header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-17 PROC 126

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everyone.

I'd like to welcome Mr. Alexandre Boulerice, Ms. Shanahan and Mr. Fragiskatos.

Welcome to the 126th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. We're continuing with clause-by-clause consideration of C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other Acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

Once again, we are pleased to be joined by Jean-François Morin and Manon Paquet from the Privy Council Office, and Trevor Knight and Robert Sampson—ah, he's new—from Elections Canada. Thank you all for being here.

I'll go to Mr. Nater in a minute, but I just want to do a couple of things first.

First of all, I hope people will be judicious in following the five-minute rule, roughly, so that we can make good progress today, so that we don't have to stay late today or on the weekend.

I also want to go back really quickly. I know it's hard to believe with 200 clauses, but we actually missed clause 71. There were no amendments, so I would just like to ask for unanimous approval of clause 71.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Oh, I see how it is.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

What?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is this how we're affecting our democracy? We're just going to make it up as we go along and go back in time?

Do you want to filibuster that, John?

The Chair:

The five minutes is up.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

(Clause 71 agreed to)

The Chair: Now we'll go to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Chair, based on the decisions we made yesterday on the clauses and amendment we approved, the Conservatives will be withdrawing some amendments.

The first one is 9964902 and that relates to clause 234.

The Chair:

Can you say that number again?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes. The first two are ones that were table dropped. The first number is 9964902 and that relates to clause 234.

The second one is 9965053 and that relates to clause 235.

We'll be withdrawing CPC-146, CPC-147, CPC-149, CPC-150, CPC-154, CPC-161 and CPC-169.

Also, Chair, I was wondering—

The Chair:

Are there any more?

Mr. John Nater:

Nope.

The Chair: Oh, I was hoping....

Mr. John Nater: Those are it for now, but we'll see after the next set of amendments.

On that subject, perhaps at one point, Chair, we could get an update on what's been adopted so far in terms of amendments from all parties. It doesn't have to be right now. Perhaps after the lunch break or something, the clerk or someone could provide us with an update for our records of what's been adopted and what hasn't.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Do you want the percentages?

Mr. John Nater:

No, we don't need stats, just which ones were adopted and which ones weren't.

The Chair:

He can give you a list. He has photocopies. We'll get it to you.

Mr. John Nater:

That's fine.

The Chair:

I also welcome Ms. May.

Just so you know, before we start, tentatively, tomorrow we'll meet from 9:00 until 1:00 and from 3:30 to 7:00. Do you remember that when we first discussed this we talked about the evening being a 7:00 to 9:00 type of framework? We're doing 7:00 right now. Just so you know when we get around to planning our committee, next Thursday is Wednesday hours. It goes into our time because of the visit of the Prime Minister of the Netherlands. If we adjust our schedule for next Thursday, you'll know why.

When we left off, we had just finished clause 223.

We'll go to clause 224.

(On clause 224)

The Chair: We have amendment CPC-98, and there are some ramifications. The vote on this amendment applies to CPC-101, which is on page 184, CPC-103, which is on page 189, CPC-105, which is on page 191, CPC-106, which is on page 192, and CPC-107, which is on page 200. They are linked by the concept of surveys conducted in preparation for an election.

Would the Conservatives introduce amendment CPC-98, please.

(1535)

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, we discussed something similar with a similar amendment yesterday. This one links directly to third parties and to the actual writ period, so the election period itself and not the pre-writ period in this case. It's including the cost of a survey that's done immediately prior to the writ period for the purposes of the activities during the writ period, as an expense within the writ period for third parties. We did have a discussion similar to this yesterday, and there was some good debate, but we're bringing forward this amendment.

The Chair:

For anyone who's new here today, as a general philosophy, when there's a concept that's been studied and we had a long discussion on it before, we're trying not to have the same discussion every time it comes up. We can then go quickly on similar amendments.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just so I understand it clearly, is this about a poll that is conducted with the intention of dropping it in the election?

Mr. John Nater:

Using it during the election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Of using it during the election period?

Mr. John Nater:

In this case, it is a third party.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, I understand that. Yes.

The only tricky thing with that is sometimes polls that happen, especially on very specific issues, can happen a year or months before, and you're asking the third party to know.... I guess it's a decision they make then if they have any old survey that they bring out. How long back does it go?

Mr. John Nater:

It doesn't say.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You see, that's the worry.

If any third party publishes the survey during an election or a pre-writ period without a backstop, if it's a survey they published or conducted in 2016 and in 2019 they say Canadians like the flag, that's an election expense all of a sudden. Do you see what I mean?

I understand the intention of certainly someone trying to get out of the loophole and spend the polling money just before an election obviously it's going in. But without a time limitation on it, then for any third party who uses any poll ever, essentially it's going to have to be an election expense.

The Chair:

I think we had a relatively lengthy discussion on this yesterday.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But even going backwards?

Okay, excuse me then. Pardon me. I'm repeating a conversation I wasn't a part of.

The Chair:

You had the same comment that he did. So it's okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You had the same point.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Did we have the same point? Really? But I made it much better, right? Isn't that what you're thinking?

The Chair:

We'll see in a minute. We'll have the vote.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We'll see how it works out.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Could the Conservatives introduce CPC-99, relating to clause 224.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

What we are proposing here is that we take the spending limits that are in place; however, should the campaign be extended for a longer period of time, the spending limits would be pro-rated to the amount of time for the longer campaign.

Essentially it is maintaining the same spending limits as they were for the existing campaign period, but for longer campaigns pro-rating these rates to the extended amount of time.

(1540)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

This just reflects the way things were. In the last campaign, there was a pro-rating that went on, so we're just trying to make sure that—

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is a change included in the Fair Elections Act that we opposed fairly strenuously at the time and continue to oppose. It was intended to give the government of the day an advantage by controlling how much money everybody could spend by stretching the campaign. I think it's not a very good system. Spending should be predictable in advance.

I'll be opposing this amendment, absolutely.

The Chair:

If there is no further discussion, we'll vote on the amendment.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Shall clause 224 carry?

Some hon. members: On division.

(Clause 224 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Just for the record, and so people have all their records straight, I want to confirm that when we defeated amendment CPC-98, it also defeated amendments CPC-101, CPC-103, CPC-105, CPC-106, and CPC-107.

(On clause 225)

The Chair: On clause 225, there was amendment PV-9, but it was consequentially lost with PV-3.

We're now going to CPC-100. If we adopt this amendment, CPC-101 cannot be moved as they amend the same line.

Could the Conservatives introduce CPC-100, please.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

This has to do with collusion and it extends where collusion applies. As part of this extension, it also includes collusion between third parties as well, so it extends the definition and makes it tougher for third parties and for registered parties to collude on the basis of doing so to avoid spending limits.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have a question for the officials.

Does Bill C-76 imagine this form of collusion right now between third parties and their efforts to coordinate?

Mr. Jean-François Morin (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

I think we had a long discussion yesterday regarding a similar amendment during the pre-election period. This one would apply to the election period.

I don't think it would only apply to collusion between third parties. Wouldn't it also apply to collusion between a registered party and a third party, and the opposite as well?

A voice: Yes.

Mr. Jean-François Morin: Yesterday we mentioned that—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is making the one-way street a two-way street.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Mr. Chair, did they indicate that it is covered elsewhere in the bill?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

We had a discussion yesterday on that and we mentioned that a third party that would be colluding with the registered party to the extent that it would be bringing services or products to the registered party would likely constitute a non-monetary contribution, so....

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, but in this case, it's not specifically in regard to a non-monetary contribution. It's in regard to influence through advertising or surveys. That wouldn't be included, then, in terms of.... Those are specific types of influence. That's not in regard to monetary contribution. Would you say this is different from that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Of course it is a bit different. What we were saying basically yesterday was that third parties can of course bring information to the knowledge of parties in order to try to influence the registered party in its policies, and that is fine. That is part of the goal of political parties, to regroup a large segment of the Canadian population in order to represent it.

We were saying that when that collaboration or collusion gets to a point where the third party provides goods or services to the registered party, then it becomes a non-monetary contribution that is prohibited, under some circumstances, under part 18 of the Canada Elections Act.

(1545)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, that's goods or services, but that doesn't necessarily cover information.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I wonder then what the government's hesitation would be in providing a more stringent application of an amendment that would also cover information in addition to resources.

The Chair:

Is there any debate?

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

What was the question?

The Chair:

This amendment adds information to the things that can't be colluded and they want to know what the government's thoughts are.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Don't you want information to pass between third parties?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Well, not if it's a form of collusion, not if it is information that helps them to influence the election undemocratically.

It's in proposed subsection 351.01(4) in the amendment. It specifically speaks of “information—in order to influence either third party in its partisan activities that it carries out during an election period, its election advertising”, which would be more in terms of resources, or “election surveys that it conducts or causes to be conducted during an election period.”

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, just quickly, there are already rules in place within the act to prohibit the circumvention of the spending limits by splitting an organization in two, for example. Is that correct?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, exactly. There is already a prohibition in place to prohibit third parties from colluding to exceed their spending limits, basically.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If two organizations are colluding to share information—colluding might be an awfully strong word in that situation there—we risk criminalizing, for lack of a better word, civil society communications.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Well, as we know, third parties are everybody but candidates and political parties, so....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand what you want to do, but I think this is a very highly risky thing to do, and I cannot support that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think there could be a lot of unforeseen harm. I think we discussed this last time, too. Again, it goes down the path of those who are potential candidates or candidates discussing.... You're not even talking about the election period. You're talking about way beyond that, right? Are you talking pre-writ and prior to that as well?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I believe, as we have seen in previous discussions as it exists here, presently, yes, that's correct, but....

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think that would be going way too far, because communications are often so necessary and third parties provide us such vital important information. We may be getting carried away along the lines of sometimes.... Before becoming a parliamentarian I even thought that lobbying.... It gets such a bad rap. Just the word, “lobbying”, makes it seem like it's some kind of evil way of convincing MPs, but when you become an MP, you realize that there are all sorts of lobbying. There's the Heart and Stroke Foundation trying to inform you of healthy eating habits and information on how to make Canadians healthier and safer.

As Mr. Morin has pointed out, when you're talking about third parties, it means basically everybody. I think this would be really hard to prove, first of all, and then, also, it would really be interfering with people being able to conduct...and learn from organizations that do a whole bunch of research for us.

The Chair:

Mr. Boulerice. [Translation]

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP):

I would like to ask Mr. Morin a question.

Based on your understanding of this proposal by the Conservative Party, what would happen if organizations with a common objective, such as protecting green spaces or endangered species, wanted to establish a pre-election or election coalition to bring pressure to bear or to conduct public information and awareness activities in order to promote their issue during an election campaign?

Would that constitute collusion? I call it a coalition, and that's part of everyday life.

(1550)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you very much for your question, Mr. Boulerice.

For the purposes of this debate, I would note that the aim of Conservative amendment CPC-100 is limited to the election period. The proposed changes concern part 17 of the Canada Elections Act, which addresses the activities of third parties during the election period.

Amendment CPC-100 concerns two separate subjects. Paragraphs (a) and (b) of the amendment address situations in which a third party and a registered party, or a third party and a candidate act in collusion with each other.

The only place where the bill refers to third parties that act in coordination with each other is paragraph (c) of the amendment, which provides for the new subsection (4), which reads as follows: (4) No third party shall act in collusion with any other third party - including by sharing information - in order to influence either third party in its partisan activities that it carries out..., its election advertising or its election surveys...

The particular feature of a third party as set forth in the Canada Elections Act is that a third party can really be anyone except a candidate or a political party. The Canada Elections Act already provides that third parties may associate with each other. A third party may be a person, a business or a corporation, but it is also possible for a number of persons, corporations or associations to combine to form a third party.

Where the term "third party" is used in the Canada Elections Act, it refers to all third parties.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

In other words, a coalition can be a third party.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, absolutely.

Where we want to single out certain third parties more specifically, we will refer to registered third parties, for example, which must file certain expense reports.

I don't mean to suggest what action the committee should take, but the prohibition is so broad that it would be difficult to enforce, given the very definition of "third party", which is equally broad.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Graham and then Mr. Nater.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think I've already made our position fairly clear on this. I don't think we need to beat this to death.

Just to be clear, as this amendment, especially proposed subclause (4) suggests, for the sake of argument, if the director of the Sierra Club sends a message on Facebook to the director of Greenpeace that influences the message they post on the next Facebook post, that would count as collusion of information for purposes of influencing the election. I think that's a very dangerous precedent to be setting. I think on that basis this cannot be supported in any way. Thank you for that.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, and then we'll go to a vote.

Mr. John Nater:

If a third party is effectively campaigning on issue x, which directly benefits a registered political party determining the fair market value of that campaigning services, would that be considered non-monetary contribution to a political party?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

During the pre-election period, which we discussed yesterday, only partisan advertising, partisan activities and election surveys are covered. During the election period we are including everything, including issue advertising. To the extent that a third party supports a registered party and does so in a manner that does not bring the third party to exceed its spending limit, that's fine. That is already within the scope of part 17 of the act.

No, it does not constitute a non-monetary contribution.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie, just before we vote.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

In closing, in many of these amendments we are putting forward, I foresee infinite hypothetical situations, which we couldn't possibly anticipate here in this committee at this moment. Yet I feel they will come to pass in 2019 and we will look back and say that CPC-99 would have addressed something like this.

I feel very strongly about that. It's for those reasons I think we continue to push for stronger, clearer definitions of these things such as collusion.

Thank you.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(1555)

The Chair:

Amendment CPC-101 was a victim of CPC-98. We'll go to CPC-101.1.

Could the Conservatives present that, please.

Mr. John Nater:

I have a good feeling about this amendment.

This makes a relatively minor change on page 127 of the bill at line 20. It replaces the words “only activity carried on in Canada during an election period” with “primary purpose in Canada during an election period is to influence”, and then there's the remainder of the clause.

I think this is eminently supportable. I have a sense that it might be supported.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's still opportunity.

Mr. John Nater:

It's not quite as strong as I would like to see it, but I think it's....

The Chair:

Perhaps I could test if there's support.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: There's great co-operation in this committee. It's the presentation that did it, I think.

We'll now go to one of the new amendments that were tabled later, reference 10008289.

Could the Conservatives present this amendment, please.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm not confident it will be met with support, considering it returns to treating as foreign third parties those entities incorporated in Canada but with foreign directing minds whose primary purpose is political activity. I believe my colleagues and I have tried to emphasize what we believe is the necessity of this clause relative to things such as the primary purpose of political activity, further clarifying, as we see, foreign directing minds. I am slightly comforted in that I feel CPC-101.1, this higher threshold, provides some coverage for that but not nearly what we believe is necessary. Unless my colleague Mr. Nater has anything to add, I will leave it at that and save us some time as well this evening.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you'll talk fast to save us some time, will you?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was just going to say that I think we dealt with this topic yesterday.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I said that.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll vote on the new CPC amendment, reference number 10008289.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We're now going to amendment CPC-102. If it is adopted, amendment LIB-31 cannot be moved, as both amend the same line.

Would the Conservatives introduce amendment CPC-102.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I believe, relevant to yesterday, that this is something that was recommended by the commissioner of Canada elections.

I feel there is some consensus in regard to this from the government. I will leave it at that, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You would be correct about that. There have been discussions—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

—every now and then.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Oh, no, for accuracy, you did quite well, I think, in the last one too.

There have been some discussions among the three parties, and there is a subamendment I'd like to propose to this amendment, if I may read it into the record.

It is that amendment CPC-102, proposing to amend clause 223 of Bill C-76 by replacing lines 24 and 25 on page 115—

The Chair:

I think it's clause 225 that you mean.

(1600)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Oh, there's a typo. Thank you for catching my mistake.

It is that the amendment be amended by substituting the following for the substituted text appearing after the word “following”: “352 A third party shall include in a manner that is clearly visible or otherwise accessible in any election advertising message placed by it its name, its telephone number, either its civic or Internet address and an indication in or on”.

The Chair:

Seeing that we've had discussions and co-operation, we may be ready for the vote.

(Subamendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Amendment as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Amendment CPC-102 as amended has passed; therefore, amendment LIB-31 cannot be moved. Amendment NDP-20 is defeated, because it was consequential to NDP-17.

I'm sorry, Mr. Boulerice. I feel for you.

(Clause 225 as amended agreed to)

(On clause 226)

The Chair: There was amendment CPC-103, but that was defeated because of amendment CPC-98.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is amendment CPC-103 dead?

The Chair:

Yes, it is dead, in those terms.

Now we have amendment CPC-104.

Would the Conservatives present this amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is in a similar vein to an amendment that we presented yesterday. Basically, if these third parties will be required to register, then with this amendment we are just allowing them early registration for the election period.

The Chair:

If there is no further discussion, we will vote on the amendment.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 226 agreed to on division)

(Clause 227 agreed to)

The Chair: Regarding clause 228, there was amendment CPC-105, but it is lost because it was consequential to amendment CPC-98.

(Clause 228 agreed to on division)

(Clause 229 agreed to on division)

The Chair:

Clause 230 had amendment CPC-106, but that was consequential to CPC-98 as well. That amendment is therefore defeated. There are no amendments to clause 230 now.

(Clause 230 agreed to on division)

(On clause 231)

The Chair: On clause 231, there is LIB-32. This has some ramifications. The vote on LIB-32 applies to LIB-35 on page 215, LIB-48 on page 281, LIB-51 on page 287, as they are linked by reference.

Would a Liberal member present LIB-32, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The proposed amendment would create an obligation to submit additional interim reports during the election period. This is for the third party's report on the seventh day and 21st day prior to polling day, if they incur expenses over, I believe, $500.

We've discussed some of it before.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(1605)

The Chair:

It's unanimous. For the record, that also means that LIB-35, LIB-48 and LIB-51 are all passed, linked by reference.

There was amendment CPC-107 on this clause, but it was defeated because it was consequential to CPC-98.

(Clause 231 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 232)

The Chair:

On clause 232, LIB-33 is consequential to LIB-26. Did LIB-26 pass?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I would think so.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It probably did.

A voice: Yes.

The Chair:

I got lost here.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Another amendment on clause 232 is CPC-108.

Would someone from the Conservatives introduce this amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Again, I believe it is precluded because LIB-33 was adopted, so CPC-108 and CPC-109 are....

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's CPC-110 we go to next.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'd love to present them again, if I could.

The Chair:

Sorry, I made a mistake there.

There's a line conflict with LIB-33, so CPC-108 and CPC-109 cannot be moved. Sorry.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's okay.

(Clause 232 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 233)

The Chair:

We have amendment CPC-110. Before the Conservatives present it, there are some ramifications you should be aware of. If it doesn't pass, CPC-151 cannot be moved as they are linked by reference. One relates to a penalty, I think, that wouldn't exist if CPC-110 is defeated.

Would you present CPC-110, please.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This again is in regard to third parties and the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendation for anti-circumvention provisions regarding foreign contributions.

As historically has been the case, we are trying to further, I genuinely believe, protect Canadians and democracy by making the clauses as watertight as possible. Certainly, as has been indicated by our witnesses several times, the legislation largely points to, “You can't do this. If you do this, that's illegal.”

We believe that CPC-110 takes this further by, for example, in proposed paragraph 358.02(1)(a) making it also legal, “No person or entity shall”...“conceal, or attempt to conceal, the identity of the source of a contribution”.

Again, we are just trying to further close these loopholes relative to the bill that was put forward.

The Chair:

Is there discussion?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Largely, it was hashed out before, and I think it will be covered in new division 0.1 brought in by amendments, so I don't see a need to support it.

The Chair:

Ruby, do you have something to say?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

As David said, it's already covered. Partisan advertising is already prohibited and it's already a crime. Sorry, I meant foreign funding and partisan advertising—not just partisan advertising, which is what I think I just said, and my mind is all over the place today—so it just seems to be redundant. It doesn't really seem to be closing anything.

(1610)

The Chair:

Monsieur Boulerice. [Translation]

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

I like the spirit of the Conservatives' amendment.

Mr. Morin, I would like to ask a question to help me understand this.

Let's say an organization has an annual operating budget of $2 million and that it receives a $2 million contribution from a foreign corporation. That money received from a foreign corporation or foreign donor won't be used to conduct political or pre-election activities but rather to pay the organization's ordinary operating expenses.

How can we determine whether this foreign donation was used for pre-election or election activities or whether it's just a substitution? The claim can be made that this cash donation wasn't used for pre-election activities but rather to pay rent, a secretary, researchers and so on. The fact remains that this money didn't previously exist.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you for your question, Mr. Boulerice.

I'm just going to make a technical comment on amendment CPC-110. I would note that the new section 358.01 here proposed refers to section 358, which has been deleted by the adoption of amendment LIB-33.

To answer your question, Mr. Boulerice, I should note that the new division 0.1 was created under another Liberal amendment that was adopted yesterday. Broadly speaking, that new division prohibits the use of foreign funds at any time for partisan advertising, election advertising, partisan activities and election surveys. More specifically, it provides as follows: 349.02 No third party shall use funds for a partisan activity, for advertising or for an election survey if the source of the funds is a foreign entity. 349.03 No third party shall (a) circumvent, or attempt to circumvent, the prohibition under section 349.02; or (b) act in collusion with another person or entity for that purpose.

I know that doesn't exactly answer your question, and I won't answer it either, because every case is unique.

As we said earlier, however, third parties may include anyone except a candidate or party.

Canadian businesses probably receive foreign funds everyday, from dividends or other sources. If it were perfectly clear that an organization with a very limited budget was suddenly able to incur extraordinary expenses that it would normally be unable to incur, thanks to a foreign contribution, the situation could be investigated by the commissioner because it might involve one of the prohibitions I just cited. It all depends on the amounts and circumstances involved.

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice:

I see. Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

I get a sense that people know how they're going to vote, but I'll close off with Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I have a quick question for the officials. Would the bill as it stands apply only to foreign funding, or would it also apply to collusion domestically?

The Chair:

Do you mean the amendment or the bill?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I mean the bill.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

What do you mean by that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Pardon me, I mean the amendment, not the bill.

The Chair:

Does the amendment as written apply to both collusion and foreign funding? Is that what you're asking, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's correct.

The Chair:

Is that your question?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, would the amendment apply only to foreign funding or also to domestic collusion?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Well, it's an interesting question.

In the amendment, the new section 358.01 that was proposed referred to section 358 for which the topic was foreign funding, but that section has been repealed. So of course that provision specifically referred to foreign funding, but in the new section 358.02, for example, paragraph (a) has no specific reference to foreign funding. It just says that it is prohibited to "conceal, or attempt to conceal, the identity of the source of a contribution”, so that would apply domestically as well.

(1615)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, thank you, Mr. Morin.

The Chair:

Can we vote on this, please?

Mr. John Nater:

We would like a recorded vote, please, Chair.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

We have LIB-34 as the next amendment to clause 233, but it was consequential and passed.

You withdrew LIB-34? Can we withdraw it after it was passed? Was it passed consequentially?

While you're looking that up, we'll go to CPC-111. There are some ramifications to this amendment, before we introduce it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Chair, why was LIB-34 withdrawn?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was a backup amendment to clause 227.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

All right, thank you.

The Chair:

LIB-34 is withdrawn.

We're going to CPC-111. The vote on this amendment also applies to CPC-115.

Also, if CPC-111 is negatived, then CPC-153 on page 288 cannot be moved, as they are linked by reference.

Again, it's probably an infraction and the next one is the penalty for the infraction. If there's no infraction, you can't have a penalty.

Would the Conservatives present CPC-111.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Again, this is in regard to Professor Turnbull's recommendation. I feel as though we've touched on this in several other areas, but again, as the official opposition, we are trying to provide watertight mechanisms to prevent improper funding of Canadian elections.

This is the implementation of the ongoing segregated bank account and fundraising operations for third parties. I can't see why the government would be opposed to putting in mechanisms to ensure that improper funding of elections will not occur.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, I have a question for our officials. This is a recommendation that Professor Turnbull made fairly strongly when she appeared before the committee. At that time, she was an analyst with the Privy Council Office. I'm curious as to whether you ever had a conversation with Dr. Turnbull about the segregated bank account, and why PCO didn't recommend this when the bill was being drafted.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I have not, personally. I occupied my position at PCO from January 2011 to August 2012, and then more recently from April of this year to now. Sorry, I was not at PCO at the same time as Ms. Turnbull.

Mr. John Nater:

It's unfortunate. Professor Turnbull is an exceptionally smart political scientist who has won awards for a number of books she wrote. She's eminently qualified to make this recommendation, and it's disappointing that it hasn't been adopted, because she made it before this committee.

The Chair:

She's also eminently non-partisan.

Mr. John Nater:

Absolutely.

The Chair:

David, do you have comments on this?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I saw in the blues that we should actually call you Lieutenant-Commander Morin. Is that correct?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes. I served as a legal officer in the Canadian Armed Forces from August 2012 to April of this year.

(1620)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That takes care of the intervening time, so thank you for that.

Mechanically, how would this amendment work? As I understand it, it would force third parties to keep their accounts open between elections, which would be vastly different from how anybody else is handled in a campaign. It's a pretty big burden to ask somebody to spend $500 in bank fees to keep that $500 account open.

Is that a correct assessment of what this would do?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I will not comment on the burden but, of course, the necessity to keep a bank account open would come with fees, yes.

The Chair:

Do you have any response to that, Mr. Nater?

Mr. John Nater:

I think the big thing is that we want to see every dime that goes into segregated bank accounts accounted for to ensure it comes from domestic Canadian sources, is traceable, audited and so on. This is recommended by senior experienced people in the field. I think that's an appropriate way to go.

Bank fees are bank fees for constituting business. We all pay bank fees on our riding association accounts.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Community associations.

Mr. John Nater:

I think it makes sense, and I know the way the vote is going to go, but I think that's some protection of our—

The Chair:

Have you prejudged the vote?

Mr. John Nater:

I'm thinking it may go a certain way.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Why are candidates' bank accounts closed after the election, and then it's not necessary to open them back up until the writ period? Is it because they have that fallback of the riding associations to handle the money?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Do you mean for candidates?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, for candidates, or say a new candidate all of a sudden emerged a year before the election. They're not required to open a bank account at all until the writ time.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I will ask my dear colleague Trevor Knight who is an expert in political financing at Elections Canada to complement my answer. I would only add that the definition of candidate at the beginning of the Canada Elections Act says that a candidate is a candidate until all the financial obligations that are required under the act have been complied with.

My understanding is that at the end of this process when all financial returns have been provided and all debts have been reimbursed, the bank account should be closed and when a new campaign opens, then the new candidate should open a new bank account.

Mr. Trevor Knight (Senior Counsel, Legal Services, Elections Canada):

Yes, and the only thing I would add would be that as a candidate, once you start accepting contributions or incurring expenses for your election, even if it's before the writ period, the bank account has to be opened because all those contributions and expenses have to go through that bank account. Also, in closing, once all the transactions of the campaign are done and the surplus is disbursed, that's when the campaign bank account is closed.

The Chair:

Is there further discussion?

Do any of the witnesses have any comments on this amendment?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

May we have a recorded vote?

The Chair:

We will have a recorded vote on CPC-111.

(Amendment negatived: nays 6; yeas 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: As the amendment is defeated, it also defeats CPC-115. Amendment CPC-153 cannot be moved now because it was dependent on amendment CPC-111.

(Clause 233 agreed to on division)

(On clause 234)

The Chair:

There are a few amendments to clause 234.

We will first go to CPC-112.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This one doesn't strike me as familiar, in our having discussed it previously here, but it requires third parties to do pre-election reporting when there is a pre-election period, but the election is not on a fixed date

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was. We discussed it on CPC-94. It's a similar basis for the discussion.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Can you recall what the general conclusion was, David, in regard to the necessity or lack thereof for this? I'm sorry to put that burden on you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, but I can tell you that we voted it down.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm sure that happened, but I'm trying to remember why.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't remember exactly, but I remember that it created weird circumstances that we weren't comfortable with.

That's the short version.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

All right.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This one is clearly better.

This doesn't create weird circumstances. This resolves weird circumstances.

The Chair:

If there is no further debate, we'll vote on CPC-112.

Did you want it on division?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We don't say on division if it's defeated, right?

A voice: Two voted against it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was defeated on division.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's the wrong side of the dividing line.

The Chair:

Right.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll move to CPC-113.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

As best I know, we did discuss this in detail yesterday, adding the geographical catchment area to opinion poll disclosures.

The government was not in favour of it, so I'm not sure what I could say today to persuade them otherwise. I feel as though we've had this conversation. Although Dancing with the Stars is not on tonight, I don't want to be here for an extended period of time as a result of discussing the—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm so out of touch with Dancing with the Stars. Is it getting close to the end of it, or is it just the beginning?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

They're about a third to half way through.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually prefer that part. It's funnier.

The Chair:

Now we have a substantial reason for going to the vote quickly.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now we have one of the new amendments which were recently handed out. It's supplementary amendment 9961280.

Would the Conservatives present that.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It is, again, our attempt to make disclosures of foreign sources of funding watertight, legislating that third parties are required to disclose foreign sources of funding received for any purpose by third parties.

The amendment would add the following: (v) a list of all contributions received since the preceding general election by the third party from foreign individuals or entities and the date and purpose of the contribution; and

Again, it is an attempt to tighten up the language to avoid any possibility of foreign funding.

The Chair:

Is there comment by the witnesses?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I would like to make a comment on that.

The Chair:

Monsieur Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The Canada Elections Act defines a contribution as any monetary or non-monetary contribution. A monetary contribution is defined as an amount of money provided that is not repayable.

The approach we've taken with regard to the regulation of foreign funding for third parties is on the use of foreign funds rather than on the receipt of contributions. The reason for that is that since third parties are everybody who went in to making election advertising, partisan advertising, et cetera, I'm afraid that this motion would add a very broad disclosure requirement to the act.

If I were to receive a gift of $500 from my grandmother who lived in the United States, it would need to be disclosed. I would also be afraid that many not-for-profit organizations that receive donations from abroad would have to disclose all of these contributions.

(1630)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This is regardless of whether it's used for partisan advertising, because they're not allowed to use any foreign funds. It's just anything that is not being actually used in an election.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This only applies to your grandmother if she is a third party who is required to provide an expense disclosure, which, I think by definition, would not actually fit your grandmother. I think you're mistaken, Mr. Morin, in giving that example.

The Chair:

Would anyone else at the witness table say that Mr. Morin made a mistake?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I think I would read it similarly to Mr. Morin, or at least it raises that question in the sense that where, elsewhere in the third party regime, we've said a registered third party has to report contributions, they are contributions made for certain purposes—for election advertising or partisan activities. In contrast, this provision just says “a list of all contributions”.

A possibility, using a slightly different example of a non-profit group that sought to conduct third party advertising would be if it did register and it had some donors who were foreign donors. It would have to report all of those foreign donors regardless of whether it used those foreign contributions for partisan activities, etc., or for their other regular purposes.

In terms of the size of the burden, I'm not sure, but it would obviously be more reporting than is elsewhere in the contributions regime for third parties.

The Chair:

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Well, I appreciate that, and I think that example almost specifically outlines the necessity of this amendment. When you were a kid, how many times did your parents give you money for pizza, and you went to the mall and bought jeans? I see this as—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I can't say that ever happened to me.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Video games, then, David, or comic books....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If I wanted an allowance, I had to sell eggs.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, Mr. Chair, thank you.

The Chair:

I think we've had enough levity on this amendment.

We will go to the vote on CPC amendment 9961280. That is the reference number.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Just to be the devil's advocate here, Mr. Morin, really quickly, you said that if something had to be repaid, then it's not a contribution. If someone gave an interest-free loan or something to a Canadian for 10 years and that has to be repaid, it wouldn't be caught.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I don't want to get into that without looking at specific provisions of the act, but there are specific provisions about loans. This is a case that is being dealt with by the act already.

The Chair:

Okay. Now we go to CPC-114.

Stephanie, would you introduce that amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This again is in regard to third parties. It would make it a requirement to do the disclosure of political expenditures incurred between elections as well. As outlined, clause 234 would be amended by adding after line 20 on page 134: (v) a list of all expenses—other than those referred to in subparagraphs (i) to (iv)—incurred during the period beginning the day after polling day at the general election previous to the polling day referred to in subsection (1) and ending on the polling day referred to in that subsection The amendment continues and ends with: the date and place of the partisan activities to which the expenses relate; and

It would make the reportable period the entirety of the election period in terms of the political expenditures.

