header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-10-26 TRAN 77

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I'm calling to order meeting number 77 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities in the 42nd Parliament.

Welcome, everyone. Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, October 4, 2017, we are studying Bill C-48, an act respecting the regulation of vessels that transport crude oil or persistent oil to or from ports or marine installations located along British Columbia's north coast.

We have witnesses today. From the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, we have Nancy Bérard-Brown, manager. We also have, from the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association, Mr. Bloomer, president and chief executive officer; from the City of Victoria, by video conference, Councillor Ben Isitt; and from the City of Burnaby, Mayor Derek Corrigan.

We welcome all of you. Thank you very much for taking the time to join us today.

We'll open it up with Ms. Bérard-Brown. [Translation]

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown (Manager, Oil Markets and Transportation, Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers):

Good afternoon dear members of the committee.

My name is Nancy Bérard-Brown. I am speaking to you on behalf of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.

I sent copies of our brief and of our presentation to the committee, as well as copies of the comments we submitted to the Honourable Minister of Transport in 2006. The documents are in both official languages.[English]

Prior to introducing the oil tanker moratorium act in May 2017, Transport Canada undertook very brief consultations. CAPP did not support the proposed moratorium because it is not based on facts or science. There were no science-based gaps identified in safety or environmental protection that might justify a moratorium.

It is worth noting that Canada has an outstanding record on marine safety due to its stringent regulatory, monitoring, and enforcement regime and good operating practices deployed by industry. Canada has extensive experience in moving crude oil and petroleum products by sea.

The federal government has been a leader in ensuring that Canada has a world-class marine safety system that continues to evolve over time. Many safety measures have been implemented over the last number of years.

The government set up an independent tanker expert safety panel to review the Canadian regime. That panel concluded that the regime is fundamentally sound and it made some recommendations, which were all endorsed by the federal government. The national oceans protection plan launched by the Prime Minister will continue to ensure that Canada remains a leader in marine safety.[Translation]

The bill as it stands would prohibit maritime access for a large range of hydrocarbon products. The moratorium would close the most economical route toward Asia, in addition to sending the message to the community of investors that Canada is not open for business.

Our production of oil and natural gas continues to increase. Canada has to expand its energy markets beyond the United States. The very broad definitions in the bill could exclude future condensate shipment opportunities from natural gas deposits that are rich in liquids and light hydrocarbons in the first stages of development.

Results have been very promising up till now.[English]

My comments today will focus on the various definitions of oil and the need for science-based research.

As written, the regulations would prohibit the transportation of crude oil, persistent oil, or a combination of both.

First, the definition of crude oil is very broad and essentially includes all hydrocarbons. On the other hand, a list of persistent oils included in the moratorium is provided in the schedule. Having a “persistent oil” and a “crude oil” definition is confusing. If an oil product is not listed in the schedule, that does not necessarily mean that it could be transported, because it may fall under the definition of “crude oil”.

CAPP, respectfully, would recommend that the bill include only one definition of persistent oil, which links to a schedule that can be modified by regulation. Alternatively, CAPP would recommend that the crude oil definition be amended to say something like “any liquid hydrocarbon designated by regulation”.

The concept of persistent and non-persistent oils is very important, as it informs the response required in the event of a spill. The distinction is based on the likelihood of the material dissipating naturally. As a rule, persistent oils contain a large proportion of heavy hydrocarbons. They dissipate more slowly and require cleanup. In contrast, non-persistent oils are generally composed of lighter hydrocarbons, which tend to dissipate quickly through evaporation.

I would like to note that in the schedule, “condensate” is defined as a persistent oil in accordance with the ASTM D86 method. While distillation thresholds have been broadly used to define persistence, there are other key physical properties that should be considered in determining persistency.

Of note, definitions of persistent oil do vary. For example, Australia relies on standards that refer to API gravity and viscosity, in addition to alternative distillation.

Of note, western Canadian condensate is a unique, light hydrocarbon, which has very different properties and behaves differently from heavier crude oils. The timeline for condensate persistence in a marine environment is often hours or days.

(1540)



CAPP would recommend that alternative definitions of persistent oil and thresholds be explored further. CAPP is also seeking consideration for alternative treatment of condensate from the list of persistent oil products. [Translation]

The safe and reliable transportation of all of our products is critical for our members.

More scientific analyses are needed in order to better understand the changes and behaviours of various oil types. The industry is meeting that need. Our association and the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association have commissioned a study which should be completed in 2018.

We recommend that the federal government undertake a science-based risk assessment related to oil tanker movements along the British Columbia north coast.

We also recommend that you examine scientific research regarding the fate and behaviour of oil products under the Oceans Protection Plan. [English]

The Chair:

I know you are finishing up. Could you get your last comments in?

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Yes.

In conclusion, CAPP does not support the moratorium because it is not based on science. Recognizing the intent of the government to proceed, CAPP seeks to eliminate the confusion of overlapping definitions of persistent and crude oil, encourage further evaluation of the relevant characteristics of persistence, and have the flexibility to revise the scope of persistent oil through regulation consistent with future learning.

We also seek some clarification as to what factors would lead to the moratorium being lifted for any type or all types of crude oil.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Bloomer, you have five minutes, if you can, please.

Mr. Chris Bloomer (President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Energy Pipeline Association):

Good afternoon. Thanks very much for the opportunity to speak with you today.

I'm Chris Bloomer, president and CEO of CEPA, the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association. We represent Canada's 11 major transmission pipeline companies. We transport 97% of Canada's natural gas and crude oil production. Our members have delivered oil and gas products with a 99.99% safety record for over a decade, a record we consistently improve through collaborative initiatives such as our integrity first program.

Our members are committed to public accountability, environmental stewardship, transparency, and continuous operational improvements through the application of management systems and evidence-based practices. We're global leaders in pipeline operations, technology, and innovation.

Although the approval of two pipelines by the federal government was a positive step for Canada, the cumulative effects of the many policy and legislative changes that directly and indirectly impact our industry are of deep concern and will determine whether or not we will be competitive in the future. This includes, but is not limited to, the potential for a complete overhaul of the system regulating and assessing major projects for interprovincial pipelines, the extent of proposed methane emissions reductions regulations, ambiguity about how indigenous people will be included within regulatory frameworks, and the fact that even recently approved pipelines are subject to further reviews and additional consultation requirements.

The proposed oil tanker moratorium act, Bill C-48, is yet another change that will compound uncertainty and negatively impact investor confidence in Canada. In his mandate letter, the Minister of Natural Resources was directed by the Prime Minister to introduce “new, fair processes” that will ensure that decisions for energy projects “are based on science, facts, and evidence, and serve the public’s interest”. This is the foundation from which we reasonably expect the government to legislate on critical matters of national importance like market access.

If passed, Bill C-48 will ban the shipping of crude oil to or from ports located on the northern British Columbia coast, restricting market access for one of Canada's high-value resources. This is perplexing given that Canada currently imports approximately 400,000 barrels a day of foreign oil into our eastern ports. CEPA strongly believes that, given the profound impact of this bill, more thought must be given to scientific analysis and achieving a broader consensus. Currently, Bill C-48 does not do this, despite claims to the contrary. Bill C-48 appears rushed, and CEPA is concerned about its content and disregard of Canada's world leadership on maritime safety.

For example, the low-carbon condensate from the Duvernay and Montney plays are of great economic and environmental significance and contribute to the government's strategic goals for wealth and job creation. However, Bill C-48 is unclear on whether they could be included in the definitions for banned oil products. The lack of clarity on this is alarming, especially given the inherent global opportunities that condensate represents for Canada.

Canada's history with marine oil transportation also contradicts the need for this bill. A 2014 Transport Canada report noted that, between 1988 and 2011, significant work by the government had improved the protection of marine safety. Since the mid-1990s, Canada has not experienced a single major spill from oil tankers or other vessels in national waters on either coast.

Additionally, this government has announced $1.5 billion in funding for a national oceans protection plan to strengthen Canada's leadership as a world leader in marine safety. It is fair to ask the question: what are the safety gaps this moratorium is supposed to restore?

In conclusion, the consequences of potentially drastic policy changes for future energy projects have instilled uncertainty within the regulatory system, adding additional risks, costs, and delays for a sector that the Prime Minister publicly acknowledged has built Canada's prosperity and directly employs more than 270,000 Canadians.

The approach to policy-making represented by the development of Bill C-48 contributes to this uncertainty and erodes Canada's competitiveness.

Thank you.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Bloomer.

We're on to Mr. Corrigan, mayor of the City of Burnaby.

Welcome, and thank you for joining us.

Mr. Derek Corrigan (Mayor, City of Burnaby):

Thank you very much for the invitation to appear before the committee. It is a real privilege.

I've been a member of Burnaby's city council for 30 years, and I'm now in my 16th year as mayor. I'm very pleased to represent the City of Burnaby at this committee meeting, and I am most certainly in support of the moratorium on oil tankers provided in this bill to the north coast.

I am experiencing the problems associated with oil tanker traffic right here in our city. We are threatened by the imposition, against our will, of a significant new shipping risk on our shores from oil tankers, which includes the new risk of oil spills from crude bitumen oil, often, in the vernacular, called “dirty oil”.

I certainly believe that the environmental values of British Columbia's coastline in the north are worth protecting. It shows that the federal government has the power and the will to do the right thing in protecting our coast for future generations. The ban should be extended to our harbours in Burrard Inlet. The environmental values of our southern coast are at least equally deserving of protection as those in the north. In our case, we are dealing with protection of the lands and waters of a dense, urban population of nearly two and a half million people. Our citizens deserve equal protection.

This bill should also consider the risk of barges, which, under the bill, would not be included, yet pose a realistic risk to our coast. The dilemmas faced by Canada in dealing with the Enbridge northern gateway project and the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain project are similar. They show the problems that arise with an NEB process, where proponents drive the options that are considered, rather than common sense choices of the best option. They show that corporations, sometimes foreign ones, whose sole interest is profit do not have the best interests of the people of our country or our environment in mind.

One of the things that interested me most in entering this process.... I did not want to learn as much as I've had to learn about the transportation of oil through our country, and the potential for the transportation of oil along our coast. When the issue of the Kinder Morgan pipeline came up, I began to get educated. One of the first things I did was go to the National Energy Board and ask it about its policies, about the strategic plan that was being considered in regard to the options it was choosing.

We, in cities—and I'm sure Ben will support this—are always planning. We're also looking forward, thinking of ways to protect the interests of our citizens in an organized way, in a way that makes people believe there is certainty in the future. I wanted to see the plan and the policy for this. I was truly shocked to find out there was no national oil policy. There was no national strategy. The National Energy Board was making it up as it went along, essentially on the basis of the submissions that came from individual pipeline procurers and the oil industry.

The situation is one in which the National Energy Board simply considered what Kinder Morgan wanted, and then both the National Energy Board and the Governor in Council decided they would proceed, even though they would go through the heart of metro Vancouver, Burnaby, Surrey, New Westminster, and Coquitlam, to a tank farm next to family neighbourhoods and an elementary school, on the only evacuation route for Simon Fraser University. They would then require the loading of tankers at the back end of Burrard Inlet, a location that certainly would never reasonably be considered for any new facilities, the busiest port on the west coast.

I certainly think this is a situation close to lunacy. It does not show a sensible planning process. My entire city has been concerned about this issue. Throughout the Lower Mainland, we've had the support of other jurisdictions, including metro Vancouver, in opposing this pipeline coming through Burnaby, Burrard Inlet, and along the southern coast.

If we have a pipeline to tidewater for bitumen oil that is in the national interest, it should be part of good public policy to choose a shipping route that causes the least risk and the least damage. That is not a choice that should be made for us by the oil companies.

(1550)



In our case, the National Energy Board refused absolutely to consider any alternative routes, and refused to even allow Burnaby to ask for evidence of alternatives. Both Canada and the National Energy Board argued before the Federal Court of Appeal just two weeks ago that a process that fails to consider alternative locations is perfectly lawful.

It is a shame—

The Chair:

Mayor Corrigan, if you could just wrap up, please....

Mr. Derek Corrigan:

Yes. I say that if this is upheld by the Federal Court of Appeal, it will certainly destroy people's faith in our system.

Again, I applaud the government for the measures in this bill. We shouldn't have to choose between a healthy environment and a healthy economy. We know that here in the city of Burnaby and throughout British Columbia.

Thank you for this opportunity.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mayor Corrigan.

Now we move on to Councillor Isitt.

Mr. Ben Isitt (Councillor, City of Victoria):

Thank you very much for the invitation to present to the committee.

On behalf of Mayor Lisa Helps and the council for the City of Victoria, I provide the following remarks as acting mayor of Victoria.

Victoria is located on the southern tip of Vancouver Island. The shipping lanes of tankers carrying petroleum products from the Trans Mountain pipeline and other fossil fuel ports in the Pacific northwest pass offshore within several kilometres of our community. Victoria is also the capital city of British Columbia and the urban centre of the Capital Regional District, which is comprised of nine first nations, 13 municipalities, three unincorporated areas, and approximately 380,000 people.

The capital region includes more than 1,500 kilometres of marine shoreline in the area known as the Salish Sea, adjacent to southern Vancouver Island. This includes the Juan de Fuca Strait, which connects the Pacific Ocean to Burrard Inlet, and other inland waters. It includes the shoreline frontage of the 13 municipalities of greater Victoria around Sooke Harbour, Esquimalt Harbour, Victoria Harbour, the Saanich Peninsula, and the Saanich Inlet. It includes several hundred islands and surrounding waters in the area known as the southern Gulf Islands.

These coastal waters are vital to the economic and social well-being of our region: tens of thousands of jobs in tourism and related sectors, the property values of more than 100,000 residents and property owners who have made investment decisions in relation to their proximity to a healthy marine and shoreline environment, and also the health and wellness of all residents of the region, including their recreational options and their quality of life.

In addition, the coastal waters of the city of Victoria and the capital region are of vital importance from the standpoint of biological diversity. They provide vital and fragile habitat for species, including the southern resident killer whale population, an endangered species that has now been reduced to 75 surviving animals on the southern coast of British Columbia, concentrated in the tanker shipping route surrounding the capital region.

Risks associated with the shipment of bitumen include substantial emergency response and spill cleanup costs imposed on local government through inadequate federal safeguards, and the delegation of responsibility to a third party entity controlled by the petroleum exporters.

One final factor I wish to note is the impact of fossil fuel exports and tanker shipping from the standpoint of climate change, which Canada has recognized as a signatory to the Paris agreement. The consequences of climate change are already being felt around the globe and within Canada's borders, including within the capital region, in terms of volatile weather patterns, extreme storm surges resulting in flooding, and rising sea levels that impact property values, as well as public and private infrastructure.

Even if everything functions according to plan with the petroleum product being transported from its source to the end consumer with no loss into interior coastal waterways, there is still an unavoidable negative impact from the standpoint of climate change. The fuel is burnt by the consumer, and it is spilled into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming and threatening the ability of humans to survive on this planet.

For these reasons and others, the City of Victoria and the Capital Regional District have adopted a position of opposition to infrastructure or policies that will result in an increase of fossil fuels transport through the fragile coastal waters of the Salish Sea. I, therefore, wish to reiterate the mayor of Burnaby's request that consideration be given to extending the application of this legislation to the shipment of crude petroleum products in the southern coastal waters of British Columbia, including the Salish Sea and the Juan de Fuca Strait.

Thank you.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now it's time for questions.

Mr. Lobb, you have six minutes.

Mr. Ben Lobb (Huron—Bruce, CPC):

Thanks very much.

I have a couple of comments to the councillor and mayor who are here today. Thanks for appearing.

I appreciate your comments, and I assume you're doing the best you can for your constituents. How do you square this argument that you make on one hand with the tanker ban and then on the other hand with this historical track record of sewage spills in the area? How do you square that argument for us here today?

Mr. Ben Isitt:

That's a good question.

Mr. Derek Corrigan:

I'd say that in metro Vancouver, we have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in secondary treatment to ensure that our outfalls are of the highest environmental standards. It's one of the primary responsibilities.

In fact, right across our region, in the case of the north shore Lions Gate treatment plant, we joined to seek federal funding to assist in ensuring that we have the highest level of protection for Burrard Inlet. We are very conscious of and very responsible in regard to those issues.

But as we all know, nobody is ever perfect, which is one of the things that concerns—

Mr. Ben Lobb:

To that point, though, sir—and I'm not here to debate this, to be quite honest—at one point you're saying that nobody can be perfect, but then you're expecting the tankers, which have an almost perfect track record, to be more than perfect.

For somebody sitting here—and I'm not from British Columbia, I'm from Ontario, but I am along a Great Lake, so I appreciate the importance of clean water and safety and so forth—I scratch whatever hair I have left and wonder how we can say, on one hand, tankers be perfect, yet we will spill sewage into our waterways almost in perpetuity in those areas. I can't understand that.

Anyway, we'll move on. I want to ask the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers a question on the schedule that's listed in the bill.

Is it your argument that there should be certain types removed from the schedule now? Do you want certain ones taken off now, or are you saying that further science and research should be done immediately to make the argument for them to be removed?

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Thank you for the opportunity to clarify.

What CAPP is seeking at this point is twofold. There needs to be some consideration as to whether or not condensate does belong on the list of persistent oils. Also, as I indicated a bit earlier, what we want to ensure is that as a result of further science becoming available, it is important to us that if there is any change required to any of those products listed here, we have clarity about how we can go about having those removed from the list.

The issue that we saw, as well, with the definition is that currently you have the list of persistent oil in the schedule, and it can be amended by regulation. However, the definition of “crude oil” within the text, and “oil”, does not allow for any changes. We think that it is important.

With all respect, we understand the determination of the government to proceed, but we want to ensure that if there is any persistent oil that doesn't belong there, that we have the ability and the clarity on which principle is going to be followed, which science and criteria, in order to remove any or all of those from the list of persistent.

(1600)

Mr. Ben Lobb:

I have one last question to the councillor from Victoria.

I wonder what your thoughts are with the government leaving a huge loophole in their ban, in the fact that they allow supertankers with light diesel fuel, gasoline, propane, etc. A supertanker can carry 318,000 metric tons of that product, yet only 12,500 metric tons of oil.

There has to be a study put forward to justify this. What are your thoughts and what are the thoughts of your constituents on this loophole here?

Mr. Ben Isitt:

I'll preface my remarks by pointing out that I'm not a marine biologist or a chemical engineer.

My understanding is that crude products, particularly bitumen, are particularly harmful to the marine ecology and particularly challenging to recover by authorities entrusted with cleanup operations. I think, at a minimum, those products cannot be permitted.

My understanding is that as the refining process is advanced, the opportunities for the product evaporating or being recovered in other ways increase, so there could be some rationale...but generally I think we have to strengthen regulations of the transport of all petroleum products, including the refined products you mentioned.

I do have a brief comment in relation to your first question.

Certainly the absence of proper sewage treatment infrastructure in the core area of the capital region is a major problem. For 40 years, federal and provincial authorities allowed greater Victoria to dump raw sewage into the Juan de Fuca Strait. About two-thirds of our population rely on this unacceptable situation. One-third of our population of the region is covered by about 10 waste-water treatment plants.

Fortunately, the previous Government of Canada pledged approximately a quarter of a billion dollars to build proper waste-water infrastructure for the core area. This commitment was honoured by the current government, and construction is now under way for a proper tertiary waste-water treatment system for the core area of greater Victoria.

I want to acknowledge the contribution by both of those governments to this vital partnership to clean up the marine environment.

The Chair:

That's good. Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Mr. Floatie's going to be out of a job? Is that what you're saying? That's an inside-the-ballpark joke.

Mayor Corrigan, who would have known 18 years ago that you and I would find ourselves in this connection today? I have to acknowledge the fact that out of everybody here, you and your city have had the most direct experience with respect to crude oil ending up where it shouldn't be. I'll give you some time to elaborate on what happened and what it meant when that pipeline burst.

Mr. Derek Corrigan:

One of the realities of the pipelines in Burnaby is that they were originally part of a co-operative that served refineries along our coastline in Burrard Inlet. Five or six refineries have now been reduced to a single refinery. Over the course of many years though it became incredibly difficult, as a result of geographical changes, to be able to determine where the original pipelines were laid. In each case, the National Energy Board has required that at any point you were doing any excavation near those pipelines, you were required to have staff from the transmission company available to supervise.

In the case of the oil spill we had in our residential neighbourhood in Burnaby, that supervision was not done. It was not properly executed when a contractor worked on sewer lines and a pipe was broken. That broken pipe, instead of being turned off at the point of the tank farm, was turned off at the tanker, which exacerbated the huge flow of oil into our neighbourhood, costing residential damage in the millions of dollars, and ecological damage, as that oil flowed into Burrard Inlet. It was catastrophic, and it literally took years to clean up the mess that was left for us.

That direct incident in our community, and the way it was handled by Trans Mountain in the course of their dealings with it was extremely disappointing. It brought to the attention of all our residents that these accidents do happen, and when they do happen there are severe consequences for the surrounding community and for the ecology of our city.

It's going to be even worse if we're looking at bitumen products coming through our community because, in reality, if we are going to export oil, I believe very strongly that we Canadians should be refining it here in Canada. We should be sending refined products to any place in the world that wants to purchase them and not crude oil. I'm very disappointed in it.

(1605)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'd like to ask both our pipeline representatives, why not refine it here? There's an easy way around this if you have the right product, a safer product, to ship out of our ports.

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I think it's a matter of economics and markets. I think the cost to refine in Canada to be competitive and have those products delivered to the relevant markets is.... You just mentioned that three refineries were taken out of Burnaby. There was refining in the past, and there's less refining now because of the economics.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

What does that say about the long-term economics for your product to ship through Prince Rupert? You would either have to have a pipeline or a pretty massive rail shipment of the product. Is there a world market for that level of additional product coming out of Canada? What is your long-term prognosis about the investment you'd have to make to make that happen, even if we did allow it?

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

If we look at the most recent forecasts that have been prepared by the International Energy Agency out of Paris, there is growing global demand for oil. The purpose of producers, and our desire to reach tidewater is to be able to satisfy those markets.

In response to your earlier question, our expertise is to produce the resources. If there's a desire and a demand and a refinery to purchase our product, we would be indifferent. My understanding has been that the reason refineries close is that the price differential over the last number of years has not justified having a refinery built. From a producer's perspective, we have growing resources, and if there's a demand, we are prepared to sell our resources and fetch market prices independent of the purchaser.

