quelque chose pour une diversité de raisons en cas de violation de nos politiques.

M. Frank Baylis:

Non. Pas vos politiques. Il parlait de « publicité politique ». Ma question était très précise.

Vous pouvez enlever la politique, mais vous ne pouvez pas la transférer dans une base de données. J'aimerais comprendre la différence.

M. Derek Slater:

Il y a une grande différence entre le fait de dire que nous allons adopter, de façon générale, une approche conservatrice, et dire, d'un autre côté: « Je vais dire clairement qu'il s'agit d'une publicité électorale légitime », et faire ce pas de plus.

M. Frank Baylis:

Une fois que vous constatez que c'est une publicité, vous ne permettez pas son affichage. Vous la bloquez. Vous pouvez décider instantanément que c'est une publicité, mais, une fois que vous avez décidé que c'était une publicité, c'est trop de travail de programmer votre système afin de la transférer dans une base de données. C'est ce que notre loi demande: de tout simplement mettre ça dans une base de données.

Vous dites: « Ça, c'est quelque chose que nous ne pouvons pas faire ».

M. Derek Slater:

Le besoin d'appliquer la loi précisément comme elle a été rédigée n'était pas possible pour nous dans la période qui était prévue si nous voulions bien faire les choses. En outre, si nous devons permettre des publicités électorales au pays, nous voulons être sûrs de bien faire les choses.

C'est la décision que nous avons prise ici, malheureusement, mais nous serons heureux de travailler là-dessus à l'avenir.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous pouvez affirmer ne pas pouvoir le faire en six mois — même si quelqu'un d'autre peut le faire — et affirmer être en mesure d'identifier immédiatement toute publicité n'importe où et n'importe quand, sans pour autant avoir les capacités technologiques chez Google de mettre la publicité cernée dans une base de données en 24 heures. Vous n'avez tout simplement pas la capacité de programmer une telle chose en six mois.

M. Derek Slater:

Nous n'avons pas la capacité en ce moment de respecter totalement la nouvelle loi.

(1225)

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous n'avez pas la capacité. Vous êtes sérieux lorsque vous dites ça?

Dites-vous sérieusement que vous pouvez identifier n'importe quelle publicité sur n'importe quelle plateforme, mais vous ne pouvez pas demander à vos développeurs de transférer cette information dans une base de données? Il vous faut trop de temps pour tout simplement programmer le système de façon à ce que les publicités cernées soient transférées dans une base de données.

M. Derek Slater:

Je ne peux pas parler des services fournis par n'importe qui, n'importe où. Pour être clair, nous utilisons des machines et des gens pour surveiller les publicités qui sont présentées par l'intermédiaire de nos systèmes et nous assurer qu'elles respectent nos règles.

Pour ce qui est des obligations supplémentaires, non, nous ne pouvions pas les respecter dans ce cas-ci.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord. J'ai une autre question pour Google et Facebook, une question simple.

Je n'aime pas vos conditions d'utilisation. Qu'est-ce que je peux faire?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, si vous pouviez me fournir un peu plus d'explications, peut-être m'en dire un peu plus sur ce que vous n'aimez pas...

M. Frank Baylis:

Je n'aime pas qu'on m'espionne.

M. Kevin Chan:

Oh, eh bien, nous ne faisons rien de tel, monsieur.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous recueillez des données à mon sujet que je ne veux pas que vous recueilliez.

M. Kevin Chan:

Comme vous le savez, je consacre beaucoup de temps à l'alphabétisation numérique. Ce qui est approprié, c'est que les gens ne doivent pas mettre plus d'information sur notre service qu'ils ne le souhaitent.

Monsieur, si vous me permettez, j'aimerais fournir un point de vue un peu différent sur tout ça. Comme vous le savez, je crois, nous allons offrir un type d'expérience très différente relativement à nos produits très bientôt et les utilisateurs pourront retirer non seulement les renseignements qu'ils ont communiqués sur le service, mais aussi les renseignements qui s'y trouveraient en raison de l'intégration avec d'autres services d'Internet. Nous allons donner aux gens cette fonctionnalité, alors, encore une fois, dans la mesure où une personne jugerait que ce n'est pas souhaitable, nous voulons lui donner ce contrôle.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Baylis. Malheureusement, nous devons poursuivre.

Les cinq prochaines minutes reviennent à M. Kent.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai une question pour M. Chan.

Si un employeur canadien se tourne vers Facebook et veut mettre en place une publicité liée à l'emploi misant sur un microciblage en fonction de l'âge et du sexe en excluant d'autres groupes démographiques, Facebook accepterait-elle de faire une telle publicité?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, merci de la question. Encore une fois, je tiens aussi à vous remercier de nous avoir invités à participer à votre récente table ronde à Oshawa. C'est quelque chose dont nous sommes très reconnaissants.

Ce serait une violation de nos politiques, alors ce ne serait pas accepté.

Nous avons deux ou trois choses, et je crois comprendre là où vous voulez en venir...

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Si vous me le permettez, parce que j'ai peu de temps... Serez-vous surpris d'apprendre que l'opposition officielle au Parlement a reçu une réponse à une question inscrite au Feuilleton aujourd'hui selon laquelle plusieurs ministères du gouvernement du Canada ont placé des publicités assorties de ces mêmes conditions de microciblage et que le nom de votre entreprise revient plusieurs fois?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, comme vous le savez, cette information a été dévoilée grâce aux reportages incroyablement détaillés d'Elizabeth Thompson de CBC; cette information appartient également au domaine public, car c'est là que j'ai lu la nouvelle en premier.

Vous devriez savoir que cela constitue une violation de notre politique, monsieur. Ces derniers temps, nous avons pris des mesures assez énergiques pour éliminer toute une série de pratiques de ciblage différentes à l'égard de ces types d'annonces. Pour ce qui est des annonces concernant le logement, l'emploi et le crédit, pour être précis, nous avons également exigé de tous les annonceurs qu'ils garantissent à l'avenir qu'ils ne diffuseront pas d'annonces relatives au logement ni au crédit.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Avez-vous informé le gouvernement libéral du Canada du fait que cette pratique de microciblage qu'il emploie ne sera plus acceptée à l'avenir? Répondez simplement par oui ou non.

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous avons envoyé des courriels à tous les administrateurs pour leur dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas utiliser cette pratique.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Pour en revenir à la question originale de M. Collins au sujet de la vidéo manipulée, sexiste et politiquement hostile dont on a autorisé la diffusion continue sur votre plateforme Facebook, je crois comprendre que, après que le Washington Post a communiqué avec Facebook, une déclaration a été publiée disant: « Nous n'avons pas de politique [...] exigeant que les renseignements que vous affichez sur Facebook soient véridiques. »

D'après vos réponses antérieures, il semblerait que Facebook refuse de retirer cette vidéo politiquement hostile, plaidant une défense pervertie de liberté d'expression, et que 24 heures après que le Washington Post vous a informé de la situation, ce même journal a signalé que le nombre de visionnements sur une seule page Facebook a atteint plus de 2,5 millions, chiffre qui se multiplie nombre de fois si on inclut d'autres pages Facebook.

Si un événement du genre se produisait pendant l'élection canadienne — si une vidéo semblable montrant un politicien canadien, peut-être le chef de l'un des partis, était manipulée et publiée de la même manière pour donner l'impression que la personne souffre d'un handicap mental ou qu'il est en état d'ébriété —, est-ce que Facebook retirerait cette vidéo ou est-ce que votre intervention se limiterait à donner des réponses semblables à celles que vous avez fournies à M. Collins, soit de dire simplement que ce n'est pas vrai, malgré le fait que certains continuent d'exploiter la fausseté de la vidéo?

(1230)

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, mettons simplement de côté la vidéo en question qui provient des États-Unis. Nous examinons la question, et depuis plus de deux ans, je me penche personnellement sur la question afin de trouver des façons de mieux sécuriser la plateforme en vue des élections à venir.

Je peux vous dire que, lorsque nous recevons des demandes provenant de diverses personnes et parties et de divers secteurs, dans 99 % des cas où nous trouvons quelque chose qu'on nous a signalé, nous allons en fait au-delà du contenu. Nous ne cherchons pas le contenu. Nous cherchons le comportement.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Mais supprimeriez-vous la vidéo?

M. Kevin Chan:

Si elle provient d'un faux compte ou que ce semble être un contenu indésirable, ou si la vidéo viole d'une manière ou d'une autre les normes d'une communauté, il est certain que nous la supprimerions.

Je peux vous assurer que dans presque tous les cas, j'ai...

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Mais elle est fausse. Ce n'est pas la vérité. Est-ce que Facebook défend toujours le concept selon lequel le contenu n'a pas à être véridique pour se retrouver sur sa plateforme?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, je crois comprendre où vous voulez en venir. Si vous me le permettez, la façon dont j'aimerais en parler est la suivante...

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Un oui ou un non suffira.

M. Kevin Chan:

C'est pourquoi nous sommes ici. Nous serions favorables à...

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Donc, tout ceci est une expérience d'apprentissage pour vous?

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur Kent...

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je pose la question avec respect et courtoisie.

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous accueillerions favorablement des normes de base que les législateurs pourraient imposer à la plateforme à propos de ce qui devrait être publié et de ce qui devrait être supprimé. Si les législateurs, avec leur sagesse, souhaitent établir certaines limites qui pourraient relever ou non de la censure, il est certain que nous appliquerions la loi locale.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Je vais peut-être terminer par un commentaire.

Chris Hughes, un cofondateur désillusionné de Facebook, qui est devenu en quelque sorte un dénonciateur pour certains, a dit: « Quelques règles de plus ne font pas peur à Facebook. Facebook craint qu'il y ait une action antitrust. »

Étiez-vous au courant que, dans des démocraties du monde entier, vous vous rapprochez de plus en plus d'une action antitrust?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je suis au courant de nombreuses questions qui concernent la réglementation à l'échelle mondiale, oui, monsieur.

L'hon. Peter Kent:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Kent.

Simplement pour que vous soyez au courant, je tiens à rappeler à tous le déroulement de la période de questions. Tout d'abord, il y aura une question par délégation, par pays. Vous pouvez voir comment l'ordre a été établi. Puis, il y aura différentes rondes jusqu'à ce que tous les membres aient eu la chance de poser une question. Par exemple, le prochain membre de la délégation poserait la question suivante, etc.

À l'heure actuelle, nous avons le deuxième membre de la délégation du Royaume-Uni, M. Lucas. Il posera la prochaine question de cinq minutes, ou ce sera peut-être Jo Stevens.

Préparez-vous en conséquence. Je me tournerai peut-être vers différents pays. Si vous avez un deuxième délégué, la personne aura la possibilité de poser une question également.

Allez-y, madame Stevens, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Jo Stevens (membre, Comité sur le numérique, la culture, les médias et le sport, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Potts et monsieur Chan, je tiens à vous remercier d'être présents aujourd'hui, mais mes collègues et moi-même du Parlement du Royaume-Uni souhaitions poser nos questions à Mark Zuckerberg. Il ne voulait pas venir répondre à nos questions à Londres, dans notre Parlement, alors nous avons traversé l'Atlantique pour lui faciliter la tâche. Nous pouvons seulement conclure que l'examen de ses pratiques l'effraie. Pour éviter tout doute, j'en ai assez de passer des heures assise à entendre les représentants de Facebook dire des platitudes et employer des tactiques d'évitement pour ne pas répondre aux questions. Je veux que le patron prenne ses responsabilités, donc je vous prie de transmettre ce message à M. Zuckerberg.

J'aimerais poser une question aux représentants de Google.

Dans tous les autres secteurs, le monopole de votre entreprise aurait été déjà démantelé. Que faites-vous à l'heure actuelle pour vous préparer à cette éventualité?

M. Colin McKay:

Je pense que nous travaillons très fort pour montrer à nos utilisateurs et aux organismes de réglementation que nous apportons de la valeur au marché et à nos utilisateurs. Ils comprennent clairement — que ce soit en utilisant nos cartes à partir de leur compte ou en mode de navigation privée, en utilisant Gmail ou nos services d'infrastructure — que nous leur offrons une certaine valeur et que nous jouons un rôle positif sur le marché en leur offrant non seulement de la valeur en ce qui a trait aux services informatiques, mais aussi des produits et des services qui favorisent la croissance des entreprises dans le monde.

Nous pensons que les organismes de réglementation ont le droit et, certainement, l'obligation de surveiller nos activités et de les examiner à l'intérieur du cadre de leurs compétences locales. Nous participerons à ce processus et essaierons d'expliquer de quelle manière nous offrons cette valeur tout en respectant les obligations prévues par les règlements, d'après leur interprétation.

(1235)

Mme Jo Stevens:

Toutefois, vous ne prenez actuellement aucune mesure pour vous préparer en vue d'actions futures.

M. Colin McKay:

En ce moment, nous nous concentrons sur la prestation de services qui comblent et anticipent les besoins de nos utilisateurs.

M. Ian Lucas:

Je pourrais peut-être poser une question au sujet d'une audience en particulier durant laquelle un représentant de Facebook a témoigné en février 2018. Lorsque nous avons interrogé le représentant de Facebook au sujet de Cambridge Analytica à Washington, on ne nous a pas informés de l'incident de données impliquant Cambridge Analytica et Aleksandr Kogan.

Monsieur Potts, en ce qui a trait à la transparence, dont vous avez parlé, pourquoi n'avons-nous pas été informés de l'incident touchant Cambridge Analytica, que nous avons précisément soulevé ce jour-là?

M. Neil Potts:

Merci, monsieur Lucas.

Je suis désolé, mais je ne suis pas certain de ce qui s'est passé au cours de cette audience. Je peux essayer de trouver précisément ce qui a été présenté et les données fournies, mais malheureusement, je ne m'en souviens pas.

M. Ian Lucas:

C'est dans le domaine public. La raison pour laquelle nous voulons que Mark Zuckerberg vienne ici, c'est parce que nous voulons des réponses claires de dirigeants de Facebook à des questions précises que nous avons posées.

Monsieur Chan, pouvez-vous répondre à la question pour moi?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, je ne veux pas parler à tort et à travers, mais nous ne sommes pas au courant de ce qui s'est passé en février 2018, si c'est bien le mois dont vous avez parlé. Nous pouvons certainement nous pencher sur la question.

M. Ian Lucas:

Je peux vous dire exactement ce qui s'est passé. Je pourrais lire la réponse. Nous avons soulevé la question de Cambridge Analytica, l'incident lié aux données et le problème relatif à Cambridge Analytica. On ne nous a pas dit qu'il y avait eu un incident lié à des données impliquant Aleksandr Kogan, lequel a fait les manchettes dans les deux mois suivants. Vous êtes au courant de l'incident, je présume.

M. Neil Potts:

Nous sommes au courant de la situation de Cambridge Analytica. Encore une fois, nous ne savons pas ce qui a été dit.

M. Ian Lucas:

Avez-vous considéré l'incident impliquant Cambridge Analytica comme étant grave?

M. Neil Potts:

Oui, monsieur Lucas.

M. Ian Lucas:

Savez-vous quelles mesures ont été prises par les dirigeants de Facebook lorsque l'incident de Cambridge Analytica impliquant Aleksandr Kogan...? Quelles mesures ont été prises? Le savez-vous?

M. Kevin Chan:

Si je comprends bien votre question, depuis 2014, nous avons réduit considérablement...

M. Ian Lucas:

Je vous ai posé une question précise. Quelles mesures ont été prises par les dirigeants de Facebook lorsque vous avez été mis au courant de l'incident impliquant Cambridge Analytica? Je choisis mes mots très soigneusement; la majorité des gens emploieraient des termes moins sympathiques. Certaines personnes qualifieraient cette situation d'atteinte à la sécurité des données, mais en ce qui a trait à l'incident impliquant Aleksandr Kogan, quelles mesures ont été prises par les dirigeants de Facebook?

M. Kevin Chan:

En ce qui concerne précisément l'application d'Aleksandr Kogan, elle a été bannie de la plateforme.

M. Ian Lucas:

Qui a pris la décision?

M. Kevin Chan:

L'entreprise... Je ne saurais vous dire. Si vous cherchez une personne en particulier, je ne peux vraiment pas vous dire, mais l'entreprise...

M. Ian Lucas:

La personne en particulier à qui j'aimerais poser la question, c'est Mark Zuckerberg, car j'aimerais savoir s'il était au courant de l'incident à ce moment-là. Le savait-il?

J'ai posé la question à Mike Schroepfer, et il m'a dit qu'il me reviendrait avec la réponse. C'était l'été dernier. Mark Zuckerberg était-il au courant de cette atteinte à la sécurité des données en 2015?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, nous serons ravis de vous fournir une réponse. Quant au fait que vous n'avez pas reçu de réponse, ce que vous semblez dire, nous sommes désolés. Il est évident que nous voulons toujours collaborer quant aux questions...

M. Ian Lucas:

Puis-je vous arrêter là?

Monsieur Potts, vous avez dit que l'incident était grave. Pouvez-vous me donner un exemple d'entreprise ou de personne qui a été retirée de la plateforme de Facebook pour le type de brèche ou d'incident survenu impliquant Aleksandr Kogan et touchant la communication de renseignements?

M. Neil Potts:

Je pense que vous venez tout juste d'en nommer une. Monsieur Lucas, je ne m'occupe pas directement des questions de protection des renseignements personnels. Ces questions sont traitées par une équipe distincte.

Je tiens à dire que, comme M. Chan l'a dit, nous nous engageons à vous revenir avec une réponse. J'ai eu le plaisir de témoigner devant un comité récemment et...

(1240)

M. Ian Lucas:

Je suis désolé, monsieur Potts. Nous voulons la simple honnêteté, qui est une valeur universelle, et il y a des gens des quatre coins du monde à cette table. Nous comprenons tous l'honnêteté. Nos systèmes juridiques diffèrent...

M. Neil Potts:

Je suis tout à fait...

M. Ian Lucas:

... et je veux des réponses directes. J'ai entendu quatre témoignages de votre part.

M. Neil Potts:

Monsieur Lucas, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous en ce qui a trait à l'honnêteté et...

Le président:

Je suis désolé, monsieur Potts...

M. Neil Potts:

... et ce n'est pas rien que d'attaquer l'intégrité d'une personne.

Le président:

Monsieur Potts, la priorité est accordée aux membres du Comité, et M. Lucas a la parole.

Allez-y, monsieur Lucas.

M. Ian Lucas:

Je n'ai pas reçu de réponse directe de la part de votre entreprise. Vous avez été envoyé ici par M. Zuckerberg pour parler au nom de Facebook. Il a été informé de ces questions suffisamment à l'avance.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je suis désolé, monsieur, laissez-moi simplement... Si je comprends bien, votre question est la suivante: y a-t-il d'autres applications qui ont été bannies de Facebook pour utilisation inappropriée ou abusive de la plateforme? La réponse est oui.

M. Ian Lucas:

Pour le transfert des données...

Le président:

Le temps est écoulé; je vais devoir donner la parole au prochain intervenant. Il s'agit de M. Lawless de l'Irlande.

M. James Lawless (membre, Comité mixte sur les communications, l'action sur le climat et l'environnement, Parlement de la République d'Irlande):

Monsieur le président, merci de nous inviter ici aujourd'hui. Je suis ravi d'être présent.

Au sein de notre comité irlandais, nous avons bien évidemment dialogué avec les entreprises et nous avons rencontré M. Zuckerberg à Dublin récemment.

Je dois dire que je salue la participation des représentants des compagnies technologiques qui sont ici présents, mais je trouve extraordinaires certaines des déclarations qui ont été faites, notamment celle de M. Potts, il y a quelques minutes, selon laquelle il ne connaissait pas la procédure parlementaire, et c'était peut-être pour expliquer certaines lacunes dans son témoignage.

Je trouve également extraordinaire le fait que certains des témoins ne soient pas au courant de ce qui a été dit lors d'audiences ou de discours antérieurs à propos de ces enjeux dans chacun de nos parlements. J'aurais cru que c'était une condition fondamentale pour entrer dans la pièce, si vous vouliez être qualifié pour faire le travail. C'est le bémol que je mets à mes questions. C'est décevant. Je veux que cela figure au compte rendu.