(1635)

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Actually, I have a question. According to the amendment, would they be applicable...? No, they would be outside of the writ and pre-writ period caps for third parties.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm not sure I understand your question.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Let's say that under Bill C-76 there will now be caps for all entities, including third parties. Third parties have a cap during the election period, during the pre-election period. I was asking—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This amendment is about reporting, so it does not impose a new cap. The cap that is being enacted for the pre-election period and the election period remain in other provisions, but this amendment would make it mandatory for third parties who are required to provide a financial return after the election to disclose all their expenses of a partisan nature that have happened since the last general election. All partisan advertisements, all election surveys, all partisan activities would be captured by this reporting requirement.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

I think this is the direction in which things are going. If you look historically at, I think, the good planning of some political parties, they thought, “Oh, there are election limits during the election period, so we we will move to the pre-writ”—to what was not defined as the pre-writ before. Then they started spending like crazy. Now we'll just see this pushed even further than before.

This amendment attempts to address that.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Well, yes and no. The way we define the various types of expenses.... For example, we do not define election advertising expenses as expenses incurred during the election period. We define them as expenses incurred, I think, “in relation to” the election period. That wording was carefully crafted to make sure that expenses that would be incurred immediately before the period, but for goods and services that would be used during the election period, would also be captured.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, of course. It's like accrual.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

But this goes much further.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This would require third parties to disclose every single partisan expense they've made since the last general election.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Well, we'll get there.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would this require all third parties to report all partisan activity on an ongoing, permanent basis? That seems fairly draconian.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It would require all third parties who have an obligation to report after a general election to report on all of their partisan activities since the last general election. A third party who did not incur expenses during a pre-writ and a writ period would not have to report anything on what happened between the two elections, but those who are required to report would, yes, be required to report on that as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, I think I have the impression. Thank you.

The Chair:

I think we've heard enough to go to a vote.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(1640)

The Chair:

The CPC amendment with reference number 9964902 has been withdrawn, and amendment CPC-115 was consequential to CPC-111, so no amendments pass related to clause 234.

(Clause 234 agreed to on division)

The Chair: There was one CPC amendment for clause 235, with reference number 9965053, but it was withdrawn, so there are no amendments.

(Clauses 235 to 237 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: Regarding clause 238, there was amendment CPC-116, but it was withdrawn by the Conservatives. Amendment LIB-35 passed because it was consequential to amendment LIB-32.

(Clause 238 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 239)

The Chair:

First of all, we have an amendment, LIB-36. The vote on this amendment will apply to amendment LIB-52, which is on page 294, as they are linked together by reference.

Ruby, present amendment LIB-36, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

During testimony before PROC, the CEO criticized aspects of Bill C-76. He indicated that allowing a party to deduct the cost described above from the amount of the contribution for a convention would permit a party to raise funds for a core party activity, for example, a leadership convention or whatever, with other funds counting against an individual's contribution limit. He further indicated that this problem would be compounded by the fact that a wealthy individual could pay for multiple attendees and buy several tickets and could end up paying for most or all of the convention.

The proposed amendment would delete two contentious proposed subsections, subsections 364(8) and 364(9), from Bill C-76. This deletion would uphold the status quo with regard to the treatment of party convention fees under the Canada Elections Act while retaining a new prohibition on persons other than eligible contributors paying for convention fees.

The Chair:

If there is no debate, we will vote on amendment LIB-36.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We just passed amendment LIB-36 unanimously. The vote applies also to amendment LIB-52. Those two amendments are linked by reference.

(Clause 239 as amended agreed to)

The Chair: There are no amendments on clauses 240 to 249.

Shall clauses 240 to 249 carry?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Clause 246 can carry on division. The rest can carry.

The Chair:

Okay.

(Clauses 240 to 245 inclusive agreed to)

(Clause 246 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 247 to 249 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 250)

The Chair: We have two CPC amendments on clause 250. The first one is CPC-117.

Would the Conservatives present that, please.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This requires advance notice of reporting requirements on the Chief Electoral Officer's limits on categories of candidates' personal expenses, and would amend the text to read: (2) No categories or amounts established under subsection (1) take effect until six months after the day on which they are established. If that day is within an election period, the categories or amounts do not apply in respect of that election. (3) The Chief Electoral Officer shall make a report to the Speaker of the House of Commons in respect of any categories and amounts established under subsection (1). (4) The Speaker shall submit to the House of Commons, without delay, any report received by him or her under this section.

Obviously, candidates need to have knowledge of not only the requirements but the limits on expenses.

I would say that this is something of interest to all candidates. As well, I believe the minister herself is interested very much in personal expenses for things such as child care, a concern I share as well. The opportunity to have advance notice of these reporting requirements and the limits on the categories would prove useful.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

(1645)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was going to ask Mr. Morin and Mr. Knight whether they have any comments on this, to start with.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

From PCO's perspective, I don't have any technical comment. This would create a new requirement for the Chief Electoral Officer to inform the Speaker of the House of Commons of these new categories. It would create a new delay in their implementation, but it's a policy decision.

The Chair:

Mr. Knight.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I don't know the specifics in terms of how we would inform people. I think it's fair to say that in terms of the entire implementation, we'll obviously have to be clear and inform people. I don't think we would object to a process for informing people of these things.

If I can take a step back, right now in the act there is a category of personal expenses, which includes child care, travel and living expenses. It also includes other personal expenses that people may seek a reimbursement for. Those could include a wide variety of things that people seek reimbursement for. Under the current act, that has an overall limit of $200. The limitation functions as a way of achieving a balance in what you can seek a reimbursement for, not what you can spend on these things.

Bill C-76 would expand that to travel and living expenses, so there will now be other categories, potentially, where the CEO may wish to place limits.

I don't know that I can comment. The only comment I would make is, given the timing of everything, if there is a situation where these things cannot be implemented before the next election because of the time delays in here, there is the possibility that the categories of travel, living expenses, and personal expenses would be open and not subject to limit.

The consequence of that isn't on the overall election expense limit. The consequence of that would be on the reimbursements candidates could seek for those expenses. There may be higher reimbursements than perhaps would be thought appropriate in terms of achieving that balance, but that's the only consequence of this amendment that I would see that would raise a concern for Elections Canada at this time.

The Chair:

To Trevor and Stephanie, would you not just put the information on your website, in the same way you inform everyone of everything else?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I don't know exactly how. As various changes are rolled out, we'll certainly issue the candidate handbooks. I assume we'll have some other ways, on our website and through other means, to contact candidates and potential candidates, and obviously, electoral district associations and parties. We also have the advisory committee on political parties, which I assume will be used as a way to inform them of C-76 and likely coming changes.

(1650)

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It seems like a peculiar thing to require the Speaker to care about rather than the general public disclosures that we usually have. I see a lot of extra work and no advantage to this amendment, so I'm not going to support it.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Perhaps our witnesses could inform us if there are other things in the act that are required to be reported to Parliament through the Speaker.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

It will probably not be a comprehensive list, but there is certainly a report after every general election and a report on by-elections. There is a recommendations report that is made after each election on suggestions that the Chief Electoral Officer has to change the act.

There's a provision in the act that allows the Chief Electoral Officer to replace signatures with another method that they believe will be satisfactory for the purposes. There is a report to the Speaker on any such change. There's also a report to the Speaker on the process used for appointing and removing returning officers under the act.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

To this, I may add that Trevor was very thorough in his lists, so all these reports are provided at sections 533 to 537 of the Canada Elections Act.

The Chair:

Mr. de Burgh Graham, are you ready to vote?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I am ready to vote.

The Chair:

Is there anything further?

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Sampson has something.

Mr. Robert Sampson (Legal Counsel, Legal Services, Elections Canada):

Thank you.

I just want to note that there are, of course, other publication requirements and other means, for example, in the Canada Gazette, or under the guidelines and opinions provisions that are published on their website. The publication requirements are often commensurate with the type of information that is being made public.

The Chair:

We are ready to vote on CPC-117.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll now go to CPC-117.1.

Would the Conservatives introduce that amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This continues, in effect, the Chief Electoral Officer's current limits on categories of candidates' personal expenses until he determines otherwise.

The Chair:

Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, is this not already the case?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, paragraph 44(g) of the Interpretation Act provides that when an action is replaced by another and the substance of the amendment is the same, then the previous regulations or the previous determinations made under the previous text are deemed to have continued under the new text.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So it's redundant. Thank you.

The Chair:

If we are ready, we will vote on CPC-117.1.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 250 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Now, proposed by the Conservatives is a new clause, 252.1, and there's a new CPC amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Did we do clause 251?

I think we did clause 250 but not clause 251.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We haven't passed clause 251.

The Chair:

Okay.

(Clauses 251 and 252 agreed to)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We have two amendments.

The Chair:

We're going to new clause 252.1 now.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This is not actually a new amendment. It's a new clause after clause 252.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Oh, pardon me. Okay.

The Chair:

We have two Conservative proposals that add a clause after clause 252, which we just approved.

The first one is reference number 10009236.

Would the Conservatives present that amendment, please.

(1655)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. This ensures that the solicitor-client privilege is not waived on litigation expense disclosures. I think that we are seeing in society at all levels of government, more and more litigation with elections and with outcomes of elections. I am hoping we're going the way of the United States—that's a joke.

We believe ensuring that the solicitor-client privilege is not waived on litigation expense disclosures provides for more transparency in the disclosure process.

The Chair:

Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, do you have any comments on this?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No.

The Chair:

Or on the United States?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No.

Seriously, Mr. Graham, I don't have any specific comments. I'll only say that in recent years—and I don't have specific cases to note—the Supreme Court of Canada has repeatedly reinforced the importance of solicitor-client privilege in Canada, and I don't think that anyone would require the disclosure of such documents.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Yes, Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm sorry. To clarify, Monsieur Morin, the solicitor-client privilege is something that.... The privilege of clients to not identify their solicitor, is that something that is in law at present? Is it a privilege that you do not have to disclose who your solicitor is?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm asking that.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, I'm sorry. The solicitor-client privilege is about protecting the communications between the client and the solicitor.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I see. Pardon me. My apologies. I misunderstood that.

Okay, I will leave it at that, then.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, are we ready to vote?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I am.

The Chair:

All in favour of the CPC amendment with reference number 10009236 please signify.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That was 10009234, I believe.

The Chair:

Was it 10009234 that you introduced?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's correct.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings]

The Chair:

Now you can introduce the amendment with the reference number 10009236.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I believe this is within the same—

The Chair:

—spirit?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

—spirit, exactly. Thank you.

I don't think there is a need to discuss it further.

The Chair:

Okay, we will vote on the Conservative amendment with the reference number 10009236 that would create new clause 252.1.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: There is no new clause 252.1 because the two amendments proposing to add it were defeated.

(On clause 253)

The Chair: There is an amendment, CPC-118.

Would the Conservatives present that amendment, please.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is maintaining the public disclosure of candidates' expense returns, but through online publication instead of by visiting the returning officer. The text is amended exactly as that: The Chief Electoral Officer shall, as soon as feasible after receiving the documents referred to in subsection 477.59(1) for an electoral district, publish them on his or her Internet site.

It seems modern and expedient.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As subsection 382(1) requires that these things be disclosed in a manner considered appropriate by the CEO as it is, I don't see the advantage of adding this thing. The CEO can already mandate it.

The Chair:

Well, you just said it was up to his discretion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right. It's up to the CEO.

The Chair:

So he doesn't have to do it electronically.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's what he considers appropriate.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's right, because Elections Canada....

I rather assumed that posting candidates' expenses was done electronically. Is it done already, or not so much?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Yes, it is. The obligation in the act, and I don't have the section right with me, is to publish the returns in the manner and form which the Chief Electoral Officer feels is appropriate. On the Internet, then—

(1700)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What is currently done? What is the current practice?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

They are published on the website, although not exactly as they come in, but in a more searchable form. They're translated into a form that allows them to be searched.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. What this would insist on, then, is the practice that you currently have. I'm wondering whether this would alter anything that Elections Canada currently does.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

It is essentially what we do. One thing that we do on the website is publish the name and postal code of contributors rather than the name, address and postal code, to balance between privacy and disclosure. This would have us publish, presumably, the whole document.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm sorry, but can you help me to understand why that enhanced amount of disclosure would be mandated by this change? You're suggesting that what is published right now is a bit more limited information, in terms of postal code and name.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

The street address is not published, so—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Does this require the street address?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Well, because it is in the document that we receive.... The return is available at Elections Canada in an unredacted form, but it's not published at Elections Canada. It's available to anyone who wishes to inspect it.

On the website, the contents of the document are reported, but they're in a more readable form. They're taken from the paper document and put into a system, but there's a difference, which is that the street address is not published, because that reflects a long-time practice that was developed a long time ago with the Privacy Commissioner. This, by requiring the publication, would slightly alter that practice.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is my last question, Chair.

Just to be clear, you're suggesting that discretion would no longer be available if we passed this amendment; that if you have to pass it in this form, Elections Canada would be prevented from redacting things such as street address.

I'm not reading it that way, but I know this has a couple of references in it to other sections of the act.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I would just read it as.... I mean, there are other references to the return. Section 477.59 is the candidate's return, so it would be published on the website. This is a quick read at this time, but it looks to me like it suggests that it would then be posted on the website, presumably in a PDF format—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

With the address.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

—with all the information.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is that your reading as well, Mr. Sampson?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Yes, and my only comment is that it requires the documents themselves to be published. This is the point. We would be required to publish—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You wouldn't be able to redact an address, for example.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

—and we would also lose the ability.... Well, we would publish the documents, and then we would also translate them, I guess, into a form that is more accessible.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

A searchable form.

I know we're getting some comment from Mr. Morin, but that would be.... I broadly support the initiative of more transparency and searchability. If there's an unintended consequence of then also producing street address information—

The Chair:

I read it the way they did too.

Mr. Nater, you had a question.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes. Thank you, Chair.

It's just a clarification. As is the case now, receipts, vouchers, invoices, none of that is published online. Is that correct?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

That's correct.

Mr. John Nater:

Would it be in a case such as this?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Well, not the way this is written because the reference of subsection 477.59(1) is to the declarations of the official agent and the candidate, the return itself, and the auditor's report. Those documents, I guess, would be published, but the vouchers, which are the documents you're talking about, the supporting documents are in subsection (2), so they wouldn't be published online under this.

The Chair:

Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

The law at present is under public availability. A returning officer who receives documents under subsection (1) shall, on request, make them available for six months for public inspection at any reasonable time. Copies may be obtained for a fee of up to 25¢ per page.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I would like to make a few comments on that. The first comment is the current obligation for the Chief Electoral Officer to publish the information that is found at paragraph 382(1)(a) of the act. That is, as Trevor was referring to, the publication in the manner that the Chief Electoral Officer considers appropriate.

With regard to the specific provision that is being modified here by the motion, Bill C-76 was recommending the repeal of section 383. This was a recommendation of the Chief Electoral Officer in his latest recommendations report because, as we read section 383 right now, it contains a mistake. It was amended by mistake in 2015, whereby subsection 383(2) is kind of out of place and doesn't make sense in the context. Also, generally section 383 was about the consultation of these candidates' returns at the returning officer's office, and the Chief Electoral Officer has indicated in his latest recommendations report that nowadays, as these returns are available online, this consultation in person at the returning officer's office seems pretty unnecessary.

Finally, on the motion itself, my colleague Robert alluded to that, but all government institutions that have a website, including Elections Canada, are required to make all documents readable in accessible formats for persons with disabilities. The PDF documents represent a very specific problem because often, as in the case of financial returns, those would be scanned copies, so the document would not be readable in a machine-readable format. This would require Elections Canada to create a translation, word for word, of what appears in the entire document for each and every election return. That would represent a very heavy burden for the organization.

(1705)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, I'm going to propose a subamendment that I hope will help with some of the concerns, that amendment CPC-118 be amended by replacing the words “subsection 477.59(1)” with the words “subsections 477.59(3) and (4)”.

That would give us the information we're looking for but would still maintain that first part, which had the street addresses.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could our witnesses give their interpretation of the effect of this, before we go further?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Does getting rid of subsection (1) and adding (3) and (4) address the issue?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor] and it's not searchable and is adding an extra burden, but it might address the issue.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's not available. I think the level of detail they're looking at is not available right now—the voucher report, which is the receipt level. That is my understanding.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let's see what they have to say.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They're not talking to us, so I figured we should just talk about it and figure it out.

The Chair:

While the officials are figuring that out, I have a question for Ms. May.

Do you want us to finish your amendment before we break for food so that you can go, or are you planning on staying?

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

That's really something I hate to ask you guys to do. You're probably desperate for a break and would probably like to have your food.

The Chair:

We can do it.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

If the committee is willing.... I imagine it will be a long debate, because it will lead us to saying yes to my amendment, but if you think it's relatively quickly that you're going to come to yes, I'm prepared to do it now.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're holding our dinners hostage. Is that what you're saying?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I'm saying that the depths of the venality of the Green Party have yet to be tested.

I'm in your hands, Mr. Chair. I won't stay after this amendment. Honestly, I think this is the amendment I care the most about, and for the rest of the evening I can bugger off.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You can just listen to us on CPAC.

I mean ParlVu—excuse me—not CPAC.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Sorry.

The Chair:

I'll go for a few minutes here, and if it drags on, we'll break.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it exceptionally rude if we eat while we're listening to her?

The Chair:

Yes, we may get to that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It depends upon what you're eating.

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments on the subamendment? Does it solve the problem of having to put out the address and everything?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Am I right that the amendment would replace subsection 477.59(1) by subsections 477.59(3) and (4)?

Mr. John Nater:

That's correct.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Okay.

Well, this is a policy decision, but from an operational perspective, 338 electoral districts times six, seven, or eight candidates represents thousands of candidates, and these represent thousands of documents.

I must remind the committee that these documents are already public documents pursuant to section 541 of the Canada Elections Act and can be consulted upon request at Elections Canada.

(1710)

The Chair:

—where they can see the addresses?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, this is about supporting documents. This is about receipts from bank accounts—

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

From an operational perspective, all of these documents would need to be translated and would need to be made available in an available format for persons with disabilities.

I'm not saying that making something available in an accessible format is a burden; I'm just saying that in this case, these are invoices and bank accounts, and....

The Chair:

I can sense where we're going to go here, but Mr. Cullen and Mr. Nater may speak briefly.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I just have a brief question.

If the documents are already public documents, how would someone from, say, Dawson City get access to these documents?

The Chair:

That's a good choice of reference. It's in the most beautiful riding in the country.

Mr. Robert Sampson:

Under section 541 you can request.... The provision is actually drafted such that you need to come to the Chief Electoral Officer's office. In practice, that is available, but we also make documents available for people who cannot come to the office.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do they physically have to come?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

That is what the act requires, but we do have this facility. If someone wishes to come to our office, we will provide the documents that way, but in instances in which people cannot come, we have provided them by a new electronic format.

Mr. John Nater:

Is that a policy of Elections Canada? Has there been a directive to that effect, or is it just common practice?

Mr. Robert Sampson:

I'd have to check as to whether there's a policy or whether it is common practice, but I know it has been done on occasion.

The Chair:

Okay.

(Subamendment negatived)

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 253 agreed to on division)

(On clause 254)

The Chair:

We have amendment PV-10.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you, Chair, and thanks to committee members.

This amendment will be something with which you're all familiar. We've had a lot of focus in the national media, in this committee, and in the evidence. Particularly, I remind you of the evidence of our former chief electoral officer, Marc Mayrand. An approach that he favoured in his testimony was to adhere to the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act. This is what my amendment will do.

There was discussion before the committee about that suggestion. It was also supported by Professor Michael Pal from the University of Ottawa, and tellingly, in the media, Teresa Scassa, the Canada research chair in information law and policy at the University of Ottawa described Bill C-76 as it is now, as "an almost contemptuous and entirely cosmetic quick fix designed to deflect attention from the very serious privacy issues raised by the use of personal information by political parties.”

It's very timely. It's the right thing to do. There's no reason political parties can't adhere to the same laws that the private sector adheres to.

I would really hope that you'll give serious consideration to actually voting for this amendment to enshrine privacy protection for Canadians and not exempt political parties any longer.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is meant to be based on evidence that we heard, and I'm trying to reflect on a single witness who spoke against this idea of the parties moving into the modern era and falling under some sort of privacy rules.

As we heard, Chair, from the current Chief Electoral Officer, there are none that parties are subjected to—zero. It should be of concern not just from the Canadian voter's point of view that we collect a lot of information about Canadians—not just voting intentions but all sorts of information—from the electoral lists. Parties are in the business of accumulating and cross-tabulating data on citizens to understand their voting motivations and their intentions. That's the primary objective of most political parties in their very existence right now, along with raising money and all sorts of other things.

The current examples in front of us from the U.S. and the U.K. should be important. We don't want to fall into a similar scenario in which an important election or referendum is affected because one or all of the parties' data systems were hacked. We also heard from security experts that our parties' data systems are not secure.

This is a clear and present concern. In the most recent Quebec referendum, for example, which was a very close vote, if after the fact—or during, but certainly if after the fact—it was learned that the Parti Québécois or the Liberals had serious breaches of their databases and that those voters were targeted by outside influences to vote one way or another on the question, you can imagine the fallout from that on whoever won or whoever lost. For a country like ours, which, as Mr. Dion used to say, works better in practice than it does in theory, we shouldn't have anything built into our political or democratic infrastructure that threatens our ability to conduct ourselves and to have the will of the voters expressed as cleanly as possible into the parliament they elect.

Marc Mayrand was joined by, of course, our Privacy Commissioner, who said, and I quote, “Nothing of substance in regard to privacy”, and a requirement to have publicly available data policy is a 'hollow” requirement.

The Chief Electoral Officer, whom members on the government side have referred to continuously in support of amendments you have made, said: If there is one area where this bill failed, it is privacy. The parties are not subjected to any kind of privacy regime.

In answer to a question he said, “I think the time has come for that, and privacy commissioners around the country are of the same view.”

David Moscrop joined that conversation in support of bringing this in.

Victoria Henry from Open Media said that the “omission of political parties from privacy legislation is a concerning gap”.

I'm quoting there, as I will Dr. Dubois, when she said: This proposed legislation does not include any form of audit or verification that the policy is adequate, ethical, or being followed. There are no penalties for non-compliance. There are no provisions that permit Canadians to request their data be corrected or deleted....

All that's in this bill right now, as committee members know, is the requirement that parties simply publish a privacy policy somewhere on their website. It doesn't say whether that privacy policy should do anything, and it doesn't say that if the party breaks that privacy policy as stated, there is any consequence.

That is meaningless. It really is, folks. If a Canadian challenges a party and says, “I think you've lost my data. I'm getting all sorts of calls from certain groups or certain people trying to sell me things, and I told you on my doorstep that I'm concerned about the environment”, or “I'm concerned about taxes”, there are exactly zero consequences contemplated under Bill C-76 for a data breach from any of the parties. This has to be concerning. This is way beyond right-left partisan politics.

This is simply about trying to address a gap in our legislative ability to run free and fair elections in this country. I've talked with the minister from day one about this. From having talked to some congressional colleagues in the U.S., who said, “If you do anything, fix this gap. You guys are naive; you're boy scouts; you think you're not going to be got after because you're nice people”....

That's not the way it works. Outside influences, inside influences, just looking to disrupt—again, imagine the experience we had in Quebec—a fundamental question going on within one of our provinces, not even to push voters, but to cast doubt....

(1715)



As we've seen, Chair, when we're talking about election laws, one of the things we're always safeguarding is that on election night, when the results are released in each of our ridings and then the grand result is released for Canadians, win or lose, Canadians accept the results as being good, whether they like them or not—but they weren't tampered with and they weren't affected.

This is one of the things that maintains that assurance for Canadians. Without this, we're in a whole different world, because we collect an enormous amount of information about Canadians. I seem to be the only one around this table admitting that, but we all know it for fact to be true, and we don't have the proper protections, because data is so powerful these days. We watch it all the time. It's only going to increase.

This problem is not going to get better on its own, right? It's not as if parties are going to give up collecting data and are not going to get increasingly sophisticated, yet our security systems are not in place to protect what is so valuable to the functioning of our democracy.

(1720)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I worked in the technology industry for most of my career before getting into politics. I'm aware of the issues and I don't disagree with what you're saying. I don't think the appropriate way of doing this is by a single amendment putting this under PIPEDA. I think it requires a much fuller study, and I am totally in favour of doing a fuller study here at PROC as soon as this bill is done.

I know what you're going to say, but it's a much bigger issue than one amendment to one bill for one effect, because if you were to put the entire political system under PIPEDA in one amendment with no study, with no research on what the effects are on the political process versus other things....

So yes, I would like to get to where you want to go—to privacy protections for political parties—but I think you have to do a study on how to do it properly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We know that another committee of Parliament, the privacy and ethics committee, has studied this and they've recommended this.

To your point about more study, and I am not accusing you of this, David, it is one reason that I have heard from government too often when they simply don't want to do something—“let's study it”. We're a year away from the election and we are ill prepared for this threat. Parliament has studied this. Parliament made the decision at another committee to do it, and we're going to reject that, which is what we're actually saying....

The Chair:

Ms. May.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you, Chair, because I know that your committee motion didn't require you to give me a second crack at this.

I just want to mention that I tried to amend this when it was Bill C-23, the Fair Elections Act. I brought forward an amendment to have the Privacy Act apply. This time, I modified it to having the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, PIPEDA, apply.

Based on the advice we're hearing from our Chief Electoral Officer and from experts in privacy, if we wait, David, with all due respect, we'll be having the 2019 election with inadequate protection of Canadians' privacy data, and we know what can happen. As Nathan was talking, I remembered that when Irwin Cotler was in Parliament with us—it was a huge honour to serve at the same time as Irwin—he was so upset because he told his campaign staff to make no phone calls on High Holy Days, no phone calls, and somehow somebody had the database of the Jewish families in his riding and they all got calls on Seder. They were interrupted if they were at the Seder feast by calls from the Irwin Cotler office.

Now, we don't know who made those calls, but it's a misuse of privacy data to be able to know who is Jewish, who is likely to be home, and who could be offended by the misuse of data. Our privacy data is private, and Canadians should have a right to be able to say to any political party, “Show me what you've got on me—I want to know.” That's a right Canadians should have. There's no reason, ethically, practically.... There is no justification for political parties to be the only exempt operators who collect data, and boy, do they collect data.

We collect as much as we can. We don't have as much as you guys. I will never forget talking to Garth Turner. He put this in his book. It was about the FRANK system, which stands for friends, relatives, and neighbours' kids, in terms of what his former party was collecting.

We've got to fix this. We've got one shot and it's in the next half hour.

The Chair:

Are we ready to vote on PV-10?

Mr. Nathan Cullen: I would like a recorded vote, Chair.

(Amendment negatived: nays 8; yeas 1 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 254 agreed to on division)

The Chair:

We'll take a break.

Witnesses, please eat so that you're strong for the next part of our session.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: We won't be very long. Bring your food back to the table, please, and we'll carry on.

Thank you.

(1720)

(1740)

The Chair:

Welcome back.

Thank you again to all the committee members for very positive decorum and for positively disagreeing.

Voices: Oh, oh!

(On clause 255)

The Chair: There's one proposed amendment and that's NDP-21.

Mr. Cullen, you could introduce that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Very good.

This is for colleagues who were feeling that PV-10 was too much, too fast and too quick; who are interested in privacy; and who understand the concerns of the experts we heard from, the Privacy Commissioner and the Chief Electoral Officer. Everybody hears those concerns and wants to do something about it, because how could you not? That would be my argument. In that case, NDP-21 is for you.

Here's what it does. It works with the Chief Electoral Officer to develop directives in consultation with the Privacy Commissioner and to work with the parties to establish guidelines. Those guidelines are then given into directives, and the Chief Electoral Officer can use those directives. It doesn't invoke PIPEDA. This was one of the concerns I heard, particularly from Liberal members, that PIPEDA was too much; it was too much on parties. This does not insist upon that.

This is exactly our job—to independently, as MPs, get elected to a committee, listen to the witnesses, glean the best information we can from them, and do right by Canadians. I suspect, or I presume, I suppose, there's a certain amount of pressure on colleagues to not vote for things that folks back in the party offices don't want to do.

This has two effects, one in practice and one in support of good behaviour. In practice, I think having real privacy policies that are in force, that work with our Chief Electoral Officer...which, again, this entire committee has referenced dozens of times and holds up in high esteem. It also has a secondary effect, where if anybody within the party structure is tempted to do something—such as, I don't know, a robocall into ridings illegally—these types of policies prevent that behaviour, which is what the law is supposed to do. It's not just to catch people when they do wrong. It's also to give enough warning so that when people are tempted, they're not really tempted to enact it.

I really believe we heard everything we need to hear from every witness. If a colleague can recall the testimony of a single witness who said something like this was a bad idea, from all the witnesses we heard, or if colleagues want to look through the ethics and privacy committee, which studied this as well, to find a single witness of any political persuasion who came forward and said Parliament shouldn't do something like this, I would love to hear that testimony. I feel pretty confident that we didn't receive that testimony, and neither did our corresponding committee at privacy and ethics receive that testimony.

A number of us on that committee visited Washington last year. Facebook and Congress and Twitter and a whole bunch of groups that are involved with this issue all gave us the same warning: Your laws are insufficient. We thought we had enough protections. We did not. When a hack happens, it's too late. When the illegal robocalls go out, it's too late.

I just implore colleagues that this is as soft a move as we can make while still ensuring that we get the job done. Like, really; the pleas to study more will be pretty weak when something bad happens. When we're asked what we did about it and we say “Well, we promised to study it more”, we'll hear, “Well, thanks”.We don't do this for any other section of law.

I'll end with this, Chair. This puts some of us in what I almost want to say is a direct conflict between our responsibilities as members of Parliament and members of political parties. The political parties generally don't want this. I know: I've talked to your parties about this. They don't want it. And I know why. They'd rather have it as it is, because status quo means nobody has any idea what the political parties are gathering and what we do with that information.

We don't work for political parties. We may represent them, and fly under various banners, but we work for the people who sent us here. I believe if you sat down with the average Canadian and told them what happens when they click on a survey or when they press “Like” on Facebook; what the parties do with the data; that the parties have very little to no protection to keep that secure; and the potential consequences if that data is breached, then the average Canadian of whatever political persuasion, from the right to the left, would say, “That's crazy. Can you do anything about it?”

Here's something we can do about it. I'll read from the amendment: 385.2 (1) The Chief Electoral Officer may develop directives, in consultation with the Privacy Commissioner, in respect of the protection of personal information by registered parties.

(1745)



In proposed subsection 385.2(2), the subsections that are named turn guidelines into directives. Proposed subsection 385.2(3) would read: The Chief Electoral Officer may deregister a registered party if that party's policy for the protection of personal information does not comply with a directive made under this section.

There is a consequence. Posting your policy on your website with no consequence—come on—is totally meaningless. It's checking a box. You don't even have to do it, and if you put up some policy and you don't do it, there's no consequence to you breaking whatever it is you wrote down.

That's not taking this issue seriously. This is an attempt to take the issue seriously.

Elizabeth's motion did more, and we supported it. This motion takes us down the path of us getting serious about privacy. It's 2018, and we're going to the polls in 2019. If anyone believes that this problem isn't only going to get worse for 2023, you're dreaming, and that's what the experts told us.

Don't listen to your parties on this.

We did not support Elizabeth's initial initiatives on this two or three years ago. It took a long conversation with some of the people running my party, saying to suck it up, that they're going to have to develop some privacy policy and we're going to have to be accountable if we break it—real ones—and so they did.

I'm here and able to say it, and not with everybody in my party who works on the data side thrilled about it, but I don't care; I don't work for them.

I ask members to support this amendment. We should do this. The evidence told us we should do this.

The Chair:

I have a couple of questions for clarification.

One is, can you tell me really briefly what the ethics committee study was? What was its mandate?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They actually recommended that PIPEDA apply to the parties.

The Chair:

But what was the topic?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This was about data and data breaches.

You have to remember—

The Chair:

By parties, specifically?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. Because out of Cambridge Analytica, that was—

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The U.K. is at our privacy committee right now. They are sending representatives there. We're able, there, to be asking Cambridge Analytica and some of the Canadian affiliates how it was that Brexit went the way it went. How did $1 million dumped into a students' association get access to a bunch of data and then micro-target a bunch of Britons the week prior to their vote on Brexit, which, of course, passed, and the leave campaign won?

Ask England, if they could go back and strengthen their privacy laws, do they think they would. Was that referendum done fairly, openly? Absolutely not.

The Chair:

My second question is whether in your preamble you said "in consultation with the parties".

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, of course, because we've talked to the Privacy Commissioner and the Chief Electoral Officer about this. We asked how they would come up with these initiatives and whether they would do it in isolation. They said, no, they would consult with the parties, because, as of right now, the Privacy Commissioner and the Chief Electoral Officer have no idea of how our systems work.