But there's definitely a growing demand, and I know that all our exports are currently to the U.S., so we need to diversify.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

On balance, there's also a demand, though, that this be done carefully. The experience they had in Burnaby said that even crude oil, which I understand you'd like taken off the regulated list, can create one hell of a mess—pardon my French—and it's the type of thing this moratorium is meant to address.

The Chair:

Could you provide just a short response, please?

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

I just want to clarify that the reconsideration we've asked for is for condensate, which comes from the production of natural gas. It is not a heavy oil or comparable to a dilbit.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

I want to put on the record my apologies to all our witnesses for being late. To our friends from Victoria and Burnaby, hello as well.

Madam Bérard-Brown, I'll start where we just ended, if you don't mind.

I represent northwestern British Columbia, the place for much of the conversation around the northern gateway, and for the last 40 years, the conversation around whether supertankers can move safety through our waters with oil.

One of the questions that came up consistently, that even just recently I'm still not able to get a sufficient answer from the government on, is the nature of diluted bitumen and the nature of diluted bitumen when it touches water, salt water and fresh water. Do either of your associations have research that tells us what that nature is?

Of course, answering that question first dictates how we manage, how we do safety protocols, cleanup protocols. Parenthetically, that was never answered through the entire northern gateway process, yet the government of the day still released approval despite not knowing what we would do if a cleanup was required. Do we have research from industry?

(1610)

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

That is a very excellent question.

As I mentioned, there was a significant gap identified. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers and the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association, a few years ago, commissioned the Royal Society of Canada to conduct a study and to explore what was the state of the literature in terms of fate and behaviour of various crude oils. They identified a gap. That is the study that I referred to earlier in my remarks.

We have undertaken jointly to hire a consultant to proceed and do some further research on the fate and behaviour of crude oil under various environments. Those results will be available next year and they will be public.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just to be clear, is it crude oil or diluted bitumen? It's an important distinction.

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

It will include crude oil that currently moves through North America, so it will include some light, heavy, medium, conventional, unconventional, bunker C fuel, and condensate.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

And dilbit...?

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Yes, dilbit, synbit, and dilsynbit.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's an interesting process that we have in Canada. We've been moving diluted bitumen for not a long time but quite a while now, and the prospect of going through Mayor Corrigan's part of the world is to move more of it in large quantities. This is product from northern Alberta that's put in with condensate and allowed enough viscosity to move it through the pipeline, yet changes the composition and nature of the product, it is fair to say, especially if the product goes into water and is then weathered.

Mayor Corrigan, has this been brought up in the conversations within your community, and between your community, your office, and the federal government, in the way that we have done the environmental assessment with respect to the next pipeline, the Kinder Morgan project, and the Liberal government's decision to approve that?

Mr. Derek Corrigan:

It has been a subject of great concern in our city because little is known about dilbit and the ultimate impact of dilbit if there is a spill. Certainly the condensate is said to be a proprietary secret as to exactly what chemicals are in the condensate that allows them to have the viscosity to move through the pipe, which is again an issue of significant concern because there are a great many unknowns as to the impact this might have on our ecology.

Ultimately, the federal government does have the power to do this. You heard the industry saying, “Well, if someone is going to refine it and we can sell it to the refinery, we'll do that,” but the problem is that there's no responsibility being taken by the industry for building the infrastructure here in Canada. It would provide a secondary industry, and one that would make products safer to move, wherever it was going to go. I don't think there has been an adequate explanation of why we shouldn't take the environmental responsibility for making that product safe to use right here in the country that's producing it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Isn't this just about money—

Mr. Derek Corrigan:

Yes, it is all about money.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—why we don't refine, why we haven't built any significant refinery infrastructure?

We've built one significant refinery and one upgrader maybe in the last 35 years in this country, while the number of millions of barrels of export has gone up quite a bit.

To Councillor Isitt in Victoria, the connection through now turns primarily to salt water; if we go to the interior, it's fresh water.

Do the conversations you have with residents in Victoria and the greater Victoria area reflect some of the conversations that Mayor Corrigan talked about, in terms of imagining Kinder Morgan going ahead? It has been approved by the federal Liberal government. Tankers start plying the waters in sevenfold increase, and what do we do if an accident happens? Can we clean it up, given the nature of dilbit?

Mr. Ben Isitt:

The short answer is no, and that is why the City of Victoria and the Capital Regional District have adopted a position of opposition, both to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project application and to other policies or infrastructure that would result in increased fossil fuel transport along the coast.

We've heard from our fire chief that coordination between government agencies is wholly inadequate. The current model of federal oversight of fossil fuel shipments is totally inadequate, in terms of Transport Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard delegating and abrogating responsibility to Western Canada Marine Response Corporation, which is controlled by industry. By its very structure, its interests are aligned with industry, rather than with the public interest of protecting people, property, and the natural environment from harm.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Councillor.

We are moving on to Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My first question is for Mr. Bloomer.

You mentioned that your success rate of moving oil is 99.9%. Is that right?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

There is one more nine.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

That's what I thought.

The odd time, the 0.01% when something goes wrong.... Actually, I'll just backtrack. What is that based on, the volume or the number of shipments? How is that percentage calculated?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

It's calculated based on the actual volume. Annually, there are about 1.2 billion barrels of oil shipped, and about five and a half trillion cubic feet of gas. That's what the numbers are based on.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

The odd time there is a disaster or something goes wrong, do you have numbers associated with that—cost of cleanup, damages?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

The most recent was in 2010, in Kalamazoo, Michigan. It was in the billions-of-dollars range, but it was cleaned up. It's back to its original state.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

When something goes wrong, is it often in that range, in the billions?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

No.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay. It's an exception.

To our municipal counterparts.... I guess I'll start with the mayor.

Do you have money allocated in your budget for cleanup, if something were to go wrong?

Mr. Derek Corrigan:

No. In fact, we don't even have the money to deal with the issues surrounding the tank farm, in a potential conflagration at the tank farm. The expectation of the Kinder Morgan corporation is that somehow our firefighters will look after their tank farm, even if there is a major incident. We don't have the capacity. Our firefighters have said that it is impossible to deal with this and it would require simply burning out. That is a tank farm right below Simon Fraser University.

The concerns for us are that there has not been the level of study in the protection in case of incidents that would allow us to feel confident that the federal government has this issue under control.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Councillor, you mentioned that you have a position of opposition. Did that come from the council? Were there town halls held? Was it from the residents? How did that come about?

Mr. Ben Isitt:

That's a good question. All the data is available on the City of Victoria website, and also the Capital Regional District website.

It began by way of a notice of motion and a resolution adopted by our council. We proceeded to have a town hall meeting on the issue of the Trans Mountain pipeline application. We heard overwhelmingly from the public that this application was not supported.

That public input formed a part of the city's contribution when we were an intervenor in the National Energy Board process. There were ultimately resolutions, by both the city and the regional district, adopting that position of opposition and calling on the National Energy Board and the Government of Canada to decline the application.

In terms of your question to Mayor Corrigan around cleanup, it's thinking about things like needing police officers to go down to the beaches to prevent members of the public from trying to walk, or children from trying to play, in dirty sand that's made toxic by bitumen. It's literally hundreds of millions of dollars of cleaning up the intertidal areas—

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I apologize. I'm going to cut you off because I only have six minutes here.

Ms. Bérard-Brown, I completely understand the hindrance that you face in reaching your markets, but at the same time, I don't know if that can necessarily come at a detriment to our planet or the environment.

You said a whole bunch of stuff that I want to clarify. You were asking for an exemption, and to the best of my knowledge, an exemption is based on dry material. You were also talking about how some of this is persistent. You talked about the viscosity. Could you dive into that a bit and describe what would be a dry material in order to get an exemption?

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

I'm sorry. For clarity, I did not refer to a dry material. What I was trying to elaborate is that there is a distinction between a persistent and a non-persistent oil, and currently, the definition used refers to the distillation curve. What I was saying is that there are other factors that should be taken into account when considering the persistence. For example, if there were a spill, whether it's dilbit or a conventional oil, all oils would weather. That means it changes composition based on the environment, the temperature, or if there's a tidal wave in the environment. That's the purpose of the studies we're undertaking. We're trying to better understand how that changes over time, how that affects the behaviour of the crude oil, and what the best measures are that we can take.

The consideration of looking at condensate is that many experts would consider condensate to be non-persistent. We're just asking that there be further exploration as to whether or not condensate belongs on that list.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Sorry, Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

No, you just pre-empted my last question, so that's perfect. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

I want to drill a bit deeper with respect to the emergency resources that are not available and emergency preparedness protocols. I'm going to ask the question of the mayor and the councillor, as well as the industry, with respect to this specific area.

In my former life as a mayor for many years, as Mr. Lobb described, we had incidents happen on the Great Lakes. We take our water from the Great Lakes into our inflow treatment plant and of course out to the taps, bathtubs, showers, and sinks of our residents. There are a lot of challenges attached to that, especially when it comes to an incident, and of course then there's the shutting down of a treatment centre and getting back online within the minimum time of a week.

With all that said, what is in place currently, from the municipality's standpoint, with respect to your emergency preparedness plans and the protocols attached to it? I'm going to ask the industry the same question.

We'll start off with the mayor.

Mr. Derek Corrigan:

Obviously, we have general emergency preparedness plans that would deal with any kind of emergency or disaster in our community, but this is outside the scope of anything we could anticipate. First of all, the reality of the tank farm, which is situated on Burnaby Mountain above residential areas and schools, is one that causes me loss of sleep on a regular basis. I worry about what would happen to our citizens and to the university if that facility went into a major meltdown.

As far as Burrard Inlet is concerned, no one in their right mind would be building a facility to transport oil in the deepest part of our inlet, through two narrows, at this stage. The reality is that it was built some 50 or 60 years ago, when circumstances in Burrard Inlet were significantly different. Now you have this incredibly busy port, where Aframax tankers are going to be going through two narrows. If, in fact, there is an accident in that heavily trafficked area, it would be impossible to clean up. It would be 1,000 years before we'd be able to clean up the mess that was left for us. The impact here in the Vancouver area, on tourism and our economy, would be devastating. The problem, even though they keep telling you it's a minimal risk, is that the consequences of the risk are so devastating that it would be impossible for us to recover or to cope with it.

There are no plans in place and no plans available. They previously decimated the Coast Guard. There are not any plans from the federal government to deal with it. They've passed it on to industry to look after it.

Mr. Ben Isitt:

Similar to Burnaby, we have formal emergency management plans in place. It's under the authority of our fire chief, who reports to council. Prepare Victoria is an agency of the fire department that has three employees and about 100 volunteers. They primarily respond to fires and residents who are displaced by fire. They put a lot of attention into seismic risk, which is a major risk on the west coast of Canada, as it is in the Ottawa Valley. There has been an exercise in the last year with Western Canada Marine Response Corporation, the Coast Guard, and Transport Canada, which is the operator of the port of Victoria.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

That's great. I'm going to move on to the industry. I only have about a minute left.

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

It's incumbent upon the shippers, the pipelines, to have emergency response plans in place. There are two things. There is a requirement for the companies to have the financial resources to be prepared and be able to cover anticipated or possible emergencies. There is mutual aid amongst the industry. If there is an incident, then the pipelines that are part of CEPA, the transmission pipelines—

(1625)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Are those plans that you have applicable to this area?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Yes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Due to the fact that they have very few resources available to them...?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

The industry does emergency response exercises. They have the resources. The government has put in place additional resources, and that's going to be taken care of.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Badawey.

We go to Ms. Block for five minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I'd like to thank all of our witnesses for joining us today.

I don't have as much time as my other colleagues did, so I'll get right to the point. Given that this bill, Bill C-48, as was discussed in our last meeting and confirmed by departmental officials, does nothing to change the voluntary agreement that was put in place in 1985, and given that this current government has killed the northern gateway pipeline project, do you believe there is a pressing need for Bill C-48 today?

This is to either Ms. Brown or Mr. Bloomer.

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I think there is a need to go back and do more consulting, more science, and more evaluation of what this really means and what the implications are. I think there's not a consensus around whether or not the folks in northern B.C. should have access to tidewater to produce resources and so on. More work needs to be done on this.

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

I would concur. I think that there needs to be more scientific evidence. There needs to be an identification of the gaps and maybe potential mitigative measures in order to address the need.

I think what you referred to a bit earlier is the exclusion zone. I'd just like to point out that it was in place for production coming from Valdez for the lower 48. It does not apply to any vessel moving in or out of Canada.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Right.

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

It is separate and distinct. I know from my dealings that there is sometimes confusion.

As I mentioned earlier, too, there was very brief consultation, and I think in light of the impact that it may have on our ability as producers of both natural gas and oil to reach tidewater, there would be some significant economic impacts if the bill were to proceed.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

I'll follow that up with another comment and question. There's no question in the minds of those of us sitting here representing our Conservative caucus that this is not a moratorium on oil tanker traffic, but it's a moratorium on the production of the oil sands and on a port. This definitely addresses, as you've said, the loading and unloading of oil on tankers in that area, so I'm wondering if you could tell us how Canadian laws and regulations regarding the loading and unloading of oil tankers compare with other countries?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

In terms of the maritime movement of oil cargo and so on, there are international standards and there are processes. Canada abides by them. The international shipping coordinators and regulatory bodies have those regulations in place. There are thousands of vessels all over the world moving in and out of ports, moving hydrocarbon and oil on water all over the planet, so Canada will fit within that framework, and as we usually do, we'll be the best at it.

Ms. Nancy Bérard-Brown:

I may not be able to offer some specifics. The danger that I foresee is that when you're making a policy or a significant action that is not based on science, there's a danger of creating a precedent. There's also I think a danger in terms of reputation. Canada is party to international agreements, so we know that it has not been very well received because they are perceiving this as a restriction of movement to and from Canada.

In terms of loading and unloading, I would not be able to offer you any specifics. It is not within the sphere of my expertise.

(1630)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Block.

To our witnesses, thank you very much for helping us out today as we continue on with our study of Bill C-48.

We will suspend while we switch our video conference folks around and our witnesses.

(1630)

(1635)

The Chair:

We'll call the meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities back to order.

Welcome to our witnesses. We have Janet Drysdale, vice-president, corporate development at CN. Nice to see you again, Janet.

We also have Ross Chow, managing director of InnoTech Alberta; Scott Wright, director of response readiness, Western Canada Marine Response Corporation; Kate Moran, president of Ocean Networks Canada; and Greg D'Avignon, president and chief executive officer, Business Council of British Columbia.

Welcome to all of you. Sorry for the delay of a few minutes. We had to get everybody connected.

Ms. Drysdale, we'll start with you. If you could keep your comments to five minutes or less, it would be appreciated.

Ms. Janet Drysdale (Vice-President, Corporate Development and Sustainability, Canadian National Railway Company):

Good afternoon.

My name is Janet Drysdale, and I am vice-president of corporate development and sustainability at CN. I am making this opening statement on behalf of both CN and our research partner InnoTech Alberta, which is represented via teleconference by managing director Ross Chow. We appreciate the opportunity to appear today to add our perspective to your study of Bill C-48.

CN is the only railway that services the ports on the north coast of British Columbia. The Port of Prince Rupert is an important and rapidly growing part of CN's network, and over the past 10 years it has become a key gateway for Asian goods moving to the North American market. In addition, we serve the port of Kitimat, also on the B.C. north coast.

CN currently moves intermodal traffic, coal, grain, wood pellets, and lumber through terminals at Prince Rupert, and we are in active discussions with customers interested in moving a variety of other export products through the port. We also operate a rail barge service out of Prince Rupert, which serves the Alaska Panhandle. CN does not currently move any product to the B.C. north coast for export that would be affected by the provisions of Bill C-48.

For the past three years CN has been working with InnoTech Alberta to develop a process to solidify bitumen. InnoTech is part of the Province of Alberta's research and innovation effort and is an industry-leading expert in the fields of energy and the environment. Together, CN and InnoTech looked at many different ways to solidify the entire barrel of bitumen, with no refining involved. Frankly, nothing worked.

However, in reviewing the numerous methods we tested, we realized that if we combined several processes, we could create the solid, transportable product we were seeking. Through this research, we have now developed a patent-pending process to successfully solidify bitumen.

The process involves adding polymers to the bitumen to form a stable core and then creating a polymer shell around the bitumen-polymer blend, enabling us to create something that loosely resembles a hockey puck. Importantly, the bitumen-polymer blend is easily separated back into its bitumen and polymer components. The process does not degrade the bitumen, and the separated polymer can be subsequently recycled or reused in the solidification process. We have named the product “CanaPux”.

The key point for this committee is that CanaPux will not require tank cars for movement by rail, and the product will not move in ocean tankers to end markets. CanaPux will be transported much as are any other dry bulk products, such as coal and potash, in gondola cars on the railway and in the hull of general bulk cargo ships. At ports, CanaPux could be transported to ships utilizing existing bulk-loading infrastructure.

From a safety and economic point of view, CanaPux do not require diluent in order to be moved. As I am sure you are aware, diluent—or condensate, as it was referred to earlier—is a lighter, more volatile petroleum product used to dilute bitumen in order to make it easier to move in pipelines.

Unlike pure bitumen, the inclusion of the polymer ensures that CanaPux float in water, making recovery in the case of a marine spill straightforward. I do have a sample with me, if anyone is interested in looking.

To date, we have successfully proven the chemistry and the concept of CanaPux. In addition, we continue to work with InnoTech on scientifically confirming the environmental aspects, including its fate in the environment, as well as the GHG life cycle.

Of course, we also need to demonstrate the commercial viability. In other words, we need to show that we can create CanaPux at high speed and high volume. This is essentially a straightforward manufacturing question, and CN is currently leading the development of a pilot project that will answer that question. The pilot will allow us to demonstrate the technology to interested producers and global refiners. It will also allow us to quantify the actual costs involved and will create scalable engineering work that can be used to commercialize the technology.

We believe the pilot will demonstrate that CanaPux is a safe and competitive way to move bitumen from western Canada to offshore markets.

We briefed various officials from numerous departments in the federal, Alberta, and British Columbia governments before moving forward with the patent process.

Given that CanaPux would move in freighters rather than tankers, it is our understanding that the movement would be permissible under Bill C-48, thereby allowing the safe movement of bitumen while extending market options for Canadian producers. We believe that, given the environmental properties of CanaPux, this is appropriate.

Environmental protection of our coastlines is extremely important. Market access for Canada's rich natural resources, which provide economic opportunity for all Canadians, needs to be balanced with that protection.

(1640)



CN and InnoTech are very proud to have taken the lead in the development of CanaPux. We believe that the safety and environmental benefits of the product will be of great benefit to Canadians.

We thank you for the opportunity to comment.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Drysdale.

You said you have a sample here for the committee?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Yes.

The Chair:

We will pass that around for the members.

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

It is in a zip-lock bag because it is oil and it smells like oil, so you can open it, but that's the disclosure.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

All right, let's go on to Kate.

Ms. Kathryn Moran (President and Chief Executive Officer, Ocean Networks Canada):

Sure.

The Chair:

Please go right ahead. That's a beautiful background behind you.

Ms. Kathryn Moran:

I thought I'd bring the ocean to you since you're talking about the ocean.

I'm appearing today representing Ocean Networks Canada. I'm the president and CEO. I've been in this position for five years. Prior to coming to Victoria, I served for two years in the U.S. as an assistant director in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, serving under President Obama's science adviser, John Holdren. During my secondment there, I was selected to be on Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's eight-member science team that oversaw shutting down the flow of oil from the Deepwater Horizon.

At Ocean Networks Canada, I lead an exceptional team that operates the world's leading ocean observing systems. Ocean Networks Canada delivers the Internet-connected ocean by observing and monitoring primarily the west coast but also assets on the east coast and in the Arctic. These are observatories that continuously gather data in real time for scientific research, but they are also important in helping communities and managers make decisions and, for example, in informing decisions such as those you're making today with regard to Bill C-48. These decisions are really important to protecting the ocean now and in the future.

The locations, as you know well, that would be most impacted by an oil spill accident are our oceans and coastlines. At best, coastal oil spill cleanup tools recover less than 10%, sometimes up to 15%, of the oil spilled, which everyone agrees is a pretty dismal record. These facts alone provide support for the intention of Bill C-48.

Seven years ago, the blowout in BP's Deepwater Horizon opened up that spouting spigot of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, marking the beginning of the world's second-largest oil spill. We all watched oil spew from the spigot on 24-7 cable news. I was watching it as we were trying to shut it down. That lasted for months, with feelings of both aversion and shame. After months of work, the spigot was shut, but not before almost five million gallons were spilled. Now, this is totally different from what we're talking about here in terms of tankers, but just bear with me as I talk about these other accidents.

Over 20 years earlier, the Exxon Valdez spilled 42 million litres of crude oil in offshore Alaska, which remains today one of the most devastating spills because of its remote location, the type of oil spilled, and the negative impact on the area's rich biodiversity. Most coastal waters in B.C. resemble those in Alaska where the Exxon Valdez spill occurred. They are remote, the waters are relatively cold, slowing down the breakdown of crude oil, and they consist of many narrow inlets and channels characterized by large tidal ranges and strong tidal currents. These waters are similar to those in B.C. that are home to seabirds; salmon, and other harvestable fish species; sea otters; seals; and resident migrating whales, most notably gray, humpback that are increasing in numbers, and both orca and transient orca whales.

To pause there for a moment, in response to the Exxon Valdez, the tanker industry has done considerable work in reducing accidents with tanker spills, which I'm sure you've heard from other people appearing before you. There were many lessons learned from the Exxon Valdez, which have reduced the risk of tankers going aground in these kinds of waters.

Let me talk about, most recently, the tug Nathan. E. Stewart, which foundered and sank along the rocky coast of B.C. Although the fuel barge it was powering was empty, the tug itself carried 220,000 litres of diesel fuel, and thousands of litres of petroleum-based lubricants. The result is that the pristine coastline and the Heiltsuk First Nation have been negatively impacted, and that impact is still being assessed. We don't know the full impact of that, but certainly the first nation is claiming that there was a significant negative impact.

How could these accidents have happened? When I worked on the BP accident, I was stunned at how the oil industry assured us—as they do today—that their technology advances allowed for safe development and transportation of oil and gas even in the most challenging environments. The simple answer is that each of these disasters was caused by a combination of human error, weak regulations, and a paucity of oversight that relies on robust monitoring.

