header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under tran...

  1. 2016-10-20: 2016-10-20 TRAN 27
  2. 2017-09-11: 2017-09-11 TRAN 67
  3. 2017-09-12: 2017-09-12 TRAN 68
  4. 2017-09-13: 2017-09-13 TRAN 69
  5. 2017-09-14: 2017-09-14 TRAN 70
  6. 2017-10-26: 2017-10-26 TRAN 77
  7. 2018-03-26: 2018-03-26 TRAN 96
  8. 2018-03-28: 2018-03-28 TRAN 97
  9. 2018-09-20: 2018-09-20 TRAN 108
  10. 2018-10-04: 2018-10-04 TRAN 112
  11. 2018-10-23: 2018-10-23 TRAN 115
  12. 2018-10-25: 2018-10-25 TRAN 116
  13. 2018-10-30: 2018-10-30 TRAN 117
  14. 2018-11-27: 2018-11-27 TRAN 122
  15. 2018-11-29: 2018-11-29 TRAN 123
  16. 2018-12-04: 2018-12-04 TRAN 124
  17. 2018-12-06: 2018-12-06 TRAN 125
  18. 2018-12-11: 2018-12-11 TRAN 126
  19. 2019-02-07: 2019-02-07 TRAN 129
  20. 2019-02-21: 2019-02-21 TRAN 131
  21. 2019-05-09: 2019-05-09 TRAN 142

Displaying the most recent stories under tran...

2019-05-09 TRAN 142

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I call to order this meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.

Welcome to everyone.

We gather today to study three departmental plans for agencies that fall under the purview of the Minister of Transport, as well as the main estimates 2019-20.

A number of votes were referred to the committee for discussion on Thursday, April 11, 2019, namely votes 1 and 5 under Canadian Air Transport Security Authority; vote 1 under Canadian Transportation Agency; votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 under the Department of Transport; vote 1 under Marine Atlantic Incorporated; vote 1 under the Federal Bridge Corporation Limited and vote 1 under VIA Rail.

We are delighted to welcome the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, along with his officials. They are Michael Keenan, Deputy Minister; Kevin Brosseau, Assistant Deputy Minister for Safety and Security; Anuradha Marisetti, Assistant Deputy Minister for Programs and André Lapointe, Chief Financial Officer.

For the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, we have Mike Saunders, President and Chief Executive Officer, as well as Nancy Fitchett, Acting Vice-President for Corporate Affairs and Chief Financial Officer. Welcome back.

For the Canadian Transportation Agency, we have Scott Streiner, Chair and Chief Executive Officer, and Manon Fillion, Secretary and Chief Corporate Officer.

For Marine Atlantic, we have Murray Hupman, President and Chief Executive Officer, and Shawn Leamon, Vice-President of Finance.

Finally, for VIA Rail Canada, we have Jacques Fauteux, Director of Government and Community Relations.

Welcome, everyone, to our committee. Thank you for coming.

I'll start the discussion by calling vote 1 under the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority.

Minister Garneau, it's over to you for five minutes. I know that you're not feeling well today, and we really appreciate the fact that you're here with us today.

Hon. Marc Garneau (Minister of Transport):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. I know that people would have been very disappointed if I weren't here today.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Marc Garneau: I'm delighted to be here today. If I occasionally cough and splutter, please don't worry. I'm alive and well. I don't want to make a habit of having a cold when I come here, but I am fine. Thank you.[Translation]

Madam Chair and members of the committee, thank you for the invitation to meet with you today. I am joined by the people you have already mentioned. [English]

There is a great deal of important work being done in the federal transportation portfolio, which includes Transport Canada, crown corporations, agencies and administrative tribunals.

Regarding this year's main estimates, I will begin by mentioning that for the fourth year Transport Canada is involved in a pilot project, as we assess how effective it is to link grants and contribution votes to their purpose.

To help the parliamentary study of the estimates and the scrutiny of government expenditures overall, planned Transport Canada expenditures are presented in the main estimates for 2019-20 in accordance with the department's results framework.

The overarching goal at Transport Canada is to ensure that our transportation system is safe and secure, efficient, green and innovative. We work towards this goal by proposing laws, policies and regulations; monitoring and inspecting the transportation industry to ensure that these laws, policies and regulations are respected; and funding projects to strengthen the transportation network. We also collaborate with a variety of partners, including indigenous peoples, industry, provincial and territorial governments, and international bodies.

Transport Canada's main estimates for 2019-20 total $1.86 billion. That total can be broken down into four categories, which are $879 million under “Efficient Transportation”, $374 million under “Safe and Secure Transportation”, $252 million under “Green and Innovative Transportation” and $194 million for “Internal Services.” There is also $162 million for new budget 2019 items.

This is an interesting and exciting time for transportation in Canada. Innovation is delivering new opportunities and new challenges. In response, we are allocating resources to address these challenges, and we are always seeking ways to take advantage of new opportunities to make transportation safer, more secure, and more efficient, with less impact on the environment.

Budget 2019 announced a $300-million commitment for a new incentive program for zero-emission vehicles to help us achieve our targets for new light-duty vehicles in Canada of 10% by 2025, 30% by 2030, and 100% by 2040. The first portion of that amount, $71 million for the 2019-20 fiscal year, is included in these main estimates.[Translation]

Transport Canada is also requesting $2.1 million in these main estimates for protecting critical cyber systems in the transportation sector. Budget 2019 announced more than $12 million over three years to implement the modernized Motor Vehicle Safety Act. This includes using fines to increase safety compliance, and more flexibility to support safe testing and deployment of innovative technologies.

Budget 2019 also allocated nearly $46 million dollars over three years to support innovation and modernization of Transport Canada's regulatory regime. This would affect commercial testing of remotely piloted aircraft systems beyond visual line of sight, cooperative truck platooning pilot projects, and an enhanced road safety transfer payment program.

I will also provide some highlights from these main estimates for federal agencies and Crown corporations in my portfolio.

The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) is seeking $875 million, to continue to protect travellers with effective, consistent and high-quality security screening.

Budget 2019 included $288 million for fiscal year 2019-20, to continue securing critical elements of the air transportation system, to protect the public.

Budget 2019 also announced our intention to advance legislation that would enable us to sell the assets and liabilities of CATSA to an independent, not-for-profit entity. The funding envelope for 2019-20 includes transition resources to support this corporate structure change.

(1105)

[English]

Marine Atlantic is seeking nearly $153 million for year-round constitutionally mandated ferry service between North Sydney, Nova Scotia, and Port Aux Basques, Newfoundland and Labrador, as well as non-mandated seasonal service between North Sydney and Argentia, Newfoundland and Labrador.

Marine Atlantic brings more than a quarter of all visitors to Newfoundland, and two-thirds of all freight, including 90% of perishables and time-sensitive goods. Marine Atlantic service is vital to the interests of companies that do business in that region and to the people who travel to and from the island of Newfoundland. Budget 2019 mentioned that we will extend support for existing ferry services in eastern Canada and will look to procure three new modern ferries, including one for Marine Atlantic.[Translation]

VIA Rail Canada is requesting almost $732 million in these main estimates. As our national passenger rail carrier, VIA Rail's objective is to provide a safe, secure, efficient, reliable, and environmentally sustainable passenger service. ln addition to trains that run through the Quebec City—Windsor corridor, and long-haul trains between Toronto and Vancouver and between Montreal and Halifax, this also includes passenger rail service to regional and remote communities, some of which have no access to alternative year round transportation.

ln conclusion, the financial resources outlined in these main estimates will help these agencies, Crown corporations, and Transport Canada to maintain and improve our transportation system. Our transportation system is vital for our economy, and for our quality of life. It is vital for our safety and security. And by making improvements to our transportation system, we are making it safer and more secure.

And we are also creating good, well-paying jobs for the middle class, and ensuring a better quality of life for all Canadians.

I would now be happy to answer any questions you may have. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much for that presentation, Minister Garneau.

We'll go now to Ms. Block for six minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank you as well, Minister, and your departmental staff, for joining us today.

Where does one begin with the opportunity to question you on the main estimates, the departmental report on plans and priorities and the Canadian Transportation Agency, as well as the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority? It feels like the field is wide open.

At first blush, Minister, it would appear that you have been very busy, but a closer look reveals that whether we're looking at legislation you've introduced, regulations that have been gazetted or the recent measures included in the Budget Implementation Act, much of the heavy lifting has been left to the department or to industry itself.

Take the numerous initiatives undertaken in the air industry. Consistently we have heard that the cumulative effect of these initiatives—regulations on flight duty time, the air passenger bill of rights, the recent creation of a new entity for security screening through the BIA and the tight timelines, for which industry must be ready—is overwhelming the industry's capacity to implement these changes in a safe and seamless manner.

On top of this, the industry is continuing to grapple with the recent grounding of their Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft and the subsequent changes that have had to be made by the airlines to continue providing safe air service to Canadians.

I want to quote Mr. Bergamini when he was here at committee: Now, as our industry is grappling with major operational challenges stemming from the grounding of the Max 8, the implementation of new flight duty times rules, and the impossible task of complying by July 1 with prescriptive new passenger rights rules, we are again confronted with a government-imposed deadline and process.

He was referring to the measures in the BIA.

Why, Minister, would you introduce this measure in the Budget Implementation Act at the end of a session, five months before an election, when the industry is already struggling on so many other fronts?

(1110)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I would like to say that there are a lot of things happening in the airline industry, and we announced our intention to put a lot of these in place, I would say, years ago. In fact, the proper normal government process of consultation and gazetting has been a very long process, and the time has come in certain cases to go to Canada Gazette, part II, and put these regulations into effect.

First, it hardly comes as a surprise to the industry that we have wanted to address the issue of pilot fatigue. It's something that started under the Conservatives back in 2010, and it didn't get done by 2015. We carried on with it and are now putting it in place, so it hardly comes as a surprise.

Second, on the issue of passenger rights, we made it clear three years ago that we were going to come forward with that.

We're also adamant about issues related to accessibility for passengers.

These are all things we clearly indicated we would go forward with. We have consulted with industry, and now the time has come to put the results into effect. We feel that the timelines we are going to announce, and in some cases have already announced, are very reasonable.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

My question was about the measures in the BIA that would create a new entity for security screening. Given all the other initiatives that the air industry is being asked to implement on very short timelines, I asked why you deemed it necessary to introduce this measure in the BIA with yet another very short timeline.

It's our understanding that it needs to be implemented by January 1, 2020, and we're going into an election in the fall. Can you please explain why you included this measure in the Budget Implementation Act?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

We did it because we feel very strongly about making the current CATSA into a not-for-profit organization, much as was done by a previous government back in the nineties in severing NavCan from Transport Canada, which has turned out to be an extremely successful model.

I will point out that there are differing opinions about this decision. The airline industry has expressed what you have said. On the other hand, the airports where this measure would be implemented feel very positive about the decision we have taken to move ahead with this not-for-profit version of CATSA.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

You have stated that flying in Canada has not become more affordable for Canadians, despite this being one of your Transportation 2030 goals. With half the price of an airline ticket from Ottawa to Toronto being the result of direct taxes and surcharges, why is your government making air travel in Canada even more expensive with the imposition of a carbon tax, and have you costed what the cost of a carbon tax will be on the airline industry?

I need a quick response, please, because I only have 45 seconds left.

(1115)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

We feel, of course—and this is a broader question—that it is important for us to address the issue of climate change. Of course, through the pan-Canadian framework we have given provinces the option of deciding how they would do it. For those that decided they would not, there would be a backstop, and with respect to flying, fuel surcharges would be imposed for provinces in which the backstop applies and where we're only addressing intraprovincial flying. We have not changed anything with interprovincial flying.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

We will move on to Mr. Badawey for six minutes.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair, and welcome to our committee, Minister Garneau. Thank you for being here today.

Mr. Garneau, I understand that you have just returned from the Great Lakes Economic Forum in Cleveland, Ohio, in your role not only as a minister but as chair of the Cabinet Committee on Canada-U.S. Relations, Trade Diversification and Internal Trade.

The question, and in particular as it relates to today's discussion in respect to the budget, is on how there continue to be investments to strengthen trade corridors domestically here in Canada. Are you continuing to have discussions with our U.S. counterparts to integrate and communicate those domestic trade corridor investments, and also, with that being done and completed, to ensure fluidity and hopefully see that they're also integrating a lot of their trade corridor investments so that movement does flow over the border in a seamless fashion, whether it be by road, by the Great Lakes, by air or by rail?

The reason I ask is that in our neck of the woods in Niagara, we see a lot of trade leaving our region and going into the States. Equally as important, if not more important, is that a lot of that trade is going through or coming from Niagara over the border and then going into, for example, the Port of New York, Staten Island, Manhattan or other ports, and then going international.

Therefore, there's the need to have that fluidity, especially when you're going over the border, whether it is road, rail, water or air. Are those discussions happening?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

In short, yes. The Great Lakes Economic Forum, which I attended yesterday, is, as you know, composed of nine American states that border on the Great Lakes, as well as Ontario and Quebec. This is a very useful forum, because we all have a lot of things in common.

As you point out, looming large in those interests that we have in common is how we make the trade corridors as efficient as possible. We're talking about a region that represents $6 trillion of economy and 100 million people. There are an awful lot of products that we want to get to the right place. The St. Lawrence Seaway is an essential element of that, and as you point out, there is rail, but we have under-exploited the maritime routing.

As you know, we in Canada are at the moment evaluating how we can make the St. Lawrence Seaway more efficient. It also, of course, goes through a region that you're very concerned about, the Niagara peninsula and the Welland Canal. We want to get more of the goods that are produced to markets in a quicker fashion. The people I met with from the Port of Cleveland and those nine American states, for example, want to get their products. Yes, they can use rail, but they also feel, as we do, that we can do better with respect to maritime traffic.

It is something that we are talking about and that we share in common.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I want to ask about the message to our American counterparts with respect to the USMCA and section 232, the tariffs. Obviously, that seamless trade corridor is binational, and eventually its final destination is most times international. Is it very well understood by our counterparts on the U.S. side that while we're making those investments, there still is a need for the USMCA to be dealt with and for section 232, the tariffs, to be dealt with in a positive fashion?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Yes, and that was one of the main messages that I carried yesterday to the audiences I spoke to. Yes, we want to ratify what we call the CUSMA, the Canada-United States-Mexico agreement, but at the same time there is a serious impediment, the steel and aluminum tariffs. I made it very clear that this presented challenges for us here in Canada, especially given the fact that we really only have about five to six weeks before Parliament rises. They understand that very well. They understand the importance of finalizing and implementing NAFTA too, and they share that commitment with us.

(1120)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

My last question, Madam Chair, has to do with the national trade corridors fund.

What kinds of successes are you seeing now, based on the investments that you've already made, and what are your expectations in the future with respect to the returns on those investments?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

So far we have committed funding to 39 projects. Some of those projects are in construction at this point, and we feel that they are going to make our trade corridors more fluid. Some of them affect Great Lake ports, such as Thunder Bay and Hamilton. Funding has been put put into both of those ports, and there have been other measures to keep the goods flowing as well as possible in those corridors.

We are currently in an open situation, in that we have another $750 million, and we have, since January 15, been inviting new submissions for consideration under the national trade corridors fund. This is highly solicited and extremely popular as a program to help do exactly what it says, which is to keep our corridors moving efficiently.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Madam Chair, I have a quick question for you since I don't want to waste any of the time I have to talk to the minister.

During the public portion of the meeting for committee business, will I have time to move the motion announced on Tuesday? [English]

The Chair:

Yes, if you want to do it at the end of this portion of the meeting and prior to starting the second or at the beginning of the second portion, that's fine, Mr. Aubin.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

That's perfect for me.[Translation]

Good morning, Minister.

Thank you for being here. It is always a pleasure to see you. I hope to hear you say today that green intercity mobility is your top priority, along with the fight against greenhouse gas emissions.

In the budget, I see that VIA Rail Canada is asking for $731.6 million, $435.6 million of which will be for capital expenditures.

How should the average person understand the term “capital expenditures”? Is there anything in those expenses for a possible high-frequency rail (HFR)?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

The government subsidizes not only the price of VIA Rail tickets, but also the corporation's capital expenditures. It has a lot of equipment and stations that it has to maintain. That costs money.

We are still assessing the high-frequency train project. This project is separate from VIA Rail Canada's ongoing activities and responsibilities.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I know that you are interested in high-frequency trains.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Extremely interested.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I would have been disappointed if you hadn't asked me a question about it.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Don't worry, I have another one.

I found absolutely nothing in the budget about the HFR. Your colleague from Infrastructure and Communities told me that the project is progressing well, even though there was not one word in the budget about it.

Once you are convinced of the relevance of this project, if all the funds earmarked for studies on the HFR project have not been used up, will you still be able to make a decision, or will you have to wait until all those funds have been used up?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I want to assure you that we are doing our work very diligently. I am sure you will understand that this is an extremely complex project that involves hundreds of kilometres and raises some key issues. Will there be enough passengers to make the HFR viable? We do not want to be forced to subsidize this train beyond a certain amount, if I may say so. There are also environmental issues and the need to consult with indigenous peoples. In addition, there is an interoperability issue if the Réseau express métropolitain (REM) is built in Montreal.

(1125)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

If you had answers before the end of the studies, could you make a decision?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

We are working very hard and diligently to make a decision. I expect you to remind me every week that this is something I should not forget.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Absolutely, and I will continue to do so.

Let's change the subject. The budget referred to zero emission vehicles with fewer than seven passengers. I attended a symposium in recent weeks on the hydrogen and fuel cell sector. It seems that Canada is quite a way behind on this issue, particularly with regard to hydrogen-powered buses and trucks.

If heavier vehicles were electrified and recharged, either from the electricity grid or by a more complex system, could this be another approach to reducing greenhouse gases? Is hydrogen also being considered in Canada?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

That's certainly an open question. We look to the market to see whether other models of cars will meet the criteria necessary for a grant.

I must remind you of one of the measures that has not been mentioned very much and that applies to individuals wishing to buy one of those cars. Companies are also entitled to a tax cut if they buy cars, light or heavy, that run on hydrogen fuel cells.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you very much for that answer.

In my last minute, I would like to briefly talk about CATSA. As we well know, the sums deducted from passenger tickets for security measures are not fully reinvested in security. It is like a cash cow for the government.

Could privatizing security services have advantages, particularly for regional airports, such as Trois-Rivières, which need security services to operate the discount travel business sector, for example?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

One of our objectives is to reduce costs for passengers. Of course, costs must be incurred for security measures. Users pay for their security, that is to say those who buy airline tickets, but we do not want the cost to be higher than needed.

For airports that are not served by a system such as CATSA, as mentioned in Bill C-49, the modernization of the Canada Transportation Act, airports have access to this system, but at their own expense. It is possible that, in the future, we will review the designated airports, but we don't expect that by June. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

Mr. Iacono is next. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Minister, thank you for being here this morning.

Our committee has been working on the impact of aircraft noise near Canada's major airports, which is a problem for some communities across the country, particularly in Laval. In fact, the report was tabled in the House on March 19.

Do you have any comments on that issue?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question.

I recognize that transportation affects the daily lives of Canadians, including the noise it generates. Although airports are the hub of the economy, their activities must take into account the needs of communities.

In terms of the specific problem of airport noise, the government is sensitive to the concerns of residents living near Montreal airport and other airports across the country. We continue to monitor the situation very closely.

Aircraft noise management is complex. It requires the combined efforts of various levels of government and various players in the air transport industry. Various groups are involved.

It's encouraging to see that the industry is paying attention to this issue. For example, NAV CANADA and the Greater Toronto Airport Authority have called on recognized experts and the general public to help them find ways to reduce aircraft noise at Toronto Airport. They have openly committed to implementing most of the recommendations provided by this group of experts. They are preparing reports and consulting on this work.

There are things that can be done, but all players must work together. I am highly aware of this issue because I constantly hear about it.

(1130)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Let us now turn to rail transport. Last March, you announced a number of appointments to VIA Rail Canada, including that of Ms. Garneau, who was appointed president and chief executive officer.

Can you tell us about Ms. Garneau's appointment process and mandate objectives?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

In an appointment process like that, you try to find the best person to fill the position, someone who has the experience and qualifications to be at the helm of a large company with tremendous responsibilities. I am particularly proud to see Cynthia Garneau officially taking charge of VIA Rail today. I am sure there's a bright future.

As you know, one of VIA Rail's major projects is currently the renewal of its fleet in the Quebec-Windsor corridor. That's a considerable investment. All equipment, locomotives and cars will be replaced. From 2022, we will be able to see the new cars and locomotives. It is a big project and a significant responsibility. As you know, the contract has been awarded to Siemens Canada, which will be responsible for providing this equipment. Finally, if we decide to take action on the high-frequency train, a lot more work will have to be done.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Since May 1, the federal incentives program for zero-emission vehicles has been a game changer for Canadians who want to “drive green”. The most frequent comments were about the cost of those vehicles. In Quebec and Laval, incentives are already in place for the purchase of zero emission vehicles.

Can this new federal incentive be cumulative? In other words, can it be in addition to those provided by the provinces and municipalities?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Yes, the list of eligible vehicles is available on Transport Canada's website. The incentive can be up to $5,000. Quebec has an incentive of up to $8,000. As you mentioned, the City of Laval is unique in that it also provides a $2,000 incentive. All those incentives can be combined, but the vehicle the person is buying must be on all three lists. It might appear on one list, but not on the others. If the vehicle appears on all three lists, which include the most common vehicles, the person can benefit from a truly significant discount.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

What are the forecasts for the sale of zero-emission vehicles for 2019-20?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

We have no forecasts, but we hope that many people will feel that it's time to buy vehicles like that. We would like to see a lot of people look at those vehicles at dealerships. [English]

The Chair:

We'll move on to Mr. Rogers.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, Minister and officials, for being here today.

Minister, I want to focus on the issues of transportation pertaining to Newfoundland and Labrador, of course, which is predominantly done by flights or ferry service.

Marine Atlantic provides an important constitutionally mandated ferry service to the citizens of my province. Recently we have been faced with challenges in terms of rates set by Marine Atlantic and cost recovery rates, which some believe are too high. Many residents are concerned about the affordability of this crucially important ferry service to my province.

Could you comment on the process undertaken to ensure the affordability of the constitutionally mandated service that we have?

(1135)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

We try to achieve the right balance here. As you point out, Marine Atlantic service is vital to the interests of Newfoundland and Labrador, and for people who depend on it not only for their personal travel but also for most of the goods that arrive at and leave the island.

Marine Atlantic brings more than a quarter of all visitors to Newfoundland, as well as two-thirds of all freight and 90% of perishables and time-sensitive goods, and we have a constitutional responsibility to maintain the service between North Sydney and Port aux Basques.

Marine Atlantic is seeking $153 million for year-round constitutionally mandated ferry service between North Sydney, Nova Scotia, and Port aux Basques, as well as non-mandated seasonal service between North Sydney and Argentia. Budget 2019, as you know, mentioned that we're going to extend support for existing ferry services in eastern Canada, and we will also be looking to procure three new ferries, one of them for Marine Atlantic. That would be to replace the Leif Ericson.

I realize the service is still expensive. Our approach has been that we subsidize the constitutionally mandated one, and we aim to get 100% recovery on the non-mandated one. We feel we've achieved the right balance, although perhaps not everybody agrees with that. We're trying to do something that provides that service and allows the fleet to be modernized when the time comes, but at the same time we also have to be mindful of the expenditures involved.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

I appreciate trying to find a balance in all of that, but I think there's a general sentiment across the province from the business community, tourism operators and others that the current rates are an impediment to people coming to the province. We've seen marked improvement in tourism in the province, but people still believe that affordability is an issue, and they suggest we may need to take a closer look at the cost-recovery rates.

I'm glad you mentioned the new ferry, because I wonder how that fleet renewal approach is going to impact the operations of Marine Atlantic and the services it provides.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

We have people from Marine Atlantic here. Murray Hupman is here. Did you want to say anything?

Mr. Murray Hupman (President and Chief Executive Officer, Marine Atlantic Inc.):

Sure. It will not impact the service at all.

When the new vessel comes into service, it will enhance the service. We will have the existing fleet right up to the point when the new vessel comes into service, and then at that point we will dispose of the Leif Ericson, so it won't impact the service at all.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

It's positive from your perspective?

Mr. Murray Hupman:

It's extremely positive, yes.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

Thank you very much.

During our ongoing study on trade and transportation logistics, Minister, we've heard from witnesses such as the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council on the need to harmonize transportation regulations, and in budget 2019 the Government of Canada announced that through the road safety transfer payment program, it would support the provinces and territories in their efforts to harmonize road safety and transportation requirements.

How does the government plan to support the provinces and territories, specifically in harmonizing these regulations regarding the weight and size of freight trucks?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I'll pass it over to my deputy minister, but you're right about the issue of trying to harmonize, because provinces have set their own weight limits with respect to how they design their roads or the kinds of roads they have to live with and the ground conditions.

We are trying to improve the situation so that if a truck is leaving St. John's, Newfoundland, on its way to Victoria, British Columbia, it doesn't have to stop along the way and unload. In some cases there have been tire problems as well. To improve internal trade in our country, we're trying to harmonize those rules under provincial jurisdiction.

I'll pass it to Deputy Minister Keenan.

(1140)

Mr. Michael Keenan (Deputy Minister, Department of Transport):

As Minister Garneau said, there's a lot of work going on to work through this very technical issue. Minister Garneau and his provincial colleagues on the council of ministers of transport commissioned a task force report on trucking harmonization. It came in early in 2019. An interprovincial group on weights and measures has been tasked with working through that and establishing priorities to harmonize these regulations.

One area where significant progress is being made is in single wide tires. We now have an agreement in principle with the provinces to standardize the regulations with respect to single wide tires, and the trucking industry is very keen to get rules that work across the country.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Keenan.

We'll go on to Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'd like to thank the minister and his staff for being out.

Madam Chair, I'd like to share my time with my colleague, Mr. Liepert.

At this time, Madam Chair, I'd like to move a motion on behalf of Matt Jeneroux, who's not here today.

The Chair:

Yes, go ahead.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

The motion reads: That the Committee invite the parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Indigenous Services to appear on the Minister's behalf to update the Committee on the status of delivering infrastructure directly to indigenous communities, including the doubling of the Gas Tax Fund, announced in Budget 2019, and that the meeting on this study currently scheduled for Tuesday, May 28, 2019, be televised.

Madam Chair, I would like the vote recorded, please.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Go ahead, Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I'll be quick because I know we want to get back to questioning the minister.

As was discussed at our last meeting, we know that the Prime Minister provided a guideline for parliamentary secretaries that outlines their role and duties, one of which is to appear at committees if the ministers can't make themselves available. I know the original motion inviting the minister was passed unanimously, so it is our hope that asking the parliamentary secretary to appear in place of the minister will be supported by the members of the governing party.

That said, I do support this motion.

The Chair:

For the interest of committee members, the clerk has informed me that parliamentary secretaries do answer questions and can replace a minister in many instances, but it's not automatic. The clerk goes with the answer that's provided by the department, and from the department it was the officials.

Is there any further discussion on this motion?

(Motion negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair: Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

I just wanted to follow up a little more on the CATSA transfer.

I'm not here to ask questions on behalf of the airlines, but we had some quite compelling testimony over the last couple of meetings.

I won't repeat everything my colleague mentioned in her initial question, but I think you have to admit, Minister, that while your comments—and I'm going to paraphrase them—were that this consultation has been going on for a long time, really all of the details of the passenger bill of rights were only passed through in this session. These details around the CATSA transfer only really came to light in the BIA. Of course, the airlines have had to deal with something that was not anyone's fault, which was the grounding of the MAX 8s.

I'd like to get a little more of an explanation of why it is so important to get this through as part of the budget implementation act, rather than ensure that it's negotiated fairly and that at the end of the day the consumer is not going to be impacted negatively by this measure.

(1145)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

One of the main reasons we're putting this forward is to make things better and more efficient for the consumer, and we feel that taking the measures we are taking will accomplish that objective. As I said, we had a lot of people who were very skeptical about when NavCan was separated from Transport Canada. Today, people continue to use that as an example of a very wise decision that was taken 20 years ago.

Now, it hasn't been officially on the radar screen, but this doesn't come as a surprise to either the airline industry or the airports. Again, the airport people are the ones who are very close to this as well. They've been asking for this measure for a very long time.

We believe that the schedule we have put forward is one that can be implemented. I can understand the airlines' situation, because lots of things are happening, and I do sympathize on the issue of the Max 8. This was totally unexpected.

However, when we make decisions about the implementation schedule, we look at it very carefully. We don't just throw out dates.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I don't know how much time I have, but I want to get clarification on another issue.

The airlines seemed to indicate that it was a done deal, that there was a sale price actually attached to the assets. I believe it was one of your deputies at committee the other day who said that was not the case, that it would still be negotiated.

Can you elaborate a little further on where that situation stands today? It seems to us that if you sell those assets for more than a dollar, let's say, the passenger is paying for those assets twice, because they've already paid for them once.

Could you elaborate a bit more on that?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

The deputy minister will answer.

Mr. Michael Keenan:

There are two points I could elaborate on here. One is that the purpose of the BI, the budget implementation legislation, is to authorize a negotiated transfer. Beyond that, it sets some basic terms, but everything is subject to negotiations with the airlines and the airports.

The airlines have expressed concerns here in committee and elsewhere. We've been talking with them and we've addressed their concerns, to the point where they're ready to sit down with us next week and start those negotiations on a reform that's been in discussion, in some manner or other, since 2017.

On the issue of the transfer price, the director general of air policy was testifying that it's subject to negotiations, and it is. The government's position going into those negotiations is that the appropriate price to transfer the assets is their book value in the government's accounts. If you transfer them at book value, then there's no impact on the deficit. The transfer is neutral in terms of the impact on current taxpayers versus current travellers. That's our position going into the negotiations.

However, this is all subject to a negotiation with the airports and the airlines. The airports are ready, and the airlines told us yesterday that they would be ready to start those negotiations as early as next week.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

It seems that the passenger has already paid for those assets. I still don't understand how the government can make the claim that this is a straight across transfer. That asset base was built up through fees that the paying public has paid. The government is now saying that we're going to take that asset base, which the public has paid for, and put it into general revenue, and then we're going to charge you a second time. That doesn't make any sense.

Mr. Michael Keenan:

I would say that the assets that have been built up at CATSA are quite significant, and they've been built up over a long period of time, over many years. If you go back in the history of CATSA, sometimes it ran a big deficit and the government topped it up, and sometimes it ran a surplus.

There is a big overlap between taxpayers and passengers. There are 13 million Canadians who travel every year, and they're all taxpayers. The government's position at the beginning of the negotiations is to transfer it in a manner that is neutral between taxpayers and passengers. If you don't do that, then you're either having a windfall for the Government of Canada or you're taking a hit on the deficit, which makes it not neutral between taxpayers and passengers.

(1150)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Keenan.

Mr. Hardie and Mr. Fuhr, you are sharing your time. Mr. Fuhr, you have two minutes, and then we'll go on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Minister, thank you for coming this morning. As you're aware, this committee recently tabled a report called “Supporting Canada's Flight Schools”. That came about as a result of my Motion No.177, which was supported unanimously in the House, 280 to zero, which is something that doesn't happen very often these days, as you are well aware. I think that indicates that the House is very supportive—and by extension, so are Canadians—of what this country is going to do about generating pilots.

I also understand and appreciate that the department has 120 days to respond, which is going to get tight, given the number of days we have left in this sitting period. Therefore, in the event that it doesn't happen—although I really hope it does—I was wondering if you could give us a little bit of feedback on what you thought of the report.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I thought it was excellent. I want to thank the transportation committee, and I want to thank you aswell for your motion to set this process going. Also, as you know, Transport Canada is seized with this issue of the need for more pilots and more training in Canada because of the looming shortage, some of which is being felt at this time.

As you point out, we are currently looking at all of the recommendations from the transportation committee on this issue. It's my hope that we will be able to come forward, even though we have only 120 days. We're working very hard to do it before Parliament rises.

This is an extremely valuable report. It helps us. I think it's a perfect example of how important it is to have committees. It's because of the valuable input that they bring in helping different ministries do their job.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you. That's my two minutes. I'll pass.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Minister Garneau, the trade corridors are obviously very important. I think you, your ministry and the whole government have recognized that. This committee has recognized it.

Mr Badawey and I initiated a study of the Niagara trade corridor and the west coast trade corridor. You will be pleased to know that the level of talk about collaboration among the component parts of the west coast trade corridor has gone significantly up. I had the pleasure of attending a WESTAC conference a week ago, and they understand that they've got to do a better job of coordinating their activities and not just leave it to government to sort everything out.

Having said that, I have a request rather than a question. It has to do with that third class 1 railway serving metro Vancouver's ports, the Burlington Northern Santa Fe. That line continues to demonstrate difficulties with safe operation, with reliability. There was a washout just the other week that shut it down for two days, and of course there's the difficulty of capacity, because the rail line currently follows the shoreline through a residential area in White Rock, where there are obviously speed limitations.

The request is one that I'll repeat, because we've made this request before. It's for around $300,000, give or take, to co-fund, with the regional municipalities and the Province of British Columbia, a study to relocate that BNSF line off of the waterfront, opening up obviously better trade movement as well as the possibility of high-speed rail service down the Cascadia corridor.

I'll leave that with you, sir, but if you have a comment to make, please do so.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you very much. I would also add that I would encourage the City of Surrey to continue to apply for funding for this study through the national trade corridors fund. This is an eligible project. It hasn't happened yet, but I would encourage them to persist. It's open any time for them to put their submission in.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to everyone.

Now I have to read out the following: Pursuant to Standing Order 81(4), the committee will now dispose of the main estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2020. CANADIAN AIR TRANSPORT SECURITY AUTHORITY Vote 1—Payments to the Authority for operating and capital expenditures..........$586,860,294 ç Vote 5—Delivering Better Service for Air Travellers..........$288,300,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division) CANADIAN TRANSPORTATION AGENCY ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$31,499,282

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$678,526,078 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$134,973,337 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions - Efficient Transportation System..........$593,897,864 ç Vote 15—Grants and contributions - Green and Innovative Transportation System..........$65,026,921 ç Vote 20—Grants and contributions - Safe and Secure Transportation System..........$17,842,681 ç Vote 25—Bringing Innovation to Regulations..........$10,079,959 ç Vote 30—Canada's Marine Safety Response..........$1,128,497 ç Vote 35—Delivering Better Service for Air Travellers..........$4,800,000 ç Vote 40—Encouraging Canadians to Use Zero Emission Vehicles..........$70,988,502 ç Vote 45—Protecting Canada's Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Threats..........$2,147,890 ç Vote 50—Safe and Secure Road and Rail Transportation..........$73,110,648

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 agreed to on division) MARINE ATLANTIC INC. ç Vote 1—Payments to the corporation..........$152,904,000

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) VIA RAIL CANADA INC. ç Vote 1—Payments to the corporation..........$731,594,011

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report these votes to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you all very much.

Minister Garneau and your officials, it's great seeing you again. We've seen a lot of you in this last three and a half years, so thank you all very much. Have a wonderful day.

We will suspend for a moment, and then when we come back, we will deal with Mr. Aubin's request and Mr. Kmiec's motion.

(1150)

(1200)

The Chair:

I am calling the meeting back to order.

Before we go to the other work that we have to do, Mr. Aubin has a motion that is appropriately before us and that he wants to entertain.

Would you like to speak to it briefly, Mr. Aubin? [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I'll be quite brief, because I've already presented the substance of this motion at our last meeting. I am a little surprised by the previous vote.

My point is not related to any particular request. The point I want to make is that it seems to me that we are not engaging in partisan politics when we ask a minister to appear. With all due respect to officials, I would like to point out that they are subordinates. The ones who give the orders and come up with the vision are the politicians. If a minister cannot appear, for whatever reason, we should be able to meet with the parliamentary secretary. That makes sense to me. What we want to discuss is the vision of those who make the decisions, who lead and who give the directions.

For reason x, y or z, the parliamentary secretary may not be able to appear either. I would like the chair and the clerk to at least have the freedom, either to automatically invite the parliamentary secretary to save time and achieve the objective, or to have a discussion with those who make the decisions.

I do not think I need to reread the motion, it is clear enough. That's what I had to say.

(1205)

[English]

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Would you like a recorded vote? Okay.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 9; nays 0 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. Ron Liepert: Excuse me, Madam Chair.

The Chair: Yes?

Mr. Ron Liepert:

In light of our approving this motion now, it would seem to me that it should be automatic that the motion we asked for earlier would not even require a motion since the earlier motion asked for the minister, and the minister wasn't available. We've now passed a motion that says that the parliamentary secretary should appear.

I would ask you, as chair, to reconsider whether or not we have the ability to move forward with the original motion and have the parliamentary secretary appear, as was asked for in this motion.

The Chair:

It's my understanding that we have already decided that, but just as a point, with regard to the particular date Mr. Jeneroux proposed in his motion, it would not have been possible to do that.

The committee has already decided that at a previous meeting, so we're not going to go back and reconsider it. Thank you.

All right, we're on to the Department of Transport. We're now studying the temporary use in Canada, by Canadians, of American-plated vehicles. This is brought to us by Mr. Kmiec, who has been working on it for some time.

The committee was kind enough to give Mr. Kmiec some time to introduce his motion and put it on the table. We were happy to accommodate that.

From the Department of Transport, we have Michael DeJong, Director General, Multimodal Strategies and Program Integration; and Mario Demers, Chief, Importation and Audit Inspection.

From the Department of Finance, we have Carlos Achadinha, Senior Director, Sales Tax Division, Tax Policy Branch; and Scott Winter, Director, Trade and Tariff Policy, International Trade Policy Division, International Trade and Finance.

From the Canada Border Services Agency, we have Andrew Lawrence, Acting Director General, Traveller Program Directorate.

From the Canadian Snowbird Association, we have Evan Rachkovsky, Director of Research and Communication.

As an individual, by video conference from Calgary, Alberta, we have Tim Reed.

Welcome to all of you. We are pleased to have you with us today.

We'll start off with the Department of Transport, please. [Translation]

Mr. Michael DeJong (Director General, Multimodal Strategies and Program Integration, Department of Transport):

Madam Chair, members of the committee, thank you for this opportunity to discuss the temporary use of American-plated vehicles by Canadians.[English]

I'm Mike DeJong with Transport Canada. I would like to take the opportunity to introduce my colleague Mario Demers, who's the Chief of Importation at Transport Canada.

I will briefly describe the current rules that apply to the importation of American-plated vehicles and provide a brief update on measures under way to improve this process.

With respect to the current process, the Motor Vehicle Safety Act allows for vehicles purchased in the U.S. to be imported into Canada if they comply with the Canadian motor vehicle safety standards. These standards set out minimum safety requirements to protect the travelling public, such as lighting and braking requirements and steering controls. The act also allows American-plated vehicles to be imported to Canada if the vehicle complies with the equivalent U.S. standards—the U.S. federal motor vehicle safety standards—and can be updated to comply with Canadian rules.

Both countries' motor vehicle safety standards are very closely aligned, but Transport Canada does have unique requirements in areas with proven safety benefits. For example, the Canadian standards include requirements for daytime running lights, a manual transmission clutch interlock and anti-theft immobilizer equipment.

Transport Canada manages the importation process through the Registrar of Imported Vehicles, or RIV. Under this process, an importer must confirm that their vehicle has no outstanding recalls and submit proof to the RIV before importation. Once in Canada, after paying the RIV fee, the RIV will tell the importer to present their vehicle for a final federal standards inspection. Before the inspection, the importer must make any modifications needed to bring U.S. vehicles into compliance with Canadian requirements.

The RIV is funded through user fees charged to Canadian importers of vehicles brought into the U.S. The fee pays for a series of tasks and services, such as pre-purchase compliance verification, importation documentation, and tracking and final notification to provincial vehicle registration authorities. The RIV also operates seven days a week and operates 500 inspection stations.

In the case of a temporary importation, the current safety regulations provide allowances for vehicles that do not meet Canadian safety standards. For example, these allowances cover circumstances that involve testing vehicles, evaluations or evaluating new safety features. To facilitate tourism and cross-border movement, U.S. citizens are allowed to temporarily import and export U.S. vehicles, including rental vehicles. The same is true for Canadian citizens exporting and importing Canadian licensed vehicles.

Currently, the existing safety regulations do not permit a Canadian citizen to temporarily import a U.S.-registered vehicle into Canada. Rather, the vehicle must be imported on a permanent basis. This is identical to U.S. law, which prevents a U.S. citizen from temporarily importing a Canadian registered vehicle to the U.S.

The federal safety regulations are currently based on an assumption that a Canadian importing a U.S.-registered vehicle is doing so on a permanent basis. Transport Canada recognizes that this is not always the case. As such, the department is working to amend the safety regulations to allow for a temporary importation of U.S. vehicles by a Canadian citizen when it is clear that the vehicle will be returning to the U.S.

These regulatory amendments are under way. As part of these regulatory amendments, there would not be any RIV fees applied to temporary importation of U.S.-plated vehicles into Canada. These proposed amendments were pre-published in the Canada Gazette, part II, on May 19, 2018. Building on this progress, the department is aiming to finalize the amendments and seek final approval, final publication in the Canada Gazette, part 2, by the end of this calendar year 2019. Pending final publication, Canadian citizens would immediately be able to apply to Transport Canada, with no registration fees, for a permit to temporarily import a U.S.-registered vehicle into Canada.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. DeJong.

We move on to the Department of Finance, please.

Mr. Scott Winter (Director, Trade and Tariff Policy, International Trade Policy Division, International Trade and Finance, Department of Finance):

Good afternoon.

Thank you, Madam Chair, and members of the committee, for inviting us here today to speak with you.

My name is Scott Winter. I'm the Director of Trade and Tariff Policy at the Department of Finance. I'm joined today by my colleague, Mr. Carlos Achadinha, who is the Senior Director of the Sales Tax Division.

I'd like to begin today by explaining the general policy goals of Canada's tariff regime and the goods and services tax—the GST—followed by a short description of the treatment of imported vehicles, including importations on a temporary basis, and how this treatment fits with those goals.

Customs duties are established under customs tariff legislation, and applied on imported goods, where applicable, for a variety of policy reasons, including domestic industry protection, as well as revenue generation.

The GST is Canada's national sales tax. It is a broad-based tax that applies to most goods and services acquired for consumption in Canada. The GST is generally levied on imported goods in the same manner as it is imposed on domestic purchases, in order that the imported goods do not benefit from a tax-based competitive advantage over goods sold in Canada.

In light of these considerations and principles, Canadian residents who import a vehicle into Canada are required to pay applicable import duties and taxes at the time of importation. There are certain exceptions to the general rule that customs duties and the GST apply to the importation of vehicles, including for those imported on a temporary basis.

For example, customs duties and the GST do not apply to vehicles temporarily imported by Canadian residents for the purpose of transporting their own household or personal effects into or out of Canada, or as a result of an emergency or unforseen contingency.

Subject to conditions specified by regulation, Canadian residents are also able to temporarily import, free of customs duties and GST, a foreign-registered vehicle to reach their destination in Canada and return directly to a point outside of Canada within 30 days. However, the vehicle may not be used for other personal reasons while it is in Canada.

The current framework was designed with the broad policy goals of avoiding competitive disadvantages or inequities for Canadian businesses, for example, vehicle dealers in Canadian border communities, as well as minimizing the risks of duty and tax avoidance that could negatively affect government revenues, and create an uneven playing field for Canadian businesses.

The collection and administration of customs duties and the GST on imported goods, as well as the exceptions for temporarily imported vehicles that I mentioned, fall under the responsibility of Canada Border Services Agency—CBSA. My colleague from the CBSA will outline how the agency currently applies and administers the customs duties and GST on temporary importations of vehicles.

Thank you, once again, for allowing us the opportunity to speak today. We welcome any follow-up questions the committee may have.

(1215)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Winter.

We will move on to Mr. Lawrence.

Mr. Andrew Lawrence (Acting Director General, Travellers Branch, Canada Border Services Agency):

Good afternoon, Madam Chair and members of the committee.

As the committee is aware, the agency's mandate is complex and dynamic. In managing the border, we administer and enforce over 90 acts and regulations on behalf of other federal government departments and the provinces and territories.

With respect to this study, on the feasibility of allowing Canadians to bring their legally owned and U.S.-registered and -plated passenger vehicles into Canada for a defined temporary period without having to pay any taxes, duties or importation fees, the CBSA can only speak to its enforcement of the legislation as it applies to the border. The CBSA first derives its authorities to examine, detain and/or refuse entry to any good or conveyance, in this case a vehicle, under the Customs Act, one of the agency's primary pieces of legislation. When a Canadian resident is seeking to return to Canada with their U.S.-plated passenger vehicle and they approach a land border or port of entry, a border service officer must consider a number of acts and regulations before the vehicle may be admitted to the country.

First, vehicles imported into Canada must meet the requirements set by Transport Canada under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act. The CBSA assists Transport Canada by ensuring that these vehicles can be imported, and will prohibit the entry of inadmissible vehicles. Second, with its broad food, plant and animal authorities, the CBSA will inspect motor vehicles entering Canada to ensure that they are clean and free of pests, soil or other organic material. Vehicles found to be contaminated are refused entry and ordered removed from Canada under the authorities of the Plant Protection Act and the Health of Animals Act, as well as their associated regulations. Third, on behalf of Environment and Climate Change Canada, the CBSA may, on ECCC request, detain shipments suspected of non-compliance pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Finally, on behalf of the Department of Finance, the CBSA must ensure that residents of Canada operating vehicles for which duties and taxes have not been paid are in compliance with the strict conditions set out in customs tariff item no. 9802 and the regulations respecting temporary importation of conveyances by residents of Canada. Vehicles imported temporarily will be on a duty- and tax-free basis so long as the conditions under the regulations are respected. For those vehicles that are admissible to Canada and that will be imported on a permanent basis, the CBSA must then assess the duty, excise tax and goods and services tax owed to the Crown.

lt should be noted that in situations of emergency or unforeseen circumstances, Canadian residents may be permitted, under these regulations, to temporarily import non-compliant vehicles. Currently, the processing of foreign registered vehicles is paper-based, and the CBSA does not track statistics or data related specifically to the subset of the population the committee is examining.

I hope I have clarified the CBSA's border enforcement role with respect to the temporary importation of vehicles by Canadian residents. I would be happy to take any questions the committee may have.

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll now go to the Canadian Snowbird Association.

Evan Rachkovsky, please.

Mr. Evan Rachkovsky (Director, Research and Communication, Canadian Snowbird Association):

Good afternoon, Madam Chair and members of the committee. Thank you for inviting me here today to discuss the issue of Canadian residents temporarily using American-plated vehicles in Canada. My name is Evan Rachkovsky. I am the Director of Research and Communications at the Canadian Snowbird Association.

For the members of the committee who are not familiar with our organization, let me provide you with a brief overview. Founded in 1992, the Canadian Snowbird Association is a national, non-partisan, not-for-profit advocacy organization dedicated to actively defending and improving the rights and privileges of Canadian travellers. Today the CSA has grown to over 110,000 members who come from every province and territory in Canada.

To fulfill our mandate and provide meaningful results for our members, our association delivers timely travel-related information for our membership and works with government at all levels to pursue policies for the betterment of Canadian travellers. We not only provide our members with up-to-date information; we also have a government relations program that is wide-ranging and includes the defence of the Canada Health Act—namely, the portability principle; the provincial and territorial drug program vacation supply policies; residency requirements related to continuous health coverage; and a number of cross-border issues.

(1220)

The Chair:

I'm wondering if you could slow down a little bit. The interpreters are having a hard time keeping up.

Mr. Evan Rachkovsky:

Of course.

With regard to the latter, most recently the CSA has been actively tracking the development and implementation of the entry/exit initiative, the information-sharing program between Canada and the United States that is scheduled to become fully operational by the end of this year. The entry/exit initiative is one program in the broader Beyond the Border declaration that was unveiled in February 2011 and aims to enhance the collective security and accelerate the flow of legitimate goods, services and people both at and beyond the Canada-U.S. border.

Another cross-border matter that impacts our membership, and is the current subject of study for this committee, relates to Canadian residents' temporary use of American-plated vehicles while in Canada. Under the current legislative and regulatory framework, Canadian residents are only allowed to bring into Canada a foreign-plated vehicle temporarily for the purposes of transporting household or personal effects into or out of Canada for up to 30 days. In all other circumstances, if you buy, lease, rent or borrow a vehicle while outside of Canada, Transport Canada and Canada Border Services Agency legislation do not allow you to bring a vehicle into Canada for your personal use, even temporarily, unless it meets all Transport Canada requirements and you pay the duty and federal taxes that apply.

In our opinion, the current arrangement is outdated and does not reflect the growing trend in both countries towards making the border experience as seamless and as timely as possible for low-risk travellers. This policy ought to be modernized because, in its current form, it places an unnecessary restriction on the travel options of Canadian travellers who own U.S.-registered vehicles.

Over 60% of our members drive from Canada to their winter destinations annually. Generally, as snowbirds age, they opt to fly back and forth from Canada to the United States rather than tolerate the multi-day drive to their winter residences. In order to have a mode of transportation while they are down south, many of them will purchase a U.S.-plated vehicle. This is permitted in all Sunbelt states, particularly Florida, Arizona, California and Texas, and vehicles can be registered and insured with a Canadian driver's licence.

In certain instances, these Canadian travellers may be required to return to Canada in their U.S.-plated vehicles. Under the current legislation, if they cannot satisfy the existing exemption, these individuals are required to import the vehicle through the RIV program, the registrar of imported vehicles program, and pay the necessary import duties, taxes and program fees. These requirements make sense for vehicle owners who reside in Canada for most of the year, but seem excessive for owners of U.S.-plated vehicles who reside in the United States for up to six months annually and eventually intend to sell the vehicle in the United States.

Once again, I would like to thank the committee members for their invitation.

I'm happy to take any questions that you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now, as an individual, we have Mr. Reed.

Welcome to our committee, Mr. Reed.

Mr. Tim Reed (As an Individual):

Thank you, Madam Chair and committee members, for inviting me to address you.

I'd also like to thank my MP Tom Kmiec for his attendance and his valiant support for this cause, along with Mr. Badawey for his interest in the item.

By way of background, like hundreds of thousands of Canadians, my wife and I own a retirement home in the U.S. We also own two vehicles purchased and registered in the State of Arizona. Following the purchase those vehicles, I was surprised to learn that we would not be able to bring them into Canada for a temporary period. The only way under existing legislation, which I understand to be the Motor Vehicle Safety Act, would be to apply to permanently import the vehicle, as you've just heard from several other speakers. It would seem that the Motor Vehicle Safety Act, given its title and its preamble, exists primarily for safety reasons. While laudable and necessary, it seems the act would not apply to a U.S. citizen wishing to bring their vehicle into Canada temporarily. Indeed, we see this by the tens of thousands, I suspect, at border crossings.

While the legislation deals at length with the permanent importation of vehicles, you have to assume that when the legislation was passed it had not been conceived that a Canadian citizen would own a vehicle in the U.S. and wish to bring it temporarily into Canada. This results in the ludicrous situation where a U.S. citizen in this instance enjoys more rights in Canada than a Canadian citizen.

Why should a Canadian citizen wish to bring their vehicle temporarily into Canada? In our own circumstances, one of our vehicles happens to be a convertible sports car, which we would, in the occasional year, like to enjoy for several summer months on the roads in Canada.

Another example that my wife and I encountered was the proposal by Australian friends of ours to join us at our property in the U.S. and take a scenic drive north through the U.S. and through western Canada, from where they would return to Australia from Canada by air, and we would depart back to the U.S. with our van. As it turns out, the only way that was possible was through a costly car rental, and as a result, our proposed road trip was cancelled.

Interestingly, under this legislation, we would have been able to bring a rental car into Canada, but not our own. This begs the question: Why does a U.S.-based rental car company enjoy this right while Canadian citizens do not?

In another instance, my brother-in-law, unaware of these restrictions, intended to trailer his off-road vehicle temporarily into Canada, but was prohibited from crossing with it at the border. He had to leave the vehicle on the U.S. side of the border, drive to his home in Calgary, process paperwork to have it permanently registered in Canada, return to pick up the vehicle, and then return it several months later to leave it permanently back in the U.S.

These are actual occurrences. One can easily imagine other scenarios, too. For instance, should a Canadian citizen with her own U.S.-registered vehicle need to urgently return to Canada but be unable to fly, perhaps due to health reasons, being unable to book or afford an airline flight, or perhaps air traffic being grounded, they are further stymied from.... Let me just say I had understood that they would be further stymied from driving their own vehicle, and now we've just heard that, in cases of emergency, Canadian citizens could bring their vehicles back. I was unaware of that.

For almost five years now I've been investigating and communicating with government officials about this issue. During this time, a Department of Transport employee raised the problem of ensuring that a vehicle brought into Canada temporarily leaves the country. One might ask the same question about a U.S. citizen. Notwithstanding, I had offered a simple and easily implemented process to deal with this issue.

As my time in front of you is limited, and this meeting concerns a legislative problem, not an implementation challenge, I will defer going through this procedure I had suggested. Although, for your reference, you may find my suggestion and copies of letters to Minister Garneau dated January and September of 2019.

In 2017 Mr. Kmiec kindly offered to support a petition to Parliament concerning this issue. I was advised that as few as 25 original signatures of Canadian citizens would suffice. When this fact about petitions was explained, not a single person declined to sign. I easily gathered 100 signatures. Many of these individuals own property in the U.S. and many of them own vehicles in the U.S. It is safe to say that most were aghast to learn of the restrictions on their right. Mr. Kmiec subsequently read and entered our petition in Parliament in 2017.

(1225)



In summary, I'm asking the committee to initiate the process of having this oversight in legislation corrected, thus restoring the rights of Canadian citizens that have been inadvertently eliminated for no apparent reason.

It is gratifying to see officials from various departments of the civil service in attendance. I am a retired corporate executive from the private sector with a long career in administrative functions. As such, I can fully appreciate the importance of the administrative process when it comes to implementing policy, or in this case, legislation. However, as I fully know from my own career, process and administration follow policy, and not vice-versa.

I acknowledge that this issue affects a very small part of our population. However, I ask, what is the calculus for deciding when to disregard a citizen's rights? I trust in your judgment as parliamentarians to do what is right regardless of the number of Canadians affected.

Thank you for your attention, and I can take questions, too.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Reed.

Mr. Reed's documents are currently in translation: hence, you have not yet received them.

Mr. Kmiec, it's on to your time, for six minutes, please.

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC):

Again, my thanks to the committee members, and the government side especially, for making this possible. As you've heard from my constituent from the great riding of Calgary Shepard—not the greatest, but a great riding, as I know everybody is going to correct me and say theirs is the greatest—it has taken five years to get to this point where I could get a committee hearing. That's the nice part.

Also to the officials, thank you all for being here. I know we've picked you out of your departments on a weekday to present what is—I admit it, and so did Mr. Reed—a very small niche issue.

Now I'll go into the more negative aspect of it. I have all the correspondence here, that back and forth with the minister's office that Mr. Reed has given me, as well as the petition response that I got, which was very unsatisfactory.

This is what happens when issues such as this are not dealt with immediately, when a resident of Canada raises an issue of private property, raises an issue that is very technical in nature.

Mr. DeJong, you said you are waiting, because at the end of the year there will be changes to the Motor Vehicle Safety Act regulations to allow Canadians to import their American-plated vehicles temporarily, but my understanding is that first they have to seek a permit. They won't just be able to show up at the border. They would apply for a permit ahead of time with the Canadian government. They would fill out the application with the licence plate information.

Could you tell me more about how that will actually function?

(1230)

Mr. Michael DeJong:

I'll start by just simply confirming the process, and I'll turn to my colleague Mario to talk about the specific permit involved.

Yes, there is a regulatory process that is now under way to remove the RIV fees, or the registrar of imported vehicle fees, associated with temporarily importing a U.S.-plated vehicle into Canada by a Canadian citizen.

Therefore, yes, there is a process still for this about respecting the safety requirements in the Motor Vehicle Safety Act.

Mario.

Mr. Mario Demers (Chief, Importation and Audit Inspection, Department of Transport):

Currently, there are allowances for temporary importation. The changes in the regulation that will be put into effect by the end of this year in part II of the Canada Gazette are to expand on that. What's being added is an ability to do exactly what we're discussing today, to temporarily import a U.S.-registered vehicle.

Currently, there's a form online, or you can also get a paper form by reaching out to Transport Canada. You provide basic information, the vehicle information such as the VIN, the make, model and year, the date of importation, how long you think you're going to be here and the purposes for importation, and Transport Canada will then issue you an authorization certificate that you present to CBSA at the time of entry, to demonstrate that you've already cleared it as a temporary importation, not a permanent importation, and therefore, you are not to be sent to the RIV program and have to pay a RIV fee, and so on, and have your vehicle modified.

It just clearly identifies, and when you get to the border with the sheet, CBSA understands that it has been viewed and approved by Transport Canada.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

You heard Mr. Reed's example of bringing up a vehicle from Arizona temporarily. He thereafter will be able to apply for the permit and bring up that vehicle for, say, 30 days and bring it back.

Mr. Mario Demers:

Correct.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

I have another example from other constituents who mentioned it.

Let's say I have a cottage or a cabin in Montana and I have a jeep that I use for off-roading. That's the example I used at the committee. I want to bring my jeep to, say, Lethbridge where I live, to fix it up, because I have a garage there. Maybe I damaged it while I was off-roading. I understand from Mr. Lawrence that I have to wash my jeep to make sure it's clean—so thank you for that, because I probably wouldn't have done so. I will wash my jeep, then show up at the border with the permit, and I would be allowed entry.

What if my vehicle were non-functional? It's my vehicle; I'm taking it on a trailer across the border towed by a Canadian vehicle, and I'm trying to go to my garage to fix my vehicle. I'm handy; I'm a tinkerer; I'm making an upgrade to it, or it needs a new timing belt or work on its transmission. Can I still do so even though the vehicle is non-functional?

Mr. Mario Demers:

The condition of the vehicle is not a distinguishing factor for being allowed in or not. Depending on what this vehicle is.... Again, we don't enforce and regulate on the intended use of the vehicle. If you have a Jeep Cherokee, for example, and you say that you know it's a road vehicle and it's a regulated vehicle, but you never use it on the road, that vehicle is still a regulated vehicle and has to meet standards. However, if it is a true off-road vehicle—a UTV or ATV—there are, again, basic things, and if you're bringing it in temporarily it's a non-issue.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

I have another question. Under this model that you're proposing here, does it match with.... I guess the permit part doesn't match, but on the fees, will all fees then be waived for that time period? What will happen if you overstay? How long is the permit good for?

Mr. Mario Demers:

The Transport Canada permit currently.... It's what we call a schedule VII or TVIS. Basically, it allows for periods of one year or longer with justifiable reasoning. Typically for temporary importation by a Canadian of a U.S.-plated vehicle, the periods will not be that long. It's a month, three month or six month kind of thing.

For those vehicles, the form is quick and easy. It's a series of nine or 10 very basic questions. You receive your certificate and you enter. There are no fees at all associated with temporary importation—only for permanent importation.

(1235)

The Chair:

We will move on to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, folks, for being here today. It's much appreciated. As well, I want to thank you for the work that I'm sure you've done on this file in the past little while.

I also want to thank you, Mr. Kmiec, for bringing this forward. Although it's a niche area and I'm sure it affects only a few individuals throughout the country, whether it's one, a hundred, a thousand or a million, it is important. I thank you for that. I also want to thank you for bringing the motion that was unanimously supported. You weren't here at the last meeting when I brought up my amendment to that—or change of motion. I just want to make it clear that the reason I did that was to try to expedite this for you, to ensure that. Although sometimes we sit on different sides of the table, we are in fact working together in the best interests of individuals like the ones I'm sure you've discussed this issue with for many months.

My question for Mr. Kmiec is going to be very short and simple.

In what you've brought forward now and in the work that's being done, it has been very well articulated by the department that they are working to amend the safety regulations. You've set a time frame for the proposed amendments and, although they were pre-published in the Canada Gazette, part I, on May 19 of 2018, the intent is now, pending final publication, to have this done by year-end. Then, of course, a lot of these issues would be dealt with and put to rest, so to speak.

Mr. Kmiec, are you satisfied with the direction that the department has taken?

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Can I answer that even though I'm not a witness?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Fantastic.

Yes, I think that's great as long as it actually follows through the Canada Gazette, part II. I only have a another couple of procedure questions, so I was wondering....

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Mr. Kmiec, I'll give you that time. Go ahead.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Fantastic. Thank you, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Lawrence, how involved has CBSA been with this permit process? You've said that right now there's paper-based record-keeping of the vehicles crossing into Canada. Is this just another piece of paper that border agents are going to be collecting? Or is there some electronic communication that will happen between the two departments at some point?

You're creating a new paper-based directorate—

Mr. Mario Demers:

No, it's an existing one.

Mr. Tom Kmiec: It's an existing one?

Mr. Mario Demers: We just expanded it to add one more purpose, which is this.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Is it a paper I would have to print or show on my electronic device at the border?

Mr. Mario Demers:

For personal importation, yes. If you've heard of the single-window initiative that has to do with commercial importation, that's electronic. For personal importation, yes, it is still a paper process.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Would I still have to print it? Could I not show it on my phone if I have the document there?

Mr. Mario Demers:

No. You cannot show it on your phone.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

That's kind of odd, isn't it? You said that you had a paper-based system and you're making me do it electronically and then print it so I could show it to Mr. Lawrence's CBSA officers at the border.

Mr. Andrew Lawrence:

If I could clarify, the paper I referred to was a temporary import permit. It's a separate administrative document. They're not used in all cases of the temporary importation of a vehicle.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

How fast will CBSA officers be aware that, in fact, after this passes Canada Gazette, part II.... How fast will people actually know across your agency that Canadians with American-plated vehicles can bring them in temporarily? How is that training going to be rolled out?

Mr. Andrew Lawrence:

Part of my role is to provide the front-line functional guidance in matters related to a regulatory change and policy change. We have a process set up whereby we would issue what's called a “shift briefing” in an operational bulletin. It will reference back to the various authorities governed by Transport, and step-by-step instructions will be issued to the front-line staff so that they understand what the form looks like, how it's applied for and what it means in terms of the application of the various requirements at the border.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

The question is back to you, Mr. Demers.

What happens when a Canadian overstays? How long will the time period for these permits be?

Mr. Mario Demers:

Again, it's on a case-by-case basis. For example, if someone says, “I'd like to bring my vehicle in for three months,” and something happens and three months become four months, they can simply contact Transport Canada and say, “My permit number is such and such, I had stated three months, but I need a little bit longer.” As long as it's for a valid reason, the permit is extended.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

This is all fees—import fees, GST, customs. There will be no fees for Canadians bringing their vehicle across the border if it's American-plated?

(1240)

Mr. Mario Demers:

From Transport Canada's perspective, that is correct.

Mr. Michael DeJong:

Specifically, the reference was for the Transport Canada registrar of imported vehicle fees. It's those fees in particular.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Would there still be that AC fee?

Mr. Mario Demers:

No, that fee would not apply on temporary importation.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Okay. I'm satisfied. They're actually going to do it, and on a very tight timeline, too, by December. I'm pleased as peaches.

The Chair:

Exactly.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have never felt that Trois-Rivières was as far from the U.S. border as it was this morning. This is an issue I have not addressed in eight years of practice. In my opinion, there are two ways to learn, by listening or by asking questions. I have the impression that the questions I would ask would be so basic and for such a targeted niche that I would be happy to offer my time to the person moving this motion, who wanted us to hold two meetings on the topic. I think that by combining the time that Mr. Badawey has just given him and mine, we will be able to offer him two meetings in one.[English]

If you want my time, it's yours. [Translation]

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Mr. Aubin, thank you for your offer. I know that this is a very specific and particular subject, one that affects my constituents. Actually, a few have come to see me about it.[English]

Can I go back to schedule VII? The acronym TVIS was used.

Mr. Mario Demers:

That's the electronic online system. It stands for temporary vehicle importation system. People have the option to log on to a computer and complete all the information. It's automatically reviewed and processed by Transport Canada officials. Then they will respond electronically with, “Here's your authorization.”

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

I've seen things gazetted before, and then the consultation process is prolonged and it disappears and dies off on the paper, so just so I can have the certainty that this will be done by the end of the year, is there a fixed date by which you believe it'll be gazetted for the second and final time? Is there a fixed date to make this operational?

Mr. Michael DeJong:

It has been gazetted for the first time; it was pre-published in May 2018. The second date, the final publication, is not fixed, so this would be subject to decisions by the Minister of Transport and approvals from Treasury Board ministers. The department is aiming to finalize and seek approval for the regulations by the end of 2019.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

My only problem is that there's an election, and elections tend to make all of these niche issues kind of disappear. Every single department has a regulatory plan. Is this part of the regulatory plan as well?

Mr. Michael DeJong:

It is part of our forward regulatory plan. It can be found in the regulations amending the motor vehicle safety regulations on importation and national safety marks.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

If this isn't done in 2019, and my constituents are okay with my returning here to the next Parliament, are you okay to return to this reconstituted committee, to explain why it wasn't done?

Mr. Michael DeJong:

I'd be happy to return.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

If the interpreters had problems with Mr. Rachkovsky, then they'll have real issues with me. I'm sorry about that.

I appreciate Mr. Aubin's comments that this is new to him; this is new to me as well. Thank you, Mr. Kmiec, for bringing this up. It is more interesting than I expected it to be.

I'm trying to get my mind around what a temporary importation is. As I understand it, if you cross the border, you're temporarily importing a vehicle, straight up. As soon as you cross the border in a vehicle, in the eyes of the law, you're temporarily importing it. Is that correct?

Mr. Mario Demers:

As soon as you cross the border, you are importing the clothes on your back, even. When it comes to a vehicle, you're importing. It's at that time you have to declare to customs whether this is a permanent or temporary importation. Based on that decision, different process flows apply.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. You can bring in a vehicle to the other country, say, for 30 days, as long as you only go to your destination. Are you in a technical violation if you go to the grocery store in the other country?

Mr. Mario Demers:

On that I'm going to have to defer to the CBSA, because the 30-day and the “not use” are CBSA criteria.

Mr. Andrew Lawrence:

To clarify, the 30 days is outlined in customs tariff item 9802, which outlines the conditions under which a resident of Canada may temporarily import a vehicle. The conditions are up to 30 days. The vehicle would have to be exported solely for going from the port of entry to point A, and then from point A back to the port of entry. By using the car while in Canada for leisure purposes or for transportation of goods or carrying.... If you were a Uber driver and you were carrying folks around, you would be in violation of the conditions in the customs tariff.

(1245)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If that vehicle is caught at the grocery story, what are the penalties and the repercussions for that?

Mr. Andrew Lawrence:

The penalties can be monetary, up to the duties and taxes owed on that vehicle. The vehicle may be seized for the owner's untrue statements.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It gets to be pretty expensive milk. All right, thanks.

Can a vehicle have dual registration? Can it be registered in both countries at the same time? Is that possible?

Mr. Mario Demers:

I do not believe so. The U.S. and Canada have different standards. As such, they reciprocate exactly what we do. When you're permanently importing a vehicle into Canada, you have to make certain modifications to make it Canadian-compliant, including modified daytime running lights, clutch interlock, etc. Depending on the class of the vehicle, it can be different things. Likewise, the U.S. has slightly different things. So when you're importing a vehicle into the States, there is also a similar registrar of imported vehicle program there, where you have to bring your vehicle and pay fees to have the vehicle modified, then inspected and recertified to the U.S. safety standards.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The North American road network doesn't end in the U.S. It goes all the way to the Darien Gap in Panama to Colombia. How do our rules apply to other North American and Central American vehicles that are not American or Canadian?

Mr. Mario Demers:

Basically, the Motor Vehicle Safety Act currently ensures that vehicles coming into Canada are Canadian-compliant. With NAFTA, or whatever it's called now, Mexican and U.S. vehicles are allowed into Canada under certain conditions, to be modified and inspected, because the safety standards are very similar between the U.S. and Canada. As part of this implementation package, the Mexican vehicles, I believe, will be reviewed and gazetted, too, at the end of this year just to expand that and allow Mexican vehicles to also come in. Beyond that, the vehicles cannot come in. The Motor Vehicle Safety Act says that the vehicles have to be Canadian-compliant. The exception under the act—subsection 7(2)—talks about vehicles purchased at the retail level in the United States that have no open recalls and can be modified to our Canadian standards. They are allowed entry and they have to do all of this—the modifications and the vehicle inspection—prior to licensing and registering in a province, and within 45 days. But, again, that's for permanent importation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. It's all as clear as mud to me. I appreciate that.

Mr. Rachkovsky, there's a discussion of having snowbirds across the southern U.S. register their vehicles in the U.S., which is where this comes from in the first place. Why don't snowbirds want to have Canadian-registered plates for their Canadian addresses while they're in the U.S.? Why wouldn't they just register it back at home?

Mr. Evan Rachkovsky:

There are a couple of instances. One example is that most Canadian insurance providers limit the amount of time your Canadian-registered vehicle can be outside of Canada to six months. In order to combat that, if you had the U.S.-registered vehicle, you'd be able to use that beyond that time frame and be able to drive it in Canada with, again, these regulatory changes, which are pending. Again, because of those limitations, the only one that comes to mind for me is SGI in Saskatchewan, which would allow a Canadian-registered vehicle to be in the U.S. for a prolonged period of time—beyond the six-month period. Other than for them, most private insurers in Canada limit the amount of time that you can have the vehicle outside the country to six months. That's why, again, people will purchase U.S.-plated vehicles. It's a way to get around that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One of the other questions—albeit I forget who asked it—

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Never mind.

Thank you, though.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Actually, I want to build on that because I believe this might be some good communication material for Mr. Kmiec and other interested people to develop for people who might want to take advantage of this new regime. What requirements might U.S. insurers have on those vehicles crossing into Canada? I used to work for the public auto insurer in B.C. and I believe we had about the same rules as SGI did, but there were also mandatory minimum coverage limits that had to apply to a vehicle, a certain amount of third party liability, etc. In communicating this new regime, I think it would be very wise to make sure that Canadians bringing back those U.S.-plated cars check with their insurance provider down there, because there could be some difficulties if a crash occurred and they were liable.

I don't know if anybody has any knowledge of that or can comment on it.

(1250)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Our guest may very well have a comment.

The Chair:

Mr. Reed, would you like to respond to Mr. Hardie?

Mr. Tim Reed:

I have a bit of personal knowledge with that—not that I have attempted to bring a U.S.-plated vehicle into Canada that we own, given the restrictions.

This is anecdotal because it applies to me. I had discussed this with our own insurance company—Farmers Insurance, in case you are interested—and their conditions would be the same. They would allow the vehicle in Canada and continue to insure the vehicle for, I believe it was six months. There is a different restriction going into Mexico, and I presume farther south, but Canada was fine.

The Chair:

Are there any further questions or comments?

Mr. Kmiec, over to you.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

Tim, based on everything you've heard from the officials so far, are you comfortable with the way the government officials are handling this importation permit and the changes and amendments to the regulation?

Mr. Tim Reed:

Thanks, Mr. Kmiec.

One concern in the back of my mind here is that I was continually advised by Department of Transport officials that this could not be handled by regulatory changes, that it had to require a change in legislation to accommodate it.

I'm sorry for not being familiar with the process through legislation and regulations, but it sounded to me as if these were regulatory changes that were coming and very much welcomed. I'm just concerned that this would require legislative changes as well.

Perhaps officials from the Department of Transport can comment on that.

The Chair:

Mr. DeJong.

Mr. Michael DeJong:

Absolutely.

To confirm, the proposed regulatory change is available online. There is a specific reference in the regulatory change, done pursuant to the Motor Vehicle Safety Act, the applicable legislation, to Canadian residents entering Canadian with their U.S. registered vehicle. They would not have to pay any RIV fees.

Mr. Tom Kmiec:

I am going to cede the rest of my time to Mr. Eglinski.

The Chair:

Mr. Eglinski, you are next if you like.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

This temporary importation permit will not change the standard that you can only drive it to point A and leave it there and then return to the port of entry.

Mr. Mario Demers:

No.

With Transport Canada's temporary importation program, I believe that when our colleagues from the CBSA they talk about a 30-day limit and limitations on driving, that's for something coming in for Transport Canada approval. Once you are coming in with a Transport Canada approval for temporary importation....

Basically, as mentioned, we have expanded the rights. Currently it's testing, evaluation, demonstration and so on. We have expanded these rights, but there are no restrictions on where the vehicle is used.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Have you checked with the provincial legislation in the provinces of B.C. and Alberta for instance? Some have 30-day restrictions that you can't operate a vehicle with a foreign plate.

If you are a resident of the province, will that not contradict—?

Mr. Mario Demers:

We can only address it from the federal level. The provinces retain—

Mr. Michael DeJong:

As a matter of course, for all of our regulatory initiatives relating to motor vehicle safety, we consult with provinces and territories every time, through the Canada Council of Motor Transport Administrators. We similarly invite provinces and territories to submit comments.

The comment period has closed. We have not received any expressions of concerns from provinces and territories on this proposed amendment.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

But they have been given the opportunity.

Mr. Michael DeJong:

Yes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

All right.

To all of our officials, thank you very much, especially to Mr. Reed for bringing these small issues forward to us. I think the transportation committee was very happy to help move it along.

Congratulations to Mr. Kmiec for some good work as a parliamentarian, and to Mr. Badawey and to all the rest.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(1100)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte cette séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités.

Bienvenue à tous.

Nous sommes réunis aujourd'hui pour étudier trois plans ministériels pour des organismes qui relèvent du ministre des Transports, ainsi que le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020 de ce ministère.

Un certain nombre de crédits ont été renvoyés au Comité le jeudi 11 avril 2019 aux fins de discussion, à savoir les crédits 1 et 5 sous la rubrique Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien; le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Office des transports du Canada; les crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 et 50 sous la rubrique ministère des Transports; le crédit 1 sous Marine Atlantique S.C.C.; le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Société des ponts fédéraux limitée et le crédit 1 sous VIA Rail.

Nous sommes ravis d'accueillir l'honorable Marc Garneau, ministre des Transports, ainsi que ses fonctionnaires, qui sont Michael Keenan, sous-ministre, Kevin Brosseau, sous-ministre adjoint, Sécurité et sûreté, Anuradha Marisetti, sous-ministre adjointe pour les programmes et André Lapointe, dirigeant principal des finances.

Pour l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, nous accueillons Mike Saunders, président-directeur général, ainsi que Nancy Fitchett, vice-présidente des Affaires organisationnelles et chef des services financiers par intérim. Nous sommes heureux de vous revoir.

Pour l'Office des transports du Canada, nous recevons Scott Streiner, président et premier dirigeant, et Manon Fillion, secrétaire et dirigeante principale des services corporatifs.

Pour Marine Atlantique, nous avons Murray Hupman, président et chef de la direction, et Shawn Leamon, vice-président des finances.

Enfin, pour VIA Rail Canada, nous accueillons Jacques Fauteux, directeur des relations gouvernementales et communautaires.

Soyez les bienvenus au Comité. Merci de votre présence.

Je vais amorcer la discussion en mettant en délibération le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien.

Monsieur le ministre Garneau, vous avez la parole pour cinq minutes. Je sais que vous ne vous sentez pas bien aujourd'hui. Sachez que nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'être là malgré tout.

L’hon. Marc Garneau (ministre des Transports):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente. Je sais que les gens auraient été très déçus que je ne sois pas ici aujourd'hui.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Marc Garneau: Je suis ravi d'être là. Si je tousse et bafouille de temps en temps, ne vous inquiétez pas. Je suis en vie et en bonne santé. Je ne veux pas prendre l'habitude d'avoir un rhume quand je viens ici, mais je vais bien. Je vous remercie.[Français]

Madame la présidente, membres du Comité, je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à vous rencontrer aujourd'hui. Je suis accompagné des personnes que vous avez déjà nommées.[Traduction]

Le portefeuille fédéral des transports, qui comprend Transports Canada, des sociétés d'État, des organismes et des tribunaux administratifs, accomplit de nombreux travaux importants.

Pour ce qui est du Budget principal des dépenses du présent exercice, j'aimerais commencer par dire que, pour la quatrième année, Transports Canada participe à un projet pilote dans le cadre duquel nous évaluons l'efficacité de relier les crédits pour subventions et contributions à leurs objectifs.

Pour appuyer l'examen parlementaire du Budget principal des dépenses et, plus généralement, l'examen rigoureux des dépenses du gouvernement, les dépenses prévues par Transports Canada sont présentées dans le Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020 conformément au cadre des résultats du ministère.

L'objectif global de Transports Canada est de veiller à ce que notre réseau de transport soit sûr, sécuritaire, efficace, écologique et novateur. Nous tâchons d'atteindre ce but en proposant des lois, des politiques et des règlements, en surveillant et en inspectant l'industrie du transport pour veiller à ce qu'elle respecte ces lois, politiques et règlements, et en finançant des projets qui renforcent le réseau de transport. Aussi, nous collaborons avec divers partenaires, y compris les peuples autochtones, l'industrie, les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux ainsi que des organismes internationaux.

Le Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020 de Transports Canada se chiffre à 1,86 milliard de dollars. La presque totalité de ce montant est répartie en quatre volets de la façon suivante: 879 millions de dollars pour le transport efficient, 374 millions dollars pour le transport sûr et sécuritaire, 252 millions dollars pour le transport écologique et novateur, et 194 millions dollars pour les services internes. Un montant de 162 millions de dollars est également prévu pour de nouveaux postes budgétaires.

Au Canada, le secteur des transports connaît actuellement une période excitante et enrichissante. L'innovation engendre de nouvelles possibilités et de nouveaux défis. C'est pourquoi nous allouons les ressources nécessaires pour relever ces nouveaux défis, et nous recherchons des moyens de tirer parti des nouvelles occasions d'accroître la sécurité, la sûreté et l'efficacité des transports. Nous cherchons aussi des moyens de réduire l'incidence des transports sur notre environnement.

Dans le budget de 2019, le gouvernement a annoncé un investissement de 300 millions de dollars dans un nouveau programme incitatif favorisant l'achat de véhicules zéro émission afin de nous aider à atteindre notre objectif à l'égard des nouveaux véhicules légers au Canada, soit de réduire l'empreinte carbone de 10 % d'ici 2025, de 30 % d'ici 2030 et de 100 % d'ici 2040. La première tranche de ce montant, qui représente 71 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2019-2020, est incluse dans le présent Budget principal des dépenses. [Français]

Transports Canada demande également la somme de 2,1 millions de dollars dans le présent budget principal des dépenses pour la protection des cybersystèmes essentiels dans le secteur des transports. Le budget de 2019 prévoit plus de 12 millions de dollars sur trois ans pour mettre en oeuvre la version modernisée de la Loi sur la sécurité automobile. Cette loi prévoit le recours à des amendes pour renforcer la conformité en matière de sécurité ainsi qu'une plus grande souplesse pour appuyer les essais de sécurité et le déploiement de technologies novatrices.

Le budget de 2019 prévoit aussi près de 46 millions de dollars sur trois ans pour appuyer l'innovation et la modernisation du régime de réglementation de Transports Canada. Cela aura une incidence sur les essais commerciaux des systèmes commerciaux d'aéronefs télépilotés et exploités hors visibilité directe, les projets pilotes sur les systèmes coopératifs de circulation en peloton de camions et le Programme de paiement de transfert de sécurité routière, qui sera amélioré.

Je vais également présenter les points saillants du budget principal des dépenses des organismes fédéraux et des sociétés d'État faisant partie de mon portefeuille.

L'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, ou ACSTA, sollicite 875 millions de dollars pour continuer à protéger les voyageurs au moyen d'un contrôle de sécurité efficace, uniforme et de grande qualité.

Un montant de 288 millions de dollars a été annoncé dans le budget de 2019 pour protéger le public et continuer d'assurer la sûreté des éléments essentiels du réseau de transport aérien en 2019-2020.

Dans le budget de 2019, le gouvernement a aussi annoncé son intention de présenter un projet de loi qui nous permettrait de vendre les actifs et les passifs de l'ACSTA à une entité indépendante à but non lucratif. L'enveloppe de financement de 2019-2020 comprend des ressources pour la transition afin d'appuyer ce changement de structure organisationnelle.

(1105)

[Traduction]

Marine Atlantique demande près de 153 millions de dollars pour offrir, conformément à la Constitution, un service de traversier à longueur d'année entre North Sydney, en Nouvelle-Écosse, et Port aux Basques, à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, ainsi qu'un service saisonnier non obligatoire, entre North Sydney et Argentia, à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador.

Marine Atlantique assure le transport de plus du quart de toutes les personnes se rendant à Terre-Neuve, ainsi que deux tiers des marchandises acheminées dans cette province, dont 90 % des marchandises périssables et des marchandises d'utilité temporaire. Les services de Marine Atlantique sont cruciaux pour les intérêts des entreprises qui font des affaires dans cette région, ainsi que pour les personnes qui voyagent à destination et en provenance de l'île de Terre-Neuve. Il est mentionné dans le budget de 2019 que nous prolongerons le soutien accordé aux services actuels de traversier dans l'Est du Canada, et que nous envisagerons l'achat de trois nouveaux traversiers modernes, dont un pour Marine Atlantique. [Français]

VIA Rail Canada demande près de 732 millions de dollars dans le présent budget principal des dépenses. VIA Rail, qui est notre transporteur ferroviaire national, veut offrir à ses passagers un service sûr, sécuritaire, efficace, fiable et viable sur le plan écologique. VIA Rail exploite non seulement des trains dans le corridor Québec-Windsor ainsi que des trains long-courriers entre Toronto et Vancouver et entre Montréal et Halifax, mais offre aussi un transport ferroviaire dans les régions et les collectivités éloignées, notamment à certaines qui n'ont pas recours à un autre moyen de transport à longueur d'année.

En conclusion, les ressources financières présentées dans le présent budget principal des dépenses aideront ces organismes, ces sociétés d'État et Transports Canada à entretenir et à améliorer notre réseau de transport, qui est vital pour notre économie et notre qualité de vie. Le réseau de transport est aussi crucial pour assurer notre sûreté et notre sécurité, et c'est en le perfectionnant que nous le rendrons plus sûr et plus sécuritaire.

Nous créons aussi de bons emplois, bien rémunérés, pour la classe moyenne et nous offrons une meilleure qualité de vie à la population canadienne.

C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai maintenant à vos questions. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur le ministre, merci beaucoup de cet exposé.

Nous allons passer tout de suite à Mme Block, pour six minutes.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens également à vous remercier, monsieur le ministre, ainsi que le personnel de votre ministère, de vous être joints à nous aujourd'hui.

Par où faut-il commencer pour vous interroger sur le Budget principal des dépenses, le Rapport ministériel sur les plans et priorités, l'Office des transports du Canada et l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien? J'ai l'impression qu'on a l'embarras du choix.

À première vue, monsieur le ministre, on peut avoir l'impression que vous avez été très occupé, mais en y regardant de plus près, on constate qu'une bonne partie du gros du travail qui s'est fait a été laissé au ministère ou au secteur lui-même. Je parle ici des mesures législatives que vous avez présentées, des règlements qui ont été publiés dans la Gazette du Canada ou des mesures récentes qui ont été incluses dans la Loi d'exécution du budget.

Prenons par exemple les nombreuses initiatives qui visent l'industrie du transport aérien. Nous avons toujours entendu dire que l'effet cumulatif de ces initiatives — la réglementation sur le temps de service de vol, la Déclaration des droits des passagers aériens, la création récente, par le truchement de la Loi d’exécution du budget, d'une nouvelle entité pour les contrôles de sûreté — et les délais serrés à l'intérieur desquels l'industrie doit s'adapter dépassent la capacité qu'a cette dernière de mettre en œuvre ces changements de façon sécuritaire et uniforme.

De plus, l'industrie continue d'essayer de composer avec la récente immobilisation au sol de son Boeing 737 Max 8 et les changements subséquents que les compagnies aériennes ont dû apporter pour continuer à offrir un service aérien sécuritaire aux Canadiens.

J'aimerais citer partiellement les propos que M. Bergamini a tenus lorsqu'il est passé devant notre comité: Maintenant, alors que notre industrie est aux prises avec des défis opérationnels majeurs, découlant de l'interdiction de vol des appareils Max 8, la mise en œuvre de nouvelles règles concernant les temps de vols et l'impossible tâche de se conformer avant le 1er juillet aux nouvelles règles normatives touchant les droits des passagers, nous sommes une fois de plus confrontés à un échéancier et à un processus imposés par le gouvernement.

Il faisait référence aux mesures incorporées dans la Loi d’exécution du budget.

Monsieur le ministre, pourquoi présentez-vous cette mesure dans la Loi d'exécution du budget à la fin d'une session et à cinq mois de nouvelles élections, alors que l'industrie est déjà aux prises avec tant d'autres difficultés?

(1110)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

J'aimerais dire qu'il se passe beaucoup de choses dans l'industrie du transport aérien et que nous avions annoncé il y a des années notre intention de mettre en place bon nombre d'entre elles. En fait, le processus normal de consultation et de publication dans la Gazette du Canada a été très long et, dans certains cas, le temps est venu de passer à la partie II de la Gazette du Canada et de mettre ces règlements en vigueur.

Premièrement, l'industrie ne s'étonne guère que nous ayons voulu aborder la question de la fatigue des pilotes. C'est quelque chose qui a commencé sous les conservateurs, en 2010, et qui n'avait pas encore été mis en œuvre en 2015. Nous l'avons poursuivie et nous sommes en train de la mettre en place, alors ce n'est pas une surprise.

Deuxièmement, en ce qui concerne les droits des passagers, nous avons dit clairement il y a trois ans que c'était quelque chose que nous allions le faire.

Nous sommes également inflexibles en ce qui concerne l'accessibilité pour les passagers.

Nous avons clairement indiqué que nous allions de l'avant avec toutes ces mesures. Nous avons consulté l'industrie et le moment est venu de mettre les résultats en pratique. Nous estimons que les échéanciers que nous allons annoncer — et que nous avons déjà annoncés dans certains cas — sont très raisonnables.

Mme Kelly Block:

Ma question portait sur les mesures prévues dans la Loi d'exécution du budget qui permettraient de créer une nouvelle entité pour les contrôles de sûreté. Compte tenu de toutes les autres initiatives que l'industrie du transport aérien doit mettre en œuvre dans des délais très courts, je me suis demandé pourquoi vous avez jugé nécessaire d'introduire cette mesure dans la Loi d'exécution du budget avec un autre délai très court.

Nous croyons comprendre qu'elle doit être mise en œuvre d'ici le 1er janvier 2020, et nous allons tenir des élections à l'automne. Pouvez-vous expliquer pourquoi vous avez inclus cette mesure dans la Loi d'exécution du budget?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous l'avons fait parce que nous tenons beaucoup à transformer l'ACSTA actuelle — l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien — en un organisme sans but lucratif, comme un gouvernement précédent l'avait fait dans les années 1990 en séparant NavCan de Transports Canada, ce qui s'est révélé être un modèle extrêmement efficace.

Permettez-moi de souligner que cette décision ne fait pas l'unanimité. L'industrie du transport aérien a aussi émis les réserves que vous venez d'exprimer. Par ailleurs, les aéroports où cette mesure serait mise en œuvre sont très satisfaits de la décision que nous avons prise d'aller de l'avant avec cette version sans but lucratif de l'ACSTA.

Mme Kelly Block:

Vous avez déclaré que l'avion au Canada n'est pas devenu plus abordable pour les Canadiens, même si c'est l'un de vos objectifs de 2030 en matière de transport. Étant donné que la moitié du prix d'un billet d'avion d'Ottawa à Toronto est attribuable aux taxes directes et aux suppléments, pourquoi votre gouvernement rend-il le transport aérien au Canada encore plus coûteux en imposant une taxe sur le carbone? Aussi, j'aimerais savoir si vous avez évalué le coût de cette taxe pour l'industrie aérienne.

J'ai besoin d'une réponse rapide, s'il vous plaît, car il ne me reste que 45 secondes.

(1115)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Bien entendu, nous croyons qu'il est important pour nous — et il s'agit d'un enjeu de plus grande envergure — d'aborder la question des changements climatiques. Évidemment, grâce au cadre pancanadien, nous avons donné aux provinces la possibilité de décider de la façon dont elles allaient procéder. Pour celles qui ont décidé de ne pas le faire, il y aurait un filet de sécurité et, en ce qui concerne les vols, des suppléments sur le carburant seraient imposés aux provinces dans lesquelles le filet de sécurité s'applique et où nous ne nous occupons que des vols intraprovinciaux. Nous n'avons rien changé aux vols interprovinciaux.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Badawey pour six minutes.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente, et bienvenue à notre comité, monsieur le ministre. Merci d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Monsieur Garneau, je crois savoir que vous revenez tout juste du Forum économique des Grands Lacs, à Cleveland, en Ohio, où vous étiez présent non seulement en tant que ministre, mais aussi comme président du Comité du Cabinet chargé des questions concernant les relations canado-américaines, la diversification du commerce et le commerce interne.

La question, en particulier en ce qui concerne le débat d'aujourd'hui sur le budget, est de savoir comment nous continuons d'investir pour consolider nos corridors commerciaux, ici au Canada. Poursuivez-vous vos discussions avec nos homologues américains pour intégrer et faire valoir ces investissements dans les corridors commerciaux intérieurs, et aussi, une fois ces investissements réalisés et achevés, pour assurer la fluidité et, espérons-le, voir à ce qu'ils intègrent eux aussi une grande partie de leurs investissements dans les corridors commerciaux? Idéalement, nous voulons que les mouvements transfrontaliers se fassent de façon transparente, que ce soit par la route, par les Grands Lacs, par la voie des airs ou par train?

La raison pour laquelle je pose la question, c'est que, dans notre région du Niagara, nous assistons à un exode important du commerce vers les États-Unis. Tout aussi important, sinon plus important, c'est le fait qu'une grande partie de ce commerce passe par la région du Niagara ou vient de l'autre côté de la frontière et se rend ensuite, par exemple, au port de New York, à Staten Island, à Manhattan ou dans d'autres ports, puis s'internationalise.

Par conséquent, il est nécessaire d'avoir cette fluidité, surtout lorsque vous passez la frontière, que ce soit par la route, le rail, l'eau ou la voie des airs. Ces discussions ont-elles lieu?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

En bref, oui. Le Forum économique des Grands Lacs, auquel j'ai assisté hier, est, comme vous le savez, composé de neuf États américains limitrophes des Grands Lacs, de l'Ontario et du Québec. C'est un forum très utile, parce que nous avons tous beaucoup de choses en commun.

Comme vous l'avez fait remarquer, la façon dont nous pouvons rendre les corridors commerciaux aussi efficaces que possible est l'un des grands intérêts que nous avons en commun. L'économie de cette région se chiffre à 6 000 milliards de dollars et elle touche 100 millions de personnes. Il y a un très grand nombre de produits que nous voulons amener au bon endroit. La Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent est un élément essentiel de ce plan et, comme vous le soulignez, il y a le rail, mais disons que l'option maritime est sous-exploitée.

Comme vous le savez, nous, les Canadiens, sommes en train d'évaluer comment nous pouvons rendre la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent plus efficace. C'est un axe qui traverse aussi une région dont vous vous souciez beaucoup, la péninsule du Niagara et le canal Welland. Nous voulons faire en sorte qu'une plus grande part des marchandises produites se retrouve plus rapidement sur les marchés. Les gens que j'ai rencontrés au port de Cleveland et dans ces neuf États américains, par exemple, veulent recevoir leurs produits. Oui, ils peuvent utiliser le rail, mais ils pensent comme nous que le trafic maritime pourrait être mieux utilisé.

C'est quelque chose dont nous parlons et que nous avons en commun.

M. Vance Badawey:

J'aimerais poser une question au sujet du message qui doit être transmis à nos homologues américains concernant l'AEUMC — l'Accord États-Unis-Mexique-Canada — et l'article 232, où il est question des tarifs. Évidemment, ce corridor commercial intégré est binational et, en fin de compte, sa destination finale est la plupart du temps internationale. Nos homologues américains sont-ils bien conscients que, pendant que nous faisons ces investissements, l'AEUMC doit encore faire l'objet d'un examen, et que l'article 232 sur les tarifs devrait, dans ce contexte, être traité de façon positive?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Oui, et c'est l'un des principaux messages que j'ai transmis hier aux gens à qui j'ai parlé. Oui, nous voulons ratifier ce que nous appelons l'ACEUM, soit l'Accord Canada-États-Unis-Mexique, mais en même temps, il existe un sérieux obstacle: les droits de douane sur l'acier et l'aluminium. J'ai dit très clairement que cette situation nous causait des difficultés ici au Canada, d'autant plus qu'il ne nous reste que cinq ou six semaines avant que le Parlement s'ajourne. Nos homologues américains comprennent très bien cela. Ils comprennent aussi l'importance de finaliser et de mettre en oeuvre l'ALENA, et ils partagent notre engagement.

(1120)

M. Vance Badawey:

Ma dernière question, madame la présidente, porte sur le Fonds national des corridors commerciaux.

Quelles sortes de réussites observez-vous à l'heure actuelle, dans la foulée des investissements que vous avez déjà effectués, et quelles sont vos attentes face au rendement futur de ces investissements?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Jusqu'ici, nous avons engagé des fonds pour 39 projets. Certains d'entre eux sont en cours de construction pour l'instant, et nous estimons qu'ils permettront d'accroître la fluidité de la circulation dans nos corridors commerciaux. Quelques projets visent les ports des Grands Lacs, comme ceux de Thunder Bay et de Hamilton. Des fonds ont été accordés à ces deux ports, et d'autres mesures ont été prises pour faciliter au maximum le mouvement des biens dans ces corridors.

Nous nous trouvons actuellement dans une situation en évolution, car nous avons 750 millions de dollars de plus, et nous recevons, depuis le 15 janvier, de nouvelles soumissions aux fins d'examen dans le cadre du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux. Il s'agit d'un programme très sollicité et très populaire, qui permet de faire exactement ce que son nom indique, c'est-à-dire maintenir une circulation efficace dans nos corridors.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai une question rapide pour vous, madame la présidente, puisque je ne veux pas perdre le temps qui m'est imparti pour discuter avec le ministre.

Y aura-t-il un moment, pendant la portion de la réunion publique réservée aux affaires du Comité, où je pourrai déposer la motion annoncée mardi dernier? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui, si vous voulez le faire à la fin de cette portion de la réunion, avant que nous entamions la deuxième partie, ou encore au début de la deuxième partie, je n'y vois pas d'inconvénient, monsieur Aubin.

M. Robert Aubin:

C'est parfait.[Français]

Bonjour, monsieur le ministre.

Merci d'être ici. C'est toujours un plaisir de vous revoir. J'espère vous entendre dire aujourd'hui que la mobilité interurbaine verte est votre priorité absolue, de même que la lutte contre les émissions de gaz à effet de serre.

Dans le budget, je vois que VIA Rail Canada demande 731,6 millions de dollars, dont 435,6 millions de dollars serviront aux dépenses en capital.

Qu'est-ce que le commun des mortels doit comprendre de l'expression « dépenses en capital »? Y a-t-il quelque chose dans ces dépenses pour un éventuel train à grande fréquence, ou TGF?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Le gouvernement subventionne non seulement le prix des billets de VIA Rail, mais également les dépenses en capital de la société. Celle-ci a beaucoup d'équipement et de gares qu'elle doit entretenir. Cela coûte de l'argent.

Nous continuons d'évaluer le projet de train à grande fréquence. Ce projet est distinct des activités et des responsabilités courantes de VIA Rail Canada.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je sais que le train à grande fréquence vous intéresse.

M. Robert Aubin:

Au plus haut point.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

J'aurais été déçu si vous ne m'aviez pas posé une question à ce sujet.

M. Robert Aubin:

Soyez sans crainte, j'en ai une autre.

Je n'ai absolument rien trouvé dans le budget qui parle du TGF. Votre collègue de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités m'a dit que le projet avançait bien, même s'il n'y avait pas un mot dans le budget à ce sujet.

