header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-22 INDU 133

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Welcome to the industry committee as we continue our continuation of our five-year legislative review of copyright.

Today, we have with us from the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, Mr. Simpson, head, public affairs; and Mr. Greco, national manager, advocacy.

We also have from the Council of Canadians with Disabilities, John Rae, chair, social policy committee. Welcome.

From Toronto, where they're having some big elections today, we have from the Screen Composers Guild of Canada, Paul Novotny, screen composer; and Ari Posner, screen composer.

We're going to get started with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. You have about seven minutes.

Mr. Thomas Simpson (Head, Public Affairs, Canadian National Institute for the Blind):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My name is Thomas Simpson. I'm the head of public affairs for CNIB. Joining with me today is my colleague Lui Greco, who is national manager of advocacy.

We've ensured that we have a brief in Braille that should be sent to each member of the committee. I'm sure some of you are wondering why disability organizations are present today to be discussing Canada's Copyright Act. I hope the next few minutes of our presentation can better help you understand how Canada's Copyright Act can be altered to remove barriers for persons with print disabilities.

To start, I'd like to provide an overview of CNIB. We were formed in 1918 by war-blinded veterans coming back from World War I, as well as a result of the Halifax explosion. CNIB has been providing post-vision loss rehabilitation as well as emotional and social services to Canadians who are blind or partially sighted. We deliver innovative programs and powerful advocacy that empowers people impacted by blindness to live their dreams and to tear down barriers to inclusion.

Mr. Lui Greco (National Manager, Advocacy, Canadian National Institute for the Blind):

When we talk about a print disability and the barrier that access to alternate format materials creates, you're experiencing it right now. It's very unlikely that you're able to read Braille, just as it is for people who are blind or partially sighted to be able to read print.

Unfortunately, the option of going to a bookstore and purchasing a book in an alternate format doesn't exist.

For Canadians with print disabilities, sight loss included, we rely on alternate format materials. This includes Braille, which is exactly what you have in front of you. Print Braille is, as it says, print and Braille. This is something that would be used by parents with blind kids or blind kids with sighted parents to be able for them to read together. We'll get you to listen to a sample of what digitized accessible speech sounds like.

[Audio presentation]

As you can tell, that's not exactly the most friendly sounding voice, but it's what many of us rely on because it's really all we have to choose from.

In Canada, we estimate that there are about three million people living with some kind of disability that creates a print disability. The material in accessible formats is rare. We're here talking to you today to try to bring that change around.

Worldwide, estimates of people living with some kind of disability are consistent with overall health estimates for sight loss.

The percentage of material that's available in alternate formats, as just explained to you, is somewhere between 5% to 7%—we're not really sure. What does this really mean?

A few years ago, I decided to take a course in project management. I registered through the university continuing education program, did reasonably well in the course. I got a B+. I paid my fees to the project management institute, studied, and when it came time to write the exam, I couldn't find a study exam that was accessible. I wrote to the author. The author said, “Go away”. I wrote to the project management institute, and they said, “Go away”. The end result was that I was the denied an opportunity to gain a professional designation that would have furthered my career.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

According to the Association of Canadian Publishers, more than 10,000 books are published in Canada each year. However, under Canada's current copyright requirements, publishers are not required by law or regulation to make these books accessible. Even with incentive programs through Canadian Heritage, Canadian publishers are under no obligation to produce accessible works, despite receiving public dollars.

The CNIB believes all books should be accessible. Whether it's just to ensure that accessibility applications can be used simultaneously with e-books or that Canadians with sight loss can buy Braille or electronic Braille copies in-store, all books published in Canada must be accessible.

We recommend that publishers be legislated to make accessible copies of their books. To do so, we recommend creating an additional subsection within section 3 of the Copyright Act, subsection 3(2), which would read, “For the purpose of this Act, a copyright cannot be granted to a literary work unless the production of such a work is done in an alternate format for persons with a print disability.” You can follow along in your Braille copy, if you'd like to know the specifics.

We believe that this sensible amendment to the Copyright Act would ensure that all books will be born accessible in Canada. Given the abundance of means by which accessible books can be produced, why does the lack of accessible books continue to be an issue?

(1535)

Mr. Lui Greco:

Access to literature is important for a multitude of reasons for people with disabilities. It enables full participation in the economic and cultural fabric of our society. Inability to access published content makes it hard to succeed in education and work, as I illustrated earlier.

Future generations will need to compete in a faster paced world; thus, the need to have accessible books available at the same time—when the books are born—is going to be increasingly more competitive as the information age escalates.

Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you. We'd be glad to try to answer any questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to the Council of Canadians with Disabilities.

Mr. Rae, you have up to seven minutes.

Mr. John Rae (Chair, Social Policy Committee, Council of Canadians with Disabilities):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Members of the committee, as you indicated my name is John Rae. I am a member of CCD's national council and chair of its social policy committee.

I'm here to talk to you about the dual issues of accessibility and usability. I assure you these two concepts are connected, but they are not synonymous.

In my time I'm hoping to cover five points.

Point number one is accessibility. As the previous speakers have indicated, many published works today are not accessible to folks like me or folks like them. That needs to change. Even when I receive reports from the Government of Canada that are sent to me electronically, I wonder whether when I open the attachment, my screen reader will say empty document, the bane of my existence. That tells me that I have received a PDF document that is not readable by my screen reader. Yes, this still happens in the year 2018, and it must stop.

I have done some work with your publishing people earlier this year. I'm hoping this problem is behind me, but I'm a skeptical guy. There is, of course, a simple way to solve the problem, and that is to stop publishing documents solely in the PDF format. It is, after all, the most problematic of formats. Or, if you continue to insist on using it, publish simultaneously a version in text or HTML. They are more likely to be accessible.

The act should bind Parliament insomuch and insofar as the publication of documents. All of your documents must be published in an accessible format.

Point number two is usability. I'm sure you've all heard the notion from some of your constituents that it often seems that government documents are written for lawyers and only for lawyers. I've seen some of you are lawyers and that's all right. I started up that road and didn't get there. I'm an advocate. I also need, as do other ordinary Canadians, access to the material you folks publish.

I'm talking about the need to write reports in plainer and more understandable language, and maybe even shorter in length. That would help too. As you know when a new document is released, the media is interested in responses the day it's released, perhaps the day after. If you're really lucky and it's really controversial, maybe two days later. People like us need to be able to participate in that discourse just like all other Canadians. That's the issue of usability. Documents need to be produced more in plain language.

Point number three is Braille. For blind people, Braille is our route to literacy. It is essential. Strange though it may sound, in the year 2018, while it is easier than ever before in human history to publish material in Braille, it seems like less and less of it is being produced. We can talk about why that's the case, but we'll save that for the time being.

There needs to be greater promotion of Braille. In the past, the Council of Canadians with Disabilities has recommended that the federal government establish a national program for disability supports. One of those areas could be the provision of refreshable Braille displays to those blind persons who need them and want them, to make access to Braille easier and to encourage more and more people to use Braille, because it really is our mode to literacy.

When the accessible Canada act was introduced, I immediately asked for it in Braille, because as you know every comma, every semicolon, can make a difference. I said that I might need it when I go to meetings to talk about it. Well, I had to justify as to why I wanted it. It wasn't just that I wanted it. I had to say why I needed it. I'm pleased that I did get it, and it has come in handy.

(1540)



Point number four is publishers. I want to support the point Mr. Simpson made earlier. CCD believes in the addition of a disability lens, especially to Bill C-81, but I think it could be added to the Copyright Act as well, whereby no federal funds would be given to any program, policy, contract or grant that would contribute to perpetuating barriers or creating new ones. That would include grants or contributions to publishers.

Point number five, my final point, is the whole involvement of the publishing sector. Earlier this year, the office for disability issues called together a wide range of representatives: publishers, consumers, producers. I believe many of the right players were brought to the table. The goal was to produce a five-year plan for the production and the expansion of the availability of material in alternate formats.

We last met in May. So far, no plan whatsoever has been seen. The first year of those five is ticking away awfully fast. Still, no plan has been issued. Perhaps you folks can help us get that release. That would be helpful. Publishers need to be more involved. If that would involve maybe some initial assistance from Heritage Canada to help them get started or to rev up their work in producing accessible documents, then so be it. I would support that. Publishers need to do a better job, not only of producing documents, but making them available to public libraries and making them available for direct sale to consumers.

Thank you for the opportunity to come and talk to you about those dual questions about accessibility and usability. I would be happy to respond to questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Toronto, the Screen Composers Guild of Canada.

Mr. Novotny, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Paul Novotny (Screen Composer, Screen Composers Guild of Canada):

Thank you very much. We're very happy to be here today.

Ari and I represent the Screen Composers Guild of Canada. Screen composers create original music for film, television, documentary and other screen media that is exported around the world. You may not know our names, but you may very well know our work.

(1545)

Mr. Ari Posner (Screen Composer, Screen Composers Guild of Canada):

Most of the work I've done has been for television. I'm going to talk about just two shows that will be pertinent to this discussion. One was a show that I scored with a colleague of mine here in Toronto called Flashpoint, which was a procedural police drama that was a landmark show for Canada because it opened the floodgates to the U.S. in some ways. It was sold to CBS and it aired down there very successfully. That's an example of a show from the 20th century that aired terrestrially. Currently I work on a show that has a different model. It's called Anne with an E, which is a modern-day telling of Lucy Maud Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables. Anne with an E airs on CBC here in Canada, but in the rest of the world it's airing on the streaming giant Netflix in 190 different countries.

Mr. Paul Novotny:

I had the good fortune to work with George Stroumboulopoulos creating the music for CBC's The Hour. Also, I've written the music for CBC News Now, which is on Newsworld. Also, I did the music for CBC's The National.

The reason we're here today is because we want to tell you a little bit more about our dilemma and exactly how we locate ourselves in our creative ecosystem.

Screen composers are the first owners of their copyright. Like screen writers, screen composers are recognized as key creative people. Our music copyrights consist of two types of rights: a performance right and a reproduction right. These rights live alongside a separate bundle of motion picture copyrights. When our music is married to picture, it is distributed for domestic and international broadcast, generating copyright remuneration, which is derived from a broadcaster's advertising sales. Our remuneration is governed by copyright policy, not by us. SOCAN collects on behalf of us from around the world.

The money for public performance and reproduction rights is calculated on a per cent of quarterly advertising sales. Twentieth century copyright policy for screen composers is based on broadcast advertising sales. I want to ask Ari how that is working for him in the 21st century.

Mr. Ari Posner:

I'm here to tell you that it's not working well so far, and Anne with an E is a good example of it. This is a show that Netflix reported to the producers of the show. I might add that Netflix doesn't report a lot of data, but this is something that they reported to the producers, that the show was the fourth most binge-watched series on the network in 2017.

That's a pretty staggering statistic. It means that millions and millions of people are watching that show all over the world. They're watching it quickly. Anne with an E is about to start its third season next year, and I can tell you that, when I look at the remuneration I've seen compared to a show like Flashpoint, which was aired terrestrially, it's not an exaggeration to say that I've seen a 95% drop in downstream revenue.

Mr. Paul Novotny:

My story is that I recently wrote music for a film called Mishka, made by Canadian filmmaker Cleo Tellier. It has achieved 22.5 million YouTube views since April 22, 2018. The film is generating approximately $3,000 a month in YouTube advertising revenue. There is no connection, though, in the 21st century, of that advertising revenue to a public performance or a reproduction copyright.

At this point, Ari and I are both sitting here wondering what has happened to our public performance and reproduction royalties. The simple truth is that they've become insignificant, because the money has moved to subscription. We think that copyright policy must be augmented in order to gather adequate money from subscriptions to sustain our sector in the 21st century.

What has happened is a value gap has been created. We want the members of the committee and all Canadian citizens to understand exactly what this value gap looks like. I'm going to tell you right now.

In 2018, Netflix reported $290 million in net income for the first quarter, more profit in three months than the streaming giant had for the entire year of 2016. If the company meets its second quarter forecast of $358 million in profit, it will earn more in the first half of 2018 than in all of 2017 when it reported an annual profit of $585.9 million.

During the same time period, Ari Posner has experienced a 95% decline in public performance and reproduction copyright remuneration from the fourth most self-served, binge-watched Netflix TV series in 191 countries.

Ari, it seems like you and your family are subsidizing Netflix. What's going on in your household?

(1550)

Mr. Ari Posner:

Let's just be clear, it's not just about me. I'm an example of someone who's in the middle of my career. I'll be 48 years old this year, and I have three young kids. I have a mortgage. I live a pretty basic middle-class lifestyle, and I've only been able to do that because of the value of my intellectual property on shows that I've worked on in the past.

Here I am, at this stage of the game, doing the same work on shows like Anne with an E that are more popular than anything I've ever worked on in the past, and yet the remuneration is not there. That is the value gap.

The only organization that can really help someone like me, my colleagues and my peers is an organization like SOCAN that advocates for us and goes after the performance and reproduction royalties from our work.

As it stands right now, the streaming giants, the big tech companies—the Amazons, the Hulus, the Netflixes—have no transparency, and they don't seem to need to have any transparency. I'm not sure why.

Mr. Paul Novotny:

We're going to finish up very quickly here. We have three things that we would like to request.

The Screen Guild wants to participate further in the process of crafting a fair-trade, techno-moral copyright policy for the 21st century so as to respect every constituent in the value chain of screen media, including the consumer.

We want Canada to adopt a philosophical vision that aligns with other countries and economic unions that embrace copyright protection for creators. An example could be found in EU articles 11 and 13, which espouse similar ideas to Music Canada and CMPC recommendations. With that, what we want to do is encourage you to endorse those recommendations.

Ari is going to finish up with a few principles that we believe are key to techno-moral copyright policy in the 21st century.

The Chair:

We should just quickly wrap it up, because we are a little over time.

Thank you. Go ahead.

Mr. Ari Posner:

I'm going to read you a quote that I would like to finish with. I read this to the heritage committee as well. This was something said by J.F.K.: “The life of the arts, far from being an interruption, a distraction, in the life of a nation, is very close to the centre of a nation's purpose—and is a test of the quality of a nation's civilization.”

I'd like everyone in the room to consider that if the government cannot intervene and help strengthen copyright laws to protect creators' rights, we are going to have a country that is going to be a far less rich place, because people are going to be discouraged from pursuing careers in that field.

Thank you very much for listening. I'm sorry I went a little over time. I'll be happy to take questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for all of your presentations.

Normally, I just introduce the members as they go through questions, but seeing as we have some who are visually impaired, I will also introduce you by your party, so the witnesses will know where the questions are coming from.

We're going to start with Mr. Jowhari from the Liberal Party.

You have seven minutes.

(1555)

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to all the witnesses.

I will let you know that I will be sharing my time with MP Longfield.

I'm going to start with the Screen Composers Guild of Canada. Mr. Novotny or Mr. Posner—either of you could answer this question. This goes back to the testimony you provided in front of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, on September 25.

You brought up SOCAN, and you stated that SOCAN was unable to “get behind those closed doors of Netflix” and that Netflix would not be able to “give them the data they need in order for them to properly tabulate the views and turn them into a proper remuneration model”. You made similar comments about YouTube. You touched on both Netflix and YouTube in this testimony.

Can you tell us exactly what type of data needs to be collected from these two organizations to be able to fairly compensate? The numbers you are talking about—what they are going to hit by the middle of this year, compared to where they were last year—are astronomical. What data do you need to be able to make sure you get your fair share?

Mr. Paul Novotny:

Both Ari and I are composers. That is a question that would be best answered by somebody from SOCAN. I just honestly don't know.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Ari, you're of the same point of view?

Mr. Ari Posner:

You're talking about some very technical stuff there. It's really not our place to be speaking on their behalf. They are our advocates.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

In your industry, who is doing the licensing and remuneration negotiations with organizations such as Netflix and YouTube?

Mr. Ari Posner:

It is SOCAN. It's only the performance rights organizations, like SOCAN and their counterparts around the world, that make these negotiations. However, they do not have the transparency from territory to territory. Netflix does not have to talk about what deal they made in this country versus that country. What SOCAN reports to us is they need to have more data in terms of the actual numbers of views and streams, to be able to tabulate popularity. That's what we've been told.

This is what we are getting from SOCAN. It's not as clear and simple as in the terrestrial model, where “here's our advertising revenue, here's the percentage that is dictated by the government by the tariff”, and there you go.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

I have about 30 seconds. I want to come back you again. What data do you think should be collected to make sure you get remunerated properly?

Mr. Ari Posner:

As Paul said, I do think that's something we should consult with our performance rights organization about, to be able to give you an accurate picture of that.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Okay, thank you.

I'll pass it on to Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks.

I'd like to start off with some questions for Mr. Greco from the CNIB. I volunteered for several years at the CNIB in Winnipeg back in the 1970s, I'm afraid to say. Technology was a lot different then. We were working with books that were on cassette tapes or on reel-to-reel tapes.

I'm wondering in terms of this legislation...we've opened up the Marrakesh Treaty. We've given the green light for materials to be available in different formats, but it sounds like that isn't being enacted by the people providing the formats for your use.

Mr. Lui Greco:

Let me use an analogy to answer that.

Marrakesh has turned on the tap, but the water's not running.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

There's no pump.

Mr. Lui Greco:

It is incredibly easy today to produce Braille. The technology is very different from the four-track cassette tapes. I remember those tapes.

I had a calculus book in university that was 36 four-track, slow-speed cassette tapes. Today, the technology would make that more than redundant. It would be considered dinosaur age.

Let's be honest, if Marrakesh is successful then the quantity of alternate format materials that are available to Canadians—because Marrakesh requires sharing across borders—will be improved. This applies not only to English and French materials. Because we are a multicultural society and immigration is rapidly changing our landscape, we'll be able to get books in other languages that are produced offshore.

(1600)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

So it isn't a legislative problem I'm hearing.

Mr. Lui Greco:

Correct.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'm thinking also of your example of career planning. Looking on your website, I see that the Project Aspiro has an employment resource on it that's developed in partnership with the World Blind Union and funded by the Ontario Trillium Foundation. Again, the tools might be there to develop skills or to share skills but there seems to be a blockage there even in terms of just getting tested.

Mr. Lui Greco:

Yes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

It's a little frustrating when we're trying to work on legislation and thinking that we're going to do something. It sounds like we need to put some teeth into the legislation in terms of funding.

Mr. Lui Greco:

I think, as Mr. Simpson said at the end of our talking points, if publishers expect the protection that copyright affords them in whatever form that comes in, then the expectation should be that they produce their books in alternate format at birth. We're well beyond the days of needing every single accessible-format book to be read in a studio by a human being. There is free software available that will produce books in a better quality than you heard on this. It's getting better, it's getting faster and it's free, so it can't get much cheaper.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you very much.