I think Bill C-48 begins to strengthen the regulation gap and is a positive move forward. It supports, perhaps for the first time, Canada's use of the precautionary principle outlined in the London 1996 protocol to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter.

Ocean Networks Canada recently completed—

(1645)

The Chair:

Ms. Moran, I'm sorry to interrupt. Could you make your closing remarks, and then get some of those other comments in when you're responding to members?

Ms. Kathryn Moran:

I'm sorry. I've gone over time.

The Chair:

Maybe you can just get everything added in. I'm sure you'll get lots of questions from the committee.

Ms. Kathryn Moran:

Okay.

The Chair:

Whatever you weren't able to get in, we could get in at the committee level.

Ms. Kathryn Moran:

My main point is that Bill C-48 doesn't change anything that's now existing in terms of our tanker traffic on the coast. It doesn't impact the small communities in terms of needing oil, but we do see significant traffic of car carriers and cargo. Those are the ones that are most at risk.

(1650)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Moran.

Mr. Wright, director of response readiness, go ahead, please. Please try to keep your presentation to five minutes or less if you can.

Mr. Scott Wright (Director, Response Readiness, Western Canada Marine Response Corporation):

I'm here today to talk to you about marine spill response in Canada.

We are here neither to support nor to oppose the tanker moratorium. Our mandate, under the Canada Shipping Act, is to be prepared for spill response on the west coast of Canada regardless of where the spill happens. While we neither support nor oppose the bill, spill response and our ability to handle spills have played a central role in the conversation around energy export, market access, and shipping volumes.

In 1976 WCMRC began as an industry co-op under the name Burrard Clean Operations. At that time, it was our duty to provide spill response within the Port of Vancouver. Following the Exxon Valdez incident in 1989, the Canadian government established a public review panel on tanker safety and marine spill response capability.

The panel's first report included 107 recommendations that ultimately informed amendments to the Canada Shipping Act in 1995. The changes created an industry-funded and government-regulated spill response regime for all of Canada's coastal waters. WCMRC became the only dedicated response organization on the west coast.

Our state of preparedness is funded by membership fees from shipping companies and oil-handling facilities that operate on the west coast. Vessels greater than 400 tonnes are charged an annual membership, whereas charges for oil carried for commercial trade are based on volumes. In the event of a spill, the polluter is required by law to pay for cleanup costs. Should the spiller be unable to pay, there are international and Canadian funds available to pay for spill cleanup and claims related to spills. Those funds are the result of levies placed on industry.

The Canadian government sets the standards, and industry pays for the response organization, the role of which is to meet and exceed the standards. The Government of Canada requires them to pay for it so that Canadians do not have to.The spirit of the regime is that Canadian taxpayers are not responsible for the cost of response. For those who are concerned that industry ownership somehow impacts our ability to respond, know that the federal government sets standards and provides oversight to the regime and response. It is an excellent model, and the federal government is in the process of improving the regime.

The Canada Shipping Act requires that we recover up to 10,000 tonnes of oil off the water in 10 days. Tiered response times are also defined by the Shipping Act. For example, within the Port of Vancouver, WCMRC is required to be on scene responding in less than six hours. Currently, the Port of Vancouver is the only designated port on the west coast. WCMRC exceeds those planning standards on every level. Our average response time in the Lower Mainland over the last 10 years has been 60 minutes.

WCMRC has offices and warehouses located in Burnaby, Duncan, and Prince Rupert, and more than a dozen equipment caches strategically located along B.C.'s coast. We have a fleet of 42 vessels and booming capability along more than 36 kilometres. We have a skimming capacity of 550 tonnes, which is 20 times the Canada Shipping Act standard. WCMRC has successfully responded to both light and heavy oil spills. We have a range of skimmers that can handle all types of oil transported on the coast. We also train hundreds of contractors every year.

In the event of a spill, our organization is contracted by the polluters to clean up the spill on their behalf. The entire response is managed by a range of federal, provincial, and municipal partners, including first nations, health authorities, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Environment Canada, the B.C. Ministry of Environment, and others. The Canadian Coast Guard monitors the response and takes command if the polluter is unknown, or unable or unwilling to respond.

Currently, Transport Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard lead four pilot projects in Canada to develop area response plans based on risk assessment.

(1655)



In B.C., the pilot project is focused on the southern shipping lane and includes partners from Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, and the B.C. Ministry of Environment.

The development of—

The Chair:

Excuse me, Mr. Wright, but I have to cut you off. Please try to get your comments added on to the members' questions.

We now have Greg D'Avignon, president of the B.C. Business Council.

Please go ahead, Mr. D'Avignon.

Mr. Greg D'Avignon (President and Chief Executive Officer, Business Council of British Columbia):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, standing committee, for the invitation to present today.

My name is Greg D'Avignon, and I am the CEO of the Business Council of British Columbia. We are in our 51st year. We are an organization of 260 firms that have assets and operations in the province, including leading firms in every sector of the economy, including our post-secondary institutions.

My comments today are really reflective of two key areas. One is related to the context of global and domestic energy demand and innovation and the role that Canada can play in meeting our obligations from an environmental and marine protection perspective. The other has to do with seizing the opportunity to export Canadian products to the benefit of the economy and the peoples of British Columbia and Canada.

These objectives were articulated in a submission in September 2016, but they bear repeating for the committee today. As the committee is aware, the International Energy Agency in its latest report showed that the global demand for hydrocarbons continues to grow and is projected to grow by one-third until 2040. Energy demand will be satisfied by a global mix of energy products, including renewables, but for decades to come it will involve primarily energy sources based on fossil fuels.

Canada, in our view, can choose to shut itself off from this demand and these market realities and forgo the benefits, including investment, taxes, jobs, and innovation that flow from our energy sector, which comprises today 10% of our GDP and most recently up to 25% of the capital investment in Canada as a whole, or we can choose to participate by contributing lower-greenhouse-intensive oil and natural gas products based on our baseline approach and innovations, as you heard about a moment ago, and drive change globally through a Canadian impact.

This is a unique proposition, particularly in British Columbia where we have the ability and today are integrating electrification in the upstream and downstream natural gas and oil production. These efforts are reducing by as much as half the carbon intensity of a barrel of oil, compared with the average in the U.S. The irony is that Canada today imports over 400,000 barrels of U.S. oil, while landlocking our Canadian product.

Canada's high environmental standards play a role in this, and Bill C-48 helps to strengthen it. Frankly, however, we have concerns with respect to our ability as the fourth-largest oil producer in the world, and given the innovations in electrification taking place in the market, to actually take advantage of the opportunities we have. The legislation in its persistence levels and schedule preclude both the innovations around the CanaPux, which we heard about earlier, and the opportunities that will arise out of natural gas production, which will include the production of light tight oil, condensate, and methane.

The British Columbia Business Council's concern is that the public narrative has not actually captured the voices of all indigenous peoples either. While many indigenous communities have the right to oppose the ability to ship, particularly diluted bitumen, from their traditional territories, the committee has heard from a great number who would like to seize those opportunities in environmental, traditional, and sustainable manners. This includes the supply chain through British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan.

Ironically, the oil industry and the energy sector in Canada is among the highest employers of indigenous peoples, creating self-determination, financial independence, and jobs for the future of those communities.

The opportunity for us in Canada is to seize these markets, to build on our innovation, to drive down the carbon intensity of our products, and, most importantly, to make sure that we create economic and cultural opportunities for all Canadians through the energy abundance we enjoy in Canada.

I'll conclude with some suggestions. While we are not in support of Bill C-48, we recognize the government's interest in moving forward with the legislation. Therefore, we would suggest the following. First, despite our views on the potential negative and unintended consequences of the legislation, permitting the export of products of less concern and less persistence than diluted bitumen through our northern deepwater ports must be recognized. Initially, the conversation on this legislation started around diluted bitumen, and, unfortunately, it has captured a much broader array of products and opportunities than was originally envisaged.

Second, reviews within the next 12 months of the legislation being passed and seeking royal assent should focus on the persistence level of products aimed at increasing the precision of in-out definitions, particularly given the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association's independent study on this topic, which is targeted for completion in 2018.

(1700)



Third, the technology developments and other response capabilities should be reviewed within 24 months of royal assent of the legislation, particularly through the oceans protection plan and some innovations we heard about earlier, such as the CanaPux, to see whether the legislation continues to remain relevant.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. D'Avignon. Can we get your last point into one of our members' questions and answers?

Mr. Greg D'Avignon:

Certainly.

The Chair:

We'll move on to Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

If you will permit, I'd like to split my time with Madam Block. I have a comment. I don't have a question.

My comment concerns the international aspect of this bill, which I don't think any of our witnesses have talked about, so I want to put this on the record. Bill C-48 concerns boundary waters for which we are in dispute with the United States. It involves the disputed waters around the Alaska Panhandle and also the waters around the Dixon Entrance, as well as issues concerning innocent passage, freedom of navigation, and the like.

The United States is not a party to UNCLOS, the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, and it's also a global maritime policing power, through the U.S. Navy, that has always been very clear about its determination to protect flag rights. Since the 1890s Canada has claimed these waters, both Dixon Entrance and Hecate Strait, believing they're internal to Canada. That's a position I support, but the U.S. doesn't recognize our sovereignty here.

As I understand it, the Government of Canada's foreign policy priority right now is protecting NAFTA, and I believe the Government of Canada should have a whole-of-government approach in ensuring that every resource of the Government of Canada is used to fighting for and protecting NAFTA, which is so vital to the approximately one-fifth of the Canadian economy that relies on trade exports to the United States. One of the things I have a concern about with this legislation is that it potentially will provoke the Trump administration while at the same time we're trying to get their attention and their support for the protection of Canadian jobs and Canadian interests in NAFTA. In that context, I think it's important for us, as members of Parliament, to put this on the record.

I think this is not well timed, and I don't believe it fits into what I believe should be a whole-of-government strategy to focusing every aspect, every department, every minister, and every part of the Government of Canada on the single biggest need, which is to protect our interests in NAFTA and to ensure that we can convince the Trump administration to come around to our point of view.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I'm trying to give everybody only five minutes, so we can get as many questions as possible out there. Two minutes remain.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Ms. Drysdale, I'm very interested in this new technology, this new product that has been worked on. It was discussed in a media report that CN was in talks with Transport Canada for an exemption from the oil tanker moratorium for CanaPux.

How far have these discussions advanced and what proof of concept has been required from Transport Canada?

(1705)

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

We have not requested an exemption. Our understanding, from the proposed legislation, is that this product would be excluded from the legislation.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie, you have five minutes.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I asked CN to be here because the CanaPux program seemed to be fascinating and perhaps to give Mr. Chow an opportunity to speak to this. Obviously, commercial viability is going to be crucial. What timeline do you have in mind to bring this process to the point where it makes the whole conversation we're having here moot?

Mr. Ross Chow (Managing Director, InnoTech Alberta):

We're working very closely with our partners at CN, and in terms of technology development, this one is moving quite quickly. We're ready to put the pilot together sometime next year. I think after the pilot, we're going to be moving that into the demonstration phase, so you're probably looking at a two-year development timeline before we look at a commercial application or a commercial trial of this particular technology.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Are there other technologies? Are you aware of any other technologies that are also being examined here?

Mr. Ross Chow:

As a first part of a study that we did with CN, we reviewed all the current solidification technologies for bitumen, and actually none of them met all the requirements for solid transport. A large part of that had to do with the strength required to take the handling in freighters and then the loading into rail cars.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I want to “lift the green curtain” a little bit here, if I can use that analogy.

Mr. D'Avignon, we talk about reducing the carbon intensity of products that we have some control over. However, if we're shipping any of this stuff offshore, be it CanaPux, or diluted bitumen, or anything else, it's going to end up being processed and used somewhere else in the world where we don't necessarily have any say at all over the standards that they apply and the emissions that they put out.

Do we not actually have to take more of a global responsibility for the use of our product?

Mr. Greg D'Avignon:

Mr. Hardie, I think that's a good question.

I think in the prescribed five minutes, we would tend to glaze over some of the complexities of the question you just asked. In British Columbia, as you might be aware, and certainly in Alberta, because of the plentiful supply of electricity that is based on renewable provision through B.C. Hydro, we're seeing electrification of the upstream extraction of natural gas and light tight oil. In the case of liquid natural gas, which isn't covered under the bill, we're also seeing the electrification potential for downstream movement of the products, as well.

The consequence of electrification in the domestic extraction is that its carbon intensity is half of that of the average U.S. barrel. Within Canada's borders, we're already a 50% lower carbon contributor to the global supply chain moving forward.

I can't speak to your point on offshore refining costs. However, the reality is that, in the case of British Columbia, where the Government of Canada has supported the LNG industry through both environmental assessment approvals and offtake approvals, with that technology we have the potential for up to a million barrels of light tight oil and condensate a year, which requires very little refining and which would have no market off the north coast.

Moreover, what you would find, despite the protections that we're investing in the oceans protection plan and the investments we've made in infrastructure, Prince Rupert on the north coast, is a day to three days closer to the markets with the highest demand moving forward. That in itself in the supply chain also reduces transportation GHG emissions as well as costs and the impacts on the environment.

I have every confidence in the ability of marine tanker safety moving forward, but within the walls of Canada, we already have the ability with technology today, let alone tomorrow, to reduce our carbon footprint and to make a bigger global impact on GHG reductions.

(1710)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses.

I'll start with Mr. Wright.

I still think of you as Burrard Clean, but I believe it was you folks from Western Canada Marine Response Corporation who did the Nathan E. Stewartcleanup. Is that right?

Mr. Scott Wright:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How easy was that cleanup on a scale of one to ten? It wasn't a particularly large spill in global terms. Is that fair to say?

Mr. Scott Wright:

The spill from the Nathan E. Stewart was refined product. It was in a coastal, nearshore environment. During that response, we did not see recoverable oil coming from the vessel. We did take on strategies to protect certain sensitivities around the casualty site, so that was basically the strategy that we undertook during that response.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just in terms of scale, in terms of global spills—I know your company works around the world—would that be seen as a major, medium, or minor-sized spill?

Mr. Scott Wright:

As I pointed out, it was a significant quantity at risk. The oil on the water was non-recoverable. It was a significant response.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have put this question to the government and to other witnesses. As we contemplate these tanker bans and how to manage the risk versus reward for the government—and just parenthetically to Mr. Chong, I'm not entirely sure what provokes Mr. Trump from day to day, and I don't think anybody necessarily does, including Mr. Trump, it seems—the link into NAFTA is an interesting stretch.

The question I have around this bill and your company—because you're the experts—is that we're trying to find out from industry and from the government the very nature of the product that we're talking about in water, whether a saltwater or a freshwater environment, because one contemplates both, of course, with regared to a proposal like Kinder Morgan or Northern Gateway.

Do you have any science you can provide to the committee as to what happens to diluted bitumen once it enters the marine or river environment?

Mr. Scott Wright:

We have experience with a product very similar to diluted bitumen, synthetic Albian crude, which we responded to in 2007. During that response we saw oil on water for a number of days. That oil behaved exactly as do conventional crude oils, as well as bunker, which is commonly in and around the marine environment. It didn't present any unique challenges.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, you called this synthetic Albian crude. Is this one of the condensate and oil mixes? I'm not familiar with this.

Mr. Scott Wright:

That's correct. It's a product that's very similar to diluted bitumen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Beyond the field experience, has your company done any empirical research to understand the weather? I know spill to spill things are very different in terms of wave action and in terms of weathering, all of these factors that we deal with on the north coast.

Mr. Scott Wright:

Yes, absolutely. We have been involved with Natural Resources Canada on undertaking studies, in which we look at the behaviour, the weathering of the product, and how it affects our ability to recover it in those types of circumstances. We want to understand the product and how it behaves on water. We've been part of a number of studies by industry and government.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

From an industry perspective, I've had dealings with your company in its former iteration and the current one. I've heard various numbers as to what a successful spill recovery looks like for recoverable oil. Of course we had the extremes of the Valdez, where very little, a single-digit percentage of the oil, was ever recovered. In 2017, what is considered the gold standard, what is considered a silver, and what's terrible with respect to an oil spill recovery rate?

Mr. Scott Wright:

That's a difficult question to answer, but certainly there are lots of data out there that suggest that mechanical recovery is not always very effective. We have seen instances in which we're highly effective when we're recovering product, and we've seen instances in which we are not recovering a great percentage of the product. We focus on the sensitivities, how we can protect those, and how we can contain and recover oil. Those are our strategies.

(1715)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will go now to Mr. Sikand for five minutes.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My first question is for Mr. D'Avignon.

You mentioned that the dependance on hydrocarbons is going to go up by one-third. Is that right?

Mr. Greg D'Avignon:

That's correct. The International Energy Agency, in its most recent report, shows that hydrocarbon consumption is going to continue to represent a significant portion of global energy demand, particularly with an emerging middle class, particularly in south Asia, central Asia, and Asia as a whole.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

What's the baseline? What's the starting number on that?

Mr. Greg D'Avignon:

I don't have that information in front of me, but I'd be happy to forward the International Energy Agency's most recent report to the committee.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Could you, please?

Do you happen to know what our contribution is currently to the global demand?

Mr. Greg D'Avignon:

Globally, the only customer for Canadian fossil fuels is the United States. They are now a net exporter of oil, including an exporter to Canada, in excess of 430,000 barrels per day. We are the fourth-largest supplier of oil in the world, but to one customer.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

You also mentioned capital investment. I missed your point on that. Were you saying that there was foreign capital investment?

Mr. Greg D'Avignon:

If you were to quantify the total capital investment that is placed in Canada by the private sector in any given year.... In 2015, 25% of that capital investment came from the energy sector in Canada. It has since been reduced, given the lower price of oil. It's about 19% today, but at its height it has been 25%. Currently, the entire energy sector, from a private perspective, is just over 10% of the national GDP, and by province it's obviously significantly higher or lower, depending on the basket of energy products.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

My other question is for Ms. Drysdale.

With regard to your CanaPux—that's a great name, by the way—I know the minister said that there would have to be testing for it to be considered a dry good and that the technology is encouraging, but I think that's just one aspect. You also have to have producers producing it, and refiners with the ability to actually refine it. Has there been any movement in that space? Are you in dialogue with either of those?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

We are in dialogue with a number of Canadian producers, all under non-disclosure agreements. We also have had initial discussions with people who could potentially refine it on the other end. At this point, I would say that there is strong commercial interest in the product and in following its development.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

That's good to hear.

Ms. Moran, I know you got cut off there. If there's anything you want to add to your remarks, you can add that now, and I have a question as well.

Ms. Kathryn Moran:

I think one of the most important things is to actually monitor shipping on the northern coast. One of the biggest risk areas is really from other kinds of ships that don't have to follow the voluntary exclusion zone that tankers do. We have demonstrated over the past six months that tankers are following the voluntary exclusion almost to the letter of the law, but in fact, the other ships actually have a higher risk level. Therefore, we are advocating, as a world-leading observatory, that we should begin to monitor shipping in a much closer way and to provide alerts to prevent accidents. We've talked about response, but the best thing we can do is prevent accidents. We're advocating that robust monitoring be in place to prevent all accidents, particularly in ships that do travel very close to the coast, have high windage, and if they lose power, can readily go aground on the coastline.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

First, I want to give some clarification to some comments that Mr. Chong made earlier with respect to Bill C-48 and dealing with disputed marine borders. Bill C-48, just to be clear, does not deal with disputed marine borders. It's a land-based moratorium. I think that was made clear at the last meeting.

I do want to congratulate CN for taking a forward-looking approach, for looking at not just the moratorium we're dealing with and, of course, the possibility of it then moving forward, but also at taking it steps further than that and coming up with new products and new approaches to the impact of this moratorium.

(1720)

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Thank you.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

With that, I'm going to give you time here, Ms. Drysdale. You're about corporate development; I get that. I know you want this time to communicate the business plan, the approach that you're going to take to attempt to put a positive business approach on all of this moving forward with respect to the movement of this product.

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

The next key step is really this pilot project we are undertaking. We have gone out to the marketplace to look for an engineering, procurement, and construction firm to help us in that endeavour. We are rapidly advancing that and narrowing in on the chosen provider. As Ross mentioned, we would be gearing up to do a kind of pilot project at some point next year. Our goal is to have a type of demonstration facility, if you will, that would be located at one of our distribution centres in Edmonton. I kind of liken it to a model house in a new condo development, or something along those lines, where people can come and see the product actually being solidified and reliquefied.

We are progressing in our discussions with interested producers. I will say that those who are interested are the ones who are not currently connected to pipelines and who probably don't have much reasonable probability of having a pipeline connection.

In terms of the end market, we've done some initial analysis on our own, and certainly Asia would appear to be the strongest end-market possibility, not only for the bitumen but also for the polymer once it's separated out. There are end markets, certainly, in Asia for that polymer if it's not used in a closed-loop cycle to bring it back.

I would just caution the committee that it's early days. This is really true R and D work, but as we've taken every step in this process, every step has been very encouraging.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

That said, and looking at the R and D side unfolding and accruing over time, are you working with folks such as the business council? Are they aligning with you with respect to moving in a strategic business direction? Utilizing the resources and as an enabler, as you are, but also within industry, is there a discussion now happening on aligning?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

We haven't engaged yet in terms of business councils. Certainly our focus has been on the R and D side. Ross can speak to some of the partners we've been engaging with in our fate-in-the-environment study and greenhouse gas life-cycle study. Our engagement on the commercial side has really been with interested producers at this point. We've shared some of our economic assumptions with them. They've built up some of their own models. They've looked at the analysis. Those are the discussions really, from a pure business development point of view, that are most promising.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I would encourage not just you at CN but also the business council to have those discussions with the federal government and with the BDC or EDC with respect to how we can move those agendas forward. It could be a whole new market for all of us.

Well done. Good job.

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Lobb.

Mr. Ben Lobb:

Thank you very much.

Just out of curiosity, I don't have the numbers in front of me here, but for CN's projected capacity for the rail lines you have in Prince Rupert and Kitimat, what kind of volume would be an equivalent in barrels per day?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Off the top of my head, I don't have that number, but certainly in terms of capacity constraints, the network that goes to Prince Rupert, for example, is high-quality rail. There is capacity on it. Certainly with the appropriate lead time, we have the ability to add incremental capacity to our network. To the extent that this moves in large volumes, it would move potentially in unit train service, open gondola railcars, very similar to the way that we would move coal today. Even at the port, the port handling would be very similar to the way that coal is shipped off the coast as we speak.