Le jour où vous serez convaincu de la pertinence de ce projet, si l'on n'a pas épuisé l'ensemble des sommes prévues pour les études entourant le projet du TGF, pourrez-vous quand même prendre une décision, ou faudra-t-il attendre que toutes ces sommes soient épuisées?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je veux vous assurer que nous faisons notre travail avec beaucoup de diligence. Vous allez comprendre, j'en suis sûr, que c'est un projet extrêmement complexe qui concerne des centaines de kilomètres et qui soulève des questions très centrales. Y aura-t-il suffisamment de passagers pour que le TGF soit viable? On ne veut pas être obligé de subventionner ce train au-delà d'un certain montant, si je puis dire. Il y a aussi des questions environnementales et la nécessité de consulter les peuples autochtones. De plus, il y a une question liée à l'interopérabilité si l'on construit le Réseau express métropolitain, ou REM, à Montréal.

(1125)

M. Robert Aubin:

Si vous aviez des réponses avant la fin des études, pourriez-vous prendre une décision?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous travaillons avec beaucoup d'assiduité et de diligence afin de pouvoir prendre une décision. Je m'attends à ce que vous me rappeliez chaque semaine que c'est quelque chose que je ne devrais pas oublier.

M. Robert Aubin:

Absolument, et je continuerai de le faire.

Changeons de sujet. Dans le budget, il était question de véhicules à zéro émission de moins de sept passagers. J'ai assisté à un colloque ces dernières semaines sur la filière hydrogène et les piles à combustible. Il semble que le Canada soit relativement en retard dans ce dossier, notamment pour ce qui est des autobus et des camions à hydrogène.

Si des véhicules plus lourds étaient électrifiés et rechargés par le réseau électrique ou par un système plus complexe, cela pourrait-il constituer une autre approche pour combattre les gaz à effet de serre? La filière hydrogène est-elle aussi envisagée au Canada?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Cette question est certainement ouverte. Nous nous fions au marché pour voir si d'autres modèles d'automobiles répondront aux critères nécessaires pour bénéficier d'une subvention.

Je dois vous rappeler l'une des mesures qui n'a pas été autant mentionnée et qui s'applique aux particuliers désireux d'acheter l'une de ces voitures. Les entreprises ont aussi droit à une réduction fiscale si elles achètent des voitures, légères ou lourdes, qui fonctionnent à piles à hydrogène.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci infiniment de cette réponse.

Dans ma dernière minute, je voudrais vous parler rapidement de l'ACSTA. On sait bien que les sommes prélevées sur le billet des passagers pour les mesures de sécurité ne sont pas totalement réinvesties en sécurité. C'est comme une vache à lait pour le gouvernement.

La privatisation des services de sécurité pourrait-elle avoir des avantages, notamment pour des aéroports régionaux, comme Trois-Rivières, qui ont besoin de services de sécurité pour exploiter, par exemple, le secteur des entreprises qui offrent des voyages au rabais?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

L'un de nos objectifs est de réduire les coûts pour les passagers. Il faut, bien sûr, engager des coûts pour les mesures de sécurité. C'est l'usager qui paie pour sa sécurité, c'est-à-dire la personne qui achète un billet d'avion, mais on ne veut pas que ce coût soit plus élevé que nécessaire.

En ce qui concerne les aéroports qui ne sont pas desservis par un système comme l'ACSTA, tel qu'il est mentionné dans le projet de loi C-49 sur la modernisation de la Loi sur les transports au Canada, les aéroports ont accès à ce système, mais à leurs frais. Il est possible qu'à l'avenir, nous réexaminions les aéroports désignés, mais cela n'est pas envisagé d'ici le mois de juin. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, ministre Garneau.

C'est au tour de M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, merci d'être ici ce matin.

Notre comité a travaillé sur l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens, ce qui représente un problème pour certaines communautés au pays, particulièrement à Laval. D'ailleurs, le rapport a été présenté à la Chambre le 19 mars dernier.

Avez-vous des commentaires à formuler au Comité à ce sujet?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci de votre question.

Je reconnais que les transports ont une incidence sur la vie quotidienne des Canadiens, notamment le bruit qu'ils génèrent. Bien que les aéroports soient les pivots de l'économie, leurs activités doivent tenir compte des besoins des communautés.

En ce qui concerne le problème spécifique du bruit des aéroports, le gouvernement est sensible aux préoccupations des citoyens qui vivent à proximité de l'aéroport de Montréal et d'autres aéroports partout au pays. Nous continuons à suivre la situation de très près.

La gestion du bruit des aéronefs est complexe. Elle nécessite des efforts combinés de divers paliers de gouvernement et de divers acteurs de l'industrie du transport aérien. Différents groupes sont en cause.

Ce qui m'encourage, c'est de voir l'attention que l'industrie accorde à cette question. Par exemple, NAV CANADA et l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto ont fait appel à des experts reconnus ainsi qu'au grand public pour les aider à trouver des moyens d'atténuer le bruit des aéronefs à l'aéroport de Toronto. Elles se sont engagées ouvertement à mettre en oeuvre la plupart des recommandations que ce groupe d'experts a fournies. Elles établissent des rapports et procèdent à des consultations sur ce travail.

Il y a des choses que l'on peut faire, mais il faut que tous les acteurs travaillent de concert. Je suis très conscient de ce problème parce que l'on m'en parle constamment.

(1130)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Passons maintenant au transport ferroviaire. Au mois de mars dernier, vous avez annoncé plusieurs nominations à VIA Rail Canada, entre autres, celle de Mme Garneau, qui a été nommée présidente et chef de la direction.

Pouvez-vous nous parler du processus de nomination et des objectifs de Mme Garneau dans le cadre de son mandat?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Lors d'un processus de nomination comme celui-là, on essaie de trouver la meilleure personne qui soit pour occuper le poste, une personne qui a l'expérience et les qualifications nécessaires pour prendre la direction d'une grande société dont les responsabilités sont extrêmement importantes. Je suis particulièrement fier de voir Mme Cynthia Garneau prendre officiellement les commandes de VIA Rail aujourd'hui. Je suis certain que l'avenir s'annonce bien.

Comme vous le savez, l'un des gros projets de VIA Rail est présentement le renouvellement de sa flotte dans le corridor Québec-Windsor. Il s'agit d'un investissement important. Tout l'équipement, les locomotives et les wagons vont être remplacés. À partir de 2022, on pourra voir les nouveaux wagons et les nouvelles locomotives. C'est un gros projet et une importante responsabilité. Comme vous le savez, le contrat a été confié à la compagnie Siemens Canada, qui sera responsable de fournir cet équipement. Enfin, si on décide de passer à l'action pour ce qui est du train à haute fréquence, il va y avoir beaucoup plus de pain sur la planche.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Depuis le 1er mai, le programme fédéral Incitatifs pour l'achat de véhicules zéro émission change la donne pour les Canadiens qui veulent « rouler vert ». Parmi les commentaires qui reviennent le plus souvent, il y a le coût de ces véhicules. Au Québec et à Laval, il existe déjà des incitatifs pour l'achat de véhicules zéro émission.

Ce nouvel incitatif fédéral peut-il être cumulatif? Autrement dit, peut-il s'ajouter à ceux offerts par les provinces et les municipalités?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Oui. On trouve sur le site Web de Transports Canada la liste des véhicules admissibles. L'incitatif peut atteindre 5 000 $. Le Québec a un incitatif qui peut atteindre 8 000 $. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, la Ville de Laval est unique en ce sens qu'elle offre également un incitatif de 2 000 $. Tous ces incitatifs sont cumulables, mais le véhicule que la personne achète doit figurer sur les trois listes. Il est possible en effet qu'il figure sur une liste, mais pas sur les autres. Si le véhicule apparaît sur les trois listes, où figurent les véhicules les plus communs, la personne peut bénéficier d'un rabais vraiment considérable.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Quelles sont les prévisions quant à la vente de véhicules zéro émission pour la période de 2019-2020?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous n'avons pas de prévisions, mais nous espérons que les gens seront nombreux à considérer que le temps est venu d'acheter ce genre de véhicules. Nous aimerions voir en grand nombre des gens examiner ces véhicules chez les concessionnaires. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Rogers.

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier le ministre et les fonctionnaires d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui.

Monsieur le ministre, j'aimerais m'attarder sur les problèmes de transport qui touchent Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, où les déplacements se font surtout, bien entendu, par avion ou par traversier.

Marine Atlantique offre un important service de traversier obligatoire en vertu de la Constitution aux citoyens de ma province. Récemment, nous avons connu des difficultés en raison des tarifs fixés par Marine Atlantique et des taux de recouvrement des coûts, qui, de l'avis de certains, sont trop élevés. De nombreux habitants s'inquiètent du prix inabordable de ce service de traversier, qui revêt une importance cruciale pour ma province.

Pourriez-vous nous parler des mesures qui sont prises pour faire en sorte que ce service obligatoire en vertu de la Constitution soit abordable?

(1135)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous essayons d'atteindre le juste équilibre dans ce dossier. Comme vous l'avez souligné, le service de Marine Atlantique est essentiel pour les intérêts de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, ainsi que pour les gens qui en dépendent non seulement pour leurs déplacements personnels, mais aussi pour le transport de la plupart des marchandises à destination et en provenance de l'île.

Marine Atlantique assure le transport de plus d'un quart de toutes les personnes se rendant à Terre-Neuve, ainsi que des deux tiers des marchandises acheminées dans cette province, dont 90 % des denrées périssables et des marchandises d'utilité temporaire, et nous avons la responsabilité constitutionnelle de maintenir le service entre North Sydney et Port aux Basques.

Marine Atlantique demande 153 millions de dollars pour offrir un service de traversier à longueur d'année, prévu par la Constitution, entre North Sydney, en Nouvelle-Écosse, et Port aux Basques, ainsi qu'un service saisonnier non obligatoire entre North Sydney et Argentia. Dans le budget de 2019, comme vous le savez, il est mentionné que nous prolongerons le soutien accordé aux services actuels de traversier dans l'est du Canada, et que nous envisagerons d'acheter trois nouveaux traversiers modernes, dont un pour Marine Atlantique. Cela viendrait remplacer le Leif Ericson.

Je suis conscient que le service demeure coûteux. Notre approche consiste à subventionner le service obligatoire en vertu de la Constitution, et nous visons à recouvrir 100 % des coûts du service non obligatoire. Nous estimons avoir atteint le juste équilibre, même si certains ne seraient peut-être pas d'accord là-dessus. Nous essayons de faire quelque chose qui assure le maintien du service et qui permet la modernisation de la flotte, en temps et lieu, mais nous devons également tenir compte des dépenses engagées.

M. Churence Rogers:

Je peux comprendre l'objectif d'essayer d'atteindre le juste équilibre, mais je crois que d'après le sentiment général partout dans la province — entre autres, auprès des gens d'affaires et des exploitants d'entreprises touristiques —, les tarifs actuels constituent un obstacle au transport des personnes vers la province. Nous avons observé une amélioration marquée du tourisme dans la province, mais les gens sont toujours d'avis que l'abordabilité constitue un problème, et ils nous invitent à examiner de plus près les taux de recouvrement des coûts.

Je suis content que vous ayez mentionné le nouveau traversier, car je me demande comment l'approche de renouvellement de la flotte aura une incidence sur les activités de Marine Atlantique et les services qu'elle offre.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous avons ici des représentants de Marine Atlantique. Il y a Murray Hupman. Vouliez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Murray Hupman (président et chef de la direction, Marine Atlantique S.C.C.):

Oui, bien sûr. Cette initiative n'aura aucune incidence sur le service.

Lorsque le nouveau traversier sera mis en service, cela améliorera le service. Nous utiliserons la flotte existante jusqu'à l'entrée en service du nouveau traversier, après quoi nous nous dessaisirons du Leif Ericson. Bref, il n'y aura aucune incidence sur le service.

M. Churence Rogers:

C'est donc positif, de votre point de vue?

M. Murray Hupman:

C'est extrêmement positif, oui.

M. Churence Rogers:

Merci beaucoup.

Dans le cadre de notre étude actuelle sur la logistique du commerce et des transports, monsieur le ministre, nous avons entendu des témoignages, notamment de la part du Conseil économique des provinces de l'Atlantique, au sujet de la nécessité d'harmoniser les règlements en matière de transport. Dans le budget de 2019, le gouvernement du Canada a annoncé que, par l'entremise du Programme de paiements de transfert de la sécurité routière, il allait appuyer les provinces et les territoires dans leurs efforts visant à améliorer l'harmonisation des exigences de sécurité routière et de transport.

Comment le gouvernement prévoit-il appuyer les provinces et les territoires dans l'harmonisation de leur réglementation concernant le poids et la dimension des camions de marchandises?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je vais céder la parole au sous-ministre, mais vous avez raison de dire qu'il faut essayer d'harmoniser la réglementation, parce que les provinces ont établi leurs propres limites de poids en fonction de la manière dont elles conçoivent leurs routes ou des types de routes dont elles sont dotées et des conditions terrestres qui les caractérisent.

Nous essayons d'améliorer la situation de telle sorte que, si un camion part de St. John's, à Terre-Neuve, pour se rendre à Victoria, en Colombie-Britannique, il n'aura pas à s'arrêter en chemin et à décharger la marchandise. Dans certains cas, il y a également eu des problèmes liés aux pneus. Pour améliorer le commerce intérieur au pays, nous nous employons à harmoniser ces règles de compétence provinciale.

Je cède maintenant la parole au sous-ministre Keenan.

(1140)

M. Michael Keenan (sous-ministre, ministère des Transports):

Comme l'a dit le ministre Garneau, beaucoup d'efforts sont déployés pour régler cette question très technique. Le ministre et ses collègues provinciaux qui siègent au Conseil des ministres des Transports ont demandé à un groupe de travail de produire un rapport sur l'harmonisation de l'industrie du camionnage. Ce document a été publié au début de 2019. Par ailleurs, un groupe interprovincial sur le poids et les dimensions a été chargé de se pencher là-dessus et d'établir des priorités pour harmoniser ces règlements.

D'importants progrès ont été réalisés dans le domaine des pneus simples à bande large. Nous avons maintenant un accord de principe avec les provinces pour uniformiser les règlements applicables à cette catégorie de pneus, et l'industrie du camionnage attend avec impatience d'avoir des règles qui fonctionnent dans l'ensemble du pays.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Keenan.

La parole est à M. Eglinski.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier le ministre et son personnel de leur présence.

Madame la présidente, je voudrais partager mon temps de parole avec mon collègue, M. Liepert.

Sur ce, madame la présidente, j'aimerais proposer une motion au nom de Matt Jeneroux, qui est absent aujourd'hui.

La présidente:

Oui, allez-y.

M. Jim Eglinski:

La motion se lit comme suit: Que le Comité invite le secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Services aux Autochtones à comparaître au nom du ministre, pour faire le point sur l'état de l'octroi de fonds d'infrastructures directement aux communautés autochtones, y compris par le doublement du Fonds de la taxe sur l'essence, annoncé dans le budget de 2019 et que la réunion du mardi 28 mai 2019 déjà prévue pour cette étude soit télévisée.

Madame la présidente, je demande un vote par appel nominal.

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Y a-t-il des observations?

Allez-y, madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je serai brève, car je sais que nous voulons continuer à poser des questions au ministre.

Comme nous en avons discuté à la dernière réunion, nous savons que le premier ministre a fourni aux secrétaires parlementaires une ligne directrice qui énonce leurs rôles et leurs fonctions, notamment celui de comparaître devant des comités si les ministres sont dans l'impossibilité de le faire. Je sais que la motion originale, qui visait à inviter le ministre, a été adoptée à l'unanimité; nous espérons donc que les députés du parti au pouvoir appuieront la proposition de demander au secrétaire parlementaire de comparaître à la place du ministre.

Cela dit, j'appuie cette motion.

La présidente:

Pour la gouverne des membres du Comité, la greffière m'a informée que les secrétaires parlementaires répondent effectivement aux questions et qu'ils peuvent remplacer un ministre dans bien des cas, mais cela ne se fait pas automatiquement. La greffière s'en remet à la réponse qui est fournie par le ministère et, en l'occurrence, il s'agissait de fonctionnaires.

Y a-t-il d'autres observations sur cette motion?

(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

La présidente: Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être ici.

J'aimerais revenir un peu sur le transfert de l'ACSTA.

Je ne suis pas ici pour poser des questions au nom des compagnies aériennes, mais nous avons entendu des témoignages très éloquents lors des dernières séances.

Je ne répéterai pas tout ce que ma collègue a mentionné dans sa question initiale, mais je crois que vous devez admettre, monsieur le ministre, que même si, comme l'avez dit — et je vais vous paraphraser —, cette consultation dure depuis longtemps, en réalité, tous les détails de la déclaration des droits des passagers n'ont été adoptés qu'au cours de la présente session. À vrai dire, les détails concernant le transfert de l'ACSTA n'ont été révélés que dans le cadre du projet de loi d'exécution du budget. Bien entendu, les compagnies aériennes ont dû faire face à une situation qui n'est la faute de personne, à savoir l'immobilisation au sol des appareils Max 8.

J'aimerais que vous nous expliquiez un peu plus pourquoi il est si important de faire adopter cette mesure dans le cadre du projet de loi d'exécution du budget, au lieu de veiller à ce qu'elle soit négociée de façon équitable et qu'au bout du compte, les consommateurs n'en subissent pas d'effets négatifs.

(1145)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

L'une des principales raisons pour lesquelles nous mettons de l'avant cette proposition, c'est pour rendre les choses meilleures et plus efficaces pour les consommateurs, et nous estimons que les mesures envisagées nous permettront d'atteindre cet objectif. Comme je l'ai dit, beaucoup de gens se sont montrés sceptiques face à la décision de séparer NavCan de Transports Canada. Pourtant, aujourd'hui, les gens y voient un exemple d'une décision très sage prise il y a 20 ans.

Il est vrai que cette question ne figurait pas officiellement sur l'écran radar, mais ce n'est pas une surprise ni pour l'industrie aérienne ni pour les aéroports. Là encore, les administrateurs des aéroports suivent de très près ce dossier. Ils réclament cette mesure depuis très longtemps.

À notre avis, le calendrier que nous avons proposé est réalisable. Je peux comprendre la situation des compagnies aériennes, parce qu'il se passe plein de choses, et je déplore le problème concernant des appareils Max 8. C'était tout à fait inattendu.

Toutefois, quand nous prenons des décisions au sujet du calendrier de mise en oeuvre, nous en faisons un examen très attentif. Nous ne lançons pas de dates arbitraires.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je ne sais pas combien de temps il me reste, mais j'aimerais obtenir des précisions sur un autre point.

Les représentants des compagnies aériennes ont semblé laisser entendre que l'affaire était conclue et que le prix de vente des actifs avait déjà été établi. Si je ne me trompe pas, l'un de vos sous-ministres a déclaré l'autre jour au Comité que ce n'était pas le cas et qu'il y aurait quand même des négociations.

Pouvez-vous faire le point sur la situation actuelle? Il nous semble que si vous vendez ces actifs pour plus de 1 $, disons, les passagers paient en double pour ces actifs, parce qu'ils ont déjà payé une fois.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

C'est le sous-ministre qui va répondre.

M. Michael Keenan:

Il y a deux points que je pourrais aborder. Tout d'abord, le projet d'exécution du budget vise à autoriser un transfert négocié. Par ailleurs, il établit certaines conditions de base, mais tout est sous réserve des négociations avec les compagnies aériennes et les aéroports.

Les représentants des compagnies aériennes ont exprimé des inquiétudes devant le Comité et ailleurs. Nous nous sommes entretenus avec eux et nous avons répondu à leurs préoccupations, si bien qu'ils sont maintenant prêts à s'asseoir avec nous la semaine prochaine et à entamer les négociations sur une réforme qui fait l'objet de discussions, d'une manière ou d'une autre, depuis 2017.

Au sujet du prix de transfert, la directrice générale de la politique aérienne a mentionné dans son témoignage que cette question fera partie des négociations, et c'est effectivement le cas. Selon la position adoptée par le gouvernement en vue de ces négociations, le prix approprié pour transférer les actifs est la valeur comptable dans les comptes du gouvernement. Si vous les transférez à leur valeur comptable, alors il n'y aura aucune incidence sur le déficit. Ainsi, le transfert est neutre au chapitre de l'incidence sur les contribuables actuels par rapport aux voyageurs actuels. C'est notre position à l'amorce des négociations.

Toutefois, tout cela est sous réserve d'une négociation avec les aéroports et les compagnies aériennes. Les aéroports sont prêts, et les compagnies aériennes nous ont dit hier qu'elles seraient prêtes à entamer ces négociations dès la semaine prochaine.

M. Ron Liepert:

Il semble que les passagers ont déjà payé pour ces actifs. Je ne comprends toujours pas comment le gouvernement peut prétendre qu'il s'agit d'un simple transfert direct. L'ensemble de ces actifs a été établi au moyen de frais que les contribuables ont payés. Le gouvernement affirme maintenant que nous allons prendre cet ensemble d'actifs, auquel le public a déjà contribué, et que nous allons l'inclure dans les recettes générales pour ensuite demander aux contribuables de payer une deuxième fois. Cela n'a pas de bon sens.

M. Michael Keenan:

Je dirais que les actifs accumulés à l'ACSTA sont assez considérables et qu'ils ont été accumulés sur une longue période et au fil des ans. Si vous regardez l'histoire de l'Administration, elle a parfois enregistré un énorme déficit, et le gouvernement est intervenu, et elle a parfois enregistré un excédent.

Les contribuables et les passagers représentent dans une grande mesure les mêmes personnes. Pas moins de 13 millions de Canadiens prennent l'avion chaque année, et ce sont tous des contribuables. La position du gouvernement au début des négociations est de procéder au transfert d'une manière qui serait neutre pour les contribuables et les passagers. Autrement, le gouvernement du Canada réaliserait un gain, ou cela s'ajouterait au déficit, et ce ne serait pas neutre pour les contribuables et les passagers.

(1150)

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Keenan.

Messieurs Hardie et Fuhr, vous vous partagerez le prochain temps de parole. Monsieur Fuhr, vous avez deux minutes, puis la parole sera à M. Hardie.

M. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, merci de votre présence ce matin. Comme vous le savez, le Comité a récemment déposé un rapport intitulé « À l'appui des écoles de pilotage au Canada ». C'est le rapport qui a découlé de ma motion M-177, qui a reçu l'appui unanime de la Chambre, soit 280 voix contre 0, ce qui n'arrive pas très souvent ces temps-ci, comme vous le savez très bien. Je crois que cela indique que la Chambre appuie sans réserve — et, par extension, les Canadiens — ce que le pays fera pour former des pilotes.

Je comprends aussi que le ministère à 120 jours pour répondre au rapport, et ce sera très serré compte tenu du nombre de jours de séance qu'il nous reste. Par conséquent, au cas où cela ne se produirait pas, même si je souhaite de tout cœur que cela se fasse, j'aimerais vous inviter à nous dire ce que vous avez pensé du rapport.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je l'ai trouvé excellent. Je tiens à remercier le Comité des transports et je tiens également à vous remercier de votre motion qui a déclenché ce processus. Par ailleurs, comme vous le savez, Transports Canada se penche sur cet enjeu et la nécessité d'avoir plus de pilotes et d'offrir plus de formations au Canada en raison de la pénurie imminente en la matière, et nous en ressentons déjà un peu les effets.

Comme vous l'avez souligné, nous examinons actuellement toutes les recommandations qu'a formulées le Comité des transports sur cette question. Je suis sûr que nous serons en mesure d'y arriver, même si nous avons seulement 120 jours. Nous travaillons d'arrache-pied pour le faire d'ici l'ajournement des travaux.

C'est un rapport extrêmement utile; cela nous aide. Je crois que c'est un exemple parfait de l'importance des comités. Les précieux commentaires qu'ils formulent aident les divers ministères dans leur travail.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Merci. Mes deux minutes sont écoulées. Je cède donc la parole à mon collègue.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Monsieur Garneau, les corridors commerciaux sont évidemment très importants. Je crois que vous, votre ministère et l'ensemble du gouvernement l'avez reconnu. Le Comité l'a aussi reconnu.

M. Badawey et moi-même avons lancé une étude sur le corridor commercial de Niagara et le corridor commercial de la côte Ouest. Vous serez ravi d'apprendre que les discussions au sujet de la collaboration entre les divers intervenants du corridor commercial de la côte Ouest se sont énormément intensifiées. J'ai eu le privilège d'assister à la conférence du WESTAC il y a une semaine, et les participants comprennent qu'ils doivent réussir à mieux coordonner leurs activités au lieu de seulement laisser le gouvernement démêler le tout.

Cela étant dit, j'ai davantage une demande qu'une question. Cela concerne la troisième compagnie de chemin de fer de catégorie 1 qui dessert les ports du Grand Vancouver, soit la Burlington Northern Santa Fe. Cette ligne de chemin de fer continue de connaître des difficultés sur le plan de la sécurité et de la fiabilité. La semaine dernière, un emportement par les eaux a forcé la fermeture du chemin de fer durant deux jours, et il y a évidemment le problème de capacité, parce que le chemin de fer longe la côte et traverse une zone résidentielle à White Rock, où la vitesse est évidemment limitée.

C'est une demande que je répète, parce que je l'ai déjà faite auparavant. Je demande environ 300 000 $ pour cofinancer, avec les municipalités régionales et la province de la Colombie-Britannique, une étude pour déplacer la ligne de chemin de fer de la BNSF plus loin de la côte, ce qui permettrait évidemment d'assurer une meilleure circulation des marchandises et de possiblement avoir une liaison ferroviaire rapide le long du corridor de Cascadia.

Je vous laisse y penser, mais je vous invite à faire un commentaire si vous le voulez.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci beaucoup. J'aimerais ajouter que j'encourage la Ville de Surrey à continuer de présenter des demandes de financement pour cette étude par l'entremise du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux. C'est un projet admissible. Cela n'a pas encore porté ses fruits, mais j'encourage les intervenants à persévérer. Ils peuvent présenter en tout temps une demande en ce sens.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je remercie tout le monde.

Je dois maintenant lire l'énoncé qui suit: Conformément au paragraphe 81(4) du Règlement, le Comité met maintenant aux voix le Budget principal des dépenses pour l'année financière qui prend fin le 31 mars 2020. ADMINISTRATION CANADIENNE DE LA SÛRETÉ DU TRANSPORT AÉRIEN Crédit 1—Paiements à l'Administration pour les dépenses de fonctionnement et les dépenses en capital..........586 860 294 $ ç Crédit 5—Offrir un meilleur service aux passagers du transport aérien..........288 300 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) OFFICE DES TRANSPORTS DU CANADA ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........31 499 282 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DES TRANSPORTS ç Crédit 1—Dépenses de fonctionnement..........678 526 078 $ ç Crédit 5—Dépenses en capital..........134 973 337 $ ç Crédit 10—Subventions et contributions - Réseau de transport efficace..........593 897 864 $ ç Crédit 15—Subventions et contributions - Réseau de transport écologique et novateur..........65 026 921 $ ç Crédit 20—Subventions et contributions - Réseau de transport sûr et sécuritaire..........17 842 681 $ ç Crédit 25—Intégrer l’innovation à la réglementation..........10 079 959 $ ç Crédit 30—Intervention en matière de sécurité maritime du Canada..........1 128 497 $ ç Crédit 35—Offrir un meilleur service aux passagers du transport aérien..........4 800 000 $ ç Crédit 40—Encourager les Canadiens à utiliser des véhicules à émission zéro..........70 988 502 $ ç Crédit 45—Protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces..........2 147 890 $ ç Crédit 50—Transport routier et ferroviaire sécuritaire..........73 110 648 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 et 50 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) MARINE ATLANTIQUE S.C.C. ç Crédit 1—Paiements à la société..........152 904 000 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) VIA RAIL CANADA INC. ç Crédit 1— Paiements à la société..........731 594 011 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

La présidente: Dois-je faire rapport de ces crédits à la Chambre?

Des députés: Oui.

La présidente: Merci beaucoup.

C'est toujours agréable de vous voir, monsieur Garneau, de même que vos fonctionnaires. Nous vous avons vus souvent depuis trois ans et demi. Merci beaucoup à tous. Je vous souhaite une excellente journée.

Nous prendrons une pause, puis nous examinerons au retour la demande de M. Aubin et la motion de M. Kmiec.

(1150)

(1200)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons nos travaux.

Avant de passer à l'autre sujet à l'ordre du jour, M. Aubin a une motion dont nous sommes dûment saisis et qu'il souhaite proposer.

Aimeriez-vous dire quelques mots à ce sujet, monsieur Aubin? [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vais être assez bref, parce que j'ai déjà présenté l'essence de cette motion à notre dernière réunion. Je suis un peu surpris par le vote précédent.

Mon propos n'est rattaché à aucune demande particulière. Le point que je veux souligner, c'est qu'il me semble que nous ne sommes pas en train de faire de la politique partisane quand nous demandons à un ministre de se présenter. Malgré tout le respect que j'ai pour les fonctionnaires, je signale que ces derniers sont des exécutants. Ceux qui donnent la commande et amorcent la vision, ce sont les politiciens. En l'absence d'un ministre, pour quelque raison que ce soit, nous devrions pouvoir rencontrer son secrétaire parlementaire. Cela m'apparaît sensé. Ce qu'on veut avoir comme discussion, c'est une discussion sur la vision, de ceux qui prennent les décisions, qui dirigent et qui donnent les orientations.

Pour une raison x, y ou z, il se pourrait que le secrétaire parlementaire ne puisse pas se présenter non plus. Je souhaiterais que, au moins, la présidente et la greffière aient cette liberté, soit de convoquer automatiquement le secrétaire parlementaire pour qu'on gagne du temps et qu'on arrive à l'objectif, soit d'avoir une discussion avec ceux qui prennent les décisions.

Je pense ne pas avoir besoin de relire la motion, elle est suffisamment claire. Voilà ce que j'avais à dire.

(1205)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

Aimeriez-vous avoir un vote par appel nominal? D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée par 9 voix contre 0. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. Ron Liepert: Je m'excuse, madame la présidente.

La présidente: Oui.

M. Ron Liepert:

Étant donné que nous venons d'adopter cette motion, j'ai l'impression qu'automatiquement la motion que nous avons proposée plus tôt ne nécessiterait même pas de motion puisque l'autre motion visait le ministre et qu'il n'était pas disponible. Nous avons maintenant adopté une motion qui prévoit que le secrétaire parlementaire devrait témoigner.

Je vous demande, à titre de présidente, d'évaluer si nous pouvons aller de l'avant avec la motion initiale et inviter le secrétaire parlementaire à témoigner, comme le prévoit cette motion.

La présidente:

Selon ce que j'en comprends, nous avons déjà pris une décision à cet égard, mais il n'aurait pas été possible de le faire à la date proposée par M. Jeneroux dans sa motion.

Le Comité a déjà pris une décision à ce sujet lors d'une précédente réunion. Nous ne reviendrons donc pas sur cette décision. Merci.

D'accord. Passons au ministère des Transports. Nous étudions maintenant l'utilisation temporaire au Canada, par des Canadiens, de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis. Ce sujet nous est proposé par M. Kmiec, et notre collègue s'intéresse depuis un bon temps à cette question.

Le Comité a accepté de donner du temps à M. Kmiec pour présenter et proposer sa motion. Nous l'avons fait avec plaisir.

Nous accueillons des représentants du ministère des Transports: Michael DeJong, directeur général, Intégration des stratégies et programmes multimodaux, et Mario Demers, chef, Importation et inspection de la vérification.

Nous avons aussi des représentants du ministère des Finances: Carlos Achadinha, directeur principal, Division de la taxe de vente, Direction de la politique de l'impôt, et Scott Winter, directeur, Politique tarifaire et commerciale, Division de la politique commerciale internationale, Finances et échanges internationaux.

Nous avons aussi Andrew Lawrence, directeur exécutif par intérim à la Direction de programme des voyageurs à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.

Nous avons aussi Evan Rachkovsky, directeur de la recherche et des communications à l'Association canadienne des snowbirds.

Enfin, nous avons Tim Reed, qui témoigne, à titre personnel, par vidéoconférence en direct de Calgary, en Alberta.

Bienvenue à tous. Nous sommes ravis de vous accueillir ici aujourd'hui.

Nous entendrons en premier l'exposé du ministère des Transports. [Français]

M. Michael DeJong (directeur général, Intégration des stratégies et programmes multimodaux, ministère des Transports):

Madame la présidente, membres du Comité, je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de parler de l'utilisation temporaire de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis par des citoyens canadiens.[Traduction]

Je m'appelle Mike DeJong et je représente Transports Canada. J'aimerais prendre un instant pour présenter mon collègue Mario Demers, qui est chef de l'importation à Transports Canada.

Je voudrais décrire brièvement les règles actuelles qui s'appliquent à l'importation de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis et fournir une mise à jour sur les mesures en cours pour améliorer ce processus.

En ce qui concerne le processus actuel, la Loi sur la sécurité automobile autorise l'importation au Canada de véhicules achetés aux États-Unis, si ces véhicules sont conformes aux normes de sécurité des véhicules automobiles du Canada. Ces normes établissent les exigences minimales de sécurité pour protéger le public voyageur, notamment les exigences en matière d'éclairage, de freinage et de commandes de direction. La Loi permet aussi l'importation au Canada de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis qui sont conformes aux normes équivalentes en vigueur aux États-Unis, à savoir les Normes fédérales de sécurité des véhicules automobiles des États-Unis, et qui peuvent être révisés afin de se conformer aux règles canadiennes.

Même si les normes de sécurité des véhicules automobiles des deux pays sont très similaires, Transports Canada a des exigences uniques dans des domaines où les avantages en matière de sécurité ont été démontrés. À titre d'exemple, les normes canadiennes comprennent des exigences concernant les feux de jour, l'interverrouillage du système d'embrayage pour les véhicules équipés d'une boîte de vitesse manuelle et le système antidémarrage antivol.

Transports Canada gère le processus d'importation par l'entremise du Registraire des véhicules importés, ou le RVI. Un importateur doit confirmer que tout rappel touchant son véhicule a été corrigé et en présenter une preuve au RVI avant l'importation. Une fois au Canada, après avoir payé les frais d'inscription au RVI, l'importateur devra présenter le véhicule pour une inspection finale des normes fédérales. Avant cette inspection, l'importateur doit apporter les modifications nécessaires pour que les véhicules importés des États-Unis soient conformes aux exigences canadiennes.

Le RVI est financé au moyen de frais d'utilisation imposés aux importateurs canadiens de véhicules achetés aux États-Unis. Ces frais ouvrent une série de tâches et de services tels que la vérification de la conformité avant l'achat, les documents liés à l'importation, le suivi et l'avis final aux autorités d'immatriculation provinciales. Le RVI offre également une ligne d'assistance sept jours par semaine et maintient un réseau de plus de 500 centres d'inspection.

Dans le cas d'une importation temporaire, le règlement de sécurité actuel prévoit des options pour les véhicules qui ne sont pas conformes aux normes de sécurité canadiennes. Ces options s'appliquent notamment aux circonstances impliquant des essais de véhicules, des évaluations ou l'évaluation de nouveaux dispositifs de sécurité. Afin de faciliter le tourisme et les mouvements transfrontaliers, les citoyens américains sont autorisés à importer et à exporter temporairement des véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis, notamment les véhicules de location. Il en est de même pour les citoyens canadiens qui exportent et importent des véhicules immatriculés au Canada.

Actuellement, le règlement de sécurité en vigueur n'autorise pas un citoyen canadien à importer temporairement au Canada un véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis. Le véhicule doit être plutôt importé à titre permanent. Ce règlement s'apparente à la loi américaine, qui interdit à un citoyen américain d'importer temporairement un véhicule immatriculé au Canada vers les États-Unis.

Le règlement fédéral se base actuellement sur la supposition que, lorsqu'un Canadien importe un véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis, il le fait à titre permanent. Le ministère est conscient que ce n'est pas toujours le cas et, par conséquent, cherche à modifier le règlement de sécurité de manière à autoriser l'importation temporaire de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis par un citoyen canadien lorsqu'il est clair que le véhicule sera retourné aux États-Unis.

Nous modifions actuellement le règlement. Dans le cadre de ces modifications réglementaires, aucuns frais d'inscription au RVI ne seront exigés pour l'importation temporaire de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis vers le Canada. Les modifications proposées ont fait l'objet d'une publication préalable dans la Partie I de la Gazette du Canada le 19 mai 2018. Fort de ce progrès, le ministère souhaite finaliser ces modifications et demander l'approbation de la publication finale dans la Partie II de la Gazette du Canada d'ici la fin de l'année civile 2019. En attendant la publication finale, les citoyens canadiens pourraient immédiatement envoyer une demande à Transports Canada, sans frais, pour obtenir un permis d'importation temporaire d'un véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis vers le Canada.

Merci, madame la présidente.

(1210)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur DeJong.

Passons maintenant au représentant du ministère des Finances.

M. Scott Winter (directeur, Politique tarifaire et commerciale, Division de la politique commerciale internationale, Finances et échanges internationaux, ministère des Finances):

Bonjour.

Madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, merci de nous avoir invités à nous adresser à vous aujourd'hui.

Je m'appelle Scott Winter. Je suis directeur de la politique commerciale et tarifaire au ministère des Finances du Canada. Je suis accompagné de mon collègue M. Carlos Achadinha, directeur principal de la Division de la taxe de vente.

Je vais tout d'abord expliquer les objectifs stratégiques généraux de la structure tarifaire du Canada et de la taxe sur les produits et services, soit la TPS, ce qui sera suivi d'une courte description du traitement des véhicules importés et de la place qu'occupe ce traitement par rapport à ces objectifs.

Les droits de douane sont établis en vertu du Tarif des douanes et sont prélevés sur les marchandises importées, s'il y a lieu, pour diverses raisons stratégiques, y compris la protection des industries nationales et la production de recettes fiscales.

La TPS est la taxe de vente nationale du Canada. Elle est une taxe générale qui s'applique à la plupart des produits et des services qui sont acquis en vue d'être consommés au Canada. La TPS est habituellement prélevée sur les marchandises importées de la même façon qu'elle est imposée aux achats effectués au pays afin que les marchandises importées n'obtiennent pas un avantage concurrentiel lié à la taxe par rapport aux marchandises vendues au Canada.

Compte tenu de ces considérations et de ces principes, les résidents canadiens qui importent un véhicule au Canada sont tenus de payer les droits d'importation et les taxes applicables au moment de l'importation. Il y a certaines exceptions, à la règle générale selon laquelle les droits de douane et la TPS s'appliquent à l'importation de véhicules, y compris aux véhicules importés temporairement.

Par exemple, les droits de douane et la TPS ne s'appliquent pas aux véhicules importés temporairement par des résidents canadiens afin de transporter leurs propres articles à usage personnel ou domestique au Canada ou à l'extérieur du Canada ou encore en raison d'une urgence ou d'un imprévu.

Sous réserve de certaines conditions précisées par règlement, les résidents canadiens peuvent aussi importer temporairement, en franchise de droits de douane et de TPS, un véhicule immatriculé à l'étranger afin de parvenir à leur destination au Canada et de retourner à un endroit situé à l'extérieur du Canada dans un délai de 30 jours. Ils ne peuvent toutefois pas utiliser le véhicule pour d'autres raisons pendant que le véhicule se trouve au Canada.

Le cadre actuel a été conçu avec pour objectifs stratégiques généraux d'éviter les désavantages concurrentiels ou les iniquités pour les entreprises canadiennes — par exemple, les concessionnaires automobiles dans des collectivités canadiennes frontalières —, ainsi que de réduire au minimum les risques d'évitement des droits et de la taxe, ce qui pourrait avoir une incidence négative sur les recettes publiques et créer des règles du jeu non équitables pour les entreprises canadiennes.

La perception et l'administration des droits de douane et de la TPS sur les marchandises importées, ainsi que les exceptions que j'ai mentionnées pour les véhicules importés temporairement, relèvent de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada. Mon collègue de l'ASFC décrira la façon dont son organisation applique et administre actuellement les droits de douane et la TPS sur les importations temporaires de véhicules.

Encore une fois, merci de nous avoir permis de prendre la parole aujourd'hui. Nous serons heureux de répondre à toutes les questions du Comité.

(1215)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Winter.

La parole est maintenant à M. Lawrence.

M. Andrew Lawrence (directeur général par intérim, Direction générale des voyageurs, Agence des services frontaliers du Canada):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

Comme le Comité le sait, le mandat de l'Agence est complexe et dynamique. Dans le cadre de la gestion de la frontière, nous appliquons plus de 90 lois et règlements pour le compte d’autres ministères fédéraux, des provinces et des territoires.

En ce qui concerne cette étude sur la faisabilité de permettre aux Canadiens d’importer au Canada, pour une période temporaire définie, des véhicules de promenade immatriculés aux États-Unis dont ils sont les propriétaires légaux, sans avoir à payer de taxes, de droits ou de frais d’importation, l’ASFC ne peut se prononcer que sur son rôle d’organisme d’exécution de la législation frontalière. L’ASFC tire son pouvoir d’examiner, de retenir et de refuser l’entrée de toute marchandise ou de tout moyen de transport — dans le cas présent, un véhicule — de la Loi sur les douanes, soit l’une des principales lois exécutées par l’Agence. Lorsqu’un résident canadien souhaite revenir au Canada avec son véhicule de promenade immatriculé aux États-Unis et qu’il se présente à un poste frontalier terrestre, un agent des services frontaliers doit tenir compte d’un certain nombre de lois et de règlements avant d’admettre le véhicule au pays.

Premièrement, les véhicules importés au Canada doivent répondre aux exigences établies par Transports Canada en vertu de la Loi sur la sécurité automobile. L’ASFC aide Transports Canada en s’assurant que les véhicules peuvent être importés et elle interdit l’entrée aux véhicules inadmissibles. Deuxièmement, en vertu de ses pouvoirs étendus en matière d’aliments, de plantes et d’animaux, l’ASFC inspecte les véhicules automobiles qui entrent au Canada pour s’assurer qu’ils sont propres et exempts d’organismes nuisibles, de terre ou d’autres matières organiques. Les véhicules contaminés se voient refuser l’entrée et sont renvoyés du Canada en vertu de la Loi sur la protection des végétaux, de la Loi sur la santé des animaux et de leurs règlements connexes. Troisièmement, l’ASFC peut, à la demande et au nom d’Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, retenir les expéditions soupçonnées de déroger aux exigences de la Loi canadienne sur la protection de l’environnement (1999).

Enfin, au nom du ministère des Finances, l’ASFC doit s’assurer que les résidents du Canada qui conduisent des véhicules pour lesquels les droits et les taxes n’ont pas été payés respectent les conditions strictes énoncées au numéro tarifaire 9802 et dans le Règlement sur l’importation temporaire de moyens de transport par des résidents du Canada. Les véhicules importés temporairement sont exempts de droits et de taxes tant que les conditions imposées par le Règlement sont respectées. Pour les véhicules admissibles au Canada qui sont importés de façon permanente, l’ASFC doit évaluer les droits, la taxe d’accise et la taxe sur les biens et services dus à l’État.

Il convient de noter qu’en cas d'urgence ou de circonstances imprévues l’importation temporaire de véhicules inadmissibles par des résidents canadiens peut être autorisée en vertu du Règlement. Actuellement, le traitement des véhicules immatriculés à l’étranger se fait sur papier, et l’ASFC ne tient pas de statistiques ou de données concernant expressément le sous-ensemble de la population que le Comité examine.

J’espère avoir clarifié le rôle de l’ASFC en matière d’exécution de la loi à la frontière pour ce qui est de l’importation temporaire de véhicules par des résidents canadiens. Je répondrai avec plaisir à toutes les questions des membres du Comité.

Merci.

La présidente:

Passons maintenant à l'Association canadienne des snowbirds.

Monsieur Rachkovsky, vous avez la parole.

M. Evan Rachkovsky (directeur, Recherche et communication, Association canadienne des snowbirds):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Merci de nous avoir invités ici aujourd'hui pour discuter de la question des résidents canadiens qui utilisent temporairement au Canada des véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis. Je m'appelle Evan Rachkovsky. Je suis directeur de la recherche et des communications à l'Association canadienne des snowbirds.

Pour les membres du Comité qui ne connaissent pas notre organisation, j'aimerais brièvement présenter l'Association. L'Association canadienne des snowbirds a été fondée en 1992, et il s'agit d'une organisation nationale de défense des droits non partisane et sans but lucratif qui travaille activement à défendre et à améliorer les droits et les privilèges des voyageurs canadiens. L'Association compte aujourd'hui plus de 110 000 membres de toutes les provinces et de tous les territoires au Canada.

Pour remplir notre mandat et offrir des résultats tangibles à nos membres, notre association fournit en temps opportun des renseignements sur les voyages à ses membres et collabore avec tous les gouvernements pour faire adopter des politiques dans l'intérêt des voyageurs canadiens. Nous ne fournissons pas seulement des renseignements à jour à nos membres; nous avons aussi un programme de relations gouvernementales qui vise un vaste ensemble de sujets, et cela inclut le respect de la Loi canadienne sur la santé en ce qui a trait au principe de transférabilité, aux politiques provinciales et territoriales de délivrance de médicaments lors d'un séjour à l'étranger, aux exigences en matière de résidence pour conserver la couverture d'assurance maladie et à un certain nombre d'enjeux transfrontaliers.

(1220)

La présidente:

Pourriez-vous parler un peu plus lentement? Les interprètes ont beaucoup de mal à suivre votre cadence.

M. Evan Rachkovsky:

Certainement.

Concernant le dernier point, l'Association a récemment suivi de près l'élaboration et la mise en œuvre de l'Initiative sur les entrées et les sorties, soit le programme d'échange de renseignements entre le Canada et les États-Unis qui devrait être pleinement fonctionnel d'ici la fin de l'année. L'Initiative sur les entrées et les sorties est un programme de la grande déclaration Par-delà la frontière qui a été annoncée en février 2011 et qui vise à renforcer la sécurité collective et à accélérer la circulation des marchandises, des services et des voyageurs légitimes à la frontière canado-américaine et au-delà.

Il y a un autre enjeu transfrontalier qui a des effets sur nos membres, et c'est le sujet de votre étude au Comité. Cela concerne l'utilisation temporaire au Canada, par des résidents canadiens, de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis. Selon le cadre législatif et réglementaire actuel, les résidents canadiens ont seulement le droit d'importer temporairement au Canada des véhicules immatriculés à l'étranger pour transporter des effets personnels ou domestiques à l'intérieur ou à l'extérieur du Canada pour une durée maximale de 30 jours. Dans toute autre circonstance, si vous achetez, louez ou empruntez un véhicule pendant que vous êtes à l'étranger, les lois relevant de Transports Canada et de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ne vous permettent pas d'importer un véhicule au Canada pour votre usage personnel, et ce, même temporairement, à moins de respecter toutes les exigences de Transports Canada et de payer les droits et les taxes fédérales applicables.

Selon nous, les dispositions actuelles sont dépassées et elles ne reflètent pas la tendance dans les deux pays qui cherchent de plus en plus à rendre l'expérience à la frontière la plus harmonieuse et la plus rapide possible pour les voyageurs à faible risque. Nous devons moderniser cette politique, parce qu'elle impose, dans sa forme actuelle, une restriction inutile sur les possibilités de transport des voyageurs canadiens qui sont propriétaires de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis.

Plus de 60 % de nos membres partent du Canada en voiture pour se rendre chaque année là où ils passent l'hiver. Normalement, avec l'âge, les snowbirds choisissent de faire l'aller-retour en avion entre le Canada et les États-Unis plutôt que de devoir conduire plusieurs jours pour se rendre à leur résidence d'hiver. Pour avoir un moyen de transport pendant qu'ils sont plus au sud, bon nombre d'entre eux achètent un véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis. C'est possible dans tous les États du Sunbelt, en particulier en Floride, en Arizona, en Californie et au Texas, et les gens peuvent immatriculer et assurer leur véhicule avec un permis de conduire canadien.

Dans certains cas, ces voyageurs canadiens peuvent devoir retourner au Canada avec leur véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis. En vertu des dispositions actuelles de la loi, si l'exemption prévue ne s'applique pas dans leur cas, ils doivent importer le véhicule par l'entremise du programme du Registraire des véhicules importés et payer les droits d'importation, les taxes et les frais relatifs au programme. Ces exigences sont logiques pour les propriétaires de véhicules qui habitent au Canada pendant presque toute l'année, mais cela semble excessif pour les propriétaires de véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis qui restent aux États-Unis jusqu'à six mois par an et qui ont l'intention un jour de vendre leur véhicule aux États-Unis.

Je remercie encore une fois les membres du Comité de leur invitation.

Je répondrai avec plaisir à toutes vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Reed, qui témoigne à titre personnel.

Bienvenue au Comité, monsieur Reed.

M. Tim Reed (à titre personnel):

Merci, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, de m'avoir invité à venir vous parler de cet enjeu.

J'aimerais aussi remercier mon député Tom Kmiec de sa présence et de son dévouement pour cette cause, de même que M. Badawey de son intérêt.

À titre d'information, à l'instar de centaines de milliers de Canadiens, ma femme et moi possédons une résidence aux États-Unis où nous profitons de notre retraite. Nous possédons aussi deux véhicules achetés et immatriculés dans l'État de l'Arizona. Après avoir acheté ces véhicules, j'ai été surpris d'apprendre que nous ne pourrions pas venir temporairement au Canada avec ces véhicules. La seule possibilité en vertu de la loi actuelle, qui est la Loi sur la sécurité automobile, selon ce que j'en comprends, serait d'importer de manière permanente le véhicule, comme vous venez d'entendre plusieurs autres intervenants vous l'expliquer. La Loi sur la sécurité automobile donne l'impression, compte tenu de son titre et de son préambule, qu'elle existe principalement pour des raisons de sécurité. Même si c'est louable et nécessaire, il semble que la Loi ne s'appliquerait pas à un citoyen américain qui souhaiterait venir temporairement au Canada avec son véhicule. Je présume que cela se produit des dizaines de milliers de fois aux postes frontaliers.

Bien que la loi traite en long et en large de l'importation permanente de véhicules, nous devons présumer que, lorsque la loi a été adoptée, les législateurs n'avaient pas pensé qu'un citoyen canadien posséderait un véhicule aux États-Unis et qu'il pourrait vouloir venir temporairement au Canada avec son véhicule. Cela donne une situation ridicule où un citoyen américain jouit dans un tel cas de plus de droits au Canada qu'un citoyen canadien.

Pourquoi un citoyen canadien souhaiterait-il venir temporairement avec son véhicule au Canada? Dans notre cas, l'un de nos véhicules est une voiture sport décapotable, et nous aimerions la conduire à l'occasion durant l'été au Canada.

Voici un autre exemple que ma femme et moi avons vécu. Des amis australiens nous ont offert de venir nous rejoindre à notre domicile aux États-Unis et de faire une promenade panoramique en traversant les États-Unis et l'Ouest canadien avant de retourner en Australie par avion en partant du Canada, et nous retournerions aux États-Unis avec notre fourgonnette. Nous avons appris que la seule manière de le faire aurait été de louer à grands frais une voiture. Par conséquent, notre projet d'escapade en voiture est tombé à l'eau.

Fait intéressant, en vertu de cette loi, nous aurions eu le droit d'entrer au Canada au volant d'une voiture de location, mais pas de la nôtre. La question se pose. Pourquoi une entreprise américaine de location de voitures jouit-elle de ce droit alors que les citoyens canadiens ne peuvent pas le faire?

Dans un autre cas, mon beau-frère n'était pas au courant de ces restrictions et il avait l'intention d'installer son véhicule tout terrain sur une remorque et de l'apporter temporairement au Canada, mais il s'est vu refuser l'entrée au pays à la frontière. Il a dû laisser son véhicule aux États-Unis, conduire jusque chez lui à Calgary, remplir de la paperasse pour l'importer de manière permanente au Canada, retourner chercher son véhicule et enfin le rapporter plusieurs mois plus tard pour le laisser de manière permanente aux États-Unis.

Ce sont des cas réels. Nous pouvons aussi facilement imaginer d'autres scénarios. Par exemple, si une citoyenne canadienne qui conduit sa voiture immatriculée aux États-Unis doit de toute urgence retourner au Canada et qu'elle ne peut pas prendre l'avion pour des raisons de santé, par exemple, qu'elle ne peut pas acheter de vol, qu'elle n'en a pas les moyens ou que le trafic aérien est cloué au sol, elle ne pourrait pas... Je dois dire que j'avais cru comprendre que cette personne ne pourrait pas conduire son propre véhicule, mais nous venons tout juste d'entendre qu'en cas d'urgence les citoyens canadiens sont autorités à entrer au Canada avec leur véhicule. Je ne le savais pas.

Je mène des enquêtes et je communique depuis près de cinq ans maintenant avec des fonctionnaires du gouvernement au sujet de cet enjeu. Durant cette période, un employé du ministère des Transports a mentionné qu'il est difficile de s'assurer qu'un véhicule importé temporairement au Canada quitte le pays. La même question se pose dans le cas d'un citoyen américain. J'ai tout de même offert un processus simple et facile à mettre en œuvre pour régler cette question.

Comme mon temps devant le Comité est limité et que cette réunion porte sur un problème législatif et non la mise en œuvre, je vais m'abstenir de vous présenter la procédure que j'ai proposée. Si vous voulez plus d'information, vous avez ma proposition et des copies des lettres que j'ai envoyées au ministre Garneau en janvier 2019 et en septembre.

En 2017, M. Kmiec a gentiment offert d'appuyer une pétition présentée au Parlement à ce sujet. J'ai été informé que je n'aurais besoin que de la signature originale de 25 citoyens canadiens. Après avoir expliqué ce fait au sujet des pétitions, j'ai facilement réussi à obtenir 100 signatures. Personne n'a refusé de signer la pétition. Bon nombre de ces gens possèdent une propriété aux États-Unis, et bon nombre d'entre eux possèdent des véhicules aux États-Unis. Je crois que nous pouvons affirmer que la majorité des signataires étaient stupéfaits d'apprendre la façon dont leur droit était restreint. M. Kmiec a ensuite lu et présenté notre motion au Parlement en 2017.

(1225)



En résumé, je demande au Comité de lancer un processus pour faire rectifier cette erreur dans la loi afin de rétablir les droits des Canadiens qui ont été, par inadvertance, éliminés sans raison apparente.

Il est gratifiant de voir des fonctionnaires de divers ministères participer à la séance. Je suis un haut dirigeant du secteur privé à la retraite qui a connu une longue carrière dans le domaine administratif. Je suis donc à même de comprendre pleinement le processus administratif relatif à la mise en oeuvre d'une politique ou, dans le cas présent, d'une loi. Cependant, comme je le sais pertinemment en raison de ma carrière, ce sont le processus et l'administration qui suivent les politiques et non l'inverse.

J'admets que ce problème touche une part infime de la population. Je me demande toutefois sur quel calcul on se base pour décider quand on fait fi des droits des citoyens. Je fais confiance à votre jugement de parlementaires pour faire ce qu'il faut, sans égard au nombre de citoyens canadiens touchés.

Je vous remercie de votre attention. Je pourrai également répondre aux questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Reed.

Les documents de M. Reed sont en cours de traduction; vous ne les avez donc pas encore reçus.

Monsieur Kmiec, vous avez la parole pour six minutes.

M. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, PCC):

Je remercie de nouveau les membres du Comité, particulièrement ceux du côté du gouvernement, d'avoir permis la tenue de la présente rencontre. Comme vous l'avez entendu de la bouche de mon électeur de la formidable circonscription de Calgary Shepard — ce n'est pas la meilleure, car je sais que tout le monde affirmera que la sienne est la meilleure, mais elle est formidable —, il m'a fallu cinq ans pour arriver à obtenir une audience d'un comité. C'est le bon côté de la chose.

Je tiens à remercier également les fonctionnaires de témoigner. Je sais que nous vous avons éloigné de vos ministères un jour de semaine pour traiter de ce qui est un problème très circonscrit, comme moi et M. Reed l'admettons nous-mêmes.

Je vais maintenant passer aux facettes moins reluisantes de l'affaire. J'ai ici toute la correspondance échangée entre le cabinet du ministre et M. Reed, qui me l'a remise, ainsi que la réponse — fort insatisfaisante — que j'ai reçue à propos de la pétition.

Voilà ce qui arrive quand des problèmes comme celui-ci ne sont pas résolus immédiatement, quand un résidant du Canada soulève un problème très technique relativement à un bien privé.

Monsieur DeJong, vous avez indiqué que vous attendiez parce qu'à la fin de l'exercice, le règlement d'application de la Loi sur la sécurité automobile sera modifié pour permettre aux Canadiens d'importer temporairement leurs véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis. Je crois toutefois comprendre qu'ils doivent d'abord demander un permis. Ils ne peuvent pas simplement se présenter à la frontière. Ils devront préalablement demander un permis au gouvernement du Canada, remplissant un formulaire en fournissant l'information relative à la plaque d'immatriculation.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus sur la manière dont cela fonctionnera?

(1230)

M. Michael DeJong:

Je commencerai en confirmant simplement le processus, puis je céderai la parole à mon collègue Mario pour qu'il traite du permis requis.

Un processus est effectivement en cours pour éliminer les droits relatifs au Registraire des véhicules importés qui sont imposés aux véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis importés temporairement au Canada par un citoyen canadien.

Il y a donc encore effectivement un processus à cet égard afin de respecter les exigences en matière de sécurité de la Loi sur la sécurité automobile.

Mario, voulez-vous poursuivre?

M. Mario Demers (chef, Importation et inspection de la vérification, ministère des Transports):

À l'heure actuelle, l'importation temporaire peut être autorisée. Les modifications au règlement qui entreront en vigueur à la fin de l'année et qui seront publiées dans la Partie II de la Gazette du Canada élargiront la marge de manœuvre afin de faire exactement ce dont il est question aujourd'hui, c'est-à-dire importer temporairement un véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis.

Il existe actuellement un formulaire en ligne, que l'on peut également se procurer en format papier auprès de Transports Canada. On y fournit des renseignements de base, comme le numéro d'identification, le constructeur, le modèle et l'année du véhicule, la date d'importation, la durée estimée du séjour au pays et le but de l'importation, et Transports Canada délivrera une autorisation que l'on présentera à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada au moment de l'entrée afin de prouver que l'importation temporaire — et non permanente — est déjà approuvée. On n'a donc pas à recourir au Registraire des véhicules importés, à payer les droits afférents et à faire modifier le véhicule.

Le permis identifie clairement le véhicule, et quand on le présente à la frontière, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada comprend que le dossier a été examiné et approuvé par Transports Canada.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Vous avez entendu l'exemple de M. Reed quand il a voulu importer temporairement un véhicule de l'Arizona. Il pourra désormais demander le permis et importer ce véhicule, pour une période de 30 jours, par exemple, puis le ramener aux États-Unis.

M. Mario Demers:

Oui.

M. Tom Kmiec:

J'ai un autre exemple dont m'ont fait part d'autres électeurs.

Disons que j'ai une maison de campagne ou un chalet au Montana et je conduis une jeep pour effectuer des balades hors route. C'est l'exemple que j'ai utilisé devant le Comité. Je veux amener ce véhicule à Lethbridge, par exemple, où je vis afin de le réparer, car j'y ai un garage. J'ai peut-être endommagé mon véhicule quand j'étais hors route. D'après ce que je comprends des propos de M. Lawrence, je dois laver ma jeep pour être certain qu'elle soit propre, et je vous remercie de l'avoir précisé, car je ne l'aurais probablement pas fait. Je laverai donc ma jeep, puis je me présenterai à la frontière avec le permis, et je serai autorisé à entrer au pays.

Et si mon véhicule n'est pas fonctionnel? C'est mon véhicule, que je transporte sur une remorque tirée par un véhicule canadien, car je veux l'amener à mon garage pour le réparer. Je suis habile de mes mains et je veux l'améliorer, remplacer la courroie crantée ou réparer à la transmission. Puis-je importer ce véhicule même s'il n'est pas fonctionnel?

M. Mario Demers:

L'état du véhicule ne constitue pas un facteur qui entre en compte quand on décide si son importation est autorisée ou non. Selon le véhicule... Ici encore, nous ne réglementons pas l'utilisation prévue du véhicule. Si vous avez une Jeep Cherokee, par exemple, et que vous dites que vous savez que c'est un véhicule réglementé pour la route, mais que vous ne l'utilisez jamais sur la route, il s'agit quand même d'un véhicule réglementé qui doit satisfaire aux normes. S'il s'agit d'un véritable véhicule utilitaire ou tout-terrain, toutefois, il y a ici encore des exigences de base, mais si vous l'importez temporairement, ce n'est pas un problème.

M. Tom Kmiec:

J'ai une autre question. Le modèle que vous proposez ici cadre-t-il avec... Je suppose que la partie relative au permis ne cadre pas, mais les droits seront-ils tous annulés pendant la période visée? Que se passera-t-il si on reste trop longtemps? Pendant combien de temps le permis est-il valide?

M. Mario Demers:

Le permis de Transports Canada autorise actuellement... C'est ce que nous appelons l'annexe VII ou le Système d'importation temporaire de véhicules qui s'appliquent ici. Ce système permet essentiellement l'importation pendant un an ou plus en présence de motifs justifiables. Les périodes ne sont habituellement pas aussi longues pour l'importation temporaire d'un véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis par un Canadien. Ce sont plutôt des périodes d’un, trois ou six mois.

Pour ces véhicules, le formulaire est facile et rapide à remplir. Il comprend 9 à 10 questions très simples. On reçoit son certificat et on entre au pays, sans payer le moindre droit pour l'importation temporaire. On n'en paie que pour l'importation permanente.

(1235)

La présidente:

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vous remercie de témoigner aujourd'hui. Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Je tiens à vous remercier aussi du travail que vous avez certainement accompli dans ce dossier depuis quelque temps.

Je veux aussi vous remercier, monsieur Kmiec, d'avoir mis ce problème en lumière. Même s'il s'agit d'un problème très circonscrit qui ne touche certainement qu'une poignée de personnes au pays, c'est important, que cela concerne une, cent, mille ou un million de personnes. Je vous remercie d'avoir porté la question à notre attention. Je vous remercie également d'avoir présenté la motion qui a recueilli un appui unanime. Vous n'étiez pas présent lors de la dernière réunion quand j'ai présenté les modifications que je voulais faire apporter à la motion. Je voulais simplement que vous sachiez que mon but était d'accélérer les choses pour vous. Même si nous sommes parfois assis de côtés différents de la table, nous travaillons ensemble dans l'intérêt de personnes comme celles avec lesquelles vous discutez de la question depuis plusieurs mois.

La question que je poserai à M. Kmiec sera très brève et fort simple.

Dans le cadre du dossier que vous avez présenté et du travail qui est en cours, le ministère a très clairement indiqué qu'il s'emploie à modifier le règlement sur la sécurité. Vous avez établi un échéancier pour les modifications proposées, et même si elles ont fait l'objet d'une publication préalable dans la Partie I de la Gazette du Canada le 19 mai 2018, vous entendez maintenant, d'ici la publication finale, clore le dossier avant la fin de l'année. Un grand nombre de problèmes pourraient ainsi être résolus.

Monsieur Kmiec, êtes-vous satisfait de la direction que le ministère a empruntée?

M. Tom Kmiec:

Puis-je répondre à cette question même si je ne suis pas un témoin?

La présidente:

Vous le pouvez.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Formidable.

Oui, je pense que c'est excellent, tant que le ministère poursuit le processus jusqu'à publication dans la Partie II de la Gazette du Canada. Comme il me reste encore quelques questions sur la procédure, je me demandais...

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vous laisserai le temps de les poser, monsieur Kmiec. Allez-y.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Excellent. Merci, monsieur Badawey.

Monsieur Lawrence, dans quelle mesure l'Agence des services frontaliers intervient-elle dans le processus relatif au permis? Vous avez indiqué qu'à l'heure actuelle, la tenue de dossiers se fait en format papier pour les passages frontaliers au Canada. Ne s'agit-il que d'un autre document que les agents des services frontaliers recueilleront ou est-ce que deux ministères communiqueront par voie électronique à un moment donné?

Vous créez une nouvelle direction travaillant avec des documents papier...

M. Mario Demers:

Non, c'est une direction existante.

M. Tom Kmiec: Elle existe?

M. Mario Demers: Nous l'avons simplement agrandie pour lui confier une tâche supplémentaire, soit celle de s'occuper de ce dossier.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Est-ce un document que je devrai imprimer ou pourrai-je le présenter sur mon appareil électronique à la frontière?

M. Mario Demers:

Pour l'importation personnelle, oui. Dans le cadre de l'initiative de guichet unique concernant l'importation commerciale, on procède de manière électronique, mais pour l'importation personnelle, le processus fonctionne toujours avec des documents papier.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Je devrai encore imprimer le document? Ne pourrais-je pas le montrer sur mon téléphone si le document s'y trouve?

M. Mario Demers:

Non, vous ne pouvez pas le montrer sur votre téléphone.

M. Tom Kmiec:

C'est un peu bizarre, non? Vous avez indiqué que vous avez un système papier, mais vous me faites présenter une demande par voie électronique, puis imprimer le document pour que je puisse le montrer aux agents des services frontaliers de M. Lawrence à la frontière.

M. Andrew Lawrence:

Si vous me permettez d'apporter un éclaircissement, le document auquel j'ai fait référence est un permis d'importation temporaire. Il s'agit d'un document distinct, qui n'est pas utilisé dans tous les cas d'importation temporaire de véhicules.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Avec quelle célérité les agents de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada seront-ils avisés du changement une fois que les modifications auront été publiées dans la Partie II de la Gazette du Canada? Quand les employés de votre organisme sauront-ils que les Canadiens peuvent importer temporairement leur véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis? Comment se déroulera la formation?

M. Andrew Lawrence:

Mon rôle consiste, entre autres, à offrir une orientation fonctionnelle en première ligne en ce qui concerne les changements de réglementation et de politique. Nous avons établi un processus dans le cade duquel nous publions ce que nous appelons « l'information sur le quart de travail » dans un bulletin opérationnel. Nous y parlons des divers pouvoirs conférés à Transports Canada et fournissons des instructions étape par étape aux employés de première ligne pour qu'ils sachent de quoi a l'air le formulaire, comment on en fait la demande et ce que ce changement signifie sur le plan de l'application des diverses exigences à la frontière.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Je reviens à vous, monsieur Demers.

Que se passe-t-il si un Canadien reste trop longtemps? Quelle sera la durée de ces permis?

M. Mario Demers:

Ici encore, c'est au cas par cas. Par exemple, si une personne déclare qu'elle souhaite importer son véhicule pour trois mois, mais qu'un imprévu survient et que son séjour dure quatre mois, elle peut simplement aviser Transports Canada de la situation en fournissant son numéro de permis. Tant que la raison est valable, le permis est prolongé.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Tous les frais disparaîtront, qu'il s'agisse des droits d'importation, de la TPS ou des droits de douane. Les Canadiens qui importent leur véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis ne paieront aucuns frais?

(1240)

M. Mario Demers:

En ce qui concerne Transports Canada, c'est exact.

M. Michael DeJong:

C'est en fait aux droits relatifs au Registraire des véhicules importés de Transports Canada que référence est faite. Ce sont ces droits qui sont visés.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Y aura-il encore un droit pour le climatiseur?

M. Mario Demers:

Non, ce droit ne s'appliquerait pas en cas d'importation temporaire.

M. Tom Kmiec:

D'accord. Me voilà satisfait. Le ministère va vraiment résoudre le problème, et dans un délai serré en plus, d'ici décembre. Je suis enchanté.

La présidente:

Exactement.

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je n'ai jamais eu l'impression que Trois-Rivières était aussi loin de la frontière américaine que ce matin. Voilà une question dont je n'ai jamais traité encore en huit ans de pratique. À mon avis, il y a deux façons d'apprendre, en écoutant ou en posant des questions. J'ai l'impression que les questions que je poserais seraient tellement d'un niveau élémentaire et dans une niche tellement ciblée que j'offrirais volontiers mon temps de parole au porteur de cette motion, qui souhaitait que nous tenions deux réunions sur ce sujet. Je pense qu'en regroupant le temps que vient de lui accorder M. Badawey et le mien, nous arriverons à lui offrir deux réunions en une.[Traduction]

Si vous voulez mon temps, il est à vous. [Français]

M. Tom Kmiec:

Monsieur Aubin, je vous remercie de votre offre. Je sais que c'est un sujet très précis et très particulier, qui touche mes concitoyens et les gens de ma circonscription. D'ailleurs, quelques-uns sont venus me voir à ce propos.[Traduction]

Puis-je revenir à l'annexe VII? L'acronyme SITV a été utilisé.

M. Mario Demers:

Cet acronyme fait référence au système électronique appelé Système d'importation temporaire de véhicules. Les gens peuvent y fournir tous les renseignements nécessaires à partir d'un ordinateur. Le tout est automatiquement examiné et traité par les fonctionnaires de Transports Canada, qui confirmeront l'autorisation par voie électronique.

M. Tom Kmiec:

J'ai vu des mesures législatives publiées dans la Gazette du Canada, puis le processus de consultation s'est prolongé et la mesure est restée lettre morte. Juste pour être certain que le dossier soit réglé d'ici la fin de l'année, est-ce qu'une date a été fixée pour la deuxième et dernière publication dans la Gazette du Canada? A-t-on établi une date pour l'entrée en vigueur de la mesure?

M. Michael DeJong:

La publication préalable a été faite en mai 2018. La date de la seconde publication n'a pas encore été fixée, et dépend des décisions de Transports Canada et de l'approbation des ministres du Conseil du Trésor. Le ministère entend boucler le dossier et demander l'approbation du règlement d'ici la fin de 2019.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Mon seul problème, c'est qu'il y a des élections, auquel cas les problèmes circonscrits comme celui-ci tendent à disparaître. Chaque ministère dispose d'un plan de réglementation. Cette mesure fait-elle partie également du plan de réglementation?

M. Michael DeJong:

Elle fait partie de notre plan de réglementation prospectif, dans le règlement modifiant les règlements sur la sécurité des véhicules automobiles concernant l'importation et la sécurité nationale.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Si le dossier ne se règle pas en 2019 et que mes électeurs me réélisent, accepteriez-vous de comparaître de nouveau devant le Comité reconstitué pour lui en expliquer les raisons?

M. Michael DeJong:

Je le ferais avec plaisir.

La présidente:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Si les interprètes ont éprouvé des difficultés avec M. Rachkovsky, alors ils vont avoir de véritables problèmes avec moi. Vous m'en voyez désolé.

Je remercie M. Aubin d'avoir indiqué que la question est nouvelle pour lui, car elle l'est pour moi également. Merci, monsieur Kmiec, d'avoir porté cette affaire à notre attention. C'est plus intéressant que je ne m'y attendais.

J'essaie de comprendre en quoi consiste l'importation temporaire. Selon ce que je comprends, si on traverse la frontière, on importe temporairement un véhicule d'entrée de jeu. Dès qu'on traverse la frontière dans un véhicule, aux yeux de la loi, on importe temporairement un véhicule. Est-ce exact?

M. Mario Demers:

Dès qu'on traverse la frontière, on importe même les vêtements que l'on porte. Quand on arrive en véhicule, c'est de l'importation. C'est à ce moment qu'on doit déclarer aux douanes si cette importation est temporaire ou permanente. Selon la décision, divers processus s'appliquent alors.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Vous pouvez importer un véhicule dans l'autre pays pour, disons, 30 jours, seulement pour vous rendre à votre destination. Commettez-vous une infraction si vous utilisez le véhicule pour aller à l'épicerie dans l'autre pays?

M. Mario Demers:

Je vais demander au représentant de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada de répondre, car cette règle des 30 jours et de la non-utilisation du véhicule relève de l'Agence.

M. Andrew Lawrence:

Cette règle des 30 jours est précisée dans le numéro tarifaire 9802 du Tarif des douanes, qui porte sur les conditions selon lesquelles un résident du Canada peut importer temporairement un véhicule. Les 30 jours font partie de ces conditions. Le véhicule doit être exporté uniquement aux fins du déplacement entre le point d'entrée et le point A et du déplacement entre le point A et le point d'entrée. En utilisant le véhicule au Canada à des fins de loisir ou pour le transport de biens ou de... Si vous êtes un chauffeur Uber et que vous conduisez des personnes ici et là, il s'agirait d'une infraction aux conditions prescrites dans le Tarif des douanes.

(1245)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si on trouve ce véhicule à l'épicerie, quelles seraient les sanctions et les répercussions?

M. Andrew Lawrence:

Il peut s'agir de sanctions monétaires, qui peuvent atteindre le montant des droits de douane et des taxes qui s'appliquent sur ce véhicule. Le véhicule peut être saisi en raison d'une fausse déclaration de la part du propriétaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela peut coûter assez cher. C'est très bien, merci.

Est-ce que le véhicule peut être enregistré dans les deux pays à la fois? Est-ce que c'est possible?

M. Mario Demers:

Je ne crois pas. Les États-Unis et le Canada n'ont pas les mêmes normes. Par conséquent, les États-Unis font la même chose que nous. Lorsqu'on importe de façon permanente un véhicule au Canada, il faut y apporter certaines modifications pour qu'il soit conforme aux normes canadiennes, notamment modifier les feux de jour, l'embrayage, etc. Cela varie selon la catégorie de véhicule. Aux États-Unis, il y a de légères différences à cet égard. Donc, si vous importez un véhicule aux États-Unis, vous devez amener ce véhicule chez un registraire du programme des véhicules importés et vous devez payer des frais pour faire modifier le véhicule, le faire inspecter et certifier conformément aux normes de sécurité américaines.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le réseau routier nord-américain ne se termine pas aux États-Unis. Il va jusqu'au Darien, entre le Panama et la Colombie. De quelle façon nos règles s'appliquent-elles à d'autres véhicules de l'Amérique du Nord et de l'Amérique centrale qui ne sont pas des véhicules américains ou canadiens?

M. Mario Demers:

Essentiellement, la Loi sur la sécurité automobile vise à faire en sorte que les véhicules importés au Canada respectent les normes canadiennes. Dans le cadre de l'ALENA, ou peu importe comment on l'appelle maintenant, les véhicules mexicains et américains peuvent être importés au Canada selon certaines conditions, à savoir qu'ils doivent être modifiés et inspectés, car les normes de sécurité aux États-Unis et au Canada sont très semblables. Dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre, les véhicules mexicains, je crois, feront l'objet d'un examen et il y aura une publication dans la Gazette du Canada à la fin de cette année pour permettre aux véhicules mexicains d'être importés également. Sans cela, l'importation n'est pas possible. La Loi sur la sécurité automobile précise que les véhicules doivent respecter les normes canadiennes. L'exception prévue au paragraphe 7(2) vise les véhicules achetés au détail aux États-Unis qui ne font pas l'objet de rappels et qui peuvent être modifiés afin de les rendre conformes aux normes canadiennes. Ils peuvent être importés, mais ils doivent faire l'objet de modifications et d'une inspection avant leur immatriculation dans une province, et ce dans un délai de 45 jours. Mais je le répète, cela concerne les importations permanentes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. C'est aussi clair que de la boue pour moi. Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Rachkovsky, on parle de faire enregistrer aux États-Unis les véhicules des Canadiens qui passent l'hiver dans le sud de ce pays. C'est de là que ça vient au départ. Pourquoi ces Canadiens ne veulent-ils pas avoir un véhicule avec une plaque canadienne pendant qu'ils sont aux États-Unis? Pourquoi ne pourraient-ils pas simplement enregistrer de nouveau leur véhicule lorsqu'ils reviennent au Canada?

M. Evan Rachkovsky:

Il y a deux raisons. Premièrement, la plupart des compagnies d'assurance canadiennes limitent à six mois la période durant laquelle un véhicule enregistré au Canada peut être utilisé à l'extérieur du Canada. Si votre véhicule était enregistré aux États-Unis, il serait alors possible de l'utiliser là-bas plus longtemps et de revenir au Canada avec votre véhicule en vertu de ces modifications réglementaires proposées. La seule compagnie d'assurance qui me vient en tête, c'est SGI, en Saskatchewan, qui autorise qu'un véhicule enregistré au Canada soit utilisé aux États-Unis pendant une période qui va au-delà de six mois. Outre cette compagnie, je dois dire que la plupart des compagnies d'assurance privées au Canada limitent à six mois la période durant laquelle on peut utiliser son véhicule à l'extérieur du pays. C'est pourquoi des gens achètent des véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis. C'est une façon de contourner cette règle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'une des autres questions — je ne me souviens pas qui l'a posée —

La présidente:

Il vous reste 20 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Laissez-faire.

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je veux revenir là-dessus, car ce pourrait être utile pour M. Kmiec et d'autres personnes afin de préparer du matériel de communication à l'intention des personnes qui voudraient tirer profit de ce nouveau régime. Quelles seraient les exigences établies par les compagnies d'assurance américaines relativement aux véhicules qui entrent au Canada? J'ai travaillé auprès de l'assurance-automobile publique de Colombie-Britannique, et je crois que nous avions les mêmes règles que SGI, mais il y avait aussi une couverture minimale obligatoire qui s'appliquait aux véhicules, une assurance de responsabilité civile, etc. Lorsqu'on diffusera des renseignements sur ce nouveau régime, je crois qu'il serait très judicieux de dire aux Canadiens qui entrent au pays avec ces véhicules immatriculés aux États-Unis qu'ils devraient communiquer avec leur compagnie d'assurance, car il pourrait y avoir des problèmes s'il y a un accident et qu'ils sont responsables.

Je ne sais pas si quelqu'un a des connaissances à ce sujet ou est en mesure de commenter cela.

(1250)

M. Ron Liepert:

Il se pourrait très bien que notre invité puisse répondre à cela.

La présidente:

Monsieur Reed, voulez-vous répondre à M. Hardie?

M. Tim Reed:

Je me suis moi-même renseigné à ce sujet, quoique je n'aie jamais essayé d'amener au Canada un véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis, étant donné les restrictions.

Je vais vous parler de ma propre situation. J'ai discuté de cela avec ma propre compagnie d'assurance — Farmers Insurance, si vous voulez le savoir — et les conditions qu'elle a établies sont les mêmes. Le véhicule pourrait être amené au Canada, et elle continuerait de l'assurer pendant six mois je crois. En ce qui concerne le Mexique, c'est différent, et je présume que c'est la même chose plus au sud, mais au Canada, il n'y a pas de problème.

La présidente:

Y a-t-il d'autres questions ou commentaires?

Monsieur Kmiec, la parole est à vous.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Monsieur Reed, compte tenu de tout ce que avez entendu de la part des fonctionnaires jusqu'à maintenant, êtes-vous satisfait de la façon dont les fonctionnaires du gouvernement gèrent ce permis d'importation et des modifications au Règlement?

M. Tim Reed:

Merci, monsieur Kmiec.

Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que des fonctionnaires du ministère des Transports m'ont toujours dit que cela ne pouvait pas se faire par l'intermédiaire de modifications réglementaires, qu'il fallait modifier la loi.

Je suis désolé, je ne connais pas bien les processus législatifs et réglementaires, mais il me semble qu'il s'agit de modifications réglementaires qui sont très bien accueillies. Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est qu'il faudrait peut-être aussi des changements législatifs.

Peut-être que les représentants du ministère des Transports pourraient répondre à cela.

La présidente:

Monsieur DeJong.

M. Michael DeJong:

Bien sûr.

Le changement réglementaire proposé figure en ligne. Dans ce changement réglementaire, effectué en vertu de la Loi sur la sécurité automobile, la loi pertinente, on fait précisément référence aux Canadiens qui entrent au Canada avec leur véhicule immatriculé aux États-Unis. Il est précisé qu'ils n'ont pas à payer de frais d'inscription.

M. Tom Kmiec:

Je vais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Eglinski.

La présidente:

Monsieur Eglinski, la parole est à vous si vous le souhaitez.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Ce permis d'importation temporaire ne changera rien à la règle selon laquelle on peut seulement amener le véhicule au point A puis le ramener au point d'entrée.

M. Mario Demers:

C'est exact.

Le programme d'importation temporaire de Transports Canada... la limite de 30 jours et les restrictions dont nos collègues de l'Agence canadienne des services frontaliers ont parlé visent des véhicules qui doivent être approuvés par Transports Canada. Lorsque vous entrez avec un véhicule approuvé par Transports Canada pour l'importation temporaire...

Comme je l'ai mentionné, nous avons élargi les droits. Actuellement, il y a les essais, les évaluations, les démonstrations, etc. Nous avons élargi ces droits, mais il n'y a aucune restriction en ce qui concerne l'endroit où le véhicule est utilisé.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Avez-vous vérifié les lois provinciales en Colombie-Britannique et en Alberta par exemple? Certaines provinces ont des limites de 30 jours pour ce qui est de l'utilisation d'un véhicule immatriculé à l'étranger.

Si vous êtes un résident de cette province, est-ce que ce n'est pas contradictoire...?

M. Mario Demers:

Je peux seulement parler du niveau fédéral. Les provinces conservent...

M. Michael DeJong:

Dans le cadre de toutes les modifications réglementaires liées à la sécurité automobile, nous consultons les provinces et les territoires par l'entremise du Conseil canadien des administrateurs en transport motorisé. Nous invitons les provinces et les territoires à présenter des commentaires.

La période pour ce faire est terminée. Les provinces et les territoires ne nous ont fait part d'aucune préoccupation à propos de l'amendement proposé.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Mais ils ont eu la possibilité de le faire.

M. Michael DeJong:

Oui.

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord. Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

C'est très bien.

Je remercie beaucoup tous nos témoins, particulièrement M. Reed d'avoir porté ces petits détails à notre attention. Je pense que le Comité des transports est très heureux d'avoir contribué à faire avancer les choses.

Je remercie M. Kmiec pour son bon travail en tant que parlementaire, ainsi que M. Badawey et tous les autres.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard tran 33942 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on May 09, 2019

2019-02-21 TRAN 131

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I am calling to order meeting number 131 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are receiving a briefing on the transportation of flammable liquids by rail.

The witnesses we have here from 11 until 12 this morning are from the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board. We have with us the Chair, Kathleen Fox.

Welcome again, Ms. Fox. It's nice to see you.

Also with us are Faye Ackermans, Board Member.

We also have Kirby Jang, Director, Rail and Pipeline Investigations; and, Jean Laporte, Chief Operating Officer.

Welcome to all of you. Thank you for coming back.

Ms. Fox.

Ms. Kathleen Fox (Chair, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

Madam Chair and honourable members, thank you for inviting the Transportation Safety Board of Canada to appear before you today so that we can answer your questions relating to the removal of the transportation of flammable liquids by rail from the most recent update to our watchlist.

First issued in 2010, the TSB's watchlist identifies the key safety issues that need to be addressed to make Canada's transportation system even safer. Each of the seven issues on the current edition is supported by a combination of investigation reports, board safety concerns and board recommendations. [Translation]

Over the years, the watchlist has served as both a call to action and a blueprint for change—a regular reminder to industry, to regulators, and to the public that the problems we highlight are complex, requiring coordinated action from multiple stakeholders in order to reduce the safety risks involved.

And that is exactly what has happened. As Canada's transportation network has evolved, so too has the watchlist: every two years, we put issues on it, call for change, and, when enough action has been taken that the risks have been sufficiently reduced, the issues are removed.[English]

As for the transportation of flammable liquids by rail, it was first added to the watchlist in 2014 in the wake of the terrible tragedy in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, and it was supported by a number of board recommendations. In 2016, we kept the issue on the watchlist. We were also explicit about the type of action we wanted to see—specifically, two things.

First, we called on railway companies to conduct thorough route planning and analysis and to perform risk assessments to ensure that risk control measures are effective. Second, we wanted more robust tank cars used when large quantities of flammable liquids are being transported by rail, in order to reduce the likelihood or consequences of a dangerous goods release following derailments.

Since then, Transport Canada and the industry have taken a number of positive steps. Notably, railway companies are conducting more route planning and risk assessments and have increased targeted track inspections when transporting large quantities of flammable liquids.

New standards were established for the construction of rail tank cars, and the replacement of the DOT-111 legacy cars—as in what occurred in Lac-Mégantic—was initiated. Then, in August 2018, the Minister of Transport ordered an accelerated timeline for removing the least crash-resistant rail tank cars. Specifically, as of November 2018, in addition to the earlier removal of the legacy DOT-111 cars, unjacketed CPC-1232s would no longer be used to carry crude oil and, as of January 1 of this year, they would not be transporting condensate either.

Given that kind of action, we removed the issue from the watchlist. However, that does not mean that all the risks have been eliminated or that the TSB has stopped watching.

On the contrary, we are still closely monitoring the transportation of flammable liquids by rail through our review of occurrence statistics, via our ongoing investigations and via the annual reassessment of our outstanding recommendations. To assist the committee, we are pleased to table today an extract from our most recent rail occurrence statistics showing accidents and incidents involving dangerous goods, including crude oil, from 2013 to 2018.

We are now prepared to answer your questions.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Fox. We'll go on to our questioners.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. In light of the fact that this motion was brought forward by Mr. Aubin, I am going to trade spots and allow him to have the first line of questioning.

The Chair:

I think we have the best committee ever, right? Everybody gets along so well. Look at that.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

We aren't finished yet. Just wait.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, Ms. Block.

I thank all the members of this committee for agreeing to hold this study.

We are looking into this issue because I feel that Canadians, who—like myself—are not experts on railway safety and are seeing the exponential growth of rail transportation, are generally worried about the increase in the number of incidents and need to be reassured, if that is possible.

Ms. Fox, you have already said that, if the risks increased, nothing was preventing the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, or TSB, from putting the issue back on the watchlist. What criteria would you use to make that decision? Instead of always reacting after an accident, would it to not be possible to proactively implement measures that help avoid those accidents?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

When we put an issue on the watchlist, it is because we have determined that a risk has not been sufficiently reduced. We ask the government, the regulatory organization or the industrial sector in question to take steps that would help further reduce those risks. We consider the statistics we have on incidents and accidents, as well as the recommendations that have not yet been implemented.

In the case of transportation of flammable liquids, we have noted that the actions we requested were taken, and that is why we removed that issue from the watchlist. However, if we note that risk management is declining and that the number of accidents is increasing significantly, we will consider the possibility of putting that issue back on the list.

(1105)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You are talking about mitigation measures, which I understand. May I conclude from this that, if an issue is on the watchlist, it is because it poses an immediate danger requiring swift action, but if that issue is removed from the list, it is because the risk is considered to be controlled?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

The determining factor here is not that the risk is immediate, but rather that it is ongoing and persistent. The issues we have kept on the watchlist are there because the actions we think would better mitigate the risk have not yet been taken.

Concerning the transportation of flammable liquids, we realize that the risk involved in the transportation of dangerous goods by any mode of transportation is ongoing. In this case, the actions we wanted to see in terms of analysis, risk management and use of more crash-resistant tank cars have been taken. So we have removed that issue from the list.

However, we continue to monitor the statistics and conduct our investigations when necessary. No action has yet been taken in response to three of the five recommendations we issued in relation to the Lac-Mégantic incident, or in response to two other recommendations we proposed after other derailments in 2015. So it is clear that we have not stopped monitoring that safety issue.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

The transportation of goods by rail is increasingly prevalent. In your opening remarks, you talked about different car models. The issue of the DOT-111 models has not yet been completely resolved, but we are getting there, and the issue is behind us. As for the armoured CPC-1232 models that were supposed to be one of the alternatives to the DOT-111 models, recent derailments showed that a number of those cars were not crash-resistant. Thank goodness they were not transporting oil, but they could be used for that.

Does the TSB have reliability data for new types of cars, like the TC-117, which are supposed to be risk-free? In light of the latest derailments, have those new cars been taken into consideration? Have you examined their resistance and how they behave when impact or derailment occurs?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Before I yield the floor to my colleague, who could talk to you a bit about statistics, I just wanted to tell you that, when a derailment involving dangerous goods like crude oil takes place, we always look at the performance of the cars, which we compare to cars used in other accidents.

I will now ask Ms. Ackermans to explain what we have noted about changes in the distribution of tank cars over the last while. [English]

Ms. Faye Ackermans (Board Member, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

We haven't tabled this, but we certainly could. When Lac-Mégantic happened, 80% of the tank cars in service for crude oil were DOT-111 or the CPC-1232 unjacketed, which we have called the least crash-resistant or the less robust tank cars. As of today, virtually all of those have been removed from service in North America, and now 80% of the cars are of a much higher quality. We are still looking at, and will continue to look at, when an accident happens, what happens to the cars involved.

In the most recent accident, only six or seven—we're not quite sure yet of the number—cars out of 37 that derailed were damaged. In Lac-Mégantic about 65 cars derailed and 63 were damaged in the accident. There's clearly a difference in the containment capability, but it will take more accidents for us to be able to have good numbers.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, your time is up.

We're on to Mr. Hardie.

(1110)

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm looking at your statistics sheets here, and they show quite a number of occurrences in 2013 and 2014. There seems to have been a spike there. Would the bad weather conditions over that winter have played a factor in the ability of trains to stay on the tracks? Do we know anything about why we had that spike in occurrences?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I would have to go back and do a lot of analysis to determine that, but what we know is that in 2013 and 2014, the transportation of crude oil by rail was increasing significantly. During those years we had the Lac-Mégantic accident, in 2013.

Since then, and especially since 2015, there have been a number of actions taken by the industry and by the regulator to reduce the risk of a derailment or the consequences of a derailment. We also saw a drop in activity during a couple of years. I don't think you can make a direct cause and effect, especially since Lac-Mégantic happened in the summer, but there's no doubt that winter operations are much harder in terms of rail activities than are those in summer, because of the extreme cold conditions.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

There would seem to have been—and certainly this is what we have seen and heard about—an increase in the shipment of oil by rail simply because everybody's waiting for pipelines to be built, not least those who are on this side of the House.

The longer trains, heavier trains.... I'm not sure if the new cars in fact have more capacity per car than do some of the ones that have been taken out of service, but there does seem to be a perfect storm developing. When you add abnormally cold conditions that can spike, particularly at certain times of the year, it would seem that we're dealing with an elevated risk. I'm wondering if, in terms of the service characteristics, the way trains are put together, the length, etc., you're convinced that the railways are making those adjustments appropriately.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'll ask Ms. Ackermans to respond.

Ms. Faye Ackermans:

I took at look, in the last few days, at how long some of these unit oil trains are. Typically, when we have an accident, they seem to be about 100 cars long, according to the data we have. In fact, the oil trains don't seem to be abnormally long compared to some of the other trains that the railroads put together.

With respect to capacity, the new cars have less capacity than the old ones because there's extra steel and extra insulation, so they actually hold a little bit less oil in each tank car.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

We know, of course, that it was oil from the Bakken oil fields that was involved in the Lac-Mégantic incident and that, as we learned just from the media reports, it is a much more flammable product than are many of the others. Do you know something about the mix that's being transported by rail? Are there still very high levels of the kind of oil that we had present in Lac-Mégantic being shipped, or are we dealing more now with diluted bitumen and some of those other less flammable products?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't know if we have the statistics in terms of the distribution of the type of oil. We certainly look at that during an investigation, and that will be part of the investigation into the most recent—last weekend's—accident in St. Lazare, Manitoba. What we can say is that since the last two major derailments in northern Ontario in 2015—if you look at the statistics—until last weekend, we had not had any significant derailment involving crude oil trains. We'll look at that in the context of the ongoing investigation for St. Lazare.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Now, we also had that incident in the Rockies near Field, B.C. It was just last week or the week before, very, very recently. Of course, anybody who remembers Lac-Mégantic could see some similarities. A train that was parked all of a sudden started to roll. The minister came out with a ministerial order very quickly.

Does that incident concern you? Do you think that the remedies that the minister has required to be put in place now until further notice will be adequate? Do we need even further investigation of the safety equipment present on trains?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

With respect to the investigation into the accident in Field, British Columbia, that accident is currently under investigation. The circumstances were different in Lac-Mégantic; it was an unattended train that was improperly secured that ran away. In this particular accident, there were crew aboard the train, and it would be premature for us to determine—we haven't determined yet, we're doing the investigation—all the factors that were at play.

I think any action that the minister takes to reduce the risk of a loss of control is good. Whether it's adequate remains to be seen once we have further information about what caused that particular accident.

(1115)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank you for appearing here today to provide testimony on removing the transportation of flammable liquids from your watchlist.

It's already been referenced in light of the three recent derailments in as many weeks. I think the first was on January 24, the next one was on February 4 and now February 14. We've been seeing these derailments happen. Of course, there was the very tragic accident in Field, B.C. where three lives were lost.

I think it's very timely that we're having this study now. I think some people would be asking themselves if it's a good idea to remove this issue from the watchlist, given that there is more oil by rail. Perhaps we need to look at the bigger issue of whether or not we need to be getting oil off rail and into a pipeline. I know that was referenced as well.

I'm just wondering if you could tell me, Ms. Fox, if are you familiar with the August 2015 report by the Fraser Institute comparing the safety records of pipelines and rail.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'm somewhat familiar, yes. I've seen the report.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay, you're somewhat familiar. Are their conclusions accurate in your opinion?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

We haven't assessed the report in those kinds of critical terms. As far as we know, the information that they used from TSB data sources was accurate. We have no reason to question that. I think the question of rail versus pipeline safety when it comes to transporting dangerous goods is a lot more complex and challenging to answer than may appear on the surface.

It really requires an apples-to-apples comparison. You have to aggregate volume data from various sources. You need a common denominator to compare them on an apples-to-apples basis. That's very difficult.

From our perspective, the risks in pipelines are very different. They relate to, for example, fracturing or fatigue cracks in the pipeline, to interactions with the environment and sometimes to third party intervention, versus rail, where you have hundreds of tonnes of train operating on steel rails in a variety of climatic conditions.

The risks are very different. At the end of the day, our job is to identify where there are deficiencies and where more needs to be done. We don't make those kinds of comparisons as to which mode is safer than the other. We believe that, whatever mode is used, it needs to be done as safely as can be.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

In the last Parliament, I was the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources. I don't question that rail is a safe way of transporting oil; I just believe that pipelines are a bit safer. I think it behooves all of us to try to move this product across our country using the safest mode possible.

One of the main findings of this report was that rail was found to be over 4.5 times more likely to experience an occurrence when compared to pipelines.

I'm wondering if you've noticed a shift in the numbers to indicate that this ratio is no longer accurate.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I can't comment on the specific ratio. What I can tell you from our preliminary 2018 statistics, when we look at the number of occurrences in the rail mode, is that there were 1,468 occurrences reported to the TSB in 2018, which included 1,173 rail accidents. That's all types of accidents: derailments, collisions and so on.

When we look at pipelines, we had a total of 110 occurrences reported to us, including one accident. So there is a definite difference in terms of the number of occurrences that are reported to us, recognizing that we only do federally regulated pipelines. Secondly, we have no outstanding pipeline recommendation. Pipelines are not on our watchlist, but there are a number of anecdotal things that can be used to suggest, or to indicate, relative issues between the modes.

The issue that I think we also have to keep in mind is that if there is a pipeline spill—and depending on whether it is carrying crude oil or gas—the consequences can be quite significant in terms of the amount spilled compared to the amount carried in a unit train of, say, crude oil. I use the example of the October 2018 occurrence that we're investigating north of Prince George, which involved the rupture and fire of a natural gas pipeline.

If you talk frequency, there are more rail occurrences reported than pipeline, but then you also have to look at the consequences in terms of how much is spilled, what is spilled and where it spilled.

(1120)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I represent a riding in Mississauga and we're often reminded of the 1979 derailment, which our mayor was quite aptly named "Hurricane Hazel" for. In 2015 when we were running, there was an incident. I wouldn't call it a derailment but a train did hop off the rails and a minor cleanup was required. In my riding we are quite aware of the safety concerns of rail and transporting chemicals and crude oil. Since 2015 I've gone door knocking and people have a marked difference in their emotions to rail. They feel pretty safe, relative to when I was first running. I think one of the reasons is that we accelerated the phase-out of the CPC-1232 railcars and the DOT-111s.