Pour en revenir aux questions spécifiques, nous avons entendu — aujourd'hui et par le passé — beaucoup de choses, dont certaines sont positives et plutôt encourageantes, à supposer que nous les croyons, de la part de représentants de divers échelons. Toutefois, je suppose que les actes sont plus éloquents que les mots; c'est ma philosophie. Aujourd'hui, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler du scandale impliquant Cambridge Analytica et Kogan. Encore une fois, je tiens à dire pour le compte rendu que le commissaire à la protection des données de l'Irlande a relevé ce problème en 2014 et en a avisé les dirigeants de Facebook. Cependant, je crois comprendre qu'il n'y a pas eu de suivi. Je pense qu'il a fallu deux ou trois ans avant qu'on fasse quelque chose. Tout ce qui s'est produit depuis aurait potentiellement pu être évité si des mesures avaient été prises et qu'il y avait eu un suivi à l'époque.

Encore une fois, je reviens là-dessus pour mettre les entreprises à l'épreuve concernant les mesures réellement prises, je suppose. Les premières questions s'adressent aux représentants de Facebook.

Nous avons entendu M. Zuckerberg dire en public, et d'autres témoins l'ont répété ici aujourd'hui, que le RGPD est possiblement une norme d'excellence, qu'il s'agirait d'un bon modèle de gestion de données et qu'il pourrait éventuellement être déployé à l'échelle mondiale. Selon moi, c'est tout à fait logique. J'approuve cette mesure. Je siégeais au comité qui a intégré ce règlement au droit irlandais, et je peux voir les avantages.

Si tel est le cas, pourquoi Facebook a-t-elle rapatrié 1,5 milliard d'ensembles de données des serveurs irlandais la nuit précédant l'entrée en vigueur du RGPD? La situation, c'est qu'une énorme portion des données mondiales de Facebook se trouvait sur le territoire irlandais, car il s'agit du territoire de l'Union européenne, et à la veille de l'adoption du RGPD — moment où, bien évidemment, le règlement serait entré en vigueur —, 1,5 milliard d'ensembles de données ont été retirés des serveurs et rapatriés aux États-Unis. Cela ne semble pas être un geste de bonne foi.

Nous allons peut-être commencer par cette question, puis nous poursuivrons si nous avons le temps.

M. Kevin Chan:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous pour dire que les actes sont plus éloquents que les mots. Je pense que, dans la mesure où nous devons faire la preuve de nos intentions, dans les mois et les années à venir, nous travaillerons de sorte que nos actes témoignent de notre objectif de préserver la sécurité de notre service et de protéger les renseignements personnels des gens, et du fait que nous voulons faire la bonne chose.

Quant à ce que vous avez dit à propos du transfert... Encore une fois, pour tout dire — déclaration complète —, je ne suis pas avocat, mais je crois comprendre que ce transfert est conforme à nos conditions de service.

M. James Lawless:

Il est conforme, mais c'est tout un hasard qu'il soit survenu la nuit avant l'entrée en vigueur du RGPD.

Je vais poser une autre question du même genre. Je crois comprendre que les dirigeants de Facebook continuent d'interjeter appel d'un certain nombre de décisions. Le commissaire à l'information du Royaume-Uni a récemment rendu une conclusion défavorable à Facebook, laquelle a été portée en appel. Ma collègue, Hildegarde Naughton, a parlé des conclusions du commissaire à la protection des données de l'Irlande.

Si vous levez la main et dites: « Nous avons commis certaines erreurs », et que vous faites preuve de bonne foi — ce que je saluerais si c'était le cas —, pourquoi continuez-vous d'interjeter appel de ces nombreuses décisions?

(1245)

M. Kevin Chan:

Il y a des cas... Comme les appels sont assujettis aux processus judiciaires, je crois qu'il y a des limites à ce que je peux dire aujourd'hui. Comme vous le savez probablement, nous déployons beaucoup d'efforts pour en arriver à un règlement dans d'autres affaires en cours. Je vous exhorte d'examiner nos actions à mesure que nous les rendons publiques dans le cadre de ces processus et de prendre une décision à ce moment-là.

M. James Lawless:

J'ai simplement une petite question pour les représentants de Google.

Je crois comprendre que l'approche de Google consiste à ne diffuser absolument aucune publicité politique, du moins dans le contexte canadien. Nous avons eu une décision semblable en Irlande durant le référendum sur l'avortement il y a un an. Je suis préoccupé par cette décision, car je crois qu'elle permet à des acteurs malveillants de publier des renseignements erronés qui ne sont pas ciblés. En fait, je pense qu'il serait peut-être mieux de permettre aux acteurs politiques d'être transparents et de diffuser des publicités, dans un contexte légitime et vérifié.

C'est tout simplement un aspect qui me préoccupe, et j'espère qu'il ne s'agit pas d'une mesure à long terme. Peut-être s'agit-il d'une mesure provisoire.

M. Colin McKay:

Il me reste quelques secondes, et j'aimerais faire une observation. Tant en Irlande qu'au Canada, nous nous retrouvons dans une position où il y a de l'incertitude quant à ce que nous pouvons garantir aux électeurs. Nous voulons nous assurer de mettre en place un cadre rigoureux quant à la façon dont nous présentons les publicités et reconnaissons nos responsabilités. Comme l'a dit mon collègue plus tôt, l'un de nos objectifs à l'avenir est de mettre en place des outils, qu'il soit question d'ambiguïté ou d'acteurs malveillants, pour assurer aux utilisateurs la transparence des activités ainsi que la clarté et l'uniformité dans l'ensemble de nos produits.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Lawless.

Nous allons passer à notre prochaine ronde de questions.

C'est au tour des représentants du Parlement de Singapour.

Mme Sun Xueling (secrétaire parlementaire principale, ministère des Affaires intérieures et ministère du Développement national, Parlement de Singapour):

J'aimerais revenir à l'exemple du Sri Lanka, avec M. Neil Potts.

M. Potts a dit plus tôt qu'il n'était pas au courant que les vidéos incendiaires avaient été diffusées sur Facebook. J'aimerais attirer l'attention sur le fait que, dans un article paru dans le Wall Street Journal, M. Hilmy Ahamed, vice-président du conseil musulman du Sri Lanka, a dit que des dirigeants musulmans avaient signalé les vidéos incendiaires de Hashim diffusées sur Facebook et YouTube en utilisant les services intégrés à votre système de signalement.

Puis-je simplement confirmer avec M. Potts que, si Facebook avait été au courant de l'existence de ces vidéos, elles auraient été retirées de la plateforme?

M. Neil Potts:

Oui, madame. C'est exact. Si nous l'avions su, nous aurions retiré les vidéos. Dans ce cas en particulier, je n'ai pas les données avec moi; je ne suis pas certain si nous en avons été informés, mais si cela avait été le cas, ces vidéos auraient été retirées.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Merci.

Par ailleurs, dans la même veine, puis-je confirmer que, si Facebook avait été au courant qu'une vidéo avait été falsifiée —et nous avons discuté du cas de Nancy Pelosi plus tôt —, Facebook aurait précisé qu'elle savait que la vidéo était falsifiée?

M. Neil Potts:

Lorsque l'un de nos tiers, de nos partenaires qui vérifient les faits... Nous avons plus de 50 vérificateurs de faits à l'échelle mondiale qui adhèrent aux principes de Poynter. Ils auraient considéré la vidéo comme fausse. Nous aurions alors publié la mise en garde. Nous aurions pris des mesures dynamiques pour réduire ce type d'information et signaler non seulement aux utilisateurs qui regardent la vidéo, mais aussi à ceux qui tentent de la partager ou qui l'ont déjà fait, qu'il s'agit d'une fausse vidéo.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Votre mise en garde dirait en fait que vous savez que les renseignements contenus sont faux.

M. Neil Potts:

Elle comporterait un lien qui mène à l'article de l'un des vérificateurs de faits qui conteste son authenticité et qui affirme qu'il s'agit d'une fausse vidéo.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Cette mise en garde serait envoyée à tous ceux qui auraient vu la vidéo originale.

M. Neil Potts:

Si vous étiez en train de la visionner, vous verriez la mise en garde apparaître soit dans le bas de votre fil de nouvelles, soit peut-être sur le côté si vous utilisez un ordinateur portable. Si vous aviez partagé la vidéo, vous seriez informé du fait que la validité du contenu est contestée.

Mme Sun Xueling:

Monsieur Chan, vous avez parlé du fait que Facebook intègre des mécanismes de ralentissement au système. Puis-je confirmer avec vous que Facebook s'est engagé à éliminer toute ingérence étrangère dans les activités politiques et les élections et que vous intégrez activement des mécanismes de ralentissement au système pour vous assurer d'éliminer une telle ingérence étrangère?

M. Kevin Chan:

J'imagine que vous parlez d'éventuelles mesures législatives à Singapour. Vous auriez tout intérêt à examiner la Loi sur la modernisation des élections que le Canada a mise en place...

Mme Sun Xueling:

Ma question était assez précise. Je voulais que vous confirmiez ce que vous avez dit plus tôt, que vous intégrez des mécanismes de ralentissement au système. Vous avez précisément utilisé ce terme.

M. Kevin Chan:

Le Parlement nous a bien conseillés, et nous avons décidé d'intégrer des mécanismes de ralentissement au système. Vous pourriez peut-être envisager le modèle canadien au moment d'élaborer des mesures législatives ailleurs.

(1250)

Mme Sun Xueling:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous avons entendu à peu près tous les délégués. Nous allons revenir au Royaume-Uni pour une autre question. Vous n'avez pas eu à partager votre temps; nous allons donc vous en accorder un peu plus.

Nous allons écouter M. Erskine-Smith, et je pense que M. Angus avait une autre question. Madame Stevens, vous avez encore la parole, puis je pense que nous aurons terminé.

À titre de président, je vais essayer d'accorder cinq minutes à tout le monde. Quand tout le monde aura parlé, nous demanderons à M. de Burgh Graham de suivre l'ordre. Puis, nous passerons à la deuxième série de questions de cinq minutes, donc si vous souhaitez poser une autre question, faites-le-moi savoir, et j'essaierai de vous accorder la priorité.

Pour la suite des choses, nous écoutons M. Erskine-Smith.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais simplement reprendre où j'en étais à propos de Google. Appuieriez-vous un cadre de concurrence qui intègre la protection des renseignements personnels au mandat du commissaire à la concurrence?

M. Colin McKay:

Nous avons deux mécanismes de réglementation au Canada: l'un pour la concurrence, et l'autre pour la protection des données. C'est ce qui a été mis de l'avant dans la récente charte numérique du gouvernement. Les deux mécanismes feront l'objet d'un examen au cours de la prochaine année, et je pense que nous pouvons discuter de cet équilibre dans le cadre de ce processus.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Donc les dirigeants de Google n'ont pas d'opinion à l'heure actuelle. D'accord.

Quant à Twitter... Et je pose la question en partie parce que notre commissaire à la concurrence, sans que Facebook, précisément, soit au courant, prendra part à cette même discussion jeudi. Il n'y a pas seulement que l'organisme de réglementation allemand. On organise un forum sur les données au Centre national des Arts.

Est-ce que les dirigeants de Twitter ont une vision de la politique de la concurrence et de la protection des renseignements personnels?

M. Carlos Monje:

Je vous remercie de poser la question, ainsi que d’avoir fait la distinction entre les plateformes qui sont concernées. Twitter possède une part à un seul chiffre du marché publicitaire. Nous comptons quelque 130 millions d’utilisateurs quotidiens. Nous les chérissons tous. Nous travaillons à garder leur confiance et à les tenir mobilisés, et nous surveillons de près les lois antitrust et relatives à la concurrence...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Souscrivez-vous à l’opinion selon laquelle la protection des renseignements personnels devrait jouer un rôle de premier plan dans la loi sur la concurrence?

M. Carlos Monje:

Il faudrait que j’examine cette question d’un peu plus près.

Mme Michele Austin (chef, Gouvernement et politique publique, Twitter Canada, Twitter inc.):

Nous répéterions les commentaires formulés par le représentant de Google. Nous attendons avec impatience...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Alors, vous n’avez aucun point de vue, pour l’instant.

Mme Michele Austin:

... de travailler sur le cadre relatif au marché, qui est le fondement de la loi sur la concurrence.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord, alors aucun d’entre vous n’a de point de vue sur une question réellement importante de notre journée.

En ce qui concerne la responsabilité algorithmique, le gouvernement du Canada dispose maintenant d’évaluations d’impact algorithmiques. Est-ce que l’une de vos entreprises a déjà mené des évaluations d’impact algorithmiques? Facebook pour le fil d’actualités, Google pour la fonction de recommandation sur YouTube et Twitter; avez-vous mené des évaluations d’impact algorithmiques internes, oui ou non?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je pense que, d’une façon générale, oui. Je ne sais pas exactement ce que vous voulez dire, mais, si vous demandez si nous avons un volet de travail visant à comprendre les conséquences des algorithmes...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

À réaliser une évaluation des risques associés aux résultats positifs et négatifs des algorithmes que vous employez actuellement sur des millions de personnes...

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, non seulement nous avons affecté une équipe à cette tâche, à l’interne, mais nous avons également mis sur pied un groupe de travail composé d’experts en matière de biais algorithmique qui se réunissent régulièrement afin de discuter de ces questions.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Votre entreprise n’a jamais affecté des analystes à l’étude du fil d’actualités et des algorithmes qui sont employés sur ce fil ni présenté les résultats positifs et négatifs dont nous devrions tenir compte.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je pense que je viens tout juste de répondre en ce qui concerne les résultats positifs.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Alors, oui. D’accord.

Pour ce qui est de Google, en ce qui concerne la fonction de recommandation sur YouTube...?

M. Derek Slater:

De même, nous évaluons constamment les algorithmes et cherchons à les améliorer.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous tenez des documents internes qui disent, voici les résultats positifs; voici les résultats négatifs, et voici l’évaluation des risques en ce qui a trait aux algorithmes que nous employons. Est-il juste d’affirmer que vous tenez ces documents?

M. Derek Slater:

Nous effectuons constamment ce genre d’évaluation, oui.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Excellent.

Et dans le cas de Twitter, est-ce la même chose?

M. Carlos Monje:

Nous les évaluons. Je soulignerais également que la façon dont Twitter utilise les algorithmes est considérablement différente. Les gens peuvent les désactiver à tout moment.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Fourniriez-vous les évaluations des risques internes au Comité?

M. Derek Slater:

Pour notre part, en ce qui concerne l’algorithme de recommandation sur YouTube, nous continuons de tenter d’améliorer notre transparence.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Fourniriez-vous ces évaluations des risques internes? Honnêtement, en ce qui me concerne, elles devraient être publiques, de la même manière que le gouvernement du Canada procède à une évaluation d’impact algorithmique et que tout organisme gouvernemental qui veut employer un algorithme doit faire preuve de transparence à cet égard. Aucune de vos entreprises multimilliardaires n’est tenue de procéder ainsi, mais je pense que vous devriez l’être.

Voudriez-vous fournir au Comité les évaluations d’impact algorithmiques que vous affirmez avoir effectuées et faire preuve d’une certaine transparence?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je vous remercie de cette question. Je pense que nous irons plus loin que cela. Comme je l’ai mentionné, nous sommes en train d'accroître notre transparence à l’égard d’un certain nombre d’éléments que vous verrez sur la plateforme. Nous avons déjà introduit sur certains marchés, en guise d’essai, ce qu’on appelle WAIST, qui est le sigle anglais de « Pourquoi est-ce que je vois ceci? » Cet outil vous donne une très bonne idée de la façon dont les publications sont classées et triées par le fil d’actualités.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Comme vous irez plus loin, je suppose que la réponse est oui, vous allez fournir cette documentation interne au Comité.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je pense que nous allons faire mieux. Nous allons joindre le geste à la parole, comme nous en avons parlé plus tôt, monsieur.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je n’arrive pas à déterminer s’il s’agit d’un oui ou d’un non.

Les représentants de Google ont-ils un commentaire à faire?

M. Derek Slater:

Nous allons continuer à communiquer concernant notre situation.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je considère cette réponse comme un non.

Qu'en est-il des représentants de Twitter?

M. Carlos Monje:

Nous croyons que la transparence est la clé. Je pense qu’il y a deux ou trois éléments à prendre en considération. L’un est que chacun de ces algorithmes est propriétaire. Il est important de réfléchir à ces aspects.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith: Je comprends, oui.

M. Carlos Monje: L’autre est compréhensible. Nous parlons souvent des langues différentes. De mauvais acteurs, et leur interprétation de notre façon de mener nos activités... et aussi de nous juger par rapport aux résultats, et pas nécessairement aux intrants.

(1255)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord.

Il ne me reste plus beaucoup de temps, alors je veux aborder la responsabilité à l’égard du contenu publié sur vos plateformes. Je crois comprendre que, dans le cas du contenu très préjudiciable... et nous pouvons parler de la nature du contenu, en soi. S’il est très préjudiciable, s’il s’agit de pornographie infantile ou de terrorisme, vous le retirez. S’il s’agit clairement d’un discours haineux criminel, vous le retirez, car ce contenu est préjudiciable de par sa nature seulement. En Allemagne, il est certain qu’il y aurait une responsabilité, et nous avons recommandé au sein du Comité qu’une responsabilité soit établie. S’il s’agit manifestement de contenu haineux, s’il est manifestement illégal, les plateformes de médias sociaux devraient être responsables si elles ne le retirent pas rapidement. À mes yeux, c’est logique.

Toutefois, la prochaine question ne porte pas sur la nature du contenu. Elle concerne votre participation active à l’augmentation du public exposé à ce contenu. Si un algorithme est employé par votre entreprise et utilisé pour faire augmenter les visionnements ou les expositions, reconnaissez-vous votre part de responsabilité à l’égard du contenu? Je souhaite obtenir une simple réponse affirmative ou négative.

Faisons le tour, en commençant par Google.

M. Derek Slater:

Nous sommes responsables de ce que nous recommandons, oui.

Une voix: C’est certain.

Une voix: Oui.

M. Carlos Monje:

Oui, nous prenons cette responsabilité très au sérieux.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous allons retourner à la délégation du Royaume-Uni pour une autre période de cinq minutes.

Simplement pour que ce soit clair: la représentante de l’Estonie a demandé à poser une deuxième question. Les représentants de l’Allemagne et du Mexique et des membres du Comité l’ont demandé également. Je viens tout juste de voir une main levée du côté de Singapour; il y a aussi Charlie Angus et Damian Collins, puis je terminerai.

Monsieur Lucas ou madame Stevens, allez-y.

M. Ian Lucas:

Je m’adresse aux représentants de toutes les plateformes: avez-vous mis en place un processus satisfaisant pour la vérification de l’âge sur votre plateforme?

Monsieur Monje, allez-y.

M. Carlos Monje:

Oui. Nous mettons en œuvre les procédures relatives aux limites d’âge prévues dans le RGPD et tentons de trouver des moyens de le faire d’une manière qui protège la vie privée de nos utilisateurs. Souvent, il faut recueillir plus de renseignements auprès des mineurs dans le but de vérifier s’ils sont bien qui ils affirment être.

M. Ian Lucas:

Messieurs les représentants de Facebook, avez-vous établi un processus satisfaisant pour la vérification de l’âge?

M. Kevin Chan:

J’ai trouvé que la réponse de M. Monje était très bonne. C’est exactement l'équilibre que nous tentons d'atteindre.

Cela dit, je comprends l’esprit de votre question. Nous pouvons toujours nous améliorer. Je dois vous dire — et je pense que vous l’avez entendu de la bouche de mes collègues qui ont récemment comparu au Royaume-Uni...

M. Ian Lucas:

Alors, vous lisez des transcriptions de témoignages.

M. Kevin Chan:

En fait, non. J’ai passé du temps avec une collègue — Karina Newton — que les députés connaissent peut-être. C’est une femme très aimable, et elle a consacré une partie de son temps à me faire un compte rendu de la séance, de son point de vue. Selon elle, cela s’était très bien passé. Des questions approfondies et très ciblées ont été posées en ce qui concerne la vérification de l’âge.

Malheureusement, toutefois, la technologie n’est pas encore tout à fait là.

M. Ian Lucas:

Les représentants de Google veulent-ils ajouter quelque chose?

M. Derek Slater:

Oui, nous avons mis en place des exigences et souscrivons de façon générale aux propos qui ont été tenus.