Mr. Ben Lobb:

Okay, and quite likely there would be enough capacity if new refineries were built in either port area, enough volume to meet the requirements they would have.

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Yes. With enough lead time, we could bring the capacity required.

Mr. Ben Lobb:

I know it's your position that you would be outside the schedule and therefore exempt from Bill C-48, so maybe you don't want to say this right now, but inside the bill, is there any issue with how you would actually prove that you shouldn't be put in the schedule?

I know the minister made comments back in February when you made this announcement, that they were still working on the criteria regarding how that would be done. Has there been any discussion since February on how you would be able to prove out this product so you wouldn't find yourself on the schedule?

(1725)

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Yes. We have done some work. In the product context, I don't think we necessarily have more information in the context of the bill itself. The key parameter of the bill that makes us outside the bill is really that the product would move in bulk freighters. It would not move in a tanker.

Mr. Ben Lobb:

Madam Chair, that might be something on which, as we come to concluding our study, we could have the department officials come back to give us a better idea about the governor in council on this, and the regulations they plan to build into this on that. We'll have the legislation, but the department is going to build in the regulations on how this done.

For a corporation such as yours, if you do find you're on the schedule, you're going to want to be able to have a clear way to find yourself off the schedule, not in 10 years but in a timely fashion.

The Chair:

I'll make sure we take care of that.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser (Central Nova, Lib.):

Thanks very much.

I've been unusually silent this meeting. I have two quick questions and only a couple of minutes to get them answered.

First, assuming that with your partners you can produce the CanaPux at volume and in a commercially responsible way, can you get them to an export market on the west coast of Canada at a price that can compete with the current cost of getting Canadian petroleum products to export facilities that exist today?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Every indication is that we can. The producers we've worked with so far, who have put the numbers in their own model, feel the same way.

The key thing is that it's comparable to the crude oil that's moving in a pipeline in which the diluent can be 30% to 40% of the product shipment. We have polymer instead of diluent. Polymer is much cheaper than the diluent. We can even use recycled polymer. It takes up much less space.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Are you looking at somewhere in the range of $4.50 for a barrel, or less, potentially?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

We think we're competitive, definitely.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Just to change gears, Mr. D'Avignon, I agree that we have to take advantage of ways in which we can get our resources to market, of course, in an environmentally responsible way. I spent some time working in the energy sector in western Canada. One thing that hasn't entered into this discussion to date is really our ability to produce versus our ability to export. If I look at CAPP's projections to 2030, I see that they're suggesting we're going to be just north of 5.1 million barrels a day.

When I look at our present export capacity and I factor in the Keystone—and it looks as though it's going to be going ahead, and the Trans Mountain project has been approved—I see our combined export capacity as somewhere in the range of 4.9 million barrels a day and our domestic consumption would easily make up the balance, I'd suggest. If there is a moratorium here, are we really limiting our export capacity or am I missing something? It seems as through it's spoken for with projects that are already in the pipeline, so to speak.

Mr. Greg D'Avignon:

I think you asked one of the fundamental questions in front of government and the committee itself. Canada is resource rich. We have 172% more energy than we need to satisfy domestic demand. In the case of fossil fuels, we have one customer, which is the United States. Their exports to Canada have increased 10% in fossil fuel alone in the last decade. They built the equivalent of seven Keystone XL pipelines in the U.S. under the Obama administration and are net exporters, as of 36 months ago, to global markets.

The consequence is that there's a global competition for energy supply. Canada isn't playing because of the lack of access to markets and particularly with long-standing trading customers in Asia and South Asia that have relied on Canada and Canadian products for decades.

To your point, Mr. Fraser, I think the ability of this legislation to deal with diluted bitumen, which is a concern off the north coast.... I recognize that, particularly for first nations. The schedule actually precludes a variety of other products that have persistence levels much lower than those of diluted bitumen, which are being caught up in the legislation, and those include light tight oil as I referred to earlier.

The export capacity of another million barrels a day of that light tight oil—which has very low persistence but also very low refining requirements—means that could serve a market in Asia and South Asia that would be happy to take on that product with lower carbon content at a competitive price. It would mean economic benefits and also the ability for Canada, frankly, to continue to brand itself globally as a climate leader that is contributing to a lower GHG impact on energy consumption.

(1730)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you.

I think there's one minute left. Mr. Graham, I think, had a quick question if he can squeeze it in.

Sorry, David.

The Chair:

There's about 45 seconds left.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'm known for brevity, so that shouldn't be too much of a problem.

In the last hour, the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association said that they move about 1.2 billion barrels of oil per year with a success rate of 99.9% by volume, which I figure gives us a loss rate of about 120,000 barrels of oil. If we consider that's an awful lot of oil that could just go missing, your product of CanaPux is quite interesting. I find it fascinating. I know I have only about 10 seconds left. In practical terms, how easy is it to transport it? You just passed that around. It looks as though if you put a bit of pressure on it, it would pop and spray everywhere.

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

No, actually the way it's packaged, there is actually air inside here and that helps with the compression in terms of the transportation. I could cut this open and there'd be no leaching. I could cut it into 20 pieces, and every individual piece would still float and wouldn't leach.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How long would that last? If you left a couple of container loads of this in the ocean for a few years, sitting there in bad weather, what would happen to that?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Let me turn it over to Ross. That's one of the studies we're looking at.

Mr. Ross Chow:

Absolutely. That's part of the phase of the environmental study that we're conducting right now. Unfortunately, we've not completed it yet but that is actually one of the key pieces we're looking at, its fate in the environment. In the next phase, we're actually going to reach out to the federal labs and look at the fate in marine environments.

The Chair:

Thank you, all. Thank you very much to all of the witnesses and to the committee.

Thank you for your patience.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(1535)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte. Le Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités tient sa 77e réunion au cours de la 42e législature.

Bienvenue à tous. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 4 octobre 2017, nous examinons le projet de loi C-48, Loi concernant la réglementation des bâtiments transportant du pétrole brut ou des hydrocarbures persistants à destination ou en provenance des ports ou des installations maritimes situés le long de la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique.

Nous avons des témoins avec nous aujourd'hui. Nous avons Nancy Bérard-Brown, gestionnaire à l'Association canadienne des producteurs pétroliers; M. Bloomer, président et chef de la direction de l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie; et par vidéoconférence, Ben Isitt, conseiller municipal à la ville de Victoria, et Derek Corrigan, maire de la ville de Burnaby.

Nous vous souhaitons tous la bienvenue. Merci beaucoup de prendre le temps d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

Nous commençons par Mme Bérard-Brown. [Français]

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown (gestionnaire, Marchés du pétrole et de transportation, Association canadienne des producteurs pétroliers):

Bonjour, chers membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Nancy Bérard-Brown. Je m'adresse à vous au nom de l'Association canadienne des producteurs pétroliers.

J'ai fait parvenir au Comité des copies de notre présentation et de notre soumission, ainsi que des copies des commentaires que nous avions soumis à l'honorable ministre des Transports, en 2006. Les documents sont rédigés dans les deux langues officielles.[Traduction]

Avant le dépôt de la Loi sur le moratoire relatif aux pétroliers en mai 2017, Transports Canada a mené de très brèves consultations. L'ACPP n'a pas appuyé le projet de moratoire, car il ne repose pas sur des faits ou des données scientifiques. Aucune lacune en matière de sécurité ou de protection environnementale reposant sur des données scientifiques n'a été recensée qui pourrait justifier un moratoire.

Il convient de souligner que le Canada a un bilan remarquable en matière de sécurité, en raison de la rigueur de la réglementation, de la surveillance et de la mise en application de la loi, et des bonnes pratiques d'exploitation déployées par l'industrie. Le Canada possède une vaste expérience dans le transport du pétrole brut et des produits pétroliers par voie maritime.

Le gouvernement fédéral a été un chef de file pour faire en sorte que le Canada dispose d'un système de sécurité maritime de classe mondiale qui continue d'évoluer avec le temps. Bon nombre de mesures de sécurité ont été mises en oeuvre au cours des dernières années.

Le gouvernement a mis sur pied un comité indépendant d'experts sur la sécurité des navires-citernes chargé d'examiner le régime canadien. Le comité a conclu que le régime est fondamentalement solide et il a formulé des recommandations qui ont été approuvées par le gouvernement fédéral. Le Plan national de protection des océans lancé par le premier ministre continuera d'assurer au Canada son rôle de chef de file en matière de sécurité maritime.[Français]

Le projet de loi, tel qu'il est formulé, interdirait l'accès par voie maritime à un très large éventail d'hydrocarbures. Le moratoire mettrait un terme à la voie la plus économique vers l'Asie, en plus de signifier à la communauté des investisseurs que le Canada n'est pas prêt à faire des affaires.

Notre production de pétrole et de gaz naturel continue de croître. Le Canada doit accroître ses marchés énergétiques au-delà des États-Unis. Les définitions étendues envisagées dans la loi pourraient exclure les possibilités futures d'expédition de condensats à partir des gisements de gaz naturel riche en liquides et d'hydrocarbures légers qui en sont à leurs premières étapes.

Jusqu'à maintenant, les résultats sont très prometteurs.[Traduction]

Je me concentrerai aujourd'hui sur les différentes définitions du pétrole et sur la nécessité d'effectuer des recherches scientifiques.

Dans leur forme actuelle, les règlements interdiraient le transport du pétrole brut, des hydrocarbures persistants, ou de toute combinaison des deux.

Tout d'abord, la définition de pétrole brut est très vaste et englobe essentiellement tous les hydrocarbures. L'annexe contient ensuite une liste des hydrocarbures persistants visés par le moratoire. Le fait d'avoir une définition pour « hydrocarbure persistant » et une pour « pétrole brut » porte à confusion. Si un produit pétrolier n'est pas mentionné dans l'annexe, cela ne signifie pas nécessairement qu'il peut être transporté, puisqu'il peut également être couvert par la définition de « pétrole brut ».

L'ACPP recommande, respectueusement, que le projet de loi ne contienne qu'une seule définition d'hydrocarbure persistant liée à une annexe qui puisse être modifiée par règlement. L'ACPP recommande ensuite que la définition de pétrole brut soit modifiée pour parler, par exemple, de « tout hydrocarbure liquide désigné par règlement ».

Le concept d'hydrocarbure persistant et non persistant est très important, car il détermine les mesures à prendre en cas de déversement. La distinction repose sur la probabilité qu'ont les matières à se dissiper de façon naturelle. Normalement, les hydrocarbures persistants contiennent une large proportion d'hydrocarbures lourds, qui se dissipent plus lentement et requièrent un nettoyage, contrairement aux hydrocarbures non persistants qui sont généralement composés d'hydrocarbures légers, qui tendent à se dissiper rapidement en s'évaporant.

J'aimerais souligner que dans l'annexe, « condensat » est défini comme un hydrocarbure persistant, conformément à la méthode ASTM D86. Bien que les seuils de cette méthode aient largement été utilisés pour définir la persistance, il existe d'autres propriétés physiques clés qui devraient être prises en considération pour déterminer la persistance.

Il convient de noter que les définitions d'hydrocarbure persistant varient. À titre d'exemple, l'Australie fait référence aux standards qui se rapportent à la gravité API et à la viscosité, en plus d'autres critères de distillation.

Il importe de mentionner également que le condensat de l'Ouest canadien est un hydrocarbure unique, léger, qui présente des propriétés et des réactions très différentes des pétroles bruts qui sont plus lourds. La durée de persistance du condensat dans un environnement marin est souvent de quelques heures ou de quelques jours.

(1540)



L'ACPP recommande que l'on examine différentes définitions pour hydrocarbure persistant et différents seuils. Elle demande également que l'on examine d'autres modes de traitement du condensat figurant à la liste des produits d'hydrocarbures persistants.[Français]

Le transport sécuritaire et fiable de tous nos produits est essentiel pour nos membres.

Il est nécessaire de procéder à davantage d'analyses scientifiques pour mieux comprendre les changements et le comportement de différents types de pétrole. L'industrie répond à ce besoin. Notre association et l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie ont commandé une étude qui devrait être complétée en 2018.

Nous recommandons au gouvernement fédéral d'entreprendre une évaluation scientifique des risques associés à la circulation des pétroliers qui transportent du pétrole le long de la côte Nord de la Colombie-Britannique.

Nous recommandons également qu'on se penche sur des recherches scientifiques sur les changements et le comportement de produits pétroliers en vertu du Plan d'action du Canada pour les océans. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je sais que vous êtes sur le point de terminer, mais pourriez-vous faire vos derniers commentaires afin qu'ils figurent au dossier?

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Oui.

En conclusion, l'ACPP n'appuie pas le moratoire, parce qu'il ne repose pas sur des données scientifiques. Dans le cas où le gouvernement voudrait aller de l'avant, l'ACPP souhaite éliminer la confusion que cause le chevauchement des définitions d'hydrocarbure persistant et de pétrole brut, encourager une évaluation plus poussée des caractéristiques pertinentes de la persistance, et donner la flexibilité nécessaire à la réglementation pour réviser la portée des hydrocarbures persistants selon les découvertes futures.

Nous aimerions également obtenir des clarifications sur les facteurs qui pourraient permettre au moratoire d'être levé pour certains types ou l'ensemble des pétroles bruts.[Français]

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Bloomer, vous avez cinq minutes. Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Chris Bloomer (président et chef de la direction, Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie):

Bonjour. Je vous remercie de l'occasion qui nous est donnée de témoigner aujourd'hui.

Je m'appelle Chris Bloomer, et je suis le président et chef de la direction de l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie, ou ACPE. Nous représentons les 11 sociétés de pipeline les plus importantes au Canada. Nous transportons 97 % du gaz naturel et du pétrole brut produit au Canada. Nos membres ont livré des produits gaziers et pétroliers avec un bilan de sécurité de 99,99 % depuis plus d'une décennie, bilan que nous améliorons sans cesse grâce à des initiatives de collaboration comme notre programme d'intégrité d'abord.

Nos membres sont résolument en faveur de la reddition de comptes à la population, l'intendance environnementale, la transparence et l'amélioration continue dans l'utilisation des systèmes de gestion et des pratiques fondées sur la recherche. Nous sommes des chefs de file mondiaux dans la technologie, l'innovation et l'exploitation des pipelines.

Bien que l'approbation de deux pipelines par le gouvernement fédéral ait été une étape positive pour le Canada, les effets cumulatifs des nombreux changements législatifs et stratégiques qui ont des répercussions directes et indirectes sur notre industrie sont très préoccupants et seront déterminants pour notre compétitivité future. En voici quelques exemples: la possibilité d'une réforme complète du système de réglementation et d'évaluation des grands projets de pipelines interprovinciaux, le projet de réglementation concernant la réduction des émissions de méthane, l'incertitude entourant la participation des peuples autochtones aux cadres réglementaires, et le fait que même les pipelines qui ont été approuvés récemment pourraient être assujettis à d'autres examens et des consultations additionnelles.

Le projet de loi C-48, Loi sur le moratoire relatif aux pétroliers, est un autre changement qui vient aggraver l'incertitude et avoir des répercussions négatives sur la confiance des investisseurs au Canada. Dans sa lettre de mandat, le ministre des Ressources naturelles a été chargé par le premier ministre d'introduire de « nouveaux processus équitables » afin que les décisions relatives aux projets énergétiques « se fondent sur la science, les faits et les preuves et servent l'intérêt du public ». Il est raisonnable de s'attendre à ce que le gouvernement s'appuie sur ces éléments fondamentaux lorsqu'il légifère sur des questions d'importance nationale cruciale comme l'accès aux marchés.

S'il est adopté, le projet de loi C-48 interdira le transport de pétrole brut à destination ou en provenance de ports situés le long de la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique, limitant ainsi l'accès au marché à l'une des ressources à valeur élevée au Canada. C'est très surprenant, étant donné que le Canada importe actuellement environ 400 000 barils par jour de pétrole étranger dans les ports de la côte est. L'ACPE croit fermement qu'en raison des répercussions profondes qu'aura ce projet de loi, il faudrait procéder à une analyse scientifique et obtenir un large consensus avant de procéder. Ce n'est pas le cas du projet de loi C-48 à l'heure actuelle, même si certains disent le contraire. On semble pressés de le faire adopter, et l'ACPE s'inquiète de son contenu et de voir qu'on fait fi du rôle de chef de file mondial du Canada en matière de sécurité maritime.

À titre d'exemple, le condensat faible en carbone qui provient des zones pétrolières Duvernay et Montney a une grande importance économique et environnementale et contribue à l'atteinte des objectifs stratégiques du gouvernement en matière de création de richesses et d'emplois. Toutefois, il n'est pas clair dans le projet de loi C-48 s'il est inclus dans la définition des produits interdits. Ce manque de clarté est alarmant, quand on pense notamment aux possibilités que représente ce condensat pour le Canada sur les marchés mondiaux.

Le Canada a un passé en matière de transport pétrolier maritime qui contredit le besoin d'un tel projet de loi. Dans un rapport de 2014, Transports Canada indique qu'entre 1988 et 2011, le gouvernement a pris des mesures importantes pour accroître la sécurité maritime. Depuis le milieu des années 1990, le Canada n'a pas connu un seul déversement important, provenant d'un pétrolier ou d'un autre type de navire, dans ses eaux nationales sur ses deux côtes.

De plus, le présent gouvernement a annoncé un montant de 1,5 milliard de dollars pour la mise en oeuvre d'un plan national de protection des océans afin de renforcer le rôle de chef de file mondial du Canada en sécurité maritime. On peut donc, à juste titre, se poser la question suivante: quelles sont les lacunes en matière de sécurité que ce moratoire vise à combler?

En conclusion, je dirais que des changements possiblement draconiens à la politique pour les projets futurs ont pour conséquence de rendre la réglementation incertaine, ce qui accroît les risques, les coûts et les délais pour un secteur qui a bâti la prospérité du Canada et qui emploie 270 000 Canadiens, comme l'a reconnu publiquement le premier ministre.

En procédant comme on l'a fait pour élaborer le projet de loi C-48, on crée de l'incertitude et on mine la compétitivité du Canada.

Merci.

(1545)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Bloomer.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Corrigan, maire de la ville de Burnaby.

Bienvenue et merci d'être avec nous.

M. Derek Corrigan (maire, Ville de Burnaby):

Merci beaucoup de votre invitation à comparaître devant le Comité. C'est un réel privilège.

Je fais partie du conseil municipal de la ville de Burnaby depuis 30 ans et je suis dans ma seizième année comme maire. Je suis très heureux de représenter la ville de Burnaby à cette réunion du Comité, et j'appuie sans réserve le moratoire sur les pétroliers le long de la côte nord prévu dans le projet de loi.

Nous subissons, ici même dans notre ville, les problèmes liés à la circulation des pétroliers. On menace de nous imposer, contre notre volonté, de nouveaux risques importants liés à la circulation des pétroliers sur nos côtes, notamment celui d'un déversement de pétrole bitumineux brut, souvent appelé dans le jargon « pétrole sale ».

Je crois fermement que les richesses naturelles qui se trouvent le long de la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique méritent d'être protégées. Le gouvernement fédéral montre ainsi qu'il a le pouvoir et la volonté de faire ce qui est nécessaire pour protéger notre côte pour les générations futures. L'interdiction devrait s'étendre aux ports dans la baie Burrard. Les richesses naturelles de la côte sud méritent tout autant d'être protégées que celles de la côte nord. Dans notre cas, nous voulons protéger les terres et les eaux d'une population urbaine dense de près de deux millions et demi d'habitants. Nos citoyens méritent la même protection.

On devrait également examiner les risques liés aux barges, qui ne sont pas incluses dans le projet de loi, mais qui présentent un risque réel pour notre côte. Le Canada a fait face à des dilemmes semblables pour le projet Northern Gateway d'Enbridge et le projet Trans Mountain de Kinder Morgan. On voit les problèmes qui découlent d'un processus d'examen mené par l'ONE, où ce sont les tenants d'un projet qui établissent les options à examiner, plutôt que d'opter pour la meilleure option et le gros bon sens. Cela nous montre que les sociétés, parfois étrangères, qui ne s'intéressent qu'aux profits, se soucient guère de notre pays et de notre environnement.

Un des éléments qui m'intéressait le plus au début... Je ne voulais pas en apprendre autant que j'ai dû le faire sur le transport du pétrole dans notre pays et sur le potentiel de transport le long de notre côte. Lorsqu'il a été question du pipeline de Kinder Morgan, j'ai commencé à me renseigner. Une des premières choses que j'ai faites, c'est de me rendre à l'Office national de l'énergie pour m'enquérir de leurs politiques et du plan stratégique examiné pour chaque option.

Dans les villes — et je suis certain que Ben sera de mon avis —, nous sommes toujours en mode planification. Nous regardons vers l'avenir, en réfléchissant à des façons de protéger les intérêts de nos citoyens d'une façon organisée, pour qu'ils voient une certitude dans l'avenir. J'ai donc voulu prendre connaissance du plan et de la politique. J'ai été consterné d'apprendre qu'il n'y avait pas de politique nationale sur le pétrole, pas de stratégie nationale. L'Office national de l'énergie la planifiait chemin faisant, en s'appuyant essentiellement sur les documents qui lui étaient fournis par des souteneurs des pipelines et l'industrie pétrolière.

On se trouve donc dans une situation où l'Office national de l'énergie a examiné tout simplement ce que Kinder Morgan voulait, puis l'Office et le gouverneur en conseil ont décidé qu'ils allaient de l'avant, même si le pipeline traversait le coeur du Grand Vancouver, de Burnaby, de Surrey, de New Westminster et de Coquitlam, pour se rendre à un parc de stockage situé à proximité de quartiers familiaux, d'une école primaire et de la seule route d'évacuation pour l'Université Simon-Fraser. On allait ensuite exiger que le chargement des pétroliers se fasse au bout de la baie Burrard, où on n'envisagerait certainement pas, raisonnablement, de construire de nouvelles installations, car on y trouve le port le plus achalandé de la côte ouest.

Je suis convaincu que cette situation frise l'absurde. Il n'y a pas de processus de planification sensée. Ma ville tout entière s'inquiète à ce sujet. Nous avons le soutien d'autres municipalités partout dans la vallée du bas Fraser, y compris le Grand Vancouver, pour nous opposer au passage du pipeline à Burnaby, dans la baie de Burrard, et le long de la côte sud.