They wouldn't develop these in isolation, because they couldn't. They would have to work together, and they do.

Correct me if I'm wrong, Elections Canada, but what's the committee called that is established for the party consultation?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

It's the advisory committee of political parties.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you. It's the advisory committee of political parties.

Elections Canada is in conversation with our political parties all the time: new rules, old rules, enforcement and what to expect in 2019. This is where this would go.

(1750)

The Chair:

But it's not referenced in your motion at all.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's not. However, in testimony and in individual conversations that I've had with them, this is absolutely where they go, especially on something that affects parties.

My experience with them, and the party's experience, is that they don't come out of the blue with a new policy that affects the way we operate, especially on privacy. As I said, they're starting from zero; they have no idea how we manage data, what our security systems are.

The Chief Electoral Officer sat right there and I asked him whether he had any idea of how parties operate when it comes to data. He said, no, he had no idea.

The Chair:

Ms. May.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I would just add that in the example from Cambridge Analytica and the other one, IQ—those are the initials—as you probably remember, it was a Victoria, B.C., company implicated in illegally interfering in the Brexit vote. This is horrific stuff, because this is another risk for political parties. You can contract a company and think they're there to help you with your data, but they're stealing your data for some other use and you won't know.

We have to get a handle on this. It's very dangerous. The thing about it is that while political parties are getting more sophisticated at collecting data and wanting to hang on to it, for people who want to hack our systems we give them a key to our data when we hire a company like that. You think they're working for you. That's what happened on Brexit.

I'm going to say that the Green Party of B.C. hired those people to do some work for us—not us, it's a separate party—in organizing a website. When we and the Green Party of B.C. found out that this company was implicated, this IQ company, they started trying to figure out if our data was stolen, if our data was breached. They had to go public and say, “We really don't know—we've done our best to track it down, but we don't know.”

We have to have controls over what happens to our data so that the public knows, the Privacy Commissioner knows, and so we have control and we know that the public has the right to privacy. It's not as if political parties are the only ones who might misuse the data. The companies we hire in good faith might be the ones who are collecting our data. If people knew that you could click a “like” on a Facebook post and a political party could have a contractor who collects that data....

In other words, it's a two-way street. You're not just saying, “Yes, I like that, thumbs up.” You're not just hiring a company to make the Facebook ad look good. You're actually giving another company.... It's quite Orwellian, I have to admit, but we have to control it. If I were a voting member of this committee, you know I'd be voting to support NDP amendment 21, because at least it's a good start and it gives discretion to the Chief Electoral Officer. Also, I'm sure, as Nathan said, that it would be in consultation with the parties.

It gives us some chance to develop some regulations around what's now.... Because we're not insisting that political parties be under our privacy laws, we're creating a Wild West situation where the political parties are vulnerable, members' data is vulnerable and the average person whose door we knock on is vulnerable, and we have got to get a handle on it.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin, did I see that you wanted to speak?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes. I will just mention to the committee that from a technical standpoint, NDP-21 does refer to consultations with political parties through its proposed subsection 385.2(2), which makes reference to subsections 16.1(2) to (7) of the Canada Elections Act. Subsection 16.1(3) provides for consultation with the commissioner of Canada elections and members of the advisory committee of political parties.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's a better amendment than I thought, Chair.

I don't know if this happened for you or other MPs who were in the last Parliament, but Cambridge Analytica approached a number of our offices in the last election with the offer of harvesting our Facebook likes. They asked if we would like to find out the emails of the people who have liked us and if we would like to find out who likes them. They were quite bold and open about it and approached MPs from all parties.

You can see why MPs would be tempted, because, as you know, you get a Facebook like and you know what you know from that, if you just use it like a normal person would. These folks weren't normal people. They asked if we would like to know more about the people and if we would like to be able to email them directly, not just through Facebook, but independently. Would we like to know where they live? Would we like to know what they like? Would we like to know all of their friends and their emails? That was the offer.

(1755)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I just heard somebody say “who cares”. That's a fascinating response to—

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I don't think so [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. I misheard it.

The Chair: Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Just to clarify that, there is a concern with privacy. That being said, my concern in hearing from the Privacy Commissioner was with respect to PIPEDA. My concern is that he doesn't understand political parties. It's great for the head offices and those involved there to be governed by a set of principles, but going down the line, the people at the door with the call sheet or with the door sheet at their home looking to call, they are governed by the same legislation, the same concerns. If the Privacy Commissioner's belief is that PIPEDA should apply, I don't see where this consultation goes. If the volunteers with the list of names go home after the end of their shift, there's been a data breach.

How do we apply this policy well beyond, to our volunteers and beyond this? We haven't studied it nearly enough to come up with a reasonable solution, creating a broad hope that something will come of it. I don't believe having consultations is something I can support, even though it is desirable to have stronger statements on privacy.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

When we're drawing up legislation, we're always measuring risk. This is a case where we're tyring to prevent bad things from happening. On the other side, there is the consequence we couldn't have understood before it happens. Every piece of legislation tries to anticipate this and tries to think about it.

To Chris's point, the idea that a volunteer going home with a poll sheet being the type of breach that the Chief Electoral Officer is concerned about versus the things that we know are present dangers.... There's no conspiracy or mythological thinking about this. The concerns have been demonstrated to us in functioning old democracies that we rely on for all sorts of lessons. We built our parliamentary system off of one of them. In the measurement of the risks, if we see this being conducted right now and we know it's getting worse and, instead, we talk about it more and not change anything until maybe some time later because we're concerned that a volunteer going home with a poll sheet is somehow going to be subjected to some arbitrary penalty, that is of course not the breach that the Privacy Commissioner and the Chief Electoral Officer are concerned about. They're really not.

For a government that loves consultation—sometimes you don't listen, but whatever; you hit the consultation button a lot—to say you're not into consultation now with people who we trust, Elections Canada, the Chief Electoral Officer, the Privacy Commissioner, on millions of decisions that affect the way that our democracy.... We trust these guys.

In that weighing of risks, I can't see how the perversion of an election from inside or outside forces, which is everything, versus a volunteer getting caught out with a poll sheet, imagining the day that the Privacy Commissioner is going to hammer that volunteer—they are incomparable to me.

You can tell I'm pleading with my colleagues to say this is a prudent step forward. We have 10 or 11 months until the writ drops. What are we able to put in place before 2019? We have somewhat limited scope in these consultations because they have to go to this committee, as is referenced in the amendment.

Let me anticipate. The parties will not be jumping over themselves to slam down and agree to PIPEDA for 2019. Let me guess at that right now. They've been so reluctant every step of the way. We have to weigh the partisan interest versus public interest. This is one of those times.

The Chair:

Do any of the other members who haven't spoken want to speak?

If there are no other comments, we will have a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 8; yeas 1 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 255 agreed to on division)

(1800)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Before we go to the next clause, I just have some quick withdrawals, if that's okay.

Based on the decisions we made before our supper break, the Conservatives will be withdrawing the following amendments: CPC-124, CPC-151, CPC-152, CPC-153 and CPC-162.

The Chair:

Excellent.

(On clause 256)

The Chair: We have CPC-119.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, this amendment removes the pre-election spending caps on political parties, but maintains the rest of the pre-writ regime.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, if I understand this correctly, the effect of this amendment, as well as the next one, I think, would be to remove the pre-writ spending limits for political parties.

Is that correct?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

That is correct.

The Chair:

I can imagine how people are going to vote on this, so we'll go to a vote.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 256 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 257 to 261 inclusive agreed to on division)

(On clause 262)

The Chair:

Amendments CPC-120, PV-11 and CPC-121 cannot be moved because they amend the same line that was amended by the adoption of the motion at the PROC meeting.

Amendment PV-12 was defeated because it was consequential to PV-3. That leaves amendment CPC-122 to discuss.

Would the Conservatives propose CPC-122.

Mr. John Nater:

Absolutely, Mr. Chair.

CPC-122 clarifies the rules of collusion between parties and riding associations as it relates to the pre-writ spending limit.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

This one just seems to create a loophole that would allow for the circumvention of the national spending limit. We're opposed.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Amendment LIB-37 is passed consequentially to LIB-26.

(Clause 262 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 263)

(1805)

The Chair:

There is one proposed amendment by the Conservatives.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

This amendment has to do with the pro-rated spending limit for a longer campaign in the event it's postponed for a given reason.

I suspect I know where things are going, so I don't think we need too much debate, Chair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We could have done this an hour ago.

The Chair:

We'll find out if your suspicion is correct.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 263 agreed to on division)

The Chair:

On clause 264, there was amendment PV-13 , but that is defeated consequentially to PV-3.

(Clause 264 agreed to)

The Chair: On clause 265, there was, before tonight, one amendment, CPC-124, but it was withdrawn a few minutes ago.

(Clause 265 agreed to)

(On clause 266)

The Chair: We have amendment CPC-125.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, this is a fairly minor amendment, but it clarifies the quarterly financial obligations by adding the words “polling day”. Currently it reads: that follows that general election, beginning with the quarter that immediately follows that general election and ending with the quarter in which the next general election is held. We're amending it to say: with the quarter in which polling day at the next general election is

It clarifies that.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's a good amendment.

The Chair:

It's a good amendment?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

The Chair:

Could you repeat that?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do we vote, Larry?

The Chair:

Yes. I'm just getting back to my notes.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 266 as amended agreed to)

(Clause 267 agreed to)

(On clause 268)

The Chair: We have two amendments. No, we have more than two amendments, but we'll start with CPC-126.

Mr. John Nater:

Effectively what CPC-126 does is delay the implementation of the pre-election spending limits until after the 2019 election, so it would be for the 2023 election if there's a majority government when prime minister Scheer.... I had to add that.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. John Nater:

It delays it until the next election. The effect would be to give more time to implement it and to give knowability, so we propose that it be delayed until the election following the 2019 election.

The Chair:

Is there discussion?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't think we have to say that we're going to oppose that.

Mr. John Nater:

But you might as well put it on the record.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We oppose that.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

On CPC-127, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

It removes pre-election spending limits on parties.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(1810)

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC):

I think Mr. Graham voted twice. It sets a bad example—

An hon. member: That's exactly what we're trying to avoid with proper ID requirements.

The Chair:

Garnett, you can't speak. You don't have your 10 binders here tonight.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

I have to say, was it really Mr. Graham who voted the second time or was it somebody else?

The Chair:

Okay. Let's go to LIB-38.

Now, this has some ramifications. If you vote for LIB-38, it applies to LIB-53 on page 299, LIB-55 on page 305, LIB-57 on page 309, and LIB-60 on page 328. Also, if LIB-38 is adopted, CPC-163 on page 310 cannot be moved, as it amends the same line as LIB-57, which is consequential to LIB-38.

Do you want me to read this again?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, you have a point of order.

Mr. John Nater:

On a point of order, Chair, I ask that you rule amendment LIB-55 out of order for offending the so-called “parent act rule”. Page 771 of House of Commons Procedure and Practice, third edition, Bosc and Gagnon, states: In the case of a bill referred to a committee after second reading, an amendment is inadmissible if it proposes to amend a statute that is not before the committee or a section of the parent Act, unless the latter is specifically amended by a clause of the bill.

The latter point traces back to citation 698(8)(b) of Beauchesne's Parliamentary Rules and Forms, sixth edition, the editor of which, Mr. John Holtby, is perhaps well known to many of us around this place.

Bosc and Gagnon offer, among several precedents, the November 20, 2007, meeting of the legislative committee on Bill C-2, a meeting at which I understand you, Mr. Chair, were in attendance, where the committee chair ruled several amendments out of order for offending this very rule.

In the present case, amendment LIB-55 proposes to add a new clause 344.1 for the purpose of making an amendment to section 498 of the Canada Elections Act.

Bill C-76 as introduced would amend both sections 497.5 and 499 of the Canada Elections Act, the two sections that bookend 498, but not section 498 itself. Therefore, Chair, I think the government's amendment is quite clearly out of order.

The Chair:

Would it work if we discussed everything except LIB-55?

Okay, so what we'll do is we'll go on with LIB-38. It will have the ramifications to all those other amendments except LIB-55. We'll come back to LIB-55.

We need someone from the Liberals to move and describe LIB-38.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The proposed amendment will give the commissioner of Canada elections the authority to request from political parties documents to evidence expenses reported in their financial return. Political parties are already required to provide the CEO with audited financial reports. The blanket authority currently found in Bill C-76 could create an unnecessary heavy burden on political parties. Giving a similar authority to the commissioner in the context of investigation provides for a balanced approach and facilitates obtaining these documents, but delineates the circumstances in which it can be used.

The Chair:

Do the officials have comments?

Mr. Cullen, do you want to comment?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I read this differently, and I'm curious. Because it deletes the passage from line 39 on page 156 to line 5 on page 157, we read it differently, that it's removing that power of the CEO to request documents. Can you clarify?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes. Motion LIB-38 would be removing the lines 1 to 5 in the English version at page 157 and the equivalent in French, so that would remove the power of the Chief Electoral Officer to require the chief agent of a party to provide specified documents in support of the party's—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It would remove that requirement.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It would remove that requirement, but a following motion, which is associated as per the chair's ruling, LIB-60, would empower the commissioner of Canada elections, in the course of an investigation conducted in response to a complaint, to request documents from registered parties in support of their election expense returns.

(1815)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Through you, Chair, this removes it here and adds it through LIB-60, you said?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it enhanced? Does it enhance the ability of...?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's just different.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How is it different?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The Chief Electoral Officer of Canada does not conduct investigations. The Chief Electoral Officer conducts audits of the various financial returns that are provided to him. On the other hand, the commissioner of Canada elections conducts investigations on the enforcement of the act.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't want to get into a policy debate, but why not both? Why take the power away from the commissioner, even if it's being found over with the investigative body, because I don't see anyone opposed to the audit by the commissioner of how a party conducts itself and how it spends money.

I'd be curious. Maybe Mr. Bittle has a reason.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

At this point, it's a policy decision.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's a policy decision.

Through you, Chair, to Mr. Bittle, why remove that power from the commissioner, because they do audits and that seems appropriate to me?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

They do audits. Before political parties submit their election returns anyway, they are audited in advance, but if we're dealing with millions of dollars in receipts, finding the receipt from the Tim Hortons perhaps provides too much of a burden. However, giving that over if there is an investigation, allowing the commissioner to require the production of that material is still within the bill and provides a more balanced approach.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, that was a bunch of words. I'm trying to find out what—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, but the commissioner doesn't ask for every Tim Hortons receipt in this case, right? This is where the commissioner has the power to request specific receipts. They're not going to ask for every cup of coffee that was bought during the campaign, and they don't. Why remove the power? If, worst case, it's redundant, and you have two offices with that power....

I don't know if Elections Canada has a comment that could help guide me through the fog.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

We should distinguish between Elections Canada, which performs—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, sorry; excuse me.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

—the Chief Electoral Officer, which performs the audit power. Currently, as was recommended by the Chief Electoral Officer, there's the power in the bill for Elections Canada to request supporting documents in the course of the audit to find out what lies behind the expenses that are reported. This—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—takes that power away.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

—would remove that power. It gives the commissioner power to more easily obtain documents that they could obtain during an investigation.

This does not meet the suggestion of Elections Canada, in our recommendation—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This does not meet the suggestion of Elections Canada.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

No, it does not.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Elections Canada never came to the committee and said, “Please take this power away from us.”

Mr. Trevor Knight:

It was our recommendation that we should have a power much as is in the bill right now, yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So in fact the opposite is true. Elections Canada came before this committee and said they must maintain this power. In your testimony, you had a concern about removing this section.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Well, this is a new section.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. This is an amendment.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

It is a section that is based on our recommendation, because we believe that to properly perform our audit function, we need to be able to—

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Request receipts.

Mr. Trevor Knight: —obtain those supporting documents.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Agreeing to this would be going against the recommendation of the Chief Electoral Officer.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

The Chair:

Monsieur Morin, do you have any comments on the effect of this, or the technical effect of this?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The technical effect of this is that the Chief Electoral Officer will not be granted the power to request documents.

The Chair:

Right.

Is there any further debate?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It sounds pretty clear to me.

The Chair:

If there is no further debated, I'll go to the vote on all this except for the ramifications to LIB-55. I'll come back to LIB-55, because I have an answer.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'd like a recorded vote.

(Amendment agreed to: yeas 5; nays 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

So LIB-38 is carried. LIB-53 is carried. LIB-57 is carried. LIB-60 is carried.

LIB-38 is carried—

(1820)

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

Do they have a majority or something?

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

—and CPC-163 cannot be moved because it amends the same line.

On to LIB-55.

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

They'll love this act in 2019, I can tell you that.

The Chair:

I'll give my interpretation, and then you'll get the real one.

My understanding is that your principle is right. You can't amend the clause of a bill that's not proposed in the parent bill. However, if a consequential amendment is needed to create something into the bill, then it is actually legal to do that.

I'll let the legislative clerk give the real definition.

Mr. Philippe Méla (Legislative Clerk):

I agree with your assessment, Mr. Nater, that you can't amend a section of the act that's not opened by the bill. There's an exception to that, and this is the exception. We just voted on LIB-60, which creates new proposed subsection 510.001, and there's a reference to it in LIB-55 that's necessary for the whole thing to work.

As a consequential, it's allowed. If it were a strict amendment to the act that wasn't opened, you couldn't do it. Here, because it's a consequential amendment to something that was adopted already, you can.

The Chair:

So if you don't believe me....

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Okay.

All in favour that CPC-38 includes LIB-55?

Mr. John Nater:

On division.

The Chair:

That amendment and its ramifications are approved on division.

(Amendment agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've just voted on LIB-38.

(Clause 268 as amended agreed to on division)

(Clause 269 agreed to)

(On clause 270)

The Chair:

There is NDP-23, but my reading is that it's inadmissible because it's beyond the scope of the bill.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Could you explain, Chair?

The Chair:

Yes, I could explain.

Bill C-76 amends the Canada Elections Act. This amendment seeks to introduce the concept of gender parity among the candidates of a registered party at a general election in relation to the reimbursement of election expenses, which is not envisioned by the bill.

As House of Commons Procedure and Practice, third edition, states on page 770: An amendment to a bill that was referred to a committee after second reading is out of order if it is beyond the scope and principle of the bill.

In the opinion of the chair, the amendment brings in a new concept that is beyond the scope of the bill, and therefore, I rule the amendment inadmissible.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you.

In terms of the scope of the bill, C-76, unlike C-33, is much broader in its approach. There are all sorts of things we're trying to deal with in the way that our elections are conducted.

NDP-23 talks about how it is that candidates are preferred and the reimbursement system, which is also part of our elections act, as well as the way this is managed. How does that fall outside its scope? Our surface reading of this was that C-76 was an overhaul of the Elections Act. How Elections Canada interacts with the parties, reimbursements, going after receipts—all that stuff is within this bill.

This is simply a policy amendment to encourage a policy outcome. In this case, it seeks to have the Prime Minister's self-defined feminism actually happen by having more women present themselves as candidates and hopefully get elected.

I'm trying to figure where you're interpreting that this falls outside of that scope.

(1825)

The Chair:

There's nothing related to gender parity in the bill, so this is a new area.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I listened to your reference to scope, but concepts? Concepts get introduced all the time. For example, we just went through a concept on privacy and data. The concept that we brought in was totally novel to where C-76 stopped, which is a policy reference on their website.

We had concepts that were new and brought in. The concept of how candidates get nominated exists within the Elections Act. That's fair. The concept of reimbursements also exist within the Elections Act. That's fair. The concept of how those reimbursements are then distributed based on policy, in this policy seeking gender equity....

I don't want to get into a philosophical debate. It's much more a technical debate. How does that concept not already exist within C-76? We're just saying we want the concept interpreted this way to have more women in Parliament.

The Chair:

The privacy...there's a better relation there. There was a privacy section of the bill.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, but C-76 affects the Elections Act as it is. In this Elections Act there are all sorts of sections on how we deal with nominations and the proper reimbursements of parties. We're just saying to do it better, if you believe in more women in Parliament. But that depends on your point of view, I guess.

How wedded are you to your ruling on this? It feels like this is open to...honestly, this is not seeking to challenge. Well, I guess it is, but in the nicest way. It feels like this limits the scope of something that is dealt with within this bill and is dealt with within the elections act itself. If we can't affect that, then I would humbly suggest there might be a great number of amendments in here dealing with issues that were not originally intended and are therefore out of scope.

I'm surprised, I guess. I'm surprised by the ruling. We didn't anticipate this one. We know that parties introduce amendments all the time that they know are going to be ruled out of scope. This one didn't feel like that.

The Chair:

Well, you can appeal the ruling.

If this were to go through, what would happen is, in the House, the Speaker would ask about this if it was brought up, and the Speaker would make the same ruling, and there's no appeal to that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

He may or may not make the same ruling as precedent. I understand there's no appeal.

Let me refer this to colleagues this way. This question, which this bill, I would argue, doesn't deal with at all, gender parity within the House, is worthy of the conversation.

Support the appeal to the Chair simply because we can therefore have the conversation. No offence intended, Chair, to you and your clerks in terms of the interpretation. I think we have grounds for this. More importantly, this is a good conversation to have because we're sitting at 26% with no real prospect of getting a whole lot better in our Parliament.

That is my appeal. I don't believe it's necessarily debatable.

The Chair:

It's not really debatable.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, it's not. It's not strictly on the ruling, but let's have a conversation about this topic.

The Chair:

It's not really debatable, so the clerk will call the vote.

(Ruling of the chair sustained: yeas, 5; nays, 4)

(Clause 270 agreed to on division)

The Chair:

There's a new clause.

Nathan, would you like to introduce NDP-22?

(1830)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, so you can then strike it out of order.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

I think the only reason the government doesn't reintroduce the per vote subsidy, which a previous Liberal government introduced in the first round, and all the evidence.... There is no evidence supporting the opposite, that the per vote subsidy helps. It was certainly brought in—as you'll remember Chair, because we were both here for it—when big money, corporate and union money, was taken out of politics, the per vote subsidy was brought in as a way to level the playing field and also allow Canadians to express, not just a vote, but in that case, financial support for their choice.

All of the evidence around the world supports this being a good policy. The politics, I suspect, is what's stopping the government from doing it because these guys—I'm going to take shots at you—do from time to time....

Jean-Pierre Kingsley and other former chief electoral officers on policy have supported this. It seems Melanee Thomas, who appeared in front of the ERRE committee, said it's a democratic way of doing party financing. It also struck me as a way of being able to tell people, who thought their votes were wasted because they weren't necessarily voting for the winner, that their votes were contributing to something.

In effect, this would go a small measure towards helping keep the Prime Minister's promise that every vote was going to count in 2019, which he broke. This would maybe make up for it a little bit.

I wait with bated breath for your ruling, Chair, and then we can move on with the evening.

The Chair:

Okay.

I think you'll be excited that I have a different reason this time.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you?

The Chair:

Bill C-76 mainly seeks to amend the Canada Elections Act. The amendment attempts to increase the quarterly amount a registered political party receives based on the result of a general election preceding that quarter.

As House of Commons Procedure and Practice, third edition, states on page 772: Since an amendment may not infringe upon the financial initiative of the Crown, it is inadmissible if it imposes a charge on the public treasury, or if it extends the objects or purposes or relaxes the conditions and qualifications specified in the royal recommendation.

In the opinion of the chair, the amendment proposes a new scheme that imposes a charge on the public treasury. Therefore, I rule the amendment inadmissible.

NDP-22 is inadmissible, so new clause 270.1 does not occur.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It was a great idea.

The Chair:

Sorry?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It was inadmissible but a great idea. That's what I think you meant to say.

The Chair:

Yes, that's what I meant to say.

(On clause 271)

The Chair: Amendment CPC-128 has ramifications because it also applies to CPC-131, which is on page 242.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, this would defer the pre-election spending limits on political parties until after the 2019 election.

The Chair:

Oh, I see that this will be popular.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Since CPC-128 is defeated, CPC-131 is defeated as a consequence.

Now we're going to CPC-129.

There are consequences to this one too. It applies to CPC-159, on page 301, as they both deal with partisan advertising expenses.

Mr. Nater, would you introduce CPC-129, please.

Mr. John Nater:

I would love to, Chair.

This would revert us to the status quo for spending limits in the pre-election period.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In other words, now.

The Chair:

I can imagine that this will be popular.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: One person in favour, and four opposed.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You know you're going to lose, but he makes it worse on them.

The Chair:

It's defeated.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's a trick, a Yukon ploy. I've seen it before.

The Chair:

Amendment CPC-129 was just defeated, so CPC-159 is also defeated.

Amendment CPC-130 was withdrawn by the Conservatives.

CPC-131, I think was—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was already effectively dealt with.

The Chair:

It was consequential, yes.

I think CPC-132 is still in play.

(1835)

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, it is.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

This deals with the riding associations and their ability to run pre-election advertisements. It allows them to do so during the pre-writ period.

The Chair:

Is there any debate?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

We're on LIB-39.

This has a ramification. Whatever the result of this vote is, it applies to LIB-54, as they are linked by reference.

Could a Liberal propose this amendment, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure.

This one would allow electoral district associations, EDAs, to “incur partisan advertising expenses” when such expenses are incurred for messages intended “to be transmitted solely, or substantially solely, within the association's electoral district”.

They'd also be allowed to “transmit or cause to be transmitted partisan advertising messages”...“solely, or substantially solely, within the association's electoral district” in the pre-writ period.

The Chair:

Are there any comments from the witnesses on that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Do you have a specific question?

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, go ahead, and then Mr. Nater.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This brings it down to the EDA level in terms of being able to do political advertising.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Within the EDA.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Within the district, yes. But if the intention is to clamp down on pre-election spending overall, if you have 338 ridings, especially if there were a coordinated effort, does that not get around the thing that the bill is trying to—?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Actually, no, not in my personal opinion, which is very valuable, of course.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It is.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Let me have a quick look at the bill.

When we look at the definition of “partisan advertising expenses”, it relates to the idea of promoting or opposing a party, and also a candidate. When we look at the prohibition here, at page 157 of the bill, lines 25 and following, in English, it says: 449.1 (1) No electoral district association of a registered party shall (a) incur partisan advertising expenses in relation to partisan advertising messages that promote or oppose a registered party or an eligible party and that are transmitted during a pre-election period;

With the words used here, I think it is clear that the prohibition was meant to be on the type of partisan advertising message that would have more of a national impact and would be talking about the party's campaign. What's left out of the prohibition is any mention of local issues or a local candidate, so the prohibition was not meant to be a blanket prohibition on EDAs from incurring—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understand that. That doesn't exist there. If this is accepted, what would the stop circumvention of the limits in 338 EDAs that this bill is trying to put on...? Unless I'm reading it wrong, it doesn't say that those EDA campaigns can only talk about local issues. Each EDA could run the same ad on a national level, on a national issue and promoting a national leader, could it not?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It says that each EDA can incur partisan advertising expenses for partisan advertising messages that are basically aimed at the distribution in the electoral district.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You heard my question, right? If we had a universal limit as to what parties can spend on partisan advertising, does this not represent an increase in that expenditure at a riding level?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The party is also prohibited from trying to circumvent its own limit.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If every EDA runs an ad that says “vote Liberal”, and underneath that it has “candidate for riding” 338 times....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can they do that?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They're thinking about it. It just expands the amount of money being spent with a partisan message. You're saying you'd have to prove coordination.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly. The party cannot try to circumvent its own limit. It would be very suspicious if the same advertisement was published by each and every EDA. Again, the goal of this amendment is to ensure that EDAs will be able to, for example, print a pamphlet and put the party logo or the party's name on it.

(1840)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That would not count towards the limit.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, I have a question of clarification, too. Would this catch something or not? I'm thinking of a Facebook ad promoting, for example, an EDA summer BBQ. Would something like that be caught under this, especially when it comes to being solely or substantially within an electoral district? When you're looking at something in a Facebook ad, targeting that specifically within an electoral district becomes a little more challenging. Would something like that be covered?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The publication of information on the Internet has a much broader distribution than a mail-out, for example. It all depends on the circumstances. It's very difficult to answer your question because I don't have the ad in front of me. If the invitation is for a specific event on a specific date in the electoral district it would seem to be restricted enough to the electoral district that it would pass the—

Mr. John Nater:

There could be a degree of interpretation at the time, depending on specific situations. It could be advertise at your own peril, in the sense that you may or may not get caught.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The intent needs to be to distribute it within the electoral district. If it can be shown that the intent was to give it a much broader distribution, then it wouldn't be caught by the exception and it would likely count towards the party limit.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, and then we'll go back to Mr. Nater because I think he has more to say.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Morin, if we don't pass this amendment, could, for example, Nathan Cullen put out a flyer in his riding in the pre-writ period with his name and the leader's name and party address on it, or is there a drafting error, because I understand that would prevent that from happening?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If it is paid out of the EDA funds, the answer is no. Given the definitions that have been given by the act, to “promote or oppose a registered party or eligible party”, just naming the party or showing its logo would be sufficient to—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would be sufficient to make it banned.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Not to make it banned, but to make it count towards the national limit.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's the issue. Doing this allows you to have a local flyer about yourself that mentions the party you're supporting in that pre-writ period, which we could not otherwise do without affecting the party's spending amount.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Correct.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That seems rather important.

Thank you.

The Chair:

You're exempting that local stuff from the party limit.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can put out your flyer with your own face and the party's face on it, but without this amendment, you wouldn't be able to do that without affecting the party itself.

The Chair:

We'll go back to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, I'm thinking of another example of how this might be caught. I have a large rural riding, not nearly as large as some, and not nearly as large as our chair's, for example, but I'm thinking more of radio stations in an urban setting. If you had a Montreal riding, let's say a small riding, Papineau, for example, which is one of the smallest ridings in Canada, and if you were to run a pre-election ad on the radio, a Montreal radio station that is going to hit many Montreal ridings, even though it's paid for by the small riding of Papineau, is that something that would be caught under this amendment? You could say it was meant for just that tiny riding, but it's hitting the entire city.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Really, at this point it would be a question of interpretation in the context of a specific case. If multiple electoral district associations covering the area where the radio station is located were all to participate in this advertising campaign, then it would probably be fine.

Mr. John Nater:

If they weren't, though, if it were just the one riding association, would it probably not be fine?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I can give you the example of The Globe and Mail. If an EDA is trying to publish an ad in The Globe and Mail in the electoral district where The Globe and Mail is printed, clearly it goes way beyond the scope of this exception.

We need to draw a line somewhere. The intent is really to allow EDAs to communicate with the local population in the riding.

(1845)

Mr. John Nater:

So running an ad that says, “Vote for Justin Trudeau, your Papineau candidate” could potentially be caught in that.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

In a national distribution newspaper? No.

Mr. John Nater:

In a city-wide, Montreal—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, it needs to be within the electoral district.

Mr. John Nater:

In that case, a radio ad that's going across the city would be caught. That is your interpretation.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

The Chair:

We're ready for the vote on LIB-39, which also applies to LIB-54. They are linked by reference.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 271 as amended agreed to)

The Chair: There are no amendments for clauses 272 to 277.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, could we do clause 272 on division?

The Chair:

Okay.

(Clause 272 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 273 to 277 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: New clause 277.1 is being proposed.

Nathan, could you introduce this so that I could make a ruling?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There's a certain ominous tone in your voice, Mr. Chair.

It seems to be a common sense kind of thing. We're asking for equity statistics to be released on nominations, and collected.

Political parties self-publish some of these some of the time, but not consistently and not in a consistent manner. They're reporting it to Elections Canada, the Chief Electoral Officer, I believe. Oh, excuse me, this would seek to extend it to the Chief Electoral Officer. This is about gender and sexual orientation. It would not identify each nominee, but it would give the universal totals—how many women the Liberals nominated, how many Conservatives, LGBTQ. It's just a way to statistically understand how the nomination part of this democracy is working out. Are we getting more representation or less? Who's doing more and who's doing less?

Also, I think this could be helpful to some Canadians, particularly those interested in getting involved in politics. It would also require parties to describe the nomination voting process—is it a preferential ballot, is it a straight round voting, how did each party nominate their...? There's no requirement to do that right now. I think it is interesting.

I don't see this as even being controversial, but perhaps it is. Again, most parties self-describe, but it's not done consistently. Any Canadian interested in knowing how many women are being nominated, or LGBTQ candidates, can't compare apples to apples. Just to underline, it wouldn't reveal candidate X and riding Y. It's a universal approach.