I wish I had more time.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Albas from the Conservative Party.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank all of our witnesses for making the time to share your expertise with us today.

In particular, I'd like to start with the CNIB on the Braille.

First of all, is this French? Is it English?

Second, about how many pages would this be either[Translation]

in French or in English,[English]if this was submitted? I just want to get a sense of the briefing note you supplied today.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

That's double-sided. That is four single-sided pages.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, so it's quite extensive.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

Yes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you. That's a very effective way of communicating that.

Getting to the actual Copyright Act, they use the term “perceptual disability.” Does either the CNIB or the Council of Canadians with Disabilities believe that definition is broad enough to cover all of the people who may require exceptions under the act?

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

There's also a definition of “print disabilities” within the copyright legislation that is probably just as good as or better than “perceptual disabilities.” That was why our recommendation was to continue to use the term “print disabilities.”

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Mr. John Rae:

I've always thought that “perceptual disability” in this context is a rather strange term. I think “print disability” is better. Harkening back to the Marrakesh Treaty, it may help the cross-border sharing of what is produced, but still the issue is getting publishers to produce more to start with. That's where the act needs to do a better job in encouraging publishers to produce materials accessibly from the get-go.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I believe you mentioned the accessibility act that has recently been tabled. Which term do you think should be used in it? As far as I have read, the term “perceptual disability” does not exist in that legislation.

Mr. John Rae:

That's true. I believe it does not. There's a fairly broad definition of disability in Bill C-81. A lot of us are suggesting that the bill could be strengthened considerably with amendments and we hope that the HUMA committee will see fit to do so.

(1605)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Rae, in regard to that piece of legislation, it's helpful for people, regardless of where they come from, to have similar language applied along different pieces of legislation. Would you be supportive of seeing a definition in the Copyright Act that's similar to the one in the accessibility act?

Mr. John Rae:

I agree with your notion that consistency of definition would be helpful.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Would the CNIB wish to respond?

Mr. Lui Greco:

“Perceptual disability” would exclude people with physical disabilities who are unable to physically handle a book, with ALS, for instance, and other neurological diseases that would be a barrier. I don't think we've had a chance to really decide whether “perceptual disability” or “print disability” would be the language of choice, but what we would strongly advocate for, and my colleague will correct me if I am wrong on this, is that the language must be inclusive.

It must be inclusive of anyone with a disability that, for whatever reason, due to a disability that is physical, perceptual or cognitive, which is the same thing, bars them from being able to visit the bookstore and buy a book.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you for that. I certainly appreciate the expertise you're bringing to this issue.

I've also heard from disability advocates. In my area, for example, in Kelowna, we have Michelle Hewitt, who is championing local accessibility issues. She said to me that she and many of the people she works with are often unaware of many of the exemptions in the Copyright Act for people with disabilities, that they even existed.

Is that something that either group has found consistently as well, that even though there are carved exemptions in the Copyright Act, people don't necessarily know about them?

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

To be honest, I would assume that a lot of Canadians probably don't know the intricacies of the Copyright Act, so the limitations are probably somewhat problematic. We as an organization haven't looked into those. As we've discussed, our primary focus is in sharing. If a copyright is to be given to a producer, it should ensure that the literary work is done in accessible format.

Mr. Lui Greco:

Academic institutions, libraries and production houses such as the one that CNIB operates—and Simon Fraser University used to and probably still does have a production facility—those players are well aware.... We are well aware of the intricacies, what we're allowed to do and what we're not allowed to do, and where the line exists.

For consumers, when I take my hat off at the end of the day and I want to access material, my only concern is what's available. Where do I get it, and what barriers or hurdles do I have to overcome in order to access it?

Mr. John Rae:

I would assume that producers are aware. I've seen publishers that are aware. As Lui just said, at the end of the day, our community wants access to more material to read. That's what we're after. Therefore, our work in CCD has really been more in trying to get publishers more involved in producing more accessible materials.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Then you would say that there's a fair number who know about the exemptions, but the knowledge of the general public and those who are working with disabilities is inconsistent with that. Is that correct?

Should government be playing a role in that, other than establishing the Copyright Act and those exemptions?

Mr. John Rae:

It certainly can't hurt to expand Canadians' knowledge of what the act says and what it provides for. I think a lot of people who produce it, whether it be producers of alternate formats, or whether we're talking about colleges and universities—I suspect those people are reasonably well aware, but it can never hurt.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I go back to Mr. Greco's case about his inability to take an exam. Does government have a role?

Mr. Lui Greco:

Of course. But in the current context, you can shout it from the rooftops. In my case, with the Project Management Institute where I paid a fee to write an exam, they chose not to comply under a false pretext that it would be too onerous on them and simply shut the door on their moral obligation to accommodate me. I don't see how government or any organization providing education would help.

I needed a stick, some kind of mandate or obligation to say to them, this is how you can provide the resources to me as a paid member in a format that I can be successful. You must do it, and here is the piece of legislation that says you must do it.

Quite honestly, in an ideal world, I shouldn't be having those conversations. I should be able to identify myself as a blind person, and as a producer I require the materials in an alternate format—be it Braille, electronic text, DAISY, whatever—and the publisher, or in my case the PMI organization, as a producer should simply deliver it. I've paid my fees, I've met their credentials, I've jumped through the necessary hoops, and then I encounter a wall. It's not just. It's not fair.

(1610)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

Mr. John Rae:

I think an area that would help here would be more resources to the human rights commissions across Canada so they can do a better job of informing Canadians of the duty to accommodate, of legal obligations that in my mind already exist in human rights law.

That's why so many of us go to commissions; why over 50% of cases taken to the human rights commissions every year fall under the prohibited grounds of disability. If harder awards and more public education were done, maybe we could cut down the need for some of those complaints.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

From the NDP, we have Brian Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

When I had a real job, I used to be an employment specialist on behalf of persons with disabilities at Community Living Mississauga and the Association for Persons with Physical Disabilities of Windsor and Essex County, and I was on the board of directors for the CNIB.

It's frustrating to have to continue to prove how your own taxpayers' dollars have to be used for basic things that should be a right. I'll give you a card later, but I'll give an example of the barriers we create. I have a Braille card from the House of Commons that I use, and I'm allowed to have this, but my staff is not. Despite the fact that I could get this business card printed in Braille, our public policy here, that I have been unable to change in the 16 years I've worked here, will not provide my staff with the same accommodation, despite the complete accessibility of something like this. This is the type of stuff we continue to see.

I want to talk a little about your amendment, subsection 3(2), and where the philosophy for that comes from. I think it's important. Government and also sponsored investments have the onerous responsibility to be accessible. I can tell you once again we have a 50% unemployment rate for persons with disabilities, which is a chronic problem, a systemic problem in our society, and then on top of that, if we don't have these materials, not only is it social exclusion from the workplace, but also socio-cultural.

Please explain a little more about section 3(2) and how that turns the tables to be more proactive. There are those who argue that accessible doors or accessible washrooms are too expensive, but you can use them as good examples that the investment makes a better society for all.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

CNIB recently did a study, which we've also commissioned internationally, to compare levels of employment for persons with sight loss. Our findings, which we hope to publish shortly, indicate that in Canada a person who is blind or partially sighted has a full-time employment rate of 28%. Of those people who are employed, half make under $20,000 a year. So we already have the problem of trying to get an education. Trying to then go into post-secondary education, to get books and studying material in an accessible format is hard enough as well, so you have that barrier. Trying to be on a level playing field culturally—you know, what's happening; what is the newest Harry Potter book; what is Stephen King writing; trying to be able to compare with society—is difficult as well.

There are so many barriers in just trying to access a book that you then can't compare with your sighted peers and citizens.

Lui, do you want to further comment?

(1615)

Mr. Lui Greco:

I'd say take the word “compare” and replace it with “compete”. The shelves, I assume, are full of leadership books: how to manage your career, how to get ahead, how to write the ultimate resumé, how to leverage social networking for job-searching skills. We're all just between jobs. The days of lifelong careers are long gone. I'm at the end of my career. I've got more years behind me than ahead of me. In fact, I've got very few years ahead of me, probably 10 or 15, but in those 10 or 15 years, whether they're with CNIB or with someone else, I need to be competitive. I need the skills and knowledge and toolset to be able to compete with Mr. Simpson or Mr. Rae or our two colleagues from Toronto for whatever opportunities come along. I don't have those now.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Then 3(2) will require some of the works to have that available. Is that...?

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

Our creation of subsection 3(2) would ensure that if a copyright is to be issued for literary work, it must be published in an accessible format.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I guess there are many persons with disabilities who are taxpayers and have contributed to some of the programs and services. I can't tell you how many announcements I've been to over the years where I walk into a place that's inaccessible, getting millions of dollars of funding from the public and not even having accessible doorways or other things of that nature. Things are changing, but the reality is that we need more of an assertive approach, a more upfront approach.

Mr. Rae, do you have anything to add?

Mr. John Rae:

I agree with everything you're saying. We have hopes that the accessible Canada act will have a positive effect on our lives. I think it needs strengthening, but we are delighted that the government introduced it. I think what would also help is some harsher words from human rights commissions. I think at the moment a lot of these small awards are not a deterrent to organizations to stop discriminating against the disabled community, or other groups for that matter, so I think that would help as well.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It would certainly be much more of an advantage, similar to the example I used of accessible washrooms and accessible doorways and the mechanics behind them, because currently in the literary works and with Braille and other things now, we're still at the point where we have to continue to raise awareness and almost beg for inclusion versus this being part of the process. If we had to still go around our government buildings and our different places and beg for accessible washrooms and accessible doors to this day, it would be a lot of energy, a lot of wasted time. By the way, those things there actually improve the workplace for everybody else, as they lower work-related accidents and so forth.

Mr. Greco, your notation about competing is very valid because that's not even often mentioned. I would argue that the low-vision Brick Books that have been introduced by so many different libraries across the country have helped that inclusion, but it's still not completed in terms of the works that are necessary.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

I would say to that point, as well, that as our society ages and people live longer, most of you in this room probably will also have sight loss affecting you in some capacity, so at some point you may also have a barrier when trying to access printed works if we don't do anything about it.

Mr. John Rae:

I would also suggest to you that the low level of unemployment you mentioned has an additional negative effect. It's not just the economic deprivation that comes to us, but the fact that we are not represented in adequate numbers means that many organizations do not have expertise on disability in-house.

Increasing our representation in places where decisions are made that affect the lives of all Canadians, in the boardrooms, in Parliament, in the newsrooms of our nation, would reduce the extent to which our issues are either just forgotten about because we aren't there, or callously not dealt with.

Bringing more of us into the mainstream is what we're looking for.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we go back to the Liberal Party. Mr. David Graham, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Simpson, you held up a device earlier. What is that thing called?

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

This is a Victor Reader. It plays a DAISY book, which is a navigable audiobook.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any technology that exists, regardless of cost right now, that you can point at a piece of paper and it will read it to you?

To take the text to—

A voice: OCR.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: OCR, thank you—to the next level, does that technology exist or is it in development? Have we heard about it?

Mr. Lui Greco:

Yes, it does exist. There are free programs. One is called Seeing AI, which is an artificial-intelligence app that Microsoft put out. It's a prototype development platform they're trying to use to tweak artificial intelligence.

A few years ago, the National Federation of the Blind, in partnership with Ray Kurzweil—I'm sure you've all heard of him—made available for cost an app called the KNFB Reader. The last time I checked—and please don't quote me on this—it was around the $100 price point. It was a very robust optical character-recognition system that you could literally point at a piece of paper—a menu, a newspaper, whatever—and it would do a really half-decent job of digitizing that to make it accessible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have you used such a device, Mr. Greco?

Mr. Lui Greco:

I have the Seeing AI app on my phone. It's great. I tried using it in the hotel room last night to tell me whether it was shampoo or body lotion, not exactly Ultimate Format materials, but it gives you a sense of the.... Hopefully I didn't use...anyhow, it doesn't matter.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Lui Greco: We laugh, but these things are real. You go into a hotel room and there's a deluge of leaflets on your bed. You go onto a plane and they encourage you to read the safety briefing card. You go to a university and they ask you to pick your courses from a calendar, and so on and so on and so on.

I haven't personally used the KNFB Reader. I know many people who have, and they love it. It's opened huge doors to them. It's definitely going the right way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For somebody who is visually impaired or outright blind, how much does it cost in extra things you need to get through life? Is there any way of quantifying that for us?

Mr. Lui Greco:

For the talking book reader that Thomas has here, a company called HumanWare, just outside of Montreal, sells these devices internationally for $350 to $400 a pop.

The KNFB Reader was around $100 the last time I checked. Some of the more sophisticated reading machines, closer to TV readers, where you place printed material underneath a camera that then blows it up, based on the person's ability to read or to see, are in the thousands of dollars. Braille display machines that Mr. Rae talked about, the refreshable Braille displays, are in excess of $3,500.

Prototypes are coming onto the market. CNIB participated in something called the Orbit Reader. It's just coming to fruition now, selling for $500, but it's still first generation. Just think back to microwaves; they were clunky, and they sort of worked.

It will get better. As these devices go through their life-cycle development, they will get better, and they will become cheaper and do more.

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, now—

Mr. John Rae:

But the costs that Mr. Greco was speaking about are real, and that's one of the reasons that we need a national program to fund technical equipment. If you live in Ontario, as I do, our ADP will cover three-quarters of the cost of a fair number of pieces of equipment. If I suddenly move out of Ontario, I lose access to that. That should be available across the country.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As I understand it, you're allowed to circumvent a technological protection measure for visual impairment, so you can use it. If something is protected, you're able to reverse engineer that legally. What are the resources required to do that? If you have a device that has digital locks on it, what's involved in circumventing them to use it?

Mr. Lui Greco:

In DRM?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. It's DRM in the U.S., and TPM in Canada.

Mr. Lui Greco:

It's impossible. It's impossible, because unless you want to reverse engineer a DRM product, you then run the risk of contravening not only the law, even though you are entitled to do so for accessibility purposes.... Once you start tampering with electronic files, you run the risk of compromising the content, which, quite honestly, I think is a more serious issue than running the risk of alienating or upsetting a publisher because you've broken their copyright.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I have a few seconds left. David, do you have a quick question.?

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Sure. I'll speak to Mr. Novotny and Mr. Posner.

The gist of your argument is that you had a system. There was an ecosystem in which your contribution would be valued with payments collected by SOCAN, but based on a model that doesn't represent the reality. We've moved from advertising to subscription as a source of revenue, so tracking advertising is not very good.

As a hypothetical question, do you think you have enough negotiating clout at the outset to say you'd be better off getting a higher fixed fee at the outset? Would that be a possible solution?

Mr. Ari Posner:

I can pretty much tell you that it wouldn't be. Based on the types of budgets that we see here in Canada, certainly it wouldn't be. I'm not even sure if would be for American composers, either. I suppose if I were a single guy in my twenties living in a one-bedroom apartment, or something like that, perhaps I could make a go of it that way. But it certainly wouldn't make for a reasonable middle-class lifestyle of any sort. So much of our livelihood is dependent on our intellectual property working for us. We do contract work. When you're between contracts, and maybe you don't see a new series or film or show for a few months, that revenue is all the more important.

Mr. David Lametti:

What can we fix upon in the subscription model in order to try to replicate or create a revenue stream? Is it the number of streams? Is there something there that we could pin some kind of remuneration on?

Mr. Paul Novotny:

It's a little difficult for either of us to say because we are composers. SOCAN would probably know that. But my understanding of it is that there must be some sort of rate that these subscription services basically pay to performing rights organizations. Maybe that mill rate needs to go up. Maybe the actual way the views are counted needs to change. There's such a disconnect between the way this is working now and the way it used to work.

I'll be truthful. I teach at Humber College and I'm also at York University. I'm very concerned for the next generation of composers and musicians. Many of them are saying that they want to enter this profession, and with the numbers that Ari has reported to me, I feel like a hypocrite trying to position an optimistic viewpoint to my students.

(1630)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move back to the Conservative Party. Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm going to go along the same lines as MP Graham.

We've heard a lot about the education exemptions that are available with fair dealing and their impacts on the publishing sector. Are there any aspects of those exceptions that impact people with disabilities to a larger extent that the committee should be aware of?

Mr. Lui Greco:

As I understand it, and perhaps Mr. Rae can clarify this, if I attend a post-secondary institution in Canada, I buy the book from the bookstore. The university can then burst it, scan it, and give it to me in an alternate format without incurring any penalties or fees, or be in jeopardy of contravening its obligation.

One suggestion might be to better enable those institutions and others in the production business to be a better resource to do that. It's always a matter of resources. Scanning a book is not just a matter of pushing a button and away it goes, because technology often falls far short of doing a good job. There's always that human element that needs to go in and actually fix the text, so that if it's a chart, that chart should be properly described. That would be the only improvement that I would see.

Mr. John Rae:

I think Mr. Greco is right. Even when you scan a book, sometimes scanning isn't perfect. If the publisher produced an accessible version to begin with, that would alleviate that problem. It would alleviate the need to spend time scanning, and it would presumably produce a better copy. After all, as far as I understand most documents these days started out electronically, so I see no reason why an accessible version in an electronic format can't be produced.

Mr. Lui Greco:

No one is using the IBM Selectric to produce books anymore.

Mr. John Rae:

That's right.

Mr. Dan Albas:

The act specifies that if a work is available in the proper format in a commercially available form, it's available for a reasonable price with reasonable effort to acquire. It does not fall under the exceptions. Day-to-day tasks that we may take for granted can be very challenging for people with a disability. Should the act specify that reasonable effort is a different standard for the disabled community?

Mr. Lui Greco:

In our opinion, sir, no. We don't apply reasonable effort to make buildings accessible. We don't say, “You must put in a ramp or you must provide a door opener only if it doesn't create an undue hardship”. We don't say that. We say, “Buildings must be accessible and usable by everyone.” Period, new paragraph.

Why do we provide those opt-outs for publishers?

We do the same thing with transportation. The Canadian Transportation Agency has similar language. Websites must be made accessible, provided that it's not an undue hardship. Terminals must make their facilities accessible to people with disabilities, provided that it doesn't create an undue barrier.

I call that nonsense. I'm not from Ottawa; I'm from Calgary. Mr. Simpson and I walked over from a hotel that I'm staying at, which is about four blocks away. Most of the intersections did not have appropriate accessibility accommodations. The ones that did were inconsistent. The beeping traffic lights or the accessible pedestrian signals, as we refer to them, didn't work.

Why do we allow that? Why is that acceptable? Bringing it back to this conversation, why do we say it's okay to produce things that are not accessible? Why is it okay that a book or a work of art that is produced with public funding is not made accessible?

