header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-18 PROC 127

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(0905)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to meeting 127 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we once again continue clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other Acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

We are pleased to be joined by Jean-François Morin and Manon Paquet from the Privy Council Office, and Trevor Knight and Robert Sampson from Elections Canada.

Thank you for being here again. You're great members of this committee.

(On clause 320)

The Chair: We will pick up where we left off last evening, clause 320.

Mr. Nater, could you present CPC-138.1, please?

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Absolutely, Chair.

This provision reverts to the status quo in giving the election officer the ability to have a person removed or arrested for causing a disruption at a polling station. Bill C-76 simply envisions the power to order a person to leave, it doesn't have the arrest provision in it. We're recommending it be reverted to that provision, the ability to have an arrest made.

The Chair:

Is there debate?

We'll hear Mr. Graham, and then Mr. Bittle.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

In response to recommendations from the CEO itself, this bill.... Just for the record I'll read the recommendation.

B39 recommended that: Section 479 of the Act provides the legislative framework for maintaining order at an RO office or at a polling place. This provision grants considerable powers, including forcible ejection or arrest of a person. But it is complex, calls for a difficult exercise of judgment, and requires election officers to perform duties for which they are not trained and likely cannot be adequately trained, given the extent of their current duties and skill sets. The potential risks arising from section 479 include violence and injury as well as violation of fundamental rights guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Local law enforcement officials are better trained and equipped to perform these functions. While this section should continue to make it clear that the relevant election officer has the power to maintain order at the polls and may order a person to leave if the person is committing or reasonably believed to be committing an offence, the election officer's power of arrest without a warrant should be deleted. The subsections providing for the use of force and listing procedures in the event of an arrest should be repealed.

I think it's fairly important that we follow that recommendation. It's from the elections officer's report on the election, recommendation B39.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

It's the question of capacity. This is at an election station, a voter is becoming so disruptive that the election officials want to have him or her removed. What would the normal procedures be if this didn't exist? I'm going to imagine the opposite. If this amendment weren't here, what powers would they have? Simply call the police and wait?

Mr. Robert Sampson (Legal Counsel, Legal Services, Elections Canada):

The practice right now, notwithstanding the provision in the act, is that we instruct election officials to call the police. This provision is somewhat anachronistic in that it predates the institution of police forces, for example.

It's one of the oldest provisions in the act and reflects a time when election administration was quite dispersed and elections could be administered in very remote areas. This version was updated somewhat to reflect the advent of the charter, but it still provides for extraordinary powers that we do not—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're including the advent of the charter in the charter of rights for the voter, even if they're being disruptive, or is it the charter rights of the election official?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

For example, it requires a charter caution, so before you arrest them without a warrant you need to advise them of their charter rights. This isn't a practice that we encourage. We direct our election officials to call the police. To facilitate that process, one of the preparatory steps is a liaison between the returning officer and the local police force to make sure there is easy access in case of need.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is in advance of the election being conducting. Okay, that's great.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

An obvious question is this: When was the last time, to your knowledge, that this provision was used and an arrest would have been...?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I would take them all out of the polls, Chair, just because they don't know how to vote properly.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm just curious, what was the...?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

I've been with Elections Canada on and off since 2013. To my knowledge, it hasn't been used.

Trevor is a bit more aged than me, so I will ask him if he is aware of its being used.

Mr. Trevor Knight (Senior Counsel, Legal Services, Elections Canada):

I've been at Elections Canada since 2002. I'm not aware of its being used, certainly in the time I've been there. I don't recall of any cases being noted.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You're saying it goes way back. Does it literally go back as far as the days when people were still pointing at the candidate they wanted as a way of indicating...? Are we talking that far back? I'm asking if that's when the provision came into effect. Did it go back that far, to the 19th century?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Yes, it goes right back to a time when it would be difficult, for example, to access a judge in order to secure a warrant. Hence the provisions allowing for arrest without a warrant.

As to the precise date and whether it's in the initial Dominion Elections Act of 1874, I don't recall. It is quite far back.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That was an era when you didn't have a secret ballot and you pointed at the candidate you wanted while they stood in hustings. There were frequent fist fights and everybody was drunk. They were being paid for their votes with bottles of whiskey or rum, depending on the part of the country. Yes, it was a somewhat different era.

(0910)

The Chair:

I'll call the question.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Stephanie, could you present CPC-138.2, please?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

This is in regard to maintaining the existing provisions allowing for persons committing ballot offences to be ordered to leave. Under the new legislation, these provisions are changing, and we believe that they should stay as they are at present.

The Chair:

They're becoming less strong, the new provisions, is that what you're saying?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's just that it's being removed. We're adding after line 19 on page 182: In performing his or her duty under subsection (1) or (2), an election officer may, if a person is committing, in the returning officer's office or other place where the vote is taking place, an offence referred to in paragraph 281.3(a), section 281.5 or paragraph 281.7(1)(a) — or if the officer believes on reasonable grounds that a person has committed such an offence in such an office or place — order the person to leave the office or place or arrest the person without warrant.

We prefer the existing provisions, as they are.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Again, in the instance where somebody is being disruptive at the polls, what does Bill C-76 allow for right now? If it were passed without amendment, what powers do returning officers have to have somebody removed?

I assume it's similar to what we just discussed, that they can call the police without warrant and have the person removed.

Is this necessary?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

I won't comment on whether it's necessary.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I know, it was a trap.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

The election official maintains a broad mandate to maintain order. They can ask someone to leave. The directive will be for them to call the police.

The amendment removes the use of force to ask people to leave, and also arrest without a warrant. It may pose problems delivering, for example, a charter caution, which is a complex affair. Not all election officers will feel comfortable doing that. They won't have the specialized training to do that. The amendment reflects the reality that the job is for the police officers to remove people, in Elections Canada's mind.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The amendment reflects the reality that it's an officer that removes...?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

I'm so sorry, Bill C-76 does.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I see.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there further discussion?

(Amendment negatived)

The Chair: Stephanie, we'll go to CPC-138.3, please.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is similar to CPC-138.1, in that it maintains the existing provisions allowing for removal or arrest of disruptive persons at polling stations. Here, specifically, it says, “The officer who arrests a person under subsection (3) shall without delay”.

The bill alleviates this and we are suggesting that we maintain the existing provision as it is.

The Chair:

Is there debate?

(Amendment negatived)

The Chair: Stephanie, we'll now have CPC-139.

Mr. John Nater:

We won't be moving this one.

The Chair:

You're not moving it. Okay.

(Clause 320 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 321 and 322 agreed to)

(On clause 323)

The Chair: On clause 323, there's CPC amendment 140, which has some ramifications. If this is adopted, Liberal-40 cannot be moved, as they are virtually identical. If CPC-140 is defeated, so is Liberal-40.

On CPC-140, go ahead. You can present it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendation to protect against misleading publications claiming to be from Elections Canada.

(0915)

The Chair:

If you guys are in favour, we can vote quickly then.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's obviously well phrased. It's fine.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

It's unanimous.

As CPC-140 is adopted, Liberal-40 cannot be moved.

CPC-141 has ramifications as well. If adopted, PV-14 cannot be moved, as they amend the same line.

Could you present CPC-141?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is to extend the “misuse of computer” offence to efforts to undermine confidence in election integrity.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is this recommended by the CEO?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I can't confirm that.

It says: results of an election or of undermining confidence in the integrity of an election,

The Chair:

Do the officials want to come in on that?

Go ahead, Robert.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

If I may, the Chief Electoral Officer expressed concern with the mens rea element in this amendment.

The intent element, which is twofold, currently requires that someone “fraudulently, and with the intention of affecting the results of an election”.... The concern was that this is a limited scope and it may lead to unforeseen or unanticipated limits. For example, the word “election” in the Canada Elections Act has limited meaning. It does not include leadership contests or nomination contests.

With regard to the word “fraudulently”, if someone is authorized to access a computer system, they would not fall within the scope of this provision. Then, in a third, and perhaps more significant way, the intent may not be to affect the results or the integrity, it might be something that falls outside of that and yet is germane to the electoral process.

The Chief Electoral Officer's recommendation was to remove the mens rea element, the intent element, from the provision.

The Chair:

Are you speaking in favour of or against this amendment?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Neither. I'm simply reiterating the position that the Chief Electoral Officer took when he appeared, I believe on September 25, and submitted a table with respect to certain amendments that he would like to see.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Conservative-141, Green-14, and Liberal-41 all tend to do the same thing, but Liberal-41 solves the problem of referring to elections, which they're discussing. I think it's the cleanest version of this.

Of the three, I recommend that we take the Liberal one. That is the cleanest one.

That's my recommendation.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let's not forget that we're talking about two pieces: first is that narrowly defined term “election”, and second is the mens rea element.

We have three in front of us to essentially choose from, I suppose and if one is adopted, the other two become nullified.

The Chair:

We can just discuss all three of them together.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understood CPC-141 to remove that element of intention, whether the act was successful in casting doubt or aspersions over our election.

Perhaps you're suggesting something different, Mr. Sampson. Without too much comment on which of these versions satisfy, if we're looking for something that applies more broadly than just to elections....

What was your second concern? Was that the mens rea, and then the third was something else?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

It was the mens rea, but also the reference to election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. That was the first one.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

“Fraudulently”, I believe, is also being removed in some of these amendments.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. In Liberal-41, it's “attempts to commit any offence referred to in paragraphs (a) to (c)”, does that keep it open enough to lose those two concerns that you have?

You can understand, looking at that, how we're really going to rely on you on this one, because all it does is refer to two paragraphs and it says very little. As David has said, it might be the cleanest, but we want to make sure it's actually effective.

(0920)

The Chair:

Trevor.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I think our concern wasn't really the attempt that's dealt with in Lib-41. Our concern was with respect to the intention of the person who is affecting the election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. You do want it to be a factor, that they intended to affect—

Mr. Trevor Knight:

No. The current provision in Bill C-76 talks about intending to affect the results of the election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

We felt that was too narrow, because it could be a leadership or a nomination contestant, not just an election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

We also feel that it might just not be to affect the results of the election, but also to bring the process into disrepute or generally cause mischief. They don't care who wins, just as long as—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sure, it's just casting doubt, but on that first piece you said about intention, intention remains important. If somebody unintentionally does something, reposts something on social media—because that's what we're talking about here—the intention is not to capture somebody without intent, is it?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

No. That wouldn't be our intent.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's the two other pieces. First is the broadening beyond elections and second is not whether it was “successful” or not. It's just the fact that it was attempted to cast aspersions.

Again, to go back to what Liberal-41 does in affecting paragraphs (a) to (c) in clause 323, does that keep things sufficiently broad but also effective enough? I'm having a hard time with this piece of the legislation.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin, did you want to comment on this?

Mr. Jean-François Morin (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

Yes. I would like to comment.

Ms. Sahota asked me a question on this specific topic right after the minister's remarks on Monday. I answered Ms. Sahota's question in English, so this morning, if the committee doesn't mind, I will take the unusual step of answering this question in French.

Please, all of those who don't understand French, hook up to the translation. I was trained in criminal law in French and I want to make sure that my answer is very precise.[Translation]

The offence referred to in subsection 482(1) includes two elements of mens rea: fraud and the intention of affecting the results of an election.

When the Chief Electoral Officer appeared before the committee earlier this spring, he recommended that the second element of mens rea, intent to affect the results of an election, be deleted. I don't remember the exact wording he used to propose its replacement, but it referred, in the various subsections, to the use of a computer in an election or leadership run.

I would like to draw the committee's attention to the three amendments and to show how they differ from one another because they are not entirely similar.

Amendments CPC-141 and PV-14 are more similar, and the Liberal amendment is more different.

The purpose of the Liberal amendment is really to add a new offence, which is to attempt to commit any of the offences referred to in paragraphs 482(1)(a), (b) or (c) proposed in the bill. As this offence would be described in the new paragraph (d), it would include both elements of mens rea named in subsection 482(1). The Liberal amendment is thus not entirely consistent with the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendation.

Amendments CPC-141 and PV-14 both add an element of mens rea that, where applicable, could substitute for the element of intent to affect the results of an election. The element of mens rea in amendment CPC-141 would be the fact of "undermining confidence in the integrity of an election". In amendment PV-14, it would be "the intention of affecting...[the] integrity of an election".

One of the concerns with these elements of mens rea is that they are highly subjective. It could be very difficult to determine the level of confidence in the integrity of an election. That might subsequently lead to enforcement problems.

I would also like to draw the committee's attention to another point that I addressed in my answer to a question from Ms. Sahota.

Section 342.1 of the Criminal Code refers to a very similar offence. In fact, the offence described in section 482 of the Canada Elections Act, as proposed in Bill C-76, is based on section 342.1 of the Criminal Code. As I said on Monday, section 342.1 of the Criminal Code does not require any clear mens rea or intent to affect the results of an election.

Section 342.2 of the Criminal Code refers to another offence, possession of equipment enabling the commission of the offence described in section 342.1 of the Criminal Code.

I remind committee members of these provisions for a very simple reason. The Chief Electoral Officer of course plays an investigative role specializing in elections, but it would be false to believe that federal elections take place in a legal void or in a world where other investigative services are non-existent and inactive.

The Government of Canada recently announced the establishment of the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security, which is staffed by employees from Public Safety Canada, the Communications Security Establishment and other specialized cyber security organizations. The government also announced the creation of the National Cybercrime Coordination Unit within the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

If candidates, parties or government organizations encountered a security breach or a potential unauthorized use of a computer in the context of an election, they would have to file a complaint with the Commissioner of Canada Elections and with the RCMP or local police departments.

The Privacy Act, the Access to Information Act and our criminal law framework enable investigative agencies to cooperate. Cooperation is encouraged because every investigative organization has its own specialty. Initiatives such as the National Cybercrime Coordination Unit are established precisely to ensure that all investigative organizations collaborate and draw on each other's specialties.

It is true, as the Chief Electoral Officer said, that the criminal law framework provided for under section 482 of the Canada Elections Act may be limited, but many other Criminal Code offences could apply to similar situations, including sections 342.1 and 342.2.

I would like to reassure committee members on this point: if an incident did occur, it would not be the only offence we could rely on. This is all part of a much broader legal framework.

(0925)

[English]

The Chair:

All that being said, which of these three amendments better reflects the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

None.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There is not one here that stands...?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The Liberal motion adds the new offence of “attempt”—thank you, Ms. Sahota—because in the Criminal Code there is a general provision that applies to other offences in the Criminal Code. It is an offence to “attempt” to commit an offence under the Criminal Code.

Of course, that Criminal Code provision does not apply to other federal legislation. That's why the government recommends adding the offence of “attempt” to cover a bit wider.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

If I may, I think Mr. Morin is saying “none” of them because Liberal-41—I guess Liberal-40 was already done—goes halfway to addressing what this Chief Electoral Officer had said. When he was before PROC, I believe it was stated to also take away the intent portion. Now we are learning that for any criminal offence, you would need the mens rea, so it wouldn't be wise to do that. That was the statement made.

But yes, this does somewhat take into consideration what he wanted to achieve and allows for the offence of attempting.

(0930)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm wondering if there's anything additive between that, which is helpful and broadening, and any element of PV-14 or CPC-141 that is also helpful. I know that once we affect one line of the act, that's kind of it. We have to leave it be.

I know you're not here on policy, but is there any element of the two prior amendments that are in line with, if I can put it that way, what the CEO requested be changed within Bill C-76?

The Chair:

And could be added, you're saying, to Liberal-41?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. I don't want to complicate things too much, but if there is a simple addition we can make to Liberal-41 to satisfy something else we heard from the Chief Electoral Officer, then why not consider it?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

With CPC-141 and PV-14, we move away from simply an intent to affect the results of an election by adding “confidence in the integrity of an election” to that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

That would broaden the scope and would be more in line with the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations.

I would say that we could go one step further and refer to leadership contests and nomination contests. That would broaden it even further.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What is the term within the act that covers elections, nomination contests and leadership races? There isn't one, is there?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

There is no one single term.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You have to name them all.

We don't update the Canada Elections Act very often, right, so why not go for gold here? If there's a way to say election, nominations and leadership contests....

If “results of an election, nomination or leadership contest, or of undermining confidence in the integrity of the same” were added to Liberal-41, that would fall in line, that would include another recommendation that came from the CEO while still, as Ruby has said, broadening the question about intent.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

On this specific question, CPC-141 and PV-14 do not modify the same line as Liberal-41. I think that Liberal-41 comes a bit later in line number, so CPC-141 and PV-14 are the only ones that amend the chapeau of subsection 482(1).

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

These are all connected, but the first two are the ones that we need to consider first, and then we can consider Liberal-41 after that as an independent clause.

Looking through you, Chair, to get help—yes.

I'm not sure how the Conservatives feel about this, but that friendly amendment to CPC-141, I think, is better than PV-14. Pass that or consider it, and then look at Liberal-41, which is an addition—adding subsection (d)—and we wouldn't be affecting the same thing twice, so those votes would stand apart. Is that right?

The Chair:

If we did that, passed CPC-141 and Liberal-41 and made the amendment that Mr. Cullen is talking about, would that cover a lot of stuff the CEO was recommending?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Yes, it would cover a lot of the stuff.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't know how the Conservatives feel about accepting a subamendment to their amendment to include “results of an election, nomination or leadership contest, or of undermining confidence in the integrity of an election, nomination or leadership contest”.

Then we could move on to Liberal-41 after that.

The Chair:

Do you want to jot that down while they're talking, just the subamendment? Add those words for the clerk.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You want me to write that? Sure.

The Chair:

He's going to get you some paper.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it nomination contest or just nomination? Okay, thank you very much.

Is it called leadership contest, as well? Is that how it's referred to in the act? Thank you.

(0935)

The Chair:

I'll just read you the subamendment to CPC-141. We're discussing the following subamendment: results of an election, nomination contest or leadership contest, or of undermining confidence in the integrity of the election, nomination contest or leadership contest.

It just adds two elements. It adds those other two events in the electoral cycle. It is not only affecting the results but undermining confidence in the integrity of the election. Those are the two things that would be added that the Chief Electoral Officer had proclivity for.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Personally, I have no problem with the “confidence in the integrity” language and all of that. That's all nice and flowery, and we can add it in. I don't think it makes any change to the effect of the actual clause.

Regarding the leadership contest and the nomination, so far every time we've sat down it's been decided that the parties are going to be responsible for those things, and it is not under the purview of Elections Canada, necessarily. They're not involved in those processes.

I don't know. What do you guys think?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

In terms of nomination contests and leadership contests, Elections Canada's primary involvement is with respect to political financing aspects. For an offence here, we would likely be speaking of the commissioner's involvement.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible—Editor] attempted to commit...tried to put into a leadership race or a nomination race, spreading information that was trying to discredit the race itself, the contest itself.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

That's correct.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Chair, I think we share the views of the government. It's sort of our philosophy to keep party politics in the family.

The Chair:

My sense is—correct me if I'm wrong—that we would defeat this amendment but redo an amendment that had the same stuff in it, except for the part about the nomination and leadership contests. Is that the sense of the room? Do you get the sense...?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I get that sense, but I just want people to think about it. First of all, this is a recommendation that did come from the Chief Electoral Officer. We seem to be very selective whether we think he's wonderful or not, depending on what he says. He's great when we agree with him, and we ignore him when we don't agree with him.

We're saying that if, during a leadership race, somebody—with intent or not—tries to cast doubt by hacking into it, spreading misinformation or disinformation, we're okay with the parties being able to handle it themselves and not relying on any of the potential criminal offences that could result if we included this in the Elections Act. I don't know why we wouldn't want to keep the highest integrity over all of our nomination races. I really don't see it as interference, personally. This is in the event of somebody trying, for example, in Ruby's nomination, to do all of those things to cast doubt over the results of you being the candidate—if you had a nomination race.

That's the point and the intention of this. I appreciate people wanting to keep party things party, but look at the offences we're talking about. This is people who are intentionally trying to discredit our democratic process—not just at the general election but when we pick candidates who will then be put forward as candidates in the general election. The whole thing seems integral to me. Why not have an offence on the books that says, “If you try to do this, regardless of whether it's successful, you're committing an offence”, as opposed to just letting the parties handle it?

(0940)

The Chair:

Everybody's views are on the table. We'll vote on the subamendment. If it's defeated, look to maybe Mr. Cullen to resubmit a smaller subamendment.

(Subamendment negatived)

The Chair: If we had the amendment, Mr. Cullen, would you be willing to present that it undermines the confidence in the integrity of the election, nomination contest or leadership contest?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I thought that was just defeated.

The Chair:

Sorry, it's “undermining confidence in the integrity of an election”, just those words.

Ruby said you were okay with that part.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Does it make any difference? Looking for advice, does that language make any difference in the effect?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

We are back to the original text of CPC-141. The only comment I made was with regard to the subject of the nature of “undermining confidence in the integrity of an election”. It may cause enforcement problems in the future. That being said, it would be a specific element of mens rea that could be used instead of with the intent of affecting the results of the election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The question is that it's not additive. It's not subtractive certainly—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's not subtractive. It would be an alternative to affecting the results of the election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Why not consider an additive piece to what exists in other parts of the Criminal Code, which is what you referred to, Mr. Morin? There are other aspects of the Criminal Code that can be applied.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

As I said, 482(1) includes two elements of mens rea. There's a more general one, fraud, which is also included in the Criminal Code, and a more specific one, the intent to affect the results of an election, which is not presented in the Criminal Code. Laying a charge under the Criminal Code without any proof of specific intent to affect the results of an election would still be possible, provided that all other elements of the offence are met, of course.

The Chair:

We'll go to a vote now. First we'll do CPC-141.

Mr. John Nater:

Can we have a recorded vote, Chair?

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair:

PV-14 can be moved because that didn't pass. Is there any further comment on PV-14, which is very similar?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think we've hashed out this discussion.

The Chair:

Now we move to Liberal-41.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 323 as amended agreed to on division)

(Clauses 324 and 325 agreed to)

(On clause 326)

The Chair: On clause 326, there's a new CPC amendment, which is reference number 9952454.

Stephanie, would you like to present this?

(0945)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

For the register of future electors, this increases the penalties for the improper use of the registry data.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It increases the penalties from what to what?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If I may....

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Ms. Kusie, you're right that this would eventually have an effect on punishment, but this specific motion is about the offence itself.

Currently the offence associated with the prohibition found at paragraph 56 (e.1), on the unauthorized use of personal information recorded in the register of future electors, is considered to be an offence requiring intent, but on summary conviction only. This offence is found at that specific provision because it mirrors the offence associated with the unauthorized use of personal information recorded in the register of electors.

The amendment would transfer the offence related to unauthorized use of personal information found in the register of future electors to proposed subsection 485(2), which would make it a dual procedure offence. Potentially it could be prosecuted on indictment and have higher criminal consequences.

The Chair:

It could be summary or indictment.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes. Currently, it's summary only, as it is for the similar offence for the register of electors. Now the one for the register of future electors would be separated from that, and it would be dual procedure.

The Chair:

This makes stricter.... There are potentially more options for the commissioner and the prosecutor to go by indictment as well as summary conviction.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

The Chair:

Are there any further comments?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right now, there's already a prosecution option for the misuse of the register of electors. I think having it consistent for electors and future electors is the appropriate way to go, not treating them separately.

The Chair:

Right now, electors can just be proceeded by summary. This would have the future electors as summary or indictment, basically.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, and it's for the misuse of the information.

It's not typically electors who would be found liable for that, but people who are using this information on a daily basis.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, are you discussing this amendment?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, something else totally different.

The Chair:

Okay. Could we vote on this thing?

Go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We're dealing with minors here, so I think that in society, in law, whether it's in regard to offences or pornography, we have always looked at the inclusion and the involvement of those under age with specific regard.

I think that this amendment reflects that.

(0950)

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 326 agreed to on division)

(On clause 327)

The Chair: We have two amendments here. We'll start with CPC-142.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

CPC-142 and CPC-143 are similar in that they maintain the element of “knowingly” to the offence of false publications.

Again, if someone were to do something.... If we remove “knowingly”, it just leaves it very subjective in terms of people reposting or redistributing information, whereas the “knowingly” adds the intention around which we've had a lot of discussion this morning.

We're advocating to maintain the element of “knowingly” in both CPC-142 and CPC-143.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My understanding of things is that the amendment is already redundant because intent is already required in the offence related to the prohibition.

Is that correct, Mr. Morin?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The prohibition associated with both CPC-142 and CPC-143 is in proposed subsection 91(1) of the bill. This prohibition says that no person or entity shall, with the intention of affecting the results of the election, make or publish a false statement.

Yes, the intent requirement is already reflected in the intent to affect the results of the election, and of course, the person committing the offence would also need to be aware that the information that is published is false. I think that adding in “knowingly” here would be adding some uncertainty in the level of proof that would be required to successfully convict someone under that provision.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thanks.

I'm prepared to vote on CPC-142 and CPC-143 on that basis.

The Chair:

We'll vote on CPC-142.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Is CPC-143 the same thing?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's the same thing. Just continue on.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 327 agreed to on division)

(Clause 328 agreed to)

(On clause 329)

The Chair:

On clause 329, there was CPC-144, but it was consequential to CPC-49, which I assume is defeated.

(Clause 329 agreed to on division)

(Clause 330 agreed to)

The Chair: Clause 331 had two amendments, both of which have been withdrawn: CPC-145 and Liberal-42.

(Clause 331 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Clause 332 had one amendment, CPC-146, which was withdrawn.

(Clause 332 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Clause 333 had some amendments. It had Liberal-43. That was consequential to LIB-24, so that amendment is passed. There was a CPC-147, but that's withdrawn.

(Clause 333 as amended agreed to on division)

(Clauses 334 and 335 agreed to)

(On clause 336)

The Chair: Clause 336 has about 10 amendments. Liberal-44 was passed consequentially to Liberal-26. NDP-25 was defeated consequential to NDP-17. CPC-148 has been withdrawn. Liberal-45 is passed consequential to....

Are you withdrawing this one?

(0955)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

The Chair:

Liberal-45 is not being presented.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, there may be an explanation that's rational, but I don't understand. You said that it was passed consequential to something else and then we say it's withdrawn. How can they withdraw if it has already been passed?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

LIB-44 was passed. LIB-45 was withdrawn.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The indication was given prior to the date or the point at which...?

The Chair:

At the time, Liberal-30 was being discussed.

Mr. Scott Reid:

They actually indicated that.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. Therefore, the committee would not have been under the impression that it was passing Liberal-45 as a consequence, because that would mean it would have to be withdrawn separately.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Would you mind saying that affirmatively so that's actually there and we're—

The Chair:

Okay. The intention to withdraw Liberal-45 was provided at the time we were talking about Liberal-30, so it is not consequential.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

CPC-149 was withdrawn. Liberal-46 was passed consequential to Liberal-26. PV-15 was defeated consequential to PV-3. CPC-150 was withdrawn.

We have Liberal-47. It's still in play. Can someone introduce Liberal-47?

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

The new paragraphs 495.3(2)(h) and (i) should both begin with “being a third party” in the English version and “le tiers qui” in the French version, just as the corresponding offences in proposed paragraphs 495.3(1)(f) and (g) are limited to third parties. It's just a technical correction.

The Chair:

Are there any questions?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This was just a drafting oversight that was raised by the drafters when we drafted the amendments to the bill. It should have been included from the get-go.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 336 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 337)

The Chair:

Clause 337 has eight amendments. Liberal-48 is passed consequential to Liberal-32.

We have Liberal-49.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll have to withdraw Liberal-49.

The Chair:

You're not presenting Liberal-49?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will withdraw LIB-49.

The Chair:

Liberal-50 is consequential to Liberal-26, so that means it's included. That amendment was adopted.

CPC-151 is withdrawn. PV-16 was lost consequentially to PV-3. CPC-152 is withdrawn.

Liberal-51 has passed consequentially to LIB-32.

(1000)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Chair, may I ask a question?

The Chair:

Yes, Monsieur Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Did you say that Liberal-49 has carried?

The Chair:

No, Liberal-49 was not presented.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Okay, thank you. It was consequential to another amendment that was withdrawn, so I wanted to make sure.

(Clause 337 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair:

Clause 338 had two amendments from the Conservatives: CPC-153 and CPC-154. Both were withdrawn.

(Clause 338 agreed to on division)

The Chair: On clause 339, Liberal-52 is consequential to Liberal-36, so that amendment passes.

(Clause 339 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 340)

The Chair: Clause 340 has six amendments. The first, which I think is still open for discussion, is CPC-155.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This essentially defers the implementation of the pre-election spending limits for political parties until after the 2019 election.

The Chair:

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It deletes any offences related to pre-election spending limits, and we are not in favour of that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It nullifies the next two as well.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

CPC-156 is on the same topic.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Is CPC-157 on the same topic?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, it's the same topic.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

PV-17 is defeated consequentially to PV-3.

Liberal-53 is passed consequentially to Liberal-38. Liberal-38 did pass, so Liberal-53 now passes.

(Clause 340 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 341)

The Chair: Clause 341 has five amendments. We'll start with CPC-158.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Isn't it a continuation of the last three?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, it is, more or less.

The Chair:

Can we just go to a vote on it?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think so.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Now we're on CPC-159.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Liberal-54 passes consequentially to Liberal-39. Liberal-39 passed, so Liberal-54 now passes.

(Clause 341 as amended agreed to on division)

(Clause 342 agreed to)

(On clause 343)

The Chair: We go on to clause 343, and we have an amendment in place, CPC-160.

(1005)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is introducing coordination and collusion standards similar to those that we have discussed already, but I think they were touched upon when we had the Chief Electoral Officer here from Ontario. I think I'll leave it at that.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, did you want to add anything?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes. I would just say this is kind of a precursory amendment for CPC-167. It would be important that we pass this, so that we can also pass CPC-167 as well.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can we vote on CPC-167 right now?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No.

Mr. John Nater:

If you want CPC-167, you have to pass this one too.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for making my life so easy.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

PV-18 was defeated consequential to PV-3.

(Clause 343 agreed to on division)

(Clause 344 agreed to on division)

The Chair: New clause 344.1 is proposed by Liberal-55, and that passes consequential to Liberal-38.

It's already adopted so we don't have to vote.

(Clause 345 agreed to)

(On clause 346)

The Chair: Now we're onto clause 346, and there are roughly eight amendments.

The first was CPC-161, which has been withdrawn. I believe CPC-162 was also withdrawn.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes.

The Chair:

Liberal-56 was passed consequential to Liberal-26. Liberal-57 is passed consequential to Liberal-38.

CPC-163, I believe, is still in play.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, I have a point of order.

Is there a line conflict between Liberal-56 and Liberal-57?

The Chair:

We will ask the legislative clerk that question.

Yes, Mr. Nater, you're right, there is a line conflict. I have no idea what that means, but we'll find out.

(1010)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Chair, in Liberal-56, at paragraph (b) I think there is a typo. It should read, “replacing line 15 on page 201” instead of “line 16”. The French is good.

The Chair:

Which one is that? That is Liberal-56?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, that is what he said.

The Chair:

Could everyone make that typo change on Liberal-56. In (b), replace “line 16” with “line 15”.

Mr. John Nater:

Does that require unanimous consent since it has been adopted?

The Chair:

It doesn't change the substance.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And it's correct in the French.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The Spanish is way off.

The Chair:

So that removes the line conflict.

Okay, Mr. Nater, thank you for bringing that up and I'm glad you're making such careful....

Mr. John Nater:

I'm here to serve.

The Chair:

Yes, that's impressive.

We're at CPC-163, but it cannot be moved if Liberal-38 passes because it amends the same line as Liberal-57. I'm sorry, this can't be moved.

Liberal-58 can be presented by Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is related to foreign funding of third parties' regular activities. It will allow the court, having found a third party guilty of an offence related to the use of foreign funds, to impose an additional punishment equal to five times the amount of foreign funds used in contravention of the act.

The Chair:

What does that do, in simple English?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It creates a punitive.... What is it called when you get additional penalties based on the gains? I'll ask the lawyers.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

In addition to the penalty imposed by the judge under section 500, if a third party is found guilty of having used foreign funds, then the judge could impose an additional penalty over the punishment that was imposed of up to five times the amount of foreign funds that were used in contravention of the act.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's exactly what I was trying to say.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If you use a contribution of $5,000 from a foreign origin, a fine of $10,000 could be imposed, for example, and then an additional penalty of $25,000.

The Chair:

Is there discussion on this amendment?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

We'll go to CPC-164.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This has tougher anti-collusion definitions and penalties that essentially result in a third party that's found guilty of offences under sections 349 and 351 to cease being registered as a third party.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion on this?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Morin, can you explain the effect of deregistering a third party, given that they don't run?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

They get sucked into a big black hole.

Voices: Oh, oh!

(1015)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'll make a technical comment first. We would need to verify, but in the chapeau at new proposed subsection 500(7), I think a few of these provisions that have been mentioned have not been adopted or carried. We would need to verify that.

The concept of deregistration of a third party is currently foreign to part 17 of the Canada Elections Act.

Is it...?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

It does not exist in the act. I guess the consequence—I haven't studied this too closely—would probably be that then they cease to have obligations under the act. One unintended consequence of this might be that they couldn't be found guilty of the offences that we....

The Chair:

We'd let them off the hook.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But they could be found guilty of not being registered.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

not really, because they would be deregistered as a result of the act, and it would also put into question the requirement for them to present a financial return after the election.

I am really unsure of the entire scope of this amendment.