The Chair:

This amendment intends to add information to the nomination contest report that is to be filed with the Chief Electoral Officer under section 476.1 of the act. This goes beyond the scope of the bill and aims to amend a section of the act that's not open to amendments by the bill.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

May I ask a question? When dealing with the act itself and dealing with Bill C-76, which affects many parts of the act and creates new sections of the act.... Is that fair to say?

Maybe “sections” might be the wrong term. Bill C-76 introduces new concepts into the act itself. Is that fair to say?

(1850)

Mr. Philippe Méla:

Within the bill, do you mean?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes.

Mr. Philippe Méla:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, so how do we prescribe scope limits on saying that this concept under this amendment...? Can amendments just not do it, but the bill itself can? Is that essentially it?

Mr. Philippe Méla:

The bill is adopted at second reading by the House based on the number of concepts they want to add to the act, so those are the parameters that you have to stand by basically, the frame, if you will.

In this case, there are two problems, if you want to put it that way. There's the concept in itself that you are adding some criteria to something that's not envisioned within the frame, and the other problem is you're amending a section of the act that's not amended by the bill. That is the problem that Mr. Nater has been raising all day.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you for the explanation.

The Chair:

Because of Mr. Nater, Mr. Cullen is ruled out, is inadmissible.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Clause 277.1 is inadmissible, so it's not added to the act.

There are no amendments on clauses 278 and 279.

(Clauses 278 and 279 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 280)

The Chair: There's CPC-133.

Mr. Nater, could you introduce CPC-133, please.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, this would require the Chief Electoral Officer to publish the nomination expense limits both in the Canada Gazette and on the website of Elections Canada.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The CEO already publishes the nomination campaign expense limits. I don't feel there's a need to legislate this.

The Chair:

You're saying they're already doing it, so you don't have to legislate it.

Do the witnesses have any comments?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

We do publish them, yes.

The Chair:

You already publish them. Okay.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 280 agreed to)

(Clauses 281 to 291 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: There was a big high-five by Mr. Reid. We'll note that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I like those kinds of clauses.

(On clause 292)

The Chair:

There's amendment CPC-134.

Mr. Nater, would you present that amendment, please.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, earlier we discussed the pro-rated spending limits for longer campaigns. This deals with a similar concept. This specifically applies to longer campaigns where the election day has been postponed for whatever reason, a natural disaster or the death of a candidate, for example. I think this one is important and eminently supportable, and I can't imagine anyone voting against this one.

The Chair:

We'll find out if that's true.

Mr. John Nater:

I'll wait and see the results.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 292 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 293 to 296 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 297)

The Chair:

I think there's an outstanding amendment, CPC-135.

Mr. Nater talked about this.

Mr. John Nater:

You said outstanding. That's a great amendment, right?

The Chair:

There are several meanings of that word.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes.

This refers to members who have not filed their expense reports stemming from the election, of which the Speaker is informed. We are making an amendment that the Speaker would also inform the House very quickly, before adjournment of the next sitting. When a member isn't entitled to sit because of a failure to file, the House should be informed, not just the Speaker.

The Chair:

Is there any debate on CPC-135?

Mr. Longfield.

(1855)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

We're telling the Speaker how to do his job. He already does his job well, so it shouldn't be in the act. It's up to the Speaker to call out members who need to be called out.

The Chair:

I have a premonition that Mr. Nater may want to speak again.

Mr. John Nater:

Actually, believe it or not—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't believe it.

Mr. John Nater:

—there was an issue in the previous Parliament in which a Liberal raised a question of privilege on this very issue.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

When was that?

Mr. John Nater:

What happened is that particular member did not in fact know that he or she was in the position that happened here because the Speaker was not in a position to inform the House. This actually helpfully addresses the concern the Liberals raised in the last Parliament.

We're really looking forward to helping out our friends across the way.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Who was the Speaker then? Oh yes, that's right.

Mr. John Nater:

Exactly, and if Speaker Scheer had had this authority granted unto him with this amendment—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Unto him?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, unto him.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Even unto him, verily.

Mr. John Nater:

This would have fixed that.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

I've missed you guys.

The Chair:

You mean the Mr. Scheer who was hung today in the—

Mr. John Nater:

He was hung today. I was just informed that the Speaker at the time asked PROC to deal with this very issue. Here we are—

The Chair:

—dealing with it.

Mr. John Nater:

—dealing with it at the request of our former Speaker.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's right.

A voice: I understand he will be the first person ever to have his portrait hung twice.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

We dealt with it. We got a new Speaker.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate on CPC-135, as raucous as it's been?

Do you have any other points, Mr. Nater?

Mr. John Nater:

Perhaps you'd like to know which MP it was who raised the point.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I'm curious.

Mr. John Nater:

It was Scott Simms, a member of this committee.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

He said we needed to fix this problem.

Mr. John Nater:

He was the one who raised it.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

He's not here.

Mr. John Nater:

Where is he?

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

Is he allowed to speak again?

The Chair:

We'll vote on the amendment.

Mr. John Nater:

I'd like a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 297 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 298 and 299 agreed to)

(On clause 300)

The Chair:

Clause 300 has a residual amendment, which is CPC-136.

Mr. Nater would like to present this.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, this would offset the clawback. If there's overspending, obviously there's a clawback, so it would offset that rebate.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll just ask the officials this. From our viewpoint it seems to be redundant.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Subsection 477.74(3) already affects the amount calculated at subsection (2), and currently paragraph 477.75(1)(d) does not refer to subsection (3), so it would appear unnecessary, unless I'm not seeing something.

The Chair:

Are you saying this wouldn't make any difference?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

We now have CPC-137.

I'll ask Mr. Reid to present this.

Mr. Scott Reid:

As tempted as I am by that generous offer I'm going to defer to my colleague Mr. Nater.

(1900)

Mr. John Nater:

Just to go back and clarify this, typically expenses are rebated now at 60%. Changes in this act have some expenses being rebated at different amounts. In some cases it's 90%.

The Chair:

Like day care?

Mr. John Nater:

Exactly. This would clarify the overall cap in terms of the amount that would be rebated at 75%, all things included.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Why do you want to do that?

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Richards had the foresight to table this motion.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Where is he? I've been wondering who this Mr. Richards is.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado:

He's with Scott.

The Chair:

He tabled all these amendments.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

He's very interested in this committee and he doesn't show up.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Our concern is that the amendment would in effect reduce the important allowance that C-76 creates for reimbursing costs that help candidates connect with voters who have disabilities, in my own words.

The Chair:

Do you have a response to that, Mr. Nater?

Mr. John Nater:

It's just that we always want to be aware that we're dealing with taxpayer dollars, that we always have an eye to the money we spend.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, you said this reduces ones for people with disabilities?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

The Chair:

If we're ready, we'll vote on CPC-137.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 300 agreed to)

Mr. John Nater:

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, I need to correct the record. I misspoke earlier when I made a comment that it was Scott Simms who made the point of order. It wasn't. It was a different Liberal Scott. It was Scott Andrews who was a Liberal at the time.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That changes my vote.

Mr. John Nater:

I would like the record to reflect that. I would not want to leave this committee with incorrect information.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's an important distinction.

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

You said Scott Andrews was a Liberal at the time. Can you refresh our memory as to what happened?

Mr. John Nater:

No, I will not be going down that path.

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

I was just trying to remember. I wasn't here at the time.

The Chair:

I'm sure Mr. Simms will appreciate this because his staff is here, and we'll pass that on to him.

There are no amendments from clauses 301 to 307.

(Clauses 301 to 307 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 308)

The Chair: It looks as though there's one amendment, CPC-138.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

This would reduce the disclosure threshold from $500 to $200 and would align it with what we have in our own conflict of interest code as parliamentarians, which is at $200. It aligns the two, and I think it makes sense. I don't think anyone should be accepting gifts of significant value anyway during an election period, so I think putting it at $200 would be a reasonable amount.

The Chair:

I think PROC had some debate about that related to the conflict of interest—not that this is relevant—whether the $200 was enough or not. I can't remember the details so I'll leave that out.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think some start at $800.

The Chair:

Is there debate on CPC-138 on changing the limit from $500 down to $200?

Mr. John Nater:

I would like to provide a little more clarity on that.

Apparently at the beginning of this Parliament that was reduced to $200 for the Conflict of Interest Code for Members of the House of Commons and PROC had made that recommendation.

It would be consistent with the decision that was taken at that time.

The Chair:

We'll vote on CPC-138.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 308 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 309 to 319 inclusive agreed to)

(1905)

The Chair:

We're going into clause 320. There are four CPC amendments.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Before we get into a series of clauses, maybe now is a good time to break.

You can stick around. Ruby, you'll be more than happy to speak.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I thought we were going until nine o'clock.

The Chair:

Do you not want to stay?

Mrs. Bernadette Jordan (South Shore—St. Margarets, Lib.):

I believe the Conservative Party.... We're unable to stay past seven o'clock tonight.

The Chair:

Is that true?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Why don't we have a motion to adjourn, suspend or something like that, and see how people vote?

Mrs. Bernadette Jordan:

We're finished.

The Chair:

We don't have consent to continue past the time we had scheduled.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, we're finished.

The Chair:

We're in this room at nine o'clock tomorrow morning.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous.

J’aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à M. Alexandre Boulerice, à Mme Shanahan et à M. Fragiskatos.

Bienvenue à la 126e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous poursuivons l’étude article par article du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d’autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d’autres textes législatifs.

Encore une fois, nous sommes heureux d’accueillir Jean-François Morin et Manon Paquet, du Bureau du Conseil privé, et Trevor Knight et Robert Sampson — ah, il est nouveau — d’Élections Canada. Merci à tous d’être ici.

Je vais donner la parole à M. Nater dans une minute, mais j’aimerais d’abord régler deux ou trois choses.

Tout d’abord, j’espère que les gens suivront judicieusement la règle des cinq minutes, en gros, afin que nous puissions faire de bons progrès aujourd’hui et que nous n’ayons pas à rester plus tard aujourd’hui ou en fin de semaine.

Je veux aussi revenir très rapidement en arrière. Je sais que c’est difficile à croire avec 200 articles, mais nous avons raté l’article 71. Comme il n’y a pas eu d’amendement, j’aimerais demander l’approbation unanime de l’article 71.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Oh, je vois.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Quoi?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce ainsi que fonctionne notre démocratie? Nous allons simplement improviser au fur et à mesure et remonter dans le temps?

Voulez-vous faire de l’obstruction à cela, John?

Le président:

Les cinq minutes sont écoulées.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

(L’article 71 est adopté.)

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Monsieur le président, à la lumière des décisions que nous avons prises hier sur les articles et l’amendement que nous avons approuvés, les conservateurs retireront certains amendements.

Le premier est le 9964902 et porte sur l’article 234.

Le président:

Pouvez-vous répéter ce numéro?

M. John Nater:

Oui. Les deux premiers ont été déposés. Le premier numéro est le 9964902 et concerne l’article 234.

Le deuxième est le 9965053, et il porte sur l’article 235.

Nous allons retirer les amendements CPC-146, CPC-147, CPC-149, CPC-150, CPC-154, CPC-161 et CPC-169.

De plus, monsieur le président, je me demandais...

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose?

M. John Nater:

Non.

Le président: Oh, j’espérais...

M. John Nater: C’est tout pour l’instant, mais nous verrons après la prochaine série d’amendements.

À ce sujet, monsieur le président, nous pourrions peut-être obtenir une mise à jour sur les amendements de tous les partis qui ont été adoptés jusqu’ici. Il n’est pas nécessaire de le faire maintenant. Peut-être qu’après la pause-repas ou à un autre moment, le greffier ou quelqu’un d’autre pourrait nous fournir une mise à jour pour nos dossiers de ce qui a été adopté et de ce qui ne l’a pas été.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Voulez-vous les pourcentages?

M. John Nater:

Non, nous n’avons pas besoin de statistiques, seulement de savoir ceux qui ont été adoptés et ceux qui ne l’ont pas été.

Le président:

Il peut vous donner une liste. Il a des photocopies. Nous vous la ferons parvenir.

M. John Nater:

C’est bien.

Le président:

Je souhaite également la bienvenue à Mme May.

Avant de commencer, sachez que nous nous réunirons demain de 9 à 13 heures et de 15 h 30 à 19 heures. Vous rappelez-vous que lorsque nous en avons discuté pour la première fois, nous avons parlé d’un cadre de travail en soirée de 19 à 21 heures? Nous allons arrêter à 19 heures pour l'instant. Pour que vous sachiez quand nous planifierons l'horaire de notre comité, jeudi prochain, nous appliquerons les heures du mercredi. Cela s'insère dans notre horaire en raison de la visite du premier ministre des Pays-Bas. Si nous ajustons notre horaire pour jeudi prochain, vous saurez pourquoi.

Lorsque nous nous sommes arrêtés, nous venions de terminer l’article 223.

Nous passons à l’article 224.

(Article 224)

Le président: Nous avons devant nous l'amendement CPC-98, et il comporte certaines ramifications. Le vote sur cet amendement s’applique à l’amendement CPC-101, à la page 184, à l’amendement CPC-103, à la page 189, à l’amendement CPC-105, à la page 191, à l’amendement CPC-106, à la page 192, et à l’amendement CPC-107, à la page 200. Ils sont liés par le thème commun des sondages menés en vue d’une élection.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter l’amendement CPC-98?

(1535)

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, nous avons discuté d’un amendement semblable hier. Celui-ci est directement lié aux tiers et à la délivrance des brefs proprement dite, c’est-à-dire la période électorale en soi, et non pas la période préélectorale dans ce cas-ci. Cela inclut le coût d’un sondage effectué immédiatement avant la période électorale aux fins d'activités qui se dérouleront pendant la période électorale, parmi les dépenses effectuées pendant la période électorale pour les tiers. Nous avons eu une discussion semblable hier, et il y a eu un bon débat, mais nous proposons cet amendement.

Le président:

Pour ceux qui sont nouveaux ici aujourd’hui, en général, lorsqu’un thème a été étudié et que nous en avons longuement discuté auparavant, nous essayons de ne pas avoir la même discussion chaque fois qu’il est soulevé. Nous pouvons ainsi passer ensuite rapidement sur les amendements semblables.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je veux m’assurer de bien comprendre. S’agit-il d’un sondage mené dans le but d'en rendre les résultats publics pendant la campagne électorale?

M. John Nater:

De l’utiliser pendant la campagne électorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

De l’utiliser pendant la période électorale?

M. John Nater:

Dans ce cas-ci, il s'agit d’une tierce partie.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, je comprends cela. Oui.

Le seul problème, c’est que les sondages, surtout sur des questions très précises, peuvent avoir lieu un an ou des mois plus tôt, et vous demandez au tiers de savoir... Je suppose que c’est une décision qu’ils prennent ensuite s’ils ont un vieux sondage dont ils rendent les résultats publics. Cela remonte à quand?

M. John Nater:

Ce n'est pas précisé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voyez-vous, c’est ce qui est inquiétant.

Si un tiers peut publier les résultats du sondage pendant une campagne électorale ou une période préélectorale sans filet de sécurité, s’il s’agit d’un sondage qu’il a publié ou mené en 2016 et qu’en 2019 il dit que les Canadiens aiment le drapeau, cela devient soudainement une dépense électorale. Comprenez-vous ce que je veux dire?

Je comprends l’intention visant quelqu’un qui essaie de trouver une échappatoire et de dépenser l’argent des sondages juste avant les élections. Mais sans limite de temps, alors, pour toute tierce partie qui utilise un bureau de scrutin, ce devra essentiellement être une dépense électorale.

Le président:

Je pense que nous avons eu une discussion assez longue à ce sujet hier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais même revenir en arrière?

D’accord, excusez-moi. Excusez-moi. Je répète une conversation à laquelle je n’ai pas participé.

Le président:

Vous avez fait le même commentaire que lui. Donc, tout va bien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez soulevé le même point.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avions-nous le même argument? Vraiment? Mais je l’ai beaucoup amélioré, n’est-ce pas? N’est-ce pas ce que vous pensez?

Le président:

Nous verrons dans une minute. Nous allons passer au vote.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous verrons comment cela se conclura.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter l'amendement CPC-99, qui porte sur l’article 224?

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Ce que nous proposons ici, c’est de conserver les plafonds de dépenses qui sont en place; toutefois, si la campagne était prolongée, les plafonds seraient calculés au prorata de la prolongation de la campagne.

Il s’agit essentiellement de maintenir les mêmes plafonds de dépenses que pour la période actuelle, mais pour les campagnes plus longues, ces taux seront calculés au prorata de la prolongation de la période.

(1540)

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Cela reflète simplement la façon dont le calcul a toujours été fait. Au cours de la dernière campagne, il y a eu un calcul au prorata, alors nous essayons simplement de nous assurer que...

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s’agit d’un changement prévu dans la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections auquel nous nous sommes opposés assez vigoureusement à l’époque et auquel nous continuons de nous opposer. Il visait à donner au gouvernement un avantage en lui permettant de contrôler la somme d’argent que tout le monde pouvait dépenser en étirant la campagne. Je pense que ce n’est pas un très bon système. Les dépenses devraient être prévisibles à l’avance.

Je vais m’opposer farouchement à cet amendement.

Le président:

S’il n’y a pas d’autres interventions, nous allons voter sur l’amendement.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'article 224 est-il adopté?

Des députés: Avec dissidence.

(L’article 224 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Aux fins du compte rendu, et pour que tout le monde comprenne bien, je tiens à confirmer que lorsque nous avons rejeté l’amendement CPC-98, nous avons également rejeté les amendements CPC-101, CPC-103, CPC-105, CPC-106 et CPC-107.

(Article 225)

Le président: Au sujet de l'article 225, il y avait l’amendement PV-9, mais il a été rejeté de façon corrélative avec l’amendement PV-3.

Nous passons maintenant à CPC-100. Si nous adoptons cet amendement, l'amendement CPC-101 ne pourra pas être proposé puisque les deux modifient la même ligne.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter l'amendement CPC-100, s’il vous plaît?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Allez-y.

M. John Nater:

Celui-ci concerne la collusion et il s’étend là où il y a collusion. Dans le cadre de cette prolongation, il englobe aussi la collusion entre des tiers, ce qui élargit la définition et fait en sorte qu’il est plus difficile pour les tiers et les partis enregistrés de s’entendre pour contourner les règles relatives aux plafonds de dépenses.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’ai une question pour les fonctionnaires.

Le projet de loi C-76 englobe-t-il actuellement cette forme de collusion entre les tierces parties et leurs efforts de coordination?

M. Jean-François Morin (conseiller principal en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Nous avons eu une longue discussion hier au sujet d’un amendement semblable pendant la période préélectorale. Celui-ci s’appliquerait à la période électorale.

Je ne pense pas que cela s’appliquerait seulement à la collusion entre des tiers. Cela ne s’appliquerait-il pas aussi à la collusion entre un parti enregistré et un tiers, et l’inverse aussi?

Une voix: Oui.

M. Jean-François Morin: Nous avons mentionné hier que...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela fait d'une rue à sens unique une rue à deux sens.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres commentaires?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, ont-ils indiqué que c’est couvert ailleurs dans le projet de loi?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Nous en avons parlé hier et nous avons mentionné qu’une tierce partie qui serait en collusion avec le parti enregistré, dans la mesure où elle procurerait des services ou des produits au parti enregistré, apporterait probablement à ce moment une contribution non pécuniaire, alors...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D’accord, mais dans ce cas-ci, il ne s’agit pas précisément d’une contribution non pécuniaire. Il s’agit de l’influence exercée par la publicité ou les sondages. Cela ne serait donc pas inclus, en ce qui concerne... Ce sont des types particuliers d’influence. Cela ne concerne pas une contribution pécuniaire. Diriez-vous que c’est différent?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Bien sûr, c’est un peu différent. Ce que nous disions essentiellement hier, c’est que les tiers peuvent, bien sûr, informer les partis pour essayer d’influer sur les politiques du parti enregistré, et c’est bien. Cela fait partie de l’objectif des partis politiques de regrouper une grande partie de la population canadienne pour la représenter.

Nous disions que lorsque cette collaboration ou cette collusion en arrive à un point où le tiers fournit des biens ou des services au parti enregistré, cela devient une contribution non pécuniaire qui est interdite, dans certaines circonstances, en vertu de la partie 18 de la Loi électorale du Canada.

(1545)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D’accord, il s’agit de biens ou de services, mais cela ne couvre pas nécessairement l’information.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je me demande donc pourquoi le gouvernement hésiterait à imposer une application plus stricte d’un amendement qui viserait également l’information en plus des ressources.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un débat sur cette question?

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Quelle était la question?

Le président:

Cet amendement ajoute les renseignements aux éléments qui ne peuvent pas donner lieu à de la collusion, et ils veulent savoir ce que pense le gouvernement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ne voulez-vous pas que les renseignements circulent entre les tiers?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Eh bien, pas si c’est une forme de collusion, pas s'il s'agit de renseignements qui les aident à influer sur le résultat des élections de façon non démocratique.

C’est au paragraphe 351.01(4) proposé dans l’amendement. On parle plus précisément de « renseignements, pour influencer, selon le cas, le tiers à l'égard des activités partisanes qu'il tient pendant la période préélectorale, de sa publicité partisane », ce qui concernerait davantage les ressources ou « des sondages électoraux qu'il effectue ou fait effectuer pendant la période préélectorale ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, rapidement, il y a déjà dans la loi des règles qui interdisent de contourner les règles relatives aux plafonds de dépenses en scindant une organisation en deux, par exemple. Est-ce exact?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, exactement. Il y a déjà une interdiction qui empêche les tierces parties de s’associer pour dépasser leurs plafonds de dépenses, essentiellement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si deux organisations coopèrent pour échanger des renseignements — le mot collusion est peut-être très fort dans cette situation —, nous risquons de criminaliser, faute d’un meilleur mot, les communications de la société civile.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Eh bien, comme nous le savons, les tierces parties peuvent être tout le monde sauf des candidats et des partis politiques, alors...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends ce que vous voulez faire, mais je pense que c’est très risqué, et je ne peux pas appuyer cela.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il pourrait y avoir beaucoup de dommages imprévus. Nous en avons aussi discuté la dernière fois. Encore une fois, cela concerne les candidats potentiels ou les candidats qui discutent... Vous ne parlez même pas de la période électorale. Vous parlez de beaucoup plus que cela, n’est-ce pas? Parlez-vous de la période préélectorale et d'avant cela aussi?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois, comme nous l’avons vu dans les discussions antérieures, que c’est exact, mais...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je pense que ce serait aller beaucoup trop loin, parce que les communications sont souvent nécessaires et que les tierces parties nous fournissent des renseignements si importants. Nous nous laissons parfois emporter par... Avant de devenir parlementaire, je pensais même que le lobbying... Cette activité a tellement mauvaise réputation. À la simple évocation du mot « lobbying », l'on a l’impression que c’est une façon malhonnête de convaincre les députés, mais quand on devient député, on se rend compte qu’il y a toutes sortes de lobbying. Il y a la Fondation des maladies du coeur qui essaie de vous renseigner sur les saines habitudes alimentaires et sur la façon de faire en sorte que les Canadiens soient en meilleure santé et plus en sécurité.

Comme M. Morin l’a souligné, quand on parle de tiers, cela signifie essentiellement tout le monde. Je pense que ce serait vraiment difficile à prouver, tout d’abord, et ensuite, cela empêcherait vraiment les gens de mener... et d’apprendre des organisations qui font toute une série de recherches pour nous.

Le président:

Monsieur Boulerice. [Français]

M. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NPD):

Je voudrais poser une question à M. Morin.

Selon votre compréhension de cette proposition du Parti conservateur, qu'arriverait-il si des organismes ayant un objectif commun, par exemple la protection des espaces verts ou des espèces vivantes menacées, voulaient créer une coalition préélectorale ou électorale pour faire pression, pour tenir des activités d'information et de sensibilisation auprès du public, afin que leur enjeu prenne de la place pendant une campagne électorale?

Est-ce que ce serait de la collusion? Moi, j'appelle cela une coalition, et cela fait partie de la vie.

(1550)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Merci beaucoup de votre question, monsieur Boulerice.

Aux fins du débat, j'aimerais préciser que l'objet de l'amendement conservateur CPC-100 s'applique seulement pendant la période électorale. Les changements proposés concernent la partie 17 de la Loi électorale du Canada, qui traite des activités des tiers pendant la période électorale.

L'amendement CPC-100 traite de deux sujets distincts. Les points a) et b) de l'amendement traitent de la situation où un tiers et un parti enregistré ou encore un tiers et un candidat agissent de concert.

Là où l'on parle seulement des tiers qui collaborent, c'est au point c) de l'amendement, qui prévoit notamment le nouveau paragraphe (4) suivant: (4) Il est interdit au tiers d'agir de concert avec tout autre tiers, notamment en échangeant des renseignements, pour influencer l'un ou l'autre des tiers à l'égard des activités partisanes qu'il tient [...], de sa publicité électorale ou des sondages [...]

Ce qu'a de particulier la notion de tiers dans la Loi électorale du Canada, c'est qu'un tiers peut vraiment être n'importe qui, sauf un candidat ou un parti politique. Or, la Loi électorale du Canada prévoit déjà que les tiers peuvent s'associer. Un tiers peut être une personne, une entreprise ou une personne morale, mais il est aussi possible que plusieurs personnes, personnes morales ou associations se regroupent pour former un tiers.

Lorsque, dans la Loi électorale du Canada, on utilise seulement le mot « tiers », on vise vraiment tous les tiers.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Autrement dit, une coalition peut être un tiers.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, absolument.

Quand on veut viser certains tiers plus précisément, on va parler de tiers enregistrés, par exemple, qui doivent faire certains rapports de dépenses.

Je ne veux pas indiquer au Comité comment agir, mais l'interdiction est tellement large que ce serait difficile à appliquer, compte tenu de la définition même de « tiers », qui est tout aussi large.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

M. Graham, puis M. Nater.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense avoir déjà exposé assez clairement notre position à ce sujet. Je ne pense pas qu’il soit nécessaire d'y revenir.

Pour que les choses soient bien claires, comme le propose cet amendement, surtout le paragraphe (4) proposé, si le directeur du Sierra Club envoie un message sur Facebook au directeur de Greenpeace qui influe sur le message que l’organisation affichera ensuite sur Facebook, cela pourrait être considéré comme une collusion en matière de renseignements pour influer sur le résultat de l’élection. Je pense que c’est un précédent très dangereux à établir. Je pense que c’est pour cette raison qu’on ne peut pas appuyer cet amendement, de quelque façon que ce soit. Je vous en remercie.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, puis nous passerons au vote.

M. John Nater:

Si un tiers fait effectivement campagne sur la question x, ce qui profite directement à un parti politique enregistré qui détermine la juste valeur marchande de ces services de campagne, est-ce que cela serait considéré comme une contribution non pécuniaire à un parti politique?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pendant la période préélectorale, dont nous avons discuté hier, seuls les publicités partisanes, les activités partisanes et les sondages électoraux sont couverts. Pendant la période électorale, nous incluons tout, y compris la publicité. Dans la mesure où un tiers appuie un parti enregistré et le fait d’une manière qui n’amène pas le tiers à dépasser son plafond de dépenses, c’est très bien. Cela relève déjà de la partie 17 de la loi.

Non, il ne s’agit pas d’une contribution non pécuniaire.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, juste avant le vote.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En terminant, je dirais que, dans bon nombre des amendements que nous proposons, je prévois des situations hypothétiques infinies, que nous ne pouvons absolument pas prévoir ici, au Comité, en ce moment. Pourtant, j’ai l’impression qu’ils seront adoptés en 2019 et que nous allons revenir en arrière et dire que l'amendement CPC-99 aurait réglé ce genre de problème.

Cette question me tient beaucoup à coeur. C’est pour ces raisons que je pense que nous devons continuer de réclamer des définitions plus solides et plus claires de problèmes comme la collusion.

Merci.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(1555)

Le président:

L’amendement CPC-101 a été victime du rejet de l’amendement CPC-98. Nous passons à l’amendement CPC-101.1.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils nous le présenter?

M. John Nater:

J’ai un bon pressentiment au sujet de cet amendement.

Il s’agit d’un changement relativement mineur à la ligne 20 de la page 127 du projet de loi. Il remplace les mots « dont les seules activités au Canada » par « son objectif principal au Canada vise, pendant la période électorale, à exercer », et il y a ensuite le reste de l’article.

Je pense que c’est tout à fait acceptable. J’ai l’impression qu’il pourrait être appuyé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a encore des possibilités.

M. John Nater:

Elles ne sont pas aussi fortes que je l'aurais espéré, mais je pense qu'elles...

Le président:

Je pourrais peut-être vérifier s’il y a un appui.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il y a beaucoup de coopération au sein de ce comité. C’est l’exposé qui a permis cela, je crois.

Nous allons maintenant passer à l’un des nouveaux amendements qui a été déposé plus tard, sous le numéro de référence 10008289.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter cet amendement, s’il vous plaît?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je ne suis pas sûr qu’il sera accueilli favorablement, étant donné qu’il envisage de revenir à traiter comme des tierces parties étrangères les entités constituées en personne morale au Canada, mais dirigées par des cerveaux étrangers dont l'objectif principal est l’activité politique. Je crois que mes collègues et moi-même avons essayé de souligner ce que nous croyons être la nécessité de cet article par rapport à des éléments comme l'objectif principal de l’activité politique, afin de clarifier davantage, comme nous le voyons, la direction par des cerveaux étrangers. Je suis un peu rassurée par le fait que l’amendement CPC-101.1, grâce à ce seuil plus élevé, offre une certaine couverture à cet égard, mais pas autant que ce que nous jugeons nécessaire. À moins que mon collègue, M. Nater, ait quelque chose à ajouter, je vais m’arrêter ici et nous faire gagner du temps ce soir.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous allez faire rapidement pour nous faire gagner du temps aussi, n’est-ce pas?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’allais simplement dire que je pense que nous en avons discuté hier.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C’est ce que j’ai dit.

Le président:

D’accord, nous allons voter sur le nouvel amendement CPC, numéro de référence 10008289.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-102. S’il est adopté, l’amendement LIB-31 ne peut pas être proposé, puisque les deux modifient la même ligne.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter l’amendement CPC-102?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En ce qui concerne ce qui s’est passé hier, il s'agit d'une recommandation du commissaire aux élections fédérales.

Je crois qu’il y a un certain consensus du côté du gouvernement à ce sujet. Je vais en rester là, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez raison à ce sujet. Il y a eu des discussions...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

... de temps à autre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oh, non, pour être précis, je pense que vous vous en êtes assez bien tiré, dans le dernier cas également.

Il y a eu des discussions entre les trois partis, et j’aimerais proposer un sous-amendement à cet amendement, si je peux le lire aux fins du compte rendu.

L’amendement CPC-102, qui propose de modifier l’article 223 du projet de loi C-76 par substitution, aux lignes 24 et 25, page 115...

Le président:

Je pense que c’est de l’article 225 que vous voulez parler.

(1600)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oh, il y a une coquille. Merci d’avoir relevé mon erreur.

Il est proposé que l’amendement soit modifié par adjonction, après les mots « leur adresse Internet, » de ce qui suit: « d'une façon qui soit clairement visible ou autrement accessible, ».

Le président:

Comme nous avons eu des discussions et de la coopération, nous sommes peut-être prêts à passer au vote.

(Le sous-amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’amendement modifié est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L’amendement CPC-102 modifié est adopté; en conséquence, l’amendement LIB-31 ne peut être proposé. L’amendement NDP-20 est rejeté parce qu’il est corrélatif à l’amendement NDP-17.

Je suis désolé, monsieur Boulerice. Je compatis avec vous.

(L’article 225 modifié est adopté)

(Article 226)

Le président: Il y avait l'amendement CPC-103, mais il a été rejeté en raison de l’amendement CPC-98.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L’amendement CPC-103 est-il mort?

Le président:

Oui, il est mort, exactement.

Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-104.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il va dans le même sens que l’amendement que nous avons présenté hier. Essentiellement, si ces tierces parties sont tenues de s’enregistrer, avec cet amendement, nous ne faisons que leur permettre de s’enregistrer plus tôt en prévision de la période électorale.

Le président:

S’il n’y a pas d’autres interventions, nous allons voter sur l’amendement.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 226 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 227 est adopté)

Le président: En ce qui concerne l'article 228, il y avait l’amendement CPC-105, mais il est rejeté parce qu’il est corrélatif à l’amendement CPC-98.

(L’article 228 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 229 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

L’amendement CPC-106 portait sur l’article 230, mais il était corrélatif à l’amendement CPC-98. Cet amendement est donc rejeté. Il n’y a donc pas d’amendement à l’article 230.