Si nous voulons un pipeline qui transporte du pétrole bitumineux jusqu'à la côte et qui sert l'intérêt national, une bonne politique publique veut qu'on choisisse le circuit qui présente le moins de risque et qui cause le moins de dommage possible. Le choix ne doit pas être fait en notre nom par les sociétés pétrolières.

(1550)



Dans notre cas, l'Office national de l'énergie a refusé catégoriquement d'envisager d'autres circuits, et il a même refusé à la ville de demander des preuves d'autres circuits. Il y a à peine deux semaines, le Canada et l'Office ont tous les deux fait valoir devant la Cour d'appel fédérale qu'un processus qui ne prend pas en considération d'autres circuits est tout à fait légal.

C'est honteux...

La présidente:

Monsieur le maire, si vous pouviez conclure, s'il vous plaît...

M. Derek Corrigan:

Oui. Si la Cour d'appel fédérale retient ces arguments, cela aura assurément pour effet d'anéantir la confiance de la population dans notre système.

Je le répète, je félicite le gouvernement des mesures prises dans ce projet de loi. On ne devrait pas avoir à choisir entre un environnement sain et une économie prospère. Nous le savons ici à Burnaby et partout en Colombie-Britannique.

Merci de m'avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le maire.

Nous passons maintenant au conseiller Isitt.

M. Ben Isitt (conseiller municipal, Ville de Victoria):

Merci beaucoup de l'invitation à comparaître devant le Comité.

Au nom de la mairesse Lisa Helps et du conseil municipal de la ville de Victoria, je vous présente les observations suivantes à titre de maire suppléant de Victoria.

Victoria est située à l'extrémité sud de l'île de Vancouver. Les routes maritimes empruntées par les pétroliers transportant des produits pétroliers en provenance du pipeline Trans Mountain et de ports de combustibles fossiles dans le nord-ouest du Pacifique longeant la côte à quelques kilomètres de notre collectivité. Victoria est aussi la capitale de la Colombie-Britannique et le centre urbain du district régional de la capitale, qui comprend neuf Premières Nations, 13 municipalités, trois secteurs non constitués en municipalité et environ 380 000 habitants.

La région de la capitale est bordée par plus de 1 500 kilomètres de rivages marins dans la région appelée mer des Salish, adjacente à la partie sud de l'île de Vancouver. Cela comprend le détroit de Juan de Fuca, qui relie l'océan Pacifique à la baie de Burrard, et d'autres eaux intérieures. On y trouve également les terrains riverains des 13 municipalités du Grand Victoria, près du havre de Sooke, du port d'Esquimalt, du port de Victoria, de la péninsule de Saanich et de la baie de Saanich. On y trouve aussi plusieurs centaines d'îles et les eaux environnantes dans ce qu'on appelle la région sud des îles Gulf.

Les eaux côtières sont vitales pour assurer le bien-être social et économique de notre région: des dizaines de milliers d'emplois dans le tourisme et des secteurs connexes en dépendent, tout comme la valeur des propriétés de plus de 100 000 habitants, des propriétaires qui ont pris la décision d'investir à cet endroit en raison de sa proximité avec un environnement côtier marin en santé, et la santé et le bien-être de tous les habitants de la région, y compris leurs activités récréatives et leur qualité de vie.

Les eaux côtières de la ville de Victoria et de la région de la capitale sont vitales aussi pour une autre raison: la biodiversité. Elles constituent un habitat essentiel et fragile pour de nombreuses espèces, notamment la population d'orques résidentes du Sud, une espèce menacée dont le nombre n'est plus que de 75 animaux survivant sur la côte sud de la Colombie-Britannique, concentré sur la route de navigation des pétroliers qui entoure la région de la capitale.

Les risques associés au transport du bitume comprennent notamment les coûts substantiels d'une intervention d'urgence et du nettoyage d'un déversement, des coûts qui échoient aux administrations locales en raison des mesures de protection inadéquates du gouvernement fédéral et de la délégation de la responsabilité à une tierce partie contrôlée par les exportateurs pétroliers.

Le dernier facteur que je souhaite mentionner est celui des répercussions de l'exportation des combustibles fossiles et du transport pétrolier sur les changements climatiques, dont le Canada a pris acte en signant l'Accord de Paris. Ces répercussions ont déjà commencé à se faire sentir partout dans le monde, de même qu'au Canada, notamment dans la région de la capitale, où les conditions climatiques sont instables, les tempêtes extrêmement violentes provoquent des inondations, et où un relèvement des niveaux de la mer influe sur la valeur des propriétés, de même que sur l'infrastructure publique et privée.

Même si tout se passe comme prévu, et que les produits pétroliers sont acheminés sans encombre de la source jusqu'aux consommateurs sur les voies navigables côtières, il existe toujours un effet négatif inévitable sur les changements climatiques. Le combustible est brûlé par le consommateur et se répand dans l'atmosphère en contribuant au réchauffement climatique et en minant la capacité de survie des humains sur la planète.

Pour toutes ces raisons, notamment, la ville de Victoria et le district régional de la capitale ont convenu de s'opposer à toute infrastructure ou politiques qui résulterait en une augmentation du transport des combustibles fossiles dans les eaux côtières fragiles de la mer des Salish. Je souhaite donc réitérer la demande du maire de Burnaby d'examiner la possibilité d'élargir l'application de la loi au transport des produits pétroliers bruts dans les eaux côtières du sud de la Colombie-Britannique, notamment dans la mer des Salish et dans le détroit de Juan de Fuca.

Merci.

(1555)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions.

Monsieur Lobb, vous avez six minutes.

M. Ben Lobb (Huron—Bruce, PCC):

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai quelques observations à faire au conseiller municipal et au maire qui se joignent à nous aujourd'hui. Merci de votre comparution.

Je comprends votre point de vue, et je suppose que vous faites de votre mieux pour vos concitoyens. Comment conciliez-vous, d'une part, l'interdiction des pétroliers et, d'autre part, le bilan des déversements d'eaux usées dans la région? Comment expliquez-vous cette contradiction dans l'argument que vous nous présentez aujourd'hui?

M. Ben Isitt:

C'est une bonne question.

M. Derek Corrigan:

Je dirais que, dans le Grand Vancouver, nous avons investi des centaines de millions de dollars dans les systèmes de traitement secondaire afin de garantir que nos conduites d'évacuation respectent les normes environnementales les plus élevées. C'est l'une de nos principales responsabilités.

En fait, juste en face de notre région, dans le cas de l'usine de traitement Lions Gate, sur la rive nord, nous avons fait des démarches pour obtenir du financement fédéral dans le but d'assurer une protection optimale pour le bras de mer Burrard. Nous sommes très conscients de ces enjeux, et nous agissons de manière très responsable à cet égard.

Mais, comme nous le savons tous, personne n'est parfait, et c'est l'une des inquiétudes...

M. Ben Lobb:

À ce propos, monsieur — et je ne suis pas ici pour débattre de cette question, bien franchement —, vous dites que personne n'est parfait, mais vous vous attendez à beaucoup plus de la part des pétroliers, qui ont déjà un bilan presque parfait.

Voilà la difficulté pour quelqu'un assis ici —  et je ne viens pas de la Colombie-Britannique, mais de l'Ontario, et j'habite le long d'un des Grands Lacs, alors je suis conscient de l'importance de l'eau potable, de la sécurité, etc. Bref, je me gratte la tête — enfin, le peu de cheveux qu'il me reste —, en me demandant comment il est possible, d'un côté, d'affirmer que les pétroliers doivent être parfaits et, de l'autre, de continuer à déverser, presque à perpétuité, des eaux usées dans les cours d'eau de ces régions. Je n'arrive pas à comprendre cela.

En tout cas, passons à un autre point. J'aimerais poser une question à l'Association canadienne des producteurs pétroliers au sujet de l'annexe du projet de loi.

Faites-vous valoir l'argument que certains types d'hydrocarbures devraient être retirés de l'annexe tout de suite? Voulez-vous que certains d'entre eux soient enlevés dès maintenant, ou êtes-vous en train de dire qu'il faut effectuer d'emblée d'autres travaux de recherche scientifique avant d'invoquer un tel argument?

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Merci de me donner l'occasion d'apporter des précisions.

À ce stade-ci, l'ACPP demande deux choses. D'abord, il faut déterminer si le condensat doit figurer ou non sur la liste des hydrocarbures persistants. Ensuite, comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, à mesure que d'autres résultats de recherche scientifique seront disponibles, si des changements s'imposent à l'un ou l'autre des produits énumérés dans l'annexe, il est important que nous sachions clairement comment procéder pour les retirer de la liste.

Un autre aspect qui nous pose problème, c'est la définition. Pour l'instant, la liste des hydrocarbures persistants figure en annexe, et il est possible de la modifier par voie réglementaire. Par contre, la définition de « pétrole brut » et d'« hydrocarbure » se trouve dans le texte même, ce qui empêche toute modification. Nous pensons qu'il s'agit d'un point important.

En tout respect, nous comprenons la détermination du gouvernement à passer à l'action, mais si certains hydrocarbures persistants ne doivent pas être inclus dans la liste, nous voulons nous assurer d'avoir la capacité d'apporter les changements qui s'imposent et de savoir clairement sur quels principes, critères et données scientifiques nous appuyer pour retirer une partie ou la totalité de ces produits de la liste des hydrocarbures persistants.

(1600)

M. Ben Lobb:

J'ai une dernière question à poser au conseiller municipal de Victoria.

Je me demande ce que vous pensez de l'énorme échappatoire qui existe dans l'interdiction imposée par le gouvernement, en ce sens qu'il permet aux superpétroliers de transporter du carburant diesel léger, de l'essence, du gaz propane, etc. Un superpétrolier peut transporter 318 000 tonnes métriques de ce genre de produit, mais seulement 12 500 tonnes métriques de pétrole.

Il faut mener une étude pour justifier une telle décision. Que pensez-vous de cette échappatoire, et qu'en pensent les gens de votre municipalité?

M. Ben Isitt:

Je tiens d'abord à dire que je ne suis ni biologiste de la vie marine ni ingénieur chimiste.

À ma connaissance, les produits dérivés du pétrole brut, surtout le bitume, sont particulièrement dangereux pour l'écologie marine, et leur récupération est une tâche particulièrement difficile pour les autorités chargées des opérations de nettoyage. Je pense que nous devrions, à tout le moins, interdire ces produits.

Si je comprends bien, le raffinage est un procédé de pointe, ce qui permet d'accroître les possibilités d'évaporation ou de récupération du produit par d'autres moyens. Il pourrait donc être justifié de... mais, en général, je crois que nous devons renforcer les règlements sur le transport de tous les produits pétroliers, y compris les produits raffinés que vous avez mentionnés.

J'ai une brève observation à faire concernant votre première question.

L'absence d'une infrastructure adéquate de traitement des eaux usées au coeur de la capitale est un grave problème. Pendant 40 ans, les autorités fédérales et provinciales ont permis que les eaux d'égout brutes du Grand Victoria soient déversées dans le détroit de Juan de Fuca. Environ les deux tiers de notre population dépendent de cette situation inacceptable. Quant au tiers des habitants de la région, ils sont desservis par une dizaine d'usines de traitement des eaux usées.

Heureusement, l'ancien gouvernement du Canada s'était engagé à verser près d'un quart de milliard de dollars pour bâtir une infrastructure adéquate de traitement des eaux usées dans la zone centrale. Cet engagement a été honoré par l'actuel gouvernement, et les travaux de construction sont déjà en cours afin de doter le centre-ville du Grand Victoria d'un système adéquat de traitement tertiaire des eaux usées.

Je tiens d'ailleurs à souligner la contribution des deux gouvernements à ce partenariat crucial pour assainir le milieu marin.

La présidente:

C'est bien. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

M. Floatie va donc perdre son emploi? Est-ce bien ce que vous dites? C'est une blague pour les initiés.

Monsieur Corrigan, qui aurait cru, il y a 18 ans, que vous et moi, nous nous retrouverions dans un tel contexte aujourd'hui? Je dois admettre que, de toutes les personnes ici, vous et votre ville avez l'expérience la plus immédiate en matière de déversement accidentel de pétrole brut. Je vais vous donner un peu de temps pour expliquer ce qui s'est passé et ce que la rupture du pipeline a eu comme conséquences.

M. Derek Corrigan:

Une des réalités des pipelines à Burnaby, c'est qu'ils faisaient initialement partie d'une coopérative qui desservait les raffineries le long de notre littoral, dans le bras de mer Burrard. La région comptait cinq ou six raffineries, mais il n'en reste qu'une seule maintenant. Au fil des années, toutefois, à la suite de changements géographiques, il est devenu incroyablement difficile de déterminer l'emplacement des premiers pipelines. Chaque fois que des travaux d'excavation étaient prévus près de ces pipelines, l'Office national de l'énergie avait exigé la présence d'employés de la société de transmission afin de superviser le tout.

Dans le cas du déversement de pétrole dans le quartier résidentiel de Burnaby, ce genre de supervision n'avait pas eu lieu. Les travaux n'avaient pas été exécutés adéquatement; en effet, un entrepreneur qui effectuait des travaux sur les conduites d'égout a causé la rupture d'un oléoduc. Pour colmater la brèche, on a fermé les vannes reliées au pétrolier, au lieu de fermer celles situées dans le parc de réservoirs de stockage. C'est ce qui a exacerbé le déversement massif de pétrole dans notre quartier, causant ainsi des dommages de plusieurs millions de dollars aux résidences, sans compter les dommages écologiques, car le pétrole a fini par se déverser dans le bras de mer Burrard. Ce fut une catastrophe, et il a fallu des années avant de nettoyer le gâchis.

Cet incident est survenu directement dans notre collectivité, et nous avons été très déçus de la façon dont Trans Mountain a géré la situation. Les gens de la région se sont rendu compte que ce genre d'accidents se produisent et, quand cela arrive, il y a des conséquences graves pour la collectivité environnante et l'écologie urbaine.

Les répercussions seront encore pires dans le cas des produits bitumineux qui passent par notre collectivité, car, en réalité, si nous allons exporter du pétrole, je crois très fermement que nous devrions le raffiner ici, au Canada. Nous devrions vendre nos produits raffinés à n'importe quel marché mondial qui souhaite en faire l'acquisition, au lieu d'exporter du pétrole brut. Je suis très déçu.

(1605)

M. Ken Hardie:

J'aimerais poser une question à nos deux représentants du secteur des pipelines: pourquoi ne pas raffiner le pétrole ici? Il existe une solution facile si vous avez le bon produit, un produit plus sûr, afin de l'expédier à partir de nos ports.

M. Chris Bloomer:

Je crois que cela dépend des réalités économiques et des marchés. Selon moi, pour que le coût de raffinage au Canada soit concurrentiel et pour que ces produits soient livrés aux marchés pertinents, il faut... Vous venez de mentionner que trois raffineries ont fermé leurs portes à Burnaby. Il y avait des activités de raffinage dans le passé, mais il y en a moins maintenant en raison des conditions économiques.

M. Ken Hardie:

Justement, quelles conditions économiques à long terme feraient en sorte que votre produit puisse être expédié par Prince Rupert? Il faudrait soit un pipeline, soit un réseau ferroviaire assez étendu pour l'expédition du produit. Y a-t-il un marché mondial pour cette ampleur d'expédition supplémentaire du produit en provenance du Canada? Quel est votre pronostic à long terme sur les investissements à effectuer afin de concrétiser un tel projet, si jamais nous donnions le feu vert?

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Selon les dernières prévisions produites par l'Agence internationale de l'énergie à Paris, la demande mondiale pour le pétrole ne cesse d'augmenter. Les producteurs cherchent à avoir accès aux côtes, et c'est ce que nous souhaitons afin d'être en mesure de répondre à la demande sur ces marchés.

En réponse à votre question précédente, notre domaine d'expertise est la production de ressources. S'il y avait déjà une volonté, une demande et une raffinerie prête à acheter notre produit, nous serions indifférents. D'après ce que j'ai pu comprendre, la raison pour laquelle certaines raffineries ont fermé leurs portes, c'est parce que l'écart de prix enregistré au cours des dernières années ne justifie plus la construction de raffineries. Du point de vue des producteurs, nous disposons de ressources croissantes et, s'il y a une demande, nous sommes prêts à les vendre et à obtenir des prix du marché qui sont indépendants de l'acheteur.

En tout cas, la demande est certainement à la hausse, et je sais que toutes nos exportations sont actuellement destinées aux États-Unis, d'où la nécessité de diversifier nos marchés.

M. Ken Hardie:

Par contre, il y a aussi une demande pour que le tout se fasse sans danger. L'expérience de Burnaby montre que même le pétrole brut — un produit que vous voulez retirer, si je comprends bien, de la liste d'hydrocarbures réglementés —, peut créer un immonde gâchis — excusez mon langage —, et c'est le genre de situation que le moratoire vise à corriger.

La présidente:

Pourriez-vous répondre brièvement?

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Je tiens simplement à préciser que nous demandons un réexamen pour le retrait éventuel du condensat, qui provient de la production de gaz naturel. Ce n'est pas une forme de pétrole lourd ou un produit comparable au bitume dilué.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je voudrais d'abord présenter mes excuses aux témoins pour mon retard. Je salue également nos amis de Victoria et de Burnaby.

Madame Bérard-Brown, je vais reprendre là où nous venons de nous arrêter, si vous me le permettez.

Je représente le nord-ouest de la Colombie-Britannique, la région au coeur de la plupart des discussions sur le projet Northern Gateway. Au cours des 40 dernières années, cette région a aussi fait l'objet de discussions afin de déterminer si les superpétroliers peuvent circuler en toute sécurité dans nos eaux.

Une question qui est constamment revenue sur le tapis et à laquelle je n'arrive toujours pas à obtenir une réponse satisfaisante de la part du gouvernement, c'est la nature du bitume dilué, surtout au contact de l'eau, qu'il s'agisse d'eau salée ou d'eau douce. L'une ou l'autre de vos associations dispose-t-elle de résultats de recherche à ce sujet?

Bien entendu, pour répondre à cette question, il faut d'abord déterminer comment nous gérons le dossier et comment nous mettons en oeuvre des protocoles de sécurité et d'assainissement. Soit dit en passant, on n'a jamais répondu à cette question tout au long des consultations sur le projet Northern Gateway; pourtant, le gouvernement d'alors a donné son aval, sans même savoir comment procéder si un nettoyage devait s'imposer. Y a-t-il des recherches menées par l'industrie?

(1610)

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

C'est une excellente question.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, nous avons observé une lacune importante. Il y a quelques années, l'Association canadienne des producteurs pétroliers et l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie ont demandé à la Société royale du Canada de mener une étude et de vérifier l'état des travaux de recherche sur l'évolution et le comportement des divers types de pétrole brut. Les auteurs ont ainsi repéré une lacune. C'est l'étude à laquelle j'ai fait allusion dans mon exposé.

Par ailleurs, nos deux associations ont uni leurs efforts pour embaucher un consultant chargé de mener des recherches plus poussées sur l'évolution et le comportement du pétrole brut dans divers milieux. Ces résultats seront disponibles l'année prochaine, et ils seront rendus publics.

M. Nathan Cullen:

À titre de précision, parlez-vous de pétrole brut ou de bitume dilué? Il s'agit là d'une distinction importante.

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Cette étude portera sur le pétrole brut en transit partout en Amérique du Nord, c'est-à-dire le pétrole léger, moyen, classique et non classique ainsi que le combustible de soute C et le condensat.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Et le bitume dilué...?

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Oui, le bitume dilué, le bitume synthétique et le bitume synthétique dilué.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La situation au Canada est intéressante. Nous transportons du bitume dilué depuis maintenant un certain temps, et la possibilité de passer par la région du maire Corrigan nous permettra d'en transporter en plus grandes quantités. Il s'agit d'un produit du nord de l'Alberta, qui est mélangé avec le condensat et qui est assez visqueux pour pouvoir être acheminé par pipeline. Toutefois, il est juste de dire que la composition et la nature du produit subissent des changements, surtout si le produit est altéré au contact de l'eau.

Monsieur Corrigan, a-t-on soulevé cette question dans le cadre des discussions menées au sein de votre collectivité, entre vos concitoyens, votre bureau et le gouvernement fédéral, en ce qui concerne l'évaluation environnementale du prochain projet de pipeline, celui de Kinder Morgan, et la décision du gouvernement libéral d'en approuver la mise en oeuvre?

M. Derek Corrigan:

C'est un sujet qui suscite beaucoup de préoccupations dans notre ville, car on en sait peu à propos du bitume dilué et des répercussions qu'aurait un déversement de cette matière. Chose certaine, on sait qu'un secret privatif entoure la composition exacte du condensat; on ne sait donc pas quels produits chimiques il contient afin de posséder la viscosité nécessaire pour se déplacer dans le pipeline. Voilà qui est également fort préoccupant, car on ignore bien des choses quant aux conséquences d'un déversement sur l'écologie.

Au bout du compte, le gouvernement fédéral a le pouvoir d'intervenir. L'industrie vous a affirmé que si quelqu'un va raffiner le produit et qu'elle peut vendre le pétrole à la raffinerie, elle le fera. L'ennui, c'est qu'elle ne s'est pas engagée à construire les infrastructures au pays. Cela permettrait de faire vivre une industrie secondaire et ferait en sorte que le transport des produits serait plus sécuritaire, peu importe la destination. Je ne pense pas que l'industrie ait fourni une explication adéquate pour dire pourquoi nous ne devrions pas prendre la responsabilité écologique de rendre ce produit plus sécuritaire à utiliser dans le pays qui le produit.

M. Nathan Cullen:

N'est-ce pas seulement une question d'argent...

M. Derek Corrigan:

Oui, c'est entièrement une question d'argent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

... si nous ne raffinons pas le produit, si nous n'avons pas construit d'infrastructures de raffinage d'envergure?

Nous avons peut-être construit une grande raffinerie et une usine de transformation au cours des 35 dernières années, alors que le nombre de millions de barils exportés a monté en flèche.

Monsieur Isitt, à Victoria, le tracé passe maintenant principalement par des eaux salées, alors qu'à l'intérieur des terres, c'est de l'eau douce.

Avez-vous avec les résidants de Victoria et de la région des échanges semblables à ceux que le maire Corrigan a eus concernant la perspective que le projet Kinder Morgan aille de l'avant? Ce dernier a été avalisé par le gouvernement fédéral. Le nombre de pétroliers qui ont commencé à sillonner les eaux a septuplé; que faisons-nous alors en cas de déversement? Pouvons-nous nettoyer les dégâts, au regard de la nature du bitume dilué?