The Chair:

There may be some unintended consequences here.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Normally we ask...not force, but people are required to register as a third party if they're involving themselves.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So then to deregister them from being a third party—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think we have enough information to show that this amendment isn't terribly helpful.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

In an effort to be helpful, I propose that the amendment be amended by deleting new proposed paragraph 500(7)(a).

(Subamendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 346 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair:

Amendment CPC-165 proposes new clause 346.1.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This empowers judges to consider deregistration penalties for political parties engaged in collusion with third parties.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion on this?

Do the officials have any comments?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

My only comment is that while the motion is two pages long, really the only substance here is—

The Chair:

That's not very positive.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I mean no offence. It's just that the Conservatives adopted a prudent approach in proposing a new section 501.1 because 501 was not yet open. All it does, basically, is repeat several subsections of section 501, which talks about the deregistration of parties in certain circumstances. This regime is already known. The effect of this motion is to add the three paragraphs that are mentioned in proposed subsection 501.1(1) to the category of offences that can lead to the deregistration of a party.

The Chair:

Do you happen to know what those three things are that could cause a deregistration?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes. They are offences of collusion with a third party.

The Chair:

Okay, so this is adding the fact that collusion with a third party could also lead to deregistration, on top of everything else that could lead to the deregistration of a party.

Mr. Cullen.

(1020)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What are the offences imagined up to this point for a registered party colluding with a third party? What penalties would a party face without this?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It would face the various penalties that are found in section 500 of the Canada Elections Act, basically fines or imprisonment.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We've already contemplated that if a registered party colludes with a third party, imprisonment and fines are available. This would essentially add on the penalty of potentially deregistering the party as well.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

The Chair:

We'll have one last comment from Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

I like your prescience here in predicting this. It's a question to our witnesses. It was mentioned that there already is a deregistration concept within the act. What provisions would trigger that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Section 501 of the act includes some other contexts as well as the context of deregistration, which is specifically in subsection 501(2). In subsection 501(3), you can see the various offences that could lead to deregistration currently, for example, entering into prohibited agreement, soliciting or accepting contributions contrary to the act, collusion, providing or certifying false or misleading information, making false or misleading declarations, and so forth and so on.

The Chair:

This amendment would add the fact that a party could also be deregistered if it colludes with a third party. There are other penalties for doing that already, as Mr. Cullen noted, jail and so on.

Mr. John Nater:

I request a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We haven't had one for a while.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 347)

There's no new clause 346.1. We'll go on to clause 347.

There is one amendment proposed, CPC-166.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I feel good about this one. With third parties, it adds candidates' collusion with foreign third parties to the list of illegal practices, which also triggers prohibitions on sitting and voting in the House.

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments on this?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The motion is quite clear. The concept of illegal practices and corrupt practices is found in section 502 of the Canada Elections Act, and the consequences are found in subsection (3), paragraphs (a) and (b). There is a prohibition on being elected to or sitting in the House of Commons, or holding any office in the nomination of the Crown or of the Governor in Council.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I wasn't sure if this came up in the Del Mastro case, that if you break certain sections of the Elections Act, then you can't stand as a candidate for a certain amount of time. Am I right?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Those are the provisions exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can you remind me of what that provision is? Is it five years?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It depends. For an illegal practice, I think it's five years.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's five years.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

In the case of an illegal practice, it's during five years, or in the case of a corrupt practice, it's during the next seven years.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's either five or seven. This would help me out, to add in the fact that someone convicted of this would not be able to sit in the House.

Even if elected, if convicted of this collusion, they would essentially not be able to sit in Parliament to which they were elected.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What happens then? You can't force a by-election, can you?

(1025)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

We would have to refer—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The elected person might be doing jail time. What do you do about that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

We would have to refer to the Parliament of Canada Act, to the vacancy provisions, which I don't have in front of me, unfortunately, but I can look it up and get back to you.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's not that I'm against the concept. I'm just looking at what the consequence would be. Could you simply have a vacated seat without the concept of a by-election forcing the recasting of the vote? If someone is convicted of this crime.... They might be doing jail time, which is another whole category in the Parliament of Canada Act.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, did you want to add something?

Mr. John Nater:

I believe in that case the House would have to exercise its privilege to vacate the seat.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The MP would be an elected candidate. Their having been elected as an MP, the House would have to expel them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can vote them off the island.

The Chair:

Then it basically adds another reason why you could get all these penalties that are already in the act, right?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Right. We just looked it up in the Parliament of Canada Act. This wouldn't result in an automatic vacancy in the House. It would not result in an automatic vacancy, so the person could resign or otherwise.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But they would be forced out of the House.

Mr. John Nater:

It would also be a further incentive for a candidate not to collude with a third party.

The Chair:

Is it just a third party or a foreign third party?

Mr. John Nater:

I mean a foreign third party. It's a fairly strong incentive not to do that.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate? Do the Liberals have any comment?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Taking away the right to seek office from the rights of a citizen is a fairly serious penalty for anything, as it should be. I think the act already has some pretty severe penalties within it. I don't know if this is the best one. The commissioner has the tools to catch the lawbreakers as it is. If somebody is put in jail under a separate thing, that already takes care of it under the Parliament of Canada Act.

The Chair:

If someone colludes with a third party, is there a way to catch that right now in the act?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If somebody commits a crime and is in jail, then they aren't there anyway.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes. As I said earlier, the consequences would be either jail time or a fine, or both.

The Chair:

But without this amendment, if someone colludes with a third party, can that be caught?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

There is an offence for that.

The Chair:

There is.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Of course. This is an additional consequence to being found guilty of the offence itself.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 347 agreed to on division)

(Clause 348 agreed to)

The Chair:

Clause 349 had one amendment, Liberal-59. It's consequential to Liberal-26, which passed, so Liberal-59 passes.

(Clause 349 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair: There's a new clause proposed, 349.1, by CPC-167.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Again, this introduces legislation similar to that seen in Ontario as well as the United States in regard to coordination, collusion standards.

The Chair:

Is there discussion?

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

My question to the officials is on the enforceability of this. Does the amendment make it more difficult to enforce the act?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It is very precise. It also seems very broad, so it would certainly distract from the case law that already exists in the context of collusion. We cannot predict the exact effects of legislating a concept that already has a lot of legal meaning associated with it.

(1030)

The Chair:

You said very precise and very broad at the same time.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, it goes into great detail in describing what is and isn't collusion, while the act currently only talks about the general concept of collusion and leaves it to the report to determine the precedent using case law.

Mr. John Nater:

These provisions are based on those adopted by the Ontario Liberal government of Kathleen Wynne in 2014. I suspected our friends across the way would appreciate that in supporting....

The Chair:

That's a great argument for the amendment.

Mr. John Nater:

I thought my friends across the way would appreciate that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, not even a little.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate on this amendment?

Mr. John Nater:

I would like a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 6; yeas 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 350)

The Chair:

We will go on to clause 350. Four CPC amendments are proposed, one of which has been withdrawn. We'll start with CPC-168.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This removes the offences of multiple or ineligible voting from the administrative monetary penalties regime.

The Chair:

We'll come back to the stricter regime.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, correct.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Why do we want to restrict the commissioner's ability to have AMP, which is a great addition in this act?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you looking for rhetoric lines?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Feel free.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I would, but I don't want to delay us beyond the necessary time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We might be done by one.

The Chair:

Okay.

All in favour of CPC-168, which reduces the commissioner's scope in dealing with these particular offences.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: CPC-169 is withdrawn, so we're on CPC-170.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This adjusts the penalty, making it a minimum $1,000 fine, or administrative monetary penalty, for issues that previously led to a candidate's deposit being forfeited.

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comment?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This is a policy decision.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

An interesting observation of why this is important is that recently an Alberta court struck down the provisions of the candidate deposit. This would provide at least a $1,000 monetary situation.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Doesn't this lower the maximum possible fine?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, it imposes a minimum administrative monetary penalty of $1,000. Currently, at section 500 of the act, which imposes the penalties for committing an offence, there is no minimum penalty.

(1035)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there a maximum?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, of course. The act always establishes maximum penalties, but in this case, it would be a novel use of a minimum penalty in the act. Currently, at proposed subsection 508.5(2), the maximum AMP that can be imposed on a person is $1,500.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This would change that to $1,000.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It would limit the commissioner's ability to determine an appropriate amount for the AMP.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Whatever you do, it's $1,000 instead of the flexibility of one dollar to $1,500. Okay.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Does Mr. Nater have any further comments before we vote?

Mr. John Nater:

No.

The Chair:

Okay, we shall vote on CPC-170, which reduces the flexibility in determining the fine, which is now one dollar to $1,500, and puts a minimum on it of $1,000 to $1,500.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll go on to CPC-170.1

Mr. John Nater:

Maybe I'll take this one, Chair.

This basically makes it that the maximum penalty that could be imposed by a public servant, by a bureaucrat, would not be higher than it would be in a similar situation where a judge would be imposing the penalty.

Under the way Bill C-76 would operate at this point, a fine issued through an AMP, a monetary penalty, could be higher than that which would be imposed in a similar situation with a judge. This is aligning the two in terms of the maximum penalty.

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments on this?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No. It would further restrict the flexibility afforded to the commissioner, but at the same time I think that we should trust the commissioner's good judgment in applying the new AMPs regime.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm just curious. To our officials, would the administrative monetary penalties process have the same legal safeguards that would exist in a court situation or in a situation where a summary conviction would be sought?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The context of the AMPs regime is different. The AMPs regime is an administrative process, while the prosecution of offences falls into the criminal set of rules. Yes, there are many safeguards included in the AMPs regime, including an administrative review of the penalty and of the file from the Chief Electoral Officer, and of course, the Chief Electoral Officer's review decision could be reviewed by the Federal Court. The process is different. It's an administrative process rather than a criminal process, but yes, there are a lot of safeguards in place.

Mr. John Nater:

But not as many as in a court situation....

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Given the different burden of proof in a criminal process versus in an administrative process, of course, the rules are different.

The Chair:

Mr. Sampson wanted to come in.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

I'm open to being corrected by my colleague on this, but it may be useful to note that the amounts set for summary conviction are already higher than the maximum allowable under an AMP. Currently, under an AMP, the decision-maker could not exceed the amount that is the maximum for a non-summary conviction.

(1040)

The Chair:

That would make this amendment moot.

Mr. Nater, would it be safe to say that this amendment is being soft on crime, by reducing the potential penalty?

Mr. John Nater:

We are the party that really likes to see judicial protections for those under the law. We're the party of the charter—let's put it that way.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, we believe this is a lower burden of proof for a greater penalty, similar to another issue we're seeing in the House right now, which rhymes with “Gorman”.

The Chair:

Given that Mr. Sampson said it wouldn't be a higher penalty....

Mr. Robert Sampson:

I should correct myself there. In the AMPs provision, there is an additional ability to impose a fine of double the amount of the contribution that is illegal, so above and beyond the normal fine, which can only meet $1,500. My colleague points out, and I do apologize, that in the case of a contribution that is illegal, in fact the fine is not set out in the act.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I believe we're ready to vote on this one.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, you have a worried look on your face.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I always have a worried look on my face.

The Chair:

Okay, I will call the vote on CPC-170.1.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clauses 350 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 351 agreed to on division)

(On clause 352)

The Chair: Clause 352 is a little complicated. The vote on CPC-171 applies to CPC-185, which is on page 344, and CPC-193.1, which is on page 363. Also, if CPC-171 is adopted, CPC-173 cannot be moved as they amend the same line.

Stephanie, do you want to present CPC-171?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This maintains the Commissioner of Canada Elections within the Public Prosecution Service of Canada.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When the Fair Elections Act came out, one thing that we quickly found troublesome was moving the commissioner away from Elections Canada. It's important that we put it back where it belongs and has been for most of its life. On that basis, I won't support amendments CPC-171 or CPC-172.

The Chair:

I think we know where people stand on this, so we'll go to a vote.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Pardon me, Chair.

I'd like to thank Mr. de Burgh Graham for not referring to it as the “unfair elections act”. That was gracious.

Mr. Scott Reid:

He had no need to.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Stephanie, just for your own reference, at the time, I worked for Scott Simms, who was our democratic reform critic, so that was my file back then as well.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Scott was always pretty fair-minded about it. There was another member who I thought was—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Whether you agree with him or not....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a “Scott” thing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I wouldn't go that far.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll go to the vote.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could we not do CPC-172 together with CPC-171?

The Chair:

Are they the same thing?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Basically, yes, CPC-172 is the same topic.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, it maintains the authority to initiate prosecutions with the Director of Public Prosecutions.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead, present CPC-172.

Mr. John Nater:

Sure. I would just point out that the change that is being reversed in Bill C-76 we're changing with this amendment. It was actually first introduced in 2006 with the Federal Accountability Act, Bill C-2 at the time, which was at the time with multi-party support. This is reversing some of the good work that was done in the Federal Accountability Act.

(1045)

The Chair:

The vote on CPC-172 applies to CPC-174, which is on page 333; to CPC-176, which is on page 335; to CPC-177, which is on page 336; and to CPC-178, which is on page 337. They are linked together by the concept of instituting prosecutions.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Mr. Chair, I just wanted to reiterate that this is restricting the abilities of the commissioner. We have heard...to that.

Are all of these amendments that you were talking about going to be affected if this one passes?

The Chair:

They'll all be approved if it passes, and they'll all be defeated if it's defeated.

We'll go to the vote on CPC-172.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Also defeated are CPC-174, CPC-176, CPC-177 and CPC-178.

We will now go on to CPC-173.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This prohibits the commissioner of Elections Canada consulting the Chief Electoral Officer in respect of investigations of the Chief Electoral Officer or his staff.

The Chair:

It prohibits him from what?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It prohibits the commissioner of Elections Canada from consulting the Chief Electoral Officer in respect of investigations of the Chief Electoral Officer or his staff.

The Chair:

Is there a reason that you don't want him getting all the information?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What was that last part?

Are you suggesting that in the investigation of themselves...? If there is an investigation on the CEO, then they can't communicate under this provision.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Knight, what do you think?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

When your boss is under investigation, what do you think?

If Mr. Knight is under investigation....

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I could be under investigation as well as Mr. Morin, maybe.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are you pleading the fifth, sir?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm a little confused by the comments related to the presentation of the motion, just because I don't read the motion that way. It says, “other than an investigation by the Chief Electoral Officer or a member of his or her staff”.

Really it refers to an investigation that would be conducted by the Chief Electoral Officer. I'm not sure if I understand the motion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then I put the question to the Conservatives.

Why would you want the commissioner not being able to talk to the CEO when the CEO is conducting an investigation? This is the actual wording of the amendment.

The Chair:

Did you consult behind you, Mr. Nater?

Mr. John Nater:

I had a question. I'll leave it to my colleagues.

I'm going to ask a question while maybe my team is consulting.

The Chair:

Go ahead. Ask your question.

Mr. John Nater:

My question would be to Mr. Knight or Mr. Sampson.

Now that the change has put both under the same roof, what type of, I think the phrase is “Chinese firewall” would be implemented within Elections Canada? People keep changing these terms. What kinds of safeguards or walls, protective barriers, imaginary protective barriers, would be in place in the event of such an investigation being foreseen by this now that both are going to be underneath the same roof?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Before Mr. Knight and Mr. Sampson answer, I would like to point out that the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, under the current act, does not have investigative powers. The Chief Electoral Officer will of course conduct some internal investigations of an administrative nature, but it is not within the powers of the Chief Electoral Officer to initiate any kind of investigation of a criminal nature.

As we pointed out yesterday, part 18 of the Canada Elections Act allows the Chief Electoral Officer to conduct administrative audits, which are, again, audits of an administrative nature. If the auditor finds something that would warrant an investigation, we'll recommend the referral of this case to the commissioner of Canada Elections.

(1050)

The Chair:

I sense that Mr. Nater wants to speak.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, I would like to clarify. Apparently there was a typo in the amendment as presented.

I'll read the subamendment. It is that the amendment be amended by replacing the words “investigation by” with the words “investigation of”. The word “by” was inserted rather than “of”. It should read “investigation of the Chief Electoral Officer or a member of his or her staff”.That's where the confusion obviously stems from.

The Chair:

I'll take that as an administrative typo change.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question for the officials again.

Does the commissioner even have the power to investigate Elections Canada, as opposed to candidates, parties and elections?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

There are some offences that could potentially be committed by members of the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer and potentially by the Chief Electoral Officer himself.

I'll remind you that the Chief Electoral Officer is now the only person who doesn't have the right to vote—the only elector who doesn't have the right to vote in the federal election. In theory, there could be an investigation if Mr. Perrault were to show up at a polling station to vote in a federal election.

Seriously, yes, it is possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the commissioner is investigating Elections Canada, wouldn't it make sense that he'd talk to his suspects?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If the commissioner were investigating Elections Canada, there would be some good investigative practices in place. I would imagine that the investigation would go on, and at an appropriate point in the investigation, once the evidence has been collected, yes, there would be contact with Elections Canada to let them know that an investigation was conducted or to request the provision of additional information. That would be within the realm of best practices in the context of a criminal investigation.

I see that my colleague Trevor has comments on this.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I just want to get back to Mr. Nater's question.

There are I guess formal separations in terms of the different roles. The discretion to institute prosecutions and to conduct investigations is with the commissioner as an office as opposed to with the Chief Electoral Officer. There are also new formal requirements respecting independence in proposed section 509.21 of the bill.

There's also—I think it should be added, obviously—a sort of understanding, an informal separation in terms of the roles that is taken quite seriously both by the commissioner and by the Chief Electoral Officer in the current arrangement. The commissioner was part of Elections Canada earlier, I know, and obviously the prosecutorial role or the investigative role is separate from Elections Canada's role in terms of an audit. There's that element.

All of those things would be especially important if the commissioner were investigating an election officer or someone at Elections Canada, which could arise, although, hopefully, it would not.

The Chair:

Are we ready to vote? All in favour of CPC-173?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 352 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 353 to 356 inclusive agreed to on division)

(On clause 357)

The Chair: There is, first of all, Liberal-60, which has passed consequential to Liberal-38.

There's a new CPC amendment. It's 10009245.

Mr. Nater, could you present this one?

(1055)

Mr. John Nater:

As Bill C-76 envisions, this would give the power to compel testimony on crimes that may happen in the future. We are restricting this to past tense rather than envisioning things that may happen in the future.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Do the officials have any comments?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, this amendment would basically remove the words “or is about to be contravened” from proposed subsection 510.01(1).

The Chair:

Do you have any comments on the practical implementation of that change?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No. I think it's a policy decision.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I have a question to the witnesses. What powers of foresight and predictability does Elections Canada have to predict acts that may happen?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Again, I would say that this is not within the realm of Elections Canada here.

Just to be clear, Elections Canada is not a name that exists. Elections Canada is a trade name for the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, but there are only two public bodies involved here. The Office of the Chief Electoral Officer is headed by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, and the office of the commissioner of Canada elections is the investigative body.

Here we're in the realm of the commissioner of Canada elections. First of all, this power that would be provided to the commissioner here, the order requiring testimony or a written return, is always subject to a court approval, so it is not for the commissioner himself or herself to compel a person to provide testimony or a written return. It is always on the authorization of a judge.

Second, the commission of offences in the Canada Elections Act can be extended in time in the sense that the same offence can be committed over a long period, for example, because returns are not filed or because the entity or the third party committing the offence is pursuing a path that will lead the commissioner to think that an offence is about to occur.

I hope this answers your question.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It seems to me that, if the commissioner has received information that has come to his or her attention in regard to a potential violation of the Elections Act, there would be an investigation. We would expect that of any investigative body in this country, be it the RCMP, be it our local police forces.

We don't wait necessarily until an offence has happened. We ensure that all threats.... We have some serious concerns and some serious issues that we've debated in terms of threats to the democratic process and threats to election campaigns. If there is a credible threat to an election, if there is a credible issue with respect to the Elections Act, it would make perfect sense for the commissioner to engage in that investigation.

I don't understand the rationale behind restricting this power. It just doesn't seem to make any sense to me.

I'll just leave it there.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(1100)

The Chair:

We're on CPC-173.1.

I'm going to suspend for about five minutes so people can have washroom breaks, etc. If you're getting food, bring it back to the table, please.

We'll just have a quick break.



(1110)

The Chair:

I'll remind people that we're on clause 357, which has been amended so far by Liberal-60. CPC amendment with reference number 10009245 has been defeated.

We're now moving on to CPC-173.1, which Stephanie is just about to introduce.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially, this gives the judge more discretion in terms of ex parte deliberations. There are three examples and it would apply to all of them. We know how much the government believes in the judges and the judicial system, so we feel confident that they will support this amendment in that this provides for the judge to have greater discretion in these three proceedings.

The Chair:

Will the Liberals do that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That sounded uncertain, Larry.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

We do have faith in the judiciary and we have faith in the justice process. Decisions of administrative actions can be challenged via judicial review. That exists, and we think that's sufficient.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Is CPC-173.2 the same...?

Mr. John Nater:

We're talking about broadening judicial discretion for individuals to seek relief from an undue amount of burden in terms of providing documents. This provision mirrors what's in place for the Competition Bureau, which has similar powers as the commissioner of elections. We're suggesting this especially for the case of a voluntary organization where an executive member of a riding may be asked to provide extensive documentation that might be seen as undue, or a challenge for them to do so with their limited resources. A judge may provide discretion to provide relief in providing those documents.

We think it's reflective of what's in place now with the Competition Bureau. Perhaps it might be supportable.

The Chair:

Does the government have any comments?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

We're confident in the power to compel that already exists.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Now we are on amendment CPC-173.3.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This amendment provides that: Within one year of a decision to cease an investigation, not to institute a prosecution, or not to serve a notice of violation, the Commissioner shall destroy or cause to be destroyed records of any testimony given or of any written return delivered under an order made under section 510.01(1) in respect of the relevant investigation.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

(1115)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a quick question for the officials. What is the statute of limitations in respect to these offences?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Actually, there are no limitations anymore for the offences themselves under the Canada Elections Act. I think the AMPs regime provides for a limitation period, but of course if the AMPs regime limitation period is over, the commissioner could always refer to the offence itself.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it normal to destroy evidence before the statute of limitations is up?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I would say no, but I would also say that being a federal public body, the commissioner of Canada Elections must obey the Library and Archives of Canada Act and get rid of documents when their prescribed lifespan expires under the Library and Archives of Canada Act. There are already provisions for the disposal of these documents at the end of their life.

The Chair:

Did there not used to be a a one-year, end of life cut-off for all offences?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

In the past, there used to be various limitations, delays or timelines in the Canada Elections Act. They were extended on a few occasions. My understanding is that in 2014 they were eliminated altogether.

I stand to be corrected on that.

The Chair:

Trevor.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Unfortunately, I don't know off the top of my head what they are.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm really perplexed by this amendment. I would think that, if new evidence came to light, you'd want that testimony to be present in order to bring forth an investigation.

It seems like the opposite of what the Conservatives have been saying they're trying to do.

I would be very opposed to this. I think that the destruction of evidence before it's necessary is not a good thing.

Mr. John Nater:

Perhaps here's a question to our friends from Elections Canada. Is there a normal practice right now? How long would this type of information be maintained within Elections Canada at this point in time?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Because the commissioner of Canada Elections is a separate body and is independent, it would deal with the evidence and have rules, as Jean-François mentioned, with respect to how long it has to retain documents. All public bodies have agreements with Library and Archives Canada for that sort of thing.

Elections Canada has those agreements with respect to all the documents we prepare and keep from elections. We have a schedule as to when we dispose of them. Some of them go to Library and Archives, and others are destroyed. I imagine the commissioner would have something similar. I don't know the details of it.

The Chair:

If they go to the library, are they still available to a prosecutor or the commissioner?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The way the Library and Archives of Canada Act works is that each federal institution has a retention calendar for each class of document.

For example, an institution may keep its active records and may keep dormant records for a number of years within the institution. Eventually they are either disposed of by the institution or transferred to Library and Archives. They would be kept then for a number of years.

It's really complex. Each class of documents has its own retention period. It really depends on the type of document we're talking about, and it varies from one institution to another.

(Amendment negatived)

(Clause 357 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 358)

The Chair:

CPC-174 is consequential to CPC-172.

(1120)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We just did 353. Did we do 354?

The Chair:

We just passed clause 357.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Pardon me.

We wanted clause 353 on division, 354 on division....

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

Clauses 353, 354, 355 and 356 were carried on division.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Pardon me.

Now we're at 357.

The Clerk:

Clause 357 was carried on division. Now we're on clause 358.

The Chair:

We're on clause 358, and there are two amendments, CPC-174 is defeated consequential to CPC-172. We're going to now discuss CPC-175. A vote on CPC-175, as Stephanie gets ready, also applies to CPC-179 on page 338, CPC-180 on page 339, CPC-181 on page 340, CPC-182 on page 341, CPC-183 on page 342 and CPC-191 on page 354, as they are linked together by the director of public prosecutions.

Stephanie, go ahead, on CPC-175.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This transfers responsibility to review the commissioner's administrative monetary penalties from the Chief Electoral Officer to the director of public prosecutions.

The Chair:

I think we know how people stand on that.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Just to provide a little bit more information as well, now that we're moving the commissioner back in-house within the broad elections complex, let's call it, whatever trade name you want to call it, we think it would be appropriate that an external review process be available to those who are seeking reviews. That's why we're suggesting it be the director of public prosecutions, which makes sense from a legal standpoint.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Well said, Mr. Nater.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The offer for a complaint coming from a citizen, you want to have it externalized not have it in-house?

Mr. John Nater:

The review of an AMP.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What's the scenario you're imagining that would not be satisfactory currently?

Mr. John Nater:

If any individual person has been charged or fined an AMP, in this current situation it would be reviewed by the CEO. Now that the commissioner and the CEO are in the same entity we think it should be an external.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Even though they're two separate jobs....

Mr. John Nater:

It's still not enough. We'd like to see an external review.

The Chair:

If someone charged the Liberals with an election offence from the last election, do you think the Attorney General, who is responsible for the chief prosecutor and is inside that government that's being charged, should be the one adjudicating?

Isn't that a good question?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That was a really good question.

Mr. John Nater:

In fact, it allows me to once again highlight the great work done with the Federal Accountability Act, which gave the director of public prosecutions independence from the Attorney General of Canada. It's another good reason to thank the former government.

The Chair:

I think that's a good preamble to a vote.

We will vote on CPC-175, which has ramifications on CPC-179, CPC-180, CPC-181, CPC-182, CPC-183 and CPC-191. The vote is applied to all of those amendments as well.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Also defeated are CPC-179, CPC-180, CPC-181, CPC-182, CPC-183 and CPC-191, because they are linked together by the director of public prosecutions.

(Clause 358 agreed to on division)

(Clause 359 agreed to)

Clause 360 had one amendment, CPC-176, which was consequential to CPC-172 so it was defeated.

(Clause 360 agreed to on division)

(Clause 361 agreed to on division)

(Clause 362 agreed to)

(1125)

The Chair:

Clause 363 had one amendment, which was CPC-177, but that was defeated consequential to CPC-172.

(Clause 363 agreed to on division)

Clause 364 had one amendment, which was CPC-178, but that was defeated consequential to CPC-172.

(Clause 364 agreed to on division)

Clause 365 has five amendments. The first one was CPC-179, which is defeated consequential to CPC-175. CPC-180 is defeated consequential to CPC-175. CPC-181 is defeated consequential to CPC-175. CPC-182 is defeated consequential to CPC-175. CPC-183 is defeated consequential to CPC-175.

(Clause 365 agreed to on division)

(Clause 366 agreed to)

Now there's a new clause proposed, 365.1. It's one of the new CPC amendments, reference number 10018294.

Do you want to present that, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

This, as the chair indicated, is a new clause that requires our committee to review the rules related to pre-election spending, third parties and foreign influence after the next election. In a similar way, there were evaluations of the—

Pardon me. I'm on CPC-184. I'm jumping ahead, Chair.

Non-resident electors require separate reporting of results of special ballots cast.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have we not had this discussion before?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I feel as though we have had this conversation already, but—

The Chair:

Did we vote on this one?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Let me take a moment to see if there are any points I want to raise again.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can vote on it now or later, if you'd like.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I have to see if I have to get anything on the record.

I think it's just in consideration of the huge number of additional non-resident electors we are going to see, for many reasons. We think it's important to have special and distinct reporting of the special ballots cast.

That's all I will add, but it's true, we did have a large discussion in regard to this yesterday, Mr. Chair.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

There's a new clause 366.1 proposed in CPC-184.

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

My apologies. This is what I was starting on before.

It requires our committee to review rules related to pre-election spending, third parties and foreign influence after the next election, similar to the evaluations we would see in Ontario after the election. I think it's good practice, no matter what, to do an evaluation, a lessons learned. Having been in the public service for 15 years, I can say that this is a fundamental part of Canadian government. We believe it should apply to this legislation as well.

(1130)

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

After the election the CEO issues us a nice long report, which gives us an opportunity to discuss all the things he has discovered, and it comes to this committee to discuss.

Although I appreciate what you want to do, it happens anyway so I think this amendment is redundant.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is a similar point. I would be careful not to assume too much, but given all these new changes we've made to the clause governing third parties, which I think is the central concern that Stephanie's raising, the CEO would report back. It's impossible for me to imagine that his report on the next election will not include lessons learned, as we've talked about, particularly with these aspects, so I feel pretty confident, given the track record of Elections Canada, that we'll get a decent report. This is the committee it always comes to, I believe, by mandate.

The Chair:

We'll hear Mr. Nater, and then Ms. Kusie.

Mr. John Nater:

I thought I would point out that this recommendation mirrors a similar provision related to political financing that was introduced in 2003 in the Chrétien government's Bill C-24. We're reflecting the good work that Mr. Chrétien undertook in 2003.

The Chair:

That's an excellent argument for this class.

Mr. John Nater:

I can appreciate that, sir, your having served with the prime minister.

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I also wanted to state, using the example of the potential new format for the leadership debates, that this is an example, Mr. Cullen, of where we do not always have the assurance, if it is not legislated, that we will have review and input into the democratic processes. This provides specifically for that.

The Chair:

We'll go to a vote on a potential new clause 366.1, which would be created by CPC-184.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

On clause 367, there was an amendment, CPC-185, but this lost consequential to CPC-171.

(Clause 367 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 368 and 369 agreed to)

There is a potential new clause 369.1, proposed by amendment CPC-186, which Stephanie will now introduce for us.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This amendment is in regard to the register of future electors, so that they mirror the record retention protection and evidence rules, which pertain to the register of electors. It follows common sense that the rules regarding the register of electors should, at the very least, be the standard for the future electors. As I indicated earlier, generally speaking, we'd like to see greater enforcement where there are minors concerned, but for the sake of this amendment, it is simply with regard to mirroring the retention, protection and evidence rules, which pertain to the register of electors.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for this excellent suggestion.

The Chair:

Oh, we got there quickly.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Hold it here for a minute. This feels so good.

(1135)

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen is still undecided.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm going to go on division, Chair.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: That's just a joke.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 370)

The Chair:

There is a proposed amendment CPC-187.

Go ahead, Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This maintains protection for bingo sheets from becoming public documents. In the past few days, we've heard a lot of discussion, with regard to privacy concerns, so we feel that this fits into the protection of those concerns and as I said, it just protects the bingo sheets from becoming public documents.

The Chair:

Is there any comment from the government or maybe comment from officials, if the government has no thoughts?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

First of all, I have a very technical comment. While the English version of the amendment seems to afford more protection to the bingo sheets, the French version seems to be doing the opposite, so there is a....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is there a problem?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Second, although the previous amendments removed the bingo sheets from the definition of election documents, without the list of electors that was used on polling days, bingo sheets are useless. Bingo sheets are just a bunch of numbers circled on a piece of paper and without the associated documents, they provide absolutely no information.

The Chair:

Maybe I'll just find out how this is going to go.

I know it would need to be amended, if it was passed, to put the French and the English together, but it doesn't look like it has good potential, so let's vote on it and see.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 370 agreed to on division)

(On clause 371)

The Chair: On clause 371, there is one amendment. It is Liberal-61, which will be proposed by Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Bingo sheets....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is related to bingo sheets again. I'm still waiting for somebody to shout “Bingo”, and there you go, problem solved.

The amendment will provide for two distributions of the bingo sheets to occur: one by the returning officer after polling day, and the second essentially by the CEO after the election. This is tied into what we discussed yesterday.

The second distribution would take the form of a final statement of electors who voted, prepared by Elections Canada and distributed to candidates and interested parties in electronic form within six months of the election. This is related to what we discussed.

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Specifically, given the passage of this bill, is Elections Canada able to do this for 2019?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

If it didn't, the law will definitely ask us to do it. I can assure you of that.

The Chair:

The commissioner will get them.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Trevor Knight:

My understanding is that there was a discussion before we attended, about adding an additional amendment bringing back the requirement of the returning officers to provide, upon request, bingo sheets in their paper form after the election.

Just going back, in terms of our general recommendation, what existed in the past was that on polling day, every hour, the bingo sheets were given out to representatives. Then there was a requirement on the returning officer to provide copies of all the bingo sheets to candidates and parties after the election. We found that to be quite a burden on the returning officers. Many of them were unable to do that. Therefore, our proposal has been to have a process much like this, where Elections Canada would centralize that process afterwards and make that happen.

Generally, we would not be as concerned about this as the continuing obligation on the returning officer to provide the paper bingo sheets.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Essentially, there is no paper backup. This will be centralized through Elections Canada. That's the cumulated list. The parties will be given those hourly bingo sheets.