(L’article 230 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 231)

Le président: Pour l’article 231, il y a l’amendement LIB-32. Il a des ramifications. Le vote sur l’amendement LIB-32 s’applique à l’amendement LIB-35, à la page 215, à l’amendement LIB-48, à la page 281, à l’amendement LIB-51, à la page 287, puisqu’ils sont liés par renvoi.

Un député libéral peut-il présenter l’amendement LIB-32?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'amendement proposé créerait l’obligation de présenter des rapports provisoires supplémentaires pendant la période électorale. C’est pour le rapport du tiers le septième et le vingt et unième jour précédant le jour du scrutin, s’il a des dépenses de plus de 500 $, je crois.

Nous en avons déjà discuté en partie.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(1605)

Le président:

C’est unanime. Aux fins du compte rendu, cela signifie également que les amendements LIB-35, LIB-48 et LIB-51 sont tous adoptés, puisqu'ils sont liés par renvoi.

Il y avait l’amendement CPC-107 relativement à cet article, mais il a été rejeté parce qu’il était corrélatif à l’amendement CPC-98.

(L’article 231 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 232)

Le président:

À l’article 232, l’amendement LIB-33 est corrélatif à l’amendement LIB-26. L’amendement LIB-26 a-t-il été adopté?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je pense que oui.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Probablement.

Une voix: Oui.

Le président:

Je me suis perdu ici.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il y a un autre amendement à l’article 232, soit le CPC-108.

Un député conservateur pourrait-il présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Encore une fois, je crois que c’est inutile parce que l’amendement LIB-33 a été adopté, alors les amendements CPC-108 et CPC-109 sont...

M. Scott Reid:

Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-110.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J’aimerais les présenter de nouveau, si vous me le permettez.

Le président:

Désolé, j’ai fait une erreur.

Il y a un conflit de ligne avec l’amendement LIB-33, de sorte que les amendements CPC-108 et CPC-109 ne peuvent être proposés. Désolé.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Aucun problème.

(L’article 232 modifié est adopté avec dissidence 6/10)

(Article 233)

Le président:

Nous avons devant nous l’amendement CPC-110. Avant que les conservateurs ne le présentent, il y a certaines ramifications que vous devez connaître. S’il n’est pas adopté, l'amendement CPC-151 ne peut pas être proposé puisqu’il est lié par renvoi. L’un concerne une pénalité, je crois, qui n’existerait pas si l’amendement CPC-110 était rejeté.

Pourriez-vous présenter l’amendement CPC-110, s’il vous plaît?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Encore une fois, cela concerne les tiers et la recommandation du directeur général des élections au sujet des dispositions anti-contournement concernant les contributions étrangères.

Comme cela a toujours été le cas, nous essayons de mieux protéger les Canadiens et la démocratie en rendant les articles aussi étanches que possible. Certes, comme nos témoins l’ont indiqué à plusieurs reprises, le projet de loi précise les choses à ne pas faire parce qu'elles sont illégales.

Nous croyons que l’amendement CPC-110 va plus loin, par exemple, à l’alinéa 358.02(1)a) proposé, en rendant également légal: « Il est interdit à toute personne ou entité de cacher ou de tenter de cacher l’identité de l'auteur d’une contribution ».

Encore une fois, nous essayons simplement d’éliminer ces échappatoires par rapport au projet de loi qui a été présenté.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En grande partie, puisque cela a déjà été réglé, et je pense que cela sera couvert dans la nouvelle section 0.1 créée par des amendements, je ne vois pas la nécessité de l’appuyer.

Le président:

Ruby, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comme David l’a dit, c’est déjà couvert. La publicité partisane est déjà interdite et c’est déjà un crime. Je suis désolée, je parlais de financement étranger et de publicité partisane — pas seulement de publicité partisane, comme je crois l'avoir dit, car mon cerveau va dans tous les sens aujourd’hui — alors cela semble redondant. Cela ne semble rien régler.

(1610)

Le président:

Monsieur Boulerice. [Français]

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

Je suis plutôt favorable à l'esprit de l'amendement des conservateurs.

J'aurais une question, monsieur Morin, pour aider à ma compréhension.

Disons qu'une organisation a un budget de fonctionnement annuel de 2 millions de dollars et qu'elle reçoit une contribution de 2 millions de dollars d'une société étrangère. Cet argent reçu d'une société étrangère ou d'un donateur étranger ne sera pas utilisé pour mener des activités politiques ou préélectorales, mais servira à payer les frais de fonctionnement habituels de l'organisation.

Comment peut-on savoir si c'est le don provenant de l'étranger qui a servi à des activités préélectorales ou électorales, ou si c'est juste une substitution? On peut prétendre que l'argent du don n'est pas utilisé pour les activités préélectorales, mais bien pour payer le loyer, la secrétaire, les chercheurs, et ainsi de suite, or il demeure que cet argent n'existait pas auparavant.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Merci de la question, monsieur Boulerice.

Je vais seulement faire un commentaire technique concernant l'amendement CPC-110. Je tiens à indiquer que le nouvel article 358.01 proposé fait référence à l'article 358, lequel a été éliminé par l'adoption de l'amendement LIB-33.

Pour répondre à votre question, monsieur Boulerice, je dois préciser qu'un autre amendement des libéraux adopté hier a eu pour effet de créer la nouvelle section 0.1 à la partie 17 de la Loi électorale du Canada. En gros, cette nouvelle section interdit l'utilisation de fonds étrangers en tout temps pour la publicité partisane, pour la publicité électorale, pour les activités partisanes et pour les sondages électoraux. Cette nouvelle section dit notamment ceci: 349.02 Il est interdit au tiers d'utiliser des fonds provenant d'une entité étrangère à des fins d'activité partisane, de publicité ou de sondage électoral. 349.03 Il est interdit au tiers: a) d'esquiver ou de tenter d'esquiver l'interdiction prévue par l'article 349.02; b) d'agir de concert avec d'autres personnes ou entités en vue d'accomplir un tel fait.

Je sais que cela ne répond pas exactement à votre question, et je n'y répondrai pas non plus, parce que chaque cas est un cas d'espèce.

Rappelons cependant, comme nous le disions tout à l'heure, que les tiers peuvent être constitués de n'importe qui, sauf d'un candidat ou d'un parti.

Les entreprises canadiennes reçoivent probablement tous les jours des fonds de l'étranger, que cela provienne de dividendes ou d'autres choses. Si, de façon vraiment évidente, une organisation ayant un budget très limité était tout à coup capable, grâce à une contribution étrangère, de faire des dépenses exceptionnelles qu'elle n'aurait pas été capable de faire habituellement, cela pourrait faire l'objet d'une enquête du commissaire, car cela pourrait correspondre à l'une des interdictions dont je viens de parler. Tout dépend de l'ampleur des montants et du contexte.

M. Alexandre Boulerice:

D'accord, merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

J’ai l’impression que les gens savent comment ils vont voter, mais je vais terminer par Mme Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J’ai une brève question pour les fonctionnaires. Le projet de loi, dans sa forme actuelle, s’appliquerait-il uniquement au financement étranger ou s’appliquerait-il également à la collusion au pays?

Le président:

Parlez-vous de l’amendement ou du projet de loi?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je parle du projet de loi.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Que voulez-vous dire par là?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Excusez-moi, je parle de l’amendement et non du projet de loi.

Le président:

L’amendement dans sa forme actuelle s’applique-t-il à la fois à la collusion et au financement étranger? Est-ce bien ce que vous demandez, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C’est exact.

Le président:

Est-ce votre question?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, l’amendement s’appliquerait-il seulement au financement étranger ou aussi à la collusion au pays?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Eh bien, c’est une question intéressante.

Dans l’amendement, le nouvel article 358.01 qui a été proposé renvoyait à l’article 358 dont le sujet était le financement étranger, mais cet article a été abrogé. Donc, bien sûr, cette disposition faisait expressément référence au financement étranger, mais dans le nouvel article 358.02, par exemple, l’alinéa a) ne fait pas expressément référence au financement étranger. On dit simplement qu’il est interdit de « cacher ou de tenter de cacher l’identité de l'auteur d’une contribution », ce qui s’appliquerait également au Canada.

(1615)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D’accord, merci monsieur Morin.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous voter à ce sujet?

M. John Nater:

Nous aimerions un vote par appel nominal, s’il vous plaît, monsieur le président.

(L’amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous avions aussi l’amendement LIB-34 comme prochain amendement à l’article 233, mais il était corrélatif et a été adopté.

Vous avez retiré l’amendement LIB-34? Pouvons-nous le retirer après son adoption? A-t-il été adopté de façon corrélative?

Pendant que vous cherchez, nous allons passer à l’amendement CPC-111. Vous devez savoir que cet amendement comporte certaines ramifications, avant que nous le présentions.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, pourquoi l’amendement LIB-34 a-t-il été retiré?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s’agissait d’un amendement de rechange à l’article 227.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Très bien, merci.

Le président:

L’amendement LIB-34 est retiré.

Nous passons à l’amendement CPC-111. Le vote sur cet amendement s’applique également à l’amendement CPC-115.

De plus, si l’amendement CPC-111 est rejeté, alors l’amendement CPC-153, à la page 288, ne peut être proposé, puisque les deux sont liés par renvoi.

Encore une fois, il s’agit probablement d’une infraction et le suivant concerne la pénalité pour l’infraction. S’il n’y a pas d’infraction, il n’y a pas de pénalité.

Les conservateurs voudraient-ils maintenant présenter l'amendement CPC-111?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Encore une fois, cela concerne la recommandation de la professeure Turnbull. J’ai l’impression que nous avons abordé cette question dans plusieurs autres domaines, mais encore une fois, en notre qualité d’opposition officielle, nous essayons de fournir des mécanismes étanches pour empêcher le financement inapproprié des élections canadiennes.

Il s’agit de la mise en oeuvre des opérations de financement et de compte bancaire distincts pour les tiers. Je ne vois pas pourquoi le gouvernement s’opposerait à la mise en place de mécanismes pour s’assurer qu’il n’y aura pas de financement inapproprié des élections.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, j’ai une question pour nos fonctionnaires. C’est une recommandation que la professeure Turnbull a faite assez fermement lorsqu’elle a comparu devant le Comité. À l’époque, elle était analyste au Bureau du Conseil privé. Je suis curieux de savoir si vous avez déjà parlé avec Mme Turnbull du compte bancaire distinct et si vous avez tenté de savoir pourquoi le BCP n’a pas recommandé cela au moment de la rédaction du projet de loi.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Personnellement, je ne lui en ai pas parlé. J’ai occupé mon poste au BCP de janvier 2011 à août 2012, puis, plus récemment, d’avril de cette année jusqu’à maintenant. Désolé, je n’étais pas au BCP en même temps que Mme Turnbull.

M. John Nater:

C’est malheureux. La professeure Turnbull est une politologue exceptionnellement intelligente qui a remporté des prix pour un certain nombre de livres qu’elle a écrits. Elle est éminemment qualifiée pour faire une telle recommandation, et il est décevant qu’elle n’ait pas été adoptée, parce qu’elle l’a présentée au Comité.

Le président:

Elle est aussi éminemment impartiale.

M. John Nater:

Exact.

Le président:

David, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai vu dans les bleus que nous devrions en fait vous appeler capitaine de corvette Morin. Est-ce exact?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui. J’ai été avocat militaire dans les Forces armées canadiennes d’août 2012 à avril de cette année.

(1620)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela confirme donc la période évoquée plus tôt, je vous remercie.

D'un point de vue purement technique, comment s'appliquerait cet amendement? Si je comprends bien, il obligerait les tiers à garder leurs comptes ouverts entre les élections, ce qui serait très différent de la façon dont tous les autres sont traités pendant une campagne électorale. C’est un fardeau assez lourd que de demander à quelqu’un de dépenser 500 $ en frais bancaires pour garder ouvert ce compte de 500 $.

Est-ce là une bonne évaluation de l'application de l'amendement?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne ferai pas de commentaires sur le fardeau, mais bien sûr, la nécessité de garder un compte bancaire ouvert s’accompagnerait de frais, oui.

Le président:

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter à ce sujet, monsieur Nater?

M. John Nater:

Je pense que le plus important, c’est que nous voulons que chaque sou qui est versé dans des comptes bancaires distincts soit comptabilisé pour nous assurer qu’il provient de sources canadiennes, qu’il est traçable, vérifié et ainsi de suite. C’est ce que recommandent des personnes ayant une solide expérience sur le terrain. Je pense que c’est une bonne façon de procéder.

Des frais bancaires sont exigés pour constituer une entreprise. Nous payons tous des frais bancaires pour les comptes de notre association de circonscription.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Des associations communautaires.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que c’est logique, et je sais comment le vote va se dérouler, mais je pense que c’est une façon de protéger notre...

Le président:

Vous préjugez du résultat du vote?

M. John Nater:

Je pense qu'il pourrait aller dans une certaine direction.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pourquoi les comptes bancaires des candidats sont-ils fermés après les élections et qu’il n’est pas nécessaire de les rouvrir avant la période électorale? Est-ce parce qu'il est possible de compter sur les associations de circonscription pour s'occuper des fonds?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Parlez-vous des candidats?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, pour les candidats, ou disons qu'un nouveau candidat se présente tout à coup, un an avant les élections. Ils ne sont pas tenus d’ouvrir un compte bancaire avant le déclenchement des élections.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je vais demander à mon cher collègue Trevor Knight, qui est un spécialiste du financement politique à Élections Canada, de compléter ma réponse. J’ajouterais seulement que selon la définition de candidat qui se trouve au début de la Loi électorale du Canada, un candidat est un candidat jusqu’à ce que toutes les obligations financières exigées par la loi aient été respectées.

Je crois comprendre qu’à la fin de ce processus, lorsque tous les rapports financiers ont été fournis et que toutes les dettes ont été remboursées, le compte bancaire doit être fermé et lorsqu’une nouvelle campagne s’ouvre, le nouveau candidat doit ouvrir un nouveau compte bancaire.

M. Trevor Knight (avocat principal, Services juridiques, Élections Canada):

Oui, et la seule chose que j’ajouterais, c’est que comme candidat, une fois que vous commencez à accepter des contributions ou à engager des dépenses pour votre élection, même si c’est avant la période électorale, le compte bancaire doit être ouvert parce que toutes ces contributions et dépenses doivent passer par ce compte bancaire. En conclusion, une fois que toutes les transactions de la campagne sont faites et que l’excédent est décaissé, c’est à ce moment-là que le compte bancaire de la campagne est fermé.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d’autres interventions?

Est-ce que les témoins ont des commentaires à faire sur cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pouvons-nous avoir un vote par appel nominal?

Le président:

Il y aura un vote par appel nominal sur l'amendement CPC-111.

(L’amendement est rejeté par 6 voix contre 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Comme l’amendement est rejeté, l’amendement CPC-115 l'est aussi. L’amendement CPC-153 ne peut être proposé maintenant parce qu’il dépendait de l’amendement CPC-111.

(L’article 233 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 234)

Le président:

Il y a quelques amendements à l’article 234.

Nous allons commencer par l’amendement CPC-112.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Celui-ci ne me semble pas avoir déjà été discuté ici, mais il exige que les tiers présentent des rapports préélectoraux lorsqu’il y a une période préélectorale, mais que les élections ne sont pas à date fixe.

(1625)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous en avons discuté. Nous en avons discuté à propos de CPC-94. C’est la même discussion.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Vous souvenez-vous de la conclusion générale, David, concernant sa nécessité ou son absence de nécessité? Je suis désolée de vous imposer ce fardeau.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, mais je peux vous dire que nous avons voté contre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je suis sûr que c’est arrivé comme cela, mais j’essaie de me rappeler pourquoi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne m’en souviens pas exactement, mais je me souviens que cela créait des situations bizarres avec lesquelles nous n’étions pas à l’aise.

C’est la version abrégée.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Très bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Celui-ci est nettement meilleur.

Il ne crée pas de situations bizarres. Il règle les situations bizarres.

Le président:

S’il n’y a pas d’autres interventions, nous allons voter sur l’amendement CPC-112.

Vouliez-vous l'adopter avec dissidence?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous ne disons pas avec dissidence s’il est rejeté, n’est-ce pas?

Une voix: Deux ont voté contre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il a été rejeté avec dissidence.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est le mauvais côté de la ligne de démarcation.

Le président:

C’est exact.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons à l’amendement CPC-113.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Autant que je sache, nous avons discuté en détail hier, en ajoutant le secteur géographique relativement aux renseignements sur les sondages d’opinion.

Le gouvernement n’était pas d'accord. Je ne vois donc pas trop ce que je pourrais dire aujourd'hui pour convaincre les députés ministériels de se raviser. J’ai l’impression que cette discussion a déjà eu lieu. Bien que Dancing with the Stars ne soit pas diffusée ce soir, je ne tiens pas à prolonger ma présence ici pour discuter de...

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne suis vraiment pas Dancing with the Stars de très près. Est-ce presque terminé ou est-ce seulement le début?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

On en est à peu près au tiers ou à la moitié.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, je préfère cette partie. C’est plus drôle.

Le président:

Nous avons maintenant une solide raison de passer rapidement au vote.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous avons maintenant un des nouveaux amendements qui ont été distribués récemment. Il s’agit de l’amendement supplémentaire 9961280.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils le présenter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Encore une fois, nous tentons de rendre absolument impossible le contournement de l'obligation de communiquer les renseignements sur les fonds de source étrangère en exigeant que les tiers déclarent les fonds de source étrangère, peu importe à quelle fin ils sont reçus.

L’amendement ajouterait ce qui suit: (v) la liste des contributions que le tiers a reçues de toute personne ou entité étrangère depuis l'élection générale précédente, ainsi que la date et l'objet des contributions;

Encore une fois, nous essayons de resserrer le libellé pour éviter toute possibilité de financement étranger.

Le président:

Les témoins ont-ils quelque chose à dire?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je voudrais dire un mot à ce sujet.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

La Loi électorale du Canada définit le terme contribution ainsi: toute contribution monétaire et toute contribution non monétaire. La contribution monétaire est définie comme toute somme d’argent versée et non remboursable.

Nous avons choisi d'aborder la réglementation des fonds reçus de l'étranger pour les tiers sous l'angle de l’utilisation de ces fonds plutôt que sous celui de la réception de contributions. C'est que, puisque les tiers sont tous ceux qui ont fait de la publicité électorale, de la publicité partisane, etc., je crains que cette motion n'ajoute à la loi une exigence de divulgation très large.

Si je recevais un cadeau de 500 $ de ma grand-mère qui vit aux États-Unis, il faudrait que je le déclare. Je crains également que de nombreux organismes sans but lucratif qui reçoivent des dons de l’étranger ne soient obligés de déclarer toutes ces contributions.

(1630)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Peu importe que l’argent soit utilisé pour de la publicité partisane, puisque les tiers ne sont pas autorisés à utiliser des fonds venant de l'étranger. C’est tout ce qui ne sert pas dans le cadre d'une élection.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela s’applique à votre grand-mère seulement si elle est une tierce partie qui est tenue de fournir une déclaration de dépenses, ce qui, par définition, ne correspond pas à la situation de votre grand-mère. Selon moi, vous faites erreur, monsieur Morin, en donnant cet exemple.

Le président:

Un autre témoin serait-il d'avis que M. Morin se fourvoie?

M. Trevor Knight:

Mon interprétation serait semblable à celle de M. Morin. En tout cas, la question est soulevée, en ce sens que, ailleurs dans le régime des tiers, nous avons dit qu’un tiers enregistré doit déclarer les contributions. Il s’agit de contributions faites à certaines fins, comme la publicité électorale ou des activités partisanes. Par contre, la disposition proposée dit simplement: « la liste des contributions ».

Une possibilité, pour prendre l'exemple légèrement différent d’un groupe sans but lucratif qui cherche à faire de la publicité comme tiers, qui s’enregistre et qui a des donateurs étrangers. Il devrait déclarer tous ces donateurs étrangers, que ces contributions étrangères aient servi à des fins partisanes ou à ses autres fins ordinaires.

Pour ce qui est de l’ampleur du fardeau, je n’en suis pas certain, mais il y aurait évidemment plus de rapports que pour d'autres éléments du régime applicable aux tiers.

Le président:

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je comprends, et cet exemple illustre presque précisément la nécessité de l'amendement. Quand vous étiez enfant, combien de fois vos parents vous ont-ils donné de l’argent pour acheter de la pizza, et vous êtes allé au centre commercial acheter des jeans? Je vois cela comme...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne peux pas dire que cela me soit jamais arrivé.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Des jeux vidéo, alors, David, ou des bandes dessinées...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si je voulais une allocation, je devais vendre des oeufs.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D’accord, monsieur le président, merci.

Le président:

Assez plaisanté avec cet amendement.

Nous allons mettre aux voix l’amendement CPC 9961280. C’est le numéro de référence.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Pour me faire l’avocat du diable, monsieur Morin, très rapidement, vous avez dit que, si un montant devait être remboursé, ce n’était pas une contribution. Si quelqu’un accorde un prêt sans intérêt ou quelque chose du genre à un Canadien pendant 10 ans et que ce prêt doit être remboursé, cet apport ne sera pas visé.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne veux pas entrer dans les détails sans examiner les dispositions précises de la loi, mais il y a des dispositions qui portent expressément sur les prêts. La loi contient déjà des dispositions à ce sujet.

Le président:

D’accord. Passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-114.

Stephanie, voulez-vous présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Encore une fois, l'amendement concerne les tiers. Il exigerait également la divulgation des dépenses politiques engagées entre les élections. Tel qu’indiqué, l’article 234 serait modifié par adjonction, après la ligne 22, page 134, de ce qui suit: (v) la liste des dépenses qui ne sont pas visées aux sous-alinéas (i) à (iv), qui sont engagées au cours de la période commençant le jour suivant le jour du scrutin de l'élection générale précédant le jour du scrutin visé au paragraphe (1) et se terminant le jour du scrutin visé à ce paragraphe... L’amendement se poursuit, et il se termine ainsi: ... les date et lieu des activités partisanes auxquelles les dépenses se rapportent...

Ainsi, la période de déclaration correspondrait à la totalité de la période électorale pour ce qui est des dépenses politiques.

(1635)

Le président:

Débat?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En fait, j’ai une question. Selon l’amendement, seraient-ils applicables...? Non, cela échapperait aux plafonds de la période électorale et préélectorale pour les tiers.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre votre question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Disons qu’en vertu du projet de loi C-76, il y aura des plafonds pour toutes les entités, y compris les tiers. Les tiers ont un plafond pour la période électorale et pour la période préélectorale. Je demandais...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cet amendement porte sur la présentation de rapports et n’impose donc pas un nouveau plafond. Le plafond qui est établi pour la période préélectorale et la période électorale demeurent dans d’autres dispositions, mais cet amendement obligerait les tiers qui sont tenus de produire un rapport financier après l’élection à déclarer toutes leurs dépenses de nature partisane depuis les dernières élections générales. Toutes les publicités partisanes, tous les sondages électoraux et toutes les activités partisanes seraient visés par cette exigence de production de rapports.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

C’est dans cette direction que les choses évoluent. Par le passé, des partis politiques se sont dit, par souci de bonne planification: « Puisque des limites s'appliquent pendant la période électorale, alors nous allons faire passer des dépenses dans la période préélectorale », dans cette période qui n'était pas alors définie comme préélectorale. Puis, ils ont commencé à dépenser comme des fous. Maintenant, on va aller encore plus loin.

L'amendement proposé vise à régler ce problème.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui et non. Notre définition des divers types de dépenses... Par exemple, nous ne définissons pas les dépenses de publicité électorale comme des dépenses engagées pendant la période électorale. Nous les définissons comme des dépenses engagées, je crois, « relativement » à la période électorale. Cette formulation a été soigneusement choisie pour garantir que les dépenses engagées immédiatement avant la période électorale, mais pour les biens et services qui seraient utilisés pendant la période électorale, soient également comptabilisées.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, bien sûr. C’est comme la comptabilité d’exercice.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Mais cela va beaucoup plus loin.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D’accord.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cela obligerait les tiers à déclarer toutes les dépenses partisanes qu’ils ont faites depuis les dernières élections générales.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Eh bien, nous y arriverons.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que cela obligerait tous les tiers à déclarer de façon soutenue et permanente toutes les activités partisanes? Cela semble assez draconien.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Tous les tiers qui ont l’obligation de faire rapport après une élection générale seraient tenus de déclarer toutes leurs activités partisanes depuis la dernière élection générale. Un tiers qui n’a pas engagé de dépenses pendant une période préélectorale et une période électorale n’aurait pas à faire rapport de ce qui s’est passé entre les deux élections, mais les tiers qui ont engagé des dépenses seraient tenus de déclarer ces activités également.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense avoir saisi. Merci.

Le président:

Nous en avons assez entendu pour nous prononcer.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(1640)

Le président:

L’amendement CPC portant le numéro 9964902 a été retiré, et l’amendement CPC-115 était corrélatif au CPC-111, de sorte qu’aucun amendement n’a été apporté à l’article 234.

(L’article 234 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Il y avait un amendement CPC portant sur l’article 235, portant le numéro 9965053, mais il a été retiré. Il n'y a donc aucun amendement.

(Les articles 235 à 237 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: En ce qui concerne l’article 238, il y avait l’amendement CPC-116, mais les conservateurs l'ont retiré. L’amendement LIB-35 a été adopté parce qu’il était corrélatif à l’amendement LIB-32.

(L’article 238 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 239)

Le président:

Tout d’abord, nous sommes saisis de l'amendement LIB-36. Le vote sur cet amendement vaudra pour l’amendement LIB-52, qui se trouve à la page 294, puisqu’ils sont reliés par renvoi.

Ruby, veuillez présenter l’amendement LIB-36.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Lors de son témoignage devant le Comité de la procédure, le DGE a critiqué certains aspects du projet de loi C-76. Selon lui, le fait de permettre à un parti de déduire le coût décrit ci-dessus du montant de la contribution pour un congrès permettrait à un parti de recueillir des fonds pour une activité de base du parti, par exemple, un congrès à la direction ou autre chose, avec d’autres fonds comptés dans la limite de contribution d’un particulier. Il a ajouté que ce problème serait aggravé par le fait qu’une personne riche pourrait payer pour plusieurs participants et acheter plusieurs billets et pourrait finir par payer la majeure partie ou la totalité du congrès.

L’amendement proposé supprimerait deux paragraphes controversés, soit les paragraphes 364(8) et 364(9), du projet de loi C-76. Cette suppression maintiendrait le statu quo en ce qui concerne le traitement des frais de participation aux congrès des partis aux termes de la Loi électorale du Canada, tout en conservant une nouvelle interdiction visant les personnes autres que les cotisants admissibles qui paient des frais de participation.

Le président:

S’il n’y a pas de débat, nous allons voter sur l’amendement LIB-36.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous venons d’adopter l’amendement LIB-36 à l’unanimité. Le vote s’applique également à l’amendement LIB-52. Ces deux amendements sont liés par renvoi.

(L’article 239 modifié est adopté.)

Le président : Les articles 240 à 249 ne font l'objet d'aucun amendement.

Les articles 240 à 249 sont-ils adoptés?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

L’article 246 peut être adopté avec dissidence. Les autres peuvent être adoptés sans dissidence.

Le président:

D’accord.

(Les articles 240 à 245 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(L’article 246 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 247 à 249 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 250)

Le président: Nous avons deux amendements du PCC à l’article 250. Le premier est le CPC-117.

Je demanderais aux conservateurs de bien vouloir le présenter.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s'agit d'imposer un préavis au sujet des exigences du directeur général des élections relatives aux plafonds imposés aux catégories de dépenses personnelles des candidats et de modifier le texte, qui se lirait ainsi: (2) Les catégories et les plafonds de dépenses établis en vertu du paragraphe (1) prennent effet au plus tôt six mois suivant le jour de leur établissement. Si ce jour tombe pendant une période électorale, ces catégories et ces plafonds de dépenses ne s'appliquent pas relativement à cette élection. (3) Le directeur général des élections fait au président de la Chambre des communes un rapport sur les catégories et les plafonds de dépenses établis en vertu du paragraphe (1). (4) Le Président présente sans délai à la Chambre des communes tout rapport qui lui est transmis conformément au présent article.

De toute évidence, les candidats doivent connaître non seulement les exigences, mais aussi les plafonds des dépenses.

À mon avis, la question intéresse tous les candidats. De plus, je crois que la ministre elle-même s’intéresse beaucoup aux dépenses personnelles pour des choses comme la garde d’enfants, une préoccupation que je partage également. Il serait utile d’avoir un préavis de ces exigences de déclaration et des plafonds imposés aux diverses catégories.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

(1645)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’allais demander à M. Morin et à M. Knight s’ils ont des observations à formuler à ce sujet, pour commencer.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Du point de vue du BCP, je n’ai pas de commentaire technique à faire. Cela créerait une nouvelle obligation pour le directeur général des élections, qui devrait informer le Président de la Chambre des communes de ces nouvelles catégories. Cela retarderait leur mise en place, mais c’est une décision stratégique.

Le président:

Monsieur Knight.

M. Trevor Knight:

Je ne sais pas exactement comment nous informerions les gens. Il me semble juste de dire que, pour l'application de toute cette disposition, nous devrons évidemment être clairs et informer les gens. Nous n'aurions probablement aucune objection à ce qu'on informe les gens de ces plafonds et catégories.

Si vous me permettez de revenir un peu en arrière, il y a actuellement dans la loi une catégorie de dépenses personnelles, qui comprend les frais de garde, de déplacement et de subsistance. Sont également comprises d’autres dépenses personnelles dont on peut demander le remboursement. Il peut s'agir de diverses choses. Aux termes de la loi actuelle, la limite globale est de 200 $. Le plafond sert à établir un équilibre dans ce pour quoi on peut demander un remboursement et non dans ce qu’on peut dépenser pour ces choses.

Le projet de loi C-76 étendrait l'application de cette disposition aux frais de déplacement et de subsistance. Il y aura donc désormais d’autres catégories de dépenses pour lesquelles le DGE pourrait vouloir imposer un plafond.

Je ne sais pas si je peux exprimer une opinion. Tout ce que je dirais, c'est que, compte tenu du moment choisi pour intervenir, s’il arrive qu'on ne puisse pas mettre les choses en place avant l'élection suivante à cause des délais à respecter, il est possible que les catégories des frais de déplacement, des frais de subsistance et des dépenses personnelles soient ouvertes au lieu d'être plafonnées.

La conséquence ne se ferait pas sentir sur la limite globale des dépenses électorales, mais sur les remboursements que les candidats pourraient demander pour ces dépenses. Il pourrait y avoir des remboursements plus élevés que ce qu’on pourrait estimer convenir pour atteindre cet équilibre. Pour l'instant, c'est, il me semble, la seule conséquence qui puisse préoccuper Élections Canada.

Le président:

Trevor et Stephanie, ne pourriez-vous pas simplement afficher l’information sur votre site Web, de la même façon que vous informez tout le monde de tout le reste?

M. Trevor Knight:

Je ne sais pas comment au juste. Au fur et à mesure que divers changements seront apportés, nous publierons certainement les guides des candidats. Je suppose que nous aurons d’autres moyens, sur notre site Web notamment, de communiquer avec les candidats et les candidats potentiels et, évidemment, avec les associations de circonscription et les partis. Nous avons aussi le Comité consultatif des partis politiques, qui, je suppose, sera un moyen de diffuser de l'information sur le projet de loi C-76 et les changements qui viendront probablement.

(1650)

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me semble étrange d’exiger du Président qu’il se préoccupe de la question plutôt que de s'en remettre aux divulgations publiques que nous faisons habituellement. L'amendement me semble imposer un grand surcroît de travail sans apporter quelque avantage que ce soit.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Nos témoins pourraient-ils nous dire s’il y a d’autres éléments dans la loi qui doivent faire l’objet d’un rapport au Parlement par l’entremise du Président?

M. Trevor Knight:

Ce ne sera probablement pas une liste exhaustive, mais il y a certainement un rapport après chaque élection générale et un rapport sur les élections partielles. Il y a un rapport contenant des recommandations qui est fait après chaque élection sur les propositions que le directeur général des élections avance pour modifier la loi.

Il y a une disposition dans la loi qui permet au directeur général des élections de remplacer les signatures par une autre méthode qui, selon lui, sera satisfaisante. Il y a un rapport au Président sur tout changement de cette nature. Il y a aussi un rapport au Président sur le processus de nomination et de révocation des directeurs du scrutin aux termes de la loi.