M. Ben Isitt:

La réponse est « non». Voilà pourquoi la Ville de Victoria et le district régional de la capitale ont exprimé leur opposition quant à la demande d'expansion du pipeline de Trans Mountain et aux diverses politiques et infrastructures qui iraient de pair avec une augmentation du transport de combustible fossile le long de la côte.

Le chef du service d'incendie a déploré le manque total de coordination entre les organismes gouvernementaux. Le modèle actuel de surveillance gouvernementale des expéditions de combustible fossile est tout à fait inadéquat, Transports Canada et la Garde côtière canadienne déléguant leurs responsabilités à la Western Canada Marine Response Corporation, qui est sous la coupe de l'industrie. De par sa structure même, elle partage les intérêts de l'industrie au lieu de se préoccuper de l'intérêt public afin de protéger la population, la propriété et l'environnement naturel.

(1615)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le conseiller.

Nous accordons maintenant la parole à M. Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Bloomer.

Vous avez indiqué que votre taux de réussite au chapitre du transport du pétrole est de 99,9 %. Est-ce exact?

M. Chris Bloomer:

Il y a un « neuf » de plus.

M. Gagan Sikand:

C'est ce que je pensais.

En ce qui concerne le 0,01 %, la fois où les choses dérapent... En fait, je vais revenir en arrière. Sur quoi se fonde ce chiffre; sur le volume ou le nombre d'expéditions? Comment avez-vous calculé ce pourcentage?

M. Chris Bloomer:

Il est calculé en fonction du volume réel. Annuellement, il s'expédie environ 1,2 milliard de barils de pétrole et quelque 5,5 billions de pieds cubes de gaz. Voilà ce sur quoi les chiffres sont fondés.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Avez-vous des chiffres concernant le désastre occasionnel, quand quelque chose ne va pas? Quel est le prix du nettoyage, des dommages?

M. Chris Bloomer:

Le dernier déversement est survenu en 2010 à Kalamazoo, au Michigan. La facture s'est élevée à quelques milliards de dollars, mais le déversement a été nettoyé et l'environnement a été remis dans son état initial.

M. Gagan Sikand:

En cas de problème, la facture s'élève-t-elle souvent à plusieurs milliards de dollars?

M. Chris Bloomer:

Non.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord. Il s'agit donc d'une exception.

Je me tournerai maintenant vers nos homologues municipaux. Je suppose que je commencerai par monsieur le maire.

Votre budget prévoit-il des sommes pour le nettoyage en cas d'incident?

M. Derek Corrigan:

Non. En fait, nous n'avons même pas l'argent nécessaire pour réagir si une conflagration se produisait au parc de réservoirs. La société Kinder Morgan s'attend en quelque sorte à ce que nos pompiers s'occupent de son parc, même en cas d'incident majeur. Or, nous n'avons pas la capacité d'agir. Nos pompiers ont fait savoir qu'il était impossible d'intervenir en cas de problème et qu'il faudrait simplement laisser l'incendie s'éteindre de lui-même. Ce parc de réservoirs se trouve juste en aval de l'Université Simon Fraser.

Ce qui nous préoccupe, c'est que le nombre d'études effectuées sur la protection en cas d'incidents ne nous permet pas de croire que le gouvernement fédéral contrôle la situation.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Monsieur le conseiller, vous avez fait état d'une position d'opposition. Cette opposition vient-elle du conseil municipal? Avez-vous tenu des séances de discussion ouverte? Est-ce que ce sont les résidants qui s'opposent au projet? D'où vient cette opposition?

M. Ben Isitt:

C'est une bonne question. Toutes les données sont publiées sur le site Web de la Ville de Victoria et du district régional de la capitale.

Tout a commencé quand le conseil a adopté un avis de motion et une résolution. Nous avons ensuite organisé une séance de discussion ouverte à propos du projet de pipeline Trans Mountain. La vaste majorité de la population a alors indiqué qu'elle n'appuyait pas ce projet.

L'opinion de la population faisait partie de la contribution de la Ville quand nous sommes intervenus dans le cadre du processus de l'Office national de l'énergie. La Ville et le district régional ont finalement adopté des résolutions dans lesquelles ils s'opposaient à la demande et exhortaient l'Office national de l'énergie et au gouvernement fédéral à la rejeter.

En ce qui concerne la question que vous avez posée à M. Corrigan à propos du nettoyage, il faut penser à affecter des agents de police pour arpenter les plages afin d'empêcher les citoyens de tenter de s'y promener ou les enfants d'essayer de jouer dans les sables souillés par le bitume toxique. Le nettoyage des zones intertidales exige littéralement des centaines de millions de dollars.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Pardonnez-moi. Je vais vous interrompre, car je ne dispose que de six minutes.

Madame Bérard-Brown, je comprends parfaitement les obstacles qui entravent votre accès aux marchés, mais je ne suis pas certain que cet accès doive nécessairement se faire au détriment de notre planète ou de l'environnement.

Vous avez tenu bien des propos que je veux clarifier. Vous demandez une exemption, laquelle, à ce que je sache, est fondée sur la matière sèche. Vous avez indiqué qu'une partie des hydrocarbures sont persistants et parlé de la viscosité. Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet et nous expliquer en quoi consisterait la matière sèche afin d'obtenir une exemption?

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Je suis désolée. Pour que tout soit clair, je n'ai pas parlé de matière sèche. J'essayais d'expliquer qu'il existe une distinction entre l'hydrocarbure persistant et non persistant, et à l'heure actuelle, la définition utilisée fait référence à la courbe de distillation. Je voulais vous faire savoir qu'il faut tenir compte d'autres facteurs au chapitre de la persistance. Par exemple, s'il se produit un déversement de bitume dilué ou de pétrole traditionnel, tous les produits s'altéreraient. Leur composition changerait donc selon l'environnement, la température ou la présence d'ondes de marée. Dans le cadre des études que nous entreprenons, nous tentons de mieux comprendre la manière dont la composition de la matière change au fil du temps, l'influence de cette évolution sur le pétrole brut et les mesures optimales que nous pouvons prendre.

Sachez que de nombreux experts considéreraient que le condensat est un pétrole non persistant. Nous demandons simplement d'étudier la question plus en profondeur pour déterminer si le condensat entre ou non dans cette liste.

(1620)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Je suis désolée, monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Vous m'avez simplement empêché de poser ma dernière question; c'est donc parfait. Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Je veux approfondir brièvement la question du manque de ressources en cas d'urgence et des protocoles de préparation aux situations d'urgence. Je vais interroger le maire, le conseiller, ainsi que les représentants de l'industrie à ce propos.

Dans mon ancienne vie, j'ai été maire pendant de nombreuses années. Comme M. Lobb l'a indiqué, des incidents sont survenus dans les Grands Lacs. Or, nous y puisons notre eau pour alimenter notre usine de traitement et, bien entendu, les robinets, les bains et les douches de nos résidants. Voilà qui pose bien des défis, particulièrement quand il se produit un incident, auquel cas nous fermons évidemment le centre de traitement et réalimentons le réseau après au moins une semaine.

Cela étant dit, quels plans et protocoles de préparation aux situations d'urgence la municipalité a-t-elle adoptés à cet égard? Je poserai la même question aux représentants de l'industrie.

Je commencerai par monsieur le maire.

M. Derek Corrigan:

De toute évidence, nous disposons de plans de préparation aux situations d'urgence afin de pouvoir réagir à toutes sortes d'urgence ou de catastrophes dans notre communauté, mais cela dépasserait la portée de tout ce que nous pourrions anticiper. Tout d'abord, la présence du parc de réservoirs, qui est situé sur le mont Burnaby, au-dessus de zones résidentielles et d'écoles, me fait bien souvent perdre le sommeil. Je m'inquiète de ce qu'il arriverait à nos citoyens et à l'université si un accident d'envergure survenait dans cette installation.

En ce qui concerne le bras de mer Burrard, aucune personne saine d'esprit ne construirait une installation de transport de pétrole dans sa partie la plus profonde, à travers deux pertuis, à l'heure actuelle. Le fait est que cette installation a été construite il y a 50 ou 60 ans, quand la situation était fort différente à cet endroit. Le port est maintenant très occupé et les pétroliers d'Aframax traverseront deux pertuis. S'il se produisait un accident dans cette zone très achalandée, un nettoyage s'avérerait impossible. Il faudrait un millier d'années avant de pouvoir nettoyer les dégâts. Les répercussions seraient catastrophiques sur la région de Vancouver, le tourisme et l'économie. L'ennui, c'est que même si l'industrie affirme que le risque est minimal, les conséquences d'un accident seraient si terribles que nous ne pourrions pas nous en remettre ou y faire face.

Il n'existe pas de plan. Le gouvernement a considérablement réduit les ressources de la Garde côtière et n'a pas de plan pour réagir à la situation. Il a délégué cette responsabilité à l'industrie.

M. Ben Isitt:

Comme à Burnaby, nous disposons de plans officiels de gestion des situations d'urgence. Ces plans sont de la responsabilité de notre chef des pompiers, qui relève du conseil. « Prepare Victoria » est un organisme du service d'incendie qui compte trois employés et une centaine de pompiers volontaires, lesquels interviennent en cas d'incendies et aident les résidants déplacés. Ils portent une grande attention au risque sismique, qui est élevé sur la côte Ouest du pays, comme dans la vallée de l'Outaouais. L'an dernier, la Western Canada Marine Response Corporation, la Garde côtière et Transports Canada, qui exploite le port de Victoria, ont mené un exercice.

M. Vance Badawey:

C'est excellent. Je vais maintenant me tourner vers l'industrie. Il ne me reste qu'une minute environ.

M. Chris Bloomer:

Il incombe aux expéditeurs et aux propriétaires de pipeline d'instaurer des plans de réaction aux situations d'urgence. Deux éléments entrent en ligne de compte. Les entreprises doivent disposer des ressources financières pour être préparées et pouvoir s'occuper des urgences potentielles ou anticipées. Les entreprises s'aident mutuellement. Ainsi, en cas d'incident, si le propriétaire du pipeline fait partie de l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie, les pipelines de transport...

(1625)

M. Vance Badawey:

Ces plans sont-ils applicables dans la région?

M. Chris Bloomer:

Oui.

M. Vance Badawey:

Compte tenu du peu de ressources disponibles...

M. Chris Bloomer:

L'industrie effectue des exercices de réaction aux situations d'urgence et dispose des ressources nécessaires. Le gouvernement a affecté des ressources supplémentaires. On s'occupera donc de la question.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Badawey.

Nous accordons maintenant la parole à Mme Block pour cinq minutes.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je voudrais remercier tous les témoins de comparaître aujourd'hui.

Je ne dispose pas d'autant de temps que mes collègues; j'irai donc droit au but. Puisque le projet de loi C-48 ne change en rien l'entente volontaire intervenue en 1985, comme il en a été question lors de notre dernière séance et comme les fonctionnaires l'ont confirmé, et étant donné que le gouvernement actuel a rejeté le projet de pipeline Northern Gateway, considérez-vous que nous ayons un besoin urgent de ce projet de loi?

Cette question s'adresse tant à Mme Brown qu'à M. Bloomer.

M. Chris Bloomer:

À mon avis, il faut revenir en arrière et effectuer davantage de consultations, recueillir plus de données scientifiques et évaluer plus en profondeur les répercussions réelles de cette mesure. Je pense qu'on ne s'entend pas sur le fait que les exploitants devraient ou non avoir accès à l'océan dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique pour produire des ressources. Il faut donc réaliser d'autres travaux à ce sujet.

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Je partage son avis. Il faut réunir plus de données scientifiques, déceler les lacunes et peut-être établir des mesures d'atténuation potentielles pour combler le besoin.

Il me semble que vous avez fait référence plus tôt à la zone d'exclusion. Je ferais remarquer que cette zone a été instaurée pour la production venant des installations de Valdez à destination des régions en dessous du 48e parallèle. Elle ne s'applique donc pas aux navires qui entrent au Canada ou qui en sortent.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Il s'agit d'une mesure distincte. Je sais d'expérience qu'il existe parfois une certaine confusion à cet égard.

Comme je l'ai souligné précédemment, une brève consultation a été menée, et je pense qu'à la lumière des répercussions que la mesure aurait sur la capacité des producteurs de gaz naturel et de pétrole d'atteindre l'océan, l'adoption du projet de loi aurait des conséquences économiques substantielles.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Je formulerai maintenant un commentaire et une question. Il est très clair, dans l'esprit de ceux d'entre nous qui représentent ici le caucus conservateur, que le moratoire ne vise pas la circulation de pétroliers, mais l'exploitation des sables bitumineux et un port. Il concerne précisément, comme vous l'avez fait remarquer, le chargement et le déchargement de pétroliers dans la région. Je me demande donc si vous pourriez nous indiquer comment les lois et les règlements canadiens qui régissent la question se comparent à ceux des autres pays?

M. Chris Bloomer:

Il existe des normes et des processus internationaux en ce qui concerne le mouvement maritime de chargements de pétrole et d'autres matières. Le Canada y adhère. Les coordonnateurs de l'expédition et les organes de réglementation internationaux gèrent ces règlements. Des milliers de navires entrent dans des ports et en sortent dans toutes les régions du monde, transportant des hydrocarbures et du pétrole par voie maritime sur toute la planète. Le Canada se conformera à ce cadre, et nous serons les meilleurs à cet égard, comme nous le faisons habituellement.

Mme Nancy Bérard-Brown:

Je ne pourrai peut-être pas fournir de détails. Ce que je crains, c'est que lorsqu'on élabore une politique ou une mesure ne s'appuyant pas sur des données scientifiques, on risque d'établir un précédent. Un danger guette également notre réputation. Le Canada adhère aux accords internationaux; nous savons donc que cette mesure n'est pas accueillie très favorablement, car les pays étrangers la considèrent comme une restriction de la circulation maritime au Canada.

Je ne pourrais vous donner de détails au sujet du chargement et du déchargement, la question ne relevant pas de ma sphère de compétences.

(1630)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Block.

Nous remercions nos témoins de l'aide qu'ils nous ont apportée aujourd'hui alors que nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-48.

Nous suspendrons la séance afin d'accueillir nos prochains témoins, dont certains comparaîtront par vidéoconférence.

(1630)

(1635)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons la séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des communautés.

Nous souhaitons la bienvenue à nos témoins. Nous recevons notamment Janet Drysdale, vice-présidente, Développement corporatif, au CN. Nous sommes ravis de vous revoir, Janet.

Nous entendrons également Ross Chow, directeur général d'InnoTech Alberta; Scott Wright, directeur, Préparation d'intervention, à la Western Canada Marine Response Corporation; Kate Moran, présidente d'Ocean Networks Canada; et Greg D'Avignon, président et chef de la direction du Business Council of British Columbia.

Bienvenue à tous. Nous nous excusons du retard de quelques minutes. Il a fallu établir la communication avec tous les témoins.

Madame Drysdale, nous commencerons par vous. Si vous pouviez faire un exposé de cinq minutes ou moins, nous vous en saurions gré.

Mme Janet Drysdale (vice-présidente, Développement corporatif et Développement durable , Compagnie des chemins de fer nationaux du Canada):

Bonjour.

Je m'appelle Janet Drysdale et je suis vice-présidente du Développement corporatif et du Développement durable au CN. Je fais cet exposé au nom du CN et d'InnoTech Alberta, notre partenaire de recherche qui est représenté aujourd'hui par son directeur général, Ross Chow, qui comparaît par vidéoconférence. Nous vous remercions de nous donner l'occasion de témoigner afin d'offrir notre point de vue dans le cadre de votre étude du projet de loi C-48.

Le CN est la seule compagnie ferroviaire qui dessert les ports de la côte Nord de la Colombie-Britannique. Le port de Prince Rupert constitue un maillon important du réseau du CN qui est en croissance rapide. Au cours des 10 dernières années, il est devenu une porte d'entrée pour les biens venus d'Asie qui affluent sur le marché nord-américain. Nous desservons aussi le port de Kitimat, également situé sur la côte Nord de la Colombie-Britannique.

Le CN assure actuellement le transport intermodal de produits comme le charbon, le grain, le granulé de bois et le bois d'oeuvre par l'entremise du port de Prince Rupert, et nous discutons activement avec des clients souhaitant expédier un éventail de produits d'exportation à partir de ce port. Nous exploitons également une barge ferroviaire, qui relie le port de Prince Rupert à l'Enclave de l'Alaska. À l'heure actuelle, le CN ne transporte pas de produits d'exportation sur la côte Nord de la Colombie-Britannique qui seraient assujettis aux dispositions du projet de loi C-48.

Depuis trois ans, le CN collabore avec InnoTech Alberta afin d'élaborer un processus pour solidifier le bitume. InnoTech, qui participe à l'effort de recherche et d'innovation de l'Alberta, est un expert et un chef de file de l'industrie dans les domaines de l'énergie et de l'environnement. Ensemble, le CN et InnoTech ont étudié diverses manières de solidifier un baril entier de bitume sans devoir faire appel au raffinage. À dire vrai, rien n'a fonctionné.

Cependant, lorsque nous nous sommes penchés sur les nombreuses méthodes mises à l'essai, nous nous sommes aperçus que si nous combinions plusieurs processus, nous pourrions concevoir le produit solide transportable recherché. Grâce à ces recherches, nous avons maintenant mis au point un processus de solidification du bitume, dont le brevet est en instance.

Dans le cadre de ce processus, on ajoute des polymères au bitume afin de former un coeur stable, puis de créer une enveloppe de polymère autour du mélange de bitume et de polymère, le tout formant quelque chose s'apparentant un peu à une rondelle de hockey. Fait important, on peut aisément séparer le bitume du polymère. Le processus n'altère en rien le bitume, et le polymère séparé peut être ensuite recyclé ou réutilisé dans le processus de solidification. Nous avons nommé le produit « CanaPux ».

L'intérêt principal pour le Comité, c'est que l'on n'a pas besoin de wagons-citernes ou de pétroliers océaniques pour acheminer le CanaPux jusqu'aux marchés finaux. Le CanaPux sera transporté comme n'importe quel autre produit sec en vrac, comme le charbon et la potasse, à bord de wagons-tombereaux et dans la cale de vraquiers. Aux ports, le CanaPux pourrait être transporté jusqu'aux bateaux à l'aide des infrastructures de chargement existantes.

Au chapitre de la sécurité et de l'économie, le transport du CanaPux ne requiert pas de diluant. Vous savez certainement que le diluant, précédemment appelé condensat, est un produit pétrolier léger et plus volatil utilisé pour diluer le bitume afin d'en faciliter l'écoulement dans les pipelines.

L'inclusion du polymère permet au CanaPux de flotter sur l'eau, contrairement au bitume pur, ce qui en facilite la récupération en cas de déversement en mer. J'ai un échantillon avec moi, si quelqu'un souhaite y jeter un coup d'oeil.

Jusqu'à présent, nous avons réussi à prouver la composition chimique et le concept du CanaPux. En outre, nous continuons de travailler avec InnoTech afin de confirmer scientifiquement les aspects environnementaux du produit, en ce qui concerne notamment son incidence dans l'environnement et le cycle de vie des gaz à effet de serre.

Bien entendu, nous devons également en prouver la viabilité commerciale. Autrement dit, nous devons montrer que nous pouvons produire de grandes quantités de CanaPux très rapidement. Il s'agit essentiellement d'une simple question de fabrication, et le CN est actuellement à la tête d'un projet pilote qui permettra d'y répondre. Ce projet nous permettra de faire la démonstration de la technologie aux raffineurs étrangers et aux producteurs intéressés. Il nous donnera également l'occasion de préciser les coûts réels et d'effectuer des travaux d'ingénierie évolutifs qui pourront être utilisés pour commercialiser la technologie.

Nous pensons que le projet pilote prouvera que le CanaPux offre un moyen sécuritaire et concurrentiel de transporter le bitume de l'Ouest canadien jusqu'aux marchés étrangers.

Nous avons informé des fonctionnaires de divers ministères des gouvernements du Canada, de l'Alberta et de la Colombie-Britannique avant d'amorcer le processus d'obtention de brevet.

Comme le CanaPux serait transporté dans des cargos plutôt que des pétroliers, nous pensons que ce transport serait autorisé au titre du projet de loi C-48. Voilà qui permettrait de transporter le bitume de façon sécuritaire tout en élargissant les perspectives commerciales des producteurs canadiens. Nous considérons que c'est approprié, compte tenu des propriétés environnementales du CanaPux.

La protection de l'environnement sur les côtes est extrêmement importante. Il faut donc concilier l'accès aux riches ressources naturelles du Canada, qui offrent des occasions économiques à l'ensemble de la population canadienne, avec cette protection.

(1640)



Le CN et Innotech sont très fiers d'avoir pris les devants en concevant le CanaPux. Nous considérons que les bénéfices de ce produit sur les plans de la sécurité et l'environnement auront des avantages substantiels pour les Canadiens.

Nous vous remercions de nous avoir donné l'occasion de faire un exposé.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Drysdale.

Vous avez dit que vous aviez apporté un échantillon à l'intention du Comité?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Oui.

La présidente:

Nous le ferons passer entre les membres du Comité.

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Il est dans un sac à fermeture à glissière, car il s'agit d'un produit pétrolier qui sent le pétrole, mais vous pouvez l'ouvrir. Nous voulions vous le montrer.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant Kate.

Mme Kathryn Moran (présidente et directrice générale, Ocean Networks Canada):

Oui.

La présidente:

Vous pouvez faire votre exposé. Quel magnifique panorama derrière vous.

Mme Kathryn Moran:

J'ai pensé vous faire voir l'océan, puisque nous en parlons.

Je représente aujourd'hui Ocean Networks Canada, dont je suis présidente et chef de la direction depuis cinq ans. Avant de venir à Victoria, j'ai travaillé pendant deux ans aux États-Unis à titre de directrice adjointe au bureau des politiques en matière de sciences et de technologie de la Maison-Blanche, où je relevais de John Holdren, conseiller scientifique auprès du président Obama. Au cours de cette affectation, j'ai été choisie pour faire partie de l'équipe de huit membres du secrétaire de l'Énergie, Steven Chu, qui a supervisé l'arrêt de la fuite de pétrole de la plateforme Deepwater Horizon.