M. Ian Lucas:

Vous avez peut-être mis en place des exigences, mais j’ai été capable de m’ouvrir un compte Instagram en me faisant passer pour un enfant de 10 ans — je pense — au cours d’une séance de comité. Il me semble, d’après les témoignages que j’ai entendus et ce que j’entends de la bouche de mes électeurs au Royaume-Uni, que les gens sont extrêmement préoccupés, et je ne crois pas que des processus de vérification de l’âge satisfaisants soient en place. En effet, selon les témoignages qui m’ont été présentés, les représentants des plateformes au Royaume-Uni semblaient eux-mêmes laisser entendre que les procédures de vérification de l’âge en place n’étaient pas satisfaisantes.

Souscrivez-vous à cette opinion? Pensez-vous que la situation est acceptable? Il s’agit essentiellement de ce que la plupart d’entre nous cherchent à savoir.

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, ce que j’ai dit plus tôt, c’est que nous pouvons toujours nous améliorer. La technologie n’est pas rendue au stade où nous voudrions qu’elle soit.

M. Ian Lucas:

D’accord.

Dans le cas de Facebook, je suis un peu perplexe au sujet de votre relation avec WhatsApp et Instagram et du transfert des données. Si je donne des renseignements à Facebook, sont-ils transférables librement vers Instagram et WhatsApp?

M. Kevin Chan:

Comme vous le savez — je crois, car Karina a mentionné que vous aviez eu un échange à ce sujet au Royaume-Uni —, Facebook et Instagram sont régies par un ensemble de conditions d’utilisation, et WhatsApp est régie par un autre.

(1300)

M. Ian Lucas:

Cela signifie que des renseignements sont échangés entre Instagram et Facebook.

M. Kevin Chan:

Exact. Comme nous l’avons mentionné plus tôt, il est important pour nous de pouvoir mettre à profit l’infrastructure dans le but de prendre beaucoup des mesures que nous prenons pour tenter de garder les gens en sécurité. Karina l'a mentionné, en quelque sorte, quoiqu’elle a affirmé ne pas savoir si c’était complètement clair. Le fait d’avoir l'identité réelle des personnes sur Facebook nous permet de faire certaines des choses que nous ne pourrions pas faire au moyen d’Instagram seulement pour nous assurer que nous pouvons acquérir une plus grande certitude quant à ces questions d’âge, d’identité réelle, et ainsi de suite. Facebook nous permet de mettre à profit certains des systèmes de sécurité et de les appliquer à Instagram, car cette application — comme vous le savez manifestement — fonctionne très différemment et comporte un ensemble de pratiques différent du point de vue de la façon dont les gens utilisent le service.

M. Ian Lucas:

Enfin, je m’adresse aux représentants de toutes les plateformes: si vous étiez juridiquement responsable du contenu diffusé sur votre plateforme, seriez-vous en mesure de fonctionner en tant qu’entreprise?

M. Derek Slater:

Il existe des cadres juridiques en ce qui a trait à notre responsabilité à l’égard du contenu illégal, et nous les respectons.

M. Ian Lucas:

S’il était possible d’intenter des poursuites judiciaires contre les différentes plateformes en raison de renseignements que vous avez diffusés, lesquels, nous le savons, pourraient causer des préjudices dans l’avenir, pensez-vous que vous seriez en mesure de continuer à échanger des renseignements, ou bien que cela mettrait un terme à vos activités?

M. Carlos Monje:

C’est le contexte américain que je connais le mieux, et nous avons un certain degré d’immunité. C’était sous le régime de la Communications Decency Act, et cette loi avait été conçue pour nous procurer la marge de manœuvre nécessaire afin que nous puissions mettre en œuvre nos conditions d’utilisation sans nous faire poursuivre. La société américaine est très axée sur les actions en justice — comme vous le savez —, et cette mesure de protection nous a permis de créer et de maintenir une plateforme beaucoup plus sûre qu’elle ne l’aurait été autrement.

Ce que vous voyez ici même et partout dans le monde, ce sont de nombreux régimes différents qui font l’essai de mécanismes différents à cette fin. Des recherches indépendantes ont été menées au sujet des conséquences de cette situation, notamment à des endroits où on accusait les plateformes d'apporter des corrections excessives et d'étouffer des opinions valables. Aux États-Unis, il est rare que le gouvernement nous critique et demande de retirer du contenu parce qu’il enfreint notre politique sur le discours haineux ou sur la conduite haineuse; c'est plutôt lorsqu’il s’agit d’une violation de la loi sur le droit d’auteur, car les règles qui régissent le droit d’auteur aux États-Unis sont très strictes, et nous devons retirer le contenu dans un certain délai.

Au lieu de demander à une personne qui critique le gouvernement de retirer le contenu en raison d’autres conditions d’utilisation, on a recours au régime le plus strict, et cela a une incidence très négative sur la liberté d’expression.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous devons passer à un autre sujet. Je veux souligner ce qui se passera au cours des 30 prochaines minutes. Deux membres du Comité canadien n'ont pas encore pris la parole. Nous allons leur accorder cinq minutes chacun, ce qui nous laisse, pour les personnes qui ont demandé un deuxième tour de parole, environ 20 minutes, soit approximativement 3 minutes par personne.

Encore une fois, nous céderons d'abord la parole à M. Graham, puis à M. Saini et, ensuite, nous procéderons par pays.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Je veux entrer directement dans le vif du sujet. Je vais me concentrer sur Google et Facebook pour un instant.

Messieurs les représentants de Google, acceptez-vous le terme « capitalisme de surveillance »?

M. Colin McKay:

Je pense qu'il s'agit d'une exagération de la situation, mais il reflète les pressions sociales et constitue une reconnaissance de l'inquiétude croissante au sujet des données recueillies sur les personnes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les représentants de Facebook souhaitent-ils se prononcer?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je pense avoir grimacé la première fois que j'ai entendu le terme.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous suivez les gens sur Internet de toutes les façons possibles sans qu'ils le sachent et sans qu'ils aient donné leur consentement explicite, à tout moment et pour toute raison, et vous le faites pour générer des profits.

M. Colin McKay:

Nous entretenons une relation très claire avec nos utilisateurs au sujet des renseignements que nous recueillons et de l'utilisation que nous en faisons. Nous obtenons leur consentement à l'égard des renseignements que nous utilisons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais vous ne faites pas uniquement le suivi des renseignements sur les utilisateurs. Vous recueillez de l'information sur quiconque se trouve sur Internet. Si on regarde Google Analytics et n'importe lequel de ces autres services, lesquels font le suivi de toutes les personnes qui passent par un autre site Web qui n'a rien à voir avec Google, vous recueillez beaucoup plus de données que celles qui sont fournies volontairement par les utilisateurs. Ma question est la suivante: encore une fois, recueillez-vous des données sur les gens à des fins lucratives et, le cas échéant, ne s'agit-il pas de capitalisme de surveillance?

M. Colin McKay:

Je pense que, dans la situation générale que vous venez tout juste de décrire relativement aux personnes qui utilisent Internet, nous ne recueillons pas de renseignements au sujet des gens. Nous mesurons le comportement et... Désolé, c'est le mauvais terme. J'entends le ricanement.

Nous mesurons la façon dont les gens agissent sur Internet et fournissons des données liées à ces comportements, mais elles ne sont pas liées à une personne. Elles sont liées à un acteur.

(1305)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ou bien elles sont liées à un type de personne, à une adresse IP ou à ce type d'information. Vous recueillez des données qui peuvent être reliées à des personnes. Là où je veux en venir, et je veux aller plus loin que cela, c'est que les gouvernements ont une capacité de surveillance exceptionnelle, comme nous le savons tous. Du moins, au pays, et dans beaucoup d'autres pays représentés à la table, nous avons maintenant un comité de parlementaires chargé de surveiller notre appareil de sécurité, et il le fait dans un contexte de confidentialité. Il procède à un examen approfondi des organismes de renseignement, de ce qu'ils font, de la façon dont ils le font et des raisons pour lesquelles ils le font, et il rend des comptes à ce sujet.

Si ces comités étaient créés uniquement pour se concentrer sur les entreprises de médias sociaux ou que le Comité s'y mettait, quelles surprises découvrirait-on?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, comme je l'ai indiqué, nous voulons faire plus au moyen de nos actes. Nous allons rendre toute cette information accessible, et, ensuite, les gens pourront... y compris les éléments qui sont à l'extérieur de la plateforme. Si un site utilise, disons, un module externe ou quelque chose de ce genre provenant de Facebook, vous avez accès à tous ces renseignements et vous pouvez en faire tout ce que vous voulez. Vous pouvez retirer des éléments. Vous pouvez en supprimer. Vous pouvez en transférer ou en télécharger. Voilà notre engagement, et nous allons le faire rapidement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends, mais, si on va sur Facebook et qu'on demande à télécharger nos données, il ne s'agit pas d'une collection complète des renseignements que Facebook possède sur nous en tant qu'utilisateur.

M. Kevin Chan:

Exact. Je pense que vous faites allusion aux situations où une personne télécharge ses renseignements et on obtient des choses comme ses photographies et ses vidéos.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On obtient une poignée de photographies et de mises à jour, et puis bonne journée.

M. Kevin Chan:

C'est exact. Ce que nous voulons faire, c'est établir... et cela prend un peu de temps. Si vous pouvez faire preuve de patience, il faut un peu plus de temps pour établir un système beaucoup plus ambitieux, qui vous permettra ensuite de prendre les commandes non seulement des renseignements que vous avez affichés sur Facebook, mais de toute l'activité que vous pourriez avoir effectuée ailleurs au moyen de modules externes. Nous pourrons vous donner la capacité de contrôler et de retirer des choses, si vous le choisissez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si Mark Zuckerberg était candidat à la présidence des États-Unis, par exemple, qu'est-ce qui limiterait sa capacité d'utiliser les données, les machines, les algorithmes et les capacités de collecte de Facebook pour alimenter sa campagne?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, si je puis me permettre, il s'agit d'une très bonne question, et c'est précisément pourquoi nous avons établi les politiques qui sont en place et pourquoi nous les respectons aussi rigoureusement. Ce n'est pas... et je pense que la question a été présentée d'une manière différente. C'était: « Qu'arriverait-il s'il y avait une photographie de Mark Zuckerberg ou une vidéo de lui? » Le traitement serait le même. C'est parce que ces politiques doivent tenir sans égard à la direction dans laquelle le vent souffle.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nous comprenons que les gens puissent ne pas être à l'aise avec le degré de transparence et la mesure dans laquelle Facebook peut prendre ces décisions au sujet de ce qui se passe sur son service, et c'est pourquoi nous établissons ce comité de surveillance externe, afin qu'un grand nombre de ces décisions difficiles établissant un précédent ne soient pas prises par Facebook seulement. Les gens auront la capacité d'interjeter appel auprès d'un organisme indépendant, lequel pourra prendre les décisions qui régiront le discours sur une plateforme.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne dispose que de quelques secondes, et je veux revenir sur l'organisme indépendant dans une seconde.

Là où je veux en venir, c'est que je soupçonne que le soutien de Facebook et l'utilisation des données de cette plateforme ne seront pas les mêmes si Neil Potts est candidat à la présidence des États-Unis que si Mark Zuckerberg est candidat à ce poste. C'est pourquoi il serait très difficile d'affirmer que la comparution de M. Zuckerberg est équivalente à celle de Neil Potts.

M. Kevin Chan:

Encore une fois, nos politiques s'appliquent à tout le monde. Nous ne ferions aucune exception pour qui que ce soit, et il s'agit en fait de la raison pour laquelle nous tenons ces genres de conversations solides.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

M. Zuckerberg a-t-il un...

Le président:

Notre temps est écoulé. Désolé, monsieur Graham.

Nous allons passer à M. Saini, pour cinq minutes.

M. Raj Saini (Kitchener-Centre, Lib.):

Bonjour.

L'une des choses que nous avons entendu de nombreux experts affirmer, c'est que beaucoup des problèmes qui sont survenus relativement aux données ont eu lieu au moment où l'apprentissage machine est vraiment entré en vigueur. Il y a eu un tournant. De nombreux experts s'entendent sur le fait que l'autoréglementation n'est plus viable. Des règles doivent être établies. Le modèle d'affaires ne peut tout simplement pas se réglementer, et il ne correspond pas à l'intérêt public.

J'ai deux questions à soulever. Ma préoccupation tient au fait qu'actuellement, nous sommes une démocratie mature. Beaucoup des pays représentés à la table sont des démocraties matures. Mon inquiétude concerne les démocraties naissantes qui tentent de s'élever, mais qui ne disposent pas de la structure, de la réglementation, de l'éducation et de l'efficience appropriées ni d'une presse libre ou avancée. Certains ont laissé entendre qu'il faudrait peut-être internationaliser cette autoréglementation, comme dans le cas d'autres produits. Même si certains pays pourraient ne pas avoir la capacité de réglementer efficacement certaines industries, les démocraties matures pourraient établir une norme mondiale.

Serait-ce quelque chose d'acceptable, par le truchement d'un mécanisme de l'OMC ou d'une autre institution internationale qui est peut-être mise à part? Une partie de la conversation porte sur le RGPD, mais ce règlement ne s'applique qu'à l'Europe. Il y a les règles américaines, les règles canadiennes, les règles sud-asiatiques... Si une seule institution gouvernait tout le monde, il n'y aurait pas de confusion, peu importe où les plateformes mèneraient leurs activités, car elles adhéreraient à une norme mondiale.

(1310)

M. Kevin Chan:

Vous avez raison. Nous pouvons faire harmoniser les normes à l'échelle mondiale; ce serait utile. Nous l'avons demandé à plusieurs égards, notamment en ce qui concerne la protection des renseignements personnels.

J'affirmerais qu'il s'agit en fait de l'un des défis clés. C'est un débat dynamique que nous tenons lorsque nous parlons du comité de surveillance. Dans le cadre des consultations que nous avons menées partout dans le monde, y compris au Canada, la grande question qui a été soulevée est la suivante: « Comment peut-on permettre à un comité mondial de prendre des décisions qui auront des conséquences locales? » Cette question a été posée, et je peux affirmer que nous avons tenu des conversations intéressantes avec l'Assemblée des Premières Nations. Manifestement, les Autochtones posent des questions uniques au sujet de la nature du bon cadre de gouvernance pour le contenu en ligne et de la façon dont nous allierons l'international au local.

Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous, monsieur. C'est une question très pertinente, à laquelle nous tentons de répondre.

M. Raj Saini:

Les représentants de Google veulent-ils s'exprimer?

M. Colin McKay:

C'est un défi que nous reconnaissons depuis les tout débuts de la mise en œuvre de l'apprentissage machine dans nos produits, et il s'agit de l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous avons établi il y a plus d'un an un ensemble très clair de principes relatifs à la façon dont nous utiliserons l'intelligence artificielle dans nos produits.

Nous soulignons certainement le fait qu'une conversation active doit avoir lieu entre l'industrie et les gouvernements de partout dans le monde. Dans le passé, l'élaboration, sous la direction de l'OCDE, d'une telle réglementation axée sur des principes relativement à la protection des données nous a été utile en ce qui a trait aux progrès en fonction de la région et aux taux de sophistication.

Je suis d'accord avec vous sur le fait que ce genre de collaboration mondiale fondée sur des principes, surtout de concert avec les entreprises qui devront mettre cette réglementation à exécution, entraînera un système réglementaire plus équitable qui sera applicable le plus généralement possible, ici même dans la salle ou à l'échelle mondiale.

M. Raj Saini:

Je vous remercie de cette réponse. Évidemment, vous allez tenir compte de l'effet local dans tout pays avec lequel vous travaillez, mais il existe certains principes fondamentaux sur lesquels je pense que l'on peut s'entendre à l'échelle mondiale.

Ma dernière question est un peu philosophique, mais aussi un peu pratique. Dans certains pays où vous menez vos activités, vous savez qu'il n'existe aucune norme ni aucune réglementation. La primauté du droit est absente, tout comme la liberté de presse, et la structure gouvernementale n'est pas très avancée. Le contenu pourrait être exploité d'une manière plus haineuse dans ces pays que dans d'autres régions du monde.

Les plateformes n'ont-elles aucun mandat moral de s'assurer que, lorsqu'elles vont dans ces pays, elles contribuent à élever la structure de gouvernance, afin que leurs activités à ces endroits soient menées d'une manière plus équitable?

M. Colin McKay:

Ma réponse à cette question comporte deux volets.

Tout d'abord, comme l'a mentionné mon collègue, M. Slater, nous travaillons très dur afin de nous assurer que les politiques et les lignes directrices relatives à tous nos produits s'appliquent à ces pays ainsi qu'aux pays que nous pourrions décrire comme développés ou stables.

Toutefois, c'est aussi pourquoi des gens comme moi travaillent pour l'entreprise. Nous œuvrons au sein d'équipes qui se concentrent sur l'IA et sur la protection des renseignements personnels et des données. Nous tenons ces discussions, dans le pays en tant que tel ou à l'occasion de réunions d'organisations internationales, afin que nous puissions échanger continuellement des renseignements au sujet de la façon dont nous voyons ces politiques et technologies évoluer à l'échelle internationale. Nous pouvons fournir une comparaison avec la façon dont ces pays voient cette évolution à l'intérieur de leur propre administration.

Il s'agit d'un échange honnête et franc, où nous reconnaissons que nous sommes à l'avant-plan d'une technologie qui a une incidence importante sur nos produits et qui présente un avantage considérable pour nos utilisateurs.

M. Raj Saini:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Saini.

Nous allons maintenant passer à nouveau aux représentants des pays, qui disposeront d'environ deux minutes chacun. Je vous prie d'être brefs. Nous allons entendre les représentants de l'Estonie, de l'Allemagne, du Mexique, de Singapour et de l'Irlande, puis nous allons conclure.

C'est au tour de l'Estonie. Vous avez la parole.

Mme Keit Pentus-Rosimannus:

Merci.

Il a été souligné que le phénomène de la désinformation devient de plus en plus complexe et qu'il est présent sur bon nombre de canaux et de plateformes, ce qui signifie que les différentes phases et les différentes étapes des campagnes de désinformation ont souvent lieu sur différents canaux.

Comment faire pour coopérer? Qu'est-ce que vous envisagez comme modèle pour la coopération entre les différentes plateformes afin de lutter contre la désinformation?

M. Derek Slater:

Nous effectuons nos propres évaluations des menaces pour prévoir et prévenir les nouvelles tendances, puis nous travaillons en collaboration avec l'industrie et, au besoin, avec les forces de l'ordre et d'autres intervenants afin de nous assurer que les renseignements et les indicateurs sont communiqués. Nous tenons absolument à prendre part à ce genre de processus.

M. Carlos Monje:

Je tiens simplement à dire que les entreprises collaborent sur ces problèmes et travaillent en étroite collaboration avec les gouvernements. Pendant la déclaration de M. Saini, je pensais au rôle du gouvernement et à quel point l'Estonie était avant-gardiste — bien qu'elle compose depuis longtemps avec la désinformation russe — au chapitre de ses efforts pour améliorer l'éducation sur les médias et de son travail avec les plateformes de façon à nous faciliter la tâche.

Tout le monde a un rôle à jouer, et les entreprises travaillent en collaboration pour lutter contre les menaces communes.

(1315)

M. Neil Potts:

Il faudrait se pencher sur le travail que nous effectuons dans le cadre du Forum mondial de lutte contre le terrorisme. Toutes nos entreprises participent à ce forum, au sein duquel nous avons des responsabilités partagées au chapitre de l'échange de renseignements, de la collaboration en matière de technologies et de soutien pour la recherche.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer au représentant de l'Allemagne.

Vous avez la parole.

M. Jens Zimmermann:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais poser quelques questions aux représentants de Twitter.

Au cours des récentes élections européennes, vous avez mis en place plusieurs mesures, lesquelles visaient particulièrement les fausses nouvelles concernant le processus électoral. Cela semblait être une bonne idée au départ, cependant, en Allemagne, les gazouillis de certains de nos représentants élus ont été bloqués alors qu'ils ne comportaient bien évidemment aucun renseignement erroné.