M. Jean-François Morin:

J’ajouterais que Trevor a dressé une liste très détaillée et que tous ces rapports figurent aux articles 533 à 537 de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Le président:

Monsieur de Burgh Graham, êtes-vous prêt à voter?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je le suis.

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose?

M. John Nater:

M. Sampson a quelque chose à dire.

M. Robert Sampson (conseiller juridique, Services juridiques, Élections Canada):

Merci.

Je veux simplement souligner qu’il y a, bien sûr, d’autres exigences en matière de publication et d’autres moyens de donner de l'information, par exemple, dans la Gazette du Canada, ou en vertu des lignes directrices et des dispositions relatives aux opinions qui sont publiées sur le site Web. Les exigences de publication varient souvent en fonction de la nature des renseignements à rendre publics.

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts à voter sur l’amendement CPC-117.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-117.1.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Dans les faits, le directeur général des élections maintient les plafonds existants imposés aux catégories de dépenses personnelles des candidats jusqu’à ce qu’il en décide autrement.

Le président:

Monsieur de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, n’est-ce pas déjà le cas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, l’alinéa 44g) de la Loi d’interprétation prévoit que, lorsqu’une mesure est remplacée par une autre et que le fond de la modification est le même, alors les règlements précédents ou les décisions antérieures prises en vertu du texte précédent sont réputés avoir été maintenus en vertu du nouveau texte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'amendement est donc inutile. Merci.

Le président:

Si nous sommes prêts, nous allons voter sur l’amendement CPC-117.1.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 250 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Maintenant, les conservateurs proposent un nouvel article, le 252.1, et il y a un nouvel amendement du PCC.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Avons-nous étudié l’article 251?

Sauf erreur, nous avons étudié l’article 250, mais pas le 251.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous n’avons pas adopté l’article 251.

Le président:

D’accord.

(Les articles 251 et 252 sont adoptés.)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous sommes saisis de deux amendements.

Le président:

Passons maintenant au nouvel article 252.1.

M. Scott Reid:

Il ne s’agit pas d’un nouvel amendement. C’est un nouvel article qui suivrait l’article 252.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oh, excusez-moi. D’accord.

Le président:

Nous avons deux propositions conservatrices qui ajoutent un article après l’article 252, que nous venons d’approuver.

La première porte le numéro 10009236.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter cet amendement?

(1655)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr. Cette disposition garantit que le secret professionnel de l’avocat n’est pas levé en ce qui concerne la divulgation des frais de contentieux. Nous observons dans la société, à tous les niveaux de gouvernement, une multiplication des litiges concernant les élections et leurs résultats. J’espère que nous allons suivre l’exemple des États-Unis. Je plaisante.

Selon nous, veiller à ce que le secret professionnel de l’avocat ne soit pas levé en ce qui concerne les dépenses liées aux litiges assure une plus grande transparence du processus de divulgation.

Le président:

Monsieur de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non.

Le président:

Ou au sujet des États-Unis?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non.

Sérieusement, monsieur Graham, je n’ai rien à dire de précis. Je dirai seulement que, ces dernières années — et je n’ai pas de cas précis à signaler —, la Cour suprême du Canada a confirmé à maintes reprises l’importance du secret professionnel de l’avocat au Canada, et je ne pense pas que quiconque exigerait la divulgation de ces documents.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord. Merci.

Le président:

Oui, madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je suis désolée. Pour préciser, monsieur Morin, le secret professionnel de l’avocat est quelque chose qui... Le droit des clients de ne pas identifier leur avocat est-il prévu par la loi à l’heure actuelle? A-t-on le droit de refuser de révéler qui est son avocat?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pose la question.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, je suis désolé. Le secret professionnel de l’avocat vise à protéger les communications entre le client et l’avocat.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je vois. Excusez-moi. Toutes mes excuses. J’ai mal compris.

D’accord, je vais en rester là.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, sommes-nous prêts à voter?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Le président:

Que tous ceux qui sont en faveur de l’amendement CPC portant le numéro 10009236 veuillent bien se manifester.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C’était le 10009234, je crois.

Le président:

Était-ce le 10009234 que vous avez présenté?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C’est exact.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Vous pouvez maintenant présenter l’amendement portant le numéro 10009236.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois que c’est dans le même...

Le président:

... esprit?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

... dans le même esprit, exactement. Merci.

Je ne pense pas qu’il soit nécessaire d’en discuter davantage.

Le président:

D’accord, nous allons voter sur l’amendement conservateur portant le numéro 0009236, qui créerait le nouvel article 252.1.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il n’y a pas de nouvel article 252.1 parce que les deux amendements proposant de l’ajouter ont été rejetés.

(Article 253)

Le président: Un amendement est proposé à cet article, le CPC-118.

Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s’agit de maintenir la divulgation publique des déclarations de dépenses des candidats, mais par la publication en ligne plutôt que par la remise d'un document au directeur du scrutin. Le texte est ainsi modifié, exactement: Dès que possible après avoir reçu les documents visés au paragraphe 477.59(1) pour une circonscription, le directeur général des élections les publie sur son site Internet.

Cela semble moderne et commode.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme le paragraphe 382(1) exige que ces informations soient communiquées d’une manière que le DGE juge appropriée, je ne vois pas l’avantage d’ajouter cette disposition. Le DGE peut déjà imposer cette façon de faire.

Le président:

Eh bien, vous venez de dire que c’était à sa discrétion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est exact. C’est au DGE de décider.

Le président:

Il n’a donc pas à le faire par voie électronique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il retient la modalité qu’il juge convenir.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact, car Élections Canada...

J’ai plutôt supposé que l’affichage des dépenses des candidats se faisait par voie électronique. Cela se fait déjà ou pas tellement?

M. Trevor Knight:

Oui, cela se fait. L’obligation prévue par la loi, et je n’ai pas le texte de l'article sous les yeux, est de publier les rapports de la manière et sous la forme que le directeur général des élections juge convenir. Sur Internet, alors...

(1700)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Que fait-on actuellement? Quelle est la pratique actuelle?

M. Trevor Knight:

Les renseignements sont publiés sur le site Web, même si ce n’est pas exactement au fur et à mesure qu'ils arrivent, mais sous une forme plus facile à consulter. Ils sont mis sous une forme qui permet les recherches.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact. L'amendement insisterait donc pour qu'on fasse ce qui se fait déjà. Je me demande si cela modifierait quoi que ce soit aux pratiques d'Élections Canada.

M. Trevor Knight:

C’est essentiellement ce que nous faisons. Sur le site Web, nous publions le nom et le code postal des donateurs plutôt que le nom, l’adresse et le code postal, afin d’établir un équilibre entre la protection de la vie privée et la divulgation. L'amendement proposé nous obligerait probablement à publier tout le document.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suis désolé, mais pouvez-vous m’aider à comprendre pourquoi l'amendement rendrait obligatoire cette divulgation plus poussée? Vous laissez entendre que ce qui est publié actuellement est un peu plus limité, puisqu'il n'y a que le code postal et le nom.

M. Trevor Knight:

L’adresse municipale n’est pas publiée...

M. Nathan Cullen:

L'amendement exige-t-il l’adresse municipale?

M. Trevor Knight:

Puisqu'elle se trouve dans le document que nous recevons... Le rapport est disponible à Élections Canada sous forme non expurgée, mais il n’est pas publié à Élections Canada. Tous ceux qui le désirent peuvent le consulter.

Sur le site Web, le contenu du document est repris à partir du format papier, mais présenté sous une forme plus lisible. On le verse dans un système, mais il y a une différence, c’est-à-dire que l’adresse municipale n’est pas publiée, conformément à une pratique de longue date qui a été élaborée il y a longtemps avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée. En exigeant la publication de cette adresse, on modifierait légèrement cette pratique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voici ma dernière question, monsieur le président.

Je voudrais que ce soit bien clair. Vous dites que, si l'amendement est adopté, Élections Canada n'aurait plus cette même latitude, qu'il ne lui serait plus possible de caviarder des éléments comme l’adresse municipale.

Je n’interprète pas l'amendement de cette façon, mais je sais qu’il renvoie à d’autres articles de la loi.

M. Trevor Knight:

Je l'interpréterais simplement comme... Il est question ailleurs des comptes et rapports. L’article 477.59 porte sur le compte de dépenses du candidat, qui serait donc publié sur le site Web. Il s’agit d’une interprétation rapide pour le moment, mais il me semble que l'amendement propose que les renseignements soient ensuite publiés sur le site Web, probablement en format PDF...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avec l’adresse.

M. Trevor Knight:

... avec la totalité des renseignements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce également votre interprétation, monsieur Sampson?

M. Robert Sampson:

Oui, et tout ce que j'ai à dire, c'est que l'amendement exige que les documents eux-mêmes soient publiés. Voilà l'essentiel. Nous serions tenus de publier...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous ne pourriez pas caviarder une adresse, par exemple.

M. Robert Sampson:

... et nous perdrions également la capacité... Nous publions les documents, puis nous les transposons, je suppose, dans un format plus accessible.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Une forme consultable.

Je sais que M. Morin veut intervenir, mais ce serait... Je suis généralement en faveur d’une plus grande transparence et d’une plus grande capacité de recherche. S’il y a, la communication de l'adresse municipale a une conséquence imprévue...

Le président:

Je fais la même interprétation qu'eux.

Monsieur Nater, vous aviez une question à poser.

M. John Nater:

Oui. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je veux simplement avoir une précision. Comme c’est le cas maintenant, les reçus, les pièces justificatives, les factures, rien de tout cela n’est publié en ligne. Est-ce exact?

M. Trevor Knight:

C’est exact.

M. John Nater:

Serait-ce la même chose si l'amendement était adopté?

M. Trevor Knight:

Ce n’est pas libellé de cette façon. Le paragraphe 477.59(1) renvoie aux déclarations de l’agent officiel et du candidat, au compte lui-même et au rapport du vérificateur. Ces documents, je suppose, seraient publiés, mais les pièces justificatives, c’est-à-dire les documents dont vous parlez, sont mentionnés au paragraphe (2), de sorte qu’elles ne seraient pas publiées en ligne.

Le président:

Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

À l’heure actuelle, la loi prévoit l'accessibilité pour le public. Le directeur du scrutin qui reçoit les documents visés au paragraphe (1) doit, sur demande, les mettre à la disposition du public pour une période de six mois aux fins d’inspection à tout moment raisonnable. On peut en obtenir copie pour des frais qui peuvent atteindre 25 ¢ la page.

M. Jean-François Morin:

J’aurais quelques mots à dire à ce sujet. Voyons d'abord l’obligation actuelle du directeur général des élections de publier l’information. Elle est prévue à l’alinéa 382(1)a) de la loi. Comme Trevor l’a dit, cette publication se fait selon les modalités que le directeur général des élections juge appropriées.

En ce qui concerne la disposition précise qui est modifiée par la motion, le projet de loi C-76 recommandait l’abrogation de l’article 383. C’était une recommandation du directeur général des élections dans son dernier rapport qui énumère ses recommandations parce que le libellé actuel de cet article contient une erreur. Il a été modifié de façon erronée en 2015, ce qui fait que le paragraphe 383(2) est un peu déplacé et illogique dans le contexte. De plus, en général, l’article 383 portait sur la consultation des comptes des candidats au bureau du directeur du scrutin. Dans ses dernières recommandations le directeur général des élections écrit que, de nos jours, comme ces comptes sont disponibles en ligne, cette consultation en personne au bureau du directeur du scrutin semble plutôt inutile.

Enfin, en ce qui concerne la motion elle-même, mon collègue Robert y a fait allusion, toutes les institutions gouvernementales qui ont un site Web, y compris Élections Canada, sont tenues de rendre tous les documents lisibles dans des formats accessibles pour les personnes handicapées. Les documents PDF présentent un problème très particulier parce que, souvent, comme dans le cas des déclarations financières, ils sont numérisés, de sorte que le document ne peut pas être lu à la machine. Cela obligerait Élections Canada à créer une traduction, mot pour mot, de ce qui apparaît dans le document entier pour chaque rapport d’élection. Ce serait un fardeau très lourd pour l’organisation.

(1705)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, je vais proposer un sous-amendement qui, je l’espère, répondra à certaines préoccupations, à savoir que l’amendement CPC-118 soit modifié par substitution aux mots « paragraphe 477.59(1) » des mots « paragraphes 477.59(3) et (4) ».

Cela nous donnerait l’information que nous voulons, mais nous conserverions quand même cette première partie, qui comportait les adresses municipales.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avant que nous n'allions plus loin, les témoins pourraient-ils donner leur interprétation des conséquences de cette disposition?

M. Nathan Cullen:

L’élimination du paragraphe (1) et l’ajout des paragraphes (3) et (4) règlent-ils le problème?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] ... et ce n’est pas consultable et cela ajoute un fardeau supplémentaire, mais cela pourrait régler le problème.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce n’est pas disponible. Le niveau de détail envisagé n’est pas possible à l’heure actuelle — le rapport sur les pièces justificatives, c’est-à-dire au niveau des reçus. C’est ce que je crois comprendre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voyons ce qu’ils ont à dire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils ne nous parlent pas, alors je me suis dit que nous devrions simplement en discuter et trouver une solution.

Le président:

Pendant que les fonctionnaires y réfléchissent, j’ai une question à poser à Mme May.

Voulez-vous que nous terminions l’étude de votre amendement avant la pause-repas pour que vous puissiez partir, ou avez-vous l’intention de rester?

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

C’est vraiment quelque chose que je déteste vous demander de faire. Vous avez probablement désespérément besoin de faire une pause et vous aimeriez probablement prendre une bouchée.

Le président:

Nous pouvons le faire.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Si le Comité est d’accord... J’imagine que ce sera un long débat, parce que cela nous amènera à accepter mon amendement, mais si vous pensez que vous en viendrez à l'accepter assez rapidement, je suis prête a tenir le débat maintenant.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous tenez nos dîners en otage. Est-ce bien ce que vous dites?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je dis que les profondeurs de la vénalité du Parti vert n’ont pas encore été sondées.

Je m’en remets à vous, monsieur le président. Je ne resterai pas après l'étude de cet amendement. Honnêtement, je pense que c’est l’amendement qui me tient le plus à coeur, et pour le reste de la soirée, je peux m’en aller.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous n’avez qu’à nous écouter sur CPAC.

Je veux dire sur ParlVu, excusez-moi, et non CPAC.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Désolée.

Le président:

Je vais prendre quelques minutes, et si le débat traîne en longueur, nous allons faire une pause.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce exceptionnellement impoli de manger pendant qu’on écoute la députée?

Le président:

Oui, c'est peut-être ce que nous finirons par faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela dépend de ce que vous mangez.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils quelque chose à dire sur le sous-amendement? Cela règle-t-il le problème de l’obligation d’indiquer l’adresse et tout le reste?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Ai-je raison de croire que l’amendement remplacerait le paragraphe 477.59(1) par les paragraphes 477.59(3) et (4)?

M. John Nater:

C’est exact.

M. Jean-François Morin:

D’accord.

Il s’agit d’une décision stratégique, mais d’un point de vue opérationnel, 338 circonscriptions électorales multipliées par six, sept ou huit candidats, cela représente des milliers de candidats et des milliers de documents.

Je dois rappeler au Comité que ces documents sont déjà publics en vertu de l’article 541 de la Loi électorale du Canada et qu’ils peuvent être consultés sur demande à Élections Canada.

(1710)

Le président:

... où on peut voir les adresses?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, il s’agit de documents à l’appui, des reçus de comptes bancaires...

Le président:

D’accord.

M. Jean-François Morin:

D’un point de vue opérationnel, tous ces documents devraient être traduits dans un autre format et rendus accessibles pour les personnes handicapées.

Je ne dis pas que le fait de rendre un document accessible constitue un fardeau, mais simplement que, dans ce cas-ci, il s’agit de factures et de comptes bancaires, et...

Le président:

Je comprends où cela nous mène, mais MM. Cullen et Nater peuvent intervenir brièvement.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

J’ai une brève question à poser.

Si les documents sont déjà publics, comment une personne de Dawson City, disons, aurait-elle accès à ces documents?

Le président:

C’est un bon exemple. C’est dans la plus belle circonscription du Canada.

M. Robert Sampson:

En vertu de l’article 541, on peut demander... La disposition est ainsi conçue qu’il faut se présenter au bureau du directeur général des élections. Dans les faits, les documents sont disponibles, mais nous rendons aussi des documents disponibles pour quiconque ne peut pas venir au bureau.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Doivent-ils venir en personne?

M. Robert Sampson:

C’est ce que la loi exige, mais nous offrons un service. Si quelqu’un veut venir à notre bureau, nous lui fournissons les documents, mais, à ceux qui ne peuvent pas venir, nous les fournissons sous un nouveau format électronique.

M. John Nater:

Est-ce une politique d’Élections Canada? Y a-t-il eu une directive à cet effet, ou est-ce une pratique courante?

M. Robert Sampson:

Il faudrait que je vérifie s’il y a une politique à ce sujet ou si c’est une pratique courante, mais je sais que cela a été fait à l’occasion.

Le président:

D’accord.

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté.)

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 253 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 254)

Le président:

Nous sommes saisis de l’amendement PV-10.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci aux membres du Comité.

Vous savez tous de quoi parle cet amendement. Il en a été question dans les médias nationaux, au Comité et dans les témoignages. Je vous rappelle en particulier le témoignage de notre ancien directeur général des élections, Marc Mayrand. Il préconisait de respecter de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques. C’est ce à quoi vise mon amendement.

Cette suggestion a été discutée devant le Comité. Elle a également reçu l’appui du professeur Michael Pal, de l’Université d’Ottawa, et, ce qui est révélateur, dans les médias, Teresa Scassa, titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit et en politique de l’information à l’Université d’Ottawa, a déclaré que le projet de loi C-76,dans sa forme actuelle, était « une solution de facilité, presque méprisante et tout à fait cosmétique, conçue pour détourner l’attention des questions très graves liées à la protection de la vie privée que soulève l’utilisation des renseignements personnels par les partis politiques ».

Cela tombe à point nommé. C’est ce qu'il faut faire. Il n’y a pas de raisons que les partis politiques ne puissent pas être assujettis aux mêmes lois que le secteur privé.

J’espère vraiment que vous envisagerez sérieusement de voter en faveur de cet amendement visant à consacrer la protection de la vie privée des Canadiens et à ne plus exempter les partis politiques.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est censé s'appuyer sur les témoignages que nous avons entendus, et j’essaie de me rappeler un seul témoin opposé à l’idée que les partis entrent dans l’ère moderne et soient assujettis à des règles de protection de la vie privée.

Comme nous l’a dit le directeur général des élections actuel, monsieur le président, aucun parti n’est assujetti à... rien du tout. Ce n'est pas seulement du point de vue des électeurs canadiens qu'on devrait s'inquiéter du fait que nous recueillons beaucoup d’information sur les Canadiens — pas seulement sur leurs intentions de vote, mais sur toutes sortes de choses — à partir des listes électorales. Les partis sont en train d’accumuler et de compiler des données croisées sur les citoyens pour comprendre leurs raisons de voter et leurs intentions. C’est le principal objectif de la plupart des partis politiques, et c'est au coeur de leur existence, à l’heure actuelle, tout comme les campagnes de financement et toutes sortes d’autres choses.

Les exemples que nous avons devant nous, aux États-Unis et au Royaume-Uni, devraient nous faire réfléchir. Nous ne voulons pas nous retrouver dans une situation semblable, où une élection ou un référendum important est compromis par le piratage des systèmes de données d’un parti ou de tous. Des experts en sécurité nous ont également dit que les systèmes de données de nos partis ne sont pas sécurisés.

C’est une préoccupation claire et actuelle. Au dernier référendum du Québec, par exemple, qui a donné lieu à un vote très serré, si, après coup — ou pendant, mais certainement après coup —, on avait découvert que les bases de données du Parti québécois ou du Parti libéral avaient été gravement compromises et que ces électeurs avaient été visés par des influences extérieures pour voter d’une façon ou d’une autre sur la question, vous pouvez imaginer les conséquences que cela aurait eues sur ceux qui auraient gagné ou perdu. Pour un pays comme le nôtre, qui, comme le disait M. Dion, fonctionne mieux en pratique qu’en théorie, il ne devrait rien y avoir dans notre infrastructure politique ou démocratique qui menace notre capacité à nous comporter et à obtenir que la volonté des électeurs soit exprimée aussi correctement que possible au Parlement qu’ils élisent.

Marc Mayrand était accompagné, bien sûr, de notre commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, qui a dit, et je cite : « Rien de substantiel en ce qui concerne la protection de la vie privée », et l’exigence d’avoir une politique sur les données accessibles au public est une exigence « creuse ».

Le directeur général des élections, auquel ont systématiquement renvoyé les députés du gouvernement pour appuyer les amendements que vous avez apportés, a dit ceci: S’il y a un domaine où ce projet de loi a échoué, c’est bien celui de la protection de la vie privée. Les partis ne sont assujettis à aucun système de protection de la vie privée.

En réponse à une question, il a dit: « Je pense que le moment est venu de le faire, et les commissaires à la protection de la vie privée de tout le pays sont du même avis. »

David Moscrop s’est joint à la conversation pour appuyer cette mesure.

Victoria Henry, d’Open Media, a dit que « l’omission des partis politiques dans la réglementation de la protection de la vie privée est une lacune inquiétante. »

Je citerai également Mme Dubois, qui a dit: Le projet de loi ne prévoit aucune forme d'audit ou de vérification de la pertinence, de l’éthique ou du respect de la politique. Aucune sanction n’est prévue en cas de non-conformité. Aucune disposition ne permet aux Canadiens de demander que leurs données soient corrigées ou supprimées...

Comme les membres du Comité le savent, tout ce que le projet de loi contient à l’heure actuelle, c’est l’obligation pour les partis de publier une politique sur la protection des renseignements personnels sur leur site Web. Il ne dit pas si cette politique de protection de la vie privée devrait faire quoi que ce soit et il ne dit pas que, si le parti enfreint cette politique telle qu’elle est énoncée, il y aura des conséquences.

Cela ne veut rien dire. Rien du tout, mesdames et messieurs. Si un Canadien conteste un parti et dit: « Je pense que vous avez perdu mes données. Je reçois toutes sortes d’appels de la part de certains groupes ou de certaines personnes qui essaient de me vendre des choses, et je vous ai dit sur le pas de ma porte que je m’inquiète pour l’environnement ou pour les impôts », le projet de loi C-76 ne prévoit aucune conséquence pour une atteinte à la protection des données de la part de l’un ou l’autre des partis. Cela doit vous inquiéter. Cela va bien au-delà de la partisanerie gauche-droite.

Il s’agit simplement d'essayer de combler une lacune dans notre capacité législative à tenir des élections libres et équitables dans notre pays. J’en ai parlé avec la ministre dès le début. J’ai parlé à des collègues du Congrès américain qui m’ont dit: « Si vous devez faire quelque chose, corrigez cette lacune. Vous êtes des naïfs, des boy-scouts; vous pensez que vous ne serez pas poursuivis parce que vous êtes des gens gentils. »...

Ce n’est pas ainsi que cela fonctionne. Les influences externes, les influences internes, le simple fait de chercher à perturber — encore une fois, imaginez l’expérience que nous avons vécue au Québec — une question fondamentale qui se pose dans l’une de nos provinces, même pas pour influencer les électeurs, mais pour jeter le doute...

(1715)



Comme nous l’avons vu, monsieur le président, quand nous parlons de lois électorales, l’une des choses que nous protégeons toujours, c’est que, le soir des élections, quand les résultats sont publiés dans chacune de nos circonscriptions et que les résultats généraux sont communiqués à la population, qu’ils aient gagné ou perdu, les Canadiens acceptent les résultats, qu'ils considèrent comme valables, qu’ils les aiment ou non — ces résultats n’ont pas été modifiés et ils n’ont pas été compromis.

C’est l’une des choses qui maintiennent cette garantie pour les Canadiens. Sans cela, notre monde serait complètement différent, parce que nous recueillons énormément de renseignements sur les Canadiens. On dirait que je suis le seul à l'admettre à cette table, mais nous savons tous que c’est vrai, et nous n’avons pas les protections nécessaires, parce que les données sont d'une très grande importance de nos jours. On le voit tout le temps. Et cela ne fera qu’augmenter.

Ce problème ne va pas se régler tout seul, n’est-ce pas? Ce n’est pas comme si les partis allaient renoncer à recueillir des données et ne pas devenir de plus en plus sophistiqués, mais nos systèmes de sécurité ne permettent pas protéger ce qui est si précieux pour le fonctionnement de notre démocratie.

(1720)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai travaillé dans le secteur de la technologie durant la majeure partie de ma carrière avant de me lancer en politique. Je suis au courant des problèmes et je ne suis pas en désaccord avec ce que vous dites. Je ne pense pas que la meilleure façon de procéder soit d’apporter un seul amendement à la LPRPDE. Je pense qu'il y faut une étude beaucoup plus approfondie et je serais tout à fait en faveur d’une étude plus approfondie ici, au Comité, dès que ce projet de loi sera terminé.

Je sais ce que vous allez dire, mais c’est une question beaucoup plus vaste qu’un seul amendement à un projet de loi pour un seul effet, parce que, si vous soumettiez tout le système politique sous le régime de la LPRPDE dans un seul amendement, sans étude, sans recherche sur les effets éventuels sur le processus politique par rapport à d’autres choses...

Donc, oui, j’aimerais en arriver là où vous voulez en venir — à l'application aux partis politiques de la réglementation de la protection de la vie privée —, mais je pense que vous devez faire une étude pour savoir comment bien faire les choses.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous savons qu’un autre comité du Parlement, le Comité de la protection de la vie privée et de l’éthique, a étudié la question et a recommandé cela.

Pour revenir à ce que vous disiez au sujet d’une étude plus approfondie, et je ne vous accuse pas de cela, David, c’est une raison que j’ai trop souvent entendu invoquer par le gouvernement quand il ne veut rien faire: « Étudions la question ». Nous sommes à un an des élections et nous sommes mal préparés pour faire face à cette menace. Le Parlement a étudié la question. Le Parlement a pris la décision de le faire dans un autre comité, et nous allons le rejeter, car c’est bien ce que nous disons en fait...

Le président:

Madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci, monsieur le président, parce que je sais que la motion de votre comité ne vous obligeait pas à me redonner la parole.

Je veux simplement rappeler que j’ai essayé de faire modifier le projet de loi C-23, la Loi sur l’intégrité des élections. J’avais proposé un amendement pour que la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels s’applique. Cette fois-ci, j'ai modifié ma proposition pour que la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques s’applique.

D'après les conseils de notre directeur général des élections et des experts en matière de protection de la vie privée, si nous attendons, David, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, nous aurons, en 2019, des élections au cours desquelles il ne sera pas possible de protéger correctement les renseignements personnels des Canadiens, et nous savons ce qui peut arriver. Pendant que Nathan parlait, je me suis souvenu que, quand Irwin Cotler était au Parlement avec nous — ce fut un grand honneur de servir en même temps qu’Irwin —, il avait été très contrarié, parce qu’il avait dit à son personnel de campagne de ne pas faire d’appels téléphoniques pendant les Grandes Fêtes; il ne voulait pas d’appels téléphoniques, mais quelqu’un avait accès la base de données sur les familles juives dans sa circonscription, et ces familles avaient toutes reçu des appels le jour du seder. Au festin du seder, elles ont été interrompues par des appels du bureau d’Irwin Cotler.

Nous ne savons pas qui a fait ces appels, mais c’est un mauvais usage des données personnelles que de savoir qui est Juif, qui est susceptible d’être à la maison et qui pourrait être offensé par un mauvais usage des données. Nos données sur la protection des renseignements personnels sont confidentielles, et les Canadiens devraient avoir le droit de dire à n’importe quel parti politique: « Montrez-moi ce que vous avez sur moi, je veux savoir ». C’est un droit que les Canadiens devraient avoir. Il n’y a aucune raison, sur le plan éthique, pratique... Rien ne justifie que les partis politiques soient les seuls exploitants exemptés qui recueillent des données et, bon sang, en recueillent-ils des données.

Nous recueillons le plus de renseignements possible. Nous n’en avons pas autant que vous. Je n’oublierai jamais le jour où j'ai parlé à Garth Turner. Il a mis cela dans son livre. C'était au sujet du système FRANK, qui est l'abréviation de Friends, Relatives, And Neighbours' Kids, c’est-à-dire les amis, la parenté, et les enfants des voisins. Ce sont les données que recueillait son ancien parti.

Nous devons régler ce problème. Nous avons une chance de le faire, et c’est dans la prochaine demi-heure.

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à voter sur l’amendement PV-10?

M. Nathan Cullen: J’aimerais un vote par appel nominal, monsieur le président.

(L’amendement est rejeté par 8 voix contre 1. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 254 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

Nous allons faire une pause.

Mesdames et messieurs les témoins, pensez à manger pour être en forme durant la partie suivante de notre séance.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Ce ne sera pas très long. Rapportez votre casse-croûte à la table, s’il vous plaît, et nous poursuivrons ainsi.

Merci.

(1720)

(1740)

Le président:

Reprenons.

Merci encore à tous les membres du Comité de ce décorum très positif et d'être positivement en désaccord.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

(Article 255)

Le président: Il y a un amendement proposé, le NDP-21.

Monsieur Cullen, vous pourriez le présenter.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Très bien.

Je m’adresse aux collègues qui estimaient que l’amendement PV-10 était trop long, trop précoce et trop rapide, qui s’intéressent à la protection de la vie privée et qui comprennent les préoccupations des experts que nous avons entendus, à savoir le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et le directeur général des élections. Tout le monde entend ces préoccupations et veut faire quelque chose, et comment ne le pourrait-on pas? C’est ce que je fais valoir. Dans ce cas, l’amendement NDP-21 s’adresse à vous.

Voici ce qui est proposé. Il s'agit de travailler avec le directeur général des élections pour élaborer des directives en consultation avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et de travailler avec les partis pour établir des lignes directrices. Ces lignes directrices seraient ensuite transmises sous forme de directives, et le directeur général des élections pourrait s’en servir. L'amendement n’invoque pas la LPRPDE. C’est l’une des préoccupations que j’ai entendues, notamment parmi les députés libéraux, à savoir que la LPRPDE était trop complexe et que c’était trop demander aux partis. L’amendement n’insiste pas là-dessus.

C’est exactement notre travail: nous devons être indépendants, comme députés élus au sein d’un comité, écouter les témoins, recueillir les meilleurs renseignements et faire ce qu’il faut pour les Canadiens. Je soupçonne, ou je suppose, qu’il y a une certaine pression sur les collègues pour qu’ils ne votent pas pour des choses que les gens dans les bureaux des partis ne veulent pas faire.

Cela a deux effets, l’un dans la pratique, et l’autre à l’appui d’un bon comportement. Dans la pratique, je pense que le fait d'avoir en vigueur de véritables politiques en matière de protection de la vie privée, qui fonctionnent avec notre directeur général des élections... que tous les membres du Comité ont mentionné des dizaines de fois et qu’ils tiennent en haute estime. Cela a également un effet secondaire, c’est-à-dire que, si quelqu’un, dans la structure du parti, est tenté de faire quelque chose — comme, je ne sais pas, un appel automatisé illégal dans des circonscriptions —, ces politiques empêcheraient ce type de comportement, et c'est ce que la loi est censée faire. Il ne s’agit pas seulement d’attraper les gens quand ils font quelque chose de mal. Il s’agit aussi de donner suffisamment de les prévenir pour qu'ils ne soient pas vraiment tentés de le faire.

Je crois vraiment que les témoins nous ont dit tout ce qu'il y avait à dire. Si un collègue se souvient du témoignage d’un seul témoin qui aurait dit que c’était une mauvaise idée, parmi tous ceux que nous avons entendus, ou s'ils veulent consulter le Comité de l’éthique et de la protection de la vie privée, qui a également étudié la question, pour trouver un seul témoin de quelque allégeance politique que ce soit qui aurait dit que le Parlement ne devrait pas faire quelque chose de ce genre, j’aimerais beaucoup l'entendre. Je suis tout à fait convaincu qu'il n'y en a pas eu, de notre côté, pas plus que du côté du Comité de la protection de la vie privée et de l’éthique.

Certains d'entre nous se sont rendus à Washington l’an dernier. Facebook, le Congrès, Twitter et toute une série de groupes s’intéressant à cette question nous ont tous avertis que nos lois sont insuffisantes. Nous pensions avoir suffisamment de garanties. Ce n'est pas le cas. Quand il y a piratage, il est trop tard. Quand des appels automatisés illégaux sont faits, il est trop tard.