Could you speak to that and how that's made the entire safety system safer?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Again, when we talk about the transportation of crude oil, specifically, what's been phased out much earlier than was originally planned are the CPC-1232 unjacketed cars. The CPC-1232 jacketed cars are still in service and will be allowed to remain in service until as late as 2025. However, we are seeing a much greater distribution of reducing use of CPC-1232 cars and increasing usage of the newly developed TC 117 standard following the Lac-Mégantic accident. We'll have an opportunity in this investigation into what happened in St. Lazare this past weekend to look at the performance of those cars, compared to CPC-1232 jacketed cars that are still allowed.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

In terms of the GTA, is it the unjacketed cars that are frequently the ones passing through?

Ms. Faye Ackermans:

You can't say that those types of cars are in any particular area. It's really the shipper that determines what car is used to load a product, so we would have to go have a look at who is shipping what and where to be able to answer that question. I don't have the information.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay.

I'd like to give the remainder of my time to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Ms. Fox, the thing that surprised me in your first responses to Mr. Aubin is that we have to wait for more crashes to happen to have more data. Are freight cars crash-tested before they're put into service?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

They are crash-tested, but at a lower speed. Maybe Mr. Jang can provide the specific speed. When you have higher speeds, obviously there is a likelihood of greater damage. What we look at for each of the investigations is the relative performance. How many cars were involved? What speeds were they travelling at? What level of damage was incurred? How did these perform?

We can't say that the 117 cars will never be damaged, or that there's no risk. It depends on the speed and it depends on the crash dynamics at which the derailment happens and where it happens. All we can do is compare the relative performance. I can assure you that with the recent ministerial direction, at least the unjacketed 1232 cars have been removed from transporting crude oil about six months earlier, and petroleum distillates. They are not going to be used for the transportation of crude oil anymore.

(1125)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In my experience, ethanol trains have a boxcar at each end to buffer them. Do you see any safety difference with buffer cars or spacers, in terms of outcomes?

Mr. Kirby Jang (Director, Rail and Pipeline Investigations, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

In terms of previous investigations, we have looked at the marshalling of different loaded tank cars and positioning within the train. Any separation between the more dangerous cars is a good thing.

You're probably aware that we have an active recommendation looking at the factors and the severity of derailments involving dangerous goods. Within that analysis, we're asking the railway industry and Transport to look at the risk profiles of various trains to determine whether there should be adjustments to the rules respecting the key trains and key routes. That's a very important aspect. Any train carrying more than 20 loaded cars is defined as a key train. Distribution within the train is quite important.

You bring up a very good factor, in terms of where the buffer cars are located.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank the witnesses for being here this morning.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada's watchlist contains the main safety issues presented by various modes of transportation that must be remedied. Can you tell us what factors the TSB takes into consideration when deciding that a safety issue must not only lead to recommendations, but must also be added to its watchlist?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Every other year, the TSB considers a number of factors. We look at accident and incident statistics to identify patterns. We review the recommendations that have not been implemented, as well as the TSB's concerns. We also consult our staff about their recommendations on what should be added to or kept on the list, or what issues should be removed from it. We also monitor other issues that are not on the list. When we add something to the list, however, it is because we feel that the risk is sufficiently high, that the addition is appropriate and that the corrective actions we called for have not yet been taken.

When it comes to the transportation of flammable liquids, we have two requirements: risk analysis and risk management by railway companies, and the accelerated removal of the least crash-resistant tank cars. Once industry and Transport Canada met those requirements, we removed that issue from the watchlist. A simple activity increase does not in itself justify us keeping an issue on the list. If we believe that the risk is sufficiently managed, we can remove it from the list. However, we continue to monitor it, especially in the case of oil transportation by rail, which is on the rise.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Transportation of flammable liquids by rail is a particularly significant concern, especially in Quebec, given the Lac-Mégantic tragedy. Transportation of flammable liquids was added to the TSB's watchlist after that event. As that issue has since been removed from the watchlist, it is fair to say that Transport Canada is working to improve the safety of transportation of flammable liquids by rail. Can you elaborate on the steps Transport Canada has taken in relation to that concern?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I can elaborate, but I think that you will also hear from Transport Canada representatives later, and they will probably be in a better position to give you the details you want.

However, I can tell you that a change was made to the Railway Safety Management System Regulations, 2015. Operating certificates for railway companies were introduced, and the number and extent of checks or inspections of railway companies carried out by Transport Canada was increased. Fines have also been introduced for companies that don't comply with the railway safety act or regulations. Furthermore, the removal of the least crash-resistant cars was ordered, as was the implementation of emergency response plans in case of derailment.

All those measures have reduced the risk, but they have not completely eliminated it. Action is yet to be taken in response to three of the five recommendations we issued in the aftermath of the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, and two other recommendations we issued after the derailments in northern Ontario in 2015. We will continue to monitor this file until all our recommendations have been implemented in a fully satisfactory manner.

(1130)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

It's good that Transport Canada is a key player in this file, but what about railway companies?

What measures have the companies implemented to make rail transportation safer?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

As I said at the beginning of my presentation, when companies transport large quantities of flammable liquids, the measures have to do with considerations such as the risk management system, inspections, maintenance and risk analysis.

Companies are required to maintain higher standards, especially for key trains or routes. So a measure was implemented to reduce speed for trains transporting oil. However, as we have seen in the accidents that occurred in northern Ontario, speed is not the only factor in derailment. That is why we have asked Transport Canada to carry out a more in-depth study on other risk factors that could lead to new requirements for their reduction and that railway companies will have to comply with.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Are departments aware of all the data related to those measures? Has the data been provided to departments?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Yes, in the sense that the information entered into railway companies' safety management systems must be transmitted to Transport Canada. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you all for being here today.

I represent a Calgary riding. I have a fair bit of interest in the transportation of petroleum products, and I've got a couple of questions that I hope you can answer.

It is clear that the transportation of oil liquids and condensates is much safer by pipeline than by rail. If we didn't have to ship our oil on rail or our liquids and condensates headed to petrochemical manufacturing facilities in Quebec creating thousands of jobs in Quebec, but could ship it on pipelines the way it is supposed to be shipped....

We don't have pipelines to ship it because of special interest groups that are impeding it—including political parties who are seated to my left—with falsehoods and rhetoric about the safety of pipelines. If it weren't for them, we wouldn't even be doing this study today.

Is that fair to say?

The Chair:

That's kind of a loaded question.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I really can't answer that question.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I will take that as a yes, madam. Thank you.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

[Inaudible—Editor] answer that question.

The Chair:

Ms. Fox has indicated that she's not comfortable answering that question.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

All right. Then I'll ask you a second question.

I want to go back to this Fraser Institute report. One of the statistics that came out of the Fraser Institute report was that over 70% of pipeline occurrences resulted in a spill of one cubic metre or less, which probably would be the equivalent to what is spilled on a daily basis at gas stations at the pump.

Is that statistic still relevant three years later?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I can't comment on the statistics in the report. What I can say is that many of the reports that we get are of minor spills or minor releases of product. We do about one or two pipeline investigations a year, when we believe that there's enough to be gained from doing a full investigation in terms of advancing transportation safety. Yes, the vast majority of releases of product that are reported to us are minor.

I just want to qualify that by saying that the risk—as I mentioned earlier, when we were talking about pipelines—is that, if there is a significant spill of product of either oil or gas, the consequences could be quite significant. We saw that with the Prince George occurrence, which we're currently investigating, which involved a rupture and fire involving natural gas.

There are fewer occurrences. Consequences could be potentially more significant. It depends on what's being carried, how much is spilled, how quickly it's stopped and where it happened.

(1135)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Maybe I'll come back to my first question and try to phrase it another way.

Can you confirm that there are liquids and condensates and oil that is being transported into the province of Quebec on a daily basis that are going to refineries and manufacturing facilities in Quebec, creating thousands of jobs?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't have the answers of how much product is being shipped specifically where. I'm sorry I can't—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

But product is being shipped, is that fair to say?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

As far as we know.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Can anybody else shed any light on that?

Mr. Jean Laporte (Chief Operating Officer, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

We typically don't have activity data broken down by province, region or facilities. The National Energy Board and Statistics Canada would capture that type of information. We typically capture information about what was shipped and what was spilled, associated with incidents or occurrences.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

We do know refineries in the province of Quebec are refining oil products for use by Quebeckers. That's fair to say, right?

Mr. Jean Laporte:

Yes.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

And a lot of that oil is coming by rail.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

We don't have accurate and specific data. A lot of the oil that's being refined in Quebec is coming by ship.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Yes, that's foreign oil, isn't it? Now we're getting somewhere.

Do I have any more time?

The Chair:

Yes, you have a minute.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

What would you suggest we do to try to change the narrative to convince people across the country that shipping oil by pipeline is much safer than by rail? We wouldn't need to be spending taxpayers' money doing studies like this if we had the pipelines to ship it.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

Again, that is not for us to determine. Our mandate is very clear; we investigate occurrences. There are regulators, other bodies, other government agencies, that have the responsibility to look at energy products being produced, imported and exported, and to do the oversight.

In terms of pipeline activity, the number of occurrences has been relatively stable, it has dropped a little in the last few years. The quantities spilled when there are occurrences are fairly small, as was mentioned earlier, however, in rail transportation, the data is changing.

If you refer to the Fraser study of 2015, since then, there have been a number of improvements to rail safety and we're seeing some changes in the numbers. n a few weeks, we'll be releasing our formal statistics for 2018 and you'll see in there more current data that could be used by the Fraser Institute and others to do the analysis that you're talking about.

The Chair:

Mr. Laporte, once that report comes out, if you could send it to the clerk for distribution to the committee, it would be appreciated. Thank you.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to share some time with Madame Pauzé. First, I have two questions.

Does your board investigate any issues or any incidents involving ships?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Yes.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

How many incidents have you investigated with respect to shipping of all kinds in and out of Burrard Inlet?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't have the numbers at hand to be able to specify how many accidents have involved Burrard Inlet.

We have investigated a number of occurrences off the west coast of Vancouver Island involving all manner of vessels, including fishing vessels, tugs and barges. In my memory, which could be corrected, we have not had spills involving what was being transported, but we have had spills involving what was pulling them. For example, a fishing vessel capsized and released bunker fuel. We had the example of the tug Nathan E. Stewart out west, which released 110,000 litres of bunker fuel.

(1140)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

The focus on the west coast has been the prospect of shipping more oil or diluted bitumen out of the terminal in Burnaby. You're probably aware there are other products, corrosives, other things that would be just as difficult to deal with if they were spilled that have been shipped out of Vancouver for some time.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Again, we don't have specific data on what's transported where or when. We look at each specific occurrence, incident or accident, what is on board, what is being transported and the consequences if that spills.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Transport Canada is obviously involved in doing risk assessments. Are you comfortable with the data they have at hand to do that job effectively?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

We have some data that they have access to. They may have other data. I can't speak to what happens internally in the department in their risk assessments.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Very good.

Madame Pauzé. [Translation]

Ms. Monique Pauzé (Repentigny, BQ):

Thank you very much, Mr. Hardie. That's very nice of you.

Just before Christmas, I went to Lac-Mégantic to meet with people who were affected by the tragedy. They told me that the turning where the train derailed, when it was going 101 kilometres per hour, was 3.1 degrees or 3.2 degrees. As the companies insisted on putting cars back in service and resuming transportation as quickly as possible, a portion of the turning was rebuilt, and it is even more pronounced than it was when the derailment occurred.

In addition, the cars passing through Lac-Mégantic are transporting propane gas, an even more explosive product. You will understand that the situation is pretty traumatic for the people of that small village. Your decision to remove that issue from the watch list is also traumatic. The people of Lac-Mégantic talked to me about it all day. It was very traumatic.

According to your opening remarks, railway companies are assessing risks and carrying out inspections themselves. Once again, it is very troubling for the people of Lac-Mégantic—and it should be for all Canadians—to think that railway companies are being given back the power to carry out their own inspections and assessments.

Earlier, you said that you were suggesting measures and then checking whether they were implemented. Do you trust the representatives of railway companies to tell you?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

First, I can reassure you and the people of Lac-Mégantic: we will never forget what happened there. That was a tragedy.

Three of our five recommendations have still not been implemented. In other words, the TSB is not satisfied with the actions taken in that area.

When it comes to inspections, railway companies definitely must inspect their own infrastructure. However, Transport Canada also carries out inspections and audits of their safety management systems. So it is not quite accurate to say that it's all self-inspection. All companies—be it an airlane, a railway company or a pipeline company—must inspect their own infrastructure according to the standards.

In addition, we require the regulatory body—Transport Canada in the case of railway companies—to conduct its own audits and inspections. That recommendation stems from the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, and it is still in effect because we want to see Transport Canada's inspection results.

We have removed that issue from the watchlist because the specific measures that were part of our requirements have been implemented by railway companies and Transport Canada. That is the only reason we removed it from our watch list, which is like a list of measures to be implemented.

We continue to follow and closely monitor transportation of flammable liquids and railway safety. To do so, we are continuing with our statistical studies and our investigations, and we make recommendations we reassess every year.

(1145)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go on to Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you for being here today, everyone.

I scrolled through many of the active rail transportation safety recommendations, but most of them are directed at the department of transport. No doubt you've heard that the current Alberta government plans to lease 4,400 railcars to move Alberta oil to market.

I'm curious about those recommendations. Should Transport Canada be acting urgently on them, in light of this oil tanker traffic?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'm going to ask Ms. Ackermans to put the statistics in context; then I'll add anything I can.

Ms. Faye Ackermans:

We took a look at the data and how much is moving. The NEB issued their crude export data yesterday. There are about 130,000 carloads of product being exported. I haven't seen the Stats Canada data; they will update their data as well. There are probably another 50,000 or 100,000 carloads of crude moving within Canada.

Because all of this extra crude in those 4,400 tank cars is for export market, this means about a 50% increase in the export crude volume that is planned to be shipped by the time it becomes fully implemented in 2020, which, as I understand, is the date.

That's the context.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I will just add that, in terms of the measures and relating to our watchlist, rail accidents can happen for a number of reasons. Crews don't always follow the signals properly. That is a specific issue on our watchlist. We have the issue of fatigue in all modes of transport now—air, rail and marine—so we're certainly looking at that in the context of rail.

The other two issues on the watchlist that are particularly important are safety management and oversight. We're continuing to track what the industry and Transport Canada are doing with respect to safety management and oversight, as well as our outstanding recommendations, some of which date for more than 10 years, and five of which involve rail recommendations. Three of those five are on the watchlist in some other capacity.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Would you do any proactive stuff? The Premier of Alberta applied to the minister to make this happen. Obviously, approval has been given in some form or another. Is there a conversation that you have with the department—perhaps with the minister—in preparation for some of this?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

No, our mandate is to investigate occurrences, incidents and accidents. That's what we do. We gather data, and we share that data with Transport Canada and with the industry—the Railway Association of Canada. We meet periodically—at least once a year—with the major railway companies to find out what they're doing and to signal any concerns we may have.

We have an ongoing dialogue with various stakeholders, including the regulator, as to what we're seeing in our statistics and what further actions we think should be taken.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

How often do you meet with the minister?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't meet that often with the minister. I met with him to brief him initially when he assumed that mandate. We typically meet a deputy minister on a regular basis and quite frequently at the staff level.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

There have been three derailments. There is now a whole bunch more traffic coming onto the rail system and you've only met with the minister once, in terms of briefing him at the beginning. That seems a little strange to me.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

That doesn't include any letters that may have been sent.

Derailments happen. They happen as a consequence of railway operations.

When we're talking about the transportation of flammable liquids, there's been one derailment since January—of the three—that involved the transportation of flammable liquids. That was St. Lazare, and we are conducting an ongoing investigation on that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move on to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

We have a Minister of Transport whose trademark is to repeat as often as possible that safety is his top priority. We would like to believe him, but what I am seeing among Canadians is that they have more trust in the TSB, which has a semblance of neutrality, than the minister.

You have said twice today that three of the five recommendations provided in the report on the accident in Lac-Mégantic have not been acted upon, and I am concerned by that. I would like you to remind us which recommendations they are.

I would also like you to explain to us what the meaning of certain comments in your report is, in a lingo specific to you, regarding the current status of a recommendation—“fully satisfactory”, “satisfactory in part” and “satisfactory intent”.

To me, “satisfactory intent” means that no actions have been taken and “satisfactory in part” means that a step in the right direction has been taken, but the issue has not been resolved. The status “fully satisfactory” would satisfy me, as well, but I have a feeling that we are far from it.

(1150)

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Allow me to reiterate the three recommendations stemming from the investigation into the accident at Lac-Mégantic that are still active.

The first recommendation concerns tank cars. We wanted the tank cars used to transport oil or flammable liquids to be as crash-resistant as possible. A lot of progress has been made in that area, but the recommendation is active because oil is still being transported in other kinds of tank cars than those meeting the latest standards.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Safety standards.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

The second recommendation involved measures to prevent train derailment.

Measures were taken following the Lac-Mégantic accident. Changes were made to the rules for securing parked and unattended trains. I'm going to come back to your other question in a moment.

The third recommendation concerned oversight of railway safety management systems, as well as auditing and inspections.

Those are the three outstanding recommendations. Despite the significant progress that's been made and the measures that have been taken, the deficiencies have not been fully addressed. We are waiting to see what the next steps will be.

Now I'll talk about how we rate the department's response to the recommendations.

Take, for instance, the emergency response assistance plans that were put in place after the Lac-Mégantic accident. Given that the department acted immediately on our recommendation in a manner that was fully satisfactory, we designated the recommendation as closed.

When the department or Minister of Transport announces a plan that, in our view, will remedy the deficiency once implemented, we assess the response as having “satisfactory intent”, but we don't designate the recommendation as closed until the plan has been fully implemented. If the board considers that the plan will only partially correct the deficiency, we assess the response as being “satisfactory in part”. The measures taken to prevent train derailment are a case in point. We still have concerns regarding the steps the department has taken to date because they may not be adequate to eliminate the risk completely.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

On that very issue, I would point to another train derailment that occurred in the past few weeks. The train wasn't transporting anything flammable, but the problem is the same. The minister responded, but after the fact.

In light of the fact that measures weren't taken until after the Lac-Mégantic derailment and subsequent to a number of other train derailments, can we really say that the department is doing enough? Do you think the recently announced measures are satisfactory or only satisfactory in part?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Problems linked to uncontrolled and unplanned movements or runaway trains can be attributed to three factors. The first is a loss of control, as was the case in the Field accident. The train was attended, but for reasons yet to be determined, it derailed. The second factor is a change in car distribution in the yard. The third factor concerns unattended and improperly secured cars, as was also the case in the Lac-Mégantic incident.

Each of those factors has to be examined to determine whether the measures taken will reduce the risk of a train or some of its cars derailing, but we aren't there yet.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

I'd like to add something, Mr. Aubin, if I may.

We assess all of our outstanding recommendations on an annual basis. In fact, we are working on that right now. In late March or early April, the cycle will come to an end. Transport Canada provides us with updates on all the recommendations. We will reassess them over the next two months, and the findings will be made public in April or May.

(1155)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to our witnesses for providing that valuable information.

We will now suspend for a few minutes until our next panel comes to the table.

(1155)

(1200)

The Chair:

I'm calling the meeting back to order.

Welcome to our witnesses.

From the Department of Transport, we have Kevin Brosseau, Assistant Deputy Minister, Safety and Security; Brigitte Diogo, Director General, Rail Safety; and Benoit Turcotte, Director General, Transportation of Dangerous Goods.

Thank you all very much. I'll turn the floor over to you folks.

Mr. Kevin Brosseau (Assistant Deputy Minister, Safety and Security, Department of Transport):

Thank you very much.

Good afternoon, Madam Chair and committee members. My name is Kevin Brosseau. As mentioned, I'm the assistant deputy minister of safety and security at Transport Canada. I am joined by Brigitte Diogo, the director general of rail safety, and Benoit Turcotte, the director general of transportation of dangerous goods. Given that our time today is short, I will keep my opening remarks similarly short to ensure that we have sufficient time for your questions.

Canada maintains one of the safest rail transportation systems in the world as a result of shared efforts between numerous partners, including other levels of government, railway companies, the TSB, as you just heard, and communities.[Translation]

Transport Canada remains committed to improving public safety as it relates to the transport of dangerous goods by rail.[English]

Transport Canada takes its leadership role seriously, and has a rigorous and robust rail safety regulatory framework and oversight program in place. We've taken significant actions to enhance public safety during the transport of dangerous goods by rail, including flammable liquids by rail, under the pillars of prevention, effective response and accountability. I'll list a few of these actions. They include reducing permitted train speed and accelerating older tank phase-out timelines for the transport of crude oil. In addition, the department has implemented new requirements related to liability and compensation, classification and emergency response, means of containment standards, and additional inspections in key route and key train requirements. Through these actions and 33,000 oversight activities per year, and others, Transport Canada is committed to promoting a rail safety culture in order to keep Canadians safe.

With those words, we look forward to taking your questions.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Brosseau.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you for being here. You're helping us make the most of this very brief half-hour that we have with you today. As I commented to the earlier panel, I appreciate that we're here as a result of a motion that was brought forward by my colleague Mr. Aubin. I made the observation in the last panel that I think it's a timely briefing—I won't necessarily call it a “study”—in light of the three recent derailments in as many weeks. One was tragic in the loss of life that was experienced.

To follow along the same line of questions I had for the previous witnesses, are you familiar with the August 2015 report by the Fraser Institute comparing pipeline and rail safety records?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I personally am not, but I'll turn to my colleagues before we answer as a department.

Mr. Benoit Turcotte (Director General, Transportation of Dangerous Goods, Department of Transport):

I am not familiar with the report.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo (Director General, Rail Safety, Department of Transport):

I am.

(1205)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Can you tell me, Ms. Diogo, if, in your opinion, the Fraser Institute's research and conclusions are accurate?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

I think the report makes some very good points in terms of the analysis it conducted, but as an official of the department, I'm not able to comment on whether it was a good report or not. We took a look at the report.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I know there often is a misunderstanding in terms of where pipelines fall and under which department they fall. I know they fall under the Department of Natural Resources. Oftentimes, people think they fall under Transport because it's transporting a commodity. I'm wondering if you have conversations with the Department of Natural Resources around the issues of transporting oil by rail or by pipeline, or if you work closely together on those issues.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

We work closely in the sense that we share information. I think Natural Resources has a lot of information that feeds into our work in terms of volumes of goods that are being transported. I think in the past they were exchanging in terms of “is rail better or is pipeline better”. I think the conclusion is that no matter what the mode of transportation is, it needs to be made safely. That's where, as government officials, our emphasis should be: that regardless, it needs to be made safely.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I appreciate that. It was going to be my next question.

In the previous Parliament, I was the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, and I know that pipelines have a safety record of 99.99%. That would have been in 2013 to 2015. I think rail had a 99.997% safety record. There's not a lot of difference. However, I think that for most of us, we believe that you would want to see oil transported through a pipeline rather than on rail, for any number of issues, not the least of which is the accidents that can occur when a train derails.

I'm wondering as well if you would comment on the fact that most of the safety recommendations on the active rail transportation, on the watchlist, are directed at the Department of Transport. I'm wondering if you can comment on whether or not you believe that there is a lack of resources to do all the things that could and should be done in order to protect Canadians.

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I'll start and then turn it over to my colleagues, who are both responsible for their particular sector so that we're driving the priorities forward.

Organizationally, Transport, like every other government department, manages its resources based on the priorities that are set and uses the resources that it has, delivering on a risk-based approach, a priority-based approach. Of course, we know that addressing the watchlist issues and responding to the TSB recommendations, which we take very seriously, are a priority area and accrue resources accordingly. I'll turn it over to my colleagues, who perhaps will be able to put a finer point on that.

Mr. Benoit Turcotte:

It's a very good question. I would say that the government has invested heavily in both the rail safety program and the TDG safety program since the tragedy of Lac-Mégantic.

Our resources in terms of our ability to examine the risks in the transportation of dangerous goods system have been increased. Our program size has more or less tripled. This has allowed us to do tremendous things in terms of examining what those risks are in the transportation of dangerous goods system.

We know that crude oil remains one of the higher risks that we have identified as a program. The volumes will fluctuate. As a program, we're very conscious of that. We do look at the volumes of crude oil being shipped. We've tripled the number of inspections we conduct, from about 2,000 pre-Mégantic to about 6,000 on a yearly basis, ongoing. We're very proud of that.

I would say that we do have enough resources in the transportation of dangerous goods program to fulfill our basic mandate to properly regulate and oversee the transportation of the dangerous goods system.

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I really did want to ask Mr. DeJong a question with respect to multimodal strategies and program integration, but apparently he's not here. I'm going to attempt to ask you three the question, and hopefully you can help me out.

As you may know, I had the privilege yesterday on behalf of the committee to table a report essentially moving toward a Canadian transportation and logistics strategy. In the process of authoring that report, we recognized strategic areas in our travels throughout Canada, essentially located in the Niagara and Vancouver and Seattle areas. I learned a lot. As I said earlier, what we learned most was the identification of those strategic trade corridor areas within the nation.

With that said, Niagara was identified as a strategic trade corridor. Within the Niagara region, as you can well appreciate, over time there are areas that were identified under official plans at the municipal level allowed to grow in an industrial manner, but over time, they became more of a residential area that is attached to an industrial area.

Right now I'm working with one situation in the city of Thorold, where we have a shunting yard that is literally right next to a water course, an aquifer, as well as a residential area. I have received a lot of, not only complaints, but also concerns with respect to safety in that area because of what's being shunted by trains and, of course, what those trains are carrying. There are concerns relative to noise, safety and so forth, which I'm sure you can well appreciate.

How do I successfully facilitate with, in this case CN, a solution to relocate that shunting yard? By the way, it was relocated from another area, and then the problem just moved to that area. How do I successfully facilitate with that partner, CN Rail, a more appropriate area of relocation for the shunting yard?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

It's very similar to issues that many communities across Canada are raising in terms of the concern of proximity to rail operations. I think CN has a whole infrastructure in terms of how to conduct community engagement. I would say that the best approach would be to connect to CN at the most senior level.

I also think that, when it comes to issues of noise and vibration, the Canadian Transportation Agency is also a good venue to bring some of these issues forward. They have the mandate to examine these types of issues.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you for that.

I have met on site with CN Rail, but to no satisfaction—besides being very much pacified—with respect to trying to deal with that specific issue. To their credit, we did deal with another issue. That very issue, again, hasn't been dealt with to the satisfaction of the community. The next step, of course, is to involve the community, which I intend to do.

You also mentioned bringing in the CTA, and getting them involved as well.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Yes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great.

Madam Chair, how much time do I have left?

The Chair:

One minute.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I will pass the rest of my time to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I understand that Transport Canada can now assess administrative monetary penalties. You're nodding, so that means yes. Have you done it yet, and what effect do you think that's going to have?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

This is one of the new regulations that were put in place after Lac-Mégantic. It came into effect in April, 2015. Like many of the tools that we have been given, it has been used. In fact, on our website, all of the penalties that we have issued are listed there. To date, we have issued a total of half a million dollars in penalties to various railways.

The tool is really how to bring companies back into compliance, but our work doesn't stop there. Issuing monetary penalties can address an issue in the short term, but we continue to follow up on a particular issue to ensure that the measures a company has taken are lasting.

In our experience, it's a very good tool. We are very careful in how we use it, because our penalties are pretty high.

I think that overall, when we do our inspections, we've seen improvement in the compliance that the railways have to achieve. The defect rates are going down. I can't say that it's due to penalties, because it's not an automatic penalty. Overall we think that it's another tool in our series of measures.

(1215)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Go ahead, Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here today.

When I hear the Department of Transport officials describe Canada's rail transportation system as one of the safest in the world, despite the deficiencies, I'm certainly glad I don't live anywhere else, to put it mildly.

In previous studies, the issue of railway auditing by inspectors came up. Am I right to think that the majority of inspectors—who aren't all that numerous—do more inspections on paper? In other words, they flip through railway reports, ticking boxes before giving the green light.

Of the total number of inspectors, how many are on the ground checking whether the tracks are in good condition or the wheels of the cars have cracks?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Thank you for the question.

We currently have about 140 inspectors, out of a total of 156 positions. All of them have to go out to the field. They do their work in two stages. First of all, they do a paper-based evaluation using data provided by the railway. It's important to conduct a paper-based review to see what the company has done, what it has identified and whether it has followed up on its own findings. That information helps us determine what to focus on during the on-site inspection.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I see.

You take a risk-based approach, then. You examine the information on paper, and if there are any red flags, you send out an inspector to examine the situation. Is that correct?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

No. I think that's an oversimplification of the work we do.

Every year, we develop an inspection plan using a number of sources of information. We review the volume of transported goods, past inspection results, safety management system audit findings, as well as accident-related data. We look at a set of economic data to measure the risk in different areas.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

The number of inspectors at Transport Canada has been dropping for years, even though rail transportation has grown exponentially. At the very least, doesn't that call for an adjustment on your end? It seems to me the number of inspections should keep pace with the growth in rail traffic.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

The number of inspectors has actually gone up significantly since the accident in Lac-Mégantic. The government gave us a lot more resources and better equipment to carry out that function, and the number of inspections has gone up as a result.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

According to the figures I have, 25 out of 141 inspectors are actually on the ground. The others merely do paper-based inspections. Are you disputing that?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Yes.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Very well. I'll do some homework.

With a risk-based approach, how can Transport Canada be proactive, not reactive, whenever a rail occurrence or accident happens, as we saw a few weeks ago, with the minister's response to a train derailment? The department could have introduced measures immediately following the Lac-Mégantic accident. It's been six years since the tragedy, and three out of the five recommendations have not been implemented.

Can you at least tell us that, in the upcoming March report, your response to the TSB's five recommendations on the Lac-Mégantic accident will receive a “satisfactory intent” rating?

(1220)

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

That is our hope.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

It's not a matter of hope; it's a matter of action.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

I'd like to finish answering your question, if I may.

The department has taken a number of measures in response to the TSB's recommendations. We've taken all of the recommendations related to the accident seriously and have been working very hard to implement them.

As you mentioned, it's an industry, a sector of the economy, that's changing, and the risks are changing as well. With every reassessment, the TSB calls on us to examine different facets of the issue, and that's what we are doing. With every reassessment, the department has provided a meaningful response and that work is ongoing.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I was rather surprised by something I learned earlier. [English]

The Chair:

Make it very short, Mr. Aubin, please. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Very well.

I was rather surprised to learn that the Minister and his TSB counterpart had met very little, and that the public views the TSB as a very credible organization, on the whole.

Shouldn't Transport Canada and the TSB have a closer working relationship?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

Mr. Aubin, even though Ms. Fox doesn't meet with the minister, [English]within our department we meet on a regular basis. Monsieur Laporte and I have met frequently over the past month. It is a regular ongoing conversation, discussion, sharing of information and best practices to be able to respond best and for the TSB to have a real important view in terms of what our work is.

Brigitte, perhaps I could just let you augment that.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Yes. I would also like to add that the TSB is an independent agency, and in fact it does not fall under the portfolio of the Minister of Transport.[Translation]

The Minister of Transport is not responsible for the TSB. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We'll go on to Mr. Hardie.

Just as a reminder, this panel is only here till 12:30, so there's Mr. Hardie, Mr. Iacono and Mr. Liepert who we're trying to get through before we end this panel.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay. We'll do our best here.

Quickly then, going back to the fines that have been levied—your administrative fines. How many of them have been to short-line railways?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

I would not like to say it from memory, but I believe it's two.

What I would suggest, Madam Chair, is we'll provide a list to the committee.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

The reason for that is just out of the ongoing concern we have for the financial health of the short-lines and their ability to stay up to speed on all of the safety regulations. The locomotive video and voice recorders, I think, are imposing quite a cost on them. That's not to say it shouldn't be done, but I think we're all continuously concerned about how well they can hold up, based on their own realities there.

Can you talk about your risk assessment process, particularly when it comes to the transport of dangerous goods? Are you satisfied that you have enough data? Are you collecting enough information about the kinds of shipments being made, how they're being made, when they're being made, etc.? We're managing risk as opposed to doing other things that some people would see as more effective. Talk to us about risk management.

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I'll let—okay, go ahead.

Mr. Benoit Turcotte:

From the perspective of the transportation of dangerous goods, we do a number of things. Our program has been organized around risk, and we take that very seriously. It drives a lot of what we do, including our inspections.

The first part of how we go about this is that we've developed a risk register. We update it on a continual basis in terms of all the intelligence we gather—the 6,000 inspections we do per year, all the research we do, what we're hearing back from the field and our inspectors when they actually do their inspections, where the non-compliances are and so on. That helps us tremendously.

Then, we produce every year a program environment document that documents all of that, not only the risks in the transportation of dangerous goods but program risks as well. That drives a lot of what we do. That influences our national oversight plan, which is a document we establish every year, and it lays out our priorities. We've developed a risk ranking of all our known transportation of dangerous goods, TDG, sites. That could be a Canadian Tire, an oil field or any place where dangerous goods are handled and/or transported.

(1225)



From that, it drives a lot of our inspections. For example, when talking about crude oil, we inspect and put a high priority on inspecting transload facilities. This is where the crude oil trains are loaded with oil. This current fiscal year, we'll have inspected more than half of all known transload facilities. This is where we target those crude oil trains, to make sure that the crude oil is being placed in the appropriate tank car, that they have the appropriate transport documentation, that their personnel are trained, that they are loading the crude oil appropriately. We check all that very carefully.

That, again, feeds into our risk-based approach to inspecting dangerous goods.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Iacono.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

I would like to start by bringing some clarification and setting the record straight with respect to my colleague MP Liepert's comments before when he was questioning Ms. Fox.

Quebec now gets most of its crude oil from North American producers. Western Canada is now Quebec's top source of crude provider. Much of that stems from the 2015 reversal of Enbridge's Line 9 pipeline. Quebec's refineries now get 82% of their oil from North American sources, thus only 11% comes from, as an example, Algeria. This is just to bring some clarification to your comment.

My question is with respect to risk assessment. What oversight measures have been taken in order to see to it that the companies comply with the rules?

Mr. Benoit Turcotte:

With our transportation of dangerous goods rules and rail safety rules we prioritize the sites based on the sort of risk they bring forward. For example, if a site hasn't been inspected in a number of years or if it has a history of non-compliance, we will inspect it more frequently, even on an annual basis. That's generally our approach in addition to what I just mentioned to Mr. Hardie a few moments ago.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Madam Chair, I'll give the rest of my time to Madam Pauzé. [Translation]

Ms. Monique Pauzé:

Thank you.

Lac-Mégantic residents gave me photos they had taken of existing tracks that trains still use on their approach to Lac-Mégantic. I posted them on my Facebook page and I've shown them to a lot of people, and everyone's reaction is the same. No one can get over the fact that trains are still travelling on such badly damaged tracks.

And here's something else. A farmer in my riding showed me tracks that pass through his property. He said he's the one who maintains them and tightens the screws because no one else does.

By the way, those trains travel past General Dynamics, which is in my riding. Suffice it to say, if there were an accident, my entire riding would be obliterated. The company is like a powder keg.

That brings me back to what you said earlier: you should see an improvement in compliance.

Doesn't the situation call for rules that are much more stringent, given the two examples I just gave of companies not maintaining the tracks?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Thank you for the feedback.

If you have any complaints, you should share them with us.

We've done many rail inspections in the Lac-Mégantic area, further to concerns raised by residents. A special effort has been made in the area to make sure railways comply with the rules. Any specific issues should be brought to our attention.

I will just end by saying that we're in the midst of examining the rules and standards around rail maintenance, so that could result in changes in the future.

(1230)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go on to Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Just to make sure that we have the facts on the table correctly, it was the Conservative government under Stephen Harper that approved the Enbridge reversal, so let's get that on the table.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

All right. I'm proud of you.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

There is still oil going into Quebec by rail. There is still oil and gas coming from the United States, and it is not....The 82% is counting American products coming into Quebec. All of these jobs that are being created in Quebec, whether it's western Canadian oil, foreign oil or oil from the United States, are all jobs that are being created in Quebec at refineries, at petrochemical operations.

I'm glad that the member has put it on the table so that our friends who are sitting to the left of us, who keep talking about the oil and the bad things that come out of oil.... Maybe they need to know that there are thousands and thousands of jobs that are being created in Quebec every day at refineries, whether that oil comes from the United States, Algeria or western Canada. It goes in by rail because there is no additional pipeline capacity. If they would get out of the way and let pipelines be constructed and quit being an impediment to pipelines....

I'd like to ask our witnesses this. Can you give us an idea of how many extra employees Transport Canada has had to bring on to be inspectors of oil by rail because we don't have adequate pipeline capacity in this country?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I'll defer to my colleagues. I don't have that number available to me.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Give me a rough number. How many inspectors do you have? I think you said that you had increased it threefold.

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

We tripled the inspector cadre of our department. That was post-Lac-Mégantic, a number of years ago, obviously. Those numbers are tripled. My colleagues can give you the exact numbers, or we can provide them to the committee.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Is it fair to say that if oil wasn't being shipped by rail, we wouldn't have had to have tripled those numbers?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I don't know if that's really the answer. I can't give that answer. It was important that we were able to respond, and—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

But you responded primarily because of Lac-Mégantic, right?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

Lac-Mégantic was, obviously, a traumatic event for this country.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

And that was oil being shipped by rail.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to our witnesses, to our officials from the department. We appreciate your coming.

We will suspend for a moment before we start the committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(1100)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance no 131 du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous allons tenir une séance d'information sur le transport ferroviaire de liquides inflammables.

Les témoins que nous recevons de 11 heures à midi ce matin sont du Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports. Nous avons parmi nous la présidente, Kathleen Fox.

Je vous souhaite encore une fois la bienvenue, madame Fox. Je suis heureuse de vous voir.

Nous accueillons également Faye Ackermans, qui est membre du Bureau.

Kirby Jang, directeur, Enquêtes ferroviaires et pipelines, ainsi que Jean Laporte, administrateur en chef des opérations, se joignent également à nous.

Bienvenue à vous tous. Merci d'être revenus.

Madame Fox, vous avez la parole.

Mme Kathleen Fox (présidente, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Madame la présidente, chers membres du Comité, merci d'avoir invité le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada, le BST, à s'adresser à vous et à répondre à vos questions concernant le retrait du transport de liquides inflammables par rail de notre dernière liste de surveillance.

Publiée pour la première fois en 2010, la liste de surveillance du BST contient les principaux enjeux de sécurité auxquels il faut remédier pour rendre le système de transport canadien encore plus sécuritaire. Chacun des sept enjeux de notre nouvelle liste a fait l'objet de rapports d'enquête, de préoccupations liées à la sécurité et de recommandations du Bureau.[Français]

Au fil des ans, la liste de surveillance a servi à mobiliser les intervenants et à guider le changement, tout en rappelant à l'industrie, aux organismes de réglementation et au public que les enjeux en cause sont complexes et qu'ils nécessitent les efforts conjugués de nombreux intervenants afin que nous puissions réduire les risques pour la sécurité.

C'est précisément ce qui s'est produit. Tout comme le système de transport canadien, la liste de surveillance a évolué. Tous les deux ans, nous y plaçons des enjeux et nous appelons au changement. Nous retirons également de cette liste les enjeux dont les risques ont été suffisamment atténués par les mesures prises.[Traduction]

Le transport de liquides inflammables par rail a été ajouté à la liste de surveillance en 2014, à la suite de la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic au Québec, et a fait l'objet de nombreuses recommandations du Bureau. En 2016, nous avons laissé cet enjeu sur la liste de surveillance; nous avons aussi explicité les types de mesures que nous désirions voir mettre en oeuvre, dont deux en particulier.

Premièrement, nous avons demandé aux compagnies ferroviaires de planifier et d'analyser exhaustivement leurs itinéraires et d'effectuer des évaluations de risques afin de s'assurer de l'efficacité des mesures d'atténuation. Deuxièmement, nous avons recommandé l'utilisation de wagons-citernes plus robustes pour le transport par rail de grandes quantités de liquides inflammables afin de réduire les risques et les conséquences d'un déversement de marchandises dangereuses en cas de déraillement.

Depuis ce temps, Transports Canada et l'industrie ont pris un certain nombre d'initiatives concrètes. Notamment, les compagnies ferroviaires ont élargi leur planification des itinéraires et leurs évaluations des risques, et multiplié leurs inspections ciblées des voies lors du transport de grandes quantités de liquides inflammables.

De nouvelles normes de construction de wagons-citernes ont été mises en oeuvre, et le processus de remplacement des wagons DOT-111 — comme ceux impliqués à Lac-Mégantic — a été amorcé. Puis, en août 2018, le ministre des Transports a ordonné un échéancier accéléré pour le retrait des wagons-citernes les moins résistants à l'impact. Ainsi, à partir de novembre 2018, en plus du retrait prévu des DOT-111 existants, les CPC-1232 sans chemise ne devraient plus être utilisés pour transporter du pétrole brut et, à partir du 1er janvier 2019, ils ne devraient plus servir à transporter du condensat.

Compte tenu de ces mesures, nous avons retiré cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance. Toutefois, cela ne veut pas dire que tous les risques ont été éliminés et que le BST a cessé toute surveillance.

Au contraire. Nous surveillons toujours étroitement le transport des liquides inflammables par rail grâce à l'examen des statistiques sur les événements, durant nos enquêtes et lors de la réévaluation annuelle de nos recommandations en suspens. Dans le but d'aider le Comité, c'est avec plaisir que je dépose aujourd'hui un extrait de nos plus récentes statistiques sur le transport ferroviaire, qui présente les accidents et les incidents mettant en cause des marchandises dangereuses, y compris le pétrole brut, de 2013 à 2018.

Nous sommes maintenant prêts à répondre à vos questions.

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Fox. Nous allons passer aux questions.

Allez-y, madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente. Comme c'est M. Aubin qui a présenté la motion, je vais lui céder mon tour et prendre le sien pour qu'il puisse être le premier à poser une question.

La présidente:

Je pense qu'il n'y a jamais eu d'aussi bon comité, n'est-ce pas? Tout le monde s'entend à merveille. Vous voyez.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Nous n'avons pas encore terminé. Attendez un peu.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, madame Block.

Merci à l'ensemble des membres de ce comité d'avoir accepté de tenir cette étude.

Si nous nous penchons sur cette question, c'est parce que j'ai l'impression que les citoyens, qui — comme moi — ne sont pas des spécialistes de la sécurité ferroviaire et qui constatent l'augmentation exponentielle du transport par rail, sont pour leur part généralement inquiets quant à la multiplication du nombre d'incidents et qu'ils ont besoin d'être rassurés, si tant est que la chose soit possible.

Madame Fox, vous avez déjà dit que si les risques venaient à s'aggraver, rien n'empêcherait le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada, ou BST, de remettre cet enjeu sur la liste de surveillance. Sur quels critères se fonderait-il pour prendre cette décision? Au lieu de toujours réagir après un accident, ne serait-il pas possible de mettre en place de façon proactive des mesures qui permettent d'éviter ces accidents?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Lorsque nous inscrivons un enjeu sur la liste de surveillance, c'est parce que nous avons déterminé qu'un risque n'était pas suffisamment atténué. Nous demandons au gouvernement, à l'organisme réglementaire ou au secteur industriel visé de prendre des mesures qui permettraient d'atténuer davantage ces risques. Nous étudions les statistiques dont nous disposons sur les incidents et les accidents ainsi que les recommandations auxquelles aucune suite n'a encore été donnée.

Dans le cas du transport des liquides inflammables, nous avons pris acte du fait que les gestes que nous avions demandés ont été posés, ce qui explique que nous avons retiré cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance. Par contre, si nous constatons que le risque devient moins bien géré et que le nombre des accidents augmente de façon importante, nous étudierons alors la possibilité de réinscrire cet enjeu sur la liste.

(1105)

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous parlez de mesures d'atténuation, ce que je comprends bien. Puis-je en conclure que si un enjeu est sur la liste de surveillance, c'est qu'il pose un danger immédiat nécessitant une action rapide, mais que si l'on retire cet enjeu de la liste, c'est que l'on considère que le risque est maîtrisé?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

L'élément déterminant ici n'est pas que le risque est immédiat, mais plutôt qu'il est continu et persistant. Les enjeux que nous avons laissés sur la liste de surveillance y sont parce que les mesures qui permettraient selon nous de mieux atténuer le risque n'ont pas encore été prises.

Dans le cas du transport des liquides inflammables, nous réalisons que le risque posé par le déplacement de matières dangereuses par n'importe quel mode de transport est continu. Dans le cas présent, les mesures que nous voulions voir en ce qui concerne l'analyse, la gestion du risque et le recours à des wagons-citernes plus résistants à l'impact ont été prises. Nous avons donc retiré cet enjeu de la liste.

Par contre, nous continuons à surveiller les statistiques et à mener nos enquêtes lorsqu'il y a lieu. Aucune suite n'a encore été donnée à trois des cinq recommandations que nous avions formulées en lien avec les événements survenus à Lac-Mégantic, pas plus qu'à deux autres recommandations que nous avons proposées après d'autres déraillements en 2015. Il est donc clair que nous n'avons nullement arrêté de surveiller cet enjeu de sécurité.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Le transport de marchandises par rail est de plus en plus courant. Dans vos propos préliminaires, vous avez parlé de différents modèles de wagons. La question des modèles DOT-111 n'est pas encore tout à fait réglée, mais cela s'en vient, et la question est derrière nous. Pour ce qui est des modèles CPC-1232 blindés qui devaient être l'une des solutions de rechange aux modèles DOT-111, on a constaté lors de déraillements récents qu'un certain nombre de ces wagons n'avaient pas résisté aux chocs. Dieu merci, ils ne transportaient pas de pétrole, mais ils pourraient être utilisés à cette fin.

Est-ce que le BST dispose de données sur la fiabilité des nouveaux types de wagons, comme les TC-117, qui sont censés être sans risque? Dans le contexte des derniers déraillements, a-t-on pris en considération ces nouveaux wagons? Est-ce qu'on a étudié leur résistance, leur façon de se comporter lors d'un impact ou d'un déraillement?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Avant de passer la parole à ma collègue, qui pourra vous parler un peu des statistiques, je voudrais simplement vous dire que lorsque survient un déraillement impliquant des matières dangereuses comme du pétrole brut, nous étudions toujours la performance des wagons-citernes, que nous comparons à ceux utilisés dans d'autres accidents.

Je vais maintenant demander à Mme Ackermans de vous expliquer ce que nous avons constaté sur l'évolution relative à la distribution des wagons-citernes depuis un certain temps. [Traduction]

Mme Faye Ackermans (membre du bureau, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Nous n'avons pas déposé cette information, mais nous pourrions certainement le faire. Quand la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic s'est produite, 80 % des wagons-citernes étaient des DOT-111 ou des CPC-1232 sans chemise, ceux que nous avons appelés les moins résistants aux impacts ou les moins robustes. À l'heure actuelle, pratiquement tous ces wagons ont été mis hors service en Amérique du Nord, et 80 % des wagons sont donc maintenant de bien meilleure qualité. Nous nous penchons encore, et nous continuerons de le faire, sur ce qui arrive aux wagons lors d'un accident.

Lors du dernier accident à être survenu, seuls six ou sept — nous ne sommes pas encore certains du nombre — wagons sur les 37 qui ont déraillé étaient endommagés. À Lac-Mégantic, environ 65 wagons ont déraillé et 63 ont été endommagés dans l'accident. De toute évidence, la capacité de retenue n'est pas la même, mais il faudra que d'autres accidents surviennent pour que nous puissions avoir de bons chiffres.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, votre temps est écoulé.

Nous passons à M. Hardie.

(1110)

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je regarde vos feuilles de statistiques, et on y voit un bon nombre d'événements en 2013 et en 2014. Il semble y avoir une hausse. Les mauvaises conditions météorologiques cet hiver-là ont-elles nui à la capacité des trains à rester sur les rails? Savons-nous la moindre chose sur ce qui explique cette augmentation du nombre d'événements?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Il faudrait que je revienne en arrière et que je fasse beaucoup d'analyse pour déterminer cela, mais ce que nous savons, c'est qu'en 2013 et en 2014, le transport de pétrole brut par voie ferroviaire augmentait considérablement. C'est pendant cette période que s'est produit l'accident de Lac-Mégantic, en 2013.

Depuis, et surtout depuis 2015, l'industrie et l'organisme de réglementation ont pris un certain nombre de mesures pour réduire le risque de déraillement ou les conséquences d'un déraillement. Nous avons également observé une baisse des activités pendant quelques années. Je ne pense pas qu'on puisse établir un lien direct de cause à effet, surtout parce que l'accident de Lac-Mégantic a eu lieu pendant l'été, mais il ne fait aucun doute qu'il est beaucoup plus difficile de mener des activités ferroviaires l'hiver que l'été, compte tenu des conditions de froid extrême.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il semble y avoir eu — et c'est certainement ce que nous avons vu et entendu — une augmentation des cargaisons ferroviaires de pétrole tout simplement parce que tout le monde attend la construction d'oléoducs, surtout les personnes qui siègent de ce côté-ci de la Chambre.

Les trains plus longs et pesants... Je ne sais pas si les nouveaux wagons ont en fait une plus grande capacité que certains de ceux qui ont été mis hors service, mais il semble y avoir une tempête parfaite qui se profile à l'horizon. Quand on ajoute les conditions anormalement froides qui peuvent survenir, particulièrement à certaines périodes de l'année, nous semblons être face à un risque élevé. Je me demande, pour ce qui est des caractéristiques du service, du type de trains, de leur longueur et ainsi de suite, si vous êtes convaincus que les chemins de fer apportent ces ajustements comme il se doit.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je vais demander à Mme Ackermans de répondre.

Mme Faye Ackermans:

Au cours des derniers jours, j'ai regardé à quel point certains de ces trains qui transportent du pétrole sont longs. Habituellement, lorsque nous avons un accident, il semble y avoir environ 100 wagons, selon nos données. En fait, les trains de pétrole ne semblent pas être anormalement longs par rapport à certains des autres trains des chemins de fer.

À propos de la capacité, les nouveaux wagons ont une capacité moindre que celle des anciens wagons à cause de l'acier et du revêtement supplémentaires. Ils contiennent donc chacun un peu moins de pétrole.

M. Ken Hardie:

Nous savons, bien entendu, que le pétrole impliqué dans l'accident de Lac-Mégantic provenait des champs de Bakken, et nous venons tout juste d'apprendre dans les médias que c'est un produit beaucoup plus inflammable qu'une grande partie des autres. Savez-vous quelque chose à propos du mélange transporté par voie ferroviaire? Comporte-t-il encore de très hautes concentrations du type de pétrole impliqué à Lac-Mégantic, ou avons-nous maintenant du bitume plus dilué et certains des autres produits moins inflammables?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne sais pas si nous avons les chiffres sur la distribution du type de pétrole. C'est certainement une chose sur laquelle nous nous penchons dans le cadre d'une enquête, et cela fera d'ailleurs partie de l'enquête sur le dernier accident, qui a eu lieu la fin de semaine passée, à Saint-Lazare, au Manitoba. Ce que nous pouvons dire, c'est que depuis les deux déversements majeurs dans le Nord de l'Ontario en 2015 — quand on regarde les chiffres — jusqu'à la fin de semaine passée, nous n'avions pas eu de déraillement important de wagons de pétrole. Nous allons nous pencher là-dessus dans le cadre de l'enquête en cours sur l'accident à Saint-Lazare.

M. Ken Hardie:

Nous avons aussi eu l'incident dans les Rocheuses près de Field, en Colombie-Britannique. C'était la semaine dernière ou celle d'avant, tout récemment. Bien sûr, quiconque se souvient de l'accident de Lac-Mégantic peut voir des similitudes: un train stationné a soudainement commencé à bouger, et le ministre a pris très rapidement un arrêté.

Êtes-vous préoccupés par cet incident? Pensez-vous que les remèdes exigés par le ministre jusqu'à nouvel ordre seront adéquats? Avons-nous même besoin d'enquêter sur l'équipement de sécurité à bord des trains?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

En ce qui a trait à l'enquête sur l'accident à Field, en Colombie-Britannique, elle est toujours en cours. Les circonstances étaient différentes à Lac-Mégantic; c'était un train sans surveillance aux freins mal actionnés qui s'est mis à bouger. À Field, il y avait des membres d'équipage dans le train, et il est trop tôt pour que nous déterminions — nous ne le savons pas encore puisque l'enquête est en cours — tous les facteurs en jeu.

Je pense que toute mesure prise par le ministre pour réduire le risque d'une perte de maîtrise est bonne. Quant à savoir si les mesures sont adéquates, il faut attendre d'en savoir plus long sur la cause de cet accident.

(1115)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Allez-y, madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à vous remercier de comparaître aujourd'hui pour témoigner sur le retrait du transport ferroviaire de liquides inflammables, qui se trouvait sur votre liste de surveillance.

Il en a déjà été question à la lumière des trois déraillements récents en autant de semaines. Je pense que le premier était le 24 janvier, le deuxième, le 4 février et le dernier, le 14 février. Nous voyons ce genre de déraillements se produire. Bien entendu, il y a eu l'accident tragique à Field, en Colombie-Britannique, où trois personnes sont décédées.

Je pense qu'il est opportun de faire cette étude maintenant. Je crois que certaines personnes pourraient se demander s'il est judicieux de retirer cela de la liste de surveillance, alors qu'on transporte plus de pétrole par voie ferroviaire. Nous devrions peut-être examiner la grande question de savoir si nous devrions ou non transporter le pétrole par oléoducs plutôt que par voie ferroviaire. Je sais qu'il en a également été question.

Je me demande juste si vous pourriez me dire, madame Fox, si vous connaissez le rapport d'août 2015 de l'Institut Fraser dans lequel on compare le bilan en matière de sécurité des oléoducs à celui des trains.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je le connais un peu, oui. J'ai vu le rapport.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vois; vous le connaissez donc un peu. À votre avis, les conclusions du rapport sont-elles exactes?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Nous n'avons pas évalué le rapport de manière aussi sévère. À notre connaissance, les renseignements du BST qui ont été utilisés sont exacts. Nous n'avons aucune raison d'en douter. Je pense que la comparaison des trains et des oléoducs pour ce qui est du transport sécuritaire de matières dangereuses est beaucoup plus complexe et qu'il est beaucoup plus difficile d'y répondre que ce qu'on pourrait croire à première vue.

Il faut vraiment comparer des comparables. Il faut des données agrégées sur le volume provenant de différentes sources. Il faut un dénominateur commun pour les comparer. C'est très difficile.

De notre point de vue, les risques associés aux oléoducs sont très différents. Ils se rapportent, par exemple, au bris ou à l'usure, aux interactions avec l'environnement et parfois à l'intervention d'une tierce partie. En revanche, par voie ferroviaire, des cargaisons pesant des centaines de tonnes circulent sur des rails en acier dans toutes sortes de conditions climatiques.

Les risques sont très différents. Au bout du compte, notre travail consiste à trouver les lacunes et les aspects pour lesquels il faut en faire davantage. Nous ne faisons pas de comparaisons pour déterminer quel est le moyen le plus sécuritaire. Nous croyons que, peu importe le moyen, il faut que ce soit fait de la façon la plus sécuritaire qui soit.

Mme Kelly Block:

Au cours de la dernière législature, j'étais secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Ressources naturelles. Je ne remets pas en question la sûreté du transport de pétrole par voie ferroviaire; je crois tout simplement que les oléoducs sont un peu plus sécuritaires. Je crois qu'il incombe à chacun de nous d'essayer de transporter ce produit partout au pays en recourant au moyen le plus sécuritaire.

L'une des principales constatations de ce rapport, c'est que le risque d'avoir un événement était 4,5 fois plus élevé par voie ferroviaire qu'au moyen d'oléoducs.

Je me demande si vous avez remarqué dans les chiffres un changement qui indique que ce ratio n'est plus exact.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne peux pas me prononcer sur le ratio. Ce que je peux vous dire d'après nos chiffres préliminaires de 2018, c'est que lorsqu'on regarde le nombre d'événements dans le transport ferroviaire, on constate que 1 468 événements ont été signalés au BST en 2018, ce qui comprend 1 173 accidents ferroviaires. On parle de tous les types d'accidents: les déraillements, les collisions et ainsi de suite.

Quand on regarde les chiffres sur les oléoducs, on constate premièrement qu'on nous a signalé un total de 110 événements, y compris un accident. Il y a donc une différence nette dans le nombre d'événements qui nous sont signalés. Je mentionne que nous nous préoccupons uniquement des pipelines sous réglementation fédérale. Deuxièmement, nous n'avons pas de recommandation en suspens pour ce qui est des pipelines. Les pipelines ne figurent pas sur notre liste de surveillance, mais un certain nombre d'exemples anecdotiques peuvent évoquer, ou indiquer, des problèmes connexes entre les moyens de transport.

Je pense qu'il ne faut également pas oublier qu'en cas de déversement de pipeline — et selon ce qui est transporté, à savoir du pétrole brut ou du gaz —, les conséquences peuvent être majeures compte tenu de la quantité déversée par rapport au volume de, disons, pétrole brut transporté dans un train-bloc. Je me sers de l'exemple de l'événement d'octobre 2018 sur lequel nous enquêtons au nord de Prince George, où un gazoduc s'est rompu et a pris en feu.

En ce qui a trait à la fréquence, le nombre d'événements ferroviaires signalés est supérieur aux événements impliquant des pipelines, mais il faut également tenir compte des conséquences, à savoir la quantité déversée, le produit concerné et l'endroit touché.

(1120)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Sikand, vous avez la parole.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je représente une circonscription à Mississauga, et on nous rappelle souvent le déraillement de 1979, après lequel notre mairesse a été nommée à juste titre l'« Ouragan Hazel ». En 2015, pendant notre campagne, un incident a eu lieu. Je ne parlerais pas d'un déraillement, mais un train est sorti des rails, et il a fallu faire un petit nettoyage. Dans ma circonscription, nous sommes bien conscients des préoccupations en matière de sécurité liées au transport ferroviaire, au transport de produits chimiques et de pétrole brut. Depuis 2015, je fais du porte-à-porte et je constate une différence marquée dans les émotions que le transport ferroviaire suscite chez les gens. Ils se sentent plutôt en sécurité, par rapport à l'époque où je menais ma première campagne. Je pense que c'est, entre autres, parce que nous avons accéléré l'élimination progressive des wagons CPC-122 et DOT-111.

Pouvez-vous en parler et dire comment cette mesure a rendu plus sécuritaire l'ensemble du système de sécurité?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Lorsqu'on parle du transport du pétrole brut, les wagons CPC-1232 sans chemise sont éliminés progressivement plus tôt que prévu. Les wagons CPC-1232 avec chemise sont toujours en service et pourront le demeurer jusqu'en 2025. Toutefois, on constate une réduction de l'utilisation de ces wagons et une augmentation du recours à la nouvelle norme relative aux wagons-citernes TC-117, qui a été établie à la suite de l'accident de Lac-Mégantic. Nous aurons l'occasion d'apprendre ce qui s'est passé à Saint-Lazare la fin de semaine dernière et de comparer le rendement de ces wagons à celui des wagons-citernes CPC-1232 avec chemise qui sont toujours permis.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Dans la région du Grand Toronto, ce sont les wagons sans chemise qui passent fréquemment?

Mme Faye Ackermans:

On ne peut pas dire quel type de wagon-citerne passe dans une région en particulier. L'expéditeur détermine le wagon à utiliser pour transporter un produit en particulier, alors il faut se demander qui transporte quel produit pour répondre à cette question. Je n'ai pas la réponse.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord.

J'aimerais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Madame Fox, ce qui m'a surpris le plus dans vos premières réponses aux questions de M. Aubin, c'est d'entendre dire qu'il faudra plus d'accidents pour que nous obtenions plus de données. Est-ce que les wagons de marchandises sont soumis à des essais de collision avant d'être mis en service?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Oui, mais à une vitesse moins élevée. M. Jang pourrait peut-être vous donner la vitesse exacte. Lorsque la vitesse est plus grande, bien entendu, les dommages risquent d'être plus importants. Dans le cadre de nos enquêtes, nous évaluons la performance relative. Combien de wagons ont été impliqués? À quelle vitesse allaient-ils? Quelle est l'importance des dommages? Quel était le rendement?

Nous ne pouvons pas affirmer que ces 117 wagons ne subiront jamais de dommages ou qu'ils ne présentent aucun risque. Tout dépend de la vitesse, des forces dynamiques associées au déraillement et du moment de l'incident. Nous pouvons uniquement comparer le rendement relatif. Je peux vous assurer que selon une consigne ministérielle récente, les wagons-citernes 1232 sans chemise ont été éliminés du transport du pétrole brut et des distillats de pétrole environ six mois plus tôt que prévu. C'est au moins cela. Ils ne seront plus utilisés à cette fin.

(1125)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Selon mon expérience, les trains qui transportent de l'éthanol ont un wagon couvert à chaque extrémité, qui sert de zone tampon. Avez-vous constaté une différence sur le plan de la sécurité avec les wagons tampons ou les séparateurs?

M. Kirby Jang (directeur, Enquêtes ferroviaires et pipelines, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Dans le cadre des enquêtes précédentes, nous avons étudié la formation des wagons-citernes chargés et leur position dans le train. Toute séparation entre les wagons les plus dangereux est une bonne chose.

Vous savez probablement que nous avons fait une recommandation active en ce qui a trait aux facteurs associés aux déraillements de trains contenant des matières dangereuses et à leur gravité. Dans le cadre de cette analyse, nous demandons à l'industrie ferroviaire et au ministère des Transports d'étudier le profil de risque des divers trains afin de déterminer si des modifications doivent être apportées aux règles associées aux trains et itinéraires clés. C'est un élément très important. Un train qui comprend plus de 20 wagons chargés est considéré à titre de train clé. La distribution dans le train est assez importante.

Vous soulevez un bon point au sujet de l'emplacement des wagons tampons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence ce matin.

La liste de surveillance du Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada comprend les principaux enjeux de sécurité des différents modes de transport auxquels il faudrait remédier. Pouvez-vous nous dire quels éléments sont pris en considération par le BST lorsqu'il détermine qu'un enjeu de sécurité ne doit pas seulement mener à des recommandations, mais être inclus dans sa liste de surveillance?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Tous les deux ans, le BST étudie plusieurs éléments. Nous nous penchons sur les statistiques d'accidents et d'incidents pour dégager des tendances. Nous révisons les recommandations auxquelles aucune suite n'a encore été donnée, ainsi que les préoccupations du BST. Nous consultons aussi notre personnel pour savoir ce qu'il recommande d'inscrire ou de conserver sur la liste, ou quels sont les enjeux à retirer. Nous surveillons également d'autres enjeux qui ne figurent pas sur la liste. Quand nous inscrivons quelque chose sur la liste, par contre, c'est parce que nous croyons que le risque est suffisamment important, que l'inscription est appropriée et que les correctifs que nous avons demandés n'ont pas encore été mis en place.

Pour ce qui est du transport de liquides inflammables, nous avions deux exigences: une analyse des risques et la gestion des risques de la part des compagnies ferroviaires, et l'accélération du retrait des wagons-citernes les moins résistants à l'impact. Quand l'industrie et Transports Canada ont répondu à ces exigences, nous avons retiré cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance. Une simple augmentation de l'activité ne justifie pas en soi que nous conservions un enjeu sur la liste. Si nous croyons que le risque est suffisamment géré, nous pouvons retirer un enjeu de la liste. Nous continuons toutefois de le surveiller, surtout dans le cas du transport du pétrole par rail, qui est en hausse.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Le transport des liquides inflammables par train est une préoccupation particulièrement importante, surtout au Québec, étant donné la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic. D'ailleurs, le transport des liquides inflammables avait été ajouté à la liste de surveillance du BST à la suite de cet événement. Étant donné que cet enjeu a depuis été retiré de la liste de surveillance, il est juste de penser que Transports Canada travaille à l'amélioration de la sécurité du transport des liquides inflammables par train. Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de précisions sur les mesures qui ont été prises par Transports Canada par rapport à cette préoccupation?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je peux vous donner des précisions, mais je crois que vous allez aussi recevoir les représentants de Transports Canada tout à l'heure, qui seront probablement plus en mesure de vous donner les détails que vous souhaitez obtenir.

Je peux cependant vous dire qu'il y a eu un changement dans le Règlement de 2015 sur le système de gestion de la sécurité ferroviaire. Il y a eu l'introduction de certificats d'exploitation pour les compagnies ferroviaires ainsi qu'une augmentation du nombre et de l'envergure des vérifications ou inspections faites par Transports Canada auprès des compagnies ferroviaires. Des amendes ont aussi été instaurées si les compagnies ne se conforment pas à la loi ou au règlement sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Par ailleurs, le retrait des wagons les moins résistants à l'impact a été décrété, ainsi que la mise en place de plans d'intervention d'urgence en cas de déraillement.

L'ensemble de toutes ces mesures a fait en sorte de réduire le risque, mais sans l'éliminer complètement. Il reste encore à donner suite à trois des cinq recommandations que nous avions faites dans la foulée de la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic, ainsi qu'à deux autres recommandations que nous avons formulées après des déraillements survenus dans le nord de l'Ontario en 2015. Nous continuerons à suivre ce dossier jusqu'à ce que toutes nos recommandations aient été mises en oeuvre de façon pleinement satisfaisante.

(1130)

M. Angelo Iacono:

C'est bien que Transports Canada soit un acteur principal dans ce dossier, mais qu'en est-il des compagnies ferroviaires?

Quelles mesures ont été mises en place par les compagnies pour assurer une plus grande sécurité sur les rails?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Comme je l'ai mentionné au début de ma présentation, quand les compagnies transportent de grandes quantités de liquides inflammables, les mesures ont trait, entre autres, au système de gestion du risque, aux inspections, à l'entretien et à l'analyse de risques.

Les compagnies sont tenues de maintenir des normes supérieures particulièrement quand il s'agit de trains ou de routes clés. Il y a ainsi eu la mise en place d'une mesure visant la réduction de la vitesse pour les trains qui transportent le pétrole. Par contre, comme on l'a vu dans des accidents survenus dans le nord de l'Ontario, ce n'est pas juste la vitesse qui peut provoquer un déraillement. C'est pourquoi nous avons demandé à Transports Canada d'effectuer une étude plus approfondie sur d'autres facteurs de risques, laquelle pourrait mener à de nouvelles exigences visant leur réduction et auxquelles devraient se soumettre les compagnies ferroviaires.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Est-ce que les ministères ont connaissance de toutes les données liées à ces mesures? Les données sont-elles transmises aux ministères?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Oui, en ce sens que l'information entrée dans les systèmes de gestion de sécurité des compagnies ferroviaires doit être transmise à Transports Canada. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui.

Je représente une circonscription de Calgary. Je m'intéresse au transport des produits du pétrole et j'ai quelques questions à vous poser; j'espère que vous pourrez y répondre.

Il est évident qu'il est beaucoup plus sécuritaire de transporter les liquides pétroliers et les condensats par pipeline que par rail. Si nous n'avions pas à expédier par rail notre pétrole ou nos liquides et condensats destinés aux installations de fabrication de produits pétrochimiques du Québec — qui créent des milliers d'emplois dans la province —, mais que nous pouvions les transporter par pipeline, comme ils devraient l'être...

Nous n'avons pas de pipelines pour les transporter parce que des groupes d'intérêts particuliers n'en veulent pas — et cela comprend les membres des partis politiques qui se trouvent à ma gauche — et qu'ils transmettent des faussetés ou leur rhétorique sur la sécurité des pipelines. Si ce n'était d'eux, nous ne ferions même pas cette étude aujourd'hui.

Est-ce que c'est exact?

La présidente:

C'est une question tendancieuse.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne peux pas répondre à cette question.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je vais prendre cela pour un oui, madame. Merci.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

[Inaudible] répondre à cette question.

La présidente:

Mme Fox dit qu'elle n'est pas à l'aise de répondre à cette question.

M. Ron Liepert:

D'accord. Je vais vous en poser une autre.

J'aimerais qu'on revienne au rapport de l'Institut Fraser, qui indique que les déversements de plus de 70 % des pipelines sont de l'ordre d'un mètre cube ou moins, ce qui équivaut probablement à ce qui est répandu au quotidien dans les stations-services.

Est-ce que cette statistique est toujours pertinente trois ans plus tard?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne peux faire de commentaire sur les statistiques du rapport. Je peux vous dire que bon nombre des rapports que nous recevons font état de déversements ou de rejets mineurs des produits. Nous réalisons environ une ou deux enquêtes sur les pipelines par année, lorsque nous croyons que ces enquêtes exhaustives peuvent améliorer la sécurité des transports. Oui, dans la grande majorité des cas, les rejets déclarés sont mineurs.

Je tiens à préciser que le risque — comme je l'ai dit plus tôt lorsque nous parlions des pipelines — est qu'en cas de déversement important de produit, qu'il s'agisse de pétrole ou de gaz, les conséquences peuvent être assez importantes. C'est ce qui est arrivé à Prince George, où nous menons présentement une enquête: il y a eu un bris et le gaz naturel a pris feu.

Les cas sont moins nombreux. Les conséquences pourraient être plus graves. Cela dépend de ce qui est transporté, de la quantité déversée, du temps qu'il faut pour arrêter la fuite et de l'endroit où elle se produit.

(1135)

M. Ron Liepert:

J'aimerais revenir à ma première question et la formuler autrement.

Pouvez-vous me confirmer qu'on transporte chaque jour des liquides, des condensats et du pétrole vers les raffineries et les installations de fabrication du Québec, ce qui crée des milliers d'emplois?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne sais pas quelle quantité de produits est acheminée à un endroit en particulier. Je suis désolée, je ne peux pas...

M. Ron Liepert:

Mais on transporte ces produits, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

À notre connaissance, oui.

M. Ron Liepert:

Quelqu'un peut-il nous éclairer là-dessus?

M. Jean Laporte (administrateur en chef des opérations, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Habituellement, nous ne ventilons pas les données sur les activités selon les provinces, les régions ou les installations. L'Office national de l'énergie et Statistique Canada auraient ces renseignements. En règle générale, nous recueillons les données sur les produits qui ont été expédiés et déversés, les incidents et leur occurrence.

M. Ron Liepert:

Nous savons que les raffineries du Québec transforment les produits pétroliers pour les clients québécois. Est-ce exact?

M. Jean Laporte:

Oui.

M. Ron Liepert:

Tous ces produits sont transportés par rail.

M. Jean Laporte:

Nous n'avons pas de données précises à ce sujet. Une grande partie du pétrole raffiné au Québec arrive par bateau.

M. Ron Liepert:

C'est du pétrole étranger, n'est-ce pas? Nous progressons.

Est-ce qu'il me reste du temps?

La présidente:

Oui, il vous reste une minute.

M. Ron Liepert:

Que pourrions-nous faire pour changer les choses et convaincre la population que le transport du pétrole par pipeline est beaucoup plus sécuritaire que le transport par rail? Nous n'aurions pas besoin de dépenser l'argent des contribuables pour réaliser des études comme celle-ci si nous avions des pipelines pour expédier le pétrole.

M. Jean Laporte:

Encore une fois, ce n'est pas à nous de déterminer cela. Notre mandat est très clair: nous enquêtons sur les événements. Des organismes de réglementation et autres organismes gouvernementaux sont responsables d'examiner la production, l'importation et l'exportation de produits énergétiques, et d'exercer une surveillance à cet égard.

En ce qui a trait aux activités relatives au transport par pipeline, le nombre d'incidents a été relativement stable et a légèrement diminué au cours des dernières années. Les quantités déversées en cas d'incident sont assez petites, comme nous l'avons dit plus tôt, mais les données sur le transport par rail changent.

Si vous faites référence à l'étude de 2015 de l'Institut Fraser, plusieurs améliorations ont été apportées en matière de sécurité ferroviaire depuis, et les chiffres changent. Dans quelques semaines, nous publierons nos statistiques officielles pour l'année 2018; vous aurez donc accès à des données plus actuelles dont pourraient se servir l'Institut Fraser et d'autres pour procéder à l'analyse à laquelle vous faites référence.

La présidente:

Monsieur Laporte, lorsque le rapport sera publié, pourriez-vous l'envoyer à la greffière afin qu'elle en transmette une copie aux membres du Comité? Nous vous en serions reconnaissants. Merci.

Monsieur Hardie, vous avez la parole.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec Mme Pauzé. J'aimerais tout d'abord poser deux questions.

Est-ce que le Bureau enquête sur les problèmes ou incidents impliquant des navires?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Oui.

M. Ken Hardie:

Sur combien d'incidents impliquant le transport de toutes sortes de marchandises dans l'inlet Burrard avez-vous enquêté?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne sais pas exactement combien d'accidents impliquaient l'inlet Burrard.

Nous avons enquêté sur plusieurs événements au large de la côte ouest de l'île de Vancouver impliquant toutes sortes de navires, y compris des bateaux de pêche, des remorqueurs et des barges. De mémoire — et je me trompe peut-être —, il n'y a pas eu déversement d'un produit qui était transporté; c'est plutôt ce qui permettait aux navires d'avancer qui s'est déversé. Par exemple, un bateau de pêche a chaviré et le combustible de soute s'est déversé. Dans l'Ouest, le remorqueur Nathan E. Stewart a déversé 110 000 litres de combustible de soute.

(1140)

M. Ken Hardie:

Sur la côte Ouest, on songe à expédier plus de pétrole ou de bitume dilué à partir du terminal de Burnaby. Vous savez probablement qu'il y a d'autres produits comme les substances corrosives qui seraient tout aussi difficiles à gérer en cas de déversement qui sont expédiés de Vancouver depuis un bon moment.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Encore une fois, nous n'avons pas de données précises sur les produits transportés, la destination ou le moment du transport. Nous étudions chaque événement, incident ou accident de façon précise. Nous déterminons ce qui était à bord, ce qui était transporté et les conséquences du déversement.

M. Ken Hardie:

Transports Canada participe évidemment à l'évaluation des risques. Croyez-vous que le ministère pourra faire son travail de manière efficace avec les données dont il dispose?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Nous lui donnons accès à certaines de nos données. Il a peut-être d'autres données. Je ne peux me prononcer sur ce qui se passe au ministère dans le cadre de l'évaluation des risques.

M. Ken Hardie:

Très bien.

Madame Pauzé, vous avez la parole. [Français]

Mme Monique Pauzé (Repentigny, BQ):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hardie. C'est très gentil de votre part.

Peu de temps avant Noël, je suis allée à Lac-Mégantic afin de rencontrer les gens touchés par le drame. Ils m'ont expliqué que la courbe où le train a déraillé, alors qu'il circulait à 101 kilomètres à l'heure, était de 3,1 ou 3,2 degrés. Comme les compagnies ont insisté pour remettre le plus rapidement possible des wagons en circulation et reprendre le transport, une section de la courbe a été refaite et elle est encore plus accentuée qu'au moment du déraillement.

De plus, c'est du gaz propane, un produit encore plus explosif, que transportent les wagons qui passent à Lac-Mégantic. Vous comprendrez que, pour les gens de ce petit village, c'est assez traumatisant. Votre décision de retirer cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance est également traumatisante. Les citoyens de Lac-Mégantic m'en ont parlé toute la journée. C'était vraiment dramatique.

Dans vos notes d'allocution, on peut lire que les compagnies ferroviaires font elles-mêmes l'évaluation des risques et les inspections. Encore une fois, c'est très troublant pour les gens de Lac-Mégantic — cela devrait l'être pour tous les Canadiens — de penser qu'on remet entre les mains des compagnies ferroviaires le pouvoir de faire leurs propres inspections et évaluations.

Plus tôt, vous avez dit que vous suggériez des mesures et que vous vérifiiez par la suite si elles étaient prises. Vous fiez-vous à ce que les représentants des compagnies ferroviaires vous disent?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Premièrement, je peux vous rassurer et rassurer les citoyens et les citoyennes de Lac-Mégantic: nous n’oublierons jamais ce qui s'y est passé. Cela a été une tragédie.

Trois de nos cinq recommandations n'ont toujours pas fait l'objet de suivi, c'est-à-dire qu'on n'y a pas encore répondu de façon satisfaisante, selon le BST.

En ce qui concerne les inspections, c'est certain que les compagnies ferroviaires doivent faire des inspections de leur propre infrastructure. Cependant, Transports Canada fait aussi des inspections et des audits de leurs systèmes de gestion de la sécurité. Ce n'est donc pas tout à fait précis de dire que c'est de l'auto-inspection. Toutes les compagnies, que ce soit une compagnie d'aviation, une compagnie ferroviaire ou une compagnie de pipeline, doivent faire les inspections de leur propre infrastructure selon les normes.

De plus, nous exigeons que l'organisme de réglementation, soit Transports Canada dans le cas des compagnies ferroviaires, fasse ses propres audits et inspections. Il s'agit d'une recommandation découlant de la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic qui est encore en vigueur et qui n'est pas fermée, parce que nous voulons voir les résultats des inspections de Transports Canada.

Nous avons retiré cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance parce que les mesures précises qui faisaient partie de nos exigences ont été prises par les compagnies ferroviaires et Transports Canada. C'est la seule raison pour laquelle nous l'avons retiré de notre liste de surveillance. C'est comme une liste de mesures à prendre.

Nous continuons de suivre et de surveiller de près le transport des liquides inflammables et la sécurité ferroviaire. Pour ce faire, nous poursuivons nos études statistiques et nos enquêtes, et nous proposons des recommandations que nous réévaluons chaque année.

(1145)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci à tous d'être ici aujourd'hui.

J'ai lu bon nombre des recommandations actives sur la sécurité du transport ferroviaire, mais la plupart d'entre elles visent le ministère des Transports. Vous savez sans doute que le gouvernement de l'Alberta prévoit de louer 4 400 wagons pour transporter le pétrole de l'Alberta vers le marché.

Je me pose des questions au sujet de ces recommandations. Est-ce que Transports Canada devrait agir rapidement en raison des activités à venir?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je vais demander à Mme Ackermans de mettre les statistiques en contexte; je compléterai la réponse du mieux que je le pourrai.

Mme Faye Ackermans:

Nous avons examiné les données et la quantité de produits déplacée. L'ONE a publié ses données sur l'exportation du pétrole brut hier. Environ 130 000 wagons de produits sont exportés. Je n'ai pas vu les données de Statistique Canada; elles seront mises à jour également. Il y a probablement 50 000 ou 100 000 autres wagons de pétrole brut transporté au Canada.

Puisque ce pétrole brut transporté dans 4 400 wagons supplémentaires vise le marché de l'exportation, il entraînera une augmentation d'environ 50 % du volume d'exportation du pétrole brut d'ici la mise en oeuvre complète de ces mesures, soit en 2020, selon ce que je comprends.

Voilà le contexte.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

J'ajouterais simplement qu'en ce qui a trait aux mesures et à notre liste de suivi, les accidents ferroviaires arrivent pour plusieurs raisons. L'équipage ne respecte pas toujours les signaux. C'est un enjeu particulier. La fatigue est aussi un facteur d'importance pour tous les modes de transport — aérien, ferroviaire et maritime — alors nous étudions la question dans le contexte du transport ferroviaire.

Les deux autres éléments qui se trouvent sur la liste de suivi et qui sont particulièrement importants sont la gestion de la sécurité et la surveillance. Nous continuons de suivre les activités de l'industrie et de Transports Canada en ce qui a trait à cela et en ce qui a trait aux recommandations en suspens, dont certaines datent d'il y a plus de 10 ans. Cinq d'entre elles visent le transport ferroviaire. Parmi ces cinq recommandations, trois figurent à la liste de suivi à un autre titre.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Est-ce que vous prenez des mesures proactives? La première ministre de l'Alberta a fait une demande au ministre à cet égard. De toute évidence, la demande a été approuvée d'une manière ou d'une autre. Est-ce que vous échangez avec le ministère — et peut-être avec le ministre — dans le but de vous préparer à cela?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Non. Notre mandat consiste à enquêter sur les événements, les incidents et les accidents. C'est ce que nous faisons. Nous recueillons des données que nous transmettons à Transports Canada et à l'industrie... à l'Association des chemins de fer du Canada. Nous rencontrons périodiquement — au moins une fois par année — les représentants des grandes compagnies de chemin de fer pour savoir où elles en sont et pour leur faire part de nos préoccupations.

Nous entretenons un dialogue continu avec les divers intervenants, notamment l'organisme de réglementation, sur ce qui se dégage de nos statistiques et sur les mesures qui, à notre avis, devraient être prises

M. Matt Jeneroux:

À quelle fréquence rencontrez-vous le ministre?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne rencontre pas souvent le ministre. Je l'ai rencontré pour une séance d'information au début de son mandat. Nous avons des rencontres régulières avec les sous-ministres et des rencontres assez fréquentes avec le personnel.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Il y a eu trois déraillements. On prévoit une hausse considérable de la circulation ferroviaire, mais vous n'avez rencontré le ministre qu'une fois, pour une séance d'information au début. Cela me semble un peu étrange.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Cela n'inclut pas les lettres qui peuvent avoir été envoyées.

Les déraillements font partie de la réalité dans le secteur ferroviaire.

Un seul des trois déraillements qui ont eu lieu depuis janvier était lié au transport de liquides inflammables. C'était à Saint-Lazare, et l'enquête sur cet incident se poursuit.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

On a un ministre des Transports dont la marque de commerce est de répéter aussi souvent qu'il le peut que la sécurité est sa priorité absolue. Nous aimerions le croire, mais ce que je découvre dans la population, c'est que celle-ci fait davantage confiance au BST, qui a l'apparence d'une certaine neutralité, qu'au ministre.

Vous avez dit deux fois aujourd'hui qu'on n'avait pas encore donné suite à trois des cinq recommandations formulées dans le rapport sur l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic, et cela m'inquiète. J'aimerais que vous nous rappeliez de quelles recommandations il s'agit.

J'aimerais aussi que vous nous expliquiez ce que veulent dire les mentions faites dans votre rapport, dans un jargon qui vous est propre, relativement à l'état actuel d'une recommandation, à savoir « attention satisfaisante », « attention en partie satisfaisante » et « intention satisfaisante ».

Selon moi, « intention satisfaisante » veut dire qu'il n'y a pas eu de mesures prises et « attention en partie satisfaisante », qu'on a fait un pas dans la bonne direction, mais qu'on n'a pas réglé le problème. La cote « satisfaisant » me satisferait aussi, mais j'ai l'impression que nous sommes loin du compte.

(1150)

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Permettez-moi de rappeler les trois recommandations encore actives découlant de l'enquête sur l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic.

La première recommandation concerne les wagons-citernes. Nous voulons que les wagons-citernes utilisés pour le transport de pétrole ou de liquides inflammables soient les plus résistants possible à l'impact. Beaucoup de progrès ont été faits de ce côté, mais la recommandation est active parce que le pétrole est encore transporté dans d'autres sortes de wagons-citernes que ceux qui respectent les normes les plus récentes.

M. Robert Aubin:

Des normes sécuritaires.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

La deuxième recommandation concerne la prise de mesures visant à empêcher que les trains partent à la dérive.

On a pris des mesures à la suite de l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic. On a changé les règlements concernant la manière de sécuriser un train garé et non supervisé. Je vais revenir à votre autre question tantôt.

La troisième recommandation concerne la surveillance du système de gestion de la sécurité des compagnies ferroviaires ainsi que des vérifications et des inspections qui ont été faites.

Ce sont les trois recommandations encore actives. Bien qu'il y ait eu beaucoup de progrès et qu'on ait pris des mesures, les lacunes ne sont pas complètement corrigées. Nous attendons de voir les suites qui y seront données.

Je vais maintenant parler de la façon dont nous évaluons l'état des recommandations.

Prenons l'exemple des plans d'urgence et d'intervention qui ont été mis en place après l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic. Étant donné qu'on a immédiatement donné suite à notre recommandation de façon entièrement satisfaisante, nous avons fermé la recommandation.

Quand le ministère ou le ministre des Transports annonce un plan d'action et que nous croyons que celui-ci permettra de corriger les lacunes une fois qu'il aura été mis en œuvre, nous attribuons la cote « intention satisfaisante ». Cependant, nous ne fermons pas la recommandation tant que le plan n'a pas complètement été mis en oeuvre. Si nous pensons que le plan va corriger seulement une partie des lacunes, nous indiquons « attention en partie satisfaisante ». Les mesures prises pour empêcher que les trains partent à la dérive en sont un exemple: nous avons encore des préoccupations en ce qui concerne les mesures prises à ce jour en ce sens qu'elles ne sont peut-être pas suffisantes pour éliminer complètement ce risque.

M. Robert Aubin:

Justement, à ce sujet, il y a eu un autre train qui est parti à la dérive au cours de ces dernières semaines. Il ne contenait pas de produits inflammables, mais le problème reste le même. On a vu le ministre réagir, mais après coup.

Compte tenu du fait que des mesures ont été prises seulement après le déraillement survenu à Lac-Mégantic et après que plusieurs autres trains sont partis à la dérive, pouvons-nous dire que le ministre en fait suffisamment? Selon vous, les dernières mesures annoncées sont-elles satisfaisantes ou en partie satisfaisantes?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Les problèmes liés à des mouvements non maîtrisés et non planifiés ou à des trains qui partent à la dérive sont attribuables à trois facteurs. Le premier est la perte de maîtrise, comme cela a été le cas dans l'accident survenu à Field. Le train était surveillé, mais pour des raisons qu'il nous reste à déterminer, il est parti à la dérive. Il y a aussi les changements de distribution des wagons dans les gares de triage. Le troisième facteur concerne les wagons non surveillés et mal sécurisés, comme cela a aussi été le cas à Lac-Mégantic.

Il faut vérifier chacun de ces enjeux pour voir si les mesures prises vont réduire le risque qu'un train ou quelques wagons partent à la dérive, mais on n'en est pas encore là.

M. Jean Laporte:

J'aimerais ajouter un commentaire, monsieur Aubin.

Nous faisons une évaluation annuelle de toutes nos recommandations en cours. Nous sommes actuellement engagés dans ce processus annuel. Vers la fin mars ou le début d'avril, le cycle devrait être terminé. Transports Canada nous présente des mises à jour relativement à toutes les recommandations. Nous allons les réévaluer dans les deux prochains mois et ce sera rendu public au cours d'avril ou de mai.

(1155)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je remercie les témoins de ces précieux renseignements.

Nous allons maintenant suspendre la séance pour quelques minutes pour permettre au prochain groupe de prendre place.

(1155)

(1200)

La présidente:

Reprenons.

Bienvenue aux témoins.

Représentant le ministère des Transports, nous avons M. Kevin Brosseau, sous-ministre adjoint de la sécurité et de la sûreté; Mme Brigitte Diogo, directrice générale de la sécurité ferroviaire; M. Benoit Turcotte, directeur général du transport des marchandises dangereuses.

Merci beaucoup à tous. La parole est à vous.

M. Kevin Brosseau (sous-ministre adjoint, Sécurité et sûreté, ministère des Transports):

Merci beaucoup.

Madame la présidente, membres du Comité, bonjour. Je m'appelle Kevin Brosseau. Comme il a été mentionné, je suis sous-ministre adjoint de la sécurité et de la sûreté à Transports Canada. Je suis accompagné de Mme Brigitte Diogo, notre directrice générale de la sécurité ferroviaire et de M. Benoit Turcotte, qui est directeur général du transport des marchandises dangereuses. Puisque nous avons peu de temps, je vais faire un bref exposé. Cela vous donnera le temps de poser des questions.

Le Canada a l'un des réseaux de transport ferroviaire les plus sécuritaires au monde grâce à la collaboration de nombreux partenaires, notamment les autres ordres de gouvernement, les compagnies de chemin de fer, le BST, comme vous venez de l'entendre, et les communautés.[Français]

Transports Canada demeure engagé à améliorer la sécurité du public lors du transport des marchandises dangereuses par train. [Traduction]

Transports Canada prend son rôle de chef de file au sérieux et dispose d’un cadre de réglementation de la sécurité ferroviaire et d’un programme de surveillance rigoureux et solides. Nous avons pris des mesures importantes pour améliorer la sécurité publique durant le transport de marchandises dangereuses par train, y compris les liquides inflammables, dans le cadre d'une stratégie de prévention, d'intervention efficace et de responsabilisation. Parmi ces mesures, notons la réduction de la vitesse autorisée des trains et la mise hors service accélérée des anciens wagons-citernes servant au transport de pétrole brut. En outre, le ministère a établi de nouvelles exigences en matière de responsabilité et d'indemnisation, de classification, d'intervention d'urgence ainsi que de nouvelles normes sur les moyens de confinement, en plus d'augmenter le nombre d'inspections des tronçons principaux et d'ajouter des exigences pour les trains clés. Grâce à ces mesures et aux 33 000 activités de surveillance menées chaque année, Transports Canada est déterminé à promouvoir une culture de la sécurité au sein de l'industrie ferroviaire afin d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.

C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons à vos questions.[Français]

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Brosseau.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Merci beaucoup d'être ici. Vous nous aidez à tirer parti de la petite demi-heure que nous passons ensemble aujourd'hui. Comme je l'ai indiqué au groupe précédent, nous sommes ici en raison d'une motion de mon collègue, M. Aubin. Au cours de la partie précédente, j'ai indiqué que je considère que cette séance d'information — je ne dirais pas que c'est une étude — tombe à point, étant donné les trois déraillements survenus en autant de semaines, dont l'un avec décès, malheureusement.

Pour poursuivre dans la même veine qu'avec les témoins précédents, avez-vous pris connaissance du rapport de l'Institut Fraser publié en août 2015 comparant les bilans de sécurité des pipelines et du transport ferroviaire?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Non, personnellement, mais je demanderais à mes collègues de répondre aussi.

M. Benoit Turcotte (directeur général, Transport des marchandises dangereuses, ministère des Transports):

Je ne connais pas ce rapport.

Mme Brigitte Diogo (directrice générale, Sécurité ferroviaire, ministère des Transports):

Moi oui.

(1205)

Mme Kelly Block:

Madame Diogo, les recherches et les conclusions de l'Institut Fraser sont-elles exactes, à votre avis?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Je pense que ce rapport contient de très bons points d'analyse, mais en tant que fonctionnaire du ministère, je ne peux me prononcer sur la qualité de ce rapport. Nous en avons pris connaissance.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je sais qu'on se demande souvent de qui relèvent les pipelines. Je sais qu'ils relèvent du ministère des Ressources naturelles, mais les gens pensent souvent qu'ils relèvent de Transports Canada parce qu'ils servent au transport d'une marchandise. Je me demande si vous avez des discussions avec le ministère des Ressources naturelles sur le transport du pétrole par rail ou par pipelines, ou si vous collaborez étroitement pour ces questions.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Nous avons une étroite collaboration sur le plan de la communication des renseignements. Je pense que le ministère des Ressources naturelles a beaucoup de données liées à notre secteur d'activité, notamment sur le volume de biens transportés. Je dirais qu'auparavant, les discussions portaient sur le mode de transport idéal, entre les trains ou les pipelines, mais qu'on en est venu à la conclusion que cela importait peu, pourvu que le transport soit sécuritaire. En tant que fonctionnaire, c'est ce qui devrait être notre préoccupation première. Le mode de transport importe peu, pourvu que ce soit sécuritaire.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci de la réponse. C'était ma prochaine question.

Pendant la législature précédente, j'étais secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Ressources naturelles, et je sais que les pipelines sont sûrs à 99,99 %. Ce sont les données pour 2013 à 2015. Quant au transport ferroviaire, je pense que le taux était de 99,997 %. Ce n'est pas une grosse différence. Je pense toutefois que la plupart des gens estiment que le pétrole devrait être transporté par pipelines plutôt que par train, pour diverses raisons, notamment les accidents qui peuvent survenir lors d'un déraillement de train.

J'aimerais aussi avoir vos commentaires sur le fait que la plupart des recommandations actives en matière de sécurité — la liste de surveillance — visent le ministère des Transports. J'aimerais savoir si vous considérez qu'il y a un manque de ressources pour faire tout ce qui pourrait ou devrait être fait pour protéger les Canadiens.

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Je vais commencer, puis je céderai la parole à mes collègues, qui sont tous les deux responsables de leur secteur respectif, ce qui contribue à l'avancement des priorités.

Comme tout autre ministère, le ministère des Transports gère et utilise ses ressources en fonction des priorités établies selon une approche axée sur les risques et les priorités. Nous savons évidemment que régler les problèmes qui figurent sur la liste de surveillance et répondre aux recommandations du BST, que nous prenons très au sérieux, sont une priorité. Nous y consacrons les ressources nécessaires. Je cède la parole à mes collègues. Ils pourront peut-être fournir une réponse plus détaillée.

M. Benoit Turcotte:

C'est une très bonne question. Je dirais que depuis la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic, le gouvernement a investi massivement, tant dans le programme de sécurité ferroviaire que dans le programme de sécurité du transport des marchandises dangereuses.

Nous avons augmenté les ressources consacrées à l'évaluation des risques dans le système de transport des marchandises dangereuses. La taille du programme a pratiquement triplé, ce qui nous a permis de faire des progrès considérables pour l'évaluation des risques dans ce système.

Grâce à ce programme, nous savons que le pétrole brut demeure parmi les marchandises qui présentent le risque le plus élevé. Les volumes varieront, et nous en sommes très conscients. Nous examinons les volumes de pétrole brut expédié. Nous avons triplé le nombre d'inspections, qui sont passées de 2 000 inspections par année avant la catastrophe de Lac-Mégantic à environ 6 000. Nous en sommes très fiers.

Je dirais que nous consacrons au programme du transport des marchandises dangereuses les ressources nécessaires pour nous acquitter de notre mandat de base, qui est d'assurer une réglementation et une surveillance adéquates du système de transport des marchandises dangereuses.

(1210)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'avais une question sur les stratégies multimodales et l'intégration des programmes pour M. DeJong, mais il n'est pas là, semble-t-il. Je vais quand même vous poser la question à tous les trois et j'espère que vous pourrez m'aider.

Hier, comme vous le savez peut-être, j'ai eu le privilège de présenter, au nom du Comité, un rapport sur l'établissement d'une stratégie canadienne de transport et de logistique. Pendant les voyages que nous avons faits partout au Canada pour préparer ce rapport, nous avons cerné des secteurs stratégiques, qui sont surtout situés dans les régions de Niagara, de Vancouver et de Seattle. J'ai beaucoup appris. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nous avons notamment cerné les corridors commerciaux stratégiques du pays.

La région de Niagara était du nombre. Selon les plans municipaux officiels, comme vous le savez sûrement, certains secteurs étaient zonés industriels, mais au fil du temps, ils sont devenus des quartiers résidentiels en périphérie d'une zone industrielle.

Je travaille actuellement sur un cas précis, dans la municipalité de Thorold, où l'on trouve une gare de triage directement à côté d'un cours d'eau, d'un aquifère et d'une zone résidentielle. J'ai reçu beaucoup de plaintes, et entendu beaucoup de préoccupations concernant la sécurité dans la région en raison des aspects négligés en raison de la présence des trains et de la nature des marchandises transportées, évidemment. Vous savez certainement que les préoccupations portent sur le bruit, la sécurité, etc.

Comment puis-je contribuer à trouver une solution avec le CN, dans ce cas-ci, pour relocaliser cette gare de triage? Je souligne au passage qu'elle a déjà été relocalisée et qu'on avait simplement déplacé le problème dans ce secteur. Comment puis-je réussir à trouver une solution avec ce partenaire — le CN — pour trouver un meilleur emplacement pour cette gare de triage?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Beaucoup de collectivités partout au Canada ont des préoccupations semblables en raison de la proximité des opérations ferroviaires. Je pense que le CN a établi un mécanisme pour les relations avec les communautés. Je dirais que la meilleure solution serait de communiquer avec les hauts dirigeants du CN.

En outre, je pense que l'Office des transports du Canada est aussi une instance appropriée pour soulever les problèmes liés au bruit et aux vibrations, car cela relève de son mandat.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vous remercie.

J'ai rencontré les gens du CN sur place, mais je n'ai reçu aucune réponse satisfaisante sur les mesures prises pour régler ce problème, mais cela m'a permis d'apaiser mes craintes. Je dois dire que nous avons réussi à régler un autre problème. Quant à ce problème précis, nous n'avons pu le régler à la satisfaction de la communauté. Donc, bien entendu, la prochaine étape sera de mobiliser la communauté, ce que j'ai l'intention de faire.