Technically, why was that such a burden? It seems that you're just accumulating them all together, and then providing them once from the returning officer. Why was that found to be so difficult?

(1140)

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Partially it's an issue of volume. We're talking about maybe 3,000 sheets of paper.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How many?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Maybe 3,000 sheets per electoral district, or a little less. Let's say, 12 sheets per polling division and approximately 200 polling divisions, so that's 2,400 sheets, which, just to note, means a little less than 800,000 sheets of paper would be coming to Elections Canada after the election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Currently, that's what happens.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That part is not going to change with this amendment, is it?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

They're no longer election documents, so they won't be retained in the same way, but in order to make them available, yes, they would be coming back.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That will be status quo.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's 800,000 pages back to Elections Canada, give or take.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Yes, more or less.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Our comment is not a concern about this amendment. I believe this amendment reflects what our intention always was. I just want to highlight that the concern we raised that led us to recommend a process such as this, where it was centralized, was the burden on the returning officers. That's just a matter of their closing down their offices, having very limited resources and having to keep on staff, and that type of thing, to perform that.

As you say, it's only a few thousand pieces of paper, but it involves a gathering together, and often these things have been filed incorrectly. Putting that all together is more difficult in the timelines they're working on, because they have their offices rented for a very limited time—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As well, there's the time to shut it all down.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

—and they don't have staff afterwards. Really, the burden on them was what inspired us to seek that this only be done centrally.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Mr. Morin, were you trying to jump in there? Okay.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Could one person explain, in one sentence, what a bingo sheet is, just in case someone, 20 years from now, reads this and thinks we're talking about bingo?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I can explain it, because I was the data director for more campaigns than I can count.

The Chair:

David, you have one sentence.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Every poll has a list of electors who are registered, and each person has a number associated to them. The bingo sheet just says by poll number and by voter number who voted in the previous hour. It's a big sheet with about 500 numbers on it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We will vote on Liberal-61.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 371 as amended agreed to)

(On clause 372)

The Chair: Clause 372 has six amendments. The first one is CPC-188.

Would you like to present that, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially it is, as verbatim within the amendment: (5) No solemn declaration made under this Act shall be invalid, void or voidable because the person making it added or spoke words or used forms or mannerisms normally associated with an oath.

That solemn declaration's not void due to oath-like words or mannerisms.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As it's worded, as I understand it, if somebody makes an oath, and completely messes it up and swears to hand out everything they learned to whoever they want, this would not invalidate it because they didn't.... Is that not correct?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think it's more like this.

Colleagues may be wondering why I've been so quiet up until now. Mostly it's because I wanted to hear your wisdom—

The Chair:

You saved it for this amendment.

(1145)

Mr. Scott Reid:

The main reason is that I've been saving up for this one.

Sometimes you can swear an oath and people may add things or muff it slightly or adjust it, perhaps based on their own religious beliefs or on their own rejections of religious beliefs, whatever the case may be. The oath itself remains absolutely valid, binding in precisely the normal manner.

A really good example of this is the oath that we all swore when we became members of Parliament. Some people have added to that in the past. I remember that when I was first elected, many of us who were Canadian Alliance MPs at the time, added a bit about not just swearing allegiance to the Queen but also to the Constitution and the people of Canada, all of which is irrelevant, from the perspective of the legality of the oath, although obviously of personal importance.

In that spirit, and also in the spirit of religious freedom, openness and acceptance, which of course is a motivating spirit of modern Canada, the purpose of this wording is to make sure that a solemn declaration—which means an oath—remains valid, regardless of whether people add words or use some form of mannerism that is appropriate to them but not part of the formal solemn declaration.

To answer Mr. Graham's question, I think that if I were to add something to the effect of “I'm now going to mess with the system, so ignore everything I said”, that wouldn't count. You're still under oath.

More likely is a situation where someone makes a solemn declaration and feels the need, based on their own profoundly held religious beliefs, to add something indicating their own level of solemnity.

The Chair:

And if you didn't say everything that was in the oath, would the entire oath still apply?

Mr. Scott Reid:

If you said literally nothing?

The Chair:

No, less than...if you missed some words by accident.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I would think so, if you're asking if someone has an auditory impairment or can't read, and they muddle it up slightly.

We have a citizenship oath. I went to a ceremony at the Museum of Civilization, as it then was, when the judge said to me he did it two words at a time. He started by saying “I swear”, and everybody said, “I swear”, etc. He said the reason was that a lot of people didn't speak either official language very well and were going to muddle it up slightly. That doesn't have any legal meaning, but they want to get it right. They're trying.

He's an experienced judge. He's used to dealing with this. Some of our people administering elections might not be, and there would be some kind of issue of that sort. The oath is still proper, full and complete.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand what you want to do with this, but I would like to ask the witnesses if they could expand on what would be and what would not be an acceptable oath under this.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you for your question.

Before answering your question, I would like, with permission, to ask for precision from Mr. Reid or Mrs. Kusie.

On the fourth line of the English version, it says, “or used forms or mannerisms normally associated with an oath.” When you use the word “forms” are you referring to a paper form or to a manner by which one can express themselves, for example?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's a manner.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, it does not mean literally a form as in a singular sheet, but a formulaire. If you take a look at the French, you see that it probably provides us with the....

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

That's my question, because in French, formulaire really refers to a paper form. If you're referring to a manner of expressing oneself, I would recommend changing “formulaires” to “formules”.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's a good point.

I'm assuming nobody objects to that, before we vote on the actual amendment, to reading the French as “formules” instead of “formulaires”.

The Chair:

I think that's okay.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

With regard to any comment on the motion, the way I understand the motion is that now that we've gone from “oath” to “solemn declaration” it doesn't have any faith associated with it, and it's more neutral from a “liberty of faith” perspective. My understanding of this motion is that if someone were to say, “So help me God” at the end of a solemn declaration, it wouldn't affect the validity of the solemn declaration.

That's my understanding of this motion.

(1150)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If there's anything unrelated, irrelevant or contradictory to the oath, would it affect the oath?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Something that would contradict the oath, of course, would not be admissible. However, something that would only, as I said, add a form that people would usually add at the end of an oath, like “So help me God” or any other form added at the end of an oath by a person of another religious denomination, wouldn't make the solemn declaration invalid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

David, just to set your mind at ease, it does say “forms or mannerisms normally associated with an oath”, such as “So help me God”. Something such as “Everything I just said, I'm going to do the opposite of, heh, heh, heh” doesn't count and is not normally associated with an oath.

The Chair:

Are you ready to vote? There is a request for a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair: Amendment CPC-189 was withdrawn.

CPC-190 can't be moved because Liberal-62 passed, consequential to Liberal-1.

We have NDP-26.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is the electoral district situation.

We've had some conversation. I'm not sure what the consequence of the previous conversations might be on NDP-26, so I'll just give you a second.

The Chair:

Yes, I'm just going to check that. It looks to me like it's been defeated already.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I will hold my breath until you determine that.

Mr. John Nater:

I have a point of order, Chair. Is this not already adopted, based on NDP-8?

The Chair:

NDP-8 did pass but we're just checking.

This amendment was related to NDP-8 but in NDP-8 we changed the words “electoral district” to “polling station” so we withdrew the consequential effect, because you can't live in a polling station. Therefore, we can discuss this amendment now because we withdrew its consequence.

Do you want to present the effect of the amendment?

(1155)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

I'll start with our officials. The language is about vouching, as I understand what has been proposed. It's about somebody in the same electoral district being able to vouch for somebody else.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, it wouldn't be in the same electoral district, but it could be in one of the polling divisions associated with the polling station.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

One of the polling divisions within the same electoral district.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

That was associated with the same polling station.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. We're back to the grouping again?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's not novel, but it's the new introduction where these would be allowed. We're in the gym. There are several.... We didn't call it a polling place. Remind me of the terminology.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It used to be called a polling place, but now it's called the polling station.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It would allow somebody, as they're in different divisions but in the same polling station, to be able to vouch for somebody else.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly, the rule used to say that you could only vouch for someone if you were registered on the list of electors for the same polling division. Then the amendment, as amended, that was brought forward changed that so that you can only vouch for a person if you are registered on the list of electors for the same polling station, and the polling station regroups one or several polling divisions.

Now this amendment here would need to refer to a person whose ordinary residence is in a polling division associated with the polling station.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Again, we're looking at having voters vote in this similar but new way. If somebody comes in and says, “I'd like to vouch for this person; they're my neighbour", as it currently stands, if they're not in the exact same polling division, that vouching is not valid. Is that right?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly.

(1200)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's nonsensical.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The frontier between polling divisions can be in the middle of the street, and you could very well try to vouch for the person who lives in front of you but if you're not in the same....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The circumstance we're contemplating is that two citizens go to vote, and one seeks to vouch for the other. They live literally across the street from each other, and as Bill C-76 is currently written now, that vouching cannot happen if they're not in the exact same polling division.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

One of your motions, which was amended to say “polling station”, would now allow the person to be vouched for if the voucher is on the list for the same polling station. That being said, there are two other sets of provisions that would restrict it, which now create an inconsistency in the act.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

One is located in the proposed new part 11.1 of the act, which talks about the prohibitions related to voting. This provision has already been passed, so this is something that will need to be fixed.

Now we are in the provision about the solemn declarations, so one of the statements the voucher needs to make is that the elector who is being vouched for resides in the same polling division. This is where we would need to change for—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Because of what's been passed already, there are two inconsistencies within the act, which maybe at report we'll have to....

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Probably at report.... I cannot predict what will happen in Parliament's proceeding.

The second inconsistency is the one we are dealing with now, the one that is found at proposed paragraph 549.1(2)(a).

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is what NDP-26 seeks to address.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's clearing up an inconsistency within the act.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If we have agreed to this principle already, this question between divisions and stations....

The Chair:

We would need to change this to say “polling division”. Is that right, or is it “polling station”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In each polling division within the station....

I don't know what the language would be, but you have to be consistent.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly. In electoral law, in practice, a polling division is a geographical area. A polling station is a place. You cannot reside in a polling station, so we need to massage the language a little bit to refer to the geographical area itself.

The Chair:

It would be the polling divisions that are included in that polling station.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Then my question specifically is, if the language then changed, the other elector resides in the polling division. Does that satisfy the “not living within the polling station” concerns?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It would need to say “the other elector resides in a polling division associated with the polling station”. Then there was another Liberal motion related to vouching in long-term care facilities that has already amended that line.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

With that similar language...?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It was with slightly different language to accommodate for the special mechanism that was created for long-term care facilities.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I want the language to be clear. Perhaps, then, we're into a subamendment conversation.

The Chair:

You can't amend your own motion, but get someone to make that subamendment.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, okay, the subamendment is that the elector resides in a polling division in that polling station.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Associated with that polling station....

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Chair, my colleague Trevor would like to say something.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

In section 120 what we talk about is a polling division "assigned" to the polling station—rattachée.

The Chair:

Okay, then it is lives in a polling division assigned to that polling station.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Correct.

The Chair:

That's the subamendment.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm going over the blues from the meeting where we dealt with NDP-8, and at that point in time the Chair said this: We now have NDP-8. Just so you know, NDP-8 also applies to NDP-9 on page 67, NDP-11 on page 78, NDP-16 on page 114, and NDP-26 on page 352. It's to replace....

I just wonder under what provision we're able to now do this.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's because we changed NDP-8.

(1205)

The Chair:

Yes. Later on we said we'd put those back in when we get to them, which is now, for discussion, for that reason.

(Subamendment agreed to)

(Amendment as amended agreed to)

I will get the clerk to read the subamendment, just to make sure everyone knows what we just approved.

Mr. Philippe Méla (Legislative Clerk):

I'm reading the whole amendment as it stands right now. It's that Bill C-76 in clause 372 be amended by replacing line 6 on page 229 with the following: (a) the other elector resides in a polling division assigned to the polling station.

The Chair:

That was passed.

There was also a Liberal amendment, Liberal-63, which passed consequential to Liberal-9.

(Clause 372 as amended agreed to on division)

(Clause 373 agreed to)

Clause 374 had one amendment, CPC-191, but it was defeated consequential to CPC-175.

(Clause 374 agreed to on division)

(Clause 375 agreed to)

(On clause 376)

The Chair: We are now on clause 376. There is amendment CPC-192. Who will present that?

Mr. John Nater:

I'll present it and then I'll also introduce a subamendment to clarify it based on the coming into force of an upcoming bill currently before the Senate.

The CPC subamendment would read that amendment CPC-192 be amended by (a) replacing the words “replacing lines 1 to” with the words “adding after line”; (b) replacing the words “376 Schedule” with the words “(2) Schedule”; and (c) deleting all the words after the words “Cold Lake”.

I'll pass this around for clarity's sake. It has to deal with the fact that Bill....

Oh, sorry. Go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Isn't there already a process to change riding names? I'm trying to get some clarity on this.

Mr. John Nater:

That's what's being caught in this. That's why the subamendment is being presented.

First of all, this is coordinating with amendment CPC-199, which makes it reflective of Bill C-402.

These are the only two ridings in that schedule that would be affected by Bill C-402 with a name change. The various schedules list various ridings that can be affected, based on size and geography. These two riding names need to be changed based on what's currently within that schedule.

Bill C-402 will change the riding names. This bill isn't currently showing the change, so we have to make the change to reflect that, if that makes sense.

(1210)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, not at all.

Has the other one already passed?

Mr. John Nater:

It's currently before the Senate, so it will pass.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then we can't change this in advance of that.

Mr. John Nater:

That's why the subamendment does.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there any comments from the officials, who look as confused as I do?

Mr. John Nater:

Amendment CPC-199 does this to coordinate with Bill C-402. It corrects the set schedule in this act.

But I'm happy for the officials to have a word.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Just to confirm, Mr. Nater, the effect of this motion would be to revert back to status quo upon...?

Mr. John Nater:

No, it would be to change it to the new names of the electoral districts. Amendment CPC-199 is contingent on Bill C-402's receiving royal assent and officially making those name changes.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

As I understand it, then, schedule 3 would be updated, if Bill C-402 passes, upon the first dissolution of Parliament after Bill C-402 passes, to reflect the names in Bill C-402.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Shouldn't that be part of the process of Bill C-402 at the Senate, rather than here?

Mr. John Nater:

Are you saying it should be done with Bill C-402?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the Senate currently has Bill C-402, shouldn't it be changed there? This is just a weird thing that I don't get.

Mr. John Nater:

I didn't introduce Bill C-402. That was Mr. Rodriguez.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Mr. John Nater:

I think that train has left the station, though. It's already in the Senate. We're not going to get the chance to get back to it.

Just as an example of this, “Western Arctic” was changed in the previous name change bill in 2014 and was never actually changed in this one. That's why that one is not included in the first two, but it nonetheless needs to be changed as well.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Just to provide some context on our reading of schedule 3—because schedule 3 can only be changed by statute—schedule 3 sets out the ridings, saying that you need 50 signatures from electors rather than 100 signatures from electors.

In a case in which a name is changed by an act of Parliament but schedule 3 is not updated, we just read schedule 3 via the new name. To reassure people, even if the name in schedule 3 is not the current updated name, we will still read it as if it were.

The Chair:

That is so whether or not this passes, but if it passes, that would be better.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

It would certainly be clearer. But yes, we would continue to read the ridings as if they had the name at the 2013 representation order.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does this fall under the commissioner's going after crimes that haven't taken place yet?

The Chair:

Does everyone understand? We're just changing electoral names that have already been changed, for clarity.

There's a subamendment to amendment CPC-192. It's CPC-192-A. Someone has to propose it other than Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I think Mr. Reid is eager to do that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Which one am I eager to do?

The Chair:

It is a subamendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

My goodness, do I ever want to do this.

Are you ready? Can I read this?

The Chair:

Yes, please read it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

It is that amendment CPC-192 be amended by (a) replacing the words “replacing lines 1 to” with the words “adding after line”; (b) replacing the words “376 Schedule” with the words “(2) Schedule”; and ( c) deleting all the words after the words “Cold Lake”.

(Subamendment negatived)

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 376 agreed to on division)

(On clause 377)

The Chair:

Clause 377 has a new CPC-proposed amendment. It's one of the new ones. We're discussing reference number 10008651.

Stephanie, could you present this amendment?

(1215)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is, again, in regard to the new relationship that we have between the polling station and the polling divisions. This allows us to determine the applicable polling division when counting ballots and reporting results during judicial recounts. Like several of our other previous amendments, we.... Certainly we have faith in the abilities of Elections Canada. Certainly as a former public servant, for 15 years, I know in the public service, you truly are among the best and the brightest.

We'd like to just determine as much clarity as possible in regard to the procedures with these new methodologies, just to ensure the legitimacy of our electoral process. We believe that this amendment provides for that.

The Chair:

Are there any comments from the government?

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

This amendment seeks to legislate the process for the counting of certain ballots, and that's not necessary.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 377 agreed to on division)

The Chair:

There's a new clause, 377.1 proposed by NDP-27.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is a good one.

The Chair:

Is this a good one?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, because I know....

The Chair:

That the next one won't be...?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Don't bring me down, Chair. I was feeling good for a moment.

This is, as was expressed by my Liberal colleagues earlier.... I enjoy studying things, looking them over carefully before we imprudently move ahead. This one requires the Chief Electoral Officer to make recommendations, after study and consultation, about lowering the voting age to 17. The reason we think this is a good idea is that there have been a number of attempts in parliaments to lower the voting age even further, to 16. Seventeen has been the number that folks have landed on because that is the age at which someone can be conscripted in Canada. To deem 17-year-olds able to handle certain responsibilities like holding a gun and pointing it at somebody, one would by association also deem them possessed of the capacity to vote freely and fairly.

In combination with that—and we talk about this, all parties do, in Parliament—are the many decisions we make that are much longer in nature than just affecting us. They affect the folks to come.

I have moved legislation in the past. I think the first bill I helped support was one promoted by a Liberal. It was backed by a Conservative at the time, Ms. Stronach, and a Bloc member and me. This may be hard to imagine these days, Chair, but we went across the country and held town halls just to talk about lowering the voting age.

I have one small reflection on that. I think we were in Edmonton and we had a whole bunch of high schools come to a big forum. A young woman came to the mike and said, “I think this is a terrible idea.” She was 16. We said, “Okay, tell us why.” She said, “If I were voting in the next election, I would have to look at all the candidates, study their platforms and understand what each of those platforms meant for me, and that's just a lot of pressure. I don't want it.” It was a fascinating disclosure because that's exactly the voter you'd want. As we know, most voters don't walk into the polling station with one-tenth of that consideration of what their vote means.

In this day and age, some people—usually the older generations—despair for the generations coming. My sense of things is that they are certainly the most informed and most connected generation in history. Their ability to engage in issues is beyond what it was for you and me at 16 or 17. They can connect into communities and understand laws that are being passed or proposed.

I think this is a very tentative step. This is not saying we're going to do it, just that Elections Canada will be able to gather data on what the impacts would be. Would higher voter turnout happen? What would the consequences be for other things that we don't anticipate? We could just prudently step forward.

We've heard, of course, from Daughters of the Vote, from the Canadian Federation of Students, from the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations and on down the line that the motivation among young voters would increase dramatically if they were able to actually participate in voting.

The last thing I'd say is that, from all the research that has been done by Elections Canada and other elections agencies, we know that if a voter participates in an election at their first opportunity, the chances of their voting in consequential elections goes up dramatically. The reason 17 is important is that, obviously, most 17-year-olds and those approaching 17 are still in school. Once they hit 18—and most people don't vote right at 18 but just at the next election that comes—they're out of high school. They may be in another form of education, but oftentimes they're in the workforce and otherwise. What an educational opportunity it is to be 16 going on 17, with an election on the horizon and part of your education is getting yourselves and your classmates ready to vote in that election.

The chances of voting would be dramatically higher. We imagine polling stations being right in or near those high schools. Those are the merits of voting at 17, but these are the things we'd want Elections Canada to look at. Will it increase participation? Will it increase lifelong participation in the democratic process? None of us, I hope, are opposed to that.

(1220)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To be clear, I don't think this amendment addresses lowering the age, which I guess is what you want to be doing, ultimately. Your final objective is to lower the age of voting—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It does not lower the age of voting.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—which is a laudable objective and one I would personally support, lowering the age.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This motion requires the CEO to make a policy recommendation to us, through its website, and to the Speaker, which seems like a really odd thing to do. They give us all kinds of recommendations on how the election went, and so on and so forth, but saying, “This is what we believe you should do on a policy question”, not a procedural question, I think that's outside of the scope of what we'd normally ask Elections Canada to do. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We've done it six times today. We do it all the time. When the CEO comes to us, as he has recently done—the new CEO and the previous one—we ask for policy advice. Really, we do. We ask whether this will enable that? We ask about the consequences of vouching and other things. We've relied on that advice very consistently, particularly because Elections Canada has some primary roles and functions: free and fair elections, etc. In the policy advice we've gotten, I've never had a hint of partisanship or advantage or anything like that. They just do what they've done very well historically—run elections fairly.

This is the gathering of evidence from a non-partisan source who is, I would say, best placed to look at this and knows who the experts are on elections. I might be asking about the effects on the election, whether the experts support the policy of lowering the voting age, or whether we have evidence enough to overcome the resistance from a broad sector of Canadians. As you know, a large number of our constituents did not think this was a good idea, present company excluded.

This does not bind this committee or Elections Canada to a policy doctrine, one way or the other. This is simply recommending that they go out and ask what the effects would be, positive and negative, and report back to Parliament, which, I think would help Parliament. If any of you have been to high school classes and talked about politics, I'm sure you found a very engaged group of folks. I would say these students are more engaged than an average roomful of Canadians would be if you gathered 30 or 35 of them together and asked them about the policies we deal with all the time. They're studying, and that's what they're supposed to be doing. I think this has merit.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(1225)

The Chair:

NDP-28 is inadmissible because goes beyond the scope of the bill, as the bill does not relate to the report.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I guess if promises made by politicians were all inadmissible, there wouldn't be much we would move in legislation.

One very senior prime minister adviser, Gerald Butts, once told me that nobody cares about this issue. I think it was borne out that a great number of people actually care about electoral reform. Hope springs eternal. We've just heard from the new Quebec government, I believe, that they are looking to bring in legislation within the year. B.C. is voting in a week or so, and P.E.I. will soon be voting as well. This issue was supposed to die in the weeds, according to one close friend of the Prime Minister, but somehow, in this one instance, he's wrong. This is just our attempt to get back to promises made to see if they can be kept.

I don't appreciate your ruling but I respect it very much.

The Chair:

Could you introduce NDP-29 so I can rule on that?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's like a last cigarette before going out to the execution squad.

This is a tricky one for us because, as many of us have heard from the minister just recently, the idea of a debates commissioner has been coming. At first it was promised in legislation, which I greatly appreciated because that would allow Parliament to debate it and a committee like this to study it and make improvements. Not everything that emanates from the Prime Minister's office comes out perfect, from my experience. The delays have just been going on and on, which is at least consistent for this department. They're not quick. This was an attempt to bring the debate commission into this process so we would have something we could talk about as parliamentarians.

This is my primary concern with the process used here. My advice to this minister early on was that the debates commission cannot in any way have any hint of partisanship for it to have credibility with Canadians. I think what happened in the last election was very unfortunate, when the then sitting Prime Minister was refusing to cede to a debate in the proper way. It became an election issue for a lot of Canadians, which I didn't ever suspect it would. Obviously we support the idea of a debates commission. My advice to the minister and to the Prime Minister's office was to include the other parties in constructing that commission. Then you would have the input and it would credibly be seen as a non-partisan effort. The fact that the government has again insisted on keeping it entirely in-house runs the risk of people accusing whatever comes out as not being fair.

The debates should just be the debates. Three or four podiums, a moderator and let's go. I don't get it. This is not a partisan thing. I just don't get the strategy to consistently keep it so close to the vest and then run the risk, as happened with the first ERRE committee structure, which was seen as flawed. There was never a conversation with the opposition as to how to build the process to design a new electoral system for us. That blew up and then on the back of a piece of paper we had to create a new one, which I think worked well in terms of a committee process.

That's a weird twitch of this government, and there it is again.

The Chair:

Thank you.

NDP-29 is inadmissible as it goes beyond the scope of the bill as the bill does not deal with an independent commissioner for the leaders' debate.

PV-19 is tabled because of our procedures for parties that are not part of this committee, but I rule it inadmissible as it goes beyond the scope of the bill as the bill does not relate to the leaders' debate.

(On clause 378)

The Chair: Clause 378 has amendment Liberal-64. Does someone want to present that amendment?[Translation]

You have the floor, Ms. Lapointe.

(1230)

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to talk about this provision, the issues and the amendments. Some people have said they're afraid that, as a result of this change, residents of an electoral district where the House of Commons seat is vacant may wind up without a representative for a period of up to 16 months before a general election. The proposal here is to amend this provision so that no election to fill a vacancy in the House of Commons may be held less than nine months before a fixed-date general election.

Ultimately, there would be no by-election less than nine months before a general election. Consequently, a seat could be vacant for a maximum of nine months. [English]

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I read that.[Translation]

Why propose this amendment?

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

To prevent a by-election from being held seven months before a general election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, but why propose to change it from six to nine months?

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Because, from the way it's written, there might be no member for a period of up to 16 months.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's the citizens in the riding who would suffer the consequences because they would be without representation for a long time. A by-election can be held in 35 days. There would be a member in the riding for nearly a year. Six months is something for a person, but it's reasonable before the start of an upcoming election. Nine months is...

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Currently, from the way it's written, it could be up to 16 months.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I know.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

With our amendment, that period would be reduced to nine months. That way we would ensure no by-election is held nine months earlier.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, it's just that—

The Chair:

I'm going to ask Mr. Morin to speak.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That's a good idea.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I would just like to clarify two technical points in the debate.

First, no by-election could be triggered to fill a vacancy in the House of Commons less than nine months before a fixed-date election. However, a vacancy that occurred shortly before the deadline would result in a by-election. For example, in 2019, the limit of nine months before the fixed-date election would be January 21. Consequently, if a vacancy occurred before January 21, 2019, it would have to be filled by a by-election, which would be held in the spring or summer of 2019.

Second, this statutory amendment responds to a recommendation by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada concerning overlapping by-elections and general elections. In the 2015 general election, if my memory serves me, by-elections had to be triggered in three or four ridings. They were triggered very early on, in May or June, I believe, and voting day was the day scheduled for the general election. Those by-elections were considered replaced by the general election when the writs for the general election were issued. This overlap created several problems of interpretation of the act regarding the rules respecting the financing of political parties and the campaigns of candidates during by-elections.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you. [English]

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can we get this brief from Elections Canada? Can you remind me of the situation?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

The situation is much as was described. As we approach a general election, there's a belief that if a by-election is called, it will be called and the person will sit for two days, and then the general election will be held. Often, the by-elections are called so that they overlap with the general election. Then when the general election is called, the by-elections are superceded. That causes problems with the political financing rules in terms of mixing funds, transferring funds and that sort of thing.

As part of that, our recommendation was to try to give a period of time to recognize that at a certain point before the general election, by-elections would not be called.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The circumstance we're looking at is one in which somebody steps down six and a half or seven months from the next election. The by-election must be called under the law right now. That runs for, say, 35 days. Have I said anything incorrect so far?

(1235)

Mr. Trevor Knight:

The by-election has to be called within 11 and 180 days after Elections Canada receives the warrant from the Speaker.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. At seven months, it's the Prime Minister's prerogative to call that by-election, but the practice right now is that they don't call it within that 11 days. They simply wait and then, at seven months of somebody vacating the seat, that by-election rolls into the general election, does it not? Do we have practice of somebody calling it within 11 days and then running an election into the five and a half month window, and then that dissolving into the general election?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Normally they would wait, to give themselves time. There have been occasions where they get to the 180 days and there's a requirement to call but there's only three months before the general election, so they call it. There's a minimum election period at present but no maximum, so they can call it for a later date and it would be the general election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There's a minimum and no maximum, in terms of the by-election writ?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

That is the writ period under the current law. There's a maximum of 50 days put in place by Bill C-76, but under the current law, there's no maximum election period.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There's just the minimum point at which it has to be called.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

There's a minimum point at which it has to be called, and then a minimum length for the election campaign.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's under Bill C-76.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

That's under the current law. Bill C-76 changes that by adding a maximum election period of 50 days.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm trying to anticipate scenarios. The fundamental principle we have is that Canadians are due representation at all times unless there are extreme circumstances. The circumstance of somebody nine months out...or could it even be 10 or 11 months out, given they vacate the seat? I'm just wondering what the implication of this is. If they're 10 months out and they vacate the seat and the Prime Minister at the time delays any call into the nine-month window now, would it then roll right through to the general election? How would that work?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No. With this amendment, only a vacancy that would occur on the last day or the last few days could be rolled into the general election, and only in years that are not leap years.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Really? Do leap years affect us?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, then. Is it because of just that one day?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It adds one day.

But seriously, all the vacancies that would occur up to very close to the nine months would have to be held and conducted fully up to polling day before the general election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can you explain why, though? Could I not interpret this to say that 10 months out from the fixed election day, if somebody says, “I'm out,” the Prime Minister has a minimum of 11 days that he or she can call—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

That's it. Ten months out would be, for example, December 21. Then there would be a minimum 11-day delay before the election can be called. The Prime Minister would have before the 11th and the 180th day to call the election. If the Prime Minister were to wait for the full extent—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, now we're into spring.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

—the election would be called somewhere around June 21. Because there is now a maximum of 50 days for the writ period, the election would be held at the beginning of August. Under Bill C-76—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

With this amendment....

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, not with this amendment. But with Bill C-76, again with the maximum period of 50 days, in 2019 the first day on which the writ for the general election could be issued, I think, is September 1. The by-election would be held. The candidate who won would be declared the winner up to mid-August, and then the general election would be called.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's contemplating a nine-month window, not the six-month window.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That is with this modification. Is that right?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm just trying to understand. This might seem technical to folks—and it is.

I'm imagining our existing.... Right now under Bill C-76, with this as an amendment, and somebody in Parliament right now saying, “At the beginning of December, I'm done,” is there a scenario where, from that moment all the way through to the general, the people in that riding don't have representation? You're suggesting not. You're suggesting that timelines would require the PM to call the by-election, which would result sometime around June, or later. You said later than June.

(1240)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The earlier the vacancy occurs, the earlier the maximum day on which the by-election can be called will occur.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Perhaps I'll add one more piece of context.

In Bill C-76, as it stands now, the trigger is that the writ may not be issued within the nine months before the general election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The writ may not be issued without this amendment.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

That's right—without this amendment. That actually extends the period of the vacancy, which could lead to a period of non-representation back to 15 months or so.

That wasn't the intention of our recommendation, although I don't think our recommendation, to be honest, was perfectly well crafted. Our idea was to have a period where a by-election does not need to be called, and a clear period where it does not need to be called. By drawing it from the vacancy period, it makes it clearer.

This amendment responds to a concern we had about the way the provision exists in Bill C-76, and it reduces the time in which you will not have representation.

The Chair:

I think we're up to our five minutes.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, but we also said that we would be somewhat adaptable to this.

What I'm trying to understand, which was just revealed now, I think, is that the.... If anyone is comfortable with citizens not having representation for 12 months because someone is playing around with the schedule—

The Chair:

That's what this precludes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That wasn't explained up until 30 seconds ago.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Forgive me for going over the five minutes, but if anybody else had the insight, then they might have offered it at any point.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate on this amendment?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was seven minutes well spent.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We will vote on Liberal-64.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: That's unanimous.

CPC-193 can't be moved because it's related to the same line as the amendment we just did.

(Clause 378 as amended agreed to)

The Chair: Clause 379 had one amendment. It was CPC-193.1, but that was consequential to CPC-171, which was defeated.

(Clause 379 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 380 to 383 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: There is a new clause proposed. It was originally proposed by CPC-194, but that was withdrawn and it now will be proposed by the new CPC amendment with reference number 10008080.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This clause is in regard to third parties, to apply the pre-Bill C-76 rules in the event that Bill C-76 takes effect during the pre-election period.

The Chair:

Sorry. This is CPC-195. It's not a new one.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, and it's in regard to political parties, not third parties. I'm sorry.

The Chair:

Is there debate on CPC-195?

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Stephanie, can you explain what the impact of this would be?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Let's say that the election is called. If the election is called at a time when we are in the pre-election period and Bill C-76 has not taken effect yet, then we are applying the pre-existing rules prior to Bill C-76 during the pre-election period.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The circumstance you're imagining is that an election is called and Bill C-76 is not law.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The coming into force comes in during the pre-writ period. That's what they're talking about.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Bill C-76 comes into force—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The coming into force during the pre-writ period is what it's about.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Regardless of—

(1245)

Mr. John Nater:

Just to clarify, because the bill has a six-month delay in coming into force, this amendment relates to the fact that if royal assent is received on January 6 and six months later—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The government decides to call an election....

Mr. John Nater:

The pre-writ period would have started on July 1.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The government doesn't call the pre-writ period.