Our colleagues from Toronto on the art side... Described video is not expensive, yet we have huge discussions with broadcasters and producers around the inclusion of described video. Why is it okay not to expect that content be made accessible to everyone, regardless of how they consume that work of art or media?

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now back to the Liberal side, with Ms. Celina Caesar-Chavannes.

You have five minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you very much to all the witnesses.

I'll start quickly with the composers. I have a quick question in terms of the speed in which the digital era is moving forward.

It seems that we are far behind. You're giving us numbers from Netflix. You're quoting how much they're making year over year, and it's not getting into your pockets or your coffers at all.

Do you think a five-year review of the Copyright Act is sufficient, or should it happen more frequently?

Mr. Paul Novotny:

I think something needs to happen faster than that actually, a lot faster. Things are moving at an epic pace with regard to technology.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Mr. Posner, do you agree?

Mr. Ari Posner:

Yes, I would definitely agree. When it was last reviewed, it was, as I understand it, decided at the time that it would be five years before it would be reviewed again. Maybe that seemed appropriate at the time, but times have changed, and they're changing faster than ever.

I really believe that it's only going to be maybe in a century from now when people look back at this time and say, my God, look at what happened in the beginning of the 21st century. How did they weather that storm? It's just going up and up, the speed at which things are changing. And copyright is something that needs to keep pace with that, no matter what happens.

Mr. Paul Novotny:

It needs to be agnostic, technologically agnostic. The copyright has to actually relate to the first ownership and to the work. It needs to allow for the technology to move so that it can basically be attached to the work, if that makes sense.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you very much.

Now I'm going to move to Mr. Simpson, Mr. Greco and Mr. Rae.

I have to say that I appreciated your testimony, Mr. Greco. Stories are sticky. Your opening story about your project management course failures at the end, after you've paid your fees, was frustrating to listen to.

Mr. Rae, you talked about reinforcing human rights. If we pull away the curtain of this copyright review, I would say that a lot of what you are talking about, especially with regard to publicly funded material, is not just about copyright, it's about the right to access. If we expect to have access within the federal jurisdiction of materials in French and English, you would like it in either French or English, but you'd just like to have it, period. Is that a fair assessment of what you would want?

Mr. John Rae:

It probably goes a bit beyond that.

We have a lot of indigenous languages in this country. There's a growing amount of literature and artistic performance in these various indigenous languages. I think we need to do more to promote that. Making some of that accessible to folks who need their languages in a more accessible manner should also be included. After all, the incidence of disability among indigenous communities is very high. I think the needs of indigenous peoples need to be considered in this context.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Are there any comments from Mr. Greco or Mr. Simpson?

Mr. Lui Greco:

I'd say that you found it frustrating listening to it; imagine living it. Whether that be a professional career step that someone is trying to take, whether it be buying a book on gardening, or some hobby that people want to leverage to improve the quality of their life, I don't see a difference. Mine was professional. But fortunately, we have more in our life than our job. It's about not continuing to encounter those types of barriers that prohibit people from exploring, growing and contributing to their world and their families.

(1640)

Mr. John Rae:

I have a slightly similar story.

When I retired, I decided I would go back to school. I applied to Ryerson. I was accepted. Some of their courses are done by distance learning, and they used this thing called “Blackboard”.

I'm not 100% sure whether it was inaccessible or if it was just so complicated I couldn't figure out how to use it, but it was a barrier, so I withdrew. I felt I had to withdraw before I even got started, and that was a great disappointment to me. I actually had a reason for wanting to go back to school, and Blackboard at the time was a barrier to me. I think it has been changed a little bit since then, but I don't know if it's accessible now or not.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Again, going along the same lines here and understanding that we're in the context of the Copyright Act review, in terms of the ability to create inclusive spaces, inclusive workplaces, or inclusive places within the federal jurisdiction or anything that uses public funding, Mr. Greco, you said that no federal funds should be awarded to programs that further perpetuate barriers.

We use something called gender-based analysis plus. I find that often we focus on the gender lens, and the plus—the intersectionality piece—seems to come in but not as fervently as the gender.

You might not know specific numbers, but can you talk to the economic downfall of not having those accessible materials that you need in a timely fashion, as you said, when books are born or when material is born.

Mr. Lui Greco:

I think the short answer is no. I don't think anyone really has studied that, but I would simply point to the situation around employment of persons with disabilities. Can you tie that back strictly to barriers around copyright? Probably not, but is the ability to obtain accessible materials a variable in that equation? Definitely, yes.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

The economic potential of persons with disabilities who are unemployed, should they become employed, is in the millions. To get there, we need to ensure that persons with print disabilities have access and the right to reading and information.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. John Rae:

If you consider the stat that Mr. Simpson gave you earlier, that only 28% of blind Canadians are currently employed, think of the costs that society is incurring for the extent of our unemployment. That is impacted on all aspects of life. If we don't have more money in our pockets, it's pretty difficult to participate in community life. It's more difficult to put decent food on our tables. It's difficult to find decent housing. These are all impacted by our low rate of employment. Certainly, if one has difficulty getting the training that is necessary to acquire credentials like those Mr. Greco talked about earlier, there's a vicious cycle here. We are excluded from equal access to so many aspects of life.

(1645)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move back to the Conservatives. Mr. Dan Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd actually like to speak to the screen composers. Thanks for being here today.

In regard to your plan to tax Internet users above 15 gigabytes, how exactly did you arrive at that number?

Mr. Paul Novotny:

Basically, it was a consideration for Canadians who do not have the money to be able to pay some sort of a levy. If we look at the extent of use by people who live in remote regions where they might have dial-up service, we felt that they likely would not be doing any sort of streaming, so the idea was to create some sort of relief if a system like that were to be looked at.

Mr. Dan Albas:

An eagerly awaited new game called Red Dead Redemption 2 is coming out this week. It is over 100 gigabytes. In what you're proposing here with starting any new tax at 15 gigabytes, that one game that somebody is going to buy and pay for—and we've heard from those who work in that industry that everyone gets paid, including the people who make the music for it, through their purchases—is six times higher. How is that fair to someone who has lawfully bought and paid for something, that one download of one game would hit that threshold right over the top?

Mr. Paul Novotny:

That's a very good question. You're talking to somebody who has actually worked on one of the most successful video games in the world that has come out of Canada. The bottom line is that our brethren, the screen composers who work in video, don't receive a public performance royalty or a reproduction royalty as we do. The idea here would be to include them in that type of copyright remuneration stream.

We all get paid fees up front to do our work, but oftentimes what we have to do is spend most of those fees to make the work for our clients. Copyright remuneration from public performance and reproduction is essential to our livelihood.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I totally understand what you're saying, sir, and the business model and the way people are behaving has changed. However, to be fair to someone, again, they may not access your content. They may be just looking to pay lawfully. We're not talking about pirates here who are taking away from that ability, we're talking about people who purchase something with their good money and may be not interested in your content. Why should they have to pay that 15-gigabyte tax for simply utilizing a service that they've paid the ISP supporter on, that they've bought the console or the TV with and they're enjoying for entertainment?

Again, I would go back to it. Why should someone who has not expressed interest in your content be paying for this new tax that you're proposing?

Mr. Paul Novotny:

Are you familiar with the economic mechanism called the “private copying levy”?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yes, but again, when I talk to millennials, they will say, “I've bought this song off iTunes” or “I've paid to stream this service, and I'm utilizing my own TV, my own console or computer, or router, my own ISP, the Internet usage plan”, and so on. They are paying for those services, and if they want to consume your content, they will pay you for it.

Again, this is a very specific question. Why should people who are paying for those things, in addition, have to pay this tax for your members, recognizing that there are real families who need to put food on the table such as yourselves?

Mr. Paul Novotny:

I have to be really clear that it's an idea we're exploring. The whole stimulus for this idea is that we have made it very clear how we are being compromised by the shift from the advertising model to the subscription model. We are searching hard for economic mechanisms that relate from the 20th century of copyright to the 21st century. The truth of the matter is that there is a levy in place already with private copying that “taxes”, if you will—and many people are using that term—zeroes and ones, which have been on digital media such as CDs, all sorts of data.

We're not saying this is going to 100% solve the problem, but what we think we should look at is somehow trying to extend an economic mechanism that was and is in place already in the 20th century, into the 21st century.

(1650)

Mr. Dan Albas:

I met with Unifor today. Obviously they were here on the Hill speaking about the need to support journalism, and one of their suggestions was almost identical to what you're calling for.

If we start creating rent-seeking on ISP, eventually everyone will want that, and then you'll be having consumers who are not consuming but are paying. Do you think that's fair? Who do you think we should limit it to?

Mr. Ari Posner:

It's a very complicated issue and your question's a good one.

Mr. Dan Albas:

This is your proposal. And, again, when you come here, I'd like to know—and I think people at home would like to know. Why do you believe, versus Unifor, versus some of these other groups that are as challenged as you with the new models of Netflix and Google and Facebook, that we as parliamentarians should be looking to give you that capacity and say no to all the rest?

Mr. Ari Posner:

Well, let me be clear and reiterate what Paul just said. This is just one of many ideas that the Screen Composers Guild and creators in our world are looking at. Again, we are not economists. The 15 gigabytes, it's not like it's the magic number, or this is what it should be. We obviously agree with you that you don't want to have people who aren't using the content to be paying a tax for it, if you want to call it that. We agree with that. But in an ideal world, what would be great is what we talked about earlier, which is transparency and to be able to have access to the knowledge to have our performance rights organizations get in there and do the work that they need to do in order to help remunerate the artists and the creators.

The levy that was talked about is just a very simple idea, something that has been in existence in the past. It would be very simple—

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would just say it's quite different from blank tapes, where I would make a mix tape for someone and utilize content from my own private collection to give to someone else. We're past blank CDs. Again, simply adding more cost to consumers—you're a consumer, I'm a consumer—I don't think that's right. But as parliamentarians, what is fundamental to us is government cannot tax without the consent of the people. And that's where any of these changes have to come from this committee.

When you bring forward a proposal from here, we do expect there to be good answers for this. It can't just be “we're hurting”, because everyone out there is challenged by this new technology. I would say that if you're going to come to a committee and ask for us to ask Canadians to pay more for something that they may not use, we should have good reasons as to why it's a special case.

We've heard at this committee that some of the publishers have suffered greatly. That might compromise the ecosystem for producing new materials. I'm concerned about that. We have to have those kinds of things fleshed out.

I appreciate that you don't have all the answers. I certainly don't myself. But when you come to a committee and you're asking us to use that ancient power to tax the people, we need to have good reasons.

Mr. Paul Novotny:

Could I add something?

The Chair:

Yes, quickly.

Mr. Paul Novotny:

Well, I just wanted to say that we completely respect everything that was just said. We just want to have a discussion about this. There actually is a precedent with existing legislation that is still in force right now with the Copyright Act. That's what we want: a discussion about updating that specific policy. That's where we're at with it.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan. You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank all of our presenters for their testimonies.

My first question is going to be for a panel that is present here with us. My wife works for an ophthalmologist. She is an opthalmic medical technician. I certainly understand a lot of what you're suggesting and stating, particularly with the fastest-growing segment of people with visual impairment being those 75 years and older. It's growing significantly as well.

Mr. Thomas Simpson, you had a book. Can you hold it up, please?

(1655)

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

I have this one and I have this one.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Okay. You have Harry Potter, for instance.

What would it cost a publisher to put a book into Braille? I'm not talking about the distribution and the total amount.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

Increasingly it's much cheaper than what it has been. I don't have that number offhand, but there's new technology coming out that would enable the production of Braille quicker, in large quantities and cheaper.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

So production is not cost-prohibitive to the publishers, you're suggesting.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

Correct. You can also have electronic Braille as well. If you have a refreshable Braille display—that's about this big—it will refresh the Braille for you so you're not then wasting paper. It's cheaper to produce as well.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

One of the reasons I ask that is that during your testimony, Lui, John and Thomas, you talked about a number of suggestions, and one of the things that this committee did as part of this study was travel from coast to coast. We started in Halifax and then went to Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and British Columbia.

We heard a lot from the creators. I'm not talking about the Harry Potter-type creators; I'm talking about the up-and-coming new creators, the people who do it part-time or casually and support their middle-class lifestyle by having another job. What are the chances that those same authors are going to be published in Braille or that there's going to be an interest in publishing their works?

Do you have any stats on smaller, less-known Canadian creators getting their opportunities to be published and distributed in Braille?

Mr. Lui Greco:

That's a really good question. I think the short answer is no. No one tracks it. Someone brings a book to market, and their job is to convince as many people as possible to buy it. Some of those people may or may not have a print disability.

I think to keep it in context, if you look at self-publishing today, Apple, Adobe and a multitude of other platforms provide the ability to self-publish. Provided that those platforms are accessible and that they design the platform to generate alternate format materials, the format that the consumer or I buy it in.... I either hook up my Braille printer to my computer and print it or listen to it on my Victor Reader or what have you. Then I bear the cost of making the content consumable in a format that I choose to digest, but the building has to be built to be usable and accessible, i.e., the building is the book.

Is that cost onerous? No. There's free software now. You can go to daisy.org, and you can download for free software that will take a Word document or an ASCII text file, or probably an XML or HTML file— XML is a protocol that publishers would be familiar with—and literally, at the click of a button, you can create a well-structured accessible book at no cost. Whether one person who's blind chooses to consume that or a thousand people choose to consume it, it doesn't matter. It's available in an accessible format.

We don't ask questions around how many people are going to be watching television with closed captioning. We don't ask that question anymore; we just make it available. One hundred percent of Canadian television has to include closed captioning.

Why would we ask the question that you just posed, sir? It's unfair and unnecessary. The fact is that all content should be made accessible, end of story.

(1700)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I agree with that. One of the things that struck me is that there's a disconnect between what's been happening in the publishing industry and the accessibility that is necessary. It struck me that the larger, more popular books probably get into Braille, but sometimes the new people who are writing are perhaps not getting their stuff into Braille. Any suggestions that we can make—and your testimony will help us—will help us to make sure that all books, whatever interests that person, are available for them, whether it's quality of life, study or business. I think those are important questions for us to continue.

What if we reversed it? For visually impaired creators, what tools are available for somebody who wishes to take an idea, get it published, and get it out to market? Would you have any suggestions or answers on that?

Mr. Lui Greco:

I would suggest self-publishing. There's a gentleman in my office in Calgary who lost his sight as a result of having water on the brain. I think it's hydrocephaly. He went from having normal vision to being legally blind literally overnight. He self-published a book that you can buy on iTunes for $10. He went through the same channels as you folks would go through when you decide to publish your memoirs.

Those platforms are available. Some are better than others. That's the same as anything else. There are good cars out there and there are bad cars. There are good self-publishing platforms that are usable by someone relying on assistive technologies and there are those that aren't. The natural market progression would be that when and if folks with disabilities choose to publish, they will find by trial and error those tools and those systems that work well for them. Those will be the ones they patronize, and hopefully, those will be the ones that last.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you for that really important testimony, so that we could get it on record.

The Chair:

Now we'll go back to the NDP. Mr. Masse, you have your two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

For our witnesses from Toronto, I just want to make sure it's clear this is just a five-year statutory review of the copyright change that we've had, and then we will be making recommendations, which will go to the minister. The minister will then have a designated period to respond to us. We're also constrained by a similar study going on with the heritage committee. From there, if there are going to be any changes, they would require tabled legislation, and likely more hearings, and then they would have to go through the House of Commons and the Senate. This is quite a winding tale to get where we're at.

What would you see as some of your priorities for what could be done? I know there's been a lot attention to a couple of items from other witnesses. Is there something, through regulation or in the short term—for example, the enforcement of current provisions—that could be done? If we do not come away with any changes in the short term, we're likely to come into an election, and that would then increase the time for all of this to take place. Perhaps you can enlighten us as to any potential things that would be seen in the short term or through regulation or enforcement of current provisions of the Copyright Act or the Copyright Board, for example. That would be helpful.

Mr. Ari Posner:

I guess I would come back to the notion that we're here to address the value gap. It's a very critical issue, and I think the most important thing that could happen is to have everyone at the table talking about it. It's my understanding that some of the big tech giants and streaming services have no desire to do this. It's not in their interest or necessary for them to be at the table. My understanding is that Spotify, for example, is one company that many artists have huge problems with because of the rates they're being paid. Yet Spotify is at least coming to the table to talk about it. Organizations like SOCAN and their sister organizations in the United States and England and France, all over the world, all need to be able to come to the table with the streaming companies—the Amazons, the Hulus, with Netflix, you can insert any one you want—to look at how things are being distributed in this new era and how we can make sure the creators are compensated fairly for it.

If you're Drake or you're the Weeknd or you're Hans Zimmer, and you're at the top of the chain, you're making money from these streaming services. But there's no middle class anymore, and there's no long game because of that. We're going to have a population of creators that is going to die out pretty quickly.

(1705)

Mr. Paul Novotny:

May I add something? Specifically, we do endorse what Music Canada is putting forward in its “Value Gap” document. Also, we do endorse what the CMPC recommends in their document “Sounding Like a Broken Record”. There are a number of things that could be actionable points fairly soon. That's where we start, but mostly we want to be part of the dialogue and we have ideas.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

The Chair:

For the final five minutes, we'll go to Mr. Lametti from the Liberal Party.

Mr. David Lametti:

Thank you very much.

I'll turn my attention to Mr. Greco and Mr. Rae.

I first want to say that my doctoral supervisor was the great Professor James Harris of Oxford University, who was blind and was not only a wonderful man but a brilliant scholar. He was a prolific author of two major books with Oxford University Press, plus articles and all the rest of what one would expect in an academic career of that stature. What was truly tragic, the biggest injustice of all, is that technology was just starting to make his life a whole lot easier back in the early 2000s. The last time I saw him was at his house in the U.K., and he had just gotten a new software that was reading texts to him. I used to submit my texts in WordPerfect and he had a machine that would convert it to Braille.

I want to invite Mr. Rae, and Mr. Greco as well, to speculate on what Mr. Rae had said earlier, which is, why? It seems to me crazy that people will not produce documents in formats, technological formats, that can then be easily convertible and easily accessible. If it's HTML or some other format, why do people insist on using formats such as PDF that are locked?

Mr. John Rae:

Well, there's a belief that it's locked. I maintain that's actually the big lie, and I say that for this reason: I get a PDF document, and if I can read it, if it is accessible, and there's a good chance it may be, I can take that document, turn it into Notepad or move it into the drafts folder of my email program, and immediately I can do anything I want with it.

In my opinion, the notion that a PDF document is automatically protected is a big lie.