Vous avez aussi indiqué qu'on peut faire appel à l'OTC.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Oui.

M. Vance Badawey:

Excellent.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, madame la présidente?

La présidente:

Une minute.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je cède le reste de mon temps à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je crois comprendre que Transports Canada peut imposer des pénalités pécuniaires administratives. Je vois que vous acquiescez de la tête. L'avez-vous déjà fait? Quel effet cela aura-t-il, à votre avis?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Ce règlement, qui fait partie des nouveaux règlements mis en place après l'accident de Lac-Mégantic, est entré en vigueur en avril 2015. Nous y avons eu recours, comme pour beaucoup d'outils à notre disposition. Vous trouverez la liste des pénalités qui ont été imposées sur notre site Web. À ce jour, nous avons imposé un demi-million de dollars en pénalités aux diverses sociétés ferroviaires.

Essentiellement, l'outil sert à amener les entreprises à se conformer, mais notre rôle ne s'arrête pas là. Les pénalités pécuniaires administratives peuvent aider à régler un problème à court terme, mais nous exerçons un suivi constant des problèmes pour nous assurer que les mesures prises par l'entreprise sont durables.

Notre expérience démontre que c'est un très bon outil. Nous y avons recours avec prudence, car nos pénalités sont assez élevées.

Dans l'ensemble, à mon avis, nos inspections démontrent une amélioration de la conformité des sociétés ferroviaires. Les taux de défectuosité sont en baisse. Je ne dirais pas que c'est attribuable aux pénalités, parce qu'elles ne sont pas automatiques. Essentiellement, nous considérons que c'est un outil parmi de nombreux autres.

(1215)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Quand j'entends les représentants du ministère des Transports dire que le Canada offre l'un des réseaux les plus sécuritaires du monde malgré les lacunes qui existent, je ne souhaiterais pas vivre ailleurs, c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire.

Dans des études antérieures, il a été question des inspecteurs qui font des audits chez des compagnies ferroviaires. Ai-je raison de penser que la majorité de ces inspecteurs, qui, au fait, ne sont pas très nombreux, font davantage des inspections sur papier? Autrement dit, ils tournent les pages des rapports des compagnies ferroviaires, cochent des cases, puis ils donnent leur approbation.

Sur le nombre total d'inspecteurs, combien sont sur le terrain pour vérifier si les rails sont en bon état et combien sont capables de vérifier si les roues des wagons sont fissurées?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Présentement, nous avons environ 140 inspecteurs en place, sur un nombre total de 156 postes. Tous ces inspecteurs doivent aller sur le terrain. Leur travail se fait en deux étapes. Premièrement, ils font une évaluation sur papier en se fondant sur les données que les compagnies doivent nous transmettre. Il est important que nous révisions sur papier ce que la compagnie a fait, ce qu'elle a trouvé et si elle a donné suite à ses propres constatations. Cela nous permet de savoir comment cibler notre propre inspection quand nous allons sur le terrain.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

On revient donc à l'approche basée sur le risque. On étudie des éléments sur papier et, si une alarme sonne, on envoie quelqu'un vérifier la situation sur le terrain. Est-ce cela?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Non. Je pense que dire les choses de cette façon simplifie la façon dont nous faisons le travail.

Chaque année, nous préparons un plan d'inspection fondé sur plusieurs sources d'information. Nous passons en revue le volume des biens transportés, les constatations découlant de nos inspections passées et de nos audits sur les systèmes de gestion de la sécurité, de même que les données sur les accidents. Nous examinons une série de données économiques pour déterminer quel est le risque dans différents domaines.

M. Robert Aubin:

Depuis des années, on observe une diminution du nombre d'inspecteurs à Transports Canada, alors que le transport ferroviaire est en pleine expansion et qu'il croît de façon exponentielle. N'y a-t-il pas là un rajustement, pour le moins, à faire? Il me semble que le nombre d'inspections devrait suivre la croissance du trafic ferroviaire.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

En fait, le nombre d'inspecteurs a augmenté de façon importante depuis l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic. Le gouvernement nous a donné beaucoup plus de ressources et un meilleur équipement pour faire le travail. Par conséquent, le nombre de nos inspections a augmenté en conséquence.

M. Robert Aubin:

Selon les données dont je dispose, 25 inspecteurs sur 141 sont vraiment sur le terrain, les autres ne faisant que des inspections sur papier. Réfutez-vous cela?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Oui.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord. Je vais faire mes vérifications.

Comment une approche basée sur le risque permet-elle à Transports Canada d'être proactif plutôt que réactif chaque fois qu'il survient un incident ou un accident ferroviaire, comme on l'a vu il y a quelques semaines suite à la réaction du ministre lorsque des trains sont partis à la dérive? On aurait pu imposer des mesures tout de suite après l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic. Cela fait déjà six ans que ces événements sont survenus et il reste encore trois recommandations sur cinq qui n'ont pas fait l'objet de suivi.

Pouvez-vous au moins nous annoncer que, dans le prochain rapport qui doit être présenté en mars, les cinq recommandations du BST découlant de l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic auront obtenu la cote « attention satisfaisante »?

(1220)

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Nous l'espérons.

M. Robert Aubin:

Il ne faut pas espérer, il faut le faire.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Permettez-moi de finir de répondre à cet aspect de votre question.

Le ministère a pris plusieurs mesures pour répondre aux recommandations du BST. Nous avons pris au sérieux toutes les recommandations faites à la suite de l'accident et avons beaucoup travaillé pour y donner suite.

Comme vous le dites, c'est une industrie, une économie qui évolue, et les risques évoluent aussi. À chaque réévaluation, le BST nous demande de regarder différents aspects de la question, et c'est ce que nous sommes en train de faire. Pour toutes ces évaluations, il y a une réponse concrète du ministère et nous continuons à travailler sur la question.

M. Robert Aubin:

J'ai été assez surpris d'apprendre un fait tantôt. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Très brièvement, monsieur Aubin, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

J'ai donc été assez surpris d'apprendre qu'il y avait peu de rencontres entre le BST et le ministre. Le public en général accorde une grande crédibilité au BST.

N'y a-t-il pas lieu d'avoir un rapprochement ou une collaboration plus serrée entre Transports Canada et le BST?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Monsieur Aubin, même si Mme Fox ne rencontre pas le ministre,[Traduction]nous nous rencontrons régulièrement au ministère. J'ai eu de fréquentes réunions avec M. Laporte au cours du dernier mois. Nous discutons et mettons en commun des renseignements et des pratiques exemplaires de façon continue pour améliorer nos interventions et pour que le BST ait un aperçu réel et important de nos activités.

Brigitte, je pourrais vous laisser compléter la réponse.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Certainement. J'aimerais aussi ajouter que le BST est un organisme indépendant et qu'il ne relève pas du portefeuille du ministre des Transports.[Français]

Le ministre des Transports n'est pas le ministre responsable du BST. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Nous passons à M. Hardie.

Je rappelle que ce groupe de témoins sera ici jusqu'à 12 h 30 seulement. Donc, d'ici la fin, nous entendrons M. Hardie, M. Iacono et M. Liepert.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord. Nous allons faire de notre mieux.

Rapidement, pour revenir aux amendes — vos amendes administratives —, combien ont été imposées à des lignes ferroviaires sur courtes distances?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Je préférais ne pas le dire de mémoire, mais je crois que c'est deux.

Ce que je suggère, madame la présidente, c'est de faire parvenir une liste au Comité à une date ultérieure.

M. Ken Hardie:

La raison, c'est que nous nous préoccupons de la santé financière des lignes ferroviaires sur courtes distances et de leur capacité de rester au fait des règlements relatifs à la sécurité. Je pense que les enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans les locomotives imposent un coût élevé à ces lignes ferroviaires. On ne dit pas qu'il ne devrait pas y en avoir, mais je pense que nous nous préoccupons constamment de la façon dont elles peuvent rester en activité, compte tenu de leurs réalités.

Pouvez-vous parler de votre processus d'évaluation des risques, plus particulièrement en ce qui concerne le transport de matières dangereuses? Estimez-vous que vous avez suffisamment de données? Recueillez-vous suffisamment de renseignements à propos des types d'expéditions effectuées, de la façon dont elles sont effectuées, du moment où elles sont effectuées, etc.? Nous gérons les risques plutôt que de prendre des mesures qui, selon certains, seraient plus efficaces. Parlez-nous de la gestion des risques.

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Je vais laisser [...] d'accord, allez-y.

M. Benoit Turcotte:

Du point de vue du transport des matières dangereuses, nous prenons un certain nombre de mesures. Notre programme s'articule autour du risque, et nous prenons les risques très au sérieux. Une grande partie de ce que nous faisons se fonde sur la gestion des risques, y compris nos inspections.

La première étape pour établir la façon de procéder est que nous avons créé un registre des risques. Nous le mettons à jour de façon continue à partir de tous les renseignements que nous recueillons — les 6 000 inspections que nous effectuons par année, toutes les recherches que nous menons et les observations que nous recevons des gens sur le terrain et de nos inspecteurs, pour connaître notamment les cas de non-conformité. Ces données nous sont extrêmement utiles.

Par ailleurs, nous produisons chaque année un document sur l'environnement du programme qui renferme tous ces renseignements, et non pas seulement les risques du transport des matières dangereuses, mais les risques du programme également. Une bonne partie de notre travail repose sur ces renseignements. Ce document influe sur notre plan national de surveillance, qui est un document que nous préparons chaque année et qui énonce nos priorités. Nous classons les risques de tous nos sites connus où des matières dangereuses sont acheminées. Ce pourrait être un magasin Canadian Tire, un champ pétrolifère ou n'importe quel endroit où des matières dangereuses sont manutentionnées ou transportées.

(1225)



Nous effectuons un grand nombre de nos inspections en tenant compte de ces renseignements. Par exemple, lorsqu'il est question de pétrole brut, nous accordons une grande priorité à l'inspection des installations de transbordement. C'est là où les trains transportant du pétrole brut sont chargés. Au cours du présent exercice financier, nous aurons inspecté plus de la moitié de toutes les installations de transbordement connues. C'est là où nous ciblons les trains transportant du pétrole brut, pour nous assurer que le pétrole brut est chargé dans le wagon-citerne approprié, qu'elles ont les documents liés, au transport, adéquats, que leur personnel est formé et qu'elles chargent le pétrole brut de façon appropriée. Nous vérifions soigneusement tous ces éléments.

Là encore, cela cadre avec notre approche axée sur les risques pour l'inspection des matières dangereuses.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Iacono.

M. Angelo Iacono:

J'aimerais commencer par apporter quelques clarifications et remettre les pendules à l'heure concernant les remarques que mon collègue, le député Liepert, a faites plus tôt lorsqu'il interrogeait Mme Fox.

Le Québec reçoit maintenant la majorité de son pétrole brut de producteurs nord-américains. L'Ouest canadien est maintenant le principal fournisseur de pétrole brut du Québec. C'est en grande partie à la suite du projet d'inversion du pipeline no 9 d'Enbridge. Les raffineries du Québec reçoivent maintenant 82 % de leur pétrole de sources nord-américaines, si bien que seulement 11 % du pétrole provient de l'Algérie, par exemple. Je le mentionne pour clarifier votre observation.

Ma question porte sur l'évaluation des risques. Quelles mesures de surveillance ont été prises pour vérifier que les entreprises respectent les règles?

M. Benoit Turcotte:

À l'aide de nos règles relatives au transport des matières dangereuses et de nos règles sur la sécurité ferroviaire, nous établissons l'ordre de priorité des sites en fonction du type de risques qu'ils présentent. Par exemple, si un site n'a pas fait l'objet d'une inspection depuis un certain nombre d'années ou qu'il a des antécédents de non-conformité, nous effectuerons des inspections plus fréquentes, voire tous les ans. C'est généralement l'approche que nous adoptons, outre ce que je viens de mentionner à M. Hardie il y a quelques instants.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Madame la présidente, je vais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à Mme Pauzé. [Français]

Mme Monique Pauzé:

Merci beaucoup.

Des citoyens de Lac-Mégantic m'ont donné des photos qu'ils ont prises de rails encore existants sur lesquels des trains circulent vers Lac-Mégantic. Je les ai publiées sur ma page Facebook, je les ai montrées à de nombreuses personnes et la réaction est unanime: tout le monde s'étonne du fait que des trains circulent encore sur des rails aussi abîmés.

Voici un autre élément. Un agriculteur de ma circonscription m'a montré des rails qui sont installés sur sa propriété. Il m'a dit que c'était lui qui les entretienait et qui resserrait les vis parce que personne ne le fasait.

En passant, ces wagons circulent près de la General Dynamics, située dans ma circonscription. On s'entend pour dire que, s'il y avait un accident, ma circonscription au complet disparaîtrait. Cette compagnie, c'est de la « dynamite ».

Je reviens donc sur ce que vous avez dit tantôt: vous devez constater une amélioration de la conformité.

N'y aurait-il pas lieu d'avoir plutôt des règles beaucoup plus sévères que celles qui existent déjà, compte tenu des deux exemples que je vous donne de rails qui ne sont pas entretenus par les compagnies?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Merci du commentaire.

Si vous avez des plaintes, ce serait bien de nous les communiquer.

Nous avons fait beaucoup d'inspections de rails dans la région de Lac-Mégantic en réponse aux préoccupations de la population. Il y a eu un effort particulier en ce sens dans la région pour veiller à ce que les compagnies soient en conformité avec les règlements. Ce serait bon de nous communiquer les plaintes précises, le cas échéant.

Je terminerai en disant que nous examinons présentement la question des règles et des normes qui ont trait à l'entretien des rails afin de favoriser, peut-être, des changements dans l'avenir.

(1230)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Simplement pour m'assurer que nous avons tous les faits en main, c'est le gouvernement conservateur de Stephen Harper qui a approuvé le projet d'inversion d'Enbridge. Mettons les choses au clair.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien. Je suis fier de vous.

M. Ron Liepert:

Du pétrole est encore acheminé dans la province du Québec par voie ferroviaire. Du pétrole et du gaz arrivent des États-Unis, et ce n'est pas... Les 82 % englobent les produits américains qui sont acheminés au Québec. Tous ces emplois qui sont créés au Québec, que ce soit du pétrole de l'Ouest canadien, du pétrole étranger ou du pétrole des États-Unis, ce sont tous des emplois qui sont créés au Québec à des raffineries et à des installations qui se livrent à des activités de pétrochimie.

Je suis heureux que le député ait soulevé ce point pour que nos amis qui sont à notre gauche, qui parlent sans cesse du pétrole et de ses effets néfastes... Ils doivent peut-être savoir qu'il y a des milliers et des milliers d'emplois qui sont créés au Québec chaque jour à des raffineries, que ce pétrole provienne des États-Unis, de l'Algérie ou de l'Ouest canadien. Il est acheminé par voie ferroviaire car il n'y a aucune capacité de transport par pipeline. Si ces gens s'écartaient du chemin et permettaient la construction de pipelines et de faire obstacle aux pipelines...

J'aimerais poser à nos témoins la question suivante. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée du nombre d'employés supplémentaires que Transports Canada a dû embaucher pour inspecter le pétrole acheminé par train parce que nous n'avons pas les capacités de transport par pipeline adéquates au pays?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Je vais laisser le soin à mes collègues de poser la question. Je n'ai pas ce chiffre.

M. Ron Liepert:

Donnez-moi un chiffre approximatif. Combien d'inspecteurs avez-vous? Je pense que vous avez dit que vous avez dû tripler le nombre d'inspecteurs.

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Nous avons tripé le nombre d'inspecteurs à notre ministère. C'était après l'accident à Lac-Mégantic il y a un certain nombre d'années, évidemment. Les chiffres ont triplé. Mes collègues peuvent vous fournir les chiffres exacts, ou nous pouvons les faire parvenir au Comité.

M. Ron Liepert:

Est-il juste de dire que si le pétrole n'était pas expédié par train, nous n'aurions pas été obligés de tripler le nombre d'inspecteurs?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Je ne sais pas si c'est vraiment la réponse. Je ne peux pas fournir cette réponse. Il était important que nous puissions intervenir, et...

M. Ron Liepert:

Mais vous êtes intervenus principalement à cause de l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic, n'est-ce pas?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

L'accident de Lac-Mégantic a évidemment été un événement traumatisant pour le pays.

M. Ron Liepert:

Et c'était du pétrole qui était expédié par train.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à nos témoins, à nos fonctionnaires du ministère. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'être venus.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un instant avant de passer à l'étude des travaux du Comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard tran 25462 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on February 21, 2019

2019-02-07 TRAN 129

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I am calling the meeting to order. This is the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, 42nd Parliament. Pursuant to the order of reference from Wednesday, November 28, 2018, we are continuing our study of challenges facing flight schools in Canada.

I welcome all of you here today. This is our new meeting room in West Block and it's our first meeting here. We are joined today by, over and above the committee members, the mover of the motion, Mr. Fuhr. Welcome.

Today we have as witnesses, from Aéro Loisirs, Caroline Farly, Chief Pilot and Chief Instructor; from Air Canada Pilots Association, Captain Mike Hoff, External Affairs Committee; and from Carson Air, Marc Vanderaegen, Flight School Director, Southern Interior Flight Centre.

Mr. Vanderaegen, would you like to begin for five minutes?

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen (Flight School Director, Southern Interior Flight Centre, Carson Air):

Madam Chair, good morning and thank you for the invitation to participate today. I'm going to be reading from notes because I want to make sure I don't miss anything.

Southern Interior Flight Centre is a part of the Carson group of companies, which provides flight training in Kelowna, B.C., and medevac, freight and fuel and hangarage services in Kelowna, Calgary, Vancouver and Abbotsford. We get to face the challenges related to the pilot shortage in all aspects, not just training, but that's the focus for today.

At the flight school level, we train students to become recreational, general commercial, airline and instructor pilots, and we have a commercial aviation diploma program with Okanagan College. We have formal training partnerships with WestJet Encore, Jazz, Porter, and Carson Air, as well as informal connections with many companies seeking our graduates. As to the challenges, some of these you will recognize from previous meetings.

First, there is inadequate financial assistance for students. The high cost of initial training for a commercial pilot's licence combined with low funding leaves students deeply in debt. Available student loan assistance combined through Canada student loans and B.C. student loans, for example, in our province is a mere $5,440 per semester. Put this against the demonstrated need for $23,519 per semester and this means the typical unmet need in this is $18,000 for each semester, or over $90,000 one might need for a five-semester diploma program.

Second, we are facing increasing training costs. To acquire instructor staff, we now have to train flight instructors at a burden of $10,000 per instructor. This used to be a revenue stream generated from commercial pilots who wanted to instruct and has, instead, become a cost that now has to be passed along to the general flight training student group, thereby increasing their financial burden. The costs of aircraft parts and fuel are also unstable and increasing significantly. For example, a single-engine Cessna 172 aircraft new from the factory is currently $411,000 U.S. and requires a lead time of 14 months for delivery. Used aircraft result in bidding wars and still run 50% to 75% of new cost before adding in the high cost of overhauling major components like engines and propellers.

Not only is the domestic training demand fuelling aircraft sales and prices but international companies have been purchasing aircraft in groups of 25 or more for their own training use overseas. In addition to costs being increased through those means, the pool of aircraft maintenance engineers is also being depleted, thereby requiring higher pay and incentives to attract and retain qualified maintenance personnel.

Our third challenge is our general lack of access to potential staff. With the current state of hiring in the industry, new pilots do not need to spend time instructing to build experience to move to being commercial operators. Many graduates are going straight to airlines or other companies directly out of flight school. The lower availability of instructors equals fewer instructors who advance through the instructor class system in order to become supervising instructors or to be able to train new instructors.

As a temporary solution, hiring qualified international applicants for instructor positions is not a viable option for us as the current LMIA process is overly onerous and the lengthy Transport Canada licence conversion process also holds up the administrative processing of international applicants. Medical requirements are also overly restrictive in some circumstances, for example, when dealing with correctable colour blindness or when preventing retired airline pilots who no longer hold medicals from teaching in a simulator for us as they were already able to do at the airlines.

To counter that, our recommendations fall into two groups.

First, we need more aviation-specific funding. I think that's pretty clear. We need to increase federal funding in the way of additional student loans and loan forgiveness programs for students. We need to look at federal funding support in the way of instructor training or retention grants to help alleviate the financial burden passed along to the students. We also need to look at federal funding or tax credits for capital purchases to also help cover the extremely high and increasingly higher equipment costs.

The second group of recommendations involves being able to increase access to instructor staff. First, an increase in student funding would allow flight training units to pay instructors and aircraft maintenance engineers higher wages to be able to retain them. Next, providing easier access in the short term for international employees through the LMIA programs, either on a fast track or by exempting suitable candidates entirely, would allow us to hire pilots or aircraft maintenance engineers who are available internationally to fill the gap.

Reducing turnaround times at Transport Canada for the licence-conversion—

(1105)

The Chair:

Excuse me, Mr. Vanderaegen, could you do your closing comments, please.

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

Sure. In closing, I'll get straight to the point. We need these challenges to be addressed to ensure that we cannot only stay in business today but to expand to meet the growing need that's coming up through the market.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Captain Hoff, you have five minutes, please.

Captain Mike Hoff (Captain, External Affairs Committee, Air Canada Pilots Association):

Good morning, and thank you.

My name is Michael Hoff. I am an airline pilot, and I love my job. I'm a Boeing 787 captain at Air Canada based in Vancouver. I'm here representing the Air Canada Pilots Association.

Before I begin my remarks, I'd like to thank all of you for taking on this issue. Stable and predictable access to aviation is important in a country as large as ours. Many sectors are struggling with labour supply issues. For pilots, the issue is complex. In our submission to the committee, you will see that the cost of pilot training and limited access to training flight time are factors, and not only that, so are the poor safety records and working conditions for entry-level pilots, factors that are borne out in research we have done to show that young Canadians are more likely to be interested in a career as a nurse, a firefighter or even a video gamer than as a pilot.

The easiest way for me to explain this is to tell my story through personal experience. Not only am I a pilot, but my 26-year-old son now flies for the regional airline Jazz. Let me explain. Pilot training can run upwards of $90,000, a tremendous cost burden for families, and a difficult case to make if you need to secure a loan. For my son to get the training and accumulate the hours he needed, I ended up buying a small airplane, a PA-22, and we hired our own instructor. Yes, if you're wondering, it is somewhat like learning to drive a car: It can be better if someone else tells your kid what to do.

Flight schools across Canada are fragmented. Some are aligned with accredited colleges; others are not. Many are small, family-run operations. The Canada Revenue Agency does not recognize tuition expenses for all of them. Personally, I can tell you it took three years of fighting before CRA recognized my son's flight school for tax purposes. Not only that, I wasn't able to deduct any of the flying time in my own aircraft. Now contrast this with how easy it was to claim my other son's university tuition.

A lot of students think that when they get their pilot's licence, they can walk into a job at WestJet or Air Canada. In reality, it's more like pro sports. Before you make it to the big leagues, you have to literally get thousands of hours on the farm team. In Canada, that often means flying up north.

Let me speak frankly. Day-to-day regulatory oversight can be totally disconnected from the reality on the ground. Rules require self-monitoring, and that means pilots are supposed to decide for themselves whether or not they are fit for duty, which can be a tough decision when you are new and out of your element. In some operations, if a pilot reports that they are unfit to fly due to fatigue, they will be asked if they need a blankie and a pacifier to facilitate their nap. That is the culture.

If you need the job to get a better job, it can create a tremendous amount of pressure on inexperienced pilots, and it's one of the reasons that, when we look at accident rates in Canadian aviation, the majority of hull losses—in other words, the total loss of an aircraft, and far too often the souls on board—are in the far north. I can tell you honestly that, as a parent, I did not get a good night's sleep when my son was flying up north.

What can we do about this? The survey we commissioned showed very clearly that parents and students today are more attracted to the stable, safe pathways and immediate benefits that more traditional careers might offer. We need to reduce and eliminate the barriers that students face.

That means, one, we need policies to help defray the costs of entry, including making loans and tax credits available for flight schools. Two, we need to find ways to make accumulating flight and simulator time easier. Three, we need to encourage accredited public institutions to build flight schools. Four, we need to work on making aviation safer, which includes ensuring strong regulatory oversight where our new pilots are flying, especially in the north. Statistics show that we must do better. This protects not only our newest pilots but also their passengers.

I am proud to be a pilot. Nothing makes me happier than encouraging young people to consider this as a career. We have the best view in the world from our office, but there's work to be done.

I am grateful for the attention from this committee on these important issues.

(1110)



I would specifically like to thank Mr. Fuhr for bringing this forward.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Captain Hoff.

Ms. Farly, go ahead, please.

Ms. Caroline Farly (Chief Pilot and Chief Instructor, Aéro Loisirs):

Thank you. I will also read, and I'm going to do this presentation in French.[Translation]

Good morning. Thank you for having me today.

I am Caroline Farly, owner of the Aéro Loisirs flying school. I am Chief Pilot and Chief Instructor, as well as the person in charge of aircraft maintenance and authorized agent for Transport Canada. I became an instructor in 2011 in order to pursue it as a career.

I want to thank Louise Gagnon, who was a pilot and class 1 instructor at Cargair for 25 years, and Rémi Cusach, founder of the ALM flying school, also class 1 instructor for 25 years and now retired. Both are currently delegated examiners at Transport Canada and helped me prepare this presentation.

Lengthy student admission delays are a problem for flying schools. Behind the problem is an instructor shortage, which is not improving. It is urgent to address our inability to meet the current and growing demand of commercial pilot licence candidates.

It is no longer necessary to go through the training process to accumulate flying hours. Only pilots who truly show interest will become instructors. Inspiration should be drawn from the conclusions of this study to promote the value of the flight instructor profession, the current perception of which is definitely impeding candidate recruitment.

Pilots who have decided to pursue a career as instructors are few in the network and are mainly school founders, examiners and chief instructors. They have an immeasurable wealth of knowledge in training and aviation and have been playing a leading role over the past 30 years in the establishment of flying schools. However, they are approaching the age of retirement, selling their schools and leaving an enormous void in the field.

That is what happened with the school I took over in 2013. Until the founder retired in 2018, we were two career instructors, but now it's just me. I like to think that our enthusiasm has strongly influenced and inspired pilots we have trained to become instructors, as access to role models or mentors has always been a key to success in professional recruitment.

Instruction is the least valued and the lowest paid aspect of aviation. That is the harsh reality. Schools are paying wages to independent workers instead of salaries to employees. Weather-related loss of income is considerable, both for flight schools and for workers, not to mention the negative impact the loss has on the region where our students live. The demand for our services increases significantly when students are on vacation during the summer and during holidays. Last-minute cancellations because of the weather or mechanical failures make the enforcement of labour standards difficult and costly.

Although instructors at our school are relatively well paid because they receive a significant bonus, the fact remains that our operations impose a ceiling on us. The cost of maintenance and the purchase of aircraft parts and fuel are increasing while we face income variations. Pilot training is expensive, and we are trying to keep its cost at acceptable levels that make aviation accessible. Those costs fluctuate and increase, but the cost of service cannot follow suit.

The big question is: who will train the instructors of tomorrow? Only the most senior instructors—those in class 1—who have accumulated 750 flying hours as instructors can train flight instructors. That is essentially what is stated in standard 421.72 of the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

Today, it is possible to become a class 1 instructor after only one or two seasons. Airlines compete for experienced pilots—all experienced instructors and class 1 instructors—over other instructors and professional pilots lacking additional qualifications. We will witness a gradual drop in the quality of training and a disappearance of role models and mentors with a wealth of experience and operational and practical knowledge.

The reality is also that experienced instructors were running flying schools across Canada. Declining experience levels in that area are certainly likely to affect the quality of the training of new instructors. Currently, Transport Canada is mobilizing class 1 instructors to deal with those challenges, and that highly significant and constructive initiative shows that the department is serious about taking action.

(1115)



The majority of class 1 instructors currently working are over the age of 50, and I am concerned about becoming one of the rare class 1 instructors with more than 10 years of experience. I am already one of the few, if not the only, woman who owns a flying school. [English]

The Chair:

Please give your closing comments. [Translation]

Ms. Caroline Farly:

In closing, one of my last concerns is the availability of flight examiners for flight instructors. That issue needs to be addressed because a flight examiner for flight instructors must currently be an airline pilot, and that complicates the scheduling of instructor exam activities.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are going to questions from our members.

We have Ms. Block for six minutes, please.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to welcome our guests here this morning and, as well, echo your appreciation to Mr. Fuhr for bringing his motion forward. I believe it was unanimously supported, so we recognize the very important role that flight schools have in our airline industry.

I want to go back to the testimony of Captain Hoff. If you wouldn't mind recapping for me, I think you outlined three policies you believed the government should undertake in order to address some of the issues for young pilots who are seeking to get more experience and perhaps make it easier for that to happen.

(1120)

Capt Mike Hoff:

I highlighted four points. They were to improve working conditions for new pilots in Canada's north, encourage accredited public institutions to build flight schools, make it easier for students to accumulate flight and simulator time, and examine options for reducing costs for students, like making it easier to get tax deductions for their education.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

All of those would touch upon the things you have heard, not only perhaps, from your son and his experience, but also from other young pilots, for whom some of these actually are real barriers to pursuing a career in this industry.

Capt Mike Hoff:

That's correct.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

I would like to follow up on the testimony of Ms. Farly. I appreciate what you were saying at the end of your testimony, in terms of being one of the only females—or the only female—who owns a flight school.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

I think I'm one of the only. I'm not sure if there is another one, so I don't want to proclaim myself to be the only one, but I do not know another.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

I know time is short, but you were starting out on that train of thought. Was there anything you wanted to add in regard to that?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

In regard to that, I think I had completed that issue. However, it's a whole generation—

I'll speak in French.[Translation]

The idea here is continuity. We are currently lacking succession and there are no more instructors. Even I, as one of the rare class 1 instructors still active with a certain number of years of experience, need support and a group of peers—other class 1 instructors. We no longer have role models or support.

A process must really be implemented to help retain our instructors and make the profession into a viable vocation. Right now, the instructor profession is negatively perceived because the only thing said about it is that it is not well paid, which is unfortunately true. No one is talking about the richness of that career and the experience of flying with so many different people. That whole issue must really be looked into.[English]

I think that was the main point.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

You also talked about the costs of operating a flight school. I'm wondering about the other side of the balance sheet, which would be revenue. Where do you get your revenue from?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

For any school or aviation service, the revenue comes when the plane takes off and when we give class instructions. We give theoretical classes, so there's revenue from that, but then we have the office. We have the Internet, so I won't go into that business side. If we don't give theoretical classes and we don't have planes flying, there's no revenue. That's also why instructors....

For example, starting in November until today, we've all seen the weather, and when you're in aviation, you don't look at the weather the same way. I don't know if you all have seen how bad the weather has been for flying. That's less revenue. How can we with travailleur autonome ensure a stable work payment when we can't guarantee such a high revenue?

I have a nice team of instructors right now. Because we are career-motivated instructors, I have a really strong and nice team right now, but one is going to leave in a year. He wants to stay, but he's going to be wrapped up by a company. He promised me one year, maybe two, because he wants to stay in the region. He doesn't want to fly an airliner so much. He prefers staying at home. But you cannot compare salaries.

I chose to be an instructor because I love it but also because I have a son at home and I wanted to make sure that I came home at night. We can give instructors different incentives, but right now, the salary is not one of them, unfortunately.

(1125)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

Do I have any time left?

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Fuhr.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.):

Thank you all very much for coming. I appreciate that.

Marc, you ran out of time. I want to give you an opportunity to finish what you wanted to say, and then I have a question.

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

Thank you, Mr. Fuhr.

The thing that was left out for me was the medical requirements that we have to face when we want to have pilots or instructors. I used a small example of people with colour blindness who can use corrective lenses that could fix that, no different from us when we have to wear regular lenses to repair that. But the people with colour blindness are still not allowed to fly at night, and they're still restricted to having to have a radio and a control zone.

With regard to medicals, the other thing is we have this abundance of people retiring at the top end of the airline community right now. Of course, once you reach a certain age, it's harder to maintain your medicals. If they were at the airlines, they could continue to teach in a simulator, whereas we can't use them for any of the specific licensing requirements in our simulators in flight schools.

Who better to train these people for where they're going than the people who are retiring? We have to add that as additional training, and that comes at a cost to the students in addition to what they're already paying.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you for that.

It's been pretty clear that we need more students. We need to remove the barriers to getting them into flight training. Obviously, there's a financial piece. That's probably the biggest speed bump on that note. We need to train them faster and we need more instructors.

On training them faster, I was wondering if any of the three of you would comment on how you think competency-based training might shorten that training cycle so we can get people through the pipeline faster. Caroline, do you have an opinion on that?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

I need you to clarify. Sorry.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

I'm talking about training people to be competent versus just saying for this phase of flying that they need so many hours. That may not be suitable for ab initio pilot training, but certainly for a commercial standard or an airline transport rating standard, once we get further up the training cycle. Some places will do training to competency regardless of hours. The Canadian system basically says they need to achieve these hours and competency. Do you think if we looked at how we train people that might help us get people through faster once we got them in the door?

The Chair:

Ms. Farly, please feel free to speak in French. We have full translation available.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Okay. Thank you.[Translation]

Your question is really quite interesting, and I will give you my point of view. That is already an approach we use. Take for example the 45 hours of training required to become a private pilot. It is very rare for candidates, even the most talented ones, to be ready after only 35 hours. With exercises added to it, the 45-hour training is completed quickly and effectively. In addition, people cannot move on to the next flight exercise before they really master the previous one. [English]

I'm sorry. I have difficulty answering this question.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

It's okay. I'll move to Mike.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Yes, thank you.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Do you have an opinion on that?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Yes. I think that is a piece of it. Some of it is outdated and antiquated, but I think in the process, you have to be careful that you don't start lowering the bar to meet a perceived problem you have. You have to keep the standard, but there are avenues.

My son is in the right seat of a Dash 8 Q400. He's out flying around in circles in my airplane at night, because he needs to tick a Transport Canada box. I really don't think it's going to make him a better pilot, but the box needs to be ticked.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Right. I would agree with you. The standard has to be maintained throughout the entire process. It certainly wouldn't be applicable to every phase of flight training, in my opinion, and based on my experience, but I think it might shorten the process in areas where it made sense.

Marc, do you have an opinion on that?

(1130)

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

Yes. I agree with what Mr. Hoff has said here. You have to make sure the bar has been maintained.

We use a combination of competency-based and scenario-based training, but you still have to meet the standards. We have students we will test at three-quarters of their training. That would be more than adequate to fly commercially, but we have to fill in another 40 or 50 hours with them. Those are the ones we do advanced things with, which is fine. Again, that would also be a method of potentially reducing costs for them. On the flip side, you're probably also going to see students with whom you have to go beyond the current limits. I guess it's finding the balance.

I think with input from the airlines.... We have a large program advisory committee. If they're provided access in schools in the way we provide access, where we open the books and show them how everybody is performing, I think that could help maintain those standards.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you very much.

I believe that's my time.

The Chair:

Yes, it is.

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to make a quick comment before I ask my questions. At the meeting's outset, during the opening statements, the interpreters told us that they had not received the texts, which complicated their job. I was wondering whether we could make an effort for future meetings and ensure that interpreters have the texts before the meeting starts.

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for joining us this morning.

Your testimony is very enlightening. Since we began our study, I have felt that the situation is complex, but relatively simple to summarize. We have two problems: how to attract new pilots, and how to retain them, regardless of whether they are professionals or instructors.

We are talking about the situation in Canada, but the pilot market is global. With a pilot shortage, I assume that every one of them holds all the cards when it comes to finding the company that will give them the best working conditions.

About a year and a half ago, we carried out a very broad study on aviation safety. One of the issues discussed intensively was the matter of flying hours imposed on Canadian pilots.

My first questions are for you, Captain Hoff. First, can the number of flying hours imposed on Canadian pilots put the Canadian industry at a disadvantage and push our pilots to work abroad in better conditions? Second, are the new regulations submitted by the minister and by Transport Canada satisfactory to you in that regard? [English]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Sorry, the volume went down there, but I think you were asking if the hours were adequate and if Canada was out of line globally with.... Was that annual flight times or flight times for licensing? [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

My question is about whether the number of hours plays a role.

Can the number of flying hours Canadian pilots must log compared to what is required of foreign pilots affect our ability to keep our pilots in Canada? [English]

Capt Mike Hoff:

I think our pilot qualification times are in line with those of other ICAO countries. We are actually advantaged over the U.S. system where, as a result— [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

If I may, I am not talking about training hours, but about flying hours. [English]

Capt Mike Hoff:

I think we're fairly well aligned with other ICAO jurisdictions. I don't see any disparity there that would tip it one way or the other. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I will move on to another question. In your opening remarks, you quickly mentioned issues with the Canada Revenue Agency that lasted three years. It seems to me that this situation is well within the federal Parliament's jurisdiction. Can you explain to us the issues you have had with the agency, so that we can decide what measures could help retain students? [English]

Capt Mike Hoff:

I'm really glad you asked me that question.

Actually, Marc and I went to college together, a college that no longer exists, unfortunately.

One of the big problems I ran into was the inconsistency in pilot training across the country. Ontario and Quebec have much more fulsome, vertically integrated training programs. Out west it's really become the wild, wild west. Some colleges are affiliated with a flight school, but they have no idea what happens over at the airport. They've put together a basket of some economics classes and called it a business aviation diploma. But you go over to an airport and they're not the college's instructors. They don't really know what's going on with the curriculum, and something magic happens over there.

There are really good examples of how to do it properly; it's just that there's no continuity. It was quite interesting to see the juxtaposition with my younger son, who's an engineer, and the resources afforded to him to pursue his dream there the resources afforded to my older son as a pilot.

(1135)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

My next question is for Ms. Farly.

A lot is being said about the cost of training a student. That is a delicate and complex issue because education also comes under provincial jurisdiction, and the federal government cannot act alone. However, you were saying that you bought a company you were already working for. Could the federal government implement measures that would foster business transfer, thus enabling a flying school to quickly find someone to take over instead of closing?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

That is an excellent question. I was able to benefit from the regional support program for young entrepreneurs under the age of 35. The Community Futures Development Corporation and the local development centre really helped me buy that business, and those measures are in line with what you are talking about.

Currently, flying schools are being bought by people who are passionate about flying, but who are not necessarily flight instructors. In Quebec, I don't know of any schools that have declared bankruptcy or have been closed, which proves that the transition is taking place. However, I know nothing about the rest of Canada. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Mr. Graham, for six minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I will start with you, Ms. Farly.

In your conclusion, you talked about the issue of examiner availability. Can you tell me more about that? What is the current time frame for examination candidates? In my case, it only took a few days for me to take the exam. How long does it now take for a candidate to be able to take the exam, receive the results and be able to take on their new role, with their new licence?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Thank you for the question.

Currently, it takes about one week for someone to be able to take their private pilot or commercial pilot exam. When the instructor feels that the student is ready, they can call in and arrange for the exam to take place fairly quickly. The flight exam can be cancelled due to weather, but it is easy to reschedule it for the next day, the weekend or the following week, if necessary.

However, for a flight instructor flight exam, at least two months are needed, without the possibility of a definitive date because, for the time being, examiners must be airline pilots and have other professional obligations. Since instructor training takes three months when attended full time, as it is generally the case with us, it is difficult to set at the start of the training a specific date for the final exam because a two-month advance notice is needed, which is reset if the exam has to be postponed. So that leads to significant delays. At the same time, I know some class 1 instructors who are currently on the ground as flight examiners and would like to be flight instructor examiners for Transport Canada, but they are being turned away because they are not airline pilots.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are the theory exams up to date? Are they in line with current knowledge?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

That's one of the concerns those of us in the field have right now. The process to review or challenge the theory exams is either outdated or non-existent. A number of my fellow instructors and I have concerns about the subjects covered in the exam. Obviously, the content of the exam isn't public.

To give you a sense of the situation, I'll give you an example. I am an authorized agent for Transport Canada, and my job is to invigilate exams. I had to be fingerprinted by the RCMP. I have a file. I know that I will be held criminally responsible if anything were to occur, but I would like Transport Canada to invite me to take part in an exam review committee. Many of us in the field are concerned about the subjects covered in theory exams and their updating. On both the private and commercial sides, students are discouraged for the simple reason that certain subjects are now out of step with current practice and standards.

(1140)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At the beginning of your presentation, you talked about the shortage of pilots interested in becoming instructors. In the past, all many pilots wanted was to accumulate flight hours.

Do a lot of pilots interested in becoming instructors not do so because they can't make a good living at it?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Indeed, I knew many 25 years ago and still know many today. At my school, the pilots who become instructors do it because they want to and can. They're retired and work part time. That's the reality. We work with part-time instructors, so it's quite the juggling act. For example, one of my instructors has another job because he wants to be home with his partner in the evening. I have another young pilot who's becoming an instructor next year. He began the process to become an instructor. He wants to stay in the area and work with his father. It won't be a full-time job for him. These are people who wish to become instructors and make ends meet by working a second job. All of that makes it harder to run the school and provide a stable learning environment. It's tough to make sure students are consistently trained by the same instructor when we work with a team of part-time instructors.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Say an instructor completes their training and has up-to-date skills and knowledge. If they find another job, are you able to keep them on part time but offer them more hours?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

I sure wish I had an incentive other than motivation to offer. The sense of belonging to a school and being part of the culture is what motivates people to work as instructors, not the money. Our schools can't afford to pay them as much as they'd like. There's just no comparing the pay. For now, the only things that can keep someone working as an instructor are motivation and love of the job.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In response to Mr. Aubin's question, you mentioned the help of the CFDC and the CLD. Could you tell us more about the program that made it possible for you to buy the flight school?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

For the project, I submitted an action plan, and I received a grant for young entrepreneurs. Adopting a similar program for instructors would be worth exploring. Unfortunately, I can't remember the name of the program anymore, but the funding enabled entrepreneurs to be paid during the business's first year in operation. That meant the business had more working capital. It was as though I was receiving employment insurance benefits, but they weren't, of course. What it allowed me to do was spend money and revenue on getting the business up and running or at least to have more working capital. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Rogers, please.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you to the witnesses for appearing today.

I want to address my question to Caroline first.

According to the labour market report of March 2018, only 30% of the people involved in the aviation industry are female, and only 7% of pilots are women. What do you believe is the cause of this significant under-representation of women among Canadian pilots?

Is it because of how we have created a gender divide or is it the way we've targeted certain people? I know that back in the day doctors were men and nurses were women. We have gender parity, of course, and gender equality and all the other things we talk about, but is this a problem such that females in our society and under-represented groups, such as minority groups, have not applied to pilot schools to become pilots? Is that one of the biggest causes of the shortage that we see today?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

That's a very good question.

I think we all have this image.... I'm sorry to say it this way, but Captain Hoff represents the image of the pilot that we all have. We do not see a lot of female pilots. The fact is that we need to hear the voice of a woman telling us that we're ready to land in Peterborough or that we're ready to land. Our parents never tell us as young women that it is a possibility to be an airline pilot. We're not given that possibility. It's when we're older and we see someone that we're given the opportunity to think outside the box.

At my school I think I do have a certain influence. I do influence the daughters of my pilots. I do influence my pilots who say, “I have a daughter and I think she should come and meet you.” At my school we're way more than 7%, but I think there's this new generation, and there are a lot of initiatives for women in aviation that are going out. We have the Ninety-Nines. We have a lot of women's associations that do exist. I think that soon enough we'll be increasing those percentages.

If I can be permitted to say one other thing, because I'm asked to talk to a lot of ladies. Although it is conceived of as a male environment, women are so included in aviation. I have never felt discriminated against. I have never felt that I was a woman in a man's group. This is a sisterhood, a brotherhood, and there is always room for women and everyone in aviation. One thing that we learn in aviation is you cannot be a pilot if you're not a team player.

(1145)

Mr. Churence Rogers:

I thank you for that. I've done a lot of flying in my lifetime, and I think last year was the first time on a flight where I ever saw a pilot and a co-pilot who were female. That was the first time I've ever seen that.

The other comment I want to make is directed to Captain Mike Hoff.

Teaching is a noble career. I was a teacher for 29 years. I loved interacting with high school kids on a daily basis—most days, anyway. It was imparting knowledge and guiding these young people who were chasing different careers and stuff.

In your pilot association is wanting to be mentors to young pilots an inspiration for you as part of your career?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Absolutely. I would love to be able to participate in that. I feel strongly about it. My career has been fantastic because of altruistic people ahead of me. Marc and I were extremely fortunate to go through a school that had a lot of retired airline people and retired military people, and we got a fantastic education as a result.

It's been difficult to give back vis-à-vis instructing, because we have time limits and we're expensive to our companies. If I go and teach somewhere else, that takes away from the time my employer can use me. That's a no-go area for them.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Rogers.

We move now to Ms. Leitch.

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch (Simcoe—Grey, CPC):

Thank you, witnesses, for being here today. My questions will be for all of you, so please feel free to step forward.

One of the things I think all of you have mentioned is the high capital cost, obviously, of running flight schools. Has there been any opportunity for you to speak to an increase in the airport capital assistance program or, quite frankly, a change in the capital cost allowance on your taxes for your organizations? We talk about that frequently for other industries, but have you been able to approach the government with respect to that in your flight schools and your overhead costs?

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

I can answer a little bit of that.

The way the programs are set up—where we are for the aircraft capital part of it—the airport doesn't qualify, because it's too busy. It's one of these things where there's nothing out there that assists specifically for this. Even if it did qualify, it wouldn't qualify under the equipment and rules of—

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

What I'm saying is I think there may be an opportunity there for you. I would encourage you to be advocates on that, whether it be for your flight simulation equipment, which is a high capital cost.... I'm a surgeon. We use simulators all the time. You guys are like the anaesthetists in my world, you do the takeoff and landing, and I'm the person in between as a surgeon. we use simulators all the time, and they're high capital cost equipment.

I have a second question. With respect to the actual education of young pilots, obviously for undergraduate or post-graduate education in this country, we provide the Canada student loans program and a forgiveness program. Have any of you, or a large industry leader like Air Canada and others, advocated that, similar to skilled trades, your young pilots and trainees should be a component part of that program?

I leave it with you.

(1150)

[Translation]

Ms. Caroline Farly:

In terms of student loans, if a flight school isn't linked to an accredited college program, students aren't eligible for those loan programs.

Even though private schools aren't linked to the college system, their performance levels are recognized by Transport Canada and they are equally as qualified. Ideally, the government would open up those programs to our students as well.

Currently, what students are allowed to do is take out a loan, enter into a specific agreement with a bank for professional training delivered in the region.[English]

One thing, I'm sorry, that I can say is I know that[Translation]

students submit their tuition receipts for a tax deduction. Recently, my students have told me that the percentage of tax deductible tuition fees has dropped significantly for aviation.

By no means an expert in the area, I do know the issue is worth a closer look. Numerous students have told me that changes were made to the tax credit for commercial programs and that it's significantly less. [English]

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Maybe I could ask each of you about one of the other issues that came up, and I guess it's a bit tangential to what Ms. Farly was just mentioning.

It's with regard to the regulations for the simulation schools, and who should be eligible to be running them. That may also aid in providing an opportunity, whether it be for the federal government or provincial governments, to say that all students should be eligible. If there's one set of regulations that governs one being able to function in these facilities, and one standard, then obviously each organization should be eligible for financial support for their students.

Mr. Hoff, you look as if you would like to answer that.

Capt Mike Hoff:

Yes, I'd like to jump in here.

First of all, I'd like to thank both of my colleagues for the work they do at these schools. These schools have done a great job of stepping forward and filling a need—

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Absolutely.

Capt Mike Hoff:

—that wasn't there, because it had been abandoned.

One of the upsides to the type of school that Marc and I attended was that the college bought the simulator. This is not to take anything away from businesses that need to make a profit; they have to pay for that simulator, so they need to charge for the time on it. When Marc and I went to school, our college was very highly regarded for its grads, for their instrument skills, because we had 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week access to those simulators for free. We would get in there and fly them. A private institution can't do that.

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

I would beg to differ on whether a private institution can do it. It's whether they choose to do it. I think that is the issue. I think it's incumbent upon industry to actually try to escalate that bar. If we're going to have excellence, then we should be training people to be excellent.

That being said, with respect to regulations, my question would be for Ms. Farly and Marc Vanderaegen.

Would these regulations be more of a burden to you as a company, or would you see them as something that would augment your ability to receive additional funding and support for your students and for your own company?

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

I guess I'm trying to understand what regulations you're actually talking about as a potential.... Are you talking about regulations that would allow, that would be established—

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

I mean educational standards.

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

Educational standards of...?

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

You're running a flight school. It's a school.

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

It depends on how they're rolled out, I guess, and what they actually are.

Right now we have educational standards per se through Transport Canada already, so if it's just doubling them up, like we have with the Ministry of Education in B.C. where they try to manage us as well and things like that, it becomes cumbersome, and it doesn't really benefit the students.

No, if it benefits the students and can be managed, that's fine. Just bear in mind that costs do have to come out of the students' pockets unless there are other funding avenues set up as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Mr. Badawey.

(1155)

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a question for Mr. Hoff with respect to the industry, as well as the partnership that industry may have with the Air Canada Pilots Association, and in particular Air Canada itself.

In my former life, we really encouraged industry, in partnership with unions, in partnership with communities, secondary and post-secondary schools, etc., to get students at a younger age interested in different trades, different disciplines, and with that, to partner then to start the process of co-ops, apprenticeship education, etc. Then leading into post-secondary, they would pursue those disciplines to further their education and ultimately end up in the area of expertise they want to be in.

Is there any of that partnership between the association and, in your case, Air Canada with respect to getting the younger secondary individuals interested and from there to pursue it through secondary and post-secondary? You have the air cadet programs. You have other interested organizations that would actually align with being a pilot. Is there any partnership occurring between you and Air Canada?

Capt Mike Hoff:

First of all, I'll speak to the piece with my employer. I've approached my employer. They are the apex predator. Their position is that they don't have a problem getting pilots. I've found very little traction with them. Personally, they do give me access to the simulator, as well as taking would-be pilots, who are looking at it as a career, up in my own plane. I also take them into the simulator. I thank Air Canada for the opportunity to use their simulators, but that's about where it ends.

On the altruistic side, where I feel the need to give back, I've got excellent traction through my association. People would ask why your association would use your membership's dues to hire advocates and do these studies to collect the data. The data wasn't there. I'm a pilot. I need data. I can't come and talk to you and say, “I've heard”. We did a study. We drilled down to get some data and we're trying to help.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

You seem very cautious in your comments. I'll have a little chat with you offline, after the meeting, about some of the—

Capt Mike Hoff:

I appreciate that.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

—comments that I'm sure you're being very cautious with.

With that, I'll pass it over to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you.

Good morning. Thank you for being here.

Ms. Farly, I want to commend you for having the courage to take over a business that was on the verge of going under. Sorry, I didn't mean that it was about to go under; what I meant was that it was about to close its doors. My apologies.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

That's fine.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Let's say you saved it from going under.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

I saved it from shutting down.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Precisely.

Describe for us, if you would, the challenges you faced or continue to face. What has the economic impact on regional flight schools been?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Sorry, but are you asking about the challenges I faced getting the business back on track?

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Yes, and those you continue to face.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Oh, well, that's a lengthy conversation.

The biggest challenge to the school's sustainability is finding instructors. I don't mean instructors just looking to do a few hours—in any case, they don't exist anymore. I'm talking about instructors who can deliver quality training that lives up to the school's reputation—instructors who will stay with us. That's our biggest challenge in terms of long-term survival.

Another challenge I faced was managing the demand. Being a stable resource in the aviation sector, I had five places ask me to start a flying school in their region. I won't name them, mind you. One of my challenges right now is running the flight school with a view to stability, while maintaining the same standard upheld by its founder. I've been there since 2010.

Flight instructors are desperately needed all over the regions for two-engine airplanes. I was discussing it with Mr. Vanderaegen, in fact. Commercial pilots are being trained all over, with demand on the rise. However, there aren't any more two-engine airplanes for pilot training because of how expensive they are. The current wait time for two-engine pilot training is two to three months.

If I was to let the company go, despite the ever-increasing costs of the school, I would buy another plane. I would buy another two-engine plane, but I can't allow training costs to go up. Training has to remain accessible. I try to pay my instructors more. I'd like to provide more training by purchasing a two-engine plane and more, but students are already struggling to register for my programs because of the cost. There aren't any funding programs.

It's a financial challenge. I try to maintain an acceptable balance on both ends without having excessive operating costs. I'm trying to keep aviation accessible to my pilots.

(1200)

[English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but our time has expired.

Thank you very much to all of our witnesses for coming today.

We will suspend momentarily, while we change our witnesses.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome to our witnesses for this portion of the program. By video conference, we have Ms. Bell, Board Chair of the British Columbia Aviation Council. From CAE, we have Joseph Armstrong, Vice-President and General Manager. From Super T Aviation, we have Terri Super, Chief Executive Officer. From Go Green Aviation, we have Gary Ogden, Chief Executive Officer. Welcome to all of you.

I would ask that you keep your comments to five minutes, because the committee members always have lots of questions.

We will start with Ms. Bell from the British Columbia Aviation Council.

Ms. Heather Bell (Board Chair, British Columbia Aviation Council):

Good afternoon. I would like to thank the committee for the opportunity to speak today and for the efforts being taken to address this critical issue.

I speak today as the chair of the British Columbia Aviation Council, which represents the interests of the aviation community in B.C. Personally, my 36-year career has been in air traffic control. I've worked as an operational tower controller and a radar controller. When I retired from NAV Canada, I was the general manager of the Vancouver flight information region. I was responsible for all air navigation services in the province as well as the more than 500 employees who delivered that service.

I am aware that the committee has had the opportunity to hear from many respected industry professionals. As such, I am confident in your awareness of the critical resource shortages being experienced and projected for our industry. These shortages will span the depth and breadth of our industry and will include but not be limited to airport operators, air traffic controllers, aircraft maintenance engineers and pilots.

As the motion before the committee is specific to pilots, I will focus my comments on the pilot shortage and the difficulties at the flight training level, but I feel it is important to note that the pilot shortage, while critical, is not singular. Just as this issue is not specific to the pilot group, the fix for it is not simple or singular, either. I know that several recommendations have been put forth to the committee and I would like to add the support of BCAC for the following four:

Number one is increased and consistent access to student loans for flight training. Currently the access to student loans for flight training is not consistent from province to province. Unlike some other provinces, loans funding in B.C. is based on the length of training rather than the cost of training. As has been presented to the committee, the cost of flight training to the level of a commercial multi-engine IFR-rated pilot will exceed $75,000, certainly more than the cost of tuition and books for most four-year university bachelor degrees. Therefore, the creation of a federally backed national student loan program that makes available a level of funding commensurate with the cost of flight training would be the single most impactful step that could be taken.

Number two is initiatives to increase recruitment and retention of flight instructors. Prior to the resource shortage, flight schools and northern air operators could count on new pilots gaining much-needed flight hours and experience by obtaining instructor ratings and working as flight instructors. They could also take positions with operators servicing northern and remote communities. Now we see our flight training units and northern air operators struggling to recruit and retain employees. Along with the development of a national student loan program, we recommend a matrix of loan forgiveness based on time spent as a flight instructor or time spent flying designated remote routes. For reference, we see similar programs in place for medical personnel working in remote communities.

Number three is support for training innovation. The regulatory requirements around aviation can be an impediment to innovation and training. We need to rethink how and who is doing our training. Aviation is an extremely complex environment, so it's interesting that flight training is one of—if not perhaps the only—system I can think of where, for the most part, we send our least experienced aviators to train our new aviators. We don't send first-year medical students to train new doctors and we don't send high school students to train the next generation of teachers, yet in the beginning of their career, that is what we do with pilots. I'm not saying it's not safe and I'm not saying we don't produce a good product, because it is and we do, but is it the best way?

ATAC, the Air Transport Association of Canada, has recommended the approved training organization model that could change, streamline and improve training, all while meeting regulatory requirements. BCAC strongly supports this initiative.

Four is support for initiatives to remove barriers to entry for women and indigenous people. Women and indigenous people continue to be under-represented in this industry. With women making up 50% of our population and indigenous youth the fastest-growing demographic in Canada, a focus on these groups could prove advantageous on many levels. We strongly encourage continued support to established outreach programs for women such as Elevate Aviation.

To energize the indigenous sector, I believe there needs to be a concerted effort to take culturally relevant programs of introduction and education out to indigenous communities. I'm the co-founder of a program we have called Give Them Wings where we will introduce indigenous youth to careers in aviation, with a focus on pilots. Our first event will be held in March at Boundary Bay Airport, where we will connect with the Musqueam, Tsawwassen and Tsleil-Waututh communities. With support, we hope to take this initiative across the province and beyond.

Today our transport has become a “taken for granted” mode of transportation in the developed world.

(1210)



The social and economic impacts stemming from a pilot shortage have the potential to be annoying at best. It would be annoying if your vacation is ruined because your flight from Vancouver to Penticton or vice versa was cancelled because of a lack of a pilot and then you miss your connection to Rome and subsequently your cruise.

(1215)

The Chair:

Do your closing lines, Ms. Bell.

Ms. Heather Bell:

At worst, it can be devastating, like when there is no pilot to transport your critically ill child and the unimaginable happens.

I thank the committee, and I look forward to any questions you may have and to any assistance I or my organization can lend.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Armstrong from CAE.

Mr. Joseph Armstrong (Vice-President and General Manager, CAE):

Hello Madam Chair and committee members. It's an honour to be here today on behalf of CAE to provide our perspectives on pilot training in Canada and abroad.

I'll give a bit of a history lesson. In 1939, in conjunction with its allies, Canada established the British Commonwealth air training plan, or BCATP. Located in communities across Canada, the BCATP trained more that 130,000 crew men and women over a six-year period, which is considered today one of Canada's great contributions to allied victory. Today our nation's history in pilot training and our strong aerospace sector remain some of our greatest national assets. Successive governments have identified flight training as a key industrial capability.

Building on the BCATP heritage, CAE was founded in 1947 by Mr. Ken Patrick, an ex-Royal Canadian Air Force officer, who had a goal to create something Canadian and take advantage of a war-trained team that was extremely innovative and very technology intensive.

Fast forward to today. We're now the world leader in training for civil, defence and health care professionals. With over 65 training locations, we have the largest civil aviation training network in the world. Each year, we train more than 220,000 civil and defence crew members, including more than 135,000 pilots. Most people don't realize it, but wherever you're travelling, chances are the pilots were either trained at CAE in a simulator we built right here in Canada, or in a training centre located somewhere in the world.

Although the number of pilots we train annually is impressive, it is far from being sufficient to meet current and future needs. In 2018, we released a pilot demand outlook. According to our analysis, by 2028 the active combined airline and business jet pilot population will exceed half a million pilots, and 300,000 of those pilots will be new. Many military pilots are choosing a career in the commercial sector. Some of the driving factors are quality of life and better pay and opportunities. Military pilot attrition is also having a significant impact on professional air forces, reducing their ability to maintain a cadre of pilots to meet operational requirements, as well as their ability to produce qualified flight instructors to support their training pipelines. We see this impact today on the military training programs we deliver right here in Canada.

In this context, maximizing the available pool of potential talent is more important than ever. Today, women make up only 5% of professional pilots and cadets worldwide. Tackling gender diversity would address that imbalance, while giving the aviation community access to a talent pool nearly twice its current size.

In a recent survey that we conducted of aviation students and cadets in Canada and abroad, a number of issues were raised consistently, including the significant financial burden placed on students to enter into pilot training as well as the lack of certainty in career outcomes when they make that investment. Women specifically raised concerns about being able to fit in a male-dominated world and have an appropriate work-life balance. The fact that they have very few female role models in aviation does not help to mitigate their concerns.

Faced with such a shortage, our industry is looking for solutions to help develop more pilots faster. We'll do this by building new types of partnerships between fleet operators and training providers to provide better links between flight schools and the airlines that will ultimately receive these students. New training systems that make better use of real-time data and analytics are facilitating a move towards competency-based training. We are taking advantage of AI and big data analytics.

The Chair:

I'm sorry to interrupt, but could you slow down a little. I realize you only have five minutes, but the translators have to—

Mr. Joseph Armstrong:

Yes, no problem.

I'll slow down the fire hose. It's a lot of information.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Joseph Armstrong:

Last summer, in partnership with the governments of Canada and the province of Quebec, CAE announced a digital transformation project to develop the next generation of training solutions. We will be investing $1 billion over the next five years in innovation, which is one of the largest investments of its kind in the aviation training sector anywhere in the world.

Beyond technology and improving training, the real challenge is attracting students and increasing diversity to broaden the civil aviation talent pool. As an example, through its recently launched CAE women in flight scholarship program, we will award up to five full scholarships to women who are passionate about becoming professional pilots and interested in becoming role models.

Incentives are required to stimulate pilot production in both the civil and military markets and to offset the significant costs associated with student fees, investments in infrastructure and the need to evolve technology to optimize training output. Focused investments are required, targeting areas such as scholarships and bursaries, which should be put in place to support financing of pilot training in Canada for students and cadets; infrastructure, to support increased pilot training capacity; committing to training and simulation as a key industrial capability; and AI and competency-based training.

We encourage Canada to increase funding and directly support pilot training as a unique part of our heritage that must be maintained as a key economic driver for growth within Canada and abroad, and as a key focus for young Canadians to become part of the global aviation community.

Thank you very much.

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Armstrong.

We go now to Ms. Super from Super T Aviation.

Ms. Terri Super (Chief Executive Officer, Super T Aviation):

Madam Chair, it is with great pleasure that I present to this committee the concerns and challenges facing Canadian flight schools. As the chief pilot of Super T Aviation based in Medicine Hat, Alberta, I have over 13,000 hours in medevac, training, and charter and scheduled flying experience. While I have provided the committee with a briefing document outlining our recommendations, I would like to highlight three categories for the committee to consider: student support, instructor attention and school support.

Pursuing a career as a professional pilot costs between $75,000 and $85,000 in training alone, not including living expenses. Lack of funds or their unavailability are often the reasons for student dropout or students' inability to consider a career in aviation. Therefore, we are calling for increased government-backed financial aid and assistance for flight training. This would allow students to obtain financing through the government and/or a commercial pathway and eliminate a major barrier facing Canadians interested in becoming pilots.

Amending the Canada-provincial job grant program to allow flight schools to obtain funds for employee training without the need for the training to be done by third party providers would remove another barrier facing pilots who want to improve flying qualifications. Most flight schools are the only training unit at an airport. To receive advanced training through this federal assistance program, these pilots would have to move to a new city and new airport to obtain training that could last anywhere from one to six months.

Retention of experienced flight instructors has become a major issue facing the flight school community. While flight schools would traditionally mentor an inexperienced flight instructor for one and a half to two years before they moved on to bigger, faster aircraft with a charter or small airline operator, these days the progression can be as little as a matter of months. This puts a tremendous strain on flight schools, which must constantly be training and hiring new students. This also adds a safety concern where inexperienced pilots are focused on moving on to their next job and end up flying more complex aircraft without sufficient experience.

In order to rectify this situation, I recommend that the government offer loan forgiveness for instructors similar to what is offered to medical...working in the remote and rural areas. I also recommend legislation similar to that of the United States, where pilots are required to obtain a minimum of 1,500 hours of flying experience before they are eligible to fly for the major airlines. Regulations such as these would not only aid flight schools but also small charter and medevac operations.

We need to provide help for flight schools. Flight schools are the backbone of the aviation industry and we cannot keep up with the demand, given the high cost of training which is partly due to government policy. It's a harsh reality that aircraft burn fossil fuels. The cost of fuel is one of the largest expenses for a flight school. This cost of course is passed on to the student as part of instructional fees.

To help keep the cost of training down for the student, we recommend that the federal government: one, exclude flight schools from the carbon tax, which has increased and/or will increase the cost of training for the student dramatically; two, reprise the federal excise tax for fuel on instructional aircraft; three, support the development of alternate biofuels for aircraft or electric aircraft; and four, financially support flight schools in their use of specialized equipment that is required for flight training, including flight training devices commonly known as simulators. These devices increase competency and experience in a controlled environment but come at a cost usually several times greater than the cost of a flight school's other capital assets.

In conclusion, this committee has been presented with statistics of the pilot shortage from various witnesses appearing before it. The numbers are real and the shortage is real. Flight schools are tasked with producing safe, dependable and professional pilots in ever-increasing numbers in order to sustain and in fact expand the growing aviation industry. This can only be accomplished by government and the aviation industry working together to provide students, instructors and flight schools with the resources and help they need.

Thank you very much for your time. I look forward to answering any of your questions.

(1225)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go now to Go Green Aviation. Mr. Ogden, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Gary Ogden (Chief Executive Officer, Go Green Aviation):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, members of the committee, and thank you to my fellow witness colleagues.

My name is Gary Ogden—Gary Douglas Ogden, if my mom's watching—and I'd like to speak to a higher level. My colleague Mike Rocha, who is an executive from our flight school, will be speaking to this committee on the 19th. I'd like to touch on some of the elements of our business and offer analysis of a possible root cause showing why we're in the situation we're in right now.

My background aligns itself with airports, airlines and ground service providers in the aviation industry. I rode my bike to the airport in 1979 and haven't been home since. I started as a security guard and I became a CEO. The business and the industry holds much for us all, and it offers opportunity.

I'm concerned with the fact that I have five major clients, all of whom—including Aura Airlink, which will be doing business as Central North Flying Club—are struggling to find and keep people. We face the enemy of attrition and turnover in aviation.

I have worked overseas at airports in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, in the States, and pretty much everywhere. I choose to work in Canada because I'm proud of our aviation, and as my colleague points out, we have a vast history of training. We are world-renowned for the training we offer. Part of the reason I wanted to be involved with Aura and CNFC in a flying school in Canada is that we have this reputation and should be able to attract domestic students, and we should be very successful at attracting international students as well.

We do this business for two reasons, one a holistic reason. These do still exist. I listened to my colleagues here speak about this earlier. There are holistic reasons for doing this work. We see a shortage and we want to fill it. We want to accommodate the view stated by ICAO, IATA and ATAC, and all of the industry pundits who say that there is growth in their business. We want to accommodate that growth. We want to facilitate regional access. We don't want to lose regional access by having no air service. We want also to serve our remote communities and our indigenous people to the level to which they deserve to be served. We want to build bridges and we want to fly over obstacles. We want to do so holistically, but then the economic reality sets in: The math doesn't work. Airlines and the industry itself are burdened with a number of challenges. The price of a ticket today is probably as low as or maybe less than it was in 1980, yet our costs are a lot higher.

Central North Flying Club plans to start up in Sudbury. A regional airport has to struggle to get the attention of government. I salute Mr. Fuhr and the efforts of the current sitting and previous governments as we work towards alleviating some of this problem. The problem with general aviation, GA, at regional airports is that they don't generate revenue. They generally don't pay for themselves. At best, they are revenue neutral. We don't have duty free. We don't have parking. We don't have non-aeronautical revenues to support the airport.

Kelly, who I believe is gone for now, brought up the ACAP. We need to do more for regional airports at which flying schools are located to ensure that the flying school is not burdened with the infrastructure of that airport. We have to see the flight schools, the medevac, the charters, and the public flying and learning as critical, as providing a benefit in the pipeline of our aviation industry.

In a hockey sense, think of it as your farm team. If you don't have a farm team, if you don't reproduce for the future, you are doomed not to successfully live it. We must support the farm team, must support flying schools, and must support regional aviation to the best of our abilities.

(1230)



I thank all of you, because there are a number of initiatives with loans, student work programs and LMIAs. We have a number of initiatives. As for what I would like to see—I was talking to my friend MP Sikand about this—maybe we have to get our information out there better. Maybe there are programs, but maybe they're not consolidated and maybe they're not accessible, so for somebody who struggles...and God bless our friend who started a flight school after it looked like it was closing.

Maybe access to information is something that we can do, perhaps even as low-hanging fruit. Give people access to the information that they can use in order to access those funds that you have there. As well, let's grow the funding, and let's grow the initiatives to further those funds.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Ogden.

We'll start the questioning from our members.

Mr. Falk, you have five minutes.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you to all of our witnesses at committee today. Your testimony has been very interesting.

Ms. Super, I'd like to ask you a few questions.

I took my pilot's licence about 20 years ago. I have my private pilot's licence, with just over 800 hours.

At the time, I thought the cost was expensive. I was really frustrated that I couldn't write it off as a furthering education expense. It wasn't tax deductible for me at all. I talked to our local flight school operator, Harv's Air, where I took my training.

My instructor, by the way, was a woman about 20 years my junior. I had no problems with that and she had no problems with training me. She did a great job. Her name is Dana Chepil, if I can give her a little shout-out. I think she is an examiner today.

I thought at the time that the cost was prohibitive. In talking to my flight school in the last couple of weeks, they said that retaining instructors is a huge challenge. You've mentioned a few things, but what do you think would really be the number one thing or the two things that you could do to retain instructors? You talked about increasing the hours to 1,500 before they can fly commercially. That's probably not a bad idea, because most of them are instructing just to log hours to get onto a carrier somewhere. Is that right?

Ms. Terri Super:

Yes, that's true. Flight schools have traditionally been the bottom-feeders. Instructors do not usually stay with instructing. It would be great if we could get some of the airline captains to come back. We're currently in talks with WestJet, one of the carriers, to see if we can work out something where they lend us one of their pilots for even one or two days a month, which would be a really good start.

I don't think you're ever going to cure that problem. You can throw more money at the instructors—higher salaries—but they're looking for the “big iron”, because most of them are young people and they want to fly larger aircraft, so you can only capture them for a short period of time.

That's where I think if there were some sort of loan forgiveness it might be an incentive, because the loans are significant for these students. That may be an incentive for them to stay in the flight instructional area longer and get more experience before they go out to their other jobs.

Mr. Ted Falk:

I don't know what your experience is with the pilots or the potential pilots that you're attracting, whether they're domestic or international. I know that Harv's Air in Steinbach attracts a lot of international students, but domestic ones not quite so much.

I talk to young people all the time about getting into aviation and getting their pilot's licence. The number one reason they cite is not that they're not interested and not that it's not exciting—it's the cost. One of the things that adds significantly to the cost, and I know it from operating an aircraft—my Mooney doesn't fly on fumes—is the cost of fuel.

You talked a bit about the carbon tax and what it is and will be. Just last week, the National Airlines Council of Canada released a statement saying that they had done two studies in 2018 showing the negative impacts a carbon tax would have for aviation, both on the cost of passenger travel and also on the cost for flight school operators, without really any measurable effect on reducing emissions. Could you comment on that?

(1235)

Ms. Terri Super:

The carbon tax that we have already in Alberta, and it is significant, does increase the costs.

We need the infrastructure. We need airlines. Everyone wants to fly. You guys all fly on an airline to get home on the weekends. We have to provide that.

The idea that the carbon tax will help people to reduce use of fossil fuels is just not going to be true for a flight school. The more students we put out, the more fuel we're going to use.

The one thing I see that has great potential is the use of simulation. At our school, we have an integrated course that we give to students. We have two simulators. They're flight training devices. They don't move, but they simulate flight very well, but we can't use all of that training for their licence.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Also, we heard previous testimony that the cost of simulators is very expensive, and you need to recover that cost somehow, as well. Perhaps there are some assistance programs you could have that would help you explore that avenue.

Ms. Terri Super:

Some sort of government matching for these costs—

Mr. Ted Falk:

I'm out of time in eight seconds, but if you have the opportunity to talk a little bit about infrastructure needs either at municipal airports or private airports, I'd appreciate that.

The Chair:

Please be very brief.

Ms. Terri Super:

I'm afraid I'm not really qualified to talk about the infrastructure at airports.

Mr. Ted Falk:

That's fine. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Ms. Super, when the transition between the panels was taking place, you met Ms. Farly from my riding. It was nice to learn about the other female airport owner. I just wanted to make that point; you hadn't mentioned that particular bit in your opening statement.

Are there other comments from the previous panel that you want to address? You indicated interest in doing so at the beginning and that in our early conversations there were things that were animating you.

Ms. Terri Super:

Yes. Now if I can think of them.... I'm getting a little older, so it takes me a little longer to—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's okay. Some flight planning is required.

I'll go to Mr. Ogden for a second. You mentioned the costs of the infrastructure burden on flight schools. Can you go more into detail on what those costs are and what the actual numbers are?

Mr. Gary Ogden:

I can't give you actual numbers because I'm sure it changes by airport, but you have hangarage fees and you have the controlled environment at an airport that needs to be maintained from a safety and security perspective. We have flight instructors basically going out and de-icing airplanes, pushing them back either by hand or by machine, adding oils and doing maintenance work while they are supposed to be flight instructors because there's just not the money there. Again, that's a vicious circle, and it puts people off being flight instructors.

I can speak to Sudbury a little better because we're going up there and have taken a facility. The cost of hangaring the airplanes and of keeping them in a weather-protected environment when we have weather exactly like what we have just seen is not cheap.

De-icing at airports is not cheap. With regard to our business, we simply don't fly at big airports, so we don't have the benefit of central facilities, but we are forced to buy de-icing equipment. I believe there was even a study released a couple of weeks ago which said that northern airports are somewhat lacking in their de-icing capability and coverage.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, a lot of flight schools are at grass strips and things like that, too, where there's very little infrastructure to speak of.

Mr. Gary Ogden:

Also, we have to wait until it thaws, or we have to wait until it goes.... I mean, we contemplated using Brampton, but we needed more access to better facilities—unfortunately, more expensive facilities. At Sudbury, we also have a second airport, just adjacent there, that we can use to increase our flying hours.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think I have a picture of that.

Just out of curiosity, what is the GO Green reference?

Mr. Gary Ogden:

GO Green is the company I started many years ago with respect to cleaning and greening the airport environment.

I personally am involved with a number of initiatives. One is to try to electrify more of the airport ramp—again, cleaning and greening that ramp, making it safer for our staff out there. That's the holding company that the consultancy goes out from, but I have joined with Aura to be a component of this flight school.

(1240)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, thank you.

Ms. Super, I'll come back to you now.

You talked about the cost of fuel in your presentation. Flight schools generally rent their aircraft wet. When you rent a plane, you rent it wet. Can you explain, for those don't fly, what that means and if that approach is sustainable over the long term?

Ms. Terri Super:

If the aircraft is “wet”, that means it has fuel in it. If a student or a renter is going to take one of our aircraft, it comes with fuel. If they go away to another airport, we will reimburse them at our cost. We won't reimburse them if they purchase fuel at a higher price at a different airport.

Some schools don't do it that way. Some operators actually do because the price of aviation fuel floats week to week, as the price of fuel does at the gas pumps. They rent it to the person dry, and for every flight, they figure out how much fuel has been used and apply the cost of the fuel onto the price of the flight.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It sounds like a lot of extra paperwork to keep track of how much fuel you will need.

Ms. Terri Super:

Yes, and that's why a lot of schools go with just wet.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That makes sense.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Graham.

We'll move to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'd like to thank the witnesses for being here today. Hearing what they have to say is quite enlightening.

My question is for you, Ms. Bell. In an industry where the issues are complex, you've put your finger on a problem all the witnesses have talked about—the training costs for students who choose this career path.

The problem, as I see it, is that models seem to vary from province to province, even territory to territory. For example, in Quebec, which I know more about because I live there, students have the option to train at a wholly private school that meets Transport Canada's standards or a school that is integrated into the college system.

Is there a model Quebec should conform to in an effort to harmonize things and, by extension, examine the impact on training costs? [English]

Ms. Heather Bell:

Thank you for that question.

Yes. If there was a more consistent model across the country, I believe that we would see streamlined training, certainly from province to province. The issue that I spoke about was with respect to the availability of student funding and how that varies from province to province.

With respect to how the training organizations operate province to province, I'm not an expert in that, but I do know that the Air Transport Association of Canada has put forth a model with respect to approved training organizations that would make a more uniform training system. Right now, the Canadian aviation regulations regulate the number of hours that are required to be accomplished prior to any student pilot receiving any level of licensing. I think that some of that needs to be re-examined about how the training is applied with respect to time. As other people have said, a simulator would be a very valuable asset for a training organization, but right now, the regulations don't allow much simulator time to be applied to a licence. Yes, if there were more uniform federal regulations, it would be very helpful. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you for that information.

My next question is for Mr. Ogden.

Mr. Ogden, the name of your company, Go Green Aviation, is inspiring. In another study the committee did, on the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major airports, we learned how difficult it was for aviation and civil society to coexist.

Is it now possible to train pilots on electric airplanes, where the cost of buying those planes is comparable to that of gas-fuelled planes?

Mr. Gary Ogden:

Thank you, Mr. Aubin.[English]

I'm a big believer that anything that improves our environmental stewardship at airports is a positive thing. I don't necessarily like following Europe, and even some U.S. states, in what we do in Canada because I think we should lead, not follow.

The use of any non-flying, non-gas burning alternative is a positive. I think simulators are certainly an answer. I think the use of simulators and ground school elements can help us get over the national carrier pilot accessibility, with respect to fatigue. Yes, those companies don't want their pilots doing flight time in their four days off or any number of days off. However, non-flying and more systems and aids-related flying with simulators and the like can serve a lot of purposes. It's a lot safer, a a lot cleaner and we do have access then to a more available labour pool in terms of flight instruction.

I'm sorry about speaking to electric airplanes. It's not an area of expertise that I have.

(1245)

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, you have 30 seconds. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I hope we'll have an opportunity to hear more of what you have to say on the subject.

Mr. Armstrong, I'd like you to talk about the new agreement with Quebec on the development of digital pilot training. [English]

Mr. Joseph Armstrong:

I'm not familiar with which agreement you're talking about, unless you're referring to the agreement we have established with both the Quebec government and the federal government in terms of innovating, and the digital investments we are making in digitizing training.

I think the biggest change that's happened over the last, let's say, decade, has been a significant advancement in the science of learning and education, and applying the evolution of that science in learning to understanding better how to apply assets at various points along the pilot training curriculum. The whole concept of creating a system whereby you have a more efficient, more optimized, more tailored program to build people up to a level of competence can be done with things other than aircraft.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Armstrong.

We'll move to Mr. Sikand.

You have four minutes.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to start off with a question for Mr. Ogden.

You hit some political trigger words for me: international and you choose Canada. I often like to amalgamate the two.

You said that the enemy for flight schools is attrition. Why is it that we can't turn to the international community to bring in trainers to help train Canadian pilots?

Mr. Gary Ogden:

Mr. Sikand, the concept is a very good one.

We have looked, and we are looking at establishing an international element to the flight school we have. It will come down to the age-old recognition of standards and credentials that we face in many fields in Canada.

I'm not really up for lowering standards, but I am for recognizing standards. If international students and international flight instructors can fill that necessary gap for us and all we have to do is match the accreditations, then that's on us. Let's do it, because the solutions it provides are geometric in their impact.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

I have less time than normal, so I'm going to move to Ms. Super.

You were mentioning the price on pollution and how that affects the cost of operation. If smaller flight schools or airlines were to be excluded in an initial program but the larger carriers were priced but then given a rebate as they improved technology or became more efficient and had less of an impact on the environment, is this a system that you think would be favourable?

Ms. Terri Super:

I can hardly hear you.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Sorry.

You were mentioning carbon and how things can be taxed and how that affects operations. If smaller carriers or flight schools were excluded initially but larger ones had a tax but then were given a rebate as they became more efficient or lowered their carbon footprint, is that a model which you think would be favourable?

Ms. Terri Super:

Yes, that could be feasible, as technology improves, for instance, with simulation or with the electric aircraft. They're not really at the stage where they're feasible to use for a flight school. The charge doesn't last long enough. Flight schools are required to have a minimum of 150 nautical mile cross-country flight for beginning students, and I don't believe there's any electric aircraft that can do that yet. I think that would be feasible if we could come up with something like that.

With the simulation, there needs to be, in my estimation, changes to the regulations on the amount of simulation that can be used. If that were possible, that would greatly aid it. For a commercial pilot, you need 25 hours of instrument time, of which only 10 hours can be used in a flight training device or simulator. If we could up the hours that are used in the simulator, that would greatly help and obviously reduce our carbon footprint.

(1250)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

I'm going to jump in and with the 30 seconds I have left quickly ask Ms. Bell a question.

If the government were to subsidize training to help students become pilots, but then they had a return of service, that they had to serve in Canada or maybe with Canadian airlines, is this something that's possible? Would you be open to something like that?

Ms. Heather Bell:

Absolutely. One of the recommendations is that there be some student loan forgiveness for time spent as a flight instructor or flying in a northern and remote community. Certainly you've heard a lot about how schools are having trouble retaining instructors.

Also, I have fear that here in the province of British Columbia, one of the first places we're going to see the drop-off in our pilots are in those areas that are servicing remote communities. I have a fear that we are going to see some unfortunate incidents happen.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Bell.

We'll move to Mr. Fuhr.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you, witnesses, for coming today.

I want to thank Ms. Bell. I used your letter. I got dozens of letters on this topic, and I used yours in its entirety in my remarks in the House.

Something that hasn't come up is we're losing a significant amount of the limited capacity we have due to foreign entities buying Canadian flight schools or foreign students coming here to get trained by Canadian flight schools and then leave. I want some feedback on that.

Ms. Bell, could you wade in on that issue?

Ms. Heather Bell:

Certainly in British Columbia we see a very high number of foreign students. When I speak to my members who are flight training unit operators, they don't see that as a problem in that those students are not taking spots that other students could be taking. More of a problem is getting the Canadian students in the pipeline to begin with. You have people there with the flight training unit who may have a different experience, but here in B.C., we're not seeing the uptake.

There is a further issue. I want to mention something about immigration and bringing in pilots from other countries. Some of our members would very much like to do that but they stumble across immigration rules that require that pilots coming into Canada not just meet the regulatory standards for being a pilot but also there is no real framework for how pilots should be hired from offshore.

They are considered to be like an engineer such that hours have to be guaranteed at 40 hours a week, a Monday-to-Friday type of job. These are not the kinds of jobs that people are hiring for. I wanted to have an opportunity to throw that out there. We don't see the intake of foreign students as a problem or as taking spots that Canadian students would take otherwise.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you for that.

Mr. Armstrong, has the military looked at what future air crew training looks like, how that's going to be delivered? Do you think that, given both the domestic need and the global need for pilots, it could be structured in a way that it could incorporate some excess capacity to train civilians or accommodate a surge in production of pilots for the military and when that was no longer needed, we then...civilians.... It's complex and it's thinking outside the box, but given where we are and what we have to do, do you think that's possible? How do you think that would look?

Mr. Joseph Armstrong:

If you look at NATO flying training in Canada, which is the existing military flying training program, when it was crafted, it was created within the context of international contribution and international involvement from the get-go. Right now it's partly due to try to generate revenue to subsidize the cost of operating the training centre. The training centre is expensive because you're now operating military aircraft that have a different price point from what you would see on the civil aviation side.

Certainly I think the approach of building tailored flight training programs is what we need to be targeting because the idea of saying you're going to have a fixed cost base that you need to operate to be able to deliver a training service.... If I can build that fixed cost base that has variable capacity, then the ability to inject participation by other students, whether or not that's civilian or from foreign nations, absolutely goes a long way in being able to amortize that cost.

Certainly I think the mindset we need to have as Canadians—and we certainly see this within our company—and the success we've had globally is that the solution to these problems involves a global mindset. If we look at anything in isolation from the complete ecosystem of pilot training, then you're only looking at one piece of the problem and the solution is much larger than that.

Even the conversation about are foreign students in Canada creating problems or is it possible to bring in foreign instructors to supplement Canadian instructors, think about it in the inverse. The demand we see for pilot production and pilot training requirements is so high globally that it is creating a draw on Canadian capacity.

I go back to what the others have said and suggest we need to focus on a few things. One is building tailored competency-based training programs, and two, really focusing on and emphasizing the ability to recruit active students.

(1255)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Armstrong.

Thank you, Mr. Fuhr.

We'll move to Ms. Block for four minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. I want to thank you, and I appreciate the committee's indulgence as I take a few moments to move a motion regarding aviation safety, which was circulated to the members of the committee on January 2.

I'll give you a bit of back story. Nearly two years ago, on June 8, 2017, 21-year-old Alex, along with his girlfriend Sidney, rented a single-engine Piper Warrior from a flight school in Lethbridge, Alberta, and headed for Kamloops, B.C. Alex, being a certified pilot, flew the light aircraft, with Sidney as the sole passenger. After refuelling in Cranbrook, they departed but never arrived at their destination. An 11-day search was conducted over a vast area. During this 11-day period, 18 Royal Canadian Air Force and civil search and rescue aircraft flew a total of 576 hours and covered approximately 37,513 square kilometres. On average, 10 aircraft were deployed each day, with more than 70 Royal Canadian Air Force personnel and 137 volunteer pilots and spotters from civil search and rescue. Despite this extensive search and rescue mission, they were unable to find Alex, Sidney and their aircraft. It was at the end of this extensive search that Alex's father and stepmother, Matthew Simons and Natalie Lindgren, were notified that the emergency locator transmitter, ELT, on board the aircraft failed to activate, thus making the plane impossible to find. Sadly, this happens in 38% of crashes.

ELTs are emergency transmission devices that are carried on board most aircraft. In the event of a crash, ELTs send distress signals on designated frequencies to help search and rescue locate the aircraft and its passengers. ELTs operate on two frequencies: 121.5 megahertz and 406 megahertz.

Since 2009, ELTs that operate at 121.5 megahertz are no longer monitored by satellite systems and are therefore ineffective. However, they are still mandated. Since June 2016, the Transportation Safety Board has put forward seven recommendations with regard to modernizing ELTs, but to date, these recommendations have not been acted upon. In many aircraft accidents, the ELT, if there is one, is damaged to the point that no distress signal can be sent. As a result, a number of light aircraft are never found. This was the case for Alex and Sidney, and it's the case for many others like them.

With this motion, I believe that we have the opportunity to help grieving parents like Matthew and Natalie by undertaking a short study that will help us to better understand the issue and make recommendations to Transport Canada. In particular, the motion requests that the committee look at the benefits, for search and rescue purposes, of using GPS technology that allows an aircraft's position to be determined via satellite navigation and periodically broadcast to a remote tracking system. The idea is that a GPS would be used in conjunction with a modern 406 megahertz ELT on light aircraft.

The chair of the Transportation Safety Board, Kathy Fox, has pointed out that when an aircraft crashes, it needs to be located quickly so that survivors can be rescued. The information that a simple GPS system could provide would empower search and rescue to respond quickly when a crash occurs, and would reduce lengthy searches for lost aircraft, thus saving lives and tax dollars.

In closing, I believe that together we have the opportunity to initiate a very important study in honour of Alex and Sidney, and I hope that all members of the committee would support this motion.

Thank you so much for allowing me to take this time.

(1300)

The Chair:

I have a couple of speakers. Please note the time. The next committee is prepared to come in at 1:00 p.m., so our time is very tight.

I have Mr. Graham, Mr. Aubin and Ms. Leitch. Please keep your comments brief.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand your motion and your intent. I think if we look at the intent of the motion, it is, quite frankly, to improve methods to ensure recovery of missing aircraft. That's the objective, right?

The motion is very prescriptive. I can't support the motion the way it's written, but I am willing to propose an amendment that I have put to your motion: “That the Committee conduct a study for the duration of 4-6 meetings, on:”—that's what you have—and from the colon all the way from (a) through to (e), we'd replace that with “improved methods to ensure recovery of missing aircraft, particularly in general aviation.”

I'd further amend it to remove the idea of reporting within four months, because we have quite a bit on the agenda for this committee at this time.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Obviously, it's an important issue. I won't oppose the motion.

I would, however, like to know whether you think the study should follow what we already have planned. For instance, a passenger rail study has been in the works for months. It had unanimous committee support.

If we tack the study on at the end, in terms of what's already on our plate, that's fine, but if we bump work that's already planned to accommodate the study, I think that's a problem.

I'd like to know where you stand on that. [English]

The Chair:

Yes, there's no question that we do have a full schedule. We have supplementary estimates coming up. We have to finish off two other reports and we have committed to four meetings on bus safety and a couple of meetings on rail safety. Those are things we've already committed to, so I would suggest that if the committee adopts either of the motions, it would start when we have completed what we currently have on the agenda. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

The passenger rail study is one of the items already on the agenda, isn't it? [English]

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Leitch.

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Thank you very much.

I'm commenting on this from my perspective of being a former minister of labour. I had heard from many families, as well as pilots and other professionals within the industry, the need for safety regulations, but also specifically for technology that would augment the safety and the ability of not just families but also the professionals working in the area to modernize the industry. The one thing I will say is that this industry modernization is required, this case being evidence alone, let alone the other cases that have taken place.

We as Canadians use GPS every day. My brother and sister, Michael and Melanie, use it to make sure they know where their children are. We could use this to make sure that families similar to Alex's and Sidney's families, are able to find their loved ones, hopefully so that they can actually be rescued and taken care of in a hospital, but if nothing else, for the families to have closure.

I recognize there is an amendment on the floor with regard to this motion, but the use of modern technology such as GPS and others is something that is fundamental to this motion. I'm sure you use it in your car to get home on occasion. Thus I would encourage the government to consider that those specific pieces of technology that we use every single day be things that we should be encouraging and facilitating for pilots and other people in the aviation industry to use as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Leitch.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My only point is that having the study include its conclusion is not how a study works. The study is on how to improve the recovery, not here's a solution to figure it out.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

(Amendment agreed to)

(Motion as amended agreed to)

The Chair: Thank you all very much.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(1100)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités de la 42e législature. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 28 novembre 2018, nous poursuivons notre étude des défis que doivent relever les écoles de pilotage au Canada.

Bienvenue à tous dans notre nouvelle salle de réunion de l'édifice de l'Ouest, où nous tenons notre première séance. Le parrain de la motion, M. Fuhr, se joint aujourd'hui aux membres du Comité. Bienvenue.

Nous recevons aujourd'hui les témoins suivants: Caroline Farly, chef pilote et instructrice en chef d'Aéro Loisirs; le capitaine Mike Hoff, du Comité des affaires extérieures de l'Association des pilotes d'Air Canada; et Marc Vanderaegen, directeur de l'école de pilotage du Southern Interior Flight Centre de Carson Air.

Monsieur Vanderaegen, voudriez-vous faire en premier votre exposé de cinq minutes?

M. Marc Vanderaegen (directeur de l'école de pilotage, Southern Interior Flight Centre, Carson Air):

Madame la présidente, bonjour et merci de m'avoir invité à participer à la séance d'aujourd'hui. Je vais lire mes notes, car je veux être certain de ne rien omettre.

Le Southern Interior Flight Centre fait partie du groupe d'entreprises Carson, lequel offre de la formation de pilotage à Kelowna, en Colombie-Britannique, ainsi que des services d'évacuation médicale, de transport de fret, d'approvisionnement en carburant et de hangar à Kelowna, Calgary, Vancouver et Abbotsford. Nous sommes confrontés aux défis relatifs à la pénurie de pilotes à tous les égards et pas seulement sur le plan de la formation, sujet dont nous traitons aujourd'hui.

À l'école de pilotage, nous formons des étudiants pour qu'ils deviennent des pilotes amateurs, généraux, commerciaux et de ligne, ainsi que les instructeurs de pilotage. Nous offrons en outre un programme d'aviation commerciale avec diplôme en association avec le collège Okanagan. À cela s'ajoutent des partenariats officiels en matière de formation avec WestJet Encore, Jazz, Porter et Carson Air, ainsi que des liens informels avec de nombreuses entreprises qui s'intéressent à nos diplômés. Pour ce qui est des défis, vous en reconnaîtrez certains qui vous auront été présentés au cours de séances précédentes.

Sachez d'abord que l'aide financière aux étudiants est insuffisante. Le coût élevé de la formation initiale permettant d'obtenir un permis de pilote commercial, associé au faible financement, fait en sorte que les étudiants s'endettent lourdement. Les prêts offerts aux étudiants au Canada combinés à ceux offerts dans notre province, par exemple, totalisent un maigre 5 440 $ par trimestre, alors qu'il a été montré que la somme nécessaire s'élève à 23 519 $ par trimestre. Voilà qui laisse un manque à gagner de 18 000 $ par trimestre ou de plus de 90 000 $ pour un programme de diplomation de cinq trimestres.

En outre, les coûts de la formation augmentent. Pour engager des instructeurs, nous devons maintenant former des instructeurs de pilotage au prix de 10 000 $ par personne. Ce qui était autrefois une source de revenus parce que des pilotes commerciaux voulaient devenir instructeurs s'est transformé en coût, qui doit maintenant être refilé au groupe d'étudiants suivant la formation générale de pilotage, dont le fardeau financier s'accroît à l'avenant. Les coûts des pièces d'aéronefs et du carburant sont instables et augmentent considérablement. Par exemple, un monomoteur Cessna 172 sortant de l'usine, et dont il faut attendre la livraison pendant 14 mois, coûte actuellement 411 000 $US. Un aéronef usagé fera l'objet de guerres d'enchères et entraînera encore 50 à 75 % de nouveaux coûts, auxquels s'ajoutent les coûts élevés de la mise à niveau du moteur et des hélices.

Outre le fait que la demande en formation au pays a fait augmenter les ventes et les prix des avions, des entreprises étrangères achètent des aéronefs par groupes de 25 ou plus afin de les utiliser aux fins de formation. Cela se traduit non seulement par une augmentation des coûts, mais aussi par une diminution du nombre de techniciens d'entretien. Il faut donc proposer des salaires et des incitatifs plus intéressants pour attirer et garder en poste des employés d'entretien qualifiés.

Notre manque général d'accès aux employés potentiels constitue notre troisième défi. Avec la situation d'embauche actuelle dans notre industrie, les nouveaux pilotes n'ont pas besoin de passer du temps à offrir de la formation pour acquérir de l'expérience avant de devenir des pilotes commerciaux. De nombreux diplômés sont directement engagés par les compagnies aériennes ou d'autres entreprises dès leur sortie de l'école. Comme il y a moins d'instructeurs, moins nombreux sont ceux qui peuvent gravir les échelons du système de classification afin de devenir instructeurs superviseurs ou de pouvoir former de nouveaux instructeurs.

Il ne nous est pas possible d'embaucher des candidats étrangers qualifiés à titre d'instructeurs comme solution temporaire, car le processus d'évaluation de l'impact sur le marché du travail est trop lourd et le long processus de conversion de permis de Transports Canada ralentit le traitement administratif des demandes de candidats étrangers. Les exigences médicales sont également trop restrictives dans certaines situations, notamment en cas de daltonisme pouvant être corrigé. En outre, ces exigences empêchent des pilotes de ligne retraités qui n'ont plus d'autorisation médicale d'enseigner dans des simulateurs pour nous comme ils pouvaient déjà le faire pour les compagnies aériennes.

Pour relever ces défis, nous proposons des recommandations réparties en deux groupes.

Il faut d'abord accroître le financement destiné à l'aviation; je pense que cela saute aux yeux. Le gouvernement fédéral doit offrir aux étudiants davantage de prêts et de programmes de remise de dette. Il faut se pencher sur le financement fédéral offert sous la forme de subventions pour la formation ou le maintien en poste des instructeurs afin d'alléger le fardeau financier refilé aux étudiants. Le gouvernement fédéral doit également revoir le financement ou les crédits d'impôt accordés pour l'achat d'immobilisations afin de contribuer à réduire les coûts d'équipement élevés qui ne cessent d'augmenter.

Le second groupe de recommandations vise à accroître l'accès aux instructeurs. D'abord, une augmentation du financement offert aux étudiants permettrait aux unités de formation en pilotage de verser de meilleurs salaires aux instructeurs et aux techniciens d'entretien afin de pouvoir les garder à leur emploi. De plus, en facilitant à court terme l'accès aux employés étrangers au titre des programmes d'évaluation de l'impact sur le marché du travail, que ce soit en accélérant le processus ou en en exemptant complètement les candidats qualifiés, le gouvernement nous permettrait d'embaucher des pilotes ou des techniciens d'entretien étrangers pour combler les manques.

La réduction des délais de conversion de permis de Transports Canada...

(1105)

La présidente:

Pardonnez-moi, monsieur Vanderaegen; pourriez-vous clore votre propos, s'il vous plaît?