Bien entendu, le mécanisme de plainte de Twitter a été utilisé par des activistes de l'extrême droite afin de signaler, par exemple, des publications tout à fait légales mises en ligne par des membres du Parlement. Le problème, c'est la façon dont vous avez fait cela, et il a fallu un certain temps avant que tout ne rentre dans l'ordre.

Avez-vous fait un suivi à cet égard? Quelles leçons en avez-vous tirées, et comment cela va-t-il évoluer au cours des prochaines élections?

M. Carlos Monje:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

J'ai suivi tout cela depuis les États-Unis, à savoir les signalements pour désinformation que nous avons lancés dans l'Union européenne et en Inde. Je crois qu'il s'agit à la fois d'un défi et d'un avantage liés au fait d'être une plateforme mondiale: dès que vous vous retournez, il y a une nouvelle élection. Il y a les élections en Argentine qui s'en viennent, celles aux États-Unis en 2020 et celles au Canada, bien sûr, en octobre.

Nous avons appris que, lorsque vous créez une règle et mettez en place un système pour l'appliquer, les gens vont toujours tenter de le contourner. En Allemagne, la question était de savoir si on signait le bulletin de vote et comment on le faisait. Il s'agit de l'un des problèmes qui sont survenus. Nous allons en tirer des leçons et tenter de nous améliorer.

Ce que nous avons découvert — et M. Potts a mentionné le Forum mondial de lutte contre le terrorisme —, c'est que notre contribution à l'effort, ou plutôt ce que fait Twitter, c'est se pencher en premier sur les comportements, c'est-à-dire sur la façon dont les différents comptes interagissent entre eux, et non pas sur le contenu. De cette façon, nous n'avons pas à examiner les différents contextes qui rendent ces décisions plus compliquées.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons passer au représentant de Singapour pour deux minutes.

M. Edwin Tong:

Monsieur Potts, vous avez dit plus tôt, en réponse à la question de ma collègue, que vous n'étiez pas au courant que les vidéos avant ou après les attentats à la bombe au Sri Lanka avaient été signalées à Facebook avant les événements. Vous rappelez-vous avoir dit cela?

M. Neil Potts:

Oui, monsieur.

M. Edwin Tong:

C'était un massacre important et abominable, dont les vidéos ont circulé sur Facebook pendant un certain temps et, comme vous l'avez dit, il s'agit d'un discours haineux constituant clairement une violation de vos politiques. Vous savez sans doute que l'auteur présumé de l'attentat lui-même avait un compte Facebook. Je suis surpris que vous n'ayez pas vérifié cela, puisqu'il me semble que c'est quelque chose que Facebook aurait probablement voulu savoir.

On aurait voulu savoir pourquoi, compte tenu des vidéos qui ont circulé sur Facebook, c'est quelque chose qui avait échappé à Facebook, dans la mesure où cela vous avait échappé. Je suis surpris que vous ne sachiez toujours pas aujourd'hui si cela a été signalé à Facebook. Êtes-vous en mesure de confirmer cela?

M. Neil Potts:

Pour cette vidéo en particulier, monsieur, je serais heureux de vous revenir là-dessus après l'audience et de vous montrer la chronologie exacte des événements. Lorsqu'on nous a mis au courant de l'attaque perpétrée par cet individu, nous avons rapidement retiré...

M. Edwin Tong:

Je sais. Ce n'est pas ma question. Comment se fait-il qu'aujourd'hui, environ deux mois après les événements en question, vous ne savez toujours pas si, avant l'attaque, Facebook avait été mis au courant de l'existence des vidéos? J'aurais pensé que, si vous vouliez nous faire croire que les politiques que vous avez maintenant en place — l'intelligence artificielle et d'autres mécanismes pour l'avenir... Si j'étais à la place de Facebook, j'aurais voulu savoir pourquoi cela m'avait échappé. Je suis étonné que vous ne le sachiez toujours pas, même en date d'aujourd'hui.

M. Neil Potts:

C'est exact. Nous effectuons un processus officiel d'analyse après-action dans le cadre duquel nous nous penchons sur ces incidents afin de nous assurer que nos politiques...

(1320)

M. Edwin Tong:

Ce point n'a pas été soulevé.

M. Neil Potts:

J'aurais simplement besoin de vous revenir avec les renseignements. Je ne veux pas me prononcer à tort.

M. Edwin Tong:

Monsieur Potts, vous avez vous-même témoigné au Parlement du Royaume-Uni le mois dernier, et cette question a été soulevée au cours de l'audience. Est-ce exact?

M. Neil Potts:

Il me semble que l'attaque est survenue le dimanche de Pâques. Nous avons témoigné, il me semble, le mardi suivant. Nous n'en étions qu'aux premiers stades lorsque nous avons témoigné.

M. Edwin Tong:

D'accord, mais j'aimerais dire que je suis étonné que Facebook n'ait pas jugé bon de vérifier si quelque chose n'avait pas été oublié.

M. Kevin Chan:

Si je peux me permettre, monsieur, je tiens à vous assurer d'une chose...

M. Edwin Tong:

Si c'est pour répondre à ma question, alors je vous prie de formuler des explications, autrement...

M. Kevin Chan:

C'est par rapport à notre posture de sécurité, monsieur.

Le président:

Je suis désolé. Si ce n'est pas pour répondre directement à la question de M. Tong, nous ne disposons pas d'assez de temps.

Je m'excuse, monsieur Tong. Il ne reste plus de temps.

Nous devons passer à la représentante de l'Irlande pour deux minutes, puis nous allons conclure.

Je m'excuse, j'aurais aimé que nous ayons plus de temps, mais nous n'en avons pas.

Vous pouvez y aller.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'ai pas obtenu de réponse à ma première question, laquelle portait sur la position de Google par rapport au RGPD. Bon nombre des entreprises de médias sociaux ont leur siège social en Irlande. En effet, notre commissaire à la protection des données réglemente pour l'Europe, et Mark Zuckerberg de Facebook a demandé qu'une approche inspirée du RGPD soit adoptée partout dans le monde.

Quel est votre point de vue à ce sujet? Est-ce que cela peut fonctionner?

M. Colin McKay:

Nous estimons que le RGPD offre un cadre solide pour une conversation mondiale sur ce à quoi ressemblerait une protection étendue des renseignements personnels. La question est de savoir comment ce cadre peut s'adapter aux administrations locales et tenir compte du contexte politique et social de chacune de ces administrations.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Vous ne pouvez pas être certain que cela va fonctionner.

Êtes-vous d'accord avec M. Zuckerberg sur l'application du RGPD à l'échelle mondiale?

M. Colin McKay:

Nous avons déjà abordé en détail le besoin de travail accru au chapitre de la réglementation de la protection des renseignements personnels. C'était l'automne dernier. Cela se fonde en grande partie sur le travail lié à l'élaboration du RGPD.

Je fais preuve de prudence, parce que je sais qu'il y a bon nombre de différents types de réglementation sur la protection des renseignements personnels en place à l'heure actuelle.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Dans différents pays...

Pour ce qui est de l'Irlande, encore une fois, puisque c'est là où se trouve le siège social de bon nombre d'entreprises de médias sociaux... Votre siège social européen international est situé en Irlande. Nous travaillons sur des dispositions législatives concernant le commissaire à la sécurité numérique, ce qui signifie que l'Irlande légiférera sur la modération de contenu en ligne pour l'Europe et peut-être même pour d'autres administrations.

Voyez-vous les choses de la même façon? Très brièvement, quel est votre avis à ce sujet?

M. Derek Slater:

Comme nous l'avons dit dès le départ, il est essentiel que le gouvernement établisse des définitions claires sur ce qui est illégal, en plus d'avis clairs, pour que les plateformes agissent rapidement. Nous sommes ravis de voir ce genre de collaboration relativement au contenu illégal.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Pourriez-vous envisager de déployer cela au-delà de l'Europe compte tenu de la loi en Irlande?

M. Derek Slater:

Qu'il s'agisse de cette loi ou non, je crois qu'il y a de plus en plus consensus au sujet des principes de base en matière d'avis et de retrait de contenu illégal.

Mme Hildegarde Naughton:

Les représentants de Facebook souhaitent-ils intervenir à ce sujet?

M. Kevin Chan:

Je crois que ce que M. Slater a dit est absolument vrai. Nous voulons travailler en collaboration avec vous. Je crois comprendre, en fait, que notre équipe travaille de concert avec les autorités publiques irlandaises sur cette question.

Nous travaillons également en collaboration avec le gouvernement français et le président Macron sur ce que ce dernier appelle la réglementation intelligente. Nous serions heureux d'avoir l'occasion de nous entretenir avec vous et avec d'autres personnes en Irlande sur l'évolution de la situation. Je crois que cela mérite que l'on s'y attarde un peu plus.

M. Carlos Monje:

En plus de l'importance d'avoir une terminologie précise, j'estime que la question de la responsabilité est importante, au-delà de l'organisme de réglementation qui rend des comptes au Parlement et des personnes qui pourraient avoir des comptes à rendre à leurs électeurs.

J'aimerais également ajouter qu'il est important, surtout dans le cadre de ces questions sur la modération de contenu, que nous prenons extrêmement au sérieux, de reconnaître la façon dont ces outils peuvent être utilisés par les régimes autocratiques. J'écoutais ce qui a été dit hier au sujet de l'Allemagne avant le nazisme. Les outils qui ont été utilisés afin de protéger la démocratie ont ensuite été utilisés pour l'étouffer au bout du compte. Je crois qu'il s'agit de questions difficiles, et je suis heureuse que ce comité les prenne au sérieux.

Le président:

Merci, madame Naughton.

Nous tenons à vous remercier tous et toutes de vos témoignages aujourd'hui.

Nous avons des observations finales, et nous commençons avec M. Angus...

Je présente mes excuses à la représentante du Mexique. Vous avez levé la main et je vais donc vous accorder deux brèves minutes. Vous avez la parole.

L’hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[La déléguée s'exprime en espagnol. Traduction de l'interprétation.]

J'aimerais rapidement vous demander quelle est la marche à suivre pour une victime lorsque le contrôle fait défaut et qu'il y a violation [Difficultés techniques] et Google en particulier.

M. Derek Slater:

Si je vous comprends bien, vous avez posé une question par rapport au contenu sur YouTube qui viole les lignes directrices communautaires. Nous avons des systèmes de signalement dans le cadre desquels un utilisateur n'a qu'à cliquer pour nous informer d'un contenu qui viole nos lignes directrices. Cet avis est envoyé et mis en attente d'examen. Il est possible de faire cela juste sous la vidéo.

(1325)

L’hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[La déléguée s'exprime en espagnol. Traduction de l'interprétation.]

Qu'arrive-t-il lorsqu'on leur dit qu'il n'y a pas d'infraction aux politiques, mais qu'il y a une vidéo accessible à tous dans laquelle une personne est nue?

M. Derek Slater:

Selon le contexte, si le contenu enfreint nos lignes directrices, nous allons le retirer. Si nous ne le faisons pas, il y a des mécanismes d'appel en place, et ainsi de suite.

L’hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[La déléguée s'exprime en espagnol et l'interprétation en anglais de ses propos est traduite ainsi:]

Je connais des cas, de nombreux cas, où les gens ont suivi toutes les procédures en ligne, et la réponse a toujours été: « Cela ne va pas à l'encontre de nos politiques », et ce, sur les trois plateformes. Que peut faire la victime? Comment peut-elle faire appel à qui que ce soit?

Comme je vous l'ai dit, dans un cas particulier, lorsque les personnes concernées se sont rendues au bureau de Google au Mexique, on leur a dit d'aller au bureau de Google aux États-Unis. Par conséquent, que peut faire une victime lorsque les images qui lui portent préjudice sont toujours affichées? Elles sont en ligne.

M. Derek Slater:

Je ne connais pas les cas particuliers dont vous parlez, mais nous serions heureux d'y donner suite.

L’hon. Antares Guadalupe Vázquez Alatorre:

[La déléguée s'exprime en espagnol et l'interprétation en anglais est traduite ainsi:]

Dans tous les cas, que se passe-t-il ensuite?

M. Derek Slater:

En règle générale, si quelque chose portait atteinte à la vie privée d'une personne, était diffamatoire ou incitait à la violence, et ainsi de suite, que cela allait à l'encontre de nos lignes directrices, nous le supprimerions. Le cas que vous décrivez m'est inconnu, mais nous serions heureux de recevoir plus de renseignements et de les transmettre à nos équipes.

Le président:

Nous ferions mieux de poursuivre.

Nous allons passer à M. Angus pour quelques minutes, puis à M. Collins et moi-même.

Allez-y, monsieur Angus.

M. Charlie Angus:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais faire une confession. Je suis un utopiste du numérique en rémission. Je suis venu ici en tant que jeune socialiste démocratique et je me suis battu avec acharnement contre la réglementation. Pensez-y, parce que nous avons vu toutes ces entreprises en démarrage ainsi qu'un grand avenir pour le monde numérique. C'était en 2006. Maintenant, en 2019, j'ai ici des présidents conservateurs qui font pression en faveur d'une réglementation gouvernementale. C'est le monde dans lequel nous sommes tous.

C'est parce que nous parlons des droits démocratiques des citoyens, du rétablissement des droits des citoyens dans le domaine que vous contrôlez. Nous parlons du pouvoir qu'ont les plateformes de bouleverser nos systèmes démocratiques partout dans le monde, ce qui est sans précédent. Nous parlons du pouvoir qu'ont ces plateformes d'amener les gens à se radicaliser dans chacune de nos circonscriptions, ce qui a entraîné des massacres partout dans le monde. Ce sont là de graves problèmes. Nous commençons à peine à nous attaquer aux problèmes de l'IA et des technologies de reconnaissance faciale ainsi qu'à ce que cela signifiera pour nos concitoyens.

C'est ce que notre commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a appelé le droit des citoyens de vivre sans surveillance, ce qui touche au cœur même du modèle de gestion, en particulier celui de Facebook et de Google, et certains des meilleurs experts au monde ont dit hier et aujourd'hui que la première ligne de cette lutte pour les espaces publics et la vie privée des citoyens sera menée à Toronto avec le projet Google.

Monsieur McKay, nous vous avons déjà posé des questions sur Sidewalk Labs, mais vous avez dit que vous ne parliez pas au nom de l'organisation et que, d'une certaine manière, il s'agissait d'une entreprise différente.

Monsieur Slater, des experts nous ont dit qu'il s'agissait d'une menace pour les droits de nos citoyens. M. McNamee a dit qu'il ne laisserait pas Google approcher à moins de 100 milles de Toronto.

Pourquoi les citoyens de notre pays devraient-ils faire confiance à ce modèle de gestion pour décider de l'aménagement de certains des meilleurs terrains dans notre plus grande ville?

M. Derek Slater:

Je ne travaille pas non plus pour Sidewalk Labs. Vous avez raison. Nous voulons votre confiance, mais nous devons la mériter, en étant transparents, en élaborant des pratiques exemplaires avec vous et en étant responsables. Je pense que différents sites feront différents choix. C'est généralement le cas, mais je ne peux pas parler de cette entreprise en particulier, parce que je n'en fais pas partie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Angus.

Monsieur Collins, vous avez la parole.

M. Damian Collins:

Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais simplement revenir sur quelques points qui ont été abordés au cours de la séance.

Monsieur Potts, vous avez parlé brièvement des changements apportés à la politique de Facebook Live à la suite de l'attaque de Christchurch. Je crois comprendre qu'il s'agit d'une restriction pour les personnes qui ont diffusé les images les plus révélatrices sur Facebook Live, lesquelles verraient alors leurs comptes automatiquement suspendus. Est-ce exact?

M. Neil Potts:

C'est exact. Mais de plus, de façon plus générale, s'il y a violation des normes communautaires pour des types d'actions spécifiques, votre accès vous permettant d'utiliser le produit en direct sera suspendu pour une période de 30, 60 ou 90 jours.

(1330)

M. Damian Collins:

Vous ne pourriez pas utiliser le produit en direct.

M. Neil Potts:

C'est exact.

M. Damian Collins:

Le temps maximum de la suspension serait-il de 90 jours?

M. Neil Potts:

Je pense que pour les violations graves de nos normes communautaires, nous nous réservons également le droit de désactiver votre compte.

M. Damian Collins:

D'accord.

Qu'en est-il des personnes qui ont partagé du contenu grave qui a été diffusé sur Facebook Live? Ce ne sont pas elles qui l'ont diffusé, mais elles l'ont partagé à d'autres personnes sur la plateforme. Des mesures sont-elles prises contre elles?

M. Neil Potts:

Nous essayons d'examiner l'intention de la personne qui partage. Je pense que dans l'exemple de Christchurch, il y avait beaucoup de gens qui partageaient le contenu simplement pour des raisons de sensibilisation. Il y en avait certainement qui le partageaient à des fins malveillantes, pour bouleverser nos politiques ainsi que notre intelligence artificielle. Des mesures seraient prises contre eux. Si nous savions que vous partagiez — même des entreprises de médias partageaient la vidéo —, nous essayerions de voir le contexte et de comprendre l'intention derrière votre partage.

M. Damian Collins:

Est-ce que les personnes qui, selon vous, ont malicieusement partagé les images ont vu leurs comptes annulés?

M. Neil Potts:

Dans certains cas, les personnes ont vu leurs comptes désactivés. Dans d'autres cas, elles ont été sanctionnées.

M. Damian Collins:

Pourriez-vous nous écrire pour nous dire combien de comptes ont été désactivés à la suite de ces partages?

M. Neil Potts:

Je serais heureux de faire un suivi après l'audience.

M. Damian Collins:

De toute évidence, ces changements entraînent des mesures rétroactives à l'encontre de ceux qui sont responsables. Y a-t-il quelque chose que Facebook a fait pour empêcher un drame comme celui de Christchurch de se reproduire, en ce qui concerne la façon dont il est diffusé et partagé dans l'ensemble des systèmes?

M. Neil Potts:

Nous continuons d'investir dans l'IA.

Dans le cas de Christchurch, l'utilisation de la vidéo à la première personne de l'appareil GoPro est très difficile à reconnaître pour l'IA. Nous continuons d'investir pour essayer de nous améliorer et de fournir des données d'entraînement à l'apprentissage machine afin que nous puissions détecter et prévenir. Nous avons intégré de nouveaux protocoles permettant d'acheminer ces types de vidéos à des réviseurs humains en temps réel, mais il est important de noter que la vidéo n'a jamais été signalée pendant qu'elle était en direct.

M. Damian Collins:

D'accord. Je ne suis pas certain de bien comprendre, mais il y a encore deux ou trois questions.

Vous avez beaucoup parlé de la suppression des comptes non authentiques. Facebook, je crois, a dit que 3,3 milliards de comptes non authentiques avaient été supprimés au cours des six derniers mois. C'est beaucoup plus que le nombre d'utilisateurs actifs de l'entreprise. À la lumière de ces données, à quel point pouvez-vous être certain qu'il n'y a qu'environ 5 % des comptes qui ne sont pas authentiques?

M. Neil Potts:

Nous avons des équipes scientifiques qui étudient la question de près, alors je m'en remets à leur expertise et à leur analyse à ce sujet.

M. Damian Collins:

Monika Bickert a dit que les comptes non authentiques sont beaucoup plus susceptibles de partager de la désinformation; par conséquent, sur ces 3,3 milliards de comptes, combien d'entre eux partagent activement de la désinformation?

M. Neil Potts:

Je n'ai pas ce chiffre. Je crois qu'elle a dit qu'ils sont plus susceptibles... C'est une combinaison de comportements abusifs, donc non seulement de la désinformation, mais également des propos haineux. Votre point est pris en compte, et je peux y donner suite.

M. Damian Collins:

Facebook serait-elle en mesure d'écrire au Comité pour lui donner une réponse à cette question?

M. Kevin Chan:

Eh bien, monsieur, je devrais clarifier les choses. Je pense que c'est le cas, si vous examinez le rapport sur la transparence...

M. Damian Collins:

Je suis désolé, monsieur, nous manquons de temps.

Je veux juste dire que, si vous n'avez pas la réponse à cette question maintenant...

M. Kevin Chan:

Nous avons la réponse, monsieur.

M. Damian Collins:

... l'entreprise peut nous l'envoyer par écrit.

M. Kevin Chan:

La grande majorité des comptes sont en fait désactivés avant même qu'un humain puisse interagir avec eux.