As to why so much is just not produced, I guess there are those who see it as not a sufficient market. In terms of Braille, a lot of kids are now mainstreamed. Do itinerant teachers know Braille? Do they believe in Braille? There's an assumption that we read everything electronically now.

That's an unfortunate assumption, and it's an unfortunate idea, because as I said earlier, our road to literacy is Braille. I've learned so much about spelling and punctuation by having my fingers go over Braille. That's something you just do not get when you listen to a document, whether it's a book or a report, or whatever. Braille is so important, but it's just not given the priority it deserves.

(1710)

The Chair:

Mr. Greco.

Mr. Lui Greco:

If your doctoral colleague were still working today, I guarantee you his world would be much different from what it was when you were in school.

As to the question of why it is still so hard, sir, if I had that answer I wouldn't be talking to you today. This wouldn't be a conversation we would bring before a parliamentary committee looking at revising the Copyright Act. All I can tell you with certainty is that when I fly home tomorrow, if I want to walk into the magazine shop at the airport, all I can buy is gum and candy. I can't buy a magazine that I can read, a newspaper that I can read.

Newspapers are accessible to some extent—

Mr. John Rae:

But not in that shop.

Mr. Lui Greco:

—but not in that shop.

If I could have access to the magazines available in the shop or the bookstore down the street, I guarantee you that I would be spending a lot more money on consuming media. I don't spend much money, in fact I don't spend any money on media, because the things I really want to read just aren't available. Therefore, I consume what's available.

Mr. David Lametti:

Would it be sufficient, in terms of designing some type of legislation here, to require an accessible format and then rely on other kinds of incentives or assistance to allow persons with visual disabilities, perceptual disabilities, or who are blind to then convert the documents themselves, or do we need to do something more?

Mr. Lui Greco:

I think, at source, if the book were made available in a format that could be made easily accessible.... The ideal scenario, the world that we're envisioning, is that I walk into a Coles, I put my $20 down and say that I want this as a DAISY book or as an electronic Braille copy. That's what we should be going towards.

The availability of Victor Reader machines is scarce, and Braille printers are scarce, but they are available. If I had the content in a format that was accessible and usable, as John said earlier—and that's very important—then the publisher or the creator would not incur any additional costs. The devil's always in the details. Let's be honest, it's not a simple matter. The more they do it, the better they become at it; and the better they become at it, the more efficient they are and the cheaper it becomes.

Mr. Thomas Simpson:

I'd like to add that I think it's a matter of equality here. We can go as people who are sighted and get a book. We've provided Braille copies to all MPs. I don't expect, as a witness, that you are all going to now give it to your assistants and say, “Take this Braille copy and give it to me in a conventional print form.” That's just not going to happen.

I don't think it's a matter of enabling people with print disabilities to create an accessible format for themselves. It should just be made accessible.

Mr. John Rae:

There's another aspect to this that I don't think we've touched on very much, and that is libraries. We've talked to you a fair bit about our desire to be able to buy a book, and that's reality. In my case, I have a particular interest in certain areas of non-fiction, but it's very hard to get an accessible version of books on ancient Egypt, or some other countries I'd like to visit, and that sort of thing, whereas fiction might be a bit easier. Just as you have the choice of going to your local bookstore and buying a book, or going to your local library hoping it's in, and wanting to borrow it, we want the same. The more that publishers make that possible by producing their books in alternate formats.... Part of the market is direct sales to us as individuals, but part of it is also, of course, sales to local library systems, and that's also important. We want to be able to make greater use of our local libraries, and this moves in a positive direction in that regard.

I think there may be some need to provide a bit of financial assistance to publishers to really give them a push—not forever—but maybe to give them a push.

(1715)

Mr. David Lametti:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

That brings us to the end of our session today. I want to thank all of our witnesses from Toronto and the folks who came in to visit us.

I will remind some people that the accessibility legislation will be held in this room at six o'clock, and you can join me. I'll be sitting on the side, participating.

This is all actually very helpful for that portion. It's been quite eye-opening for me. I want to thank everybody. We have to ask hard questions to try to get some good evidence that we can include on that.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bienvenue au Comité de l’industrie, qui poursuit son examen quinquennal, prévu par la loi, du droit d’auteur.

Nous accueillons aujourd’hui, de l’Institut national canadien pour les aveugles, M. Simpson, responsable des affaires publiques, et M. Greco, gestionnaire national de la défense des intérêts.

Nous accueillons également, du Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences, John Rae, président du Comité de la politique sociale. Bienvenue.

De Toronto, où se tiennent de grandes élections aujourd’hui, nous accueillons Paul Novotny, compositeur à l’image, de la Guilde des compositeurs canadiens de musique à l’image, et Ari Posner, compositeur à l’écran.

Nous allons commencer par l’Institut national canadien pour les aveugles. Vous avez environ sept minutes.

M. Thomas Simpson (responsable, Affaires publiques, Institut national canadien pour les aveugles):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je m’appelle Thomas Simpson. Je suis le responsable des affaires publiques de l’INCA. Je suis accompagné aujourd’hui par mon collègue Lui Greco, directeur national de la défense des intérêts.

Nous nous sommes assurés d’avoir un mémoire en braille qui devrait être envoyé à chacun des membres du Comité. Certains d’entre vous se demandent sûrement pourquoi des organisations qui s'occupent de déficiences comparaissent pour parler de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur du Canada. J’espère que les prochaines minutes de notre exposé vous aideront à mieux comprendre comment il est possible de modifier la Loi sur le droit d’auteur du Canada pour éliminer les obstacles auxquels se heurtent les personnes ayant une déficience de lecture des imprimés.

Pour commencer, je vous propose un aperçu de l’INCA. L’INCA a vu le jour en 1918 pour aider les anciens combattants aveugles qui revenaient de la Première Guerre mondiale et les personnes blessées par l’explosion de Halifax. L’INCA offre des services de réadaptation après la perte de la vue ainsi que des services de soutien affectif et sociaux aux Canadiens aveugles ou atteints de cécité partielle. Il propose des programmes novateurs et des activités de sensibilisation efficaces qui permettent à ceux qui sont touchés par la cécité de réaliser leurs rêves et d’éliminer les obstacles à leur participation à la vie de la société.

M. Lui Greco (gestionnaire national, Défense des intérêts, Institut national canadien pour les aveugles):

Ce qui se passe en ce moment vous fera comprendre ce que c'est, avoir une déficience de lecture des imprimés et avoir du mal à obtenir des documents sur support de substitution, car il est très peu probable que vous puissiez lire le braille, tout comme les personnes aveugles ou malvoyantes sont incapables de lire les imprimés.

Malheureusement, il n’est pas possible d’acheter en librairie un livre sous une forme autre que l'imprimé.

Les Canadiens qui ont une déficience de lecture des imprimés, y compris la perte de la vue, doivent compter sur des documents en médias substituts. Cela comprend le braille, qui est exactement ce que vous avez sous les yeux. L'imprimé-braille dit bien ce dont il s'agit: de l'imprimé et du braille. Les parents d’enfants aveugles ou les enfants aveugles de parents voyants s'en servent pour pouvoir lire ensemble. Nous allons vous faire écouter un exemple pour vous montrer ce qu'est un discours numérisé accessible.

[Présentation audio]

Comme vous pouvez le constater, ce n’est pas exactement la voix la plus agréable, mais c’est ce sur quoi beaucoup d’entre nous doivent se rabattre parce qu'il n'y a pas autre chose.

Nous estimons que, au Canada, environ trois millions de personnes ont une incapacité quelconque qui les empêche de lire l'imprimé. Les documents accessibles sont rares. Nous comparaissons pour essayer d’apporter des changements à cet égard.

À l’échelle mondiale, les estimations du nombre de personnes qui ont une incapacité quelconque concordent avec les estimations globales de la perte de la vue.

Comme je viens de vous l’expliquer, le pourcentage de documents disponibles sur support de substitution se situe entre 5 et 7 % — nous ne sommes pas vraiment certains. Qu’est-ce que cela signifie, au fond?

Il y a quelques années, j’ai décidé de suivre un cours en gestion de projet. Je me suis inscrit au programme d’éducation permanente de l’université, et j’ai assez bien réussi, puisque j’ai eu un B+. J’ai payé mes droits au Project Management Institute, j’ai étudié, et quand est venu le moment de passer l’examen, je n’ai pas pu obtenir une forme accessible d’examen. J’ai écrit à l’auteur, qui m'a dit qu'il ne voulait rien savoir. J’ai écrit au Project Management Institute, dont le message a été le même. En fin de compte, on m’a refusé la possibilité d’obtenir un titre professionnel qui aurait favorisé ma carrière.

M. Thomas Simpson:

Selon l’Association of Canadian Publishers, plus de 10 000 livres paraissent au Canada chaque année, mais, aux termes des exigences actuelles du Canada en matière de droit d’auteur, les éditeurs ne sont pas tenus par la loi ou la réglementation de rendre ces livres accessibles. Même si Patrimoine canadien propose des programmes incitatifs, les éditeurs canadiens ne sont pas obligés de produire des oeuvres accessibles, même s’ils reçoivent des fonds publics.

L’INCA croit que tous les livres devraient être accessibles. Qu'il s'agisse de s’assurer que les applications qui facilitent l’accessibilité peuvent être utilisées simultanément avec les livres électroniques ou que les Canadiens ayant une perte de vision peuvent acheter des exemplaires en braille ou en version électronique en magasin, tous les livres publiés au Canada doivent être accessibles.

Nous recommandons que les éditeurs soient tenus par la loi de rendre leurs livres accessibles. Pour ce faire, nous recommandons l'ajout d’un paragraphe à l’article 3 de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, le paragraphe 3(2), qui se lirait ainsi: « Aux fins de la présente loi, le droit d’auteur ne peut être accordé à une oeuvre littéraire à moins que la production de cette oeuvre ne soit faite sur un support de substitution pour les personnes qui ont une déficience de lecture des imprimés. » Vous pouvez suivre dans votre exemplaire en braille, si vous voulez des détails.

Nous croyons que cette modification sensée de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur ferait en sorte que, au Canada, tous les livres soient accessibles dès le départ. Étant donné l’abondance des moyens de produire des livres accessibles, comment se fait-il que l'accès aux livres constitue toujours un problème?

(1535)

M. Lui Greco:

Pour une multitude de raisons, l’accès à la littérature est important pour les personnes handicapées. Il permet la pleine participation au tissu économique et culturel de la société. L’impossibilité d’accéder au contenu publié complique la réussite scolaire et professionnelle, comme je l’ai montré tout à l'heure.

Les générations futures devront livrer concurrence dans un monde au rythme plus rapide; par conséquent, à mesure que l'ère de l'information resserrera son emprise, il sera de plus en plus nécessaire, pour affronter la concurrence, d’avoir des livres accessibles dès leur publication.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l’occasion de m’adresser à vous. Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer au Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences.

Monsieur Rae, vous avez sept minutes.

M. John Rae (président, Comité de politique sociale, Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, comme on vient de le dire, je m’appelle John Rae. Je suis membre du conseil national du CCD et président de son comité de politique sociale.

Je comparais pour vous parler de la double question de l’accessibilité et de la convivialité. Je vous assure que ces deux concepts sont liés, mais non synonymes.

Pendant le temps qui m’est alloué, j’espère aborder cinq points.

Le premier porte sur l’accessibilité. Comme les intervenants précédents l’ont dit, beaucoup d'ouvrages publiés aujourd’hui ne sont pas accessibles pour des gens comme moi ou comme eux. Il faut que cela change. Même lorsque je reçois des rapports du gouvernement du Canada qui me sont envoyés par voie électronique, je me demande si, lorsque j’ouvrirai la pièce jointe, mon lecteur d’écran ne dira pas que le document est vide. Cela m'empoisonne la vie. Je me fais dire que j’ai reçu un document PDF qui n’est pas lisible par mon lecteur d’écran. Oui, cela arrive encore en 2018. Il faut que cela cesse.

J’ai travaillé avec vos éditeurs plus tôt cette année. J’espère que ce problème est réglé, mais je suis sceptique. Il y a bien sûr une façon simple de régler le problème, et c’est de cesser de publier des documents uniquement en format PDF. Après tout, c’est le format qui présente le plus de problèmes. Ou, si vous continuez d’insister pour l’utiliser, publiez simultanément une version en texte ou en HTML. Ils ont de meilleures chances d’être accessibles.

La loi devrait lier le Parlement en ce qui concerne la publication de documents. Tous vos documents doivent être publiés dans un format accessible.

Deuxième point: la convivialité. Je suis sûr que vous avez tous entendu certains de vos électeurs dire qu’il semble souvent que les documents gouvernementaux sont rédigés pour les avocats et seulement pour eux. J’ai constaté que certains d’entre vous sont avocats, et ce n'est pas mal. Je me suis engagé dans cette voie, mais je m'en suis détourné. Je suis un intervenant. Comme d’autres Canadiens ordinaires, j’ai aussi besoin d’avoir accès aux documents que vous publiez.

Il faudrait rédiger les rapports dans une langue plus simple et plus compréhensible, et peut-être même faire des textes plus courts. Cela aiderait aussi. Comme vous le savez, lorsqu’un nouveau document est publié, les médias s’intéressent aux réactions le jour de sa publication et peut-être aussi le lendemain. Avec beaucoup de chance et si le sujet prête à controverse, il peut être encore d'actualité deux jours plus tard. Des gens comme nous doivent pouvoir participer à ces échanges comme tous les autres Canadiens. C’est là l'enjeu de la convivialité. Les documents doivent être produits dans une langue simple.

Troisième point, le braille. Pour les aveugles, le braille est ce qui permet de lire. C’est essentiel. Aussi étrange que cela puisse paraître, en 2018, bien qu’il soit plus facile que jamais dans l’histoire de l’humanité de publier des documents en braille, il semble qu’on en produit de moins en moins. Nous pouvons discuter des raisons qui expliquent ce fait, mais nous verrons cela une autre fois.

Il faut promouvoir davantage le braille. Par le passé, le Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences a recommandé que le gouvernement fédéral établisse un programme national de soutiens aux personnes handicapées. L’une de ces mesures pourrait consister à offrir l'afficheur braille dynamique aux personnes aveugles qui en ont besoin et qui le veulent, afin de faciliter l’accès au braille et d’encourager de plus en plus de gens à l'utiliser, parce que c’est vraiment grâce au braille que nous arrivons à lire.

Lorsque la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité a été présentée, j'en ai immédiatement demandé le texte en braille, parce que, comme vous le savez, chaque virgule, chaque point-virgule a son importance. J’ai dit que j’en aurais peut-être besoin lorsque j’irais aux réunions pour en parler. Eh bien, j’ai dû justifier ma demande. Il ne suffisait pas que je veuille cette version. Il a fallu que j'explique aussi pourquoi j’en avais besoin. Je suis heureux de l’avoir reçue, et elle m’a été utile.

(1540)



Le quatrième point concerne les éditeurs. J'appuie le point de vue que M. Simpson a exprimé tout à l'heure. En effet, le CCD croit qu'il faut effectivement tenir compte de la problématique des déficiences, notamment dans le projet de loi C-81, mais on pourrait tout aussi bien en tenir compte dans la Loi sur le droit d’auteur. On pourrait priver de toute participation fédérale les programmes, politiques, contrats ou subventions qui contribueraient à perpétuer les obstacles ou à en créer de nouveaux. Cela comprend les subventions ou les contributions accordées aux éditeurs.

Le cinquième et dernier point concerne toute la participation du secteur de l’édition. Plus tôt cette année, le Bureau de la condition des personnes handicapées a réuni un large éventail de représentants: éditeurs, consommateurs et producteurs. Je crois que beaucoup des bons intervenants ont été invités à la table. L’objectif était de produire un plan quinquennal pour favoriser la production de documents sur support de substitution et leur plus grande disponibilité.

Nous nous sommes rencontrés la dernière fois en mai. Jusqu’à maintenant, aucune trace de plan. La première de ces cinq années passe à toute vitesse. Pourtant, aucun plan n’a été publié. Vous pourriez peut-être nous aider à l'obtenir. Ce serait utile. Les éditeurs doivent participer davantage. Si cela suppose une aide initiale de Patrimoine Canada pour les aider à démarrer ou à accélérer leur travail de production de documents accessibles, alors soit. Je suis d’accord. Les éditeurs doivent faire un meilleur travail, non seulement en produisant des documents, mais en les mettant à la disposition des bibliothèques publiques et en les proposant à la vente directe aux consommateurs.

Merci de m'avoir donné l’occasion de venir vous parler de ces deux questions que sont l’accessibilité et la convivialité. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Toronto pour entendre les représentants de la Guilde des compositeurs canadiens de musique à l’image.

Monsieur Novotny, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Paul Novotny (compositeur de musique à l'image, Guilde des compositeurs canadiens de musique à l’image):

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes très heureux de comparaître.

Ari et moi représentons la Guilde des compositeurs canadiens de musique à l’image. Ces compositeurs créent de la musique originale pour le cinéma, la télévision, le documentaire et d’autres médias visuels, et elle est exportée dans le monde entier. Vous ne connaissez peut-être pas nos noms, mais il se peut très bien que vous connaissiez notre travail.

(1545)

M. Ari Posner (compositeur de musique à l'image, Guilde des compositeurs canadiens de musique à l’image):

J’ai surtout travaillé pour la télévision. Je vais parler seulement de deux émissions qui ne sont pas sans intérêt dans la discussion. L’une était une émission dont j'ai composé la musique avec un de mes collègues ici, à Toronto, appelée Flashpoint, une dramatique en milieu policier qui a marqué le Canada parce qu’elle a ouvert la porte toute grande aux États-Unis à certains égards. Elle a été vendue à la CBS et diffusée là-bas avec beaucoup de succès. C’est un exemple d’une émission du XXe siècle diffusée par voie hertzienne. À l’heure actuelle, je travaille à une émission qui obéit à un modèle différent. Elle s'intitule Anne, et c'est une version moderne de l'oeuvre de Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne... la maison aux pignons verts. Au Canada, Anne est une émission diffusée par la CBC, mais dans le reste du monde, soit dans 190 pays, elle est proposée par le géant de la diffusion en continu Netflix.

M. Paul Novotny:

J’ai eu la chance de travailler avec George Stroumboulopoulos pour créer la musique de l’émission The Hour de la CBC. J’ai aussi composé la musique de CBC News Now, sur Newsworld. De plus, j’ai fait la musique de l’émission The National de la CBC

Si nous comparaissons aujourd’hui, c’est pour vous parler un peu plus du dilemme qui est le nôtre et de la situation précise qui est la nôtre dans notre écosystème créatif.