À Ocean Networks Canada, je dirige une équipe exceptionnelle qui utilise les meilleurs systèmes d'observation des océans du monde. Ocean Networks Canada fait en sorte que l'océan soit connecté à Internet en observant et en surveillant principalement la côte Ouest, mais aussi des actifs sur la côte Est et dans l'Arctique. Les observatoires recueillent continuellement des données en temps réel aux fins de recherches scientifiques, mais ils jouent également un rôle important en aidant les communautés et les gestionnaires à prendre des décisions. Par exemple, ils peuvent vous aider à prendre des décisions éclairées comme celles que vous devez prendre aujourd'hui à propos du projet de loi C-48. Ces décisions sont vraiment importantes afin d'assurer la protection des océans aujourd'hui et dans l'avenir.

Vous savez fort bien que ce sont nos océans et nos côtes qui seraient les plus touchés en cas de déversement de pétrole. Les outils de nettoyage des côtes permettent de récupérer au mieux 10, parfois 15 % du pétrole, ce qui est bien peu, on en conviendra tous. Ces faits appuient à eux seuls l'intention du projet de loi C-48.

Il y a sept ans, l'explosion survenue sur la plateforme Deepwater Horizon de BP a marqué le début, dans le golfe du Mexique, de ce qui serait le deuxième déversement de pétrole en importance dans le monde. Nous avons tous regardé le pétrole jaillir de la valve sur les chaînes de diffusion de nouvelles en continu. Je regardais la situation alors que nous tentions d'arrêter le déversement. Le pétrole s'est écoulé pendant des mois, suscitant des sentiments d'aversion et de honte. Après des mois de travail, la fuite a été colmatée, mais pas avant que près de cinq millions de gallons de pétrole se soient échappés. La situation est totalement différente de celle dont il est question ici, puisque nous parlons de pétroliers, mais je ferai appel à votre patience alors que j'évoque d'autres accidents.

Plus de 20 ans auparavant, l'Exxon Valdez a laissé fuir 42 millions de litres de pétrole brut au large de l'Alaska, provoquant ainsi ce qui est encore à ce jour un des déversements les plus catastrophiques du monde, compte tenu de l'éloignement de l'endroit, du type de pétrole et des répercussions néfastes du déversement sur la riche biodiversité de la région. Les eaux de la Colombie-Britannique ressemblent en grande partie à celles où le déversement de l'Exxon Valdez s'est produit en Alaska. Ces dernières se situent en zones éloignées, leur température basse ralentit la dispersion du pétrole brut et elles se répartissent en une myriade de petits bras de mer et de canaux caractérisés par des marées de grande envergure et des courants puissants. Elles ressemblent aux eaux de la Colombie-Britannique, lesquelles accueillent des oiseaux marins, des saumons et d'autres espèces de poissons que l'on peut pêcher, des loutres de mer, des phoques et des baleines migrantes qui y ont élu résidence, notamment des baleines grises et des baleines à bosse en nombre croissant. On y trouve également des orques et des épaulards nomades.

Je m'arrêterai un instant pour souligner qu'en réaction à l'incident de l'Exxon Valdez, l'industrie des pétroliers a fait des pieds et des mains pour réduire le nombre d'accidents provoquant des déversements de pétrole, comme d'autres témoins vous l'ont certainement expliqué. Elle a tiré de nombreuses leçons de cet accident, ce qui lui a permis de réduire le risque quand des pétroliers s'aventurent dans ce genre d'eaux.

Permettez-moi de parler d'un accident plus récent, celui du remorqueur Nathan. E. Stewart, qui a coulé au large de la côte rocheuse de la Colombie-Britannique. Même si la citerne qu'il remorquait était vide, le remorqueur transportait lui-même 220 000 litres de diesel et des milliers de litres de lubrifiant à base de pétrole. Cet accident a eu sur la côte virginale et la nation Heiltsuk des répercussions néfastes que l'on cherche encore à évaluer. Nous ignorons tous les effets que cet accident a eus, mais chose certaine, la nation autochtone affirme avoir subi des torts considérables.

Comment de tels accidents ont-ils pu se produire? Quand je travaillais relativement à l'accident de BP, j'ai été stupéfiée d'entendre l'industrie pétrolière nous affirmer alors, comme elle le fait aujourd'hui, que ses progrès technologiques lui permettent d'exploiter et de transporter le pétrole et le gaz de manière sécuritaire, même dans les environnements les plus difficiles. La simple vérité, c'est que chacune de ces catastrophes est le résultat d'une combinaison d'erreur humaine et de lacunes au chapitre de la réglementation et de la supervision, laquelle doit reposer sur une solide surveillance.

Je considère que le projet de loi C-48 commence à corriger les lacunes de la réglementation, ce qui constitue un bon pas en avant. Il appuie, peut-être pour la première fois, le recours par le Canada du principe de précaution en vertu du protocole adopté à Londres en 1996 au titre de la Convention sur la prévention de la pollution des mers résultat de l'immersion de déchets.

Ocean Networks Canada a récemment effectué...

(1645)

La présidente:

Madame Moran, je suis désolée de vous interrompre. Pourriez-vous terminer votre exposé, puis nous communiquer le reste de votre contenu lorsque vous répondrez aux questions?

Mme Kathryn Moran:

Je suis désolée; j'ai dépassé le temps qui m'était alloué.

La présidente:

Peut-être pourrez-vous ajouter tout ce que vous vouliez nous dire. Je suis certaine que le Comité vous posera beaucoup de questions.

Mme Kathryn Moran:

D'accord.

La présidente:

Vous pourrez nous dire tout ce dont vous n'avez pu parler quand le Comité vous interrogera.

Mme Kathryn Moran:

Ce que je voulais surtout faire remarquer, c'est que le projet de loi C-48 ne change en rien en ce qui concerne la circulation des pétroliers le long de la côte. Cela n'a pas de répercussion sur les petites communautés au chapitre de l'approvisionnement en pétrole, mais un nombre substantiel de transporteurs et de cargos sillonnent les parages. Ce sont eux qui représentent le plus grand risque.

(1650)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Moran.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Wright, directeur de la préparation d'intervention. Tentez de parler cinq minutes ou moins, je vous prie.

M. Scott Wright (directeur, Préparation d'intervention, Western Canada Marine Response Corporation):

Je témoigne aujourd'hui pour traiter de la réaction aux déversements en mer au Canada.

Nous ne sommes ni pour ni contre le moratoire relatif aux pétroliers. En vertu de la Loi sur la marine marchande du Canada, notre mandat consiste à préparer l'intervention en cas de déversement sur la côte Ouest du pays, peu importe où il survient. Même si nous ne nous prononçons ni en faveur ni en défaveur du projet de loi, la réaction aux déversements et notre capacité à intervenir en cas de déversement ont joué un rôle crucial dans le débat sur l'exportation d'énergie, l'accès au marché et le volume des expéditions.

En 1976, la WCMRC a vu le jour à titre de coopérative sous le nom de Burrard Clean Operations. À l'époque, elle était chargée d'intervenir en cas de déversement dans le port de Vancouver. À la suite de l'incident de l'Exxon Valdez, en 1989, le gouvernement fédéral a mis sur pied un groupe de travail public relativement à la sécurité des pétroliers et à la capacité d'intervention en cas de déversement en mer.

Le premier rapport du groupe contenait 107 recommandations, lesquelles ont inspiré les modifications apportées à la Loi sur la marine marchande du Canada en 1995. Ces modifications ont instauré un régime d'intervention en cas de déversement financé par l'industrie et réglementé par le gouvernement pour toutes les eaux côtières du pays. La WCMRC est ainsi devenue la seule organisation d'intervention spécialisée sur la côte Ouest.

Nos activités de préparations sont financées par les droits de membre versés par les compagnies de transport maritime et les installations de transport de pétrole en activité sur la côte Ouest. Les navires de plus de 400 tonnes doivent verser des droits annuels, alors que les droits des entreprises transportant du pétrole à des fins commerciales sont établis en fonction des volumes. S'il se produit un déversement, la Loi exige que le pollueur paie le nettoyage. S'il est incapable de le faire, des fonds canadiens et internationaux peuvent couvrir les coûts du nettoyage et des réclamations relatifs au déversement. Ces fonds sont composés de sommes perçues auprès de l'industrie.

Le gouvernement fédéral établit les normes, et l'industrie paie pour l'organisation d'intervention, dont le rôle consiste à respecter et à dépasser les normes. Le gouvernement du Canada exige que l'industrie paie pour que les contribuables canadiens n'aient pas à le faire. Selon l'esprit du régime, ces derniers n'ont pas à assumer le coût des interventions. À ceux qui s'inquiètent que la présence de l'industrie ait une incidence quelconque sur notre capacité d'intervenir, je dis que le gouvernement fédéral établit des normes et assure la surveillance du régime et de l'intervention. C'est un excellent modèle, et le gouvernement fédéral est en train d'améliorer le régime.

La Loi sur la marine marchande du Canada exige que nous récupérions jusqu'à 10 000 tonnes de pétrole dans l'eau en l'espace de 10 jours. Elle prévoit en outre des temps d'intervention modulés. Par exemple, dans le port de Vancouver, la WCMRC doit être sur place dans un délai de six heures. Pour l'instant, ce port est la seule installation désignée sur la côte Ouest. La WCMRC surpasse ces normes de planification à tous les égards, son temps de réaction moyen étant de 60 minutes dans la vallée du bas Fraser au cours des 10 dernières années.

La WCMRC possède des bureaux et des entrepôts à Burnaby, Duncan et Prince-Rupert, et plus d'une dizaine de caches de matériel réparties stratégiquement le long de la côte de la Colombie-Britannique. Nous disposons d'une flotte de 42 bateaux et d'un rayon d'action de plus de 36 kilomètres. Notre capacité d'écumage est de 550 tonnes, soit 20 fois la quantité exigée par la Loi. La WCMRC est intervenue avec succès à la suite de déversements de pétrole léger et lourd. Nous disposons d'un éventail d'écumoires qui peuvent récupérer tous les genres de pétrole transportés sur la côte. Nous formons également des centaines d'entrepreneurs chaque année.

En cas de déversement, le pollueur communique avec notre organisation pour qu'elle nettoie les dégâts en son nom. L'ensemble de l'intervention est géré par un éventail de partenaires fédéraux, provinciaux et municipaux, notamment les Premières Nations, les autorités sanitaires, le ministère des Pêches et des Océans, Environnement Canada, le ministère de l'Environnement de la Colombie-Britannique et d'autres intervenants. La Garde côtière canadienne surveille l'intervention et prend les choses en main si le pollueur est inconnu, est incapable d'intervenir ou refuse de le faire.

Transports Canada et la Garde côtière canadienne dirigent quatre projets pilotes afin d'élaborer des plans d'interventions régionaux fondés sur une évaluation du risque.

(1655)



Environnement Canada, Pêches et Océans et le ministère de l'Environnement de la Colombie-Britannique participent au projet pilote en Colombie-Britannique sur les couloirs de navigation du Sud.

L'élaboration de...

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Wright, mais je dois vous interrompre. Vous aurez l'occasion de compléter en répondant aux questions des membres.

Nous accueillons maintenant Greg D'Avignon, président et chef de la direction, Business Council of British Columbia.

Monsieur D'Avignon, vous avez la parole.

M. Greg D'Avignon (président et chef de la direction, Business Council of British Columbia):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier le Comité de m'avoir invité à comparaître.

Mon nom est Greg D'Avignon. Je suis le président et chef de la direction du Business Council of British Columbia. Notre organisation, qui entame sa 51e année, compte 260 entreprises ayant des biens et menant des activités dans la province, y compris des entreprises de premier plan dans tous les secteurs de l'économie, dont des établissements d'études postsecondaires.

Mon intervention d'aujourd'hui portera principalement sur deux domaines clés. D'abord, la demande d'énergie et l'innovation à l'échelle mondiale et domestique et le rôle que peut jouer le Canada pour satisfaire ses obligations du point de vue de la protection environnementale et marine. Je parlerai également de l'occasion qui s'offre à nous, et dont nous devrions profiter, d'exporter les produits canadiens au profit de l'économie et des citoyens du Canada et de la Colombie-Britannique.

Nous avons déjà exprimé ces objectifs dans un mémoire présenté en septembre 2016, mais ils valent la peine d'être répétés aujourd'hui. Comme vous le savez, dans son dernier rapport, l'Agence internationale de l'énergie nous apprend que la demande mondiale en hydrocarbures continue de grimper et que, selon les prévisions, elle devrait augmenter d'un tiers jusqu'en 2040. Il faudra un mélange mondial de produits énergétiques afin de satisfaire à cette demande, y compris l'énergie renouvelable, mais, pour les prochaines décennies, cette demande sera assouvie principalement par des sources d'énergie axées sur les combustibles fossiles.

Selon nous, le Canada peut choisir d'ignorer cette demande et les réalités du marché et se priver de certains avantages, y compris des investissements, des impôts, des emplois et des innovations qui découlent de notre secteur de l'énergie, secteur qui représente 10 % de notre PIB et, plus récemment, jusqu'à 25 % des investissements en capitaux dans l'ensemble du pays, ou de jouer un rôle en offrant des produits pétroliers et de gaz naturel ayant moins d'impact sur les gaz à effet de serre créés grâce à notre approche de base et à nos innovations, comme l'a souligné le témoin précédent, et inciter un changement mondial grâce à l'impact canadien.

Il s'agit d'une proposition unique, surtout pour la Colombie-Britannique qui dispose de cette capacité et qui intègre déjà l'électrification dans la production pétrolière et du gaz naturel en amont et en aval. Ces efforts réduisent de moitié l'intensité carbonique d'un baril de pétrole, comparativement à la moyenne américaine. Fait ironique, le Canada importe plus de 400 000 barils de pétrole américains, alors que ses propres produits demeurent enclavés sur son territoire.

Les normes environnementales élevées du Canada jouent un rôle à ce chapitre et le projet de loi C-48 aide à renforcer ces normes. Toutefois, nous entretenons certaines inquiétudes quant à notre capacité en tant que quatrième producteur pétrolier en importance au monde, et étant donné nos innovations en matière d'électrification sur le marché, à profiter des occasions qui se présentent à nous. La persistance des lois et des programmes empêche l'innovation entourant le produit CanaPux, comme on l'a souligné plus tôt, et fait obstacle aux opportunités qui découleront de notre production de gaz naturel, y compris la production de pétrole léger de réservoirs étanches, de condensat et de méthane.

Ce qui inquiète le conseil, c'est que le discours public ne tient pas compte de tous les peuples autochtones. Bien que bon nombre de communautés autochtones ont le droit de s'opposer à la capacité d'expédier des produits à partir de leurs territoires traditionnels, notamment le bitume dilué, de nombreux témoins ayant comparu devant le Comité ont souligné qu'ils aimeraient profiter de ces occasions en utilisant des moyens durables et qui respecteraient l'environnement et les traditions. Cela inclut la chaîne d'approvisionnement qui traverse la Colombie-Britannique, l'Alberta et la Saskatchewan.

Ironiquement, l'industrie pétrolière et le secteur de l'énergie canadiens sont parmi les plus importants employeurs d'Autochtones, favorisant ainsi l'autodétermination et l'indépendance financière de ces communautés ainsi que la création d'emplois.

Le Canada a l'occasion de profiter de ces marchés, de bâtir sur ces innovations, de réduire l'intensité carbonique de ses produits et, surtout, de créer des possibilités économiques et culturelles pour tous les Canadiens grâce à l'abondance énergétique qui existe sur son territoire.

En terminant, j'aimerais formuler quelques suggestions. Bien que le conseil n'appuie pas le projet de loi C-48, il comprend l'intérêt du gouvernement pour cette mesure législative. Par conséquent, nous souhaitons formuler les suggestions suivantes. Premièrement, malgré nos opinions sur les conséquences négatives et involontaires potentielles de cette mesure législative, nous devons reconnaître qu'elle permet l'exportation de produits moins inquiétants et moins persistants que le bitume dilué à partir de nos ports en eau profonde du Nord. Les discussions concernant ce projet de loi ont d'abord porté sur le bitume dilué et, malheureusement, elles ont été élargies pour inclure une grande variété de produits et de possibilités non prévues à l'origine.

Deuxièmement, dans les 12 mois suivant l'adoption de cette mesure législative et une fois qu'elle aura reçu la sanction royale, des examens devraient être effectués sur la persistance des produits afin d'accroître la précision des définitions, surtout étant donné l'étude menée par l'Association canadienne des pipelines d'énergie sur le sujet, étude qui devrait se terminer en 2018.

(1700)



Troisièmement, les développements technologiques et autres capacités d'intervention devraient faire l'objet d'un examen dans les 24 mois suivant la sanction royale, notamment en ce qui a trait au plan de protection des océans et à certaines innovations dont nous avons entendu parler plus tôt, comme le produit CanaPux, afin de voir si la mesure législative demeure pertinente.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur D'Avignon. Pourriez-vous nous formuler votre dernière suggestion en répondant à l'une des questions des membres?

M. Greg D'Avignon:

Certainement.

La présidente:

Monsieur Chong, vous avez la parole.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais partager mon temps d'intervention avec Mme Block. Je n'ai pas de question à poser aux témoins, seulement un commentaire à formuler.

Mon commentaire porte sur la dimension internationale du projet de loi. Je ne crois pas que les témoins aient abordé le sujet, donc je voulais le faire afin qu'il figure au compte rendu. Le projet de loi C-48 porte sur les eaux limitrophes que nous disputons aux États-Unis, celles entourant la péninsule de l'Alaska et l'entrée Dixon, ainsi que les questions relatives aux droits de passage inoffensifs et à la liberté de navigation, notamment.

Les États-Unis ne sont pas signataires de l'UNCLOS, la Convention des Nations unies sur le droit de la mer. Toutefois, grâce à leur marine, les États-Unis assurent une surveillance maritime mondiale. Le pays a toujours été très clair dans son intention de protéger ses droits. Depuis les années 1890, le Canada revendique ces eaux, tant l'entrée Dixon que le détroit d'Hecate, stipulant qu'elles font partie de son territoire. J'appuie cette position, mais les États-Unis ne reconnaissent pas la souveraineté du Canada dans ces eaux.

Si j'ai bien compris, la priorité actuelle du gouvernement du Canada en matière de politique étrangère est de protéger l'ALENA. À mon avis, le gouvernement du Canada devrait adopter une approche pangouvernementale afin de s'assurer que toutes ses ressources sont utilisées pour protéger l'ALENA, un accord vital pour environ le cinquième de l'économie canadienne qui dépend de nos exportations vers les États-Unis. Une des choses qui m'inquiètent, c'est que cette mesure législative risque de provoquer l'administration Trump, alors que nous tentons d'attirer son attention sur les emplois et les intérêts canadiens liés à l'ALENA et d'obtenir son soutien à cet égard. Dans ce contexte, je crois qu'il est important pour nous, députés, d'exprimer officiellement cette inquiétude.

À mon avis, le moment est mal choisi. Je ne crois pas que ce projet de loi cadre avec ce qui devrait être, à mon avis, une stratégie pangouvernementale qui concentre tous les aspects, tous les ministères, tous les ministres et tous les éléments du gouvernement du Canada sur un seul sujet, soit la protection de nos intérêts liés à l'ALENA et faire en sorte que l'administration Trump adopte notre point de vue.

La présidente:

Merci.

Je tente de limiter les interventions à cinq minutes afin que nous puissions poser le plus de questions possible aux témoins. Il vous reste deux minutes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Madame Drysdale, cette nouvelle technologie, ce nouveau produit, m'intéresse beaucoup. Des médias ont rapporté que le CN était en discussion avec Transports Canada pour obtenir une exemption au moratoire sur les pétroliers pour le produit CanaPux.

Où en sont ces discussions et quelle validation de principe Transports Canada a-t-il exigée?

(1705)

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Nous n'avons demandé aucune exemption. Selon notre compréhension de la mesure législative proposée, ce produit ne serait pas touché par cette mesure législative.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord, merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie, vous avez la parole pour cinq minutes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai demandé à ce que le CN vienne témoigner, car le programme CanaPux me paraissait fascinant et je voulais donner l'occasion à M. Chow de nous en parler. Bien entendu, la viabilité commerciale du produit sera essentielle. Quels échéanciers avez-vous fixés pour vous rendre à un point où la conversation d'aujourd'hui sera sans objet?

M. Ross Chow (directeur général, InnoTech Alberta):

Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec nos partenaires du CN. En ce qui a trait au développement technologique, le développement de cette technologie progresse très rapidement. Nous serons prêts, l'an prochain, à lancer un projet pilote. Par la suite, nous passerons à l'étape de la démonstration. Donc, je dirais environ deux ans pour développer la technologie avant d'en tester l'application commerciale.

M. Ken Hardie:

Y a-t-il d'autres technologies? Êtes-vous au courant d'autres technologies à l'étude?

M. Ross Chow:

Dans la cadre de la première partie de l'étude que nous avons effectuée en collaboration avec le CN, nous avons examiné toutes les technologies actuelles de solidification du bitume et aucune ne satisfaisait aux exigences relatives au transport de matières solides. Une grande partie de cela est attribuable à la grande résistance nécessaire pour la manutention dans les cargos et le chargement dans les wagons-citernes.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'aimerais « soulever le voile écologique », si je puis m'exprimer ainsi.

Monsieur D'Avignon, vous avez parlé de réduire l'intensité carbonique des produits sur lesquels nous avons un certain contrôle. Toutefois, si nous expédions ces produits à l'étranger, qu'il s'agisse du produit CanaPux ou du bitume dilué, notamment, ils seront transformés et utilisés ailleurs dans le monde où nous n'avons pas nécessairement un contrôle sur les normes en place et les émissions.

Ne devrions-nous pas assumer une plus grande responsabilité mondiale quant à l'utilisation de nos produits?

M. Greg D'Avignon:

Monsieur Hardie, c'est une très bonne question.

Je crois que dans les cinq minutes que nous avons pour cette intervention, nous aurions tendance à survoler certaines des complexités associées à votre question. Comme vous le savez peut-être, en Colombie-Britannique, et certainement en Alberta, grâce à la grande quantité d'électricité produite par B.C. Hydro à l'aide d'une ressource renouvelable, nous travaillons à l'électrification du processus d'extraction en amont du gaz naturel et du pétrole léger de réservoirs étanches. En ce qui a trait au gaz naturel liquéfié, dont il n'est pas question dans ce projet de loi, nous travaillons également à la possible électrification du transport en aval du produit.