M. Damian Collins:

D'accord.

Facebook pourrait-elle s'engager à écrire au Comité pour dire...

M. Neil Potts:

Nous le ferons.

M. Damian Collins:

... combien de ces comptes qui ont été supprimés, ces 3,3 milliards, partageaient de la désinformation? L'entreprise dit que ces comptes sont plus susceptibles de partager de la désinformation que d'autres types de comptes?

M. Neil Potts:

Si nous avons [Inaudible].

M. Damian Collins:

Enfin, à la suite du scandale de Cambridge Analytica l'an dernier, Facebook a annoncé qu'il y aurait une nouvelle fonctionnalité permettant aux utilisateurs d'effacer l'historique de leur navigateur. Je crois savoir que Facebook a annoncé que ce serait lancé plus tard cette année. Cela semble être une longue période. S'il s'agissait du lancement d'un produit qui rapporte de l'argent à Facebook, on pourrait croire que cela se serait fait plus rapidement. On ne dirait pas que vous vous précipitez et que vous remuez terre et mer; on dirait plutôt que vous prenez votre temps.

Facebook est-elle capable d'arrêter une date à laquelle la fonction permettant d'effacer l'historique du navigateur sera activée?

M. Kevin Chan:

Monsieur, je crois avoir parlé de cette nouvelle fonction à quelques reprises avec divers membres du Comité. Il serait probablement inopportun pour moi d'arrêter une date, évidemment, à ce moment-ci. Je ne veux pas aller plus vite que mes skis, mais je pourrais simplement dire que, même avec les mesures de transparence que nous mettons en place au Canada, nous travaillons sans relâche pour bien faire les choses. Nous allons essayer de déployer cet autre produit à l'échelle mondiale. Cela va prendre...

M. Damian Collins:

Je dirais simplement que ce genre de fonctions est assez répandu sur le Web. Je pense que le fait que cela fait maintenant plus d'un an qu'elle a été annoncée et que vous ne pouvez même pas donner une date cette année pour son entrée en vigueur est vraiment déplorable.

M. Kevin Chan:

Je comprends.

Le président:

Je tiens à remercier tout le monde de son témoignage aujourd'hui.

Je félicite M. Chan pour certains des changements qu'il a annoncés. Nous avons entendu ces promesses à maintes reprises, alors je suppose que nous attendrons de voir ce que nous obtiendrons au bout du compte.

Cela nous ramène à ce que nous demandions au départ. En toute bonne foi, nous avons demandé à votre PDG et à votre directrice des opérations de comparaître devant nous aujourd'hui pour que nous travaillions ensemble à trouver une solution à ces problèmes que tout un tas de pays et de gens dans le monde considère comme des problèmes communs. À mon avis, il est honteux qu'ils ne soient pas ici aujourd'hui pour répondre à ces questions précises auxquelles vous n'avez pas pu répondre pleinement.

C'est ce qui est troublant. Nous essayons de travailler avec vous, et vous dites que vous essayez de travailler avec nous. Nous venons d'avoir un message aujourd'hui qui m'a été transmis par mon vice-président. Il indique que « Facebook témoignera devant le Grand comité international ce matin. Neil Potts et Kevin Chan témoigneront. Aucun d'eux ne figure au tableau des 35 plus hauts fonctionnaires de l'équipe des politiques. »

On nous a ensuite dit que vous ne figurez même pas parmi les 100 plus importants. Je ne veux pas vous offenser personnellement; vous assumez la responsabilité pour l'équipe de Facebook, alors je vous suis reconnaissant de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. Cependant, la dernière chose que j'ai à dire au Comité, c'est qu'il est honteux que Mark Zuckerberg et Sheryl Sandberg ne soient pas venus aujourd'hui.

Cela dit, nous tiendrons une rencontre avec les médias immédiatement après la réunion pour répondre aux questions. Nous allons signer la déclaration d'Ottawa juste ici, de sorte qu'un membre de chaque délégation siégera à titre de représentant.

Par la suite, tous les parlementaires en visite de partout dans le monde sont invités à assister à notre période de questions d'aujourd'hui. Je vais vous orienter vers ma chef de cabinet, Cindy Bourbonnais. Elle vous aidera à obtenir les laissez-passer dont vous avez besoin pour siéger à la Chambre si vous souhaitez venir à la période de questions aujourd'hui.

Merci encore d'être venus en tant que témoins. Nous passerons directement à la déclaration d'Ottawa.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee ethi foss hansard 63340 words - whole entry and permanent link. Posted at 22:44 on May 28, 2019

2019-05-13 SECU 162

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1525)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

I'll bring this meeting to order.

Welcome to the 162nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.

We have the Honourable David McGuinty and Rennie Marcoux. Thank you to both of you for coming and presenting the annual report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, which has the unfortunate name of NSICOP. I'm sure Mr. McGuinty will explain in his own inimitable style what NSICOP actually does.

Welcome, Mr. McGuinty, to the committee. We look forward to your comments.

Hon. David McGuinty (Chair, National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, colleagues. Thank you for your invitation to appear before your committee. I am joined by Rennie Marcoux, executive director of the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, or NSICOP.

It's a privilege to be here with you today to discuss the 2018 annual report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians.

The committee's first annual report is the result of the work, the dedication and the commitment from my colleagues on the committee. It is intended to contribute to an informed debate among Canadians on the difficult challenges of providing security and intelligence organizations with the exceptional powers necessary to identify and counter threats to the nation while at the same time ensuring that their activities continue to respect and preserve our democratic rights. [Translation]

NSICOP has the mandate to review the overall framework for national security and intelligence in Canada, including legislation, regulations, policy, administration and finances.

It may also examine any activity that is carried out by a department that relates to national security or intelligence.

Finally, it may review any matter relating to national security or intelligence that a minister refers to the committee.[English]

Members of the committee are all cleared to a top secret level, swear an oath and are permanently bound to secrecy. Members also agree that the nature of the committee, multi-party, drawn from the House of Commons and the Senate, with a broad range of experience, bring a unique perspective to these important issues.

In order to conduct our work, we are entitled to have access to any information that is related to our mandate, but there are some exceptions, namely, cabinet confidences, the identity of confidential sources or protected witnesses, and ongoing law enforcement investigations that may lead to prosecutions.

The year 2018 was a year of learning for the committee. We spent many hours and meetings building our understanding of our mandate and of the organizations responsible for protecting Canada and Canadians. The committee was briefed by officials from across the security and intelligence community and visited all seven of the main departments and agencies. Numerous meetings were also held with the national security and intelligence adviser to the Prime Minister. NSICOP also decided to conduct a review of certain security allegations surrounding the Prime Minister's trip to India in February 2018.

Over the course of the calendar year, the committee met 54 times, with an average of four hours per meeting. Annex E of the report outlines the committee's extensive outreach and engagement activities with government officials, academics and civil liberties groups.

The annual report is a result of extensive oral and written briefings, more than 8,000 pages of printed materials, dozens of meetings between NSICOP analysts and government officials, in-depth research and analysis, and thoughtful and detailed deliberations among committee members.

The report is also unanimous. In total, the report makes 11 findings and seven recommendations to the government. The committee has been scrupulously careful to take a non-partisan approach to these issues. We hope that our findings and recommendations will strengthen the accountability and effectiveness of Canada's security and intelligence community.

(1530)

[Translation]

The report before you contains five chapters, including the two substantive reviews conducted by the committee.

The first chapter explains the origins of NSICOP, its mandate and how it approaches its work, including what factors the committee takes into consideration when deciding what to review.

The second chapter provides an overview of the security and intelligence organizations in Canada, of the threats to Canada's security and how these organizations work together to keep Canada and Canadian safe and to promote Canadian interests.

Those two chapters are followed by the committee's two substantive reviews for 2018.[English]

In chapter 3, the committee reviewed the way the government determines its intelligence priorities. Why is this important? There are three reasons.

First, this process is the fundamental means of providing direction to Canada's intelligence collectors and assessors, ensuring they focus on the government's, and the country's, highest priorities.

Second, this process is essential to ensure accountability in the intelligence community. What the intelligence community does is highly classified. This process gives the government regular insight into intelligence operations from a government-wide lens.

Third, this process helps the government to manage risk. When the government approves the intelligence priorities, it is accepting the risks of focusing on some targets and also the risk of not focusing on others. [Translation]

The committee found that the process, from identifying priorities to translating them into practical guidance, to informing ministers and seeking their approval, does have a solid foundation. That said, any process can be improved.

In particular, the committee recommends that the Prime Minister's national security and intelligence advisor should take a stronger leadership role in the process in order to make sure that cabinet has the best information to make important decisions on where Canada should focus its intelligence activities and its resources.[English]

Moving on, chapter 4 reviews the intelligence activities of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. The government's defence policy, “Strong, Secure, Engaged”, states that DND/CAF is “the only entity within the Government of Canada that employs the full spectrum of intelligence collection capabilities while providing multi-source analysis.”

We recognize that defence intelligence activities are critical to the safety of troops and the success of Canadian military activities, including those abroad, and they are expected to grow. When the government decides to deploy the Canadian Armed Forces, DND/CAF also has implicit authority to conduct defence intelligence activities. In both cases, the source of authority is what is known as the Crown prerogative. This is very different from how other intelligence organizations, notably CSE and CSIS, operate. Each of those organizations has clear statutory authority to conduct intelligence activities, and they are subject to regular, independent and external review.

This was a significant and complex review for the committee, with four findings and three recommendations.

Our first recommendation focuses on areas where DND/CAF could make changes to strengthen its existing internal governance structure over its intelligence activities and to strengthen the accountability of the minister.

The other two recommendations would require the government to amend or to consider enacting legislation. The committee has set out the reasons why it formed the view that regular independent review of DND/CAF intelligence activities will strengthen accountability over its operations.

We believe there is an opportunity for the government, with Bill C-59 still before the Senate, to put in place requirements for annual reporting on DND/CAF's national security or intelligence activities, as would be required for CSIS and CSE.

Second, the committee also believes that its review substantiates the need for the government to give very serious consideration to providing explicit legislative authority for the conduct of defence intelligence activities. Defence intelligence is critical to the operations of the Canadian Armed Forces and, like all intelligence activities, involves inherent risks.

DND/CAF officials expressed concerns to the committee about maintaining operational flexibility for the conduct of defence intelligence activities in support of military operations. The committee, therefore, thought it was important to present both the risks and the benefits of placing defence intelligence on a clear statutory footing.

Our recommendations are a reflection of the committee's analysis of these important issues.

(1535)

[Translation]

We would be pleased to take your questions.[English]

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. McGuinty.

Mr. Picard, you have seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you.

Welcome to our witnesses.

This my first experience with this committee, and I am very enthusiastic about it.

My first question is very basic, Mr. McGuinty, just to get the discussion rolling.

The NSICOP is a new organization and there is currently a learning curve associated with it. It is an addition to our current structures.

To help us better understand what our intelligence organizations do, can you explain how this organization, the NSICOP, adds value to what was done in the past, before it was established?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thank you for the question.

I would start by saying that the added value comes first from the fact that members of NSICOP have access to all classified information, to all documents, to presentations and to witnesses. Having access to the most in-depth information helps a great deal.

Then I believe that, this year, NSICOP has shown that it is very possible for parliamentarians of all parties, from both Houses of the Parliament of Canada, to work together in a non-partisan way. That is being done against a currently very partisan backdrop, I feel.

My colleagues and I decided from the outset that we would check the partisan approach at the door because of the importance of the work. Matters of national security are simply too important for us to be part of the normal daily tensions on the political stage.

The year was not easy because, in a sense, we had to learn how to get the plane off the ground. We formed a secretariat, we hired about a dozen full-time people and we have a budget of $3.5 million per year.

We are proud of what we have done to get NSICOP started in its first year.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

So I am now going to ask you a more technical question. I would like to go back to your comment about military intelligence.

You made a comparison between the intelligence services, the agencies working in intelligence, such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, or CSIS, and the Security Communications Establishment, or CSE, on the one hand and, on the other hand, the other agencies engaged in intelligence activities.

When you talk about military intelligence, you say that the Department of National Defence encompasses the entire range of intelligence services. Are the services similar to the extent that we can consider them equal?

How are military intelligence activities broader in scope than those in the other agencies?

What comparisons can the government use to evaluate the issue of military intelligence? For example, can it rely on best practices in other countries in order to properly evaluate the needs in terms of military intelligence?

Hon. David McGuinty:

First of all, we cannot forget that the legislative basis for the Department of National Defence always remains the prerogative of the Crown.

(1540)

[English]

What we know about the Crown prerogative is that it's several centuries old. It's a very old vestigial power vested in the Crown that allows countries to, for example, deploy troops, prosecute wars and conduct foreign policy.

The powers vested today in CSIS and CSE, for example, also sprang forth from the original concept of the Crown prerogative, but as a result of evolving, both of those organizations now have four corners of a statute within which to operate. They have their own law. They have their own enabling legislation, and by its own admission, in the government's defence paper, the Department of National Defence indicates that it's the only full spectrum organization in the country. In other words, it does what CSIS, CSE and the RCMP do combined.

It also plans on expanding the number of intelligence personnel by 300 over the next several years. It is a major actor in the intelligence sphere.

We took a long hard look at the statutory footing on which it's operating and began to ask some difficult probative questions. The report tries to walk a fine line between the merits of the government considering a statutory footing, new legislation, and some of the inherent risks that the department has brought to our attention. We've been very careful in the report to put it in very plain black and white for people to understand. In so doing, we wanted to simply raise the profile of this issue and ignite a debate, not only amongst parliamentarians but in Canadian society.

Mr. Michel Picard:

For the remaining time, my last question will be on one of your findings. On page 54 it states: F7. Performance measurements for the security and intelligence community is not robust enough to give Cabinet the context it needs to understand the efficiency and effectiveness of the security and Intelligence community.

Do we have any example of prejudice caused by the lack of effectiveness? Would you expand on this finding please?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux (Executive Director, Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians):

I'll answer the question.

What we've indicated in the report is that we did not have access to the actual cabinet documents, since it's a limit in our legislation. What we saw were all the discussions, the briefing materials and the minutes of meetings leading up to that. I think it's in the overall process, from start to finish, where we identify the result, that cabinet did not get enough in terms of answering these questions: What are the risks? What are the benefits? Where are the gaps in collection? Where are the gaps in assessment? Could we contribute more to the alliance?

It was the whole gamut of information, in terms of measuring the committee's performance, that we felt could be better.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

We'll hear from Mr. Paul-Hus for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. McGuinty and Ms. Marcoux.

On page 26 of your report, paragraph 66, you talk about espionage and foreign influence.

Do you consider election campaigns, such as for the election coming up, to be a national security issue?

Hon. David McGuinty:

NSICOP has not yet looked deeply into the whole matter of the integrity of elections, specifically the one coming up.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Do you feel that foreign interference in elections is a matter of national security? In paragraphs 66 and 67, you say that Russia and China are two countries known to be major players in political interference. You also talk about activities designed to influence political parties as well.

It is mentioned in your report. It is a known fact.

Is NSICOP currently in a position to take measures to help stop the Chinese Communist Party trying to interfere in the coming election campaign?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Let me be clear on two things.

We included Russia and China in the report because we relied on open sources. So that is what was repeated there.

Then, we announced that one of the reviews that we will be doing in 2019 is about foreign interference. Eventually, we will have much more to say about it.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

So clearly, we will not have the information before the next campaign. Is that right?

(1545)

Hon. David McGuinty:

Probably not.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

When you undertook the study on the trip the Prime Minister took to India, it was likely because a matter of national security would normally be involved. Is that correct?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Minister Goodale appeared before this committee during the hearings on Bill C-59, I believe. At that time, he told us that he could not answer certain questions because it was a matter of national security. After that, in the House of Commons, Minister Goodale said the opposite. Daniel Jean also testified before our committee that it was not a matter of national security.

In your opinion, is it a matter of national security?

Hon. David McGuinty:

In the report, we included a letter to the Prime Minister in which we clearly deal with it.

We told him that, as per our terms of reference, we had examined the allegations of foreign interference, of risks to the Prime Minister’s security, and of inappropriate use of intelligence.

The report deals with those three matters specifically. The Department of Justice clearly redacted the report and revised it.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Your report on the trip to India mentions that the Prime Minister’s Office did not screen the visitors well and that an error in judgment was probably made.

Has the Prime Minister or a member of his staff responded to your recommendations?

Hon. David McGuinty:

No, not yet. We are still waiting for a response from the government to both reports.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

So you submit your reports but there has been no follow-up or reply on the recommendations. Is that right?

Hon. David McGuinty:

NSICOP hopes that there will be some follow-up. We are still waiting for a response. We have raised the matter with the appropriate authorities.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

We certainly see that, basically, colleagues from all parties who work with you on the NSICOP have done so seriously since it was created. That is also clear as we read your report. There is a desire to take the work very seriously.

However, we still have doubts about what will come of your reports. Right from when you submit a report in which you identified serious matters, the Prime Minister basically always has the last word.

The concern we have had since the beginning, when Bill C-22 was introduced, is about the way information is transmitted. Of course, we understand that highly secret information cannot be made public.

However, when the Prime Minister himself is the subject of a study, we don’t expect a response.

As chair of the committee, do you expect at the very least a reply to your studies from the government and the Prime Minister?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Your notes mention Bill C-59. You make recommendations involving the Department of National Defence, DND. I know that the bill is being studied in the Senate at the moment, but I no longer recall which stage it has reached. Do you think that amendments will be proposed by the Senate or the government? Have you heard anything about that?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Our role is to submit reports to the government, and we have done that. All we can do is hope that the government will take them seriously[English]

The national security and intelligence review agency, NSIRA, once it's created under Bill C-59, will have the power to review the Department of National Defence but will not be obligated to do so on an annual basis like it will for CSIS and CSE. The committee was unanimous in calling for NSIRA to have that annual responsibility built into Bill C-59 so that the extensive activities of the Department of National Defence in intelligence were reviewed on an ongoing basis. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

You explained that NSICOP has had a number of working sessions and that they are several hours long. What is the main subject that concerns you?

Hon. David McGuinty:

What do you mean?

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

For example, when you have an investigation to conduct and you need information, do you have easy access to it?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

The doors of all departments are open?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Sometimes, we ask for so much documentation that the members of NSICOP find it quite difficult to manage the amount. But we have an exceptional secretariat and very experienced analysts. However, from time to time, we have to put a little pressure on some departments or some agencies. But you have to remember that our committee has only been in existence for 17 or 18 months.

Do you want to add anything, Ms. Marcoux?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

Yes.

What we notice most is the difference between agencies that are already subject to examination and that are used to providing classified information—such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, CSIS, the Communications Security Establishment, CSE, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the RCMP—and other departments that are not used to it.

Those other organizations, such as the Department of National Defence or other departments, first of all have to establish a triage process for the documents and make sure that their directorates or divisions accept that a committee like ours has an almost absolute right of access to classified information, including information protected by solicitor-client privilege. It really is a learning process.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Marcoux.

Mr. Paul-Hus and Mr. Dubé, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My thanks to the witnesses for joining us today.

First of all, I want to thank you and all the members of the NSICOP for the work that you have done up to now. Given that this is the first experience for us all, please know that, if we are asking more technical questions on the procedure, it is in order to reach certain conclusions, it is not that we are criticizing your work, quite the contrary.

I would like to know more about the follow-up to your recommendations. As an example, when the Auditor General submits a report, the Standing Committee on Public Accounts generally makes it a point to hear from representatives of the various departments.

In your case, it is a little more complicated for two reasons. First of all, the information needed for the follow-up may well be classified. Then, you are not completely able to engage in the political jousting that is sometimes necessary to achieve good accountability.

Would it be appropriate for a committee, like ours, for example, to be given the responsibility of conducting the follow-up with some of the organizations mentioned in your recommendations?

Hon. David McGuinty:

That is a question that the members of the committee have discussed at length: how can we push a little harder and require the recommendations to be implemented?

We are considering several possibilities. We have learned, for example, that the CSE carries over recommendations that have not yet been implemented from one report to the next. That is a possibility we are looking at, but we are in contact with the people involved every day.