Mr. John Nater:

This wouldn't come into effect until what the pre-writ period would have normally have been. We would have been into the pre-writ period. It's in a case like that.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes...in the context of calling an election.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To me, this is an incentive to delay this bill further at the Senate.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Why?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Because then it would not come into force. It would be to affect the coming into force of the pre-election period.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Would it prevent it from coming into force in the pre-election period?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Am I correct that this prevents the coming into force of the pre-election period rules if the bill is delayed past a certain point?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This amendment provides that if clause 262 of the bill, which is on page 153 and provides for the maximum partisan advertising expenses for a political party during the pre-election period, were to come into force after June 30, 2019, then it wouldn't apply to the pre-election period, which means that there would not be any maximum partisan advertising expenses for political parties during the pre-election period preceding the 2019 election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is the effect of this, then, that all the pre-election advertising limits we've placed in Bill C-76, if the election were called earlier, would be voided?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's irrelevant of the date on which the election is called. This is only relevant to the beginning of the pre-election period, which is June 30. This amendment would only affect the limits on political parties. It would not affect the limits on third parties.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, and how would it affect those limits?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

On third parties...?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, on the political parties.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

They just wouldn't apply at all.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's my point. All the limits that we've just placed on political advertising in the pre-writ period, if we were to pass CPC-195 and an election were called early—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No? It's irrelevant to that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It is an incentive to delay the royal assent past January 1.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Because if royal assent is delayed then—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then they don't have a spending limit.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You crafty....

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. John Nater:

Actually, I have a question of clarification for our officials.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That is very sneaky.

Mr. John Nater:

In a scenario where the government doesn't take the wisdom coming from the Conservative Party, in a case where royal assent is provided for this bill at a date past January 1, so that in fact the coming into force of this bill would be mid-July of 2019, how would Elections Canada deal with the coming into force in the middle of a period where this would apply?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'd first like to mention that the Chief Electoral Officer has the power to bring into force various provisions of the act upon the publication of a notice in the Canada Gazette, provided that the preparation for the coming into force of those specific provisions has been completed. The fact that the bill would receive royal assent after January 1 would not be an indication of the applicability of this section.

Mr. John Nater:

You're saying that the CEO would, in fact, provide written notification that this would be something he could implement.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm not saying he would. I'm saying he could do it.

Mr. John Nater:

If he didn't, though, and if it were to come into effect during the pre-writ period, how would Elections Canada deal with that? That's what I'm wondering.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Unfortunately—I think I have to be honest—I can't say I have information on that particular case. Part of the issue, of course, is exactly what has just been expressed. There is the possibility of bringing things into force earlier. We're monitoring the situation, and depending upon when it is passed, we'll have to consider it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Your worry is that any delay means that the pre-election limits on advertising by political parties—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They would not apply to next year.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—would not apply to the 2019 election, unless the CEO—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Whereas if they don't do this, the CEO has a pretty strong incentive to make sure it's in place on time.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I thought I just heard that the CEO could place those limits through the Canada Gazette. Is what you were suggesting, Monsieur Morin, that the CEO could do it, through gazetting only?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

He could, but if this passes he doesn't have to. If this doesn't pass, he pretty much has to bring it in before that pre-writ period starts, so if you want those spending limits in next time, this amendment can't happen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You don't see it that way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm not surprised they don't see it that way.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I thought the Liberals liked giving discretion to the CEO. This seems to be going against it.

I would just point out—and I'm not going to dwell on this any longer—that the coming into force provisions of this bill are awfully unique. I wish I had some insight into exactly why this unique coming into force provision was added to this bill, but it does muddy a lot of things by having this “six months, oh but maybe if we're able to”. It's unique, and I suspect that's a challenge. I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall when that was done.

I'm going to leave it there, Chair.

(1250)

The Chair:

Okay. We'll vote on CPC-195.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: There is no new clause 383.1.

I am of the understanding that because we're so close, a majority of the committee is willing to stay a little later if we have to.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, I have a one o'clock commitment.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have eight amendments left to deal with.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let's see if we can do it in the next eight minutes, then.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is now the appropriate time?

I haven't done any of these but there's an amendment I'd like us to consider. It will require unanimous consent, because it goes back. We were working with Elections Canada in a previous iteration to try to figure out language around this. You and I would have this experience, but perhaps other committee members don't. This is about the timing of when results are released during election night. Many of our constituents are still going to the polls when results are coming out from the east coast: how Newfoundland, Nova Scotia or P.E.I. have voted already.

I think there are provisions in the act in terms of the availability of information being somewhat equal to voters across the country. That privileged information can't be given to some voters and not others. This is affected in section 283. This is why it will need unanimous consent.

Just allow me to read it out, explain it, then one comment to the elections officials and then move on. It would say, “One and a half hours after the polling stations close in Newfoundland and Labrador, one hour after the polling stations close in the Maritimes and immediately after the polling stations close in the rest of the country, an election officer who is assigned to the polling station shall count the votes in the presence of” Then it continues through section 283, which is the counting of votes.

We've been struggling for years. It's been taken all the way to the Supreme Court, as some people know. This was about transmission of results initially but this is also just about the fairness.

I grew up in Toronto so I didn't experience this until I became a voter and was living on the west coast. When heading to the polling station the results of the election were announced already, at four o'clock, five o'clock, six o'clock. I think Elections Canada has also contemplated and tried to find ways around this.

It's very difficult to open the boxes, start the counting and then not to release the results. That was one of the things that was contested at court. We're suggesting a delay until the counting begins but not an extensive delay, 60 minutes and 90 minutes in the extreme case. Then the counting begins. Then the results start to come out.

It narrows the gap as to how much we're hearing the results in the western provinces of what the eastern provinces have already decided. Other countries deal with this in totally different ways, which we're not suggesting. We're just attempting to do this by saying, when the polls close, the boxes are sealed, have a cup of coffee, wait 60 minutes, then open them up, start to count, and release the results as per normal.

The Chair:

What did you want to ask the officials?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I want to ask the officials if what I'm suggesting here is feasible logistically.

It makes for extra long days, a longer day.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

It is logistically feasible but it does make for longer workdays. We already have very long days and tired poll workers are often a problem at the end of the day. That would be the main operational concern in holding the results.

It could be done.

The Chair:

Do we have unanimous consent to go back to the clause where this would be amended?

Some hon. members: No.

(On clause 384)

The Chair: On clause 384, we have Liberal-65.

Does someone want to present? [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The purpose of this amendment is to replace all mentions of "section 299" with "section 1" in clause 384 of the bill.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What effect would that replacement have?

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That's easy: it would read "section 1" instead of "section 299".

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Maybe. I don't know. I'd like to hear Mr. Morin's comments on that.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

In drafting transitional provisions, it's common to write the first clause that's concerned by the transitional provision in question as a benchmark clause in that transitional provision.

That specific provision in this case states that, if the act comes into force during the election period, the previous version of the act applies with respect to the election and all related obligations and rights, including obligations to report and rights to reimbursement of election expenses.

Section 299 was selected in accordance with this legislative drafting convention. It is the first section in the act that concerns candidates' obligations. However, the Chief Electoral Officer raised a concern about this section in one of the appearances he made before this committee after the bill was introduced.

"Section 299" has been replaced by "section 1" simply to express clearly that this transitional provision applies to all rights and obligations resulting from the act, particularly those with respect to third parties, candidates and registered parties, but also the other rights and obligations arising from the changes made by the bill.

For example, if the bill came into force during a by-election, none of these provisions would be in force for that by-election. The by-election would continue to be administered under the previous version of the Canada Elections Act.

This is a common transitional provision found in most bills amending the Canada Elections Act.

(1255)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In this bill or in...

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

A similar provision very frequently appears in all bills amending the Canada Elections Act, especially where political financing rules are amended.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Mr. Knight or Mr. Sampson, do you want to add anything? [English]

Mr. Robert Sampson:

We do agree and, in fact, these provisions are modelled very closely on Bill C-23, the Fair Elections Act, and other acts before. This is very much in keeping with the tradition of transitional provisions.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Just so the committee knows, we need the majority support of the committee to go past 1:00 p.m. We're that close.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is that right? Is that a practice that we've been keeping?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm really familiar with this. On this, there is no dispute.

The Chair:

We don't want to revisit that.

On CPC-196 amendment to clause 384, do you want to present this?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. This is the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendation concerning transitional provisions in the event Bill C-76 takes effect during an election.

The Chair:

Is there any debate?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 384 as amended agreed to on division)

(Clauses 385 to 394 inclusive agreed to on division)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's easier. It's faster.

(On clause 395)

The Chair:

CPC-197, do you want to present that, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This maintains the authority to initiate prosecutions with the director of public prosecution.

The Chair:

Okay, we know how that's going to go.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You have no sense of drama, Chair.

The Chair:

This is the drama.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 395 agreed to)

(Clauses 396 to 400 inclusive agreed to on division)

(On clause 401)

(1300)

The Chair:

The last clause is 401. We have CPC-198.

Do you want to introduce that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is about pre-election spending limits on political parties, and deferring the implementation to 2021.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does this apply to CPC-199?

The Chair:

Is that the same type of thing?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We're withdrawing CPC-199.

The Chair:

Next is CPC-200.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This one is requiring one year, not six months, for the coming into force of the bill.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

We'll move on to CPC-201.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This one is to remove the Chief Electoral Officer's discretion to accelerate the bill coming into force.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Next is CPC-202.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This limits the Chief Electoral Officer's discretion to accelerate the bill's coming into force to five months after royal assent.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 401 agreed to on division)

The Chair:

Shall the schedule carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Shall the short title carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

An hon. member: On division.

The Chair: Shall the title carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

An hon. member: On division.

The Chair: Shall the bill as amended carry?

Mr. John Nater:

I request a recorded vote.

(Bill C-76 as amended agreed to: yeas 6; nays 3)

The Chair:

Shall the Chair report the bill as amended to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

An hon. member: On division.

The Chair: Shall the committee order a reprint of the bill as amended for the use of the House at report stage?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Just so you know, next Tuesday we'll probably have a subcommittee meeting on the agenda.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we meeting Thursday?

The Chair:

Next Thursday we won't meet because of the Dutch Prime Minister's visit.

I'd like to thank all the witnesses and also the clerk, as well as the interpreters and the researcher.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: We're adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(0905)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 127e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous reprenons l’étude article par article du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d’autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d’autres textes législatifs.

Nous avons le plaisir d’accueillir Jean-François Morin et Manon Paquet, du Bureau du Conseil privé, ainsi que Trevor Knight et Robert Sampson, d’Élections Canada.

Je vous remercie encore une fois de votre présence. Vous êtes d’excellents membres du Comité.

(Article 320)

Le président: Nous reprendrons là où nous nous sommes arrêtés hier soir, à l’article 320.

Monsieur Nater, pourriez-vous présenter l’amendement CPC-138.1, s’il vous plaît?

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Absolument, monsieur le président.

Cette disposition rétablit le statu quo en permettant aux fonctionnaires électoraux d’ordonner à une personne qui trouble l’ordre dans un bureau de scrutin de quitter les lieux ou de la faire arrêter. Le projet de loi C-76 prévoit simplement le pouvoir d’ordonner à une personne de quitter le bureau de scrutin, mais il ne prévoit pas la possibilité de la faire arrêter. Nous recommandons de revenir à cette disposition, à la possibilité de procéder à une arrestation.

Le président:

Y a-t-il débat?

Nous allons entendre M. Graham, puis M. Bittle.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

En réponse aux recommandations du DGE lui-même, ce projet de loi... aux fins du compte rendu, je vais lire la recommandation.

Selon la recommandation B39: L’article 479 de la Loi présente le cadre législatif pour le maintien de l’ordre au bureau du DS ou à un lieu de scrutin. Cette disposition confère des pouvoirs considérables, notamment l’expulsion de force ou l’arrestation d’une personne. Toutefois, son application est complexe: elle requiert un difficile exercice de jugement et exige des fonctionnaires électoraux d’accomplir des tâches pour lesquelles ils n’ont pas reçu de formation et ne peuvent probablement pas recevoir de formation adéquate, étant donné l’étendue de leurs tâches et de leurs compétences actuelles. Des risques possibles de violence et de blessures ainsi que de violation des droits fondamentaux garantis par la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés sont associés à l’article 479. Les agents locaux chargés de l’application de la loi sont mieux formés et outillés pour exercer ces fonctions. Bien que cet article doive continuer d’indiquer clairement que le fonctionnaire électoral compétent a le pouvoir de maintenir l’ordre au bureau de scrutin et peut ordonner à une personne de quitter le bureau de scrutin si elle commet une infraction ou s’il a des motifs raisonnables de croire qu’elle en a commis une, le pouvoir d’arrestation sans mandat du fonctionnaire électoral devrait être supprimé. Les paragraphes prévoyant le recours à la force et décrivant les mesures à prendre en cas d’arrestation devraient être abrogés.

Je pense qu’il est assez important de suivre cette recommandation. C’est tiré du rapport du directeur général des élections sur l’élection, recommandation B39.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

C’est une question de capacité. C’est dans un bureau de scrutin, dans le cas où un électeur trouble l'ordre au point où les fonctionnaires électoraux veulent lui ordonner de quitter les lieux. Quelles seraient les procédures normales si ces dispositions n’existaient pas? Imaginons le contraire. Si cet amendement n’existait pas, quels pouvoirs auraient-ils? Appeler les policiers et attendre?

M. Robert Sampson (conseiller juridique, Services juridiques, Élections Canada):

Selon la pratique actuelle, nonobstant les dispositions prévues dans la loi, on demande aux fonctionnaires électoraux de téléphoner aux policiers. Cette disposition est un peu anachronique en ce sens qu’elle est antérieure à l’institution des forces policières, notamment.

C’est l’une des plus anciennes dispositions de la Loi et elle témoigne d’une époque où l’administration des élections était très éparpillée et où les élections pouvaient être administrées dans des régions très éloignées. Cette version a été quelque peu mise à jour pour tenir compte de l’avènement de la Charte, mais elle prévoit quand même des pouvoirs extraordinaires que nous ne...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous incluez l’avènement de la Charte dans la charte des droits de l’électeur, même si ces derniers troublent l'ordre, ou s’agit-il des droits garantis par la charte des droits du fonctionnaire électoral?

M. Robert Sampson:

Par exemple, il faut une mise en garde fondée sur la Charte, de sorte qu’avant d'arrêter une personne sans mandat, il faut l'informer de ses droits au titre de la Charte. Ce n’est pas une pratique que nous encourageons. Nous demandons à nos fonctionnaires électoraux d’appeler les policiers. Pour faciliter ce processus, parmi les étapes préparatoires, il faut assurer la liaison entre le directeur de scrutin et la police locale pour que l’accès aux ressources soit facile en cas de besoin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce doit être fait avant l’élection. D’accord, c’est très bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Voici une question évidente: à votre connaissance, à quand remonte la dernière fois où cette disposition a été invoquée et où une arrestation aurait été...?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je les retirerais tous des bureaux de scrutin, monsieur le président, simplement parce qu’ils ne savent pas comment voter correctement.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis simplement curieux, quel était...?

M. Robert Sampson:

Je travaille à Élections Canada de façon intermittente depuis 2013. À ma connaissance, elle n’a pas été appliquée.

Trevor est un peu plus vieux que moi, alors je vais lui demander s’il sait si elle a déjà été appliquée.

M. Trevor Knight (avocat principal, Services juridiques, Élections Canada):

Je suis à Élections Canada depuis 2002. Je ne suis pas au courant qu’elle ait été appliquée, du moins depuis que je suis là. Je ne me souviens d’aucun cas qui ait été signalé.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous dites que cela remonte à très longtemps. Est-ce que cela remonte à l’époque où les gens pointaient encore du doigt le candidat qu’ils voulaient pour indiquer...? Est-ce que cela remonte aussi loin? Je demande si c’est à ce moment-là que la disposition est entrée en vigueur. Cela remonte-t-il aussi loin, qu'au XIXe siècle?

M. Robert Sampson:

Oui, cela remonte à une époque où il était difficile, par exemple, d’avoir accès à un juge pour obtenir un mandat. D’où les dispositions permettant l’arrestation sans mandat.

Quant à la date précise et à la question de savoir si c’est dans la première Loi des élections fédérales de 1874, je ne m’en souviens pas. Cela remonte à très longtemps.

M. Scott Reid:

C’était une époque où il n’y avait pas de scrutin secret et où on pointait du doigt le candidat pour qui on voulait voter lors d’une assemblée électorale. Les bagarres étaient fréquentes et tout le monde était ivre. Les électeurs étaient payés pour leurs votes avec des bouteilles de whisky ou de rhum, selon la région au pays. Oui, c’était une époque un peu différente.

(0910)

Le président:

Je vais mettre la question aux voix.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Stephanie, pourriez-vous présenter l’amendement CPC-138.2, s’il vous plaît?

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Il s’agit de maintenir les dispositions actuelles selon lesquelles une personne qui commet une infraction relative au bulletin de vote peut se voir ordonner de quitter les lieux. Conformément à la nouvelle loi, ces dispositions sont modifiées, et nous croyons qu’elles devraient demeurer telles qu’elles sont actuellement.

Le président:

Les nouvelles dispositions sont plus faibles, c’est ce que vous voulez dire?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C’est simplement qu’elles sont supprimées. Nous les ajoutons après la ligne 19, page 182: Dans le cadre de l’exercice des responsabilités visées aux paragraphes (1) ou (2), les fonctionnaires électoraux peuvent ordonner à quiconque enfreint l’alinéa 281.3a), l’article 281.5 ou l’alinéa 281.7(1)a) dans le bureau du directeur du scrutin ou dans le lieu où se déroule le scrutin – ou dont ils ont des motifs raisonnables de croire qu’il a commis une telle infraction – de quitter le bureau du directeur du scrutin ou le lieu où se déroule le scrutin, selon le cas, ou l’arrêter sans mandat.

Nous préférons le libellé des dispositions actuelles.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Encore une fois, dans le cas où quelqu’un trouble l'ordre dans un bureau de scrutin, qu’est-ce que le projet de loi C-76 prévoit actuellement? Si le projet de loi était adopté sans amendement, quels pouvoirs les directeurs du scrutin ont-ils pour ordonner à quelqu’un de quitter les lieux?

Je suppose que c’est semblable à ce dont nous venons de discuter, c’est-à-dire qu’on peut appeler les policiers sans avoir de mandat et ordonner à la personne de quitter les lieux.

Est-ce que c'est nécessaire?

M. Robert Sampson:

Je ne dirai pas si c’est nécessaire ou non.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je sais, c’était un piège.

M. Robert Sampson:

Le responsable des élections conserve le mandat général de maintien de l’ordre. Il peut demander à quelqu’un de partir. La directive qu'il recevra sera d’appeler la police.

L’amendement supprime le recours à la force pour demander aux gens de quitter les lieux et aussi l’arrestation sans mandat. Il peut être difficile, par exemple, de donner une mise en garde fondée sur la Charte, ce qui est une affaire complexe. Ce ne sont pas tous les fonctionnaires électoraux qui se sentiront à l’aise de le faire. Ils n’auront pas la formation spécialisée pour le faire. L’amendement tient compte du fait que, dans l’esprit d’Élections Canada, il incombe aux policiers d’ordonner aux gens de quitter les lieux.

M. Nathan Cullen:

L’amendement tient compte du fait que c’est un agent qui retire...?

M. Robert Sampson:

Je suis désolé, c’est le projet de loi C-76.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois.

Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres interventions?

(L’amendement est rejeté.)

Le président: Stephanie, passons à l’amendement CPC-138.3.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet amendement est similaire à l’amendement CPC-138.1, en ce sens qu’il maintient les dispositions actuelles permettant le renvoi ou l’arrestation de personnes qui troublent l'ordre dans les bureaux de scrutin. Ici, plus précisément, on dit: « Le directeur du scrutin qui procède à l’arrestation au titre du paragraphe (3) doit, sans délai ».

Le projet de loi diminue ce pouvoir et nous suggérons de maintenir la disposition actuelle.

Le président:

Y a-t-il débat?

(L’amendement est rejeté.)

Le président: Stephanie, nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-139.

M. John Nater:

Nous n’allons pas le proposer.

Le président:

Vous ne le proposez pas. D’accord.

(L’article 320 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 321 et 322 sont adoptés.)

(Article 323)

Le président: Pour l’article 323, il y a l’amendement CPC-140, qui a certaines ramifications. Si cet amendement est adopté, l’amendement LIB-40 ne pourra pas être proposé, car il est pratiquement identique. Si l’amendement CPC-140 est rejeté, l’amendement LIB-40 l’est aussi.

Pour CPC-140, allez-y. Vous pouvez le proposer.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s’agit de la recommandation du directeur général des élections visant à prévenir les publications trompeuses prétendant provenir d’Élections Canada.

(0915)

Le président:

Si vous êtes d’accord, nous pouvons voter rapidement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est manifestement bien formulé. C’est bien.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

C’est unanime.

Comme l’amendement CPC-140 est adopté, l’amendement LIB-40 ne peut être proposé.

L’amendement CPC-141 a également des ramifications. S’il est adopté, l’amendement PV-14 ne peut pas être proposé puisqu’il modifie la même ligne.

Pourriez-vous présenter l’amendement CPC-141?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s’agit d’étendre l’infraction d’« utilisation non autorisée d’un ordinateur » aux tentatives visant à miner la confiance dans l’intégrité des élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que c’est recommandé par le DGE?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je ne peux pas le confirmer.

On peut y lire: « résultats d’une élection ou de miner la confiance dans l’intégrité d’une élection ».

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires veulent-ils intervenir à ce sujet?

Allez-y, Robert.

M. Robert Sampson:

Si vous me le permettez, le directeur général des élections s’est dit préoccupé par l’élément mens rea de cet amendement.

L’intention, qui comporte deux volets, exige actuellement que quelqu’un qui « frauduleusement, avec l’intention d’influencer les résultats d’une élection »... le problème, c’est que la portée est limitée et que l’amendement pourrait entraîner des limites imprévues. Par exemple, le mot « élection » dans la Loi électorale du Canada a un sens limité. Il ne comprend pas les courses à la direction ou les courses à l’investiture.

En ce qui concerne le terme « frauduleusement », si une personne est autorisée à accéder à un système informatique, elle ne serait pas visée par cette disposition. Ensuite, dans un troisième temps, et c’est peut-être plus important encore, l’intention n’est peut-être pas de nuire aux résultats ou à l’intégrité, mais plutôt quelque chose qui ne relève pas de cela et qui est pourtant lié au processus électoral.

La recommandation du directeur général des élections était d’enlever l’élément mens rea, la notion d’intention, de la disposition.

Le président:

Êtes-vous en faveur ou contre cet amendement?

M. Robert Sampson:

Ni l’un, ni l’autre. Je ne fais que réitérer la position qu’a prise le directeur général des élections lorsqu’il a comparu, je crois le 25 septembre, et qu’il a présenté un tableau qui renfermait certains amendements qu’il aurait souhaités voir adopter.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les amendements Conservateur-141, Vert-14 et Libéral-41 ont tous tendance à faire la même chose, mais l’amendement LIB-41 règle le problème de la référence aux élections, dont ils parlent. Je pense que c’est la version la mieux formulée.

Sur les trois, je recommande que nous adoptions l’amendement libéral. C’est le mieux formulé.

C’est ma recommandation.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr.

M. Nathan Cullen:

N’oublions pas que nous parlons de deux éléments: premièrement, le terme « élection » défini de façon circonscrite et, deuxièmement, l’élément mens rea.

Nous devons choisir entre les trois devant nous, je suppose, et si l’un est adopté, les deux autres seront annulés.

Le président:

Nous pouvons simplement parler des trois en même temps.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’ai cru comprendre que l’amendement CPC-141 supprimait cet élément d’intention, que l’infraction réussisse à semer le doute ou à dénigrer notre élection ou non.

Vous proposez peut-être quelque chose de différent, monsieur Sampson. Sans trop vous prononcer sur l’amendement qui vous semble satisfaisant, si nous voulons quelque chose qui s’applique à plus grande échelle que les élections...

Quelle était votre seconde préoccupation? Était-ce l’élément mens rea, et le troisième portait sur autre chose?

M. Robert Sampson:

C’était l’élément mens rea, mais aussi la référence à l’élection.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. C’était la première.

M. Robert Sampson:

Je crois que certains de ces amendements suppriment également le mot « frauduleusement ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord. Dans l’amendement LIB-41, on parle de « d) tente de commettre l’une des infractions prévues aux alinéas a) à c). ». Est-ce que cela laisse suffisamment de latitude pour répondre à vos deux préoccupations?

Vous pouvez comprendre, en voyant cela, à quel point nous allons vraiment nous en remettre à vous pour celui-là, parce que tout ce qu’il fait, c’est qu’il renvoie à deux paragraphes et qu’il dit très peu de chose. Comme David l’a dit, c’est peut-être le mieux formulé, mais nous voulons nous assurer qu’il soit vraiment efficace.

(0920)

Le président:

Trevor.

M. Trevor Knight:

Je pense que notre préoccupation n’était pas vraiment la question de tentative dont il est question dans l’amendement LIB-41. Notre préoccupation concernait l’intention de la personne qui influe sur l’élection.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Vous voulez que ce soit un facteur, que la personne ait l'intention d’influer...

M. Trevor Knight:

Non. La disposition actuelle du projet de loi C-76 mentionne l’intention d’influer sur les résultats des élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord.

M. Trevor Knight:

Nous estimions que c’était trop restreint, parce qu’il aurait pu s’agir d’un candidat à la direction ou à l’investiture, et non pas seulement d’une élection.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord.

M. Trevor Knight:

Nous pensons également qu’il ne s’agit pas seulement d’influer sur les résultats des élections, mais aussi de jeter le discrédit sur le processus ou de causer des méfaits en général. Peu importe qui gagne, pourvu que...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bien sûr, cela ne fait que jeter le doute, mais en ce qui concerne le premier élément que vous avez mentionné au sujet de l’intention, l’intention demeure importante. Si quelqu’un fait quelque chose de façon non intentionnelle, qu’il publie sur les médias sociaux — parce que c’est ce dont nous parlons ici —, l’intention n’est pas de prendre quelqu’un qui ne l’a pas fait volontairement, n’est-ce pas?

M. Trevor Knight:

Non. Ce n’est pas notre intention.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce sont les deux autres éléments. Premièrement, il s’agit d’élargir la portée au-delà des élections et, deuxièmement, il ne s’agit pas de savoir si la tentative a été fructueuse ou non. C’est simplement le fait qu’on a tenté de faire du dénigrement.

Encore une fois, pour en revenir à l’amendement LIB-41 qui touche les alinéas a) à c) de l’article 323, est-il suffisamment général, mais aussi assez efficace? J’ai de la difficulté avec cette mesure législative.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin (conseiller principal en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Oui. J’aimerais formuler une observation.

Mme Sahota m’a posé une question à ce sujet tout de suite après les remarques du ministre, lundi. J’ai répondu à la question de Mme Sahota en anglais, alors ce matin, si le Comité n’y voit pas d’inconvénient, je vais faire quelque chose d’inhabituel et répondre à cette question en français.

Je prie tous ceux qui ne comprennent pas le français d’utiliser la traduction. J’ai été formé en droit criminel en français et je veux m’assurer que ma réponse est très précise.[Français]

L'infraction prévue au paragraphe 482(1) du projet de loi inclut effectivement deux éléments de mens rea: la fraude et l'intention d'influencer les résultats d'une élection.

Lorsque le directeur général des élections a comparu devant le Comité plus tôt ce printemps, il a recommandé de supprimer le second élément de mens rea, à savoir l'intention d'influencer les résultats d'une élection. Je ne me souviens pas du libellé exact par lequel il proposait de le remplacer, mais cela faisait référence, aux différents paragraphes, au fait qu'un ordinateur ait été utilisé dans le cadre d'une élection ou d'une course à la direction.

J'aimerais attirer l'attention du Comité sur les trois amendements et montrer les différences qu'ils présentent, car ils ne sont pas tout à fait similaires.

Les amendements CPC-141 et PV-14 se ressemblent davantage; l'amendement libéral est plus différent.

L'objectif de l'amendement libéral est vraiment d'ajouter une nouvelle infraction, soit la tentative de commettre l'une des infractions prévues aux alinéas 482(1)a), b) ou c) qui sont proposés dans le projet de loi. Comme cette infraction serait prévue dans le nouvel alinéa d), elle comprendrait les deux éléments de mens rea prévus dans le chapeau du paragraphe 482(1). L'amendement libéral ne répond donc pas entièrement à la recommandation du directeur général des élections.

Les amendements CPC-141 et PV-14, quant à eux, ajoutent tous deux un élément de mens rea qui pourrait être substitué, lorsque ce serait applicable, à l'élément d'intention d'influencer les résultats d'une élection. L'élément de mens rea prévu dans l'amendement CPC-141 serait le fait de « miner la confiance dans l'intégrité d'une élection ». Dans le cas de l'amendement PV-14, ce serait « l'intention d'influencer [...] l'intégrité d'une élection ».

L'une des inquiétudes relatives à ces éléments de mens rea, c'est qu'ils sont très subjectifs. Il pourrait être très difficile de déterminer ce qu'est la confiance dans l'intégrité d'une élection. Cela pourrait mener à des problèmes d'application plus tard.

J'aimerais aussi attirer l'attention du Comité sur un autre sujet que j'avais abordé dans ma réponse à une question de Mme Sahota.

L'article 342.1 du Code criminel prévoit une infraction très similaire. En fait, l'infraction prévue à l'article 482 de la Loi électorale du Canada tel qu'il est proposé dans le projet de loi C-76 est basée sur l'article 342.1 du Code criminel. Comme je l'ai dit lundi, l'article 342.1 du Code criminel ne prévoit pas de mens rea précise quant à l'intention d'influencer les résultats d'une élection.

L'article 342.2 du Code criminel prévoit une autre infraction, celle de posséder du matériel ayant permis de perpétrer l'infraction prévue à l'article 342.1 du Code criminel.

Je rappelle ces dispositions aux membres du Comité pour une raison bien simple. Certes, le commissaire aux élections fédérales joue un rôle d'enquête qui se spécialise dans les élections, mais il serait faux de croire que les élections fédérales se passent dans un vide juridique et dans un monde où les autres services d'enquête n'existent pas et ne sont pas actifs.

Le gouvernement du Canada a annoncé récemment la création du Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité, qui réunit des employés de Sécurité publique Canada, du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications et d'autres organismes spécialisés en cybersécurité. Le gouvernement a aussi annoncé la création, au sein de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, de l'Unité nationale de coordination de la lutte contre la cybercriminalité.

Si des candidats, des partis ou des organismes gouvernementaux devaient faire face à une faille de sécurité ou à une possible utilisation non autorisée d'un ordinateur dans le cadre d'une élection, ils devraient porter plainte au commissaire aux élections fédérales, mais aussi à la GRC ou aux services policiers locaux.

La Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, la Loi sur l'accès à l'information et notre cadre juridique criminel permettent aux organismes d'enquête de collaborer. Cette collaboration est encouragée, parce que chaque organisme d'enquête a sa spécialité. Des initiatives comme l'Unité nationale de coordination de la lutte contre la cybercriminalité sont justement mises sur pied pour s'assurer que tous les organismes d'enquête collaborent et font appel aux spécialités de chacun.

Il est vrai, comme l'a dit le directeur général des élections, que le cadre de l'infraction prévue à l'article 482 de la Loi électorale du Canada peut être limité, mais il y a beaucoup d'autres infractions dans le Code criminel qui pourraient s'appliquer à des situations semblables, dont les articles 342.1 et 342.2.

Je voudrais rassurer les membres du Comité à ce sujet: si un incident survenait, il n'y aurait pas que sur cette infraction qu'on pourrait s'appuyer. Cela s'inscrit dans un cadre juridique beaucoup plus grand.

(0925)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Cela dit, lequel de ces trois amendements correspond le mieux aux recommandations du directeur général des élections?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Aucun.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il n’y en a pas un ici qui...?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La motion libérale ajoute la nouvelle « tentative » d’infraction — merci, madame Sahota — parce que le Code criminel renferme une disposition générale qui s’applique à d’autres infractions du Code criminel. Le fait de « tenter » de commettre une infraction en vertu du Code criminel constitue une infraction.

Bien sûr, cette disposition du Code criminel ne s’applique pas à d’autres lois fédérales. C’est pourquoi le gouvernement recommande d’ajouter la « tentative » d'infraction pour ratisser un peu plus large.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Si vous me le permettez, je pense que M. Morin dit « aucun » d’entre eux parce que l’amendement LIB-41 — je suppose que l’amendement LIB-40 a déjà été fait — répond à la moitié de ce que le directeur général des élections a recommandé. Lorsqu’il a comparu devant le comité de la procédure, je crois qu’il a dit qu’il fallait aussi supprimer la notion d’intention. Nous apprenons maintenant que, pour toute infraction criminelle, il faut qu’il y ait mens rea, alors ce ne serait pas sage de le faire. C’est ce qui a été dit.

Mais oui, cela tient en quelque sorte compte de ce qu’il voulait accomplir et prévoit la tentative d’infraction.

(0930)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me demande s’il y a quelque chose qu'on pourrait ajouter entre cela, qui est utile et qui élargit la portée, et tout élément des amendements PV-14 ou CPC-141 qui est également utile. Je sais que dès que nous touchons une ligne de la loi, c’est à peu près tout. Nous en restons là.

Je sais que vous n’êtes pas ici pour parler de politiques, mais y a-t-il des éléments dans les deux amendements précédents qui correspondent, si je puis dire, à ce que le DGE a demandé de modifier dans le projet de loi C-76?

Le président:

Et qui pourrait être ajouté, vous dites, à l’amendement LIB-41?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Je ne veux pas trop compliquer les choses, mais s’il y a un simple ajout que nous pouvons faire à l’amendement LIB-41 pour satisfaire à une autre demande du directeur général des élections, pourquoi ne pas l’envisager?