Je voudrais faire comprendre à mes collègues que cette mesure est la plus facile qui soit tout en permettant que le travail soit fait. Je vous assure. Les plaidoyers en faveur d'une étude plus approfondie ne tiendront pas si les choses tournent mal. Si on nous demande alors ce que nous avons fait à ce sujet et que nous disons: « Eh bien, nous avons promis d’étudier la question plus en profondeur », on nous dira: « Merci bien ». Nous ne faisons cela pour aucun autre article de loi.

Je vais m’arrêter ici, monsieur le président. Cela place certains d’entre nous dans une situation que je qualifierais presque de conflit direct entre nos responsabilités de membres du Parlement et nos responsabilités de membres de partis politiques. En général, les partis politiques n’en veulent pas. Je le sais puisque j’en ai parlé à vos partis. Ils n’en veulent pas. Et je sais pourquoi. Ils préféreraient que les choses en restent là, parce que le statu quo signifie que personne n’a la moindre idée de ce que les partis politiques recueillent et de ce que nous faisons avec cette information.

Nous ne travaillons pas pour les partis politiques. Nous les représentons peut-être et marcher sous différentes bannières, mais nous travaillons pour les gens qui nous ont envoyés ici. Je crois que, si vous rencontriez un Canadien moyen et lui disiez ce qui se passe lorsqu’il clique sur un sondage ou qu’il appuie sur « J’aime » sur Facebook, si vous lui disiez ce que les partis font des données, que les partis ont très peu ou pas de mécanismes de protection pour garantir leur sécurité et ce que pourraient être les conséquences si ces données étaient compromises, votre Canadien moyen, quelle que soit son allégeance politique, de droite à gauche, dirait: « C’est complètement fou. Est-ce que vous pouvez faire quelque chose? »

Voici quelque chose que nous pouvons faire. Je vais lire l’amendement: 385.2 (1) Le directeur général des élections peut élaborer, en consultation avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, des directives sur la protection des renseignements personnels par les partis enregistrés.

(1745)



Au paragraphe 385.2(2) proposé, les paragraphes qui sont nommés transforment les lignes directrices en directives. Le paragraphe 385.2(3) proposé se lirait comme suit: Le directeur général des élections peut radier un parti enregistré si la politique sur la protection des renseignements personnels adoptée par le parti enregistré ne respecte pas les directives prises en vertu du présent article.

Il y a une conséquence à cela. L'idée d’afficher votre politique sur votre site Web sans qu'il y ait de conséquences, allons donc, cela n'a pas de sens. Il suffit de cocher une case. On n'a même pas besoin de le faire. Si on adopte une politique qu'on n'applique pas, il n'y a aucune conséquence aux infractions à ce qui a été écrit.

Ce n’est pas ainsi qu'on prend cette question au sérieux. Ici, nous essayons de la prendre au sérieux.

La motion d’Elizabeth allait plus loin, et nous l’avons appuyée. Cette motion nous amène à prendre au sérieux la question de la protection de la vie privée. Nous sommes en 2018, et nous irons aux urnes en 2019. Si quelqu’un croit que ce problème ne va pas empirer en 2023, vous rêvez, et c’est ce que les experts nous ont dit.

N’écoutez pas vos partis à ce sujet.

Nous n’avons pas appuyé les initiatives initiales d’Elizabeth à cet égard il y a deux ou trois ans. Il a fallu une longue conversation avec certains des dirigeants de mon parti pour leur faire comprendre qu’ils allaient devoir élaborer une politique sur la protection de la vie privée et qu’ils allaient devoir rendre des comptes en cas d'infraction — une vraie politique autrement dit —, et c’est ce qu’ils ont fait.

Je suis ici et en mesure de le dire, et ceux qui, dans mon parti, travaillent sur des données ne sont pas très contents, mais cela m'est égal. Je ne travaille pas pour eux.

Je demande aux membres du Comité d’appuyer cet amendement. C’est ce que nous devrions faire. Les témoins nous l'ont dit.

Le président:

J’aimerais avoir quelques précisions.

Premièrement, pouvez-vous me dire très brièvement en quoi consistait l’étude du Comité de l’éthique? Quel était son mandat?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils ont recommandé que la LPRPDE s’applique aux partis.

Le président:

Mais quel était le sujet?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il s’agissait des données et des atteintes à la sécurité des données.

Vous devez vous souvenir...

Le président:

Par les partis, précisément?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Parce que, à la suite de Cambridge Analytica, c’était...

Le président:

Je vois.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le Royaume-Uni est actuellement représenté à notre Comité sur la protection de la vie privée. Ils nous ont envoyé des représentants. C'est là que nous pouvons demander à Cambridge Analytica et à certaines des filiales canadiennes comment il se fait que le Brexit se soit déroulé ainsi, comment il se fait qu'un million de dollars a été versé à une association d’étudiants pour avoir accès à une foule de données, et qu'on ait visé précisément tout un tas de Britanniques la semaine précédant leur vote sur le Brexit, qui, bien sûr, a été adopté, après une campagne réussie?

Demandez à l’Angleterre si elle voudrait revenir en arrière et consolider ses lois sur la protection de la vie privée. Est-ce que ce référendum a été fait façon équitable, ouverte? Absolument pas.

Le président:

Ma deuxième question est de savoir si, dans votre préambule, vous avez dit « en consultation avec les partis ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, bien sûr, parce que nous en avons parlé au commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et au directeur général des élections. Nous leur avons demandé comment ils allaient élaborer ces initiatives et s’ils allaient le faire de façon isolée. Ils ont dit que non, qu’ils consulteraient les partis, parce que, pour l'instant, ni l'un ni l'autre ne savent comment fonctionnent nos systèmes.

Ils ne travailleraient pas de façon isolée, parce qu’ils ne le pourraient pas. Ils devraient travailler ensemble, et c'est ce qu'ils font.

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, Élections Canada, mais quel est le nom du comité qui est établi pour la consultation des partis?

M. Trevor Knight:

C’est le Comité consultatif des partis politiques.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci. Donc, c'est le Comité consultatif des partis politiques.

Élections Canada est constamment en contact avec les partis politiques, qu’il s’agisse des nouvelles règles, des anciennes règles, de l’application de la loi et de ce à quoi il faut s’attendre en 2019. C’est par là que cela irait.

(1750)

Le président:

Mais vous n’en parlez pas du tout dans votre motion.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En effet. Cependant, d’après les témoignages et les conversations que j’ai eues avec eux, c’est tout à fait ce qu’ils font, surtout lorsqu’il s’agit de quelque chose qui touche les partis.

D’après mon expérience avec eux et d'après celle du parti, ils n'arrivent pas de nulle part avec une nouvelle politique qui influe sur notre façon de fonctionner, surtout en ce qui concerne la protection de la vie privée. Comme je l’ai dit, ils partent de zéro, ils n’ont aucune idée de la façon dont nous gérons les données, de nos systèmes de sécurité.

Le {directeur général des élections était assis là, et je lui ai demandé s’il avait une idée du fonctionnement des partis en matière de données. Il a dit qu’il n’en avait aucune idée.

Le président:

Madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May:

J’ajouterais simplement que, dans l’exemple de Cambridge Analytica et de l’autre, IQ — ce sont les initiales —, comme vous vous en souvenez probablement, il s’agissait d’une entreprise de Victoria, en Colombie-Britannique, impliquée dans une ingérence illégale dans le vote sur le Brexit. C’est terrible, parce que c’est un autre risque pour les partis politiques. On peut passer un contrat avec une entreprise et penser qu’elle est là pour nous aider à gérer nos données, mais, en fait, elle les vole pour en faire un autre usage, et on ne le saura pas.

Nous devons contrôler cette situation. C’est très dangereux. Le problème, c’est que, même si les partis politiques sont de plus en plus habiles à recueillir des données et tiennent à les garder, les gens qui veulent pirater nos systèmes ont accès à nos données lorsque nous embauchons une entreprise comme celle-là. Vous pensez qu’ils travaillent pour vous. C’est ce qui est arrivé avec le Brexit.

Je dirais que le Parti vert de la Colombie-Britannique a embauché ces gens pour faire du travail pour nous — pas nous, c’est un parti distinct — en organisant un site Web. Lorsque nous et le Parti vert de la Colombie-Britannique avons appris que cette entreprise était impliquée, l'entreprise IQ, ils ont commencé à essayer de déterminer si nos données avaient été volées, si nos données avaient été compromises. Ils ont dû dire publiquement: « Nous ne le savons pas vraiment, nous avons fait de notre mieux pour remonter à l'origine, mais nous ne le savons pas. »

Nous devons exercer un contrôle sur ce qu’il advient de nos données afin que le public le sache, que le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée le sache, et ainsi nous avons le contrôle et nous savons que le public a droit à la vie privée. Ce n’est pas comme si les partis politiques étaient les seuls à abuser des données. Les entreprises que nous embauchons de bonne foi sont peut-être celles qui recueillent nos données. Si les gens savaient qu’on peut cliquer sur un « J'aime » sur un message Facebook et qu’un parti politique peut avoir un entrepreneur qui recueille ces données...

Autrement dit, c’est une voie à deux sens. On ne se contente pas de dire: « Oui, j’aime ça, bravo. » On n’embauche pas seulement une entreprise pour que la publicité sur Facebook passe bien. En fait, on donne à une autre entreprise... C’est tout à fait orwellien, j'en conviens, mais nous devons le contrôler. Si j’étais un membre votant du Comité, vous savez que je voterais en faveur de l’amendement 21 du NPD, parce que c’est au moins un bon début et que cela donne un pouvoir discrétionnaire au directeur général des élections. De plus, je suis sûr, comme Nathan l’a dit, que ce serait en consultation avec les partis.

Cela nous donne l’occasion d’élaborer une réglementation sur ce qui est maintenant... Comme nous n’insistons pas pour que les partis politiques soient assujettis à nos lois sur la protection de la vie privée, nous créons une situation extrême où les partis politiques sont vulnérables, où les données des députés sont vulnérables et où la personne ordinaire à qui nous rendons visite est vulnérable, et nous devons exercer un contrôle sur tout cela.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, je crois que vous vouliez intervenir, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui. Je dirai simplement au Comité que, du point de vue technique, l’amendement NDP-21 renvoie aux consultations avec les partis politiques par le biais du paragraphe 385.2(2) proposé, qui renvoie aux paragraphes 16.1(2) à (7) de la Loi électorale du Canada. Le paragraphe 16.1(3) prévoit la consultation du commissaire aux élections fédérales et des membres du Comité consultatif des partis politiques.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est un meilleur amendement que je ne le pensais, monsieur le président.

Je ne sais pas si cela s’est produit pour vous ou d’autres députés qui siégeaient à la dernière législature, mais Cambridge Analytica a communiqué avec un certain nombre de nos bureaux au cours de la dernière élection en leur offrant de récolter nos « J'aime » sur Facebook. Ils nous ont demandé si nous voulions connaître les courriels des gens qui avaient coché « J'aime » et si nous voulions savoir qui les aime. Ils se sont montrés directs et sans vergogne et ont approché les députés de tous les partis.

On peut comprendre pourquoi des députés seraient tentés, parce que, comme vous le savez, vous obtenez un « J'aime » de Facebook, et on sait ce qu'on sait à partir de là, si on l’utilise comme une personne normale le ferait. Ces gens n’étaient pas des gens normaux. Ils nous ont demandé si nous voulions en savoir davantage sur les gens et pouvoir leur envoyer des courriels directement, pas seulement par Facebook, mais de façon indépendante. Est-ce que nous voulions savoir où ils vivent? Est-ce que nous voulions savoir ce qu'ils désirent? Est-ce que nous voulions connaître tous leurs amis et leurs courriels? C’était ça, leur offre.

(1755)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je viens d’entendre quelqu’un dire « Et alors? » C’est une réaction fascinante à...

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je ne crois pas [Note de la [Inaudible]

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord. J’ai mal entendu.

Le président: Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je tiens à préciser, il y a, en effet, un problème lié à la protection de la vie privée. Cela dit, ce qui me préoccupe dans ce qu'a dit le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, c’est la LPRPDE. Ce qui m’inquiète, c’est qu’il ne comprend pas les partis politiques. C’est formidable que les sièges sociaux et les personnes concernées soient régis par un ensemble de principes, mais si l’on va plus loin, les gens qui sont à la porte avec la feuille d’appel ou à la maison et qui veulent appeler, eux aussi sont régis par la même loi et font l'objet des mêmes préoccupations. Si le commissaire croit que la LPRPDE devrait s’appliquer, je ne vois pas où va cette consultation. Si les bénévoles rentrent chez eux avec la liste de noms après leur tournée, il y a atteinte à la sécurité des données.

Comment pouvons-nous appliquer cette politique beaucoup plus loin, à nos bénévoles et au-delà? Nous n’avons pas suffisamment étudié la question pour en arriver à une solution raisonnable, en créant ainsi l’espoir qu’il en résultera quelque chose. Je ne crois pas que la tenue de consultations soit quelque chose que je puisse appuyer, même s’il est souhaitable d’avoir des déclarations plus fermes sur la protection de la vie privée.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Lorsque nous rédigeons des lois, nous mesurons toujours les risques. En l'occurrence, nous cherchons à empêcher que des ennuis se produisent. D’un autre côté, il y a le fait que certaines conséquences ne peuvent être comprises avant de se produire. Chaque projet de loi essaie de prévoir cela et d'en tenir compte.

Concernant ce qu'a dit Chris, l’idée qu’un bénévole qui rentre chez lui avec une liste d'électeurs vote est le genre d'infraction qui préoccupe le directeur général des élections, comparativement à ce que nous savons être des dangers... Il n’y a pas de conspiration ou de pensée mythologique à ce sujet. Ces préoccupations existent dans les vieilles démocraties qui fonctionnent, sur lesquelles nous comptons pour tirer toutes sortes de leçons. Nous avons bâti notre système parlementaire à partir de ces leçons. Pour ce qui est de la mesure des risques, si nous constatons que la situation empire et que, au lieu de cela, nous en parlons davantage et que nous ne changeons rien avant un certain temps, parce que nous craignons qu’un bénévole qui rentre chez lui avec une liste d'électeurs fasse l’objet d’une sanction arbitraire, ce n’est évidemment pas le genre d'infraction qui préoccupe le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et le directeur général des élections. Pas du tout.

Pour un gouvernement qui aime la consultation — parfois, vous n’écoutez pas, mais peu importe, vous appuyez souvent sur le bouton de la consultation —, dire que vous n’êtes pas en train de consulter des gens en qui nous avons confiance, Élections Canada, le directeur général des élections, le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée, sur des millions de décisions qui ont une incidence sur la façon dont notre démocratie... Nous leur faisons confiance.

Pour ce qui est de l’évaluation des risques, entre la perversion d’une élection de l’intérieur ou de l’extérieur, et c'est l'essentiel de la question, et un bénévole qui se fait prendre avec une liste d'électeurs, si on imagine le jour où le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée s’en prendrait à ce bénévole... il n'y a pas de comparaison à mes yeux.

Vous pouvez dire que j'implore mes collègues de dire qu’il s’agit d’une mesure d'amélioration prudente. Nous avons 10 ou 11 mois avant le déclenchement des élections. Que pouvons-nous mettre en place avant 2019? Nous avons une portée quelque peu limitée dans ces consultations parce qu’elles doivent être soumises au Comité, comme l'indique l’amendement.

Permettez que j'anticipe. Les partis ne se précipiteront pas pour se taper sur les doigts et accepter la LPRPDE en 2019. Imaginons d'ores et déjà. Ils ont toujours été très réticents. Nous devons peser l’intérêt partisan par rapport à l’intérêt public. C’est là qu'on en est.

Le président:

Est-ce que les députés qui n’ont pas encore pris la parole veulent intervenir?

S’il n’y a pas d’autres commentaires, nous passerons au vote, par appel nominal.

(L’amendement est rejeté par 8 voix contre 1. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 255 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(1800)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Avant de passer à l’article suivant, j’aimerais quelques retraits rapides, si vous voulez bien.

Compte tenu des décisions que nous avons prises avant la pause du souper, les conservateurs retireront les amendements CPC-124, CPC-151, CPC-152, CPC-153 et CPC-162.

Le président:

Excellent.

(Article 256)

Le président: Nous avons l'amendement CPC-119.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, cet amendement supprime le plafond des dépenses préélectorales des partis politiques, mais maintient le reste du régime préélectoral.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, si je comprends bien, cet amendement, ainsi que le suivant, je crois, auraient pour effet de supprimer les limites de dépenses préélectorales pour les partis politiques.

C'est bien cela?

M. Jean-François Morin:

C’est exact.

Le président:

Je peux imaginer comment les gens vont voter dans ce cas, alors nous allons passer au vote.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 256 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 257 à 261 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

(Article 262)

Le président:

Les amendements CPC-120, PV-11 et CPC-121 ne peuvent être proposés parce qu’ils modifient la même ligne qui a été modifiée par l’adoption de la motion à la réunion du Comité de la procédure.

L’amendement PV-12 a été rejeté parce qu’il était corrélatif à l’amendement PV-3. Il reste donc à discuter de l’amendement CPC-122.

Les conservateurs proposent-ils l’amendement CPC-122?

M. John Nater:

Absolument, monsieur le président.

L’amendement CPC-122 clarifie les règles concernant la collusion entre des partis et les associations de circonscription en ce qui a trait à la limite des dépenses préélectorales.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Cet amendement semble créer une échappatoire qui permettrait de contourner la limite nationale des dépenses. Nous sommes contre.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

L’amendement LIB-37 est adopté en conséquence de l’amendement LIB-26.

(L’article 262 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 263)

(1805)

Le président:

Il y a un amendement proposé par les conservateurs.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Cet amendement porte sur la limite des dépenses au prorata lorsqu'une campagne est prolongée pour une raison quelconque.

Je crois savoir où nous allons, et je ne crois pas que nous ayons besoin de beaucoup de débat, monsieur le président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous aurions pu le faire il y a une heure.

Le président:

Nous allons vérifier si votre sentiment est juste.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 263 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

Au sujet de l’article 264, il y avait l’amendement PV-13, mais il est rejeté en conséquence de l'amendement PV-3.

(L’article 264 est adopté.)

Le président: Au sujet de l'article 265, il y avait, avant ce soir, un amendement, le CPC-124, mais il a été retiré il y a quelques minutes.

(L’article 265 est adopté.)

(Article 266)

Le président: Nous avons l'amendement CPC-125.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, il s’agit d’un amendement assez mineur, mais qui clarifie les obligations financières trimestrielles en ajoutant les mots « jour du scrutin ». À l’heure actuelle, il se lit comme suit: qui suit cette élection générale, débutant avec le trimestre qui suit immédiatement cette élection générale et se terminant avec le trimestre au cours duquel se tient l’élection générale suivante. Nous le modifions comme suit: avec le trimestre au cours duquel se tient le jour du scrutin de l'élection

C’est plus clair.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

C’est un bon amendement.

Le président:

C’est un bon amendement?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous répéter?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que nous votons, Larry?

Le président:

Oui. Je reviens à mes notes.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 266 modifié est adopté.)

(L’article 267 est adopté.)

(Article 268)

Le président: Nous avons deux amendements. Non, nous avons plus de deux amendements, mais nous allons commencer par l’amendement CPC-126.

M. John Nater:

En fait, l’amendement CPC-126 retarde l'application des limites de dépenses préélectorales jusqu’après les élections de 2019. Ce serait donc pour les élections de 2023 s’il y a un gouvernement majoritaire lorsque le premier ministre Scheer... Je devais ajouter cela.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. John Nater:

Il le reporte aux prochaines élections. L’effet serait de donner plus de temps pour la mise en oeuvre et l'accessibilité des mesures, et nous proposons donc que l'application en soit reportée à l’élection suivant l’élection de 2019.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne pense pas qu’il soit nécessaire de dire que nous allons nous y opposer.

M. John Nater:

Mais aussi bien le dire aux fins du compte rendu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous nous y opposons.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Au sujet de l’amendement CPC-127, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Il supprime les limites de dépenses préélectorales imposées aux partis.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(1810)

M. Garnett Genuis:

Je crois que M. Graham a voté deux fois. Il donne un mauvais exemple...

Un député: C’est exactement ce que nous essayons d’éviter en exigeant des pièces d’identité valables.

Le président:

Garnett, vous ne pouvez pas parler. Vous n’avez pas vos 10 cartables ici ce soir.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Garnett Genuis:

Je me demande si c’est vraiment M. Graham qui a voté la deuxième fois ou quelqu’un d’autre.

Le président:

Très bien. Passons à l’amendement LIB-38.

Eh bien, cet amendement a des ramifications. Si on vote pour l'amendement LIB-38, cela s’applique à LIB-53 à la page 299, à LIB-55 à la page 305, à LIB-57 à la page 309 et à LIB-60 à la page 328. De plus, si l’amendement LIB-38 est adopté, l’amendement CPC-163, à la page 310, ne peut pas être proposé, puisqu’il modifie la même ligne que l’amendement LIB-57, qui est corrélatif à l’amendement LIB-38.

Voulez-vous que je relise le tout?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vous invoquez le Règlement.

M. John Nater:

J’invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Je vous demande de déclarer irrecevable l’amendement LIB-55 parce qu’il contrevient à ce qu’on appelle la « règle de la loi existante ». On peut lire dans la version française de la page 771 de la version anglaise de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, troisième édition, Bosc et Gagnon, ce qui suit: En ce qui concerne un projet de loi renvoyé à un comité après la deuxième lecture, un amendement est irrecevable s’il vise à modifier un texte législatif dont le comité n’est pas saisi ou s'il vise à modifier un article de la loi existante, sauf si celle-ci est explicitement modifiée par un article du projet de loi.

Ce dernier point est attribuable au commentaire 698(8)b) de la sixième édition de la Jurisprudence parlementaire de Beauchesne, dont le directeur d'édition, M. John Holtby, est bien connu de nombreux parlementaires.

Le « Bosc-Gagnon » invoque, parmi plusieurs précédents, la séance du 20 novembre 2007 du comité législatif chargé du projet de loi C-2, une séance à laquelle vous avez assisté, monsieur le président, si j’ai bien compris, et au cours de laquelle la présidence a déclaré non recevables plusieurs amendements parce qu'ils allaient à l'encontre de cette règle.

Dans le cas présent, l’amendement LIB-55 propose d’ajouter l'article 344.1 afin de modifier l’article 498 de la Loi électorale du Canada.

Le projet de loi C-76 présenté modifie les articles 497.5 et 499 de la Loi électorale du Canada, les deux articles qui enserrent l’article 498, mais pas l’article 498 lui-même. Par conséquent, monsieur le président, je pense que l’amendement du gouvernement est clairement irrecevable.

Le président:

Est-ce que ça irait, si nous discutions de tout, sauf de l’amendement LIB-55?

Bien, ce que nous allons faire, c'est passer à l’amendement LIB-38. Cela aura des répercussions sur tous les autres amendements, sauf le LIB-55. Nous reviendrons ensuite au LIB-55.

Un député du Parti libéral doit proposer et décrire l’amendement LIB-38.

Monsieur Bittle...

M. Chris Bittle:

L'amendement proposé donnera au commissaire aux élections fédérales le pouvoir de demander aux partis politiques de fournir des pièces justificatives des dépenses déclarées dans leur rapport financier. Les partis politiques sont déjà tenus de fournir au DGE des rapports financiers vérifiés. L'autorisation générale que confère actuellement le projet de loi C-76 pourrait imposer un lourd fardeau inutile aux partis politiques. Le fait d’accorder un pouvoir semblable au commissaire dans le cadre d’une enquête permet d’adopter une approche équilibrée et de faciliter l’obtention de ces documents, tout en définissant les circonstances dans lesquelles il peut être utilisé.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires?

Monsieur Cullen, voulez-vous intervenir?

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'en fais une lecture différente, et je suis curieux de savoir pourquoi. Parce qu’il supprime le passage commençant à la ligne 37, page 156, et se terminant à la ligne 7, page 157, nous l’interprétons différemment, c’est-à-dire qu’il retire au DGE le pouvoir de demander des pièces justificatives. Pouvez-vous préciser?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui. La motion LIB-38 supprime les lignes 1 à 5 de la version anglaise, page 157, et l’équivalent en français, ce qui enlèverait au directeur général des élections la possibilité d'obliger l’agent principal d’un parti à produire les pièces justificatives demandées en lien avec les dépenses du parti.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Elle supprimerait cette obligation.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Elle supprimerait cette obligation, mais une motion subséquente qui est corrélative, selon la décision du président, la LIB-60, autoriserait le commissaire aux élections fédérales, dans le cadre d’une enquête menée en réponse à une plainte, à demander aux partis enregistrés les pièces justificatives de leur compte de dépenses électorales.

(1815)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, on supprime ce pouvoir ici et on l'ajoute dans l’amendement LIB-60; c'est bien ce que vous avez dit?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce amélioré? Est-ce que cela améliore la capacité de...?

M. Jean-François Morin:

C’est simplement différent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En quoi est-ce différent?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Le directeur général des élections ne fait pas d’enquêtes. Il vérifie les divers rapports financiers qui lui sont remis. De son côté, le commissaire aux élections fédérales mène des enquêtes aux fins du contrôle d'application de la Loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne veux pas lancer une discussion de politique générale, mais pourquoi pas les deux? Pourquoi enlever ce pouvoir au commissaire, même si ça se retrouve avec l’organisme d’enquête, parce que je ne vois personne qui s’oppose à ce que le commissaire vérifie comment se comporte un parti et les dépenses qu'il engage.

J'aimerais savoir. M. Bittle a peut-être une raison.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pour le moment, c’est une décision stratégique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est une décision stratégique.

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je m’adresse à M. Bittle. Pourquoi retirer ce pouvoir au commissaire, parce qu’il fait des vérifications et que cela me semble approprié?

M. Chris Bittle:

Il fait des vérifications. De toute façon, avant que les partis politiques ne produisent leur compte de dépenses électorales, ils font l'objet d'une vérification préalable, mais si on parle de millions de dollars de dépenses, c'est peut-être trop demander que d'essayer de trouver le reçu du Tim Hortons. Toutefois, confier la tâche en cas d'enquête, ce qui permet au commissaire d’exiger la production de ces pièces comptables, fait partie du projet de loi et constitue une approche plus équilibrée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord, c’était un paquet de mots. J’essaie de savoir ce que...

M. Chris Bittle:

[Inaudible]

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, mais le commissaire ne demande pas chaque reçu de Tim Hortons dans ce cas, n’est-ce pas? C’est là que le commissaire a le pouvoir d'exiger des reçus précis. Il ne va pas demander un reçu pour chaque tasse de café achetée pendant la campagne, et il ne le fait pas. Pourquoi enlever ce pouvoir? Dans le pire des cas, c’est redondant, et vous avez deux bureaux qui ont ce pouvoir...

Je ne sais pas si Élections Canada a un commentaire qui pourrait éclairer ma lanterne.

M. Trevor Knight:

Il faut faire la distinction entre Élections Canada, qui effectue...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, excusez-moi.

M. Trevor Knight:

... le directeur général des élections, qui exerce le pouvoir de vérification. À l’heure actuelle, comme l’a recommandé le directeur général des élections, le projet de loi confère à Élections Canada le pouvoir de demander des pièces justificatives dans le cadre de la vérification pour découvrir ce qui se cache derrière les dépenses déclarées. Ceci...

M. Nathan Cullen:

... lui enlève ce pouvoir.

M. Trevor Knight:

... supprimerait ce pouvoir. Il donne au commissaire le pouvoir d’obtenir plus facilement les pièces justificatives qu’on pourrait obtenir dans le cadre d’une enquête.

Cela ne retient pas la suggestion d’Élections Canada; dans notre recommandation...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela ne retient pas la suggestion d’Élections Canada?

M. Trevor Knight:

Non, en effet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Élections Canada ne s’est jamais présenté devant le Comité et n’a jamais dit: « Veuillez nous enlever ce pouvoir. »

M. Trevor Knight:

C'est nous qui avons recommandé que nous ayons un pouvoir semblable à celui qui est prévu dans le projet de loi, oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, en fait, c’est le contraire. Élections Canada a comparu devant le Comité et a dit qu’il devait conserver ce pouvoir. Dans votre témoignage, vous avez exprimé des réserves au sujet de la suppression de cet article.

M. Trevor Knight:

Eh bien, c’est un nouvel article.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est exact. Il s’agit d’un amendement.

M. Trevor Knight:

C’est un article qui est basé sur notre recommandation, parce que nous croyons que pour bien exécuter notre fonction de vérification, nous devons pouvoir...

M. Nathan Cullen: ... demander des reçus.

M. Trevor Knight: ... obtenir les pièces justificatives.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Accepter cela irait à l’encontre de la recommandation du directeur général des élections.

M. Trevor Knight:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, avez-vous quelque chose à dire sur les effets de cette mesure ou sur ses conséquences sur la procédure?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Sur le plan formel, cela veut dire que le directeur général des élections n’aura pas le pouvoir de demander des pièces justificatives.

Le président:

C’est exact.

Y a-t-il d’autres interventions?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Tout me semble assez clair.

Le président:

S’il n’y a pas d’autres interventions, je vais mettre tout cela aux voix, sauf en ce qui concerne les incidences de l’amendement LIB-55. Je vais revenir à l’amendement LIB-55, parce que j’ai obtenu une réponse.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’aimerais un vote par appel nominal.

(L’amendement est adopté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

L’amendement LIB-38 est donc adopté. L’amendement LIB-53 est adopté. L’amendement LIB-57 est adopté. L’amendement LIB-60 est adopté.

L’amendement LIB-38 est adopté...

(1820)

M. Garnett Genuis:

Sont-ils adoptés à la majorité ou quelque chose du genre?

Des voix : Oh, oh!

Le président:

 ...et le CPC-163 ne peut être proposé parce qu’il modifie la même ligne.

Passons à l’amendement LIB-55.

M. Garnett Genuis:

Je peux vous dire qu’ils adoreront cette loi en 2019.

Le président:

Je vais vous donner mon interprétation, puis vous aurez la vraie.

Je crois comprendre que votre principe est juste. On ne peut pas amender un article qui n’est pas proposé dans un projet de loi. Cependant, si un amendement corrélatif est nécessaire pour insérer quelque chose dans un projet de loi, alors c’est légal de le faire.

Je vais laisser le greffier législatif donner la vraie définition.

M. Philippe Méla (greffier législatif):

Je suis d’accord avec votre analyse, monsieur Nater, qui veut qu'on ne puisse pas modifier un article d'une loi qui n’est pas visé par le projet de loi. Il y a une exception à cela, et c’est l’exception. Vous venez de mettre aux voix l’amendement LIB-60, qui crée le paragraphe 510.001, et il y est fait référence dans l’amendement LIB-55 pour que tout fonctionne.

En conséquence, c’est permis. S’il s’agissait d’une modification formelle de la Loi dont il n’était pas question, vous ne pourriez pas le faire. Dans le cas présent, puisqu'il s’agit d’un amendement corrélatif à quelque chose qui a déjà été adopté, vous pouvez le faire.

Le président:

Si vous ne me croyez pas...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: D'accord.

Tous ceux qui sont pour que l’amendement CPC-38 comprenne l’amendement LIB-55?

M. John Nater:

Avec dissidence.

Le président:

Cet amendement et ses ramifications sont adoptés avec dissidence.

(L’amendement est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous venons d'adopter l’amendement LIB-38.

(L’article 268 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L’article 269 est adopté.)

(Article 270)

Le président:

Il y a l’amendement NDP-23, mais d’après moi, il est irrecevable parce qu’il dépasse la portée du projet de loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourriez-vous expliquer, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Oui, je peux.

Le projet de loi C-76 modifie la Loi électorale du Canada. Cet amendement vise à introduire le concept de parité hommes-femmes chez les candidats d’un parti enregistré pour une élection générale relativement au remboursement des dépenses électorales. Il n'en est pas question dans le projet de loi.

Comme on peut le lire dans la version française de la page 770 de la version anglaise de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, troisième édition: Un amendement à un projet de loi renvoyé à un comité après la deuxième lecture est irrecevable s’il en dépasse la portée et le principe.

De l’avis du président, l’amendement introduit un nouveau concept qui dépasse la portée du projet de loi et, par conséquent, l’amendement est irrecevable.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci.