To go back to Mr. Paul-Hus’ question, the Department of National Defence has never yet been examined by an external committee of parliamentarians like the NSICOP, which has the authority to require all that information.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Since we have had DND in our sights, they, for the first time in their history, have established a group of employees with the sole responsibility of processing all the information requested. That alone is progress.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

Please forgive me if I move things along. I have a limited amount of time.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I understand.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I would like to focus on one other point. I am going back to the question that was asked about foreign interference.

Your study was supposed to be submitted, or at least completed, before May 3, if I am not mistaken. Did I understand correctly that it is possible that the report will not be tabled in the House before Parliament adjourns for the summer?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We are working as fast as we can and spending a lot of time on that task in order to try to finish the report. However, it deals with four topics.

The problem is that the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians Act stipulates that the government must table its reports, once the process of redaction, or revision, is complete, within 30 days.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I do not want to add to your workload and I understand that you are making every possible effort.

Is the committee satisfied with the length of time between your report arriving at the Prime Minister’s Office and it being laid before the House?

Hon. David McGuinty:

That is an excellent question. In fact, we are thinking of studying those timeframes as part of the review of the act, which has to be done five years after its coming into force. You have put your finger on a good question.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I am not doubting your good faith, but it is important for us to ask these kinds of questions in order to do our work, especially as the elections draw nearer.

In paragraph 49 of your report, you talk about the national intelligence expenditure report. You quote statistics from Australia, but the figures for Canada are redacted. Why did the Australians decide that it was appropriate to make those figures public to the extent that even we in our country are aware of them, but Canada did not? Are you able to answer that?

(1555)

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

We asked the government the same question when we learned that this information was going to be redacted.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Have you received a response that you're able to send us?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

The government told us that this was classified data and that it did not want to disclose these details.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

This is interesting, especially considering that Australia is a member of the Five Eyes.

I have another question on redacting, particularly with regard to the summary, which must remain consistent with the rest of the document. Does the NSICOP determine how the summary is written?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

The summary is written by the staff of our secretariat. In this case, after reviewing the sentences or sentence sections and the paragraphs that had been redacted, we decided to reformulate sentences to make them complete and therefore produce a complete summary.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Was your decision to use asterisks draw from the British model?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes, exactly.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Right, thank you.

I have another question on National Defence and the recommendation to amend Bill C-59 as well as on the definition of the mandate that would be given to the new committee.

Is your committee concerned about the resources that this new sister committee would have to do this monitoring? The resources are already rather limited. If the mandate is expanded, are you concerned about whether the new committee will be able to carry it out each year? I would like it to be and I agree with the recommendation, but the question is whether it will be able to do so adequately given current or planned resources.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

We aren't aware of the resources and budget available to the new committee. I know that this budget will be much larger than the one allocated to my secretariat because the mandate of the new committee is much broader, but we are not aware of the precise figures. That being said, we agree that resources will have to be allocated according to the mandate.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I have one last question, which may be obvious, but which I would like to ask in the 15 seconds I have left.

When you list the criteria—sufficient, but not necessary, or still necessary, but insufficient—according to which you have decided to initiate an investigation or study, can it be said that it is in fact only a guide to inform the public, since you do not necessarily limit yourself to these criteria as appropriate?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Absolutely.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Spengemann and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, thank you very much.

Mr. McGuinty and Madam Marcoux, thank you very much for being with us. Congratulations on tabling the report.

Mr. McGuinty, in addition to chairing the NSICOP, which is a committee of parliamentarians and not a parliamentary committee, you also chair the Canadian Group of the Inter-Parliamentary Union, or IPU, which is the umbrella organization for the world's parliaments founded in 1889.

This puts you in a very unique position to comment on the role of parliamentarians on two fundamental policy objectives that are very live around the globe today. One is the fight against terrorism and also violent extremism in all of its forms. The other is the fight for diversity and inclusion, the fight for gender equality, the fight against racism and the fight for LGBTI rights.

I'm wondering if I could invite you to comment on your perspectives, your reflections on the role of parliamentarians on these two issues, drawing on the two roles that you currently hold.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thank you for the question.

One of the things we've been hearing as a new committee as we interface with our colleagues in Australia, the United States, Britain, New Zealand, the Five Eyes and beyond, is that parliaments worldwide are struggling with this tension between the granting of exceptional powers for security purposes and the ways in which those powers are exercised with the protection of fundamental rights to privacy, freedom, and charter rights in the Canadian context, for example.

We're not alone on this journey. Many countries have reached out to NSICOP already. Ms. Marcoux was in Europe speaking to a number of countries that are fascinated by our approach. We've been invited to countries, like Colombia, and elsewhere to help them build capacity in this regard.

I think it's not necessarily only a Canadian challenge; it's obviously a global one, with the rise of violent extremism and terrorist activity.

However, we have to make sure that we get this balance right. That's what the government's intention was when NSICOP was created, and it is certainly the informing ethic among all the members of all parties who sit on the committee now.

(1600)

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

If you were to put your finger on the one most important aspect of parliamentary dialogue in an unencumbered setting like the IPU where there is no ministerial direction—the reconciliation between these two policy objectives—what would that role be for parliamentarians such as ourselves here on the committee?

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think the secret sauce in the work that we're doing is non-partisanship. If we learned how to work together in a more non-partisan fashion in many critical areas that we're facing as a country and as a planet—security being one, climate change being another—we might do better by our respective populations, the people we represent. I think that is integral to being able to treat issues like national security in that balance between security and rights.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Thank you very much.

I'll hand it over to my colleague.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. McGuinty, I'd like to put it on the record that without your mentorship when I was a staffer many years ago, I probably wouldn't be at this table today. Thank you for that.

I am happy to see your considerable skills and experience being put to use in this important work, which is very far from the public eye.

Chapter 2 makes frequent reference to Canadians not appreciating the extent of our intelligence services or understanding the various roles.

What is the most important thing you want Canadians to understand that they they don't understand today?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thanks for pointing that out, Mr. Graham.

We were struck early on in our steep learning curve about how little Canadians knew about the security and intelligence community in the country: who were the actors, what were their powers, how did they co-operate, how did they not co-operate, how could things be improved, and what are the threats facing the country.

We saw some astonishing polling results about the lack of information in Canadian society. Despite the fact that we have good agencies and departments putting out good information, Canadians are not ferreting out that information, not understanding it and not collating it.

We decided, on a foundational go-forward basis, to provide some 30 to 32 pages at the front end in this chapter to give Canadians a bit of a survey, a security and intelligence 101 course in plain English.

One of my favourite tests that I apply all the time in the committee is, if you can't stop anybody coming off of a Canadian bus or train or commuter vehicle and put this report in front of them and have them understand it, you've failed. We've tried to write and deliver information here for Canadians to understand what's going on in the country in a way that they can get it.

Canadians do get this; they get it perfectly well. It's just that I think we haven't necessarily taken the time to put it in a format and a way that they can understand and digest it. That's the purpose of those 32 or 34-odd pages, to paint a picture and a mosaic of what is going on, and at the same time to show Canadians that historically, security and intelligence has been an almost organic process.

I mentioned earlier that CSIS was spun off from the RCMP—after the RCMP was involved in some shenanigans going way back—from the Macdonald commission. It was given its own statutory footing, and CSE was given its statutory footing. Things evolved, and we think that this is an organic process in the security and intelligence field. We've tried to capture that as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I have quite a lot of questions, but I probably won't have time to get through most of them.

Do we have an appropriate number of intelligence agencies? Are there too many, too few?

Before you answer that, table 1 on page 20 lists 17 organizations, and I think there might be one missing. From our work at procedure and House affairs, we've learned that the Parliamentary Protective Service has its own intelligence unit.

Would that fall under your mandate? As a parliamentarian or as a government committee, how would you see that?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Any federal actor involved in national security and intelligence falls under the mandate of NSICOP. We did not turn our minds to the sufficiency or insufficiency or perhaps over-sufficiency of the number of actors in the field so I can't comment on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much. I still have a few seconds.

The Chair:

Yes, you do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned plain English as an important point.

There's a whole page, page 94, describing the arguments by DND against legislative supervision. Could you boil that down into plain English for us on how that debate went?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Manoeuvrability, operational manoeuvrability. We wanted to capture in the report verbatim the submission made by DND for that very reason. We wanted Canadians to juxtapose what we think are the merits of proceeding or considering to proceed this way with a legislative basis and some of the challenges coming forth from our front-line practitioners in the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces, so we reflected that very accurately. In a sense we wanted to give Canadians a shot at the state of the debate in this area.

(1605)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Motz, for five minutes, please.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Mr. McGuinty and Ms. Marcoux, for being here today.

Before I begin with my questions, I just want to commend you and thank you for your dedication of this report to our colleague Gord Brown who passed away just about a year ago. I know his family is really appreciative of that gesture, so thank you very much.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thank you, sir.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I also appreciate the comments you made about the necessity to have national security issues remain non-partisan. These issues need to be non-partisan. I couldn't agree with you more and there are a lot of lessons to be learned.

Unfortunately, the 2018 terrorism report produced by the Minister of Public Safety appears to have now become mired in some partisan politics.

Would that report have come to NSICOP before it was published?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Do you want to take a shot at that?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

Are you referring to the 2017 or the 2018 report?

Mr. Glen Motz:

The 2018 terrorist threat.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

We were given a copy of the final report, I think, a day or two in advance of its publication, as a courtesy.

Mr. Glen Motz:

You were not involved in reviewing it.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

No.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Mr. McGuinty, does your committee intend then to evaluate the development or publication or revision of this report to determine if there was any political interference in its various iterations, in what best practices should be moving forward, or does that not fall within your mandate?

Hon. David McGuinty:

It might, but it's not something I'm in a position to comment on now. We have a full spectrum of four reviews for 2019 and we generally only pronounce on what we're working on once we announce what we're working on.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, fair enough.

In the original terrorism threat report, the Minister of Public Safety named Khalistan extremism as a threat. The minister has since reworded that, but the evidence remains very dated in the report.

The only explanation that I can think of is either that the new information can't be published or that it was a political issue, not a security one. If it's the latter, if it was political and not security, then it's a significant breach of trust, in my opinion, to use terrorism threats for a political purpose.

Where should these questions be investigated? Is this committee the right one? Is your committee the right one? How do we get to the bottom of that issue, sir?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We haven't turned our minds to this question at all. We're not in a position at all to comment on the government's decision one way or the other. I think that's a question better put to the government itself and the minister.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Are your members of the committee prevented from speaking out on any errors in reports like this?

Hon. David McGuinty:

As a general rule, the membership has agreed from the very beginning that we are extremely circumspect in any public comments, and generally we only comment on the merits of the work that we've done in the form of reports.

Mr. Glen Motz:

The work you've done....

Hon. David McGuinty:

The work our committee has done. That's correct.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. So—

Hon. David McGuinty:

And those reports, of course, are unanimous.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, very good.

I just want to ask a more general question about the committee and how you operate now.

During study of Bill C-22, which is the legislation that created your committee, former CSIS director and national security adviser Richard Fadden said that the committee should go slow and see how the committee does.

Now that you have 16 to 18 months of operations under your belt, do you think there are aspects that the committee should consider changing in its operations, in its role or its access? I know you and Mr. Dubé just talked about the timeliness of its release once you give it to the PMO. Is there anything else you can think of? Would those changes be legislative or internal? There must be touchpoints now, some things you need to work on.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes, one of the areas we're learning a lot about is this question of redaction and the redaction process. We have turned our minds to this, and we reserve the right, so to speak, to say more about it in due course. We're comparing and contrasting with other redaction processes—Australia was raised, and there's the United States and other countries—to see what their practices are. We also think the redaction process may be capable of evolving. However, we always tend, as best as we can, towards providing more information, rather than less, to the Canadian public.

Mr. Glen Motz:

If I'm hearing you correctly, this committee should maybe have its own redaction rules, and because it's non-partisan and it represents the government, well, the whole House, then maybe no outside redaction should occur. Have I heard you correctly?

(1610)

Hon. David McGuinty:

Not exactly. What we're trying to get our heads around collectively as a committee of parliamentarians is how the redaction process works, how the departments fit into this, what role the national security adviser plays, the role of the Department of Justice under the Canada Evidence Act, and on. We think its capable of evolving and becoming more transparent over time.

The Chair:

Thank you Mr. Motz.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have five minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Over the past few exchanges, we've heard a little bit about Bill C-59 and the other forms of oversight or review that might be put in place. In respect of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency, NSIRA, how would you see the complementarity between the review agency and yourself?

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think it's fair to say that NSIRA's mandate will be chiefly based on examining the activities of different security and intelligence actors on the basis of their lawfulness and whether they're operating within the powers they have vested in them. They also have some mandatory yearly reviews to perform. They'll be becoming, as they say, a bit of a super-SIRC, so they'll have to review SIRC as well as the Communications Security Establishment on an annual basis.

Public complaints will be a big factor in terms of receiving Canadians' complaints. That will be a very large component, but we'll wait and see. We've already met with the folks at SIRC and other agencies that are in place, and we fully intend to meet up with NSIRA, when it's created. I'm sure we will be co-operating and sharing information, research, and analysis. One of the benefits of having a secretariat, which will be led by Ms. Marcoux, is that the institutional memory will remain constant, transcending any one government or any one membership of the committee.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Do you think having that kind of a super-SIRC agency will result in the creation of another base of information that will help you do your work?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We think so. It's going to be in a position to have access to key information and classified materials, and I fully expect that we'll be sharing and co-operating as best we can.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

In paragraph 69 of your report, you talk about the threat of espionage and foreign influence that's growing in Canada, and then at the end, the last sentence refers to Australian legislation. It says, "The committee agrees and notes that Australia passed legislation in June 2018 to better prevent, investigate, and disrupt foreign interference."

I'm wondering if you'd be able to tell me a little bit about that legislation, and what you think we could learn from it.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Well, we can't learn very much as this stage, because we're actually in the throes of reviewing the government's response to foreign interference, and that's one of our major reviews for 2019. Following this 2018 report, we want to shed light on the scope of the threat of foreign interference.

We also want to assess the government's response to that threat. We want to do this particularly with respect to Canadian institutions and different ethnocultural communities in a Canadian context. We are not looking so much at electoral integrity or the acquisition of Canadian companies under the Investment Canada Act. Those are not areas or cybersecurity, not the areas that we're honing in on. We're going to be looking at who these foreign actors are, what they're up to, and how well we're responding.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Is there anything you would be able to comment on about the Australian legislation? It's referenced in this paragraph, so is there something you can tell us about the Australian example?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

I don't have the details of the legislation in front of me, but I remember something of the discussion at committee. I was struck by the fact that Australia had enacted explicit legislation on foreign interference, whereas here in Canada, foreign interference is listed as a threat to national security under the CSIS Act. Australia felt that the threat was severe enough to draft and enact explicit legislation on it—probably a whole-of-government approach as opposed to that of a single agency.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

You're working on that right now, so it's something that hopefully we'll get to—

Hon. David McGuinty:

You will have more to say.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

—talk to you about a little bit more.

This is the last one, as I only have a minute.

You've talked a bit about the lack of awareness among Canadians about our security agencies. When you looked into it, what did you find was the biggest misunderstanding, if there was a biggest misunderstanding? There's one part you note in the report about lack of knowledge about what our agencies are, but was there anything where you actually spotted a misunderstanding as to how our agencies work?

(1615)

Hon. David McGuinty:

It was more basic than that. Very few Canadians could name our core intelligence agencies. Very few knew what CSE was. Very few really understood what CSIS was, what it was doing, how it was operating. It's an even more rudimentary lack of understanding not so much in precision about the way they act, but simply the very existence of the organizations or the number of organizations that are acting. This is very new for Canadians.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

A chart of all the organizations is in here, so that might help get that information out.

Hon. David McGuinty:

We hope so, thank you.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Mr. Eglinski, for five minutes, please.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I'd like to thank both presenters today. Thank you for the work that you're doing for our country. It's a lot of long hours, and I appreciate what you're doing.

I noticed in your report, especially paragraphs 67 and 68 and even partially going into 69 where.... I think in 68 you mention CSIS has raised concerns about Chinese influence in Canadian elections and stuff like that. Is your agency involved in any of the preparations for the 2019 election to ensure there's no political interference from foreign agents, or could it potentially retroactively look at this issue? Are you going to look at it before...? Have there been any studies done?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Not at this time, not by NSICOP. In our foreign interference focus, as I mentioned, our first objective is to simply shed light on the breadth and the scope of the threat by foreign actors in terms of who these primary threat actors are, what threat they are posing, and what they are doing, and also, how well our country is responding to the threat. We're not focusing so much on electoral integrity in this forthcoming election as we are the general role of outside actors.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Your organization itself is not. Do you know if the other groups, like CSIS, are doing some active research, study or intelligence work in that area?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

One of the reasons we didn't look at the upcoming election in terms of foreign interference is that the government—they informed us—was doing so much work in terms of assessing the threat and then taking action to prevent the threat of foreign interference.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Being a new organization and working with our basically eight major intelligence gathering organizations in Canada, how have you found over the last year the co-operation with these outside agencies? Quite often these agencies are reluctant to give information, reluctant to trust a new organization or outside.... Has the transition been fairly good? Are they buying into the need for our national organization—you, your group?

Hon. David McGuinty:

That's a great question.

Generally yes, I think most folks we work with are very supportive, but it's new. We're building trust and building a relationship of co-operation and getting access to information, pushing and poking and prodding from time to time to get what we need.

I mentioned earlier the Department of National Defence has never had a spotlight shone on it this way in terms of its intelligence activities. That was a great learning experience, and there was a lot of trust.

This year, we're doing a major review on the Canada Border Services Agency, which has never been reviewed by an outside body of parliamentarians. We've already received roughly 15,000 to 16,000 pages of documentation from CBSA, so the co-operation is very good so far.

I think most folks think that this kind of external review is helpful in terms of how they conduct their affairs, and look forward to the findings of NSICOP because they are non-partisan, and because they are very much recommendations for improvement.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Just expanding on that, how are you finding your group being recognized by international communities?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We're very proud of the report; the annual report has been well received around the world. We've had commentary from the U.K., the United States, Australia and New Zealand. For example, we heard from New Zealand's intelligence commissioner, I think she's called—

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

She's the inspector general.

Hon. David McGuinty:

She has said that chapter 4 on national defence—

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

It's the intelligence priorities.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I'm sorry. The intelligence priorities will be part of the foundational examination in the commission of inquiry on the Christchurch shooting. We're reaching out as best we can, but the feedback so far is very positive.

(1620)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I have a quick last question.

We gave you a mandate when the group was started, and there was lots of controversy over it initially. Have we given you enough tools? I believe there was supposed to be a five-year review. Do you find, even in your first year, that we may need to look at that more quickly? Are you going to need better tools to assist your organization?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We might, but right now we're only two years or so into the five-year mandate, and I think it's going to be interrupted a bit with an election campaign in the fall—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Yes, it will be.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think the committee would say that five years is an appropriate moment, but we're certainly carrying forward some of these areas, and as we practise and get more experience, I think we'll have more to say and perhaps more suggestions for improvement.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Graham, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

On page 66 of the report, paragraph 170 describes defence intelligence. There is a description of the different types of intelligence. Signals intelligence is, of course, the one that gets the most interest. It's the one that all the Edward Snowden stories were about at the core. By the very nature of SIGINT, it captures everything; it's really hard not to.

In your view, and this comes down to the core reason the committee was created for political reasons, does Canada's intelligence apparatus, and our Five Eyes partners especially, take adequate safeguards to prevent unjustified or illegal collection of data by, about or between Canadians?

Hon. David McGuinty:

That's an excellent and really difficult question. I'm going to deflect it to a certain extent by letting you know that again this year, 2019, one of the major reviews we're undertaking is a special review of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. We're going to be examining the collection, use, retention and dissemination of information on Canadian citizens by the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. We're going to try to make sure there's clarity on the legal and policy constraints around this collection of information on Canadian citizens when conducting defence intelligence activities. So it's something we're immediately seized with.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does DND have domestic intelligence or is it mostly international?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

They're able to collect intelligence if they have a legally mandated authority to deploy forces on a mission, whether it's in Canada in support of the RCMP or CSE for example, or on a mission abroad. They can collect in support of a mission wherever it is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do we know if the existence of NSICOP has changed the behaviour of any of the intelligence community?