Les compositeurs à l’image sont les premiers propriétaires de leurs droits d’auteur. Comme les scénaristes, ces compositeurs sont reconnus comme des créateurs clés. Leurs droits d’auteur sur la musique sont de deux ordres: un droit d'exécution et un droit de reproduction. Ces droits sont assortis d’un ensemble distinct de droits d’auteur sur les films. Lorsque notre musique est associée à l’image, elle est distribuée pour diffusion aux niveaux national et international, ce qui donne une rémunération grâce au droit d’auteur. Elle est dérivée des ventes publicitaires du radiodiffuseur. Notre rémunération est régie par la politique sur le droit d’auteur et non par nous. La SOCAN perçoit nos droits en notre nom dans le monde entier.

L’argent des droits de représentation et de reproduction est calculé comme un pourcentage des ventes trimestrielles de publicité. La politique du droit d’auteur du XXe siècle pour les compositeurs à l’image est fondée sur les ventes de publicité à la diffusion. Je voudrais demander à Ari comment cela fonctionne pour lui au XXIe siècle.

M. Ari Posner:

Je comparais pour vous dire que cela ne fonctionne pas bien jusqu’à maintenant, et Anne en est un bon exemple. Il s’agit d’une émission dont Netflix a fait rapport aux producteurs de l’émission. J’ajouterais que Netflix ne communique pas beaucoup de données, mais l'entreprise a révélé aux producteurs que l’émission était au quatrième rang des séries les plus regardées en rafale sur le réseau en 2017.

C’est une statistique assez stupéfiante. Cela signifie que des millions et des millions de téléspectateurs regardent cette émission partout dans le monde. Ils la regardent rapidement. Anne est sur le point d'entamer sa troisième saison l’an prochain, et je peux vous dire que, si je fais une comparaison avec la rémunération que j’ai obtenue pour une émission comme Flashpoint, qui a été diffusée par voie hertzienne, il n’est pas exagéré de dire que j’ai constaté une baisse de 95 % des revenus.

M. Paul Novotny:

J’ai composé récemment de la musique pour un film intitulé Mishka, réalisé par la cinéaste canadienne Cleo Tellier. Il y a eu 22,5 millions de visionnements sur YouTube depuis le 22 avril 2018. Le film rapporte environ 3 000 $ par mois en revenus publicitaires sur YouTube. Toutefois, au XXIe siècle, il n’y a aucun lien entre ces revenus publicitaires et les droits de représentation ou de reproduction.

À ce stade-ci, Ari et moi nous demandons tous les deux ce qu'il est advenu de nos redevances pour représentation publique et reproduction. La simple vérité, c’est qu'elles sont devenues insignifiantes, parce que l’argent est passé à l’abonnement. Il faut que la politique sur le droit d’auteur soit bonifiée de façon à rapporter assez d'argent, à partir des abonnements, pour faire vivre notre secteur au XXIe siècle.

Ce qui s’est produit, c’est qu’un écart de valeur est apparu. Nous voudrions que les membres du Comité et tous les Canadiens comprennent exactement ce qu'est cet écart de valeur. Je vais vous le dire tout de suite.

En 2018, Netflix a déclaré un bénéfice net de 290 millions de dollars pour le premier trimestre, soit plus de profits en trois mois que le géant de la diffusion en continu n'en a réalisé dans toute l’année 2016. Si l’entreprise atteint son objectif de profit de 358 millions de dollars pour le deuxième trimestre, elle gagnera plus au premier semestre de 2018 qu’au cours de toute l’année 2017, exercice pour lequel elle a déclaré un bénéfice annuel de 585,9 millions de dollars.

Au cours de la même période, Ari Posner a connu une baisse de 95 % de la rémunération provenant des droits sur l'exécution en public et sur la reproduction d'une série télé en libre-service et regardée en rafale qui est au quatrième rang des plus regardées sur Netflix dans 191 pays.

Ari, il semble que vous et votre famille subventionniez Netflix. Que se passe-t-il dans votre ménage?

(1550)

M. Ari Posner:

Soyons clairs, il ne s’agit pas seulement de moi. Je suis un exemple de quelqu’un qui est en milieu de carrière. J’aurai 48 ans cette année et j’ai trois jeunes enfants. J’ai une hypothèque. J'ai un mode de vie plutôt de base pour la classe moyenne. J'ai pu me débrouiller grâce à mes droits de propriété intellectuelle sur des émissions auxquelles j’ai travaillé par le passé.

À ce stade-ci, je fais le même travail pour des émissions comme Anne, qui est plus populaire que tout ce à quoi j’ai travaillé par le passé, et pourtant la rémunération n’est pas au rendez-vous. Voilà l’écart de valeur dont je veux parler.

La seule organisation qui peut vraiment aider quelqu’un comme moi, mes collègues et mes pairs, c’est une société comme la SOCAN qui nous défend et qui essaie de récupérer les redevances pour l'exécution et la reproduction de nos oeuvres.

À l’heure actuelle, les géants de la diffusion en continu, les grandes entreprises de technologie comme Amazon, Hulus et Netflix, n’ont aucune transparence, et ils ne semblent pas en avoir besoin. J'ignore pourquoi.

M. Paul Novotny:

Nous allons terminer très rapidement. Nous aimerions demander trois choses.

La Guilde veut participer davantage à l'élaboration d’une politique de droit d’auteur équitable et techno-morale pour le XXIe siècle afin de respecter chaque élément de la chaîne de valeur des médias sur écran, y compris le consommateur.

Nous voulons que le Canada adopte des principes conformes à ceux des autres pays et des unions économiques qui protègent le droit d’auteur des créateurs. On en trouve un exemple dans les articles 11 et 13 de l’Union européenne, qui reprennent des idées semblables à celles des recommandations de Music Canada et de la CMPC. Cela dit, nous voulons vous encourager à appuyer ces recommandations.

Ari va terminer en énumérant quelques principes qui, selon nous, sont essentiels à la politique techno-morale du droit d’auteur au XXIe siècle.

Le président:

Nous devrions conclure rapidement, car nous dépassons un peu la période prévue.

Merci. Allez-y.

M. Ari Posner:

Je vais vous lire une citation par laquelle je voudrais terminer. J’ai également lu cela au Comité du patrimoine. J.F.K. a dit: « La vie des arts, loin d’être une interruption ou une distraction dans la vie d’une nation, est près du cœur de ce qui constitue une nation et un test de la qualité de sa civilisation. »

Je souhaite que tous ceux qui sont ici présents réfléchissent au fait que, si l'État ne peut pas intervenir pour renforcer les lois sur le droit d’auteur afin de protéger les droits des créateurs, nous aurons un pays beaucoup moins riche, parce que rien n'encouragera les carrières dans le domaine artistique.

Merci beaucoup de m’avoir écouté. Je suis désolé d’avoir pris un peu trop de temps. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup à tous de vos exposés.

Normalement, je présente les députés sans donner de précisions au moment où ils posent des questions, mais comme certains témoins ont une déficience visuelle, je vais aussi indiquer leur parti, pour que les témoins sachent à quoi s'en tenir lorsqu'ils entendent les questions.

Nous allons commencer par M. Jowhari, du Parti libéral.

Vous avez sept minutes.

(1555)

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous les témoins.

Je partagerai mon temps de parole avec le député Longfield.

Je vais m'adresser d'abord à la Guilde des compositeurs canadiens de musique à l’image. Monsieur Novotny ou monsieur Posner pourraient l’un ou l’autre répondre à cette question, qui nous ramène à votre témoignage du 25 septembre, au Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien de la Chambre des communes.

Vous avez parlé de la SOCAN et dit qu'elle « n'a aucun moyen d'ouvrir les portes de Netflix », que l'entreprise « ne lui donne pas les données dont elle a besoin pour compiler le nombre de visionnements afin de créer un modèle de rémunération approprié ». Vous avez fait des réflexions semblables au sujet de YouTube. Vous avez parlé de Netflix et de YouTube dans votre témoignage.

Pouvez-vous nous dire au juste quel genre de données il faut recueillir auprès de ces deux entreprises pour être en mesure de verser une juste rémunération? Les chiffres que vous avez donnés sont astronomiques. Je veux parler des résultats qu’elles vont obtenir d'ici le milieu de l'exercice, comparés à ceux de l’an dernier. De quelles données avez-vous besoin pour vous assurer d’obtenir votre juste part?

M. Paul Novotny:

Ari et moi sommes tous deux compositeurs. Un représentant de la SOCAN serait mieux placé pour vous répondre. Honnêtement, je ne le sais pas.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Ari, même avis?

M. Ari Posner:

Vous parlez de choses très techniques. Ce n’est pas vraiment à nous de parler au nom de la SOCAN, qui est là pour nous défendre.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Dans votre secteur, qui négocie les licences et la rémunération avec des organisations comme Netflix et YouTube?

M. Ari Posner:

La SOCAN. Seules les organisations de défense des droits de représentation ou d'exécution, comme la SOCAN et les organisations semblables dans le monde, mènent ces négociations. Toutefois, il n'y a aucune transparence entre les territoires. Netflix n’a pas à révéler l’entente conclue avec tel pays par opposition à tel autre. La SOCAN nous dit qu’elle a besoin de plus de données sur le nombre réel de visionnements et de téléchargements pour pouvoir calculer la popularité des diverses émissions. C’est ce qu’on nous a expliqué.

C’est là le message de la SOCAN. Ce n’est pas aussi clair et simple que dans le modèle de diffusion par voie hertzienne: « Voici le montant de nos revenus publicitaires et voici le pourcentage que le gouvernement exige en fonction de sa grille. » Et voilà.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Il me reste une trentaine de secondes. Je reviens à vous. Selon vous, quelles données devrait-on recueillir pour vous assurer une rémunération correcte?

M. Ari Posner:

Comme Paul l’a dit, nous devrions consulter à ce sujet notre organisation qui s'occupe des droits d'exécution. Elle pourrait vous donner une idée exacte de la situation.

M. Majid Jowhari:

D’accord, merci.

Je cède la parole à M. Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vais d'abord poser quelques questions à M. Greco, de l’INCA. J’ai fait du bénévolat pendant plusieurs années à l’INCA, à Winnipeg, dans les années 1970, je crains de le dire. La technologie était bien différente à l’époque. Nous travaillions avec des livres qui étaient enregistrés sur des cassettes ou sur des bandes de magnétophone.

Je me demande, à propos du projet de loi... Nous avons adhéré au Traité de Marrakech. Nous avons donné le feu vert pour que les documents soient disponibles sur des supports de substitution, mais on dirait que ce traité n'est pas respecté par ceux qui mettent ces supports à votre disposition.

M. Lui Greco:

Permettez-moi de recourir à une analogie pour répondre à cette question.

Marrakech a ouvert le robinet, mais l’eau ne coule pas.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Il n’y a pas de pompe.

M. Lui Greco:

De nos jours, il est incroyablement facile de produire du braille. La technologie est très différente des cassettes à quatre pistes. Je me souviens de ces bandes.

J’avais un manuel de calcul à l’université qui se composait de 36 cassettes à vitesse lente à quatre pistes. Aujourd’hui, tout cela est largement dépassé à cause des progrès de la technologie. Ce serait considéré comme digne de l'ère des dinosaures.

Soyons honnêtes, si le Traité de Marrakech est une réussite, il y aura plus de documents en médias substituts offerts aux Canadiens, puisque ce traité exige un partage international. Cela vaut non seulement pour les documents en anglais et en français. Comme nous sommes une société multiculturelle et que l’immigration fait évoluer rapidement notre paysage, nous pourrons obtenir des livres produits dans d’autres langues à l’étranger.

(1600)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Ce n’est donc pas un problème législatif, si je comprends bien.

M. Lui Greco:

C’est exact.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je pense aussi à votre exemple de planification de carrière. En consultant votre site Web, j'ai vu que le projet Aspiro contient une ressource pour l’emploi qui a été élaborée en partenariat avec la World Blind Union et financée par la Fondation Trillium de l’Ontario. Les outils sont peut-être là pour développer les compétences ou les mettre en commun, mais il semble y avoir un blocage, même pour la mise à l'essai.

M. Lui Greco:

Effectivement.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C’est un peu exaspérant. Nous travaillons à un projet de loi et nous pensons faire quelque chose de bon. On dirait qu'il faut donner plus de mordant à la loi pour ce qui est du financement.

M. Lui Greco:

Je pense, comme M. Simpson l’a dit à la fin de nos points de discussion, que si les éditeurs comptent sur la protection que leur accorde le droit d’auteur sous quelque forme que ce soit, alors on devrait s’attendre à ce qu’ils produisent leurs livres sur des supports de substitution dès le départ. Nous avons largement dépassé l’époque où il fallait que chaque livre accessible soit lu en studio par un être humain. Il existe un logiciel gratuit qui produira des livres de meilleure qualité que ce que vous avez entendu. La technique s’améliore, elle s’accélère et elle est gratuite. On ne peut pas faire meilleur marché.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci beaucoup.

J’aimerais avoir plus de temps.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Albas, du Parti conservateur.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins d’avoir pris le temps de nous faire profiter de leurs compétences aujourd’hui.

Je commence par l’INCA. Il s'agit du braille.

Premièrement, est-ce que c’est en français? Est-ce en anglais?

Deuxièmement, combien de pages cela ferait-il...[Français] en français ou en anglais, [Traduction]... si le document était soumis? Je voudrais avoir une idée de ce que représente la note d’information que vous avez fournie aujourd’hui.

M. Thomas Simpson:

C'est recto verso. Cela fait quatre pages imprimées d'un seul côté.

M. Dan Albas:

D’accord, c’est donc assez long.

M. Thomas Simpson:

Oui.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci. C’est une façon très efficace de communiquer votre message.

La Loi sur le droit d’auteur utilise l'expression « déficience perceptuelle ». L’INCA ou le Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences croient-ils que la définition est suffisamment large pour englober tous ceux qui pourraient avoir besoin d'exceptions aux termes de la loi?

M. Thomas Simpson:

La Loi sur le droit d’auteur contient également une définition de « déficience de lecture des imprimés » qui est probablement aussi bonne ou meilleure que celle de « déficience perceptuelle ». C’est pourquoi nous avons recommandé de continuer à utiliser l’expression « déficience de lecture des imprimés ».

M. Dan Albas:

D’accord.

M. John Rae:

J’ai toujours pensé que l’expression « déficience perceptuelle » dans ce contexte est plutôt étrange. « Déficience de lecture des imprimés » me semble préférable. Pour revenir au Traité de Marrakech, cela pourrait faciliter le partage entre pays des documents produits, mais il reste que le problème, c'est d’amener les éditeurs à produire davantage de documents sur support de substitution. C’est là que la loi doit mieux encourager les éditeurs à produire des documents accessibles dès le départ.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous avez parlé de la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité qui a été déposée récemment. Selon vous, quelle expression devrait-on y employer? D’après ce que j’ai lu, on n'y parle pas de « déficience perceptuelle ».

M. John Rae:

C’est vrai. Je crois que non. Il y a une définition assez large de l’invalidité dans le projet de loi C-81. Beaucoup d’entre nous disent que le projet de loi pourrait être considérablement renforcé au moyen d’amendements et nous espérons que le Comité des ressources humaines jugera bon de le faire.

(1605)

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur Rae, en ce qui concerne ce texte législatif, il est utile pour tous, sans distinction aucune, qu'un libellé semblable soit utilisé dans les différentes lois. Seriez-vous d'accord pour qu'on utilise dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur une définition semblable à celle qui se trouve dans la Loi sur l'accessibilité?

M. John Rae:

Je suis d’accord avec vous pour dire qu'il serait utile d'avoir une certaine cohérence dans les définitions.

M. Dan Albas:

L’INCA voudrait-il répondre?

M. Lui Greco:

L'expression « déficience perceptuelle » exclurait les personnes ayant une déficience physique qui les empêche de manipuler un livre, par exemple la SLA et d’autres maladies neurologiques qui constitueraient un obstacle. Je ne pense pas que nous ayons vraiment eu l’occasion de décider si « déficience perceptuelle » ou « déficience de lecture des imprimés » serait la formulation idéale, mais nous préconisons fortement, et mon collègue me corrigera si je me trompe, un libellé inclusif.

Le libellé ne doit exclure aucune personne handicapée qui, pour une raison ou une autre, à cause d’un handicap physique, perceptuel ou cognitif, ce qui est la même chose, ne peut aller en librairie acheter un livre.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci de votre réponse. Je vous sais gré de l'éclairage que vous nous apportez.

J’ai aussi entendu des défenseurs des personnes handicapées. Dans ma région, par exemple, à Kelowna, nous avons Michelle Hewitt, qui s'occupe des problèmes locaux d’accessibilité. Elle m’a dit qu’elle et bien des gens avec qui elle travaille ne sont souvent pas au courant des nombreuses exemptions prévues dans la Loi sur le droit d’auteur pour les personnes handicapées, qu’ils n'en soupçonnent même pas l'existence.

L’un ou l’autre des groupes a-t-il fait la même constatation de façon constante également, à savoir que, même s’il y a des exemptions prévues dans la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, on n'est pas nécessairement au courant?

M. Thomas Simpson:

Pour être honnête, je suppose que beaucoup de Canadiens ne connaissent probablement pas les subtilités de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, alors les limites sont probablement un peu problématiques. Notre organisation ne s’est pas penchée sur ces exceptions. Comme nous l’avons dit, nous mettons principalement l’accent sur le partage. Si un producteur obtient un droit d’auteur, il doit s’assurer que l'oeuvre littéraire est proposée sur des supports de substitution.

M. Lui Greco:

Les établissements d'enseignement, les bibliothèques et les maisons de production comme celle qu’exploite l’INCA — et l’Université Simon Fraser a eu et a probablement toujours une installation de production —, tous ces intervenants savent fort bien... Nous sommes bien conscients des subtilités, de ce que nous sommes autorisés à faire ou non et de la démarcation qui existe entre les deux.

Quant aux consommateurs... Quand je rentre en fin de journée et que je veux avoir accès à des documents, tout ce que je veux savoir, c'est ce qui est disponible. Où puis-je l’obtenir et quels obstacles dois-je surmonter pour y avoir accès?

M. John Rae:

Je présume que les producteurs sont au courant. J’ai vu des éditeurs qui étaient au courant. Comme Lui vient de le dire, au bout du compte, notre communauté veut avoir accès à plus de documents à lire. C’est ce que nous recherchons. Par conséquent, notre travail au CCD a surtout consisté à amener les éditeurs à participer davantage à la production d'un plus grand nombre de documents accessibles.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous diriez donc qu’il y en a pas mal qui connaissent les exemptions, mais le grand public et ceux qui travaillent avec des handicaps ne sont pas aussi bien renseignés. Est-ce exact?