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Bien sûr. En terminant, j'irai droit au but. Il faut réagir à ces défis pour que nous puissions non seulement poursuivre nos activités aujourd'hui, mais aussi les élargir pour répondre au besoin croissant qui se manifeste sur le marché.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Capitaine Hoff, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Capitaine Mike Hoff (capitaine, Comité des affaires extérieures, Association des pilotes d'Air Canada):

Bonjour et merci.

Je m'appelle Michael Hoff. Je suis pilote de ligne et j'adore mon travail. Je suis capitaine d'appareils Boeing 787 pour Air Canada et je travaille depuis Vancouver. Je témoigne à titre de représentant de l'Association des pilotes d'Air Canada.

Avant de commencer mon exposé, je voudrais vous remercier tous de vous intéresser à cette question. L'accès stable et prévisible à l'aviation est important dans un pays aussi vaste que le nôtre. De nombreux secteurs sont aux prises avec des problèmes de main-d'oeuvre. Pour les pilotes, la question est complexe. Dans le mémoire que nous vous avons remis, vous constaterez que le coût de la formation des pilotes et l'accès restreint aux heures de vol de formation sont des facteurs qui entrent en compte, auxquels s'ajoutent les mauvaises conditions de sécurité et de travail des pilotes au niveau d'entrée. Ces facteurs sont confirmés par les recherches que nous avons réalisées pour montrer que les jeunes Canadiens sont plus susceptibles de s'intéresser à des emplois d'infirmier, de pompier ou même de joueur de jeux vidéo qu'à une carrière de pilote.

Je vous expliquerai plus facilement la situation en vous racontant mon expérience personnelle. Je ne suis pas seulement pilote; mon fils de 26 ans pilote des avions régionaux pour Jazz. Permettez-moi de vous expliquer ce qu'il en est. La formation de pilote peut s'élever jusqu'à 90 000 $, ce qui constitue un fardeau financier considérable pour les familles, qui peinent à faire valoir leur cas si elles constatent qu'elles ont besoin d'un prêt. Pour permettre à mon fils de suivre une formation et d'accumuler le nombre d'heures nécessaire, j'ai fini par acheter un petit avion de type PA-22, et nous avons engagé notre propre instructeur. Si vous vous posez la question, oui, c'est comme apprendre à conduire une voiture: cela va mieux quand quelqu'un d'autre dit à votre enfant ce qu'il faut faire.

Les écoles de pilotage au Canada sont fragmentées, certaines étant associées à des collèges accrédités, mais d'autres pas. Nombre d'entre elles sont de petites entreprises familiales. L'Agence du revenu du Canada ne reconnaît pas les droits de scolarité de toutes les écoles. Personnellement, je peux vous dire que je me suis battu pendant trois ans pour que l'Agence reconnaisse l'école de pilotage de mon fils aux fins d'impôt. Et ce n'est pas tout: je n'ai pas pu déduire le temps de vol de mon propre aéronef. Il a, au contraire, été très facile de déduire les droits de scolarité de mon autre fils.

Un grand nombre d'étudiants pensent qu'une fois qu'ils ont leur permis de pilote, ils peuvent obtenir un emploi chez WestJet ou Air Canada. En réalité, les choses se passent plus comme dans le domaine du sport professionnel: avant d'entrer dans les ligues majeures, il faut littéralement passer des milliers d'heures dans le club-école. Au Canada, cela signifie souvent qu'il faut piloter dans le Nord.

Permettez-moi d'être franc: la surveillance réglementaire quotidienne peut être complètement déconnectée de la réalité sur place. Les règles exigent une autosurveillance, ce qui signifie que les pilotes sont censés décider eux-mêmes s'ils sont aptes ou non au travail. C'est une décision qui peut être difficile à prendre quand on est nouveau et hors de son élément. Dans certaines entreprises, si un pilote indique qu'il est inapte au travail en raison de la fatigue, on lui demandera s'il veut une doudou et une suce pour faciliter sa sieste. C'est la culture.

Si on a besoin d'un emploi pour trouver un meilleur travail, cela peut soumettre les pilotes inexpérimentés à des pressions substantielles. C'est une des raisons pour lesquelles, quand on examine les taux d'accidents dans le secteur canadien de l'aviation, on constate que la majorité des pertes de coque — c'est-à-dire les pertes totales d'aéronefs et, bien trop souvent, des âmes à bord — se produisent dans le Nord. Je peux vous dire honnêtement qu'à titre de parent, je ne dors pas bien quand mon fils vole dans le Nord.

Que pouvons-nous faire à ce sujet? Le sondage que nous avons commandé montre très clairement qu'aujourd'hui, les parents et les étudiants sont plus attirés par les parcours stables et sécuritaires et les retombées immédiates que les emplois traditionnels pourraient offrir. Nous devons donc réduire et éliminer les obstacles auxquels les étudiants se heurtent.

Pour ce faire, il faut d'abord adopter des politiques pour contribuer à couvrir les coûts d'entrée, notamment en accordant des prêts et des crédits d'impôt pour les écoles de pilotage. Nous devons ensuite trouver des moyens de faciliter l'accumulation des heures de vol et de simulation. En outre, nous devons encourager les établissements publics accrédités à établir des écoles de pilotage. Enfin, nous devons rendre l'aviation plus sûre, notamment en assurant une surveillance réglementaire plus stricte là où nos nouveaux pilotes volent, particulièrement dans le Nord. Les statistiques montrent que nous devons faire mieux, et ce, pour protéger non seulement nos nouveaux pilotes, mais aussi leurs passagers.

Je suis fier d'être pilote. Rien ne me rend plus heureux que d'encourager les jeunes à envisager une carrière dans le domaine. Nous jouissons de la meilleure vue du monde de notre bureau, mais il y a du travail à faire.

Je vous remercie de porter attention à ces questions importantes.

(1110)



Je voudrais remercier particulièrement M. Fuhr d'avoir proposé cette motion.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, capitaine Hoff.

Madame Farly, vous pouvez faire votre exposé.

Mme Caroline Farly (chef pilote et instructrice en chef, Aéro Loisirs):

Merci. Je lirai moi aussi mon exposé. [Français]

Bonjour. Je vous remercie de m'accueillir aujourd'hui.

Je suis Caroline Farly, propriétaire de l'école de pilotage Aéroloisirs. J'y suis chef pilote et instructrice en chef, ainsi que responsable de l'entretien des avions et agente autorisée pour Transports Canada. Je suis devenue instructrice en 2011 dans le but d'en faire carrière.

Je tiens ici à remercier Mme Louise Gagnon, pilote et instructrice de classe 1 chez Cargair depuis 25 ans, ainsi que M. Rémi Cusach, fondateur de l'école de pilotage ALM, lui aussi instructeur de classe 1 pendant 25 ans et aujourd'hui retraité. Tous les deux sont actuellement examinateurs délégués de Transports Canada et m'ont aidé à préparer cette présentation.

Les longs délais d'admission des élèves sont un fléau pour les écoles de pilotage. La cause en est le manque d'instructeurs, qui n'est pas près de se résorber. Il est urgent de corriger notre incapacité de répondre à la demande actuelle et grandissante de candidats à une licence de pilote commercial.

Il n'est plus nécessaire de passer par le rituel de l'instruction pour accumuler des heures de vol. Seuls les pilotes qui en manifestent véritablement l'intérêt deviendront instructeurs. Il faut s'inspirer des constats de la présente étude pour revaloriser la profession d'instructeur de pilotage, dont la perception actuelle nuit assurément au recrutement de candidats.

Les pilotes qui ont choisi de faire carrière comme instructeurs sont peu nombreux dans le réseau et comptent notamment des fondateurs d'école, des examinateurs et des instructeurs en chef. Elles et ils possèdent un bagage incommensurable de connaissances sur l'instruction et sur l'aviation et jouent un rôle de premier plan depuis 30 ans dans la fondation des écoles de pilotage. Cependant, ils arrivent actuellement à l'âge de la retraite, vendent leurs écoles et laissent un énorme vide sur le terrain.

C'est ce qui est arrivé dans le cas de l'école dont j'ai pris la relève en 2013. Jusqu'au départ à la retraite du fondateur en 2018, nous étions deux instructeurs de carrière, mais je suis désormais seule. J'aime penser que notre enthousiasme a grandement influencé et inspiré les pilotes en formation chez nous à devenir instructeurs, car l'accès à des modèles ou à des mentors a toujours été une clé du succès dans le recrutement professionnel.

L'instruction est le domaine le moins valorisé et le moins bien payé dans le milieu de l'aviation. C'est une dure réalité. Les écoles versent des honoraires à des travailleurs autonomes plutôt que des salaires à des employés. Les pertes de revenus liées à la météo sont considérables, tant pour les écoles de pilotage que pour les travailleurs, sans oublier leur effet adverse dans la région qui héberge nos élèves. La demande pour nos services augmente nettement lorsque les élèves sont en congé durant les périodes estivales et les jours fériés. Les annulations de dernière minute dues à la météo ou aux bris mécaniques rendent difficile et coûteuse l'application des normes du travail.

Bien que les instructeurs de notre école soient relativement bien payés puisqu'ils touchent une prime appréciable, il reste que le coût de nos opérations nous impose un plafond. Les frais de maintenance et d'achat de pièces d'avion et de carburant augmentent pendant que nous faisons face aux variations de revenus. La formation de pilote est onéreuse et nous essayons d'en conserver les frais à des niveaux acceptables qui rendent l'aviation accessible. Ces frais fluctuent et augmentent, mais le prix du service, lui, ne peut pas suivre.

Une grande question se pose: qui va former les instructeurs de demain? Seuls les instructeurs les plus hauts gradés, ceux de classe 1, qui ont accumulé 750 heures de vol en qualité d'instructeurs, peuvent former des instructeurs de vol. C'est pour l'essentiel ce que dit la norme 421.72 du Règlement de l'aviation canadien.

Aujourd'hui, il est possible de devenir instructeur de classe 1 après seulement une saison ou deux. Les compagnies aériennes vont s'arracher les pilotes d'expérience, c'est-à-dire tous les instructeurs expérimentés et les instructeurs de classe 1, avant les autres instructeurs et les pilotes professionnels sans qualification supplémentaire. Nous assisterons progressivement à une baisse de la qualité de la formation et à la disparition de modèles et de mentors qui possèdent un riche bagage d'expérience et de connaissances opérationnelles et pratiques.

La réalité veut aussi que ce soient des instructeurs d'expérience qui étaient responsables de l'exploitation des écoles de pilotage partout au Canada. Une baisse du niveau d'expérience à ce chapitre risque certainement de se répercuter sur qualité de la formation des nouveaux instructeurs. À l'heure actuelle, Transports Canada mobilise les instructeurs de classe 1 pour faire face à ces défis, une initiative hautement appréciable et constructive qui démontre le sérieux du ministère à vouloir agir.

(1115)



Une majorité des instructeurs de classe 1 en fonction sont des gens âgés de plus de 50 ans et je crains personnellement de devenir l'une des rares instructrices de classe 1 possédant plus de 10 ans d'expérience. Je suis déjà l'une des rares, pour ne pas dire la seule, qui est femme et propriétaire d'une école de pilotage. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je vous demanderais de conclure votre exposé. [Français]

Mme Caroline Farly:

En conclusion, l'une de mes dernières préoccupations est la disponibilité d'examinateurs de vol pour les instructeurs de vol. Il faut aborder ce dossier puisqu'un examinateur de vol pour instructeurs de vol doit à l'heure actuelle être pilote de ligne, ce qui complique la programmation des activités d'examen des instructeurs.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions de nos membres.

Nous accordons la parole à Mme Block pour six minutes.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je veux souhaiter la bienvenue à nos invités ce matin et remercier moi aussi M. Fuhr d'avoir proposé sa motion. Je pense que le Comité l'a adoptée à l'unanimité; il admet donc le rôle très important que les écoles de pilotage jouent dans l'industrie aérienne.

Je veux revenir au témoignage du capitaine Hoff. Si vous voulez bien récapituler votre exposé pour moi, je pense que vous avez recommandé trois politiques que le gouvernement devrait adopter afin de résoudre les problèmes que doivent affronter les jeunes pilotes qui cherchent à acquérir plus d'expérience, afin de peut-être leur faciliter la tâche.

(1120)

Capt Mike Hoff:

J'ai proposé quatre mesures consistant à améliorer les conditions de travail des nouveaux pilotes dans le Nord canadien, à encourager les établissements publics accrédités à établir des écoles de pilotage, à faciliter l'accumulation des heures de vol et de simulation, et à examiner des solutions afin de réduire les coûts pour les étudiants, par exemple, en faisant en sorte qu'il soit plus facile d'obtenir des déductions fiscales pour leur éducation.

Mme Kelly Block:

Toutes ces mesures toucheraient les défis dont vous avez entendu parler, pas seulement de la part de votre fils en raison de son expérience, mais aussi d'autres jeunes pilotes pour qui ces problèmes constituent de réels problèmes alors qu'ils cherchent à faire carrière dans l'industrie.

Capt Mike Hoff:

C'est exact.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci. Je comprends.

Je voudrais donner suite au témoignage de Mme Farly. Je vous remercie d'avoir souligné, à la fin de votre exposé, que vous êtes une des rares femmes — ou la seule — à être propriétaires d'une école de pilotage.

Mme Caroline Farly:

Je pense être la seule. Comme je ne suis pas certaine s'il en y ait d'autres, je ne veux pas affirmer être la seule, mais je n'en connais aucune autre.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

Je sais que j'ai peu de temps, mais vous commenciez à vous engager dans une ligne de pensée. Vouliez-vous ajouter quelque chose à ce sujet?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Je pense que j'avais fait le tour de la question. Cependant, il y a toute une génération...

Je vais m'exprimer autrement.[Français]

L'idée ici est celle d'une continuité. Il y a à l'heure actuelle un manque de relève et il n'y a plus d'instructeurs. Même moi qui suis l'une des rares instructrices de classe 1 encore active et qui ai autant d'années d'expérience, j'ai besoin de soutien et d'un groupe de pairs, d'autres instructeurs de classe 1. Nous n'avons plus de modèles ni de soutien.

Il faut vraiment mettre en place un processus qui permette de conserver nos instructeurs et de faire de cette profession une vocation viable. En ce moment, la carrière d'instructeur est mal perçue parce que tout ce qui s'en dit, c'est qu'elle n'est pas bien rémunérée, ce qui est malheureusement vrai. Personne ne parle de la richesse de cette carrière et de l'expérience de voler avec autant de personnes différentes. Il faut vraiment se pencher sur toute cette question.[Traduction]

Je pense que c'était le principal point que je voulais souligner.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Vous avez également évoqué les coûts d'exploitation d'une école de pilotage. Je me demande ce qu'il en est de l'autre côté du bilan: celui des revenus. D'où tirez-vous vos revenus?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Les envolées et les cours constituent les sources de revenus des écoles ou des services d'aviation. Nous donnons des cours théoriques qui nous procurent des revenus, mais nous avons aussi le bureau. Nous avons Internet; je ne m'attarderai pas à cette facette des activités, toutefois. Si nous ne donnons pas de cours théoriques et si les avions ne volent pas, nous n'avons pas de revenus. C'est aussi pourquoi les instructeurs...

Par exemple, nous avons tous vu le temps qu'il fait depuis novembre. Quand on travaille dans l'aviation, on ne considère pas la température de la même manière. Je ne sais pas si vous avez vu à quel point la température est peu propice aux vols. Cette situation se traduit par une baisse des revenus. Comment pouvons-nous offrir aux travailleurs autonomes un salaire stable sans la moindre garentie?

Nous disposons d'une bonne équipe d'instructeurs à l'heure actuelle. Comme nous sommes motivés par nos carrières, j'ai une excellente équipe, mais un instructeur quittera ses fonctions dans un an. Il veut rester, mais il est attiré par une autre entreprise. Il m'a promis qu'il ne serait parti qu'un an ou deux, car il veut rester dans la région. Il ne tient pas tant à piloter pour une compagnie aérienne, car il préfère rester dans la région, mais les salaires ne se comparent pas.

J'ai choisi d'être instructrice par amour du métier, mais aussi parce que j'ai un fils à la maison et que je voulais être sûre de rentrer chez moi le soir. Nous pouvons offrir divers incitatifs aux instructeurs, mais à l'heure actuelle, le salaire n'en fait malheureusement pas partie.

(1125)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Me reste-t-il du temps?

La présidente:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Fuhr.

M. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.):

Merci à tous de témoigner. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Marc, comme vous avez manqué de temps, je veux vous donner l'occasion de terminer ce que vous vouliez dire. J'aurai ensuite une question.

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Merci, monsieur Fuhr.

Il me restait à traiter des exigences médicales qu'il faut respecter quand on veut embaucher des pilotes ou des instructeurs. J'ai donné un petit exemple en parlant des daltoniens qui peuvent porter des lentilles correctrices pour rectifier le problème, comme nous le faisons avec des lentilles ordinaires pour corriger la vue. Cependant, les daltoniens ne sont toujours pas autorisés à voler de nuit et sont toujours contraints à avoir une radio et une zone de contrôle.

En ce qui concerne les exigences médicales, sachez aussi qu'un grand nombre de personnes d'expérience partent à la retraite actuellement. Bien entendu, quand on atteint un certain âge, il est plus difficile de satisfaire les exigences médicales. Si ces personnes travaillaient pour des lignes aériennes, elles pourraient continuer de donner de la formation sur des simulateurs, alors que nous ne pouvons pas recourir à elles afin d'inculquer les compétences exigées pour les permis dans les simulateurs de nos écoles de pilotage.

Qui d'autre que ces personnes qui partent à la retraite peut mieux former les étudiants en vue de leur carrière? Nous devons ajouter cette formation supplémentaire, et cela a un coût pour les étudiants, un coût qui s'ajoute à ce qu'ils paient déjà.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Merci de cette réponse.

Il est évident que nous avons besoin de plus d'étudiants. Nous devons éliminer les obstacles qui les empêchent de suivre une formation de pilotage. L'aspect financier fait évidemment partie de l'équation. C'est probablement l'obstacle le plus important à cet égard. Nous devons former les étudiants plus rapidement et embaucher plus d'instructeurs.

Pour ce qui est de former les étudiants plus rapidement, je me demande si vous pourriez me dire comment une formation axée sur les compétences pourrait accélérer le cycle de formation pour que les gens entrent plus rapidement sur le marché du travail. Caroline, avez-vous une opinion à ce sujet?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Pardonnez-moi, je dois vous demander de clarifier votre question.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Je parle de former les gens pour qu'ils soient compétents au lieu d'imposer un nombre d'heures pour une étape de la formation de pilotage. Ce n'est peut-être pas adéquat pour la formation pour débutants, mais ce le serait certainement pour une norme commerciale ou une norme de transport de ligne, une fois que le pilote est rendu aux étapes avancées du cycle de formation. Le système canadien exige essentiellement que les pilotes accomplissent un nombre donné d'heures et maîtrisent certaines compétences. Pensez-vous que si nous examinions la manière dont nous formons les gens, cela nous aiderait à les former plus rapidement une fois qu'ils sont inscrits?

La présidente:

Madame Farly, sentez-vous libre de vous exprimer comme bon vous semble.

Mme Caroline Farly:

D'accord. Merci.[Français]

Votre question est vraiment très intéressante et je vais vous donner mon point de vue. C'est déjà une approche que nous utilisons et je prends l'exemple de la formation de 45 heures requise pour être pilote privé. Il est bien rare qu'un candidat, même le plus talentueux, soit prêt après seulement 35 heures. Eny rajoutant des exercices, on arrive rapidement et de façon efficace à la fin de la période de formation de 45 heures. De plus, on ne peut pas passer à un autre exercice en vol sans avoir vraiment bien maîtrisé le précédent.[Traduction]

Je suis désolée, j'ai de la difficulté à répondre à cette question.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

D'accord. Je m'adresserai donc à Mike.

Mme Caroline Farly:

Oui, merci.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Avez-vous une opinion à ce sujet?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Oui. Je pense que cela fait partie de l'équation. Une partie des exigences sont désuètes, mais je pense qu'il faut prendre soin de ne pas réduire les exigences dans le cadre du processus afin de résoudre ce qu'on perçoit comme un problème. Il faut maintenir la norme, mais il existe des solutions.

Mon fils occupe le siège droit d'un appareil Dash 8 Q400, volant en cercle dans mon avion la nuit, car il doit cocher une case dans le formulaire de Transports Canada. Je ne pense pas vraiment que cela en fera un meilleur pilote, mais la case doit être cochée.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

En effet. Je suis d'accord avec vous: il faut maintenir la norme dans l'ensemble du processus. Selon moi et d'après mon expérience, ce ne serait certainement pas applicable à toutes les étapes de la formation de pilotage, mais je pense que cela pourrait accélérer le processus aux étapes où il serait sensé d'agir ainsi.

Marc, avez-vous une opinion à ce sujet?

(1130)

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Oui. Je partage l'avis de M. Hoff: il faut veiller à maintenir la norme.

Nous utilisons une combinaison de formation axée sur les compétences et sur des scénarios, mais il faut quand même se conformer aux normes. Nous évaluons certains étudiants aux trois quarts de la formation. Ce serait plus que suffisant pour effectuer des vols commerciaux, mais nous devons accomplir encore 40 ou 50 heures avec eux. Ce sont des étudiants avec lesquels nous effectuons des manoeuvres avancées, donc ça va. Ici encore, ce serait une méthode qui permettrait de réduire les coûts pour ces étudiants. Par contre, il y aura probablement des étudiants pour lesquels il faudra dépasser les limites actuelles. Je suppose qu'il faut trouver un juste équilibre.

Je pense que les observations des compagnies aériennes... Il existe un imposant comité consultatif en matière de programmes. Si les gens offraient le même accès que nous fournissons à l'école, où nous ouvrons les livres et faisons état du rendement de chacun, je pense que cela contribuerait à maintenir les normes.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Merci beaucoup.

Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

La présidente:

Il l'est, en effet.

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je souhaite faire un bref commentaire avant de poser mes questions. Au tout début de la réunion, durant les présentations préliminaires, les interprètes nous ont signalé qu'ils n'avaient pas reçu les textes, ce qui compliquait leur travail. Je me demandais si nous ne pourrions pas faire un effort pour les prochaines réunions et nous assurer que les interprètes aient les textes avant que la séance ne commence.

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous ce matin.

Vos témoignages sont très éclairants. Depuis que nous avons commencé notre étude, il me semble que la situation est complexe, mais relativement simple à résumer. Nous avons deux problèmes: comment attirer de nouveaux pilotes et comment les conserver, peu importe qu'ils soient professionnels ou instructeurs.

Nous parlons de la situation au Canada, mais le marché du pilotage est mondial. Comme il y a pénurie de pilotes, j'imagine que chacun d'entre eux a le beau jeu pour lorsque vient le temps de trouver la compagnie qui va lui offrir les meilleures conditions de travail.

Il y a environ un an et demi, nous avons mené une très grosse étude sur la sécurité aérienne. Il y avait été entre autres abondamment question des heures de vol imposées aux pilotes canadiens.

Mes premières questions s'adressent donc à vous, capitaine Hoff. Tout d'abord, est-ce que le nombre d'heures de vol imposées aux pilotes canadiens peut désavantager l'industrie canadienne et pousser nos pilotes à aller travailler à l'étranger dans de meilleures conditions? De plus, est-ce la nouvelle réglementation qui a été déposée par le ministre et par Transports Canada vous satisfait à cet effet? [Traduction]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Désolé, le volume a diminué, mais je pense que vous demandiez si les heures de vol sont adéquates et si le Canada était désavantagé à l'échelle internationale. Faites-vous référence aux heures de vol annuelles ou aux heures nécessaires à l'obtention d'un permis? [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Ma question est de savoir si le nombre d'heures a un rôle à jouer.

Est-ce que le nombre d'heures de vol qu'un pilote canadien doit effectuer par rapport à ce qui est exigé d'un pilote étranger peut influencer notre capacité à conserver nos pilotes au Canada? [Traduction]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je pense que les heures de vol exigées aux fins de qualification correspondent à celles des pays membres de l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale. En fait, nous bénéficions d'un avantage par rapport au système des États-Unis où, en raison de... [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Si je peux me permettre, je ne parle pas des heures de formation, mais bien des heures de vol. [Traduction]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je pense que nos pratiques correspondent assez bien à celles des pays membres de l'OACI. Je n'observe aucune disparité qui nous désavantagerait ou nous avantagerait. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je passe à une autre question. Dans vos propos préliminaires, vous avez rapidement fait mention de problèmes avec l'Agence du revenu du Canada qui auraient duré trois ans. Il me semble qu'il s'agit là d'une situation qui relève tout à fait du Parlement fédéral. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer les problèmes que vous avez eus avec l'Agence, pour que nous puissions déterminer les mesures qui pourraient faciliter la rétention des élèves? [Traduction]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je suis vraiment content que vous me posiez cette question.

En fait, Marc et moi avons été au collège ensemble. Cet établissement n'existe malheureusement plus.

Un des gros problèmes que j'ai rencontrés, c'est le manque d'uniformité de la formation de pilotage au pays. L'Ontario et le Québec offrent des programmes de formation fort exhaustifs et intégrés verticalement, alors que dans l'Ouest, c'est vraiment devenu n'importe quoi. Certains collèges sont associés à une école de pilotage, mais les établissements n'ont aucune idée de ce qui se passe à l'aéroport. Ils ont constitué un ensemble de cours économiques donnant droit à ce qu'ils appellent un diplôme d'aviation d'affaires. Mais ce ne sont pas les instructeurs du collège qui sont à l'aéroport. Les établissements ne savent pas vraiment comment se déroule le programme, et quelque chose de magique se passe là.

Certaines écoles constituent d'excellents exemples de la manière dont il faut procéder adéquatement; l'ennui, c'est qu'il n'y a pas de continuité. C'était très intéressant de comparer les ressources offertes pour concrétiser le rêve de mon fils cadet, qui est ingénieur, avec celles dont pouvait se prévaloir mon fils aîné pour devenir pilote.

(1135)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à Mme Farly.

Il est beaucoup question du coût de la formation d'un étudiant. C'est un sujet délicat et complexe parce que l'éducation relève aussi des compétences provinciales et que le gouvernement fédéral ne peut pas agir seul. Cependant, vous me disiez avoir acheté une entreprise dans laquelle vous travailliez déjà. Le gouvernement fédéral pourrait-il instaurer des mesures qui favoriseraient le transfert d'entreprises, permettant ainsi à une école de pilotage de trouver rapidement preneur au lieu de fermer?

Mme Caroline Farly:

C'est une excellente question. Dans les faits, j'ai pu bénéficier de programmes de soutien en région aux jeunes entrepreneurs de moins de 35 ans. La Société d'aide au développement des collectivités et le Centre local de développement m'ont grandement aidé à racheter cette entreprise, et ces mesures sont de celles auxquelles vous pensez.

À l'heure actuelle, les écoles de pilotage sont rachetées par des personnes qui ont la passion de l'aviation, mais qui ne sont pas nécessairement des instructeurs de vol. Au Québec, je ne connais aucune école qui ait fait faillite ou qui ait fermé, ce qui prouve que la transition a lieu. Pour le reste du Canada, par contre, je n'en sais rien. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous accordons la parole à M. Graham pour six minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais commencer en m'adressant à vous, madame Farly.

Dans votre conclusion, vous avez parlé du problème de disponibilité des examinateurs. Pouvez-vous m'en dire plus à ce sujet? Quel est le délai actuel pour les candidats à l'examen? Dans mon cas, cela ne m'a pris que quelques jours avant de passer l'examen. Combien de temps cela prend-il maintenant à un candidat avant de pouvoir passer l'examen, de recevoir ses résultats et de pouvoir exercer ses nouvelles fonctions, muni de son nouveau permis?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Actuellement, il faut environ une semaine avant de pouvoir passer son examen de pilote privé ou de pilote commercial. Quand l'instructeur sent que l'élève est prêt, il peut appeler et programmer l'examen assez rapidement. Par ailleurs, cet examen de vol peut être annulé à cause de la météo, mais il est facile de le reprogrammer pour le lendemain, la fin de semaine ou la semaine suivante, le cas échéant.

Par contre, pour un examen en vol d'instructeur de vol, il faut prévoir au moins deux mois, sans possibilité d'un rendez-vous définitif puisque, pour l'instant, les examinateurs doivent être pilotes de ligne et ont donc d'autres obligations professionnelles. Étant donné que la formation d'un instructeur dure trois mois quand il la suit à temps plein, comme c'est généralement le cas chez nous, il est difficile de déterminer dès le début de la formation une date précise pour l'examen final, puisqu'il faut un préavis de deux mois, qui se répète si l'examen doit être reporté. Cela crée donc des délais importants. En parallèle, je connais présentement des instructeurs de classe 1 qui sont sur le terrain à titre d'examinateurs de vol et qui voudraient bien être examinateurs d'instructeurs de vol pour Transports Canada, mais qui essuient un refus parce qu'ils ne sont pas pilotes de ligne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les examens théoriques sont-ils à jour? Sont-ils en phase avec les connaissances actuelles?

Mme Caroline Farly:

C'est une préoccupation que nous avons présentement sur le terrain. Les processus de révision ou de contestation des examens théoriques sont soit désuets soit inexistants. Nous sommes plusieurs instructeurs sur le terrain à être préoccupés par les sujets abordés dans les examens. Évidemment, leur contenu n'est pas dévoilé.

Je vous donne un exemple pour que vous ayez une idée de la situation. Je suis une agente autorisée pour Transports Canada et je suis affectée à la surveillance des examens. Mes empreintes digitales ont été prises par la GRC. J'ai un dossier. Je sais que je serai criminellement responsable si jamais il se passe quelque chose, mais j'aimerais que Transports Canada m'invite à participer à un comité chargé de réviser les examens. Nous sommes plusieurs sur le terrain à être préoccupés par les sujets considérés pour la mise à jour des examens théoriques. Certains élèves sont découragés, tant du côté privé que du côté commercial, ne serait-ce que parce que certains sujets ne reflètent plus la pratique et les normes actuelles.

(1140)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au début de votre présentation, vous avez parlé de la pénurie de pilotes qui souhaitent devenir instructeurs Auparavant, beaucoup des pilotes voulaient uniquement accumuler des heures.

Est-ce que beaucoup de pilotes voudraient devenir instructeurs, mais ne le font pas parce que ce n'est pas viable économiquement?

Mme Caroline Farly:

J'en connaissais beaucoup il y a 25 ans et j'en connais beaucoup aujourd'hui. Chez moi, les pilotes qui deviennent instructeurs le font parce qu'ils le veulent et le peuvent. Ce sont des retraités qui travaillent à temps partiel. Cela fait partie de la réalité. Nous faisons affaire avec des instructeurs à temps partiel, ce qui demande toute une gestion de notre part. Par exemple, un de mes instructeurs fait ce travail et occupe un autre emploi parce qu'il veut voir sa conjointe le soir. Un autre, qui est un jeune pilote, sera instructeur l'année prochaine. Il a entamé le processus qui lui permettra de devenir instructeur. Il veut rester dans la région et travailler avec son père. Dans son cas, ce ne sera pas un emploi à temps plein. On parle ici de gens qui veulent être instructeurs et qui sont en mesure d'arriver financièrement en occupant un deuxième emploi. Tout cela complexifie la gestion et la stabilité. Il est difficile d'assurer que nos élèves cheminent avec le même instructeur alors que nous gérons une équipe d'instructeurs à temps partiel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si un instructeur qui finit sa formation et dont les connaissances sont à jour trouve un autre emploi, y a-t-il moyen de le garder en l'employant à temps partiel comme instructeur, mais en lui offrant un plus grand nombre d'heures?

Mme Caroline Farly:

J'aimerais beaucoup pouvoir offrir un incitatif autre que la motivation. C'est le sentiment d'appartenance à une école et à une certaine culture, et non une motivation financière, qui peut les inciter à exercer le métier d'instructeur. Je ne crois pas que nos écoles soient en mesure de répondre à leurs attentes. Les salaires ne sont vraiment pas comparables. Pour l'instant, seuls la motivation et l'amour du métier d'instructeur peuvent les inciter à continuer à exercer celui-ci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En réponse aux questions de M. Aubin, vous avez évoqué la contribution de la SADC et du CLD. Pouvez-vous nous parler davantage du programme vous a permis d'acheter l'école de pilotage?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Dans le cadre du projet, j'ai présenté un plan d'action. J'ai pu bénéficier d'une bourse pour les jeunes entrepreneurs. Il serait intéressant de s'inspirer de ce programme pour les instructeurs. Je ne me souviens malheureusement plus du nom du programme, mais la subvention permettait aux entrepreneurs de recevoir un salaire pendant la première année de l'entreprise. Celle-ci pouvait garder plus d'argent dans son fonds de roulement. C'était comme des prestations d'assurance-emploi sans en être vraiment. Cela m'a permis d'allouer des fonds et des revenus au démarrage ou du moins au roulement de la compagnie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Rogers, vous avez la parole.

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente. Je remercie les témoins de comparaître aujourd'hui.

Je veux d'abord interroger Caroline.

Selon le rapport sur le marché du travail de mars 2018, les femmes représentent à peine 30 % des membres de l'industrie de l'aviation et 7 % des pilotes. À quoi attribuez-vous cette sous-représentation substantielle des femmes parmi les pilotes canadiens?

Est-elle parce que nous avons créé un fossé entre les sexes ou ciblé certaines personnes? Je sais qu'à une époque, les hommes étaient médecins et les femmes, infirmières. Nous avons la parité et l'égalité entre les sexes et toutes ces autres choses dont nous parlons, bien entendu, mais le problème est-il tel que les femmes et les groupes sous-représentés de la société, comme les groupes minoritaires, ne présentent pas de demande aux écoles de pilotage pour devenir pilotes? S'agit-il d'une des principales causes de la pénurie actuelle?

Mme Caroline Farly:

C'est une excellente question.

Je pense que nous avons tous l'image... Je suis désolée d'exprimer les choses ainsi, mais le capitaine Hoff incarne l'image du pilote que nous avons tous en tête. On ne voit pas beaucoup de femmes pilotes. Le fait est qu'on n'entend jamais de femmes annoncer que l'avion s'apprête à atterrir à Peterborough ou qu'il est prêt à atterrir. Les parents ne disent jamais aux jeunes filles qu'elles peuvent être pilotes de ligne. On ne leur présente pas cette possibilité. C'est quand elles sont plus âgées et qu'elles voient quelqu'un qu'elles ont l'occasion de voir les choses autrement.

À mon école, je pense que nous avons une certaine influence. J'influence les filles de mes pilotes. J'influence mes pilotes, qui disent qu'ils ont une fille et qu'ils pensent qu'elle devrait venir me rencontrer. À mon école, les femmes représentent bien plus de 7 % de pilotes, mais je pense qu'il y a une nouvelle génération et que de nombreuses initiatives s'adressent aux femmes dans l'aviation, comme Ninety-Nines et un grand nombre d'associations de femmes. Je pense que les pourcentages ne tarderont pas à augmenter.

Me permettez-vous d'ajouter autre chose, étant donné qu'on me demande de parler à de nombreuses femmes? Même si l'aviation est considérée comme un milieu d'homme, les femmes en font partie. Je n'ai jamais eu l'impression de faire l'objet de discrimination ou d'être une femme dans un groupe d'hommes. C'est une sororité, une fraternité, et il y a toujours de la place pour les femmes et pour tout le monde dans l'aviation. S'il est une chose qu'on apprend dans ce domaine, c'est qu'on ne peut pas être pilote si on n'a pas l'esprit d'équipe.

(1145)

M. Churence Rogers:

Merci de cette réponse. J'ai beaucoup voyagé en avion au cours de ma vie, et je pense que c'est l'an dernier que j'ai vu pour la première fois un vol où des femmes agissaient à titre de pilote et de copilote. C'était la première fois que je voyais cela.

Je veux poser mon autre question au capitaine Mike Hoff.

L'enseignement est une noble carrière. J'ai enseigné pendant 29 ans. J'adorais agir quotidiennement en interaction avec les élèves de niveau secondaire afin de leur inculquer des connaissances et de guider les jeunes alors qu'ils s'orientaient vers une variété de carrières et de domaines.

Dans votre association de pilotes, est-ce que la volonté d'agir à titre de mentor auprès des jeunes pilotes constitue une source d'inspiration dans le cadre de votre carrière?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Mais certainement. J'adorerais pouvoir participer au mentorat, une démarche à laquelle je crois fortement. J'ai connu une carrière formidable en raison des personnes altruistes qui me précédaient. Marc et moi avons eu la chance inouïe de fréquenter une école où travaillaient de nombreux pilotes de ligne et militaires retraités, ce qui nous a permis de bénéficier d'une excellente éducation.

Il est difficile de rendre au suivant dans le domaine de l'enseignement, car notre temps est limité et nous coûtons cher à nos compagnies. Si je vais enseigner ailleurs, j'ai moins de temps à offrir à mon employeur. Ce dernier est réfractaire à l'idée.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Rogers.

Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Leitch.

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch (Simcoe—Grey, PCC):

Je remercie les témoins de comparaître aujourd'hui. Mes questions s'adresseront à vous tous; sentez-vous donc libres d'y répondre.

Je pense que vous avez tous déploré le coût d'immobilisations élevé que les écoles de pilotage doivent de toute évidence assumer. Avez-vous eu l'occasion de proposer une bonification du Programme d'aide aux immobilisations aéroportuaires ou, à dire vrai, une modification de la déduction pour amortissement fiscal pour vos organisations? Nous évoquons fréquemment cette possibilité pour d'autres industries, mais avez-vous pu aborder le sujet avec le gouvernement en ce qui concerne vos écoles de pilotage et vos coûts indirects?

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Je peux répondre brièvement à cette question.

Les programmes sont élaborés de telle sorte que l'aéroport ne peut se qualifier au chapitre des immobilisations relatives aux aéronefs parce qu'il est trop achalandé. Aucune initiative ne peut nous aider à cet égard. Même si l'aéroport pouvait se qualifier, il ne pourrait le faire en ce qui concerne l'équipement et les règles de...

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Ce que je dis, c'est qu'il y a peut-être une occasion pour vous à cet égard. Je vous encouragerais à plaider votre cause, en ce qui concerne notamment le matériel de simulation, dont les coûts sont élevés. Je suis chirurgienne. Nous utilisons constamment des simulateurs. Vous êtes comme les anesthésistes de mon domaine: vous décollez et atterrissez, et j'interviens entre les deux à titre de chirurgienne. Nous utilisons tout le temps des simulateurs, dont le coût d'immobilisations est substantiel.

J'ai une deuxième question concernant l'éducation des jeunes pilotes. De toute évidence, le Programme canadien de prêts aux étudiants et un programme de radiation de dette sont offerts pour les études de premier cycle et des cycles supérieurs. Est-ce que vous ou un important chef de file de l'industrie comme Air Canada et d'autres compagnies ont fait valoir que les jeunes pilotes et les pilotes en formation devraient pouvoir se prévaloir de ce programme, comme c'est le cas pour les métiers spécialisés?

Je vous laisse le soin de répondre à cette question.

(1150)

[Français]

Mme Caroline Farly:

Relativement aux prêts pour les étudiants, si notre école n'est pas reliée à un programme d'attestation d'études collégiales, nos élèves ne sont pas admissibles à ces programmes.

Les écoles privées, même si elles ne sont pas reliées à ces systèmes collégiaux, ont des niveaux de performance reconnus par Transports Canada et sont tout aussi qualifiées. Idéalement, ce serait vraiment toute une initiative du gouvernement de permettre à nos élèves aussi de s'inscrire à ces programmes.

Pour l'instant, ce qui est permis, ce sont des prêts étudiants, des ententes spécifiques avec des banques pour la formation professionnelle dispensée dans notre région.[Traduction]

Je peux toutefois dire que je sais qu'[Français] on remet des reçus pour les frais de scolarité aux fins de déductions d'impôt. Récemment, mes élèves m'ont dit que, dans la déclaration de revenus, on a sérieusement diminué le pourcentage admissible des frais de scolarité déductibles dans le domaine de l'aviation.

Ne connaissant pas trop ce domaine, je sais qu'il vaudrait la peine d'examiner cela de plus près. Beaucoup d'élèves reviennent me dire qu'une modification a été faite dans les crédits d'impôt pour les études commerciales et que ceux-ci ont foncièrement diminué. [Traduction]

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Je pourrais peut-être vous interroger tous à propos d'une des autres questions qui ont été soulevées, car elle a un certain lien avec ce que Mme Farly vient de dire.

Cela concerne les règlements qui régissent les écoles de simulation et qui précisent qui devrait être admissible. Cela pourrait aussi donner une occasion d'indiquer aux gouvernements fédéral ou provinciaux que tous les étudiants devraient être admissibles. Si un seul ensemble de règlements indique qui peut utiliser ces installations et s'il existe une seule norme, alors toutes les organisations devraient, à l'évidence, être admissibles pour que leurs étudiants bénéficient d'un soutien financier.

Monsieur Hoff, vous avez l'air de vouloir répondre.

Capt Mike Hoff:

Oui, j'aimerais intervenir.

Je voudrais tout d'abord remercier mes deux collègues pour le travail qu'ils accomplissent dans ces écoles. Ces dernières ont magistralement réussi à combler un besoin...

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Absolument

Capt Mike Hoff:

... qui n'était pas là, car il avait été abandonné.

Le genre d'école que Marc et moi avons fréquenté avait l'avantage d'avoir acheté le simulateur. Cela n'enlève rien aux entreprises qui doivent faire du profit; comme elles doivent payer le simulateur, elles doivent imposer des frais pour son temps d'utilisation. Quand Marc et moi étions à l'école, notre collège était fort réputé pour ses diplômés, car nous avions accès en tout temps, et gratuitement, aux simulateurs. Nous pouvions aller les utiliser. Un établissement privé ne peut faire de même.

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Je ne suis pas de cet avis. Un établissement privé peut le faire; c'est une question de choix. Je pense que le problème se situe là. Il incombe à l'industrie, selon moi, de tenter d'améliorer ses pratiques. Pour assurer l'excellence, nous devrions former les gens pour qu'ils soient excellents.

Cela étant dit, je poserais ma question à Mme Farly et Marc Vanderaegen.

Ces règlements constitueraient-ils plus un fardeau pour votre compagnie ou accroîtraient-ils votre capacité à recevoir du financement et du soutien supplémentaires pour vos étudiants et votre établissement?

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Je suppose que je tente de comprendre de quels règlements vous parlez au sujet du potentiel. Faites-vous référence aux règlements qui seraient établis pour permettre...

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Je parle des normes d'éducation.

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Des normes d'éducation de...?

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Vous exploitez une école de pilotage. C'est un établissement d'enseignement.

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Cela dépend de la façon dont c'est déployé, je pense bien, et de ce que la réglementation prévoit en fait.

En ce moment, en matière d'éducation, nous avons déjà les normes de Transports Canada. C'est donc du chevauchement tout simplement, comme c'est le cas avec le ministère de l'Éducation de la Colombie-Britannique, qui essaie de nous gérer également. Cela devient fastidieux, et cela n'aide pas vraiment les étudiants.

Non. Si les étudiants en tirent parti et que c'est gérable, c'est bon. N'oubliez pas que ce sont les étudiants qui vont payer les coûts, sauf s'il y a d'autres options de financement.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est au tour de M. Badawey.

(1155)

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai une question pour M. Hoff concernant l'industrie et le partenariat qu'elle a peut-être avec l'Association des pilotes d'Air Canada, et en particulier avec Air Canada elle-même.

Dans mon ancienne vie, nous encouragions vraiment l'industrie, en partenariat avec les syndicats, les collectivités, les écoles secondaires et postsecondaires et ainsi de suite, à amener les jeunes à s'intéresser très tôt à divers métiers, diverses disciplines, et en plus à collaborer pour lancer le processus des coops, des formations en apprentissage, etc. Les jeunes allaient ensuite au postsecondaire dans ces disciplines, et se retrouvaient dans le domaine de compétence qu'ils souhaitaient.

Est-ce qu'il y a un tel partenariat entre l'Association et Air Canada, dans votre cas, afin d'amener les jeunes du secondaire à s'intéresser à cela et à se concentrer là-dessus pendant le reste du secondaire et pendant leurs études postsecondaires? Vous avez les programmes des cadets de l'air. Vous avez d'autres organisations qui sont intéressées. Est-ce qu'il y a un partenariat entre vous et Air Canada?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je vais commencer par vous parler de l'élément qui touche mon employeur. J'ai approché mon employeur. Cet employeur est le prédateur supérieur. Il estime ne pas avoir de difficulté à trouver des pilotes. Il n'y a pas beaucoup d'intérêt de son côté. Personnellement, il me donne accès au simulateur et me permet d'emmener dans mon propre avion des personnes qui envisagent une carrière de pilote. Je les emmène aussi dans le simulateur. Je remercie Air Canada de me donner l'occasion d'utiliser ses simulateurs, mais c'est là que cela s'arrête.

Pour ce qui est de l'altruisme, parce que je sens le besoin de redonner, mon association est très réceptive. Les gens demandent pourquoi l'Association utilise les frais d'adhésion pour retenir les services de défenseurs et pour mener des études visant à recueillir des données. Les données n'étaient pas là. Je suis un pilote. J'ai besoin de données. Je ne peux venir ici et vous dire simplement que j'ai entendu dire ceci ou cela. Nous avons mené une étude. Nous avons approfondi les choses afin d'obtenir des données et nous essayons d'aider.

M. Vance Badawey:

Vous semblez faire très attention à ce que vous dîtes. J'aurai une petite discussion hors-ligne avec vous, après la réunion, au sujet…

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je vous en sais gré.

M. Vance Badawey:

… des choses que vous dîtes avec grande prudence.

Sur ce, je vais laisser la parole à M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci.

Bonjour. Je vous remercie de votre présence.

Madame Farly, je vous félicite pour le courage que vous avez eu de reprendre une entreprise qui était au bord de la faillite. En fait, je ne voulais pas dire qu'elle était au bord de la faillite, mais plutôt au bord de la fermeture. Excusez-moi.

Mme Caroline Farly:

D'accord.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Disons que vous l'avez sauvée de la faillite.

Mme Caroline Farly:

Je l'ai sauvée de la fermeture.

M. Angelo Iacono:

C'est exact.

Pouvez-vous nous décrire un peu les difficultés auxquelles vous avez fait face ou auxquelles vous continuez de faire face? Quelles sont les répercussions économiques pour les écoles d'aviation dans les régions?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Excusez-moi, parlez-vous des difficultés que j'ai dû surmonter pour remettre l'entreprise sur pied?

M. Angelo Iacono:

Oui, ainsi que celles auxquelles vous continuez de faire face.

Mme Caroline Farly:

Ouf! Il s'agit d'une grosse conversation.

La plus grande difficulté qui se pose en ce qui a trait à la relève pour cette école de pilotage est de trouver des instructeurs. Je ne parle pas d'instructeurs qui veulent juste faire quelques heures — de toute façon, cela n'existe plus —, mais d'instructeurs qui peuvent donner de la formation de grande qualité, à la hauteur de la réputation de l'école, et qui resteront chez nous. C'est notre plus grande difficulté, quand nous essayons d'assurer une pérennité.

Une autre difficulté que j'ai eue a été de gérer la demande. Juste en étant une ressource stable dans l'aviation, sans les nommer, je peux dire que cinq endroits voudraient que je mette sur pied une école de pilotage dans leur région. En ce moment, une de mes difficultés est de gérer mon école de pilotage, d'assurer sa stabilité et de la maintenir au niveau auquel son fondateur l'a toujours maintenue. J'y suis depuis 2010.

Il y a un besoin criant partout dans les régions pour des instructeurs de pilotage de bimoteurs — j'en parlais d'ailleurs à M. Vanderaegen. On forme partout des pilotes commerciaux et la demande pour ces pilotes va en augmentant, mais il n'y a plus de bimoteurs pour former des pilotes, étant donné le coût exorbitant de ces avions. Actuellement, le temps d'attente pour suivre une formation en pilotage de bimoteur est de deux à trois mois.

Si je laissais la compagnie aller, en dépit des frais de l'école qui ne cessent d'augmenter, j'irais m'acheter un avion de plus, j'irais m'acheter un bimoteur de plus, mais je ne peux pas me permettre d'augmenter le coût de la formation. Il faut que la formation reste accessible. J'essaie de payer mes instructeurs plus cher. J'aimerais offrir plus de formation en achetant un bimoteur et plus d'avions, mais j'ai des élèves qui ont de la misère à s'inscrire à mon école de pilotage parce que cela coûte cher. Il n'y a pas de programme de subventions.

La difficulté est d'ordre financier. J'essaie de garder des plafonds acceptables des deux côtés et de ne pas avoir des coûts d'exploitation trop élevés. Je veux protéger l'accessibilité de l'aviation pour mes pilotes.

(1200)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, mais nous n'avons plus de temps.

Merci beaucoup à tous nos témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui.

Nous allons nous arrêter un petit moment pour permettre au nouveau groupe de témoins de s'installer.

(1200)

(1205)

La présidente:

Bienvenue aux témoins qui participent à cette partie de la réunion. Par vidéo-conférence, nous avons Mme Bell, présidente du conseil d'administration du British Columbia Aviation Council. Nous accueillons Joseph Armstrong, vice-président et directeur général de CAE. Nous avons également la directrice générale de Super T Aviation, Terri Super, et le directeur général de Go Green Aviation, Gary Ogden. Bienvenue à vous tous.

Je vais vous demander de limiter vos exposés à cinq minutes, car les membres du Comité ont toujours de très nombreuses questions.

Nous allons commencer par Mme Bell, du British Columbia Aviation Council.

Mme Heather Bell (présidente du conseil d'administration, British Columbia Aviation Council):

Bonjour. Je tiens à remercier le Comité de me donner l'occasion de prendre la parole aujourd'hui, et je le remercie également de ses efforts pour résoudre cette question cruciale.

Je vous parle aujourd'hui en tant que présidente du conseil d'administration du British Columbia Aviation Council, organisme qui représente les intérêts du milieu de l'aviation en Colombie-Britannique. Personnellement, j'ai passé mes 36 ans de carrière à faire du contrôle de la circulation aérienne. J'ai travaillé comme contrôleuse à la tour et comme contrôleuse radar. Quand j'ai pris ma retraite de NAV Canada, j'étais la directrice générale de la région d'information de vol de Vancouver. J'étais responsable de tous les services de navigation aérienne de la province, ainsi que du groupe de plus de 500 employés chargés d'assurer ce service.

Je sais que le Comité a eu l'occasion d'entendre de nombreux professionnels respectés de l'industrie. C'est pourquoi je suis convaincue que vous êtes au courant de la grave pénurie de ressources que nous connaissons et que nous allons continuer de connaître dans l'industrie. Ces pénuries vont toucher notre industrie dans toutes ses facettes et vont comprendre, entre autres, les exploitants d'aéroports, les contrôleurs aériens, les techniciens d'entretien d'aéronefs et les pilotes.

Étant donné que la motion visant l'étude du Comité porte précisément sur les pilotes, je vais parler en particulier de la pénurie de pilotes et des difficultés relatives à la formation en vol. Cependant, je trouve important de souligner que la pénurie de pilotes, même si elle est critique, n'a rien de singulier. Le problème n'étant pas limité au groupe des pilotes, la solution n'est pas simple ou singulière non plus. Je sais que de nombreuses recommandations ont été soumises au Comité, et j'aimerais préciser que le BCAC appuie les quatre recommandations suivantes:

La première est d'améliorer et de rendre constant l'accès aux prêts étudiants pour la formation au pilotage. En ce moment, l'accès aux prêts étudiants pour la formation au pilotage varie d'une province à l'autre. Contrairement à d'autres provinces, le financement des prêts en Colombie-Britannique se fonde sur la durée de la formation plutôt que sur le coût de la formation. Comme on l'a indiqué au Comité, le coût de la formation au pilotage permettant l'obtention de la qualification IFR multimoteurs va dépasser les 75 000 $, ce qui est nettement plus que les frais de scolarité et le coût des manuels pour l'obtention d'un baccalauréat de quatre ans. Par conséquent, la mesure qui aurait le plus d'effet entre toutes serait la création d'un programme national de prêts étudiants appuyé par le gouvernement fédéral et offrant un degré de financement correspondant au coût de la formation au pilotage.

La deuxième est l'adoption d'initiatives permettant de recruter et de garder plus d'instructeurs de vol. Avant la pénurie de ressources, les écoles de pilotage et les exploitants aériens du Nord pouvaient compter sur les nouveaux pilotes qui accumulaient des heures de vol et de l'expérience en se qualifiant et en travaillant comme instructeurs de vol. Ils pouvaient aussi accepter des postes auprès d'exploitants qui desservaient les collectivités nordiques éloignées. Maintenant, nos unités de formation au pilotage et nos exploitants aériens du Nord ont de la difficulté à recruter et à conserver des employés. En plus de la conception d'un programme national de prêts étudiants, nous recommandons une matrice de radiation des dettes fondée sur le temps consacré à travailler comme instructeur de vol ou à piloter des avions desservant des régions éloignées désignées. En guise d'exemple, nous voyons des programmes semblables pour le personnel médical qui travaille dans des collectivités éloignées.

La troisième est l'appui à l'innovation en matière d'instruction. Les exigences réglementaires visant l'aviation peuvent constituer un frein à l'innovation et à la formation. Nous devons repenser la manière de donner la formation et le choix des instructeurs. L'aviation est un environnement extrêmement complexe. Il est donc intéressant que pour la formation au vol, nous ayons l'un des seuls systèmes, sinon le seul système où nous demandons à nos aviateurs les moins expérimentés de veiller à la formation de nos nouveaux aviateurs. Nous ne demandons pas à des étudiants en médecine de première année de veiller à la formation des nouveaux médecins, et nous ne demandons pas à des élèves du secondaire de former les générations suivantes d'enseignants. Pourtant, c'est ce que nous faisons avec les pilotes au début de leur carrière. Je ne dis pas que ce n'est pas sécuritaire et je ne dis pas que le produit est mauvais. Au contraire. Cependant, est-ce la meilleure manière?

L'ATAC, l'Association du transport aérien du Canada, a recommandé le modèle d’Organismes de formation agréés, ce qui permettrait de modifier, de simplifier et d'améliorer la formation tout en respectant les exigences réglementaires. Le BCAC appuie fermement cette initiative.

La quatrième est l'appui aux initiatives visant à supprimer les obstacles à l'entrée pour les femmes et les membres des peuples autochtones. Les femmes et les Autochtones continuent d'être sous-représentés dans cette industrie. Les femmes forment 50 % de notre population, et les jeunes Autochtones forment le groupe démographique qui connaît la plus forte croissance au Canada. Il serait donc avantageux à bien des égards de porter une attention particulière à ces groupes. Nous croyons fermement qu'il faut continuer de soutenir l'établissement de programmes de mobilisation pour les femmes comme Elevate Aviation.

Pour stimuler les membres des peuples autochtones, je crois qu'il faut un effort concerté pour présenter des programmes d'introduction et d'éducation adaptés à la culture dans les collectivités autochtones. J'ai cofondé un programme appelé Give them Wings, dont le but est de présenter à de jeunes Autochtones les carrières en aviation, l'accent étant mis sur les pilotes. Notre premier événement aura lieu en mars à l'aéroport de Boundary Bay. À cette occasion, nous établirons des liens avec les collectivités de Musqueam, de Tsawwassen et de Tsleil-Waututh. Avec de l'aide, nous espérons étendre la portée de cette initiative à toute la province et au-delà.

Dans le monde développé, on en est venu à tenir le transport par avion pour acquis.

(1210)



Les conséquences sociales et économiques d'une pénurie de pilotes seront au mieux agaçantes. Il serait agaçant que vos vacances soient gâchées par l'annulation de votre vol Vancouver-Penticton, ou l'inverse, faute de pilote, ce qui vous ferait manquer votre vol à destination de Rome, puis votre croisière.

(1215)

La présidente:

Je vais vous demander de conclure, madame Bell.

Mme Heather Bell:

Au pire, les conséquences seront dévastatrices, par exemple, s'il n'y a pas de pilote pour transporter votre enfant gravement malade et que l'impensable se produit.

Je remercie le Comité, et je serai ravie de répondre à toutes vos questions et de vous offrir notre aide.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant écouter M. Armstrong, de CAE.

M. Joseph Armstrong (vice-président et directeur général, CAE):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. C'est pour moi un honneur d'être ici aujourd'hui, au nom de CAE, pour vous présenter nos points de vue sur la formation au pilotage au Canada et à l'étranger.

Je vais vous donner une brève leçon d'histoire. En 1939, avec ses alliés, le Canada établissait le Plan d'entraînement aérien du Commonwealth britannique, ou PEACB. Dans des collectivités de tous les coins du Canada, on a formé dans le cadre du PEACB plus de 130 000 membres d'équipage, hommes et femmes, sur une période de six ans. On estime aujourd'hui que c'est l'une des grandes contributions du Canada à la victoire des Alliés. Aujourd'hui, notre histoire en matière de formation au pilotage et notre robuste secteur aérospatial font partie de nos plus importants atouts nationaux. Les divers gouvernements qui se sont succédé ont donné la formation au pilotage comme étant une capacité industrielle clé.

S'appuyant sur l'héritage laissé par le PEACB, CAE a été fondée en 1947 par M. Ken Patrick, un ancien officier de l'Aviation royale canadienne qui voulait créer quelque chose de canadien et tirer parti d'une équipe formée à la guerre qui était extrêmement novatrice et fortement axée sur la technologie.

Revenons au présent. Nous sommes maintenant le chef de file mondial de la formation dans les domaines de l'aviation civile, de la défense et des soins de santé. Avec plus de 65 établissements de formation, nous avons le plus vaste réseau de formation en aviation civile dans le monde. Chaque année, nous formons plus de 220 000 professionnels pour l'aviation civile et la défense, y compris plus de 135 000 pilotes. La plupart des gens ne s'en rendent pas compte, mais où que vous alliez, il y a fort à parier que les pilotes ont été formés par CAE dans un simulateur que nous avons construit ici même au Canada ou dans un centre de formation situé ailleurs dans le monde.

Même si le nombre de pilotes que nous formons chaque année est impressionnant, il est loin de suffire aux besoins actuels et futurs. En 2018, nous avons publié le rapport Perspectives sur la demande de pilotes de ligne. Selon notre analyse, la population active combinée des pilotes de ligne et des pilotes de jet d’affaires dépassera un demi-million de pilotes d’ici 2028, et 300 000 de ces pilotes seront de nouveaux pilotes. De nombreux pilotes militaires choisissent une carrière dans le secteur commercial. Certains des facteurs déterminants sont la qualité de vie ainsi qu'un salaire plus élevé et de meilleures possibilités. L'attrition chez les pilotes militaires produit également un effet important sur les forces aériennes professionnelles, car cela réduit leurs capacités de maintenir une équipe de pilotes répondant aux besoins opérationnels ainsi que leur capacité de produire des instructeurs de vol qualifiés à l'appui de leurs volets d'instruction. Nous voyons l'effet que cela produit aujourd'hui sur les programmes d'instruction militaire que nous offrons ici même au Canada.

Dans ce contexte, il est plus important que jamais de maximiser le bassin de talents potentiels. Aujourd'hui, les femmes ne représentent que 5 % des pilotes professionnels et cadets à l'échelle du monde. S'attaquer aux inégalités entre les sexes corrigerait ce déséquilibre tout en donnant au milieu de l'aviation l'accès à un bassin de talents presque deux fois plus important.

Selon une enquête que nous avons menée récemment sur les élèves en aviation et les cadets, au Canada et à l'étranger, certains enjeux ont constamment été évoqués, entre autres le lourd fardeau financier à porter pour s'inscrire à la formation au pilotage, ainsi que l'absence de certitude quant à la carrière malgré cet investissement. Les femmes en particulier ont soulevé des préoccupations concernant leur capacité de s'intégrer dans un univers dominé par les hommes et d'atteindre un bon équilibre travail-famille. La rareté des modèles féminins dans l'aviation n'apaise pas leurs préoccupations.

Devant une telle pénurie, notre industrie cherche des solutions qui lui permettront de produire plus rapidement un plus grand nombre de pilotes. À cette fin, nous allons établir de nouveaux types de partenariats entre les exploitants de flotte et les fournisseurs de formation de sorte qu'il y ait de meilleurs liens entre les écoles de pilotage et les compagnies aériennes qui accueilleront au bout du compte ces étudiants. De nouveaux systèmes de formation qui font un meilleur usage des données et des analyses en temps réel facilitent la progression vers la formation axée sur les compétences. Nous profitons de l'IA et de l'analyse des mégadonnées.

La présidente:

Je suis désolée de vous interrompre, mais je vais vous demander de ralentir un peu. Je comprends que vous n'ayez que cinq minutes, mais les interprètes doivent…

M. Joseph Armstrong:

Oui. Pas de problème.

Je vais modérer mes transports. Il y a beaucoup d'information.

La présidente:

Merci.

M. Joseph Armstrong:

L'été dernier, de concert avec le gouvernement du Canada et le gouvernement du Québec, CAE a annoncé un projet de transformation numérique visant à développer la prochaine génération de solutions de formation. Nous investirons 1 milliard de dollars en innovation sur les cinq prochaines années, ce qui représente l'un des plus importants investissements de ce genre dans le secteur de la formation au pilotage à l'échelle mondiale.

Outre la technologie et l'amélioration de la formation, le véritable enjeu est d'attirer les étudiants et d'améliorer la diversité afin d'augmenter le bassin de talents pour l'aviation civile. Par exemple, grâce au programme de bourses Women in Flight lancé récemment par CAE, nous allons accorder un maximum de cinq bourses complètes à des femmes qu'une carrière comme pilote professionnelle passionne et qui souhaitent devenir des modèles.

Il faut des incitatifs afin de stimuler la production de pilotes pour le marché civil et le marché militaire, ainsi que pour compenser les coûts élevés associés aux frais de scolarité, aux investissements dans l'infrastructure et à la nécessité de faire évoluer la technologie de manière à optimiser la formation. Il faut que les investissements soient axés sur des aspects comme les bourses d'études à mettre en place à l'appui de la formation de pilotes au Canada, pour les étudiants et les cadets; l'infrastructure requise à l'appui d'une meilleure capacité de formation au pilotage; l'engagement à l'égard de la formation et de la simulation comme capacités industrielles clés; et l'IA et la formation axée sur les compétences.

Nous encourageons le Canada à augmenter le financement et à soutenir directement la formation au pilotage, puisqu'il s'agit d'un élément unique de notre héritage qu'il faut maintenir comme moteur économique clé de la croissance au Canada et à l'étranger, et comme domaine d'intérêt clé pour les jeunes Canadiens qui pourraient devenir membres du milieu mondial de l'aéronautique.

Merci beaucoup.

(1220)

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Armstrong.

C'est maintenant à Mme Super, de Super T Aviation.

Mme Terri Super (directrice générale, Super T Aviation):

Madame la présidente, c'est avec grand plaisir que je présente au Comité les préoccupations et les défis des écoles de pilotage au Canada. En tant que pilote en chef de Super T Aviation à Medecine Hat, en Alberta, j'ai accumulé plus de 13 000 heures de vol régulier et nolisé, d'évacuation médicale et de formation. J'ai remis au Comité un mémoire qui expose nos recommandations, mais j'aimerais souligner trois catégories que j'aimerais qu'il prenne en considération: l'aide aux étudiants, le maintien en poste des instructeurs et l'aide pour les écoles de pilotage.

Pour suivre la formation requise en vue de devenir pilote professionnel, un étudiant doit débourser entre 75 000 et 85 000 $, ce qui ne tient pas compte de ses frais de subsistance. Le manque ou l'absence de financement est souvent la raison pour laquelle les étudiants décrochent ou ne peuvent pas envisager une carrière en aviation. Nous demandons donc une hausse du financement et de l'aide provenant du gouvernement pour l'entraînement au vol. Les étudiants pourront ainsi obtenir du financement auprès du gouvernement ou dans le cadre d'un processus commercial et éliminer un obstacle majeur auquel se heurtent les Canadiens qui souhaitent devenir pilotes.

La modification du programme de subventions canadien et provincial pour permettre aux écoles de pilotage d'obtenir des fonds afin de former des employés sans devoir recourir aux services d'un tiers éliminerait un autre obstacle auquel se heurtent les pilotes qui veulent améliorer leurs compétences. La plupart des écoles de pilotage sont les seules à donner de la formation à un aéroport. Pour recevoir une formation avancée grâce à ce programme fédéral d'aide, ces pilotes doivent se rendre à l'aéroport d'une autre ville pour suivre une formation qui peut durer de un à six mois.

Le maintien en poste d'instructeurs de vol expérimentés est devenu un problème majeur du réseau des écoles de pilotage. Auparavant, les écoles de pilotage encadraient les instructeurs de vol pendant un an et demi à deux ans avant qu'ils passent aux appareils plus grands et plus rapides d'un affréteur ou à de petits exploitants de lignes aériennes, mais maintenant, la progression peut ne prendre que quelques mois. Cela exerce d'énormes pressions sur les écoles de pilotage, qui doivent constamment former et inscrire de nouveaux étudiants. Cela crée aussi un problème de sécurité, car des pilotes inexpérimentés se concentrent sur le passage à leur prochain emploi et finissent par piloter des appareils plus complexes sans avoir assez d'expérience.

Pour remédier à la situation, je recommande que le gouvernement offre aux instructeurs une exonération du remboursement des dettes semblable à ce qui est offert aux médecins qui travaillent dans des régions rurales et éloignées. Je recommande aussi l'adoption d'une mesure législative semblable à celle des États-Unis, où les pilotes doivent obtenir un minimum de 1 500 heures d'expérience de vol avant de pouvoir travailler pour les grandes compagnies aériennes. Ce genre de règles aideraient non seulement les écoles de pilotage, mais aussi les petits affréteurs et les personnes qui mènent des opérations d'évaluation sanitaire.

Nous devons aider les écoles de pilotage. Elles sont l'épine dorsale de l'industrie aérienne et ne peuvent pas répondre à la demande, compte tenu du coût élevé de la formation qui est en partie attribuable à une politique gouvernementale. Les aéronefs brûlent des combustibles fossiles, et c'est une dure réalité. Le carburant est une des principales dépenses d'une école de pilotage. De toute évidence, ce sont les étudiants qui assument cette dépense lorsqu'ils payent leurs frais d'instruction.

Pour contribuer à diminuer le coût de leur formation, nous recommandons ce qui suit au gouvernement fédéral: premièrement, exonérer les écoles de pilotage de la taxe sur le carbone, qui a fait ou qui fera augmenter considérablement le coût de la formation; deuxièmement, remettre la taxe d'accise fédérale sur le carburant pour les appareils d'instruction; troisièmement, appuyer la mise au point de biocarburants de remplacement pour les aéronefs ou d'appareils électriques; et quatrièmement, aider les écoles de pilotage à financer l'équipement spécialisé nécessaire à la formation de vol, y compris des dispositifs d'entraînement au vol communément appelés des simulateurs. Ces dispositifs permettent d'accroître les compétences et l'expérience dans un environnement contrôlé, mais ils coûtent de l'argent, habituellement beaucoup plus que ce que coûtent les autres immobilisations d'une école de pilotage.

En conclusion, différents témoins ayant comparu ici ont déjà donné à votre comité des chiffres sur la pénurie de pilotes. Ces chiffres et la pénurie sont réels. Les écoles de pilotage ont pour mission de former des pilotes professionnels fiables et capables de piloter en toute sécurité. Elles doivent en former de plus en plus d'une part pour répondre à la demande de l'industrie, et d'autre part pour assurer son expansion. Cela ne peut être possible qu'au moyen d'une collaboration entre le gouvernement et l'industrie aérienne en vue de fournir aux étudiants, aux instructeurs et aux écoles de pilotage les ressources et l'aide dont ils ont besoin.

Merci beaucoup du temps que vous m'avez accordé. Je suis impatiente de répondre à vos questions.

(1225)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Go Green Aviation. Monsieur Ogden, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Gary Ogden (directeur général, Go Green Aviation):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les membres du Comité et les autres témoins.

Je m'appelle Gary Ogden — Gary Douglas Ogden, au cas où ma mère regarderait — et j'aimerais parler dans une perspective plus large. Mon collègue, Mike Rocha, un cadre de notre école de pilotage, s'adressera à votre comité le 19. J'aimerais aborder des aspects de notre entreprise et présenter une analyse d'une possible cause première de la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons actuellement.

Je viens du monde des aéroports, des compagnies aériennes et des fournisseurs de services au sol dans l'industrie aérienne. Je me suis rendu à l'aéroport à vélo en 1979 et je ne suis pas revenu à la maison depuis. J'ai commencé comme gardien de sécurité et je suis devenu PDG. L'entreprise et l'industrie comptent beaucoup pour nous tous, et elles offrent des possibilités.

J'ai cinq grands clients — y compris Aura Airlink, qui mènera ses activités au Central North Flying Club — qui ont tous de la difficulté à trouver des gens et à les maintenir en poste, ce qui me préoccupe. Nous faisons face à l'ennemi de l'attrition et du roulement dans le domaine de l'aviation.

J'ai travaillé à l'étranger, à des aéroports à Achkhabad, au Turkménistan, aux États-Unis et un peu partout. J'ai choisi de travailler au Canada parce que je suis fier de notre industrie aérienne, et comme mon collègue le dit, nous donnons de la formation depuis très longtemps. La formation que nous offrons est d'ailleurs reconnue mondialement. Je voulais, entre autres, travailler dans une école de pilotage au Canada avec Aura et le Central North Flying Club compte tenu de notre réputation et parce que nous devrions être en mesure d'attirer des étudiants du pays, et nous devrions très bien réussir à attirer aussi des étudiants internationaux.

Nous faisons ce travail pour deux raisons, dont une qui est holistique. Ces raisons existent encore. J'ai écouté mes collègues en parler plus tôt. Il y a des raisons holistiques de faire ce travail. Nous voyons une pénurie et nous voulons y remédier. Nous voulons accommoder le point de vue exprimé par l'OACI, l'IATA et l'ATAC, ainsi que tous les autres experts de l'industrie qui disent que le secteur est en croissance. Nous voulons accommoder cette croissance. Nous voulons faciliter l'accès aux régions. Nous ne voulons pas le perdre à défaut d'y offrir des services aériens. Nous voulons également desservir nos collectivités éloignées et nos peuples autochtones comme elles le méritent. Nous voulons construire des ponts et survoler les obstacles. Nous voulons le faire globalement, mais la réalité économique nous rattrape: les chiffres n'arrivent pas. Les compagnies aériennes et l'industrie proprement dite sont aux prises avec un certain nombre de problèmes. Le prix d'un billet aujourd'hui est probablement aussi faible ou peut-être moins élevé que dans les années 1980, mais les coûts que nous assumons sont beaucoup plus élevés.

Le Central North Flying Club prévoit offrir ses services à Sudbury. Un aéroport régional doit se démener pour attirer l'attention du gouvernement. Je salue M. Fuhr et les efforts du gouvernement actuel et des précédents pour remédier en partie à ce problème. Dans le secteur aérien en général, le problème aux aéroports régionaux est qu'ils ne génèrent pas de revenus. Ils ne sont généralement pas rentables. Au mieux, ils sont sans incidence sur les recettes. Nous n'avons pas de boutiques hors taxes. Nous n'avons pas de stationnement. Nous n'avons pas de revenus non aéronautiques pour soutenir l'aéroport.

Kelly, qui, je crois, n'est pas là pour l'instant, a mentionné le PAIA. Nous devons en faire plus pour les aéroports régionaux où se trouvent les écoles de pilotage afin d'éviter qu'elles soient accablées par l'infrastructure des aéroports. Nous devons voir les écoles de pilotage, les évacuations sanitaires, les affréteurs, le transport aérien de passagers et la formation comme étant essentiels, comme étant avantageux dans la filière de l'industrie aérienne.

Pour faire une analogie avec le hockey, il faut voir les écoles comme un club-école. À défaut d'en avoir un, de préparer la relève, on est voué à l'échec. Nous devons soutenir le club-école, les écoles de pilotage, et nous devons soutenir l'aviation régionale de notre mieux.

(1230)



Je vous remercie tous, car il y a un certain nombre d'initiatives comme des prêts, des programmes visant l'embauche d'étudiants et des études d'impact sur le marché du travail. Nous avons un certain nombre d'initiatives. Quant à ce que j'aimerais voir — j'en ai parlé avec mon ami, le député Sikand —, peut-être que nous devrions mieux diffuser notre information. Il y a peut-être des programmes, mais ils ne sont peut-être pas regroupés ni accessibles, ce qui signifie qu'une personne en difficulté... et que Dieu bénisse notre ami qui a repris une école de pilotage au moment où on pensait qu'elle allait fermer.

Nous pouvons peut-être faire quelque chose sur le plan de l'accès à l'information, peut-être même en visant des cibles faciles. Il faut donner aux gens l'information dont ils peuvent se servir pour avoir accès aux fonds à votre disposition. De plus, nous devons augmenter le financement et élargir les initiatives à cette fin.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Ogden.

Nous allons commencer les questions des députés.

Monsieur Falk, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Merci à tous les témoins du Comité. Vos témoignages sont très intéressants.

Madame Super, j'aimerais vous poser quelques questions.

J'ai obtenu mon brevet de pilote il y a environ 20 ans. J'ai mon brevet de pilote privé et un peu plus de 800 heures de vol à mon actif.

À l'époque, je pensais que cela coûtait cher. J'étais très frustré de ne pas pouvoir déclarer cela comme des dépenses engagées pour poursuivre mes études. Ce n'était aucunement déductible d'impôt pour moi. J'ai parlé à l'entreprise, Harv's Air, responsable de notre école de pilotage locale, celle où j'ai suivi ma formation.

Mon instructrice était une femme d'environ 20 ans ma cadette. Cela ne m'a posé aucun problème, ni à elle non plus. Elle a fait un excellent travail. Son nom est Dana Chepil, pour lui faire un petit salut. Je pense qu'elle est maintenant examinatrice.

Je pensais à l'époque que le coût était prohibitif. Lorsque j'ai parlé aux gens de mon école de pilotage au cours des dernières semaines, ils ont dit qu'il est extrêmement difficile de maintenir les instructeurs en poste. Vous avez mentionné certaines choses, mais que seraient selon vous la mesure ou les deux mesures que vous pourriez prendre pour maintenir en poste les instructeurs? Vous avez parlé d'augmenter le nombre d'heures à 1 500 avant qu'ils puissent piloter des avions commerciaux. Ce n'est probablement pas une mauvaise idée, car la plupart d'entre eux ne sont instructeurs que pour accumuler les heures afin de travailler pour un transporteur quelque part, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Terri Super:

Oui, c'est vrai. Les écoles de pilotage sont depuis longtemps au bas de l'échelle. Les instructeurs passent habituellement à autre chose. Il serait formidable de pouvoir faire revenir des capitaines des compagnies aériennes. Nous discutons actuellement avec les gens de WestJet, l'un des transporteurs aériens, pour voir s'il serait possible qu'ils nous prêtent un de leurs pilotes, ne serait-ce qu'un ou deux jours par mois, ce qui serait vraiment un bon point de départ.

Je ne pense pas qu'on puisse un jour régler le problème. On peut donner plus d'argent aux instructeurs — des salaires plus élevés —, mais il s'agit surtout de jeunes qui veulent piloter les grands appareils, ce qui explique pourquoi on peut seulement les retenir pendant une courte période de temps.

Je crois que c'est ici qu'une sorte d'exonération de remboursement du prêt d'études pourrait constituer un incitatif, car les prêts de ces étudiants sont considérables. Cela pourrait les inciter à rester plus longtemps dans le domaine de l'instruction et à acquérir plus d'expérience avant d'occuper un autre emploi.

M. Ted Falk:

Je ne sais pas quelle est votre situation avec les pilotes ou les pilotes potentiels que vous attirez, s'ils viennent du pays ou de l'étranger. Je sais toutefois que Harv's Air à Steinbach attire beaucoup d'étudiants internationaux, mais pas autant qui viennent du pays.

Je propose tout le temps à des jeunes de se tourner vers l'aviation et d'obtenir un brevet de pilote. La principale raison pour expliquer leur refus n'est pas qu'ils ne sont pas intéressés et que ce n'est pas excitant, c'est le coût. L'une des choses qui augmente le coût de façon marquée, et je le sais parce que je pilote un avion — mon appareil Mooney ne vole pas le réservoir vide —, c'est le coût du carburant.

Vous avez parlé un peu de la taxe sur le carbone, de ce que c'est et de ce que cela sera. Pas plus tard que la semaine dernière, le Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada a publié une déclaration dans laquelle il mentionne deux études qu'il a réalisées en 2018 et qui montrent les répercussions négatives sur l'industrie aérienne de la taxe sur le carbone, tant pour le transport des voyageurs que pour les écoles de pilotage, sans qu'il n'y ait vraiment d'effet mesurable sur la réduction des émissions. Pouvez-vous dire ce que vous en pensez?

(1235)

Mme Terri Super:

La taxe sur le carbone que nous avons déjà en Alberta, et elle est considérable, augmente les coûts.

Nous avons besoin de l'infrastructure. Nous avons besoin des transporteurs aériens. Tout le monde veut voler. Vous prenez tous l'avion pour rentrer chez vous les fins de semaine. Nous devons fournir ce service.

L'idée que la taxe sur le carbone aidera les gens à réduire la consommation de combustibles fossiles ne fonctionnera pas pour une école de pilotage. Plus nous avons d'étudiants, plus nous consommerons de carburant.

La seule chose que je vois et qui a un grand potentiel est le recours à la simulation. À notre école, nous donnons aux étudiants un cours intégré. Nous avons deux simulateurs. Ce sont des dispositifs d'entraînement au vol. Ils ne bougent pas, mais ils simulent très bien le vol. Nous ne pouvons toutefois pas nous servir de toute la formation donnée ainsi pour accorder des brevets.

M. Ted Falk:

De plus, des témoins nous ont dit que les simulateurs coûtent très cher, et vous devez aussi recouvrer le coût d'une certaine façon. Il pourrait peut-être y avoir des programmes pour vous aider à examiner cette possibilité.

Mme Terri Super:

Une sorte de contribution gouvernementale de contrepartie...

M. Ted Falk:

Il ne me reste que huit secondes, mais si vous avez l'occasion de parler un peu des besoins en infrastructure aux aéroports municipaux ou privés, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

La présidente:

Veuillez être très brefs.

Mme Terri Super:

Je crains de ne pas être qualifié pour parler de l'infrastructure aux aéroports.

M. Ted Falk:

C'est bien. Merci.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Madame Super, pendant la transition du premier groupe de témoins au deuxième, vous avez rencontré Mme Farly, qui vient de ma circonscription. Il était intéressant d'apprendre à connaître l'autre femme propriétaire d'un aéroport. Je tenais juste à le souligner; vous n'en avez pas parlé dans votre déclaration liminaire.

Y a-t-il des observations du groupe précédent de témoins dont vous voulez parler? Vous avez dit au début que vous en aviez l'intention et que des aspects de nos discussions précédentes vous préoccupaient.

Mme Terri Super:

Oui. Si je peux me le rappeler... Je commence à être vieille, et il me faut donc un peu de temps pour...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bon. Un plan de vol est nécessaire.

Je vais passer à M. Ogden pour une seconde. Vous avez parlé du fardeau attribuable aux coûts de l'infrastructure des écoles de pilotage. Pouvez-vous parler plus en détail de ces coûts et donner les chiffres réels?

M. Gary Ogden:

Je ne peux pas vous donner de chiffres précis, parce que je suis certain qu'ils varient d'un aéroport à l'autre, mais il y a les frais d'entreposage en hangar, puis il y a tout l'environnement contrôlé de l'aéroport, qui doit être maintenu pour garantir la sûreté et la sécurité. On voit des instructeurs de vol faire le dégivrage des avions, pousser les dégivreurs manuellement ou mécaniquement, ajouter de l'huile aux moteurs ou faire toutes sortes de travaux d'entretien alors qu'ils sont censés enseigner le pilotage, parce que l'argent manque. Encore une fois, c'est un cercle vicieux qui nuit au travail des instructeurs de vol.

Je peux vous parler un peu plus de Sudbury, puisque nous occupons des installations là-bas. Les coûts d'entreposage des aéronefs dans des hangars pour les protéger des intempéries, quand les conditions météorologiques sont exactement celles que nous connaissons actuellement, sont non négligeables.

Les coûts de dégivrage des aéroports sont aussi non négligeables. Notre entreprise n'utilise simplement pas les grands aéroports, donc nous n'avons pas accès aux avantages des grandes installations centrales et nous sommes forcés d'acheter du matériel de dégivrage. Je pense qu'il y a même une étude qui a été publiée il y a quelques semaines, qui fait état d'un manque de capacité et de services de dégivrage dans les aéroports du Nord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, il y a beaucoup d'écoles de pilotage qui utilisent des pistes gazonnées, par exemple, où il y a très peu d'infrastructure à proprement parler.

M. Gary Ogden:

Souvent, nous devons attendre un dégel ou... En fait, nous avons envisagé d'utiliser la piste de Brampton, mais nous aurions besoin d'avoir accès à de meilleures installations, des installations qui coûtent plus cher, malheureusement. À Sudbury, il y a un deuxième aéroport, adjacent au premier, que nous pouvons utiliser pour augmenter notre nombre d'heures de vol.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que j'en ai une photo.

Par curiosité, à quoi correspond la référence Go Green?

M. Gary Ogden:

Go Green est l'entreprise que j'ai fondée il y a déjà de nombreuses années pour le nettoyage et l'écologisation des aéroports.

Je participe personnellement à diverses initiatives. L'une d'elles vise à électrifier davantage l'aire de trafic de l'aéroport, l'idée étant encore une fois de la nettoyer et de la rendre plus écologique et donc, plus sûre pour notre personnel. C'est donc la société de portefeuille qui est le consultant principal, mais je travaille également avec Aura et l'école de pilotage.

(1240)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, merci.

Madame Super, je reviens à vous.

Vous avez parlé du coût du carburant dans votre exposé. Les écoles de pilotage louent habituellement des avions avec services. Quand on loue un avion, on le loue avec services. Pouvez-vous expliquer à ceux qui ne s'y connaissent pas ce que cela signifie et si cette façon de faire est viable à long terme?

Mme Terri Super:

Quand l'avion est loué avec services, cela signifie que le réservoir de carburant est plein. Si un étudiant ou un locataire utilise l'un de nos avions, le carburant est compris. S'il doit faire le plein dans un autre aéroport, nous le rembourserons selon notre grille de prix. Nous ne lui rembourserons pas la différence s'il achète du carburant à un prix plus élevé dans un autre aéroport.

Certaines écoles fonctionnent différemment. Certains exploitants le font parce que le prix du carburant d'aviation varie beaucoup d'une semaine à l'autre, comme le prix de l'essence à la pompe, d'ailleurs. L'avion sera donc loué à la personne avec un réservoir vide, et pour chaque vol, on calculera la quantité de carburant utilisé, puis le coût du carburant sera ajouté au prix du vol.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela semble représenter beaucoup de paperasse supplémentaire pour déterminer de combien de carburant on aura besoin.

Mme Terri Super:

Oui, et c'est la raison pour laquelle beaucoup d'écoles préféreront louer des avions avec services.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est logique.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Graham.

Passons à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être avec nous ce matin. Leurs témoignages sont éclairants.

Ma question s'adresse à vous, madame Bell. Dans une industrie où la situation semble assez complexe, vous avez mis le doigt sur un problème dont tous les témoins nous parlent, c'est-à-dire les coûts de formation pour les étudiants qui choisissent cette carrière.

Ce qui m'apparaît problématique, c'est que les modèles semblent différents d'une province à l'autre, voire d'un territoire à l'autre. Par exemple, au Québec, un milieu que je connais davantage puisque j'y suis, on a la possibilité d'une école totalement privée qui répond aux normes de Transports Canada ou d'une école intégrée au réseau scolaire collégial, notamment.

Y a-t-il un modèle sur lequel il faudrait s'aligner, au Québec, pour tenter une certaine harmonisation et, par le fait même, voir quelles sont les répercussions sur les coûts de la formation? [Traduction]

Mme Heather Bell:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Oui. S'il y avait un modèle plus uniforme au pays, je pense que la formation serait simplifiée d'une province à l'autre. Le problème que je soulevais concerne l'accès à du financement étudiant et les écarts qui existent d'une province à l'autre.

Je ne connais pas très bien la façon dont les centres d'entraînement fonctionnent dans les différentes provinces, mais je sais que l'Association du transport aérien du Canada a proposé un modèle d'accréditation des organisations de formation pour uniformiser la formation. À l'heure actuelle, la réglementation canadienne en matière d'aviation régit le nombre d'heures requises pour qu'un apprenti pilote puisse recevoir une quelconque forme de licence. Je pense que certains critères devraient être revus, ainsi que la comptabilisation du temps de formation. Comme d'autres l'ont dit, il serait également très pertinent de doter les centres d'entraînement d'un simulateur, mais à l'heure actuelle, la réglementation ne permet pas d'utiliser beaucoup de temps passé dans des simulateurs pour obtenir une licence. Bref, ce serait effectivement très utile d'uniformiser la réglementation fédérale. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie de ces informations.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à M. Ogden.

Monsieur Ogden, le nom de votre entreprise, Go Green Aviation, est inspirant. Dans une autre étude sur le bruit entourant les grands aéroports, nous avons constaté la difficulté de cohabitation de l'aviation et de la société civile.

Est-il possible maintenant de former des pilotes au moyen d'avions électriques dont le coût d'achat serait comparable à celui d'avions à essence?

M. Gary Ogden:

Merci, monsieur Aubin.[Traduction]

Je crois fermement que tout ce qui peut améliorer l'intendance environnementale dans les aéroports sera positif. Je ne crois pas nécessairement qu'il faille suivre l'exemple de l'Europe, ni même de certains États américains, dans ce que nous faisons au Canada, parce que je pense que nous devons nous-mêmes donner l'exemple et non le suivre.

Le recours à une solution hors vol qui ne consommerait pas de carburant serait positif. Je pense que les simulateurs font certainement partie de la réponse. L'utilisation de simulateurs et d'outils d'entraînement au sol pourrait nous aider à réduire les problèmes d'accessibilité à la carrière nationale de pilote et à diminuer la fatigue. Il est vrai que les entreprises ne veulent pas que leurs pilotes volent pendant leurs quatre journées de congé ou tout autre congé, mais les systèmes hors vol et les autres aides au pilotage comme les simulateurs pourraient être utiles à bien des égards. C'est beaucoup plus sûr, plus écologique, et nous aurions alors accès à un plus grand nombre d'instructeurs de vol.

Je m'excuse de ne pas vous parler davantage des avions électriques. Cela ne fait pas partie de mes compétences.

(1245)

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez 30 secondes. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'espère que nous aurons l'occasion de vous entendre davantage à ce sujet.

Monsieur Armstrong, j'aimerais que vous parliez de cette nouvelle entente avec le Québec concernant le développement numérique de la formation des pilotes. [Traduction]

M. Joseph Armstrong:

Je ne connais pas bien l'entente dont vous parlez, à moins que vous ne fassiez allusion à l'entente conclue avec le gouvernement du Québec et le gouvernement fédéral sur l'innovation et les investissements dans la formation numérique.

Je pense que le plus grand changement à s'être opéré au cours de la dernière dizaine d'années, environ, c'est l'avancement important des sciences de l'éducation et l'application des nouvelles données scientifiques sur l'apprentissage pour mieux comprendre comment nous pouvons utiliser nos ressources aux divers stades de la formation de pilote. L'idée est qu'on puisse se doter de programmes plus efficaces, optimisés et adaptés pour permettre aux candidats d'atteindre le niveau de compétence voulu par d'autres moyens que le pilotage direct d'un avion.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Armstrong.

Passons à M. Sikand.

Vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je commencerai par poser une question à M. Ogden.

Vous avez mentionné quelques mots clés politiques selon moi: l'international et le fait de choisir le Canada. J'aime souvent combiner les deux.

Vous avez affirmé que l'ennemi des écoles de pilotage était l'attrition. Comment se fait-il que nous n'arrivions pas à recruter à l'international des instructeurs qualifiés pour participer à la formation des pilotes canadiens?

M. Gary Ogden:

Monsieur Sikand, c'est une très bonne idée.

Nous avons fait nos devoirs et souhaitons ajouter un volet international à notre école de pilotage. Le grand enjeu sera la reconnaissance des anciennes normes et des titres de compétences dans toutes sortes de domaines au Canada.

Je ne suis pas vraiment en faveur d'un abaissement des normes, mais je suis pour la reconnaissance des normes existantes. Si les étudiants et les instructeurs de vol d'autres pays du monde pouvaient nous aider à combler nos besoins et qu'il suffisait de reconnaître les équivalences, alors la balle est dans notre camp. Allons-y, parce que cette solution pourrait être très avantageuse.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

J'ai moins de temps que d'ordinaire, donc je m'adresserai maintenant à Mme Super.

Vous avez mentionné la tarification de la pollution et son incidence sur les coûts de fonctionnement. Si les écoles de pilotage et les lignes aériennes les plus petites étaient exclues d'un premier programme, mais que les grands transporteurs se faisaient imposer un tarif, qui serait assorti d'une réduction au fur et à mesure qu'ils améliorent leur technologie et leur écoefficacité pour réduire leur empreinte environnementale, seriez-vous favorable à l'idée?

Mme Terri Super:

Je vous entends à peine.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je m'excuse.

Vous avez mentionné le carbone, les taxes et leur incidence sur les activités. Si les petits transporteurs et les petites écoles de pilotage étaient exclus du programme initial, mais que les plus grands se faisaient imposer une taxe, qui serait également assortie d'une réduction au fur et à mesure qu'ils gagnent en efficacité et réduisent leur empreinte carbone, seriez-vous favorable à ce modèle?

Mme Terri Super:

Oui, ce pourrait être réaliste, les tarifs pourraient baisser au fur et à mesure que la technologie s'améliore, grâce aux simulateurs ou aux avions électriques, par exemple. Nous n'en sommes pas encore vraiment à l'étape où il soit possible de les utiliser dans une école de pilotage. La pile ne permet pas de voler assez longtemps encore. Les écoles de pilotage doivent assujettir les pilotes débutants à un vol national d'au moins 150 milles nautiques, et je crois qu'il n'y a pas encore d'avion électrique qui puisse voler aussi longtemps en continu. Je pense que ce serait faisable quand les avions électriques le permettront.

Pour ce qui est des simulateurs, je crois qu'il faut modifier la réglementation pour changer le nombre d'heures d'utilisation possible d'un simulateur. Si c'est possible, cela aiderait beaucoup. Pour obtenir une licence de pilote professionnel, il faut cumuler 25 heures de temps aux instruments, dont seulement 10 peuvent être cumulées dans un simulateur ou un dispositif d'entraînement au vol. Si l'on pouvait augmenter le nombre d'heures de formation en simulateur, cela aiderait beaucoup à réduire notre empreinte carbone, évidemment.

(1250)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Je vous arrête. Je profiterai des 30 secondes qu'il me reste pour poser rapidement une question à Mme Bell.

Si le gouvernement subventionnait la formation des apprentis pilotes en échange d'une obligation de service au Canada ou peut-être pour les transporteurs aériens canadiens, serait-ce possible? Seriez-vous ouverte à une formule du genre?

Mme Heather Bell:

Absolument. L'une des recommandations serait que le gouvernement accorde une exonération du remboursement de prêt étudiant pour le temps passé comme instructeur de vol ou comme pilote dans une communauté nordique éloignée. Vous avez sûrement beaucoup entendu parler du mal qu'ont les écoles à conserver leurs instructeurs.

J'ai également peur qu'ici, en Colombie-Britannique, les services aux communautés éloignées soient parmi les premiers à souffrir d'une diminution du nombre de pilotes. Je crains que des incidents malheureux se produisent.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Bell.

Passons à M. Fuhr.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Je remercie nos témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je remercie particulièrement Mme Bell. J'ai utilisé votre lettre. J'en ai reçu des dizaines sur le même sujet, et j'ai utilisé la vôtre intégralement dans mes observations à la Chambre.

Il y a une question qui n'a pas encore été soulevée, c'est-à-dire que nous perdons énormément de nos ressources limitées parce que des entités étrangères achètent des écoles de pilotage canadiennes ou que des étudiants étrangers viennent suivre une formation dans nos écoles, puis repartent tout de suite après. J'aimerais vous entendre à ce sujet.

Madame Bell, pouvez-vous nous en parler un peu?

Mme Heather Bell:

ll faut dire qu'en Colombie-Britannique, il y a un très grand nombre d'étudiants étrangers. Quand j'en parle avec mes collègues exploitants d'unités de formation au pilotage, ils n'y voient aucun problème, puisque ces étudiants ne prennent pas la place d'autres étudiants. Le plus difficile, c'est d'attirer les étudiants canadiens. Il peut y avoir des gens dans l'unité de formation qui ont une expérience différente, mais ici, en Colombie-Britannique, il y a peu d'inscriptions.

Il y a un autre problème aussi. Je dois mentionner l'immigration et la difficulté d'embaucher des pilotes d'autres pays. Certains de nos membres aimeraient beaucoup en embaucher, mais se heurtent aux règles d'immigration qui dictent que les pilotes immigrant au Canada respectent les normes de pilotage prescrites par règlement, mais il n'y a pas véritablement de cadre prescrivant comment on peut recruter des pilotes à l'étranger.

Les pilotes sont considérés un peu comme les ingénieurs. Il faudrait leur garantir 40 heures par semaine, du lundi au vendredi, mais ce n'est pas le genre d'horaire qu'on peut offrir aux pilotes. Je tenais à le dire. Quoi qu'il en soit, nous ne voyons pas l'inscription d'étudiants étrangers comme un problème, pas plus que nous ne considérons qu'ils prennent la place d'étudiants canadiens.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Armstrong, l'armée s'est-elle penchée sur la forme que prendra la formation des équipages aériens à l'avenir, sur la façon dont elle sera donnée? Croyez-vous qu'en raison du besoin national et international de pilotes, la formation pourrait être conçue de manière à intégrer des étudiants civils ou à répondre d'abord au besoin accru de pilotes de l'armée, mais à permettre l'inclusion de civils quand les besoins de l'armée sont moins grands? C'est complexe, et ce n'est pas la façon de faire habituelle, mais compte tenu de la situation actuelle et des besoins futurs, croyez-vous que ce serait possible? Quelle forme cela pourrait-il prendre, d'après vous?

M. Joseph Armstrong:

Si l'on regarde le centre d'entraînement en vol de l'OTAN, au Canada, qui est le programme d'entraînement en vol de l'armée, à l'heure actuelle, il a été créé dans un contexte de contribution internationale et de participation internationale dès le départ. En ce moment, il faut notamment essayer de générer des revenus pour subventionner ses coûts de fonctionnement. Ils sont élevés, parce que les aéronefs militaires ne coûtent pas la même chose que les aéronefs civils.

Je pense que nous devons viser l'établissement de programmes de formation au pilotage sur mesure, parce que s'il y a des coûts de base fixes inévitables pour offrir de la formation... Si ces coûts de base fixes me permettent d'offrir toutes sortes de programmes différents, je serai beaucoup mieux en mesure d'amortir mes coûts, parce que je pourrai accepter des étudiants de l'extérieur, qu'il s'agisse de civils ou d'étudiants étrangers.

Je pense vraiment que les Canadiens doivent adopter une perspective globale — et c'est nettement la mentalité dans notre entreprise. C'est la clé de notre succès dans le monde et la solution à nos problèmes. Si l'on analyse la situation sans tenir compte de tout l'écosystème de la formation au pilotage, on ne verra qu'une facette du problème, alors que la solution est beaucoup plus large.

Pensons seulement à la question des étudiants étrangers au Canada. On se demande si leur présence ici pose problème ou s'il est possible de faire venir des instructeurs étrangers au Canada pour venir en aide aux instructeurs canadiens, mais renversons la prémisse. La demande pour la production de pilotes et la formation de pilote est tellement grande dans le monde qu'elle accapare des ressources canadiennes.