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think it has. I mentioned earlier that one of the immediate effects of examining intelligence activities at the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces is that for the first time ever, the department set up a unit within to respond to outside review, to pull together information, to collate and to respond to the requests that we made. We've made many requests to the department and have received thousands of pages. When we think it's not satisfactory, we go back and ask for more. If something is missing, we ask why things might be missing.

We think the probity that NSICOP can bring to organizations that are involved in national security intelligence is really positive for Canadians.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At the very end of your report, paragraph 265, I read a hint of frustration that the intelligence community is less than forthcoming and sometimes has to be coaxed along to provide information you're asking for. Is this changing, and will the recommendations you propose also help solve that?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Did you say paragraph 265?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Paragraph 265 on page 110. It's towards the end of the report. There was a bit of frustration by the committee that you'd ask a question and you'd get a very narrow response instead of getting the answers you're looking for.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think Ms. Marcoux is best placed to answer that question, because she is dealing with her colleagues inside these departments and agencies on a regular basis.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

As I think I mentioned earlier, it's a question of the departments, particularly those that are not subject to regular review, getting used to providing information, the relevant information, to the committee.

In some cases, it's perhaps about the secretariat needing to be more precise in terms of time frames or the type of information we want. It's a back and forth process that's going on. In some cases, it's just a question of the need to read the document carefully. If there's a reference, for example, to a document in a footnote, it is incumbent on them to give us that document as well. So it can be the small things as well as the big ones.

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand.

Paragraph 107, on page 41—you don't need to go to each page; I'm just telling you where they are—discusses a case of CSIS drafting a ministerial direction minus two priorities, and it creating a bunch of confusion about whether or not intelligence can be collected.

Are they allowed to collect things outside of the priority list? Why would it create confusion? They can still do data collection, even if it's not among 10 items that are redrafted on the—

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

It's easier for me to—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure. It's paragraph 107, on pages41 and 42. This is excellent weekend reading, by the way.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I don't think we're in a position to give you much more insight, given the classified information that backs up that paragraph.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

Yes. I think it's because CSIS operates within very precise references and direction, so the more precision they get, the better it is for the officers in a region to collect. I think that's what we were trying to refer to.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Dubé, you have three minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I just have two last questions. One may seem a little ridiculous, but I think it's important.

Will the format of the report be different next time so that it is easier to view on a computer—for example, to allow searching using the Ctrl-F keys? In other words, will it still be a scanned copy?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

This problem is related to the redaction process. You can't just cross out the information in a document and then transfer it to a computer or on the web. In fact, copies and photocopies must be made before they are posted on the website.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

You will forgive me for saying that in 2019, we should be able to find a solution to consult the document more quickly.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

Yes.

We share your frustration, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Excellent. Thank you. I couldn't help but mention it.

I have one last quick thing to ask you.

To go back to the first question I asked, is there a plan to formally monitor the implementation of the recommendations made by the NSICOP? I asked the same question at the beginning of my intervention, but I just want to make sure that there is a formal follow-up on these recommendations.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes.

The NSICOP has a plan to do exactly this kind of follow-up. We are really pleased to be here today, and perhaps be invited to the Senate later, to address your counterparts there. We think this is a good start to raise awareness among parliamentarians at the very least.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Excellent. Thank you.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

I have one last question.

In your recommendations, you talk about the process for setting intelligence priorities, the F1 recommendation, and you're complimentary about that. Then you say in F7 that the performance measurement for the security and intelligence community is not robust enough.

Intelligence priorities change all the time. The one that comes to mind is the change in priorities between terrorism and cybersecurity. A lot of intelligence analysts think that cybersecurity is a far greater threat than terrorism.

Can you describe that process, in terms of whether you're satisfied that, ultimately, we have our priorities correct?

Hon. David McGuinty:

When we undertook the intelligence priority setting review, we did it because we wanted to be, so to speak, at the top of the crow's nest for the country, examining the overall architecture of security and intelligence, while at the same time getting into the engine room, to see how these priorities were, in fact, arrived at.

One of the stumbling blocks we think we happened upon here, which is made very plain in the recommendation, is this question of standing intelligence requirements. There are over 400. It's very difficult to triage and feed 400-plus standing intelligence requirements into a cabinet process. We don't have access to cabinet confidences in this regard, but we see most of the material that has led up to those kinds of discussions and debate.

We think there's real improvement to be made, which is why we're calling on the national security and intelligence adviser to take a much more proactive role. The NSIA is pivotal in the overall architecture of security and intelligence in Canada, and she is best placed, we believe, to streamline and simplify. A lot of good front-line actors in security and intelligence in the country are looking for more clarity, and perhaps a smoother process.

The entire chapter breaks down for Canadians how this works, step by step, and we've honed in on a couple of internal fine-tuning mechanisms that we think would go a certain distance in improving the entire process.

(1630)

The Chair:

Thank you for that.

On behalf of the committee, I want to thank both of you for your presentation. It's an insight that all of us appreciate. I commend the work of your committee. I commend your report. Thank you for the very hard work that I know you have put in over the last 18 months.

With that, colleagues, I propose to suspend until we see Minister Goodale in the room, but I'm going to turn to Mr. Paul-Hus while we have a little bit of time. He wishes to deal with M-167, which is not on the agenda. I only want to deal with that if there is unanimity on the part of colleagues to deal with it now. If not, I'm just going to shut it down and deal with it—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have to be in camera for that, right?

The Chair:

Yes, we do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can't wait for Ralph then.

The Chair:

First of all, is there an attitude that we wish to do this at the end of Minister Goodale's presentation?

An hon. member: That's fine.

The Chair: You'll be fine if I then go in camera. Is that right? I want to just make sure we are all okay.

With that, we will suspend.

(1630)

(1630)

The Chair:

We will resume. The minister and his colleagues are with us.

This is a special meeting. We agreed to invite the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness to appear on, respond to and take questions on the “2018 Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada”.

I'll turn to Minister Goodale for his opening statement and ask him to introduce his colleagues.

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee. It's good to be back.

I have with me today the associate deputy minister, Vincent Rigby, the commissioner of the RCMP, Brenda Lucki, and the director of CSIS, David Vigneault.

We're happy to try to respond to your questions about the “2018 Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada”.

I'd like to begin by saying that the women and men who work for our intelligence and security agencies do an incredible and very difficult job of identifying, monitoring, mitigating, and stopping threats in the interests of keeping Canadians safe. It is a 24-7, unrelenting job and the people who protect us deserve our admiration and our thanks.

The purpose of the “Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada” is to provide Canadians with unclassified information about the threats we are facing. That includes threats emanating from Canada but targeted elsewhere around the world. No country wants to be an exporter of terrorism or violent extremism. Providing Canadians with a public assessment of terrorists threats is a core element of the government's commitment to transparency and accountability. While never exposing classified information, the goal is to be informative and accurate.

Before I get into the specifics of this year's report, I would like to remind committee members about the “2016 Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada”. In the ministerial foreword to that report, I wrote this: It is a serious and unfortunate reality that terrorist groups, most notably the so-called Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), use violent extremist propaganda to encourage individuals to support their cause. This group is neither Islamic nor a state, and so will be referred to as Daesh (its Arabic acronym) in this Report.

In hindsight, that principle is something that should have better guided the authors of subsequent reports when referring to the various terrorist threats facing our country. Canadians of all faiths and backgrounds have helped to build our country and continue to be integral members of our communities and neighbourhoods. They contribute to inspiring a stronger, more equal and compassionate Canada, one that we all strive for. It is neither accurate nor fair to equate any one community or an entire religion with extremist violence or terror. To do so is simply wrong and inaccurate.

Following the issuance of the 2018 report, we heard several strong objections, particularly from the Sikh and Muslim communities in Canada, that the language in the report was not sufficiently precise. Due to its use of terms such as “Sikh extremism” or “Sunni extremism”, the report was perceived as impugning entire religions instead of properly zeroing in on the dangerous actions of a small number of people. I can assure you that broad brush was not the intent of the report. It used language that has actually been in use for years. It has appeared in places such as the previous government's 2012 counterterrorism strategy and the report in December 2018 of the all-party National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. Similar language also appeared on the Order Paper of the House of Commons in reference to certain proposed parliamentary business. As I have said before, language matters. Just because something has often been phrased in a certain way does not mean that it should be phrased in that way now or in the future.

As a result of the concerns presented to me, I requested a review of the language in the report, to ensure that it provides Canadians with useful, unclassified information about terrorist threats to Canada without falsely maligning any particular community. We consulted with the Sikh and Muslim communities in Canada. We consulted with the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on National Security. We consulted with our security and intelligence agencies. We also heard from many members of Parliament.

(1635)



Going forward, we will use terminology that focuses on intent or ideology, rather than an entire religion. As an example, the report now refers to “extremists who support violent means to establish an independent state within India”. This is an approach, interestingly enough, that is sometimes used by some of our allies. For instance, the 2018 national strategy for counterterrorism of the United States of America reads in part, “Babbar Khalsa International seeks, through violent means, to establish its own independent state in India”.

The objective must be to describe the threat to the public accurately and precisely, without unintentionally condemning the entire Sikh community or any other community. The vast majority of the Sikh community in Canada are peaceful and would never wish to harm anyone, not in this country or anywhere else.

Similarly, we have eliminated the use of terms such as “Shia or Sunni extremism”. Going forward, these threats will be described in a more precise manner, such as by referring directly to terrorist organizations like Hezbollah or Daesh. That is more accurate and more informative. Once again, the point is that language matters, and we must always be mindful of that fact, which is why the review will be an ongoing process.

I'm sure that every member here has seen the increasing statistics on hate crime published just a couple of weeks ago. Sadly, 2017 saw a 47% increase in police-reported hate crime in Canada. Social media platforms are making it easier and easier for hateful individuals to find each other and then to amplify their toxic rhetoric. Tragically, as we saw very recently in New Zealand, this sometimes leads to devastating and deadly consequences. The idea should be anathema to all of us that governments of any stripe might inadvertently continue to use language that can then be twisted by these nefarious and violent individuals as proof points in their minds and justifications for their hatred.

In addition to the language review, I would like to share some of the innovative things that our security agencies are doing to be accurate, effective and bias-free in their day-to-day work. That's just one example. For the past several months, the people who are tasked with making those final difficult decisions about adding someone to the SATA, the Secure Air Travel Act, or the no-fly list, in other words, have had the name and the picture of that particular person removed from the file, so that the name or the picture does not influence the final decision, not even subconsciously. The focus of the decision-makers must be on the facts that are in the file, and they must make a decision on the basis of those facts. So it's a matter of fact and not prejudice.

The women and men of our intelligence and security community are hard-working professionals, but there is not a human being alive who is not prone to some preconceived idea or bias. Government should try very hard to mitigate the effects of this very human trait.

Finally, while the updated report has been received reasonably well, there have been critics who have complained that the changes reduce the ability of our agencies to do their job. I would profoundly disagree with that. The factual content of the report has not changed. It continues to outline the threats facing and emanating from Canada. It simply does it in a manner that cannot be interpreted to denigrate entire communities or religions because of the actions of a small number of individuals who are actually behaving in a manner that is contrary to what that community holds dear. The whole community should not be condemned for that.

(1640)



Frankly, our security and intelligence agencies need the goodwill and the support of all peaceful, law-abiding members of all communities to do their jobs effectively. We cannot build those partnerships if the language we use creates division or distance or unease among those communities and our security agencies.

Mr. Chair, thank you for inviting me to be here again today. I and my officials would be pleased to try to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister Goodale.

Ms. Sahota, you have seven minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

At the outset, Minister, I'd like to thank you for appearing here today. Thank you for the work you do. We know with the RCMP and CSIS, your job is not easy. You keep our country safe, and it is much appreciated.

I have raised this issue with you, Minister, several times. My community and several stakeholders contacted me after this report was made public back in December. They were truly bewildered as to why Sikhs had been identified in this way, why other faiths—Sunni, Shia, Islamist—had been mentioned in this report. Previously in these public reports they've always focused on regions and extremist travellers. Why the change in the way this report was set up this time?

(1645)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ms. Sahota, the report is the collective work of a variety of security and intelligence agencies within the Government of Canada. As you have acknowledged, they do a very difficult and very professional job of assessing the risks before the country at any given moment. That changes from time to time. Since this is a report to the government and to the public, it's perhaps not for me to comment on the input that went into it.

Perhaps, David, from CSIS's point of view, can you provide a perspective on the factors that would come into the thinking of the authors of the report in what needs to be assembled at any given moment and...?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

If I may just add a little more to that, in your introductory remarks, Minister, you referred to the 2016 report which specifically mentioned that ISIL would no longer be used as it's neither Islamic nor a state and Daesh would be used. Why that reversal in this report? We've seen a lot of changes in the layout, the substance and the description in this report.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Rigby, the associate deputy minister, wants to comment.

Mr. Vincent Rigby (Associate Deputy Minister, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thanks very much, Minister.

This is a whole of security and intelligence community product. Public Safety has the technical lead, but we reach out to the community and in a very inclusive way take input from across the RCMP, from CSIS, from ITAC. We assemble the information both in threat and threat capabilities and also in the government response. We pull all that material together and then we all collectively agree at the end of the day, right up to head of agency, before it goes to the government and to the minister to sign off.

There had been, I think, a little criticism in the last couple of years that the reports had not been as detailed as people would like. They'd like it to be a little more expansive and go into a little more of the intricacies of the threat, etc. I think in our attempt perhaps to provide a little more of that detail, unfortunately some language crept into the report that, at the end of the day, we're now here to discuss. As the minister said, the language which in future we would much prefer will focus more on ideology and less on community.

That's a little of the background as to how this slipped in. Again, the language had been used in previous reports, but in some of the specific terminology the minister referred to, had not been used since 2012.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. I know there has been some criticism about removing these words, saying that it will not be precise, but like the minister, I disagree. I think homing in on the actual terrorist organizations is being far more precise.

Can you explain to me, in the section on those who continue to support establishing an independent state within India by violent means, how this section is precise? The questions I get from stakeholders in the community is that this section, or reference to this section, has not previously been in past reports other than the mention of one organization, so why now? Why, when no events have occurred publicly that we know of, was it included in the 2018 report and never referenced before, when in that section it mainly references an incident and a time between 1982 and 1993?

(1650)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I think Mr. Vigneault can comment on this, but I'd just make two preliminary observations.

The material that is prepared and published in the public threat report of course has to be unclassified. Classified information has to remain classified, but there is a parliamentary avenue for some examination of that. Of course, that's the purview of your previous witness this afternoon.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I was thinking that myself.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians was created for the purpose of allowing our security agencies, when appropriate, to be able to discuss classified information with the appropriate group of parliamentarians. That is the NSICOP as opposed to a standard parliamentary committee. If the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians wishes to pursue an issue of this kind, that would be the appropriate venue for that discussion to happen.

I will invite David Vigneault, the director of CSIS, to comment further.

Mr. David Vigneault (Director, Canadian Security Intelligence Service):

Thank you, Minister.

Thank you for your question and for giving me an opportunity to elaborate on this topic.

As you can imagine, CSIS's national security investigations are very fluid. They're influenced by events taking place here in Canada and taking place abroad. Our mandate is to make sure that individuals here in Canada who are supporting or engaged somehow in support of the use of violence for political purposes are investigated. These fluid investigations ebb and flow, and we have been providing advice to the government, and we have been providing advice to Public Safety in the context of the report and our threat assessment.

We stand behind the assessment we've provided that there is a small group of individuals who right now are engaging in activities that are pursuing use of violent means to establish an independent state in India. It is our responsibility to make sure that we investigate these threats and that we provide advice to the RCMP and to other colleagues to make sure, based on our information and our own investigations done by CSIS, that Canada is not being used to plot terrorist activity and that we Canadians are also safe at the same time.

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave it there, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Goodale, I was fortunate to have the first copy of the December 11, 2018 report, which gave us some information. I understand your arguments and the whole explanation you are giving us to try to fix what, technically, we should not have had to do. I'm glad I got it, because it gives us information about national security.

For you, you're playing politics with it. What worries me a little bit is that at one point, as Canadians, we had access to information, which was then changed. We have learned that CSIS, the RCMP and other agencies have done some work and have reported important information in a Public Safety Canada report about our security. Subsequently, groups lobbied. You were initially pressured and on April 12, you amended the report. A second version has been put online on the site. Two weeks later, on April 26, another group lobbied, and you modified the report a second time. We now have a watered down version.

I want to understand the process. I know it can affect communities, but the fact remains that reports have been prepared by our security agencies and that information has been put on them that corresponds to the situation described. To what extent does politics play a role and do we water down reality so as not to hurt anyone? How does it work? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Paul-Hus, the representations that we received, as I mentioned in my remarks, came from representatives of the Muslim community and the Sikh community in particular. We also heard from a number of members of Parliament from different political parties, not just one. In fact, all sides of the House of Commons had occasion to comment on this situation and made their views known, raising similar kinds of concerns.

In assessing the input that was coming in, contrary to the assertion in your question, it was not a partisan issue; it was a matter of accuracy, fairness and being effective.

(1655)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I believe the information was accurate. The information presented still clearly indicated points concerning an existing threat. You changed some words to lighten it up.

In essence, that's what politics is all about: trying not to displease people. However, the fact remains that the first version of the agencies was clear. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No. That is not the purpose of the changes.

Clearly, what we heard from a number of stakeholders across the country, the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on National Security, and members of Parliament of several different political parties, when you read the words in the report, was the impression that an entire religion or an entire community was a threat to national security. That is factually incorrect.

There are certain individuals that are threats to national security that need to be properly investigated, but when you report on that matter publicly, using expressions that leave the impression with people that it's an entire religion, or an entire ethnocultural community that's to be feared, that is factually incorrect. That is what needed to be corrected. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

But we understand that we are talking about extremism. Obviously, not everyone is targeted. No matter which religions and cultural communities are involved, when we talk about radical Islam, for example, we clearly say “radical Islam”. We refer to people who are radical or radicalized. We don't attack all Muslims, of course.

Is there a way to be clear without attacking people who do not need to be targeted?

Word choice is important. It is important to avoid removing information, especially if you do not want to displease. What I want to know is the truth. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No. The very objective here, Mr. Paul-Hus, is to do exactly what you have said, to convey the threats in a public way, in an accurate way, but not using a brush that is so broad that you condemn an entire religion, or you condemn an entire ethnocultural community.

While you have seen phrases in the report which to you were clear in narrowing the scope of what was being referred to, there were others who read that report and saw it exactly through the opposite end of the telescope, and saw the language used was broadening the brush beyond what really was the threat.

The objective of the review, the consultation, and the work we have done here is to be accurate and precise in telling Canadians what the threat is, but also to be fair in the sense that we are not condemning, impugning or maligning entire religions or entire ethnic communities. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

To your knowledge, is this the first time interest groups have lobbied to change a national security report?

In your government or in other governments, has there ever been a case where, following official publication, groups have information changed? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

In my experience in the areas over which I have jurisdiction and responsibility, this is the first change of this nature. The reaction was sufficiently large and pointed. It lead me to the conclusion that the problem being raised was a serious one. It wasn't just a little semantic argument. It was a very serious concern that impressions were being left by the report that were not fair and accurate, and that the language needed to be modified.

When we looked at the language, we found that very similar phrases had been used in many other places at different times, including in reports that had been filed by the previous government, in reports that had been filed by the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. Indeed, some of the language also appeared at one point in time on the Order Paper of the House of Commons.

The language had been in use, but just because it had been in use for a certain period of time or for certain purposes does not mean you need to continue using a phrase that is running the risk of conveying misinformation and a misimpression of entire communities or entire religions.

(1700)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus.

It would be helpful, Minister, if from time to time you looked at the chair so that colleagues can get their questions in.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

You are indeed a very attractive specimen, sir, but—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Ralph Goodale: —I'm admiring this entire committee.

The Chair:

I thought you'd admire my tie.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Minister, thank you for being here. I want to thank my colleagues on the committee for accepting my motion to have you come and speak to this issue. As you know, I wrote to you in December when this issue first arose, and Mr. Singh and I had both written to the Prime Minister before the changes were made. Unlike what was just mentioned, the words do matter, and on that we agree, Minister.

I think the Sikh community deserves praise for standing up for itself because ultimately, the consequences are very real. There is a rise in hate crimes, and there is another form of terrorism that is happening in communities not just here in Canada but around the world, namely, going after and attacking faith communities, and other communities of course.