M. Robert Sampson:

Avec les amendements CPC-141 et PV-14, nous nous éloignons de la simple intention d’influencer les résultats d’une élection en ajoutant « confiance dans l’intégrité d’une élection ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est vrai.

M. Robert Sampson:

Cela élargirait la portée et ce serait plus conforme aux recommandations du directeur général des élections.

Nous pourrions aller un peu plus loin et mentionner les courses à la direction et les courses à l’investiture. Cela élargirait encore davantage la portée du projet de loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quel est le terme dans la loi qui couvre les élections, les courses à l’investiture et les courses à la direction? Il n’y en a pas, non?

M. Robert Sampson:

Il n’y a pas de terme unique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il faut toutes les nommer.

Nous ne mettons pas très souvent à jour la Loi électorale du Canada, n’est-ce pas, alors pourquoi ne pas viser l’or ici? S’il y a une façon de dire élection, course à l'investiture et course à la direction...

Si on ajoutait « les résultats d’une élection, d’une investiture ou d’une course à la direction, ou de miner la confiance dans l’intégrité desdites » à l’amendement LIB-41, cela répondrait à une autre recommandation du DGE, tout en élargissant, comme Ruby l’a dit, la question au sujet de l’intention.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Sur cette question précise, les amendements CPC-141 et PV-14 ne modifient pas la même ligne que l’amendement LIB-41. Je pense que l’amendement LIB-41 arrive un peu plus loin dans la numérotation des lignes, alors les amendements CPC-141 et PV-14 sont les seuls qui modifient l'introduction du paragraphe 482(1).

M. Nathan Cullen:

Tous ces amendements sont liés, mais les deux premiers sont ceux que nous devons examiner d'abord, puis nous pourrons examiner séparément l’amendement LIB-41.

Avec votre aide, monsieur le président... oui.

Je ne sais pas ce qu’en pensent les conservateurs, mais cet amendement favorable au CPC-141, je crois, vaut mieux que l’amendement PV-14. Adoptons-le ou examinons-le, puis regardons l’amendement LIB-41, qui est un ajout — il ajoute l'alinéa d) — et nous ne toucherions pas à la même chose deux fois, de sorte que ces votes seraient tenus séparément. C'est bien cela?

Le président:

Si nous adoptions les amendements CPC-141 et LIB-41 et que nous faisions l'amendement dont parle M. Cullen, est-ce que cela couvrirait beaucoup de choses que le DGE recommande?

M. Trevor Knight:

Oui, cela couvrirait beaucoup de choses.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne sais pas ce que les conservateurs pensent de l’idée d’accepter un sous-amendement à leur amendement pour inclure « résultats d’une élection, d’une investiture ou d'une course à la direction, ou de miner la confiance dans l’intégrité d’une élection, d’une investiture ou d'une course à la direction ».

Nous pourrions passer ensuite à l’amendement LIB-41.

Le président:

Voulez-vous noter cela pendant qu’ils parlent, juste le sous-amendement? Ajoutez ces mots pour le greffier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous voulez que j’écrive cela? Bien sûr.

Le président:

Il va vous donner du papier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce course à l’investiture ou seulement investiture? D’accord, merci beaucoup.

Disons-nous aussi course à la direction? Est-ce ainsi que cela s'appelle dans la loi? Merci.

(0935)

Le président:

Je vais vous lire le sous-amendement au CPC-141. Nous discutons du libellé suivant: résultats d’une élection, d’une course à l’investiture ou d’une course à la direction, ou de miner la confiance dans l’intégrité de l’élection, de la course à l’investiture ou de la course à la direction.

Cela ne fait qu’ajouter deux éléments, deux autres activités du cycle électoral. On ne parle pas seulement d'influencer les résultats, mais de miner la confiance dans l’intégrité de l'élection. Ce sont les deux choses à ajouter pour lesquelles penchait le directeur général des élections.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Personnellement, je n’ai pas de problème avec le libellé « confiance dans l’intégrité » et tout le reste. C'est beau, c'est fleuri et nous pouvons l’ajouter. Je ne pense pas que cela change quoi que ce soit à l’effet de l’article lui-même.

En ce qui concerne la course à la direction et l’investiture, chaque fois que nous avons siégé jusqu’à présent, il était convenu que les partis seraient responsables de ces choses-là, qui ne relèvent pas nécessairement d’Élections Canada. Élections Canada ne s'en mêle pas.

Je ne sais pas. Qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Robert Sampson:

En ce qui concerne les courses à l’investiture et les courses à la direction, Élections Canada s'en tient surtout aux aspects du financement des partis. Une infraction ici, ce serait probablement l'affaire du commissaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible] a tenté de commettre... a tenté de s'immiscer dans une course à la direction ou une course à l’investiture, en diffusant de l’information qui visait à compromettre la course elle-même.

M. Robert Sampson:

C’est bien cela.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, je pense que nous sommes du même avis que le parti ministériel. C’est en quelque sorte notre philosophie de garder la politique partisane dans la famille.

Le président:

Si je comprends bien — corrigez-moi si je me trompe —, nous rejetons cet amendement, mais nous en refaisons un qui contient la même chose, sauf pour la partie concernant les courses à l’investiture et à la direction. Est-ce bien ainsi que vous le comprenez? Avez-vous l’impression...?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais je veux simplement qu'on y réfléchisse. Tout d’abord, c'est une recommandation qui est venue du directeur général des élections. Nous semblons être très sélectifs quant il s'agit de l'encenser ou non, selon ce qu’il dit. Il est formidable quand on est d’accord avec lui, et on fait comme s'il n'existait pas quand on n’est pas d’accord avec lui.

Nous disons que si, durant une course à la direction, quelqu'un — à dessein ou non — sème le doute en la piratant, en répandant des faussetés, nous sommes d’accord pour que les partis puissent s’en occuper eux-mêmes sans invoquer aucune des clauses pénales qui pourraient s'appliquer si nous les incluions dans la Loi électorale. Or, je ne vois pas pourquoi nous ne voudrions pas assurer la plus grande intégrité à toutes nos courses à l’investiture. Personnellement, je ne vois pas cela comme de l’ingérence. C’est au cas où une personne essaie, par exemple, dans l'investiture de Ruby, de faire toutes ces choses pour mettre en doute les résultats de votre candidature — si vous aviez une course à l’investiture.

C’est le but de tout ceci. Je comprends qu'on veuille que les affaires de parti restent à l'interne, mais voyez les infractions dont il s'agit. On parle de gens qui essaient intentionnellement de compromettre notre processus démocratique — pas seulement aux élections générales, mais lors du choix des candidats qui se présenteront ensuite aux élections générales. Tout cela me semble aller de soi. Pourquoi ne pas mettre dans le texte une infraction qui dit: « Si vous essayez de faire ceci, peu importe que vous réussissiez, vous commettez une infraction », au lieu de laisser les partis s’en occuper?

(0940)

Le président:

Nous avons entendu tous les points de vue. Nous mettons aux voix le sous-amendement. S’il est rejeté, demandez à M. Cullen d'en présenter un autre plus petit.

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté.)

Le président: Si nous avions l’amendement, monsieur Cullen, seriez-vous prêt à proposer que cela mine la confiance dans l’intégrité de l’élection, de la course à l’investiture ou de la course à la direction?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je croyais que cela venait juste d’être rejeté.

Le président:

Pardon. Seulement les mots « miner la confiance dans l’intégrité d’une élection ».

Ruby a dit que cette partie vous convenait.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que cela fait une différence? Dites-moi, cette formulation a-t-elle une incidence quelconque?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Nous revenons au texte original de l’amendement CPC-141. Le seul commentaire que j’ai fait concernait la nature de l'expression « miner la confiance dans l’intégrité d’une élection ». Cela pourrait causer des problèmes d’application de la loi à l’avenir. Par ailleurs, on pourrait invoquer un élément précis de mens rea au lieu de « avec l'intention d’influencer les résultats de l’élection ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

La question est que cela n’ajoute rien. Cela n'enlève rien en tout cas...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cela n’enlève rien. Ce serait une solution de rechange à « influencer les résultats de l'élection ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourquoi ne pas envisager un ajout à ce qui existe dans d’autres parties du Code criminel, comme vous le laissiez entendre, monsieur Morin? Il y a d’autres aspects du Code criminel qui peuvent s'appliquer.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Comme je l’ai dit, le paragraphe 482(1) comprend deux éléments de mens rea. Il y en a un plus général, la fraude, qui figure aussi dans le Code criminel, et un autre plus particulier, l’intention d’influencer les résultats d’une élection, qu'on ne trouve pas dans le Code criminel. Il serait toujours possible de porter une accusation en vertu du Code criminel sans la moindre preuve de l’intention particulière d’influencer les résultats d’une élection, pourvu que tous les autres éléments soient réunis, bien sûr.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer au vote. D'abord, l’amendement CPC-141.

M. John Nater:

Pouvons-nous avoir un vote par appel nominal, monsieur le président?

(L’amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

L’amendement PV-14 est recevable vu que l'autre n’a pas été adopté. Y a-t-il d’autres commentaires sur l’amendement PV-14, qui est très semblable?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que nous avons terminé cette discussion.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement LIB-41.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 323 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 324 et 325 sont adoptés.)

(Article 326)

Le président: Au sujet de l'article 326, il y a un nouvel amendement CPC, qui porte le numéro de référence 9952454.

Stephanie, voulez-vous le présenter?

(0945)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est à propos du registre des futurs électeurs; on augmente les peines pour mauvais usage des données du registre.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

M. Nathan Cullen:

On augmente les peines de quoi à quoi?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Si vous me permettez...

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Madame Kusie, vous avez raison de dire que cela finirait par avoir un effet sur les peines, mais cette motion porte précisément sur l’infraction elle-même.

À l’heure actuelle, l’infraction associée à l’interdiction prévue à l’alinéa 56e.1), concernant l’utilisation non autorisée de renseignements personnels figurant dans le registre des futurs électeurs, est considérée comme une infraction exigeant une intention, mais seulement sur déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire. Elle figure dans cette disposition parce qu’elle est pareille à l’infraction associée à l’utilisation non autorisée de renseignements personnels figurant dans le registre des électeurs.

Selon l’amendement, l’infraction liée à l’utilisation non autorisée de renseignements personnels figurant dans le registre des futurs électeurs serait transférée au paragraphe 485(2) proposé, ce qui en ferait une infraction mixte. Elle pourrait alors faire l'objet d'une mise en accusation et avoir des conséquences pénales plus graves.

Le président:

Ce pourrait être la procédure sommaire ou l’acte d’accusation.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui. À l’heure actuelle, c’est seulement la procédure sommaire, comme pour la même infraction avec le registre des électeurs. Maintenant, celle du registre des futurs électeurs serait considérée à part et deviendrait une infraction mixte.

Le président:

Cela rend plus strict... Le commissaire et le procureur auraient plus de latitude pour procéder par voie de mise en accusation, ainsi que par procédure sommaire.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres commentaires?

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Actuellement, il existe déjà une possibilité de poursuite pour mauvais usage du registre des électeurs. Je pense que le mieux est d’uniformiser les règles pour les deux registres, et non de les traiter séparément.

Le président:

Actuellement, les électeurs peuvent être poursuivis seulement par procédure sommaire. Les futurs électeurs, eux, seraient poursuivis par procédure sommaire ou par voie de mise en accusation, essentiellement.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, et c’est pour un mauvais usage des renseignements.

Ce ne sont pas habituellement des électeurs qui se rendent coupables de cela, mais des gens qui utilisent ces renseignements au quotidien.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, discutez-vous de cet amendement?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, quelque chose de complètement différent.

Le président:

D’accord. Pouvons-nous passer au vote?

Allez-y.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous parlons de mineurs ici, alors je pense que dans la société, en droit, que ce soit en ce qui concerne les infractions ou la pornographie, nous avons toujours regardé d'un oeil particulier l’inclusion et la participation des mineurs.

Je pense que cet amendement en tient compte.

(0950)

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres commentaires?

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 326 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 327)

Le président: Nous avons deux amendements. Nous allons commencer par l’amendement CPC-142.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Les amendements CPC-142 et CPC-143 se ressemblent en ce qu'ils gardent le mot « sciemment » pour qui commet l’infraction de fausses publications.

Encore une fois, si quelqu’un devait faire quelque chose... Si nous supprimons le mot « sciemment », il devient très subjectif de juger les gens qui réaffichent ou qui redistribuent l’information, tandis que le mot « sciemment » ajoute l’intention dont nous avons tant discuté ce matin.

Nous préconisons le maintien du mot « sciemment » dans les amendements CPC-142 et CPC-143.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour moi, l’amendement est redondant parce que l’intention est déjà exigée dans l’infraction liée à l’interdiction.

N'est-ce pas, monsieur Morin?

M. Jean-François Morin:

L’interdiction associée aux amendements CPC-142 et CPC-143 se trouve au paragraphe 91(1) du projet de loi. Il est interdit à toute personne ou entité de faire ou de publier une fausse déclaration, avec l’intention d’influencer les résultats de l’élection.

Oui, l’exigence d'intention est déjà présente dans l’intention d’influencer les résultats de l’élection et, bien sûr, la personne qui commet l’infraction doit aussi savoir que l’information publiée est fausse. Je pense que l’ajout du mot « sciemment » apporterait une dose d'incertitude quant au degré de preuve nécessaire pour réussir à condamner quelqu'un en vertu de cette disposition.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je suis prêt à voter sur les amendements CPC-142 et CPC-143.

Le président:

Nous mettons aux voix l’amendement CPC-142.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L’amendement CPC-143 est-il pareil?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C’est la même chose. Poursuivez, je vous prie.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 327 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 328 est adopté.)

(Article 329)

Le président:

Au sujet de l’article 329, il y avait l’amendement CPC-144, mais il était corrélatif à l’amendement CPC-49, qui, je suppose, est rejeté.

(L’article 329 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 330 est adopté.)

Le président: Il y avait deux amendements à l'article 331, qui ont tous deux été retirés: CPC-145 et LIB-42.

(L’article 331 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: L' article 332 faisait l'objet de l'amendement CPC-146, qui a été retiré.

(L’article 332 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Il y avait quelques amendements à l'article 333. Il y avait l’amendement LIB-43, qui était corrélatif à l’amendement LIB-24, alors cet amendement est adopté. Il y avait un amendement CPC-147, qui est retiré.

(L’article 333 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 334 et 335 sont adoptés.)

(Article 336)

Le président: Il y a une dizaine d'amendements à l'article 336. L’amendement LIB-44 a été adopté conséquemment à l’amendement LIB-26. L’amendement NDP-25 a été rejeté conséquemment à l’amendement NDP-17. L'amendement CPC-148 a été retiré. L’amendement LIB-45 est adopté conséquemment à...

Est-ce que vous retirez celui-ci?

(0955)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Le président:

L’amendement LIB-45 n’est pas présenté.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, il y a peut-être une explication rationnelle, mais je ne comprends pas. Vous dites qu’il a été adopté conséquemment à quelque chose d’autre, puis on dit qu’il est retiré. Comment peut-on le retirer s’il a déjà été adopté?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L’amendement LIB-44 a été adopté. L’amendement LIB-45 a été retiré.

M. Scott Reid:

L’indication a été donnée avant la date ou le moment où...?

Le président:

À ce moment-là, il était question de l’amendement LIB-30.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est bien ce qu'on a indiqué.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Donc, le Comité n’aurait pas eu l’impression qu’il adoptait l’amendement LIB-45 conséquemment à autre chose, car cela voudrait dire qu’il devrait être retiré séparément.

Le président:

D’accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Auriez-vous l’obligeance de le dire en toutes lettres pour que cela figure au compte rendu et que nous soyons...?

Le président:

D’accord. L’intention de retirer l’amendement LIB-45 a été donnée au moment où nous parlions de l’amendement LIB-30, alors ce n'est pas corrélatif.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord. Merci.

Le président:

L'amendement CPC-149 a été retiré. L’amendement LIB-46 a été adopté conséquemment à l’amendement LIB-26. L’amendement PV-15 a été rejeté conséquemment à l’amendement PV-3. L’amendement CPC-150 a été retiré.

Nous avons l’amendement LIB-47. C’est toujours en jeu. Quelqu’un peut-il le présenter?

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Les nouveaux alinéas 495.3(2)h) et i) devraient tous deux commencer par « being a third party » dans la version anglaise et par « le tiers qui » dans la version française, tout comme les infractions correspondantes aux alinéas 495.3(1)f) et g) proposés sont limitées aux tiers. C’est juste une correction technique.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des questions?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Ce n’est qu’une erreur de rédaction qui a été relevée par les rédacteurs lorsque nous avons rédigé les amendements au projet de loi. Cela aurait dû figurer dès le départ.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 336 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 337)

Le président:

Il y a huit amendements à l’article 337. L’amendement LIB-48 est adopté conséquemment à l’amendement LIB-32.

Nous avons l’amendement LIB-49.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je dois retirer l'amendement LIB-49.

Le président:

Vous ne présentez pas le LIB-49?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais le retirer.

Le président:

L'amendement LIB-50 étant corrélatif au LIB-26, il est donc inclus. Cet amendement a été adopté.

L'amendement CPC-151 a été retiré. Le PV-15 a disparu puisqu'il était corrélatif au PV-3. Le CPC-152 a été retiré.

L'amendement LIB-51 a été adopté puisqu'il était corrélatif au LIB-32.

(1000)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur le président, puis-je poser une question?

Le président:

Oui, monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Avez-vous dit que l'amendement LIB-49 a été adopté?

Le président:

Non, le LIB-49 n'a pas été présenté.

M. Jean-François Morin:

D'accord, merci. Il était corrélatif à un autre amendement qui a été retiré, je voulais donc m'en assurer.

(L'article 337 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

Les conservateurs ont proposé deux amendements à l'article 338: le CPC-153 et le CPC-154. Les deux ont été retirés.

(L'article 338 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Concernant l'article 339, l'amendement LIB-52 étant corrélatif au LIB-36, il est donc adopté.

(L'article 339 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 340)

Le président: L'article 340 fait l'objet de six amendements. Le premier est le CPC-155 et je pense qu'il est toujours ouvert à débat.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En gros, il reporte l'application des plafonds des dépenses préélectorales imposés aux partis politiques après l'élection de 2019.

Le président:

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il supprime toute infraction liée aux plafonds des dépenses préélectorales et nous ne sommes pas favorables à cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il invalide également les deux suivants.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

L'amendement CPC-156 porte sur le même sujet.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement CPC-157 porte-t-il sur le même sujet?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, il porte sur le même sujet.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal ])

Le président:

Le PV-17 étant corrélatif au PV-3, il est rejeté.

L'amendement LIB-53 étant corrélatif au LIB-38, il est donc adopté.

(L'article 340 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 341)

Le président: Il y a cinq amendements à l'article 341. Commençons par le CPC-158.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N'est-il pas la continuité des trois derniers?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, plus ou moins.

Le président:

Ne pouvons-nous pas passer directement au vote?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je le pense.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement CPC-159.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement LIB-54 est adopté puisqu'il est corrélatif au LIB-39. Le LIB-39 ayant été adopté, le LIB-54 l'est également.

(L'article 341 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 342 est adopté.)

(Article 343)

Le président: Nous passons à l'article 343 qui fait l'objet d'un amendement, le CPC-160.

(1005)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet amendement établit des mesures de coordination et anticollusion semblables à celles dont nous avons déjà parlé. Je pense qu'il en a été question quand nous avons reçu ici le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Je vais donc en rester là.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vous vouliez ajouter quelque chose?

M. John Nater:

Oui. Je dirais seulement qu'il s'agit d'un amendement préalable au CPC-167. Il serait important que nous l'adoptions afin que nous puissions aussi adopter le CPC-167.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvons-nous nous prononcer sur le CPC-167 maintenant?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non.

M. John Nater:

Avant d'adopter le CPC-167, il faut adopter celui-ci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci de me faciliter la vie.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Le PV-18 a été rejeté puisqu'il était corrélatif au PV-3.

(L'article 343 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 344 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Le nouvel article 344.1 est proposé par le biais de l'amendement LIB-55 qui est adopté puisqu'il est corrélatif au LIB-38.

Puisqu'il a déjà été adopté, il n'est pas nécessaire de voter.

(L'article 345 est adopté.)

(Article 346)

Le président: Nous en sommes maintenant à l'article 346 qui fait l'objet d'environ huit amendements.

Le premier était le CPC-161, qui a été retiré. Je pense que le CPC-162 a également été retiré.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

Le président:

L'amendement LIB-56 a été adopté puisqu'il était corrélatif au LIB-26. Le LIB-57 étant corrélatif au LIB-38, il est donc adopté.

Le CPC-163 est maintenu, je crois.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le règlement.

N'y a-t-il pas un conflit de lignes entre les amendements LIB-56 et LIB-57?

Le président:

Nous allons poser la question au greffier législatif.

Oui, vous avez raison, monsieur Nater, il y en a un. Je n'ai aucune idée de ce que cela veut dire, mais nous allons tirer les choses au clair.

(1010)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur le président, je pense qu'il y a une coquille dans la version anglaise de l'alinéa b) de l'amendement LIB-56. Il faudrait lire « replacing line 15 on page 201 » et non pas « line 16 ». La version française est correcte.

Le président:

De quel amendement parlez-vous? Du LIB-56?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, c'est ce qu'il a dit.

Le président:

Pouvez-vous tous corriger la coquille à l'amendement LIB-56 en remplaçant, dans la version anglaise, « line 16 » par « line 15 ».

M. John Nater:

Puisqu'il a déjà été adopté, faut-il avoir le consentement unanime?

Le président:

Cela ne change rien à la teneur de l'amendement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et la version française est correcte.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Et la version espagnole est loin d'être au point.

Le président:

Cela corrige donc l'incohérence.

D'accord. Monsieur Nater, merci de nous avoir signalé cette erreur. Je me réjouis de voir que vous êtes si attentif...

M. John Nater:

Je suis ici pour servir.

Le président:

Oui, c'est impressionnant.

Nous en sommes à l'amendement CPC-163, mais il ne peut être proposé si le LIB-38 est adopté parce qu'il modifie la même ligne que le LIB-57. Désolé, il ne peut être proposé.

Monsieur de Burgh Graham, vous pouvez présenter l'amendement LIB-58.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il concerne le financement étranger des activités courantes de tiers. Il permettra au tribunal, après avoir reconnu un tiers coupable d'une infraction liée à l'utilisation de fonds étrangers, de lui imposer une amende supplémentaire équivalant à cinq fois le montant des fonds étrangers utilisés en contravention à la loi.

Le président:

De quoi s'agit-il, en termes simples?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il crée une sanction... Comment appelle-t-on les amendes supplémentaires basées sur les gains?Je vais demander aux avocats.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En plus de la peine imposée par le juge en vertu de l'article 500, si un tiers est reconnu coupable d'avoir utilisé des fonds étrangers, le juge peut lui imposer une amende maximale équivalant à cinq fois le montant des fonds étrangers utilisés en contravention à la loi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exactement ce que je voulais dire.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Si vous utilisez une contribution de 5 000 $ provenant d'une source étrangère, vous pourriez être passible d'une amende de 10 000 $, par exemple, et ensuite d'une amende supplémentaire de 25 000 $.

Le président:

D'autres commentaires au sujet de cet amendement?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Nous passons maintenant au CPC-164.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il prévoit des définitions et des sanctions anticollusion plus sévères en vertu desquelles un tiers reconnu coupable d'une infraction en vertu des articles 349 et 351 perdra sa qualité de tiers enregistré.

Le président:

D'autres commentaires au sujet de cet amendement?

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, pouvez-vous expliquer à quoi cela sert de radier des tiers partis, puisqu'ils ne sont pas dans la course?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ils se retrouvent dans un gros trou noir.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

(1015)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je vais d'abord apporter une précision technique. Il nous faudra vérifier, mais quelques-unes des dispositions énoncées dans le nouveau paragraphe 500(7) n'ont pas été adoptées, je pense. Il faudrait vérifier cela.

La notion de radiation d'un tiers parti n'est actuellement pas abordée à la partie 17 de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Est-ce que...?

M. Trevor Knight:

Elle n'existe pas dans la loi. Je suppose que la conséquence — je n'ai pas approfondi la question — serait probablement que les partis cesseraient d'avoir des obligations en vertu de la loi. Une conséquence non voulue pourrait être qu'ils ne pourront plus être reconnus coupables des infractions que nous...

Le président:

Nous les laisserions s'en tirer à bon compte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais ils pourraient être reconnus coupables de ne pas être enregistrés.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pas vraiment, parce qu'ils seraient radiés en vertu de la loi; cela remettrait également en question leur obligation de présenter un rapport financier après l'élection.

Je ne mesure pas bien la portée de cet amendement.

Le président:

Il pourrait y avoir des conséquences non voulues.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Normalement, nous demandons aux gens... sans toutefois les obliger, nous leur demandons de s'enregistrer en tant que tiers s'ils veulent s'impliquer.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, c'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, pour leur retirer le statut de tiers...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que nous avons suffisamment de renseignements démontrant que cet amendement n'est pas très utile.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

À toutes fins utiles, je propose que l'amendement soit modifié par la suppression du nouvel alinéa 500(7)a).

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 346 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

L'amendement CPC-165 propose un nouvel article 346.1.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il confère aux juges le pouvoir d'ordonner la radiation de partis politiques qui agissent de concert avec des tiers.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter à ce sujet?

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires à faire?

M. Jean-François Morin:

J'ajouterais seulement que même si cette motion fait deux pages, le seul élément ici...

Le président:

Ce n'est pas très positif.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne veux offenser personne. Je dis simplement que les conservateurs ont fait preuve de prudence en proposant le nouvel article 501.1 parce que l'article 501 n'était pas encore ouvert à débat. Au fond, il ne fait que reprendre plusieurs paragraphes de l'article 501 qui prévoit la radiation de partis dans certaines circonstances. Ce régime n'est pas nouveau. Cette motion a pour effet d'ajouter les trois paragraphes mentionnés au paragraphe 501.1(1) à la catégorie des infractions pouvant mener à la radiation d'un parti.

Le président:

Savez-vous quels sont ces trois motifs susceptibles d'entraîner une radiation?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui. Ce sont des infractions de collusion avec un tiers.

Le président:

D'accord, on y ajoute donc que le fait d'agir de concert avec un tiers pourrait aussi entraîner une radiation, en plus de tout le reste?

Monsieur Cullen.

(1020)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quelles sont les infractions imaginées jusqu'à maintenant en matière de collusion entre un parti enregistré et un tiers? Si elles n'existaient pas, à quelles sanctions s'exposerait un parti?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il s'exposerait aux diverses sanctions prévues à l'article 500 de la Loi électorale du Canada, essentiellement des amendes ou des peines d'emprisonnement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous avons déjà envisagé d'imposer des peines d'emprisonnement et des amendes à tout parti enregistré qui agit de concert avec un tiers. Ces peines s'ajouteraient à la sanction de radiation possible du parti.

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

Le président:

Nous entendrons un dernier commentaire de M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aime bien votre clairvoyance à cet égard. Ma question s'adresse à nos témoins. On a dit que la notion de radiation existait déjà dans la loi. Quelles dispositions pourrait déclencher cette sanction?

M. Jean-François Morin:

L'article 501 de la Loi prévoit d'autres contextes, dont celui de la radiation, plus précisément le paragraphe 501(2). Le paragraphe 501(3) énumère, comme vous pouvez le constater, diverses infractions pouvant entraîner une radiation, par exemple, le fait de conclure un accord interdit, de solliciter ou d'accepter des contributions en violation de la loi, de produire ou d'attester des renseignements faux ou trompeurs et ainsi de suite.

Le président:

En vertu de cet amendement, un parti pourrait également être radié s'il agit de concert avec un tiers. Il existe d'autres sanctions pour cette infraction, comme l'a fait remarquer M. Cullen, par exemple l'emprisonnement.

M. John Nater:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Ça fait longtemps que nous n'en avons pas eu.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 347)

Il n'y a pas de nouvel article 346.1. Nous passons donc à l'article 347.

Un seul amendement a été proposé, le CPC-166.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je trouve que c'est un bon amendement. Dans le cas des tiers, il ajoute la collusion entre des candidats et des tiers étrangers à la liste des pratiques illégales, ce qui déclenche également l'interdiction de siéger et de voter à la Chambre.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires à faire à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La motion est très claire. L'article 502 de la Loi électorale du Canada porte sur les actes illégaux et les manoeuvres frauduleuses et les alinéas a) et b) du paragraphe (3) énoncent les conséquences, notamment l'interdiction de se porter candidat ou de siéger à la Chambre des communes ou d'être nommé à une charge par la Couronne ou le gouverneur en conseil.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne sais pas si la question s'est posée dans l'affaire Del Mastro, mais si vous enfreignez certains articles de la Loi électorale du Canada, vous ne pouvez pas poser votre candidature pendant un certain temps. Est-ce exact?

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est ce que prévoit la loi, c'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvez-vous me rappeler ce que prévoit cette disposition? Est-ce cinq ans?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cela dépend. Pour un acte illégal, je pense que c'est cinq ans.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cinq ans.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Dans le cas d'un acte illégal, c'est une période de cinq ans et dans le cas d'une manoeuvre frauduleuse, de sept ans.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est cinq ou sept ans. Je trouverais utile qu'on ajoute le fait qu'une personne reconnue coupable de ces infractions soit déclarée inapte à siéger à la Chambre.

Même après avoir été élue, une personne reconnue coupable de collusion serait inapte à siéger au Parlement au sein duquel elle a été élue.

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Que se passe-t-il ensuite? On ne peut pas déclencher de force une élection partielle, n'est-ce pas?

(1025)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il faudrait demander...

M. Nathan Cullen:

La personne élue pourrait purger une peine d'emprisonnement. Que faites-vous dans ce cas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il faudrait s'en remettre à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, en particulier aux dispositions relatives aux vacances, que je n'ai malheureusement pas sous les yeux. Je vais consulter la loi et je vous reviens là-dessus.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne suis pas contre ce principe. Je veux seulement savoir quelles seraient les conséquences. Est-il simplement possible de garder un siège vacant, sans envisager une élection partielle qui nécessiterait le remaniement du scrutin? Si une personne est reconnue coupable de cette infraction... Elle pourrait purger sa peine d'emprisonnement, ce qui relève d'une partie distincte de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vouliez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. John Nater:

Je crois que dans ce cas, la Chambre devrait invoquer son privilège pour rendre ce siège vacant.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce député serait un candidat élu. Puisqu'il a été élu, la Chambre devrait donc l'expulser.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions décider de l'expulser.

Le président:

C'est justement une raison de plus de maintenir toutes les peines déjà prévues à la loi, exact?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exact. Nous venons de le vérifier dans la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada. Cela n'entraînerait pas automatiquement une vacance à la Chambre. La personne pourrait alors démissionner, par exemple.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais elle serait expulsée de la Chambre.

M. John Nater:

De plus, cette disposition aurait pour effet de dissuader un candidat d'agir de concert avec un tiers.

Le président:

Parle-t-on simplement d'un tiers ou d'un tiers étranger?

M. John Nater:

Je parle d'un tiers étranger. Cette disposition aurait un effet dissuasif assez fort.

Le président:

D'autres commentaires? Les libéraux souhaitent-ils ajouter quelque chose?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le fait de retirer à un citoyen son droit de solliciter une charge est déjà une sanction assez grave et à juste titre. Je pense que la loi prévoit déjà des sanctions très sévères. Je ne sais pas si celle-ci est la meilleure. Le commissaire dispose actuellement de tous les outils dont il a besoin pour attraper les contrevenants. Si une personne est envoyée en prison pour une infraction distincte, ce cas de figure est déjà pris en compte dans la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada.

Le président:

Dans sa forme actuelle, la loi permet-elle d'attraper une personne qui agit de concert avec un tiers?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si une personne commet une infraction et se retrouve en prison, elle n'est pas là de toute manière.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, comme je l'ai déjà dit, les conséquences seraient une peine d'emprisonnement ou une amende, ou les deux.

Le président:

Mais sans cet amendement, si une personne agit de concert avec un tiers, peut-elle être attrapée?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il existe une infraction pour cela.

Le président:

Il y en a une.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Bien sûr. Il s'agit d'une conséquence supplémentaire imposée à une personne reconnue coupable de l'infraction proprement dite.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 347 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 348 est adopté.)

Le président:

Il y avait un seul amendement à l'article 349, le LIB-59. Il est corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-26, qui a été adopté. Le LIB-59 est donc adopté.

(L'article 349 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-167 propose un nouvel article, le 349.1.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Là encore, il propose une disposition comparable à celle adoptée en Ontario et aux États-Unis en matière de coordination et de mesures anticollusion.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

La question que je pose aux fonctionnaires porte sur l’applicabilité de cette disposition. L’amendement complique-t-il l’application de la Loi?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il est très précis et semble en même temps très large, alors il amènerait certainement à s'écarter de la jurisprudence existante en matière de collusion. Vu la diversité des interprétations entourant cette notion, on ne peut pas prévoir les effets exacts qu'aurait l'adoption d'un tel amendement.

(1030)

Le président:

Vous avez dit très précis et très large en même temps.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, l'amendement décrit en détail ce qui constitue et ce qui ne constitue pas de la collusion, alors que jusqu'à présent la Loi ne parle que de la notion générale de collusion et laisse au rapport le soin de déterminer le précédent en se fondant sur la jurisprudence.