L'électrification du processus d'extraction domestique signifie que l'intensité carbonique de nos produits est de moitié moins élevée que la moyenne du baril américain. Le Canada contribue déjà 50 % moins de carbone à la chaîne d'approvisionnement mondiale.

Je ne peux pas me prononcer sur les coûts de raffinage à l'étranger. Toutefois, en Colombie-Britannique et dans les régions où le Canada a soutenu l'industrie du GNL en approuvant des évaluations environnementales et le sous-tirage, cette technologie nous permettrait de produire jusqu'à un million de barils de pétrole léger de réservoirs étanches et de condensat par année, des produits qui demandent très peu de raffinage et pour lesquels il n'existe aucun marché au large de la côte Nord.

De plus, malgré les mesures de protection que nous intégrons au plan de protection des océans et nos investissements en infrastructure, dont à Prince Rupert, sur la côte Nord, les produits seront de un à trois jours de transport plus près des marchés où la demande est plus élevée. Au sein de la chaîne d'approvisionnement, cette amélioration permettrait également de réduire les gaz à effet de serre associés au transport, les coûts et les conséquences sur l'environnement.

J'ai pleinement confiance en la sécurité des navires-citernes, mais, sur le territoire terrestre du Canada, nous disposons déjà de la technologie nécessaire pour nous permettre de réduire notre empreinte carbonique et d'avoir un impact plus important sur la réduction des gaz à effet de serre à l'échelle mondiale, sans compter ce que nous pourrons accomplir avec la technologie de demain.

(1710)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Cullen, vous avez la parole.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci aux témoins d'avoir accepté notre invitation.

Je vais d'abord m'adresser à M. Wright.

À mes yeux, vous êtes toujours Burrard Clean, mais, si je ne m'abuse, c'est Western Canada Marine Response Corporation qui a nettoyé le déversement du Nathan E. Stewart. C'est exact?

M. Scott Wright:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Sur une échelle de un à dix, quel était le niveau de difficulté de ce nettoyage? Comparativement à d'autres déversements survenus ailleurs dans le monde, celui-ci n'était pas particulièrement important. Est-ce juste de dire cela?

M. Scott Wright:

Le Nathan E. Stewart a déversé un produit raffiné dans une zone côtière, une zone littorale. Dans le cadre de cette intervention, nous n'avons constaté aucun pétrole recouvrable provenant du navire. Nous avons adopté des stratégies visant à protéger certaines zones sensibles autour du site. Donc, c'est essentiellement ce que nous avons fait dans le cadre de cette intervention.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En termes d'importance, comparativement à d'autres déversements survenus ailleurs dans le monde — je sais que votre compagnie mène des activités un peu partout dans le monde —, s'agissait-il d'un déversement majeur, moyen ou mineur?

M. Scott Wright:

Comme je l'ai souligné, il y avait une quantité importante à risque. Le pétrole déversé ne pouvait être récupéré. Il s'agissait d'une intervention importante.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'ai posé la question suivante au gouvernement et à d'autres témoins. Alors que nous nous penchons sur cette interdiction relative aux pétroliers et sur la façon de gérer le risque par rapport aux avantages pour le gouvernement — et, en guise de parenthèse, monsieur Chong, j'ignore ce qui provoque M. Trump d'un jour à l'autre, et je crois que personne ne le sait, même pas M. Trump lui-même —, le lien avec l'ALENA, quoique poussé, est intéressant.

Ma question concerne ce projet de loi et votre entreprise, puisque vous êtes des spécialistes dans le domaine. Nous tentons de découvrir, en interrogeant l'industrie et le gouvernement, la nature réelle du produit dont il est question lorsque celui-ci se retrouve dans l'eau, qu'il s'agisse d'eau salée ou d'eau potable, car, bien entendu, les deux types d'eau doivent être examinés dans le cadre d'un projet comme Kinder Morgan ou le Northern Gateway.

Auriez-vous des données scientifiques à nous fournir sur ce qui se produit lorsque le bitume dilué entre dans l'eau?

M. Scott Wright:

Nous avons de l'expérience avec un produit très similaire au bitume dilué, soit le pétrole brut albien synthétique; nous sommes intervenus lors d'un déversement de ce produit en 2007. Dans le cadre de cette intervention, nous avons observé pendant plusieurs jours le comportement de ce produit sur l'eau. Il se comportait exactement comme les pétroles bruts conventionnels et le mazout que l'on retrouve souvent dans les zones marines et autour de celles-ci. Il n'a présenté aucun défi particulier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pardonnez-moi, mais vous dites qu'il s'agissait d'un pétrole brut albien synthétique. Est-ce un des condensats ou un mélange de pétrole? Ce produit ne m'est pas familier.

M. Scott Wright:

C'est exact. C'est un produit qui ressemble beaucoup au bitume dilué.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Outre cette expérience, quelle autre recherche empirique votre entreprise a-t-elle effectuée pour comprendre l'impact des conditions météorologiques? Je sais que les conditions varient d'un déversement à l'autre en raison des vagues et de l'exposition aux intempéries, tous des facteurs avec lesquels nous devons composer sur la côte Nord.

M. Scott Wright:

Absolument. Nous avons participé à des études menées par Ressources naturelles Canada sur le comportement des produits et leur exposition aux intempéries et sur l'impact de ces facteurs sur notre capacité à recouvrir le produit. Nous souhaitons comprendre le produit lui-même et la façon dont il se comporte dans l'eau. Nous avons participé à plusieurs études menées par l'industrie et le gouvernement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'ai déjà travaillé avec votre entreprise dans son ancienne mouture et dans sa nouvelle. On m'a révélé plusieurs chiffres sur ce qui constitue une intervention réussie à la suite d'un déversement en ce qui a trait au pétrole récupérable. Bien entendu, il y a eu le déversement extrême du Exxon Valdez où une très petite quantité, moins de 10 % du produit, a été récupérée. Que considère-t-on, en 2017, comme étant un standard de référence, un standard moyen ou un mauvais standard en ce qui a trait au taux de récupération de pétrole à la suite d'un déversement?

M. Scott Wright:

C'est difficile de répondre à cette question, mais il y a certainement beaucoup de données qui suggèrent que la récupération mécanique n'est pas toujours très efficace. Dans certains cas, on a réussi à récupérer une grande partie du produit, mais dans d'autres, on n'arrive pas à en récupérer un grand pourcentage. Nous nous centrons sur les points faibles de même que sur les mesures de protection et les façons de contenir et de récupérer le pétrole. Voilà nos stratégies.

(1715)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Sikand. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. D'Avignon.

Vous avez dit que la dépendance aux hydrocarbures allait augmenter d'un tiers. Est-ce exact?

M. Greg D'Avignon:

C'est exact. Dans son plus récent rapport, l'Agence internationale de l'énergie montre que la consommation d'hydrocarbures continuera de représenter une partie importante de la demande mondiale d'énergie, surtout en raison de l'émergence de la classe moyenne en Asie du Sud, en Asie centrale et dans toute l'Asie.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Quelle est la base? Le chiffre de départ?

M. Greg D'Avignon:

Je n'ai pas ces renseignements avec moi, mais je serai heureux de vous transmettre le plus récent rapport de l'Agence internationale de l'énergie.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Pourriez-vous faire cela?

Savez-vous dans quelle mesure nous contribuons à la demande mondiale?

M. Greg D'Avignon:

À l'échelle mondiale, les États-Unis sont les seuls clients à acheter les combustibles fossiles canadiens. Ils sont un exportateur net de pétrole et exportent plus de 430 000 barils par jour au Canada. Nous sommes le quatrième plus important fournisseur de pétrole au monde, mais nous n'avons qu'un seul client.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Vous avez aussi parlé d'investissements de capitaux. Je n'ai pas saisi votre point à cet égard. Avez-vous dit qu'il y avait des investissements de capitaux étrangers?

M. Greg D'Avignon:

Si l'on voulait quantifier le total des investissements de capitaux au Canada par le secteur privé pour une année donnée... En 2015, 25 % des investissements de capitaux au Canada provenaient du secteur de l'énergie. Les investissements ont diminué depuis en raison de la réduction du prix du pétrole. C'est environ 19 % aujourd'hui, mais on a déjà atteint les 25 %. À l'heure actuelle, le secteur de l'énergie privé représente un peu plus de 10 % du PIB national et ce pourcentage est plus ou moins élevé dans les provinces selon le panier de produits énergétiques de chacune.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à Mme Drysdale.

En ce qui a trait à vos briques CanaPux — c'est un très bon nom, en passant —, je sais que le ministre a dit qu'il fallait effectuer des essais avant de les considérer à titre de produit sec et que la technologie était prometteuse, mais je crois qu'il s'agit là d'un seul volet. Il faut aussi qu'il y ait des producteurs qui les produisent et des raffineries capables de les raffiner. Avez-vous entrepris des démarches à cet égard? Avez-vous entamé le dialogue avec ces intervenants?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Nous sommes en pourparlers avec plusieurs producteurs canadiens, qui sont tous visés par des ententes de non-divulgation. Nous avons aussi entamé la discussion avec les intervenants qui pourraient raffiner le produit à l'autre bout de la chaîne. À l'heure actuelle, je dirais que l'intérêt commercial à l'égard du produit et de son développement est grand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Tant mieux.

Madame Moran, je sais qu'on vous a interrompue. Si vous aviez des commentaires à ajouter, je vous invite à le faire. J'aurai aussi une question à vous poser.

Mme Kathryn Moran:

Je crois que le plus important, c'est de surveiller le transport sur la côte Nord. Le risque le plus important vient des autres types de navires qui ne sont pas tenus de respecter la zone d'exclusion volontaire que les pétroliers doivent respecter. Au cours des six derniers mois, nous avons démontré que les pétroliers respectaient presque à la lettre la loi en ce qui a trait à l'exclusion volontaire, mais qu'en fait, les autres navires présentaient un niveau de risque plus élevé. Par conséquent, à titre d'observatoire de premier plan dans le monde, nous croyons qu'il faut surveiller le transport de beaucoup plus près et aussi émettre des alertes pour éviter les accidents. Nous avons parlé d'intervention, mais la meilleure chose à faire, c'est d'éviter les accidents. Nous demandons la mise en place d'un système de surveillance robuste pour prévenir tous les accidents, surtout pour les navires qui se déplacent très près de la côte, qui ont une grande prise au vent et qui peuvent facilement se rendre sur le littoral s'ils perdent de la puissance.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Badawey, vous avez la parole.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Tout d'abord, je tiens à clarifier certains commentaires de M. Chong au sujet du projet de loi C-48 et des frontières maritimes contestées. Pour être clair, le projet de loi C-48 ne traite pas des frontières maritimes contestées. Il s'agit d'un moratoire terrestre. Je crois qu'on a établi cela clairement lors de la dernière réunion.

Je veux féliciter le CN d'avoir adopté une approche prospective, d'être allé au-delà du moratoire et de sa possible mise en oeuvre et d'avoir pensé à de nouveaux produits et à de nouvelles approches.

(1720)

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Merci.

M. Vance Badawey:

Cela étant dit, je veux vous donner du temps, madame Drysdale. Vous vous consacrez à l'expansion de votre société; je comprends cela. Je sais que vous voulez communiquer votre plan d'affaires, votre tentative d'adopter une approche positive à l'égard du transport de ce produit.

Mme Janet Drysdale:

La prochaine étape, c'est le lancement de notre projet pilote. Nous avons cherché une société d'ingénierie, d'approvisionnement et de construction sur le marché pour nous aider dans notre démarche. Nous progressons rapidement et nous choisirons bientôt notre fournisseur. Comme l'a fait valoir Ross, nous pensons lancer le projet pilote au cours de l'année prochaine. Notre objectif est de créer une installation de démonstration, si l'on veut, dans l'un de nos centres de distribution d'Edmonton. Je compare cela à un condo modèle pour un projet de construction de condominiums, qui permettrait aux gens de voir le produit être solidifié puis reliquéfié.

Nos discussions avec les producteurs intéressés progressent. Je dirais que ce produit intéresse surtout ceux qui ne sont pas reliés aux pipelines et qui ne le seront probablement jamais.

En ce qui a trait au marché final, selon notre première analyse, l'Asie semble être le marché le plus important, non seulement pour le bitume, mais aussi pour le polymère, une fois séparé. L'Asie compte certainement des marchés finaux pour ce polymère, s'il n'est pas utilisé dans un circuit fermé.

Je tiens toutefois à vous rappeler que nous en sommes aux premières étapes de notre projet. Nous procédons à la recherche et au développement, mais jusqu'à maintenant, toutes les étapes franchies étaient encourageantes.

M. Vance Badawey:

À ce sujet — et en ce qui a trait aux résultats de la R-D, qui s'accentuera au fil du temps —, est-ce que vous travaillez en collaboration avec le conseil commercial? Est-ce qu'il reconnaît votre orientation opérationnelle stratégique? Est-ce qu'on tient une discussion sur l'harmonisation au sein de l'industrie, en utilisant les ressources à titre de facilitateur?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Nous n'avons pas entamé la discussion avec les conseils commerciaux. Nous nous centrons sur la R-D. Ross peut vous parler des partenaires de notre étude sur le devenir dans l'environnement et de notre étude sur le cycle de vie des gaz à effet de serre. Sur le plan commercial, nous avons surtout parlé avec les producteurs intéressés pour le moment. Nous leur avons fait part de certaines de nos hypothèses économiques. Ils ont établi leurs propres modèles. Ils ont étudié l'analyse. Ce sont là les discussions les plus prometteuses sur le plan du développement des activités.

M. Vance Badawey:

J'encourage le CN et le conseil commercial à discuter avec le gouvernement fédéral et la BDC ou EDC sur la façon de mener à bien ces projets. Ce pourrait être un tout nouveau marché pour nous tous.

Bravo. Vous faites du bon travail.

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Lobb, vous avez la parole.

M. Ben Lobb:

Merci beaucoup.

Simplement par curiosité, je n'ai pas les chiffres devant moi, mais en ce qui a trait à la capacité prévue du CN pour les voies ferrées de Prince Rupert et de Kitimat, quel serait l'équivalent en nombre de barils par jour?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Je ne connais pas le chiffre par coeur, mais en ce qui a trait aux contraintes relatives à la capacité, le réseau qui se rend à Prince Rupert, par exemple, est d'une très grande qualité. Nous avons la capacité requise. Si nous y consacrons le temps nécessaire, nous pourrons accroître la capacité de notre réseau. On transportera des volumes importants de produits sur des trains-blocs, des wagons-tombereaux ouverts, de façon comparable au transport du charbon. La manutention portuaire ressemblerait aussi beaucoup à la façon dont on transporte actuellement le charbon au large des côtes.

M. Ben Lobb:

D'accord, et la capacité serait suffisante pour que l'on construise de nouvelles raffineries dans les zones portuaires; le volume répondrait aux exigences.

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Oui. Si on nous donne du temps, nous pourrons atteindre la capacité requise.

M. Ben Lobb:

Je sais qu'à votre avis, vous ne seriez pas visés par l'annexe et seriez donc exemptés du projet de loi C-48, et que vous ne voudrez peut-être pas en parler, mais avez-vous pensé à la façon de le prouver?

Je sais que le ministre a émis des commentaires en février dernier lorsque vous avez fait cette annonce. Il a dit que le ministère travaillait à établir des critères à cet égard. Depuis février, avez-vous discuté de la façon dont vous pourriez valider le produit pour éviter qu'il ne soit visé par l'annexe?

(1725)

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Nous avons travaillé à cette question. Je ne crois pas que nous ayons plus de renseignements dans le contexte du projet de loi en soi. La raison pour laquelle nous ne sommes pas visés par le projet de loi, c'est que le produit serait transporté dans des vraquiers et non par pétrolier.

M. Ben Lobb:

Madame la présidente, au terme de notre étude, nous pourrions peut-être demander aux représentants ministériels de nous donner l'avis du gouverneur en conseil à ce sujet et de nous faire part des règlements qu'il prévoit d'élaborer à cet égard. Nous aurons la loi, mais le ministère élaborera les règlements sur la marche à suivre.

Si une société comme la vôtre est visée par l'annexe, elle devra rapidement — et non dans 10 ans — trouver le moyen de s'en sortir.

La présidente:

Nous allons nous en occuper.

Monsieur Fraser, vous avez la parole.

M. Sean Fraser (Nova-Centre, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Contrairement à mon habitude, j'ai été très silencieux aujourd'hui. J'aimerais vous poser deux questions, rapidement, et il ne me reste que quelques minutes pour obtenir des réponses.

Tout d'abord, supposons qu'avec vos partenaires, vous arriviez à produire un grand volume de briques CanaPux de façon responsable sur le plan commercial; est-ce que vous pourrez les amener vers un marché d'exportation sur la côte Ouest du Canada à un coût qui pourra faire concurrence au coût actuel du transport des produits pétroliers vers les installations d'exportation?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Tout indique que oui. Les producteurs avec lesquels nous travaillons, qui ont fait les calculs pour leurs propres modèles, sont du même avis.

L'élément clé, c'est que le transport de notre produit est comparable à celui du pétrole brut dans un pipeline, où le diluant peut représenter 30 à 40 % de la livraison du produit. Nous utilisons le polymère au lieu du diluant, qui est beaucoup moins cher. On peut même utiliser du polymère recyclé. Il prend beaucoup moins d'espace.

M. Sean Fraser:

Est-ce que vous pensez à un prix de 4,50 $ le baril ou moins peut-être?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Nous croyons être compétitifs, certainement.

M. Sean Fraser:

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, monsieur D'Avignon, je conviens que nous devons tirer profit des façons d'amener nos ressources vers les marchés de manière écoresponsable, bien entendu. J'ai travaillé dans le secteur de l'énergie dans l'Ouest canadien. Jusqu'à présent, on n'a pas parlé de notre capacité de production par rapport à notre capacité d'exportation. Selon les projections de l'ACPP jusqu'en 2030, on frôlera les 5,1 millions de barils par jour.

Lorsque je regarde notre capacité d'exportation actuelle et que je tiens compte du projet Keystone, qui semble aller de l'avant, et du projet Trans Mountain qui a été approuvé, je comprends que notre capacité d'exportation se situe à 4,9 millions de barils par jour environ et que notre consommation nationale comblera facilement le reste. Est-ce que le moratoire limitera notre capacité d'exportation ou est-ce qu'il y a quelque chose qui m'échappe? Il me semble qu'on parle de projets qui sont déjà dans le pipeline, si je puis dire.

M. Greg D'Avignon:

C'est une des questions fondamentales sur lesquelles le gouvernement et le Comité devront se pencher. Le Canada regorge de ressources. Nos réserves pourraient répondre à 172 % de la demande nationale. Pour ce qui est des combustibles fossiles, nous avons un client, c'est-à-dire les États-Unis. Au cours des 10 dernières années, les exportations de combustibles fossiles au Canada en provenance des États-Unis ont connu une hausse de 10 %. Les États-Unis ont construit pour l'équivalent de 7 pipelines Keystone XL sous l'administration Obama et sont devenus, il y a 36 mois, un exportateur net sur les marchés mondiaux.

Par conséquent, l'offre de ressources énergétiques est assujettie à une concurrence mondiale. Le Canada n'en fait pas partie parce qu'il n'a pas l'accès nécessaire aux marchés, mais surtout parce qu'il a des partenaires commerciaux de longue date en Asie et en Asie du Sud, qui comptent sur les produits canadiens depuis des dizaines d'années.

Pour revenir à votre question, monsieur Fraser, à savoir si la loi peut couvrir le bitume dilué, qui est une source de préoccupation au large de la côte Nord... Je le reconnais, et c'est particulièrement vrai pour les Premières Nations. En fait, l'annexe exclut toute une gamme de produits qui ont des degrés de persistance bien inférieurs à ceux du bitume dilué et qui sont couverts par la loi; je pense notamment au pétrole léger de réservoirs étanches, dont j'ai parlé tout à l'heure.

Si nous pouvions exporter un million de barils supplémentaires par jour de pétrole léger de réservoirs étanches — qui présente une très faible persistance et qui demande très peu de transformation —, nous pourrions desservir un marché en Asie et en Asie du Sud qui accueillerait volontiers, à un prix concurrentiel, ce produit à plus faible teneur en carbone. Cela se traduirait par des retombées économiques pour le Canada, mais cela lui permettrait aussi de continuer à s'imposer sur la scène internationale comme chef de file en matière d'environnement, en contribuant à la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre sur le plan de la consommation d'énergie.

(1730)

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci.

Je crois qu'il reste une minute. Si je ne m'abuse, M. Graham a une question à poser rapidement, s'il en a le temps.

Désolé, David.

La présidente:

Il vous reste environ 45 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je suis reconnu pour ma concision, alors cela ne devrait pas poser problème.

Dans la dernière heure, l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie nous a dit qu'elle transportait environ 1,2 milliard de barils de pétrole par an, avec un taux de réussite de 99,9 % par volume. J'en conclus que cela équivaut à un taux de perte de quelque 120 000 barils de pétrole. Considérant que c'est une quantité faramineuse de pétrole qui disparaît ainsi, votre produit, CanaPux, me paraît vraiment intéressant. C'est fascinant. Je sais qu'il ne me reste que 10 secondes. Concrètement, est-ce bien facile à transporter? Vous l'avez fait circuler. On dirait que cela pourrait exploser et se répandre partout à la moindre pression.

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Non, il y a de l'air à l'intérieur et le tout est empaqueté de façon à équilibrer la compression lors du transport. Je pourrais couper la brique sans qu'elle se dissolve. Même en 20 morceaux, elle continuerait de flotter sans se dissoudre dans l'eau.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et combien de temps cela pourrait-il durer? Si on laissait deux chargements de briques dans l'océan, exposées aux intempéries, qu'arriverait-il?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Je vais renvoyer la question à Ross. C'est une des questions que nous étudions.

M. Ross Chow:

Absolument. Cela fait partie de l'étude environnementale que nous menons actuellement. Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas encore tiré nos conclusions, mais c'est un élément clé que nous examinons, c'est-à-dire son évolution dans l'environnement. Pour la prochaine étape, nous allons faire appel aux laboratoires fédéraux afin d'étudier l'évolution du produit en milieu marin.

La présidente:

Merci à vous tous. Merci beaucoup aux témoins et aux membres du Comité.

Et merci de votre patience.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 26, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.