I think these changes are welcome, and I certainly hope the work will continue with affected communities, because there's a specific issue that was raised in this report. We know, though, that the Muslim community both here in Canada and around the world, and certainly in the United States, has faced this issue with regard to terrorism for the better part of two decades. It's a concern that has been raised. One of the reasons you've had to make changes to the no-fly list is that there is a form of profiling inherent in the way that apparatus works.

Minister, you've said a lot of the things that I think are welcome certainly by folks hoping for change in how this is done. We've asked that there be a rethink of this process, given that we are seeing a rise in hate crimes and other incidents that seriously jeopardize public safety.

Will there be a push to institutionalize the thinking that you've put forward here today? These types of mechanisms, transparency-wise, are very important but can have the opposite affect, as you've pointed out.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

We intend to use language throughout our systems, Mr. Dubé, that is accurate, precise and fair in conveying information about terrorist threats. It has to be an ongoing process. It's not something that you can just sort of do once as a kind of blip and presume that you've addressed the issue or solved the problem.

People need to be alert to the issue all the time, partly for the reason that you mentioned, that if you're not alert to the issue, you can inadvertently be encouraging those who would be inclined towards hate crimes and using the language as a pretext for what they do. The other reason it's important, Mr. Dubé, is that if we're going to have a safe, respectful, inclusive society, there has to be a good rapport between our police and security agencies and every community in our society. If language is used that is seen to be divisive, then you won't have that rapport, and we'll have a less safe society.

(1705)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

It's probably not the greatest point to interrupt you on, but my time is limited. I did want to get to the substantive piece, though.

Older reports are quite challenging to find in this digital age, to be fair. I think that's worth pointing out, but from what we see, it has been 17 years since the issue that was raised in this report was ever part of a similar report, so it's been quite a while.

I think one of the issues that was raised by many who were taking issue with this is not just the language that's used, which we've all addressed today, but it's also the why. I think there was a question raised to that effect.

Given that you can't divulge everything because it's classified information, as much as we always want transparency, is there not a concern that if you can't explain why, some thought needs to be put into whether it's better to leave some things classified instead of sort of going halfway without being able to provide any justification?

This was also a big issue that was taken up by some of the communities that were calling the government to account on this.

It is important to raise the question of why. There was reporting this morning, even about the Minister of Foreign Affairs getting talking points relating to specific communities on foreign trips.

There is some cynicism around that. Are you not concerned that it gets fed into by dropping something into a report and then not being able to back it up?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There are two imperatives, Mr. Dubé. They sometimes present a bit of a conflict. On the one side, our security agencies would want to be as forthcoming with Canadians as they can possibly be in a public report to provide information that would be useful and helpful to Canadians in understanding the various public threats. At the same time, you raise the competing issue, which is the extent to which they can actually discuss the details.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Right.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The experience will undoubtedly be borne in mind when future reports are written.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Minister, with the last minute I have, I just want to ask you about the fact that the consequences were, perhaps, not properly thought out. Is that a sign of a larger issue that seems to be coming more and more to the forefront, which is to say that the threat posed by another form of extremism, namely, white nationalism and white supremacy, is being understated or undervalued by our security agencies? Does more thought need to be put into what's happening there, and the consequences that it has?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The police and security agencies have to deal with all of it, Mr. Dubé. They are alert to all of those threats and potential risks. You will note that in this report there are frequent references to far-right-wing extremism that poses a threat as well. It is very much a part of the matrix of issues that the police and security agencies are alert to and are dealing with.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have seven minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you, Minister.

In fact, I'll be picking up a little bit from where Mr. Dubé left off. It's the sections in this report about right-wing extremism.

I'm from Montreal. I was a CEGEP student at the time of École Polytechnique, which was an impactful event, as far as it was clearly targeting women because of the hatred of women. Only about a month ago, I was at a vigil for the van attack on Yonge Street, which was another event that was based on the hatred of women. At least that's what we've heard from reports.

At the beginning of this year, we held a vigil outside a mosque in my community because of what happened in Christchurch, New Zealand. In fact, not so long ago, we had also had a vigil because of what had happened at the mosque shooting in Sainte-Foy.

Those are three very large events, as far as people killed. All of them would be based on right-wing extremism and that kind of a philosophy. Yet, when I'm looking at this report, it says, “However, while racism, bigotry, and misogyny may undermine the fabric of Canadian society, ultimately they do not usually result in criminal behavior or threats to national security.”

Is this type of extremism truly less dangerous than the other forms of extremism? That doesn't seem to be, at least in my experience when I look back on our recent history.

(1710)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ms. Dabrusin, I'll invite both the commissioner of the RCMP and David Vigneault to comment on those issues, because it falls to them to do the investigations and to keep people safe.

I can tell you that, over the course of the last several years when I've had the vantage point of being fairly close to our security agencies, watching their activities and the shaping of their priorities and so forth, they have worked very hard on the issue of right-wing extremism. The report that is the subject of this meeting in fact makes specific reference to a number of incidents that demonstrate why this worry needs to be treated seriously.

We've had instances from outside the country, in New Zealand, in Pittsburgh, in Charlottesville, and so forth, but within our own country, the van attack on Yonge Street, the mosque attack in Sainte-Foy, the attack on police officers at Mayerthorpe and Moncton and the misogynist attacks at Dawson College and École Polytechnique are all the product of the same perverted and evil ideology that results in people being put at risk and people losing their lives. It is taken seriously.

Let me ask Brenda and David to comment.

Commissioner Brenda Lucki (Commissioner, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

To respond, it's no less a threat than other topics within this report, but when we look at the report, one focus, the goal, amongst others, was to provide an overall assessment of the terrorist threats to Canada first. We've added in right-wing extremism because it is a threat, maybe not when we talk, as you mentioned in your quote, to national security; it's more to events and individuals.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Just to clarify, the report says, “ultimately they do not usually result in criminal behaviour or threats to national security.” It seemed to me that, when we look at the list of events, in fact, you have a very long list of events that seem to be due to right-wing extremism.

Commr Brenda Lucki:

Yes, there's absolutely criminal activity, and that would be our focus. When we do our focus on criminal activity, it's conducted by groups or individuals in any category within this report or outside, most definitely. It's no less a threat.

Mr. David Vigneault:

From CSIS's perspective, the way we look at this is that any individuals or groups who are looking to use violence to achieve political, religious or ideological objectives are a threat to national security as per the definition in our act. I'm on the record in the other chamber recently, too, having said that we are focusing more of our resources on looking at the threat of different extremist groups: misogynist, white nationalist and neo-nationalist. Essentially, they are now using terrorist methods to achieve some of their goals.

As for the attack on Yonge Street, the method was publicized initially by an al Qaeda-affiliated magazine. They called it the ultimate mowing machine, essentially telling people that it is what they should be doing. You had someone who had other extremist views who used a technique that had been developed or popularized by another set of groups to essentially kill people. From our perspective, we're not marking the difference. We investigate these groups when they meet these definitions.

(1715)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

My only concern is that, when I was reading the rest of the report, I didn't see any other form of terrorism or criminal behaviour being kept within the context of saying that, whatever these groups, ultimately they do not usually result in criminal behaviour or threats to national security. Those kinds of terms weren't couched around other types of groups. I was just curious why the differentiation when we're looking at—

Mr. David Vigneault:

I can't speak for all the groups, but essentially, if you look at a funnel, the vast majority of the commentary, the vile commentary online, will have an impact on society but would not be admitted to the criminal threshold. Then you have a small amount of that, which may be of interest to the RCMP or to other police bodies and law enforcement in Canada. Then you have a very, very small group of people, individuals or small groups, who are looking to organize themselves and use violence to achieve some political purpose, and that would be a national security case. It is, if you want, a kind of methodology we're looking at to essentially better understand and better characterize what we're seeing in society, but it is definitely evolving.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair, and thank you, Minister and officials, for being here today.

In reference to this, I have some experience in threat assessments from a criminal organization perspective that fit into a national organized crime threat assessment for this country, so I understand the work and vigour it takes from our security agencies to create this.

With that in mind, Mr. Minister, I'd like to read a quote from Phil Gurski, a former CSIS analyst, and a well-respected one. He said the following with regard to this report: What about 'individuals or groups who are inspired by violent ideologies and terrorist groups, such as Daesh or al-Qaida (AQ)?' Aside from the ridiculous insistence on 'Daesh' rather than Islamic State (Minister Goodale: Daesh is Arabic for 'Islamic State' by the way), this phrase is only partially accurate. I know from my days at CSIS that yes some Canadians are inspired by these terrorist groups but there is also a huge swathe that radicalise to violence in the name of greater Sunni Islamist extremist thought (Shia Islamist extremists are a different beast altogether) that has little or nothing to do with AQ [al-Qaida] or IS [Islamic State] or any other terrorist group. Oh and guess what else? They are all Muslims—nary a Buddhist or an animist among them. Again, using the term 'Sunni Islamist extremism', which is what we called it when I was at CSIS, does not mean all Canadian Muslims are terrorists. To my mind this is just political correctness and electioneering gone mad.

I think it's important to recognize, and I know you do, sir, that national security issues are far more important for Canadians than to have politics as part of that. My question for you is this: Do you think that informing Canadians, informing the public, of the actual threats posed by terrorists, regardless of the moniker, should be beyond any electoral designs of the current government?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Absolutely, and that's the way I conduct myself.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. How will you then dismiss Mr. Gurski's expertise so easily with regard to the changes that have been made to this report?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, I don't have his quote in front of me, but I go to the latter part of it that you referred to, where he seemed to be saying, despite some of the language that he referred to, that everybody would understand that not all of the Muslim community was being criticized. That's a rough paraphrase of what you said.

It's not at all clear, Mr. Motz, that that's in fact true. When you use broad-brush language, you can, by implication, be impugning innocent people who you do not mean to criticize, but the language gets extrapolated and extrapolated, and if you look at some of the material on the Internet, you see the distortions, the misinterpretations and the abuse.

It all gets back to the original point. Let's be very, very careful about the language used in the first place. We have to be accurate about conveying the nature of the risk, but let's not express it in such a way that we impugn people who are innocent and, by impugning them, put them at risk.

(1720)

Mr. Glen Motz:

We all agree that a threat can be an individual and it can be a small element within certain communities, but I think Canadians are astute enough to appreciate and understand that it is not the entire community at all that is subject to the very defining language that would define a terrorist threat.

I guess one of the things that I'm curious about is how many agencies contributed to this report. Who were they?

The Chair:

Very briefly, Minister.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'll ask Mr. Rigby to do the calculation of adding up the numbers that were involved.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Along with that question, on the agencies that were involved in the creation of this, were they also involved in the—

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, you are stretching the chair's patience.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Were they also involved and consulted in the revision?

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, please.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's all I'm getting at.

The Chair:

Please, a brief answer.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

As I said, we consulted with a whole variety of agencies to get their input.

I'll ask Mr. Rigby to talk about the total numbers that are involved in the intelligence community within the Government of Canada.

I think when the people who wrote the material were using those expressions that you've just referred to, their intent was to narrow the focus, but when members of the public saw those expressions, they actually saw the situation through the other end of the telescope and thought the criticism was actually getting broader rather than narrower. That's the dilemma here of finding the language that is accurate and precise, but at the same time, fair so that we're not having consequences that we don't mean to have.

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave the answer there.

We'll go to Ms. Sahota, for five minutes, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm going to follow on what my colleague Julie was saying earlier.

In the right-wing extremism section, it says: It may be difficult to assess, in the short term, to what extent a specific act was ideologically driven, or comment while investigations are ongoing or cases are before the court.

To one of my previous questions, it was mentioned that there are fluid investigations ongoing and that we would not want a plot to occur on Canadian soil. I agree with you 100%. I would never want to see what had happened in 1985 ever happen on Canadian soil again. I hope you catch the people who are up to no good, because they indirectly, or directly in this case, end up impacting whole communities at times. I think all of us would be outraged if any religion, Catholicism or Protestantism, were ever brought into any organization that had committed an act, and we wouldn't do that. However, it seems as though, from this perspective, there's an insensitivity originally to other faiths that don't originate from the western world.

In short, why wasn't the “but” language, which is included in the right-wing extremism section, included in those other sections? You're saying they are fluid investigations. How do you know for sure whether they were ideologically driven? Those exceptions are definitely referred to in the right-wing extremism section.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

David, can you comment on that?

Mr. David Vigneault:

I'm not the author of the report, so I cannot comment on exactly why the final wording is there.

However, I can say from a CSIS perspective, as I mentioned earlier, that we're not looking at a specific religion; we're looking at the activity of individuals. If the activity of individuals is plotting to use violence to achieve political, ideological or religious objectives, that's when we would be investigating.

With the example in New Zealand, that individual invoked about five, six or seven different reasons as to why he committed the activity. When you start to mix what is happening online with mental health issues, and so on, what exactly was the motivator of an individual can be extremely delicate to determine. That's why when we work in the sphere of national security, when our colleagues in law enforcement are investigating, we might not know exactly what we're dealing with initially.

I can only speak to the types of investigations. In terms of the report and why these other caveats were not added to the others, I cannot speak to that angle.

(1725)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

There has been a lot of skepticism since the release of the report. From my investigation and from my talks with Minister Goodale, I found out that about 17 different agencies and departments were involved in feeding into this report.

I don't think we got to that number.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's approximately correct.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I also found out that, when compiling this report, no evidence is taken from any single source.

Can a single source be feeding allegations or evidence into all these various different departments, and therefore, when it comes out of more than a few departments, it elevates to the level of being in the report? What are your comments on that?

Mr. Vincent Rigby:

I'll defer to David in terms of some of the source reporting from a CSIS perspective, but I can only repeat what you just said. When we went out to those 17 agencies and departments representing the breadth and scope of the security intelligence community, we looked at all sources.

Everything that came up to us was intelligence, open sources, consultations with academics right across the board. What you see reflected in the report is a composite picture of all the evidence, all the intelligence, and all the analysis, open-sourced right on down across the spectrum.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Could it be bad intelligence coming from another country?

Mr. Vincent Rigby:

How would you define bad intelligence?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is it verified intelligence by our own independent agencies?

Mr. Vincent Rigby:

I'll defer to David on this, but we are in regular consultation, without a doubt, with our allied partners, particularly in a Five Eyes context, so we're often looking at the intelligence they provide as well.

I should stop here and let David finish it off, but we are going to make our own assessments. We will certainly look at what our allies are saying, but this is a Canadian assessment at the end of the day.

The Chair:

Mr. Vigneault is going to have to finish it off very quickly.

Mr. David Vigneault:

Mr. Rigby described the way it is done very well. I mentioned in my first answer to you, Ms. Sahota, that it was based on our own investigations. I want to be very clear that they were CSIS-led investigations.

The Chair:

I want to thank the minister and his colleagues for their attendance and a thorough discussion of this issue.

We're going to suspend and then go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1525)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bienvenue à cette 162e réunion du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui l'honorable David McGuinty et Mme Rennie Marcoux. Merci à tous les deux d'être des nôtres pour nous présenter le rapport annuel du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement (CPSNR). Je suis convaincu que M. McGuinty saura nous expliquer dans son style bien à lui le rôle exact de ce comité.

Bienvenue, monsieur McGuinty. Je vous cède la parole pour vos observations préliminaires.

L’hon. David McGuinty (président, Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, chers collègues, et merci de nous avoir invités à comparaître devant votre comité. Je suis accompagné de Mme Rennie Marcoux, directrice générale du Secrétariat du CPSNR.

C'est un privilège pour nous de pouvoir discuter avec vous aujourd'hui du rapport annuel du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement pour 2018.

Ce premier rapport annuel est le fruit du travail, du dévouement et de l'engagement de tous mes collègues faisant partie de ce comité. Nous souhaitons que ce rapport puisse contribuer à un débat éclairé entre Canadiens quant aux difficultés qui nous attendent lorsqu'il s'agit de conférer aux organisations de sécurité et de renseignement les pouvoirs exceptionnels nécessaires pour cerner et contrer les menaces qui pèsent sur la nation tout en veillant à ce que leurs activités soient menées de manière à respecter et à protéger nos droits démocratiques.[Français]

Le CPSNR a pour mandat d'examiner l'ensemble du cadre de la sécurité nationale et du renseignement au Canada, soit les lois, les règlements, la stratégie, l'administration et les finances.

Il peut aussi examiner toute activité menée par un ministère lié à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement.

Enfin, il peut examiner toute question se rapportant à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement qu'un ministre nous confie.[Traduction]

Les membres de notre comité possèdent tous une cote de sécurité de niveau « très secret ». Nous prêtons serment et nous sommes astreints au secret à perpétuité. Nous pouvons en outre jeter un éclairage tout à fait particulier sur ces enjeux primordiaux du fait que nous comptons des membres de plusieurs partis, aussi bien à la Chambre des communes qu'au Sénat, qui nous font bénéficier d'une gamme variée d'expériences.

Nous pouvons accéder à tout renseignement se rapportant à notre mandat afin d'exécuter notre travail. Il y a cependant des exceptions. C'est le cas notamment des documents confidentiels du Cabinet, de l'identité de sources confidentielles ou de témoins protégés, et des enquêtes menées par les forces de l'ordre pouvant conduire à des poursuites judiciaires.

L'année 2018 en été une d'apprentissage pour le comité. Nous avons consacré plusieurs heures et réunions au développement d'une meilleure compréhension de notre mandat et du fonctionnement des organismes chargés de protéger le Canada et les Canadiens. Des fonctionnaires des différents secteurs de la sécurité et du renseignement ont informé les membres du comité, et nous avons visité les sept principaux ministères et organismes concernés. Nous avons rencontré plusieurs fois la conseillère à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement auprès du premier ministre. Le comité a également décidé de faire enquête concernant les diverses allégations entourant le voyage du premier ministre en Inde en février 2018.

En 2018, le comité s'est réuni à 54 reprises, en moyenne quatre heures à chaque fois. Vous trouverez à l'annexe C du rapport la liste des représentants du gouvernement, du milieu universitaire et des groupes de défense des libertés civiles que le comité a eu le plaisir de rencontrer en 2018.

Notre rapport annuel est l'aboutissement de nombreuses séances d'information, écrites et orales, d'une analyse de plus de 8 000 pages de documents, de dizaines de rencontres entre les analystes du CPSNR et les représentants du gouvernement, d'un travail approfondi de recherche et d'analyse, et de délibérations réfléchies et détaillées entre les membres du comité.

Il faut aussi préciser que ce rapport est unanime. En tout et partout, nous avons tiré 11 conclusions et formulé sept recommandations à l'intention du gouvernement. Le comité s'est bien assuré d'aborder ces questions en adoptant une approche non partisane. Nous osons espérer que nos conclusions et recommandations contribueront à renforcer la reddition de comptes et l'efficacité au sein de l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement au Canada.

(1530)

[Français]

Le rapport qui vous est présenté aujourd'hui contient cinq chapitres, dont certains portent sur les deux examens de fond menés par le CPSNR.

Le premier chapitre décrit les origines du CPSNR, son mandat et sa façon d'aborder le travail, y compris les facteurs qu'il examine ou considère au moment de choisir les examens à effectuer.

Le deuxième chapitre présente un aperçu des organismes de la sécurité et du renseignement au Canada et des menaces pour la sécurité du Canada ainsi que la manière dont ces organismes collaborent afin d'assurer la sécurité du Canada et des Canadiens et de promouvoir les intérêts du pays.

Les chapitres suivants présentent les deux examens de fond entrepris par le CPSNR en 2018.[Traduction]

Au chapitre 3, le comité a examiné la façon dont le gouvernement du Canada établit ses priorités en matière de renseignement. Pourquoi est-ce important? Pour trois raisons.

Premièrement, ce processus est le moyen privilégié pour guider le travail des collecteurs et des évaluateurs de renseignement du Canada afin de veiller à ce qu'ils canalisent leurs efforts en fonction des grandes priorités du gouvernement et de notre pays.

Deuxièmement, c'est un processus essentiel pour s'assurer qu'il y a reddition de comptes au sein de l'appareil du renseignement, lequel accomplit un travail hautement confidentiel. Grâce à ce processus, le gouvernement bénéficie de mises à jour régulières sur les opérat