M. John Nater:

Ces dispositions sont fondées sur celles adoptées par le gouvernement libéral de Kathleen Wynne en 2014. Je me doutais que nos amis d’en face apprécieraient le fait qu'en appuyant...

Le président:

C’est un excellent argument en faveur de l’amendement.

M. John Nater:

Je pensais que mes collègues d’en face l’apprécieraient.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, pas même un peu.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres interventions sur cet amendement?

M. John Nater:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

(L’amendement est rejeté par 6 voix contre 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 350)

Le président:

Nous allons passer à l’article 350. Quatre amendements du PCC sont proposés, dont l’un a été retiré. On commencera par le CPC-168.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cela soustrait les infractions de vote multiple ou inadmissible du régime de sanctions administratives pécuniaires.

Le président:

Nous reviendrons au régime plus strict.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c’est exact.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourquoi veut-on restreindre la capacité du commissaire d’imposer des sanctions administratives pécuniaires, ce qui est un ajout formidable dans cette loi?

M. Scott Reid:

Ce sont des déclamations que vous voulez?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À votre guise.

M. Scott Reid:

Je m'abstiendrai, pour ne pas nous retarder inutilement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On pourrait avoir terminé à 13 heures.

Le président:

D’accord.

Tous ceux qui sont pour le CPC-168, qui restreint les pouvoirs du commissaire relativement à ces infractions particulières.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Le CPC-169 est retiré, alors nous en sommes au CPC-170.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet amendement ajuste la pénalité, et en fait une amende minimale de 1 000 $ ou une sanction administrative pécuniaire, pour des motifs qui, auparavant, entraînaient la confiscation du dépôt d’un candidat.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La décision relève des orientations générales.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Il est intéressant de noter que, récemment, un tribunal albertain a invalidé les dispositions relatives au dépôt du candidat. Avec ça, on aurait au moins une somme de 1 000 $.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela n’abaisse-t-il pas l’amende maximale possible?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, on impose là une sanction administrative pécuniaire minimale de 1 000 $. À l’heure actuelle, l’article 500 de la Loi, qui traite des peines sanctionnant les infractions, ne prévoit pas de peine minimale.

(1035)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il un maximum?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, bien sûr. La Loi prévoit toujours des peines maximales, mais ici, en prévoyant une peine minimale, elle innoverait. À l’heure actuelle, la sanction maximale prévue au paragraphe 508.5(2) proposé est de 1 500 $.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le montant serait ramené à 1 000 $.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Le commissaire aurait moins de latitude pour déterminer le montant approprié de la sanction.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En tout cas, c’est 1 000 $, au lieu qu'il puisse la moduler de 1 à 1 500 $. D’accord.

Merci.

Le président:

M. Nater a-t-il d’autres commentaires avant que l'on passe au vote?

M. John Nater:

Non.

Le président:

D’accord, on passe au vote sur l’amendement CPC-170 qui, en imposant un minimum de 1 000 $, réduit la latitude laissée au commissaire pour déterminer l’amende par rapport à la plage de variation actuelle qui va de 1 à 1 500 $.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: On passe à l’amendement CPC-170.1.

M. John Nater:

Permettez-moi de répondre à cette question, monsieur le président.

Essentiellement, cela signifie qu'un fonctionnaire, un bureaucrate, ne pourrait pas imposer une peine maximale plus élevée qu'un juge ne le ferait dans une situation semblable.

En vertu du projet de loi C-76, une amende imposée au moyen d’une sanction pécuniaire pourrait être plus élevée que celle qu'imposerait un juge dans une situation semblable. Il s’agit d’aligner les deux pour ce qui est de la peine maximale.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires à faire à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. Cela limiterait davantage la souplesse accordée au commissaire, mais en même temps, je pense que l'on devrait faire confiance à son bon jugement dans l’application du nouveau régime de sanctions administratives pécuniaires.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je suis simplement curieux. Je m’adresse à nos fonctionnaires. Ce régime sera-t-il assorti des mêmes garanties juridiques que celles qui s’appliqueraient dans le cas d’un tribunal ou d’une procédure sommaire?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Ce régime se situe dans un contexte différent. C'est un régime administratif, tandis que la poursuite des infractions relève de l’ensemble des règles pénales. Oui, il comporte de nombreuses mesures de protection, y compris un examen administratif de la pénalité et du dossier établi par le directeur général des élections, et bien sûr, la décision du directeur général des élections peut être portée devant la Cour fédérale. C'est un régime différent. Un régime administratif plutôt que pénal, mais oui, il y a beaucoup de mesures de protection en place.

M. John Nater:

Mais pas autant que dans un tribunal...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Les différences quant au fardeau de la preuve, en droit pénal et administratif, se traduisent naturellement par des règles différentes.

Le président:

M. Sampson voulait intervenir.

M. Robert Sampson:

Mon collègue me corrigera au besoin, mais il convient de noter que les montants fixés pour une déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire sont déjà supérieurs au maximum autorisé en vertu d’une sanction administrative pécuniaire. En la matière, le décideur ne peut pas, à l’heure actuelle, dépasser le montant qui est le maximum pour une condamnation hors procédure sommaire.

(1040)

Le président:

Cela rendrait cet amendement inutile.

Monsieur Nater, peut-on hasarder que cet amendement est indulgent envers les criminels, en réduisant la peine potentielle?

M. John Nater:

Nous sommes le parti qui aime vraiment que la Loi protège les justiciables. Nous sommes le parti de la Charte, disons-le ainsi.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, on trouve qu’on a ici un fardeau de la preuve moins lourd pour une peine plus lourde, un peu comme dans l'autre affaire dont la Chambre débat en ce moment, et qui rime avec « Gorman ».

Le président:

Étant donné que M. Sampson a dit qu’il ne s’agirait pas d’une peine plus lourde...

M. Robert Sampson:

Je dois me corriger. Le régime des sanctions pécuniaires prévoit en outre la possibilité d’imposer une amende deux fois plus élevée que le montant de la contribution illégale, donc au-delà de l’amende normale, qui ne peut dépasser 1 500 $. Mon collègue fait remarquer, et je m’en excuse, que dans le cas d’une contribution illégale, la Loi ne fixe pas le montant de l’amende.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous sommes prêts à voter là-dessus, je crois.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, vous avez l’air inquiet.

M. Chris Bittle:

J’ai toujours l'air inquiet.

Le président:

D’accord, je mets aux voix l’amendement CPC-170.1.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 350 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 351 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 352)

Le président: L'article 352 est un peu compliqué. Le vote sur le CPC-171 s’applique au CPC-185, à la page 344, et au CPC-193.1, à la page 363. De plus, si l’amendement CPC-171 est adopté, l’amendement CPC-173 ne peut être proposé puisqu’il modifie la même ligne.

Stephanie, voulez-vous présenter l’amendement CPC-171?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il maintient le commissaire aux élections fédérales au sein du Service des poursuites pénales du Canada.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections a été promulguée, on a vite trouvé gênant qu'elle dissocie le commissaire d’Élections Canada. Il est important de le remettre là où il doit être et où il a été pendant la plus grande partie de sa vie. Pour cette raison, je n’appuierai pas les amendements CPC-171 ou CPC-172.

Le président:

On sait ce que chacun en pense, me semble-t-il, alors on va passer au vote.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Excusez-moi, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais remercier M. de Burgh Graham de ne pas avoir parlé de « loi sur le manque d’intégrité des élections ». C’était gentil.

M. Scott Reid:

Il n’a pas eu à le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Stephanie, pour votre information personnelle, à l’époque, j’ai travaillé pour Scott Simms, qui était notre porte-parole en matière de réforme démocratique. C’était donc mon dossier également à l’époque.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D’accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Scott a toujours été assez juste. Je croyais qu’il y avait un autre député qui...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Que vous soyez d’accord ou non avec lui...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est du « Scott ».

M. Scott Reid:

Je n’irais pas aussi loin.

Le président:

D’accord, on passe au vote.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ne pourrait-on pas examiner le CPC-172 avec le CPC-171?

Le président:

Est-ce la même chose?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Essentiellement, oui, le CPC-172 porte sur le même sujet.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, il maintient le pouvoir du directeur des poursuites pénales d’intenter des poursuites.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, allez-y, présentez l’amendement CPC-172.

M. John Nater:

Bien sûr. J’aimerais simplement souligner que le changement que l'on renverse dans le projet de loi C-76 est modifié par cet amendement. En fait, il a été présenté pour la première fois en 2006 avec la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité, le projet de loi C-2 à l’époque, avec l’appui des différents partis. On annule ainsi une partie du bon travail qui a été fait dans la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité.

(1045)

Le président:

Le vote sur l’amendement CPC-172 s’applique à l’amendement CPC-174, à la page 333; à l’amendement CPC-176, à la page 335; au CPC-177, à la page 336; et au CPC-178, à la page 337. Ils sont liés par le concept de poursuites.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Monsieur le président, je voulais simplement répéter que cela limite les capacités du commissaire. Nous en avons entendu parler.

Est-ce que tous les amendements dont vous parliez seront touchés si celui-ci est adopté?

Le président:

Ils seront tous adoptés s’il est adopté, et ils seront tous rejetés s’il est rejeté.

L’amendement CPC-172 est mis aux voix.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Les amendements CPC-174, CPC-176, CPC-177 et CPC-178 sont également rejetés.

Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-173.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il est interdit au commissaire d’Élections Canada de consulter le directeur général des élections au sujet des enquêtes du directeur général des élections ou de son personnel.

Le président:

Qu'est-ce qui lui est interdit?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il interdit au commissaire d’Élections Canada de consulter le directeur général des élections au sujet des enquêtes du directeur général des élections ou de son personnel.

Le président:

Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle vous ne voulez pas qu’il obtienne toute l’information?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quelle était la dernière partie?

Êtes-vous en train de dire que, dans l’enquête sur eux-mêmes...? S’il y a une enquête sur le directeur général des élections, il ne peut communiquer en vertu de cette disposition.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Knight, qu’en pensez-vous?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quand votre patron fait l’objet d’une enquête, qu’en pensez-vous?

Si M. Knight fait l’objet d’une enquête...

M. Trevor Knight:

Je pourrais faire l’objet d’une enquête aussi bien que M. Morin, peut-être.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Êtes-vous en train de plaider la cinquième cause, monsieur?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Les commentaires concernant la présentation de la motion m'ont un peu embrouillé, simplement parce que je n'interprète pas la motion de cette façon. Elle dit: « à l’exception d’une enquête menée par le directeur général des élections ou un membre de son personnel ».

En fait, il s’agit d’une enquête qui serait menée par le directeur général des élections. Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre la motion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors, je pose la question aux conservateurs.

Pourquoi voudrait-on que le commissaire ne puisse pas parler au directeur général des élections lorsque celui-ci mène une enquête? C’est le libellé actuel de l’amendement qui le dit.

Le président:

Avez-vous consulté vos collègues derrière vous, monsieur Nater?

M. John Nater:

J’avais une question. Je laisserai mes collègues y répondre.

Je vais poser une question pendant que mon équipe consulte.

Le président:

Allez-y. Posez votre question.

M. John Nater:

Ma question s’adresse à M. Knight ou à M. Sampson.

Maintenant que le changement a placé les deux sous le même toit, quel type de « pare-feu chinois » serait mis en oeuvre au sein d’Élections Canada? Les gens changent constamment ces termes. Quels types de mesures de protection ou de murs, de barrières de protection, de barrières virtuelles, seraient en place si une telle enquête était prévue maintenant que les deux seront sous le même toit?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Avant que M. Knight et M. Sampson ne répondent, j’aimerais souligner que le directeur général des élections du Canada n’a pas de pouvoirs d’enquête en vertu de la loi actuelle. Il peut bien sûr mener des enquêtes internes de nature administrative, mais il n’a pas le pouvoir d’entreprendre une enquête de nature criminelle.

Comme nous l’avons souligné hier, la partie 18 de la Loi électorale du Canada permet au directeur général des élections d’effectuer des vérifications administratives, qui sont, encore une fois, des vérifications de nature administrative. Si le vérificateur trouve quelque chose qui justifie une enquête, on recommande le renvoi de ce cas au commissaire aux élections fédérales.

(1050)

Le président:

Je sens que M. Nater veut intervenir.

M. John Nater:

Oui, j’aimerais apporter une précision. Apparemment, il y avait une coquille dans l’amendement tel que présenté.

Je vais lire le sous-amendement. Je propose que l’amendement soit modifié par substitution des mots « enquête par » par les mots « enquête sur ». Le mot « par » a été inséré plutôt que « de ». On devrait lire « enquête sur le directeur général des élections ou un membre de son personnel ».C’est évidemment de là que vient la confusion.

Le président:

Je considère qu’il s’agit d’une erreur administrative.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai une autre question pour les fonctionnaires.

Le commissaire a-t-il même le pouvoir d’enquêter sur Élections Canada, par opposition aux candidats, aux partis et aux élections?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Certaines infractions pourraient être commises par des membres du Bureau du directeur général des élections et peut-être par le directeur général des élections lui-même.

Je vous rappelle que le directeur général des élections est maintenant la seule personne qui n’a pas le droit de voter, c'est le seul électeur qui n’a pas le droit de voter aux élections fédérales. En théorie, il pourrait y avoir une enquête si M. Perrault se présentait à un bureau de scrutin pour voter à une élection fédérale.

Sérieusement, oui, c’est possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si le commissaire enquête sur Élections Canada, ne serait-il pas logique qu’il parle à ses suspects?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Si le commissaire faisait enquête sur Élections Canada, il y aurait de bonnes pratiques d’enquête en place. J’imagine que l’enquête se poursuivrait et qu’à un moment approprié de l’enquête, une fois les preuves recueillies, oui, il y aurait un contact avec Élections Canada pour lui faire savoir qu’une enquête a été menée ou pour lui demander de fournir des renseignements supplémentaires. Cela relève des pratiques exemplaires dans le contexte d’une enquête criminelle.

Je vois que mon collègue Trevor a quelque chose à dire à ce sujet.

M. Trevor Knight:

J’aimerais revenir à la question de M. Nater.

Je suppose qu’il y a des séparations officielles en ce qui concerne les différents rôles. Le pouvoir discrétionnaire d’intenter des poursuites et de mener des enquêtes revient au commissaire, en tant que bureau, plutôt qu’au directeur général des élections. L’article 509.21 du projet de loi contient également de nouvelles exigences officielles concernant l’indépendance.

Il y a aussi — je pense qu’il faudrait l’ajouter, évidemment — une sorte d'entente, une séparation informelle des rôles qui est prise très au sérieux par le commissaire et par le directeur général des élections dans l’arrangement actuel. Le commissaire faisait partie d’Élections Canada auparavant, je le sais, et il est évident que le rôle de poursuite ou d’enquête est distinct du rôle d’Élections Canada en matière de vérification. Il y a cet élément.

Toutes ces choses deviendraient particulièrement importantes si le commissaire enquêtait sur un fonctionnaire électoral ou quelqu’un à Élections Canada, ce qui pourrait se produire, même si, espérons-le, ce ne serait pas le cas.

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à voter? Que tous ceux qui sont pour l’amendement CPC-173 lèvent la main?

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 352 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 353 à 356 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

(Article 357)

Le président: Il y a d’abord l'amendement LIB-60, qui est corrélatif à l’amendement LIB-38.

Il y a un nouvel amendement du PCC. C’est le 10009245.

Monsieur Nater, pourriez-vous présenter cet amendement?

(1055)

M. John Nater:

Le projet de loi C-76 permettrait d'exiger des témoignages sur des crimes qui risquent d'être commis à l’avenir. Nous préférons nous limiter au passé plutôt que d’envisager des actes qui pourraient se produire à l’avenir.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, cet amendement supprimerait essentiellement le libellé « — ou qu'il y aura — » du paragraphe 510.01(1) proposé.

Le président:

Avez-vous des commentaires sur la mise en oeuvre pratique de ce changement?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. Je pense que c’est une décision stratégique.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

J’ai une question pour les témoins. De quels pouvoirs de prévoyance et de prévisibilité dispose Élections Canada pour prévoir les actes qui pourraient se produire?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je le répète, il me semble que cela ne relève pas d’Élections Canada.

Je tiens à préciser qu'Élections Canada n’est pas un titre officiel. C'est l'appellation commerciale du Bureau du directeur général des élections, mais il n’y a que deux organismes publics en cause, le Bureau du directeur général des élections que dirige le directeur général des élections du Canada, et le Bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales, qui est l’organisme enquêteur.

Ce dont nous débattons relève du commissaire aux élections fédérales. Tout d’abord, ce pouvoir qui serait conféré au commissaire, l’ordonnance exigeant un témoignage ou une déclaration écrite, nécessite encore l’approbation d’un tribunal. Par conséquent, il n’appartient pas au commissaire lui-même de contraindre une personne à témoigner ou à produire une déclaration écrite. Il lui faudra toujours l’autorisation d’un juge.

Deuxièmement, les violations de la Loi électorale du Canada peuvent se prolonger dans le sens où la même infraction peut être commise sur une longue période, par exemple si les déclarations ne sont pas produites ou si l’entité ou le tiers qui commet l’infraction s'est engagé dans une voie qui amène le commissaire à penser qu’une infraction est sur le point d’être commise.

J’espère que cela répond à votre question.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres commentaires?

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Il me semble que si l'on signale au commissaire une éventuelle violation de la Loi électorale, il mènera enquête. Nous nous attendrions à ce que tout organisme enquêteur canadien le fasse, qu’il s’agisse de la GRC ou de forces policières locales.

Nous n’attendons pas nécessairement qu’une infraction soit commise. Nous veillons à ce que toutes les menaces... Nous avons de graves préoccupations et nous avons sérieusement discuté de ce qui pourrait nuire au processus démocratique et aux campagnes électorales. En cas de menace crédible avant une élection, si l'on décèle une grave déficience dans la Loi électorale, il sera tout à fait logique que le commissaire mène enquête.

Je ne comprends pas pourquoi on veut restreindre ce pouvoir. Cela ne me semble pas logique du tout.

Je vais m’arrêter ici.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(1100)

Le président:

Nous en sommes à l’amendement CPC 173.1.

Je vais suspendre la séance pendant environ cinq minutes pour vous laisser le temps d'aller aux toilettes, etc. Si vous prenez de la nourriture, veuillez l'amener à la table.

Nous allons faire une courte pause.



(1110)

Le président:

Je vous rappelle que nous en sommes à l’article 357, qui a été modifié jusqu’à présent par l’amendement LIB-60. L’amendement du PCC portant le numéro de référence 10009245 a été rejeté.

Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-173.1, que Stephanie va nous présenter.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Essentiellement, cet amendement accorde au juge un plus grand pouvoir discrétionnaire dans le cas des délibérations ex parte. On y mentionne trois situations auxquelles cela s’appliquerait. Nous savons à quel point le gouvernement compte sur les juges et sur le système judiciaire. Nous sommes donc sûrs qu’il appuiera cet amendement, puisqu'il accorde aux juges un plus grand pouvoir discrétionnaire dans ces trois situations.

Le président:

Les libéraux accepteront-ils cela?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous n'en étions pas tout à fait sûrs, Larry.

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous faisons confiance à la magistrature et au processus judiciaire. On peut contester les décisions relatives aux mesures administratives en demandant un contrôle judiciaire. Ce recours existe, et nous le trouvons suffisant.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres interventions?

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L’amendement CPC-173.2 est-il le même...?

M. John Nater:

Il s'agit d’élargir le pouvoir discrétionnaire des juges pour qu’ils puissent alléger fardeau indu des documents à fournir. Ce pouvoir reproduit celui dont jouit le Bureau de la concurrence, qui a des pouvoirs semblables à ceux du commissaire aux élections. Nous suggérons d'accorder ce pouvoir, notamment si l'on exigeait d'un membre de l’exécutif d’un organisme bénévole d’une circonscription de fournir un volume de documents qui pourrait être considéré comme indu ou très difficile à soumettre compte tenu des ressources limitées de l'organisme. Un juge pourrait donc, à sa discrétion, le dispenser de fournir ces documents.

Cette disposition est similaire à ce qui existe actuellement au Bureau de la concurrence. Le Comité pourrait peut-être l’appuyer.

Le président:

Le gouvernement a-t-il des commentaires?

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous sommes convaincus que ce pouvoir existe déjà.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous en sommes maintenant à l’amendement CPC-173.3.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet amendement prévoit que: Dans l'année qui suit la décision de mettre fin à l'enquête, de ne pas engager de poursuite ou de ne pas signifier de procès-verbal, le commissaire détruit ou fait détruire tout témoignage rendu ou toute déclaration écrite donnée conformément à I'ordonnance visée au paragraphe 510.01(1) à l'égard de l'enquête en cause.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

(1115)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai une question rapide pour les fonctionnaires. Quel est le délai de prescription pour ces infractions?

M. Jean-François Morin:

En fait, la Loi électorale du Canada ne prévoit plus de prescription pour ces infractions. Je pense que le régime de sanction administrative pécuniaire prévoit un délai de prescription, mais bien sûr, si ce délai est écoulé, le commissaire peut toujours faire référence à l’infraction elle-même.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-il normal de détruire des éléments de preuve avant l’expiration du délai de prescription?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je dirais que non, mais j'ajouterais qu’à titre d'organisme public fédéral, le commissaire aux élections fédérales doit obéir à la Loi sur la Bibliothèque et les Archives du Canada et se débarrasser de documents à la date d'expiration prévue dans cette loi. Il existe déjà des dispositions sur l'élimination de ces documents à la fin de leur vie.

Le président:

N’y avait-il pas auparavant un délai de prescription d'un an pour toutes les infractions?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Auparavant, la Loi électorale du Canada prévoyait différentes prescriptions, des délais ou des échéances. Elles ont été prolongées à quelques reprises. Je crois savoir qu’en 2014, on a éliminé tout cela.

Vous me corrigerez si je me trompe.

Le président:

Trevor.

M. Trevor Knight:

Malheureusement, je ne les connais pas de mémoire.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cet amendement me laisse vraiment perplexe. Il me semble que si l'on présente de nouveaux éléments de preuve, on voudra conserver ce témoignage aux fins de l'enquête.

Il semble que cela va à l'encontre de ce que les conservateurs disent vouloir accomplir.

Je m'y oppose complètement. Il ne me semble pas sage de détruire des preuves avant qu'il soit nécessaire de le faire.

M. John Nater:

J’aimerais poser une question à nos collègues d’Élections Canada. Que faites-vous à l'heure actuelle? Pendant combien de temps ces renseignements seraient-ils conservés à Élections Canada?

M. Trevor Knight:

Comme le Bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales est un organisme distinct et indépendant, il s’occuperait de la preuve et appliquerait des règles, comme Jean-François l’a dit, sur la durée de conservation des documents. Tous les organismes publics ont des ententes avec Bibliothèque et Archives Canada sur ce genre de choses.

Élections Canada conclut ces ententes pour tous les documents que nous préparons et que nous conservons après les élections. Nous avons un calendrier d'élimination des documents. Certains sont envoyés à Bibliothèque et Archives et d’autres sont détruits. J’imagine que le commissaire fait quelque chose de semblable. Je n'en connais pas les détails.

Le président:

Lorsqu'on les envoie à Bibliothèque et Archives, les documents demeurent-ils à la disposition du procureur ou du commissaire?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Selon la Loi sur la Bibliothèque et les Archives du Canada, chaque institution fédérale établit un calendrier de conservation pour chaque catégorie de documents.

Par exemple, une institution peut conserver ses dossiers actifs et garder des dossiers inactifs pendant un certain nombre d’années au sein de l’institution. À un moment donné, elle les élimine ou les envoie à Bibliothèque et Archives, où ils demeurent pendant plusieurs années.

C’est très complexe. Chaque catégorie de documents a sa propre période de conservation. Cela dépend vraiment du type de document, et cela varie d’une institution à l’autre.

(L’amendement est rejeté.)

(L’article 357 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 358)

Le président:

L’amendement CPC-174 est corrélatif à l’amendement CPC-172.

(1120)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous venons d’examiner l'article 353. Avons-nous revu l'article 354?

Le président:

Nous venons d’adopter l’article 357.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Désolée.

Nous voulions que l’article 353 soit adopté avec dissidence, 354 avec dissidence...

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Les articles 353, 354, 355 et 356 ont été adoptés avec dissidence.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Excusez-moi.

Nous en sommes donc à 357.

Le greffier:

L’article 357 a été adopté avec dissidence. Nous en sommes maintenant à l’article 358.

Le président:

Nous en sommes à l’article 358, et il y a deux amendements, le CPC-174 est rejeté en corrélation au CPC-172. Nous allons maintenant discuter de l’amendement CPC-175. Le vote sur le CPC-175, pendant que Stephanie se prépare, s’appliquera également au CPC-179 à la page 338, au CPC-180 à la page 339, au CPC-181 à la page 340, au CPC-182 à la page 341, au CPC-183 à la page 342 et au CPC-191 à la page 354, puisqu’ils traitent tous du directeur des poursuites pénales.

Stephanie, nous écoutons votre explication du CPC-175.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il transmet la responsabilité qu'a le commissaire d'examiner les sanctions administratives pécuniaires du directeur général des élections au directeur des poursuites pénales.

Le président:

Je crois que nous connaissons la position de nos collègues à ce sujet.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Juste pour vous donner un peu plus d’information, maintenant que nous replaçons le commissaire au sein du vaste complexe électoral — appelons-le ainsi, quel que soit le nom commercial que vous voulez lui donner —, nous pensons qu’il serait bon d'établir un processus d’examen externe pour les personnes qui demandent un examen. C’est pourquoi nous suggérons d'y affecter le directeur des poursuites pénales; ce serait logique du point de vue juridique.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien dit, monsieur Nater.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si la plainte vient d’un citoyen, vous voulez qu’on l'examine à l'extérieur et non à l'interne?

M. John Nater:

L’examen d’une sanction administrative pécuniaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quel processus actuel trouvez-vous insatisfaisant?

M. John Nater:

À l'heure actuelle, lorsqu'une personne a été accusée ou condamnée à une sanction administrative pécuniaire, c'est le DGE qui examine la décision. Maintenant que le commissaire et le DGE font partie d'une même entité, nous pensons qu’il faudrait confier cet examen à une entité de l'extérieur.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Même s’il s’agit de deux tâches distinctes...

M. John Nater:

Cela ne suffit pas. Nous voudrions un examen externe.

Le président:

Si quelqu’un accusait les libéraux d’une infraction électorale aux dernières élections, pensez-vous que le procureur général, qui supervise le procureur en chef et qui fait partie du gouvernement accusé, devrait lui-même trancher cette accusation?

N’est-ce pas une bonne question?

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’était une très bonne question.

M. John Nater:

En fait, cela me permet de souligner une fois de plus l’excellent remaniement de la Loi fédérale sur la responsabilité, qui donne au directeur des poursuites pénales plus d'indépendance face au procureur général du Canada. C’est une autre bonne raison de remercier l’ancien gouvernement.

Le président:

Je pense que c’est un bon préambule à un vote.

Nous allons voter sur l’amendement CPC-175, qui a des ramifications sur les amendements CPC-179, CPC-180, CPC-181, CPC-182, CPC-183 et CPC-191. Ce vote s’applique également à tous ces amendements.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Les amendements CPC-179, CPC-180, CPC-181, CPC-182, CPC-183 et CPC-191 sont également rejetés parce qu’ils traitent tous du directeur des poursuites pénales.

(L’article 358 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 359 est adopté.)

L’article 360 comportait un amendement, le CPC-176, qui était corrélatif au CPC-172 et qui a donc été rejeté.

(L’article 360 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 361 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 362 est adopté.)

(1125)

Le président:

L’article 363 comportait un amendement, le CPC-177, mais il a été rejeté par corrélation au CPC-172.

(L’article 363 est adopté avec dissidence.)

L’article 364 comportait un amendement, le CPC-178, mais il a été rejeté par corrélation au CPC-172.

(L’article 364 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Clause 365 has five amendments. The first one was CPC-179, which is defeated consequential to CPC-175. CPC-180 is defeated consequential to CPC-175. CPC-181 is defeated consequential to CPC-175. CPC-182 is defeated consequential to CPC-175. CPC-183 is defeated consequential to CPC-175.

(Clause 365 agreed to on division)

(Clause 366 agreed to)

Nous avons maintenant un nouvel article proposé, le 365.1. C’est l’un des nouveaux amendements proposés par le PCC, et son numéro de référence est le 10018294.

Voulez-vous le présenter, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr.

Comme le président l’a indiqué, il s’agit d’un nouvel article qui oblige notre comité à examiner les règles relatives aux dépenses préélectorales, aux tiers partis et à l’influence étrangère après les prochaines élections. De même, les évaluations du...

Excusez-moi. Je parle de l’amendement CPC-184. Je suis allée trop vite, monsieur le président.

Il faudrait un compte rendu spécial des résultats du vote des électeurs résidant à l'étranger.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me semble que nous avons déjà discuté de cela.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, j’ai l’impression que nous avons déjà eu cette conversation, mais...

Le président:

Avons-nous voté sur celui-ci?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Donnez-moi une minute pour voir s’il y a des points que j’aimerais encore souligner.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons voter maintenant ou plus tard, si vous le souhaitez.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il faut que je vérifie si je dois ajouter quelque chose au compte rendu.

Je crois que nous présentons cela à cause du nombre très élevé de nouveaux électeurs non résidents qui voteront, pour différentes raisons. Nous pensons qu’il est important d’effectuer un compte rendu particulier et distinct des votes par bulletins spéciaux.

C’est tout ce que j’ajouterai, mais il est vrai que nous avons longuement discuté de ce sujet hier, monsieur le président.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Le CPC-184 propose le nouvel article 366.1.

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Toutes mes excuses. C’est celui que je commençais à présenter tout à l'heure.

Il exige qu'après la prochaine élection, notre comité examine les règles relatives aux dépenses préélectorales, aux tiers partis et à l’influence étrangère, un peu comme on le fait en Ontario après une élection. Je pense que quoi qu'il arrive, il est bon d'effectuer une évaluation et de voir quelles leçons en tirer. J'ai travaillé dans la fonction publique pendant 15 ans, et je peux dire que c’est un élément fondamental du gouvernement canadien. Nous pensons qu'il faudrait aussi ajouter cela à ce projet de loi.

(1130)

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Après les élections, le directeur général des élections publie un beau long rapport, qui nous donne l’occasion de discuter au Comité de tout ce qu’il a constaté.

Je comprends où vous voulez en venir, mais nous le faisons de toute façon, alors je trouve cet amendement redondant.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mon observation est similaire. Je ne veux pas pousser trop loin, mais compte tenu de tous les changements que nous avons apportés à la disposition régissant les tiers — ce qui est, je crois, la principale préoccupation soulevée par Stephanie —, le DGE présenterait un rapport. Il m’est impossible d’imaginer que son rapport sur la prochaine élection ne présente pas, comme nous en avons parlé, les leçons apprises sur ces aspects en particulier. Je suis convaincu, compte tenu de la compétence dont Élections Canada a toujours fait preuve, que nous recevrons un bon rapport. Si je ne m'abuse, l'étude de ce rapport fait partie du mandat de ce comité.

Le président:

Nous allons entendre M. Nater, puis Mme Kusie.

M. John Nater:

J’ai cru bon de souligner que cette recommandation reflète une disposition semblable sur le financement politique que le gouvernement Chrétien a présentée en 2003 dans son projet de loi C-24. Nous reflétons le bon travail que M. Chrétien a entrepris en 2003.

Le président:

C’est un excellent argument.

M. John Nater:

Vous le dites en toute connaissance de cause, monsieur, puisque vous avez servi avec le premier ministre.

Le président:

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je voulais également dire, en utilisant l’exemple de la nouvelle formule possible pour les débats à la direction, que dans ce genre de situation, monsieur Cullen, nous n’avons pas toujours l’assurance, si ce n’est pas légiféré, de lancer un examen et d'améliorer les processus démocratiques. C’est précisément ce que prévoit ce projet de loi.

Le président:

Nous allons mettre aux voix le nouvel article 366.1, qui serait créé par l’amendement CPC-184.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

L’article 367 s'accompagnait de l'amendement CPC-185, qui a été rejeté en corrélation au CPC-171.

(L’article 367 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 368 et 369 sont adoptés.)

Nous aurons peut-être un nouvel article 369.1, que propose l’amendement CPC-186 que Stephanie va maintenant nous présenter.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet amendement porte sur le registre des futurs électeurs. Il vise à y appliquer les règles sur la conservation et sur la protection des documents ainsi que sur les éléments de preuve. Il est logique que ces règles s'appliquent au moins aux futurs électeurs. Comme je l’ai dit plus tôt, nous aimerions en général un resserrement de la loi dans le cas des mineurs, mais aux fins de cet amendement, il s’agit simplement de respecter les règles de conservation, de protection et de preuve qui se rapportent au registre des électeurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie pour cette excellente suggestion.

Le président:

Oh, c'était rapide.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Attendez un instant. Cela me rend tellement heureuse.

(1135)

Le président:

M. Cullen est encore indécis.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais voter avec dissidence, monsieur le président.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: Je plaisantais.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 370)

Le président:

Nous avons la proposition d’amendement CPC-187.

Allez-y, Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous voudrions éviter que les cartes de bingo ne deviennent des documents publics. Ces derniers jours, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de préoccupations relatives à la protection de la vie privée, et nous estimons que ces cartes devraient aussi être protégées et qu’elles ne deviennent pas des documents publics.