D'autres avant moi ont dit qu'il fallait mettre l'accent sur un certain nombre de choses. Il faudrait premièrement concevoir des programmes de formation sur mesure fondés sur les compétences et deuxièmement, vraiment mettre l'accent sur notre aptitude à recruter des étudiants actifs.

(1255)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Armstrong.

Merci, monsieur Fuhr.

Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Block pendant quatre minutes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci infiniment, madame la présidente. Je tiens à vous remercier, comme je remercie le Comité de son indulgence, puisque je saisirai l'occasion pour déposer une motion sur la sécurité aérienne, que les membres du Comité ont reçue le 2 janvier.

Je vais vous faire un bref historique. Il y a presque deux ans, le 8 juin 2017, Alex, un jeune homme de 21 ans, a loué avec sa petite amie Sidney un monomoteur Piper Warrior d'une école de pilotage de Lethbridge, en Alberta, pour se rendre à Kamloops, en Colombie-Britannique. Alex, un pilote certifié, était aux commandes de l'avion, et Sidney en était l'unique passagère. Après s'être ravitaillés à Cranbrook, ils sont partis, mais ne sont jamais arrivés à destination. On les a cherchés pendant 11 jours sur un vaste territoire. Pendant cette période de 11 jours, 18 aéronefs de recherche et de sauvetage civils et de l'Aviation royale canadienne ont été mobilisés pendant 576 heures au total et ont parcouru environ 37 513 kilomètres carrés. En moyenne, 10 aéronefs ont été déployés chaque jour, de même que plus de 70 membres de l'Aviation royale canadienne et 137 pilotes et observateurs bénévoles de recherche et de sauvetage civils. Malgré cette vaste mission de recherche et de sauvetage, ils n'ont pas réussi à trouver Alex, Sidney et l'avion. Ce n'est qu'à la fin de cette vaste opération que le père et la belle-mère d'Alex, Matthew Simons et Natalie Lindgren, ont été avisés du fait que l'émetteur de localisation d'urgence (ELT) à bord de l'aéronef ne s'était pas activé, ce qui rendait l'avion impossible à localiser. Malheureusement, c'est ce qui arrive dans 38 % des cas d'écrasement.

Les ELT sont des appareils de localisation d'urgence installés à bord de la plupart des aéronefs. En cas d'écrasement, ils envoient des signaux de détresse sur des fréquences désignées pour aider les équipes de recherche et de sauvetage à localiser l'aéronef et ses passagers. Les ELT utilisent deux fréquences: celle de 121,5 mégahertz et celle de 406 mégahertz.

Depuis 2009, les ELT 121,5 mégahertz ne sont plus surveillés par satellite, si bien qu'ils ne sont plus opérants, sauf qu'ils demeurent obligatoires. En juin 2016, le Bureau de la sécurité des transports a présenté sept recommandations en vue de la modernisation des ELT, mais aucune n'a encore été suivie à ce jour. Dans bien des accidents d'aéronefs, l'ELT est endommagé au point de ne plus pouvoir émettre de signaux de détresse. Par conséquent, bien des aéronefs légers ne sont jamais retrouvés. C'est ce qui est arrivé dans le cas d'Alex et de Sidney, comme dans bien d'autres.

Grâce à cette motion, je crois que nous avons l'occasion d'alléger un peu la peine de parents endeuillés comme Matthew et Natalie en entreprenant une courte étude qui nous permettra de mieux comprendre le problème et de faire des recommandations à Transports Canada. Plus particulièrement, cette motion prescrit que le Comité examine les avantages, à des fins d'activités de recherche et de sauvetage, d'utiliser la technologie GPS pour déterminer la position d'un aéronef grâce à la navigation par satellite et la diffuser périodiquement à un système de localisation à distance. L'idée est que le GPS soit utilisé de concert avec un ELT 406 mégahertz moderne dans les aéronefs légers.

La présidente du Bureau de la sécurité des transports, Kathy Fox, a souligné que quand un aéronef s'écrase, il doit être localisé rapidement pour qu'on puisse secourir les survivants. L'information qu'un système de GPS simple fournirait permettrait aux équipes de recherche et de sauvetage de réagir rapidement après un écrasement, ce qui réduirait les longues recherches d'aéronefs perdus et nous permettrait à la fois de sauver des vies et d'économiser de l'argent des contribuables.

Pour terminer, je pense qu'ensemble, nous avons l'occasion d'effectuer une étude très importante en l'honneur d'Alex et de Sidney, et j'espère que tous les membres du Comité appuieront cette motion.

Je vous remercie infiniment de m'avoir permis de prendre la parole à ce sujet.

(1300)

La présidente:

Il y a quelques personnes qui ont manifesté le désir d'intervenir. Regardez bien l'heure. Le prochain comité est prêt à entrer à 13 heures, donc nous avons très peu de temps.

J'ai pris les noms de M. Graham, de M. Aubin et de Mme Leitch. Je vous prie d'être brefs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends votre motion et votre intention. Je pense que l'intention de la motion, honnêtement, est d'améliorer les méthodes nous permettant de retrouver les aéronefs disparus. C'est l'objectif, n'est-ce pas?

Cette motion est très prescriptive. Je ne peux pas appuyer le libellé actuel, mais je serais prêt à proposer un amendement, que j'ai préparé: « Que le Comité procède à une étude d'une durée de quatre à six réunions », comme vous l'écrivez vous-même dans votre motion, mais je remplacerais ensuite tout ce qui suit, de (a) à (e) par « sur les méthodes améliorées de récupération des aéronefs disparus, en particulier dans l’aviation générale. »

Je modifierais également la fin pour enlever l'obligation de présenter un rapport à la Chambre dans les quatre mois suivants, parce que le Comité aura un horaire très chargé pendant cette période.

Mme Kelly Block:

Très bien, merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Évidemment, le sujet est pertinent. Je ne vais pas m'opposer à la motion.

J'aimerais cependant savoir si, à votre avis, cette étude s'inscrit à la suite de ce que nous avons déjà au programme. Par exemple, il y a déjà une étude sur le transport ferroviaire passager qui attend dans les cartons depuis des mois et qui a été acceptée unanimement par ce comité.

Si on met cette étude à la suite des travaux que nous avons à faire, il n'y a pas de problème. Toutefois, si cela vient court-circuiter un travail que nous avons déjà à faire, cela peut poser problème.

J'aimerais connaître votre avis là-dessus. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui, il ne fait aucun doute que notre calendrier est déjà bien rempli. Il y a le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses qui s'en vient. Nous devons terminer deux autres rapports et nous nous sommes engagés à tenir quatre réunions sur la sécurité des autobus, puis quelques autres sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Ce sont les études que nous nous sommes déjà engagés à mener, donc je propose que si le Comité adopte l'une ou l'autre de ces motions, il commence cette étude quand nous aurons terminé ce que nous avons déjà au programme. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Ce que nous avons à l'ordre du jour comprend l'étude qui était prévue sur le transport ferroviaire passager, n'est-ce pas? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui.

Madame Leitch.

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Merci beaucoup.

Je m'exprime ici à titre d'ancienne ministre du Travail. J'ai entendu beaucoup de familles, de même que des pilotes et d'autres professionnels de l'industrie, parler de la nécessité d'adopter un règlement sur la sécurité aérienne, mais aussi d'adopter des technologies qui augmenteraient la sûreté des aéronefs et permettraient non seulement aux familles, mais aussi aux professionnels du secteur de moderniser cette industrie. Je vous dirais que cette modernisation est nécessaire, cet incident en est la preuve à lui seul, et c'est sans parler de tous les autres qui sont survenus.

Les Canadiens utilisent la technologie GPS tous les jours. Mon frère et ma soeur, Michael et Melanie, l'utilisent pour savoir où se trouvent leurs enfants. Nous pourrions nous aussi l'utiliser pour que des familles comme celles d'Alex et de Sidney arrivent à retrouver leurs proches, pour qu'on puisse leur porter secours et idéalement, les emmener à l'hôpital, mais sinon, pour que les familles puissent faire leur deuil.

Je suis consciente qu'un amendement à la motion a été déposé, mais je crois que l'utilisation de la technologie moderne, comme la technologie GPS, est au coeur de la question. Je suis certaine que vous l'utilisez dans votre voiture pour rentrer chez vous à l'occasion. J'encouragerais donc le gouvernement à envisager de favoriser l'utilisation de cette technologie, que nous utilisons tous les jours, pour faciliter le travail des pilotes et des autres membres de l'industrie de l'aviation.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Leitch.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je dirai seulement qu'on ne peut pas prévoir la conclusion d'une étude à l'avance, ce n'est pas ainsi qu'on mène une étude. Cette étude doit porter sur la façon d'améliorer la récupération et non sur une solution en particulier.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

(L'amendement est adopté.)

(La motion modifiée est adoptée.)

La présidente: Je vous remercie tous infiniment.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard tran 36210 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on February 07, 2019

2018-12-11 TRAN 126

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0850)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I call to order this meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are doing a study assessing the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

We will go to committee business for a moment on the issue of the loss of recording from our last meeting.

Perhaps we could get everybody's attention, please.

I have spoken to Mr. Fuhr's office, and he is fine with the way the clerk has suggested that we deal with it, but I will need this motion adopted. I will read it out.

It reads: That, due to a technical error that occurred during meeting no. 124 on Tuesday, December 4, 2018, which resulted in a loss of the audio recording required to prepare the evidence, the speaking notes presented by Daniel-Robert Gooch and Glenn Priestley and the written brief submitted by Darren Buss be taken as read and included in the Evidence for that meeting and that the clerk inform the witnesses of the committee’s decision.

Is there any discussion?

Hearing none, are we agreed?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Thank you.

I'm sorry?

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

[Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

The motion was moved by Vance and seconded by Ron.

We go on to our witnesses for our meeting today. From Air Canada, we have Murray Strom, vice-president, flight operations; and Samuel Elfassy, vice-president, safety. Welcome to both of you. Thank you very much for being here.

We are not going to wait for Mr. Wilson. He will be here with us shortly.

Captain Scott Wilson (Vice-President, Flight Operations, WestJet Airlines Ltd.):

I'm here.

The Chair:

Isn't that terrific? He just walked right through the door. Welcome, Mr. Wilson. Mr. Wilson is from WestJet Airlines.

Okay, we're going to open it up for five minutes maximum. When I raise my hand, please do your closing remarks so that the committee has sufficient time for questions.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

With all due respect, you left the impression that Mr. Wilson wasn't here. He was sitting at the table all this time. I think you need to formally introduce Mr. Wilson from WestJet.

The Chair:

All right.

Scott Wilson is here. He is vice-president of flight operations with WestJet Airlines. Thank you very much, and sorry for the mix-up.

Who would like to go first for Air Canada?

Mr. Murray Strom (Vice-President, Flight Operations, Air Canada):

I'll go first.

Good morning, Madam Chair and members of the committee. My name is Murray Strom. I'm vice-president of flight operations at Air Canada.

I have overall responsibility for all aspects of safe flying operations across Air Canada's mainline fleet. I'm the airline's designated operations manager, responsible to the Minister of Transport for the management of our air operator's certificate and liaison with the international regulatory agencies with which Air Canada operates.

I'm an active Air Canada pilot and presently a triple-7 captain. I operate to all of Air Canada's international destinations.

I'm joined today by my colleague Sam Elfassy, vice-president of safety.

We are pleased to be here today to provide context to our operations and to answer any questions related to the committee's study on the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

Since 2001, Air Canada has been an advocate of the balanced approach to aircraft noise management that was developed by ICAO, based in Montreal. The balanced approach is founded on four elements for noise around airports: noise reduction at source, land use management and planning, noise abatement operational procedures, and operating restrictions.

To effectively manage the impact of aircraft noise on communities takes the concerted effort of all parties involved, including airports, Nav Canada, government, and airline communities.

The biggest impact an airline can have is by reducing noise with new aircraft and technology and by supporting the development and implementation of effective noise abatement operational procedures.

Over the years, aircraft manufacturers have made significant progress to reduce aircraft noise. Aircraft today are 75% quieter than they were 50 years ago. Since 2007, Air Canada has invested more than $15 billion to modernize its fleet with new aircraft, such as the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and the Boeing 737 MAX. Supporting many jobs in the Canadian aerospace industry, these aircraft are the quietest in their respective categories. For example, the Dreamliner is more than 60% quieter than other similar airplanes from past years.

In addition to Air Canada's fleet renewal program, we've also been modernizing our A320 jets with new cavity vortex generators since 2015. Newer A320s are in the process of being retrofitted as they undergo maintenance, while older A320s are being retired.

Maintenance schedules are planned months and years in advance, and in order to consider manufacturing schedules and commercial realities, Air Canada had planned originally to retrofit all its A320 aircraft by the end of 2020. However, due to lack of available kits from Airbus, we are now operating under the following schedule: 15% of our fleet completed by the end of 2018, 50% by the end of 2019, 80% by the end of 2020, and the remainder in 2021.

Air Canada is committed to completing this program on an expedited basis. However, we are limited by maintenance schedules and the availability of the vortex kits from the manufacturer. It is important to note that while the program is under way, Air Canada is replacing A320s with quieter, more efficient 737 MAX aircraft and the Canadian-made A220s formerly known as the Bombardier C Series.

Renewing and upgrading our fleet is also reducing greenhouse gases, an important goal for Air Canada, Canadians, and the government. Once this process is complete, our fleet will be among the most fuel-efficient in the world. By the end of 2019 we will have also completed the upgrade of our flight management and guidance systems and the satellite-based navigation systems of our Airbus narrow-body fleet.

These updates will enable the aircraft to fully participate in performance-based navigation initiatives being implemented in airports across the country. This improves fuel efficiency, reduces greenhouse gases, and also reduces noise.

Air carriers operate with the highest safety standards. Our pilots must comply with the navigation and noise abatement procedures set by Nav Canada and airports at all times. We contribute to this process, informed by the balanced approach and Transport Canada's guidelines for implementation of the new and amended abatement procedures.

We also participate in the Toronto industry noise abatement board that provides the technical forum to analyze and consider the operational impact of many of the noise mitigation techniques. We also extend technical expertise to the board and support the effort, with the use of our simulators, to test the proposed approaches.

(0855)



Another important element of the balanced approach is land use planning. Appropriate land use planning policies are critical to preserve the noise reductions achieved through this $15-billion investment in new aircraft. It is important that local governments and airport authorities work together to prevent further urban encroachment around the airports.

Finally, we must recognize that demand for air travel is on the rise worldwide. In fact, IATA predicts the global passenger demand for air travel will surge from $4 billion in 2017 to over $7.8 billion in 2036. Air travel is no longer a luxury. It is for everyone. It is the middle class that is driving this growth. It is an efficient and cost-effective way to travel; connects family, business people and communities; and promotes trade and tourism. Air travel reduces travel time from days to mere hours. It builds economies. Consider that in Toronto alone, Air Canada connects Canadians to more than 220 destinations directly and that Canada has three airports among the top 50 most connected in the world.

In closing, I'd like to say that Air Canada is proud of its role in Canadian aviation as a global champion for Canada and is proud of its contribution to the national economy. We remain committed to improving our operation in all aspects and live by our motto of “Fly the Flag”.

(0900)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Strom.

We'll move on to WestJet Airlines and Mr. Wilson for five minutes, please.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Good morning, Madam Chair and members of the committee.

My name is Captain Scott Wilson. I serve as WestJet's vice-president of flight operations and operations manager, responsible for the safety and oversight of WestJet's fleets and daily operations. I also maintain currency as a Boeing 737 pilot across our domestic and international networks.

Thank you for the opportunity to address the committee this morning.

WestJet is very proud of the positive impact we've had on Canadians by offering travellers more choice, lower airfares and the opportunity to connect families and business people, both within Canada and beyond. WestJet is extremely proud of our track record of operating safely and with respect for the environment and for the communities that we serve. This includes a commitment to operate in a way that minimizes the noise footprint from our aircraft in all phases of flight, with particular emphasis on the approach and departure phases.

As an airline, we recognize that we operate within a large and complex ecosystem made up of many partners and stakeholders, including airports and airport authorities, air traffic service providers around the world, aircraft manufacturers, all three levels of government, and of course regulators here in Canada, as well as those in the foreign jurisdictions in which we fly.

The Chair:

Could you slow it down a little bit? The translators are having difficulty keeping up with you.

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'm sorry. I'm talking like a pilot. I will slow down.

I will begin by outlining our ongoing community consultation process and the way we incorporate public feedback in our discussions and decisions. I'll provide the committee with information about our fleet, how our ongoing investment in the most modern aircraft available helps to reduce noise, and how we operate those aircraft to best minimize the noise footprint over the communities we serve.

Along with Nav Canada and the Canadian Airports Council, WestJet was a key participant in developing the Airspace Change Communications and Consultation Protocol in June of 2015. This is the document that launched an industry-wide commitment to open and transparent engagement with all stakeholders in the communities we serve.

WestJet is an active participant in regular and ongoing community consultations in Canada's four largest cities: Toronto, Montreal, Calgary and Vancouver. At the Vancouver airport, we are actively involved in the development of the five-year noise management plan.

In Calgary, we have given numerous presentations to community members on pilot noise mitigation responsibilities, today's aircraft technology, approach procedure design and the benefits of performance-based navigation. These have been very well received by the public. In fact, along with the Calgary Airport Authority and Nav Canada, we meet with a group of representatives from communities across Calgary every six to eight weeks to discuss aircraft noise and the operational means available to help reduce the impact of aircraft operations on noise in the environment.

On major airspace revisions, we attend open houses to field any operational questions on matters such as steeper approach profiles and variable dispersed lateral paths.

We are continuously engaged with the broader industry, including ICAO, IATA and the FAA, on their noise initiatives, and we attend noise conferences to ensure that we remain current with the latest procedures and technologies.

As my partner at Air Canada mentioned, it is worth mentioning that today's newer-generation aircraft have seen a 90% reduction in noise footprint compared to jet aircraft that first flew over Canada in the 1960s.

WestJet has invested heavily in new state-of-the-art aircraft, including the Boeing 737 Next Generation, or NG, as well as the Boeing 737 MAX narrow-body aircraft. In January, we'll deliver the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which includes significant noise-reduction features.

For example, the new Boeing 737 MAX aircraft has a 40% smaller noise footprint than even its most recent 737 family member, the NG. The Boeing 787 Dreamliner will have a 60% smaller noise footprint than the Boeing 767 aircraft it will replace in the WestJet fleet.

Aircraft noise is reduced by improvements to aerodynamics and through weight-saving technologies. These improvements allow aircraft to climb higher and faster on takeoff, with less engine thrust. The addition of newer, quiet, high-bypass ratio engines with noise-reducing chevrons on the engine exhaust ensures the lowest noise footprint possible.

Low-speed devices, such as flaps on the wings, are designed to ensure minimum airframe noise during the landing phase, when aircraft are at their lowest and slowest over our communities.

Other aerodynamic and weight-saving technologies also contribute to better takeoff and landing performance. This enables lower noise footprints for the communities around the airports we serve. These investments bring dual benefits of noise pollution and lower carbon emissions, ensuring that aviation remains at the forefront of environmental innovation.

All pilots are trained to strictly adhere to Transport Canada's published noise abatement procedures at every Canadian airport. Without exception, prior to every approach or departure to be flown, pilots specifically brief considerations to help mitigate noise, including the vertical and lateral profiles to be flown.

WestJet invested early in a tailored required navigation program, or RNP. This pioneered the capability in Canada in 2004 in developing RNP procedures at 20 Canadian airports. New RNP AR approaches incorporate vertical profiles with constant descent angles that are flown at very low thrust settings, with no level segments. Laterally, they are designed to avoid noise-sensitive areas below our flight paths.

WestJet was a key contributor to Nav Canada's public RNP program, which by the end of 2020 will see 24 Canadian airports served by RNP approaches during multiple approach transitions.

In conclusion, I would like to thank the members of the committee for the opportunity to share our story today as it relates to noise mitigation. We are proud of the work we have accomplished and continue to do in this important area.

I would like to also reinforce once more that we remain committed to the safe and responsible operation of our airline, including further investment in fleet, innovation in noise reduction and fuel-efficient technologies, and ongoing consultation and collaboration with the communities we serve.

Thank you, and I look forward to your questions.

(0905)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Wilson.

We will go on to Mr. Liepert for six minutes.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good morning, gentlemen.

We've had a number of witnesses before us who are suggesting—especially at Pearson in Toronto, but I think we need to think about all of our major airports in the country—to ban or severely curtail night flights. Frankfurt is always used as the example.

I don't think WestJet flies into Frankfurt, but feel free to comment as well.

As my first question, what would be the negative impacts of following what I'll call the “Frankfurt model” that you are aware of, Mr. Strom?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I'd like to comment. Thank you for the question.

I've been flying into Frankfurt for 25 years. Frankfurt is a very robust hub.

The one thing I wanted to start talking about is the difference between noise 25 years ago and noise today. It's completely different.

We're very fortunate that we have two robust airlines that can afford to spend, in our case, $15 billion on new aircraft. That is the key to noise abatement. You can see a 60% noise reduction, or up to a 90% noise reduction compared to the old stage 3. That's the biggest single thing we can do as an airline, and with the support of the House of Commons, we've been able to do that.

When I flew into Frankfurt 25 years ago, there was a whole section of cargo airplanes flying in Frankfurt. When I fly in there today, there are none. All the jobs associated with those cargo airplanes and the night-time flying disappeared. They have gone elsewhere.

The biggest change I've noticed is that it hasn't changed my operation, because we don't fly cargo airplanes. What has changed is the loss of thousands and thousands of jobs in Frankfurt because of this.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

There's no question there is an economic impact to recommending that type of action.

Mr. Murray Strom:

That's correct.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Okay.

I'd like to ask you about a more personal situation. I represent a Calgary riding, and I know both of you are familiar with Calgary approaches.

Since the new runway, the approaches have changed, certainly, from the west side. My riding, which is a half an hour's drive from the airport, is now under a flight path that is giving me no end of grief from my residents, despite what you're saying about reduced noise over the past few years.

One of the things that I asked Nav Canada was why they couldn't move that flight path five miles to the west, where very few people live, and if they needed to, five miles to the east, coming in on the other side, where very few people live. They maintained, if I'm correct, that there were safety issues, but there were also airline requests for those particular pathways.

Can you tell me, in each case, whether moving that approach five miles to the west and east is feasible? If not, why not? If it is, why aren't they doing it?

(0910)

Capt Scott Wilson:

Maybe I'll start with that and allow Mr. Strom to follow.

When you take a look at Calgary, obviously you see we have terrain considerations with the Rocky Mountains to the west of us. As long as we can maintain the proper separation and the proper terrain clearance on the way in, there should be no safety considerations of moving an approach path closer to the airport one way or the other.

When we do look, though, at what is optimum for allowing an approach path, which is to keep the arrival rates up and the efficiency of the airport up, obviously what we also look for is the shortest number of track miles coming into an arrival, which is basically a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. That usually becomes one of the priorities for the approach as we come into the city or the community.

I don't believe it's safety considerations, but there would be loss of an efficiency and more greenhouse gas emissions over the communities where we fly.

Mr. Murray Strom:

I agree with Scott's comments.

For us, it's about efficiency. We plan on being at idle power on approach, from the top of descent all the way to 1,000 feet, because when you're at idle, you make no noise. You make wind noise, and that's it. That's our objective.

It reduces greenhouse gases, saves money on the fuel, and gets the passengers to their destination as soon as possible.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Let's say I tell my constituents that the reason they're flying over our communities is that Nav Canada and the airlines have concluded it is the greenest and most efficient route, regardless of the impact on communities. Is that fair?

Mr. Murray Strom:

My comment to that is that we follow Nav Canada's procedures and the airports' consultations with the communities. The approach Nav Canada and the communities have decided is the best is what we're going to follow.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I know, but you would have some input into that, obviously. You're saying that the reason is not a safety issue but an efficiency issue and a greenhouse gas issue.

Mr. Murray Strom:

Yes, we're always looking for the most efficient approach.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Go ahead. I'll pick it up later.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham is next.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'll follow up on one of Mr. Liepert's points.

The new runway at Calgary is 14,000 feet, if I recall. At Toronto Pearson, a lot of the runways are under 10,000 feet. I don't know the answer to this, but is there any impact on airplane noise from different runway lengths and boundary zones of airports for surrounding communities? How much of a difference does that make?

Capt Scott Wilson:

One of the primary reasons for the length of the runways in Calgary is, of course, that the airport is almost 3,600 feet above sea level. Atmospheric conditions, density or altitude mean you are normally going to require more runway.

Whenever we do take off, we try to do what's called a balanced field takeoff. We try to use the minimum amount of thrust to depart a runway. The benefit of a longer runway is that it allows us to basically use more runway as we gain speed so that we can use less thrust for takeoff.

With regard to a shorter runway, the requirement would be to be closer to maximum thrust for departure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then a shorter runway does have an impact on noise for sure.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Potentially.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right.

With regard to the A320 noise reduction kit—I know that WestJet isn't affected—you said that Airbus doesn't have enough of these available. I have seen a picture of this kit. It's basically a butterfly clip that you put on the wing. How long have they been available from Airbus?

Mr. Murray Strom:

It looks like a clip that you put on the wing, but in order to put that clip on, you have to secure it inside the wing. This means that generally an aircraft has to be in a major overhaul, because you have to drain the fuel tank of all the fuel and you have to open up the entire wing. Then you have to have individuals climb into the wing to secure it and hook it up.

Airbus, right now, has a shortage. We had a plan in place. Just like with everything, it takes time to get the plan in place. Unfortunately, Airbus doesn't have the kits. We've asked Airbus if we can manufacture our own kits, and they told us that we can't. It owns the patent on the kit.

We're doing everything we can—trust me—to get this installed as soon as possible. I know more about these generators now than I ever wanted to know about them. Again, it's a 3% reduction in noise, whereas a new airplane is 60%, so that's where Air Canada has really put its efforts.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many A320s are there in the fleet?

You gave us percentages, not a raw number.

Mr. Murray Strom:

Yes, we gave percentages. What we're doing right now.... We have a combination of the 737 MAX arriving and the Airbus fleet leaving. To actually come up with a hard number every single time, I would have to take that back to our maintenance to get the hard number. We're going to eventually end up with about 50 Airbuses, and they will all be converted with this change.

The Airbus is a very quiet airplane. It just has a little whining noise just in this one section. We're going to fix it, but it's a 3% reduction. Right now, we're worried about bringing the new A220s in, and the new 737 MAX. Next year we're getting 18 of the 737 MAX. That's our number one emphasis right now.

(0915)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are retro fixes like this common on other aircraft? Is this something that has happened before, or is this new to the A320?

Mr. Murray Strom:

As far as I'm aware, it's just for the A320 problem.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, so no other aircraft.... Aircraft manufacturers don't have a habit of saying, “Here, we found this little doohickey that will reduce the noise on your airplane.”

Mr. Murray Strom:

No, they don't.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Another line I want to take on this is consumers' choice.

Do you, as airlines, do anything to inform consumers about the noise of the aircraft that they can be booking their flights on or the options that they have—a reminder, for example, that a flight is going to be at night over a community? Is there anything being done on that side of things by any airline?

Mr. Samuel Elfassy (Vice-President, Safety, Air Canada):

There is nothing that is currently accomplished to communicate that question that you just asked.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any intention to look at that kind of thing, even as a public relations thing? You could say, “Just so you are aware, this flight costs this much, but guess what? It doesn't bother the neighbourhood, versus this flight, which does.”

Mr. Samuel Elfassy:

We provide opportunities for passengers to buy offsets to reduce their carbon footprints, but nothing as it relates to noise currently.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Wilson, you talked a lot about the RNP approaches earlier, the RNP program. In your own experience as a pilot, does that have any impact on your flight—having the straight-in approaches versus the older tradition of holds and...?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Yes, it's one of the greatest innovations, I think, that we'll see, particularly as it pertains to safety, noise and carbon footprints.

RNP approaches are unique in many ways. The first thing is, of course, that it utilizes the satellite constellation, the navigation capability of the aircraft and the training of the pilots. There are no ground-based requirements whatsoever. It allows you to basically use different separation for terrain, and Calgary is quite unique. We actually have the first approaches in the world that have been qualified to do what's called RNP on arrival, which allows us to basically do the curved approaches and have reduced separation that way.

What it also allows us to do is either avoid terrain or avoid noise-sensitive areas. The benefit, of course, is that you not only are always in constant descent, which keeps the thrust back and the noise down, but you also can basically curve the path as required. Straight-in approaches are required when you have, say, ground-based navigation systems such as an ILS, an instrument landing system. The benefit of RNP is that we can tailor it uniquely to the situation that we're working in—the airport environment, the communities, etc.—while gaining greater efficiency and safety, and the smallest noise footprint possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Will RNP be available for SVFR pilots anytime soon?

Capt Scott Wilson:

You'd be surprised what you can actually get in a configuration a small aircraft now to fly these approaches—so, yes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nantel is next. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

My thanks to all the witnesses for being here.

We have been talking about A320 and C Series aircraft, but I would like to know whether the new Boeing 777 is equipped with the Pratt & Whitney PurePower engine. Can anyone tell me that? [English]

Mr. Murray Strom:

The new Boeing aircraft use a consortium engine. Pratt & Whitney is involved with them. There's also a European manufacturer on it. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

I represent the constituency of Longueuil—Saint-Hubert. This is a little biased on my part, but it was Pratt & Whitney that invented the PT6 turboprop, which is man’s best friend after the dog and the horse. They also developed the PurePower engine, which, as you said, is extremely effective in reducing noise.

Are you going to be able to equip your fleet with that engine? You tell me that Boeing uses a consortium engine. Do you have PurePower engines in your housings? [English]

Mr. Murray Strom:

I'd have to go back to our maintenance division to check. The new Bombardier airplane, the A220, which is the C Series, is built in Montreal. It has a Pratt & Whitney engine. I'm going to have to check the the engine manufacturer on the 737. Unfortunately, I fly the 777, which is the big one. I've been involved with the 737, but I'll have to check back with maintenance on it. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Mr. Wilson, has Westjet Airlines acquired quieter engines, like the PurePower?

(0920)

[English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

With our fleets, particularly with the Boeing 737, there's only one engine variable. That's the LEAP-1B engine. It basically is a 40% reduction in the noise footprint compared to the aircraft that we purchased only 10 years earlier. Although not PurePower and not a product that way, it is one of the quietest engines. It's the only engine you can get on the 737 MAX, but it's a very quiet engine.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

With these engines being more quiet, either the PurePower or the other engine that you're talking about, are they also much more fuel-efficient?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Yes, they're roughly 20% more fuel-efficient than the engines they're replacing.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

That's outstanding.[Translation]

I would like to ask you a question about noise management. I am from Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, and you can be sure that I am well aware of the problems with noise from flight schools. A number of witnesses have said that Transport Canada has kind of left noise management to the communities or to the not-for-profit organizations that run the airports.

Would you like Transport Canada to better regulate those activities and establish standards for noise? I am thinking, for example, about the requests that people living near the Dorval airport made this spring. They complained that noise monitors were being installed as the airport saw fit.

If Transport Canada were to establish standards and more centralized regulation, would that help to ease those ongoing conflicts? When you live next to an airport, of course, you know that there will be noise. But would certain measures not be better enforced if Transport Canada were more involved? [English]

Mr. Murray Strom:

I have the pleasure to fly to most of the major airports in the world. I can say that the noise abatement procedures of Transport Canada, Nav Canada and the local airport authorities are some of the strictest in the world.

You have certain countries that don't have any at all, because aviation is number one to them in the Middle East, but throughout Europe and most of North America, including Canada, they have very thorough procedures. Our pilots are trained on every single departure. They brief the procedures and they follow the procedures. If they don't, we're quickly made aware of it.

Capt Scott Wilson:

I would agree with Murray's comments. When I take a look at Transport Canada's engagement, particularly with the airport authorities and Nav Canada and the airlines in Canada, I think we have a unique system here. We work together. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Okay.

So you are acknowledging that this is in fact a community organizing to solve the problems of being next to the airport, rather than waiting for the government to become involved. Right? [English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Having lived under an airport flight path myself for many years, I certainly understand how the communities feel. Just as a starting point, one thing I will point out is that I lived under the departure end of runway 20 in Calgary, and compared to 20 years ago, the noise has almost disappeared.

Communities can and should have a say in the system as well, but we obviously have to find some impartial way of determining what is the right balance, looking at the efficiencies and the investment versus the requirements to keep an arrival rate up to maintain an efficiency coming into an airport and to continue to provide Canadians with the travel that they expect. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Mr. Elfassy, you told my colleague Mr. Graham that you do not provide compensation for noise caused by aircraft.

However, since you provide the opportunity of offsetting the carbon footprint, is the company that benefits from you buying its carbon credits accountable to Air Canada?

To whom is it accountable for the real use of the money invested by your customers? [English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry, gentlemen, but you've gone over time, so there's not sufficient time—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Sorry about that.

The Chair:

—to answer. Perhaps we can get that answer back to the member through the meeting or after the meeting.

Go ahead, Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to the representatives of the airline companies here this morning.

My question goes to both companies.

In your opinion, is there a correlation between the noise pollution caused by aircraft and cardiac illness in adults, or chronic stress?

(0925)

[English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

With all due respect, based on my background as a pilot, I don't know if I'd be the appropriate one to give you an answer on that. I don't know if there's any correlation as you've described.

Mr. Murray Strom:

I echo Scott's comments. I'm very good at flying airplanes, but not good at health effects. I leave that to my doctor. I'm sorry. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Okay.

However, you are aware of all the studies that have been done on health problems, correct?

Perhaps you are not in a position to describe or confirm the correlation, but are you, or are you not, aware that there is one? [English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'm aware of numerous papers out there that have tried to provide correlations. I'm not sure of the validity of the science. Again, I don't think I'm a fair one to comment on such things.

Mr. Murray Strom:

I have read the World Health Organization's paper and I've read the papers that don't agree with it. I'll have to leave this up to the experts. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Have you received any comments, complaints or grievances from your pilots on this noise problem, or is it not an issue for them? [English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Having grown up in this great country through many levels of aviation in Canada and over the years, I've certainly operated aircraft that have been a lot noisier than the ones that I operate now.

When we brought the Boeing 737 MAX into Canada a year ago, my first experience operating it was that I noticed how quiet it was on the flight deck and in the cabin, as well as the benefits that we see on the ground. The nice thing is that the new aircraft with new technologies are quieter on the ground and over the communities where they fly, and they're a much better experience on board for our passengers and guests as well as for the crew members who operate them. We see the benefits as well.

Mr. Murray Strom:

I agree with Scott and his comments. We actively monitor our aircraft inside the flight deck. If a pilot raises a concern about the noise in the flight deck, we'll do a study on the flight deck to ensure that the noise level is where it should be. If it's slightly elevated, we'll provide the pilots with noise-cancelling headsets to eliminate the noise. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.[English]

Mr. Strom, in your opening comments you made a reference to the noise being different in the last 20 or 25 years. Is that what your comments were?

Mr. Murray Strom:

Yes.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

If it's the case that the noise is different, something has changed, because I don't think 20 or 25 years ago we had so many people complaining about airplane noise. Something has changed. I see you're acknowledging my comments with a nice smile. What I would like to ask you is, what has changed?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I remember that when I was hired by Air Canada 32 years ago, I would sit outside the Dorval airport at the Hilton in Dorval and listen to all these wonderful DC-8s, 727s, DC-9s and 737s take off, and I love airplane noise. That's why I got into aviation. To hear the thrust of these engines was magnificent.

I go out there now, and you don't really hear anything. That has changed. Technology has changed the airline industry. We hear more about the noise now, and that's for various reasons, but the airplanes themselves are 90% quieter, I believe, in some cases. I miss it personally, because I like airplanes that make noise, but the airplanes are far quieter now than they were before.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Since you love noise, I invite you to come in to my riding in Laval. You can sit down with my constituents and enjoy the noise, because they hear it quite often.

Mr. Murray Strom:

No, no.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

This is what they're telling me—that there is a change.

I'd like to ask you another question. Are planes flying lower than before? Is the altitude much lower than before?

Mr. Murray Strom:

No, it's higher.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

You say it's higher.

Mr. Murray Strom:

Yes.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Can you also tell me, Mr. Wilson, how is it for you? Are planes flying at the same altitude, higher or lower?

Capt Scott Wilson:

The benefit that we see with RNP approaches—I'll go back to this—is that when you're close to an airport, for a safety perspective we fly what is a 3° gradient path, so that's roughly 300 feet per nautical mile. Regardless of what we're able to accomplish beyond that, when you're close in proximity to the airport, three miles back, you're roughly going to be a thousand feed above ground. That hasn't changed from the 1960s to where we are today.

(0930)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

My last question is to both of you. What is your input on flying, on flying the routes, on flying the pathways you're using, the altitude, everything? What is your input with respect to flying planes?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Are you asking what the input is from a pilot's perspective?

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

No, from an airline perspective.

Capt Scott Wilson:

From an airline....

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Who decides what route to take, at what time to take it? Who controls all that? Who dictates all that?

Capt Scott Wilson:

I think probably the best way to start with that is actually with the flying public. Basically, the flying public lets airlines know through where they purchase tickets, through their trends on what times they like to leave and on what routes, and that basically proves the viability.

It then goes to the network planner, who basically builds a network schedule and utility around that schedule to provide the best service possible to travelling Canadians and the public. Then from that point it goes to our flight dispatch systems, which try to provide the most optimum routing, and then, basically on the day that a flight is being flown, it's the pilot in command, working with Nav Canada.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Mr. Strom—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Strom. Could you somehow get that answer to Mr. Iacono?

We move on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

I'll give the first question to my colleague, Mr. Rogers, if he promises to make it a short one.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

I do.

First of all, thanks, gentlemen, for being here this morning. Thank you, Chair.

My question is for Mr. Strom.

Aircraft noise is not an issue in my area of Newfoundland and Labrador, specifically Gander airport, particularly since Air Canada cancelled morning flights and night flights, which makes life very difficult for travellers and for the business community trying to get out of the province and into other parts of the country. It makes life very difficult for me as an MP. It really cut my two-day weekends down to one day, because I cannot get back on the island on a Thursday night.

I want to know, Mr. Strom, what might be the rationale for cutting these flights?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I will have to talk to our corporate planning people and I'll get back to you with the answer for the rationale. I don't have that information in front of me at this time.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

All right. It's my turn, I guess.

Thank you, Mr. Rogers.

RNP—what does that stand for?

Capt Scott Wilson:

RNP stands for required navigation performance.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

Have any of you had to deal directly with neighbours who are complaining about the noise of your aircraft?

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'd be happy to take that on to answer.

Yes—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I just need a short answer, because I have a follow-up question. The answer, then, is yes. Okay.

Has there ever been any discussion with people who profess to be affected by this noise about the whole issue of active noise cancellation in their homes? There are things you can buy that are basically like noise-cancelling headphones, which could cancel the noise in a bedroom, for instance.

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'm familiar with the technology on board the aircraft. Our fleet of Bombardier Q400s has active noise cancellation capability in the cabin. I'm not aware of how it applies or of any technology that actually does it in the home. It's a good point, but I'm not aware of the technology in the home.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Somebody might want to do a pilot program.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Good thought.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Let's talk about noise itself. Maybe you're not quite the right people to ask, because you may not track this, but do you have a profile developed of the people who are most susceptible to noise—men versus women, age, etc.?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I don't have that information. I don't believe we've studied it. It was addressed in one report by the World Health Organization, but I don't have the information in front of me at this time.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Just from past experience when I used to program radio stations, I know that women handle noise or annoyance differently from men; they will react differently. As well, we've come through an era—I would call it the ear-damaged generation—when people have been subjecting themselves to very loud stereos in their cars or personal devices and everything else.

You would wonder whether perhaps part of what you're experiencing, with the level of complaints going up even with quieter planes, is with people who have somehow altered their hearing with these other devices, making them more susceptible to the noise. I'll ask you to comment on that.

Also, if you're a member of the flight crew and you're in the cabin, you're dealing with a constant level of noise throughout the whole journey, whereas if you're on the ground, it's sporadic. There's noise, then there isn't noise, and then there's noise again. Has that been examined in the course of trying to come up with an overall management plan for noise at airports?

(0935)

Mr. Murray Strom:

Again, I'm not the expert on your first question.

On the second question, the newer airplanes are considerably quieter in the cabin. I'm not aware of any studies that have been made of the effect of what the noise does to an individual. We have Health Canada guidelines for our cabin crew, our passengers, and our pilots, and we generally follow those as guidelines.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you participate at all in the planning of airports, particularly the alignment of runways versus what's going on in the surrounding area? It would be one thing, for instance, to have a flight path coming in over a light industrial area such as you normally see close to airports, and another to have one coming in over a new development of townhouses.

Mr. Murray Strom:

We consult with the local airport authorities to assist them wherever we can. We offer our simulators up for testing of new approaches. We work with Nav Canada also.

We're a participant, but we're not the lead group on it.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Are you ever invited to or asked to participate in zoning decisions by municipalities near airports?

Mr. Murray Strom:

We are not, so far as I'm aware. I believe that's handled by the airport authority.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you very much, Mr. Hardie.

We move on to Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you for being here today, and for coming right before Christmastime as well. We appreciate it.

We recently had the Minister of Transport here, and he made an interesting comment along the lines of the carbon tax. He says he hasn't heard from anybody that the carbon tax has been detrimental.

Have you guys heard that the carbon tax has been detrimental? Can you perhaps comment on what the carbon tax means to your particular industry?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I'm not the right person to answer that question. We'd have to bring together three or four different departments to give you the correct answer. I can get that answer for you, but I take care of the day-to-day flight operations of the aircraft, and that information lies in other departments.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You have no personal opinion, Mr. Strom. Is there maybe something that you've heard around the office?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I don't like offering an opinion unless I have the facts to deal with.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you have an opinion, Mr. Wilson?

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'd be aligned with Mr. Strom that way, in terms of offering an opinion in an area that's not my expertise.

However, I will strongly point out that we've talked about both the very strong level of capital investment in airframes and engines that produce the lowest level of noise possible and the greatest amount of efficiency. Therefore, on anything from a tax perspective, I'd also hope that it would be offset by looking at the level of investment that an airline is making.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Your companies are part of the National Airlines Council of Canada. Is that correct? There was a letter sent from your association to Minister McKenna, with a cc to Minister Garneau and Minister Morneau, highlighting the negative impact of the carbon tax.

Let me ask this a different way, then. Do you think that perhaps a study on the impacts of the carbon tax, at a committee like this, would be useful for your airline or for the association?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I believe it would be, yes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Sorry. Could you say that again?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I believe it would be, yes.

Capt Scott Wilson:

I would concur.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay.

I'd like to share my time with Mr. Godin.

(0940)

[Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC):

Thank you.

As I listen to the testimony today and consider the cost of replacing aircraft as a solution to the noise problem, I see that the consumer always ends up paying the bill.

I would like to introduce a motion on behalf of Kelly Block, who submitted the notice of motion on October 26. The motion reads:

That the committee undertake a study on the impact of the federal carbon tax on the transportation industry as follows: meeting on the carbon tax’s impact on the aviation industry, one meeting on the carbon tax’s impact on the rail industry, one meeting on the carbon tax’s impact on the trucking industry, and that the committee report its findings to the House.

I believe that is important to have the facts and to do this exercise rigorously in order to have clear answers. We all agree about protecting our environment, but we have to measure the cost of doing so, and to find out what we are talking about. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Godin.

Go ahead, Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

I assume you're speaking to the motion.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I am speaking to the motion.

To the witnesses, I apologize. Based on your comments here today, plus the comments of the minister, I think it's important that we look into this as quickly as possible. Perhaps it could be when we come back from the break. Maybe it's even during the break that we would take the time to look at this.

Often we see on the other side that we adjourn debate and this issue is unfortunately taken off the table, so we'd like to move it today, again with regard to some of the comments that were made here and some of the comments the minister has made.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I would support the motion. If we took this time, I think that it would also give us an opportunity to expand on what has been made clear this morning.

Nav Canada, which in many ways tries to accommodate policies of the government at the time, is making decisions that are impacting constituents—certainly my constituents—for what I can see are efficiency reasons for airlines. That's all well and good, but once we get these efficiencies, then we layer a carbon tax on industry, which defeats the whole purpose and results in aircraft having to fly over communities that have a high density.

In addition to that, it has been made clear that a reduction in emissions is a primary reason that some of these flight paths are directed over high-density areas. I think that's something that could be explored as well, as we go through discussion on this particular motion.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Godin. Speak briefly, please. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to tell my colleagues that witnesses have told us this morning about the importance of renewing aircraft fleets. Reducing the noise and the environmental footprint means buying new aircraft. However, I recognize that that involves costs and repercussions for consumers. Moreover, we must be conscious of the fact that producing new aircraft implies using resources and raw materials, which is a factor in increasing the environmental footprint.

We must also remember that there are a number of aircraft graveyards, with planes that are no longer used and that have been withdrawn from service. These factors must be measured. It is important for us as parliamentarians to consider the situation as a whole so that we can make informed decisions. To do so, I suggest that we wait for answers to our questions. Our future is at stake and I feel that it is our responsibility. That is why this motion is important for us.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Godin.

Mr. Nantel is next. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Gentlemen, you may not be aware, but you will probably not be surprised to learn that I am currently making a lot of effort to bring all parties together around the problem of global warming. The Conservatives too have a point of view about it, I feel. In my opinion, we cannot deny the evidence on global warming. Before we take any measures, I would like to see the Conservative Party become involved in a serious discussion on global warming.

It is self-evident that reducing our carbon footprint comes with costs. We can clearly see that a game of political obstruction is under way. I don't think that is in anyone's interest. I will conclude simply by saying that, of course, I am going to oppose this motion. However, I am making a gesture by suggesting that the proposal be presented again once your leader has agreed to participate in the leaders' summit on global warming that I propose to hold next January.

Thank you.

(0945)

[English]

The Chair:

We'll go back to Mr. Godin again—briefly, please. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

In response to my colleague's remarks, I will say that we Conservatives are very sensitive to the environment. Our approach is perhaps different from that of my NDP colleague, but I believe that, before we take any initiative, we have to know what we are talking about. That is why I think it would be prudent to conduct a study and to organize meetings to determine what the real impact would be. We are just realizing that electric cars are not as environmentally friendly as scientists claimed in the past. We have to have those discussions before we make decisions that affect the future. So I invite the committee to accept this motion so that we can obtain answers to our questions and thereby do some excellent work as parliamentarians.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Godin.

The motion is rightfully before us. We all—

Go ahead, Mr. Nantel. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Since you have been kind enough to give me the floor again, let me make it clear that, of course, I am inviting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to be part of the summit. Clearly, no one person is all black or all white. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Nantel.

You all have the motion in front of you. I don't see any further debate.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I request a recorded vote.

The Chair:

A recorded vote is fine.

(Motion negatived: nays 6; yeas 3)

The Chair: Thank you very much to the witnesses for being here. I'm sure we will hear more from each other as we complete this study.

We'll suspend for a few moments while our witnesses for motion 177 on flight schools come to the table.

(0945)

(0950)

The Chair:

Let us bring our meeting back to order, please.

Thank you all. I appreciate everybody's patience.

From the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association, we have Bernard Gervais, president and chief executive officer; from The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots, we have Robin Hadfield, a director on the international board of directors and governor of the east Canada section; and we have Judy Cameron, a retired Air Canada captain, director of Northern Lights Aero Foundation, as an individual.

They will of course be speaking to motion M-177, under which we are studying the challenges facing flight schools in Canada.

Ms. Hadfield, would you like to go first? You have five minutes. When I raise my hand, please make your closing remarks.

Ms. Robin Hadfield (Director, International Board of Directors, Governor, East Canada Section, The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots):

Thank you.

My personal involvement as a pilot started 39 years ago and has continued in general aviation. The Hadfield family spans over 60 years in aviation, with three generations and four captains at Air Canada and with backgrounds as flying instructors, flying surveys up in the Arctic, and flying with an indigenous-owned northern Ontario commuter, Wasaya Airways, operating into the isolated reserves. It gives one a very unique perspective on my brother-in-law, who was commander on the space station.

In my background and with my family, our daily discussions centre around aviation. They've given me a very broad understanding of many of the issues facing the aviation sector.

While the motion has to do with flying schools and I do not have an in-depth background on that, within general aviation I certainly know the problems that we're hitting. What I wanted to do today was to deal with where we see problems. The Ninety-Nines is the largest and oldest organization of women pilots in the world, with over 6,000 members in pretty much every continent now.

This is not just an issue in Canada; it's an issue everywhere. I want to go through what we see as the problem and then, very quickly, what I see as the solution. We can deal with it further with questions if you want to.

The first problem is the very high cost of flight training, as you've heard in your meetings to date. Realistically, it costs $80,000 to $90,000 for a student to go from private pilot to the commercial licence with a multi-engine instrument rating. These high costs pose a special barrier, especially for students coming from households with a low income.

A solution is to make student loans that don't require collateral and co-signing available at the flying schools that are offering a diploma program, just as we have with other colleges and universities. Right now, those flying schools that do offer college programs are taken away from colleges and universities and classified as private colleges, so student loans and OSAP do not apply for them. It's creating quite a hindrance.

A precedent does exist for funding beyond loans. As you heard just the other day from, I believe, one of the pilots here—or it could have been Stephen Fuhr—back in the fifties, when you got your pilot's licence, they actually gave you a rebate once you reached a commercial licence, in order to help with those costs. A student loan forgiveness program could work the same way.

We don't have enough flying instructors. The instructors working at flight schools traditionally make a starvation wage. One of the solutions is to forgive the student loan if, for example, a graduate stays and works for two years as an instructor. Perhaps they could get a 40% rebate on what their student loan forgiveness would be, and if they stayed for four years, it would increase. In the same way that we do this for doctors, nurses and teachers that go up into the north, the same type of program could apply for flight students.

One of the other issues is that there are not enough young people considering it as a career. To me, making aviation a high school credit course would make a lot of sense. I've talked to our Ministry of Education in Ontario. As a past school board trustee, I'm aware of what's going on in the high schools, and they're really missing the mark. They are clueless when it comes to aviation. While there is a program in Ontario that has aviation and aerospace, they focus completely on items that are outside of aviation itself.

There aren't enough females. That's simple. Again, we can facilitate this by raising awareness in high schools, raising the profiles of successful females as role models, having material in packages for the guidance departments and teachers—including examples of female pilots who have successful careers—and having career days that have female professional pilots present at them. Organizations such as the Ninety-Nines already facilitate this with our current programs, working in conjunction with provincial ministers and creating new programs such as our “Let's Fly Now!” program.

Using that model in Manitoba, the Manitoba chapter of the Ninety-Nines has an airplane and works with the University of Manitoba and the St. Andrews flight school. They bought a simulator. It cost $15,000. It's free for girls to come in and use for learning procedures. Within two years, they have had over 20 women receive their pilot's licence, which is more than most of the Ontario flight schools combined in terms of female pilots.

(0955)



There are not enough indigenous. We need to encourage flight schools into remote areas, such as Yellowknife, Thompson, or Senneterre. Although good flying weather is vital for a flight school, we have to go where they are; they're not coming down where we are.

We don't have enough flying schools. There are insufficient facilities for potentially new flight students. We can improve the business case for expansion because we are looking at enormous global shortages of pilots. A good business case exists to offer economic incentives to expand. Low-interest loans could help with the high capital cost for expansion in such areas as hangars and training aircraft.

There are a high number of foreign students who are taking up spaces in our flight schools. I believe the number right now is that 56% of all the students in the flying schools are from other countries. The country subsidizes the students to come here. The flight schools charge almost double the amount of tuition for them, so there's no incentive for our flight schools to not take them. The foreign students are good for our economy and they're good for the local areas where they come in. However, we have to recognize that these students leave immediately after they get their licence.

(1000)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Hadfield.

We'll go on to Mr. Gervais.

Mr. Bernard Gervais (President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Owners and Pilots Association):

Thank you. Good morning.

I will quickly tell you a little about COPA, the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association, which was founded in 1952.

It's the largest aviation organization in Canada and is based in Ottawa. We have 16,000 members across the country, mostly private pilots and commercial pilots, with some airline pilots, and Commander Hadfield is our spokesperson. We're the second-largest of about 80 members of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations, with representation at ICAO. Our mission is to advance, promote and preserve the Canadian freedom to fly.

We represent general aviation in the country. General aviation is pretty much everything that is not scheduled flights and military flying; it's pilot training, agricultural flying, bush-flying operations and many others. As I said, it's anything but scheduled flights and military flying. On the civil air registry right now, out of about 36,000 aircraft, over 32,000 are general aviation aircraft. Almost 90% of the aircraft in the civil air registry are general aviation aircraft.

The impact of GA on the economy is $9.3 billion. Why am I bringing this up? It's because GA plays a niche role in pilot training.

Most flight training aircraft are also constituents of the GA fleet. The first step in any pilot's career is walking through the front door of a flight training unit, and that's most likely a general aviation flight training unit. This training takes place in smaller GA-type airports and aerodromes more suited to the training environment and the type of aircraft operations that we see in these smaller GA airports all around the country.

Also, with COPA being GA, over the last five years COPA has taken more than 18,000 youngsters aged eight to 17 up for an aircraft ride in a program called “COPA For Kids”, so right there, in the last five years, we could have solved the whole pilot shortage problem with the COPA For Kids program.

What challenges do new pilots face? First they have to get into a PPL program—“PPL” being a private pilot licence—and get through that. There is no financial aid for this available anywhere in the country, except for scholarships. It's up to them, their parents or anyone else to get that money to put up front just to walk through this first step of a PPL. Anything above that is the commercial pilot licence.

Most flight training costs are not eligible for student loans unless done as part of a college program, in which case it would only be the classroom portion. Flight training units are only available in certain areas, usually the most densely populated. There's only one flight school in Yukon and none in the Northwest Territories or Nunavut.

In terms of the availability of instructors, applications from students are actually being turned down due to lack of instructors, or there's a long waiting list and they're told to come back in a year when there may be room for them in a flight training unit. Especially if the students just want to go for a private pilot licence, this recreational and private pilot licence thing is put on the back burner. The idea is to get some foreign students, but also, if you're in the airline training program, they're looking for airline pilots. The ones who will become instructors, the ones we will need, are left out.

Challenges for the flight training units include the availability of qualified instructors. With a few exceptions, most instructors need to be employed by an FTU, a flight training unit, to use their instructor rating. Other challenges include using older aircraft.

As well, another challenge faced by the flight training units is the fact that flight training units are at aerodromes that are quite old, and there are also capacity issues because of airport size, air traffic control capabilities, and the need to balance—as was presented earlier—flight training capacity with responsible aerodrome operation, especially in certain high-density areas, such as Saint-Hubert in Longueuil.

Also, for the FTUs and these airports, the only federal funding that can help these airports to develop, sustain and look at other ways is ACAP funding, but these funds are only for airports that have passenger service, and most of the GA airports do not have that.

(1005)



As I said earlier, most people see aviation in Canada as airliners and very few smaller aircraft, when actually it's the other way around: 90% to 95% of all aircraft in the country are general aviation. Some people also see aviation in the country as the 26 big airports of the national airport system, but there are over 1,500 airports.

In conclusion, to ensure that the supply chain for pilots stays healthy, the front door of the general aviation world has to stay open. It means protecting community airports so that the flight schools have places to live and grow, ensuring that adequate talent and experience is retained at the instructor level. It means preserving the flying clubs and social networks associated with airports, including community, in terms of what goes on at their local airport so that they are connected and realize the important role that this asset is playing locally and in the big picture.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Gervais.

Captain Cameron, welcome.

Ms. Judy Cameron (Air Canada Captain (retired), Director, Northern Lights Aero Foundation, As an Individual):

Thank you for this opportunity to speak today.

I was the first woman in Canada to fly for a major airline when I was hired by Air Canada in 1978. After 37 years and more than 23,000 flying hours, I retired from the airline as a Boeing 777 captain three years ago.

The biggest challenge for aviation in Canada today, and therefore flight schools, is the looming pilot shortage. You have heard that by 2025, Canada will need 7,000 to 10,000 new pilots. By 2036 a staggering 620,000 commercial pilots will be required worldwide. Part of the problem is that 50% of the population—women—are not engaged. I began my flying training 45 years ago, yet there's been very little progress in the number of women flying as airline pilots. Since the very first few were hired in 1973, the percentage of women flying for airlines globally has only increased to 5% today.

The main reason for this is the lack of role models. Countless times I've heard girls say they've never seen a female pilot before. Women in aviation need to be more visible, demonstrating their capability, credibility and passion for flying.

A 2018 study by Microsoft showed that women are more likely to do well and have a sense of belonging if they can see positive role models in a STEM career. They need to see other women performing a job before they will consider it. Research has also shown that this exposure needs to start when girls are young, as interest in technology begins at around age 11 but falls off at around age 16. A hands-on, engaging introduction to aviation is needed as part of the curriculum in elementary school. An aviation ground school course incorporating physics, math and meteorology could be offered to high school students.

As you heard from Bernard, an actual flight is even more successful to spark the passion to be a pilot. My first flight in a small airplane completely changed my career path. I had been pursuing an arts degree. My first flight was the catalyst that gave me the will and the determination to pursue an aviation career. Annual events like Girls Take Flight, an initiative started by the Ninety-Nines, provide this opportunity.

I'm a director with the Northern Lights Aero Foundation, which inspires women in all sectors of aviation and aerospace. Northern Lights has held an annual awards event for the last 10 years to highlight Canadian women who've made significant accomplishments in these fields. Past winners have included Dr. Roberta Bondar and Lieutenant-Colonel Maryse Carmichael, the first female Snowbird commander. We have a mentoring program, a speakers bureau and scholarships. In addition, we do outreach at aviation events. Our foundation has managed to attract strong support from industry. Companies are finally realizing that our activities assist in the recruitment of women. The Northern Lights Aero Foundation introduces girls and young women to positive role models and mentors who have been successful in their field.

You have heard about the high cost of flight training. At $75,000 to $100,000, it is a barrier to both sexes. A national funding program that provides such remedies as tax incentives to flight schools, student loans for the private pilot licence—which, as you heard, is not eligible for any loans right now and costs around $20,000—and loan forgiveness for pilots committing to work as flight instructors for a specified period of time could mitigate this.

The low pay for flight instructors is a significant challenge to flight schools. I just spoke to a young female instructor in Edmonton about this. She's been 10 years in the field. Instructors are paid between $25,000 and $40,000 a year. Their income is variable, as they're not on salary unless they're working for a university or a college. They're only paid when the weather is suitable for flight. This makes it difficult for schools to retain experienced instructors, who leave as soon as possible for more lucrative jobs, sometimes not even in aviation. Elevating this pay could also make it a viable permanent career choice for pilots who wish to remain at home each night instead of spending days away from their family. A lack of instructors will ultimately choke the pipeline that ensures a reliable supply of future pilots.

Women and the younger generation as a whole are also concerned about work-life balance. This dissuades some from entering flight schools. Junior pilots at an airline often have the most onerous schedules, which involve many consecutive days away from home during the time when they're most likely to be starting a family. Such innovative programs as Porter Airlines' “block sharing”, which means sharing a schedule of flying, eases the transition for women returning from maternity leave. This is a difficult time in a pilot's career; I can personally attest to this, as I have two daughters, and I returned to work in as little as two and a half months after having one of them.

(1010)



In closing, I will say that one of the biggest challenges to flight schools is actually attracting women to walk in through their door. With support from government and industry to increase exposure to STEM subjects in the classroom and incentives for young people to pursue flight training and remain in the industry, I believe we can turn the tide on the impending pilot shortage. I had the most amazing job in the world, and I wholeheartedly encourage other women to pursue it as well.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Captain Cameron.

Thank you to all for your excellent recommendations.

Mr. Jeneroux, you have four minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm sorry, Madam Chair; how many minutes did you say?

The Chair:

Given the fact that we're at 10:13 already and we're trying to divide it up, it's four minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm okay; I was just curious about how many minutes I had.

Thank you all for being here. It's great to have you here.

It's really an honour to have you here, Captain Cameron. Thank you for taking the time to be here.

What is the main reason we're seeing pilots leave the industry? We talk a lot about attracting new and young pilots to the industry, but why are pilots leaving the industry?

I'll start with you, Captain Cameron.

Ms. Judy Cameron:

My experience is airline. Generally, people don't leave an airline career. Once you start on the seniority pathway, the progression is pretty much assured as long as you can pass your check rides.

This is just conjecture on my part, but I'm thinking that if you're starting out, you've paid all this money, and you're having difficulty finding a job.... There's this joke that the difference between a junior pilot and a pizza is that a pizza will feed a family of four.

Those early years are tough. That's the only reason I can think of for you to leave: You've found another way to make a living that is more secure.

Again, once you're with an airline, you generally continue, because you're on a great career path.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Ms. Hadfield, would you comment?

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

That's an issue I am familiar with, because out of the graduates, only about 40% actually stay in aviation. A lot of them whom I know first-hand do not want to go up into the north, especially when they're from the large urban areas. They go up there and spend a couple of years. They don't make very much, because the third-tier commuter lines are well aware that the pilots will be leaving to go to the next level up, with the goal of Air Canada or WestJet. Very few go there and say they want to stay up in the north. Some do, but that's not the majority.

A lot of them have had scares. The northern operators had in the past been known for trying to push the limits on overweighting planes and for some maintenance issues. If they've had a scare, they'll just say, “I've had enough, and I'm not making very much money”, and they'll walk away. With females, they have problems where.... You know, they're young and the guys are young; they start dating each other and they break up, and that's it. They leave the industry.

There's a whole sort of...but pay is a huge issue. It's a tough one to get around with the way the whole industry has been structured, back from the beginning of airlines.

(1015)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay. Perfect. Thank you.

Mr. Gervais, maybe you'll be able to work your answer in during some of the other questions. I have only a minute left, and I want to put a notice of motion on the table.

This would be a verbal notice of motion, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

You want to give a notice of motion? Okay.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Tell me when you're ready for me to read it.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay. It reads: That the committee undertake a study of the impact of the federal carbon tax related to the transportation industry as follows: Two meetings on the carbon tax's impact on air passengers; Two meetings on the carbon tax's impact on railway customers; Two meetings on the carbon tax's impact on trucking customers; and that the committee report its findings to the House.

I have it written out here, Marie-France.

The Chair:

Thank you.

You still have 45 seconds left.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Wonderful.

Mr. Gervais, maybe you could take that time to respond to my question, please.

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

Our feeling is that if the pilots are on a pathway to becoming airline pilots, there's such a demand around the world that there's no time to fill these voids and these gaps.

As to why they would be leaving, as Captain Cameron said, usually you don't leave an airline career; it's just that there's no time to get there. They get taken and brought into the business, into the airliner world around the world, because there's so much growth and so much more air traffic.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have four seconds. We'll move to Mr. Iacono.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, ladies and gentleman, for being here this morning.

Captain, more and more people are flying, are travelling, and therefore airlines are busier and thus making more money. Do you agree?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

It's a cyclical industry. Maybe they are for now. I've seen it go up and down.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Therefore, why not invest internally in order to fill up this void? Why aren't the airlines investing in their own personnel? You have many flight attendants on board who have that experience of being flown and serving the public, so why not invest in them taking up these courses? Why isn't there a program that exists internally whereby you give that initiative to your employees to move up the ladder, to move up to the next level and become a pilot? Since we're having this shortage, why isn't that being done?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

I wish I could answer that as an airline executive, which I am not. It's an interesting question. One of the members of the audience today works with a foundation called Elevate, and they're studying right now why women don't look at aviation as a career for economic security. They certainly would make a lot more money as a pilot than as a flight attendant. I don't have the answer to that.

There is a model in Europe, a cadet program. For example, Lufthansa has a European flight training academy. They do the ground school, and then once you've finished, you start with a feeder airline to Lufthansa. Eventually you move into Lufthansa. There's a signing bonus once you start, and you gradually repay your training once you start with a feeder.

There are pros and cons to that model, as Robin may attest. I'm not sure why Air Canada hasn't looked at it. They haven't had to because in the past people were clambering over each other to get an airline job when there was quite a lack of them. This is a complete change now.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

There's no shortage when it comes to finding flight attendants, right?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

I suppose not.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

I think that would be a positive way to look at it.

My second thing—and the other two can also respond to the questions—is why not also look internally when it comes to pilots, as to pilots giving the courses? A teacher, for example, after two or three years, is going to take a sabbatical to go do research. Why not initiate a program in which you have pilots of a certain number of years' experience initiate six months of training for new pilots, new students? This way you don't have the shortage of trainers. You're saying there's a shortage of students and there's a shortage of pilots. Why not look internally to fulfill both?

(1020)

Ms. Judy Cameron:

The shortage is at the beginner level. It's at the private pilot, the commercial pilot level.

Once you're with the airline, the airline has its own internal training program, and they've quite successfully recruited many retired pilots to come back and teach simulator. That's an entirely different skill set from the instructors that they're referring to, the instructors that are needed to get the young ones into the aviation field.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Would you like to add something to that, Ms. Hadfield?

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

I would. On the idea of flight attendants, I personally know over 15 flight attendants who have become pilots and who are working their way up, but they've had to do it totally on their own. There is no incentive for an airline to do their own training.

Concerning the shortage of pilots, there's a misconception that people don't want to become pilots. In Springbank there are two flying schools with a waiting list of over 300 students. There were 78 air cadets who did not get their power licence this summer because of lack of instructors, and at the busiest flying school in the country, at Brampton, in October they put out a notice that they are not taking any more new students.

There is a waiting list of people in Canada who want to learn to fly. The seats are taken by international students. Then they leave the country, meaning we have a shortage of instructors, meaning we can't take that waiting list of students.

It's a cycle. The schools need money, so they take the international students, and that kicks the door shut for our students.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Iacono; your time is up.

Mr. Nantel is next. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ms. Hadfield, as you quite rightly pointed out, there is no link between the education system in Canada and flight schools, although we have a real need for pilots. What also strikes me is when Ms. Cameron suggested that people in the north, where there is such a need for pilots, will not move to the south to take that training for any length of time. However, I am well aware of the situation in flight schools in Saint-Hubert, where there are major concerns. We have always bemoaned the fact that they are all concentrated in that location, right above the houses of ordinary folks.

However, as you explained, is quite sad to see that the schools are accepting a lot of foreign pilots who take places, not just from Canadian students, but also from Canadian pilots. That means that the pilots leave. Would you like the committee to recommend setting up a network? I am talking about the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada, the AIAC, which set up the Don't Let Go Canada program. We met Mr. Hadfield to talk about that.

Should we not have a concerted approach to establish a training program for young people, particularly young women, so that they can get started in the field? [English]

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

I think that if we can set up programs at the high school level, where students who are not that familiar with airports.... As urban areas have expanded, we've lost the small airports and general aviation. People don't see airplanes flying around, and our youth can't look up and say, “Oh, I want to do that.” They go into high schools and focus on STEM programs, but those don't include aviation.

I think it's about bringing it back into the high schools and also about having a loan and debt repayment program—making it affordable so they can go to school—to keep our own students in the flight schools. You're looking at half our population that is making under.... How is a family with a combined income of $80,000 going to afford putting their kid through these schools?

Also, the payback is slow. When our son was at a flying school, I said to him that he was going to have to go up north and be up there for years, that he was going to be pumping gas and cleaning puke out of airplanes for the pleasure of making $20,000 a year. Then, when you start making your way up there—you get married, you have kids—and you're making $100,000, you go to Air Canada and you drop to $40,000.

It's a cycle. For the flight schools, I think we have to make a definite loan repayment program. You can't stop them from accepting foreign students, but if we can have our students afford to get there.... Canada is very well known around the world for our aviation sector. That's why other countries are paying for their kids to come here.

(1025)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Education is very clearly in provincial jurisdiction, which can complicate things a little. However, Mr. Gervais, I believe that you are aware of the current situation at Saint-Hubert. In my opinion, there is no doubt that one of the solutions would be to plan the distribution of flight schools better. Why not bring the CEGEPs in Quebec to chat with their local airports and see about installing a flight simulator and a few aircraft, thereby establishing a flight school?

Currently, in my constituency of Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, those schools are so thick on the ground that they have become a problem. I am the first to sing the praises of aerospace and to proclaim that Longueuil—Saint-Hubert is the birthplace of a number of wonderful technologies of which we are proud. However, when almost 25% or 30% of the places in the École nationale d'aérotechnique are vacant, I see it as a deplorable situation. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Nantel, I'm sorry, but there's just not enough time for an answer right now. Possibly it could be intertwined it with some other answer.

We'll move on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thanks to all of you for being here.

It sounds as if the free market system has really imploded in all of this. On the one hand, you have higher load factors generally, at least on the flights I take, and fares are still pretty robust, especially in the north, yet you have pilots practically lining up at food banks, a phenomenon that we've seen in the States.

You tell me that on the one hand there are a lot of people who want to go to flight schools here, but the trainers make peanuts and the tuition is really expensive. I'm sorry, but where's the money going?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

It's expensive to operate an airplane.

I was just going to say, speaking to some earlier questions, that there are low-cost solutions too. Just being able to watch an airplane take off and land, there's no place in Toronto where you can do that. Vancouver has a great observation area. In Toronto you have to park on the side of the highway to see an aircraft.

There used to be a wonderful opportunity to have people in the flight deck. We can't do that anymore. It was one of the best selling tools. It probably cost a lot of parents a lot of money over the years if they had children watching us take off and land.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Yes, but the question is that the key people—the trainers and the students and the new pilots—all tend to.... Who would want that job if it costs you a lot of money to get trained and you end up making peanuts? Heck, I started off in radio, and it was exactly like that. Then again, we really wanted to do it.

I'm just wondering if we're dealing—millennials back home, don't listen for a second—with a millennial attitude here as well: “We want it all. We want it now.”

One of you is saying yes and the other says no.

Ms. Judy Cameron:

I've heard that from some people who are training some of the newer pilots.

I can only attest to my own experience. I did do the northern experience. I flew up north for a year and I did pump gas on a DC-3. I did roll fuel drums. When Air Canada hired me, I went to my interview board, and they said, “Bring your log book and bring anything that you think might get you hired”, so I brought pictures of me—black and white—rolling fuel drums, wearing a flight suit and steel-toed boots. Maybe that helped me get the job.

The thing about flying is that unlike a lot of other occupations, it's really enjoyable. It's a lot of fun, and some people are just driven to pursue it no matter how difficult, but the costs are getting out of hand now.

I think the answer is to have forgivable loans, particularly if you're willing to work as a flight instructor or if you're willing to work in a northern community. I think there have to be some solutions.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Robin, do you want to comment on this as well?

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Yes. I think that what you see in the difference in generations is actually not a lack of motivation. I think people still want to fly, and the waiting lists for flying schools attest to that. What the airlines find is that the skill sets they come in with are a little bit different, and that could be more from the millennial side, where they don't have the same type of leadership skills.

However, this is also very rare within the industry. As Judy already said, the airline industry is up and down and up and down, and I've seen this through all the generations of our Air Canada pilots and with—

(1030)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I have one quick question in the time I have, and I'm sorry to be so brief here.

Are we using military training to its fullest? Could the military basically make a little money on the side by training pilots?

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Yes, but I believe the military also has a shortage of pilots for exactly the same reason—instructors. They can't get them in fast enough.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I might have a little extra time if you want to finish your other thought—

Oh, Mr. Gervais...?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

I want to add something.

I think MP Iacono also asked why they don't train. There's a highly regulated environment for training for a private pilot licence or for a commercial airline and everything around that, and it's been around for many years. It's because there's a safety issue on this. It can't be really “I'll train you.” You have to be an instructor to train people.

There's a protocol, and you'll see this in the Canadian aviation regulations. There's a protocol and a process that's tried and true, and it's really been there very long. Maybe that could be reviewed also to accelerate the process.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

One of the peculiarities about the industry that I found out when I myself started flying in 2005 was that it's the only industry in which the new pilots trained the newer pilots. There seems to be very little of the experienced pilots passing their knowledge on down.

At the same time, you can't have a 737 pilot training a 172 pilot, because it's a completely different skill set, so how do we get experienced pilots to pass their knowledge on to brand new pilots to augment the instructor base?

I open that generally to all of you.

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Financially, you have to give an incentive. If you have a retired airline pilot who is invited to come back to the airline to teach in simulators, they will make $70 an hour. We were talking about this earlier. If you offered to have them go into a flight school, they would make $30 an hour, so they're going to say “no way”—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's if they're lucky—

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

—but if you made that a tax-free income for them, they would all flood in. Pilots are the cheapest people you can meet in the world.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Robin Hadfield: If you offered a pilot $30 an hour and it was tax-free, it would be the same as making $70, and you would probably have a huge percentage of retiring pilots going into these flight schools. They love working with the younger kids. They like seeing them fly. They love being in airplanes. Give them a tax incentive and they'll do it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a lot of different questions, so I'll have to try to keep it brief.

We talked about the cost of flight training, as you just did, and also about mitigating the student loans for the students, but as I discussed a couple of weeks ago with respect to the Germanwings crash, we saw the risk if a student goes through their training and then loses their medical certificate. How would you mitigate this risk on loans so that you don't have people hiding illnesses and disabilities in order to pay off that loan?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

That is a concern. You spend all of this money and then find out that you are medically disabled. It's fairly stringent to get a class 1 medical, so maybe there should be some sort of a parachute clause, an insurance that you can pay into, whereby if you lose you licence medically, you don't have to pay back $75,000 to $100,000 in training.

That is a difficulty. Something that you don't face in almost any other occupation is the requirement to keep your class 1 medical.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is a different topic that we haven't discussed at all before. When you get a degree, you get “B.A.” after your name, or whatever it is. When you become an engineer, you get a “P.Eng.”

You go through years and years of school and there's no post-nominal for a pilot. Should there be one?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

Absolutely.

A voice: There is “captain”.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There is, but not for a co-pilot or a bush pilot. When you get your four bars at Air Canada, you become a captain, but if you're flying in any other part of the industry....

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

You're still “captain”.

A voice: Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

When I was learning to fly, we learned on paper CFSes and paper VNCs. Now everyone is on ForeFlight. Are we losing confidence of the pilots by switching to digital means?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

No, not really. It's just a different way of learning. Nowadays, if you look at how things have changed regarding technology, the younger generation is still doing...they know, and they can find as much information as we did in the paper form. Everything is still there.

No, I don't think so, not that we see.

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

I think it has increased. I believe that it has helped the safety aspect. I fly solo into Oshkosh, which for a week is the busiest airport in the world, and if my ForeFlight ever crashed as I was coming in there, I'd be lost. I'd turn around and head towards the lake.

(1035)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's exactly my point. We—

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I'm sorry, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Monsieur Godin is next. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to our fine witnesses. Their comments are really interesting.

It seems to me that we are somewhat blasé about the effect that our lack of pilots will have on the future of the aviation industry. Could you tell me about the importance of pilot training? The number of flights is increasing by 4% to 5% per year. If the aerospace industry does not find a solution, what will be the impact on that increasing number of flights?

That question is for the three of you.

Do you want to start, Mr. Gervais?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

Yes.

The shortage of pilots is worldwide. The fact is that, if Canada does not find an answer to it, we will have to hire people from other countries.

The industry is growing around the world, but I do not believe that we should start by recruiting people from other countries. We have the capacity to train them in Canada. Most of our pilots were trained as a result of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. About 130,000 pilots were trained in its military bases. Canada's pilot training is internationally renowned. We have the ability to do it; we just have to roll up our sleeves and get going.

As Mr. Nantel said earlier, there should be a national training program, now and for the future. Canada is the home of the aerospace industry. The country was largely opened up by aviation.

We must do it, otherwise Canadian companies around Montreal, Calgary, and Vancouver, like Viking Air, will suffer as a result. Canada is the home of aviation

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you.

Do the other witnesses want to add any comments? I see that they do not.

In other professions, like medicine and accounting, firms are fighting over students.

Should we not give it some thought and encourage companies to invest in recruiting young men and young women with the potential to become pilots? The company could sponsor them, in a way. with financial assistance that would help them pay off their loans more quickly and have a promising and comfortable future.

It is important for the industry to have pilots so that it can continue to function. [English]

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Are you referring to a cadet program? [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

No, it would come later than that. Cadets have not yet made made their decisions. But the programs could be run together.

The solution should come from the aerospace industry, which sponsors your cadets, as in the case you mentioned in your testimony, or in other circumstances. When the industry sees young, motivated people with potential, why not sponsor them and support them so that they can view the future in a positive light?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

I really agree with you. Some companies are already doing it. Pratt & Whitney and Bombardier have air clubs. However, there is a whole other stage.

Last year, the Air Canada Pilots Association and COPA developed a career guide and established pilot scholarships to encourage people to enter the field. But that was not really sponsorship in the strict sense.

Companies would do well to have sponsorships, exactly as you say. It is perfectly possible. The costs would be minimal, but there needs to be a plan. COPA would be ready to work with people. To start programs like that, we could use airports and aerodromes located away from the problem areas we were talking about earlier. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'm sorry, Mr. Godin, but your time is up.

Go ahead, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to share my time with Mr. Graham. I think he has a few more questions, but I do want to introduce a notice of motion, Madam Chair, that I'm hoping will be entertained at the next meeting.

On that notice of motion, Madam Chair, as you know, we've been diving into pollution-related costs and we're trying to get as much input as we can from all sides of the floor. Therefore, my notice of motion, Madam Chair, reads as follows: That the Official Opposition present to the Committee its plan to deal with transportation-related pollution costs.

I'll be presenting that at the next meeting.

With that, Mr. Graham, go ahead. The floor is yours.

(1040)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I don't have too much more, but I do have some more.

Mr. Gervais, you mentioned COPA For Kids and you used to be involved with the ABPQ, and as you know, I am as well. I've flown in at least five of these Kids in Flight events. Can you speak to the real impact of this? I know of the 50 or so kids I've taken, only one of which puked—I'm very proud of that—I'd say about half or maybe even more were girls, and it doesn't seem to be translating into an interest at the flying school.

Do you have any thoughts on why that is?

Madam Cameron, you were talking about seeing those role models. My instructor is a woman. She's an excellent instructor and an excellent pilot. She's flying at all these events. She does the ground school for all the kids, so they are seeing it. How do we convert that into an interest?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

I'd argue that they're still not seeing it enough. I think it needs to start at the elementary school level and then progress to, say, high school guidance counsellors. They need educating.

There are a lot of misconceptions out there. One is that you have to be a math whiz to be a pilot. That's not true—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's only when you're in trouble.

Ms. Judy Cameron:

You have to be able to do simple addition and subtraction.

The other is that you have to have perfect 20/20 vision. That's also not true.

I think the problem is that we're just not getting young kids interested early enough, and I'm a perfect example. I had to go back to school before I started my aviation college. I had not taken grade 12 math. I was in an arts program at university, so I had limited my options already.

I think you need to get them younger.

I can't answer your question as to why that first flight wasn't absolutely motivational for them. It certainly was for me, and there are a lot of programs like this. The Ninety-Nines has Girls Take Flight. One of our directors at Northern Lights does this. They had 1,000 people this year at Oshawa, where 221 girls and women were taken flying. I'm sure a number of them were interested in pursuing a career after this.

I think it is exposure, having more things like Elevate. Again I'm referring to a lady in the audience. She runs an organization, and they are going to be going to 20 cities across Canada and promoting various aviation careers. She's an air traffic controller, so it's not just pilots; it's air traffic control, maintenance, and different areas. I think kids need to be exposed to this, and the more hands-on experience, the better. It shouldn't just be someone speaking in a classroom.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want to build on that a little bit. When I was a kid, whenever I flew, I always went into the cockpit. It was fun. Then 9/11 happened, and that obviously changed a lot of this.

You're an experienced pilot. Do you see a safety issue? Is there a way of perhaps pre-clearing people who have an interest to get into the cockpit before a flight so that we can bring this experience back? Is that possible?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

One of the biggest burning desires for any airline pilot was to be able to have their family back in the flight deck again. If you can't trust your children or your spouse, really who can you trust?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There was that Airbus crash in Russia....

Ms. Judy Cameron:

It's really a pity that this can't be addressed. We have NEXUS cards. We have various security things. I'd like to see that change.

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Could I speak on that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Of course.

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

I think with the thousands and thousands of kids we've taken up for flights, they see it as a free flight. We have found with our program that it's the parents who are the hindrance. When the child says they want to become a pilot, their natural reaction is, “You're going to crash and die. No. You can't do that. Nobody in our family has ever done that.”

We changed, and this year in the program you have to already be of flying age. We had seven events where we took them up. If they were in high school, the parent had to come for the flight as well. At every single one of the events, we had anywhere from one to three people sign up, with the flying school that was there talking to them on the spot. I think we have to look at the older kids, not the little ones.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Gervais, would you comment?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

To add to what Robin was saying, last year COPA started giving anyone of flying age, 14 to 17, free online ground school and a logbook to go into flight school. If you're 14 to 17, your next step is to open that door to the flight school. We're pushing for that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

On the point about danger, when I was in flying school we liked to say that the most dangerous time in a pilot's day was driving to the airport. If people could understand that....

I think the Southwest incident a year ago, when a passenger was sucked out of the window and killed, was the first death on a commercial flight in the U.S. in something like nine years. There's this whole myth of an airplane not being safe. How do we share the fact that it is by far the safest means of travel in the world?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

Last year we, COPA and Transport, started the general aviation safety campaign. They asked us to help them with it. This is a communication tool we're using to show to the general public that flying is safe, extremely safe, so there will be some more publicity and communication out there.

(1045)

The Chair:

Thank you very much to our witnesses. This was very informative. You certainly gave our analysts lots of possible recommendations that the committee might want to put forward. I thank you very much for taking the time today.

I wish everyone here a Merry Christmas.

I have one thought for the committee. I did not plan a meeting for Thursday; we had that discussion. Given the fact that it looks like we will be here, is it the desire of the committee to have a meeting on Thursday? We could try to pull together a meeting on Thursday. If so, I'd like to see overwhelming support for that.

I don't see any overwhelming enthusiasm for trying to schedule for Thursday. Thank you very much.

Again, Merry Christmas. Thank you all very much for your co-operation.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0850)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous procédons à une évaluation de l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Nous allons nous pencher un instant sur les travaux du Comité, concernant la perte d'enregistrement survenue lors de notre dernière séance.

Nous pourrions peut-être obtenir l'attention de tout le monde, s'il vous plaît.

J'ai parlé aux gens du bureau de M. Fuhr, et la façon dont la greffière a proposé que nous réglions le problème leur convient, mais j'aurais besoin de faire adopter cette motion. Je vais la lire.

Elle est ainsi libellée: Que, vu l'erreur technique survenue lors de la réunion no 124, du mardi 4 décembre 2018, et la perte des enregistrements audio nécessaires à la transcription des Témoignages, les notes d'allocution de Daniel-Robert Gooch et de Glen Priestley, de même que le mémoire écrit soumis par Darren Buss, soient considérés comme ayant été lus et qu'ils soient inclus aux Témoignages de la réunion en question, et que la greffière informe les témoins de la décision du Comité.

Voulez-vous en discuter?

Puisque personne ne se manifeste, sommes-nous d'accord?

(La motion et adoptée.)

La présidente: Merci.

Pardon?

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

[Inaudible]

La présidente:

La motion a été proposée par Vance et appuyée par Ron.

Nous passons à nos témoins pour la séance d'aujourd'hui. Nous accueillons Murray Strom, vice-président, Opérations de vol, et Samuel Elfassy, vice-président, Sécurité, d'Air Canada. Bienvenue à vous deux. Je vous remercie infiniment de votre présence.

Nous n'attendrons pas M. Wilson. Il se joindra à nous sous peu.

Capitaine Scott Wilson (vice-président, Opérations de vol, WestJet Airlines Ltd.):

Je suis là.

La présidente:

N'est-ce pas merveilleux? Il vient tout juste de franchir la porte. Bienvenue, monsieur Wilson. M. Wilson représente WestJet Airlines.

D'accord, nous allons vous accorder une période allant jusqu'à cinq minutes. Quand je lèverai la main, veuillez prononcer votre mot de la fin afin qu'il reste suffisamment de temps au Comité pour poser des questions.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, vous avez donné l'impression que M. Wilson n'était pas là. Il était assis à la table pendant tout ce temps. Je pense que vous devez présenter officiellement M. Wilson, de WestJet.

La présidente:

Très bien.

Scott Wilson est là. Il est le vice-président des opérations de vol à WestJet Airlines. Merci beaucoup, et désolée pour la confusion.

Qui voudrait commencer, pour Air Canada?

M. Murray Strom (vice-président, Opérations de vol, Air Canada):

Je vais commencer.

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les députés. Je m'appelle Murray Strom. Je suis le vice-président des Opérations de vol chez Air Canada.

J'assume la responsabilité générale à l'égard de tous les aspects de la sécurité des opérations de vol pour l'ensemble de la flotte principale d'Air Canada. Je suis le gestionnaire des opérations désigné de la compagnie aérienne, je rends des comptes au ministre des Transports concernant la gestion de notre permis d'exploitation aérienne et j'agis en tant qu'intermédiaire pour les organismes de réglementation internationaux avec lesquels Air Canada collabore.

Je suis un pilote actif d'Air Canada et actuellement capitaine de Boeing 777. J'effectue des vols vers toutes les destinations internationales d'Air Canada.

Mon collègue Sam Elfassy, vice-président de la Sécurité, m'accompagne aujourd'hui.

Nous sommes heureux d'être là pour présenter le contexte de nos activités et répondre à toute question liée à l'étude du Comité concernant l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Depuis 2001, Air Canada préconise l'approche équilibrée de la gestion du bruit des aéronefs élaborée par l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale, l'OACI, à Montréal. L'approche équilibrée est fondée sur quatre éléments pour la gestion du bruit émis près des aéroports: la réduction du bruit à la source, la gestion et la planification de l'utilisation des terrains, les procédures opérationnelles relatives à l'atténuation du bruit et les restrictions d'utilisation.

Afin de gérer efficacement l'incidence du bruit des aéronefs sur les collectivités, il faut que toutes les parties concernées déploient un effort commun, y compris les aéroports, Nav Canada, le gouvernement et les compagnies aériennes.

La principale façon dont une compagnie aérienne peut avoir une incidence, c'est en réduisant le bruit grâce à de nouveaux aéronefs et à de nouvelles technologies et en soutenant l'élaboration et la mise en oeuvre de procédures opérationnelles efficaces en matière d'atténuation du bruit.

Au fil des ans, les fabricants d'aéronefs ont réalisé des progrès importants dans le but de réduire le bruit émis par leurs appareils. Aujourd'hui, les aéronefs font 75 % moins de bruit qu'il y a 50 ans. Depuis 2007, Air Canada a investi plus de 15 milliards de dollars pour moderniser sa flotte en achetant de nouveaux aéronefs, comme le Boeing 787 Dreamliner et le Boeing 737 MAX. Ces aéronefs, qui soutiennent de nombreux emplois dans l'industrie de l'aérospatiale canadienne, sont les plus silencieux de leur catégorie respective. Par exemple, le Dreamliner fait 60 % moins de bruit que d'autres avions semblables des années passées.

En plus du programme de renouvellement de la flotte d'Air Canada, nous modernisons également depuis 2015 nos aéronefs à réaction A320 par l'installation de générateurs de tourbillons à cavité. Les nouveaux modèles d'A320 sont en train d'être modernisés dans le cadre de leur entretien, alors que les anciens modèles sont retirés de la flotte.

Les calendriers d'entretien sont planifiés des mois et des années à l'avance et, dans le but de tenir compte des calendriers de fabrication et des réalités commerciales, Air Canada avait prévu au départ de moderniser tous ses aéronefs A320 d'ici la fin de 2020. Toutefois, en raison du manque d'accessibilité de trousses d'Airbus, nous menons maintenant nos activités en fonction de l'échéancier suivant: 15 % de notre flotte mise à niveau d'ici la fin de 2018, 50 % d'ici la fin de 2019, 80 % d'ici la fin de 2020, et le reste, en 2021.

Air Canada est déterminée à achever ce programme de façon accélérée. Cependant, nous sommes limités par les calendriers d'entretien et l'accessibilité des générateurs de tourbillons auprès du fabricant. Il importe de souligner que, même si le programme est en cours, Air Canada remplace des aéronefs A320 par des 737 MAX plus silencieux et plus efficients et par des aéronefs A220 faits au Canada, qu'on appelait autrefois les C Series de Bombardier.

Le renouvellement et la mise à niveau de notre flotte entraînent également une réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, un objectif important pour Air Canada, pour les Canadiens et pour le gouvernement. Une fois que ce processus sera terminé, notre flotte comptera parmi les plus écoénergétiques au monde. D'ici la fin de 2019, nous aurons également terminé la mise à niveau de nos systèmes de gestion de vol et de guidage automatique et des systèmes de navigation par satellite de notre flotte d'avions à fuselage étroit d'Airbus.

Ces mises à jour permettront aux aéronefs de contribuer pleinement aux initiatives de navigation fondée sur les performances mises en oeuvre dans les aéroports de l'ensemble du pays. On améliore ainsi l'efficience énergétique et on réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre ainsi que le bruit.

Les transporteurs aériens mènent leurs activités dans le respect des normes les plus élevées en matière de sécurité. Nos pilotes doivent se conformer en tout temps aux procédures de navigation et d'atténuation du bruit établies par Nav Canada et par les aéroports. Nous contribuons à ce processus, qui est étayé par l'approche équilibrée et par les lignes directrices de Transports Canada concernant la mise en oeuvre des procédures nouvelles et modifiées en matière d'atténuation.

Nous participons également aux réunions du conseil d'atténuation du bruit industriel de Toronto, qui fournit la tribune technique nécessaire pour analyser et examiner les conséquences opérationnelles d'un grand nombre des techniques d'atténuation du bruit. Nous offrons également une expertise technique au conseil et appuyons l'effort déployé, au moyen de nos simulateurs, pour mettre à l'essai les approches proposées.

(0855)



La planification de l'utilisation des terrains est un autre élément important de l'approche équilibrée. Les politiques relatives à la planification d'une utilisation appropriée des terrains sont essentielles pour ce qui est de préserver les réductions du bruit obtenues grâce à cet investissement de 15 milliards de dollars dans de nouveaux aéronefs. Il importe que les administrations locales et les autorités aéroportuaires travaillent ensemble dans le but de prévenir d'autres proliférations urbaines à proximité des aéroports.

Enfin, nous devons reconnaître que la demande de transport aérien augmente partout dans le monde. De fait, l'Association du Transport Aérien International, l'IATA prévoit que la demande mondiale à cet égard augmentera subitement pour passer de 4 milliards de dollars en 2017 à plus de 7,8 milliards de dollars en 2036. Le transport aérien n'est plus un luxe. Il est accessible à tous. C'est la classe moyenne qui stimule cette croissance. Il s'agit d'un moyen efficient et rentable de voyager; il relie les familles, les gens d'affaires et les collectivités, et il encourage le commerce et le tourisme. Le transport aérien réduit la durée des déplacements en la faisant passer de jours à de simples heures. Il renforce les économies. Songez que, à Toronto seulement, Air Canada relie les Canadiens à plus de 220 destinations directement et que le Canada compte 3 aéroports parmi les 50 premiers en importance au monde en ce qui a trait aux liaisons.

En conclusion, je voudrais dire qu'Air Canada est fière de son rôle dans l'aviation canadienne en tant que champion mondial pour le Canada, ainsi que de sa contribution à l'économie nationale. Nous restons résolus à améliorer nos activités à tous les égards et vivons selon notre devise en portant « haut le drapeau ».

(0900)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Strom.

Nous allons passer à M. Wilson, de WestJet Airlines, pour cinq minutes; vous avez la parole.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les députés.

Je suis le capitaine Scott Wilson. J'occupe les postes de vice-président des Opérations de vol et de gestionnaire des opérations chez WestJet; je suis responsable de la sécurité et de la surveillance des flottes et des activités quotidiennes de la compagnie. Je tiens également mes compétences à jour en tant que pilote de Boeing 737 dans l'ensemble de nos réseaux national et international.

Merci de me donner la possibilité de m'adresser au Comité ce matin.

WestJet est très fière de l'incidence positive qu'elle a eue sur les Canadiens en offrant aux voyageurs un plus grand choix et des tarifs réduits, ainsi qu'en reliant les familles et les gens d'affaires, au Canada et à l'étranger. À WestJet, nous sommes extrêmement fiers de notre bilan concernant la sécurité opérationnelle et le respect de l'environnement et des collectivités que nous servons. Il s'agit notamment d'un engagement à mener nos activités d'une manière qui réduit au minimum l'empreinte sonore de nos aéronefs à toutes les phases du vol, en mettant particulièrement l'accent sur celles de l'approche et du départ.

En tant que compagnie aérienne, nous reconnaissons que nous fonctionnons dans un écosystème vaste et complexe composé de nombreux partenaires et intervenants, y compris les aéroports et les autorités aéroportuaires, les fournisseurs de services de la circulation aérienne de partout dans le monde, les fabricants d'aéronefs, les trois ordres de gouvernement et, bien entendu, les organismes de réglementation du Canada et des administrations étrangères vers lesquelles nous offrons des vols.

La présidente:

Pourriez-vous ralentir un peu? Les interprètes ont de la difficulté à vous suivre.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je suis désolé. Je parle comme un pilote. Je vais ralentir.

Je commencerai par décrire notre processus continu de consultation communautaire et la façon dont nous intégrons la rétroaction du public dans nos discussions et décisions. Je fournirai au Comité des renseignements au sujet de notre flotte, de la façon dont notre investissement continuel dans les aéronefs les plus modernes sur le marché contribue à la réduction du bruit et de la manière dont nous faisons fonctionner ces aéronefs afin de réduire au minimum l'empreinte sonore pour les collectivités que nous desservons.

Aux côtés de Nav Canada et du Conseil des aéroports du Canada, WestJet a été un participant clé à l'élaboration du Protocole de communications et de consultation sur les modifications à l'espace aérien, en juin 2015. Il s'agit du document à l'origine de l'engagement de l'industrie tout entière à l'égard de la tenue d'une discussion ouverte et transparente avec tous les intervenants des collectivités que nous desservons.

WestJet participe activement à des consultations communautaires régulières et continuelles tenues dans les quatre plus grandes villes du Canada: Toronto, Montréal, Calgary et Vancouver. À l'aéroport de Vancouver, nous participons activement à l'élaboration du plan quinquennal de gestion du bruit.

À Calgary, nous avons présenté aux membres de la collectivité de nombreux exposés sur les responsabilités des pilotes en matière d'atténuation du bruit, la technologie des aéronefs d'aujourd'hui, la conception de la procédure d'approche et les avantages que présente la navigation fondée sur les performances. Ces exposés ont été très bien reçus par le public. De fait, en plus de l'autorité aéroportuaire de Calgary et de Nav Canada, nous rencontrons tous les six à huit semaines un groupe de représentants de collectivités de partout dans la ville afin de discuter du bruit des aéronefs et des moyens opérationnels dont nous disposons pour mieux réduire l'incidence du pilotage des aéronefs sur le bruit dans l'environnement.

Concernant les modifications majeures apportées à l'espace aérien, nous assistons à des assemblées publiques dans le but de répondre à toutes les questions opérationnelles sur des affaires comme les profils d'approche à forte pente et les trajectoires latérales dispersées variables.

Nous échangeons continuellement avec l'industrie dans son ensemble, y compris l'OACI, l'IATA et la Federal Aviation Administration, la FAA, concernant les initiatives relatives au bruit, et nous assistons à des conférences à ce sujet pour nous assurer que nous restons à jour en ce qui a trait aux dernières procédures et technologies.

Comme l'a mentionné mon partenaire d'Air Canada, il vaut la peine de préciser que les aéronefs de nouvelle génération affichent une réduction de l'empreinte sonore de l'ordre de 90 % comparativement aux premiers aéronefs à réaction qui ont survolé le Canada dans les années 1960.

WestJet a investi considérablement dans de nouveaux aéronefs à la fine pointe de la technologie, notamment le Boeing 737 Next Generation — ou NG — ainsi que l'aéronef à fuselage étroit Boeing 737 MAX. En janvier, nous commencerons à utiliser le Boeing 787 Dreamliner, qui comprend d'importantes caractéristiques de réduction du bruit.