Le gouvernement devrait-il jouer un rôle à cet égard, à part mettre en place la Loi sur le droit d’auteur et ces exemptions?

M. John Rae:

Cela ne peut certainement pas nuire de faire mieux connaître aux Canadiens ce que dit la loi et ce qu’elle prévoit. Beaucoup de gens qui produisent ces documents, qu’il s’agisse de producteurs de médias substituts ou de représentants de collèges et d’universités, sont sans doute raisonnablement renseignés, mais faire mieux connaître la loi, cela ne peut pas nuire.

M. Dan Albas:

Je reviens au cas de M. Greco qui a été incapable de faire un examen. Le gouvernement a-t-il un rôle à jouer?

M. Lui Greco:

Bien sûr. Mais dans le contexte actuel, vous pouvez le crier sur les toits. Dans mon cas, avec le Project Management Institute, à qui j’ai payé des droits pour me présenter à un examen, on a choisi de ne pas se conformer sous le faux prétexte que ce serait trop onéreux et on a simplement fait fi de l'obligation morale de prendre des mesures d'adaptation pour moi. Je ne vois pas comment le gouvernement ou un établissement d'enseignement pourrait y faire quoi que ce soit.

J’avais besoin d’une contrainte, d’une sorte de mandat ou d’obligation pour pouvoir dire à ces gens-là: voici comment vous pouvez me fournir les ressources, en tant que membre en règle, sous une forme qui me permette de réussir. Vous en avez l'obligation, et voici la disposition législative qui le dit.

Honnêtement, dans un monde idéal, ce genre de discussion n'aurait pas lieu d'être. Je devrais pouvoir dire simplement que je suis aveugle et que j'ai besoin des documents sur support de substitution —  texte en braille, texte électronique, DAISY, peu importe — et l’éditeur, ou dans mon cas, le PMI, en tant que producteur, devrait fournir le nécessaire. J’ai payé mes droits, j’ai respecté les exigences, j’ai franchi toutes les étapes nécessaires, puis je me suis heurté à un mur. Ce n’est pas juste. Ce n’est pas équitable.

(1610)

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

M. John Rae:

Il serait utile d’accorder plus de ressources aux commissions des droits de la personne de partout au Canada afin qu’elles puissent mieux informer les Canadiens au sujet de l’obligation de prendre des mesures d’adaptation et des obligations juridiques qui, à mon avis, existent déjà dans les lois sur les droits de la personne.

C’est pourquoi nous sommes si nombreux à nous adresser à ces commissions et c'est pourquoi plus de 50 % des cas qui leur sont soumis chaque année relèvent des distinctions illicites fondées sur les déficiences. Si les décisions rendues étaient plus sévères et si on renseignait davantage le grand public, peut-être pourrions-nous faire diminuer le nombre de plaintes.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Ce sera maintenant Brian Masse, du NPD.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Lorsque je travaillais pour vrai, j’étais spécialiste de l’emploi pour les personnes handicapées au sein de l'organisme Community Living Mississauga et à l’Association for Persons with Physical Disabilities of Windsor and Essex County, et je siégeais au conseil d’administration de l’Institut national canadien pour les aveugles, l'INCA.

Il est frustrant de devoir continuer à prouver que l’argent des contribuables doit servir à des programmes fondamentaux auxquels ils ont droit. Je vous donnerai une carte plus tard, mais je vais vous donner un exemple des obstacles que nous créons. J’ai une carte en braille de la Chambre des communes que j’utilise, et j’ai le droit de l’avoir, mais les membres de mon personnel n'ont pas ce droit. Même si je pouvais faire imprimer cette carte professionnelle en braille, notre politique publique, que je n’ai jamais pu faire changer dans mes 16 ans passés ici, n'accorde pas le même droit aux membres de mon personnel, malgré la facilité avec laquelle cela pourrait être changé. C’est le genre de choses que nous continuons de voir.

J’aimerais parler un peu de votre amendement, le paragraphe 3(2), et de l’origine de votre raisonnement. Je pense que c’est important. Le gouvernement et les parrains investisseurs ont la lourde responsabilité d’être accessibles. Je peux vous dire encore une fois que le taux de chômage se chiffre à 50 % chez les personnes handicapées, ce qui est un problème chronique, un problème systémique dans notre société, et en plus, si nous n’avons pas ces documents, il y a non seulement l’exclusion sociale du milieu de travail, mais aussi l’exclusion socioculturelle.

Veuillez expliquer un peu plus en détail le paragraphe 3(2) et nous dire comment il rend le texte législatif plus proactif. Certains prétendent que des portes accessibles ou des toilettes accessibles coûtent trop cher, mais on peut s’en servir comme exemple pour dire que l’investissement fait en sorte que la société est ainsi mieux adaptée à tous.

M. Thomas Simpson:

L’INCA a récemment réalisé une étude, que nous avons également commandée à l’échelle internationale, pour comparer les niveaux d’emploi des personnes ayant une perte de vision. Nos conclusions, que nous espérons publier sous peu, indiquent qu’au Canada, les personnes aveugles ou ayant une déficience visuelle ont un taux d’emploi à temps plein de 28 %. La moitié de ces travailleurs gagnent moins de 20 000 $ par année. Il existe donc déjà le problème de l’éducation. Ensuite, il est également assez difficile d’essayer de faire des études postsecondaires, d’obtenir les livres et les documents dans un format accessible, et c'est un obstacle. Essayer d’être sur un pied d’égalité sur le plan culturel — vous savez comment; avoir le dernier livre de Harry Potter; celui de Stephen King; se comparer avec le reste de la société — c’est également difficile.

Il y a tellement d’obstacles à l’accès à un livre qu’on ne peut pas se comparer à ses pairs voyants et aux autres citoyens.

Lui, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

(1615)

M. Lui Greco:

Je dirais qu’il faut remplacer l'expression « se comparer » par « concurrencer ». Les étagères des librairies sont pleines de livres sur le leadership, sur la façon de gérer sa carrière, de progresser, de rédiger son curriculum vitae, de tirer parti du réseautage social pour acquérir des compétences en recherche d’emploi. Nous sommes tous entre deux emplois. L’époque où l'on passait toute sa carrière à occuper un seul emploi est révolue depuis longtemps. Je suis en fin de carrière. J'en ai plus de fait qu'il m'en reste à faire. En réalité, j’ai très peu d’années devant moi, probablement encore 10 ou 15 ans, mais au cours de ces 10 ou 15 années, que ce soit avec l’INCA ou avec quelqu’un d’autre, je dois être concurrentiel. J’ai besoin des compétences, des connaissances et des outils nécessaires pour être en mesure de concurrencer M. Simpson, M. Rae ou nos deux collègues de Toronto pour les occasions qui se présenteront. Je ne les ai pas à l'heure actuelle.

M. Brian Masse:

Ensuite, le paragraphe 3(2) exigera que certains ouvrages rendent cela disponible. Est-ce que...

M. Thomas Simpson:

Notre paragraphe 3(2) fera en sorte que si un droit d’auteur est accordé pour une oeuvre littéraire, cette oeuvre doit être publiée dans un format accessible.

M. Brian Masse:

Bon nombre de personnes handicapées sont des contribuables, et ont donc à ce titre contribué au financement de certains programmes et services. Je ne peux pas vous dire à combien d’annonces j’ai assisté, au fil des ans, qui étaient faites dans un endroit inaccessible. L'on annonce un projet dont le financement public se chiffre en millions de dollars, et on le fait dans une salle où il n'y a même pas de portes accessibles ou d’autres aides de cette nature. Les choses changent, mais la réalité, c’est qu'il nous faut adopter une approche plus affirmative, plus directe.

Monsieur Rae, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

M. John Rae:

Je suis d’accord avec tout ce que vous dites. Nous espérons que la Loi canadienne sur l’accessibilité aura un effet positif sur nos vies. Je pense qu’il faut la renforcer, mais nous sommes ravis que le gouvernement l’ait présentée. Je pense qu’il serait également utile que les commissions des droits de la personne soient plus sévères. À l’heure actuelle, comme toutes ces petites récompenses ne sont pas suffisantes pour dissuader les organisations de cesser de faire de la discrimination contre les personnes handicapées, ou d’autres groupes d’ailleurs, il faudrait peut-être changer cela également.

M. Brian Masse:

Ce serait certainement beaucoup plus avantageux, un peu comme dans l’exemple que j’ai donné des toilettes accessibles, des portes accessibles et les mécanismes qui les sous-tendent, parce qu’à l’heure actuelle, pour ce qui est des ouvrages littéraires et en braille et d’autres choses, nous en sommes encore au point où nous devons continuer de sensibiliser les gens et presque les supplier d’inclure ces aides, au lieu que cela fasse partie du processus. Si nous devions encore faire la tournée de nos édifices gouvernementaux et de différents endroits pour réclamer des toilettes accessibles et des portes accessibles, ce serait une grande perte d’énergie, beaucoup de temps perdu. Soit dit en passant, ces mesures améliorent le milieu de travail pour tous les autres, car elles réduisent le nombre d’accidents de travail et ainsi de suite.

Monsieur Greco, votre remarque pour ce qui est d'être concurrentiel est très judicieuse parce que ce n’est souvent même pas mentionné. Je dirais que les Brick Books pour les personnes ayant la vue faible, qui ont été offerts par de nombreuses bibliothèques à l'échelle du pays ont contribué à cette inclusion, mais il reste du travail à faire.

M. Thomas Simpson:

Je dirais à ce sujet, également, qu'à mesure que notre société vieillit et que les gens vivent plus longtemps, la plupart d’entre vous dans cette salle souffriront probablement d’une perte de la vue qui vous affectera dans une certaine mesure, de sorte qu’à un moment donné, vous pourriez aussi être confronté à un obstacle lorsque vous essaierez d’avoir accès à des oeuvres imprimées si rien n'est fait d'ici là.

M. John Rae:

Je vous dirais également que le faible taux d'emploi dont vous avez parlé a un effet négatif supplémentaire. Outre le dénuement économique, le fait que nous ne soyons pas représentés en nombre suffisant signifie que beaucoup d’organisations n’ont pas d’expertise interne en matière d’invalidité.

Si nous augmentions notre représentation dans les centres décisionnels qui ont une incidence sur la vie de tous les Canadiens, dans les conseils d’administration, au Parlement, dans les salles de nouvelles de notre pays, nous réduirions la mesure dans laquelle nos problèmes sont oubliés en raison de notre absence ou de notre inaction.

Nous voulons simplement être plus nombreux à participer à la vie de notre société.

(1620)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous revenons maintenant au Parti libéral. Monsieur David Graham, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Simpson, vous avez brandi un appareil plus tôt. Comment s’appelle cet appareil?

M. Thomas Simpson:

Voici un lecteur de livres Victor. On y fait jouer un livre DAISY, qui est un livre audio navigable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Existe-t-il une technologie, peu importe son coût actuel, qui vous permet de pointer un bout de papier pour le faire lire?

Pour amener le texte à...

Une voix: La ROC, la reconnaissance optique de caractères.

M. David de Burgh Graham: La ROC, merci — au niveau suivant, cette technologie existe-t-elle ou est-elle en développement? En avons-nous entendu parler?

M. Lui Greco:

Oui, elle existe. Il y a des programmes gratuits, notamment Seeing AI, une application d’intelligence artificielle que Microsoft a créée. C’est une plateforme de développement de prototypes qu’ils utilisent pour peaufiner l’intelligence artificielle.

Il y a quelques années, la National Federation of the Blind, en partenariat avec Ray Kurzweil — je suis sûr que vous en avez tous entendu parler —, a mis à la disposition du public une application appelée KNFB Reader. La dernière fois que j’ai vérifié — et je vous prie de ne pas me citer —, c’était autour de 100 $. Il s’agissait d’un dispositif de reconnaissance optique de caractères très robuste avec lequel on pouvait littéralement pointer un bout de papier — un menu, un journal, peu importe — et qui permettait de numériser un document assez bien pour le rendre accessible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous utilisé un tel appareil, monsieur Greco?

M. Lui Greco:

J’ai l’application Seeing AI sur mon téléphone. C’est formidable. J’ai essayé de l’utiliser dans la chambre d’hôtel hier soir pour savoir s’il s’agissait de shampoing ou de lotion corporelle, pas exactement du matériel en format final, mais cela vous donne une idée de... J’espère ne pas avoir utilisé... quoi qu’il en soit, cela n’a pas d’importance.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Lui Greco: Nous rions, mais ce sont des problèmes réels. Vous allez dans une chambre d’hôtel et il y a un déluge de dépliants sur votre lit. Vous montez dans un avion et on vous encourage à lire la fiche de sécurité. Vous allez à l’université et on vous demande de choisir vos cours à partir d’un calendrier, et ainsi de suite.

Personnellement, je n’ai pas utilisé le KNFB Reader. Je connais toutefois beaucoup de gens qui l’utilisent, et ils l’adorent. Cela leur a ouvert de grandes portes. Ces aides vont assurément dans la bonne direction.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien doit payer en frais supplémentaires quelqu’un qui a une déficience visuelle ou qui est carrément aveugle, tout au long de sa vie? Est-il possible de quantifier cela pour nous?

M. Lui Greco:

Pour un lecteur de livres parlants comme celui de Thomas, une entreprise appelée HumanWare, juste à l’extérieur de Montréal, vend ces appareils à l’échelle internationale pour 350 à 400 $ chacun.

Le KNFB Reader coûtait environ 100 $ la dernière fois que j’ai vérifié. Certaines des machines de lecture les plus avancées, plus près des lecteurs de télévision, dans lesquelles vous placez du matériel imprimé sous une caméra pour le faire agrandir, selon la vue de la personne, coûtent des milliers de dollars. Les appareils d’affichage en braille dont M. Rae a parlé, les afficheurs braille dynamiques, coûtent plus de 3 500 $.

Des prototypes arrivent sur le marché. L’INCA a participé à un projet appelé Orbit Reader. Il arrive tout juste sur le marché et se vend 500 $, mais c’est encore la première génération. Pensez aux micro-ondes; les premiers essais étaient maladroits, mais les fours fonctionnaient.

Les choses s’amélioreront. Au fur et à mesure que ces appareils seront mis au point, ils s’amélioreront, ils coûteront moins cher et en feront davantage.

(1625)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord, maintenant...

M. John Rae:

Mais les coûts dont parlait M. Greco sont réels, et c’est l’une des raisons pour lesquelles nous avons besoin d’un programme national pour financer l’équipement technique. Si, comme moi, vous vivez en Ontario, le PAAF couvre les trois quarts du coût d’un bon nombre d'appareils. Si je déménage soudainement à l’extérieur de l’Ontario, je n’y ai plus accès. Cela devrait être disponible partout au pays.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’après ce que je comprends, vous avez le droit de contourner une mesure technique de protection en cas de déficience visuelle, alors vous pouvez l’utiliser. Si un appareil est protégé, vous pouvez légalement éliminer cette protection. Quelles sont les ressources nécessaires pour cela? Si vous avez un appareil qui comporte des verrous numériques, que faut-il faire pour contourner ce problème?

M. Lui Greco:

Avec la DRM?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. La DRM aux États-Unis et les MTP au Canada.

M. Lui Greco:

C’est impossible. C’est impossible, parce qu’à moins de vouloir inverser la conception d’un produit DRM, on court le risque de contrevenir non seulement à la loi, même si on a le droit de le faire à des fins d’accessibilité... Une fois que vous commencez à trafiquer des fichiers électroniques, vous courez le risque de compromettre le contenu, ce qui, bien honnêtement, me semble plus grave que le risque de vous mettre à dos ou de contrarier un éditeur parce que vous avez violé son droit d’auteur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord.

Il me reste quelques secondes. David, avez-vous une brève question?

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Bien sûr. Je vais m’adresser à MM. Novotny et Posner.

Votre argument repose essentiellement sur le fait que vous aviez un système. Il y avait un écosystème dans lequel votre contribution était évaluée au moyen de paiements recueillis par la SOCAN, mais selon un modèle qui ne représentait pas la réalité. Nous sommes passés de la publicité à l’abonnement comme source de revenus, mais le suivi de la publicité n’est pas très bon.

Hypothétiquement, pensez-vous avoir suffisamment de poids dans les négociations pour dire qu’il serait préférable pour vous d’exiger des frais fixes plus élevés au départ? Serait-ce une solution possible?

M. Ari Posner:

Je peux vous dire que ce ne serait pas le cas. D’après les budgets que nous voyons ici au Canada, ce ne serait sûrement pas le cas. Je ne suis même pas sûr que ce soit le cas pour les compositeurs américains. Je suppose que si j’étais un célibataire dans la vingtaine et si je vivais dans un appartement d’une chambre à coucher, ou quelque chose du genre, je pourrais peut-être gagner ma vie de cette façon. Mais ce ne serait certes pas un mode de vie raisonnable de la classe moyenne. Une grande partie de notre gagne-pain repose sur notre propriété intellectuelle. Nous faisons du travail à contrat. Lorsque vous êtes entre deux contrats et que vous ne voyez peut-être pas de nouvelles séries, de nouveaux films ou de nouvelles émissions avant quelques mois, ces revenus sont d’autant plus importants.

M. David Lametti:

Que pouvons-nous corriger dans le modèle d’abonnement pour essayer de reproduire ou de créer une source de revenus? Est-ce le nombre de diffusions en continu? Y a-t-il quelque chose sur quoi nous pourrions fixer une forme de rémunération?

M. Paul Novotny:

C’est un peu difficile pour nous deux de le dire parce que nous sommes des compositeurs. La SOCAN le saurait probablement. Mais je crois comprendre qu’il doit y avoir une sorte de tarif que ces services d’abonnement paient essentiellement aux organismes de droits d’exécution. Peut-être que le taux par mille devrait augmenter. Peut-être faut-il changer la façon dont les visionnements sont comptés. Il y a un tel décalage entre la façon actuelle et l'ancienne façon.

Je vais être honnête. J’enseigne au Humber College et aussi à l’Université York. Je suis très inquiet pour la prochaine génération de compositeurs et de musiciens. Beaucoup d’entre eux disent qu’ils veulent gagner leur vie de cette façon, mais avec les chiffres qu’Ari m’a rapportés, j'ai l'impression d'être hypocrite quand j'essaie de brosser un portrait optimiste de la situation à mes étudiants.

(1630)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons revenir au Parti conservateur. Monsieur Albas, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais poursuivre dans la même veine que le député Graham.

Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler des exemptions pour le secteur de l’éducation qui s’appliquent à l’utilisation équitable et de leurs répercussions sur le secteur de l’édition. Y a-t-il des aspects de ces exceptions qui touchent davantage les personnes handicapées et dont le Comité devrait être au courant?