Le président:

Le gouvernement a-t-il des commentaires, ou peut-être les fonctionnaires si le gouvernement n’en a pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Tout d’abord, une observation très technique. Bien que la version anglaise de l’amendement semble protéger davantage les cartes de bingo, la version française semble faire le contraire, alors il y a...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y a un problème?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Deuxièmement, bien que les amendements précédents aient retiré les cartes de bingo de la définition des documents électoraux, sans la liste des électeurs utilisée le jour du scrutin, les cartes de bingo sont inutiles. Les cartes de bingo ne sont qu’une série de chiffres encerclés sur un bout de papier et, sans les documents connexes, ils ne fournissent absolument aucune information.

Le président:

Voyons comment ces choses vont se dérouler.

Je sais que si cet amendement était adopté, il faudrait l’amender pour que les versions française et anglaise correspondent, mais il ne me semble pas avoir beaucoup de potentiel, alors votons et voyons.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 370 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 371)

Le président: L’article 371 s'accompagne d'un amendement, le LIB-61, qui sera proposé par M. de Burgh Graham.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les cartes de bingo...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela concerne aussi les cartes de bingo. J’attends toujours que quelqu’un crie « Bingo! », et voilà, le problème serait réglé.

L’amendement prévoit deux distributions des cartes de bingo, l’une par le directeur du scrutin le lendemain du vote, et l’autre par le DGE après l’élection. Nous avons discuté de cette question hier.

La deuxième distribution prendrait la forme d’une déclaration finale des électeurs qui ont voté, préparée par Élections Canada et distribuée par voie électronique aux candidats et aux partis intéressés dans les six mois suivant l’élection. C’est lié à ce dont nous avons discuté.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ou plutôt, si ce projet de loi était adopté, est-ce qu'Élections Canada serait en mesure de faire cela en 2019?

M. Trevor Knight:

S'il n'est pas adopté, la loi exigera de toute façon que nous le fassions, c'est sûr.

Le président:

Le commissaire les recevra.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Trevor Knight:

Je crois comprendre qu’avant notre comparution, vous avez discuté de l’ajout d’un amendement qui exigerait que les directeurs du scrutin fournissent, sur demande, des cartes de bingo sur papier après l’élection.

Pour revenir à notre recommandation générale, auparavant, le jour du scrutin, on remettait chaque heure les cartes de bingo aux représentants. Ensuite après l’élection, le directeur du scrutin devait fournir des copies de toutes les cartes de bingo aux candidats et aux partis. Nous avons constaté que cela compliquait la tâche des directeurs du scrutin. Plusieurs d'entre eux étaient incapables de s'en acquitter. Nous proposons donc un processus semblable par lequel Élections Canada centraliserait cette tâche pour l'accomplir par la suite.

De façon générale, nous ne nous opposerions pas à ce que les directeurs du scrutin continuent à fournir les cartes de bingo papier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Essentiellement, il n’en existe pas de copies papier. Cette tâche serait centralisée à Élections Canada, qui établirait une liste globale. Les partis continueraient à recevoir leurs cartes de bingo chaque heure.

Techniquement, pourquoi était-ce si difficile? Il suffit qu'on les ramasse et que le directeur du scrutin les remette une seule fois. Pourquoi trouvez-vous cela si difficile?

(1140)

M. Robert Sampson:

C’est en partie une question de volume. Il s'agit d'à peu près 3 000 feuilles de papier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Combien?

M. Robert Sampson:

À peu près 3 000 feuilles par circonscription, peut-être un peu moins. Disons 12 feuilles par section de vote pour environ 200 sections de vote, soit 2 400 feuilles, ce qui revient à un peu moins de 800 000 feuilles de papier que l'on enverrait à Élections Canada après l’élection.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est ce qui se passe actuellement.

M. Robert Sampson:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cet amendement n'y changera rien, n’est-ce pas?

M. Robert Sampson:

Ces feuilles ne sont plus considérées comme des documents électoraux, alors elles ne seraient pas conservées de la même façon, mais pour les rendre disponibles, oui, elles reviendraient.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y aura un statu quo.

M. Robert Sampson:

C’est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est environ 800 000 pages à retourner à Élections Canada.

M. Robert Sampson:

Oui, plus ou moins.

M. Trevor Knight:

Notre observation ne porte pas sur cet amendement. Je crois que cet amendement reflète l’intention que nous avons toujours eue. Je veux simplement souligner que nous avons recommandé un processus de centralisation de la tâche à cause du fardeau qu'elle impose aux directeurs du scrutin. Ils doivent fermer les bureaux, ils ont des ressources très limitées et ils doivent conserver du personnel et d'autres ressources pour accomplir cette tâche.

Comme vous l'avez dit, il ne s’agit que de quelques milliers de feuilles de papier, mais il faut les rassembler, et souvent elles sont mal classées. Les directeurs du scrutin ont de la peine à accomplir tout cela dans les délais imposés, parce que leurs bureaux sont loués pour une période très limitée...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il leur faut aussi du temps pour clore toute l'élection.

M. Trevor Knight:

... et ensuite, ils n'ont plus de personnel. En fait, nous avons demandé de centraliser cette tâche à cause de ce fardeau qui leur est imposé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur Morin, vouliez-vous intervenir? D’accord.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Quelqu'un pourrait-il expliquer, en une seule phrase, en quoi consiste une carte de bingo, juste au cas où dans 20 ans, une personne lisait le compte rendu en pensant que nous parlons de bingo?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je peux l’expliquer, parce que j’ai été directeur des données pour une multitude de campagnes.

Le président:

David, vous avez une phrase.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Chaque bureau de scrutin a une liste d’électeurs inscrits, et un numéro est associé à chaque nom. La carte de bingo indique simplement le numéro du bureau de scrutin et le numéro de l’électeur qui a voté pendant l’heure précédente. C’est une grosse feuille qui contient environ 500 chiffres.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons voter sur l’amendement LIB-61.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 371 modifié est adopté.)

(Article 372)

Le président: L’article 372 s'accompagne de six amendements. Le premier est le CPC-188.

Voulez-vous le présenter, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Essentiellement, l’amendement se lit comme suit: (5) Le fait qu'une personne ajoute des mots, dit des mots, utilise des formulaires ou pose des gestes normalement associés à la prestation de serment lorsqu'elle fait une déclaration solennelle en application de la présente loi ne rend pas celle-ci invalide, nulle ou annulable.

Cette déclaration solennelle n’est pas annulée à cause d'expressions ou de gestes qui sont typiques d'un serment.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si je comprends bien, selon ce libellé, si quelqu’un fait serment, mais qu’il le gâche complètement et qu’il jure de donner tout ce qu’il a appris à qui le lui demande, cela n’invaliderait pas le serment, parce qu’il n’a pas... Est-ce exact?

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais vous expliquer.

Mes collègues se demandent peut-être pourquoi j’ai été si silencieux jusqu’à présent. C’est surtout parce que je voulais écouter vos sages paroles...

Le président:

Vous avez conservé votre sagesse pour cet amendement.

(1145)

M. Scott Reid:

La principale raison, c’est que j’ai conservé ma sagesse pour celui-ci.

Il arrive qu'en prêtant serment, les gens ajoutent des choses ou en suppriment quelques-unes ou les modifient, parfois à cause de leurs croyances religieuses ou de leur rejet de croyances religieuses. Le serment lui-même demeure tout à fait valide et exécutoire.

Le serment que nous avons tous prêté en devenant députés en est un excellent exemple. Certaines personnes y ont ajouté des choses, dans le passé. Je me souviens que quand j’ai été élu pour la première fois, bon nombre d’entre nous venant de l’Alliance canadienne ne nous sommes pas contentés de prêter allégeance à la Reine, mais aussi à la Constitution et au peuple canadien. Ce n'était pas du tout pertinent du point de vue de la légalité du serment, mais pour nous, c'était important.

Dans cet esprit, et aussi dans l’esprit de la liberté religieuse, de l’ouverture et de l’acceptation, qui est bien sûr un esprit motivant du Canada moderne, le but de ce libellé est de veiller à ce qu’une déclaration solennelle — c’est-à-dire un serment — demeure valide même si les gens y ajoutent des mots ou des gestes qui leur semblent importants, mais qui ne font pas partie du libellé de la déclaration solennelle officielle.

Pour répondre à la question de M. Graham, je pense que si j’ajoutais quelque chose comme: « Je vais maintenant semer la pagaille dans le système, alors ne tenez pas compte de ce que je dis », cela ne compterait pas. La personne reste sous serment.

Il est plus probable qu’une personne fasse une déclaration solennelle et ressente le besoin, en fonction de ses croyances religieuses profondes, d’ajouter quelque chose indiquant à quel point elle prend cette déclaration au sérieux.

Le président:

Et si la personne ne prononce pas tout le libellé du serment, est-ce que ce serment demeurerait valide?

M. Scott Reid:

Si elle ne dit absolument rien?

Le président:

Non, si elle dit moins que... si elle oublie certains mots par inadvertance.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense que oui, si vous parlez d'une personne un peu malentendante ou qui ne sait pas lire, elle risque de s'embrouiller un peu.

Nous avons un serment de citoyenneté. J’ai assisté à une cérémonie au Musée des civilisations, comme on le faisait à l’époque, et le juge m’a dit qu’il ne prononçait que deux mots à la fois. Il a commencé par dire « Je jure », et tout le monde a répété « Je jure », et ainsi de suite. Il m'a expliqué que beaucoup de gens ne parlent pas très bien l’une ou l’autre des langues officielles et qu’ils risquent de s'embrouiller. Cela n’a pas de sens juridique, mais les juges veulent bien faire les choses. Ils font de leur mieux.

Ce juge a beaucoup d’expérience. Il a l’habitude de faire cela. Certains de nos gens qui administrent les élections n'ont souvent pas autant d'expérience. On pourrait se heurter à un problème de ce genre. Le serment est quand même considéré comme étant correct et complet.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends où vous voulez en venir, mais j’aimerais demander aux témoins de nous expliquer ce qui serait acceptable et ce qui ne le serait pas.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je vous remercie d'avoir posé cette question.

Avec votre permission, j’aimerais demander des précisions à M. Reid ou à Mme Kusie avant d'y répondre.

À la quatrième ligne de la version anglaise, on lit « or used forms or mannerisms normally associated with an oath ». Par « forms », parlez-vous d’un formulaire papier ou d’une façon de s’exprimer, par exemple?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C’est une façon de s'exprimer.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, cela ne désigne pas littéralement un formulaire comme sur une feuille, mais une forme, par exemple. Si vous regardez la version française, vous verrez qu’elle nous donne...

M. Jean-François Morin:

C’est ma question, parce qu’en français, le mot « formulaire » indique vraiment un formulaire papier. Si vous parlez d’une façon de s’exprimer, je recommanderais de remplacer « formulaires » par « formules ».

M. Scott Reid:

C’est très juste.

Je suppose qu'avant de voter sur cet amendement, personne ne s’oppose à reconnaître que le français fait référence à des « formules » et non à des « formulaires ».

Le président:

Je pense que cela ne dérangera personne.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En ce qui concerne les observations sur la motion, d’après ce que je comprends, maintenant que nous avons remplacé le mot « serment » par « déclaration solennelle », nous ne parlons plus de convictions religieuses, et ce terme est plus neutre du point de vue de la « liberté de la foi ». Si je comprends bien cette motion, si quelqu’un ajoutait « avec l'aide de Dieu » à une déclaration solennelle, cela n’invaliderait pas sa déclaration solennelle.

C’est ainsi que je comprends cette motion.

(1150)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si la personne ajoute quelque chose qui n’a aucun rapport avec le serment, qui n’est pas pertinent ou qui le contredit, le serment serait-il invalidé?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il est bien évident qu'une expression qui contredirait le serment serait inadmissible. Cependant comme je l’ai dit, si la personne ajoute une formule que l'on prononce souvent à la fin d’un serment, comme « avec l'aide de Dieu » ou toute autre formule type d’une autre confession religieuse, cela n'invaliderait pas sa déclaration solennelle.

M. Scott Reid:

David, pour soulager votre préoccupation, on lit ici « utilise des formules ou pose des gestes normalement associés à la prestation de serment », comme « avec l'aide de Dieu ». Des paroles comme « Je vais faire le contraire de tout ce que je viens de dire, ha ha ha » ne comptent pas et ne sont normalement pas associées à la prestation d'un serment.

Le président:

Êtes-vous prêt à voter? On demande un vote par appel nominal.

(L’amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-189 a été retiré.

L’amendement CPC-190 ne peut pas être proposé parce que l’amendement LIB-62 a été adopté et qu’il est corrélatif à l’amendement LIB-1.

Nous avons le NDP-26.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est la question des circonscriptions électorales.

Nous en avons déjà discuté. Je ne sais pas bien quelles conséquences les conversations que nous venons de tenir pourraient avoir sur l’amendement NDP-26, alors je vais vous laisser y réfléchir pendant un instant.

Le président:

Oui, je vais vérifier. Il me semble qu’il a déjà été rejeté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je retiendrai mon souffle jusqu’à ce que vous trouviez la réponse.

M. John Nater:

J’invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. N’a-t-il pas déjà été adopté avec l’amendement NDP-8?

Le président:

L’amendement NDP-8 a été adopté, mais nous ne faisons que vérifier.

Il était relié à l’amendement NDP-8, mais dans ce dernier, nous avons remplacé les mots « circonscription électorale » par « bureau de scrutin », de sorte que nous avons retiré l’effet corrélatif, parce que l'on ne peut pas vivre dans un bureau de scrutin. Par conséquent, nous pouvons discuter de cet amendement maintenant parce que nous en avons retiré la corrélation.

Voulez-vous présenter l’objectif de cet amendement?

(1155)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais d'abord m'adresser à nos fonctionnaires. Le libellé concerne le recours à un répondant, si je comprends bien ce qui a été proposé. Il s’agit de la capacité de répondre de quelqu'un qui vit dans la même circonscription électorale.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, ce ne serait pas dans la même circonscription électorale, mais dans l’une des sections de vote associées au bureau de scrutin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Une des sections de vote dans la même circonscription électorale.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Qui était associée au même bureau de scrutin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact. Nous revenons au regroupement?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il n'y a là rien de nouveau, mais la nouvelle introduction le permettrait. Nous sommes installés dans le gymnase, et il y a plusieurs... nous ne l'avons pas appelé un « bureau de scrutin ». Rappelez-moi la terminologie.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Auparavant, on appelait cela un bureau de scrutin, mais maintenant, on parle de bureau de vote.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela permettrait à une personne qui vit dans une section différente, mais qui se trouve dans le même bureau de vote, de se porter garante de quelqu’un d’autre.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pour préciser, la règle prévoyait que l'on ne pouvait répondre d’une personne que si l'on était inscrit à la liste électorale de la même section de vote. Mais l’amendement proposé a été modifié de façon à ce que l'on ne puisse répondre d’une personne que si l'on est inscrit à la liste électorale du même bureau de vote et si le bureau de vote regroupe une ou plusieurs sections de vote.

Maintenant, il faudrait préciser dans cet amendement que la personne doit résider habituellement dans une section de vote associée au bureau de vote.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je le répète, dans ce cas, les électeurs votent de cette nouvelle façon, qui ressemble toutefois à l'ancienne. Si quelqu’un se présente en demandant, comme on peut le faire actuellement, de répondre d'un de ses voisins, si ces deux personnes ne sont pas inscrites dans la même section de vote, le recours à un répondant n’est pas valide. Est-ce exact?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement.

(1200)

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est insensé.

M. Jean-François Morin:

La frontière entre les sections de vote peut se trouver au milieu d'une rue, et vous pourriez très bien essayer de répondre de la personne qui habite devant chez vous, mais si vous n’êtes pas dans la même...

M. Nathan Cullen:

La situation que nous envisageons est celle de deux citoyens qui vont voter et dont l’un cherche à répondre de l’autre. Ils vivent littéralement de chaque côté de la rue et, selon le libellé actuel du projet de loi C-76, un ne peut pas répondre d'un autre qui ne se trouve pas dans la même section de vote.

M. Jean-François Morin:

L’une de vos motions, qui a été modifiée pour ajouter « bureau de scrutin », permettrait maintenant à une personne d’avoir un répondant qui figure sur la liste du même bureau de scrutin. Cela dit, il y a deux autres séries de dispositions qui limiteraient cette mesure, de sorte qu'il s'ensuit une incohérence dans la loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En effet.

M. Jean-François Morin:

L’une se trouve dans la nouvelle partie 11.1 de la Loi, qui traite des interdictions relatives au vote. Cette disposition a déjà été adoptée, et il faudra donc la corriger.

Nous en sommes maintenant à la disposition concernant les déclarations solennelles, et l’une des déclarations que le répondant doit faire est que l’électeur dont il répond réside effectivement dans la même section de vote. C’est là qu’il faudrait changer...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Compte tenu de ce qui a déjà été adopté, il y a deux incohérences dans la Loi, et peut-être que, à l'étape du rapport, il faudra...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Probablement à l'étape du rapport... Je ne peux pas prédire ce qui se passera au Parlement.

La deuxième incohérence est celle dont nous parlons maintenant, celle qui se trouve à l’alinéa 549.1(2)a) proposé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est ce que vise l’amendement NDP-26.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il corrige une incohérence dans la Loi.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si nous avons déjà accepté ce principe, cette question entre les sections et les bureaux...

Le président:

Il faudrait remplacer par « section de vote ». C'est bien cela ou est-ce « bureau de scrutin »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans chaque bureau de scrutin de la section de vote...

Je ne sais pas comment il faudrait le dire, mais il faut être cohérent.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement. En droit électoral, dans la pratique, une section de vote est une zone géographique. Un bureau de scrutin est un endroit précis. On ne peut pas résider dans un bureau de scrutin. Il faut donc modifier un peu le libellé pour renvoyer à la zone géographique proprement dite.

Le président:

Ce sont les sections de vote qui font partie de ce bureau de scrutin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ma question est donc la suivante: si le libellé est modifié, l’autre électeur réside dans la section de vote. Est-ce que cela répond aux préoccupations de ceux qui « ne vivent pas dans le bureau de scrutin »?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il faudrait dire « l’autre électeur réside dans une section de vote associée au bureau de scrutin ». Mais une autre motion libérale concernant le recours à un répondant dans les établissements de soins de longue durée a déjà modifié cette ligne.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avec un libellé semblable...?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Le libellé était légèrement différent compte tenu du mécanisme spécial prévu pour les établissements de soins de longue durée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je veux que le libellé soit clair. Dans ce cas, nous sommes peut-être en train de discuter d’un sous-amendement.

Le président:

Vous ne pouvez pas modifier votre propre motion, mais vous pouvez demander à quelqu’un de proposer ce sous-amendement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je vais faire.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, d’accord, le sous-amendement est que l’électeur réside dans une section de vote de ce bureau de scrutin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Associée à ce bureau de scrutin...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur le président, mon collègue Trevor aimerait dire quelque chose.

M. Trevor Knight:

À l’article 120, on parle d’une section de vote « rattachée » au bureau de scrutin.

Le président:

D’accord, on parlera donc d'une personne qui réside dans une section de vote assignée à ce bureau de scrutin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est bien cela.

Le président:

Voilà le sous-amendement.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je suis en train de revoir les bleus de la séance au cours de laquelle nous avons examiné l’amendement NDP-8, et, à ce moment-là, le président a dit ceci: Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement NDP-8. À titre d’information, l’amendement NDP-8 s’applique également à l’amendement NDP-9, à la page 67, à l’amendement NDP-11, à la page 78, à l’amendement NDP-16, à la page 114, et à l’amendement NDP-26, à la page 352. C’est pour remplacer...

Je me demande simplement en vertu de quelle disposition nous pouvons le faire maintenant.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est parce que nous avons modifié l’amendement NDP-8.

(1205)

Le président:

Oui. Plus tard, nous avons dit que nous les remettrions à l’ordre du jour, ce qui est maintenant, pour discussion, pour cette raison.

(Le sous-amendement est adopté.)

(L’amendement modifié est adopté.)

Je vais demander au greffier de lire le sous-amendement, pour être sûr que tout le monde sait ce que nous venons d’approuver.

M. Philippe Méla (greffier législatif):

Je lis l’amendement dans sa forme actuelle. Que le projet de loi C-76, à l’article 372, soit modifié par substitution, à la ligne 6, page 229, de ce qui suit: a) l’autre électeur réside dans une section de vote assignée au bureau de scrutin.

Le président:

C'est adopté.

Il y avait aussi un amendement libéral, le LIB-63, qui était corrélatif au LIB-9.

(L’article 372 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 373 est adopté.)

L’article 374 avait un amendement, le CPC-191, mais il a été rejeté en conséquence du CPC-175.

(L’article 374 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 375 est adopté.)

(Article 376)

Le président: Nous en sommes maintenant à l’article 376. Il y a l’amendement CPC-192. Qui va le présenter?

M. John Nater:

Je vais le faire, puis je présenterai un sous-amendement pour le clarifier en fonction de l’entrée en vigueur d’un projet de loi dont le Sénat est actuellement saisi.

Le sous-amendement du PCC propose que l’amendement CPC-192 soit modifié par a) remplacement des mots « remplaçant les lignes 1 à » par les mots « ajoutant après la ligne »; b) remplacement des mots « 376 À l'annexe » par les mots « (2) À l'annexe »; c) suppression de tous les mots après les mots « Cold Lake ».

Je vais le distribuer pour que ce soit clair. Il faut tenir compte du fait que Bill...

Oh, désolé. Allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'il n'y a pas déjà un processus pour changer le nom des circonscriptions? J’essaie d’obtenir des éclaircissements à ce sujet.

M. John Nater:

C’est ce qui est visé. C’est pour cette raison que le sous-amendement est présenté.

Tout d’abord, il s’agit d’une coordination avec l’amendement CPC-199, qui le rend conforme au projet de loi C-402.

Ce sont les deux seules circonscriptions de cette annexe dont le nom serait changé en raison du projet de loi C-402. Les diverses annexes énumèrent les diverses circonscriptions qui peuvent être touchées, en fonction de la taille et de la géographie. Ces deux noms de circonscription doivent être modifiés en fonction de ce qui se trouve actuellement dans cette annexe.

Le projet de loi C-402 changera les noms des circonscriptions. Ce projet de loi ne tient pas compte de ce changement pour l'instant. Nous devons apporter une modification à cet égard, si c’est logique.

(1210)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, pas du tout.

Est-ce que l'autre changement a déjà été adopté?

M. John Nater:

Il est actuellement devant le Sénat; il sera donc adopté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous ne pouvons donc pas changer ceci avant cela.

M. John Nater:

C’est la raison d’être du sous-amendement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que les fonctionnaires, qui semblent aussi perplexes que moi, ont des commentaires à faire?

M. John Nater:

L’amendement CPC-199 prévoit ainsi la coordination avec le projet de loi C-402. Il corrige l’annexe de cette loi.

Mais je suis heureux que les fonctionnaires aient un mot à dire.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Juste pour confirmer, monsieur Nater, que cette motion aurait pour effet de revenir au statu quo...?

M. John Nater:

Non, il s’agirait de changer les noms des circonscriptions électorales. L’amendement CPC-199 est conditionnel à ce que le projet de loi C-402 reçoive la sanction royale et apporte officiellement ces changements de nom.

M. Trevor Knight:

Si j’ai bien compris, l’annexe 3 serait mise à jour, si le projet de loi C-402 est adopté, à la première dissolution du Parlement après l’adoption du projet de loi C-402, pour tenir compte des noms qui y figurent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que cela ne devrait pas faire partie du processus du projet de loi C-402 au Sénat plutôt qu’ici?

M. John Nater:

Vous voulez dire que cela devrait se faire avec le projet de loi C-402?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si le Sénat est actuellement saisi du projet de loi C-402, est-ce que ce n'est pas là que le changement devrait se faire? C’est bien étrange, et je ne comprends pas.

M. John Nater:

Ce n'est pas moi qui ai présenté le projet de loi C-402. C’était M. Rodriguez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est juste.

M. John Nater:

Mais je crois que le train a quitté la gare. C’est déjà au Sénat. Nous n’aurons pas l’occasion d’y revenir.

À titre d’exemple, « Western Arctic » a été modifié dans l’ancien projet de loi sur le changement de nom en 2014 et n’a jamais été modifié dans celui-ci. C’est la raison pour laquelle ce n’est pas inclus dans les deux premiers, mais il faut quand même le changer.

M. Trevor Knight:

Pour vous donner une idée de la façon dont nous interprétons l’annexe 3 — parce que l’annexe 3 ne peut être modifiée que par une loi —, elle fixe les circonscriptions, en précisant qu’il faut désormais obtenir 50 signatures d’électeurs au lieu de 100.

Si un nom est modifié par une loi du Parlement, mais que l’annexe 3 n’est pas mise à jour, nous nous contentons de lire l’annexe 3 en utilisant le nouveau nom. Pour rassurer les gens, même si le nom figurant à l’annexe 3 n’est pas le nom actuel mis à jour, nous le lirons quand même comme s’il l’était.

Le président:

Que le projet de loi soit adopté ou non, c’est vrai, mais, s’il est adopté, ce serait mieux.

M. Trevor Knight:

Ce serait certainement plus clair. Mais oui, nous continuerions de lire les circonscriptions comme si elles avaient le nom au décret de représentation de 2013.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que cela relève de la responsabilité du commissaire à l’égard des crimes qui n’ont pas encore été commis?

Le président:

Est-ce que tout le monde comprend? Par souci de clarté, nous ne faisons que changer des noms électoraux qui ont déjà été modifiés.

Il y a un sous-amendement à l’amendement CPC-192. C’est le CPC-192-A. Quelqu’un d’autre que M. Nater doit le proposer.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que M. Reid est impatient de le faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Qu’est-ce que j’ai hâte de faire?

Le président:

C’est un sous-amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

Bon sang, j'ai tellement hâte.

Êtes-vous prêt? Puis-je le lire?

Le président:

Oui, s'il vous plaît.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Que l’amendement CPC-192 soit modifié par a) remplacement des mots « remplaçant les lignes 1 à » par les mots « ajoutant après la ligne »;b) remplacement des mots « 376 À l'annexe » par les mots « (2) À l'annexe »; c) suppression de tous les mots après les mots « Cold Lake ».

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté.)

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 376 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 377)

Le président:

L’article 377 comporte un nouvel amendement proposé par le PCC. C’est l’un des nouveaux. Nous discutons du numéro de référence 10008651.

Stephanie, pourriez-vous présenter cet amendement?

(1215)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je rappelle qu'il s’agit de la nouvelle relation entre le bureau de scrutin et les sections de vote. Cela nous permet de déterminer la section de vote applicable au moment de compter les bulletins de vote et de rendre compte des résultats pendant le dépouillement judiciaire. Comme plusieurs de nos amendements précédents, nous... Il est certain que nous avons confiance dans les compétences d’Élections Canada. J'ai été fonctionnaire pendant 15 ans, et je sais que, dans la fonction publique, vous êtes vraiment parmi les meilleurs et les plus brillants.

Nous aimerions simplement clarifier le plus possible les procédures relatives à ces nouvelles méthodes, simplement pour garantir la légitimité de notre processus électoral. Et c’est ce que fait cet amendement, à notre avis.

Le président:

Est-ce qu'il y a des commentaires de la part des députés du gouvernement?

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Cet amendement vise à légiférer le processus de dépouillement de certains bulletins de vote, et il n’est pas nécessaire.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 377 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

Il y a une nouvelle disposition, l'article 377.1 qui est proposé par l’amendement NDP-27.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est un bon amendement.

Le président:

Vraiment?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, parce que je sais...

Le président:

Que le prochain ne le sera pas...?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ne me déprimez pas, monsieur le président. Je me suis senti bien pendant un instant.

Comme mes collègues libéraux l’ont dit tout à l'heure... j’aime étudier les choses, les examiner attentivement avant que nous risquions d'agir avec imprudence. Cette disposition prévoit que le directeur général des élections fasse des recommandations, après étude et consultation, sur l’abaissement de l’âge du droit de vote à 17 ans. La raison pour laquelle nous pensons que c’est une bonne idée, c’est qu’un certain nombre de mesures ont été tentées dans les parlements pour abaisser encore plus l’âge du droit de vote, à 16 ans. Dix-sept ans, c’est l’âge auquel une personne peut être enrôlée au Canada. Si on estime que des jeunes de 17 ans peuvent assumer certaines responsabilités, dont tenir une arme à feu et la pointer sur quelqu’un, on doit donc estimer également, par association, qu’ils ont la capacité de voter librement et équitablement.

Par ailleurs — et nous en parlons, tous les partis le font, au Parlement —, il y a les nombreuses décisions que nous prenons, dont la portée dépasse largement nos petites personnes. Elles touchent les générations à venir.

J’ai déjà présenté des projets de loi. Je crois que le premier projet de loi que j’ai appuyé a été présenté par un libéral. Il avait l’appui d’une conservatrice de l’époque, Mme Stronach, d’un bloquiste et de moi-même. C’est peut-être difficile à imaginer ces jours-ci, monsieur le président, mais nous avons parcouru le pays et tenu des assemblées publiques simplement pour parler de l’abaissement de l’âge du droit de vote.

J’ai une petite réflexion à ce sujet. Nous étions à Edmonton, je crois, et un grand nombre d’écoles secondaires participaient à un grand forum. Une jeune femme est venue au micro et a dit: « Je pense que c’est une très mauvaise idée. » Elle avait 16 ans. Nous avons demandé: « D’accord, dites-nous pourquoi. » Elle a dit: « Si je votais aux prochaines élections, je devrais examiner tous les candidats, étudier leur programme et comprendre ce que chacun de ces programmes signifierait pour moi, et c’est beaucoup de pression. Je n’en veux pas. » C’était une révélation fascinante, parce que c’est exactement le genre d'électeur qu'on veut. Comme nous le savons, la plupart des électeurs ne se présentent pas au bureau de scrutin en tenant compte du dixième de cette façon de comprendre leur décision.

À notre époque, certaines personnes — habituellement les générations plus âgées — sont désespérées pour les générations à venir. J’ai pourtant l’impression que c'est certainement la génération la plus informée et la plus branchée de l’histoire. Leur capacité de s’intéresser à des enjeux dépasse ce qu’elle était pour vous et moi à 16 ou 17 ans. Ils peuvent créer des liens avec leurs collectivités et comprendre les lois qui sont adoptées ou proposées.

Je pense que c’est une mesure très provisoire. Cela ne veut pas dire que nous allons le faire, mais simplement qu’Élections Canada sera en mesure de recueillir des données sur les répercussions. Le taux de participation électorale serait-il plus élevé? Quelles seraient les conséquences que nous ne prévoyons pas à d'autres égards? Nous pourrions simplement faire preuve de prudence.

Nous avons, bien sûr, entendu les témoignages des représentants des Héritières du suffrage, de la Fédération canadienne des étudiants, de l’Alliance canadienne des associations étudiantes, etc., qui nous ont dit que la motivation des jeunes électeurs augmenterait considérablement s’ils étaient en mesure de participer au vote.

La dernière chose que je dirais, c’est que, d’après toutes les recherches qui ont été faites par Élections Canada et d’autres organismes électoraux, nous savons que, si un électeur participe à une élection à la première occasion, les chances qu'il vote aux élections suivantes augmentent de façon spectaculaire. La raison pour laquelle l'âge de 17 ans est important, c’est, évidemment, que la plupart des jeunes de 17 ans et ceux qui approchent de cet âge sont encore à l’école. Une fois qu’ils ont atteint l’âge de 18 ans — et la plupart des gens ne votent pas à 18 ans, mais seulement aux prochaines élections —, ils sortent de l’école secondaire. Ils sont peut-être dans une autre forme d’éducation, mais ils sont souvent sur le marché du travail et ailleurs. Quelle belle occasion d’apprendre que d'avoir 16 ou 17 ans, avec une élection à l’horizon et qu'une partie de votre éducation consiste à vous préparer, vous et vos camarades de classe, à voter à cette élection.

Les chances que les gens votent seraient beaucoup plus élevées. On peut imaginer que des bureaux de vote seraient installés dans ces écoles secondaires ou à proximité. Ce sont les avantages de voter à 17 ans, mais c'est une question que nous aimerions confier à Élections Canada. Cela permettra-t-il de faire augmenter la participation? Cela permettra-t-il de favoriser une participation durable au processus démocratique? J’espère qu’aucun d’entre nous ne s’y oppose.

(1220)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour être clair, je ne pense pas que cet amendement vise à abaisser l’âge, qui est, je crois, votre but en fin de compte. Votre objectif ultime est d’abaisser l’âge du droit de vote...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il n’abaisse pas l’âge du droit de vote.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... et c'est un objectif louable que j’appuierais personnellement, l’abaissement de l’âge.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cette motion exige que le DGE nous fasse une recommandation stratégique, par le biais de son site Web, ainsi qu'au Président , ce qui semble vraiment étrange. Ils nous font toutes sortes de recommandations sur la façon dont les élections se sont déroulées, etc., mais ils nous disent: « Voici ce que nous croyons que vous devriez faire sur une question de politique », pas une question de procédure. Je pense que cela dépasse la portée de ce que nous demanderions normalement à Élections Canada. Corrigez-moi si je me trompe.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous l’avons fait six fois aujourd’hui. Nous le faisons tout le temps. Lorsque le directeur général des élections vient nous voir, comme l’ont fait récemment le nouveau et le précédent, nous lui demandons des conseils stratégiques. Oui, vraiment. Nous posons des questions sur les causes et les effets, sur les conséquences pour les répondants et d’autres enjeux. Nous nous sommes toujours fiés à ces conseils, surtout parce qu’Élections Canada a des fonctions essentielles, dont la tenue d’élections libres et équitables. Dans les conseils que nous avons reçus sur les politiques, je n’ai jamais vu la moindre trace de partisanerie ni la recherche d’un avantage quelconque. Élections Canada fait simplement ce qu’elle a très bien fait par le passé, c’est-à-dire mener des élections de façon équitable.