Par exemple, le nouvel aéronef Boeing 737 MAX possède une empreinte sonore inférieure de 40 % même à celle du plus récent membre de la famille 737, le NG. Le Boeing 787 Dreamliner aura une empreinte sonore inférieure de 60 % à celle du Boeing 767 qu'il remplacera dans la flotte de WestJet.

Le bruit des aéronefs est réduit par des améliorations apportées à l'aérodynamique et grâce à des technologies de réduction du poids. Ces améliorations permettent aux aéronefs de monter plus haut et plus rapidement au décollage, avec une poussée moins importante du réacteur. L'ajout de nouveaux propulseurs silencieux à taux de dilution élevé et de chevrons réducteurs de bruit dans l'échappement du moteur garantit la plus faible empreinte sonore possible.

Les dispositifs à faible vitesse, comme les volets sur les ailes, sont conçus pour assurer un bruit de cellule minimal durant la phase d'atterrissage, quand les aéronefs survolent nos collectivités le plus lentement et à l'altitude la plus basse.

D'autres technologies d'aérodynamisme et de réduction du poids contribuent également à l'amélioration des performances au décollage et à l'atterrissage. On réduit ainsi les empreintes sonores pour les collectivités situées près des aéroports que nous desservons. Ces investissements apportent des avantages doubles en ce qui a trait à la pollution sonore et à la réduction des émissions de carbone; ils permettent de s'assurer que l'aviation demeure à l'avant-plan de l'innovation environnementale.

Tous les pilotes reçoivent une formation leur permettant de respecter rigoureusement les procédures d'atténuation du bruit publiées par Transports Canada dans tous les aéroports canadiens. Avant toutes les approches ou tous les départs de vol, sans exception, les pilotes tiennent expressément compte de diverses considérations pour mieux atténuer le bruit, notamment les profils vertical et latéral de la trajectoire.

WestJet a investi tôt dans un programme de qualité de navigation requise — ou RNP — adapté sur mesure. Ce programme a implanté cette capacité au Canada en 2004, et a permis à WestJet d'appliquer les procédures RNP dans 20 aéroports canadiens. Les nouvelles approches RNP AR intègrent les profils verticaux avec des angles de descente constants effectués à des réglages de très faible poussée, sans segments de vol en palier. D'un point de vue latéral, elles sont conçues pour éviter les zones sensibles au bruit situées sous la trajectoire de nos vols.

WestJet a apporté une contribution clé au programme public de qualité de navigation requise de Nav Canada, grâce auquel, d'ici la fin de 2020, des approches RNP seront appliquées dans 24 aéroports canadiens dans le cadre de plusieurs transitions d'approche.

En conclusion, je voudrais remercier les membres du Comité de m'avoir donné la possibilité de leur communiquer notre bilan aujourd'hui en ce qui a trait à l'atténuation du bruit. Nous sommes fiers du travail que nous avons accompli et continuons de travailler dans cet important domaine.

Je voudrais également insister une fois de plus sur le fait que nous demeurons engagés à l'égard de l'exploitation sécuritaire et responsable de notre compagnie aérienne, y compris en faisant d'autres investissements dans la flotte, en innovant en matière de réduction du bruit et de technologies écoénergétiques et en assurant des consultations et une collaboration continuelles avec les collectivités que nous desservons.

Merci, et j'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions.

(0905)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Wilson.

Nous allons passer à M. Liepert, pour six minutes.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonjour, messieurs.

Un certain nombre de témoins qui ont comparu devant nous proposent — surtout à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, mais je pense que nous devons penser à tous nos grands aéroports du pays — que l'on interdise ou que l'on limite sérieusement les vols de nuit. On utilise toujours Francfort en guise d'exemple.

Je ne pense pas que WestJet ait des vols à destination de cette ville, mais sentez-vous à l'aise de formuler un commentaire également.

Ma première question serait la suivante: quelles seraient, à votre connaissance, les conséquences négatives du fait de suivre ce que j'appellerai le « modèle de Francfort », monsieur Strom?

M. Murray Strom:

Je voudrais formuler un commentaire. Je vous remercie de la question.

Je pilote des avions à destination de Francfort depuis 25 ans. Cette ville est un centre très solide.

La seule chose dont je voulais commencer à parler, c'est la différence entre le bruit d'il y a 25 ans et celui d'aujourd'hui. Il est complètement différent.

Nous avons beaucoup de chances d'avoir deux compagnies aériennes solides qui ont les moyens de dépenser, dans notre cas, 15 milliards de dollars pour acheter de nouveaux aéronefs. C'est la clé de l'atténuation du bruit. On peut observer une réduction du bruit de l'ordre de 60 %, ou même allant jusqu'à 90 % comparativement aux vieux avions du chapitre 3. Il s'agit de la mesure la plus importante que nous puissions prendre en tant que compagnie aérienne et, grâce au soutien de la Chambre des communes, nous avons été en mesure de le faire.

Quand j'arrivais à Francfort, il y a 25 ans, il y avait toute une section d'avions-cargos qui s'y rendaient également. Quand j'arrive là-bas de nos jours, il n'y en a aucun. Tous les emplois associés à ces avions-cargos et aux vols de nuit ont disparu. Ils sont partis ailleurs.

Le changement le plus important que j'ai remarqué... Cette situation n'a pas modifié mes activités, car nous ne pilotons pas d'avions-cargos. Ce qui a changé, c'est la perte de plusieurs milliers d'emplois à Francfort pour cette raison.

M. Ron Liepert:

Il ne fait aucun doute que le type de mesures recommandées a des conséquences économiques.

M. Murray Strom:

C'est exact.

M. Ron Liepert:

D'accord.

Je voudrais poser une question au sujet d'une situation personnelle. Je représente une circonscription de Calgary, et je sais que vous connaissez bien tous les deux les approches de cette ville.

Depuis l'inauguration de la nouvelle piste, les approches ont changé, certes, du côté ouest. Ma circonscription, qui se situe à une demi-heure de route de l'aéroport, se trouve maintenant sous une trajectoire de vol qui amène mes résidants à me faire part de problèmes sans fin, et ce, malgré que vous affirmiez que le bruit a été réduit au cours des dernières années.

J'ai notamment demandé aux représentants de Nav Canada pourquoi ils ne pouvaient pas déplacer cette trajectoire de vol de huit kilomètres vers l'ouest, où très peu de gens vivent, et, s'il le fallait, de huit kilomètres vers l'est, de sorte qu'on arrive de l'autre côté, où très peu de gens vivent. Ils ont soutenu, si je ne me trompe pas, que des problèmes de sécurité se posaient, mais des compagnies aériennes avaient également demandé à emprunter ces trajectoires particulières.

Pouvez-vous me dire, dans chaque cas, si le déplacement de cette approche de cinq kilomètres vers l'ouest et vers l'est est faisable? Si non, pourquoi? Si oui, pourquoi ne le fait-on pas?

(0910)

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je vais peut-être commencer par cette question et permettre à M. Strom de poursuivre.

Quand on jette un coup d'oeil à Calgary, évidemment, on voit que nous devons prendre le terrain en considération, compte tenu des montagnes Rocheuses situées à l'ouest de la ville. Si nous pouvons maintenir le bon espacement et la marge d'affranchissement du relief appropriée à l'arrivée, il ne devrait y avoir aucun problème de sécurité lié au rapprochement d'une trajectoire dans un sens ou dans l'autre.

Toutefois, si nous regardons ce qui est optimal afin de permettre une trajectoire d'approche, c'est-à-dire préserver les taux d'arrivée et l'efficience de l'aéroport, bien entendu, ce que nous recherchons également, c'est la distance la plus courte en milles de parcours pour l'arrivée, ce qui entraîne essentiellement une réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Cette considération devient habituellement l'une des priorités en matière d'approche, au moment où nous entrons dans la ville ou dans la collectivité.

Je ne crois pas qu'il s'agisse de problèmes de sécurité, mais il y aurait une perte d'efficience, et davantage de gaz à effet de serre serait émis sur les collectivités que nous survolons.

M. Murray Strom:

Je souscris aux commentaires formulés par Scott.

À nos yeux, c'est une question d'efficience. Nous prévoyons être au régime de ralenti au moment de l'approche, du haut de la descente jusqu'à 1 000 pieds, car, quand on est au ralenti, on ne fait pas de bruit. On fait un bruit de vent, et c'est tout. Voilà notre objectif.

Ainsi, on réduit les gaz à effet de serre, on économise sur les carburants et on amène les passagers à leur destination le plus tôt possible.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je pourrais donc dire à mes électeurs que la raison pour laquelle des aéronefs survolent nos collectivités, c'est que Nav Canada et les compagnies aériennes ont conclu qu'il s'agit de l'itinéraire le plus écologique et le plus sûr, sans égard aux conséquences sur les collectivités. Est-ce juste?

M. Murray Strom:

Mon commentaire à ce sujet est que nous suivons les procédures de Nav Canada et les consultations des aéroports auprès des collectivités. Nous suivons l'approche que Nav Canada et les collectivités ont désignée comme étant la meilleure.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je sais, mais vous auriez votre mot à dire là-dessus, évidemment. Vous affirmez que la raison est une question non pas de sécurité, mais d'efficience et de gaz à effet de serre.

M. Murray Strom:

Oui, nous recherchons toujours l'approche la plus efficiente.

La présidente:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Ron Liepert:

Allez-y. J'y reviendrai plus tard.

La présidente:

M. Graham est le prochain intervenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vais donner suite à l'une des questions posées par M. Liepert.

La nouvelle piste de Calgary fait 14 000 pieds de long, si je me souviens bien. À l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, beaucoup de pistes font moins de 10 000 pieds. Je ne connais pas la réponse à cette question, mais les diverses longueurs de pistes et les zones limites des aéroports ont-elles une quelconque incidence sur le bruit des avions pour les collectivités avoisinantes? Dans quelle mesure y changent-elles quelque chose?

Capt Scott Wilson:

L'une des premières raisons de la longueur des pistes à Calgary tient, bien entendu, au fait que l'aéroport est situé à près de 3 600 pieds au-dessus du niveau de la mer. Les conditions atmosphériques, la densité ou l'altitude signifient qu'on a habituellement besoin d'une piste plus longue.

Lorsque nous décollons, nous tentons de procéder à ce qu'on appelle un décollage à longueur de piste équivalente. Nous tentons d'utiliser une poussée minimale pour décoller d'une piste. L'avantage d'une piste plus longue tient au fait qu'elle nous permet essentiellement de prendre de la vitesse afin que nous puissions utiliser moins de poussée pour le décollage.

Dans le cas d'une piste courte, il faudrait se rapprocher de la poussée maximale pour le décollage.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce cas, il est certain qu'une piste plus courte a une incidence sur le bruit.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Elle le pourrait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

En ce qui concerne le kit de réduction du bruit produit des A320 — je sais que WestJet n'est pas touchée —, vous affirmez qu'Airbus ne suffit pas à la demande. J'ai vu une photographie de ce dispositif. Il s'agit essentiellement d'une attache croisée que l'on place sur l'aile. Depuis combien de temps Airbus offre-t-elle cette pièce d'équipement?

M. Murray Strom:

On dirait une attache; elle se fixe à l'aile, mais, pour l'installer, il faut la verrouiller à l'intérieur de l'aile. Généralement, elle est installée pendant une opération majeure d'entretien, parce qu'il faut vider complètement les réserves de combustible, puis ouvrir l'aile au complet. Ensuite, des gens peuvent grimper dans l'aile pour installer l'attache et la verrouiller.

Présentement, il y a une pénurie chez Airbus. Nous avions un plan. Comme toute chose, on ne peut pas mettre en oeuvre un plan du jour au lendemain, et malheureusement, Airbus n'a plus de kits. Nous avons demandé à Airbus si nous pouvions en fabriquer nous-mêmes, mais on nous a répondu que non. Airbus détient le brevet du kit.

Nous faisons tout en notre pouvoir — vous avez ma parole — pour que ce soit installé le plus tôt possible. J'en sais davantage maintenant sur ces générateurs que je ne l'aurais voulu. Encore une fois, on parle d'une réduction sonore de 3 %, mais avec les nouveaux appareils, elle est de 60 %, alors c'est surtout de ce côté que Air Canada a déployé des efforts.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de A320 y a-t-il dans votre flotte aérienne?

Vous nous avez donné les pourcentages au lieu d'un nombre.

M. Murray Strom:

Oui, nous avons donné des pourcentages. Ce que nous faisons présentement... D'un côté, les 737 MAX arrivent, et de l'autre, les Airbus partent. Pour être en mesure de connaître le chiffre exact, je vais devoir poser la question à notre équipe d'entretien. Au bout du compte, nous devrions avoir environ 50 Airbus, et chaque appareil sera modifié avec cette technologie.

L'Airbus est un avion très silencieux. Il n'y a que cette section qui émet un genre de petit sifflement. Nous allons régler cela, mais on parle d'une réduction de 3 %. Pour l'instant, nous mettons l'accent sur l'arrivée des nouveaux A220 et des nouveaux 737 MAX. L'année prochaine, nous allons recevoir 18 nouveaux 737 MAX. C'est notre priorité présentement.

(0915)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les réparations rétroactives de ce genre sont-elles fréquentes avec les autres aéronefs? Quelque chose du genre s'est-il déjà passé avant, ou est-ce que cela concerne seulement le A320?

M. Murray Strom:

Pour autant que je sache, le problème concerne seulement les A320.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, donc, aucun autre aéronef... Les fabricants d'aéronefs n'ont pas l'habitude de dire: « Regardez, nous avons mis au point un petit machin pour réduire le bruit émis par l'avion. »

M. Murray Strom:

Non, effectivement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, j'aimerais parler des options offertes aux consommateurs.

Les compagnies aériennes — comme la vôtre — prennent-elles des mesures pour informer les consommateurs du bruit émis par les aéronefs dans lesquels ils embarqueront, lorsqu'ils réservent leur vol, ou des options qui leur sont offertes? Par exemple, leur dit-on qu'un vol de nuit va passer au-dessus d'une collectivité? Les compagnies aériennes font-elles quoi que ce soit à ce sujet?

M. Samuel Elfassy (vice-président, Sécurité, Air Canada):

Nous ne donnons aucune information par rapport à ce que vous venez de demander.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce quelque chose que vous envisagez, par exemple dans le cadre d'activités de relations publiques? Vous pourriez dire: « À titre indicatif, voici le prix du vol, mais ce vol ne dérangera aucune collectivité. Cet autre vol, si. »

M. Samuel Elfassy:

Nous offrons aux passagers la possibilité d'acheter des crédits compensatoires pour atténuer leur empreinte carbone, mais il n'y a rien relativement au bruit présentement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Wilson, vous avez beaucoup parlé des approches de RNP, du programme de RNP. D'après votre expérience de pilote, cela a-t-il une incidence sur les vols? Je veux dire, si l'on compare l'approche directe et les entrées traditionnelles de circuit d'attente...?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Oui. Selon moi, c'est l'une des plus belles innovations que nous allons voir, en particulier en ce qui concerne la sécurité, le bruit et les empreintes carbone.

À bien des égards, les approches de RNP sont uniques. Pour commencer, il y a bien sûr le fait qu'elles tirent parti de la constellation de satellites, des capacités de navigation de l'aéronef ainsi que de la formation des pilotes. Elles n'ont besoin d'absolument rien au sol. Essentiellement, cela permet aux pilotes d'adapter l'espacement au terrain. À cet égard, Calgary est unique. À dire vrai, c'est la première fois dans le monde où ce qu'on pourrait appeler des approches de RNP à l'arrivée sont autorisées. Cela nous permet, en résumé, d'avoir une approche courbe et de réduire l'espacement de cette façon.

Cela nous permet également d'éviter certains espaces ou des zones sensibles au bruit. L'avantage, donc, c'est que vous pouvez non seulement conserver un angle de descente constant et ainsi diminuer la poussée et le bruit, mais également courber la trajectoire lorsque c'est nécessaire, essentiellement. Les approches directes sont nécessaires lorsqu'on utilise, par exemple, un système de navigation au sol comme le LIS, le système d'atterrissage aux instruments. L'avantage, avec les approches de RNP, c'est que nous pouvons adapter les approches aux conditions uniques où nous nous trouvons — l'aéroport, les collectivités, etc. —, tout en étant encore plus efficaces et sécuritaires et en réduisant autant que possible notre empreinte sonore du même coup.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les pilotes de vol VFR spéciaux pourront-ils faire des approches de RNP bientôt?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Vous seriez surpris d'apprendre ce que peut supposer la configuration des petits aéronefs, alors, oui, ils peuvent maintenant effectuer ce genre d'approche.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Nantel, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence.

On a parlé des avions A320 et C Series, mais j'aimerais savoir si le nouveau Boeing 777 est équipé d'un moteur PurePower de Pratt & Whitney. Quelqu'un peut-il me répondre? [Traduction]

M. Murray Strom:

Le nouveau Boeing est muni d'un moteur fabriqué par un consortium dont Pratt & Whitney fait partie. Il y a aussi un fabricant européen. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Je représente la circonscription de Longueuil—Saint-Hubert. C'est un peu chauvin de ma part, mais ce sont les gens de Pratt & Whitney qui ont inventé le turbopropulseur PT6, qui est le meilleur ami de l'homme après le chien et le cheval. Ils ont aussi mis au point le moteur PurePower qui, comme vous l'avez dit, diminue beaucoup le bruit et de façon extrêmement efficace.

Allez-vous pouvoir doter votre flotte de ce moteur? Vous me dites que ce moteur de Boeing est issu d'un consortium. Est-ce le moteur PurePower qui est à l'intérieur des nacelles? [Traduction]

M. Murray Strom:

Je vais devoir vérifier auprès de la division d'entretien. Le nouvel avion Bombardier, le A220 — de la C Series — est construit à Montréal et est équipé d'un moteur Pratt & Whitney. Je vais devoir vérifier qui est le fabricant du moteur du 737. Malheureusement, mon avion est le 777, le gros aéronef. Je connais aussi le 737, mais je vais devoir vérifier auprès de l'équipe d'entretien. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Monsieur Wilson, WestJet Airlines a-t-elle fait l'acquisition de moteurs plus silencieux, comme le PurePower?

(0920)

[Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Dans notre flotte, en particulier les Boeing 737, il n'y a qu'un type de moteur possible, le LEAP-1B. Son empreinte sonore est inférieure de 40 %, essentiellement, à celle des aéronefs que nous achetions il y a 10 ans seulement. Même si ce n'est pas un moteur PurePower — que ce n'est pas le même type de produit —, c'est tout de même l'un des moteurs les plus silencieux. C'est le seul moteur qu'on peut installer dans le 737 MAX, mais c'est un moteur très silencieux.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Ces moteurs plus silencieux — que ce soit le PurePower ou l'autre moteur dont vous avez parlé — consomment-ils moins de combustible?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Oui, ils consomment environ 20 % moins de combustible que ceux qu'ils remplacent.

M. Pierre Nantel:

C'est impressionnant. [Français]

J'aimerais vous poser une question sur la gestion du bruit. Je suis de Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, et vous pouvez être certain que je suis bien au fait des problèmes liés au bruit des écoles de pilotage. Plusieurs témoins ont dit que Transports Canada a un peu laissé la gestion du bruit aux communautés ou aux organismes sans but non lucratif qui gèrent les aéroports.

Souhaiteriez-vous que Transports Canada encadre mieux ces activités et établisse des normes en matière de bruit? Je pense, entre autres, aux requêtes que les personnes habitant dans le voisinage de l'aéroport de Dorval ont faites au printemps. Ces gens se sont plaints que l'installation de capteurs de bruit se faisait selon la bonne volonté de l'aéroport.

L'établissement de normes et un encadrement plus centralisé par Transports Canada aideraient-ils à apaiser ces conflits qui perdurent? Quand on habite à côté d'un aéroport, bien sûr qu'on sait qu'il y aura du bruit, mais certaines mesures ne seraient-elles pas davantage respectées si Transports Canada s'engageait davantage en ce sens? [Traduction]

M. Murray Strom:

J'ai la chance de voler dans la plupart des grands aéroports du monde, et je peux dire que les procédures de réduction du bruit de Transports Canada, de Nav Canada et des autorités aéroportuaires locales sont parmi les plus strictes au monde.

Dans certains pays, il n'y en a pas du tout. Par exemple, au Moyen-Orient, on accorde la priorité au secteur de l'aviation, tandis qu'en Europe et dans la plupart d'Amérique du Nord, y compris le Canada, on impose des procédures très rigoureuses. Nos pilotes reçoivent une formation pour chaque départ. Ils sont mis au courant des procédures et doivent les suivre. S'ils ne suivent pas les procédures, on les ramène rapidement à l'ordre.

Capt Scott Wilson:

J'approuve les commentaires de Murray. Selon moi, nous avons un système unique au Canada, où Transports Canada collabore avec les organisations, en particulier les autorités aéroportuaires, Nav Canada et les compagnies aériennes. Nous travaillons ensemble. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

D'accord.

Vous reconnaissez donc que, justement, c'est une communauté qui s'organise pour régler les problèmes liés au voisinage de l'aéroport, plutôt que d'attendre que le gouvernement intervienne. N'est-ce pas? [Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

J'ai vécu pendant de nombreuses années en dessous d'un corridor aérien, alors je comprends le point de vue des collectivités. Pour commencer, j'aimerais souligner que j'ai vécu près de l'extrémité de départ de la piste 20, à Calgary, et, en comparaison d'il y a 20 ans, le bruit a quasiment disparu.

Les collectivités peuvent et devraient avoir leur mot à dire sur le système, mais il faut évidemment trouver de façon objective un juste équilibre entre la rentabilité et les investissements, d'une part, et, d'autre part, la nécessité de maintenir une fréquence d'arrivée adéquate pour utiliser efficacement l'aéroport et continuer de fournir aux Canadiens les vols auxquels ils s'attendent. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Monsieur Elfassy, vous avez mentionné à mon collègue M. Graham que vous n'offriez pas de compensation pour ce qui est du bruit causé par les avions.

Par contre, quand vous évoquez la possibilité de compenser l'empreinte carbone, l'entreprise qui est bénéficiaire de votre lien pour acheter son crédit carbone rend-elle des comptes à Air Canada?

À qui rend-elle des comptes quant à la réelle application des sommes investies par les consommateurs? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, messieurs, mais vous avez dépassé votre temps, alors vous n'aurez pas le temps...

M. Pierre Nantel:

Toutes mes excuses.

La présidente:

... de répondre. Peut-être que la réponse sera fournie au député à un autre moment pendant la séance ou après la séance.

Allez-y, monsieur Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les représentants des compagnies aériennes d'être ici, ce matin.

Ma question s'adresse aux deux compagnies.

Selon vous, existe-t-il une corrélation entre la pollution sonore causée par les aéronefs et la maladie cardiaque chez les adultes ou le stress chronique?

(0925)

[Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, vu ma profession de pilote, je doute être la bonne personne pour vous répondre. Je ne sais pas s'il y a une corrélation comme vous le dites.

M. Murray Strom:

Je vais me faire l'écho de ce que Scott a dit. Je suis très doué pour piloter un avion, mais je ne connais pas grand-chose de leurs effets sur la santé. Je laisse cela à mon médecin. Désolé. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

D'accord.

Toutefois, vous êtes au courant de toutes les études qui ont été menées sur les problèmes de santé. N'est-ce pas?

Peut-être que vous n'êtes pas en mesure de décrire ou de confirmer la corrélation, mais savez-vous s'il y en a une ou pas? [Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je sais que plusieurs articles ont essayé d'établir une corrélation, mais je ne suis pas convaincu de la validité des données. Mais, encore une fois, je ne crois pas être la meilleure personne pour faire des commentaires à propos de ce genre de choses.

M. Murray Strom:

J'ai lu l'article de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé ainsi que d'autre articles qui le contredisent. Je laisse les experts statuer sur cette question. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Concernant ce problème de bruit, avez-vous reçu des commentaires, des plaintes ou des griefs de la part de vos pilotes ou est-ce que, pour eux, le phénomène n'existe pas? [Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

J'ai grandi ici, dans notre beau pays, et j'ai vu l'évolution du monde de l'aviation au fil des ans. Je peux vous dire que j'ai piloté des aéronefs beaucoup plus bruyants que ceux que je pilote aujourd'hui.

Quand nous avons fait l'acquisition du Boeing 737 MAX il y a un an, et, la première fois que je l'ai piloté, j'ai remarqué à quel point c'était silencieux dans le poste de pilotage, en plus des autres avantages au sol qu'offre cet appareil. La bonne chose, avec les nouveaux aéronefs et les nouvelles technologies, c'est qu'ils sont moins bruyants pour les gens au sol et les collectivités que l'on survole. Les passagers et les invités ainsi que les membres d'équipage vivent aussi une bien meilleure expérience à bord. Nous reconnaissons les avantages.

M. Murray Strom:

Je suis d'accord avec ce que Scott dit. Nous effectuons une surveillance active de l'aéronef dans le poste de pilotage. Si un pilote remarque quelque chose d'anormal par rapport au bruit dans le poste de pilotage, nous allons faire des vérifications pour nous assurer que le niveau de bruit est normal. Si le niveau de bruit est un peu trop élevé, nous allons fournir aux pilotes des casques pour supprimer le bruit ambiant. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.[Traduction]

Monsieur Strom, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez mentionné que le bruit a changé au cours des 20 ou 25 dernières années. Est-ce bien ce que vous avez dit?

M. Murray Strom:

Oui.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Si le bruit est différent, c'est que quelque chose a changé, parce que je ne crois pas qu'autant de personnes se plaignaient du bruit des avions il y a 20 ou 25 ans. Quelque chose a changé. Je vois que vous souriez par rapport à mon commentaire. J'aimerais vous demander: « Qu'est-ce qui a changé? »

M. Murray Strom:

Je me souviens que, quand j'ai été embauché par Air Canada il y a 32 ans, j'avais l'habitude de m'asseoir à l'extérieur, à l'hôtel Hilton de Dorval, près de l'aéroport, pour écouter le bruit des DC-8, des 727, des DC-9 et des 737 qui décollaient. C'était un son merveilleux. J'adore le bruit des aéronefs. C'est pourquoi j'ai décidé de devenir pilote. C'est extraordinaire d'entendre le bruit de la poussée des moteurs.

Maintenant, quand je vais à l'extérieur, je n'entends pas grand-chose. Les choses ont changé. La technologie a changé l'industrie aérienne. Les gens se plaignent davantage du bruit maintenant, pour toutes sortes de raisons, mais les aéronefs eux-mêmes émettent 90 % moins de bruit, je crois, dans certains cas. Personnellement, cela me manque, parce que j'aime le son des aéronefs, mais ils font moins de bruit maintenant qu'avant.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Puisque vous adorez ce son, je vous invite à venir dans ma circonscription de Laval. Vous pourrez vous asseoir avec mes électeurs et l'écouter, parce qu'ils l'entendent très souvent.

M. Murray Strom:

Non, non.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Ce qu'ils me disent, c'est que les choses ont changé.

J'ai une autre question. Les avions volent-ils plus bas qu'avant? Leur altitude est-elle beaucoup plus basse qu'avant?

M. Murray Strom:

Non, ils volent plus haut.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Vous dites qu'ils volent plus haut.

M. Murray Strom:

Oui.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Pouvez-vous aussi répondre à la question, monsieur Wilson? Les avions volent-ils à la même altitude, plus haut ou plus bas?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Pour en revenir aux approches de RNP, l'avantage est que nous sommes beaucoup plus près de l'aéroport. Par mesure de sécurité, l'angle d'inclinaison est de 3°, ce qui donne environ 300 pieds par mille marin. Si on fait abstraction du reste que l'on peut faire par ailleurs, quand un avion est à proximité de l'aéroport, disons à trois milles, il se trouvera environ à mille pieds dans les airs. Cela n'a pas vraiment changé entre les années 1960 à aujourd'hui.

(0930)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Ma dernière question s'adresse à vous deux. Dans quelle mesure participez-vous aux décisions concernant les vols, par exemple les trajectoires de vol, les corridors aériens et l'altitude? De quelle façon intervenez-vous dans les décisions sur les vols?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Vous voulez savoir quelles décisions le pilote peut prendre?

M. Angelo Iacono:

Non, plutôt la compagnie aérienne.

Capt Scott Wilson:

La compagnie aérienne...

M. Angelo Iacono:

Qui décide de l'itinéraire et de l'heure du départ? Qui contrôle tout cela? Qui donne les ordres?

Capt Scott Wilson:

À dire vrai, je crois que les décisions viennent surtout du public voyageur. Essentiellement, c'est le public voyageur qui dit ce qu'il veut aux compagnies aériennes par l'intermédiaire des billets qu'il achète. Nous pouvons voir quelles heures de départ et quels itinéraires sont les plus populaires. C'est de cette façon que nous évaluons la durabilité.

L'information est ensuite fournie à un planificateur de réseau qui, en gros, montera un horaire pour le réseau et les services connexes, et cet horaire est censé fournir le meilleur service possible au public et aux voyageurs canadiens. Ensuite, l'information est transmise à nos systèmes de régulation des vols, qui permettent d'établir les meilleurs itinéraires. En dernier lieu, le jour du vol, le pilote prend les commandes de l'appareil et il travaille avec Nav Canada.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Monsieur Strom...

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Strom. Pouvez-vous faire parvenir la réponse d'une façon ou d'une autre à M. Iacono?

La parole va à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Je vais laisser mon collègue, M. Rogers , poser la première question, pourvu qu'il me promette de faire vite.

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Je vous le promets.

Avant tout, merci, messieurs, d'être ici ce matin. Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Strom.

La pollution sonore des avions n'est pas un problème dans ma région à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, en particulier, à l'aéroport de Gander, depuis qu'Air Canada a annulé ses vols du matin et de la nuit, ce qui cause bien des désagréments aux voyageurs et aux gens d'affaires qui veulent sortir de la province pour aller ailleurs au pays. Cela me cause bien des désagréments à moi dans mon rôle de député. Mes fins de semaine ne comptent plus qu'un jour, puisque je ne peux pas retourner sur l'île un jeudi soir.

Monsieur Strom, pour quelles raisons a-t-on décidé d'annuler ces vols?

M. Murray Strom:

Je vais devoir poser la question aux responsables de la planification opérationnelle pour vous fournir une justification. Je n'ai pas l'information sous la main présentement.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord. Je crois que c'est mon tour.

Merci, monsieur Rogers.

Pouvez-vous me dire ce que signifie le sigle RNP?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Required navigation performance, ou qualité de navigation requise.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

Est-ce que l'un ou l'autre d'entre vous avez eu affaire personnellement avec des gens de la collectivité qui se plaignent du bruit de vos aéronefs?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je serais heureux de répondre à cette question.

Oui...

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai seulement besoin d'une réponse courte, parce que j'ai une question complémentaire à poser ensuite. Donc, vous avez dit oui. D'accord.

Avez-vous déjà discuté avec des gens qui se disent importunés par le bruit des dispositifs d'annulation active du bruit dans leur maison? Il se vend des choses qui fonctionnent essentiellement comme des casques de réduction de bruit et qui pourraient éliminer le bruit dans une chambre, par exemple.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je connais la technologie utilisée à bord des aéronefs. Les Bombardier Q400 de notre flotte utilisent une technologie d'annulation active du bruit, dans le poste de pilotage, mais je ne sais pas comment cela fonctionnerait ou si cela pourrait être utilisé dans une résidence. C'est une bonne question, mais je ne suis au courant d'aucune technologie pour les maisons.

M. Ken Hardie:

Peut-être que quelqu'un devrait lancer un projet pilote.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Bonne idée.

M. Ken Hardie:

Parlons du bruit lui-même. Vous n'êtes peut-être pas les meilleures personnes à qui poser la question, étant donné que vous ne recueillez probablement pas ce genre d'information, mais y a-t-il un profil établi des personnes les plus sensibles au bruit? Par exemple, y a-t-il une différence entre les hommes et les femmes ou entre les tranches d'âge?

M. Murray Strom:

Je n'ai pas ce genre d'information, et je ne crois pas que nous nous sommes penchés là-dessus. On en parlait dans l'un des rapports de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé, mais je n'ai pas l'information sous la main présentement.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'après mon expérience de l'époque où je travaillais à la programmation de stations de radio, je sais que les hommes et les femmes réagissent différemment au bruit ou aux irritants. En outre, nous sommes à une époque — ce que j'appellerais la génération qui s'abîme les tympans — où les gens montent au maximum le volume de leur chaîne stéréo, dans la voiture, ou de leurs autres appareils.

Je me demandais si une partie du problème — le nombre de plaintes qui augmente même si les avions sont plus silencieux que jamais — tient d'une façon ou d'une autre au fait que les gens ont abîmé leur audition avec ces appareils, ce qui les rend plus sensibles aux bruits. Pouvez-vous faire des commentaires là-dessus?

Il y a aussi le fait que, comme membre d'équipage dans le poste de pilotage, vous êtes en présence constante d'un certain niveau de bruit pendant la durée du voyage, alors qu'au sol, le bruit est sporadique. Il y a du bruit, puis du silence, puis encore du bruit. Est-ce que ce genre de chose a été pris en considération pour élaborer un plan global de gestion du bruit dans les aéroports?

(0935)

M. Murray Strom:

Encore une fois, je ne suis pas un expert et je ne peux pas répondre à votre première question.

Pour répondre à votre deuxième question, le poste de pilotage des nouveaux avions est beaucoup plus silencieux. Je ne suis pas au courant d'études qui auraient été menées sur l'effet du bruit sur les personnes. Dans l'ensemble, nous suivons les lignes directrices de Santé Canada applicables au personnel de bord, aux passagers et aux pilotes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Participez-vous d'une façon ou d'une autre à la planification dans les aéroports, en particulier en ce qui concerne l'alignement des pistes par rapport à tout ce qui se passe aux alentours? Une trajectoire de vol qui passe, par exemple, au-dessus d'une petite zone industrielle comme on en voit souvent près des aéroports, ce n'est pas la même chose que si elle passe au-dessus d'un nouveau quartier résidentiel.

M. Murray Strom:

Nous consultons les autorités aéroportuaires locales pour les aider lorsque nous le pouvons. Nous leur offrons d'utiliser nos simulateurs pour tester de nouvelles approches. Nous travaillons aussi avec Nav Canada.

Nous participons aux efforts, mais nous ne les dirigeons pas.

M. Ken Hardie:

Est-ce que des municipalités situées près des aéroports vous ont déjà invité à participer aux décisions de zonage? Vous l'a-t-on déjà demandé?

M. Murray Strom:

Non, pour autant que je le sache. Je crois que c'est l'autorité aéroportuaire qui s'en charge.

La présidente:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hardie.

La parole va à M. Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci d'être venus ici aujourd'hui, si près de Noël. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants.

Récemment, le ministre des Transports est venu témoigner devant nous et il a dit quelque chose d'intéressant à propos de la taxe sur le carbone. Il a affirmé que personne ne lui a parlé d'effets défavorables de la taxe sur le carbone.

Avez-vous entendu un autre son de cloche? La taxe sur le carbone a-t-elle eu des effets défavorables? Peut-être pourriez-vous nous dire quel a été l'effet de la taxe sur le carbone sur votre industrie?

M. Murray Strom:

Je ne suis pas la bonne personne à qui poser cette question. Il faudrait réunir les représentants de trois ou quatre services différents pour vous donner une réponse exacte. Je pourrais m'informer pour vous, mais, en ce qui me concerne, je m'occupe des opérations aériennes au quotidien. Ce genre d'information relève d'autres services.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Donc, monsieur Strom, vous n'avez pas d'opinion personnelle à ce sujet. Peut-être avez-vous entendu quelque chose au travail?

M. Murray Strom:

Je préfère ne pas formuler d'opinion quand je ne connais pas les faits.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Et vous, monsieur Wilson, avez-vous une opinion?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je suis d'accord avec M. Strom à ce sujet. Je ne veux pas dire mon opinion sur un sujet que je ne connais pas bien.

Cependant, je veux insister sur le fait qu'il y a eu un très haut niveau d'investissement de capitaux dans les cellules d'aéronef et dans les moteurs, afin de réduire au minimum le niveau de bruit et d'augmenter au maximum l'efficience. Donc, j'ose espérer que le niveau d'investissement de la compagnie aérienne compensera n'importe quelle taxe.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vos entreprises font partie du Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada. Est-ce exact? Votre association a envoyé à la ministre McKenna une lettre qui mettait en relief les conséquences défavorables de la taxe sur le carbone. Une copie de la lettre a aussi été envoyée au ministre Garneau et au ministre Morneau.

Laissez-moi poser la question en d'autres termes. Croyez-vous qu'il serait utile, pour votre compagnie aérienne ou votre association, qu'un comité comme le nôtre songe à entreprendre une étude sur les répercussions de la taxe sur le carbone?

M. Murray Strom:

Je crois que oui.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Pardon. Pouvez-vous répéter?

M. Murray Strom:

Je crois que oui.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je suis d'accord.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord.

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Godin.

(0940)

[Français]

M. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, PCC):

Merci.

À l'écoute des témoignages aujourd'hui et considérant le coût que représenterait le remplacement des appareils comme solution au problème de bruit, je constate que c'est toujours le consommateur qui, au bout du compte, paie la note.

J'aimerais déposer une motion au nom de Mme Kelly Block, qui a présenté l'avis de motion le 26 octobre dernier. La motion est ainsi rédigée: Que le Comité entame une étude sur les répercussions de la taxe fédérale sur le carbone sur l'industrie du transport, comme suit: une réunion sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur le secteur de l'aviation; une réunion sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur le secteur ferroviaire; une réunion sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur le secteur du camionnage; et que le Comité fasse rapport de ses conclusions à la Chambre.

Je crois qu'il est important d'avoir des faits et de faire l'exercice de façon rigoureuse afin d'avoir des réponses claires. Nous sommes tous d'accord pour protéger notre environnement, mais il faut en mesurer le coût et il faut savoir de quoi nous parlons. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Godin.

Allez-y, monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Je tiens pour acquis que vous prenez la parole à propos de la motion.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Effectivement.

Je tiens à m'excuser auprès des témoins, mais, à la lumière de vos commentaires d'aujourd'hui ainsi que du témoignage de la ministre, je crois qu'il est important que nous entamions une étude le plus tôt possible. Peut-être pourrions-nous commencer tout de suite après le congé. Peut-être pourrions-nous même étudier la question pendant le congé.

Il arrive souvent que l'autre côté balaye la question sous le tapis lorsque le débat est ajourné, et c'est pourquoi nous voulions le proposer aujourd'hui, encore une fois, à la lumière des témoignages qui ont été faits ici et des commentaires de la ministre.

Merci.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je soutiens cette motion. Si nous pouvions y consacrer du temps, je crois que cela nous permettra d'approfondir tout ce que nous avons appris aujourd'hui.

Nav Canada essaie à de nombreux égards de se conformer aux politiques du gouvernement au pouvoir, mais ses décisions ont des répercussions sur les électeurs — c'est surtout vrai pour les miens —, parce qu'il cherche à accroître l'efficience des compagnies aériennes. C'est très bien, mais, malgré que les décisions donnent des résultats, nous imposons quand même à l'industrie une taxe sur le carbone, ce qui va à l'encontre de l'objectif et force les compagnies aériennes à faire voler leurs appareils au-dessus des collectivités peuplées.

De plus, il a clairement été dit que c'est principalement pour réduire les émissions que certaines trajectoires de vol passent au-dessus de zones très peuplées. Je crois que l'on devrait creuser un peu plus de ce côté, pendant que nous débattons de la motion.

La présidente:

Allez-y monsieur Godin. Soyez bref, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais mentionner à mes collègues que des témoins nous ont parlé ce matin de l'importance de renouveler la flotte d'aéronefs. La diminution du bruit et l'empreinte environnementale passent par l'achat de nouveaux appareils. Je conviens cependant que cela entraîne des coûts et des répercussions sur les consommateurs. En outre, il faut être conscient que la production d'un nouvel appareil suppose une utilisation de ressources et de matières premières, et que cela contribue à augmenter l'empreinte environnementale.

Il faut aussi se rappeler qu'il existe plusieurs cimetières de vieux avions, où se trouvent des avions qui ne sont plus utilisés, qui sont retirés de la circulation. Il faut mesurer ces éléments. Il serait important, comme parlementaires, que nous considérions la situation dans son ensemble pour pouvoir prendre des décisions éclairées. Pour ce faire, je suggère que nous attendions d'obtenir des réponses à nos questions. C'est notre avenir qui est en cause et je pense que c'est notre responsabilité. C'est pourquoi la motion est importante pour nous.

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Godin.

M. Nantel est le prochain sur la liste. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Peut-être n'êtes-vous pas au courant, messieurs, mais vous ne serez sans doute pas surpris d'apprendre que je déploie présentement beaucoup d'efforts pour réunir tous les partis autour du problème lié au réchauffement climatique. Je pense que les conservateurs ont, eux aussi, un point de vue là-dessus. À mon avis, on ne peut pas nier l'évidence du réchauffement climatique. Avant d'en arriver à de telles mesures, j'aimerais voir le Parti conservateur s'engager dans une sérieuse discussion sur le réchauffement climatique.

Il va de soi que des coûts sont associés à la réduction de notre empreinte de carbone. Nous voyons bien qu'un jeu d'obstruction sur le plan politique est en cours. Je ne crois pas que ce soit dans l'intérêt de qui que ce soit. Je vais conclure simplement en disant que, bien entendu, je vais m'opposer à cette motion. Cependant, je tends la main en suggérant que cette proposition soit présentée à nouveau une fois que votre chef aura accepté de participer au sommet des chefs sur le réchauffement climatique, que je propose de tenir en janvier prochain.

Merci.

(0945)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Nous allons revenir à M. Godin une fois encore; brièvement, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

En réponse aux propos de mon collègue, je dirai que nous, les conservateurs, sommes très sensibles à l'environnement. Notre approche est peut-être différente de celle de mon collègue du NPD, mais je crois que, avant d'entreprendre des initiatives, il faut savoir de quoi on parle. C'est pourquoi je pense qu'il serait judicieux de faire une étude et d'organiser des rencontres pour déterminer ce que serait l'incidence réelle. Nous sommes en train de réaliser que les voitures électriques ne sont pas si bénéfiques, sur le plan environnemental, que le prétendaient les scientifiques dans le passé. Il faut s'interroger avant de prendre des décisions qui touchent l'avenir. J'invite donc le Comité à accepter cette motion pour que nous puissions obtenir des réponses à nos questions et faire ainsi de l'excellent travail en tant que parlementaires.

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Godin.

La motion nous est soumise à juste titre. Nous allons tous...

Allez-y, monsieur Nantel. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Puisque vous avez la gentillesse de me redonner la parole, je précise que j'invite le premier ministre Justin Trudeau à participer à ce sommet, bien sûr. En effet, il est évident qu'aucun individu n'est tout noir ou tout blanc. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Nantel.

Vous avez tous la motion sous les yeux. Je ne vois pas d'autre intervention.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

La présidente:

Un vote par appel nominal me va.

(La motion est rejetée par 6 voix contre 3.)

La présidente: Je remercie beaucoup les témoins d'être venus ici. Je suis certaine que nous allons en apprendre davantage les uns sur les autres d'ici la fin de cette étude.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour quelques instants pendant que les témoins qui sont venus parler de la motion 177 sur les écoles de pilotes s'installent.

(0945)

(0950)

La présidente:

Reprenons nos travaux, s'il vous plaît.

Merci à tous. Merci à tous pour votre patience.

Nous accueillons M. Bernard Gervais, président et chef de la direction de la Canadian Owners and Pilots Association; Mme Robin Hadfield, administratrice du Conseil d'administration international, gouverneure de la Section de l'Est du Canada, de The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots; et Mme Judy Cameron, ancienne pilote d'Air Canada, directrice de la Northern Lights Aero Foundation, qui témoigne à titre personnel.

Ils parleront bien sûr de la motion M-177 dans le cadre de l'étude des défis que doivent relever les écoles de pilotage au Canada.

Madame Hadfield, voulez-vous prendre la parole en premier? Vous avez cinq minutes. Quand je lèverai la main, c'est pour vous prier de conclure.

Mme Robin Hadfield (administratrice, Conseil d'administration international, gouverneure, Section de l'Est du Canada, The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots):

Merci.

Mon engagement personnel en tant que pilote a commencé il y a 39 ans et s'est poursuivi dans le secteur de l'aviation générale. La famille Hadfield se consacre à l'aviation depuis plus de 60 ans; trois générations et quatre pilotes ont travaillé à Air Canada; des membres de la famille ont été instructeurs de vol, d'autres ont effectué des relevés aériens dans l'Arctique et d'autres encore ont volé pour Wasaya Airways, compagnie qui appartient à des Autochtones et fait la navette, dans le Nord de l'Ontario, entre les réserves isolées. Cela nous donne une perspective unique sur mon beau-frère, qui a commandé dans la station spatiale.

Quand j'étais jeune, nos discussions quotidiennes en famille portaient sur l'aviation. Elles m'ont permis d'avoir une compréhension très large de bon nombre des enjeux liés au secteur de l'aviation.

Bien que la motion concerne les écoles de pilotage et que je n'aie pas de connaissances approfondies sur la question, je connais certainement les problèmes auxquels nous faisons face dans le secteur de l'aviation générale. Aujourd'hui, je voulais qu'on règle les problèmes que nous observons. The Ninety-Nines est la plus ancienne et la plus grande organisation de femmes pilotes au monde; elle compte plus de 6 000 membres, maintenant, sur presque tous les continents.

Il ne s'agit pas d'un problème propre au Canada, c'est un problème qu'on observe partout. J'aimerais exposer les problèmes tel que nous les voyons et ensuite, très rapidement, présenter ce que je considère comme étant la solution. Nous pouvons en parler plus tard, pendant la séance des questions, si vous le voulez.

Le premier problème concerne les coûts très élevés de la formation au pilotage, comme vous l'avez déjà entendu dire pendant vos séances. En réalité, cela coûte de 80 000 à 90 000 $ à un étudiant qui veut passer du statut de pilote privé à celui de détenteur d'une licence de pilote professionnel avec qualification de vol aux instruments pour avions multimoteurs. Ces coûts élevés sont un obstacle particulier, surtout pour les étudiants des ménages à faible revenu.

La solution serait d'offrir des prêts étudiants, n'exigeant ni garanties ni cosignataires, dans les écoles de pilotage qui offrent un programme menant à un diplôme, comme nous le faisons dans d'autres collèges et universités. En ce moment, les écoles de pilotage qui offrent des programmes de niveau collégial sont séparées des collèges et des universités et considérées comme des collèges privés; les prêts étudiants et le Régime d'aide financière aux étudiantes et étudiants de l'Ontario ne s'appliquent donc pas à elles, c'est un obstacle important.

Il existe un exemple de financement qui va au-delà des prêts. Comme vous avez entendu l'autre jour un pilote, je crois, dire ici — mais c'était peut-être Stephen Fuhr — dans les années 1950, quand vous obteniez votre licence de pilote, vous aviez droit à un rabais une fois que vous obteniez votre licence de pilote professionnel, pour vous aider avec les coûts. Un programme d'exonération de remboursement de prêts étudiants pourrait fonctionner de la même façon.

Nous n'avons pas suffisamment d'instructeurs de vols. Les instructeurs qui travaillent dans des écoles de pilotage gagnent généralement un salaire de misère. Une des solutions, c'est d'alléger le prêt à rembourser quand, par exemple, un diplômé travaille pendant deux ans en tant qu'instructeur. Peut-être qu'il aurait droit à une exonération de 40 % de son prêt étudiant, et, s'il travaille pendant quatre ans, à un pourcentage supérieur d'exonération. Nous pourrions appliquer aux élèves pilotes le même type de programme que nous avons appliqué aux médecins, au personnel infirmier et au personnel enseignant qui vont travailler dans le Nord.

L'un des autres problèmes, c'est qu'il n'y a pas assez de jeunes qui envisagent une carrière de pilote. Selon moi, il serait tout à fait logique que l'aviation et les cours de pilotage donnent droit à des crédits d'études secondaires. J'ai parlé au ministre de l'Éducation de l'Ontario. En tant qu'ancien conseiller scolaire, je suis au courant de ce qui se passe dans les écoles secondaires, et elles ne sont pas vraiment à la hauteur. Elles n'ont aucune idée de ce qu'est l'aviation. Il existe en Ontario un programme en aviation et aérospatiale, mais il se concentre exclusivement sur des aspects qui ne concernent pas l'aviation elle-même.

Il n'y a pas assez de femmes. C'est simple. Une fois encore, nous pouvons faciliter les choses en sensibilisant davantage les élèves des écoles secondaires, en mettant en lumière des femmes qui ont réussi et qui pourraient servir de modèle, en préparant des trousses à l'intention des services d'orientation et des enseignants — y compris avec des exemples de femmes pilotes qui ont de brillantes carrières — et en organisant des journées d'orientation présentées par des femmes pilotes professionnelles. Les organisations comme la nôtre facilitent déjà cela avec leurs programmes actuels, en travaillant de concert avec les ministres provinciaux et en créant de nouveaux programmes comme notre programme « Let's Fly Now! ».

En utilisant ce modèle, la section de The Ninety-Nines du Manitoba, avec son avion, travaille avec l'Université du Manitoba et l'école de pilotage de St. Andrews. Elle a acheté un simulateur de 15 000 $. Les filles peuvent l'utiliser gratuitement pour apprendre les procédures. En deux ans, plus de 20 femmes ont reçu leur licence de pilote, ce qui est plus que la plupart des écoles de pilotage de l'Ontario réunies.

(0955)



Il n'y a pas assez d'Autochtones. Nous devons encourager les écoles de pilotages des régions éloignées, comme Yellowknife, Thompson ou Senneterre. Même si de bonnes conditions météorologiques sont essentielles pour voler, nous devons nous déplacer là où se trouvent les écoles de pilotage; elles ne viendront pas à nous.

Nous n'avons pas assez d'écoles de pilotage. Les installations pour les nouveaux étudiants en pilotage sont insuffisantes. Nous pouvons améliorer les analyses de rentabilisation pour justifier un agrandissement de ces installations, car nous constatons qu'il y a une pénurie mondiale de pilotes. Nous avons déjà une bonne analyse de rentabilisation qui énonce les incitatifs économiques de ces agrandissements. Des prêts à faible taux d'intérêt pourraient aider à couvrir les coûts d'immobilisations élevés liés à l'expansion, par exemple pour les hangars et les avions d'entraînement.

Un nombre élevé d'étudiants étrangers s'inscrivent dans nos écoles de pilotage. Je crois qu'actuellement, 56 % des étudiants des écoles de pilotage viennent de l'étranger. Ces pays offrent des subventions aux étudiants pour qu'ils viennent étudier ici. Les écoles de pilotage leur facturent près du double des frais de scolarité; elles sont donc encouragées à les admettre. Les étudiants étrangers sont bénéfiques pour notre économie et pour les régions où ils s'installent. Toutefois, nous devons reconnaître que ces étudiants partent immédiatement après l'obtention de leur licence.

(1000)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Hadfield.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Gervais.

M. Bernard Gervais (président et chef de la direction, Canadian Owners and Pilots Association):

Merci. Bonjour.

Je vais rapidement vous parler de l'Association canadienne des propriétaires et pilotes d'aéronefs, qui a été fondée en 1952.

C'est la plus grande organisation d'aviation du Canada; son siège social est à Ottawa. Nous comptons 16 000 membres dans tout le pays; la plupart sont des pilotes privés et des pilotes professionnels, mais il y a aussi quelques pilotes de ligne, et le commandant Hadfield est notre porte-parole. Nous sommes la deuxième organisation en importance sur les 80 organisations membres du conseil international des associations de propriétaires et pilotes d'aéronefs, et nous avons des représentants à l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale. Notre mission est de faire avancer, de promouvoir et de préserver la liberté de voler du Canada.

Nous sommes les représentants de l'aviation générale au Canada. À l'exception des vols réguliers et des activités militaires aériennes, l'aviation générale englobe à peu près tout: la formation au pilotage, l'aviation agricole, l'aviation de brousse et bien d'autres choses encore. Comme je l'ai dit, c'est tout, sauf les vols réguliers et les vols militaires. Actuellement, parmi les 36 000 aéronefs inscrits au registre des aéronefs civils, plus de 32 000 sont des aéronefs d'aviation générale, ce qui représente près de 90 % des aéronefs.

L'aviation générale injecte 9,3 milliards de dollars dans notre économie. Pourquoi est-ce que je parle de cela? Parce que l'aviation générale occupe un créneau particulier dans le secteur de la formation au pilotage.

La plupart des aéronefs d'entraînement au pilotage font également partie de la flotte de l'aviation générale. La première étape dans la carrière de tout pilote, c'est d'entrer dans une unité de formation au pilotage, et il est très probable que ce soit une unité de formation à l'aviation générale. Cette formation a lieu dans de petits aéroports conçus pour l'aviation générale et dans des aérodromes plus adaptés à l'environnement de formation et aux activités aériennes des petits aéroports de tout le pays.

Puisque la COPA oeuvre dans le secteur de l'aviation générale, au cours des cinq dernières années, elle a offert un petit tour d'avion à plus de 18 000 enfants âgés de 8 à 17 ans, dans le cadre d'un programme appelé « COPA pour les jeunes ». Dès ce moment-là, en cinq ans, nous aurions pu régler le problème de la pénurie de pilotes grâce à ce programme.

Quels sont les nouveaux défis auxquels les nouveaux pilotes font face? Tout d'abord, ils doivent s'inscrire au programme de licence de pilote privé. Il n'y a aucune aide financière pour ce programme dans tout le pays, il n'y a que des bourses. C'est aux élèves, à leurs parents ou à n'importe qui d'autre de trouver l'argent pour simplement passer à la première étape du programme de licence de pilote privé. Tout ce qui vient après concerne la licence de pilote professionnel.

La plupart des cours de pilotage ne donnent pas droit aux prêts étudiants, à moins qu'ils fassent partie d'un programme d'études collégiales, auquel cas il s'agirait que d'une formation théorique en classe. Les unités de formation au pilotage sont seulement accessibles dans certaines régions, généralement les régions à forte densité de population. Il y a seulement une école de pilotage au Yukon, et il n'y en a aucune dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest ni au Nunavut.

En ce qui concerne la disponibilité des instructeurs... On refuse des étudiants, en fait, en raison du manque d'instructeurs, ou en raison de la longue liste d'attente. On demande donc aux candidats de revenir un an plus tard, quand il y aura, peut-être, de la place pour eux dans une unité de formation au pilotage. Quant aux étudiants qui veulent seulement obtenir la licence de pilote privé... Le pilotage récréatif ainsi que la licence de pilote privé ont été mis de côté. L'idée, c'est d'avoir quelques étudiants étrangers, mais également des pilotes de ligne, pour ceux du programme de formation de pilote en ligne. On laisse pour compte ceux qui deviendront instructeurs, ceux dont nous aurons besoin.

Les défis auxquels les unités de formation en pilotage font face comprennent la disponibilité d'instructeurs qualifiés. À quelques exceptions près, la plupart des instructeurs doivent être employés par une unité de formation au pilotage pour obtenir leur qualification d'instructeur de vol. Les autres défis comprennent l'utilisation des vieux aéronefs.

De plus, un autre défi auquel les unités de formation au pilotage font face est le fait qu'elles se trouvent dans des aérodromes assez vieux; il y a également des problèmes de capacité liés à la taille de l'aéroport et aux capacités de contrôle du trafic aérien et le besoin d'établir un équilibre — comme je l'ai expliqué tout à l'heure — entre la capacité de formation au pilotage et l'exploitation responsable des aérodromes, surtout dans certaines régions à forte densité, comme l'aéroport Saint-Hubert à Longueuil.

De plus, le seul financement fédéral qui pourrait aider ces unités de formation au pilotage et ces aéroports à se développer, à se maintenir et à explorer d'autres voies viendrait du PAIA, mais ces fonds sont destinés uniquement aux aéroports qui ont des services de transport de passagers, et la plupart des aéroports d'aviation générale n'en ont pas.

(1005)



Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, la plupart des gens voient l'aviation au Canada comme les transporteurs aériens et quelques petits aéronefs alors que, en réalité, c'est le contraire: de 90 à 95 % de tous les aéronefs au pays font partie de l'aviation générale. Certaines personnes considèrent également que l'aviation au pays correspond aux 26 aéroports importants du réseau aéroportuaire national, mais il y a plus de 1 500 aéroports.

En conclusion, pour que l'on puisse s'assurer que la chaîne d'approvisionnement des pilotes demeure solide, la porte du monde de l'aviation générale doit demeurer ouverte. On doit protéger les aéroports locaux afin que les écoles de pilotage aient un endroit où mener leurs activités et croître et qu'elles s'assurent de conserver des instructeurs expérimentés et talentueux. Cela signifie qu'on doit préserver les aéroclubs et les réseaux sociaux associés aux aéroports, y compris la communauté, du point de vue de ce qui se passe à l'aéroport local de sorte que les intervenants soient en relation et comprennent le rôle important que cette installation joue à l'échelle locale et de façon générale.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Gervais.

Capitaine Cameron, je vous souhaite la bienvenue.

Mme Judy Cameron (capitaine (à la retraite), Air Canada, directrice, Northern Lights Aero Foundation, à titre personnel):

Merci de m'offrir l'occasion de parler aujourd'hui.

J'ai été la première femme au Canada à piloter pour une compagnie aérienne importante lorsque j'ai été embauchée par Air Canada en 1978. Après 37 ans et plus de 23 000 heures de vol, j'ai pris ma retraite comme capitaine de boeing 777 il y a trois ans.

Le plus grand défi auquel fait face aujourd'hui l'aviation au Canada, et, par conséquent, les écoles de pilotage, c'est la pénurie imminente de pilotes. Vous avez entendu que, d'ici 2025, le Canada aura besoin de 7 000 à 10 000 nouveaux pilotes. En 2036, il faudra 620 000 pilotes professionnels à l'échelle mondiale, ce qui est un nombre ahurissant. Le problème, en partie, c'est que 50 % de la population — les femmes — ne sont pas embauchés. J'ai commencé ma formation au pilotage il y a 45 ans, mais très peu de progrès ont été réalisés au chapitre du recrutement de femmes comme pilotes de ligne. Depuis 1973, année où les quelques premières femmes ont été embauchées, le pourcentage de femmes pilotes de ligne à l'échelle mondiale n'a augmenté qu'à 5 %.

Cela s'explique principalement par le manque de modèles. D'innombrables filles m'ont dit qu'elles n'avaient jamais vu une femme pilote auparavant. Les femmes dans l'aviation doivent être plus visibles et démontrer leur capacité, leur crédibilité et leur passion pour le pilotage.

Une étude de 2018 réalisée par Microsoft montre que les femmes sont plus susceptibles de connaître du succès et d'avoir un sentiment d'appartenance si elles ont des modèles positifs dans une carrière en STIM. Elles ont besoin de voir d'autres femmes qui occupent un emploi avant d'envisager cette carrière. La recherche montre également que l'exposition doit se faire lorsque les filles sont jeunes, puisque l'intérêt pour la technologie commence vers l'âge de 11 ans, mais disparaît vers l'âge de 16 ans. Une introduction manuelle et participative à l'aviation est nécessaire dans le cadre du programme de l'école primaire. Un cours de formation au sol en aviation intégrant des notions de physique, de mathématiques et de météorologie pourrait être offert aux étudiants du secondaire.

Comme l'a affirmé Bernard, un véritable vol est encore plus efficace pour susciter la passion de devenir pilote. Mon premier vol dans un petit avion a complètement changé mon parcours de carrière. Je faisais des études en arts. Mon premier vol a été l'élément déclencheur qui m'a donné la volonté et la détermination d'entamer une carrière en aviation. Des événements annuels comme Les filles prennent vol, une initiative lancée par les Ninety-Nines, offrent cette occasion.

Je suis directrice de la Northern Lights Aero Foundation, qui inspire les femmes de tous les secteurs de l'aviation et de l'aérospatial. Northern Lights organise un événement annuel de remise de prix depuis 10 ans pour souligner les femmes canadiennes qui ont réalisé de grandes choses dans ces domaines. Parmi les gagnantes antérieures, on compte la Dre Roberta Bondar et la lieutenante-colonel Maryse Carmichael, la première femme à commander les Snowbird. Nous avons un programme de mentorat, un bureau des conférenciers et des bourses. En outre, nous faisons de le sensibilisation lors d'événements d'aviation. Notre fondation a réussi à obtenir un soutien solide de l'industrie. Les entreprises comprennent enfin que nos activités favorisent le recrutement des femmes. La Northern Lights Aero Foundation présente aux filles et aux jeunes femmes des mentors et des modèles positifs qui ont réussi dans leur domaine.

Vous avez entendu parler du coût élevé de la formation au pilotage: de 75 000 $ à 100 000 $; il s'agit d'un obstacle tant pour les hommes que pour les femmes. On pourrait atténuer ce programme national de financement qui offre des recours comme des incitatifs fiscaux pour les écoles de pilotage, des prêts étudiants pour la licence de pilote privé — qui, comme vous l'avez entendu, n'est pas admissible aux prêts étudiants à l'heure actuelle et coûte environ 20 000 $ — et une exonération de prêts pour les pilotes qui s'engagent à travailler en tant qu'instructeur de vol pour une période déterminée.

Le faible salaire des instructeurs de vol est un défi important auquel font face les écoles de pilotage. Je viens de parler à une jeune femme instructrice d'Edmonton à ce sujet. Elle est dans le domaine depuis 10 ans. Les instructeurs sont rémunérés entre 25 000 et 40 000 $ par année. Leur revenu est variable, car ils ne sont pas salariés à moins de travailler pour une université ou un collège. Ils ne sont rémunérés que lorsque les conditions météorologiques sont propices au vol. Cela complique la tâche des écoles de maintenir en poste les instructeurs expérimentés, qui quittent leur emploi dès qu'ils s'en trouvent un autre plus payant, parfois dans un autre domaine que l'aviation. L'augmentation du salaire pourrait faire en sorte qu'il s'agisse d'un choix de carrière permanent viable pour les pilotes qui désirent être à la maison tous les soirs au lieu de passer des journées loin de leur famille. Un manque d'instructeurs finira par contribuer à la pénurie de futurs pilotes.

Les femmes et l'ensemble de la jeune génération s'inquiètent également de la conciliation travail-famille. C'est un aspect qui dissuade certaines femmes de s'inscrire à l'école de pilotage. Les jeunes pilotes d'une compagnie aérienne ont souvent les horaires les plus chargés, ce qui suppose nombre de journées consécutives loin de la maison au cours de la période où ils sont les plus susceptibles de fonder une famille. Des programmes novateurs comme le « partage de blocs » de Porter Airlines, qui consiste à partager un horaire de vol, facilitent la transition des femmes qui reviennent d'un congé de maternité. C'est une période difficile dans la carrière d'une pilote; je peux en témoigner personnellement, car j'ai eu deux filles et je suis retournée au travail seulement deux mois et demi après la naissance de l'une d'elles.

(1010)



En terminant, je dirai qu'un des plus grands défis auxquels se heurtent les écoles de pilotage, c'est en réalité d'attirer des femmes. Avec le soutien du gouvernement et de l'industrie pour accroître l'initiation aux disciplines de STIM en salle de classe et offrir des incitatifs destinés aux jeunes qui veulent entamer une formation au pilotage et demeurer dans l'industrie, je crois que nous pouvons renverser la vapeur et remédier à la pénurie imminente de pilotes. J'ai eu le travail le plus extraordinaire au monde et j'encourage de tout mon coeur d'autres femmes à en faire autant.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, capitaine Cameron.

Merci à tous les témoins de leurs excellentes recommandations.

Monsieur Jeneroux, vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je suis désolé, madame la présidente, combien de minutes avez-vous dit?

La présidente:

Compte tenu du fait qu'il est déjà 10 h 13 et que nous essayons de diviser le temps qu'il reste, vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Cela me convient; j'étais seulement curieux de savoir de combien de minutes je disposais.

Merci à vous tous de votre présence ici. Il est bon de vous recevoir au Comité.

C'est un véritable honneur de vous avoir avec nous, capitaine Cameron. Je vous suis reconnaissant d'avoir pris le temps de venir témoigner.

Quelle est la raison principale pour laquelle les pilotes quittent l'industrie? Nous parlons beaucoup d'attirer de nouveaux et de jeunes pilotes dans l'industrie, mais pourquoi les pilotes abandonnent-ils le domaine?

Je vais commencer par vous, capitaine Cameron.

Mme Judy Cameron:

J'ai acquis mon expérience dans une compagnie aérienne. En règle générale, personne n'abandonne une carrière avec un transporteur aérien. Une fois qu'on a une certaine ancienneté, la progression est en quelque sorte assurée tant et aussi longtemps qu'on réussit ses vols de vérification compétence.

C'est seulement une hypothèse de ma part, mais je crois que, au début de sa carrière, si on a payé tout cet argent et qu'on a de la difficulté à trouver un emploi... On raconte à la blague que la différence entre un pilote débutant et une pizza, c'est que, contrairement au pilote, la pizza peut nourrir une famille de quatre.

Les premières années sont difficiles. C'est la seule raison, à mon avis, pour laquelle on peut penser à abandonner cette carrière. On trouve une autre façon plus sûre de gagner sa vie.

Encore une fois, lorsqu'on devient pilote d'une compagnie aérienne, on continue en général dans cette voie parce qu'il s'agit d'une excellente carrière.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame Hadfield, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

Mme Robin Hadfield:

C'est une question que je connais bien parce que seulement environ 40 % des diplômés demeurent en réalité dans le domaine de l'aviation. Nombre d'entre eux que je connais personnellement ne veulent pas aller travailler dans le Nord, particulièrement lorsqu'ils sont issus de grands centres urbains. Ils vont dans le Nord deux ou trois ans. Ils ne gagnent pas beaucoup d'argent parce que les transporteurs régionaux de troisième palier savent très bien que les pilotes quitteront bientôt leur emploi pour monter d'échelon dans le but de travailler pour Air Canada ou WestJet. Très peu de pilotes vont dans le Nord et disent vouloir y demeurer. Certains le font, mais ce n'est pas la majorité.

Nombre de ces pilotes ont été effrayés. Par le passé, les exploitants nordiques étaient connus pour essayer de repousser les limites des avions en les surchargeant et pour ne pas bien les entretenir. S'ils ont peur, ils diront simplement: « J'en ai assez et je ne gagne pas beaucoup d'argent » et quitteront leur emploi. Quant aux femmes, elles éprouvent des problèmes lorsque... Vous savez, il s'agit de jeunes femmes et de jeunes hommes; ils commencent à se fréquenter et ensuite ils se séparent, et c'est fini. Elles quittent l'industrie.

Il y a un éventail de... Mais le salaire est un énorme problème. Il est difficile à régler en raison de la façon dont l'ensemble de l'industrie a été structuré, au début des compagnies aériennes.

(1015)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord. Parfait, merci.

Monsieur Gervais, vous aurez peut-être l'occasion de répondre à la suite d'autres questions. Il ne me reste qu'une minute et je veux présenter un avis de motion.

Il s'agit d'un avis de motion verbal, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Vous voulez déposer un avis de motion? D'accord.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Dites-moi lorsque vous serez prête pour que je le lise.

La présidente:

Allez-y.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord. La motion se lit ainsi: Que le Comité entreprenne une étude sur les répercussions de la taxe fédérale sur le carbone sur l'industrie des transports, comme suit: Deux réunions sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur les passagers aériens; Deux réunions sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur les passagers ferroviaires; Deux réunions sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur les clients du secteur du camionnage; et que le Comité fasse rapport de ses conclusions à la Chambre.

Je l'ai ici par écrit, Marie-France.

La présidente:

Merci.

Il vous reste encore 45 secondes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merveilleux.

Monsieur Gervais, vous pouvez prendre le temps qu'il reste pour répondre à la question que j'ai posée.

M. Bernard Gervais:

Nous pensons que, si des pilotes sont en voie de devenir des pilotes de ligne, il y a une telle demande partout dans le monde que nous n'aurons pas le temps de combler les vides et les lacunes.

Quant à savoir pourquoi les pilotes quittent le domaine, comme la capitaine Cameron l'a dit, on ne laisse habituellement pas une carrière de pilote de ligne; c'est juste qu'on n'a pas le temps d'y parvenir. Les pilotes décrochent un emploi dans le domaine de l'aviation et des transporteurs aériens partout dans le monde en raison de la croissance accrue et de la circulation aérienne beaucoup plus importante.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

La présidente:

Vous avez quatre secondes. Nous allons passer à M. Iacono.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, mesdames et messieurs, d'être ici ce matin.

Capitaine, de plus en plus de gens prennent l'avion et voyagent, et, par conséquent, les compagnies aériennes sont plus occupées et font ainsi plus d'argent. Êtes-vous d'accord avec moi?

Mme Judy Cameron:

C'est une industrie cyclique. C'est peut-être le cas pour le moment. J'ai vu qu'elle a connu des hauts et des bas.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Par conséquent, pourquoi ne pas investir à l'interne pour combler ce vide? Pourquoi les compagnies aériennes n'investissent-elles pas dans leur propre personnel? Nombre d'agents de bord possèdent de l'expérience de vol et de service au public, alors pourquoi ne pas investir en eux afin qu'ils suivent ces cours? Pourquoi n'existe-t-il pas un programme à l'interne dans le cadre duquel on offre la possibilité aux employés de grimper dans la hiérarchie, de passer au prochain échelon et de devenir pilotes? Puisqu'une pénurie sévit, pourquoi ne fait-on pas cela?

Mme Judy Cameron:

J'aimerais pouvoir répondre comme si j'étais cadre d'une compagnie aérienne, mais ce n'est pas le cas. C'est une question intéressante. Un des membres du public aujourd'hui travaille avec une fondation appelée Elevate; elle étudie à l'heure actuelle la raison pour laquelle les femmes n'envisagent pas une carrière de pilote compte tenu de la sécurité financière. Elles gagneraient certainement beaucoup plus d'argent si elles étaient pilotes au lieu d'être agentes de bord. Je n'ai pas de réponse à cela.

Il existe un modèle en Europe, un programme de cadets. Par exemple, Lufthansa a l'académie European Flight Training. Cette dernière s'occupe de la formation au sol, et, lorsqu'on a terminé cette formation, on peut commencer à piloter pour un transporteur aérien d'apport avec Lufthansa. On finit par piloter pour Lufthansa. Une prime à la signature est offerte au début, et les pilotes remboursent graduellement leur formation lorsqu'ils travaillent pour le transporteur d'apport.

Ce modèle présente des avantages et des inconvénients, comme peut en témoigner Robin. Je ne sais pas pourquoi Air Canada ne l'a pas examiné. Elle n'a pas eu à le faire parce que, par le passé, les gens se battaient pour obtenir un emploi chez Air Canada alors que les postes vacants étaient rares. La situation a complètement changé.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Il n'y a aucune pénurie d'agents de bord, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Judy Cameron:

J'imagine que non.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Je crois que ce serait une façon positive d'examiner les choses.

Ma deuxième question — et les deux autres témoins peuvent également y répondre —, c'est pourquoi ne pas rester à l'interne et demander aux pilotes de donner des cours? Un professeur, par exemple, après deux ou trois ans, prendra une année sabbatique pour faire de la recherche. Pourquoi ne pas lancer un programme dans le cadre duquel des pilotes possédant un certain nombre d'années d'expérience donnent six mois de formation aux nouveaux pilotes et aux nouveaux étudiants? On éviterait ainsi la pénurie de formateurs. Vous dites que nous faisons face à une pénurie d'étudiants et de pilotes. Pourquoi ne pas la combler de l'interne?

(1020)

Mme Judy Cameron:

La pénurie touche les débutants, les pilotes privés et les pilotes de ligne.

Une fois embauché par la compagnie aérienne, on suit son programme de formation interne; les transporteurs aériens ont réussi à recruter nombre de pilotes à la retraite pour donner des cours de simulateur. Ce sont des compétences complètement différentes de celles des instructeurs dont on parle, qui sont nécessaires pour amener les jeunes pilotes à travailler dans le domaine de l'aviation.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Aimeriez-vous ajouter quelque chose à cela, Mme Hadfield?

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Oui. Pour ce qui est de l'idée des agents de bord, j'en connais personnellement plus de 15 qui sont devenus pilotes et qui ont gravi les échelons, mais ils ont dû le faire par leurs propres moyens. Aucun incitatif n'est offert aux compagnies aériennes pour qu'elles donnent leur propre formation.

À propos de la pénurie de pilotes, on croit à tort que les gens ne veulent pas devenir pilotes. À Springbank, il existe deux écoles de pilotage qui ont une liste d'attente de plus de 300 étudiants. Au total, 78 cadets de l'air n'ont pas obtenu leur permis pour piloter un avion à moteur cet été en raison du manque d'instructeurs, et l'école de pilotage la plus achalandée au pays, à Brampton, a publié un avis en octobre qui indiquait qu'elle n'acceptait plus de nouveaux étudiants.

Il y a une liste d'attente pour les gens au Canada qui désirent apprendre à piloter. Les places sont occupées par des étudiants étrangers. Ces derniers quittent ensuite le pays, ce qui veut dire que nous avons une pénurie d'instructeurs; c'est pourquoi nous avons une liste d'attente d'étudiants.

C'est un cercle vicieux. Les écoles ont besoin d'argent, alors elles acceptent les étudiants étrangers, ce qui ferme la porte à nos étudiants.

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Iacono, votre temps est écoulé.

M. Nantel est le prochain. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Madame Hadfield, vous soulignez avec beaucoup de justesse qu'il n'y a pas de relais dans le système d'éducation au Canada quant aux écoles de pilotage, alors que nous avons un besoin criant de pilotes. Ce qui me frappe aussi, c'est ce que Mme Cameron évoquait quand elle disait que les gens du Nord, qui ont tant besoin de pilotes, ne déménageront pas dans le Sud pour suivre une formation pendant une période plus ou moins longue. Par ailleurs, je suis bien au courant du phénomène des écoles de pilotage à Saint-Hubert, lesquelles soulèvent de grandes préoccupations. Nous avons toujours déploré le fait qu'elles soient toutes concentrées à cet endroit, au-dessus des résidences de gens ordinaires.

Cependant, comme vous l'avez expliqué, il est assez triste de voir que les écoles acceptent beaucoup d'étudiants étrangers qui viennent prendre la place, non seulement d'étudiants canadiens, mais aussi de pilotes canadiens. Cela veut dire que ces pilotes s'en vont. Souhaitez-vous que le Comité recommande la création d'un réseau? Je pense ici à l'Association des industries aérospatiales du Canada, ou AIAC, qui a lancé le programme Tiens bon Canada et au sujet duquel nous avons voulu rencontré M. Hadfield.

Ne devrions-nous pas adopter une approche concertée pour établir un programme de formation à l'intention des jeunes, particulièrement des jeunes femmes, afin qu'ils se lancent dans ce domaine? [Traduction]

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Je crois que, si nous mettions en place des programmes dans les écoles secondaires, où les étudiants qui ne connaissent pas les aéroports... À mesure que les centres urbains ont pris de l'ampleur, nous avons perdu de petits aéroports et de l'aviation générale. Les gens ne voient pas les avions voler, alors les jeunes ne peuvent pas regarder dans le ciel et dire: « Oh, c'est ce que je veux faire dans la vie. » Ils fréquentent l'école secondaire et se concentrent sur des programmes de STIM, mais ceux-ci n'englobent pas l'aviation.

Je crois qu'il est temps de ramener l'aviation dans les écoles secondaires et également de mettre en place un programme de prêts étudiants et de remboursement de ces prêts — et le rendre abordable afin que les étudiants puissent fréquenter l'école — pour conserver nos étudiants canadiens dans les écoles de pilotage. La moitié de la population gagne moins de... Comment une famille ayant un revenu combiné de 80 000 $ peut-elle avoir les moyens de payer la formation de leur enfant dans ces écoles?

Également, le remboursement est lent. Lorsque notre fils fréquentait l'école de pilotage, je lui ai dit qu'il allait devoir aller dans le Nord, y travailler pendant des années, pomper de l'essence et nettoyer du vomi dans les avions pour le fabuleux salaire de 20 000 $ par année. Ensuite, lorsqu'on gravit les échelons — on se marie, on a des enfants — et qu'on gagne 100 000 $, on passe à Air Canada et le salaire baisse à 40 000 $.

C'est un cycle. Pour les écoles de pilotage, je crois qu'on doit assurément mettre en place un programme de remboursement des prêts. On ne peut pas empêcher les écoles de pilotage d'accepter des étudiants étrangers, mais si on peut faire en sorte que nos étudiants aient les moyens de suivre cette formation... Le Canada est très reconnu partout dans le monde pour son secteur de l'aviation. C'est la raison pour laquelle, dans d'autres pays, on paie pour que les enfants suivent une formation au Canada.

(1025)

[Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Bien évidemment, l'éducation est de compétence provinciale, ce qui peut rendre les choses un peu complexes. Cependant, monsieur Gervais, je crois que vous êtes au courant de la situation qui existe à Saint-Hubert. Il n'y a aucun doute à mon avis qu'une des solutions serait de mieux planifier la répartition des écoles de pilotage. Pourquoi ne pas amener les cégeps du Québec à fraterniser avec leur aéroport local et à veiller à l'installation d'un simulateur de vol et de quelques avions dans le cadre d'une école de pilotage?

Actuellement, dans ma circonscription de Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, la concentration de ces écoles est tellement grande qu'elle en est devenue problématique. Je suis le premier à vanter les mérites de l'aérospatiale et à affirmer que Longueuil-Saint-Hubert est le berceau de plusieurs technologies merveilleuses qui font notre fierté. Cependant, lorsque je constate qu'à peine 25 à 30 % des places à l'École nationale d'aérotechnique sont libres, je trouve la situation déplorable. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Nantel, je suis désolée, mais il ne reste pas assez de temps pour une réponse à votre question maintenant. Elle pourrait peut-être être intégrée à celle d'une autre question.

Nous allons passer à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente, et merci à vous tous d'être ici.

On dirait que le système de marché libre a vraiment implosé dans tout ça. Il y a des facteurs de charge plus élevés, du moins à bord des vols que je prends, et les coûts sont quand même assez élevés, particulièrement dans le Nord. Pourtant, des pilotes font pratiquement la file dans les banques alimentaires, un phénomène que nous avons observé aux États-Unis.

Vous me dites que, d'un côté, nombre de personnes veulent fréquenter les écoles de pilotage ici, mais, de l'autre, les formateurs gagnent un très faible salaire, et les frais de scolarité sont très élevés. Je suis désolé, mais où va l'argent?

Mme Judy Cameron:

L'exploitation d'un avion est coûteuse.

J'allais justement dire, relativement à certaines questions précédentes, qu'il existe également des solutions à faible coût. Il n'y a aucun endroit à Toronto où on peut seulement regarder un avion décoller et atterrir. Vancouver possède une excellente zone d'observation. À Toronto, on doit se stationner sur le bord de l'autoroute pour observer les aéronefs.

Auparavant, nous pouvions offrir aux gens une merveilleuse occasion de visiter le poste de pilotage. Nous ne pouvons plus faire cela. C'était un des meilleurs outils de vente. Il a probablement été très coûteux pour beaucoup de parents au fil des ans de permettre à leurs enfants de nous regarder décoller et atterrir.

M. Ken Hardie:

Oui, mais le fait est que les gens clés — les formateurs, les étudiants et les nouveaux pilotes — ont tous tendance à... Qui voudrait faire ce travail si la formation très coûteuse conduit à un faible salaire? Bon dieu, j'ai commencé en radio, et c'était exactement comme ça. Mais, encore une fois, nous voulions vraiment travailler dans ce domaine.

Je me demande si nous avons affaire — les milléniaux à la maison, bouchez-vous les oreilles pendant un moment — à l'attitude des millénaires ici également: « Nous voulons tout, et nous le voulons tout de suite. »

Un de vous dit oui, et l'autre dit non.

Mme Judy Cameron:

J'ai entendu cela de personnes qui forment certains des nouveaux pilotes.

Je peux seulement témoigner de ma propre expérience. J'ai travaillé dans le Nord. J'y ai piloté pendant un an et j'ai pompé de l'essence dans un DC-3. J'ai manipulé des fûts de carburant. Lorsqu'Air Canada m'a embauchée, les gens de mon comité d'entrevue m'ont dit: « Apportez votre carnet de vol et tout ce qui peut favoriser votre embauche. » J'ai donc apporté des photographies de moi-même — en noir et blanc — en train de manipuler des fûts de carburant en combinaison de vol avec des bottes à embout d'acier. C'est peut-être ce qui m'a aidée à décrocher l'emploi.

Le fait est que le pilotage, contrairement à beaucoup d'autres occupations, c'est très plaisant. On s'amuse beaucoup, et certaines personnes sont motivées à devenir pilotes peu importe les difficultés, mais les coûts sont en train de devenir exorbitants.

Je crois que la solution, c'est d'avoir des prêts-subventions, particulièrement si on est disposé à travailler comme instructeur de vol ou dans une collectivité nordique. Je crois qu'on peut trouver des solutions.

M. Ken Hardie:

Robin, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose à cela?

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Oui. Je pense que la différence entre les générations n'est pas le manque de motivation en réalité. À mon avis, les gens veulent encore devenir pilotes, et les listes d'attente des écoles de pilotage en font foi. Ce que les compagnies aériennes constatent, c'est que l'ensemble de compétences des candidats est un peu différent du côté des milléniaux, qui n'ont pas le même type de compétences de leadership.

Toutefois, c'est également très rare au sein de l'industrie. Comme l'a déjà dit Judy, l'industrie aérienne connaît des hauts et des bas, et j'ai observé cela dans toutes les générations de pilotes d'Air Canada et avec...

(1030)

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai une petite question pour le temps qu'il me reste et je suis désolé d'être très bref ici.

Utilisons-nous pleinement la formation militaire? Est-ce que des militaires pourraient essentiellement gagner un peu d'argent supplémentaire en formant des pilotes?

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Oui, mais je crois que l'armée fait également face à une pénurie de pilotes pour exactement la même raison: le manque d'instructeurs. Elle ne peut pas les embaucher assez rapidement.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il me reste peut-être encore un peu de temps si vous voulez terminer votre réponse précédente...

Oh, monsieur Gervais...?

M. Bernard Gervais:

J'aimerais ajouter quelque chose.

Je crois que monsieur le député Ianono a également demandé pourquoi on n'offre pas de formation. L'environnement de formation pour l'obtention d'une licence de pilote privé ou de pilote de ligne et tout ce qui l'entoure est très réglementé, et c'est comme ça depuis nombre d'années. C'est une question de sécurité. On ne peut pas seulement décider de former quelqu'un. On doit être instructeur pour former les gens.

Il y a un protocole, lequel est prévu dans le Règlement de l'aviation canadien. Il s'agit d'un protocole et d'un processus éprouvés, et ils existent depuis très longtemps. On pourrait peut-être également examiner cela afin d'accélérer le processus.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Une des particularités que j'ai constatées lorsque je suis devenu pilote en 2005, c'est que c'est la seule industrie dans laquelle les nouveaux pilotes forment d'autres nouveaux pilotes. Il semble que très peu de pilotes expérimentés transmettent leurs connaissances aux débutants.

En même temps, un pilote de 737 ne peut pas former un pilote de Cesna 172 parce qu'il s'agit d'un ensemble de connaissances complètement différent, alors comment pouvons-nous faire en sorte que les pilotes expérimentés transmettent leurs connaissances aux nouveaux pilotes afin d'augmenter le bassin d'instructeurs?

Vous pouvez tous répondre à la question.

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Sur le plan financier, il faut donner un incitatif. Si on invite un pilote de ligne à la retraite à revenir à la compagnie aérienne pour enseigner dans des simulateurs, il gagnera 70 $ l'heure. On en parlait plus tôt. Si vous lui proposez d'aller dans une école de pilotage, il gagnera 30 $ l'heure; il répondra donc que c'est hors de question...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'il a de la chance...

Mme Robin Hadfield:

... mais si vous faisiez en sorte que ce revenu soit exempt d'impôt, tous les pilotes accourraient. Ils sont les plus radins que vous puissiez rencontrer dans le monde.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Mme Robin Hadfield: Si vous offriez 30 $ l'heure à un pilote et que ce revenu était exempt d'impôt, cela reviendrait au même que de gagner 70 $ l'heure, et vous auriez probablement un pourcentage énorme de pilotes à la retraite qui iraient dans ces écoles de pilotage. Ils adorent travailler avec les jeunes. Ils aiment les voir voler. Ils adorent être dans des avions. Donnez-leur un incitatif fiscal et ils le feront.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai beaucoup de questions différentes, alors je vais devoir être bref.

Nous avons parlé du coût de la formation de pilotage, comme vous venez tout juste de le faire, et également de la réduction des prêts étudiants, mais, comme je l'ai dit il y a quelques semaines au sujet de l'écrasement de l'avion de Germanwings, nous avons vu quel était le risque si un étudiant suit la formation et égare ensuite son certificat médical. Comment atténueriez-vous ce risque à l'égard des prêts de manière à ce que personne ne dissimule de maladie et de handicap afin de rembourser ce prêt?

Mme Judy Cameron:

C'est préoccupant. Vous dépensez tout cet argent et découvrez ensuite que vous êtes médicalement invalide. Les exigences pour obtenir un certificat médical de classe 1 sont assez strictes, alors peut-être qu'il devrait y avoir une sorte de clause de protection, une assurance à laquelle vous pourriez souscrire, grâce à laquelle, si vous perdez votre licence pour des raisons médicales, vous n'aurez pas à rembourser de 75 000 à 100 000 $ en frais de formation.

C'est une situation difficile. Presque aucune autre profession n'exige que l'on conserve un certificat médical valable de classe 1.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s'agit d'un sujet différent dont nous n'avons pas du tout discuté auparavant. Quand vous obtenez un diplôme universitaire, vous obtenez les initiales « B.A. » après votre nom, ou peu importe quoi d'autre. Quand vous devenez ingénieur, vous obtenez l'abréviation « ing. »

Vous passez des années et des années à l'école, et il n'y a pas d'initiales honorifiques pour les pilotes. Ne devrait-il pas y en avoir?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Absolument.

Une voix: Il y a « capitaine ».

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, mais pas pour un copilote ou un pilote de brousse. Quand vous obtenez vos quatre barrettes à Air Canada, vous devenez capitaine, mais, si vous êtes pilote dans un autre secteur de l'industrie...

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Vous êtes tout de même « capitaine ».

Une voix: En effet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Quand j'apprenais à piloter, nous avons appris à l'aide de documents CFS et VNC en version papier. À présent, tout le monde utilise l'application ForeFlight. Sommes-nous en train de perdre la confiance des pilotes en passant au numérique?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Non, pas vraiment. C'est juste une autre façon d'apprendre. De nos jours, si vous regardez comment les choses ont changé en ce qui concerne la technologie, la jeune génération continue... les jeunes ont des connaissances et peuvent trouver autant d'information que nous l'avons fait sur papier. Tout est encore là.

Non, je ne crois pas, pas selon ce que nous constatons.

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Je pense que cela a amélioré l'apprentissage. Je crois que cela a contribué à améliorer la sécurité. Je me rends seule à Oshkosh, l'aéroport le plus fréquenté du monde, pendant une semaine, et, si mon application ForeFlight cessait de fonctionner comme j'arrivais là-bas, je serais perdue. Je ferais demi-tour et me dirigerais vers le lac.

(1035)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exactement ce que je veux dire. Nous...

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Je suis désolée, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

M. Godin est le prochain. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie nos chers témoins. Leurs propos sont très intéressants.

Il semble y avoir une certaine banalisation de l'incidence du manque de pilotes sur l'avenir de l'industrie de l'aviation. J'aimerais que vous me parliez de l'importance de la formation des pilotes. Le nombre de vols augmente de 4 % à 5 % par année. Si on ne trouve pas de solution dans l'industrie aérospatiale, quelle sera l'incidence de cette augmentation de vols?

Ma question s'adresse à vous trois.

Voulez-vous commencer, monsieur Gervais?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Oui.

Il y a un manque de pilotes à l'échelle mondiale. Il demeure que si le Canada ne trouve pas de réponse à cela, il faudra embaucher des gens d'autres pays.

L'industrie est en croissance partout dans le monde, mais je ne crois pas qu'il faille commencer à recruter des gens d'autres pays. Nous avons la capacité de les former au Canada. La plupart de nos pilotes ont été formés grâce au Plan d'entraînement aérien du Commonwealth britannique. Dans ces bases militaires, on a formé environ 130 000 pilotes. La formation des pilotes au Canada est de notoriété internationale. Nous avons la capacité de le faire et il faudrait se retrousser les manches et aller de l'avant.

Comme M. Nantel l'a mentionné tantôt, il devrait y avoir un programme national de formation et de relève. Le Canada est le berceau de l'aérospatiale. Le pays s'est développé notamment grâce à l'aéronautique.

Nous devons le faire, sinon, ce sont les entreprises canadiennes autour de Montréal, de Calgary et de Vancouver, notamment Viking Air, qui en souffriront. Le Canada est le berceau de l'aéronautique.

M. Joël Godin:

Merci.

Les autres témoins veulent-ils ajouter des commentaires? Je vois que non.

Dans d'autres professions, comme la médecine et la comptabilité, les firmes s'arrachent les étudiants.

N'y aurait-il pas lieu de réfléchir et d'inciter les entreprises à investir dans le recrutement de jeunes hommes et de jeunes femmes ayant le potentiel de devenir des pilotes? L'entreprise pourrait les parrainer, en quelque sorte, en les aidant financièrement, ce qui leur permettrait de rembourser leurs prêts plus rapidement et d'avoir un avenir prometteur et confortable.

Il est important, pour l'industrie, d'avoir des pilotes pour pouvoir continuer à fonctionner. [Traduction]

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Faites-vous référence à un programme des cadets? [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Non, ce serait pour plus tard, en fait. Il n'y a pas de décision prise quant aux cadets, mais les programmes pourraient être jumelés.

La solution devrait venir de l'industrie aérospatiale, qui parraine vos cadets, comme dans le cas dont vous avez parlé dans votre témoignage ou dans d'autres circonstances. Quand, dans l'industrie, on voit des jeunes qui sont motivés et qui ont du potentiel, pourquoi ne pas les parrainer et les accompagner pour qu'ils voient l'avenir positivement?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Je suis bien d'accord avec vous. D'ailleurs, certaines entreprises le font déjà. Pratt & Whitney et Bombardier ont des aéroclubs. Cependant, il y a une tout autre étape à entreprendre.

L'an dernier, l'Association des pilotes d'Air Canada et la COPA ont élaboré un guide des carrières et mis sur pied des bourses de pilotage pour inciter les gens à se lancer dans ce domaine, mais ce n'est pas nécessairement du parrainage à proprement parler.

Il y aurait lieu que les compagnies fassent du parrainage, exactement comme vous le dites, et c'est très possible. Les coûts seraient minimes, mais il faut avoir un plan. La COPA serait prête à travailler avec ces gens. On pourrait utiliser les aéroports et les aérodromes situés ailleurs que dans les points névralgiques dont on parlait plus tôt pour démarrer de tels programmes. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis désolée, monsieur Godin, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Allez-y, monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Graham. Je pense qu'il a encore quelques questions à poser, mais j'aimerais présenter un avis de motion, madame la présidente, qui, je l'espère, sera examiné à la prochaine séance.

En ce qui concerne cet avis de motion, madame la présidente, comme vous le savez, nous nous sommes penchés sur les coûts liés à la pollution et nous essayons d'obtenir autant de commentaires que possible de part et d'autre de la Chambre. Par conséquent, mon avis de motion, madame la présidente, se lit comme suit: Que l'Opposition officielle présente au Comité son plan pour gérer les coûts de la pollution liée aux transports.

C'est ce que je présenterai à la prochaine réunion.

Sur ce, monsieur Graham, allez-y. Vous avez la parole.

(1040)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie.

Je n'en ai pas beaucoup d'autres, mais j'en ai encore quelques-unes.

Monsieur Gervais, vous avez mentionné le programme COPA pour les jeunes et vous avez déjà fait partie de l'APBQ, et, comme vous le savez, j'en fais également partie. J'ai participé à au moins cinq de ces événements Kids in Flight. Pouvez-vous nous parler des répercussions réelles de tout cela? Je sais que, de la cinquantaine d'enfants que j'ai pris avec moi, dont un seul a vomi — j'en suis très fier —, je dirais qu'environ la moitié ou peut-être même plus étaient des filles, mais cela ne semble pas se traduire par un intérêt pour l'école de pilotage.

Avez-vous une idée de la raison pour laquelle c'est ainsi?

Madame Cameron, vous parliez de voir des modèles. Mon instructrice est une femme. C'est une excellente instructrice et une excellente pilote. Elle vole lors de tous ces événements. Elle s'occupe de la formation au sol de tous les enfants, ils voient ce modèle. Comment convertir cela en intérêt?

Mme Judy Cameron:

Je dirais qu'ils ne le voient toujours pas assez. Je pense que cela doit commencer à l'école primaire, puis être abordé, disons, par des conseillers d'orientation du secondaire. On doit les éduquer.

Il y a beaucoup de fausses idées. La première est qu'il faut être un génie des mathématiques pour être pilote. Ce n'est pas vrai.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est seulement lorsqu'on a des ennuis.

Mme Judy Cameron:

Il faut pouvoir faire des additions et des soustractions simples.

L'autre idée fausse est qu'il faut avoir une vision parfaite de 20/20. Ce n'est pas vrai non plus.

Je pense que le problème, c'est que nous ne suscitons pas l'intérêt des jeunes assez tôt, et j'en suis un parfait exemple. J'ai dû retourner à l'école avant de commencer le collège d'aviation. Je n'avais pas fait de mathématiques en douzième année. J'étais dans un programme d'arts à l'université, de sorte que j'avais déjà limité mes options.

Je pense que vous devez les recruter plus jeunes.

Je ne peux pas vous dire pourquoi ce premier vol n'a pas été totalement motivant pour eux. C'était certainement le cas pour moi, et il y a beaucoup de programmes comme celui-là. L'organisation The Ninety-Nines présente l'événement Girls Take Flight. Un de nos directeurs de Northern Lights en est responsable. Il y avait 1 000 personnes cette année à Oshawa, où 221 filles et femmes ont volé. Je suis sûre qu'un certain nombre d'entre elles étaient intéressées à poursuivre une carrière après cela.

Je pense que c'est une question d'exposition, d'avoir plus de choses comme Elevate. Encore une fois, je parle d'une dame dans l'auditoire. Elle dirige une organisation qui se rendra dans 20 villes du Canada et fera la promotion de diverses carrières dans le domaine de l'aviation. Elle est contrôleuse aérienne, donc il ne s'agit pas seulement des pilotes; il s'agit du contrôle aérien, de l'entretien et de différents domaines. Je pense que les enfants ont besoin d'être exposés à cela, et, plus l'expérience pratique est grande, mieux c'est. Ce ne devrait pas être seulement quelqu'un qui parle dans une salle de classe.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais poursuivre un peu sur cette voie. Enfant, quand je prenais l'avion, j'allais toujours dans le poste de pilotage. C'était amusant. Puis, le 11 septembre est arrivé, et cela a évidemment changé beaucoup de choses.

Vous êtes une pilote expérimentée. Voyez-vous un problème de sécurité? Existe-t-il un moyen de préautoriser les personnes qui sont intéressées à entrer dans le poste de pilotage avant un vol afin que nous puissions ramener cette expérience? Est-ce possible?

Mme Judy Cameron:

L'un des plus grands désirs ardents de tout pilote de ligne était de pouvoir avoir de nouveau sa famille dans le poste de pilotage. Si vous ne pouvez pas faire confiance à vos enfants ou à votre conjoint, vraiment, à qui pouvez-vous faire confiance?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a eu l'écrasement de l'Airbus en Russie...

Mme Judy Cameron:

C'est vraiment déplorable que cela ne puisse être réglé. Nous avons des cartes NEXUS. Nous avons diverses mesures de sécurité. J'aimerais voir des changements.

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Pourrais-je intervenir à ce sujet?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr.