M. Lui Greco:

Si j’ai bien compris, et peut-être que M. Rae pourrait nous éclairer, si je fréquente un établissement d’enseignement postsecondaire au Canada, j’achète le livre à la librairie. L’université peut alors le passer à la rupteuse, le numériser et me le remettre sous une autre forme sans encourir de pénalités ou de frais, ou risquer de contrevenir à ses obligations.

L'on pourrait peut-être mieux permettre à ces institutions et à d’autres dans le secteur de la production de devenir de meilleures ressources. C’est toujours une question de ressources. Il ne suffit pas d’appuyer sur un bouton pour numériser un livre, car la technologie est souvent loin de faire du bon travail. Il y a toujours cet élément humain qui doit intervenir et corriger le texte, de sorte que s’il s’agit d’un graphique, il doit être décrit correctement. Ce serait la seule amélioration que je verrais.

M. John Rae:

Je pense que M. Greco a raison. Même quand on numérise un livre, il arrive que la numérisation ne soit pas parfaite. Si l’éditeur produisait une version accessible au départ, cela atténuerait le problème. Cela réduirait le besoin de consacrer du temps à la numérisation et produirait probablement une meilleure copie. Après tout, d’après ce que je comprends, la plupart des documents de nos jours commencent par une version électronique, alors je ne vois pas pourquoi une version accessible en format électronique ne pourrait pas être produite.

M. Lui Greco:

Plus personne n’utilise la machine IBM Selectric pour produire des livres.

M. John Rae:

C’est exact.

M. Dan Albas:

La loi précise que si une oeuvre est disponible dans le format approprié, sous une forme disponible sur le marché, elle doit être offerte à un prix raisonnable, moyennant un effort raisonnable d’acquisition. Cela ne relève pas des exceptions. Les tâches quotidiennes que nous pouvons tenir pour acquises peuvent être très difficiles pour les personnes handicapées. La loi devrait-elle préciser que ce qui constitue un effort raisonnable est différent pour les personnes handicapées?

M. Lui Greco:

À notre avis, monsieur, non. Nous ne faisons pas un effort raisonnable pour rendre les immeubles accessibles. Nous ne disons pas qu'il faut installer une rampe ou un ouvre-porte uniquement si cela ne crée pas de difficultés indues. Non, ce n’est pas ce que nous disons. Ce que nous disons, c'est que les bâtiments doivent être accessibles et utilisables par tous, un point, c'est tout.

Pourquoi offrons-nous ces possibilités de dérogation aux éditeurs?

Nous faisons la même chose avec le transport. L’Office des transports du Canada utilise des expressions analogues. Les sites Web doivent être accessibles, à condition qu’il n’y ait pas de contrainte excessive. Les terminaux doivent rendre leurs installations accessibles aux personnes handicapées, pourvu que cela ne crée pas d’obstacle indu.

Pour moi, c'est absurde. Je ne suis pas d’Ottawa; je viens de Calgary. M. Simpson et moi sommes venus à pied de l'hôtel où nous sommes descendus, à environ quatre pâtés de maisons. La plupart des intersections n’étaient pas dotées d’installations d’accessibilité appropriées. Les autres manquaient de cohérence. Les feux clignotants ou les signaux sonores pour les piétons n’ont pas fonctionné.

Pourquoi permettons-nous cela? Pourquoi est-ce acceptable? Et pour en revenir au débat, pourquoi trouvons-nous acceptable de produire des choses qui ne sont pas accessibles? Pourquoi est-il acceptable qu’un livre ou un objet d’art produit avec des fonds publics ne soit pas rendu accessible?

Côté art, nos collègues de Toronto... La vidéodescription ne coûte pas cher, mais son inclusion fait l'objet de véritables débats avec les radiodiffuseurs et les producteurs. Pourquoi est-il acceptable de ne pas s’attendre à ce que le contenu soit accessible à tous, peu importe la façon dont on consomme cette oeuvre d’art ou ces médias?

(1635)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Revenons maintenant au Parti libéral, avec Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup à tous les témoins.

Je vais commencer rapidement par les compositeurs. J’ai une brève question au sujet de la vitesse à laquelle progresse l’ère numérique.

Il semble que nous soyons loin derrière. Vous nous donnez des chiffres de Netflix. Vous dites que cette entreprise gagne de plus en plus d’argent chaque année, sans que vous ne voyiez le moindre bénéfice dans vos poches ou dans vos coffres.

Pensez-vous qu’un examen quinquennal de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur est suffisant ou devrait-il être plus fréquent?

M. Paul Novotny:

Je pense qu’il faut agir beaucoup plus rapidement. Les choses avancent à un rythme épique en ce qui concerne la technologie.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Monsieur Posner, êtes-vous d’accord?

M. Ari Posner:

Oui, tout à fait. La dernière fois que la loi a été examinée, il a été décidé, si j’ai bien compris, qu’il faudrait attendre cinq ans avant de la réexaminer. Cela pouvait sembler approprié à l’époque, mais les temps ont changé, et ils évoluent plus rapidement que jamais.

Dans 100 ans, je vois d'ici les gens se demander comment on a bien pu tenir le coup avec tout ce qui se passe en ce début du XXIe siècle. La vitesse à laquelle les choses changent ne fait que s'accélérer. Et le droit d’auteur doit suivre le rythme, advienne que pourra.

M. Paul Novotny:

Il doit être agnostique, technologiquement neutre. Le droit d’auteur doit se rapporter au premier titulaire et à l’oeuvre. Il faut permettre à la technologie d'avancer pour qu’elle puisse être rattachée à l'oeuvre, si la logique en dicte ainsi.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à MM. Simpson, Greco et Rae.

Je dois dire que j’ai apprécié votre témoignage, monsieur Greco. Les histoires se gravent mieux dans la mémoire. J'ai trouvé frustrante celle que vous avez racontée au début sur le cours en gestion de projet que vous n'avez pu suivre jusqu'à la fin malgré le fait de l'avoir payé.

Monsieur Rae, vous avez parlé de renforcer les droits de la personne. Si nous enlevons le rideau de cet examen du droit d’auteur, je dirais qu’une grande partie de ce dont vous parlez, surtout en ce qui concerne le matériel financé par l’État, ne concerne pas seulement le droit d’auteur, mais aussi le droit d’accès. Si on s'attend à avoir accès à des documents de compétence fédérale dans les deux langues, ce qu'on veut, c'est avoir le choix entre le français ou l'anglais, point à la ligne. Est-ce une juste appréciation de ce que vous voudriez?

M. John Rae:

Cela va probablement un peu plus loin.

Il y a beaucoup de langues autochtones au Canada. Il y a de plus en plus de littérature et de spectacles artistiques dans ces diverses langues, et je pense que nous devons nous efforcer davantage de les promouvoir. Il faudrait aussi les adapter aux besoins des gens dans leur propre langue. Après tout, l’incidence de personnes handicapées dans les communautés autochtones est très élevée. Je pense qu’il faut tenir compte des besoins des peuples autochtones dans ce contexte.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Y a-t-il des commentaires de M. Greco ou de M. Simpson?

M. Lui Greco:

Si vous avez trouvé frustrant d’écouter mon histoire; imaginez donc ce que c'est que de l'avoir vécu. Qu’il s’agisse d’une carrière professionnelle, de l’achat d’un livre sur le jardinage ou d’un passe-temps dont les gens veulent profiter pour améliorer leur qualité de vie, je ne vois pas de différence. C'était une question professionnelle dans mon cas. Mais heureusement, il n'y a pas que le travail qui compte dans la vie. Il s’agit de ne pas continuer à se heurter à ce genre d’obstacles qui empêchent les gens d’explorer, de s'épanouir et de contribuer à leur monde et à leur famille.

(1640)

M. John Rae:

J’ai une histoire plus ou moins comparable.

Quand j’ai pris ma retraite, j’ai décidé de reprendre les études. J’ai présenté une demande à Ryerson, et j’ai été accepté. Certains cours sont impartis à distance, à l'aide d'un système appelé « Blackboard ».

Je ne saurais vous dire à 100 % si c’était carrément inaccessible ou si c’était tellement compliqué que je ne savais pas comment m'y retrouver, mais c’était un obstacle, alors j'ai renoncé. J’ai senti que je devais me retirer avant même de commencer, ce qui m’a beaucoup déçu. En fait, j’avais une bonne raison de vouloir retourner à l’école, et Blackboard était un obstacle pour moi à l'époque. Je pense que le système a été légèrement modifié depuis, mais je ne sais pas s’il est accessible ou non maintenant.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Pour suivre dans la même ligne et comprendre que nous sommes dans le contexte de l’examen de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, en ce qui concerne la capacité de créer des espaces inclusifs, des milieux de travail inclusifs ou des endroits inclusifs dans les secteurs de compétence fédérale ou tout ce qui utilise des fonds publics, monsieur Greco, vous avez dit qu’aucun financement fédéral ne devrait être accordé à des programmes qui perpétuent les obstacles.

Nous utilisons ce que nous appelons l’analyse comparative entre les sexes plus. Je constate que nous mettons souvent l’accent sur l’analyse entre les sexes, et le facteur « plus » — soit l’intersectionnalité —, semble entrer en ligne de compte, mais pas avec autant de ferveur que l’analyse du point de vue du genre.

Vous n'avez peut-être pas des chiffres concrets, mais pouvez-vous nous parler du ralentissement économique causé par l’absence de documents accessibles dont on a besoin en temps opportun, comme vous l’avez dit, lorsque l'ouvrage ou le document voit le jour.

M. Lui Greco:

Je crois que la réponse est tout simplement non. Je ne pense pas que l'on ait vraiment étudié la question, mais je voudrais simplement signaler la situation concernant l’emploi des personnes handicapées. Peut-on faire le lien strictement entre cela et les obstacles entourant le droit d’auteur? Probablement pas, mais la capacité d’obtenir des documents accessibles est-elle une variable dans cette équation? Certainement, oui.

M. Thomas Simpson:

Embaucher des personnes handicapées sans emploi offre un potentiel économique qui se chiffre en millions. Pour y arriver, nous devons veiller à ce que les personnes incapables de lire les imprimés puissent se renseigner sur leur contenu.

Le président:

Merci.

M. John Rae:

Si vous prenez la statistique que M. Simpson vous a donnée tout à l’heure, à savoir que seulement 28 % des Canadiens aveugles ont actuellement un emploi, songez aux coûts que la société doit assumer en raison de l’ampleur de notre taux de chômage. Tous les aspects de la vie sont touchés. Si nous n’avons pas plus d’argent dans nos poches, il est assez difficile de participer à la vie communautaire. Il est plus difficile de nous nourrir comme il faut. Il est difficile de trouver un logement décent. Tous ces facteurs sont touchés par notre faible taux d’emploi. Si on a de la difficulté à obtenir la formation nécessaire pour acquérir les titres de compétence dont M. Greco a parlé plus tôt, il est manifeste qu'il s'agit d'un cercle vicieux. Nous sommes exclus de l’égalité d’accès à beaucoup d’aspects de la vie.

(1645)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons revenir aux conservateurs. Monsieur Dan Albas.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais m'adresser aux compositeurs de musique à l'image. Merci d’être ici aujourd’hui.

En ce qui concerne votre plan d’imposition des utilisateurs d’Internet de plus de 15 gigaoctets, comment en êtes-vous arrivés à ce chiffre?

M. Paul Novotny:

En gros, c’était une considération pour les Canadiens qui n’ont pas les moyens de verser une sorte de redevance. Si nous examinons l’étendue de l’utilisation par les gens qui vivent dans des régions éloignées où ils pourraient avoir un service par ligne commutée, nous avons estimé qu’ils ne feraient probablement pas de diffusion en continu, alors il s'agissait de prévoir une sorte d’allègement si un tel système était envisagé.

M. Dan Albas:

Un nouveau jeu très attendu intitulé Red Dead Redemption 2 sera lancé cette semaine. Il occupe plus de 100 gigaoctets. Dans ce que vous proposez ici, c’est-à-dire d’imposer une nouvelle taxe à partir de 15 gigaoctets, le jeu que quelqu’un va acheter et payer — et nous avons entendu de la bouche de ceux qui travaillent dans cette industrie que tout le monde est payé, y compris les gens qui font la musique pour cela, par leurs achats — en a six fois plus. En quoi est-ce équitable pour quelqu’un qui a acheté et payé pour, légalement, que le téléchargement d’un seul jeu atteigne ce seuil exorbitant?

M. Paul Novotny:

C’est une très bonne question. Vous parlez à quelqu’un qui a travaillé à l’un des jeux vidéo de production canadienne les plus réussis au monde. En fin de compte, nos confrères, les compositeurs à l’image qui travaillent dans le domaine de la vidéo, ne reçoivent pas de redevances de performance publique ou de reproduction comme nous. L’idée serait de les inclure dans ce type de régime de rémunération au titre du droit d’auteur.

Nous recevons tous des honoraires dès le départ pour faire notre travail, mais souvent, nous devons en dépenser la majeure partie pour faire le travail pour nos clients. La rémunération des droits d’auteur découlant de l’exécution et de la reproduction publiques fait partie essentielle de notre gagne-pain.

M. Dan Albas:

Je comprends tout à fait ce que vous dites, monsieur, et le modèle d’affaires et la façon dont les gens se comportent ont changé. Cependant, pour être juste, il se peut qu’on n’ait pas accès à votre contenu. On cherche peut-être simplement à payer légalement. Nous ne parlons pas ici de pirates qui volent de la capacité, mais de gens qui achètent quelque chose avec leur argent et qui ne s’intéressent pas nécessairement à votre contenu. Pourquoi devraient-ils payer cette taxe sur 15 gigaoctets, simplement parce qu’ils utilisent un service pour lequel ils ont payé le fournisseur de services Internet, qu’ils ont acheté la console ou la télévision et qu’ils s'en servent pour se divertir?

Je réviserais la situation. Pourquoi quelqu’un qui n’a pas manifesté d’intérêt pour votre contenu devrait-il payer pour cette nouvelle taxe que vous proposez?

M. Paul Novotny:

Connaissez-vous le mécanisme économique appelé « régime de la copie privée »?

M. Dan Albas:

Oui, mais encore une fois, quand je parle aux jeunes de la génération Y, ils me disent: « J’ai acheté cette chanson sur iTunes » ou « J’ai payé pour diffuser ce service, et j’utilise ma propre télévision, ma propre console ou mon propre ordinateur, ou un routeur, mon propre fournisseur, mon propre forfait d'accès Internet », et ainsi de suite. Ils paient pour ces services, et s’ils veulent consommer votre contenu, ils vous paieront.

Encore une fois, c’est une question très précise. Pourquoi les gens qui paient pour ces choses, devraient-ils payer en plus cette taxe pour vos membres, sachant qu’il y a de vraies familles qui ont besoin de mettre du pain sur la table, tout comme vous?

M. Paul Novotny:

Je tiens à préciser que c’est une idée que nous explorons. Tout ce qui a stimulé cette idée, c’est que nous avons indiqué très clairement comment nous sommes compromis par le passage du modèle de publicité au modèle d’abonnement. Nous sommes à la recherche de mécanismes économiques qui fassent le lien entre le droit d'auteur du XXe et du XXIe siècles. La vérité, c’est qu’il y a déjà un régime en place en ce qui concerne la copie privée, qui « taxe », si vous voulez — et beaucoup de gens utilisent ce terme —, les zéros et les uns, qui ont été sur les médias numériques comme les CD, et toutes sortes de données.

Nous ne prétendons nullement que cela va régler le problème à 100 %, mais nous pensons que nous devrions essayer d’étendre au XXIe siècle un mécanisme économique qui était déjà en place au XXe.

(1650)

M. Dan Albas:

J’ai rencontré aujourd’hui des représentants d'Unifor. De toute évidence, ils étaient ici sur la Colline pour parler de la nécessité d’appuyer le journalisme, et l’une de leurs suggestions était presque identique à ce que vous réclamez.

Si nous commençons à adopter des pratiques de maximisation des bénéfices pour les fournisseurs de services Internet, ils finiront tous par y souscrire, et les consommateurs paieront la note sans vraiment consommer. Pensez-vous que c’est juste? À qui pensez-vous que nous devrions nous limiter?

M. Ari Posner:

C’est une question très complexe, mais elle est excellente.

M. Dan Albas:

C’est votre proposition. Encore une fois, lorsque vous venez ici, j’aimerais savoir — et je pense que les gens à la maison l'aimeraient aussi —, pourquoi, contrairement à Unifor et à certains autres groupes qui ont autant de difficultés que vous avec les nouveaux modèles de Netflix, Google et Facebook, croyez-vous que nous, les parlementaires, devrions chercher à vous donner cette capacité et dire non à tous les autres?

M. Ari Posner:

Eh bien, permettez-moi d’être clair et de répéter ce que Paul vient de dire. Ce n’est qu’une des nombreuses idées que la Guilde des compositeurs de musique à l'image et les créateurs de notre milieu envisagent. Il faut dire que nous ne sommes pas des économistes. Les 15 gigaoctets, ce n’est ni le chiffre magique ni le chiffre idéal. Nous convenons évidemment avec vous qu’il ne faut pas que des gens qui n’utilisent pas le contenu paient une taxe, si vous voulez l’appeler ainsi. Nous sommes d’accord. Mais dans un monde idéal, ce qui serait formidable, c’est ce dont nous avons parlé tout à l’heure, c’est-à-dire la transparence et la possibilité d’avoir accès aux connaissances pour que nos organismes de défense des droits des artistes puissent intervenir et se mobiliser pour aider à rémunérer les artistes et les créateurs.

La redevance dont on a parlé n’est qu’une idée très simple, quelque chose qui existait dans le passé. Ce serait très simple...

M. Dan Albas:

Je dirais simplement que c’est très différent des cassettes vierges, où je fais un mélange pour quelqu’un et j’utilise le contenu de ma propre collection privée pour le donner à autrui. L'époque des CD vierges est révolue. Encore une fois, je ne trouve pas juste que l'on fasse payer davantage aux consommateurs — vous êtes consommateur, je le suis aussi. Or, comme parlementaires, ce qui est fondamental pour nous, c’est que le gouvernement ne peut pas imposer cette taxe sans le consentement de la population. Et c’est là que le Comité doit apporter ces changements.

Les propositions que l'on nous présentera désormais devraient recevoir de bonnes réponses, à condition que l'on ne se contente pas de dire qu'on « souffre », car tout le monde est confronté à cette nouvelle technologie. Si vous vous présentez devant un comité pour nous exhorter à demander aux Canadiens de payer davantage pour quelque chose qu’ils n’utilisent peut-être pas, nous devrions avoir de bonnes raisons pour expliquer pourquoi il s’agit d’un cas spécial.