Il s’agit de recueillir des données d’une source non partisane qui est, selon moi, la mieux placée pour examiner la question et qui connaît les experts en matière d’élections. Je pourrais poser des questions au sujet des effets sur les élections, à savoir si les experts appuient la politique visant à abaisser l’âge de voter ou si nous avons suffisamment de preuves pour surmonter la résistance d’un vaste secteur de la population canadienne. Comme vous le savez, un grand nombre de nos électeurs ne pensaient pas que c’était une bonne idée, contrairement à nous.

Cette relation n'oblige en rien le Comité ou Élections Canada à s'en tenir à une doctrine politique. Il s’agit simplement de lui recommander de faire un sondage sur les effets, positifs et négatifs, et de faire rapport au Parlement, car je crois que cette information peut lui être utile. S'il y en a parmi vous qui avez eu l'occasion de parler de politique dans une école secondaire, je suis sûr que vous avez rencontré un groupe de gens très engagés. Je parie que ces élèves sont plus engagés qu’un groupe d'une trentaine de Canadiens moyens que vous interrogeriez sur les politiques que nous appliquons constamment. Ils étudient, et c’est ce qu’ils sont censés faire. Je pense que c’est valable.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(1225)

Le président:

L’amendement NDP-28 est irrecevable parce qu’il dépasse la portée du projet de loi, où il n'est pas question de rapport.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suppose que si les promesses faites par les politiciens étaient toutes irrecevables, il n’y aurait pas grand-chose que nous pourrions faire par voie législative.

Un conseiller très important du premier ministre, Gerald Butts, m’a dit un jour que personne ne se souciait de cette question. Or, je crois qu’il a été démontré qu’un grand nombre de personnes se soucient de la réforme électorale. L’espoir ne meurt jamais. Le nouveau gouvernement du Québec vient de nous dire, je crois, qu’il envisage de présenter un projet de loi d’ici un an. La Colombie-Britannique votera dans une semaine environ, et l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard votera bientôt aussi. Selon un ami proche du premier ministre, cette question était censée disparaître, mais pour une fois, il se trompe. Nous essayons simplement de revenir aux promesses faites pour voir si elles peuvent être tenues.

Je n’apprécie pas votre décision, mais je la respecte pleinement.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous présenter l’amendement NDP-29 pour que je puisse rendre une décision?

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est comme une dernière cigarette avant de se faire fusiller par un peloton d’exécution.

C’est une question délicate pour nous parce que, comme beaucoup d’entre nous l’ont entendu récemment de la bouche du ministre, l’idée d’un commissaire chargé des débats n'est pas nouvelle. Au début, on l’avait promis dans un projet de loi, ce que j’ai beaucoup apprécié parce que cela aurait permis au Parlement d’en débattre et à un comité comme celui-ci de l’étudier et d’y apporter des améliorations. D’après mon expérience, ce qui émane du Cabinet du premier ministre n’est pas toujours parfait. Les retards ne cessent de se multiplier, ce qui est au moins la même chose pour ce ministère. Les choses se font lentement. Il s’agissait d’une tentative de faire intervenir la commission chargée des débats dans ce processus afin d'avoir un sujet de discussion en qualité de parlementaires.

C’est ma principale préoccupation en ce qui concerne le processus suivi ici. Dès le départ, j’ai rappelé au ministre que la commission chargée des débats ne pouvait pas donner le moindre signe de partisanerie s'il fallait qu’elle ait de la crédibilité auprès des Canadiens. Je pense que ce qui s’est passé aux dernières élections était très malheureux, lorsque le premier ministre de l’époque refusait de céder à un débat de la bonne façon. C’est devenu un enjeu électoral pour beaucoup de Canadiens, ce que je n’aurais jamais cru. Évidemment, nous appuyons l’idée d’une commission chargée des débats. J’ai conseillé au ministre et au Cabinet du premier ministre d'établir cette commission de concert avec les autres partis. Ainsi, tout le monde aurait eu son mot à dire et on aurait pu croire qu'il s'agissait d'un effort non partisan. Mais comme le gouvernement a encore une fois insisté pour que le processus se déroule entièrement à l’interne, les gens risquent de considérer le résultat injuste.

Les débats ne devraient être que des débats. Trois ou quatre podiums, un modérateur et voilà. Je ne comprends pas. Ce n’est pas une question partisane. Je ne comprends tout simplement pas la stratégie de s'accrocher à ses atouts pour ensuite courir le risque, comme ce fut le cas avec la première structure du Comité ERRE, qui était perçue comme étant défectueuse. Il n’y a jamais eu de conversation avec l’opposition sur la façon de mettre en place le processus pour concevoir un nouveau système électoral. Ce fut un échec et c'est au verso d’un document que nous avons dû en créer un nouveau qui, je crois, a bien fonctionné pour le Comité.

C’est encore un revirement étrange de ce gouvernement.

Le président:

Merci.

L’amendement NDP-29 est irrecevable parce qu’il dépasse la portée du projet de loi, qui ne traite pas d’un commissaire indépendant chargé des débats des chefs.

L’amendement PV-19 est déposé en raison de nos procédures pour les partis qui ne siègent pas à ce Comité, mais je le déclare irrecevable parce qu’il dépasse la portée du projet de loi, qui ne se rapporte pas au débat des chefs.

(Article 378)

Le président: L’amendement LIB-64 porte sur l’article 378. Quelqu’un veut-il présenter cet amendement?[Français]

Madame Lapointe, vous avez la parole.

(1230)

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais parler de cette disposition, des enjeux et des modifications. Certains ont dit craindre qu'en raison de ce changement, les résidants d'une circonscription électorale dont le siège à la Chambre des communes est vacant puissent se retrouver sans représentant pendant une période pouvant aller jusqu'à 16 mois avant une élection générale. Il est proposé de modifier cette disposition pour qu'aucune élection en vue de combler une vacance survenue à la Chambre des communes ne soit tenue moins de neuf mois avant une élection générale à date fixe.

Dans le fond, il n'y aurait pas d'élection partielle moins de neuf mois avant une élection générale. Un siège pourrait donc être vacant pendant un maximum de neuf mois. [Traduction]

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je l’ai lu.[Français]

Pourquoi fait-on cette proposition?

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est pour qu'il ne puisse pas y avoir une élection partielle sept mois avant une élection générale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais pourquoi propose-t-on de faire passer cela de six mois à neuf mois?

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est parce que, selon la façon dont c'est écrit, il pourrait ne pas y avoir de député pendant une période allant jusqu'à 16 mois.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce sont les citoyens de la circonscription qui en subiront les conséquences, car ils seront sans représentation pendant longtemps. Une élection partielle peut se tenir en 35 jours. Pour avoir un député dans la circonscription, ce sera presque un an. Six mois, c'est quelque chose pour quelqu'un, mais c'est raisonnable avant le début d'une élection qui s'en vient. Neuf mois, c'est quand même...

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Présentement, selon la façon dont c'est écrit, cela pourrait aller jusqu'à 16 mois.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je le sais.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Avec notre amendement, cette période serait réduite à neuf mois. Ainsi, on s'assurerait de ne pas tenir d'élection partielle neuf mois avant.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, c'est juste que...

Le président:

Je vais demander à M. Morin d'intervenir.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est une bonne idée.

M. Jean-François Morin:

J'aimerais seulement apporter deux clarifications techniques au débat.

Premièrement, aucune élection partielle pour combler une vacance qui survient à la Chambre des communes ne pourra être déclenchée moins de neuf mois avant le jour de l'élection à date fixe. Toutefois, une vacance qui arriverait peu avant l'échéance donnerait lieu à une élection partielle. Par exemple, en 2019, la limite de neuf mois avant le jour de l'élection à date fixe serait le 21 janvier. Donc, si une vacance survenait avant le 21 janvier 2019, elle devrait être comblée par une élection partielle, qui aurait lieu au printemps ou à l'été 2019.

Deuxièmement, cette modification législative donne suite à une recommandation du directeur général des élections du Canada qui avait trait au chevauchement des élections partielles et des élections générales. Lors de l'élection générale de 2015, si ma mémoire est bonne, il y avait trois ou quatre circonscriptions où des élections partielles devaient être déclenchées. Elles ont été déclenchées très tôt, en mai ou en juin, je crois, et la date du scrutin correspondait au jour prévu pour l'élection générale. Ces élections partielles ont été considérées comme remplacées par l'élection générale lorsque les brefs de l'élection générale ont été émis. Cette superposition a créé plusieurs problèmes d'interprétation de la loi en ce qui a trait aux règles sur le financement des partis politiques et des campagnes des candidats lors d'élections partielles.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci. [Traduction]

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvons-nous obtenir ce mémoire d’Élections Canada? Pouvez-vous me rappeler la situation?

M. Trevor Knight:

La situation est très semblable à ce qui a été décrit. À l’approche d’une élection générale, on croit que si une élection partielle est déclenchée, la personne ne siégera que très brièvement en attendant l'élection générale. Les élections partielles sont souvent déclenchées de sorte qu’elles chevauchent l’élection générale et elles sont annulées une fois que l'élection générale a lieu. Cela cause des problèmes au niveau des règles de financement politique en ce qui concerne le mélange ou le transfert des fonds.

Dans ce contexte, nous avons recommandé de prévoir un délai pour reconnaître que des élections partielles ne peuvent être déclenchées à compter d'un moment donné avant l'élection générale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans le cas qui nous occupe, quelqu’un démissionne six mois et demi ou sept mois avant les élections suivantes. La loi exige la tenue d'une élection partielle sans plus tarder. Cela dure, disons, 35 jours. Ai-je dit quelque chose d’incorrect jusqu’ici?

(1235)

M. Trevor Knight:

L’élection partielle doit être déclenchée entre les 11 et 180 jours à compter de la date où Élections Canada reçoit son mandat du Président.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact. Au bout de sept mois, c’est la prérogative du premier ministre de déclencher une élection partielle, mais la pratique actuelle, c’est de ne pas convoquer l'élection dans ce délai de 11 jours et d'attendre tout simplement que, sept mois après que quelqu’un ait quitté son siège, l’élection partielle soit inscrite à l’élection générale, n’est-ce pas? Y a-t-il un exemple pratique de quelqu’un qui aurait déclenché l'élection dans les 11 jours, puis qu’il y ait des élections pendant la période de cinq mois et demi, pour que cela se solde par des élections générales?

M. Trevor Knight:

Normalement, on attendrait pour se donner du temps. Il y a eu des cas où le délai de 180 jours est atteint et où il faut déclencher l'élection, mais il n’y a que trois mois avant l'élection générale, alors on convoque la partielle. Il y a une période électorale minimale à l’heure actuelle, mais pas de période maximale, de sorte qu’on peut la convoquer à une date ultérieure, et ce serait l’élection générale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y a un minimum et aucun maximum, en ce qui concerne les brefs ordonnant la tenue d'une élection partielle?

M. Trevor Knight:

C’est la période électorale prévue par la loi actuelle. Le projet de loi C-76 prévoit un maximum de 50 jours, mais en vertu de la loi actuelle, il n’y a pas de période électorale maximale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y a seulement le moment minimal où il faut la convoquer.

M. Trevor Knight:

Il y a un point minimum à partir duquel il faut la convoquer, puis une durée minimale pour la campagne électorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est ce que prévoit le projet de loi C-76.

M. Trevor Knight:

C’est ce que prévoit la loi actuelle. Le projet de loi C-76 change cela en ajoutant une période électorale maximale de 50 jours.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’essaie de prévoir les scénarios. Le principe fondamental que nous avons, c’est que les Canadiens doivent être dûment représentés en tout temps, hormis dans des circonstances extrêmes. Je songe à une circonstance où quelqu'un quitterait son siège 9, 10 ou 11 mois à l’avance? Je me demande ce que cela implique. Si la personne quitte son siège 10 mois à l'avance et le premier ministre retarde le déclenchement des élections dans la période de neuf mois, est-ce que cela se répercutera jusqu’à l'élection générale? Comment cela fonctionnerait-il?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. Avec cette modification, seule une vacance qui se produirait le dernier jour ou les derniers jours pourrait être intégrée aux élections générales, et seulement dans les années qui ne sont pas bissextiles.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vraiment? Les années bissextiles nous touchent-elles?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord, alors. Est-ce à cause de cette simple journée en plus?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cela ajoute une journée.

Mais sérieusement, tous les postes vacants qui pourraient se produire pendant près de neuf mois devraient être maintenus jusqu’au jour du scrutin précédant l’élection générale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi? Ne pourrais-je pas interpréter cela comme voulant dire que si quelqu'un renonce à son siège à 10 mois du jour des élections à date fixe, le premier ministre a un minimum de 11 jours pour enclencher...

M. Jean-François Morin:

C’est cela. Dix mois avant, ce serait, par exemple, le 21 décembre. Il y aurait alors un délai minimal de 11 jours avant le déclenchement des élections. Le premier ministre devrait les déclencher d'ici le 11e et le 180e jours. S'il devait attendre à la toute fin...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, nous serions au beau milieu du printemps.

M. Jean-François Morin:

... les élections seraient déclenchées autour du 21 juin. Comme il y a maintenant un maximum de 50 jours pour la période électorale, les élections auraient lieu au début du mois d’août. En vertu du projet de loi C-76...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avec cet amendement...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, pas avec cet amendement. Mais avec le projet de loi C-76, encore une fois avec la période maximale de 50 jours, en 2019, le premier jour où les brefs d’élection générale pourraient être émis serait le 1er septembre, je crois. L’élection partielle aurait lieu. Le candidat gagnant serait déclaré gagnant jusqu’à la mi-août, puis les élections générales seraient déclenchées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il s’agit d’une période de neuf mois, et non de six mois.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est ce que prévoit cette modification, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’essaie simplement de comprendre. Cela peut sembler technique aux gens — et il y a de quoi.

J’imagine que nos... À l’heure actuelle, en vertu du projet de loi C-76, avec cet amendement, si un député devait annoncer aujourd'hui même qu'il renonce à son siège à compter du début de décembre, les gens de sa circonscription risqueraient-ils de ne pas être représentés jusqu'à la tenue de l'élection générale? Vous laissez entendre que non, que l’échéancier exigerait que le premier ministre déclenche l’élection partielle, qui aurait lieu vers le mois de juin, ou plus tard. Vous avez dit plus tard qu’en juin.

(1240)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Plus la vacance surviendra sur le tôt, plus le délai maximal où l’élection partielle peut être déclenchée arrivera sur le tôt.

M. Trevor Knight:

Je vais peut-être ajouter un autre élément de contexte.

Dans le projet de loi C-76, sous sa forme actuelle, l'affaire c'est que les brefs ne peuvent être émis dans les neuf mois précédant l'élection générale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Les brefs ne peuvent être émis sans cette modification.

M. Trevor Knight:

C’est exact — sans cet amendement. Cela prolonge en fait la période de vacance, ce qui pourrait mener à une période de non-représentation d’environ 15 mois.

Ce n’était pas l’intention de notre recommandation, bien que je ne pense pas, pour être honnête, que notre recommandation ait été parfaitement bien formulée. Notre idée était d’avoir une période où il n’est pas nécessaire de déclencher une élection partielle et une période claire où il n’est pas nécessaire de le faire. Tout devient plus clair quand on soustrait ce temps de la période de vacance.

Cet amendement répond à une préoccupation que nous avions au sujet de l'existence de cette disposition dans le projet de loi C-76, et il réduit le temps pendant lequel on sera sans représentation.

Le président:

Je crois que vos cinq minutes sont écoulées.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président, mais on a dit aussi qu’on allait un peu s’adapter à cela.

Ce que j’essaie de comprendre, et qui vient d’être révélé, je crois, c’est que... Si l'idée que les citoyens ne soient pas représentés pendant 12 mois parce que quelqu’un joue avec l’horaire ne vous dérange pas plus que ça...

Le président:

C’est ce que cela exclut.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela vient d'être expliqué il y a à peine 30 secondes.

Le président:

D’accord.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pardonnez-moi d’avoir dépassé les cinq minutes, mais si quelqu’un d’autre avait quelque chose à dire, il aurait pu m'interrompre tranquillement.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres interventions sur cet amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vos sept minutes ont été bien utilisées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons voter sur l’amendement LIB-64.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: C’est unanime.

L’amendement CPC-193 ne peut être proposé parce qu’il porte sur la même ligne que l’amendement que nous venons d'adopter.

(L’article 378 modifié est adopté.)

Le président: Il y avait un amendement à l’article 379. C’était l’amendement CPC-193.1, mais il était corrélatif à l’amendement CPC-171, qui a été rejeté.

(L’article 379 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 380 à 383 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: Un nouvel article est proposé. Il a été proposé à l’origine comme CPC-194, mais il a été retiré et il sera maintenant proposé comme un nouvel amendement du Parti conservateur, portant le numéro de référence 10008080.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet article concerne les tierces parties et vise à appliquer les règles qui existaient avant le projet de loi C-76 au cas où le projet de loi entrerait en vigueur pendant la période préélectorale.

Le président:

Désolé. Il s’agit du CPC-195. Ce n’est pas nouveau.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, et cela concerne les partis politiques et non les tiers. Je suis désolée.

Le président:

Y a-t-il débat sur l’amendement CPC-195?

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Stephanie, pouvez-vous nous expliquer quel serait l’impact?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Disons que des élections sont déclenchées. Si nous sommes en période préélectorale et le projet de loi C-76 n’est pas encore entré en vigueur, nous devrons appliquer les règles qui existaient avant le projet de loi C-76 pendant la période préélectorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous imaginez que des élections sont déclenchées et que le projet de loi C-76 n’a pas force de loi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L’entrée en vigueur se produit pendant la période préélectorale. C’est de cela qu’ils parlent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le projet de loi C-76 entre en vigueur...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce dont il s'agit, c'est de son entrée en vigueur pendant la période préélectorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Indépendamment de...

(1245)

M. John Nater:

À titre de précision, étant donné que le projet de loi a un délai de six mois pour entrer en vigueur, cet amendement porte sur le fait que si la sanction royale est reçue le 6 janvier et six mois plus tard...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le gouvernement décide de déclencher des élections...

M. John Nater:

La période préélectorale aurait commencé le 1er juillet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le gouvernement ne déclenche pas la période préélectorale.

M. John Nater:

Cela n’entrerait pas en vigueur avant ce que la période préélectorale aurait été normalement. Nous en étions à la période préélectorale. C’est dans un cas comme celui-là.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui... dans le contexte du déclenchement d’une élection.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À mon avis, c’est une incitation à retarder davantage l’adoption de ce projet de loi au Sénat.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourquoi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parce que la loi n’entrerait pas en vigueur et cela aurait une incidence sur l’entrée en vigueur de la période préélectorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela empêcherait-il son entrée en vigueur pendant la période préélectorale?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ai-je raison de dire que cela empêche l’entrée en vigueur du règlement de la période préélectorale si le projet de loi est retardé au-delà d’un certain point?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cet amendement prévoit que si l’article 262 du projet de loi, qui se trouve à la page 153 et qui prévoit le maximum de dépenses de publicité partisane pour un parti politique pendant la période préélectorale, entrait en vigueur après le 30 juin 2019, il ne s’appliquerait pas à la période préélectorale, ce qui signifie qu’il n’y aurait pas de plafond pour les dépenses de publicité partisane pour les partis politiques pendant la période préélectorale précédant l’élection de 2019.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cet amendement aura-t-il pour effet d'annuler toutes les limites imposées à la publicité préélectorale dans le projet de loi C-76, si les élections étaient déclenchées plus tôt?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Rien à voir avec la date du déclenchement des élections. Cela ne concerne que le début de la période préélectorale, soit le 30 juin. Cet amendement ne toucherait que les limites imposées aux partis politiques et n’aurait aucune incidence sur celles imposées aux tiers.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, et quelle incidence aurait-il sur ces limites?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pour les tiers...?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, les partis politiques.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Elles ne s’appliqueraient tout simplement pas.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voilà où je veux en venir. Toutes les limites que nous venons d’imposer à la publicité politique pendant la période préélectorale, si nous adoptions l’amendement CPC-195 et qu’une élection était déclenchée plus tôt...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non? Cela n’a rien à voir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est une incitation à reporter la sanction royale au-delà du 1er janvier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Parce que si la sanction royale est retardée...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n’y a donc pas de limite aux dépenses.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous êtes astucieux...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. John Nater:

En fait, j’ai une question d’éclaircissement pour nos fonctionnaires.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est très sournois.

M. John Nater:

Dans un scénario où le gouvernement ne tient pas compte de la sagesse du Parti conservateur, advenant que la sanction royale est octroyée à ce projet de loi à une date postérieure au 1er janvier, de sorte qu'il entrera en vigueur à la mi-juillet 2019, que fera Élections Canada pour gérer l’entrée en vigueur au milieu d’une période où cela s’appliquerait?

M. Jean-François Morin:

J’aimerais d’abord mentionner que le directeur général des élections a le pouvoir de mettre en vigueur diverses dispositions de la loi dès la publication d’un avis dans la Gazette du Canada, à condition que la préparation en vue de l’entrée en vigueur de ces dispositions particulières soit terminée. Le fait de recevoir la sanction royale après le 1er janvier ne serait pas une indication de l’applicabilité de cet article.

M. John Nater:

Vous dites que le directeur général des élections enverrait un avis écrit indiquant que c’est quelque chose qu’il pourrait mettre en oeuvre.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne dis pas qu’il le ferait. Je dis qu’il pourrait le faire.

M. John Nater:

Si ce n’était pas le cas, cependant, et si cela entrait en vigueur au cours de la période préélectorale, comment Élections Canada s’y prendrait-il? C’est ce que je me demande.

M. Trevor Knight:

Malheureusement — je crois que je dois être honnête —, je ne peux pas dire que j’ai de l’information sur ce cas particulier. Une partie du problème, bien sûr, est exactement ce qui vient d’être dit. Il y a la possibilité de mettre les choses en vigueur plus tôt. Nous surveillons la situation et il s'agira de l'aborder, suivant le moment où le projet de loi sera adopté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous craignez que tout retard signifie que les limites préélectorales en matière de publicité des partis politiques...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Elles ne s’appliqueraient pas à l’année prochaine.

M. Nathan Cullen:

... ne s’appliqueraient pas à l’élection de 2019, à moins que le directeur général des élections...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si ce n’est pas le cas, le directeur général est fortement incité à s’assurer que le système est en place à temps.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je croyais avoir entendu dire à l'instant que le directeur général des élections pouvait imposer ces limites en les publiant dans la Gazette du Canada. Suggérez-vous, monsieur Morin, que le directeur général ne peut le faire que par la publication dans la Gazette?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il pourrait le faire, mais si le projet de loi est adopté, il n’aura pas à le faire. Si le projet de loi n’est pas adopté, il devra le présenter avant le début de la période préélectorale, alors si vous voulez ces limites aux dépenses la prochaine fois, cet amendement ne pourra pas être adopté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous ne voyez pas les choses de cette façon.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne suis pas surpris qu’ils ne voient pas les choses de cette façon.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je croyais que les libéraux aimaient donner un pouvoir discrétionnaire au directeur général des élections. On dirait que c'est aller à contre-courant.

Je tiens simplement à souligner — et je ne m’étendrai plus sur le sujet — que les dispositions d’entrée en vigueur de ce projet de loi sont tout à fait uniques. J’aimerais bien savoir exactement pourquoi cette disposition unique a été ajoutée à ce projet de loi, mais elle embrouille beaucoup les choses en prévoyant un délai de « six mois, mais peut-être si nous sommes en mesure de le faire ». C’est unique, et ça m'a l'air d'être tout un défi. J’aurais aimé être une mouche sur le mur lorsque cela a été fait.

Je vais m’arrêter ici, monsieur le président.

(1250)

Le président:

D’accord. Nous allons voter sur l’amendement CPC-195.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il n’y a pas de nouvel article 383.1.

Je crois comprendre qu’étant donné que nous sommes si près de la fin, la plupart des membres sont prêts à rester un peu plus tard, s’il le faut.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, j’ai un rendez-vous à 13 heures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il nous reste huit amendements à examiner.

M. Scott Reid:

Voyons si nous pouvons nous en occuper dans les huit prochaines minutes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le moment est-il venu?

Je n’ai rien fait de tout cela, mais il y a un amendement que j’aimerais que nous examinions. Il faudra le consentement unanime, parce qu’il fait marche arrière. Nous avons travaillé avec Élections Canada à une version précédente pour essayer de trouver un libellé. Nous possédons cette expérience, vous et moi, mais peut-être pas les autres membres du Comité. Il s’agit du moment où les résultats sont publiés le soir des élections. Bon nombre de nos électeurs vont encore aux urnes quand les résultats viennent de la côte Est, c’est-à-dire quand Terre-Neuve, la Nouvelle-Écosse ou l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard ont déjà voté.

Je pense qu’il y a des dispositions dans la loi pour que la disponibilité de l’information soit à peu près égale pour les électeurs de tout le pays. Cette information privilégiée ne peut être donnée à certains électeurs et pas à d’autres. L'article 283 a une incidence là-dessus. C’est pourquoi il faudra le consentement unanime.

Permettez-moi de le lire, de l’expliquer, puis de faire un commentaire aux fonctionnaires électoraux avant de passer à autre chose. Il dirait à peu près ceci: Une heure et demie après la fermeture des bureaux de scrutin à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, une heure après la fermeture des bureaux de scrutin dans les Maritimes et immédiatement après la fermeture des bureaux de scrutin dans le reste du pays, le fonctionnaire électoral affecté au bureau de scrutin compte les votes en présence de... La phrase se poursuit dans l’article 283, qui porte sur le dépouillement des votes.

Nous luttons depuis des années. La question a été portée jusqu’à la Cour suprême, comme certains le savent. Il s’agissait de la transmission des résultats au départ, mais c'est aussi une question d’équité.

J’ai grandi à Toronto, alors je n’ai pas vécu cela avant de devenir un électeur et de vivre sur la côte Ouest. On se rendait au bureau de scrutin que les résultats de l’élection étaient déjà annoncés à 16 heures, 17 heures, 18 heures. Je pense qu’Élections Canada a également envisagé et essayé de trouver des moyens de contourner ce problème.

Il est très difficile d’ouvrir les boîtes, de commencer le dépouillement et de ne pas divulguer les résultats. C’est un des aspects qui ont été contestés devant les tribunaux. Nous proposons un bref délai de 60 minutes, de 90 dans les cas extrêmes, au bout duquel le dépouillement peut commencer, les résultats s'annonçant petit à petit.

Cela réduit l’écart entre ce que nous entendons dans les provinces de l’Ouest et ce que les provinces de l’Est ont déjà décidé. D’autres pays traitent de cette question de façon tout à fait différente, que nous ne suggérons pas. Nous nous contentons de proposer que lorsque les bureaux de scrutin ferment et les boîtes sont scellées, prenez une tasse de café, attendez 60 minutes, puis ouvrez-les, commencez le dépouillement et diffusez les résultats comme d’habitude.

Le président:

Que vouliez-vous demander aux fonctionnaires?

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’aimerais leur demander si ce que je propose est faisable sur le plan logistique.

La journée sera forcément plus longue.

M. Trevor Knight:

C’est faisable sur le plan logistique, mais cela allonge les jours de travail. Nous avons déjà de très longues journées et la fatigue des travailleurs électoraux est souvent un problème à la fin de la journée. Ce serait la principale préoccupation opérationnelle à l'égard de la validation des résultats.

C'est faisable.

Le président:

Avons-nous le consentement unanime pour revenir à l’article qui serait modifié?

Des voix: Non.

(Article 384)

Le président: Pour l’article 384, nous avons l’amendement LIB-65.

Quelqu’un veut-il faire un exposé? [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Cet amendement vise à remplacer, à l'article 384 du projet de loi, toutes les mentions « article 299 » par « article 1 ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quel serait l'effet de ce remplacement?

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est facile: au lieu d'« article 299 », ce serait « article 1 ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Peut-être, je ne le sais pas. J'aimerais entendre les commentaires de M. Morin là-dessus.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Lorsqu'on rédige des dispositions transitoires, il est commun d'écrire comme article de référence, dans la disposition transitoire, le premier article qui est visé par la disposition transitoire en question.

Cette disposition particulière prévoit que, si la loi entre en vigueur pendant la période électorale, la version antérieure de la loi s'applique à l'égard de l'élection, de même que les droits et obligations qui en découlent, notamment l'obligation de faire rapport et les droits au remboursement des dépenses électorales.

L'article 299 a été choisi conformément à la convention de rédaction législative. C'est le premier article dans la loi qui parle des obligations liées aux candidats. Cependant, le directeur général des élections a soulevé une préoccupation relativement à cet article, lors de l'une de ses comparutions devant ce comité depuis le dépôt du projet de loi.

On remplace « article 299 » par « article 1 » seulement pour exprimer clairement que cette disposition transitoire s'applique à tous les droits et obligations découlant de la loi, notamment ceux à l'égard des tiers, des candidats et des partis enregistrés, mais aussi les autres droits et obligations qui découlent des changements apportés par le projet de loi.

Par exemple, si le projet de loi entrait en vigueur pendant une élection partielle, aucune de ses dispositions ne serait en vigueur pour cette élection partielle. L'élection partielle continuerait à être administrée conformément à la version antérieure de la Loi électorale du Canada.

C'est une disposition transitoire commune qu'on retrouve dans la plupart des projets de loi qui modifient la Loi électorale du Canada.

(1255)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans ce projet de loi ou dans...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Dans l'ensemble des projets de loi qui modifient la Loi électorale du Canada, il est très fréquent qu'il y ait une disposition semblable, surtout dans les cas où l'on modifie les règles entourant le financement politique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur Knight ou monsieur Sampson, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose? [Traduction]

M. Robert Sampson:

Nous sommes d’accord et, en fait, ces dispositions s’inspirent très étroitement du projet de loi C-23, la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections, et d’autres lois antérieures. C'est tout à fait conforme à la tradition des dispositions transitoires.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

À titre d’information pour les membres du Comité, nous avons besoin de l’appui de la majorité pour rester au-delà de 13 heures. Nous sommes pratiquement au bout de nos peines.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce exact? Est-ce une pratique que nous avons suivie?

M. Scott Reid:

Je connais très bien. Cela ne fait aucun doute.

Le président:

Nous ne voulons pas revenir là-dessus.

Voulez-vous présenter l’amendement CPC-196 à l’article 384?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr. Il s’agit de la recommandation du directeur général des élections concernant les dispositions transitoires en cas d’entrée en vigueur du projet de loi C-76 pendant une élection.

Le président:

Y a-t-il débat?

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 384 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 385 à 394 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est plus facile. C’est plus rapide.

(Article 395)

Le président:

CPC-197, voulez-vous le présenter, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s'agit de maintenir le pouvoir d’engager des poursuites auprès du directeur des poursuites pénales.

Le président:

Bon, nous savons comment cela va se passer.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous n’avez pas le sens du dramatique, monsieur le président.

Le président:

C’est là le drame.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 395 est adopté.)

(Les articles 396 à 400 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

(Article 401)

(1300)

Le président:

Le dernier article est l’article 401. Nous avons l'amendement CPC-198.

Voulez-vous le présenter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s’agit de limiter les dépenses des partis politiques avant les élections et de reporter la mise en oeuvre à 2021.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que cela s’applique au CPC-199?

Le président:

Est-ce le même genre de chose?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous retirons l’amendement CPC-199.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-200.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Celui-ci exige un an, et non six mois, pour l’entrée en vigueur du projet de loi.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous passons à l’amendement CPC-201.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Celui-ci vise à retirer au directeur général des élections le pouvoir discrétionnaire d’accélérer l’entrée en vigueur du projet de loi.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

L'amendement suivant est le CPC-202.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il limite le pouvoir discrétionnaire du directeur général des élections d’accélérer l’entrée en vigueur du projet de loi à cinq mois après la sanction royale.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 401 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

L’annexe est-elle adoptée?

Des députés: D’accord. Oui.

Le président: Le titre abrégé est-il adopté?

Des députés: D’accord. Oui.

Une voix: Avec dissidence.

Le président: Le titre est-il adopté?

Des députés: D'accord. Oui.

Une voix: Avec dissidence.

Le président: Le projet de loi modifié est-il adopté?

M. John Nater:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

(Le projet de loi C-76 modifié est adopté par 6 voix contre 3.)

Le président:

La présidence doit-elle faire rapport du projet de loi modifié à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord. Oui.

Une voix: Avec dissidence.

Le président: Le Comité ordonne-t-il la réimpression du projet de loi modifié pour l’usage de la Chambre à l’étape du rapport?

Des députés: D'accord. Oui.

Le président: Pour votre information, mardi prochain, nous aurons probablement une réunion du sous-comité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que nous nous réunissons jeudi?

Le président:

Jeudi prochain, nous ne nous réunirons pas à cause de la visite du premier ministre néerlandais.

J’aimerais remercier tous les témoins ainsi que le greffier, les interprètes et le recherchiste.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 18, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.