En ce qui concerne la portée du projet de loi C-76, ce dernier, contrairement au projet de loi C-33, a une approche beaucoup plus large. Il y a toutes sortes de choses dont nous essayons de nous occuper dans la façon dont nos élections se déroulent.

L’amendement NDP-23 explique la préférence accordée aux candidatures et comment le mode de remboursement, ce qui fait également partie de notre loi électorale, ainsi que le mode de gestion. En quoi cela en dépasse-t-il la portée? À première vue, le projet de loi C-76 est une refonte de la Loi électorale. La façon dont Élections Canada interagit avec les partis, les remboursements, les pièces justificatives, tout cela se trouve dans le projet de loi.

Il s’agit simplement d’une modification de politique visant à favoriser un résultat stratégique. Dans ce cas-ci, il s’agit de faire en sorte que le féminisme, tel que l'entend le premier ministre, se concrétise sous la forme d'un plus grand nombre de candidatures féminines et, espérons-le, de femmes élues.

J’essaie de comprendre où votre lecture vous amène à considérer que cette question dépasse la portée du projet de loi.

(1825)

Le président:

Il n’y a rien dans le projet de loi qui concerne la parité hommes-femmes, alors c’est un nouveau domaine.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J’ai écouté ce que vous avez dit de la portée, mais les concepts? De nouveaux concepts sont introduits en tout temps. Par exemple, nous venons de passer en revue le concept de protection de la vie privée et des renseignements personnels. Le concept que nous avons introduit était tout à fait étranger au projet de loi C-76, ce qui est une référence stratégique sur le site Web.

Nous avions des concepts qui étaient nouveaux et qui ont été introduits. Le concept de nomination des candidats existe dans la Loi électorale. C’est juste. La notion de remboursement existe aussi dans la Loi. C’est juste. Le principe de répartition des remboursements en fonction de la politique en place, dans cette politique visant l’égalité entre les sexes...

Je ne veux pas me lancer dans un débat philosophique. C’est beaucoup plus un débat formel. En quoi ce concept n’existe-t-il pas déjà dans le projet de loi C-76? Nous disons simplement que nous voulons que le concept soit interprété de cette façon pour qu’il y ait plus de femmes au Parlement.

Le président:

La protection de la vie privée... il y a là un meilleur lien. Il y avait une partie sur la protection des renseignements personnels dans le projet de loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais le projet de loi C-76 touche la Loi électorale en vigueur. Dans cette loi électorale, il y a toutes sortes d’articles sur le mode de nomination et le remboursement approprié des partis. Nous disons simplement qu’il faut faire mieux, si l’on croit en un plus grand nombre de femmes au Parlement. Cela dépend de votre point de vue, je suppose.

Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous attaché à votre décision à ce sujet? J’ai l’impression que c’est ouvert à... Honnêtement, je ne cherche pas à contester. Eh bien, je suppose que oui, mais d'une bonne façon. J’ai l’impression que cela limite la portée de quelque chose qui est traité dans ce projet de loi et qui est traité dans la Loi électorale elle-même. Si nous ne pouvons pas changer cela, alors je suggère en toute humilité qu’il y a peut-être un grand nombre d’amendements ici qui portent sur des questions qui n’étaient pas prévues à l’origine et qui sont donc hors de portée.

Je suis surpris, je suppose. Je suis surpris par la décision. Je ne l’avais pas prévue, celle-là. Nous savons que les partis présentent constamment des amendements dont ils savent qu’ils seront jugés irrecevables. On n'avait pas cette impression avec celui-ci.

Le président:

Eh bien, vous pouvez en appeler de la décision.

Si le projet de loi était adopté, ce qui se produirait, c’est qu'à la Chambre, le Président poserait la question et rendrait la même décision, et il n’y a pas d’appel possible à ce moment-là.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il peut rendre la même décision, ou non. Je sais qu’il n’y a pas de possibilité d’appel.

Permettez-moi de soumettre la question à mes collègues. Cette question, dont le projet de loi, à mon avis, ne traite pas du tout, c’est-à-dire la parité hommes-femmes à la Chambre, mérite d’être discutée.

Appuyez l’appel d'une décision de la présidence simplement pour permettre d'avoir cette discussion. Monsieur le président, je ne veux offenser ni vous ni vos greffiers. Je pense que cet appel est motivé. Plus important encore, cette discussion serait pertinente parce que nous en sommes à 26 % et que nous ne pouvons pas vraiment espérer mieux au Parlement.

C’est l'appel que j'adresse. Je ne crois pas qu'il soit nécessairement discutable.

Le président:

Il n’est pas vraiment discutable.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, en effet. Il ne vise pas uniquement la décision, mais discutons du sujet.

Le président:

La motion ne peut pas vraiment faire l’objet d’un débat, alors le greffier va procéder au vote.

(La décision de la présidence est maintenue par 5 voix contre 4.)

(L’article 270 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

Il y a une nouvelle clause.

Nathan, voulez-vous présenter l’amendement NDP-22?

(1830)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, pour que vous puissiez le déclarer irrecevable.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord.

Je pense que la seule raison pour laquelle le gouvernement ne rétablit pas la subvention proportionnelle au nombre de votes obtenus, qui a été instaurée par un gouvernement libéral précédent au premier tour, et tous les témoignages... Rien ne prouve le contraire, à savoir que la subvention proportionnelle aide. Elle a certainement été mise en place — vous vous en souviendrez, monsieur le président, car nous étions là tous les deux — lorsque les gros sous, ceux des entreprises et des syndicats, ont été soustraits de la politique; la subvention proportionnelle visait à uniformiser les règles du jeu et à permettre aux Canadiens d’exprimer, non seulement leur suffrage, mais dans ce cas, leur soutien financier pour le candidat de leur choix.

Toutes les données probantes à l’échelle mondiale confirment que c’est une bonne politique. Je soupçonne que c’est le politique qui freine l'élan du gouvernement parce que ces gars-là — je vais vous lancer des attaques — font de temps en temps...

Jean-Pierre Kingsley et d’autres anciens directeurs généraux des élections ont appuyé cette mesure. Il semble que Melanee Thomas, qui a comparu devant le comité ERRE, a dit que c’était une façon démocratique de financer les partis. Cela m’a aussi frappé comme moyen de dire aux électeurs qui pensent que leur vote est gaspillé quand leur suffrage ne va pas au gagnant que leur vote contribue à quelque chose.

En fait, cette mesure aiderait un peu à remplir la promesse du premier ministre qui affirmait que chaque vote compterait en 2019, promesse qu’il a brisée. Cela compenserait peut-être un peu.

J’attends votre décision en retenant mon souffle, monsieur le président, et nous pourrons ensuite passer à autre chose.

Le président:

D’accord.

Je pense que vous serez heureux d’apprendre que j’ai une raison différente cette fois-ci.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui?

Le président:

Le projet de loi C-76 vise principalement à modifier la Loi électorale du Canada. L’amendement vise à augmenter l'allocation trimestrielle versée à un parti politique enregistré en fonction du nombre de votes obtenus lors de l'élection générale précédant le trimestre en question.

Comme on peut le lire dans la version française de la page 772 de la version anglaise de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, troisième édition: Étant donné qu’un amendement ne peut empiéter sur la prérogative de la Couronne en matière financière, est irrecevable tout amendement qui entraîne une imputation sur le Trésor, qui étend l’objet ou le but de la recommandation royale ou qui en assouplit les conditions et les réserves.

De l’avis de la présidence, l’amendement propose un nouveau régime qui impose des frais au Trésor; par conséquent, je déclare l’amendement irrecevable.

L’amendement NDP-22 est irrecevable, de sorte qu’il n’y a pas de nouvel article 270.1.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’était une excellente idée.

Le président:

Pardon?

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’était irrecevable, mais c’était une excellente idée. C’est ce que vous vouliez dire, je crois.

Le président:

Oui, c’est ce que je voulais dire.

(Article 271)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-128 a des ramifications parce qu’il s’applique également à l’amendement CPC-131, qui se trouve à la page 242.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, cela reporterait les limites de dépenses préélectorales des partis politiques après les élections de 2019.

Le président:

Oh, je vois que cela va plaire.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement CPC-128 étant rejeté, en conséquence, l’amendement CPC-131 est rejeté.

Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-129.

Cet amendement a aussi des conséquences. Cela s’applique à l’amendement CPC-159, à la page 301, puisque les deux portent sur les dépenses de publicité partisane.

Monsieur Nater, veuillez présenter l’amendement CPC-129.

M. John Nater:

J’en serais ravi, monsieur le président.

Cela nous ramènerait au statu quo pour les limites de dépenses pendant la période préélectorale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Autrement dit, maintenant.

Le président:

J’imagine que cela va plaire.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Une voix pour et quatre voix contre.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous savez que vous allez perdre, mais il empire les choses.

Le président:

C'est rejeté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est un tour de passe-passe, un stratagème du Yukon. Je l’ai déjà vu.

Le président:

L’amendement CPC-129 vient d’être rejeté, de sorte que l’amendement CPC-159 est également rejeté.

L’amendement CPC-130 a été retiré par les conservateurs.

CPC-131, je crois que c’était...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La question a déjà été réglée.

Le président:

Oui, c’était corrélatif.

Je crois que l’amendement CPC-132 tient toujours.

(1835)

M. John Nater:

Oui, c’est vrai.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Cela concerne les associations de circonscription et leur capacité de faire de la publicité préélectorale. Cela leur permet d'en faire pendant la période préélectorale.

Le président:

Y a-t-il débat?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous en sommes à l’amendement LIB-39.

Cela a des conséquences. Quel que soit le résultat de ce vote, il s’applique à l’amendement LIB-54, puisqu’ils sont liés par renvoi.

Un libéral pourrait-il proposer cet amendement, s’il vous plaît?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr.

Celui-ci permettrait aux associations de circonscription « d’engager des dépenses de publicité partisane » lorsque de telles dépenses sont engagées pour des messages destinés « à être diffusés exclusivement, ou essentiellement, dans la circonscription électorale de l’association ».

Elles seraient également autorisées à « diffuser ou faire diffuser des messages publicitaires partisans » [...] « exclusivement, ou essentiellement, dans la circonscription de l’association » pendant la période préélectorale.

Le président:

Les témoins ont-ils quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Avez-vous une question précise?

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, allez-y, puis ce sera au tour de M. Nater.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela nous ramène au niveau de l’association de circonscription pour ce qui est de la possibilité de faire de la publicité politique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au sein de l’association de circonscription.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans la circonscription, oui. Mais si l’intention est de limiter l’ensemble des dépenses préélectorales, si vous avez 338 circonscriptions, surtout s’il y a eu un effort concerté, est-ce que cela ne contourne pas ce que le projet de loi tente de...?

M. Jean-François Morin:

En fait, non, pas à mon avis personnel, qui a beaucoup de valeur, bien sûr.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est vrai.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Permettez-moi de jeter un coup d’oeil rapide au projet de loi.

Lorsque nous examinons la définition de « dépenses de publicité partisane », il s’agit de l’idée de favoriser ou contrecarrer un parti, ainsi qu’un candidat. Quand on regarde l’interdiction ici, à la page 157 du projet de loi, aux lignes 25 et suivantes, on lit: 449.1(1) Il est interdit à l’association de circonscription d’un parti enregistré: a) d'engager des dépenses de publicité partisane qui se rapportent à des messages de publicité partisane qui favorisent ou contrecarrent un parti enregistré ou un parti admissible et qui sont diffusés pendant la période préélectorale;

Vu les mots utilisés ici, il me semble clair que l’interdiction vise le genre de message publicitaire partisan qui aurait un impact plus national et qui parlerait de la campagne du parti. Ce qui est exclu de l’interdiction, c’est toute mention de questions locales ou d’un candidat local, de sorte que l’interdiction ne vise pas à interdire de façon générale aux associations de circonscription de se livrer à des activités...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends. Ce n'est pas mentionné. Si cet amendement est accepté, qu’est-ce qui empêcherait de contourner les limites que ce projet de loi tente d’imposer dans les 338 associations de circonscription ...? À moins que je ne me trompe, il n’est pas mentionné que les campagnes des associations de circonscription ne peuvent parler que de questions locales. Chaque association de circonscription pourrait diffuser la même publicité à l’échelle nationale, sur un enjeu national, et promouvoir un chef national, n’est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

On dit que chaque association de circonscription peut engager des dépenses de publicité partisane pour des messages publicitaires partisans destinés à être diffusés essentiellement dans la circonscription.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez entendu ma question, n’est-ce pas? Si nous avions une limite universelle quant à ce que les partis peuvent dépenser en publicité partisane, cela ne représenterait-il pas une augmentation de ces dépenses au niveau des circonscriptions?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il est également interdit à un parti de tenter de contourner sa propre limite.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si chaque association de circonscription diffuse une annonce disant « Votez libéral » et qu’en dessous, il y a « candidat de la circonscription » 338 fois...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce possible?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils y réfléchissent. Cela ne fait qu’augmenter le montant d’argent dépensé au moyen d’un message partisan. Vous dites qu’il faudrait prouver la coordination.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement. Le parti ne peut pas essayer de contourner sa propre limite. Il serait très suspect que la même publicité soit publiée par chaque association de circonscription. Encore une fois, le but de cet amendement est de faire en sorte que les associations de circonscription puissent, par exemple, imprimer un dépliant et y apposer le logo ou le nom du parti.

(1840)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela ne compterait pas dans la limite.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En effet.

Le président:

M. Nater, puis M. Graham.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, j’aimerais aussi obtenir une précision. Est-ce que cela serait visé ou non? Je pense à une publicité sur Facebook en faveur du barbecue estival d'une association de circonscription, par exemple. Est-ce que cela s’appliquerait à ce genre de chose, surtout s'il faut que ce soit diffusé exclusivement ou essentiellement dans une circonscription donnée? Lorsqu’un événement est annoncé sur Facebook, il devient un peu plus difficile de cibler précisément la circonscription. Est-ce que ce genre de chose serait couvert?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La diffusion de l’information sur Internet est beaucoup plus large qu’un envoi postal, par exemple. Tout dépend des circonstances. Il est très difficile de répondre à votre question parce que je n’ai pas l'annonce sous les yeux. Si l’invitation porte sur un événement précis, à une date précise, dans la circonscription électorale, elle semble être assez limitée à la circonscription pour être acceptée...

M. John Nater:

Il pourrait y avoir un certain degré d’interprétation à ce moment-là, selon la situation. On pourrait faire de la publicité à ses propres risques et périls, en ce sens qu’on pourrait se faire prendre ou non.

M. Jean-François Morin:

L’intention doit être de la diffuser dans la circonscription. Si l’on peut démontrer que l’intention était de lui donner une diffusion beaucoup plus large, elle ne serait pas visée par l’exception et compterait probablement pour la limite de dépenses du parti.

Le président:

M. Graham, puis nous reviendrons à M. Nater parce que je pense qu’il a quelque chose à ajouter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, si nous n’adoptons pas cet amendement, Nathan Cullen pourrait-il, par exemple, publier dans sa circonscription, au cours de la période préélectorale, un dépliant indiquant son nom, celui de son chef et l’adresse du parti, ou y a-t-il une erreur de rédaction, parce que je crois comprendre que cela l'empêcherait de le faire?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Si l’argent est prélevé sur les fonds de l’association de circonscription, la réponse est non. Compte tenu des définitions qui ont été données dans la loi, pour « favoriser ou contrecarrer un parti enregistré ou un parti admissible », il suffirait de nommer le parti ou de montrer son logo pour...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il suffirait de l’interdire.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il ne s’agit pas de l’interdire, mais de le faire entrer dans la limite nationale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voilà le problème. Cela vous permet d'avoir un dépliant local sur vous-même qui mentionne le parti que vous appuyez pendant la période préélectorale, ce que nous ne pourrions pas faire autrement sans affecter le montant des dépenses du parti.

M. Jean-François Morin:

C’est exact.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela semble assez important.

Merci.

Le président:

Vous exemptez les publicités locales de la limite du parti.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pouvez publier votre dépliant avec votre photo et le logo du parti, mais sans cet amendement, vous ne pourriez pas le faire sans répercussions pour le parti.

Le président:

Nous revenons à M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, je pense à un autre exemple de la façon dont cela pourrait être visé. J’ai une grande circonscription rurale, qui est loin d’être aussi grande que celle de certains et qui est loin d’être aussi grande que celle de notre président, par exemple, mais je pense davantage aux stations de radio en milieu urbain. Si vous aviez une circonscription de Montréal, disons une petite circonscription comme Papineau, qui est l’une des plus petites du pays, et si vous faisiez une publicité préélectorale à la radio, dans une station de radio montréalaise qui rejoint beaucoup de circonscriptions de Montréal, même si elle est payée par la petite circonscription de Papineau, est-ce une situation qui serait visée par cet amendement? On pourrait dire que c’était pour cette petite circonscription, mais cela touche toute la ville.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Vraiment, à ce stade-ci, ce serait une question d’interprétation dans le contexte d’un cas particulier. Si plusieurs associations de circonscription couvrant la région où se trouve la station de radio participaient toutes à cette campagne de publicité, ce serait probablement acceptable.

M. John Nater:

Si ce n’était pas le cas, cependant, s’il n’y avait qu’une seule association de circonscription, ne serait-ce pas acceptable?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je peux vous donner l’exemple du Globe and Mail. Si une association de circonscription tente de publier une annonce dans le Globe and Mail dans la circonscription électorale où le journal est imprimé, il est clair que cela dépasse de loin la portée de cette exception.

Il faut tracer une ligne rouge quelque part. L’intention est vraiment de permettre aux associations de circonscription de communiquer avec la population locale de la circonscription.

(1845)

M. John Nater:

Par conséquent, le fait de diffuser une annonce disant « Votez pour Justin Trudeau, votre candidat dans Papineau » pourrait être visé.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Dans un journal dont la distribution est nationale? Non.

M. John Nater:

Dans toute la ville de Montréal...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, il faut que ce soit dans la circonscription.

M. John Nater:

Dans ce cas, cela s'appliquerait à une annonce radiophonique diffusée dans la ville entière. C’est votre interprétation.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts à voter sur l’amendement LIB-39, qui s’applique également à l’amendement LIB-54. Ils sont liés par renvoi.

(L’amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 271 modifié est adopté.)

Le président: Il n’y a pas d’amendement pour les articles 272 à 277.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, pourrions-nous adopter l’article 272 avec dissidence?

Le président:

D’accord.

(L’article 272 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 273 à 277 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: Le nouvel article 277.1 est proposé.

Nathan, pourriez-vous le présenter pour que je puisse rendre une décision?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y a un ton inquiétant dans votre voix, monsieur le président.

Cela semble être une simple question de bon sens. Nous demandons que des statistiques sur l’équité soient publiées et recueillies relativement aux nominations.

Les partis politiques publient parfois eux-mêmes certaines de ces données, mais pas de façon uniforme et cohérente. Ils en font rapport à Élections Canada, au directeur général des élections, je crois. Oh, excusez-moi, cet amendement vise à fournir ces renseignements au directeur général des élections. Il est question de sexe et d’orientation sexuelle. Le rapport n’identifierait pas chaque candidat, mais il donnerait les totaux universels — le nombre de candidates chez les libéraux ou chez les conservateurs, le nombre de LGBTQ. C’est simplement une façon de comprendre statistiquement comment fonctionne le processus de nomination dans notre démocratie. Sommes-nous plus ou moins représentés? Qui fait plus et qui fait moins?

De plus, je pense que cela pourrait être utile à certains Canadiens, particulièrement à ceux qui s’intéressent à la politique. Cela obligerait également les partis à décrire le processus de vote pour l’investiture — est-ce un scrutin préférentiel, est-ce un vote par tour direct, comment chaque parti a-t-il proposé son...? Il n’y a aucune exigence à cet égard actuellement. Je pense que c’est intéressant.

Je ne pense même pas que ce soit controversé, mais c’est peut-être le cas. Encore une fois, la plupart des partis se décrivent eux-mêmes, mais cela ne se fait pas de façon uniforme. Tous les Canadiens qui veulent savoir combien de femmes sont mises en candidature, ou combien il y a de candidats LGBTQ, ne peuvent pas faire de comparaison sur les mêmes bases. Je précise simplement que cela ne révélerait pas le nom du candidat ou de la circonscription. C’est une approche universelle.

Le président:

Cet amendement vise à ajouter des renseignements au rapport sur la course à l’investiture qui doit être déposé auprès du directeur général des élections en vertu de l’article 476.1 de la loi. Cela dépasse la portée du projet de loi et vise à modifier un article de la loi qui ne peut faire l’objet d’amendements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Puis-je poser une question? Pour ce qui est de la loi et du projet de loi C-76, qui touche de nombreuses parties de la loi et crée de nouveaux articles de la loi... N'est-ce pas?

Le terme « articles » n’est peut-être pas le bon. Le projet de loi C-76 introduit de nouveaux concepts dans la loi, n'est-ce pas?

(1850)

M. Philippe Méla:

Vous voulez dire dans le projet de loi?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui.

M. Philippe Méla:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D’accord, alors comment pouvons-nous prescrire des limites de portée en disant que le concept de cet amendement...? Les amendements ne peuvent pas le faire, mais le projet de loi lui-même le peut? Est-ce bien cela?

M. Philippe Méla:

Le projet de loi est adopté à l’étape de la deuxième lecture par la Chambre en fonction du nombre de concepts qu’elle veut ajouter à la loi. Ce sont donc les paramètres que vous devez respecter, le cadre, si vous voulez.

Dans ce cas-ci, il y a deux problèmes, si vous voulez. Il y a le fait que vous ajoutez certains critères à quelque chose qui n’est pas envisagé dans le cadre de la loi, et l’autre problème, c’est que vous modifiez un article de la loi qui n’est pas modifié par le projet de loi. C’est le problème que M. Nater a soulevé toute la journée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vous remercie de cette explication.

Le président:

À cause de M. Nater, M. Cullen est déclaré irrecevable.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: L'article 277.1 est irrecevable, donc il n’est pas ajouté à la loi.

Il n’y a pas d’amendement aux articles 278 et 279.

(Les articles 278 et 279 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 280)

Le président: Il y a l'amendement CPC-133.

Monsieur Nater, pourriez-vous nous présenter CPC-133, s’il vous plaît.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, cela obligerait le directeur général des élections à publier les limites des dépenses de campagne d'investiture dans la Gazette du Canada et dans le site Web d’Élections Canada.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Le DGE publie déjà les limites de dépenses de campagnes d’investiture. Je ne crois pas qu’il soit nécessaire de légiférer.

Le président:

Vous dites qu’il le fait déjà, et qu'il n'est donc pas nécessaire de légiférer.

Les témoins ont-ils des commentaires?

M. Trevor Knight:

Oui, nous les publions.

Le président:

Vous les publiez déjà. D’accord.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 280 est adopté.)

(Les articles 281 à 291 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: M. Reid a fait un signe de victoire. Nous allons en prendre note.

M. Scott Reid:

J’aime ce genre d’articles.

(Article 292)

Le président:

Il y a l’amendement CPC-134.

Monsieur Nater, pourriez-vous présenter cet amendement, s’il vous plaît?

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, nous avons parlé plus tôt des limites de dépenses au prorata pour les campagnes plus longues. Il s’agit d’un concept semblable. Cela s’applique spécifiquement aux campagnes plus longues où le jour des élections a été reporté pour une raison quelconque, une catastrophe naturelle ou la mort d’un candidat, par exemple. Je pense que cet amendement est important et tout à fait acceptable, et je ne peux pas imaginer que quelqu'un puisse voter contre.

Le président:

Nous verrons si c’est vrai.

M. John Nater:

Je vais attendre de voir les résultats.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 292 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 293 à 296 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 297)

Le président:

Je pense qu’il y a un amendement en suspens, CPC-135.

M. Nater en a parlé.

M. John Nater:

Vous l'avez qualifié d'exceptionnel. C’est un excellent amendement, n’est-ce pas?

Le président:

Le mot anglais « outstanding » a plusieurs sens.

M. John Nater:

Oui.

Cela concerne les députés qui n’ont pas déposé leur rapport de dépenses à la suite de l’élection, ce dont le Président est informé. Nous proposons un amendement pour que le Président en informe très rapidement la Chambre, avant l’ajournement de la prochaine séance. Lorsqu’un député n’a pas le droit de siéger parce qu’il n’a pas déposé son rapport, la Chambre devrait en être informée, pas seulement le Président.

Le président:

Y a-t-il débat sur l’amendement CPC-135?

Monsieur Longfield.

(1855)

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Nous disons au Président comment faire son travail. Comme il le fait déjà bien, cela ne devrait pas figurer dans la loi. Il revient au Président de rappeler les députés à leur devoir.

Le président:

J’ai la prémonition que M. Nater voudra peut-être parler de nouveau.

M. John Nater:

En fait, croyez-le ou non...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne le crois pas.

M. John Nater:

... au cours de la dernière législature, un député libéral a soulevé une question de privilège à ce sujet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quand était-ce?

M. John Nater:

En fait, le député en question ne savait pas qu’il était dans cette situation parce que le Président n’était pas en mesure d’en informer la Chambre. Cela répond bien aux préoccupations que les libéraux ont soulevées au cours de la dernière législature.

Nous avons vraiment hâte d’aider nos amis d’en face.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Qui était le Président à l’époque? Oh oui, c’est vrai.

M. John Nater:

Exactement, et si le Président Scheer avait eu le pouvoir que cet amendement lui conférerait...

M. Scott Reid:

À lui?

M. John Nater:

Oui, à lui.

M. Scott Reid:

Eh oui, même à lui.

M. John Nater:

Cela aurait réglé le problème.

Mme Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

Vous m’avez manqué.

Le président:

Vous parlez de M. Scheer qui a été pendu au mur aujourd’hui dans le...

M. John Nater:

Son portrait a été suspendu aujourd’hui. On vient de m’informer que le Président avait demandé au comité de la procédure de se pencher sur cette question. Nous sommes en train...

Le président:

... de nous en occuper.

M. John Nater:

... à la demande de notre ancien Président.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est exact.

Une voix: Je crois comprendre qu’il sera la première personne à voir son portrait suspendu deux fois.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Nous nous en sommes occupés. Nous avons un nouveau Président.

Le président:

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter au débat houleux sur l’amendement CPC-135?

Avez-vous d'autres observations, monsieur Nater?

M. John Nater:

Vous voulez peut-être savoir quel député a soulevé la question.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je serais curieux de le savoir.

M. John Nater:

C’était Scott Simms, qui est membre du Comité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il a dit que nous devions régler ce problème.

M. John Nater:

C’est lui qui a soulevé la question.

Mme Sherry Romanado:

Il n’est pas ici.

M. John Nater:

Où est-il?

M. Garnett Genuis:

A-t-il le droit de parler de nouveau?

Le président:

Nous allons voter sur l’amendement.

M. John Nater:

J’aimerais un vote par appel nominal.

(L’amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 297 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 298 et 299 sont adoptés.)

(Article 300)

Le président:

L’article 300 fait l'objet d'un autre amendement, le CPC-136.

M. Nater désire en parler.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, cela compenserait la récupération. S’il y a des dépenses excessives, il y a évidemment une récupération, et cela compenserait le remboursement.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vais simplement poser la question suivante aux fonctionnaires. De notre point de vue, cela semble redondant.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Le paragraphe 477.74(3) a déjà une incidence sur le montant calculé au paragraphe (2), et à l’heure actuelle, l’alinéa 477.75(1)d) ne fait pas référence au paragraphe (3), de sorte que cela semble inutile, à moins que quelque chose m'échappe.

Le président:

Êtes-vous en train de dire que cela ne changerait rien?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à l’amendement CPC-137.

Je vais demander à M. Reid de le présenter.

M. Scott Reid:

Même si je suis tenté par cette offre généreuse, je vais céder la parole à mon collègue, M. Nater.

(1900)

M. John Nater:

Pour revenir en arrière et clarifier les choses, les dépenses sont généralement remboursées à 60 %. Les modifications apportées à la loi prévoient le remboursement de certaines dépenses dans des proportions différentes. Dans certains cas, c’est à 90 %.

Le président:

Comme pour la garde d'enfants?

M. John Nater:

Exactement. Cela clarifierait le plafond global en fixant le montant qui serait remboursé à 75 %, pour toutes les dépenses.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourquoi voulez-vous faire cela?

M. John Nater:

M. Richards a eu la clairvoyance de déposer cette motion.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Où est-il? Je me demande qui est ce M. Richards.

Mme Sherry Romanado:

Il est avec Scott.

Le président:

Il a déposé tous ces amendements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il s’intéresse beaucoup à notre comité, mais il ne vient pas.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Ce qui nous préoccupe, dirais-je, c’est que cet amendement aurait pour effet de réduire l'allocation importante que le projet de loi C-76 prévoit pour le remboursement des dépenses qui aident les candidats handicapés à établir des liens avec les électeurs.

Le président:

Avez-vous une réponse à cela, monsieur Nater?

M. John Nater:

C’est simplement que nous voulons toujours être conscients qu’il s’agit de l’argent des contribuables, que nous gardons toujours un oeil sur l’argent que nous dépensons.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, vous avez dit que cela réduit le remboursement pour les personnes handicapées?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

Le président:

Si nous sommes prêts, nous allons voter sur l’amendement CPC-137.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 300 est adopté.)

M. John Nater:

J’invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Je dois corriger le compte rendu. Je me suis trompé tout à l’heure quand j’ai dit que c’était Scott Simms qui avait invoqué le Règlement. Ce n’était pas le cas. C’était un autre Scott libéral. C’est Scott Andrews, qui était libéral à l’époque.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela change mon vote.

M. John Nater:

J’aimerais que cela figure au compte rendu. Je ne voudrais pas donner au Comité des renseignements erronés.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C’est une distinction importante.

M. Garnett Genuis:

Vous avez dit que Scott Andrews était libéral à l’époque. Pouvez-vous nous rappeler ce qui s’est passé?

M. John Nater:

Non, je ne m’engagerai pas dans cette voie.

M. Garnett Genuis:

J’essayais simplement de me souvenir. Je n’étais pas là à l’époque.

Le président:

Je suis sûr que M. Simms vous en sera reconnaissant parce que son personnel est ici, et nous allons l'en informer.

Il n’y a pas d’amendement pour les articles 301 à 307.

(Les articles 301 à 307 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 308)

Le président: Il semble qu’il y ait un amendement, le CPC-138.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Cela réduirait le seuil de divulgation de 500 $ à 200 $ et le ferait concorder avec le montant figurant dans notre propre code sur les conflits d’intérêts en tant que parlementaires, soit 200 $. Cela harmonise les deux, et je pense que c’est logique. Je ne pense pas que quiconque devrait accepter des cadeaux d’une grande valeur de toute façon pendant une période électorale, et je crois donc raisonnable de fixer le montant à 200 $.

Le président:

Je pense que le comité de la procédure a débattu de la question du conflit d’intérêts — non pas que ce soit pertinent — à savoir si les 200 $ étaient suffisants ou non. Comme je ne me souviens pas des détails, je vais laisser cela de côté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je pense que certains commencent à 800 $.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un débat sur l’amendement CPC-138, qui vise à faire passer la limite de 500 $ à 200 $?

M. John Nater:

J’aimerais apporter quelques précisions à ce sujet.

Apparemment, au début de la présente législature, le montant a été réduit à 200 $ pour le Code régissant les conflits d’intérêts des députés et c'est le comité de la procédure qui a fait cette recommandation.

Ce serait conforme à la décision qui a été prise à ce moment-là.

Le président:

Nous allons voter sur l’amendement CPC-138.

(L’amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L’article 308 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 309 à 319 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(1905)

Le président:

Nous passons à l’article 320. Il y a quatre amendements du PCC.

M. Chris Bittle:

Avant de passer à une série d’articles, le moment est peut-être bien choisi pour faire une pause.

Vous pouvez rester. Ruby, vous serez très heureuse de prendre la parole.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je croyais que nous allions continuer jusqu’à 21 heures.

Le président:

Vous ne voulez pas rester?

Mme Bernadette Jordan (South Shore—St. Margarets, Lib.):

Je crois que le Parti conservateur... Nous ne pouvons pas rester au-delà de 19 heures ce soir.

Le président:

Est-ce vrai?

M. Scott Reid:

Pourquoi n’avons-nous pas une motion d’ajournement, de suspension ou quelque chose de ce genre, pour voir comment les gens voteront?

Mme Bernadette Jordan:

Nous avons terminé.

Le président:

Nous n’avons pas le consentement pour poursuivre au-delà de l’heure prévue.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, nous avons terminé.

Le président:

Nous serons dans cette salle à 9 heures demain matin.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 17, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.