Nous avons entendu dire au Comité que certains éditeurs ont beaucoup souffert. Cela pourrait compromettre l’écosystème de production de nouveaux ouvrages. Cela m’inquiète. Il faut étoffer les détails de ce genre de choses.

Je comprends que vous n’ayez pas toutes les réponses. En tout cas, moi je ne les ai pas. Mais lorsque vous comparaissez devant un comité et que vous nous demandez d’utiliser cet ancien pouvoir pour taxer la population, nous devons avoir de bonnes raisons de le faire.

M. Paul Novotny:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose?

Le président:

Oui, rapidement.

M. Paul Novotny:

Eh bien, je voulais simplement dire que nous respectons tout ce qui vient d’être dit. Nous voulons juste en discuter. Il existe en fait un précédent avec des dispositions qui sont toujours en vigueur dans la Loi sur le droit d’auteur. C’est ce que nous voulons: un débat sur la mise à jour de cette politique précise. C’est là que nous en sommes.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Sheehan. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais remercier tous nos témoins de leurs témoignages.

Ma première question s’adresse aux témoins ici présents. Ma femme travaille pour une ophtalmologiste. Elle est technicienne médicale ophtalmique. Je comprends certainement beaucoup de ce que vous suggérez et de ce que vous dites, surtout que le segment de personnes ayant une déficience visuelle qui croît le plus rapidement est celui des personnes de 75 ans et plus, soit une tranche d'âge qui prend de plus en plus d'envergure de son côté aussi.

Monsieur Thomas Simpson, vous aviez un livre. Pouvez-vous le montrer, s’il vous plaît?

(1655)

M. Thomas Simpson:

J’ai celui-ci et celui-ci.

M. Terry Sheehan:

D’accord. Vous avez Harry Potter, par exemple.

Combien en coûterait-il à un éditeur de mettre un livre en braille? Je ne parle pas de la distribution ni du montant total.

M. Thomas Simpson:

C'est bien moins cher que par le passé. Je n’ai pas ce chiffre sous la main, mais il y a de nouvelles technologies qui permettraient de produire le braille plus rapidement, en grande quantité et à moindre coût.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Donc d'après vous, les coûts de production ne sont pas prohibitifs pour les éditeurs.

M. Thomas Simpson:

Tout à fait. Il y a aussi le braille électronique. Avec un afficheur braille dynamique — c’est à peu près de cette grandeur —, on peut rafraîchir l'affichage pour éviter de gaspiller du papier. C’est aussi moins cher à produire.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je vous pose la question en songeant aux suggestions que vous avez faites dans votre témoignage, Lui, John et Thomas, et aux propos d'autres témoins que le Comité a eu l'occasion d'entendre dans le cadre de cette étude, en voyageant d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Nous avons commencé à Halifax, puis nous sommes allés à Montréal, Toronto, Winnipeg et en Colombie-Britannique.

Nous avons entendu les créateurs. Je ne parle pas de gens susceptibles de lancer tout un Harry Potter, mais de nouveaux créateurs en devenir, des gens qui travaillent à temps partiel ou à l'occasion et qui soutiennent leur mode de vie de la classe moyenne en occupant un autre emploi. Quelles sont les chances pour que ces auteurs soient publiés en braille ou qu’il y ait un intérêt à publier leurs oeuvres?

Avez-vous des statistiques sur les petits créateurs canadiens moins connus qui ont l’occasion de publier et de distribuer leurs oeuvres en braille?

M. Lui Greco:

C’est une très bonne question. Je crois que la réponse toute simple est non. Personne ne suit la situation. Quand on lance un livre sur le marché, il s'agit de convaincre le plus de gens possible de l’acheter, y compris les personnes ayant une déficience de lecture des imprimés.

Dans ce contexte, il y a l'autoédition, qui est possible de nos jours grâce à Apple, Adobe et à une multitude d’autres plateformes, pourvu qu'elles soient accessibles et puissent produire des documents en médias substituts, soit le genre de support que le consommateur ou moi-même voudrons bien acheter... Soit je branche mon imprimante en braille à mon ordinateur et je l’imprime, soit je l’écoute sur mon lecteur Victor Reader ou autre dispositif analogue. Ensuite, j’assume le coût de rendre le contenu consommable dans un format de mon choix. L'essentiel, c'est de veiller à ce que le livre que je construis de la sorte soit utilisable et accessible.

Est-ce que cela coûte cher? Non. Il y a maintenant des logiciels gratuits. Vous pouvez aller sur Daisy.org et télécharger gratuitement un logiciel qui prendra un document Word ou un fichier texte ASCII, ou probablement un fichier XML ou HTML — XML est un protocole que les éditeurs connaissent bien — et il vous suffira littéralement de cliquer sur un bouton pour créer un livre accessible et bien structuré sans frais. Peu importe qu’un millier de personnes ou qu'une seule personne aveugle décident de consommer ce produit. Ce qui compte, c'est qu'il est disponible dans un format accessible.

Nous ne demandons pas combien de personnes vont regarder la télévision sous-titrée. Nous ne posons plus la question; nous nous limitons à rendre ce service disponible. Absolument toutes les chaînes de télévision canadiennes ont l'obligation d'offrir le sous-titrage codé.

Pourquoi poser la question que vous venez de poser, monsieur? C’est injuste et inutile. Tout le contenu devrait être accessible, un point c'est tout.

(1700)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je suis d’accord. Une chose qui m’a frappé, c’est le décalage entre ce qui se passe dans l’industrie de l’édition et l’accessibilité qui est nécessaire. J’ai été étonné de constater que les livres les plus connus sont trouvables en braille, sans que ce soit nécessairement le cas pour les oeuvres des nouveaux auteurs. Toutes les suggestions que nous pouvons faire — et vos témoignages nous aideront — nous permettront de nous assurer que tous les livres, quels que soient les intérêts de la personne, sont à sa disposition, qu’il s’agisse de qualité de vie, d’études ou d’affaires. Je pense que ce sont des questions importantes que nous devons poursuivre.

Et que dire de la situation inverse? Qu'en est-il des créateurs ayant une déficience visuelle? Quels sont les outils à la disposition de ceux qui veulent prendre une idée, la publier et la commercialiser? Avez-vous des suggestions ou des réponses à ce sujet?

M. Lui Greco:

Je suggère l’autoédition. Il y a un monsieur dans mon bureau à Calgary qui a perdu la vue parce qu’il avait de l’eau dans le cerveau. Je crois que c’est de l’hydrocéphalie. Il est passé d'une vision normale à devenir légalement aveugle du jour au lendemain. Il a publié lui-même un livre que vous pouvez acheter sur iTunes pour 10 $. Il a suivi les mêmes voies que vous lorsque vous décidez de publier vos mémoires.

Ces plateformes sont disponibles. Certaines sont meilleures que d’autres. C’est comme pour toute autre chose. Il y a de bonnes voitures et il y en a des mauvaises. Il y a de bonnes plateformes d’autoédition qui sont utilisables par quelqu’un qui compte sur des technologies fonctionnelles et il y en a d’autres qui ne le sont pas. Si le marché suit son cours, à force d'essais et d'erreurs, les personnes handicapées qui choisissent de publier finiront par trouver les outils et les systèmes qui leur conviennent le mieux. Elles y resteront fidèles et ces outils et systèmes dureront plus longtemps que d'autres, espérons-le.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je vous remercie de ce témoignage vraiment important, que nous ne manquerons pas de consigner au compte rendu.

Le président:

Nous revenons maintenant au NPD. Monsieur Masse, vous avez deux minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

À l’intention de nos témoins de Toronto, je veux simplement m’assurer qu’il est clair qu’il ne s’agit que d’un examen quinquennal prévu par la loi des changements apportés au droit d’auteur, après quoi nous formulerons des recommandations à l'intention du ministre, qui disposera alors d’un délai pour nous répondre. Nous sommes par ailleurs limités par une étude semblable qui est en cours au comité du patrimoine. À partir de là, s’il doit y avoir des changements, il faudra déposer un projet de loi et probablement tenir plus d’audiences pour ensuite passer par la Chambre des communes et le Sénat. C’est tout un parcours pour en arriver là où nous en sommes.

Quels seraient selon vous les aspects à régler en priorité? Je sais que d’autres témoins ont accordé beaucoup d’attention à quelques points. Y a-t-il quelque chose qui pourrait être fait par voie de règlement ou à court terme — par exemple, l’application des dispositions actuelles? Si nous n’apportons pas de changements à court terme, nous entrerons peut-être en période électorale, et il faudra alors attendre plus longtemps avant que les réformes se matérialisent. Peut-être pourriez-vous nous éclairer quant à ce que l'on pourrait envisager à court terme ou moyennant la réglementation ou l’application des dispositions actuelles de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur ou de la Commission du droit d’auteur, par exemple. Ce serait utile.

M. Ari Posner:

Je suppose que je reviendrais à l’idée que nous sommes ici pour parler de l’écart de valeur. C’est une question primordiale, et je pense que l'essentiel serait que tout le monde autour de la table en parle. Je crois comprendre que certains géants de la technologie et des services de diffusion en continu n’ont pas l’intention de participer. Il n’est ni dans leur intérêt ni nécessaire qu’ils soient à la table. Je crois savoir que Spotify, par exemple, est une entreprise avec laquelle beaucoup d’artistes ont d’énormes problèmes à cause des taux de rémunération. Pourtant, Spotify est au moins venue à la table pour en parler. Des organisations comme la SOCAN et leurs organisations soeurs aux États-Unis, en Angleterre et en France, partout dans le monde, doivent toutes pouvoir s’asseoir à la table avec les entreprises de diffusion en continu — les Amazon, Hulu, Netflix, et compagnie —, pour voir comment les choses sont réparties dans cette nouvelle ère et comment nous pouvons nous assurer que les créateurs sont rémunérés équitablement.

Si vous êtes Drake, Weeknd ou Hans Zimmer, et que vous êtes au sommet de la chaîne, vous gagnez de l’argent grâce à ces services de diffusion en continu. Mais il n’y a plus de classe moyenne et il n’y a plus de jeu à long terme à cause de cela. Nous allons avoir une population de créateurs qui va disparaître assez rapidement.

(1705)

M. Paul Novotny:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose? Plus précisément, nous appuyons ce que Music Canada propose dans son document intitulé « L'Écart de valeur », tout comme ce que la CMPC recommande dans son document « Sounding Like a Broken Record ». Il y a un certain nombre de mesures qui pourraient être prises assez rapidement. C’est là que nous entrons en scène, mais nous voulons surtout participer au dialogue et exposer nos idées.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Le président:

Pour les cinq dernières minutes, nous allons donner la parole à M. Lametti, du Parti libéral.

M. David Lametti:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais m’adresser à MM. Greco et Rae.

Je tiens d’abord à dire que mon directeur de thèse doctorale était le grand professeur James Harris, de l’Université d’Oxford, qui était aveugle et qui était non seulement un homme merveilleux, mais aussi un brillant érudit. Il est un auteur prolifique de deux grands ouvrages aux éditions de la Oxford University Press, en plus de nombreux articles et autres publications qui vont avec une carrière universitaire aussi prestigieuse. Ce qui est vraiment tragique, la plus grande injustice de toutes, c’est que la technologie commençait tout juste à rendre sa vie beaucoup plus facile au début des années 2000. La dernière fois que je l’ai vu, c’était chez lui, au Royaume-Uni, et il venait de se procurer un nouveau logiciel qui lui lisait les textes. Je lui présentais mes textes en WordPerfect et il avait une machine qui les convertissait en braille.

J’invite MM. Rae et Greco à spéculer sur ce que M. Rae a dit plus tôt, c’est-à-dire, le pourquoi. Il me semble insensé que les gens ne produisent pas des documents dans des supports, des formats technologiques, qui peuvent ensuite être facilement convertibles et facilement accessibles. Si c’est HTML ou un autre format, pourquoi les gens insistent-ils pour utiliser des formats comme PDF qui sont bloqués?

M. John Rae:

Eh bien, on croit que c’est bloqué. Je soutiens que c’est tout simplement faux, et ce pour le motif suivant: je reçois un document en PDF, et si je peux le lire, s’il est accessible, et il y a de bonnes chances qu’il le soit, je peux prendre ce document, le transformer en Bloc-notes ou le placer dans le dossier des ébauches de mon programme de courrier électronique, et je peux dès lors faire tout ce que je veux avec ce document.

À mon avis, l’idée qu’un document PDF soit automatiquement protégé est complètement fausse.

Quant à savoir pourquoi la production est plutôt limitée, je suppose qu’il y en a qui estiment que le marché n’est pas suffisant. En ce qui concerne le braille, beaucoup de jeunes s'y connaissent déjà. Les enseignants itinérants connaissent-ils le braille? Croient-ils au braille? On part du principe que tout est maintenant lu électroniquement.

C’est une supposition malheureuse, une idée malheureuse, parce que, comme je l’ai dit plus tôt, notre chemin vers l’alphabétisation passe par le braille. J’ai beaucoup appris sur l’orthographe et la ponctuation en faisant passer mes doigts sur le braille. C’est quelque chose que l’on ne voit pas quand on écoute la lecture d'un document, qu’il s’agisse d’un livre, d’un rapport ou d’autre chose. Le braille est extrêmement important, mais on ne lui accorde pas la priorité qu’il mérite.

(1710)

Le président:

Monsieur Greco.

M. Lui Greco:

Si votre collègue au doctorat travaillait encore aujourd’hui, je vous garantis que son monde serait bien différent de ce qu’il était lorsque vous étiez à la faculté.

Quant à savoir pourquoi c’est encore si difficile, monsieur, si j’avais cette réponse, je ne serais pas là à vous parler aujourd’hui. Ce ne serait pas une conversation que nous aurions devant un comité parlementaire chargé de réviser la Loi sur le droit d’auteur. Tout ce que je peux vous dire avec certitude, c’est que lorsque je rentrerai chez moi demain, si je veux entrer dans la boutique de magazines à l’aéroport, tout ce que je peux acheter, c’est de la gomme et des bonbons. Je ne peux pas acheter une revue que je puisse lire, un journal que je puisse lire.

Les journaux sont accessibles dans une certaine mesure...

M. John Rae:

Mais pas dans ce magasin.

M. Lui Greco:

... mais pas dans ce magasin.

Si je pouvais avoir accès aux magazines disponibles dans la boutique ou la librairie au coin de la rue, je vous garantis que je dépenserais beaucoup plus d’argent comme consommateur des médias. Je ne dépense pas beaucoup d’argent, en fait je ne dépense pas d’argent pour les médias, parce que les choses que je veux vraiment lire ne sont tout simplement pas disponibles. Par conséquent, je consomme ce qui est disponible.

M. David Lametti:

Serait-il suffisant, dans le cadre de l’élaboration d’un projet de loi, d’exiger un format accessible et de compter ensuite sur d’autres types d’incitatifs ou d’aide pour permettre aux personnes ayant des déficiences visuelles, des déficiences perceptuelles ou qui sont aveugles de convertir les documents eux-mêmes, ou devons-nous faire quelque chose de plus?

M. Lui Greco:

Je pense que si le livre était disponible à la source dans un format qui pourrait être facilement accessible... Le scénario idéal, le monde que nous envisageons, c’est que j’entre dans un Coles, je mets mes 20 $ sur le comptoir et je dis que je veux tel ou tel ouvrage sous forme de livre DAISY ou comme copie électronique en braille. C’est cela que nous devrions viser.

Les lecteurs Victor Reader sont rares, tout comme les imprimantes en braille, mais ils existent. Si j’avais le contenu dans un format accessible et utilisable, comme John l’a dit plus tôt — et c’est très important —, l’éditeur ou le créateur n’aurait pas à assumer de coûts supplémentaires. Il leur suffirait de régler quelques menus détails. Soyons honnêtes, ce n’est pas simple. Plus ils le feront, mieux ils s’y prendront et mieux ils s'y prendront, plus ils seront efficaces et le produit coûtera moins cher.

M. Thomas Simpson:

J’aimerais ajouter que je pense que c’est une question d’égalité. Les personnes voyantes peuvent obtenir un livre sans plus. Nous avons remis des exemplaires en braille à tous les députés. Je ne m’attends pas, comme le témoin que je suis, à ce que vous remettiez votre copie à vos collaborateurs en leur demandant de vous la redonner sous une forme imprimée conventionnelle. Cela ne se produira tout simplement pas.

Je ne pense pas qu’il s’agisse de doter les personnes incapables de lire les imprimés de quoi créer un format accessible pour elles-mêmes. Il faudrait simplement les rendre accessibles.

M. John Rae:

Il y a un autre aspect dont nous n’avons pas beaucoup parlé, je crois, et c’est celui des bibliothèques. Nous vous avons beaucoup parlé de notre désir de pouvoir acheter un livre, et c’est la réalité. Dans mon cas, je m’intéresse particulièrement à des domaines qui n'ont rien à voir avec la fiction, mais il est très difficile d’obtenir une version accessible de livres sur l’Égypte ancienne, ou sur d’autres pays que j’aimerais visiter, alors que c'est un peu plus facile quand il s'agit de fiction. Tout comme vous avez le choix d’aller à votre librairie locale et d’acheter un livre, ou d’aller à votre bibliothèque locale en espérant qu’il s'y trouve pour pouvoir l'emprunter, eh bien nous, nous voulons la même chose. Plus les éditeurs rendent cela possible en produisant leurs livres en médias substituts... Une partie du marché consiste en des ventes directes aux particuliers, mais aussi, bien sûr, à des réseaux de bibliothèques locales, et c’est également important. Nous voulons pouvoir utiliser davantage nos bibliothèques locales, et les choses vont dans le bon sens à cet égard.

Je pense qu’il pourrait être nécessaire de fournir un peu d’aide financière aux éditeurs pour leur donner un petit coup de pouce — pas indéfiniment —, juste de quoi les inspirer.

(1715)

M. David Lametti:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Cela nous amène à la fin de notre séance d’aujourd’hui. Je tiens à remercier tous nos témoins de Toronto et les gens qui sont venus nous rendre visite.

Je rappelle aux intéressés que le projet de loi sur l’accessibilité aura lieu dans cette même salle à 18 heures, et que vous pouvez vous joindre à moi. Je serai assis sur le côté, participant.

Tout cela est très utile pour cette partie, en plus de m'avoir ouvert les yeux. Je tiens à remercier tout le monde. Nous devons poser des questions difficiles pour essayer d’obtenir des données probantes à inclure dans notre étude.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 22, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.