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Je pense que les milliers et les milliers d'enfants que nous avons embarqués pour des vols voient cela comme un vol libre. Dans le cadre de notre programme, nous avons constaté que ce sont les parents qui font obstacle. Quand l'enfant dit qu'il veut devenir pilote, leur réaction naturelle est: « Tu vas t'écraser et mourir. Pas question. Tu ne peux pas faire ça. Personne dans notre famille n'a jamais fait ça. »

Nous avons apporté des changements, et dans le programme cette année, vous devez déjà être en âge de voler. Nous avons eu sept événements où nous avons amené des jeunes. S'ils étaient à l'école secondaire, le parent devait également participer au vol. À chacun des événements, de une à trois personnes se sont inscrites, et l'école de pilotage qui était présente leur a parlé sur place. Je pense qu'il faut se concentrer sur les enfants plus âgés, pas les petits.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Gervais, aimeriez-vous faire un commentaire?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Pour ajouter à ce que Robin disait, l'an dernier, la COPA a commencé à offrir gratuitement à tous ceux qui ont l'âge de voler, de 14 à 17 ans, un cours théorique en ligne et un carnet de bord pour entrer à l'école de pilotage. Si vous avez entre 14 et 17 ans, votre prochaine étape est de vous rendre à l'école de pilotage. Nous déployons des efforts dans ce sens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

En ce qui concerne le danger, lorsque j'étais à l'école de pilotage, nous aimions dire que la période la plus dangereuse de la journée d'un pilote était de se rendre en voiture à l'aéroport. Si les gens pouvaient comprendre cela...

Je pense que l'incident survenu dans le Sud-Ouest il y a un an, lorsqu'un passager a été aspiré par la fenêtre et tué, était le premier décès à bord d'un vol commercial aux États-Unis en quelque chose comme neuf ans. Il y a un mythe persistant selon lequel un avion n'est pas sûr. Comment pouvons-nous faire valoir le fait qu'il s'agit de loin du moyen de transport le plus sûr au monde?

M. Bernard Gervais:

L'année dernière, la COPA et Transports Canada ont lancé la campagne de sécurité de l'aviation générale. Le ministère nous a demandé de l'aider. Il s'agit d'un outil de communication que nous utilisons pour montrer au grand public que les vols sont sûrs au plus haut point; par conséquent, il y aura davantage de publicité et de communication à cet égard.

(1045)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à nos témoins. C'était très instructif. Vous avez certainement donné à nos analystes un grand nombre de recommandations que le Comité pourrait vouloir présenter. Je vous remercie beaucoup du temps que vous nous avez consacré aujourd'hui.

Je vous souhaite à tous un joyeux Noël.

J'ai une pensée pour le Comité. Je n'avais pas prévu de réunion pour jeudi; nous avons eu cette discussion. Étant donné qu'il semble que nous serons ici, le Comité souhaite-t-il tenir une réunion jeudi? On pourrait essayer d'organiser une réunion à ce moment. Le cas échéant, j'aimerais que ce soit appuyé massivement.

Je ne constate pas de grand enthousiasme pour ce qui est d'essayer de planifier une réunion jeudi. Merci beaucoup.

Encore une fois, joyeux Noël. Merci beaucoup à tous de votre coopération.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

committee hansard tran 36648 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:44 on December 11, 2018

2018-12-06 TRAN 125

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I'm calling to order meeting 125 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are continuing a study of the mandate of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities.

With us today we have the Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and from the Office of Infrastructure Canada, Kelly Gillis, Deputy Minister, Infrastructure and Communities. Welcome to you both. We've been waiting anxiously for your appearance, so thank you for coming today.

Minister Champagne, I'll turn it over to you.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Madam Chair, sorry, just as a bit of housekeeping before we get to the minister's much anticipated comments, I'm hoping he'll address in his opening remarks that he wasn't here for the estimates. I know he's here on his mandate letter today, but I just want to make sure we've flagged the fact that most of the time, ministers come for their supplementary estimates as well.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Jeneroux.

Minister Champagne, you have five minutes, please.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

It's a real pleasure to be in front of you and your colleagues today.

It's my first appearance at this committee, but as a start, I am very delighted to be with all of you and to talk about progress in infrastructure. I think, Madam Chair, that infrastructure touches the lives of Canadians in every community, whether urban or rural.

Good morning and thank you for inviting me, members of the committee.

I'm joined by Kelly Gillis, my very able deputy minister, who has been very active on this file to deliver for Canadians.

I'd like to start by acknowledging the outstanding work of my predecessor, Minister Sohi. Minister Sohi was responsible for this file, and we all know he's truly passionate about infrastructure, almost as much as he is about his hometown of Edmonton. He left a good legacy in the projects and the program. He's been a strong voice for his region, and obviously the province of Alberta, and continues to be in his new portfolio as Minister of Natural Resources.[Translation]

I would also like to thank my Deputy Minister, and the whole department of Infrastructure Canada for their hard work and dedication over the past three years. Thanks to their continued efforts, we have made enormous progress in delivering modern infrastructure to Canadians everywhere in the country.[English]

Let me give a brief overview. Since I was appointed Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, I was fortunate enough to see first-hand our investments in infrastructure across the country. I recently attended the groundbreaking for the Port Lands flood protection project in Toronto, which will help transform the Port Lands into beautiful new communities that will be surrounded by parks and green spaces. It will also add affordable housing to the Toronto region.

I also visited the Inuvik wind generation project in the Northwest Territories, which will provide an efficient, reliable and clean source of energy for Inuvik residents. I was pleased that this was the first project under the Arctic energy fund, which is helping to move communities in the north from diesel to renewable energy.

(0850)

[Translation]

I also visited an underground garage in Montreal that will increase the city's fleet of metro cars, improve the frequency of service, and, of course, support the anticipated growth in ridership on Montreal's public transit.[English]

Let me briefly touch on a few successes that we've had so far. Our plan of investing $180 billion over the next decade in infrastructure across the country is truly historic. I am proud of the progress we have made so far and the positive impact it has made on people across the country. The plan is being delivered by 14 federal departments and agencies.[Translation]

All 70 new programs and initiatives are now launched and more than 32,000 infrastructure projects have already been approved. Nearly all are underway.[English]

Since Minister Sohi's last appearance at this committee in May, I am pleased to note some of the significant milestones we have achieved together. The first one, which I'm very proud of, is the smart cities challenge. Finalists were announced this summer, and the winners will be announced in late spring 2019.[Translation]

The Canada Infrastructure Bank announced its first investment, which is $1.28 billion in the Réseau express métropolitain in Montreal. With this investment, the bank does exactly what it was intended to do: free up grant funding so that we can build more infrastructure for Canadians.[English]

Despite the fact that very little was done to advance this important project when we formed government, the Gordie Howe international bridge is now finally under way. That is truly historic for Canada. We know the Windsor-Detroit corridor has about 30% of all merchandise trade between Canada and the United States. This project is truly building on our current and future prosperity.[Translation]

Infrastructure Canada has also signed bilateral agreements with all of the provinces and territories for the next decade. We have already approved funding under these new guidelines for[English]the Green Line in Calgary, the Millennium Line extension in British Columbia, [Translation]

and Azur subway trains for Montreal,[English]and the water treatment system in the Comox Valley Regional District in British Columbia.

Lastly, we also launched the disaster mitigation and adaptation fund. We've already received a number of applications for funding and are currently reviewing them.

I also had the pleasure to meet with my provincial and territorial counterparts in September. One key item we discussed was how to better match the flow of our funding and our processes with the construction season in the sense that we want to make our intake, review and approval process faster and better, and make sure that our processes, whether federal, provincial or territorial, are in line with the construction season. I have impressed on my colleagues that we need to work diligently on that.

I visited several projects where work is well under way, but the claims for reimbursements have not been submitted, for example the Cherry Street water and lake-filling project in Toronto and the Côte-Vertu garage in Montreal, Quebec. To address this issue, we recently launched a pilot project with Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and Alberta to test the effectiveness of a progressive billing approach. We know that Canadians want to see funds that match milestones in projects, a “percentage of completion” type of approach, and we have asked our colleagues in the provinces to work with us to achieve that outcome as well.[Translation]

In closing, I would like to thank the committee members for giving me this opportunity to update you. I hope that together, with each member of the committee, we will be able to build 21st-century infrastructures, modern, durable and green, for all Canadians.

Thank you.

(0855)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Champagne. We appreciate all of your comments, and the fact that you kept them to five minutes so that the committee can ask the umpteen questions they have for you.

Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you, Minister, for being here today.

Have you heard from stakeholders, who I know you meet with frequently, about the social impacts of male construction workers, specifically in rural areas?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

One group of people I meet most often is construction workers. They are the true heroes of what we're doing. I was just recently on the Champlain Bridge in Montreal. I can say to my colleague that when I met the 1,600 workers who are working seven days a week, day and night, in good and bad weather, I really listened to them. I always made sure to repeat to them that my first priority on every construction site is the health and safety of the people and the benefits to the community in which they work.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I know you know this, Minister, but Montreal is not a rural area. My specific question was about rural areas. The Prime Minister recently made a statement that there are negative social impacts of men, specifically construction workers, in rural areas. I'm wondering if you've heard the same thing.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

The member is right. I was referring to an urban project, but since we have more than 4,000 projects across the country, he would appreciate that I do that not only in urban areas, but also in rural areas. I always engage with workers, making sure I understand about their health and safety and the benefits to the community in which they operate. I was recently with the member at the Fort Edmonton Park extension, and we met with workers and people who are going to be doing the work there, and everywhere they are—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Again, Minister, Edmonton is not a rural area. I'm speaking specifically about rural areas and the Prime Minister's comments. Yes or no, do you agree with the Prime Minister's comments?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I appreciate that Edmonton is not a rural area, just as Montreal is not, but everywhere I go, whether it's rural or urban, I meet with workers and I make sure I listen to them. I engage with them, because they are the true heroes of our infrastructure projects across the country.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It was a yes or no, Minister. The Prime Minister made a comment this past weekend. Did you agree with his comments?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

As I said, again, my role is to ensure that across the country we build infrastructure for the 21st century that is modern, resilient and green, and obviously the workers across the country, male or female, are key in delivering for Canadians across the country.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'll ask this in a different way, Minister. Does applying the—

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux, I think you've beaten that issue up a little bit.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Madam Chair, it's my time. I'm allowed to ask whatever question I wish during my time.

The Chair:

You cannot be repetitive on the same issue.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Madam Chair, I ask you to first of all pause the time, and to quote from which standing order it is that says I'm not allowed to ask a repetitive question.

The Chair:

Would you like me to read it?

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Please.

The Chair:

In Procedure and Practice, at pages 1058-9, it's any time that it is “repetitive or are unrelated to the matter before” us. It's the issue of being repetitive. It's the third time that you've tried to get the same question on the table.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It was the second time, Madam Chair, and I wouldn't say that. I'm asking it in a different way this time.

Allow me to ask the questions, please. We only have six minutes here to ask the questions.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Does applying the gender lens that the Prime Minister refers to then affect infrastructure getting built on time?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I would say that applying a gender lens is key in every program and project that we're delivering. Understanding the impact on different communities and on different people who will be working on our sites is essential—and on the community—so I think it's a great step forward for our country that we take into account the gender lens. Also, as part of the historic $180-billion infrastructure plan, we have also, as the member knows, not only applied that lens but also put on an environmental lens to understand the impacts of our projects.

The more we understand how to deliver for communities across Canada, I think we're all better as Canadians.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Under your opening comments, Minister, you state that in the Canada Infrastructure Bank you freed up grant funding. I don't think you necessarily freed it up. I'll give you a chance to rephrase that.

There's the $5 billion you took from the investing in Canada plan under public transit systems. You took $5 billion from trade and transportation corridors. You took $5 billion from green infrastructure projects. There's now $15 billion that is sitting in the Infrastructure Bank. You've mentioned that you built one project in Montreal, which was a reannouncement of what the Prime Minister announced back in June of 2017.

First, I don't see how that's freeing up money. That's just moving money around. Secondly, the Infrastructure Bank, for which you trumpet so much success in your opening comments, I think across the country, has been referred to as anything but. I've heard it called a disaster and a debacle. I'm hoping you can comment on why this infrastructure money isn't flowing.

Quite frankly, it's not freeing up anything. It's just moving money around at this point.

(0900)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I'm very happy to answer that question. I think the Infrastructure Bank is another tool in our tool box to deliver better and faster for Canadians.

We obviously don't talk to the same people. I used to be trade minister, and I can tell you that investors around the world were looking to crowd in investment in Canada. For the Infrastructure Bank, like you said, the first project was the REM in Montreal. It was allowed to give a loan to get that project going, which is going to transform public transit in the city.

I can reassure the member that I speak with the CEO of the bank, although it's an independent entity in its management and investment decisions. I talk to the CEO regularly. They are currently looking at more than a few dozen projects. They have had, I would say, hundreds of conversations across the country with community leaders and representatives of territorial and provincial governments.

For me, it's about doing more. It's making sure that we have more money available to deliver across the country. The bank is allowing us, for example—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You're just moving money around, Minister. That's all it is. It's the investing in Canada plan. You've moved money from there to the Infrastructure Bank.

On the REM project, was it or was it not a reannouncement from a previous announcement?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I would say no, and I would correct my colleague in a sense. The fact that the bank has provided the loan is freeing up investments that would be otherwise taken from the public transit allocation that Quebec had.

For me, to have been able to attract investors like the Infrastructure Bank to this project is a great thing. It's going to allow us to do more. I can tell the member that we're looking at interties, and we're looking at other light rail transit systems across the country. I think we should celebrate that. Canada was one of the few G7 countries not having an infrastructure bank—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux: Nothing is getting built, Minister.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne: —and having that is another great tool to deliver for Canadians.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

But nothing's getting built with the Infrastructure Bank, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We'll move on to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here this morning.

Minister, first of all, I do have to express my appreciation for the over $300 million that you have afforded my riding over the past few years, in terms of the infrastructure work that's been done. Of course, that alleviates the financial burden on those who pay property taxes, but also it enhances diverse business planning within many sectors of our business community. In partnership with the business communities, our municipalities are looking at sustainable funding envelopes to satisfy community improvement planning and community improvement strategies but also at aligning those investments for better returns on those investments for, once again, enhancing the overall structure of the community as well as the different sectors that are part of the community.

Mr. Minister, can you speak on some of the sustainable funding envelopes that are being made available for both communities and the businesses within them?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Thank you very much for the question.

What we have done, which is truly transformational in this country, is to provide stability and predictability in the funding for municipalities. The FCM called it a game-changer. I know the member comes from municipal government, so he well understands what it is to be able to plan infrastructure. I keep saying that when we take money and put it in infrastructure, we invest, because by definition, that goes more than a fiscal cycle. It is for 10, 15 or sometimes even 100 years ahead.

I would say that the $180 billion we have provided is really a game-changer. It's historic in our country. If you look at the stream of investment we have decided on, for me public transit is key. Not only does it afford more mobility so that people can spend more time with their families and friends, since commuting is essential in our communities today, but also the green infrastructure stream is really in line with our values. I think Canadians understand today that we want 21st-century infrastructure, which is green, resilient and modern. The social stream is allowing us to bring Canadians together in the community centres that people want to see across Canada. Trade and transportation are very much linked to the 1.5 billion consumers that we have access to now through our various trade agreements. Making sure our goods go to market is essential. Finally, the rural and northern communities stream is allowing us to take into account the particular needs of communities across Canada.

I would say to my colleague that, indeed, what we are doing, especially with the integrated bilateral agreement—which provides funding over 10 years to communities, and they understand where we want to invest—is to fix the framework, but we let communities decide what is best for them in terms of specific projects.

(0905)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

With respect to meeting what I call the “triple bottom line”—economy, social, environment—in working with municipalities, do you find that the investments you are making are more from a whole-of-government approach and are not just siloed in different ministries, and that those investments are aligning with strategies coming from, say, the departments of transport, environment, or family and children services, and things of that nature?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Yes, it's key. We have put the framework together, as I said, with objectives such as increasing mobility within communities across Canada and reducing our greenhouse gas emissions, but the way to do it....

Phase one of our program was an asset-based program. The second phase is based on outcome. I think the streams we have developed leave all the flexibility for communities to do what's best for them. We're not here pretending that we know—saying that we were recently in Saanich or Inuvik or Norman Wells—what is best for their community. However, what we have done is the framework to allow them to see, with regard to meeting the objectives we have set nationally, what is best to deliver for the people in their community. I would say that all of these projects—which is why I think this committee is essential—are about delivering for people. My mission is to improve the lives of Canadians from coast to coast to coast. I was in Inuvik, where we are going to have the first wind project in the Arctic, which is going to remove about three million litres of diesel from use, and thousands of greenhouse gas emissions.

This is truly what we want to do, and obviously my colleague Mr. Badawey understands what it is, because, coming from a municipal government, he knows that our role is to set the policy agenda but to leave the communities to decide what's best for them.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

With respect to pollution-related costs, right now municipalities are being defaulted upon with respect to those costs. For example, one-hundred-year storms are now five-year storms, and, therefore, oversize pipes have to be placed in the ground, and the costs are defaulting to those who pay property taxes.

How is your ministry working with the environment ministry to, once again, alleviate a great deal of those costs to the payers of property taxes?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madam Chair, I'm very happy to have that question. It's right to the point.

That's why we put forward the disaster mitigation and adaptation fund. I've always said it's better for us to invest in adapting communities to climate change events, which are more frequent and more severe. We have put $2 billion aside to really deal with these issues. I always say that either we invest in adaptation or we'll have to invest in recovery. It's better to prevent that, to remove, I would say, the chance that these disasters would affect communities and people.

We know how disastrous that could be. I look at other members who had flooding, for example. In my own region we know the social toll of that is tremendous. Investing in infrastructure that would withstand storm events, for example, is the right way to go, not only to make our country more resilient but also to prevent the harm and the stress that communities that have to live through these disasters from season to season undergo.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Minister, thank you for joining us this morning. I am probably one of the rare opposition MPs to have such close contact with you, since we are from the same region.

It seems to me that I have heard you many times, particularly in our region, speaking in support of VIA Rail’s high frequency train, the HFT. Here is my first question. Given the concerns about mobility and reducing greenhouse gases that you were talking about earlier, does your department’s philosophy or vision see the HFT as a green infrastructure project?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

My thanks to my colleague, Mr. Aubin. He and I represent much of a major region of Quebec.

The high frequency train has been one of my priorities since I was elected, if not even before. For our region like ours, it is essential in the development of the economy and of recreation and tourism, as well as for labour mobility.

I feel that Mr. Aubin and myself have, in every possible forum, repeated how much the project could make great things happen for the region and even for Quebec. There is often talk about a labour shortage. With a high frequency train between, say, Trois-Rivières, Montreal and Quebec City, people living in other centres would be able to come and work in ours.

Of course, I feel that the high frequency train is a component in 21st-century smart mobility. If we look at what is happening in a number of cities around the world, we can conclude that this is the kind of project that we want to support. That is why, in its recent statement, VIA Rail announced a massive investment in rolling stock, a vital requirement…

(0910)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Minister. Unfortunately, I have very little time. I hope that the Minister of Transport will hear your testimony, because it really goes in the direction that everyone is expecting. We are no longer talking about consensus in this matter, we are talking about virtual unanimity.

When we look at the amounts being spent on the REM project in Montreal, for example, and the endless wait for the simple announcement of the government's desire to move forward with the HFT, we get the impression that major cities and regions are treated differently. Is that perception of mine correct?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

As a minister from a region of Quebec, I always energetically stand up for the regions in Quebec and in Canada. I can assure you that we have set aside significant sums in the recent budget, specifically to conduct the studies needed. Of course, building a high frequency train between Quebec City and Windsor requires a certain number of technical and environmental impact studies.

We are certainly going in the right direction, in my view, first investing in rolling stock and then in allocating funds in the budget for the necessary studies. Those are two steps in the right direction.

It must be understood that these are complex projects in terms of engineering and capacity. I feel that the Minister of Transport, you and I have come out in favour of the project, as you heard on stage at the Chambre de commerce et d'industries de Trois-Rivières. In other words, we have to do the studies and everything else that is required so that we have all the information we need to make the right decision.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Minister.

In your answer to a previous question, I heard you talk about the Canada Infrastructure Bank as a means to do more and to do it more quickly. The principle seems commendable, but I feel that the results are debatable, to say the least, since the process is not very quick and very few projects have been funded.

I am really in favour of public financing, because financing by the Infrastructure Bank would eventually result in increased costs being paid by the consumers. In your opinion, should the HFT project be financed by the Infrastructure Bank or from the public purse?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Setting up a new organization like the Canada Infrastructure Bank requires a certain amount of time. Having myself seen Invest in Canada get under way, another agency in the portfolio I was responsible for previously, I know that you always have to create some buzz at the start. Fortunately, a CEO is now in place to make sure that the agency is well managed.

Several dozen discussions are underway around the country specifically to answer that question. This is the kind of project that the Canada Infrastructure Bank could study and, in my opinion, as you recall, it has to do so more quickly. I understand that my colleagues are asking us to do more, and, in Ottawa, I am one of the ministers who is the most anxious to see things move forward quickly. However, these products do present us with a degree of complexity. Because of the confidentiality of the negotiations and discussions under way, you will understand that I cannot talk about the projects under consideration. However, I can assure you that we are monitoring what is happening and that the bank is in the process of analyzing a number of projects all over the country.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

However, this year, the bank has asked the government for $6 million to cover its operating expenses. That does not seem to me like financing a lot of projects or moving forward quickly, or doing more. Moreover, we are still faced with the divide between the scale of the projects financed by the bank and the scale of the projects that the small communities that you and I represent can afford. Is there not a substantial difference between the intentions announced when the bank was created and its accomplishments after three years?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Mr. Aubin, to answer your question, I would remind you that establishing a new agency requires some unique expenditures, the cost of premises, for example. I can also tell you that the bank has hired someone to be responsible for investments, and that will, in the coming months and years, mean an increase in the number of projects in which the bank will invest.

I am also very aware that the bank must serve not only urban communities but rural communities as well. That is why we are discussing with the bank projects that would see some northern communities move from diesel to renewable sources of energy.

(0915)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will move now to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to pull back a bit for the benefit of the people who might be either listening or watching—this is televised—and talk about the big picture on infrastructure. Back in the mid to late 2000s, the previous Conservative Government rolled out a fairly substantial infrastructure program, and it was in response to the recession. I think the issue there was to get people working and to use the opportunity to get some things built. The side effect was the changing of the environmental regulations, which of course had proven to be an impediment to the pipeline expansions, etc. Then when we came along, we had this $180-billion infrastructure program at a time when we were coming out of the recession, and in fact we're not even anywhere close to that now. That took a lot of people by surprise, but it seems to me that there are some really fundamental differences in approach, and the kinds of results that we're looking for in the program we have today versus the one that Mr. Harper's government had back 10 years ago.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madam Chair, I totally agree with my colleague on that. I mean, we faced an era in which there was a decade of underinvestment in infrastructure. Anyone in that field will understand that you then need to invest exponentially. That's why we put together a historic plan of more than $180 billion to address issues that Canadians watching us would understand. When we're talking about public transit, for example, I think the people who live in urban areas in our country would understand that it was about time we made these historic investments to allow people greater fluidity.

In terms of the big picture, as I always tell my colleagues, infrastructure is key in our country. Modern, resilient green infrastructure will help us attract investment and talent. For me, when we invest in infrastructure, we invest in not only our current prosperity but future prosperity. In terms of our plan, we asked ourselves this: What is one of the biggest challenges we have to tackle as human beings? It's climate change, so when we're building infrastructure, people are watching us. We understand that we cannot do things today the way we did them in 1980. We need to build in a way that will be resilient but also green. Canadians expect this when we are investing in this.

I can give you the example of Saanich. I was in B.C. recently at the Commonwealth pool. They decided to change from fossil fuels to biomass. By doing so, they reduced their energy costs by 90%. That's the type of project we want in communities. You're improving lives and at the same time you're reducing your carbon footprint.

When I think about social infrastructure, as the member from Trois-Rivières was saying before, this is also about making sure.... You know, infrastructure means different things to different people. If you're in an urban area, you may think about a bridge or a road. If you are in a rural community, you may think about a community centre or broadband access. You may think about cellphone coverage. I come from a riding where about half the riding has no cellphone coverage and no Internet coverage.

Obviously, when you talk about infrastructure, it touches the lives of people. When we talk about rural and northern communities and the way we structure it, to the member's point, I can provide another example of why we have a stream that is very specific to rural and northern areas. When I was in Saskatchewan recently, people were telling me that if we gave them the funds to increase, for example, the length of the runway about 200 metres or 300 metres, they could land bigger planes, reduce greenhouse gas emissions with the fewer planes needed, and reduce the price of food by about 50% in northern communities.

That's why we have projects that are tailored to the needs of Canadians across the country.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

With respect to the Infrastructure Bank, I have, like some of my colleagues, a municipal background. I worked with the transportation authority in metro Vancouver.

Thank you, by the way, for the funding for our new SkyTrain extensions. We appreciate that very much. It will go right through my community, in fact.

The Infrastructure Bank represents something that I've seen happen before—public-private partnerships where the private sector comes in as another funding partner. To me, that has to alleviate the pressure, first of all, on municipal governments for their share, provincial governments for their share, and it makes the given funding from the federal government go further. Is that a fair assessment?

(0920)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Totally. As I've said before, the Infrastructure Bank of Canada is there to do more for Canadians. I'm the former trade minister for Canada, and I can tell you that people in the world want to invest in Canada. Why? We have stability, predictability, rule of law and a very inclusive society that cherishes diversity. People want to invest in Canada to help us build the infrastructure that Canadians need.

Exactly as my colleague said, Madam Chair, that's why we created the Infrastructure Bank. It's just like in Australia, for example, where they created a vehicle to make sure they would have a pipeline of projects where they could crowd in the investment. By crowding in the investment, we can free capital to invest in the types of assets that governments need to invest in and that we know the private sectors will not invest in. It frees up capital to do more. The REM is a good example of where you're better to take a loan from the Infrastructure Bank to do that project and free up capital for us to invest in other projects—for example, in this case, in the province of Quebec under the allocation—where we don't want the private sector to invest.

This is really, truly another tool in our tool box. I'm not suggesting in front of members that this will solve every problem. What I'm saying to Canadians is that it's great to have another tool in our tool box. We're in 2018. Modern countries are looking at different ways to provide infrastructure. We know that in OECD countries there's a huge deficit in infrastructure. Every time we invest in infrastructure, we're giving ourselves the means of our dreams. We can attract better investment. We can attract talent. We know that we are facing labour shortages across Canada. We also know that people move to places where you have modern infrastructure, where you have quality of water, where you can have mobility, where you can have community centres, and where you can have green buildings.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Champagne.

We move on to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Minister, thank you for being here this morning. On October 25, you had the opportunity to update the media on the Champlain Bridge situation. I would like to thank you for the transparency you are showing to Canadians about it.

Can you tell us about the significant steps forward with the work on the Champlain Bridge?

We know that some work cannot be done until the good weather returns. Do we have a timeline for the work that remains to be done until the bridge opens?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

First, Madam Chair, may I thank my colleague Mr. Iacono for that question.

Yes, I was in Montreal recently, in October, to inform the people of Montreal and Quebec about the Champlain Bridge situation.

I explained that the bridge structure would be complete by December 21 at the latest, but that the bridge would open permanently for vehicle traffic in June 2019. The reason is that some work, such as waterproofing the structure and applying asphalt, cannot be done in winter conditions. The waterproofing, for example requires a certain level of humidity and temperature for three consecutive days.

I have always told Montrealers that my priority is the health and safety of the workers. Sixteen hundred people work on that site around the clock, rain or shine.

The project's durability is another priority. This structure is built to be in service for the next 125 years. Clearly, therefore, we want to make sure that the work is done well.

The matter of the timeline is also essential. I have told Montrealers that, if there are deficiencies and delays, there will be consequences. That is the way the contract with the builder is structured.

Mr. Iacono, I can tell you that I will continue to provide Montrealers with information on the exact status, because the infrastructure is important.

More than 60 million people use that corridor each year. If I recall correctly, the value of the goods shipped to the United States over the bridge is more than $20 billion. The corridor is therefore essential.

As I have always been transparent and open with people, I believe that Montrealers fully understood the situation.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Mr. Minister.

I represent the constituency of Alfred-Pellan, located in Laval. I am aware that the realities of urban communities are not the same as those of rural communities, especially in terms of infrastructure. That is why it is critical to understand the infrastructure needs of those communities.

Can you tell us about the efforts being made to support infrastructure projects in small communities and rural communities?

(0925)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

That somewhat goes back to the question from our colleague, the member for Trois-Rivières.

In the bilateral agreements we have with the provinces, there is a component for rural and northern communities.

The reason why we created a specific program is that we are aware that rural communities, for example, have specific needs.

We also departed from the traditional three-way sharing of the funding between municipalities, provinces and the federal government that was in effect in the past.

For example, if a project is eligible for the infrastructure program for rural and northern communities, and if the local population is under 5,000, the federal government could provide up to 60% of the funding for the infrastructure, the province could assume 33% of the costs, and the community would pay the remaining 7%.

That allows things to be done that would be otherwise difficult to do, given the municipalities' tax base. The program can greatly help small communities in Canada, both in Quebec and in the west, in Alberta, for example. It is one of the programs in which the government has invested $2 billion, specifically for small communities.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Mr. Minister.

In your speech, you mentioned that a pilot project had recently been started with the provinces to test the effectiveness of a progressive billing approach.

Could you give us a little bit more detail about that? What will the effects be? What are the expectations?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Thank you for your question, Mr. Iacono.

At the last federal-provincial-territorial meeting, I raised three issues.

First, we had to make sure that our respective processes, federally, provincially and territorially, align with the construction season. Given that the construction season will not change—it is the same each year—it is up to us to plan our projects so that the workers can do their part during each construction season.

Second, we had to see how we could establish a process to make projects easier to call for, to study, and, of course, to approve. That means we have to work in concert with the provinces and territories to come up with a review process for the easiest and quickest projects.

Third, we had to make sure, as Mr. Iacono mentioned, that we have a billing process that takes into account how projects are moving forward. In some cases, provinces send us invoices when projects are complete.

That is in line with what my colleague Mr. Jeneroux asked me earlier about the impact of the projects. I can give you an example.

The Prime Minister and I went to visit the site at the Côte-Vertu metro station in Montreal. This is a major project for an underground garage for metro cars. I saw about 200 to 300 workers there. I am not an engineer, but I would say that the project is about 70 or 76% complete. The work has been going on for several years. The impact on the economy, the workers and the community is clear to see. However, up to now, the federal government has not spent one dollar on the project, because we have not received any invoices.

So we are trying to come to an agreement with the provinces so that they send us invoices as the projects move along. The federal government can then release the money gradually. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move on to Mr. Godin. Welcome to our committee, by the way. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My greetings to my right honourable colleague, the Minister of Infrastructure. Our constituencies are also adjacent.

So I would like to agree with Mr. Aubin in saying that there is unanimity on the HFT, the high frequency train project in the Quebec City-Windsor corridor, while expressing the hope that service to Portneuf will not be forgotten.

Mr. Minister, earlier you provide an update on the Champlain Bridge. I believe that the Champlain Bridge is really important, and that the people of Montreal, and all Quebecers, look forward to being able to take advantage of that infrastructure.

On November 14, I wrote to you for clearer information and an update on the project. The questions that seem to me very important deal with the costs. Will there be additional costs? Will the penalties for which the consortium is liable be maintained and imposed? What changes have occurred as the process moves to completion?

Just now, you said that they need three days of good temperatures so that the workers, who are working seven days a week, can finish their work properly. This summer has been great for our workers, I feel, and we cannot blame the temperature for the delays. Let's understand that the crane operators’ strike lasted six days.

Initially, the bridge was supposed to be open to traffic on December 1. That date was pushed back to December 21, and now the opening has been postponed until the end of June 2019.

Will you make the commitment, before the committee this morning, that Montrealers will be able to use their infrastructure after a perhaps-justified six-month delay? That's the information I would like.

Will you make the commitment that, at the end of June 2019, just before the federal election campaign, the people of Montreal and Quebec will be able to use the infrastructure?

(0930)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

First, I would like to thank my colleague, Mr. Godin, who is also my riding neighbour, with whom I share a large part of the territory.

I am pleased to talk about the Champlain Bridge and to answer all of my colleague's questions, as I did last time when I provided an update in Montreal.

It is important to note that the Champlain Bridge is one of the largest construction sites in North America, so it is a major project. As the member mentioned, there are more than 1,600 workers working around the clock, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

In terms of costs, I have always said that, if there are delays, there will be consequences. In conjunction with the announcements I made in Montreal last time, there are currently commercial discussions between the contractor and the Government of Canada.

When the builder informed us, a few weeks before my announcement in Montreal, that it was impossible to do some of the work, I asked for second opinions. I received confirmation that, to do some of the work, a constant temperature and humidity level for three days was required. It is important to understand that the work is being done over the St. Lawrence River.

I would like to remind my colleague that my priority is always the health and safety of the workers. None of the measures we have taken should jeopardize the health and safety of workers.

The durability of the work is another important factor. The bridge is expected to last more than 125 years. We do not want to make any compromises that could affect the durability of the work.

Finally, there is the timeline for the construction of the bridge. I told Montrealers and I am pleased to repeat it to the committee today: the bridge structure will be completed before December 21. I will cross the bridge before December 21 to demonstrate to Montrealers that the structure is complete. Anyway, people can see the progress of the work on satellite photos. However, the bridge will be permanently open to traffic later in June—

Mr. Joël Godin:

Unfortunately, I cannot let you finish your answer because my time is limited. I have only one minute left.

I have another very specific question about the bridge. The original contract provided for toll booths, and there are costs associated with those booths.

Can you tell us how much those toll booths would have cost? Does it reduce the bill for Canadian taxpayers?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Since I made that announcement, we have been in commercial discussions with the builder. When the negotiations are completed, I will be transparent, like last time, with Quebeckers and the committee by providing them with all the information on the agreement we have reached with the final builder on all the costs of the project.

Mr. Joël Godin:

I have another question for you.

With respect to the excise tax, 28 municipalities in my riding are in the process of preparing their budgets and calculating the money they will have available for their activities next year, in 2019. The Programme de la taxe sur l'essence et de la contribution du Québec 2014-2018 (TECQ) has not yet been renewed. However, it will end on December 31, 2018.

Can the minister assure Quebec municipalities that this program will be renewed?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I can assure my colleague that we will provide him with all the details in writing.

The renewal of this gas tax is in progress. I would be pleased to provide him with all the details in writing to keep him well informed on the matter. He will in turn be able to inform the municipalities in his riding. The gas tax is an important lever for small and large municipalities alike, allowing them to carry out infrastructure projects. I would be happy to provide him with details in writing, which he can then share with the municipalities in his riding.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Minister, can you tell me if this program has already been renewed? Can municipalities count on that money?

(0935)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Municipalities can count on the sustainability of the gas tax program. As for the details, I would be happy to send a letter to the member, providing him and the municipalities in his riding with detailed information.

With your permission, Madam Chair, I will send a letter to the hon. member detailing the amounts that each of the municipalities in his riding will be able to receive.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Minister.

Thank you, Madam Chair. [English]

The Chair:

Would you please send that to the clerk so that all members have an opportunity to review the same information.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Just so I'm clear, Madam Chair, do you want me to provide that information for the gas tax for every member in their riding, or just for that member?

The Chair:

Whatever you distribute to one member, we prefer it to be distributed in the same—

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

We'll do that for the member as he asked, and every other member can see it. Perfect.

The Chair:

Yes, if the others would like to have it for theirs, they can ask for that. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Madam Chair, I am not a member of the committee. Would it be possible to have the information forwarded to me? [English]

The Chair:

Yes, we will, Mr. Godin. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Rogers.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Welcome, Minister.

I'm going to be sharing my time with my colleague, Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Minister, I want to ask specifically about municipal issues. I come from a municipal background from a very small town as a mayor. I've been involved provincially as president of the municipal association and sitting on the FCM board, the federal board. Specifically, I'd like for you to inform the committee about what some of the things are that you're focused on or doing, in trying to assist small towns in rural Canada with their infrastructure needs, specifically things like water, waste water and other issues and challenges that they deal with every day.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I'd like to thank the member. I realize we have a lot of colleagues with a municipal background and that's good.

One of the things we have done is to work with FCM very closely in understanding the needs of municipalities.

As Mr. Rogers knows, I come from a riding that has 34 small municipalities as well, so I really understand the need. That's why I was saying that infrastructure means different things to different people. If you're in an urban area, like in the question before, I can talk about Montreal and the Champlain Bridge, or I can talk about things happening in B.C. or in Alberta in Calgary or Edmonton, but obviously when you're talking, for example, about Newfoundland and Labrador and smaller communities, that's why we tailored part of our program. The $33 billion and the agreements, the integrated bilateral agreements, have a component that deals with rural and northern communities.

The reason was that we understood that for smaller communities you needed more flexibility, that in smaller communities sometimes what would be needed, for example, could be an Internet connection to change the lives of people.

I am very happy to be engaging. I was just, for example, in the province next to yours, in New Brunswick, and I met, for example, I think 30 small municipality mayors. I did the same thing in Alberta the last time I was there. I think it's the Alberta Urban Municipalities Association.

I like to do that because, first of all, it's about providing information. Second, it's about engaging with them about their needs and, third, I would say, it's about making sure that our programs are tailored to fit the purposes of small communities.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

I have one other question. I appreciate the support you provide to municipalities because it sometimes alleviates the municipal burden or the tax burden on people within our small communities, especially, across the country. Today Internet and cellphone service are crucially important but sadly lacking in many parts of rural Canada.

I can specifically talk about my riding and the Baie Verte Peninsula, for instance, where there's very sparse cell coverage. People are calling out for and asking and requesting that I lobby my government for increased funding for Internet and cellphone coverage in my riding. Can you tell us what our government is doing to connect more communities with broadband Internet and improved cell service in rural Canada especially?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madam Chair, I'd like to thank my colleague, Mr. Rogers, because that's something dear to my heart. As I said before, I feel exactly the same as him. A good part of my own riding is not connected with either cellphone or Internet. I'm happy to advocate for him and with him on that very important issue.

The rural and community stream under our program is providing some elements of response to that. We have been able under the program to tailor the rules to be able to finance part of that. However, I would say, Madam Chair, this is only part of the answer.

I think that the connect to innovate program, under Minister Bains, has been very important with the $500 million that was set aside to start connecting Canada. I think that people understand today that Internet connectivity is a bit like electricity in the old days, where this is allowing people to, for example, have remote education, remote learning, or remote medicine, for example, provided in their communities.

I understand the member and I can assure him that I'm on the same page as him. We would like to work with you to make sure that we can do more for communities across Canada with respect to the Internet.

(0940)

Mr. Churence Rogers:

Thank you.

I'll now turn it over to Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'd actually like to start by thanking you, Minister, for an over $1-million investment out of the $2-billion clean water and waste water fund, as it helped build the foundation drainage collector, the FDC pumping station and utility dewatering system in my riding. Thank you for that.

Following up with that, what has our government done to make sure that Canadians know what we're investing in or are aware of where the dollars are going?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I'm very happy. I think what you see this morning is that there are projects in every community around this table. Canadians watching us at home would feel exactly the same. We have more than 4,400 projects ongoing in the country. Obviously, each and every one of them is improving the quality of life of people.

The first project I announced, to give you an example, was in a community close to my hometown. It was about $10,000. I remember people were asking me, “Minister, why would you make an announcement of $10,000?” I said, “It's because a small amount in a small community can make a big difference.” The example you give is that you have one in your riding. I could go around the table because I have a list of projects in every riding represented around this table.

The green infrastructure, for me, is one of the most important ones. You're talking about waste-water treatment.

Many of these projects may not be visible to Canadians because they will be upgrading stations—for example, pumping stations like in Trois-Rivières—or other things. If Canadians want to know what kinds of projects they have in their communities, we have provided what we call the geo-map. If people go to Infrastructure Canada's website, they'll be able to zoom in on a map. We have tried to provide transparency to Canadians, so that they can see in their communities the types of projects that have been funded and their states of completion. Sometimes we can even provide pictures, so that people can relate to what we're doing. We're going to continue to do that because I think it's important that Canadians realize that these projects, in different ways—whether it's about water, whether it's about public transit, whether it's about extending a runway in a community—are making a difference in their lives.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Jeneroux, you have two minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'd just like to remind colleagues on the other side of the table that this is taxpayers' money.

Everyone's thanking you, Minister. Even though you're here in front of us, this is still taxpayers' money at the end of the day, and it's not from your personal account that you're paying for these projects.

I want to ask you, yes or no, if the Infrastructure Bank is, in your opinion, delayed on announcing projects.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Just allow me, Madame Chair, to say that I think the member made a great point. I never pretend that it's my own money. I'm just here to represent the public interest of the government, parliamentarians and Canadians. I always make the point, I would say to my colleague, to make sure that people understand that it's taxpayers' money. Our job is to manage it, and to allocate it in the best possible way to make an impact. I take that point very—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Is the Infrastructure Bank delayed in announcing projects, yes or no?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I would say that the Infrastructure Bank, as I said before, is looking at dozens of projects as we're talking. Obviously my colleague, who knows these things well, would understand that there are commercial sensitivities about announcements. We will do the work. The bank will do the work. When it's ready to announce, there will be announcements.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

In terms of timeline, Minister, it was part of the 2015 election that this was going to be a tool. Then it was announced again, in 2016, that you're doing it. There was recently an additional $11 million drawdown on it. This is a $35 billion bank. You have seen one project built in Montreal, which was a reannouncement from a previous project. Do you or do you not think that this bank has been an absolute failure for Canadians up to this point?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame Chair, as the member said, our role as parliamentarians and as government, as the Infrastructure Bank, is obviously to invest public dollars. When we do that, I'm sure the member and the people watching us would expect us to do proper due diligence. I'm sure the member is not suggesting that we rush into any investment, but that we need to do the proper due diligence. As you said, those are precious dollars from taxpayers across the country. We need to do the proper due diligence on these projects. This is what is ongoing.

I would hope that the member realizes that the bank is a tool to do more for Canadians. I think that if he were to talk to some of the investors I talk to, and Canadians, they understand that—

(0945)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It's a very expensive tool, Minister. It's a very expensive tool, from which we've seen very few results.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

We're building a bank for the next century. If I were the member, I would look back at that. I'm sure one day he will see the impacts of that, whether we're looking at interties and other things that will make a difference not only in his province but across Canada. This is a tool to build the types of things that Canadians want. This is about thinking big. This is about thinking smart. I'm sure the member is with us when it comes to building better communities across Canada.

The Chair:

Minister Champagne, thank you very much for being here with the committee today. We waited impatiently. We appreciate all of the information you have shared with the committee.

We will suspend for a moment while we change witnesses—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Madam Chair, before we suspend, I have just a point of order on the quote that you quoted to me, in terms of asking repetitive questions. Typically that's used for repetitive speeches in the House of Commons. I'd like you to come back to this committee with examples of when it's been used in terms of committees here. If you're able to do that, fantastic, because I don't want to raise this in the House and make the Speaker rule on something like this. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Jeneroux.

I'd be happy to share the book with the rules in it, on page 1058, chapter 20 on committees and the ability of the chair to decide whether it's repetitive or out of—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Madam Chair, the request was to bring back examples of when it's been used in the capacity that you're using it. It's been used in the House in terms of saying word for word the same speeches, but in terms of what you're using it for, the committee would love to see examples of when it's been used in the past.

Thank you.

The Chair:

If you would like to challenge the chair, certainly, Mr. Jeneroux, you're welcome to do that.

I will attempt to supply to you what I have, and I doubt that there will be examples, because I just don't think I'm going to ask the clerk to go looking for examples. If you're unhappy with my ruling, you certainly are welcome to challenge the chair, sir.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madam Chair, I don't want to be repetitive, but I'd just like to thank the members for their questions and their passion in delivering 21st-century infrastructure for Canadians. I think it's the best way to attract talent and investment to our country, and we will continue. I would be happy to come back to answer any questions from the members.[Translation]

Madam Chair and colleagues, thank you all for welcoming me here this morning. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will suspend momentarily.

(0945)

(0950)

The Chair:

I call the meeting back to order.

We will have half an hour to review the study we're doing on assessing the impact of airport noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

With us we have Nick Boud, Principal Consultant for Helios.

Mr. Boud, you have five minutes to address, please, or maybe six, since you're the only witness, and we look forward to your testimony. Thank you.

Mr. Nick Boud (Principal Consultant, Helios):

Okay.

Good morning, Madam Chair, members of the committee. Thank you for inviting Helios to appear before you today.

Helios is a U.K. aviation consultancy working for clients around the world and across the whole of the aviation industry. I lead the airport consultancy business within Helios and have 26 years of aviation experience. Helios is currently contracted to provide independent technical analysis and support to the GTAA as they move forward in the delivery of their latest five-year noise management action plan.

Over the past two and a half years, Helios has completed one study for Nav Canada, two for the GTAA, and one for Aéroports de Montréal. I have submitted four reference documents ahead of today, of which the first two were written by Helios. I'll come on to explain each of those documents.

The first one is the “Independent Toronto Airspace Noise Review”, prepared for Nav Canada, which provides noise mitigation recommendations and conclusions focused on the Toronto airspace, as well as a lot of informative background information.

The second document is “Best practices in noise management”, which was prepared for the GTAA and provides an excellent overview of 11 different noise management practices across 26 international airports that are comparative to Toronto Pearson.

The third document is an analysis paper prepared by the Airports Council International and published earlier this week, addressing the future of aviation noise. This was prepared in response to the recent release by the World Health Organization on their latest environmental noise guidelines.

The final document that I've submitted is a paper from the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The paper concludes that the data used by the World Health Organization and the analysis conducted in establishing the relationship between aviation noise and annoyance has, in the author's words, had “a huge impact on the final recommendations”. The author goes on to conclude that the recommended noise level to avoid adverse health impacts from aviation noise should be eight decibels higher than those proposed by the World Health Organization. An eight-decibel increase is substantial. It is generally accepted that the human ear perceives a 100% increase in volume for every 10-decibel increase.

Aviation noise management is a complex, multi-faceted topic, and I'm going to have a chance to only make a microscope dent in it today.

Helios finds the same aviation noise complaints and challenges everywhere we go. However, the solutions differ, because the urban, social, geographic, political, regulatory and operational environments are never the same.

I must apologize, for I am about to make a generalization. It is the aircraft that makes the noise, yet time and again, the party not present at public meetings, and generally the last at the table, are the airlines. Meaningful progress is only possible if all stakeholders are present at the table on a voluntary basis, work corroboratively, are prepared to give and take, make tough decisions and are committed to the objectives of delivering noise reduction and mitigation.

Moving noise from community A to community B on a long-term or permanent basis for no other reason than to pacify community A is not a solution. It is only likely to inflate the problem exponentially. The short-term relocation of noise on a predictable and regular basis, often referred to as “noise sharing” or “noise respite”, can be a valuable mitigation in some situations. Many airports have worked for decades and invested millions of dollars to reduce or mitigate noise, yet they still have a large number of residents who are not satisfied. This does not mean that we should not continue to try, as major improvements have been made and there is more that can be achieved in the weeks, months and years ahead.

One of the common questions raised by this committee is about what national standards there are to protect people from aviation noise. As far as I'm aware, there are two in Canada.

(0955)



The first is set by Transport Canada and requires airports to prepare a noise exposure forecast, which is used to inform urban zoning strategies. The acoustician, Dr. Colin Novak, spoke about some of the challenges with using the NEF metric. I suspect, based on trends elsewhere in the world, that public tolerance of aviation noise has reduced since the NEF 25 and NEF 30 levels were set by Transport Canada, and I offer that the majority of noise complaints come from people outside of the geographic areas enclosed by these NEF contours.

The second standard is the aircraft noise certification requirements specified by ICAO, which have become more stringent with each generation of aircraft, meaning that aircraft have become quieter. Aircraft remain in active service for 30-plus years, so it can take a long time for noisier aircraft to be retired.

I would like to provide an element of perspective on what flights are in the night at Toronto Pearson. An analysis being undertaken by Helios Technology Ltd. for the GTAA shows that over 80% of night flights are passenger services, with the remainder being cargo, at 10% to 15%, or general and/or business aviation.

Night flights account for 3% of all flights at Toronto Pearson. Airports and community groups argue about whether the number of noise complaints recorded is an accurate indication of the scale of the problem. I counsel that you look at complaints as only one piece of the wider evaluation as to the scale of aviation noise as a problem. There are many factors that mean you cannot directly compare the number of complaints between airports. Identifying the percentage of new complaints each year can be an informative metric, but again, it should never be considered in isolation.

The Chair:

I'm sorry to interrupt, but the committee members have many questions.

Mr. Nick Boud:

I have four lines.

The Chair:

Please continue.

Mr. Nick Boud:

Helios Technology would happily provide further support to this committee, but I hope you understand that the reality is that we are a commercial organization and must limit our non-fee earning work. Up to this point, we have invested our time on a voluntary basis, and I hope our input will be valuable.

Thank you. I look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

It's on to Mr. Liepert for four minutes.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thank you, sir, for your work.

One of the things that I think the committee has had trouble determining—I know I have—is who owns this issue. It seems like the airport authorities say, “We only land the planes that want to land here.” Nav Canada says, “Our job is to make sure they land safely.” It seems like Transport Canada has kind of hived off responsibility to Nav Canada.

Suppose we were to come forward with certain recommendations. Let's just pick one out of the air, one that has been suggested by numerous witnesses: banning night flights, for example. In your study of this issue, in your work, who do you see would actually have the ability or the authority to do that?

(1000)

Mr. Nick Boud:

From experience in other nations around the world, the only people who can do that would be those in the government. It would require legislation to achieve that. That is what is being done. There are some voluntary restrictions, but to ban night flights, I believe, would take formal legislation.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

You seem to have indicated in your statement that this is multi-faceted and that there are various aspects that go into this whole issue.

We've certainly heard about the health aspect of it. We haven't heard a ton about the economic impacts of some of the things that would be the fallout from some recommendations. Can you talk a little bit about the complexity of taking one action that might have unintended consequences for a whole bunch of other things?

Mr. Nick Boud:

I think it comes back to the fact that one solution doesn't fit all airports. Frankfurt, for example, which I know has been spoken of here before, has a period of the night when flights aren't allowed. Zurich has a period when they're not allowed, yet other airports in Germany and Switzerland do have night flights.

It can cause a relocation of services from the airport with the ban to other airports, which is moving noise from one location to another. The airlines, if there is a commercial business there, will find a means to achieve it. There is certainly an economic impact, and I know that the GTAA is looking to do an evaluation of the economics of night flights because we are employed to help formulate some of the traffic scenarios to feed into that study.

You cannot take one action without there being an impact on businesses not directly related to the airport, on employees at the airport and on the wider community.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Certainly, the consumer as well.... Our way of doing business as consumers has moved from shopping malls to online shopping, and that product has to get somewhere. I'm not suggesting that it has to come on a night flight. All I am saying is that it certainly creates, in all likelihood, more problems. Are there any thoughts about that in your work?

Mr. Nick Boud:

The vast majority of cargo is moved on passenger aircraft. The percentage of cargo-dedicated aircraft is tiny, compared to the overall movements. Yes, the change in social attitudes towards shopping will drive up additional air cargo, but unless society changes its practices, it is not something we can avoid.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

It was noted in the Helios report that Toronto Pearson's night period starts late and is shorter in duration than similar periods at other airports. What have other airports that are comparable in size and volume done to address the issue of noise?

Mr. Nick Boud:

In relation to night, I believe there were two other airports with a similar length of night period as Toronto, but others certainly do have night periods of eight or nine hours. Some of them have implemented a quota system, where the noisier the aircraft, the higher the penalty implemented against a total point system.

Others have a total limit, similar to Pearson, as to the number of night flights they can handle each year. Others have put in additional charges, possibly two or three times the daily charge to operate at night. Others have, as does Pearson, a restriction on certain types of aircraft that can operate in the night period.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

My second question is that in the Helios “Independent Toronto Airspace Noise Review” report, it was recommended that Nav Canada should formally write to Transport Canada requesting them to consider the establishment of a sunset date of December 31, 2020, for the operation of the Airbus A320 series. However, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority has proposed incentives for the noise reduction modification to occur electively.

What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of an elective incentive program?

(1005)

Mr. Nick Boud:

They have been shown to work at other airports around the world. Lufthansa, in Germany, voluntarily modified their aircraft and were one of the first airlines to do so. Gatwick has introduced a financial penalty if airlines operate a modified aircraft.

It has to, again, be finding the right solution for Canada. I still stand by the recommendation that there should be action to persuade carriers to modify the A320. It is a simple refit or modification to the aircraft that can make a significant impact on noise.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

This is a question I have been asking because I represent a riding that's pretty much adjacent to Pearson airport. Based on your exhaustive studies, particularly in and around Toronto Pearson, what are your thoughts on the establishment of a new airport within perhaps Kitchener or north of the escarpment, anywhere in and around the GTA?

Mr. Nick Boud:

I say to the establishment of a new airport or through-traffic distribution being directed to other airports, it is moving noise. Also, communities tend to grow up close to airports because they are an economic driver and people will want to be close to that because that is where the jobs are.

Time and again, building new airports may seem like the solution, but in the long term you tend to end up with communities, development, moving closer to the airport. It takes very careful planning to make that a successful solution.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to the witnesses for joining us.

Madam Chair, before I ask questions, I would like to make a comment for your consideration.

In his opening remarks, the witness referred to four documents he had submitted. However, I have learned that those documents are currently being translated. Because of their volume, they are not available in French.

When we plan our list of witnesses, we should ensure that witnesses only appear once the documents are distributed to everyone in both languages. If I had had all the documents in French, my preparation and my questions would have been significantly different. I probably would have found the answers to my questions in the documents and could have probed further. However, that's impossible.

Could we ensure that we receive the documents in both official languages before hearing the witnesses in committee? It would be much appreciated. I leave that for your consideration, Madam Chair.

I will now turn to you, Mr. Boud. You have already answered one of my questions in your opening remarks. You said that it seemed difficult to apply the conclusions of Helios' report for Toronto Pearson International Airport to each of the airports. There must still be some features that apply to all the airports you have studied.

Would it be fair to say that there can be two types of recommendations: recommendations for all the airports that are experiencing the same problem related to the surrounding communities and recommendations specific to each of the airports? [English]

Mr. Nick Boud:

There is certainly a common thread through the solutions that are out there. We do not have to reinvent solutions with every airport we go to, but just because a solution is right at one airport, it may not be immediately transferable to another airport. That is, flight routings into Vancouver have the option of coming in over the water, but that is not a solution that is available to Toronto Pearson. Yes, you can look at flight routings and try to make use of industrial corridors or rural areas, but it is not immediately transferable.

Keeping aircraft higher certainly is something that is probably achievable at a lot of airports, and it reduces noise, but again, you have to look at the local environment to see what obstacles are there, be they man-made obstacles or mountainous terrain, before you can conclude whether that solution is applicable in that area.

The distribution of residential communities around the airport again has an impact on what solution is right. If you look at the best practices report or the Toronto independent airspace review, when they're translated—and I appreciate one of them is a sizable document to translate—you will find that there is a common thread through there and you will be able to find elements that could be taken and considered for other airports, but bespoking them is still required.

(1010)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You have worked internationally on these issues. Do you think the committee could target one, two or three airports that could be leaders in noise reduction? Among the top airports, would there be a Canadian airport? When it comes to noise reduction, are Canadian airports at the back of the pack? [English]

Mr. Nick Boud:

I don't believe there's one or a small number that you should look at. Hence, when we undertook the best practices piece of work for the GTAA, we looked at 26 international airports, because it is from taking that broad view that you start to get the multiplicity of the flavours of solutions that are out there.

Schiphol in Amsterdam has made a huge effort to minimize noise in communities and swaps runways so many times a day that it becomes boggling for other airports to consider, yet they do not have a night ban. They have more night flights than Toronto Pearson. It really does need a look across a broad number of airports to pick up the different best practices that can then be applied.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin, we're short on time. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I'll be brief. Is the international standard of 55 decibels achieved by a number of airports? [English]

Mr. Nick Boud:

Fifty-five is the standard that the European Union asks airports to report against. It is not a mandated standard that has to be achieved. It is a benchmark to measure the population affected, but it is not something that has to be achieved.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We'll move on to Mr. Maloney.

Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Boud, thank you for joining us today. You and I have met on several occasions. You know I represent a riding, Etobicoke—Lakeshore, that is very much affected by air traffic noise and volume at Pearson Airport, so it's an issue close to my constituents' hearts.

You've been commissioned previously to do a study for both NavCan and the GTAA, and in the course of doing those studies, you reviewed what's referred to as ideas five and six, which very generally, from a high level—no pun intended—dealt with the direction of traffic on a regular basis. My constituents were concerned about redirecting traffic flow from east-west to north-south and the conclusion from your studies and the decision reached by the GTAA was that they weren't going to increase the north-south air traffic.

I have that right so far, haven't I?

Mr. Nick Boud:

In general.... We looked at weekends and night flights.

Mr. James Maloney:

Weekends and night flights, that's correct.

From a very basic level, and I know this because my brother's a pilot with Air Canada, it's safer for planes to land and take off going into the wind. Is that correct?

Mr. Nick Boud:

Yes, as a basic rule.

Mr. James Maloney:

As a basic rule, and the winds tend to go east-west, so that's a big reason why that happened.

I want to move on to night flights. A formula is used at Pearson in how many flights are allowed to come in and out of Pearson, and I believe the formula is based on an annual basis, as opposed to a per night basis. As a result of that, on any given night, depending on winds and other things, there could be a much higher volume of night flight traffic coming in. Isn't that correct?

Mr. Nick Boud:

That's correct.

Mr. James Maloney:

The night flights are also governed by the rules that apply to runway usage and whatnot.

Mr. Nick Boud:

Yes, there are preferential runways.

Mr. James Maloney:

You talked about the commercial aspect of night flights and the fact that most of it is arising because of passengers. Is it realistic, in your view, to ban night flights altogether at Pearson airport, factoring in the surrounding area and the available alternatives?

Mr. Nick Boud:

Anything is possible, but there would be a significant economic impact because of it.

Mr. James Maloney:

You said one size does not fit all. For example, if you're talking about European airports, if you ban night flights in one large centre, you probably have another large airport two hours away, give or take, that you can divert some of that traffic to. Is that a fair comment?

(1015)

Mr. Nick Boud:

Certainly in Germany, traffic is relocated from Frankfurt to Cologne and aircraft have been relocated because the aircraft doesn't just do the one flight. Overall, that has had an impact on Frankfurt's business.

Mr. James Maloney:

Which takes me to my third point. Your options are limited in Toronto because you don't have other large airports nearby available to you. You said communities tend to grow up around airports, and that's exactly what's happened around Pearson, because when Pearson was put there, Mississauga and Brampton weren't anywhere near the size they are now, and they've developed those cities close to the airport, which has partially contributed to the problem.

I was in Edmonton this summer, and I was impressed by the fact that they had a very positive relationship with the surrounding communities and business community, and it's because they don't have that build up around the airport. We have the Pickering lands, which were secured many years ago, and there's a lot of space around that.

Wouldn't it be sensible to put an airport there, given the opportunity to develop a situation where you don't have that problem?

Mr. Nick Boud:

Building a new airport and moving the whole of the business is a significant undertaking. It has been done by some cities. It is not just the airport you need to consider relocating, generally a huge amount of other infrastructure is required, and the development tends to grow towards that airport, but it is not impossible to do.

Mr. James Maloney:

I have one quick follow-up. You don't have to move the whole of business. You're creating a second office. You're not shutting one down and moving it to another place. You're creating an alternative.

Mr. Nick Boud:

History has shown that if you leave both airports open, a lot of the air carriers will not want to relocate, because relocation is a significant cost to them and their business. The first airport tends to have the best connections and the greatest value to them.

Mr. James Maloney:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move on to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair. [English]

The Chair:

You have two minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Mr. Boud, the witnesses we received were essentially complaining about the lack of accountability and transparency on the part of our airport authorities. The optics it gives is that Canada is trailing behind in terms of noise management.

How do Canadian airports compare to airports in other countries in terms of noise management? How are noise advisory committees organized in other countries compared to Canada's? [English]

Mr. Nick Boud:

In the few days that I've been working in Canada, I would certainly say that Canada has come to the noise mitigation topic later than a lot. Europe and Australia have been looking at this for many more years. The U.S. also, to some extent, is ahead of Canada on this. I only have one real airport to focus on, because that's where I spend most of my effort here, which is Toronto Pearson, and they have made huge steps from where they were when I first came over here.

As to how the committees look, again, the best practice report did look at the structure of committees. There were some recommendations in there. I know that the GTAA is briefing the public this evening at their quarterly meeting about changes to the structure to try to become closer to the best practice that we've looked at across the 26 airports. There is learning to be had, and that can be implemented.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have two minutes.

Then we can get to Mr. Jeneroux for two minutes and that will be the end. We have committee business. I'm sorry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

The time I have is equivalent to about the wake turbulence gap between two planes, so I'll try to be quick. I have two totally different questions.

First, can passengers make ticketing decisions that affect airplane noise? Is there anything they can do when they are buying their tickets to influence when, where and how planes fly?

Mr. Nick Boud:

Certainly, passengers could choose not to take night flights, as an example, and to travel during the day. That would be one situation such as that, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The other side of this is that you talked about the 30-year life cycle for aircraft, more or less. What's the noisiest part of a plane?

(1020)

Mr. Nick Boud:

It depends on which stage of flight you're talking about. For departures, it is the engines. For arrival, it is the body of the aircraft. It's the air rushing over the aircraft that makes more noise than the engines on the final part of the descent.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How do you compare the plane noise of, say, a 787 to that of a 707 or a 747?

Mr. Nick Boud:

There are generations of difference between them. If you could put a 707 back at Toronto Pearson and then fly in a 787 behind it, nobody would dispute the fact that they have become significantly quieter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've talked a lot about the A320 fix. Can you describe what the fix actually is?

Mr. Nick Boud:

The problem is that there are vents in the underside of that wing and the wind rockets over it, a bit like blowing over the top of a bottle. It is a small piece of metal that has to be attached just ahead of that hole so as to disrupt the airflow so that you do not get that humming-whistling noise as the air goes over the hole.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you know how much it costs to fix it?

Mr. Nick Boud:

I don't. I've had different values quoted because different airlines have different maintenance agreements with Airbus. Some people quote $5,000 or $7,000. The cost of the piece is small compared with the cost of taking the aircraft out of service. You have to drain the fuel to be able to fit it, but that is not major compared with the cost of replacing an aircraft.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair. I want to use the two minutes allotted to me just to clarify my intent from the previous witness and the point of order. It certainly wasn't my intention to challenge the chair. I appreciate all that you do in terms of the good nature of our committee. I feel that we work quite well together for the majority of the time.

However, I think it's important that we on this side are able to continue to ask the questions. You in your role don't need to be protective of the minister in any form or fashion whatsoever.

I just want to read into the record a brief quote from page 1078 in chapter 20 of practices, policies and procedures: There are no specific rules governing the nature of questions which may be put to witnesses appearing before committees, beyond the general requirement of relevance to the issue before the committee. Witnesses must answer all questions which the committee puts [before] them.

It states further: The actions of a witness who refuses to answer questions may be reported to the House.

Again, I want to make sure that this committee continues to work together. I know that you had a piece of paper in front of you ready to quote the order you referred to. However, again, I would hate to see us come back in the new year and not remain in the friendly fashion that we've continued up to this point.

I just leave those comments there, Madam Chair, in further clarifying my point of order. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Jeneroux.

There are no pressing questions that we actually have to get done.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.):

If I might, I have just one quick question.

The Chair:

You can have a very short question, because we have committee business.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

You mentioned Schiphol in your study, but other than Schiphol, Pearson had the highest number of night flights of any airport that was part of that study, three times more than Heathrow. Was there any particular reason that the study had no recommendations or suggestion that GTAA should reduce the number of night flights, or night flights per night as they have in the annual budget?

Mr. Nick Boud:

No, there was no specific reason why we hadn't. It is a case of our making recommendations about extending the night and changing the controls on the night to potentially freeze the quantity of noise where it is, rather than taking a decision or a recommendation that would have an economic impact, which is something that, as aviation consultants, we feel is outside of our remit.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to our witness. You can see that we really would have loved to have you for an hour but schedules just didn't permit. Thank you very much for your contribution.

Mr. Nick Boud:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We will suspend for a moment and then we'll go into committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la 125e  du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous poursuivons notre étude du mandat du ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui l'honorable François-Philippe Champagne, ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités, ainsi que Kelly Gillis, sous-ministre, Infrastructure et Collectivités, du Bureau de l'infrastructure du Canada. Bienvenue à vous deux. Nous avions hâte à votre comparution, alors je vous remercie de vous être présentés aujourd'hui.

Monsieur le ministre Champagne, je vous cède la parole.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Madame la présidente, je suis désolé, je veux seulement régler quelques petites questions d'ordre administratif avant que nous arrivions aux commentaires très attendus du ministre; j'espère qu'il abordera dans sa déclaration préliminaire le fait qu'il n'était pas là pour l'examen du budget des dépenses. Je sais qu'il comparaît aujourd'hui au sujet de sa lettre de mandat, mais je veux simplement m'assurer que nous avons souligné le fait que, la plupart du temps, les ministres viennent aussi comparaître pour leur Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Jeneroux.

Monsieur le ministre Champagne, vous disposez de cinq minutes; allez-y.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne (ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je suis très heureux de comparaître devant vous et vos collègues aujourd'hui.

C'est la première fois que je comparais devant le Comité, mais je commencerai par déclarer que je suis tout à fait ravi d'être des vôtres et d'aborder les progrès liés à l'infrastructure. Madame la présidente, je pense que l'infrastructure touche la vie des Canadiens de toutes les collectivités, qu'elles soient urbaines ou rurales.

Bonjour et merci de m'avoir invité, mesdames et messieurs les députés.

Kelly Gillis, ma très apte sous-ministre, qui oeuvre très activement sur ce dossier pour qu'on puisse livrer des résultats aux Canadiens, m'accompagne.

Je voudrais commencer par reconnaître le travail exceptionnel de mon prédécesseur, le ministre Sohi. Il était responsable de ce dossier, et nous savons tous qu'il est un véritable passionné de l'infrastructure, presque autant que de sa ville natale d'Edmonton. Il a laissé un bon héritage en ce qui concerne les projets et le programme. Il défend avec vigueur les intérêts de sa région et, évidemment, de l'Alberta, et il continue d'oeuvrer au sein de son nouveau portefeuille en tant que ministre des Ressources naturelles. [Français]

J'aimerais aussi remercier ma sous-ministre et l'ensemble des employés d'Infrastructure Canada de leurs nombreux efforts et de leur dévouement au cours des trois dernières années. Grâce à leurs efforts soutenus, nous avons fait d'énormes progrès pour livrer des infrastructures modernes aux Canadiens partout au pays.[Traduction]

Laissez-moi vous donner un bref aperçu. Depuis que j'ai été nommé ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités, j'ai eu la chance de constater par moi-même nos investissements dans les infrastructures de partout au pays. J'ai récemment assisté à l'inauguration du projet de protection des terrains portuaires contre les inondations, à Toronto, qui contribuera à transformer les terrains portuaires en de belles collectivités nouvelles entourées de parcs et d'espaces verts. Le projet ajoutera également des logements abordables dans la région de Toronto.

J'ai également visité le projet d'énergie éolienne à Inuvik, dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest; ce projet fournira une source d'énergie efficiente, fiable et propre aux résidants d'Inuvik. J'ai été heureux de constater qu'il s'agissait du premier projet réalisé au titre du Fonds pour l'énergie dans l'Arctique, qui aide les collectivités du Nord à passer du diesel à l'énergie renouvelable.

(0850)

[Français]

J'ai aussi visité un garage souterrain, à Montréal, qui permettra d'augmenter la flotte de voitures de métro de la Ville de Montréal, d'améliorer la fréquence du service et, évidemment, de soutenir la croissance prévue du nombre d'usagers du transport en commun à Montréal.[Traduction]

Laissez-moi aborder brièvement quelques réussites que nous avons connues jusqu'ici. Notre plan consistant à injecter au cours de la prochaine décennie 180 milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures de partout au pays est véritablement historique. Je suis fier des progrès que nous avons réalisés jusqu'ici et de l'incidence positive qu'a eue le plan sur les gens dans l'ensemble du pays. Il est exécuté par 14 ministères et organismes fédéraux. [Français]

Les 70 nouveaux programmes et initiatives sont maintenant tous lancés, et plus de 32 000 projets d'infrastructure ont déjà été approuvés. Presque tous les projets sont déjà en cours.[Traduction]

Je suis heureux de souligner certaines des importantes étapes clés que nous avons franchies ensemble depuis la dernière comparution du ministre Sohi devant le Comité, au mois de mai. La première, dont je suis très fier, est le Défi des villes intelligentes. Le nom des finalistes a été annoncé cet été, et celui des gagnants le sera à la fin du printemps 2019. [Français]

La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada a annoncé son premier investissement, soit un montant de 1,28 milliard de dollars dans le Réseau express métropolitain, à Montréal. Au moyen de cet investissement, la Banque fait exactement ce qu'il était prévu qu'elle fasse, c'est-à-dire accorder un financement pour permettre de créer davantage d'infrastructures pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes de partout au pays.[Traduction]

Même si très peu avait été fait pour promouvoir cet important projet quand nous sommes arrivés au pouvoir, le pont international Gordie-Howe est enfin en cours de construction. C'est vraiment historique pour le Canada. Nous savons que le corridor Windsor-Détroit compte pour environ 30 % du commerce de marchandises entre le Canada et les États-Unis. Ce projet se fonde véritablement sur notre prospérité actuelle pour garantir qu'elle se poursuive à l'avenir. [Français]

Infrastructure Canada a aussi signé des ententes bilatérales avec l'ensemble des provinces et des territoires pour la prochaine décennie. Nous avons déjà approuvé du financement en vertu de ces ententes, comme[Traduction]la ligne verte, à Calgary, le prolongement de la ligne Millenium, en Colombie-Britannique,[Français]les voitures de métro Azur, à Montréal,[Traduction]et le système de traitement des eaux dans le district régional de Comox Valley, en Colombie-Britannique.

Enfin, nous avons également lancé le Fonds d'atténuation et d'adaptation en matière de catastrophes. Nous avons déjà reçu un certain nombre de demandes de financement et sommes en train de les examiner.

J'ai également eu le plaisir de rencontrer mes homologues provinciaux et territoriaux, au mois de septembre. L'un des éléments clés que nous avons abordés tenait à la façon de mieux adapter le versement de nos fonds et nos processus à la saison de la construction, c'est-à-dire que nous voulons accélérer et améliorer notre processus d'évaluation initiale, d'examen et d'approbation et nous assurer que nos processus — fédéraux, provinciaux ou territoriaux — sont harmonisés avec la saison de la construction. J'ai insisté auprès de mes collègues sur le fait que nous devons travailler là-dessus avec diligence.

J'ai visité plusieurs chantiers de projet, où les travaux avancent bien, mais pour lesquels on n'a pas présenté de demandes de remboursement, par exemple le projet de la rue Cherry lié à l'eau et au remblayage du lac, à Toronto, et le garage de Côte-Vertu, à Montréal, au Québec. Pour régler ce problème, nous avons récemment lancé avec la Saskatchewan, la Nouvelle-Écosse et l'Alberta un projet pilote visant à vérifier l'efficacité d'une approche de facturation progressive. Nous savons que les Canadiens veulent voir des fonds qui correspondent aux étapes clés des projets, une approche fondée sur le pourcentage d'achèvement, et nous avons demandé à nos collègues dans les provinces de travailler avec nous afin d'obtenir ce résultat également. [Français]

En conclusion, je souhaite remercier les membres du Comité de m'avoir donné l'occasion de faire une mise à jour. J'espère qu'ensemble, avec chaque membre du Comité, nous pourrons bâtir des infrastructures du XXIe siècle qui soient modernes, résilientes et vertes pour l'ensemble des Canadiens.

Je vous remercie.

(0855)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre Champagne. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de tous vos commentaires et du fait que vous les avez formulés dans le délai de cinq minutes, de sorte que les membres du Comité puissent poser les innombrables questions qu'ils ont à vous adresser.

Monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, madame la présidente, et je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Avez-vous entendu des intervenants — que vous rencontrez fréquemment, je le sais — parler des conséquences sociales du fait d'avoir des travailleurs de la construction majoritairement de sexe masculin, surtout dans les régions rurales?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

L'un des groupes de personnes que je rencontre le plus souvent est celui des travailleurs de la construction. Ce sont les vrais héros de ce que nous faisons. Je suis allé tout récemment sur le pont Champlain, à Montréal. Je peux dire à mon collègue qu'au moment où j'ai rencontré les 1 600 travailleurs qui oeuvrent sept jours par semaine, jour et nuit, beau temps mauvais temps, je les ai vraiment écoutés. Je me suis toujours assuré de leur répéter que ma grande priorité sur tous les chantiers de construction, c'est la santé et la sécurité des gens et les avantages pour la collectivité dans laquelle ils travaillent.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je sais que vous le savez, monsieur le ministre, mais Montréal n'est pas une région rurale. Ma question précise portait sur les régions rurales. Le premier ministre a récemment fait une déclaration selon laquelle la présence d'hommes — surtout des travailleurs de la construction — a des conséquences sociales négatives dans les régions rurales. Je me demande si vous avez entendu dire la même chose.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Le député a raison. Je mentionnais un projet urbain, mais, puisque nous réalisons plus de 4 000 projets dans l'ensemble du pays, il souhaiterait que je le fasse non seulement dans les régions urbaines, mais aussi dans les régions rurales. J'interviens toujours auprès des travailleurs, afin de m'assurer d'acquérir une compréhension des questions touchant leur santé et leur sécurité ainsi que des avantages pour la collectivité dans laquelle ils mènent leurs activités. Je suis récemment allé sur le chantier de l'agrandissement du parc Fort Edmonton en compagnie du député, et nous avons rencontré des travailleurs et des gens qui vont faire le travail là-bas, et, partout, on est...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Encore une fois, monsieur le ministre, Edmonton n'est pas une région rurale. Je parle précisément des régions rurales et des commentaires formulés par le premier ministre. Oui ou non, souscrivez-vous à ces commentaires?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je sais qu'Edmonton n'est pas une région rurale, tout comme Montréal n'en est pas une, mais, partout où je vais, que ce soit en région rurale ou urbaine, je rencontre les travailleurs et m'assure de les écouter. J'interviens auprès d'eux, car ils sont les vrais héros des projets d'infrastructure que nous réalisons partout au pays.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'était un oui ou un non, monsieur le ministre. Le premier ministre a formulé un commentaire la fin de semaine dernière. Souscriviez-vous à ses commentaires?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Comme je l'ai dit, encore une fois, mon rôle est de m'assurer que, partout au pays, nous construisons des infrastructures pour le XXIe siècle, qui sont modernes, solides et écologiques, et, évidemment, les travailleurs de l'ensemble du pays — hommes ou femmes — sont la clé de la réalisation de ces projets pour tous les Canadiens.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je vais poser cette question différemment, monsieur le ministre. Est-ce que le fait d'appliquer le...

La présidente:

Monsieur Jeneroux, je pense que vous insistez un peu trop sur cette question.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la présidente, c'est mon temps de parole. J'ai le droit de poser la question que je souhaite poser durant la période qui m'est allouée.

La présidente:

Vous ne pouvez pas vous répéter sur la même question.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la présidente, je vous demande tout d'abord d'arrêter le chronomètre, puis de citer l'article du Règlement qui prévoit que je n'ai pas le droit de poser une question répétitive.

La présidente:

Voudriez-vous que je le lise?

M. Matt Jeneroux:

S'il vous plaît.

La présidente:

Dans La Procédure et les usages, aux pages 1058-1059, c'est chaque fois que les questions sont « répétitives ou n'ont aucun rapport avec l'affaire dont » nous sommes saisis. Le problème tient à la répétition. C'est la troisième fois que vous tentez de poser la même question.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'était la deuxième fois, madame la présidente, et je ne dirais pas cela. Je pose la question différemment, cette fois.

Permettez-moi de poser la question, s'il vous plaît. Nous ne disposons que de six minutes pour poser les questions.

La présidente:

Oui.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Le fait d'appliquer le point de vue sexospécifique que mentionne le premier ministre, a-t-il une incidence sur le fait que l'infrastructure est construite en temps voulu?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je dirais que l'application d'un point de vue sexospécifique est capitale dans le cadre de tous les programmes et projets que nous réalisons. Il est essentiel que nous comprenions les conséquences sur les différents groupes et sur les diverses personnes qui travailleront sur nos chantiers — et sur la collectivité —, alors je pense que le fait que nous tenons compte du sexe est un grand pas en avant pour notre pays. En outre, dans le cadre du plan d'infrastructure historique de 180 milliards de dollars, comme le député le sait, nous avons appliqué non seulement ce point de vue, mais aussi un point de vue environnemental afin de comprendre les répercussions de nos projets.

Plus nous comprenons comment fournir des infrastructures aux collectivités de partout au pays, selon moi, mieux ce sera pour nous, en tant que Canadiens.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Monsieur le ministre, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous affirmez avoir libéré des fonds de subventions dans la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. Je ne pense pas que vous les ayez nécessairement libérés. Je vais vous donner une chance de reformuler cette affirmation.

Il y a les 5 milliards de dollars que vous avez pris du plan Investir dans le Canada, sous la rubrique des réseaux de transport en commun. Vous avez pris 5 milliards de dollars qui étaient destinés aux corridors commerciaux et de transport, puis un autre 5 milliards de dollars qui étaient destinés à des projets d'infrastructure verte. Vous avez mentionné avoir construit un projet à Montréal, qui était une répétition de l'annonce faite par le premier ministre en juin 2017.

Premièrement, je ne vois pas en quoi il s'agit d'argent libéré. Vous l'avez simplement changé de place. Deuxièmement, la Banque de l'infrastructure, dont vous vantez beaucoup le succès dans votre déclaration préliminaire, selon moi, dans l'ensemble du pays, a été désignée comme étant tout, sauf une réussite. J'ai entendu des gens la qualifier de catastrophe et d'échec. J'espère que vous pourrez formuler un commentaire sur la raison pour laquelle cet argent destiné aux infrastructures n'est pas versé.

Bien franchement, aucune somme n'a été libérée. Pour l'instant, ce n'est que de l'argent déplacé.

(0900)

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je suis très heureux de répondre à cette question. Je pense que la Banque de l'infrastructure est un autre outil à notre disposition afin que nous puissions travailler mieux et plus rapidement pour les Canadiens.

Manifestement, nous ne parlons pas aux mêmes personnes. Autrefois, j'étais ministre du Commerce, et je peux vous dire que les investisseurs de partout dans le monde envisageaient d'investir au Canada. Dans le cas de la Banque de l'infrastructure, comme vous l'avez affirmé, le premier projet a été le REM, à Montréal. Elle a eu la permission de consentir un prêt afin de faire démarrer ce projet, qui va transformer le transport en commun dans la ville.

Je peux rassurer le député quant au fait que je parle avec le PDG de la Banque, même s'il s'agit d'une entité indépendante du point de vue de sa gestion et de ses décisions en matière d'investissement. Je parle régulièrement au PDG. Il étudie actuellement plus de quelques dizaines de projets. Je dirais que les responsables de la Banque ont tenu des centaines de conversations, dans l'ensemble du pays, avec des dirigeants communautaires et des représentants des gouvernements territoriaux et provinciaux.

À mes yeux, il s'agit d'en faire plus. Il est question de nous assurer que nous avons accès à plus d'argent pour réaliser des projets partout au pays. La Banque nous permet, par exemple...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous ne faites que déplacer de l'argent, monsieur le ministre. C'est tout ce que c'est. C'est le plan Investir dans le Canada. Vous avez déplacé de l'argent provenant de ce plan vers la Banque de l'infrastructure.

Concernant le projet de REM, s'agissait-il ou non de la reprise d'une annonce précédente?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

J'affirmerais que non, et je corrigerais mon collègue, dans un sens. Le fait que la Banque a consenti le prêt libère des investissements qui, autrement, seraient retirés de l'allocation pour le transport public qu'a obtenue le Québec.

À mon avis, le fait d'avoir été en mesure de convaincre des investisseurs comme la Banque de l'infrastructure de prendre part à ce projet est une grande chose. Cela nous permettra d'en faire plus. Je peux affirmer au député que nous examinons les interconnexions et que nous envisageons d'autres systèmes de train léger sur rail dans l'ensemble du pays. Je pense que nous devrions célébrer cette situation. Le Canada faisait partie des quelques pays du G7 à ne pas avoir de banque d'infrastructure...

M. Matt Jeneroux: Rien n'est construit, monsieur le ministre.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne: ... et cette banque est un autre excellent outil permettant de réaliser des projets pour les Canadiens.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Mais rien n'est construit grâce à la Banque de l'infrastructure, monsieur le ministre.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Nous allons passer à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence ce matin.

Tout d'abord, monsieur le ministre, je dois vous faire part de mon appréciation à l'égard de la somme de 300 millions de dollars que vous avez accordée à ma circonscription au cours des dernières années, en ce qui a trait aux travaux d'infrastructure qui ont été effectués. Bien entendu, cet argent allège le fardeau financier des personnes qui paient des impôts fonciers, mais il améliore aussi la planification de diverses activités menées au sein de nombreux secteurs de notre milieu des affaires. En partenariat avec les milieux d'affaires, nos municipalités veulent obtenir des enveloppes de financement durable pour répondre aux besoins liés à la planification de l'amélioration communautaire et aux stratégies connexes, mais elles envisagent aussi l'harmonisation de ces investissements afin d'accroître le rendement de ce capital investi, encore une fois, dans le but d'améliorer la structure générale de la collectivité ainsi que les divers secteurs qui en font partie.

Monsieur le ministre, pouvez-vous nous parler de certaines des enveloppes de financement durable qui sont mises à la disposition des collectivités et des entreprises qui s'y trouvent?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Merci beaucoup de poser la question.

Ce que nous avons fait, qui suscite une véritable transformation au pays, c'était assurer la stabilité et la prévisibilité du financement destiné aux municipalités. La Fédération canadienne des municipalités, la FCM, a affirmé que cela avait changé la donne. Je sais que le député provient d'une administration municipale, alors il comprend bien ce que c'est que de pouvoir planifier des projets d'infrastructure. Je n'arrête pas de dire que, quand nous prenons de l'argent et l'injectons dans les infrastructures, nous investissons, car, par définition, cet argent couvre plus qu'un cycle budgétaire. C'est pour les 10, 15 ou parfois même 100 années à venir.

J'affirmerais que la somme de 180 milliards de dollars que nous avons fournie change réellement la donne. C'est historique au pays. Si on regarde le volet d'investissement à l'égard duquel nous avons pris des décisions, à mon avis, le transport en commun est la clé. Non seulement il procure une plus grande mobilité afin que les gens puissent passer plus de temps auprès de leur famille et leurs amis, puisque le navettage est essentiel dans nos collectivités d'aujourd'hui, mais, de plus, le volet des infrastructures écologiques est vraiment harmonisé avec nos valeurs. Je pense qu'aujourd'hui, les Canadiens comprennent que nous voulons une infrastructure du XXIe siècle, qui est écologique, solide et moderne. Le volet social nous permet de rassembler les Canadiens dans les centres communautaires que les gens veulent voir partout au Canada. Le commerce et les transports sont tout à fait liés aux 1,5 milliard de consommateurs à qui nous avons maintenant accès, grâce à nos divers accords commerciaux. Il est essentiel que nous nous assurions que nos marchandises se rendent sur le marché. Enfin, le volet des collectivités rurales et nordiques nous permet de tenir compte des besoins particuliers des collectivités de partout au Canada.

Je dirais à mon collègue que, en effet, ce que nous faisons, surtout dans le cas de l'accord bilatéral intégré — qui prévoit un financement sur 10 ans destiné aux collectivités, et elles savent où nous voulons investir —, c'est établir le cadre, mais nous laissons les collectivités décider de ce qui est le mieux pour elles du point de vue des projets particuliers.

(0905)

M. Vance Badawey:

En ce qui concerne l'obtention de ce que j'appelle le « triple résultat » — l'économie, l'aspect social, l'environnement — en collaboration avec les municipalités, estimez-vous que les investissements que vous effectuez s'inscrivent dans une approche pangouvernementale, par opposition à une démarche cloisonnée des divers ministères, et que ces investissements s'harmonisent avec des stratégies provenant, disons, des ministères des Transports, de l'Environnement ou des services aux enfants et à la famille, et des choses de cette nature?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Oui, c'est la clé. Nous avons créé le cadre, comme je l'ai dit, en fonction d'objectifs tels que l'accroissement de la mobilité au sein des collectivités de l'ensemble du Canada et la réduction de nos émissions de gaz à effet de serre, mais la façon de procéder...

La première étape de notre programme était fondée sur les actifs. La deuxième étape est fondée sur le résultat. Je pense que les volets que nous avons élaborés laissent toute la marge de manoeuvre nécessaire pour que les collectivités puissent faire ce qui est le mieux pour elles. Nous ne sommes pas là pour faire semblant de savoir — en disant que nous sommes récemment allés à Saanich, à Inuvik ou à Norman Wells — ce qui est le mieux pour leurs collectivités. Toutefois, ce que nous avons fait, c'est créer un cadre qui leur permettra de voir, en ce qui concerne l'atteinte des objectifs que nous avons établis à l'échelle nationale, quels sont les meilleurs projets à réaliser pour les gens de leur collectivité. J'affirmerais que tous ces projets — et c'est pourquoi je pense que le Comité est essentiel — ont pour but de procurer des résultats aux gens. Ma mission consiste à améliorer la vie des Canadiens de partout au pays. Je suis allé à Inuvik, où nous réaliserons le premier projet d'énergie éolienne dans l'Arctique, lequel réduira la consommation de diesel d'environ 3 millions de litres, et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre à hauteur de milliers...

C'est vraiment ce que nous faisons, et, évidemment, mon collègue M. Badawey comprend de quoi il s'agit, car, comme il vient d'une administration municipale, il sait que notre rôle est d'établir le programme stratégique, mais de laisser les collectivités décider de ce qui est le mieux pour elles.

M. Vance Badawey:

En ce qui concerne les coûts liés à la pollution, actuellement, les municipalités se voient imposer ces coûts par défaut. Par exemple, les tempêtes du siècle ont maintenant lieu tous les cinq ans; par conséquent, il faut placer des tuyaux surdimensionnés dans le sol, et les coûts qui s'y rattachent sont imposés par défaut aux personnes qui paient des impôts fonciers.

Comment votre ministère travaille-t-il avec le ministère de l'Environnement afin, encore une fois, de réduire considérablement ces coûts pour les contribuables fonciers?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame la présidente, je suis très heureux de me faire poser cette question. Elle va droit au but.

Voilà pourquoi nous avons présenté le Fonds d'atténuation et d'adaptation en matière de catastrophes. J'ai toujours dit qu'il vaut mieux pour nous d'investir dans l'adaptation des collectivités aux événements liés aux changements climatiques, qui sont plus fréquents et plus graves. Nous avons mis de côté 2 milliards de dollars pour faire vraiment face à ces problèmes. J'ai toujours affirmé que nous devons investir dans l'adaptation, sans quoi nous devrons investir dans le rétablissement. Il vaut mieux prévenir ces événements et d'éliminer — je dirais — la possibilité que ces catastrophes nuisent aux collectivités et aux gens.

Nous savons à quel point ce pourrait être catastrophique. Je regarde d'autres députés qui ont vécu une inondation, par exemple. Dans ma propre région, nous savons que les conséquences sociales de ces catastrophes sont énormes. L'investissement dans des infrastructures qui résisteraient aux tempêtes, par exemple, est la bonne façon de procéder, non seulement pour rendre notre pays plus résilient, mais aussi pour prévenir les dommages et le stress que doivent vivre les collectivités qui subissent ces catastrophes de saison en saison.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie d'être avec nous ce matin. Je suis probablement l'un des rares députés de l'opposition à avoir un contact aussi privilégié avec vous, puisque nous sommes de la même région.

Il me semble vous avoir entendu à multiples reprises, en région particulièrement, soutenir le projet de train à grande fréquence de VIA Rail, le TGF. Ma première question est la suivante. Compte tenu des préoccupations de mobilité et de réduction des gaz à effet de serre dont vous parliez tantôt, votre ministère, dans sa philosophie ou sa vision, considère-t-il le projet du TGF comme un projet d'infrastructure verte?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

J'aimerais remercier mon collègue M. Aubin. Nous partageons, lui et moi, la représentation d'une bonne partie d'une grande région du Québec.

Le train à grande fréquence est l'une de mes priorités depuis mon élection, sinon même avant. Pour une région comme la nôtre, c'est un élément essentiel au développement économique et récréotouristique, ainsi qu'à la mobilité de la main-d'oeuvre.

Je pense que M. Aubin et moi avons répété sur toutes les tribunes possibles à quel point ce projet pourrait permettre de grandes choses pour la région, et même pour le Québec. On parle souvent de pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. S'il y avait un train à grande fréquence entre, par exemple, Trois-Rivières, Montréal et Québec, cela permettrait à des gens qui habitent dans d'autres centres de venir travailler chez nous.

Je considère évidemment que le train à grande fréquence est une composante de la mobilité intelligente du XXIe siècle. Si on regarde ce qui se passe dans plusieurs villes du monde, on peut conclure que c'est le genre de projet que nous voulons soutenir. C'est pour cette raison que VIA Rail, dans son dernier énoncé, a investi massivement dans le matériel roulant, un préalable sine qua non...

(0910)

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Je ne dispose malheureusement que de très peu de temps. J'espère que le ministre des Transports entendra votre témoignage, parce qu'il va vraiment dans le sens de ce que tout le monde attend. On ne parle plus de consensus dans ce dossier, on parle pratiquement d'unanimité.

Quand on regarde les sommes qui sont consacrées au projet du REM à Montréal, par exemple, et l'attente interminable de la simple annonce d'une volonté gouvernementale d'aller de l'avant avec le TGF, on a l'impression que les grandes villes et les régions sont traitées différemment. Est-ce que ma perception est bonne?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

En tant que ministre québécois qui vient d'une région, je défends toujours avec énergie les régions du Québec et du Canada. Je peux vous assurer que si nous avons prévu des sommes importantes dans le dernier budget, c'est notamment pour réaliser les études nécessaires. En effet, la construction d'un train à grande fréquence entre Québec et Windsor demande un certain nombre d'études techniques et d'études d'impact sur le territoire.

Nous allons certainement dans la bonne direction, selon moi, d'abord en ayant investi dans le matériel roulant, puis en ayant prévu dans le budget les montants nécessaires pour les études. Ce sont là deux pas dans la bonne direction.

Il faut comprendre que ces projets sont complexes en matière d'ingénierie et de capacité. Je pense que le ministre des Transports, vous et moi nous sommes exprimés en faveur de ce projet, comme vous l'avez entendu à la tribune de la Chambre de commerce et d'industries de Trois-Rivières. En d'autres termes, il faut maintenant réaliser les études et tout ce qu'il faut d'autre pour obtenir toute l'information nécessaire pour prendre la bonne décision.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Je vous ai entendu, en réponse à une question précédente, parler de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada comme d'un moyen d'en faire plus et plus rapidement. Le principe peut sembler louable, mais je pense que les résultats sont pour le moins discutables, puisque le processus n'est pas très rapide et que peu de projets sont financés.

Je suis vraiment en faveur d'un financement public, car un financement par la Banque de l'infrastructure aurait comme conséquence éventuelle d'augmenter les coûts payés par les consommateurs. Selon vous, est-ce que le projet du TGF devrait être financé par la Banque de l'infrastructure ou par les deniers publics?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

L'établissement d'un nouvel organisme comme la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada demande un certain temps. Pour avoir moi-même vu démarrer Investir au Canada, une autre agence dans le portefeuille dont j'étais responsable auparavant, je sais qu'il faut toujours créer un certain élan au début. Heureusement, il y a maintenant un président en place pour assurer la bonne gestion de cette agence.

Quelque douzaines de discussions sont en cours au pays pour répondre spécifiquement à cette question. C'est le genre de projet que la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada pourrait étudier et, selon moi et comme vous le rappeliez, il faut en faire plus et plus rapidement. Je comprends que mes collègues nous demandent d'en faire plus, étant à Ottawa l'un des ministres les plus impatients de voir avancer les choses rapidement. Cependant, ces projets présentent une certaine complexité. Pour des raisons de confidentialité des négociations et des discussions en cours, vous comprendrez que je ne peux pas parler des projets à l'étude. Je peux toutefois vous assurer que nous suivons ce qui se passe et que la Banque est en train d'analyser plusieurs projets de partout au pays.

M. Robert Aubin:

Pourtant, la Banque a demandé cette année 6 millions de dollars au gouvernement pour couvrir ses frais de fonctionnement. Cela ne m'apparaît pas financer beaucoup de projets ni aller très vite et en faire plus. Par ailleurs, nous faisons toujours face à cette dichotomie entre l'ampleur des projets financés par la Banque et celle des projets que peuvent se permettre les petites communautés que vous et moi représentons. N'y a-t-il pas une différence notable entre les intentions énoncées lors de la création de la Banque et ses réalisations après trois ans?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

En réponse à votre question, monsieur Aubin, je vous rappellerais que la mise sur pied d'une nouvelle agence exige certains coûts uniques, des coûts d'immobilisations par exemple. D'autre part, je peux vous dire que la Banque a embauché un responsable des investissements, ce qui devrait permettre, au cours des prochains mois et des prochaines années, une augmentation du nombre de projets dans lesquels la Banque investira.

Je suis par ailleurs très conscient que la Banque doit servir les communautés non seulement urbaines, mais aussi rurales. C'est pour cette raison que nous étudions avec elle certains projets qui permettraient, par exemple, à des communautés du Nord de passer du diesel à des sources d'énergie renouvelables.

(0915)

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je veux revenir un peu en arrière pour la gouverne des gens qui pourraient nous écouter ou nous regarder — la séance est télévisée — et aborder le tableau d'ensemble de l'infrastructure. Du milieu à la fin des années 2000, le gouvernement conservateur précédent a mis en oeuvre un programme d'infrastructure assez important, et c'était en réaction à la récession. Je pense que l'idée était de faire travailler les gens et de se servir de l'occasion pour faire construire des choses. L'effet indésirable a été la modification de la réglementation environnementale, laquelle, bien entendu, s'est avérée être un obstacle pour les projets de prolongement de pipelines, etc. Ensuite, quand nous sommes arrivés, nous avions ce programme d'infrastructure de 180 milliards de dollars à une époque où nous sortions de la récession, et, de fait, nous sommes maintenant très loin de cette situation. Cela a pris beaucoup de gens par surprise, mais il me semble qu'il y a des différences vraiment fondamentales dans l'approche, et les résultats que nous souhaitons obtenir dans le cadre du programme que nous exécutons aujourd'hui varient grandement par rapport aux résultats que le gouvernement de M. Harper voulait obtenir il y a 10 ans.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame la présidente, je suis totalement d'accord avec mon collègue sur cette question. Nous avons dû composer avec les conséquences d'une décennie de sous-investissement dans les infrastructures. Quiconque travaillant dans ce domaine comprendra qu'il faut ensuite investir de façon exponentielle. Voilà pourquoi nous avons dressé un plan historique de plus de 180 milliards de dollars pour régler des problèmes que les Canadiens qui nous regardent comprendraient. Lorsqu'il est question de transport en commun, par exemple, je pense que les gens qui vivent dans les régions urbaines de notre pays comprennent qu'il était à peu près temps que nous fassions ces investissements historiques afin de permettre aux gens de se déplacer avec plus de fluidité.

Pour ce qui est du tableau d'ensemble, comme je le dis toujours à mes collègues, l'infrastructure est la clé, au pays. Une infrastructure moderne, solide et écologique nous aidera à attirer les investissements et les talents. À mes yeux, lorsque nous investissons dans les infrastructures, nous le faisons non seulement pour notre prospérité actuelle, mais aussi pour notre prospérité à venir. En ce qui concerne notre plan, nous nous sommes posé la question suivante: Quel est l'un des plus grands défis auxquels no